Science.gov

Sample records for achieved pain relief

  1. Approaching cancer pain relief.

    PubMed

    Lickiss, J N

    2001-01-01

    Pain is defined as an unpleasant experience-it is subjective and achieving pain relief is achieving a change in the patient's experience. There needs to be an adequate concept of a human person (an ecological model will be discussed) and a logical process for approaching pain relief in an individual patient (e.g. the plan used in the Sydney Institute of Palliative Medicine). Communication with the patient is critical to get a grasp of him or her as a person, their environment, personal experience and cultural background. Then encourage him or her to tell the story of the cancer saga as they perceive it, listening carefully for the matters which may have given rise to acute distress (for example, delay in diagnosis) and how they adjusted to this. The individual is conveying a great deal about him or herself as they tell their story. Next the story of the treatment and their experience of it, and then the response of their tumour to it--then the story of their pain: when it began, its characteristics, how it evolved, what factors worsen the pain, what relieves it, etc. This is followed by careful clinical examination to clarify what could be the most likely mechanism(s) responsible for the noxious stimulus. Some investigation (e.g. X-ray) may be justified to assist clarification--but not before making a clinical diagnosis (best guess) and commencing treatment with drugs or other logical measures with some local action--depending on the most probable mechanism. Paracetamol/non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) etc may be logical. Threshold factors should be attended to--comfort, concern always, or anxiolytic or antidepressant drugs if the patient is pathologically anxious or depressed. The opioid drugs--with morphine still as the gold standard--should be appropriately used. This involves careful calibration of dose (below sedative level) normally with an immediate-release, preparation--and, in the case of morphine, specific counselling concerning 'myths' to

  2. Cyclic endomorphin analogs in targeting opioid receptors to achieve pain relief.

    PubMed

    Janecka, Anna; Gentilucci, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Endomorphins, the endogenous ligands of the µ-opioid receptor, are attractive candidates for opioid-based pain-relieving agents. These tetrapeptides, with their remarkable affinity for the µ-opioid receptor, display favorable antinociceptive activity when injected directly into the brain of experimental animals. However, the application of endomorphins as clinical analgesics has been impeded by their instability in body fluids and inability to reach the brain after systemic administration. Among numerous modifications of the endomorphin structure aimed at improving their pharmacological properties, cyclization can be viewed as an interesting option. Here, we have summarized recent advances in obtaining endomorphin-based cyclic peptide analogs.

  3. Team Approach to Pain Relief

    MedlinePlus

    ... barely functional. A consultation with the Pain and Palliative Care Service produced a medication plan that eased her pain without interfering with her quality of life, and acupuncture brought relief from severe shoulder pain. "I'm functional again. That's the ...

  4. Alternative medicine - pain relief

    MedlinePlus

    ... relieve pain due to: Cancer Carpal tunnel syndrome Fibromyalgia Childbirth (labor) Musculoskeletal injuries (such as the neck, ... pain for: After surgery or labor Arthritis Cancer Fibromyalgia Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine headache Tension headache Both ...

  5. Non-Drug Pain Relief: Imagery

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain. Imagery does not replace pain medicine. It works with your pain medicine to help you have better pain relief. How Imagery Helps Imagery is used to help reduce stress that can cause muscle tension. It can help ...

  6. OXYCODONE COMBINATIONS FOR PAIN RELIEF

    PubMed Central

    Raffa, R.B.; Pergolizzi, J.V.; Segarnick, D.J.; Tallarida, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY No single analgesic drug provides the perfect therapeutic/adverse effect profile for every pain condition. In addition to convenience and possibly improved compliance, a combination of analgesic drugs offers the potential, requiring verification, of providing greater pain relief and/or reduced adverse effects than the constituent drugs when used individually. We review here analgesic combinations containing oxycodone. We found surprisingly little preclinical information about the analgesic or adverse effect profiles of the combinations (with acetaminophen, paracetamol, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, morphine, gabapentin or pregabalin). Clinical experience and studies suggest that the combinations are safe and effective and may offer certain advantages. As with all combinations, the profile of adverse effects must also be determined in order to provide the clinician with the overall benefit/risk assessment. PMID:20571607

  7. Brain Circuits Encoding Reward from Pain Relief

    PubMed Central

    Navratilova, Edita; Atcherley, Christopher; Porreca, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Relief from pain in humans is rewarding and pleasurable. Primary rewards, or reward predictive cues, are encoded in brain reward/motivational circuits. While considerable advances have been made in our understanding of reward circuits underlying positive reinforcement, less is known about the circuits underlying the hedonic and reinforcing actions of pain relief. We review findings from electrophysiological, neuroimaging and behavioral studies supporting the concept that the rewarding effect of pain relief requires opioid signaling in the anterior cingulate cortex, activation of midbrain dopamine neurons and release of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens. Understanding of circuits that govern the reward of pain relief may allow the discovery of more effective and satisfying therapies for patients with acute and chronic pain. PMID:26603560

  8. Pain relief is a human right.

    PubMed

    Daher, Michel

    2010-01-01

    For centuries, medical and surgical treatment has emphasized saving the life of the patient rather than ameliorating the patient's pain, particularly when there were few options for the latter. Today at the dawn of the 21st century, the best available evidence indicates a major gap between an increasingly understanding of the pathophysiology of pain and widespread inadequacy of its treatment. Epidemiologic evidence has proven that chronic pain is a widespread public health issue. Studies of cancer patients' pain control consistently reveal that up to half of patients receive inadequate analgesia and 30% do not receive appropriate drugs for their pain. Equally, for patients suffering HIV/AIDS, 60%-100% will experience pain at some stage in their illness. In the developed world, this gap has prompted a series of declarations and actions by national and international bodies advocating better pain control. One response to the worldwide undertreatment of pain has been to promote the concept that pain relief is a public health issue of such critical importance as to constitute an international imperative and fundamental human right. The importance of pain relief as the core of the medical ethic is clear. Pain clinicians promote the status of pain management beyond that of appropriate clinical practice or even an ethic of good medicine. They advocate a paradigm shift in the medical professions' perspective on pain management, from simply good practice to an imperative founded on patient rights. There is a need to promote policies which create conditions where human beings can bear even incurable illnesses and death in a dignified manner. This must help health professionals or lay groups to initiate a powerful agenda to reform local statutes. The essential components of such legislation are: 1. Reasonable pain management is a right. 2. Doctors have a duty to listen to and reasonably respond to a patient's report of pain. 3. Provision of necessary pain relief is immune from

  9. Reward and motivation in pain and pain relief

    PubMed Central

    Navratilova, Edita; Porreca, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Pain is fundamentally unpleasant, a feature that protects the organism by promoting motivation and learning. Relief of aversive states, including pain, is rewarding. The aversiveness of pain, as well as the reward from relief of pain, is encoded by brain reward/motivational mesocorticolimbic circuitry. In this Review, we describe current knowledge of the impact of acute and chronic pain on reward/motivation circuits gained from preclinical models and from human neuroimaging. We highlight emerging clinical evidence suggesting that anatomical and functional changes in these circuits contribute to the transition from acute to chronic pain. We propose that assessing activity in these conserved circuits can offer new outcome measures for preclinical evaluation of analgesic efficacy to improve translation and speed drug discovery. We further suggest that targeting reward/motivation circuits may provide a path for normalizing the consequences of chronic pain to the brain, surpassing symptomatic management to promote recovery from chronic pain. PMID:25254980

  10. Reward and motivation in pain and pain relief.

    PubMed

    Navratilova, Edita; Porreca, Frank

    2014-10-01

    Pain is fundamentally unpleasant, a feature that protects the organism by promoting motivation and learning. Relief of aversive states, including pain, is rewarding. The aversiveness of pain, as well as the reward from relief of pain, is encoded by brain reward/motivational mesocorticolimbic circuitry. In this Review, we describe current knowledge of the impact of acute and chronic pain on reward/motivation circuits gained from preclinical models and from human neuroimaging. We highlight emerging clinical evidence suggesting that anatomical and functional changes in these circuits contribute to the transition from acute to chronic pain. We propose that assessing activity in these conserved circuits can offer new outcome measures for preclinical evaluation of analgesic efficacy to improve translation and speed drug discovery. We further suggest that targeting reward/motivation circuits may provide a path for normalizing the consequences of chronic pain to the brain, surpassing symptomatic management to promote recovery from chronic pain.

  11. [Can breastfeeding promote acute pain relief in newborns?].

    PubMed

    Leite, Adriana Moraes; Castral, Thaila Correa; Scochi, Carmen Gracinda Silvan

    2006-01-01

    This review study aimed to identify the efficacy of breastfeeding and its component aspects (contact, sucking, odor and milk) as nonpharmacological measures for pain relief in newborns. 14 articles from Medline/PubMed were analyzed. We observed methodological differences related to sampling, painful procedures, periods, treatment administration and variables measured. Breastfeeding and its component aspects were perceived as efficient to relieve acute pain. We observed the need for studies to evaluate the analgesic effect of breastfeeding before the painful procedure until recovery. This period is sufficient to achieve the analgesic effect after milk absorption. The interaction between all breastfeeding components must be considered.

  12. 7 CFR 3201.59 - Topical pain relief products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Topical pain relief products. 3201.59 Section 3201.59... Designated Items § 3201.59 Topical pain relief products. (a) Definition. Products that can be balms, creams and other topical treatments used for the relief of muscle, joint, headache, and nerve pain, as...

  13. 7 CFR 2902.59 - Topical pain relief products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Topical pain relief products. 2902.59 Section 2902.59... Items § 2902.59 Topical pain relief products. (a) Definition. Products that can be balms, creams and other topical treatments used for the relief of muscle, joint, headache, and nerve pain, as well...

  14. 7 CFR 3201.59 - Topical pain relief products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Topical pain relief products. 3201.59 Section 3201.59... Designated Items § 3201.59 Topical pain relief products. (a) Definition. Products that can be balms, creams and other topical treatments used for the relief of muscle, joint, headache, and nerve pain, as...

  15. 7 CFR 3201.59 - Topical pain relief products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Topical pain relief products. 3201.59 Section 3201.59... Designated Items § 3201.59 Topical pain relief products. (a) Definition. Products that can be balms, creams and other topical treatments used for the relief of muscle, joint, headache, and nerve pain, as...

  16. Enhancing Post-Traumatic Pain Relief with Alternative Perineural Drugs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-2-0099 TITLE: Enhancing Post-Traumatic Pain Relief...DATES COVERED 1 Sep 2010-31 Aug 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Enhancing Post-Traumatic Pain Relief with Alternative Perineural Drugs 5a. CONTRACT...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The primary objective of this proposal was to identify perineural drug combinations that enhance pain relief by

  17. Doubling Your Payoff: Winning Pain Relief Engages Endogenous Pain Inhibition1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Wiebke; Kwan, Saskia; Ahmed, Alysha-Karima; Schweinhardt, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Abstract When in pain, pain relief is much sought after, particularly for individuals with chronic pain. In analogy to augmentation of the hedonic experience (“liking”) of a reward by the motivation to obtain a reward (“wanting”), the seeking of pain relief in a motivated state might increase the experience of pain relief when obtained. We tested this hypothesis in a psychophysical experiment in healthy human subjects, by assessing potential pain-inhibitory effects of pain relief “won” in a wheel of fortune game compared with pain relief without winning, exploiting the fact that the mere chance of winning induces a motivated state. The results show pain-inhibitory effects of pain relief obtained by winning in behaviorally assessed pain perception and ratings of pain intensity. Further, the higher participants scored on the personality trait novelty seeking, the more pain inhibition was induced. These results provide evidence that pain relief, when obtained in a motivated state, engages endogenous pain-inhibitory systems beyond the pain reduction that underlies the relief in the first place. Consequently, such pain relief might be used to improve behavioral pain therapy, inducing a positive, perhaps self-amplifying feedback loop of reduced pain and improved functionality. PMID:26464995

  18. Overcoming barriers to pain relief in the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Cheryl; Aarons, Derrick

    2009-12-01

    This paper examines pain and pain relief in the Caribbean, where pain is widely perceived as an unavoidable part of life, and where unnecessary suffering results from untreated and under treated pain. Barriers to pain relief in the Caribbean include patient and family attitudes, inadequate knowledge among health professionals and unduly restrictive regulations on the medical use of opioids. Similar barriers exist all over the world. This paper urges medical, nursing and public health professionals, and educators to examine attitudes towards pain and pain relief and to work towards making effective pain relief and palliation more accessible. It recommends that i) health professionals and officials be better educated about pain, palliation and opioids, ii) regulatory restrictions be updated in light of clinical and scientific evidence, iii) opioid procurement policies be adjusted to facilitate increased medical use, iv) medical charts and records be modified to routinely elicit and document patients levels of pain, and v) educational campaigns be developed to inform the public that moderate and severe pain can be safely relieved at the end of life and other stages of life. The professional, respectful, and beneficent response to patients in pain is to provide rapid and aggressive pain relief or to urgently consult a pain or palliative specialist. When a health system hinders such efforts the ethical response is to identify, facilitate and advocate for overcoming barriers to improvement.

  19. Targeting the cannabinoid system for pain relief?

    PubMed

    Chiou, Lih-Chu; Hu, Sherry Shu-Jung; Ho, Yu-Cheng

    2013-12-01

    Marijuana has been used to relieve pain for centuries, but its analgesic mechanism has only been understood during the past two decades. It is mainly mediated by its constituents, cannabinoids, through activating central cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptors, as well as peripheral CB1 and CB2 receptors. CB2-selective agonists have the benefit of lacking CB1 receptor-mediated CNS side effects. Anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) are two intensively studied endogenous lipid ligands of cannabinoid receptors, termed endocannabinoids, which are synthesized on demand and rapidly degraded. Thus, inhibitors of their degradation enzymes, fatty acid amide hydrolase and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), respectively, may be superior to direct cannabinoid receptor ligands as a promising strategy for pain relief. In addition to the antinociceptive properties of exogenous cannabinoids and endocannabinoids, involving their biosynthesis and degradation processes, we also review recent studies that revealed a novel analgesic mechanism, involving 2-AG in the periaqueductal gray (PAG), a midbrain region for initiating descending pain inhibition. It is initiated by Gq-protein-coupled receptor (GqPCR) activation of the phospholipase C (PLC)-diacylglycerol lipase (DAGL) enzymatic cascade, generating 2-AG that produces inhibition of GABAergic transmission (disinhibition) in the PAG, thereby leading to analgesia. This GqPCR-PLC-DAGL-2-AG retrograde disinhibition mechanism in the PAG can be initiated by activating type 5 metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR5), muscarinic acetylcholine (M1/M3), and orexin (OX1) receptors. mGluR5-mediated disinhibition can be initiated by glutamate transporter inhibitors, or indirectly by substance P, neurotensin, cholecystokinin, capsaicin, and AM404, the bioactive metabolite of acetaminophen in the brain. The putative role of 2-AG generated after activating the above neurotransmitter receptors in stress-induced analgesia is also discussed.

  20. The origin and relief of common pain.

    PubMed

    Irvin, R E

    1998-01-01

    kinds of motion: translation, rotation and oscillation. An example of postural boundaries that are rigid with respect to compression and tensile character are the bones that bear weight. In contrast, ligaments provide a tractive rigidity and musculotendons a relatively elastic boundary. Joint surfaces are considered boundaries that are rigid but not perfectly so. Of fundamental importance are those joints that arc lowermost in a column of the musculoskeletal system namely: (1) the feet and ankles that support the entirety of the musculoskeletal system and; (2) the base of the sacrum that supports the vertebral spine. This broadened definition of posture leads to a greatly enhanced manipulability of posture in the upright stance and alleviation of more than two-thirds of common pain by the coherent combination of (1) manual manipulation to reduce somatic dysfunction; (2) foot orthotics to optimize the amplitude of the arches of the feet and vertically align the ankle; (3) a heel lift to level the sacral base; (4) and a group of therapeutic postures configured to minimize restriction of peripheral soft tissue reflective of the earlier posture, all aimed to optimize posture. Mediated by the postural control system, manipulation of postural boundaries accordingly modifies the structure and function of the entire musculoskeletal system. Typically, this relief is maintained by foot orthotic and heel lift alone without maintenance by manual manipulation, medication, or exercise.

  1. Combined approaches for the relief of spinal cord injury-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Gwak, Young S; Kim, Hee Young; Lee, Bong Hyo; Yang, Chae Ha

    2016-04-01

    The adequate treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI)-induced neuropathic pain still remains an unresolved problem. The current medications predominantly used in the SCI-induced neuropathic pain therapy are morphine, anticonvulsants, antidepressants, and antiepileptics, which suggests that psychiatric aspects might be important factors in the treatment of neuropathic pain. It is well documented that the modulation of the sensory events is not a unique way for achieving pain relief. In addition, pain patients still express dissatisfaction and complain of unwanted effects of the medications, suggesting that alternative approaches for the treatment of neuropathic pain are essential. In psychiatry, pain relief represents relaxation and a feeling of comfort and satisfaction, which suggests that cognitive and emotional motivations are important factors in the treatment of neuropathic pain. The comorbidity of chronic pain and psychiatric disorders, which is well recognized, suggests that the effective therapeutic relief for neuropathic pain induced by SCI can be achieved in conjunction with the management of the sensory and psychiatric aspects of patient. In this review, we address the feasibility of a combined acupuncture and pharmacotherapy treatment for the relief of neuropathic pain behavior following SCI.

  2. Careful: Acetaminophen in Pain Relief Medicines Can Cause Liver Damage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Careful: Acetaminophen in pain relief medicines can cause liver damage Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... word or may have the abbreviation "APAP." Severe liver damage may occur and may lead to death ...

  3. Parents: Acetaminophen in Pain Relief Medicines Can Cause Liver Damage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Parents: Acetaminophen in pain relief medicines can cause liver damage Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... whole word or may have the abbreviation "APAP." Liver damage: Giving your child more acetaminophen than directed ...

  4. Pain relief at the end of life: nurses' experiences regarding end-of-life pain relief in patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Brorson, Hanna; Plymoth, Henrietta; Örmon, Karin; Bolmsjö, Ingrid

    2014-03-01

    Patients with dementia receive suboptimal palliative care, and this patient group is at risk to have pain at the end of life. Because communicative impairments are common in this patient group, nurses play an important caregiver role in identifying, assessing, and relieving patients' pain. This study aimed to describe nurses' experiences regarding end-of-life pain relief in patients with dementia. This descriptive exploratory qualitative study was based on seven semistructured interviews. Burnard's content analysis inspired the data analysis. Two main categories were identified: (1) nurses' experience of difficulties concerning pain relief and (2) nurses' experience of resources concerning pain relief. Nurses experienced difficulties, such as feeling of powerlessness because of difficulties in obtaining adequate prescriptions for analgesics, ethical dilemmas, feeling of inadequacy because analgesia did not have the desired effect, and a feeling of not being able to connect with the patient. Factors, including knowledge about the patient, professional experience, utilization of pain assessment tools, interpersonal relationships, and interprofessional cooperation, served as resources and enabled end-of-life pain relief. The results of this study highlight the complexity of pain relief in patients with dementia at the end of life from a nursing perspective. The inability of patients with dementia to verbally communicate their pain makes them a vulnerable patient group, dependent on their caregivers. Knowing the life story of the patient, professional experience, teamwork based on good communication, and use of a pain assessment tool were reported by the nurses to improve pain relief at the end of life for patients with dementia.

  5. The importance of context: when relative relief renders pain pleasant.

    PubMed

    Leknes, Siri; Berna, Chantal; Lee, Michael C; Snyder, Gregory D; Biele, Guido; Tracey, Irene

    2013-03-01

    Context can influence the experience of any event. For instance, the thought that "it could be worse" can improve feelings towards a present misfortune. In this study we measured hedonic feelings, skin conductance, and brain activation patterns in 16 healthy volunteers who experienced moderate pain in two different contexts. In the "relative relief context," moderate pain represented the best outcome, since the alternative outcome was intense pain. However, in the control context, moderate pain represented the worst outcome and elicited negative hedonic feelings. The context manipulation resulted in a "hedonic flip," such that moderate pain elicited positive hedonics in the relative relief context. Somewhat surprisingly, moderate pain was even rated as pleasant in this context, despite being reported as painful in the control context. This "hedonic flip" was corroborated by physiological and functional neuroimaging data. When moderate pain was perceived as pleasant, skin conductance and activity in insula and dorsal anterior cingulate were significantly attenuated relative to the control moderate stimulus. "Pleasant pain" also increased activity in reward and valuation circuitry, including the medial orbitofrontal and ventromedial prefrontal cortices. Furthermore, the change in outcome hedonics correlated with activity in the periacqueductal grey (PAG) of the descending pain modulatory system (DPMS). The context manipulation also significantly increased functional connectivity between reward circuitry and the PAG, consistent with a functional change of the DPMS due to the altered motivational state. The findings of this study point to a role for brainstem and reward circuitry in a context-induced "hedonic flip" of pain.

  6. Oral sucrose and pain relief for preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Anita; Waltman, Patricia A

    2003-06-01

    The frequency of painful procedures performed on preterm infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) presents a challenge to nurses who are attempting to provide effective pain relief, and to the infants themselves who may suffer adverse consequences in response to repeated painful procedures. One new pain relief intervention under study is the administration of oral sucrose, which may activate endogenous opioid systems within the body. Studies with preterm infants that have examined the use of oral sucrose as an analgesic during heelsticks and venipunctures have shown that sucrose is effective in reducing pain. Sucrose may also be combined with nonnutritive sucking to provide significant pain relief. The use of oral sucrose is now recommended with a wide range of painful procedures in the NICU. Promising results have been observed in studies with both term and preterm infants, but less research has occurred with preterm infants. Additional research is warranted to determine the most effective approaches for the administration of sucrose, to examine the effectiveness of sucrose with additional types of painful procedures, and to examine the effects of long-term repeated use of sucrose.

  7. Opiate Pharmacology and Relief of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Gavril W.

    2014-01-01

    Opioids remain the mainstay of severe pain management in patients with cancer. The hallmark of pain management is individualization of therapy. Although almost all clinically used drugs act through mu opioid receptors, they display subtle but important differences pharmacologically. Furthermore, not all patients respond equally well to all drugs. Evidence suggests that these variable responses among patients have a biologic basis and are likely to involve both biased agonism and the many mu opioid receptor subtypes that have been cloned. PMID:24799496

  8. Pain relief in palliative care: a focus on interventional pain management.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Mandar; Chambers, William A

    2010-05-01

    Pharmacological treatment forms the foundation of the management of pain in patients with advanced cancer. Although the majority of patients in the realm of palliative care can be provided with acceptable pain relief using the three-step WHO cancer pain guidelines, a significant minority still have pain that is not adequately controlled by conventional pharmacological management. Development of pain management strategies using a multidisciplinary input with appropriate and timely use of interventional pain management techniques can provide satisfactory pain relief for these patients, helping to reduce distress in the patient and their relatives during this difficult period. This clinical review aims to discuss the commonly used interventional techniques in pain management in palliative care. As patients with advanced cancer are the major recipients of palliative care services, the main focus of this article remains on pain management in advanced cancer. The use of central neuraxial blockade, autonomic blockade and peripheral nerve blocks are summarized.

  9. Mindfulness meditation-related pain relief: evidence for unique brain mechanisms in the regulation of pain.

    PubMed

    Zeidan, F; Grant, J A; Brown, C A; McHaffie, J G; Coghill, R C

    2012-06-29

    The cognitive modulation of pain is influenced by a number of factors ranging from attention, beliefs, conditioning, expectations, mood, and the regulation of emotional responses to noxious sensory events. Recently, mindfulness meditation has been found attenuate pain through some of these mechanisms including enhanced cognitive and emotional control, as well as altering the contextual evaluation of sensory events. This review discusses the brain mechanisms involved in mindfulness meditation-related pain relief across different meditative techniques, expertise and training levels, experimental procedures, and neuroimaging methodologies. Converging lines of neuroimaging evidence reveal that mindfulness meditation-related pain relief is associated with unique appraisal cognitive processes depending on expertise level and meditation tradition. Moreover, it is postulated that mindfulness meditation-related pain relief may share a common final pathway with other cognitive techniques in the modulation of pain.

  10. Mindfulness meditation-related pain relief: Evidence for unique brain mechanisms in the regulation of pain

    PubMed Central

    Zeidan, F.; Grant, J.A.; Brown, C.A.; McHaffie, J.G.; Coghill, R.C.

    2013-01-01

    The cognitive modulation of pain is influenced by a number of factors ranging from attention, beliefs, conditioning, expectations, mood, and the regulation of emotional responses to noxious sensory events. Recently, mindfulness meditation has been found attenuate pain through some of these mechanisms including enhanced cognitive and emotional control, as well as altering the contextual evaluation of sensory events. This review discusses the brain mechanisms involved in mindfulness meditation-related pain relief across different meditative techniques, expertise and training levels, experimental procedures, and neuroimaging methodologies. Converging lines of neuroimaging evidence reveal that mindfulness meditation-related pain relief is associated with unique appraisal cognitive processes depending on expertise level and meditation tradition. Moreover, it is postulated that mindfulness meditation-related pain relief may share a common final pathway with other cognitive techniques in the modulation of pain. PMID:22487846

  11. Natural anti-inflammatory agents for pain relief

    PubMed Central

    Maroon, Joseph C.; Bost, Jeffrey W.; Maroon, Adara

    2010-01-01

    The use of both over-the-counter and prescription nonsteroidal medications is frequently recommended in a typical neurosurgical practice. But persistent long-term use safety concerns must be considered when prescribing these medications for chronic and degenerative pain conditions. This article is a literature review of the biochemical pathways of inflammatory pain, the potentially serious side effects of nonsteroidal drugs and commonly used and clinically studied natural alternative anti-inflammatory supplements. Although nonsteroidal medications can be effective, herbs and dietary supplements may offer a safer, and often an effective, alternative treatment for pain relief, especially for long-term use. PMID:21206541

  12. Pain relief in childbirth: changing historical and feminist perspectives.

    PubMed

    Skowronski, G A

    2015-07-01

    Pain during human childbirth is ubiquitous and severe. Opium and its derivatives constitute the oldest effective method of pain relief and have been used in childbirth for several thousand years, along with numerous folk medicines and remedies. Interference with childbirth pain has always been criticised by doctors and clergy. The 19th century saw the introduction of three much more effective approaches to childbirth pain; diethyl ether, chloroform and nitrous oxide. Access to pain relief was demanded by the first wave of feminist activists as a woman's right. They popularised the use of 'twilight sleep', a combination of morphine and scopolamine, which fell into disrepute as its adverse effects became known. From the 1960s, as epidural analgesia became more popular, a second wave of feminists took the opposite position, calling for a return to non-medicalised, female-controlled, 'natural' childbirth and, in some cases, valorising the importance of the pain experience as empowering for women. However, from the 1990s, a third wave of feminist thought has begun to emerge, revalidating a woman's right to choose a 'technological', pain-free birth, rather than a 'natural' one, and regarding this as a legitimate feminist position.

  13. Requests for cesarean deliveries: The politics of labor pain and pain relief in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Eileen

    2017-01-01

    Cesarean section rates have risen dramatically in China within the past 25 years, particularly driven by non-medical factors and maternal requests. One major reason women request cesareans is the fear of labor pain, in a country where a minority of women are given any form of pain relief during labor. Drawing upon ethnographic fieldwork and in-depth interviews with 26 postpartum women and 8 providers at a Shanghai district hospital in June and July of 2015, this article elucidates how perceptions of labor pain and the environment of pain relief constructs the cesarean on maternal request. In particular, many women feared labor pain and, in a context without effective pharmacological pain relief or social support during labor, they came to view cesarean sections as a way to negotiate their labor pain. In some cases, women would request cesarean sections during labor as an expression of their pain and a call for a response to their suffering. However, physicians, under recent state policy, deny such requests, particularly as they do not view pain as a reasonable indication for a cesarean birth. This disconnect leads to a mismatch in goals for the experience of birth. To reduce unnecessary C-sections, policy makers should instead address the lack of pain relief during childbirth and develop other means of improving the childbirth experience that may relieve maternal anxiety, such as allowing family members to support the laboring woman and integrating a midwifery model for low-risk births within China's maternal-services system.

  14. Ensuring pain relief for children at the end of life

    PubMed Central

    Grégoire, Marie-Claude; Frager, Gerri

    2006-01-01

    Pain management in the context of pediatric palliative care can be challenging. The present article reviews, through a case-based presentation, the nonpharmacological and pharmacological methods used to ensure adequate pain control in children facing end of life. Details on the impressive range of opioid dosages required and routes of administration are highlighted from published literature and clinical experience. Where available, evidence-based recommendations are provided. Potential side effects of pain medication and barriers to good pain control are discussed. Novel analgesics and innovative delivery methods are presented as future tools enhancing pain relief at the end of life. Some challenges to ethically grounded research in this important context of care are reviewed. PMID:16960633

  15. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief... Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a patient's spinal cord to...

  16. 21 CFR 882.5840 - Implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... pain relief. 882.5840 Section 882.5840 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 882.5840 Implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief is a device that applies electrical...

  17. 21 CFR 882.5840 - Implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... pain relief. 882.5840 Section 882.5840 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 882.5840 Implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief is a device that applies electrical...

  18. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief... Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a patient's spinal cord to...

  19. 21 CFR 882.5890 - Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... pain relief. 882.5890 Section 882.5890 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 882.5890 Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. A transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device used to apply an electrical current...

  20. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief... Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a patient's spinal cord to...

  1. 21 CFR 882.5890 - Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... pain relief. 882.5890 Section 882.5890 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 882.5890 Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. A transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device used to apply an electrical current...

  2. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief... Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a patient's spinal cord to...

  3. 21 CFR 882.5840 - Implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... pain relief. 882.5840 Section 882.5840 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 882.5840 Implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief is a device that applies electrical...

  4. 21 CFR 882.5890 - Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... pain relief. 882.5890 Section 882.5890 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 882.5890 Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. A transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device used to apply an electrical current...

  5. 21 CFR 882.5890 - Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... pain relief. 882.5890 Section 882.5890 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 882.5890 Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. A transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device used to apply an electrical current...

  6. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief... Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a patient's spinal cord to...

  7. 21 CFR 882.5840 - Implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... pain relief. 882.5840 Section 882.5840 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 882.5840 Implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief is a device that applies electrical...

  8. 21 CFR 882.5890 - Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... pain relief. 882.5890 Section 882.5890 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 882.5890 Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. A transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device used to apply an electrical current...

  9. 21 CFR 882.5840 - Implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... pain relief. 882.5840 Section 882.5840 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 882.5840 Implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief is a device that applies electrical...

  10. The importance of context: When relative relief renders pain pleasant

    PubMed Central

    Leknes, Siri; Berna, Chantal; Lee, Michael C.; Snyder, Gregory D.; Biele, Guido; Tracey, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Context can influence the experience of any event. For instance, the thought that “it could be worse” can improve feelings towards a present misfortune. In this study we measured hedonic feelings, skin conductance, and brain activation patterns in 16 healthy volunteers who experienced moderate pain in two different contexts. In the “relative relief context,” moderate pain represented the best outcome, since the alternative outcome was intense pain. However, in the control context, moderate pain represented the worst outcome and elicited negative hedonic feelings. The context manipulation resulted in a “hedonic flip,” such that moderate pain elicited positive hedonics in the relative relief context. Somewhat surprisingly, moderate pain was even rated as pleasant in this context, despite being reported as painful in the control context. This “hedonic flip” was corroborated by physiological and functional neuroimaging data. When moderate pain was perceived as pleasant, skin conductance and activity in insula and dorsal anterior cingulate were significantly attenuated relative to the control moderate stimulus. “Pleasant pain” also increased activity in reward and valuation circuitry, including the medial orbitofrontal and ventromedial prefrontal cortices. Furthermore, the change in outcome hedonics correlated with activity in the periacqueductal grey (PAG) of the descending pain modulatory system (DPMS). The context manipulation also significantly increased functional connectivity between reward circuitry and the PAG, consistent with a functional change of the DPMS due to the altered motivational state. The findings of this study point to a role for brainstem and reward circuitry in a context-induced “hedonic flip” of pain. PMID:23352758

  11. One-year trend in pain and disability relief recall in acute and chronic ambulatory low back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Haas, Mitchell; Nyiendo, Joanne; Aickin, Mikel

    2002-01-01

    Clinicians use patients' recall of pain and disability relief as indicators of therapeutic effectiveness. Recall can change over time, however, and is influenced by factors other than true relief, including current health status. We have determined the trend in the relative contribution of current pain/disability and actual relief (current-baseline score) to relief recall over the course of 1 year. Self-referred patients (n=1182) seeking treatment from primary-care medical doctors and chiropractors in community-based clinics were asked to record present pain and disability, as well as perceived relief at five follow-up time points from 2 weeks to 12 months after initial consultation for acute and chronic low back pain (LBP). Multiple regression analysis was performed at each time point and over the five follow-up time points. We found a clear logarithmic time trend of increasing dependence of pain relief recall on present pain (P<0.0001) and a concomitant pattern of decreasing dependence on actual pain relief (P<0.0001). The patterns are fairly consistent for acute and chronic patients. The principal independent predictor of perceived pain/disability relief appears to be present pain/disability with actual relief playing a smaller role at all time points (P<0.0001) except for disability relief recall at 2 weeks (P=0.103). The findings are robust in LBP sufferers. Complaint characteristics including LBP chronicity, sciatica, LBP history, and comorbidity; psychosocial variables including stress, depression, and well being; sociodemographics; and treating provider type are not important independent predictors of pain and disability relief recall in ambulatory LBP patients. Perceived relief is too weakly related to present pain and disability to be accurate enough for use as a clinical assessment tool for individual patients. Physicians may need to use objective relief data to give the patient a realistic idea of actual improvement.

  12. The Reasons for Using Acupuncture for Pain Relief

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Roghyeh; Heidarnia, Mohamad Ali; Zagheri Tafreshi, Mansoure; Rassouli, Maryam; Soori, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acupuncture has recently received considerable attention around the world due to its cost-effectiveness, few side effects, and well-established analgesic properties. Objectives: The present study aimed to identify the factors that might lead to using acupuncture for pain relief. Patients and Methods: This qualitative study was conducted using conventional content analysis method. The study population included eight patients and six highly experienced acupuncturists, who were able to express their opinion and were willing to take part in the study. The inclusion criteria for patients were being under treatment with acupuncture for pain relief or a history of treatment during the last year and age > 18 years. All highly trained acupuncturists with minimum of one-year active experience were included. The data were collected via semi-structured in-depth interviews. Categories were extracted through inductive analysis and codes and eventually, themes emerged. Data rigor was assured by data collection triangulation, participants’ variety, and external and members’ check. Results: Initially, 1311 primary codes were extracted, then the related codes were divided into 127 subcategories according to their similarities, and after reduction and integration process, 16 categories were developed from subcategories and eventually five themes were determined, including conventional medicine limitation, efficacy of acupuncture, external promoters, internal promoters, and acupuncture inhibitors. Conclusions: The important factors that affect choosing acupuncture for pain relief included conventional medicine limitations, external promoters, internal promoters, acupuncture efficacy, and acupuncture inhibitors. More interest can be drawn to this technique by basic planning to enhance some of the underlying factors and eliminate obstacles to its further applicability. PMID:25593727

  13. 21 CFR 882.5870 - Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain....5870 Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a peripheral...

  14. 21 CFR 882.5870 - Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain....5870 Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a peripheral...

  15. 21 CFR 882.5870 - Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain....5870 Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a peripheral...

  16. 21 CFR 882.5870 - Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain....5870 Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a peripheral...

  17. 21 CFR 882.5870 - Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain....5870 Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a peripheral...

  18. Times to pain relief and pain freedom with rizatriptan 10 mg and other oral triptans

    PubMed Central

    Ng-Mak, D S; Hu, X H; Chen, Y; Ma, L; Solomon, G

    2007-01-01

    Background: In the clinical trial setting, oral rizatriptan 10 mg has greater efficacy than other oral triptans in freedom from migraine headache pain 2 h after dosing. Objective: The study objective is to compare the effectiveness of rizatriptan 10 mg and other oral triptans for acute migraine attack in a naturalistic setting. Methods: A total of 673 patients took rizatriptan 10 mg or their usual-care oral triptans for two migraine attacks in a sequential, cross-over manner and recorded outcomes using a diary and a stopwatch. Mean and median times to pain relief (PR) and pain freedom (PF) for rizatriptan and other oral triptans were compared. The effect of rizatriptan on times to PR and PF, adjusting for potential confounding factors (treatment sequence, treatment order and use of rescue medication), was computed via a Cox proportional hazard model. Results: Significantly, more patients taking rizatriptan achieved both PR and PF within 2 h after dosing than other oral triptans. Times to PR and PF were shorter with rizatriptan than with other oral triptans (median time to PR: 45 vs. 52 min, p < 0.0001; median time to PF: 100 vs. 124 min, p < 0.0001). The adjusted proportional hazard ratios (rizatriptan vs. other oral triptans) for times to PR and PF were 1.32 (95% CI: 1.22–1.44) and 1.27 (95% CI: 1.16–1.39) respectively. Conclusion: The times to PR and PF in a ‘naturalistic’ setting were significantly shorter for patients treating a migraine attack with rizatriptan 10 mg than with other oral triptans. PMID:17537184

  19. Switching off pain at the source: is this the end for opioid pain relief?

    PubMed

    Spencer, Nick J

    2016-01-01

    Opiates, like morphine or codeine, are used to suppress nociceptive pain in humans. While these drugs can provide effective pain relief, they also cause an extensive array of undesirable side effects, including central depression, sedation and addiction. Relatively recently, the sodium channel Nav1.7 was shown to be essential for pain perception in humans. Based on this, we describe a new technical approach that may be useful for the prolonged suppression of nociceptive pain. The technique uses a harmless adeno-associated virus carrying a short hairpin RNA to silence Nav1.7 ion channels only in sensory neurons underlying pain perception. The major advantage is that pain may be suppressed at the source for many months, without the side effects of opiates.

  20. Food-Derived Natural Compounds for Pain Relief in Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Lim, Eun Yeong; Kim, Yun Tai

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain, defined as pain caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory nervous system, is characterized by dysesthesia, hyperalgesia, and allodynia. The number of patients with this type of pain has increased rapidly in recent years. Yet, available neuropathic pain medicines have undesired side effects, such as tolerance and physical dependence, and do not fully alleviate the pain. The mechanisms of neuropathic pain are still not fully understood. Injury causes inflammation and immune responses and changed expression and activity of receptors and ion channels in peripheral nerve terminals. Additionally, neuroinflammation is a known factor in the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain. During neuropathic pain development, the C-C motif chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) acts as an important signaling mediator. Traditional plant treatments have been used throughout the world for treating diseases. We and others have identified food-derived compounds that alleviate neuropathic pain. Here, we review the natural compounds for neuropathic pain relief, their mechanisms of action, and the potential benefits of natural compounds with antagonistic effects on GPCRs, especially those containing CCR2, for neuropathic pain treatment.

  1. Food-Derived Natural Compounds for Pain Relief in Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Eun Yeong

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain, defined as pain caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory nervous system, is characterized by dysesthesia, hyperalgesia, and allodynia. The number of patients with this type of pain has increased rapidly in recent years. Yet, available neuropathic pain medicines have undesired side effects, such as tolerance and physical dependence, and do not fully alleviate the pain. The mechanisms of neuropathic pain are still not fully understood. Injury causes inflammation and immune responses and changed expression and activity of receptors and ion channels in peripheral nerve terminals. Additionally, neuroinflammation is a known factor in the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain. During neuropathic pain development, the C-C motif chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) acts as an important signaling mediator. Traditional plant treatments have been used throughout the world for treating diseases. We and others have identified food-derived compounds that alleviate neuropathic pain. Here, we review the natural compounds for neuropathic pain relief, their mechanisms of action, and the potential benefits of natural compounds with antagonistic effects on GPCRs, especially those containing CCR2, for neuropathic pain treatment. PMID:27891521

  2. Codeine and its alternates for pain and cough relief*

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, Nathan B.; Friebel, Hans; Hahn, Klaus-Jürgen; Halbach, Hans

    1969-01-01

    This chapter concludes the survey of experimental and clinical data on the analgesic and antitussive properties of codeine and its potential therapeutic alternates. From an evaluation of their effectiveness on the one hand and the side-effects, including tolerance, dependence and abuse liability on the other, it would appear that the therapeutic goals of codeine could be achieved by other substances, except perhaps where analgesia, cough relief, and sedation are required simultaneously. The use of these other substances would, however, result in no particular gain and probably no particular loss. PMID:4898386

  3. Postoperative pain relief following hysterectomy: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Raghvendra, K. P.; Thapa, Deepak; Mitra, Sukanya; Ahuja, Vanita; Gombar, Satinder; Huria, Anju

    2016-01-01

    Background: Women experience moderate to severe postoperative pain following total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH). The transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is a new modality for providing postoperative pain relief in these patients. Materials and Methods: The present study was a single center, prospective randomized trial. After the Institutional Ethics Committee approval and informed consent, patients were randomized to either epidural group: Epidural block placement + general anesthesia (GA) or TAP group: Single shot TAP block + GA. Patients in both the groups received standard general anesthetic technique and intravenous tramadol patient-controlled analgesia in the postoperative period. Patients were monitored for tramadol consumption, visual analog scale (VAS) both at rest and on coughing, hemodynamics, and side effects at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, and 24 h postoperatively. Results: The total consumption of tramadol in 24 h was greater in TAP group as compared to epidural group (68.8 [25.5] vs. 5.3 [11.6] mg, P < 0.001). The VAS scores at rest and on coughing were higher in TAP group as compared to the epidural group at 6, 8, 12, and 24 h postoperatively (P < 0.05). None of the patients in either group had any adverse effects. Conclusion: Epidural analgesia provided greater tramadol-sparing effect with superior analgesia postoperatively as compared to TAP block in patients up to 24 h following TAH. PMID:27499592

  4. Effects of perceived and exerted pain control on neural activity during pain relief in experimental heat hyperalgesia: a fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Mohr, C; Leyendecker, S; Petersen, D; Helmchen, C

    2012-04-01

    Perceived control over pain can attenuate pain perception by mechanisms of endogenous pain control and emotional reappraisal irrespective of whether this control is exerted or only perceived. Self-initiated termination of pain elicits different expectations of subsequent pain relief as compared to perceived pain control. It is unknown whether and how this perceived vs. exerted control on pain differs and affects subsequent pain relief. Using fMRI, we studied two factors of pain control on pain relief: the (i) sense of control (perceived control but no execution) and (ii) the execution of control (exerted control). To account for the impact of factual execution of pain control on pain relief we applied bearable short and hardly bearable long contact-heat stimuli which were applied either controllable or not. Using controllability as factor, there was dissociable neural activity during pain relief: following the perceived control condition neural activity was found in the orbitofrontal and mediofrontal cortex and, following the exerted control condition, in the anterolateral and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and posterior parietal cortex. We conclude that (i) pain controllability has an impact on pain relief and (ii) the prefrontal cortex shows dissociable neural activity during pain relief following exerted vs. perceived pain control. This might reflect the higher grade of uncertainty during pain relief following perceived pain control mediated by the orbitofrontal and medial prefrontal cortex and processes of working memory and updating expectations during pain relief following exerted control mediated by the lateral prefrontal cortex.

  5. Effectiveness of Acupressure Treatment for Pain Management and Fatigue Relief in Gulf War Veterans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    electroencephalography, non-invasive, pain management , quality of life III. STUDY PROGRESS The study received continuing renewal approval from Cleveland Clinic IRB with...1 TITLE: Effectiveness of Acupressure Treatment in Pain Management and Fatigue Relief for Gulf War Veterans AWARD #: W81XWH-12-1-0567 REPORT...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Effectiveness of Acupressure Treatment for Pain Management and Fatigue Relief in Gulf War Veterans 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  6. Effectiveness of Acupressure Treatment for Pain Management and Fatigue Relief in Gulf War Veterans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    for Pain Management and Fatigue Relief in Gulf War Veterans PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Vernon Lin...Effectiveness of Acupressure Treatment for Pain Management and Fatigue Relief in Gulf War Veterans 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0567... pain management for GWI disease. We plan to recruit patients who report they have symptoms of GWI through the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), and

  7. Steroid Shots Offer No Long-Term Relief for Low-Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164172.html Steroid Shots Offer No Long-Term Relief for Low- ... back pain affects millions of Americans. Many try steroid injections to ease their discomfort, but researchers now ...

  8. After microvascular decompression to treat trigeminal neuralgia, both immediate pain relief and recurrence rates are higher in patients with arterial compression than with venous compression.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Gu, Xiaoyan; Sun, Guan; Guo, Jun; Lin, Xin; Zhang, Shuguang; Qian, Chunfa

    2017-01-20

    We explored differences in postoperative pain relief achieved through decompression of the trigeminal nerve compressed by arteries and veins. Clinical characteristics, intraoperative findings, and postoperative curative effects were analyzed in 72 patients with trigeminal neuralgia who were treated by microvascular decompression. The patients were divided into arterial and venous compression groups based on intraoperative findings. Surgical curative effects included immediate relief, delayed relief, obvious reduction, and invalid result. Among the 40 patients in the arterial compression group, 32 had immediate pain relief of pain (80.0%), 5 cases had delayed relief (12.5%), and 3 cases had an obvious reduction (7.5%). In the venous compression group, 12 patients had immediate relief of pain (37.5%), 13 cases had delayed relief (40.6%), and 7 cases had an obvious reduction (21.9%). During 2-year follow-up period, 6 patients in the arterial compression group experienced recurrence of trigeminal neuralgia, but there were no recurrences in the venous compression group. Simple artery compression was followed by early relief of trigeminal neuralgia more often than simple venous compression. However, the trigeminal neuralgia recurrence rate was higher in the artery compression group than in the venous compression group.

  9. Rapid Extremity Pain Relief by Battlefield Acupuncture after Orthopedic Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-21

    FINAL REPORT Project Title: Rapid Extremity Pain Relief by Battlefield Acupuncture after Orthopedic Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial...surgeries. These invasive procedures result in swelling and pain . The side effects of the pain medications are well known and a decrease in their use could...relieving acute extremity pain , reducing medication use, decreasing time to full ambulation and improving quality of life than placebo acupuncture or

  10. Feeling worse to feel better: pain-offset relief simultaneously stimulates positive affect and reduces negative affect.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Joseph C; Lee, Kent M; Hanna, Eleanor K; Prinstein, Mitchell J

    2013-04-01

    Although pain itself induces negative affect, the removal (or offset) of pain induces a powerful state of relief. Despite being implicated in a wide range of psychological and behavioral phenomena, relief remains a poorly understood emotion. In particular, some theorists associate relief with increased positive affect, whereas others associate relief with diminished negative affect. In the present study, we examined the affective nature of relief in a pain-offset paradigm with psychophysiological measures that were specific to negative valence (startle eyeblink reactivity) and positive valence (startle postauricular reactivity). Results revealed that pain offset simultaneously stimulates positive affect and diminishes negative affect for at least several seconds. Results also indicated that pain intensity differentially affects the positive and negative valence aspects of relief. These findings clarify the affective nature of relief and provide insight into why people engage in both normal and abnormal behaviors associated with relief.

  11. Intrathecal baclofen for spasticity-related pain in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: efficacy and factors associated with pain relief.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Shearwood; Bethoux, Francois A; Boulis, Nicholas M; Sutliff, Matthew H; Stough, Darlene K; Schwetz, Kathleen M; Gogol, Danuta M; Harrison, Michelle; Pioro, Erik P

    2008-03-01

    Clinical signs and symptoms of spasticity include hypertonia, involuntary movements (spasms, clonus), decreased range of motion, contractures, and often spasm-related pain. When spasticity is refractory to medical management, patients may be referred for intrathecal baclofen (ITB) pump placement. We reviewed a cohort of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients with intractable spasticity requiring ITB to further define the impact of ITB on pain relief in this patient population. From 2003 to 2005, eight patients (mean age 43.8 years; 5 men, 3 women) with ALS received ITB for pain associated with intractable spasticity at our institution. Mean disease duration preoperatively was 47.4 months, mean follow-up was 9.8 months, and pain was evaluated using a 0-10 scoring system. All patients experienced spasticity relief in response to a preoperative bolus test injection of ITB (25-50 microg) via lumbar puncture. Following ITB pump placement, the average reduction of pain was 54% (P = 0.0082). Six patients (75%) experienced pain score reduction, three of whom had complete pain relief. Postoperative pain reduction was predicted by the degree of pain reduction following preoperative ITB test injection. These results support ITB as a treatment modality for pain associated with spasticity in ALS.

  12. Percutaneous Image-Guided Cryoablation of Head & Neck Tumors for Local Control, Preservation of Functional Status, and Pain Relief

    PubMed Central

    Guenette, Jeffrey P.; Tuncali, Kemal; Himes, Nathan; Shyn, Paul B.; Lee, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    We report 9 consecutive percutaneous image-guided cryoablation procedures of head and neck tumors in 7 patients (4 males, 3 females; mean age 68 years, range 50-78). Entire tumor ablation for local control or regional ablation for pain relief or functional status preservation was achieved in 8 of 9 procedures. One patient experienced intraprocedural bradycardia while another developed a neopharyngeal abscess. There were no deaths, permanent neurological or functional deficits, vascular complications, or adverse cosmetic sequelae. PMID:27845860

  13. A rift between implicit and explicit conditioned valence in human pain relief learning

    PubMed Central

    Andreatta, Marta; Mühlberger, Andreas; Yarali, Ayse; Gerber, Bertram; Pauli, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Pain is aversive, but does the cessation of pain (‘relief’) have a reward-like effect? Indeed, fruitflies avoid an odour previously presented before a painful event, but approach an odour previously presented after a painful event. Thus, event-timing may turn punishment to reward. However, is event-timing also crucial in humans who can have explicit cognitions about associations? Here, we show that stimuli associated with pain-relief acquire positive implicit valence but are explicitly rated as aversive. Specifically, the startle response, an evolutionarily conserved defence reflex, is attenuated by stimuli that had previously followed a painful event, indicating implicit positive valence of the conditioned stimulus; nevertheless, participants explicitly evaluate these stimuli as ‘emotionally negative’. These results demonstrate a rift between the implicit and explicit conditioned valence induced by pain relief. They might explain why humans in some cases are attracted by conditioned stimuli despite explicitly judging them as negative. PMID:20356893

  14. Effectiveness of the World Health Organization cancer pain relief guidelines: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Cathy L

    2016-01-01

    Inadequate cancer pain relief has been documented extensively across historical records. In response, in 1986, the World Health Organization (WHO) developed guidelines for cancer pain treatment. The purpose of this paper is to disseminate the results of a comprehensive, integrative review of studies that evaluate the effectiveness of the WHO guidelines. Studies were included if they: 1) identified patients treated with the guidelines, 2) evaluated self-reported pain, 3) identified instruments used, 4) provided data documenting pain relief, and 5) were written in English. Studies were coded for duration of treatment, definition of pain relief, instruments used, findings related to pain intensity or relief, and whether measures were used other than the WHO analgesic ladder. Twenty-five studies published since 1987 met the inclusion criteria. Evidence indicates 20%-100% of patients with cancer pain can be provided pain relief with the use of the WHO guidelines - while considering their status of treatment or end-of-life care. Due to multiple limitations in included studies, analysis was limited to descriptions. Future research to examine the effectiveness of the WHO guidelines needs to consider recommendations to facilitate study comparisons by standardizing outcome measures. Recent studies have reported that patients with cancer experience pain at moderate or greater levels. The WHO guidelines reflect the knowledge and effectual methods to relieve most cancer pain, but the guidelines are not being adequately employed. Part of the explanation for the lack of adoption of the WHO guidelines is that they may be considered outdated by many because they are not specific to the pharmacological and interventional options used in contemporary pain management practices. The conundrum of updating the WHO guidelines is to encompass the latest pharmacological and interventional innovations while maintaining its original simplicity.

  15. Effectiveness of the World Health Organization cancer pain relief guidelines: an integrative review

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Cathy L

    2016-01-01

    Inadequate cancer pain relief has been documented extensively across historical records. In response, in 1986, the World Health Organization (WHO) developed guidelines for cancer pain treatment. The purpose of this paper is to disseminate the results of a comprehensive, integrative review of studies that evaluate the effectiveness of the WHO guidelines. Studies were included if they: 1) identified patients treated with the guidelines, 2) evaluated self-reported pain, 3) identified instruments used, 4) provided data documenting pain relief, and 5) were written in English. Studies were coded for duration of treatment, definition of pain relief, instruments used, findings related to pain intensity or relief, and whether measures were used other than the WHO analgesic ladder. Twenty-five studies published since 1987 met the inclusion criteria. Evidence indicates 20%–100% of patients with cancer pain can be provided pain relief with the use of the WHO guidelines – while considering their status of treatment or end-of-life care. Due to multiple limitations in included studies, analysis was limited to descriptions. Future research to examine the effectiveness of the WHO guidelines needs to consider recommendations to facilitate study comparisons by standardizing outcome measures. Recent studies have reported that patients with cancer experience pain at moderate or greater levels. The WHO guidelines reflect the knowledge and effectual methods to relieve most cancer pain, but the guidelines are not being adequately employed. Part of the explanation for the lack of adoption of the WHO guidelines is that they may be considered outdated by many because they are not specific to the pharmacological and interventional options used in contemporary pain management practices. The conundrum of updating the WHO guidelines is to encompass the latest pharmacological and interventional innovations while maintaining its original simplicity. PMID:27524918

  16. Predictive Nomogram for the Durability of Pain Relief From Gamma Knife Radiation Surgery in the Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, John T.; Nida, Adrian M.; Isom, Scott; Marshall, Kopriva; Bourland, John D.; Laxton, Adrian W.; Tatter, Stephen B.; Chan, Michael D.

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To determine factors associated with the durability of stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS) for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2008, 446 of 777 patients with TN underwent SRS and had evaluable follow-up in our electronic medical records and phone interview records. The median follow-up was 21.2 months. The Barrow Neurologic Institute (BNI) pain scale was used to determine pre- and post-SRS pain. Dose-volume anatomical measurements, Burchiel pain subtype, pain quality, prior procedures, and medication usage were included in this retrospective cohort to identify factors impacting the time to BNI 4-5 pain relapse by using Cox proportional hazard regression. An internet-based nomogram was constructed based on predictive factors of durable relief pre- and posttreatment at 6-month intervals. Results: Rates of freedom from BNI 4-5 failure at 1, 3, and 5 years were 84.5%, 70.4%, and 46.9%, respectively. Pain relief was BNI 1-3 at 1, 3, and 5 years in 86.1%, 74.3%, and 51.3% of type 1 patients; 79.3%, 46.2%, and 29.3% of type 2 patients; and 62.7%, 50.2%, and 25% of atypical facial pain patients. BNI type 1 pain score was achieved at 1, 3, and 5 years in 62.9%, 43.5%, and 22.0% of patients with type 1 pain and in 47.5%, 25.2%, and 9.2% of type 2 patients, respectively. Only 13% of patients with atypical facial pain achieved BNI 1 response; 42% of patients developed post-Gamma Knife radiation surgery (GKRS) trigeminal dysfunction. Multivariate analysis revealed that post-SRS numbness (hazard ratio [HR], 0.47; P<.0001), type 1 (vs type 2) TN (HR, 0.6; P=.02), and improved post-SRS BNI score at 6 months (HR, 0.009; P<.0001) were predictive of a durable pain response. Conclusions: The durability of SRS for TN depends on the presenting Burchiel pain type, the post-SRS BNI score, and the presence of post-SRS facial numbness. The durability of pain relief can be estimated pre- and posttreatment by using our

  17. Pain relief produces negative reinforcement through activation of mesolimbic reward-valuation circuitry.

    PubMed

    Navratilova, Edita; Xie, Jennifer Y; Okun, Alec; Qu, Chaoling; Eyde, Nathan; Ci, Shuang; Ossipov, Michael H; King, Tamara; Fields, Howard L; Porreca, Frank

    2012-12-11

    Relief of pain is rewarding. Using a model of experimental postsurgical pain we show that blockade of afferent input from the injury with local anesthetic elicits conditioned place preference, activates ventral tegmental dopaminergic cells, and increases dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. Importantly, place preference is associated with increased activity in midbrain dopaminergic neurons and blocked by dopamine antagonists injected into the nucleus accumbens. The data directly support the hypothesis that relief of pain produces negative reinforcement through activation of the mesolimbic reward-valuation circuitry.

  18. Medications for Pain Relief during Labor and Delivery

    MedlinePlus

    ... used during labor and delivery? • What are systemic analgesics? • What are the risks of systemic analgesia? • What ... are two types of pain-relieving drugs: 1) analgesics and 2) anesthetics . Analgesics relieve pain without total ...

  19. Mindfulness meditation-based pain relief: a mechanistic account.

    PubMed

    Zeidan, Fadel; Vago, David R

    2016-06-01

    Pain is a multidimensional experience that involves interacting sensory, cognitive, and affective factors, rendering the treatment of chronic pain challenging and financially burdensome. Further, the widespread use of opioids to treat chronic pain has led to an opioid epidemic characterized by exponential growth in opioid misuse and addiction. The staggering statistics related to opioid use highlight the importance of developing, testing, and validating fast-acting nonpharmacological approaches to treat pain. Mindfulness meditation is a technique that has been found to significantly reduce pain in experimental and clinical settings. The present review delineates findings from recent studies demonstrating that mindfulness meditation significantly attenuates pain through multiple, unique mechanisms-an important consideration for the millions of chronic pain patients seeking narcotic-free, self-facilitated pain therapy.

  20. [An attitude survey on the medical use of narcotics for cancer pain relief].

    PubMed

    Sato, Yasuo

    2007-12-01

    Narcotic medications are the major drug therapy for cancer pain relief. A clinical use of fentanyl patches and oxycodone extended-release tablets has recently become available, which led to more choices of narcotics to be used medically. On the other hand, palliative care systems have not yet been fully established by medical institutions. The management of symptoms including pain, therefore, actually has to be performed by "care doctors" involved in cancer care. We conducted a survey on the medical use of narcotics for 500 people, including cancer patients and their family members. The result showed that the recognition rate of morphine used for cancer pain relief was 88%, while the recognition rate of narcotics for medical use other than morphine available for cancer pain relief was 20%. The most acceptable dosage form of narcotics was a skin patch, followed by an oral preparation. A response percentage that the dosage form of medical narcotics should be selectable by users was 93%.

  1. Pain predictability reverses valence ratings of a relief-associated stimulus

    PubMed Central

    Andreatta, Marta; Mühlberger, Andreas; Glotzbach-Schoon, Evelyn; Pauli, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Relief from pain is positively valenced and entails reward-like properties. Notably, stimuli that became associated with pain relief elicit reward-like implicit responses too, but are explicitly evaluated by humans as aversive. Since the unpredictability of pain makes pain more aversive, this study examined the hypotheses that the predictability of pain also modulates the valence of relief-associated stimuli. In two studies, we presented one conditioned stimulus (FORWARDCS+) before a painful unconditioned stimulus (US), another stimulus (BACKWARDCS+) after the painful US, and a third stimulus (CS−) was never associated with the US. In Study 1, FORWARDCS+ predicted half of the USs while the other half was delivered unwarned and followed by BACKWARDCS+. In Study 2, all USs were predicted by FORWARDCS+ and followed by BACKWARDCS+. In Study 1 both FORWARDCS+ and BACKWARDCS+ were rated as negatively valenced and high arousing after conditioning, while BACKWARDCS+ in Study 2 acquired positive valence and low arousal. Startle amplitude was significantly attenuated to BACKWARDCS+ compared to FORWARDCS+ in Study 2, but did not differ among CSs in Study 1. In summary, predictability of aversive events reverses the explicit valence of a relief-associated stimulus. PMID:24068989

  2. Use, perceived effectiveness, and gender differences of pain relief strategies among the community-dwelling elderly in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hsing-Yi; Tang, Fu-In; Yeh, Ming-Chen; Kuo, Benjamin Ing-Tiau; Yu, Shu

    2011-03-01

    Pain is a common problem among the elderly. The entire scope of chronic pain relief strategies used by community elderly is still unclear. A limited number of studies have investigated this issue from diverse culture perspectives. In the present study, we investigated the use and perceived effectiveness of pain relief strategies adopted by the elderly; gender differences between frequently used relief strategies were also explored. Two hundred nineteen participants living in Taiwan City, Taiwan, were recruited by a random sampling method and interviewed face to face. The prevalence of chronic pain among the elderly was 42.0% (n = 92). The elderly tended to adopt multiple strategies (mean ± SD = 9.08 ± 3.56; range = 2-18) to relieve their chronic pain. In three domains of pain relief strategies, conventional medicine was used more frequently than complementary and alternative medicine and psychologic approaches. Most pain relief strategies were ineffective. Among the 22 strategies used, no strategy was reported as "much improved" by a majority of users. The top five pain relief strategies used by men and women were the same. Elderly women tended to adopt more psychologic approaches, such as acceptance and ignoring to relieve pain, than men. The findings suggest that nurses should pay more attention to the issue of chronic pain relief and provide the elderly with more effective pain relief strategies.

  3. Trends in pain relief in labour: implications for obstetric analgesia service in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Imarengiaye, C O

    2005-09-01

    Labour and delivery result in severe pain for most women. Attention to comfort and analgesia for women in labour is important for physiological reasons and out of compassion. A review of common methods of pain relief of labour was done. Inhalation method as well as intravenous administration of opioids for pain relief in labour is fast giving way to lumbar epidural analgesia. The use of local anaesthetic in labour offers superior pain relief, is effective and safe. The inhalation and parenteral routes seem reserved for patients with contraindication to insertion of epidural. The administration of high volume dilute concentration of local anaesthetic plus lipid soluble opioids, with some level of patient's control, appears to be the current trend in the management of labour pains. There is a body of evidence indicating that Nigerian women may want pain relief in labour. However, there is no organised labour analgesia service in Nigeria. An organised obstetric analgesia service can be developed within the limits of available manpower and technology in an emerging country like Nigeria. This article therefore, focuses on trends in obstetric analgesia and its implications on the development of organised obstetric analgesia services in Nigeria. Key words: obstetric analgesia, obstetric analgesia service, Nigeria.

  4. No pain relief with the rubber hand illusion.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Rahul; Jensen, Karin B; Petkova, Valeria I; Dey, Abishikta; Barnsley, Nadia; Ingvar, Martin; McAuley, James H; Moseley, G Lorimer; Ehrsson, Henrik H

    2012-01-01

    The sense of body ownership can be easily disrupted during illusions and the most common illusion is the rubber hand illusion. An idea that is rapidly gaining popularity in clinical pain medicine is that body ownership illusions can be used to modify pathological pain sensations and induce analgesia. However, this idea has not been empirically evaluated. Two separate research laboratories undertook independent randomized repeated measures experiments, both designed to detect an effect of the rubber hand illusion on experimentally induced hand pain. In Experiment 1, 16 healthy volunteers rated the pain evoked by noxious heat stimuli (5 s duration; interstimulus interval 25 s) of set temperatures (47°, 48° and 49°C) during the rubber hand illusion or during a control condition. There was a main effect of stimulus temperature on pain ratings, but no main effect of condition (p = 0.32), nor a condition x temperature interaction (p = 0.31). In Experiment 2, 20 healthy volunteers underwent quantitative sensory testing to determine heat and cold pain thresholds during the rubber hand illusion or during a control condition. Secondary analyses involved heat and cold detection thresholds and paradoxical heat sensations. Again, there was no main effect of condition on heat pain threshold (p = 0.17), nor on cold pain threshold (p = 0.65), nor on any of the secondary measures (p<0.56 for all). We conclude that the rubber hand illusion does not induce analgesia.

  5. Relief of Lower Back and Leg Pain after Myelography

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rui; Sakakibara, Toshihiko; Mizuno, Tetsutaro; Akeda, Koji; Kondo, Tetsushi; Kasai, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: It is well-known that many patients will have adverse reactions such as headache and nausea after undergoing myelography, but we have often seen cases where symptoms such as lower back pain and leg pain were alleviated following myelography. To the best of our knowledge, such clinical cases of post-myelographic alleviation have not been reported. Materials and Methods: A total of 325 patients with a degenerative lumbar spinal disorder who underwent myelography were prospectively investigated at four hospitals from April 2012 to March 2014 to survey the post-myelographic alleviation of lower back and leg pain prospectively. The severities of lower back pain, leg pain and numbness of the lower extremities were evaluated and intermittent claudication distance was measured before myelography. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and myelographic findings were also evaluated for the patients that their symptoms were improved. Results: Thirty-five of 325 cases (10.8%) of these patients had their symptoms alleviated after undergoing myelography; 26 cases of lower back pain, two cases of leg pain, two cases of numbness of the lower extremity, and five cases of intermittent claudication. Conclusion: In the patients of a degenerative lumbar spinal disorder, about 10% cases with lower back pain or intermittent claudication had post-myelographic alleviation. Intradural injection therapy might be a therapeutic method to alleviate these symptoms. PMID:27990191

  6. Non-pharmacological treatments for pain relief: TENS and acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Coutaux, Anne

    2017-02-20

    Acupuncture and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) are non-pharmacological methods that have been used for millennia to relieve pain. As with all complementary treatments, efficacy evaluations face two hurdles: the non-feasibility of double-blinding and the difficulty in identifying the optimal control population or treatment. Nevertheless, recent studies of good methodological quality have demonstrated benefits in many types of pain compared to conventional treatment. The mechanisms of action of acupuncture and TENS, which are increasingly well understood, involve endogenous pain control systems, cerebral plasticity, and nonspecific effects (e.g., expectations and placebo effect). No serious adverse effects have been reported. These data support the more widespread use of non-pharmacological pain management, most notably in patients with chronic pain inadequately relieved by medications alone.

