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Sample records for achieved partial response

  1. Achieving zero ischemia in minimally invasive partial nephrectomy surgery.

    PubMed

    Hou, Weibin; Ji, Zhigang

    2015-06-01

    Widespread application of the minimally invasive partial nephrectomy (MIPN) techniques like laparoscopic and robotic partial nephrectomy, has been limited by concerns about prolonged warm ischemia. So techniques aiming at performing have been actively explored. A systemic review of literatures on the MIPN without hilar clamping was performed and related methods were summarized. There are mainly seven methods including selective/segmental renal artery clamping technique, selective renal parenchymal clamping technique, targeted renal blood flow interruption technique, laser supported MIPN, radio frequency assisted MIPN, hydro-jet assisted MIPN, and sequential preplaced suture renorrhaphy technique that have been undergoing enthusiastic investigation for achieving MINP without hilar clamping. All of these emerging techniques represent the exploring work to achieve a zero ischemia MIPN for small renal tumors of different characteristics. Though not perfect for any of the technique, they deserve a further assessment during their future experimental and clinical applications.

  2. Achievement motivation and competition: perceptions and responses.

    PubMed

    Scanlan, T K; Ragan, J T

    1978-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of achievement motivation (Nach) on how individuals perceive an evaluative competition situation, whether they prefer to perform in this type of setting, and whether they seek the inherent appraisal information regarding their motoric competence. Specifically, perceived threat to self esteem was examined as indicated by state anxiety responses and measured by the Competitive Short Form of the Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory. State anxiety was assessed at rest, while performing a motor task alone in a nonevaluative setting, and during competition against an equal ability opponent. Situation perference and information seeking behavior were assessed at the conclusion of the closely paced competition. Subjects were asked whether they had perferred performing in the noncompetition or competition situation and were given the opportunity to select the relative ability level of a future opponent. As predicted, the major findings indicated that high Nach males experienced less threat during competition than low Nach males. Further, more high than low Nach individuals perferred the competition situation to the noncompetition situation and sought the evaluative ability information to a greater extent by choosing opponents of equal or greater relative ability for a future hypothetical competition.

  3. Circuit life versus bleeding risk: the impact of achieved activated partial thromboplastin time versus achieved filtration fraction.

    PubMed

    MacEwen, Clare; Watkinson, Peter; Winearls, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    Whilst prolonging hemofilter (circuit) life, heparin increases bleeding risk. The impact of achieved activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) on circuit life and bleeding risk has not been assessed in a modern critically ill cohort. Lowering filtration fraction may be an alternative means of prolonging circuit life, but is often overlooked in critical care. An observational study of 309 consecutive circuits in a general intensive care unit was conducted using a wide target APTT range. Multilevel modeling was used to predict circuit life and bleeding according to achieved APTT and filtration fraction. Independent predictors of circuit failure (i.e. unplanned ending of treatment) included filtration fraction (P<0.001, HR 1.07 per 1% increase), peak APTT (P<0.001, HR 0.8 per 10 s increase or 0.3 APTR increase) and baseline PT (P=0.014, HR 0.91 for every 50% increase). The only significant predictor of bleeding was peak APTT (P=0.017, OR 1.05 per 10 s increase). Every 10 s APTT increase was associated with a 20% reduction in circuit failure, but a 5% increase in hemorrhage. A 3% reduction in filtration fraction was associated with the same improvement in circuit life as a 10 s increase in APTT. Increasing APTT prolongs circuit life but carries a substantial risk of bleeding even in modern practice. Filtration fraction has a large impact on circuit life in the critically ill: a 3% reduction in filtration fraction, e.g. by increasing blood flow or delivering some of the clearance via dialysis, would be expected to reduce circuit failure as much as a 10 s increase in APTT.

  4. Maternal Employment and Adolescent Achievement: Effects of Demandingness, Responsiveness, and Commitment to Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulson, Sharon E.; Slavin, Lesley A.

    This study examined the influences of three parenting variables on children's school achievement: commitment to children's school achievement, demandingness, and responsiveness. The study also examined the influence of maternal employment and satisfaction with employment on the three parenting variables and on children's achievement.…

  5. Behavioral responses to partial-gravity conditions in rats.

    PubMed

    Zeredo, Jorge L; Toda, Kazuo; Matsuura, Masaaki; Kumei, Yasuhiro

    2012-11-01

    The effects of microgravity or hypergravity on living organisms have been studied extensively; however, thus far no studies have addressed the effects of "partial-gravity", that is, the low-gravity levels between the unit gravity (1G) on Earth and zero gravity (0 G) in space. The purpose of the present study was to examine behavioral responses in rats under partial-gravity conditions. Rat behavior was monitored by video cameras during parabolic flights. The flight trajectory was customized in order to generate graded levels of partial gravity. Gravity-dependent behavior patterns were observed in rats. In the conditions of 0.4 G through 0.2G, rats showed startle and crouching. Hindlimb stretching emerged at 0.15 G and was more frequently observed toward 0.01 G. Different thresholds may exist for emotional and balance/posture-related behaviors. PMID:23036524

  6. Are Teachers Responsible for Low Achievement by Poor Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berliner, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Backers of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) law based their support on the belief that teachers and administrators primarily were responsible for low levels of achievement by America's poor. This one-sided view about who is responsible for the nation's achievement gap is both inadequate and unsupported by the evidence. The author argues that harsh…

  7. Superintendents' Responses to the Achievement Gap: An Ethical Critique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Whitney H.; Grogan, Margaret

    2003-01-01

    Uses multidimensional ethical framework to critique 15 Virginia superintendents' responses to the achievement gap as measured by the Standards of Learning (SOL) tests. Questions majority of superintendents' readiness to deal with moral and ethical issues related to achievement gap. (Contains 24 references.) (PKP)

  8. Performance evaluation of partial response continuous phase modulation: Discriminator detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trachtman, Eyal

    1989-09-01

    The principles of continuous phase modulation (CPM) are reviewed and signalling schemes based on it are discussed. The discriminator detector is widely used to detect CPM signals on band limited channels; it is a non-coherent detector which is widely used in mobile communication applications in which fading makes coherent detection difficult; it is suitable for frequency hopping systems. The detector's inferior response to that of a coherent detector can be compensated by suitable design. The performance is compared of various receivers which use the discriminator detector, using an especially written computer simulation. Receiver schemes considered included: Full response signal with integrate and dump filter; Integrate and dump filter with differential symbol detection; zero forcing linear equalization with symbol detection; Decision feedback equalization (DFE); Maximum likelihood sequence estimation; and Tomlinson filter configuration. The Tomlinson filter configuration, which has not previously been used in a CPM communication system, was compared with the other systems with respect to performance and complexity. For all CPM and detection schemes there are optimum values of h, the modulation index and there is no benefit in increasing the value of h and, therefore the bandwidth, beyond this value. Results are presented for various signal schemes, which indicate that detectability performance can be improved and bandwidth reduced by using a partial response CPM. There is a tradeoff between detectability performance and bandwidth, as a function of the baseband pulse duration. It was found that quaternary signal schemes gave better detectability performance than binary schemes, for the same bit-rates. The simulation results indicated that the Tomlinson-DFE configuration was effective for the partial response M-ary CPM channel with discriminator detection; spectral efficiency was not seriously degraded by precoding using the Tomlinson filter, and there was no

  9. Changes in spatiotemporal patterns of hydrological response after partial deforestation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiekenkamp, Inge; Huisman, Johan Alexander; Reemt Bogena, Heye; Lin, Henry; Drüe, Clemens; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-04-01

    Predicting the effects of land use change on hydrology can be extremely challenging. It requires looking beyond the current structure and functioning of hydrological systems to predict how the system is influenced in a changed setting. Although the hydrological effects of land use change have been studied extensively, only few high resolution datasets are available to accurately describe, model and predict detailed changes in spatiotemporal patterns of hydrological fluxes and states due to land use change. The TERENO test site Wüstebach provides a unique monitoring setup to measure the major components of the water balance (evapotranspiration, discharge, precipitation) and the spatiotemporal distribution of soil moisture before and after a partial deforestation. Here, we present 5 years of measured hydrological data, including soil moisture and water budget component data 3 years before and 2 years after the partial deforestation. A data-driven investigation was used to understand changes and related feedback mechanisms in spatiotemporal hydrological response patterns. The effects of deforestation on soil moisture and evapotranspiration were analyzed by comparing states and fluxes for the control and the deforested area. The effects on discharge characteristics were analyzed using discharge metrics, including baseflow separation, peakflow rates and time to peak. Changes in preferential flow occurrence were identified using a sensor response time analysis of soil moisture measurements before and after the deforestation where preferential flow was identified as a non-sequential sequence of sensor response times within the soil. As expected from earlier studies, the partial deforestation caused a decrease in evapotranspiration and an increase in discharge. A closer look at the high resolution datasets however reveals new insights in the intra-annual variability of the water balance components. The overall decrease in evapotranspiration caused a large increase in soil

  10. Response to Intervention (RTI) Effectiveness in Kindergarten Reading Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittaker, Susan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to determine whether kindergarten-reading achievement could be increased by implementing Response to Intervention (RtI) strategies. Kindergarten children (N = 290) who were identified as at-risk for reading difficulties were assigned to receive intervention through a) small reading groups (SRG), b)…

  11. Middle School Response to Intervention and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kelly A. Obrion

    2013-01-01

    This ex post facto descriptive-comparative quantitative study compared the differences in reading achievement between groups of 6th- through 8th-grade students enrolled in a response to intervention (RtI) classroom against groups of students enrolled in a general education classroom. Students across English language learner and low socioeconomic…

  12. Are Teachers Responsible for Low Achievement by Poor Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berliner, David C.

    2010-01-01

    Backers of No Child Left Behind (NCLB) based their support on the belief that teachers and administrators primarily were responsible for low levels of achievement by America's poor. But this one-sided view is both inadequate and unsupported by the evidence. The author argues that harsh social policies and the pernicious effects of poverty are more…

  13. Contextual Determinants of Achievement Responses in Men and Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albino, Judith E.; Shuell, Thomas J.

    Picture stimuli depicting females and males working together were shown to college students by either a male or a female experimenter. Subjects' responses to the pictures were assessed using standard need achievement scoring. A significant interaction was obtained between sex of subject and sex of experimenter, such that higher need achievement…

  14. Transient quantum coherent response to a partially coherent radiation field.

    PubMed

    Sadeq, Zaheen S; Brumer, Paul

    2014-02-21

    The response of an arbitrary closed quantum system to a partially coherent electric field is investigated, with a focus on the transient coherences in the system. As a model we examine, both perturbatively and numerically, the coherences induced in a three level V system. Both rapid turn-on and pulsed turn-on effects are investigated. The effect of a long and incoherent pulse is also considered, demonstrating that during the pulse the system shows a coherent response which reduces after the pulse is over. Both the pulsed scenario and the thermally broadened CW case approach a mixed state in the long time limit, with rates dictated by the adjacent level spacings and the coherence time of the light, and via a mechanism that is distinctly different from traditional decoherence. These two excitation scenarios are also explored for a minimal "toy" model of the electronic levels in pigment protein complex PC645 by both a collisionally broadened CW laser and by a noisy pulse, where unexpectedly long transient coherence times are observed and explained. The significance of environmentally induced decoherence is noted.

  15. Transient quantum coherent response to a partially coherent radiation field

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeq, Zaheen S.; Brumer, Paul

    2014-02-21

    The response of an arbitrary closed quantum system to a partially coherent electric field is investigated, with a focus on the transient coherences in the system. As a model we examine, both perturbatively and numerically, the coherences induced in a three level V system. Both rapid turn-on and pulsed turn-on effects are investigated. The effect of a long and incoherent pulse is also considered, demonstrating that during the pulse the system shows a coherent response which reduces after the pulse is over. Both the pulsed scenario and the thermally broadened CW case approach a mixed state in the long time limit, with rates dictated by the adjacent level spacings and the coherence time of the light, and via a mechanism that is distinctly different from traditional decoherence. These two excitation scenarios are also explored for a minimal “toy” model of the electronic levels in pigment protein complex PC645 by both a collisionally broadened CW laser and by a noisy pulse, where unexpectedly long transient coherence times are observed and explained. The significance of environmentally induced decoherence is noted.

  16. High-performance partially aligned semiconductive single-walled carbon nanotube transistors achieved with a parallel technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yilei; Pillai, Suresh Kumar Raman; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2013-09-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are widely thought to be a strong contender for next-generation printed electronic transistor materials. However, large-scale solution-based parallel assembly of SWNTs to obtain high-performance transistor devices is challenging. SWNTs have anisotropic properties and, although partial alignment of the nanotubes has been theoretically predicted to achieve optimum transistor device performance, thus far no parallel solution-based technique can achieve this. Herein a novel solution-based technique, the immersion-cum-shake method, is reported to achieve partially aligned SWNT networks using semiconductive (99% enriched) SWNTs (s-SWNTs). By immersing an aminosilane-treated wafer into a solution of nanotubes placed on a rotary shaker, the repetitive flow of the nanotube solution over the wafer surface during the deposition process orients the nanotubes toward the fluid flow direction. By adjusting the nanotube concentration in the solution, the nanotube density of the partially aligned network can be controlled; linear densities ranging from 5 to 45 SWNTs/μm are observed. Through control of the linear SWNT density and channel length, the optimum SWNT-based field-effect transistor devices achieve outstanding performance metrics (with an on/off ratio of ~3.2 × 10(4) and mobility 46.5 cm(2) /Vs). Atomic force microscopy shows that the partial alignment is uniform over an area of 20 × 20 mm(2) and confirms that the orientation of the nanotubes is mostly along the fluid flow direction, with a narrow orientation scatter characterized by a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of <15° for all but the densest film, which is 35°. This parallel process is large-scale applicable and exploits the anisotropic properties of the SWNTs, presenting a viable path forward for industrial adoption of SWNTs in printed, flexible, and large-area electronics.

  17. Multimodal treatment of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma to achieve complete response results in improved survival

    PubMed Central

    Newell, Pippa H; Wu, YingXing; Hoen, Helena; Uppal, Richa; Thiesing, John Tyler; Sasadeusz, Kevin; Cassera, Maria A; Wolf, Ronald F; Hansen, Paul; Hammill, Chet W

    2015-01-01

    Introduction With technological advances, questions arise regarding how to best fit newer treatment modalities, such as transarterial therapies, into the treatment algorithm for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods Between 2005 and 2011, 128 patients initially treated with transarterial radioembolization or chemoembolization using drug-eluting beads were identified. The response was graded retrospectively. Toxicity was measured 1, 3, and 6 months after the first and last treatments. Results Sixty-five patients (53%) were advanced stage. Twenty patients (16%) had an initial complete response, but with additional treatments, this was increased to 46 (36%). Patients with a complete response as their best response to treatment had a median survival [95% confidence interval (CI)] of 5.77 (2.58, upper limit not yet reached) years, significantly longer than those whose best response was a partial response, 1.22 (0.84, 2.06) years and those with stable disease as their best response, 0.34 (0.29, 0.67) years. Repeated treatments did not increase toxicity. Discussion This retrospective review of patients treated for intermediate and advanced stage HCC revealed a significant survival advantage in patients who achieved a complete response. These data support use of a multi-modality approach to intermediate and advanced stage HCC, combining liver-directed treatments as necessary to achieve a complete response. PMID:25580988

  18. Maternal responsiveness and children's achievement of language milestones.

    PubMed

    Tamis-LeMonda, C S; Bornstein, M H; Baumwell, L

    2001-01-01

    This prospective longitudinal study examined the contribution of dimensions of maternal responsiveness (descriptions, play, imitations) to the timing of five milestones in children's (N = 40) early expressive language: first imitations, first words, 50 words in expressive language, combinatorial speech, and the use of language to talk about the past. Events-History Analysis, a statistical technique that estimates the extent to which predictors influence the timing of events, was used. At 9 and 13 months, maternal responsiveness and children's activities (e.g., vocalizations, play) were coded from videotaped interactions of mother-child free play; information about children's language acquisition was obtained through biweekly interviews with mothers from 9 through 21 months. Maternal responsiveness at both ages predicted the timing of children's achieving language milestones over and above children's observed behaviors. Responsiveness at 13 months was a stronger predictor of the timing of language milestones than was responsiveness at 9 months, and certain dimensions of responsiveness were more predictive than others. The multidimensional nature of maternal responsiveness and specificity in mother-child language relations are discussed.

  19. Longitudinal study of young children's responses to challenging achievement situations.

    PubMed

    Ziegert, D I; Kistner, J A; Castro, R; Robertson, B

    2001-01-01

    Three studies were conducted to replicate and extend Dweck's findings regarding young children's responses to challenging achievement situations. Dweck's dichotomous helplessness classification system (i.e., task choice, task choice reason) was replicated with kindergartners, n = 235 (50% male), and first graders, n = 70 (46% male). To test whether individual differences in young children's responses to challenging situations are stable over time, 1- and 5-year follow-ups of the kindergartners were conducted. On the basis of children's responses on age-appropriate behavioral tasks, a composite of cognitive, behavioral, and affective helplessness indices predicted helplessness at 1 and 5 years later, n = 114 (50% male), above and beyond kindergarten task ability and gender, p<.05. Kindergarten helplessness predicted teacher ratings of children's helplessness 5 years later as well, p<.05. The implications of these findings for early intervention are discussed. PMID:11333088

  20. Soft commitment: self-control achieved by response persistence.

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, E; Rachlin, H

    1995-01-01

    With reinforcement contingent on a single peck on either of two available keys (concurrent continuous reinforcement schedules) 4 pigeons, at 80% of free-feeding weights, preferred a smaller-sooner reinforcer (2.5 s of mixed grain preceded by a 0.5-s delay) to a larger-later reinforcer (4.5 s of mixed grain preceded by a 3.5-s delay). However, when the smaller-sooner and larger-later reinforcers were contingent on a concurrent fixed-ratio 31 schedule (the first 30 pecks distributed in any way on the two keys), all pigeons obtained the larger-later reinforcer much more often than they did when only a single peck was required. This "self-control" was achieved by beginning to peck the key leading to the larger-later reinforcer and persisting on that key until reinforcement occurred. We call this persistence "soft commitment" to distinguish it from strict commitment, in which self-control is achieved by preventing changeovers. Soft commitment also effectively achieved self-control when a brief (1-s) signal was inserted between the 30th and 31st response of the ratio and with concurrent fixed-interval 30-s schedules (rather than ratio schedules) of reinforcement. In a second experiment with the same subjects, the fixed ratio was interrupted by darkening both keys and lighting a third (center) key on which pecking was required for various fractions of the fixed-ratio count. The interruption significantly reduced self-control. When interruption was complete (30 responses on the center key followed by a single choice response), pigeons chose the smaller-sooner reinforcer as frequently as they did when only a single choice response was required. PMID:7561671

  1. A class of reduced-complexity Viterbi detectors for partial response continuous phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, A.; Sundberg, C.-E.; Aulin, T.

    1984-10-01

    Partial response continuous phase modulation (CPM) gives constant envelope digital modulation schemes with excellent power spectra. Both narrow main lobe and low spectral tails can be achieved. When these signals are detected in an optimum coherent maximum likelihood sequence detector (Viterbi detector), power efficient schemes can also be designed, sometimes at the expense of receiver complexity. This paper describes a general class of simple Viterbi detectors with reduced complexity compared to the optimum case. The key idea is that the approximate receiver is based on a less complex CPM scheme than the transmitted scheme. The asymptotically optimum reduced-complexity receiver is found for a variety of transmitted schemes and various complexity reduction factors, for a specific class of receivers and modulation indexes. A new distance measure is introduced for the performance analysis. Smooth schemes based on raised cosine pulses are analyzed and simulated for the case of simplified reception. A graceful performance degradation occurs with the reduction of complexity.

  2. Breeding bird response to partially harvested riparian management zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chizinski, Christopher J.; Peterson, Anna; Hanowski, JoAnn; Blinn, Charles R.; Vondracek, Bruce C.; Niemi, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    We compared avian communities among three timber harvesting treatments in 45-m wide even-age riparian management zones (RMZs) placed between upland clearcuts and along one side of first- or second-order streams in northern Minnesota, USA. The RMZs had three treatments: (1) unharvested, (2) intermediate residual basal area (RBA) (targeted goal 11.5 m2/ha, realized 16.0 m2/ha), and (3) low RBA (targeted goal 5.7 m2/ha, realized 8.7 m2/ha). Surveys were conducted one year pre-harvest and three consecutive years post-harvest. There was no change in species richness, diversity, or total abundance associated with harvest but there were shifts in the types of birds within the community. In particular, White-throated Sparrows (Zonotrichia albicollis) and Chestnut-sided Warblers (Dendroica pensylvanica) increased while Ovenbirds (Seiurus aurocapilla) and Red-eyed Vireos (Vireo olivaceus) decreased. The decline of avian species associated with mature forest in the partially harvested treatments relative to controls indicates that maintaining an unharvested RMZ adjacent to an upland harvest may aid in maintaining avian species associated mature forest in Minnesota for at least three years post-harvest. However, our observations do not reflect reproductive success, which is an area for future research.

  3. Raising Black Students' Achievement through Culturally Responsive Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinley, Johnnie H.

    2010-01-01

    While there are theories about how to close the achievement gap between black students and their white peers, what you need is the real low-down from frontline educators who know what works. Here's a book that gives you that plus a whole-school plan for raising the achievement of these chronically underserved students. Drawing from her work with…

  4. Decision Feedback Partial Response Maximum Likelihood for Super-Resolution Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, Ryosuke; Ogata, Tetsuya; Kawasaki, Toshiyuki; Miura, Hiroshi; Yokoi, Kenya

    2007-06-01

    A decision feedback partial response maximum likelihood (PRML) for super-resolution media was developed. Decision feedback is used to compensate for nonlinear distortion in the readout signals of super-resolution media, making it possible to compensate for long-bit nonlinear distortion in small circuits. An field programmable gate array (FPGA) was fabricated with a decision feedback PRML, and a real-time bit error rate (bER) measuring system was developed. As a result, a bER of 4× 10-5 was achieved with an actual readout signal at the double density of a Blu-ray disc converted to the optical properties of the experimental setup using a red-laser system. Also, a bER of 1.5× 10-5 was achieved at double the density of an a high definition digital versatile disc read-only memory (HD DVD-ROM), and the radial and tangential tilt margins were measured in a blue-laser system.

  5. Partial oxidation of landfill leachate in supercritical water: Optimization by response surface methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Yanmeng; Wang, Shuzhong; Xu, Haidong; Guo, Yang; Tang, Xingying

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Partial oxidation of landfill leachate in supercritical water was investigated. • The process was optimized by Box–Behnken design and response surface methodology. • GY{sub H2}, TRE and CR could exhibit up to 14.32 mmol·gTOC{sup −1}, 82.54% and 94.56%. • Small amounts of oxidant can decrease the generation of tar and char. - Abstract: To achieve the maximum H{sub 2} yield (GY{sub H2}), TOC removal rate (TRE) and carbon recovery rate (CR), response surface methodology was applied to optimize the process parameters for supercritical water partial oxidation (SWPO) of landfill leachate in a batch reactor. Quadratic polynomial models for GY{sub H2}, CR and TRE were established with Box–Behnken design. GY{sub H2}, CR and TRE reached up to 14.32 mmol·gTOC{sup −1}, 82.54% and 94.56% under optimum conditions, respectively. TRE was invariably above 91.87%. In contrast, TC removal rate (TR) only changed from 8.76% to 32.98%. Furthermore, carbonate and bicarbonate were the most abundant carbonaceous substances in product, whereas CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} were the most abundant gaseous products. As a product of nitrogen-containing organics, NH{sub 3} has an important effect on gas composition. The carbon balance cannot be reached duo to the formation of tar and char. CR increased with the increase of temperature and oxidation coefficient.

  6. Partially Testing a Process Model for Understanding Victim Responses to an Anticipated Worksite Closure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blau, Gary

    2007-01-01

    This study partially tested a recent process model for understanding victim responses to worksite/function closure (W/FC) proposed by Blau [Blau, G. (2006). A process model for understanding victim responses to worksite/function closure. "Human Resource Management Review," 16, 12-28], in a pharmaceutical manufacturing site. Central to the model…

  7. Rotor-to-stator Partial Rubbing and Its Effects on Rotor Dynamic Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muszynska, Agnes; Franklin, Wesley D.; Hayashida, Robert D.

    1991-01-01

    Results from experimental and analytical studies on rotor to stationary element partial rubbings at several locations and their effects on rotor dynamic responses are presented. The mathematical model of a rubbing rotor is given. The computer program provides numerical results which agree with experimentally obtained rotor responses.

  8. Increased Student Achievement through Parental Involvement and Increased Student Responsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boberg, Tim; Carpenter, Kerry; Haiges, Shelley; Lundsgaard, Barb

    This action research project addressed the problem of missing assignments among fourth- and fifth-graders at a school in northern Illinois. In order to document the extent to which students lacked responsibility for turning in daily assignments, the teacher-researchers kept track of missing assignments for each student and grade book records for 6…

  9. A Comparison of Responsive Interventions on Kindergarteners' Early Reading Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Mary E.; Rawlinson, D'Ann; Simmons, Deborah C.; Kim, Minjung; Kwok, Oi-man; Hagan-Burke, Shanna; Simmons, Leslie E.; Fogarty, Melissa; Oslund, Eric; Coyne, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the effects of Tier 2 reading interventions that operated in response-to-intervention contexts. Kindergarten children (N = 90) who were identified as at risk for reading difficulties were stratified by school and randomly assigned to receive (a) Early Reading Intervention (ERI; Pearson/Scott Foresman, 2004) modified in response…

  10. Surface plasmon resonance microscopy: Achieving a quantitative optical response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Alexander W.; Halter, Michael; Plant, Anne L.; Elliott, John T.

    2016-09-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging allows real-time label-free imaging based on index of refraction and changes in index of refraction at an interface. Optical parameter analysis is achieved by application of the Fresnel model to SPR data typically taken by an instrument in a prism based figuration. We carry out SPR imaging on a microscope by launching light into a sample and collecting reflected light through a high numerical aperture microscope objective. The SPR microscope enables spatial resolution that approaches the diffraction limit and has a dynamic range that allows detection of subnanometer to submicrometer changes in thickness of biological material at a surface. However, unambiguous quantitative interpretation of SPR changes using the microscope system could not be achieved using the Fresnel model because of polarization dependent attenuation and optical aberration that occurs in the high numerical aperture objective. To overcome this problem, we demonstrate a model to correct for polarization diattenuation and optical aberrations in the SPR data and develop a procedure to calibrate reflectivity to index of refraction values. The calibration and correction strategy for quantitative analysis was validated by comparing the known indices of refraction of bulk materials with corrected SPR data interpreted with the Fresnel model. Subsequently, we applied our SPR microscopy method to evaluate the index of refraction for a series of polymer microspheres in aqueous media and validated the quality of the measurement with quantitative phase microscopy.

  11. Utility of Serum Free Light Chain Measurements in Multiple Myeloma Patients Not Achieving Complete Response to Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Muhamad Alhaj; Rajkumar, S. Vincent; Dispenzieri, Angela; Gertz, Morie A.; Lacy, Martha Q.; Buadi, Francis K.; Hwa, Yi Lisa; Dingli, David; Kapoor, Prashant; Hayman, Suzanne R.; Lust, John A.; Kyle, Robert A.; Kumar, Shaji K.

    2015-01-01

    Normalization of the serum free light chain ratio (FLCr) with the absence of bone marrow monoclonal plasma cells following achievement of a complete response (CR) to therapy denotes a stringent CR in multiple myeloma (MM), and is associated with improved overall survival (OS). However, its value in patients achieving achieving a normalization of FLCr with initial therapy of MM will have an improved outcome, even in the absence of a CR. We retrospectively evaluated 449 patients with newly-diagnosed MM with measurable disease at baseline, who did not achieve a CR with initial therapy. One hundred fifty three patients (34%) had a normal FLCr while 296 (66%) had an abnormal ratio. Patients with a normal FLCr had a longer progression-free survival (PFS) (29 vs. 16 months, P <.001) and OS (91 vs. 58 months, P <.001). Normalization of FLCr retained its prognostic value in a multivariable model. Our results suggest an important role for sFLC measurement in disease monitoring even in patients who achieve only a partial response to therapy. Obtaining a normal FLCr confers a favorable prognosis independent from other factors, supporting the inclusion of sFLC in all levels of response criteria. PMID:25962523

  12. A Comparison of the Partial Credit and Graded Response Models in Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Ayala, R. J.; And Others

    Computerized adaptive testing procedures (CATPs) based on the graded response method (GRM) of F. Samejima (1969) and the partial credit model (PCM) of G. Masters (1982) were developed and compared. Both programs used maximum likelihood estimation of ability, and item selection was conducted on the basis of information. Two simulated data sets, one…

  13. Diagnosing nonlinearities in the local and remote responses to partial Amazon deforestation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badger, Andrew M.; Dirmeyer, Paul A.

    2016-08-01

    Using a set of fully coupled climate model simulations, the response to partial deforestation over the Amazon due to agricultural expansion has been analyzed. Three variations of 50% deforestation (all of western half, all of eastern half, and half of each grid box) were compared with total deforestation to determine the degree and character of nonlinearity of the climate response to partial deforestation. A metric is developed to quantify the degree and distribution of nonlinearity in the response, applicable to any variable. The metric also quantifies whether the response is saturating or accelerating, meaning significantly either more or less than 50% of the simulated response to total deforestation is attained at 50% deforestation. The spatial structure of the atmospheric response to Amazon deforestation reveals large areas across the tropics that exhibit a significant nonlinear component, particularly for temperature and geopotential height. Over the domain between 45°S and 45°N across all longitudes, 50% deforestation generally provides less than half of the total response to deforestation over oceans, indicating the marine portion of climate system is somewhat resilient to progressive deforestation. However, over continents there are both accelerating and saturating responses to 50% Amazon deforestation, and the response is different depending on whether the eastern or western half of Amazonia is deforested or half of the forest is removed uniformly across the region.

  14. Dielectric response of fully and partially depleted ferroelectric thin films and inversion of the thickness effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misirlioglu, I. B.; Yildiz, M.

    2013-03-01

    We study the effect of full and partial depletion on the dielectric response characteristics of ferroelectric thin films with impurities via a computational approach. Using a thermodynamic approach along with the fundamental equations for semiconductors, we show that films with partial depletion display unique features and an enhanced dielectric response compared with those fully depleted. We find that the capacitance peak at switching can be significantly suppressed in the case of high impurity densities (>1025 m-3) with relatively low ionization energy, of the order of 0.5 eV. For conserved number of species in films, electromigration of ionized impurities at room temperature is negligible and has nearly no effect on the dielectric response. In films with high impurity density, the dielectric response at zero bias is enhanced with respect to charge-free films or those with relatively low impurity density (<1024 m-3). We demonstrate that partially depleted films should be expected to exhibit peculiar capacitance-voltage characteristics at low and high bias and that the thickness effect probed in experiments in ferroelectric thin films could be entirely inverted in thin films with depletion charges where a higher dielectric response can be measured in thicker films. Therefore, depletion charge densities in ferroelectric thin films should be estimated before size-effect-related studies. Finally, we noted that these findings are in good qualitative agreement with dielectric measurements carried out on PbZrxTi1-xO3.

  15. Long-term treatment with responsive brain stimulation in adults with refractory partial seizures

    PubMed Central

    Bergey, Gregory K.; Mizrahi, Eli M.; Goldman, Alica; King-Stephens, David; Nair, Dileep; Srinivasan, Shraddha; Jobst, Barbara; Gross, Robert E.; Shields, Donald C.; Barkley, Gregory; Salanova, Vicenta; Olejniczak, Piotr; Cole, Andrew; Cash, Sydney S.; Noe, Katherine; Wharen, Robert; Worrell, Gregory; Murro, Anthony M.; Edwards, Jonathan; Duchowny, Michael; Spencer, David; Smith, Michael; Geller, Eric; Gwinn, Ryder; Skidmore, Christopher; Eisenschenk, Stephan; Berg, Michel; Heck, Christianne; Van Ness, Paul; Fountain, Nathan; Rutecki, Paul; Massey, Andrew; O'Donovan, Cormac; Labar, Douglas; Duckrow, Robert B.; Hirsch, Lawrence J.; Courtney, Tracy; Sun, Felice T.; Seale, Cairn G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The long-term efficacy and safety of responsive direct neurostimulation was assessed in adults with medically refractory partial onset seizures. Methods: All participants were treated with a cranially implanted responsive neurostimulator that delivers stimulation to 1 or 2 seizure foci via chronically implanted electrodes when specific electrocorticographic patterns are detected (RNS System). Participants had completed a 2-year primarily open-label safety study (n = 65) or a 2-year randomized blinded controlled safety and efficacy study (n = 191); 230 participants transitioned into an ongoing 7-year study to assess safety and efficacy. Results: The average participant was 34 (±11.4) years old with epilepsy for 19.6 (±11.4) years. The median preimplant frequency of disabling partial or generalized tonic-clonic seizures was 10.2 seizures a month. The median percent seizure reduction in the randomized blinded controlled trial was 44% at 1 year and 53% at 2 years (p < 0.0001, generalized estimating equation) and ranged from 48% to 66% over postimplant years 3 through 6 in the long-term study. Improvements in quality of life were maintained (p < 0.05). The most common serious device-related adverse events over the mean 5.4 years of follow-up were implant site infection (9.0%) involving soft tissue and neurostimulator explantation (4.7%). Conclusions: The RNS System is the first direct brain responsive neurostimulator. Acute and sustained efficacy and safety were demonstrated in adults with medically refractory partial onset seizures arising from 1 or 2 foci over a mean follow-up of 5.4 years. This experience supports the RNS System as a treatment option for refractory partial seizures. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that for adults with medically refractory partial onset seizures, responsive direct cortical stimulation reduces seizures and improves quality of life over a mean follow-up of 5.4 years. PMID:25616485

  16. Relationship between Admission, Extracurricular Services and Academic Achievement in Secondary Schools: A Partial Least Square (PLS) Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suleiman, Yusuf; Hanaf, Zahyah Bt; Bin Taslikhan, Muhajir

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the nexus between two dimensions of student personnel services (Admission Services, Extracurricular Services) academic achievement in secondary schools with the particular interest to know the significant impact of these services on students' academic achievement. It is believed that the provision of these services are…

  17. Analysis of Multiple Partially Ordered Responses to Belief Items with Don't Know Option.

    PubMed

    Ip, Edward H; Chen, Shyh-Huei; Quandt, Sara A

    2016-06-01

    Understanding beliefs, values, and preferences of patients is a tenet of contemporary health sciences. This application was motivated by the analysis of multiple partially ordered set (poset) responses from an inventory on layman beliefs about diabetes. The partially ordered set arises because of two features in the data-first, the response options contain a Don't Know (DK) option, and second, there were two consecutive occasions of measurement. As predicted by the common sense model of illness, beliefs about diabetes were not necessarily stable across the two measurement occasions. Instead of analyzing the two occasions separately, we studied the joint responses across the occasions as a poset response. Few analytic methods exist for data structures other than ordered or nominal categories. Poset responses are routinely collapsed and then analyzed as either rank ordered or nominal data, leading to the loss of nuanced information that might be present within poset categories. In this paper we developed a general class of item response models for analyzing the poset data collected from the Common Sense Model of Diabetes Inventory. The inferential object of interest is the latent trait that indicates congruence of belief with the biomedical model. To apply an item response model to the poset diabetes inventory, we proved that a simple coding algorithm circumvents the requirement of writing new codes such that standard IRT software could be directly used for the purpose of item estimation and individual scoring. Simulation experiments were used to examine parameter recovery for the proposed poset model.

  18. Short Stature in Partially Corrected X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency- Suboptimal Response to Growth Hormone

    PubMed Central

    De Ravin, Suk See; Shum, Elaine; Zarember, Kol A.; Rezvani, Geoffrey; Rosenfeld, Ron G.; Stratakis, Constantine A.; Malech, Harry L.

    2009-01-01

    Background X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) results from defects in the common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc) required for signaling by receptors for interleukin (IL)-2, -4, -7, -9, -15, and -21 (1). Following haploidentical bone marrow transplant without myelo-conditioning for XSCID, most patients achieve partial reconstitution(2) often limited to T lymphocytes. Many partially corrected patients manifest extreme short stature (<5th percentile). Previous reports have implicated γc in growth hormone (GH) receptor signaling, thus severe growth failure in XSCID may be related to the underlying γc defect. Objective To evaluate the GH/insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) axes in 3 children with XSCID and partial immune reconstitution with profound growth failure. Methods The IGF-1 generation test was performed by administering recombinant GH subcutaneously for 5 days, and measuring serum levels for IGF-1 before GH injection, and on days 5 and 8. Results Study of the somatotropic axis revealed profoundly diminished IGF-1 production following rGH challenge in all 3 patients. Conclusion The data indicate that the GH/IGF-1 axes in these partially corrected XSCID patients with severe short stature is profoundly impaired, and supports previous studies suggesting that the underlying γc defect may contribute to the severe growth failure in XSCID. This supports a role for defective γc in extreme short stature of XSCID, and raises the possibility of recombinant IGF-1 treatment to bypass this defect. PMID:19189700

  19. Response to Marie Paz Morales' "Influence of Culture and Language Sensitive Physics on Science Attitude Achievement"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Mikel Walker

    2015-01-01

    This response to Marie Paz Morales' "Influence of culture and language sensitive physics on science attitude achievement" explores the ideas of culturally responsive pedagogy and critical literacy to examine some implications for culturally responsive science instruction implicit in the original manuscript. [For "Influence of…

  20. Response to Marie Paz Morales' ``Influence of culture and language sensitive physics on science attitude achievement''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Mikel Walker

    2015-12-01

    This response to Marie Paz Morales' "Influence of culture and language sensitive physics on science attitude achievement" explores the ideas of culturally responsive pedagogy and critical literacy to examine some implications for culturally responsive science instruction implicit in the original manuscript.

  1. Meta-Analysis of the Research on Response Cards: Effects on Test Achievement, Quiz Achievement, Participation, and Off-Task Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randolph, Justus J.

    2007-01-01

    In this meta-analysis, the author analyzed 18 response card articles, theses, or dissertations to determine the magnitude of effect that response card strategies have on test achievement, quiz achievement, class participation, and intervals of off-task behavior. The author also determined whether the type of response cards used or the presence or…

  2. On-track and off-track distance properties of Class 4 partial response channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soljanin, Emina

    1995-12-01

    We consider Class 4 partial response (PR) channels, and examine off-track performance of maximum likelihood sequence estimators for these channels that ignore inter-track interference (ITI). We assume that the pulse response to the head from an adjacent track is the same Class 4 channel, and only its amplitude varies with the track-to-head distance, in a way not known to the receiver. For each of these channels, we find analytical expressions for off-track performance, as well as sets of sequences most susceptible to errors in the ITI environment. We also discuss how the problem of off-track error rate can be alleviated through coding.

  3. Biomechanical Response in Mandibular Bone due to Mastication Loading on 3-Unit Fixed Partial Dentures

    PubMed Central

    Field, Clarice; Li, Qing; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of functional responses in oral bone is a crucial component of dental biomechanics. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential biological remodelling response during mastication on the mandibular pre- and post-insertion of a fixed partial denture (FPD). A series of three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis (FEA) models were presented pre- and postextraction to determine the biomechanical responses to masticatory loading in the anterior mandible. Equivalent strains were analysed at lingual/buccal and mesial/distal areas of the premolar to molar region and quantified to anticipate bone remodelling response. Mandibular bone incorporating an FPD experienced substantially greater stress/strain magnitudes than that prior to placement of fixed prosthodontics, which is suggestive of engagements of bone remodelling. The results suggest similar outcomes to those reported clinically. Developing a simulation reflecting the outcomes of restorative treatment can provide meaningful insight into restorative treatment planning, clinical outcomes, and fixed prosthodontics designs. PMID:20981154

  4. Biomechanical Response in Mandibular Bone due to Mastication Loading on 3-Unit Fixed Partial Dentures.

    PubMed

    Field, Clarice; Li, Qing; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of functional responses in oral bone is a crucial component of dental biomechanics. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential biological remodelling response during mastication on the mandibular pre- and post-insertion of a fixed partial denture (FPD). A series of three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis (FEA) models were presented pre- and postextraction to determine the biomechanical responses to masticatory loading in the anterior mandible. Equivalent strains were analysed at lingual/buccal and mesial/distal areas of the premolar to molar region and quantified to anticipate bone remodelling response. Mandibular bone incorporating an FPD experienced substantially greater stress/strain magnitudes than that prior to placement of fixed prosthodontics, which is suggestive of engagements of bone remodelling. The results suggest similar outcomes to those reported clinically. Developing a simulation reflecting the outcomes of restorative treatment can provide meaningful insight into restorative treatment planning, clinical outcomes, and fixed prosthodontics designs.

  5. One night of partial sleep deprivation affects habituation of hypothalamus and skin conductance responses.

    PubMed

    Peters, Anja C; Blechert, Jens; Sämann, Philipp G; Eidner, Ines; Czisch, Michael; Spoormaker, Victor I

    2014-09-15

    Sleep disturbances are prevalent in clinical anxiety, but it remains unclear whether they are cause and/or consequence of this condition. Fear conditioning constitutes a valid laboratory model for the acquisition of normal and pathological anxiety. To explore the relationship between disturbed sleep and anxiety in more detail, the present study evaluated the effect of partial sleep deprivation (SD) on fear conditioning in healthy individuals. The neural correlates of 1) nonassociative learning and physiological processing and 2) associative learning (differential fear conditioning) were addressed. Measurements entailed simultaneous functional MRI, EEG, skin conductance response (SCR), and pulse recordings. Regarding nonassociative learning, partial SD resulted in a generalized failure to habituate during fear conditioning, as evidenced by reduced habituation of SCR and hypothalamus responses to all stimuli. Furthermore, SCR and hypothalamus activity were correlated, supporting their functional relationship. Regarding associative learning, effects of partial SD on the acquisition of conditioned fear were weaker and did not reach statistical significance. The hypothalamus plays an integral role in the regulation of sleep and autonomic arousal. Thus sleep disturbances may play a causal role in the development of normal and possibly pathological fear by increasing the susceptibility of the sympathetic nervous system to stressful experiences.

  6. [Carboplatin plus irinotecan induced partial response in a patient with small cell carcinoma of the prostate; a case report].

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroko; Uegaki, Masayuki; Aoyama, Teruyoshi; Kawai, Jun; Hamano, Toshiaki; Hashimura, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    An 80-year-old man with prostate cancer receiving hormone therapy presented with urinary retention. The computed tomographic scan showed metastases to the lung, liver, and lymph nodes, as well as increased prostate volume. Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) was performed, and the resected specimen was pathologically found to be a small cell carcinoma of the prostate. The patient was treated with a combination of carboplatin and irinotecan, and achieved a partial response : size reduction of the prostate and the metastatic lesions, and decreased neuron specific enolase (NSE) level. The chemotherapy with carboplatin and irinotecan is reported to have fewer serious adverse effects, and equivalent efficacy to the cisplatin/etoposide chemotherapy. Therefore, this regimen could also be a treatment option for the patients with small cell carcinoma of the prostate.

  7. Importance of Achieving Stringent Complete Response After Autologous Stem-Cell Transplantation in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Prashant; Kumar, Shaji K.; Dispenzieri, Angela; Lacy, Martha Q.; Buadi, Francis; Dingli, David; Russell, Stephen J.; Hayman, Suzanne R.; Witzig, Thomas E.; Lust, John A.; Leung, Nelson; Lin, Yi; Zeldenrust, Steven R.; McCurdy, Arleigh; Greipp, Philip R.; Kyle, Robert A.; Rajkumar, S. Vincent; Gertz, Morie A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To study the impact of achieving stringent complete response (sCR), an increasingly attainable goal, after autologous stem-cell transplantation (ASCT) in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Patients and Methods Maximal response rates were determined in 445 consecutive patients who underwent ASCT within 12 months of diagnosis of MM. The patients achieving varying degrees of complete response (CR) are the focus of our study. Results One hundred and nine patients (25%) achieved sCR after ASCT. The median overall survival (OS) rate from the time of transplantation for patients attaining sCR was not reached (NR), in contrast to those patients achieving conventional complete response (CR; n = 37; OS, 81 months) or near CR (nCR; n = 91; OS, 60 months; P < .001). Five-year OS rates were 80%, 53%, and 47% for sCR, CR, and nCR, respectively. The median time to progression (TTP) from ASCT of patients achieving sCR was significantly longer (50 months) than TTP of patients achieving CR or nCR (20 months and 19 months, respectively). On multivariable analysis, post-ASCT response of sCR was an independent prognostic factor for survival (hazard ratio, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.25 to 0.80; versus CR; P = .008), in addition to proliferation rate, pre-ASCT cytogenetics, and performance status. OS rates of patients attaining sCR continued to remain superior at 2-year landmark (median, NR v 70 months for conventional CR group; P = .007). Conclusion Improved long-term outcome is seen after ASCT with achievement of sCR when compared with lesser degrees of responses. Myeloma trials reporting the response rates should identify patients achieving sCR and CR separately, owing to markedly disparate outcomes of the two categories. PMID:24248686

  8. Internal resonances and dynamic responses in equivalent mechanical model of partially liquid-filled vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farid, M.; Gendelman, O. V.

    2016-09-01

    The paper treats dynamical responses in an equivalent mechanical model for oscillations of a liquid in partially filled vessel under horizontal harmonic ground excitation. Such excitation may lead to hydraulic impacts. The liquid sloshing mass is modeled by equivalent pendulum, which can impact the vessel walls. Parameters of the equivalent pendulum for well-explored case of cylindrical vessels are used. The hydraulic impacts are modeled by high-power potential function. Conditions for internal resonances are formulated. A non-resonant behavior and dynamic response related to 3:1 internal resonance are explored. When the excitation amplitude exceeds certain critical value, the system exhibits multiple steady state solutions. Quasi-periodic solutions appear in relatively narrow range of parameters. Numerical continuation links between resonant regimes found asymptotically for small excitation amplitude, and high-amplitude responses with intensive impacts.

  9. Using Culturally Competent Responsive Services to Improve Student Achievement and Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schellenberg, Rita; Grothaus, Tim

    2011-01-01

    This article illustrates standards blending, the integration of core academic and school counseling standards, as a culturally alert responsive services strategy to assist in closing the achievement gap while also enhancing employability skills and culturally salient career competencies. The responsive services intervention described in this…

  10. The Impact of Response to Intervention on Student Reading Achievement in Urban Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Wendy Smyth

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the implementation of a Response to Intervention framework had a positive impact on student reading achievement in urban elementary schools. This was a causal-comparative study that examined the reading performance of a sample of kindergarten through grade three students who experienced the Response to…

  11. Using Explanatory Item Response Models to Analyze Group Differences in Science Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Derek C.

    2008-01-01

    This article illustrates the use of an explanatory item response modeling (EIRM) approach in the context of measuring group differences in science achievement. The distinction between item response models and EIRMs, recently elaborated by De Boeck and Wilson (2004), is presented within the statistical framework of generalized linear mixed models.…

  12. Adaptive Partial Response Maximum Likelihood Detection with Tilt Estimation Using Sync Pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyusuk; Lee, Joohyun; Lee, Jaejin

    2006-02-01

    We propose an improved detection method that concurrently adjusts the coefficients of equalizer and reference branch values in Viterbi detector. For the estimation of asymmetric channel characteristics, we exploit sync patterns in each data frame. Because of using the read-only memory (ROM) table to renew the coefficients of equalizer and reference values of branches, the complexity of the hardware is reduced. The proposed partial response maximum likelihood (PRML) detector has been designed and verified by VerilogHDL and synthesized by Synopsys Design Compiler with Hynix 0.35 μm standard cell library.

  13. The nitric oxide redox sibling nitroxyl partially circumvents impairment of platelet nitric oxide responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Dautov, R F; Ngo, D T M; Licari, G; Liu, S; Sverdlov, A L; Ritchie, R H; Kemp-Harper, B K; Horowitz, J D; Chirkov, Y Y

    2013-11-30

    Impaired platelet responsiveness to nitric oxide (NO resistance) is a common characteristic of many cardiovascular disease states and represents an independent risk factor for cardiac events and mortality. NO resistance reflects both scavenging of NO by superoxide (O2(-)), and impairment of the NO receptor, soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC). There is thus an urgent need for circumvention of NO resistance in order to improve clinical outcomes. Nitroxyl (HNO), like NO, produces vasodilator and anti-aggregatory effects, largely via sGC activation, but is not inactivated by O2(-). We tested the hypothesis that HNO circumvents NO resistance in human platelets. In 57 subjects with or without ischemic heart disease, platelet responses to the HNO donor isopropylamine NONOate (IPA/NO) and the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were compared. While SNP (10μM) induced 29±3% (p<0.001) inhibition of platelet aggregation, IPA/NO (10μM) caused 75±4% inhibition (p<0.001). In NO-resistant subjects (n=28), the IPA/NO:SNP response ratio was markedly increased (p<0.01), consistent with partial circumvention of NO resistance. Similarly, cGMP accumulation in platelets was greater (p<0.001) with IPA/NO than with SNP stimulation. The NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO (CPTIO, 200μM) inhibited SNP and IPA/NO responses by 92±7% and 17±4% respectively (p<0.001 for differential inhibition), suggesting that effects of IPA/NO are only partially NO-mediated. ODQ (10μM) inhibited IPA/NO responses by 36±8% (p<0.001), consistent with a contribution of sGC/haem to IPA/NO inhibition of aggregation. There was no significant relationship between whole blood ROS content and IPA/NO responses. Thus the HNO donor IPA/NO substantially circumvents platelet NO resistance while acting, at least partially, as a haem-mediated sGC activator.

  14. Transient temperature response of functionally gradient material subjected to partial stepwise heating

    SciTech Connect

    Makino, Atsushi; Araki, Nobuyuki; Kitajima, Hidetoshi; Ohashi, Kentaro

    1996-01-01

    Functionally gradient materials (FGMs) with distributed properties have attracted special interests as advanced heat-shielding/structural materials in future space applications. The objective of the present study is to derive an analytical solution of the temperature response in a multilayer-type FGM, the front surface of which is subjected to partial, stepwise heating. Heat losses from the front, rear, and side surfaces are also considered. The Laplace transform has been used to obtain the analytical solution. This solution is expected to elucidate the dependence of the temperature response on the various parameters, such as thermophysical properties and heat losses. It is also expected to reduce the calculation time to obtain thermal stress and/or strain in large-scale numerical calculations. Appropriateness of this solution has also been demonstrated by comparing the present results and the experimental results obtained by the National Aerospace Laboratory, Japan.

  15. Alternative construction of interleaved RLL codes for partial response channels using multichannel methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Robert E.

    1994-09-01

    Current work in magnetic recording channels has demonstrated significant improvement in recording density using partial response communication methods along with maximum likelihood detection. The class IV partial response channel (PR4) behaves as the interleaving of two identical run-length limited (RLL) channels. Efficient recording codes for the PR4 channel have been made by considering a channel bit sequence to be composed of two interleaved subsequences. Finite state techniques are used to describe run-length constraints on each subsequence as well as a global run-length constraint on both sequences combined. A recent paper by Swanson and Wolf discusses multichannel run-length limited codes that turn out to be very similar to interleaved run-length limited codes. The present paper discusses the similarities between the code description of multichannel RLL codes and the interleaved RLL codes required by the PR4 channel. The extension of the techniques of multichannel RLL work to the interleaved problem is discussed. It was found that suitable code constructions are possible by viewing the problem as two distinct RLL codes that have individual maximum run-lengths onto which a global run-length is imposed. Two examples are developed to illustrate the ideas.

  16. Bupropion as an augmenting agent in patients of depression with partial response.

    PubMed

    Gulrez, Gaurav; Badyal, Dinesh Kumar; Deswal, Randhir Singh; Sharma, Arvind

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of bupropion as an add-on therapy to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) on patients of major depressive disorder with partial response. This prospective, randomized, controlled and single-blind study was conducted in sixty patients suffering from major depressive disorder as per Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM)-IV TR criteria, who were having Hamilton depression rating scale (HDRS) score ≥16 after 4 weeks of treatment with SSRIs. Group A received SSRI plus placebo and group B received SSRI plus bupropion. Evaluation was performed based on changes in HDRS score, Montgomery and Asberg depression rating scale (MADRS), Amritsar depressive inventory (ADI) and spontaneously reported adverse effects. There was a significant decrease in the HDRS, MADRS and ADI scores as compared to baseline in both groups. However, the mean decrease in depression score was more in group B than in group A. The percentage decrease of remitters was also significantly more in group B (60% as per HDRS score and 63% as per MADRS score), as compared to group A (24% as per HDRS score and 27% as per MADRS score) (p < 0.05), at the end of treatment. In conclusion, bupropion add-on can act as augmenting agent in patients of depression with partial response to SSRIs.

