Science.gov

Sample records for achieved detection limits

  1. Detection limits of organic compounds achievable with intense, short-pulse lasers.

    PubMed

    Miles, Jordan; De Camillis, Simone; Alexander, Grace; Hamilton, Kathryn; Kelly, Thomas J; Costello, John T; Zepf, Matthew; Williams, Ian D; Greenwood, Jason B

    2015-06-21

    Many organic molecules have strong absorption bands which can be accessed by ultraviolet short pulse lasers to produce efficient ionization. This resonant multiphoton ionization scheme has already been exploited as an ionization source in time-of-flight mass spectrometers used for environmental trace analysis. In the present work we quantify the ultimate potential of this technique by measuring absolute ion yields produced from the interaction of 267 nm femtosecond laser pulses with the organic molecules indole and toluene, and gases Xe, N2 and O2. Using multiphoton ionization cross sections extracted from these results, we show that the laser pulse parameters required for real-time detection of aromatic molecules at concentrations of one part per trillion in air and a limit of detection of a few attomoles are achievable with presently available commercial laser systems. The potential applications for the analysis of human breath, blood and tissue samples are discussed.

  2. Sensitivity and noise in GC-MS: Achieving low limits of detection for difficult analytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fialkov, Alexander B.; Steiner, Urs; Lehotay, Steven J.; Amirav, Aviv

    2007-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) instrument limit of detection (LOD) is typically listed by major vendors as that of octafluoronaphthalene (OFN). Most current GC-MS instruments can achieve LODs in the low femtogram range. However, GC-MS LODs for realistic analytes in actual samples are often a few orders of magnitude higher than OFN's. Users seldom encounter 1 pg LOD in the single ion monitoring mode in their applications. We define this detectability difference as the "OFN gap." In this paper, we demonstrate and discuss how the OFN gap can be significantly reduced by the use of GC-MS with supersonic molecular beams (SMB). Experimental results were obtained with a recently developed GC-MS with SMB named 1200-SMB, that is based on the conversion of the Varian 1200 system into a GC-MS-MS with SMB. With this 1200-SMB system, the LOD of all types of analytes, including OFN, in real samples is significantly improved through the combination of: (a) enhanced molecular ion; (b) elimination of vacuum background noise; (c) elimination of mass independent noise; (d) elimination of ion source peak tailing and degradation; (e) significantly increased range of thermally labile and low volatility compounds that are amenable for analysis through lower sample elution temperatures; (f) reduced column bleed and ghost peaks through sample elution at lower temperatures; (g) improved compatibility with large volume injections; and (h) reduced matrix interferences through the combination of enhanced molecular ion and MS-MS. As a result, the 1200-SMB LODs of common and/or difficult compounds are much closer to its OFN LOD, even in complex matrices. We crossed the <1 fg OFN LOD milestone to achieve the lowest LOD to date using GC-MS, but more importantly, we attained LOD of 2 fg for diazinon, a common pesticide analyte. In another example, we achieved an LOD of 10 fg for underivatized testosterone, which is not amenable in traditional GC-MS analysis, and conducted many analyses

  3. Electrochemical flow injection analysis of hydrazine in an excess of an active pharmaceutical ingredient: achieving pharmaceutical detection limits electrochemically.

    PubMed

    Channon, Robert B; Joseph, Maxim B; Bitziou, Eleni; Bristow, Anthony W T; Ray, Andrew D; Macpherson, Julie V

    2015-10-06

    The quantification of genotoxic impurities (GIs) such as hydrazine (HZ) is of critical importance in the pharmaceutical industry in order to uphold drug safety. HZ is a particularly intractable GI and its detection represents a significant technical challenge. Here, we present, for the first time, the use of electrochemical analysis to achieve the required detection limits by the pharmaceutical industry for the detection of HZ in the presence of a large excess of a common active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), acetaminophen (ACM) which itself is redox active, typical of many APIs. A flow injection analysis approach with electrochemical detection (FIA-EC) is utilized, in conjunction with a coplanar boron doped diamond (BDD) microband electrode, insulated in an insulating diamond platform for durability and integrated into a two piece flow cell. In order to separate the electrochemical signature for HZ such that it is not obscured by that of the ACM (present in excess), the BDD electrode is functionalized with Pt nanoparticles (NPs) to significantly shift the half wave potential for HZ oxidation to less positive potentials. Microstereolithography was used to fabricate flow cells with defined hydrodynamics which minimize dispersion of the analyte and optimize detection sensitivity. Importantly, the Pt NPs were shown to be stable under flow, and a limit of detection of 64.5 nM or 0.274 ppm for HZ with respect to the ACM, present in excess, was achieved. This represents the first electrochemical approach which surpasses the required detection limits set by the pharmaceutical industry for HZ detection in the presence of an API and paves the wave for online analysis and application to other GI and API systems.

  4. All-numerical noise filtering of fluorescence signals for achieving ultra-low limit of detection in biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Dongre, Chaitanya; Pollnau, Markus; Hoekstra, Hugo J W M

    2011-03-21

    We present an all-numerical method for post-processing of the fluorescent signal as obtained from labeled molecules by capillary electrophoresis (CE) in an optofluidic chip, on the basis of data filtering in the Fourier domain. It is shown that the method outperforms the well-known lock-in amplification during experiments in the reduction of noise by a factor of (square root)2. The method is illustrated using experimental data obtained during CE separation of molecules from a commercial DNA ladder with 17 fluorescently labeled molecules having different base-pair sizes. An improvement in signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of ∼10 is achieved, resulting in a record-low limit of detection of 210 fM.

  5. Geographic range limits: achieving synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Gaston, Kevin J.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding of the determinants of species' geographic range limits remains poorly integrated. In part, this is because of the diversity of perspectives on the issue, and because empirical studies have lagged substantially behind developments in theory. Here, I provide a broad overview, drawing together many of the disparate threads, considering, in turn, how influences on the terms of a simple single-population equation can determine range limits. There is theoretical and empirical evidence for systematic changes towards range limits under some circumstances in each of the demographic parameters. However, under other circumstances, no such changes may take place in particular parameters, or they may occur in a different direction, with limitation still occurring. This suggests that (i) little about range limitation can categorically be inferred from many empirical studies, which document change in only one demographic parameter, (ii) there is a need for studies that document variation in all of the parameters, and (iii) in agreement with theoretical evidence that range limits can be formed in the presence or absence of hard boundaries, environmental gradients or biotic interactions, there may be few general patterns as to the determinants of these limits, with most claimed generalities at least having many exceptions. PMID:19324809

  6. Adaptive limit margin detection and limit avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavrucuk, Ilkay

    This thesis concerns the development of methods, algorithms, and control laws for the development of an adaptive flight envelope protection system to be used for both manned and unmanned aircraft. The proposed method lifts the requirement for detailed a priori information of aircraft dynamics by enabling adaptation to system uncertainty. The system can be used for limits that can be either measured or related to selected measurable quantities. Specifically, an adaptive technique for predicting limit margins and calculating the corresponding allowable control or controller command margins of an aircraft is described in an effort to enable true carefree maneuvering. This new approach utilizes adaptive neural network based loops for the approximation of required aircraft dynamics. For limits that reach their maximum value in steady state, a constructed estimator model is used to predict the maneuvering quasi-steady response behavior---the so called dynamic trim---of the limit parameters and the corresponding control or command margins. Linearly Parameterized Neural Networks as well as Single Hidden Layer Neural Networks are used for on-line adaptation. The approach does not require any off-line training of the neural networks, instead all learning is achieved during flight. Lyapunov based weight update laws are derived. The method is extended for multi-channelled control limiting for aircraft subject to multiple limits, and for automatic control and command limiting for UAV's. Simulation evaluations of the method using a linear helicopter model and a nonlinear Generalized Tiltrotor Simulation (GTRSIM) model are presented. Limit avoidance methods are integrated and tested through the implementation of an artificial pilot model and an active-stick controller model for tactile cueing in the tiltrotor simulation, GTRSIM. Load factor, angle-of-attack, and torque limits are considered as examples. Similarly, the method is applied to the Georgia Tech's Yamaha R-Max (GTMax

  7. Achieving metrological precision limits through postselection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, G. Bié; Pimentel, A.; Hor-Meyll, M.; Walborn, S. P.; Davidovich, L.; Filho, R. L. de Matos

    2017-01-01

    Postselection strategies have been proposed with the aim of amplifying weak signals, which may help to overcome detection thresholds associated with technical noise in high-precision measurements. Here we use an optical setup to experimentally explore two different postselection protocols for the estimation of a small parameter: a weak-value amplification procedure and an alternative method that does not provide amplification but nonetheless is shown to be more robust for the sake of parameter estimation. Each technique leads approximately to the saturation of quantum limits for the estimation precision, expressed by the Cramér-Rao bound. For both situations, we show that parameter estimation is improved when the postselection statistics are considered together with the measurement device.

  8. Speciation Analysis of Arsenic by Selective Hydride Generation-Cryotrapping-Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry with Flame-in-Gas-Shield Atomizer: Achieving Extremely Low Detection Limits with Inexpensive Instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the method of a selective hydride generation-cryotrapping (HG-CT) coupled to an extremely sensitive but simple in-house assembled and designed atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) instrument for determination of toxicologically important As species. Here, an advanced flame-in-gas-shield atomizer (FIGS) was interfaced to HG-CT and its performance was compared to a standard miniature diffusion flame (MDF) atomizer. A significant improvement both in sensitivity and baseline noise was found that was reflected in improved (4 times) limits of detection (LODs). The yielded LODs with the FIGS atomizer were 0.44, 0.74, 0.15, 0.17 and 0.67 ng L–1 for arsenite, total inorganic, mono-, dimethylated As and trimethylarsine oxide, respectively. Moreover, the sensitivities with FIGS and MDF were equal for all As species, allowing for the possibility of single species standardization with arsenate standard for accurate quantification of all other As species. The accuracy of HG-CT-AFS with FIGS was verified by speciation analysis in two samples of bottled drinking water and certified reference materials, NRC CASS-5 (nearshore seawater) and SLRS-5 (river water) that contain traces of methylated As species. As speciation was in agreement with results previously reported and sums of all quantified species corresponded with the certified total As. The feasibility of HG-CT-AFS with FIGS was also demonstrated by the speciation analysis in microsamples of exfoliated bladder epithelial cells isolated from human urine. The results for the sums of trivalent and pentavalent As species corresponded well with the reference results obtained by HG-CT-ICPMS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry). PMID:25300934

  9. Nitromethane K-9 Detection Limit

    SciTech Connect

    Strobel, R; Kury, J

    2003-08-29

    The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF) trains canine/handler teams to detect explosives for government and other agencies worldwide. After completing the training program the teams are tested on an array containing explosives and numerous other samples designed to distract a canine. Passing this test results in a team's certification. These teams can be considered as ''detection instruments'' freshly calibrated just before leaving the ''factory''. Using these teams to examine special experimental arrays immediately following certification can lead to a better understanding of a canine's detection capabilities. Forty-one of these ''detection instruments'' were used in four test series with arrays containing dilute nitromethane-in-water solutions. (The canines had been trained on the amount of nitromethane vapor in equilibrium with the undiluted liquid explosive.) By diluting liquid nitromethane with water, the amount of explosive vapor can be reduced many orders of magnitude to test the lower limit of the canine's nitromethane vapor detection response. The results are presented in this paper.

  10. Detection limits with spectral differential imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rameau, J.; Chauvin, G.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Maire, A.-L.; Boccaletti, A.; Bonnefoy, M.

    2015-09-01

    Context. Direct imaging of exoplanets is polluted by speckle noise that severely limits the achievable contrast. Angular and spectral differential imaging have been proposed to make use of the temporal and chromatic properties of the speckles. Both modes, associated with extreme adaptive-optics and coronagraphy, are at the core of the new generation of planet imagers SPHERE and GPI. Aims: We aim to illustrate and characterize the impact of the SDI and SDI+ADI (ASDI) data reduction on the detection of giant planets. We also propose an unbiased method to derive the detection limits from SDI/ASDI data. Methods: Observations of AB Dor B and β Pictoris made with VLT/NaCo were used to simulate and quantify the effects of SDI and ASDI. The novel method is compared to the traditional injection of artificial point sources. Results: The SDI reduction process creates a typical radial positive-negative pattern of any point-source. Its characteristics and its self-subtraction depend on the separation, but also on the spectral properties of the object. This work demonstrates that the self-subtraction cannot be reduced to a simple geometric effect. As a consequence, the detection performances of SDI observations cannot be expressed as a contrast in magnitude with the central star without the knowledge of the spectral properties of detectable companions. In addition, the residual noise cannot be converted into contrast and physical characteristics (mass, temperature) by standard calibration of flux losses. The proposed method takes the SDI bias into account to derive detection limits without the cost of massively injecting artificial sources into the data. Finally, the sensitivity of ASDI observations can be measured only with a control parameter on the algorithms that controls the minimum rotation that is necessary to build the reference image. Based on observations collected at the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile, ESO : 60.A

  11. Detection limits of confocal surface plasmon microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pechprasarn, Suejit; Somekh, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper applies rigorous diffraction theory to evaluate the minimum mass sensitivity of a confocal optical microscope designed to excite and detect surface plasmons operating on a planar metallic substrate. The diffraction model is compared with an intuitive ray picture which gives remarkably similar predictions. The combination of focusing the surface plasmons and accurate phase measurement mean that under favorable but achievable conditions detection of small numbers of molecules is possible, however, we argue that reliable detection of single molecules will benefit from the use of structured surfaces. System configurations needed to optimize performance are discussed. PMID:24940537

  12. Detection Limits and Selectivity in Electrochemical Detectors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Stephen G.; Long, John T.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses three aspects of electrochemical detectors: (1) signal and noise generation and signal-to-noise ratio, (2) improvement of qualitative information content, and (3) control of selectivity of the detector. Explains electronic principles of detectors and detection limits. Lists current applications and research. (ML)

  13. Quantum limited heterodyne detection of spin noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronenberger, S.; Scalbert, D.

    2016-09-01

    Spin noise spectroscopy is a powerful technique for studying spin relaxation in semiconductors. In this article, we propose an extension of this technique based on optical heterodyne detection of spin noise, which provides several key advantages compared to conventional spin noise spectroscopy: detection of high frequency spin noise not limited by detector bandwidth or sampling rates of digitizers, quantum limited sensitivity even in case of very weak probe power, and possible amplification of the spin noise signal. Heterodyne detection of spin noise is demonstrated on insulating n-doped GaAs. From measurements of spin noise spectra up to 0.4 Tesla, we determined the distribution of g-factors, Δg/g = 0.49%.

  14. 137Cs measurement uncertainties and detection limits for airborne gamma spectrometry (AGS) data analysed using a spectral windows method.

    PubMed

    Cresswell, A J; Sanderson, D C W; White, D C

    2006-02-01

    The uncertainties associated with airborne gamma spectrometry (AGS) measurements analysed using a spectral windows method, and associated detection limits, have been investigated. For individual short measurements over buried 137Cs activity detection limits of 10 kBq m(-2) are achieved. These detection limits are reduced for superficial activity and longer integration times. For superficial activity, detection limits below 1 kBq m(-2) are achievable. A comparison is made with the detection limits for other data processing methods.

  15. Limits of detection and decision. Part 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigtman, E.

    2008-02-01

    It has been shown that the MARLAP (Multi-Agency Radiological Laboratory Analytical Protocols) for estimating the Currie detection limit, which is based on 'critical values of the non-centrality parameter of the non-central t distribution', is intrinsically biased, even if no calibration curve or regression is used. This completed the refutation of the method, begun in Part 2. With the field cleared of obstructions, the true theory underlying Currie's limits of decision, detection and quantification, as they apply in a simple linear chemical measurement system (CMS) having heteroscedastic, Gaussian measurement noise and using weighted least squares (WLS) processing, was then derived. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations were performed, on 900 million independent calibration curves, for linear, "hockey stick" and quadratic noise precision models (NPMs). With errorless NPM parameters, all the simulation results were found to be in excellent agreement with the derived theoretical expressions. Even with as much as 30% noise on all of the relevant NPM parameters, the worst absolute errors in rates of false positives and false negatives, was only 0.3%.

  16. 40 CFR 450.22 - Effluent limitations reflecting the best available technology economically achievable (BAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... best available technology economically achievable (BAT). 450.22 Section 450.22 Protection of... Effluent limitations reflecting the best available technology economically achievable (BAT). Except as... application of the best available technology economically achievable (BAT). (a) Beginning no later than...

  17. 40 CFR 450.22 - Effluent limitations reflecting the best available technology economically achievable (BAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... best available technology economically achievable (BAT). 450.22 Section 450.22 Protection of... Effluent limitations reflecting the best available technology economically achievable (BAT). Except as... application of the best available technology economically achievable (BAT). (a) Beginning no later than...

  18. 40 CFR 450.22 - Effluent limitations reflecting the best available technology economically achievable (BAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... best available technology economically achievable (BAT). 450.22 Section 450.22 Protection of... Effluent limitations reflecting the best available technology economically achievable (BAT). Except as... application of the best available technology economically achievable (BAT). (a) Beginning no later than...

  19. 40 CFR 450.22 - Effluent limitations reflecting the best available technology economically achievable (BAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... best available technology economically achievable (BAT). 450.22 Section 450.22 Protection of... limitations reflecting the best available technology economically achievable (BAT). Except as provided in 40... the best available technology economically achievable (BAT). (a) Beginning no later than August...

  20. SNR Limits to Achieving the Cramer-Rao Lower Bounds with PCID

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    TP-2010-1008 SNR LIMITS TO ACHIEVING THE CRAMER-RAO LOWER BOUNDS WITH PCID Chuck...To) Jan 7, 2007- Jan 1, 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In House DF701944 SNR Limits to Achieving the Cramer-Rao Lower Bounds...Purpose for the Research • To further understand the achievability of CRBs by MFBD algorithms (PCID is being used for these results) - At what SNRs

  1. Emerging technologies for the detection of melanoma: achieving better outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Cila

    2012-01-01

    Every year around 2.5–3 million skin lesions are biopsied in the US, and a fraction of these – between 50,000 and 100,000 – are diagnosed as melanoma. Diagnostic instruments that allow early detection of melanoma are the key to improving survival rates and reducing the number of unnecessary biopsies, the associated morbidity, and the costs of care. Advances in technology over the past 2 decades have enabled the development of new, sophisticated test methods, which are currently undergoing laboratory and small-scale clinical testing. This review highlights and compares some of the emerging technologies that hold the promise of melanoma diagnosis at an early stage of the disease. The needs for detection at different levels (patient, primary care, specialized care) are discussed, and three broad classes of instruments are identified that are capable of satisfying these needs. Technical and clinical requirements on the diagnostic instruments are introduced to aid the comparison and evaluation of new technologies. White- and polarized-light imaging, spatial and spectroscopic multispectral methods, quantitative thermographic imaging, confocal microscopy, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), and Terahertz (THZ) imaging methods are highlighted in light of the criteria identified in the review. Based on the properties, possibilities, and limitations of individual methods, those best suited for a particular setting are identified. Challenges faced in development and wide-scale application of novel technologies are addressed. PMID:23204850

  2. Occult peripheral artery disease is common and limits the benefit achieved in cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Tam, Marty C; Longenecker, Chris T; Chow, Chen; Vest, Marianne; Sukeena, Richard; Madan Mohan, Sri K; Carman, Teresa; Parikh, Sahil A; Josephson, Richard A

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) has proven morbidity and mortality benefits in cardiovascular disease, which directly correlates with exercise performance achieved. Many patients in CR exercise at sub-optimal levels, without obvious limitations. Occult lower-extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) may be a determinant of diminished exercise capacity and reduced benefit obtained from traditional CR. In this prospective study of 150 consecutive patients enrolled in Phase II CR, we describe the prevalence of PAD, the utility of externally validated screening questionnaires, and the observed impact on CR outcomes. Abnormal ankle-brachial indices (ABI) (< 0.9 and >1.4) were observed in 19% of those studied. The Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire was insensitive for detecting PAD by low ABI in this population, and the Walking Impairment Questionnaire and a modified Gardner protocol demonstrated a lack of typical symptoms with low levels of activity. Importantly, at completion of traditional CR, exercise improvement measured in metabolic equivalents (METs) was worse in those with a low ABI compared to those with a normal ABI (+1.39 vs +2.41 METs, p = 0.002). In conclusion, PAD is common in patients in Phase II CR and often clinically occult. Screening based on standard questionnaires appears insensitive in this population, suggesting a need for a broad-based screening strategy with ABI measurements. In this study, undiagnosed PAD significantly attenuated improvements in exercise performance, which potentially has bearings on future clinical events.

  3. Crack Detection for Aircraft Holes with Limited Accessibility Containing Fasteners and Sealant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldrin, J. C.; Mandeville, J. R.; Judd, D. R.; Mullis, R. T.; Kropas-Hughes, C. V.

    2003-03-01

    This paper presents a study of crack detection methods for holes in structures with limited accessibility containing fasteners with variable interface conditions. For far crack detection, a method was first designed using models, and refined using a signal processing parameter optimization scheme and an iterative neural network training process. For near crack detection, a method incorporating the spatial variation of the principal components was developed. Using these methods, improvements in crack detection performance were achieved.

  4. The Effects of Different Approaches to Reading Instruction on Letter Detection Tasks in Normally Achieving and Low Achieving Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faust, Miriam; Kandelshine-Waldman, Osnat

    2011-01-01

    The present study used two letter detection tasks, the classic missing letter effect paradigm and a single word versus familiar word compound version of this paradigm, to study bottom-up and top-down processes involved in reading in normally achieving as compared to low achieving elementary school readers. The research participants were children…

  5. Estimating the Impact of the Massachusetts English Immersion Law on Limited English Proficient Students' Reading Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Qian; Koretz, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The large number of limited English proficient (LEP) children in U.S. schools and the uncertainty about the impact of bilingual education versus English immersion on their achievement warrant rigorous investigation of the effects of "English immersion laws." We estimated the impact of "Question 2", the Massachusetts English…

  6. Understanding Possibilities and Limitations of Abstract Chemical Representations for Achieving Conceptual Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corradi, David M. J.; Elen, Jan; Schraepen, Beno; Clarebout, Geraldine

    2014-01-01

    When learning with abstract and scientific multiple external representations (MERs), low prior knowledge learners are said to have difficulties in using these MERs to achieve conceptual understanding. Yet little is known about what these limitations precisely entail. In order to understand this, we presented 101 learners with low prior knowledge…

  7. Evaluating Limited English Proficient Students' Achievement: Does Curriculum Content in the Home Language Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariza, Maria J.

    This study followed longitudinal achievement data from Hispanic students with limited proficiency in English who participated in a pilot instructional program. The program involved bilingual curriculum content (BCC) in the home language and was initiated in the winter of 1983-84 and continued through the 1986-87 school year. Six elementary schools…

  8. Wave Detection Beyond the Standard Quantum Limit via EPR Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yiqiu; Miao, Haixing; Pang, Belinda; Evans, Matthew; Zhao, Chunnong; Harms, Jan; Schnabel, Roman; Chen, Yanbei

    2017-01-01

    The Standard Quantum Limit in continuous monitoring of a system is given by the trade-off of shot noise and back-action noise. In gravitational-wave detectors, such as Advanced LIGO, both contributions can simultaneously be squeezed in a broad frequency band by injecting a spectrum of squeezed vacuum states with a frequency-dependent squeeze angle. This approach requires setting up an additional long base-line, low-loss filter cavity in a vacuum system at the detector's site. Here, we show that the need for such a filter cavity can be eliminated, by exploiting EPR-entangled signal and idler beams. By harnessing their mutual quantum correlations and the difference in the way each beam propagates in the interferometer, we can engineer the input signal beam to have the appropriate frequency dependent conditional squeezing once the out-going idler beam is detected. Our proposal is appropriate for all future gravitational-wave detectors for achieving sensitivities beyond the Standard Quantum Limit.

  9. Achieving fast and stable failure detection in WDM Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Donghui; Zhou, Zhiyu; Zhang, Hanyi

    2005-02-01

    In dynamic networks, the failure detection time takes a major part of the convergence time, which is an important network performance index. To detect a node or link failure in the network, traditional protocols, like Hello protocol in OSPF or RSVP, exchanges keep-alive messages between neighboring nodes to keep track of the link/node state. But by default settings, it can get a minimum detection time in the measure of dozens of seconds, which can not meet the demands of fast network convergence and failure recovery. When configuring the related parameters to reduce the detection time, there will be notable instability problems. In this paper, we analyzed the problem and designed a new failure detection algorithm to reduce the network overhead of detection signaling. Through our experiment we found it is effective to enhance the stability by implicitly acknowledge other signaling messages as keep-alive messages. We conducted our proposal and the previous approaches on the ASON test-bed. The experimental results show that our algorithm gives better performances than previous schemes in about an order magnitude reduction of both false failure alarms and queuing delay to other messages, especially under light traffic load.

  10. Receiver operating characteristic-curve limits of detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysoczanski, Artur; Voigtman, Edward

    2014-10-01

    Using a simple UV LED-excited ruby fluorescence measurement system, we demonstrate that it is easily possible to obtain unbiased detection limits, despite the system deliberately having non-linear response function and non-Gaussian noise. Even when the noise precision model is heteroscedastic, but otherwise only roughly linear, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) method readily yields results that are in accordance with a priori canonical specifications of false positives and false negatives at the detection limit. The present work demonstrates that obtaining unbiased detection limits is not abstruse and need not be mathematically complicated. Rather, detection limits continue to serve a useful purpose as part of the characterization of chemical measurement systems.

  11. Size dependence of microscopic Hall sensor detection limits.

    PubMed

    Vervaeke, K; Simoen, E; Borghs, G; Moshchalkov, V V

    2009-07-01

    In this paper the magnetic field detection limits of microscopic Hall sensors are investigated as a function of their lateral size. Hall sensors fabricated from GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures and silicon are experimentally investigated at different temperatures using Hall effect and noise spectrum measurements. At room temperature a clear size dependence of the detection limit is observed, whereas at low temperatures this dependence is found to disappear. The results are explained using the theory of noise in semiconductors.

  12. PageFocus: Using paradata to detect and prevent cheating on online achievement tests.

    PubMed

    Diedenhofen, Birk; Musch, Jochen

    2016-08-29

    Cheating threatens the validity of unproctored online achievement tests. To address this problem, we developed PageFocus, a JavaScript that detects when participants abandon test pages by switching to another window or browser tab. In a first study, we aimed at testing whether PageFocus could detect and prevent cheating. We asked 115 lab and 186 online participants to complete a knowledge test comprising items that were difficult to answer but easy to look up on the Internet. Half of the participants were invited to look up the solutions, which significantly increased their test scores. The PageFocus script detected test takers who abandoned the test page with very high sensitivity and specificity, and successfully reduced cheating by generating a popup message that asked participants not to cheat. In a second study, 510 online participants completed a knowledge test comprising items that could easily be looked up and a reasoning task involving matrices that were impossible to look up. In a first group, a performance-related monetary reward was promised to the top scorers; in a second group, participants took part in a lottery that provided performance-unrelated rewards; and in a third group, no incentive was offered. PageFocus revealed that participants cheated more when performance-related incentives were offered. As expected, however, this effect was limited to items that could easily be looked up. We recommend that PageFocus be routinely employed to detect and prevent cheating on online achievement tests.

  13. Lower limit on the achievable temperature in resonator-based sideband cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grajcar, M.; Ashhab, S.; Johansson, J. R.; Nori, F.

    2009-03-01

    A resonator with eigenfrequency φr can be effectively used as a cooler for another linear oscillator with a much smaller frequency φmφr. A huge cooling effect, which could be used to cool a mechanical oscillator below the energy of quantum fluctuations, has been predicted by several authors. However, here we show that there is a lower limit T^* on the achievable temperature, given by T^* = Tm; φm/ φr, that was not considered in previous work and can be higher than the quantum limit in realistic experimental realizations. We also point out that the decay rate of the resonator, which previous studies stress should be small, must be larger than the decay rate of the cooled oscillator for effective cooling. M. Grajcar, S. Ashhab, J.R. Johansson, F. Nori, Lower limit on the achievable temperature in resonator-based sideband cooling, Phys. Rev. B 78, 035406 (2008). URL: http://link.aps.org/abstract/PRB/v78/e035406

  14. The limit of detection for explosives in spectroscopic differential reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubroca, Thierry; Vishwanathan, Karthik; Hummel, Rolf E.

    2011-05-01

    In the wake of recent terrorist attacks, such as the 2008 Mumbai hotel explosion or the December 25th 2009 "underwear bomber", our group has developed a technique (US patent #7368292) to apply differential reflection spectroscopy to detect traces of explosives. Briefly, light (200-500 nm) is shone on a surface such as a piece of luggage at an airport. Upon reflection, the light is collected with a spectrometer combined with a CCD camera. A computer processes the data and produces in turn a differential reflection spectrum involving two adjacent areas of the surface. This differential technique is highly sensitive and provides spectroscopic data of explosives. As an example, 2,4,6, trinitrotoluene (TNT) displays strong and distinct features in differential reflectograms near 420 nm. Similar, but distinctly different features are observed for other explosives. One of the most important criteria for explosive detection techniques is the limit of detection. This limit is defined as the amount of explosive material necessary to produce a signal to noise ratio of three. We present here, a method to evaluate the limit of detection of our technique. Finally, we present our sample preparation method and experimental set-up specifically developed to measure the limit of detection for our technology. This results in a limit ranging from 100 nano-grams to 50 micro-grams depending on the method and the set-up parameters used, such as the detector-sample distance.

  15. Review: Balancing Limiting Factors and Economic Drivers to Achieve Sustainable Midwestern US Agricultural Residue Feedstock Supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Wally W. Wilhelm; J. Richard Hess; Douglas L. Karlen; David J. Muth; Jane M. F. Johnson; John M. Baker; Hero T. Gollany; Jeff M. Novak; Diane E. Stott; Gary E. Varvel

    2010-10-01

    Advanced biofuels will be developed using cellulosic feedstock rather than grain or oilseed crops that can also be used for food and feed. To be sustainable, these new agronomic production systems must be economically viable without degrading soil resources. This review examines six agronomic factors that collectively define many of the limits and opportunities for harvesting crop residue for biofuel feedstock. These six “limiting factors” are discussed in relationship to economic drivers associated with harvesting corn (Zea mays L.) stover as a potential cellulosic feedstock. The limiting factors include soil organic carbon, wind and water erosion, plant nutrient balance, soil water and temperature dynamics, soil compaction, and off-site environmental impacts. Initial evaluations using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation 2.0 (RUSLE2) show that a single factor analysis based on simply meeting tolerable soil loss might indicate stover could be harvested sustainably, but the same analysis based on maintaining soil organic carbon shows the practice to be non-sustainable. Modifying agricultural management to include either annual or perennial cover crops is shown to meet both soil erosion and soil carbon requirements. The importance of achieving high yields and planning in a holistic manner at the landscape scale are also shown to be crucial for balancing limitations and drivers associated with renewable bioenergy production.

  16. Sniper detection using infrared camera: technical possibilities and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastek, M.; Dulski, R.; Trzaskawka, P.; Bieszczad, G.

    2010-04-01

    The paper discusses technical possibilities to build an effective system for sniper detection using infrared cameras. Descriptions of phenomena which make it possible to detect sniper activities in infrared spectra as well as analysis of physical limitations were performed. Cooled and uncooled detectors were considered. Three phases of sniper activities were taken into consideration: before, during and after the shot. On the basis of experimental data the parameters defining the target were determined which are essential in assessing the capability of infrared camera to detect sniper activity. A sniper body and muzzle flash were analyzed as targets. The simulation of detection ranges was done for the assumed scenario of sniper detection task. The infrared sniper detection system was discussed, capable of fulfilling the requirements. The discussion of the results of analysis and simulations was finally presented.

  17. Breaking the concentration limit of optical single-molecule detection.

    PubMed

    Holzmeister, Phil; Acuna, Guillermo P; Grohmann, Dina; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2014-02-21

    Over the last decade, single-molecule detection has been successfully utilized in the life sciences and materials science. Yet, single-molecule measurements only yield meaningful results when working in a suitable, narrow concentration range. On the one hand, diffraction limits the minimal size of the observation volume in optical single-molecule measurements and consequently a sample must be adequately diluted so that only one molecule resides within the observation volume. On the other hand, at ultra-low concentrations relevant for sensing, the detection volume has to be increased in order to detect molecules in a reasonable timespan. This in turn results in the loss of an optimal signal-to-noise ratio necessary for single-molecule detection. This review discusses the requirements for effective single-molecule fluorescence applications, reflects on the motivation for the extension of the dynamic concentration range of single-molecule measurements and reviews various approaches that have been introduced recently to solve these issues. For the high-concentration limit, we identify four promising strategies including molecular confinement, optical observation volume reduction, temporal separation of signals and well-conceived experimental designs that specifically circumvent the high concentration limit. The low concentration limit is addressed by increasing the measurement speed, parallelization, signal amplification and preconcentration. The further development of these ideas will expand our possibilities to interrogate research questions with the clarity and precision provided only by the single-molecule approach.

  18. Production of Biodiesel at Kinetic Limit Achieved in a Centrifugal Reactor/Separator

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Joanna; Tsouris, Costas; Birdwell Jr, Joseph F; Lee, Denise L; Jennings, Hal L; Pahmer Boitrago, Amy M; Terpstra, Sarah M

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics of the transesterification of soybean oil has been investigated in a centrifugal reactor at temperatures from 45 to 80 C and pressures up to 2.6 bar using gas chromatography flame ionization detection (GC-FID) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The yields of product methyl esters were quantified using IR, proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (H1NMR), and viscosity measurements and were found to achieve 90% of the yield in 2 min; however, to meet ASTM specifications with one pass through the reactor, a 15 min residence time was needed. Performance was improved by sequential reactions, allowing separation of by-product glycerine and injection of additional small aliquots of methanol. The kinetics was modeled using a three-step mechanism of reversible reactions, which was used to predict performance at commercial scale. The mechanism correctly predicted the exponential decline in reaction rate as the concentration of the products allowed significant reverse reactions to occur.

  19. Global limits and interference patterns in dark matter direct detection

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo; Gondolo, Paolo

    2015-08-13

    We compare the general effective theory of one-body dark matter nucleon interactions to current direct detection experiments in a global multidimensional statistical analysis. We derive exclusion limits on the 28 isoscalar and isovector coupling constants of the theory, and show that current data place interesting constraints on dark matter-nucleon interaction operators usually neglected in this context. We characterize the interference patterns that can arise in dark matter direct detection from pairs of dark matter-nucleon interaction operators, or from isoscalar and isovector components of the same operator. We find that commonly neglected destructive interference effects weaken standard direct detection exclusion limits by up to one order of magnitude in the coupling constants.

  20. Global limits and interference patterns in dark matter direct detection

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo; Gondolo, Paolo E-mail: paolo.gondolo@utah.edu

    2015-08-01

    We compare the general effective theory of one-body dark matter nucleon interactions to current direct detection experiments in a global multidimensional statistical analysis. We derive exclusion limits on the 28 isoscalar and isovector coupling constants of the theory, and show that current data place interesting constraints on dark matter-nucleon interaction operators usually neglected in this context. We characterize the interference patterns that can arise in dark matter direct detection from pairs of dark matter-nucleon interaction operators, or from isoscalar and isovector components of the same operator. We find that commonly neglected destructive interference effects weaken standard direct detection exclusion limits by up to one order of magnitude in the coupling constants.

  1. Advances in genetics and genomics: use and limitations in achieving malaria elimination goals.

    PubMed

    Gunawardena, Sharmini; Karunaweera, Nadira D

    2015-05-01

    Success of the global research agenda towards eradication of malaria will depend on the development of new tools, including drugs, vaccines, insecticides and diagnostics. Genetic and genomic information now available for the malaria parasites, their mosquito vectors and human host, can be harnessed to both develop these tools and monitor their effectiveness. Here we review and provide specific examples of current technological advances and how these genetic and genomic tools have increased our knowledge of host, parasite and vector biology in relation to malaria elimination and in turn enhanced the potential to reach that goal. We then discuss limitations of these tools and future prospects for the successful achievement of global malaria elimination goals.

  2. Advances in genetics and genomics: use and limitations in achieving malaria elimination goals

    PubMed Central

    Gunawardena, Sharmini; Karunaweera, Nadira D.

    2015-01-01

    Success of the global research agenda towards eradication of malaria will depend on the development of new tools, including drugs, vaccines, insecticides and diagnostics. Genetic and genomic information now available for the malaria parasites, their mosquito vectors and human host, can be harnessed to both develop these tools and monitor their effectiveness. Here we review and provide specific examples of current technological advances and how these genetic and genomic tools have increased our knowledge of host, parasite and vector biology in relation to malaria elimination and in turn enhanced the potential to reach that goal. We then discuss limitations of these tools and future prospects for the successful achievement of global malaria elimination goals. PMID:25943157

  3. Piloted Simulator Investigation of Techniques to Achieve Attitude Command Response with Limited Authority Servos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Key, David L.; Heffley, Robert K.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to develop generic design principles for obtaining attitude command response in moderate to aggressive maneuvers without increasing SCAS series servo authority from the existing +/- 10%. In particular, to develop a scheme that would work on the UH-60 helicopter so that it can be considered for incorporation in future upgrades. The basic math model was a UH-60A version of GENHEL. The simulation facility was the NASA-Ames Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS). Evaluation tasks were Hover, Acceleration-Deceleration, and Sidestep, as defined in ADS-33D-PRF for Degraded Visual Environment (DVE). The DVE was adjusted to provide a Usable Cue Environment (UCE) equal to two. The basic concept investigated was the extent to which the limited attitude command authority achievable by the series servo could be supplemented by a 10%/sec trim servo. The architecture used provided angular rate feedback to only the series servo, shared the attitude feedback between the series and trim servos, and when the series servo approached saturation the attitude feedback was slowly phased out. Results show that modest use of the trim servo does improve pilot ratings, especially in and around hover. This improvement can be achieved with little degradation in response predictability during moderately aggressive maneuvers.

  4. Simple Limits on Achieving A Quasi-Linear Magnetic Compression for an FEL Driver

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; /SLAC

    2012-02-16

    Free electron lasers (FEL) need a very bright electron beam in three dimensions and a high peak charge density. In order to compress an initially longer electron bunch generated from the photoinjector, magnetic bunch compression systems are widely employed. In this paper, first harmonic RF linearization and its associated requirements are reviewed. Meanwhile it is also briefly discussed what is the relation between a proper initial bunch length and main RF frequency, when a harmonic RF linearization is included. Then given a reasonable bunch compression ratio, a proper initial bunch length as a function of the main RF frequency and RF phase is estimated analytically by several approaches, assuming that no harmonic RF section is needed to linearize the energy modulation introduced during main RF acceleration, and at the same time still linearly compress the bunch length. Next the upper limit of the bunch compression ratio in a single stage is evaluated analytically. The analytical relations derived on choosing a proper initial bunch length as a function of main RF frequency are confirmed by numerical simulation. These simple limit provide rough estimations and may be beneficial for choosing bunch compression ratios in different stages of an FEL driver, especially in a first stage bunch compression where there is usually a harmonic RF linearization applied. It may also be useful in evaluating the possibility of low charge operation mode without any harmonic RF linearization, where a shorter initial bunch length can be achieved from the photoinjector.

  5. A locally-blazed ant trail achieves efficient collective navigation despite limited information

    PubMed Central

    Fonio, Ehud; Heyman, Yael; Boczkowski, Lucas; Gelblum, Aviram; Kosowski, Adrian; Korman, Amos; Feinerman, Ofer

    2016-01-01

    Any organism faces sensory and cognitive limitations which may result in maladaptive decisions. Such limitations are prominent in the context of groups where the relevant information at the individual level may not coincide with collective requirements. Here, we study the navigational decisions exhibited by Paratrechina longicornis ants as they cooperatively transport a large food item. These decisions hinge on the perception of individuals which often restricts them from providing the group with reliable directional information. We find that, to achieve efficient navigation despite partial and even misleading information, these ants employ a locally-blazed trail. This trail significantly deviates from the classical notion of an ant trail: First, instead of systematically marking the full path, ants mark short segments originating at the load. Second, the carrying team constantly loses the guiding trail. We experimentally and theoretically show that the locally-blazed trail optimally and robustly exploits useful knowledge while avoiding the pitfalls of misleading information. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20185.001 PMID:27815944

  6. Magnetic properties with multiwavelets and DFT: the complete basis set limit achieved.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Stig Rune; Flå, Tor; Jonsson, Dan; Monstad, Rune Sørland; Ruud, Kenneth; Frediani, Luca

    2016-08-03

    Multiwavelets are emerging as an attractive alternative to traditional basis sets such as Gaussian-type orbitals and plane waves. One of their distinctive properties is the ability to reach the basis set limit (often a chimera for traditional approaches) reliably and consistently by fixing the desired precision ε. We present our multiwavelet implementation of the linear response formalism, applied to static magnetic properties, at the self-consistent field level of theory (both for Hartree-Fock and density functional theories). We demonstrate that the multiwavelets consistently improve the accuracy of the results when increasing the desired precision, yielding results that have four to five digits precision, thus providing a very useful benchmark which could otherwise only be estimated by extrapolation methods. Our results show that magnetizabilities obtained with the augmented quadruple-ζ basis (aug-cc-pCVQZ) are practically at the basis set limit, whereas absolute nuclear magnetic resonance shielding tensors are more challenging: even by making use of a standard extrapolation method, the accuracy is not substantially improved. In contrast, our results provide a benchmark that: (1) confirms the validity of the extrapolation ansatz; (2) can be used as a reference to achieve a property-specific extrapolation scheme, thus providing a means to obtain much better extrapolated results; (3) allows us to separate functional-specific errors from basis-set ones and thus to assess the level of cancellation between basis set and functional errors often exploited in density functional theory.

  7. Stochastic fluctuations and the detectability limit of network communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floretta, Lucio; Liechti, Jonas; Flammini, Alessandro; Rios, Paolo De Los

    2013-12-01

    We have analyzed the detectability limits of network communities in the framework of the popular Girvan and Newman benchmark. By carefully taking into account the inevitable stochastic fluctuations that affect the construction of each and every instance of the benchmark, we come to the conclusion that the native, putative partition of the network is completely lost even before the in-degree/out-degree ratio becomes equal to that of a structureless Erdös-Rényi network. We develop a simple iterative scheme, analytically well described by an infinite branching process, to provide an estimate of the true detectability limit. Using various algorithms based on modularity optimization, we show that all of them behave (semiquantitatively) in the same way, with the same functional form of the detectability threshold as a function of the network parameters. Because the same behavior has also been found by further modularity-optimization methods and for methods based on different heuristics implementations, we conclude that indeed a correct definition of the detectability limit must take into account the stochastic fluctuations of the network construction.

  8. Limitations for heterodyne detection of Brillouin scattered light

    SciTech Connect

    Allemeier, R.T.; Wagner, J.W.; Telschow, K.L.

    1995-01-01

    One means by which elastic properties of a material may be determined is measuring sound wave velocities in the material, from which elastic moduli of interest can be computed. Velocity can be measured by conventional piezoelectric transduction techniques, by applying laser ultrasonics, or by using Brillouin-scattering methods. Brillouin-scattering techniques for determining the sound wave velocity are particularly attractive since they are completely noninvasive. Only a probe beam of light is required since the thermal energy in the material provides the elastic motion. Heterodyne methods for detection of Brillouin-scattered light are considered one possible means to increase the speed of the scattered light frequency detection. Results of experiments with simulated Brillouin scattering suggest that heterodyne detection of the Brillouin-scattered light is feasible. Experiments to detect Brillouin-scattered light, with water as the scattering medium, were designed and interpreted using the results of the simulated scattering experiments. Overall, results showed that it is difficult to narrow the linewidth for Brillouin scattering to an acceptable level. The results given indicate that heterodyne detection of the Brillouin components requires detection bandwidths that are quite small, perhaps 10 Hz or lower. These small bandwidths can be routinely achieved using lock-in amplifier techniques.

  9. Detection of amplitude modulation with squeezed light for sensitivity beyond the shot-noise limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Min; Wu, Ling-An; Kimble, H. J.

    1988-06-01

    An improvement in precision beyond the limit set by the vacuum-state or zero-point fluctuations of the electromagnetic field is reported for the detection of amplitude modulation encoded on a weak signal beam. The improvement is achieved by employing the squeezed light from an optical parametric oscillator to reduce the level of fluctuations below the shot-noise limit. An increase in signal-to-noise ratio of 2.5 dB relative to the shot-noise limit is demonstrated.

  10. Phase noise in pulsed Doppler lidar and limitations on achievable single-shot velocity accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnicholl, P.; Alejandro, S.

    1992-01-01

    The smaller sampling volumes afforded by Doppler lidars compared to radars allows for spatial resolutions at and below some sheer and turbulence wind structure scale sizes. This has brought new emphasis on achieving the optimum product of wind velocity and range resolutions. Several recent studies have considered the effects of amplitude noise, reduction algorithms, and possible hardware related signal artifacts on obtainable velocity accuracy. We discuss here the limitation on this accuracy resulting from the incoherent nature and finite temporal extent of backscatter from aerosols. For a lidar return from a hard (or slab) target, the phase of the intermediate frequency (IF) signal is random and the total return energy fluctuates from shot to shot due to speckle; however, the offset from the transmitted frequency is determinable with an accuracy subject only to instrumental effects and the signal to noise ratio (SNR), the noise being determined by the LO power in the shot noise limited regime. This is not the case for a return from a media extending over a range on the order of or greater than the spatial extent of the transmitted pulse, such as from atmospheric aerosols. In this case, the phase of the IF signal will exhibit a temporal random walk like behavior. It will be uncorrelated over times greater than the pulse duration as the transmitted pulse samples non-overlapping volumes of scattering centers. Frequency analysis of the IF signal in a window similar to the transmitted pulse envelope will therefore show shot-to-shot frequency deviations on the order of the inverse pulse duration reflecting the random phase rate variations. Like speckle, these deviations arise from the incoherent nature of the scattering process and diminish if the IF signal is averaged over times greater than a single range resolution cell (here the pulse duration). Apart from limiting the high SNR performance of a Doppler lidar, this shot-to-shot variance in velocity estimates has a

  11. Modeling the performance limits of novel microcantilever heaters for volatile organic compound detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahangir, Ifat; Koley, Goutam

    2017-01-01

    We present a theoretical model estimating the performance limits of novel AlGaN/GaN heterostructure based microcantilever heater sensors to perform advanced volatile organic compound (VOC) detection and mixture analysis. Operating without any specific surface functionalization or treatment; these devices utilize the strong surface polarization of AlGaN as well as the unique device geometries, to perform selective detection of analytes based on their latent heat of evaporation and molecular dipole moment over a wide concentration range. The presented model incorporates heat transfer, Joule heating, thermal expansion and evaporative heat loss mechanisms, to predict device behaviors such as temperature profiles and sensing performance limits under various steady-state and transient test conditions. In addition, the versatility of the proposed model enables us to successfully predict the capability of the device to perform mixture analysis, and provides guidelines to further optimize the device properties to achieve a limit of detection in sub-ppm concentration.

  12. Investigation of NMR limits of detection for implantable microcoils.

    PubMed

    Baxan, N; Rengle, A; Pasquet, G; Châteaux, J-F; Briguet, A; Morin, P; Fakri-Bouchet, L

    2007-01-01

    Although NMR has the ability to investigate biological systems non-destructively, its low sensitivity primarily has hampered their investigation compared to other analytical techniques. Therefore, optimi zing radio frequency (RF) coils to improve sensitivity do offer benefits in MR spectroscopy (MRS). Sensitivity may be improved for mass- and volume-limited samples if the size of the detection RF coils matches the sample size. In this paper, the mass- and concentration-limit of detection (LOD(m), LOD(c)) for an implantable microcoil will be estimated by MRS measurements and then compared with their analytical values. For a sample containing a solution of several cerebral metabolites, for the Choline case, the LODm is 5.7 . 10(-9)mol and LODc of 3.8 mM. These preliminary results enable to open largely the biomedical applications based on cerebral metabolism investigation on small animal experiments.

  13. Electrostrictive limit and focusing effects in pulsed photoacoustic detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heritier, J.-M.

    1983-01-01

    We give an analytical solution in the time and frequency domain for the cylindrical pressure wave generated by a laser pulse traveling in a liquid, which is valid over a wide range of laser beam dimensions and pulse durations. This leads to a simple prediction of the ultimate limitation set by the electrostrictive coupling and an easy analysis of the focusing effects on the photoacoustic signal. Two separate detection schemes were considered and show different behavior.

  14. Accuracy, precision, and lower detection limits (a deficit reduction approach)

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, C.T.

    1993-10-12

    The evaluation of the accuracy, precision and lower detection limits of the determination of trace radionuclides in environmental samples can become quite sophisticated and time consuming. This in turn could add significant cost to the analyses being performed. In the present method, a {open_quotes}deficit reduction approach{close_quotes} has been taken to keep costs low, but at the same time provide defensible data. In order to measure the accuracy of a particular method, reference samples are measured over the time period that the actual samples are being analyzed. Using a Lotus spreadsheet, data are compiled and an average accuracy is computed. If pairs of reference samples are analyzed, then precision can also be evaluated from the duplicate data sets. The standard deviation can be calculated if the reference concentrations of the duplicates are all in the same general range. Laboratory blanks are used to estimate the lower detection limits. The lower detection limit is calculated as 4.65 times the standard deviation of a set of blank determinations made over a given period of time. A Lotus spreadsheet is again used to compile data and LDLs over different periods of time can be compared.

  15. Thermal Infrared Spectral Band Detection Limits for Unidentified Surface Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkland, Laurel E.; Herr, Kenneth C.; Salisbury, John W.

    2001-01-01

    Infrared emission spectra recorded by airborne or satellite spectrometers can be searched for spectral features to determine the composition of rocks on planetary surfaces. Surface materials are identified by detections of characteristic spectral bands. We show how to define whether to accept an observed spectral feature as a detection when the target material is unknown. We also use remotely sensed spectra measured by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Spatially Enhanced Broadband Array Spectrograph System to illustrate the importance of instrument parameters and surface properties on band detection limits and how the variation in signal-to-noise ratio with wavelength affects the bands that are most detectable for a given instrument. The spectrometer's sampling interval, spectral resolution, signal-to-noise ratio as a function of wavelength, and the sample's surface properties influence whether the instrument can detect a spectral feature exhibited by a material. As an example, in the 6-13 micrometer wavelength region, massive carbonates exhibit two bands: a very strong, broad feature at approximately 6.5 micrometers and a less intense, sharper band at approximately 11.25 micrometers. Although the 6.5-micrometer band is stronger and broader in laboratory-measured spectra, the 11.25-micrometer band will cause a more detectable feature in TES spectra.

  16. Ultrafast scene detection and recognition with limited visual information.

    PubMed

    Hagmann, Carl Erick; Potter, Mary C

    2016-01-01

    Humans can detect target color pictures of scenes depicting concepts like picnic or harbor in sequences of six or twelve pictures presented as briefly as 13 ms, even when the target is named after the sequence (Potter, Wyble, Hagmann, & McCourt, 2014). Such rapid detection suggests that feedforward processing alone enabled detection without recurrent cortical feedback. There is debate about whether coarse, global, low spatial frequencies (LSFs) provide predictive information to high cortical levels through the rapid magnocellular (M) projection of the visual path, enabling top-down prediction of possible object identities. To test the "Fast M" hypothesis, we compared detection of a named target across five stimulus conditions: unaltered color, blurred color, grayscale, thresholded monochrome, and LSF pictures. The pictures were presented for 13-80 ms in six-picture rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) sequences. Blurred, monochrome, and LSF pictures were detected less accurately than normal color or grayscale pictures. When the target was named before the sequence, all picture types except LSF resulted in above-chance detection at all durations. Crucially, when the name was given only after the sequence, performance dropped and the monochrome and LSF pictures (but not the blurred pictures) were at or near chance. Thus, without advance information, monochrome and LSF pictures were rarely understood. The results offer only limited support for the Fast M hypothesis, suggesting instead that feedforward processing is able to activate conceptual representations without complementary reentrant processing.

  17. The molecular-kinetic approach to wetting dynamics: Achievements and limitations.

    PubMed

    Sedev, Rossen

    2015-08-01

    The molecular-kinetic theory (MKT) of dynamic wetting was formulated almost 50 years ago. It explains the dependence of the dynamic contact angle on the speed of a moving meniscus by estimating the non-hydrodynamic dissipation in the contact line. Over the years it has been refined to account explicitly for the influence of (bulk) fluid viscosity and it has been applied successfully to both solid-liquid-vapour and solid-liquid-liquid systems. The free energy barrier for surface diffusion has been related to the energy of adhesion. The MKT provides a qualitative explanation for most effects in dynamic wetting. The theory is simple, flexible, and it is widely used to rationalize the physics of wetting dynamics and fit experimental data (dynamic contact angle versus contact line speed). The MKT predicts an intermediate wettability as optimal for high-speed coating as well as the maximum speeds of wetting and dewetting. Nevertheless, the values of the molecular parameters derived from experimental data tend to be scattered and not particularly reliable. This review outlines the main achievements and limitations of the MKT and highlights some common cases of misinterpretation.

  18. Achieving large ends with limited means: grand strategy in global health.

    PubMed

    Curry, Leslie A; Luong, Minh A; Krumholz, Harlan M; Gaddis, John; Kennedy, Paul; Rulisa, Stephen; Taylor, Lauren; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2010-06-01

    Unprecedented attention is focused on global health, with a four-fold increase in development assistance in the last 15 years and the scope of global health expanding beyond infectious disease to include chronic disease and health systems strengthening. As the global impact of health is more widely understood, it has become a crucial element of international relations, economic development, and foreign affairs. At this potential leverage point in the global health movement, the application of grand strategy is of critical importance. Grand strategy, i.e., the development and implementation of comprehensive plans of action to achieve large ends with limited means, has been refined through centuries of international relations and the management of states but has been inadequately applied to global health policy and implementation. We review key principles of grand strategy and demonstrate their applicability to a central global health issue: maternal mortality. The principles include: start with the end in mind, take an ecological approach, recognize that tactics matter, use positive deviance to characterize practical solutions and foster scale-up, and integrate timely intelligence and data into health interventions and improvement efforts. We advocate for the greater use of grand strategy in global health.

  19. Detection limits of organochlorine pesticides and related compounds in blood serum

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, M.S.; Rivera, M.; Baker, D.B. )

    1991-10-01

    Determinations of organochlorine pesticides and similar chemical residues in blood serum have often reported detection limits of 1 ng/mL. When a study group has incurred body burdens lower than this, underestimates and misclassifications of exposure may occur because persons with pesticide residue concentration below the limit of detection are usually treated as zeros.' Thus in order to more accurately assess exposures in such populations, analysis of adipose tissue has been done. Recently, with TCDD, use of a sufficient volume of serum, as much as 0.5 L, in conjunction with appropriate analytical techniques has been shown to achieve detection limits necessary for epidemiological assessments, i.e., comparable to analysis of adipose tissue. In a population-based study involving children in which the authors were involved, it was not feasible to obtain specimens of either adipose or a large volume of serum. There was no compelling health motivation for such measures, nor did they wish to impair participation rates. Therefore, they chose to optimize the existing serum analysis, in order to achieve a detection limit low enough to assess reasonably the anticipated exposures.

  20. 40 CFR 450.22 - Effluent limitations reflecting the best available technology economically achievable (BAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... limitations are described at § 450.21(a). (d) Soil stabilization. The limitations are described at § 450.21(b). (e) Dewatering. The limitations are described at § 450.21(c). (f) Pollution prevention measures....

  1. Attentional Capacity Limits Gap Detection during Concurrent Sound Segregation.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ada W S; Jolicoeur, Pierre; Alain, Claude

    2015-11-01

    Detecting a brief silent interval (i.e., a gap) is more difficult when listeners perceive two concurrent sounds rather than one in a sound containing a mistuned harmonic in otherwise in-tune harmonics. This impairment in gap detection may reflect the interaction of low-level encoding or the division of attention between two sound objects, both of which could interfere with signal detection. To distinguish between these two alternatives, we compared ERPs during active and passive listening with complex harmonic tones that could include a gap, a mistuned harmonic, both features, or neither. During active listening, participants indicated whether they heard a gap irrespective of mistuning. During passive listening, participants watched a subtitled muted movie of their choice while the same sounds were presented. Gap detection was impaired when the complex sounds included a mistuned harmonic that popped out as a separate object. The ERP analysis revealed an early gap-related activity that was little affected by mistuning during the active or passive listening condition. However, during active listening, there was a marked decrease in the late positive wave that was thought to index attention and response-related processes. These results suggest that the limitation in detecting the gap is related to attentional processing, possibly divided attention induced by the concurrent sound objects, rather than deficits in preattentional sensory encoding.

  2. Radiometric STFT Analysis of PDV recordings and detectivity limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozier, Olivier; Prudhomme, Gabriel; Mercier, Patrick; Berthe, Laurent

    2015-06-01

    Photonic Doppler Velocimetry is a plug-and-play and versatile diagnostic used in dynamic physic experiments to measure velocities. When signals are analyzed using a Short-Time Fourier Transform, multiple velocities can be distinguished: by example, the velocities of moving particle-cloud appear on spectrograms. In order to estimate the back-scattering fluxes of target, we propose an original approach ``PDV Radiometric analysis'' resulting in an expression of time-velocity spectrograms coded in power units. Experiments involving micron-sized particles raise the issue of detection limit; particle-size limit is very difficult to evaluate. From the quantification of noise sources, we derivate an estimation of the spectrogram noise leading to a detectivity limit. It may be compared to back-scattering and collected power from a particle, which is increasing with its size. At least, some results from laser-shock accelerated particles using two different PDV systems are compared: it may show the improvement of sensitivity.

  3. Data-Mining Techniques in Detecting Factors Linked to Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martínez Abad, Fernando; Chaparro Caso López, Alicia A.

    2017-01-01

    In light of the emergence of statistical analysis techniques based on data mining in education sciences, and the potential they offer to detect non-trivial information in large databases, this paper presents a procedure used to detect factors linked to academic achievement in large-scale assessments. The study is based on a non-experimental,…

  4. Assessment of detection limits of fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing for detection of illicit connections.

    PubMed

    Nienhuis, Jaap; de Haan, Cornelis; Langeveld, Jeroen; Klootwijk, Martijn; Clemens, François

    2013-01-01

    Distributed temperature sensing (DTS) with fiber-optic cables is a powerful tool to detect illicit connections in storm sewer systems. High-frequency temperature measurements along the in-sewer cable create a detailed representation of temperature anomalies due to illicit discharges. The detection limits of the monitoring equipment itself are well-known, but there is little information available on detection limits for the discovery of illicit connections, as in mixing of sewers, and attenuation also plays an important role. This paper describes the results of full-scale experiments aiming to quantify the detection limits for illicit connections under various sewer conditions. Based on the results, a new monitoring set-up for (partially) filled sewer conduits has been proposed.

  5. Electrostatic Limit of Detection of Nanowire-Based Sensors.

    PubMed

    Henning, Alex; Molotskii, Michel; Swaminathan, Nandhini; Vaknin, Yonathan; Godkin, Andrey; Shalev, Gil; Rosenwaks, Yossi

    2015-10-07

    Scanning gate microscopy is used to determine the electrostatic limit of detection (LOD) of a nanowire (NW) based chemical sensor with a precision of sub-elementary charge. The presented method is validated with an electrostatically formed NW whose active area and shape are tunable by biasing a multiple gate field-effect transistor (FET). By using the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) as a local top gate, the field effect of adsorbed molecules is emulated. The tip induced charge is quantified with an analytical electrostatic model and it is shown that the NW sensor is sensitive to about an elementary charge and that the measurements with the AFM tip are in agreement with sensing of ethanol vapor. This method is applicable to any FET-based chemical and biological sensor, provides a means to predict the absolute sensor performance limit, and suggests a standardized way to compare LODs and sensitivities of various sensors.

  6. Detection limits of organic contaminants in drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, W.M.; Dhoot, J.S.; Dhaliwal, J.S.; Remoy, J.W.; Perera, S.K.; Baumann, F.J.

    1998-06-01

    This article examines some of the experimental variables that can contribute to the observed variability in laboratory performance. The examples provided suggest that method detection limits (MDLs) would be more uniform among laboratories if (1) uniform spike concentrations were used in MDL determination; (2) analytical methods were more uniform as to procedures, reagents, and materials; and (3) tighter guidelines were established for conducting MDL experiments and handling MDL data. The pooling of data from multiple spike levels (or any other means to increase sample size) minimizes random error in MDL determination. Improved control in MDL determination would lead to better information on laboratory capabilities, and this in turn would improve the technical basis for reporting limits, trigger levels, and water quality standards.

  7. Minimum detection limit and spatial resolution of thin-sample field-emission electron probe microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Yugo; Hamada, Kotaro; Urano, Akira

    2013-12-01

    The minimum detection limit and spatial resolution for a thinned semiconductor sample were determined by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) using a Schottky field emission (FE) electron gun and wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometry. Comparison of the FE-EPMA results with those obtained using energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry in conjunction with scanning transmission electron microscopy, confirmed that FE-EPMA is largely superior in terms of detection sensitivity. Thin-sample FE-EPMA is demonstrated as a very effective method for high resolution, high sensitivity analysis in a laboratory environment because a high probe current and high signal-to-noise ratio can be achieved.

  8. 40 CFR 449.10 - Effluent limitations representing the best available technology economically achievable (BAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... best available technology economically achievable (BAT). 449.10 Section 449.10 Protection of... available technology economically achievable (BAT). Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32, any... following requirements representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of...

  9. 40 CFR 449.10 - Effluent limitations representing the best available technology economically achievable (BAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... best available technology economically achievable (BAT). 449.10 Section 449.10 Protection of... available technology economically achievable (BAT). Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32, any... following requirements representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of...

  10. 40 CFR 449.10 - Effluent limitations representing the best available technology economically achievable (BAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... best available technology economically achievable (BAT). 449.10 Section 449.10 Protection of... available technology economically achievable (BAT). Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32, any... following requirements representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of...

  11. Role of detection limits in drinking water regulation.

    PubMed

    Calder, Ryan S D; Schmitt, Ketra A

    2010-11-01

    Some commentators on environmental science and policy have claimed that advances in analytical chemistry, reflected by an ability to detect contaminants at ever-decreasing concentrations, lead to regulations stricter than justified by available toxicological data. We evaluate this claim in the context of drinking water regulation, with respect to contaminants regulated under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). We examine the relationships between historical and present maximum contaminant levels and goals in the greater context of detection capability and evaluate the extent to which different aspects of the regulatory apparatus (i.e., analytical capability, cost-benefit analysis, analysis of competing risks, and available toxicological data) influence the regulatory process. Our findings do not support the claim that decreases in detection limit lead to more stringent regulation in the context of drinking water regulation in the United States. Further, based on our analysis of the National Primary Drinking Water Regulation and existing United States Environmental Protection Agency approaches to establishing the practical quantifiable level, we conclude that in the absence of changes to the underlying toxicological model, regulatory revision is unlikely.

  12. PCR detection of aflatoxin producing fungi and its limitations.

    PubMed

    Levin, Robert E

    2012-05-01

    Unlike bacterial toxins that are primarily peptides and are therefore encoded by a single gene, fungal toxins such as the aflatoxins are multi-ring structures and therefore require a sequence of structural genes for their biological synthesis. There is therefore no specific PCR for any one of the four biologically produced aflatoxins. Unfortunately, the structural genes presently in use for PCR detection of aflatoxin producing fungi are also involved in the synthesis of other fungal toxins such as sterigmatocystin by Aspergillus versicolor and Aspergillus nidulans and therefore lack absolute specificity for aflatoxin producing fungi (Table 1). In addition, the genomic presence of several structural genes involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis does not guarantee the production of aflatoxin by all isolates of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus. The most widely used DNA target regions for discriminating Aspergillus species are those of the rDNA complex, mainly the internal transcribed spacer regions 1 and 2 (ITS1 and ITS2) and the variable regions in the 5'-end of the 28S rRNA gene. Since these sequence regions are unrelated to the structural genes involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis there successful amplification can be used for species identification but do not confirm aflatoxin production. This review therefore presents the various approaches and limitations in the use of the PCR in attempting to detect aflatoxin producing fungi.

  13. Theoretical limits on detection and analysis of small earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatek, Grzegorz; Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    2016-08-01

    We investigate theoretical limits on detection and reliable estimates of source characteristics of small earthquakes using synthetic seismograms for shear/tensile dislocations on kinematic circular ruptures and observed seismic noise and properties of several acquisition systems (instrument response, sampling rate). Simulated source time functions for shear/tensile dislocation events with different magnitudes, static stress drops, and rupture velocities provide estimates for the amplitude and frequency content of P and S phases at various observation angles. The source time functions are convolved with a Green's function for a homogenous solid assuming given P, S wave velocities and attenuation coefficients and a given instrument response. The synthetic waveforms are superposed with average levels of the observed ambient seismic noise up to 1 kHz. The combined seismograms are used to calculate signal-to-noise ratios and expected frequency content of P and S phases at various locations. The synthetic simulations of signal-to-noise ratio reproduce observed ratios extracted from several well-recorded data sets. The results provide guidelines on detection of small events in various geological environments, along with information relevant to reliable analyses of earthquake source properties.