  7. Pain Relief in Cervical Dystonia with Botulinum Toxin Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Carlos Henrique Ferreira; Cattai, Lígia; Teive, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni

    2015-01-01

    Dystonia is a neurological disorder characterized by intermittent or sustained muscle contractions that cause abnormal, usually repetitive, movements and postures. Dystonic movements can be tremulous and twisting and often follow a pattern. They are frequently associated with overflow muscle activation and may be triggered or worsened by voluntary action. Most voluntary muscles can be affected and, in the case of the neck muscles, the condition is referred to as cervical dystonia (CD), the most common form of dystonia. The high incidence of pain distinguishes CD from other focal dystonias and contributes significantly to patient disability and low quality of life. Different degrees of pain in the cervical region are reported by more than 60% of patients, and pain intensity is directly related to disease severity. Botulinum toxin (BoNT) is currently considered the treatment of choice for CD and can lead to an improvement in pain and dystonic symptoms in up to 90% of patients. The results for BoNT/A and BoNT/B are similar. The complex relationship between pain and dystonia has resulted in a large number of studies and more comprehensive assessments of dystonic patients. When planning the application of BoNT, pain should be a key factor in the choice of muscles and doses. In conclusion, BoNT is highly effective in controlling pain, and its analgesic effect is sustained for a long time in most CD patients. PMID:26110508

  8. Optimizing pain relief during pregnancy using manual therapy

    PubMed Central

    Oswald, Christopher; Higgins, Ceara C.; Assimakopoulos, Demetry

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Question Many of my pregnant patients have muscle and joint aches, and are reluctant to use analgesics. What is known about chiropractic care during pregnancy? Answer As pregnant women move into their second and third trimesters, their centres of mass shift anteriorly, causing an increase in lumbar lordosis, which causes low back and pelvic girdle pain. Increasing recent evidence attests to the effectiveness and safety of treating this pain using manual therapy. Massage therapy and chiropractic care, including spinal manipulation, are highly safe and effective evidence-based options for pregnant women suffering from mechanical low back and pelvic pain. PMID:23946024

  9. Double Blind Test For Bio-Stimulation Effects On Pain Relief By Diode Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeki, Norio; Sembokuya, Iwajiro; Arakawa, Kazuo; Fujimasa, Iwao; Mabuchi, Kunihiko; Abe, Yuusuke; Atsumi, Kazuhiko

    1989-09-01

    The bio-stimulation effect of semiconductor laser on therapeutic pain relief was investigated by conducting a double blind test performed on more than one hundred patient subjects suffering from various neualgia. A compact laser therapeutic equipment with two laser probes each having 60 mW power was developed and utilized for the experiment. Each probe was driven by either the active or the dummy source selected randomly, and its results were stored in the memory for statistical processing. The therapeutic treatments including active and dummy treatments were performed on 102 subjects. The pain relief effects were confirmed for 85.5% of the subjects.

  10. Acupuncture: a first approach on pain relief using a 617 nm LED device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, J. M.; Corral-Baqués, M. I.; Amat, A.

    2007-02-01

    In this study, a preliminary approach for pain relief using a novel pulsated LED device was conducted. 12 patients were treated with a Photopuncture device designed by SORISA, which consisted in a 10-channel LED system at 617 nm. 15 patients with different pain localizations were treated: cervicobrachialgia (3 cases), lumbago / sciatica (4 cases), gonalgia (3 cases), cephalalgia (2 cases), talalgia (1 case), epicondylitis (1 case) and trigeminal neuralgia (1 case). To characterize the pain level, the Categorical Pain Scale (none (0), mild (1-3), moderate (4-6) and severe (7-10)) was used. Just patients with severe pain (7-10) were treated. Patients were treated twice a week for 25 minutes; 5 to 8 sessions were given at the following treatment parameters: 10 mW per channel pulsed at 60 Hz with a 50 % duty cycle. The total dose for point was 7.5 J. To characterize the response to the treatment, the results were classified as: "no result", no changes in pain degree; "poor", pain decreased one category; "good", pain decreased two categories; "very good", complete healing (no pain). The results were: 1 case with "very good" result; 11 cases with "good" result; 3 cases with "poor" result; and 0 cases with "no result". We conclude that the Photopuncture led device may be a good alternative to classical Acupuncture in pain relief, although further experimentation is required.

  11. Complementary and alternative approaches to pain relief during labor.

    PubMed

    Tournaire, Michel; Theau-Yonneau, Anne

    2007-12-01

    This review evaluated the effect of complementary and alternative medicine on pain during labor with conventional scientific methods using electronic data bases through 2006 were used. Only randomized controlled trials with outcome measures for labor pain were kept for the conclusions. Many studies did not meet the scientific inclusion criteria. According to the randomized control trials, we conclude that for the decrease of labor pain and/or reduction of the need for conventional analgesic methods: (i) There is an efficacy found for acupressure and sterile water blocks. (ii) Most results favored some efficacy for acupuncture and hydrotherapy. (iii) Studies for other complementary or alternative therapies for labor pain control have not shown their effectiveness.

  12. Complementary and Alternative Approaches to Pain Relief During Labor

    PubMed Central

    Theau-Yonneau, Anne

    2007-01-01

    This review evaluated the effect of complementary and alternative medicine on pain during labor with conventional scientific methods using electronic data bases through 2006 were used. Only randomized controlled trials with outcome measures for labor pain were kept for the conclusions. Many studies did not meet the scientific inclusion criteria. According to the randomized control trials, we conclude that for the decrease of labor pain and/or reduction of the need for conventional analgesic methods: (i) There is an efficacy found for acupressure and sterile water blocks. (ii) Most results favored some efficacy for acupuncture and hydrotherapy. (iii) Studies for other complementary or alternative therapies for labor pain control have not shown their effectiveness. PMID:18227907

  13. Anti-Seizure Medications: Relief from Nerve Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... tightly. Anti-seizure medications may also help with fibromyalgia, a chronic condition that causes muscular pain and ... nerves (neuropathy) or overly sensitized nerves, as in fibromyalgia. Some anti-seizure drugs work particularly well for ...

  14. Topical preparations for pain relief: efficacy and patient adherence

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Liliana L; Feres, Caroline C; Teles, Vitor EP

    2011-01-01

    There has been an increasing focus on development of new routes of drug administration to provide tailored treatments for patients, without decreasing efficacy of analgesia, in proportion to the progression of the knowledge of pain mechanisms. While acute pain acts as an alarm, chronic pain is a syndrome requiring meticulous selection of analgesic drugs of high bioavailability for long-term use. Such criteria are challenges that topical medications aim to overcome, allowing progressive delivery of active component, maintaining stable plasma levels, with a good safety profile. This review presents recent findings regarding topical formulations of the most widely used drugs for pain treatment, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, anesthetics, and capsaicin, and the role of physical agents as delivery enhancers (phonophoresis and iontophoresis). Although the number of topical agents is limited for use in peripheral conditions, increasing evidence supports the efficacy of these preparations in blocking nociceptive and neuropathic pain. Patient adherence to medical treatment is also a challenge, especially in chronic painful conditions. It is known that reduction of treatment complexity and pill burden are good strategies to increase patient compliance, as discussed here. However, the role of topical presentations, when compared to traditional routes, has not yet been fully explored and thus remains unclear. PMID:21386951

  15. Endogenous Opioid Activity in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex Is Required for Relief of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Navratilova, Edita; Xie, Jennifer Yanhua; Meske, Diana; Qu, Chaoling; Morimura, Kozo; Okun, Alec; Arakawa, Naohisa; Ossipov, Michael; Fields, Howard L.

    2015-01-01

    Pain is aversive, and its relief elicits reward mediated by dopaminergic signaling in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a part of the mesolimbic reward motivation pathway. How the reward pathway is engaged by pain-relieving treatments is not known. Endogenous opioid signaling in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), an area encoding pain aversiveness, contributes to pain modulation. We examined whether endogenous ACC opioid neurotransmission is required for relief of pain and subsequent downstream activation of NAc dopamine signaling. Conditioned place preference (CPP) and in vivo microdialysis were used to assess negative reinforcement and NAc dopaminergic transmission. In rats with postsurgical or neuropathic pain, blockade of opioid signaling in the rostral ACC (rACC) inhibited CPP and NAc dopamine release resulting from non-opioid pain-relieving treatments, including peripheral nerve block or spinal clonidine, an α2-adrenergic agonist. Conversely, pharmacological activation of rACC opioid receptors of injured, but not pain-free, animals was sufficient to stimulate dopamine release in the NAc and produce CPP. In neuropathic, but not sham-operated, rats, systemic doses of morphine that did not affect withdrawal thresholds elicited CPP and NAc dopamine release, effects that were prevented by blockade of ACC opioid receptors. The data provide a neural explanation for the preferential effects of opioids on pain affect and demonstrate that engagement of NAc dopaminergic transmission by non-opioid pain-relieving treatments depends on upstream ACC opioid circuits. Endogenous opioid signaling in the ACC appears to be both necessary and sufficient for relief of pain aversiveness. PMID:25948274

  16. Delivery systems of opioid analgesics for pain relief: a review.

    PubMed

    Leppert, Wojciech; Krajnik, Malgorzata; Wordliczek, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pain is usually treated with pharmacological measures using opioids alone or in combination with adjuvant analgesics that play an important role in the treatment of pain not fully responsive to opioids administered alone, especially in neuropathic, bone and visceral colicky pain. The important part of the chronic pain treatment is the appropriate use of non-pharmacological measures along with psychosocial and spiritual support. Opioids may be administered by different routes; the most common and most convenient for majority of treated patients are oral and transdermal. However, in certain circumstances such as inability to swallow, lack of analgesic efficacy and intractable opioid-induced adverse effects parenteral routes (subcutaneous, intravenous) might be more useful. When these routes fail, in some patients intrathecal administration of opioids is required. Recently, more patients have been treated with short-acting opioids for breakthrough pain with sublingual, buccal and intranasal routes of opioid administration that may provide efficacy superior to oral and comparable to intravenous routes. Alternative routes comprise rectal, inhaled and topical administration of opioids. This article discusses various routes of opioid administration.

  17. The human brain response to dental pain relief.

    PubMed

    Meier, M L; Widmayer, S; Abazi, J; Brügger, M; Lukic, N; Lüchinger, R; Ettlin, D A

    2015-05-01

    Local anesthesia has made dental treatment more comfortable since 1884, but little is known about associated brain mechanisms. Functional magnetic resonance imaging is a modern neuroimaging tool widely used for investigating human brain activity related to sensory perceptions, including pain. Most brain regions that respond to experimental noxious stimuli have recently been found to react not only to nociception alone, but also to visual, auditory, and other stimuli. Thus, presumed functional attributions have come under scrutiny regarding selective pain processing in the brain. Evidently, innovative approaches are warranted to identify cerebral regions that are nociceptive specific. In this study, we aimed at circumventing known methodological confounders by applying a novel paradigm in 14 volunteers: rather than varying the intensity and thus the salience of painful stimuli, we applied repetitive noxious dental stimuli at constant intensity to the left mandibular canine. During the functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm, we suppressed the nociceptive barrage by a mental nerve block. Brain activity before and after injection of 4% articaine was compared intraindividually on a group level. Dental pain extinction was observed to correspond to activity reduction in a discrete region of the left posterior insular cortex. These results confirm previous reports demonstrating that direct electrical stimulation of this brain region-but not of others-evokes bodily pain sensations. Hence, our investigation adds further evidence to the notion that the posterior insula plays a unique role in nociceptive processing.

  18. TRPV1: on the road to pain relief.

    PubMed

    Jara-Oseguera, Andrés; Simon, Sidney A; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2008-11-01

    Historically, drug research targeted to pain treatment has focused on trying to prevent the propagation of action potentials in the periphery from reaching the brain rather than pinpointing the molecular basis underlying the initial detection of the nociceptive stimulus: the receptor itself. This has now changed, given that many receptors of nociceptive stimuli have been identified and/or cloned. Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels have been implicated in several physiological processes such as mechanical, chemical and thermal stimuli detection. Ten years after the cloning of TRPV1, compelling data has been gathered on the role of this channel in inflammatory and neuropathic states. TRPV1 activation in nociceptive neurons, where it is normally expressed, triggers the release of neuropeptides and transmitters resulting in the generation of action potentials that will be sent to higher CNS areas where they will often be perceived as pain. Its activation also will evoke the peripheral release of pro-inflammatory compounds that may sensitize other neurons to physical, thermal or chemical stimuli. For these reasons as well as because its continuous activation causes analgesia, TRPV1 has become a viable drug target for clinical use in the management of pain. This review will provide a general picture of the physiological and pathophysiological roles of the TRPV1 channel and of its structural, pharmacological and biophysical properties. Finally, it will provide the reader with an overall view of the status of the discovery of potential therapeutic agents for the management of chronic and neuropathic pain.

  19. Cherry juice targets antioxidant potential and pain relief.

    PubMed

    Kuehl, Kerry S

    2012-01-01

    Strenuous physical activity increases the risk of musculoskeletal injury and can induce muscle damage resulting in acute inflammation and decreased performance. The human body's natural response to injury results in inflammation-induced pain, swelling, and erythema. Among sports medicine physicians and athletic trainers, the mainstays of urgent treatment of soft tissue injury are rest, ice, compression, and elevation (RICE). In order to reduce pain and inflammation, anti-inflammatory agents such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) act on the multiple inflammatory pathways, which, although often very effective, can have undesirable side effects such as gastric ulceration and, infrequently, myocardial infarction and stroke. For centuries, natural anti-inflammatory compounds have been used to mediate the inflammatory process and often with fewer side effects. Tart cherries appear to possess similar effectiveness in treating the inflammatory reaction seen in both acute and chronic pain syndromes encountered among athletes and non-athletes with chronic inflammatory disease. This article reviews the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of tart cherries on prevention, treatment, and recovery of soft tissue injury and pain.

  20. Effectiveness of Acupressure Treatment for Pain Management and Fatigue Relief in Gulf War Veterans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    This study will provide symptomatic veterans with acupressure treatment and determine its effectiveness in fatigue relief and pain management for GWI... acupressure group (to receive acupressure treatment) and control group (without acupressure treatment). The acupressure treatment, twice per week for 6...weeks, will be offered by licensed acupressure practitioner, with at least 5 years of clinical experience, who have received 20 hours of training

  1. Honey Versus Diphenhydramine for Post-Tonsillectomy Pain Relief in Pediatric Cases: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Amani, Soroush; Kheiri, Soleyman

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Tonsillectomy is one of the most common surgeries done worldwide and often the first one a child sustains. Pain relief after tonsillectomy is helpful for oral feeding after surgery. Acetaminophen and diphenhydramine have been conventionally used for reducing pain. This study was conducted to compare the effect of honey and diphehydramine on pain relief after tonsillectomy. Materials and Methods: For this randomized clinical trial study, 120 patients of 5 to 12 years undergoing tonsillectomy were recruited. The patients were divided into four groups randomly. After tonsillectomy and beginning of eating, Group A took 5cc honey alone every hour, Group B was given 5 cc 50% honey (mixed with water) every hour, group C was treated with 1mg/kg diphenhydramine every 6 hours and group D was observed without any intervention. In all patients, severity of the pain was evaluated by ocher questionnaire at recovery, and 3, 6, 12 and 24 hours after surgery. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and the repeated measures ANOVA (SPSS version 17). Results: The repeated ANOVA showed a significant decreasing trend of pain scores during the study for both pain scales (p <0.05), but the rate of trend was similar between the four groups (p > 0.05). No statistically significant difference in pain was detected among the groups. Conclusion: Although honey can help the pain decrease, more research is supported for confirmation of this effect. PMID:25954673

  2. Randomized controlled trial of benzocaine versus placebo spray for pain relief at hysterosalpingogram.

    PubMed

    Bachman, E A; Senapati, S; Sammel, M D; Kalra, S K

    2014-06-01

    Many women experience pain during hysterosalpingogram (HSG). This prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study assessed whether the use of benzocaine spray during HSG is associated with reduced pain as compared with placebo. Thirty women presenting for HSG were enrolled and randomized to either benzocaine or saline spray. Treatment groups were similar in age, race, parity, pre-procedure oral analgesic use and history of dysmenorrhoea and/or chronic pelvic pain. Median change in pain score from baseline to procedure was 50.6mm (-7.4 to 98.8mm) in the benzocaine group and 70.4mm (19.8 to 100mm) in the placebo group. There was no difference between groups after adjusting for history of dysmenorrhoea. There was no difference in resolution of pain in benzocaine versus placebo groups at 5 min post procedure--median pain score difference -11.1 (-90.1 to 18.5) versus -37.0 (-100 to 1.2)--or at 30 min post procedure. Satisfaction scores did not differ by treatment and did not correlate with pain score during the procedure (rho=0.005). The use of benzocaine spray does not significantly improve pain relief during HSG nor does it hasten resolution of pain post HSG. Of interest, patient satisfaction was not correlated with pain. Many women experience pain during hysterosalpingogram (HSG), which is a test used to evaluate the uterine cavity and fallopian tube. We conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study to assess whether the use of benzocaine spray during HSG is associated with reduced pain as compared with placebo. Thirty women presenting for HSG were enrolled and randomized to either benzocaine or saline spray. Treatment groups were similar in age, race, previous pregnancies, pre-procedure oral analgesic use and history of dysmenorrhoea (painful periods) and/or chronic pelvic pain. There was no difference in pain scores or resolution of pain between the two groups. Satisfaction scores did not differ by treatment group

  3. Codeine and its alternates for pain and cough relief*

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, Nathan B.; Friebel, Hans; Hahn, Klaus-Jürgen; Halbach, Hans

    1969-01-01

    In this report—the fourth of a series on codeine and its alternates for pain and cough relief—an attempt is made to evaluate, on the basis of experimental and clinical data, and wherever possible in comparison with codeine, the effectiveness of a number of antitussive substances currently in clinical use. In the discussion of the undesired side-effects particular attention is paid to the risk of dependence and abuse. PMID:4390406

  4. Codeine and its alternates for pain and cough relief*

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, Nathan B.; Friebel, Hans; Hahn, Klaus-Jürgen; Halbach, Hans

    1969-01-01

    This report—the second of a series on codeine and its alternates for pain and cough relief—contains a detailed evaluation of experimental and clinical data on newer substances having analgesic properties comparable to and in approximately the same range as those of codeine. The data are discussed under the headings: analgesic effects in animals; clinical usefulness; side-effects with particular reference to dependence and abuse liability. PMID:4894737

  5. Codeine and its alternates for pain and cough relief*

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, Nathan B.; Friebel, Hans; Hahn, Klaus-Jürgen; Halbach, Hans

    1969-01-01

    This report—the third of a series on codeine and its alternates for pain and cough relief—presents a detailed review of the physiology and pathophysiology of cough, the methods for the experimental and clinical measurement of the antitussive action of drugs, possible mechanisms of action of antitussive agents, and includes a compilation of experimental results and clinical experience with codeine as an antitussive. PMID:4896168

  6. The relief of bone pain in primary biliary cirrhosis with calcium infusions

    PubMed Central

    Ajdukiewicz, A. B.; Agnew, J. E.; Byers, P. D.; Wills, M. R.; Sherlock, Sheila

    1974-01-01

    Intravenous calcium infusions produced subjective relief of bone pain in 14 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. The bone pain had developed despite long-term parenteral vitamin D therapy. The pain returned after two to three months, but a subsequent course of infusions again brought relief. Before treatment satisfactory iliac crest bone biopsies were obtained in 11 of the patients and were normal in seven; two patients had biopsies indicating osteomalacia and two osteoporosis. After treatment a repeat biopsy in one of the patients with osteomalacia showed marked reduction in osteoid. The infusion treatment produced no change in plasma calcium concentration, serum phosphate, or serum alkaline phosphatase. Absorption of oral calcium was also unchanged. PMID:4279816

  7. Dissociation between the relief of skeletal pain behaviors and skin hypersensitivity in a model of bone cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Guedon, Jean-Marc G; Longo, Geraldine; Majuta, Lisa A; Thomspon, Michelle L; Fealk, Michelle N; Mantyh, Patrick W

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have suggested that in humans and animals with significant skeletal pain, changes in the mechanical hypersensitivity of the skin can be detected. However, whether measuring changes in skin hypersensitivity can be a reliable surrogate for measuring skeletal pain itself remains unclear. To explore this question, we generated skeletal pain by injecting and confining GFP-transfected NCTC 2472 osteosarcoma cells unilaterally to the femur of C3H male mice. Beginning at day 7 post-tumor injection, animals were administered vehicle, an antibody to the P2X3 receptor (anti-P2X3) or anti-NGF antibody. Pain and analgesic efficacy were then measured on days 21, 28, and 35 post-tumor injection using a battery of skeletal pain-related behaviors and von Frey assessment of mechanical hypersensitivity on the plantar surface of the hind paw. Animals with bone cancer pain treated with anti-P2X3 showed a reduction in skin hypersensitivity but no attenuation of skeletal pain behaviors, whereas animals with bone cancer pain treated with anti-NGF showed a reduction in both skin hypersensitivity and skeletal pain behaviors. These results suggest that although bone cancer can induce significant skeletal pain-related behaviors and hypersensitivity of the skin, relief of hypersensitivity of the skin is not always accompanied by attenuation of skeletal pain. Understanding the relationship between skeletal and skin pain may provide insight into how pain is processed and integrated and help define the preclinical measures of skeletal pain that are predictive end points for clinical trials.

  8. Intrathecal ziconotide and baclofen provide pain relief in seven patients with neuropathic pain and spasticity: case reports.

    PubMed

    Saulino, M; Burton, A W; Danyo, D A; Frost, S; Glanzer, J; Solanki, D R

    2009-03-01

    Seven cases of combination of intrathecal (IT) ziconotide and baclofen therapy in patients with refractory neuropathic pain and spasticity were reviewed. Five of the seven adult patients were receiving IT baclofen treatment when ziconotide was initiated. All five patients had experienced at least one previous failed IT treatment regimen. Pain intensity scores improved by a mean of 50.3% with the use of ziconotide-baclofen therapy. Mean time to onset of pain relief was 15 weeks, at a mean ziconotide dose of 3.7 microg/day. Within this group of patients, adverse events were observed in one patient, but they were not considered to be ziconotide related and subsequently resolved. The remaining two patients were receiving ziconotide treatment when baclofen was initiated. Pain intensity scores improved by 75% and 30%, respectively. Pain relief was evident at two weeks and one week, with corresponding ziconotide doses of 2.4 microg/day and 14.4 microg/day, respectively. One patient in this group reported adverse events, but all resolved during continued treatment with the study drugs. Treatment regimens varied between patients in these case series; each regimen used a different titration strategy and different concentrations of ziconotide and baclofen. Combination IT ziconotide and baclofen therapy may be a treatment option for patients with neuropathic pain and spasticity. Future studies are warranted to determine the optimal dosing and titration schedules for ziconotide-baclofen usage.

  9. Paracetamol and diflunisal for pain relief following third molar surgery in Hong Kong Chinese.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, M R; Rosenquist, J B; Cheung, L K

    1987-10-01

    In a double blind study in Hong Kong Chinese, 250 mg of diflunisal, 500 mg of paracetamol or placebo were given for post-operative pain relief following 77 third molar surgical procedures. The intensity of pain was recorded on a visual analogue scale. The first and second doses of paracetamol reduced pain significantly more than placebo, while this was true only for the second dose of diflunisal. There was no significant difference in pain reduction with the first and second dose of paracetamol, when compared with the first and the second dose of diflunisal. In this study in Hong Kong Chinese, neither the dose nor the interval between ingestion of the analgesic tablets in patients, who needed analgesics for postoperative pain, were significantly different to that reported before in non-Chinese, in contrast to the popular belief that Chinese patients have higher pain thresholds. However, a higher proportion of Chinese than that reported in non-Chinese did not need any analgesics for relief of postoperative pain.

  10. Decreasing Time to Pain Relief for Emergency Department Patients with Extremity Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Heilman, James A.; Tanski, Mary; Burns, Beech; Lin, Amber; Ma, John

    2016-01-01

    Significant delays occur in providing adequate pain relief for patients who present to the emergency department (ED) with extremity fractures. The median time to pain medication administration for patients presenting to our ED with extremity fractures was 72.5 minutes. We used a multidisciplinary approach to implement three improvement cycles with the goal of reducing the median time to pain medication by 15% over an eight month time period. First, we redesigned nursing triage and treatment processes. Second, we improved nursing documentation standardization to ensure accurate tracking of patients who declined pain medication. Third, through consensus building within our physician group, we implemented a department-wide standard of care to provide early pain relief for extremity fractures. Median time to pain medication for patients with an extremity fracture reduced significantly between the pre-and post-intervention periods (p=0.009). The average monthly median time to medication was 72.5 minutes (95% CI: 57.1 to 88.0) before the intervention (Jan 2013-Oct 2014) and 49.8 minutes (95% CI: 42.7 to 56.9) after the intervention (November 2014 to June 2016). In other words, monthly median time was 31% faster (22.7 minute difference) in the post intervention period. Implementing three key interventions reduced the time to pain medication for patients with extremity injuries. Since June 2016 the reductions in median time to medication have continued to improve. PMID:28090328

  11. Pain relief in labor: a survey of awareness, attitude, and practice of health care providers in Zaria, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ogboli-Nwasor, E; Adaji, SE; Bature, SB; Shittu, OS

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to assess the attitudes of maternal health care providers to pain relief during labor in Zaria, Nigeria. Methods: This was a multicenter, collaborative, cross-sectional pilot study of provider perspectives concerning pain relief during labor. A structured, self-administered, questionnaire was completed by 95 consenting maternal health care providers at three high-volume facilities in Zaria, an ancient northern Nigerian city. Descriptive statistics was performed on the data. Results: Most respondents (94.8%) agreed that pain relief is needed during labor. Only 2.1% of respondents were undecided about the provision of pain relief during labor and 3.2% were of the opinion that pain relief was not necessary during labor. Most respondents (93.7%) had attended a woman in labor in the 4 weeks preceding the survey. Of these, 56.8% had counseled a parturient in labor. Most of the counseling (42.1%) took place during labor. Less than half of the respondents (48.4%) had administered pain relief in labor in the preceding 4 weeks and systemic opioids was the most commonly form of pain relief. Among the respondents who did not offer pain relief agents in labor, the majority (54.5%) had no reason for not offering it. Unavailability of methods, inability to afford the cost of pain relief, lack of knowledge and skills, as well as lack of essential equipment to provide the procedure were also given by respondents as reasons for not offering pain relief. Conclusion: Even though maternal health care providers in this environment have a positive attitude to pain relief in labor, most women go through labor without the benefit of analgesia. There exists a gap between provider attitudes to pain relief in labor and practice of the same, with many providers having no genuine reason(s) for not offering pain relief to their clients during labor. Providers need to align their practice to their attitudes, and need to be helped to do this through

  12. Codeine and its alternates for pain and cough relief*

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, Nathan B.; Friebel, Hans; Hahn, Klaus-Jürgen; Halbach, Hans

    1968-01-01

    This report—the first of a series on codeine and its alternates for pain and cough relief—presents a detailed evaluation of experimental and clinical data concerning the analgesic action of codeine (the antitussive action will be assessed separately). The authors discuss the pharmacology of the drug, including side-effects and toxicity; effects on the respiratory, circulatory, digestive and urinary systems; tolerance, dependence and liability to abuse; metabolic effects; and mechanism of action. Though codeine is generally more toxic than morphine to animals on account of its convulsant action, it is less toxic to man, possibly because it produces less respiratory depression. Again, tolerance to its analgesic effects has been demonstrated in several animal species, but dependence in man is observed far less frequently than it is with morphine, and the abstinence syndrome is less intense. From their extensive review of the evidence available, the authors conclude that codeine is a good analgesic and that little risk to public health is likely to arise from its clinical use to relieve pain. PMID:4972938

  13. Valdecoxib provides effective pain relief following acute ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Diaz, J A; Cuervo, C; Valderrama, A M; Kohles, J

    2006-01-01

    We sought to determine whether valdecoxib is as effective as diclofenac in treating acute ankle sprain. Patients (n=202) with acute first- and second-degree ankle sprain were randomized to valdecoxib (40 mg twice daily on day 1 followed by 40 mg once daily on days 2-7) or diclofenac (75 mg twice daily). The primary efficacy end-point was the Patient's Assessment of Ankle Pain visual analogue scale (VAS, 0-100 mm) value on day 4. Valdecoxib was as efficacious as diclofenac in treating the signs and symptoms of acute ankle sprain. The mean VAS reduction in ankle pain on day 4 was not different between groups; the two-sided 95% confidence interval for the between-group difference was within the prespecified limit for non-inferiority (10 mm). There were no significant differences between groups for all secondary efficacy end-points. The two treatments were similarly effective and well tolerated for treatment of acute ankle sprain.

  14. On the importance of placebo timing in rTMS studies for pain relief.

    PubMed

    André-Obadia, Nathalie; Magnin, Michel; Garcia-Larrea, Luis

    2011-06-01

    The efficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the motor cortex for neuropathic pain relief is founded on double-blind studies versus placebo. In these studies, however, the analgesic effect of active interventions remained modest compared with the placebo effect. This observation led us to re-evaluate the intrinsic placebo action on pain relief according to the relative timing of active and sham rTMS interventions. In a randomized controlled study including 45 patients, we compared the analgesic effect of sham rTMS that either preceded or followed an active rTMS, which could be itself either successful or unsuccessful. Placebo analgesia differed significantly when the sham rTMS session followed a successful or an unsuccessful active rTMS. Placebo sessions induced significant analgesia when they followed a successful rTMS (mean pain decrease of 11%), whereas they tended to worsen pain when following an unsuccessful rTMS (pain increase of 6%). Only when the sham intervention was applied before any active rTMS were placebo scores unchanged from the baseline. These results probably reflect an unconscious conditioned learning. The timing of placebo relative to active interventions should be taken into account in rTMS studies for pain relief, and possibly in other conditions too. The fact that placebo effects could be enhanced by a previous rTMS with an analgesic effect as low as 10% suggests that a 30% pain decrease threshold in therapeutic trials may be too severe because smaller analgesic effects may have a clinical significance too. Sham rTMS induces significant analgesia only when preceded by a successful active stimulation. Such a placebo modulation is probably related to an unconscious conditioned learning.

  15. Mindfulness-Meditation-Based Pain Relief Is Not Mediated by Endogenous Opioids

    PubMed Central

    Adler-Neal, Adrienne L.; Wells, Rebecca E.; Stagnaro, Emily; May, Lisa M.; Eisenach, James C.; McHaffie, John G.; Coghill, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    . The results demonstrate that meditation-based pain relief does not require endogenous opioids. Therefore, the treatment of chronic pain may be more effective with meditation due to a lack of cross-tolerance with opiate-based medications. PMID:26985045

  16. Correlation of pain relief with physical function in hand osteoarthritis: randomized controlled trial post hoc analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are recommended for the relief of pain associated with hand osteoarthritis (OA) but do not alter the underlying structural changes that contribute to impaired physical function. The current analysis examined the relationship of pain relief with measures of function and global rating of disease in patients with hand OA. Methods This was a combined analysis of 2 prospective, randomized, double-blind, 8-week, multicenter, parallel-group studies comparing diclofenac sodium 1% gel with placebo gel (vehicle) in patients with radiographically confirmed mild to moderate hand OA. Patients (n = 783) aged ≥ 40 years applied diclofenac sodium 1% gel (2 g) or vehicle to each hand 4 times daily for 8 weeks. Outcome measures included pain intensity assessed on a 100-mm Visual Analog Scale (VAS); the Australian/Canadian Osteoarthritis Hand Index (AUSCAN) subscales for pain, stiffness, and physical function (100-mm VAS); and a global rating of disease (100-mm VAS). Change in VAS pain intensity from baseline to week 8 was categorized (<0%, 0%-<15%, 15%-<30%, 30%-<50%, 50%-<70%, and ≥ 70%) without regard to treatment and compared in each category with the mean change from baseline in each AUSCAN subindex and the global rating of disease. Pearson correlations between changes in outcome measures from baseline to week 8 were calculated. Results Changes in VAS pain intensity were accompanied by similar changes in AUSCAN scores and global rating of disease. Pearson correlations confirmed significant associations (P < 0.001) between change in VAS pain intensity and changes in AUSCAN pain (correlation coefficient [r] = 0.81), AUSCAN function (r = 0.75), AUSCAN stiffness (r = 0.66), and global rating of disease (r = 0.76). Conclusions Pain relief correlated with improvements in physical function, stiffness, and global rating of disease in patients with hand OA, irrespective of treatment. This suggests that pain or anticipation of pain

  17. Traumeel S® for pain relief following hallux valgus surgery: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In spite of recent advances in post-operative pain relief, pain following orthopedic surgery remains an ongoing challenge for clinicians. We examined whether a well known and frequently prescribed homeopathic preparation could mitigate post-operative pain. Method We performed a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of the homeopathic preparation Traumeel S® in minimizing post-operative pain and analgesic consumption following surgical correction of hallux valgus. Eighty consecutive patients were randomized to receive either Traumeel tablets or an indistinguishable placebo, and took primary and rescue oral analgesics as needed. Maximum numerical pain scores at rest and consumption of oral analgesics were recorded on day of surgery and for 13 days following surgery. Results Traumeel was not found superior to placebo in minimizing pain or analgesic consumption over the 14 days of the trial, however a transient reduction in the daily maximum post-operative pain score favoring the Traumeel arm was observed on the day of surgery, a finding supported by a treatment-time interaction test (p = 0.04). Conclusions Traumeel was not superior to placebo in minimizing pain or analgesic consumption over the 14 days of the trial. A transient reduction in the daily maximum post-operative pain score on the day of surgery is of questionable clinical importance. Trial Registration This study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov. # NCT00279513 PMID:20380750

  18. Subcutaneous tunneled intrapleural catheters in the long-term relief of right upper quadrant pain of malignant origin.

    PubMed

    Waldman, S D; Allen, M L; Cronen, M C

    1989-06-01

    A 33-yr-old, 42-kg female, with extensive hepatic metastatic disease with intractable pain unresponsive to narcotic analgesics, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, and tricyclic antidepressants, is presented. Management of this patient's intractable pain with local anesthetics administered via a tunneled intrapleural catheter is discussed. Tunneling techniques are described. The patient continued to experience excellent pain relief at 6 wk follow-up.

  19. Anticipation and choice heuristics in the dynamic consumption of pain relief.

    PubMed

    Story, Giles W; Vlaev, Ivo; Dayan, Peter; Seymour, Ben; Darzi, Ara; Dolan, Raymond J

    2015-03-01

    Humans frequently need to allocate resources across multiple time-steps. Economic theory proposes that subjects do so according to a stable set of intertemporal preferences, but the computational demands of such decisions encourage the use of formally less competent heuristics. Few empirical studies have examined dynamic resource allocation decisions systematically. Here we conducted an experiment involving the dynamic consumption over approximately 15 minutes of a limited budget of relief from moderately painful stimuli. We had previously elicited the participants' time preferences for the same painful stimuli in one-off choices, allowing us to assess self-consistency. Participants exhibited three characteristic behaviors: saving relief until the end, spreading relief across time, and early spending, of which the last was markedly less prominent. The likelihood that behavior was heuristic rather than normative is suggested by the weak correspondence between one-off and dynamic choices. We show that the consumption choices are consistent with a combination of simple heuristics involving early-spending, spreading or saving of relief until the end, with subjects predominantly exhibiting the last two.

  20. Effect of laser on pain relief and wound healing of recurrent aphthous stomatitis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Suter, Valerie G A; Sjölund, Sophia; Bornstein, Michael M

    2017-03-27

    The aim of this systematic review was to assess a potential benefit of laser use in the treatment of recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS). The primary outcome variables were pain relief, duration of wound healing and reduction in episode frequency. A PICO approach was used as a search strategy in Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases. After scanning and excluding titles, abstracts and full texts, 11 studies (ten RCTs and one non-randomised controlled trial) were included. Study selection and data extraction was done by two observers. Study participants varied between 7-90 for the laser and 5-90 for the control groups. Laser treatment included Nd:YAG laser ablation, CO2 laser applied through a transparent gel (non-ablative) and diode laser in a low-level laser treatment (LLLT) mode. Control groups had placebo, no therapy or topical corticosteroid treatment. Significant pain relief immediately after treatment was found in five out of six studies. Pain relief in the days following treatment was recorded in seven studies. The duration of RAS wound healing was also reduced in five studies. However, criteria of evaluation differed between the studies. The episode frequency was not evaluated as only one study addressed this outcome parameter, but did not discriminate between the study (LLLT) and control (corticosteroid) groups. Jadad scores (ranging from 0 to 5) for quality assessment of the included studies range between 0 and 2 (mean = 1.0) for studies analysing pain relief and between 0 and 3 (mean = 1.1) for studies evaluating wound healing. The use of lasers (CO2 laser, Nd:YAG laser and diode laser) to relieve symptoms and promote healing of RAS is a therapeutic option. More studies for laser applications are necessary to demonstrate superiority over topical pharmaceutical treatment and to recommend a specific laser type, wavelength, power output and applied energy (ablative versus photobiomodulation).

  1. Does Daily Kangaroo Care Provide Sustained Pain and Stress Relief in Preterm Infants?

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Anita J.; Yates, Charlotte C.; Williams, D. Keith; Chang, Jason Y.; Hall, Richard Whit

    2014-01-01

    Objectives 1. Determine whether stress in preterm infants, measured with salivary cortisol, decreases after five days of Kangaroo Care (KC) compared to five days of Standard Care (SC). 2. To determine whether kangaroo care provides sustainable pain relief beyond the period of skin-to-skin holding. Study Design Preterm infants (n=38) born at 27-30 weeks gestational age were randomized to either the KC or the SC group and received the allocated intervention starting on day of life (DOL) five and continuing for five days. Salivary cortisol was collected on DOL five and again on DOL ten. Differences were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA and t tests. Pain during nasal suctioning over five days was assessed using the Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP). Result 1. Adequate saliva samples for salivary cortisol were collected for 13 KC infants and 11 SC infants. There was no main effect of group (p=0.49), but there was a significant main effect of age (DOL five versus DOL ten), with salivary cortisol levels decreasing in both groups (p=0.02). 2. Pain scores for both groups (n=38) indicted mild to moderate pain during suctioning, with no significant difference in pain scores between groups. Conclusion 1. KC did not affect salivary cortisol levels in preterm neonates, but levels in both the KC and SC groups decreased over time from DOL five to ten. Salivary cortisol may vary with age of infant. 2. Infants experience pain during routine suctioning and may require pain management. PMID:24246458

  2. Oral glucose for pain relief during examination for retinopathy of prematurity: a masked randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Marlene Coelho; Eckert, Gabriela Unchalo; Fortes, Bárbara Gastal Borges; Filho, João Borges Fortes; Silveira, Rita C.; Procianoy, Renato S

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Ophthalmologic examination for retinopathy of prematurity is a painful procedure. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions have been proposed to reduce pain during eye examinations. This study aims to evaluate the analgesic effect of 25% glucose using a validated pain scale during the first eye examination for retinopathy of prematurity in preterm infants with birth weight ≤1,500 g and/or gestational age ≤32 weeks. METHODS: A masked, randomized clinical trial for one dose of 1 ml of oral 25% glucose solution 2 minutes before the first ophthalmologic examination for retinopathy of prematurity was conducted between March 2008 and April 2010. The results were compared to those of a control group that did not receive oral glucose solution. Pain was evaluated using a Neonatal Infant Pain Scale immediately before and immediately after the ophthalmologic examination in both groups. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00648687 RESULTS: One hundred and twenty-four patients who were examined for the first time for retinopathy of prematurity were included. Seventy were included in the intervention group and 54 in the control group. The number of patients with pain immediately before the procedure was similar in both groups. The number of patients with pain after ophthalmologic examination was 15.7% in the intervention group and 68.5% in the control group (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: One ml of oral 25% glucose solution given 2 minutes before an ophthalmologic examination for retinopathy of prematurity was an effective measure for pain relief. PMID:23525316

  3. Predictors of Pain Relief Following Spinal Cord Stimulation in Chronic Back and Leg Pain and Failed Back Surgery Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Regression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Rod S; Desai, Mehul J; Rigoard, Philippe; Taylor, Rebecca J

    2014-01-01

    We sought to assess the extent to which pain relief in chronic back and leg pain (CBLP) following spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is influenced by patient-related factors, including pain location, and technology factors. A number of electronic databases were searched with citation searching of included papers and recent systematic reviews. All study designs were included. The primary outcome was pain relief following SCS, we also sought pain score (pre- and post-SCS). Multiple predictive factors were examined: location of pain, history of back surgery, initial level of pain, litigation/worker's compensation, age, gender, duration of pain, duration of follow-up, publication year, continent of data collection, study design, quality score, method of SCS lead implant, and type of SCS lead. Between-study association in predictive factors and pain relief were assessed by meta-regression. Seventy-four studies (N = 3,025 patients with CBLP) met the inclusion criteria; 63 reported data to allow inclusion in a quantitative analysis. Evidence of substantial statistical heterogeneity (P < 0.0001) in level of pain relief following SCS was noted. The mean level of pain relief across studies was 58% (95% CI: 53% to 64%, random effects) at an average follow-up of 24 months. Multivariable meta-regression analysis showed no predictive patient or technology factors. SCS was effective in reducing pain irrespective of the location of CBLP. This review supports SCS as an effective pain relieving treatment for CBLP with predominant leg pain with or without a prior history of back surgery. Randomized controlled trials need to confirm the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of SCS in the CLBP population with predominant low back pain. PMID:23834386

  4. Effectiveness of paracervical block for pain relief in women undergoing hysterosalpingography

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Shikha; Inamdar, Dattaprasad B.; Majumdar, Abha; Jain, Deepak K.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the potential benefit, in terms of pain relief, of the paracervical block with 2% lignocaine in women undergoing hysterosalpingography (HSG). STUDY DESIGN: This study was a prospective randomized controlled study. SETTINGS: This study was conducted in infertility clinic of a tertiary care center. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Four hundred and six patients undergoing HSG as a part of infertility evaluation were included in the study. These women were randomized into two groups: Group I received paracervical block with 2% lignocaine at the time of HSG (n = 53) and Group II (n = 53) served as control. Hyoscine (10 mg) oral tablet was given to all the patients 30 min before the procedure. Pain perception during the procedure was analyzed by the patient between 0 and 10 on a numeric rating scale, immediately after HSG. RESULTS: The baseline demographic characteristics of participants in two groups were similar. Mean pain score immediately after HSG in the study group and control group was 4.84 ± 2.56 and 5.21 ± 1.89, respectively (P = 0.21). CONCLUSIONS: There is no benefit of paracervical block with 2% lignocaine, in terms of pain relief, in women undergoing HSG. PMID:28216910

  5. Indomethacin submicron particle capsules provide effective pain relief in patients with acute pain: a phase 3 study.

    PubMed

    Altman, Roy; Daniels, Stephen; Young, Clarence L

    2013-11-01

    Although frequently prescribed to relieve acute pain in patients, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are associated with dose-related gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and renal complications. Investigational, submicron particle NSAIDs are being developed that could provide effective pain relief at lower doses than currently available oral NSAIDs. This is the first phase 3 study evaluating the analgesic efficacy and safety of lower-dose indomethacin submicron particle capsules in patients following elective surgery. This multicenter, double-blind study enrolled patients aged 18 to 68 years who underwent bunionectomy under regional anesthesia. Patients with a pain intensity rating of ≥40 mm on a 100-mm Visual Analog Scale were randomized to receive indomethacin submicron particle capsules (40 mg 3 times daily [TID], 40 mg twice daily [BID], or 20 mg TID), celecoxib (400 mg loading dose, then 200 mg BID), or placebo. The primary efficacy parameter was the overall (summed) pain intensity difference measured by a Visual Analog Scale during a period of 48 hours. Scheduled assessments measured secondary efficacy parameters such as patient pain intensity differences. Indomethacin submicron particle capsules 40 mg 3 times daily (509.6 ± 91.9 overall [summed] pain intensity difference), 40 mg twice daily (328.0 ± 92.9 overall [summed] pain intensity difference), and 20 mg 3 times daily (380.5 ± 92.9 overall [summed] pain intensity difference) reduced pain intensity from 0 to 48 hours (P ≤ 0.046 for all 3 groups) compared with placebo (67.8 ± 91.4 overall [summed] pain intensity difference). There was some evidence of patient analgesia for celecoxib (279.4 ± 91.9 overall [summed] pain intensity difference; P = 0.103). Some evidence of pain control was observed in patients as early as 2 hours following administration of indomethacin submicron particle capsules and was sustained throughout the treatment period. Indomethacin submicron particle capsules were

  6. Pain management in occupational health: a guide for non-narcotic pain relief.

    PubMed

    Ferriolo, Angela E; Conlon, Helen Acree

    2012-12-01

    Narcotic pain management is currently a topic of concern in the United States; the latest concerns are both legal and ethical. Narcotics are frequently prescribed medications that, when improperly used or supervised, can cause death. Legal concerns include prescribing narcotics without performing detailed health-related evaluations, not recognizing those seeking drugs for personal recreational use, and clients diverting drugs to others for financial gain. Injured workers need to have pain controlled and be mentally safe to perform their job duties. This article identifies types of pain, comorbidities, and alternative methods of pain management beyond narcotic therapy, as well as discusses guidelines used to initiate narcotic therapy when needed.

  7. Antagonism of Nerve Growth Factor-TrkA Signaling and the Relief of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Mantyh, Patrick W.; Koltzenburg, Martin; Mendell, Lorne M.; Tive, Leslie; Shelton, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) was originally discovered as a neurotrophic factor essential for the survival of sensory and sympathetic neurons during development. However in the adult, NGF has been found to play an important role in nociceptor sensitization following tissue injury. Here we outline mechanisms by which NGF activation of its cognate receptor, tropomyosin-related kinase A receptor, regulates a host of ion channels, receptors, and signaling molecules to enhance acute and chronic pain. Further, we document that peripherally restricted antagonism of NGF-tropomyosin-related kinase A receptor signaling is effective for controlling human pain while appearing to maintain normal nociceptor function. Understanding whether there are any unexpected adverse events as well as how humans may change their behavior and use of the injured/degenerating tissue following significant pain relief without sedation will be required to fully appreciate the patient populations that may benefit from these therapies targeting NGF. PMID:21602663

  8. The Efficacy of Thermotherapy and Cryotherapy on Pain Relief in Patients with Acute Low Back Pain, A Clinical Trial Study

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan, Morteza

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Acute low back pain is one of the most common health problems especially in industrialized countries where 75 per cent of the population develop it at least once during their life. This study examined the efficacy of thermotherapy and cryotherapy, alongside a routine pharmacologic treatment, on pain relief in patients with acute low back pain referring an orthopedic clinic in Shahrekord, Iran. Materials and Methods: This clinical trial study was conducted on 87 patients randomly assigned to three (thermotherapy and cryotherapy as intervention, and naproxen as control) groups of 29 each. The first (thermotherapy) group underwent treatment with hot water bag and naproxen, the second (cryotherapy) group was treated with ice and naproxen, and the naproxen group was only treated with naproxen, all for one week. All patients were examined on 0, 3rd, 8th, and 15th day after the first visit and the data gathered by McGill Pain Questionnaire. The data were analyzed by SPSS software using paired t-test, ANOVA, and chi-square. Results: In this study, mean age of the patients was 34.48 (20–50) years and 51.72 per cent were female. Thermotherapy patients reported significantly less pain compared to cryotherapy and control (p≤0.05). In thermotherapy and cryotherapy groups, mean pain in the first visit was 12.70±3.7 and 12.06±2.6, and on the 15th day after intervention 0.75±0.37 and 2.20±2.12, respectively. Conclusion: The results indicated that the application of thermo–therapy and cryotherapy accompanied with a pharmacologic treatment could relieve pain in the patients with acute low back pain. PMID:25386469

  9. Percutaneous Peripheral Nerve Stimulation for the Treatment of Chronic Low Back Pain: Two Clinical Case Reports of Sustained Pain Relief.

    PubMed

    Kapural, Leonardo; Gilmore, Christopher A; Chae, John; Rauck, Richard L; Cohen, Steven P; Saulino, Michael F; Wongsarnpigoon, Amorn; McGee, Meredith J; Boggs, Joseph W

    2017-03-14

    As the leading cause of disability among U.S. adults, chronic low back pain (LBP) is one sof the most prevalent and challenging musculoskeletal conditions. Neuromodulation provides an opportunity to reduce or eliminate the use of opioids to treat chronic LBP, but the cost and invasiveness of existing methods have limited its broad adoption, especially earlier in the treatment continuum. The present case report details the results of a novel method of short-term percutaneous peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in 2 subjects with chronic LBP. At the end of the 1-month therapy, stimulation was discontinued and the leads were withdrawn. PNS produced clinically significant improvements in pain (62% average reduction in Brief Pain Inventory Question #5, average pain), and functional outcomes (73% reduction in disability, Oswestry Disability Index; 83% reduction in pain interference, Brief Pain Inventory). Both subjects reduced non-opioid analgesic use by 83%, on average, and the one subject taking opioids ceased using all opioids. The only adverse event was minor skin irritation caused by a topical dressing. The clinically significant improvements were sustained at least 4 months after start of therapy (79% average reduction in pain; both reported minimal disability; 100% reduction in opioids; 74% reduction non-opioids). The results reveal the utility of this novel, short-term approach and its potential as a minimally invasive neuromodulation therapy for use earlier in the treatment continuum to produce sustained pain relief and reduce or eliminate the need for analgesic medications, including opioids, as well as more expensive and invasive surgical or therapeutic alternatives. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Does pain relief influence recovery of consciousness? A case report of a patient treated with ziconotide.

    PubMed

    Lanzillo, Bernardo; Loreto, Vincenzo; Calabrese, Claudio; Estraneo, Anna; Moretta, Pasquale; Trojano, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    For people with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI), access to computers can be difficult, thus several devices have been developed to facilitate their Disorders of consciousness (DOC) are difficult to classify. The degree of consciousness varies from coma to vegetative state or unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS) and minimally conscious state. Correct diagnosis has important ethical and legal implications, and pain may be cause of misdiagnosis. We describe here a patient with traumatic brain injury, classified as UWS. His clinical picture was dominated by spasticity, and pain. He underwent intrathecal treatment of spasticity with baclofen. Improvement was not that expected. However, there was a dramatic improvement when ziconotide was added to relieve pain; the patient began to eat by mouth, talk, and his tracheal tube could be removed and he is currently classified as having severe disability. The suspension of ziconotide caused a clear re-worsening of clinical condition, reverted by his reintroduction. Pain is an important factor in patients with DOC. Anecdotal reports of improved consciousness with intrathecal baclofen therapy may be due to pain relief. Reduction of pain in DOC is important and drugs should not interfere with cognition, and must be effective and manageable. Ziconotide may be one of the possible candidate due to its synergistic antispastic action in combination with baclofen when an intratecal pump has been implanted.

  11. Capacitively Coupled Electric Field for Pain Relief in Patients with Vertebral Fractures and Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Viapiana, Ombretta; Gatti, Davide; de Terlizzi, Francesca; Adami, Silvano

    2009-01-01

    Fragility vertebral fractures often are associated with chronic back pain controlled by analgesic compounds. Capacitive coupling electrical stimulation is a type of electrical stimulation technology approved by the US FDA to noninvasively enhance fracture repair and spinal fusion. These uses suggest it would be a possible treatment for patients with back pain attributable to vertebral fractures. We therefore randomized 51 postmenopausal women with multiple fractures and chronic pain to the use of one of two indistinguishable devices delivering either the standard capacitive coupling electrical stimulation by Osteospine™ (active group) or low intensity pulse (control group). Twenty patients of the active group and 21 of the control group (80%) completed the study for a total duration of 3 months. The mean visual analog scale values for pain and the Quality of Life Questionnaire of the European Foundation for Osteoporosis (QUALEFFO) scores improved in both groups. We observed a relationship between hours of treatments and reductions in pain intensity only in the active group. Capacitive coupling electrical stimulation was not more effective than control treatment when comparing mean visual analog scale pain and QALEFFO scores in the two groups and when adjusting for the hours of treatment. However, the proportion of patients able to discontinue NSAIDs owing to elimination or reduction of pain was greater in the active group than in the control group. We interpret these findings as suggesting capacitive coupling electrical stimulation controls pain in some patients and reduces the use of NSAIDs. Level of Evidence: Level I, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19756902

  12. Mindfulness Meditation-Based Pain Relief Employs Different Neural Mechanisms Than Placebo and Sham Mindfulness Meditation-Induced Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, Nichole M.; Farris, Suzan R.; Ray, Jenna N.; Jung, Youngkyoo; McHaffie, John G.; Coghill, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Mindfulness meditation reduces pain in experimental and clinical settings. However, it remains unknown whether mindfulness meditation engages pain-relieving mechanisms other than those associated with the placebo effect (e.g., conditioning, psychosocial context, beliefs). To determine whether the analgesic mechanisms of mindfulness meditation are different from placebo, we randomly assigned 75 healthy, human volunteers to 4 d of the following: (1) mindfulness meditation, (2) placebo conditioning, (3) sham mindfulness meditation, or (4) book-listening control intervention. We assessed intervention efficacy using psychophysical evaluation of experimental pain and functional neuroimaging. Importantly, all cognitive manipulations (i.e., mindfulness meditation, placebo conditioning, sham mindfulness meditation) significantly attenuated pain intensity and unpleasantness ratings when compared to rest and the control condition (p < 0.05). Mindfulness meditation reduced pain intensity (p = 0.032) and pain unpleasantness (p < 0.001) ratings more than placebo analgesia. Mindfulness meditation also reduced pain intensity (p = 0.030) and pain unpleasantness (p = 0.043) ratings more than sham mindfulness meditation. Mindfulness-meditation-related pain relief was associated with greater activation in brain regions associated with the cognitive modulation of pain, including the orbitofrontal, subgenual anterior cingulate, and anterior insular cortex. In contrast, placebo analgesia was associated with activation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and deactivation of sensory processing regions (secondary somatosensory cortex). Sham mindfulness meditation-induced analgesia was not correlated with significant neural activity, but rather by greater reductions in respiration rate. This study is the first to demonstrate that mindfulness-related pain relief is mechanistically distinct from placebo analgesia. The elucidation of this distinction confirms the existence of multiple

  13. Would Larger Radiation Fields Lead to a Faster Onset of Pain Relief in the Palliation of Bone Metastases?

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Edward Makhani, Leila; Culleton, Shaelyn; Makhani, Nadiya; Davis, Lori; Campos, Sarah; Sinclair, Emily

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: Hemibody irradiation has been shown to relieve bony metastatic pain within 24-48 hours of treatment, whereas for local external beam radiation, onset of pain relief is 1-4 weeks after radiation. The primary objective of this study is to examine whether there is a relationship between the areas of radiation treatment and onset of pain relief. Methods and Materials: From Jan 1999 to Jan 2002, a total of 653 patients with symptomatic bone metastases were treated with external beam radiation. Pain scores and analgesic consumption were recorded at baseline and Weeks 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12. The areas of radiation treatment for all patients were calculated, then correlated with the response and analyzed in various ways. We first compared pain score alone with mean radiation field size. Second, we combined pain score and analgesic consumption. Last, we implemented the International Consensus end points for pain score and analgesic intake. Results: Assessment of 653 patients showed no significant correlation comparing pain scores alone with radiation field area, with the exception of Week 4 for partial responders. Again, no significant correlation was found when combining both analgesic intake and pain score against radiation field size. Even when implementing the International Consensus end point definitions for radiation response, the only significant correlation between radiation field size and response was observed in Week 2 for partial response. Conclusion: There was no statistical significance between mean areas of radiation treatment with the onset of pain relief.

  14. Technique for creation of artificial pneumothorax for pain relief during radiofrequency ablation of peripheral lung tumors: report of seven cases.

    PubMed

    Hiraki, Takao; Gobara, Hideo; Shibamoto, Kentaro; Mimura, Hidefumi; Soda, Yuko; Uka, Mayu; Masaoka, Yoshihisa; Toyooka, Shinichi; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2011-04-01

    This report describes seven cases in which a pneumothorax was artificially created for relief from severe pain that occurred during radiofrequency (RF) ablation of peripheral lung tumors. In this procedure, the multitined probe surrounding the lesion was advanced into the chest, displacing the tines and the peripheral tumor away from the parietal pleura and the chest wall and resulting in pain relief in one patient; in the remaining patients, an intravenous catheter was also introduced, followed by the administration of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) into the space between the tumor and the parietal pleura. The pain decreased considerably immediately after this procedure. No complication related to the creation of the artificial pneumothorax was observed. Creation of an artificial pneumothorax is a safe and effective method for pain relief.

  15. Intrathecal clonidine as a sole analgesic for pain relief after cesarean section.

    PubMed

    Filos, K S; Goudas, L C; Patroni, O; Polyzou, V

    1992-08-01

    In a small number of studies and isolated case reports, intrathecally administered clonidine has been reported to relieve intractable cancer pain and to prolong spinal anesthesia induced by various local anesthetics. A double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial was carried out in order to evaluate the effect of intrathecal clonidine on pain following cesarean section. Twenty patients who underwent elective cesarean section received, 45 min after general anesthesia, either 150 micrograms (n = 10) clonidine or saline (control group, n = 10) intrathecally. Pain scores were lower in clonidine- than saline-treated patients from 20 to 120 min after intrathecal injection, as measured by a visual pain linear analog scale (P less than 0.05). Pain relief, in terms of the first supplemental analgesic request by patients, lasted 414 +/- 128 min after intrathecal clonidine and 181 +/- 169 min (mean +/- SD) (P less than 0.01) after saline. Clonidine decreased systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressures compared to baseline values (P less than 0.05), but heart rate and central venous pressure were unaffected (difference not significant). Maximal reduction of systolic arterial pressure was 15 +/- 9%, of diastolic arterial pressure 22 +/- 12%, and of mean arterial pressure 18 +/- 12%. Clonidine did not affect arterial hemoglobin oxygen saturation or PaCO2. Patients in the clonidine group were significantly more sedated (P less than 0.05) and more frequently reported a dry mouth (P less than 0.01) compared to the normal saline group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Between pain and pleasure: Pregnant women's knowledge and preferences for pain relief in labor, a pilot study from Zaria, Northern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ogboli-Nwasor, Elizabeth O.; Adaji, Sunday E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pain relief in labor remains a hot topic and these debates get louder by the day as more women become aware of their rights to better quality of care in labor. This study was conceived in a background where the practice of pain relief in labor is evolving and where women are seeking to fulfill their need for pain-free labor. Objective: To investigate the knowledge, utilization and preferences of methods of pain relief in labor by expectant mothers in order to design a labor analgesia program. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire-based descriptive study involving 124 antenatal clients in a teaching hospital over a 1 week period. Descriptive statistics were carried out using SPSS for windows version 17. Results: The mean age of clients was 28.8 years (standard deviation = 5.17) with median parity of two and mean gestational age was 31.5 weeks. Majority of the respondents (47.9%) were of Hausa/Fulani ethnicity and 97.6% had primary school level education. Majority (87.3%) had heard about pain relief methods with the hospital being the source in 79% of cases. The most common method ever heard about was epidural analgesia (69.4%). Only 4% (n = 5) of respondents remembered ever using any form of pain relief agent in labor, of which three received parenteral opioids. In their current pregnancies, 45.2% consented to the use of pain relief in labor; of which, epidural analgesia was preferred by 92.9% (n = 52). Fear of adverse effects on self and infants were cited as reasons for non-consent by some respondents while others had no reason. Conclusion: The study reveals a high awareness of pain relief methods which is not matched by utilization and low knowledge about side-effects, although fear of side-effects is a factor for under-utilization. There is a need to educate adequately as well provide high quality pain relief services in labor in order to dispel with myths, misconceptions and fears associated with the use of methods of pain relief in labor. PMID

  17. Buprenorphine for pain relief in mice: repeated injections vs sustained-release depot formulation.

    PubMed

    Jirkof, P; Tourvieille, A; Cinelli, P; Arras, M

    2015-07-01

    Sustained-release formulations of analgesic drugs are promising alternatives to repeated drug injections. Here, we compared a sustained-release formulation of buprenorphine (SB, 2.2 mg/kg) with a standard protocol of three injections of buprenorphine (Temgesic, 0.1 mg/kg/8 h) in mice. Buprenorphine serum concentration and analgesic action (thermal sensitivity) were determined in healthy mice. Additionally, the pain relief properties of both protocols were assessed after laparotomy using physiological and ethological measures of pain and recovery. Serum concentrations and thermal sensitivity tests indicated duration of action of at least 4 h (but less than 8 h) with the Temgesic protocol, and 24-48 h with SB. Behavioural and clinical parameters indicated at least partial pain relief after surgery for both protocols. Observed side-effects of buprenorphine independent of the protocol were increased activity, disturbed circadian rhythm and several abnormal behaviours. A tendency for decreased food and water intake as well as body weight reduction was also seen. Body weight decreased significantly in animals that received three injections of Temgesic, regardless of whether surgery was performed or not (P = 0.015; P = 0.023), hinting at a stress response towards this repeated intervention. In conclusion, an application interval of 8 h (Temgesic) appears too long and might lead to repeated periods with insufficient analgesia in animals undergoing lasting and/or substantial pain after surgery. In comparison to the standard protocol, SB provided a long-lasting, assured analgesia without possible stressful repeated injections in a standard surgical model, with only limited and acceptable behavioural side-effects.

  18. Ibuprofen and/or paracetamol (acetaminophen) for pain relief after surgical removal of lower wisdom teeth, a Cochrane systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bailey, E; Worthington, H; Coulthard, P

    2014-04-01

    This paper compares the beneficial and harmful effects of paracetamol, ibuprofen and the novel combination of both in a single tablet for pain relief following the surgical removal of lower wisdom teeth. In this systematic review only randomised controlled double-blinded clinical trials were included. We calculated the proportion of patients with at least 50% pain relief at 2 and 6 hours post dosing, along with the proportion of participants using rescue medication at 6 and 8 hours. Adverse events were also analysed. Data was meta-analysed where possible. Seven studies were included with a total of 2,241 participants enrolled. Ibuprofen 400 mg is superior to 1,000 mg paracetamol with a risk ratio for at least 50% pain relief at 6 hours of 1.47 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.28 to 1.69). For the combined drug, the risk ratio for at least 50% maximum pain relief over 6 hours is 1.77 (95% CI 1.32 to 2.39) based on total pain relief (TOTPAR) data. There is high quality evidence that ibuprofen is superior to paracetamol. The novel combination drug shows encouraging results when compared to the single drugs (based on two trials).