  17. The Pre-Optic Anterior Hypothalamus (POAH) partially mediates the hypothermic response to hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Brown, Justin W; Whitehurst, Marvin E; Gordon, Christopher J; Carroll, Robert G

    2005-04-11

    Two sets of experiments were performed to characterize the role of the Pre-Optic Area of the Anterior Hypothalamus (POAH) in the decrease in set point and hypothermia that follows severe hemorrhage. In the first set, lidocaine or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) was microinjected into the POAH of rats at the time of hemorrhage. Lidocaine microinjection attenuated the hemorrhagic hypothermia by approximately 50%. The mean drop in core temperature (Tc) following hemorrhage was 1.5 degrees C with ACSF microinjection (N = 6), 0.70 degrees C (N = 6) with lidocaine, and 1.77 degrees C (N = 6) after sham microinjection. This partial attenuation of the hemorrhagic hypothermic response indicates that an intact POAH is necessary for at least some of the hypothermia following hemorrhage. In the second experimental set, hypothalamic tissue temperature (Thyp) was modulated in an attempt to alter the hemorrhagic hypothermic response. Bilateral closed-ended cannulas were inserted into the POAH. One cannula consisted of a water-perfused thermode to change local tissue temperature. The other housed a thermocouple to measure local temperature. The effectiveness of the thermode was first confirmed in conscious rats, evidenced by an inverse deflection in Tc upon Thyp modulation. Then, the POAH region was either heated, cooled, or sham perfused following hemorrhage. The mean drop in Tc following hemorrhage was 2.16 degrees C (N = 5) with hypothalamic heating, 1.35 degrees C (N = 5) with cooling, and 1.44 degrees C (N = 5) following the sham perfusion control. Heating of the POAH significantly exacerbated the hemorrhagic hypothermic response. These data further suggest that the POAH is at least partially responsible for mediating hemorrhagic hypothermia. PMID:15804494

  18. Relationship between Achievement Goals and Students' Self-Reported Personal and Social Responsibility Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Agbuga, Bulent; Xiang, Ping; McBride, Ron E

    2015-01-01

    This study utilized the 2x2 achievement goal model (mastery-approach, mastery-avoidance, performance-approach, performance-avoidance goals) to explore the relationships between achievement goals and self-reported personal and social responsibility behaviors in high school physical education settings. Two hundred and twenty one Turkish students completed questionnaires assessing their achievement goals, personal and social responsibility behaviors. Results of the one-way repeated measures ANOVA revealed significant differences among the four achievement goals, F(3, 660) = 137.05, p < .001, η2 = .39. The result also revealed that students were more likely to endorse the mastery-approach goal than three other goals. The simple correlations revealed mastery-approach and performance-approach goals were positively related to students' self-reported personal (r = .54, p < .001; r = .37, p < .001, respectively) and social responsibility (r = .38, p < .001; r = .22, p < .001, respectively) behaviors. However, hierarchical regression analyses indicated only the mastery-approach goal emerged as the significant positive predictor, b = .52, t(216) = 7.19, p < .001 for personal responsibility behaviors, and b = .41, t(216) = 5.23, p < .001 for social responsibility behaviors. These findings seem to provide convergent evidence that mastery-approach goals are positively related to positive educational outcomes.

  19. Sirolimus therapy in a child with partially diazoxide-responsive hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia

    PubMed Central

    Anjian, Andrew Sng; Yijuan, Yvonne Lim; Ho Wei Li, Cindy; Güemes, Maria; Hussain, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Summary Hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia (HH), which causes persistent neonatal hypoglycaemia, can result in neurological damage and it’s management is challenging. Diazoxide is the first-line treatment, albeit not all patients will fully respond to it, as episodes of hypoglycaemia may persist and it entails unpleasant adverse effects. Sirolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, has reportedly been successful in treating children with severe diffuse HH, thus obviating the need for pancreatectomy. We report a girl with HH, with a novel heterozygous ABCC8 gene missense mutation (c.4154A>T/ p.Lys1385Thr), who was initially responsive to diazoxide therapy. After 11 months of diazoxide treatment, she developed intermittent, unpredictable breakthrough episodes of hypoglycaemia, in addition to generalized hypertrichosis and weight gain from enforced feeding to avoid hypoglycaemia. Sirolimus, which was commenced at 15 months of age, gradually replaced diazoxide, with significant reduction and abolition of hypoglycaemia. The hypertrichosis resolved and there was less weight gain given the reduced need for enforced feeding. Sirolimus, which was administered over the next 15 months, was well tolerated with no significant side effects and was gradually weaned off. After stopping sirolimus, apart from hypoglycaemia developing during an episode of severe viral gastroenteritis, the capillary glucose concentrations were maintained >3.5 mmol/L, even after a 10 h fast. Sirolimus may have a role in the treatment of partially diazoxide-responsive forms of HH who experience breakthrough hypoglycaemia, but the long-term safety and efficacy of sirolimus are not established. Learning points: Conventional treatment of diffuse HH with diazoxide is not always effective in controlling hypoglycaemia and can be associated with unpleasant side effects. Sirolimus was successfully used to abolish recurrent hypoglycaemia in partially diazoxide-responsive HH, with resolution of unacceptable diazoxide

  20. Postponing the Hypoglycemic Response to Partial Hepatectomy Delays Mouse Liver Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiansheng; Schriefer, Andrew E; Cliften, Paul F; Dietzen, Dennis; Kulkarni, Sakil; Sing, Sucha; Monga, Satdarshan P S; Rudnick, David A

    2016-03-01

    All serious liver injuries alter metabolism and initiate hepatic regeneration. Recent studies using partial hepatectomy (PH) and other experimental models of liver regeneration implicate the metabolic response to hepatic insufficiency as an important source of signals that promote regeneration. Based on these considerations, the analyses reported here were undertaken to assess the impact of interrupting the hypoglycemic response to PH on liver regeneration in mice. A regimen of parenteral dextrose infusion that delays PH-induced hypoglycemia for 14 hours after surgery was identified, and the hepatic regenerative response to PH was compared between dextrose-treated and control mice. The results showed that regenerative recovery of the liver was postponed in dextrose-infused mice (versus vehicle control) by an interval of time comparable to the delay in onset of PH-induced hypoglycemia. The regulation of specific liver regeneration-promoting signals, including hepatic induction of cyclin D1 and S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 expression and suppression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and p27 expression, was also disrupted by dextrose infusion. These data support the hypothesis that alterations in metabolism that occur in response to hepatic insufficiency promote liver regeneration, and they define specific pro- and antiregenerative molecular targets whose regenerative regulation is postponed when PH-induced hypoglycemia is delayed.

  1. Nonlinear seismic response of a partially-filled rectangular liquid tank with a submerged block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Santosh Kumar; Biswal, Kishore Chandra

    2016-04-01

    The seismic response of partially-filled two-dimensional rigid rectangular liquid tanks with a bottom-mounted submerged block is numerically simulated. The Galerkin-weighted-residual based finite element method (FEM) is used for solving the governing Laplace equation with fully nonlinear free surface boundary conditions and also for velocity recovery. Based on the mixed Eulerian-Lagrangian (MEL) method, a fourth order explicit Runge-Kutta scheme is used for the time-stepping integration of free surface boundary conditions. A cubic-spline fitted regridding technique is used at every time step to eliminate possible numerical instabilities on account of Lagrangian node induced mesh distortion. An artificial surface damping term is used to mimic the viscosity induced damping. Three different earthquake motions characterized on the basis of low, intermediate and high frequency contents are used to study the effect of frequency content on the nonlinear dynamic response of this tank-liquid-submerged block system. The effect of the submerged block on the impulsive and convective response components of the hydrodynamic forces manifested in terms of base shear, overturning base moment and pressure distribution along the tank wall as well as the block wall has been quantified vis-a-vis frequency content of ground motions. It is observed that the convective response of this tank-liquid system is highly sensitive to the frequency content of the ground motion.

  2. Opioid partial agonist buprenorphine dampens responses to psychosocial stress in humans

    PubMed Central

    Bershad, Anya K.; Jaffe, Jerome H.; Childs, Emma; de Wit, Harriet

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical evidence indicates that opioid drugs have stress-dampening effects. In animal models, opioid analgesics attenuate responses to isolation distress, and in humans, opioids reduce stress related to anticipation of physical pain. The stress-reducing effects of opioid drugs may contribute to their abuse potential. Despite this evidence in laboratory animals, the effects of opioids on responses to psychosocial stress have not been determined in humans. Here we examined the effects of buprenorphine, a μ-opioid partial agonist used to treat opioid dependence and pain, on subjective and physiological responses to a stressful public speaking task in healthy adults. We hypothesized that buprenorphine would reduce subjective and physiological stress responses. Healthy adult volunteers (N = 48) were randomly assigned to receive placebo, 0.2mg sublingual buprenorphine, or 0.4mg sublingual buprenorphine in a two-session study with a stressful speaking task (Trier Social Stress Test; TSST) and a non-stressful control task. During the sessions, the participants reported on their mood states, provided subjective appraisals of the task, and measures of salivary cortisol, heart rate, and blood pressure at regular intervals. Stress produced its expected effects, increasing heart rate, blood pressure, salivary cortisol, and subjective ratings of anxiety and negative mood. In line with our hypothesis, both doses of buprenorphine significantly dampened salivary cortisol responses to stress. On self-report ratings, buprenorphine reduced how threatening participants found the tasks. These results suggest that enhanced opioid signaling dampens responses to social stress in humans, as it does in laboratory animals. This stress-dampening effect of buprenorphine may contribute to the non-medical use of opioid drugs. PMID:25544740

  3. Partial blockade of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors improves the counterregulatory response to hypoglycemia in recurrently hypoglycemic rats.

    PubMed

    LaGamma, Edmund F; Kirtok, Necla; Chan, Owen; Nankova, Bistra B

    2014-10-01

    Recurrent exposure to hypoglycemia can impair the normal counterregulatory hormonal responses that guard against hypoglycemia, leading to hypoglycemia unawareness. This pathological condition known as hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure (HAAF) is the main adverse consequence that prevents individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus from attaining the long-term health benefits of tight glycemic control. The underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for the progressive loss of the epinephrine response to subsequent bouts of hypoglycemia, a hallmark sign of HAAF, are largely unknown. Normally, hypoglycemia triggers both the release and biosynthesis of epinephrine through activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) on the adrenal glands. We hypothesize that excessive cholinergic stimulation may contribute to impaired counterregulation. Here, we tested whether administration of the nAChR partial agonist cytisine to reduce postganglionic synaptic activity can preserve the counterregulatory hormone responses in an animal model of HAAF. Compared with nicotine, cytisine has limited efficacy to activate nAChRs and stimulate epinephrine release and synthesis. We evaluated adrenal catecholamine production and secretion in nondiabetic rats subjected to two daily episodes of hypoglycemia for 3 days, followed by a hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic clamp on day 4. Recurrent hypoglycemia decreased epinephrine responses, and this was associated with suppressed TH mRNA induction (a measure of adrenal catecholamine synthetic capacity). Treatment with cytisine improved glucagon responses as well as epinephrine release and production in recurrently hypoglycemic animals. These data suggest that pharmacological manipulation of ganglionic nAChRs may be promising as a translational adjunctive therapy to avoid HAAF in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  4. The Effects of Response to Intervention on the Mathematics Achievement of Seventh and Eighth Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornelius, Annette Sargent

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to investigate the effectiveness of a system-wide Response to Intervention (RTI) program on the mathematical achievement of seventh and eighth grade students. The study consisted of five district schools with a total of 502 participants. The students were identified as belonging to one of two tiers, which…

  5. The Effects of Response to Intervention on Third Graders' Reading Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Marlon Demetrius

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to examine the effects of the Response to Intervention Three Tier Model on third graders' reading achievement. Two hundred forty-three students participated in this study. Students were from an elementary school in the southeastern region of the United States. The data on the students was collected…

  6. The Effect of a Student Response System on Student Achievement in Mathematics within an Elementary Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dix, Yvette Ellsworth

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this quasi-experimental quantitative study was to determine if the use of a student response system, combined with an interactive whiteboard, led to increased student achievement in mathematics within a fifth grade classroom as measured by a district benchmark assessment and the annual Arizona Instrument to Measure Standards…

  7. Homework Practices and Academic Achievement: The Mediating Role of Self-Efficacy and Perceived Responsibility Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Barry J.; Kitsantas, Anastasia

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigated the role of students' homework practices in their self-efficacy beliefs regarding their use of specific learning processes (e.g., organizing, memorizing, concentrating, monitoring, etc.), perceptions of academic responsibility, and academic achievement. One hundred and seventy-nine girls from multi-ethnic, mixed…

  8. Culturally Responsive Caring and Expectations for Academic Achievement in a Catholic School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dallavis, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This article draws from a larger dissertation study that applied ethnographic and historical research methods to explore the intersection of culturally responsive pedagogy and Catholic schooling in immigrant communities. In particular, this article presents qualitative data analysis to describe student achievement expectations at a contemporary…

  9. Compensatory Paracrine Mechanisms That Define The Urothelial Response to Injury in Partial Bladder Outlet Obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Bassuk, James; Lendvay, Thomas S.; Sweet, Robert; Han, Chang-Hee; Soygur, Tarkan; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Plaire, J. Chadwick; Charleston, Jay S.; Charleston, Lynne B.; Bagai, Shelly; Cochrane, Kimberly; Rubio, Eric; Bassuk, James A.; Fuchs, Elaine

    2007-06-21

    Diseases and conditions affecting the lower urinary tract are a leading cause of dysfunctional sexual health, incontinence, infection, and kidney failure. The growth, differentiation, and repair of the bladder's epithelial lining are regulated, in part, by fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-7 and -10 via a paracrine cascade originating in the mesenchyme (lamina propria) and targeting the receptor for FGF-7 and -10 within the transitional epithelium (urothelium). The FGF-7 gene is located at the 15q15-q21.1 locus on chromosome 15 and four exons generate a 3.852-kb mRNA. Five duplicated FGF-7 gene sequences that localized to chromosome 9 were predicted not to generate functional protein products, thus validating the use of FGF-7-null mice as an experimental model. Recombinant FGF-7 and -10 induced proliferation of human urothelial cells in vitro and transitional epithelium of wild-type and FGF-7-null mice in vivo.To determine the extent that induction of urothelial cell proliferation during the bladder response to injury is dependent on FGF-7, an animal model of partial bladder outlet obstruction was developed. Unbiased stereology was used to measure the percentage of proliferating urothelial cells between obstructed groups of wild-type and FGF-7-null mice. The stereological analysis indicated that a statistical significant difference did not exist between the two groups, suggesting that FGF-7 is not essential for urothelial cell proliferation in response to partial outlet obstruction. In contrast, a significant increase in FGF-10 expression was observed in the obstructed FGF-7-null group, indicating that the compensatory pathway that functions in this model results in urothelial repair.

  10. Effect of inositol and tri-iodothyronine on the hormonal responsiveness of hepatocytes obtained from partially hepatectomized rats.

    PubMed Central

    Huerta-Bahena, J; García-Sáinz, J A

    1984-01-01

    Hepatocytes obtained from animals partially hepatectomized (72 h before the experiment) have a diminished responsiveness to alpha 1-adrenergic amines, vasopressin, angiotensin and glucagon and an increased responsiveness to beta-adrenergic amines. Administration of inositol or tri-iodothyronine to the hepatectomized animals induced a recovery in the hepatocyte responsiveness to the Ca2+-dependent hormones and abolished that to beta-adrenergic amines; the response to glucagon was not improved. PMID:6508748

  11. Potent, transient inhibition of BCR-ABL with dasatinib 100 mg daily achieves rapid and durable cytogenetic responses and high transformation-free survival rates in chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients with resistance, suboptimal response or intolerance to imatinib

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Neil P.; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kantarjian, Hagop; Rousselot, Philippe; Llacer, Pedro Enrique Dorlhiac; Enrico, Alicia; Vela-Ojeda, Jorge; Silver, Richard T.; Khoury, Hanna Jean; Müller, Martin C.; Lambert, Alexandre; Matloub, Yousif; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Background Dasatinib 100 mg once daily achieves intermittent BCR-ABL kinase inhibition and is approved for chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients resistant or intolerant to imatinib. To better assess durability of response to and tolerability of dasatinib, data from a 2-year minimum follow-up for a dose-optimization study in chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia are reported here. Design and Methods In a phase 3 study, 670 chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients with resistance, intolerance, or suboptimal response to imatinib were randomized to dasatinib 100 mg once-daily, 50 mg twice-daily, 140 mg once-daily, or 70 mg twice-daily. Results Data from a 2-year minimum follow-up demonstrate that dasatinib 100 mg once daily achieves major cytogenetic response and complete cytogenetic response rates comparable to those in the other treatment arms, and reduces the frequency of key side effects. Comparable 2-year progression-free survival and overall survival rates were observed (80% and 91%, respectively, for 100 mg once daily, and 75%–76% and 88%–94%, respectively, in other arms). Complete cytogenetic responses were achieved rapidly, typically by 6 months. In patients treated with dasatinib 100 mg once daily for 6 months without complete cytogenetic response, the likelihood of achieving such a response by 2 years was 50% for patients who had achieved a partial cytogenetic response, and only 8% or less for patients with minor, minimal, or no cytogenetic response. Less than 3% of patients suffered disease transformation to accelerated or blast phase. Conclusions Intermittent kinase inhibition can achieve rapid and durable responses, indistinguishable from those achieved with more continuous inhibition. PMID:20139391

  12. Added mass matrix estimation of beams partially immersed in water using measured dynamic responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fushun; Li, Huajun; Qin, Hongde; Liang, Bingchen

    2014-09-01

    An added mass matrix estimation method for beams partially immersed in water is proposed that employs dynamic responses, which are measured when the structure is in water and in air. Discrepancies such as mass and stiffness matrices between the finite element model (FEM) and real structure could be separated from the added mass of water by a series of correction factors, which means that the mass and stiffness of the FEM and the added mass of water could be estimated simultaneously. Compared with traditional methods, the estimated added mass correction factors of our approach will not be limited to be constant when FEM or the environment of the structure changed, meaning that the proposed method could reflect the influence of changes such as water depth, current, and so on. The greatest improvement is that the proposed method could estimate added mass of water without involving any water-related assumptions because all water influences are reflected in measured dynamic responses of the structure in water. A five degrees-of-freedom (dofs) mass-spring system is used to study the performance of the proposed scheme. The numerical results indicate that mass, stiffness, and added mass correction factors could be estimated accurately when noise-free measurements are used. Even when the first two modes are measured under the 5 percent corruption level, the added mass could be estimated properly. A steel cantilever beam with a rectangular section in a water tank at Ocean University of China was also employed to study the added mass influence on modal parameter identification and to investigate the performance of the proposed method. The experimental results demonstrated that the first two modal frequencies and mode shapes of the updated model match well with the measured values by combining the estimated added mass in the initial FEM.

  13. Measures of Partial Knowledge and Unexpected Responses in Multiple-Choice Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Shao-Hua; Lin, Pei-Chun; Lin, Zih-Chuan

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates differences in the partial scoring performance of examinees in elimination testing and conventional dichotomous scoring of multiple-choice tests implemented on a computer-based system. Elimination testing that uses the same set of multiple-choice items rewards examinees with partial knowledge over those who are simply…

  14. Partially Compensatory Multidimensional Item Response Theory Models: Two Alternate Model Forms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMars, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    Partially compensatory models may capture the cognitive skills needed to answer test items more realistically than compensatory models, but estimating the model parameters may be a challenge. Data were simulated to follow two different partially compensatory models, a model with an interaction term and a product model. The model parameters were…

  15. Identification of Genes in a Partially Resistant Genotype of Avena sativa Expressed in Response to Puccinia coronata Infection.

    PubMed

    Loarce, Yolanda; Navas, Elisa; Paniagua, Carlos; Fominaya, Araceli; Manjón, José L; Ferrer, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Cultivated oat (Avena sativa), an important crop in many countries, can suffer significant losses through infection by the fungus Puccinia coronata, the causal agent of crown rust disease. Understanding the molecular basis of existing partial resistance to this disease might provide targets of interest for crop improvement programs. A suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) library was constructed using cDNA from the partially resistant oat genotype MN841801-1 after inoculation with the pathogen. A total of 929 genes returned a BLASTx hit and were annotated under different GO terms, including 139 genes previously described as participants in mechanisms related to the defense response and signal transduction. Among these were genes involved in pathogen recognition, cell-wall modification, oxidative burst/ROS scavenging, and abscisic acid biosynthesis, as well genes related to inducible defense responses mediated by salicylic and jasmonic acid (although none of which had been previously reported involved in strong responses). These findings support the hypothesis that basal defense mechanisms are the main systems operating in oat partial resistance to P. coronata. When the expression profiles of 20 selected genes were examined at different times following inoculation with the pathogen, the partially resistant genotype was much quicker in mounting a response than a susceptible genotype. Additionally, a number of genes not previously described in oat transcriptomes were identified in this work, increasing our molecular knowledge of this crop. PMID:27303424

  16. The Response of Blind and Partially Sighted Teenagers to Genetic Counselling: First Study in the West Midlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Janice A.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The article describes the response of 55 blind and partially sighted teenagers to genetic counseling and outlines their knowledge of their disability and their attitudes towards marriage and parenthood. It was concluded that the counseling was not cost-effective though such services were welcomed by the teenagers. (Author/DB)

  17. Identification of Genes in a Partially Resistant Genotype of Avena sativa Expressed in Response to Puccinia coronata Infection

    PubMed Central

    Loarce, Yolanda; Navas, Elisa; Paniagua, Carlos; Fominaya, Araceli; Manjón, José L.; Ferrer, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Cultivated oat (Avena sativa), an important crop in many countries, can suffer significant losses through infection by the fungus Puccinia coronata, the causal agent of crown rust disease. Understanding the molecular basis of existing partial resistance to this disease might provide targets of interest for crop improvement programs. A suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) library was constructed using cDNA from the partially resistant oat genotype MN841801-1 after inoculation with the pathogen. A total of 929 genes returned a BLASTx hit and were annotated under different GO terms, including 139 genes previously described as participants in mechanisms related to the defense response and signal transduction. Among these were genes involved in pathogen recognition, cell-wall modification, oxidative burst/ROS scavenging, and abscisic acid biosynthesis, as well genes related to inducible defense responses mediated by salicylic and jasmonic acid (although none of which had been previously reported involved in strong responses). These findings support the hypothesis that basal defense mechanisms are the main systems operating in oat partial resistance to P. coronata. When the expression profiles of 20 selected genes were examined at different times following inoculation with the pathogen, the partially resistant genotype was much quicker in mounting a response than a susceptible genotype. Additionally, a number of genes not previously described in oat transcriptomes were identified in this work, increasing our molecular knowledge of this crop. PMID:27303424

  18. Identification of Genes in a Partially Resistant Genotype of Avena sativa Expressed in Response to Puccinia coronata Infection.

    PubMed

    Loarce, Yolanda; Navas, Elisa; Paniagua, Carlos; Fominaya, Araceli; Manjón, José L; Ferrer, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Cultivated oat (Avena sativa), an important crop in many countries, can suffer significant losses through infection by the fungus Puccinia coronata, the causal agent of crown rust disease. Understanding the molecular basis of existing partial resistance to this disease might provide targets of interest for crop improvement programs. A suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) library was constructed using cDNA from the partially resistant oat genotype MN841801-1 after inoculation with the pathogen. A total of 929 genes returned a BLASTx hit and were annotated under different GO terms, including 139 genes previously described as participants in mechanisms related to the defense response and signal transduction. Among these were genes involved in pathogen recognition, cell-wall modification, oxidative burst/ROS scavenging, and abscisic acid biosynthesis, as well genes related to inducible defense responses mediated by salicylic and jasmonic acid (although none of which had been previously reported involved in strong responses). These findings support the hypothesis that basal defense mechanisms are the main systems operating in oat partial resistance to P. coronata. When the expression profiles of 20 selected genes were examined at different times following inoculation with the pathogen, the partially resistant genotype was much quicker in mounting a response than a susceptible genotype. Additionally, a number of genes not previously described in oat transcriptomes were identified in this work, increasing our molecular knowledge of this crop.

  19. How partial reinforcement of food cues affects the extinction and reacquisition of appetitive responses. A new model for dieting success?

    PubMed

    van den Akker, Karolien; Havermans, Remco C; Bouton, Mark E; Jansen, Anita

    2014-10-01

    Animals and humans can easily learn to associate an initially neutral cue with food intake through classical conditioning, but extinction of learned appetitive responses can be more difficult. Intermittent or partial reinforcement of food cues causes especially persistent behaviour in animals: after exposure to such learning schedules, the decline in responding that occurs during extinction is slow. After extinction, increases in responding with renewed reinforcement of food cues (reacquisition) might be less rapid after acquisition with partial reinforcement. In humans, it may be that the eating behaviour of some individuals resembles partial reinforcement schedules to a greater extent, possibly affecting dieting success by interacting with extinction and reacquisition. Furthermore, impulsivity has been associated with less successful dieting, and this association might be explained by impulsivity affecting the learning and extinction of appetitive responses. In the present two studies, the effects of different reinforcement schedules and impulsivity on the acquisition, extinction, and reacquisition of appetitive responses were investigated in a conditioning paradigm involving food rewards in healthy humans. Overall, the results indicate both partial reinforcement schedules and, possibly, impulsivity to be associated with worse extinction performance. A new model of dieting success is proposed: learning histories and, perhaps, certain personality traits (impulsivity) can interfere with the extinction and reacquisition of appetitive responses to food cues and they may be causally related to unsuccessful dieting.

  20. A new method for achieving enhanced dielectric response over a wide temperature range

    SciTech Connect

    Maurya, Deepam; Sun, Fu -Chang; Pamir Alpay, S.; Priya, Shashank

    2015-10-19

    We report a novel approach for achieving high dielectric response over a wide temperature range. In this approach, multilayer ceramic heterostructures with constituent compositions having strategically tuned Curie points (TC) were designed and integrated with varying electrical connectivity. Interestingly, these multilayer structures exhibited different dielectric behavior in series and parallel configuration due to variations in electrical boundary conditions resulting in the differences in the strength of the electrostatic coupling. The results are explained using nonlinear thermodynamic model taking into account electrostatic interlayer interaction. We believe that present work will have huge significance in design of high performance ceramic capacitors.

  1. A new method for achieving enhanced dielectric response over a wide temperature range

    PubMed Central

    Maurya, Deepam; Sun, Fu-Chang; Pamir Alpay, S.; Priya, Shashank

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel approach for achieving high dielectric response over a wide temperature range. In this approach, multilayer ceramic heterostructures with constituent compositions having strategically tuned Curie points (TC) were designed and integrated with varying electrical connectivity. Interestingly, these multilayer structures exhibited different dielectric behavior in series and parallel configuration due to variations in electrical boundary conditions resulting in the differences in the strength of the electrostatic coupling. The results are explained using nonlinear thermodynamic model taking into account electrostatic interlayer interaction. We believe that present work will have huge significance in design of high performance ceramic capacitors. PMID:26477391

  2. Mapping brain Fos immunoreactivity in response to water deprivation and partial rehydration: Influence of sodium intake.

    PubMed

    Dalmasso, Carolina; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Vivas, Laura; De Luca, Laurival A

    2015-11-01

    Water deprivation (WD) followed by water intake to satiety, produces satiation of thirst and partial rehydration (PR). Thus, WD-PR is a natural method to differentiate thirst from sodium appetite. WD-PR also produces Fos immunoreactivity (Fos-ir) in interconnected areas of a brain circuit postulated to subserve sodium appetite. In the present work, we evaluated the effect of sodium intake on Fos-ir produced by WD-PR in brain areas operationally defined according to the literature as either facilitatory or inhibitory to sodium intake. Isotonic NaCl was available for ingestion in a sodium appetite test performed immediately after a single episode of WD-PR. Sodium intake decreased Fos-ir in facilitatory areas such as the lamina terminalis (particularly subfornical organ and median preoptic nucleus), central amygdala and hypothalamic parvocellular paraventricular nucleus in the forebrain. Sodium intake also decreased Fos-ir in inhibitory areas such as the area postrema, lateral parabrachial nucleus and nucleus of the solitary tract in the hindbrain. In contrast, sodium intake further increased Fos-ir that was activated by water deprivation in the dorsal raphe nucleus, another inhibitory area localized in the hindbrain. WD-PR increased Fos-ir in the core and shell of the nucleus accumbens. Sodium intake reduced Fos-ir in both parts of the accumbens. In summary, sodium intake following WD-PR reduced Fos-ir in most facilitatory and inhibitory areas, but increased Fos-ir in another inhibitory area. It also reduced Fos-ir in a reward area (accumbens). The results suggest a functional link between sodium intake and the activity of the hindbrain-forebrain circuitry subserving reward and sodium appetite in response to water deprivation.

  3. Piloted Simulator Investigation of Techniques to Achieve Attitude Command Response with Limited Authority Servos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Key, David L.; Heffley, Robert K.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to develop generic design principles for obtaining attitude command response in moderate to aggressive maneuvers without increasing SCAS series servo authority from the existing +/- 10%. In particular, to develop a scheme that would work on the UH-60 helicopter so that it can be considered for incorporation in future upgrades. The basic math model was a UH-60A version of GENHEL. The simulation facility was the NASA-Ames Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS). Evaluation tasks were Hover, Acceleration-Deceleration, and Sidestep, as defined in ADS-33D-PRF for Degraded Visual Environment (DVE). The DVE was adjusted to provide a Usable Cue Environment (UCE) equal to two. The basic concept investigated was the extent to which the limited attitude command authority achievable by the series servo could be supplemented by a 10%/sec trim servo. The architecture used provided angular rate feedback to only the series servo, shared the attitude feedback between the series and trim servos, and when the series servo approached saturation the attitude feedback was slowly phased out. Results show that modest use of the trim servo does improve pilot ratings, especially in and around hover. This improvement can be achieved with little degradation in response predictability during moderately aggressive maneuvers.

  4. Adjuvant therapy sparing in rectal cancer achieving complete response after chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    García-Albéniz, Xabier; Gallego, Rosa; Hofheinz, Ralf Dieter; Fernández-Esparrach, Gloria; Ayuso-Colella, Juan Ramón; Bombí, Josep Antoni; Conill, Carles; Cuatrecasas, Miriam; Delgado, Salvadora; Ginés, Angels; Miquel, Rosa; Pagés, Mario; Pineda, Estela; Pereira, Verónica; Sosa, Aarón; Reig, Oscar; Victoria, Iván; Feliz, Luis; María de Lacy, Antonio; Castells, Antoni; Burkholder, Iris; Hochhaus, Andreas; Maurel, Joan

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the long-term results of conventional chemoradiotherapy and laparoscopic mesorectal excision in rectal adenocarcinoma patients without adjuvant therapy. METHODS: Patients with biopsy-proven adenocarcinoma of the rectum staged cT3-T4 by endoscopic ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging received neoadjuvant continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil for five weeks and concomitant radiotherapy. Laparoscopic surgery was planned after 5-8 wk. Patients diagnosed with ypT0N0 stage cancer were not treated with adjuvant therapy according to the protocol. Patients with ypT1-2N0 or ypT3-4 or N+ were offered 5-fluorouracil-based adjuvant treatment on an individual basis. An external cohort was used as a reference for the findings. RESULTS: One hundred and seventy six patients were treated with induction chemoradiotherapy and 170 underwent total mesorectal excision. Cancer staging of ypT0N0 was achieved in 26/170 (15.3%) patients. After a median follow-up of 58.3 mo, patients with ypT0N0 had five-year disease-free and overall survival rates of 96% (95%CI: 77-99) and 100%, respectively. We provide evidence about the natural history of patients with localized rectal cancer achieving a complete response after preoperative chemoradiation. The inherent good prognosis of these patients will have implications for clinical trial design and care of patients. CONCLUSION: Withholding adjuvant chemotherapy after complete response following standard neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and laparoscopic mesorectal excision might be safe within an experienced multidisciplinary team. PMID:25400468

  5. Pressure dependence of the electro-optic response function in partially exposed polymer dispersed ferroelectric liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, D. S.; Holmes, H. K.

    1993-01-01

    Ferroelectric liquid crystals in a new configuration, termed partially exposed polymer dispersed ferroelectric liquid crystal (PEPDFLC), respond to external pressures and demonstrate pressure-induced electro-optic switching response. When the PEPDFLC thin film is sandwiched between two transparent conducting electrodes, one a glass plate and the other a flexible sheet such as polyvenylidene fluoride, the switching characteristics of the thin film are a function of the pressure applied to the flexible transparent electrode and the bias voltage across the electrodes. Response time measurements reveal a linear dependence of the change in electric field with external pressure.

  6. Screening of ionic cores in partially ionized plasmas within linear response

    SciTech Connect

    Gericke, D. O.; Vorberger, J.; Wuensch, K.; Gregori, G.

    2010-06-15

    We employ a pseudopotential approach to investigate the screening of ionic cores in partially ionized plasmas. Here, the effect of the tightly bound electrons is condensed into an effective potential between the (free) valence electrons and the ionic cores. Even for weak electron-ion coupling, the corresponding screening clouds show strong modifications from the Debye result for elements heavier than helium. Modifications of the theoretically predicted x-ray scattering signal and implications on measurements are discussed.

  7. Screening of ionic cores in partially ionized plasmas within linear response.

    PubMed

    Gericke, D O; Vorberger, J; Wünsch, K; Gregori, G

    2010-06-01

    We employ a pseudopotential approach to investigate the screening of ionic cores in partially ionized plasmas. Here, the effect of the tightly bound electrons is condensed into an effective potential between the (free) valence electrons and the ionic cores. Even for weak electron-ion coupling, the corresponding screening clouds show strong modifications from the Debye result for elements heavier than helium. Modifications of the theoretically predicted x-ray scattering signal and implications on measurements are discussed.

  8. Lack of response to artificial selection on developmental stability of partial wing shape components in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Tsujino, Masahiro; Takahashi, Kazuo H

    2014-04-01

    Developmental stability, the ability of organisms to buffer their developmental processes against developmental noise is often evaluated with fluctuating asymmetry (FA). Natural genetic variation in FA has been investigated using Drosophila wings as a model system and the recent estimation of the heritability of wing shape FA was as large as 20%. Because natural genetic variation in wing shape FA was found to localize in a partial component of the wings, heritable variation in specific parts of the wings might be responsible for FA estimation based on the whole wing shape. In this study, we quantified the shape of three partial components of the wings, and estimated the heritability of the wing shape FA based on artificial selections. As a result, FA values for the partial wing shape components did not respond to artificial selections and the heritability scores estimated were very small. These results indicate that natural additive genetic variation in FA of partial wing components was very small compared with that in a complex wing trait.

  9. Recurrence after Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation and Surgery for Esophageal Cancer: Does the Pattern of Recurrence Differ for Complete Responders and Those with Partial or No response?

    PubMed Central

    Meguid, Robert A.; Hooker, Craig M.; Taylor, Joshua T.; Kleinberg, Laurence R.; Cattaneo, Stephen M.; Sussman, Marc S.; Yang, Stephen C.; Heitmiller, Richard F.; Forastiere, Arlene A.; Brock, Malcolm V.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We hypothesized that most relapses in esophageal patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy would occur outside of the surgical and radiation fields. Methods Recurrence patterns, time to recurrence, and median survival were examined in 267 patients who underwent esophagectomy after neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy at Johns Hopkins over 19 years. Results Of 267 patients, 82 (30.7%) were complete responders (CR) to neoadjuvant therapy, with 108 (40.4%) and 77 (28.8%) being partial responders (PR) and non-responders (NR), respectively. Recurrence developed in 84 patients, (CR 18 /82 (21.4%), PR 39/108 (36.1%), NR 27/77 (35.1%) ,p=0.055, respectively.) Most patients recurred at distant sites (65/84;77.4) regardless of pathological response and subsequent survival was brief (median 8.37 months). Median disease-free survival was short (10 months) and did not differ based on recurrence site for partial and non-responding patients, but was longer for CR patients with distant recurrence whose median disease-free survival was 27.3 months (p=0.008).By multivariate analysis, no other factor except for pathological response to neoadjuvant therapy was associated with disease recurrence or death. PR and NR patients were 1.97 and 2.23 times more likely to recur than CR patients (p=0.024 and p=0.012, respectively). Conclusions Most esophageal cancer recurrences after neoadjuvant therapy and surgery are distant, and survival time after recurrence is short regardless of pathological response. Fewer patients achieving CR recur, and distant recurrences in these patients manifest later than in patients with PR and NR. Only pathological response is significantly associated with disease recurrence suggesting that tumor biology and chemosensitivity are critical in long-term patient outcome. PMID:19931663

  10. Autonomous Information Fading and Provision to Achieve High Response Time in Distributed Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaodong; Arfaoui, Helene; Mori, Kinji

    In highly dynamic electronic commerce environment, the need for adaptability and rapid response time to information service systems has become increasingly important. In order to cope with the continuously changing conditions of service provision and utilization, Faded Information Field (FIF) has been proposed. FIF is a distributed information service system architecture, sustained by push/pull mobile agents to bring high-assurance of services through a recursive demand-oriented provision of the most popular information closer to the users to make a tradeoff between the cost of information service allocation and access. In this paper, based on the analysis of the relationship that exists among the users distribution, information provision and access time, we propose the technology for FIF design to resolve the competing requirements of users and providers to improve users' access time. In addition, to achieve dynamic load balancing with changing users preference, the autonomous information reallocation technology is proposed. We proved the effectiveness of the proposed technology through the simulation and comparison with the conventional system.

  11. Fluoxetine response in children with autistic spectrum disorders: correlation with familial major affective disorder and intellectual achievement.

    PubMed

    DeLong, G Robert; Ritch, Chad R; Burch, Sherri

    2002-10-01

    One hundred and twenty-nine children, 2 to 8 years old, with idiopathic autistic spectrum disorder diagnosed by standard instruments (Childhood Austim Ratings Scale and Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule) were treated with fluoxetine (0.15 to 0.5mg/kg) for 5 to 76 months (mean 32 to 36 months), with discontinuation trials. Response criteria are described. Family histories were obtained using the family history method in repeated interviews. Fluoxetine response, family history of major affective disorder, and unusual intellectual achievement, pretreatment language, and hyperlexia were used to define a coherent subgroup of autistic spectrum disorder. Statistical analyses were post hoc. Of the children, 22 (17%) had an excellent response, 67 (52%) good, and 40 (31%) fair/poor. Treatment age did not correlate with response. Fluoxetine response correlated robustly with familial major affective disorder and unusual intellectual achievement, and with hyperlexia in the child. Family history of bipolar disorder and of unusual intellectual achievement correlated strongly. Five children developed bipolar disorder during follow-up. Fluoxetine response, family history of major affective disorder (especially bipolar), unusual achievement, and hyperlexia in the children appear to define a homogeneous autistic subgroup. Bipolar disorder, unusual intellectual achievement, and autistic spectrum disorders cluster strongly in families and may share genetic determinants.

  12. Partial gravity unloading inhibits bone healing responses in a large animal model.

    PubMed

    Gadomski, Benjamin C; McGilvray, Kirk C; Easley, Jeremiah T; Palmer, Ross H; Santoni, Brandon G; Puttlitz, Christian M

    2014-09-22

    The reduction in mechanical loading associated with space travel results in dramatic decreases in the bone mineral density (BMD) and mechanical strength of skeletal tissue resulting in increased fracture risk during spaceflight missions. Previous rodent studies have highlighted distinct bone healing differences in animals in gravitational environments versus those during spaceflight. While these data have demonstrated that microgravity has deleterious effects on fracture healing, the direct translation of these results to human skeletal repair remains problematic due to substantial differences between rodent and human bone. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the effects of partial gravitational unloading on long-bone fracture healing in a previously-developed large animal Haversian bone model. In vivo measurements demonstrated significantly higher orthopedic plate strains (i.e. load burden) in the Partial Unloading (PU) Group as compared to the Full Loading (FL) Group following the 28-day healing period due to inhibited healing in the reduced loading environment. DEXA BMD in the metatarsus of the PU Group decreased 17.6% (p<0.01) at the time of the ostectomy surgery. Four-point bending stiffness of the PU Group was 4.4 times lower than that of the FL Group (p<0.01), while µCT and histomorphometry demonstrated reduced periosteal callus area (p<0.05), mineralizing surface (p<0.05), mineral apposition rate (p<0.001), bone formation rate (p<0.001), and periosteal/endosteal osteoblast numbers (p<0.001/p<0.01, respectively) as well as increased periosteal osteoclast number (p<0.05). These data provide strong evidence that the mechanical environment dramatically affects the fracture healing cascade, and likely has a negative impact on Haversian system healing during spaceflight.

  13. Responses of neurons in the auditory pathway of the barn owl to partially correlated binaural signals.

    PubMed

    Albeck, Y; Konishi, M

    1995-10-01

    1. Extracellular single-unit recording in anesthetized barn owls was used to study neuronal response to dichotic stimuli of variable binaural correlation (BC). Recordings were made in the output fibers of nucleus laminaris (NL), the anterior division of the ventral lateral lemniscal nucleus (VLVa), the core of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICcC), the lateral shell of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICcLS), and the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICx). 2. The response of all neurons sensitive to interaural time difference (ITD) varied with BC. The relationship between BC and impulse number fits a linear, a parabolic, or a ramp model. A linear or parabolic model fits most neurons in low-level nuclei. Higher order neurons in ICx did not respond to noise bursts with strong negative binaural correlation, creating a ramp-like response to BC. 3. A neuron's ability to detect ITD varied as a function of BC. Conversely, a neuron's response to BC changed with ITD. Neurons in NL, VLVa, and ICcC show almost periodic ITD response curves. In these neurons peaks and troughs of ITD response curves diminished as BC decreased, creating a flat ITD response when BC = 0. When BC was set to -1, the most favorable ITD became the least favorable one and vice versa. The ITD response curve of ICx neurons usually has a single dominant peak. The response of those neurons to a negatively correlated noise pair (BC = -1) showed two ITD peaks, flanking the position of the primary peak. 4. The parabolic BC response of NL neurons fits the prediction of the cross-correlation model, assuming half-wave rectification of the sound by the cochlea. Linear response is not predicted by the model. However, the parabolic and the linear neurons probably do not belong to two distinct groups as the difference between them is not statistically significant. Thus, the cross-correlation model provides a good description of the binaural response not only in NL but also in

  14. Effect of carbon source on acclimatization of nitrifying bacteria to achieve high-rate partial nitrification of wastewater with high ammonium concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, Seyyed Alireza; Ibrahim, Shaliza; Aroua, Mohamed Kheireddine

    2014-08-01

    Experiments in two laboratory-scale sequential batch reactors were carried out to investigate the effect of heterotrophic bacteria on nitrifying bacteria using external carbon sources. Partial nitrification of ammonium-rich wastewater during short-term acclimatization enriched the activity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in both reactors. Heterotrophic bacteria exhibited a minor effect on nitrifying bacteria, and complete removal of ammonium occurred at a rate of 41 mg L-1 h-1 in both reactors. The main strategy of this research was to carry out partial nitrification using high-activity ammonia-oxidizing bacteria with a high concentration of free ammonia (70 mg L-1). The NO2 -/(NO3 - + NO2 -) ratio was greater than 0.9 in both reactors most of the time.

  15. Teaching Low-Achieving Students to Self-Regulate Persuasive Quick Write Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Linda H.; Benedek-Wood, Elizabeth; Valasa, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    Students' academic achievement across content areas is often dependent on their ability to express knowledge through written expression. Many adolescent students lack the skills to write efficiently and effectively. These low-achieving writers can benefit from instruction in self-regulating the writing process. One approach, Self-Regulated…

  16. A Cross-Cultural Examination of the Psychometric Properties of Responses to the Achievement Goal Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murayama, Kou; Zhou, Mingming; Nesbit, John C.

    2009-01-01

    The psychometric properties of scores from the Achievement Goal Questionnaire were examined in samples of Japanese (N = 326) and Canadian (N = 307) postsecondary students. Previous research found evidence of a four-factor structure of achievement goals in U.S. samples. Using confirmatory factor-analytic techniques, the authors found strong…

  17. Partial Response to First-Line Crizotinib in an Elderly Male Patient with ROS1 Translocation-Positive Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Overbeck, Tobias R; Schmitz, Katja; Engelke, Christoph; Sahlmann, Carsten-Oliver; Hugo, Sara; Kellner, Laura; Trümper, Lorenz; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    We report on a 90-year-old male patient with a ROS1-translocated adenocarcinoma of the lung who was treated with crizotinib as first-line therapy. After 11 months of treatment, we noticed complete metabolic response as measured by (18)F-FDG-PET/CT scan and a partial response according to RECIST criteria. This patient indicates that ROS1 translocations are not restricted to young age, female gender and low stage. Furthermore, this case illustrates exemplarily that crizotinib therapy is effective and manageable even as first-line treatment in elderly patients with comorbidities. Based on our findings, we recommend to include elderly patients with advanced pulmonary adenocarcinomas in molecular screening approaches for ROS1 translocations.

  18. Partial Response to First-Line Crizotinib in an Elderly Male Patient with ROS1 Translocation-Positive Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Overbeck, Tobias R.; Schmitz, Katja; Engelke, Christoph; Sahlmann, Carsten-Oliver; Hugo, Sara; Kellner, Laura; Trümper, Lorenz; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    We report on a 90-year-old male patient with a ROS1-translocated adenocarcinoma of the lung who was treated with crizotinib as first-line therapy. After 11 months of treatment, we noticed complete metabolic response as measured by 18F-FDG-PET/CT scan and a partial response according to RECIST criteria. This patient indicates that ROS1 translocations are not restricted to young age, female gender and low stage. Furthermore, this case illustrates exemplarily that crizotinib therapy is effective and manageable even as first-line treatment in elderly patients with comorbidities. Based on our findings, we recommend to include elderly patients with advanced pulmonary adenocarcinomas in molecular screening approaches for ROS1 translocations. PMID:27065847

  19. Picrotoxin but not bicuculline partially abolishes the cardio-inhibitory responses induced by visual stimulation in the crab Neohelice granulata.

    PubMed

    Yang, M; Carbó Tano, M; Hermitte, G

    2013-02-17

    Conspicuous and sustained heart arrests, revealed as an increase in the magnitude of cardiac interbeat intervals, are elicited in the crab Neohelice granulata upon the presentation of a visual danger stimulus (VDS). Aiming to study the regulation of cardio-inhibitory responses (CIR) in vivo, we investigated whether GABA mediates the extrinsic regulation of the cardiac activity. We examined the possibility of abolishing CIR by injecting the GABAergic antagonists picrotoxin and bicuculline, right before sensory stimulation. Picrotoxin partially abolished the reversible cardiac arrests induced by VDS, whereas bicuculline showed no effects. These results suggest that the rapid responses of the cardiac system of the crab Neohelice to environmental disturbances, reminiscent of an autonomic-like regulation associated with fear, flight or fight, may be extrinsically regulated by the GABAergic system.

  20. Student Response to a Partial Inversion of an Organic Chemistry Course for Non-Chemistry Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rein, Kathleen S.; Brookes, David T.

    2015-01-01

    We report the student response to a two-year transformation of a one-semester organic chemistry course for nonchemistry majors. The transformed course adopted a peer led team learning approach and incorporated case studies. Student attitudes toward the course transformation were assessed throughout the semester, and adjustments to the methods were…

  1. Community emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents: A selected and partially annotated bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Youngen, G.

    1988-10-01

    The role of responding to emergencies at nuclear power plants is often considered the responsibility of the personnel onsite. This is true for most, if not all, of the incidents that may happen during the course of the plant`s operating lifetime. There is however, the possibility of a major accident occurring at anytime. Major nuclear accidents at Chernobyl and Three Mile Island have taught their respective countries and communities a significant lesson in local emergency preparedness and response. Through these accidents, the rest of the world can also learn a great deal about planning, preparing and responding to the emergencies unique to nuclear power. This bibliography contains books, journal articles, conference papers and government reports on emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents. It does not contain citations for ``onsite`` response or planning, nor does it cover the areas of radiation releases from transportation accidents. The compiler has attempted to bring together a sampling of the world`s collective written experience on dealing with nuclear reactor accidents on the sate, local and community levels. Since the accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, that written experience has grown enormously.

  2. The Use of Information from Wrong Responses in Measuring Students' Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birenbaum, Menucha; Tatsuoka, Kikumi K.

    Much valuable information can be gained by analyzing the students' wrong responses. When a student answers a free response item she/he gives the response which she/he considers to be the correct one. Therefore, diagnosing the algorithm that led the student to his/her answer provides an important source of information for assessing his/her…

  3. The immune response against Chlamydia suis genital tract infection partially protects against re-infection.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Evelien; Devriendt, Bert; Yin, Lizi; Chiers, Koen; Cox, Eric; Vanrompay, Daisy

    2014-09-25

    The aim of the present study was to reveal the characteristic features of genital Chlamydia suis infection and re-infection in female pigs by studying the immune response, pathological changes, replication of chlamydial bacteria in the genital tract and excretion of viable bacteria. Pigs were intravaginally infected and re-infected with C. suis strain S45, the type strain of this species. We demonstrated that S45 is pathogenic for the female urogenital tract. Chlamydia replication occurred throughout the urogenital tract, causing inflammation and pathology. Furthermore, genital infection elicited both cellular and humoral immune responses. Compared to the primo-infection of pigs with C. suis, re-infection was characterized by less severe macroscopic lesions and less chlamydial elementary bodies and inclusions in the urogenital tract. This indicates the development of a certain level of protection following the initial infection. Protective immunity against re-infection coincided with higher Chlamydia-specific IgG and IgA antibody titers in sera and vaginal secretions, higher proliferative responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), higher percentages of blood B lymphocytes, monocytes and CD8⁺ T cells and upregulated production of IFN-γ and IL-10 by PBMC.

  4. Integrative Analysis of Gene-Environment Interactions under a Multi-response Partially Linear Varying Coefficient Model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cen; Cui, Yuehua; Ma, Shuangge

    2014-01-01

    Consider the integrative analysis of genetic data with multiple correlated response variables. The goal is to identify important gene-environment (G×E) interactions along with main gene and environment effects that are associated with the responses. The homogeneity and heterogeneity models can be adopted to describe the genetic basis of multiple responses. To accommodate possible nonlinear effects of some environment effects, a multi-response partially linear varying coefficient (MPLVC) model is assumed. Penalization is adopted for marker selection. The proposed penalization method can select genetic variants with G×E interactions, no G×E interactions, and no main effects simultaneously. It adopts different penalties to accommodate the homogeneity and heterogeneity models. The proposed method can be effectively computed using a coordinate descent algorithm. Simulation study and the analysis of Health Professional’s Follow-up Study (HPFS), which has two correlated continuous traits, SNP measurements, and multiple environment effects, show superior performance of the proposed method over its competitors. PMID:25146388

  5. Response of a partial wall to an external perturbation of rotating plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Atanasiu, C. V.; Zakharov, L. E.

    2013-09-15

    In this paper, we present the response of a 3D thin multiply connected wall to an external kink mode perturbation in axisymmetric tokamak configurations. To calculate the contribution of the plasma perturbed magnetic field in the vacuum region, we have made use of the concept of surface currents [following C. V. Atanasiu, A. H. Boozer, L. E. Zakharov, and A. A. Subbotin, Phys. Plasmas 6, 2781 (1999)]. The wall response is expressed in terms of a stream function of the wall surface currents, which are obtained by solving a diffusion type equation, taking into account the contribution of the wall currents themselves iteratively. The use of stream function makes the approach applicable for both well-studied earlier Resistive Wall Modes and for Wall Touching Kink Modes, which were discovered recently as a key phenomenon in disruptions [L. E. Zakharov, S. A. Galkin, and S. N. Gerasimov, Phys. Plasmas 19, 055703 (2012)]. New analytical expressions, suitable for numerical calculations of toroidal harmonics of the vacuum magnetic fields from the surface currents on axisymmetric shells, are derived.

  6. The Grasshopper and the Ant: Motivational Responses of Low-Achieving Students to High-Stakes Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roderick, Melissa; Engel, Mimi

    2001-01-01

    Examined the responses of 102 low achieving sixth and eighth graders to Chicago's highly publicized efforts to end social promotion. Students generally described increased work efforts, and students with high levels of work effort generally had greater than average learning gains and positive outcomes in terms of promotion. About one-third of…

  7. Effects of Science Interest and Environmental Responsibility on Science Aspiration and Achievement: Gender Differences and Cultural Supports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiu, Mei-Shiu

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study is twofold: (1) to investigate gender differences in the effects of science interest and environmental responsibility on science aspiration and achievement and (2) to explore the relations between cultural supports (macroeconomic and gender equality) and both boys' and girls' tendencies to integrate the aforementioned…

  8. Simulating the Response of Urban Water Quality to Climate and Land Use Change in Partially Urbanized Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, N.; Yearsley, J. R.; Nijssen, B.; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2014-12-01

    Urban stream quality is particularly susceptible to extreme precipitation events and land use change. Although the projected effects of extreme events and land use change on hydrology have been resonably well studied, the impacts on urban water quality have not been widely examined due in part to the scale mismatch between global climate models and the spatial scales required to represent urban hydrology and water quality signals. Here we describe a grid-based modeling system that integrates the Distributed Hydrology Soil Vegetation Model (DHSVM) and urban water quality module adpated from EPA's Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) and Soil and water assessment tool (SWAT). Using the model system, we evaluate, for four partially urbanized catchments within the Puget Sound basin, urban water quality under current climate conditions, and projected potential changes in urban water quality associated with future changes in climate and land use. We examine in particular total suspended solids, toal nitrogen, total phosphorous, and coliform bacteria, with catchment representations at the 150-meter spatial resolution and the sub-daily timestep. We report long-term streamflow and water quality predictions in response to extreme precipitation events of varying magnitudes in the four partially urbanized catchments. Our simulations show that urban water quality is highly sensitive to both climatic and land use change.