  14. Limits on detectability of mass loss from cool dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.; Doyle, J. G.; Redman, R. O.; Mathioudakis, M.

    1992-01-01

    Recent spectroscopic evidence supports the theoretical expectation that certain cool dwarfs may have stellar winds with M-dot values several orders of magnitude larger than the solar rate. For large enough values of M-dot, the emission from the wind is expected to have a spectrum which, at low enough frequencies, becomes a power law, S(v) about v exp alpha with alpha about 0.7. Data from IRAS and VLA suggest that such a spectrum may in fact occur in certain M dwarfs: a key test of the wind spectrum would be provided if the stars could be detected at lambda about 1 mm. We show that the M-dot required to ensure power-law emission is a few times 10 exp -10 solar mass/yr. With M-dot of this order, fluxes at lambda about 1 mm would be tens of mJy. Using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, we have tested this prediction on several stars: the data are suggestive but are near the limits of detection. Confirmation of our estimates will be important for evolution and for interstellar medium (ISM) physics: if even a few percent of all M dwarfs are losing mass at the above rates, the mass balance of the ISM will be dominated by M dwarfs.

  15. Fundamental limits of target detection performance in passive polarization imaging.

    PubMed

    Goudail, François; Boffety, Matthieu

    2017-04-01

    We quantitatively determine the target detection performance of different passive polarization imaging architectures perturbed by signal-independent detection noise or signal-dependent Poisson shot noise. We compare the fully adaptive polarimetric imager and the best channel of a static polarimetric imager, and in each case, we compare the use of a polarizer and a polarizing beam splitter as the polarization analyzing device. For all these configurations, we derive a closed-form expression of the target/background separability and quantify the performance gain brought by polarization imaging compared to standard intensity imaging. We show in particular that all the considered polarimetric imaging configurations but one require a minimum value of the polarimetric contrast in order to outperform intensity imaging. The only configuration that always performs better than intensity imaging uses a polarizing beam splitter in the presence of background shot noise. These results are useful in evaluating the fundamental limits of the gain brought by polarization imaging and determining, in practice, which type of imaging architecture is preferable for a given application.

  16. Physiological techniques for detecting expiratory flow limitation during tidal breathing.

    PubMed

    Koulouris, N G; Hardavella, G

    2011-09-01

    Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) often exhale along the same flow-volume curve during quiet breathing as they do during the forced expiratory vital capacity manoeuvre, and this has been taken as an indicator of expiratory flow limitation at rest (EFL(T)). Therefore, EFL(T), namely attainment of maximal expiratory flow during tidal expiration, occurs when an increase in transpulmonary pressure causes no increase in expiratory flow. EFL(T) leads to small airway injury and promotes dynamic pulmonary hyperinflation, with concurrent dyspnoea and exercise limitation. In fact, EFL(T) occurs commonly in COPD patients (mainly in Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease III and IV stage), in whom the latter symptoms are common, but is not exclusive to COPD, since it can also be detected in other pulmonary and nonpulmonary diseases like asthma, acute respiratory distress syndrome, heart failure and obesity, etc. The existing up to date physiological techniques of assessing EFL(T) are reviewed in the present work. Among the currently available techniques, the negative expiratory pressure has been validated in a wide variety of settings and disorders. Consequently, it should be regarded as a simple, noninvasive, practical and accurate new technique.

  17. Limits of linearity and detection for some drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Needleman, S B; Romberg, R W

    1990-01-01

    The limits of linearity (LOL) and detection (LOD) are important factors in establishing the reliability of an analytical procedure for accurately assaying drug concentrations in urine specimens. Multiple analyses of analyte over an extended range of concentrations provide a measure of the ability of the analytical procedure to correctly identify known quantities of drug in a biofluid matrix. Each of the seven drugs of abuse gives linear analytical responses from concentrations at or near their LOD to concentrations several-fold higher than those generally encountered in the drug screening laboratory. The upper LOL exceeds the Department of Navy (DON) cutoff values by factors of approximately 2 to 160. The LOD varies from 0.4 to 5.0% of the DON cutoff value for each drug. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) is calculated as the LOD + 7 SD. The range for LOL is greater for drugs analyzed with deuterated internal standards compared with those using conventional internal standards. For THC acid, cocaine, PCP, and morphine, LOLs are 8 to 160-fold greater than the defined cutoff concentrations. For the other drugs, the LOL's are only 2 to 4-fold greater than the defined cutoff concentrations.

  18. Detection limit for activation measurements in ultralow background sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trache, Livius; Chesneanu, D.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Ghita, D. G.; Burducea, I.; Straticiuc, M.; Tang, X. D.

    2014-09-01

    We used 12C +13C fusion at the beam energies E = 6, 7 and 8 MeV to determine the sensitivity and the limits of activation method measurements in ultralow background sites. A 13C beam of 0.5 μA from the 3 MV Tandem accelerator of the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH impinged on thick graphite targets. After about 24 hrs of irradiation targets were measured in two different laboratories: one with a heavy shielded Ge detector in the institute (at the surface) and one located underground in the microBequerel laboratory, in the salt mine of Slanic-Prahova, Romania. The 1369- and 2754 keV peaks from 24Na deactivation were clearly observed in the γ-ray spectra obtained for acquisitions lasting a few hours, or a few days. Determination of the detection limit in evaluating the cross sections for the target irradiated at Ec . m = 3 MeV indicates the fact that it is possible to measure gamma spectrum in underground laboratory down to Ec . m = 2 . 6 MeV. Cleaning the spectra with beta-gamma coincidences and increasing beam intensity 20 times will take as further down. The measurements are motivated by the study of the 12 C +12 C reaction at astrophysical energies.

  19. Mode-converters for rectangular-core fiber amplifiers to achieve diffraction-limited power scaling.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Arun Kumar; Pax, Paul H; Heebner, John E; Drachenberg, Derrek R; Armstrong, J Paul; Dawson, Jay W

    2012-12-17

    A rectangular-core (ribbon) fiber that guides and amplifies a single higher-order-mode (HOM) can potentially scale to much higher average powers than what is possible in traditional circular-core large-mode-area fibers. Such an amplifier would require mode-conversion at the input to enable interfacing with seed sources that typically output TEM(00) mode radiation and at the output to generate diffraction-limited radiation for end-user applications. We present the first simulation and experimental results of a mode conversion technique that uses two diffractive-optic-elements in conjugate Fourier planes to convert a diffraction limited TEM(00) mode to the HOM of a ribbon fiber. Mode-conversion-efficiency is approximately 84% and can theoretically approach 100%. We also demonstrate a mode-converter system that converts a single HOM of a ribbon fiber back to a diffraction-limited TEM(00) mode. Conversion efficiency is a record 80.5%.

  20. Fundamental performance limits of carbon nanotube thin-film transistors achieved using hybrid molecular dielectrics.

    PubMed

    Sangwan, Vinod K; Ortiz, Rocio Ponce; Alaboson, Justice M P; Emery, Jonathan D; Bedzyk, Michael J; Lauhon, Lincoln J; Marks, Tobin J; Hersam, Mark C

    2012-08-28

    In the past decade, semiconducting carbon nanotube thin films have been recognized as contending materials for wide-ranging applications in electronics, energy, and sensing. In particular, improvements in large-area flexible electronics have been achieved through independent advances in postgrowth processing to resolve metallic versus semiconducting carbon nanotube heterogeneity, in improved gate dielectrics, and in self-assembly processes. Moreover, controlled tuning of specific device components has afforded fundamental probes of the trade-offs between materials properties and device performance metrics. Nevertheless, carbon nanotube transistor performance suitable for real-world applications awaits understanding-based progress in the integration of independently pioneered device components. We achieve this here by integrating high-purity semiconducting carbon nanotube films with a custom-designed hybrid inorganic-organic gate dielectric. This synergistic combination of materials circumvents conventional design trade-offs, resulting in concurrent advances in several transistor performance metrics such as transconductance (6.5 μS/μm), intrinsic field-effect mobility (147 cm(2)/(V s)), subthreshold swing (150 mV/decade), and on/off ratio (5 × 10(5)), while also achieving hysteresis-free operation in ambient conditions.

  1. Superintendents' Instructional Leadership Practices and the Achievement of Students with Disabilities and Students with Limited English Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revis, Kathy G.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to discover if there was a statistically significant relationship between the self-reported instructional leadership practices of North Carolina superintendents and the achievement of their students with limited English proficiency (LEP) and students with disabilities (SWDs) as measured by the percent of students who…

  2. Neutron activation analysis detection limits using {sup 252}Cf sources

    SciTech Connect

    DiPrete, D.P.; Sigg, R.A.

    2000-07-01

    The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) developed a neutron activation analysis (NAA) facility several decades ago using low-flux {sup 252}Cf neutron sources. Through this time, the facility has addressed areas of applied interest in managing the Savannah River Site (SRS). Some applications are unique because of the site's operating history and its chemical-processing facilities. Because sensitivity needs for many applications are not severe, they can be accomplished using an {approximately}6-mg {sup 252}Cf NAA facility. The SRTC {sup 252}Cf facility continues to support applied research programs at SRTC as well as other SRS programs for environmental and waste management customers. Samples analyzed by NAA include organic compounds, metal alloys, sediments, site process solutions, and many other materials. Numerous radiochemical analyses also rely on the facility for production of short-lived tracers, yielding by activation of carriers and small-scale isotope production for separation methods testing. These applications are more fully reviewed in Ref. 1. Although the flux [{approximately}2 x 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s] is low relative to reactor facilities, more than 40 elements can be detected at low and sub-part-per-million levels. Detection limits provided by the facility are adequate for many analytical projects. Other multielement analysis methods, particularly inductively coupled plasma atomic emission and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, can now provide sensitivities on dissolved samples that are often better than those available by NAA using low-flux isotopic sources. Because NAA allows analysis of bulk samples, (a) it is a more cost-effective choice when its sensitivity is adequate than methods that require digestion and (b) it eliminates uncertainties that can be introduced by digestion processes.

  3. Femtomolar concentration detection limit and zeptomole mass detection limit for protein separation by capillary isoelectric focusing and laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Lauren M; Dickerson, Jane A; Dada, Oluwatosin; Dovichi, Norman J

    2009-03-01

    Fluorescence tends to produce the lowest detection limits for most forms of capillary electrophoresis. Two issues have discouraged its use in capillary isoelectric focusing. The first issue is fluorescent labeling of proteins. Most labeling reagents react with lysine residues and convert the cationic residue to a neutral or anionic product. At best, these reagents perturb the isoelectric point of the protein. At worse, they convert each protein into hundreds of different fluorescent products that confound analysis. The second issue is the large background signal generated by impurities within commercial ampholytes. This background signal is particularly strong when excited in the blue portion of the spectrum, which is required by many common fluorescent labeling reagents. This paper addresses these issues. For labeling, we employ Chromeo P540, which is a fluorogenic reagent that converts cationic lysine residues to cationic fluorescent products. The reaction products are excited in the green, which reduces the background signal generated by impurities present within the ampholytes. To further reduce the background signal, we photobleach ampholytes with high-power photodiodes. Photobleaching reduced the noise in the ampholyte blank by an order of magnitude. Isoelectric focusing performed with photobleached pH 3-10 ampholytes produced concentration detection limits of 270 +/- 25 fM and mass detection limits of 150 +/- 15 zmol for Chromeo P540 labeled beta-lactoglobulin. Concentration detection limits were 520 +/- 40 fM and mass detection limits were 310 +/- 30 zmol with pH 4-8 ampholytes. A homogenate was prepared from a Barrett's esophagus cell line and separated by capillary isoelectric focusing, reproducibly generating dozens of peaks. The sample taken for the separation was equal to the labeled protein homogenate from three cells.

  4. Current limitations and challenges in nanowaste detection, characterisation and monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Part, Florian; Zecha, Gudrun; Causon, Tim; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • First review on detection of nanomaterials in complex waste samples. • Focus on nanoparticles in solid, liquid and gaseous waste samples. • Summary of current applicable methods for nanowaste detection and characterisation. • Limitations and challenges of characterisation of nanoparticles in waste. - Abstract: Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are already extensively used in diverse consumer products. Along the life cycle of a nano-enabled product, ENMs can be released and subsequently accumulate in the environment. Material flow models also indicate that a variety of ENMs may accumulate in waste streams. Therefore, a new type of waste, so-called nanowaste, is generated when end-of-life ENMs and nano-enabled products are disposed of. In terms of the precautionary principle, environmental monitoring of end-of-life ENMs is crucial to allow assessment of the potential impact of nanowaste on our ecosystem. Trace analysis and quantification of nanoparticulate species is very challenging because of the variety of ENM types that are used in products and low concentrations of nanowaste expected in complex environmental media. In the framework of this paper, challenges in nanowaste characterisation and appropriate analytical techniques which can be applied to nanowaste analysis are summarised. Recent case studies focussing on the characterisation of ENMs in waste streams are discussed. Most studies aim to investigate the fate of nanowaste during incineration, particularly considering aerosol measurements; whereas, detailed studies focusing on the potential release of nanowaste during waste recycling processes are currently not available. In terms of suitable analytical methods, separation techniques coupled to spectrometry-based methods are promising tools to detect nanowaste and determine particle size distribution in liquid waste samples. Standardised leaching protocols can be applied to generate soluble fractions stemming from solid wastes, while

  5. Estimation of the limit of detection using information theory measures.

    PubMed

    Fonollosa, Jordi; Vergara, Alexander; Huerta, Ramón; Marco, Santiago

    2014-01-31

    Definitions of the limit of detection (LOD) based on the probability of false positive and/or false negative errors have been proposed over the past years. Although such definitions are straightforward and valid for any kind of analytical system, proposed methodologies to estimate the LOD are usually simplified to signals with Gaussian noise. Additionally, there is a general misconception that two systems with the same LOD provide the same amount of information on the source regardless of the prior probability of presenting a blank/analyte sample. Based upon an analogy between an analytical system and a binary communication channel, in this paper we show that the amount of information that can be extracted from an analytical system depends on the probability of presenting the two different possible states. We propose a new definition of LOD utilizing information theory tools that deals with noise of any kind and allows the introduction of prior knowledge easily. Unlike most traditional LOD estimation approaches, the proposed definition is based on the amount of information that the chemical instrumentation system provides on the chemical information source. Our findings indicate that the benchmark of analytical systems based on the ability to provide information about the presence/absence of the analyte (our proposed approach) is a more general and proper framework, while converging to the usual values when dealing with Gaussian noise.

  6. Satellite based Global Flood Detection System - strengths and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revilla-Romero, Beatriz; Salamon, Peter; Thielen, Jutta; De Groeve, Tom; Zajac, Zuzanna

    2014-05-01

    One of the main problems for global hydrological models is that for many regions only very limited or no observational data for a model assessment is available. This problem could be overcome with filling the gaps using information derived from satellite observations. Thus, an evaluation of the remote sensing signal of the Global Flood Detection System (GFDS) against observed discharge data was performed in order to test the use of this data in sparsely gauged river basins. The study was carried out at 398 locations near the main rivers and in Africa, Asia, Europe, North America and South America. After evaluating different methodologies for extracting the satellite signal, a temporal (4 days) and spatial (4 GFDS pixels) average was chosen to proceed with the analysis. For the 340 stations with a concurrent time series longer than seven years for both, the signal and the in situ observed discharge (obtained mainly from the Global Runoff Data Centre), a calibration based on monthly linear models was carried out. The validation was executed and several skill scores were calculated such as the R2, Nash-Sutcliffe (NSE), and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE). It is important to highlight that, for this study, 230 stations globally had Nash-Sutcliffe efficient score higher than zero, indicating that for specific conditions the satellite signal as used in GFDS can fill the gaps where observations are not available. For example, several locations in African catchments have good performance as in the Niger, Volta and Zambezi for which Nash-Sutcliffe is greater than 0.75. It is known that a number of factors affect total upwelling microwave brightness from a mixed water and land surface measured by a single image pixel. Aiming to better understand how some features of the sites could affect the satellite signal and the correlation with in situ observations, apart from the dependency on the river geometry, a multivariate analysis was carried out between the skill scores (NSE and

  7. Photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence using a quartz substrate to reduce limits of detection

    PubMed Central

    Pokhriyal, Anusha; Lu, Meng; Chaudhery, Vikram; Huang, Cheng-Sheng; Schulz, Stephen; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2010-01-01

    A Photonic Crystal (PC) surface fabricated upon a quartz substrate using nanoimprint lithography has been demonstrated to enhance light emission from fluorescent molecules in close proximity to the PC surface. Quartz was selected for its low autofluorescence characteristics compared to polymer-based PCs, improving the detection sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of PC Enhanced Fluorescence (PCEF). Nanoimprint lithography enables economical fabrication of the subwavelength PCEF surface structure over entire 1x3 in2 quartz slides. The demonstrated PCEF surface supports a transverse magnetic (TM) resonant mode at a wavelength of λ = 632.8 nm and an incident angle of θ = 11°, which amplifies the electric field magnitude experienced by surface-bound fluorophores. Meanwhile, another TM mode at a wavelength of λ = 690 nm and incident angle of θ = 0° efficiently directs the fluorescent emission toward the detection optics. An enhancement factor as high as 7500 × was achieved for the detection of LD-700 dye spin-coated upon the PC, compared to detecting the same material on an unpatterned glass surface. The detection of spotted Alexa-647 labeled polypeptide on the PC exhibits a 330 × SNR improvement. Using dose-response characterization of deposited fluorophore-tagged protein spots, the PCEF surface demonstrated a 140 × lower limit of detection compared to a conventional glass substrate. PMID:21164826

  8. Photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence using a quartz substrate to reduce limits of detection.

    PubMed

    Pokhriyal, Anusha; Lu, Meng; Chaudhery, Vikram; Huang, Cheng-Sheng; Schulz, Stephen; Cunningham, Brian T

    2010-11-22

    A Photonic Crystal (PC) surface fabricated upon a quartz substrate using nanoimprint lithography has been demonstrated to enhance light emission from fluorescent molecules in close proximity to the PC surface. Quartz was selected for its low autofluorescence characteristics compared to polymer-based PCs, improving the detection sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of PC Enhanced Fluorescence (PCEF). Nanoimprint lithography enables economical fabrication of the subwavelength PCEF surface structure over entire 1x3 in2 quartz slides. The demonstrated PCEF surface supports a transverse magnetic (TM) resonant mode at a wavelength of λ = 632.8 nm and an incident angle of θ = 11°, which amplifies the electric field magnitude experienced by surface-bound fluorophores. Meanwhile, another TM mode at a wavelength of λ = 690 nm and incident angle of θ = 0° efficiently directs the fluorescent emission toward the detection optics. An enhancement factor as high as 7500 × was achieved for the detection of LD-700 dye spin-coated upon the PC, compared to detecting the same material on an unpatterned glass surface. The detection of spotted Alexa-647 labeled polypeptide on the PC exhibits a 330 × SNR improvement. Using dose-response characterization of deposited fluorophore-tagged protein spots, the PCEF surface demonstrated a 140 × lower limit of detection compared to a conventional glass substrate.

  9. Supercontinuum spatial modulation spectroscopy: Detection and noise limitations

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, M. P.; Vietmeyer, F.; Kuno, M.; Aleksiuk, D.

    2013-11-15

    Supercontinuum spatial modulation spectroscopy is a facile tool for conducting single molecule/particle extinction spectroscopy throughout the visible and near infrared (420–1100 nm). The technique's capabilities are benchmarked using individual Au nanoparticles (NPs) as a standard since they are well studied and display a prominent plasmon resonance in the visible. Extinction spectra of individual Au NPs with diameters (d) ranging from d ∼ 8 to 40 nm are resolved with extinction cross sections (σ{sub ext}) of σ{sub ext} ∼1 × 10{sup −13}–1 ×10{sup −11} cm{sup 2}. Corresponding signal-to-noise ratios range from ∼30 to ∼1400. The technique's limit of detection is determined to be 4.3 × 10{sup −14} cm{sup 2} (4.3 nm{sup 2}). To showcase supercontinuum spatial modulation spectroscopy's broader applicability, extinction spectra are acquired for other model systems, such as individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and CdSe nanowires. We show for the first time extinction spectra of individual (8,3) and (6,5) SWCNTs. For both chiralities, their E{sub 11} [(8,3) 1.30 eV (952 nm); (6,5) 1.26 eV (986 nm)] and E{sub 22} [(8,3) 1.86 eV (667 nm); (6,5) 2.19 eV (567 nm)] excitonic resonances are seen with corresponding cross sections of σ{sub ext} ∼ 10{sup −13} cm{sup 2} μm{sup −1}.

  10. 40 CFR 434.64 - Procedure and method detection limit for measurement of settleable solids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Procedure and method detection limit... method detection limit for measurement of settleable solids. For the purposes of this part, the following... CFR part 136, the method detection limit for measuring settleable solids under this part shall be...

  11. 40 CFR 434.64 - Procedure and method detection limit for measurement of settleable solids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedure and method detection limit... method detection limit for measurement of settleable solids. For the purposes of this part, the following... CFR part 136, the method detection limit for measuring settleable solids under this part shall be...

  12. Recent advances on enzymatic glucose/oxygen and hydrogen/oxygen biofuel cells: Achievements and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosnier, Serge; Gross, Andrew J.; Le Goff, Alan; Holzinger, Michael

    2016-09-01

    The possibility of producing electrical power from chemical energy with biological catalysts has induced the development of biofuel cells as viable energy sources for powering portable and implanted electronic devices. These power sources employ biocatalysts, called enzymes, which are highly specific and catalytic towards the oxidation of a biofuel and the reduction of oxygen or hydrogen peroxide. Enzymes, on one hand, are promising candidates to replace expensive noble metal-based catalysts in fuel cell research. On the other hand, they offer the exciting prospect of a new generation of fuel cells which harvest energy from body fluids. Biofuel cells which use glucose as a fuel are particularly interesting for generating electricity to power electronic devices inside a living body. Hydrogen consuming biofuel cells represent an emerging alternative to platinum catalysts due to comparable efficiencies and the capability to operate at lower temperatures. Currently, these technologies are not competitive with existing commercialised fuel cell devices due to limitations including insufficient power outputs and lifetimes. The advantages and challenges facing glucose biofuel cells for implantation and hydrogen biofuel cells will be summarised along with recent promising advances and the future prospects of these exotic energy-harvesting devices.

  13. Fermentative production of lactic acid from renewable materials: recent achievements, prospects, and limits.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    The development and implementation of renewable materials for the production of versatile chemical resources have gained considerable attention recently, as this offers an alternative to the environmental problems caused by the petroleum industry and the limited supply of fossil resources. Therefore, the concept of utilizing biomass or wastes from agricultural and industrial residues to produce useful chemical products has been widely accepted. Lactic acid plays an important role due to its versatile application in the food, medical, and cosmetics industries and as a potential raw material for the manufacture of biodegradable plastics. Currently, the fermentative production of optically pure lactic acid has increased because of the prospects of environmental friendliness and cost-effectiveness. In order to produce lactic acid with high yield and optical purity, many studies focus on wild microorganisms and metabolically engineered strains. This article reviews the most recent advances in the biotechnological production of lactic acid mainly by lactic acid bacteria, and discusses the feasibility and potential of various processes.

  14. Diamond-based electrochemical aptasensor realizing a femtomolar detection limit of bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yibo; Liu, Junsong; Li, Hongdong

    2017-06-15

    In this study, we designed and fabricated an electrochemical impedance aptasensor based on Au nanoparticles (Au-NPs) coated boron-doped diamond (BDD) modified with aptamers, and 6-mercapto-1-hexanol (MCH) for the detection of bisphenol A (BPA). The constructed BPA aptasensor exhibits good linearity from 1.0×10(-14) to 1.0×10(-9)molL(-1). The detection limitation of 7.2×10(-15)molL(-1) was achieved, which can be attributed to the synergistic effect of combining BDD with Au-NPs, aptamers, and MCH. The examine results of BPA traces in Tris-HCl buffer and in milk, UV spectra of aptamer/BPA and interference test revealed that the novel aptasensors are of high sensitivity, specificity, stability and repeatability, which could be promising in practical applications.

  15. Diffuse reflectance optical topography: location of inclusions in 3D and detectability limits

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, N. A.; Baez, G. R.; García, H. A.; Waks Serra, M. V.; Di Rocco, H. O.; Iriarte, D. I.; Pomarico, J. A.; Grosenick, D.; Macdonald, R.

    2014-01-01

    In the present contribution we investigate the images of CW diffusely reflected light for a point-like source, registered by a CCD camera imaging a turbid medium containing an absorbing lesion. We show that detection of μa variations (absorption anomalies) is achieved if images are normalized to background intensity. A theoretical analysis based on the diffusion approximation is presented to investigate the sensitivity and the limitations of our proposal and a novel procedure to find the location of the inclusions in 3D is given and tested. An analysis of the noise and its influence on the detection capabilities of our proposal is provided. Experimental results on phantoms are also given, supporting the proposed approach. PMID:24876999

  16. A computational approach to achieve situational awareness from limited observations of a complex system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwin, Jason

    At the start of the 21st century, the topic of complexity remains a formidable challenge in engineering, science and other aspects of our world. It seems that when disaster strikes it is because some complex and unforeseen interaction causes the unfortunate outcome. Why did the financial system of the world meltdown in 2008--2009? Why are global temperatures on the rise? These questions and other ones like them are difficult to answer because they pertain to contexts that require lengthy descriptions. In other words, these contexts are complex. But we as human beings are able to observe and recognize this thing we call 'complexity'. Furthermore, we recognize that there are certain elements of a context that form a system of complex interactions---i.e., a complex system. Many researchers have even noted similarities between seemingly disparate complex systems. Do sub-atomic systems bear resemblance to weather patterns? Or do human-based economic systems bear resemblance to macroscopic flows? Where do we draw the line in their resemblance? These are the kinds of questions that are asked in complex systems research. And the ability to recognize complexity is not only limited to analytic research. Rather, there are many known examples of humans who, not only observe and recognize but also, operate complex systems. How do they do it? Is there something superhuman about these people or is there something common to human anatomy that makes it possible to fly a plane? Or to drive a bus? Or to operate a nuclear power plant? Or to play Chopin's etudes on the piano? In each of these examples, a human being operates a complex system of machinery, whether it is a plane, a bus, a nuclear power plant or a piano. What is the common thread running through these abilities? The study of situational awareness (SA) examines how people do these types of remarkable feats. It is not a bottom-up science though because it relies on finding general principles running through a host of varied

  17. Limited irrigation research and infrared thermometry for detecting water stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA-ARS Limited Irrigation Research Farm, located outside of Greeley Colorado, is an experiment evaluating management perspectives of limited irrigation water. An overview of the farm systems is shown, including drip irrigation systems, water budgeting, and experimental design, as well as preli...

  18. LIMITATIONS ON THE USES OF MULTIMEDIA EXPOSURE MEASUREMENTS FOR MULTIPATHWAY EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT - PART I: HANDLING OBSERVATIONS BELOW DETECTION LIMITS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multimedia data from two probability-based exposure studies were investigated in terms of how censoring of non-detects affected estimation of population parameters and associations. Appropriate methods for handling censored below-detection-limit (BDL) values in this context were...

  19. Remote sensing for detection of soil limitations in agricultural areas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazee, C. J.; Myers, V. I.; Westin, F. C.

    1971-01-01

    Research was initiated to establish remote sensing techniques for recognizing and mapping soil limitations to land use. Analysis of soils with limitations to land use because of dense subsoil (claypan) and unfavorable topography (convex sloping or depressional areas) was accomplished by experienced soil scientists utilizing a density slicing system. Maps of soil limitations were produced by photographing the color encoded density slicing analysis of an area. The percentage of each soil limitation was measured by the planimeter feature of the density slicing system. The initial results indicate that a density slicing system has great potential not only for delineating areas of similar soil limitations but also for indicating the percentage composition of an area.

  20. Remote sensing for detection of soil limitations in agricultural areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazee, C. J.; Heil, R. D.; Westin, F. C.

    1970-01-01

    Automatic analysis of soil limitations studied by an automatic color TV density slicing system was accomplished. This system color codes the density range of the value component of color of an image. Maps of soil limitations or other similar soil groups are produced by photographing the color coded representation of an area. The planimeter feature of the density slicing system measures the area of each soil limitation providing information on the importance of a soil limitation in an area. The results of this study suggest that an automatic color TV density slicing system has great potential not only for identifying and mapping similar soil areas, but also for indicating the percentage composition of an area.

  1. Exploring the limits of community detection strategies in complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Aldecoa, Rodrigo; Marín, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    The characterization of network community structure has profound implications in several scientific areas. Therefore, testing the algorithms developed to establish the optimal division of a network into communities is a fundamental problem in the field. We performed here a highly detailed evaluation of community detection algorithms, which has two main novelties: 1) using complex closed benchmarks, which provide precise ways to assess whether the solutions generated by the algorithms are optimal; and, 2) A novel type of analysis, based on hierarchically clustering the solutions suggested by multiple community detection algorithms, which allows to easily visualize how different are those solutions. Surprise, a global parameter that evaluates the quality of a partition, confirms the power of these analyses. We show that none of the community detection algorithms tested provide consistently optimal results in all networks and that Surprise maximization, obtained by combining multiple algorithms, obtains quasi-optimal performances in these difficult benchmarks. PMID:23860510

  2. Determination of a Limited Scope Network's Lightning Detection Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rompala, John T.; Blakeslee, R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper outlines a modeling technique to map lightning detection efficiency variations over a region surveyed by a sparse array of ground based detectors. A reliable flash peak current distribution (PCD) for the region serves as the technique's base. This distribution is recast as an event probability distribution function. The technique then uses the PCD together with information regarding: site signal detection thresholds, type of solution algorithm used, and range attenuation; to formulate the probability that a flash at a specified location will yield a solution. Applying this technique to the full region produces detection efficiency contour maps specific to the parameters employed. These contours facilitate a comparative analysis of each parameter's effect on the network's detection efficiency. In an alternate application, this modeling technique gives an estimate of the number, strength, and distribution of events going undetected. This approach leads to a variety of event density contour maps. This application is also illustrated. The technique's base PCD can be empirical or analytical. A process for formulating an empirical PCD specific to the region and network being studied is presented. A new method for producing an analytical representation of the empirical PCD is also introduced.

  3. Effectiveness of hairpin probe in increasing the limit of detection for gold nanowire based-biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien Cao, Huu; Pham, Xuan Thanh Tung; Linh Ha, Van; Hieu Le, Van

    2014-12-01

    Electrochemical DNA (E-DNA) sensors, which are rapid, reagentless and readily integrated into microelectronics and microfluidics, appear a promising alternative to optical methods for the detection of specific nucleic acid sequences. In keeping with this, a large number of distinct E-DNA architectures have been reported to date. Most, however, suffer from one or more drawbacks, including low signal gain, signal-off behavior or instability. To remedy these problems, we report here the development of a signal-on E-DNA architecture that achieves both high signal gain and good stability. This new sensor employs a commercially synthesized, asymmetric hairpin DNA as its recognition and signaling probe, the shorter arm of which is labeled with a redox reporting methylene blue at its free end. Unlike all prior E-DNA architectures, in which the recognition probe is attached via a terminal functional group to its underlying electrode, the probe employed here is affixed using a thiol group located internally, in the turn region of the hairpin. Hybridization of a target DNA to the longer arm of the hairpin displaces the shorter arm, allowing the reporter to approach the electrode surface and transfer electrons. The observed signal gain is sufficient to achieve a demonstrated detection limit of 25 pM.

  4. Reflectance measurements for the detection and mapping of soil limitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, L. A.; Frazee, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    During 1971 and 1972 research was conducted on two fallow fields in the proposed Oahe Irrigation Project to investigate the relationship between the tonal variations observed on aerial photographs and the principal soil limitations of the area. A grid sampling procedure was used to collected detailed field data during the 1972 growing season. The field data was compared to imagery collected on May 14, 1971 at 3050 meters altitude. The imagery and field data were initially evaluated by a visual analysis. Correlation and regression analysis revealed a highly significant correlation and regression analysis revealed a highly significant correlation between the digitized color infrared film data and soil properties such as organic matter content, color, depth to carbonates, bulk density and reflectivity. Computer classification of the multiemulsion film data resulted in maps delineating the areas containing claypan and erosion limitations. Reflectance data from the red spectral band provided the best results.

  5. METHODS OF DEALING WITH VALUES BELOW THE LIMIT OF DETECTION USING SAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to limitations of chemical analysis procedures, small concentrations cannot be precisely measured. These concentrations are said to be below the limit of detection (LOD). In statistical analyses, these values are often censored and substituted with a constant value, such ...

  6. Limits of Precipitation Detection from Microwave Radiometers and Sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munchak, S. J.; Skofronick-Jackson, G.; Johnson, B. T.

    2012-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission will unify and draw from numerous microwave conical scanning imaging radiometers and cross-track sounders, many of which already in operation, to provide near real-time precipitation estimates worldwide at 3-hour intervals. Some of these instruments were designed for primary purposes unrelated to precipitation remote sensing. Therefore it is worthwhile to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of each set of channels with respect to precipitation detection to fully understand their role in the GPM constellation. The GPM radiometer algorithm will use an observationally-based Bayesian retrieval with common databases of precipitation profiles for all sensors. Since these databases are still under development and will not be truly complete until the GPM core satellite has completed at least one year of dual-frequency radar observations, a screening method based upon retrieval of non-precipitation parameters related to the surface and atmospheric state is used in this study. A cost function representing the departure of modeled radiances from their observed values plus the departure of surface and atmospheric parameters from the TELSEM emissivity atlas and MERRA reanalysis is used as an indicator of precipitation. Using this method, two datasets are used to evaluate precipitation detection: One year of matched AMSR-E and AMSU-B/MHS overpasses with CloudSat used as validation globally; and SSMIS overpasses over the United States using the National Mosaic and QPE (NMQ) as validation. The Heidke Skill Score (HSS) is used as a metric to evaluate detection skill over different surfaces, seasons, and across different sensors. Non-frozen oceans give the highest HSS for all sensors, followed by bare land and coasts, then snow-covered land and sea ice. Negligible skill is present over ice sheets. Sounders tend to have higher skill than imagers over complex surfaces (coast, snow, and sea ice), whereas imagers have higher skill

  7. Transduction of nanovolt signals: Limits of electric-field detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmijn, J.

    1989-11-01

    Life scientists discussed the extreme electrical sensitivity of marine sharks, skates, and rays. After reviewing the results of earlier studies on the electric sense at the animal and system levels, the participants discussed the basic process of signal transduction in terms of voltage-sensitive ionic channels. Struck by the small charge displacements needed for excitation, they strongly recommended that sensory biologists, physiologists, and biophysicists join in a concerted effort to initiate new research on the ionic mechanisms of electric field detection. To obtain detailed information on the electroreceptive membrane and its ionic channels, high resolution recording techniques will be mandatory.

  8. Limit on Remote FTIR Detection of Trace Gases,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    sr.cm-l) CCMIN v (pV) HCI 2900-3000 1.3 x 10- 2.5 x 109 20 NO2 2650-2935 1.4 x 10-9 1.3 x 1010 92 DF 2700-2900 2.6 x 10-9 3.5 x 109 i7 HBr 2450-2650 3.9...dwell time =" 10 secs. MIN v - minimum detectable volume concentration for td 1 0 secs., cloud thickness = 10 m, &T Y5C., Tsfc 300K. L -7.. 2H9-58

  9. Hidden evolution: progress and limitations in detecting multifarious natural selection.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Norman A; Kliman, Richard M

    2002-04-01

    From illustrative examples of research on the best-studied group of species to date, Drosophila melanogaster and its closest relatives, we argue that selection is multifarious, but often hidden. Selective fixation of new, highly advantageous alleles is the most parsimonious explanation for a typical pattern of molecular variation observed in genomic regions characterized by very low recombination: drastically reduced DNA sequence variation within species and typical levels of sequence divergence among species. At the same time, the identity of the gene (or genes) influenced by selection is not just difficult to discern; it may be impossible. Studies of the genetic basis of reproductive isolation demonstrate that, although the D. melanogaster complex species appear virtually identical, dozens of currently unidentified genes contribute to hybrid sterility. We argue that these findings are best explained by selectively-driven functional divergence and demonstrate the multifarious nature of selection. Although multifarious selection certainly occurs, the exact characters responsible for differences in survival and reproductive success are unknown. We do not see these inherent limits as a cause for despair or a problem for evolutionary biology. Instead, we hope to raise awareness of these complexities of evolution by highlighting both the progress and the limitations of characterizing multifarious natural selection.

  10. Naked-eye detection as a universal approach to lower the limit of detection of enzyme-linked immunoassays.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Erin F; Paterson, Sureyya; de la Rica, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    Colorimetric biosensors for the detection of analytes with the naked eye are required in environmental monitoring, point-of-care diagnostics, and analyses in resources constrained settings, where detection instruments may not be available. However, instrument-based detection methods are usually more adequate for detecting small variations in the signal compared to naked-eye detection schemes, and consequently the limit of detection of the latter is usually higher than the former. Here, we demonstrate that the limit of detection of colorimetric enzyme-linked immunoassays can be decreased several orders of magnitude when using naked-eye detection instead of a spectrophotometer for detecting the signal. The key step to lower the limit of detection is adding a small volume of chromogenic substrate during the signal generation step. This generates highly colored solutions that can be easily visualized with the naked eye and recorded with the camera of a mobile phone. The proposed method does not require expensive equipment or complex protocols to enhance the signal, and therefore it is a universal approach to lower the limit of detection of colorimetric enzyme-linked immunoassays.

  11. Quantum-limited Terahertz detection without liquid cryogens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Under this contract, we have successfully designed, fabricated and tested a revolutionary new type of detector for Terahertz (THz) radiation, the tunable antenna-coupled intersubband Terahertz (TACIT) detector. The lowest-noise THz detectors used in the astrophysics community require cooling to temperatures below 4K. This deep cryogenic requirement forces satellites launched for THz- observing missions to include either large volumes of liquid Helium, complex cryocoolers, or both. Cryogenic requirements thus add significantly to the cost, complexity and mass of satellites and limit the duration of their missions. It hence desirable to develop new detector technologies with less stringent cryogenic requirements. Such detectors will not only be important in space-based astrophysics, but also respond to a growing demand for THz technology for earth-based scientific and commercial applications.

  12. Analysis of remotely sensed data for detecting soil limitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, L. A.; Frazee, C. J.; Waltz, F. A.

    1973-01-01

    During 1971 and 1972 a detailed study was conducted on a fallow field in the proposed Oahe Irrigation Project to determine the relationship between the tonal variation observed on aerial photographs and the properties of eroded soil. Correlation and regression analysis of digitized, multiemulsion, color infrared film (2443) data and detailed field data revealed a highly significant correlation between film transmittance and several soil properties indicative of the erosion limitation. Computer classification of the multiemulsion film data resulted in maps portraying the eroded soil and the normal soil. Both correlation and computer classification results were best using the reflectance data from the red spectral band. The results showed film transmittance was actually measuring the reflectivity of the soil surface which was increased by the incorporation of the light colored, calcareous parent material exposed by erosion or tillage on soils with thin surface horizons.

  13. Achieving Stable Nitritation for Mainstream Deammonification by Combining Free Nitrous Acid-Based Sludge Treatment and Oxygen Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongbo; Wang, Qilin; Laloo, Andrew; Xu, Yifeng; Bond, Philip L.; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    Stable nitritation is a critical bottleneck for achieving autotrophic nitrogen removal using the energy-saving mainstream deammonification process. Herein we report a new strategy to wash out both the Nitrospira sp. and Nitrobacter sp. from the treatment of domestic-strength wastewater. The strategy combines sludge treatment using free nitrous acid (FNA) with dissolved oxygen (DO) control in the nitritation reactor. Initially, the nitrifying reactor achieved full conversion of NH4+ to NO3−. Then, nitrite accumulation at ~60% was achieved in the reactor when 1/4 of the sludge was treated daily with FNA at 1.82 mg N/L in a side-stream unit for 24 h. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) revealed FNA treatment substantially reduced the abundance of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) (from 23.0 ± 4.3 to 5.3 ± 1.9%), especially that of Nitrospira sp. (from 15.7 ± 3.9 to 0.4 ± 0.1%). Nitrite accumulation increased to ~80% when the DO concentration in the mainstream reactor was reduced from 2.5–3.0 to 0.3–0.8 mg/L. FISH revealed the DO limitation further reduced the abundance of NOB (to 2.1 ± 1.0%), especially that of Nitrobacter sp. (from 4.9 ± 1.2 to 1.8 ± 0.8%). The strategy developed removes a major barrier for deammonification in low-strength domestic wastewater. PMID:27151247

  14. Achieving Stable Nitritation for Mainstream Deammonification by Combining Free Nitrous Acid-Based Sludge Treatment and Oxygen Limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongbo; Wang, Qilin; Laloo, Andrew; Xu, Yifeng; Bond, Philip L.; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-05-01

    Stable nitritation is a critical bottleneck for achieving autotrophic nitrogen removal using the energy-saving mainstream deammonification process. Herein we report a new strategy to wash out both the Nitrospira sp. and Nitrobacter sp. from the treatment of domestic-strength wastewater. The strategy combines sludge treatment using free nitrous acid (FNA) with dissolved oxygen (DO) control in the nitritation reactor. Initially, the nitrifying reactor achieved full conversion of NH4+ to NO3-. Then, nitrite accumulation at ~60% was achieved in the reactor when 1/4 of the sludge was treated daily with FNA at 1.82 mg N/L in a side-stream unit for 24 h. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) revealed FNA treatment substantially reduced the abundance of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) (from 23.0 ± 4.3 to 5.3 ± 1.9%), especially that of Nitrospira sp. (from 15.7 ± 3.9 to 0.4 ± 0.1%). Nitrite accumulation increased to ~80% when the DO concentration in the mainstream reactor was reduced from 2.5-3.0 to 0.3-0.8 mg/L. FISH revealed the DO limitation further reduced the abundance of NOB (to 2.1 ± 1.0%), especially that of Nitrobacter sp. (from 4.9 ± 1.2 to 1.8 ± 0.8%). The strategy developed removes a major barrier for deammonification in low-strength domestic wastewater.

  15. Current limitations and challenges in nanowaste detection, characterisation and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Part, Florian; Zecha, Gudrun; Causon, Tim; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin; Huber-Humer, Marion

    2015-09-01

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are already extensively used in diverse consumer products. Along the life cycle of a nano-enabled product, ENMs can be released and subsequently accumulate in the environment. Material flow models also indicate that a variety of ENMs may accumulate in waste streams. Therefore, a new type of waste, so-called nanowaste, is generated when end-of-life ENMs and nano-enabled products are disposed of. In terms of the precautionary principle, environmental monitoring of end-of-life ENMs is crucial to allow assessment of the potential impact of nanowaste on our ecosystem. Trace analysis and quantification of nanoparticulate species is very challenging because of the variety of ENM types that are used in products and low concentrations of nanowaste expected in complex environmental media. In the framework of this paper, challenges in nanowaste characterisation and appropriate analytical techniques which can be applied to nanowaste analysis are summarised. Recent case studies focussing on the characterisation of ENMs in waste streams are discussed. Most studies aim to investigate the fate of nanowaste during incineration, particularly considering aerosol measurements; whereas, detailed studies focusing on the potential release of nanowaste during waste recycling processes are currently not available. In terms of suitable analytical methods, separation techniques coupled to spectrometry-based methods are promising tools to detect nanowaste and determine particle size distribution in liquid waste samples. Standardised leaching protocols can be applied to generate soluble fractions stemming from solid wastes, while micro- and ultrafiltration can be used to enrich nanoparticulate species. Imaging techniques combined with X-ray-based methods are powerful tools for determining particle size, morphology and screening elemental composition. However, quantification of nanowaste is currently hampered due to the problem to differentiate engineered from

  16. Portable TXRF Spectrometer with 10{sup -11}g Detection Limit and Portable XRF Spectromicroscope with Sub-mm Spatial Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kunimura, Shinsuke; Hatakeyama, So; Sasaki, Nobuharu; Yamamoto, Takashi; Kawai, Jun

    2010-04-06

    A portable total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometer that we have developed is applied to trace elemental analysis of water solutions. Although a 5 W X-ray tube is used in the portable TXRF spectrometer, detection limits of several ppb are achieved for 3d transition metal elements and trace elements in a leaching solution of soils, a leaching solution of solder, and alcoholic beverages are detected. Portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectromicroscopes with a 1 W X-ray tube and an 8 W X-ray tube are also presented. Using the portable XRF spectromicroscope with the 1 W X-ray tube, 93 ppm of Cr is detected with an about 700 {mu}m spatial resolution. Spatially resolved elemental analysis of a mug painted with blue, red, green, and white is performed using the two portable spectromicroscopes, and the difference in elemental composition at each paint is detected.

  17. Portable TXRF Spectrometer with 10-11g Detection Limit and Portable XRF Spectromicroscope with Sub-mm Spatial Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunimura, Shinsuke; Hatakeyama, So; Sasaki, Nobuharu; Yamamoto, Takashi; Kawai, Jun

    2010-04-01

    A portable total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometer that we have developed is applied to trace elemental analysis of water solutions. Although a 5 W X-ray tube is used in the portable TXRF spectrometer, detection limits of several ppb are achieved for 3d transition metal elements and trace elements in a leaching solution of soils, a leaching solution of solder, and alcoholic beverages are detected. Portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectromicroscopes with a 1 W X-ray tube and an 8 W X-ray tube are also presented. Using the portable XRF spectromicroscope with the 1 W X-ray tube, 93 ppm of Cr is detected with an about 700 μm spatial resolution. Spatially resolved elemental analysis of a mug painted with blue, red, green, and white is performed using the two portable spectromicroscopes, and the difference in elemental composition at each paint is detected.

  18. Model averaging quantiles from data censored by a limit of detection.

    PubMed

    Nysen, Ruth; Faes, Christel; Ferrari, Pietro; Verger, Philippe; Aerts, Marc

    2016-03-01

    In chemical risk assessment, it is important to determine the quantiles of the distribution of concentration data. The selection of an appropriate distribution and the estimation of particular quantiles of interest are largely hindered by the omnipresence of observations below the limit of detection, leading to left-censored data. The log-normal distribution is a common choice, but this distribution is not the only possibility and alternatives should be considered as well. Here, we focus on several distributions that are related to the log-normal distribution or that are seminonparametric extensions of the log-normal distribution. Whereas previous work focused on the estimation of the cumulative distribution function, our interest here goes to the estimation of quantiles, particularly in the left tail of the distribution where most of the left-censored data are located. Two different model averaged quantile estimators are defined and compared for different families of candidate models. The models and methods of selection and averaging are further investigated through simulations and illustrated on data of cadmium concentration in food products. The approach is extended to include covariates and to deal with uncertainty about the values of the limit of detection. These extensions are illustrated with (134) cesium measurements from Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. We can conclude that averaged models do achieve good performance characteristics in case no useful prior knowledge about the true distribution is available; that there is no structural difference in the performance of the direct and indirect method; and that, not surprisingly, only the true or closely approximating model can deal with extremely high percentages of censoring.

  19. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  20. Breath Analysis Using Laser Spectroscopic Techniques: Breath Biomarkers, Spectral Fingerprints, and Detection Limits

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chuji; Sahay, Peeyush

    2009-01-01

    Breath analysis, a promising new field of medicine and medical instrumentation, potentially offers noninvasive, real-time, and point-of-care (POC) disease diagnostics and metabolic status monitoring. Numerous breath biomarkers have been detected and quantified so far by using the GC-MS technique. Recent advances in laser spectroscopic techniques and laser sources have driven breath analysis to new heights, moving from laboratory research to commercial reality. Laser spectroscopic detection techniques not only have high-sensitivity and high-selectivity, as equivalently offered by the MS-based techniques, but also have the advantageous features of near real-time response, low instrument costs, and POC function. Of the approximately 35 established breath biomarkers, such as acetone, ammonia, carbon dioxide, ethane, methane, and nitric oxide, 14 species in exhaled human breath have been analyzed by high-sensitivity laser spectroscopic techniques, namely, tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS), cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS), integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS), cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS), cavity leak-out spectroscopy (CALOS), photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS), and optical frequency comb cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OFC-CEAS). Spectral fingerprints of the measured biomarkers span from the UV to the mid-IR spectral regions and the detection limits achieved by the laser techniques range from parts per million to parts per billion levels. Sensors using the laser spectroscopic techniques for a few breath biomarkers, e.g., carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, etc. are commercially available. This review presents an update on the latest developments in laser-based breath analysis. PMID:22408503

  1. Scope-of-practice laws for nurse practitioners limit cost savings that can be achieved in retail clinics.

    PubMed

    Spetz, Joanne; Parente, Stephen T; Town, Robert J; Bazarko, Dawn

    2013-11-01

    Retail clinics have the potential to reduce health spending by offering convenient, low-cost access to basic health care services. Retail clinics are often staffed by nurse practitioners (NPs), whose services are regulated by state scope-of-practice regulations. By limiting NPs' work scope, restrictive regulations could affect possible cost savings. Using multistate insurance claims data from 2004-07, a period in which many retail clinics opened, we analyzed whether the cost per episode associated with the use of retail clinics was lower in states where NPs are allowed to practice independently and to prescribe independently. We also examined whether retail clinic use and scope of practice were associated with emergency department visits and hospitalizations. We found that visits to retail clinics were associated with lower costs per episode, compared to episodes of care that did not begin with a retail clinic visit, and the costs were even lower when NPs practiced independently. Eliminating restrictions on NPs' scope of practice could have a large impact on the cost savings that can be achieved by retail clinics.

  2. Epidemiologic Evaluation of Measurement Data in the Presence of Detection Limits

    PubMed Central

    Lubin, Jay H.; Colt, Joanne S.; Camann, David; Davis, Scott; Cerhan, James R.; Severson, Richard K.; Bernstein, Leslie; Hartge, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of environmental factors greatly improve the quality of epidemiologic studies but can pose challenges because of the presence of upper or lower detection limits or interfering compounds, which do not allow for precise measured values. We consider the regression of an environmental measurement (dependent variable) on several covariates (independent variables). Various strategies are commonly employed to impute values for interval-measured data, including assignment of one-half the detection limit to nondetected values or of “fill-in” values randomly selected from an appropriate distribution. On the basis of a limited simulation study, we found that the former approach can be biased unless the percentage of measurements below detection limits is small (5–10%). The fill-in approach generally produces unbiased parameter estimates but may produce biased variance estimates and thereby distort inference when 30% or more of the data are below detection limits. Truncated data methods (e.g., Tobit regression) and multiple imputation offer two unbiased approaches for analyzing measurement data with detection limits. If interest resides solely on regression parameters, then Tobit regression can be used. If individualized values for measurements below detection limits are needed for additional analysis, such as relative risk regression or graphical display, then multiple imputation produces unbiased estimates and nominal confidence intervals unless the proportion of missing data is extreme. We illustrate various approaches using measurements of pesticide residues in carpet dust in control subjects from a case–control study of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:15579415

  3. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Samuel A.; Hosea, Joel C.; Timberlake, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face accommodates the various power scrape-off distances .lambda..sub.p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V.sub..parallel., of the impacting particles. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution.

  4. Shot noise limited detection of OH using the technique of laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakalyar, D. M.; Davis, L. I., Jr.; Guo, C.; James, J. V.; Kakos, S.; Morris, P. T.; Wang, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    Nearly shot-noise limited detection of OH using the technique of laser-induced fluorescence is reported. A LIDAR configuration is used to excite fluorescence in a large volume and a narrow-bandwidth interference filter provides spectral discrimination. This arrangement alleviates the effect of ozone interference and facilitates image processing at relatively close distances. The detection limit is determined mainly by the shot-noise of the solar background. Ground-based measurements in Dearborn indicate a detection limit of better than 1 x 10 to the 6th power OH/cubic cm over a forty-minute acquisition period. Under favorable conditions, a comparable detection limit was also observed for airborne measurements.

  5. A Descriptive Analysis of Enrollment and Achievement among Limited English Proficient Students in New Jersey. Summary. Issues & Answers. REL 2012-No. 108

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Conner, Rosemarie; Abedi, Jamal; Tung, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    This study describes enrollment and achievement trends of limited English proficient (LEP) students in New Jersey public schools between 2002/03 and 2008/09. It documents achievement gaps between LEP and general education students in language arts literacy and math. The study's main findings include: (1) From 2002/03 to 2008/09, LEP student…

  6. A Descriptive Analysis of Enrollment and Achievement among Limited English Proficient Students in New Jersey. Issues & Answers. REL 2012-No. 108

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Conner, Rosemarie; Abedi, Jamal; Tung, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    This study describes enrollment and achievement trends of limited English proficient (LEP) students in New Jersey public schools between 2002/03 and 2008/09. It documents achievement gaps between LEP and general education students in language arts literacy and math. The study's main findings include: (1) From 2002/03 to 2008/09, LEP student…

  7. Quantum limits on the detection sensitivity of a linear detector with feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang

    2017-03-01

    We show that the detection sensitivity of a linear detector is lower bounded by some quantum limits. For the force sensitivity, which is relevant for atomic force microscopes, the lower bound is given by the so-called ultimate quantum limit (UQL). For the displacement sensitivity, which is relevant for detecting gravitational waves, a generalized lower bound that can overcome the usual UQL is obtained.

  8. METHODS OF DEALING WITH VALUES BELOW THE LIMIT OF DETECTION USING SAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to limitations of chemical analysis procedures, small values cannot be precisely measured. These values are said to be below the limit of detection (LOD). In statistical analyses, these values are often censored and substituted with a constant value, such as half the LOD,...

  9. Modeling of a Single-Notch Microfiber Coupler for High-Sensitivity and Low Detection-Limit Refractive Index Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiali; Shi, Lei; Zhu, Song; Xu, Xinbiao; Zhang, Xinliang

    2016-01-01

    A highly sensitive refractive index sensor with low detection limit based on an asymmetric optical microfiber coupler is proposed. It is composed of a silica optical microfiber and an As2Se3 optical microfiber. Due to the asymmetry of the microfiber materials, a single-notch transmission spectrum is demonstrated by the large refractive index difference between the two optical microfibers. Compared with the symmetric coupler, the bandwidth of the asymmetric structure is over one order of magnitude narrower than that of the former. Therefore, the asymmetric optical microfiber coupler based sensor can reach over one order of magnitude smaller detection limit, which is defined as the minimal detectable refractive index change caused by the surrounding analyte. With the advantage of large evanescent field, the results also show that a sensitivity of up to 3212 nm per refractive index unit with a bandwidth of 12 nm is achieved with the asymmetric optical microfiber coupler. Furthermore, a maximum sensitivity of 4549 nm per refractive index unit can be reached while the radii of the silica optical microfiber and As2Se3 optical microfiber are 0.5 μm and a 0.128 μm, respectively. This sensor component may have important potential for low detection-limit physical and biochemical sensing applications. PMID:27187386

  10. Strategies and limitations for fluorescence detection of XAFS at high flux beamlines

    DOE PAGES

    Heald, Steve M.

    2015-02-17

    The issue of detecting the XAFS signal from dilute samples is discussed in detail with the aim of making best use of high flux beamlines that provide up to 1013photons-1. Various detection methods are compared, including filters with slits, solid state detectors, crystal analyzers and combinations of these. These comparisons rely on simulations that use experimentally determined parameters. It is found that inelastic scattering places a fundamental limit on detection, and that it is important to take proper account of the polarization dependence of the signals. The combination of a filter–slit system with a solid state detector is a promisingmore » approach. With an optimized system good performance can be obtained even if the total count rate is limited to 107Hz. Detection schemes with better energy resolution can help at the largest dilutions if their collection efficiency and count rate limits can be improved.« less

  11. Strategies and limitations for fluorescence detection of XAFS at high flux beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Heald, Steve M.

    2015-02-17

    The issue of detecting the XAFS signal from dilute samples is discussed in detail with the aim of making best use of high flux beamlines that provide up to 1013photons-1. Various detection methods are compared, including filters with slits, solid state detectors, crystal analyzers and combinations of these. These comparisons rely on simulations that use experimentally determined parameters. It is found that inelastic scattering places a fundamental limit on detection, and that it is important to take proper account of the polarization dependence of the signals. The combination of a filter–slit system with a solid state detector is a promising approach. With an optimized system good performance can be obtained even if the total count rate is limited to 107Hz. Detection schemes with better energy resolution can help at the largest dilutions if their collection efficiency and count rate limits can be improved.

  12. Analytical Method and Detection Limit Studies for Detection of GB in GB Hydrolysate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    performed at pH 8 and room temperature with a J 50:2 hydrolysate:solvent ratio. Extraction recoveries are listed in Table 13. Hexane and isooctane were...22 Solvent Extraction Efficiency Chloroform 50% Methylene Chloride 49 % Hexane 5 % Isooctane None detected Previous studies have indicated that GB

  13. Estimating the resolution limit of the map equation in community detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Tatsuro; Rosvall, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A community detection algorithm is considered to have a resolution limit if the scale of the smallest modules that can be resolved depends on the size of the analyzed subnetwork. The resolution limit is known to prevent some community detection algorithms from accurately identifying the modular structure of a network. In fact, any global objective function for measuring the quality of a two-level assignment of nodes into modules must have some sort of resolution limit or an external resolution parameter. However, it is yet unknown how the resolution limit affects the so-called map equation, which is known to be an efficient objective function for community detection. We derive an analytical estimate and conclude that the resolution limit of the map equation is set by the total number of links between modules instead of the total number of links in the full network as for modularity. This mechanism makes the resolution limit much less restrictive for the map equation than for modularity; in practice, it is orders of magnitudes smaller. Furthermore, we argue that the effect of the resolution limit often results from shoehorning multilevel modular structures into two-level descriptions. As we show, the hierarchical map equation effectively eliminates the resolution limit for networks with nested multilevel modular structures.

  14. The Effect of Error Correction vs. Error Detection on Iranian Pre-Intermediate EFL Learners' Writing Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abedi, Razie; Latifi, Mehdi; Moinzadeh, Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    This study tries to answer some ever-existent questions in writing fields regarding approaching the most effective ways to give feedback to students' errors in writing by comparing the effect of error correction and error detection on the improvement of students' writing ability. In order to achieve this goal, 60 pre-intermediate English learners…

  15. Early breast cancer screening using iron/iron oxide-based nanoplatforms with sub-femtomolar limits of detection

    PubMed Central

    Samarakoon, Thilani N; Yapa, Asanka S; Abayaweera, Gayani; Basel, Matthew T; Maynez, Pamela; Ortega, Raquel; Toledo, Yubisela; Bossmann, Leonie; Robinson, Colette; Janik, Katharine E; Koper, Olga B; Li, Ping; Motamedi, Massoud; Higgins, Daniel A; Gadbury, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Summary Proteases, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), tissue serine proteases, and cathepsins (CTS) exhibit numerous functions in tumor biology. Solid tumors are characterized by changes in protease expression levels by tumor and surrounding tissue. Therefore, monitoring protease levels in tissue samples and liquid biopsies is a vital strategy for early cancer detection. Water-dispersable Fe/Fe3O4-core/shell based nanoplatforms for protease detection are capable of detecting protease activity down to sub-femtomolar limits of detection. They feature one dye (tetrakis(carboxyphenyl)porphyrin (TCPP)) that is tethered to the central nanoparticle by means of a protease-cleavable consensus sequence and a second dye (Cy 5.5) that is directly linked. Based on the protease activities of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), MMPs 1, 2, 3, 7, 9, and 13, as well as CTS B and L, human breast cancer can be detected at stage I by means of a simple serum test. By monitoring CTS B and L stage 0 detection may be achieved. This initial study, comprised of 46 breast cancer patients and 20 apparently healthy human subjects, demonstrates the feasibility of protease-activity-based liquid biopsies for early cancer diagnosis. PMID:27335730

  16. Limit of detection of 15{sub N} by gas-chromatography atomic emission detection: Optimization using an experimental design

    SciTech Connect

    Deruaz, D.; Bannier, A.; Pionchon, C.

    1995-08-01

    This paper deals with the optimal conditions for the detection of {sup 15}N determined using a four-factor experimental design from [2{sup 13}C,-1,3 {sup 15}N] caffeine measured with an atomic emission detector (AED) coupled to gas chromatography (GC). Owing to the capability of a photodiodes array, AED can simultaneously detect several elements using their specific emission lines within a wavelength range of 50 nm. So, the emissions of {sup 15}N and {sup 14}N are simultaneously detected at 420.17 nm and 421.46 nm respectively. Four independent experimental factors were tested (1) helium flow rate (plasma gas); (2) methane pressure (reactant gas); (3) oxygen pressure; (4) hydrogen pressure. It has been shown that these four gases had a significant influence on the analytical response of {sup 15}N. The linearity of the detection was determined using {sup 15}N amounts ranging from 1.52 pg to 19 ng under the optimal conditions obtained from the experimental design. The limit of detection was studied using different methods. The limits of detection of {sup 15}N was 1.9 pg/s according to the IUPAC method (International-Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry). The method proposed by Quimby and Sullivan gave a value of 2.3 pg/s and that of Oppenheimer gave a limit of 29 pg/s. For each determination, and internal standard: 1-isobutyl-3.7 dimethylxanthine was used. The results clearly demonstrate that GC AED is sensitive and selective enough to detect and measure {sup 15}N-labelled molecules after gas chromatographic separation.

  17. Hydrazine detection limits in the cigarette smoke matrix using infrared tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Plunkett, Susan; Parrish, Milton E; Shafer, Kenneth H; Shorter, Joanne H; Nelson, David D; Zahniser, Mark S

    2002-09-01

    Infrared absorption lines of hydrazine are broad and typically not baseline resolved, with line strengths approximately 100 times weaker than the more widely studied compound ammonia. Hardware and software improvements have been made to a two-color infrared tunable diode laser (IR-TDL) spectrometer in order to improve the limit of detection (LOD) of hydrazine (N2H4) in the cigarette smoke matrix. The detection limit in the smoke matrix was improved from 25 parts-per-million-by-volume (ppmv) to 4.2 ppmv using a 100 m pathlength cell with acquisition of background spectra immediately prior to each sample and 100 ms temporal resolution. This study did not detect hydrazine in cigarette smoke in the 964.4-964.9 cm(-1) spectral region, after mathematically subtracting the spectral contributions of ethylene, ammonia, carbon dioxide, methanol, acrolein, and acetaldehyde. These compounds are found in cigarette smoke and absorb in this spectral region. The LOD is limited by remaining spectral structure from unidentified smoke species. The pseudo random noise (root mean square) in the improved instrument was 2 x 10(-4) absorbance units (base e) which is equivalent to a 0.09 ppmv hydrazine gas sample in the multipass cell. This would correspond to a detection limit of 0.44 ppmv of hydrazine, given the dilution of the smoke by a factor of 5 by the sampling system. This is a factor of 10 less than the 4.2 ppmv detection limit for hydrazine in the smoke matrix, and indicates that the detection limit is primarily a result of the complexity of the matrix rather than the random noise of the TDL instrument.

  18. Limits of passive remote detection of hazardous vapors by computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanigan, Dennis F.

    1996-06-01

    Passive infrared is an emerging method for the remote detection of hazardous vapors particularly where warning is the primary consideration. Detection of gases, vapors and aerosols is based on the difference, (Delta) T), between the temperature of the target cloud and the effective radiometric temperature of the background. Computer simulation of spectra has been used to predict the detection limits for several target gases with a low angle sky background. The simulation is based on a 3 layer model that uses MODTRAN, which includes 6 standard atmospheric models, to compute background radiance and atmospheric transmittance. The detection limits, at 2 cm-1 resolution, for sulfur hexafluoride (simulant), Sarin, trichlorethylene, methyl isocyanate (the Bhopal gas), mustard gas, methyl chloride, and sulfur dioxide are discussed for selected cases with the U.S. Standard, and the sub-arctic winter and the tropical models. In this paper the method is illustrated with methyl isocyanate.

  19. Method for improving the limit of detection in a data signal

    DOEpatents

    Synovec, Robert E.; Yueng, Edward S.

    1989-10-17

    A method for improving the limit of detection for a data set in which experimental noise is uncorrelated along a given abscissa and an analytical signal is correlated to the abscissa, the steps comprising collecting the data set, converting the data set into a data signal including an analytical portion and the experimental noise portion, designating and adjusting a baseline of the data signal to center the experimental noise numerically about a zero reference, and integrating the data signal preserving the corresponding information for each point of the data signal. The steps of the method produce an enhanced integrated data signal which improves the limit of detection of the data signal.

  20. Limit of detection of field effect transistor biosensors: Effects of surface modification and size dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Nitin K.; Brower, Kara; Duan, Xuexin; Reed, Mark A.

    2014-02-01

    Field-effect transistor biosensors have shown great promise in the detection of biomolecules. However, a quantitative understanding of what limits the smallest measurable concentration of analyte (limit of detection or LOD) is still missing. By considering the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), extracted from a combination of noise and I-V characterization, we are able to accurately predict and experimentally confirm a LOD of 0.01 pH. Our results also show that devices with larger area and with amine functionalized surfaces have larger SNR. We are able to extract the associated oxide trap densities and, thus, quantify the improvements in LOD.

  1. Double-well atom trap for fluorescence detection at the Heisenberg limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroescu, Ion; Hume, David B.; Oberthaler, Markus K.