  19. More in hope than expectation: a systematic review of women's expectations and experience of pain relief in labour

    PubMed Central

    Lally, Joanne E; Murtagh, Madeleine J; Macphail, Sheila; Thomson, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Background Childbirth is one of the most painful events that a woman is likely to experience, the multi-dimensional aspect and intensity of which far exceeds disease conditions. A woman's lack of knowledge about the risks and benefits of the various methods of pain relief can heighten anxiety. Women are increasingly expected, and are expecting, to participate in decisions about their healthcare. Involvement should allow women to make better-informed decisions; the National Institute for Clinical Excellence has stated that we need effective ways of supporting pregnant women in making informed decisions during labour. Our aim was to systematically review the empirical literature on women's expectations and experiences of pain and pain relief during labour, as well as their involvement in the decision-making process. Methods A systematic review was conducted using the following databases: Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Bath Information and Database Service (BIDS), Excerpta Medica Database Guide (EMBASE), Midwives Information and Resource (MIDIRS), Sociological Abstracts and PsychINFO. Studies that examined experience and expectations of pain, and its relief in labour, were appraised and the findings were integrated into a systematic review. Results Appraisal revealed four key themes: the level and type of pain, pain relief, involvement in decision-making and control. Studies predominantly showed that women underestimated the pain they would experience. Women may hope for a labour free of pain relief, but many found that they needed or benefited from it. There is a distinction between women's desire for a drug-free labour and the expectation that they may need some sort of pain relief. Inaccurate or unrealistic expectations about pain may mean that women are not prepared appropriately for labour. Many women acknowledged that they wanted to participate in decision

  20. Efficacy and Effects of Parenteral Pethidine or Meptazinol and Regional Analgesia for Pain Relief during Delivery. A Comparative Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Singer, J.; Jank, A.; Amara, S.; Stepan, P. D. H.; Kaisers, U.; Hoehne, C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Peripartum anesthesia may consist of parenteral opioids and/or regional analgesia. There is only limited data in the literature comparing both methods in daily obstetric practice. This observational study investigated the opioids pethidine and meptazinol as well as regional analgesics with regard to their administration, efficacy, side effects and subjective maternal satisfaction with therapy. The rates of secondary regional analgesia administration after administration of the respective opioid served as a means of evaluating treatment. Methods: This study collected data on pain management during vaginal delivery in a German university hospital over a twelve month period. Severity of pain was measured intrapartum using a numerical rating scale. Maternal, neonatal and delivery-related data were obtained postpartum from the clinical records and from the mothers using a questionnaire. Results: The study is based on data obtained from 449 deliveries. Pain relief achieved by the administration of pethidine and meptazinol was similarly low; maternal satisfaction with the respective therapy was high. Meptazinol was usually administered intravenously (83 % vs. 6 %; p < 0.001), repeatedly (27 % vs. 6 %; p < 0.001) and closer to the birth (1.9 ± 2.7 h vs. 2.6 ± 2.8 h; p < 0.05) compared to pethidine. Secondary regional analgesia was more common after the administration of pethidine (16 % vs. 8 %; p < 0.05). Regional analgesia resulted in greater pain relief compared to opioid therapy (78 % vs. 24 % after 30 min; p < 0.001) and was associated with longer times to delivery (7.6 ± 2.5 h vs. 5.7 ± 2.5 h; p < 0.001) and higher levels of maternal satisfaction with therapy (6.1 ± 1.2 vs. 4.8 ± 1.6 on a 7-point scale; p < 0.001). Conclusion: In daily clinical practice, meptazinol can be adapted more readily to changes during birth and requires less secondary analgesia. Regional neuraxial

  1. Effect of breast-feeding on pain relief during infant immunization injections.

    PubMed

    Abdel Razek, Aida; Az El-Dein, Nagwa

    2009-04-01

    Using a quasi-experimental design, this study was conducted in two maternal & child health centres in Jordan to examine the effects of breast-feeding on pain relief during neonatal immunization injections. Inclusion criteria were first year of age, breast-fed and no concurrent illness. Infants were divided into two groups (of 60 infants for each). One is intervention group: mothers were taken to a private room, seated and reclined on a comfortable chair with their infants awake in their arms, without cloth and with clean diapers. The mothers cradled their infants during breast-feeding to maintain full-body skin-to-skin contact during immunization injections. The other is control group: infants were observed during routine immunization in maternal & child health centres. Pain responses of infants during and after immunization were assessed by using Facial Pain Rating Scale and Neonatal/Infant Pain Scale (NIPS), before, during and after the procedure. Infants' heart rates and duration of crying for both groups were calculated. Findings revealed that the crying time was shorter in intervention (breast-fed) group than in the control group with a statistically significant difference in the duration of crying during and after immunization. We concluded that, breast-feeding and skin-to-skin contact significantly reduced crying in infants receiving immunization.

  2. Moxibustion for pain relief in patients with primary dysmenorrhea: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Bo, Linna; Lao, Lixing; Chen, Jiao; Yu, Siyi; Yu, Zheng; Tang, Hongzhi; Yi, Ling; Wu, Xi; Yang, Jie; Liang, Fanrong

    2017-01-01

    Background Though moxibustion is frequently used to treat primary dysmenorrhea in China, relevant evidence supporting its effectiveness is still scanty. Methods This study was a pragmatic randomized, conventional drug controlled, open-labeled clinical trial. After initial screen, 152 eligible participants were averagely randomized to receive two different treatment strategies: Moxibustion and conventional drugs. Participants and practitioners were not blinded in this study. The duration of each treatment was 3 months. The primary outcome was pain relief measured by the Visual Analogue Scale. The menstrual pain severity was recorded in a menstrual pain diary. Results 152 eligible patients were included but only 133 of them eventually completed the whole treatment course. The results showed that the menstrual pain intensity in experimental group and control group was reduced from 6.38±1.28 and 6.41±1.29, respectively, at baseline, to 2.54±1.41 and 2.47±1.29 after treatment. The pain reduction was not significantly different between these two groups (P = 0.76), however; the pain intensity was significantly reduced relative to baseline for each group (P<0.01). Three months after treatment, the effectiveness of moxibustion sustained and started to be superior to the drug’s effect (-0.87, 95%CI -1.32 to -0.42, P<0.01). Secondary outcome analyses showed that moxibustion was as effective as drugs in alleviating menstrual pain-related symptoms. The serum levels of pain mediators, such as PGF2α, OT, vWF, β-EP, PGE2, were significantly improved after treatment in both groups (P<0.05). No adverse events were reported in this trial. Conclusions Both moxibustion and conventional drug showed desirable merits in managing menstrual pain, given their treatment effects and economic costs. This study as a pragmatic trial only demonstrates the effectiveness, not the efficacy, of moxibustion for menstrual pain. It can’t rule out the effect of psychological factors during

  3. Monoaminergic Antidepressants in the Relief of Pain: Potential Therapeutic Utility of Triple Reuptake Inhibitors (TRIs)

    PubMed Central

    Hache, Guillaume; Coudore, François; Gardier, Alain M.; Guiard, Bruno P.

    2011-01-01

    Over 75% of depressed patients suffer from painful symptoms predicting a greater severity and a less favorable outcome of depression. Imaging, anatomical and functional studies have demonstrated the existence of common brain structures, neuronal pathways and neurotransmitters in depression and pain. In particular, the ascending serotonergic and noradrenergic pathways originating from the raphe nuclei and the locus coeruleus; respectively, send projections to the limbic system. Such pathways control many of the psychological functions that are disturbed in depression and in the perception of pain. On the other hand, the descending pathways, from monoaminergic nuclei to the spinal cord, are specifically implicated in the inhibition of nociception providing rationale for the use of serotonin (5-HT) and/or norepinephrine (NE) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs, NRIs, SNRIs), in the relief of pain. Compelling evidence suggests that dopamine (DA) is also involved in the pathophysiology and treatment of depression. Indeed, recent insights have demonstrated a central role for DA in analgesia through an action at both the spinal and suprasinal levels including brain regions such as the periaqueductal grey (PAG), the thalamus, the basal ganglia and the limbic system. In this context, dopaminergic antidepressants (i.e., containing dopaminergic activity), such as bupropion, nomifensine and more recently triple reuptake inhibitors (TRIs), might represent new promising therapeutic tools in the treatment of painful symptoms with depression. Nevertheless, whether the addition of the dopaminergic component produces more robust effects than single- or dual-acting agents, has yet to be demonstrated. This article reviews the main pathways regulating pain transmission in relation with the monoaminergic systems. It then focuses on the current knowledge regarding the in vivo pharmacological properties and mechanism of action of monoaminergic antidepressants including SSRIs, NRIs, SNRIs and TRIs

  4. The Effect of Magnesium Sulfate on Renal Colic Pain Relief; a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jokar, Abolfazl; Cyrus, Ali; Babaei, Maryam; Taheri, Majid; Almasi-Hashiani, Amir; Behzadinia, Ezatollah; Yazdanbakhsh, Arash

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Renal colic can be managed by preventing the contraction movements of ureter muscles. By reducing acetylcholine in the nerve terminals, magnesium sulfate could be effective in this regard. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of magnesium sulfate on acute renal colic pain relief. Method: The present study was a double-blind clinical trial in which the patients suffering from acute renal colic were randomly divided into 2 groups of who either received standard protocol (intravenous infusion of 0.1 mg/Kg morphine sulfate, 30 mg of Ketorolac, and 100 ml normal saline as placebo/15 minutes) or standard protocol plus 15 mg/Kg of intravenous magnesium sulfate 50%/100 ml normal saline/15 minutes. Severity of patients’ pain was measured by visual analogue scale (VAS) at baseline, and 30 and 60 minutes after infusion. The collected data were analyzed using STATA statistical software. Results: 100 cases were randomly allocated to intervention or control group. The two groups were similar in baseline pain score and demographic characteristics. At 30 and 60 minutes, mean pain score was less in the intervention group compared to the control group. Moreover, the difference between the two groups was statistically significant regarding the additional amount of morphine, suggesting that the intervention group needed less additional morphine than the control group. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that Magnesium sulfate can be used as an adjunct drug in treatment of patients suffering from renal colic. It not only alleviates the pain in the patients, but also diminishes the need for pain medications. PMID:28286832

  5. [Pain relief with cannabinoids-- the importance of endocannabinoids and cannabinoids for pain therapy].

    PubMed

    Karst, Matthias; Bernateck, Michael

    2008-07-01

    The endocannabinoid system reduces sensitization processes. Low doses of cannabinoids may enhance the potency of opioid-drugs and reduce the risk of tolerance to opioids. So far no cannabinoid has been approved for the treatment of acute pain due to lack of consistent data. In contrast, a Cannabis Based Medicine spray consisting of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol has been approved for the treatment of neuropathic pain in patients with multiple sclerosis. The adjunct of cannabidiol and the oromucosal formulation increase the therapeutic index of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol. The differentiation of analgetic effects and cannabimimetic effects may be increased while compounds--such as ajulemic acid--are used which preferentially act on peripheral cannabinoid receptors and exert receptor independent effects. A further approach in this direction is the use of enzymes which metabolize endocannabinoids.

  6. Implementation of a portable electronic system for providing pain relief to patellofemoral pain syndrome patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang Chien, Jia-Ren; Lin, Guo-Hong; Hsu, Ar-Tyan

    2011-10-01

    In this study, a portable electromyogram (EMG) system and a stimulator are developed for patellofemoral pain syndrome patients, with the objective of reducing the pain experienced by these patients; the patellar pain is caused by an imbalance between the vastus medialis obliquus (VMO) and the vastus lateralis (VL). The EMG measurement circuit and the electrical stimulation device proposed in this study are specifically designed for the VMO and the VL; they are capable of real-time waveform recording, possess analyzing functions, and can upload their measurement data to a computer for storage and analysis. The system can calculate and record the time difference between the EMGs of the VMO and the VL, as well as the signal strengths of both the EMGs. As soon as the system detects the generation of the EMG of the VL, it quickly calculates and processes the event and stimulates the VMO as feedback through electrical stimulation units, in order to induce its contraction. The system can adjust the signal strength, time length, and the sequence of the electrical stimulation, both manually and automatically. The output waveform of the electrical stimulation circuit is a dual-phase asymmetrical pulse waveform. The primary function of the electrical simulation circuit is to ensure that the muscles contract effectively. The performance of the device can be seen that the width of each pulse is 20-1000 μs, the frequency of each pulse is 10-100 Hz, and current strength is 10-60 mA.

  7. OPRM1 and ABCB1 polymorphisms and their effect on postoperative pain relief with piritramide.

    PubMed

    Bartošová, O; Polanecký, O; Perlík, F; Adámek, S; Slanař, O

    2015-01-01

    Genetic factors may contribute to the differential response to opioids. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between polymorphisms of µ1-opioid receptor gene OPRM1 (rs1799971), and P-glycoprotein transporter gene ABCB1 (rs1045642, rs2032582), and piritramide efficacy under postoperative patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). In 51 patients, OPRM1 variant was associated with decreased efficacy in early postoperative period evidenced by sum of pain intensity difference in the 0-6 h postoperative period (SPID(0-6)), (F=3.27, p=0.029). Mean (SD) SPID(0-6) was observed in the 118AA genotype 22.9 (6.1) mm, which was significantly higher from the 118GG genotype 10.0 (4.4) mm, p=0.006. The lowest cumulative dose was recorded in 118AA genotype 19.1 (9.8) mg, which was significantly less than in the 118GG genotype group 36.6 (6.1) mg, p=0.017. Opioid-induced adverse effects were observed in 11, 30, and 100 % of patients in 118AA, 118AG, and 118GG genotype groups, respectively (p<0.05). Piritramide efficacy and safety was not significantly affected by ABCB1 (rs1045642, rs2032582) polymorphisms. Variant OPRM1 118G allele is associated with decreased acute postoperative pain relief after piritramide. Decreased efficacy leads to higher drug consumption under PCA settings, which however, does not fully compensate insufficient pain relief, but increases incidence of adverse effects.

  8. The effect of oral tizanidine on postoperative pain relief after elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Talakoub, Reihanak; Abbasi, Saeed; Maghami, Elham; Zavareh, Sayyed Morteza Heidari Tabaei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cholecystectomy is considered as the most important and relatively common postoperative pain control often begins in recovery room by using systemic narcotics that may have some side effects. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of premedication with oral tizanidine on pain relief after elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Materials and Methods: In this double-blinded clinical trial, 70 adults of American Society of Anesthesiologist physiologic state 1 and 2 scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia were studied and randomly divided in two study and control groups. Ninety minutes before the induction of anesthesia, patients received either 4 mg tizanidine (study group) orally in 50cc or the same volume of plain water as a placebo (control group). Then, the vital signs, pain intensity, duration of stay in recovery, and the analgesic consumption were measured and then compared in both groups during 24 h postoperatively. Results: There was no significant difference in patient characteristics, with respect to age, weight, gender, and duration of anesthesia and surgery between the groups (P > 0.05). The pain intensity, need for analgesic drugs (34.57 ± 8.88 mg vs. 101.86 ± 5.08 mg), and the duration of stay in recovery room (67.43 ± 1.59 min vs. 79.57 ± 5.48 min) were significantly lower in tizanidine group than that of the control group. Conclusion: Oral administration of 4 mg tizanidine before laparoscopic cholecystectomy reduces postoperative pain, opioid consumption, and consequence of the duration of stay in recovery room without any complication. PMID:26962521

  9. A new series of oral medications for chronic (cancer) pain relief.

    PubMed

    Baker, J P

    1984-05-01

    This new program of pain medication provides more even pain relief, avoiding the peaks and valleys of the traditional injections. Patients remain lucid, slightly euphoric, and pain free--even from deep pain. The family is capable of coping and treating the patient in their home, without having to contend with anger, hostility, and frustration. The patients are cooperative, not as demanding, and for the most part, are able to verbalize freely about their impending death to family members and friends in such a manner that when death does occur, it is peaceful . We have not encountered any addiction/habituation problems. We have not experienced any failures as long as the patient could take the oral medication. With continuous examination and evaluation, we have avoided any adverse drug reactions by tailoring the cocktail to the patient's needs and responses on a continuous basis. When changing from injections or other medications to the cocktail program, or when changing from one cocktail to another, the patient is assured that the old medication is available on demand. Should a patient become anxious or fearful that his cocktail will not always work, he is assured that there are others that will. A pain-free patient relieves the anxiety of the family, an important and welcome fact to be considered. By monitoring such factors as dosage, volume, taste, texture, and color, as well as offering other flavoring (cinnamon, lemon, cherry), we have not experienced any patient refusal. Once on the program, their self-respect is regained and their personal pride and sense of well-being are reestablished.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Pain behaviour after castration of piglets; effect of pain relief with lidocaine and/or meloxicam.

    PubMed

    Kluivers-Poodt, M; Zonderland, J J; Verbraak, J; Lambooij, E; Hellebrekers, L J

    2013-07-01

    Behavioural responses and the effect of lidocaine and meloxicam on behaviour of piglets after castration were studied. A total of 144 piglets of 2 to 5 days of age were allocated to one of six treatments: castration (CAST), castration with lidocaine (LIDO), castration with meloxicam (MELO), castration with lidocaine and meloxicam (L + M), handling (SHAM) and no handling (NONE). Behaviour was observed for 5 days after the procedure, growth until weaning was recorded and characteristics of the castration wound noted. MELO piglets showed significantly (P < 0.05) more no pain-related behaviour than CAST and LIDO at the afternoon after castration, and were not significantly different from SHAM and NONE. LIDO piglets showed an increase (P < 0.001) in tail wagging, lasting for 3 days. This increase was not seen in L + M piglets. The occurrence of several behaviours changed with age, independent of treatment. A treatment effect on growth was not found. Wound healing was rapid in all treatments, but thickening of the heal was observed in several piglets, suggesting perturbation in the cicatrization process. Our study showed a pain-relieving effect of meloxicam after castration. Local anaesthesia resulted in piglets performing more tail wagging during the first few days after castration, which was prevented by administering meloxicam in combination with local anaesthesia.

  11. Pain-relief learning in flies, rats, and man: basic research and applied perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Bertram; Yarali, Ayse; Diegelmann, Sören; Wotjak, Carsten T.; Pauli, Paul; Fendt, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Memories relating to a painful, negative event are adaptive and can be stored for a lifetime to support preemptive avoidance, escape, or attack behavior. However, under unfavorable circumstances such memories can become overwhelmingly powerful. They may trigger excessively negative psychological states and uncontrollable avoidance of locations, objects, or social interactions. It is therefore obvious that any process to counteract such effects will be of value. In this context, we stress from a basic-research perspective that painful, negative events are “Janus-faced” in the sense that there are actually two aspects about them that are worth remembering: What made them happen and what made them cease. We review published findings from fruit flies, rats, and man showing that both aspects, respectively related to the onset and the offset of the negative event, induce distinct and oppositely valenced memories: Stimuli experienced before an electric shock acquire negative valence as they signal upcoming punishment, whereas stimuli experienced after an electric shock acquire positive valence because of their association with the relieving cessation of pain. We discuss how memories for such punishment- and relief-learning are organized, how this organization fits into the threat-imminence model of defensive behavior, and what perspectives these considerations offer for applied psychology in the context of trauma, panic, and nonsuicidal self-injury. PMID:24643725

  12. Is There a Dose-Response Relationship of Cement Volume With Cement Leakage and Pain Relief After Vertebroplasty?

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhiyi; Hu, Xiaopeng; Wu, Yujie; Zhou, Zihui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if there were dose-response relationships of cement volume with cement leakage and pain relief after percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) for osteoporosis vertebral compression fractures (OVCFs). We collected the patient and procedural characteristics on 108 patients with OVCFs in our hospital who received PVP. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to explore the relationships between these potential influential variables and cement leakage and pain relief at 1 month postoperatively. Multivariate linear and logistic regression analyses were conducted with the pain score reduction and the bone cement leakage as dependent variables and the potential risk factors as independent variables, respectively. The results showed that the independent risk factors for the pain relief were the cement volume injected and fracture age, and for bone cement leakage were the cement volume injected and low-viscosity cement. In conclusion, the present study indicated that there were positive dose-response correlation relationships of cement volume with the incidence of cement leakage and the degree of pain relief after PVP, respectively. Thus, the cement should be injected into the vertebrae as much as possible during the PVP procedure.

  13. Is There a Dose–Response Relationship of Cement Volume With Cement Leakage and Pain Relief After Vertebroplasty?

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Zhiyi; Hu, Xiaopeng

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if there were dose–response relationships of cement volume with cement leakage and pain relief after percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) for osteoporosis vertebral compression fractures (OVCFs). We collected the patient and procedural characteristics on 108 patients with OVCFs in our hospital who received PVP. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to explore the relationships between these potential influential variables and cement leakage and pain relief at 1 month postoperatively. Multivariate linear and logistic regression analyses were conducted with the pain score reduction and the bone cement leakage as dependent variables and the potential risk factors as independent variables, respectively. The results showed that the independent risk factors for the pain relief were the cement volume injected and fracture age, and for bone cement leakage were the cement volume injected and low-viscosity cement. In conclusion, the present study indicated that there were positive dose–response correlation relationships of cement volume with the incidence of cement leakage and the degree of pain relief after PVP, respectively. Thus, the cement should be injected into the vertebrae as much as possible during the PVP procedure. PMID:28182178

  14. Ibuprofen given pre- and post-operatively for the relief of pain.

    PubMed

    Hill, C M; Carroll, M J; Giles, A D; Pickvance, N

    1987-08-01

    155 patients undergoing surgical removal of lower third molars took part in a parallel group, randomised double-blind study to assess the analgesic effect of single pre-operative doses of ibuprofen (400 mg), codeine phosphate (30 mg), a combination of ibuprofen/codeine (400 mg/30 mg), placebo and post-operative single doses of the same combination or diflunisal (250 mg). Patients receiving the combination or ibuprofen pre-operatively took significantly longer between surgery completion and needing the post-operative study treatment than patients receiving codeine phosphate or placebo. At 1 1/2-2 h after post-operative administration, patients receiving the combination post-operatively reported significantly greater decreases in pain severity than those receiving diflunisal. Patients taking the combination post-operatively experienced significantly better pain relief than patients taking diflunisal at 1 and 2 h, but the reverse was true at 5 h. Side-effects reported were mild with no significant differences between the different treatment groups.

  15. Sharing pain and relief: Neural correlates of physicians during treatment of patients

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Karin B.; Petrovic, Predrag; Kerr, Catherine; Kirsch, Irving; Raicek, Jacqueline; Cheetham, Alexandra; Spaeth, Rosa; Cook, Amanda; Gollub, Randy L.; Kong, Jian; Kaptchuk, Ted J.

    2014-01-01

    Patient-physician interactions significantly contribute to placebo effects and clinical outcomes. While the neural correlates of placebo responses have been studied in patients, the neurobiology of the clinician during treatment is unknown. This study investigated physicians’ brain activations during patient-physician interaction while the patient was experiencing pain, including a ‘treatment‘, ‘no-treatment’ and ‘control’ condition. Here we demonstrate that physicians activated brain regions previously implicated in expectancy for pain-relief and increased attention during treatment of patients, including the right ventrolateral and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices. The physician’s ability to take the patients’ perspective correlated with increased brain activations in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex, a region that has been associated with processing of reward and subjective value. We suggest that physician treatment involves neural representations of treatment expectation, reward processing and empathy, paired with increased activation in attention-related structures. Our findings further the understanding of the neural representations associated with reciprocal interactions between clinicians and patients; a hallmark for successful treatment outcomes. PMID:23358155

  16. Examining the side effects of sucrose for pain relief in preterm infants: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Linhares, M.B.M.; Gaspardo, C.M.; Souza, L.O.; Valeri, B.O.; Martinez, F.E.

    2014-01-01

    Sucrose solution is recommended as relevant pain relief management in neonates during acute painful procedures; however, only a few studies have analyzed the potentially adverse effects of sucrose administration to preterm neonates. The goal of this study was to examine the potential side effects of sucrose for pain relief in preterm infants, assessing feeding and weight gain during hospitalization and their feeding patterns postdischarge. The study sample consisted of 43 preterm neonates divided into two groups: a sucrose group (SG, n=18) and a control group (CG, n=25) in which no sucrose was administered. The SG received 0.5 mL/kg 25% oral sucrose for 2 min prior to all acute painful procedures during three consecutive days. A prospective review of medical charts was performed for all samples. The study was done prior to implementation of the institutional sucrose guidelines as a routine service, and followed all ethical requirements. There were no statistically significant differences between groups in terms of weight gain, length of stay with orogastric tubes, and parenteral feeding. Postdischarge, infant nutritional intake included feeding human milk to 67% of the SG and 74% of the CG. There were no statistically significant differences between groups regarding human milk feeding patterns postdischarge. Neonate feeding patterns and weight gain were unaffected following the short-term use of sucrose for pain relief. PMID:24820067

  17. Postoperative infusional continuous regional analgesia. A technique for relief of postoperative pain following major extremity surgery.

    PubMed

    Malawer, M M; Buch, R; Khurana, J S; Garvey, T; Rice, L

    1991-05-01

    A new technique using postoperative infusional continuous regional analgesia (PICRA) for postoperative pain relief was investigated in 23 surgical patients treated by amputation (12 patients) or by limb-salvage resection operations (11 patients). Bupivacaine was delivered into peripheral nerve sheaths via catheters placed therein at the time of surgery. Only patients in whom the nerves were easily accessible were treated. Catheters were placed in the axillary sheath, the lumbosacral trunk, and the femoral nerve sheaths of patients treated with shoulder girdle and pelvic procedures (resections and amputations), and within the sciatic nerve sheath of those treated with lower extremity procedures. The anesthetic agent was delivered at controllable rates. Regional analgesia was obtained in the operative site with minimal motor or sensory decrease. To assess the efficacy of this technique, the results of this study group were compared with those of a matched group of 11 patients treated with similar surgical procedures but who received epidural morphine. Eleven of the 23 patients on PICRA required no supplemental narcotic agents. The mean level of the narcotic agents required by the remaining 13 PICRA patients was approximately one third of that required by the matched group of 11 patients receiving epidural morphine. Overall, the patients on PICRA had an 80% reduction of narcotic requirements when compared to the historical controls. The technique is reliable and can be performed by the surgeon, requiring about a ten-minute increase in operating time. It has potentially wide application in orthopedics in procedures in which the major nerves are easily accessible (e.g., pelvic fractures and revision hip surgery) and for patients with intractable pain of the extremities.

  18. Pharmaceutical services in a Mexican pain relief and palliative care institute

    PubMed Central

    Escutia Gutiérrez, Raymundo; Cortéz Álvarez, César R.; Álvarez Álvarez, Rosa M.; Flores Hernández, Jorge LV.; Gutiérrez Godínez, Jéssica; López Y López, José G.

    Neither the purchase nor the distribution of pharmaceuticals in hospitals and community pharmacies in Mexico is under the care of pharmacists. Some are under control of physicians. This report presents the results of the implementation of somef pharmaceutical services for the Jalisco Pain Relief, and Palliative Care Institute (Palia Institute), under the direction of the Secretary of Health, Government of Jalisco. The services implemented were drug distribution system, Drug Information Service, Pharmacovigilance Program, and home pharmacotherapy follow-up pilot program for patients with advanced illness, with the ultimate using the appropriate medication. The drug distribution system included dispensing of opioid pain medications, antidepressants, anticonvulsants, NSAIDs, anxiolytic drugs, steroid drugs, laxatives, and anti-emetics. The frequently used drugs were morphine sulfate (62%), amitriptyline (6.4%), and dextropropoxyphene (5.8%). The Drug Information Service answered 114 consultations, mainly asked by a physician (71%) concerned with adverse drug reactions and contraindications (21%). The pharmacovigilance program identified 146 suspected adverse drug reactions and classified them reasonably as possible (27%), probable (69%), and certain (4%). These were attributed mainly to pregabalin and tramadol. The home pharmacotherapy follow-up pilot program cared patients with different cancer diagnoses and drug-related problems (DRP), which were identified and classified (according to second Granada Consensus) for pharmaceutical intervention as DRP 1 (5%), DRP 2 (10%), DRP 3 (14%), DRP 4 (19%), DRP 5 (24%), or DRP 6 (28%). This report provides information concerning the accurate use of medication and, above all, an opportunity for Mexican pharmacists to become an part of health teams seeking to resolve drug-related problems. PMID:25170355

  19. Animal-assisted therapy as a pain relief intervention for children.

    PubMed

    Braun, Carie; Stangler, Teresa; Narveson, Jennifer; Pettingell, Sandra

    2009-05-01

    Animal-assisted therapy (AAT) is a healing modality involving a patient, an animal therapist, and handler with a goal of achieving a specified therapeutic outcome. Despite the myriad of studies documenting the benefits of AAT, no studies have yet determined the impact of animals on alleviation of pain in children. Therefore, a quasi-experimental intervention design was used to capture the change in pain and vital signs with (n=18) or without (n=39) AAT in children ages 3-17 in one acute care pediatric setting. The AAT intervention group experienced a significant reduction in pain level compared to the control group, t(55)=-2.86, p=.006. Although blood pressure and pulse were not impacted, respiratory rates became significantly higher in the AAT group (by an average of 2.22 breaths/min) as compared to the control group, t(55)=-2.63, p=.011. This study provides further support to the numerous health benefits of AAT, particularly for children in pain.

  20. Pain relief by various kinds of interference stimulation applied to the peripheral skin in humans: pain-related brain potentials following CO2 laser stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kakigi, R; Watanabe, S

    1996-01-01

    Pain perception is changed by various kinds of interference stimulation applied to the peripheral skin in humans. We investigated pain-related somatosensory evoked brain potentials (pain SEPs) following CO2 laser stimulation applied to the hand or foot in normal subjects, to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. A pain visual analogue scale (VAS) was also scored to determine the degree of subjective feeling of painful sensation. The following stimulations were applied as the interference: (1) vibration, (2) active and passive movements of the hand or foot, (3) noxious warming by hot water (46 degrees C) and (4) noxious cooling by ice water (0 degrees C). These interference stimulations were applied not only to the same hand or foot as the laser stimuli but also to the contralateral hand or foot. Significant changes in the amplitude of pain SEPs and VAS score were observed to some degree for each type of interference, and we concluded that gate control theory and diffuse noxious inhibitory control were the most appropriate hypotheses to account for this particular phenomenon of pain relief. Some movement-related cortical activities were also considered to be an important factor. These findings could not be accounted for by simple changes in the subjects' attention. Pain relief was more prominent at the second pain ascending through C fibers than that of the first pain ascending through Adelta fibers. The responsible sites for this phenomenon are considered to be the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, the brainstem and some parts of the brain such as the second sensory cortex and the cingulate cortex.

  1. Pain Relief and Health-Related Quality-of-Life Improvement After Microsurgical Decompression of Entrapped Peripheral Nerves in Patients With Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenqiang; Guo, Zhuangli; Yu, Yanbing; Xu, Jun; Zhang, Li

    Surgery had been shown to be effective for superimposed peripheral nerve entrapment syndrome in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), with pain relief and sensation restored. Few studies, however, have reported the quality-of-life outcomes of surgery for the treatment of painful DPN (PDPN). The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of microsurgical decompression of multiple entrapped peripheral nerves on pain and health-related quality of life in patients with refractory PDPN of the lower limbs. Eleven patients with intractable PDPN of the lower limbs were recruited for the present study. All the patients underwent microsurgical decompression of the common peroneal nerve, deep peroneal nerve, and posterior tibial nerve. The pain intensity was assessed using the visual analog scale and health-related quality of life was measured using the short-form 36-item quality-of-life survey. Six (54.6%) patients experienced >50% pain relief (both daytime pain and nocturnal pain) at 2 weeks after the decompression procedure and 8 (72.7%) patients at 24 months postoperatively. Two (18.2%) patients experienced a >50% decrease in peak pain at the 2 weeks after the procedure and 8 (72.7%) patients at 24 months. Additionally, the scores from the short-form 36-item quality-of-life survey were significantly improved in the following 2 domains: bodily pain and general health at 2 weeks after the decompression procedure. Also, at 24 months postoperatively, 6 domains had significantly improved, including physical function, bodily pain, general health, social function, role emotional, and mental health. No significant side effects were recorded during the study. Microsurgical decompression of peripheral nerves is an effective and safe therapy for intractable PDPN with superimposed nerve compression.

  2. Relief as a reward: hedonic and neural responses to safety from pain.

    PubMed

    Leknes, Siri; Lee, Michael; Berna, Chantal; Andersson, Jesper; Tracey, Irene

    2011-04-07

    Relief fits the definition of a reward. Unlike other reward types the pleasantness of relief depends on the violation of a negative expectation, yet this has not been investigated using neuroimaging approaches. We hypothesized that the degree of negative expectation depends on state (dread) and trait (pessimism) sensitivity. Of the brain regions that are involved in mediating pleasure, the nucleus accumbens also signals unexpected reward and positive prediction error. We hypothesized that accumbens activity reflects the level of negative expectation and subsequent pleasant relief. Using fMRI and two purpose-made tasks, we compared hedonic and BOLD responses to relief with responses during an appetitive reward task in 18 healthy volunteers. We expected some similarities in task responses, reflecting common neural substrates implicated across reward types. However, we also hypothesized that relief responses would differ from appetitive rewards in the nucleus accumbens, since only relief pleasantness depends on negative expectations. The results confirmed these hypotheses. Relief and appetitive reward task activity converged in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, which also correlated with appetitive reward pleasantness ratings. In contrast, dread and pessimism scores correlated with relief but not with appetitive reward hedonics. Moreover, only relief pleasantness covaried with accumbens activation. Importantly, the accumbens signal appeared to specifically reflect individual differences in anticipation of the adverse event (dread, pessimism) but was uncorrelated to appetitive reward hedonics. In conclusion, relief differs from appetitive rewards due to its reliance on negative expectations, the violation of which is reflected in relief-related accumbens activation.

  3. Relief as a Reward: Hedonic and Neural Responses to Safety from Pain

    PubMed Central

    Leknes, Siri; Lee, Michael; Berna, Chantal; Andersson, Jesper; Tracey, Irene

    2011-01-01

    Relief fits the definition of a reward. Unlike other reward types the pleasantness of relief depends on the violation of a negative expectation, yet this has not been investigated using neuroimaging approaches. We hypothesized that the degree of negative expectation depends on state (dread) and trait (pessimism) sensitivity. Of the brain regions that are involved in mediating pleasure, the nucleus accumbens also signals unexpected reward and positive prediction error. We hypothesized that accumbens activity reflects the level of negative expectation and subsequent pleasant relief. Using fMRI and two purpose-made tasks, we compared hedonic and BOLD responses to relief with responses during an appetitive reward task in 18 healthy volunteers. We expected some similarities in task responses, reflecting common neural substrates implicated across reward types. However, we also hypothesized that relief responses would differ from appetitive rewards in the nucleus accumbens, since only relief pleasantness depends on negative expectations. The results confirmed these hypotheses. Relief and appetitive reward task activity converged in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, which also correlated with appetitive reward pleasantness ratings. In contrast, dread and pessimism scores correlated with relief but not with appetitive reward hedonics. Moreover, only relief pleasantness covaried with accumbens activation. Importantly, the accumbens signal appeared to specifically reflect individual differences in anticipation of the adverse event (dread, pessimism) but was uncorrelated to appetitive reward hedonics. In conclusion, relief differs from appetitive rewards due to its reliance on negative expectations, the violation of which is reflected in relief-related accumbens activation. PMID:21490964

  4. Comparative clinical study using laser and LED-therapy for orofacial pain relief: dentin hypersensitivity and cervicogenic headache

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizarelli, Rosane F. Z.; Pizzo, Renata C. A.; Florez, Fernando L. E.; Grecco, Clovis; Speciali, Jose G.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2015-06-01

    Considering several clinical situations, low intensity laser therapy has been widely applied in pain relief or analgesia mechanism. With the advent of new LED-based (light emitting diode) light sources, the need of further clinical experiments aiming to compare the effectiveness among them is paramount. The LED system therapeutic use can be denominated as LEDT - Light Emitting Diode Therapy. This study proposed two clinical evaluations of pain relief effect: to dentin hypersensitivity and to cervicogenic headache using different sources of lasers (low and high intensity) and light emitting diodes (LEDs), one emitting at the spectral band of red (630+/- 5nm) and the other one at infrared band (880+/- 5nm). Two different clinical studies were performed and presented interesting results. Considering dentin hypersensitivity, red and infrared led were so effective than the control group (high intensity laser system); by the other side, considering cervicogenic headache, control group (infrared laser) was the best treatment in comparison to red and infrared led system.

  5. Blood flow, sympathetic activity and pain relief following lumbar sympathetic blockade or surgical sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Walsh, J A; Glynn, C J; Cousins, M J; Basedow, R W

    1985-02-01

    The physiological effects of local anaesthetic (bupivacaine), neurolytic (phenol) blockade and surgical ablation of the lumbar sympathetic chain were assessed in patients with peripheral vascular disease or sympathetic dystrophy. Local anaesthetic blockade in 49 patients resulted in significant decrease in pain, plantar sweating and in the vasoconstrictor ice response of the foot, as well as a significant increase in skin temperature and foot blood flow. Subsequent neurolytic blockade in 31 of these patients achieved an effective denervation as assessed by the same physiological measurements. The magnitude of changes in blood flow and sympathetic activity were similar for local anaesthetic and neurolytic blockade as well as in six patients who underwent surgical sympathectomy.

  6. Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS) with Anatomically Guided (3D) Neural Targeting Shows Superior Chronic Axial Low Back Pain Relief Compared to Traditional SCS-LUMINA Study.

    PubMed

    Veizi, Elias; Hayek, Salim M; North, James; Brent Chafin, T; Yearwood, Thomas L; Raso, Louis; Frey, Robert; Cairns, Kevin; Berg, Anthony; Brendel, John; Haider, Nameer; McCarty, Matthew; Vucetic, Henry; Sherman, Alden; Chen, Lilly; Mekel-Bobrov, Nitzan

    2017-01-20

    BACKGROUND : The aim of this study was to determine whether spinal cord stimulation (SCS) using 3D neural targeting provided sustained overall and low back pain relief in a broad routine clinical practice population.

  7. Epidural Analgesia Versus Patient-Controlled Analgesia for Pain Relief in Uterine Artery Embolization for Uterine Fibroids: A Decision Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kooij, Sanne M. van der Moolenaar, Lobke M.; Ankum, Willem M.; Reekers, Jim A.; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Hehenkamp, Wouter J. K.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to compare the costs and effects of epidural analgesia (EDA) to those of patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCA) for postintervention pain relief in women having uterine artery embolization (UAE) for systematic uterine fibroids. Methods: Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) based on data from the literature by constructing a decision tree to model the clinical pathways for estimating the effects and costs of treatment with EDA and PCA. Literature on EDA for pain-relief after UAE was missing, and therefore, data on EDA for abdominal surgery were used. Outcome measures were compared costs to reduce one point in visual analogue score (VAS) or numeric rating scale (NRS) for pain 6 and 24 h after UAE and risk for complications. Results: Six hours after the intervention, the VAS was 3.56 when using PCA and 2.0 when using EDA. The costs for pain relief in women undergoing UAE with PCA and EDA were Euro-Sign 191 and Euro-Sign 355, respectively. The costs for EDA to reduce the VAS score 6 h after the intervention with one point compared with PCA were Euro-Sign 105 and Euro-Sign 179 after 24 h. The risk of having a complication was 2.45 times higher when using EDA. Conclusions: The results of this indirect comparison of EDA for abdominal surgery with PCA for UAE show that EDA would provide superior analgesia for post UAE pain at 6 and 24 h but with higher costs and an increased risk of complications.

  8. Percutaneous Vertebroplasty in Vertebral Metastases from Breast Cancer: Interest in Terms of Pain Relief and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Barragán-Campos, Héctor Manuel; Le Faou, Anne-Laurence; Rose, Michèle; Livartowski, Alain; Doz, Marianne; Astagneau, Pascal; Cormier, Evelyne; Chiras, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Summary Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) is a therapeutic option in patients with vertebral metastases (VM). However its efficacy in pain relief, improvement in quality of life and safety in patients with VM from breast cancer has not been reported. We present a longitudinal retrospective study of 31 consecutively treated female patients with VM from breast cancer where 88 vertebrae were treated in 44 sessions of PV, in which osteolytic, osteoblastic and mixed lesions were recorded. The visual analogue pain scale (VAS) was used to evaluate pain pre-PV, at one, three, six and 12 months post-PV. The Eastern Cooperative Group (ECOG) performance status scale was used at the same time intervals to measure quality of life: 90.3% pain relief was identified with a VAS reduction from 5.7 ± 2.0 pre-PV to 2.9 ± 2.2 post-PV at one-month follow-up (p<0.001) and 0.6 ± 1.0 at 12-month follow-up (p<0.001). In our series 48.4% of patients were classified as having an ECOG grade 0 and 1 pre-PV, which increased to 80.8% at the 12-month follow-up. While 22.6% of the patients were classified at ECOG grades 3 and 4 pre-PV, this improved to 0% at 12 months follow-up. The morbidity rate for this procedure was 12.9% immediately and only 3.2% at 30 days post-PV with all complications being resolved medically or with CT-guided infiltration. PV is a safe procedure with a high efficacy in pain relief, and improvement of quality of life in patients with diverse types of VM from breast cancer. PMID:25363262

  9. Critical care nurses' experiences: "a good relationship with the patient is a prerequisite for successful pain relief management".

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Jan-Olov; Engström, Åsa

    2011-09-01

    There is a lack of studies describing how critical care nurses experience assessing and treating pain in patients receiving postoperative care in an intensive care unit (ICU). The aim of this study was to describe those experiences. Qualitative personal interviews with six critical care nurses in an ICU in northern Sweden were conducted during 2009. The interview texts were subjected to qualitative content analysis, which resulted in the formulation of one theme and four categories. It was important to be able to recognize signs of pain in patients unable to communicate verbally. In older patients, anxiety could be interpreted as an indication of pain. Pain was primarily assessed by means of a visual analog scale. Being unable to treat pain successfully was experienced as failing in one's work. Pharmacologic treatment was always the first choice for relief. The environment was experienced as a hindrance to optimal nursing care, because all postoperative patients shared a room with only curtains between them. The work of assessing and treating pain in patients receiving postoperative care is an important and frequent task for critical care nurses, and knowledge in the field is essential if the patients are to receive optimal nursing care and treatment. Patients cared for in an ICU might benefit from nonpharmacologic treatment. Being without pain after surgery implies increased well-being and shorter hospitalization for the patient.

  10. Effect of vertebroplasty on pain relief, quality of life, and the incidence of new vertebral fractures: a 12-month randomized follow-up, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Blasco, Jordi; Martinez-Ferrer, Angeles; Macho, Juan; San Roman, Luis; Pomés, Jaume; Carrasco, Josep; Monegal, Ana; Guañabens, Nuria; Peris, Pilar

    2012-05-01

    Uncertainty regarding the benefits of vertebroplasty (VP) for the treatment of acute osteoporotic vertebral fractures has recently arisen. A prospective, controlled, randomized single-center trial (ClinicalTrials.gov registration number NCT00994032) was designed to compare the effects of VP versus conservative treatment on the quality of life and pain in patients with painful osteoporotic vertebral fractures, new fractures and secondary adverse effects were also analyzed during a 12-month follow-up period. A total of 125 patients were randomly assigned to receive conservative treatment or VP. The primary end point was to compare the evolution of the quality of life (Quality of Life Questionnaire of the European Foundation for Osteoporosis [Qualeffo-41] and pain (Visual Analogue Scale [VAS]) during a 12 month follow-up. Secondary outcomes included comparison of analgesic consumption, clinical complications, and radiological vertebral fractures at the same time points. Both arms showed significant improvement in VAS scores at all time points, with greater improvement (p = 0.035) in the VP group at the 2-month follow-up. Significant improvement in Qualeffo total score was seen in the VP group throughout the study, whereas this was not seen in the conservative treatment arm until the 6-month follow-up. VP treatment was associated with a significantly increased incidence of vertebral fractures (odds ratio [OR], 2 · 78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-7.62, p = 0.0462). VP and conservative treatment are both associated with significant improvement in pain and quality of life in patients with painful osteoporotic vertebral fractures over a 1-year follow-up period. VP achieved faster pain relief with significant improvement in the pain score at the 2-month follow-up but was associated with a higher incidence in vertebral fractures.

  11. Observing continuous change in heart rate variability and photoplethysmography-derived parameters during the process of pain production/relief with thermal stimuli.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jing-Jhao; Lee, Kuan-Ting; Lin, Jing-Siang; Chuang, Chiung-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Continuously monitoring and efficiently managing pain has become an important issue. However, no study has investigated a change in physiological parameters during the process of pain production/relief. This study modeled the process of pain production/relief using ramped thermal stimulation (no pain: 37°C water, process of pain production: a heating rate of 1°C/min, and subject feels pain: water kept at the painful temperature for each subject, with each segment lasting 10 min). In this duration, the variation of the heat rate variability and photoplethysmography-derived parameters was observed. A total of 40 healthy individuals participated: 30 in the trial group (14 males and 16 females with a mean age of 22.5±1.9 years) and 10 in the control group (7 males and 3 females with a mean age of 22.5±1.3 years). The results showed that the numeric rating scale value was 5.03±1.99 when the subjects felt pain, with a temperature of 43.54±1.70°C. Heart rate, R-R interval, low frequency, high frequency, photoplethysmography amplitude, baseline, and autonomic nervous system state showed significant changes during the pain production process, but these changes differed during the period Segment D (painful temperature 10: min). In summary, the study observed that physiological parameters changed qualitatively during the process of pain production and relief and found that the high frequency, low frequency, and photoplethysmography parameters seemed to have different responses in four situations (no pain, pain production, pain experienced, and pain relief). The trends of these variations may be used as references in the clinical setting for continuously observing pain intensity.

  12. Observing continuous change in heart rate variability and photoplethysmography-derived parameters during the process of pain production/relief with thermal stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jing-Jhao; Lee, Kuan-Ting; Lin, Jing-Siang; Chuang, Chiung-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Continuously monitoring and efficiently managing pain has become an important issue. However, no study has investigated a change in physiological parameters during the process of pain production/relief. This study modeled the process of pain production/relief using ramped thermal stimulation (no pain: 37°C water, process of pain production: a heating rate of 1°C/min, and subject feels pain: water kept at the painful temperature for each subject, with each segment lasting 10 min). In this duration, the variation of the heat rate variability and photoplethysmography-derived parameters was observed. A total of 40 healthy individuals participated: 30 in the trial group (14 males and 16 females with a mean age of 22.5±1.9 years) and 10 in the control group (7 males and 3 females with a mean age of 22.5±1.3 years). The results showed that the numeric rating scale value was 5.03±1.99 when the subjects felt pain, with a temperature of 43.54±1.70°C. Heart rate, R-R interval, low frequency, high frequency, photoplethysmography amplitude, baseline, and autonomic nervous system state showed significant changes during the pain production process, but these changes differed during the period Segment D (painful temperature 10: min). In summary, the study observed that physiological parameters changed qualitatively during the process of pain production and relief and found that the high frequency, low frequency, and photoplethysmography parameters seemed to have different responses in four situations (no pain, pain production, pain experienced, and pain relief). The trends of these variations may be used as references in the clinical setting for continuously observing pain intensity. PMID:28331355

  13. Activation of mesocorticolimbic reward circuits for assessment of relief of ongoing pain: a potential biomarker of efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jennifer Y.; Qu, Chaoling; Patwardhan, Amol; Ossipov, Michael H.; Navratilova, Edita; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David; Porreca, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical assessment of pain has increasingly explored operant methods that may allow behavioral assessment of ongoing pain. In animals with incisional injury, peripheral nerve block produces conditioned place preference (CPP) and activates the mesolimbic dopaminergic reward pathway. We hypothesized that activation of this circuit could serve as a neurochemical output measure of relief of ongoing pain. Medications commonly used clinically including gabapentin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were evaluated in models of post-surgical (one day following incision) or neuropathic (14 days following spinal nerve ligation, SNL) pain to determine if the clinical efficacy profile of these drugs in these pain conditions was reflected by extracellular dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell. Microdialysis was performed in awake rats. Basal DA levels were not significantly different between experimental groups and no significant treatment effects were seen in sham-operated animals. Consistent with clinical observation, spinal clonidine produced CPP and produced a dose-related increase in net NAc DA release in SNL rats. Gabapentin, commonly used to treat neuropathic pain produced increased NAc DA in rats with SNL, but not in animals with incisional, injury. In contrast, ketorolac or naproxen produced increased NAc DA in animals with incisional, but not neuropathic, pain. Increased extracellular NAc DA release was consistent with CPP and observed selectively with treatments commonly used clinically for post-surgical or neuropathic pain. Evaluation of NAc DA efflux in animal pain models may represent an objective neurochemical assay that may serve as a biomarker of efficacy for novel pain-relieving mechanisms. PMID:24861580

  14. Activation of mesocorticolimbic reward circuits for assessment of relief of ongoing pain: a potential biomarker of efficacy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jennifer Y; Qu, Chaoling; Patwardhan, Amol; Ossipov, Michael H; Navratilova, Edita; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David; Porreca, Frank

    2014-08-01

    Preclinical assessment of pain has increasingly explored operant methods that may allow behavioral assessment of ongoing pain. In animals with incisional injury, peripheral nerve block produces conditioned place preference (CPP) and activates the mesolimbic dopaminergic reward pathway. We hypothesized that activation of this circuit could serve as a neurochemical output measure of relief of ongoing pain. Medications commonly used clinically, including gabapentin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), were evaluated in models of post-surgical (1 day after incision) or neuropathic (14 days after spinal nerve ligation [SNL]) pain to determine whether the clinical efficacy profile of these drugs in these pain conditions was reflected by extracellular dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell. Microdialysis was performed in awake rats. Basal DA levels were not significantly different between experimental groups, and no significant treatment effects were seen in sham-operated animals. Consistent with clinical observation, spinal clonidine produced CPP and produced a dose-related increase in net NAc DA release in SNL rats. Gabapentin, commonly used to treat neuropathic pain, produced increased NAc DA in rats with SNL but not in animals with incisional, injury. In contrast, ketorolac or naproxen produced increased NAc DA in animals with incisional but not neuropathic pain. Increased extracellular NAc DA release was consistent with CPP and was observed selectively with treatments commonly used clinically for post-surgical or neuropathic pain. Evaluation of NAc DA efflux in animal pain models may represent an objective neurochemical assay that may serve as a biomarker of efficacy for novel pain-relieving mechanisms.

  15. Epidural electrical stimulation in severe limb ischemia. Pain relief, increased blood flow, and a possible limb-saving effect.

    PubMed Central

    Augustinsson, L E; Carlsson, C A; Holm, J; Jivegård, L

    1985-01-01

    Peripheral vascular disease of the extremities causes ischemic pain and, at times, skin ulcerations and gangrene. It has been suggested that epidural spinal electrical stimulation (ESES) could improve peripheral circulation. Since 1978 we have used ESES in 34 patients with severe limb ischemia; all had resting pain and most had ischemic ulcers. Arterial surgery was technically impossible. Twenty-six patients had arteriosclerotic disease, one had Buerger's disease, and seven had severe vasospastic disorders. Ninety-four per cent of the patients experienced pain relief. ESES healed ulcers in 50% of those with preoperative nonhealing skin ulcerations. Seventy per cent of the patients showed improved skin temperature recordings. Only 38% of the stimulated arteriosclerotic patients underwent amputations during a mean followup period of 16 months, as compared to 90% of a comparable group of unstimulated patients. ESES is very promising in severe limb ischemia where reconstructive surgery is impossible or has failed. PMID:3874610

  16. A comparison of ibuprofen and ibuprofen-codeine combination in the relief of post-operative oral surgery pain.

    PubMed

    Walton, G M; Rood, J P

    1990-10-20

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory analgesics are commonly prescribed to out-patients who have undergone oral surgical procedures, since they are said to provide excellent pain relief for mild to moderate pain, allied with minimal side-effects. One hundred patients were entered into a randomised clinical trial to compare the efficacy of a simple non-steroidal analgesic with that of a combination analgesic compound following the removal of lower third molars under local anaesthesia. Pain scores were measured for patients post-operatively by means of a verbal rating scale for 3 days and data were analysed using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Results suggest that this combination product offers no advantages (but shows definite disadvantages) when compared to an effective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory product.

  17. Peripheral Nerve Stimulation Compared to Usual Care for Pain Relief of Hemiplegic Shoulder Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Richard D.; Gunzler, Douglas D.; Bennett, Maria E.; Chae, John

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study seeks to establish the efficacy of single-lead, 3-week peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) therapy for pain reduction in stroke survivors with chronic hemiplegic shoulder pain. Design Single-site, pilot, randomized controlled trial for adults with chronic shoulder pain after stroke. Participants were randomized to receive a 3-week treatment of single-lead PNS or usual care (UC). The primary outcome was the worst pain in the last week (Brief Pain Inventory, Short Form question 3) measured at baseline, and weeks 1,4, 12, and 16. Secondary outcomes included pain interference (Brief Pain Inventory, Short Form question 9), pain measured by the ShoulderQ Visual Graphic Rating Scales; and health-related quality of life (SF-36v2). Results Twenty-five participants were recruited, 13 to PNS and 12 to UC. There was a significantly greater reduction in pain for the PNS group compared to controls, with significant differences at 6 and 12 weeks after treatment. Both PNS and UC were associated with significant improvements in pain interference and physical health related quality of life. Conclusions Short-term PNS is a safe and efficacious treatment for shoulder pain. Pain reduction is greater than compared to UC and is maintained for at least 12 weeks after treatment. PMID:24355994

  18. Hypnosis and Local Anesthesia for Dental Pain Relief-Alternative or Adjunct Therapy?-A Randomized, Clinical-Experimental Crossover Study.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Thomas Gerhard; Wolf, Dominik; Callaway, Angelika; Below, Dagna; d'Hoedt, Bernd; Willershausen, Brita; Daubländer, Monika

    2016-01-01

    This prospective randomized clinical crossover trial was designed to compare hypnosis and local anesthesia for experimental dental pain relief. Pain thresholds of the dental pulp were determined. A targeted standardized pain stimulus was applied and rated on the Visual Analogue Scale (0-10). The pain threshold was lower under hypnosis (58.3 ± 17.3, p < .001), maximal (80.0) under local anesthesia. The pain stimulus was scored higher under hypnosis (3.9 ± 3.8) than with local anesthesia (0.0, p < .001). Local anesthesia was superior to hypnosis and is a safe and effective method for pain relief in dentistry. Hypnosis seems to produce similar effects observed under sedation. It can be used in addition to local anesthesia and in individual cases as an alternative for pain control in dentistry.

  19. Stress and pain relief in the care of the surgical neonate.

    PubMed

    Currie, John M

    2008-11-01

    In recent years, there has been a major change in our thinking about the way neonates experience stress. This understanding has led to advances in anesthetic technique and the pre- and postoperative care of the surgical neonate. Stress can develop before birth due to placental insufficiency. This can lead to preterm delivery, and the preterm infant is much more vulnerable to stressful stimulus. Stress is detrimental to the neonate in the short term and can also have adverse effects on the future wellbeing of the child. Limiting stress is not just about good pain control. The nursing environment is vitally important. Much can be achieved with good attention to detail in this respect. The effects of stress and the ways they can be minimized are discussed.

  20. An Innovative and Portable Multimodal Pain Relief Device for the Management of Neuropathic Low Back Pain - a Study from Kashmir (Southeast Asia)

    PubMed Central

    Lone, Baseer-ul-Rasool; Beigh, Mirza-Idrees-ul-Haq; Manzoor, Mushbiq

    2016-01-01

    We developed a portable multimodal system with seven different mechanisms of pain relief incorporated into a lumbar belt called the Comfort-N-Harmony Belt (C&H belt). Here, we describe the technical details of the system and also summarize the effects of this multimodal pain relieving technology as an adjuvant to analgesics versus analgesics alone, on the level of pain, improvement of psychological status, disability, and the quality of life in the patients with neuropathic low back pain (LBP). We tracked the volunteers who were following up at a tertiary health care center for the complaints of neuropathic LBP of minimum three months duration and were on analgesics alone with no relief in the severity of the pain. Study group A (n = 45) consisted of volunteers with LBP on C&H belt therapy, along with the usually prescribed analgesic intake, and group B (n = 45) with LBP volunteers on analgesics, plus a similar looking but plain leather belt (placebo). For pain, the VAS (Visual Analogue Scale); for anxiety and depression, the (HADS) Hospital Anxiety-Depression Scale; for disability, the RMDQ (Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire); and for quality of life, (NHP) Nottingham-Health-Profile were used before and after the study period.  There were no significant differences in demographic variables between the groups (p < 0.05). After the study period of one month, VAS, RMDQ, NHP-pain, NHP-physical activity, and HADS scores in both groups were significantly improved compared to the pre-treatment scores (p < 0.05). Group A also showed significant improvements in the scores of NHP-energy level and NHP-social isolation (p < 0.05). The post-treatment scores did not significantly show any difference between the two groups (p > 0.05). However, in comparison of pre- and post-treatment scores, the pre-treatment score values of RMDQ, NHP-pain, NHP-physical activity, and NHP-social isolation were much higher in group A compared to the group B, but still these scores were

  1. An Innovative and Portable Multimodal Pain Relief Device for the Management of Neuropathic Low Back Pain - a Study from Kashmir (Southeast Asia).

    PubMed

    Tarfarosh, Shah Faisal Ahmad; Lone, Baseer-Ul-Rasool; Beigh, Mirza-Idrees-Ul-Haq; Manzoor, Mushbiq

    2016-06-29

    We developed a portable multimodal system with seven different mechanisms of pain relief incorporated into a lumbar belt called the Comfort-N-Harmony Belt (C&H belt). Here, we describe the technical details of the system and also summarize the effects of this multimodal pain relieving technology as an adjuvant to analgesics versus analgesics alone, on the level of pain, improvement of psychological status, disability, and the quality of life in the patients with neuropathic low back pain (LBP). We tracked the volunteers who were following up at a tertiary health care center for the complaints of neuropathic LBP of minimum three months duration and were on analgesics alone with no relief in the severity of the pain. Study group A (n = 45) consisted of volunteers with LBP on C&H belt therapy, along with the usually prescribed analgesic intake, and group B (n = 45) with LBP volunteers on analgesics, plus a similar looking but plain leather belt (placebo). For pain, the VAS (Visual Analogue Scale); for anxiety and depression, the (HADS) Hospital Anxiety-Depression Scale; for disability, the RMDQ (Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire); and for quality of life, (NHP) Nottingham-Health-Profile were used before and after the study period.  There were no significant differences in demographic variables between the groups (p < 0.05). After the study period of one month, VAS, RMDQ, NHP-pain, NHP-physical activity, and HADS scores in both groups were significantly improved compared to the pre-treatment scores (p < 0.05). Group A also showed significant improvements in the scores of NHP-energy level and NHP-social isolation (p < 0.05). The post-treatment scores did not significantly show any difference between the two groups (p > 0.05). However, in comparison of pre- and post-treatment scores, the pre-treatment score values of RMDQ, NHP-pain, NHP-physical activity, and NHP-social isolation were much higher in group A compared to the group B, but still these scores were

  2. Pain relief by transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation with bidirectional modulated sine waves in patients with chronic back pain: a randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Shimoji, Koki; Takahashi, Norio; Nishio, Yasuyuki; Koyanagi, Mika; Aida, Sumihisa

    2007-01-01

    Objectives.  Newly developed bidirectional modulated sine waves (BMW) might provide some derived benefit to patients with low back pain. Pain relief by transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) with BMWs was tested. Materials and Methods.  Analgesic effects of BMWs and conventional bidirectional pulsed waves on chronic back pain in 28 patients were compared, and effects of repeated TENS using BMWs on chronic back pain were investigated in 21 patients by means of a randomized double-blind, sham-controlled, parallel-group method. Pain intensity was assessed using numerical rating scale (NRS). Results.  There was significant immediate reduction in NRS in patients receiving BMWs, and 60 min after treatment compared to sham TENS. Weekly repeated treatments using massage and TENS with BMWs for 5 weeks resulted in a decrease of NRS, but there were no significant differences between the TENS plus massage and sham TENS plus massage groups. Conclusions.  This study shows that TENS with BMWs significantly inhibits chronic back pain, and treatment effects are attained within a day. The results also suggest that there were no statistically significant long-term effects of TENS with BMW in the repeated treatment.

  3. Pain relief is associated with decreasing postural sway in patients with non-specific low back pain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Increased postural sway is well documented in patients suffering from non-specific low back pain, whereby a linear relationship between higher pain intensities and increasing postural sway has been described. No investigation has been conducted to evaluate whether this relationship is maintained if pain levels change in adults with non-specific low back pain. Methods Thirty-eight patients with non-specific low back pain and a matching number of healthy controls were enrolled. Postural sway was measured by three identical static bipedal standing tasks of 90 sec duration with eyes closed in narrow stance on a firm surface. The perceived pain intensity was assessed by a numeric rating scale (NRS-11). The patients received three manual interventions (e.g. manipulation, mobilization or soft tissue techniques) at 3-4 day intervals, postural sway measures were obtained at each occasion. Results A clinically relevant decrease of four NRS scores in associated with manual interventions correlated with a significant decrease in postural sway. In contrast, if no clinically relevant change in intensity occurred (≤ 1 level), postural sway remained similar compared to baseline. The postural sway measures obtained at follow-up sessions 2 and 3 associated with specific NRS level showed no significant differences compared to reference values for the same pain score. Conclusions Alterations in self-reported pain intensities are closely related to changes in postural sway. The previously reported linear relationship between the two variables is maintained as pain levels change. Pain interference appears responsible for the altered sway in pain sufferers. This underlines the clinical use of sway measures as an objective monitoring tool during treatment or rehabilitation. PMID:22436337

  4. Chronic pain relief after the exposure of nitrous oxide during dental treatment: longitudinal retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Mattos Júnior, Francisco Moreira; Mattos, Rafael Villanova; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Siqueira, Silvia Regina Dowgan Tesseroli de; Siqueira, Jose Tadeu Tesseroli de

    2015-07-01

    The objective was to investigate the effect of nitrous/oxygen in chronic pain. Seventy-seven chronic pain patients referred to dental treatment with conscious sedation with nitrous oxide/oxygen had their records included in this research. Data were collected regarding the location and intensity of pain by the visual analogue scale before and after the treatment. Statistical analysis was performed comparing pre- and post-treatment findings. It was observed a remarkable decrease in the prevalence of pain in this sample (only 18 patients still had chronic pain, p < 0.001) and in its intensity (p < 0.001). Patients that needed fewer sessions received higher proportions of nitrous oxide/oxygen. Nitrous oxide may be a tool to be used in the treatment of chronic pain, and future prospective studies are necessary to understand the underlying mechanisms and the effect of nitrous oxide/oxygen in patients according to the pain diagnosis and other characteristics.

  5. Effectiveness of Self-Hypnosis on the Relief of Experimental Dental Pain: A Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Thomas Gerhard; Wolf, Dominik; Below, Dagna; d'Hoedt, Bernd; Willershausen, Brita; Daubländer, Monika

    2016-01-01

    This randomized, controlled clinical trial evaluates the effectiveness of self-hypnosis on pain perception. Pain thresholds were measured, and a targeted, standardized pain stimulus was created by electrical stimulation of the dental pulp of an upper anterior tooth. Pain stimulus was rated by a visual analogue scale (VAS). The pain threshold under self-hypnosis was higher (57.1 ± 17.1) than without hypnotic intervention (39.5 ± 11.8) (p < .001). Pain was rated lower on the VAS with self-hypnosis (4.0 ± 3.8) than in the basal condition without self-hypnosis (7.1 ± 2.7) (p < .001). Self-hypnosis can be used in clinical practice as an adjunct to the gold standard of local anesthesia for pain management, as well as an alternative in individual cases.

  6. The effect of pulpotomy using a calcium-enriched mixture cement versus one-visit root canal therapy on postoperative pain relief in irreversible pulpitis: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Asgary, Saeed; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this noninferiority trial was to compare postoperative pain relief after one-visit root canal therapy (ORCT) with a pulpotomy performed with a new endodontic calcium-enriched mixture cement (PCEM) in human permanent molars with irreversible pulpitis. A total of 407 selected patients were randomly allocated into the ORCT group (n = 202) or the PCEM group (n = 205). Numerical Rating Scale questionnaires were used to record pain intensity (PI) by the patients during the first 7 days after treatment. While there was no statistically significant difference in the mean PI at baseline between the two study groups (P = 0.45), changes in mean PI were significantly different between them (P < 0.001). In the ORCT group, pain relief was achieved after 36 h [95% confidence interval (CI), 27.00-45.00], compared to 18 h in the PCEM group (95% CI, 15.00-21.00), a significant difference (P < 0.01). Comparison of the mean PI sum recorded over 7 days showed that patients in the ORCT group experienced significantly more pain than those in the PCEM group (P < 0.001); a similar difference was observed for pain in response to percussion tests (P < 0.001). Treatment with PCEM thus had the better pain-reducing effects than ORCT in irreversible pulpitis cases.

  7. Pharmacological Inhibition of Voltage-gated Ca2+ Channels for Chronic Pain Relief

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seungkyu

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pain is a major therapeutic problem as the current treatment options are unsatisfactory with low efficacy and deleterious side effects. Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs), which are multi-complex proteins consisting of α1, β, γ, and α2δ subunits, play an important role in pain signaling. These channels are involved in neurogenic inflammation, excitability, and neurotransmitter release in nociceptors. It has been previously shown that N-type VGCCs (Cav2.2) are a major pain target. U.S. FDA approval of three Cav2.2 antagonists, gabapentin, pregabalin, and ziconotide, for chronic pain underlies the importance of this channel subtype. Also, there has been increasing evidence that L-type (Cav1.2) or T-type (Cav3.2) VGCCs may be involved in pain signaling and chronic pain. In order to develop novel pain therapeutics and to understand the role of VGCC subtypes, discovering subtype selective VGCC inhibitors or methods that selectively target the inhibitor into nociceptors would be essential. This review describes the various VGCC subtype inhibitors and the potential of utilizing VGCC subtypes as targets of chronic pain. Development of VGCC subtype inhibitors and targeting them into nociceptors will contribute to a better understanding of the roles of VGCC subtypes in pain at a spinal level as well as development of a novel class of analgesics for chronic pain. PMID:24396337

  8. Regulation of peripheral blood flow in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: clinical implication for symptomatic relief and pain management

    PubMed Central

    Groeneweg, George; Huygen, Frank JPM; Coderre, Terence J; Zijlstra, Freek J

    2009-01-01

    Background During the chronic stage of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS), impaired microcirculation is related to increased vasoconstriction, tissue hypoxia, and metabolic tissue acidosis in the affected limb. Several mechanisms may be responsible for the ischemia and pain in chronic cold CPRS. Discussion The diminished blood flow may be caused by either sympathetic dysfunction, hypersensitivity to circulating catecholamines, or endothelial dysfunction. The pain may be of neuropathic, inflammatory, nociceptive, or functional nature, or of mixed origin. Summary The origin of the pain should be the basis of the symptomatic therapy. Since the difference in temperature between both hands fluctuates over time in cold CRPS, when in doubt, the clinician should prioritize the patient's report of a persistent cold extremity over clinical tests that show no difference. Future research should focus on developing easily applied methods for clinical use to differentiate between central and peripheral blood flow regulation disorders in individual patients. PMID:19775468

  9. Imaging the neural correlates of neuropathic pain and pleasurable relief associated with inherited erythromelalgia in a single subject with quantitative arterial spin labelling.