  9. Who Is to Blame? Students, Teachers and Parents Views on Who Is Responsible for Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Elizabeth R.; Rubie-Davies, Christine M.; Elley-Brown, Margaret J.; Widdowson, Deborah A.; Dixon, Robyn S.; Irving, Earl S.

    2011-01-01

    This research investigates who students, parents and teachers believe is responsible for student learning. Thirteen focus groups were conducted with Year 9 and 10 students, and parents and teachers from three diverse New Zealand secondary schools. Differences were found with respect to whom the three stakeholders thought were responsible for…

  10. Collective Responsibility, Academic Optimism, and Student Achievement in Taiwan Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Hsin-Chieh

    2012-01-01

    Previous research indicates that collective efficacy, faculty trust in students and parents, and academic emphasis together formed a single latent school construct, called academic optimism. In the U.S., academic optimism has been proven to be a powerful construct that could effectively predict student achievement even after controlling for…

  11. Response to Comment on "Math at home adds up to achievement in school".

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Talia; Schaeffer, Marjorie W; Rozek, Christopher S; Maloney, Erin A; Levine, Susan C; Beilock, Sian L

    2016-03-11

    Frank presents an alternative interpretation of our data, yet reports largely similar results to those in our original Report. A critical difference centers on how to interpret and test interaction effects. Frank finds no mistakes in our analyses. We stand by our original conclusions of meaningful effects of the Bedtime Learning Together (BLT) math app on children's math achievement.

  12. The Role of Temperament in Children's Affective and Behavioral Responses in Achievement Situations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirvonen, Riikka; Aunola, Kaisa; Alatupa, Saija; Viljaranta, Jaana; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2013-01-01

    Although students' affects and behaviors in achievement situations have been shown to be influenced by their previous learning experiences, less is known about how they relate to students' dispositional characteristics, such as temperament. This study examined to what extent children's temperament is related to their affective and behavioral…

  13. Performance Concern, Contingent Self-Worth, and Responses to Repeated Achievement Failure in Second Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smiley, Patricia A.; Coulson, Sheri L.; Greene, Joelle K.; Bono, Katherine L.

    2010-01-01

    Individual differences in emotion, cognitions, and task choice following achievement failure are found among four- to seven-year-olds. However, neither performance deterioration during failure nor generalization after failure--aspects of the helpless pattern in 10-year-olds--have been reliably demonstrated in this age group. In the present study,…

  14. Multilevel Item Response Modeling: Applications to Large-Scale Assessment of Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Xiaohui

    2009-01-01

    The call for standards-based reform and educational accountability has led to increased attention to large-scale assessments. Over the past two decades, large-scale assessments have been providing policymakers and educators with timely information about student learning and achievement to facilitate their decisions regarding schools, teachers and…

  15. Asymmetry Compensation by Nonlinear Adaptive Partial Response Equalizer for 31.3 GB Blu-ray Disk ROM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajiwara, Yoshiyuki; Higashino, Satoru; Yamagami, Tamotsu

    2005-05-01

    We investigated a nonlinear adaptive partial response equalizer for the asymmetry compensation of a 31.3 GB higher linear density Blu-ray disc read only memory (ROM) with a 16% asymmetry. A second-order adaptive Volterra filter approximately equalizes a nonlinear signal into a linear one. We reduced its calculation complexity to design a digital circuit in optimum hardware resources by the result of computer simulations. Then we designed an adaptive Volterra filter on an FPGA evaluation board for bit error rate measurements. Finally, we determined that an adaptive Volterra filter has a capability to obtain improved bit error rates by signal linearization in a conventional Viterbi detector for PR(1221).

  16. Partial response after intensive chemotherapy for adrenal cortical carcinoma in a child.

    PubMed

    Aricò, M; Bossi, G; Livieri, C; Raiteri, E; Severi, F

    1992-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) in childhood is a rare tumor with high fatality rate. Available reports provide event free survival rates ranging between 10 to 50%. Optimal treatment has not yet been established; surgery plays a major role, and the value of adjuvant chemotherapy needs to be evaluated further, especially in children who develop recurrent disease and those with metastases at diagnosis. Optimal therapy of ACC has not been established. Surgery has been curative after complete tumor resection. Children with inoperable, recurrent and metastatic ACC have been treated with O,P'DDD, with response rates ranging from 10 to 60% in different series [7,11-20]. Radiotherapy [21] and other anti-cancer drugs have been used [4-22] but their efficacy has not been established. Combination chemotherapy containing oncovin, cisPlatinum, epipodophyllotoxin and cyclophosphamide (OPEC) produced regression of metastatic ACC in a 5-year-old male [23]. We report one girl with relapsed disseminated ACC who showed good, even if temporary, control of the disease, with disappearance of lung, liver and spleen metastases, and marked reduction of the adrenal mass, following combined chemotherapy according to the "eight-drugs-in-one-day" protocol. PMID:1574038

  17. Impaired physiological responses to chronic hypoxia in mice partially deficient for hypoxia-inducible factor 1α

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Aimee Y.; Shimoda, Larissa A.; Iyer, Narayan V.; Huso, David L.; Sun, Xing; McWilliams, Rita; Beaty, Terri; Sham, James S.K.; Wiener, Charles M.; Sylvester, J.T.; Semenza, Gregg L.

    1999-01-01

    Chronic hypoxia induces polycythemia, pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular hypertrophy, and weight loss. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) activates transcription of genes encoding proteins that mediate adaptive responses to hypoxia, including erythropoietin, vascular endothelial growth factor, and glycolytic enzymes. Expression of the HIF-1α subunit increases exponentially as O2 concentration is decreased. Hif1a–/– mouse embryos with complete deficiency of HIF-1α due to homozygosity for a null allele at the Hif1a locus die at midgestation, with multiple cardiovascular malformations and mesenchymal cell death. Hif1a+/– heterozygotes develop normally and are indistinguishable from Hif1a+/+ wild-type littermates when maintained under normoxic conditions. In this study, the physiological responses of Hif1a+/– and Hif1a+/+ mice exposed to 10% O2 for one to six weeks were analyzed. Hif1a+/– mice demonstrated significantly delayed development of polycythemia, right ventricular hypertrophy, pulmonary hypertension, and pulmonary vascular remodeling and significantly greater weight loss compared with wild-type littermates. These results indicate that partial HIF-1α deficiency has significant effects on multiple systemic responses to chronic hypoxia. J. Clin. Invest. 103:691–696 (1999) PMID:10074486

  18. High frequency wide-band transformer uses coax to achieve high turn ratio and flat response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Parry, T.

    1966-01-01

    Center-tap push-pull transformer with toroidal core helically wound with a single coaxial cable creates a high frequency wideband transformer. This transformer has a high-turn ratio, a high coupling coefficient, and a flat broadband response.

  19. Responses of blind fish to gravitational changes as achieved in parabolic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonbaumgarten, R. J.; Shillinger, G. L., Jr.; Baldright, G.

    1972-01-01

    Blind fish, during parabolic flight, display a measurable and consistent behavior. The most spectacular new behavioral response is the forward looping of blind fish in or near weightlessness. This response shows no measurable adaptation during the entire period of weightlessness of about 30 sec. During the entrance and exit of weightless parabolas (pushover and pullout) respectively, the fish assumes a forward tilted diving position. Parabolic flight with negative g in the range between 0g and -1g causes similar diving responses of the fish with the only difference being that the dive is directed toward the top of the fish tank. When the response to a g value less than 1g is compared to the response to increased g load on the ground (escape of darting response) an essential difference is seen: higher horizontal acceleration or jerk on the ground causes fish to swim, or even dart, against the direction of inertial force; fish during weightless parabolas move into the direction of the inertial or gravitational force. Since the vestibular system of fish is homologous to that of man, the observed behavior of fish in weightless flight could help to better understand human performance and sensations in comparable situations.

  20. Preoperative Single-Fraction Partial Breast Radiation Therapy: A Novel Phase 1, Dose-Escalation Protocol With Radiation Response Biomarkers

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Janet K.; Blitzblau, Rachel C.; Yoo, Sua; Geradts, Joseph; Chang, Zheng; Baker, Jay A.; Georgiade, Gregory S.; Chen, Wei; Siamakpour-Reihani, Sharareh; Wang, Chunhao; Broadwater, Gloria; Groth, Jeff; Palta, Manisha; Dewhirst, Mark; Barry, William T.; Duffy, Eileen A.; and others

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Women with biologically favorable early-stage breast cancer are increasingly treated with accelerated partial breast radiation (PBI). However, treatment-related morbidities have been linked to the large postoperative treatment volumes required for external beam PBI. Relative to external beam delivery, alternative PBI techniques require equipment that is not universally available. To address these issues, we designed a phase 1 trial utilizing widely available technology to 1) evaluate the safety of a single radiation treatment delivered preoperatively to the small-volume, intact breast tumor and 2) identify imaging and genomic markers of radiation response. Methods and Materials: Women aged ≥55 years with clinically node-negative, estrogen receptor–positive, and/or progesterone receptor–positive HER2−, T1 invasive carcinomas, or low- to intermediate-grade in situ disease ≤2 cm were enrolled (n=32). Intensity modulated radiation therapy was used to deliver 15 Gy (n=8), 18 Gy (n=8), or 21 Gy (n=16) to the tumor with a 1.5-cm margin. Lumpectomy was performed within 10 days. Paired pre- and postradiation magnetic resonance images and patient tumor samples were analyzed. Results: No dose-limiting toxicity was observed. At a median follow-up of 23 months, there have been no recurrences. Physician-rated cosmetic outcomes were good/excellent, and chronic toxicities were grade 1 to 2 (fibrosis, hyperpigmentation) in patients receiving preoperative radiation only. Evidence of dose-dependent changes in vascular permeability, cell density, and expression of genes regulating immunity and cell death were seen in response to radiation. Conclusions: Preoperative single-dose radiation therapy to intact breast tumors is well tolerated. Radiation response is marked by early indicators of cell death in this biologically favorable patient cohort. This study represents a first step toward a novel partial breast radiation approach. Preoperative radiation should

  1. Achievement of controlled resistive response of nanogapped palladium film to hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, M.; Wong, M. H.; Ong, C. W.

    2015-07-20

    Palladium (Pd) film containing nanogaps of well controlled dimension was fabricated on a Si wafer having a high-aspect-ratio micropillar. The Pd film was arranged to experience hydrogen (H{sub 2})-induced volume expansion. (i) If the nanogap is kept open, its width is narrowed down. A discharge current was generated to give a strong, fast, and repeatable on-off type resistive switching response. (ii) If the nanogap is closed, the cross section of the conduction path varies to give continuous H{sub 2}-concentration dependent resistive response. The influence of stresses and related physical mechanisms are discussed.

  2. P2Y2 purinergic receptor activation is essential for efficient hepatocyte proliferation in response to partial hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tackett, Bryan C.; Sun, Hongdan; Mei, Yu; Maynard, Janielle P.; Cheruvu, Sayuri; Mani, Arunmani; Hernandez-Garcia, Andres; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Karpen, Saul J.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular nucleotides via activation of P2 purinergic receptors influence hepatocyte proliferation and liver regeneration in response to 70% partial hepatectomy (PH). Adult hepatocytes express multiple P2Y (G protein-coupled) and P2X (ligand-gated ion channels) purinergic receptor subtypes. However, the identity of key receptor subtype(s) important for efficient hepatocyte proliferation in regenerating livers remains unknown. To evaluate the impact of P2Y2 purinergic receptor-mediated signaling on hepatocyte proliferation in regenerating livers, wild-type (WT) and P2Y2 purinergic receptor knockout (P2Y2−/−) mice were subjected to 70% PH. Liver tissues were analyzed for activation of early events critical for hepatocyte priming and subsequent cell cycle progression. Our findings suggest that early activation of p42/44 ERK MAPK (5 min), early growth response-1 (Egr-1) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) DNA-binding activity (30 min), and subsequent hepatocyte proliferation (24–72 h) in response to 70% PH were impaired in P2Y2−/− mice. Interestingly, early induction of cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6) and cytokine-mediated signaling (NF-κB, STAT-3) were intact in P2Y2−/− remnant livers, uncovering the importance of cytokine-independent and nucleotide-dependent early priming events critical for subsequent hepatocyte proliferation in regenerating livers. Hepatocytes isolated from the WT and P2Y2−/− mice were treated with ATP or ATPγS for 5–120 min and 12–24 h. Extracellular ATP alone, via activation of P2Y2 purinergic receptors, was sufficient to induce ERK phosphorylation, Egr-1 protein expression, and key cyclins and cell cycle progression of hepatocytes in vitro. Collectively, these findings highlight the functional significance of P2Y2 purinergic receptor activation for efficient hepatocyte priming and proliferation in response to PH. PMID:25301185

  3. Academic Optimism and Collective Responsibility: An Organizational Model of the Dynamics of Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Jason H.

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the construct of academic optimism and its relationship with collective responsibility in a sample of Taiwan elementary schools. The construct of academic optimism was tested using confirmatory factor analysis, and the whole structural model was tested with a structural equation modeling analysis. The data were…

  4. The Reading Response E-Journal: An Alternative Way to Engage Low-Achieving EFL Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hsiao-Chien

    2013-01-01

    The reading response journal has been valued as an effective tool for involving students in authentic reading and writing activities. As the internet has become an essential medium in today's English classroom, it is advisable to integrate both the web and the journal when approaching our EFL students. In order to motivate and engage my…

  5. Effectiveness of Student Response Systems in Terms of Learning Environment, Attitudes and Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohn, Stephen T.; Fraser, Barry J.

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate the effectiveness of using Student Response Systems (SRS) among grade 7 and 8 science students in New York, the How Do You Feel About This Class? (HDYFATC) questionnaire was administered to 1097 students (532 students did use SRS and 565 students who did not use SRS). Data analyses attested to the sound factorial validity…

  6. [Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the testis relapsed 16 years after achieving complete response].

    PubMed

    Nagasaka, Isao; Mitsui, Takeki; Ishizaki, Takuma; Koiso, Hiromi; Yokohama, Akihiko; Saitoh, Takayuki; Hirato, Junko; Igarashi, Tadahiko; Kojima, Masaru; Tsukamoto, Norifumi; Nojima, Yoshihisa; Murakami, Hirokazu; Handa, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Testicular lymphoma is a rare disease, accounting for 1-2% of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 5-9% of all testicular tumors, and has a high relapse rate with a poor prognosis. We report a patient with testicular diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) who relapsed after being in remission for 16 years. He had undergone orchiectomy of the right testis and was diagnosed as having DLBCL (stage IAE) at 49 years of age. After 3 cycles of CHOP, he achieved a complete remission. Orchiectomy was performed because of a left testicular tumor, and he was again diagnosed with DLBCL at the age of 65. VH3-21 was detected in lymphoma cells at the times of both the first diagnosis and the relapse based on analysis of the variable region of the immunoglobulin heavy chain. Accordingly, the lymphoma cells at relapse were confirmed to be the same clone as that which had been documented at the first diagnosis.

  7. Petit receives Robert C. Cowen Award for Sustained Achievement in Science Journalism: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Charles W.

    2012-01-01

    Charles W. Petit, a veteran science writer, received the 2011 Robert C. Cowan Award for Sustained Achievement in Science Journalism at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 7 December 2011 in San Francisco, Calif. Petit covered earthquakes for the San Francisco Chronicle during the 1980s and 1990s and has recently served as "head tracker" for the Knight Science Journalism Tracker, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology-based daily blog that compiles and critiques science reporting worldwide. Petit was previously honored by AGU in 2003 when he received the David Perlman Award for an article about a new finding in oceanography. The Cowan Award, named for a former science editor of the Christian Science Monitor, is given no more than every 2 years and recognizes a journalist who has made "significant, lasting, and consistent contributions to accurate reporting or writing" on the Earth and space sciences for the general public.

  8. Achieving a stable time response in polymeric radiation sensors under charge injection by X-rays.

    PubMed

    Intaniwet, Akarin; Mills, Christopher A; Sellin, Paul J; Shkunov, Maxim; Keddie, Joseph L

    2010-06-01

    Existing inorganic materials for radiation sensors suffer from several drawbacks, including their inability to cover large curved areas, lack of tissue-equivalence, toxicity, and mechanical inflexibility. As an alternative to inorganics, poly(triarylamine) (PTAA) diodes have been evaluated for their suitability for detecting radiation via the direct creation of X-ray induced photocurrents. A single layer of PTAA is deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates, with top electrodes selected from Al, Au, Ni, and Pd. The choice of metal electrode has a pronounced effect on the performance of the device; there is a direct correlation between the diode rectification factor and the metal-PTAA barrier height. A diode with an Al contact shows the highest quality of rectifying junction, and it produces a high X-ray photocurrent (several nA) that is stable during continuous exposure to 50 kV Mo Kalpha X-radiation over long time scales, combined with a high signal-to-noise ratio with fast response times of less than 0.25 s. Diodes with a low band gap, 'Ohmic' contact, such as ITO/PTAA/Au, show a slow transient response. This result can be explained by the build-up of space charge at the metal-PTAA interface, caused by a high level of charge injection due to X-ray-induced carriers. These data provide new insights into the optimum selection of metals for Schottky contacts on organic materials, with wider applications in light sensors and photovoltaic devices.

  9. Deep molecular responses achieved in patients with CML-CP who are switched to nilotinib after long-term imatinib.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Timothy P; Lipton, Jeffrey H; Spector, Nelson; Cervantes, Francisco; Pasquini, Ricardo; Clementino, Nelma Cristina D; Dorlhiac Llacer, Pedro Enrique; Schwarer, Anthony P; Mahon, Francois-Xavier; Rea, Delphine; Branford, Susan; Purkayastha, Das; Collins, LaTonya; Szczudlo, Tomasz; Leber, Brian

    2014-07-31

    Patients in complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) with detectable BCR-ABL1 after ≥2 years on imatinib were randomized to nilotinib (400 mg twice daily, n = 104) or continued imatinib (n = 103) in the Evaluating Nilotinib Efficacy and Safety in clinical Trials-Complete Molecular Response (ENESTcmr) trial. By 1 and 2 years, confirmed undetectable BCR-ABL1 was achieved by 12.5% vs 5.8% (P = .108) and 22.1% vs 8.7% of patients in the nilotinib and imatinib arms, respectively (P = .0087). Among patients without molecular response 4.5 (BCR-ABL1(IS) ≤0.0032%; MR(4.5)) and those without major molecular response at study start, MR(4.5) by 2 years was achieved by 42.9% vs 20.8% and 29.2% vs 3.6% of patients in the nilotinib and imatinib arms, respectively. No patient in the nilotinib arm lost CCyR, vs 3 in the imatinib arm. Adverse events were more common in the nilotinib arm, as expected with the introduction of a new drug vs remaining on a well-tolerated drug. The safety profile of nilotinib was consistent with other reported studies. In summary, switching to nilotinib enabled more patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP) to sustain lower levels of disease burden vs remaining on imatinib. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00760877.

  10. Understanding the DNA damage response in order to achieve desired gene editing outcomes in mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Overcash, Justin M; Aryan, Azadeh; Myles, Kevin M; Adelman, Zach N

    2015-02-01

    Mosquitoes are high-impact disease vectors with the capacity to transmit pathogenic agents that cause diseases such as malaria, yellow fever, chikungunya, and dengue. Continued growth in knowledge of genetic, molecular, and physiological pathways in mosquitoes allows for the development of novel control methods and for the continued optimization of existing ones. The emergence of site-specific nucleases as genomic engineering tools promises to expedite research of crucial biological pathways in these disease vectors. The utilization of these nucleases in a more precise and efficient manner is dependent upon knowledge and manipulation of the DNA repair pathways utilized by the mosquito. While progress has been made in deciphering DNA repair pathways in some model systems, research into the nature of the hierarchy of mosquito DNA repair pathways, as well as in mechanistic differences that may exist, is needed. In this review, we will describe progress in the use of site-specific nucleases in mosquitoes, along with the hierarchy of DNA repair in the context of mosquito chromosomal organization and structure, and how this knowledge may be manipulated to achieve precise chromosomal engineering in mosquitoes. PMID:25596822

  11. Understanding the DNA damage response in order to achieve desired gene editing outcomes in mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Overcash, Justin M; Aryan, Azadeh; Myles, Kevin M; Adelman, Zach N

    2015-02-01

    Mosquitoes are high-impact disease vectors with the capacity to transmit pathogenic agents that cause diseases such as malaria, yellow fever, chikungunya, and dengue. Continued growth in knowledge of genetic, molecular, and physiological pathways in mosquitoes allows for the development of novel control methods and for the continued optimization of existing ones. The emergence of site-specific nucleases as genomic engineering tools promises to expedite research of crucial biological pathways in these disease vectors. The utilization of these nucleases in a more precise and efficient manner is dependent upon knowledge and manipulation of the DNA repair pathways utilized by the mosquito. While progress has been made in deciphering DNA repair pathways in some model systems, research into the nature of the hierarchy of mosquito DNA repair pathways, as well as in mechanistic differences that may exist, is needed. In this review, we will describe progress in the use of site-specific nucleases in mosquitoes, along with the hierarchy of DNA repair in the context of mosquito chromosomal organization and structure, and how this knowledge may be manipulated to achieve precise chromosomal engineering in mosquitoes.

  12. [Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the testis relapsed 16 years after achieving complete response].

    PubMed

    Nagasaka, Isao; Mitsui, Takeki; Ishizaki, Takuma; Koiso, Hiromi; Yokohama, Akihiko; Saitoh, Takayuki; Hirato, Junko; Igarashi, Tadahiko; Kojima, Masaru; Tsukamoto, Norifumi; Nojima, Yoshihisa; Murakami, Hirokazu; Handa, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Testicular lymphoma is a rare disease, accounting for 1-2% of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 5-9% of all testicular tumors, and has a high relapse rate with a poor prognosis. We report a patient with testicular diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) who relapsed after being in remission for 16 years. He had undergone orchiectomy of the right testis and was diagnosed as having DLBCL (stage IAE) at 49 years of age. After 3 cycles of CHOP, he achieved a complete remission. Orchiectomy was performed because of a left testicular tumor, and he was again diagnosed with DLBCL at the age of 65. VH3-21 was detected in lymphoma cells at the times of both the first diagnosis and the relapse based on analysis of the variable region of the immunoglobulin heavy chain. Accordingly, the lymphoma cells at relapse were confirmed to be the same clone as that which had been documented at the first diagnosis. PMID:26725353

  13. Self-reported impulsivity, but not behavioral choice or response impulsivity, partially mediates the effect of stress on drinking behavior.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Kristen R; Ansell, Emily B; Reynolds, Brady; Potenza, Marc N; Sinha, Rajita

    2013-01-01

    Stress and impulsivity contribute to alcohol use, and stress may also act via impulsivity to increase drinking behavior. Impulsivity represents a multi-faceted construct and self-report and behavioral assessments may effectively capture distinct clinically relevant factors. The present research investigated whether aspects of impulsivity mediate the effect of stress on alcohol use. A community-based sample of 192 men and women was assessed on measures of cumulative stress, alcohol use, self-reported impulsivity, and behavioral choice and response impulsivity. Data were analyzed using regression and bootstrapping techniques to estimate indirect effects of stress on drinking via impulsivity. Cumulative adversity exhibited both direct effects and indirect effects (via self-reported impulsivity) on drinking behavior. Additional models examining specific types of stress indicated direct and indirect effects of trauma and recent life events, and indirect effects of major life events and chronic stressors on drinking behavior. Overall, cumulative stress was associated with increased drinking behavior, and this effect was partially mediated by self-reported impulsivity. Self-reported impulsivity also mediated the effects of different types of stress on drinking behavior. These findings highlight the value of mediation models to examine the pathways through which different types of stress increase drinking behavior. Treatment and prevention strategies should focus on enhancing stress management and self-control.

  14. Meteorological responses in the atmospheric boundary layer over southern England to the deep partial eclipse of 20 March 2015.

    PubMed

    Burt, Stephen

    2016-09-28

    A wide range of surface and near-surface meteorological observations were made at the University of Reading's Atmospheric Observatory in central southern England (latitude 51.441° N, longitude 0.938° W, altitude 66 m above mean sea level) during the deep partial eclipse on the morning of 20 March 2015. Observations of temperature, humidity, radiation, wind speed and direction, and atmospheric pressure were made by computerized logging equipment at 1 Hz, supplemented by an automated cloud base recorder sampling at 1 min intervals and a high-resolution (approx. 10 m vertical interval) atmospheric sounding by radiosonde launched from the same location during the eclipse. Sources and details of each instrumental measurement are described briefly, followed by a summary of observed and derived measurements by meteorological parameter. Atmospheric boundary layer responses to the solar eclipse were muted owing to the heavily overcast conditions which prevailed at the observing location, but instrumental records of the event documented a large (approx. 80%) reduction in global solar radiation, a fall in air temperature of around 0.6°C, a decrease in cloud base height, and a slight increase in atmospheric stability during the eclipse. Changes in surface atmospheric moisture content and barometric pressure were largely insignificant during the event.This article is part of the themed issue 'Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse'.

  15. Meteorological responses in the atmospheric boundary layer over southern England to the deep partial eclipse of 20 March 2015.

    PubMed

    Burt, Stephen

    2016-09-28

    A wide range of surface and near-surface meteorological observations were made at the University of Reading's Atmospheric Observatory in central southern England (latitude 51.441° N, longitude 0.938° W, altitude 66 m above mean sea level) during the deep partial eclipse on the morning of 20 March 2015. Observations of temperature, humidity, radiation, wind speed and direction, and atmospheric pressure were made by computerized logging equipment at 1 Hz, supplemented by an automated cloud base recorder sampling at 1 min intervals and a high-resolution (approx. 10 m vertical interval) atmospheric sounding by radiosonde launched from the same location during the eclipse. Sources and details of each instrumental measurement are described briefly, followed by a summary of observed and derived measurements by meteorological parameter. Atmospheric boundary layer responses to the solar eclipse were muted owing to the heavily overcast conditions which prevailed at the observing location, but instrumental records of the event documented a large (approx. 80%) reduction in global solar radiation, a fall in air temperature of around 0.6°C, a decrease in cloud base height, and a slight increase in atmospheric stability during the eclipse. Changes in surface atmospheric moisture content and barometric pressure were largely insignificant during the event.This article is part of the themed issue 'Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse'. PMID:27550762

  16. Combined utilization of partial-response coding and equalization for high-speed WDM-PON with centralized lightwaves.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qi; Tran, An V

    2012-12-17

    In this paper, we investigate the transmission impairments in a high-speed single-feeder wavelength-division-multiplexed passive optical network (WDM-PON) employing low-bandwidth upstream transmitter. A 1-GHz reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA) is operated at the rates of 10 Gb/s and 20 Gb/s in the proposed WDM-PON. Since the system performance is seriously limited by its uplink in both capacity and reach owing to inter-symbol interference and reflection noise, we present a novel technique with simultaneous capability of spectral efficiency enhancement and transmission distance extension in the uplink via coding and equalization that exploit the principles of partial-response (PR) signal. It is experimentally demonstrated that the proposed system supports the delivery of 10 Gb/s and 20 Gb/s upstream signals over 75-km and 25-km bidirectional fiber, respectively. The configuration of PR equalizer is optimized for its best performance-complexity trade-off. The reflection tolerance of 10 Gb/s and 20 Gb/s channels is improved by 8 dB and 6 dB, respectively, with PR coding. The proposed cost-effective signal processing scheme has great potential for the next-generation access networks. PMID:23263032

  17. Application and Refinement of a Method to Achieve Uniform Convective Response on Variable-Resolution Meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walko, R. L.; Medvigy, D.; Avissar, R.

    2013-12-01

    Variable-resolution computational grids can substantially improve the benefit-to-cost ratio in many environmental modeling applications, but they can also introduce unwanted and unrealistic numerical anomalies if not properly utilized. For example, we showed in previous studies that resolved (non-parameterized) atmospheric convection develops more quickly as resolution increases. Furthermore, on variable grids that transition from resolved to parameterized convection, timing and intensity of the convection in both regimes is generally disparate unless special care is taken to tune the parameterization. In both cases, the convection that develops first (due to purely numerical reasons) tends to suppress convection elsewhere by inducing subsidence in the surrounding environment. This highly nonlinear competition, while desirable when induced by natural causes such as surface inhomogeneity, is highly undesirable when it is a numerical artifact of variable grid resolution and/or selective application of convective parameterization. Our current research is aimed at leveling the playing field for convection across a variable resolution grid so that the above problems are avoided. The underlying idea is to apply the same or very similar 'convective machinery' to all areas of the grid. For convection-resolving regions of the grid, this machinery is simply the model grid itself, along with explicit representation of dynamics and a bulk microphysics parameterization. For coarser regions of the grid, the local environment is sampled from one or more grid columns (depending on local resolution) and fed to a separate 'convective processor', which determines the convective response to that environment and feeds the result back to the host grid. The convective processor chooses to either (1) explicitly resolve convective activity in the given environment on a separate (independent) limited-area 3D computational grid of comparable resolution to the convection-resolving part of the

  18. Long-term survival and T-cell kinetics in relapsed/refractory ALL patients who achieved MRD response after blinatumomab treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gökbuget, Nicola; Klinger, Matthias; Viardot, Andreas; Stelljes, Matthias; Neumann, Svenja; Horst, Heinz-A.; Marks, Reinhard; Faul, Christoph; Diedrich, Helmut; Reichle, Albrecht; Brüggemann, Monika; Holland, Chris; Schmidt, Margit; Einsele, Hermann; Bargou, Ralf C.; Topp, Max S.

    2015-01-01

    This long-term follow-up analysis evaluated overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) in a phase 2 study of the bispecific T-cell engager antibody construct blinatumomab in 36 adults with relapsed/refractory B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In the primary analysis, 25 (69%) patients with relapsed/refractory ALL achieved complete remission with full (CR) or partial (CRh) hematologic recovery of peripheral blood counts within the first 2 cycles. Twenty-five patients (69%) had a minimal residual disease (MRD) response (<10−4 blasts), including 22 CR/CRh responders, 2 patients with hypocellular bone marrow, and 1 patient with normocellular bone marrow but low peripheral counts. Ten of the 36 patients (28%) were long-term survivors (OS ≥30 months). Median OS was 13.0 months (median follow-up, 32.6 months). MRD response was associated with significantly longer OS (Mantel-Byar P = .009). All 10 long-term survivors had an MRD response. Median RFS was 8.8 months (median follow-up, 28.9 months). A plateau for RFS was reached after ∼18 months. Six of the 10 long-term survivors remained relapse-free, including 4 who received allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) as consolidation for blinatumomab and 2 who received 3 additional cycles of blinatumomab instead of allo-SCT. Three long-term survivors had neurologic events or cytokine release syndrome, resulting in temporary blinatumomab discontinuation; all restarted blinatumomab successfully. Long-term survivors had more pronounced T-cell expansion than patients with OS <30 months. PMID:26480933

  19. Impact of involved field radiotherapy in partial response after doxorubicin-based chemotherapy for advanced aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, Elizabeth C. . E-mail: e.c.moser@lumc.nl; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Carde, Patrice; Meerwaldt, Jacobus H.; Tirelli, Umberto; Aleman, Berthe M.P.; Baars, Joke; Thomas, Jose; Glabbeke, Martine van; Noordijk, Evert M.

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: Whether salvage therapy in patients with advanced aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in partial remission (PR) should consist of radiotherapy or autologous stem-cell transplantation (ASCT) is debatable. We evaluated the impact of radiotherapy on outcome in PR patients treated in four successive European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer trials for aggressive NHL. Patients and Methods: Records of 974 patients (1980-1999) were reviewed regarding initial response, final outcome, and type and timing of salvage treatment. After 8 cycles of doxorubicin-based chemotherapy, 227 NHL patients were in PR and treated: 114 received involved field radiotherapy, 16 ASCT, 93 second-line chemotherapy, and 4 were operated. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) after radiotherapy were estimated (Kaplan-Meier method) and compared with other treatments (log-rank). Impact on survival was evaluated by multivariate analysis (Cox proportional hazards model). Results: The median PFS in PR patients was 4.2 years and 48% remained progression-free at 5 years. Half of the PR patients converted to a complete remission. After conversion, survival was comparable to patients directly in complete remission. Radiotherapy resulted in better OS and PFS compared with other treatments, especially in patients with low to intermediate International Prognostic Index score, bulky disease, or nodal disease only. Correction by multivariate analysis for prognostic factors such as stage, bulky disease, and number of extranodal locations showed that radiotherapy was clearly the most significant factor affecting both OS and PFS. Conclusion: This retrospective analysis demonstrates that radiotherapy can be effective for patients in PR after fully dosed chemotherapy; assessment in a randomized trial (radiotherapy vs. ASCT) is justified.

  20. A flowing liquid test system for assessing the linearity and time-response of rapid fibre optic oxygen partial pressure sensors.

    PubMed

    Chen, R; Hahn, C E W; Farmery, A D

    2012-08-15

    The development of a methodology for testing the time response, linearity and performance characteristics of ultra fast fibre optic oxygen sensors in the liquid phase is presented. Two standard medical paediatric oxygenators are arranged to provide two independent extracorporeal circuits. Flow from either circuit can be diverted over the sensor under test by means of a system of rapid cross-over solenoid valves exposing the sensor to an abrupt change in oxygen partial pressure, P O2. The system is also capable of testing the oxygen sensor responses to changes in temperature, carbon dioxide partial pressure P CO2 and pH in situ. Results are presented for a miniature fibre optic oxygen sensor constructed in-house with a response time ≈ 50 ms and a commercial fibre optic sensor (Ocean Optics Foxy), when tested in flowing saline and stored blood.

  1. In response to partial plant shading, the lack of phytochrome A does not directly induce leaf senescence but alters the fine-tuning of chlorophyll biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Bastiaan; Gardeström, Per; Keech, Olivier

    2014-07-01

    Phytochrome is thought to control the induction of leaf senescence directly, however, the signalling and molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, an ecophysiological approach was used to establish a functional connection between phytochrome signalling and the physiological processes underlying the induction of leaf senescence in response to shade. With shade it is important to distinguish between complete and partial shading, during which either the whole or only a part of the plant is shaded, respectively. It is first shown here that, while PHYB is required to maintain chlorophyll content in a completely shaded plant, only PHYA is involved in maintaining the leaf chlorophyll content in response to partial plant shading. Second, it is shown that leaf yellowing associated with strong partial shading in phyA-mutant plants actually correlates to a decreased biosynthesis of chlorophyll rather than to an increase of its degradation. Third, it is shown that the physiological impact of this decreased biosynthesis of chlorophyll in strongly shaded phyA-mutant leaves is accompanied by a decreased capacity to adjust the Light Compensation Point. However, the increased leaf yellowing in phyA-mutant plants is not accompanied by an increase of senescence-specific molecular markers, which argues against a direct role of PHYA in inducing leaf senescence in response to partial shade. In conclusion, it is proposed that PHYA, but not PHYB, is essential for fine-tuning the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway in response to partial shading. In turn, this mechanism allows the shaded leaf to adjust its photosynthetic machinery to very low irradiances, thus maintaining a positive carbon balance and repressing the induction of leaf senescence, which can occur under prolonged periods of shade.

  2. Achieving deeper molecular response is associated with a better clinical outcome in chronic myeloid leukemia patients on imatinib front-line therapy

    PubMed Central

    Etienne, Gabriel; Dulucq, Stéphanie; Nicolini, Franck-Emmanuel; Morisset, Stéphane; Fort, Marie-Pierre; Schmitt, Anna; Etienne, Madeleine; Hayette, Sandrine; Lippert, Eric; Bureau, Caroline; Tigaud, Isabelle; Adiko, Didier; Marit, Gérald; Reiffers, Josy; Mahon, François-Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Sustained imatinib treatment in chronic myeloid leukemia patients can result in complete molecular response allowing discontinuation without relapse. We set out to evaluate the frequency of complete molecular response in imatinib de novo chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients, to identify base-line and under-treatment predictive factors of complete molecular response in patients achieving complete cytogenetic response, and to assess if complete molecular response is associated with a better outcome. A random selection of patients on front-line imatinib therapy (n=266) were considered for inclusion. Complete molecular response was confirmed and defined as MR 4.5 with undetectable BCR-ABL transcript levels. Median follow up was 4.43 years (range 0.79–10.8 years). Sixty-five patients (24%) achieved complete molecular response within a median time of 32.7 months. Absence of spleen enlargement at diagnosis, achieving complete cytogenetic response before 12 months of therapy, and major molecular response during the year following complete cytogenetic response was predictive of achieving further complete molecular response. Patients who achieved complete molecular response had better event-free and failure-free survivals than those with complete cytogenetic response irrespective of major molecular response status (95.2% vs. 64.7% vs. 27.7%, P=0.00124; 98.4% vs. 82.3% vs. 56%, P=0.0335), respectively. Overall survival was identical in the 3 groups. In addition to complete cytogenetic response and major molecular response, further deeper molecular response is associated with better event-free and failure-free survivals, and complete molecular response confers the best outcome. PMID:24362549

  3. The Encapsulation of Hemagglutinin in Protein Bodies Achieves a Stronger Immune Response in Mice than the Soluble Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Hofbauer, Anna; Melnik, Stanislav; Tschofen, Marc; Arcalis, Elsa; Phan, Hoang T.; Gresch, Ulrike; Lampel, Johannes; Conrad, Udo; Stoger, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Zein is a water-insoluble polymer from maize seeds that has been widely used to produce carrier particles for the delivery of therapeutic molecules. We encapsulated a recombinant model vaccine antigen in newly formed zein bodies in planta by generating a fusion construct comprising the ectodomain of hemagglutinin subtype 5 and the N-terminal part of γ-zein. The chimeric protein was transiently produced in tobacco leaves, and H5-containing protein bodies (PBs) were used to immunize mice. An immune response was achieved in all mice treated with H5-zein, even at low doses. The fusion to zein markedly enhanced the IgG response compared the soluble H5 control, and the effect was similar to a commercial adjuvant. The co-administration of adjuvants with the H5-zein bodies did not enhance the immune response any further, suggesting that the zein portion itself mediates an adjuvant effect. While the zein portion used to induce protein body formation was only weakly immunogenic, our results indicate that zein-induced PBs are promising production and delivery vehicles for subunit vaccines. PMID:26909090

  4. A method for achieving monotonic frequency-temperature response for langasite surface-acoustic-wave high-temperature sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaoming, Bao; Yabing, Ke; Yanqing, Zheng; Lina, Cheng; Honglang, Li

    2016-02-01

    To achieve the monotonic frequency-temperature response for a high-temperature langasite (LGS) surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) sensor in a wide temperature range, a method utilizing two substrate cuts with different propagation angles on the same substrate plane was proposed. In this method, the theory of effective permittivity is adopted to calculate the temperature coefficients of frequency (TCF), electromechanical coupling coefficients (k2), and power flow angle (PFA) for different propagation angles on the same substrate plane, and then the two substrate cuts were chosen to have large k2 and small PFA, as well as the difference in their TCFs (ΔTCF) to always have the same sign of their values. The Z-cut LGS substrate plane was taken as an example, and the two suitable substrate cuts with propagation angles of 74 and 80° were chosen to derive a monotonic frequency-temperature response for LGS SAW sensors at -50 to 540 °C. Experiments on a LGS SAW sensor using the above two substrate cuts were designed, and its measured frequency-temperature response at -50 to 540 °C agreed well with the theory, demonstrating the high accuracy of the proposed method.

  5. Low frequency noise and radiation response in the partially depleted SOI MOSFETs with ion implanted buried oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Chen, Hai-Bo; Liu, Yu-Rong; Wang, Xin; En, Yun-Fei; Li, Bin; Lu, Yu-Dong

    2015-08-01

    Low frequency noise behaviors of partially depleted silicon-on-insulator (PDSOI) n-channel metal-oxide semiconductors (MOS) transistors with and without ion implantation into the buried oxide are investigated in this paper. Owing to ion implantation-induced electron traps in the buried oxide and back interface states, back gate threshold voltage increases from 44.48 V to 51.47 V and sub-threshold swing increases from 2.47 V/dec to 3.37 V/dec, while electron field effect mobility decreases from 475.44 cm2/V·s to 363.65 cm2/V·s. In addition, the magnitude of normalized low frequency noise also greatly increases, which indicates that the intrinsic electronic performances are degenerated after ion implantation processing. According to carrier number fluctuation theory, the extracted flat-band voltage noise power spectral densities in the PDSOI devices with and without ion implantation are equal to 7×10-10 V2·Hz-1 and 2.7×10-8 V2·Hz-1, respectively, while the extracted average trap density in the buried oxide increases from 1.42×1017 cm-3·eV-1 to 6.16×1018 cm-3·eV-1. Based on carrier mobility fluctuation theory, the extracted average Hooge’s parameter in these devices increases from 3.92×10-5 to 1.34×10-2 after ion implantation processing. Finally, radiation responses in the PDSOI devices are investigated. Owing to radiation-induced positive buried oxide trapped charges, back gate threshold voltage decreases with the increase of the total dose. After radiation reaches up to a total dose of 1 M·rad(si), the shifts of back gate threshold voltage in the SOI devices with and without ion implantation are -10.82 V and -31.84 V, respectively. The low frequency noise behaviors in these devices before and after radiation are also compared and discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61204112 and 61204116).

  6. Two-year seizure reduction in adults with medically intractable partial onset epilepsy treated with responsive neurostimulation: Final results of the RNS System Pivotal trial

    PubMed Central

    Heck, Christianne N; King-Stephens, David; Massey, Andrew D; Nair, Dileep R; Jobst, Barbara C; Barkley, Gregory L; Salanova, Vicenta; Cole, Andrew J; Smith, Michael C; Gwinn, Ryder P; Skidmore, Christopher; Van Ness, Paul C; Bergey, Gregory K; Park, Yong D; Miller, Ian; Geller, Eric; Rutecki, Paul A; Zimmerman, Richard; Spencer, David C; Goldman, Alica; Edwards, Jonathan C; Leiphart, James W; Wharen, Robert E; Fessler, James; Fountain, Nathan B; Worrell, Gregory A; Gross, Robert E; Eisenschenk, Stephan; Duckrow, Robert B; Hirsch, Lawrence J; Bazil, Carl; O'Donovan, Cormac A; Sun, Felice T; Courtney, Tracy A; Seale, Cairn G; Morrell, Martha J

    2014-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of responsive stimulation at the seizure focus as an adjunctive therapy to reduce the frequency of seizures in adults with medically intractable partial onset seizures arising from one or two seizure foci. Methods Randomized multicenter double-blinded controlled trial of responsive focal cortical stimulation (RNS System). Subjects with medically intractable partial onset seizures from one or two foci were implanted, and 1 month postimplant were randomized 1:1 to active or sham stimulation. After the fifth postimplant month, all subjects received responsive stimulation in an open label period (OLP) to complete 2 years of postimplant follow-up. Results All 191 subjects were randomized. The percent change in seizures at the end of the blinded period was −37.9% in the active and −17.3% in the sham stimulation group (p = 0.012, Generalized Estimating Equations). The median percent reduction in seizures in the OLP was 44% at 1 year and 53% at 2 years, which represents a progressive and significant improvement with time (p < 0.0001). The serious adverse event rate was not different between subjects receiving active and sham stimulation. Adverse events were consistent with the known risks of an implanted medical device, seizures, and of other epilepsy treatments. There were no adverse effects on neuropsychological function or mood. Significance Responsive stimulation to the seizure focus reduced the frequency of partial-onset seizures acutely, showed improving seizure reduction over time, was well tolerated, and was acceptably safe. The RNS System provides an additional treatment option for patients with medically intractable partial-onset seizures. PMID:24621228

  7. Coherent detection of frequency-hopped quadrature modulations in the presence of jamming. II - QPR Class I modulation. [Quadrature Partial Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, M. K.

    1981-01-01

    This paper considers the performance of quadrature partial response (QPR) in the presence of jamming. Although a QPR system employs a single sample detector in its receiver, while quadrature amplitude shift keying (or quadrature phase shift keying) requires a matched-filter type of receiver, it is shown that the coherent detection performances of the two in the presence of the intentional jammer have definite similarities.

  8. Thin film oxygen partial pressure sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wortman, J. J.; Harrison, J. W.; Honbarrier, H. L.; Yen, J.

    1972-01-01

    The development is described of a laboratory model oxygen partial pressure sensor using a sputtered zinc oxide thin film. The film is operated at about 400 C through the use of a miniature silicon bar. Because of the unique resistance versus temperature relation of the silicon bar, control of the operational temperature is achieved by controlling the resistance. A circuit for accomplishing this is described. The response of sputtered zinc oxide films of various thicknesses to oxygen, nitrogen, argon, carbon dioxide, and water vapor caused a change in the film resistance. Over a large range, film conductance varied approximately as the square root of the oxygen partial pressure. The presence of water vapor in the gas stream caused a shift in the film conductance at a given oxygen partial pressure. A theoretical model is presented to explain the characteristic features of the zinc oxide response to oxygen.

  9. Principal Perceptions toward the Leadership Responsibilities and Practices of the Superintendency in High and Low Achievement School Districts with High and Low Superintendent Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colby-Rooney, Danielle M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of building principals toward superintendent leadership responsibilities and practices of goal setting, nonnegotiable goals for achievement and instruction, board alignment with support of district goals, monitoring goals for achievement and instruction, use of resources to support the…

  10. Linear Discriminant Analysis Achieves High Classification Accuracy for the BOLD fMRI Response to Naturalistic Movie Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Mandelkow, Hendrik; de Zwart, Jacco A; Duyn, Jeff H

    2016-01-01

    Naturalistic stimuli like movies evoke complex perceptual processes, which are of great interest in the study of human cognition by functional MRI (fMRI). However, conventional fMRI analysis based on statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and the general linear model (GLM) is hampered by a lack of accurate parametric models of the BOLD response to complex stimuli. In this situation, statistical machine-learning methods, a.k.a. multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA), have received growing attention for their ability to generate stimulus response models in a data-driven fashion. However, machine-learning methods typically require large amounts of training data as well as computational resources. In the past, this has largely limited their application to fMRI experiments involving small sets of stimulus categories and small regions of interest in the brain. By contrast, the present study compares several classification algorithms known as Nearest Neighbor (NN), Gaussian Naïve Bayes (GNB), and (regularized) Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) in terms of their classification accuracy in discriminating the global fMRI response patterns evoked by a large number of naturalistic visual stimuli presented as a movie. Results show that LDA regularized by principal component analysis (PCA) achieved high classification accuracies, above 90% on average for single fMRI volumes acquired 2 s apart during a 300 s movie (chance level 0.7% = 2 s/300 s). The largest source of classification errors were autocorrelations in the BOLD signal compounded by the similarity of consecutive stimuli. All classifiers performed best when given input features from a large region of interest comprising around 25% of the voxels that responded significantly to the visual stimulus. Consistent with this, the most informative principal components represented widespread distributions of co-activated brain regions that were similar between subjects and may represent functional networks. In light of these

  11. Linear Discriminant Analysis Achieves High Classification Accuracy for the BOLD fMRI Response to Naturalistic Movie Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Mandelkow, Hendrik; de Zwart, Jacco A; Duyn, Jeff H

    2016-01-01

    Naturalistic stimuli like movies evoke complex perceptual processes, which are of great interest in the study of human cognition by functional MRI (fMRI). However, conventional fMRI analysis based on statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and the general linear model (GLM) is hampered by a lack of accurate parametric models of the BOLD response to complex stimuli. In this situation, statistical machine-learning methods, a.k.a. multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA), have received growing attention for their ability to generate stimulus response models in a data-driven fashion. However, machine-learning methods typically require large amounts of training data as well as computational resources. In the past, this has largely limited their application to fMRI experiments involving small sets of stimulus categories and small regions of interest in the brain. By contrast, the present study compares several classification algorithms known as Nearest Neighbor (NN), Gaussian Naïve Bayes (GNB), and (regularized) Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) in terms of their classification accuracy in discriminating the global fMRI response patterns evoked by a large number of naturalistic visual stimuli presented as a movie. Results show that LDA regularized by principal component analysis (PCA) achieved high classification accuracies, above 90% on average for single fMRI volumes acquired 2 s apart during a 300 s movie (chance level 0.7% = 2 s/300 s). The largest source of classification errors were autocorrelations in the BOLD signal compounded by the similarity of consecutive stimuli. All classifiers performed best when given input features from a large region of interest comprising around 25% of the voxels that responded significantly to the visual stimulus. Consistent with this, the most informative principal components represented widespread distributions of co-activated brain regions that were similar between subjects and may represent functional networks. In light of these

  12. Linear Discriminant Analysis Achieves High Classification Accuracy for the BOLD fMRI Response to Naturalistic Movie Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Mandelkow, Hendrik; de Zwart, Jacco A.; Duyn, Jeff H.

    2016-01-01

    Naturalistic stimuli like movies evoke complex perceptual processes, which are of great interest in the study of human cognition by functional MRI (fMRI). However, conventional fMRI analysis based on statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and the general linear model (GLM) is hampered by a lack of accurate parametric models of the BOLD response to complex stimuli. In this situation, statistical machine-learning methods, a.k.a. multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA), have received growing attention for their ability to generate stimulus response models in a data-driven fashion. However, machine-learning methods typically require large amounts of training data as well as computational resources. In the past, this has largely limited their application to fMRI experiments involving small sets of stimulus categories and small regions of interest in the brain. By contrast, the present study compares several classification algorithms known as Nearest Neighbor (NN), Gaussian Naïve Bayes (GNB), and (regularized) Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) in terms of their classification accuracy in discriminating the global fMRI response patterns evoked by a large number of naturalistic visual stimuli presented as a movie. Results show that LDA regularized by principal component analysis (PCA) achieved high classification accuracies, above 90% on average for single fMRI volumes acquired 2 s apart during a 300 s movie (chance level 0.7% = 2 s/300 s). The largest source of classification errors were autocorrelations in the BOLD signal compounded by the similarity of consecutive stimuli. All classifiers performed best when given input features from a large region of interest comprising around 25% of the voxels that responded significantly to the visual stimulus. Consistent with this, the most informative principal components represented widespread distributions of co-activated brain regions that were similar between subjects and may represent functional networks. In light of these

  13. Responses of canopy transpiration and canopy conductance of peach (Prunus persica) trees to alternate partial root zone drip irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Daozhi; Kang, Shaozhong; Zhang, Jianhua

    2005-08-01

    We investigated canopy transpiration and canopy conductance of peach trees under three irrigation patterns: fixed 1/2 partial root zone drip irrigation (FPRDI), alternate 1/2 partial root zone drip irrigation (APRDI) and full root zone drip irrigation (FDI). Canopy transpiration was measured using heat pulse sensors, and canopy conductance was calculated using the Jarvis model and the inversion of the Penman-Monteith equation. Results showed that the transpiration rate and canopy conductance in FPRDI and APRDI were smaller than those in FDI. More significantly, the total irrigation amount was greatly reduced, by 34.7% and 39.6%, respectively for APRDI and FPRDI in the PRDI (partial root zone drip irrigation) treatment period. The daily transpiration was linearly related to the reference evapotranspiration in the three treatments, but daily transpiration of FDI is more than that of APRDI and FPRDI under the same evaporation demand, suggesting a restriction of transpiration water loss in the APRDI and FPRDI trees. FDI needed a higher soil water content to carry the same amount of transpiration as the APRDI and FPRDI trees, suggesting the hydraulic conductance of roots of APRDI and FPRDI trees was enhanced, and the roots had a greater water uptake than in FDI when the average soil water content in the root zone was the same. By a comparison between the transpiration rates predicted by the Penman-Monteith equation and the measured canopy transpiration rates for 60 days during the experimental period, an excellent correlation along the 1:1 line was found for all the treatments (R2 > 0.80), proving the reliability of the methodology.