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an atom number detector capable of simultaneous detection of two mesoscopic ensembles with single-atom resolution. Such a sensitivity is a prerequisite for quantum metrology at a precision approaching the Heisenberg limit. Our system is based on fluorescence detection of atoms in a hybrid trap in which a dipole barrier divides a magneto-optical trap into two separated wells. We introduce a noise model describing the various sources contributing to the measurement error and report a limit of up to 500 atoms for single-atom resolution in the atom number difference.

  2. Reliability, detection limit and depth resolution of the elastic recoil measurement of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisao, Nagai; Shigeki, Hayashi; Michi, Aratani; Tadashi, Nozaki; Minoru, Yanokura; Isao, Kohno; Osamu, Kuboi; Yoshifumi, Yatsurugi

    1987-08-01

    Reliability, detection limit and depth resolution were studied in the elastic recoil measurement of hydrogen mainly in silicon compounds by bombardment with argon ions accelerated up to 50 MeV. For the quantitative determination of hydrogen, recoil silicon atoms proved to serve satisfactorily as an internal monitor. The detection limit was shown to be about 1 to 2×10 12 (atoms/cm 2 for hydrogen on surface and about 1 wt. ppm for hydrogen in bulk. The depth resolution was found to be about 50 nm in most silicon compounds.

  3. Gravitational radiation detection with spacecraft Doppler tracking - Limiting sensitivities and prospective missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estabrook, F. B.; Hellings, R. W.; Wahlquist, H. D.; Wolff, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    The prospects of using spacecraft Doppler tracking, in NASA missions, for the detection of gravitational waves are examined. The sensitivity limits of such detection are characterized in terms of plasma scintillation, troposphere scintillation, receiver noise, MDA and ODA quantization error, and clock jitter. Current and possible future NASA missions that will involve gravitational wave experiments are briefly reviewed, including the Galileo, solar polar, Halley/Tempel-2, and solar probe missions.

  4. Determination of Detection Limits and Quantitation Limits for Compounds in a Database of GC/MS by FUMI Theory

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Shinya; Hayashi, Yuzuru

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a stochastic method for estimating the detection limits (DLs) and quantitation limits (QLs) of compounds registered in a database of a GC/MS system and prove its validity with experiments. The approach described in ISO 11843 Part 7 is adopted here as an estimation means of DL and QL, and the decafluorotriphenylphosphine (DFTPP) tuning and retention time locking are carried out for adjusting the system. Coupled with the data obtained from the system adjustment experiments, the information (noise and signal of chromatograms and calibration curves) stored in the database is used for the stochastic estimation, dispensing with the repetition measurements. Of sixty-six pesticides, the DL values obtained by the ISO method were compared with those from the statistical approach and the correlation between them was observed to be excellent with the correlation coefficient of 0.865. The accuracy of the method proposed was also examined and concluded to be satisfactory as well. The samples used are commercial products of pesticides mixtures and the uncertainty from sample preparation processes is not taken into account. PMID:27162706

  5. Limits on Achievable Dimensional and Photon Efficiencies with Intensity-Modulation and Photon-Counting Due to Non-Ideal Photon-Counter Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moision, Bruce; Erkmen, Baris I.; Farr, William; Dolinar, Samuel J.; Birnbaum, Kevin M.

    2012-01-01

    An ideal intensity-modulated photon-counting channel can achieve unbounded photon information efficiencies (PIEs). However, a number of limitations of a physical system limit the practically achievable PIE. In this paper, we discuss several of these limitations and illustrate their impact on the channel. We show that, for the Poisson channel, noise does not strictly bound PIE, although there is an effective limit, as the dimensional information efficiency goes as e[overline] e PIE beyond a threshold PIE. Since the Holevo limit is bounded in the presence of noise, this illustrates that the Poisson approximation is invalid at large PIE for any number of noise modes. We show that a finite transmitter extinction ratio bounds the achievable PIE to a maximum that is logarithmic in the extinction ratio. We show how detector jitter limits the ability to mitigate noise in the PPM signaling framework. We illustrate a method to model detector blocking when the number of detectors is large, and illustrate mitigation of blocking with spatial spreading and altering. Finally, we illustrate the design of a high photon efficiency system using state-of-the-art photo-detectors and taking all these effects into account.

  6. Displacement response, detection limit, and dynamic range of fiber-optic lever sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Gang; Cuomo, Frank W.

    1991-01-01

    The authors present the evaluation of the displacement response, detection limit, and dynamic range of fiber-optic lever sensors in a general format to establish their dependence on fiber sizes, optoelectronic detector specifications, input power, and other relevant parameters. The formations for the normalized reflected optical power change are derived for the evaluation of the optimal sensor response, the linearity range, and the minimum detectable displacement. The theoretical models are verified by an experiment which determines sensor response, modulation index, reflected optical power change, and linear response range through dynamic measurement. The application of this theoretical model to the study of a fiber-optic microphone for acoustic pressure detection is considered.

  7. Effects of Semantic Ambiguity Detection Training on Reading Comprehension Achievement of English Learners with Learning Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jozwik, Sara L.; Douglas, Karen H.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined how explicit instruction in semantic ambiguity detection affected the reading comprehension and metalinguistic awareness of five English learners (ELs) with learning difficulties (e.g., attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, specific learning disability). A multiple probe across participants design (Gast & Ledford, 2010)…

  8. Effective Partnering of State Agencies to Achieve Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Benchmarks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corwin, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    Relative to Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI), New Mexico struggles with multiple points of referral into early intervention in the same way most states do. Referrals are not systematized through a single point of entry. The Step*Hi (statewide Parent-Infant) Program of the New Mexico School for the Deaf (NMSD) receives referrals from…

  9. Approaches to Improving the Lower Detection Limit of Polymeric Membrane Ion-Selective Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Szigeti, Zsófia; Vigassy, Tamás; Bakker, Eric; Pretsch, Ernö

    2010-01-01

    More than ten different approaches for improving the lower detection limit of polymeric membrane ion-selective electrodes have been suggested during the recent years. In this contribution, their principles are briefly summarized with a focus to their general practical applicability. The methods that are the most rugged and the easiest to implement in a routine laboratory will be highlighted. PMID:20336172

  10. ROBUST ESTIMATION OF MEAN AND VARIANCE USING ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SETS WITH BELOW DETECTION LIMIT OBSERVATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scientists, especially environmental scientists often encounter trace level concentrations that are typically reported as less than a certain limit of detection, L. Type 1, left-censored data arise when certain low values lying below L are ignored or unknown as they cannot be mea...

  11. The detection limits of antimicrobial agents in cow's milk by a simple Yoghurt Culture Test.

    PubMed

    Mohsenzadeh, M; Bahrainipour, A

    2008-09-15

    The aim of this study was to study performance of Yoghurt Culture Test (YCT) in the detection of antimicrobial residues in milk. For this purpose, the sensitivity of YCT for 15 antibiotics were determined. For each drug, 8 concentrations were tested. The detection limits of YCT at 2.5 h and 4 h incubation were determined (microg kg(-1)): 15 and 37.5, penicillin G; 4 and 5, ampicillin; 5 and 7.5, amoxycillin; 100 and 200, cephalexin; 80 and 100, cefazoline; 100 and 200, oxytetracycline; 500 and 100, chlortetracycline; 100 and 200, tetracycline; 150 and 200, doxycycline; 200 and 400, sulphadimidine; 500 and 1000, gentamycin; 1000 and 1500, spectinomycin; 400 and 500, erythromycin; 50 and 100, tylosin; 5000 and 10000, chloramphenicol. The YCT detection limits at 2.5 h incubation for ampicillin, cephalexin, tetracycline, oxytetracycline and tylosin are similar to those obtained as Maximum Residue Limit (MRL) according to Regulation 2377/90 EEC as set out by the European Union. In addition the detection limits of YCT for some antibiotics were lower than some of microbial inhibitor test.

  12. Native Language Proficiency, English Literacy, Academic Achievement, and Occupational Attainment in Limited-English-Proficient Students: A Latent Growth Modeling Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guglielmi, R. Sergio

    2008-01-01

    The hypothesis that native language (L1) proficiency promotes English acquisition and overall academic achievement, a key theoretical assumption underlying bilingual education, was tested using latent growth modeling of data from 899 limited-English-proficient (LEP) eighth graders who were followed for 12 years in the National Education…

  13. Theoretical detection limits of magnetic biobarcode sensors and the phase space of nanobiosensing.

    PubMed

    Nair, Pradeep R; Alam, Muhammad A

    2010-11-01

    A scaling theory of the sub atto-molar (aM) detection limits of magnetic particle (MP) based biosensors (e.g., bio-barcode assays) is developed and discussed. Despite the dramatic differences of sensing protocols and detection limits, the MP-based sensors can be interpreted within the same theoretical framework as any other classical biosensor (e.g., nanowire sensors), except that these sensors are differentiated by the geometry of diffusion and the probe (ρ(MP))/target (ρ(T)) density ratio. Our model predicts two regimes for biomolecule detection: For classical biosensors with ρ(MP) ≤ ρ(T), the response time t(s) proportional to 1/ρ(T); while for MP-based biosensors with ρ(MP) > ρ(T), t(s) proportional to 1/ρ(MP). The theory (i) explains the performance improvement of MP-sensors by ρ(MP)/ρ(T) (order of 10(3)-10(6)), broadly validating the sub-aM detection limits reported in literature, (ii) offers intuitive interpretation for the counter-intuitive ρ(T)-independence of detection time in MP-sensors, (iii) shows that statistical fluctuations should reduce with ρ(T) for MP sensors, and (iv) offers obvious routes to sensitivity improvement of classical sensors.

  14. Detection limits of antimicrobials in ewe milk by delvotest photometric measurements.

    PubMed

    Althaus, R L; Torres, A; Montero, A; Balasch, S; Molina, M P

    2003-02-01

    The Delvotest method detection limits per manufacturer's instructions at a fixed reading time of 3 h for 24 antimicrobial agents were determined in ewe milk by photometric measurement. For each drug, eight concentrations were tested on 20 ewe milk samples from individual ewes. Detection limits, determined by means of logistic regression models, were (microg/kg): 3, amoxycillin; 2, ampicillin; 18, cloxacillin; 1, penicillin "G"; 34, cefadroxil; 430, cephalosporin "C"; 40, cephalexin; 20, cefoperazone; 33, Ceftiofur; 18, cefuroxime; 6100, streptomycin; 1200, gentamycin; 2600, neomycin; 830, erythromycin; 100, tylosin; 180, doxycycline; 320, oxytetracycline; 590, tetracycline; 88, sulfadiazine; 44, sulfamethoxazole; 140, sulfametoxypyridazine; 48, sulfaquinoxaline; 12,000, chloramphenicol; and 290, trimethoprim. Whereas the beta-lactam antibiotics, sulphonamides, and tylosin were detected by Delvotest method at levels equal to those of maximum residue limits, its sensitivity needs to be enhanced to detect aminoglycosides, tetracyclines, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, and trimethoprim residues in ewe milk or to develop an integrated residue detection system for ewe milk with different sensitive microorganisms for each group of antiinfectious agents.

  15. Detection limit of Clostridium botulinum spores in dried mushroom samples sourced from China.

    PubMed

    Malakar, Pradeep K; Plowman, June; Aldus, Clare F; Xing, Zengtao; Zhao, Yong; Peck, Michael W

    2013-08-16

    A survey of dried mushrooms (Lentinula edodes (Shiitake) and Auricularia auricula (Wood Ear)) sourced from China was carried out to determine the natural contamination of these mushrooms with spores of proteolytic Clostridium botulinum and non-proteolytic C. botulinum. The mushrooms were collected from supermarkets and retailers in 21 cities in China during October 2008. Spore loads of C. botulinum in mushrooms have a degree of uncertainty and variability and this study contributes valuable data for determining prevalence of spores of C. botulinum in mushrooms. An optimized detection protocol that combined selective enrichment culture with multiplex PCR was used to test for spores of proteolytic and non-proteolytic C. botulinum. Detection limits were calculated, using a maximum likelihood protocol, from mushroom samples inoculated with defined numbers of spores of proteolytic C. botulinum or non-proteolytic C. botulinum. Based on the maximum likelihood detection limit, it is estimated that dried mushroom A. auricula contained <550spores/kg of proteolytic C. botulinum, and <350spores/kg of non-proteolytic C. botulinum. Dried L. edodes contained <1500spores/kg of proteolytic C. botulinum and it was not possible to determine reliable detection limits for spores of non-proteolytic C. botulinum using the current detection protocol.

  16. Closing the Achievement Gap: How To Reach Limited-Formal-Schooling and Long-Term English Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Yvonne S.; Freeman, David E.

    This book reviews the research on effective practices for older English learners. It is intended for teachers, program directors, resource personnel, and administrators who are attempting to meet the needs of older English learners who come to school with limited formal schooling experiences. The book shows how three teachers have put theory into…

  17. Reframing the Conversation about Students with Limited or Interrupted Formal Education: From Achievement Gap to Cultural Dissonance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCapua, Andrea; Marshall, Helaine W.

    2015-01-01

    U.S. schools face increasing pressure to ensure that all students succeed, yet the dropout rate for English learners is alarmingly high, especially for those with limited or interrupted formal schooling (SLIFE). Serving SLIFE can be challenging because they not only need to master language and content but also need to develop literacy skills and…

  18. The limitations of case-control studies in the detection of environmental carcinogens.

    PubMed Central

    Crombie, I K

    1981-01-01

    The ability of the case-control study to detect human carcinogens has been investigated theoretically for varying fractions of the population exposed to hazards carrying different relative risks. The method is shown to be useful for the investigation of factors to which exposure is widespread (for example, common foods or beverages) but it is of limited use for the study of uncommon types of exposure, such as those associated with occupation. The case-control study is unable to detect very small relative risks (less than 1.5) even where exposure is widespread and large numbers of cases of cancer are occurring in the population. The principal limitation of the method is the maximum number of cases which can be recruited and analysed. It will only be through large-scale collaborative multicentre or international studies that important risk factors will be detected. PMID:7338704

  19. Accounting for Limited Detection Efficiency and Localization Precision in Cluster Analysis in Single Molecule Localization Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shivanandan, Arun; Unnikrishnan, Jayakrishnan; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Single Molecule Localization Microscopy techniques like PhotoActivated Localization Microscopy, with their sub-diffraction limit spatial resolution, have been popularly used to characterize the spatial organization of membrane proteins, by means of quantitative cluster analysis. However, such quantitative studies remain challenged by the techniques’ inherent sources of errors such as a limited detection efficiency of less than 60%, due to incomplete photo-conversion, and a limited localization precision in the range of 10 – 30nm, varying across the detected molecules, mainly depending on the number of photons collected from each. We provide analytical methods to estimate the effect of these errors in cluster analysis and to correct for them. These methods, based on the Ripley’s L(r) – r or Pair Correlation Function popularly used by the community, can facilitate potentially breakthrough results in quantitative biology by providing a more accurate and precise quantification of protein spatial organization. PMID:25794150

  20. Limited knowledge of fraction representations differentiates middle school students with mathematics learning disability (dyscalculia) versus low mathematics achievement.

    PubMed

    Mazzocco, Michèle M M; Myers, Gwen F; Lewis, Katherine E; Hanich, Laurie B; Murphy, Melissa M

    2013-06-01

    Fractions pose significant challenges for many children, but for some children those challenges persist into high school. Here we administered a fractions magnitude comparison test to 122 children, from Grades 4 to 8, to test whether their knowledge of fractions typically learned early in the sequence of formal math instruction (e.g., fractions equivalent to one-half, fraction pairs with common denominators) differentiates those with mathematics learning disability (MLD) versus low achievement (LA) or typical achievement (TA) in mathematics and whether long-term learning trajectories of this knowledge also differentiate these groups. We confirmed that although fourth graders with TA (n=93) were more accurate in evaluating "one-half" fractions than in evaluating "non-half" fractions (until they reached ceiling performance levels on both types of fractions), children with MLD (n=11) did not show a one-half advantage until Grade 7 and did not reach ceiling performance even by Grade 8. Both the MLD and LA groups had early difficulties with fractions, but by Grade 5 the LA group approached performance levels of the TA group and deviated from the MLD group. All groups showed a visual model advantage over Arabic number representation of fractions, but this advantage was short-lived for the TA group (because ceiling level was achieved across formats), whereas it was slightly more persistent for the LA group and persisted through Grade 8 for children with MLD. Thus, difficulties with fractions persist through Grade 8 for many students, but the nature and trajectories of those difficulties vary across children with math difficulties (MLD or LA).

  1. Determination of target detection limits in hyperspectral data using band selection and dimensionality reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, W.; Boehler, J.; Twizer, K.; Kedem, B.; Lenz, A.; Kneubuehler, M.; Wellig, P.; Oechslin, R.; Schilling, H.; Rotman, S.; Middelmann, W.

    2016-10-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing data can be used for civil and military applications to robustly detect and classify target objects. High spectral resolution of hyperspectral data can compensate for the comparatively low spatial resolution, which allows for detection and classification of small targets, even below image resolution. Hyperspectral data sets are prone to considerable spectral redundancy, affecting and limiting data processing and algorithm performance. As a consequence, data reduction strategies become increasingly important, especially in view of near-real-time data analysis. The goal of this paper is to analyze different strategies for hyperspectral band selection algorithms and their effect on subpixel classification for different target and background materials. Airborne hyperspectral data is used in combination with linear target simulation procedures to create a representative amount of target-to-background ratios for evaluation of detection limits. Data from two different airborne hyperspectral sensors, AISA Eagle and Hawk, are used to evaluate transferability of band selection when using different sensors. The same target objects were recorded to compare the calculated detection limits. To determine subpixel classification results, pure pixels from the target materials are extracted and used to simulate mixed pixels with selected background materials. Target signatures are linearly combined with different background materials in varying ratios. The commonly used classification algorithms Adaptive Coherence Estimator (ACE) is used to compare the detection limit for the original data with several band selection and data reduction strategies. The evaluation of the classification results is done by assuming a fixed false alarm ratio and calculating the mean target-to-background ratio of correctly detected pixels. The results allow drawing conclusions about specific band combinations for certain target and background combinations. Additionally

  2. Detection limits of the strip test and PCR for genetically modified corn in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, V E; Von Pinho, É V R; Von Pinho, R G; do Nascimento, A D

    2012-08-16

    Brazilian legislation establishes a labeling limit for products that contain more than 1% material from genetically modified organisms (GMOs). We assessed the sensitivity of the lateral flow strip test in detection of the GMO corn varieties Bt11 and MON810 and the specificity and sensitivity of PCR techniques for their detection. For the strip test, the GMO seeds were mixed with conventional seeds at levels of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8% for Bt11, and 0.4, 0.8 and 1.6% for MON810. Three different methodologies were assessed and whole seeds, their endosperm and embryonic axis were used. For the PCR technique, the GMO seeds of each of the two varieties were mixed with conventional seeds at levels of 20, 10, 5, 2, 1, and 0.5%. The seeds were ground and the DNA extracted. For detection of the GMO material, specific primers were used for MON810 and Bt11 and maize zein as an endogenous control. The sensitivity of the strip test varied for both maize varieties and methodologies. The test was positive for Bt11 only at 0.8%, in contrast with the detection limit of 0.4% indicated by the manufacturer. In the multiplex PCR, the primers proved to be specific for the different varieties. These varieties were detected in samples with one GMO seed in 100. Thus, this technique proved to be efficient in detecting contaminations equal to or greater than 1%.

  3. 1010 Amplification and phase conjugation with high efficiency achieved by overcoming noise limitations in Brillouin two-beam coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Yaakov; Sternklar, Shmuel

    1995-06-01

    A model incorporating noise and pump depletion in a Brillouin amplifier (BA) predicts a fundamental limitation on attainable pump-to-signal-ratio extraction efficiency. Experimental data supporting this model are also presented. In spite of the limitation, an experimental technique is shown that results in a factor-of-7 increase in extraction efficiency. We accomplish this by noise suppressing and subsequently double passing a BA. We report an overall power efficiency of 37% and phase-conjugate amplification of 3.75 \\times 1010 for a signal input power near the noise level. This performance, which is the best to our knowledge recorded to date, is accomplished without requiring additional input energy.

  4. Inclusivity, exclusivity and limit of detection of commercially available real-time PCR assays for the detection of Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Margot, H; Stephan, R; Guarino, S; Jagadeesan, B; Chilton, D; O'Mahony, E; Iversen, C

    2013-08-01

    The traditional cultural detection of Salmonella spp. is both time- and labour-intensive. Salmonella is often a release criterion for the food industry and time to result is therefore an important factor. Storage of finished products and raw materials can be costly and may adversely impact available shelf-life. The application of real-time PCR for the detection of Salmonella spp. in food samples enables a potential time-saving of up to four days. The advancement of real-time PCR coupled with the development of commercially available systems in different formats has made this technology accessible for laboratories in an industrial environment. Ideally these systems are reliable and rapid as well as easy to use. The current study represents a comparative evaluation of seven commercial real-time PCR systems for the detection of Salmonella. Forty-nine target and twenty-nine non-target strains were included in the study to assess inclusivity and exclusivity. The limit of detection for each of the method was determined in four different food products. All systems evaluated were able to correctly identify the 49 Salmonella strains. Nevertheless, false positive results (Citrobacter spp.) were obtained with four of the seven systems. In milk powder and bouillon powder, the limit of detection was similar for all systems, suggesting a minimal matrix effect with these samples. Conversely, for black tea and cocoa powder some systems were prone to inhibition from matrix components. Up to 100% of the samples were inhibited using the proprietary extracts but inhibition could be reduced considerably by application of a DNA clean-up kit.

  5. In-depth Evaluation of Content-Based Phishing Detection to Clarify Its Strengths and Limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komiyama, Koichiro; Seko, Toshinori; Ichinose, Yusuke; Kato, Kei; Kawano, Kohei; Yoshiura, Hiroshi

    Zhang et al. proposed a method for content-based phishing detection (CBD) and reported its high performance in detecting phishing sites written in English. However, the evaluations of the CBD method performed by Zhang et al. and others were small-scale and simply measured the detection and error rates, i.e, they did not analyze the causes of the detection errors. Moreover, the effectiveness of the CBD method with non-English sites, such as Japanese and Chinese language sites, has never been tested. This paper reports our in-depth evaluation and analysis of the CBD method using 843 actual phishing sites (including 475 English and 368 Japanese sites), and explains both the strengths of the CBD method and its limitations. Our work provides a base for using the CBD method in the real world.

  6. Signal averaging limitations in heterodyne- and direct-detection laser remote sensing measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menyuk, N.; Killinger, D. K.; Menyuk, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The improvement in measurement uncertainty brought about by the averaging of increasing numbers of pulse return signals in both heterodyne- and direct-detection lidar systems is investigated. A theoretical analysis is presented which shows the standard deviation of the mean measurement to decrease as the inverse square root of the number of measurements, except in the presence of temporal correlation. Experimental measurements based on a dual-hybrid-TEA CO2 laser differential absorption lidar system are reported which demonstrate that the actual reduction in the standard deviation of the mean in both heterodyne- and direct-detection systems is much slower than the inverse square-root dependence predicted for uncorrelated signals, but is in agreement with predictions in the event of temporal correlation. Results thus favor the use of direct detection at relatively short range where the lower limit of the standard deviation of the mean is about 2 percent, but advantages of heterodyne detection at longer ranges are noted.

  7. Polymeric ion sensors with multiple detection modes achieved by a new type of click chemistry reaction.

    PubMed

    Michinobu, Tsuyoshi; Li, Yongrong; Hyakutake, Tsuyoshi

    2013-02-28

    The rapid growth of the click chemistry concept enables the production of a wide variety of functional polymers. Among the new generation of click chemistry reactions, the highly efficient addition reactions between electron-rich alkynes and cyano-based acceptors, referred to as alkyne-acceptor click chemistry, have found promising application possibilities as polymeric chemosensors. The donor-acceptor chromophores, formed by this click chemistry reaction, feature intense charge-transfer (CT) bands in the visible region, but they are hardly fluorescent. Importantly, the chromophores possess two different nitrogen atoms, namely the aniline nitrogen and cyano nitrogen. The recognition of some specific metal cations by different nitrogen atoms in the polymers led to different modes of changes in the absorption spectra. For example, the hard acid of Fe(3+) ion was recognized by the aniline nitrogen, resulting in a decrease in the CT bands. On the other hand, the soft acid of the Ag(+) ion was captured by the cyano nitrogen, leading to a bathochromic shift in the CT bands. Some specific anions, such as CN(-), F(-), and I(-) ions, were also recognized by a chemodocimetric detection mode, discoloring the original solutions. When the CT bands decreased upon the addition of analytes, the polymers were found to serve as turn-on fluorescent sensors. In this perspective, the detailed detection modes of the new polymeric chemosensors are fully described.

  8. Advantages, limitations, and diagnostic accuracy of photoscreeners in early detection of amblyopia: a review

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Irene; Ortiz-Toquero, Sara; Martin, Raul; de Juan, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Amblyopia detection is important to ensure proper visual development and avoid permanent decrease of visual acuity. This condition does not produce symptoms, so it is difficult to diagnose if a vision problem actually exists. However, because amblyopia treatment is limited by age, early diagnosis is of paramount relevance. Traditional vision screening (conducted in <3 years) is related with difficulty in getting cooperation from a subject to conduct the eye exam, so accurate objective methods to improve amblyopia detection are necessary. Handheld devices used for photoscreening or autorefraction could offer advantages to improve amblyopia screening because they reduce exploration time to just few seconds, no subject collaboration is needed, and they provide objective information. The purpose of this review is to summarize the main functions and clinical applicability of commercially available devices for early detection of amblyopia and to describe their differences, advantages, and limitations. Although the studies reviewed are heterogeneous (due to wide differences in referral criteria, use of different risk factors, different types of samples studied, etc), these devices provide objective measures in a quick and objective way with a simple outcome report: retest, pass, or refer. However, due to major limitations, these devices are not recommended, and their use in clinical practice is limited. PMID:27555744

  9. A new design approach to achieve a minimum impulse limit cycle in the presence of significant measurement uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, M. W.; Kubiak, E. T.

    1982-01-01

    A new design was developed for the Space Shuttle Transition Phase Digital Autopilot to reduce the impact of large measurement uncertainties in the rate signal during attitude control. The signal source, which was dictated by early computer constraints, is characterized by large quantization, noise, bias, and transport lag which produce a measurement uncertainty larger than the minimum impulse rate change. To ensure convergence to a minimum impulse limit cycle, the design employed bias and transport lag compensation and a switching logic with hysteresis, rate deadzone, and 'walking' switching line. The design background, the rate measurement uncertainties, and the design solution are documented.

  10. Limits imposed by solenoid damage on the maximum velocity achieved by an electromagnetic coilgun: A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhavan, S.; Sijoy, C. D.; Pahari, S.; Chaturvedi, S.

    2012-06-01

    CAD has set up an electromagnetic acceleration and impact facility for studies of material fracture and deformation at high strain rates. The target is to reach projectile velocities of 200-500 m/s. The mechanical strength of the solenoid coil and potting material is an important factor affecting coil survival during experiments. We have performed a computational study, using the materials and coil and circuit parameters typically used in experiments, and found the operating limits up to which the coil can survive without breaking.

  11. Detecting terrestrial nutrient limitation: a global meta-analysis of foliar nutrient concentrations after fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostertag, Rebecca; DiManno, Nicole

    2016-03-01

    Examining foliar nutrient concentrations after fertilization provides an alternative method for detecting nutrient limitation of ecosystems, which is logistically simpler to measure than biomass change. We present a meta-analysis of response ratios of foliar nitrogen and phosphorus (RRN, RRP) after addition of fertilizer of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), or the two elements in combination, in relation to climate, ecosystem type, life form, family, and methodological factors. Results support other meta-analyses using biomass, and demonstrate there is strong evidence for nutrient limitation in natural communities. However, because N fertilization experiments greatly outnumber P fertilization trials, it is difficult to discern the absolute importance of N vs. P vs. co-limitation across ecosystems. Despite these caveats, it is striking that results did not follow "conventional wisdom" that temperate ecosystems are N-limited and tropical ones are P-limited. In addition, the use of ratios of N-to-P rather than response ratios also are a useful index of nutrient limitation, but due to large overlap in values, there are unlikely to be universal cutoff values for delimiting N vs. P limitation. Differences in RRN and RRP were most significant across ecosystem types, plant families, life forms, and between competitive environments, but not across climatic variables.

  12. Detecting single nanomagnet dynamics beyond the diffraction limit in varying magnetostatic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Brandt, R.; Yahagi, Y.; Hansen, B.; Harteneck, B.; Bokor, J.; Hawkins, A. R.; Schmidt, H.

    2011-01-01

    As areal bit density increases, characterizing individual magnetic bits within dense arrays becomes difficult with diffraction-limited optics. We demonstrate that dynamic magneto-optical detection breaks this diffraction limit if the characteristic behavior of a nanomagnet is sufficiently different from its neighbors'. We use far-field time-resolved Kerr microscopy to resolve the high-frequency magnetization dynamics of a single, small (Ø150 nm) nanomagnet within a low-frequency background from an array of large (Ø500 nm) magnets. We use this technique to observe and quantify the effects of magnetostatic interactions on the single magnet dynamics as the intermagnet spacing is varied.

  13. Achieving the Health Care Financing Administration limits by quality improvement and quality control. A real-world example.

    PubMed

    Engebretson, M J; Cembrowski, G S

    1992-07-01

    With the enactment of the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (CLIA 88), the federal government is now using proficiency testing as the primary indicator of laboratory quality. Laboratories with proficiency test failures are now at risk of a variety of harsh penalties including large monetary fines and suspension of operations. To minimize the risk of failed proficiency testing, we initiated a continuous quality improvement program in our general chemistry laboratory in conjunction with the use of a new survey-validated quality control product. This article describes the quality improvement program and our success in reducing the long-term random error in general chemistry. Despite our improvement program, significant analytical errors (greater than 30% of the CLIA limits) still exist in analytes measured by our chemistry analyzer. These errors are present in nearly the same analytes measured by other common chemistry analyzers indicating the need for improvement in their design and manufacture.

  14. Absorber and emitter for solar thermo-photovoltaic systems to achieve efficiency exceeding the Shockley-Queisser limit.

    PubMed

    Rephaeli, Eden; Fan, Shanhui

    2009-08-17

    We present theoretical considerations as well as detailed numerical design of absorber and emitter for Solar Thermophotovoltaics (STPV) applications. The absorber, consisting of an array of tungsten pyramids, was designed to provide near-unity absorptivity over all solar wavelengths for a wide angular range, enabling it to absorb light effectively from solar sources regardless of concentration. The emitter, a tungsten slab with Si/SiO(2) multilayer stack, provides a sharp emissivity peak at the solar cell band-gap while suppressing emission at lower frequencies. We show that, under a suitable light concentration condition, and with a reasonable area ratio between the emitter and absorber, a STPV system employing such absorber-emitter pair and a single-junction solar cell can attain efficiency that exceeds the Shockley-Queisser limit.

  15. Silver nanoparticles for SERS-based ultrasensitive chemical detection in aqueous solutions: Role of binding affinity and surface oxidation in the detection limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erol, Melek

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) in the presence of noble metal nanostructures holds significant promise for sensing and molecular fingerprinting down to single molecule level. This dissertation explores the effect of binding affinity and surface oxidation of Ag nanoparticles on SERS detection sensitivity of SO42-, CN-, SCN-, ClO4- and nitro-aromatic compounds in water. Specifically positively charged Ag nanoparticles (Ag [+]) were synthesized by UV-assisted reduction of silver nitrate using branched polyethyleneimine (BPEI) and 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) solutions. Both primary amino and amide groups on the surface of Ag [+] allowed strong binding affinity with anions, critical for sensitive SERS measurements. For substrates with immobilized Ag [+] (30 nanoparticles/mum2), SERS sensitivity increased in the order of SO42- < CN- < SCN- ≈ ClO4 -, with respective binding constants of 105, 3.3 x 105, and 107 (for both SCN- and ClO4-) M-1. Significantly, substrates with Ag [+] exhibited limit of detection values of 8.0 x 10-8 M (8 ppb) and 2.7 x 10-7 M (7 ppb) for ClO 4- and CN-, respectively. We revealed for the first time that oxidation of negatively charged Ag nanoparticles (Ag [-]) produced by a modified Lee and Meisel procedure drastically altered adsorption and orientation of nitro-aromatic molecules and increased their SERS detection limit. This observation can be attributed to the hinderance of Ag-to-aromatic ring charge transfer by the resultant oxide layer. SERS detection of p-nitrophenol at 1 ppt was achieved through inhibition of oxidation of Ag [-] in argon gas. Finally, to extend our work for potential biosensing applications, we showed that BPEI coatings of high molecular weight were unique in their ability to provide avidin-resistant surfaces at physiological conditions due to steric hindrance from the branched architecture of adsorbed polymer chains. BPEI coated surfaces were also effective for suppression of

  16. A rapid method to achieve aero-engine blade form detection.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bin; Li, Bing

    2015-06-01

    This paper proposes a rapid method to detect aero-engine blade form, according to the characteristics of an aero-engine blade surface. This method first deduces an inclination error model in free-form surface measurements based on the non-contact laser triangulation principle. Then a four-coordinate measuring system was independently developed, a special fixture was designed according to the blade shape features, and a fast measurement of the blade features path was planned. Finally, by using the inclination error model for correction of acquired data, the measurement error that was caused by tilt form is compensated. As a result the measurement accuracy of the Laser Displacement Sensor was less than 10 μm. After the experimental verification, this method makes full use of optical non-contact measurement fast speed, high precision and wide measuring range of features. Using a standard gauge block as a measurement reference, the coordinate system conversion data is simple and practical. It not only improves the measurement accuracy of the blade surface, but also its measurement efficiency. Therefore, this method increases the value of the measurement of complex surfaces.

  17. A Rapid Method to Achieve Aero-Engine Blade Form Detection

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bin; Li, Bing

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a rapid method to detect aero-engine blade form, according to the characteristics of an aero-engine blade surface. This method first deduces an inclination error model in free-form surface measurements based on the non-contact laser triangulation principle. Then a four-coordinate measuring system was independently developed, a special fixture was designed according to the blade shape features, and a fast measurement of the blade features path was planned. Finally, by using the inclination error model for correction of acquired data, the measurement error that was caused by tilt form is compensated. As a result the measurement accuracy of the Laser Displacement Sensor was less than 10 μm. After the experimental verification, this method makes full use of optical non-contact measurement fast speed, high precision and wide measuring range of features. Using a standard gauge block as a measurement reference, the coordinate system conversion data is simple and practical. It not only improves the measurement accuracy of the blade surface, but also its measurement efficiency. Therefore, this method increases the value of the measurement of complex surfaces. PMID:26039420

  18. Method for improving the limit of detection in a data signal

    DOEpatents

    Synovec, R.E.; Yueng, E.S.

    1989-10-17

    Disclosed is a method for improving the limit of detection for a data set in which experimental noise is uncorrelated along a given abscissa and an analytical signal is correlated to the abscissa, the steps comprising collecting the data set, converting the data set into a data signal including an analytical portion and the experimental noise portion, designating and adjusting a baseline of the data signal to center the experimental noise numerically about a zero reference, and integrating the data signal preserving the corresponding information for each point of the data signal. The steps of the method produce an enhanced integrated data signal which improves the limit of detection of the data signal. 8 figs.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SAM detection limits of 8 debris disks (Gauchet+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauchet, L.; Lacour, S.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Ehrenreich, D.; Bonnefoy, M.; Girard, J. H.; Boccaletti, A.

    2016-06-01

    VLT/NaCo Sparse Aperture Masking data for 8 debris disks in Lprime spectral band (λ=3.80um, Δλ=0.62um). The stars hosting debris disks observed are: β Pictoris, AU Microscopii, 49 Ceti, {eta} Telescopii, Fomalhaut, g Lupi, HD181327 and HR8799 (with respective calibrator: HR2049, HD197339, HD10100, HD181517, del PsA, HD139960, HD180987, HD218234). No companion were found in the observational data. For each star, we have processed a 5σ detection limit map of the neighbourhood of the star. The primary array of each fits file contains a 237x237 pixel image representing a 900x900 mas portion of the sky plane (i.e. 3mas/pixel). The center of the array correspond to the location of the main star. Detection limit values are stated in relative magnitude compared to that of the main star. (2 data files).

  20. Investigation of detection limits for solutes in water measured by laser raman spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, M.C.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of experimental parameters on detection sensitivity was determined for laser Raman analysis of dissolved solutes in water. Individual solutions of nitrate, sulfate, carbonate, bicarbonate, monohydrogen phosphate, dihydrogen phosphate, acetate ion, and acetic acid were measured. An equation is derived which expresses the signal-to-noise ratio in terms of solute concentration, measurement time, spectral slit width, laser power fluctuations, and solvent background intensity. Laser beam intensity fluctuations at the sample and solvent background intensity are the most important limiting factors.

  1. Achieving the Complete-Basis Limit in Large Molecular Clusters: Computationally Efficient Procedures to Eliminate Basis-Set Superposition Error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Ryan M.; Herbert, John M.

    2013-06-01

    Previous electronic structure studies that have relied on fragmentation have been primarily interested in those methods' abilities to replicate the supersystem energy (or a related energy difference) without recourse to the ability of those supersystem results to replicate experiment or high accuracy benchmarks. Here we focus on replicating accurate ab initio benchmarks, that are suitable for comparison to experimental data. In doing this it becomes imperative that we correct our methods for basis-set superposition errors (BSSE) in a computationally feasible way. This criterion leads us to develop a new method for BSSE correction, which we term the many-body counterpoise correction, or MBn for short. MBn is truncated at order n, in much the same manner as a normal many-body expansion leading to a decrease in computational time. Furthermore, its formulation in terms of fragments makes it especially suitable for use with pre-existing fragment codes. A secondary focus of this study is directed at assessing fragment methods' abilities to extrapolate to the complete basis set (CBS) limit as well as compute approximate triples corrections. Ultimately, by analysis of (H_2O)_6 and (H_2O)_{10}F^- systems, it is concluded that with large enough basis-sets (triple or quad zeta) fragment based methods can replicate high level benchmarks in a fraction of the time.

  2. Nuclear Symbiosis - A Means to Achieve Sustainable Nuclear Growth while Limiting the Spread of Sensititive Nuclear Technology

    SciTech Connect

    David Shropshire

    2009-09-01

    Global growth of nuclear energy in the 21st century is creating new challenges to limit the spread of nuclear technology without hindering adoption in countries now considering nuclear power. Independent nuclear states desire autonomy over energy choices and seek energy independence. However, this independence comes with high costs for development of new indigenous fuel cycle capabilities. Nuclear supplier states and expert groups have proposed fuel supply assurance mechanisms such as fuel take-back services, international enrichment services and fuel banks in exchange for recipient state concessions on the development of sensitive technologies. Nuclear states are slow to accept any concessions to their rights under the Non-Proliferation Treaty. To date, decisions not to develop indigenous fuel cycle capabilities have been driven primarily by economics. However, additional incentives may be required to offset a nuclear state’s perceived loss of energy independence. This paper proposes alternative economic development incentives that could help countries decide to forgo development of sensitive nuclear technologies. The incentives are created through a nuclear-centered industrial complex with “symbiotic” links to indigenous economic opportunities. This paper also describes a practical tool called the “Nuclear Materials Exchange” for identifying these opportunities.

  3. Radiometric Short-Term Fourier Transform analysis of photonic Doppler velocimetry recordings and detectivity limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudhomme, G.; Berthe, L.; Bénier, J.; Bozier, O.; Mercier, P.

    2017-01-01

    Photonic Doppler Velocimetry is a plug-and-play and versatile diagnostic used in dynamic physic experiments to measure velocities. When signals are analyzed using a Short-Time Fourier Transform, multiple velocities can be distinguished: for example, the velocities of moving particle-cloud appear on spectrograms. In order to estimate the back-scattering fluxes of target, we propose an original approach "PDV Radiometric analysis" resulting in an expression of time-velocity spectrograms coded in power units. Experiments involving micron-sized particles raise the issue of detection limit; particle-size limit is very difficult to evaluate. From the quantification of noise sources, we derive an estimation of the spectrogram noise leading to a detectivity limit, which may be compared to the fraction of the incoming power which has been back-scattered by the particle and then collected by the probe. This fraction increases with their size. At last, some results from laser-shock accelerated particles using two different PDV systems are compared: it shows the improvement of detectivity with respect to the Effective Number of Bits (ENOB) of the digitizer.

  4. Evaluation on the detection limit of blood hemoglobin using photolepthysmography based on path-length optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Di; Guo, Chao; Zhang, Ziyang; Han, Tongshuai; Liu, Jin

    2016-10-01

    The blood hemoglobin concentration's (BHC) measurement using Photoplethysmography (PPG), which gets blood absorption to near infrared light from the instantaneous pulse of transmitted light intensity, has not been applied to the clinical use due to the non-enough precision. The main challenge might be caused of the non-enough stable pulse signal when it's very weak and it often varies in different human bodies or in the same body with different physiological states. We evaluated the detection limit of BHC using PPG as the measurement precision level, which can be considered as a best precision result because we got the relative stable subject's pulse signals recorded by using a spectrometer with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) level, which is about 30000:1 in short term. Moreover, we optimized the used pathlength using the theory based on optimum pathlength to get a better sensitivity to the absorption variation in blood. The best detection limit was evaluated as about 1 g/L for BHC, and the best SNR of pulse for in vivo measurement was about 2000:1 at 1130 and 1250 nm. Meanwhile, we conclude that the SNR of pulse signal should be better than 400:1 when the required detection limit is set to 5 g/L. Our result would be a good reference to the BHC measurement to get a desired BHC measurement precision of real application.

  5. Microfluidic-SERS Devices for One Shot Limit-of-Detection

    PubMed Central

    Datt, Ashish; Gao, Zhe; Rycenga, Matthew; Burrows, Nathan D.; Greeneltch, Nathan G.; Mirkin, Chad A.; Murphy, Catherine J.; Van Duyne, Richard P.; Haynes, Christy L.

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic sensing platforms facilitate parallel, low sample volume detection using various optical signal transduction mechanisms. Herein, we introduce a simple mixing microfluidic device, enabling serial dilution of introduced analyte solution that terminates in five discrete sensing elements. We demonstrate the utility of this device with on-chip fluorescence and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection of analytes, and we demonstrate device use both when combined with a traditional inflexible SERS substrate and with SERS-active nanoparticles that are directly incorporated into microfluidic channels to create a flexible SERS platform. The results indicate, with varying sensitivities, that either flexible or inflexible devices can be easily used to create a calibration curve and perform a limit of detection study with a single experiment. PMID:24756225

  6. Detection limits for real-time source water monitoring using indigenous freshwater microalgae

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez Jr, Miguel; Greenbaum, Elias

    2009-01-01

    This research identified toxin detection limits using the variable fluorescence of naturally occurring microalgae in source drinking water for five chemical toxins with different molecular structures and modes of toxicity. The five chemicals investigated were atrazine, Diuron, paraquat, methyl parathion, and potassium cyanide. Absolute threshold sensitivities of the algae for detection of the toxins in unmodified source drinking water were measured. Differential kinetics between the rate of action of the toxins and natural changes in algal physiology, such as diurnal photoinhibition, are significant enough that effects of the toxin can be detected and distinguished from the natural variance. This is true even for physiologically impaired algae where diminished photosynthetic capacity may arise from uncontrollable external factors such as nutrient starvation. Photoinhibition induced by high levels of solar radiation is a predictable and reversible phenomenon that can be dealt with using a period of dark adaption of 30 minutes or more.

  7. Limitations in the spectral method for graph partitioning: Detectability threshold and localization of eigenvectors.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Tatsuro; Kabashima, Yoshiyuki

    2015-06-01

    Investigating the performance of different methods is a fundamental problem in graph partitioning. In this paper, we estimate the so-called detectability threshold for the spectral method with both un-normalized and normalized Laplacians in sparse graphs. The detectability threshold is the critical point at which the result of the spectral method is completely uncorrelated to the planted partition. We also analyze whether the localization of eigenvectors affects the partitioning performance in the detectable region. We use the replica method, which is often used in the field of spin-glass theory, and focus on the case of bisection. We show that the gap between the estimated threshold for the spectral method and the threshold obtained from Bayesian inference is considerable in sparse graphs, even without eigenvector localization. This gap closes in a dense limit.

  8. Limitations in the spectral method for graph partitioning: Detectability threshold and localization of eigenvectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Tatsuro; Kabashima, Yoshiyuki

    2015-06-01

    Investigating the performance of different methods is a fundamental problem in graph partitioning. In this paper, we estimate the so-called detectability threshold for the spectral method with both un-normalized and normalized Laplacians in sparse graphs. The detectability threshold is the critical point at which the result of the spectral method is completely uncorrelated to the planted partition. We also analyze whether the localization of eigenvectors affects the partitioning performance in the detectable region. We use the replica method, which is often used in the field of spin-glass theory, and focus on the case of bisection. We show that the gap between the estimated threshold for the spectral method and the threshold obtained from Bayesian inference is considerable in sparse graphs, even without eigenvector localization. This gap closes in a dense limit.

  9. A point-of-care PCR test for HIV-1 detection in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Jangam, Sujit R; Agarwal, Abhishek K; Sur, Kunal; Kelso, David M

    2013-04-15

    A low-cost, fully integrated sample-to-answer, quantitative PCR (qPCR) system that can be used for detection of HIV-1 proviral DNA in infants at the point-of-care in resource-limited settings has been developed and tested. The system is based on a novel DNA extraction method, which uses a glass fiber membrane, a disposable assay card that includes on-board reagent storage, provisions for thermal cycling and fluorescence detection, and a battery-operated portable analyzer. The system is capable of automated PCR mix assembly using a novel reagent delivery system and performing qPCR. HIV-1 and internal control targets are detected using two spectrally separated fluorophores, FAM and Quasar 670. In this report, a proof-of-concept of the platform is demonstrated. Initial results with whole blood demonstrate that the test is capable of detecting HIV-1 in blood samples containing greater than 5000 copies of HIV-1. In resource-limited settings, a point-of-care HIV-1 qPCR test would greatly increase the number of test results that reach the infants caregivers, allowing them to pursue anti-retroviral therapy.

  10. Limited Streamer Tube System for Detecting Contamination in the Gas Used in the BaBar Instrumented Flux Return

    SciTech Connect

    Huntley, L.I.; /Franklin - Marshall Coll.

    2006-08-30

    The Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) initially installed in the Instrumented Flux Return (IFR) of the BABAR particle detector have proven unreliable and inefficient for detecting muons and neutral hadrons. In the summer of 2004, the BABAR Collaboration began replacing the RPCs with Limited Streamer Tubes (LSTs). LST operation requires a mixture of very pure gases and an operating voltage of 5500 V to achieve maximum efficiency. In the past, the gas supplies obtained by the BABAR Collaboration have contained contaminants that caused the efficiency of the IFR LSTs to drop from approximately 90% to approximately 60%. Therefore, it was necessary to develop a method for testing this gas for contaminants. An LST test system was designed and built using two existing LSTs, one placed 1 cm above the other. These LSTs detect cosmic muons in place of particles created during the BABAR experiment. The effect of gas contamination was mimicked by reducing the operating voltage of the test system in order to lower the detection efficiency. When contaminated gas was simulated, the coincidence rate and the percent coincidence between the LSTs in the test system dropped off significantly, demonstrating that test system can be used as an indicator of gas purity. In the fall of 2006, the LST test system will be installed in the gas storage area near the BABAR facility for the purpose of testing the gas being sent to the IFR.

  11. Detection of radioactive particles offshore by γ-ray spectrometry Part I: Monte Carlo assessment of detection depth limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maučec, M.; de Meijer, R. J.; Rigollet, C.; Hendriks, P. H. G. M.; Jones, D. G.

    2004-06-01

    A joint research project between the British Geological Survey and Nuclear Geophysics Division of the Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, Groningen, the Netherlands, was commissioned by the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority to establish the efficiency of a towed seabed γ-ray spectrometer for the detection of 137Cs-containing radioactive particles offshore Dounreay, Scotland. Using the MCNP code, a comprehensive Monte Carlo feasibility study was carried out to model various combinations of geological matrices, particle burial depth and lateral displacement, source activity and detector material. To validate the sampling and absolute normalisation procedures of MCNP for geometries including multiple (natural and induced) heterogeneous sources in environmental monitoring, a benchmark experiment was conducted. The study demonstrates the ability of seabed γ-ray spectrometry to locate radioactive particles offshore and to distinguish between γ count rate increases due to particles from those due to enhanced natural radioactivity. The information presented in this study will be beneficial for estimation of the inventory of 137Cs particles and their activity distribution and for the recovery of particles from the sea floor. In this paper, the Monte Carlo assessment of the detection limits is presented. The estimation of the required towing speed and acquisition times and their application to radioactive particle detection and discrimination offshore formed a supplementary part of this study.

  12. Detection limits of 405 nm and 633 nm excited PpIX fluorescence for brain tumor detection during stereotactic biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwardt, Niklas; Götz, Marcus; Haj-Hosseini, Neda; Hollnburger, Bastian; Sroka, Ronald; Stepp, Herbert; Zelenkov, Petr; Rühm, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    5-aminolevulinic-acid-(5-ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence may be used to improve stereotactic brain tumor biopsies. In this study, the sensitivity of PpIX-based tumor detection has been investigated for two potential excitation wavelengths (405 nm, 633 nm). Using a 200 μm fiber in contact with semi-infinite optical phantoms containing ink and Lipovenös, PpIX detection limits of 4.0 nM and 200 nM (relating to 1 mW excitation power) were determined for 405 nm and 633 nm excitation, respectively. Hence, typical PpIX concentrations in glioblastomas of a few μM should be well detectable with both wavelengths. Additionally, blood layers of selected thicknesses were placed between fiber and phantom. Red excitation was shown to be considerably less affected by blood interference: A 50 μm blood layer, for instance, blocked the 405- nm-excited fluorescence completely, but reduced the 633-nm-excited signal by less than 50%. Ray tracing simulations demonstrated that - without blood layer - the sensitivity advantage of 405 nm rises for decreasing fluorescent volume from 50-fold to a maximum of 100-fold. However, at a tumor volume of 1 mm3, which is a typical biopsy sample size, the 633-nm-excited fluorescence signal is only reduced by about 10%. Further simulations revealed that with increasing fiber-tumor distance, the signal drops faster for 405 nm. This reduces the risk of detecting tumor tissue outside the needle's coverage, but diminishes the overlap between optically and mechanically sampled volumes. While 405 nm generally offers a higher sensitivity, 633 nm is more sensitive to distant tumors and considerably superior in case of blood-covered tumor tissue.

  13. Capability of EnKF to assimilate tracer test data at the lower detection limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruckmann, Johanna; Vogt, Christian; Clauser, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    We model water flow and estimate permeability distribution to improve regional groundwater management for a tectonically limited hard-rock aquifer. Management of groundwater resources for drinking water supply requires understanding and quantifying of the regional groundwater flow and groundwater budget which depends largely on the petrophysical transport properties (e. g., porosity and permeability) of the underground. We study a structurally complex and thus highly heterogeneous area on a regional scale: the Hastenrather Graben 15 km northeast of Aachen, Germany. Here, groundwater is produced from a carbonate aquifer for drinking water supply. However, direct data on the geometry and petrophysical properties of the underground are sparse and most data are only one-dimensional. For overcoming this limitation and coping with the heterogeneity of the underground we use the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) for stochastic parameter estimation and statistical ensemble analysis. Assimilating time-dependent tracer test data will help estimating permeability. The fact that the aquifer is used for drinking water supply prevents using of any artificial tracer such as radioactive or fluorescent tracer. Instead, drinking water with a lower salinity compared to the groundwater (e.g., dam water) will be used. The detection limit will be relatively low due to the low salinity contrast between reservoir water and tracer. It might even be in the range of measuring error. For studying the sensitivity of EnKF at the limit of detection we set up a synthetic scenario based on the conditions in our study area. Performing EnKF assimilation runs based on perturbed observations characterized by different measurement error levels yields information on the acceptable signal-to-noise-ratio required by EnKF for successful estimates of the given synthetic permeability distribution. This, in turn, provides information on the limits of the real-world's tracer test at low salinity contrast.

  14. Detection limits of Legionella pneumophila in environmental samples after co-culture with Acanthamoeba polyphaga

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The efficiency of recovery and the detection limit of Legionella after co-culture with Acanthamoeba polyphaga are not known and so far no investigations have been carried out to determine the efficiency of the recovery of Legionella spp. by co-culture and compare it with that of conventional culturing methods. This study aimed to assess the detection limits of co-culture compared to culture for Legionella pneumophila in compost and air samples. Compost and air samples were spiked with known concentrations of L. pneumophila. Direct culturing and co-culture with amoebae were used in parallel to isolate L. pneumophila and recovery standard curves for both methods were produced for each sample. Results The co-culture proved to be more sensitive than the reference method, detecting 102-103 L. pneumophila cells in 1 g of spiked compost or 1 m3 of spiked air, as compared to 105-106 cells in 1 g of spiked compost and 1 m3 of spiked air. Conclusions Co-culture with amoebae is a useful, sensitive and reliable technique to enrich L. pneumophila in environmental samples that contain only low amounts of bacterial cells. PMID:23442526

  15. Immuno-analysis of microparticles: probing at the limits of detection

    PubMed Central

    Latham, Sharissa L.; Tiberti, Natalia; Gokoolparsadh, Naveena; Holdaway, Karen; Olivier Couraud, Pierre; Grau, Georges E. R.; Combes, Valery

    2015-01-01

    Microparticle (MP) research is clouded by debate regarding the accuracy and validity of flow cytometry (FCM) as an analytical methodology, as it is influenced by many variables including the pre-analytical conditions, instruments physical capabilities and detection parameters. This study utilises a simplistic in vitro system for generating MP, and through comparative analysis with immuno-electron microscopy (Immuno-EM) assesses the strengths and limitations of probe selection and high-sensitivity FCM. Of the markers examined, MP were most specifically labelled with phosphatidylserine ligands, annexin V and lactadherin, although only ~60% MP are PS positive. Whilst these two ligands detect comparable absolute MP numbers, they interact with the same population in distinct manners; annexin V binding is enhanced on TNF induced MP. CD105 and CD54 expression were, as expected, consistent and enhanced following TNF activation respectively. Their labelling however accounted for as few as 30–40% of MP. The greatest discrepancies between FCM and I-EM were observed in the population solely labelled for the surface antigen. These findings demonstrate that despite significant improvements in resolution, high-sensitivity FCM remains limited in detecting small-size MP expressing low antigen levels. This study highlights factors to consider when selecting endothelial MP probes, as well as interpreting and representing data. PMID:26553743

  16. Iron pentacarbonyl detection limits in the cigarette smoke matrix using FT-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrish, Milton E.; Plunkett, Susan E.; Harward, Charles N.

    2005-11-01

    Endogenous metals present in tobacco from agricultural practices have been purported to generate metal carbonyls in cigarette smoke. Transition metal catalysts, such as iron oxide, have been investigated for the reduction of carbon monoxide (CO) in cigarette smoke. These studies motivated the development of an analytical method to determine if iron pentacarbonyl [Fe(CO) 5] is present in mainstream smoke from cigarette models having cigarette paper made with iron oxide. An FT-IR puff-by-puff method was developed and the detection limit was determined using two primary reference spectra from different sources to estimate the amount of Fe(CO) 5 present in a high-pressure steel cylinder of CO. We do not detect Fe(CO) 5 in a single 35 mL puff from reference cigarettes or from those cigarette models having cigarette paper made with iron oxide, with a 30-ppbV limit of detection (LOD). Also, it was shown that a filter containing activated carbon would remove Fe(CO) 5.

  17. Classification using longitudinal trajectory of biomarker in the presence of detection limits.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeonhee; Kong, Lan

    2016-02-01

    Discriminant analysis is commonly used to evaluate the ability of candidate biomarkers to separate patients into pre-defined groups. Recent extension of discriminant analysis to longitudinal data enables us to improve the classification accuracy based on biomarker profiles rather than on a single biomarker measurement. However, the biomarker measurement is often limited by the sensitivity of the given assay, resulting in data that are censored at either the lower or the upper limit of detection. Inappropriate handling of censored data may affect the classification accuracy of biomarker and hinder the evaluation of its potential discrimination power. We develop a discriminant analysis method for censored longitudinal biomarker data based on mixed models and evaluate its performance by area under the receiver operation characteristic curve. Through the simulation study, we show that our method is better than the simple substitution methods in terms of parameter estimation and evaluating biomarker performance. Application to a biomarker study of patients with acute kidney injury demonstrates that our method may shed light on the potential clinical utility of biomarkers by taking into account both longitudinal trajectory and limit of detection issues.

  18. STATISTICAL METHODS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS USING DATA SETS WITH BELOW DETECTION LIMIT OBSERVATIONS AS INCORPORTED IN PROUCL 4.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nondetect (ND) or below detection limit (BDL) results cannot be measured accurately, and, therefore, are reported as less than certain detection limit (DL) values. However, since the presence of some contaminants (e.g., dioxin) in environmental media may pose a threat to human he...

  19. Improving the detection limit of conformational analysis by utilizing a dual polarization Vernier cascade.

    PubMed

    Hoste, J-W; Soetaert, P; Bienstman, P

    2016-01-11

    The dual polarization microring technique enables the simultaneous and accurate detection of thickness and refractive index of a bound molecular layer. By using three microring resonators in a double Vernier cascade configuration, the dual polarization technique is improved on three distinct levels: an increase of the sensitivity, a suppression of common noise due to self-referencing and the ability to migrate from a standard tunable laser to a cheap broadband LED and an on-chip arrayed waveguide grating as read-out system, allowing for a system which is orders of magnitude faster and cheaper. A dual polarization Vernier cascade proof-of-concept is fabricated and characterized, a read-out computational framework is constructed and it is shown on a theoretical basis that the limit of detection is improved.

  20. Yeast Biosensors for Detection of Environmental Pollutants: Current State and Limitations.

    PubMed

    Jarque, Sergio; Bittner, Michal; Blaha, Ludek; Hilscherova, Klara

    2016-05-01

    Yeast biosensors have become suitable tools for the screening and detection of environmental pollutants because of their various advantages compared to other sensing technologies. On the other hand, many limitations remain with regard to their optimal performance and applicability in several contexts, such as low-concentration samples and on-site testing. This review summarizes the current state of yeast biosensors, with special focus on screening and assessment of environmental contaminants, discusses both pros and cons, and suggests steps towards their further development and effective use in the environmental assessment.

  1. New low detection limits for EDXRF analyses on the basis of polycapillary optics and chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamizov, R. K.; Kumakhov, M. A.; Nikitina, S. V.; Mikhin, V. A.

    2005-07-01

    The possibilities of increasing the sensitivity of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis (EDXRF) of solutions with the use of special preconcentrating sensors are described in the article. The sensors are made from polycapillary tubes or plates consisting of hundred thousands micro-channels, each containing a micro-grain of collecting sorbent. The kinetic regularities for preconcentration of micro-components from solutions are considered. Experimental results are given for EDXRF analyses of different solutions containing metals and other elements in trace amounts, and the detection limits of tens and hundreds ppb are demonstrated. The pilot sample of a new analytical instrument <> is shortly described.

  2. Limit of blank and limit of detection of Plasmodium falciparum thick blood smear microscopy in a routine setting in Central Africa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Proper malaria diagnosis depends on the detection of asexual forms of Plasmodium spp. in the blood. Thick blood smear microscopy is the accepted gold standard of malaria diagnosis and is widely implemented. Surprisingly, diagnostic performance of this method is not well investigated and many clinicians in African routine settings base treatment decisions independent of microscopy results. This leads to overtreatment and poor management of other febrile diseases. Implementation of quality control programmes is recommended, but requires sustained funding, external logistic support and constant training and supervision of the staff. This study describes an easily applicable method to assess the performance of thick blood smear microscopy by determining the limit of blank and limit of detection. These two values are representative of the diagnostic quality and allow the correct discrimination between positive and negative samples. Methods Standard-conform methodology was applied and adapted to determine the limit of blank and the limit of detection of two thick blood smear microscopy methods (WHO and Lambaréné method) in a research centre in Lambaréné, Gabon. Duplicates of negative and low parasitaemia thick blood smears were read by several microscopists. The mean and standard deviation of the results were used to calculate the limit of blank and subsequently the limit of detection. Results The limit of blank was 0 parasites/μL for both methods. The limit of detection was 62 and 88 parasites/μL for the Lambaréné and WHO method, respectively. Conclusion With a simple, back-of-the-envelope calculation, the performance of two malaria microscopy methods can be measured. These results are specific for each diagnostic unit and cannot be generalized but implementation of a system to control microscopy performance can improve confidence in parasitological results and thereby strengthen malaria control. PMID:24929248

  3. Shot-noise Limited Faraday Rotation Spectroscopy for Detection of Nitric Oxide Isotopes in Breath, Urine, and Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin; Nikodem, Michal; Zhang, Eric; Cikach, Frank; Barnes, Jarrod; Comhair, Suzy; Dweik, Raed A.; Kao, Christina; Wysocki, Gerard

    2015-03-01

    Measurement of NO and/or its metabolites in the various body compartments has transformed our understanding of biology. The inability of the current NO measurement methods to account for naturally occurring and experimental NO isotopes, however, has prevented the scientific community from fully understating NO metabolism in vivo. Here we present a mid-IR Faraday rotation spectrometer (FRS) for detection of NO isotopes. The instrument utilizes a novel dual modulation/demodulation (DM) FRS method which exhibits noise performance at only 2 times the fundamental quantum shot-noise level and provides the record sensitivity in its class. This is achieved with a system that is fully autonomous, robust, transportable, and does not require cryogenic cooling. The DM-FRS enables continuous monitoring of nitric oxide isotopes with the detection limits of 3.72 ppbv/Hz1/2 to14NO and 0.53 ppbv/Hz1/2 to15NO using only 45 cm active optical path. This DM-FRS measurement method can be used to improve the performance of conventional FRS sensors targeting other radical species. The feasibility of the instrument to perform measurements relevant to studies of NO metabolism in humans is demonstrated.

  4. Shot-noise Limited Faraday Rotation Spectroscopy for Detection of Nitric Oxide Isotopes in Breath, Urine, and Blood

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yin; Nikodem, Michal; Zhang, Eric; Cikach, Frank; Barnes, Jarrod; Comhair, Suzy; Dweik, Raed A.; Kao, Christina; Wysocki, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of NO and/or its metabolites in the various body compartments has transformed our understanding of biology. The inability of the current NO measurement methods to account for naturally occurring and experimental NO isotopes, however, has prevented the scientific community from fully understating NO metabolism in vivo. Here we present a mid-IR Faraday rotation spectrometer (FRS) for detection of NO isotopes. The instrument utilizes a novel dual modulation/demodulation (DM) FRS method which exhibits noise performance at only 2 times the fundamental quantum shot-noise level and provides the record sensitivity in its class. This is achieved with a system that is fully autonomous, robust, transportable, and does not require cryogenic cooling. The DM-FRS enables continuous monitoring of nitric oxide isotopes with the detection limits of 3.72 ppbv/Hz1/2 to14NO and 0.53 ppbv/Hz1/2 to15NO using only 45 cm active optical path. This DM-FRS measurement method can be used to improve the performance of conventional FRS sensors targeting other radical species. The feasibility of the instrument to perform measurements relevant to studies of NO metabolism in humans is demonstrated. PMID:25767064

  5. First direct detection limits on sub-GeV dark matter from XENON10.

    PubMed

    Essig, Rouven; Manalaysay, Aaron; Mardon, Jeremy; Sorensen, Peter; Volansky, Tomer

    2012-07-13

    The first direct detection limits on dark matter in the MeV to GeV mass range are presented, using XENON10 data. Such light dark matter can scatter with electrons, causing ionization of atoms in a detector target material and leading to single- or few-electron events. We use 15  kg day of data acquired in 2006 to set limits on the dark-matter-electron scattering cross section. The strongest bound is obtained at 100 MeV where σ(e)<3×10(-38)  cm2 at 90% C.L., while dark-matter masses between 20 MeV and 1 GeV are bounded by σ(e)<10(-37)  cm2 at 90% C.L. This analysis provides a first proof of principle that direct detection experiments can be sensitive to dark-matter candidates with masses well below the GeV scale.

  6. Detecting and quantifying parasite-induced host mortality from intensity data: method comparisons and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Wilber, Mark Q.; Weinstein, Sara B.; Briggs, Cheryl J.