    PubMed

    Segerdahl, Andrew R; Xie, Jingyi; Paterson, Kathryn; Ramirez, Juan D; Tracey, Irene; Bennett, David L H

    2012-05-01

    We identified a patient with severe inherited erythromelalgia secondary to an L858F mutation in the voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.7. The patient reported severe ongoing foot pain, which was exquisitely sensitive to limb cooling. We confirmed this heat hypersensitivity using quantitative sensory testing. Additionally, we employed a novel perfusion imaging technique in a simple block design to assess her baseline erythromelalgia pain vs cooling relief. Robust activations of key pain, pain-affect, and reward-related centres were observed. This combined approach allowed us to confirm the presence of a temperature-sensitive channelopathy of peripheral neurons and to investigate the neural correlates of tonic neuropathic pain and relief in a single subject.

  10. Acupuncture Provides Short-term Pain Relief for Patients in a Total Joint Replacement Program

    PubMed Central

    Crespin, Daniel J.; Griffin, Kristen H.; Johnson, Jill R.; Miller, Cynthia; Finch, Michael D.; Rivard, Rachael L.; Anseth, Scott; Dusek, Jeffery A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Given the risks of opioid medications, non-pharmacological strategies should be considered for total joint replacement patients. We investigated acupuncture as an adjunct therapy for post-surgical pain management in a total joint replacement program by examining which total hip and knee replacement patients elected to receive acupuncture and the effect of acupuncture on short-term pain. Design A total joint replacement program using fast-track physiotherapy offered elective post-surgical acupuncture to all patients, at no additional cost, as an adjunct therapy to opioids for pain management. Setting The Joint Replacement Center at Abbott Northwestern Hospital, a 630-bed teaching and specialty hospital in Minneapolis, Minnesota from 2010 to 2012. Subjects Our sample included 2,500 admissions of total hip and total knee replacement patients. Methods Self-reported pain was assessed before and after acupuncture using a 0-10 scale and categorized as none/mild (0-4) and moderate/severe pain (5-10). Results Seventy-five percent of admissions included acupuncture. Women (Odds Ratio: 1.48, 95% Confidence Interval: 1.22, 1.81) had higher odds of receiving acupuncture compared to men, and non-white patients (Odds Ratio: 0.55, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.39, 0.78) had lower odds of receiving acupuncture compared to white patients. Average short-term pain reduction was 1.91 points (95% Confidence Interval: 1.83, 1.99), a 45% reduction from the mean pre-pain score. Forty-one percent of patients reported moderate/severe pain prior to receiving acupuncture, while only 15% indicated moderate/severe pain after acupuncture. Conclusions Acupuncture may be a viable adjunct to pharmacological approaches for pain management after total hip or total knee replacement. PMID:25586769

  11. Pain Relief Following Percutaneous Vertebroplasty: Results of a Series of 283 Consecutive Patients Treated in a Single Institution

    SciTech Connect

    Anselmetti, Giovanni Carlo Corrao, Giovanni; Monica, Patrizia Della; Tartaglia, Vincenzo; Manca, Antonio; Eminefendic, Haris; Russo, Filippo; Tosetti, Irene; Regge, Daniele

    2007-06-15

    The aim of this study was to assess if percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) could relieve back pain, reduce drug consumption, and improve the mobility of patients with metastases and vertebral compression fractures. From August 2002 to July 2004, 283 patients (216 females; mean age: 73.8 {+-} 9.9 years) underwent PVP on 749 vertebrae. Pain was evaluated with the pain intensity numeric rating scale (PI-NRS) (0 = no pain; 10 = worst pain) before the procedure and at the end point in September 2004 (follow-up:1-24 months; median: 7 months). A reduction of at least two points of the PI-NRS score was considered clinically relevant. Two hundred four patients were available for evaluation at the end point. Overall results showed a reduction of the median pain score from 8 at baseline to 1 at the end point (p < 0.0001); a clinically relevant pain reduction was observed in 176/205 patients (86%); 89/147 patients (61%) gave up a brace support (p < 0.0001); and 117/190 patients (62%) gave up drug therapy. Results were similar in different subgroups stratified according to age, underlying pathology, number of fractured or treated vertebrae, and length of follow-up. This study adds evidence that PVP is effective in treating painful vertebral fractures. A significant reduction in drug assumption and significant mobility improvement can also be achieved.

  12. Investigational peptide and peptidomimetic μ and δ opioid receptor agonists in the relief of pain

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Aswini Kumar; Hruby, Victor J

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Current methods for treating prolonged and neuropathic pain are inadequate and lead to toxicities that greatly diminish quality of life. Therefore, new approaches to the treatment of pain states are needed to address these problems. Areas covered The review primarily reviews approaches that have been taken in the peer-reviewed literature of multivalent ligands that interact with both μ and δ opioid receptors as agonists, and in some cases, also with pharmacophores for antagonist ligands that interact with other receptors as antagonists to block pain. Expert opinion Although there are a number of drugs currently on the market for the treatment of pain; none of them are 100% successful. In the authors’ opinion, it is clear that new directions and modalities are needed to better address the treatment of prolonged and neuropathic pain; one drug or class clearly is not the answer for all pain therapy. Undoubtedly, there are many different phenotypes of prolonged and neuropathic pain and this should be one avenue to further develop appropriate therapies. PMID:24329035

  13. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) A Possible Aid for Pain Relief in Developing Countries?

    PubMed Central

    Tashani, O; Johnson, MI

    2009-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) refers to the delivery of electrical currents through the skin to activate peripheral nerves. The technique is widely used in developed countries to relieve a wide range of acute and chronic pain conditions, including pain resulting from cancer and its treatment. There are many systematic reviews on TENS although evidence is often inconclusive because of shortcomings in randomised control trials methodology. In this overview the basic science behind TENS will be discussed, the evidence of its effectiveness in specific clinical conditions analysed and a case for its use in pain management in developing countries will be made. PMID:21483510

  14. A randomised controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of a single session of nurse administered massage for short term relief of chronic non-malignant pain

    PubMed Central

    Seers, Kate; Crichton, Nicola; Martin, June; Coulson, Katrina; Carroll, Dawn

    2008-01-01

    Background Massage is increasingly used to manage chronic pain but its benefit has not been clearly established. The aim of the study is to determine the effectiveness of a single session of nurse-administered massage for the short term relief of chronic non-malignant pain and anxiety. Methods A randomised controlled trial design was used, in which the patients were assigned to a massage or control group. The massage group received a 15 minute manual massage and the control group a 15 minute visit to talk about their pain. Adult patients attending a pain relief unit with a diagnosis of chronic pain whose pain was described as moderate or severe were eligible for the study. An observer blind to the patients' treatment group carried out assessments immediately before (baseline), after treatment and 1, 2, 3 and 4 hours later. Pain was assessed using 100 mm visual analogue scale and the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Pain Relief was assessed using a five point verbal rating scale. Anxiety was assessed with the Spielberger short form State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Results 101 patients were randomised and evaluated, 50 in the massage and 51 in the control group. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups at baseline interview. Patients in the massage but not the control group had significantly less pain compared to baseline immediately after and one hour post treatment. 95% confidence interval for the difference in mean pain reduction at one hour post treatment between the massage and control groups is 5.47 mm to 24.70 mm. Patients in the massage but not the control group had a statistically significant reduction in anxiety compared to baseline immediately after and at 1 hour post treatment. Conclusion Massage is effective in the short term for chronic pain of moderate to severe intensity. Trial Registration [ISRCTN98406653] PMID:18601729

  15. The Relief of Unilateral Painful Thoracic Radiculopathy without Headache from Remote Spontaneous Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak

    PubMed Central

    Son, Byung-chul; Ha, Sang-woo; Lee, Si-hoon; Choi, Jin-gyu

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) caused by spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks produces orthostatic headaches. Although upper arm pain or paresthesia is reportedly associated with SIH from spontaneous spinal CSF leak in the presence of orthostatic headache, low thoracic radicular pain due to spontaneous spinal CSF leak unassociated with postural headache is extremely rare. We report a 67-year-old female who presented with chronic, positional radicular right T11 pain. Computed tomography myelography showed a spontaneous lumbar spinal CSF leak at L2-3 and repeated lumbar epidural blood patches significantly alleviated chronic, positional, and lower thoracic radiculopathic pain. The authors speculate that a chronic spontaneous spinal CSF leak not severe enough to cause typical orthostatic headache or epidural CSF collection may cause local symptoms such as irritation of a remote nerve root. There might be considerable variabilities in the clinical features of SIH which can present a diagnostic challenge. PMID:27445613

  16. Factors affecting pain relief in response to physical exercise interventions among healthcare workers.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, M D; Sundstrup, E; Brandt, M; Andersen, L L

    2016-12-28

    The aim of this study is to identify factors associated with musculo-skeletal pain reduction during workplace-based or home-based physical exercise interventions among healthcare workers. Two hundred female healthcare workers (age: 42.0, BMI: 24.1, average pain intensity: 3.1 on a scale of 0-10) from three hospitals participated. Participants were randomly allocated at the cluster level (18 departments) to 10 weeks of (i) workplace physical exercise (WORK) performed in groups during working hours for 5 × 10 minutes per week and up to five group-based coaching sessions on motivation for regular physical exercise, or (ii) home-based physical exercise (HOME) performed alone during leisure-time for 5 × 10 minutes per week. Linear mixed models accounting for cluster identified factors affecting pain reduction. On average 2.2 (SD: 1.1) and 1.0 (SD: 1.2) training sessions were performed per week in WORK and HOME, respectively. The multi-adjusted analysis showed a significant effect on pain reduction of both training adherence (P=.04) and intervention group (P=.04) with participants in WORK experiencing greater reductions compared with HOME. Obesity at baseline was associated with better outcome. Leisure-time exercise, daily patient transfer, age, and chronic pain did not affect the changes in pain. In conclusion, even when adjusted for training adherence, performing physical exercise at the workplace is more effective than home-based exercise in reducing musculo-skeletal pain in healthcare workers. Noteworthy, obese individuals may especially benefit from physical exercise interventions targeting musculo-skeletal pain.

  17. Modulation of nociceptive ion channels and receptors via protein-protein interactions: implications for pain relief

    PubMed Central

    Rouwette, Tom; Avenali, Luca; Sondermann, Julia; Narayanan, Pratibha; Gomez-Varela, David; Schmidt, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    In the last 2 decades biomedical research has provided great insights into the molecular signatures underlying painful conditions. However, chronic pain still imposes substantial challenges to researchers, clinicians and patients alike. Under pathological conditions, pain therapeutics often lack efficacy and exhibit only minimal safety profiles, which can be largely attributed to the targeting of molecules with key physiological functions throughout the body. In light of these difficulties, the identification of molecules and associated protein complexes specifically involved in chronic pain states is of paramount importance for designing selective interventions. Ion channels and receptors represent primary targets, as they critically shape nociceptive signaling from the periphery to the brain. Moreover, their function requires tight control, which is usually implemented by protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Indeed, manipulation of such PPIs entails the modulation of ion channel activity with widespread implications for influencing nociceptive signaling in a more specific way. In this review, we highlight recent advances in modulating ion channels and receptors via their PPI networks in the pursuit of relieving chronic pain. Moreover, we critically discuss the potential of targeting PPIs for developing novel pain therapies exhibiting higher efficacy and improved safety profiles. PMID:26039491

  18. Perioperative intravenous lidocaine infusion on postoperative pain relief in patients undergoing upper abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Baral, B K; Bhattarai, B K; Rahman, T R; Singh, S N; Regmi, R

    2010-12-01

    Due to unpleasant nature and physiological consequences of postoperative pain, search of safe and effective modalities for its management has remained a subject of interest to clinical researchers. Analgesic action of lidocaine infusion in patients with chronic neuropathic pain is well known but its place in relieving postoperative pain is yet to be established. The study aimed to assess the effectiveness of perioperative intravenous lidocaine infusion on postoperative pain intensity and analgesic requirement. Sixty patients undergoing major upper abdominal surgery were recruited in this randomized double blinded study. Thirty patients received lidocaine 2.0% (intravenous bolus 1.5 mg/kg followed by an infusion of 1.5 mg/kg/h), and 30 patients received normal saline according to randomization. The infusion started 30 min before skin incision and stopped 1 h after the end of surgery. Postoperative pain intensity and analgesic (diclofenac) requirement were assessed at the interval 15 minutes for 1 hour then 4 hourly up to 24 hours. The pain intensity at rest and movement as well as the total postoperative analgesic (diclofenac) requirement were significantly lower (142.50 +/- 37.80 mg vs.185.00 +/- 41.31 mg, P<0.001) in lidocaine group. The extubation time was significantly longer in lidocaine group (14.43 +/- 3.50 minutes vs. 6.73 +/- 1.76 minutes, P<0.001). The time for the first dose of analgesic requirement was longer in lidocaine group (60.97 +/- 18.05 minutes vs.15.73 +/- 7.46 minutes, P<0.001). It can be concluded that perioperative infusion of low dose of lidocaine decreases the intensity of postoperative pain, reduces the postoperative analgesic consumption, without causing significant adverse effects in patients undergoing upper abdominal surgery.

  19. Expectation requires treatment to boost pain relief: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Lieven A; Sprenger, Christian; Geuter, Stephan; Büchel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of a possible interaction between topical analgesic treatment and treatment expectation on pain at the behavioral and neuronal level by combining topical lidocaine/prilocaine treatment with an expectancy manipulation in a 2 by 2 within-subject design (open treatment, hidden treatment, placebo, control). Thirty-two healthy subjects received heat pain stimuli on capsaicin-pretreated skin and rated their experienced pain during functional magnetic resonance imaging. This allowed us to separate drug- and expectancy-related effects at the behavioral and neuronal levels and to test whether they interact during the processing of painful stimuli. Pain ratings were reduced during active treatment and were associated with reduced activity in the anterior insular cortex. Pain ratings were lower in open treatment compared with hidden treatment and were related to reduced activity in the anterior insular cortex, the anterior cingulate cortex, the secondary somatosensory cortex, and the thalamus. Testing for an interaction revealed that the expectation effect was significantly larger in the active treatment conditions compared with the no-treatment conditions and was associated with signal changes in the anterior insular cortex, the anterior cingulate cortex, and the ventral striatum. In conclusion, this study shows that even in the case of a topical analgesic, expectation interacts with treatment at the level of pain ratings and neuronal responses in placebo-related brain regions. Our results are highly relevant in the clinical context as they show (i) that expectation can boost treatment and (ii) that expectation and treatment are not necessarily additive as assumed in placebo-controlled clinical trials.

  20. Resiniferatoxin: The Evolution of the “Molecular Scalpel” for Chronic Pain Relief

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Dorothy Cimino

    2016-01-01

    Control of chronic pain is frequently inadequate or can be associated with debilitating side effects. Ablation of certain nociceptive neurons, while retaining all other sensory modalities and motor function, represents a new therapeutic approach to controlling severe pain while avoiding off-target side effects. transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) is a calcium permeable nonselective cation channel expressed on the peripheral and central terminals of small-diameter sensory neurons. Highly selective chemoablation of TRPV1-containing peripheral nerve endings, or the entire TRPV1-expressing neuron itself, can be used to control chronic pain. Administration of the potent TRPV1 agonist resiniferatoxin (RTX) to neuronal perikarya or nerve terminals induces calcium cytotoxicity and selective lesioning of the TRPV1-expressing nociceptive primary afferent population. This selective neuroablation has been coined “molecular neurosurgery” and has the advantage of sparing motor, proprioceptive, and other somatosensory functions that are so important for coordinated movement, performing activities of daily living, and maintaining quality of life. This review examines the mechanisms and preclinical data underlying the therapeutic use of RTX and examples of such use for the management of chronic pain in clinical veterinary and human pain states. PMID:27529257

  1. Prevalence, discomfort and self-relief behaviours of painful diabetic neuropathy in Taiwan: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Jane, Sui-Whi; Lin, Ming-Shyan; Chiu, Wen-Nan; Beaton, Randal D; Chen, Mei-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore the prevalence, discomfort, and self-relief behaviours of painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) among rural community residents with type 2 diabetes. Design A community-based, cross-sectional study. Setting This study was part of a longitudinal cohort study of a nurse-led health promotion programme for preventing foot ulceration in Chiayi County, Taiwan. Participants Six hundred and twenty-eight community adults with type 2 diabetes participated in this study. Outcome measures Parameters assessed included peripheral neuropathy, peripheral vasculopathy, glycaemic control and metabolic biomarkers. Statistical analyses included descriptive statistics and a multivariate logistic regression model. Results About 30.6% of participants (192/628) had PDN. Factors associated with PDN included an abnormal ankle brachial index (ABI; OR=3.4; 95% CI 1.9 to 6.2; p<0.001), Michigan neuropathy screening index (OR=1.69; 95% CI 1.0 to 2.6; p=0.021), triglyceride level (OR=1.61; 95% CI 1.0 to 2.4; p=0.036) and being female (OR=1.68; 95% CI 1.1 to 2.4; p=0.022). PDN was characterised by uncomfortable feelings of prickling, stinging or burning pain and inexplicable dullness around the base or dorsal areas of the feet, but received little attention or treatment from primary healthcare providers. Conclusions A high prevalence of PDN was found in rural community residents with type 2 diabetes and the healthcare workers provided little attention to, or treatment of, discomfort. It is important to identify high-risk groups with PDN early in order to prevent foot ulceration and reduce the incidence of amputation of the extremities. It is also urgent to develop appropriate treatment and self-relief behaviours to halt or reverse the progression of PDN for this population living in rural areas. PMID:27697870

  2. Pre-operative diflunisal for pain relief following third molar surgery under general anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, M R; Comfort, M B; Lee, K M

    1993-04-01

    In order to find out whether long-acting non-narcotic analgesics given pre-operatively reduce the post-operative pain and decrease the narcotic analgesic requirements following third molar surgery under general anaesthesia, thirty Hong Kong Chinese patients undergoing this procedure were randomly given either diflunisal or placebo one hour prior to anaesthesia. Pain reduction was monitored for ten hours from the end of surgery using visual analogue scales. Except in the first hour, pain reduction at each hour was significantly better in the diflunisal group than in the placebo group. Furthermore, only one patient required narcotic analgesics in the diflunisal group compared with five in the placebo group. In patients who had multiple tooth sectioning or very difficult surgery of one or both lower third molars, the requirement for post-operative analgesics was high in the placebo group.

  3. Local anaesthetic wound infiltration used for caesarean section pain relief: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangnan; Zhou, Miao; Shi, Xuan; Yang, Haiqin; Li, Yonghua; Li, Jian; Yang, Mei; Yuan, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Local anaesthetic wound infiltration techniques were reported to reduce opiate requirements and pain scores in women undergoing caesarean section (CS). However, the results were conflicting. The primary aim of this meta-analysis was to assess whether local analgesia could reduce pain intensity when injected via wound catheters. Methods: A search of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) evaluating local analgesia in caesarean surgery in PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane database was performed. Cumulative morphine consumption and pain scores at rest at different time point after surgery were extracted and synthesized using random or fixed model for meta-analysis. Subgroup analysis was performed according to incision type and administration regimen. Results: Nine RCTs with a total of 512 patients were included. Cumulative morphine consumption was lower in LA group compared with placebo group in the first 12 h (SMD = -0.736, 95% CI (-1.105, -0.368)), 24 h (SMD = -0.378, 95% CI (-0.624, -0.132)) and 48 h after surgery (SMD = -0.913, 95% CI (-1.683 to -0.143)). Lower morphine consumption was observed in the first 6 h after surgery but the reduction failed to meet the common level of significance. Pain scores was significantly reducedat 12 h but not 6 h after surgery in the LA group compared with placebo group. At 24 h and 48 h after surgery, the pain sore was lower but the difference did not meet the common level of significance. Lower rate of post-operative nausea was observed in the LA group. Conclusions: Local anaesthetic wound infiltration can reduce morphine requirements and the rate of patients suffer nausea but not pain scores after caesarean section. Further procedure-specific RCTs were encouraged to confirm the efficacy of local anaesthetic wound infiltration techniques. PMID:26309720

  4. Therapeutic evaluation of “Ayush Tulsi Jiwan Plus” oil for chronic musculoskeletal pain relief

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Kunal; Sahoo, Jagannath; Sahu, Dipsundar; Chattopadhyay, Abichal; Kumar, Sanjay; Mishra, Sudhanshu Sekhar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic pain of musculoskeletal origin is a very common symptom and has major effect on the physical, mental, and economic aspects of the patients. There is always a crave among physicians and patients for effective analgesic, curable preparation that can be locally applied. Aim: The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy and safety of “Ayush Tulsi Jiwan Plus” oil in chronic pain management of musculoskeletal origin. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients of chronic musculoskeletal pain of unknown origin of mild to moderate condition were advised to apply “Ayush Tulsi Jiwan Plus” oil locally twice daily for 6 weeks and examined weekly. After completion of the treatment, the efficacy of the therapy was assessed on the basis of the subjective criteria such as perception of pain, tenderness, swelling, and joint mobility. Results: In this study, mean baseline score versus last visit score of pain (2.84 ± 0.68 vs. 1.33 ± 0.76), tenderness (1.64 ± 0.74 vs. 0.36 ± 0.56), and swelling (0.64 ± 0.85 vs. 0.38 ± 0.66) was significantly decreased, and also clinical improvement was seen in the study participants along with no evidence of adverse drug reactions. Conclusion: The analysis of the overall effect of this “Ayush Tulsi Jiwan Plus” oil preparation was found efficacious and topically safe in chronic pain conditions. However, further study will be required with larger sample size and in heterogeneous population to elicit long-term effect of this polyherbal preparation. PMID:27833366

  5. Music and 25% glucose pain relief for the premature infant: a randomized clinical trial 1

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Maria Vera Lúcia Moreira Leitão; Farias, Leiliane Martins; de Melo, Gleicia Martins

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to analyze the total Premature Infant Pain Profile scores of premature infants undergoing arterial puncture during music and 25% glucose interventions, and to assess their association with neonatal and therapeutic variables. METHOD: a randomized clinical trial with 80 premature infants; 24 in the Experimental Group 1 (music), 33 in the Experimental Group 2 (music and 25% glucose), 23 in the Positive Control Group (25% glucose). All premature infants were videotaped and a lullaby was played for ten minutes before puncture in Experimental Groups 1 and 2; 25% glucose administered in Experimental Group 2 and the Positive Control Group two minutes before puncture. RESULTS: 60.0% of premature infants had moderate or maximum pain; pain scores and intervention groups were not statistically significant. Statistically significant variables: Experimental Group 1: head and chest circumference, Apgar scores, corrected gestational age; Experimental Group 2: chest circumference, Apgar scores, oxygen therapy; Positive Control group: birth weight, head circumference. CONCLUSION: neonatal variables are associated with pain in premature infants. Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials: UTN: U1111-1123-4821. PMID:25493677

  6. Pain-Relief Learning in Flies, Rats, and Man: Basic Research and Applied Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerber, Bertram; Yarali, Ayse; Diegelmann, Sören; Wotjak, Carsten T.; Pauli, Paul; Fendt, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Memories relating to a painful, negative event are adaptive and can be stored for a lifetime to support preemptive avoidance, escape, or attack behavior. However, under unfavorable circumstances such memories can become overwhelmingly powerful. They may trigger excessively negative psychological states and uncontrollable avoidance of locations,…

  7. Involvement of mesolimbic dopaminergic network in neuropathic pain relief by treadmill exercise

    PubMed Central

    Wakaizumi, Kenta; Kondo, Takashige; Hamada, Yusuke; Narita, Michiko; Kawabe, Rui; Narita, Hiroki; Watanabe, Moe; Kato, Shigeki; Senba, Emiko; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yamanaka, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Exercise alleviates pain and it is a central component of treatment strategy for chronic pain in clinical setting. However, little is known about mechanism of this exercise-induced hypoalgesia. The mesolimbic dopaminergic network plays a role in positive emotions to rewards including motivation and pleasure. Pain negatively modulates these emotions, but appropriate exercise is considered to activate the dopaminergic network. We investigated possible involvement of this network as a mechanism of exercise-induced hypoalgesia. Methods In the present study, we developed a protocol of treadmill exercise, which was able to recover pain threshold under partial sciatic nerve ligation in mice, and investigated involvement of the dopaminergic reward network in exercise-induced hypoalgesia. To temporally suppress a neural activation during exercise, a genetically modified inhibitory G-protein-coupled receptor, hM4Di, was specifically expressed on dopaminergic pathway from the ventral tegmental area to the nucleus accumbens. Results The chemogenetic-specific neural suppression by Gi-DREADD system dramatically offset the effect of exercise-induced hypoalgesia in transgenic mice with hM4Di expressed on the ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons. Additionally, anti-exercise-induced hypoalgesia effect was significantly observed under the suppression of neurons projecting out of the ventral tegmental area to the nucleus accumbens as well. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the dopaminergic pathway from the ventral tegmental area to the nucleus accumbens is involved in the anti-nociception under low-intensity exercise under a neuropathic pain-like state. PMID:27909152

  8. A Self-Administered Method of Acute Pressure Block of Sciatic Nerves for Short-Term Relief of Dental Pain: A Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolin; Zhao, Wanghong; Wang, Ye; Hu, Jiao; Chen, Qiu; Yu, Juncai; Wu, Bin; Huang, Rong; Gao, Jie; He, Jiman

    2014-01-01

    Objectives While stimulation of the peripheral nerves increases the pain threshold, chronic pressure stimulation of the sciatic nerve is associated with sciatica. We recently found that acute pressure block of the sciatic nerve inhibits pain. Therefore, we propose that, the pain pathology-causing pressure is chronic, not acute. Here, we report a novel self-administered method: acute pressure block of the sciatic nerves is applied by the patients themselves for short-term relief of pain from dental diseases. Design This was a randomized, single-blind study. Setting Hospital patients. Patients Patients aged 16–60 years with acute pulpitis, acute apical periodontitis, or pericoronitis of the third molar of the mandible experiencing pain ≥3 on the 11-point numerical pain rating scale. Interventions Three-minute pressure to sciatic nerves was applied by using the hands (hand pressure method) or by having the patients squat to force the thigh and shin as tightly as possible on the sandwiched sciatic nerve bundles (self-administered method). Outcomes The primary efficacy variable was the mean difference in pain scores from the baseline. Results One hundred seventy-two dental patients were randomized. The self-administered method produced significant relief from pain associated with dental diseases (P ≤ 0.001). The analgesic effect of the self-administered method was similar to that of the hand pressure method. Conclusions The self-administered method is easy to learn and can be applied at any time for pain relief. We believe that patients will benefit from this method. PMID:24400593

  9. Synergic effects of ultrasound and laser on the pain relief in women with hand osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Paolillo, Alessandra Rossi; Paolillo, Fernanda Rossi; João, Jessica Patrícia; João, Herbert Alexandre; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador

    2015-01-01

    Patients with pain avoid movements, leading to a gradual impairment of their physical condition and functionality. In this context, the use of ultrasound (US) and low-level laser therapy (LLLT) show promising results for nonpharmacological and noninvasive treatment. The aim of this study was evaluated the synergistic effects of the US and the LLLT (new prototype) with or without therapeutic exercises (TE) on pain and grip strength in women with hand osteoarthritis. Forty-five women with hand osteoarthritis, aged 60 to 80 years, were randomly assigned to one of three groups, but 43 women successfully completed the full study. The three groups were as follows: (i) the placebo group which did not perform TE, but the prototype without emitting electromagnetic or mechanical waves was applied (n = 11); (ii) the US + LLLT group which carried out only the prototype (n = 13); and (iii) the TE + US + LLLT group which performed TE before the prototype is applied (n = 13). The parameters of US were frequency 1 MHz; 1.0 W/cm(2) intensity, pulsed mode 1:1 (duty cycle 50%). Regarding laser, the output power of the each laser was fixed at 100 mW leading to an energy value of 18 J per laser. Five points were irradiated per hand, during 3 min per point and 15 min per session. The prototype was applied after therapeutic exercises. The treatments are done once a week for 3 months. Grip strength and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were measured. Grip strength did not differ significantly for any of the groups (p ≥ 0.05). The average PPT between baseline and 3 months shows significant decrease of the pain sensitivity for both the US + LLLT group (∆ = 30 ± 19 N, p˂0.001) and the TE + US + LLLT group (∆ = 32 ± 13 N, p < 0.001). However, there were no significant differences in average PPT for placebo group (∆ = -0.3 ± 9 N). There was no placebo effect. The new prototype that combines US and LLLT reduced pain in women with hand

  10. Low and high-frequency TENS in post-episiotomy pain relief: a randomized, double-blind clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Pitangui, Ana C. R.; Araújo, Rodrigo C.; Bezerra, Michelle J. S.; Ribeiro, Camila O.; Nakano, Ana M. S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of low-frequency TENS (LFT) and high-frequency TENS (HFT) in post-episiotomy pain relief. Method A randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial with placebo composed of 33 puerperae with post-episiotomy pain. TENS was applied for 30 minutes to groups: HFT(100 Hz; 100 µs), LFT (5 Hz; 100 µs), and placebo (PT). Four electrodes were placed in parallel near the episiotomy and four pain evaluations were performed with the numeric rating scale. The first and the second evaluation took place before TENS application and immediately after its removal and were done in the resting position and in the activities of sitting and ambulating. The third and fourth evaluation took place 30 and 60 minutes after TENS removal, only in the resting position. Intragroup differences were verified using the Friedman and Wilcoxon tests, and the intergroup analysis employed the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results In the intragroup analysis, there was no significant difference in the PT during rest, sitting, and ambulation (P>0.05). In the HFT and LFT, a significant difference was observed in all activities (P<0.001). In the intergroup analysis, there was a significant difference in the resting position in the HFT and LFT (P<0.001). In the sitting activity, a significant difference was verified in the second evaluation in the HFT and LFT (P<0.008). No significant difference was verified among the groups in ambulation (P<0.20). Conclusions LFT and HFT are an effective resource that may be included in the routine of maternity wards. PMID:24675915

  11. Relief of Lumbar Symptoms After Cervical Decompression in Patients with Tandem Spinal Stenosis Presenting with Primarily Lumbar Pain

    PubMed Central

    Felbaum, Daniel R; Stewart, Jeffrey J; Sandhu, Faheem A

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Tandem cervical and lumbar spinal stenosis (TSS) is classically described as intermittent claudication, gait disturbance, and clinical findings of mixed myelopathy and polyradiculopathy. Rarely, patients can present with TSS manifesting in isolated lumbar pain. Several reports have demonstrated improved lumbar back pain and radiculopathy after decompressive cervical spine procedures. We present six patients with dramatic resolution of lumbar spine related symptoms after decompression of the cervical spinal cord despite presenting solely with lower back complaints. Methods: Clinical records of the senior author (F.A.S.) gathered from April 2006 to March 2013 were retrospectively reviewed identifying six patients presenting solely with lumbar symptoms and diagnosed with TSS based on history and physical examination. Results: Six patients with a mean age of 55 (range 39 to 60) presented with solely lower back symptoms and clinical findings suspicious for TSS. Mean follow-up time for all patients was 12 months (range three to 27 months, median 11.5 months). Three patients underwent a cervical procedure as the principal operation, while the remainder had the lumbar spine decompressed initially. All patients that underwent a cervical procedure initially experienced a dramatic decrease or complete resolution of their preoperative lower back pain and radiculopathy (mean preoperative VAS of 6.7 vs. 3.7 postoperative). The remainder of patients with persistent lumbar symptoms resolved after a subsequent cervical operation. Conclusion: Patients presenting with lumbar symptoms out of proportion to imaging require further investigation. We highlight the resolution of lumbar symptoms after a cervical procedure in a select group of patients presenting with lone lower back complaints. In patients presenting with symptoms disproportionate to lumbar imaging, treatment of cervical pathology may provide robust long-term relief of the initial lumbar-related presentation

  12. Intravenous oxycodone for pain relief in the first stage of labour--maternal pharmacokinetics and neonatal exposure.

    PubMed

    Kokki, Merja; Franco, Maria Gonzalez; Raatikainen, Kaisa; Välitalo, Pyry; Sankilampi, Ulla; Heinonen, Seppo; Neuvonen, Pertti J; Kokki, Hannu

    2012-09-01

    Physiological changes during pregnancy may change pharmacokinetics of compounds. Oxycodone is an increasingly used opioid agonist in acute pain management but its pharmacokinetics in labouring women has not been established. We studied the maternal pharmacokinetics and neonatal exposure of intravenous oxycodone for pain relief in the first stage of labour. The study was prospective, open-labelled and with a control group. After informed consent, 15 nulliparous parturients and newborns, and newborns in a control group were studied. In the study group, oxycodone boluses of 1 mg i.v., up to a cumulative dose of 5 mg, was administered when labour pain score was 5/10 or higher. As the control group, 30 other newborns after uncomplicated deliveries with no systemic opioids were assessed for the neonatal outcome. In the study group, maternal pharmacokinetics of oxycodone was measured from plasma concentrations during labour, and neonatal exposure was assessed from umbilical plasma samples using population pharmacokinetic methods. Maternal plasma oxycodone concentration decreased with a median half-life of 2.6 hr (range, 1.8-2.8). Oxycodone concentrations in the umbilical plasma 2.7 μg/l (0.3-14.5) were similar as in maternal plasma 2.4 (0.1-14.8) μg/l at the time of birth. No severe or unexpected adverse effects were noted. To conclude, firstly, maternal elimination half-life of i.v. oxycodone was significantly shorter than that reported in non-pregnant women, and secondly, maternal plasma oxycodone at the birth correlated well with neonatal umbilical concentrations and may, thus, be used as an estimate of neonatal exposure.

  13. A risk/benefit analysis of spinal manipulation therapy for relief of lumbar or cervical pain.

    PubMed

    Powell, F C; Hanigan, W C; Olivero, W C

    1993-07-01

    Approximately 12 million Americans undergo spinal manipulation therapy (SMT) every year. Renewed interest in this method requires an analysis of its reported risks and possible benefits. This review describes two patients with spinal cord injuries associated with SMT and establishes the risk/benefit ratios for patients with lumbar or cervical pain. The first case is a man who underwent SMT for recurrent sciatica 4 years after chemonucleolysis. During therapy, he developed bilateral sciatica with urinary hesitancy. After self-referral, myelography demonstrated a total block; he underwent urgent discectomy with an excellent result 3 months after surgery. The second patient with an indwelling Broviac catheter and a history of lumbar osteomyelitis underwent SMT for neck pain. Therapy continued for 3 weeks despite the development of severe quadriparesis. After self-referral, he underwent an urgent anterior cervical decompression and removal of necrotic bone and an epidural abscess with partial neurological recovery. An analysis of these cases and 138 cases reported in the literature demonstrates six risk factors associated with complications of SMT. These include misdiagnosis, failure to recognize the onset or progression of neurological signs or symptoms, improper technique, SMT performed in the presence of a coagulation disorder or herniated nucleus pulposus, and manipulation of the cervical spine. Clinical trials of SMT have been summarized in several recent articles.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Pain Relief: Make Consistency the Cornerstone of Your Policy on Grading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Kenneth E.; Wendel, Frederick C.

    1988-01-01

    An effective school board policy on grading needs to include the following six components: (1) philosophy; (2) definition of terms; (3) line of responsibility; (4) legal review; (5) academic achievement and behavioral skills reported separately; and (6) policy review. (MLF)

  15. Ilex paraguariensis Promotes Orofacial Pain Relief After Formalin Injection: Involvement of Noradrenergic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Eudislaine Fonseca; de Oliveira, Simone Kobe; Nardi, Viviane Koepp; Gelinski, Tathiana Carla; Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos; Maraschin, Marcelo; Nardi, Geisson Marcos

    2016-01-01

    Background: Drinking mate or chimarrão, a hot infusion of Ilex paraguariensis (ILEX) leaves, is a common habit in Southern South America that has a social and almost ritualistic role. It has been used as a stimulant beverage in South America and analgesic in regions of Argentina for treatment of headache and others painful inflammatory conditions such as arthritis and rheumatism. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacological activity of I. paraguariensis infusion (ILEX) on orofacial nociception model induced by formalin, and study its mechanism of action. Materials and Methods: The analgesic effect of ILEX was assessed through writhing test, paw formalin test, paw edema induced by carrageenan, and orofacial pain induced by formalin. To study the action mechanism of ILEX, opioidergic, dopaminergic, nitrergic, and adrenergic pathways were investigated. Results: The high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of ILEX infusion revealed caffeine and theobromine. The treatment with ILEX reduced the number of writhing. However, it was effective neither in the formalin paw test nor in the paw edema induced by carrageenan. Different from formalin paw test, ILEX was able to reduce the orofacial reactivity to formalin in 31.8% (70.4 ± 2.5 s; first phase), and 20% (127.3 ± 18.9 s; second phase). The analgesic effect of ILEX results from the modulation of noradrenergic pathways since prazosin (α1-adrenoceptor antagonist, 0.15 mg/kg; intraperitoneal) reversed the analgesic effect of ILEX. Conclusions: The present report demonstrates that analgesic effect of ILEX in orofacial formalin test is due mainly to modulation of noradrenergic pathways. SUMMARY Ilex paraguariensis (ILEX) has been used as a stimulant beverage in South America and analgesic in regions of Argentina for the treatment of headache and others painful inflammatory conditions such arthritis and rheumatism.The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacological activity of ILEX on

  16. PolyMorphine: an innovative biodegradable polymer drug for extended pain relief

    PubMed Central

    Rosario-Meléndez, Roselin; Harris, Carolyn L.; Delgado-Rivera, Roberto; Yu, Lei; Uhrich, Kathryn E.

    2012-01-01

    Morphine, a potent narcotic analgesic used for the treatment of acute and chronic pain, was chemically incorporated into a poly(anhydride-ester) backbone. The polymer termed “PolyMorphine”, was designed to degrade hydrolytically releasing morphine in a controlled manner to ultimately provide analgesia for an extended time period. PolyMorphine was synthesized via melt-condensation polymerization and its structure was characterized using proton and carbon nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies, and infrared spectroscopy. The weight-average molecular weight and the thermal properties were determined. The hydrolytic degradation pathway of the polymer was determined by in vitro studies, showing that free morphine is released. In vitro cytocompatibility studies demonstrated that PolyMorphine is non-cytotoxic towards fibroblasts. In vivo studies using mice showed that PolyMorphine provides analgesia for 3 days, 20 times the analgesic window of free morphine. The animals retained full responsiveness to morphine after being subjected to an acute morphine challenge. PMID:22877734

  17. Use of Saline as a Placebo in Intra-articular Injections in Osteoarthritis: Potential Contributions to Nociceptive Pain Relief

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Or, David; Rael, Leonard T.; Brody, Edward N.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis of the knee (OAK) is a severe debilitating condition characterized by joint pain, stiffness, and resultant limited mobility. In recent years, intra-articular (IA) injections have been used to relieve symptoms and have succeeded to varying degrees either with sodium hyaluronate preparations or with a biologic. Objective: The objective of this review is to evaluate multiple studies that demonstrate some relief from the symptoms of OAK in the saline arm of various clinical trials. Method: A thorough literature search (PubMed) was performed assessing the pain efficacy of various compounds compared to saline injections in clinical trials. A total of 73 studies were identified in the literature search including a total of 5,816 patients. These clinical trials all involved the IA injection of a viscosupplement (hyaluronate, platelet rich plasma (PRP), etc.) or a biologic (the low molecular weight fraction (< 5kDa) of human serum albumin (LMWF-5A)). For all of these studies, the control arm was injection of sterile physiological saline that approximates the salt concentration and total solute concentration of blood and most tissues. Results: Based on our review of the current literature, the tested compounds performed with mixed results when compared to saline injections. Moreover, OAK is a variable disease, with severity measured on the Kellgren and Lawrence (KL) scale where various hyaluronate preparations have a therapeutic effect mostly on KL 2-3 patients while a biologic works best on KL 3-4 patients. Conclusion: Since the effect of saline injection is always greater than no treatment, the evaluations of these treatments can be confounded in clinical trials. Therefore, the question of whether there are known therapeutic effects of saline injections might explain these results.

  18. Structural Connectivity Variances Underlie Functional and Behavioral Changes During Pain Relief Induced by Neuromodulation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Richard L.; Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Filippini, Nicola; Okell, Thomas W.; Stagg, Charlotte J.; Tracey, Irene

    2017-01-01

    An increased understanding of the relationship between structural connections and functional and behavioral outcomes is an essential but under-explored topic in neuroscience. During transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS)–induced analgesia, neuromodulation occurs through a top-down process that depends on inter-regional connections. To investigate whether variation in anatomical connectivity explains functional and behavorial outcomes during neuromodulation, we first combined tDCS and a tonic pain model with concurrent arterial spin labelling that measures cerebral perfusion related to ongoing neural activity. Left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (L-DLPFC) tDCS induced an analgesic effect, which was explained by reduced perfusion to posterior insula and thalamus. Second, we used diffusion imaging to assess white matter structural integrity between L-DLPFC and thalamus, two key components of the neuromodulatory network. Fractional anisotropy of this tract correlated positively with functional and behavioral modulations. This suggests structural dependence by the neuromodulatory process to induce analgesia with potential relevance for patient stratification. PMID:28148969

  19. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs for Wounds: Pain Relief or Excessive Scar Formation?

    PubMed Central

    Su, Wen-Hsiang; Cheng, Ming-Huei; Lee, Wen-Ling; Tsou, Tsung-Shan; Chang, Wen-Hsun; Chen, Chien-Sheng; Wang, Peng-Hui

    2010-01-01

    The inflammatory process has direct effects on normal and abnormal wound healing. Hypertrophic scar formation is an aberrant form of wound healing and is an indication of an exaggerated function of fibroblasts and excess accumulation of extracellular matrix during wound healing. Two cytokines—transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)—are lipid mediators of inflammation involving wound healing. Overproduction of TGF-β and suppression of PGE2 are found in excessive wound scarring compared with normal wound healing. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or their selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors are frequently used as a pain-killer. However, both NSAIDs and COX-2 inhibitors inhibit PGE2 production, which might exacerbate excessive scar formation, especially when used during the later proliferative phase. Therefore, a balance between cytokines and medication in the pathogenesis of wound healing is needed. This report is a literature review pertaining to wound healing and is focused on TGF-β and PGE2. PMID:20671960

  20. Dimethyl sulfoxide-sodium bicarbonate infusion for palliative care and pain relief in patients with metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Ba X; Le, Bao T; Tran, Hau D; Hoang, Cuong; Tran, Hung Q; Tran, Dao M; Pham, Cu Q; Pham, Tuan D; Ha, Trung V; Bui, Nga T; Shaw, D Graeme

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer (adenocarcinoma of the prostate) is the most widespread cancer in men. It causes significant suffering and mortality due to metastatic disease. The main therapy for metastatic prostate cancer (MPC) includes androgen manipulation, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy and/or radioisotopes. However, these therapeutic approaches are considered palliative at this stage, and their significant side effects can cause further decline in patients' quality of life and increase non-cancer-related morbidity/mortality. In this study, the authors have used the infusion of dimethyl sulfoxide-sodium bicarbonate (DMSO-SB) to treat 18 patients with MPC. The 90-day follow-up of the patients having undergone the proposed therapeutic regimen showed significant improvement in clinical symptoms, blood and biochemistry tests, and quality of life. There were no major side effects from the treatment. In searching for new and better methods for palliative treatment and pain relief, this study strongly suggested therapy with DMSO-SB infusions could provide a rational alternative to conventional treatment for patients with MPC.

  1. Computer modeling of electrical and thermal performance during bipolar pulsed radiofrequency for pain relief

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez, Juan J.; Pérez-Cajaraville, Juan J.; Muñoz, Víctor; Berjano, Enrique

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Pulsed RF (PRF) is a nonablative technique for treating neuropathic pain. Bipolar PRF application is currently aimed at creating a “strip lesion” to connect the electrode tips; however, the electrical and thermal performance during bipolar PRF is currently unknown. The objective of this paper was to study the temperature and electric field distributions during bipolar PRF. Methods: The authors developed computer models to study temperature and electric field distributions during bipolar PRF and to assess the possible ablative thermal effect caused by the accumulated temperature spikes, along with any possible electroporation effects caused by the electrical field. The authors also modeled the bipolar ablative mode, known as bipolar Continuous Radiofrequency (CRF), in order to compare both techniques. Results: There were important differences between CRF and PRF in terms of electrical and thermal performance. In bipolar CRF: (1) the initial temperature of the tissue impacts on temperature progress and hence on the thermal lesion dimension; and (2) at 37 °C, 6-min of bipolar CRF creates a strip thermal lesion between the electrodes when these are separated by a distance of up to 20 mm. In bipolar PRF: (1) an interelectrode distance shorter than 5 mm produces thermal damage (i.e., ablative effect) in the intervening tissue after 6 min of bipolar RF; and (2) the possible electroporation effect (electric fields higher than 150 kV m{sup −1}) would be exclusively circumscribed to a very small zone of tissue around the electrode tip. Conclusions: The results suggest that (1) the clinical parameters considered to be suitable for bipolar CRF should not necessarily be considered valid for bipolar PRF, and vice versa; and (2) the ablative effect of the CRF mode is mainly due to its much greater level of delivered energy than is the case in PRF, and therefore at same applied energy levels, CRF, and PRF are expected to result in same outcomes in terms of

  2. [Pain relief by low-intensity frequency-modulated millimeter waves acting on the acupuncture points].

    PubMed

    Samosiuk, I Z; Kulikovich, Iu N; Tamarova, Z A; Samosiuk, N I; Kazhanova, A K

    2000-01-01

    Analgetic effect of low-intensive frequency-modulated millimetric waves (MW) was studied in mice with formalin induced nociceptive behavior reaction (licking of defeat hindpaw). MW were applied to the acupoint E 36 of the defeat hindpaw. The following MW were used: 60 GHz (1) and 118 GHz (2) which were modulated by 4 Hz; noise MW within the range of 42-95 GHz (3) and 90-140 GHz (4) which were modulated in accidental order by frequencies 1-60 Hz; combinations of fixed frequencies with noise - 60 GHz + noise 42-95 GHz (5) and 118 GHz + noise 90-140 GHz (6). All used MW combinations suppressed licking of the defeat hindpaw and increased duration of sleep and eating. The strongest analgesia was achieved in series 1-3 (42.4-69.7%), the weakest in series 6 and 4 of the experiment (12.2-19.7%).

  3. Acupuncture and other physical treatments for the relief of pain due to osteoarthritis of the knee: network meta-analysis☆

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, M.S.; Rice, S.J.C.; Madurasinghe, V.; Slack, R.; Fayter, D.A.; Harden, M.; Sutton, A.J.; MacPherson, H.; Woolacott, N.F.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Objective To compare the effectiveness of acupuncture with other relevant physical treatments for alleviating pain due to knee osteoarthritis. Design Systematic review with network meta-analysis, to allow comparison of treatments within a coherent framework. Comprehensive searches were undertaken up to January 2013 to identify randomised controlled trials in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee, which reported pain. Results Of 156 eligible studies, 114 trials (covering 22 treatments and 9,709 patients) provided data suitable for analysis. Most trials studied short-term effects and many were classed as being of poor quality with high risk of bias, commonly associated with lack of blinding (which was sometimes impossible to achieve). End of treatment results showed that eight interventions: interferential therapy, acupuncture, TENS, pulsed electrical stimulation, balneotherapy, aerobic exercise, sham acupuncture, and muscle-strengthening exercise produced a statistically significant reduction in pain when compared with standard care. In a sensitivity analysis of satisfactory and good quality studies, most studies were of acupuncture (11 trials) or muscle-strengthening exercise (9 trials); both interventions were statistically significantly better than standard care, with acupuncture being statistically significantly better than muscle-strengthening exercise (standardised mean difference: 0.49, 95% credible interval 0.00–0.98). Conclusions As a summary of the current available research, the network meta-analysis results indicate that acupuncture can be considered as one of the more effective physical treatments for alleviating osteoarthritis knee pain in the short-term. However, much of the evidence in this area of research is of poor quality, meaning there is uncertainty about the efficacy of many physical treatments. PMID:23973143

  4. A comparison of intraperitoneal bupivacaine-tramadol with bupivacaine-magnesium sulphate for pain relief after laparoscopic cholecystectomy: A prospective, randomised study

    PubMed Central

    Yadava, Anurag; Rajput, Sunil K; Katiyar, Sarika; Jain, Rajnish K

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: In laparoscopic surgeries, intraperitoneal instillation of local anaesthetics and opioids is gaining popularity, for better pain relief. This study compared the quality and duration of post-operative analgesia using intraperitoneal tramadol plus bupivacaine (TB) or magnesium plus bupivacaine (MB). Methods: In this study, 186 patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly divided into two groups: group TB received intraperitoneal tramadol with bupivacaine and group MB received intraperitoneal magnesium sulphate (MgSO4) with bupivacaine. The visual analogue scale (VAS) to assess pain, haemodynamic variables and side effects were noted and compared at different time points. The primary outcome was to compare the analgesic efficacy and duration of pain relief. The secondary outcomes included comparison of haemodynamic parameters and side effects among the two groups. The data analysis was carried out with unpaired Student's t-test and Chi-square test using software SPSS 20.0 version. Results: The mean of VAS pain score after 1, 2, 4, 6 and 24 h of surgery was more in TB group compared to MB group, and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The total rescue analgesia consumption in 24 h after surgery was 2.4 g (mean) of paracetamol in TB group and 1.4 g (mean) of paracetamol in MB group which was statistically significant (P < 0.05). There were no statistically significant differences in the secondary outcomes. Conclusion: Intraperitoneal instillation of bupivacaine-MgSO4 renders patients relatively pain-free in first 24 h after surgery, with longer duration of pain-free period and less consumption of rescue analgesic as compared to bupivacaine-tramadol combination. PMID:27761040

  5. A diclofenac suppository-nabumetone combination therapy for arthritic pain relief and a monitoring method for the diclofenac binding capacity of HSA site II in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Setoguchi, Nao; Takamura, Norito; Fujita, Ken-ichi; Ogata, Kenji; Tokunaga, Jin; Nishio, Toyotaka; Chosa, Etsuo; Arimori, Kazuhiko; Kawai, Keiichi; Yamamoto, Ryuichi

    2013-03-01

    Diclofenac suppository, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), is used widely in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with severe arthritic pain. As the binding percentage of diclofenac to serum proteins is high, its free (unbound) concentration after rectal administration is low. To increase temporarily the free concentration of diclofenac and to enhance its analgesic effect by inhibiting the protein binding of diclofenac, the analgesic effect of diclofenac was examined before and after the start of an inhibitor administration to RA patients with insufficient control of arthritic pain, and the protein binding capacity of diclofenac was evaluated. Binding experiments were performed by ultrafiltration, and arthritic pain was recorded by the face scale. Free fractions of diazepam and diclofenac were augmented by increasing 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA; the active metabolite of the NSAID nabumetone) concentrations. The free fraction of diazepam increased after the start of nabumetone administration to RA patients, and arthritic pain relief was observed. These results suggest that 6-MNA has an inhibitory effect on the protein binding of diclofenac and the free fraction of diazepam can be used to evaluate the binding capacity of diclofenac. It is considered that diclofenac suppository-nabumetone combination therapy and the method for protein binding monitoring by diazepam can positively benefit RA patients with insufficient control of arthritic pain.

  6. Pain relief by applying transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) during unsedated colonoscopy: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Amer-Cuenca, J J; Goicoechea, C; Girona-López, A; Andreu-Plaza, J L; Palao-Román, R; Martínez-Santa, G; Lisón, J F

    2011-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a noninvasive alternative to traditional pain treatments. TENS has been studied in the past as a pain reduction modality in colonoscopy with limited success. Reviews and meta-analysis have shown that the inconclusive results of TENS may be due to the lack of randomized controlled trials and the difficulty in defining precise output parameters. The objective of this double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial was to investigate the pain-relieving effect of a new application of TENS in unsedated screening colonoscopy. Ninety patients undergoing unsedated screening colonoscopy were randomly allocated to one of three groups: a control group (n=30), a group to receive active TENS (n=30), or a group to receive placebo TENS (n=30). A visual analogue scale (VAS) and a five-point Likert scale were used to assess pain 5 min into the procedure and at the end of the procedure. The patient's bloating sensation during colonoscopy and the effect on the duration of the procedure were also evaluated. Throughout the procedure, the active TENS group experienced a VAS pain score reduction ≥50% compared to the placebo TENS group (P<0.001) and the control group (P<0.001). On the five-point Likert scale, there was also a significant reduction in pain score in the active TENS group compared to the placebo TENS and control groups (P=0.009). No significant differences were found between the study groups as to the bloating sensation and the duration of the procedure. We conclude that TENS can be used as a pain relief therapy in unsedated screening colonoscopy.

  7. Relief from Back Pain Through Postural Adjustment: a Controlled Clinical Trial of the Immediate Effects of Muscular Chains Therapy (MCT)

    PubMed Central

    Rosario, Jose L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Back pain can be one of the most common health problems, causing suffering, disabilities, and financial losses. Postural models for pain treatment state that poor posture alters the joint position and causes pain, such as back pain. Muscular Chain Therapy (MCT) is a technique that is used to treat posture pathologies, among others. Purpose The aim of the present study was to assess the efficiency of a single session of Muscular Chain Therapy (MCT) on complaints of undiagnosed musculoskeletal spinal pain. Setting Physical therapy clinic of the University of Center-West (Guarapuava, Brazil). Participants 100 subjects, aged between 20 and 39 years, with complaints of spinal musculoskeletal pain. Research Design Randomized controlled trial. Intervention The participants were randomly assigned by a non-care provider into two groups: The MCT Group that received Muscular Chain Treatment and the Control Group that received a placebo treatment of 15 minutes turned off ultrasound therapy. All volunteers were assessed before and after treatment using an analog pain scale. A score of 0 indicated no pain and 10 was the maximum degree of pain on the scale. Main Outcome Measure Degree of pain measured by analog scale Results The chi-square goodness of fit test was used to compare gender distribution among groups displayed a p value = .25. Subject age had differences analyzed using the unpaired t test (p = .44). Pain assessment for treatment and placebo control groups was analyzed using a paired t test and unpaired t test. The paired t test was used for intragroup before/after treatment comparison (MCT p = .00001; Control Group p = .0001). The unpaired t test was used for comparing the difference of the pain level before and after treatment between groups (p = .0001). A priori statistical significance was set a p = .05. Conclusion It is possible to conclude that one MCT session is an effective treatment of undiagnosed spinal musculoskeletal pain. PMID:25184010

  8. Comparative Evaluation of Retrocrural versus Transaortic Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block for Pain Relief in Patients with Upper Abdominal Malignancy: A Retrospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, Saipriya; Agarwal, Anil; Dhiraaj, Sanjay; Gautam, Sujeet K; Khuba, Sandeep; Madabushi, Rajashree; Shamshery, Chetna; Kumar, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare retrocrural versus transaortic techniques for neurolytic celiac plexus block (NCPB) in patients suffering from upper abdominal malignancy. Methods: In this retrospective observational study between October 2013 and April 2015, 64 patients with inoperable upper abdominal malignancy received fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous NCPB in our institute. Their case files were reviewed and the patients were divided into two groups depending on the technique used to perform NCPB: retrocrural (Group R; n = 36) versus transaortic (Group T; n = 28). The primary outcome measure was pain as assessed with a numeric rating scale (NRS) from 0 to 10; the secondary outcome measures were morphine consumption per day (M), quality of life (QOL) as assessed by comparing the percent of positive responses in each group, and complications if any. These were noted and analyzed prior to intervention and then on day 1, weeks 1, 2, 3, and months 1, 2, 3, 6 following NCPB. Results: Patients in Group R had significantly reduced NRS pain scores at week 1, 2, 3, month 1 and 2 as compared to Group T (P < 0.05). Morphine consumption also reduced significantly in Group R at day 1, week 1, 2, and 3 (P < 0.05). QOL was found to be comparable between the groups, and no major complications were noted. Conclusion: Retrocrural NCPB provides superior pain relief along with a reduction in morphine consumption as compared to transaortic NCPB in patients with pain due to upper abdominal malignancy. PMID:27559259

  9. The Effect of Virtual Reality Distraction on Pain Relief During Dressing Changes in Children with Chronic Wounds on Lower Limbs.

    PubMed

    Hua, Yun; Qiu, Rong; Yao, Wen-Yan; Zhang, Qin; Chen, Xiao-Li

    2015-10-01

    It has been demonstrated that patients with chronic wounds experience the most pain during dressing changes. Currently, researchers focus mostly on analgesics and appropriate dressing materials to relieve pain during dressing changes of chronic wounds. However, the effect of nonpharmacologic interventions, such as virtual reality distraction, on pain management during dressing changes of pediatric chronic wounds remains poorly understood. To investigate the effect of virtual reality distraction on alleviating pain during dressing changes in children with chronic wounds on their lower limbs. A prospective randomized study. A pediatric center in a tertiary hospital. Sixty-five children, aged from 4 to 16 years, with chronic wounds on their lower limbs. Pain and anxiety scores during dressing changes were recorded by using the Wong-Baker Faces picture scale, visual analogue scale, and pain behavior scale, as well as physiological measurements including pulse rate and oxygen saturation. Time length of dressing change was recorded. Virtual reality distraction significantly relieved pain and anxiety scores during dressing changes and reduced the time length for dressing changes as compared to standard distraction methods. The use of virtual reality as a distraction tool in a pediatric ward offered superior pain reduction to children as compared to standard distractions. This device can potentially improve clinical efficiency by reducing length time for dressing changes.

  10. Derivatives of furanditerpenes from Pterodon genus: Pharmacological studies disclose their potential as chronic pain relief in mice.

    PubMed

    Spindola, Humberto M; Grando, Rogério; Figueiredo, Mariana C; Basting, Rosana; Queiroz, N C A; de Fátima, Ângelo; de Carvalho, João E; Wang, Zaijie J; Foglio, M A

    2017-03-16

    Pterodon genus fruits are commercially available at the Brazilian medicinal market used in folk medicine due to their anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and anti-rheumatic effects. Previous studies demonstrated that furanditerpenes possessing vouacapan skeleton, isolated from Pterodon genus, possess expressive antinociceptive activities, with promising moiety for the development of new analgesic products. The antinociceptive properties of compounds 6α,7β-6α-hidroxivouacapan-7β-17β-lactone (HVL) and 6α-oxovouacapan-7β-17β-lactone (OVL), semi-synthetic analogues of furanditerpenes previously reported as analgesic agents were evaluated on animal experimental models (Spindola et al., 2010, 2011). The chemical-induced pain methods used in the present work, demonstrated for the first time that both compounds HVL and OVL have potential as important templates for the development of chronic pain control drugs. The main findings of this work were that both compounds were: effective in the writhing test; reduced paw edema in the carrageenan test; effective in the inflammatory phase of the formalin test corroborating their activity against inflammatory pain conditions; effective on reducing pain through the stimulation of vanilloid receptors sensible to capsaicin (an important pathway for chronic pain maintenance); reduced the pain stimulus caused by PGE2 injection (a pathway involved in chronic pain hypersensitivity); effective on decreasing mechanical allodynia in the CFA-model, demonstrating their potential use against chronic pain disorders.

  11. Oral Intake of a Liquid High-Molecular-Weight Hyaluronan Associated with Relief of Chronic Pain and Reduced Use of Pain Medication: Results of a Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Double-Blind Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Attridge, Victoria L.; Lenninger, Miki R.; Benson, Kathleen F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The goal for this study was to evaluate the effects of daily oral intake of a consumable liquid fermentate containing high-molecular-weight hyaluronan, as well as to perform a basic evaluation of safety and tolerability. A randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study design was used to examine the effects of oral intake of hyaluronan on chronic pain conditions. Safety assessment included a complete blood count with differential, blood chemistry and electrocardiogram. The study duration was 4 weeks, where three tablespoons (45 mL) product or placebo was ingested during the first 2 weeks, and two tablespoons (30 mL) was consumed during the last 2 weeks. Seventy-eight people between the age of 19 and 71 years enrolled, and 72 people completed the study. Statistical analysis was performed using the two-tailed independent t-test for between-group significance and using the paired t-test for within-group significance. A reduction in pain scores was seen after 2 weeks of consumption of both placebo (P<.1) and active (P<.065) product; the reduction was more pronounced in the group consuming the active test product. Using “within-subject” analysis, a highly significant reduction in chronic pain scores was seen after 2 weeks of consumption of three tablespoons of active product (P<.001), whereas only a mild nonsignificant reduction in pain scores was seen in the placebo group. During the reduced intake for the last 2 weeks of study participation, pain scores showed a slight increase. During the last 2 weeks, a significant increase in the quality of sleep (P<.005) and level of physical energy (P<.05) was seen. The pain reduction during the initial 2 weeks was associated with significant reduction in the use of pain medication (P<.05). Consumption of an oral liquid formula containing high-molecular-weight hyaluronan was associated with relief of chronic pain. PMID:25415767

  12. Intraperitoneal Levobupivacaine with or without Clonidine for Pain Relief after Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Govil, Nishith; Kumar, Parag

    2017-01-01

    Background: Irrigation of local anesthetic intraperitoneally in combination with opioids and non-opioids agents has been used to provide pain relief with varying success in laparoscopic surgeries. This randomized double blind placebo controlled study is designed to study the effect of intraperitoneal instillation of levo-bupivacaine along with clonidine for pain relief after laparascopic cholecystectomy. Methods: 75 patients were randomized to receive 20 ml of 0.9% normal saline as placebo (group I), 20 ml of 0.5% levo bupivacaine (group II) and 20 ml of 0.5% levo bupivacaine with 1mcg/kg clonidine (group III) intraperitoneally. The degree of postoperative pain was assessed using the VAS and VRS on the immediate arrival in the recovery room after surgery and thereafter at 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 hours, postoperatively. Statistical analysis was performed with ANOVA, the Kruskal-Wallis test followed by the Wilcoxon matched pairs rank test was used and P < 0.05 were considered significant. Results: VAS was maximum in placebo (group I) than in levobupivacaine alone (group II) and was minimum in levobupivacaine with clonidine (group III) at all time intervals. The difference between group I and II is statistically significant at immediate and at 2 hours postoperatively but no difference were found between group I and II after 2 hour. However, there is statistically significant difference (P < 0.05) between group I and III and group II and III at all time intervals. Conclusion: Intraperitoneal instillation of levobupivacaine along with clonidine in a dose of 1mcg/kg is superior to levobupivacaine alone without having any significant adverse effects. PMID:28298770

  13. A Homeopathic Arnica Patch for the Relief of Cellulitis-derived Pain and Numbness in the Hand

    PubMed Central

    Kaszkin-Bettag, Marietta

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Arnica montana, belonging to the Compositae family, is a plant with a longstanding tradition of relieving pain and/or inflammation in muscles and joints and may thus represent an alternative to nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, which are often ineffective or lead to a number of adverse effects. A homeopathic arnica patch (3X dilution according to the Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia of the United States) was developed to alleviate pain symptoms in the back and neck muscles and joints. Case Presentation: The present case report describes the treatment outcome after administration of the arnica patch in a 55-year-old female patient with pain in the right hand and numbness in the fourth finger after cellulitis in the palmar area. The cellulitis was treated with antibiotics, but pain symptoms remained at 7 points on a 0-to-10–point visual analog scale (VAS) for pain despite intake of oral ibuprofen and oral and topical application of an arnica-containing complex homeopathic ointment. Ten arnica patches were dispensed to the patient. She cut the patch into strips to cover all painful areas of the hand and applied them at night. After 3 days, she reported a substantial decrease in pain symptoms (VAS = 1) and a marked decrease in numbness and in the size of a tender nodule on the third metacarpal area. Moreover, the patient was able to sleep through the night without being awakened by the pain. The symptoms declined further during the next 2 days. Conclusion: This case demonstrates that after a relatively short period of time, the administration of the arnica patch on the hand provided a marked reduction of pain and recovery of functionality of the hand. PMID:24278813

  14. Electrical nerve stimulation and the relief of chronic pain through regulation of the accumulation of synaptic Arc protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yue-peng; Liu, Su

    2013-08-01

    Electrical nerve stimulation (ENS) is used in clinical settings for the treatment of chronic pain, but the mechanism underlying its effects remains unknown. ENS has been found to mimic neural activity, inducing the accumulation of Arc in synapses. Activity-dependent synaptic accumulation of Arc protein has been shown to reduce synaptic strength by promoting endocytosis of the AMPA receptors in the synaptic membrane. These receptors play a decisive role in central sensitization, which is one of the main mechanisms underlying chronic pain. It is here hypothesized that ENS induces Arc expression in synapses, where Arc promotes endocytosis of membrane AMPARs that are up-regulated during chronic pain. High frequency and high intensity are characteristics of ENS, which may be effective in the treatment of chronic pain. Stimulation-site of ENS may also influence the outcome of ENS.