  14. Responses of fungal and plant communities to partial humus removal in mid-boreal N-enriched forests.

    PubMed

    Tarvainen, Oili; Hamberg, Leena; Ohenoja, Esteri; Strömmer, Rauni; Markkola, Annamari

    2012-10-15

    Partial removal of the forest humus layer was performed in nitrogen-enriched urban Scots pine forest stands in the northern Finland in order to improve soil conditions for ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi, important symbionts of trees. Aboveground part of understory vegetation and the uppermost half of the humus layer were removed (REMOVAL treatment) from sample plots in six urban and eight rural reference forest sites at the beginning of the 2001 growing season. During the seasons 2001-2005, we inventoried sporocarp production of ECM and saprophytic fungi, and in 2003 the recovery of understory vegetation. The REMOVAL treatment resulted in a higher number of fruiting ECM species and sporocarps than controls at the rural, but not at urban sites. The sporocarp number of saprophytic fungi declined in the REMOVAL subplots at the urban sites. The recovery of bryophytes and lichens in the REMOVAL treatment was slow at both the urban and rural sites, whereas Vaccinium dwarf shrub cover, and herb and grass cover returned rapidly at the urban sites. We conclude that the partial vegetation and humus layer removal as a tool to promote the reproduction of ECM fungal species is limited in the boreal urban forests.

  15. RRx-001 in Refractory Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma: A Case Report of a Partial Response after a Third Reintroduction of Platinum Doublets

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Corey A.; Oronsky, Bryan T.; Caroen, Scott Z.; Scicinski, Jan J.; Degesys, Aiste; Kim, Michelle M.; Oronsky, Arnold L.; Lybeck, Harry; Cabrales, Pedro; Oronsky, Neil; Reid, Tony; Roswarski, Joseph; Brzezniak, Christina

    2016-01-01

    RRx-001 is a pan-active, systemically nontoxic epigenetic inhibitor under investigation in advanced non-small cell lung cancer, small-cell lung cancer and high-grade neuroendocrine tumors in a Phase II clinical trial entitled TRIPLE THREAT (NCT02489903), which reexposes patients to previously effective but refractory platinum doublets after treatment with RRx-001. The purpose of this case study is first to report a partial response to carboplatin and etoposide in a patient with small-cell lung cancer pretreated with RRx-001, indicating episensitization or resensitization by epigenetic mechanisms, and second to discuss the literature related to small-cell lung cancer and episensitization. PMID:27065849

  16. EFFECTS OF NEONATAL PARTIAL DEAFNESS AND CHRONIC INTRACOCHLEAR ELECTRICAL STIMULATION ON AUDITORY AND ELECTRICAL RESPONSE CHARACTERISTICS IN PRIMARY AUDITORY CORTEX

    PubMed Central

    Fallon, James B; Shepherd, Robert K.; Brown, Mel; Irvine, Dexter, R. F.

    2009-01-01

    The use of cochlear implants in patients with severe hearing losses but residual low-frequency hearing raises questions concerning the effects of chronic intracochlear electrical stimulation(ICES) on cortical responses to auditory and electrical stimuli. We investigated these questions by studying responses to tonal and electrical stimuli in primary auditory cortex (AI) of two groups of neonatally-deafened cats with residual high-threshold, low-frequency hearing. One group were implanted with a multi-channel intracochlear electrode at eight weeks of age, and received chronic ICES for up to nine months before cortical recording. Cats in the other group were implanted immediately prior to cortical recording as adults. In all cats in both groups, multi-neuron responses throughout the rostro-caudal extent of AI had low characteristic frequencies (CFs), in the frequency range of the residual hearing, and high-thresholds. Threshold and minimum latency at CF did not differ between the groups, but in the chronic ICES animals there was a higher proportion of electrically but not acoustically excited recording sites. Electrical response thresholds were higher and latencies shorter in the chronically stimulated animals. Thus, chronic implantation and ICES affected the extent of AI that could be activated by acoustic stimuli and resulted in changes in electrical response characteristics. PMID:19703532

  17. Parasympathetic Activity and Blood Catecholamine Responses Following a Single Partial-Body Cryostimulation and a Whole-Body Cryostimulation

    PubMed Central

    Hausswirth, Christophe; Schaal, Karine; Le Meur, Yann; Bieuzen, François; Filliard, Jean-Robert; Volondat, Marielle; Louis, Julien

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of a single whole-body cryostimulation (WBC) and a partial-body cryostimulation (PBC) (i.e., not exposing the head to cold) on indices of parasympathetic activity and blood catecholamines. Two groups of 15 participants were assigned either to a 3-min WBC or PBC session, while 10 participants constituted a control group (CON) not receiving any cryostimulation. Changes in thermal, physiological and subjective variables were recorded before and during the 20-min after each cryostimulation. According to a qualitative statistical analysis, an almost certain decrease in skin temperature was reported for all body regions immediately after the WBC (mean decrease±90% CL, -13.7±0.7°C) and PBC (-8.3±0.3°C), which persisted up to 20-min after the session. The tympanic temperature almost certainly decreased only after the WBC session (-0.32±0.04°C). Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were very likely increased after the WBC session, whereas these changes were trivial in the other groups. In addition, heart rate almost certainly decreased after PBC (-10.9%) and WBC (-15.2%) sessions, in a likely greater proportion for WBC compared to PBC. Resting vagal-related heart rate variability indices (the root-mean square difference of successive normal R-R intervals, RMSSD, and high frequency band, HF) were very likely increased after PBC (RMSSD: +54.4%, HF: +138%) and WBC (RMSSD: +85.2%, HF: +632%) sessions without any marked difference between groups. Plasma norepinephrine concentrations were likely to very likely increased after PBC (+57.4%) and WBC (+76.2%), respectively. Finally, cold and comfort sensations were almost certainly altered after WBC and PBC, sensation of discomfort being likely more pronounced after WBC than PBC. Both acute cryostimulation techniques effectively stimulated the autonomic nervous system (ANS), with a predominance of parasympathetic tone activation. The results of this study also suggest that a

  18. Optical response of the cultured bovine lens; testing opaque or partially transparent semi-solid/solid common consumer hygiene products.

    PubMed

    Wong, W; Sivak, J G; Moran, K L

    2003-01-01

    This study determines the relative ocular lens irritancy of 16 common partially transparent or non-transparent consumer hygiene products. The irritancy was found by measuring the changes in the sharpness of focus [referred to as the back vertex distance (BVD) variability] of the cultured bovine lens using a scanning laser In Vitro Assay System. This method consists of a laser beam that scans across the lens, and a computer, which then analyses the average focal length (mm), the BVD variability (mm), and the intensity of the beam transmitted. Lenses were exposed to the 16 hygiene products and the lens' focusing ability was monitored over 192 h. The products are semi-solids or solids (e.g. gels, lotions, shampoos). They are categorized into six groups: shampoos, body washes, lotions, toothpastes, deodorant, and anti-perspirant. Damage (measured by > 1 mm BVD variability) occurred slower for the shampoos, especially in the case of baby shampoo. The results indicate that shampoos exhibit the lowest level of ocular lens toxicity (irritability) while the deodorant is the most damaging.

  19. Structure of the lamin A/C R482W mutant responsible for dominant familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD)

    SciTech Connect

    Magracheva, Eugenia; Kozlov, Serguei; Stewart, Colin L.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Zdanov, Alexander

    2009-08-07

    Proteins of the A-type lamin family, which consists of two members, lamin A and lamin C, are the major components of a thin proteinaceous filamentous meshwork, the lamina, that underlies the inner nuclear membrane. A-type lamins have recently become the focus of extensive functional studies as a consequence of the linking of at least eight congenital diseases to mutations in the lamin A/C gene (LMNA). This spectrum of pathologies, which mostly manifest themselves as dominant traits, includes muscle dystrophies, dilated cardiomyopathies, the premature aging syndrome Hutchinson-Guilford progeria and familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD). The crystal structure of the lamin A/C mutant R482W, a variant that causes FPLD, has been determined at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution. A completely novel aggregation state of the C-terminal globular domain and the position of the mutated amino-acid residue suggest means by which the mutation may affect lamin A/C-protein and protein-DNA interactions.

  20. Discrimination training, partial reinforcement, and increases in intertrial interval all reduce response speed in a continuously reinforced key-pecking task.

    PubMed

    Reilly, S; Macphail, E M

    1995-09-01

    Pigeons were trained in a discrete-trial task in which a response to the center key obtained illumination of a side key and a single response to the side key terminated a trial with either reinforcement or nonreinforcement. Center-key speeds (i.e., reciprocals of latencies) declined with increases in intertrial interval, and it is argued that this effect is related to a decreased likelihood as intertrial interval increases that birds will be near the key at trial onset. Side-key speeds on trials with reinforcement decreased both with increases in intertrial interval and with shifts from continuous reinforcement to either a discrimination or a partial-reinforcement condition. The effects on side-key speeds are compared with effects observed in alley-running tasks using rats, and an interpretation in terms of frustration theory is offered for the results obtained in both types of task.

  1. A Quantitative Synthesis of Response Card Research on Student Participation, Academic Achievement, Classroom Disruptive Behavior, and Student Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randolph, Justus J.

    2005-01-01

    Response cards are a teaching and learning tool designed to increase active student response during whole-class instruction. Response cards allow multiple students to write their answers on a white board and get feedback from the teacher during each learning trial. This work is a quantitative synthesis of the English-language student-level…

  2. Defective excitation-contraction coupling is partially responsible for impaired contractility in hindlimb muscles of Stac3 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Xiaofei; Doering, Jonathan; Grange, Robert W.; Jiang, Honglin

    2016-01-01

    The Stac3 gene is exclusively expressed in skeletal muscle, and Stac3 knockout is perinatal lethal in mice. Previous data from Stac3-deleted diaphragms indicated that Stac3-deleted skeletal muscle could not contract because of defective excitation-contraction (EC) coupling. In this study, we determined the contractility of Stac3-deleted hindlimb muscle. In response to frequent electrostimulation, Stac3-deleted hindlimb muscle contracted but the maximal tension generated was only 20% of that in control (wild type or heterozygous) muscle (P < 0.05). In response to high [K+], caffeine, and 4-chloro-m-cresol (4-CMC), the maximal tensions generated in Stac3-deleted muscle were 29% (P < 0.05), 58% (P = 0.08), and 55% (P < 0.05) of those in control muscle, respectively. In response to 4-CMC or caffeine, over 90% of myotubes formed from control myoblasts contracted, but only 60% of myotubes formed from Stac3-deleted myoblasts contracted (P = 0.05). However, in response to 4-CMC or caffeine, similar increases in intracellular calcium concentration were observed in Stac3-deleted and control myotubes. Gene expression and histological analyses revealed that Stac3-deleted hindlimb muscle contained more slow type-like fibers than control muscle. These data together confirm a critical role of STAC3 in EC coupling but also suggest that STAC3 may have additional functions in skeletal muscle, at least in the hindlimb muscle. PMID:27184118

  3. Heifer body weight gain and reproductive achievement in response to protein and energy supplementation while grazing dormant range forage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heifers grazing winter range require supplemental nutrients to compliment dormant forage to achieve optimal growth and performance. A study was conducted to evaluate nutritional environment and effect of different supplementation strategies for developing heifers grazing dormant winter range. Eigh...

  4. Inflammatory inert poly(ethylene glycol)--protein wound dressing improves healing responses in partial- and full-thickness wounds.

    PubMed

    Shingel, Kirill I; Di Stabile, Liliana; Marty, Jean-Paul; Faure, Marie-Pierre

    2006-12-01

    In this study, a novel soft hydrogel system based on the poly(ethylene glycol)-protein conjugates was evaluated as an occlusive wound dressing material. The hydrogel material, referred by the name of BioAquacare, contains up to 96% of the liquid and is formulated with phosphate-buffered saline and safe preservative to control bacterial load in the open wounds. Performance of the BioAquacare as a wound dressing material was assessed in partial- and full-thickness wounds in pigs. Wound analysis comprised macroscopic determination of the wound size, histological examination of the healing tissues and biochemical characterisation of wound exudates. The wounds treated with BioAquacare healed without any signs of inflammation, skin irritation, oedema or erythema. Cellular composition of the reepithelialised wounds was very similar to that of the normal skin, with a well-developed stratum corneum and epithelial layer. It was observed that BioAquacare plays the role of a liquid compartment, which provides pronounced hydration effect and helps maintain a natural moist environment of the healing tissues. BioAquacare showed relatively low protein-absorbing activity, absorbing predominantly low-molecular-weight molecules, including interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, transforming growth factor-beta1 and products of haemoglobin degradation. It is concluded that application of the moist BioAquacare dressing promotes fast reepithelialisation by creating favourable environment for keratinocytes proliferation and it also reduces scarring. The results show that BioAquacare can be considered as a safe, biocompatible and inflammatory inert wound dressing material.

  5. Inflammatory inert poly(ethylene glycol)--protein wound dressing improves healing responses in partial- and full-thickness wounds.

    PubMed

    Shingel, Kirill I; Di Stabile, Liliana; Marty, Jean-Paul; Faure, Marie-Pierre

    2006-12-01

    In this study, a novel soft hydrogel system based on the poly(ethylene glycol)-protein conjugates was evaluated as an occlusive wound dressing material. The hydrogel material, referred by the name of BioAquacare, contains up to 96% of the liquid and is formulated with phosphate-buffered saline and safe preservative to control bacterial load in the open wounds. Performance of the BioAquacare as a wound dressing material was assessed in partial- and full-thickness wounds in pigs. Wound analysis comprised macroscopic determination of the wound size, histological examination of the healing tissues and biochemical characterisation of wound exudates. The wounds treated with BioAquacare healed without any signs of inflammation, skin irritation, oedema or erythema. Cellular composition of the reepithelialised wounds was very similar to that of the normal skin, with a well-developed stratum corneum and epithelial layer. It was observed that BioAquacare plays the role of a liquid compartment, which provides pronounced hydration effect and helps maintain a natural moist environment of the healing tissues. BioAquacare showed relatively low protein-absorbing activity, absorbing predominantly low-molecular-weight molecules, including interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, transforming growth factor-beta1 and products of haemoglobin degradation. It is concluded that application of the moist BioAquacare dressing promotes fast reepithelialisation by creating favourable environment for keratinocytes proliferation and it also reduces scarring. The results show that BioAquacare can be considered as a safe, biocompatible and inflammatory inert wound dressing material. PMID:17199768

  6. Root response to Fusarium solani f. sp . glycines: temporal accumulation of transcripts in partially resistant and susceptible soybean.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, M J; Yaegashi, Satsuki; Ahsan, Rubina; Shopinski, Kay L; Lightfoot, David A

    2005-05-01

    Sudden death syndrome (SDS) of soybean is a complex of root rot disease caused by the semi-biotrophic fungus Fusarium solani f. sp. glycines (Fsg) and a leaf scorch disease caused by toxins produced by the pathogen in the roots. Development of partial rate-reducing resistance in roots to SDS was studied. The recombinant inbred line 23 (RIL23) that carried resistance conferred by six quantitative trait loci (QTL) derived from cultivars 'Essex' x 'Forrest' was compared to the susceptible cultivar Essex. Roots of RIL23 and its susceptible parent Essex were inoculated with Fsg. Transcript abundance (TA) of 191 ESTs was studied at five time points after inoculation. For most of the genes, there was an initial decrease in TA in the inoculated roots of both genotypes. By days 7 and 10 the inoculated roots of Essex failed to increase expression of the transcripts of defense-related genes. In RIL23 inoculated roots, the TA of 81 genes was increased by at least two-fold at day 3 (P=0.004), 88 genes at day 7 (P=0.0023) and 129 genes at day 10 (P=0.0026). A set of 35 genes maintained at least a two-fold higher abundance at all three time points. The increase in TA in RIL23 was in contrast to that observed in Essex where most of the ESTs showed either no change or a decreased TA. The ESTs with an increased TA had homology to the genes involved in resistance (analogs), signal transduction, plant defense, cell wall synthesis and transport of metabolites. Pathways that responded included the protein phosphorylation cascade, the phospholipase cascade and the phenolic natural products pathways, including isoflavone and cell wall synthesis. PMID:15815926

  7. Identifying cochlear implant channels with poor electrode-neuron interface: electrically-evoked auditory brainstem responses measured with the partial tripolar configuration

    PubMed Central

    Bierer, Julie Arenberg; Faulkner, Kathleen F.; Tremblay, Kelly L.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The goal of this study was to compare cochlear implant behavioral measures and electrically-evoked auditory brainstem responses (EABRs) obtained with a spatially focused electrode configuration. It has been shown previously that channels with high thresholds, when measured with the tripolar configuration, exhibit relatively broad psychophysical tuning curves (Bierer and Faulkner, 2010). The elevated threshold and degraded spatial/spectral selectivity of such channels are consistent with a poor electrode-neuron interface, such as suboptimal electrode placement or reduced nerve survival. However, the psychophysical methods required to obtain these data are time intensive and may not be practical during a clinical mapping procedure, especially for young children. Here we have extended the previous investigation to determine if a physiological approach could provide a similar assessment of channel functionality. We hypothesized that, in accordance with the perceptual measures, higher EABR thresholds would correlate with steeper EABR amplitude growth functions, reflecting a degraded electrode-neuron interface. Design Data were collected from six cochlear implant listeners implanted with the HiRes 90k cochlear implant (Advanced Bionics). Single-channel thresholds and most comfortable listening levels were obtained for stimuli that varied in presumed electrical field size by using the partial tripolar configuration, for which a fraction of current (σ) from a center active electrode returns through two neighboring electrodes and the remainder through a distant indifferent electrode. EABRs were obtained in each subject for the two channels having the highest and lowest tripolar (σ=1 or 0.9) behavioral threshold. Evoked potentials were measured with both the monopolar (σ=0) and a more focused partial tripolar (σ ≥ 0.50) configuration. Results Consistent with previous studies, EABR thresholds were highly and positively correlated with behavioral thresholds

  8. Postprandial nutrient-sensing and metabolic responses after partial dietary fishmeal replacement by soyabean meal in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.).

    PubMed

    Xu, Dandan; He, Gen; Mai, Kangsen; Zhou, Huihui; Xu, Wei; Song, Fei

    2016-02-14

    In this study, we chose a carnivorous fish, turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.), to examine its nutrient-sensing and metabolic responses after ingestion of diets with fishmeal (FM), or 45% of FM replaced by soyabean meal (34·6% dry diet) balanced with or without essential amino acids (EAA) to match the amino acid profile of FM diet for 30 d. After a 1-month feeding trial, fish growth, feed efficiency and nutrient retention were markedly reduced by soyabean meal-incorporated (SMI) diets. Compared with the FM diet, SMI led to a reduction of postprandial influx of free amino acids, hypoactivated target of rapamycin signalling and a hyperactivated amino acid response pathway after refeeding, a status associated with reduced protein synthesis, impaired postprandial glycolysis and lipogenesis. These differential effects were not ameliorated by matching an EAA profile of soyabean meal to that of the FM diet through dietary amino acid supplementation. Therefore, this study demonstrated that the FM diet and SMI diets led to distinct nutrient-sensing responses, which in turn modulated metabolism and determined the utilisation efficiency of diets. Our results provide a new molecular explanation for the role of nutrient sensing in the inferior performance of aquafeeds in which FM is replaced by soyabean meal.

  9. Postprandial nutrient-sensing and metabolic responses after partial dietary fishmeal replacement by soyabean meal in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.).

    PubMed

    Xu, Dandan; He, Gen; Mai, Kangsen; Zhou, Huihui; Xu, Wei; Song, Fei

    2016-02-14

    In this study, we chose a carnivorous fish, turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.), to examine its nutrient-sensing and metabolic responses after ingestion of diets with fishmeal (FM), or 45% of FM replaced by soyabean meal (34·6% dry diet) balanced with or without essential amino acids (EAA) to match the amino acid profile of FM diet for 30 d. After a 1-month feeding trial, fish growth, feed efficiency and nutrient retention were markedly reduced by soyabean meal-incorporated (SMI) diets. Compared with the FM diet, SMI led to a reduction of postprandial influx of free amino acids, hypoactivated target of rapamycin signalling and a hyperactivated amino acid response pathway after refeeding, a status associated with reduced protein synthesis, impaired postprandial glycolysis and lipogenesis. These differential effects were not ameliorated by matching an EAA profile of soyabean meal to that of the FM diet through dietary amino acid supplementation. Therefore, this study demonstrated that the FM diet and SMI diets led to distinct nutrient-sensing responses, which in turn modulated metabolism and determined the utilisation efficiency of diets. Our results provide a new molecular explanation for the role of nutrient sensing in the inferior performance of aquafeeds in which FM is replaced by soyabean meal. PMID:26586314

  10. Epilepsy (partial)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction About 3% of people will be diagnosed with epilepsy during their lifetime, but about 70% of people with epilepsy eventually go into remission. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of starting antiepileptic drug treatment following a single seizure? What are the effects of drug monotherapy in people with partial epilepsy? What are the effects of additional drug treatments in people with drug-resistant partial epilepsy? What is the risk of relapse in people in remission when withdrawing antiepileptic drugs? What are the effects of behavioural and psychological treatments for people with epilepsy? What are the effects of surgery in people with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 83 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiepileptic drugs after a single seizure; monotherapy for partial epilepsy using carbamazepine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, phenobarbital, phenytoin, sodium valproate, or topiramate; addition of second-line drugs for drug-resistant partial epilepsy (allopurinol, eslicarbazepine, gabapentin, lacosamide, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, losigamone, oxcarbazepine, retigabine, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin, or zonisamide); antiepileptic drug withdrawal for people with partial or

  11. An Enhanced Immune Response of Mclk1+/− Mutant Mice Is Associated with Partial Protection from Fibrosis, Cancer and the Development of Biomarkers of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dantong; Wang, Ying; Argyriou, Catherine; Carrière, Audrey; Malo, Danielle; Hekimi, Siegfried

    2012-01-01

    The immune response is essential for survival by destroying microorganisms and pre-cancerous cells. However, inflammation, one aspect of this response, can result in short- and long-term deleterious side-effects. Mclk1+/− mutant mice can be long-lived despite displaying a hair-trigger inflammatory response and chronically activated macrophages as a result of high mitochondrial ROS generation. Here we ask whether this phenotype is beneficial or simply tolerated. We used models of infection by Salmonella serovars and found that Mclk1+/− mutants mount a stronger immune response, control bacterial proliferation better, and are resistant to cell and tissue damage resulting from the response, including fibrosis and types of oxidative damage that are considered to be biomarkers of aging. Moreover, these same types of tissue damage were found to be low in untreated 23 months-old mutants. We also examined the initiation of tumour growth after transplantation of mouse LLC1 carcinoma cells into Mclk1+/− mutants, as well as during spontaneous tumorigenesis in Mclk1+/− Trp53+/− double mutants. Tumour latency was increased by the Mclk1+/− genotype in both models. Furthermore, we used the transplantation model to show that splenic CD8+ T lymphocytes from Mclk1+/− graft recipients show enhanced cytotoxicity against LLC1 cells in vitro. Mclk1+/− mutants thus display an association of an enhanced immune response with partial protection from age-dependent processes and from pathologies similar to those that are found with increased frequency during the aging process. This suggests that the immune phenotype of these mutants might contribute to their longevity. We discuss how these findings suggest a broader view of how the immune response might impact the aging process. PMID:23166727

  12. The successful induction of T-cell and antibody responses by a recombinant measles virus-vectored tetravalent dengue vaccine provides partial protection against dengue-2 infection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hui-Mei; Chen, Hsin-Wei; Hsiao, Yu-Ju; Wu, Szu-Hsien; Chung, Han-Hsuan; Hsieh, Chun-Hsiang; Chong, Pele; Leng, Chih-Hsiang; Pan, Chien-Hsiung

    2016-07-01

    Dengue has a major impact on global public health, and the use of dengue vaccine is very limited. In this study, we evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a dengue vaccine made from a recombinant measles virus (MV) that expresses envelope protein domain III (ED3) of dengue-1 to 4. Following immunization with the MV-vectored dengue vaccine, mice developed specific interferon-gamma and antibody responses against dengue virus and MV. Neutralizing antibodies against MV and dengue viruses were also induced, and protective levels of FRNT50 ≥ 10 to 4 serotypes of dengue viruses were detected in the MV-vectored dengue vaccine-immunized mice. In addition, specific interferon-gamma and antibody responses to dengue viruses were still induced by the MV-vectored dengue vaccine in mice that were pre-infected with MV. This finding suggests that the pre-existing immunity to MV did not block the initiation of immune responses. By contrast, mice that were pre-infected with dengue-3 exhibited no effect in terms of their antibody responses to MV and dengue viruses, but a dominant dengue-3-specific T-cell response was observed. After injection with dengue-2, a detectable but significantly lower viremia and a higher titer of anti-dengue-2 neutralizing antibodies were observed in MV-vectored dengue vaccine-immunized mice versus the vector control, suggesting that an anamnestic antibody response that provided partial protection against dengue-2 was elicited. Our results with regard to T-cell responses and the effect of pre-immunity to MV or dengue viruses provide clues for the future applications of an MV-vectored dengue vaccine. PMID:26901482

  13. Integrating Service Learning into the Classroom: Examining the Extent to Which Students Achieve Course Objectives and a Sense of Civic Responsibility by Engaging in Service Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Julie M.

    2011-01-01

    The growing interest in service learning in higher education is connected to the idea that it helps students achieve course objectives and develop a sense of civic responsibility. Thus, it ties into broader goals within the institution of engagement of students and outreach to communities. This research examines students' perceptions of service…

  14. A Story within a Story: Culturally Responsive Schooling and American Indian and Alaska Native Achievement in the National Indian Education Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Francesca A.; Vasquez Heilig, Julian; Schram, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    There have been numerous calls to increase quantitative studies examining the role of culturally responsive schooling (CRS) on American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) achievement. The National Indian Education Study (NIES) is the only large-scale study focused on (AIAN) students' cultural experiences within the context of schools. Given…

  15. Mathematical Knowledge for Teaching, Standards-Based Mathematics Teaching Practices, and Student Achievement in the Context of the "Responsive Classroom Approach"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ottmar, Erin R.; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.; Larsen, Ross A.; Berry, Robert Q.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness of the Responsive Classroom (RC) approach, a social and emotional learning intervention, on changing the relations between mathematics teacher and classroom inputs (mathematical knowledge for teaching [MKT] and standards-based mathematics teaching practices) and student mathematics achievement. Work was…

  16. Response to Intervention, Family Involvement, and Student Achievement at Tier 2: A Mixed Methods Study of K-1 Students and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerzel-Short, Lydia

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examined the importance of family involvement in student learning and achievement within the Response to Intervention framework. This study built upon the premise that family involvement in a child's education is paramount if educational gaps are to be closed. Families included in this study were randomly assigned into a…

  17. The effects of training and competition on achievement goals, motivational responses, and performance in a golf-putting task.

    PubMed

    van de Pol P, K C; Kavussanu, Maria; Ring, Christopher

    2012-12-01

    This study examined whether (a) training and competition influence achievement goals, effort, enjoyment, tension, and performance; (b) achievement goals mediate the effects of training and competition on effort, enjoyment, tension, and performance; and (c) the context influences the relationships between goals and effort, enjoyment, tension, and performance. Participants (32 males, 28 females; M age = 19.12 years) performed a golf-putting task in a training condition and a competition condition and completed measures of goal involvement, effort, enjoyment, and tension; putting performance was also measured. Both task and ego involvement varied across training and competition, and variation in ego involvement explained variation in effort and enjoyment between these conditions. Ego involvement positively predicted effort in training and performance in competition, and interacted positively with task involvement to predict effort and enjoyment in competition. Our findings suggest that the distinction between training and competition is a valuable one when examining individuals' achievement motivation. PMID:23204359

  18. Differential partial activation phenotype and production of tumour necrosis factor-α by conventional dendritic cells in response to lipopolysaccharide in HIV+ viraemic subjects and HIV+ controllers.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Sandoval, R; Del Río Estrada, P M; Rivero-Arrieta, A; Reyes-Terán, G; Bonifaz, L C

    2014-12-01

    HIV(+) subjects are reported to have increased soluble CD14 (sCD14) in plasma, an indicator of microbial translocation. We evaluated if microbial translocation has a differential impact on the activation and function of conventional dendritic cells (cDC) from viraemic HIV(+) subjects and HIV(+) controllers (CTs). The HIV(+) subjects were classified into two groups according to their plasma viral load (pVL): CT and viraemic. Subjects without HIV were included as controls (HIV(-) ). The frequencies and phenotypes of cDC from these subjects were evaluated by multi-parameter flow cytometry. In addition, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or single-stranded RNA40 (ssRNA40), the phenotype of the cDC and the intracellular production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α by the cDC were evaluated by flow cytometry. We observed a partial activation phenotype for the cDC in the viraemic subjects and CTs ex vivo and after LPS activation, which showed differences in the expression of CD40 and CD86. Furthermore, in response to LPS the cDC from the viraemic subjects produced more TNF-α compared to the cDC from CTs. Interestingly, the percentage of TNF-α(+) cDC was found to be correlated positively with the pVL. The partial activation of cDC and the over-production of TNF-α in response to LPS in viraemic HIV(+) subjects might be related to the increased chronic activation observed in these subjects. In contrast, cDC from CTs seem to have a regulated response to LPS, indicating that they respond differently to chronic immune activation. These results may have implications in the development of HIV therapies and vaccines using DC.

  19. Differential partial activation phenotype and production of tumour necrosis factor-α by conventional dendritic cells in response to lipopolysaccharide in HIV+ viraemic subjects and HIV+ controllers

    PubMed Central

    Camacho-Sandoval, R; Del Río Estrada, P M; Rivero-Arrieta, A; Reyes-Terán, G; Bonifaz, L C

    2014-01-01

    HIV+ subjects are reported to have increased soluble CD14 (sCD14) in plasma, an indicator of microbial translocation. We evaluated if microbial translocation has a differential impact on the activation and function of conventional dendritic cells (cDC) from viraemic HIV+ subjects and HIV+ controllers (CTs). The HIV+ subjects were classified into two groups according to their plasma viral load (pVL): CT and viraemic. Subjects without HIV were included as controls (HIV–). The frequencies and phenotypes of cDC from these subjects were evaluated by multi-parameter flow cytometry. In addition, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or single-stranded RNA40 (ssRNA40), the phenotype of the cDC and the intracellular production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α by the cDC were evaluated by flow cytometry. We observed a partial activation phenotype for the cDC in the viraemic subjects and CTs ex vivo and after LPS activation, which showed differences in the expression of CD40 and CD86. Furthermore, in response to LPS the cDC from the viraemic subjects produced more TNF-α compared to the cDC from CTs. Interestingly, the percentage of TNF-α+ cDC was found to be correlated positively with the pVL. The partial activation of cDC and the over-production of TNF-α in response to LPS in viraemic HIV+ subjects might be related to the increased chronic activation observed in these subjects. In contrast, cDC from CTs seem to have a regulated response to LPS, indicating that they respond differently to chronic immune activation. These results may have implications in the development of HIV therapies and vaccines using DC. PMID:25130456

  20. Amygdala and periaqueductal gray lesions only partially attenuate unconditional defensive responses in rats exposed to a cat.

    PubMed

    de Oca, Beatrice M; Fanselow, Michael S

    2004-01-01

    Defensive responses to a cat were observed in rats given excitotoxic lesions of the central nucleus of the amygdala (ACe), dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (dlPAG), ventral periaqueductal gray (vPAG), or sham lesions. Rats were placed adjacent to a compartment containing a cat. Sham-lesioned rats avoided the area nearest the cat and preferred the area furthest away from the cat. They also exhibited numerous defensive responses including, climbing, escape from the apparatus, and freezing. Rats with lesions of the ACe reacted like the sham lesioned rats by preferring the area of the apparatus furthest from the cat, however they climbed and escaped significantly less than sham lesioned rats. Avoidance of the area adjacent to the cat was attenuated in rats with lesions of the vPAG. Climbing along the walls of the apparatus was also attenuated in rats with lesions of the vPAG. Escapes from the apparatus were not significantly reduced by lesions of the vPAG and dlPAG. Thus, ACe lesions attenuated climbing and eliminated escapes, but did not impair locomotion of the rat away from the cat.

  1. Small- and strong-signal dielectric response in a single-crystal film of partially deuterated betaine phosphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balashova, E. V.; Krichevtsov, B. B.; Lemanov, V. V.

    2011-06-01

    Poly- and single-crystal films of betaine phosphite deuterated to ˜20% have been grown by evaporation on NdGaO3 (001) substrates with a preliminarily deposited planar interdigital structure of electrodes. The small-signal dielectric response in the 0.1-100.0-kHz frequency range has revealed a strong anomaly in capacitance upon the transition of the films to the ferroelectric state. Application of a bias field brings about suppression and a slight shift of the dielectric anomaly toward higher temperatures. The strong-signal dielectric response has been studied by the Sawyer-Tower method over the frequency range 0.06-3.00 kHz both in the para- and ferroelectric phases. In contrast to the case of a plane-parallel capacitor, in the planar structure studied, the dielectric hysteresis loops exhibit a very small coercivity at low frequencies, which grows with increasing frequency. This difference should be assigned to different domain structures formed in a planeparallel capacitor and in a planar structure in a saturating field. The growth of hysteresis with increasing frequency in a planar structure is considered to be associated with the domain wall motion.

  2. Fetal Magnetoencephalography--Achievements and Challenges in the Study of Prenatal and Early Postnatal Brain Responses: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheridan, Carolin J.; Matuz, Tamara; Draganova, Rossitza; Eswaran, Hari; Preissl, Hubert

    2010-01-01

    Fetal magnetoencephalography (fMEG) is the only non-invasive method for investigating evoked brain responses and spontaneous brain activity generated by the fetus "in utero". Fetal auditory as well as visual-evoked fields have been successfully recorded in basic stimulus-response studies. Moreover, paradigms investigating precursors for cognitive…

  3. Getting better, getting well: understanding and managing partial and non-response to pharmacological treatment of non-psychotic major depression in old age.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Henry C; Karp, Jordan F; Dew, Mary Amanda; Reynolds, Charles F

    2007-01-01

    In general, the pharmacological treatment of non-psychotic major depressive disorder in old age is only partially successful, with only approximately 50% of older depressed adults improving with initial antidepressant monotherapy. Many factors may predict a more difficult-to-treat depression, including coexisting anxiety, low self-esteem, poor sleep and a high coexisting medical burden. Being aware of these and other predictors of a difficult-to-treat depression gives the clinician more reasonable expectations about a patient's likely treatment course. If an initial antidepressant trial fails, the clinician has two pharmacological options: switch or augment/combine antidepressant therapies. About 50% of patients who do not improve after initial antidepressant therapy will respond to either strategy. Switching has several advantages including fewer adverse effects, improved treatment adherence and reduced expense. However, as a general guideline, if patients are partial responders at 6 weeks, they will likely be full responders by 12 weeks. Thus, changing medication is not indicated in this context. However, if patients are partial responders at 12 weeks, switching to a new agent is advised. If the clinician treats vigorously and if the patient and clinician persevere, up to 90% of older depressed patients will respond to pharmacological treatment. Furthermore, electroconvulsive therapy is a safe and effective non-pharmacological strategy for non-psychotic major depression that fails to respond to pharmacotherapy. Getting well and staying well is the goal; thus, clinicians should treat to remission, not merely to response. Subsequently, maintenance treatment with the same regimen that has been successful in relieving the depression strongly improves the patient's chances of remaining depression free. PMID:17896830

  4. Greater Response to Placebo in Children Than in Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis in Drug-Resistant Partial Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Rheims, Sylvain; Cucherat, Michel; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Ryvlin, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Background Despite guidelines establishing the need to perform comprehensive paediatric drug development programs, pivotal trials in children with epilepsy have been completed mostly in Phase IV as a postapproval replication of adult data. However, it has been shown that the treatment response in children can differ from that in adults. It has not been investigated whether differences in drug effect between adults and children might occur in the treatment of drug-resistant partial epilepsy, although such differences may have a substantial impact on the design and results of paediatric randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Methods and Findings Three electronic databases were searched for RCTs investigating any antiepileptic drug (AED) in the add-on treatment of drug-resistant partial epilepsy in both children and adults. The treatment effect was compared between the two age groups using the ratio of the relative risk (RR) of the 50% responder rate between active AEDs treatment and placebo groups, as well as meta-regression. Differences in the response to placebo and to active treatment were searched using logistic regression. A comparable approach was used for analysing secondary endpoints, including seizure-free rate, total and adverse events-related withdrawal rates, and withdrawal rate for seizure aggravation. Five AEDs were evaluated in both adults and children with drug-resistant partial epilepsy in 32 RCTs. The treatment effect was significantly lower in children than in adults (RR ratio: 0.67 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.51–0.89]; p = 0.02 by meta-regression). This difference was related to an age-dependent variation in the response to placebo, with a higher rate in children than in adults (19% versus 9.9%, p < 0.001), whereas no significant difference was observed in the response to active treatment (37.2% versus 30.4%, p = 0.364). The relative risk of the total withdrawal rate was also significantly lower in children than in adults (RR ratio: 0.65 [95

  5. The Relationship between Self Concept and Response towards Student's Academic Achievement among Students Leaders in University Putra Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Jamaludin; Ghazali, Mazila; Hassan, Aminuddin

    2011-01-01

    This is a quantitative research using correlational method. The purpose of this research is to study the relationship between self concept and ability to handle stress on academic achievement of student leaders in University Putra Malaysia. The sample size consists of 106 respondents who are the Student Supreme Council and Student Representative…

  6. An Evaluation of Student Achievement before and after Training in Response to Instruction in a Rural School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to provide research in examining the difference in student achievement in reading and math through the quantitative data collection of North Carolina EOG scores for students in third through fifth grade from one high poverty and high performing North Carolina public school district before and after…

  7. The Long and Winding Road to Social Justice: Missouri District Uses Culturally Responsive Instruction to Close the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ijei, Charlotte; Harrison, Julie

    2010-01-01

    A key component to eliminating the achievement gap is building relationships between educators and students of color. In working toward social justice in schools, the authors encounter people at different places on the continuum. Educators in the large, primarily white, suburban Parkway School District in St. Louis, Missouri, range from the…

  8. Partial attenuation of the pressor response to endotracheal intubation. A comparison of the effects of intravenous clonidine and fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Carabine, U A; Allen, R W; Moore, J

    1992-07-01

    In a randomized, double-blind placebo controlled study, intravenous clonidine, fentanyl and saline were compared for both their effect on the cardiovascular response to intubation, and early post-operative pain. The patients treated with fentanyl and clonidine were more sedated and the requirements for induction agents were lower compared to the control group. On intubation, both the active treatments resulted in a smaller increase in both heart rate and mean arterial pressure compared to the control group. There was no significant difference in recovery times in the three groups. Although the time to first request for analgesia was longer in the clonidine group compared to both the fentanyl and saline groups, the difference in morphine requirements between the groups was not significant. The differences between the two active treatments were not significant, and clonidine offered no additional benefits over fentanyl for this purpose. PMID:1628636

  9. Partial response to imatinib treatment in a patient with unresectable gastrointestinal stromal tumor: A case report and mini literature review

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaolong; Feng, Libo; Liu, Qing; Xia, Dong; Xu, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of imatinib mesylate in unresectable gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and to discuss its therapeutic regimen. A patient with unresectable GIST is described, and several key clinical studies are reviewed, including the clinical trials B2222 and S0033, which contain recently reported results of the long-term clinical outcome of imatinib in patients with unresectable or metastatic GIST. The recent results of the two studies demonstrate the long-term efficacy and safety of imatinib for unresectable or metastatic GIST. A positive response to imatinib treatment was observed in the present patient, which is consistent with the data of the B2222 and S0033 trials. However, further long-term, large-scale, multicenter and controlled trials are required to determine the relative efficacy of combining imatinib agents with surgical procedures or administering imatinib alone.

  10. Partial response to imatinib treatment in a patient with unresectable gastrointestinal stromal tumor: A case report and mini literature review

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaolong; Feng, Libo; Liu, Qing; Xia, Dong; Xu, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of imatinib mesylate in unresectable gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and to discuss its therapeutic regimen. A patient with unresectable GIST is described, and several key clinical studies are reviewed, including the clinical trials B2222 and S0033, which contain recently reported results of the long-term clinical outcome of imatinib in patients with unresectable or metastatic GIST. The recent results of the two studies demonstrate the long-term efficacy and safety of imatinib for unresectable or metastatic GIST. A positive response to imatinib treatment was observed in the present patient, which is consistent with the data of the B2222 and S0033 trials. However, further long-term, large-scale, multicenter and controlled trials are required to determine the relative efficacy of combining imatinib agents with surgical procedures or administering imatinib alone. PMID:27698727

  11. Plasmodium falciparum-Infected Erythrocytes and β-Hematin Induce Partial Maturation of Human Dendritic Cells and Increase Their Migratory Ability in Response to Lymphoid Chemokines ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Giusti, Pablo; Urban, Britta C.; Frascaroli, Giada; Albrecht, Letusa; Tinti, Anna; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Varani, Stefania

    2011-01-01

    Acute and chronic Plasmodium falciparum infections alter the immune competence of the host possibly through changes in dendritic cell (DC) functionality. DCs are the most potent activators of T cells, and migration is integral to their function. Mature DCs express lymphoid chemokine receptors (CCRs), expression of which enables them to migrate to the lymph nodes, where they encounter naïve T cells. The present study aimed to investigate the impact of the synthetic analog to malaria parasite pigment hemozoin, i.e., β-hematin, or infected erythrocytes (iRBCs) on the activation status of human monocyte-derived DCs and on their expression of CCRs. Human monocyte-derived DCs partially matured upon incubation with β-hematin as indicated by an increased expression of CD80 and CD83. Both β-hematin and iRBCs provoked the release of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor alpha, but not IL-12, and induced upregulation of the lymphoid chemokine receptor CXCR4, which was coupled to an increased migration to lymphoid ligands. Taken together, these results suggest that the partial and transient maturation of human myeloid DCs upon stimulation with malaria parasite-derived products and the increased IL-10 but lack of IL-12 secretion may lead to suboptimal activation of T cells. This may in turn lead to impaired adaptive immune responses and therefore insufficient clearance of the parasites. PMID:21464084

  12. Mutational analysis of reverse transcriptase and surface proteins of patients with partial virological response during mono and combination antiviral therapies in genotype D chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Mahabadi, Mostafa; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Norouzi, Mehdi; Keyvani, Hossein; Mahmoudi, Mahmood; Jazayeri, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The mutational pattern of chronic Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is unclear in patients who show incomplete response to antiviral therapy. The aims of this study were 1) to determine the benefit of combination therapy with adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) and Lamivudine (LAM) versus ADV or LAM alone in maintaining virological, biochemical and histological responses and 2) to investigate the patterns of mutations in the reverse transcriptase and surface proteins of HBV with LAM and/or ADF-resistant in partially-responded chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients. Methods The study group consisted of 186 chronic HBV carriers who were admitted to the Tehran Hepatitis Network from 2010 to 2013. We retrospectively selected 86 patients who partially responded to different nucleoside analogue regimens. After 48 weeks of therapy, five groups of patients were defined including eight Lamivudine (LAM) Group (I), 30 Adefovir (ADV) Group (II), 16 ADV add on LAM Group (III), 32 ADV+LAM Group (IV), and 100 controls (no therapy). Reverse transcriptase (RT) and surface genes were amplified and sequenced for mutational analysis. Results All groups showed differences between mean values for age, gender, alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), and HBV DNA levels groups showed significant differences than other groups (p < 0.05). The mutation frequencies for groups were I (1.7%), II (1.39%), III (2.28%), IV (2.0%), and V (0.38%). T54N, L80I/V, I91L/V, L180M, M204I/V, Q215P/S, and F221Y/S showed the highest number of mutations in all groups with different frequencies. Four new, unreported mutations were found. Conclusion Those patients who failed to respond in the first 48 weeks, whether they were receiving mono or combination therapy, should be tested genotypically, for the early modification of treatment. PMID:27504160

  13. Quantifying Immune Response to Influenza Virus Infection via Multivariate Nonlinear ODE Models with Partially Observed State Variables and Time-Varying Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hulin; Miao, Hongyu; Xue, Hongqi; Topham, David J.; Zand, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Summary Influenza A virus (IAV) infection continues to be a global health threat, as evidenced by the outbreak of the novel A/California/7/2009 IAV strain. Previous flu vaccines have proven less effective than hoped for emerging IAV strains, indicating a more thorough understanding of immune responses to primary infection is needed. One issue is the difficulty in directly measuring many key parameters and variables of the immune response. To address these issues, we considered a comprehensive workflow for statistical inference for ordinary differential question (ODE) models with partially observed variables and time-varying parameters, including identifiability analysis, two-stage and NLS estimation, and model selection etc‥ In particular, we proposed a novel one-step method to verify parameter identifiability and formulate estimating equations simultaneously. Thus, the pseudo-LS method can now deal with general ODE models with partially observed state variables for the first time. Using this workflow, we verified the relative significance of various immune factors to virus control, including target epithelial cells, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CD8+) cells and IAV specific antibodies (IgG and IgM). Factors other than cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) killing contributed the most to the loss of infected epithelial cells, though the effects of CTL are still significant. IgM antibody was found to be the major contributor to neutralization of free infectious viral particles. Also, the maximum viral load, which correlates well with mortality, was found to depend more on viral replication rates than infectivity. In contrast to current hypotheses, the results obtained via our methods suggest that IgM antibody and viral replication rates may be worth of further explorations in vaccine development. PMID:26085850

  14. Partial Attenuation of Respiratory Syncytial Virus with a Deletion of a Small Hydrophobic Gene Is Associated with Elevated Interleukin-1β Responses

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Ryan F.; McDonald, Jacqueline U.; Ivanova, Maria; Zhong, Ziyun; Bukreyev, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The small hydrophobic (SH) gene of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a major cause of infant hospitalization, encodes a viroporin of unknown function. SH gene knockout virus (RSV ΔSH) is partially attenuated in vivo, but not in vitro, suggesting that the SH protein may have an immunomodulatory role. RSV ΔSH has been tested as a live attenuated vaccine in humans and cattle, and here we demonstrate that it protected against viral rechallenge in mice. We compared the immune response to infection with RSV wild type and RSV ΔSH in vivo using BALB/c mice and in vitro using epithelial cells, neutrophils, and macrophages. Strikingly, the interleukin-1β (IL-1β) response to RSV ΔSH infection was greater than to wild-type RSV, in spite of a decreased viral load, and when IL-1β was blocked in vivo, the viral load returned to wild-type levels. A significantly greater IL-1β response to RSV ΔSH was also detected in vitro, with higher-magnitude responses in neutrophils and macrophages than in epithelial cells. Depleting macrophages (with clodronate liposome) and neutrophils (with anti-Ly6G/1A8) demonstrated the contribution of these cells to the IL-1β response in vivo, the first demonstration of neutrophilic IL-1β production in response to viral lung infection. In this study, we describe an increased IL-1β response to RSV ΔSH, which may explain the attenuation in vivo and supports targeting the SH gene in live attenuated vaccines. IMPORTANCE There is a pressing need for a vaccine for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). A number of live attenuated RSV vaccine strains have been developed in which the small hydrophobic (SH) gene has been deleted, even though the function of the SH protein is unknown. The structure of the SH protein has recently been solved, showing it is a pore-forming protein (viroporin). Here, we demonstrate that the IL-1β response to RSV ΔSH is greater in spite of a lower viral load, which contributes to the attenuation in vivo. This

  15. Drosophila Embryos as a Model for Wound-Induced Transcriptional Dynamics: Genetic Strategies to Achieve a Localized Wound Response

    PubMed Central

    Juarez, Michelle T.

    2016-01-01

    While many studies have established a paradigm for tissue repair at the level of cellular remodeling, it is not clear how an organism restricts a response only to the injured region of a damaged tissue. Skin, the largest organ in the human body, is prone to injury, and repair of epidermal tissue represents a medically relevant system to investigate. Significance: Studies in Drosophila melanogaster provide a robust genetic system to identify molecular components that will positively impact repair and healing. The Drosophila skin consists of a single-cell epidermal layer and relies on well-conserved cellular mechanisms to coordinate gene expression during development. Many studies have established that key developmental genes promote a response to epidermal injury, but the balance between activator and inhibitor signals to coordinate a localized response remains unknown. Recent Advances: Discovery of a genetic pathway that promotes the restriction of transcriptional response to damage only in effected regions. Interestingly, genome-wide microarray studies have identified an intersection between gene expression after aseptic injury and activation of the innate immune response. Critical Issues: The use of a transcriptional activation reporter provides an innovative approach to uncover well-conserved components that promote the localization of a response during epidermal injury and may influence other pathological conditions of tissue damage. Future Directions: The work reviewed in this critical review may lead to development of molecular strategies of repair and improved healing after injury or infection. The outcomes on the fundamental contribution of a transcriptional response to injury will be translatable to mammalian systems. PMID:27274436

  16. The Impact of School Libraries on Academic Achievement: A Research Study Based on Responses from Administrators in Idaho

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lance, Keith Curry; Rodney, Marcia J.; Schwarz, Bill

    2010-01-01

    Where administrators value strong library programs and can see them doing their part for student success, students are more likely to thrive academically. This is the over-arching conclusion that can be drawn from the latest study of the impact of school libraries--this one in Idaho. The study included survey responses from 176 principals and…

  17. The Effects on Achievement of Using the Forced Inferential Response Mode in an Intermediate Grade Population-Geography Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, John Richmond

    This study describes and evaluates an intermediate grade self-instructional unit in population geography organized according to the Forced Inferential Response Mode (FIRM) method of presentation. This mode of presentation is compared with a conventional narrative mode supplemented with graphics. The study indicates no statistically significant…

  18. Using Gradient Analysis to Determine and Compare Invertebrate Responses to Urbanization: Can We Achieve Understanding Without Defining Reference Conditions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuffney, T. F.; Giddings, E. M.; Coles, J. F.; Zappia, H.

    2005-05-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program uses a gradient design to investigate the effects of urbanization across the U.S. This design has successfully defined invertebrate responses in metropolitan areas associated with Boston, MA, Birmingham, AL, Salt Lake City, UT, and Raleigh, NC. An urban intensity index (UII) based on population, land use, land cover, and infrastructure is used to define the gradient without explicitly identifying reference sites, although the low end of the urban gradient may include such sites. Many invertebrate metrics (e.g., tolerance, biotic integrity, richness) are significantly related to UII. Detection of responses is not dependent upon reference conditions and this design can detect responses even when many low intensity (UII < 20) sites are excluded. Reference conditions can be inferred from regressions of metrics and UII by creating a "dummy" site where the components of the UII are set to background values (e.g., population = 0, road density = 0) and then extrapolating metrics for this site (UII = 0). Unfortunately, these end members (reference site conditions) tend to be highly variable and it is more difficult to determine these values than to detect the existence, form, and rate of response across the urban gradient.

  19. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Response to Intervention: Comparing the Reading Achievement of ELLs and Native English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapienza, Philip Kiersten

    2012-01-01

    Teaching reading in the mainstream classroom is a challenge. This challenge is compounded when trying to meet the needs of English language learners. Recently, Response to Intervention (RTI) has been suggested as a framework for classroom teachers to use in order to meet the wide range of needs of their students. The purpose of this study was to…

  20. Clinically significant responses achieved with romidepsin across disease compartments in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ellen J.; Kim, Youn H.; Rook, Alain H.; Lerner, Adam; Duvic, Madeleine; Reddy, Sunil; Robak, Tadeusz; Becker, Jürgen C.; Samtsov, Alexey; McCulloch, William; Waksman, Joel; Whittaker, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is a rare heterogeneous group of non-Hodgkin lymphomas that arises in the skin but can progress to systemic disease (lymph nodes, blood, viscera). Historically, in clinical trials of CTCL there has been little consistency in how responses were defined in each disease “compartment”; some studies only assessed responses in the skin. The histone deacetylase inhibitor romidepsin is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of CTCL in patients who have received at least one prior systemic therapy. Phase II studies that led to approval used rigorous composite end points that incorporated disease assessments in all compartments. The objective of this analysis was to thoroughly examine the activity of romidepsin within each disease compartment in patients with CTCL. Romidepsin was shown to have clinical activity across disease compartments and is suitable for use in patients with CTCL having skin involvement only, erythroderma, lymphadenopathy and/or blood involvement. PMID:25791237

  1. Clinically significant responses achieved with romidepsin across disease compartments in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ellen J; Kim, Youn H; Rook, Alain H; Lerner, Adam; Duvic, Madeleine; Reddy, Sunil; Robak, Tadeusz; Becker, Jürgen C; Samtsov, Alexey; McCulloch, William; Waksman, Joel; Whittaker, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is a rare heterogeneous group of non-Hodgkin lymphomas that arises in the skin but can progress to systemic disease (lymph nodes, blood, viscera). Historically, in clinical trials of CTCL there has been little consistency in how responses were defined in each disease "compartment"; some studies only assessed responses in the skin. The histone deacetylase inhibitor romidepsin is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of CTCL in patients who have received at least one prior systemic therapy. Phase II studies that led to approval used rigorous composite end points that incorporated disease assessments in all compartments. The objective of this analysis was to thoroughly examine the activity of romidepsin within each disease compartment in patients with CTCL. Romidepsin was shown to have clinical activity across disease compartments and is suitable for use in patients with CTCL having skin involvement only, erythroderma, lymphadenopathy and/or blood involvement.