    2016-01-01

    Parasites can significantly impact animal populations by changing host behavior, reproduction and survival. Detecting and quantifying these impacts is critical for understanding disease dynamics and managing wild animal populations. However, for wild hosts infected with macroparasites, it is notoriously difficult to quantify the fatal parasite load and number of animals that have died due to disease. When ethical or logistical constraints prohibit experimental determination of these values, examination of parasite intensity and distribution data may offer an alternative solution. In this study we introduce a novel method for using intensity data to detect and quantify parasite-induced mortality in wildlife populations. Using simulations, we show that this method is more reliable than previously proposed methods while providing quantitative estimates of parasite-induced mortality from empirical data that are consistent with previously published qualitative estimates. However, we stress that this method, and all techniques that estimate parasite-induced mortality from intensity data alone, have several critical assumptions that limit their applicability in the real world. Due to these limitations, these methods should only be used as an exploratory tool to inform more rigorous studies of parasite-induced host mortality. PMID:26475963

  7. Approaching the ppb detection limits for copper in water using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawfik, Walid; Sawaf, Sausan

    2014-05-01

    Copper concentrations in drinking-water is very important to be monitored which can cause cancer if it exceed about 10 mg/liter. In the present work, we have developed a simple, low laser power method to improve the detection limits of laser induced plasma spectroscopy LIBS for copper in aqueous solutions with different concentrations. In this method a medium density fiberboard (MDF) wood have been used as a substrate that absorbs the liquid sample to transform laser liquid interaction to laser solid interaction. Using the fundamental wavelength of Nd:YAG laser, the constructed plasma emissions were monitored for elemental analysis. The signal-to-noise ratio SNR was optimized using low laser fluence of 32 J cm-2, and detector (CDD camera) gate delay of 0.5 μs. Both the electron temperature and density of the induced plasma were determined using Boltzmann plot and the FWHM of the Cu at 324.7 nm, respectively. The plasma temperature was found to be 1.197 eV, while the plasma density was about 1.66 x 1019 cm-3. The detection limits for Cu at 324.7 nm is found to be 131 ppb comparable to the results by others using complicated system.

  8. System for detecting and limiting electrical ground faults within electrical devices

    DOEpatents

    Gaubatz, Donald C.

    1990-01-01

    An electrical ground fault detection and limitation system for employment with a nuclear reactor utilizing a liquid metal coolant. Elongate electromagnetic pumps submerged within the liquid metal coolant and electrical support equipment experiencing an insulation breakdown occasion the development of electrical ground fault current. Without some form of detection and control, these currents may build to damaging power levels to expose the pump drive components to liquid metal coolant such as sodium with resultant undesirable secondary effects. Such electrical ground fault currents are detected and controlled through the employment of an isolated power input to the pumps and with the use of a ground fault control conductor providing a direct return path from the affected components to the power source. By incorporating a resistance arrangement with the ground fault control conductor, the amount of fault current permitted to flow may be regulated to the extent that the reactor may remain in operation until maintenance may be performed, notwithstanding the existence of the fault. Monitors such as synchronous demodulators may be employed to identify and evaluate fault currents for each phase of a polyphase power, and control input to the submerged pump and associated support equipment.

  9. AN ALTERNATIVE CALIBRATION OF CR-39 DETECTORS FOR RADON DETECTION BEYOND THE SATURATION LIMIT.

    PubMed

    Franci, Daniele; Aureli, Tommaso; Cardellini, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    Time-integrated measurements of indoor radon levels are commonly carried out using solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs), due to the numerous advantages offered by this radiation detection technique. However, the use of SSNTD also presents some problems that may affect the accuracy of the results. The effect of overlapping tracks often results in the underestimation of the detected track density, which leads to the reduction of the counting efficiency for increasing radon exposure. This article aims to address the effect of overlapping tracks by proposing an alternative calibration technique based on the measurement of the fraction of the detector surface covered by alpha tracks. The method has been tested against a set of Monte Carlo data and then applied to a set of experimental data collected at the radon chamber of the Istituto Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti, at the ENEA centre in Casaccia, using CR-39 detectors. It has been proved that the method allows to extend the detectable range of radon exposure far beyond the intrinsic limit imposed by the standard calibration based on the track density.

  10. Gel-based nonradioactive single-strand conformational polymorphism and mutation detection: limitations and solutions.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vibhuti; Arora, Reetakshi; Gochhait, Sailesh; Bairwa, Narendra K; Bamezai, Rameshwar N K

    2014-01-01

    Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) for screening mutations/single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is a simple, cost-effective technique, saving an expensive exercise of sequencing each and every polymerase chain reaction product and assisting in choosing only the amplicons of interest with expected mutations. The principle of detection of small changes in DNA sequences is based on changes in single-strand DNA conformations. The changes in electrophoretic mobility that SSCP detects are sequence dependent. The limitations faced in SSCP range from routine polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) problems to the problems of resolving mutant DNA bands. Both these problems can be solved by controlling PAGE conditions and by varying physical and environmental conditions such as pH, temperature, voltage, gel type and percentage, addition of additives or denaturants, and others. Despite much upgrading of the technology for mutation detection, SSCP remains the method of choice to analyze mutations and SNPs in order to understand genomic variations, both spontaneous and induced, and the genetic basis of diseases.

  11. Limits of the potential flow model for obstacle detection using a lateral line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maertens, Audrey; Weymouth, Gabriel; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Fish have a particular sensory system called lateral line through which they measure flow velocity and pressure gradient. Behavioral studies have shown that fish can detect and identify obstacles while gliding using this sensory system alone. Despite a widespread interest of the community in understanding and reproducing this capability, a realistic approach is still missing. Indeed, due to computational constraints, most attempts to date have used potential flow models. The present work aims at revealing the limits of the potential flow model in the case of a vehicle gliding by a cylinder. The understanding thus gained can be used to account for viscous effects in a computationally-efficient fashion. An improvement of the boundary data immersion method provides accurate pressure predictions at the Reynolds numbers considered (500 < Re < 10000). It is shown how a potential flow-based obstacle detection algorithm fails at locating the cylinder at these Reynolds numbers. It is also shown that a panel method accounting for dynamically changing displacement thickness leads to accurate pressure prediction. This is a first step toward real-time pressure predictions for viscous flows which is needed for efficient obstacle detection and identification algorithms.

  12. Detection of airflow limitation using a handheld spirometer in a primary care setting

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Siew-Mooi; Pang, Yong-Kek; Price, David; Cheong, Ai-Theng; Lee, Ping-Yein; Irmi, Ismail; Faezah, Hassan; Ruhaini, Ismail; Chia, Yook-Chin

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective Early diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in primary care settings is difficult to achieve chiefly due to lack of availability of spirometry. This study estimated the prevalence of airflow limitation among chronic smokers using a handheld spirometer in this setting. Methods This is a cross-sectional study performed on consecutive patients who were ≥40 years old with ≥10 pack-years smoking history. Face-to-face interviews were carried out to obtain demographic data and relevant information. Handheld spirometry was performed according to a standard protocol using the COPd-6 device (Model 4000, Vitalograph, Ennis, Ireland) in addition to standard spirometry. Airflow limitation was defined as ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1)/forced expiratory volume in 6 s <0.75 (COPd-6) or FEV1/forced vital capacity <0.7. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to determine predictors of airflow limitation. Results A total of 416 patients were recruited with mean age of 53 years old. The prevalence of airflow limitation was 10.6% (n = 44) with COPd-6 versus 6% as gauged using standard spirometry. Risk factors for airflow limitation were age >65 years (odds ratio (OR) 3.732 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.100–1.280), a history of ‘bad health’ (OR 2.524, 95% CI: 1.037–6.142) and low to normal body mass index (OR 2.914, 95% CI: 1.191–7.190). Conclusions In a primary care setting, handheld spirometry (COPd-6) found a prevalence of airflow limitation of ∼10% in smokers. Patients were older, not overweight and had an ill-defined history of health problems. SUMMARY AT A GLANCE Prevalence of COPD is unknown in Malaysia. The prevalence of COPD using a handheld spirometer (COPd-6TM) was 10.6% versus 6% as gauged using standard spirometry. Predictors of COPD were older age, lower BMI and a history of ‘bad health’. Case-finding for COPD should be targeted in this special population. PMID:24708063

  13. Recovery efficiency and limit of detection of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Sterne from environmental surface samples.

    PubMed

    Estill, Cheryl Fairfield; Baron, Paul A; Beard, Jeremy K; Hein, Misty J; Larsen, Lloyd D; Rose, Laura; Schaefer, Frank W; Noble-Wang, Judith; Hodges, Lisa; Lindquist, H D Alan; Deye, Gregory J; Arduino, Matthew J

    2009-07-01

    After the 2001 anthrax incidents, surface sampling techniques for biological agents were found to be inadequately validated, especially at low surface loadings. We aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores within a chamber to achieve very low surface loading (ca. 3, 30, and 200 CFU per 100 cm(2)). Steel and carpet coupons seeded in the chamber were sampled with swab (103 cm(2)) or wipe or vacuum (929 cm(2)) surface sampling methods and analyzed at three laboratories. Agar settle plates (60 cm(2)) were the reference for determining recovery efficiency (RE). The minimum estimated surface concentrations to achieve a 95% response rate based on probit regression were 190, 15, and 44 CFU/100 cm(2) for sampling steel surfaces and 40, 9.2, and 28 CFU/100 cm(2) for sampling carpet surfaces with swab, wipe, and vacuum methods, respectively; however, these results should be cautiously interpreted because of high observed variability. Mean REs at the highest surface loading were 5.0%, 18%, and 3.7% on steel and 12%, 23%, and 4.7% on carpet for the swab, wipe, and vacuum methods, respectively. Precision (coefficient of variation) was poor at the lower surface concentrations but improved with increasing surface concentration. The best precision was obtained with wipe samples on carpet, achieving 38% at the highest surface concentration. The wipe sampling method detected B. anthracis at lower estimated surface concentrations and had higher RE and better precision than the other methods. These results may guide investigators to more meaningfully conduct environmental sampling, quantify contamination levels, and conduct risk assessment for humans.

  14. Phase-noise limitations in continuous-variable quantum key distribution with homodyne detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corvaja, Roberto

    2017-02-01

    In continuous-variables quantum key distribution with coherent states, the advantage of performing the detection by using standard telecoms components is counterbalanced by the lack of a stable phase reference in homodyne detection due to the complexity of optical phase-locking circuits and to the unavoidable phase noise of lasers, which introduces a degradation on the achievable secure key rate. Pilot-assisted phase-noise estimation and postdetection compensation techniques are used to implement a protocol with coherent states where a local laser is employed and it is not locked to the received signal, but a postdetection phase correction is applied. Here the reduction of the secure key rate determined by the laser phase noise, for both individual and collective attacks, is analytically evaluated and a scheme of pilot-assisted phase estimation proposed, outlining the tradeoff in the system design between phase noise and spectral efficiency. The optimal modulation variance as a function of the phase-noise amount is derived.

  15. Advantages and Limitations of Androgen Receptor-Based Methods for Detecting Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Abuse as Performance Enhancing Drugs.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Kathy; Yazdi, Tahmineh; Masharani, Umesh; Tyrrell, Blake; Butch, Anthony; Schaufele, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone (T) and related androgens are performance enhancing drugs (PEDs) abused by some athletes to gain competitive advantage. To monitor unauthorized androgen abuse, doping control programs use mass spectrometry (MS) to detect androgens, synthetic anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) and their metabolites in an athlete's urine. AASs of unknown composition will not be detected by these procedures. Since AASs achieve their anabolic effects by activating the Androgen Receptor (AR), cell-based bioassays that measure the effect of a urine sample on AR activity are under investigation as complementary, pan-androgen detection methods. We evaluated an AR BioAssay as a monitor for androgen activity in urine pre-treated with glucuronidase, which releases T from the inactive T-glucuronide that predominates in urine. AR BioAssay activity levels were expressed as 'T-equivalent' concentrations by comparison to a T dose response curve. The T-equivalent concentrations of androgens in the urine of hypogonadal participants supplemented with T (in whom all androgenic activity should arise from T) were quantitatively identical to the T measurements conducted by MS at the UCLA Olympic Analytical Laboratory (0.96 ± 0.22). All 17 AASs studied were active in the AR BioAssay; other steroids were inactive. 12 metabolites of 10 commonly abused AASs, which are used for MS monitoring of AAS doping because of their prolonged presence in urine, had reduced or no AR BioAssay activity. Thus, the AR BioAssay can accurately and inexpensively monitor T, but its ability to monitor urinary AASs will be limited to a period immediately following doping in which the active AASs remain intact.

  16. Advantages and Limitations of Androgen Receptor-Based Methods for Detecting Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Abuse as Performance Enhancing Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Kathy; Yazdi, Tahmineh; Masharani, Umesh; Tyrrell, Blake; Butch, Anthony; Schaufele, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone (T) and related androgens are performance enhancing drugs (PEDs) abused by some athletes to gain competitive advantage. To monitor unauthorized androgen abuse, doping control programs use mass spectrometry (MS) to detect androgens, synthetic anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) and their metabolites in an athlete’s urine. AASs of unknown composition will not be detected by these procedures. Since AASs achieve their anabolic effects by activating the Androgen Receptor (AR), cell-based bioassays that measure the effect of a urine sample on AR activity are under investigation as complementary, pan-androgen detection methods. We evaluated an AR BioAssay as a monitor for androgen activity in urine pre-treated with glucuronidase, which releases T from the inactive T-glucuronide that predominates in urine. AR BioAssay activity levels were expressed as ‘T-equivalent’ concentrations by comparison to a T dose response curve. The T-equivalent concentrations of androgens in the urine of hypogonadal participants supplemented with T (in whom all androgenic activity should arise from T) were quantitatively identical to the T measurements conducted by MS at the UCLA Olympic Analytical Laboratory (0.96 ± 0.22). All 17 AASs studied were active in the AR BioAssay; other steroids were inactive. 12 metabolites of 10 commonly abused AASs, which are used for MS monitoring of AAS doping because of their prolonged presence in urine, had reduced or no AR BioAssay activity. Thus, the AR BioAssay can accurately and inexpensively monitor T, but its ability to monitor urinary AASs will be limited to a period immediately following doping in which the active AASs remain intact. PMID:26998755

  17. Nanoparticle size detection limits by single particle ICP-MS for 40 elements.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungyun; Bi, Xiangyu; Reed, Robert B; Ranville, James F; Herckes, Pierre; Westerhoff, Paul

    2014-09-02

    The quantification and characterization of natural, engineered, and incidental nano- to micro-size particles are beneficial to assessing a nanomaterial's performance in manufacturing, their fate and transport in the environment, and their potential risk to human health. Single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (spICP-MS) can sensitively quantify the amount and size distribution of metallic nanoparticles suspended in aqueous matrices. To accurately obtain the nanoparticle size distribution, it is critical to have knowledge of the size detection limit (denoted as Dmin) using spICP-MS for a wide range of elements (other than a few available assessed ones) that have been or will be synthesized into engineered nanoparticles. Herein is described a method to estimate the size detection limit using spICP-MS and then apply it to nanoparticles composed of 40 different elements. The calculated Dmin values correspond well for a few of the elements with their detectable sizes that are available in the literature. Assuming each nanoparticle sample is composed of one element, Dmin values vary substantially among the 40 elements: Ta, U, Ir, Rh, Th, Ce, and Hf showed the lowest Dmin values, ≤10 nm; Bi, W, In, Pb, Pt, Ag, Au, Tl, Pd, Y, Ru, Cd, and Sb had Dmin in the range of 11-20 nm; Dmin values of Co, Sr, Sn, Zr, Ba, Te, Mo, Ni, V, Cu, Cr, Mg, Zn, Fe, Al, Li, and Ti were located at 21-80 nm; and Se, Ca, and Si showed high Dmin values, greater than 200 nm. A range of parameters that influence the Dmin, such as instrument sensitivity, nanoparticle density, and background noise, is demonstrated. It is observed that, when the background noise is low, the instrument sensitivity and nanoparticle density dominate the Dmin significantly. Approaches for reducing the Dmin, e.g., collision cell technology (CCT) and analyte isotope selection, are also discussed. To validate the Dmin estimation approach, size distributions for three engineered nanoparticle samples were

  18. Limited geographic genetic structure detected in a widespread Palearctic corvid, Nucifraga caryocatactes

    PubMed Central

    Burg, Theresa M.

    2014-01-01

    The Eurasian or spotted nutcracker (Nucifraga caryocatactes) is a widespread resident corvid found throughout the Palearctic from Central Europe to Japan. Characterized by periodic bouts of irruptive dispersal in search of Pinus seed crops, this species has potential for high levels of gene flow across its range. Previous analysis of 11 individuals did not find significant range-wide population genetic structure. We investigated population structure using 924 base pairs of mitochondrial DNA control region sequence data from 62 individuals from 12 populations distributed throughout the nutcracker’s range. We complemented this analysis by incorporating additional genetic data from previously published sequences. High levels of genetic diversity and limited population genetic structure were detected suggesting that potential barriers to dispersal do not restrict gene flow in nutcrackers. PMID:25024901

  19. Recent advances and achievements in nanomaterial-based, and structure switchable aptasensing platforms for ochratoxin A detection.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Akhtar; Yang, Cheng; Rhouati, Amina; Marty, Jean Louis

    2013-11-06

    Aptamer-based bioreceptors that can easily adopt their surroundings have captured the attention of scientists from a wide spectrum of domains in designing highly sensitive, selective and structure switchable sensing assays. Through elaborate design and chemical functionalization, numerous aptamer-based assays have been developed that can switch their conformation upon incubation with target analyte, resulting in an enhanced output signal. To further lower the detection limits to picomolar levels, nanomaterials have attracted great interest in the design of aptamer-based sensing platforms. Associated to their unique properties, nanomaterials offer great promise for numerous aptasensing applications. This review will discuss current research activities in the aptasensing with typical example of detection of ochratoxin A (OTA). OTA, a secondary fungal metabolite, contaminates a variety of food commodities, and has several toxicological effects such as nephrotoxic, hepatotoxic, neurotoxic, teratogenic and immunotoxic activities. The review will introduce advances made in the methods of integrating nanomaterials in aptasensing, and will discuss current conformational switchable design strategies in aptasensor fabrication methodologies.

  20. Implications of limits of detection of various methods for Bacillus anthracis in computing risks to human health.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Amanda B; McLennan, S Devin; Pandey, Alok K; Gerba, Charles P; Haas, Charles N; Rose, Joan B; Hashsham, Syed A

    2009-10-01

    Used for decades for biological warfare, Bacillus anthracis (category A agent) has proven to be highly stable and lethal. Quantitative risk assessment modeling requires descriptive statistics of the limit of detection to assist in defining the exposure. Furthermore, the sensitivities of various detection methods in environmental matrices are vital information for first responders. A literature review of peer-reviewed journal articles related to methods for detection of B. anthracis was undertaken. Articles focused on the development or evaluation of various detection approaches, such as PCR, real-time PCR, immunoassay, etc. Real-time PCR and PCR were the most sensitive methods for the detection of B. anthracis, with median instrument limits of detection of 430 and 440 cells/ml, respectively. There were very few peer-reviewed articles on the detection methods for B. anthracis in the environment. The most sensitive limits of detection for the environmental samples were 0.1 CFU/g for soil using PCR-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), 17 CFU/liter for air using an ELISA-biochip system, 1 CFU/liter for water using cultivation, and 1 CFU/cm(2) for stainless steel fomites using cultivation. An exponential dose-response model for the inhalation of B. anthracis estimates of risk at concentrations equal to the environmental limit of detection determined the probability of death if untreated to be as high as 0.520. Though more data on the environmental limit of detection would improve the assumptions made for the risk assessment, this study's quantification of the risk posed by current limitations in the knowledge of detection methods should be considered when employing those methods in environmental monitoring and cleanup strategies.

  1. Lower Limits on Aperture Size for an ExoEarth Detecting Coronagraphic Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Christopher C.; Roberge, Aki; Mandell, Avi; Clampin, Mark; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D.; McElwain, Michael W.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.

    2015-08-01

    The yield of Earth-like planets will likely be a primary science metric for future space-based missions that will drive telescope aperture size. Maximizing the exoEarth candidate yield is therefore critical to minimizing the required aperture. Here we describe a method for exoEarth candidate yield maximization that simultaneously optimizes, for the first time, the targets chosen for observation, the number of visits to each target, the delay time between visits, and the exposure time of every observation. This code calculates both the detection time and multi-wavelength spectral characterization time required for planets. We also refine the astrophysical assumptions used as inputs to these calculations, relying on published estimates of planetary occurrence rates as well as theoretical and observational constraints on terrestrial planet sizes and classical habitable zones. Given these astrophysical assumptions, optimistic telescope and instrument assumptions, and our new completeness code that produces the highest yields to date, we suggest lower limits on the aperture size required to detect and characterize a statistically motivated sample of exoEarths.

  2. Artifactual mutations resulting from DNA lesions limit detection levels in ultrasensitive sequencing applications

    PubMed Central

    Arbeithuber, Barbara; Makova, Kateryna D.; Tiemann-Boege, Irene

    2016-01-01

    The need in cancer research or evolutionary biology to detect rare mutations or variants present at very low frequencies (<10−5) poses an increasing demand on lowering the detection limits of available methods. Here we demonstrated that amplifiable DNA lesions introduce important error sources in ultrasensitive technologies such as single molecule PCR (smPCR) applications (e.g. droplet-digital PCR), or next-generation sequencing (NGS) based methods. Using templates with known amplifiable lesions (8-oxoguanine, deaminated 5-methylcytosine, uracil, and DNA heteroduplexes), we assessed with smPCR and duplex sequencing that templates with these lesions were amplified very efficiently by proofreading polymerases (except uracil), leading to G->T, and to a lesser extent, to unreported G->C substitutions at 8-oxoguanine lesions, and C->T transitions in amplified uracil containing templates. Long heat incubations common in many DNA extraction protocols significantly increased the number of G->T substitutions. Moreover, in ∼50-80% smPCR reactions we observed the random amplification preference of only one of both DNA strands explaining the known ‘PCR jackpot effect’, with the result that a lesion became indistinguishable from a true mutation or variant. Finally, we showed that artifactual mutations derived from uracil and 8-oxoguanine could be significantly reduced by DNA repair enzymes. PMID:27477585

  3. Estimation of intervention effect using paired interval-censored data with clumping below lower detection limit.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Lam, K F; Cowling, Benjamin J; Cheung, Yin Bun

    2015-01-30

    Outcome variables that are semicontinuous with clumping at zero are commonly seen in biomedical research. In addition, the outcome measurement is sometimes subject to interval censoring and a lower detection limit (LDL). This gives rise to interval-censored observations with clumping below the LDL. Level of antibody against influenza virus measured by the hemagglutination inhibition assay is an example. The interval censoring is due to the assay's technical procedure. The clumping below LDL is likely a result of the lack of prior exposure in some individuals such that they either have zero level of antibodies or do not have detectable level of antibodies. Given a pair of such measurements from the same subject at two time points, a binary 'fold-increase' endpoint can be defined according to the ratio of these two measurements, as it often is in vaccine clinical trials. The intervention effect or vaccine immunogenicity can be assessed by comparing the binary endpoint between groups of subjects given different vaccines or placebos. We introduce a two-part random effects model for modeling the paired interval-censored data with clumping below the LDL. Based on the estimated model parameters, we propose to use Monte Carlo approximation for estimation of the 'fold-increase' endpoint and the intervention effect. Bootstrapping is used for variance estimation. The performance of the proposed method is demonstrated by simulation. We analyze antibody data from an influenza vaccine trial for illustration.

  4. Three factors limiting the reliable detection of light by retinal ganglion cells of the cat

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, H. B.; Levick, W. R.

    1969-01-01

    1. Responses of cat retinal ganglion cells have been examined with a view to specifying the characteristics that limit the detection of light stimuli. 2. Threshold is defined as the weakest stimulus that can be reliably detected by examination of the output from a retinal ganglion cell; it depends upon (a) the quantum/spike ratio, which is the mean number of additional quantal absorptions required to produce an additional impulse, (b) the temporal course of the response, which determines the time interval within which the maintained discharge is modified, and (c) the statistical distribution of the number of impulses that occur in this time interval in the absence of the stimulus. 3. The quantum/spike ratio changes greatly when adapting luminance is changed, and this is the predominant factor accounting for changes in increment threshold. 4. The time course of the response changes with adaptation level and area of the stimulus. This may account for the changes in temporal integration that occur in analogous psychophysical experiments. 5. Changes in the irregularity of the maintained discharge also affect the threshold of single ganglion cells. This is only a minor factor in the conditions of most of our experiments, but it may be important when unstabilized images and non-equilibrium adaptation conditions are encountered. PMID:5761942

  5. Artifactual mutations resulting from DNA lesions limit detection levels in ultrasensitive sequencing applications.

    PubMed

    Arbeithuber, Barbara; Makova, Kateryna D; Tiemann-Boege, Irene

    2016-12-01

    The need in cancer research or evolutionary biology to detect rare mutations or variants present at very low frequencies (<10(-5)) poses an increasing demand on lowering the detection limits of available methods. Here we demonstrated that amplifiable DNA lesions introduce important error sources in ultrasensitive technologies such as single molecule PCR (smPCR) applications (e.g. droplet-digital PCR), or next-generation sequencing (NGS) based methods. Using templates with known amplifiable lesions (8-oxoguanine, deaminated 5-methylcytosine, uracil, and DNA heteroduplexes), we assessed with smPCR and duplex sequencing that templates with these lesions were amplified very efficiently by proofreading polymerases (except uracil), leading to G->T, and to a lesser extent, to unreported G->C substitutions at 8-oxoguanine lesions, and C->T transitions in amplified uracil containing templates. Long heat incubations common in many DNA extraction protocols significantly increased the number of G->T substitutions. Moreover, in ∼50-80% smPCR reactions we observed the random amplification preference of only one of both DNA strands explaining the known 'PCR jackpot effect', with the result that a lesion became indistinguishable from a true mutation or variant. Finally, we showed that artifactual mutations derived from uracil and 8-oxoguanine could be significantly reduced by DNA repair enzymes.

  6. Detection limit of fishing boats by the day night band (DNB) on VIIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asanuma, Ichio; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Park, John-geol; Mackin, Kenneth J.; Mittleman, John

    2016-09-01

    The detection limit of DNB was proposed as a function of the brightness temperature (BT) at 3.7 μm, where the transmittance of cloud could be observed as a change of surface temperature. The shortwave infrared band exhibited a wide distribution in BT more than the thermal infrared band for the same level of DNB radiance. The lights from surface were identified even under the full Moon condition with the proposed method, where clouds were reflecting the lunar lights. A different distribution of clouds for day to day and a change of the Moon phase with its elevation make this problem more complicated. But the approach of contrast based evaluation of surface lights and lunar reflected lights could be one solution to distinguish the lights from the surface. Currently, a validation is necessary in the future to confirm this algorithm and to validate the detected pixels to be fishing boats with the stable light sources. The time series data of fishing boats could be studied to analyze the region of fishing area relative to the distribution of sea surface temperature and/or chlorophyll-a.

  7. Potential and limits of Raman spectroscopy for carotenoid detection in microorganisms: implications for astrobiology

    PubMed Central

    Jehlička, Jan; Edwards, Howell G. M.; Osterrothová, Kateřina; Novotná, Julie; Nedbalová, Linda; Kopecký, Jiří; Němec, Ivan; Oren, Aharon

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, it is demonstrated how Raman spectroscopy can be used to detect different carotenoids as possible biomarkers in various groups of microorganisms. The question which arose from previous studies concerns the level of unambiguity of discriminating carotenoids using common Raman microspectrometers. A series of laboratory-grown microorganisms of different taxonomic affiliation was investigated, such as halophilic heterotrophic bacteria, cyanobacteria, the anoxygenic phototrophs, the non-halophilic heterotrophs as well as eukaryotes (Ochrophyta, Rhodophyta and Chlorophyta). The data presented show that Raman spectroscopy is a suitable tool to assess the presence of carotenoids of these organisms in cultures. Comparison is made with the high-performance liquid chromatography approach of analysing pigments in extracts. Direct measurements on cultures provide fast and reliable identification of the pigments. Some of the carotenoids studied are proposed as tracers for halophiles, in contrast with others which can be considered as biomarkers of other genera. The limits of application of Raman spectroscopy are discussed for a few cases where the current Raman spectroscopic approach does not allow discriminating structurally very similar carotenoids. The database reported can be used for applications in geobiology and exobiology for the detection of pigment signals in natural settings. PMID:25368348

  8. The minimum detection limits of RDX and TNT deposited on various surfaces as determined by ion mobility spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rodacy, P.

    1993-08-01

    An Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS) was used to determine the detection limits of RDX and TNT on six different substrates. The preparation of the explosive deposits on the surfaces is examined as well as effects due to the size, uniformity, method of application, and time that a deposit has been on a surface. Sampling methods are discussed along with effects of the surface topology. The transfer of explosives from a hand to a surface, and methods to reduce the detection limits are presented.

  9. Design and experiment of 4H-SiC JBS diodes achieving a near-theoretical breakdown voltage with non-uniform floating limiting rings terminal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hao; Song, Qingwen; Tang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yimeng; Zhang, Yimen; Zhang, Yuming

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a 4H-SiC Junction Barrier Schottky diode (JBS) with non-uniform floating limiting rings (FLRs) has been investigated and fabricated using n type 4H-SiC epitaxial layer with thickness of 31 μm and doping concentration of 3.3 × 1015 cm-3. According to the simulated results, the key parameters of a FLRs design to achieve a high voltage are the minimum space between two adjacent doped rings, spacing growth step and number of rings. The experimental results also show a great agreement with simulated results. Meanwhile, a near-ideal breakdown voltage of 3.7 kV was achieved, which yield around 95% of the parallel-plane breakdown voltage. The forward characteristics show that the fabricated JBS diodes have a forward current density of 210 A/cm2 at 3 V and a specific on-resistance (Rsp-on) of 7.58 mΩ cm2. Different FLRs parameters have no effect on the forward device performance.

  10. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 136 - Definition and Procedure for the Determination of the Method Detection Limit-Revision 1.11

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Determination of the Method Detection Limit-Revision 1.11 B Appendix B to Part 136 Protection of Environment... Determination of the Method Detection Limit—Revision 1.11 Definition The method detection limit (MDL) is defined... processing steps of the analytical method be included in the determination of the method detection limit....

  11. Combination of high spatial resolution and low minimum detection limit using thinned specimens in cutting-edge electron probe microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Yugo; Hamada, Kotaro

    2015-10-01

    The effect of sample thickness on the spatial resolution and minimum detection limit (MDL) has been investigated for field-emission electron probe microanalysis with wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (FE-EPMA-WDX). Indium gallium phosphide samples thinned to thicknesses of about 100, 130, 210, 310, and 430 nm provided effective thin-sample FE-EPMA-WDX in the resolution range of 40-350 nm and MDL range of 13,000-600 ppm (mass). A comparison of the FE-EPMA results for thin and bulk samples demonstrated that thin-sample FE-EPMA can achieve both higher sensitivity and better spatial resolution than is possible using bulk samples. Most of the X-rays that determine the MDL are generated in a surface region of the sample with a depth of approximately 300 nm. The spatial resolution and MDL can be tuned by the sample thickness. Furthermore, analysis of small amounts of Cl in SiO2 indicated that thin-sample FE-EPMA can realize a spatial resolution and MDL of 41 nm and 446 ppm at Iprob=50 nA, respectively, whereas bulk-sample FE-EPMA offers a resolution of only 348 nm and MDL of 426 ppm.

  12. Geometrical configurations of unphased diffraction-limited antennas in passive millimetre-wave imaging systems for concealed weapon detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serenelli, Roberto

    2004-12-01

    This paper analyzes simple imaging configurations to scan a human body, suitable as passive or active millimetre-wave imaging systems for concealed weapon detection (CWD). The first cylindrical configuration allows a 360 degrees scan: N unphased diffraction-limited antennas each of size L are placed on a circular support surrounding the subject (allowing scanning in the horizontal plane with N non-overlapping independent beams), and this circle is mechanically displaced over the whole body height. An analytical formula gives the maximum obtainable spatial resolution for different dimensions of the circular scanning device and operating frequencies, and the number of receivers achieving this optimal resolution. Constraints to be taken into account are diffraction, the usable total length of the circle, and the full coverage by the N beams over the subject, which is modelled as a cylinder with variable radius, coaxial with the scanning circle. Numerical calculations of system resolution are shown for different operating microwave (MW) and millimetre-wave (MMW) frequencies; in order to study off-axis performances, situations where the subject is not coaxial with the scanning device are also considered. For the case of a parallelepiped to be imaged instead of a cylinder, a linear array configuration is analyzed similarly to the circular one. A theoretical study is carried out to design other curved arrays, filled with unphased diffraction-limited antennas, for the imaging of linear subjects with finer resolution. Finally, the application of such configurations is considered for the design of active imaging systems, and different system architectures are discussed.

  13. Detection limits of tidal-wetland sequences to identify variable rupture modes of megathrust earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shennan, Ian; Garrett, Ed; Barlow, Natasha

    2016-10-01

    Recent paleoseismological studies question whether segment boundaries identified for 20th and 21st century great, >M8, earthquakes persist through multiple earthquake cycles or whether smaller segments with different boundaries rupture and cause significant hazards. The smaller segments may include some currently slipping rather than locked. In this review, we outline general principles regarding indicators of relative sea-level change in tidal wetlands and the conditions in which paleoseismic indicators must be distinct from those resulting from non-seismic processes. We present new evidence from sites across southcentral Alaska to illustrate different detection limits of paleoseismic indicators and consider alternative interpretations for marsh submergence and emergence. We compare predictions of coseismic uplift and subsidence derived from geophysical models of earthquakes with different rupture modes. The spatial patterns of agreement and misfits between model predictions and quantitative reconstructions of coseismic submergence and emergence suggest that no earthquake within the last 4000 years had a pattern of rupture the same as the Mw 9.2 Alaska earthquake in 1964. From the Alaska examples and research from other subduction zones we suggest that If we want to understand whether a megathrust ruptures in segments of variable length in different earthquakes, we need to be site-specific as to what sort of geological-based criteria eliminate the possibility of a particular rupture mode in different earthquakes. We conclude that coastal paleoseismological studies benefit from a methodological framework that employs rigorous evaluation of five essential criteria and a sixth which may be very robust but only occur at some sites: 1 - lateral extent of peat-mud or mud-peat couplets with sharp contacts; 2 - suddenness of submergence or emergence, and replicated within each site; 3 - amount of vertical motion, quantified with 95% error terms and replicated within each

  14. Detection limits for actinides in a monochromatic, wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Michael L; Havrilla, George J

    2009-01-01

    Recent developments in x-ray optics have made it possible to examine the L x-rays of actinides using doubly-curved crystals in a bench-top device. A doubly-curved crystal (DCC) acts as a focusing monochromatic filter for polychromatic x-rays. A Monochromatic, Wavelength-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (MWDXRF) instrument that uses DCCs to measure Cm and Pu in reprocessing plant liquors was proposed in 2007 by the authors at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A prototype design of this MWDXRF instrument was developed in collaboration with X-ray Optical Systems Inc. (XOS), of East Greenbush, New York. In the MWDXRF instrument, x-rays from a Rhodium-anode x-ray tube are passed through a primary DCC to produce a monochromatic beam of 20.2-keV photons. This beam is focused on a specimen that may contain actinides. The 20.2-keV interrogating beam is just above the L3 edge of Californium; each actinide (with Z = 90 to 98) present in the specimen emits characteristic L x-rays as the result of L3-shell vacancies. In the LANL-XOS prototype MWDXRf, these x-rays enter a secondary DCC optic that preferentially passes 14.961-keV photons, corresponding to the L-alpha-1 x-ray peak of Curium. In the present stage of experimentation, Curium-bearing specimens have not been analyzed with the prototype MWDXRF instrument. Surrogate materials for Curium include Rubidium, which has a K-beta-l x-ray at 14.961 keV, and Yttrium, which has a K-alpha-1 x-ray at 14.958 keV. In this paper, the lower limit of detection for Curium in the LANL-XOS prototype MWDXRF instrument is estimated. The basis for this estimate is described, including a description of computational models and benchmarking techniques used. Detection limits for other actinides are considered, as well as future safeguards applications for MWDXRF instrumentation.

  15. Detecting regime shifts in marine systems with limited biological data: An example from southeast Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litzow, Michael A.; Hobday, Alistair J.; Frusher, Stewart D.; Dann, Peter; Tuck, Geoffrey N.

    2016-02-01

    The ability to detect ecological regime shifts in a data-limited setting was investigated, using southeast Australian ecosystems as a model. Community variability was summarized for 1968-2008 with the first two principal components (PCs) of recruitment estimates for six fish stocks and reproductive parameters for four seabird species; regional climate was summarized for 1953-2008 with the first two PCs for three parameters (sea surface temperature [SST], sea surface salinity, surface nitrate) measured at two stations; and basin-scale climate variability was summarized for 1950-2012 with mean South Pacific SST and the first two PCs of detrended South Pacific SST. The first two biology PCs explained 45% of total community variability. The first two PCs of basin-scale SST showed abrupt shifts similar to "regime" behavior observed in other ocean basins, and the first PC of basin-scale SST showed significant covariation with the first PC of regional climate. Together, these results are consistent with the strong community variability and decadal-scale red noise climatic variability associated with Northern Hemisphere regime shifts. However, statistical model selection showed that the first two PCs of regional climate and the first PC of biology time series all exhibited linear change, rather than abrupt shifts. This result is consistent with previous studies documenting rapid linear change in the climate and biology of southeast Australian shelf ecosystems, and we conclude that there is no evidence for regime shift behavior in the region's ecology. However, analysis of a large set of previously-published biological time series from the North Pacific (n = 64) suggests that studies using fewer than ∼30 biological time series, such as this one, may be unable to detect regime shifts. Thus we conclude that the nature of ecological variability in the region cannot be determined with available data. The development of additional long-term biological observations is needed

  16. Detecting differential transmissibilities that affect the size of self-limited outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, Seth; Funk, Sebastian; Pulliam, Juliet R C

    2014-10-01

    Our ability to respond appropriately to infectious diseases is enhanced by identifying differences in the potential for transmitting infection between individuals. Here, we identify epidemiological traits of self-limited infections (i.e. infections with an effective reproduction number satisfying [0 < R eff < 1) that correlate with transmissibility. Our analysis is based on a branching process model that permits statistical comparison of both the strength and heterogeneity of transmission for two distinct types of cases. Our approach provides insight into a variety of scenarios, including the transmission of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in the Arabian peninsula, measles in North America, pre-eradication smallpox in Europe, and human monkeypox in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. When applied to chain size data for MERS-CoV transmission before 2014, our method indicates that despite an apparent trend towards improved control, there is not enough statistical evidence to indicate that R eff has declined with time. Meanwhile, chain size data for measles in the United States and Canada reveal statistically significant geographic variation in R eff, suggesting that the timing and coverage of national vaccination programs, as well as contact tracing procedures, may shape the size distribution of observed infection clusters. Infection source data for smallpox suggests that primary cases transmitted more than secondary cases, and provides a quantitative assessment of the effectiveness of control interventions. Human monkeypox, on the other hand, does not show evidence of differential transmission between animals in contact with humans, primary cases, or secondary cases, which assuages the concern that social mixing can amplify transmission by secondary cases. Lastly, we evaluate surveillance requirements for detecting a change in the human-to-human transmission of monkeypox since the cessation of cross-protective smallpox vaccination. Our

  17. Visual acuity of the honey bee retina and the limits for feature detection

    PubMed Central

    Rigosi, Elisa; Wiederman, Steven D.; O’Carroll, David C.

    2017-01-01

    Visual abilities of the honey bee have been studied for more than 100 years, recently revealing unexpectedly sophisticated cognitive skills rivalling those of vertebrates. However, the physiological limits of the honey bee eye have been largely unaddressed and only studied in an unnatural, dark state. Using a bright display and intracellular recordings, we here systematically investigated the angular sensitivity across the light adapted eye of honey bee foragers. Angular sensitivity is a measure of photoreceptor receptive field size and thus small values indicate higher visual acuity. Our recordings reveal a fronto-ventral acute zone in which angular sensitivity falls below 1.9°, some 30% smaller than previously reported. By measuring receptor noise and responses to moving dark objects, we also obtained direct measures of the smallest features detectable by the retina. In the frontal eye, single photoreceptors respond to objects as small as 0.6° × 0.6°, with >99% reliability. This indicates that honey bee foragers possess significantly better resolution than previously reported or estimated behaviourally, and commonly assumed in modelling of bee acuity. PMID:28383025

  18. Review of plasmonic fiber optic biochemical sensors: improving the limit of detection.

    PubMed

    Caucheteur, Christophe; Guo, Tuan; Albert, Jacques

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of the technologies used to implement surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effects into fiber-optic sensors for chemical and biochemical applications and a survey of results reported over the last ten years. The performance indicators that are relevant for such systems, such as refractometric sensitivity, operating wavelength, and figure of merit (FOM), are discussed and listed in table form. A list of experimental results with reported limits of detection (LOD) for proteins, toxins, viruses, DNA, bacteria, glucose, and various chemicals is also provided for the same time period. Configurations discussed include fiber-optic analogues of the Kretschmann-Raether prism SPR platforms, made from geometry-modified multimode and single-mode optical fibers (unclad, side-polished, tapered, and U-shaped), long period fiber gratings (LPFG), tilted fiber Bragg gratings (TFBG), and specialty fibers (plastic or polymer, microstructured, and photonic crystal fibers). Configurations involving the excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) on continuous thin metal layers as well as those involving localized SPR (LSPR) phenomena in nanoparticle metal coatings of gold, silver, and other metals at visible and near-infrared wavelengths are described and compared quantitatively.

  19. Polarization-resolved sensing with tilted fiber Bragg gratings: theory and limits of detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialiayeu, Aliaksandr; Ianoul, Anatoli; Albert, Jacques

    2015-08-01

    Polarization based sensing with tilted fiber Bragg grating (TFBG) sensors is analysed theoretically by two alternative approaches. The first method is based on tracking the grating transmission for two orthogonal states of linear polarized light that are extracted from the measured Jones matrix or Stokes vectors of the TFBG transmission spectra. The second method is based on the measurements along the system principle axes and polarization dependent loss (PDL) parameter, also calculated from measured data. It is shown that the frequent crossing of the Jones matrix eigenvalues as a function of wavelength leads to a non-physical interchange of the calculated principal axes; a method to remove this unwanted mathematical artefact and to restore the order of the system eigenvalues and the corresponding principal axes is provided. A comparison of the two approaches reveals that the PDL method provides a smaller standard deviation and therefore lower limit of detection in refractometric sensing. Furthermore, the polarization analysis of the measured spectra allows for the identification of the principal states of polarization of the sensor system and consequentially for the calculation of the transmission spectrum for any incident polarization state. The stability of the orientation of the system principal axes is also investigated as a function of wavelength.

  20. Pushing the detection limit of infrared spectroscopy for structural analysis of dilute protein samples.

    PubMed

    Baldassarre, Maurizio; Barth, Andreas

    2014-11-07

    Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy is a powerful and versatile tool to investigate the structure and dynamics of proteins in solution. The intrinsically low extinction coefficient of the amide I mode, the main structure-related oscillator, together with the high infrared absorptivity of aqueous media, requires that proteins are studied at high concentrations (>10 mg L(-1)). This may represent a challenge in the study of aggregation-prone proteins and peptides, and questions the significance of structural data obtained for proteins physiologically existing at much lower concentrations. Here we describe the development of a simple experimental approach that increases the detection limit of protein structure analysis by infrared spectroscopy. Our approach relies on custom-made filters to isolate the amide I region (1700-1600 cm(-1)) from irrelevant spectral regions. The sensitivity of the instrument is then increased by background attenuation, an approach consisting in the use of a neutral density filter, such as a non-scattering metal grid, to attentuate the intensity of the background spectrum. When the filters and grid are combined, a 2.4-fold improvement in the noise level can be obtained. We have successfully tested this approach using a highly diluted solution of pyruvate kinase in deuterated medium (0.2% w/v), and found that it provides spectra of a quality comparable to those recorded with a 10-fold higher protein concentration.

  1. Protein immunoassay methods for detection of biotech crops: applications, limitations, and practical considerations.

    PubMed

    Stave, James W

    2002-01-01

    Immunoassay methods are available for detection and quantitation of proteins expressed by most biotechnology-derived crops in commercial production. The 2 most common test formats are enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunochromatographic (lateral flow) strip tests. Two ELISA methods, one for Roundup Ready soybeans and one for MON810 CrylAb corn, were the subject of large international collaborative studies and were demonstrated to quantitatively determine the concentrations of biotech crops in samples of ground grain. Quantitative ELISA methods are also useful for analysis of processed fractions of agricultural commodities such as soybean toasted meal or corn flour. Both strip tests and ELISAs for biotech crops are currently being used on a large scale in the United States to manage the sale and distribution of grain. In these applications, tests are used to determine if the concentration of biotech grain is above or below specified threshold limits. Using existing U.S. Department of Agriculture sampling techniques, the reliability of the threshold determination is expressed in terms of statistical confidence rather than analytical precision. Combining the use of protein immunoassays with Identity Preservation systems provides an effective means of characterizing the raw and processed agricultural inputs to the food production system in a way that allows food producers to comply with labeling laws.

  2. Probe-Specific Procedure to Estimate Sensitivity and Detection Limits for 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Alexander J.; Granwehr, Josef; Lesbats, Clémentine; Krupa, James L.; Six, Joseph S.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Thomas, Neil R.; Auer, Dorothee P.; Meersmann, Thomas; Faas, Henryk M.

    2016-01-01

    Due to low fluorine background signal in vivo, 19F is a good marker to study the fate of exogenous molecules by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using equilibrium nuclear spin polarization schemes. Since 19F MRI applications require high sensitivity, it can be important to assess experimental feasibility during the design stage already by estimating the minimum detectable fluorine concentration. Here we propose a simple method for the calibration of MRI hardware, providing sensitivity estimates for a given scanner and coil configuration. An experimental “calibration factor” to account for variations in coil configuration and hardware set-up is specified. Once it has been determined in a calibration experiment, the sensitivity of an experiment or, alternatively, the minimum number of required spins or the minimum marker concentration can be estimated without the need for a pilot experiment. The definition of this calibration factor is derived based on standard equations for the sensitivity in magnetic resonance, yet the method is not restricted by the limited validity of these equations, since additional instrument-dependent factors are implicitly included during calibration. The method is demonstrated using MR spectroscopy and imaging experiments with different 19F samples, both paramagnetically and susceptibility broadened, to approximate a range of realistic environments. PMID:27727294

  3. Factors influencing the detection limit of the lateral-flow sandwich immunoassay: a case study with potato virus X.

    PubMed

    Safenkova, Irina; Zherdev, Anatoly; Dzantiev, Boris

    2012-06-01

    Key factors influencing the analyte detection limit of the sandwich immunochromatographic assay (ICA), namely, the size of gold nanoparticles, the antibody concentration, the conjugation pH, and characteristics of membranes, are discussed. The impacts of these factors were quantitatively characterized and compared for the first time using the same antigen (potato virus X). The antibody-colloidal gold conjugates synthesized at pH 9.0-9.5 (the pH was examined in the range from 7.5 to 10.0) and at an antibody concentration of 15 μg/mL (the concentration was tested from 10 to 100 μg/mL) demonstrated maximum binding with the analyte. The relationship between the size of gold nanoparticles and the ICA detection limit was determined. The detection limit decreases from 80 to 3 ng/mL (for antibodies with K (D) = 1.0 × 10(-9) M, data were obtained using a BIAcore X instrument) for a series of particles with a diameter from 6.4 to 33.4 nm (electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering data). In the case of larger particles (52 nm in diameter), the detection limit increases and reaches 9 ng/mL. A 10 mM phosphate buffer, pH 8, and a 50 mM phosphate buffer, pH 7, were the conditions of choice for the deposition of reactants. Taking into account these facts, we developed a lateral-flow test system for the rapid (10 min) detection of potato virus X in plant leaves. The ICA provided a visual detection limit of 3 ng/mL. In the case of the instrumental processing, potato virus X can be determined in the concentration range from 3 to 300 ng/mL with a detection limit 2 ng/mL.

  4. An investigation of signal performance enhancements achieved through innovative pixel design across several generations of indirect detection, active matrix, flat-panel arrays

    PubMed Central

    Antonuk, Larry E.; Zhao, Qihua; El-Mohri, Youcef; Du, Hong; Wang, Yi; Street, Robert A.; Ho, Jackson; Weisfield, Richard; Yao, William

    2009-01-01

    Active matrix flat-panel imager (AMFPI) technology is being employed for an increasing variety of imaging applications. An important element in the adoption of this technology has been significant ongoing improvements in optical signal collection achieved through innovations in indirect detection array pixel design. Such improvements have a particularly beneficial effect on performance in applications involving low exposures and∕or high spatial frequencies, where detective quantum efficiency is strongly reduced due to the relatively high level of additive electronic noise compared to signal levels of AMFPI devices. In this article, an examination of various signal properties, as determined through measurements and calculations related to novel array designs, is reported in the context of the evolution of AMFPI pixel design. For these studies, dark, optical, and radiation signal measurements were performed on prototype imagers incorporating a variety of increasingly sophisticated array designs, with pixel pitches ranging from 75 to 127 μm. For each design, detailed measurements of fundamental pixel-level properties conducted under radiographic and fluoroscopic operating conditions are reported and the results are compared. A series of 127 μm pitch arrays employing discrete photodiodes culminated in a novel design providing an optical fill factor of ∼80% (thereby assuring improved x-ray sensitivity), and demonstrating low dark current, very low charge trapping and charge release, and a large range of linear signal response. In two of the designs having 75 and 90 μm pitches, a novel continuous photodiode structure was found to provide fill factors that approach the theoretical maximum of 100%. Both sets of novel designs achieved large fill factors by employing architectures in which some, or all of the photodiode structure was elevated above the plane of the pixel addressing transistor. Generally, enhancement of the fill factor in either discrete or continuous

  5. Exploring the Limits of Waveform Correlation Event Detection as Applied to Three Earthquake Aftershock Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. J.; Carr, D.; Resor, M.; Duffey, S.

    2009-12-01

    Swarms of earthquakes and/or aftershock sequences can dramatically increase the level of seismicity in a region for a period of time lasting from days to months, depending on the swarm or sequence. Such occurrences can provide a large amount of useful information to seismologists. For those who monitor seismic events for possible nuclear explosions, however, these swarms/sequences are a nuisance. In an explosion monitoring system, each event must be treated as a possible nuclear test until it can be proven, to a high degree of confidence, not to be. Seismic events recorded by the same station with highly correlated waveforms almost certainly have a similar location and source type, so clusters of events within a swarm can quickly be identified as earthquakes. We have developed a number of tools that can be used to exploit the high degree of waveform similarity expected to be associated with swarms/sequences. Dendro Tool measures correlations between known events. The Waveform Correlation Detector is intended to act as a detector, finding events in raw data which correlate with known events. The Self Scanner is used to find all correlated segments within a raw data steam and does not require an event library. All three techniques together provide an opportunity to study the similarities of events in an aftershock sequence in different ways. To comprehensively characterize the benefits and limits of waveform correlation techniques, we studied 3 aftershock sequences, using our 3 tools, at multiple stations. We explored the effects of station distance and event magnitudes on correlation results. Lastly, we show the reduction in detection threshold and analyst workload offered by waveform correlation techniques compared to STA/LTA based detection. We analyzed 4 days of data from each aftershock sequence using all three methods. Most known events clustered in a similar manner across the toolsets. Up to 25% of catalogued events were found to be a member of a cluster. In

  6. Boosting the Quantitative Inorganic Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Sensing to the Limit: The Case of Nitrite/Nitrate Detection.

    PubMed

    Correa-Duarte, Miguel A; Pazos Perez, Nicolas; Guerrini, Luca; Giannini, Vincenzo; Alvarez-Puebla, Ramon A

    2015-03-05

    A high-performance ionic-sensing platform has been developed by an interdisciplinary approach, combining the classical colorimetric Griess reaction and new concepts of nanotechnology, such as plasmonic coupling of nanoparticles and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy. This approach exploits the advantages of combined SERS/surface-enhanced resonant Raman Scattering (SERRS) by inducing the formation of homogeneous hot spots and a colored complex in resonance with the laser line, to yield detection limits for nitrite down to the subpicomolar level. The performance of this new method was compared with the classical Griess reaction and ionic chromatography showing detection limits about 6 and 3 orders of magnitude lower, respectively.

  7. Addressing the Limit of Detectability of Residual Oxide Discontinuities in Friction Stir Butt Welds of Aluminum using Phased Array Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, P. H.

    2008-01-01

    This activity seeks to estimate a theoretical upper bound of detectability for a layer of oxide embedded in a friction stir weld in aluminum. The oxide is theoretically modeled as an ideal planar layer of aluminum oxide, oriented normal to an interrogating ultrasound beam. Experimentally-measured grain scattering level is used to represent the practical noise floor. Echoes from naturally-occurring oxides will necessarily fall below this theoretical limit, and must be above the measurement noise to be potentially detectable.

  8. Analysis of the limiting noise and identification of some factors that dictate the detection limits in a low-power inductively coupled argon plasma system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boumans, P. W. J. M.; McKenna, R. J.; Bosveld, M.

    The background signal defined as the output signal ( xB) of the photomultiplier and the relative standard deviation (RSD) of xB at the wavelengths of 36 prominent analysis lines in the 190-320 nm region were measured under ICP compromise conditions for simultaneous multi-element analysis using a monochromator with an experimental spectral bandwidth of 0.015 nm. The RSD was found to vary systematically with xB according to the theoretically expected relationship RSD = (α B2 + gβ/ xB) 1/2 where α B(≈0.5%) is the constant source flicker noise contribution, gβ/ xB the shot-noise contribution and gβ a coefficient containing the photomultiplier (PMT) gain g. Dark current detector noise was negligible, at least in part, owing to the use of lock-in amplification. The validity of relationship (0) was tested for various types of PMT and for both pure aqueous solutions and solutions with 1 to 3% w/v amounts of either calcium chloride, sodium chloride, or a mixture of nickel and cobalt nitrates. Only in the case of the nickel-cobalt matrix were some departures found and these were attributable to line coincidences. Relationship (0) was found to apply also to net line signals, the flicker noise term, α s, then being about 1% instead of 0.5% for the present ICP system. Detection limits for 36 prominent lines of the elements As, Au, B, Be, Bi, Ge, In, Mg, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn and Zn were computed on the basis of relationship (0) and measured signal-to-background ratios (SBR). The results permitted an assessment of the separate effects that SBR, source flicker noise and shot noise have on the detection limits and this facilitated a detailed comparison of the detection limits obtained in this work with those reported by Winge, Peterson and Fassel [ Appl. Spectrosc.33, 106 (1979)]. The measurements of detection limits were extended to solutions with matrices (calcium chloride, sodium chloride, and a mixture of nickel and cobalt nitrates) to test the validity of the

  9. Application of modern anticoincidence (AC) system in HPGe γ-spectrometry for the detection limit lowering of the radionuclides in air filters.

    PubMed

    Długosz-Lisiecka, Magdalena

    2017-04-01

    The use of active and passive shields can substantially reduce the Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) of the γ-ray counting systems, rejecting events induced by cosmic-rays or by environmental radioactivity. However, the size and geometry of the samples lead to limitations in the background reduction in routine measurements. The Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) values for low energy of γ-ray emitting radionuclides (<200 keV) deposited in three typical air filter geometries have been compared for anticoincidence and single HPGe detector mode of γ-spectrometry systems. The relative increase in the Figure Of Merit (FOM) values from to 10-37% has been achieved for AC counting mode for radionuclides of (210)Pb, (234)Th, (235)U and (226)Ra deposited on the three kinds of air filters.

  10. Rapid methods for the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens: principles, applications, advantages and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of foodborne diseases has increased over the years and resulted in major public health problem globally. Foodborne pathogens can be found in various foods and it is important to detect foodborne pathogens to provide safe food supply and to prevent foodborne diseases. The conventional methods used to detect foodborne pathogen are time consuming and laborious. Hence, a variety of methods have been developed for rapid detection of foodborne pathogens as it is required in many food analyses. Rapid detection methods can be categorized into nucleic acid-based, biosensor-based and immunological-based methods. This review emphasizes on the principles and application of recent rapid methods for the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens. Detection methods included are simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR), multiplex PCR, real-time PCR, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA), loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and oligonucleotide DNA microarray which classified as nucleic acid-based methods; optical, electrochemical and mass-based biosensors which classified as biosensor-based methods; enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and lateral flow immunoassay which classified as immunological-based methods. In general, rapid detection methods are generally time-efficient, sensitive, specific and labor-saving. The developments of rapid detection methods are vital in prevention and treatment of foodborne diseases. PMID:25628612

  11. Rapid methods for the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens: principles, applications, advantages and limitations.

    PubMed

    Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of foodborne diseases has increased over the years and resulted in major public health problem globally. Foodborne pathogens can be found in various foods and it is important to detect foodborne pathogens to provide safe food supply and to prevent foodborne diseases. The conventional methods used to detect foodborne pathogen are time consuming and laborious. Hence, a variety of methods have been developed for rapid detection of foodborne pathogens as it is required in many food analyses. Rapid detection methods can be categorized into nucleic acid-based, biosensor-based and immunological-based methods. This review emphasizes on the principles and application of recent rapid methods for the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens. Detection methods included are simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR), multiplex PCR, real-time PCR, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA), loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and oligonucleotide DNA microarray which classified as nucleic acid-based methods; optical, electrochemical and mass-based biosensors which classified as biosensor-based methods; enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and lateral flow immunoassay which classified as immunological-based methods. In general, rapid detection methods are generally time-efficient, sensitive, specific and labor-saving. The developments of rapid detection methods are vital in prevention and treatment of foodborne diseases.

  12. Compact quantum dot-antibody conjugates for FRET immunoassays with subnanomolar detection limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattera, Lucia; Bhuckory, Shashi; Wegner, K. David; Qiu, Xue; Agnese, Fabio; Lincheneau, Christophe; Senden, Tim; Djurado, David; Charbonnière, Loïc J.; Hildebrandt, Niko; Reiss, Peter

    2016-05-01

    A novel two-step approach for quantum dot (QD) functionalization and bioconjugation is presented, which yields ultra-compact, stable, and highly luminescent antibody-QD conjugates suitable for use in FRET immunoassays. Hydrophobic InPZnS/ZnSe/ZnS (emission wavelength: 530 nm), CdSe/ZnS (605 nm), and CdSeTe/ZnS (705 nm) QDs were surface functionalized with zwitterionic penicillamine, enabling aqueous phase transfer under conservation of the photoluminescence properties. Post-functionalization with a heterobifunctional crosslinker, containing a lipoic acid group and a maleimide function, enabled the subsequent coupling to sulfhydryl groups of proteins. This was demonstrated by QD conjugation with fragmented antibodies (F(ab)). The obtained F(ab)-QD conjugates range among the smallest antibody-functionalized nanoprobes ever reported, with a hydrodynamic diameter <13 nm, PL quantum yield up to 66% at 705 nm, and colloidal stability of several months in various buffers. They were applied as FRET acceptors in homogeneous, time-gated immunoassays using Tb-antibodies as FRET donors, both coupled by an immunological sandwich complex between the two antibodies and a PSA (prostate specific antigen) biomarker. The advantages of the compact surface coating for FRET could be demonstrated by an 6.2 and 2.5 fold improvement of the limit of detection (LOD) for PSA compared to commercially available hydrophilic QDs emitting at 605 and 705 nm, respectively. While the commercial QDs contain identical inorganic cores responsible for their fluorescence, they are coated with a comparably thick amphiphilic polymer layer leading to much larger hydrodynamic diameters (>26 nm without biomolecules). The LODs of 0.8 and 3.7 ng mL-1 obtained in 50 μL serum samples are below the clinical cut-off level of PSA (4 ng mL-1) and demonstrate their direct applicability in clinical diagnostics.A novel two-step approach for quantum dot (QD) functionalization and bioconjugation is presented, which yields

  13. Qualitative Contrast between Knowledge-Limited Mixed-State and Variable-Resources Models of Visual Change Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nosofsky, Robert M.; Donkin, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We report an experiment designed to provide a qualitative contrast between knowledge-limited versions of mixed-state and variable-resources (VR) models of visual change detection. The key data pattern is that observers often respond "same" on big-change trials, while simultaneously being able to discriminate between same and small-change…

  14. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 425 - Definition and Procedure for the Determination of the Method Detection Limit 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... processing steps of the analytical method be included in the determination of the method detection limit. The... corresponds to an instrument signal/noise ratio in the range of 2.5 to 5. If the criteria for qualitative identification of the analyte is based upon pattern recognition techniques, the least abundant signal...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 425 - Definition and Procedure for the Determination of the Method Detection Limit 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... processing steps of the analytical method be included in the determination of the method detection limit. The... corresponds to an instrument signal/noise ratio in the range of 2.5 to 5. If the criteria for qualitative identification of the analyte is based upon pattern recognition techniques, the least abundant signal...

  16. SUPPLEMENT TO EPA COMPENDIUM METHOD TO-15 - REDUCTION OF METHOD DETECTION LIMITS TO MEET VAPOR INTRUSION MONITORING NEEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Supplement to EPA Compendium Method TO-15 provides guidance for reducing the method detection limit (MDL) for the compound 1,1- dichloroethene (1,1-DCE) and for other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from 0.5 ppbv, as cited in Method TO-15, to much lower concentrations. R...

  17. SUPPLEMENT TO EPA COMPENDIUM METHOD TO-15 - REDUCTION OF METHOD DETECTION LIMITS TO MEET VAPOR INTRUSION MONITORING NEEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Supplement to EPA Compendium Method TO-15 provides guidance for reducing the method detection limit (MDL) for the compound 1,1-dichloroethene (1,1-DCE) and for other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from 0.5 parts per billion by volume (ppbv), as cited in Method TO-15, to ...

  18. Optimizing the Thermal Read-Out Technique for MIP-Based Biomimetic Sensors: Towards Nanomolar Detection Limits

    PubMed Central

    Geerets, Bram; Peeters, Marloes; van Grinsven, Bart; Bers, Karolien; de Ceuninck, Ward; Wagner, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    In previous work, the novel heat-transfer method (HTM) for the detection of small molecules with Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIP)-type receptors was presented. In this study we focus on optimization of this sensor performance, with as final aim to lower the detection limit by reducing the noise level. It was determined that the noise originates foremost from the power supply, which can be controlled by varying the PID parameters. Therefore, the effect of the individual parameters was evaluated by tuning P, I and D separately at a temperature of 37 °C, giving a first indication of the optimal configuration. Next, a temperature profile was programmed and the standard deviation of the heat-transfer resistance over the entire regime was studied for a set of parameters. The optimal configuration, P1-I6-D0, reduced the noise level with nearly a factor of three compared to the original parameters of P10-I5-D0. With the optimized settings, the detection of L-nicotine in buffer solutions was studied and the detection limit improved significantly from 100 nM to 35 nM. Summarizing, optimization of the PID parameters and thereby improving the detection limit is a key parameter for first applications of the HTM-method for MIP receptors in analytical research. PMID:23863857

  19. Limits of detections for the determination of mono- and dicarboxylic acids using gas and liquid chromatographic methods coupled with mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Št’ávová, Jana; Beránek, Josef; Nelson, Eric P.; Diep, Bonnie A.; Kubátová, Alena

    2011-01-01

    The chromatographic separation and instrumental limits of detection (LODs) were obtained for a broad range of C1-C18 monocarboxylic (MCAs) and C2-C14 dicarboxylic acids (DCAs) employing either chemical derivatization followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and flame ionization detection (GC-MS/FID) or direct analysis with liquid chromatography high resolution MS and tandem MS (LC-MS). Suitability, efficiency and stability of reaction products for several derivatization agents used for esterification (BF3/butanol), and trimethysilylation, including trimethylsilyl-N-N-dimethylcarbamate (TMSDMC) and N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) were evaluated. The lowest limits of detection for the majority of compounds below 10 pg (with the exception of acetic acid) were obtained for derivatization with BF3/butanol followed by GC-MS in the total ion current (TIC) mode. Further improvements were achieved when applying either selected ion monitoring (SIM), which decreased the LODs to 1–4 pg or a combination of SIM and TIC (SITI) (2–5 pg). GC-FID provided LODs comparable to those obtained by GC-MS TIC. Both trimethylsilylation (followed by GC-MS) and direct LC-MS/MS analysis yielded LODs of 5– 40 pg for most of the acids. For volatile acids the LODs were higher, e.g., 25 and 590 ng for TMSDMC and BSTFA derivatized formic acid, respectively whereas the LC-MS methods did not allow for the analysis of formic acid at all. PMID:21185238

  20. H I detection survey of a complete magnitude-limited sample of dwarf irregular galaxies in the Virgo Cluster area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, G. Lyle; Glosson, John; Helou, George; Salpeter, E. E.; Sandage, A.

    1987-01-01

    New single-beam Arecibo H I observations of 298 late-type galaxies in the Virgo Cluster drawn mostly from the new catalog of Binggeli, Sandage, and Tammann (1985) are presented. Two hundred seventeen of these constitute a magnitude-limited 'complete sample' of such galaxies, types Sdm through Im and BCD. Sixty-one percent of this 'complete sample' was detected, greatly enhancing the store of redshifts and H I masses for such galaxies in the Virgo Cluster. For detected galaxies, heliocentric velocities, 50 percent profile widths, and single-beam fluxes are presented. For those that escaped detection, upper limits are computed to the flux appropriate to the redshift range (-600 to +3000 km/s).

  1. Limits on surface gravities of Kepler planet-candidate host stars from non-detection of solar-like oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Campante, T. L.; Chaplin, W. J.; Handberg, R.; Miglio, A.; Davies, G. R.; Elsworth, Y. P.; Lund, M. N.; Arentoft, T.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Karoff, C.; Kjeldsen, H.; Lundkvist, M.; Huber, D.; Hekker, S.; García, R. A.; Basu, S.; Bedding, T. R.; Gilliland, R. L.; Kawaler, S. D.; and others

    2014-03-10

    We present a novel method for estimating lower-limit surface gravities (log g) of Kepler targets whose data do not allow the detection of solar-like oscillations. The method is tested using an ensemble of solar-type stars observed in the context of the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium. We then proceed to estimate lower-limit log g for a cohort of Kepler solar-type planet-candidate host stars with no detected oscillations. Limits on fundamental stellar properties, as provided by this work, are likely to be useful in the characterization of the corresponding candidate planetary systems. Furthermore, an important byproduct of the current work is the confirmation that amplitudes of solar-like oscillations are suppressed in stars with increased levels of surface magnetic activity.