  15. Comparative study of ultrasound-guided abdominal field blocks versus port infiltration in laparoscopic cholecystectomies for post-operative pain relief

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Ruchi; Joshi, Saurabh; Srivastava, Kuldeep; Tiwari, Shashank; Sharma, Nitin; Valecha, Umesh K

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Post-operative pain is a major concern for day care surgeries like laparoscopic cholecystectomy. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of ultrasound guided abdominal field blocks (USAFB) with port site infiltrations for post-operative analgesia in terms of quality of pain relief, opioid consumption and patient satisfaction for day care surgeries Methods: Eighty patients presenting for laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly allocated to two groups either to receive port-site infiltration of local anaesthetic (n = 40, Group A) or USAFB (n = 40, Group B group). Numeric rating scores (NRS) were measured postoperatively to primarily assess the pain severity and opioid requirements. Data were analysed using Chi-Square test/Fisher's exact test for categorical data and Mann–Whitney test/unpaired t-test for quantitative data. Results: The study group (Group B) had significantly reduced NRS and opioid consumption over 24 h. The overall fentanyl consumption in patients receiving port infiltrations was approximately twice (200 ΁ 100 μg) as compared to patients in USAFB group (120 ΁ 74 μg) (P < 0.0001). Maximum fentanyl consumption was 400 μg (Group A) and 262 μg (Group B) over 24 h and the minimum requirement was 50 μg and zero, respectively. Conclusion: Superior post-operative analgesia was observed with USAFB which may help in minimising opioid-related adverse effects and facilitating faster recovery. PMID:27601741

  16. Palmitoylethanolamide is a disease-modifying agent in peripheral neuropathy: pain relief and neuroprotection share a PPAR-alpha-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Di Cesare Mannelli, L; D'Agostino, G; Pacini, A; Russo, R; Zanardelli, M; Ghelardini, C; Calignano, A

    2013-01-01

    Neuropathic syndromes which are evoked by lesions to the peripheral or central nervous system are extremely difficult to treat, and available drugs rarely joint an antihyperalgesic with a neurorestorative effect. N-Palmitoylethanolamine (PEA) exerts antinociceptive effects in several animal models and inhibits peripheral inflammation in rodents. Aimed to evaluate the antineuropathic properties of PEA, a damage of the sciatic nerve was induced in mice by chronic constriction injury (CCI) and a subcutaneous daily treatment with 30 mg kg(-1) PEA was performed. On the day 14, PEA prevented pain threshold alterations. Histological studies highlighted that CCI induced oedema and an important infiltrate of CD86 positive cells in the sciatic nerve. Moreover, osmicated preparations revealed a decrease in axon diameter and myelin thickness. Repeated treatments with PEA reduced the presence of oedema and macrophage infiltrate, and a significant higher myelin sheath, axonal diameter, and a number of fibers were observable. In PPAR- α null mice PEA treatment failed to induce pain relief as well as to rescue the peripheral nerve from inflammation and structural derangement. These results strongly suggest that PEA, via a PPAR- α -mediated mechanism, can directly intervene in the nervous tissue alterations responsible for pain, starting to prevent macrophage infiltration.

  17. Palmitoylethanolamide Is a Disease-Modifying Agent in Peripheral Neuropathy: Pain Relief and Neuroprotection Share a PPAR-Alpha-Mediated Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Di Cesare Mannelli, L.; D'Agostino, G.; Pacini, A.; Russo, R.; Zanardelli, M.; Ghelardini, C.; Calignano, A.

    2013-01-01

    Neuropathic syndromes which are evoked by lesions to the peripheral or central nervous system are extremely difficult to treat, and available drugs rarely joint an antihyperalgesic with a neurorestorative effect. N-Palmitoylethanolamine (PEA) exerts antinociceptive effects in several animal models and inhibits peripheral inflammation in rodents. Aimed to evaluate the antineuropathic properties of PEA, a damage of the sciatic nerve was induced in mice by chronic constriction injury (CCI) and a subcutaneous daily treatment with 30 mg kg−1 PEA was performed. On the day 14, PEA prevented pain threshold alterations. Histological studies highlighted that CCI induced oedema and an important infiltrate of CD86 positive cells in the sciatic nerve. Moreover, osmicated preparations revealed a decrease in axon diameter and myelin thickness. Repeated treatments with PEA reduced the presence of oedema and macrophage infiltrate, and a significant higher myelin sheath, axonal diameter, and a number of fibers were observable. In PPAR-α null mice PEA treatment failed to induce pain relief as well as to rescue the peripheral nerve from inflammation and structural derangement. These results strongly suggest that PEA, via a PPAR-α-mediated mechanism, can directly intervene in the nervous tissue alterations responsible for pain, starting to prevent macrophage infiltration. PMID:23533304

  18. Nav1.7 and other voltage-gated sodium channels as drug targets for pain relief

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Edward C; Luiz, Ana Paula; Wood, John N

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Chronic pain is a massive clinical problem. We discuss the potential of subtype selective sodium channel blockers that may provide analgesia with limited side effects. Areas covered: Sodium channel subtypes have been linked to human pain syndromes through genetic studies. Gain of function mutations in Nav1.7, 1.8 and 1.9 can cause pain, whilst loss of function Nav1.7 mutations lead to loss of pain in otherwise normal people. Intriguingly, both human and mouse Nav1.7 null mutants have increased opioid drive, because naloxone, an opioid antagonist, can reverse the analgesia associated with the loss of Nav1.7 expression. Expert Opinion: We believe there is a great future for sodium channel antagonists, particularly Nav1.7 antagonists in treating most pain syndromes. This review deals with recent attempts to develop specific sodium channel blockers, the mechanisms that underpin the Nav1.7 null pain-free phenotype and new routes to analgesia using, for example, gene therapy or combination therapy with subtype specific sodium channel blockers and opioids. The use of selective Nav1.7 antagonists together with either enkephalinase inhibitors or low dose opioids has the potential for side effect-free analgesia, as well as an important opioid sparing function that may be clinically very significant. PMID:26941184

  19. Efficacy of disintegrating aspirin in two different models for acute mild-to-moderate pain: sore throat pain and dental pain.

    PubMed

    Voelker, M; Schachtel, B P; Cooper, S A; Gatoulis, S C

    2016-02-01

    A recently developed fast-release aspirin tablet formulation has been evaluated in two different pain models. The dental impaction pain model and the sore throat pain model are widely used for assessing analgesia, including acute mild-to-moderate pain. Both studies were double-blind, randomized, parallel group and compared a single dose of 1000 mg aspirin with 1000 mg paracetamol and with placebo and investigated the onset and overall time course of pain relief. Speed of onset was measured by the double-stopwatch method for time to meaningful pain relief and time to first perceptible pain relief. Pain intensity and pain relief were rated subjectively over a 6-h (dental pain) and 2-h (sore throat pain) time period. In both models fast-release aspirin and commercial paracetamol were statistically significantly different from placebo for onset of action, summed pain intensity differences and total pain relief. Meaningful pain relief was achieved within a median of 42.3 and 42.9 min for aspirin and paracetamol, respectively, in the dental pain model. The corresponding numbers in sore throat pain were 48.0 and 40.4 min. All treatments in both studies were safe and well tolerated. No serious adverse events were reported and no subject was discontinued due to an adverse event. Overall the two studies clearly demonstrated efficacy over placebo in the two pain models and a comparable efficacy and safety profile between aspirin and an equivalent dose of paracetamol under the conditions of acute dental pain and acute sore throat pain. Trial registration These trials were registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, registration number: NCT01420094, registration date: July 27, 2011 and registration number: NCT01453400, registration date: October 13, 2011.

  20. A Randomized Double Blinded Comparison of Epidural Infusion of Bupivacaine, Ropivacaine, Bupivacaine-Fentanyl, Ropivacaine-Fentanyl for Postoperative Pain Relief in Lower Limb Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Sawhney, Krishan Yogesh; Grewal, Anju; Katyal, Sunil; Singh, Gurdeep; Kaur, Ananjit

    2015-01-01

    Background Continuous epidural infusion of Bupivacaine and Ropivacaine with or without the addition of Fentanyl has been evaluated by various researchers for effective postoperative pain relief. Studies however, depict significant variability in their results with regard to analgesic efficacy and adverse effects like hypotension, motor blockade etc. Aim To comparatively evaluate postoperative analgesic efficacy, motor sparing effect, postoperative haemodynamic variations and total postoperative analgesic consumption in first 24 hours. Materials and Methods A randomised double blind study was conducted on 100 adult, ASA grade I and II patients, of either sex who had undergone elective lower limb surgery under spinal anaesthesia. According to the group allocated, patients were started on epidural infusion after completion of surgery. Group I (0.2% Ropivacaine), Group II (0.1% Ropivacaine + 2μg/ml Fentanyl), Group III (0.2% Bupivacaine), Group IV (0.1% Bupivacaine + 2μg/ml Fentanyl) at the rate of 6 ml/hour. VAS scores, epidural consumption, supplemental epidural boluses, rescue analgesics, haemodynamics, motor block, sensory block regression, sedation, nausea and pruritis were recorded by a blinded observer for 24 hours. Results The haemodynamic parameters were stable in all the groups. Side effects including the motor block were negligible and comparable in all groups. Group I patients had significantly lower VAS scores, mean total epidural consumption, supplemental epidural bolus requirement and rescue analgesic requirement among all groups. Conclusion It can be concluded that epidural analgesia using Ropivacaine 0.2% infusion is more effective than other study groups when used for postoperative pain relief in lower limb surgeries. PMID:26500984

  1. Validating speed of onset as a key component of good analgesic response in acute pain

    PubMed Central

    Moore, RA; Derry, S; Straube, S; Ireson-Paine, J; Wiffen, PJ

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous analysis of a single data set in acute pain following third molar extraction demonstrated a strong relationship between the speed of reduction of pain intensity and overall pain relief, as well as need for additional analgesia. Methods Individual patient data analysis of a single randomized, double-blind trial of placebo, paracetamol 1000 mg, ibuprofen sodium 400 mg and ibuprofen-poloxamer 400 mg following third molar extraction. Visual analogue scale pain intensity (VASPI) and other measurements were made at baseline, every 5–45 min, and at 60, 90, 120, 180, 240, 300 and 360 min. Results Most patients produced consistent VASPI results over time. For placebo and paracetamol, few patients achieved low VASPI scores and maintained them. For both ibuprofen formulations, VASPI scores fell rapidly during the first hour and were then typically maintained until later re-medication. Analysis of all patients showed that rapid VASPI reduction in the first hour was strongly correlated with good overall pain relief (high total pain relief over 0–6 h), and with lesser need for additional analgesia within 6 h. Results for this analysis were in very good agreement with a previous analysis, validating the relationship between fast initial pain intensity reduction and overall good pain relief in this setting. Conclusions In acute pain following third molar extraction, faster acting analgesic formulations provide earlier onset of pain relief, better overall pain relief and a less frequent need for additional analgesia, indicating longer lasting pain relief. PMID:24848990

  2. A monoclonal antibody that targets a NaV1.7 channel voltage sensor for pain and itch relief

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun-Ho; Park, Chul-Kyu; Chen, Gang; Han, Qingjian; Xie, Rou-Gang; Liu, Tong; Ji, Ru-Rong; Lee, Seok-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Summary Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels control the upstroke of the action potentials in excitable cells. Multiple studies have shown distinct roles of NaV channel subtypes in human physiology and diseases, but subtype-specific therapeutics are lacking and the current efforts have been limited to small molecules. Here we present a monoclonal antibody that targets the voltage-sensor paddle of NaV1.7, the subtype critical for pain sensation. This antibody not only inhibits NaV1.7 with high selectivity but also effectively suppresses inflammatory and neuropathic pain in mice. Interestingly, the antibody inhibits acute and chronic itch, despite well-documented differences in pain and itch modulation. Using this antibody, we discovered that NaV1.7 plays a key role in spinal cord nociceptive and pruriceptive synaptic transmission. Our studies reveal that NaV1.7 is a target for itch management and the antibody has therapeutic potential for suppressing pain and itch. Our antibody strategy may have broad applications for voltage-gated cation channels. PMID:24856969

  3. A monoclonal antibody that targets a NaV1.7 channel voltage sensor for pain and itch relief.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun-Ho; Park, Chul-Kyu; Chen, Gang; Han, Qingjian; Xie, Rou-Gang; Liu, Tong; Ji, Ru-Rong; Lee, Seok-Yong

    2014-06-05

    Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels control the upstroke of the action potentials in excitable cells. Multiple studies have shown distinct roles of NaV channel subtypes in human physiology and diseases, but subtype-specific therapeutics are lacking and the current efforts have been limited to small molecules. Here, we present a monoclonal antibody that targets the voltage-sensor paddle of NaV1.7, the subtype critical for pain sensation. This antibody not only inhibits NaV1.7 with high selectivity, but also effectively suppresses inflammatory and neuropathic pain in mice. Interestingly, the antibody inhibits acute and chronic itch despite well-documented differences in pain and itch modulation. Using this antibody, we discovered that NaV1.7 plays a key role in spinal cord nociceptive and pruriceptive synaptic transmission. Our studies reveal that NaV1.7 is a target for itch management, and the antibody has therapeutic potential for suppressing pain and itch. Our antibody strategy may have broad applications for voltage-gated cation channels.

  4. Physical function improvements and relief from fatigue and pain are associated with increased productivity at work and at home in rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with certolizumab pegol

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Peter; Strand, Vibeke; Purcaru, Oana; Coteur, Geoffroy; Mease, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the association between improvements in physical function, fatigue and pain and improvements in productivity at work and at home in patients treated with certolizumab pegol (CZP) in combination with MTX. Methods. Physical function, fatigue and pain were assessed in two CZP clinical trials (Rheumatoid Arthritis PreventIon of structural Damage 1 and 2) using the HAQ-Disability Index (HAQ-DI), Fatigue Assessment Scale (FAS) and Patient Assessment of Pain, with minimal clinically important differences (MCIDs) defined as ≥0.22, ≥1 and ≥10 points, respectively. Work and home productivity were evaluated using the RA-specific Work Productivity Survey (WPS-RA). The odds of achieving an HAQ-DI, FAS or pain ‘response’ at Week 12, defined as improvements ≥MCID, were compared between CZP and control groups. Improvements in productivity at Week 12 were compared between CZP-treated HAQ-DI, FAS or pain responders and non-responders. Results. The odds of achieving improvements ≥MCID were five times higher for pain, and two to three times higher for physical function and fatigue, in patients receiving CZP vs control. Per month, responders reported significantly greater improvements in productivity at work and reduced interference of RA with their work productivity than non-responders. Responders also reported significantly greater improvements in productivity at home and participation in family, social and leisure activities. Conclusions. This study demonstrated a clear association between patient-reported improvements in physical function, fatigue and pain, and improvements in productivity both at work and home. PMID:20547658

  5. Brainstem brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling is required for histone deacetylase inhibitor-induced pain relief.

    PubMed

    Tao, Wenjuan; Chen, Quan; Wang, Lu; Zhou, Wenjie; Wang, Yunping; Zhang, Zhi

    2015-06-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that persistent pain can epigenetically suppress the transcription of Gad2 [encoding glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65)] and consequently impair the inhibitory function of GABAergic synapses in central pain-modulating neurons. This contributes to the development of persistent pain sensitization. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors increased GAD65 activity considerably, restored GABA synaptic function, and rendered sensitized pain behavior less pronounced. However, the molecular mechanisms by which HDAC regulates GABAergic transmission through GAD65 under pain conditions are unknown. This work showed that HDAC inhibitor-induced increases in colocalization of GAD65 and synaptic protein synapsin I on the presynaptic axon terminals of the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM) were blocked by a TrkB receptor antagonist K252a [(9S,10R,12R)-2,3,9,10,11,12-hexahydro-10-hydroxy-9-methyl-1-oxo-9,12-epoxy-1H-diindolo[1,2,3-fg:3',2',1'-kl]pyrrolo[3,4-i][1,6]benzodiazocine-10-carboxylic acid methyl ester], indicating that BDNF-TrkB signaling may be required in GAD65 modulation of GABA synaptic function. At the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promoter, HDAC inhibitors induced significant increases in H3 hyperacetylation, consistent with the increase in BDNF mRNA and total proteins. Although exogenous BDNF facilitated GABA miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents and GAD65 accumulation in NRM neuronal synapses in normal rats, it failed to do so in animals subjected to persistent inflammation. In addition, blockade of the TrkB receptor with K252a has no effect on miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents and synaptic GAD65 accumulation under normal conditions. In addition, the analgesic effects of HDAC inhibitors on behavior were blocked by NRM infusion of K252a. These findings suggest that BDNF-TrkB signaling is required for drugs that reverse the epigenetic effects of chronic pain at the gene level, such as HDAC inhibitors.

  6. [Changing methods of pain- and fear-relief in dental treatments based on reports published in 'Fogorvosi Szemle'].

    PubMed

    Tarján, Ildikó; Gábris, Katalin

    2008-12-01

    In the dental practice--for more than a 100 years--it has been a vital topic how to prevent, eliminate, or at least relieve pain and fear associated with dental treatments. 'Fogorvosi Szemle,' the scientific journal of the Hungarian Dental Association is now a 100 years old. Authors present how the approaches and methods of relieving pain and fear have changed in the past century, based on the reports published in this journal. The reports are grouped in three main topics: local anaesthetics and sedatives; ambulatory narcosis and sedative analgesia; hypnosis and hypnotherapy. Based on the publications of the last one hundred years, it can be concluded that the Hungarian dental practice has followed the trends and principles of the well-known international dental schools.

  7. Parenteral Pethidine for labour pain relief and substance use disorder: 20-year follow-up cohort study in offspring

    PubMed Central

    Kanhai, Humphrey; Rosendaal, Frits; van Dommelen, Paula; Swaab, Dick; Rodrigues Pereira, Erik; van de Wetering, Ben

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether use of intrapartum Pethidine pain analgesia increases the risk for substance use disorder in adult offspring. Design Analysis of data from a cohort study. Setting Academic hospital in Leiden, the Netherlands. Participants 133 cases and 164 control individuals, aged 18–20 years at follow-up. Main outcome measure Incidence of substance use disorder or use of alcohol and tobacco. Results The lifetime use of addictive substances in children exposed to intrapartum Pethidine analgesia was 45% of 133 children versus 48% of 164 not-exposed subjects (adjusted OR=0.79, 95% CI 0.48 to 1.29). Recent use of alcohol, tobacco and hard drugs showed no statistical difference either. Conclusion Pethidine for labour pain medication appears not to be associated with substance misuse or smoking in later life. PMID:22649173

  8. TENS and heat therapy for pain relief and quality of life improvement in individuals with primary dysmenorrhea: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Igwea, Sylvester Emeka; Tabansi-Ochuogu, Chidinma Samantha; Abaraogu, Ukachukwu Okoroafor

    2016-08-01

    The present systematic review aimed to synthesize evidence for the effectiveness of TENS and heat therapy interventions from randomized trials. Six relevant databases were searched for studies on TENS and heat therapy for primary dysmenorrhea. Menstrual pain intensity and quality of life were the primary and secondary outcomes respectively. The search yielded 46 citations from which six studies on TENS and three studies on heat therapy were systematically reviewed. On the PEDRO quality scale, the trials methodological quality was 4.8 out of 10 for TENS and 6.3 out of 10 for heat therapy. TENS and heat therapy both showed evidence of pain reduction, but no study included quality of life as an outcome. Meta-analysis was not possible due to substantial heterogeneity in included studies. TENS and heat therapy show potential as adjunct remedies in the management of primary dysmenorrhea, but rigorous high quality trials are still needed to made conclusive recommendation.

  9. Intravenous lidocaine for effective pain relief after a laparoscopic colectomy: a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Ahn, EunJin; Kang, Hyun; Choi, Geun Joo; Park, Yong Hee; Yang, So Young; Kim, Beom Gyu; Choi, Seung Won

    2015-03-01

    A perioperative intravenous lidocaine infusion has been reported to decrease postoperative pain. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of intravenous lidocaine in reducing postoperative pain for laparoscopic colectomy patients. Fifty-five patients scheduled for an elective laparoscopic colectomy were randomly assigned to 2 groups. Group L received an intravenous bolus injection of lidocaine 1.5 mg/kg before intubation, followed by 2 mg/kg/h continuous infusion during the operation. Group C received the same dosage of saline at the same time. Postoperative pain was assessed at 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48 hours after surgery by using the visual analog scale (VAS). Fentanyl consumption by patient-controlled plus investigator-controlled rescue administration and the total number of button pushes were measured at 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48 hours after surgery. In addition, C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were checked on the operation day and postoperative days 1, 2, 3, and 5. VAS scores were significantly lower in group L than group C until 24 hours after surgery. Fentanyl consumption was lower in group L than group C until 12 hours after surgery. Moreover, additional fentanyl injections and the total number of button pushes appeared to be lower in group L than group C (P < 0.05). The CRP level tended to be lower in group L than group C, especially on postoperative day 1 and 2 and appeared to be statistically significant. The satisfaction score was higher in group L than group C (P = 0.024). Intravenous lidocaine infusion during an operation reduces pain after a laparoscopic colectomy.

  10. The effect of SonoPrep® on EMLA® cream application for pain relief prior to intravenous cannulation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do Kyun; Choi, Sae Won; Kwak, Young Ho

    2012-06-01

    The aim the study was to determine the effect of SonoPrep® on the delivery and analgesic effects of EMLA® cream prior to intravenous (iv) cannulation in a tertiary pediatric emergency department. Children aged between 5 and 10 years were enrolled. Patients were randomized to receive either sonophoresis with SonoPrep® or sham sonophoresis followed by application of EMLA® cream for 5 min prior to iv cannulation. The primary outcome measurement was the child's rating of pain immediately after iv placement, using a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS). Parents or guardians and blinded researchers were additionally asked to rate their perception of the child's pain using the 10-cm VAS and the Wong-Baker Face scale. A total of 42 patients completed the study (21 in the study group, 21 in the control group). The baseline characteristics between the groups were similar. The VAS pain score was significantly lower in children treated with sonophoresis compared with the sham sonophoresis (median (percentiles 25th-75th), 20.0 (10.0-22.5) vs. 60.0 (31.0-87.5); p < 0.001). The parent's perception of the child's pain was significantly lower in the study group vs. the control group by the VAS (median (percentiles 25th-75th), 10.0 (10.0-20.0) vs. 50.0 (15.0-80.0); p < 0.001) and Wong-Baker Face scale (median (percentiles 25th-75th), 2.0 (2.0-2.0) vs. 4.0 (2.5-4.5); p < 0.001). The researcher's evaluation of the child's discomfort was also significantly lower in the study group (2.0 (1.0-3.0) vs. 4.0 (2.5-4.5); p < 0.001). The application of sonophoresis using SonoPrep® followed by the 5-min application of EMLA® cream showed significant benefit in young children in terms of pain reduction and patient satisfaction.

  11. Blood-nerve barrier dysfunction contributes to the generation of neuropathic pain and allows targeting of injured nerves for pain relief.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tony K Y; Shi, Xiang Qun; Martin, Hiliary Claire; Huang, Hao; Luheshi, Giamal; Rivest, Serge; Zhang, Ji

    2014-05-01

    The blood-nerve barrier (BNB) is a selectively permeable barrier that creates an immunologically and biochemically privileged space for peripheral axons and supporting cells. The breakdown of the BNB allows access of blood-borne (hematogenous) cells and molecules to the endoneurium to engage in the local inflammatory cascade. This process was examined in a mouse model of trauma-associated neuropathic pain. The impact of nerve injury-triggered opening of the BNB in the development of chronic pain behavior was investigated. Partial ligation of the sciatic nerve led to a long-lasting disruption of the BNB distal to the site of injury. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was expressed by resident macrophages after nerve injury. Intraneural injection of VEGF decreased mechanical thresholds while opening the BNB. Serum from nerve-injured or lipopolysaccharide-treated animals elicited mechanical allodynia in naive animals, when allowed to bypass the BNB by intraneural injection. Intraneural injection of fibrinogen, a clotting protein in plasma that was found to deposit in the nerve after nerve injury, also produced a decrease in mechanical thresholds when introduced into naive nerves. These results demonstrate that blood-borne molecules may play a role in the generation of neuropathic pain, suggesting that pain may be driven from infection or injury, at a distance from the nervous system. Furthermore, the breakdown of the BNB in neuropathic conditions was exploited to permit the entry of analgesic molecules that typically cannot pass the BNB, such as ProToxin-II, a BNB-impermeable Nav1.7 inhibitor. Therapeutics utilizing this mechanism could have selective access to injured nerves over healthy tissues.

  12. Over-the-Counter Relief From Pains and Pleasures Alike: Acetaminophen Blunts Evaluation Sensitivity to Both Negative and Positive Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Durso, Geoffrey R O; Luttrell, Andrew; Way, Baldwin M

    2015-06-01

    Acetaminophen, an effective and popular over-the-counter pain reliever (e.g., the active ingredient in Tylenol), has recently been shown to blunt individuals' reactivity to a range of negative stimuli in addition to physical pain. Because accumulating research has shown that individuals' reactivity to both negative and positive stimuli can be influenced by a single factor (an idea known as differential susceptibility), we conducted two experiments testing whether acetaminophen blunted individuals' evaluations of and emotional reactions to both negative and positive images from the International Affective Picture System. Participants who took acetaminophen evaluated unpleasant stimuli less negatively and pleasant stimuli less positively, compared with participants who took a placebo. Participants in the acetaminophen condition also rated both negative and positive stimuli as less emotionally arousing than did participants in the placebo condition (Studies 1 and 2), whereas nonevaluative ratings (extent of color saturation in each image; Study 2) were not affected by drug condition. These findings suggest that acetaminophen has a general blunting effect on individuals' evaluative and emotional processing, irrespective of negative or positive valence.

  13. Characterization of cannabinoid-induced relief of neuropathic pain in a rat model of cisplatin-induced neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Vera, Gema; Cabezos, Pablo Antonio; Martín, María Isabel; Abalo, Raquel

    2013-04-01

    Clinical use of antineoplastic drugs is associated with the development of numerous adverse effects that many patients find intolerable, including peripheral neuropathy. Cannabinoids have relieved neuropathic pain in different animal models. But their therapeutic activities could be affected by their psychoactive properties. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of cannabinoids in cisplatin-evoked neuropathy. For this purpose, the non-selective agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN), the CB1-selective agonist ACEA or the CB2-selective agonist JWH133 (or their vehicle) was either systemically administered at a non-psychoactive dose or locally injected in cisplatin-treated rats. Selective CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid antagonists (AM251 and SR144528, respectively) were used to characterize cannabinoid effects. Cisplatin-treated rats showed mechanical allodynia but not thermal hyperalgesia. Cannabinoid agonists alleviated mechanical allodynia. This effect was mediated by both CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors when the cannabinoid was systemically applied. At the dose used, cannabinoid agonists had no psychoactive effect. The local effect of the drug involved the activation of peripheral CB1 receptors whereas involvement of CB2 receptors was less clear. In a rat model of cisplatin-induced neuropathy, cannabinoids have an antinociceptive effect, but the cannabinoid receptors involved could be different depending on the route of administration. Non-psychoactive doses of cannabinoid agonists are capable of alleviating the signs of peripheral neuropathy when systemically applied. Interestingly, local administration of selective CB1 agonists or systemic administration of CB2 agonists, which are non-psychoactive, may serve as new therapeutic alternatives for symptom management in painful neuropathy associated with cisplatin treatment.

  14. Estimation of the contribution of norketamine to ketamine-induced acute pain relief and neurocognitive impairment in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Olofsen, Erik; Noppers, Ingeborg; Niesters, Marieke; Kharasch, Evan; Aarts, Leon; Sarton, Elise; Dahan, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Background The N-methyl-D-receptor antagonist ketamine is metabolized in the liver into its active metabolite norketamine. No human data are available on the relative contribution of norketamine to ketamine-induced analgesia and side effects. One approach to assess the ketamine and norketamine contributions is by measuring ketamine-effect at varying ketamine and norketamine plasma concentrations using the CYP450 inducer rifampicin. Methods In 12 healthy male volunteers the effect of rifampicin versus placebo pretreatment on S-ketamine (a 2-h infusion of 20 mg/h)-induced analgesia and cognition was quantified. The relative ketamine and norketamine contribution to effect was estimated using a linear additive population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model. Results S-ketamine produced significant analgesia, psychotropic effects (drug high), and cognitive impairment (including memory impairment, reduced psychomotor speed, reduced reaction time, reduced cognitive flexibility). Modeling revealed a negative contribution of S-norketamine to S-ketamine-induced analgesia and absence of contribution to cognitive impairment. At ketamine and norketamine effect concentrations of 100 ng/ml and 50 ng/ml, respectievly, the ketamine contribution to analgesia is −3.8 cm (visual analogue pain score) versus a contribution of norketamine of +1.5 cm, causing an overall effect −2.3 cm. The blood-effect-site equilibration half-life ranged from 0 (cognitive flexibility) to 11.8 (pain intensity) min, and averaged across all end-points was 6.1 min. Conclusions This first observation that norketamine produces effects in the opposite direction of ketamine requires further proof. It can explain the observation of ketamine-related excitatory phenomena (such as hyperalgesia and allodynia) upon the termination of ketamine infusions. PMID:22692377

  15. Topical application of a novel oxycodone gel formulation (tocopheryl phosphate mixture) in a rat model of peripheral inflammatory pain produces localized pain relief without significant systemic exposure.

    PubMed

    Smith, Maree T; Wyse, Bruce D; Edwards, Stephen R; El-Tamimy, Mahmoud; Gaetano, Giacinto; Gavin, Paul

    2015-07-01

    This study was designed to assess the analgesic efficacy and systemic exposure of oxycodone administered topically in a novel tocopheryl phosphate mixture (TPM) gel formulation, to the inflamed hindpaws in a rat model of inflammatory pain. Unilateral hindpaw inflammation was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA). Mechanical hyperalgesia and hindpaw inflammation were assessed by measuring paw pressure thresholds and hindpaw volume, respectively, just prior to i.pl. FCA and again 5-6 days later. The analgesic effects of oxycodone administered topically (1 mg in TPM gel) or by i.pl. injection (50 μg), were assessed. Systemic oxycodone exposure was assessed over an 8-h postdosing interval following topical application. Skin permeation of oxycodone from the gel formulation was assessed in vitro using Franz diffusion cells. Oxycodone administered topically or by i.pl. injection produced significant (p < 0.05) analgesia in the inflamed hindpaws. Systemic oxycodone exposure was insignificant after topical dosing. The in vitro cumulative skin permeation of oxycodone was linearly related to the amount applied. Topical TPM/oxycodone gel formulations have the potential to alleviate moderate to severe inflammatory pain conditions with minimal systemic exposure, thereby avoiding central nervous system (CNS)-mediated adverse effects associated with oral administration of opioid analgesics.

  16. Pollen extract in association with vitamins provides early pain relief in patients affected by chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    CAI, TOMMASO; WAGENLEHNER, FLORIAN M.E.; LUCIANI, LORENZO GIUSEPPE; TISCIONE, DANIELE; MALOSSINI, GIANNI; VERZE, PAOLO; MIRONE, VINCENZO; BARTOLETTI, RICCARDO

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy for chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) is currently unsatisfactory. The aim of the present study was to assess the safety and efficacy of pollen extract in association with vitamins (DEPROX 500®) in males with CP/CPPS. All patients with a diagnosis of CP/CPPS attending the same urologic centre between March and October 2012 were enrolled in this randomised controlled phase III study. Participants were randomised to receive oral capsules of DEPROX 500® (two capsules every 24 h) or ibuprofen (600 mg, one tablet three times a day) for four weeks. The National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI), International Prostate Symptom Score and Quality of Well-Being (QoL) questionnaires were used. In the intention-to-treat analysis, 87 males (25 class IIIa and 62 class IIIb) with a mean age of 33.6±5.9 years were randomly allocated to the DEPROX 500® (n=41) or ibuprofen (n=46) treatment groups. At the follow-up examination (following one month of treatment), in the DEPROX 500® group, 31/41 patients (75.6%) reported an improvement in quality of life, defined as a reduction of the NIH-CPSI total score by ≥25%, compared with 19/46 (41.3%) in the control group (P=0.002). The greater improvement in the DEPROX 500® group compared with the ibuprofen group was statistically significant (treatment difference in the NIH-CPSI pain domain, −2.14±0.51, P<0.001; QoL scores, P=0.002). All patients were negative at the Meares-Stamey test evaluation. Adverse events were less frequent in the DEPROX 500® group than in the ibuprofen group. The DEPROX 500® treatment significantly improved total symptoms, pain and quality of life compared with ibuprofen in patients with CP/CPPS, without severe side-effects. PMID:25187793

  17. Lipid-colloid dressing shows improved reepithelialization, pain relief, and corneal barrier function in split-thickness skin-graft donor wound healing.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Katsuya; Akita, Sadanori; Yoshimoto, Hiroshi; Houbara, Seiji; Hirano, Akiyoshi

    2014-09-01

    Donor-site wound healing was tested with a nonadherent petrolatum- and hydrocolloid-impregnated polyester, a lipid-colloid dressing, and a nonadherent polyester dressing, supplemented with petrolatum manually by a physician onsite. Ten patients, 1 woman and 9 men (22 to 79 years old; average 58.4 ± 17.54 years), were enrolled in this prospective comparison study. The split-thickness skin graft was 14.5 ± 7.49 cm long × 8.2 ± 4.07 cm wide (5.5-27 cm long and 4.0-14.0 wide) and 14/1000 inches (0.356 mm) deep. The degree of reepithelialization in lipid-colloid dressing was significantly better than that in polyester mesh dressing, with 1.7 ± 1.00 and 2.8 ± 0.83 for the lipid-colloid dressing and polyester mesh dressing, respectively (P < .05), and degree of pain was significantly lower in lipid-colloid dressing than that in polyester dressing, 1.7 ± 1.11 and 2.9 ± 1.12 for the lipid-colloid dressing and polyester mesh dressing, respectively (P < .01). In moisture meter analyses, the values of effective contact coefficient and corneal thickness in lipid-colloid at wound healing was significantly smaller than those in polyester mesh (effective contact coefficient: 11.7 ± 1.87% and 15.6 ± 3.09% for lipid-colloid and polyester mesh, respectively, P < .05; corneal thickness: 31.1 ± 6.65 µm and 40.7 ± 8.69 µm for lipid-colloid and polyester mesh, respectively, P < .05). No significant difference was observed at 1 month after healing. The nonadherent lipid-colloid polyester dressing has superior wound healing and pain relief and demonstrates better corneal barrier function delineated by effective contact coefficient and corneal thickness at healing in split-thickness donors.

  18. Risk Assessment of Using Entonox for the Relief of Labor Pain: A Healthcare Failure Modes and Effects Analysis Approach

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Tahereh Fathi; Bahri, Narjes; Ebrahimipour, Hosein; Najar, Ali Vafaee; Taleghani, Yasamin Molavi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In order to prevent medical errors, it is important to know why they occur and to identify their causes. Healthcare failure modes and effects analysis (HFMEA) is a type of qualitative descriptive that is used to evaluate the risk. The aim of this study was to assess the risks of using Entonox for labor pain by HFMEA. Methods A mixed-methods design (qualitative action research and quantitative cross-sectional research) was used. The modes and effects of failures in the process of using Entonox were detected and analyzed during 2013–2014 at Hefdahe Shahrivar Hospital, Mashhad, Iran. Overall, 52 failure modes were identified, with 25 being recognized as high-risk modes. Results The results revealed that 48.5% of these errors fall into the care process type, 22.05% belong to the communicative type, 19.1% fall into the administrative type, and 10.2% are of the knowledge and skills type. Strategies were presented in the forms of acceptance (3.2%), control (90.3%), and elimination (6.4%). Conclusion The following actions are suggested for improving the process of using Entonox: Close supervision by the midwife, precise recording of all the stages of the process in the woman’s medical record, the necessity of the presence of the anesthesiologist at the woman’s bedside during labor, confirming the indications for use of Entonox, and close monitoring to ensure the safety of the gas cylinder guards. PMID:27123224

  19. Characterization of cannabinoid-induced relief of neuropathic pain in rat models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vera, Gema; López-Miranda, Visitación; Herradón, Esperanza; Martín, María Isabel; Abalo, Raquel

    2012-08-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a frequent complication of diabetes mellitus with a tremendous impact on patients' quality of life, and it remains poorly treated. Cannabinoids relieve the signs of diabetic neuropathy in different experimental models, including streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced type 1 diabetic rodents, and they may also relieve neuropathic signs in type 2 diabetic animals. This study compares the effect of the non-selective cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) in Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats (type 2 diabetes) and in STZ-injected Wistar rats (type 1 diabetes). WIN (or its vehicle) was either systemically administered at a non-psychoactive dose or locally injected. Selective CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid antagonists were used to characterize WIN antineuropathic effects. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetic rats showed mechanical allodynia but not thermal hyperalgesia. WIN alleviated mechanical allodynia in both models of diabetes. In STZ-treated rats, both cannabinoid receptors were involved, whereas in ZDF rats, WIN effects seemed to mainly involve the activation of CB1 receptors. Higher doses of WIN were needed to significantly relieve mechanical allodynia upon intraplantar administration in ZDF vs. STZ-injected rats. Cannabinoids, acting on systemic and/or peripheral receptors, may serve as a new therapeutic alternative for symptom management in painful neuropathy associated with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Additionally, our results highlight the need for appropriate selection of diabetic experimental models because the results from studies in STZ-induced diabetic rodents might not be applicable in all diabetic situations.

  20. [The combination of chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine (artra) for pain relief and to reduce the consumption of NSAIDs in patients with I-II stages of osteoarthritis of the knee].

    PubMed

    Rodionova, S S; Eskin, N A

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of the dynamics of pain and joint function on the background of the 3-month ARTRA.Study was conducted as a multicenter, with the inclusion of 3077 patients, 56.2% of whom received NSAIDs for pain relief. While taking after a month of therapy showed significant compared to the original value of reducing the intensity of pain. The therapeutic effect is increased with duration of dosing. It is shown that the drug reduces the need for arthritis NSAIDs after a month by 6.8%, after 3 months - by 37.3%, ie after the 3-month course of treatment with arthritis, the number of people taking NSAIDs fell by more than 3 times (up 18.9%). A significant reduction in consumption, coupled with the marked dynamics of the pain is regarded by us as a manifestation expressed anesthetic effect of the drug ARTRA.

  1. Light Irradiation And Response Of The Living Body - Effect Of Pain Relief And Promotion Of Wound Healing -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Yoshio; Kurokawa, Yoshimochi; Ohara, Itaru; Ueki, Hamaichi; Inaba, Humio

    1989-09-01

    The first report of laser irradiation for wound healing was done by Mester, E., et al. in 1968. From their reports, we can get many knowledges and suggestions as for laser irradiation. At that time he used ruby laser (694.3 nm wave length) for surgical wounds and burns on the back skin of mice. The condition of irradiation was studied with energy density between 0.5-10 J/cm2 twice a week. As a result, they noticed 1 J/cm2 irradiation was effective for those wounds. After a few experimental reports, they published their clinical studies in 1975. Clinically, they used He-Ne laser (632.8 nm wave length) irradiation. Human leg ulcers due to peripheral circulatory disturbance were treated with energy density of 4 J/cm2 twice a week. And they got good results, obtaining complete healing in two-thirds of the cases. We became strongly stimulated by those reports. We have been studying the effect of light on experimental and clinical wound healing as well as on various kinds of biological phenomena since 1980. Particularly, its effect according to the difference of light has been studied. In October 1982, the first clinical case was tried by Argon laser (514.5 nm wave length) irradiation for therapeutic purpose. A man had a chronic ulcer of the left first toe due to Buerger's disease for 5 months. Surprizingly, on the 14th day after 6 treatments of the light irradiation, his ulcer completely healed. During these treatments, the patient noticed that the pain completely disappeared after 2 treatments. Fifty Argon laser treatments were carried out on clinical cases after these experiences, we reached to a conclusion that light irradiation stimulated something in the injured tissues and lead to good clinical results. Several studies concerning mechanism for these effects i.e. peripheral circulation, histology of granulation, cell proliferation, chemistry and other studies were carried out. From these investigations, peripheral circulation was improved when in those who were

  2. The efficacy of multimodal high-volume wound infiltration in primary total knee replacement in facilitating immediate post-operative pain relief and attainment of early rehabilitation milestones.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Purnajyoti

    2014-05-01

    Inadequate pain relief after lower limb joint replacement surgery has been a well-recognised limiting factor affecting post-operative mobilisation and length of hospital stay. Multimodal local wound infiltration with local anaesthetics, adrenaline and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents can lower the opiate intake, reduce the length of stay and enhance early mobilisation in knee replacement patients. A retrospective review of 64 patients undergoing primary total knee replacement was undertaken. Thirty-two patients (cases) had their wounds infiltrated with ropivacaine, adrenaline and ketorolac by the operating surgeon, intraoperatively. Subsequently, a 19G wound catheter placed into the knee joint. They received two further top-up doses of the same combination at 10 and 20 h post-operatively. This group was compared with a control group of 32 patients who did not receive any local infiltration. Both groups were comparable in terms of BMI and age. Post-operative opiate drug consumption in first 48 h after surgery, length of hospital stays and time taken to mobilise after surgery were recorded. There was significant reduction in opiate consumption in the treatment group with an average consumption of 49.35 mg of morphine compared to 71.48 mg in the control group (p = 0.004). The median length of hospital stay was significantly reduced from 5 days in the control group to 4 days in the treatment group (p = 0.03). The patients in the treatment group mobilised around 19 h earlier (p = 0.001). No major post-operative complications were encountered in either group. Wound infiltration is an effective and safe technique that promotes early rehabilitation and discharge of patients following primary total knee replacement.

  3. Ziconotide infusion for severe chronic pain: case series of patients with neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Wermeling, Daniel P; Berger, Joseph R

    2006-03-01

    Ziconotide intrathecal infusion was recently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of intractable severe chronic pain. Patients with neuropathic pain make up a significant population among those who experience chronic pain for which there are less than optimal pharmacotherapeutic options. Published clinical trials provide a global view of ziconotide efficacy and safety. A subset of patients in clinical trials obtained complete pain relief, a remarkable finding given the history of drug treatment for neuropathic pain. To provide more information regarding those who respond to ziconotide therapy, we discuss three patients with neuropathic pain who received ziconotide infusion. Two patients with longstanding neuropathic pain, one with complex regional pain syndrome (formerly known as reflex sympathetic dystrophy) of the leg and one with lumbar radiculitis, achieved temporary but complete pain relief from single 5- and 10-microg epidural test doses. In the third case, a patient with longstanding bilateral leg and foot neuropathic pain from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and antiretroviral drug therapy achieved considerable pain relief from a long-term continuous intrathecal infusion. The patients who received a single dose had mild central nervous system adverse effects such as sedation, somnolence, nausea, headache, and lightheadedness. The patient who received the intrathecal infusion experienced mild-to-severe adverse effects depending on the rate of infusion; these effects included sedation, confusion, memory impairment, slurred speech, and double vision. This patient could sense impending adverse effects and made rate adjustments or suspended infusion to avert untoward symptoms. In all three cases, patients achieved considerable pain relief that was long-lasting and persisted well after dose administration or suspension of infusion.

  4. Pain Relief for Budget Cuts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fultz, David A.

    1983-01-01

    The Grand Blanc (Michigan) Community School District sets budget priorities by (1) surveying students, taxpayers, and teachers to learn their preferences for current programs and services; (2) determining the costs of state-mandated programs; (3) listing nonmandated programs and determining their costs; and (4) considering proposed new programs.…

  5. Drumlin relief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnolo, Matteo; Clark, Chris D.; Hughes, Anna L. C.

    2012-06-01

    Drumlin relief is a key parameter for testing predictions of models of drumlin formation. Although this metric is commonly described in textbooks as being of the order of a few tens of metres, our critical review of the literature suggests an average value of about 13 m, but with much uncertainty. Here we investigate a large sample of drumlins (25,848) mapped from a high resolution digital terrain model of Britain, which allowed the identification of extremely shallow drumlins. Results indicate that most drumlins have a relief between 0.5 and 40 m (with a surprisingly low average value of only 7.1 m) a mode of 3.5-4 m, and with 41% of all drumlins characterized by a relief < 5 m. Drumlin relief is found to never exceed 7% of the width and is positively correlated with this parameter, possibly indicating that drumlins need a large base to stand against the flow of the ice. Drumlin relief is also positively correlated with the length, which shows that drumlins do not grow in length by redistributing sediments from their summits to their downflow (lee) end, as previously hypothesised.

  6. Single dose dipyrone for acute postoperative pain

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Sheena; Faura, Clara; Edwards, Jayne; McQuay, Henry J; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Dipyrone (metamizole) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug used in some countries to treat pain (postoperative, colic, cancer, and migraine); it is banned in others because of an association with life-threatening blood agranulocytosis. This review updates a 2001 Cochrane review, and no relevant new studies were identified, but additional outcomes were sought. Objectives To assess the efficacy and adverse events of single dose dipyrone in acute postoperative pain. Search methods The earlier review searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS and the Oxford Pain Relief Database to December 1999. For the update we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE,EMBASE and LILACS to February 2010. Selection criteria Single dose, randomised, double-blind, placebo or active controlled trials of dipyrone for relief of established moderate to severe postoperative pain in adults. We included oral, rectal, intramuscular or intravenous administration of study drugs. Data collection and analysis Studies were assessed for methodological quality and data extracted by two review authors independently. Summed total pain relief over six hours (TOTPAR) was used to calculate the number of participants achieving at least 50% pain relief. Derived results were used to calculate, with 95% confidence intervals, relative benefit compared to placebo, and the number needed to treat (NNT) for one participant to experience at least 50% pain relief over six hours. Use and time to use of rescue medication were additional measures of efficacy. Information on adverse events and withdrawals was collected. Main results Fifteen studies tested mainly 500 mg oral dipyrone (173 participants), 2.5 g intravenous dipyrone (101), 2.5 g intramuscular dipyrone (99); fewer than 60 participants received any other dose. All studies used active controls (ibuprofen, paracetamol, aspirin, flurbiprofen, ketoprofen, dexketoprofen, ketorolac, pethidine, tramadol, suprofen); eight used placebo controls. Over 70% of participants

  7. Ultrasound-guided alcohol neurolysis and radiofrequency ablation of painful stump neuroma: effective treatments for post-amputation pain

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Xu, Yongming; Zhou, Jin; Pu, Shaofeng; Lv, Yingying; Chen, Yueping; Du, Dongping

    2017-01-01

    Background Post-amputation pain (PAP) is highly prevalent after limb amputation, and stump neuromas play a key role in the generation of the pain. Presently, PAP refractory to medical management is frequently treated with minimally invasive procedures guided by ultrasound, such as alcohol neurolysis and radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Objective To record the immediate and long-term efficacy of alcohol neurolysis and RFA. We first used alcohol neurolysis and then, when necessary, we performed RFA on PAP patients. Study design Prospective case series. Setting Pain management center. Methods Thirteen subjects were treated with ultrasound-guided procedures. Results All patients were treated with neurolysis using alcohol solutions guided by ultrasound. Seven (54%) of 13 subjects achieved pain relief after 1–3 alcohol injection treatments. The remaining 6 subjects obtained pain relief after receiving 2 administrations of ultrasound-guided RFA. After a 6-month follow-up evaluation period, pain quantities were also assessed. Both stump pain (including intermittent sharp pain and continuous burning pain) and phantom pain were relieved. The frequency of intermittent sharp pain was decreased, and no complications were noted during the observation. Conclusion The use of ultrasound guidance for alcohol injection and RFA of painful stump neuromas is a simple, radiation-free, safe, and effective procedure that provides sustained pain relief in PAP patients. In this case series, RFA was found to be an effective alternative to alcohol injection. PMID:28223839

  8. Cancer Pain Management: Basic Information for the Young Pain Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Rana, SPS; Gupta, Rahul; Chaudhary, Prakash; Khurana, Deepa; Mishra, Seema; Bhatnagar, Sushma

    2011-01-01

    Cancer pain is multifactorial and complex. The impact of cancer pain is devastating, with increased morbidity and poor quality of life, if not treated adequately. Cancer pain management is a challenging task both due to disease process as well as a consequence of treatment-related side-effects. Optimization of analgesia with oral opioids, adjuvant analgesics, and advanced pain management techniques is the key to success for cancer pain. Early access of oral opioid and interventional pain management techniques can overcome the barriers of cancer pain, with improved quality of life. With timely and proper anticancer therapy, opioids, nerve blocks, and other non-invasive techniques like psychosocial care, satisfactory pain relief can be achieved in most of the patients. Although the WHO Analgesic Ladder is effective for more than 80% cancer pain, addition of appropriate adjuvant drugs along with early intervention is needed for improved Quality of Life. Effective cancer pain treatment requires a holistic approach with timely assessment, measurement of pain, pathophysiology involved in causing particular type of pain, and understanding of drugs to relieve pain with timely inclusion of intervention. Careful evaluation of psychosocial and mental components with good communication is necessary. Barriers to cancer pain management should be overcome with an interdisciplinary approach aiming to provide adequate analgesia with minimal side-effects. Management of cancer pain should comprise not only a physical component but also psychosocial and mental components and social need of the patient. With risk–benefit analysis, interventional techniques should be included in an early stage of pain treatment. This article summarizes the need for early and effective pain management strategies, awareness regarding pain control, and barriers of cancer pain. PMID:21976852

  9. Cryoanalgesia in interventional pain management.

    PubMed

    Trescot, Andrea M

    2003-07-01

    Cryoneuroablation, also known as cryoanalgesia or cryoneurolysis, is a specialized technique for providing long-term pain relief in interventional pain management settings. Modern cryoanalgesia traces its roots to Cooper et al who developed in 1961, a device that used liquid nitrogen in a hollow tube that was insulated at the tip and achieved a temperature of - 190 degrees C. Lloyd et al proposed that cryoanalgesia was superior to other methods of peripheral nerve destruction, including alcohol neurolysis, phenol neurolysis, or surgical lesions. The application of cold to tissues creates a conduction block, similar to the effect of local anesthetics. Long-term pain relief from nerve freezing occurs because ice crystals create vascular damage to the vasonervorum, which produces severe endoneural edema. Cryoanalgesia disrupts the nerve structure and creates wallerian degeneration, but leaves the myelin sheath and endoneurium intact. Clinical applications of cryoanalgesia extend from its use in craniofacial pain secondary to trigeminal neuralgia, posterior auricular neuralgia, and glossopharyngeal neuralgia; chest wall pain with multiple conditions including post-thoracotomy neuromas, persistent pain after rib fractures, and post herpetic neuralgia in thoracic distribution; abdominal and pelvic pain secondary to ilioinguinal, iliohypogastric, genitofemoral, subgastric neuralgia; pudendal neuralgia; low back pain and lower extremity pain secondary to lumbar facet joint pathology, pseudosciatica, pain involving intraspinous ligament or supragluteal nerve, sacroiliac joint pain, cluneal neuralgia, obturator neuritis, and various types of peripheral neuropathy; and upper extremity pain secondary to suprascapular neuritis and other conditions of peripheral neuritis. This review describes historical concepts, physics and equipment, various clinical aspects, along with technical features, indications and contraindications, with clinical description of multiple conditions

  10. Tin-117m(4+)-DTPA for palliation of pain from osseous metastases: A pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, H.L.; Mausner, L.F.; Srivastava, S.C. ||

    1995-05-01

    The physical and biological attributes of {sup 117m}Sn(4+)-DTPA indicate that it should be an effective agent for palliative therapy of painful bony metastatic disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether or not this agent could effectively reduce pain while sparing the hemopoietic marrow from adverse effects. Fifteen patients (10 males and 5 females) with painful bony metastases from various primary cancers were included in the study. Seven patients received 1.22 to 3.11 MBq/kg of {sub 117m}Sn intravenously (Group 1) and eight patients received 4.85 to 5.77 MBq/kg (Group 2). All but one were treated as outpatients and followed for a minimum of 2 mo. In the first group, pain relief was nonassessable in four patients because of death or additional treatment of soft-tissue disease by another modality. One patient had no relief of pain, one had complete relief of pain and one had transient relief of pain. No myelotoxicity was observed. For Group 2, three patients achieved complete relief of pain, two good relief, two partial relief and one began to experience pain relief when he suffered a pathological fracture 2 mo most-treatment. None of these patients had myelotoxicity. Tin-117m(4+)-DTPA can reduce pain from metastatic disease to bone without inducing adverse reactions related to bone marrow. Further studies are needed to assess tolerance levels for the bone marrow and to evaluate response rates and duration of effect. 6 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Post surgical pain treatment - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Postoperative pain relief ... Pain that occurs after surgery is an important concern. Before your surgery, you and your surgeon may have discussed how much pain you should expect and how it will be ...

  12. Pain relief as a primary treatment goal: At what point does functioning and well-being become more important? A case study of an adolescent with debilitating chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Andrew S; Weiss, Karen; Harrison, Tracy; Hansen, Dan; Bruce, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pediatric chronic pain is a common problem with significant economic implications and devastating consequences on quality of life. The present report describes a case involving a 15-year-old girl with severe and debilitating chronic pain. RESULTS: Before her referral to a pain rehabilitation program, the patient saw numerous specialists who treated her with an aggressive medical regimen and two spinal cord stimulators. She was then referred for intensive interdisciplinary treatment and, after three weeks of rehabilitation, she reported clinically significant changes in anxiety, pain catastrophizing and functional disability. The patient was successfully titrated off all of her opioid medications and, eventually, both neurostimulator implants were removed. DISCUSSION: Interdisciplinary pain rehabilitation is a useful treatment for patients with chronic pain. With its primary emphasis on functional restoration as opposed to strictly pain reduction, patients can regain a higher quality of life with reduced pain and fewer medications, surgeries and hospitalizations. PMID:24712020

  13. Efficacy of two cannabis based medicinal extracts for relief of central neuropathic pain from brachial plexus avulsion: results of a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Berman, Jonathan S; Symonds, Catherine; Birch, Rolfe

    2004-12-01

    The objective was to investigate the effectiveness of cannabis-based medicines for treatment of chronic pain associated with brachial plexus root avulsion. This condition is an excellent human model of central neuropathic pain as it represents an unusually homogenous group in terms of anatomical location of injury, pain descriptions and patient demographics. Forty-eight patients with at least one avulsed root and baseline pain score of four or more on an 11-point ordinate scale participated in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, three period crossover study. All patients had intractable symptoms regardless of current analgesic therapy. Patients entered a baseline period of 2 weeks, followed by three, 2-week treatment periods during each of which they received one of three oromucosal spray preparations. These were placebo and two whole plant extracts of Cannabis sativa L.: GW-1000-02 (Sativex), containing Delta(9)tetrahydrocannabinol (THC):cannabidiol (CBD) in an approximate 1:1 ratio and GW-2000-02, containing primarily THC. The primary outcome measure was the mean pain severity score during the last 7 days of treatment. Secondary outcome measures included pain related quality of life assessments. The primary outcome measure failed to fall by the two points defined in our hypothesis. However, both this measure and measures of sleep showed statistically significant improvements. The study medications were generally well tolerated with the majority of adverse events, including intoxication type reactions, being mild to moderate in severity and resolving spontaneously. Studies of longer duration in neuropathic pain are required to confirm a clinically relevant, improvement in the treatment of this condition.

  14. A randomised controlled trial of opioid only versus combined opioid and non-steroidal anti inflammatory analgesics for pain relief in the first 48 hours after Caesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Adamou, Natalia; Tukur, Jamilu; Muhammad, Zakari; Galadanci, Hadiza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Post-Caesarean section pain is complex in nature, requiring a combination of pharmacological and non-pharmacological methods. Effective management of postoperative pain will reduce postoperative morbidity, hospital stay and cost. The objective of this study was to compare the clinical effectiveness and adverse effects of a combination of non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor (Diclofenac sodium 50 mg) and opioid (Pentazocine 60 mg) to opiod only (Pentazocine 60 mg) for pain management after Caesarean section (CS) at Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital (AKTH). Materials and Methods: This was a randomised double-blind controlled study conducted at AKTH, Kano, Nigeria. A total of 166 patients scheduled to undergo either emergency or elective Caesarean section were studied. Group I received a combination of COX inhibitor and opiod while Group II received opiod only for pain management after CS. Results: The average age of the patients was 28.35 years (SD ± 6.426) in the group I and 26.9(SD ± 6.133) in group II. The mean parity was 3.27(SD ± 2.67) and 2.75(SD ± 2.14) while the mean gestational age at admission was 37.68(SD ± 2.69) and 38.18(SD ± 2.63) weeks in the first and second groups, respectively. Comparison of the level of pain experienced and patients satisfaction during the first 48 hours postoperatively revealed that the level of pain was statistically significantly less and patient's satisfaction significantly better in group I compared to group II (P-value 0.00001). Conclusion: The use of combined compared to single agent analgesia is safe, significantly reduced pain and improved patient satisfaction after a caesarian section (CS). PMID:25298599

  15. Adherence to All Steps of a Pain Management Protocol in Intensive Care Patients after Cardiac Surgery Is Hard to Achieve

    PubMed Central

    Ahlers, S. J. G. M.; Bruins, P.; Tibboel, D.; Knibbe, C. A. J.; van Dijk, M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate adherence to our pain protocol considering analgesics administration, number and timing of pain assessments, and adjustment of analgesics upon unacceptably high (NRS ≥ 4) and low (NRS ≤ 1) pain scores. Material and Methods. The pain protocol for patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) after cardiac surgery consisted of automated prescriptions for paracetamol and morphine, automated reminders for pain assessments, a flowchart to guide interventions upon high and low pain scores, and reassessments after unacceptable pain. Results. Paracetamol and morphine were prescribed in all 124 patients. Morphine infusion was stopped earlier than protocolized in 40 patients (32%). During the median stay of 47 hours [IQR 26 to 74 hours], 702/706 (99%) scheduled pain assessments and 218 extra pain scores were recorded. Unacceptably high pain scores accounted for 96/920 (10%) and low pain scores for 546/920 (59%) of all assessments. Upon unacceptable pain additional morphine was administered in 65% (62/96) and reassessment took place in 15% (14/96). Morphine was not tapered in 273 of 303 (90%) eligible cases of low pain scores. Conclusions. Adherence to automated prescribed analgesics and pain assessments was good. Adherence to nonscheduled, flowchart-guided interventions was poor. Improving adherence may refine pain management and reduce side effects. PMID:28298879

  16. Management of chronic pain syndromes: issues and interventions.

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    Treatment of chronic, nonmalignant pain syndromes has been largely suboptimal and the most debilitating conditions--such as LBP, arthritis, and neuropathic pain--continue to pose a significant burden to individuals and society. Although significant scientific advances in delineating pathophysiologic mechanisms have facilitated the development of targeted pharmacologic and interventional treatments, the integral role played by psychologic, behavioral, and social factors in generating, perpetuating, and individualizing the pain experience has been largely ignored. Consequently, adequate pain relief may still be an achievable goal, but one that is often realized only with a concomitant, cognitive, behaviorally based, functional restoration approach. A multidisciplinary integrative approach that places equal emphasis on understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying pain, as well as the multidimensional interplay of cognitive, behavioral, and environmental influences is essential to improving outcomes. Although there are presently a paucity of data that identify specific characteristics that define which individuals will benefit from any particular modality, evidence clearly demonstrates that the MPC setting offers patients an opportunity to achieve both adequate pain relief and improved physical, behavioral, and psychologic function. A key challenge for clinicians lies in changing the approach to pain "treatment" and in bridging the gap between the current evolving understanding of pain mechanisms and clinical management. Physiatrists' focus on maximal functional restoration is a critical contribution to cost-effective pain medicine practice. Wisely combining effective pain management techniques within a functional restoration program has the best chance of improving the quality of life for patients with chronic pain disorders and diseases.

  17. [6]-gingerol and [6]-shogaol, active ingredients of the traditional Japanese medicine hangeshashinto, relief oral ulcerative mucositis-induced pain via action on Na(+) channels.

    PubMed

    Hitomi, Suzuro; Ono, Kentaro; Terawaki, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Chinami; Mizuno, Keita; Yamaguchi, Kiichiro; Imai, Ryota; Omiya, Yuji; Hattori, Tomohisa; Kase, Yoshio; Inenaga, Kiyotoshi

    2017-03-01

    The traditional Japanese herbal medicine hangeshashinto (HST) has beneficial effects for the treatment of oral ulcerative mucositis (OUM) in cancer patients. However, the ingredient-based mechanism that underlies its pain-relieving activity remains unknown. In the present study, to clarify the analgesic mechanism of HST on OUM-induced pain, we investigated putative HST ingredients showing antagonistic effects on Na(+) channels in vitro and in vivo. A screen of 21 major ingredients using automated patch-clamp recordings in channel-expressing cells showed that [6]-gingerol and [6]-shogaol, two components of a Processed Ginger extract, considerably inhibited voltage-activated Na(+) currents. These two ingredients inhibited the stimulant-induced release of substance P and action potential generation in cultured rat sensory neurons. A submucosal injection of a mixture of [6]-gingerol and [6]-shogaol increased the mechanical withdrawal threshold in healthy rats. In a rat OUM model, OUM-induced mechanical pain was alleviated 30min after the swab application of HST despite the absence of anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory actions in the OUM area. A swab application of a mixture of [6]-gingerol and [6]-shogaol induced sufficient analgesia of OUM-induced mechanical or spontaneous pain when co-applied with a Ginseng extract containing abundant saponin. The Ginseng extract demonstrated an acceleration of substance permeability into the oral ulcer tissue without an analgesic effect. These findings suggest that Na(+) channel blockage by gingerol/shogaol plays an essential role in HST-associated analgesia of OUM-induced pain. This pharmacological mechanism provides scientific evidence supporting the use of this herbal medicine in patients suffering from OUM-induced pain.

  18. Relief of Chronic Posterior Neck Pain Depending on the Type of Forest Therapy: Comparison of the Therapeutic Effect of Forest Bathing Alone Versus Forest Bathing With Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Boram; Kim, Taikon; Kim, Mi Jung; Lee, Kyu Hoon; Choi, Seungyoung; Lee, Dong Hun; Kim, Hyo Ryoung; Jun, Byol; Park, Seen Young; Lee, Sung Jae

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the pain-reducing effect of forest bathing alone versus forest bathing in combination with stretching and strengthening exercises in patients with chronic posterior neck pain. Methods Sixty-four subjects with posterior neck pain that had lasted more than 3 months were enrolled. They were randomly divided into a forest bathing alone (FBA) group and a forest bathing with exercise (FBE) group; each group included 32 subjects. All subjects from both groups walked every morning in the forest for about 2 hours for 5 days. In the afternoon, the FBE group did a stretching and strengthening exercise for about 4 hours; the FBA group had free time in the woods. Visual analog scale (VAS) on one day, VAS over the previous week, neck disability index (NDI), EuroQol 5D-3L VAS (EQ VAS) and index (EQ index), McGill pain questionnaire (MPQ), the number of trigger points in the posterior neck region (TRPs), and the range of motion of the cervical spine were evaluated on the first and last day of the program and compared between the two groups. Results The number of TRPs were significantly reduced in the FBE group compared with the FBA group (p=0.013). However, the other scales showed no significant difference between the two groups. Conclusion When patients with chronic posterior neck pain underwent a short-term forest bathing (less than 7 days) program, FBE was more effective in the reduction of the number of TRPs than FBA. However, all other pain measurement scales we evaluated showed no statistically significant difference between the two protocols. PMID:26798610

  19. Prevention of sexually transmitted HIV infections through the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief: a history of achievements and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Caroline A; Conly, Shanti R; Stanton, David L; Hasen, Nina S

    2012-08-15

    HIV prevention in the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) began when both data on HIV prevalence and the toolbox of interventions for prevention of sexual transmission were relatively limited. PEPFAR's early focus was on scaling-up information, education, and communication programs that included messaging on abstinence for youth and faithfulness primarily through nongovernmental organizations, including faith-based organizations. Additional activities included condom promotion, distribution, and social marketing. In epidemics concentrated within key populations, PEPFAR's prevention efforts focused on a minimum package of services including outreach, information, education, and communication programs, STI treatment (where appropriate), and condom promotion and distribution. As more epidemiological data became available and with experience gleaned in these early efforts, the need for tailored and flexible approaches became evident. The next iteration of prevention efforts still emphasized behavioral interventions, but incorporated a sharper focus on key epidemic drivers, especially multiple partners; a data-driven emphasis on high transmission areas and populations, including prevention with people living with HIV; and a more strategic and coordinated approach at the national level. Recently, the paradigm for prevention efforts has shifted yet again. Evidence that biomedical interventions such as male circumcision, treatment for prevention of vertical and horizontal transmission, and treatment itself could lead to declines in incidence has refocused PEPFAR's prevention portfolio. New guidance on sexually transmitted HIV focuses on combination prevention, emphasizing biomedical, behavioral and structural approaches. Landmark speeches by the President and the Secretary of State and new ambitious targets for PEPFAR point toward a new goal: an AIDS-free generation.