  2. Significant partial response of metastatic intra-abdominal and pelvic round cell liposarcoma to a small-molecule VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor apatinib

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Min; Bi, Jingwang; Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Baocheng; Wang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Myxoid/round cell liposarcoma is the second most common subtype of liposarcoma. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy have a limited efficacy for treating advanced myxoid/round cell liposarcoma, with relatively serious side effects. Case presentation: We herein present a 68-year-old Chinese woman initially diagnosed with advanced multiple intra-abdominal and pelvic round cell liposarcoma. She refused to receive cytotoxic chemotherapy and received apatinib as the first-line therapy, a novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 that has been used in the treatment of patients with metastatic gastric cancer who progressed with 2 or more chemotherapy regimens. This patient was partially responsive to apatinib with a dose of 500 mg daily. No serious drug-related side effects were observed. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that some cases of liposarcoma may be responsive to antiangiogenic agent apatinib. Randomized clinical studies are needed to further confirm the efficacy and safety of apatinib in the clinical treatment of liposarcoma. PMID:27495042

  3. Achieving Potent Autologous Neutralizing Antibody Responses against Tier 2 HIV-1 Viruses by Strategic Selection of Envelope Immunogens

    PubMed Central

    Hessell, Ann J.; Malherbe, Delphine C.; Pissani, Franco; McBurney, Sean; Krebs, Shelly J.; Gomes, Michelle; Pandey, Shilpi; Sutton, William F.; Burwitz, Benjamin J.; Gray, Matthew; Robins, Harlan; Park, Byung S.; Sacha, Jonah B.; LaBranche, Celia C.; Fuller, Deborah H.; Montefiori, David C.; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Sather, D. Noah

    2016-01-01

    Advancement in immunogen selection and vaccine design that will rapidly elicit a protective Ab response is considered critical for HIV vaccine protective efficacy. Vaccine-elicited Ab responses must therefore have the capacity to prevent infection by neutralization-resistant phenotypes of transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses that establish infection in humans. Most vaccine candidates to date have been ineffective at generating Abs that neutralize T/F or early variants. In this study, we report that coimmunizing rhesus macaques with HIV-1 gp160 DNA and gp140 trimeric protein selected from native envelope gene sequences (envs) induced neutralizing Abs against Tier 2 autologous viruses expressing cognate envelope (Env). The Env immunogens were selected from envs emerging during the earliest stages of neutralization breadth developing within the first 2 years of infection in two clade B–infected human subjects. Moreover, the IgG responses in macaques emulated the targeting to specific regions of Env known to be associated with autologous and heterologous neutralizing Abs developed within the human subjects. Furthermore, we measured increasing affinity of macaque polyclonal IgG responses over the course of the immunization regimen that correlated with Tier 1 neutralization. In addition, we report firm correlations between Tier 2 autologous neutralization and Tier 1 heterologous neutralization, as well as overall TZM-bl breadth scores. Additionally, the activation of Env-specific follicular helper CD4 T cells in lymphocytes isolated from inguinal lymph nodes of vaccinated macaques correlated with Tier 2 autologous neutralization. These results demonstrate the potential for native Env derived from subjects at the time of neutralization broadening as effective HIV vaccine elements. PMID:26944928

  4. Achieving Potent Autologous Neutralizing Antibody Responses against Tier 2 HIV-1 Viruses by Strategic Selection of Envelope Immunogens.

    PubMed

    Hessell, Ann J; Malherbe, Delphine C; Pissani, Franco; McBurney, Sean; Krebs, Shelly J; Gomes, Michelle; Pandey, Shilpi; Sutton, William F; Burwitz, Benjamin J; Gray, Matthew; Robins, Harlan; Park, Byung S; Sacha, Jonah B; LaBranche, Celia C; Fuller, Deborah H; Montefiori, David C; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Sather, D Noah; Haigwood, Nancy L

    2016-04-01

    Advancement in immunogen selection and vaccine design that will rapidly elicit a protective Ab response is considered critical for HIV vaccine protective efficacy. Vaccine-elicited Ab responses must therefore have the capacity to prevent infection by neutralization-resistant phenotypes of transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses that establish infection in humans. Most vaccine candidates to date have been ineffective at generating Abs that neutralize T/F or early variants. In this study, we report that coimmunizing rhesus macaques with HIV-1 gp160 DNA and gp140 trimeric protein selected from native envelope gene sequences (envs) induced neutralizing Abs against Tier 2 autologous viruses expressing cognate envelope (Env). The Env immunogens were selected from envs emerging during the earliest stages of neutralization breadth developing within the first 2 years of infection in two clade B-infected human subjects. Moreover, the IgG responses in macaques emulated the targeting to specific regions of Env known to be associated with autologous and heterologous neutralizing Abs developed within the human subjects. Furthermore, we measured increasing affinity of macaque polyclonal IgG responses over the course of the immunization regimen that correlated with Tier 1 neutralization. In addition, we report firm correlations between Tier 2 autologous neutralization and Tier 1 heterologous neutralization, as well as overall TZM-bl breadth scores. Additionally, the activation of Env-specific follicular helper CD4 T cells in lymphocytes isolated from inguinal lymph nodes of vaccinated macaques correlated with Tier 2 autologous neutralization. These results demonstrate the potential for native Env derived from subjects at the time of neutralization broadening as effective HIV vaccine elements. PMID:26944928

  5. Achieving Potent Autologous Neutralizing Antibody Responses against Tier 2 HIV-1 Viruses by Strategic Selection of Envelope Immunogens.

    PubMed

    Hessell, Ann J; Malherbe, Delphine C; Pissani, Franco; McBurney, Sean; Krebs, Shelly J; Gomes, Michelle; Pandey, Shilpi; Sutton, William F; Burwitz, Benjamin J; Gray, Matthew; Robins, Harlan; Park, Byung S; Sacha, Jonah B; LaBranche, Celia C; Fuller, Deborah H; Montefiori, David C; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Sather, D Noah; Haigwood, Nancy L

    2016-04-01

    Advancement in immunogen selection and vaccine design that will rapidly elicit a protective Ab response is considered critical for HIV vaccine protective efficacy. Vaccine-elicited Ab responses must therefore have the capacity to prevent infection by neutralization-resistant phenotypes of transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses that establish infection in humans. Most vaccine candidates to date have been ineffective at generating Abs that neutralize T/F or early variants. In this study, we report that coimmunizing rhesus macaques with HIV-1 gp160 DNA and gp140 trimeric protein selected from native envelope gene sequences (envs) induced neutralizing Abs against Tier 2 autologous viruses expressing cognate envelope (Env). The Env immunogens were selected from envs emerging during the earliest stages of neutralization breadth developing within the first 2 years of infection in two clade B-infected human subjects. Moreover, the IgG responses in macaques emulated the targeting to specific regions of Env known to be associated with autologous and heterologous neutralizing Abs developed within the human subjects. Furthermore, we measured increasing affinity of macaque polyclonal IgG responses over the course of the immunization regimen that correlated with Tier 1 neutralization. In addition, we report firm correlations between Tier 2 autologous neutralization and Tier 1 heterologous neutralization, as well as overall TZM-bl breadth scores. Additionally, the activation of Env-specific follicular helper CD4 T cells in lymphocytes isolated from inguinal lymph nodes of vaccinated macaques correlated with Tier 2 autologous neutralization. These results demonstrate the potential for native Env derived from subjects at the time of neutralization broadening as effective HIV vaccine elements.

  6. Role of implant configurations supporting three-unit fixed partial denture on mandibular bone response: biological-data-based finite element study.

    PubMed

    Yoda, N; Liao, Z; Chen, J; Sasaki, K; Swain, M; Li, Q

    2016-09-01

    Implant-supported fixed partial denture with cantilever extension can transfer the excessive load to the bone around implants and stress/strain concentration potentially leading to bone resorption. This study investigated the effects of implant configurations supporting three-unit fixed partial denture (FPD) on the stress and strain distribution in the peri-implant bone by combining clinically measured time-dependent loading data and finite element (FE) analysis. A 3-dimensional mandibular model was constructed based on computed tomography (CT) images. Four different configurations of implants supporting 3-unit FPDs, namely three implant-supported FPD, conventional three-unit bridge FPD, distal cantilever FPD and mesial cantilever FPD, were modelled. The FPDs were virtually inserted to the molar area in the mandibular FE models. The FPDs were loaded according to time-dependent in vivo-measured 3-dimensional loading data during chewing. The von Mises stress (VMS) and equivalent strain (EQS) in peri-implant bone regions were evaluated as mechanical stimuli. During the chewing cycles, the regions near implant necks and bottom apexes experienced high VMS and EQS than the middle regions in all implant-supported FPD configurations. Higher VMS and EQS values were also observed at the implant neck region adjacent to the cantilever extension in the cantilevered configurations. The patient-specific dynamic loading data and CT-based reconstruction of full 3D mandibular allowed us to model the biomechanical responses more realistically. The results provided data for clinical assessment of implant configuration to improve longevity and reliability of the implant-supported FPD restoration. PMID:27224022

  7. In Their Own Words: Reasons Underlying the Achievement Striving of Students in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Minhye; Bong, Mimi

    2016-01-01

    By analyzing the open-ended reasons for studying generated by 3 different groups of Korean middle school students, we aimed to provide partial answers to current issues in achievement goal research that are difficult to resolve solely with the use of survey ratings. We categorized student responses using the achievement goal frameworks of Midgley…

  8. Laparoscopic partial splenic resection.

    PubMed

    Uranüs, S; Pfeifer, J; Schauer, C; Kronberger, L; Rabl, H; Ranftl, G; Hauser, H; Bahadori, K

    1995-04-01

    Twenty domestic pigs with an average weight of 30 kg were subjected to laparoscopic partial splenic resection with the aim of determining the feasibility, reliability, and safety of this procedure. Unlike the human spleen, the pig spleen is perpendicular to the body's long axis, and it is long and slender. The parenchyma was severed through the middle third, where the organ is thickest. An 18-mm trocar with a 60-mm Endopath linear cutter was used for the resection. The tissue was removed with a 33-mm trocar. The operation was successfully concluded in all animals. No capsule tears occurred as a result of applying the stapler. Optimal hemostasis was achieved on the resected edges in all animals. Although these findings cannot be extended to human surgery without reservations, we suggest that diagnostic partial resection and minor cyst resections are ideal initial indications for this minimally invasive approach.

  9. Density functional theory study of the γ-MnOOH (010) surface: Response to oxygen and water partial pressures and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxford, Gloria A. E.; Chaka, Anne M.

    2011-11-01

    Ab initio thermodynamics was combined with density functional theory calculations to identify stable γ-MnOOH (010) surface terminations in response to varying oxygen and water partial pressures. Within the range of accessible oxygen chemical potentials, reduced manganese atoms are not thermodynamically stable at the surface. Oxidation of the surface by addition of oxygen is favorable at oxygen chemical potentials typically found in experiments. Entropy drives the removal of H2 from the stoichiometric surface above 603 K under ambient conditions, in close agreement with the experimental decomposition temperature of 573 K. Molecular adsorption of water at half-monolayer and monolayer coverages is highly exothermic and significantly lowers the surface free energy of the clean surface. Dissociative adsorption of water is only possible at monolayer coverage, where it is stabilized by the formation of a hydrogen-bonding network on the surface. The most thermodynamically stable surfaces are oxidized surfaces, but the stoichiometric and fully hydrated surfaces may be accessible in experiments due to slow oxidation kinetics of the surface.

  10. Radiographic Progression of Patients With Psoriatic Arthritis Who Achieve Minimal Disease Activity in Response to Golimumab Therapy: Results Through 5 Years of a Randomized, Placebo‐Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    van der Heijde, Désirée; Beutler, Anna; Gladman, Dafna; Mease, Philip; Krueger, Gerald G.; McInnes, Iain B.; Helliwell, Philip; Coates, Laura C.; Xu, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate long‐term outcomes in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients who achieved or did not achieve minimal disease activity (MDA) through 5 years of golimumab treatment in the GO‐REVEAL trial. Methods The GO‐REVEAL trial was a phase III, randomized, double‐blind trial with placebo‐control through week 24 followed by an open‐label extension of golimumab 50/100 mg treatment up to 5 years. In these post‐hoc analyses, MDA was defined by the presence of ≥5 of 7 PsA outcome measures (≤1 swollen joint, ≤1 tender joint, Psoriasis Area and Severity Index [PASI] ≤1, patient pain score ≤15, patient global disease activity score ≤20 [range 0–100], Health Assessment Questionnaire disability index [HAQ DI] ≤0.5, and ≤1 tender enthesis point). Results Treatment with golimumab yielded significantly higher MDA response rates versus patients randomized to placebo at week 14 (23.5% versus 1.0%; P < 0.0001), week 24 (28.1% versus 7.7%; P < 0.0001), and week 52 (42.4% versus 30.2%; P = 0.037). MDA was achieved at least once by ∼50% of golimumab‐treated patients overall. Irrespective of treatment randomization, achievement of MDA at ≥3 and ≥4 consecutive visits was associated with significantly less radiographic progression and more improvement in MDA components allowing specific assessment of physical function (HAQ DI) and overall disease activity (patient global assessment of disease activity) at week 256 versus patients not achieving MDA. Logistic regression analyses indicated that a 1‐unit higher baseline HAQ DI score yielded a significantly lower likelihood of achieving MDA at ≥3 (odds ratio 0.514 [95% confidence interval 0.321–0.824]; P = 0.006) and ≥4 (odds ratio 0.480 [95% confidence interval 0.290–0.795]; P = 0.004) consecutive visits. Conclusion Among golimumab‐treated PsA patients, better long‐term functional improvement, patient global assessment, and radiographic outcomes were observed when

  11. Peptide immunization of guinea pigs against Chlamydia psittaci (GPIC agent) infection induces good vaginal secretion antibody response, in vitro neutralization and partial protection against live challenge.

    PubMed

    Volp, K; Mathews, S; Timms, P; Hafner, L

    2001-06-01

    Immunization of female guinea pigs with a chimeric peptide consisting of variable domain IV (VDIV) and a region known as GP8 from the major outer membrane protein of Chlamydophila caviae, formerly Chlamydia psittaci guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis strain, was performed to assess whether humoral immune responses could be elicited in the reproductive tracts of immunized animals. The C. caviae strain is able to cause a sexually transmitted infection in the guinea pig that closely parallels C. trachomatis infections in humans. The best anti-VDIV antibody response in vaginal secretions was achieved by intraperitoneal priming with subsequent intravaginal boosting (P < 0.001). Dot-blot analyses of vaginal secretions confirmed that these anti-VDIV antibodies, produced against a linear peptide, were able to recognize and bind to whole conformational C. caviae elementary bodies. Following live intravaginal challenge with C. caviae, a significant reduction in the intensity (P = 0.01) and an apparent reduction in the duration of the infection was evident between the guinea pigs immunized with VDIV-GP8 and non-immunized controls.

  12. Comparing Science Achievement Constructs: Targeted and Achieved

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrara, Steve; Duncan, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    This article illustrates how test specifications based solely on academic content standards, without attention to other cognitive skills and item response demands, can fall short of their targeted constructs. First, the authors inductively describe the science achievement construct represented by a statewide sixth-grade science proficiency test.…

  13. Bi-induced acceptor level responsible for partial compensation of native free electron density in InP1-x Bi x dilute bismide alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelczuk, Łukasz; Stokowski, Hubert; Kopaczek, Jan; Zhang, Liyao; Li, Yaoyao; Wang, Kai; Wang, Peng; Wang, Shumin; Kudrawiec, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) has been applied to study electron and hole traps in InPBi alloys with 2.2 and 2.4% Bi grown by molecular beam epitaxy. One donor-like trap with the activation energy of 0.45-0.47 eV and one acceptor-like trap with activation energy of 0.08 eV have been identified in DLTS measurements. For the reference sample (InP grown at the same temperature), the deep donor trap has also been observed, while the acceptor trap was not detected. According to the literature, the deep donor level found in InP(Bi) at 0.45-0.47 eV below the conduction band has been attributed to the isolated PIn defect, while the second trap, which is observed only for Bi containing samples at 0.08 eV above the valence band can be attributed to Bi clusters in InPBi. This acceptor level was proposed to be responsible for the observed partial compensation of native free electron density in InPBi layers. It is also shown that the deep donor traps are active in photoluminescence (PL). A strong radiative recombination between donor traps and the valence band are observed in PL spectra at energy 0.6-0.8 eV, i.e. ~0.47 eV below the energy gap of InPBi, which is determined by contactless electroreflectance.

  14. Physiological responses of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) to partial root-zone drying: ABA signalling, leaf gas exchange, and water use efficiency.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fulai; Shahnazari, Ali; Andersen, Mathias N; Jacobsen, Sven-Erik; Jensen, Christian R

    2006-01-01

    The physiological responses of potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Folva) to partial root-zone drying (PRD) were investigated in potted plants in a greenhouse (GH) and in plants grown in the field under an automatic rain-out-shelter. In the GH, irrigation was applied daily to the whole root system (FI), or to one-half of the root system while the other half was dried, for 9 d. In the field, the plants were drip irrigated either to the whole root system near field capacity (FI) or using 70% water of FI to one side of the roots, and shifted to the other side every 5-10 d (PRD). PRD plants had a similar midday leaf water potential to that of FI, whereas in the GH their root water potential (Psi(r)) was significantly lowered after 5 d. Stomatal conductance (g(s)) was more sensitive to PRD than photosynthesis (A) particularly in the field, leading to greater intrinsic water use efficiency (WUE) (i.e. A/g(s)) in PRD than in FI plants on several days. In PRD, the xylem sap abscisic acid concentration ([ABA](xylem)) increased exponentially with decreasing Psi(r); and the relative [ABA](xylem) (PRD/FI) increased exponentially as the fraction of transpirable soil water (FTSW) in the drying side decreased. In the field, the leaf area index was slightly less in PRD than in FI treatment, while tuber biomass was similar for the two treatments. Compared with FI, PRD treatment saved 30% water and increased crop water use efficiency (WUE) by 59%. Restrictions on leaf area expansion and g(s) by PRD-induced ABA signals might have contributed to reduced water use and increased WUE.

  15. TGF-α and IL-6 plasma levels selectively identify CML patients who fail to achieve an early molecular response or progress in the first year of therapy.

    PubMed

    Nievergall, E; Reynolds, J; Kok, C H; Watkins, D B; Biondo, M; Busfield, S J; Vairo, G; Fuller, K; Erber, W N; Sadras, T; Grose, R; Yeung, D T; Lopez, A F; Hiwase, D K; Hughes, T P; White, D L

    2016-06-01

    Early molecular response (EMR, BCR-ABL1 (IS)⩽10% at 3 months) is a strong predictor of outcome in imatinib-treated chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CP-CML) patients, but for patients who transform early, 3 months may be too late for effective therapeutic intervention. Here, we employed multiplex cytokine profiling of plasma samples to test newly diagnosed CP-CML patients who subsequently received imatinib treatment. A wide range of pro-inflammatory and angiogenesis-promoting cytokines, chemokines and growth factors were elevated in the plasma of CML patients compared with that of healthy donors. Most of these normalized after tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment while others remained high in remission samples. Importantly, we identified TGF-α and IL-6 as novel biomarkers with high diagnostic plasma levels strongly predictive of subsequent failure to achieve EMR and deep molecular response, as well as transformation to blast crisis and event-free survival. Interestingly, high TGF-α alone can also delineate a poor response group raising the possibility of a pathogenic role. This suggests that the incorporation of these simple measurements to the diagnostic work-up of CP-CML patients may enable therapy intensity to be individualized early according to the cytokine-risk profile of the patient. PMID:26898188

  16. Sex-ratio adjustment in response to local mate competition is achieved through an alteration of egg size in a haplodiploid spider mite.

    PubMed

    Macke, Emilie; Magalhães, Sara; Bach, Fabien; Olivieri, Isabelle

    2012-11-22

    Sex-ratio adjustments are commonly observed in haplodiploid species. However, the underlying proximate mechanisms remain elusive. We investigated these mechanisms in Tetranychus urticae, a haplodiploid spider mite known to adjust sex ratio in response to the level of local mate competition (LMC). In this species, egg size determines fertilization probability, with larger eggs being more likely to be fertilized, and thus become female. We explored the hypothesis that sex-ratio adjustment is achieved through adjustment of egg size. By using spider mites from a large population, we found that females produced not only a higher proportion of daughters under high levels of LMC, but also larger eggs. Moreover, in populations experimentally evolving under varying levels of LMC, both the proportion of females and the egg size increased with LMC intensity. These results suggest that sex-ratio adjustment in spider mites is mediated by egg size, although the causal relationship remains to be tested.

  17. The genetic and genomic background of multiple myeloma patients achieving complete response after induction therapy with bortezomib, thalidomide and dexamethasone (VTD)

    PubMed Central

    Terragna, Carolina; Remondini, Daniel; Martello, Marina; Zamagni, Elena; Pantani, Lucia; Patriarca, Francesca; Pezzi, Annalisa; Levi, Giuseppe; Offidani, Massimo; Proserpio, Ilaria; De Sabbata, Giovanni; Tacchetti, Paola; Cangialosi, Clotilde; Ciambelli, Fabrizio; Viganò, Clara Virginia; Dico, Flores Angela; Santacroce, Barbara; Borsi, Enrica; Brioli, Annamaria; Marzocchi, Giulia; Castellani, Gastone; Martinelli, Giovanni; Palumbo, Antonio; Cavo, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The prime focus of the current therapeutic strategy for Multiple Myeloma (MM) is to obtain an early and deep tumour burden reduction, up to the level of complete response (CR). To date, no description of the characteristics of the plasma cells (PC) prone to achieve CR has been reported. This study aimed at the molecular characterization of PC obtained at baseline from MM patients in CR after bortezomib-thalidomide-dexamethasone (VTD) first line therapy. One hundred and eighteen MM primary tumours obtained from homogeneously treated patients were profiled both for gene expression and for single nucleotide polymorphism genotype. Genomic results were used to obtain a predictor of sensitivity to VTD induction therapy, as well as to describe both the transcription and the genomic profile of PC derived from MM with subsequent optimal response to primary induction therapy. By analysing the gene profiles of CR patients, we identified a 5-gene signature predicting CR with an overall median accuracy of 75% (range: 72%–85%). In addition, we highlighted the differential expression of a series of genes, whose deregulation might explain patients' sensitivity to VTD therapy. We also showed that a small copy number loss, covering 606Kb on chromosome 1p22.1 was the most significantly associated with CR patients. PMID:26575327

  18. Multiwavelength Lidar Observation of the Atmospheric Response to the 20th March 2015 Partial Solar Eclipse in Rome Tor Vergata: Preliminary Results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberti, Gian Luigi; Dionisi, Davide; Federico, Stefano; Congeduti, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    This study reports some preliminary analyses of multichannel lidar measurements taken in Rome Tor Vergata (Italy) during the 20th March 2015 partial solar eclipse. The objective is assessing the capability of the instrument to document the effect of the eclipse in the lower troposphere, with a particular emphasis on the information content at relatively small temporal and spatial scales.

  19. A Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in cBIM Is Associated with a Slower Achievement of Major Molecular Response in Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia Treated with Imatinib

    PubMed Central

    Augis, Vanessa; Airiau, Kelly; Josselin, Marina; Turcq, Béatrice; Mahon, François-Xavier; Belloc, Francis

    2013-01-01

    Purpose BIM is essential for the response to tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKI) in chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) patients. Recently, a deletion polymorphism in intron 2 of the BIM gene was demonstrated to confer an intrinsic TKI resistance in Asian patients. The present study aimed at identifying mutations in the BIM sequence that could lead to imatinib resistance independently of BCR-ABL mutations. Experimental Design BIM coding sequence analysis was performed in 72 imatinib-treated CML patients from a French population of our centre and in 29 healthy controls (reference population) as a case-control study. Real-time quantitative PCR (RT qPCR) was performed to assess Bim expression in our reference population. Results No mutation with amino-acid change was found in the BIM coding sequence. However, we observed a silent single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) c465C>T (rs724710). A strong statistical link was found between the presence of the T allele and the high Sokal risk group (p = 0.0065). T allele frequency was higher in non responsive patients than in the reference population (p = 0.0049). Similarly, this T allele was associated with the mutation frequency on the tyrosine kinase domain of BCR-ABL (p<0.001) and the presence of the T allele significantly lengthened the time to achieve a major molecular response (MMR). Finally, the presence of the T allele was related to a decreased basal expression of the Bim mRNA in the circulating mononuclear cells of healthy controls. Conclusion These results suggest that the analysis of the c465C>T SNP of BIM could be useful for predicting the outcome of imatinib-treated CML patients. PMID:24223824

  20. Can repeat injection provide clinical benefit in patients with cervical disc herniation and stenosis when the first epidural injection results only in partial response?

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-07-01

    Epidural steroid injection (ESI) is known to be an effective treatment for neck or radicular pain due to herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD) and spinal stenosis (SS). Although repeat ESI has generally been indicated to provide more pain relief in partial responders after single ESI, there has been little evidence supporting the usefulness of this procedure. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to determine whether repeat ESI at a prescribed interval of 2 to 3 weeks after the first injection would provide greater clinical benefit in patients with partial pain reduction than intermittent ESI performed only when pain was aggravated. One hundred eighty-four patients who underwent transforaminal ESI (TFESI) for treatment of axial neck and radicular arm pain due to HIVD or SS and could be followed up for 1 year were enrolled. We divided the patients into 2 groups. Group A (N = 108) comprised partial responders (numeric rating scale (NRS) ≥ 3 after the first injection) who underwent repeat injection at a prescribed interval of 2 to 3 weeks after the first injection. Group B (N = 76) comprised partial responders who did not receive repeat injection at the prescribed interval, but received intermittent injections only for aggravation of pain. Various clinical data were assessed, including total number of injections during 1 year, NRS duration of <3 during 1 year (NRS < 3 duration), and time interval until pain was increased to require additional injections after repeat injection in Group A, or after first injection in Group B (time to reinjection). Groups A and B were compared in terms of total population, HIVD, and SS. In the whole population, HIVD subgroup, and SS subgroup, patients in Group A required significantly fewer injections to obtain satisfactory pain relief during the 1-year follow-up period. Group A showed a significantly longer time to reinjection and longer NRS < 3 than Group B did. Repeat TFESI conducted at 2- to 3-week intervals

  1. Assessment of Current Knowledge about the Effectiveness of School Desegregation Strategies. Volume V. A Review of the Empirical Research on Desegregation: Community Response, Race Relations, Academic Achievement and Resegregation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossell, Christine; And Others

    This literature review considers the impact of desegregation on community response, racial relations, academic achievement and resegregation. Chapter one examines the effectiveness of desegregation plans in reducing racial isolation and white flight, and in promoting a positive community response. Desegregation school practices and effects on…

  2. The mixed amphetamine salt extended release (Adderall XR, Max-XR) as an adjunctive to SSRIS or SNRIS in the treatment of adult ADHD patients with comorbid partially responsive generalized anxiety: an open-label study.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Adel

    2010-06-01

    To examine the changes in partially responsive anxiety symptoms utilizing adjunctive treatment with the mixed amphetamine salt extended release (Adderall XR, MAX-XR) in the treatment of adult ADHD patients, with comorbid refractory anxiety. Consenting adult patients (n = 32) with confirmed diagnosis of generalized anxiety (GA) and comorbid (ADHD) participated in this open-label study. All patients had significant comorbid anxiety symptoms (HAM-A > 7) and failed to respond to 8-week trials of Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) or Norepinephrine Reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). All patients were treated with the "Mixed Amphetamine salts Extended Release Adderall XR, (MAS-XR), as adjunctive to SSRIs or to SNRIs and were followed for at least 12 weeks. The primary effectiveness measure was the Clinical Global Impression severity subscale (CGI-S). Other scales included the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAM-A), the adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS-v1.1) symptom checklist, and Sheehan's disability scale. Baseline measures prior to the treatment with MAS-XR were compared to those at 4, 8, and at 12 weeks of treatment. Monitoring for pulse, blood pressure, and weight changes was carried out at baseline and at end point. All patients completed this open-label trial. There was significant and robust resolution of symptoms of all effectiveness measures, including the symptoms of anxiety, as shown by changes from baseline in HAM-A, ASRS-v1.1, and CGI at 8 weeks. Also there was significant reduction in the disability score at 12 weeks. Patients tolerated the treatment, and there were no significant cardiovascular changes at 12 weeks. There was decrease in mean weight at 12 weeks by 2.2 kg (P < .001). Mixed amphetamine salts MAS-XR can be used in adult patients with ADHD and comorbid anxiety symptoms. Larger controlled studies are needed to support the effectiveness of mixed amphetamine salts in patients with comorbid anxiety symptoms. Treatments need to include the targeting of the

  3. Urachal Carcinoma with Choroidal, Lung, Lymph Node, Adrenal, Mammary, and Bone Metastases and Peritoneal Carcinomatosis Showing Partial Response after Chemotherapy Treatment with a Modified Docetaxel, Cisplatin and 5-Fluorouracil Regimen

    PubMed Central

    Dekeister, Kathleen; Viguier, Jean Louis; Martin, Xavier; Nguyen, Anh Minh; Boyle, Helen; Flechon, Aude

    2016-01-01

    Urachal carcinoma (UC) is a rare tumor mainly affecting middle-aged males. Metastases occur most frequently in lymph nodes and the lungs. There are no standard adjuvant and metastatic treatments. We report the case of a 36-year-old female with UC treated with partial cystectomy who relapsed 3 years after surgery with left choroidal, lung, mediastinal lymph node, right adrenal, mammary, and bone metastases as well as peritoneal carcinomatosis. She obtained a partial response after 10 cycles of chemotherapy with a modified docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (mTPF) regimen. This is the first report on the use of the mTPF regimen in UC and on the existence of choroidal, adrenal, and mammary metastases. PMID:27194981

  4. User's guide to computer program CIVM-JET 4B to calculate the transient structural responses of partial and/or complete structural rings to engine-rotor-fragment impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stagliano, T. R.; Spilker, R. L.; Witmer, E. A.

    1976-01-01

    A user-oriented computer program CIVM-JET 4B is described to predict the large-deflection elastic-plastic structural responses of fragment impacted single-layer: (a) partial-ring fragment containment or deflector structure or (b) complete-ring fragment containment structure. These two types of structures may be either free or supported in various ways. Supports accommodated include: (1) point supports such as pinned-fixed, ideally-clamped, or supported by a structural branch simulating mounting-bracket structure and (2) elastic foundation support distributed over selected regions of the structure. The initial geometry of each partial or complete ring may be circular or arbitrarily curved; uniform or variable thicknesses of the structure are accommodated. The structural material is assumed to be initially isotropic; strain hardening and strain rate effects are taken into account.

  5. Plant and environment interactions: Growth and yield response of commercial bearing-age {open_quote}Casselman{close_quote} plum trees to various ozone partial pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Retzlaff, W.A.; Williams, L.E.; DeJong, T.M.

    1997-05-01

    Nursery stock of plum (Prunus salicina Lindel., cv. Casselman) was planted 1 Apr. 1988 in an experimental orchard at the Univ. of California Kearney Agricultural Center near Fresno, CA. Trees in this study were enclosed in open-top fumigation chambers on 1 May 1989, and exposed to three atmospheric ozone partial pressures (charcoal filtered air, ambient air, and ambient air + ozone) during the 1989 through 1992 growing seasons (typically 1 Apr. - 1 Nov.). A nonchamber treatment plot was used to assess chamber effects on tree performance. This study details the results of the exposures during the initial commercial bearing period (1991 through 1993) in this orchard. The mean 12-h (0800-2000 h Pacific Daylight Time [PDT]) ozone partial pressures during the experimental periods in the charcoal filtered, ambient, ambient + ozone, and nonchamber treatments averaged 0.031, 0.048, 0.091, and 0.056 {mu}Pa Pa{sup {minus}1} in 1991 and 1992, respectively. Fruit number per tree decreased as atmospheric ozone partial pressure increased from the charcoal filtered to ambient + ozone treatment, significantly affecting yield. Yield of plum trees averaged 23.6, 19.8, 13.7, and 17.9 kg tree{sup {minus}1} in 1991 and 1992 in the charcoal filtered, ambient, ambient + ozone, and nonchamber treatments, respectively. Only one out of the five original treatment plots was exposed to ozone treatments during the 1993 growing season. Yield of plum trees in this single replicate in 1993 was reduced by increased atmospheric ozone partial pressure. Yield of plum trees in the four remaining unexposed treatment plots in 1993 was 16.7, 17.9, and 16.0 kg tree{sup {minus}1} in the previous charcoal filtered, ambient, and ambient + ozone treatments respectively. The similarity in yield of the post-chamber treatments indicates that a change in air quality in the current growing season can affect yield of Casselman plum trees. 26 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Partial (focal) seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jacksonian seizure; Seizure - partial (focal); Temporal lobe seizure; Epilepsy - partial seizures ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff ... Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 101. ...

  7. Partial tooth gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A partial gear bearing including an upper half, comprising peak partial teeth, and a lower, or bottom, half, comprising valley partial teeth. The upper half also has an integrated roller section between each of the peak partial teeth with a radius equal to the gear pitch radius of the radially outwardly extending peak partial teeth. Conversely, the lower half has an integrated roller section between each of the valley half teeth with a radius also equal to the gear pitch radius of the peak partial teeth. The valley partial teeth extend radially inwardly from its roller section. The peak and valley partial teeth are exactly out of phase with each other, as are the roller sections of the upper and lower halves. Essentially, the end roller bearing of the typical gear bearing has been integrated into the normal gear tooth pattern.

  8. The Relationship between Reading Response Journals as an Intervention and Reading Achievement of Fourth and Fifth Graders in a Suburban School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hume, Julie M.

    2013-01-01

    Many of today's students are reading below grade level and schools are investigating methods for increasing student achievement in the area of reading. This mixed method research study investigated the achievement of students who were reading below grade level. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between reading response…

  9. Landsliding in partially saturated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godt, Jonathan W.; Baum, Rex L.; Lu, Ning

    2009-01-01

    Rainfall-induced landslides are pervasive in hillslope environments around the world and among the most costly and deadly natural hazards. However, capturing their occurrence with scientific instrumentation in a natural setting is extremely rare. The prevailing thinking on landslide initiation, particularly for those landslides that occur under intense precipitation, is that the failure surface is saturated and has positive pore-water pressures acting on it. Most analytic methods used for landslide hazard assessment are based on the above perception and assume that the failure surface is located beneath a water table. By monitoring the pore water and soil suction response to rainfall, we observed shallow landslide occurrence under partially saturated conditions for the first time in a natural setting. We show that the partially saturated shallow landslide at this site is predictable using measured soil suction and water content and a novel unified effective stress concept for partially saturated earth materials.

  10. Landsliding in partially saturated materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godt, J.W.; Baum, R.L.; Lu, N.

    2009-01-01

    [1] Rainfall-induced landslides are pervasive in hillslope environments around the world and among the most costly and deadly natural hazards. However, capturing their occurrence with scientific instrumentation in a natural setting is extremely rare. The prevailing thinking on landslide initiation, particularly for those landslides that occur under intense precipitation, is that the failure surface is saturated and has positive pore-water pressures acting on it. Most analytic methods used for landslide hazard assessment are based on the above perception and assume that the failure surface is located beneath a water table. By monitoring the pore water and soil suction response to rainfall, we observed shallow landslide occurrence under partially saturated conditions for the first time in a natural setting. We show that the partially saturated shallow landslide at this site is predictable using measured soil suction and water content and a novel unified effective stress concept for partially saturated earth materials. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Growth and yield responses of crops and macronutrient balance influenced by commercial organic manure used as a partial substitute for chemical fertilizers in an intensive vegetable cropping system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, H. J.; Ye, Z. Q.; Zhang, X. L.; Lin, X. Y.; Ni, W. Z.

    A long-term field experiment was conducted with an annual rotation of tomato-radish-pakchoi to assess the effects of a commercial organic manure (COM) used as a partial substitute for chemical fertilizers on crop yield and nutrient balance in an intensive vegetable cropping system. Four treatments as chemical fertilizers (T1), chemical fertilizers + lower rate of COM (T2), chemical fertilizers + medium rate of COM (T3), and chemical fertilizers + high rate of COM (T4) were designed in the present experiment. The supplied doses of N, P, and K were equal for all treatments. Results showed that there were no significant differences in shoot biomass and market yields of tomato, radish and pakchoi among treatments ( P > 0.05). It was found that positive P and K balance existed in the tomato-radish-pakchoi cropping system of all treatments. Compared with no manure treatment (T1), application of medium rate of COM (T3) decreased N, P runoff losses, increased N, P, K contents in crop tissues except N, P in pakchoi shoot, and lessened P, K accumulation in soils, accordingly, improved the efficiency of macronutrient. It was concluded that appropriate COM used as a partial substitute for chemical fertilizers could not only meet the crops’ nutrient requirement, but also improved the efficiency of macronutrient and remained positive balance of P and K in the intensive tomato-radish-pakchoi cropping system, which can be regarded as an effective measure for a contribution towards sustainable agriculture and a control pathway for reducing the potential risk of castoff to water environment.

  12. High temporal resolution functional MRI with partial separability model.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Giang-Chau; Holtrop, Joseph L; Fu, Maojing; Lam, Fan; Sutton, Bradley P

    2015-01-01

    Even though the hemodynamic response is a slow phenomenon, high temporal resolution in functional fMRI can enable better differentiation between the signal of interest and physiological noise or increase the statistical power of functional studies. To increase the temporal resolution, several methods have been developed to decrease the repetition time, TR, such as simultaneous multi-slice imaging and MR encephalography approaches. In this work, a method using a fast acquisition and a partial separability model is presented to achieve a multi-slice fMRI protocol at a temporal resolution of 75 ms. The method is demonstrated on a visual block task. PMID:26738022

  13. Interleukin-1beta partially alleviates cyclosporin A-induced suppression of IgG1 isotype response to thyroglobulin in BALB/c mice in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Dalai, S K; Miriyala, B; Kar, S K

    1998-01-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) at 120 mg/kg body weight when injected subcutaneously into BALB/c mice along with thyroglobulin emulsified in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) was found to suppress antigen-specific IgG titre by 86%. Isotyping revealed that both IgG1 and IgG2a titres were suppressed by 87% and 57%, respectively. But under identical conditions when complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) was used, the suppression of antigen-specific IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a titres was 50%, 51% and 55%, respectively. Injection of anti-IL-1beta-neutralizing hamster monoclonal antibodies along with thyroglobulin and CsA emulsified in CFA increased the suppression of antigen-specific IgG titre. Under such conditions the IgG1 titre was suppressed more than the IgG2a titre. Recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (rhuIL-1ra) also enhanced the suppression caused by CsA in the presence of CFA but control hamster immunoglobulin had no such effect. Recombinant human IL-1beta, when administered along with thyroglobulin and CsA emulsified in IFA, alleviated the suppression of antigen-specific IgG titre and the IgG1 titre was alleviated more than the IgG2a titre. Under identical conditions, rhuIL-1ra did not alleviate CsA-induced suppression. Lymphocytes from the lymph nodes of thyroglobulin-sensitized BALB/c mice when stimulated in vitro by thyroglobulin in the presence of CsA, secreted very little interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and IL-4, but on addition of an optimal dose of rhuIL-1beta, IFN-gamma and IL-4 secretion was partially restored. PMID:9767461

  14. Glycoinositol phospholipids from American Leishmania and Trypanosoma spp: partial characterization of the glycan cores and the human humoral immune response to them.

    PubMed Central

    Avila, J L; Rojas, M; Acosta, A

    1991-01-01

    The glycoinositol phospholipid (GIPL) profiles of American Leishmania spp. (L. mexicana and L. braziliensis), Leishmania donovani, and American Trypanosoma spp. (T. cruzi and T. rangeli) were compared. The major GIPLs in these parasites include tetraglycosyl-, pentaglycosyl-, and hexaglycosylphosphatidylinositol. These were partially identified by their comigration by high-performance thin-layer chromatography with purified L. major GIPLs, gas-liquid chromatography of the monosaccharides released after aqueous HF treatment, N-acetylation and methanolysis, sensitivity to exoglycosidases, and antibody absorption on several specific natural haptens. Members of the genus Leishmania have two other highly polar glycolipids, while the T. rangeli glycolipid profile was quite different from those of other kinetoplastids that were studied. On a weight basis, the glycan core of L. major GIPL-1 is the most reactive, followed by GIPL-3 and GIPL-2. Antibodies to the core glycans of GIPL-1, GIPL-2, and GIPL-3 were present at a low titer in the serum of every normal individual studied, while elevated GIPL-2 antibody levels were present in 80 to 100% of T. cruzi-, T. rangeli-, or L. donovani-infected patients, with lower values being found for GIPL-3 (30 to 60%) and GIPL-1 (30 to 50%). Except for GIPL-2 antibodies, which were mainly located on immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM, GIPL-1 and GIPL-3 antibodies were mainly distributed in IgM, with lower reactivity present in IgG. Antigen-antibody binding was very selectively blocked with Gal(alpha 1-3)Man, or Gal(beta 1-4)Man, Gal(alpha 1-3)Gal, and Gal(alpha 1-6)Gal for GIPL-1, GIPL-2, and GIPL-3 antibodies, respectively. Images PMID:1719024

  15. A Core MYC Gene Expression Signature Is Prominent in Basal-Like Breast Cancer but Only Partially Overlaps the Core Serum Response

    PubMed Central

    Chandriani, Sanjay; Frengen, Eirik; Cowling, Victoria H.; Pendergrass, Sarah A.; Perou, Charles M.; Whitfield, Michael L.; Cole, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Background The MYC oncogene contributes to induction and growth of many cancers but the full spectrum of the MYC transcriptional response remains unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings Using microarrays, we conducted a detailed kinetic study of genes that respond to MYCN or MYCNΔMBII induction in primary human fibroblasts. In parallel, we determined the response to steady state overexpression of MYCN and MYCNΔMBII in the same cell type. An overlapping set of 398 genes from the two protocols was designated a ‘Core MYC Signature’ and used for further analysis. Comparison of the Core MYC Signature to a published study of the genes induced by serum stimulation revealed that only 7.4% of the Core MYC Signature genes are in the Core Serum Response and display similar expression changes to both MYC and serum. Furthermore, more than 50% of the Core MYC Signature genes were not influenced by serum stimulation. In contrast, comparison to a panel of breast cancers revealed a strong concordance in gene expression between the Core MYC Signature and the basal-like breast tumor subtype, which is a subtype with poor prognosis. This concordance was supported by the higher average level of MYC expression in the same tumor samples. Conclusions/Significance The Core MYC Signature has clinical relevance as this profile can be used to deduce an underlying genetic program that is likely to contribute to a clinical phenotype. Therefore, the presence of the Core MYC Signature may predict clinical responsiveness to therapeutics that are designed to disrupt MYC-mediated phenotypes. PMID:19690609

  16. Teacher Attitudes on Personal Teaching Efficacy and Responsive Teaching, and Principal Leadership Behaviors in the Areas of Leader Social Relationships, Leadership/Goal Setting, and Collaboration for Learning in Low Wealth, Low and High Achieving Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levey, Eliana K.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether middle school teacher attitudes on personal teaching efficacy and responsive teaching and their descriptions of their principal's leadership behaviors in the areas of leader social relationships, leadership/goal setting, and collaboration for learning differ for high- and low-achieving Grade 8…

  17. Achievement and High School Completion Rates of Hispanic Students with No English Language Skills Compared to Hispanic Students with Some English Language Skills Attending the Same High School in an Immigrant Responsive City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Joanne M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine achievement and high school completion rates of Hispanic students (n = 13) with no English language skills compared to Hispanic students (n = 11) with some English language skills attending the same high school in an immigrant responsive city. All students were in attendance in the research school…

  18. Effects of Computer-Based Early-Reading Academic Learning Time on Early-Reading Achievement: A Dose-Response Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heuston, Edward Benjamin Hull

    2010-01-01

    Academic learning time (ALT) has long had the theoretical underpinnings sufficient to claim a causal relationship with academic achievement, but to this point empirical evidence has been lacking. This dearth of evidence has existed primarily due to difficulties associated with operationalizing ALT in traditional educational settings. Recent…

  19. Using Design To Achieve Sustainability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainability is defined as meeting the needs of this generation without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. This is a conditional statement that places the responsibility for achieving sustainability squarely in hands of designers and planners....

  20. Calcification and Growth of the Marine Coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi in Response to Elevated Partial Pressure of Carbon Dioxide and Low Phosphate Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, D. N.; Fabry, V. J.; Dickson, A. G.

    2004-12-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is expected to reach about 780 ppm by the year 2100, under the IS92a business-as-usual scenario. This expected increase will give rise to more than a threefold increase in surface ocean CO2 concentration, cause a drop in surface seawater pH of 0.4 units, and decrease the carbonate ion concentration by 55%, relative to pre-industrial values. Previous work demonstrated that the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi shows a marked decrease in calcification rates in response to elevated CO2 under nutrient-replete and nitrogen-limited conditions. Here we investigate the response of E. huxleyi to increased pCO2 under phosphate limitation. Results from laboratory and mesocosm experiments indicate that E. huxleyi can outcompete other phytoplankton in communities that are under phosphate control. Moreover, E. huxleyi has higher calcification rates under phosphate limitation, and model studies suggest that low phosphate levels are necessary for E. huxleyi to form dense blooms in the NE Atlantic. We grew E. huxleyi cells in 8-L closed systems under low phosphate conditions at present day and elevated pCO2 concentrations. Cell growth, particulate inorganic carbon, particulate organic carbon, total alkalinity and total dissolved inorganic carbon were measured over time. Results will be discussed in relation to predicted changes in the oceanic CO2/carbonate system.

  1. A novel recombinant Leishmania donovani p45, a partial coding region of methionine aminopeptidase, generates protective immunity by inducing a Th1 stimulatory response against experimental visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Reema; Kushawaha, Pramod K; Tripathi, Chandra Dev Pati; Sundar, Shyam; Dube, Anuradha

    2012-05-01

    The development of a vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis (VL) conferring long-lasting immunity remains a challenge. Identification and proteomic characterization of parasite proteins led to the detection of p45, a member of the methionine aminopeptidase family. To our knowledge the present study is the first known report that describes the molecular and immunological characterization of p45. Recombinant Leishmania donovani p45 (rLdp45) induced cellular responses in cured hamsters and generated Th1-type cytokines from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of cured/endemic VL patients. Immunization with rLdp45 exerted considerable prophylactic efficacy (∼85%) supported by an increase in mRNA expression of iNOS, IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-12 and decrease in TGF-β and IL-4, indicating its potential as a vaccine candidate against VL.

  2. How Much Is Enough? Minimal Responses of Water Quality and Stream Biota to Partial Retrofit Stormwater Management in a Suburban Neighborhood

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Allison H.; Rhea, Lee K.; Mayer, Audrey L.; Shuster, William D.; Beaulieu, Jake J.; Hopton, Matthew E.; Morrison, Matthew A.; St. Amand, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Decentralized stormwater management approaches (e.g., biofiltration swales, pervious pavement, green roofs, rain gardens) that capture, detain, infiltrate, and filter runoff are now commonly used to minimize the impacts of stormwater runoff from impervious surfaces on aquatic ecosystems. However, there is little research on the effectiveness of retrofit, parcel-scale stormwater management practices for improving downstream aquatic ecosystem health. A reverse auction was used to encourage homeowners to mitigate stormwater on their property within the suburban, 1.8 km2 Shepherd Creek catchment in Cincinnati, Ohio (USA). In 2007–2008, 165 rain barrels and 81 rain gardens were installed on 30% of the properties in four experimental (treatment) subcatchments, and two additional subcatchments were maintained as controls. At the base of the subcatchments, we sampled monthly baseflow water quality, and seasonal (5×/year) physical habitat, periphyton assemblages, and macroinvertebrate assemblages in the streams for the three years before and after treatment implementation. Given the minor reductions in directly connected impervious area from the rain barrel installations (11.6% to 10.4% in the most impaired subcatchment) and high total impervious levels (13.1% to 19.9% in experimental subcatchments), we expected minor or no responses of water quality and biota to stormwater management. There were trends of increased conductivity, iron, and sulfate for control sites, but no such contemporaneous trends for experimental sites. The minor effects of treatment on streamflow volume and water quality did not translate into changes in biotic health, and the few periphyton and macroinvertebrate responses could be explained by factors not associated with the treatment (e.g., vegetation clearing, drought conditions). Improvement of overall stream health is unlikely without additional treatment of major impervious surfaces (including roads, apartment buildings, and parking lots

  3. How much is enough? Minimal responses of water quality and stream biota to partial retrofit stormwater management in a suburban neighborhood.

    PubMed

    Roy, Allison H; Rhea, Lee K; Mayer, Audrey L; Shuster, William D; Beaulieu, Jake J; Hopton, Matthew E; Morrison, Matthew A; St Amand, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Decentralized stormwater management approaches (e.g., biofiltration swales, pervious pavement, green roofs, rain gardens) that capture, detain, infiltrate, and filter runoff are now commonly used to minimize the impacts of stormwater runoff from impervious surfaces on aquatic ecosystems. However, there is little research on the effectiveness of retrofit, parcel-scale stormwater management practices for improving downstream aquatic ecosystem health. A reverse auction was used to encourage homeowners to mitigate stormwater on their property within the suburban, 1.8 km(2) Shepherd Creek catchment in Cincinnati, Ohio (USA). In 2007-2008, 165 rain barrels and 81 rain gardens were installed on 30% of the properties in four experimental (treatment) subcatchments, and two additional subcatchments were maintained as controls. At the base of the subcatchments, we sampled monthly baseflow water quality, and seasonal (5×/year) physical habitat, periphyton assemblages, and macroinvertebrate assemblages in the streams for the three years before and after treatment implementation. Given the minor reductions in directly connected impervious area from the rain barrel installations (11.6% to 10.4% in the most impaired subcatchment) and high total impervious levels (13.1% to 19.9% in experimental subcatchments), we expected minor or no responses of water quality and biota to stormwater management. There were trends of increased conductivity, iron, and sulfate for control sites, but no such contemporaneous trends for experimental sites. The minor effects of treatment on streamflow volume and water quality did not translate into changes in biotic health, and the few periphyton and macroinvertebrate responses could be explained by factors not associated with the treatment (e.g., vegetation clearing, drought conditions). Improvement of overall stream health is unlikely without additional treatment of major impervious surfaces (including roads, apartment buildings, and parking lots

  4. Cholera toxin partially inhibits the T-cell response to phytohaemagglutinin through the ADP-ribosylation of a 45 kDa membrane protein.