  2. Detection and quantification limits: basic concepts, international harmonization, and outstanding ("low-level") issues.

    PubMed

    Currie, L A

    2004-01-01

    A brief review is given of concepts, basic definitions, and terminology for metrological detection and quantification capabilities, representing harmonized recommendations and norms of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), respectively. Treatment of the (low-level) blank and variance function are discussed in some detail, together with special problems arising with detection decisions and the reporting of low-level data. Key references to the international documents follow, as well as specialized references addressing very low-level counting data, skewed environmental blank distributions, and multiple and multivariate detection decisions.

  3. ARE WE THERE YET? TIME TO DETECTION OF NANOHERTZ GRAVITATIONAL WAVES BASED ON PULSAR-TIMING ARRAY LIMITS

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, S. R.; Vallisneri, M.; Ellis, J. A.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Haasteren, R. van

    2016-03-01

    Decade-long timing observations of arrays of millisecond pulsars have placed highly constraining upper limits on the amplitude of the nanohertz gravitational-wave stochastic signal from the mergers of supermassive black hole binaries (∼10{sup −15} strain at f = 1 yr{sup −1}). These limits suggest that binary merger rates have been overestimated, or that environmental influences from nuclear gas or stars accelerate orbital decay, reducing the gravitational-wave signal at the lowest, most sensitive frequencies. This prompts the question whether nanohertz gravitational waves (GWs) are likely to be detected in the near future. In this Letter, we answer this question quantitatively using simple statistical estimates, deriving the range of true signal amplitudes that are compatible with current upper limits, and computing expected detection probabilities as a function of observation time. We conclude that small arrays consisting of the pulsars with the least timing noise, which yield the tightest upper limits, have discouraging prospects of making a detection in the next two decades. By contrast, we find large arrays are crucial to detection because the quadrupolar spatial correlations induced by GWs can be well sampled by many pulsar pairs. Indeed, timing programs that monitor a large and expanding set of pulsars have an ∼80% probability of detecting GWs within the next 10 years, under assumptions on merger rates and environmental influences ranging from optimistic to conservative. Even in the extreme case where 90% of binaries stall before merger and environmental coupling effects diminish low-frequency gravitational-wave power, detection is delayed by at most a few years.

  4. Are We There Yet? Time to Detection of Nanohertz Gravitational Waves Based on Pulsar-timing Array Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S. R.; Vallisneri, M.; Ellis, J. A.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Lazio, T. J. W.; van Haasteren, R.

    2016-03-01

    Decade-long timing observations of arrays of millisecond pulsars have placed highly constraining upper limits on the amplitude of the nanohertz gravitational-wave stochastic signal from the mergers of supermassive black hole binaries (˜10-15 strain at f = 1 yr-1). These limits suggest that binary merger rates have been overestimated, or that environmental influences from nuclear gas or stars accelerate orbital decay, reducing the gravitational-wave signal at the lowest, most sensitive frequencies. This prompts the question whether nanohertz gravitational waves (GWs) are likely to be detected in the near future. In this Letter, we answer this question quantitatively using simple statistical estimates, deriving the range of true signal amplitudes that are compatible with current upper limits, and computing expected detection probabilities as a function of observation time. We conclude that small arrays consisting of the pulsars with the least timing noise, which yield the tightest upper limits, have discouraging prospects of making a detection in the next two decades. By contrast, we find large arrays are crucial to detection because the quadrupolar spatial correlations induced by GWs can be well sampled by many pulsar pairs. Indeed, timing programs that monitor a large and expanding set of pulsars have an ˜80% probability of detecting GWs within the next 10 years, under assumptions on merger rates and environmental influences ranging from optimistic to conservative. Even in the extreme case where 90% of binaries stall before merger and environmental coupling effects diminish low-frequency gravitational-wave power, detection is delayed by at most a few years.

  5. Limitations of highly sensitive enzymatic presence-absence tests for detection of waterborne coliforms and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Van Poucke, S O; Nelis, H J

    1997-01-01

    This study presents evidence for the unfeasibility of enzymatic presence-absence tests to detect one total coliform or one Escherichia coli organism in 100 ml of drinking water within a working day. The results of field trials with prototype chemiluminometric procedures indicated that the sensitivity-boosting measures that are essential to achieve the required speed compromise the specificity of the tests. PMID:9023956

  6. Pushing the limits of nickel detection to nanomolar range using a set of engineered bioluminescent Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cayron, Julien; Prudent, Elsa; Escoffier, Camille; Gueguen, Erwan; Mandrand-Berthelot, Marie-Andrée; Pignol, David; Garcia, Daniel; Rodrigue, Agnès

    2017-01-01

    The detection of nickel in water is of great importance due to its harmfulness for living organism. A way to detect Ni is the use of whole-cell biosensors. The aim of the present work was to build a light-emitting bacterial biosensor for the detection of Ni with high specificity and low detection limit properties. For that purpose, the regulatory circuit implemented relied on the RcnR Ni/Co metallo-regulator and its rcnA natural target promoter fused to the lux reporter genes. To convert RcnR to specifically detect Ni, several mutations were tested and the C35A retained. Deleting the Ni efflux pump rcnA and introducing genes encoding several Ni-uptake systems lowered the detection thresholds. When these constructs were assayed in several Escherichia coli strains, it appeared that the detection thresholds were highly variable. The TD2158 wild-type E. coli gave rise to a biosensor ten times more active and sensitive than its W3110 E. coli K12 equivalent. This biosensor was able to confidently detect Ni concentrations as little as 80 nM (4.7 μg l(-1)), which makes its use compatible with the norms governing the drinking water quality.

  7. Rapid Detection Strategies for the Global Threat of Zika Virus: Current State, New Hypotheses, and Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Shruti; Hong, Sung-Yong; Chung, Soo Hyun; Kim, Myunghee

    2016-01-01

    The current scenario regarding the widespread Zika virus (ZIKV) has resulted in numerous diagnostic studies, specifically in South America and in locations where there is frequent entry of travelers returning from ZIKV-affected areas, including pregnant women with or without clinical symptoms of ZIKV infection. The World Health Organization, WHO, announced that millions of cases of ZIKV are likely to occur in the USA in the near future. This situation has created an alarming public health emergency of international concern requiring the detection of this life-threatening viral candidate due to increased cases of newborn microcephaly associated with ZIKV infection. Hence, this review reports possible methods and strategies for the fast and reliable detection of ZIKV with particular emphasis on current updates, knowledge, and new hypotheses that might be helpful for medical professionals in poor and developing countries that urgently need to address this problem. In particular, we emphasize liposome-based biosensors. Although these biosensors are currently among the less popular tools for human disease detection, they have become useful tools for the screening and detection of pathogenic bacteria, fungi, and viruses because of their versatile advantageous features compared to other sensing devices. This review summarizes the currently available methods employed for the rapid detection of ZIKV and suggests an innovative approach involving the application of a liposome-based hypothesis for the development of new strategies for ZIKV detection and their use as effective biomedicinal tools. PMID:27822207

  8. Rapid Detection Strategies for the Global Threat of Zika Virus: Current State, New Hypotheses, and Limitations.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shruti; Hong, Sung-Yong; Chung, Soo Hyun; Kim, Myunghee

    2016-01-01

    The current scenario regarding the widespread Zika virus (ZIKV) has resulted in numerous diagnostic studies, specifically in South America and in locations where there is frequent entry of travelers returning from ZIKV-affected areas, including pregnant women with or without clinical symptoms of ZIKV infection. The World Health Organization, WHO, announced that millions of cases of ZIKV are likely to occur in the USA in the near future. This situation has created an alarming public health emergency of international concern requiring the detection of this life-threatening viral candidate due to increased cases of newborn microcephaly associated with ZIKV infection. Hence, this review reports possible methods and strategies for the fast and reliable detection of ZIKV with particular emphasis on current updates, knowledge, and new hypotheses that might be helpful for medical professionals in poor and developing countries that urgently need to address this problem. In particular, we emphasize liposome-based biosensors. Although these biosensors are currently among the less popular tools for human disease detection, they have become useful tools for the screening and detection of pathogenic bacteria, fungi, and viruses because of their versatile advantageous features compared to other sensing devices. This review summarizes the currently available methods employed for the rapid detection of ZIKV and suggests an innovative approach involving the application of a liposome-based hypothesis for the development of new strategies for ZIKV detection and their use as effective biomedicinal tools.

  9. Prediction of the limits of detection of hazardous vapors by passive infrared with the use of modtran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanigan, Dennis F.

    1996-10-01

    Passive infrared remote detection of hazardous gases, vapors, and aerosols is based on the difference, T , between the air temperature of the threat vapor cloud and the effective radiative temperature of the background. In this paper I address the problem of detection with a low-angle-sky background. I used Modtran to predict T and atmospheric transmittance for standard atmospheric models. The detection limits, at 2-cm 1 resolution, are discussed for sulfur hexafluoride, Sarin, trichloroethylene, methyl isocyanate, mustard gas, methyl chloride, and sulfur dioxide for selected cases with the U.S. Standard, the Subarctic Winter, and the Tropical models. I used a particularly interesting case of Sarin detection with the Subarctic Winter atmospheric model to illustrate the power of Modtran to predict subtle changes in T with angle of elevation (AOE).

  10. Improved detection limits using a hand-held optical imager with coregistration capabilities.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Sarah J; Martinez, Sergio L; Gonzalez, Jean; Caldera, Lizeth; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2010-07-15

    Optical imaging is emerging as a non-invasive and non-ionizing method for breast cancer diagnosis. A hand-held optical imager has been developed with coregistration facilities towards flexible imaging of different tissue volumes and curvatures in near real-time. Herein, fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging experiments are performed to demonstrate deeper target detection under perfect and imperfect (100:1) uptake conditions in (liquid) tissue phantoms and in vitro. Upon summation of multiple scans (fluorescence intensity images), fluorescent targets are detected at greater depths than from single scan alone.

  11. The detection of landmines by neutron backscattering: exploring the limits of the technique.

    PubMed

    Viesti, G; Lunardon, M; Nebbia, G; Barbui, M; Cinausero, M; D'Erasmo, G; Palomba, M; Pantaleo, A; Obhodas, J; Valković, V

    2006-06-01

    Neutron backscattering (NB) sensors have been proposed for Humanitarian De-mining applications. Recently, a prototype hand-held system integrating a NB sensor in a metal detector has been developed within the EU-funded DIAMINE Project. The results obtained in terms of performance of the NB systems and limitations in its use are presented in this work. It is found that the performance of NB sensors is strongly limited by the presence of the soil moisture and by its small-scale variations. The use of the neutron hit distribution to reduce false alarms is explored.

  12. Detection limits of quantitative and digital PCR assays and their influence in presence-absence surveys of environmental DNA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, Margaret; Dorazio, Robert M.; Butterfield, John S.; Meigs-Friend, Gaia; Nico, Leo; Ferrante, Jason

    2017-01-01

    A set of universal guidelines is needed to determine the limit of detection (LOD) in PCR-based analyses of low concentration DNA. In particular, environmental DNA (eDNA) studies require sensitive and reliable methods to detect rare and cryptic species through shed genetic material in environmental samples. Current strategies for assessing detection limits of eDNA are either too stringent or subjective, possibly resulting in biased estimates of species’ presence. Here, a conservative LOD analysis grounded in analytical chemistry is proposed to correct for overestimated DNA concentrations predominantly caused by the concentration plateau, a nonlinear relationship between expected and measured DNA concentrations. We have used statistical criteria to establish formal mathematical models for both quantitative and droplet digital PCR. To assess the method, a new Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) TaqMan assay was developed and tested on both PCR platforms using eDNA in water samples. The LOD adjustment reduced Grass Carp occupancy and detection estimates while increasing uncertainty – indicating that caution needs to be applied to eDNA data without LOD correction. Compared to quantitative PCR, digital PCR had higher occurrence estimates due to increased sensitivity and dilution of inhibitors at low concentrations. Without accurate LOD correction, species occurrence and detection probabilities based on eDNA estimates are prone to a source of bias that cannot be reduced by an increase in sample size or PCR replicates. Other applications also could benefit from a standardized LOD such as GMO food analysis, and forensic and clinical diagnostics.

  13. Detection limits of quantitative and digital PCR assays and their influence in presence-absence surveys of environmental DNA.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Margaret E; Dorazio, Robert M; Butterfield, John S S; Meigs-Friend, Gaia; Nico, Leo G; Ferrante, Jason A

    2017-03-01

    A set of universal guidelines is needed to determine the limit of detection (LOD) in PCR-based analyses of low-concentration DNA. In particular, environmental DNA (eDNA) studies require sensitive and reliable methods to detect rare and cryptic species through shed genetic material in environmental samples. Current strategies for assessing detection limits of eDNA are either too stringent or subjective, possibly resulting in biased estimates of species' presence. Here, a conservative LOD analysis grounded in analytical chemistry is proposed to correct for overestimated DNA concentrations predominantly caused by the concentration plateau, a nonlinear relationship between expected and measured DNA concentrations. We have used statistical criteria to establish formal mathematical models for both quantitative and droplet digital PCR. To assess the method, a new Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) TaqMan assay was developed and tested on both PCR platforms using eDNA in water samples. The LOD adjustment reduced Grass Carp occupancy and detection estimates while increasing uncertainty-indicating that caution needs to be applied to eDNA data without LOD correction. Compared to quantitative PCR, digital PCR had higher occurrence estimates due to increased sensitivity and dilution of inhibitors at low concentrations. Without accurate LOD correction, species occurrence and detection probabilities based on eDNA estimates are prone to a source of bias that cannot be reduced by an increase in sample size or PCR replicates. Other applications also could benefit from a standardized LOD such as GMO food analysis and forensic and clinical diagnostics.

  14. Detection and identification of serum monoclonal immunoglobulin by immunoisoelectric focusing. Limits of sensitivity and use during relapse of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, D; Kumararatne, D S; Stott, D

    1984-01-01

    The limits of detection of four classes of monoclonal immunoglobulin and free light chain in serum by isoelectric focusing and immunoisoelectric focusing have been determined and the sensitivity of these techniques compared with that obtained using immunoelectrophoresis and zonal electrophoresis with immunofixation. Immunoisoelectric focusing was 10-40 times more sensitive than immunoelectrophoresis and could be used to detect concentrations of monoclonal immunoglobulin that were undetectable by zonal electrophoresis with immunofixation. The relevance of this work in monitoring multiple myeloma during treatment and relapse is discussed. Images PMID:6421894

  15. Limitations of the Score-Difference Method in Detecting Cheating in Recognition Test Situations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Dennis M.

    1987-01-01

    This study examines a score-difference model for the detection of cheating based on the difference between two scores for an examinee: one based on the appropriate scoring key and another based on an alternative, inappropriate key. It argues that the score-difference method could falsely accuse students as cheaters. (Author/JAZ)

  16. Limitations of a localized surface plasmon resonance sensor on Salmonella detection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have designed a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) biosensor to perform the whole cell detection of Salmonella using gold nanoparticls fabricated by oblique angle deposition technique. The LSPR sensor showed a plasmon peak shift due to the Salmonella antigen and anti-Salmonella antibody r...

  17. Comparison of laser excited fluorescence and photoacoustic limits of detection for static and flow cells

    SciTech Connect

    Voigtman, E.; Jurgensen, A.; Winefordner, J.D.

    1981-10-01

    The fluorescence and photoacoustic characteristics of a windowless flow cell intended for liquid chromatographic applications are compared with respective characteristics of a static cuvette cell. In addition, a photoionization mode of operation for the flow cell is exhibited which utilizes the ionization products of two-photon excitation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in n-alkanes to effect a sensitive detection of those PAHs.

  18. The 1000-th MASTER detection and SALT limit: Fast Doublet OT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balanutsa, P.; Lipunov, V.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Buckley, D.; Kniazev, A.; Tiurina, N.; Kornilov, V.; Samus, N.; Kuznetsov, A.; Vlasenko, D.; Gorbunov, I.; Popova, E.; Vladimirov, V.; Shumkov, V.; Potter, S.; Kotze, M.; Gress, O.; Budnev, N.; Yazev, S.; Ivanov, K.; Tlatov, A.; Senik, V.; Dormidontov, D.; Parhomenko, A. V.; Yurkov, V.; Sergienko, Yu.; Gabovich, A.; Sinyakov, E.; Rebolo, R.; Serra-Ricart, M.; Lodieu, N.; Israelian, G.; Suarez-Andres, L.; Levato, Hugo; Astronomicas, Carlos Saffe Instituto de Ciencias; Espacio, de la Tierra y. del; Podesta, Ricardo; Mallamaci, Claudio; Lopez, Carlos; Podesta, Federico

    2015-12-01

    MASTER-SAAO (Lipunov et al., "MASTER Global Robotic Net", Advances in Astronomy, 2010, 349171) discovered the 1000th OT source at (RA, Dec) = 05h 10m 14.58s -29d 09m 00.6s on 2015-12-16.97115 UT. The OT unfiltered magnitude is 18.8m (the limit is 20.4m).

  19. Driving down the Detection Limit in Microstructured Fiber-Based Chemical Dip Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Schartner, Erik P.; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike; Warren-Smith, Stephen C.; White, Richard T.; Monro, Tanya M.

    2011-01-01

    We present improvements to fluorescence sensing in soft-glass microstructured optical fibers that result in significantly improved sensitivity relative to previously published results. Concentrations of CdSe quantum dots down to 10 pM levels have been demonstrated. We show that the primary limitation to the sensitivity of these systems is the intrinsic fluorescence of the glass itself. PMID:22163778

  20. Super-resolving quantum radar: Coherent-state sources with homodyne detection suffice to beat the diffraction limit

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Kebei; Lee, Hwang; Gerry, Christopher C.; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2013-11-21

    There has been much recent interest in quantum metrology for applications to sub-Raleigh ranging and remote sensing such as in quantum radar. For quantum radar, atmospheric absorption and diffraction rapidly degrades any actively transmitted quantum states of light, such as N00N states, so that for this high-loss regime the optimal strategy is to transmit coherent states of light, which suffer no worse loss than the linear Beer's law for classical radar attenuation, and which provide sensitivity at the shot-noise limit in the returned power. We show that coherent radar radiation sources, coupled with a quantum homodyne detection scheme, provide both longitudinal and angular super-resolution much below the Rayleigh diffraction limit, with sensitivity at shot-noise in terms of the detected photon power. Our approach provides a template for the development of a complete super-resolving quantum radar system with currently available technology.

  1. Lower limit of detection: definition and elaboration of a proposed position for radiological effluent and environmental measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, L.A.

    1984-09-01

    A manual is provided to define and illustrate a proposed use of the Lower Limit of Detection (LLD) for Radiological Effluent and Environmental Measurements. The manual contains a review of information regarding LLD practices gained from site visits; a review of the literature and a summary of basic principles underlying the concept of detection in Nuclear and Analytical Chemistry; a detailed presentation of the application of LLD principles to a range of problem categories (simple counting to multinuclide spectroscopy), including derivations, equations, and numerical examples; and a brief examination of related issues such as reference samples, numerical quality control, and instrumental limitations. An appendix contains a summary of notation and terminology, a bibliography, and worked-out examples. 100 references, 10 figures, 7 tables.

  2. Joint data detection and parameter estimation: Fundamental limits and applications to optical fiber communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coskun, Orhan

    For ≥10-Gbit/s bit rates that are transmitted over ≥100 km, it is essential that chromatic The traditional method of sending a training signal to identify a channel, followed by data, may be viewed as a simple code for the unknown channel. Results in blind sequence detection suggest that performance similar to this traditional approach can be obtained without training. However, for short packets and/or time-recursive algorithms, significant error floors exist due to the existence of sequences that are indistinguishable without knowledge of the channel. In this work, we first reconsider training signal design in light of recent results in blind sequence detection. We design training codes which combine modulation and training. In order to design these codes, we find an expression for the pairwise error probability of the joint maximum likelihood (JML) channel and sequence estimator. This expression motivates a pairwise distance for the JML receiver based on principal angles between the range spaces of data matrices. The general code design problem (generalized sphere packing) is formulated as the clique problem associated with an unweighted, undirected graph. We provide optimal and heuristic algorithms for this clique problem. For short packets, we demonstrate that significant improvements are possible by jointly considering the design of the training, modulation, and receiver processing. As a practical blind data detection example, data reception in a fiber optical channel is investigated. To get the most out of the data detection methods, auxiliary algorithms such as sampling phase adjustment, decision threshold estimation algorithms are suggested. For the parallel implementation of detectors, semiring structure is introduced both for decision feedback equalizer (DFE) and maximum likelihood sequence detection (MLSD). Timing jitter is another parameter that affects the BER performance of the system. A data-aided clock recovery algorithm reduces the jitter of

  3. Study of Laser Produced Plasma of Limiter of the Aditya Tokomak for Detection of Molecular Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Awadhesh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The tokamak wall protection is one of the prime concerns, and for this purpose, limiters are used. Graphite is commonly used as a limiter material and first wall material for complete coverage of the internal vacuum vessel surfaces of the tokamak. From the past few years, we are working to identify and quantify the impurities deposited on the different part of Aditya Tokamak in collaboration with the Scientists at Institute of Plasma Research, Ahmedabad, India using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) [1-3]. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) spectra of limiter of Aditya Tokamak have been recorded in the spectral range of 200-900 nm in open atmosphere. Along with atomic and ionic spectral lines of the constituent elements of the limiter (1-3), LIBS spectra also give the molecular bands. When a high power laser beam is focused on the sample, laser induced plasma is produced on its surface. In early stage of the plasma Back ground continuum is dominated due to free-free or free-bound emission. Just after few nanoseconds the light from the plasma is dominated by ionic emission. Atomic emission spectra is dominated from the laser induced plasma during the first few microsecond after an ablation pulse where as molecular spectra is generated later when the plasma further cools down. For this purpose the LIBS spectra has been recorded with varying gate delay and gate width. The spectra of the limiter show the presence of molecular bands of CN and C2. To get better signal to background ratios of the molecular bands, different experimental parameters like gate delay, gate width, collection angle and collection point (spatial analysis off the plasama) of the plasma have been optimized. Thus the present paper deals with the variation of spectral intensity of the molecular bands with different experimental parameters. Keywords: Limiter, Molecular bands, C2, CN. References: 1. Proof-of-concept experiment for On-line LIBS Analysis of Impurity Layer Deposited on

  4. Limits to detection of generalized synchronization in delay-coupled chaotic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hideyuki; Soriano, Miguel C; Pereda, Ernesto; Fischer, Ingo; Mirasso, Claudio R

    2013-12-01

    We study how reliably generalized synchronization can be detected and characterized from time-series analysis. To that end, we analyze synchronization in a generalized sense of delay-coupled chaotic oscillators in unidirectional ring configurations. The generalized synchronization condition can be verified via the auxiliary system approach; however, in practice, this might not always be possible. Therefore, in this study, widely used indicators to directly quantify generalized and phase synchronization from noise-free time series of two oscillators are employed complementarily to the auxiliary system approach. In our analysis, none of the indices provide the consistent results of the auxiliary system approach. Our findings indicate that it is a major challenge to directly detect synchronization in a generalized sense between two oscillators that are connected via a chain of other oscillators, even if the oscillators are identical. This has major consequences for the interpretation of the dynamics of coupled systems and applications thereof.

  5. Characterization and comparison of defects detection limits of three ultrasonic non destructive methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Péronnet, E.; Eyma, F.; Welemane, H.; Pescay, C.

    2010-06-01

    This work deals with the Liquid Resin Infusion (LRI) process developed within the research program “FUSelage COMPosite” of DAHER SOCATA. This manufacturing process enables the realization of complex composite structures or fuselage elements in a single phase (mono-material), which considerably reduce connections and relative difficulties. The concern here is the investigation of non destructive testing (NDT) methods that can be applied to LRI-structures in order to define their capacities for defect detection, and especially their associated critical defect size. In aviation industry, the AITM standards require the ultrasonic testing as NDT for composite materials. Therefore the aim of this work is to characterize and compare three different and complementary ultrasonic techniques on composite specimens. Such analysis allows to define the NDT application field of each method in term of defect detection.

  6. Taking whispering gallery-mode single virus detection and sizing to the limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dantham, V. R.; Holler, S.; Kolchenko, V.; Wan, Z.; Arnold, S.

    2012-07-01

    We report the label-free detection and sizing by a microcavity of the smallest individual RNA virus, MS2, with a mass only ˜1% of InfluenzaA (6 vs. 512 ag). Although detection of such a small bio-nano-particle has been beyond the reach of a bare spherical microcavity, it was accomplished with ease (S/N = 8, Q = 4 × 105) using a single dipole stimulated plasmonic-nanoshell as a microcavity wavelength shift enhancer, providing an enhancement of ˜70×, in agreement with theory. Unique wavelength shift statistics are recorded consistent with an ultra-uniform genetically programmed substance that is drawn to the plasmonic hot spots by light-forces.

  7. Vertical Root Fracture Detection Using Limited-FOV Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    longitudinal orientation along the root (1). The prevalence in extracted endodontically treated teeth is 10.9% (2). Mandibular and maxillary premolars, and...significant, more artificial fractures were detected using both CBCT and PAs. It is possible that fracturing the tooth on the bench- top creates larger...397-403. 8. Huumonen S, Kvist T, Grondahl K, Molander A. Diagnostic value of computed tomography in re-treatment of root fillings in maxillary

  8. Exploring the Thermal Limits of IR-Based Automatic Whale Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    exclusion zone. Marine mammal observers usually scan the ship’s environs for whales using binoculars or the naked eye. Sightings mostly rely on spotting a...of an actively stabilized, spinning IR camera and an algorithm that detects whale blows on the basis of their thermal signature. So far, this...migrations and collecting concurrent independent (double blind ) visual observations (modified cue counting), a data base will be created to: Determine

  9. The Capabilities and Limitations of Clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Detecting Kidney Stones: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Mellena D.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the performance of currently available magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting kidney stones, compared to computed tomography (CT) results, and to determine the characteristics of successfully detected stones. Patients who had undergone both abdominal/pelvic CT and MRI exams within 30 days were studied. The images were reviewed by two expert radiologists blinded to the patients' respective radiological diagnoses. The study consisted of four steps: (1) reviewing the MRI images and determining whether any kidney stone(s) are identified; (2) reviewing the corresponding CT images and confirming whether kidney stones are identified; (3) reviewing the MRI images a second time, armed with the information from the corresponding CT, noting whether any kidney stones are positively identified that were previously missed; (4) for all stones MRI-confirmed on previous steps, the radiologist experts being asked to answer whether in retrospect, with knowledge of size and location on corresponding CT, these stones would be affirmed as confidently identified on MRI or not. In this best-case scenario involving knowledge of stones and their locations on concurrent CT, radiologist experts detected 19% of kidney stones on MRI, with stone size being a major factor for stone identification. PMID:27980535

  10. Concentration of prion protein from biological samples to increase the limits of detection by immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Davidowitz, Eliot; Eljuga, Lucy; Dover, Katarzyna; Tian, Jean; Grossman, Abraham

    2005-06-01

    An RNA-ligand-based adsorbent has been shown to concentrate prion protein (PrP) from solutions in a model system. The work presented here extends the utility of the RNA-based adsorbent to brain homogenates of cow, sheep, mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and elk (Cervus elaphus). Brain homogenates were diluted either in buffer, representing specimens used in post-mortem tests, or in serum, modelling specimens used in biological-fluid-based tests. The RNA adsorbent was effective in binding PrPC (cellular PrP,) and PrPres (proteinase K-resistant PrP) from the brain homogenates of all the species tested in both model systems. The three antibodies against PrP used in the experiments identified PrP in immunoblot analysis after concentrating PrP from brain homogenates with the adsorbent, indicating the general applicability of this technology for improving the detection of PrP in immunoassays. Utilization of RNA adsorbent increased the level of detection of PrPres by immunoblot over several-hundredfold. The results obtained suggest that this RNA adsorbent can be used to increase detection in current post-mortem immunoassays and for the development of a blood-based ante-mortem test.

  11. Current Challenges and Limitations in Antibody-Based Detection of Citrullinated Histones

    PubMed Central

    Neeli, Indira; Radic, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Studies on NETosis demand reliable and convenient markers to monitor the progress of this form of cell death. Because a determining step in the release of nuclear chromatin NETs requires the conversion of arginine residues to citrulline residues in histones by peptidylarginine deiminase, citrullinated histones can provide such a marker. Here, we evaluate antibody reagents for the detection of citrulline residues in histones and observe alarming differences between commercial antisera and mouse and rabbit monoclonal antibodies in their ability to detect their nominal target residues. Differences between antibodies that are currently used to detect citrulline residues in histones could jeopardize efforts to reach a scientific consensus and instead lead to inconsistent and even conflicting conclusions regarding the regulation of histone deimination. Our results will assist others in planning their initial or ongoing studies on peptidylarginine deiminase activity with the use of currently available antibodies. Furthermore, we argue that, along with the careful attention to experimental conditions and calcium concentrations, validated antibody reagents are urgently needed to avoid possible setbacks in the research on NETosis. PMID:27933065

  12. Statistical analysis of water-quality data containing multiple detection limits: S-language software for regression on order statistics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, L.; Helsel, D.

    2005-01-01

    Trace contaminants in water, including metals and organics, often are measured at sufficiently low concentrations to be reported only as values below the instrument detection limit. Interpretation of these "less thans" is complicated when multiple detection limits occur. Statistical methods for multiply censored, or multiple-detection limit, datasets have been developed for medical and industrial statistics, and can be employed to estimate summary statistics or model the distributions of trace-level environmental data. We describe S-language-based software tools that perform robust linear regression on order statistics (ROS). The ROS method has been evaluated as one of the most reliable procedures for developing summary statistics of multiply censored data. It is applicable to any dataset that has 0 to 80% of its values censored. These tools are a part of a software library, or add-on package, for the R environment for statistical computing. This library can be used to generate ROS models and associated summary statistics, plot modeled distributions, and predict exceedance probabilities of water-quality standards. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Limits of detection in debris disks around young stars with NaCo/Sparse Aperture Masking observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauchet, L.; Lacour, S.

    2014-09-01

    To understand the formation and evolution of solar systems and planets formations in the stars neighbourhood, we need to obtain information of their state at different time of their evolution. Here, we focus on debris disks around young stars aged of ten to few tens of Myr, we analyze NaCo/Sparse Aperture Masking (SAM) observations in the L' band (3.8 μm) of eight objects (beta Pictoris, AU Mic, 49 Ceti, eta Tel, Fomalhaut, G Lupi, HD182327 and HR8799). The aim is to get limits of detection about the mass of the debris orbiting around their stars. The SAM technique consists in transforming a single telescope into a Fizeau interferometer using a non redundant mask inserted in a pupil plane of the instrument. The analysis of the observations was completed with the sparse aperture mode pipeline. Interference fringes are fitted to obtain complex visibilities of the object, then the closure phases are calibrated and evaluated. Finally, a map of the detection limits is obtained as it is related to the closure phases previously estimated. In order to obtain an estimation of the mass corresponding to the luminosity measured with the reduction pipeline we are using theoretical isochrones interpolated into synthetic color tables. The results are maps of detection limits in unit of Jupiter Mass in a range of up to 450 mas around the stars.

  14. Detection Limits for Close Eclipsing and transiting Sub-Stellar and Planetary Companions to White Dwarfs in the WASP Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faedi, Francesca; West, Richard G.; Burleigh, Matt R.; Goad, Mike R.; Hebb, Leslie

    2011-03-01

    We used photometric data from the WASP (Wide-Angle Search for Planets) survey to explore the possibility of detecting eclipses and transit signals of brown dwarfs, gas giants and terrestrial companions in close orbit around white dwarfs. We performed extensive Monte Carlo simulations and we found that for Gaussian random noise WASP is sensitive to companions as small as the Moon orbiting a V~12 white dwarf. For fainter stars WASP is sensitive to increasingly larger bodies. Our sensitivity drops in the presence of co-variant noise structure in the data, nevertheless Earth-size bodies remain readily detectable in relatively low S/N data. We searched for eclipses and transit signals in a sample of 194 white dwarfs in the WASP archive however, no evidence for companions was found. We used our results to place tentative upper limits to the frequency of such systems. While we can only place weak limits on the likely frequency of Earth-sized or smaller companions; brown dwarfs and gas giants (radius~=RJup) with periods <=0.2 days must certainly be rare (<10%). More stringent constraints requires significantly larger white dwarf samples, higher observing cadence and continuous coverage. The short duration of eclipses and transits of white dwarfs compared to the cadence of WASP observations appears to be one of the main factors limiting the detection rate in a survey optimised for planetary transits of main sequence stars.

  15. Limits of visual detection for finasteride polymorphs in prepared binary mixtures: analysis by X-ray powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Bezzon, Vinícius D N; Antonio, Selma G; Paiva-Santos, Carlos O

    2014-11-01

    Finasteride (FNT) is a drug that inhibits human enzyme type II 5α-reductase that metabolizes testosterone into dihydrotestosterone. There are two enantiotropic polymorphs with known crystal structure: designated as forms I and II. Identification and control of these polymorphic forms in mixtures can be performed using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) data and Rietveld method (RM). As experimental conditions may limit the detection of minority phases in mixtures, it is interesting to show what are these limits for some usual and one high-resolution equipment. So, in this work, we discuss the parameters to find the limit of the detection in binary mixtures of forms I and II of FNT according to each experimental condition. The samples analyzed were binary mixtures prepared with anhydrous polymorphs of the drug FNT. These samples were measured in four diffractometers with different experimental condition. These equipments represent the main resolutions generally used for drug analysis by XRPD. For the development of this work, a batch of form I was obtained pure, and another batch with forms I and II was used to obtain pure form II by heat treatment. Depending on the experimental condition, the polymorphs could be detected in a proportion as low as 0.5 wt%. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 103:3567-3575, 2014.

  16. Detection of algal lipid accumulation due to nitrogen limitation via dielectric spectroscopy of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii suspensions in a coaxial transmission line sample cell.

    PubMed

    Bono, Michael S; Ahner, Beth A; Kirby, Brian J

    2013-09-01

    In this study, dielectric characterization of algae cell suspensions was used to detect lipid accumulation due to nitrogen starvation. Wild-type Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CC-125) was cultivated in replete and nitrogen-limited conditions in order to achieve a range of lipid contents, as confirmed by Nile Red fluorescence measurements. A vector network analyzer was used to measure the dielectric scattering parameters of a coaxial region of concentrated cell suspension. The critical frequency fc of the normalized transmission coefficient |S21(*)| decreased with increasing lipid content but did not change with cell concentration. These observations were consistent with a decrease in cytoplasmic conductivity due to lipid accumulation in the preliminary transmission line model. This dielectric sensitivity to lipid content will facilitate the development of a rapid, noninvasive method for algal lipid measurement that could be implemented in industrial settings without the need for specialized staff and analytical facilities.

  17. Sulfur Limits of Detection and Spectral Interference Corrections for DWPF Sludge Matrices by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    JURGENSEN, AR

    2004-04-20

    The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) has been requested to perform sulfur (S) analysis on digested radioactive sludge and supernatant samples by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectrometry (ICP-ES). The amount of sulfur is a concern because there are sulfur limits for the incoming feed, due to glass melter, process vessel, and off-gas line corrosion concerns and limited sulfur solubility in the glass wasteform. Recent changes in the washing strategy and stream additions change the amount of sulfur in the sludge. Increasing the sulfur concentration in the sludge challenges the current limits, so accurately determining the amount of sulfur present in a sludge batch is paramount. There are two important figures of merit that need to be evaluated for this analysis. The first is the detection limit (LOD), the smallest concentration of an element that can be detected with a defined certainty. This issue is important since the sulfur concentration in these process streams is l ow. Another critical analytical parameter is the effect on the S quantitation from potential spectral interferences. Spectral interferences are caused by background emission from plasma recombination events, scattered and stray light from the line emission of high concentration elements, or molecular band emission and from direct or tailing spectral line overlap from a matrix element. Any existing spectral overlaps could give false positives or increase the measured S concentrations in these matrices.

  18. WEF/WERF study of BNR plants achieving very low N and P limits: evaluation of technology performance and process reliability.

    PubMed

    Bott, Charles B; Parker, Denny S; Jimenez, Jose; Miller, Mark W; Neethling, J B

    2012-01-01

    The Water Environment Research Foundation (WERF) funded a two-year comprehensive study of nutrient removal plants designed and operated to meet very low effluent total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) concentrations. WERF worked with the Water Environment Federation (WEF) to solicit participation of volunteers and provide a forum for information exchange at workshops at its annual conferences. Both existing and new technologies are being adapted to meet requirements that are as low as 3.0 mg/L TN and 0.1 mg/L TP, and there is a need to define their capabilities and reliabilities in the real world situation of wastewater treatment plants. A concern over very low daily permits for ammonia caused the work to be extended to include nitrification reliability. This effort focused on maximizing what can be learned from existing technologies in order to provide a database that will inform key decision makers about proper choices for both technologies and rationale bases for statistical permit writing. To this end, managers of 22 plants, 10 achieving low effluent TP, nine achieving low effluent TN, and three achieving low effluent NH(3)-N, provided three years of operational data that were analyzed using a consistent statistical approach. Technology Performance Statistics (TPSs) were developed as three separate values representing the ideal, median, and reliably achievable performance. Technological conclusions can be drawn from the study in terms of what can be learned by comparing the different nutrient removal and nitrification processes employed at these 22 plants.

  19. Quantum cascade laser-based substance detection: approaching the quantum noise limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuffner, Peter C.; Conroy, Kathryn J.; Boyson, Toby K.; Milford, Greg; Mabrok, Mohamed A.; Kallapur, Abhijit G.; Petersen, Ian R.; Calzada, Maria E.; Spence, Thomas G.; Kirkbride, Kennith P.; Harb, Charles C.

    2011-06-01

    A consortium of researchers at University of New South Wales (UNSW@ADFA), and Loyola University New Orleans (LU NO), together with Australian government security agencies (e.g., Australian Federal Police), are working to develop highly sensitive laser-based forensic sensing strategies applicable to characteristic substances that pose chemical, biological and explosives (CBE) threats. We aim to optimise the potential of these strategies as high-throughput screening tools to detect prohibited and potentially hazardous substances such as those associated with explosives, narcotics and bio-agents.

  20. An analysis of small target feature detection limits using optic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Joseph; Gremillion, Gregory; Mathis, Allison; Nothwang, William

    2015-05-01

    The neurophysiology of insects suggests that they are able to track conspecifics, which manifest as small targets, against a variety of backgrounds with ease. This perception occurs at the same stage as motion perception suggesting a role for optic flow in target discrimination. Optic flow also is an attractive method of perception for visual system design due to the possibility of parallel processing that lends itself to implementation in hardware acceleration. This paper investigates some of the limits for reliable target discrimination solely from an optic flow field which are dependent on algorithm parameters, the nature of the target, and imager noise properties.

  1. Photon noise limited radiation detection with lens-antenna coupled microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, S. J. C.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Diener, P.; Endo, A.; Janssen, R. M. J.; Ferrari, L.; Baryshev, A. M.

    2011-08-15

    Microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) have shown great potential for sub-mm instrumentation because of the high scalability of the technology. Here, we demonstrate for the first time in the sub-mm band (0.1-2 mm) a photon noise limited performance of a small antenna coupled MKID detector array and we describe the relation between photon noise and MKID intrinsic generation-recombination noise. Additionally, we use the observed photon noise to measure the optical efficiency of detectors to be 0.8 {+-} 0.2.

  2. Detection of strength limiting defects in cellular glasses by dielectric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammell, P. M.; Adams, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    The foamed glasses that are being considered for structural support in solar thermal energy system silvered glass concentrator mirrors are assessed for strength-limiting defects by a nondestructive technique which measures the capacitance of well defined regions. The feasibility of locating large defects is demonstrated for the case of one type of cellular mass. Observed capacitance variations are believed to be due to small voids or other irregularities in the material. If the defects are equal to or greater than approximately 20 times the glass matrix pore size, they can be resolved with sufficient accuracy to delineate their spatial extent.

  3. Photon noise limited radiation detection with lens-antenna coupled microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, S. J. C.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Endo, A.; Janssen, R. M. J.; Ferrari, L.; Diener, P.; Baryshev, A. M.

    2011-08-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) have shown great potential for sub-mm instrumentation because of the high scalability of the technology. Here, we demonstrate for the first time in the sub-mm band (0.1-2 mm) a photon noise limited performance of a small antenna coupled MKID detector array and we describe the relation between photon noise and MKID intrinsic generation-recombination noise. Additionally, we use the observed photon noise to measure the optical efficiency of detectors to be 0.8 ± 0.2.

  4. Enhanced detection limit by dark mode perturbation in 2D photonic crystal slab refractive index sensors.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, Costa; Lau, Wah Tung; Gad, Raanan; Akhavan, Hooman; Schilling, Ryan; Levi, Ofer

    2013-12-16

    We demonstrate for the first time a 300nm thick, 300μm × 300μm 2D dielectric photonic crystal slab membrane with a quality factor of 10,600 by coupling light to slightly perturbed dark modes through alternating nano-hole sizes. The newly created fundamental guided resonances greatly reduce nano-fabrication accuracy requirements. Moreover, we created a new layer architecture resulting in electric field enhancement at the interface between the slab and sensing regions, and spectral sensitivity of >800 nm/RIU, that is, >0.8 of the single-mode theoretical upper limit of spectral sensitivity.

  5. Automatic microseismic event detection by band-limited phase-only correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shaojiang; Wang, Yibo; Zhan, Yi; Chang, Xu

    2016-12-01

    Identification and detection of microseismic events is a significant issue in source locations and source mechanism analysis. The number of the records is notably large, especially in the case of some real-time monitoring, and while the majority of microseismic events are highly weak and sparse, automatic algorithms are indispensable. In this study, we introduce an effective method for the identification and detection of microseismic events by judging whether the P-wave phase exists in a local segment from a single three-component microseismic records. The new judging algorithm consists primarily of the following key steps: 1) transform the waveform time series into time-varying spectral representations using the S-transform; 2) calculate the similarity of the frequency content in the time-frequency domain using the phase-only correlation function; and 3) identify the P-phase by the combination analysis between any two components. The proposed algorithm is compared to a similar approach using the cross-correlation in the time domain between any two components and later tested with synthetic microseismic datasets and real field-recorded datasets. The results indicate that the proposed algorithm is able to distinguish similar and dissimilar waveforms, even for low signal noise ratio and emergent events, which is important for accurate and rapid selection of microseismic events from a large number of records. This method can be applied to other geophysical analyses based on the waveform data.

  6. Tone-deaf ears in moths may limit the acoustic detection of two-tone bats.

    PubMed

    Mora, Emanuel C; Fernández, Yohami; Hechavarría, Julio; Pérez, Martha

    2014-01-01

    Frequency alternation in the echolocation of insectivorous bats has been interpreted in relation to ranging and duty cycle, i.e. advantages for echolocation. The shifts in frequency of the calls of these so-called two-tone bats, however, may also play its role in the success of their hunting behavior for a preferred prey, the tympanate moth. How the auditory receptors (e.g. the A1 and A2 cells) in the moth's ear detect such frequency shifts is currently unknown. Here, we measured the auditory responses of the A1 cell in the noctuid Spodoptera frugiperda to the echolocation hunting sequence of Molossus molossus, a two-tone bat. We also manipulated the bat calls to control for the frequency shifts by lowering the frequency band of the search and approach calls. The firing response of the A1 receptor cell significantly decreases with the shift to higher frequencies during the search and approach phases of the hunting sequence of M. molossus; this could be explained by the receptor's threshold curve. The frequency dependence of the decrease in the receptor's response is supported by the results attained with the manipulated sequence: search and approach calls with the same minimum frequency are detected by the moth at the same threshold intensity. The two-tone bat M. molossus shows a call frequency alternation behavior that may enable it to overcome moth audition even in the mid-frequency range (i.e. 20-50 kHz) where moths hear best.

  7. Detecting and quantifying parasite-induced host mortality from intensity data: method comparisons and limitations.

    PubMed

    Wilber, Mark Q; Weinstein, Sara B; Briggs, Cheryl J

    2016-01-01

    Parasites can significantly impact animal populations by changing host behaviour, reproduction and survival. Detecting and quantifying these impacts is critical for understanding disease dynamics and managing wild animal populations. However, for wild hosts infected with macroparasites, it is notoriously difficult to quantify the fatal parasite load and number of animals that have died due to disease. When ethical or logistical constraints prohibit experimental determination of these values, examination of parasite intensity and distribution data may offer an alternative solution. In this study we introduce a novel method for using intensity data to detect and quantify parasite-induced mortality in wildlife populations. We use simulations to show that this method is more reliable than previously proposed methods while providing quantitative estimates of parasite-induced mortality from empirical data that are consistent with previously published qualitative estimates. However this method, and all techniques that estimate parasite-induced mortality from intensity data alone, have several important assumptions that must be scrutinised before applying those to real-world data. Given that these assumptions are met, our method is a new exploratory tool that can help inform more rigorous studies of parasite-induced host mortality.

  8. Fast detection of biomolecules in diffusion-limited regime using micromechanical pillars.

    PubMed

    Melli, Mauro; Scoles, Giacinto; Lazzarino, Marco

    2011-10-25

    We have developed a micromechanical sensor based on vertically oriented oscillating beams, in which contrary to what is normally done (for example with oscillating cantilevers) the sensitive area is located at the free end of the oscillator. In the micropillar geometry used here, analyte adsorption is confined only to the tip of the micropillar, thus reducing the volume from which the analyte molecules must diffuse to saturate the surface to a sphere of radius more than 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the corresponding linear distance valid for adsorption on a macroscopic surface. Hence the absorption rate is 3 orders of magnitude faster than on a typical 200 × 20 square micrometer cantilever. Pillar oscillations are detected by means of an optical lever method, but the geometry is suitable for multiplexing with compact integrated detection. We demonstrate our technology by investigating the formation of a single-strand DNA self-assembled monolayer (SAM) consisting of less than 10(6) DNA molecules and by measuring their hybridization efficiency. We show that the binding rate is 1000 times faster than on a "macroscopic" surface. We also show that the hybridization of a SAM of maximum density DNA is 40% or 4 times the value reported in the literature. These results suggest that the lower values previously reported in the literature can be attributed to incomplete saturation of the surface due to the slower adsorption rate on the "macroscopic" surfaces used.

  9. Detectability limitations with 3-D point reconstruction algorithms using digital radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Lindgren, Erik

    2015-03-31

    The estimated impact of pores in clusters on component fatigue will be highly conservative when based on 2-D rather than 3-D pore positions. To 3-D position and size defects using digital radiography and 3-D point reconstruction algorithms in general require a lower inspection time and in some cases work better with planar geometries than X-ray computed tomography. However, the increase in prior assumptions about the object and the defects will increase the intrinsic uncertainty in the resulting nondestructive evaluation output. In this paper this uncertainty arising when detecting pore defect clusters with point reconstruction algorithms is quantified using simulations. The simulation model is compared to and mapped to experimental data. The main issue with the uncertainty is the possible masking (detectability zero) of smaller defects around some other slightly larger defect. In addition, the uncertainty is explored in connection to the expected effects on the component fatigue life and for different amount of prior object-defect assumptions made.

  10. Considerations on the determination of the limit of detection and the limit of quantification in one-dimensional and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Krupčík, Ján; Májek, Pavel; Gorovenko, Roman; Blaško, Jaroslav; Kubinec, Robert; Sandra, Pat

    2015-05-29

    Methods based on the blank signal as proposed by IUPAC procedure and on the signal to noise ratio (S/N) as listed in the ISO-11843-1 norm for determination of the limit of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ) in one-dimensional capillary gas chromatography (1D-GC) and comprehensive two-dimensional capillary gas chromatography (CG×GC) are described in detail and compared for both techniques. Flame ionization detection was applied and variables were the data acquisition frequency and, for CG×GC, also the modulation time. It has been stated that LOD and LOQ estimated according to IUPAC might be successfully used for 1D-GC-FID method. Moreover, LOD and LOQ decrease with decrease of data acquisition frequency (DAF). For GC×GC-FID, estimation of LOD by IUPAC gave poor reproducibility of results while for LOQ reproducibility was acceptable (within ±10% rel.). The LOD and LOQ determined by the S/N concept both for 1D-GC-FID and GC×GC-FID methods are ca. three times higher than those values estimated by the standard deviation of the blank. Since the distribution pattern of modulated peaks for any analyte separated by GC×GC is random and cannot be predicted, LOQ and LOD may vary within 30% for 3s modulation time. Concerning sensitivity, 1D-GC-FID at 2Hz and of GC×GC-FID at 50Hz shows a ca. 5 times enhancement of sensitivity in the modulated signal output.

  11. Detection of HBr and upper limit for HOBr: Bromine partitioning in the stratosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.G.; Traub, W.A.; Chance, K.V.

    1995-06-01

    The authors determine mixing ratio profiles for HBr and upper limits for HOBr in the stratosphere with precisions up to 1.7 and 4.8 parts per trillion, respectively, using the combined data from 7 flights of their far-infrared spectrometer. The measurements suggest that in the range 22-34 km the average mixing ratio of HBr is 2.0{+-}0.8, and that the average mixing ratio of HOBr is less than 2.8 ppt. Their measurements of HBr are in reasonable agreement with a photochemical model which includes 0 or 2% production of HBr through the reaction of BrO with HO{sub 2}, but in strong disagreement with a model including 5 or 10% HBr production. 15 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. A Comparison of Two Standardized Reading and Mathematics Achievement Tests in the Native Language for Hispanic Limited-English-Proficient Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosa, Carlos M.; And Others

    A study was undertaken to examine psychometric properties of "La Prueba Riverside de Realizacion en Espanol" (PRRE) and the "Spanish Assessment of Basic Education" (SABE) when administered to a sample of limited-English-proficient students, grades 1 through 8. Spanish-language versions of both tests were used for the study.…

  13. Specificity and detection limit of a dermal temperature histamine sensitization test for absence of residual pertussis toxin in vaccines.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Sten E; Illigen, Kristin E Engelhart; Badsberg, Jens Henrik; Hasløv, Kaare R

    2012-01-01

    Currently, an assay based on fatal sensitization of mice to histamine challenge is widely used for testing absence of residual pertussis toxin in acellular pertussis containing vaccines. For replacement of this lethal end-point assay, an alternative method based on body temperature measurement in mice has been presented, and in this study the specificity and detection limit of a dermal temperature-based assay were assessed. Test preparations containing pertussis toxin were prepared in aluminum-adjuvanted pertussis toxoid vaccine and injected intraperitoneally in histamine sensitive mice. Later the mice were challenged with histamine and the pertussis toxin-induced decrease in dermal temperature recorded. By comparison of mice treated with pertussis toxoid vaccine spiked with pertussis toxin with mice treated with pertussis toxoid vaccine alone, the assay gave a response that specifically could detect presence of pertussis toxin. The acellular pertussis containing vaccine did not interfere with the pertussis toxin-induced temperature response recorded. In tests for presence of pertussis toxin in the pertussis vaccine preparation, the detection limit of the assay was estimated to approximately 5 ng pertussis toxin per human dose of pertussis toxoid. The dermal temperature-based assay was found to be a valid method to be applied in routine quality control of vaccines.

  14. Performance limitations of a free-space optical communication satellite network owing to vibrations: heterodyne detection.

    PubMed

    Arnon, S; Rotman, S R; Kopeika, N S

    1998-09-20

    Free-space optical communication between satellites in a distributed network can permit high data rates of communication between different places on Earth. To establish optical communication between any two satellites requires that the line of sight of their optics be aligned during the entire communication time. Because of the large distance between the satellites and the alignment accuracy required, the pointing from one satellite to another is complicated because of vibrations of the pointing system caused by two fundamental stochastic mechanisms: tracking noise created by the electro-optic tracker and vibrations derived from mechanical components. Vibration of the transmitter beam in the receiver plane causes a decrease in the received optical power. Vibrations of the receiver telescope relative to the received beam decrease the heterodyne mixing efficiency. These two factors increase the bit-error rate of a coherent detection network. We derive simple mathematical models of the network bit-error rate versus the system parameters and the transmitter and receiver vibration statistics. An example of a practical optical heterodyne free-space satellite optical communication network is presented. From this research it is clear that even low-amplitude vibration of the satellite-pointing systems dramatically decreases network performance.

  15. Using proximity biotinylation to detect herpesvirus entry glycoprotein interactions: Limitations for integral membrane glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Lajko, Michelle; Haddad, Alexander F; Robinson, Carolyn A; Connolly, Sarah A

    2015-09-01

    Herpesvirus entry into cells requires coordinated interactions among several viral transmembrane glycoproteins. Viral glycoproteins bind to receptors and interact with other glycoproteins to trigger virus-cell membrane fusion. Details of these glycoprotein interactions are not well understood because they are likely transient and/or low affinity. Proximity biotinylation is a promising protein-protein interaction assay that can capture transient interactions in live cells. One protein is linked to a biotin ligase and a second protein is linked to a short specific acceptor peptide (AP). If the two proteins interact, the ligase will biotinylate the AP, without requiring a sustained interaction. To examine herpesvirus glycoprotein interactions, the ligase and AP were linked to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) gD and Epstein Barr virus (EBV) gB. Interactions between monomers of these oligomeric proteins (homotypic interactions) served as positive controls to demonstrate assay sensitivity. Heterotypic combinations served as negative controls to determine assay specificity, since HSV1 gD and EBV gB do not interact functionally. Positive controls showed strong biotinylation, indicating that viral glycoprotein proximity can be detected. Unexpectedly, the negative controls also showed biotinylation. These results demonstrate the special circumstances that must be considered when examining interactions among glycosylated proteins that are constrained within a membrane.

  16. Estimating the computational limits of detection of microbial non-model organisms.

    PubMed

    Kuhring, Mathias; Renard, Bernhard Y

    2015-10-01

    Mass spectrometry has become a key instrument for proteomic studies of single bacteria as well as microbial communities. However, the identification of spectra from MS/MS experiments is still challenging, in particular for non-model organisms. Due to the limited amount of related protein reference sequences, underexplored organisms often remain completely unidentified or their spectra match to peptides of uncertain degree of relation. Alternative strategies such as error-tolerant spectra searches or proteogenomic approaches may reduce the amount of unidentified spectra and lead to peptide matches on more related taxonomic levels. However, to what extent these strategies may be successful is difficult to judge prior to an MS/MS experiment. In this contribution, we introduce a method to estimate the suitability of databases of interest. Further, it allows estimating the possible influence of error-tolerant searches and proteogenomic approaches on databases of interest with respect to the number of unidentified spectra and the taxonomic distances of identified spectra. Furthermore, we provide an implementation of our approach that supports experimental design by evaluating the benefit and need of different search strategies with respect to present databases and organisms under study. We provide several examples which highlight the different effects of additional search strategies on databases and organisms with varying amount of known relative species available.

  17. Early detection of diabetic kidney disease: Present limitations and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Hung; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is one of the most common diabetic complications, as well as the leading cause of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease around the world. To prevent the dreadful consequence, development of new assays for diagnostic of DKD has always been the priority in the research field of diabetic complications. At present, urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) are the standard methods for assessing glomerular damage and renal function changes in clinical practice. However, due to diverse tissue involvement in different individuals, the so-called “non-albuminuric renal impairment” is not uncommon, especially in patients with type 2 diabetes. On the other hand, the precision of creatinine-based GFR estimates is limited in hyperfiltration status. These facts make albuminuria and eGFR less reliable indicators for early-stage DKD. In recent years, considerable progress has been made in the understanding of the pathogenesis of DKD, along with the elucidation of its genetic profiles and phenotypic expression of different molecules. With the help of ever-evolving technologies, it has gradually become plausible to apply the thriving information in clinical practice. The strength and weakness of several novel biomarkers, genomic, proteomic and metabolomic signatures in assisting the early diagnosis of DKD will be discussed in this article. PMID:27525056

  18. Limited genetic variability and phenotypic plasticity detected for cavitation resistance in a Mediterranean pine.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Jean-Baptiste; Delzon, Sylvain; Bouche, Pauline S; Alia, Ricardo; Vendramin, Giovanni Giuseppe; Cochard, Hervé; Plomion, Christophe

    2014-02-01

    Resistance to cavitation is a major determinant of plant survival under severe drought and can be used to quantify species adaptive potential. Interspecific variation in this key trait is well defined in woody species, but intraspecific variation (level and structure) resulting from standing genetic variation and phenotypic plasticity has never been determined. Combining for the first time in situ characterization of natural populations and two reciprocal common gardens in dry and wet sites, we estimated variance components (phenotypic, genetic, environmental, and genetic × environmental) of cavitation resistance based on 513 genotypes of a Mediterranean pine, Pinus pinaster. Despite the selected populations being climatically contrasted, phenotypic plasticity in resistance to cavitation remained low and was essentially attributed to family level. Between-population variation in cavitation resistance for both phenotypic and genetic variation was limited. These results strongly suggest that cavitation resistance is buffered against genetic and to a lesser extent environmental variation (canalization) in maritime pine. Consequently, in a drier world, the increasing drought tolerance of Pinus species might be severely constrained by the low level of cavitation resistance variation, resulting in a large-scale loss of productivity.

  19. Quantum-limited detection of millimeter waves using superconducting tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Mears, C.A.

    1991-09-01

    The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor-insulator- superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction is highly nonlinear. Such a nonlinearity can be used to mix two millimeter wave signals to produce a signal at a much lower intermediate frequency. We have constructed several millimeter and sub-millimeter wave SIS mixers in order to study high frequency response of the quasiparticle tunneling current and the physics of high frequency mixing. We have made the first measurement of the out-of-phase tunneling currents in an SIS tunnel junction. We have developed a method that allows us to determine the parameters of the high frequency embedding circuit by studying the details of the pumped I-V curve. We have constructed a 80--110 GHz waveguide-based mixer test apparatus that allows us to accurately measure the gain and added noise of the SIS mixer under test. Using extremely high quality tunnel junctions, we have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 {plus minus} 0.36 quanta, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit imposed by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This measured performance is in excellent agreement with that predicted by Tucker's theory of quantum mixing. We have also studied quasioptically coupled millimeter- and submillimeter-wave mixers using several types of integrated tuning elements. 83 refs.

  20. Quantum-limited detection of millimeter waves using superconducting tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Mears, C.A.

    1991-09-01

    The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor-insulator- superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction is highly nonlinear. Such a nonlinearity can be used to mix two millimeter wave signals to produce a signal at a much lower intermediate frequency. We have constructed several millimeter and sub-millimeter wave SIS mixers in order to study high frequency response of the quasiparticle tunneling current and the physics of high frequency mixing. We have made the first measurement of the out-of-phase tunneling currents in an SIS tunnel junction. We have developed a method that allows us to determine the parameters of the high frequency embedding circuit by studying the details of the pumped I-V curve. We have constructed a 80--110 GHz waveguide-based mixer test apparatus that allows us to accurately measure the gain and added noise of the SIS mixer under test. Using extremely high quality tunnel junctions, we have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 {plus_minus} 0.36 quanta, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit imposed by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This measured performance is in excellent agreement with that predicted by Tucker`s theory of quantum mixing. We have also studied quasioptically coupled millimeter- and submillimeter-wave mixers using several types of integrated tuning elements. 83 refs.

  1. 40 CFR Table I-10 to Subpart I of... - Maximum Field Detection Limits Applicable to Fluorinated GHG Concentration Measurements for Stack...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Maximum Field Detection Limits Applicable to Fluorinated GHG Concentration Measurements for Stack Systems I Table I-10 to Subpart I of Part... Subpart I of Part 98—Maximum Field Detection Limits Applicable to Fluorinated GHG...

  2. Nouvelles Limites sur la Detection Directe de la Matiere Sombre avec l'Experience PICASSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piro, Marie-Cecile

    Astronomical and cosmological observations strongly suggest the presence of an exotic form of non-relativistic, non-baryonic matter that would represent 26% of the actual energy-matter content of the Universe. This so-called cold dark matter would be composed of Weakly Interactive Massive Particles (WIMP). PICASSO (Project In CAnada to Search for Supersymmetric Objects) aims to detect directly one of the dark matter candidates proposed in the framework of supersymmetric extensions of the standard model : the neutralino. The experiment is installed in the SNOLAB underground laboratory at Sudbury (Ontario) and uses superheated C4F10 droplets detectors, a variant of bubble chamber technique. Phase transitions in the superheated liquids are triggered by 19F recoils caused by the elastic collision with neutralinos and create an acoustic signal which is recorded by piezoelectric sensors. This thesis presents recent progress in PICASSO leading to a substantially increased sensitivity in the search of neutralinos. New fabrication and purification procedures allowed a background reduction of about a factor 10 of the major detectors contamination caused by alpha emitters. Detailed studies allowed to localize these emitters in the detectors. In addition, data analysis efforts were able to improve substantially the discrimination between alpha particle induced events and those created by nuclear recoils. New analysis tools were also developed in order to discriminate between particle induced and non-particle induced events, such as electronic backgrounds and acoustic noise signals. An important new background suppression mechanism at higher temperatures led to the present improved sensitivity of PICASSO at low WIMP masses.

  3. Molecular Detection of Culture-Confirmed Bacterial Bloodstream Infections with Limited Enrichment Time

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Miranda S.; McCann, Chase D.

    2013-01-01

    Conventional blood culturing using automated instrumentation with phenotypic identification requires a significant amount of time to generate results. This study investigated the speed and accuracy of results generated using PCR and pyrosequencing compared to the time required to obtain Gram stain results and final culture identification for cases of culture-confirmed bloodstream infections. Research and physician-ordered blood cultures were drawn concurrently. Aliquots of the incubating research blood culture fluid were removed hourly between 5 and 8 h, at 24 h, and again at 5 days. DNA was extracted from these 6 time point aliquots and analyzed by PCR and pyrosequencing for bacterial rRNA gene targets. These results were then compared to those of the physician-ordered blood culture. PCR and pyrosequencing accurately identified 92% of all culture-confirmed cases after a mean enrichment time of 5.8 ± 2.9 h. When the time needed to complete sample processing was included for PCR and pyrosequencing protocols, the molecular approach yielded results in 11.8 ± 2.9 h compared to means of 27.9 ± 13.6 h to obtain the Gram stain results and 81.6 ± 24.0 h to generate the final culture-based identification. The molecular approach enabled accurate detection of most bacteria present in incubating blood culture bottles on average about 16 h sooner than Gram stain results became available and approximately 3 days sooner than the phenotypic identification was entered in the Laboratory Information System. If implemented, this more rapid molecular approach could minimize the number of doses of unnecessary or ineffective antibiotics administered to patients. PMID:23985915

  4. Scheme for efficient extraction of low-frequency signal beyond the quantum limit by frequency-shift detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, R G; Zhang, J; Zhai, Z H; Zhai, S Q; Liu, K; Gao, J R

    2015-08-10

    Low-frequency (Hz~kHz) squeezing is very important in many schemes of quantum precision measurement. But it is more difficult than that at megahertz-frequency because of the introduction of laser low-frequency technical noise. In this paper, we propose a scheme to obtain a low-frequency signal beyond the quantum limit from the frequency comb in a non-degenerate frequency and degenerate polarization optical parametric amplifier (NOPA) operating below threshold with type I phase matching by frequency-shift detection. Low-frequency squeezing immune to laser technical noise is obtained by a detection system with a local beam of two-frequency intense laser. Furthermore, the low-frequency squeezing can be used for phase measurement in Mach-Zehnder interferometer, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can be enhanced greatly.

  5. A STUDY OF FUNDAMENTAL LIMITATIONS TO STATISTICAL DETECTION OF REDSHIFTED H I FROM THE EPOCH OF REIONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Udaya Shankar, N.; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Arcus, Wayne; Emrich, David; Herne, David; Bernardi, Gianni; Greenhill, Lincoln J.; Bowman, Judd D.; Briggs, Frank; Gaensler, Bryan M.; Bunton, John D.; DeSouza, Ludi; Cappallo, Roger J.; Corey, Brian E.; Goeke, Robert F.; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.; Hazelton, Bryna J.; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie; Kaplan, David L.; and others

    2013-10-10

    In this paper, we explore for the first time the relative magnitudes of three fundamental sources of uncertainty, namely, foreground contamination, thermal noise, and sample variance, in detecting the H I power spectrum from the epoch of reionization (EoR). We derive limits on the sensitivity of a Fourier synthesis telescope to detect EoR based on its array configuration and a statistical representation of images made by the instrument. We use the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) configuration for our studies. Using a unified framework for estimating signal and noise components in the H I power spectrum, we derive an expression for and estimate the contamination from extragalactic point-like sources in three-dimensional k-space. Sensitivity for EoR H I power spectrum detection is estimated for different observing modes with MWA. With 1000 hr of observing on a single field using the 128 tile MWA, EoR detection is feasible (S/N >1 for k ∼< 0.8 Mpc{sup –1}). Bandpass shaping and refinements to the EoR window are found to be effective in containing foreground contamination, which makes the instrument tolerant to imaging errors. We find that for a given observing time, observing many independent fields of view does not offer an advantage over a single field observation when thermal noise dominates over other uncertainties in the derived power spectrum.