  20. Effect of paracetamol, dexketoprofen trometamol, lidocaine spray, and paracervical block application for pain relief during suction termination of first-trimester pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Açmaz, Gökhan; Aksoy, Hüseyin; Özoğlu, Nil; Aksoy, Ülkü; Albayrak, Evrim

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the analgesic efficacy of preoperative oral dexketoprofen trometamol, intravenous paracetamol, lidocaine spray, and paracervical block with ultracaine on curettage procedure. A total of 111 subjects with the request of pregnancy termination between 5 and 7 weeks of gestation were included in the study. The first group (control group) consisted of 20 participants without medication. The second group consisted of 25 participants receiving 2 puffs of lidocaine sprays on cervical mucosa. The third group consisted of 20 participants receiving oral 25 mg dexketoprofen trometamol. The fourth group consisted of 23 participants receiving 1000 mg intravenous paracetamol and the fifth group consisted of 23 participants receiving paracervical block with ultracaine. Paracervical block reduced pain score significantly in both intraoperative and postoperative periods. All analgesic procedures were significantly effective for reducing pain in postoperative period. Paracervical block may be the best method for reducing pain scores in intraoperative and postoperative periods during curettage procedure. All analgesic procedures such as lidocaine, paracetamol, ultracaine, and paracervical block with ultracaine can be used for reducing pain score in postoperative period. This trial is registered with NCT01947205.

  1. Prospective comparison of long-term pain relief rates after first-time microvascular decompression and stereotactic radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Doris D; Raygor, Kunal P; Cage, Tene A; Ward, Mariann M; Westcott, Sarah; Barbaro, Nicholas M; Chang, Edward F

    2017-02-24

    OBJECTIVE Common surgical treatments for trigeminal neuralgia (TN) include microvascular decompression (MVD), stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), and radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Although the efficacy of each procedure has been described, few studies have directly compared these treatment modalities on pain control for TN. Using a large prospective longitudinal database, the authors aimed to 1) directly compare long-term pain control rates for first-time surgical treatments for idiopathic TN, and 2) identify predictors of pain control. METHODS The authors reviewed a prospectively collected database for all patients who underwent treatment for TN between 1997 and 2014 at the University of California, San Francisco. Standardized collection of data on preoperative clinical characteristics, surgical procedure, and postoperative outcomes was performed. Data analyses were limited to those patients who received a first-time procedure for treatment of idiopathic TN with > 1 year of follow-up. RESULTS Of 764 surgical procedures performed at the University of California, San Francisco, for TN (364 SRS, 316 MVD, and 84 RFA), 340 patients underwent first-time treatment for idiopathic TN (164 MVD, 168 SRS, and 8 RFA) and had > 1 year of follow-up. The analysis was restricted to patients who underwent MVD or SRS. Patients who received MVD were younger than those who underwent SRS (median age 63 vs 72 years, respectively; p < 0.001). The mean follow-up was 59 ± 35 months for MVD and 59 ± 45 months for SRS. Approximately 38% of patients who underwent MVD or SRS had > 5 years of follow-up (60 of 164 and 64 of 168 patients, respectively). Immediate or short-term (< 3 months) postoperative pain-free rates (Barrow Neurological Institute Pain Intensity score of I) were 96% for MVD and 75% for SRS. Percentages of patients with Barrow Neurological Institute Pain Intensity score of I at 1, 5, and 10 years after MVD were 83%, 61%, and 44%, and the corresponding percentages after SRS were

  2. New Schools, Overcrowding Relief, and Achievement Gains in Los Angeles--Strong Returns from a $19.5 Billion Investment. Policy Brief 12-2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welsh, William; Coghlan, Erin; Fuller, Bruce; Dauter, Luke

    2012-01-01

    Aiming to relieve overcrowded schools operating on multiple tracks, the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) has invested more than $19 billion to build 130 new facilities over the past decade. District leaders asked researchers at Berkeley to estimate the achievement effects of this massive initiative--benefits that may stem from entering…

  3. Comparison of the Short-Term Outcomes after Postisometric Muscle Relaxation or Kinesio Taping Application for Normalization of the Upper Trapezius Muscle Tone and the Pain Relief: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Ptaszkowski, Kuba; Slupska, Lucyna; Paprocka-Borowicz, Małgorzata; Kołcz-Trzęsicka, Anna; Zwierzchowski, Kamil; Halska, Urszula; Przestrzelska, Monika; Mucha, Dariusz; Rosińczuk, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to evaluate the resting bioelectrical activity of the upper trapezius muscle (the UT muscle) before and after one of the two interventions: postisometric muscle relaxation (PIR) and Kinesio Taping (KT). Moreover a comparison between group results was conducted. From the initial 61 volunteers, 52 were selected after exclusion criteria and were allocated randomly to 2 groups: PIR group and KT group. Outcome measures were assessed at baseline and completion of the intervention. The primary outcome measure was change in bioelectrical activity of UT muscle evaluated by surface electromyography (sEMG). Secondary outcomes included subjective assessment of pain using visual analogue scale (VAS). Significant differences were found only in KT group: the average resting bioelectrical activity decreased by 0.8 μV (p = 0.0237) and the average VAS result reduced by 2.0 points (p = 0.0001). Greater decrease of VAS results was recorded in KT group compared to PIR group (p = 0.0010). Both PIR and KT intervention did not influence significantly the resting bioelectrical activity of UT muscle. KT application was better for pain relief in the studied sample compared with PIR intervention. PMID:26347792

  4. Nalbuphine for obstetric analgesia. A comparison of nalbuphine with pethidine for pain relief in labour when administered by patient-controlled analgesia (PCA).

    PubMed

    Frank, M; McAteer, E J; Cattermole, R; Loughnan, B; Stafford, L B; Hitchcock, A M

    1987-07-01

    A double-blind, randomised study of 60 patients who received intravenous increments of nalbuphine 3 mg or pethidine 15 mg by patient-controlled analgesia during the first stage of labour, was carried out. Pain intensity, sedation, uterine contractions, maternal cardioventilatory variables and fetal heart rate were recorded as well as any side effects. Apgar scores, time to sustained respiration and resuscitative measures required for the neonate were noted at delivery. Modified neonatal neurobehavioural studies and a retrospective assessment of maternal analgesia, satisfaction and tolerance were also carried out. Group mean values of pain scores of nalbuphine-medicated primiparous women were statistically significantly lower than those of pethidine-medicated patients (p less than 0.01). Other assessments did not demonstrate a statistical significance between the two groups.

  5. Effects of 660- and 980-nm low-level laser therapy on neuropathic pain relief following chronic constriction injury in rat sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Masoumipoor, M; Jameie, S B; Janzadeh, A; Nasirinezhad, F; Soleimani, M; Kerdary, M

    2014-09-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) is one of the most suffered conditions in medical disciplines. The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress in the induction of NP was studied by many researchers. Neuropathies lead to medical, social, and economic isolation of the patient, so various therapies were used to treat or reduce it. During the recent years, low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been used in certain areas of medicine and rehabilitation. Chronic constriction injury (CCI) is a well-known model for neuropathic pain studies. In order to find the effects of different wavelengths of LLLT on the injured sciatic nerve, the present research was done. Thirty Wistar adult male rats (230-320 g) were used in this study. The animals were randomly divided into three groups (n = 10). To induce neuropathic pain for the sciatic nerve, the CCI technique was used. Low-level laser of 660 and 980 nm was used for two consecutive weeks. Thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia was done before and after surgery on days 7 and 14, respectively. Paw withdrawal thresholds were also evaluated. CCI decreased the pain threshold, whereas both wavelengths of LLLT for 2 weeks increased mechanical and thermal threshold significantly. A comparison of the mechanical and thermal threshold showed a significant difference between the therapeutic effects of the two groups that received LLLT. Based on our findings, the laser with a 660-nm wavelength had better therapeutic effects than the laser with a 980-nm wavelength, so the former one may be used for clinical application in neuropathic cases; however, it needs more future studies.

  6. The effect of balneotherapy on pain relief, stiffness, and physical function in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hiromi; Hagino, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Kunihiko; Ideno, Yuki; Wada, Takashi; Ogata, Toru; Akai, Masami; Seichi, Atsushi; Iwaya, Tsutomu

    2017-03-16

    This meta-analysis was performed to determine the effect of balneotherapy on relieving pain and stiffness and improving physical function, compared to controls, among patients with knee osteoarthritis. We searched electronic databases for eligible studies published from 2004 to December 31, 2016, with language restrictions of English or Japanese. We screened publications in Medline, Embase, Cochrane library, and the Japan Medical Abstracts Society Database using two approaches, MeSH terms and free words. Studies that examined the effect of balneotherapy for treating knee osteoarthritis of a ≥2-week duration were included. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores were used as the outcome measure. A total of 102 publications were assessed according to the exclusion criteria of the study; eight clinical trial studies, which comprised a total of 359 cases and 375 controls, were included in this meta-analysis. The meta-analysis analyzed improvement in WOMAC score at the final follow-up visit, which varied from 2 to 12 months post-intervention. Our meta-analysis indicates that balneotherapy was clinically effective in relieving pain and stiffness, and improving function, as assessed by WOMAC score, compared to controls. However, there was high heterogeneity (88 to 93%). It is possible that balneotherapy may reduce pain and stiffness, and improve function, in individuals with knee osteoarthritis, although the quality of current publications contributes to the heterogeneity observed in this meta-analysis.

  7. A randomised controlled trial on the efficacy and side-effect profile (nausea/vomiting/sedation) of morphine-6-glucuronide versus morphine for post-operative pain relief after major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Binning, Alexander R; Przesmycki, Krzysztof; Sowinski, Piotr; Morrison, Lachlan M M; Smith, Terry W; Marcus, Paul; Lees, James P; Dahan, Albert

    2011-04-01

    Morphine is the first choice of treatment of severe post-operative pain, despite the occurrence of often discomforting (post-operative nausea or vomiting (PONV)) and sometimes dangerous (sedation, respiratory depression) side effects. Literature data indicate that morphine's active metabolite, morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G), is a powerful analgesic with a possibly more favourable side-effect profile. In this multi-centre randomised controlled clinical trial patients undergoing major abdominal surgery were randomised to M6G or morphine treatment. Treatment started 30-60 min prior to the end of surgery and was continued postoperatively, after patients were titrated to comfort, via patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for 24-48 h. Pain intensity, nausea, vomiting and sedation scores were collected at regular intervals. In the study 268 patients were randomised to M6G and 249 to morphine. Withdrawal due to insufficient pain relief occurred predominantly just after surgery and was higher in the M6G group (16.8%) than in the morphine group (8.8%), suggesting a slower onset of analgesia for M6G compared to morphine. Subjects who continued on PCA remained equi-analgesic throughout the study. During the first 24h, nausea levels showed a 27% difference in favour of M6G which narrowly failed to reach statistical significance (P=0.052). Sub-analysis showed a significant reduction in nausea levels in females on M6G (30% difference, P=0.034). In all patients, similar reductions of 30-35% were observed in anti-emetic use, vomiting, PONV (a combined measure of nausea and vomiting) in favour of M6G, persisting for the first 24h postoperatively. Reductions in sedation were observed in the first 4h post-operative period for M6G patients.

  8. A Comparative Randomized Trial on the Optimal Timing of Dexamethasone for Pain Relief after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Early Gastric Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Pyo, Jeung Hui; Lee, Hyuk; Min, Yang Won; Min, Byung-Hoon; Lee, Jun Haeng; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kim, Jae J.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The aim of this study was to compare the clinical effects of preoperative and postoperative dexamethasone on pain after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for early gastric neoplasm. Methods Forty patients with early gastric neoplasm who were scheduled for ESD were randomized into two groups according to the timing of steroid administration: preoperative (“pre”, n=20) and postoperative (“post”, n=20) steroid administration. The pre group received 0.15 mg/kg dexamethasone before ESD and placebo after, and the post group received pre-ESD placebo and post-ESD dexamethasone. The present pain intensity (PPI) index and the short-form McGill pain (SF-MP) questionnaire were evaluated. Results The primary outcome was PPI score at 6 hours after ESD. There was a greater reduction in 6-hour PPI in the pre group than in the post group (2.1±0.8 vs 3.0±1.1, respectively; p=0.006). The immediate PPI was also significantly lower in the pre group than in the post group (1.6±0.6 vs 2.9±0.6, respectively; p<0.001), and the total SF-MP scores were significantly lower in the pre group than in the post group both immediately and at 6 hours after the operation. Conclusions Preoperative administration of dexamethasone may produce a superior analgesic effect in patients who undergo ESD compared with the postoperative administration of dexamethasone. PMID:27114413

  9. Successful management of complex regional pain syndrome type 1 using single injection interscalene brachial plexus block

    PubMed Central

    Fallatah, Summayah M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type 1 of the upper limb is a painful and debilitating condition. Interscalene brachial plexus block (ISB) in conjugation with other modalities was shown to be a feasible therapy with variable success. We reported a case of CRPS type 1 as diagnosed by International Association for the Study of Pain criteria in which pharmacological approaches failed to achieve adequate pain relief and even were associated with progressive dysfunction of the upper extremity. Single injection ISB, in combination with physical therapy and botulinum toxin injection, was successful to alleviate pain with functional restoration. PMID:25422619

  10. Acute pain management in children

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Susan T; Hannallah, Raafat S

    2010-01-01

    The greatest advance in pediatric pain medicine is the recognition that untreated pain is a significant cause of morbidity and even mortality after surgical trauma. Accurate assessment of pain in different age groups and the effective treatment of postoperative pain is constantly being refined; with newer drugs being used alone or in combination with other drugs continues to be explored. Several advances in developmental neurobiology and pharmacology, knowledge of new analgesics and newer applications of old analgesics in the last two decades have helped the pediatric anesthesiologist in managing pain in children more efficiently. The latter include administering opioids via the skin and nasal mucosa and their addition into the neuraxial local anesthetics. Systemic opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and regional analgesics alone or combined with additives are currently used to provide effective postoperative analgesia. These modalities are best utilized when combined as a multimodal approach to treat acute pain in the perioperative setting. The development of receptor specific drugs that can produce pain relief without the untoward side effects of respiratory depression will hasten the recovery and discharge of children after surgery. This review focuses on the overview of acute pain management in children, with an emphasis on pharmacological and regional anesthesia in achieving this goal. PMID:21197314

  11. Acute pain management in children.

    PubMed

    Verghese, Susan T; Hannallah, Raafat S

    2010-07-15

    The greatest advance in pediatric pain medicine is the recognition that untreated pain is a significant cause of morbidity and even mortality after surgical trauma. Accurate assessment of pain in different age groups and the effective treatment of postoperative pain is constantly being refined; with newer drugs being used alone or in combination with other drugs continues to be explored. Several advances in developmental neurobiology and pharmacology, knowledge of new analgesics and newer applications of old analgesics in the last two decades have helped the pediatric anesthesiologist in managing pain in children more efficiently. The latter include administering opioids via the skin and nasal mucosa and their addition into the neuraxial local anesthetics. Systemic opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and regional analgesics alone or combined with additives are currently used to provide effective postoperative analgesia. These modalities are best utilized when combined as a multimodal approach to treat acute pain in the perioperative setting. The development of receptor specific drugs that can produce pain relief without the untoward side effects of respiratory depression will hasten the recovery and discharge of children after surgery. This review focuses on the overview of acute pain management in children, with an emphasis on pharmacological and regional anesthesia in achieving this goal.

  12. [Experience in treatment of patients with neuropathic facial pain using ziconotide].

    PubMed

    Lux, E A; Rasche, D

    2011-08-01

    We report on the intrathecal use of ziconotide in three patients with idiopathic facial pain after surgery of the mouth, jaw or face and one patient with neuropathic pain after damage of the lingual nerve. The therapy was successful in three patients but one patient with idiopathic facial pain had pain relief only during the test phase of ziconotide with an external pump and not after implanting the Synchromed® pump. With intrathecal morphine therapy this patient achieved good pain relief. We recommend that patients with neuropathic facial pain should be treated with ziconotide after implementation of guideline-based therapy. In the test phase the ziconotide dose should be increased by 0.6 µg/day per week after an initial dose of 0.6-1.2 µg/day to avoid side-effects.

  13. Modulation of signal-transducing function of neuronal membrane Na+,K+-ATPase by endogenous ouabain and low-power infrared radiation leads to pain relief.

    PubMed

    Lopatina, Ekaterina V; Yachnev, Igor L; Penniyaynen, Valentina A; Plakhova, Vera B; Podzorova, Svetlana A; Shelykh, Tatiana N; Rogachevsky, Ilya V; Butkevich, Irina P; Mikhailenko, Viktor A; Kipenko, Anna V; Krylov, Boris V

    2012-01-01

    Effects of infrared (IR) radiation generated by a low-power Co2-laser on sensory neurons of chick embryos were investigated by organotypic culture method. Low-power IR radiation firstly results in marked neurite suppressing action, probably induced by activation of Na+,K+-ATPase signal-transducing function. A further increase in energy of radiation leads to stimulation of neurite growth. We suggest that this effect is triggered by activation of Na+,K+-ATPase pumping function. Involvement of Na+,K+-ATPase in the control of the transduction process was proved by results obtained after application of ouabain at very low concentrations. Physiological significance of low-power IR radiation and effects of ouabain at nanomolar level was investigated in behavioral experiments (formalin test). It is shown that inflammatory pain induced by injection of formalin is relieved both due to ouabain action and after IR irradiation.

  14. Overview of Total Knee Arthroplasty and Modern Pain Control Strategies.

    PubMed

    Lavie, Lacey Giambelluca; Fox, M Patricia; Dasa, Vinod

    2016-11-01

    Perioperative pain management of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) remains a challenge for physicians and anesthesiologists. Reducing postoperative pain is an essential component of patient satisfaction, functional outcomes, and hospital length of stay. Multimodal pain management regimens have been demonstrated to be superior to monotherapy in achieving adequate pain control, as well as an effective method of limiting side effects of analgesics. In the present investigation, we present literature published over the last year relating to new advancements in perioperative pain management for TKA. While it is widely accepted that methods including peripheral nerve blocks and local anesthetic injections are essential to pain protocols, there is still conflicting evidence over what modalities provide superior relief. The incorporation of cryoneurolysis preoperatively is a new modality which has been incorporated and has been shown to improve pain control in patients undergoing TKA.

  15. Sickle cell disease pain management in adolescents: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Bridget H; Nelson, Jessica

    2015-04-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) pain continues to emerge in adolescents. More than 98,000 individuals are believed to have SCD in the United States. In fact, 1 in 500 Black infants will be affected by SCD. Identifying standards of care for this unique population can improve pain management and treatment. A significant effect of vaso-occlusive crisis is a decrease in the quality of life in children. Therefore, pain management is multidimensional and includes pharmacologic, physical, and psychological strategies. A review of the literature was conducted to identify best practices regarding pain management in adolescents with sickle cell anemia. Key words such as pain, pain management, adolescent sickle cell anemia, and acute sickle cell pain were entered into databases to reveal qualitative and quantitative studies from 2009 to the present. Many of the research articles identified poor SCD pain management. Studies showed that acute SCD pain management is essential and should be evaluated and robustly managed to achieve optimum pain relief for patients. Acute SCD pain usually occurs as a result of vaso-occlusive crisis. Untreated acute SCD pain can result in morbidity and mortality in adolescents. Nursing knowledge is critical to reducing the stigma and improving management of SCD pain. Nurses play a vital role in the introduction of evidence-based practice within the clinical setting. In an effort to educate nurses and other health care professionals about SCD, this article is a literature review of studies concerning SCD and pain management in emergency rooms.

  16. Dramatic pain relief and resolution of bone inflammation following pamidronate in 9 pediatric patients with persistent chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO)

    PubMed Central

    Miettunen, Paivi MH; Wei, Xingchang; Kaura, Deepak; Reslan, Walid Abou; Aguirre, Alberto Nettel; Kellner, James D

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is an inflammatory, non-infectious osteopathy that affects predominantly patients ≤ 18 years of age. There is no uniformly effective treatment. Our objective is to describe clinical, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and bone resorption response to intravenous pamidronate in pediatric CRMO. Methods We report our prospectively documented experience with all CRMO patients treated with pamidronate between 2003 and 2008 at a tertiary pediatric centre. Pamidronate was administered as intravenous cycles. The dose of pamidronate varied among subjects but was given as monthly to every 3 monthly cycles depending on the distance the patient lived from the infusion center. Maximum cumulative dose was ≤ 11.5 mg/kg/year. Pamidronate treatment was continued until resolution of MRI documented bone inflammation. Visual analog scale for pain (VAS) and bone resorption marker urine N-telopeptide/urine creatinine (uNTX/uCr) were measured at baseline, preceding each subsequent pamidronate treatment, at final follow-up, and/or at time of MRI confirmed CRMO flare. MRI of the affected site(s) was obtained at baseline, preceding every 2nd treatment, and with suspected CRMO recurrence. Results Nine patients (5 F: 4 M) were treated, with a median (range) age at treatment of 12.9 (4.5–16.3) years, and median (range) duration of symptoms of 18 (6–36) months. VAS decreased from 10/10 to 0–3/10 by the end of first 3–day treatment for all patients. The mean (range) time to complete MRI resolution of bone inflammation was 6.0 (2–12) months. The mean (confidence interval (CI)) baseline uNTX/uCr was 738.83 (CI 464.25, 1013.42)nmol/mmol/creatinine and the mean (CI) decrease from baseline to pamidronate discontinuation was 522.17 (CI 299.77, 744.56)nmol/mmol/creatinine. Median (range) of follow-up was 31.4 (24–54) months. Four patients had MRI confirmed CRMO recurrence, which responded to one pamidronate re-treatment. The

  17. [Deep Relief sonophoresis in degenerative changes of the knee joint].

    PubMed

    Zjuzin, Nada; Muftić, Mirsad; Avdić, Dijana; Zubcević, Haris; Stefanovski, Mihajlo; Stefanovski, Gordana; Lukać, Tamara; Hotić, Asia; Halilbegović, Emir; Kapidzić, Nedima

    2004-01-01

    We analysed 130 persons with osteoarthritis of knee and compared efficiency Deep Relief gel with sonophoresis and ultrasound with standard gel. Deep Relief has significant better effect for less pain and better improvement of functional capacity in comparison with ultrasound. Results of examination are statistic significant.

  18. Percutaneous-guided pain control: exploiting the neural basis of pain sensation.

    PubMed

    Adolph, Michael D; Benedetti, Costantino

    2006-03-01

    The gastroenterologist deals frequently with painful conditions and suffering patients. Performing regular pain assessments and applying basic pain medicine principles will augment the care of patients in pain. Percutaneous-guided pain therapy techniques play a role in the multidisciplinary approach to pain medicine. Systemic opioid analgesia is the primary means of controlling cancer pain. However, 10% to 15% of cancer patients may need additional interventions to control pain. Sympathetic ganglion nerve blocks with neurolytic agents such as alcohol or phenol are reserved mostly for cancer pain. The efficacy and safety of these tools are validated by several decades of clinical application and published studies. Although the procedures are operator-dependent, in the hands of experienced clinicians, patients achieve sustained relief in the majority of cases. Although these techniques have been attempted in some benign conditions,such as chronic pancreatitis, with limited success, studies of newer imaging localization techniques such as endoscopic ultrasonography may expand future indications. Patients of the gastroenterologist who experience malignant abdominal pain may benefit from referral for percutaneous-guided pain control techniques.

  19. Pain Management: Knowledge and Attitudes of Senior Nursing Students and Practicing Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messmer, Sherry

    2009-01-01

    Despite scientific advances in pain management, inadequate pain relief in hospitalized patients continues to be an on-going phenomenon. Although nurses do not prescribe medication for pain, the decision to administer pharmacological or other interventions for pain relief is part of nursing practice. Nurses play a critical role in the relief of…

  20. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study of THC/CBD oromucosal spray in combination with the existing treatment regimen, in the relief of central neuropathic pain in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Langford, R M; Mares, J; Novotna, A; Vachova, M; Novakova, I; Notcutt, W; Ratcliffe, S

    2013-04-01

    Central neuropathic pain (CNP) occurs in many multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. The provision of adequate pain relief to these patients can very difficult. Here we report the first phase III placebo-controlled study of the efficacy of the endocannabinoid system modulator delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)/cannabidiol (CBD) oromucosal spray (USAN name, nabiximols; Sativex, GW Pharmaceuticals, Salisbury, Wiltshire, UK), to alleviate CNP. Patients who had failed to gain adequate analgesia from existing medication were treated with THC/CBD spray or placebo as an add-on treatment, in a double-blind manner, for 14 weeks to investigate the efficacy of the medication in MS-induced neuropathic pain. This parallel-group phase of the study was then followed by an 18-week randomized-withdrawal study (14-week open-label treatment period plus a double-blind 4-week randomized-withdrawal phase) to investigate time to treatment failure and show maintenance of efficacy. A total of 339 patients were randomized to phase A (167 received THC/CBD spray and 172 received placebo). Of those who completed phase A, 58 entered the randomized-withdrawal phase. The primary endpoint of responder analysis at the 30 % level at week 14 of phase A of the study was not met, with 50 % of patients on THC/CBD spray classed as responders at the 30 % level compared to 45 % of patients on placebo (p = 0.234). However, an interim analysis at week 10 showed a statistically significant treatment difference in favor of THC/CBD spray at this time point (p = 0.046). During the randomized-withdrawal phase, the primary endpoint of time to treatment failure was statistically significant in favor of THC/CBD spray, with 57 % of patients receiving placebo failing treatment versus 24 % of patients from the THC/CBD spray group (p = 0.04). The mean change from baseline in Pain Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) (p = 0.028) and sleep quality NRS (p = 0.015) scores, both secondary endpoints in phase B, were also statistically

  1. MAGnesium-oral supplementation to reduce PAin in patients with severe PERipheral arterial occlusive disease: the MAG-PAPER randomised clinical trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    Venturini, Monica Aida; Zappa, Sergio; Minelli, Cosetta; Bonardelli, Stefano; Lamberti, Laura; Bisighini, Luca; Zangrandi, Marta; Turin, Maddalena; Rizzo, Francesco; Rizzolo, Andrea; Latronico, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Magnesium exerts analgaesic effects in several animal pain models, as well as in patients affected by acute postoperative pain and neuropathic chronic pain. There is no evidence that magnesium can modulate pain in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). We describe the protocol of a single-centre randomised double-blind clinical trial aimed at assessing the efficacy of oral magnesium supplementation in controlling severe pain in patients with advanced PAOD. Methods and analysis Adult patients affected by PAOD at stages III and IV of Lèriche-Fontaine classification, who are opioid-naïve, and who have been admitted to our Acute Pain Service for intractable pain, will be eligible. Patients will be randomised to the control group, treated with standard therapy (oxycodone and pregabalin) plus placebo for 2 weeks, or to the experimental group (standard therapy plus magnesium oxide). Patients will be evaluated on days 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12 and 14; the following information will being collected: daily oxycodone dose; average and maximum pain (Numerical Rating Scale); pain relief (Pain Relief Scale); characteristics of the pain (Neuropathic Pain Scale); impact of pain on the patient's daily activities (Brief Pain Inventory). The primary outcome will be oxycodone dosage needed to achieve satisfactory analgaesia on day 14. Secondary outcomes will be pain relief on day 2, time needed to achieve satisfactory analgaesia and time needed to achieve a pain reduction of 50%. A sample size calculation was performed for the primary outcome, which estimated a required sample size of 150 patients (75 per group). Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval of the study protocol has been obtained from Comitato Etico Provinciale di Brescia, Brescia, Italy. Trial results will be disseminated through scientific journal manuscripts and scientific conference presentations. Trial registration number NCT02455726. PMID:26674497

  2. Radiofrequency Ablation Therapy Combined with Cementoplasty for Painful Bone Metastases: Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Toyota, Naoyuki Naito, Akira; Kakizawa, Hideaki; Hieda, Masashi; Hirai, Nobuhiko; Tachikake, Toshihiro; Kimura, Tomoki; Fukuda, Hideki; Ito, Katsuhide

    2005-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation therapy combined with cementoplasty under computed tomography and fluoroscopic guidance for painful bone metastases. Seventeen adult patients with 23 painful bone metastases underwent RF ablation therapy combined with cementoplasty during a 2-year period. The mean tumor size was 52 x 40 x 59 mm. Initial pain relief, reduction of analgesics, duration of pain relief, recurrence rate of pain, survival rate, and complications were analyzed. The technical success rate was 100%. Initial pain relief was achieved in 100% of patients (n = 17). The mean VAS scores dropped from 63 to 24 (p < 0.001) (n = 8). Analgesic reduction was achieved in 41% (7 out of 17 patients). The mean duration of pain relief was 7.3 months (median: 6 months). Pain recurred in three patients (17.6%) from 2 weeks to 3 months. Eight patients died and 8 patients are still alive (a patient was lost to follow-up). The one-year survival rate was 40% (observation period: 1-30 months). No major complications occurred, but one patient treated with this combined therapy broke his right femur 2 days later. There was transient local pain in most cases, and a hematoma in the psoas muscle (n = 1) and a hematoma at the puncture site (n = 1) occurred as minor complications. Percutaneous RF ablation therapy combined with cementoplasty for painful bone metastases is effective and safe, in particular, for bulky tumors extending to extraosseous regions. A comparison with cementoplasty or RF ablation alone and their long-term efficacies is needed.

  3. Radiofrequency ablation therapy combined with cementoplasty for painful bone metastases: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Naoyuki; Naito, Akira; Kakizawa, Hideaki; Hieda, Masashi; Hirai, Nobuhiko; Tachikake, Toshihiro; Kimura, Tomoki; Fukuda, Hideki; Ito, Katsuhide

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation therapy combined with cementoplasty under computed tomography and fluoroscopic guidance for painful bone metastases. Seventeen adult patients with 23 painful bone metastases underwent RF ablation therapy combined with cementoplasty during a 2-year period. The mean tumor size was 52 x 40 x 59 mm. Initial pain relief, reduction of analgesics, duration of pain relief, recurrence rate of pain, survival rate, and complications were analyzed. The technical success rate was 100%. Initial pain relief was achieved in 100% of patients (n=17). The mean VAS scores dropped from 63 to 24 (p<0.001) (n=8). Analgesic reduction was achieved in 41% (7 out of 17 patients). The mean duration of pain relief was 7.3 months (median: 6 months). Pain recurred in three patients (17.6%) from 2 weeks to 3 months. Eight patients died and 8 patients are still alive (a patient was lost to follow-up). The one-year survival rate was 40% (observation period: 1--30 months). No major complications occurred, but one patient treated with this combined therapy broke his right femur 2 days later. There was transient local pain in most cases, and a hematoma in the psoas muscle (n=1) and a hematoma at the puncture site (n=1) occurred as minor complications. Percutaneous RF ablation therapy combined with cementoplasty for painful bone metastases is effective and safe, in particular, for bulky tumors extending to extraosseous regions. A comparison with cementoplasty or RF ablation alone and their long-term efficacies is needed.

  4. Sclerosing osteomyelitis of Garré: management of femoral pain by intramedullary nailing

    PubMed Central

    Vannet, Nicola Bader; Williams, Huw L M; Healy, Brendan; Morgan-Jones, Rhidian

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of chronic sclerosing osteomyelitis of Garré in a 50-year-old woman occurring in her right femur and presenting with uncontrolled pain. The patient was initially treated with intramedullary reaming of the femur, but 3 years later re-presented with similar symptoms. This required further reaming and intramedullary nailing, achieving good clinical outcomes and lasting pain relief at 8-year follow-up. PMID:25538212

  5. Pain management in neonates.

    PubMed

    Carbajal, Ricardo; Gall, Olivier; Annequin, Daniel

    2004-05-01

    Multiple lines of evidence suggest an increased sensitivity to pain in neonates. Repeated and prolonged pain exposure may affect the subsequent development of pain systems, as well as potentially contribute to alterations in long-term development and behavior. Despite impressive gains in the knowledge of neonatal pain mechanisms and strategies to treat neonatal pain acquired during the last 15 years, a large gap still exists between routine clinical practice and research results. Accurate assessment of pain is crucial for effective pain management in neonates. Neonatal pain management should rely on current scientific evidence more than the attitudes and beliefs of care-givers. Parents should be informed of pain relief strategies and their participation in the health care plan to alleviate pain should be encouraged. The need for systemic analgesia for both moderate and severe pain, in conjunction with behavioral/environmental approaches to pain management, is emphasized. A main sources of pain in the neonate is procedural pain which should always be prevented and treated. Nonpharmacological approaches constitute important treatment options for managing procedural pain. Nonpharmacological interventions (environmental and preventive measures, non-nutritive sucking, sweet solutions, skin-skin contact, and breastfeeding analgesia) can reduce neonatal pain indirectly by reducing the total amount of noxious stimuli to which infants are exposed, and directly, by blocking nociceptive transduction or transmission or by activation of descending inhibitory pathways or by activating attention and arousal systems that modulate pain. Opioids are the mainstay of pharmacological pain treatment but there are other useful medications and techniques that may be used for pain relief. National guidelines are necessary to improve neonatal pain management at the institutional level, individual neonatal intensive care units need to develop specific practice guidelines regarding pain

  6. Pain and pain management in haemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Auerswald, Günter; Dolan, Gerry; Duffy, Anne; Hermans, Cedric; Jiménez-Yuste, Victor; Ljung, Rolf; Morfini, Massimo; Lambert, Thierry; Šalek, Silva Zupančić

    2016-01-01

    Joint pain is common in haemophilia and may be acute or chronic. Effective pain management in haemophilia is essential to reduce the burden that pain imposes on patients. However, the choice of appropriate pain-relieving measures is challenging, as there is a complex interplay of factors affecting pain perception. This can manifest as differences in patients’ experiences and response to pain, which require an individualized approach to pain management. Prophylaxis with factor replacement reduces the likelihood of bleeds and bleed-related pain, whereas on-demand therapy ensures rapid bleed resolution and pain relief. Although use of replacement or bypassing therapy is often the first intervention for pain, additional pain relief strategies may be required. There is an array of analgesic options, but consideration should be paid to the adverse effects of each class. Nevertheless, a combination of medications that act at different points in the pain pathway may be beneficial. Nonpharmacological measures may also help patients and include active coping strategies; rest, ice, compression, and elevation; complementary therapies; and physiotherapy. Joint aspiration may also reduce acute joint pain, and joint steroid injections may alleviate chronic pain. In the longer term, increasing use of prophylaxis or performing surgery may be necessary to reduce the burden of pain caused by the degenerative effects of repeated bleeds. Whichever treatment option is chosen, it is important to monitor pain and adjust patient management accordingly. Beyond specific pain management approaches, ongoing collaboration between multidisciplinary teams, which should include physiotherapists and pain specialists, may improve outcomes for patients. PMID:27439216

  7. Treatment of Neck Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hurwitz, Eric L.; Cheng, Ivan; Carroll, Linda J.; Nordin, Margareta; Guzman, Jaime; Peloso, Paul; Holm, Lena W.; Côthé, Pierre; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; van der Velde, Gabrielle; Cassidy, J. David; Haldeman, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Study Design Best evidence synthesis. Objective To identify, critically appraise, and synthesize literature from 1980 through 2006 on surgical interventions for neck pain alone or with radicular pain in the absence of serious pathologic disease. Summary of Background Data There have been no comprehensive systematic literature or evidence-based reviews published on this topic. Methods We systematically searched Medline for literature published from 1980 to 2006 on percutaneous and open surgical interventions for neck pain. Publications on the topic were also solicited from experts in the field. Consensus decisions were made about the scientific merit of each article; those judged to have adequate internal validity were included in our Best Evidence Synthesis. Results Of the 31,878 articles screened, 1203 studies were relevant to the Neck Pain Task Force mandate and of these, 31 regarding treatment by surgery or injections were accepted as scientifically admissible. Radiofrequency neurotomy, cervical facet injections, cervical fusion and cervical arthroplasty for neck pain without radiculopathy are not supported by current evidence. We found there is support for short-term symptomatic improvement of radicular symptoms with epidural corticosteroids. It is not clear from the evidence that long-term out comes are improved with the surgical treatment of cervical radiculopathy compared to non operative measures. However, relatively rapid and substantial symptomatic relief after surgical treatment seems to be reliably achieved. It is not evident that one open surgical technique is clearly superior to others for radiculopathy. Cervical foramenal or epidural injections are associated with relatively frequent minor adverse events (5%–20%); however, serious adverse events are very uncommon (<1%). After open surgical procedures on the cervical spine, potentially serious acute complications are seen in approximately 4% of patients. Conclusion Surgical treatment and limited

  8. Single dose oral mefenamic acid for acute postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Rachel; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Mefenamic acid is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It is most often used for treating pain of dysmenorrhoea in the short term (seven days or less), as well as mild to moderate pain including headache, dental pain, postoperative and postpartum pain. It is widely available in many countries worldwide. Objectives To assess the efficacy of single dose oral mefenamic acid in acute postoperative pain, and any associated adverse events. Search methods We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for studies to December 2010. Selection criteria Single oral dose, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of mefenamic acid for relief of established moderate to severe postoperative pain in adults. Data collection and analysis Studies were assessed for methodological quality and the data extracted by two review authors independently. Summed total pain relief (TOTPAR) or pain intensity difference (SPID) over 4 to 6 hours was used to calculate the number of participants achieving at least 50% pain relief. These derived results were used to calculate, with 95% confidence intervals, the relative benefit compared to placebo, and the number needed to treat (NNT) for one participant to experience at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours. Numbers of participants using rescue medication over specified time periods, and time to use of rescue medication, were sought as additional measures of efficacy. Information on adverse events and withdrawals was collected. Main results Four studies with 842 participants met the inclusion criteria; 126 participants were treated with mefenamic acid 500 mg, 67 with mefenamic acid 250 mg, 197 with placebo, and 452 with lignocaine, aspirin, zomepirac or nimesulide. Participants had pain following third molar extraction, episiotomy and orthopaedic surgery. The NNT for at least 50% pain relief over 6 hours with a single dose of mefenamic acid 500 mg compared to placebo was 4.0 (2

  9. Opioid availability and palliative care in Nepal: influence of an international pain policy fellowship.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Bishnu Dutta; Ryan, Karen M; Brown, Mary Skemp; Krakauer, Eric L; Rajagopal, M R; Maurer, Martha A; Cleary, James F

    2015-01-01

    Globally, cancer incidence and mortality are increasing, and most of the burden is shifting to low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where patients often present with late-stage disease and severe pain. Unfortunately, LMICs also face a disproportionate lack of access to pain-relieving medicines such as morphine, despite the medical and scientific literature that shows morphine to be effective to treat moderate and severe cancer pain. In 2008, an oncologist from Nepal, one of the poorest countries in the world, was selected to participate in the International Pain Policy Fellowship, a program to assist LMICs, to improve patient access to pain medicines. Following the World Health Organization public health model for development of pain relief and palliative care, the Fellow, working with colleagues and mentors, has achieved initial successes: three forms of oral morphine (syrup, immediate-release tablets, and sustained-release tablets) are now manufactured in the country; health-care practitioners are receiving training in the use of opioids for pain relief; and a new national palliative care association has developed a palliative care training curriculum. However, long-term implementation efforts, funding, and technical assistance by governments, philanthropic organizations, and international partners are necessary to ensure that pain relief and palliative care become accessible by all in need in Nepal and other LMICs.

  10. Independent natural genetic variation of punishment- versus relief-memory

    PubMed Central

    Appel, Mirjam; Kocabey, Samet; Savage, Sinead; König, Christian

    2016-01-01

    A painful event establishes two opponent memories: cues that are associated with pain onset are remembered negatively, whereas cues that coincide with the relief at pain offset acquire positive valence. Such punishment- versus relief-memories are conserved across species, including humans, and the balance between them is critical for adaptive behaviour with respect to pain and trauma. In the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster as a study case, we found that both punishment- and relief-memories display natural variation across wild-derived inbred strains, but they do not covary, suggesting a considerable level of dissociation in their genetic effectors. This provokes the question whether there may be heritable inter-individual differences in the balance between these opponent memories in man, with potential psycho-clinical implications. PMID:28003518

  11. Speeding earthquake disaster relief

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mortensen, Carl; Donlin, Carolyn; Page, Robert A.; Ward, Peter

    1995-01-01

    In coping with recent multibillion-dollar earthquake disasters, scientists and emergency managers have found new ways to speed and improve relief efforts. This progress is founded on the rapid availability of earthquake information from seismograph networks.

  12. Applying Joint Mobilization at Different Cervical Vertebral Levels does not Influence Immediate Pain Reduction in Patients with Chronic Neck Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Aquino, Rafaela L; Caires, Priscila M; Furtado, Fernanda C; Loureiro, Aline V; Ferreira, Paulo H; Ferreira, Manuela L

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of applying joint mobilization at symptomatic and asymptomatic cervical levels in patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain. Forty-eight patients aged between 18 and 65 years and presenting nonspecific neck pain with a minimum duration of 3 months were recruited for the study. Included patients were randomized to one of two treatment groups: (i) control group: the most symptomatic vertebral level was mobilized; (ii) experimental group: a randomly selected vertebral level was chosen and mobilized. All patients received one treatment session. Pain intensity in resting position during the most painful active cervical movement as well as during vertebral palpation was quantified using an 11-point pain scale. Follow-up measures were taken immediately after intervention by a blinded assessor. The results showed no significant difference in pain intensity immediately after treatment between groups (symptomatic level treated vs. randomly chosen cervical vertebral level treated) during resting position, painful active movement, or vertebral palpation. Within-group comparisons showed significant pain relief after treatment during the most painful active movement as well as during vertebral palpation for both groups, but not during resting position. Significant change in immediate pain intensity during painful active movement and vertebral palpation was achieved after vertebral mobilization. however, both groups presented similar pain reductions suggesting that pain reduction due to joint mobilization is not specific to the vertebral level being mobilized. PMID:20046551

  13. Pressure Relief Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manha, William D.

    2010-09-01

    Pressure relief devices are used in pressure systems and on pressure vessels to prevent catastrophic rupture or explosion from excessive pressure. Pressure systems and pressure vessels have manufacturers maximum rated operating pressures or maximum design pressures(MDP) for which there are relatively high safety factors and minimum risk of rupture or explosion. Pressure systems and pressure vessels that have a potential to exceed the MDP by being connected to another higher pressure source, a compressor, or heat to water(boiler) are required to have over-pressure protecting devices. Such devices can be relief valves and/or burst discs to safely relieve potentially excessive pressure and prevent unacceptable ruptures and explosions which result in fail-safe pressure systems and pressure vessels. Common aerospace relief valve and burst disc requirements and standards will be presented. This will include the NASA PSRP Interpretation Letter TA-88-074 Fault Tolerance of Systems Using Specially Certified Burst Disks that dictates burst disc requirements for payloads on Shuttle. Two recent undesirable manned space payloads pressure relief devices and practices will be discussed, as well as why these practices should not be continued. One example for discussion is the use of three burst discs that have been placed in series to comply with safety requirements of three controls to prevent a catastrophic hazard of the over-pressurization and rupture of pressure system and/or vessels. The cavities between the burst discs are evacuated and are the reference pressures for activating the two upstream burst discs. If the upstream burst disc leaks into the reference cavity, the reference pressure increases and it can increase the burst disc activating pressure and potentially result in the burst disc assembly being ineffective for over pressure protection. The three burst discs-in-series assembly was found acceptable because the burst discs are designed for minimum risk(DFMR) of

  14. The effect of Neuragen PN® on Neuropathic pain: A randomized, double blind, placebo controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A double blind, randomized, placebo controlled study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the naturally derived topical oil, "Neuragen PN®" for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Methods Sixty participants with plantar cutaneous (foot sole) pain due to all cause peripheral neuropathy were recruited from the community. Each subject was randomly assigned to receive one of two treatments (Neuragen PN® or placebo) per week in a crossover design. The primary outcome measure was acute spontaneous pain level as reported on a visual analog scale. Results There was an overall pain reduction for both treatments from pre to post application. As compared to the placebo, Neuragen PN® led to significantly (p < .05) greater pain reduction. Fifty six of sixty subjects (93.3%) receiving Neuragen PN® reported pain reduction within 30 minutes. This reduction within 30 minutes occurred in only twenty one of sixty (35.0%) subjects receiving the placebo. In a break out analysis of the diabetic only subgroup, 94% of subjects in the Neuragen PN® group achieved pain reduction within 30 minutes vs 11.0% of the placebo group. No adverse events were observed. Conclusions This randomized, placebo controlled, clinical trial with crossover design revealed that the naturally derived oil, Neuragen PN®, provided significant relief from neuropathic pain in an all cause neuropathy group. Participants with diabetes within this group experienced similar pain relief. Trial registration ISRCTN registered: ISRCTN13226601 PMID:20487567

  15. Hydrogen gas relief valve

    DOEpatents

    Whittlesey, Curtis C.

    1985-01-01

    An improved battery stack design for an electrochemical system having at least one cell from which a gas is generated and an electrolyte in communication with the cell is described. The improved battery stack design features means for defining a substantially closed compartment for containing the battery cells and at least a portion of the electrolyte for the system, and means in association with the compartment means for selectively venting gas from the interior of the compartment means in response to the level of the electrolyte within the compartment means. The venting means includes a relief valve having a float member which is actuated in response to the level of the electrolyte within the compartment means. This float member is adapted to close the relief valve when the level of the electrolyte is above a predetermined level and open the relief valve when the level of electrolyte is below this predetermined level.

  16. Spirituality and Religion in Pain and Pain Management

    PubMed Central

    Dedeli, Ozden; Kaptan, Gulten

    2013-01-01

    Pain relief is a management problem for many patients, their families, and the medical professionals caring for them. Although everyone experiences pain to some degree, responses to it vary from one person to another. Recognizing and specifying someone else’s pain is clinically a well know challenge. Research on the biology and neurobiology of pain has given us a relationship between spirituality and pain. There is growing recognition that persistent pain is a complex and multidimensional experience stemming from the interrelations among biological, psychological, social, and spiritual factors. Patients with pain use a number of cognitive and behavioral strategies to cope with their pain, including religious/spiritual factors, such as prayers, and seeking spiritual support to manage their pain. This article provides an overview of the complex phenomenon of pain, with a focus on spiritual and religious issues in pain management. PMID:26973914

  17. Intracerebroventricular opioids for intractable pain

    PubMed Central

    Raffa, Robert B; Pergolizzi, Joseph V

    2012-01-01

    When pain is refractory to systemic opioid and non-opioid analgesic therapy and palliative chemoradiation or ablative or stimulant neurosurgical procedures are not possible, palliative treatment becomes limited, particularly if the patient wishes to be at home at the end of life. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of morphine in the home setting might be presented as an option. The present article reviews the basic and clinical evidence of the efficacy and safety of ICV administration of opioids. Information was gathered from various bibliographic sources, including PubMed and others, and summarized and evaluated to assess the efficacy and safety of ICV opioids for pain relief. Results from ICV infusion of morphine into terminally ill patients refractory to other pain treatments have been reported since the early 1980s. Good efficacy has been achieved for the vast majority of patients, without serious development of analgesic tolerance. There have also been a low incidence of adverse effects, such as constipation and respiratory depression, and a significant retention of alertness associated with this route of administration. Intracerebroventricular infusion of opioid analgesics thus appears to be a safe and effective therapy for the palliative treatment of refractory pain. PMID:22295988

  18. Pain-related emotions modulate experimental pain perception and autonomic responses.

    PubMed

    Rainville, Pierre; Bao, Quoc Viet Huynh; Chrétien, Pablo

    2005-12-05

    The effect of emotions on pain perception is generally recognized but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, emotions related to pain were induced in healthy volunteers using hypnosis, during 1-min immersions of the hand in painfully hot water. In Experiment 1, hypnotic suggestions were designed to induce various positive or negative emotions. Compared to a control condition with hypnotic-relaxation, negative emotions produced robust increases in pain. In Experiment 2, induction of pain-related anger and sadness were found to increase pain. Pain increases were associated with increases in self-rated desire for relief and decreases in expectation of relief, and with increases in arousal, negative affective valence and decreases in perceived control. In Experiment 3, hypnotic suggestions specifically designed to increase and decrease the desire for relief produced increases and decreases in pain, respectively. In all three experiments, emotion-induced changes in pain were most consistently found on ratings of pain unpleasantness compared to pain intensity. Changes in pain-evoked cardiac responses (R-R interval decrease), measured in experiments 2 and 3, were consistent with changes in pain unpleasantness. Correlation and multiple regression analyses suggest that negative emotions and desire for relief influence primarily pain affect and that pain-evoked autonomic responses are strongly associated with pain affect. These results confirm the hypothesized influence of the desire for relief on pain perception, and particularly on pain affect, and support the functional relation between pain affect and autonomic nociceptive responses. This study provides further experimental confirmation that pain-related emotions influence pain perception and pain-related physiological responses.

  19. SIRT1-related inhibition of pro-inflammatory responses and oxidative stress are involved in the mechanism of nonspecific low back pain relief after exercise through modulation of Toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan-Yang; Kao, Chung-Lan; Ma, Hsin-I; Hung, Ching-Hsia; Wang, Chin-Tien; Liu, Ding-Hao; Chen, Po-Yin; Tsai, Kun-Ling

    2015-10-01

    Low back pain is a common clinical problem that causes disability and impaired quality of life. While the reason behind low back pain was largely considered to be of musculoskeletal origin, the contribution of inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress could never be overlooked. Exercise has been proven to be an effective approach to treat low back pain. However, the mechanism of the exercise effect on the inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress is still largely unknown. In this study, we revealed that exercise intervention reduces Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) pathway and enhances Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) expression in low back pain patients. We also confirmed that exercise up-regulates the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, PPAR-γ coactivator-1 and FoxOs family proteins and also increases the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase in patients with low back pain. Furthermore, we found that exercise intervention attenuates the oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory cytokine concentrations and p53 expression in patients with low back pain. This study demonstrates that exercise intervention improves low back pain symptoms through regulation of the SIRT1 axis with repression of oxidative stress and TLR-4 inhibition.

  20. Bowenwork for Migraine Relief: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Migraine is a complex neurological disorder characterized by episodic, neurogenic, cerebrovascular inflammation and hypersensitization of brain tissues and the central nervous system, causing severe pain and debility. Research literature points mostly to pharmaceutical prophylactic and symptomatic treatments, nonpharmaceutical, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) approaches, acupuncture, massage and bodywork studies, and none has been published on Bowenwork for migraine intervention. This prospective case report describes one migraineur’s response to Bowenwork (a soft-tissue bodywork technique) with cessation of migraine, neck pain, and analgesic consumption, and improved well-being and activity function. Methods The client received 14 Bowenwork sessions over a four-month period using the self-reporting Measure Yourself Medical Outcome Profile version 2 (MYMOP2) to evaluate clinically meaningful changes. Baseline MYMOP2 data were recorded prior to the first and subsequent Bowenwork sessions to track changes in migraine and neck pain occurrences, other symptoms, medication use, functional ability and sense of well-being. Specific Bowenwork procedures were applied in each session to address various symptoms. The client did not receive other migraine treatment during this study. Participant A 66-year-old Caucasian female with a history of debilitating migraine since childhood, and severe neck pain and jaw injuries resulting from two motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) sustained as an adult. She had previously sought medical, pharmaceutical and CAM treatments for migraine, neck pain, and right-sided thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) symptoms, with no satisfactory relief. Results The client progressively reported decreased migraine and neck pain until acquiring a respiratory infection with prolonged coughing spells causing symptoms to recur (session 11). Prior to session 12, she experienced an allergic reaction to ingesting an unknown food allergen

  1. Single dose oral codeine, as a single agent, for acute postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Codeine is an opioid metabolised to active analgesic compounds, including morphine. It is widely available by prescription, and combination drugs including low doses of codeine are commonly available without prescription. Objectives To assess the efficacy, the time to onset of analgesia, the time to use of rescue medication and any associated adverse events of single dose oral codeine in acute postoperative pain. Search methods We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and PubMed to November 2009. Selection criteria Single oral dose, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of codeine for relief of established moderate to severe postoperative pain in adults. Data collection and analysis Studies were assessed for methodological quality and data independently extracted by two review authors. Summed total pain relief (TOTPAR) or pain intensity difference (SPID) over 4 to 6 hours were used to calculate the number of participants achieving at least 50% pain relief, which were used to calculate, with 95% confidence intervals, the relative benefit compared to placebo, and the number needed to treat (NNT) for one participant to experience at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours. Numbers using rescue medication over specified time periods, and time to use of rescue medication, were sought as additional measures of efficacy. Data on adverse events and withdrawals were collected. Main results Thirty-five studies were included (1223 participants received codeine 60 mg, 27 codeine 90 mg, and 1252 placebo). Combining all types of surgery (33 studies, 2411 participants), codeine 60 mg had an NNT of at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours of 12 (8.4 to 18) compared with placebo. At least 50% pain relief was achieved by 26% on codeine 60 mg and 17% on placebo. Following dental surgery the NNT was 21 (12 to 96) (15 studies, 1146 participants), and following other types of surgery the NNT was 6.8 (4.6 to 13) (18 studies, 1265 participants). The NNT to prevent

  2. Longstanding neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury is refractory to transcranial direct current stimulation: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wrigley, Paul J; Gustin, Sylvia M; McIndoe, Leigh N; Chakiath, Rosemary J; Henderson, Luke A; Siddall, Philip J

    2013-10-01

    Neuropathic pain remains one of the most difficult consequences of spinal cord injury (SCI) to manage. It is a major cause of suffering and adds to the physical, emotional, and societal impact of the injury. Despite the use of the best available treatments, two thirds of people experiencing neuropathic pain after SCI do not achieve satisfactory pain relief. This study was undertaken in response to a recent clinical trial reporting short-term, clinically significant reductions in neuropathic SCI pain with primary motor cortex transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). In this investigation, we aimed to build on this previous clinical trial by extending the assessment period to determine the short-, medium-, and long-term efficacy of tDCS for the treatment of neuropathic pain after SCI. We found that, contrary to previous reports, after 5 tDCS treatment periods, mean pain intensity and unpleasantness rating were not significantly different from initial assessment. That is, in this trial tDCS did not provide any pain relief in subjects with neuropathic SCI pain (n=10). A similar lack of effect was also seen after sham treatment. Because the injury duration in this study was significantly greater than that of previous investigations, it is possible that tDCS is an effective analgesic only in individuals with relatively recent injuries and pain. Future investigations comparing a range of injury durations are required if we are to determine whether this is indeed the case.

  3. Painful pathologic fracture of the humerus: percutaneous osteoplasty with bone marrow nails under hybrid computed tomography and fluoroscopic guidance.

    PubMed

    Anselmetti, Giovanni Carlo; Manca, Antonio; Chiara, Gabriele; Tutton, Sean; Iussich, Gabriella; Gino, Giancarlo; Grignani, Giovanni; Ortega, Cinzia; Moselli, Nora; Regge, Daniele

    2011-07-01

    A case of a 75-year-old patient with a painful pathologic humeral shaft fracture, with unacceptably high surgical risk and unsatisfactory analgesia is reported. In this case, impaired arm function and persistent pain with conservative management resulted in a poor quality of life. Palliation with image-guided percutaneous osteoplasty was considered. Because of potential cement leakage, inadequate fracture reduction, the site of the fracture, and the mobility of the joints in that area, image-guided percutaneous delivery of metallic bone marrow nails implanted together with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) osteoplasty was performed. This procedure achieved humeral shaft stabilization, bone fragment alignment, fracture reduction, and pain relief.

  4. The McGill University Health Centre Cancer Pain Clinic: A Retrospective Analysis of an Interdisciplinary Approach to Cancer Pain Management

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jordi; Olivier, Sara; Rampakakis, Emmanouil; Borod, Manuel; Shir, Yoram

    2016-01-01

    Context. The McGill University Health Center (MUHC) Cancer Pain Clinic offers an interdisciplinary approach to cancer pain management for patients. The core team includes a nurse clinician specialist in oncology and palliative care, a palliativist, an anaesthetist, and a radiation oncologist. This tailored approach includes pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies offered concurrently in an interdisciplinary fashion. Objectives. Description of the interdisciplinary MUHC cancer pain approach and analysis of treatments and outcomes. Methods. A retrospective analysis of new outpatients completing two subsequent visits (baseline and follow-ups: FU1, FU2) was conducted. Variables included (a) symptom severity measured by the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale, (b) pain and disability measured with the Brief Pain Inventory, and (c) analgesic plan implementation including pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies. Results. 71 charts were reviewed. Significant pain relief was achieved consistently at FU1 and FU2. The average pain severity decreased by 2 points between initial assessment and FU2. More than half (53%) of patients responded with a pain reduction greater than 30%. Severity of other symptoms (i.e., fatigue, nausea, depression, and anxiety) and disability also decreased significantly at FU2. The total consumption of opioids remained stable; however, the consumption of short acting preparations decreased by 52% whereas the prescription of nonopioid agents increased. Beyond drug management, 60% of patients received other analgesic therapies, being the most common interventional pain procedures and psychosocial approaches. Conclusion. The MUHC interdisciplinary approach to cancer pain management provides meaningful relief of pain and other cancer-related symptoms and decreases patients' disability. PMID:27445602

  5. Improving pain assessment and managment in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, Julian; Moxham, Sian; Ramadurai, Gopinath; Williams, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Stroke patients can experience a variety of pain. Many stroke patients have co-morbidities such as osteoporosis, arthritis or diabetes causing diabetic neuropathy. As well as pain from other long term conditions, stroke patients can experience central post-stroke pain, headaches, and musculoskeletal issues such as hypertonia, contractures, spasticity, and subluxations. These stroke patients can also have communication difficulties in the form of expressive dysphasia and/or global aphasia. Communication difficulties can result in these patients not expressing their pain and therefore not having it assessed, leading to inadequate pain relief that could impact their rehabilitation and recovery. By implementing an observational measurement of pain such as the Abbey pain scale, patients with communication difficulties can have their pain assessed and recorded. Initially 30% of patients on the acute stroke ward did not have their pain assessed and adequately recorded and 15% of patients had inadequate pain relief. The patient was assessed if they were in pain and therefore not receiving adequate pain relief by measuring their pain on the Abbey pain scale. After introducing the Abbey pain scale and creating a nurse advocate, an improvement was shown such that only 5% of patients did not have their pain recorded and all had adequate pain relief.

  6. Improving pain assessment and managment in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Nesbitt, Julian; Moxham, Sian; ramadurai, gopinath; Williams, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Stroke patients can experience a variety of pain. Many stroke patients have co-morbidities such as osteoporosis, arthritis or diabetes causing diabetic neuropathy. As well as pain from other long term conditions, stroke patients can experience central post-stroke pain, headaches, and musculoskeletal issues such as hypertonia, contractures, spasticity, and subluxations. These stroke patients can also have communication difficulties in the form of expressive dysphasia and/or global aphasia. Communication difficulties can result in these patients not expressing their pain and therefore not having it assessed, leading to inadequate pain relief that could impact their rehabilitation and recovery. By implementing an observational measurement of pain such as the Abbey pain scale, patients with communication difficulties can have their pain assessed and recorded. Initially 30% of patients on the acute stroke ward did not have their pain assessed and adequately recorded and 15% of patients had inadequate pain relief. The patient was assessed if they were in pain and therefore not receiving adequate pain relief by measuring their pain on the Abbey pain scale. After introducing the Abbey pain scale and creating a nurse advocate, an improvement was shown such that only 5% of patients did not have their pain recorded and all had adequate pain relief. PMID:26732690

  7. Effects of LLLT for pain: a clinical study on different pain types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Giuseppe

    2002-10-01

    osteoarthritis of the cervical vertebrae, with sport-related injuries, with epicondylitis, tendinitis, periarthritis and neuritis. The total relief of pain was achieved in 82% of acute and 65% ofchronic cases. Conclusions: Treatment with 904 nm JR diode laser interrupts the "circulus vitiosus" ofthe origin of the different pains (neuropathic, metabolic, traumatic, toxic, immune-mediated, ischaemic) and its development. LLLT brings a normal physiological condition back to the tissue, thus myofascial pain relief, decreases tension and substantially reduces the symptoms as well as improves the quality of life of the patients. Our fourteen years of experience indicates that LLLT is a low cost, non-invasive method and easy to be applied.

  8. What sets topographic relief in extensional footwalls?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Densmore, Alexander L.; Dawers, Nancye H.; Gupta, Sanjeev; Guidon, Roman

    2005-06-01

    We use three large normal fault arrays in the northeastern Basin and Range Province, western United States, to document catchment development and relief production during fault growth. Fault slip and slip rates increase systematically along strike from zero at the fault tips. Catchment relief and across-strike range width both increase as slip accumulates but reach maximum values at a distance of ˜15 km from the fault tips and remain uniform along strike over much of the footwalls. Catchment outlet spacing also increases away from the fault tips but does not reach a uniform value and may vary by a factor of 5 6 along strike. We infer that catchments first elongate in the across-strike direction as slip accumulates and the range half-width increases. Once the half-width reaches its maximum value, continued catchment growth is possible only by along-strike capture, which increases outlet spacing but not relief. The close correspondence between catchment relief and range half-width suggests that geomorphically limited hillslope and channel gradients are achieved within the 15 km tip zone. Thus, the limiting factor in footwall development is the width of the range, which is controlled by two external agents: the geometry and spacing of the major faults, and the elevations of base level on both flanks.

  9. Design of ITER Relief Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, N.; Choukekar, K.; Jadon, M.; Sarkar, B.; Joshi, B.; Kanzaria, H.; Gehani, V.; Vyas, H.; Pandya, U.; Panjwani, R.; Badgujar, S.; Monneret, E.

    2017-02-01

    The ITER Cryogenic system is one of the most complex cryogenic systems in the world. It includes roughly 5 km of cryogenic transfer line (cryolines) having large number of layout singularities in terms of bends at odd angles and branches. The relief lines are particularly important cryolines as they collect the helium from outlet of all process safety valves of the cryogenic clients and transfers it back to cryoplant. The total length of ITER relief lines is around 1.6 km with process pipe size varying from DN 50 to DN 200. While some part of relief lines carries warm helium for the recovery system, most part of the relief line is vacuum jacketed cryoline which carries cold helium from the clients. The final detailed design of relief lines has been completed. The paper describes the major input data and constraints for design of relief lines, design steps, flexibility and structural analysis approach and major design outcome.

  10. Fluid relief and check valve

    DOEpatents

    Blaedel, K.L.; Lord, S.C.; Murray, I.

    1986-07-17

    A passive fluid pressure relief and check valve allows the relief pressure to be slaved to a reference pressure independently of the exhaust pressure. The pressure relief valve is embodied by a submerged vent line in a sealing fluid, the relief pressure being a function of the submerged depth. A check valve is embodied by a vertical column of fluid (the maximum back pressure being a function of the height of the column of fluid). The pressure is vented into an exhaust system which keeps the exhaust out of the area providing the reference pressure.

  11. Palmitoylethanolamide, a naturally occurring disease-modifying agent in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Skaper, Stephen D; Facci, Laura; Fusco, Mariella; Della Valle, Maria Federica; Zusso, Morena; Costa, Barbara; Giusti, Pietro

    2014-04-01

    Persistent pain affects nearly half of all people seeking medical care in the US alone, and accounts for at least $80 billion worth of lost productivity each year. Among all types of chronic pain, neuropathic pain stands out: this is pain resulting from damage or disease of the somatosensory nervous system, and remains largely untreatable. With few available treatment options, neuropathic pain represents an area of significant and growing unmet medical need. Current treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain involves several drug classes, including opioids, gabapentinoids, antidepressants, antiepileptic drugs, local anesthetics and capsaicin. Even so, less than half of patients achieve partial relief. This review discusses a novel approach to neuropathic pain management, based on knowledge of: the role of glia and mast cells in pain and neuroinflammation; the body's innate mechanisms to maintain cellular homeostasis when faced with external stressors provoking, for example, inflammation. The discovery that palmitoylethanolamide, a member of the N-acylethanolamine family which is produced from the lipid bilayer on-demand, is capable of exerting anti-allodynic and anti-hyperalgesic effects by down-modulating both microglial and mast cell activity has led to the application of this fatty acid amide in several clinical studies of neuropathic pain, with beneficial outcome and no indication of adverse effects at pharmacological doses. Collectively, the findings presented here propose that palmitoylethanolamide merits further consideration as a disease-modifying agent for controlling inflammatory responses and related chronic and neuropathic pain.

  12. PART 2 of 3: PAIN MANAGEMENT. Transmission of pain signals to the brain.

    PubMed

    Swift, Amelia

    Pain is the body's way of telling us something is wrong, and has a sensory and emotional component. This three-part series focuses on acute pain, describing the physiology of a normal and well-behaved pain pathway and how this relates to commonly used pain management strategies. The first article introduced the pain system and how the body detects a threatening (noxious) stimulus. This article describes how that "pain message" is transmitted to the spinal cord and the brain and how the brain responds to the stimulus, while identifying pain relief strategies linked to the physiological process. Part 3, to be published next week, discusses pain assessment.

  13. Pain management in the nursing home.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Linda G; Ramadurai, Murali

    2009-06-01

    This article is about pain management and some of the best practices to address the problem of pain in nursing home patients who have a serious illness and multiple comorbid conditions. Management of the emotional distress that accompanies chronic or acute pain is of foremost concern. In this article, the topics discussed include general pain management in a nursing home for a long-term care resident who has chronic pain, the relief of symptoms and suffering in a patient who is on palliative care and hospice, and the pain management of a postoperative patient with acute pain for a short transitional period (post-acute illness or surgery).