    PubMed Central

    Nel, A E; Vandenplas, M; Wooten, M M; Cooper, R; Vandenplas, S; Rheeder, A; Daniels, J

    1988-01-01

    This study examines the influence of cholera toxin (CT) on T lymphocyte activation by the mitogenic lectin phytohaemagglutinin (PHA). CT suppressed lectin-induced [3H]thymidine uptake in a dose-dependent fashion and acted synergistically with PHA in the generation of intracellular cyclic AMP. The toxin was assumed to act on Gs, because it also stimulated ADP-ribosylation of a 45 kDa membrane protein in vitro; no additional substrates were seen. The inhibitory effect of the adenylate cyclase/cyclic AMP pathway was shown to be directed at a concomitant stimulatory pathway, namely inositol phospholipid turnover. Lectin-stimulated 32P incorporation into both phosphatidylinositol as well as its 4,5-biphosphate derivative was depressed in the presence of CT or exogenous dibutyryl cyclic AMP. This, in turn, was associated with reduced activation of C-kinase as determined by decreased lectin-induced translocation from the cytosol to the surface membrane. These results indicate that Gs probably acts as a transducer between the PHA receptor and adenylate cyclase and may give rise to an exaggerated adenylate cyclase response in the presence of CT. It would seem as if reduction in inositol phospholipid turnover is related to the elevation of cyclic AMP rather than a CT effect on a putative transducer which acts directly on phospholipase C. Our study does not exclude the existence of non-CT-sensitive transducers in this capacity. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:2851989

  5. Replication-attenuated Human Adenoviral Type 4 vectors elicit capsid dependent enhanced innate immune responses that are partially dependent upon interactions with the complement system

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Zachary C.; Appledorn, Daniel M.; Serra, Delila; Glass, Oliver; Mendelson, Todd; Clay, Timothy M.; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Human Adenovirus Type 4 (HAdV-4) is responsible for epidemic outbreaks of Acute Respiratory Disease (especially in military recruits), and is known to cause significant morbidity with several reported cases of mortality. However, we do not understand why this serotype causes such high morbidity, and have little insight into the immunobiology of HAdV-4 infections. We have now developed a replication attenuated HAdV-4 vector system, and through it, demonstrate that HAdV-4 virions have enhanced infectivity of certain cell types and reveal aspects of the serotype-specific heightened innate immunogenicity of infectious HAdV-4 capsids both in vitro and in vivo. We further found that elements of this serotype-specific immunogenicity were dependent upon interactions with the complement system. These findings provide insights into the mechanisms possibly underlying the known morbidity accompanying wild-type HAdV-4 infections as well as highlight important considerations when considering development of alternative serotype vectors. PMID:18280530

  6. Macrophages transfer antigens to dendritic cells by releasing exosomes containing dead-cell-associated antigens partially through a ceramide-dependent pathway to enhance CD4(+) T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yingping; Liu, Yi; Yang, Chunqing; Kang, Li; Wang, Meixiang; Hu, Jingxia; He, Hao; Song, Wengang; Tang, Hua

    2016-10-01

    Defects in rapid clearance of apoptotic cells lead to an accumulation of dead cells (late apoptotic or secondary necrotic cells), which results in an aberrant immune response. However, little is known about whether and how macrophages (Mφs) cooperate with dendritic cells (DCs) in the presentation of dead-cell-associated antigens in this process. By transferring high numbers of dead cells to mimic a failure of apoptotic cell clearance in vivo, we found that Mφs and neutrophils were the predominant phagocytes in the uptake of dead cells in the spleen. Moreover, both Mφs and DCs were required for an optimal CD4(+) T-cell response triggered by dead-cell-associated antigens. Importantly, although Mφs alone had a poor capacity for antigen presentation, they could transfer phagocytosed antigens to DCs for potent antigen presentation to enhance T-cell responses. Finally, we found that exosomes released from Mφs acted as a transmitter to convey antigens to DCs partially in a ceramide-dependent manner, since treatment with the neutral sphingomyelinase inhibitor GW4869 and spiroepoxide resulted in a significant reduction of T-cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. These findings point to a novel pathway of cross-talk between Mφs and DCs, which will be helpful to explain possible mechanisms for autoimmune diseases characterized by increased rates of apoptosis. PMID:27278624

  7. Macrophages transfer antigens to dendritic cells by releasing exosomes containing dead-cell-associated antigens partially through a ceramide-dependent pathway to enhance CD4(+) T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yingping; Liu, Yi; Yang, Chunqing; Kang, Li; Wang, Meixiang; Hu, Jingxia; He, Hao; Song, Wengang; Tang, Hua

    2016-10-01

    Defects in rapid clearance of apoptotic cells lead to an accumulation of dead cells (late apoptotic or secondary necrotic cells), which results in an aberrant immune response. However, little is known about whether and how macrophages (Mφs) cooperate with dendritic cells (DCs) in the presentation of dead-cell-associated antigens in this process. By transferring high numbers of dead cells to mimic a failure of apoptotic cell clearance in vivo, we found that Mφs and neutrophils were the predominant phagocytes in the uptake of dead cells in the spleen. Moreover, both Mφs and DCs were required for an optimal CD4(+) T-cell response triggered by dead-cell-associated antigens. Importantly, although Mφs alone had a poor capacity for antigen presentation, they could transfer phagocytosed antigens to DCs for potent antigen presentation to enhance T-cell responses. Finally, we found that exosomes released from Mφs acted as a transmitter to convey antigens to DCs partially in a ceramide-dependent manner, since treatment with the neutral sphingomyelinase inhibitor GW4869 and spiroepoxide resulted in a significant reduction of T-cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. These findings point to a novel pathway of cross-talk between Mφs and DCs, which will be helpful to explain possible mechanisms for autoimmune diseases characterized by increased rates of apoptosis.

  8. Metabolic and enzymatic changes associated with carbon mobilization, utilization and replenishment triggered in grain amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus) in response to partial defoliation by mechanical injury or insect herbivory

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Amaranthus cruentus and A. hypochondriacus are crop plants grown for grain production in subtropical countries. Recently, the generation of large-scale transcriptomic data opened the possibility to study representative genes of primary metabolism to gain a better understanding of the biochemical mechanisms underlying tolerance to defoliation in these species. A multi-level approach was followed involving gene expression analysis, enzyme activity and metabolite measurements. Results Defoliation by insect herbivory (HD) or mechanical damage (MD) led to a rapid and transient reduction of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) in all tissues examined. This correlated with a short-term induction of foliar sucrolytic activity, differential gene expression of a vacuolar invertase and its inhibitor, and induction of a sucrose transporter gene. Leaf starch in defoliated plants correlated negatively with amylolytic activity and expression of a β-amylase-1 gene and positively with a soluble starch synthase gene. Fatty-acid accumulation in roots coincided with a high expression of a phosphoenolpyruvate/phosphate transporter gene. In all tissues there was a long-term replenishment of most metabolite pools, which allowed damaged plants to maintain unaltered growth and grain yield. Promoter analysis of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and vacuolar invertase genes indicated the presence of cis-regulatory elements that supported their responsiveness to defoliation. HD and MD had differential effects on transcripts, enzyme activities and metabolites. However, the correlation between transcript abundance and enzymatic activities was very limited. A better correlation was found between enzymes, metabolite levels and growth and reproductive parameters. Conclusions It is concluded that a rapid reduction of NSC reserves in leaves, stems and roots followed by their long-term recovery underlies tolerance to defoliation in grain amaranth. This requires the coordinate action of genes

  9. Toxic responses of medaka, d-rR strain, to polychlorinated naphthalene mixtures after embryonic exposure by in ovo nanoinjection: A partial life- cycle assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Villalobos, Sergio A.; Papoulias, D.M.; Meadows, J.; Blankenship, Alan L.; Pastva, Stephanie D.; Kannan, K.; Hinton, D.E.; Tillitt, D.E.; Giesy, J.P.

    2000-01-01

    Polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) are organic compounds with some chemical properties and uses similar to polychlorinated biphenyls. Polychlorinated naphthalenes have been detected in biota from certain aquatic environments. The toxicities of several PCN technical mixtures (Halowax) to medaka (Oryzias latipes) were determined by use of an embryo nanoinjection method. Medaka eggs (early gastrula) were injected with 0.5 nl of triolein (vehicle control) or 0.5 nl of four to five graded doses (0.3-30 ng/egg) of Halowax 1014, Halowax 1013, or Halowax 1051 in triolein. Following exposure, embryos developed, and fry were reared to sexual maturity (4 months), at which time they were euthanized. Responses were evaluated as early life stage (ELS) and early adult life stage (EALS) assessments. For ELS, lethality and sublethal alterations in embryos and larvae (<16 d old), such as craniofacial, cardiovascular, and myoskeletal deformities and abnormal or delayed hatch, were monitored for the first 9 d, and a dose severity index was computed. The EALS assessment examined the survival of 16-d-old larvae until early adulthood (123 ?? 3 d old), including gonadosomatic index (GSI) and morphometry. Halowax 1014 was found to be the most toxic mixture (LD50 4.2 ng/egg), whereas Halowax 1013 and 1051 were significantly less toxic (LD50s could not be determined). The gonadosomatic index of females was significantly less in fish dosed with Halowax 1014 or 1051. The LD50 for medaka embryos nanoinjected with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is about 0.75 pg/egg. Thus, Halowax 1014 was 5,585-fold less potent than TCDD. For Halowax 1014, ELS assessments accurately predicted the results of EALS assessments.

  10. Twisted partially pure spinors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Rafael; Tellez, Ivan

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the relationship between orthogonal complex structures and pure spinors, we define twisted partially pure spinors in order to characterize spinorially subspaces of Euclidean space endowed with a complex structure.

  11. Public School Response to Special Education Vouchers: The Impact of Florida's McKay Scholarship Program on Disability Diagnosis and Student Achievement in Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Marcus A.; Greene, Jay P.

    2011-01-01

    The authors expand on research evaluating public school response to school choice policies by considering the particular influence of voucher programs for disabled students--a growing type of choice program that may have different implications for public school systems from those of more conventional choice programs. The authors provide a…

  12. Applying New Methods to the Measurement of Fidelity of Implementation: Examining the Critical Ingredients of the Responsive Classroom Approach in Relation to Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abry, Tashia D. S.; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.; Larsen, Ross A.; Brewer, Alix J.

    2011-01-01

    The present study examines data collected during the second year of a three-year longitudinal cluster randomized controlled trial, the Responsive Classroom Efficacy Study (RCES). In the context of and RCT, the research questions address naturally occurring variability in the independent variables of interest (i.e., teachers' (fidelity of…

  13. Graded Achievement, Tested Achievement, and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-eight studies of grades, over a century, were reviewed using the argument-based approach to validity suggested by Kane as a theoretical framework. The review draws conclusions about the meaning of graded achievement, its relation to tested achievement, and changes in the construct of graded achievement over time. "Graded…

  14. A Potential Cost Effective Liquefaction Mitigation Countermeasure: Induced Partial Saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Bian Hanbing; Jia Yun; Shahrour, Isam

    2008-07-08

    This work is devoted to illustrate the potential liquefaction mitigation countermeasure: Induced Partial Saturation. Firstly the potential liquefaction mitigation method is briefly introduced. Then the numerical model for partially saturated sandy soil is presented. At last the dynamic responses of liquefiable free filed with different water saturation is given. It shows that the induced partial saturation is efficiency for preventing the liquefaction.

  15. Protective T Cell and Antibody Immune Responses against Hepatitis C Virus Achieved Using a Biopolyester-Bead-Based Vaccine Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Donato, G; Piniella, B; Aguilar, D; Olivera, S; Pérez, A; Castañedo, Y; Alvarez-Lajonchere, L; Dueñas-Carrera, S; Lee, J W; Burr, N; Gonzalez-Miro, M; Rehm, B H A

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major worldwide problem. Chronic hepatitis C is recognized as one of the major causes of cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver failure. Although new, directly acting antiviral therapies are suggested to overcome the low efficacy and adverse effects observed for the current standard of treatment, an effective vaccine would be the only way to certainly eradicate HCV infection. Recently, polyhydroxybutyrate beads produced by engineered Escherichia coli showed efficacy as a vaccine delivery system. Here, an endotoxin-free E. coli strain (ClearColi) was engineered to produce polyhydroxybutyrate beads displaying the core antigen on their surface (Beads-Core) and their immunogenicity was evaluated in BALB/c mice. Immunization with Beads-Core induced gamma interferon (IFN-γ) secretion and a functional T cell immune response against the HCV Core protein. With the aim to target broad T and B cell determinants described for HCV, Beads-Core mixed with HCV E1, E2, and NS3 recombinant proteins was also evaluated in BALB/c mice. Remarkably, only three immunization with Beads-Core+CoE1E2NS3/Alum (a mixture of 0.1 μg Co.120, 16.7 μg E1.340, 16.7 μg E2.680, and 10 μg NS3 adjuvanted in aluminum hydroxide [Alum]) induced a potent antibody response against E1 and E2 and a broad IFN-γ secretion and T cell response against Core and all coadministered antigens. This immunological response mediated protective immunity to viremia as assessed in a viral surrogate challenge model. Overall, it was shown that engineered biopolyester beads displaying foreign antigens are immunogenic and might present a particulate delivery system suitable for vaccination against HCV.

  16. Protective T Cell and Antibody Immune Responses against Hepatitis C Virus Achieved Using a Biopolyester-Bead-Based Vaccine Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Piniella, B.; Aguilar, D.; Olivera, S.; Pérez, A.; Castañedo, Y.; Alvarez-Lajonchere, L.; Dueñas-Carrera, S.; Lee, J. W.; Burr, N.; Gonzalez-Miro, M.; Rehm, B. H. A.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major worldwide problem. Chronic hepatitis C is recognized as one of the major causes of cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver failure. Although new, directly acting antiviral therapies are suggested to overcome the low efficacy and adverse effects observed for the current standard of treatment, an effective vaccine would be the only way to certainly eradicate HCV infection. Recently, polyhydroxybutyrate beads produced by engineered Escherichia coli showed efficacy as a vaccine delivery system. Here, an endotoxin-free E. coli strain (ClearColi) was engineered to produce polyhydroxybutyrate beads displaying the core antigen on their surface (Beads-Core) and their immunogenicity was evaluated in BALB/c mice. Immunization with Beads-Core induced gamma interferon (IFN-γ) secretion and a functional T cell immune response against the HCV Core protein. With the aim to target broad T and B cell determinants described for HCV, Beads-Core mixed with HCV E1, E2, and NS3 recombinant proteins was also evaluated in BALB/c mice. Remarkably, only three immunization with Beads-Core+CoE1E2NS3/Alum (a mixture of 0.1 μg Co.120, 16.7 μg E1.340, 16.7 μg E2.680, and 10 μg NS3 adjuvanted in aluminum hydroxide [Alum]) induced a potent antibody response against E1 and E2 and a broad IFN-γ secretion and T cell response against Core and all coadministered antigens. This immunological response mediated protective immunity to viremia as assessed in a viral surrogate challenge model. Overall, it was shown that engineered biopolyester beads displaying foreign antigens are immunogenic and might present a particulate delivery system suitable for vaccination against HCV. PMID:26888185

  17. Some Partial Models for Urban Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthrie, Harold W.

    This paper focuses on partial models for solving urban problems to contrast our achievements as social scientists with our aspirations as prescribers of public policy. The objectives of this paper are (1) to review some of the reasons that an ideal set of solutions for urban problems has not been produced by social scientists and (2) to describe…

  18. Long-Term Treatment Outcomes of Patients Infected With Hepatitis C Virus: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of the Survival Benefit of Achieving a Sustained Virological Response

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Bryony; Saleem, Jawaad; Heath, Katherine; Cooke, Graham S.; Hill, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Background. Achievement of a sustained virologic response (SVR) after treatment for Hepatitis C infection is associated with improved outcomes. This meta-analysis aimed to determine the impact of SVR on long-term mortality risk compared with nonresponders in a range of populations. Methods. An electronic search identified all studies assessing all-cause mortality in SVR and non-SVR patients. Eligible articles were stratified into general, cirrhotic, and populations coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus. The adjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence interval [CI]) for mortality in patients achieving SVR vs non-SVR, and pooled estimates for the 5-year mortality in each group were calculated. Results. 31 studies (n = 33 360) were identified as suitable for inclusion. Median follow-up time was 5.4 years (interquartile range, 4.9–7.5) across all studies. The adjusted hazard ratio of mortality for patients achieving SVR vs non-SVR was 0.50 (95% CI, .37–.67) in the general population, 0.26 (95% CI, .18–.74) in the cirrhotic group, and 0.21 (.10–.45) in the coinfected group. The pooled 5-year mortality rates were significantly lower for patients achieving SVR compared with non-SVR in all 3 populations. Conclusions. The results suggest that there is a significant survival benefit of achieving an SVR compared with unsuccessful treatment in a range of populations infected with hepatitis C virus. PMID:25987643

  19. Evaluation of factors contributing to the achievement of students participating in a culturally responsive curriculum in Hawai`i public schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowditch, Scott A.

    This research explored the effectiveness of Ka Hana 'Imi Na 'auao, a culturally responsive science curriculum developed for Hawaiian and other students in Hawai'i high schools. An instrument, The Culturally Responsive Science Perception (CRSP) inventory was developed to measure students' (a) perceptions of their science self-efficacy, (b) perceived frequency of behaviors valued by members of the Hawaiian community and (c) frequency of perceptions of behaviors conducive to learning. Initial validation for the three-factor construct was obtained using Exploratory Factor Analysis and further validated utilizing Confirmatory Factor Analysis with an oblique rotation and 24 items were found to measure the three aspects with a multicultural group of 332 students on Oahu and Hawai'i island. A multi-level analysis was conducted by (a) testing for internal consistency and growth patterns over time utilizing Confirmatory Factor Analysis, (b) developing a 2-level model using a Growth Curve Modeling approach as the final method of measuring growth over time and analyzing the differences between treatment and control groups. Results indicated a significant change ( p < .05) in science self-efficacy and frequency of pono behaviors (p <.05), as well as significant gains in overall GPA (p < .01) in the treatment group. These positive findings suggest that when curriculum developers in Hawai'i are more culturally conscious, it may benefit all learners.

  20. Variance Components: Partialled vs. Common.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Ervin W.

    1985-01-01

    A new approach to partialling components is used. Like conventional partialling, this approach orthogonalizes variables by partitioning the scores or observations. Unlike conventional partialling, it yields a common component and two unique components. (Author/GDC)

  1. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-17

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  2. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  3. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    2001-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  4. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-24

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  5. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, D.W.

    1994-09-06

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured. 1 fig.

  6. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, Dennis W.

    1994-01-01

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured.

  7. An international comparative public health analysis of sex trafficking of women and girls in eight cities: achieving a more effective health sector response.

    PubMed

    Macias Konstantopoulos, Wendy; Ahn, Roy; Alpert, Elaine J; Cafferty, Elizabeth; McGahan, Anita; Williams, Timothy P; Castor, Judith Palmer; Wolferstan, Nadya; Purcell, Genevieve; Burke, Thomas F

    2013-12-01

    Sex trafficking, trafficking for the purpose of forced sexual exploitation, is a widespread form of human trafficking that occurs in all regions of the world, affects mostly women and girls, and has far-reaching health implications. Studies suggest that up to 50 % of sex trafficking victims in the USA seek medical attention while in their trafficking situation, yet it is unclear how the healthcare system responds to the needs of victims of sex trafficking. To understand the intersection of sex trafficking and public health, we performed in-depth qualitative interviews among 277 antitrafficking stakeholders across eight metropolitan areas in five countries to examine the local context of sex trafficking. We sought to gain a new perspective on this form of gender-based violence from those who have a unique vantage point and intimate knowledge of push-and-pull factors, victim health needs, current available resources and practices in the health system, and barriers to care. Through comparative analysis across these contexts, we found that multiple sociocultural and economic factors facilitate sex trafficking, including child sexual abuse, the objectification of women and girls, and lack of income. Although there are numerous physical and psychological health problems associated with sex trafficking, health services for victims are patchy and poorly coordinated, particularly in the realm of mental health. Various factors function as barriers to a greater health response, including low awareness of sex trafficking and attitudinal biases among health workers. A more comprehensive and coordinated health system response to sex trafficking may help alleviate its devastating effects on vulnerable women and girls. There are numerous opportunities for local health systems to engage in antitrafficking efforts while partnering across sectors with relevant stakeholders. PMID:24151086

  8. An international comparative public health analysis of sex trafficking of women and girls in eight cities: achieving a more effective health sector response.

    PubMed

    Macias Konstantopoulos, Wendy; Ahn, Roy; Alpert, Elaine J; Cafferty, Elizabeth; McGahan, Anita; Williams, Timothy P; Castor, Judith Palmer; Wolferstan, Nadya; Purcell, Genevieve; Burke, Thomas F

    2013-12-01

    Sex trafficking, trafficking for the purpose of forced sexual exploitation, is a widespread form of human trafficking that occurs in all regions of the world, affects mostly women and girls, and has far-reaching health implications. Studies suggest that up to 50 % of sex trafficking victims in the USA seek medical attention while in their trafficking situation, yet it is unclear how the healthcare system responds to the needs of victims of sex trafficking. To understand the intersection of sex trafficking and public health, we performed in-depth qualitative interviews among 277 antitrafficking stakeholders across eight metropolitan areas in five countries to examine the local context of sex trafficking. We sought to gain a new perspective on this form of gender-based violence from those who have a unique vantage point and intimate knowledge of push-and-pull factors, victim health needs, current available resources and practices in the health system, and barriers to care. Through comparative analysis across these contexts, we found that multiple sociocultural and economic factors facilitate sex trafficking, including child sexual abuse, the objectification of women and girls, and lack of income. Although there are numerous physical and psychological health problems associated with sex trafficking, health services for victims are patchy and poorly coordinated, particularly in the realm of mental health. Various factors function as barriers to a greater health response, including low awareness of sex trafficking and attitudinal biases among health workers. A more comprehensive and coordinated health system response to sex trafficking may help alleviate its devastating effects on vulnerable women and girls. There are numerous opportunities for local health systems to engage in antitrafficking efforts while partnering across sectors with relevant stakeholders.

  9. Dynamics of partial control.

    PubMed

    Sabuco, Juan; Sanjuán, Miguel A F; Yorke, James A

    2012-12-01

    Safe sets are a basic ingredient in the strategy of partial control of chaotic systems. Recently we have found an algorithm, the sculpting algorithm, which allows us to construct them, when they exist. Here we define another type of set, an asymptotic safe set, to which trajectories are attracted asymptotically when the partial control strategy is applied. We apply all these ideas to a specific example of a Duffing oscillator showing the geometry of these sets in phase space. The software for creating all the figures appearing in this paper is available as supplementary material. PMID:23278093

  10. Partial hue-matching.

    PubMed

    Logvinenko, Alexander D; Beattie, Lesley L

    2011-01-01

    It is widely believed that color can be decomposed into a small number of component colors. Particularly, each hue can be described as a combination of a restricted set of component hues. Methods, such as color naming and hue scaling, aim at describing color in terms of the relative amount of the component hues. However, there is no consensus on the nomenclature of component hues. Moreover, the very notion of hue (not to mention component hue) is usually defined verbally rather than perceptually. In this paper, we make an attempt to operationalize such a fundamental attribute of color as hue without the use of verbal terms. Specifically, we put forth a new method--partial hue-matching--that is based on judgments of whether two colors have some hue in common. It allows a set of component hues to be established objectively, without resorting to verbal definitions. Specifically, the largest sets of color stimuli, all of which partially match each other (referred to as chromaticity classes), can be derived from the observer's partial hue-matches. A chromaticity class proves to consist of all color stimuli that contain a particular component hue. Thus, the chromaticity classes fully define the set of component hues. Using samples of Munsell papers, a few experiments on partial hue-matching were carried out with twelve inexperienced normal trichromatic observers. The results reinforce the classical notion of four component hues (yellow, blue, red, and green). Black and white (but not gray) were also found to be component colors. PMID:21742961

  11. Partial knee replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... You will need to understand what surgery and recovery will be like. Partial knee arthroplasty may be a good choice if you have arthritis in only one side or part of the knee and: You are older, thin, and not very active. You do not ...

  12. Risk of Late Relapse or Reinfection With Hepatitis C Virus After Achieving a Sustained Virological Response: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Bryony; Saleem, Jawaad; Hill, Andrew; Riley, Richard D.; Cooke, Graham S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) can lead to sustained virological response (SVR) in over 90% of people. Subsequent recurrence of HCV, either from late relapse or reinfection, reverses the beneficial effects of SVR. Methods. A search identified studies analysing HCV recurrence post-SVR. The recurrence rate for each study was calculated using events/person years of follow-up (PYFU). Results were pooled using a random-effects model and used to calculate 5-year recurrence risk. Three patient groups were analysed: (1) Mono-HCV infected “low-risk” patients; (2) Mono-HCV infected “high-risk” patients (injecting drug users or prisoners); (3) human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV coinfected patients. Recurrence was defined as confirmed HCV RNA detectability post-SVR. Results. In the 43 studies of HCV mono-infected “low-risk” patients (n = 7969) the pooled recurrence rate was 1.85/1000 PYFU (95% confidence interval [CI], .71–3.35; I2 = 73%) leading to a summary 5-year recurrence risk of 0.95% (95% CI, .35%–1.69%). For the 14 studies of HCV monoinfected “high-risk” patients (n = 771) the pooled recurrence rate was 22.32/1000 PYFU (95% CI, 13.07–33.46; I2 = 27%) leading to a summary 5-year risk of 10.67% (95% CI, 6.38%–15.66%). For the 4 studies of HIV/HCV coinfected patients the pooled recurrence rate was 32.02/1000 PYFU (95% CI, .00–123.49; I2 = 96%) leading to a summary 5-year risk of 15.02% (95% CI, .00%–48.26%). The higher pooled estimates of recurrence in the high-risk and coinfected cohorts were driven by an increase in reinfection rather than late relapse. Conclusions. SVR appears durable in the majority of patients at 5 years post-treatment. The large difference in 5 year event rate by risk group is driven mainly by an increased reinfection risk. PMID:26787172

  13. A unique feature of Toll/IL-1 receptor domain-containing adaptor protein is partially responsible for lipopolysaccharide insensitivity in zebrafish with a highly conserved function of MyD88.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanhui; Li, Mengzhen; Fan, Shan; Lin, Yiqun; Lin, Bin; Luo, Fang; Zhang, Chenxu; Chen, Shangwu; Li, Yingqiu; Xu, Anlong

    2010-09-15

    MyD88 and Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adaptor protein (TIRAP) are required for the TLR4 response to LPS stimulation in mammals, but the functions of the two adaptors and their involvement in zebrafish insensitivity to LPS remains unknown. We present a functional analysis of zebrafish Myd88 and Tirap and suggest that Myd88 is more important than Tirap for the activation of Tlr-mediated NF-kappaB, which may be a novel mechanism of Myd88-dependent TLR signaling in teleosts. Zebrafish Tirap lacks the phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate binding motif required for human TIRAP location and has leucine at position 233 rather than the conserved proline of human TIRAP, as well as 105 additional aa at the N terminus. Overexpression of zebrafish Tirap in HEK293T cells did not activate NF-kappaB and IFN-beta, but slightly activated NF-kappaB in carp leukocyte cells. Zebrafish Myd88 alone strongly induced the activation of NF-kappaB and IFN-beta both in HEK293T and carp leukocyte cells. The function of Myd88 was dependent on its cellular location and the proline in the Toll/IL-1R domain. Although zebrafish Tirap was distributed throughout the cell rather than localized to the cytoplasmic membrane, its impaired ability to activate downstream Tlr molecules was unlikely to be related to its location because chimera TIRAP with a human TIRAP N terminus and membrane-binding domain also did not activate NF-kappaB. However, the mutation of leucine to proline increased the ability of Tirap to activate NF-kappaB. We suggest that the zebrafish Tirap needs a longer N terminus to perform its function and could be partially responsible for the resistance to LPS in zebrafish.

  14. Partially integrated exhaust manifold

    SciTech Connect

    Hayman, Alan W; Baker, Rodney E

    2015-01-20

    A partially integrated manifold assembly is disclosed which improves performance, reduces cost and provides efficient packaging of engine components. The partially integrated manifold assembly includes a first leg extending from a first port and terminating at a mounting flange for an exhaust gas control valve. Multiple additional legs (depending on the total number of cylinders) are integrally formed with the cylinder head assembly and extend from the ports of the associated cylinder and terminate at an exit port flange. These additional legs are longer than the first leg such that the exit port flange is spaced apart from the mounting flange. This configuration provides increased packaging space adjacent the first leg for any valving that may be required to control the direction and destination of exhaust flow in recirculation to an EGR valve or downstream to a catalytic converter.

  15. Partially coherent ultrafast spectrography

    PubMed Central

    Bourassin-Bouchet, C.; Couprie, M.-E.

    2015-01-01

    Modern ultrafast metrology relies on the postulate that the pulse to be measured is fully coherent, that is, that it can be completely described by its spectrum and spectral phase. However, synthesizing fully coherent pulses is not always possible in practice, especially in the domain of emerging ultrashort X-ray sources where temporal metrology is strongly needed. Here we demonstrate how frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG), the first and one of the most widespread techniques for pulse characterization, can be adapted to measure partially coherent pulses even down to the attosecond timescale. No modification of experimental apparatuses is required; only the processing of the measurement changes. To do so, we take our inspiration from other branches of physics where partial coherence is routinely dealt with, such as quantum optics and coherent diffractive imaging. This will have important and immediate applications, such as enabling the measurement of X-ray free-electron laser pulses despite timing jitter. PMID:25744080

  16. Partially coherent ultrafast spectrography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourassin-Bouchet, C.; Couprie, M.-E.

    2015-03-01

    Modern ultrafast metrology relies on the postulate that the pulse to be measured is fully coherent, that is, that it can be completely described by its spectrum and spectral phase. However, synthesizing fully coherent pulses is not always possible in practice, especially in the domain of emerging ultrashort X-ray sources where temporal metrology is strongly needed. Here we demonstrate how frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG), the first and one of the most widespread techniques for pulse characterization, can be adapted to measure partially coherent pulses even down to the attosecond timescale. No modification of experimental apparatuses is required; only the processing of the measurement changes. To do so, we take our inspiration from other branches of physics where partial coherence is routinely dealt with, such as quantum optics and coherent diffractive imaging. This will have important and immediate applications, such as enabling the measurement of X-ray free-electron laser pulses despite timing jitter.

  17. Florida's Fit to Achieve Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Allan N.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes Florida's "Fit to Achieve," a cardiovascular fitness education program for elementary students. Children are taught responsibility for their own cardiovascular fitness through proper exercise, personal exercise habits, and regular aerobic exercise. The program stresses collaborative effort between physical educators and classroom…

  18. Identification of cysteinylated transthyretin, a predictive biomarker of treatment response to partially hydrolyzed guar gum in type 2 diabetes rats, by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Naito, Yuji; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Akagiri, Satomi; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Takagi, Tomohisa; Handa, Osamu; Yasukawa, Zenta; Tokunaga, Makoto; Ishihara, Noriyuki; Okubo, Tsutomu; Mukai, Jun; Ohki, Makoto; Uchida, Kagehiro; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has indicated that total fiber intake is inversely related to type 2 diabetes risk. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of chronic administration of partially hydrolyzed guar gum (PHGG), a water-soluble dietary fiber, on the occurrence of diabetes and its complications, fatty liver and nephropathy. We also identified predictive serum biomarkers of treatment response to PHGG by mass spectroscopy-based proteomic analysis using Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats, a good model of human non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In this study, at 5 weeks of age, OLETF rats and control strain Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats were fed a control diet or a high-fiber diet (5% PHGG) for 57 weeks. Body weight, food intake, oral glucose tolerance test, plasma insulin levels, and urine glucose and protein levels were regularly measured. Oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) and storage of serum in a deep freezer were conducted at the beginning of the experiment and every 4 weeks after overnight fasting during the experiments. PHGG treatment affected neither meal patterns nor the body weight of OLETF and LETO rats. Repeated measure analysis of variance revealed significant differences in fasting plasma glucose and plasma glucose at 2 h after OGTT between control OLETF (OLETF-C) rats and OLETF rats treated with PHGG (OLETF-F). The glucose response determined by the area under the curve of OGTT was significantly greater in OLETF-C rats than that in OLETF-F rats at 25 weeks of age. HOMA-IR, an index of insulin resistance, increased at 25 weeks of age in OLETF-C rats, while this increase was significantly inhibited in OLETF-F rats. At 62 weeks of age, PHGG treatment significantly improved hepatic steatosis as well as renal mesangial matrix accumulation in OLETF rats. To identify the risk marker for diabetes mellitus by SELDI-TOF MS, we collected sera from 21-week-old individuals. Among the 12 specific peaks that were risk marker

  19. Identification of cysteinylated transthyretin, a predictive biomarker of treatment response to partially hydrolyzed guar gum in type 2 diabetes rats, by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Yuji; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Akagiri, Satomi; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Takagi, Tomohisa; Handa, Osamu; Yasukawa, Zenta; Tokunaga, Makoto; Ishihara, Noriyuki; Okubo, Tsutomu; Mukai, Jun; Ohki, Makoto; Uchida, Kagehiro; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has indicated that total fiber intake is inversely related to type 2 diabetes risk. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of chronic administration of partially hydrolyzed guar gum (PHGG), a water-soluble dietary fiber, on the occurrence of diabetes and its complications, fatty liver and nephropathy. We also identified predictive serum biomarkers of treatment response to PHGG by mass spectroscopy-based proteomic analysis using Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats, a good model of human non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In this study, at 5 weeks of age, OLETF rats and control strain Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats were fed a control diet or a high-fiber diet (5% PHGG) for 57 weeks. Body weight, food intake, oral glucose tolerance test, plasma insulin levels, and urine glucose and protein levels were regularly measured. Oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) and storage of serum in a deep freezer were conducted at the beginning of the experiment and every 4 weeks after overnight fasting during the experiments. PHGG treatment affected neither meal patterns nor the body weight of OLETF and LETO rats. Repeated measure analysis of variance revealed significant differences in fasting plasma glucose and plasma glucose at 2 h after OGTT between control OLETF (OLETF-C) rats and OLETF rats treated with PHGG (OLETF-F). The glucose response determined by the area under the curve of OGTT was significantly greater in OLETF-C rats than that in OLETF-F rats at 25 weeks of age. HOMA-IR, an index of insulin resistance, increased at 25 weeks of age in OLETF-C rats, while this increase was significantly inhibited in OLETF-F rats. At 62 weeks of age, PHGG treatment significantly improved hepatic steatosis as well as renal mesangial matrix accumulation in OLETF rats. To identify the risk marker for diabetes mellitus by SELDI-TOF MS, we collected sera from 21-week-old individuals. Among the 12 specific peaks that were risk marker

  20. Use of response surface methodology in a fed-batch process for optimization of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates to achieve high levels of canthaxanthin from Dietzia natronolimnaea HS-1.

    PubMed

    Nasri Nasrabadi, Mohammad Reza; Razavi, Seyed Hadi

    2010-04-01

    In this work, we applied statistical experimental design to a fed-batch process for optimization of tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) intermediates in order to achieve high-level production of canthaxanthin from Dietzia natronolimnaea HS-1 cultured in beet molasses. A fractional factorial design (screening test) was first conducted on five TCA cycle intermediates. Out of the five TCA cycle intermediates investigated via screening tests, alfaketoglutarate, oxaloacetate and succinate were selected based on their statistically significant (P<0.05) and positive effects on canthaxanthin production. These significant factors were optimized by means of response surface methodology (RSM) in order to achieve high-level production of canthaxanthin. The experimental results of the RSM were fitted with a second-order polynomial equation by means of a multiple regression technique to identify the relationship between canthaxanthin production and the three TCA cycle intermediates. By means of this statistical design under a fed-batch process, the optimum conditions required to achieve the highest level of canthaxanthin (13172 + or - 25 microg l(-1)) were determined as follows: alfaketoglutarate, 9.69 mM; oxaloacetate, 8.68 mM; succinate, 8.51 mM.

  1. PARTIALLY SEEING PROGRAM, 1966-1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake County Special Education District, Gurnee, IL.

    THIS ADMINISTRATIVE OUTLINE OF THE PARTIALLY SEEING PROGRAM IN LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS, PRESENTS THE DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE TWO ITINERANT TEACHERS AND THEIR IMMEDIATE SUPERVISORS. THE PROGRAM'S PHILOSOPHY, GOALS, HISTORY AND PLACEMENT IN THE COUNTY'S ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE IS PRESENTED. THE ITINERANT TEACHER'S ADMINISTRATIVE…

  2. [Topiramate: an experience in children with partial epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Rocha, C; Brucki, S M

    2001-09-01

    Topiramate (TPM) is a new drug currently used in Brazil. We verified the clinical responses to TPM in children under 15 years-old. We started with 12.5 mg/day (1-7 mg/kg/day) and the doses increased 12,5 mg each week. Eleven children were studied, 9 females and 2 males, from 3 to 14 years-old with partial epilepsy associated to different etiological factors. Only one patient had an intense abdominal pain. The patients had weekly or daily seizures and after began TPM 1 patient stayed free from seizures, 5 improved more than 75% in frequency, 1 patient improved more than 50% and 3 had no control. A good control of seizures was achieved with a low dose of TPM as monotherapy and add-on therapy with carbamazepine even in severe cases.

  3. The technique of partial identification: waking up to the world.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Lucy

    2009-04-01

    A capacity to make partial identification with others is a skill that brings group members out of the loneliness of narcissism and into the lively world of immediacy and progressive emotional communication. Partial identification, which requires empathy and intuition, involves both knowing what another is feeling and also what we feel toward that other. Developing partial identification will meet with different resistances in men and women. Using clinical examples, the author defines and demonstrates the concept of partial identification and discusses how the pathway to achieving the technique can differ along gender lines.

  4. Melancholia and partial insanity.

    PubMed

    Jackson, S W

    1983-04-01

    In the medical literature of the eighteenth century melancholia came to be defined as partial insanity. Seventeenth-century English law introduced the term and influenced later forensic concerns about the concept. But the history of melancholia reveals a gradual development of such a concept of limited derangement associated with the delusions usually cited in accounts of this disease. In the early nineteenth century the relationship of melancholia and this concept weakened and was gradually abandoned, the content of the syndrome of melancholia was reduced, and out of this complex process emerged the notion of monomania.

  5. Esthetic removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Ancowitz, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    This article provides information regarding the many ways that removable partial dentures (RPDs) may be used to solve restorative problems in the esthetic zone without displaying metal components or conspicuous acrylic resin flanges. The esthetic zone is defined and described, as are methods for recording it. Six dental categories are presented that assist the dentist in choosing a variety of RPD design concepts that may be used to avoid metal display while still satisfying basic principles of RPDs. New materials that may be utilized for optimal esthetics are presented and techniques for contouring acrylic resin bases and tinting denture bases are described.

  6. Incremental fusion of partial biometric information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abboud, Ali J.; Jassim, Sabah A.

    2012-06-01

    Existing face recognition schemes are mostly based on extracting biometric feature vectors either from whole face images, or from a fixed facial region (e.g., eyes, nose, and mouth). Extreme variation in quality conditions between biometric enrolment and verification stages badly affects the performance of face recognition systems. Such problems have partly motivated several investigations into the use of partial facial features for face recognition. Nevertheless, partial face recognition is potentially useful in several applications, for instance, it used in forensics for detectives to identify individuals after some accidents such as fire or explosion. In this paper, we propose a scheme to fuse the biometric information of partial face images incrementally based on their recognition accuracy (or discriminative power) ranks. Such fusion scheme uses the optimal ratio of full/partial face images in each different quality condition. We found that such scheme is also useful for full face images to enhance authentication accuracy significantly. Nevertheless, it reduces the required storage requirements and processing time of the biometric system. Our experiments show that the required ratio of full/partial facial images to achieve optimal performance varies from (5%) to (80%) according to the quality conditions whereas the authentication accuracy improves significantly for low quality biometric samples.

  7. Experts' Understanding of Partial Derivatives Using the Partial Derivative Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roundy, David; Weber, Eric; Dray, Tevian; Bajracharya, Rabindra R.; Dorko, Allison; Smith, Emily M.; Manogue, Corinne A.

    2015-01-01

    Partial derivatives are used in a variety of different ways within physics. Thermodynamics, in particular, uses partial derivatives in ways that students often find especially confusing. We are at the beginning of a study of the teaching of partial derivatives, with a goal of better aligning the teaching of multivariable calculus with the needs of…

  8. Mobility and Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Theresa Z.

    A study examined the effect of geographic mobility on elementary school students' achievement. Although such mobility, which requires students to make multiple moves among schools, can have a negative impact on academic achievement, the hypothesis for the study was that it was not a determining factor in reading achievement test scores. Subjects…

  9. Is Titan Partially Differentiated?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, G.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Stevenson, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    The recent measurement of the gravity coefficients from the Radio Doppler data of the Cassini spacecraft has improved our knowledge of the interior structure of Titan (Rappaport et al. 2008 AGU, P21A-1343). The measured gravity field of Titan is dominated by near hydrostatic quadrupole components. We have used the measured gravitational coefficients, thermal models and the hydrostatic equilibrium theory to derive Titan's interior structure. The axial moment of inertia gives us an indication of the degree of the interior differentiation. The inferred axial moment of inertia, calculated using the quadrupole gravitational coefficients and the Radau-Darwin approximation, indicates that Titan is partially differentiated. If Titan is partially differentiated then the interior must avoid melting of the ice during its evolution. This suggests a relatively late formation of Titan to avoid the presence of short-lived radioisotopes (Al-26). This also suggests the onset of convection after accretion to efficiently remove the heat from the interior. The outer layer is likely composed mainly of water in solid phase. Thermal modeling indicates that water could be present also in liquid phase forming a subsurface ocean between an outer ice I shell and a high pressure ice layer. Acknowledgments: This work was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  10. Partial Triceps Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Foulk, David M.; Galloway, Marc T.

    2011-01-01

    Partial triceps tendon disruptions are a rare injury that can lead to debilitating outcomes if misdiagnosed or managed inappropriately. The clinician should have a high index of suspicion when the mechanism involves a fall onto an outstretched arm and there is resultant elbow extension weakness along with pain and swelling. The most common location of rupture is at the tendon-osseous junction. This case report illustrates a partial triceps tendon disruption with involvement of, primarily, the medial head and the superficial expansion. Physical examination displayed weakness with resisted elbow extension in a flexed position over 90°. Radiographs revealed a tiny fleck of bone proximal to the olecranon, but this drastically underestimated the extent of injury upon surgical exploration. Magnetic resonance imaging is essential to ascertain the percentage involvement of the tendon; it can be used for patient education and subsequently to determine treatment recommendations. Although excellent at finding associated pathology, it may misjudge the size of the tear. As such, physicians must consider associated comorbidities and patient characteristics when formulating treatment plans. PMID:23016005

  11. Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to the reviews of his book, "The Good Life of Teaching: An Ethics of Professional Practice." He begins by highlighting some of the main concerns of his book. He then offers a brief response, doing his best to address the main criticisms of his argument and noting where the four reviewers (Charlene…

  12. Partially exposed polymer dispersed liquid crystals for boundary layer investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, Devendra S.; Singh, Jag J.

    1992-01-01

    A new configuration termed partially exposed polymer dispersed liquid crystal in which the liquid crystal microdroplets dispersed in a rigid polymer matrix are partially entrapped on the free surface of the thin film deposited on a glass substrate is reported. Optical transmission characteristics of the partially exposed polymer dispersed liquid crystal thin film in response to an air flow induced shear stress field reveal its potential as a sensor for gas flow and boundary layer investigations.

  13. Partially segmented deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, E.S.; Smith, J.R.; Salmon, J.T.; Monjes, J.A.

    1991-05-21

    A partially segmented deformable mirror is formed with a mirror plate having a smooth and continuous front surface and a plurality of actuators to its back surface. The back surface is divided into triangular areas which are mutually separated by grooves. The grooves are deep enough to make the plate deformable and the actuators for displacing the mirror plate in the direction normal to its surface are inserted in the grooves at the vertices of the triangular areas. Each actuator includes a transducer supported by a receptacle with outer shells having outer surfaces. The vertices have inner walls which are approximately perpendicular to the mirror surface and make planar contacts with the outer surfaces of the outer shells. The adhesive which is used on these contact surfaces tends to contract when it dries but the outer shells can bend and serve to minimize the tendency of the mirror to warp. 5 figures.

  14. Partially segmented deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Erlan S.; Smith, James R.; Salmon, J. Thaddeus; Monjes, Julio A.

    1991-01-01

    A partially segmented deformable mirror is formed with a mirror plate having a smooth and continuous front surface and a plurality of actuators to its back surface. The back surface is divided into triangular areas which are mutually separated by grooves. The grooves are deep enough to make the plate deformable and the actuators for displacing the mirror plate in the direction normal to its surface are inserted in the grooves at the vertices of the triangular areas. Each actuator includes a transducer supported by a receptacle with outer shells having outer surfaces. The vertices have inner walls which are approximately perpendicular to the mirror surface and make planar contacts with the outer surfaces of the outer shells. The adhesive which is used on these contact surfaces tends to contract when it dries but the outer shells can bend and serve to minimize the tendency of the mirror to warp.

  15. Partial oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, Michael; Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Doshi, Rajiv

    2000-01-01

    A two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion. The dehydrogenation portion is a group VIII metal and the oxide-ion conducting portion is selected from a ceramic oxide crystallizing in the fluorite or perovskite structure. There is also disclosed a method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400.degree. C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide.

  16. On partially massless theory in 3 dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, Sergei; Deffayet, Cédric

    2015-03-24

    We analyze the first-order formulation of the ghost-free bigravity model in three-dimensions known as zwei-dreibein gravity. For a special choice of parameters, it was argued to have an additional gauge symmetry and give rise to a partially massless theory. We provide a thorough canonical analysis and identify that whether the theory becomes partially massless depends on the form of the stability condition of the secondary constraint responsible for the absence of the ghost. Generically, it is found to be an equation for a Lagrange multiplier implying that partially massless zwei-dreibein gravity does not exist. However, for special backgrounds this condition is identically satisfied leading to the presence of additional symmetries, which however disappear at quadratic order in perturbations.

  17. Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy: Superiority over laparoscopic partial nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Shiroki, Ryoichi; Fukami, Naohiko; Fukaya, Kosuke; Kusaka, Mamoru; Natsume, Takahiro; Ichihara, Takashi; Toyama, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    Nephron-sparing surgery has been proven to positively impact the postoperative quality of life for the treatment of small renal tumors, possibly leading to functional improvements. Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy is still one of the most demanding procedures in urological surgery. Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy sometimes results in extended warm ischemic time and severe complications, such as open conversion, postoperative hemorrhage and urine leakage. Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy exploits the advantages offered by the da Vinci Surgical System to laparoscopic partial nephrectomy, equipped with 3-D vision and a better degree in the freedom of surgical instruments. The introduction of the da Vinci Surgical System made nephron-sparing surgery, specifically robot-assisted partial nephrectomy, safe with promising results, leading to the shortening of warm ischemic time and a reduction in perioperative complications. Even for complex and challenging tumors, robotic assistance is expected to provide the benefit of minimally-invasive surgery with safe and satisfactory renal function. Warm ischemic time is the modifiable factor during robot-assisted partial nephrectomy to affect postoperative kidney function. We analyzed the predictive factors for extended warm ischemic time from our robot-assisted partial nephrectomy series. The surface area of the tumor attached to the kidney parenchyma was shown to significantly affect the extended warm ischemic time during robot-assisted partial nephrectomy. In cases with tumor-attached surface area more than 15 cm(2) , we should consider switching robot-assisted partial nephrectomy to open partial nephrectomy under cold ischemia if it is imperative. In Japan, a nationwide prospective study has been carried out to show the superiority of robot-assisted partial nephrectomy to laparoscopic partial nephrectomy in improving warm ischemic time and complications. By facilitating robotic technology, robot-assisted partial nephrectomy

  18. The Use of Partial Order Structures for Investigating Suicidal Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dancer, L. Suzanne

    This study had two purposes: to test the usefulness of partial order scalogram analysis with multivariate response data; and to illustrate the multidimensional nature of suicide risk. A detailed introduction describes partial order scalograms, which locate respondents' profiles in a two-dimensional space (rather than on a unidimensional Guttman…

  19. Partially supervised speaker clustering.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao; Chu, Stephen Mingyu; Hasegawa-Johnson, Mark; Huang, Thomas S

    2012-05-01

    Content-based multimedia indexing, retrieval, and processing as well as multimedia databases demand the structuring of the media content (image, audio, video, text, etc.), one significant goal being to associate the identity of the content to the individual segments of the signals. In this paper, we specifically address the problem of speaker clustering, the task of assigning every speech utterance in an audio stream to its speaker. We offer a complete treatment to the idea of partially supervised speaker clustering, which refers to the use of our prior knowledge of speakers in general to assist the unsupervised speaker clustering process. By means of an independent training data set, we encode the prior knowledge at the various stages of the speaker clustering pipeline via 1) learning a speaker-discriminative acoustic feature transformation, 2) learning a universal speaker prior model, and 3) learning a discriminative speaker subspace, or equivalently, a speaker-discriminative distance metric. We study the directional scattering property of the Gaussian mixture model (GMM) mean supervector representation of utterances in the high-dimensional space, and advocate exploiting this property by using the cosine distance metric instead of the euclidean distance metric for speaker clustering in the GMM mean supervector space. We propose to perform discriminant analysis based on the cosine distance metric, which leads to a novel distance metric learning algorithm—linear spherical discriminant analysis (LSDA). We show that the proposed LSDA formulation can be systematically solved within the elegant graph embedding general dimensionality reduction framework. Our speaker clustering experiments on the GALE database clearly indicate that 1) our speaker clustering methods based on the GMM mean supervector representation and vector-based distance metrics outperform traditional speaker clustering methods based on the “bag of acoustic features” representation and statistical

  20. General Achievement Trends: Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  1. General Achievement Trends: Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  2. General Achievement Trends: Nebraska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  3. General Achievement Trends: Arkansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  4. General Achievement Trends: Maryland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  5. General Achievement Trends: Maine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  6. General Achievement Trends: Iowa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  7. General Achievement Trends: Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  8. General Achievement Trends: Hawaii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  9. General Achievement Trends: Kansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  10. General Achievement Trends: Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  11. General Achievement Trends: Massachusetts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  12. General Achievement Trends: Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  13. General Achievement Trends: Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  14. General Achievement Trends: Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  15. General Achievement Trends: Michigan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  16. General Achievement Trends: Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  17. Inverting the Achievement Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White-Hood, Marian; Shindel, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    Attempting to invert the pyramid to improve student achievement and increase all students' chances for success is not a new endeavor. For decades, educators have strategized, formed think tanks, and developed school improvement teams to find better ways to improve the achievement of all students. Currently, the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) is…

  18. Achievement Test Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Trade and Industrial Education Service.

    The Ohio Trade and Industrial Education Achievement Test battery is comprised of seven basic achievement tests: Machine Trades, Automotive Mechanics, Basic Electricity, Basic Electronics, Mechanical Drafting, Printing, and Sheet Metal. The tests were developed by subject matter committees and specialists in testing and research. The Ohio Trade and…

  19. School Effects on Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Robert C.

    The New York State Education Department conducts a Pupil Evaluation Program (PEP) in which each year all third, sixth, and ninth grade students in the state are given a series of achievement tests in reading and mathematics. The data accumulated by the department includes achievement test scores, teacher characteristics, building and curriculum…

  20. Heritability of Creative Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piffer, Davide; Hur, Yoon-Mi

    2014-01-01

    Although creative achievement is a subject of much attention to lay people, the origin of individual differences in creative accomplishments remain poorly understood. This study examined genetic and environmental influences on creative achievement in an adult sample of 338 twins (mean age = 26.3 years; SD = 6.6 years). Twins completed the Creative…

  1. Confronting the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, David

    2007-01-01

    This article talks about the large achievement gap between children of color and their white peers. The reasons for the achievement gap are varied. First, many urban minorities come from a background of poverty. One of the detrimental effects of growing up in poverty is receiving inadequate nourishment at a time when bodies and brains are rapidly…

  2. Achieving Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abowitz, Kathleen Knight

    2011-01-01

    Public schools are functionally provided through structural arrangements such as government funding, but public schools are achieved in substance, in part, through local governance. In this essay, Kathleen Knight Abowitz explains the bifocal nature of achieving public schools; that is, that schools are both subject to the unitary Public compact of…

  3. Multichannel cochlear implants in partially ossified cochleas.

    PubMed

    Balkany, T; Gantz, B; Nadol, J B

    1988-01-01

    Deposition of bone within the fluid spaces of the cochlea is encountered commonly in cochlear implant candidates and previously has been considered a relative contraindication to the use of multichannel intracochlear electrodes. This contraindication has been based on possible mechanical difficulty with electrode insertion as well as uncertainty about the potential benefit of the multichannel device in the patient. Fifteen profoundly deaf patients with partial ossification of the basal turn of the cochlea received implants with long intracochlear electrodes (11, Nucleus; 1, University of California at San Francisco/Storz; and 3, Symbion/Inneraid). In 11 cases, ossification had been predicted preoperatively by computed tomographic scan. Electrodes were completely inserted in 14 patients, and partial insertion was accomplished in one patient. All patients currently are using their devices and nine of 12 postlingually deaf patients have achieved some degree of open-set speech discrimination. This series demonstrates that in experienced hands, insertion of long multichannel electrodes into partially ossified cochleas is possible and that results are similar to those achieved in patients who have nonossified cochleas. PMID:3140705

  4. Partially Decentralized Control Architectures for Satellite Formations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell; Bauer, Frank H.

    2002-01-01

    In a partially decentralized control architecture, more than one but less than all nodes have supervisory capability. This paper describes an approach to choosing the number of supervisors in such au architecture, based on a reliability vs. cost trade. It also considers the implications of these results for the design of navigation systems for satellite formations that could be controlled with a partially decentralized architecture. Using an assumed cost model, analytic and simulation-based results indicate that it may be cheaper to achieve a given overall system reliability with a partially decentralized architecture containing only a few supervisors, than with either fully decentralized or purely centralized architectures. Nominally, the subset of supervisors may act as centralized estimation and control nodes for corresponding subsets of the remaining subordinate nodes, and act as decentralized estimation and control peers with respect to each other. However, in the context of partially decentralized satellite formation control, the absolute positions and velocities of each spacecraft are unique, so that correlations which make estimates using only local information suboptimal only occur through common biases and process noise. Covariance and monte-carlo analysis of a simplified system show that this lack of correlation may allow simplification of the local estimators while preserving the global optimality of the maneuvers commanded by the supervisors.