  6. Determining the 95% limit of detection for waterborne pathogen analyses from primary concentration to qPCR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stokdyk, Joel P.; Firnstahl, Aaron; Spencer, Susan K.; Burch, Tucker R; Borchardt, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    The limit of detection (LOD) for qPCR-based analyses is not consistently defined or determined in studies on waterborne pathogens. Moreover, the LODs reported often reflect the qPCR assay alone rather than the entire sample process. Our objective was to develop an approach to determine the 95% LOD (lowest concentration at which 95% of positive samples are detected) for the entire process of waterborne pathogen detection. We began by spiking the lowest concentration that was consistently positive at the qPCR step (based on its standard curve) into each procedural step working backwards (i.e., extraction, secondary concentration, primary concentration), which established a concentration that was detectable following losses of the pathogen from processing. Using the fraction of positive replicates (n = 10) at this concentration, we selected and analyzed a second, and then third, concentration. If the fraction of positive replicates equaled 1 or 0 for two concentrations, we selected another. We calculated the LOD using probit analysis. To demonstrate our approach we determined the 95% LOD for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, adenovirus 41, and vaccine-derived poliovirus Sabin 3, which were 11, 12, and 6 genomic copies (gc) per reaction (rxn), respectively (equivalent to 1.3, 1.5, and 4.0 gc L−1 assuming the 1500 L tap-water sample volume prescribed in EPA Method 1615). This approach limited the number of analyses required and was amenable to testing multiple genetic targets simultaneously (i.e., spiking a single sample with multiple microorganisms). An LOD determined this way can facilitate study design, guide the number of required technical replicates, aid method evaluation, and inform data interpretation.

  7. Extending the Sensitivity to the Detection of WIMP Dark Matter with an Improved Understanding of the Limiting Neutron Backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat, Sharmila

    2005-01-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) uses position-sensitive Germanium and Silicon crystals in the direct detection of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) believed to constitute most of the dark matter in the Universe. WIMP interactions with matter being rare, identifying and eliminating known backgrounds is critical for detection. Event-by-event discrimination by the detectors rejects the predominant gamma and beta backgrounds while Monte Carlo simulations help estimate, and subtract, the contribution from the neutrons. This thesis describes the effort to understand neutron backgrounds as seen in the two stages of the CDMS search for WIMPs. The first stage of the experiment was at a shallow site at the Stanford Underground Facility where the limiting background came from high-energy neutrons produced by cosmic-ray muon interactions in the rock surrounding the cavern. Simulations of this background helped inform the analysis of data from an experimental run at this site and served as input for the background reduction techniques necessary to set new exclusion limits on the WIMP-nucleon cross-section, excluding new parameter space for WIMPs of masses 8-20 GeV/c2. This thesis considers the simulation methods used as well as how various event populations in the data served as checks on the simulations to allow them to be used in the interpretation of the WIMP-search data. The studies also confirmed the presence of a limiting neutron background at the shallow site, necessitating the move to the 713-meter deep Soudan Underground Facility. Similar computer-based studies helped quantify the neutron background seen at the deeper site and informed the analysis of the data emerging from the first physics run of the experiment at Soudan. In conjunction with the WIMP-search and calibration data, the simulations confirmed that increased depth considerably reduced the neutron backgrounds seen, greatly improving the sensitivity to WIMP detection. The data

  8. Non-invasive detection of animal nerve impulses with an atomic magnetometer operating near quantum limited sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kasper; Budvytyte, Rima; Thomas, Rodrigo A.; Wang, Tian; Fuchs, Annette M.; Balabas, Mikhail V.; Vasilakis, Georgios; Mosgaard, Lars D.; Stærkind, Hans C.; Müller, Jörg H.; Heimburg, Thomas; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Polzik, Eugene S.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields generated by human and animal organs, such as the heart, brain and nervous system carry information useful for biological and medical purposes. These magnetic fields are most commonly detected using cryogenically-cooled superconducting magnetometers. Here we present the first detection of action potentials from an animal nerve using an optical atomic magnetometer. Using an optimal design we are able to achieve the sensitivity dominated by the quantum shot noise of light and quantum projection noise of atomic spins. Such sensitivity allows us to measure the nerve impulse with a miniature room-temperature sensor which is a critical advantage for biomedical applications. Positioning the sensor at a distance of a few millimeters from the nerve, corresponding to the distance between the skin and nerves in biological studies, we detect the magnetic field generated by an action potential of a frog sciatic nerve. From the magnetic field measurements we determine the activity of the nerve and the temporal shape of the nerve impulse. This work opens new ways towards implementing optical magnetometers as practical devices for medical diagnostics. PMID:27417378

  9. Non-invasive detection of animal nerve impulses with an atomic magnetometer operating near quantum limited sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kasper; Budvytyte, Rima; Thomas, Rodrigo A; Wang, Tian; Fuchs, Annette M; Balabas, Mikhail V; Vasilakis, Georgios; Mosgaard, Lars D; Stærkind, Hans C; Müller, Jörg H; Heimburg, Thomas; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Polzik, Eugene S

    2016-07-15

    Magnetic fields generated by human and animal organs, such as the heart, brain and nervous system carry information useful for biological and medical purposes. These magnetic fields are most commonly detected using cryogenically-cooled superconducting magnetometers. Here we present the first detection of action potentials from an animal nerve using an optical atomic magnetometer. Using an optimal design we are able to achieve the sensitivity dominated by the quantum shot noise of light and quantum projection noise of atomic spins. Such sensitivity allows us to measure the nerve impulse with a miniature room-temperature sensor which is a critical advantage for biomedical applications. Positioning the sensor at a distance of a few millimeters from the nerve, corresponding to the distance between the skin and nerves in biological studies, we detect the magnetic field generated by an action potential of a frog sciatic nerve. From the magnetic field measurements we determine the activity of the nerve and the temporal shape of the nerve impulse. This work opens new ways towards implementing optical magnetometers as practical devices for medical diagnostics.

  10. Non-invasive detection of animal nerve impulses with an atomic magnetometer operating near quantum limited sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Kasper; Budvytyte, Rima; Thomas, Rodrigo A.; Wang, Tian; Fuchs, Annette M.; Balabas, Mikhail V.; Vasilakis, Georgios; Mosgaard, Lars D.; Stærkind, Hans C.; Müller, Jörg H.; Heimburg, Thomas; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Polzik, Eugene S.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic fields generated by human and animal organs, such as the heart, brain and nervous system carry information useful for biological and medical purposes. These magnetic fields are most commonly detected using cryogenically-cooled superconducting magnetometers. Here we present the first detection of action potentials from an animal nerve using an optical atomic magnetometer. Using an optimal design we are able to achieve the sensitivity dominated by the quantum shot noise of light and quantum projection noise of atomic spins. Such sensitivity allows us to measure the nerve impulse with a miniature room-temperature sensor which is a critical advantage for biomedical applications. Positioning the sensor at a distance of a few millimeters from the nerve, corresponding to the distance between the skin and nerves in biological studies, we detect the magnetic field generated by an action potential of a frog sciatic nerve. From the magnetic field measurements we determine the activity of the nerve and the temporal shape of the nerve impulse. This work opens new ways towards implementing optical magnetometers as practical devices for medical diagnostics.

  11. Testing the limits of Paleozoic chronostratigraphic correlation via high-resolution (13Ccarb) biochemostratigraphy across the Llandovery–Wenlock (Silurian) boundary: Is a unified Phanerozoic time scale achievable?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cramer, Bradley D.; Loydell, David K.; Samtleben, Christian; Munnecke, Axel; Kaljo, Dimitri; Mannik, Peep; Martma, Tonu; Jeppsson, Lennart; Kleffner, Mark A.; Barrick, James E.; Johnson, Craig A.; Emsbo, Poul; Joachimski, Michael M.; Bickert, Torsten; Saltzman, Matthew R.

    2010-01-01

    The resolution and fidelity of global chronostratigraphic correlation are direct functions of the time period under consideration. By virtue of deep-ocean cores and astrochronology, the Cenozoic and Mesozoic time scales carry error bars of a few thousand years (k.y.) to a few hundred k.y. In contrast, most of the Paleozoic time scale carries error bars of plus or minus a few million years (m.y.), and chronostratigraphic control better than ??1 m.y. is considered "high resolution." The general lack of Paleozoic abyssal sediments and paucity of orbitally tuned Paleozoic data series combined with the relative incompleteness of the Paleozoic stratigraphic record have proven historically to be such an obstacle to intercontinental chronostratigraphic correlation that resolving the Paleozoic time scale to the level achieved during the Mesozoic and Cenozoic was viewed as impractical, impossible, or both. Here, we utilize integrated graptolite, conodont, and carbonate carbon isotope (??13Ccarb) data from three paleocontinents (Baltica, Avalonia, and Laurentia) to demonstrate chronostratigraphic control for upper Llando very through middle Wenlock (Telychian-Sheinwoodian, ~436-426 Ma) strata with a resolution of a few hundred k.y. The interval surrounding the base of the Wenlock Series can now be correlated globally with precision approaching 100 k.y., but some intervals (e.g., uppermost Telychian and upper Shein-woodian) are either yet to be studied in sufficient detail or do not show sufficient biologic speciation and/or extinction or carbon isotopic features to delineate such small time slices. Although producing such resolution during the Paleozoic presents an array of challenges unique to the era, we have begun to demonstrate that erecting a Paleozoic time scale comparable to that of younger eras is achievable. ?? 2010 Geological Society of America.

  12. Detection of Temporally and Spatially Limited Periodic Earthquake Recurrence in Synthetic Seismic Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielke, O.; Arrowsmith, R. J.

    2005-12-01

    noticeable periodicity during certain intervals in an otherwise aperiodic record. The observed periodic signal is not equally distributed over the range of offsets but shows a multi-modal distribution with increased periodicity for the smallest events and for large events that show a specific offset. These large events also form a shoulder in the frequency-size distribution. Apparently, the model exhibits characteristic earthquakes (defined by similar coseismic slip) that occur more frequently than expected from a power law distribution, and also are significantly more periodic. The wavelength of the periodic signal generally equals the minimum loading time, which is related to the loading velocity and the amount of coseismic slip (i.e., stress drop). No significant event occurs between the characteristic events as long as the system stays in a window of periodic behavior. Within the windows of periodic behavior, earthquake prediction is straightforward. Therefore, recognition of these windows not only in synthetic data but also in real seismic records, may improve the intra-window forecast of earthquakes. Further studies will attempt to determine the characteristics of onset, duration, and end of these windows of periodic earthquake recurrence. Only the motion of a single block within a bigger system was analyzed so far. Going from a zero dimensional scenario to a two dimensional case where the offsets not only of a single block but the displacement patterns caused by a certain event are analyzed will increase the verisimilitude of the detection of periodic earthquake recurrence within an otherwise chaotic seismic record.

  13. Resistance of lichens to simulated galactic cosmic radiation: limits of survival capacity and biosignature detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Torre Noetzel, Rosa; Miller, Ana Z.; Cubero, Beatriz; Raguse, Marina; Meessen, Joachim

    2016-04-01

    Space constitutes an extremely harmful environment for survival of terrestrial organisms. Amongst extremophiles on Earth, lichens are one of the most resistant organisms to harsh terrestrial environments, as well as some species of microorganisms, such as bacteria (Moeller et al., 2010), criptoendolithic cyanobacteria and lithic fungi (de los Ríos et al. 2004). To study the survival capacity of lichens to the harmful radiation environment of space, we have selected the lichen Circinaria gyrosa, an astrobiological model defined by its high capacity of resistance to space conditions (De la Torre et al. 2010) and to a simulated Mars environment (Sanchez et al., 2012). Samples were irradiated with four types of space-relevant ionizing radiation in the STARLIFE campaign: helium and iron ion doses (up to 2,000 Gy), X-ray doses (up to 5,000 Gy) and ultra-high γ-ray doses (from 6 to 113 kGy). Results on resistance of C. gyrosa to space-relevant ionizing radiation and its post-irradiation viability were obtained by: (i) chlorophyll a fluorescence of photosystem II (PS II); (ii) epifluorescence microscopy; (iii) confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM), and (iv) field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Results of photosynthetic activity and epifluorescence showed no significant changes on the viability of C. gyrosa with increasing doses of helium and iron ions as well as X-rays. In contrast, γ-irradiation elicited significant dose-correlated effects as revealed by all applied techniques. Relevant is the presence of whewellite-like crystals, detected by FESEM on C. gyrosa thalli after high irradiation doses, which has been also identified in previous Mars simulation studies (Böttcher et al., 2014). These studies contribute to the better understanding of the adaptability of extremophile organisms to harsh environments, as well as to estimate the habitability of a planet's surface, like Mars; they will be important for planning experiments on the search of life

  14. A Control Allocation System for Automatic Detection and Compensation of Phase Shift Due to Actuator Rate Limiting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yildiz, Yidiray; Kolmanovsky, Ilya V.; Acosta, Diana

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a control allocation system that can detect and compensate the phase shift between the desired and the actual total control effort due to rate limiting of the actuators. Phase shifting is an important problem in control system applications since it effectively introduces a time delay which may destabilize the closed loop dynamics. A relevant example comes from flight control where aggressive pilot commands, high gain of the flight control system or some anomaly in the system may cause actuator rate limiting and effective time delay introduction. This time delay can instigate Pilot Induced Oscillations (PIO), which is an abnormal coupling between the pilot and the aircraft resulting in unintentional and undesired oscillations. The proposed control allocation system reduces the effective time delay by first detecting the phase shift and then minimizing it using constrained optimization techniques. Flight control simulation results for an unstable aircraft with inertial cross coupling are reported, which demonstrate phase shift minimization and recovery from a PIO event.

  15. Qualitative contrast between knowledge-limited mixed-state and variable-resources models of visual change detection.

    PubMed

    Nosofsky, Robert M; Donkin, Chris

    2016-10-01

    We report an experiment designed to provide a qualitative contrast between knowledge-limited versions of mixed-state and variable-resources (VR) models of visual change detection. The key data pattern is that observers often respond “same” on big-change trials, while simultaneously being able to discriminate between same and small-change trials. The mixed-state model provides a natural account of this data pattern: With some probability, the observer is in a zero-memory state and is forced to guess. Thus, even on big-change trials, there is a significant probability that the observer will respond “same.” On other trials, the observer retains memory for the probed study item, and these memory-based responses allow the observer to show above-chance discrimination between same and small-change trials. By contrast, we show that important versions of the VR models that we refer to as knowledge-limited models are stymied by this simple pattern of results. In agreement with Keshvari, van den Berg, and Ma (2012, 2013), alternative knowledge-rich VR models that employ ideal-observer decision rules provide a significant improvement over the knowledge-limited VR models; however, extant versions of the knowledge-rich VR models still fall short quantitatively compared to the descriptive mixed-state model. We discuss implications of the knowledge-rich assumptions that are posited in current versions of the VR models that have been used to fit change-detection data.

  16. Detection of micrometastasis by cytokeratin 20 RT-PCR is limited due to stable background transcription in granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jung, R; Petersen, K; Krüger, W; Wolf, M; Wagener, C; Zander, A; Neumaier, M

    1999-01-01

    The reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification of cytokeratin 20 (CK20) mRNA is considered a promising candidate method for the detection of circulating tumour cells in bone marrow and peripheral blood of cancer patients. In this study we have investigated the diagnostic specificity of the CK20 mRNA detection in samples from healthy donors (HD; n = 33), intensive care units patients (ICU; n = 20) and bone marrow obtained from patients suffering from chronic inflammatory diseases (CID; n = 14). RNAs purified from stabilized lysates showed positive results in 24% of the HD group (8/33), 35% of the ICU group (8/20) and in 40% of the CID group (5/14). The use of Ficoll gradients to separate nucleated cells completely restored the specificity of this CK20 RT-PCR assay. The CK20-expressing cells are positively identified to belong to the granulocyte fraction of leucocytes, which appear to express the gene on a background level. Our results demonstrate for the first time that CK20 mRNA expression is not limited to epithelium. Its occurrence in normal granulocytes has to be considered in tests designed to detect circulating cancer cells or micrometastases. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10555760

  17. Dependence of detection limits on angular alignment, substrate type and surface concentration in active mode standoff IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Zuñiga, Carlos A.; Galán-Freyle, Nataly Y.; Castro-Suarez, John R.; Aparicio-Bolaño, Joaquín.; Pacheco-Londoño, Leonardo C.; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2013-05-01

    A standoff multivariate calibration for detection of highly energetic materials (HEM) using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is presented in this report. The procedure consists in standoff sensing at 1 m distance and the variation of three parameters of detection. The first variable considered was the angular dependence: 0° to 45‡ from source-target with respect to alignment of target-detector. The second variable consisted on the use of several surfaces on which the material was deposited. The substrates used were polished aluminum and anodized aluminum. The third variable studied was the dependence on some specific analyte loading surface concentration: from 10 μg/cm2 to200 μg/cm2. The HEM used in this work was PETN, synthesized in our lab. Calibration curves were based on the use of chemometrics routines such as partial least squares (PLS) regression analysis. This algorithm was used to evaluate the impact of the angular dependence about the limits of detection of different HME loadings on aluminum substrates.

  18. The Firm Redshift Lower Limit of the Most Distant TeV-detected Blazar PKS 1424+240

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furniss, A.; Williams, D. A.; Danforth, C.; Fumagalli, M.; Prochaska, J. X.; Primack, J.; Urry, C. M.; Stocke, J.; Filippenko, A. V.; Neely, W.

    2013-05-01

    We present the redshift lower limit of z >= 0.6035 for the very high energy (VHE; E >= 100 GeV) emitting blazar PKS 1424+240 (PG 1424+240). This limit is inferred from Lyβ and Lyγ absorption observed in the far-ultraviolet spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope/Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. No VHE-detected blazar has shown solid spectroscopic evidence of being more distant. At this distance, VHE observations by VERITAS are shown to sample historically large gamma-ray opacity values at 500 GeV, extending beyond τ = 4 for low-level models of the extragalactic background light (EBL) and beyond τ = 5 for high levels. The majority of the z = 0.6035 absorption-corrected VHE spectrum appears to exhibit a lower flux than an extrapolation of the contemporaneous Large Area Telescope power-law fit beyond 100 GeV. However, the highest energy VERITAS point is the only point showing agreement with this extrapolation, possibly implying the overestimation of the gamma-ray opacity or the onset of an unexpected VHE spectral feature. A curved log parabola is favored when fitting the full range of gamma-ray data (0.5-500 GeV). While fitting the absorption-corrected VHE data alone results in a harder differential power law than that from the full range, the indices derived using three EBL models are consistent with the physically motivated limit set by Fermi acceleration processes.

  19. Finding binaries from phase modulation of pulsating stars with Kepler - IV. Detection limits and radial velocity verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Simon J.; Shibahashi, Hiromoto; Bedding, Timothy R.

    2016-10-01

    We explore the detection limits of the phase modulation (PM) method of finding binary systems among multiperiodic pulsating stars. The method is an attractive way of finding non-transiting planets in the habitable zones of intermediate-mass stars, whose rapid rotation inhibits detections via the radial velocity (RV) method. While oscillation amplitudes of a few mmag are required to find planets, many δ Scuti stars have these amplitudes. In suboptimal cases where the signal to noise of the oscillations is lower, low-mass brown dwarfs (˜13MJup) are detectable at orbital periods longer than about 1 yr, and the lowest mass main-sequence stars (0.1-0.2 M⊙) are detectable at all orbital periods where the PM method can be applied. We use purpose-written Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) software for the calculation of the PM orbits, which offers robust uncertainties for comparison with RV solutions. Using Kepler data and ground-based RVs, we verify that these two methods are in agreement, even at short orbital periods where the PM method undersamples the orbit. We develop new theory to account for the undersampling of the time delays, which is also necessary for the inclusion of RVs as observational data in the MCMC software. We show that combining RVs with time delays substantially refines the orbits because of the complementarity of working in both the spatial (PM) and velocity (RV) domains simultaneously. Software outputs were tested through an extensive hare-and-hounds exercise, covering a wide range of orbital configurations including binaries containing two pulsators.

  20. Methods for automatized detection of rapid changes in lateral boundary condition fields for NWP limited area models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudor, M.

    2015-08-01

    Three-hourly temporal resolution of lateral boundary data for limited area models (LAMs) can be too infrequent to resolve rapidly moving storms. This problem is expected to be worse with increasing horizontal resolution. In order to detect intensive disturbances in surface pressure moving rapidly through the model domain, a filtered surface pressure field (MCUF) is computed operationally in the ARPEGE global model of Météo France. The field is distributed in the coupling files along with conventional meteorological fields used for lateral boundary conditions (LBCs) for the operational forecast using limited area model ALADIN (Aire Limitée Adaptation dynamique Développement InterNational) in the Meteorological and Hydrological Service of Croatia (DHMZ). Here an analysis is performed of the MCUF field for the LACE coupling domain for the period from 23 January 2006, when it became available, until 15 November 2014. The MCUF field is a good indicator of rapidly moving pressure disturbances (RMPDs). Its spatial and temporal distribution can be associated with the usual cyclone tracks and areas known to be supporting cyclogenesis. An alternative set of coupling files from the IFS operational run in the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) is also available operationally in DHMZ with 3-hourly temporal resolution, but the MCUF field is not available. Here, several methods are tested that detect RMPDs in surface pressure a posteriori from the IFS model fields provided in the coupling files. MCUF is computed by running ALADIN on the coupling files from IFS. The error function is computed using one-time-step integration of ALADIN on the coupling files without initialization, initialized with digital filter initialization (DFI) or scale-selective DFI (SSDFI). Finally, the amplitude of changes in the mean sea level pressure is computed from the fields in the coupling files. The results are compared to the MCUF field of ARPEGE and the results of same

  1. Using an aqueous two-phase polymer-salt system to rapidly concentrate viruses for improving the detection limit of the lateral-flow immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Jue, Erik; Yamanishi, Cameron D; Chiu, Ricky Y T; Wu, Benjamin M; Kamei, Daniel T

    2014-12-01

    The development of point-of-need (PON) diagnostics for viruses has the potential to prevent pandemics and protects against biological warfare threats. Here we discuss the approach of using aqueous two-phase systems (ATPSs) to concentrate biomolecules prior to the lateral-flow immunoassay (LFA) for improved viral detection. In this paper, we developed a rapid PON detection assay as an extension to our previous proof-of-concept studies which used a micellar ATPS. We present our investigation of a more rapid polymer-salt ATPS that can drastically improve the assay time, and show that the phase containing the concentrated biomolecule can be extracted prior to macroscopic phase separation equilibrium without affecting the measured biomolecule concentration in that phase. We could therefore significantly decrease the time of the diagnostic assay with an early extraction time of just 30 min. Using this rapid ATPS, the model virus bacteriophage M13 was concentrated between approximately 2 and 10-fold by altering the volume ratio between the two phases. As the extracted virus-rich phase contained a high salt concentration which destabilized the colloidal gold indicator used in LFA, we decorated the gold nanoprobes with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to provide steric stabilization, and used these nanoprobes to demonstrate a 10-fold improvement in the LFA detection limit. Lastly, a MATLAB script was used to quantify the LFA results with and without the pre-concentration step. This approach of combining a rapid ATPS with LFA has great potential for PON applications, especially as greater concentration-fold improvements can be achieved by further varying the volume ratio. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2014;111: 2499-2507. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Taking single virus detection and sizing to the limit with molecular sensitivity: the birth of nanoplasmonic-microcavity hybrid sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, S.

    2013-03-01

    The BioPhotonics community is buzzing at the prospect that ulta-small bio-nanoparticles such as Polio virus and protein can be detected label-free in their native state and sized one at a time. As the awareness that the claim of label-free single protein sensing through the frequency shift of a bare microcavity by A.M. Armani et al in Science in 2007 fades from lack of independent experimental confirmation or a viable physical mechanism to account for the magnitude of the reported wavelength shifts, a new approach has captured the community's interest. It is a product of a marriage between nano-optics and micro-photonics, and is poised to take label-free sensing to the limit.

  3. Analysis of the Differential Phase Detection Signal in Multi-level Run-Length Limited Read-Only Disk Driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Quanhong; Pei, Jing; Xu, Haizheng; Wang, Lin; Xu, Duanyi

    2006-07-01

    Multilevel run-length-limited (ML-RLL) recording technology could be employed to increase the capacity of the read-only disc without changing optical and mechanical units. In this paper, the tracking error signal (TES) of differential phase detection (DPD) for ML-RLL digital versatile disk (DVD) read-only disk driver is analyzed in both theoretical and experimental way, the uniformity and symmetry of which are worse than that of the DVD read-only disk driver. The variation of peak to peak (PP) value distribution of the DPD signal in open loop of ML-RLL DVD read-only disk driver is about 2.6 times of that of the conventional DVD driver while the asymmetry is about 4 times. It is predicted that some improvements of the tracking servo system are needed in ML-RLL system.

  4. Quantification of selected furocoumarins by high-performance liquid chromatography and UV-detection: capabilities and limits.

    PubMed

    Macmaster, Angus P; Owen, Neil; Brussaux, Sylvain; Brevard, Hugues; Hiserodt, Richard; Leijs, Hans; Bast, Nikola; Weber, Berthold; Loesing, Gerd; Sherlock, Alan; Schippa, Christine; Vey, Matthias; Frérot, Eric; Tissot, Emeline; Chaintreau, Alain

    2012-09-28

    The performance of HPLC-UV as a means of quantifying selected furocoumarins in essential oils has been evaluated, based on a ring test validation approach. Accuracy profiles were generated, to determine bias and statistical confidence associated with determination at different concentrations, along with lower limits of quantification (LOQ). From these findings, it can be concluded that the method described may only be used in simple cases (essential oils), to measure individual furocoumarin compounds at concentrations greater than 10mg/l; the non compound-specific nature of detection by absorption in the UV range is unable to overcome the effect of interferences arising from chromatographic coelutions, such as those encountered in the analysis of complex commercial fragrance mixtures. The use of an algorithmically calculated 'spectral similarity' function, with reference to authentic standards, may be used to improve reliability in assignment and quantification.

  5. Simultaneous inference for longitudinal data with detection limits and covariates measured with errors, with application to AIDS studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lang

    2004-06-15

    In AIDS studies such as HIV viral dynamics, statistical inference is often complicated because the viral load measurements may be subject to left censoring due to a detection limit and time-varying covariates such as CD4 counts may be measured with substantial errors. Mixed-effects models are often used to model the response and the covariate processes in these studies. We propose a unified approach which addresses the censoring and measurement errors simultaneously. We estimate the model parameters by a Monte-Carlo EM algorithm via the Gibbs sampler. A simulation study is conducted to compare the proposed method with the usual two-step method and a naive method. We find that the proposed method produces approximately unbiased estimates with more reliable standard errors. A real data set from an AIDS study is analysed using the proposed method.

  6. Minimum detectable limits of measuring bone mineral density using an energy dispersive X-ray diffraction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allday, A. W.; Farquharson, M. J.

    2001-06-01

    In the clinical environment, the most common method of assessing bone mineral density (BMD) loss is dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), which relies on the transmission of X-ray photons through the volume of interest. Energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD), which utilises coherent X-ray scattering, potentially is a more accurate method. As part of the development of a precision EDXRD system, an experiment was performed using a range of bone and fat mix phantoms, which were also used for DEXA evaluation. The results are presented here and suggest initial minimum detectable limits of the order of 5% BMD loss for the EDXRD experiment and 10-15% for the DEXA assessment.

  7. On the importance of direct detection combined limits for spin independent and spin dependent dark matter interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Marcos, Cristina; Peiró, Miguel; Robles, Sandra E-mail: miguel.peiro@uam.es

    2016-03-01

    In this work we show how the inclusion of dark matter (DM) direct detection upper bounds in a theoretically consistent manner can affect the allowed parameter space of a DM model. Traditionally, the limits from DM direct detection experiments on the elastic scattering cross section of DM particles as a function of their mass are extracted under simplifying assumptions. Relaxing the assumptions related to the DM particle nature, such as the neutron to proton ratio of the interactions, or the possibility of having similar contributions from the spin independent (SI) and spin dependent (SD) interactions can vary significantly the upper limits. Furthermore, it is known that astrophysical and nuclear uncertainties can also affect the upper bounds. To exemplify the impact of properly including all these factors, we have analysed two well motivated and popular DM scenarios: neutralinos in the NMSSM and a Z' portal with Dirac DM. We have found that the allowed parameter space of these models is subject to important variations when one includes both the SI and SD interactions at the same time, realistic neutron to proton ratios, as well as using different self-consistent speed distributions corresponding to popular DM halo density profiles, and distinct SD structure functions. Finally, we provide all the necessary information to include the upper bounds of SuperCDMS and LUX taking into account all these subtleties in the investigation of any particle physics model. The data for each experiment and example codes are available at this site http://goo.gl/1CDFYi, and their use is detailed in the appendices of this work.

  8. Upper limits to the detection of ammonia from protoplanetary disks around HL Tauri and L1551-IRS 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Jose F.; Torrelles, Jose M.; Ho, Paul T. P.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Canto, Jorge

    1993-01-01

    We present NH3(1, 1) and (2, 2) observations of the young stellar sources HL Tau and L1551-IRS 5 using the VLA in its B-configuration, which provides an angular resolution of about 0.4 arcsec (about 50 AU at 140 pc) at 1.3 cm wavelength. Our goal was to detect and resolve circumstellar molecular disks with radius of the order of 100 AU around these two sources. No ammonia emission was detected toward either of them. The 3-sigma levels were 2.7 mJy/beam and 3.9 mJy/beam for HL Tau and L1551-IRS 5, respectively, with a velocity resolution of about 5 km/s. With this nondetection, we estimate upper limits to the mass of the proposed protoplanetary molecular disks (within a radius of 10 AU from the central stars) on the order of 0.02/(X(NH3)/10 exp -8) solar mass for HL Tau and 0.1/(X(NH3)/10 exp -8) solar mass for L1551-IRS 5.

  9. Quantifying Efficacy and Limits of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Technology for Weed Seedling Detection as Affected by Sensor Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Peña, José M.; Torres-Sánchez, Jorge; Serrano-Pérez, Angélica; de Castro, Ana I.; López-Granados, Francisca

    2015-01-01

    In order to optimize the application of herbicides in weed-crop systems, accurate and timely weed maps of the crop-field are required. In this context, this investigation quantified the efficacy and limitations of remote images collected with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) for early detection of weed seedlings. The ability to discriminate weeds was significantly affected by the imagery spectral (type of camera), spatial (flight altitude) and temporal (the date of the study) resolutions. The colour-infrared images captured at 40 m and 50 days after sowing (date 2), when plants had 5–6 true leaves, had the highest weed detection accuracy (up to 91%). At this flight altitude, the images captured before date 2 had slightly better results than the images captured later. However, this trend changed in the visible-light images captured at 60 m and higher, which had notably better results on date 3 (57 days after sowing) because of the larger size of the weed plants. Our results showed the requirements on spectral and spatial resolutions needed to generate a suitable weed map early in the growing season, as well as the best moment for the UAV image acquisition, with the ultimate objective of applying site-specific weed management operations. PMID:25756867

  10. Multivariate detection limits of on-line NIR model for extraction process of chlorogenic acid from Lonicera japonica.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhisheng; Sui, Chenglin; Xu, Bing; Ai, Lu; Ma, Qun; Shi, Xinyuan; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2013-04-15

    A methodology is proposed to estimate the multivariate detection limits (MDL) of on-line near-infrared (NIR) model in Chinese Herbal Medicines (CHM) system. In this paper, Lonicera japonica was used as an example, and its extraction process was monitored by on-line NIR spectroscopy. Spectra of on-line NIR could be collected by two fiber optic probes designed to transmit NIR radiation by a 2mm-flange. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used as a reference method to determine the content of chlorogenic acid in the extract solution. Multivariate calibration models were carried out including partial least squares regression (PLS) and interval partial least-squares (iPLS). The result showed improvement of model performance: compared with PLS model, the root mean square errors of prediction (RMSEP) of iPLS model decreased from 0.111mg to 0.068mg, and the R(2) parameter increased from 0.9434 to 0.9801. Furthermore, MDL values were determined by a multivariate method using the type of errors and concentration ranges. The MDL of iPLS model was about 14ppm, which confirmed that on-line NIR spectroscopy had the ability to detect trace amounts of chlorogenic acid in L. japonica. As a result, the application of on-line NIR spectroscopy for monitoring extraction process in CHM could be very encouraging and reliable.

  11. Quantifying efficacy and limits of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) technology for weed seedling detection as affected by sensor resolution.

    PubMed

    Peña, José M; Torres-Sánchez, Jorge; Serrano-Pérez, Angélica; de Castro, Ana I; López-Granados, Francisca

    2015-03-06

    In order to optimize the application of herbicides in weed-crop systems, accurate and timely weed maps of the crop-field are required. In this context, this investigation quantified the efficacy and limitations of remote images collected with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) for early detection of weed seedlings. The ability to discriminate weeds was significantly affected by the imagery spectral (type of camera), spatial (flight altitude) and temporal (the date of the study) resolutions. The colour-infrared images captured at 40 m and 50 days after sowing (date 2), when plants had 5-6 true leaves, had the highest weed detection accuracy (up to 91%). At this flight altitude, the images captured before date 2 had slightly better results than the images captured later. However, this trend changed in the visible-light images captured at 60 m and higher, which had notably better results on date 3 (57 days after sowing) because of the larger size of the weed plants. Our results showed the requirements on spectral and spatial resolutions needed to generate a suitable weed map early in the growing season, as well as the best moment for the UAV image acquisition, with the ultimate objective of applying site-specific weed management operations.

  12. [Study on limit detection of flavones in diterpene ginkgolides meglumine injection materials by LC-MS and HPLC-DAD].

    PubMed

    Bi, Sen; Li, Yan-jing; Huang, Wen-zhe; Kang, Dan-yu; Ding, Gang; Xiao, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Limit test of flavones in diterpene ginkgolides meglumine injection materials by UV-Vis and HPLC-DAD method was studied in this essay. The HPLC-DAD method has lower LOD (about 1% of the UV-Vis), that is, the sensitivity is higher than UV-Vis method. Through the analysis of the kinds of flavonoids ingredients in the samples by LC-MS, the three compounds with highest contents are kaempferol, quercetin and isorhamnetin. Kaempferol, quercetin and isorhamnetin were chosen as reference compounds for HPLC analysis, and the HPLC separation analysis was carried on an Agilent Eclipse plus C18 column (4.6 mm x 250 mm, 5 μm) with methanol and water containing 0.4% phosphoric acid (50: 50) as mobile phase, and the flow rate was 1.0 mL x min(-1). The detection wavelength was set at 360 nm. This method has good specificity, precision and reproducibility. The LODs of quercetin, kaempferide and isorhamnetin were 27.6, 22.3, 29.5 μg x L(-1). The average recovery was 87.9% (RSD 3.3%), 91.7% (RSD 3.1%), 88.3 (RSD 1.3%) for quercetin, kaempferide and isorhamnetin, respectively. Based on the 10 batches of sample results and sensitivity of different HPLC, the content of total flavonoids ingredients of diterpene ginkgolides meglumine injection materials was limited no more than 2 x 10(-5). This method is simple, quick and has good maneuverability, and could be used to the limit test of flavonoids in the diterpene ginkgolides meglumine injection materials.

  13. Study of the art: canine olfaction used for cancer detection on the basis of breath odour. Perspectives and limitations.

    PubMed

    Jezierski, Tadeusz; Walczak, Marta; Ligor, Tomasz; Rudnicka, Joanna; Buszewski, Bogusław

    2015-05-06

    Experimental studies using trained dogs to identify breath odour markers of human cancer, published in the recent decade, have been analyzed and compared with the authors' own results. Particular published studies differ as regards the experimental setup, kind of odour samples (breath, urine, tumor tissue, serum), sample collection methods, dogs' characteristics and dog training methods as well as in results presented in terms of detection sensitivity and specificity. Generally it can be stated that trained dogs are able to distinguish breath odour samples typical for patients with lung cancer and other cancers from samples typical for healthy humans at a 'better than by chance' rate. Dogs' indications were positively correlated with content of 2-pentanone and ethyl acetate (r = 0.97 and r = 0.85 respectively) and negatively correlated with 1-propanol and propanal in breath samples (r = -0.98 and -0.87 respectively). The canine method has some advantages as a potential cancer-screening method, due to its non-invasiveness, simplicity of odour sampling and storage, ease of testing and interpretation of results and relatively low costs. Disadvantages and limitations of this method are related to the fact that it is still not known exactly to which chemical compounds and/or their combinations the dogs react. So far it could not be confirmed that dogs are able to sniff out early preclinical cancer stages with approximately the same accuracy as already diagnosed cases. The detection accuracy may vary due to failure in conditioning of dogs, decreasing motivation or confounding factors. The dogs' performance should be systematically checked in rigorous double-blind procedures. Recommendations for methodological standardization have been proposed.

  14. Comparison of nucleic acid extraction platforms for detection of select biothreat agents for use in clinical resource limited settings.

    PubMed

    Shipley, Michelle A; Koehler, Jeffrey W; Kulesh, David A; Minogue, Timothy D

    2012-10-01

    High-quality nucleic acids are critical for optimal PCR-based diagnostics and pathogen detection. Rapid sample processing time is important for the earliest administration of therapeutic and containment measures, especially in the case of biothreat agents. In this context, we compared the Fujifilm QuickGene-Mini80 to Qiagen's QIAamp Mini Purification kits for extraction of DNA and RNA for potential use in austere settings. Qiagen (QIAamp) column-based extraction is the currently recommended purification platform by United States Army Medical Research Institute for Infectious Diseases for both DNA and RNA extraction. However, this sample processing system requires dedicated laboratory equipment including a centrifuge. In this study, we investigated the QuickGene-Mini80, which does not require centrifugation, as a suitable platform for nucleic acid extraction for use in resource-limited locations. Quality of the sample extraction was evaluated using pathogen-specific, real-time PCR assays for nucleic acids extracted from viable and γ-irradiated Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, vaccinia virus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, or B. anthracis spores in buffer or human whole blood. QuickGene-Mini80 and QIAamp performed similarly for DNA extraction regardless of organism viability. It was noteworthy that γ-irradiation did not have a significant impact on real-time PCR for organism detection. Comparison with QIAamp showed a less than adequate performance of the Fujifilm instrument for RNA extraction. However, QuickGene-Mini80 remains a viable alternative to QIAamp for DNA extraction for use in remote settings due to extraction quality, time efficiency, reduced instrument requirements, and ease of use.

  15. Eddy-covariance data with low signal-to-noise ratio: time-lag determination, uncertainties and limit of detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, B.; Acton, W.; Ammann, C.; Valach, A.; Nemitz, E.

    2015-03-01

    All eddy-covariance flux measurements are associated with random uncertainties which are a combination of sampling error due to natural variability in turbulence and sensor noise. The former is the principal error for systems where the signal-to-noise ratio of the analyser is high, as is usually the case when measuring fluxes of heat, CO2 or H2O. Where signal is limited, which is often the case for measurements of other trace gases and aerosols, instrument uncertainties dominate. We are here applying a consistent approach based on auto- and cross-covariance functions to quantifying the total random flux error and the random error due to instrument noise separately. As with previous approaches, the random error quantification assumes that the time-lag between wind and concentration measurement is known. However, if combined with commonly used automated methods that identify the individual time-lag by looking for the maximum in the cross-covariance function of the two entities, analyser noise additionally leads to a systematic bias in the fluxes. Combining datasets from several analysers and using simulations we show that the method of time-lag determination becomes increasingly important as the magnitude of the instrument error approaches that of the sampling error. The flux bias can be particularly significant for disjunct data, whereas using a prescribed time-lag eliminates these effects (provided the time-lag does not fluctuate unduly over time). We also demonstrate that when sampling at higher elevations, where low frequency turbulence dominates and covariance peaks are broader, both the probability and magnitude of bias are magnified. We show that the statistical significance of noisy flux data can be increased (limit of detection can be decreased) by appropriate averaging of individual fluxes, but only if systematic biases are avoided by using a prescribed time-lag. Finally, we make recommendations for the analysis and reporting of data with low signal

  16. Eddy-covariance data with low signal-to-noise ratio: time-lag determination, uncertainties and limit of detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, B.; Acton, W.; Ammann, C.; Valach, A.; Nemitz, E.

    2015-10-01

    All eddy-covariance flux measurements are associated with random uncertainties which are a combination of sampling error due to natural variability in turbulence and sensor noise. The former is the principal error for systems where the signal-to-noise ratio of the analyser is high, as is usually the case when measuring fluxes of heat, CO2 or H2O. Where signal is limited, which is often the case for measurements of other trace gases and aerosols, instrument uncertainties dominate. Here, we are applying a consistent approach based on auto- and cross-covariance functions to quantify the total random flux error and the random error due to instrument noise separately. As with previous approaches, the random error quantification assumes that the time lag between wind and concentration measurement is known. However, if combined with commonly used automated methods that identify the individual time lag by looking for the maximum in the cross-covariance function of the two entities, analyser noise additionally leads to a systematic bias in the fluxes. Combining data sets from several analysers and using simulations, we show that the method of time-lag determination becomes increasingly important as the magnitude of the instrument error approaches that of the sampling error. The flux bias can be particularly significant for disjunct data, whereas using a prescribed time lag eliminates these effects (provided the time lag does not fluctuate unduly over time). We also demonstrate that when sampling at higher elevations, where low frequency turbulence dominates and covariance peaks are broader, both the probability and magnitude of bias are magnified. We show that the statistical significance of noisy flux data can be increased (limit of detection can be decreased) by appropriate averaging of individual fluxes, but only if systematic biases are avoided by using a prescribed time lag. Finally, we make recommendations for the analysis and reporting of data with low signal

  17. Improving the detection limits of antispasmodic drugs electrodes by using modified membrane sensors with inner solid contact.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hosny; Issa, Y M; Abu-Shawish, Hazem M

    2007-05-09

    Three coated wire electrodes (CWEs) for the antispasmodic drugs; dicyclomine (Dc), mebeverine (Mv) and drotaverine (Dv) hydrochlorides were developed. Each electrode based on ion-associate of a heteropoly anion with the drug cation incorporated in membrane sensor modified with graphite and deposited on silver internal solid contact. The influence of addition of graphite to the membranes and the type of the internal solid contact on the potentiometric responses of the electrodes was investigated. The characteristics of the new electrodes were compared to the characteristics of previously reported traditional liquid inner contact electrodes of the same drugs. The lower detection limits of the proposed electrodes were somewhat better than those observed with the corresponding liquid contact ISEs and reached (1.2-2.0)x10(-7)M. The potentiometric selectivity of the CWEs revealed a significant improvement and much faster response times compared to the liquid contact ISEs. The practical utility of each electrode has been demonstrated by using it successfully in potentiometric determination of its respective drug in pharmaceutical preparations both in batch and flow injection conditions. Each electrode was also used as an indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration of the drug against standard silicotungstic acid and in potentiometric determination of the drug concentration in urine samples.

  18. Measurement of the Depth of Penetration of UV Photons into Mars Relevant Rock Samples to Constrain Habitability and Limits of Detection for the SHERLOC Mars 2020 Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrier, B. L.; Beegle, L. W.; Bhartia, R.; Abbey, W. J.

    2015-12-01

    We report on the depth of penetration of UV photons into a suite of Mars relevant materials in order to better characterize what constitutes a habitable environment on Mars, as well as to characterize the sensitivities of the Scanning Habitable Environments with Raman and Luminescence for Organics and Chemicals (SHERLOC) instrument on the Mars 2020 payload. To date, UV transparency of these rock types have not been fully characterized, and we have performed a systematic study to better constrain the UV attenuation over a wide range of materials relevant to Mars. At one point during the history of Mars, the surface may have been habitable, with flowing liquid water and access to food and energy sources. As surface conditions changed, it is not unreasonable to assume that life would have migrated into the protected interior of porous rocks, veins, fissures, and the subsurface as a means to protect itself from harsh surface conditions, such as the UV flux that we observe today. Given geological time, the depth that UV light penetrates into the subsurface will play a role in altering and/or effecting the preservation of organic molecule containing biosignatures. However, the extent to which various rock types can shield organic material currently is not well understood. In addition to constraining the UV-driven habitable "zone", the data also helps constrain the SHERLOC instrument limits of detection. SHERLOC is a deep UV fluorescence and Raman imaging instrument. This is achieved by spatially scanning a deep UV laser at 248.6 nm to stimulate fluorescence emissions and Raman scattering from the sample. Specifically, fluorescence is generated from electronic transition from aromatic organics and Raman scatter is generated from vibrational bonds from both organics and minerals. Given the excitation wavelength, and the emission/scattering wavelengths (250-350), the mineral transparency will affect the interrogation volume of analysis and thus constrain the limits of

  19. Changes in respiratory function impairment following the treatment of severe pulmonary tuberculosis – limitations for the underlying COPD detection

    PubMed Central

    Radovic, Milan; Ristic, Lidija; Ciric, Zorica; Dinic-Radovic, Violeta; Stankovic, Ivana; Pejcic, Tatjana; Rancic, Milan; Bogdanovic, Dragan

    2016-01-01

    Background During the treatment phase of active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB), respiratory function impairment is usually restrictive. This may become obstructive, as a PTB-associated airflow obstruction (AFO) or as a later manifestation of underlying COPD. Purpose The aim of the study was to examine the potential causes and risks for AFO development in PTB by exploring the aspects of spirometry limitations and clinical implications for the underlying COPD detection, taking into account various confounding factors. Patients and methods Prospective, nest case–control study on 40 new cases of PTB with initial restrictive respiratory function impairment, diagnosed and treated according to the directly observed treatment short course (DOTS) strategy. Results From all observed patients, 37.5% of them developed AFO upon the completion of PTB treatment, with significantly increased average of forced vital capacity (%) (P<0.01). Their changes in forced expiratory volume in the first second (%) during the PTB treatment were strongly associated with the air pollution exposure in living (0.474%–20.971% for 95% confidence interval [CI]; P=0.041) and working environments (3.928%–20.379% for 95% CI; P=0.005), initial radiological extent of PTB lesions (0.018%–0.700% for 95% CI; P=0.047), leukocyte count (0.020%–1.328% for 95% CI; P=0.043), and C-reactive protein serum level (0.046%–0.205% for 95% CI; P=0.003) compared to the other patients. The multivariate logistic regression analysis model shows initial radiological extent of pulmonary tuberculosis lesions (OR 1.01–1.05 for 95% CI; P=0.02) and sputum conversion rate on culture (OR 1.02–1.68 for 95% CI; P=0.04) as the most significant predictors for the risk of AFO development. Conclusion AFO upon PTB treatment is a common manifestation of underlying COPD, which mostly occurs later, during the reparative processes in active PTB, even in the absence of major risk factors, such as cigarette smoking and biomass fuel

  20. Synthesis of grafted phosphorylcholine polymer layers as specific recognition ligands for C-reactive protein focused on grafting density and thickness to achieve highly sensitive detection.

    PubMed

    Kamon, Yuri; Kitayama, Yukiya; Itakura, Akiko N; Fukazawa, Kyoko; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Takeuchi, Toshifumi

    2015-04-21

    We studied the effects of layer thickness and grafting density of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC) thin layers as specific ligands for the highly sensitive binding of C-reactive protein (CRP). PMPC layer thickness was controlled by surface-initiated activators generated by electron transfer for atom transfer radical polymerization (AGET ATRP). PMPC grafting density was controlled by utilizing mixed self-assembled monolayers with different incorporation ratios of the bis[2-(2-bromoisobutyryloxy)undecyl] disulfide ATRP initiator, as modulated by altering the feed molar ratio with (11-mercaptoundecyl)tetra(ethylene glycol). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ellipsometry measurements were used to characterize the modified surfaces. PMPC grafting densities were estimated from polymer thickness and the molecular weight obtained from sacrificial initiator during surface-initiated AGET ATRP. The effects of thickness and grafting density of the obtained PMPC layers on CRP binding performance were investigated using surface plasmon resonance employing a 10 mM Tris-HCl running buffer containing 140 mM NaCl and 2 mM CaCl2 (pH 7.4). Furthermore, the non-specific binding properties of the obtained layers were investigated using human serum albumin (HSA) as a reference protein. The PMPC layer which has 4.6 nm of thickness and 1.27 chains per nm(2) of grafting density showed highly sensitive CRP detection (limit of detection: 4.4 ng mL(-1)) with low non-specific HSA adsorption, which was improved 10 times than our previous report of 50 ng mL(-1).

  1. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy: technique, new features, and detection limits of trace elements in Al base alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegazy, H.; Abdel-Wahab, E. A.; Abdel-Rahim, F. M.; Allam, S. H.; Nossair, A. M. A.

    2014-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has proven to be extremely versatile, providing multielement analysis in real time without sample preparation. The principle is based on the ablation of a small amount of target material by interaction of a strong laser beam with a solid target. The laser must have sufficient energy to excite atoms and to ionize them to produce plasma. We aimed to improve the LIBS limit of detection (LOD) and the precision of spectral lines emitted from the produced plasma by optimizing the parameters affecting the LIBS technique. LIBS LOD is affected by many experimental parameters such as interferences, self-absorption, spectral overlap, signal-to-noise ratio, and matrix effects. The plasma in the present study is generated by focusing a 6-ns pulsed Nd-YAG laser at the fundamental wavelength of 1,064 nm onto the Al target in air at atmospheric pressure. The emission spectra are recorded using an SE 200 Echelle spectrometer manufactured by the Catalina Corporation; it is equipped with an ICCD camera type Andor model iStar DH734-18. This spectrometer allows time-resolved spectral acquisition over the whole UV-NIR (200-1,000 nm) spectral range. Calibration curves for Cu, Mg, Mn, Si, Cr, and Fe were obtained with linear regression coefficients around 99 % on the average in aluminum standard alloy samples. The determined LOD has very useful improvements for Cu I at 521.85 nm, Si I at 288.15 nm, Mn I at 482.34 nm, and Cr I at 520.84 nm spectral lines. LOD is improved by 83.8 % for Cu, 49 % for Si, 84.3 % for Mn, and 45 % for Cr lower with respect to the previous works.

  2. Limited value of PCR for detection of Toxoplasma gondii in blood from human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    PubMed Central

    Franzen, C; Altfeld, M; Hegener, P; Hartmann, P; Arendt, G; Jablonowski, H; Rockstroh, J; Diehl, V; Salzberger, B; Fätkenheuer, G

    1997-01-01

    Cerebral toxoplasmosis is a common, opportunistic, and often life-threatening disease in HIV-infected patients. Diagnosis is supported mainly by clinical evidence and computerized tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scans, but brain images may share features with other brain diseases occurring in HIV-infected patients. To determine the diagnostic value of PCR for the detection of Toxoplasma gondii in blood from HIV-infected patients, we examined 89 blood samples from 59 HIV-infected patients. PCR and Southern blot hybridization were done with DNA extracted from blood samples from 20 patients with confirmed cerebral toxoplasmosis and from 10 patients with suspected but not confirmed cerebral toxoplasmosis. The samples were taken before and 7 to 10 days after the beginning of antiparasitic therapy. For 9 patients who suffered from cerebral toxoplasmosis more than 6 months prior to the study and for 20 patients without any evidence for toxoplasmosis only one blood sample per patient was examined. PCR gave positive results with 5 of the 20 blood samples from patients who suffered from cerebral toxoplasmosis. After 7 to 10 days of therapy PCR results became negative in all these five cases. No amplification was seen with DNA from blood samples from the other 54 patients as the target. The results presented here show that PCR testing of blood samples from HIV-infected patients is of limited value for the diagnosis of cerebral toxoplasmosis. The sensitivity was only 25%, but the specificity was very high (100%), so this technique may be useful for discriminating between cerebral toxoplasmosis and other brain diseases which may be mistaken for toxoplasmosis. PMID:9316922

  3. BACKGROUND TRACK DENSITY REDUCTION OF 50-HZ-HV ECE-PROCESSED THICK POLYCARBONATE DETECTORS TO IMPROVE LOWER DETECTION LIMIT.

    PubMed

    Sohrabi, M; Hakimi, A; Soltani, Z

    2016-12-01

    A recent novel development of 50-Hz-HV ECE of 1-mm-thick and 250-µm-thick polycarbonate track detectors (PCTDs) has proved some promising results for some health physics, dosimetry and ion-beam-related applications. The method while proved having some good characteristics for some applications provided a relatively higher background track density (BGTD) in particular when very high voltages are applied to the PCTDs. In order to decrease the minimum detection limit (MDL) of the PCTDs and to further promote its applications for low dose, the BGTD was reduced by applying a layer removal methodology applying ethylendiamine (EDA). The effects of EDA concentrations (50, 60, 65, 70, 75, 80, 85 and 90 %) in water at room temperature (26°C) and soaking durations up to 100 min at different EDA concentration on BGTD reduction were studied. The thickness of the layer removed from the surface of a PCTD highly depends on the soaking time and EDA concentration; it increases as the EDA concentration increases up to for example 700 µm after 2 h of soaking in the EDA solution. After ∼10 min of soaking duration at any of the above-stated concentrations, the BGTD reaches its minimum value, a value which differs from concentration to concentration. An EDA concentration of 85 % in water provided the lowest BGTD of 64.06 ± 3.12 tracks cm(- 2); ∼6 times lower than that of its original value. It is shown that the layer removal process does not change the registration characteristics of the PCTD and its appearance significantly. The MDL of the PCTDs depends strongly on the BGTD. The MDL values for a desired confidence level were also studied by three calculation methods. The results of the BGTD and the MDL studies under different conditions applied are presented and discussed.

  4. Interaction of cosmic ray muons with spent nuclear fuel dry casks and determination of lower detection limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzidakis, S.; Choi, C. K.; Tsoukalas, L. H.

    2016-08-01

    The potential non-proliferation monitoring of spent nuclear fuel sealed in dry casks interacting continuously with the naturally generated cosmic ray muons is investigated. Treatments on the muon RMS scattering angle by Moliere, Rossi-Greisen, Highland and, Lynch-Dahl were analyzed and compared with simplified Monte Carlo simulations. The Lynch-Dahl expression has the lowest error and appears to be appropriate when performing conceptual calculations for high-Z, thick targets such as dry casks. The GEANT4 Monte Carlo code was used to simulate dry casks with various fuel loadings and scattering variance estimates for each case were obtained. The scattering variance estimation was shown to be unbiased and using Chebyshev's inequality, it was found that 106 muons will provide estimates of the scattering variances that are within 1% of the true value at a 99% confidence level. These estimates were used as reference values to calculate scattering distributions and evaluate the asymptotic behavior for small variations on fuel loading. It is shown that the scattering distributions between a fully loaded dry cask and one with a fuel assembly missing initially overlap significantly but their distance eventually increases with increasing number of muons. One missing fuel assembly can be distinguished from a fully loaded cask with a small overlapping between the distributions which is the case of 100,000 muons. This indicates that the removal of a standard fuel assembly can be identified using muons providing that enough muons are collected. A Bayesian algorithm was developed to classify dry casks and provide a decision rule that minimizes the risk of making an incorrect decision. The algorithm performance was evaluated and the lower detection limit was determined.

  5. Validity and limitation of manual rotational test to detect impaired visual-vestibular interaction due to cerebellar disorders.

    PubMed

    Murai, Norihiko; Funabiki, Kazuo; Naito, Yasushi; Ito, Juichi; Fukuyama, Hidenao

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate validity and limitation of the novel infrared system to record and analyze horizontal visual-vestibular interaction using whole-body rotation rapidly and conveniently in the routine vestibular clinic. We examined 11 patients with cerebellar dysequilibrium and 25 patients with peripheral dysequilibrium for vestibulo-ocular reflex in darkness (DVOR), visually-enhanced vestibulo-ocular reflex (VEVOR), and fixation suppression of vestibulo-ocular reflex (FSVOR), and compared the results with those of examination for head-fixed smooth pursuit and fixation suppression during caloric stimulation. The manual rotation stimuli were 0.5-0.75 Hz in frequency and 60-90 degrees /s in maximal angular velocity. Gain of vestibulo-ocular reflex in darkness was not significantly correlated with maximal slow phase velocity (MSPV) of caloric-induced nystagmus at that stimulus condition either in patients with peripheral dysequilibrium or in those with cerebellar dysequilibrium. An index for fixation suppression of vestibulo-ocular reflex during rotation stimulus was significantly lower in patients with cerebellar dysequilibrium than in normal control subjects and those with peripheral dysequilibrium. On the other hand, there was no significant difference among the two disease groups and the normal control group in gain of visually-enhanced vestibulo-ocular reflex. In about a half of patients with cerebellar dysequilibrium, measured smooth pursuit gain was lower than estimated smooth pursuit gain calculated based on a simple superposition theory of vestibulo-ocular reflex and smooth pursuit. Testing fixation suppression using the present system is an unusually convenient tool for detection of cerebellar dysequilibrium.

  6. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 425 - Definition and Procedure for the Determination of the Method Detection Limit 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Table. S=standard deviation of the replicate analyses. (b) The 95 percent confidence limits for the MDL... where MDLLCL and MDLUCL are the lower and upper 95 percent confidence limits respectively based on seven... (12, 1−a=.99) (e) The 95 percent confidence limits for MDL derived in 7c are computed according to...

  7. Higher Q factor and higher extinction ratio with lower detection limit photonic crystal-parallel-integrated sensor array for on-chip optical multiplexing sensing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Huang, Lijun; Fu, Zhongyuan; Sun, Fujun; Tian, Huiping

    2016-12-10

    We introduce an alternative method to establish a nanoscale sensor array based on a photonic crystal (PhC) slab, which is referred to as a 1×4 monolithic PhC parallel-integrated sensor array (PhC-PISA). To realize this function, four lattice-shifted resonant cavities are butt-coupled to four output waveguide branches, respectively. By shifting the first to the two closest neighboring holes around the defect, a high Q factor over 1.5×104 has been obtained. Owing to the slightly different cavity spacing, each PhC resonator shows an independent resonant peak shift as the refractive index changes surrounding the resonant cavity. The specific single peak with a well-defined extinction ratio exceeds 25 dB. By applying the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, we demonstrate that the sensitivities of each sensor in PhC-PISA S1=60.500  nm/RIU, S2=59.623  nm/RIU, S3=62.500  nm/RIU, and S4=51.142  nm/RIU (refractive index unit) are achieved, respectively. In addition, the negligible crosstalk and detection limit as small as 1×10-4 have been observed. The proposed sensor array as a desirable platform has great potential to realize optical multiplexing sensing and high-density monolithic integration.

  8. A SINFONI integral field spectroscopy survey for galaxy counterparts to damped Lyman α systems - I. New detections and limits for intervening and associated absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Péroux, Céline; Bouché, Nicolas; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; York, Donald G.; Vladilo, Giovanni

    2011-02-01

    Detailed studies of damped and sub-damped Lyman α systems (DLAs), the galaxies probed by the absorption they produce in the spectra of background quasars, rely on identifying the galaxy responsible for the absorber with more traditional methods. Integral field spectroscopy provides an efficient way of detecting faint galaxies near bright quasars, further providing immediate redshift confirmation. Here, we report the detection of Hα emission from a DLA and a sub-DLA galaxy among a sample of six intervening quasar absorbers targeted. We derive F(Hα) = 7.7 ± 2.7 × 10-17 erg s-1 cm-2 (SFR = 1.8 ± 0.6 M⊙ yr-1) at impact parameter b= 25 kpc towards quasar Q0302 - 223 for the DLA at zabs= 1.009 and F(Hα) = 17.1 ± 6.0 × 10-17 erg s-1 cm-2 (SFR = 2.9 ± 1.0 M⊙ yr-1) at b= 39 kpc towards Q1009 - 0026 for the sub-DLA at zabs= 0.887. These results are in line with low star formation rates previously reported in the literature for quasar absorbers. We use the [N II]λ 6585/Hα ratio to derive the H II emission metallicities and compare them with the neutral gas H I absorption metallicities derived from high-resolution spectra. In one case, the absorption metallicity is actually found to be higher than the emission line metallicity. For the remaining objects, we achievelimiting fluxes of the order F(Hα) ˜ 10-17 erg s-1 cm-2 (corresponding to SFR ˜ 0.1 M⊙ yr-1 at z˜ 1 and ˜1 M⊙ yr-1 at z˜ 2), i.e. among the lowest that have been possible with ground-based observations. We also present two other galaxies associated with C IV systems and serendipitously discovered in our data. Based on observations collected during programmes ESO 79.A-0673 and 80.A-0742 at the European Southern Observatory with SINFONI on the 8.2-m YEPUN telescope operated at the Paranal Observatory, Chile.

  9. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 136 - Definition and Procedure for the Determination of the Method Detection Limit-Revision 1.11

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Determination of the Method Detection Limit-Revision 1.11 B Appendix B to Part 136 Protection of Environment... FOR THE ANALYSIS OF POLLUTANTS Pt. 136, App. B Appendix B to Part 136—Definition and Procedure for the... corresponds to an instrument signal/noise in the range of 2.5 to 5. (b) The concentration equivalent of...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 136 - Definition and Procedure for the Determination of the Method Detection Limit-Revision 1.11

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Determination of the Method Detection Limit-Revision 1.11 B Appendix B to Part 136 Protection of Environment... FOR THE ANALYSIS OF POLLUTANTS Pt. 136, App. B Appendix B to Part 136—Definition and Procedure for the... corresponds to an instrument signal/noise in the range of 2.5 to 5. (b) The concentration equivalent of...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 136 - Definition and Procedure for the Determination of the Method Detection Limit-Revision 1.11

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... processing steps of the analytical method be included in the determination of the method detection limit. The... corresponds to an instrument signal/noise in the range of 2.5 to 5. (b) The concentration equivalent of three.... Interferences are defined as systematic errors in the measured analytical signal of an established...

  12. Approximating the detection limit of an infrared spectroscopic imaging microscope operating in an attenuated total reflection (ATR) modality: theoretical and empirical results for an instrument using a linear array detector and a 1.5 millimeter germanium hemisphere internal reflection element.

    PubMed

    Lanzarotta, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical detection limits have been estimated for aripiprazole (analyte) in alpha lactose monohydrate (matrix model pharmaceutical formulation) using a micro-attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging instrument equipped with a linear array detector and a 1.5 mm germanium hemisphere internal reflection element (IRE). The instrument yielded a theoretical detection limit of 0.0035% (35 parts per million (ppm)) when operating under diffraction-limited conditions, which was 49 times lower than what was achieved with a traditional macro-ATR instrument operating under practical conditions (0.17%, 1700 ppm). However, these results may not be achievable for most analyses because the detection limits will be particle size limited, rather than diffraction limited, for mixtures with average particle diameters greater than 8.3 μm (most pharmaceutical samples). For example, a theoretical detection limit of 0.028% (280 ppm) was calculated for an experiment operating under particle size-limited conditions where the average particle size was 23.4 μm. These conditions yielded a detection limit of 0.022% (220 ppm) when measured empirically, which was close to the theoretical value and only eight times lower than that of a faster, more simplistic macro-ATR instrument. Considering the longer data acquisition and processing times characteristic of the micro-ATR imaging approach (minutes or even hours versus seconds), the cost-benefit ratio may not often be favorable for the analysis of analytes in matrices that exhibit only a few overlapping absorptions (low-interfering matrices such as alpha lactose monohydrate) using this technique compared to what can be achieved using macro-ATR. However, the advantage was significant for detecting analytes in more complex matrices (those that exhibited several overlapping absorptions with the analyte) because the detection limit of the macro-ATR approach was highly formulation

  13. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 425 - Definition and Procedure for the Determination of the Method Detection Limit 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to achieve identification must be considered in making the estimate. (b) The concentration value that... 4. (b) If the MDL is to be determined in another sample matrix, analyze the sample. If the measured... sample measurements. (b) It may be economically and technically desirable to evaluate the estimated...

  14. Antimony speciation in soils: improving the detection limits using post-column pre-reduction hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (HPLC/pre-reduction/HG-AFS).

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Waldo; Olivares, David; Bravo, Manuel; Feldmann, Jorg; Raab, Andrea

    2011-04-15

    HG-AFS is highly sensitive and low cost detection system and its use for antimony chemical speciation coupled to HPLC is gaining popularity. However speciation analysis in soils is strongly hampered because the most efficient extractant reported in the literature (oxalic acid) strongly inhibits the generation of SbH(3) by Sb(V), the major species in this kind of matrix, severely affecting its detection limits. The purpose of this research is to reduce the detection limit of Sb(V), by using a post column on-line reduction system with l-cysteine reagent (HPLC/pre-reduction/HG-AFS). The system was optimized by experimental design, optimum conditions found were 2% (w/v) and 10°C temperature coil. Detection limits of Sb(V) and Sb(III) in oxalic acid (0.25 mol L(-1)) were improved from 0.3 and 0.1 μg L(-1) to 0.07 and 0.07 μg L(-1), respectively. The methodology developed was applied to Chilean soils, where Sb(V) was the predominant species.