  14. Method for residual stress relief and retained austenite destabilization

    DOEpatents

    Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2004-08-10

    A method using of a magnetic field to affect residual stress relief or phase transformations in a metallic material is disclosed. In a first aspect of the method, residual stress relief of a material is achieved at ambient temperatures by placing the material in a magnetic field. In a second aspect of the method, retained austenite stabilization is reversed in a ferrous alloy by applying a magnetic field to the alloy at ambient temperatures.

  15. The Role of Invasive Pain Management Modalities in the Treatment of Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Smith, Heather; Youn, Youngwon; Guay, Ryan C; Laufer, Andras; Pilitsis, Julie G

    2016-01-01

    Invasive analgesic therapies provide an alternative to medical management of chronic pain. With the increasing incidence of chronic pain not only in the United States but worldwide, more therapies have evolved to address the growing need for pain relief options. These therapies include spinal injections, nerve blocks, radiofrequency ablation, neurostimulation, and intrathecal drug delivery.

  16. Pain relief and improved physical function in knee osteoarthritis patients receiving ongoing hylan G-F 20, a high-molecular-weight hyaluronan, versus other treatment options: data from a large real-world longitudinal cohort in Canada.

    PubMed

    Petrella, Robert J; Wakeford, Craig

    2015-01-01

    From the Southwestern Ontario database, one of the largest primary-care datasets in Canada, 1,263 patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of one or both knees were identified who received two consecutive series of intra-articular (IA) injections of hylan G-F 20 preparation and no other prescribed OA medications, and were evaluated fully between 2006 and 2012. A cohort of 3,318 demographically matched OA patients who had not been treated with IA injection therapy was identified from the same database for comparison. Responses to therapy were assessed by means of a 10-point visual analog scale (VAS) for pain at rest and after completion of a 6-minute walk test (6 MWT), while physical capacity was measured by performance in the 6 MWT itself. After two cycles of hylan G-F 20 therapy, the average VAS score for pain at rest declined from 7.82 ± 1.27 at baseline to 4.16 ± 1.51 (average change 3.66 ± 1.78, significantly more than the reduction of 3.12 ± 2.03 seen in the reference group [P < 0.012]) and the average VAS score for pain after the 6 MWT decreased by 5.56 ± 1.74 points (from 9.58 ± 0.4 at baseline to 4.02 ± 1.67 at the final assessment), a significantly larger change than that seen in the reference group (Δ2.99 ± 1.85; P<0.001 for intergroup comparison). Distance walked in the 6 MWT increased on average by 115 m, significantly more than that seen in the reference group (Δ91 m; P < 0.001 for intergroup comparison). These findings from a primary-care database suggest sustained benefits in terms of pain and physical function from repeat cycles of IA injections of hylan G-F 20 and no other prescribed OA medications in adults with OA of the knee.

  17. Pain relief and improved physical function in knee osteoarthritis patients receiving ongoing hylan G-F 20, a high-molecular-weight hyaluronan, versus other treatment options: data from a large real-world longitudinal cohort in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Petrella, Robert J; Wakeford, Craig

    2015-01-01

    From the Southwestern Ontario database, one of the largest primary-care datasets in Canada, 1,263 patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of one or both knees were identified who received two consecutive series of intra-articular (IA) injections of hylan G-F 20 preparation and no other prescribed OA medications, and were evaluated fully between 2006 and 2012. A cohort of 3,318 demographically matched OA patients who had not been treated with IA injection therapy was identified from the same database for comparison. Responses to therapy were assessed by means of a 10-point visual analog scale (VAS) for pain at rest and after completion of a 6-minute walk test (6MWT), while physical capacity was measured by performance in the 6MWT itself. After two cycles of hylan G-F 20 therapy, the average VAS score for pain at rest declined from 7.82±1.27 at baseline to 4.16±1.51 (average change 3.66±1.78, significantly more than the reduction of 3.12±2.03 seen in the reference group [P<0.012]) and the average VAS score for pain after the 6MWT decreased by 5.56±1.74 points (from 9.58±0.4 at baseline to 4.02±1.67 at the final assessment), a significantly larger change than that seen in the reference group (Δ2.99±1.85; P<0.001 for intergroup comparison). Distance walked in the 6MWT increased on average by 115 m, significantly more than that seen in the reference group (Δ91 m; P<0.001 for intergroup comparison). These findings from a primary-care database suggest sustained benefits in terms of pain and physical function from repeat cycles of IA injections of hylan G-F 20 and no other prescribed OA medications in adults with OA of the knee. PMID:26508838

  18. [Pain management for cancer patients with critical pathway on computer].

    PubMed

    Hori, Natsuki; Konishi, Toshiro

    2005-02-01

    For relief from cancer pain, we developed critical pathway (CP) as an effective strategy for the medical staff treating cancer patients. This CP was made out of Microsoft Excel, and was used on personal computers. "Good sleeping" was set as the first goal and the second was "No pain in rest position." To achieve this, physicians and nurses evaluate medical efficacy and complications including nausea/vomiting, constipation, somnolence and hallucination everyday using controlled release oxycodone in addition to NSAIDs and prochlorperazine, stool softener and peristaltic stimulant for adverse effects. These outcomes lead to the medication change the next day by calculation using visual basic function due to opioid titration theory. In twelve patients this CP was acceptable, and all of them achieved the second goal within a week without severe adverse effects except constipation.

  19. 22 countries: tax relief for vaccines, ORS, and contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Krasovec, K; Connor, C

    1999-01-01

    This article presents the implementation of tax relief of the three key public health commodities--vaccines, oral rehydration salts (ORS), and contraceptives--in 22 countries. Tax relief was provided in the form of exemptions, waivers, reductions or some combination thereof, with the goal of improving the health status of the population. Tax relief is known to aid in the achievement of policy objectives, which include reduction of buyer's administrative cost, and budget needs, reduction of consumer prices and increase of product supply. Through a global e-mail survey in 1997, information on vaccine, ORS, and contraceptive tax exemptions was gathered. Results revealed that 68% of the countries granted tax relief. It was observed that 87% of the public sector benefits from tax relief for at least one commodity, 67% of the private nonprofit sector, and 53% of the private for-profit sector. On the other hand, the use of waiver procedures for tax relief greatly differs across countries. It was noted that tax exemptions rather than waiver procedures result in the greatest benefits. This article suggests further expansion of private nonprofit and for-profit sectors with appropriate guarantees of consumer savings, as well as implementation of tax relief.

  20. Nonsurgical Management of Osteoarthritis Knee Pain in the Older Adult.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nora

    2017-02-01

    Symptomatic knee osteoarthritis is a common complaint of many elderly patients in primary care offices. For those unable or unwilling to undergo knee replacement, the primary practitioners' understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the available treatment modalities for pain relief is critical to successful in-office counseling and expectation management. Treatment requires a multimodal approach of nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic therapies to achieve a maximal clinical benefit. The focus of this review is on the nonsurgical options for treatment of knee osteoarthritis in patients aged 65 and older.

  1. Time to onset of neuropathic pain reduction: A retrospective analysis of data from nine controlled trials of pregabalin for painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy and postherpetic neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Uma; Griesing, Teresa; Emir, Birol; Young, James P

    2010-01-01

    These retrospective analyses of daily mean pain scores from nine placebo-controlled trials of pregabalin at 150, 300, or 600 mg/day (pregabalin, n = 1205; placebo, n = 772) examined time to significant reduction of pain during the first 2 weeks of treatment of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy and postherpetic neuralgia. Time to onset of reduction in pain-defined as the first day for which patients treated with pregabalin had significant reductions (P < 0.05) in mean pain score compared with the placebo group for that day and the subsequent day-was calculated for all treatment groups demonstrating statistically significant reduction in pain at trial end point. The time to a 1-point or greater improvement in mean pain score was measured for each patient who was a responder at end point (30% or greater improvement in mean pain score). In seven of the nine trials (representing 11 of 14 pregabalin arms), significant reduction in pain was achieved at end point. The time to onset for reduction in pain was treatment Day 1 or 2 in nine of these successful treatment arms. Individual responder analysis confirmed that responders in the pregabalin groups reported a 1-point or greater pain reduction earlier than responders in placebo groups (P < 0.0001). However, this analysis is not a direct estimate of the likelihood that an individual patient would experience noticeable pain relief by the end of the second day. Overall, for patients who will respond to pregabalin, statistically significant and sustained reduction of pain associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy and posttherapeutic neuralgia occurs early, usually by the end of 2 days of pregabalin treatment.

  2. Current advances in orthodontic pain

    PubMed Central

    Long, Hu; Wang, Yan; Jian, Fan; Liao, Li-Na; Yang, Xin; Lai, Wen-Li

    2016-01-01

    Orthodontic pain is an inflammatory pain that is initiated by orthodontic force-induced vascular occlusion followed by a cascade of inflammatory responses, including vascular changes, the recruitment of inflammatory and immune cells, and the release of neurogenic and pro-inflammatory mediators. Ultimately, endogenous analgesic mechanisms check the inflammatory response and the sensation of pain subsides. The orthodontic pain signal, once received by periodontal sensory endings, reaches the sensory cortex for pain perception through three-order neurons: the trigeminal neuron at the trigeminal ganglia, the trigeminal nucleus caudalis at the medulla oblongata and the ventroposterior nucleus at the thalamus. Many brain areas participate in the emotion, cognition and memory of orthodontic pain, including the insular cortex, amygdala, hippocampus, locus coeruleus and hypothalamus. A built-in analgesic neural pathway—periaqueductal grey and dorsal raphe—has an important role in alleviating orthodontic pain. Currently, several treatment modalities have been applied for the relief of orthodontic pain, including pharmacological, mechanical and behavioural approaches and low-level laser therapy. The effectiveness of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for pain relief has been validated, but its effects on tooth movement are controversial. However, more studies are needed to verify the effectiveness of other modalities. Furthermore, gene therapy is a novel, viable and promising modality for alleviating orthodontic pain in the future. PMID:27341389

  3. Topical NSAIDs for acute pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Thomas; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Use of topical NSAIDs to treat acute musculoskeletal conditions is widely accepted in some parts of the world, but not in others. Their main attraction is their potential to provide pain relief without associated systemic adverse events. Objectives To review the evidence from randomised, double-blind, controlled trials on the efficacy and safety of topically applied NSAIDs in acute pain. Search methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, and our own in-house database to December 2009. We sought unpublished studies by asking personal contacts and searching on-line clinical trial registers and manufacturers web sites. Selection criteria We included randomised, double-blind, active or placebo (inert carrier)-controlled trials in which treatments were administered to adult patients with acute pain resulting from strains, sprains or sports or overuse-type injuries (twisted ankle, for instance). There had to be at least 10 participants in each treatment arm, with application of treatment at least once daily. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and validity, and extracted data. Numbers of participants achieving each outcome were used to calculate relative risk and numbers needed to treat (NNT) or harm (NNH) compared to placebo or other active treatment. Main results Forty-seven studies were included; most compared topical NSAIDs in the form of a gel, spray, or cream with a similar placebo, with 3455 participants in the overall analysis of efficacy. For all topical NSAIDs combined, compared with placebo, the number needed to treat to benefit (NNT) for clinical success, equivalent to 50% pain relief, was 4.5 (3.9 to 5.3) for treatment periods of 6 to 14 days. Topical diclofenac, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, and piroxicam were of similar efficacy, but indomethacin and benzydamine were not significantly better than placebo. Local skin reactions were generally mild and transient, and did not differ from

  4. Pain management in ferrets.

    PubMed

    van Oostrom, Hugo; Schoemaker, Nico J; Uilenreef, Joost J

    2011-01-01

    The growing popularity of ferrets as pets has created the demand for advanced veterinary care for these patients. Pain is associated with a broad range of conditions, including acute or chronic inflammatory disease, neoplasia, and trauma, as well as iatrogenic causes, such as surgery and diagnostic procedures. Effective pain management requires knowledge and skills to assess pain, good understanding of the pathophysiology of pain, and general knowledge of pharmacologic and pharmacodynamic principles. Unfortunately, scientific studies on efficacy, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of analgesic drugs in the ferret are limited. However, basic rules on the treatment of pain and mechanisms of action, safety, and efficacy of analgesic drugs in other species can be adapted and applied to pain management in ferrets. This article aims to make an inventory of what is known on the recognition of pain in ferrets, what analgesic drugs are currently used in ferrets, and how they can be adopted in a patient-orientated pain management plan to provide effective pain relief while reducing and monitoring for unwanted side effects.

  5. Correlation of preoperative MRI with the long-term outcomes of dorsal root entry zone lesioning for brachial plexus avulsion pain.

    PubMed

    Ko, Andrew L; Ozpinar, Alp; Raskin, Jeffrey S; Magill, Stephen T; Raslan, Ahmed M; Burchiel, Kim J

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT Lesioning of the dorsal root entry zone (DREZotomy) is an effective treatment for brachial plexus avulsion (BPA) pain. The role of preoperative assessment with MRI has been shown to be unreliable for determining affected levels; however, it may have a role in predicting pain outcomes. Here, DREZotomy outcomes are reviewed and preoperative MRI is examined as a possible prognostic factor. METHODS A retrospective review was performed of an institutional database of patients who had undergone brachial plexus DREZ procedures since 1995. Preoperative MRI was examined to assess damage to the DREZ or dorsal horn, as evidenced by avulsion of the DREZ or T2 hyperintensity within the spinal cord. Phone interviews were conducted to assess the long-term pain outcomes. RESULTS Between 1995 and 2012, 27 patients were found to have undergone cervical DREZ procedures for BPA. Of these, 15 had preoperative MR images of the cervical spine available for review. The outcomes were graded from 1 to 4 as poor (no significant relief), good (more than 50% pain relief), excellent (more than 75% pain relief), or pain free, respectively. Overall, DREZotomy was found to be a safe, efficacious, and durable procedure for relief of pain due to BPA. The initial success rate was 73%, which declined to 66% at a median follow-up time of 62.5 months. Damage to the DREZ or dorsal horn was significantly correlated with poorer outcomes (p = 0.02). The average outcomes in patients without MRI evidence of DREZ or dorsal horn damage was significantly higher than in patients with such damage (3.67 vs 1.75, t-test; p = 0.001). A longer duration of pain prior to operation was also a significant predictor of treatment success (p = 0.004). CONCLUSIONS Overall, the DREZotomy procedure has a 66% chance of achieving meaningful pain relief on long-term follow-up. Successful pain relief is associated with the lack of damage to the DREZ and dorsal horn on preoperative MRI.

  6. Randomised crossover trial of transdermal fentanyl and sustained release oral morphine for treating chronic non-cancer pain

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Laurie; Hays, Helen; Jensen, Niels-Henrik; de Waroux, Bernard Le Polain; Bolt, Michiel; Donald, Royden; Kalso, Eija

    2001-01-01

    reason for preference was better pain relief, achieved with less constipation and an enhanced quality of life. What is already known on this topicThe clinical use of potent opioids in the treatment of chronic non-cancer pain is supported by retrospective, survey data and small randomised controlled trials showing efficacy and safetyStudies with transdermal fentanyl have shown efficacy and preference over sustained release oral morphine in the treatment of cancer painWhat this study addsThis is the first study to provide comparative data supporting treatment options with potent opioids for chronic non-cancer painBoth transdermal fentanyl and sustained release oral morphine provided effective and well tolerated pain reliefDuring fentanyl treatment patients experienced superior pain relief, higher quality of life, and less constipation; fentanyl was preferred to morphine by 65% of patients PMID:11348910

  7. Temporal preference in individuals reporting chronic pain: discounting of delayed pain-related and monetary outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, D Andrew; Johnson, Patrick S; Smith, Michael T; Strain, Eric C; Edwards, Robert R; Johnson, Matthew W

    2016-08-01

    Opioid therapy for pain is associated with an increased risk for substance use disorders. This study's purpose was to determine the association between opioid misuse propensity (Screener and Opioid Assessment for Patients in Pain-Revised) and delay discounting (DD), a behavioral process linked to substance use disorders, which quantifies the extent to which outcomes are devalued because of their delay. Participants reporting chronic pain (N = 249) answered pain and opioid use questions and then completed 4 DD tasks. Each of these tasks assessed either money or pain consequences, framed as either rewards or punishments. Each task involved hypothetical choices between immediate smaller vs delayed larger consequences. The extant Monetary Choice Questionnaire assessed DD of money rewards, and a modified version assessed discounting of money losses (immediate smaller loss vs larger delayed loss). Based on the Monetary Choice Questionnaire, the novel Pain Relief Choice Questionnaire assessed choices between an immediate short duration of pain relief vs a longer duration of pain relief. Similarly, the novel Additional Pain Choice Questionnaire assessed choices between an immediate short duration of additional pain vs a longer duration of additional pain. Discounting of both additional pain and money losses were significantly associated with high Screener and Opioid Assessment for Patients in Pain-Revised scores-indicating participants at greatest risk for opioid misuse discount future punishments rather than future rewards compared with those at low risk. Measures of DD may have promise in more accurately identifying individuals at highest risk for opioid misuse during chronic opioid therapy.

  8. [Greater trochanteric pain syndrome].

    PubMed

    Gollwitzer, H; Opitz, G; Gerdesmeyer, L; Hauschild, M

    2014-01-01

    Greater trochanteric pain is one of the common complaints in orthopedics. Frequent diagnoses include myofascial pain, trochanteric bursitis, tendinosis and rupture of the gluteus medius and minimus tendon, and external snapping hip. Furthermore, nerve entrapment like the piriformis syndrome must be considered in the differential diagnosis. This article summarizes essential diagnostic and therapeutic steps in greater trochanteric pain syndrome. Careful clinical evaluation, complemented with specific imaging studies and diagnostic infiltrations allows determination of the underlying pathology in most cases. Thereafter, specific nonsurgical treatment is indicated, with success rates of more than 90 %. Resistant cases and tendon ruptures may require surgical intervention, which can provide significant pain relief and functional improvement in most cases.

  9. Are patients’ and doctors’ accounts of the first specialist consultation for chronic back pain in agreement?

    PubMed Central

    White, Kathy B; Lee, John; de C Williams, Amanda C

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The first consultation at a specialist pain clinic is potentially a pivotal event in a patient’s pain history, affecting treatment adherence and engagement with longer term self-management. What doctors communicate to patients about their chronic pain and how patients interpret doctors’ messages and explanations in pain consultations are under-investigated, particularly in specialist care. Yet, patients value personalized information about their pain problem. Patients and methods Sixteen patients in their first specialist pain clinic consultation and the doctors they consulted were interviewed shortly after the consultation. Framework analysis, using patient themes, was used to identify full match, partial match, or mismatch of patient–doctor dyads’ understandings of the consultation messages. Results Patients and doctors agreed, mainly implicitly, that medical treatment aiming at pain relief was primary and little time was devoted to discussion of self-management. Clinically relevant areas of mismatch included the explanation of pain, the likelihood of medical treatments providing relief, the long-term treatment plan, and the extent to which patients were expected to be active in achieving treatment goals. Discussion Overall, there appears to be reasonable concordance between doctors and patients, and patients were generally satisfied with their first consultation with a specialist. Two topics showed substantial mismatch, the estimated likely outcome of the next planned intervention and, assuming (as doctors but not patients did) that this was unsuccessful, the long-term treatment plan. It appeared that more complex issues often generate divergence of understanding or agreement. Despite the widespread recommendations to medical practitioners to check patients’ understanding directly, it does not appear to be routine practice. Conclusion It is hoped that this research encourages more detailed examination of shared and divergent experiences of

  10. Groin pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - groin; Lower abdominal pain; Genital pain; Perineal pain ... Common causes of groin pain include: Pulled muscle, tendon, or ligaments in the leg: This problem often occurs in people who play sports such as ...

  11. [The pain from burns].

    PubMed

    Latarjet, J

    2002-03-01

    The painful events associated with the treatment of a severe burn can, because of their long-lasting and repetitive characteristics, be one of the most excruciating experiences in clinical practice. Moreover, burn pain has been shown to be detrimental to burn patients. Although nociception and peripheral hyperalgesia are considered the major causes of burn pain, the study of more hypothetical mechanisms like central hyperalgesia and neuropathic pain may lead to a better understanding of burn pain symptoms and to new therapeutic approaches. Continuous pain and intermittent pain due to therapeutic procedures are two distinct components of burn pain. They have to be evaluated and managed separately. Although continuous pain is by far less severe than intermittent pain, the treatment is, in both cases, essentially pharmacological relying basically on opioids. Because of wide intra- and inter-individual variations, protocols will have to leave large possibilities of adaptation for each case, systematic pain evaluation being mandatory to achieve the best risk/benefit ratio. Surprisingly, the dose of medication decreases only slowly with time, a burn often remaining painful for long periods after healing. Non pharmacological treatments are often useful and sometimes indispensable adjuncts; but their rationale and their feasibility depends entirely on previous optimal pharmacological control of burn pain. Several recent studies show that burn pain management is inadequate in most burn centres.

  12. Effectiveness of Reirradiation for Painful Bone Metastases: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Huisman, Merel; Bosch, Maurice A.A.J. van den; Wijlemans, Joost W.; Vulpen, Marco van; Linden, Yvette M. van der; Verkooijen, Helena M.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Reirradiation of painful bone metastases in nonresponders or patients with recurrent pain after initial response is performed in up to 42% of patients initially treated with radiotherapy. Literature on the effect of reirradiation for pain control in those patients is scarce. In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we quantify the effectiveness of reirradiation for achieving pain control in patients with painful bone metastases. Methods and Materials: A free text search was performed to identify eligible studies using the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Collaboration library electronic databases. After study selection and quality assessment, a pooled estimate was calculated for overall pain response for reirradiation of metastatic bone pain. Results: Our literature search identified 707 titles, of which 10 articles were selected for systematic review and seven entered the meta-analysis. Overall study quality was mediocre. Of the 2,694 patients initially treated for metastatic bone pain, 527 (20%) patients underwent reirradiation. Overall, a pain response after reirradiation was achieved in 58% of patients (pooled overall response rate 0.58, 95% confidence interval = 0.49-0.67). There was a substantial between-study heterogeneity (I{sup 2} = 63.3%, p = 0.01) because of clinical and methodological differences between studies. Conclusions: Reirradiation of painful bone metastases is effective in terms of pain relief for a small majority of patients; approximately 40% of patients do not benefit from reirradiation. Although the validity of results is limited, this meta-analysis provides a comprehensive overview and the most quantitative estimate of reirradiation effectiveness to date.

  13. Dealing with Pain during Childbirth

    MedlinePlus

    ... into a muscle, they can affect the whole body. These medicines can cause side effects in the mother, including drowsiness and nausea. They also can have effects on the baby. Regional anesthesia. This is what ... from specific regions of the body, these methods can be used for pain relief ...

  14. Coping with Low Back Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kindig, L. E.; Mrvos, S. R.

    Guidelines are offered for the prevention and relief of lower back pain. The structure of the spine is described, and the functions and composition of spinal disks are explained. A list is included of common causes of abnormalities of the spinal column, and injuries which may cause the fracture of the vertebrae are described. Factors causing low…

  15. Brain mechanisms supporting violated expectations of pain.

    PubMed

    Zeidan, Fadel; Lobanov, Oleg V; Kraft, Robert A; Coghill, Robert C

    2015-09-01

    The subjective experience of pain is influenced by interactions between experiences, future predictions, and incoming afferent information. Expectations of high pain can exacerbate pain, whereas expectations of low pain during a consistently noxious stimulus can produce significant reductions in pain. However, the brain mechanisms associated with processing mismatches between expected and experienced pain are poorly understood, but are important for imparting salience to a sensory event to override erroneous top-down expectancy-mediated information. This investigation examined pain-related brain activation when expectations of pain were abruptly violated. After conditioning participants to cues predicting low or high pain, 10 incorrectly cued stimuli were administered across 56 stimulus trials to determine whether expectations would be less influential on pain when there is a high discordance between prestimulus cues and corresponding thermal stimulation. Incorrectly cued stimuli produced pain ratings and pain-related brain activation consistent with placebo analgesia, nocebo hyperalgesia, and violated expectations. Violated expectations of pain were associated with activation in distinct regions of the inferior parietal lobe, including the supramarginal and angular gyrus, and intraparietal sulcus, the superior parietal lobe, cerebellum, and occipital lobe. Thus, violated expectations of pain engage mechanisms supporting salience-driven sensory discrimination, working memory, and associative learning processes. By overriding the influence of expectations on pain, these brain mechanisms are likely engaged in clinical situations in which patients' unrealistic expectations of pain relief diminish the efficacy of pain treatments. Accordingly, these findings underscore the importance of maintaining realistic expectations to augment the effectiveness of pain management.

  16. Evaluation of Pain Preoperatively and Postoperatively in Patients with Chronic Pancreatitis Undergoing Longitudinal Pancreaticojejunostomy.

    PubMed

    Bhat, K R Seetharam; Khajanchi, Monty; Prajapati, Ram; Satoskar, R R

    2015-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a fairly common condition with pain being the major symptom, and longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy (LPJ) is performed for symptomatic relief. The aim of the study is to assess relief of pain post-LPJ for chronic pancreatitis and to evaluate the factors influencing relief of symptoms. A prospective observational non-interventional study enrolling 28 patients. This study involved a questionnaire studying various risk factors and pain related to chronic pancreatitis, pancreaticojejunostomy, and postoperative assessment of pain relief at 1 and 6 months from surgery. Pain was assessed using Visual analogue scale (VAS). In chronic pancreatitis, there is a significant relief in symptoms of pain post-LPJ; the degree of relief was less in the alcoholics vs non-alcoholics (p = 0.09) and smokers. There was also reduction in analgesic requirement and frequency of acute attacks of pain. Fifty-seven percent of patients had a complete remission of their pain after LPJ for CP. In chronic pancreatitis, there is a significant relief in symptoms of pain post-LPJ, although the degree of relief is less in the alcoholics and smokers.

  17. Home Delivery of Pain Therapy to Elderly Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietrich, Coralie

    Chronic pain occurs most frequently in the elderly. Unfortunately, most pain clinics are located in large urban areas and are not readily accessible to the rural elderly. Recent advances in behavioral medicine have provided pain relief techniques that can be used by a wide variety of professional and paraprofessional workers who do not have…

  18. Single dose oral paracetamol (acetaminophen) for postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Toms, Laurence; McQuay, Henry J; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 1, 2004 - this original review had been split from a previous title on ‘Single dose paracetamol (acetaminophen) with and without codeine for postoperative pain’. The last version of this review concluded that paracetamol is an effective analgesic for postoperative pain, but additional trials have since been published. This review sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety of paracetamol using current data, and to compare the findings with other analgesics evaluated in the same way. Objectives To assess the efficacy of single dose oral paracetamol for the treatment of acute postoperative pain. Search methods We searched The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Oxford Pain Relief Database and reference lists of articles to update an existing version of the review in July 2008. Selection criteria Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials of paracetamol for acute postoperative pain in adults. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Area under the “pain relief versus time” curve was used to derive the proportion of participants with paracetamol or placebo experiencing at least 50% pain relief over four to six hours, using validated equations. Number-needed-to-treat-to-benefit (NNT) was calculated, with 95% confidence intervals (CI). The proportion of participants using rescue analgesia over a specified time period, and time to use, were sought as measures of duration of analgesia. Information on adverse events and withdrawals was also collected. Main results Fifty-one studies, with 5762 participants, were included: 3277 participants were treated with a single oral dose of paracetamol and 2425 with placebo. About half of participants treated with paracetamol at standard doses achieved at least 50% pain relief over four to six hours, compared with about 20% treated with placebo. NNTs for at

  19. Acupuncture for chronic low back pain in long-term follow-up: a meta-analysis of 13 randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mai; Yan, Shi; Yin, Xu; Li, Xiuyang; Gao, Shuguang; Han, Rui; Wei, Licheng; Luo, Wei; Lei, Guanghua

    2013-01-01

    Chronic low back pain is one of the most common reasons that people seek medical treatment, and the consequent disability creates a great financial burden on individuals and society. The etiology of chronic low back pain is not clear, which means it is often refractory to treatment. Acupuncture has been reported to be effective in providing symptomatic relief of chronic low back pain. However, it is not known whether the effects of acupuncture are due to the needling itself or nonspecific effects arising from the manipulation. To determine the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy, a meta-analysis was performed to compare acupuncture with sham acupuncture and other treatments. Overall, 2678 patients were identified from thirteen randomized controlled trials. The meta-analysis was performed by a random model (Cohen's test), using the I-square test for heterogeneity and Begg's test to assess for publication bias. Clinical outcomes were evaluated by pain intensity, disability, spinal flexion, and quality of life. Compared with no treatment, acupuncture achieved better outcomes in terms of pain relief, disability recovery and better quality of life, but these effects were not observed when compared to sham acupuncture. Acupuncture achieved better outcomes when compared with other treatments. No publication bias was detected. Acupuncture is an effective treatment for chronic low back pain, but this effect is likely to be produced by the nonspecific effects of manipulation.

  20. Are chronic low back pain outcomes improved with co-management of concurrent depression?

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Peter; Pollard, Henry

    2005-01-01

    Objective To discuss the role of depression in chronic lower back pain and comment on appropriate methods of screening and co-management. Data Sources The current scientific literature was investigated using the online web databases CINAHL, Medline/PUBMED, Proquest, Meditext and from manual library searches. Data Extraction Databases were searched from 1980 to the present (2005). Articles were searched with the key words "depression" and "low back pain". Over three hundred articles were sourced and articles were then selected on their relevance to the chronic spinal pain states that present to manual therapy practitioners. Data synthesis Pain is a subjective awareness of peripheral nociceptive stimulation, projected from the thalamus to the cerebral cortex with each individual's pain experience being mediated by his or her psychological state. Thus a psychological component will often be associated with any painful experience. A number of studies suggest (among other things) that the incidence of depression predicts chronicity in lower back pain syndromes but that chronic lower back pain does not have the reciprocal action to predict depression. Conclusion The aetiology of chronic pain is multifactorial. There is sufficient evidence in the literature to demonstrate a requirement to draw treatment options from many sources in order to achieve a favourable pain relief outcome. The treatment should be multimodal, including mental and emotional support, counseling and herbal advice. While a strong correlation between depression and chronic low back pain can be demonstrated, an apparent paucity of literature that specifically addresses the patient response to chiropractic treatment and concurrent psychotherapy identifies the need for prospective studies of this nature to be undertaken. It is likely that multimodal/multidisciplinary treatment approaches should be encouraged to deal with these chronic lower back pain syndromes. PMID:15972104

  1. Cerebral interactions of pain and reward and their relevance for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Becker, Susanne; Gandhi, Wiebke; Schweinhardt, Petra

    2012-06-29

    Pain and reward are opponent, interacting processes. Such interactions are enabled by neuroanatomical and neurochemical overlaps of brain systems that process pain and reward. Cerebral processing of hedonic ('liking') and motivational ('wanting') aspects of reward can be separated: the orbitofrontal cortex and opioids play an important role for the hedonic experience, and the ventral striatum and dopamine predominantly process motivation for reward. Supported by neuroimaging studies, we present here the hypothesis that the orbitofrontal cortex and opioids are responsible for pain modulation by hedonic experience, while the ventral striatum and dopamine mediate motivational effects on pain. A rewarding stimulus that appears to be particularly important in the context of pain is pain relief. Further, reward, including pain relief, leads to operant learning, which can affect pain sensitivity. Indirect evidence points at brain mechanisms that might underlie pain relief as a reward and related operant learning but studies are scarce. Investigating the cerebral systems underlying pain-reward interactions as well as related operant learning holds the potential of better understanding mechanisms that contribute to the development and maintenance of chronic pain, as detailed in the last section of this review.

  2. [Assessment of pain in a patient with pressure ulcer].

    PubMed

    Píriz-Campos, Rosa María; Martín-Espinosa, Noelia María; Cobo-Cuenca, Ana Isabel

    2010-01-01

    This is a summary of a presentation made in the symposium "Improved Continuous Quality Care in Patients with Pressure Ulcers and Chronic Injuries", which was held in Toledo in 2009. A 76 year old woman had been assessed (she belonged to the age group that frequently suffers this condition). She lived in a social healthcare centre and had a III stage sacral pressure ulcer. Using Gordon's Functional Health Patterns for assessing "Acute pain", a nursing diagnosis is described and the nursing care plan has been presented according to NANDA, NIC, NOC taxonomy. The aim of this article is to show the importance of considering the pain in patients who suffer from this type of lesion, which, although almost always present, it is often undervalued by nursing staff, resulting in an even worse quality of life for the patient, due to both physical and psychological effects. This case shows how to assess pain in a patient with ulcers, and helps establish an individualised care plan with a priority on pain treatment and relief. As as result of the interventions carried out, a better perception of pain is achieved, thus helping to improve patient's mobility and night rest.

  3. Pain Control in the Presence of Drug Addiction.

    PubMed

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Lumermann, Leandro; Zhu, Richard; Kodumudi, Gopal; Elhassan, Amir O; Kaye, Alan David

    2016-05-01

    Drug addiction is present in a significant proportion of the population in the USA and worldwide. Drug addiction can occur with the abuse of many types of substances including cocaine, marijuana, stimulants, alcohol, opioids, and tranquilizers. There is a high likelihood that clinicians will encounter patients with substance abuse disorders on a regular basis with the prevalence of the use of illicit substances and the high rate of abuse of prescription drugs. The use of abuse deterrent formulations of prescription opioid agents, pill counts, and urine drug abuse screenings are all useful strategies. Optimum pain management of patients with addiction in the outpatient and inpatient setting is essential to minimize pain states. Careful selection of medications and appropriate oversight, including drug agreements, can reduce drug-induced impairments, including sleep deficits and diminished physical, social, and sexual functioning. This review, therefore, discusses the prevalence of illicit and prescription drug addiction, the challenges of achieving optimum pain control, and the therapeutic approaches to be considered in this challenging population. More research is warranted to develop improved therapies and routes of treatments for optimum pain relief and to prevent the development of central sensitization, chronic pain, and impaired physical and social functioning in patients with drug addiction.

  4. Cancer pain management-current status

    PubMed Central

    Thapa, Deepak; Rastogi, V; Ahuja, Vanita

    2011-01-01

    Cancer pain is still one of the most feared entities in cancer and about 75% of these patients require treatment with opioids for severe pain.The cancer pain relief is difficult to manage in patients with episodic or incidental pain, neuropathic pain, substance abuse and with impaired cognitive or communication skills. This non-systematic review article aims to discuss reasons for under treatment, tools of pain assessment, cancer pain and anxiety and possibly carve new approaches for cancer pain management in future. The current status of World Health Organization analgesic ladder has also been reviewed. A thorough literature search was carried out from 1998 to 2010 for current status in cancer pain management in MEDLINE, WHO guidelines and published literature and relevant articles have been included. PMID:21772673

  5. Ketoprofen Dental Pain Study.

    PubMed

    Levin, L M; Cooper, S A; Betts, N J; Wedell, D; Hermann, D G; Lamp, C; Secreto, S A; Hersh, E V

    1997-01-01

    Ketoprofen is a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, recently approved as an over-the-counter (OTC) analgesic at a 12.5 mg dosage strength. This is the first published study which explores the analgesic efficacy and safety of ketoprofen 12.5 mg in patients experiencing pain following the removal of impacted third molars. This study was single-dose, double-blind and randomized utilizing a 6-hour in-patient evaluation period. Patients ingested a single dose of ketoprofen 12.5 mg (n = 30), ketoprofen 37.5 mg (n = 32) or placebo (n = 15) when their post-surgical pain reached at least a moderate intensity on a 5-point categorical (CAT) scale and greater than 50 mm on a 100 mm visual analog scale (VAS). Measures of pain intensity and relief were gathered every 20 minutes for the first 2 hours, and then hourly from hours 3 through 6. Adverse drug reactions were also recorded as they occurred. Both dosages of ketoprofen were significantly more efficacious than placebo (two way ANOVAs, p < 0.05). For pain intensity difference (PID) and pain relief, the 12.5 mg dose exhibited statistical superiority from hours 1 through 3, while the 37.5 mg dose exhibited statistical superiority from 40 minutes through 4 hours. Ketoprofen 37.5 mg was significantly more efficacious than the 12.5 mg dose only at 40 minutes for PID(VAS) and relief, and at 60 minutes for PID(VAS). Both ketoprofen dosages displayed significantly greater 3-hr, 4-hr and 6-hr summary analgesic measures (SPID(VAS), SPID(CAT), TOTPAR) than placebo, with the exception of the 6-hr SPID(CAT) measure for ketoprofen 12.5 mg. No serious side effects were observed in this study. We conclude that ketoprofen in a dose range of 12.5 mg to 37.5 mg is a safe and effective analgesic for the relief of post-operative dental pain.

  6. LOX, GOX and Pressure Relief

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLeod, Ken; Stoltzfus, Joel

    2006-01-01

    Oxygen relief systems present a serious fire hazard risk with often severe consequences. This presentation offers a risk management solution strategy which encourages minimizing ignition hazards, maximizing best materials, and utilizing good practices. Additionally, the relief system should be designed for cleanability and ballistic flow. The use of the right metals, softgoods, and lubricants, along with the best assembly techniques, is stressed. Materials should also be tested if data is not available and a full hazard analysis should be conducted in an effort to minimize risk and harm.

  7. Nerve blocks for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Hayek, Salim M; Shah, Atit

    2014-10-01

    Nerve blocks are often performed as therapeutic or palliative interventions for pain relief. However, they are often performed for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. When considering nerve blocks for chronic pain, clinicians must always consider the indications, risks, benefits, and proper technique. Nerve blocks encompass a wide variety of interventional procedures. The most common nerve blocks for chronic pain and that may be applicable to the neurosurgical patient population are reviewed in this article. This article is an introduction and brief synopsis of the different available blocks that can be offered to a patient.

  8. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... a problem you need to take care of. Chronic pain is different. The pain signals go on for ... there is no clear cause. Problems that cause chronic pain include Headache Low back strain Cancer Arthritis Pain ...

  9. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain; Pain - abdomen; Belly ache; Abdominal cramps; Bellyache; Stomachache ... Almost everyone has pain in the abdomen at some point. Most of the time, it is not serious. How bad your pain is ...

  10. Flank pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - side; Side pain ... Flank pain can be a sign of a kidney problem. But, since many organs are in this area, other causes are possible. If you have flank pain and fever , chills, blood in the urine, or ...

  11. Heel pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - heel ... Heel pain is most often the result of overuse. However, it may be caused by an injury. Your heel ... on the heel Conditions that may cause heel pain include: Swelling and pain in the Achilles tendon ...

  12. Capsaicin 8 % as a cutaneous patch (Qutenza™): analgesic effect on patients with peripheral neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Raber, Julia Marie; Reichelt, Doris; Grüneberg-Oelker, Ute; Philipp, Konstanze; Stubbe-Dräger, Bianca; Husstedt, Ingo-W

    2015-09-01

    Evaluation of the analgesic effect after a single application of the capsaicin 8 % cutaneous patch (Qutenza™) in 37 patients suffering from painful, distal symmetric polyneuropathy (PNP) for an average of 5 years. Patients ranged from 40 to 78 years of age and 22 subjects were HIV-positive. Patients were observed 4 weeks prior to 12 weeks post administration. An evaluation of the therapeutic effect of capsaicin 8 % as a dermal patch in terms of pain reduction, change of sleeping behavior and social activities was performed and statistical analysis of data was conducted using non-parametric methods. Patients were selected according to clinical criteria. Numerical rating scale (NRS 0-10) was used to inquire pain intensity and a pain score was calculated using the painDETECT(©) questionnaire Freynhagen R (Curr Med Res Opin 22:1911-1920, [2006]). A significant reduction of pain was achieved for up to 12 weeks, with a maximum after 2-4 weeks post administration. After patient education and before application of capsaicin patch, a significant reduction of three levels on the NRS was observed. Symptoms of painful PNP decreased over the period of investigation and 8 patients reported a reduction of systemic pain medication. In patients with an HIV infection, a significant extension of sleep was achieved for 2, 4 and 8 weeks after application. Thus, the application of the capsaicin 8 % patch resulted in a significant relief of neuropathic pain, a prolongation of sleep, a reduction of oral pain medication and a resumption of social activities.

  13. Nucleus caudalis lesioning: Case report of chronic traumatic headache relief

    PubMed Central

    Sandwell, Stephen E.; El-Naggar, Amr O.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The nucleus caudalis dorsal root entry zone (DREZ) surgery is used to treat intractable central craniofacial pain. This is the first journal publication of DREZ lesioning used for the long-term relief of an intractable chronic traumatic headache. Case Description: A 40-year-old female experienced new-onset bi-temporal headaches following a traumatic head injury. Despite medical treatment, her pain was severe on over 20 days per month, 3 years after the injury. The patient underwent trigeminal nucleus caudalis DREZ lesioning. Bilateral single-row lesions were made at 1-mm interval between the level of the obex and the C2 dorsal nerve roots, using angled radiofrequency electrodes, brought to 80°C for 15 seconds each, along a path 1 to 1.2 mm posterior to the accessory nerve rootlets. The headache improved, but gradually returned. Five years later, her headaches were severe on over 24 days per month. The DREZ surgery was then repeated. Her headaches improved and the relief has continued for 5 additional years. She has remained functional, with no limitation in instrumental activities of daily living. Conclusions: The nucleus caudalis DREZ surgery brought long-term relief to a patient suffering from chronic traumatic headache. PMID:22059123

  14. Developing Countries Debt Relief Initiative for Poor Countries Faces Challenges Debt Relief Initiative for Poor Countries Faces Challenges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-06-01

    This report responds to your request that we (1) assess whether the enhanced Heavily Indebted Poor Countries Initiative is likely to free up...resources for poverty reduction and achieve the goal of debt sustainability, (2) describe the strategy to strengthen the link between debt relief and poverty

  15. Percutaneous Relief of Tension Pneumomediastinum in a Child

    SciTech Connect

    Chau, Helen Hoi-lun; Kwok, Philip Chong-hei; Lai, Albert Kwok-hung; Fan, Tsz Wo; Chan, Susan Chi-hum; Miu, Ting Yat; Chan, Grace Lai-har

    2003-11-15

    The purpose of this article was to describe the experience of relieving tension pneumomediastinum by a fluoroscopic-guided percutaneous method. We inserted a percutaneous drainage catheter with a Heimlich valve under fluoroscopic guidance to relieve the tension pneumomediastinum in a 2-year-old girl who suffered from dermatomyositis with lung involvement. This allowed immediate relief without the need for surgery. The procedure was repeated for relapsed tension pneumomediastinum. Good immediate results were achieved in each attempt. We conclude that percutaneous relief of pneumomediastinum under fluoroscopic guidance can be performed safely and rapidly in patients not fit for surgery.

  16. Asthma - quick-relief drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Asthma - quick-relief drugs URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000008.htm Asthma - quick- ...

  17. TRPs and pain.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yi

    2016-05-01

    Nociception is the process of transmission of painful signals by nociceptors in the primary afferent nerve fibers, which specifically respond to noxious stimuli. These noxious stimuli are detected by nociceptors and converted into electrical signals, which are then transmitted to the spinal cord, thalamus, and the cerebral cortex, where pain is finally sensed. Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels have emerged as a family of evolutionarily conserved ligand-gated ion channels that function as molecular detectors of physical stimuli. Several member of this family, at least six channels from three TRP family subtypes (TRPV1-4, TRPM8, and TRPA1), are expressed in nociceptors, where they act as transducers for signals from thermal, chemical, and mechanical stimuli and play crucial roles in the generation and development of pathological pain perception. This review focuses on the increasing evidence of TRP channel involvement and contribution in nociceptive pain and the pain hypersensitivity associated with peripheral inflammation or neuropathy, and on the renewed interest in targeting TRP channels for pain relief.

  18. [Pain management in dentistry].

    PubMed

    Kandreli, M G; Vadachkoriia, N R; Gumberidze, N Sh; Mandzhavidze, N A

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the most effective dose of Ibuprofen - one of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs frequently used in dental practice for pain management. According to our observations, Ibuprofen markedly softens and quickly reduces procedural pain in 55 (91.67%) patients and post-procedural pain in 44 (73.33%) patients, reduces the post-procedural need for or the amount of the drug, removes the fear of anesthesia and endodontic treatment; with irreversible pulpits significantly increases the efficiency of the inferior alveolar nerve block by local anesthetics. Our clinical observation of taking ibuprofen pre-procedurally demonstrates its effectiveness not only as a means for the relief of pain episodes, but also as an excellent anti-inflammatory treatment for chronic toothache Based on our research, the appointment of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs before dental interventions, in this case - Ibuprofen turned out to be the key to the success of effective pain management. We suggest that administration of analgesics in order to relieve and effectively pre-empt pain before, during or after treatment should start before surgery and furthermore, this treatment should be extended into the postoperative period. Premedication with ibuprofen significantly increased the success rates of inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia in teeth with irreversible pulpitis.

  19. Interactions between Pain and the Motor Cortex: Insights from Research on Phantom Limb Pain and Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Léonard, Guillaume

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Pain is a significantly disabling problem that often interacts with other deficits during the rehabilitation process. The aim of this paper is to review evidence of interactions between pain and the motor cortex in order to attempt to answer the following questions: (1) Does acute pain interfere with motor-cortex activity? (2) Does chronic pain interfere with motor-cortex activity, and, conversely, does motor-cortex plasticity contribute to chronic pain? (3) Can the induction of motor plasticity by means of motor-cortex stimulation decrease pain? (4) Can motor training result in both motor-cortex reorganization and pain relief? Summary of Key Points: Acute experimental pain has been clearly shown to exert an inhibitory influence over the motor cortex, which can interfere with motor learning capacities. Current evidence also suggests a relationship between chronic pain and motor-cortex reorganization, but it is still unclear whether one causes the other. However, there is growing evidence that interventions aimed at normalizing motor-cortex organization can lead to pain relief. Conclusions: Interactions between pain and the motor cortex are complex, and more studies are needed to understand these interactions in our patients, as well as to develop optimal rehabilitative strategies. PMID:22654236

  20. Recombinant neural progenitor transplants in the spinal dorsal horn alleviate chronic central neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Jergova, Stanislava; Gajavelli, Shyam; Pathak, Nirmal; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2016-04-01

    Neuropathic pain induced by spinal cord injury (SCI) is clinically challenging with inadequate long-term treatment options. Partial pain relief offered by pharmacologic treatment is often counterbalanced by adverse effects after prolonged use in chronic pain patients. Cell-based therapy for neuropathic pain using GABAergic neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs) has the potential to overcome untoward effects of systemic pharmacotherapy while enhancing analgesic potency due to local activation of GABAergic signaling in the spinal cord. However, multifactorial anomalies underlying chronic pain will likely require simultaneous targeting of multiple mechanisms. Here, we explore the analgesic potential of genetically modified rat embryonic GABAergic NPCs releasing a peptidergic NMDA receptor antagonist, Serine-histogranin (SHG), thus targeting both spinal hyperexcitability and reduced inhibitory processes. Recombinant NPCs were designed using either lentiviral or adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV2/8) encoding single and multimeric (6 copies of SHG) cDNA. Intraspinal injection of recombinant cells elicited enhanced analgesic effects compared with nonrecombinant NPCs in SCI-induced pain in rats. Moreover, potent and sustained antinociception was achieved, even after a 5-week postinjury delay, using recombinant multimeric NPCs. Intrathecal injection of SHG antibody attenuated analgesic effects of the recombinant grafts suggesting active participation of SHG in these antinociceptive effects. Immunoblots and immunocytochemical assays indicated ongoing recombinant peptide production and secretion in the grafted host spinal cords. These results support the potential for engineered NPCs grafted into the spinal dorsal horn to alleviate chronic neuropathic pain.

  1. What Drugs Work Best for Diabetic Nerve Pain?

    MedlinePlus

    ... suggests certain drugs may outperform others in treating diabetic neuropathy. The new review of the data on the ... group reviewed 106 studies on pain relief for diabetic neuropathy. The researchers found "moderate" evidence that the antidepressants ...

  2. 32 CFR 516.19 - Injunctive relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS LITIGATION Reporting Legal Proceedings to HQDA § 516.19 Injunctive relief. (a) General. Plaintiffs... relief is granted. (4) The public interest....

  3. An overview of treatment approaches for chronic pain management.

    PubMed

    Hylands-White, Nicholas; Duarte, Rui V; Raphael, Jon H

    2017-01-01

    Pain which persists after healing is expected to have taken place, or which exists in the absence of tissue damage, is termed chronic pain. By definition chronic pain cannot be treated and cured in the conventional biomedical sense; rather, the patient who is suffering from the pain must be given the tools with which their long-term pain can be managed to an acceptable level. This article will provide an overview of treatment approaches available for the management of persistent non-malignant pain. As well as attempting to provide relief from the physical aspects of pain through the judicious use of analgesics, interventions, stimulations, and irritations, it is important to pay equal attention to the psychosocial complaints which almost always accompany long-term pain. The pain clinic offers a biopsychosocial approach to treatment with the multidisciplinary pain management programme; encouraging patients to take control of their pain problem and lead a fulfilling life in spite of the pain.

  4. A disaster relief exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quagliotti, Fulvia; Novaro Mascarello, Laura

    2016-04-01

    The Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) is an effective tool for military applications, both for properly military operations, such as research missions and road surveillance, and for civilian support after natural disasters, like landslides, floods, and earthquakes, when reaching victims is often hard or it would take too much time for their survival. Information are needed without hazarding the life of the military troops. When roads, bridges and other communication ways are usually not available, the unmanned platform is the only easy and fast way to contact people. It can be launched directly from the operation site and it could take crucial information or carry medication, necessaries and everything that could help rescue teams. The unmanned platform can also be used for the first aid in an emergency situation when the use of a helicopter is too dangerous and other troops could be involved in heavy fighting. The RPAS has some advantages. First is the reduced cost, compared to traditional aircraft, that could enable the user to have several operating units. Secondly, pilots are not on board and therefore, if needed, the crew' rotation and rest do not imply the need to stop operations. The third fact is that, depending on the type of delivery that is used, the operations may take place on a twenty-four hours' base. The main benefit achieved with these three facts is that continuous operation may take place and eventually make up the capacity difference. To sum up, the main motivation behind this employment of UAS is to replace human lives on the cockpits and to assure the execution of Dangerous, Dull and Dirty missions. In May 2015, the ERIDANO Exercise was performed in Moncalieri city, near Turin (Italy) and it was a joint exercise between the Italian Army, National Emergency Service and Politecnico of Turin. The aim was the control and management of emergency situations due to natural disasters. In particular, a flood was simulated. A multicopter was used

  5. Motor cortex stimulation for central and peripheral deafferentation pain. Report of eight cases.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Y; Shibata, M; Hirano, S; Hirata, M; Mashimo, T; Yoshimine, T

    2000-01-01

    The authors tested a modified motor cortex stimulation protocol for treatment of central and peripheral types of deafferentation pain. Four patients with thalamic pain and four with peripheral deafferentation pain were studied. Preoperative pharmacological tests of pain relief were performed using phentolamine, lidocaine, ketamine, thiopental, and placebo. In five patients we placed a 20- or 40-electrode grid in the subdural space to determine the best stimulation point for pain relief for a few weeks before definitive placement of a four-electrode array. In three patients, the four-electrode array was implanted in the interhemispheric fissure as a one-stage procedure to treat lower-extremity pain. In two patients with pain extending from the extremity to the trunk or hip, dual devices were implanted to drive two electrodes. Six of eight patients experienced pain reduction (two each with excellent, good, and fair relief) from motor cortex stimulation. No correlation was apparent between pharmacological test results and the effectiveness of motor cortex stimulation. Patients with peripheral deafferentation pain, including two with phantom-limb pain and two with brachial plexus injury, attained pain relief from motor cortex stimulation, with excellent results in two cases. Testing performed with a subdural multiple-electrode grid was helpful in locating the best stimulation point for pain relief. Motor cortex stimulation may be effective for treating peripheral as well as central deafferentation pain.

  6. Loin Pain Haematuria Syndrome - A Narrative Review of Pain Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Loin pain haematuria syndrome (LPHS) is an uncommon clinical entity that has divided renal physicians, pain practitioners, and even psychiatrists since its initial description. A relative paucity of data exists regarding the condition, with best practice guidelines lacking amid the existing threads of anecdotal experiences and variable follow-up observations. The aim of this article was to review the cumulative published experience of pain relief strategies for LPHS. PMID:27103962

  7. 47 CFR 69.727 - Regulatory relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Regulatory relief. 69.727 Section 69.727 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) ACCESS CHARGES Pricing Flexibility § 69.727 Regulatory relief. (a) Phase I relief. Upon satisfaction of the Phase...

  8. 47 CFR 69.727 - Regulatory relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Regulatory relief. 69.727 Section 69.727 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) ACCESS CHARGES Pricing Flexibility § 69.727 Regulatory relief. (a) Phase I relief. Upon satisfaction of the Phase...

  9. 47 CFR 69.727 - Regulatory relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Regulatory relief. 69.727 Section 69.727 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) ACCESS CHARGES Pricing Flexibility § 69.727 Regulatory relief. (a) Phase I relief. Upon satisfaction of the Phase...

  10. 47 CFR 69.727 - Regulatory relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Regulatory relief. 69.727 Section 69.727 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) ACCESS CHARGES Pricing Flexibility § 69.727 Regulatory relief. (a) Phase I relief. Upon satisfaction of the Phase...

  11. 24 CFR 7.44 - Interim relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Interim relief. 7.44 Section 7.44... § 7.44 Interim relief. (a) When the Department appeals and the case involves removal, separation, or... outcome of the Department appeal. The employee may decline the offer of interim relief. (b) Service...

  12. 12 CFR 268.505 - Interim relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interim relief. 268.505 Section 268.505 Banks... REGARDING EQUAL OPPORTUNITY Remedies and Enforcement § 268.505 Interim relief. (a)(1) When the Board appeals... offer of interim relief. (2) Service under the temporary or conditional restoration provisions...

  13. 29 CFR 1614.505 - Interim relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interim relief. 1614.505 Section 1614.505 Labor Regulations... OPPORTUNITY Remedies and Enforcement § 1614.505 Interim relief. (a)(1) When the agency appeals and the case... interim relief. (2) Service under the temporary or conditional restoration provisions of paragraph...

  14. 47 CFR 69.727 - Regulatory relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... customer. (b) Phase II relief. Upon satisfaction of the Phase II triggers specified in §§ 69.709(c) or 69... Pricing Flexibility § 69.727 Regulatory relief. (a) Phase I relief. Upon satisfaction of the Phase I... similarly situated customers; and (ii) The price cap LEC excludes all contract tariff offerings from...

  15. Orofacial pain emerging as a dental specialty.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, R S; Friction, J R; Okeson, J P

    2001-01-01

    The emerging field of orofacial pain was considered by the American Dental Association for full status as a new dental specialty. While the recognition of orofacial pain as a specialty was denied, the American Academy of Orofacial Pain plans to continue its efforts. Many recent advances in the neuroscience of orofacial pain have led to treatments that provide significant relief for patients with chronic orofacial pain disorders. However, access to this care has been limited, leaving many patients to suffer. Dentists are generally supportive of the efforts to develop oral pain treatment into a specialty because the field will provide benefits for both dentists and their patients. A recent survey of 805 individuals who reported having a persistent pain disorder revealed that more than four out of 10 people have yet to find adequate relief, saying their pain is out of control--despite having the pain for more than five years and switching doctors at least once. "This survey suggests that there are millions of people living with severe uncontrolled pain," says Russell Portenoy, MD, president of the American Pain Society. "This is a great tragedy. Although not everyone can be helped, it is likely that most of these patients could benefit if provided with state-of-the-art therapies and improved access to pain specialists when needed." Development of the field of orofacial pain into a dental specialty has been moved primarily by the fact that historically, patients with complex chronic orofacial pain disorders have not been treated well by any discipline of healthcare. Recent studies of chronic orofacial pain patients have found that these patients have a higher number of previous clinicians and have endured many years with pain prior to seeing an orofacial pain dentist (see Figure 1). Complex pain patients and the clinicians who see them are often confused about who they should consult for relief of the pain. Treatment for those patients within the existing structure of

  16. Tri-wave laser therapy for spinal cord injury, neuropathic pain management, and restoration of motor function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chariff, Mark D.; Olszak, Peter

    2015-03-01

    A laser therapy device using three combined wavelengths 532nm, 808nm, and 1064nm has been demonstrated in clinical studies. Primarily, therapeutic lasers have used wavelengths in the ranges of 632nm through 1064nm, where the optical density (OD) < 5, to achieve pain relief and tissue regeneration. Conventional wisdom would argue against using wavelengths in the region of 532nm, due to poor penetration (OD ~ 8); however, the author's observations are to the contrary. The 532nm light is efficiently absorbed by chromophores such as oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and cytochrome c oxidase thereby providing energy to accelerate the healing process. The 808nm light is known to result in Nitric Oxide production thereby reducing inflammation and oxidative stress. All three laser wavelengths likely contribute to pain relief by inhibiting nerve conduction; however, the 1064nm has the deepest penetration. Through the use of this device on over 1000 patients with a variety of acute and chronic neuro-musculoskeletal disorders, the author observed that a majority of these individuals experienced rapid relief from their presenting conditions and most patients reported a tingling sensation upon irradiation. Patient testimonials and thermal images have been collected to document the results of the laser therapy. These studies demonstrate the ability of laser therapy to rapidly alleviate pain from both acute and chronic conditions.

  17. Neurological diseases and pain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pain is a frequent component of many neurological disorders, affecting 20–40% of patients for many primary neurological diseases. These diseases result from a wide range of pathophysiologies including traumatic injury to the central nervous system, neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation, and exploring the aetiology of pain in these disorders is an opportunity to achieve new insight into pain processing. Whether pain originates in the central or peripheral nervous system, it frequently becomes centralized through maladaptive responses within the central nervous system that can profoundly alter brain systems and thereby behaviour (e.g. depression). Chronic pain should thus be considered a brain disease in which alterations in neural networks affect multiple aspects of brain function, structure and chemistry. The study and treatment of this disease is greatly complicated by the lack of objective measures for either the symptoms or the underlying mechanisms of chronic pain. In pain associated with neurological disease, it is sometimes difficult to obtain even a subjective evaluation of pain, as is the case for patients in a vegetative state or end-stage Alzheimer's disease. It is critical that neurologists become more involved in chronic pain treatment and research (already significant in the fields of migraine and peripheral neuropathies). To achieve this goal, greater efforts are needed to enhance training for neurologists in pain treatment and promote greater interest in the field. This review describes examples of pain in different neurological diseases including primary neurological pain conditions, discusses the therapeutic potential of brain-targeted therapies and highlights the need for objective measures of pain. PMID:22067541

  18. Use of botulinum toxin in musculoskeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jasvinder A

    2013-01-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain is a common cause of chronic pain, which is associated with a total cost of $635 billion per year in the U.S. Emerging evidence suggests an anti-nociceptive action of botulinum toxin, independent of its muscle paralyzing action. This review provides a summary of data from both non-randomized and randomized clinical studies of botulinum toxin in back pain and various osteoarticular conditions, including osteoarthritis, tennis elbow, low back pain and hand pain. Three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of small sizes provide evidence of short-term efficacy of a single intra-articular injection of 100 units of botulinum toxin A (BoNT/A) for the relief of pain and the improvement of both function and quality of life in patients with chronic joint pain due to arthritis. Three RCTs studied intramuscular BoNT/A for tennis elbow with one showing a significant improvement in pain relief compared with placebo, another one showing no difference from placebo, and the third finding that pain and function improvement with BoNT/A injection were similar to those obtained with surgical release. One RCT of intramuscular BoNT/A for low back pain found improvement in pain and function compared to placebo. Single RCTs using local injections of BoNT in patients with either temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain or plantar fasciitis found superior efficacy compared to placebo. One RCT of intramuscular BoNT/B in patients with hand pain and carpal tunnel syndrome found improvement in pain in both BoNT/B and placebo groups, but no significant difference between groups. Most evidence is based on small studies, but the use of BoNT is supported by a single, and sometimes up to three, RCTs for several chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions. This indicates that botulinum toxin may be a promising potential new treatment for chronic refractory musculoskeletal pain. Well-designed large clinical trials are needed. PMID:24715952

  19. Percutaneous sacroplasty and sacroiliac joint cementation under fluoroscopic guidance for lower back pain related to sacral metastatic tumors with sacroiliac joint invasion.

    PubMed

    Nebreda, Carlos; Vallejo, Ricardo; Aliaga, Luis; Benyamin, Ramsin

    2011-01-01

    Cancer patients with bone metastases are at risk of a variety of skeletal events, including vertebral compression and pathologic fractures. Approximately 30% to 40% of patients with advanced lung cancer will develop bone metastases in the course of their disease, resulting in a significant negative impact on both morbidity and survival. Skeletal complications of bone metastases include pain, pathologic fractures, spinal cord compression, and hypercalcemia. The spine is the most frequent site of skeletal metastases. We present a 48-year-old female with intractable and incapacitating low back pain because of metastatic bone tumor in the left lateral side of S1 and S2 with left sacroiliac invasion. Imaging identified a metastatic invasion of the sacrum. Percutaneous sacroplasty, a safe and effective procedure for sacral-insufficient fractures, was performed under fluoroscopy guidance. However, the expected pain relief was not achieved. At 1 month, the patient remained invalided by severe back pain, which was localized to the left sacroiliac joint. In a second procedure, the sacroiliac joint was cemented. Pain relief was complete, immediate, and sustained until the patient's death related to the underlying oncologic disease. No complications were observed. Few reports exist about the treatment of sacral metastatic tumors with percutaneous sacroplasty. Further, no previous reports about sacroiliac joint cementation for joint stabilization have been found. In the present case, sacroiliac joint cementation successfully resolved residual pain that remained despite percutaneous sacroplasty treatment of the pathologic sacral fracture.

  20. Smartphone applications for pain management.

    PubMed

    Rosser, Benjamin A; Eccleston, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Smartphone applications (or apps) are becoming increasingly popular. The lack of regulation or guidance for health-related apps means that the validity and reliability of their content is unknown. We have conducted a review of available apps relating to the generic condition of pain. The official application stores for five major smartphone platforms were searched: iPhone, Android, Blackberry, Nokia/Symbian and Windows Mobile. Apps were included if they reported a focus on pain education, management or relief, and were not solely aimed at health-care professionals (HCPs). A total of 111 apps met the inclusion criteria. The majority of apps reviewed claimed some information provision or electronic manual component. Diary tracking of pain variables was also a common feature. There was a low level of stated HCP involvement in app development and content. Despite an increasing number of apps being released, the frequency of HCP involvement is not increasing. Pain apps appear to be able to promise pain relief without any concern for the effectiveness of the product, or for possible adverse effects of product use. In a population often desperate for a solution to distressing and debilitating pain conditions, there is considerable risk of individuals being misled.

  1. Photovoltaic application for disaster relief

    SciTech Connect

    Young, W.R. Jr.

    1995-11-01

    Hurricanes, floods, tornados, and earthquakes are natural disasters that can happen at any time destroying homes, businesses, and natural surroundings. One such disaster, Hurricane Andrew, devastated South Florida leaving several hundred-thousand people homeless. Many people were without electrical service, functioning water and sewage systems, communications, and medical services for days, even weeks in the aftermath of the storm. Emergency management teams, the military, and countless public and private organizations staged a massive relief effort. Dependency on electrical utility power became a pronounced problem as emergency services were rendered to survivors and the rebuilding process started. Many of the energy needs of emergency management organizations, relief workers, and the general public can be satisfied with solar electric energy systems. Photovoltaic (PV) power generated from solar energy is quiet, safe, inexhaustible and pollution-free. Previously, photovoltaics have supplied emergency power for Hurricanes Hugo and Andrew, and the earthquake at Northridge in Southern California. This document focuses on photovoltaic technology and its application to disaster relief efforts.

  2. Pain without nociceptors? Nav1.7-independent pain mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Minett, Michael S; Falk, Sarah; Santana-Varela, Sonia; Bogdanov, Yury D; Nassar, Mohammed A; Heegaard, Anne-Marie; Wood, John N

    2014-01-30

    Nav1.7, a peripheral neuron voltage-gated sodium channel, is essential for pain and olfaction in mice and humans. We examined the role of Nav1.7 as well as Nav1.3, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 in different mouse models of chronic pain. Constriction-injury-dependent neuropathic pain is abolished when Nav1.7 is deleted in sensory neurons, unlike nerve-transection-related pain, which requires the deletion of Nav1.7 in sensory and sympathetic neurons for pain relief. Sympathetic sprouting that develops in parallel with nerve-transection pain depends on the presence of Nav1.7 in sympathetic neurons. Mechanical and cold allodynia required distinct sets of neurons and different repertoires of sodium channels depending on the nerve injury model. Surprisingly, pain induced by the chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin and cancer-induced bone pain do not require the presence of Nav1.7 sodium channels or Nav1.8-positive nociceptors. Thus, similar pain phenotypes arise through distinct cellular and molecular mechanisms. Therefore, rational analgesic drug therapy requires patient stratification in terms of mechanisms and not just phenotype.