  5. Wear mechanisms of partially stabilized zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Aronov, V.

    1987-01-01

    This paper is devoted to an investigation of the wear mechanisms of magnesia and yttria partially-stabilized zirconia in ceramic/ceramic and ceramic/metal sliding-contact tribological systems at high temperature. It was found that the wear of ceramics rubbed against ceramics at room temperature may be attributed to intensive plastic deformation of surfaces resulting in low cycle fatigue. The wear mechanism of ceramics rubbed against metals was by polishing and surface fracture, while that of metals was adhesive transfer of material on to ceramic surfaces. Investigation of the wear behavior of magnesia partially-stabilized zirconia rubbed against itself showed that up to three orders of magnitude increase in wear resistance can be achieved in a particular temperature range, depending on both sliding speed and the ambient temperature. XRD analysis revealed that a thermally-induced phase transformation takes place on the frictional interface.

  6. Partial peritoneal alimentation in an infant.

    PubMed

    Merritt, R J; Atkinson, J B; Whalen, T V; Thomas, D W; Sinatra, F R; Roloson, G J

    1988-01-01

    We provided partial peritoneal alimentation to a 1.69-kg 11-month-old premature infant who had no available central venous access, depleted peripheral venous access, and gastrointestinal dysfunction. A cuffed silastic catheter was surgically inserted into the suprahepatic space. An alimentation solution was continuously infused into the peritoneum for 28 days to supplement peripheral venous and nasogastric alimentation and contributed 42 +/- 15% of total calories daily. Weight gain was achieved, but complications included hypoglycemia, hypophosphatemia, intravascular dehydration, catheter site leakage, ascites, and hydrocele. At autopsy 11 months later, lipid accumulation was present in the upper peritoneum and the hilar regions of the lungs secondary to preexisting lymphatic obstruction. Partial peritoneal alimentation may be feasible when other access routes are inadequate, but lymphatic obstruction is a contraindication to the peritoneal administration of lipid emulsions.

  7. Trigonometric Integrals via Partial Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, H.; Fulford, M.

    2005-01-01

    Parametric differentiation is used to derive the partial fractions decompositions of certain rational functions. Those decompositions enable us to integrate some new combinations of trigonometric functions.

  8. Student Achievement and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flammer, Gordon H.; Mecham, Robert C.

    1974-01-01

    Compares the lecture and self-paced methods of instruction on the basis of student motivation and achieveme nt, comparing motivating and demotivating factors in each, and their potential for motivation and achievement. (Authors/JR)

  9. Experts' understanding of partial derivatives using the partial derivative machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roundy, David; Weber, Eric; Dray, Tevian; Bajracharya, Rabindra R.; Dorko, Allison; Smith, Emily M.; Manogue, Corinne A.

    2015-12-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Upper Division Physics Courses.] Partial derivatives are used in a variety of different ways within physics. Thermodynamics, in particular, uses partial derivatives in ways that students often find especially confusing. We are at the beginning of a study of the teaching of partial derivatives, with a goal of better aligning the teaching of multivariable calculus with the needs of students in STEM disciplines. In this paper, we report on an initial study of expert understanding of partial derivatives across three disciplines: physics, engineering, and mathematics. We report on the central research question of how disciplinary experts understand partial derivatives, and how their concept images of partial derivatives differ, with a focus on experimentally measured quantities. Using the partial derivative machine (PDM), we probed expert understanding of partial derivatives in an experimental context without a known functional form. In particular, we investigated which representations were cued by the experts' interactions with the PDM. Whereas the physicists and engineers were quick to use measurements to find a numeric approximation for a derivative, the mathematicians repeatedly returned to speculation as to the functional form; although they were comfortable drawing qualitative conclusions about the system from measurements, they were reluctant to approximate the derivative through measurement. On a theoretical front, we found ways in which existing frameworks for the concept of derivative could be expanded to include numerical approximation.

  10. Adult case of partial trisomy 9q

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Complete and partial trisomy 9 is the fourth most common chromosomal disorder. It is also associated with various congenital characteristics affecting the cranio-facial, skeletal, central nervous, gastrointestinal, cardiac and renal systems. Very few cases have been reported in adults. Partial trisomy 9q is also associated with short stature, poor growth and growth hormone deficiency. This is the first reported case of an extensive endocrinology investigation of short stature in trisomy 9q and the outcome of growth hormone treatment. Case Presentation The case involves a 23-year-old female of pure partial trisomy 9q. The case involves a 23-year old female with pure partial trisomy 9q involving a duplication of 9q22.1 to q32, de novo, confirmed by genetic studies using fluorescene in situ hybridization (FISH) method. The diagnosis was at 6 years of age. She did not demonstrate all the congenital morphologies identified with trisomy 9q disorders especially in relation to multi-organ morphologies. There is also a degree of associated intellectual impairment. At prepuberty, she was referred for poor growth and was diagnosed with partial growth hormone deficiency. She responded very well to treatment with growth hormone and is currently living an independent life with some support. Conclusions Trisomy 9q is associated with short stature and failure to thrive. Growth hormone deficiency should be identified in cases of trisomy 9q and treatment offered. This is the first reported case of response to growth hormone replacement in partial trisomy 9. PMID:20158889

  11. An optical fiber Fabry-Perot flow measurement technology based on partial bend structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huijia; Jiang, Junfeng; Zhang, Xuezhi; Pan, Yuheng; Zhu, Wanshan; Zhou, Xiang; Liu, Tiegen

    2016-08-01

    An optical fiber Fabry-Perot (F-P) flow measurement technology is presented, which is based on partial bend structure. A 90° partial bend structure is designed to achieve the non-probe flow measurement with a pressure difference. The fluid simulation results of partial bend structure show that the error of the pressure difference is below 0.05 kPa during steady flow. The optical fiber F-P sensor mounted on the elbow with pressure test accuracy of 1% full scale is used to measure the fluid flow. Flow test results show that when the flow varies from 1 m3/h to 6.5 m3/h at ambient temperature of 25 °C, the response time is 1 s and the flow test accuracy is 4.5% of the F-P flow test system, proving that the F-P flow test method based on partial bend structure can be used in fluid flow measurement.

  12. An optical fiber Fabry-Perot flow measurement technology based on partial bend structure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huijia; Jiang, Junfeng; Zhang, Xuezhi; Pan, Yuheng; Zhu, Wanshan; Zhou, Xiang; Liu, Tiegen

    2016-08-01

    An optical fiber Fabry-Perot (F-P) flow measurement technology is presented, which is based on partial bend structure. A 90° partial bend structure is designed to achieve the non-probe flow measurement with a pressure difference. The fluid simulation results of partial bend structure show that the error of the pressure difference is below 0.05 kPa during steady flow. The optical fiber F-P sensor mounted on the elbow with pressure test accuracy of 1% full scale is used to measure the fluid flow. Flow test results show that when the flow varies from 1 m(3)/h to 6.5 m(3)/h at ambient temperature of 25 °C, the response time is 1 s and the flow test accuracy is 4.5% of the F-P flow test system, proving that the F-P flow test method based on partial bend structure can be used in fluid flow measurement.

  13. An optical fiber Fabry-Perot flow measurement technology based on partial bend structure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huijia; Jiang, Junfeng; Zhang, Xuezhi; Pan, Yuheng; Zhu, Wanshan; Zhou, Xiang; Liu, Tiegen

    2016-08-01

    An optical fiber Fabry-Perot (F-P) flow measurement technology is presented, which is based on partial bend structure. A 90° partial bend structure is designed to achieve the non-probe flow measurement with a pressure difference. The fluid simulation results of partial bend structure show that the error of the pressure difference is below 0.05 kPa during steady flow. The optical fiber F-P sensor mounted on the elbow with pressure test accuracy of 1% full scale is used to measure the fluid flow. Flow test results show that when the flow varies from 1 m(3)/h to 6.5 m(3)/h at ambient temperature of 25 °C, the response time is 1 s and the flow test accuracy is 4.5% of the F-P flow test system, proving that the F-P flow test method based on partial bend structure can be used in fluid flow measurement. PMID:27587096

  14. Computer Use, Parental Expectations, & Latino Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taningco, Maria Teresa V.; Pachon, Harry P.

    2008-01-01

    In the United States, traditionally underrepresented minority children have lower levels of academic achievement than their white counterparts. In the broadest perspective, this quantitative study seeks to help stakeholders and policymakers understand the factors responsible for Hispanic or Latino student achievement relative to that of comparison…

  15. Censored partial regression.

    PubMed

    Orbe, Jesus; Ferreira, Eva; Núñez-Antón, Vicente

    2003-01-01

    In this work we study the effect of several covariates on a censored response variable with unknown probability distribution. A semiparametric model is proposed to consider situations where the functional form of the effect of one or more covariates is unknown, as is the case in the application presented in this work. We provide its estimation procedure and, in addition, a bootstrap technique to make inference on the parameters. A simulation study has been carried out to show the good performance of the proposed estimation process and to analyse the effect of the censorship. Finally, we present the results when the methodology is applied to AIDS diagnosed patients.

  16. Multiple Partial Siberian Snakes in the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Takano, J.; Ahrens, L. A.; Bai, M.; Brown, K.; Courant, E. D.; Gardner, C. J.; Glenn, J. W.; Huang, H.; Luccio, A. U.; MacKay, W. W.; Okamura, M.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Yip, K.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Hattori, T.; Lin, F.

    2007-06-13

    Polarized protons are accelerated up to 24.3 GeV in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). To accelerate the beam with preserving the polarization, two different types of helical dipole partial Siberian snake have been installed to the AGS. One is a superconducting magnet (Cold Snake, CSNK), and the other is a normal conducting one (Warm Snake, WSNK). With these snake magnets, the polarization at the AGS extraction achieved 65%. However, the AGS has spin mismatches at the injection and extraction. This description shows calculated results to have better spin matching with using two or three snakes.

  17. Iowa Women of Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This issue of the Goldfinch highlights some of Iowa's 20th century women of achievement. These women have devoted their lives to working for human rights, education, equality, and individual rights. They come from the worlds of politics, art, music, education, sports, business, entertainment, and social work. They represent Native Americans,…

  18. Achieving Peace through Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    While it is generally agreed that peace is desirable, there are barriers to achieving a peaceful world. These barriers are classified into three major areas: (1) an erroneous view of human nature; (2) injustice; and (3) fear of world unity. In a discussion of these barriers, it is noted that although the consciousness and conscience of the world…

  19. Increasing Male Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Barbara Talbert

    2008-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind legislation has brought greater attention to the academic performance of American youth. Its emphasis on student achievement requires a closer analysis of assessment data by school districts. To address the findings, educators must seek strategies to remedy failing results. In a mid-Atlantic district of the Unites States,…

  20. Leadership Issues: Raising Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horsfall, Chris, Ed.

    This document contains five papers examining the meaning and operation of leadership as a variable affecting student achievement in further education colleges in the United Kingdom. "Introduction" (Chris Horsfall) discusses school effectiveness studies' findings regarding the relationship between leadership and effective schools, distinguishes…

  1. Achievements or Disasters?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, MacArthur

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on policy issues that have affected arts education in the twentieth century, such as: interest in discipline-based arts education, influence of national arts associations, and national standards and coordinated assessment. States that whether the policy decisions are viewed as achievements or disasters are for future determination. (CMK)

  2. Achieving True Consensus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier, Rod; Sanaghan, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    Uses the example of Vermont's Middlebury College to explore the challenges and possibilities of achieving consensus about institutional change. Discusses why, unlike in this example, consensus usually fails, and presents four demands of an effective consensus process. Includes a list of "test" questions on successful collaboration. (EV)

  3. School Students' Science Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shymansky, James; Wang, Tzu-Ling; Annetta, Leonard; Everett, Susan; Yore, Larry D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a report of the impact of an externally funded, multiyear systemic reform project on students' science achievement on a modified version of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) test in 33 small, rural school districts in two Midwest states. The systemic reform effort utilized a cascading leadership strategy…

  4. Essays on Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ampaabeng, Samuel Kofi

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the determinants of student outcomes--achievement, attainment, occupational choices and earnings--in three different contexts. The first two chapters focus on Ghana while the final chapter focuses on the US state of Massachusetts. In the first chapter, I exploit the incidence of famine and malnutrition that resulted to…

  5. Assessing Handwriting Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    Teachers in the school setting need to emphasize quality handwriting across the curriculum. Quality handwriting means that the written content is easy to read in either manuscript or cursive form. Handwriting achievement can be assessed, but not compared to the precision of assessing basic addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division facts.…

  6. Intelligence and Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deary, Ian J.; Strand, Steve; Smith, Pauline; Fernandes, Cres

    2007-01-01

    This 5-year prospective longitudinal study of 70,000+ English children examined the association between psychometric intelligence at age 11 years and educational achievement in national examinations in 25 academic subjects at age 16. The correlation between a latent intelligence trait (Spearman's "g"from CAT2E) and a latent trait of educational…

  7. Explorations in achievement motivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, Robert L.

    1982-01-01

    Recent research on the nature of achievement motivation is reviewed. A three-factor model of intrinsic motives is presented and related to various criteria of performance, job satisfaction and leisure activities. The relationships between intrinsic and extrinsic motives are discussed. Needed areas for future research are described.

  8. NCLB: Achievement Robin Hood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    2008-01-01

    In his "Wall Street Journal" op-ed on the 25th of anniversary of "A Nation At Risk", former assistant secretary of education Chester E. Finn Jr. applauded the report for turning U.S. education away from equality and toward achievement. It was not surprising, then, that in mid-2008, Finn arranged a conference to examine the potential "Robin Hood…

  9. Achieving All Our Ambitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Tricia

    2009-01-01

    National learning and skills policy aims both to build economic prosperity and to achieve social justice. Participation in higher education (HE) has the potential to contribute substantially to both aims. That is why the Campaign for Learning has supported the ambition to increase the proportion of the working-age population with a Level 4…

  10. INTELLIGENCE, PERSONALITY AND ACHIEVEMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MUIR, R.C.; AND OTHERS

    A LONGITUDINAL DEVELOPMENTAL STUDY OF A GROUP OF MIDDLE CLASS CHILDREN IS DESCRIBED, WITH EMPHASIS ON A SEGMENT OF THE RESEARCH INVESTIGATING THE RELATIONSHIP OF ACHIEVEMENT, INTELLIGENCE, AND EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE. THE SUBJECTS WERE 105 CHILDREN AGED FIVE TO 6.3 ATTENDING TWO SCHOOLS IN MONTREAL. EACH CHILD WAS ASSESSED IN THE AREAS OF…

  11. SALT and Spelling Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Joan

    A study investigated the effects of suggestopedic accelerative learning and teaching (SALT) on the spelling achievement, attitudes toward school, and memory skills of fourth-grade students. Subjects were 20 male and 28 female students from two self-contained classrooms at Kennedy Elementary School in Rexburg, Idaho. The control classroom and the…

  12. Appraising Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    To determine quality sequence in pupil progress, evaluation approaches need to be used which guide the teacher to assist learners to attain optimally. Teachers must use a variety of procedures to appraise student achievement in reading, because no one approach is adequate. Appraisal approaches might include: (1) observation and subsequent…

  13. Partial confinement photonic crystal waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, S.; Hong, C.-Y.; Pfaff, N.; Kimerling, L. C.; Michel, J.

    2008-12-29

    One-dimensional photonic crystal waveguides with an incomplete photonic band gap are modeled and proposed for an integration application that exploits their property of partial angular confinement. Planar apodized photonic crystal structures are deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and characterized by reflectivity as a function of angle and polarization, validating a partial confinement design for light at 850 nm wavelength. Partial confinement identifies an approach for tailoring waveguide properties by the exploitation of conformal film deposition over a substrate with angularly dependent topology. An application for an optoelectronic transceiver is demonstrated.

  14. Retinal pigment epithelial change and partial lipodystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, T. M.; Holdright, D. R.; Schulenberg, W. E.; Turner, R. C.; Joplin, G. F.

    1988-01-01

    Cuticular drusen and retinal pigment epithelial changes were found incidentally in a 27 year old Lebanese woman during assessment of partial lipodystrophy. Her vision was normal despite involvement of both maculae. The patient had hypocomplementaemia, but serum C3 nephritic factor was absent and renal function was normal. She had impaired glucose tolerance and a continuous infusion of glucose with model assessment (CIGMA) test revealed low normal tissue insulin sensitivity and high normal pancreatic beta cell function. Mild fasting hypertriglyceridaemia (2.0 mmol/l) may have been secondary to impaired insulin sensitivity. Endocrine function was otherwise normal apart from a completely absent growth hormone response to adequate hypoglycaemia. The simultaneous occurrence of partial lipodystrophy and retinal pigmentary epithelial and basement membrane changes appears to be a newly recognized syndrome. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:3255937

  15. An Ultrasonic Clamp for Bloodless Partial Nephrectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafon, Cyril; Bouchoux, Guillaume; Murat, François Joseph; Birer, Alain; Theillère, Yves; Chapelon, Jean Yves; Cathignol, Dominique

    2007-05-01

    Maximum conservation of the kidney is preferable through partial nephrectomy for patients at risk of disease recurrence of renal cancers. Haemostatic tools are needed in order to achieve bloodless surgery and reduce post surgery morbidity. Two piezo-ceramic transducers operating at a frequency of 4 MHz were mounted on each arm of a clamp. When used for coagulation purposes, two transducers situated on opposite arms of the clamp were driven simultaneously. Heat delivery was optimized as each transducers mirrored back to targeted tissues the wave generated by the opposite transducer. Real-time treatment monitoring with an echo-based technique was also envisaged with this clamp. Therapy was periodically interrupted so one transducer could generate a pulse. The echo returning from the opposite transducer was treated. Coagulation necroses were obtained in vitro on substantial thicknesses (23-38mm) of pig liver over exposure durations ranging from 30s to 130s, and with acoustic intensities of less than 15W/cm2 per transducer. Both kidneys of two pigs were treated in vivo with the clamp (14.5W/cm2 for 90s), and the partial nephrectomies performed proved to be bloodless. In vitro and in vivo, wide transfixing lesions corresponded to an echo energy decrease superior to -10dB and parabolic form of the time of flight versus treatment time. In conclusion, this ultrasound clamp has proven to be an excellent mean for achieving monitored haemostasis in kidney.

  16. Project ACHIEVE final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-13

    Project ACHIEVE was a math/science academic enhancement program aimed at first year high school Hispanic American students. Four high schools -- two in El Paso, Texas and two in Bakersfield, California -- participated in this Department of Energy-funded program during the spring and summer of 1996. Over 50 students, many of whom felt they were facing a nightmare future, were given the opportunity to work closely with personal computers and software, sophisticated calculators, and computer-based laboratories -- an experience which their regular academic curriculum did not provide. Math and science projects, exercises, and experiments were completed that emphasized independent and creative applications of scientific and mathematical theories to real world problems. The most important outcome was the exposure Project ACHIEVE provided to students concerning the college and technical-field career possibilities available to them.

  17. Partial-Payload Support Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, R.; Freeman, M.

    1984-01-01

    Partial-payload support structure (PPSS) is modular, bridge like structure supporting experiments weighing up to 2 tons. PPSS handles such experiments more economically than standard Spacelab pallet system.

  18. Secondary partial empty sella syndrome in an elite bodybuilder.

    PubMed

    Dickerman, R D; Jaikumar, S

    2001-06-01

    The pituitary gland is a hormone-responsive gland and is known to vary in size depending on the hormonal status of the patient and the multifaceted positive and negative feedback hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Partial empty sella syndrome with an atrophied pituitary gland is seen in primary neuroendocrinopathies such as growth hormone deficiency, primary hypothyroidism, central diabetes insipidus and hypogonadism. Partial empty sella has also been shown to occur in patients with elevations in intracranial pressure. Secondary partial empty sella syndrome with significant pituitary gland atrophy from negative feedback inhibition of long-term exogenous hormonal use has not been previously reported. We are reporting on a case of partial empty sella syndrome occurring in an elite bodybuilder with a long history of exogenous abuse of growth hormone, testosterone and thyroid hormone. The pathophysiological mechanisms of secondary partial empty sella syndrome from exogenous hormone use and the possibility for elevations in intracranial pressure contributing to this syndrome will be discussed.

  19. Complex partial status and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ardila, A; Gómez, J

    1988-04-01

    Three cases of complex partial status which were diagnosed as psychotic episodes are presented. The scans of two of these cases show structural abnormalities in the left temporal lobe. It is proposed that there are similar neurophysiological mechanisms in primary schizophrenia and in the perceptual, affective and cognitive phenomena apparent is some complex and psychic partial seizures. The hippocampal-amygdaline system plays a central role in both cases.

  20. [Acrylic resin removable partial dentures].

    PubMed

    de Baat, C; Witter, D J; Creugers, N H J

    2011-01-01

    An acrylic resin removable partial denture is distinguished from other types of removable partial dentures by an all-acrylic resin base which is, in principle, solely supported by the edentulous regions of the tooth arch and in the maxilla also by the hard palate. When compared to the other types of removable partial dentures, the acrylic resin removable partial denture has 3 favourable aspects: the economic aspect, its aesthetic quality and the ease with which it can be extended and adjusted. Disadvantages are an increased risk of caries developing, gingivitis, periodontal disease, denture stomatitis, alveolar bone reduction, tooth migration, triggering of the gag reflex and damage to the acrylic resin base. Present-day indications are ofa temporary or palliative nature or are motivated by economic factors. Special varieties of the acrylic resin removable partial denture are the spoon denture, the flexible denture fabricated of non-rigid acrylic resin, and the two-piece sectional denture. Furthermore, acrylic resin removable partial dentures can be supplied with clasps or reinforced by fibers or metal wires.

  1. Does achievement motivation mediate the semantic achievement priming effect?

    PubMed

    Engeser, Stefan; Baumann, Nicola

    2014-10-01

    The aim of our research was to understand the processes of the prime-to-behavior effects with semantic achievement primes. We extended existing models with a perspective from achievement motivation theory and additionally used achievement primes embedded in the running text of excerpts of school textbooks to simulate a more natural priming condition. Specifically, we proposed that achievement primes affect implicit achievement motivation and conducted pilot experiments and 3 main experiments to explore this proposition. We found no reliable positive effect of achievement primes on implicit achievement motivation. In light of these findings, we tested whether explicit (instead of implicit) achievement motivation is affected by achievement primes and found this to be the case. In the final experiment, we found support for the assumption that higher explicit achievement motivation implies that achievement priming affects the outcome expectations. The implications of the results are discussed, and we conclude that primes affect achievement behavior by heightening explicit achievement motivation and outcome expectancies. PMID:24820250

  2. Parenting Style and Parental Involvement: Relations with Adolescent Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulson, Sharon E.

    1994-01-01

    Eighty ninth-grade students completed questionnaires regarding their parents' demandingness, responsiveness, school involvement, and commitment to achievement. Boys' reports of both maternal and paternal parenting significantly predicted their achievement, with parental values toward achievement significantly predicting achievement in boys above…

  3. Partial Component Analysis of a Comprehensive Smoking Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horan, John J.; Hackett, Gail

    The effects of a comprehensive program for the treatment of cigarette addiction were investigated. Subjects were 18 university students and 12 community members. Abstinence levels of 40 percent, verified by expired air carbon monoxide tests, were achieved in a six to nine month follow-up period. A partial component analysis revealed that the…

  4. Suppression of Pest Lepidoptera by Releasing Partially Sterile Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knipling. E. F.

    1970-01-01

    Uses population growth models to calculate the theoretical suppression of reproduction achieved by releasing irradiated male moths carrying genetic sterility factors. Shows that releasing partially sterile males should be more effective than releasing fully sterile males. Discusses the costs and advantages of applying this approach to the control…

  5. Feedback and Prior Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyman, Cynthia; Tobias, Sigmund

    The hypothesis that feedback in programmed instruction is an important variable in the learning of novel, but not familiar, content was investigated. A linear, constructed response program dealing with the Sabbath rituals in the synagogue was chosen due to wide variability in student familiarity with this topic. Subjects were randomly assigned to…

  6. Multimedia document retrieval system using partially ordered/partially reliable transport service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Phillip T.; Golden, Edward; Amer, Paul D.; Marasli, Rahmi

    1996-03-01

    We investigate the benefits of using a partially-ordered/partially-reliable (PO/PR) transport service for multimedia document retrieval over the Internet by implementing a prototype system. We introduce PMSL, a document specification language combining aspects of Little and Ghafoor's OCPN with features for graceful degradation. We then show that for retrieval of PMSL documents, our PO/PR transport protocol (POCv2) provides several benefits over traditional protocols such as TCP or UDP. First, POCv2 provides mechanisms to achieve the reliability and order requirements of individual multimedia objects as specified by a document author. Second, when network conditions are poor (e.g., high loss rates), POCv2 provides for graceful degradation. Finally, POCv2 simplifies application development by providing appropriate mechanisms for synchronization.

  7. Reasonable partiality in professional relationships.

    PubMed

    Almond, Brenda

    2005-04-01

    First, two aspects of the partiality issue are identified: (1) Is it right/reasonable for professionals to favour their clients' interests over either those of other individuals or those of society in general? (2) Are special non-universalisable obligations attached to certain professional roles? Second, some comments are made on the notions of partiality and reasonableness. On partiality, the assumption that only two positions are possible--a detached universalism or a partialist egoism--is challenged and it is suggested that partiality, e.g. to family members, lies between these two positions, being neither a form of egoism, nor of impersonal detachment. On reasonableness, it is pointed out that 'reasonable' is an ambiguous concept, eliding the notions of the 'morally right' and the 'rational.' Third, a series of practical examples are taken from counselling, medicine, law, education and religious practice and some common principles are abstracted from the cases and discussed. These include truth-telling, confidentiality, conflicts of interest between clients and particular others and between clients and society. It is concluded that while partiality can be justified as a useful tool in standard cases, particular circumstances can affect the final verdict.

  8. Electric conductivity for laboratory and field monitoring of induced partial saturation (IPS) in sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemiroodsari, Hadi

    implemented in the prepared specimen to validate the numerical simulation model and explore the use of conductivity probes to detect the transport of chemical solution, estimate degree of saturation achieved due to injection of chemical solution, and evaluate final zone of partial saturation. The conductivity probe and the simulation results agreed well. To study the effect of IPS on liquefaction response of the sand specimen, IPS was implemented in a large (2-story high) sand specimen prepared in the laminar box of NEES Buffalo and then the specimen was subjected to harmonic shaking. Electric conductivity probes were used in the specimen treatment by controlling the duration and spacing of injection of the chemical solution, in monitoring the transport of chemical solution, in the estimation of zone of partial saturation achieved, and in the estimation of degree of saturation achieved due to implementation of IPS. The conductivity probes indicated partial saturation of the specimen. The shaking tests results confirmed the partial saturation state of the sand specimen. In addition, to the laboratory works, electric conductivity probes were used in field implementation of IPS in a pilot test at the Wildlife Liquefaction Array (WLA) of NEES UCSB site. The conductivity probes in the field test helped decide the optimum injection pressure, the injection tube spacing, and the degree of saturation that could be achieved in the field. The various laboratory and field tests confirmed that electric conductivity and the probes devised and used can be invaluable in the implementation of IPS, by providing information regarding transport of the chemical solution, the spacing of injection tubes, duration of injection, and the zone and degree of partial saturation caused by IPS.

  9. Achieving closure at Fernald

    SciTech Connect

    Bradburne, John; Patton, Tisha C.

    2001-02-25

    When Fluor Fernald took over the management of the Fernald Environmental Management Project in 1992, the estimated closure date of the site was more than 25 years into the future. Fluor Fernald, in conjunction with DOE-Fernald, introduced the Accelerated Cleanup Plan, which was designed to substantially shorten that schedule and save taxpayers more than $3 billion. The management of Fluor Fernald believes there are three fundamental concerns that must be addressed by any contractor hoping to achieve closure of a site within the DOE complex. They are relationship management, resource management and contract management. Relationship management refers to the interaction between the site and local residents, regulators, union leadership, the workforce at large, the media, and any other interested stakeholder groups. Resource management is of course related to the effective administration of the site knowledge base and the skills of the workforce, the attraction and retention of qualified a nd competent technical personnel, and the best recognition and use of appropriate new technologies. Perhaps most importantly, resource management must also include a plan for survival in a flat-funding environment. Lastly, creative and disciplined contract management will be essential to effecting the closure of any DOE site. Fluor Fernald, together with DOE-Fernald, is breaking new ground in the closure arena, and ''business as usual'' has become a thing of the past. How Fluor Fernald has managed its work at the site over the last eight years, and how it will manage the new site closure contract in the future, will be an integral part of achieving successful closure at Fernald.

  10. Partial pressure analysis of plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.

    1984-11-01

    The application of partial pressure analysis for plasma diagnostic measurements is reviewed. A comparison is made between the techniques of plasma flux analysis and partial pressure analysis for mass spectrometry of plasmas. Emphasis is given to the application of quadrupole mass spectrometers (QMS). The interface problems associated with the coupling of a QMS to a plasma device are discussed including: differential-pumping requirements, electromagnetic interferences from the plasma environment, the detection of surface-active species, ion source interactions, and calibration procedures. Example measurements are presented from process monitoring of glow discharge plasmas which are useful for cleaning and conditioning vacuum vessels.

  11. Full and partial gauge fixing

    SciTech Connect

    Shirzad, A.

    2007-08-15

    Gauge fixing may be done in different ways. We show that using the chain structure to describe a constrained system enables us to use either a full gauge, in which all gauged degrees of freedom are determined, or a partial gauge, in which some first class constraints remain as subsidiary conditions to be imposed on the solutions of the equations of motion. We also show that the number of constants of motion depends on the level in a constraint chain in which the gauge fixing condition is imposed. The relativistic point particle, electromagnetism, and the Polyakov string are discussed as examples and full or partial gauges are distinguished.

  12. Achieving urinary continence in children.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsi-Yang

    2010-07-01

    Achievement of urinary continence is an important developmental step that most children attain with the assistance of their parents and caregivers. Debate continues as to the best time to toilet train; in some Asian and African cultures children are trained as infants, while training at age 2-3 years is more typical in Western cultures. Infant voiding is not merely a spinal reflex, as the sensation of bladder filling is relayed to the brain. However, the ability of the brain to inhibit bladder contractions, and to achieve coordinated bladder contraction with sphincter relaxation, matures over time. While there is a concern that later toilet training may be responsible for an increase in urinary incontinence in children, no controlled studies on early versus late toilet training exist to evaluate this hypothesis. A number of medical conditions such as spina bifida, posterior urethral valves, cerebral palsy and autism can cause incontinence and difficulties in toilet training. The decision to start toilet training a child should take into account both the parents' expectation of how independent the child will be in terms of toileting, and the child's developmental readiness, so that a realistic time course for toilet training can be implemented.

  13. Induction heating apparatus and methods for selectively energizing an inductor in response to a measured electrical characteristic that is at least partially a function of a temperature of a material being heated

    DOEpatents

    Richardson, John G.; Morrison, John L.; Hawkes, Grant L.

    2006-07-04

    An induction heating apparatus includes a measurement device for indicating an electrical resistance of a material to be heated. A controller is configured for energizing an inductor in response to the indicated resistance. An inductor may be energized with an alternating current, a characteristic of which may be selected in response to an indicated electrical resistance. Alternatively, a temperature of the material may be indicated via measuring the electrical resistance thereof and a characteristic of an alternating current for energizing the inductor may be selected in response to the temperature. Energizing the inductor may minimize the difference between a desired and indicated resistance or the difference between a desired and indicated temperature. A method of determining a temperature of at least one region of at least one material to be induction heated includes correlating a measured electrical resistance thereof to an average temperature thereof.

  14. Apparatus for generating partially coherent radiation

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2005-02-22

    Techniques for generating partially coherent radiation and particularly for converting effectively coherent radiation from a synchrotron to partially coherent EUV radiation suitable for projection lithography.

  15. Achievement Goals and Achievement Emotions: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chiungjung

    2011-01-01

    This meta-analysis synthesized 93 independent samples (N = 30,003) in 77 studies that reported in 78 articles examining correlations between achievement goals and achievement emotions. Achievement goals were meaningfully associated with different achievement emotions. The correlations of mastery and mastery approach goals with positive achievement…

  16. Inducible nitric oxide synthase-deficient mice develop enhanced type 1 cytokine-associated cellular and humoral immune responses after vaccination with attenuated Schistosoma mansoni cercariae but display partially reduced resistance.

    PubMed

    James, S L; Cheever, A W; Caspar, P; Wynn, T A

    1998-08-01

    High levels of nitric oxide (NO) are produced by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in response to activating signals from Th1-associated cytokines and play an important role in cytotoxicity and cytostasis against many pathogenic microorganisms. In addition to its direct effector function, NO serves as a potent immunoregulatory factor. NO produced by gamma interferon-activated macrophages immobilizes and kills Schistosoma mansoni larvae, and several studies have indicated a role for this pathway in protective immunity against this parasite. The potential regulatory influence of NO in immunity to S. mansoni is less well understood. In this study, we have used iNOS-deficient mice to determine the role of NO in mice vaccinated with irradiated cercariae of S. mansoni. We show by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and reverse transcriptase PCR analysis that vaccinated iNOS-deficient mice develop exacerbated type 1 cytokine responses in the lungs, the site where resistance to infection is primarily manifested. In addition, parasite-specific immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) and IgG2b antibody responses were significantly increased in vaccinated iNOS-deficient animals and total IgE antibody levels in serum were decreased relative to those in wild-type controls. Surprisingly, since resistance in this vaccine model is largely Th1 dependent and since Th1-related cellular and humoral immune responses were found to be exacerbated in vaccinated iNOS-deficient mice, vaccine-elicited protective immunity against challenge infection was found to be reduced. These findings demonstrate that iNOS plays a paradoxical role in immunity to S. mansoni, both in the effector mechanism of resistance and in the down regulation of the type 1 cytokine response, which is ultimately required for NO production.

  17. Partially Opened Oven on Phoenix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This view from the Robotic Arm Camera on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shows partial opening of doors to one of the tiny ovens of the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer.

    Each oven has a pair of spring-loaded doors. Near the center of the image, the partial opening of a pair of doors reveals screen over the opening where a soil sample will be delivered. The door to the right is fully opened and the one to the left is partially deployed. The doors are 10 centimeters (4 inches) long. The opening is 4 centimeters (1.5 inches) wide.

    Tests on the Phoenix testbed at the University of Arizona, Tucson, indicate that a soil sample could be delivered into the oven through the partially opened doors. Engineers are also exploring possibilities for opening the doors more completely.This image was taken during Phoenix's eighth Martian day, or sol (June 2, 2008).

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  18. Assessing Partial Knowledge in Vocabulary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard M.

    1987-01-01

    Partial knowledge was assessed in a multiple choice vocabulary test. Test reliability and concurrent validity were compared using Rasch-based dichotomous and polychotomous scoring models. Results supported the polychtomous scoring model, and moderately supported J. O'Connor's theory of vocabulary acquisition. (Author/GDC)

  19. Covert Reinforcement: A Partial Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ripstra, Constance C.; And Others

    A partial replication of an investigation of the effect of covert reinforcement on a perceptual estimation task is described. The study was extended to include an extinction phase. There were five treatment groups: covert reinforcement, neutral scene reinforcement, noncontingent covert reinforcement, and two control groups. Each subject estimated…

  20. Partially molten magma ocean model

    SciTech Connect

    Shirley, D.N.

    1983-02-15

    The properties of the lunar crust and upper mantle can be explained if the outer 300-400 km of the moon was initially only partially molten rather than fully molten. The top of the partially molten region contained about 20% melt and decreased to 0% at 300-400 km depth. Nuclei of anorthositic crust formed over localized bodies of magma segregated from the partial melt, then grew peripherally until they coverd the moon. Throughout most of its growth period the anorthosite crust floated on a layer of magma a few km thick. The thickness of this layer is regulated by the opposing forces of loss of material by fractional crystallization and addition of magma from the partial melt below. Concentrations of Sr, Eu, and Sm in pristine ferroan anorthosites are found to be consistent with this model, as are trends for the ferroan anorthosites and Mg-rich suites on a diagram of An in plagioclase vs. mg in mafics. Clustering of Eu, Sr, and mg values found among pristine ferroan anorthosites are predicted by this model.

  1. Leadership in Partially Distributed Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plotnick, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Inter-organizational collaboration is becoming more common. When organizations collaborate they often do so in partially distributed teams (PDTs). A PDT is a hybrid team that has at least one collocated subteam and at least two subteams that are geographically distributed and communicate primarily through electronic media. While PDTs share many…

  2. Entrepreneur achievement. Liaoning province.

    PubMed

    Zhao, R

    1994-03-01

    This paper reports the successful entrepreneurial endeavors of members of a 20-person women's group in Liaoning Province, China. Jing Yuhong, a member of the Family Planning Association at Shileizi Village, Dalian City, provided the basis for their achievements by first building an entertainment/study room in her home to encourage married women to learn family planning. Once stocked with books, magazines, pamphlets, and other materials on family planning and agricultural technology, dozens of married women in the neighborhood flocked voluntarily to the room. Yuhong also set out to give these women a way to earn their own income as a means of helping then gain greater equality with their husbands and exert greater control over their personal reproductive and social lives. She gave a section of her farming land to the women's group, loaned approximately US$5200 to group members to help them generate income from small business initiatives, built a livestock shed in her garden for the group to raise marmots, and erected an awning behind her house under which mushrooms could be grown. The investment yielded $12,000 in the first year, allowing each woman to keep more than $520 in dividends. Members then soon began going to fairs in the capital and other places to learn about the outside world, and have successfully ventured out on their own to generate individual incomes. Ten out of twenty women engaged in these income-generating activities asked for and got the one-child certificate.

  3. Controllability of the better chosen partial networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xueming; Pan, Linqiang

    2016-08-01

    How to control large complex networks is a great challenge. Recent studies have proved that the whole network can be sufficiently steered by injecting control signals into a minimum set of driver nodes, and the minimum numbers of driver nodes for many real networks are high, indicating that it is difficult to control them. For some large natural and technological networks, it is impossible and not feasible to control the full network. For example, in biological networks like large-scale gene regulatory networks it is impossible to control all the genes. This prompts us to explore the question how to choose partial networks that are easy for controlling and important in networked systems. In this work, we propose a method to achieve this goal. By computing the minimum driver nodes densities of the partial networks of Erdös-Rényi (ER) networks, scale-free (SF) networks and 23 real networks, we find that our method performs better than random method that chooses nodes randomly. Moreover, we find that the nodes chosen by our method tend to be the essential elements of the whole systems, via studying the nodes chosen by our method of a real human signaling network and a human protein interaction network and discovering that the chosen nodes from these networks tend to be cancer-associated genes. The implementation of our method shows some interesting connections between the structure and the controllability of networks, improving our understanding of the control principles of complex systems.

  4. Extrapolation methods for dynamic partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turkel, E.

    1978-01-01

    Several extrapolation procedures are presented for increasing the order of accuracy in time for evolutionary partial differential equations. These formulas are based on finite difference schemes in both the spatial and temporal directions. On practical grounds the methods are restricted to schemes that are fourth order in time and either second, fourth or sixth order in space. For hyperbolic problems the second order in space methods are not useful while the fourth order methods offer no advantage over the Kreiss-Oliger method unless very fine meshes are used. Advantages are first achieved using sixth order methods in space coupled with fourth order accuracy in time. Computational results are presented confirming the analytic discussions.

  5. An Elastoplastic Model for Partially Saturated Collapsible Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianjun

    2016-02-01

    A unified elastoplastic model for describing the stress-strain behavior of partially saturated collapsible rocks is proposed. The elastic-plastic response due to loading and unloading is captured using bounding surface plasticity. The coupling effect of hydraulic and mechanical responses is addressed by applying the effective stress concept. Special attention is paid to the rock-fluid characteristic curve (RFCC), effective stress parameter, and suction hardening. A wide range of saturation degree is considered. The characteristics of mechanical behavior in partially saturated collapsible rocks are captured for all cases considered.

  6. Factors governing partial coalescence in oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Fredrick, Eveline; Walstra, Pieter; Dewettinck, Koen

    2010-01-15

    The consequences of the instability mechanism partial coalescence in oil-in-water food emulsions show a discrepancy. On the one hand, it needs to be avoided in order to achieve an extended shelf life in food products like sauces, creams and several milk products. On the other hand, during the manufacturing of products like ice cream, butter and whipped toppings partial coalescence is required to achieve the desired product properties. It contributes to the structure formation, the physicochemical properties (stability, firmness,...) and the sensory perception, like fattiness and creaminess of the final food products. This review critically summarises the findings of partial coalescence in oil-in-water emulsions in order to provide insight in how to enhance and retard it. Next to the pioneering work, a large set of experimental results of more recent work is discussed. First, the general mechanism of partial coalescence is considered and a distinction is made between partial and 'true' coalescence. The main differences are: the required solid particles in the dispersed oil phase, the formation of irregular clusters and the increased aggregation rate. Second, the kinetics of partial coalescence is discussed. In more detail, potential parameters affecting the rate of partial coalescence are considered by means of the encounter frequency and capture efficiency of the fat globules. The flow conditions, the fat volume fraction and the physicochemical properties of continuous aqueous phase affect both the encounter frequency and capture efficiency while the actual temperature, temperature history and the composition and formulation of the emulsion mainly affect the capture efficiency. PMID:19913777

  7. The partial-birth stratagem.

    PubMed

    1998-06-01

    In Wisconsin, physicians stopped performing abortions when a Federal District Court Judge refused to issue a temporary restraining order against the state's newly enacted "partial birth" abortion ban that was couched in such vague language it actually covered all abortions. While ostensibly attempting to ban late-term "intact dilation and extraction," the language of the law did not refer to that procedure or to late terms. Instead, it prohibited all abortions in which a physician "partially vaginally delivers a living child, causes the death of the partially delivered child with the intent to kill the child and then completes the delivery of the child." The law also defined "child" as "a human being from the time of fertilization" until birth. It is clear that this abortion ban is unconstitutional under Row v. Wade, and this unconstitutionality is compounded by the fact that the law allowed no exception to protect a woman's health, which is required by Roe for abortion bans after fetal viability. Wisconsin is only one of about 28 states that have enacted similar laws, and only two have restricted the ban to postviability abortions. Many of these laws have been struck down in court, and President Clinton has continued to veto the Federal partial-birth bill. The Wisconsin Judge acknowledged that opponents of the ban will likely prevail when the case is heard, but his action in denying the temporary injunction means that many women in Wisconsin will not receive timely medical care. The partial birth strategy is really only another anti-abortion strategy.

  8. Liquid spreading under partial wetting conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M.; Pahlavan, A. A.; Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; McKinley, G. H.; Juanes, R.

    2013-12-01

    Traditional mathematical descriptions of multiphase flow in porous media rely on a multiphase extension of Darcy's law, and lead to nonlinear second-order (advection-diffusion) partial differential equations for fluid saturations. Here, we study horizontal redistribution of immiscible fluids. The traditional Darcy-flow model predicts that the spreading of a finite amount of liquid in a horizontal porous medium never stops; a prediction that is not substantiated by observation. To help guide the development of new models of multiphase flow in porous media [1], we draw an analogy with the flow of thin films. The flow of thin films over flat surfaces has been the subject of much theoretical, experimental and computational research [2]. Under the lubrication approximation, the classical mathematical model for these flows takes the form of a nonlinear fourth-order PDE, where the fourth-order term models the effect of surface tension [3]. This classical model, however, effectively assumes that the film is perfectly wetting to the substrate and, therefore, does not capture the partial wetting regime. Partial wetting is responsible for stopping the spread of a liquid puddle. Here, we present experiments of (large-volume) liquid spreading over a flat horizontal substrate in the partial wetting regime, and characterize the four spreading regimes that we observe. We extend our previous theoretical work of two-phase flow in a capillary tube [4], and develop a macroscopic phase-field modeling of thin-film flows with partial wetting. Our model naturally accounts for the dynamic contact angle at the contact line, and therefore permits modeling thin-film flows without invoking a precursor film, leading to compactly-supported solutions that reproduce the spreading dynamics and the static equilibrium configuration observed in the experiments. We anticipate that this modeling approach will provide a natural mathematical framework to describe spreading and redistribution of immiscible

  9. HEPEX - achievements and challenges!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappenberger, Florian; Ramos, Maria-Helena; Thielen, Jutta; Wood, Andy; Wang, Qj; Duan, Qingyun; Collischonn, Walter; Verkade, Jan; Voisin, Nathalie; Wetterhall, Fredrik; Vuillaume, Jean-Francois Emmanuel; Lucatero Villasenor, Diana; Cloke, Hannah L.; Schaake, John; van Andel, Schalk-Jan

    2014-05-01

    HEPEX is an international initiative bringing together hydrologists, meteorologists, researchers and end-users to develop advanced probabilistic hydrological forecast techniques for improved flood, drought and water management. HEPEX was launched in 2004 as an independent, cooperative international scientific activity. During the first meeting, the overarching goal was defined as: "to develop and test procedures to produce reliable hydrological ensemble forecasts, and to demonstrate their utility in decision making related to the water, environmental and emergency management sectors." The applications of hydrological ensemble predictions span across large spatio-temporal scales, ranging from short-term and localized predictions to global climate change and regional modeling. Within the HEPEX community, information is shared through its blog (www.hepex.org), meetings, testbeds and intercompaison experiments, as well as project reportings. Key questions of HEPEX are: * What adaptations are required for meteorological ensemble systems to be coupled with hydrological ensemble systems? * How should the existing hydrological ensemble prediction systems be modified to account for all sources of uncertainty within a forecast? * What is the best way for the user community to take advantage of ensemble forecasts and to make better decisions based on them? This year HEPEX celebrates its 10th year anniversary and this poster will present a review of the main operational and research achievements and challenges prepared by Hepex contributors on data assimilation, post-processing of hydrologic predictions, forecast verification, communication and use of probabilistic forecasts in decision-making. Additionally, we will present the most recent activities implemented by Hepex and illustrate how everyone can join the community and participate to the development of new approaches in hydrologic ensemble prediction.

  10. The Homogeneity of School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahan, Sorel

    Since the measurement of school achievement involves the administration of achievement tests to various grades on various subjects, both grade level and subject matter contribute to within-school achievement variations. To determine whether achievement test scores vary most among different fields within a grade level, or within fields among…

  11. Partial information transmission can be found in music attributes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Li, Gujing; Gong, Diankun; Hu, Qingqing

    2014-02-12

    Previous studies have proved that partial information transmission can be found between intensity and pitch. In our last study, it was demonstrated that the timbre attribute can be transmitted as partial information between timbre and intensity. We manipulated the two attributes of stimulus, namely, timbre (piano vs. violin) and pitch (high vs. low), to find out whether they also have partial information transmission. We used the two-choice 'go/no-go' paradigm, which included more 'go' trials of timbre. Our result showed that lateralized readiness potentials were elicited in 'no-go' trials, which meant that the timbre attribute had been transmitted to the response preparation stage before the intensity attribute was processed in the stimuli identification stage. This result supports the asynchronous discrete coding model in information processing. Therefore, we suggest that partial information transmission can be found in music attributes including timbre, intensity, and pitch.

  12. Physics analysis of the gang partial rod drive event

    SciTech Connect

    Boman, C.; Frost, R.L.

    1992-08-01

    During the routine positioning of partial-length control rods in Gang 3 on the afternoon of Monday, July 27, 1992, the partial-length rods continued to drive into the reactor even after the operator released the controlling toggle switch. In response to this occurrence, the Safety Analysis and Engineering Services Group (SAEG) requested that the Applied Physics Group (APG) analyze the gang partial rod drive event. Although similar accident scenarios were considered in analysis for Chapter 15 of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR), APG and SAEG conferred and agreed that this particular type of gang partial-length rod motion event was not included in the SAR. This report details this analysis.

  13. Partial information transmission can be found in music attributes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Li, Gujing; Gong, Diankun; Hu, Qingqing

    2014-02-12

    Previous studies have proved that partial information transmission can be found between intensity and pitch. In our last study, it was demonstrated that the timbre attribute can be transmitted as partial information between timbre and intensity. We manipulated the two attributes of stimulus, namely, timbre (piano vs. violin) and pitch (high vs. low), to find out whether they also have partial information transmission. We used the two-choice 'go/no-go' paradigm, which included more 'go' trials of timbre. Our result showed that lateralized readiness potentials were elicited in 'no-go' trials, which meant that the timbre attribute had been transmitted to the response preparation stage before the intensity attribute was processed in the stimuli identification stage. This result supports the asynchronous discrete coding model in information processing. Therefore, we suggest that partial information transmission can be found in music attributes including timbre, intensity, and pitch. PMID:24323126

  14. Post-Transcriptional Coordination of the Arabidopsis Iron Deficiency Response is Partially Dependent on the E3 Ligases RING DOMAIN LIGASE1 (RGLG1) and RING DOMAIN LIGASE2 (RGLG2).

    PubMed

    Pan, I-Chun; Tsai, Huei-Hsuan; Cheng, Ya-Tan; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Buckhout, Thomas J; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    Acclimation to changing environmental conditions is mediated by proteins, the abundance of which is carefully tuned by an elaborate interplay of DNA-templated and post-transcriptional processes. To dissect the mechanisms that control and mediate cellular iron homeostasis, we conducted quantitative high-resolution iTRAQ proteomics and microarray-based transcriptomic profiling of iron-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana plants. A total of 13,706 and 12,124 proteins was identified with a quadrupole-Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer in roots and leaves, respectively. This deep proteomic coverage allowed accurate estimates of post-transcriptional regulation in response to iron deficiency. Similarly regulated transcripts were detected in only 13% (roots) and 11% (leaves) of the 886 proteins that differentially accumulated between iron-sufficient and iron-deficient plants, indicating that the majority of the iron-responsive proteins was post-transcriptionally regulated. Mutants harboring defects in the RING DOMAIN LIGASE1 (RGLG1)(1) and RING DOMAIN LIGASE2 (RGLG2) showed a pleiotropic phenotype that resembled iron-deficient plants with reduced trichome density and the formation of branched root hairs. Proteomic and transcriptomic profiling of rglg1 rglg2 double mutants revealed that the functional RGLG protein is required for the regulation of a large set of iron-responsive proteins including the coordinated expression of ribosomal proteins. This integrative analysis provides a detailed catalog of post-transcriptionally regulated proteins and allows the concept of a chiefly transcriptionally regulated iron deficiency response to be revisited. Protein data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002126.

  15. Post-Transcriptional Coordination of the Arabidopsis Iron Deficiency Response is Partially Dependent on the E3 Ligases RING DOMAIN LIGASE1 (RGLG1) and RING DOMAIN LIGASE2 (RGLG2)*

    PubMed Central

    Pan, I-Chun; Tsai, Huei-Hsuan; Cheng, Ya-Tan; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Buckhout, Thomas J.; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Acclimation to changing environmental conditions is mediated by proteins, the abundance of which is carefully tuned by an elaborate interplay of DNA-templated and post-transcriptional processes. To dissect the mechanisms that control and mediate cellular iron homeostasis, we conducted quantitative high-resolution iTRAQ proteomics and microarray-based transcriptomic profiling of iron-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana plants. A total of 13,706 and 12,124 proteins was identified with a quadrupole-Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer in roots and leaves, respectively. This deep proteomic coverage allowed accurate estimates of post-transcriptional regulation in response to iron deficiency. Similarly regulated transcripts were detected in only 13% (roots) and 11% (leaves) of the 886 proteins that differentially accumulated between iron-sufficient and iron-deficient plants, indicating that the majority of the iron-responsive proteins was post-transcriptionally regulated. Mutants harboring defects in the RING DOMAIN LIGASE1 (RGLG1)1 and RING DOMAIN LIGASE2 (RGLG2) showed a pleiotropic phenotype that resembled iron-deficient plants with reduced trichome density and the formation of branched root hairs. Proteomic and transcriptomic profiling of rglg1 rglg2 double mutants revealed that the functional RGLG protein is required for the regulation of a large set of iron-responsive proteins including the coordinated expression of ribosomal proteins. This integrative analysis provides a detailed catalog of post-transcriptionally regulated proteins and allows the concept of a chiefly transcriptionally regulated iron deficiency response to be revisited. Protein data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002126. PMID:26253232

  16. The Effectiveness of the Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement (MESA) Program's Administrative and Policy-Making Processes. A Report to the Legislature in Response to Assembly Bill 610 (1985). Commission Report 89-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Postsecondary Education Commission, Sacramento.

    The Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement (MESA) Program was established in 1970 to increase the number of minority students in college programs. This paper reports the MESA administrative operations and policy-making processes. Part 1 summarizes the background of this study. Part 2 describes MESA's administrative operations and provides…

  17. Administration of MESA (Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement). A Report to the Legislature in Response to Supplemental Language in the 1984-85 Budget Act. Commission Report 85-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Postsecondary Education Commission, Sacramento.