  15. Overcoming the detection bandwidth limit in precision spectroscopy: The analytical apparatus function for a stepped frequency scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohart, François

    2017-01-01

    In a previous paper [Rohart et al., Phys Rev A 2014;90(042506)], the influence of detection-bandwidth properties on observed line-shapes in precision spectroscopy was theoretically modeled for the first time using the basic model of a continuous sweeping of the laser frequency. Specific experiments confirmed general theoretical trends but also revealed several insufficiencies of the model in case of stepped frequency scans. As a consequence in as much as up-to-date experiments use step-by-step frequency-swept lasers, a new model of the influence of the detection-bandwidth is developed, including a realistic timing of signal sampling and frequency changes. Using Fourier transform techniques, the resulting time domain apparatus function gets a simple analytical form that can be easily implemented in line-shape fitting codes without any significant increase of computation durations. This new model is then considered in details for detection systems characterized by 1st and 2nd order bandwidths, underlining the importance of the ratio of detection time constant to frequency step duration, namely for the measurement of line frequencies. It also allows a straightforward analysis of corresponding systematic deviations on retrieved line frequencies and broadenings. Finally, a special attention is paid to consequences of a finite detection-bandwidth in Doppler Broadening Thermometry, namely to experimental adjustments required for a spectroscopic determination of the Boltzmann constant at the 1-ppm level of accuracy. In this respect, the interest of implementing a Butterworth 2nd order filter is emphasized.

  16. Enhancement of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) Detection limit using a low-pressure and short-pulse laser-induced plasma process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen Zhen; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Kuwahara, Masakazu; Yan, Jun Jie; Liu, Ji Ping

    2013-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technology is an appealing technique compared with many other types of elemental analysis because of the fast response, high sensitivity, real-time, and noncontact features. One of the challenging targets of LIBS is the enhancement of the detection limit. In this study, the detection limit of gas-phase LIBS analysis has been improved by controlling the pressure and laser pulse width. In order to verify this method, low-pressure gas plasma was induced using nanosecond and picosecond lasers. The method was applied to the detection of Hg. The emission intensity ratio of the Hg atom to NO (IHg/INO) was analyzed to evaluate the LIBS detection limit because the NO emission (interference signal) was formed during the plasma generation and cooling process of N2 and O2 in the air. It was demonstrated that the enhancement of IHg/INO arose by decreasing the pressure to a few kilopascals, and the IHg/INO of the picosecond breakdown was always much higher than that of the nanosecond breakdown at low buffer gas pressure. Enhancement of IHg/INO increased more than 10 times at 700 Pa using picosecond laser with 35 ps pulse width. The detection limit was enhanced to 0.03 ppm (parts per million). We also saw that the spectra from the center and edge parts of plasma showed different features. Comparing the central spectra with the edge spectra, IHg/INO of the edge spectra was higher than that of the central spectra using the picosecond laser breakdown process.

  17. Effects of Kapton Sample Cell Windows on the Detection Limit of Smectite: Implications for CheMin on the Mars Science Laboratory Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achilles, C. N.; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, R. V.; Blake, D. F.

    2012-01-01

    The CheMin instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity is an X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) instrument capable of providing the mineralogical and chemical compositions of rocks and soils on the surface of Mars. CheMin uses a microfocus X-ray tube with a Co target, transmission geometry, and an energy-discriminating X-ray sensitive CCD to produce simultaneous 2-D XRD patterns and energy-dispersive X-ray histograms from powdered samples. CheMin has two different window materials used for sample cells -- Mylar and Kapton. Instrument details are provided elsewhere. Fe/Mg-smectite (e.g., nontronite) has been identified in Gale Crater, the MSL future landing site, by CRISM spectra. While large quantities of phyllosilicate minerals will be easily detected by CheMin, it is important to establish detection limits of such phases to understand capabilities and limitations of the instrument. A previous study indicated that the (001) peak of smectite at 15 Ang was detectable in a mixture of 1 wt.% smectite with olivine when Mylar is the window material for the sample cell. Complications arise when Kapton is the window material because Kapton itself also has a diffraction peak near 15 Ang (6.8 deg 2 Theta). This study presents results of mineral mixtures of smectite and olivine to determine smectite detection limits for Kapton sample cells. Because the intensity and position of the smectite (001) peak depends on the hydration state, we also analyzed mixtures with "hydrated" and "dehydrated"h smectite to examine the effects of hydration state on detection limits.

  18. Water vapour emission in vegetable fuel: absorption cell measurements and detection limits of our CO II Dial system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellecci, C.; De Leo, L.; Gaudio, P.; Gelfusa, M.; Lo Feudo, T.; Martellucci, S.; Richetta, M.

    2006-09-01

    Forest fires can be the cause of serious environmental and economic damages. For this reason a considerable effort has been directed toward the forest protection and fire fighting. In the early forest fire detection, Lidar technique present considerable advantages compared to the passive detection methods based on infrared cameras currently in common use, due its higher sensitivity and ability to accurately locate the fire. The combustion phase of the vegetable matter causes a great amount of water vapour emission, thus the water molecule behaviour will be studied to obtain a fire detection system ready and efficient also before the flame propagation. A first evaluation of increment of the water vapour concentration compared to standard one will be estimated by a numerical simulation. These results will be compared with the experimental measurements carried out into a cell with a CO II Dial system, burning different kinds of vegetable fuel. Our results and their comparison will be reported in this paper.

  19. Detection of Microbial Water Quality Indicators and Fecal Waterborne Pathogens in Environmental Waters: A Review of Methods, Applications, and Limitations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental waters are important reservoirs of pathogenic microorganisms, many of which are of fecal origin. In most cases, the presence of pathogens is determined using surrogate bacterial indicators. In other cases, direct detection of the pathogen in question is required. M...

  20. Scope and limitations of the TEMPO/EPR method for singlet oxygen detection: the misleading role of electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Nardi, Giacomo; Manet, Ilse; Monti, Sandra; Miranda, Miguel A; Lhiaubet-Vallet, Virginie

    2014-12-01

    For many biological and biomedical studies, it is essential to detect the production of (1)O2 and quantify its production yield. Among the available methods, detection of the characteristic 1270-nm phosphorescence of singlet oxygen by time-resolved near-infrared (TRNIR) emission constitutes the most direct and unambiguous approach. An alternative indirect method is electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in combination with a singlet oxygen probe. This is based on the detection of the TEMPO free radical formed after oxidation of TEMP (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine) by singlet oxygen. Although the TEMPO/EPR method has been widely employed, it can produce misleading data. This is demonstrated by the present study, in which the quantum yields of singlet oxygen formation obtained by TRNIR emission and by the TEMPO/EPR method are compared for a set of well-known photosensitizers. The results reveal that the TEMPO/EPR method leads to significant overestimation of singlet oxygen yield when the singlet or triplet excited state of the photosensitizer is efficiently quenched by TEMP, acting as electron donor. In such case, generation of the TEMP(+) radical cation, followed by deprotonation and reaction with molecular oxygen, gives rise to an EPR-detectable TEMPO signal that is not associated with singlet oxygen production. This knowledge is essential for an appropriate and error-free application of the TEMPO/EPR method in chemical, biological, and medical studies.

  1. Markov dynamics as a zooming lens for multiscale community detection: non clique-like communities and the field-of-view limit.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Michael T; Delvenne, Jean-Charles; Yaliraki, Sophia N; Barahona, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a surge of interest in community detection algorithms for complex networks. A variety of computational heuristics, some with a long history, have been proposed for the identification of communities or, alternatively, of good graph partitions. In most cases, the algorithms maximize a particular objective function, thereby finding the 'right' split into communities. Although a thorough comparison of algorithms is still lacking, there has been an effort to design benchmarks, i.e., random graph models with known community structure against which algorithms can be evaluated. However, popular community detection methods and benchmarks normally assume an implicit notion of community based on clique-like subgraphs, a form of community structure that is not always characteristic of real networks. Specifically, networks that emerge from geometric constraints can have natural non clique-like substructures with large effective diameters, which can be interpreted as long-range communities. In this work, we show that long-range communities escape detection by popular methods, which are blinded by a restricted 'field-of-view' limit, an intrinsic upper scale on the communities they can detect. The field-of-view limit means that long-range communities tend to be overpartitioned. We show how by adopting a dynamical perspective towards community detection [1], [2], in which the evolution of a Markov process on the graph is used as a zooming lens over the structure of the network at all scales, one can detect both clique- or non clique-like communities without imposing an upper scale to the detection. Consequently, the performance of algorithms on inherently low-diameter, clique-like benchmarks may not always be indicative of equally good results in real networks with local, sparser connectivity. We illustrate our ideas with constructive examples and through the analysis of real-world networks from imaging, protein structures and the power grid, where a

  2. Markov Dynamics as a Zooming Lens for Multiscale Community Detection: Non Clique-Like Communities and the Field-of-View Limit

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Michael T.; Delvenne, Jean-Charles; Yaliraki, Sophia N.; Barahona, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a surge of interest in community detection algorithms for complex networks. A variety of computational heuristics, some with a long history, have been proposed for the identification of communities or, alternatively, of good graph partitions. In most cases, the algorithms maximize a particular objective function, thereby finding the ‘right’ split into communities. Although a thorough comparison of algorithms is still lacking, there has been an effort to design benchmarks, i.e., random graph models with known community structure against which algorithms can be evaluated. However, popular community detection methods and benchmarks normally assume an implicit notion of community based on clique-like subgraphs, a form of community structure that is not always characteristic of real networks. Specifically, networks that emerge from geometric constraints can have natural non clique-like substructures with large effective diameters, which can be interpreted as long-range communities. In this work, we show that long-range communities escape detection by popular methods, which are blinded by a restricted ‘field-of-view’ limit, an intrinsic upper scale on the communities they can detect. The field-of-view limit means that long-range communities tend to be overpartitioned. We show how by adopting a dynamical perspective towards community detection [1], [2], in which the evolution of a Markov process on the graph is used as a zooming lens over the structure of the network at all scales, one can detect both clique- or non clique-like communities without imposing an upper scale to the detection. Consequently, the performance of algorithms on inherently low-diameter, clique-like benchmarks may not always be indicative of equally good results in real networks with local, sparser connectivity. We illustrate our ideas with constructive examples and through the analysis of real-world networks from imaging, protein structures and the power grid

  3. Essential Limitations of the Standard THz TDS Method for Substance Detection and Identification and a Way of Overcoming Them

    PubMed Central

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Varentsova, Svetlana A.

    2016-01-01

    Low efficiency of the standard THz TDS method of the detection and identification of substances based on a comparison of the spectrum for the signal under investigation with a standard signal spectrum is demonstrated using the physical experiments conducted under real conditions with a thick paper bag as well as with Si-based semiconductors under laboratory conditions. In fact, standard THz spectroscopy leads to false detection of hazardous substances in neutral samples, which do not contain them. This disadvantage of the THz TDS method can be overcome by using time-dependent THz pulse spectrum analysis. For a quality assessment of the standard substance spectral features presence in the signal under analysis, one may use time-dependent integral correlation criteria. PMID:27070617

  4. Detection and Differentiation of Herpes Simplex Viruses by Use of the Viper Platform: Advantages, Limitations, and Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Amanda L. S.; Roberts, Catherine; Mazzulli, Tony; Hatchette, Todd F.

    2014-01-01

    The Viper HSV-Qx assay was evaluated for the detection of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 in specimens from oral, anogenital, and other miscellaneous sites. The HSV-Qx assay was found to be highly sensitive and accurate; however, a gray zone may be required for specimens with values falling between 50 and 800 maximum relative fluorescence units. PMID:24696023

  5. Detection and differentiation of herpes simplex viruses by use of the viper platform: advantages, limitations, and concerns.

    PubMed

    Lang, Amanda L S; Roberts, Catherine; Mazzulli, Tony; Hatchette, Todd F; LeBlanc, Jason J

    2014-06-01

    The Viper HSV-Q(x) assay was evaluated for the detection of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 in specimens from oral, anogenital, and other miscellaneous sites. The HSV-Q(x) assay was found to be highly sensitive and accurate; however, a gray zone may be required for specimens with values falling between 50 and 800 maximum relative fluorescence units.

  6. Finnigan ion trap mass spectrometer detection limits and thermal energy analyzer interface status report and present capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaraz, A.; Andresen, B.; Martin, W.

    1990-10-18

    A new Finnigan ion trap mass spectrometer was purchased and installed at LLNL. Over a period of several months the instrument was tested under a variety of conditions utilizing a capillary gas chromatography interface which allowed separated organic compounds to be carried directly into the ion source of the mass spectrometer. This direct interface allowed maximum analytical sensitivity. A variety of critical tests were performed in order to optimize the sensitivity of the system under a variety of analysis conditions. These tests altered the critical time cycles of the ionization, ion trapping, and detection. Various carrier gas pressures were also employed in order to ascertain the overall sensitivity of the instrument. In addition we have also interfaced a thermal energy analyzer (TEA) to the gas chromatograph in order to simultaneously detect volatile nitrogen containing compounds while mass spectral data is being acquired. This is the first application at this laboratory of simultaneous ultra-trace detections while utilizing two orthogonal analytical techniques. In particular, explosive-related compound and/or residues are of interest to the general community in water, soil and gas sampler. In this paper are highlighted a few examples of the analytical power of this new GC-TEA-ITMS technology.

  7. Error Performance of Differentially Coherent Detection of Binary DPSK Data Transmission on the Hard-Limiting Satellite Channel.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    unequal power levels and noise correlations between the two adjacent time slot pulses. In practice, the power imbalance, or equivalently SNR imbalance...is a practical assumption since the noise is necessarily band limited in the system. Error probabilities are given as a function of uplink SNR with...different levels of SNR imbalances and different downlink SNR as parameters. It is discovered that, while SNR imbalance affects error performance, the

  8. Long range surface plasmon resonance with ultra-high penetration depth for self-referenced sensing and ultra-low detection limit using diverging beam approach

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, Sivan Abdulhalim, Ibrahim

    2015-05-11

    Using an insulator-metal-insulator structure with dielectric having refractive index (RI) larger than the analyte, long range surface plasmon (SP) resonance exhibiting ultra-high penetration depth is demonstrated for sensing applications of large bioentities at wavelengths in the visible range. Based on the diverging beam approach in Kretschmann-Raether configuration, one of the SP resonances is shown to shift in response to changes in the analyte RI while the other is fixed; thus, it can be used as a built in reference. The combination of the high sensitivity, high penetration depth and self-reference using the diverging beam approach in which a dark line is detected of the high sensitivity, high penetration depth, self-reference, and the diverging beam approach in which a dark line is detected using large number of camera pixels with a smart algorithm for sub-pixel resolution, a sensor with ultra-low detection limit is demonstrated suitable for large bioentities.

  9. A rapid and noninvasive method for detecting tissue-limited mosaicism: detection of i(12)(p10) in buccal smear from a child with Pallister-Killian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Velagaleti, Gopalrao V N; Tapper, Jill K; Rampy, Bill A; Zhang, Shuliu; Hawkins, Judy C; Lockhart, Lillian H

    2003-01-01

    Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS), a rare disorder, is characterized by tissue-limited or tissue-specific mosaicism. The characteristic chromosome abnormality associated with PKS is i(12p), which is seen predominantly in skin fibroblast cultures. Diagnosis of i(12p) has been carried out on buccal smears before and was shown to be an easy and feasible method. All previously published studies used alpha-satellite probes for the diagnosis and as such have several pitfalls. Our approach, using dual-color, locus-specific probes, has high specificity and sensitivity for the diagnosis of i(12p). Using statistical analysis, we have also confirmed that the signal pattern in interphase nuclei is consistent with isochromosome 12p.

  10. Testing the discrimination and detection limits of WorldView-2 imagery on a challenging invasive plant target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, T. P.; Wardell-Johnson, G. W.; Pracilio, G.; Brown, C.; Corner, R.; van Klinken, R. D.

    2016-02-01

    Invasive plants pose significant threats to biodiversity and ecosystem function globally, leading to costly monitoring and management effort. While remote sensing promises cost-effective, robust and repeatable monitoring tools to support intervention, it has been largely restricted to airborne platforms that have higher spatial and spectral resolutions, but which lack the coverage and versatility of satellite-based platforms. This study tests the ability of the WorldView-2 (WV2) eight-band satellite sensor for detecting the invasive shrub mesquite (Prosopis spp.) in the north-west Pilbara region of Australia. Detectability was challenged by the target taxa being largely defoliated by a leaf-tying biological control agent (Gelechiidae: Evippe sp. #1) and the presence of other shrubs and trees. Variable importance in the projection (VIP) scores identified bands offering greatest capacity for discrimination were those covering the near-infrared, red, and red-edge wavelengths. Wavelengths between 400 nm and 630 nm (coastal blue, blue, green, yellow) were not useful for species level discrimination in this case. Classification accuracy was tested on three band sets (simulated standard multispectral, all bands, and bands with VIP scores ≥1). Overall accuracies were comparable amongst all band-sets (Kappa = 0.71-0.77). However, mesquite omission rates were unacceptably high (21.3%) when using all eight bands relative to the simulated standard multispectral band-set (9.5%) and the band-set informed by VIP scores (11.9%). An incremental cover evaluation on the latter identified most omissions to be for objects <16 m2. Mesquite omissions reduced to 2.6% and overall accuracy significantly improved (Kappa = 0.88) when these objects were left out of the confusion matrix calculations. Very high mapping accuracy of objects >16 m2 allows application for mapping mesquite shrubs and coalesced stands, the former not previously possible, even with 3 m resolution hyperspectral

  11. Detection of Acute and Early HIV-1 Infections in an HIV Hyper-Endemic Area with Limited Resources

    PubMed Central

    Mayaphi, Simnikiwe H.; Martin, Desmond J.; Quinn, Thomas C.; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Olorunju, Steve A. S.; Tintinger, Gregory R.; Stoltz, Anton C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Two thirds of the world’s new HIV infections are in sub-Saharan Africa. Acute HIV infection (AHI) is the time of virus acquisition until the appearance of HIV antibodies. Early HIV infection, which includes AHI, is the interval between virus acquisition and establishment of viral load set-point. This study aimed to detect acute and early HIV infections in a hyper-endemic setting. Methods This was a cross-sectional diagnostic study that enrolled individuals who had negative rapid HIV results in five clinics in South Africa. Pooled nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) was performed, followed by individual sample testing in positive pools. NAAT-positive participants were recalled to the clinics for confirmatory testing and appropriate management. HIV antibody, p24 antigen, Western Blot and avidity tests were performed for characterization of NAAT-positive samples. Results The study enrolled 6910 individuals with negative rapid HIV results. Median age was 27 years (interquartile range {IQR}: 23–31). NAAT was positive in 55 samples, resulting in 0.8% newly diagnosed HIV-infected individuals (95% confidence interval {CI}: 0.6–1.0). The negative predictive value for rapid HIV testing was 99.2% (95% CI: 99.0–99.4). Characterization of NAAT-positive samples revealed that 0.04% (95% CI: 0.000–0.001) had AHI, 0.3% (95% CI: 0.1–0.4) had early HIV infection, and 0.5% (95% CI: 0.5–0.7) had chronic HIV infection. Forty-seven (86%) of NAAT-positive participants returned for follow-up at a median of 4 weeks (IQR: 2–8). Follow-up rapid tests were positive in 96% of these participants. Conclusions NAAT demonstrated that a substantial number of HIV-infected individuals are misdiagnosed at South African points-of-care. Follow-up rapid tests done within a 4 week interval detected early and chronic HIV infections initially missed by rapid HIV testing. This may be a practical and affordable strategy for earlier detection of these infections in resource

  12. The limitations on organic detection in Mars-like soils by thermal volatilization–gas chromatography–MS and their implications for the Viking results

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-González, Rafael; Navarro, Karina F.; de la Rosa, José; Iñiguez, Enrique; Molina, Paola; Miranda, Luis D.; Morales, Pedro; Cienfuegos, Edith; Coll, Patrice; Raulin, François; Amils, Ricardo; McKay, Christopher P.

    2006-01-01

    The failure of Viking Lander thermal volatilization (TV) (without or with thermal degradation)–gas chromatography (GC)–MS experiments to detect organics suggests chemical rather than biological interpretations for the reactivity of the martian soil. Here, we report that TV–GC–MS may be blind to low levels of organics on Mars. A comparison between TV–GC–MS and total organics has been conducted for a variety of Mars analog soils. In the Antarctic Dry Valleys and the Atacama and Libyan Deserts we find 10–90 μg of refractory or graphitic carbon per gram of soil, which would have been undetectable by the Viking TV–GC–MS. In iron-containing soils (jarosites from Rio Tinto and Panoche Valley) and the Mars simulant (palogonite), oxidation of the organic material to carbon dioxide (CO2) by iron oxides and/or their salts drastically attenuates the detection of organics. The release of 50–700 ppm of CO2 by TV–GC–MS in the Viking analysis may indicate that an oxidation of organic material took place. Therefore, the martian surface could have several orders of magnitude more organics than the stated Viking detection limit. Because of the simplicity of sample handling, TV–GC–MS is still considered the standard method for organic detection on future Mars missions. We suggest that the design of future organic instruments for Mars should include other methods to be able to detect extinct and/or extant life. PMID:17060639

  13. The limitations on organic detection in Mars-like soils by thermal volatilization-gas chromatography-MS and their implications for the Viking results.

    PubMed

    Navarro-González, Rafael; Navarro, Karina F; de la Rosa, José; Iñiguez, Enrique; Molina, Paola; Miranda, Luis D; Morales, Pedro; Cienfuegos, Edith; Coll, Patrice; Raulin, François; Amils, Ricardo; McKay, Christopher P

    2006-10-31

    The failure of Viking Lander thermal volatilization (TV) (without or with thermal degradation)-gas chromatography (GC)-MS experiments to detect organics suggests chemical rather than biological interpretations for the reactivity of the martian soil. Here, we report that TV-GC-MS may be blind to low levels of organics on Mars. A comparison between TV-GC-MS and total organics has been conducted for a variety of Mars analog soils. In the Antarctic Dry Valleys and the Atacama and Libyan Deserts we find 10-90 mug of refractory or graphitic carbon per gram of soil, which would have been undetectable by the Viking TV-GC-MS. In iron-containing soils (jarosites from Rio Tinto and Panoche Valley) and the Mars simulant (palogonite), oxidation of the organic material to carbon dioxide (CO(2)) by iron oxides and/or their salts drastically attenuates the detection of organics. The release of 50-700 ppm of CO(2) by TV-GC-MS in the Viking analysis may indicate that an oxidation of organic material took place. Therefore, the martian surface could have several orders of magnitude more organics than the stated Viking detection limit. Because of the simplicity of sample handling, TV-GC-MS is still considered the standard method for organic detection on future Mars missions. We suggest that the design of future organic instruments for Mars should include other methods to be able to detect extinct and/or extant life.

  14. Limitations of vitek GPS-418 cards in exact detection of vancomycin-resistant enterococci with the vanB genotype.

    PubMed

    Okabe, T; Oana, K; Kawakami, Y; Yamaguchi, M; Takahashi, Y; Okimura, Y; Honda, T; Katsuyama, T

    2000-06-01

    The susceptibilities of 20 strains of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) with the vanB genotype obtained by using Vitek GPS-418 cards were compared with those obtained by the broth dilution method of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) (approved standard M7-A4) and with those obtained by the agar screen method using bile esculin azide agar containing 6 microgram of vancomycin per ml. Although both the broth dilution and agar screen methods disclosed no discordance, Vitek GPS-418 cards yielded a very major error compared with the results obtained by the reference broth dilution method of the NCCLS. Vitek GPS-418 cards were therefore found to have considerable room for improvement for the accurate detection of vanB VRE strains.

  15. NOTE: Detection limits for ferrimagnetic particle concentrations using magnetic resonance imaging based proton transverse relaxation rate measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardoe, H.; Chua-anusorn, W.; St. Pierre, T. G.; Dobson, J.

    2003-03-01

    A clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system was used to measure proton transverse relaxation rates (R2) in agar gels with varying concentrations of ferrimagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in a field strength of 1.5 T. The nanoparticles were prepared by coprecipitation of ferric and ferrous ions in the presence of either dextran or polyvinyl alcohol. The method of preparation resulted in loosely packed clusters (dextran) or branched chains (polyvinyl alcohol) of particles containing of the order of 600 and 400 particles, respectively. For both methods of particle preparation, concentrations of ferrimagnetic iron in agar gel less than 0.01 mg ml-1 had no measurable effect on the value of R2 for the gel. The results indicate that MRI-based R2 measurements using 1.5 T clinical scanners are not quite sensitive enough to detect the very low concentrations of nanoparticulate biogenic magnetite reported in human brain tissue.

  16. Explosion Seismology: Capabilities and limitations of long-range methods for detecting and recognizing explosions are discussed.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, E W

    1965-01-22

    I have tried to describe some current research trends in seismology which are specifically directed toward solving the problem of detecting, locating, and identifying underground nuclear explosions. Attention has been directed specifically toward problems which arise in efforts to obtain information at distances in excess of 2500 kilometers. The main scientific advantage which accrues from working at such distances is that the seismic signals suffer minimal distortion by the geological complexities of the earth. Extrapolation of the data to the question of an international test ban is not within the scope of this article. Suffice it to note that all of the parameters must, in the final resort, be resolved in terms of probabilities. In some cases the seismological probabilities can be estimated with reasonable degrees of accuracy, but the future of the test ban question depends not only on seismology but on such questions as inspection and what probabilities are acceptable.

  17. Efficacy and Limitations of Tachycardia Detection Interval Guided Reprogramming for Reduction of Inappropriate Shock in Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Patients.

    PubMed

    Fujiishi, Tamami; Niwano, Shinichi; Murakami, Masami; Nakamura, Hironori; Igarashi, Tazuru; Ishizue, Naruya; Oikawa, Jun; Kishihara, Jun; Fukaya, Hidehira; Niwano, Hiroe; Ako, Junya

    2016-05-25

    The avoidance of inappropriate shock therapy is an important clinical issue in implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) patients. We retrospectively analyzed therapeutic events in ICD patients, and the effect of tachycardia detection interval (TDI) and tachycardia cycle length (TCL) guided reprograming on the reduction of inappropriate ICD therapy. The clinical determinants of after reprogramming were also evaluated.A total of 254 consecutive ICD patients were included in the study, and the incidence of antitachycardia therapy was evaluated during the follow-up period of 27.3 ± 18.7 months. When inappropriate antitachycardia therapy appeared, TDI was reprogrammed not to exceed the detected TCL and the patients continued to be followed-up. Various clinical parameters were compared between patients with and without inappropriate ICD therapy. During the initial follow-up period of 18.6 ± 15.6 months, ICD therapy occurred in 127/254 patients (50%) including inappropriate antitachycardia pacing (ATP) (12.9%) and shock (44.35%). Determinants of initial inappropriate therapy were dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), history of therapeutic hypothermia, and QRS duration. Of the 61 patients with inappropriate therapy, 24 received TCL guided reprogramming. During the additional observation period of 17.0 ± 16.8 months, inappropriate therapy recurred in 5/24 patients (2 ATP, 3 shocks). The determinant of these inappropriate therapy events after reprogramming was the presence of supraventricular tachycardia.By applying simple TCL and TDI guided reprogramming, inappropriate therapy was reduced by 79%. The determinant of inappropriate therapy after reprogramming was the presence of supraventricular tachycardia.

  18. Using European travellers as an early alert to detect emerging pathogens in countries with limited laboratory resources

    PubMed Central

    Guerin, Philippe J; Grais, Rebecca Freeman; Rottingen, John Arne; Valleron, Alain Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Background The volume, extent and speed of travel have dramatically increased in the past decades, providing the potential for an infectious disease to spread through the transportation network. By collecting information on the suspected place of infection, existing surveillance systems in industrialized countries may provide timely information for areas of the world without adequate surveillance currently in place. We present the results of a case study using reported cases of Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 (Sd1) in European travellers to detect "events" of Sd1, related to either epidemic cases or endemic cases in developing countries. Methods We identified papers from a Medline search for reported events of Sd1 from 1940 to 2002. We requested data on shigella infections reported to the responsible surveillance entities in 17 European countries. Reports of Sd1 from the published literature were then compared with Sd1 notified cases among European travellers from 1990 to 2002. Results Prior to a large epidemic in 1999–2000, no cases of Sd1 had been identified in West Africa. However, if travellers had been used as an early warning, Sd1 could have been identified in this region as earlier as 1992. Conclusion This project demonstrates that tracking diseases in European travellers could be used to detect emerging disease in developing countries. This approach should be further tested with a view to the continuous improvement of national health surveillance systems and existing European networks, and may play a significant role in aiding the international public health community to improve infectious disease control. PMID:17239228

  19. A discussion on the merits and limitations of using drive-by monitoring to detect localised damage in a bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, David; González, Arturo

    2017-06-01

    Given the large number of bridges that currently have no instrumentation, there are obvious advantages in monitoring the condition of a bridge by analysing the response of a vehicle crossing it. As a result, the last two decades have seen a rise in the research attempting to solve the problem of identifying damage in a bridge from vehicle measurements. This paper examines the theoretical feasibility and practical limitations of a drive-by system in identifying damage associated to localised stiffness losses. First, the nature of the damage feature that is sought within the vehicle response needs to be characterized. For this purpose, the total vehicle response is considered to be made of 'static' and 'dynamic' components, and where the bridge has experienced a localised loss in stiffness, an additional 'damage' component. Understanding the nature of this 'damage' component is crucial to have an informed discussion on how damage can be identified and localised. Leveraging this new understanding, the authors propose a wavelet-based drive-by algorithm. By comparing the effect of the 'damage' component to other key effects defining the measurements such as 'vehicle speed', the 'road profile' and 'noise' on a wavelet contour plot, it is possible to establish if there is a frequency range where drive-by can be successful. The algorithm uses then specific frequency bands to improve the sensitivity to damage with respect to limitations imposed by Vehicle-Bridge vibrations. Recommendations on the selection of the mother wavelet and frequency band are provided. Finally, the paper discusses the impact of noise and road profile on the ability of the approach to identify damage and how periodic measurements can be effective at monitoring localised stiffness changes.

  20. Screening for thyroid disease in a primary care unit with a thyroid stimulating hormone assay with a low detection limit.

    PubMed Central

    Eggertsen, R.; Petersen, K.; Lundberg, P. A.; Nyström, E.; Lindstedt, G.

    1988-01-01

    In a study at a primary care centre in a predominantly rural area of Sweden the records of all patients with established thyroid disease were scrutinised and 2000 consecutive adult patients screened with an immunoenzymometric thyroid stimulating hormone assay. The aims of the study were fourfold: firstly, to assess the total burden of thyroid disease in primary care centres in Sweden; secondly, to assess the efficacy of clinical diagnosis of the disease in unselected populations of patients; thirdly, to assess the efficacy of clinical evaluation of treatment with thyroxine; and, lastly, to see whether a single analysis of the serum thyroid stimulating hormone concentration by recent methods would be enough to identify an abnormality of thyroid function. Of the roughly 17,400 adults in the study community, 111 women and 10 men were being treated for thyroid disease. Screening detected 68 patients (3.5%) not receiving thyroxine who had a serum thyroid stimulating hormone concentration of 0.20 mU/l or less, all of whom were followed up clinically. Fifty of these patients were also studied biochemically during follow up. Only nine of the 68 patients had thyroid disease (three with thyrotoxicosis requiring treatment), no evidence of the disease being found in the remainder. Sixteen patients had spontaneous hypothyroidism requiring treatment, and neither these nor three patients with thyrotoxicosis had been detected at the preceding clinical examination. Of 35 patients in whom thyroid disease was suspected clinically at screening, none had laboratory evidence of thyroid dysfunction. In this series 1.3% of all women in the study community (2.6% of all 50-59 year olds) and 0.1% of the men were being treated for thyroid disease at the primary care centre, roughly 1.0% of adults subjected to screening were found to have thyroid disease requiring treatment, and most patients with a thyroid stimulating hormone concentration of 0.20 mU/l or less did not have thyroid dysfunction

  1. A lower limit of detection for atrazine was obtained using bioluminescent reporter bacteria via a lower incubation temperature.

    PubMed

    Jia, Kun; Eltzov, Evgeni; Toury, Timothée; Marks, Robert S; Ionescu, Rodica E

    2012-10-01

    The present article reports on the influence of various atrazine concentrations to the response of genetically modified Escherichia coli TV1061 bacterial cells while modulating the experimental conditions. Interesting increases of bioluminescence signals are recorded for E. coli TV1061 bacteria in the presence of 10 μg/mL atrazine concentration named "high-toxicity bacteria alert" when compared with 1 μg/mL -10 fg/mL atrazine termed "low-toxicity bacteria alert". Detecting the effect of atrazine via its effect on bioluminescence of bacteria has been carried out by two consecutive measurements (fresh and overnight modes) at different concentrations of analyte. We have shown that a more precise discrimination at lower-toxicity concentrations can be obtained through overnight incubation of bacteria with the analyte at 4 °C. In addition, centrifugation of bacterial cells and analyte dilutions has been performed in order to ensure a better interaction between the insoluble atrazine pesticide and the bacterial cells.

  2. Study of boron detection limit using the in-air PIGE set-up at LAMFI-USP

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, M. V.; Silva, T. F.; Trindade, G. F.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M. H.

    2014-11-11

    The quantification of small amounts of boron in materials is of extreme importance in different areas of materials science. Boron is an important contaminant and also a silicon dopant in the semiconductor industry. Boron is also extensively used in nuclear power plants, either for neutron shielding or for safety control and boron is an essential nutrient for life, either vegetable or animal. The production of silicon solar cells, by refining metallurgical-grade silicon (MG-Si) requires the control and reduction of several silicon contaminants to very low concentration levels. Boron is one of the contaminants of solar-grade silicon (SG-Si) that must be controlled and quantified at sub-ppm levels. In the metallurgical purification, boron quantification is usually made by Inductive Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry, (ICP-MS) but the results need to be verified by an independent analytical method. In this work we present the results of the analysis of silicon samples by Particle Induced Gamma-Ray Emission (PIGE) aiming the quantification of low concentrations of boron. PIGE analysis was carried out using the in-air external beam line of the Laboratory for Materials Analysis with Ion Beams (LAMFI-USP) by the {sup 10}B(p,αγ({sup 7}Be nuclear reaction, and measuring the 429 keV γ-ray. The in-air PIGE measurements at LAMFI have a quantification limit of the order of 10{sup 16} at/cm{sup 2}.

  3. Study of boron detection limit using the in-air PIGE set-up at LAMFI-USP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro, M. V.; Silva, T. F.; Trindade, G. F.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M. H.

    2014-11-01

    The quantification of small amounts of boron in materials is of extreme importance in different areas of materials science. Boron is an important contaminant and also a silicon dopant in the semiconductor industry. Boron is also extensively used in nuclear power plants, either for neutron shielding or for safety control and boron is an essential nutrient for life, either vegetable or animal. The production of silicon solar cells, by refining metallurgical-grade silicon (MG-Si) requires the control and reduction of several silicon contaminants to very low concentration levels. Boron is one of the contaminants of solar-grade silicon (SG-Si) that must be controlled and quantified at sub-ppm levels. In the metallurgical purification, boron quantification is usually made by Inductive Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry, (ICP-MS) but the results need to be verified by an independent analytical method. In this work we present the results of the analysis of silicon samples by Particle Induced Gamma-Ray Emission (PIGE) aiming the quantification of low concentrations of boron. PIGE analysis was carried out using the in-air external beam line of the Laboratory for Materials Analysis with Ion Beans (LAMFI-USP) by the 10B ( p ,αγ(7Be nuclear reaction, and measuring the 429 keV γ-ray. The in-air PIGE measurements at LAMFI have a quantification limit of the order of 1016 at/cm2.

  4. The Capabilities and Limitation of Remote Visual Methods to Detect Service-Induced Cracks in Reactor Components

    SciTech Connect

    Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2006-11-01

    detect cracks of various widths under ideal conditions.

  5. Figure of merit and fundamental range limitations in surface sensing direct-detection mid-infrared random-modulation continuous-wave lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybaltowski, Adam; Taflove, Allen

    2002-01-01

    We perform maximum range calculations for surface sensing direct-detection mid-infrared Random-Modulation Continuous- Wave (RM-CW) lidar, and propose a system's figure of merit. In this type of lidar, noise can be additive and determined by detector's noise given by its specific detectivity D, area, and integration time. Fundamental limits of the sensing range are then imposed by diffraction, provided that the Background-Limited Infrared Photodetection (BLIP) limit (controlled by the field-of-view) is not exceeded. There is no dependence on a specific pseudorandom code (PRC) used since noise spectral density is assumed to be independent of frequency. Under most favorable conditions, including no losses due to optics or atmospheric attenuation, an object of angularly uniform unity reflectance and size not less than the laser beam can be detected within 1s with a 20-cm diameter telescope and a signal-to-noise ratio of one from a distance of about 200 km if a cooled detector and a laser emitting 500 mW cw at 5 micrometers are used. For an integration time of 0.1 ms (which is well below a typical atmospheric correlation time), or a room-temperature detector, the maximum range reduces to about 20 km. As the technology of Quantum-Cascade lasers (QCLs) advances, the maximum range of several tens of kilometers can be expected in this type of lidar with all-thermoelectrically-cooled semiconductor components, and, perhaps after some modifications in the technique, about 1 km with all-room-temperature components.

  6. Lower limits of spin detection efficiency for two-parameter two-qubit (TPTQ) states with non-ideal ferromagnetic detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majd, Nayereh; Ghasemi, Zahra

    2016-10-01

    We have investigated a TPTQ state as an input state of a non-ideal ferromagnetic detectors. Minimal spin polarization required to demonstrate spin entanglement according to entanglement witness and CHSH inequality with respect to (w.r.t.) their two free parameters have been found, and we have numerically shown that the entanglement witness is less stringent than the direct tests of Bell's inequality in the form of CHSH in the entangled limits of its free parameters. In addition, the lower limits of spin detection efficiency fulfilling secure cryptographic key against eavesdropping have been derived. Finally, we have considered TPTQ state as an output of spin decoherence channel and the region of ballistic transmission time w.r.t. spin relaxation time and spin dephasing time has been found.

  7. Silicon photomultiplier (SPM) detection of low-level bioluminescence for the development of deployable whole-cell biosensors: Possibilities and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huaqing; Lopes, Nicholas; Moser, Scott; Sayler, Gary; Ripp, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Whole-cell bacterial bioreporters await miniaturized photon counting modules with high sensitivity and robust compatible hardware to fulfill their promise of versatile, on-site biosensor functionality. In this study, we explore the photon counting readout properties of the silicon photomultiplier (SPM) with a thermoelectric cooler and the possibilities of detecting low-level bioluminescent signals. Detection performance was evaluated through a simulated LED light source and the bioluminescence produced by the genetically engineered Pseudomonas fluorescens bacterial bioreporter 5RL. Compared with the conventional photomultiplier tube (PMT), the results revealed that the cooled SPM exhibits a wider linear response to inducible substrate concentrations (salicylate) ranging from 250 to 5000 ppb. Although cooling of the SPM lowered dark count rates and improved the minimum detectable signal, and the application of a digital filter enhanced the signal-to-noise ratio, the detection of very low light signals is still limited and remains a challenge in the design of compact photon counting systems. PMID:22305444

  8. Detection limits and cost comparisons of human- and gull-associated conventional and quantitative PCR assays in artificial and environmental waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riedel, Timothy E.; Zimmer-Faust, Amity G.; Thulsiraj, Vanessa; Madi, Tania; Hanley, Kaitlyn T.; Ebentier, Darcy L.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Layton, Blythe; Raith, Meredith; Boehm, Alexandria B.; Griffith, John F.; Holden, Patricia A.; Shanks, Orin C.; Weisberg, Stephen B.; Jay, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    Some molecular methods for tracking fecal pollution in environmental waters have both PCR and quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays available for use. To assist managers in deciding whether to implement newer qPCR techniques in routine monitoring programs, we compared detection limits (LODs) and costs of PCR and qPCR assays with identical targets that are relevant to beach water quality assessment. For human-associated assays targeting Bacteroidales HF183 genetic marker, qPCR LODs were 70 times lower and there was no effect of target matrix (artificial freshwater, environmental creek water, and environmental marine water) on PCR or qPCR LODs. The PCR startup and annual costs were the lowest, while the per reaction cost was 62% lower than the Taqman based qPCR and 180% higher than the SYBR based qPCR. For gull-associated assays, there was no significant difference between PCR and qPCR LODs, target matrix did not effect PCR or qPCR LODs, and PCR startup, annual, and per reaction costs were lower. Upgrading to qPCR involves greater startup and annual costs, but this increase may be justified in the case of the human-associated assays with lower detection limits and reduced cost per sample.

  9. Insight into behavior of epithelial cells of the feline conjunctiva in chronic conjunctivitis as a possible limitation in detection of Chlamydophila spp.

    PubMed

    Kiełbowicz, Z; Płoneczka-Janeczko, K; Kuropka, P

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this work was documentation of the reactivity of feline conjunctival epithelial cells in chronic conjunctivitis and the investigation of a possible correlation of histological findings in conjunctiva with a limitation in detection of the pathogen. In this observational study, conjunctival swab samples collected from six cats suffering from chronic conjunctivitis were monitored for Chlamydophila spp. infection for one month, every ten days. Chlamydophilosis was diagnosed by conventional PCR, and confirmed by sequencing analysis. A lack of coherence with results in subsequent studies using PCR did not allow an accurate diagnosis. Additional bioptat samples of conjunctiva were collected for diagnostic purposes and stained in haematoxylin and eosin following the Giemsa method for light microscopic analysis. Additionally the samples were incubated for 15 min with IMAGEN Chlamydia conjugate (IMAGEN Chlamydia reagent kit, Dako, UK), allowing immunofluorescence detection of Chlamydophila spp. Within the epithelium an increased number of goblet cells, as well as general enlargement of the epithelium and a reduced number of normal epithelial cells, was observed. Only in areas of low epithelium could structures similar to the elementary bodies of Chlamydophila spp. be distinguished. The presented data document a possible limitation in molecular evidence for chlamydophila infection in some naturally infected cats, taking into account histological conditions in conjunctiva at the same time.

  10. Detection limits and cost comparisons of human- and gull-associated conventional and quantitative PCR assays in artificial and environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Timothy E; Zimmer-Faust, Amity G; Thulsiraj, Vanessa; Madi, Tania; Hanley, Kaitlyn T; Ebentier, Darcy L; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara; Layton, Blythe; Raith, Meredith; Boehm, Alexandria B; Griffith, John F; Holden, Patricia A; Shanks, Orin C; Weisberg, Stephen B; Jay, Jennifer A

    2014-04-01

    Some molecular methods for tracking fecal pollution in environmental waters have both PCR and quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays available for use. To assist managers in deciding whether to implement newer qPCR techniques in routine monitoring programs, we compared detection limits (LODs) and costs of PCR and qPCR assays with identical targets that are relevant to beach water quality assessment. For human-associated assays targeting Bacteroidales HF183 genetic marker, qPCR LODs were 70 times lower and there was no effect of target matrix (artificial freshwater, environmental creek water, and environmental marine water) on PCR or qPCR LODs. The PCR startup and annual costs were the lowest, while the per reaction cost was 62% lower than the Taqman based qPCR and 180% higher than the SYBR based qPCR. For gull-associated assays, there was no significant difference between PCR and qPCR LODs, target matrix did not effect PCR or qPCR LODs, and PCR startup, annual, and per reaction costs were lower. Upgrading to qPCR involves greater startup and annual costs, but this increase may be justified in the case of the human-associated assays with lower detection limits and reduced cost per sample.

  11. A socio-psychological investigation into limitations and incentives concerning reporting a clinically suspect situation aimed at improving early detection of classical swine fever outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Elbers, A R W; Gorgievski-Duijvesteijn, M J; van der Velden, P G; Loeffen, W L A; Zarafshani, K

    2010-04-21

    The aim of this study was to identify limitations and incentives in reporting clinically suspect situations, possibly caused by classical swine fever (CSF), to veterinary authorities with the ultimate aim to facilitate early detection of CSF outbreaks. Focus group sessions were held with policy makers from the veterinary authorities, and representatives of veterinary practitioners and pig farmer unions. Personal interviews with a small group of pig farmers and practitioners were held to check limitations raised and solutions proposed during the focus group sessions. An electronic questionnaire was mailed to pig farmers and practitioners to investigate perceptions and attitudes with respect to clinically suspect situations possibly caused by CSF. After triangulating the responses of veterinary authorities, veterinary practitioners and farmers, six themes emerged across all groups: (1) lack of knowledge on the early signs of CSF; (2) guilt, shame and prejudice; (3) negative opinion on control measures; (4) dissatisfaction with post-reporting procedures; (5) lack of trust in government bodies; (6) uncertainty and lack of transparency of reporting procedures. The following solutions to facilitate early detection of CSF were put forward: (a) development of a clinical decision-support system for vets and farmers, in order to get faster diagnosis and detection of CSF; (b) possibility to submit blood samples directly to the reference laboratory to exclude CSF in a clinical situation with non-specific clinical signs, without isolation of the farm and free of charge for the individual farmer; (c) decrease social and economic consequences of reporting CSF, for example by improving the public opinion on first reports; (d) better schooling of veterinary officers to deal with emotions and insecurity of farmers in the process after reporting; (e) better communication of rules and regulations, where to report, what will happen next; (f) up-to-date website with information and

  12. Evaluation of uncertainty and detection limits in 210Pb and 210Po measurement in water by alpha spectrometry using 210Po spontaneous deposition onto a silver disk.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Pedro L; Gómez, José; Ródenas, Carmen

    2012-04-01

    An easy and accurate method for the determination of (210)Pb and (210)Po in water using (210)Po spontaneous deposition onto a silver disk is proposed and assessed for its detection capabilities according to the ISO Guide for the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM) and ISO Standard 11929-7 concerning the evaluation of the characteristic limits for ionizing radiation measurements. The method makes no assumption on the initial values of the activity concentrations of (210)Pb, (210)Bi and (210)Po in the sample to be analyzed, and is based on the alpha spectrometric measurement of (210)Po in two different aliquots: the first one measured five weeks after the sampling date to ensure radioactive equilibrium between (210)Pb and (210)Bi and the second after a sufficient time for the ingrowth of (210)Po from (210)Pb to be significant. As shown, for a recommended time interval of seven months between (210)Po measurements, the applicability of the proposed method is limited to water samples with a (226)Ra to (210)Pb activity ratio C(Ra)/C(Pb) ≤ 4, as usual in natural waters. Using sample and background counting times of 24h and 240 h, respectively, the detection limit of the activity concentration of each radionuclide at the sampling time for a 1L sample typically varies between 0.7 and 16 mBq L(-1) for (210)Pb in water samples with an initial activity of (210)Po in the range 0-200 mBq L(-1), and between 0.6 and 8.5 mBq L(-1) for (210)Po in water samples with an initial activity of (210)Pb in the same range.

  13. Clinical Application of Picodroplet Digital PCR Technology for Rapid Detection of EGFR T790M in Next-Generation Sequencing Libraries and DNA from Limited Tumor Samples.

    PubMed

    Borsu, Laetitia; Intrieri, Julie; Thampi, Linta; Yu, Helena; Riely, Gregory; Nafa, Khedoudja; Chandramohan, Raghu; Ladanyi, Marc; Arcila, Maria E

    2016-11-01

    Although next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a robust technology for comprehensive assessment of EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinomas with acquired resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors, it may not provide sufficiently rapid and sensitive detection of the EGFR T790M mutation, the most clinically relevant resistance biomarker. Here, we describe a digital PCR (dPCR) assay for rapid T790M detection on aliquots of NGS libraries prepared for comprehensive profiling, fully maximizing broad genomic analysis on limited samples. Tumor DNAs from patients with EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinomas and acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors were prepared for Memorial Sloan-Kettering-Integrated Mutation Profiling of Actionable Cancer Targets sequencing, a hybrid capture-based assay interrogating 410 cancer-related genes. Precapture library aliquots were used for rapid EGFR T790M testing by dPCR, and results were compared with NGS and locked nucleic acid-PCR Sanger sequencing (reference high sensitivity method). Seventy resistance samples showed 99% concordance with the reference high sensitivity method in accuracy studies. Input as low as 2.5 ng provided a sensitivity of 1% and improved further with increasing DNA input. dPCR on libraries required less DNA and showed better performance than direct genomic DNA. dPCR on NGS libraries is a robust and rapid approach to EGFR T790M testing, allowing most economical utilization of limited material for comprehensive assessment. The same assay can also be performed directly on any limited DNA source and cell-free DNA.

  14. Detection Limits for Blood on Fabrics Using Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR FT-IR) Spectroscopy and Derivative Processing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhenyu; DeJong, Stephanie A; Cassidy, Brianna M; Belliveau, Raymond G; Myrick, Michael L; Morgan, Stephen L

    2016-06-27

    Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR FT-IR) was used to detect blood stains based on signature protein absorption in the mid-IR region, where intensity changes in the spectrum can be related to blood concentration. Partial least squares regression (PLSR) was applied for multivariate calibrations of IR spectra of blood dilutions on four types of fabric (acrylic, nylon, polyester, and cotton). Gap derivatives (GDs) were applied as a preprocessing technique to optimize the performance of calibration models. We report a much improved IR detection limit (DL) for blood on cotton (2700× in dilution factor units) and the first IR DL reported for blood on nylon (250×). Due to sample heterogeneity caused by fabric hydrophobicity, acrylic fabric produced variable ATR FT-IR spectra that caused poor DLs in concentration units compared to previous work. Polyester showed a similar problem at low blood concentrations that lead to a relatively poor DL as well. However, the increased surface sensitivity and decreased penetration depth of ATR FT-IR make it an excellent choice for detection of small quantities of blood on the front surface of all fabrics tested (0.0010 µg for cotton, 0.0077 µg for nylon, 0.011 µg for acrylic, and 0.0066 µg for polyester).

  15. Ultrahigh sensitivity made simple: nanoplasmonic label-free biosensing with an extremely low limit-of-detection for bacterial and cancer diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Svedendahl, M.; Käll, M.; Gunnarsson, L.; Dmitriev, A.

    2009-10-01

    We present a simple and robust scheme for biosensing with an ultralow limit-of-detection down to several pg cm-2 (or several tens of attomoles cm-2) based on optical label-free biodetection with localized surface plasmon resonances. The scheme utilizes cost-effective optical components and comprises a white light source, a properly functionalized sensor surface enclosed in a simple fluidics chip, and a spectral analyzer. The sensor surface is produced by a bottom-up nanofabrication technique with hole mask colloidal lithography. Despite its simplicity, the method is able to reliably detect protein-protein binding events at low picomolar and femtomolar concentrations, which is exemplified by the label-free detection of the extracellular adherence protein (EAP) found on the outer surface of the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus and of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), which is believed to be a prostate cancer marker. These experiments pave the way towards an ultra-sensitive yet compact biodetection platform for point-of-care diagnostics applications.

  16. Comparative analysis of detection limits and specificity of molecular diagnostic markers for three pathogens (Microsporidia, Nosema spp.) in the key pollinators Apis mellifera and Bombus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Erler, Silvio; Lommatzsch, Stefanie; Lattorff, H Michael G

    2012-04-01

    Global pollinator decline has recently been discussed in the context of honey and bumble bee infections from various pathogens including viruses, bacteria, microsporidia and mites. The microsporidian pathogens Nosema apis, Nosema ceranae and Nosema bombi may in fact be major candidates contributing to this decline. Different molecular and non-molecular detection methods have been developed; however, a comparison, especially of the highly sensitive PCR based methods, is currently lacking. Here, we present the first comparative quantitative real-time PCR study of nine Nosema spp. primers within the framework of primer specificity and sensitivity. With the help of dilution series of defined numbers of spores, we reveal six primer pairs amplifying N. apis, six for N. bombi and four for N. ceranae. All appropriate primer pairs detected an amount of at least 10(4) spores, the majority of which were even as sensitive to detect such low amounts as 10(3) to ten spores. Species specificity of primers was observed for N. apis and N. bombi, but not for N. ceranae. Additionally, we did not find any significant correlation for the amplified fragments with PCR efficiency or the limit of detection. We discuss our findings on the background of false positive and negative results using quantitative real-time PCR. On the basis of these results, future research might be based on appropriate primer selection depending on the experimental needs. Primers may be selected on the basis of specificity or sensitivity. Pathogen species and load may be determined with higher precision enhancing all kinds of diagnostic studies.

  17. Detections and Sensitive Upper Limits for Methane and Related Trace Gases on Mars during 2003-2014, and planned extensions in 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumma, Michael J.; Villanueva, Geronimo L.; Novak, Robert E.

    2015-11-01

    Five groups report methane detections on Mars; all results suggest local release and high temporal variability [1-7]. Our team searched for CH4 on many dates and seasons and detected it on several dates [1, 9, 10]. TLS (Curiosity rover) reported methane upper limits [6], and then detections [7] that were consistent in size with earlier reports and that also showed rapid modulation of CH4 abundance.[8] argued that absorption features assigned to Mars 12CH4 by [1] might instead be weak lines of terrestrial 13CH4. If not properly removed, terrestrial 13CH4 signatures would appear on the blue wing of terrestrial 12CH4 even when Mars is red-shifted - but they do not (Fig. S6 of [1]), demonstrating that terrestrial signatures were correctly removed. [9] demonstrated that including the dependence of δ13CH4 with altitude did not affect the residual features, nor did taking δ13CH4 as zero. Were δ13CH4 important, its omission would have overemphasized the depth of 13CH4 terrestrial absorption, introducing emission features in the residual spectra [1]. However, the residual features are seen in absorption, establishing their origin as non-terrestrial - [8] now agrees with this view.We later reported results for multiple organic gases (CH4, CH3OH, H2CO, C2H6, C2H2, C2H4), hydroperoxyl (HO2), three nitriles (N2O, NH3, HCN) and two chlorinated species (HCl, CH3Cl) [9]. Most of these species cannot be detected with current space assets, owing to instrumental limitations (e.g., spectral resolving power). However, the high resolution infrared spectrometers (NOMAD, ACS) on ExoMars 2016 (Trace Gas Orbiter) will begin measurements in late 2016. In solar occultation, TGO sensitivities will far exceed prior capabilities.We published detailed hemispheric maps of H2O and HDO on Mars, inferring the size of a lost early ocean [10]. In 2016, we plan to acquire 3-D spatial maps of HDO and H2O with ALMA, and improved maps of organics with iSHELL/NASA-IRTF.References: [1] Mumma et al. Sci09

  18. Graded Achievement, Tested Achievement, and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-eight studies of grades, over a century, were reviewed using the argument-based approach to validity suggested by Kane as a theoretical framework. The review draws conclusions about the meaning of graded achievement, its relation to tested achievement, and changes in the construct of graded achievement over time. "Graded…

  19. Detection of Single Atoms and Buried Defects in Three Dimensions by Aberration-corrected Electron Microscope with 0.5 ? Information Limit

    SciTech Connect

    Kisielowski, Christian; Bischoff, Maarten; van Lin, Hans; Lazar, Sorin; Freitag, Bernhard; Knippels, Georg; Tiemeijer, Peter; van der Stam, Maarten; von Harrach, Sebastian; Stekelenburg, Michael; Haider, Maximilian; M�ller, Hans; Hartel, Peter; Kabius, Bernd; Miller, Dean; Petrov, Ivan; Olson, Eric; Donchev, Tomas; Kenik, Edward A; Lupini, Andrew R; Bentley, James; Pennycook, Stephen J; Minor, Andrew; Schmid, Andreas; Duden, Thomas; Radmilovic, Velimir; Ramasse, Quentin; Watanabe, Masashi; Stach, Eric; Denes, Peter; Dahmen, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    The ability of electron microscopes to analyze all the atoms in individual nanostructures is limited by lens aberrations. However, recent advances in aberration-correcting electron optics have led to greatly enhanced instrument performance and new techniques of electron microscopy. The development of an ultrastable electron microscope with aberration-correcting optics and a monochromated high-brightness source has significantly improved instrument resolution and contrast. In the present work, we report information transfer beyond 50 pm and show images of single gold atoms with a signal-to-noise ratio as large as 10. The instrument's new capabilities were exploited to detect a buried Σ3 {112} grain boundary and observe the dynamic arrangements of single atoms and atom pairs with sub- ngstrom resolution. These results mark an important step toward meeting the challenge of determining the 3D atomic-scale structure of nanomaterials.

  20. WIMP Dark Matter Limit-Direct Detection Data and Sensitivity Plots from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search II and the University of California at Santa Barbara

    DOE Data Explorer

    Expectations for non-baryonic dark matter are founded principally in Big Bang nucleosynthesis calculations, which indicate that the missing mass of the universe is not likely to be baryonic. The supersymmetric standard model (SUSY) offers a promising framework for expectations of particle species which could satisfy the observed properties of dark matter. WIMPs are the most likely SUSY candidate for a dark matter particle. The High Energy Physics Group at University of California, Santa Barbara, is part of the CDMSII Collaboration and have provided the Interactive Plotter for WIMP Dark Matter Limit-Direct Detection Data on their website. They invite other collaborations working on dark matter research to submit datasets and, as a result, have more than 150 data sets now available for use with the plotting tool. The published source of the data is provided with each data set.

  1. Evaluation of EDXRF configurations to improve the limit of detection and exposure for in vivo quantification of gadolinium in tumor tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santibáñez, M.; Vásquez, M.; Figueroa, R. G.; Valente, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper the configuration of an Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) system optimized for in vivo quantification of gadolinium in tumor tissue was studied. The system was configured using XMI-MSIM software designed to predict the XRF spectral response using Monte Carlo simulations. The studied setup is comprised of an X-ray tube, tuned to different voltages, and a copper filter system configured with variable thickness, which emits a spectrally narrow beam centered on the specific excitation energy. The values for the central energy excitation and the spectral width were adjusted to optimize the system, using like figures of merit: minimization of the limit of detection, measurement uncertainty and radiation exposure. These values were obtained in two stages. The first was successive simulations of incident spectra with central energy in the range of 50-70 keV. The second was comprised of simulations with incident spectra of different widths (8-29 keV), all with the same determined central energy, evaluating the limit of detection depending on the exposure. This made it possible to find the best balance between system sensitivity and the delivered dose. The obtained results were compared with those produced by radioactive sources of 241Am whose activity was set to produce the same exposure as the proposed setup. To evaluate the feasibility of in vivo quantification, a set of tumor phantoms of 1-6 cm3 at different depths and labeled with a gadolinium concentration of 250 ppm was evaluated. From the resulting spectrum, calibration curves were obtained in function of the size and depth of the tumor, allowing for the evaluation of the potential of the methodology.

  2. Improved limits and portability over currently employed cadmium monitoring systems through preconcentration for detection by way of micro-/nanofluidic mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wach, Paul

    concentrate Cd at an initial concentration of 0.5 mol/m3, which is nearly half the limit of commercially available technology. Additionally, this preconcentration mechanism was demonstrated to potentially advance its capabilities by attaching channels in series or parallel to further preconcentrate for improved detection. Finally, measurement of extremely low concentrations of Cd is possible due to differences seen in the concentration distribution profiles once steady-state is reached.

  3. Beryllium Limits of Detection and Spectral Interferences in 2 Per Cent Nitric Acid, Digested Air Filter Paper, and GHOSTWIPETM Matrices by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Jurgensen, A.R.

    2004-02-13

    The Analytical Development Section (ADS) of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) has been requested to perform beryllium (Be) analysis on digested Air Filter Paper and GHOSTWIPE (Trade Mark) samples by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectrometry (ICP-ES). One of the important figures of merit for this analysis is the detection limit (LOD), the smallest concentration of an element that can be detected with a defined certainty. To meet the site Industrial Hygiene (IH) requirements, an instrument LOD of 0.03 mg per Air Filter Paper (1 hr sample) and 0.2 mg per GHOSTWIPE (Trade Mark) must be demonstrated. Another important analytical parameter is the effect on the Be quantization from potential spectral interfering matrix elements. Any existing spectral overlaps could give false positives or increase the measured Be concentrations in these matrices. The purpose of this study was to document the Analytical Development Sections' s contained ICP-ES performance in these two areas. In addition, other Quality Control recommendations will be discussed.

  4. Accurate mass determination, quantification and determination of detection limits in liquid chromatography-high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry: challenges and practical solutions.

    PubMed

    Vergeynst, Leendert; Van Langenhove, Herman; Joos, Pieter; Demeestere, Kristof

    2013-07-30

    Uniform guidelines for the data processing and validation of qualitative and quantitative multi-residue analysis using full-spectrum high-resolution mass spectrometry are scarce. Through systematic research, optimal mass accuracy and sensitivity are obtained after refining the post-processing of the HRMS data. For qualitative analysis, transforming the raw profile spectra to centroid spectra is recommended resulting in a 2.3 fold improved precision on the accurate mass determination of spectrum peaks. However, processing centroid data for quantitative purposes could lead to signal interruption when too narrow mass windows are applied for the construction of extracted ion chromatograms. Therefore, peak integration on the raw profile data is recommended. An optimal width of the mass window of 50 ppm, which is a trade-off between sensitivity and selectivity, was obtained for a TOF instrument providing a resolving power of 20,000 at full width at half maximum (FWHM). For the validation of HRMS analytical methods, widespread concepts such as the signal-to-noise ratios for the determination of decision limits and detection capabilities have shown to be not always applicable because in some cases almost no noise can be detected anymore. A statistical methodology providing a reliable alternative is extended and applied.

  5. The Cu-MOF-199/single-walled carbon nanotubes modified electrode for simultaneous determination of hydroquinone and catechol with extended linear ranges and lower detection limits.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Li, Xi; Yang, Linlin; Yan, Songlin; Wang, Mengmeng; Cheng, Dan; Chen, Qi; Dong, Yulin; Liu, Peng; Cai, Weiquan; Zhang, Chaocan

    2015-10-29

    A novel electrochemical sensor based on Cu-MOF-199 [Cu-MOF-199 = Cu3(BTC)2 (BTC = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylicacid)] and SWCNTs (single-walled carbon nanotubes) was fabricated for the simultaneous determination of hydroquinone (HQ) and catechol (CT). The modification procedure was carried out through casting SWCNTs on the bare glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and followed by the electrodeposition of Cu-MOF-199 on the SWCNTs modified electrode. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were performed to characterize the electrochemical performance and surface characteristics of the as-prepared sensor. The composite electrode exhibited an excellent electrocatalytic activity with increased electrochemical signals towards the oxidation of HQ and CT, owing to the synergistic effect of SWCNTs and Cu-MOF-199. Under the optimized condition, the linear response range were from 0.1 to 1453 μmol L(-1) (RHQ = 0.9999) for HQ and 0.1-1150 μmol L(-1) (RCT = 0.9990) for CT. The detection limits for HQ and CT were as low as 0.08 and 0.1 μmol L(-1), respectively. Moreover, the modified electrode presented the good reproducibility and the excellent anti-interference performance. The analytical performance of the developed sensor for the simultaneous detection of HQ and CT had been evaluated in practical samples with satisfying results.

  6. Chances and limitations of wild bird monitoring for the avian influenza virus H5N1--detection of pathogens highly mobile in time and space.

    PubMed

    Wilking, Hendrik; Ziller, Mario; Staubach, Christoph; Globig, Anja; Harder, Timm C; Conraths, Franz J

    2009-08-14

    Highly pathogenic influenza virus (HPAIV) H5N1 proved to be remarkably mobile in migratory bird populations where it has led to extensive outbreaks for which the true number of affected birds usually cannot be determined. For the evaluation of avian influenza monitoring and HPAIV early warning systems, we propose a time-series analysis that includes the estimation of confidence intervals for (i) the prevalence in outbreak situations or (ii) in the apparent absence of disease in time intervals for specified regional units. For the German outbreak regions in 2006 and 2007, the upper 95% confidence limit allowed the detection of prevalences below 1% only for certain time intervals. Although more than 25,000 birds were sampled in Germany per year, the upper 95% confidence limit did not fall below 5% in the outbreak regions for most of the time. The proposed analysis can be used to monitor water bodies and high risk areas, also as part of an early-warning system. Chances for an improved targeting of the monitoring system as part of a risk-based approach are discussed with the perspective of reducing sample sizes.

  7. High-quality imaging in environmental scanning electron microscopy--optimizing the pressure limiting system and the secondary electron detection of a commercially available ESEM.

    PubMed

    Fitzek, H; Schroettner, H; Wagner, J; Hofer, F; Rattenberger, J

    2016-04-01

    In environmental scanning electron microscopy applications in the kPa regime are of increasing interest for the investigation of wet and biological samples, because neither sample preparation nor extensive cooling are necessary. Unfortunately, the applications are limited by poor image quality. In this work the image quality at high pressures of a FEI Quanta 600 (field emission gun) and a FEI Quanta 200 (thermionic gun) is greatly improved by optimizing the pressure limiting system and the secondary electron (SE) detection system. The scattering of the primary electron beam strongly increases with pressure and thus the image quality vanishes. The key to high-image quality at high pressures is to reduce scattering as far as possible while maintaining ideal operation conditions for the SE-detector. The amount of scattering is reduced by reducing both the additional stagnation gas thickness (aSGT) and the environmental distance (ED). A new aperture holder is presented that significantly reduces the aSGT while maintaining the same field-of-view (FOV) as the original design. With this aperture holder it is also possible to make the aSGT even smaller at the expense of a smaller FOV. A new blade-shaped SE-detector is presented yielding better image quality than usual flat SE-detectors. The electrode of the new SE detector is positioned on the sample table, which allows the SE-detector to operate at ideal conditions regardless of pressure and ED.