  3. Why do you sigh? Sigh rate during induced stress and relief.

    PubMed

    Vlemincx, Elke; Van Diest, Ilse; De Peuter, Steven; Bresseleers, Johan; Bogaerts, Katleen; Fannes, Stien; Li, Wan; Van Den Bergh, Omer

    2009-09-01

    Whereas sighing appears to function as a physiological resetter, the psychological function of sighing is largely unknown. Sighing has been suggested to occur both during stress and negative emotions, such as panic and pain, and during positive emotions, such as relaxation and relief. In three experiments, sigh rate was investigated during short imposed states of stress and relief. Stress was induced by exposure to a loud noise stressor or by anticipation of it. Relief was induced by the end of the stressor or the anticipation that no stressor would follow. Breathing parameters were recorded continuously by means of the LifeShirt System. Results consistently showed that more sighing occurred during conditions of relief compared to conditions of stress.

  4. Cancer pain

    SciTech Connect

    Swerdlow, M.; Ventafridda, V.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Importance of the Problem; Neurophysiology and Biochemistry of Pain; Assessment of Pain in Patients with Cancer; Drug Therapy; Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy for Cancer Pain; Sympton Control as it Relates to Pain Control; and Palliative Surgery in Cancer Pain Treatment.

  5. [The neurobiology of pain].

    PubMed

    Brodal, Per

    2005-09-08

    The nociceptive system enables us to respond in time to external threats that otherwise would produce tissue damage. By monitoring tissue composition the system also contributes to bodily homeostasis. Nociceptors signal mechanical stress, extreme temperatures, cell injury and inflammation. Powerful modulation of nociceptive signals occurs in the spinal dorsal horn, so that their further transmission to the brain can be enhanced or inhibited. A vast array of transmitters and receptors are responsible for complex synaptic interactions in the dorsal horn. Synaptic plasticity alters neuronal excitability for hours to months (years?), contributing to hyperalgesia and chronic pain. Descending monoaminergic connections from the brain stem can inhibit or facilitate the signal transmission from nociceptors. These systems are partly controlled by ascending signals from the dorsal horn, partly by descending connections from amygdala, hypothalamus and the cerebral cortex. The latter are thought to contribute to context-dependent pain modulation. The subjective experience of pain correlates with increased activity in a cortical network including the insula, the cingulate gyrus and some other areas. The activity of the network is also positively correlated with expectation of pain, and negatively correlated with expectation of pain relief--independent of nociceptor stimulation.

  6. Foetal pain?

    PubMed

    Derbyshire, Stuart W G

    2010-10-01

    The majority of commentary on foetal pain has looked at the maturation of neural pathways to decide a lower age limit for foetal pain. This approach is sensible because there must be a minimal necessary neural development that makes pain possible. Very broadly, it is generally agreed that the minimal necessary neural pathways for pain are in place by 24 weeks gestation. Arguments remain, however, as to the possibility of foetal pain before or after 24 weeks. Some argue that the foetus can feel pain earlier than 24 weeks because pain can be supported by subcortical structures. Others argue that the foetus cannot feel pain at any stage because it is maintained in a state of sedation in the womb and lacks further neural and conceptual development necessary for pain. Much of this argument rests on the definition of terms such as 'wakefulness' and 'pain'. If a behavioural and neural reaction to a noxious stimulus is considered sufficient for pain, then pain is possible from 24 weeks and probably much earlier. If a conceptual subjectivity is considered necessary for pain, however, then pain is not possible at any gestational age. Regardless of how pain is defined, it is clear that pain for conceptual beings is qualitatively different than pain for non-conceptual beings. It is therefore a mistake to draw an equivalence between foetal pain and pain in the older infant or adult.

  7. Effect of Music Therapy on Pain and Anxiety Levels of Cancer Patients: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaswamy, Priyadharshini; Nair, Shoba

    2016-01-01

    Background: The pain associated with cancer is highly detrimental to the quality of life of the affected individuals. It also contributes to the anxiety of the patient. There is a need for a nonpharmacological approach in addition to the pharmacological therapy for the management of the pain for a more holistic improvement in the individual. With this study, we wish to achieve this through music. Objective: To assess the effect of music therapy on pain scores and anxiety levels of cancer patients with pain. Study Design: In this quantitative study, a comparative study was done on fourteen cancer patients admitted for pain relief under the Department of Pain and Palliative Medicine, of a tertiary care hospital, having moderate to severe pain (numerical pain rating scale [NRS] – of 4 to 10). Subjects and Methods: Convenience sampling was used. Patients were allocated to test group or control group nonrandomly. The test group patients were subjected to music therapy for 20 min while the control group patients were kept occupied by talking to them for 20 min. The NRS scale was used to assess the pre- and post-interventional pain scores and the Hamilton anxiety rating scale was used to assess the pre- and post-interventional anxiety scores in the two groups. Statistics: Student's t-test was used for comparing the pre- and post-interventional data. Two sample t-test was used to compare the data obtained from the control and study groups. Results: Statistically significant reduction seen in the pain scores in the test group after music therapy (P = 0.003). No statistically significant reduction seen in the pain score in the control group (P = 0.356). There was a statistically significant reduction in the postintervention pain scores in the test group compared to the control group (P = 0.034). The reduction in anxiety levels in both groups after intervention was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Music therapy was found to lower the pain score of a patient who

  8. Neck Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... injuries and conditions that cause pain and restrict motion. Neck pain causes include: Muscle strains. Overuse, such ... body then forms bone spurs that affect joint motion and cause pain. Nerve compression. Herniated disks or ...

  9. Ankle pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - ankle ... Ankle pain is often due to an ankle sprain. An ankle sprain is an injury to the ligaments, which ... the joint. In addition to ankle sprains, ankle pain can be caused by: Damage or swelling of ...

  10. Knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - knee ... Knee pain can have different causes. Being overweight puts you at greater risk for knee problems. Overusing your knee can trigger knee problems that cause pain. If you have a history of arthritis, it ...

  11. Elbow pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - elbow ... Elbow pain can be caused by many problems. A common cause in adults is tendinitis . This is inflammation and ... a partial dislocation ). Other common causes of elbow pain are: Bursitis -- inflammation of a fluid-filled cushion ...

  12. Eye pain

    MedlinePlus

    Ophthalmalgia; Pain - eye ... Pain in the eye can be an important symptom of a health problem. Make sure you tell your health care provider if you have eye pain that does not go away. Tired eyes or ...

  13. Wrist pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - wrist; Pain - carpal tunnel; Injury - wrist; Arthritis - wrist; Gout - wrist; Pseudogout - wrist ... Carpal tunnel syndrome: A common cause of wrist pain is carpal tunnel syndrome . You may feel aching, ...

  14. Foot pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - foot ... Foot pain may be due to: Aging Being on your feet for long periods of time Being overweight A ... sports activity Trauma The following can cause foot pain: Arthritis and gout . Common in the big toe, ...

  15. Phantom Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... be an effective treatment for some types of chronic pain. In acupuncture, the practitioner inserts extremely fine, sterilized ... and Stroke. http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/chronic_pain/detail_chronic_pain.htm. Accessed Sept. 16, 2014. ...

  16. Hip pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain involves any pain in or around the hip joint. You may not feel pain from your hip ... 2012:chap 48. Read More Hip fracture surgery Hip joint replacement Patient Instructions Hip fracture - discharge Hip or ...

  17. Preoperative widespread pain sensitization and chronic pain after hip and knee replacement: a cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wylde, Vikki; Sayers, Adrian; Lenguerrand, Erik; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; Pyke, Mark; Beswick, Andrew D.; Dieppe, Paul; Blom, Ashley W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Chronic pain after joint replacement is common, affecting approximately 10% of patients after total hip replacement (THR) and 20% of patients after total knee replacement (TKR). Heightened generalized sensitivity to nociceptive input could be a risk factor for the development of this pain. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether preoperative widespread pain sensitivity was associated with chronic pain after joint replacement. Data were analyzed from 254 patients receiving THR and 239 patients receiving TKR. Pain was assessed preoperatively and at 12 months after surgery using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Pain Scale. Preoperative widespread pain sensitivity was assessed through measurement of pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) at the forearm using an algometer. Statistical analysis was conducted using linear regression and linear mixed models, and adjustments were made for confounding variables. In both the THR and TKR cohort, lower PPTs (heightened widespread pain sensitivity) were significantly associated with higher preoperative pain severity. Lower PPTs were also significantly associated with higher pain severity at 12 months after surgery in the THR cohort. However, PPTs were not associated with the change in pain severity from preoperative to 12 months postoperative in either the TKR or THR cohort. These findings suggest that although preoperative widespread pressure pain sensitivity is associated with pain severity before and after joint replacement, it is not a predictor of the amount of pain relief that patients gain from joint replacement surgery, independent of preoperative pain severity. PMID:25599300

  18. Depression, Pain, and Pain Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Francis J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined the degree to which depression predicted pain and pain behavior. The Beck Depression Inventory was administered to 207 low back pain patients. Depression and physical findings were the most important predictors of pain and pain behavior. Depression proved significant even after controlling for important demographic and medical status…

  19. Management of chronic arthritis pain in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Fitzcharles, Mary-Ann; Lussier, David; Shir, Yoram

    2010-06-01

    profiles. The continued use of any medication should also be repeatedly assessed to ensure that efficacy is maintained. Throughout the treatment period, physicians must remain vigilant for emergent adverse effects. Patients and physicians should have realistic outcome goals for effective rheumatic pain management. Although complete pain relief is seldom achieved, modulation of pain and the associated components of sleep disturbance, fatigue and mood disorder will improve overall quality of life in the elderly. However, barriers to effective pain management from both the patient and the healthcare professional perspectives still exist, and will be overcome only by educational efforts. Successful rheumatic pain management in the elderly should begin with an accurate diagnosis by the physician, and patients must be realistic in their expectations. Treatments should be multimodal, with attention given to the co-morbidities of pain as well as the global health status of the patient. Whether or not an outcome is favourable should be determined not only by the treatment's impact on pain but also by its capacity to improve function and enhance quality of life. The wider range of treatment options now available is both useful and encouraging for the physician managing musculoskeletal aches and pain in the elderly.

  20. Stereotactic body radiation therapy induces fast tumor control and symptom relief in patients with iliac lymph node metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhongqiu; Wang, Jing; Zhuang, Hongqing; Wang, Ping; Yuan, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    The CyberKnife is a robotic stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) system which has shown promising results for many malignances with good efficacy and low toxicity. This study aims to evaluate the response and local control (LC) obtained with CyberKnife in the management of iliac lymph node metastases (ILNM). Twenty-two patients with 27 ILNM were treated by CyberKnife from May 2010 to May 2016. Median follow-up time was 33 months (8–97). The complete response, partial response, stable disease and progression disease rates were 37.0%, 48.0%, 7.5% and 7.5% respectively. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year LC rates were all 90.6%, and overall survival rates were 78.8%, 60.6%, and 43.3% respectively. All patients with pelvic pain and ureter obstruction achieved good and fast symptom relief, while leg edema persisted in 2 patients. The general treatment tolerance was acceptable and no severe toxicities were reported. No factors were found correlated with local failure. While overall survival (OS) was better for patients who had received a total dose more than 30 Gy or prior systemic treatment, and whose symptoms were relieved. Taken together, CyberKnife is an effective therapeutic option for ILNM, providing high LC rate and good symptom relief with minimal toxicity. PMID:27897235

  1. Pain after earthquake

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction On 6 April 2009, at 03:32 local time, an Mw 6.3 earthquake hit the Abruzzi region of central Italy causing widespread damage in the City of L Aquila and its nearby villages. The earthquake caused 308 casualties and over 1,500 injuries, displaced more than 25,000 people and induced significant damage to more than 10,000 buildings in the L'Aquila region. Objectives This observational retrospective study evaluated the prevalence and drug treatment of pain in the five weeks following the L'Aquila earthquake (April 6, 2009). Methods 958 triage documents were analysed for patients pain severity, pain type, and treatment efficacy. Results A third of pain patients reported pain with a prevalence of 34.6%. More than half of pain patients reported severe pain (58.8%). Analgesic agents were limited to available drugs: anti-inflammatory agents, paracetamol, and weak opioids. Reduction in verbal numerical pain scores within the first 24 hours after treatment was achieved with the medications at hand. Pain prevalence and characterization exhibited a biphasic pattern with acute pain syndromes owing to trauma occurring in the first 15 days after the earthquake; traumatic pain then decreased and re-surged at around week five, owing to rebuilding efforts. In the second through fourth week, reports of pain occurred mainly owing to relapses of chronic conditions. Conclusions This study indicates that pain is prevalent during natural disasters, may exhibit a discernible pattern over the weeks following the event, and current drug treatments in this region may be adequate for emergency situations. PMID:22747796

  2. A comparison of the effects of methylprednisolone and tenoxicam on pain, edema, and trismus after impacted lower third molar extraction

    PubMed Central

    Ilhan, Ozgur; Agacayak, Kamil Serkan; Gulsun, Belgin; Koparal, Mahmut; Gunes, Nedim

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of preemptive intravenous tenoxicam and methylprednisolone administrations on extraction of impacted third molars. Material/Methods This was a placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind, clinical trial. A total of 60 adult patients ages 18–40 years with the complaints of impacted third molar teeth were included in the study. Results The postoperative swelling ratios (p<0.05) and pain scores (p<0.05) were significantly better in both study groups than in the control group and there was no statistically significant difference between methylprednisolone and tenoxicam groups with regards to the edema and pain relief. Conclusions Preoperative administration of 80 mg methylprednisolone achieves better control of trismus than tenoxicam without any significant differences in edema and pain control in impacted third molar teeth extraction. PMID:24473372

  3. Thalamic pain alleviated by stellate ganglion block

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chenlong; Yang, Min; Liu, Pengfei; Zhong, Wenxiang; Zhang, Wenchuan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Thalamic pain is a distressing and treatment-resistant type of central post-stroke pain. Although stellate ganglion block is an established intervention used in pain management, its use in the treatment of thalamic pain has never been reported. Patient concerns: A 66-year-old woman presented with a 3-year history of severe intermittent lancinating pain on the right side of the face and the right hand. The pain started from the ulnar side of the right forearm after a mild ischemic stroke in bilateral basal ganglia and left thalamus. Weeks later, the pain extended to the dorsum of the finger tips and the whole palmar surface, becoming more severe. Meanwhile, there was also pain with similar characteristics emerging on her right face, resembling atypical trigeminal neuralgia. Diagnoses: Thalamic pain was diagnosed. Interventions: After refusing the further invasive treatment, she was suggested to try stellate ganglion block. Outcomes: After a 3-day period of pain free (numerical rating scale: 0) postoperatively, she reported moderate to good pain relief with a numerical rating scale of about 3 to 4 lasting 1 month after the first injection. Pain as well as the quality of life was markedly improved with less dose of analgesic agents. Lessons: Stellate ganglion block may be an optional treatment for thalamic pain. PMID:28151918

  4. Pain management mini-series. Part II. Chronic opioid drug therapy: implications for perioperative anesthesia and pain management.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Robert B; Johnson, Quinn L; Reeves-Viets, Joseph L

    2013-01-01

    In the U.S., there is a growing percentage of chronic pain patients requiring surgery. Chronic pain patients require careful evaluation and planning to achieve appropriate acute pain management. Peri-surgical pain management often requires continuation of previously prescribed chronic pain modalities and careful selection of multimodal acute pain interventions. This article will provide a broad overview of chronic pain, definitions, and current recommendations for the treatment of perioperative pain in patients maintained on opioid therapy.

  5. Shoulder pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - shoulder ... changes around the rotator cuff can cause shoulder pain. You may have pain when lifting the arm above your head or ... The most common cause of shoulder pain occurs when rotator cuff tendons ... The tendons become inflamed or damaged. This condition ...

  6. Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic pain occurs mostly in the lower abdomen area. The pain might be steady, or it might come and go. If the pain is severe, it might get in the way ... re a woman, you might feel a dull pain during your period. It could also happen during ...

  7. New disposition for pain therapy in Italy, center for headache should be integrated in the network.

    PubMed

    Gensini, Gian Franco

    2011-05-01

    On March 15th 2010, Italy adopted the Law no. 38 "Disposizioni per garantire l'accesso alle cure palliative e alla terapia del dolore" (Provisions aimed at ensuring access to palliative care and pain therapy). The aim of pain therapy is to enable patients with chronic diseases to achieve pain control. Palliative care, as defined by the World Health Organization, aims at "improving the quality of life of patients and families, who face the problems associated with incurable diseases, through prevention and relief from suffering, achieved through an early identification and treatment of pain by pharmacological medication and other physical, psychosocial and spiritual techniques". The main issues addressed by the law concern the monitoring of pain (the doctors will have to record on the clinical report form every level of pain intensity suffered by the patient, the appropriate therapy administered, and the pain relief achieved. This report must be kept accurately in all settings: hospital, day hospital and in outpatients). The law also suggests the establishment of two kinds of regional networks. One network (including Hospices) ensures the administration of palliative care to terminally ill patients; the other, including clinics and centers of pain therapy, provides assistance to patients with chronic pain. These networks involve general practitioners, hospital specialists and pain therapy specialists in order to ensure the best patient care. Simplification of the prescription of opiate drugs is also included in the law. In the prescription of opiates, the National Health Service medical staff can use the normal prescription form, and opiates will reimbursed by the NHS, like all other drugs. In addition, the technical papers provide precise indications of the appropriate modality of administration. The law allocates (art. 12, paragraph 2) 100 million euros per year and € 2,450,000 in the biennium 2010-2011 to implement experimental regional projects: "hospital

  8. Changes in and predictors of pain characteristics in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Astrup, Guro Lindviksmoen; Rustøen, Tone; Miaskowski, Christine; Paul, Steven M; Bjordal, Kristin

    2015-05-01

    Pain is a common symptom in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) that is associated with significant decrements in physical and psychological functioning. Only 4 studies have evaluated for changes in and predictors of different pain characteristics in these patients. In this longitudinal study of patients with HNC, changes in pain intensity (i.e., average pain, worst pain), pain interference with function, and pain relief were evaluated from the initiation of radiotherapy and through the following 6 months. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to evaluate for changes over time in these 4 pain characteristics, as well as to identify predictors of interindividual variability in each characteristic. Overall, pain intensity and interference with function scores were in the mild-to-moderate range, while pain relief scores were in the moderate range. The occurrence of pain, as well as scores for each pain characteristic, increased from the initiation to the completion of radiotherapy, followed by a gradual decrease to near pretreatment levels at 6 months. However, interindividual variability existed in patients' ratings of each pain characteristic. Predictors of more severe pain characteristic scores were more comorbidities, worse physical functioning, not having surgery before radiotherapy, difficulty swallowing, mouth sores, sleep disturbance, fatigue, more energy, and less social support. Patients with more depressive symptoms had better pain relief. Although some of the predictors cannot be modified (e.g., rrence of surgery), other predictors (e.g., symptoms) can be treated. Therefore, information about these predictors may result in decreased pain in patients with HNC.

  9. Quality difference in craniofacial pain of cardiac vs. dental origin.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, M; Falace, D; Michelis, V; Okeson, J P; Isberg, A

    2010-09-01

    Craniofacial pain, whether odontogenic or caused by cardiac ischemia, is commonly referred to the same locations, posing a diagnostic challenge. We hypothesized that the validity of pain characteristics would be high in assessment of differential diagnosis. Pain quality, intensity, and gender characteristics were assessed for referred craniofacial pain from dental (n = 359) vs. cardiac (n = 115) origin. The pain descriptors "pressure" and "burning" were statistically associated with pain from cardiac origin, while "throbbing" and "aching" indicated an odontogenic cause. No gender differences were found. These data should now be added to those craniofacial pain characteristics already known to point to acute cardiac disease rather than dental pathology, i.e., pain provocation/aggravation by physical activity, pain relief at rest, and bilateralism. To initiate prompt and appropriate treatment, dental and medical clinicians as well as the public should be alert to those clinical characteristics of craniofacial pain of cardiac origin.

  10. Recent advances in pharmacological treatment of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Sindrup, Søren Hein; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2010-07-14

    Recent studies investigating the pharmacological management of neuropathic pain support the efficacy of certain antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and opioids. Novel directions in drug applications include topical applications of patches with either lidocaine or capsaicin and intradermal injections of botulinum toxin. In cases of partial pain relief, drug combinations may be considered.

  11. Barriers to cancer pain management in Danish and Lithuanian patients treated in pain and palliative care units.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Ramune; Samsanaviciene, Jurgita; Liubarskiene, Zita; Sjøgren, Per; Møldrup, Claus; Christrup, Lona; Sciupokas, Arunas; Hansen, Ole Bo

    2014-03-01

    The prevalence of cancer-related pain is high despite available guidelines for the effective assessment and management of that pain. Barriers to the use of opioid analgesics partially cause undertreatment of cancer pain. The aim of this study was to compare pain management outcomes and patient-related barriers to cancer pain management in patient samples from Denmark and Lithuania. Thirty-three Danish and 30 Lithuanian patients responded to, respectively, Danish and Lithuanian versions of the Brief Pain Inventory pain scale, the Barriers Questionnaire II, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Specific Questionnaire On Pain Communication, and the Medication Adherence Report Scale. Emotional distress and patient attitudes toward opioid analgesics in cancer patient samples from both countries explained pain management outcomes in the multivariate regression models. Pain relief and pain medication adherence were better in Denmark, and the country of origin significantly explained the difference in the regression models for these outcomes. In conclusion, interventions in emotional distress and patient attitudes toward opioid analgesics may result in better pain management outcomes generally, whereas poor adherence to pain medication and poor pain relief appear to be more country-specific problems.

  12. Oxycodone controlled release in cancer pain management.

    PubMed

    Biancofiore, Giuseppe

    2006-09-01

    Oral opioids are the treatment of choice for chronic cancer pain. Morphine is the strong opioid of choice for the treatment of moderate to severe cancer pain according to guidelines from the World Health Organization (WHO). This recommendation by the WHO was derived from availability, familiarity to clinicians, established effectiveness, simplicity of administration, and relative inexpensive cost. It was not based on proven therapeutic superiority over other options. Patients who experience inadequate pain relief or intolerable side effects with one opioid may often be successfully treated with another agent or with the same agent administered by a different route. Opioid rotation, or switching to an alternative opioid, helps some patients achieve better pain control with fewer associated adverse effects. Oxycodone is a mu-opioid receptor specific ligand, with clear agonist properties. It is an active potent opioid, which is in part a kappa-receptor agonist. Like morphine and other pure agonists, there is no known ceiling to the analgesic effects of oxycodone. The active metabolites of oxycodone (eg, oxymorphone) could be important in oxycodone-mediated analgesia. The main pharmacokinetic difference between oxycodone and morphine is in oral bioavailability. The bioavailability of oxycodone is >60% and the bioavailability of morphine is 20%. Controlled-release oxycodone is absorbed in a bi-exponential fashion. There is a rapid phase with a mean half-life of 37 min, accounting for 38% of the dose, and a slow phase with a half-life of 6.2 h, which accounts for the residual 62%. Oxycodone elimination is impaired by renal failure because there are both an increased volume of distribution and reduced clearance. A lot of studies prove that the efficacy of controlled-release oxycodone in cancer-pain control is at least the same as morphine, immediate-release oxycodone and hydromorphone. Its toxicity profile seems better than that of morphine. There are actually several

  13. Painful diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Amanda; Goutman, Stephen A; Callaghan, Brian C

    2014-05-06

    Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic, and associated neuropathy is its most costly and disabling complication. Given the rising prevalence of painful diabetic neuropathy, it is increasingly important that we understand the best ways to diagnose and treat this condition. Diagnostic tests in this field are evolving rapidly. These include the use of skin biopsies to measure small unmyelinated fibers, as well as even newer techniques that can measure both small unmyelinated fibers and large myelinated fibers in the same biopsy. The main treatments for painful diabetic neuropathy remain management of the underlying diabetes and drugs for the relief of pain. However, emerging evidence points to major differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, including the ability of glycemic control to prevent neuropathy. Enhanced glucose control is much more effective at preventing neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes than in those with type 2 disease [corrected]. This dichotomy emphasizes the need to study the pathophysiologic differences between the two types of diabetes, because different treatments may be needed for each condition. The impact of the metabolic syndrome on neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes may account for the difference between the two types of diabetes and requires further study. Finally, neuropathic pain is under-recognized and undertreated despite an ever evolving list of effective drugs. Evidence exists to support several drugs, but the optimal sequence and combination of these drugs are still to be determined.

  14. High-Frequency Repetitive Sensory Stimulation as Intervention to Improve Sensory Loss in Patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome I.

    PubMed

    David, Marianne; Dinse, Hubert R; Mainka, Tina; Tegenthoff, Martin; Maier, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Achieving perceptual gains in healthy individuals or facilitating rehabilitation in patients is generally considered to require intense training to engage neuronal plasticity mechanisms. Recent work, however, suggested that beneficial outcome similar to training can be effectively acquired by a complementary approach in which the learning occurs in response to mere exposure to repetitive sensory stimulation (rSS). For example, high-frequency repetitive sensory stimulation (HF-rSS) enhances tactile performance and induces cortical reorganization in healthy subjects and patients after stroke. Patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) show impaired tactile performance associated with shrinkage of cortical maps. We here investigated the feasibility and efficacy of HF-rSS, and low-frequency rSS (LF-rSS) to enhance tactile performance and reduce pain intensity in 20 patients with CRPS type I. Intermittent high- or low-frequency electrical stimuli were applied for 45 min/day to all fingertips of the affected hand for 5 days. Main outcome measures were spatial two-point-discrimination thresholds and mechanical detection thresholds measured on the tip of the index finger bilaterally. Secondary endpoint was current pain intensity. All measures were assessed before and on day 5 after the last stimulation session. HF-rSS applied in 16 patients improved tactile discrimination on the affected hand significantly without changes contralaterally. Current pain intensity remained unchanged on average, but decreased in four patients by ≥30%. This limited pain relief might be due to the short stimulation period of 5 days only. In contrast, after LF-rSS, tactile discrimination was impaired in all four patients, while detection thresholds and pain were not affected. Our data suggest that HF-rSS could be used as a novel approach in CRPS treatment to improve sensory loss. Longer treatment periods might be required to induce consistent pain relief.

  15. High-Frequency Repetitive Sensory Stimulation as Intervention to Improve Sensory Loss in Patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome I

    PubMed Central

    David, Marianne; Dinse, Hubert R.; Mainka, Tina; Tegenthoff, Martin; Maier, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Achieving perceptual gains in healthy individuals or facilitating rehabilitation in patients is generally considered to require intense training to engage neuronal plasticity mechanisms. Recent work, however, suggested that beneficial outcome similar to training can be effectively acquired by a complementary approach in which the learning occurs in response to mere exposure to repetitive sensory stimulation (rSS). For example, high-frequency repetitive sensory stimulation (HF-rSS) enhances tactile performance and induces cortical reorganization in healthy subjects and patients after stroke. Patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) show impaired tactile performance associated with shrinkage of cortical maps. We here investigated the feasibility and efficacy of HF-rSS, and low-frequency rSS (LF-rSS) to enhance tactile performance and reduce pain intensity in 20 patients with CRPS type I. Intermittent high- or low-frequency electrical stimuli were applied for 45 min/day to all fingertips of the affected hand for 5 days. Main outcome measures were spatial two-point-discrimination thresholds and mechanical detection thresholds measured on the tip of the index finger bilaterally. Secondary endpoint was current pain intensity. All measures were assessed before and on day 5 after the last stimulation session. HF-rSS applied in 16 patients improved tactile discrimination on the affected hand significantly without changes contralaterally. Current pain intensity remained unchanged on average, but decreased in four patients by ≥30%. This limited pain relief might be due to the short stimulation period of 5 days only. In contrast, after LF-rSS, tactile discrimination was impaired in all four patients, while detection thresholds and pain were not affected. Our data suggest that HF-rSS could be used as a novel approach in CRPS treatment to improve sensory loss. Longer treatment periods might be required to induce consistent pain relief. PMID:26635719

  16. Brain Mechanisms Supporting Violated Expectations of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Zeidan, Fadel; Lobanov, Oleg V.; Kraft, Robert A.; Coghill, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    The subjective experience of pain is influenced by interactions between prior experiences, future predictions and incoming afferent information. Expectations of high pain can exacerbate pain while expectations of low pain during a consistently noxious stimulus can produce significant reductions in pain. However, the brain mechanisms associated with processing mismatches between expected and experienced pain are poorly understood, but are important for imparting salience to a sensory event in order to override erroneous top-down expectancy-mediated information. The present investigation examined pain-related brain activation when expectations of pain were abruptly violated. After conditioning participants to cues predicting low or high pain, ten incorrectly cued stimuli were administered across 56 stimulus trials to determine if expectations would be less influential on pain when there is a high discordance between pre-stimulus cues and corresponding thermal stimulation. Incorrectly cued stimuli produced pain ratings and pain-related brain activation consistent with placebo analgesia, nocebo hyperalgesia, and violated expectations. Violated expectations of pain were associated with activation in distinct regions of the inferior parietal lobe, including the supramarginal and angular gyrus, and intraparietal sulcus, the superior parietal lobe, cerebellum and occipital lobe. Thus, violated expectations of pain engage mechanisms supporting salience-driven sensory discrimination, working memory, and associative learning processes. By overriding the influence of expectations on pain, these brain mechanisms are likely engaged in clinical situations where patients’ unrealistic expectations for pain relief diminish the efficacy of pain treatments. Accordingly, these findings underscore the importance of maintaining realistic expectations to augment the effectiveness of pain management. PMID:26083664

  17. Intractable sacroiliac joint pain treated with peripheral nerve field stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabortty, Shushovan; Kumar, Sanjeev; Gupta, Deepak; Rudraraju, Sruthi

    2016-01-01

    As many as 62% low back pain patients can have sacroiliac joint (SIJ) pain. There is limited (to poor) evidence in regards to long-term pain relief with therapeutic intra-articular injections and/or conventional (heat or pulsed) radiofrequency ablations (RFAs) for SIJ pain. We report our pain-clinic experience with peripheral nerve field stimulation (PNFS) for two patients of intractable SIJ pain. They had reported absence of long-term pain relief (pain relief >50% for at least 2 weeks postinjection and at least 3 months post-RFA) with SIJ injections and SIJ RFAs. Two parallel permanent 8-contact subcutaneous stimulating leads were implanted under the skin overlying their painful SIJ. Adequate stimulation in the entire painful area was confirmed. For implantable pulse generator placement, a separate subcutaneous pocket was made in the upper buttock below the iliac crest level ipsilaterally. During the pain-clinic follow-up period, the patients had reduced their pain medications requirements by half with an additional report of more than 50% improvement in their functional status. The first patient passed away 2 years after the PNFS procedure due to medical causes unrelated to his chronic pain. The second patient has been comfortable with PNFS-induced analgesic regimen during her pain-clinic follow-up during last 5 years. In summary, PNFS can be an effective last resort option for SIJ pain wherein conventional interventional pain techniques have failed, and analgesic medication requirements are escalating or causing unwarranted side-effects. PMID:27625495

  18. Shaded Relief, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This topographic image shows the western side of the volcanically active Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia. The data are from the first C-band mapping swath of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). On the left side are four rivers, which flow northwest to the Sea of Okhotsk. These rivers are, from the south to north, Tigil, Amanina, Voyampolka, and Zhilovaya. The broad, flat floodplains of the rivers are shown in blue. These rivers are important spawning grounds for salmon. In the right side of the image is the Sredinnyy Khrebet, the volcanic mountain range that makes up the 3spine2 of the peninsula. The cluster of hills to the lower right is a field of small dormant volcanoes. High resolution SRTM topographic data will be used by geologists to study how volcanoes form and understand the hazards posed by future eruptions.

    This shaded relief image was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. A computer-generated artificial light source illuminates the elevation data to produce a pattern of light and shadows. Slopes facing the light appear bright, while those facing away are shaded. On flatter surfaces, the pattern of light and shadows can reveal subtle features in the terrain. Colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Colors range from blue at the lowest elevations to white at the highest elevations. This image contains about 2300 meters (7500 feet) of total relief. Shaded relief maps are commonly used in applications such as geologic mapping and land use planning.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11,2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and

  19. [Postoperative pain management. Aims and organization of a strategy for postoperative acute pain therapy].

    PubMed

    Nolli, M; Nicosia, F

    2000-09-01

    The Health Services, not only the Italian one, is under pressure because of request for improving treatment quality and the financial need for reorganization and cost-saving. It's required a rationalization of intervention, together with a careful choice of the best and cheapest techniques and the demonstration of their efficacy. The anaesthesia service activity, in a period of cost rationalization and funds restriction should be aimed to appropriate outcome measures corrected by both patient's risk factors and surgical-anaesthesiological case-mix. The development of a complete strategy for surgical pain management might run into two phases. The first phase, internal and mono-specialistic, should develop like the creation of an Acute Pain Team. The main processes are: focusing the problem (charge of the care), training, information, teaching methodology (timing, methods, drugs, techniques, etc.) and the audit (before and after changes). The main aims are the evaluation of the level of analgesia and pain relief or patient's satisfaction which are partial endpoints useful to demonstrate the improvement and the efficacy of the new pain management strategies. The second phase, multidisciplinary, is directed toward the creation of a Postoperative Evaluation Team. The main objective is to set up a collaborative clinical group able to identify the criteria for quality, efficacy and safety. The major purpose is the evaluation of major outcome measures: surgical outcome, morbidity, mortality and length of hospitalization. The improvement in the quality of postoperative pain treatment goes through a better organization and a progressive increase of the already available therapy. The achievement of the result and the quality projects depend on the interaction among staff members with different behaviours and settings. Internal teaching and training, continuous education for doctors and nurses, and external information, marketing and improvement of attractive capability of

  20. [Living with pain--elderly women as experts in the management on their chronic musculoskeletal pain].

    PubMed

    Huber, Evelyn; Spirig, Rebecca

    2004-10-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain in the elderly is very common. The aim of this qualitative study was to gain insight in elderly people's pain medication beliefs. Problem-focused interviews with eight women were conducted. The results show them to be experts in managing pain, which task turns out to be too complex to be described in terms of pain medication beliefs. Using the method of qualitative content analyses five main categories including subcategories were inductively generated and presented in a structured way. The category "to be carried by one's life and illness trajectory" evolved as a basic category in the pain management. It includes the subcategories "to gain experiences from one's life and illness", "to have knowledge of the causes of pain and of their treatment", "to learn how to manage pain in everyday life" as well as "to rely on spiritual well-being". Most important for the women is their every day reality "to live with pain and its physical, psychological, practical and social effects". This leads to "weigh, to combine and to evaluate treatments for pain relief" which includes the subcategories "to be disciplined in carrying out non-pharmacological measures for pain relief", "to use pain medication sparingly but purposefully" and "to cooperate as a partner with health professionals". Some of the participants are challenged by "reaching their limits", which means "to reach the limits of endurable pain", "to experience the limits of failed treatment effects" as well as "to reach the limits of endurable treatment side effects". "To sustain one's quality of life in spite of pain" seems to be the aim of the elderly women's endeavour. The results of this study demand collaborative care in a partnership with elderly people with pain acknowledging their expertise. The results also ask for transdisciplinary efforts to support elderly persons with pain and for the development as well as the evaluation of self-management education programs.

  1. Pain management in polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Bajwa, Z H; Gupta, S; Warfield, C A; Steinman, T I

    2001-11-01

    Pain is a common complaint in patients with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease, and a systematic approach is needed to differentiate the etiology of the pain and define an approach to management. A thorough history is the best clue to the multifactorial causes of the pain, superimposed upon an understanding of the complex innervation network that supplies the kidneys. The appropriate use of diagnostic radiology (especially MRI) will assist in differentiating the mechanical low back pain caused by cyst enlargement, cyst rupture and cyst infection. Also, the increased incidence of uric acid nephrolithiasis as a factor in producing renal colic must be considered when evaluating acute pain in the population at risk. MRI is not a good technique to detect renal calculi, a frequent cause of pain in polycystic kidney disease. If stone disease is a possibility, then abdominal CT scan and/or ultrasound should be the method of radiologic investigation. Pain management is generally not approached in a systematic way in clinical practice because most physicians lack training in the principles of pain management. The first impulse to give narcotics for pain relief must be avoided. Since chronic pain cannot be "cured," an approach must include techniques that allow the patient to adapt to chronic pain so as to limit interference with their life style. A detailed stepwise approach for acute and chronic pain strategies for the patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is outlined.

  2. Acupuncture for Cancer-Induced Bone Pain?

    PubMed Central

    Paley, Carole A.; Bennett, Michael I.; Johnson, Mark I.

    2011-01-01

    Bone pain is the most common type of pain in cancer. Bony metastases are common in advanced cancers, particularly in multiple myeloma, breast, prostate or lung cancer. Current pain-relieving strategies include the use of opioid-based analgesia, bisphosphonates and radiotherapy. Although patients experience some pain relief, these interventions may produce unacceptable side-effects which inevitably affect the quality of life. Acupuncture may represent a potentially valuable adjunct to existing strategies for pain relief and it is known to be relatively free of harmful side-effects. Although acupuncture is used in palliative care settings for all types of cancer pain the evidence-base is sparse and inconclusive and there is very little evidence to show its effectiveness in relieving cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP). The aim of this critical review is to consider the known physiological effects of acupuncture and discuss these in the context of the pathophysiology of malignant bone pain. The aim of future research should be to produce an effective protocol for treating CIBP with acupuncture based on a sound, evidence-based rationale. The physiological mechanisms presented in this review suggest that this is a realistic objective. PMID:21799687

  3. Painful peripheral states and sympathetic blocks.

    PubMed Central

    Loh, L; Nathan, P W

    1978-01-01

    In various chronic painful states, the sympathetic nerve supply was blocked either by injecting the sympathetic chain and ganglia with local anaesthesia or by the injection of guanethidine during occlusion of the circulation. There was a striking relation between the presence of hyperpathia and the relief of pain by the blocks. The sympathetic block was unlikely to relieve the pain unless hyperpathia accompanied the pain; when hyperpathia was present, a sympathetic block relieved both the constant pain and the hyperpathia. The effectiveness of the guanethidine blocks shows that the pain and the hyperpathia are maintained by the emission of noradrenaline in the periphery. The facts related to the sympathetic system and sensibility are discussed. PMID:690645

  4. Aberrant cervical vasculature anastomosis as cause of neck pain and successful treatment with embolization technique.

    PubMed

    He, Lucy; Ladner, Travis R; Cobb, Mark; Mocco, J

    2016-01-27

    We report a patient with non-dermatomal radiating neck pain without focal neurologic deficit. Traditional workup could not identify an anatomic or biomechanical cause. Imaging showed a deep cervical vessel centered in the region of pain. Angiography later identified an aberrant anastomosis of this vessel with the occipital artery. Subsequent endovascular embolization of this arterial trunk resulted in complete pain relief.

  5. Knowledge and Beliefs Regarding Pain in a Sample of Nursing Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrell, Betty R.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A survey of 498 nursing faculty showed that knowledge and beliefs about pain and the content of nursing curriculum on the topic were less than optimal. Particularly lacking areas included pain relief, pharmacological interventions, and differentiation of acute from chronic pain. (SK)

  6. ENDOGENOUS ANALGESIA, DEPENDENCE, AND LATENT PAIN SENSITIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Bradley K; Corder, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous activation of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) provides relief from acute pain. Recent studies have established that tissue inflammation produces latent pain sensitization (LS) that is masked by spinal MOR signaling for months, even after complete recovery from injury and re-establishment of normal pain thresholds. Disruption with MOR inverse agonists reinstates pain and precipitates cellular, somatic and aversive signs of physical withdrawal; this phenomenon requires N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated activation of calcium-sensitive adenylyl cyclase type 1 (AC1). In this review, we present a new conceptual model of the transition from acute to chronic pain, based on the delicate balance between LS and endogenous analgesia that develops after painful tissue injury. First, injury activates pain pathways. Second, the spinal cord establishes MOR constitutive activity (MORCA) as it attempts to control pain. Third, over time, the body becomes dependent on MORCA, which paradoxically sensitizes pain pathways. Stress or injury escalates opposing inhibitory and excitatory influences on nociceptive processing as a pathological consequence of increased endogenous opioid tone. Pain begets MORCA begets pain vulnerability in a vicious cycle. The final result is a silent insidious state characterized by the escalation of two opposing excitatory and inhibitory influences on pain transmission: LS mediated by AC1 (which maintains accelerator), and pain inhibition mediated by MORCA (which maintains the brake). This raises the prospect that opposing homeostatic interactions between MORCA analgesia and latent NMDAR–AC1-mediated pain sensitization create a lasting vulnerability to develop chronic pain. Thus, chronic pain syndromes may result from a failure in constitutive signaling of spinal MORs and a loss of endogenous analgesic control. An overarching long-term therapeutic goal of future research is to alleviate chronic pain by either: a) facilitating endogenous opioid

  7. 29 CFR 4041.4 - Disaster relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Disaster relief. 4041.4 Section 4041.4 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION PLAN TERMINATIONS TERMINATION OF SINGLE-EMPLOYER PLANS General Provisions § 4041.4 Disaster relief. When the President of the United...

  8. 29 CFR 4041.4 - Disaster relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disaster relief. 4041.4 Section 4041.4 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION PLAN TERMINATIONS TERMINATION OF SINGLE-EMPLOYER PLANS General Provisions § 4041.4 Disaster relief. When the President of the United...

  9. 75 FR 10707 - MORTGAGE ASSISTANCE RELIEF SERVICES

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-09

    ... electronic form should be submitted at ( http://public.commentworks.com/ftc/MARS-NPRM ) (and following the... mortgage assistance relief service (MARS) providers likely will fall within the jurisdiction of the FTC. B... Relief Services (MARS) Rulemaking.\\14\\ The MARS ANPR sought public comment on: (1) the...

  10. Relief and Distress after Marital Separation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spanier, Graham B.; Thompson, Linda

    1983-01-01

    Examined relief and distress as responses to the termination of marriage in a study of 205 individuals soon after their final separation. Results showed that relief is a frequent response to marital separation. Group differences in response were associated with the rewards and costs of ending a marriage. (JAC)

  11. 28 CFR 36.504 - Relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... relief; (ii) Providing an auxiliary aid or service, modification of policy, practice, or procedure, or... disabilities; (2) May award other relief as the court considers to be appropriate, including monetary damages... “monetary damages” and “such other relief” do not include punitive damages. (d) Judicial consideration. In...

  12. Aspirator increases relief valve poppet stroke

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biddle, M. E.

    1967-01-01

    Addition of an aspirator to a relief valve increases the valve poppet stroke under dynamic flow conditions. The aspirator allows poppet inlet dynamic forces to overcome relief valve spring force. It reduces the fluid pressure in the skirt cavity by providing a low pressure sense probe.

  13. Modeling of tower relief dynamics: Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Cassata, J.R.; Dasgupta, S.; Gandhi, S.L. )

    1993-11-01

    Dynamic simulations of individual towers or systems of distillations columns overcome limitations of steady-state models by rigorously determining dynamic responses. These will lead to a realistic quantification of relief header and flare system load and identify the design-setting relief scenario. Determination of distillation tower relief loads based on steady-state simulations or recognized methods of approximation can lead to over designing relief systems by large margins. This can result in unnecessary capital expenditure for relief headers and flare systems that can significantly alter the economics of a proposed project. Such overly conservative requirements may even cause potentially attractive projects to be unnecessarily canceled. In addition, approximate methods or analyses based on steady-state simulations sometimes do not identify the design-setting relief mode. Part 1 introduced the PRV and tower dynamic models. Different strategies were shown that can simplify these models. These strategies include tower segmentation, tray lumping and component lumping. Two case studies illustrate the advantages of dynamic models. The two studies are a depentanizer tower relief study and a delthanizer tower relief study.

  14. 7 CFR 636.20 - Equitable relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Equitable relief. 636.20 Section 636.20 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING WILDLIFE HABITAT INCENTIVE PROGRAM § 636.20 Equitable relief. (a) If...

  15. 7 CFR 636.20 - Equitable relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Equitable relief. 636.20 Section 636.20 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING WILDLIFE HABITAT INCENTIVE PROGRAM § 636.20 Equitable relief. (a) If...

  16. 7 CFR 636.20 - Equitable relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Equitable relief. 636.20 Section 636.20 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING WILDLIFE HABITAT INCENTIVE PROGRAM § 636.20 Equitable relief. (a) If...

  17. 7 CFR 636.20 - Equitable relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equitable relief. 636.20 Section 636.20 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING WILDLIFE HABITAT INCENTIVES PROGRAM § 636.20 Equitable relief. (a) If...

  18. 7 CFR 636.20 - Equitable relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Equitable relief. 636.20 Section 636.20 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING WILDLIFE HABITAT INCENTIVE PROGRAM § 636.20 Equitable relief. (a) If...

  19. Analysis of inservice inspection relief requests

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrich, D.A.; Cook, J.F.

    1989-08-01

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations require inspection (ISI) of boiling or pressurized water-cooled nuclear power plants be performed in accordance with a referenced edition and addenda of Section XI, ``Rules for Inservice Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant components,`` of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. The regulations permit licensees to request relief from the NRC from specific ASME Code requirements that are determined to be impractical for the specific licensee. The NRC evaluates these requests and may grant such relief, but the NRC may also impose alternative or augmented inspections to assure structural reliability. The purpose,of this task was to evaluate the basis for ISI nondestructive examination (NDE) relief requests and to evaluate the effect of proposed ASME Code changes that would reduce the need for such requests or provide for more complete information in relief requests. This report contains the results of an analysis of an ISI relief request data base that has been expanded to include 1195 ISI relief requests versus the 296 relief requests covered in the first report in April 1987, EGG-SD-7430. Also relief requests were added to the data base which came from both first and second 10-year inspection intervals for several facilities. This provided the means to analyze the effect of recently approved ASME Code cases and updated Code requirements, some of which have been published as a result of earlier work on this task.

  20. Fertility and Symptom Relief following Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Myomectomy

    PubMed Central

    Pitter, Michael C.; Srouji, Serene S.; Gargiulo, Antonio R.; Kardos, Leslie; Seshadri-Kreaden, Usha; Hubert, Helen B.; Weitzman, Glenn A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To examine success of robot-assisted laparoscopic myomectomy (RALM) measured by sustained symptom relief and fertility. Methods. This is a retrospective survey of 426 women who underwent RALM for fibroids, symptom relief, or infertility at three practice sites across the US. We examined rates of symptom recurrence and pregnancy and factors associated with these outcomes. Results. Overall, 70% of women reported being symptom-free, with 62.9% free of symptoms after three years. At >3 years, 66.7% of women who underwent surgery to treat infertility and 80% who were also symptom-free reported achieving pregnancy. Factors independently associated with symptom recurrence included greater time after surgery, preoperative dyspareunia, multiple fibroid surgeries, smoking after surgery, and preexisting diabetes. Factors positively correlated with achieving pregnancy included desiring pregnancy, prior pregnancy, greater time since surgery, and Caucasian race. Factors negatively correlated with pregnancy were advanced age and symptom recurrence. Conclusions. This paper, the first to examine symptom recurrence after RALM, demonstrates both short- and long-term effectiveness in providing symptom relief. Furthermore, RALM may have the potential to improve the chance of conception, even in a population at high risk of subfertility, with greater benefits among those who remain symptom-free. These findings require prospective validation. PMID:25969688

  1. Sexual pain.

    PubMed

    Boardman, Lori A; Stockdale, Colleen K

    2009-12-01

    Sexual pain is an underrecognized and poorly treated constellation of disorders that significantly impact affected women and their partners. Recognized as a form of chronic pain, sexual pain disorders are heterogeneous and include dyspareunia (superficial and deep), vaginismus, vulvodynia, vestibulitis, and noncoital sexual pain disorder. Women too often tolerate pain in the belief that this will meet their partners' needs. This article provides a review of the terminology and definition of the condition, theories on the pathophysiology, diagnostic considerations, and recommendations on the management of female sexual pain.

  2. Disrupted Brain Circuitry for Pain-Related Reward/Punishment in Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Loggia, Marco L.; Berna, Chantal; Kim, Jieun; Cahalan, Christine M.; Gollub, Randy L.; Wasan, Ajay D.; Harris, Richard E.; Edwards, Robert R.; Napadow, Vitaly

    2015-01-01

    Objective While patients suffering from fibromyalgia (FM) are known to exhibit hyperalgesia, the central mechanisms contributing to this altered pain processing are not fully understood. In this study we investigate potential dysregulation of the neural circuitry underlying cognitive and hedonic aspects of the subjective experience of pain such as anticipation of pain and of pain relief. Methods FMRI was performed on 31 FM patients and 14 controls while they received cuff pressure pain stimuli on their leg, calibrated to elicit a pain rating of ∼50/100. During the scan, subjects also received visual cues informing them of impending pain onset (pain anticipation) and pain offset (relief anticipation). Results Patients exhibited less robust activations during both anticipation of pain and anticipation of relief within regions commonly thought to be involved in sensory, affective, cognitive and pain-modulatory processes. In healthy controls, direct searches and region-of-interest analyses in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) revealed a pattern of activity compatible with the encoding of punishment: activation during pain anticipation and pain stimulation, but deactivation during relief anticipation. In FM patients, however, VTA activity during pain and anticipation (of both pain and relief) periods was dramatically reduced or abolished. Conclusion FM patients exhibit disrupted brain responses to reward/punishment. The VTA is a source for reward-linked dopaminergic/GABAergic neurotransmission in the brain and our observations are compatible with reports of altered dopaminergic/GABAergic neurotransmission in FM. Reduced reward/punishment signaling in FM may relate to the augmented central processing of pain and reduced efficacy of opioid treatments in these patients. PMID:24449585

  3. Pain from bluebottle jellyfish stings.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; McGee, Richard G; Webster, Angela C

    2015-07-01

    An 11-year-old girl presented to the emergency department with severe pain after a jellyfish sting at a New South Wales beach. Bluebottle (Physalia) jellyfish was deemed the most likely cause considering her geographical location. The Australian Resuscitation Council Guideline (2010) suggests immersing in water as hot as can be tolerated for 20 min for treating pain from jellyfish stings. This guideline was written based on past case reports, books and randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We performed a search to assess the most current evidence for relief of pain from Bluebottle jellyfish stings, which yielded two systematic reviews and seven RCTs. Both systematic reviews had similar conclusions, with one of the RCTs used in both reviews showing the most relevance to our presenting patient in terms of demographics, location and jellyfish type. This journal club article is an appraisal of this RCT by Loten et al. and the validity of its conclusion that hot water immersion is most effective for the relief of pain from Bluebottle stings.

  4. Modeling of tower relief dynamics: Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Cassata, J.R.; Dasgupta, S.; Gandhi, S.L. )

    1993-10-01

    In an environmentally responsible, safe and health-conscious design, a relief system must contain all relieving gases or vapors. The system must include treatment of these gases or vapors in a flare, scrubber or other appropriate device prior to discharge to the atmosphere. The benefit of a dynamic simulation is most significant in designing these systems. Dynamic modeling provides accurate answers to key questions which must be addressed. It identifies the design-setting relief scenario for any possible upset such as loss of reflux, power failure, loss of cooling water, fire, etc. It accurately quantifies the maximum relief rate and time dependency of the relief rates. This permits a safe relief system design that is not overly conservative.

  5. The Use of Music in Labor: Pain Perception

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    that the use of noninvasive pain relief methods such as relaxation and music therapy , may be useful for reducing the affective component of pain...techniques and decreased pain and discomfort. The participants took part in six individual, predelivery music therapy sessions and listened to preselected...of the questionnaire responses. A multiple correlation matrix was constructed to determine the value of music therapy home practice. Hanser, Larsen

  6. The treatment of chronic pain with psychotropic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Merskey, H.; Hester, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    The treatment is described of thirty patients with chronic nervous system lesion causing intractable pain. Moderately good relief of pain was obtained with a combination of phenothiazines (especially pericyazine), antidepressant drugs and antihistamines. The theoretical implications of this are discussed and it is suggested that the drugs in question act partly by virtue of an effect on the multisynaptic neuronal systems whose activities are related to the experience of pain. PMID:4404064

  7. Positive emotions and brain reward circuits in chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Navratilova, Edita; Morimura, Kozo; Xie, Jennifer Y; Atcherley, Christopher W; Ossipov, Michael H; Porreca, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Chronic pain is an important public health problem that negatively impacts the quality of life of affected individuals and exacts enormous socioeconomic costs. Chronic pain is often accompanied by comorbid emotional disorders including anxiety, depression, and possibly anhedonia. The neural circuits underlying the intersection of pain and pleasure are not well understood. We summarize recent human and animal investigations and demonstrate that aversive aspects of pain are encoded in brain regions overlapping with areas processing reward and motivation. We highlight findings revealing anatomical and functional alterations of reward/motivation circuits in chronic pain. Finally, we review supporting evidence for the concept that pain relief is rewarding and activates brain reward/motivation circuits. Adaptations in brain reward circuits may be fundamental to the pathology of chronic pain. Knowledge of brain reward processing in the context of pain could lead to the development of new therapeutics for the treatment of emotional aspects of pain and comorbid conditions.

  8. Updated Mechanisms of Sickle Cell Disease-Associated Chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Brianna; Meiler, Steffen E.; Bekker, Alex; Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD), a hemoglobinopathy, causes sickling of red blood cells, resulting in vessel blockage, stroke, anemia, inflammation, and extreme pain. A vast majority of SCD patients experience pain on a chronic basis, and many turn to opioids to provide limited relief. The side effects that come with chronic opioid use push for research into understanding the specific mechanisms of SCD-associated chronic pain. Current advances in SCD-associated pain have focused on alterations in the pain pathway including nociceptor sensitization and endogenous pain inducers. This article reviews the underlying pathophysiology of SCD, potential pain mechanisms, current treatments and their mechanism of action, and future directions of SCD-associated pain management. The information provided could help propel research in SCD-associated chronic pain and uncover novel treatment options for clinicians. PMID:26301256

  9. [Radionuclides for metastatic bone pain palliation].

    PubMed

    Lass, Piotr

    2002-10-01

    The paper overviews the role of systemic radionuclide therapy in patients with disseminated bone metastases. Most patients with bone metastases experience painful symptoms. Systemic radioisotope therapy is an alternative to traditional hemibody radiation in cases of multiple, diffuse metastases. Usually given as a single i.v. slow infusion it provides a pain relief beginning in one to three weeks, with a mean duration up to several months, depending on the kind of radioisotope applied. The paper overviews the role of unsealed source therapy with these bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals in palliating pain, improving quality of life, indications, contraindications and complications of this therapy are discussed, as well as cost-benefit aspects.

  10. Management of painful neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Brix Finnerup, Nanna; Hein Sindrup, Søren; Staehelin Jensen, Troels

    2013-01-01

    incompensation and epilepsy. The most common side-effects of gabapentin and pregabalin are CNS-related side-effects with dizziness and somnolence. Peripheral edema, weight gain, nausea, vertigo, asthenia, dry mouth, and ataxia may also occur. Topical treatments are better tolerated due to lack of systemic side-effects but there is still limited evidence for the long-term efficacy of these drugs. With available drugs, the average pain reduction is about 20-30%, and only 20-35% of the patients will achieve at least 50% pain reduction, which stresses the need of a multidisciplinary approach to pain treatment.

  11. Pain Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... acupuncture, chiropractic care, massage or other manual therapies, yoga, herbal and nutritional therapies, or others. This information helps the health care provider understand the nature of the pain or the potential benefits of treatment. The goals of the comprehensive pain ...

  12. Anal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... change in bowel habit or rectal bleeding. A hemorrhoid that develops quickly or is particularly painful may ... your doctor. The blood clot of a thrombosed hemorrhoid, although painful, can't break loose and travel, ...

  13. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... specific points on the body. Some people with low back pain report that acupuncture helps relieve their symptoms. Massage. ... Accessed May 29, 2015. Adult acute and subacute low back pain. Bloomington, Minn.: Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement. http:// ...

  14. Period Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... You may also have other symptoms, such as lower back pain, nausea, diarrhea, and headaches. Period pain is not ... Taking a hot bath Doing relaxation techniques, including yoga and meditation You might also try taking over- ...

  15. Finger pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - finger ... Nearly everyone has had finger pain at some time. You may have: Tenderness Burning Stiffness Numbness Tingling Coldness Swelling Change in skin color Redness Many conditions, such ...

  16. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oh, my aching back!", you are not alone. Back pain is one of the most common medical problems, ... 10 people at some point during their lives. Back pain can range from a dull, constant ache to ...

  17. Breast Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... before your period and sometimes continuing through your menstrual cycle. The pain may be moderate or severe, and ... breasts. Throughout the month, not related to your menstrual cycle. Postmenopausal women sometimes have breast pain, but breast ...

  18. Hip Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... clues about the underlying cause. Problems within the hip joint itself tend to result in pain on the ... tendons and other soft tissues that surround your hip joint. Hip pain can sometimes be caused by diseases ...

  19. Satisfaction with and Perception of Pain Management among Palliative Patients with Breakthrough Pain: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Pathmawathi, Subramanian; Beng, Tan Seng; Li, Lee Mei; Rosli, Roshaslina; Sharwend, Supermanian; Kavitha, Rasaiah R; Christopher, Boey Chiong Meng

    2015-08-01

    Breakthrough pain is a significant contributor to much suffering by patients. The experience of intense pain may interfere with, and affect, daily life functioning and has major consequences on patients' well-being if it is not well managed. The area of breakthrough pain has not been fully understood. This study thus aimed to explore the experiences of breakthrough pain among palliative patients. A qualitative study based on a series of open-ended interviews among 21 palliative patients suffering from pain at an urban tertiary hospital in Malaysia was conducted. Five themes were generated: (i) pain viewed as an unbearable experience causing misery in the lives of patients, (ii) deterioration of body function and no hope of recovery, (iii) receiving of inadequate pain management for pain, (iv) insensitivity of healthcare providers toward patients' pain experience, and (v) pain coping experiences of patients. The findings revealed that nonpharmacologic approaches such as psychosocial support should be introduced to the patients. Proper guidance and information should be given to healthcare providers to improve the quality of patient care. Healthcare providers should adopt a sensitive approach in caring for patients' needs. The aim is to meet the needs of the patients who want to be pain free or to attain adequate relief of their pain for breakthrough pain.

  20. Neurodevelopmental Implications of Neonatal Pain and Morphine Exposure.

    PubMed

    Kesavan, Kalpashri

    2015-11-01

    Neonatal pain management has evolved dramatically in the past few decades. Evidence is clear that neonates experience pain. Furthermore, we are increasingly aware of the detrimental effects of untreated neonatal pain during a critical period of neuronal maturation. Providing safe and effective pain relief is a primary goal of neonatal critical care specialists to ensure good outcomes. However, there are lingering concerns regarding the harmful effects of sedative-analgesics on the developing brain. Thus, striking a fine balance between effective analgesia and avoiding serious short- and long-term adverse effects from pain medications remains a major challenge for caregivers.

  1. Patellofemoral Pain.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Rebecca A; Khadavi, Michael J; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Patellofemoral pain is characterized by insidious onset anterior knee pain that is exaggerated under conditions of increased patellofemoral joint stress. A variety of risk factors may contribute to the development of patellofemoral pain. It is critical that the history and physical examination elucidate those risk factors specific to an individual in order to prescribe an appropriate and customized treatment plan. This article aims to review the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, and management of patellofemoral pain.

  2. Analgesic Microneedle Patch for Neuropathic Pain Therapy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xi; Pascual, Conrado; Lieu, Christopher; Oh, Seajin; Wang, Ji; Zou, Bende; Xie, Julian; Li, Zhaohui; Xie, James; Yeomans, David C; Wu, Mei X; Xie, Xinmin Simon

    2017-01-24

    Neuropathic pain caused by nerve injury is debilitating and difficult to treat. Current systemic pharmacological therapeutics for neuropathic pain produce limited pain relief and have undesirable side effects, while current local anesthetics tend to nonspecifically block both sensory and motor functions. Calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), a neuropeptide released from sensory nerve endings, appears to play a significant role in chronic neuropathic pain. In this study, an analgesic microneedle (AMN) patch was developed using dissolvable microneedles to transdermally deliver selective CGRP antagonist peptide in a painless manner for the treatment of localized neuropathic pain. Local analgesic effects were evaluated in rats by testing behavioral pain sensitivity in response to thermal and mechanical stimuli using neuropathic pain models such as spared-nerve injury and diabetic neuropathy pain, as well as neurogenic inflammatory pain model induced by ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation. Unlike several conventional therapies, the AMN patches produced effective analgesia on neuropathic pain without disturbing the normal nociception and motor function of the rat, resulting from the high specificity of the delivered peptide against CGRP receptors. The AMN patches did not cause skin irritation or systemic side effects. These results demonstrate that dissolvable microneedle patches delivering CGRP antagonist peptide provide an effective, safe, and simple approach to mitigate neuropathic pain with significant advantages over current treatments.

  3. Stem cell therapy for neuropathic pain treatment

    PubMed Central

    Siniscalco, D; Rossi, F; Maione, S

    2007-01-01

    Pain initiated or caused by a primary lesion or dysfunction in the nervous system is defined as neuropathic pain. About 75 -150 million people in the United States are suffering for chronic pain disorder. Neuropathic pain has a great impact on the human wellbeing. It is very debilitating and often has an associated degree of depression that contributes to decreasing the quality of life. Moreover, the management of chronic pain is costly to the health care system. Pain is a national healthcare priority in US: the United States Congress has declared the present decade (2001-2010) as the “Decade of Pain Control and Research”. Neuropathic pain is a very complex disease, involving several molecular pathways. Due to its individual character, its treatment is extremely difficult. Current available drugs are usually not acting on the several mechanisms underlying the generation and propagation of pain. Nowadays, pain research is focusing on newer molecular ways, such as stem cell therapy, gene therapy, and viral vectors for delivery of biologic anti-nociceptive molecules. These methods could provide a new therapeutic approach to neuropathic pain relief. PMID:24693013

  4. Expectations predict chronic pain treatment outcomes.

    PubMed

    Cormier, Stéphanie; Lavigne, Geneviève L; Choinière, Manon; Rainville, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests an association between patient pretreatment expectations and numerous health outcomes. However, it remains unclear if and how expectations relate to outcomes after treatments in multidisciplinary pain programs. The present study aims at investigating the predictive association between expectations and clinical outcomes in a large database of chronic pain patients. In this observational cohort study, participants were 2272 patients treated in one of 3 university-affiliated multidisciplinary pain treatment centers. All patients received personalized care, including medical, psychological, and/or physical interventions. Patient expectations regarding pain relief and improvements in quality of life and functioning were measured before the first visit to the pain centers and served as predictor variables. Changes in pain intensity, depressive symptoms, pain interference, and tendency to catastrophize, as well as satisfaction with pain treatment and global impressions of change at 6-month follow-up, were considered as treatment outcomes. Structural equation modeling analyses showed significant positive relationships between expectations and most clinical outcomes, and this association was largely mediated by patients' global impressions of change. Similar patterns of relationships between variables were also observed in various subgroups of patients based on sex, age, pain duration, and pain classification. Such results emphasize the relevance of patient expectations as a determinant of outcomes in multimodal pain treatment programs. Furthermore, the results suggest that superior clinical outcomes are observed in individuals who expect high positive outcomes as a result of treatment.

  5. Treatment of complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Resmini, Giuseppina; Ratti, Chiara; Canton, Gianluca; Murena, Luigi; Moretti, Antimo; Iolascon, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a multifactorial and disabling disorder with complex etiology and pathogenesis. Goals of therapy in CRPS should be pain relief, functional restoration, and psychological stabilization, but early interventions are needed in order to achieve these objectives. Several drugs have been used to reduce pain and to improve functional status in CRPS, despite the lack of scientific evidence supporting their use in this scenario. They include anti-inflammatory drugs, analgesics, anesthetics, anticonvulsants, antidepressants, oral muscle relaxants, corticosteroids, calcitonin, bisphosphonates, calcium channel blockers and topical agents. NSAIDs showed no value in treating CRPS. Glucocorticoids are the only anti-inflammatory drugs for which there is direct clinical trial evidence in early stage of CRPS. Opioids are a reasonable second or third-line treatment option, but tolerance and long term toxicity are unresolved issues. The use of anticonvulsants and tricyclic antidepressants has not been well investigated for pain management in CRPS. During the last years, bisphosphonates have been the mostly studied pharmacologic agents in CRPS treatment and there are good evidence to support their use in this condition. Recently, the efficacy of intravenous (IV) administration of neridronate has been reported in a randomized controlled trial. Significant improvements in VAS score and other indices of pain and quality of life in patients who received four 100 mg IV doses of neridronate versus placebo were reported. These findings were confirmed in the open-extension phase of the study, when patients formerly enrolled in the placebo group received neridronate at the same dosage, and these results were maintained at 1 year follow-up. The current literature concerning sympathetic blocks and sympathectomy techniques lacks evidence of efficacy. Low evidence was recorded for a free radical scavenger, dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) cream (50%). The same level

  6. Foot and hand massage as an intervention for postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiao-Lan; Keck, Juanita F

    2004-06-01

    Physiological responses to pain create harmful effects that prolong the body's recovery after surgery. Patients routinely report mild to moderate pain even though pain medications have been administered. Complementary strategies based on sound research findings are needed to supplement postoperative pain