  8. Estimation by limiting dilution analysis of human IL 2-secreting T cells: detection of IL 2 produced by single lymphokine-secreting T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vie, H.; Miller, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    We present here a culture method for the estimation, in human blood, of the number of lymphocytes that can respond to mitogen by producing interleukin 2 (IL 2). T cells are cultured at limiting dilutions with PHA or Con A in the presence of Epstein Barr virus-transformed human lymphoblastoid cells (EB-LCL), and supernatants are tested 3 days later for IL 2 content by a cell proliferation assay. The distribution of negative wells follows the expected Poisson single-hit relationship, suggesting that the assay is sensitive to single cells of a single limiting cell type. On average, 16.3% of peripheral blood mononuclear cells can produce IL 2 in such clonal cultures (mean of 12 determinations; SD = 5.6%). Surprisingly, irradiation (up to 2000 rad) of the titrated responder cell population diminishes the estimated frequencies by less than 50%. The ability to detect IL 2 levels in cultures containing only a single, nonproliferating T lymphocyte allows us to estimate the amount of IL 2 generated by an individual effector cell during a 3-day culture interval after mitogen stimulation. The average responding, irradiated T cell generates 0.92 pg of IL 2 (median) within 3 days. The method presented provides a straightforward way to provide independent estimates of responding cell number and of lymphokine production per cell in a variety of clinical situations.

  9. Limit of detection studies for application to natural product identification using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brkljača, Robert; Urban, Sylvia

    2015-01-02

    In the pursuit of new natural products, the demand to rapidly identify compounds present, in ever decreasing amounts, in complex crude extracts has become a limiting factor. Despite improvements in HPLC-NMR hardware and pulse sequences, no extensive limit of detection (LOD) investigations have been reported for the acquisition of 2D NMR spectroscopic experiments acquired through HPLC-NMR. In this study the LOD for five key 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic experiments have been established, using two reference compounds, including the on-flow (WET 1D proton), stop-flow (WET1D proton), gCOSY, HSQCAD and gHMBCAD NMR experiments. The LOD for all of the NMR experiments were within the range of 700ng to 1mg for the set of fixed experimental parameters implemented. For principle components in a complex multi-component mixture, this would allow for in situ compound identification. HPLC-NMR analysis was employed to investigate the principle components present in a marine brown alga crude extract, Cystophora subfarcinata.

  10. Statistical analysis of water-quality data containing multiple detection limits II: S-language software for nonparametric distribution modeling and hypothesis testing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, L.; Helsel, D.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of low concentrations of trace contaminants in environmental media often results in left-censored data that are below some limit of analytical precision. Interpretation of values becomes complicated when there are multiple detection limits in the data-perhaps as a result of changing analytical precision over time. Parametric and semi-parametric methods, such as maximum likelihood estimation and robust regression on order statistics, can be employed to model distributions of multiply censored data and provide estimates of summary statistics. However, these methods are based on assumptions about the underlying distribution of data. Nonparametric methods provide an alternative that does not require such assumptions. A standard nonparametric method for estimating summary statistics of multiply-censored data is the Kaplan-Meier (K-M) method. This method has seen widespread usage in the medical sciences within a general framework termed "survival analysis" where it is employed with right-censored time-to-failure data. However, K-M methods are equally valid for the left-censored data common in the geosciences. Our S-language software provides an analytical framework based on K-M methods that is tailored to the needs of the earth and environmental sciences community. This includes routines for the generation of empirical cumulative distribution functions, prediction or exceedance probabilities, and related confidence limits computation. Additionally, our software contains K-M-based routines for nonparametric hypothesis testing among an unlimited number of grouping variables. A primary characteristic of K-M methods is that they do not perform extrapolation and interpolation. Thus, these routines cannot be used to model statistics beyond the observed data range or when linear interpolation is desired. For such applications, the aforementioned parametric and semi-parametric methods must be used.

  11. Holevo Capacity Achieving Joint Detection Receiver

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-31

    and 1-a> + GENERATE MINIMUM PROBABILITY OF ERROR ,__,... 1320 (MPE) BASIS FOR CODEBOOK • EXTEND CODEWORDS OF CODEBOOK I_,... 1330 INTO A SET OF ALL...there exist error correction codes that allow a probability of error at a receiver to be made arbitrarily small. Thus, given the right error correction...probability of error (MPE) basis for the codebook; generating, by the computer device, a measurement unitary matrix for the codebook by expressing

  12. THE RADIAL VELOCITY TATOOINE SEARCH FOR CIRCUMBINARY PLANETS: PLANET DETECTION LIMITS FOR A SAMPLE OF DOUBLE-LINED BINARY STARS-INITIAL RESULTS FROM KECK I/HIRES, SHANE/CAT/HAMSPEC, AND TNG/SARG OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Konacki, Maciej; Helminiak, Krzysztof G.; Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.

    2009-10-10

    We present preliminary results of the first and on-going radial velocity survey for circumbinary planets. With a novel radial velocity technique employing an iodine absorption cell, we achieve an unprecedented radial velocity (RV) precision of up to 2 m s{sup -1} for double-lined binary stars. The high-resolution spectra collected with the Keck I/Hires, TNG/Sarg, and Shane/CAT/Hamspec telescopes/spectrographs over the years 2003-2008 allow us to derive RVs and compute planet detection limits for 10 double-lined binary stars. For this initial sample of targets, we can rule out planets on dynamically stable orbits with masses as small as approx0.3 to 3 M {sub Jup} for the orbital periods of up to approx5.3 years. Even though the presented sample of stars is too small to make any strong conclusions, it is clear that the search for circumbinary planets is now technique-wise possible and eventually will provide new constraints for the planet formation theories.

  13. Detection limits for blood on four fabric types using infrared diffuse reflection spectroscopy in mid- and near-infrared spectral windows.

    PubMed

    DeJong, Stephanie A; Lu, Zhenyu; Cassidy, Brianna M; O'Brien, Wayne L; Morgan, Stephen L; Myrick, Michael L

    2015-09-01

    Detection limits (DL) for blood on four fabric types were estimated for calibrations derived using partial least squares regression applied to infrared (IR) diffuse reflection spectra. Samples were prepared by dip-coating acrylic, cotton, nylon, and polyester fabrics from solutions of diluted rat blood. While DLs often appear in terms of dilution factor in the forensic community, mass percentage, coverage (mass per unit area), or film thickness are often more relevant when comparing experimental methods. These alternate DL units are related to one another and presented here. The best IR diffuse reflection DLs for blood on acrylic and cotton fabrics were in the mid-IR spectral window corresponding to the protein Amide I/II absorption bands. These DLs were dilution by a factor of 2300 (0.019% w/w blood solids) for acrylic and a factor of 610 (0.055% w/w blood solids) for cotton. The best DL for blood on polyester was found in the mid-IR spectral window corresponding to the protein Amide A absorption band at dilution by a factor of 900 (0.034% w/w blood solids). Because of the similarity between the IR spectra of blood solids and nylon fabrics, no satisfactory IR DLs were determined for the calibration of blood on nylon. We compare our values to DLs reported for blood detection using the standard luminol method. The most commonly reported luminol DLs are of the order of 1000-fold dilution, which we estimate are a factor of 2-7 lower than our reported IR DLs on a coverage basis.

  14. On the theoretical limits of detecting cyclic changes in cardiac high-energy phosphates and creatine kinase reaction kinetics using in vivo ³¹P MRS.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Kilian; Bottomley, Paul A; Weiss, Robert G

    2015-06-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is absolutely required to fuel normal cyclic contractions of the heart. The creatine kinase (CK) reaction is a major energy reserve reaction that rapidly converts creatine phosphate (PCr) to ATP during the cardiac cycle and at times of stress and ischemia, but is significantly impaired in conditions such as hypertrophy and heart failure. Because the magnitudes of possible in vivo cyclic changes in cardiac high-energy phosphates (HEPs) during the cardiac cycle are not well known from previous work, this study uses mathematical modeling to assess whether, and to what extent, cyclic variations in HEPs and in the rate of ATP synthesis through CK (CK flux) could exist in the human heart, and whether they could be measured with current in vivo (31)P MRS methods. Multi-site exchange models incorporating enzymatic rate equations were used to study the cyclic dynamics of the CK reaction, and Bloch equations were used to simulate (31)P MRS saturation transfer measurements of the CK reaction. The simulations show that short-term buffering of ATP by CK requires temporal variations over the cardiac cycle in the CK reaction velocities modeled by enzymatic rate equations. The maximum variation in HEPs in the normal human heart beating at 60 min(-1) was approximately 0.4 mM and proportional to the velocity of ATP hydrolysis. Such HEP variations are at or below the current limits of detection by in vivo (31)P MRS methods. Bloch equation simulations show that (31)P MRS saturation transfer estimates the time-averaged, pseudo-first-order forward rate constant, k(f,ap)', of the CK reaction, and that periodic short-term fluctuations in kf ' and CK flux are not likely to be detectable in human studies employing current in vivo (31)P MRS methods.

  15. Quantum Limits of Space-to-Ground Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.; Dolinar, S.

    2012-01-01

    For a pure loss channel, the ultimate capacity can be achieved with classical coherent states (i.e., ideal laser light): (1) Capacity-achieving receiver (measurement) is yet to be determined. (2) Heterodyne detection approaches the ultimate capacity at high mean photon numbers. (3) Photon-counting approaches the ultimate capacity at low mean photon numbers. A number of current technology limits drive the achievable performance of free-space communication links. Approaching fundamental limits in the bandwidth-limited regime: (1) Heterodyne detection with high-order coherent-state modulation approaches ultimate limits. SOA improvements to laser phase noise, adaptive optics systems for atmospheric transmission would help. (2) High-order intensity modulation and photon-counting can approach heterodyne detection within approximately a factor of 2. This may have advantages over coherent detection in the presence of turbulence. Approaching fundamental limits in the photon-limited regime (1) Low-duty cycle binary coherent-state modulation (OOK, PPM) approaches ultimate limits. SOA improvements to laser extinction ratio, receiver dark noise, jitter, and blocking would help. (2) In some link geometries (near field links) number-state transmission could improve over coherent-state transmission

  16. Evaluation of the Charm maximum residue limit β-lactam and tetracycline test for the detection of antibiotics in ewe and goat milk.

    PubMed

    Beltrán, M C; Romero, T; Althaus, R L; Molina, M P

    2013-05-01

    The Charm maximum residue limit β-lactam and tetracycline test (Charm MRL BLTET; Charm Sciences Inc., Lawrence, MA) is an immunoreceptor assay utilizing Rapid One-Step Assay lateral flow technology that detects β-lactam or tetracycline drugs in raw commingled cow milk at or below European Union maximum residue levels (EU-MRL). The Charm MRL BLTET test procedure was recently modified (dilution in buffer and longer incubation) by the manufacturers to be used with raw ewe and goat milk. To assess the Charm MRL BLTET test for the detection of β-lactams and tetracyclines in milk of small ruminants, an evaluation study was performed at Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnologia Animal of Universitat Politècnica de València (Spain). The test specificity and detection capability (CCβ) were studied following Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. Specificity results obtained in this study were optimal for individual milk free of antimicrobials from ewes (99.2% for β-lactams and 100% for tetracyclines) and goats (97.9% for β-lactams and 100% for tetracyclines) along the entire lactation period regardless of whether the results were visually or instrumentally interpreted. Moreover, no positive results were obtained when a relatively high concentration of different substances belonging to antimicrobial families other than β-lactams and tetracyclines were present in ewe and goat milk. For both types of milk, the CCβ calculated was lower or equal to EU-MRL for amoxicillin (4 µg/kg), ampicillin (4 µg/kg), benzylpenicillin (≤ 2 µg/kg), dicloxacillin (30 µg/kg), oxacillin (30 µg/kg), cefacetrile (≤ 63 µg/kg), cefalonium (≤ 10 µg/kg), cefapirin (≤ 30 µg/kg), desacetylcefapirin (≤ 30 µg/kg), cefazolin (≤ 25 µg/kg), cefoperazone (≤ 25 µg/kg), cefquinome (20 µg/kg), ceftiofur (≤ 50 µg/kg), desfuroylceftiofur (≤ 50µg/kg), and cephalexin (≤ 50 µg/kg). However, this test could neither detect cloxacillin nor nafcillin at or below EU-MRL (CCβ >30 µg/kg). The

  17. Detection of Occult Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Patients Who Achieved a Sustained Virologic Response to Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents for Recurrent Infection After Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Elmasry, Sandra; Wadhwa, Sanya; Bang, Bo-Ram; Cook, Linda; Chopra, Shefali; Kanel, Gary; Kim, Brian; Harper, Tammy; Feng, Zongdi; Jerome, Keith R; Kahn, Jeffrey A; Saito, Takeshi

    2017-02-01

    Occult infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is defined as the presence of the HCV genome in either liver tissue or peripheral blood monocytes, despite constant negative results from tests for HCV RNA in serum. We investigated whether patients who maintained a sustained virologic response 12 weeks after therapy (SVR12) with direct-acting antiviral (DAA) agents for recurrent HCV infection after liver transplantation had occult HCV infections. We performed a prospective study of 134 patients with recurrent HCV infection after liver transplantation who were treated with DAAs, with or without ribavirin, from 2014 through 2016 (129 patients achieved an SVR12). In >10% of the patients who achieved SVR12 (n = 14), serum levels of aminotransferases did not normalize during or after DAA therapy, or they normalized transiently but then increased sharply after DAA therapy. Of these 14 patients, 9 were assessed for occult HCV infection by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. This analysis revealed that 55% of these patients (n = 5) had an occult infection, with the detection of negative strand viral genome, indicating viral replication. These findings indicate the presence of occult HCV infection in some patients with abnormal levels of serum aminotransferases, despite SVR12 to DAAs for HCV infection after liver transplantation.

  18. Acetone gas sensor based on NiO/ZnO hollow spheres: Fast response and recovery, and low (ppb) detection limit.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Zhao, Liupeng; Wang, Boqun; Sun, Peng; Wang, Qingji; Gao, Yuan; Liang, Xishuang; Zhang, Tong; Lu, Geyu

    2017-06-01

    NiO/ZnO composites were synthesized by decorating numerous NiO nanoparticles on the surfaces of well dispersed ZnO hollow spheres using a facile solvothermal method. Various kinds of characterization methods were utilized to investigate the structures and morphologies of the hybrid materials. The results revealed that the NiO nanoparticles with a size of ∼10nm were successfully distributed on the surfaces of ZnO hollow spheres in a discrete manner. As expected, the NiO/ZnO composites demonstrated dramatic improvements in sensing performances compared with pure ZnO hollow spheres. For example, the response of NiO/ZnO composites to 100ppm acetone was ∼29.8, which was nearly 4.6 times higher than that of primary ZnO at 275°C, and the response/recovery time were 1/20s, respectively. Meanwhile, the detection limit could extend down to ppb level. The likely reason for the improved gas sensing properties was also proposed.

  19. Design of multiplex calibrant plasmids, their use in GMO detection and the limit of their applicability for quantitative purposes owing to competition effects.

    PubMed

    Debode, Frédéric; Marien, Aline; Janssen, Eric; Berben, Gilbert

    2010-03-01

    Five double-target multiplex plasmids to be used as calibrants for GMO quantification were constructed. They were composed of two modified targets associated in tandem in the same plasmid: (1) a part of the soybean lectin gene and (2) a part of the transgenic construction of the GTS40-3-2 event. Modifications were performed in such a way that each target could be amplified with the same primers as those for the original target from which they were derived but such that each was specifically detected with an appropriate probe. Sequence modifications were done to keep the parameters of the new target as similar as possible to those of its original sequence. The plasmids were designed to be used either in separate reactions or in multiplex reactions. Evidence is given that with each of the five different plasmids used in separate wells as a calibrant for a different copy number, a calibration curve can be built. When the targets were amplified together (in multiplex) and at different concentrations inside the same well, the calibration curves showed that there was a competition effect between the targets and this limits the range of copy numbers for calibration over a maximum of 2 orders of magnitude. Another possible application of multiplex plasmids is discussed.

  20. Reaction rate, activation energy, and detection limit for the reaction of 5-furoylquinoline-3-carboxaldehyde with neurotransmitters in artificial cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Chen, Z; Dovichi, N J

    2000-04-28

    The fluorogenic reagent 5-furoylquinoline-3-carboxaldehyde (FQ) has proven valuable in the analysis of proteins and small neurotransmitters. We monitored the reaction rate between this reagent and five neurotransmitters at 40 degrees and 65 degrees C in artificial cerebrospinal fluid. The reactions followed pseudo-first order kinetics. The activation energy for the reaction of FQ was 10.6, 10.7, 22.0, 31.4, and 34.4 kJ mol(-1) for alanine, taurine, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamine, and glutamic acid, respectively. At 65 degrees C, the reaction rate was quite similar for alanine, taurine, glutamine, and glutamic acid (1.8 x 10(-3) s(-1)) but was twice as fast for GABA. A reaction time of nearly 1 h was required to quantitatively convert these neurotransmitters to their fluorescent products at 65 degrees C. Detection limits for the labeled neurotransmitters were 10(-9)-10(-8) M, which corresponded to 0.3-7 amol injected onto the capillary.

  1. Low-content quantification in powders using Raman spectroscopy: a facile chemometric approach to sub 0.1% limits of detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Boyan; Calvet, Amandine; Casamayou-Boucau, Yannick; Morris, Cheryl; Ryder, Alan G

    2015-03-17

    A robust and accurate analytical methodology for low-content (<0.1%) quantification in the solid-state using Raman spectroscopy, subsampling, and chemometrics was demonstrated using a piracetam-proline model. The method involved a 5-step process: collection of a relatively large number of spectra (8410) from each sample by Raman mapping, meticulous data pretreatment to remove spectral artifacts, use of a 0-100% concentration range partial least-squares (PLS) regression model to estimate concentration at each pixel, use of a more accurate, reduced concentration range PLS model to calculate analyte concentration at each pixel, and finally statistical analysis of all 8000+ concentration predictions to produce an accurate overall sample concentration. The relative prediction accuracy was ∼2.4% for a 0.05-1.0% concentration range, and the limit of detection was comparable to high performance liquid chromatography (0.03% versus 0.041%). For data pretreatment, we developed a unique cosmic ray removal method and used an automated baseline correction method, neither of which required subjective user intervention and thus were fully automatable. The method is applicable to systems which cannot be easily analyzed chromatographically, such as hydrate, polymorph, or solvate contamination.

  2. Simultaneous estimation of vitamin K1 and heparin with low limit of detection using cascaded channels fiber optic surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Tabassum, Rana; Gupta, Banshi D

    2016-12-15

    We report an approach for the simultaneous estimation of vitamin K1 (VK1) and heparin via cascaded channel multianalyte sensing probe employing fiber optic surface plasmon resonance technique. Cladding from two well separated portions of the fiber is removed and are respectively coated with thin films of silver (channel-1) and copper (channel-2). The nanohybrid of multiwalled carbon nanotube in chitosan is fabricated over silver layer for the sensing of VK1 whereas core shell nanostructure of polybrene@ZnO is coated over copper layer for the sensing of heparin. Spectral interrogation method is used for the characterization of the sensor. Analyte selectivity of both the channels is performed by carrying out experiments using independent solutions of VK1 and heparin. Experiments performed on the solution of the mixture of VK1 and heparin show red shifts in both the channels on changing the concentration of both the analytes in the mixture. The operating range of both VK1 and heparin is from 0 to 10(-3)g/l. The limit of detection of the sensor is 2.66×10(-4)µg/l and 2.88×10(-4)µg/l for VK1 and heparin respectively which are lower than the reported ones. The additional advantages of the present sensor are low cost, possibility of online monitoring and remote sensing.

  3. Leader as achiever.

    PubMed

    Dienemann, Jacqueline

    2002-01-01

    This article examines one outcome of leadership: productive achievement. Without achievement one is judged to not truly be a leader. Thus, the ideal leader must be a visionary, a critical thinker, an expert, a communicator, a mentor, and an achiever of organizational goals. This article explores the organizational context that supports achievement, measures of quality nursing care, fiscal accountability, leadership development, rewards and punishments, and the educational content and teaching strategies to prepare graduates to be achievers.

  4. Determination of volatile compounds in wine by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection: comparison between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 3sigma approach and Hubaux-Vos calculation of detection limits using ordinary and bivariate least squares.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Rosario; Scordino, Monica; Traulo, Pasqualino; Gagliano, Giacomo

    2012-01-01

    A capillary GC-flame ionization detection (FID) method to determine volatile compounds (ethyl acetate, 1,1-diethoxyethane, methyl alcohol, 1-propanol, 2-methyl-1-propanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 1-butanol, and 2-butanol) in wine was investigated in terms of calculation of detection limits and calibration method. The main objectives were: (1) calculation of regression coefficient parameters by ordinary least-squares (OLS) and bivariate least-squares (BLS) regression models, taking into account errors in both axes; (2) estimation of linear dynamic range (LDR) according to International Conference on Harmonization recommendations; (3) performance evaluation of a method by using three different internal standards (ISs) such as acetonitrile, acetone, and 1-pentanol; (4) evaluation of LODs according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 3sigma approach and the Hubaux-Vos (H-V) method; (5) application of H-V theory to a gas chromatographic analytical method and to a food matrix; and (6) accuracy assessment of the method relative to methyl alcohol content through a Unione Italiana Vini (UIV) interlaboratory proficiency test. Calibration curves calculated via BLS and OLS show similar slopes, while intercepts are closer to zero in the first case, independent of the chosen IS. The studied ISs show a substantially equivalent behavior, even though the IS closer to the analyte retention time seems to be more appropriate in terms of LDR and LOD. Results indicate an underestimation of LODs using the EPA 3sigma approach instead of the more realistic H-V method, both with OLS and BLS regression models. Methanol contents compared with UIV average values indicate recovery between 90 and 110%.

  5. Recovery Efficiency, False Negative Rate, and Limit of Detection Performance of a Validated Macrofoam-Swab Sampling Method with Low Surface Concentrations of Two Bacillus anthracis Surrogates

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Deatherage Kaiser, Brooke L; Amidan, Brett G.; Sydor, Michael A.; Barrett, Christopher A.

    2015-03-31

    The performance of a macrofoam-swab sampling method was evaluated using Bacillus anthracis Sterne (BAS) and Bacillus atrophaeus Nakamura (BG) spores applied at nine low target amounts (2-500 spores) to positive-control plates and test coupons (2 in. × 2 in.) of four surface materials (glass, stainless steel, vinyl tile, and plastic). Test results from cultured samples were used to evaluate the effects of surrogate, surface concentration, and surface material on recovery efficiency (RE), false negative rate (FNR), and limit of detection. For RE, surrogate and surface material had statistically significant effects, but concentration did not. Mean REs were the lowest for vinyl tile (50.8% with BAS, 40.2% with BG) and the highest for glass (92.8% with BAS, 71.4% with BG). FNR values ranged from 0 to 0.833 for BAS and 0 to 0.806 for BG, with values increasing as concentration decreased in the range tested (0.078 to 19.375 CFU/cm2, where CFU denotes ‘colony forming units’). Surface material also had a statistically significant effect. A FNR-concentration curve was fit for each combination of surrogate and surface material. For both surrogates, the FNR curves tended to be the lowest for glass and highest for vinyl title. The FNR curves for BG tended to be higher than for BAS at lower concentrations, especially for glass. Results using a modified Rapid Viability-Polymerase Chain Reaction (mRV-PCR) analysis method were also obtained. The mRV-PCR results and comparisons to the culture results will be discussed in a subsequent report.

  6. On-line SPE sample treatment as a tool for method automatization and detection limits reduction: Quantification of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3/D2.

    PubMed

    Palaiogiannis, Dimitrios; Bekou, Evangelia; Pazaitou-Panayiotou, Kalliopi; Samanidou, Victoria; Tsakalof, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    The development and approbation of new, automated UHPLC-DAD method for the quantification of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3/D2 (25OH-D3/D2) metabolites in plasma/serum for the evaluation of patient's vitamin D status are presented. The method was developed on the Ultimate 3000 UHPLC dual gradient system supplied with the on-line SPE-concentration column coupled through six port switching valve to analytical column. This configuration and materials selected enable large volume sample injection (500μL) and on-line sample preconcentration, clean up and subsequent selective metabolites transfer onto the analytical column. The new method abrogates main conventional time consuming and error source off-line steps of analysis and thus simplifies analysis. The large volume injection increases the sensitivity of instrumental analysis by about ten-fold on-line pre-concentration of metabolites. The instrument response is linear (R>0.99) in the investigated concentration range 10-100ngmL(-1) which covers all the possible vitamin D status from serious deficiency (<12ngmL(-1)) to excess. The method detection limits (S/N=3) are LOD (25OH-D3)=0.94ngmL(-1) and LOD (25OH-D2)=2.4ngmL(-1). The method performance was assessed with the use of certified reference samples and perfect agreement between certified and measured values is demonstrated. The method was applied to human samples previously analyzed for total vitamin D by Competitive Protein-binding assay and findings of the two methods are compared.

  7. Comparing Science Achievement Constructs: Targeted and Achieved

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrara, Steve; Duncan, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    This article illustrates how test specifications based solely on academic content standards, without attention to other cognitive skills and item response demands, can fall short of their targeted constructs. First, the authors inductively describe the science achievement construct represented by a statewide sixth-grade science proficiency test.…

  8. Lowering detection limits for 1,2,3-trichloropropane in water using solid phase extraction coupled to purge and trap sample introduction in an isotope dilution GC-MS method.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wenta; Ghabour, Miriam; Draper, William M; Chandrasena, Esala

    2016-09-01

    Purge and trap sample introduction (PTI) has been the premier sampling and preconcentration technique for gas chromatographic determination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in drinking water for almost 50 years. PTI affords sub parts-per-billion (ppb) detection limits for purgeable VOCs including fixed gases and higher boiling hydrocarbons and halocarbons. In this study the coupling of solid phase extraction (SPE) to PTI was investigated as a means to substantially increase enrichment and lower detection limits for the emerging contaminant, 1,2,3-trichloropropane (TCP). Water samples (500 mL) were dechlorinated, preserved with a biocide, and spiked with the isotope labeled internal standard, d5-TCP. The entire 500 mL sample was extracted with activated carbon or carbon molecular sieve SPE cartridges, and then eluted with dichloromethane -- excess solvent was removed in a nitrogen evaporator and diethylene glycol "keeper" remaining was dispersed in 5 mL of water for PTI GC-MS analysis. The experimental Method Detection Limit (MDL) for TCP was 0.11 ng/L (ppt) and accuracy was 95-103% in sub-ppt determinations. Groundwater samples including impaired California sources and treated water (n = 21) were analyzed with results ranging from below the method reporting limit (0.30 ng/L) to > 250 ng/L. Coupling of SPE with PTI may provide similar reductions in detection limits for other VOCs with appropriate physical-chemical properties.

  9. Which Achievement Gap?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Sharon; Medrich, Elliott; Fowler, Donna

    2007-01-01

    From the halls of Congress to the local elementary school, conversations on education reform have tossed around the term "achievement gap" as though people all know precisely what that means. As it's commonly used, "achievement gap" refers to the differences in scores on state or national achievement tests between various…

  10. The Limit of Resolution and Detectability of the ArcCHECK QA Phantom in small field Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy and Stereotactic Radiosurgery Quality Assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Tara

    Purpose: To determine the limit of detectability and resolution of the ArcCheck QA Phantom (Sun Nuclear, Inc.) for quality assurance of volumetric-modulated arc therapy and stereotactic radiosurgery procedures when used in small field sizes. Methods: Eight different square field sizes (0.6x0.6, 1x1, 2x2, 3x3, 5x5, 7x7, 10x10, 15x15 cm2) were measured on the ArcCheck QA phantom at three different gantry angles: 0, 90, and 270 degrees, using a 6 MV beam at its maximum dose rate of 600 MU/min and a dose computed from a 200 MU beam from the Varian Edge linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) at the University of Toledo Dana Cancer Center. Four different types of errors were introduced into quality-assurance analysis procedures. Measured square field sizes were compared against the same measured square field sizes with induced collimator and MLC errors. Induced collimator errors were defined by an expansion of the jaw-defined field size by 1 mm on all axes, a collimator shift of 1 mm on the X2 and Y2 axes, a table shift by 1 mm vertically and longitudinally at 270 and 90 degrees and a table shift of 1mm laterally and longitudinally for angles of 0 and 180 degrees. MLC induced errors included the addition of one and subsequently two opposing MLC leaves in the center of each square field. Dose distributions for the normal square fields and square fields with induced errors were imported into SNC patient software (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL) in the form of DICOM RT dose files and measured dose distributions were compared between the normally measured square fields and fields containing induced errors. Percent pass rates were computed using gamma analysis criteria of 2 mm/2% with a threshold value of 20%. Point dose ratios were also analyzed for fields with induced MLC errors and output factors were calculated in order to determine the magnitude of the effect that these induced errors had on output measurements as compared with the ability of

  11. SU-F-207-07: Dual-Energy Computed Tomography Detection Limit of Various Radiopaque Contrast Agents That Can Be Infused Within Absorbable Inferior Vena Cava Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Melancon, A; Jacobsen, M; Salatan, F; Jones, A; Cody, D; Nute, J; Melancon, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Absorbable IVC filters are shown to be safe and efficacious in preventing pulmonary embolism. These absorbable filters disappear from the body after their required duration, alleviating costly removal procedures and downstream complications. Monitoring the positioning and integrity of absorbable devices using dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) would improve treatment efficacy. The purpose of this study is to determine the limit of detection and the energy dependence of DECT for various contrast agents that may be infused within the IVC filters including gold nanoparticles (AuNP) having diameters of 2 and 4 nm. Methods: All imaging studies were performed on a GE Discovery CT750 system in Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI) mode. Plastic vials containing the contrast agent solutions of water and blood were placed in a water bath, and images were acquired with the GSI-5 preset. The images were reformatted into the coronal plane and 5mm diameter ROIs were placed within each solution on a GE Advantage Workstation. Monoenergetic reconstructions were generated from 40 – 140 keV. Results: Mass attenuation (contrast per unit density) for AuNPs was greater than iron, but less than barium and iodine. Contrast was 10.2 (± 3.6) HU for 4 nm AuNP at 0.72 mg/ml and 12.1 (± 4.2) for 2 nm AuNP at 0.31 mg/ml at 70 keV suggesting reasonable chance of visualization at these concentrations for 70 keV reconstruction. The contrast as a function of CT energy is similar in both water and blood. Iodine is most dependent, followed closely by barium and iron, and trailed by a large margin by the AuNP. This was unexpected given Au’s large atomic number and the predominance of photoelectric effect at low energy. Conclusion: Infusion of IVC filters with AuNP is feasible. Discrimination of AuNP-infused IVC filters from surrounding anatomy warrants further investigation.

  12. Sparse aperture masking at the VLT. II. Detection limits for the eight debris disks stars β Pic, AU Mic, 49 Cet, η Tel, Fomalhaut, g Lup, HD 181327 and HR 8799

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauchet, L.; Lacour, S.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Ehrenreich, D.; Bonnefoy, M.; Girard, J. H.; Boccaletti, A.

    2016-10-01

    Context. The formation of planetary systems is a common, yet complex mechanism. Numerous stars have been identified to possess a debris disk, a proto-planetary disk or a planetary system. The understanding of such formation process requires the study of debris disks. These targets are substantial and particularly suitable for optical and infrared observations. Sparse aperture masking (SAM) is a high angular resolution technique strongly contributing to probing the region from 30 to 200 mas around the stars. This area is usually unreachable with classical imaging, and the technique also remains highly competitive compared to vortex coronagraphy. Aims: We aim to study debris disks with aperture masking to probe the close environment of the stars. Our goal is either to find low-mass companions, or to set detection limits. Methods: We observed eight stars presenting debris disks (β Pictoris, AU Microscopii, 49 Ceti, η Telescopii, Fomalhaut, g Lupi, HD 181327, and HR 8799) with SAM technique on the NaCo instrument at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). Results: No close companions were detected using closure phase information under 0.5'' of separation from the parent stars. We obtained magnitude detection limits that we converted to Jupiter masses detection limits using theoretical isochrones from evolutionary models. Conclusions: We derived upper mass limits on the presence of companions in the area of a few times the telescope's diffraction limits around each target star. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) during runs 087.C-0450(A), 087.C-0450(B) 087.C-0750(A), 088.C-0358(A).All magnitude detection limits maps are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/595/A31

  13. Signal-to-noise ratios in coherent soft limiters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesh, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Expressions for the output signal-to-noise power ratio of a bandpass soft limiter followed by a coherent detection device are presented and discussed. It is found that a significant improvement in the output signal-to-noise ratio at low input SNRs can be achieved by such soft limiters as compared to hard limiters. This indicates that the soft limiter may be of some use in the area of threshold extension. Approximation methods for determining output signal-to-noise spectral densities are also presented.

  14. Total synthesis of antibiotics: recent achievements, limitations, and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Prusov, Evgeny V

    2013-04-01

    Several recently accomplished total syntheses of antibiotic natural products were summarized in this review in order to present current trends in this area of research. Compounds from different substance classes, including polyketide, depsipeptide, polyketide-polypeptide hybrid, and saccharide, were chosen to demonstrate the advancement in both chemical methodology and corresponding synthetic strategy.

  15. Controlling open quantum systems: tools, achievements, and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Christiane P.

    2016-06-01

    The advent of quantum devices, which exploit the two essential elements of quantum physics, coherence and entanglement, has sparked renewed interest in the control of open quantum systems. Successful implementations face the challenge of preserving relevant nonclassical features at the level of device operation. A major obstacle is decoherence, which is caused by interaction with the environment. Optimal control theory is a tool that can be used to identify control strategies in the presence of decoherence. Here we review recent advances in optimal control methodology that allow typical tasks in device operation for open quantum systems to be tackled and discuss examples of relaxation-optimized dynamics. Optimal control theory is also a useful tool to exploit the environment for control. We discuss examples and point out possible future extensions.

  16. Spore Disruption Analysis and Detection Limit Determination at Low Volume Amplifications (2-10 uL) of Bacillus globigii Using eTags

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy, L E; Nasarabadi, S L

    2005-08-04

    In the post 9/11 world the threat of bioterrorism attacks in public venues has ignited a demand to develop a cost effective autonomous pathogen detection system capable of detecting the multitude of biological agents that can pose a threat to public safety. The major cost of such a pathogen detection system is the large volume of reagents it must expend. With the goal of reducing the reagent consumption, and therefore cost, of a pathogen detection system, we used the spore-forming bacteria Bacillus globigii (Bg) as a surrogate for the pathogen Bacillus anthracis (anthrax) to determine the lowest amplifiable volume and lowest concentration of amplified sonicated and unsonicated Bg spores that would still be detectable using capillary electrophoresis. We created a serial dilution of unsonicated Bg spores ranging in concentration from 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 1} cfu/mL. From each of these unsonicated spore dilutions we formed three aliquots that were sonicated to disrupt the spores. These sonicated aliquots were analyzed alongside the unsonicated spore samples for each dilution at reaction volumes of 25, 10, and 2 {micro}L. All samples were amplified through a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the presence of small fluorescent molecules known as electrophoretic tags (eTags), which were analyzed with capillary electrophoresis to detect the presence of certain nucleic acid signatures. Using this process, Bg samples with concentrations as low as 10{sup 1} cfu/mL and total reaction volumes of amplification as small as 2 mL were readily detectable. Interestingly, detection was more consistent for Bg samples with initial spore concentrations between 10{sup 6} and 10{sup 3} cfu/mL, with the higher and lower concentrations yielding less compelling results. The volume of the sample also affected the efficacy of detection, with detection for 2 {micro}L samples compromised in relation to 25 and 10 {micro}L samples. Detection of sonicated Bg spores appeared to be just as efficient

  17. Beyond the obvious limits of ore deposits: The use of mineralogical, geochemical, and biological features for the remote detection of mineralization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelley, D.L.; Kelley, K.D.; Coker, W.B.; Caughlin, B.; Doherty, M.E.

    2006-01-01

    Far field features of ore deposits include mineralogical, geochemical, or biological attributes that can be recognized beyond the obvious limits of the deposits. They can be primary, if formed in association with mineralization or alteration processes, or secondary, if formed from the interaction of ore deposits with the hydrosphere and biosphere. This paper examines a variety of far field features of different ore deposit types and considers novel applications to exploration and discovery. Primary far field features include mineral and rock chemistry, isotopic or element halos, fluid pathways and thermal anomalies in host-rock sequences. Examples include the use of apatite chemistry to distinguish intrusive rocks permissive for iron oxide copper gold (IOCG) and porphyry deposits; resistate mineral (e.g., rutile, tourmaline) chemistry in exploration for volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS), orogenic gold, and porphyry deposits; and pyrite chemistry to vector toward sedimentary exhalative (sedex) deposits. Distinctive whole-rock geochemical signatures also can be recognized as a far field feature of porphyry deposits. For example, unique Sr/Y ratios in whole-rock samples, used to distinguish barren versus fertile magmas for Cu mineralization, result from the differentiation of oxidized hydrous melts. Anomalous concentrations of halogen elements (Cl, Br, and I) have been found for distances of up to 200 m away from some mineralized centers. Variations in isotopic composition between ore-bearing and barren intrusions and/or systematic vertical and lateral zonation in sulfur, carbon, or oxygen isotope values have been documented for some deposit types. Owing to the thermal aureole that extends beyond the area of mineralization for some deposits, detection of paleothermal effects through methods such as conodont alteration indices, vitrinite or bitumen reflectance, illite crystallinity, and apatite or zircon thermochronology studies also can be valuable, particularly for

  18. [Cultural detection of thermotolerant Campylobacter spp. in food--potentials and limitations of diagnostic tools in the context of official food control].

    PubMed

    Messelhäusser, Ute; Thärigen, Diana; Fella, Christiane; Schreiner, Hermann; Busch, Ulrich; Höller, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Thermotolerant Campylobacter spp. rank among the most important foodborne pathogens in Germany. Therefore a necessity for rapid and routinely useable detection methods exists also in the area of food microbiology. A reliable, cultura qualitative, but also quantitative detection of thermotolerant Campylobacter spp. pose a challenge, at least concerning special food matrices, especially because in the context of official food control the cultural detection of thermotolerant Campylobacter spp. is needed. This was the reason, why different cultural detection methods, beside the standard procedure of ISO 10272:2006, in combination with molecular and immunological screening methods were tested at the Bavarian Health and Food Safety Authority (LGL) during the last years for the use in routine diagnostic using different food matrices of animal and plant origin. The results of the comparative studies showed clearly that no enrichment broth tested gave completely satisfactory results for an only culture-based detection the combination with a screening method is therefore recommended for a rapid and reliable detection. But in this case the user should take into account that the sensitivity of such molecular and immunological methods is normally so high that in some cases, depending on the food matrix and processing step, the isolation of the pathogen would not be possible in samples, which were positive in the screening methods.

  19. 'No delays achiever'.

    PubMed

    2007-05-01

    The latest version of the NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement's 'no delays achiever', a web based tool created to help NHS organisations achieve the 18-week target for GP referrals to first treatment, is available at www.nodelaysachiever.nhs.uk.

  20. Vicarious Achievement Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leavitt, Harold J.; And Others

    This study tests hypotheses about achievement orientation, particularly vicarious achievement. Undergraduate students (N=437) completed multiple-choice questionnaires, indicating likely responses of one person to the success of another. The sex of succeeder and observer, closeness of relationship, and setting (medical school or graduate school of…

  1. Heritability of Creative Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piffer, Davide; Hur, Yoon-Mi

    2014-01-01

    Although creative achievement is a subject of much attention to lay people, the origin of individual differences in creative accomplishments remain poorly understood. This study examined genetic and environmental influences on creative achievement in an adult sample of 338 twins (mean age = 26.3 years; SD = 6.6 years). Twins completed the Creative…

  2. Confronting the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, David

    2007-01-01

    This article talks about the large achievement gap between children of color and their white peers. The reasons for the achievement gap are varied. First, many urban minorities come from a background of poverty. One of the detrimental effects of growing up in poverty is receiving inadequate nourishment at a time when bodies and brains are rapidly…

  3. Achievement-Based Resourcing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Mike; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This collection of seven articles examines achievement-based resourcing (ABR), the concept that the funding of educational institutions should be linked to their success in promoting student achievement, with a focus on the application of ABR to postsecondary education in the United Kingdom. The articles include: (1) "Introduction" (Mick…

  4. States Address Achievement Gaps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Kathy

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes 2 state initiatives to address the achievement gap: North Carolina's report by the Advisory Commission on Raising Achievement and Closing Gaps, containing an 11-point strategy, and Kentucky's legislation putting in place 10 specific processes. The North Carolina report is available at www.dpi.state.nc.us.closingthegap; Kentucky's…

  5. Metastasis Detection in Sentinel Lymph Nodes: Comparison of a Limited Widely Spaced (NSABP protocol B-32) and a Comprehensive Narrowly Spaced Paraffin Block Sectioning Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Donald L.; Le, U. Phuong; Dupuis, Stacey L.; Weaver, Katherine A. E.; Harlow, Seth P.; Ashikaga, Takamaru; Krag, David N.

    2009-01-01

    The NSABP B-32 trial is examining whether patients with initially negative sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) who have occult metastases detected on deeper levels and cytokeratin immunohistochemistry (CK-IHC) stains are at risk for regional or distant metastases. The experimental B-32 protocol was designed to detect metastases larger than 1.0 mm by examining sections approximately 0.5 and 1.0 mm deeper into the paraffin blocks (2 levels; wide spacing). This pilot quality assurance study compares detection rates to a comprehensive protocol designed to detect metastases larger than 0.2 mm (multilevel; narrow spacing). All SLNs were sectioned grossly at close to 2.0 mm and all sections embedded in paraffin blocks. For clinical treatment, a single H&E section was examined from each block. For 54 cases with 1–5 SLNs and all SLNs negative, additional CK-IHC sections were evaluated every 0.18 mm through the block until no tissue remained. 20 of 176 (11.4%) blocks harbored occult metastases; the B-32 protocol detected metastases in 11 blocks (6.3%) and 9 additional blocks (5.1%) with metastases were detected on sections that would not have been evaluated (p=0.002; correlated proportions). Median number of levels examined per block on the comprehensive protocol was 11 (range 3–26); the B-32 protocol was fixed at 2 levels (median 2; range 1–2). Median thickness of node sections in the block was 2.1 mm (range 0.7–4.8 mm) and the modal thickness was 2.3 mm. Although more comprehensive sectioning of SLNs detects additional micrometastases, the data suggest diminishing returns and reduced cost effectiveness for the comprehensive strategy. PMID:19730364

  6. Razalas' Grouping Method and Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salazar, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to raise the achievement level of students in Integral Calculus using Direct Instruction with Razalas' Method of Grouping. The study employed qualitative and quantitative analysis relative to data generated by the Achievement Test and Math journal with follow-up interview. Within the framework of the limitations of the study, the…

  7. Current limiters

    SciTech Connect

    Loescher, D.H.; Noren, K.

    1996-09-01

    The current that flows between the electrical test equipment and the nuclear explosive must be limited to safe levels during electrical tests conducted on nuclear explosives at the DOE Pantex facility. The safest way to limit the current is to use batteries that can provide only acceptably low current into a short circuit; unfortunately this is not always possible. When it is not possible, current limiters, along with other design features, are used to limit the current. Three types of current limiters, the fuse blower, the resistor limiter, and the MOSFET-pass-transistor limiters, are used extensively in Pantex test equipment. Detailed failure mode and effects analyses were conducted on these limiters. Two other types of limiters were also analyzed. It was found that there is no best type of limiter that should be used in all applications. The fuse blower has advantages when many circuits must be monitored, a low insertion voltage drop is important, and size and weight must be kept low. However, this limiter has many failure modes that can lead to the loss of over current protection. The resistor limiter is simple and inexpensive, but is normally usable only on circuits for which the nominal current is less than a few tens of milliamperes. The MOSFET limiter can be used on high current circuits, but it has a number of single point failure modes that can lead to a loss of protective action. Because bad component placement or poor wire routing can defeat any limiter, placement and routing must be designed carefully and documented thoroughly.

  8. Achievability for telerobotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, Reid L.; Draper, John V.; Hamel, William R.

    2001-02-01

    Methods are needed to improve the capabilities of autonomous robots to perform tasks that are difficult for contemporary robots, and to identify those tasks that robots cannot perform. Additionally, in the realm of remote handling, methods are needed to assess which tasks and/or subtasks are candidates for automation. We are developing a new approach to understanding the capability of autonomous robotic systems. This approach uses formalized methods for determining the achievability of tasks for robots, that is, the likelihood that an autonomous robot or telerobot can successfully complete a particular task. Any autonomous system may be represented in achievability space by the volume describing that system's capabilities within the 3-axis space delineated by perception, cognition, and action. This volume may be thought of as a probability density with achievability decreasing as the distance from the centroid of the volume increases. Similarly, any task may be represented within achievability space. However, as tasks have more finite requirements for perception, cognition, and action, each may be represented as a point (or, more accurately, as a small sphere) within achievability space. Analysis of achievability can serve to identify, a priori, the survivability of robotic systems and the likelihood of mission success; it can be used to plan a mission or portions of a mission; it can be used to modify a mission plan to accommodate unpredicted occurrences; it can also serve to identify needs for modifications to robotic systems or tasks to improve achievability. .

  9. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of 86 volatile organic compounds in water by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, including detections less than reporting limits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Connor, Brooke F.; Rose, Donna L.; Noriega, Mary C.; Murtaugh, Lucinda K.; Abney, Sonja R.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents precision and accuracy data for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the nanogram-per-liter range, including aromatic hydrocarbons, reformulated fuel components, and halogenated hydrocarbons using purge and trap capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. One-hundred-four VOCs were initially tested. Of these, 86 are suitable for determination by this method. Selected data are provided for the 18 VOCs that were not included. This method also allows for the reporting of semiquantitative results for tentatively identified VOCs not included in the list of method compounds. Method detection limits, method performance data, preservation study results, and blank results are presented. The authors describe a procedure for reporting low-concentration detections at less than the reporting limit. The nondetection value (NDV) is introduced as a statistically defined reporting limit designed to limit false positives and false negatives to less than 1 percent. Nondetections of method compounds are reported as ?less than NDV.? Positive detections measured at less than NDV are reported as estimated concentrations to alert the data user to decreased confidence in accurate quantitation. Instructions are provided for analysts to report data at less than the reporting limits. This method can support the use of either method reporting limits that censor detections at lower concentrations or the use of NDVs as reporting limits. The data-reporting strategy for providing analytical results at less than the reporting limit is a result of the increased need to identify the presence or absence of environmental contaminants in water samples at increasingly lower concentrations. Long-term method detection limits (LTMDLs) for 86 selected compounds range from 0.013 to 2.452 micrograms per liter (?g/L) and differ from standard method detection limits (MDLs) in that the LTMDLs include the long-term variance of multiple instruments, multiple operators, and multiple

  10. Culture and Achievement Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maehr, Martin L.

    1974-01-01

    A framework is suggested for the cross-cultural study of motivation that stresses the importance of contextual conditions in eliciting achievement motivation and emphasizes cultural relativity in the definition of the concept. (EH)

  11. Achieving Salary Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevill, Dorothy D.

    1975-01-01

    Three techniques are outlined for use by higher education institutions to achieve salary equity: salary prediction (using various statistical procedures), counterparting (comparing salaries of persons of similar rank), and grievance procedures. (JT)

  12. Can the European ELT detect super-Earths? Measuring the contrast limit of an image slicer spectrograph in a laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnsley, Robert M.; Tecza, Matthias; Thatte, Niranjan A.

    2016-08-01

    One of the highest scientific priorities for the E-ELT is to characterise exoplanets and to image Earth-like planets with the dedicated planetary camera and spectrograph, ELT-PCS. Detailed design and construction of ELT-PCS requires R and D to be undertaken for specific components. In this paper we discuss plans to progress this R and D for the integral field spectrograph technology, with the aim of determining the best contrast achievable with both a lenslet and a slicer based spectrograph. In particular, we present the preliminary design for a new bench spectrograph capable of accepting either of the two competing technologies as its input.

  13. Limits to Stability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottey, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The author reflects briefly on what limited degree of global ecological stability and human cultural stability may be achieved, provided that humanity retains hope and does not give way to despair or hide in denial. These thoughts were triggered by a recent conference on International Stability and Systems Engineering. (Contains 5 notes.)

  14. Utility and limitations of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification technique in the detection of cytogenetic abnormalities in products of conception

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, D; Agarwal, M; Gupta, D; Agrawal, S; Das, V; Phadke, SR

    2016-01-01

    Background and Introduction: Chromosomal abnormality is found in about half of first-trimester abortions. Karyotype is the gold standard to detect chromosomal abnormalities. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) offers advantage over karyotype in terms of lower failure rate, faster turnaround time, and much higher resolution than conventional karyotyping and found to be 98% concordant with conventional karyotype. Aim: We performed this study to look for the utility of MLPA in diagnosing chromosomal abnormalities in first-trimester abortions. Materials and Methods: MLPA using subtelomeric SALSA probe sets (P036 and P070) was used to detect cytogenetic abnormalities in products of conception in missed/spontaneous abortions. Results: A total of ninety abortus samples were analyzed by MLPA. Successful results were provided in (67) 74.4% of the cases while no conclusion could be drawn in 25.6% (23) of the cases. Fifty-five (82.1%) cases were cytogenetically normal and 17.9% (12) had some abnormality. Aneuploidy was detected in 8 (66.7%) cases, 3 (25%) had double-segment imbalance, and one (8.3%) had partial aneuploidy. Conclusion: We suggest that MLPA is a good substitute to traditional karyotype. PMID:27763481

  15. International, collaborative assessment of limitations of chromosome-specific probes (CSP) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH): Analysis of expected detections in 73,000 prenatal cases

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.I.; Henry, G.P.; Miller, W.A.

    1994-09-01

    FISH and CSP have been proposed to reduce karyotyping need. The purpose of this study was to assess the potential efficacy of CSP-FISH using currently available probes (13, 18, 21, X, & Y) in large, prenatal diagnostic centers. Results (1990-1993) from 7 centers in 4 countries were divided by those expected to be detectable by currently available probes, and those which would be missed assuming 10% probe efficacy. 72,994 karyotypes included 699 trisomy 21`s, 352 trisomy 18`s, 136 trisomy 13`s, 358 sex chromosome aneuploidies, 70 triploidies, and 855 others (translocations, inversions, deletions, markers). Of 2,613 abnormalities, 1,745 would be detectable (66.8%). [Detroit 55.7%, Stockholm 68.3%, Boston 52.6%, Denver 61.3%, Muenster 77.0%, London 84.5%, Philadelphia 69.4%]. Centers with high proportions of referrals for ultrasound anomalies had the highest CSP-FISH positives secondary to increased T 18 & 13. We conclude: (1) 73,000 karyotypes show relatively consistent incidences of the common trisomies, sex chromosome abnormalities, and other chromosome abnormalities among the centers. (2) The proportion expected detectable by FISH-CSP technology varies from 52.6% to 84.5%, averaging 66.8%. (3) 1/3 of the karyotypic abnormalities would be missed, and therefore, replacement of complete karyotyping with FISH would have unacceptably high false-negative rates for routine evaluation. (4) FISH-CSP, while useful when positive for anomalies, is not sufficient when negative to obviate the need for a complete karyotype.

  16. SALT and Spelling Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Joan

    A study investigated the effects of suggestopedic accelerative learning and teaching (SALT) on the spelling achievement, attitudes toward school, and memory skills of fourth-grade students. Subjects were 20 male and 28 female students from two self-contained classrooms at Kennedy Elementary School in Rexburg, Idaho. The control classroom and the…

  17. Iowa Women of Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This issue of the Goldfinch highlights some of Iowa's 20th century women of achievement. These women have devoted their lives to working for human rights, education, equality, and individual rights. They come from the worlds of politics, art, music, education, sports, business, entertainment, and social work. They represent Native Americans,…

  18. Schools Achieving Gender Equity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revis, Emma

    This guide is designed to assist teachers presenting the Schools Achieving Gender Equity (SAGE) curriculum for vocational education students, which was developed to align gender equity concepts with the Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA). Included in the guide are lesson plans for classes on the following topics: legal issues of gender equity,…

  19. Achieving Peace through Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    While it is generally agreed that peace is desirable, there are barriers to achieving a peaceful world. These barriers are classified into three major areas: (1) an erroneous view of human nature; (2) injustice; and (3) fear of world unity. In a discussion of these barriers, it is noted that although the consciousness and conscience of the world…

  20. Explorations in achievement motivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, Robert L.

    1982-01-01

    Recent research on the nature of achievement motivation is reviewed. A three-factor model of intrinsic motives is presented and related to various criteria of performance, job satisfaction and leisure activities. The relationships between intrinsic and extrinsic motives are discussed. Needed areas for future research are described.

  1. Increasing Male Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Barbara Talbert

    2008-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind legislation has brought greater attention to the academic performance of American youth. Its emphasis on student achievement requires a closer analysis of assessment data by school districts. To address the findings, educators must seek strategies to remedy failing results. In a mid-Atlantic district of the Unites States,…

  2. Appraising Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    To determine quality sequence in pupil progress, evaluation approaches need to be used which guide the teacher to assist learners to attain optimally. Teachers must use a variety of procedures to appraise student achievement in reading, because no one approach is adequate. Appraisal approaches might include: (1) observation and subsequent…

  3. Cognitive Processes and Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Dennis; Randhawa, Bikkar S.

    For a group of 165 fourth- and fifth-grade students, four achievement test scores were correlated with success on nine tests designed to measure three cognitive functions: sustained attention, successive processing, and simultaneous processing. This experiment was designed in accordance with Luria's model of the three functional units of the…

  4. Graders' Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, John B.; Ellis, Arthur K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this experimental study was to investigate the effects of metacognitive reflective assessment instruction on student achievement in mathematics. The study compared the performance of 141 students who practiced reflective assessment strategies with students who did not. A posttest-only control group design was employed, and results…

  5. Achieving All Our Ambitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Tricia

    2009-01-01

    National learning and skills policy aims both to build economic prosperity and to achieve social justice. Participation in higher education (HE) has the potential to contribute substantially to both aims. That is why the Campaign for Learning has supported the ambition to increase the proportion of the working-age population with a Level 4…

  6. Improving Educational Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York University Education Quarterly, 1979

    1979-01-01

    This is a slightly abridged version of the report of the National Academy of Education panel, convened at the request of HEW Secretary Joseph Califano and Assistant Secretary for Education Mary F. Berry, to study recent declines in student achievement and methods of educational improvement. (SJL)

  7. The Achievement Club

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Ibram

    2009-01-01

    When Gabrielle Carpenter became a guidance counselor in Northern Virginia nine years ago, she focused on the academic achievement gap and furiously tried to close it. At first, she was compelled by tremendous professional interest. However, after seeing her son lose his zeal for school, Carpenter joined forces with other parents to form an…

  8. Achievement in Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friebele, David

    2010-01-01

    This Action Research Project is meant to investigate the effects of incorporating research-based instructional strategies into instruction and their subsequent effect on student achievement in the area of problem-solving. The two specific strategies utilized are the integration of manipulatives and increased social interaction on a regular basis.…

  9. Essays on Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ampaabeng, Samuel Kofi

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the determinants of student outcomes--achievement, attainment, occupational choices and earnings--in three different contexts. The first two chapters focus on Ghana while the final chapter focuses on the US state of Massachusetts. In the first chapter, I exploit the incidence of famine and malnutrition that resulted to…

  10. Advancing Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walberg, Herbert J.

    2010-01-01

    For the last half century, higher spending and many modern reforms have failed to raise the achievement of students in the United States to the levels of other economically advanced countries. A possible explanation, says Herbert Walberg, is that much current education theory is ill informed about scientific psychology, often drawing on fads and…

  11. NCLB: Achievement Robin Hood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    2008-01-01

    In his "Wall Street Journal" op-ed on the 25th of anniversary of "A Nation At Risk", former assistant secretary of education Chester E. Finn Jr. applauded the report for turning U.S. education away from equality and toward achievement. It was not surprising, then, that in mid-2008, Finn arranged a conference to examine the…

  12. Interferometric Astrometry of Proxima Centauri and Barnard's Star Using HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE Fine Guidance Sensor 3: Detection Limits for Substellar Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedict, G. Fritz; McArthur, Barbara; Chappell, D. W.; Nelan, E.; Jefferys, W. H.; van Altena, W.; Lee, J.; Cornell, D.; Shelus, P. J.; Hemenway, P. D.; Franz, Otto G.; Wasserman, L. H.; Duncombe, R. L.; Story, D.; Whipple, A. L.; Fredrick, L. W.

    1999-08-01

    We report on a substellar-companion search utilizing interferometric fringe-tracking astrometry acquired with Fine Guidance Sensor 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope. Our targets were Proxima Centauri and Barnard's star. We obtain absolute parallax values of pi_abs=0.7687"+/-0.0003" for Proxima Cen and pi_abs=0.5454"+/-0.0003" for Barnard's star. Once low-amplitude instrumental systematic errors are identified and removed, our companion detection sensitivity is less than or equal to one Jupiter mass for periods longer than 60 days for Proxima Cen. Between the astrometry and the recent radial velocity results of Kürster et al., we exclude all companions with M>0.8M_Jup for the range of periods 1 daydetection sensitivity is less than or equal to one Jupiter mass for periods longer than 150 days. Our null results for Barnard's star are consistent with those reported by Gatewood in 1995.

  13. Development of an iterative reconstruction method to overcome 2D detector low resolution limitations in MLC leaf position error detection for 3D dose verification in IMRT.

    PubMed

    Visser, R; Godart, J; Wauben, D J L; Langendijk, J A; Van't Veld, A A; Korevaar, E W

    2016-05-21

    The objective of this study was to introduce a new iterative method to reconstruct multi leaf collimator (MLC) positions based on low resolution ionization detector array measurements and to evaluate its error detection performance. The iterative reconstruction method consists of a fluence model, a detector model and an optimizer. Expected detector response was calculated using a radiotherapy treatment plan in combination with the fluence model and detector model. MLC leaf positions were reconstructed by minimizing differences between expected and measured detector response. The iterative reconstruction method was evaluated for an Elekta SLi with 10.0 mm MLC leafs in combination with the COMPASS system and the MatriXX Evolution (IBA Dosimetry) detector with a spacing of 7.62 mm. The detector was positioned in such a way that each leaf pair of the MLC was aligned with one row of ionization chambers. Known leaf displacements were introduced in various field geometries ranging from  -10.0 mm to 10.0 mm. Error detection performance was tested for MLC leaf position dependency relative to the detector position, gantry angle dependency, monitor unit dependency, and for ten clinical intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment beams. For one clinical head and neck IMRT treatment beam, influence of the iterative reconstruction method on existing 3D dose reconstruction artifacts was evaluated. The described iterative reconstruction method was capable of individual MLC leaf position reconstruction with millimeter accuracy, independent of the relative detector position within the range of clinically applied MU's for IMRT. Dose reconstruction artifacts in a clinical IMRT treatment beam were considerably reduced as compared to the current dose verification procedure. The iterative reconstruction method allows high accuracy 3D dose verification by including actual MLC leaf positions reconstructed from low resolution 2D measurements.

  14. Development of an iterative reconstruction method to overcome 2D detector low resolution limitations in MLC leaf position error detection for 3D dose verification in IMRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, R.; Godart, J.; Wauben, D. J. L.; Langendijk, J. A.; van't Veld, A. A.; Korevaar, E. W.

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to introduce a new iterative method to reconstruct multi leaf collimator (MLC) positions based on low resolution ionization detector array measurements and to evaluate its error detection performance. The iterative reconstruction method consists of a fluence model, a detector model and an optimizer. Expected detector response was calculated using a radiotherapy treatment plan in combination with the fluence model and detector model. MLC leaf positions were reconstructed by minimizing differences between expected and measured detector response. The iterative reconstruction method was evaluated for an Elekta SLi with 10.0 mm MLC leafs in combination with the COMPASS system and the MatriXX Evolution (IBA Dosimetry) detector with a spacing of 7.62 mm. The detector was positioned in such a way that each leaf pair of the MLC was aligned with one row of ionization chambers. Known leaf displacements were introduced in various field geometries ranging from  -10.0 mm to 10.0 mm. Error detection performance was tested for MLC leaf position dependency relative to the detector position, gantry angle dependency, monitor unit dependency, and for ten clinical intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment beams. For one clinical head and neck IMRT treatment beam, influence of the iterative reconstruction method on existing 3D dose reconstruction artifacts was evaluated. The described iterative reconstruction method was capable of individual MLC leaf position reconstruction with millimeter accuracy, independent of the relative detector position within the range of clinically applied MU’s for IMRT. Dose reconstruction artifacts in a clinical IMRT treatment beam were considerably reduced as compared to the current dose verification procedure. The iterative reconstruction method allows high accuracy 3D dose verification by including actual MLC leaf positions reconstructed from low resolution 2D measurements.

  15. Faculty achievement tracking tool.

    PubMed

    Pettus, Sarah; Reifschneider, Ellen; Burruss, Nancy

    2009-03-01

    Faculty development and scholarship is an expectation of nurse educators. Accrediting institutions, such as the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission, and the Higher Learning Commission, all have criteria regarding faculty achievement. A faculty achievement tracking tool (FATT) was developed to facilitate documentation of accreditation criteria attainment. Based on criteria from accrediting organizations, the roles that are addressed include scholarship, service, and practice. Definitions and benchmarks for the faculty as an aggregate are included. Undergoing reviews from different accrediting organizations, the FATT has been used once for accreditation of the undergraduate program and once for accreditation of the graduate program. The FATT is easy to use and has become an excellent adjunct for the preparation for accreditation reports. In addition, the FATT may be used for yearly evaluations, advancement, and merit.

  16. Project ACHIEVE final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-13

    Project ACHIEVE was a math/science academic enhancement program aimed at first year high school Hispanic American students. Four high schools -- two in El Paso, Texas and two in Bakersfield, California -- participated in this Department of Energy-funded program during the spring and summer of 1996. Over 50 students, many of whom felt they were facing a nightmare future, were given the opportunity to work closely with personal computers and software, sophisticated calculators, and computer-based laboratories -- an experience which their regular academic curriculum did not provide. Math and science projects, exercises, and experiments were completed that emphasized independent and creative applications of scientific and mathematical theories to real world problems. The most important outcome was the exposure Project ACHIEVE provided to students concerning the college and technical-field career possibilities available to them.

  17. On Limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzmann, Gerard J.

    2008-01-01

    In the last 3 decades or so, the size of systems we have been able to verify formally with automated tools has increased dramatically. At each point in this development, we encountered a different set of limits -- many of which we were eventually able to overcome. Today, we may have reached some limits that may be much harder to conquer. The problem I will discuss is the following: given a hypothetical machine with infinite memory that is seamlessly shared among infinitely many CPUs (or CPU cores), what is the largest problem size that we could solve?

  18. What is the limiting factor for organ procurement in Belgium: donation or detection ? What can be done to improve organ procurement rates?

    PubMed

    Van Gelder, E; de Roey, J; Desschans, B; Van Hees, D; Aerts, R; Monbaliu, D; De Pauw, L; Coosemans, W; Pirenne, J

    2008-01-01

    In trying to overcome the growing gap between demand and offer of organs for transplantation, solutions are usually searched for by comparing successful and unsuccessful models in different countries. In particular, one element in the more successful countries such as for instance presumed consent, or one element in the less successful countries such as for instance refusal by relatives, are seen as possible reasons for these differences. This article tackles the problem of organ donor shortage through a new multi-level approach. Organ donation can indeed be analyzed on three different levels: the macro-level, the meso-level and the micro-level. The macro-level refers to the governmental structure where legislation, policies and funding are three essential elements necessary to make donation possible. The meso-level refers to the health care organization and the professionals who surround the process of organ donation and transplantation. Facilitating this process through standardized protocols and improving detection of organ donors are the two major elements. The micro-level refers to the individual believes and personal attitudes towards organ donation. This new multi-level approach gives a thorough and complete analysis of problems and allows to propose potential solutions to try to overcome the chronic organ shortage.

  19. Achievement Network's Investing in Innovation Expansion: Impacts on Educator Practice and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Martin R.; Morton, Beth A.; Herlihy, Corinne M.

    2016-01-01

    Data-based instructional programs have proliferated in American schools despite limited evidence of their effectiveness in improving educator practice and raising student achievement. We report results from a two-year school-randomized evaluation of the Achievement Network (ANet), a program providing schools with standards-aligned interim…

  20. Information-limiting correlations

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Bote, Rubén; Beck, Jeffrey; Kanitscheider, Ingmar; Pitkow, Xaq; Latham, Peter; Pouget, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Computational strategies used by the brain strongly depend on the amount of information that can be stored in population activity, which in turn strongly depends on the pattern of noise correlations. In vivo, noise correlations tend to be positive and proportional to the similarity in tuning properties. Such correlations are thought to limit information, which has led to the suggestion that decorrelation increases information. In contrast, we found, analytically and numerically, that decorrelation does not imply an increase in information. Instead, the only information-limiting correlations are what we refer to as differential correlations: correlations proportional to the product of the derivatives of the tuning curves. Unfortunately, differential correlations are likely to be very small and buried under correlations that do not limit information, making them particularly difficult to detect. We found, however, that the effect of differential correlations on information can be detected with relatively simple decoders. PMID:25195105