    Mathematics, Engineering, and Science Achievement (MESA) is a public service program administered by the Lawrence Hall of Science at the University of California, Berkeley. The purpose of the program is to increase the number of minority students who have sound academic preparation, giving them the background to successfully complete a…

  18. Self-Regulation and the Income-Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Gary W.; Rosenbaum, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    The pervasive income-related achievement gap among children has been partially explained by parental investments. Wealthier parents provide more cognitively enriched environments (e.g., books, informal learning opportunities such as music lessons) and converse more with their children relative to low-income parents. However parental investment…

  19. High Stakes Testing and Student Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    The effects of high stakes testing may be critical in the lives of public school students and may have many consequences for schools and teachers. There are no easy answers in measuring student achievement and in holding teachers accountable for learner progress. High stakes testing also involves responsibilities on the part of the principal who…

  20. Designing the Board's New Literature Achievement Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purves, Alan C.

    1968-01-01

    This article describes the problems that the College Entrance Examination Board's Committee of Review for the Examinations in English encountered in creating a fair, objective, hour-long literature achievement test which would meet four objectives--to measure the breadth of a student's reading, his understanding of that reading, his response to…

  1. Academic Achievement, Technology and Race: Experimental Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairlie, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    Although a large literature explores the achievement gap between minority and non-minority students, very little is known about whether disparities in access to technology are partly responsible. Data from the first-ever field experiment involving the random provision of free computers to low-income community college students for home use are used…

  2. Wettability of partially suspended graphene

    PubMed Central

    Ondarçuhu, Thierry; Thomas, Vincent; Nuñez, Marc; Dujardin, Erik; Rahman, Atikur; Black, Charles T.; Checco, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The dependence of the wettability of graphene on the nature of the underlying substrate remains only partially understood. Here, we systematically investigate the role of liquid-substrate interactions on the wettability of graphene by varying the area fraction of suspended graphene from 0 to 95% by means of nanotextured substrates. We find that completely suspended graphene exhibits the highest water contact angle (85° ± 5°) compared to partially suspended or supported graphene, regardless of the hydrophobicity (hydrophilicity) of the substrate. Further, 80% of the long-range water-substrate interactions are screened by the graphene monolayer, the wettability of which is primarily determined by short-range graphene-liquid interactions. By its well-defined chemical and geometrical properties, supported graphene therefore provides a model system to elucidate the relative contribution of short and long range interactions to the macroscopic contact angle. PMID:27072195

  3. Partial stabilization-based guidance.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, M H; Binazadeh, T

    2012-01-01

    A novel nonlinear missile guidance law against maneuvering targets is designed based on the principles of partial stability. It is demonstrated that in a real approach which is adopted with actual situations, each state of the guidance system must have a special behavior and asymptotic stability or exponential stability of all states is not realistic. Thus, a new guidance law is developed based on the partial stability theorem in such a way that the behaviors of states in the closed-loop system are in conformity with a real guidance scenario that leads to collision. The performance of the proposed guidance law in terms of interception time and control effort is compared with the sliding mode guidance law by means of numerical simulations.

  4. Wettability of partially suspended graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Ondarçuhu, Thierry; Thomas, Vincent; Nuñez, Marc; Dujardin, Erik; Rahman, Atikur; Black, Charles T.; Checco, Antonio

    2016-04-13

    Dependence on the wettability of graphene on the nature of the underlying substrate remains only partially understood. We systematically investigate the role of liquid-substrate interactions on the wettability of graphene by varying the area fraction of suspended graphene from 0 to 95% by means of nanotextured substrates. We find that completely suspended graphene exhibits the highest water contact angle (85° ± 5°) compared to partially suspended or supported graphene, regardless of the hydrophobicity (hydrophilicity) of the substrate. Moreover, 80% of the long-range water-substrate interactions are screened by the graphene monolayer, the wettability of which is primarily determined by short-range graphene-liquidmore » interactions. By its well-defined chemical and geometrical properties, supported graphene therefore provides a model system to elucidate the relative contribution of short and long range interactions to the macroscopic contact angle.« less

  5. New approach to breast cancer CAD using partial least squares and kernel-partial least squares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Land, Walker H., Jr.; Heine, John; Embrechts, Mark; Smith, Tom; Choma, Robert; Wong, Lut

    2005-04-01

    Breast cancer is second only to lung cancer as a tumor-related cause of death in women. Currently, the method of choice for the early detection of breast cancer is mammography. While sensitive to the detection of breast cancer, its positive predictive value (PPV) is low, resulting in biopsies that are only 15-34% likely to reveal malignancy. This paper explores the use of two novel approaches called Partial Least Squares (PLS) and Kernel-PLS (K-PLS) to the diagnosis of breast cancer. The approach is based on optimization for the partial least squares (PLS) algorithm for linear regression and the K-PLS algorithm for non-linear regression. Preliminary results show that both the PLS and K-PLS paradigms achieved comparable results with three separate support vector learning machines (SVLMs), where these SVLMs were known to have been trained to a global minimum. That is, the average performance of the three separate SVLMs were Az = 0.9167927, with an average partial Az (Az90) = 0.5684283. These results compare favorably with the K-PLS paradigm, which obtained an Az = 0.907 and partial Az = 0.6123. The PLS paradigm provided comparable results. Secondly, both the K-PLS and PLS paradigms out performed the ANN in that the Az index improved by about 14% (Az ~ 0.907 compared to the ANN Az of ~ 0.8). The "Press R squared" value for the PLS and K-PLS machine learning algorithms were 0.89 and 0.9, respectively, which is in good agreement with the other MOP values.

  6. Effects of partial substitution of fish meal by soybean meal with or without heat-killed Lactobacillus plantarum (LP20) on growth performance, digestibility, and immune response of amberjack, Seriola dumerili juveniles.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Mahmoud A O; Koshio, Shunsuke; Ishikawa, Manabu; Yokoyama, Saichiro

    2015-01-01

    A 56-day feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of supplemented diets with heat-killed Lactobacillus plantarum (HK-LP) with graded levels of soybean meal (SBM) on growth, digestibility, blood parameters, and immune response of Seriola dumerili (initial weight, 25.05 ± 0.1 g). Seven isonitrogenous and isolipidic practical diets were formulated to contain 0%, 15%, 30%, and 45% SBM, and each SBM level was supplemented with HK-LP at 0.0 and 0.1%. Fish fed diet which contains 30% SBM with HK-LP grew significantly faster than the other groups with notable feed intake and protein retention. Further, protein gain, whole body protein content, protease activity, protein, and lipid digestibility were significantly increased for all fish groups except for fish fed diet which contains 45% SBM with or without HK-LP. Interestingly, lysozyme activity was significantly enhanced in fish fed diets that contain 15% and 30% SBM with HK-LP. Hematocrit, peroxidase, and bactericidal activities revealed a significant increase in 30% SBM with HK-LP group. In addition, fish fed diets which contain 0% and 30% SBM with HK-LP showed higher tolerance against low-salinity stress compared with other groups. In conclusion, the addition of HK-LP to amberjack diets appeared to improve SBM utilization, immune response, and stress resistance. PMID:25705667

  7. Effects of partial substitution of fish meal by soybean meal with or without heat-killed Lactobacillus plantarum (LP20) on growth performance, digestibility, and immune response of amberjack, Seriola dumerili juveniles.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Mahmoud A O; Koshio, Shunsuke; Ishikawa, Manabu; Yokoyama, Saichiro

    2015-01-01

    A 56-day feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of supplemented diets with heat-killed Lactobacillus plantarum (HK-LP) with graded levels of soybean meal (SBM) on growth, digestibility, blood parameters, and immune response of Seriola dumerili (initial weight, 25.05 ± 0.1 g). Seven isonitrogenous and isolipidic practical diets were formulated to contain 0%, 15%, 30%, and 45% SBM, and each SBM level was supplemented with HK-LP at 0.0 and 0.1%. Fish fed diet which contains 30% SBM with HK-LP grew significantly faster than the other groups with notable feed intake and protein retention. Further, protein gain, whole body protein content, protease activity, protein, and lipid digestibility were significantly increased for all fish groups except for fish fed diet which contains 45% SBM with or without HK-LP. Interestingly, lysozyme activity was significantly enhanced in fish fed diets that contain 15% and 30% SBM with HK-LP. Hematocrit, peroxidase, and bactericidal activities revealed a significant increase in 30% SBM with HK-LP group. In addition, fish fed diets which contain 0% and 30% SBM with HK-LP showed higher tolerance against low-salinity stress compared with other groups. In conclusion, the addition of HK-LP to amberjack diets appeared to improve SBM utilization, immune response, and stress resistance.

  8. Effects of Partial Substitution of Fish Meal by Soybean Meal with or without Heat-Killed Lactobacillus plantarum (LP20) on Growth Performance, Digestibility, and Immune Response of Amberjack, Seriola dumerili Juveniles

    PubMed Central

    Dawood, Mahmoud A. O.; Koshio, Shunsuke; Ishikawa, Manabu; Yokoyama, Saichiro

    2015-01-01

    A 56-day feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of supplemented diets with heat-killed Lactobacillus plantarum (HK-LP) with graded levels of soybean meal (SBM) on growth, digestibility, blood parameters, and immune response of Seriola dumerili (initial weight, 25.05 ± 0.1 g). Seven isonitrogenous and isolipidic practical diets were formulated to contain 0%, 15%, 30%, and 45% SBM, and each SBM level was supplemented with HK-LP at 0.0 and 0.1%. Fish fed diet which contains 30% SBM with HK-LP grew significantly faster than the other groups with notable feed intake and protein retention. Further, protein gain, whole body protein content, protease activity, protein, and lipid digestibility were significantly increased for all fish groups except for fish fed diet which contains 45% SBM with or without HK-LP. Interestingly, lysozyme activity was significantly enhanced in fish fed diets that contain 15% and 30% SBM with HK-LP. Hematocrit, peroxidase, and bactericidal activities revealed a significant increase in 30% SBM with HK-LP group. In addition, fish fed diets which contain 0% and 30% SBM with HK-LP showed higher tolerance against low-salinity stress compared with other groups. In conclusion, the addition of HK-LP to amberjack diets appeared to improve SBM utilization, immune response, and stress resistance. PMID:25705667

  9. Attitude Towards Physics and Additional Mathematics Achievement Towards Physics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veloo, Arsaythamby; Nor, Rahimah; Khalid, Rozalina

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to identify the difference in students' attitude towards Physics and Additional Mathematics achievement based on gender and relationship between attitudinal variables towards Physics and Additional Mathematics achievement with achievement in Physics. This research focused on six variables, which is attitude towards…

  10. The Impact of Reading Achievement on Overall Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchwell, Dawn Earheart

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between reading achievement and achievement in other subject areas. The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a correlation between reading scores as measured by the Standardized Test for the Assessment of Reading (STAR) and academic achievement in language arts, math, science, and social studies…

  11. Dependence of the Tidal Response on the Internal Structure of the Moon: Geodetic Implication to the Partial Melt Layer at the Lower-Most Part of the Lunar Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Y.; Goossens, S. J.; Matsumoto, K.; Yan, J.; Ping, J.; Noda, H.

    2012-12-01

    viscosity in this part is probably lower than that in the upper portion because the knowledge of seismology also indicates the presence of a high attenuation zone. On the other hand, the viscosity of the upper portion is regarded to be uniform in here, and fixed to the maximum value of the above parameter range. As a result, it is clarified that the viscosity solution consistent with geodetic observations of both rotation and gravity field exists if the interior structure includes the specific low viscosity zone. There is just one narrow range of allowable viscosity with the observed Q, which can only be explained by this low viscosity zone. This viscosity range determines a numerical k2 which is consistent with the observed values. As a conclusion, the strong seismic attenuation zone inside the lunar interior is probably equivalent to the low viscosity zone. Particularly, it is the remarkable point that the value of the viscosity inferred here is too low considering solid rock whereas it is too high considering complete melt. Therefore, as has formerly been pointed out, the partial melting would occur in this lower-most part like that of the ultra-low velocity zone on the Earth. Moreover, this zone is expected to include the fluid phase with a ratio corresponding to the rheologically critical melt fraction.

  12. Enhancing stability of industrial turbines using adjustable partial arc bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chasalevris, Athanasios; Dohnal, Fadi

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents the principal of operation, the simulation and the characteristics of two partial-arc journal bearings of variable geometry and adjustable/controllable stiffness and damping properties. The proposed journals are supposed to consist of a scheme that enables the periodical variation of bearing properties. Recent achievements of suppressing rotor vibrations using plain circular journal bearings of variable geometry motivate the further extension of the principle to bearings of applicable geometry for industrial turbines. The paper describes the application of a partial-arc journal bearing to enhance stability of high speed industrial turbines. The proposed partial-arc bearings with adjustable/controllable properties enhance stability and they introduce stable margins in speeds much higher than the 1st critical.

  13. Longitudinal Student Achievement Monitoring in Hawaii Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saka, Thomas; And Others

    In response to state mandates, the Hawaii Department of Education (HDE) began reporting on the current achievement status and progress of students scoring in the lowest three stanines of the Stanford Achievement Tests (SAT). The Longitudinal Student Achievement Monitoring (LSAM) process is described and evaluated; it was established to monitor low…

  14. A NUCLEAR MEMBRANE CHANGE AFTER PARTIAL HEPATECTOMY

    PubMed Central

    Kishimoto, Susumu; Lieberman, Irving

    1964-01-01

    Partial hepatectomy (67 per cent extirpation) of the rat leads to a change in the membrane of liver nuclei (purified with citric acid) detectable as an increase in electrophoretic mobility. No change is detectable 2 hours after the operation, but between 2 and 6 hours about a 1.4-fold increase in mobility occurs after which the mobility becomes constant at the elevated level. Removal of only 10 per cent of the liver causes no detectable change in 6 hours. Bilateral adrenalectomy immediately before partial hepatectomy does not affect the development of the nuclear change. Actinomycin D and p-fluorophenylalanine, but not noradrenalin, ionizing radiation, or EDTA, suppress the increase in electrophoretic mobility. The level of actinomycin D required to block the nuclear membrane change is 6 times greater than that necessary to prevent the rate increase in hepatic RNA metabolism that follows removal of part of the liver. This discrepancy and the difference in the response to noradrenalin indicate that, at least initially, the nuclear membrane change and the change in the rate of RNA synthesis are independent processes. The inability of EDTA to block the nuclear membrane change shows that the Zn++ requirement for DNA replication is not related to the events that lead to the alteration in the electrokinetic properties of liver nuclei. PMID:14245434

  15. Major Molecular Response Achievement in CML Patients Can Be Predicted by BCR-ABL1/ABL1 or BCR-ABL1/GUS Ratio at an Earlier Time Point of Follow-Up than Currently Recommended

    PubMed Central

    Huet, Sarah; Cony-Makhoul, Pascale; Heiblig, Maël; Tigaud, Isabelle; Gazzo, Sophie; Belhabri, Amine; Souche, Denis; Michallet, Mauricette; Magaud, Jean-Pierre; Hayette, Sandrine; Nicolini, Franck

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that early molecular response to tyrosine-kinase inhibitors is strongly predictive of outcome in chronic myeloid leukemia patients and that early response landmarks may identify patients at higher risk for transformation who would benefit from an early switch to second-line therapy. In this study, we evaluated the ability of the control gene GUS to identify relevant thresholds for known therapeutic decision levels (BCR-ABL1/ABL1IS  = 10% and 0.1%). We then defined the most relevant cut-offs for early molecular response markers (transcript level at 3 months, halving time and log reduction between diagnosis and 3 months of treatment) using GUS or ABL1. We demonstrated that, although both control genes could be used (in an equivalent way) to accurately assess early molecular response, the BCR-ABL1/GUS level at diagnosis is impacted by the higher GUS copy number over-expressed in CML cells, thus negatively impacting its ability to completely replace ABL1 at diagnosis. Furthermore, we pointed out, for the first time, that it would be helpful to monitor BCR-ABL1 levels at an earlier time point than that currently performed, in order to assess response to first-line tyrosine-kinase inhibitors and consider a potential switch of therapy as early as possible. We evaluated this optimal time point as being 19 days after the start of treatment in our cohort. PMID:25203717

  16. Fitting and Testing Conditional Multinormal Partial Credit Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hessen, David J.

    2012-01-01

    A multinormal partial credit model for factor analysis of polytomously scored items with ordered response categories is derived using an extension of the Dutch Identity (Holland in "Psychometrika" 55:5-18, 1990). In the model, latent variables are assumed to have a multivariate normal distribution conditional on unweighted sums of item scores,…

  17. 24 CFR 203.556 - Return of partial payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SINGLE FAMILY MORTGAGE INSURANCE Servicing Responsibilities Payments, Charges and Accounts § 203.556..., including late charges. (b) Except as provided in this section, the mortgagee shall accept any partial payment and either apply it to the mortgagor's account or identify it with the mortgagor's account...

  18. Achieving yield gains in wheat.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Matthew; Foulkes, John; Furbank, Robert; Griffiths, Simon; King, Julie; Murchie, Erik; Parry, Martin; Slafer, Gustavo

    2012-10-01

    Wheat provides 20% of calories and protein consumed by humans. Recent genetic gains are <1% per annum (p.a.), insufficient to meet future demand. The Wheat Yield Consortium brings expertise in photosynthesis, crop adaptation and genetics to a common breeding platform. Theory suggest radiation use efficiency (RUE) of wheat could be increased ~50%; strategies include modifying specificity, catalytic rate and regulation of Rubisco, up-regulating Calvin cycle enzymes, introducing chloroplast CO(2) concentrating mechanisms, optimizing light and N distribution of canopies while minimizing photoinhibition, and increasing spike photosynthesis. Maximum yield expression will also require dynamic optimization of source: sink so that dry matter partitioning to reproductive structures is not at the cost of the roots, stems and leaves needed to maintain physiological and structural integrity. Crop development should favour spike fertility to maximize harvest index so phenology must be tailored to different photoperiods, and sensitivity to unpredictable weather must be modulated to reduce conservative responses that reduce harvest index. Strategic crossing of complementary physiological traits will be augmented with wide crossing, while genome-wide selection and high throughput phenotyping and genotyping will increase efficiency of progeny screening. To ensure investment in breeding achieves agronomic impact, sustainable crop management must also be promoted through crop improvement networks.

  19. Partially hollowed ultra-thin dielectric meta-surface for transmission manipulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guiqiang; Fu, Guolan; Liu, Zhengqi; Huang, Zhenping; Chen, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Impressive optical properties are numerically demonstrated in the partially hollowed dielectric meta-surface (p-HDMS), which consists of an air cavity array intercalated in an ultra-thin (~λ/6) high-index dielectric film. Multispectral transmission band-stop response with near-perfect spectral modulation depth is achieved. The spectral slop is up to 80%/nm, indicating the sharp and narrowband transmission behavior. Classical Malus law is confirmed by this sub-wavelength platform. Moreover, the multispectral light propagation manipulation can be perfectly reproduced by using the actual dielectric with absorption loss. In this all-dielectric meta-surface, conduction loss is avoided compared to its metallic plasmonic counterpart. Such configurations can therefore serve as excellent alternatives for plasmonic meta-surfaces and constitute an important step in nanophotonics. PMID:27607661

  20. Cherokee Culture and School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Anthony D.

    1980-01-01

    Compares the effect of cooperative and competitive behaviors of Cherokee and Anglo American elementary school students on academic achievement. Suggests changes in teaching techniques and lesson organization that might raise academic achievement while taking into consideration tribal traditions that limit scholastic achievement in an…

  1. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES: Double gate lateral IGBT on partial membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaorong, Luo; Lei, Lei; Wei, Zhang; Bo, Zhang; Zhaoji, Li

    2010-02-01

    A new SOI LIGBT (lateral insulated-gate bipolar transistor) with cathode- and anode-gates on partial membrane is proposed. A low on-state resistance is achieved when a negative voltage is applied to the anode gate. In the blocking state, the cathode gate is shortened to the cathode and the anode gate is shortened to the anode, leading to a fast switching speed. Moreover, the removal of the partial silicon substrate under the drift region avoids collecting charges beneath the buried oxide, which releases potential lines below the membrane, yielding an enhanced breakdown voltage (BV). Furthermore, a high switching speed is obtained due to the absence of the drain-substrate capacitance. Lastly, a combination of uniformity and variation in lateral doping profiles helps to achieve a high BV and low special on-resistance. Compared with a conventional LIGBT, the proposed structure exhibits high current capability, low special on-resistance, and double the BV.

  2. Partial versus complete autogynephilia and gender dysphoria.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, R

    1993-01-01

    Autogynephilia (sexual arousal in men produced by the thought or image of themselves as women) is often associated with gender dysphoria (the desire to belong to the opposite sex). Previous research has shown that autogynephiles who are principally aroused by images of themselves as nude women are more gender dysphoric than those principally aroused by images of themselves as partially or fully dressed women. This study tested the hypothesis that the feature of the nude self-image most responsible for its correlation with gender dysphoria is the imagined vulva. The subjects were 220 nonhomosexual male outpatients who reported sexual arousal while imagining themselves with one or more features of the female anatomy. Autogynephilia and gender dysphoria were assessed with questionnaires. The findings confirmed that men who are sexually aroused at the thought of having a vulva are more likely to want to be women.

  3. Students’ Achievement Goals, Learning-Related Emotions and Academic Achievement

    PubMed Central

    Lüftenegger, Marko; Klug, Julia; Harrer, Katharina; Langer, Marie; Spiel, Christiane; Schober, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    In the present research, the recently proposed 3 × 2 model of achievement goals is tested and associations with achievement emotions and their joint influence on academic achievement are investigated. The study was conducted with 388 students using the 3 × 2 Achievement Goal Questionnaire including the six proposed goal constructs (task-approach, task-avoidance, self-approach, self-avoidance, other-approach, other-avoidance) and the enjoyment and boredom scales from the Achievement Emotion Questionnaire. Exam grades were used as an indicator of academic achievement. Findings from CFAs provided strong support for the proposed structure of the 3 × 2 achievement goal model. Self-based goals, other-based goals and task-approach goals predicted enjoyment. Task-approach goals negatively predicted boredom. Task-approach and other-approach predicted achievement. The indirect effects of achievement goals through emotion variables on achievement were assessed using bias-corrected bootstrapping. No mediation effects were found. Implications for educational practice are discussed. PMID:27199836

  4. Partial coalescence of soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Daniel M.; Pucci, Giuseppe; Bush, John W. M.

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of an experimental investigation of the merger of a soap bubble with a planar soap film. When gently deposited onto a horizontal film, a bubble may interact with the underlying film in such a way as to decrease in size, leaving behind a smaller daughter bubble with approximately half the radius of its progenitor. The process repeats up to three times, with each partial coalescence event occurring over a time scale comparable to the inertial-capillary time. Our results are compared to the recent numerical simulations of Martin and Blanchette and to the coalescence cascade of droplets on a fluid bath.

  5. Harmonic scalpel for a bloodless partial glossectomy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Irfan, M; Aliyu, Y A; Baharudin, A; Shahid, H

    2011-06-01

    Tongue surgery is almost always complicated by intraoperative bleeding. Its rich blood supply especially from the lingual vessels makes the operative field bloody. Electrocautery has been widely used to replace cold scissors in order to achieve better hemostasis. The use of ultrasonic harmonic scalpel for glossectomy is still new in this country. We report a case of partial glossectomy using the harmonic scalpel in a patient who had a squamous cell carcinoma of the lateral border of the tongue.

  6. Partial arytenoidectomy in the horse using an extralaryngeal approach.

    PubMed

    Hay, W P; Tulleners, E P; Ducharme, N G

    1993-01-01

    An extralaryngeal approach to partial arytenoidectomy in the horse was developed by in vitro experiments on isolated larynges and then on intact equine cadavers. The goals of the approach were to preserve the laryngeal mucosa, eliminate the need for a laryngotomy or tracheotomy, and minimize postoperative complications. The new approach was evaluated in seven horses with normal upper respiratory tracts. Left laryngeal hemiplegia was surgically created, and, after a 30-day convalescence, left partial arytenoidectomy was performed using an extralaryngeal approach. The left-to-right hemilaryngeal ratio was calculated before and after left recurrent laryngeal neurectomy and 60 days after partial arytenoidectomy. Left partial arytenoidectomy was successfully completed in all horses without performing a laryngotomy or tracheotomy. Preservation of the laryngeal mucosa (6/7 horses) and apparent stabilization of the adjacent soft tissue (6/7 horses) was achieved. In one horse, a 1-cm laryngeal mucosal tear healed without complication, and in another some collapse of adjacent soft tissue occurred when a retention suture failed. The mean left-to-right hemilaryngeal ratio was significantly increased compared to horses with left laryngeal hemiplegia, but it remained significantly less than the pre-recurrent laryngeal neurectomy ratio (p < .05). Coughing, aspiration, and airway narrowing were not observed. Partial arytenoidectomy could be reliably performed through an extralaryngeal approach in horses with a normal underlying arytenoid cartilage with preservation of the laryngeal mucosa.

  7. Examining the Effects of Notetaking Format on Achievement When Students Construct and Study Computerized Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katayama, Andrew D.; Crooks, Steven M.

    2001-01-01

    Describes two experiments conducted to investigate the effects of notetaking format on achievement. Students constructed and studied different types of notes: partial (framework and partial notes), skeletal (framework with no notes), and control (no framework and no notes). Found that, based on an application test, students who completed and…

  8. Clinical parameters for evaluating biological response modifier therapy.

    PubMed

    Hamblin, T J

    1989-01-01

    Evaluating response in cancer is a well established practice, depending on the recognition of complete response, partial response, stable disease and progressive disease. For chemotherapeutic drugs, only those patients achieving a complete response experience an increase in survival. Partial response merely indicates that the drug has some activity in that disease. What the patient wants is not active drugs but prolonged survival with good quality of life. It is well recognised that tumours may remain dormant for many years, and that even those patients with complete responses to chemotherapy usually have minimal residual disease. It is assumed that such minimal disease is controlled and held in check by a biological process. The principal aim of biological response modifiers is to enhance this effect so as to control an even larger tumour load. It therefore follows that removal of all tumour is not the only benefit, and that stable disease and even slower progression might translate to longer survival. Survival curves are the acid test and we should expect longer survival even for those patients failing to achieve complete response if we are to establish that life imprisonment is as effective in cancer treatment as capital punishment.

  9. Achievement as Resistance: The Development of a Critical Race Achievement Ideology among Black Achievers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Dorinda J.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, Dorinda Carter examines the embodiment of a critical race achievement ideology in high-achieving black students. She conducted a yearlong qualitative investigation of the adaptive behaviors that nine high-achieving black students developed and employed to navigate the process of schooling at an upper-class, predominantly white,…

  10. The Mechanics of Human Achievement

    PubMed Central

    Duckworth, Angela L.; Eichstaedt, Johannes C.; Ungar, Lyle H.

    2015-01-01

    Countless studies have addressed why some individuals achieve more than others. Nevertheless, the psychology of achievement lacks a unifying conceptual framework for synthesizing these empirical insights. We propose organizing achievement-related traits by two possible mechanisms of action: Traits that determine the rate at which an individual learns a skill are talent variables and can be distinguished conceptually from traits that determine the effort an individual puts forth. This approach takes inspiration from Newtonian mechanics: achievement is akin to distance traveled, effort to time, skill to speed, and talent to acceleration. A novel prediction from this model is that individual differences in effort (but not talent) influence achievement (but not skill) more substantially over longer (rather than shorter) time intervals. Conceptualizing skill as the multiplicative product of talent and effort, and achievement as the multiplicative product of skill and effort, advances similar, but less formal, propositions by several important earlier thinkers. PMID:26236393

  11. Outdoor Education and Science Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rios, José M.; Brewer, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Elementary students have limited opportunities to learn science in an outdoor setting at school. Some suggest this is partially due to a lack of teacher efficacy teaching in an outdoor setting. Yet the research literature indicates that outdoor learning experiences develop positive environmental attitudes and can positively affect science…

  12. Mathematics Achievement in High- and Low-Achieving Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammadpour, Ebrahim; Shekarchizadeh, Ahmadreza

    2015-01-01

    This paper identifies the amount of variance in mathematics achievement in high- and low-achieving schools that can be explained by school-level factors, while controlling for student-level factors. The data were obtained from 2679 Iranian eighth graders who participated in the 2007 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study. Of the…

  13. Attribution theory in science achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Martin

    Recent research reveals consistent lags in American students' science achievement scores. Not only are the scores lower in the United States compared to other developed nations, but even within the United States, too many students are well below science proficiency scores for their grade levels. The current research addresses this problem by examining potential malleable factors that may predict science achievement in twelfth graders using 2009 data from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). Principle component factor analysis was conducted to determine the specific items that contribute to each overall factor. A series of multiple regressions were then analyzed and formed the predictive value of each of these factors for science achievement. All significant factors were ultimately examined together (also using multiple regression) to determine the most powerful predictors of science achievement, identifying factors that predict science achievement, the results of which suggested interventions to strengthen students' science achievement scores and encourage persistence in the sciences at the college level and beyond. Although there is a variety of research highlighting how students in the US are falling behind other developing nations in science and math achievement, as yet, little research has addressed ways of intervening to address this gap. The current research is a starting point, seeking to identify malleable factors that contribute to science achievement. More specifically, this research examined the types of attributions that predict science achievement in twelfth grade students.

  14. Partial coalescence of soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucci, G.; Harris, D. M.; Bush, J. W. M.

    2015-06-01

    We present the results of an experimental investigation of the merger of a soap bubble with a planar soap film. When gently deposited onto a horizontal film, a bubble may interact with the underlying film in such a way as to decrease in size, leaving behind a smaller daughter bubble with approximately half the radius of its progenitor. The process repeats up to three times, with each partial coalescence event occurring over a time scale comparable to the inertial-capillary time. Our results are compared to the recent numerical simulations of Martin and Blanchette ["Simulations of surfactant effects on the dynamics of coalescing drops and bubbles," Phys. Fluids 27, 012103 (2015)] and to the coalescence cascade of droplets on a fluid bath.

  15. Partial Return Yoke for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Witte H.; Plate, S

    2013-05-03

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a large scale experiment which is presently assembled at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in Didcot, UK. The purpose of MICE is to demonstrate the concept of ionization cooling experimentally. Ionization cooling is an important accelerator concept which will be essential for future HEP experiments such as a potential Muon Collider or a Neutrino Factory. The MICE experiment will house up to 18 superconducting solenoids, all of which produce a substantial amount of magnetic flux. Recently it was realized that this magnetic flux leads to a considerable stray magnetic field in the MICE hall. This is a concern as technical equipment in the MICE hall may may be compromised by this. In July 2012 a concept called partial return yoke was presented to the MICE community, which reduces the stray field in the MICE hall to a safe level. This report summarizes the general concept, engineering considerations and the expected shielding performance.

  16. Compatibility and Conjugacy on Partial Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Sasikala, K.

    2016-01-01

    Research in combinatorics on words goes back a century. Berstel and Boasson introduced the partial words in the context of gene comparison. Alignment of two genes can be viewed as a construction of two partial words that are said to be compatible. In this paper, we examine to which extent the fundamental properties of partial words such as compatbility and conjugacy remain true for partial arrays. This paper studies a relaxation of the compatibility relation called k-compability. It also studies k-conjugacy of partial arrays. PMID:27774111

  17. Wave Attenuation in Partially Saturated Porous Solids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Chuan-Sheng

    1992-01-01

    This thesis consists of three independent papers. Paper 1 studies effects of pulsating gas pockets on wave propagation in partially saturated porous solids containing both liquid and gas phases. On the basis of Biot theory, an analytic solution for the White model for study of the effects of saturation history on wave attenuation is derived. One of the most significant findings of this work is that when the average spacing among the neighboring gas pockets is of the order of the boundary-layer thickness associated with the slow compressional (or P2) wave, the attenuation of the compressional (or P) wave due to local fluid flow reaches its maximum. Results of Paper 1 bear direct applications to seismic and logging responses of partially saturated rocks in prospecting for petroleum, and monitoring of oil and natural gas reservoirs. Paper 2 presents the results of the experimental studies of the effects of partial liquid/gas saturation on extensional wave attenuation in Berea sandstones. Two experimental methods are used; one is the resonant-bar method and the other the forced-deformation method. It is found that the wave attenuation depends on sample-saturation history (drainage or imbibition), as well as boundary-flow conditions, and the degree of saturation. The attenuation caused by "flowable" liquid is sensitive only in the region of low degree of gas saturation. An open-pore boundary tends to induce higher attenuation. The results obtained by the forced-deformation method show that the magnitude of the attenuation decreases substantially with decreasing frequency to the extent that no attenuation peak was apparent at frequencies below 100 Hz. Paper 3 analyzes extensional wave propagation in a porous fluid-saturated hollow-cylinder of infinite extent. Analytic solutions of complex Young's modulus for the long wavelength limit was obtained for a hollow -cylinder with open-pore inner surface. A simplified formula for estimating the frequency at which the

  18. Precise Point Positioning with Partial Ambiguity Fixing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pan; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Reliable and rapid ambiguity resolution (AR) is the key to fast precise point positioning (PPP). We propose a modified partial ambiguity resolution (PAR) method, in which an elevation and standard deviation criterion are first used to remove the low-precision ambiguity estimates for AR. Subsequently the success rate and ratio-test are simultaneously used in an iterative process to increase the possibility of finding a subset of decorrelated ambiguities which can be fixed with high confidence. One can apply the proposed PAR method to try to achieve an ambiguity-fixed solution when full ambiguity resolution (FAR) fails. We validate this method using data from 450 stations during DOY 021 to 027, 2012. Results demonstrate the proposed PAR method can significantly shorten the time to first fix (TTFF) and increase the fixing rate. Compared with FAR, the average TTFF for PAR is reduced by 14.9% for static PPP and 15.1% for kinematic PPP. Besides, using the PAR method, the average fixing rate can be increased from 83.5% to 98.2% for static PPP, from 80.1% to 95.2% for kinematic PPP respectively. Kinematic PPP accuracy with PAR can also be significantly improved, compared to that with FAR, due to a higher fixing rate. PMID:26067196

  19. Partial volume simulation in software breast phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feiyu; Pokrajac, David; Shi, Xiquan; Liu, Fengshan; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Bakic, Predrag R.

    2012-03-01

    A modification to our previous simulation of breast anatomy is proposed, in order to improve the quality of simulated projections generated using software breast phantoms. Anthropomorphic software breast phantoms have been used for quantitative validation of breast imaging systems. Previously, we developed a novel algorithm for breast anatomy simulation, which did not account for the partial volume (PV) of various tissues in a voxel; instead, each phantom voxel was assumed to contain single tissue type. As a result, phantom projection images displayed notable artifacts near the borders between regions of different materials, particularly at the skin-air boundary. These artifacts diminished the realism of phantom images. One solution is to simulate smaller voxels. Reducing voxel size, however, extends the phantom generation time and increases memory requirements. We achieved an improvement in image quality without reducing voxel size by the simulation of PV in voxels containing more than one simulated tissue type. The linear x-ray attenuation coefficient of each voxel is calculated by combining attenuation coefficients proportional to the voxel subvolumes occupied by the various tissues. A local planar approximation of the boundary surface is employed, and the skin volume in each voxel is computed by decomposition into simple geometric shapes. An efficient encoding scheme is proposed for the type and proportion of simulated tissues in each voxel. We illustrate the proposed methodology on phantom slices and simulated mammographic projections. Our results show that the PV simulation has improved image quality by reducing quantization artifacts.

  20. Perils of Standardized Achievement Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haladyna, Thomas M.

    2006-01-01

    This article argues that the validity of standardized achievement test-score interpretation and use is problematic; consequently, confidence and trust in such test scores may often be unwarranted. The problem is particularly severe in high-stakes situations. This essay provides a context for understanding standardized achievement testing, then…

  1. Poor Results for High Achievers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bui, Sa; Imberman, Scott; Craig, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Three million students in the United States are classified as gifted, yet little is known about the effectiveness of traditional gifted and talented (G&T) programs. In theory, G&T programs might help high-achieving students because they group them with other high achievers and typically offer specially trained teachers and a more advanced…

  2. Parental Involvement and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Sarah Christine

    2015-01-01

    This research study examined the correlation between student achievement and parent's perceptions of their involvement in their child's schooling. Parent participants completed the Parent Involvement Project Parent Questionnaire. Results slightly indicated parents of students with higher level of achievement perceived less demand or invitations…

  3. Examination Regimes and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosentino de Cohen, Clemencia

    2010-01-01

    Examination regimes at the end of secondary school vary greatly intra- and cross-nationally, and in recent years have undergone important reforms often geared towards increasing student achievement. This research presents a comparative analysis of the relationship between examination regimes and student achievement in the OECD. Using a micro…

  4. General Achievement Trends: New Jersey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  5. Teaching the Low Level Achiever.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Ronald E., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Intended for teachers of the English language arts, the articles in this issue offer suggestions and techniques for teaching the low level achiever. Titles and authors of the articles are as follows: (1) "A Point to Ponder" (Rachel Martin); (2) "Tracking: A Self-Fulfilling Prophecy of Failure for the Low Level Achiever" (James Christopher Davis);…

  6. Family Status and School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalker, Rhoda N.; Horns, Virginia

    This study tested the hypothesis that there is no significant difference in reading achievement among children in grades 2 through 5 related to family structure. Researchers administered the Stanford Achievement Test to 119 students in an Alabama city suburban school system. Of the sample, 69 children lived in intact families and 50 lived in…

  7. General Achievement Trends: North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  8. Classroom Composition and Achievement Gains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leiter, Jeffrey

    1983-01-01

    Third-grade students in high ability groups in mathematics achieved greater gains than students in low ability groups. The opposite results occurred in reading achievement. Possible reasons for this difference include different instructional techniques for reading and math and the effect of home environment on learning. (IS)

  9. Raising Boys' Achievement in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleach, Kevan, Ed.

    This book offers insights into the range of strategies and good practice being used to raise the achievement of boys. Case studies by school-based practitioners suggest ideas and measures to address the issue of achievement by boys. The contributions are: (1) "Why the Likely Lads Lag Behind" (Kevan Bleach); (2) "Helping Boys Do Better in Their…

  10. School Size and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggen, Vicki

    2013-01-01

    This study examined whether a relationship between high school size and student achievement exists in Illinois public high schools in reading and math, as measured by the Prairie State Achievement Exam (PSAE), which is administered to all Illinois 11th-grade students. This study also examined whether the factors of socioeconomic status, English…

  11. Stress Correlates and Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Donna Anderson; And Others

    An ongoing concern for educators is the identification of factors that contribute to or are associated with academic achievement; one such group of variables that has received little attention are those involving stress. The relationship between perceived sources of stress and academic achievement was examined to determine if reactions to stress…

  12. The Effects of Partial Reinforcement in the Acquisition and Extinction of Recurrent Serial Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dockstader, Steven L.

    The purpose of these 2 experiments was to determine whether sequential response pattern behavior is affected by partial reinforcement in the same way as other behavior systems. The first experiment investigated the partial reinforcement extinction effects (PREE) in a sequential concept learning task where subjects were required to learn a…

  13. Protease inhibitors partially overcome the interferon nonresponse phenotype in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Rojo, A; Fischer, S E; Adeyi, O; Zita, D; Deneke, M G; Selzner, N; Chen, L; Malespin, M; Cotler, S J; McGilvray, I D; Feld, J J

    2016-05-01

    The outcome of triple therapy with protease inhibitors (PI) depends on the intrinsic response to interferon. Interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) expression differs by cell type in the liver and is a strong predictor of interferon responsiveness. Patients who respond well to interferon have low/absent ISG expression in hepatocytes but significant ISG expression in macrophages. Nonresponders (NRs) show the opposite pattern. We aimed to determine the association between cell-type-specific ISG staining and treatment outcome with PI-based triple therapy. Liver biopsy tissue from consecutive patients treated with boceprevir or telaprevir with peginterferon and ribavirin was stained for myxovirus A (MxA). Staining was scored 0-3 in macrophages (M-MxA) and hepatocytes (H-MxA), and IL28B genotyping was performed. Of 56 patients included 41 achieved SVR (73%) (sustained virological response), 2 (4%) relapsed, 10 (18%) were NRs, and 3 (5%) were lost to follow-up. Median M-MxA staining was stronger and H-MxA staining was weaker in patients who achieved SVR. MxA staining correlated with IL28B genotype and with the HCV RNA decline during lead-in phase. However, unlike with dual therapy, the negative predictive value (NPV) of absent or weak M-MxA staining was poor (42%), while the positive predictive value improved (93%). Although by multivariable logistic regression M-MxA staining was significantly associated with SVR (OR 4.35, 1.32-14.28, P = 0.012), the predictive ability was inadequate to withhold therapy. The interaction between macrophages and hepatocytes plays a critical role in interferon responsiveness; however, the addition of a PI at least partially overcomes the interferon nonresponse phenotype making the predictive ability of ISG staining less clinically useful. PMID:26710754

  14. Partial-slip frictional response of rough surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Paggi, Marco; Pohrt, Roman; Popov, Valentin L.

    2014-01-01

    If two elastic bodies with rough surfaces are first pressed against each other and then loaded tangentially, sliding will occur at the boundary of the contact area while the inner parts may still stick. With increasing tangential force, the sliding parts will expand while the sticking parts shrink and finally vanish. In this paper, we study the fractions of the contact area, tangential force and tangential stiffness, associated with the sticking portion of the contact area, as a function of the total applied tangential force up to the onset of full sliding. For the numerical analysis randomly rough, fractal surfaces are used, with the Hurst exponent H ranging from 0.1 to 0.9. Numerical simulations by boundary element method are compared with an analytical analysis in the framework of the Greenwood and Williamson (GW) model. In both cases, a universal linear dependency between the real contact area fraction in stick condition and the applied tangential force is found, regardless of the Hurst exponent of the rough surfaces. Regarding the dependence of the differential tangential stiffness on the tangential force, a linear relation is found in the GW case. For randomly rough surfaces, a nonlinear relation depending on H is derived. PMID:24898988

  15. Using Partial Credit and Response History to Model User Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Inwegen, Eric G.; Adjei, Seth A.; Wang, Yan; Heffernan, Neil T.

    2015-01-01

    User modelling algorithms such as Performance Factors Analysis and Knowledge Tracing seek to determine a student's knowledge state by analyzing (among other features) right and wrong answers. Anyone who has ever graded an assignment by hand knows that some answers are "more wrong" than others; i.e. they display less of an understanding…

  16. PARTIAL RESISTANCE IN THE LINUM-MELAMPSORA HOST–PATHOGEN SYSTEM: DOES PARTIAL RESISTANCE MAKE THE RED QUEEN RUN SLOWER?

    PubMed Central

    Antonovics, Janis; Thrall, Peter H.; Burdon, Jeremy J.; Laine, Anna-Liisa

    2011-01-01

    Five levels of disease expression were scored in a cross-inoculation study of 120 host and 60 pathogen lines of wild flax Linum marginale and its rust fungus Melampsora lini sampled from six natural populations. Patterns of partial resistance showed clear evidence of gene-for-gene interactions, with particular levels of partial resistance occurring in specific host–pathogen combinations. Sympatric and putatively more highly coevolved host–pathogen combinations had a lower frequency of partial resistance types relative to allopatric combinations. Sympatric host–pathogen combinations also showed a lower diversity of resistance responses, but there was a trend toward a greater fraction of this variance being determined by pathogen-genotype × host-genotype interactions. In this system, there was no evidence that partial resistances slow host–pathogen coevolution. The analyses show that if variation is generated by among population host or pathogen dispersal, then coevolution occurs largely by pathogens overcoming the partial resistances that are generated. PMID:21029078

  17. Another Look at Cognitive Abilities and Motivational Processes in Science Achievement: A Multidimensional Approach to Achievement Validation. CSE Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kupermintz, Haggai; Roeser, Robert

    This study examined the role of affect and conation in high school students science test performance, using a sample of 491 students. It provides a profile of partial corrections of standardized multiple-choice and constructed response test scores with affect and conation scores (after accounting for general ability and student background) at…

  18. Design of partially supervised classifiers for multispectral image data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeon, Byeungwoo; Landgrebe, David

    1993-01-01

    A partially supervised classification problem is addressed, especially when the class definition and corresponding training samples are provided a priori only for just one particular class. In practical applications of pattern classification techniques, a frequently observed characteristic is the heavy, often nearly impossible requirements on representative prior statistical class characteristics of all classes in a given data set. Considering the effort in both time and man-power required to have a well-defined, exhaustive list of classes with a corresponding representative set of training samples, this 'partially' supervised capability would be very desirable, assuming adequate classifier performance can be obtained. Two different classification algorithms are developed to achieve simplicity in classifier design by reducing the requirement of prior statistical information without sacrificing significant classifying capability. The first one is based on optimal significance testing, where the optimal acceptance probability is estimated directly from the data set. In the second approach, the partially supervised classification is considered as a problem of unsupervised clustering with initially one known cluster or class. A weighted unsupervised clustering procedure is developed to automatically define other classes and estimate their class statistics. The operational simplicity thus realized should make these partially supervised classification schemes very viable tools in pattern classification.

  19. Intersexual partial diploids of phycomyces.

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, B J; Cerdá-Olmedo, E

    2001-01-01

    Sexual interaction between strains of opposite sex in many fungi of the order Mucorales modifies hyphal morphology and increases the carotene content. The progeny of crosses of Phycomyces blakesleeanus usually include a small proportion of anomalous segregants that show these signs of sexual stimulation without a partner. We have analyzed the genetic constitution of such segregants from crosses that involved a carF mutation for overaccumulation of beta-carotene and other markers. The new strains were diploids or partial diploids heterozygous for the sex markers. Diploidy was unknown in this fungus and in the Zygomycetes. Random chromosome losses during the vegetative growth of the diploid led to heterokaryosis in the coenocytic mycelia and eventually to sectors of various tints and mating behavior. The changes in the nuclear composition of the mycelia could be followed by selecting for individual nuclei. The results impose a reinterpretation of the sexual cycle of Phycomyces. Some of the intersexual strains that carried the carF mutation contained 25 mg beta-carotene per gram of dry mass and were sufficiently stable for practical use in carotene production. PMID:11404328

  20. GLSMs for partial flag manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donagi, Ron; Sharpe, Eric

    2008-12-01

    In this paper we outline some aspects of nonabelian gauged linear sigma models. First, we review how partial flag manifolds (generalizing Grassmannians) are described physically by nonabelian gauged linear sigma models, paying attention to realizations of tangent bundles and other aspects pertinent to (0, 2) models. Second, we review constructions of Calabi-Yau complete intersections within such flag manifolds, and properties of the gauged linear sigma models. We discuss a number of examples of nonabelian GLSMs in which the Kähler phases are not birational, and in which at least one phase is realized in some fashion other than as a complete intersection, extending previous work of Hori-Tong. We also review an example of an abelian GLSM exhibiting the same phenomenon. We tentatively identify the mathematical relationship between such non-birational phases, as examples of Kuznetsov's homological projective duality. Finally, we discuss linear sigma model moduli spaces in these gauged linear sigma models. We argue that the moduli spaces being realized physically by these GLSMs are precisely Quot and hyperquot schemes, as one would expect mathematically.

  1. Mathematics anxiety and mathematics achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Brian F.; Wither (Post.), David P.

    2003-09-01

    This paper is a distillation of the major result from the 1998 Ph.D. thesis of the late David Wither. It details a longitudinal study over five years of the relationship between mathematics anxiety and mathematics achievement. It starts from the already well documented negative correlation between the two, and seeks to establish one of the three hypotheses—that mathematics anxiety causes an impairment of mathematics achievement; that lack of mathematics achievement causes mathematics anxiety; or that there is a third underlying cause of the two.

  2. Saline intrusion in partially mixed estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prandle, D.

    2004-03-01

    Restricting interest to partially mixed estuaries, earlier studies of tidally averaged linearised theories relating to the vertical structure of salinity and velocities (accompanying saline intrusion) are extended to take account of tidal straining and associated convective overturning. The applicability of these theories is evaluated by reference to a 'single-point' numerical model in which the time-varying cycle of depth-averaged tidal current amplitude, Û, and a (temporally and vertically) constant saline gradient, S x, are specified. This model highlights the importance of convective overturning in counteracting unstable density structures introduced by tidal straining. By omitting overturning in the model, results agree closely with linearised theoretical derivations. However, incorporating overturning substantially increases tidally averaged surface-to-bed differences for both residual currents, δ u, and salinity, δ s. The vertical structure of tidal currents is a maximum, and hence the effect of tidal straining, in shallow macro-tidal estuaries. The propagation of tidal elevations and currents remains insensitive to saline intrusion in partially mixed estuaries. The applicability of the model was evaluated by simulation of recent measurements by Rippeth et al. (J. Phys. Oceanogr. 31 (2001) 2458). To explore the generality of estuarine responses, the model was run for a wide range of values of saline intrusion lengths, L, and water depths, D. Additional sensitivity analyses were made for changes in Û and bed stress coefficient, k. Response frameworks are shown for: δ u, δ s, potential energy anomaly φ, work done by bed friction and internal shear, rates and efficiency of saline mixing and ratios of relative mixing by diffusion to overturning. By equating the rate of mixing associated with vertical diffusion with river flow, Q, an expression for saline intrusion length L∝D 2/k ÛU o ( Uo river flow velocity) was derived. This formulation agrees with

  3. Childhood Obesity and Cognitive Achievement.

    PubMed

    Black, Nicole; Johnston, David W; Peeters, Anna

    2015-09-01

    Obese children tend to perform worse academically than normal-weight children. If poor cognitive achievement is truly a consequence of childhood obesity, this relationship has significant policy implications. Therefore, an important question is to what extent can this correlation be explained by other factors that jointly determine obesity and cognitive achievement in childhood? To answer this question, we exploit a rich longitudinal dataset of Australian children, which is linked to national assessments in math and literacy. Using a range of estimators, we find that obesity and body mass index are negatively related to cognitive achievement for boys but not girls. This effect cannot be explained by sociodemographic factors, past cognitive achievement or unobserved time-invariant characteristics and is robust to different measures of adiposity. Given the enormous importance of early human capital development for future well-being and prosperity, this negative effect for boys is concerning and warrants further investigation. PMID:26123250

  4. Mastery Achievement of Intellectual Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trembath, Richard J.; White, Richard T.

    1979-01-01

    Mastery learning techniques were improved through mathematics instruction based on a validated learning hierarchy, presenting tasks in a sequence consistent with the requirements of the hierarchy, and requiring learners to demonstrate achievement before being allowed to proceed. (Author/GDC)

  5. Achieving Standards through Environmental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaspar, Mike

    1999-01-01

    Most states do not have the time or resources to develop environmental education standards from scratch. Highlights the role that environmental education and its interdisciplinary nature can play in helping students achieve. (DDR)

  6. Childhood Obesity and Cognitive Achievement.

    PubMed

    Black, Nicole; Johnston, David W; Peeters, Anna

    2015-09-01

    Obese children tend to perform worse academically than normal-weight children. If poor cognitive achievement is truly a consequence of childhood obesity, this relationship has significant policy implications. Therefore, an important question is to what extent can this correlation be explained by other factors that jointly determine obesity and cognitive achievement in childhood? To answer this question, we exploit a rich longitudinal dataset of Australian children, which is linked to national assessments in math and literacy. Using a range of estimators, we find that obesity and body mass index are negatively related to cognitive achievement for boys but not girls. This effect cannot be explained by sociodemographic factors, past cognitive achievement or unobserved time-invariant characteristics and is robust to different measures of adiposity. Given the enormous importance of early human capital development for future well-being and prosperity, this negative effect for boys is concerning and warrants further investigation.

  7. New Light Chain Amyloid Response Criteria Help Risk Stratification of Patients by Day 100 after Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Anita; Huang, Jiaxing; Hari, Parameswaran

    2016-04-01

    Hematologic response criteria in light chain (AL) amyloidosis were updated in 2012 to incorporate free light chain responses. These criteria have been validated in autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation in AL at 6 and 12 months after transplantation. Using a transplantation registry, we assessed day 100 responses in AL amyloidosis. We validate the prognostic significance of the new criteria at this time point. Further, we show that patients who do not achieve at least a very good partial response by this time point have equally worse outcomes, regardless of depth of response (partial versus no response). Thus, we conclude that the new criteria help identify the poor responders by day 100 after transplantation and that this subset of patients should be studied for early evaluation in consolidation trials.

  8. 20% PARTIAL SIBERIAN SNAKE IN THE AGS.

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H; Bai, M; Brown, K A; Glenn, W; Luccio, A U; Mackay, W W; Montag, C; Ptitsyn, V; Roser, T; Tsoupas, N; Zeno, K; Ranjbar, V; Spinka, H; Underwood, D

    2002-11-06

    An 11.4% partial Siberian snake was used to successfully accelerate polarized proton through a strong intrinsic depolarizing spin resonance in the AGS. No noticeable depolarization was observed. This opens up the possibility of using a 20% to 30% partial Siberian snake in the AGS to overcome all weak and strong depolarizing spin resonances. Some design and operation issues of the new partial Siberian snake are discussed.

  9. Quantum states with strong positive partial transpose

    SciTech Connect

    Chruscinski, Dariusz; Jurkowski, Jacek; Kossakowski, Andrzej

    2008-02-15

    We construct a large class of bipartite M x N quantum states which defines a proper subset of states with positive partial transposes (PPTs). Any state from this class has PPT but the positivity of its partial transposition is recognized with respect to canonical factorization of the original density operator. We propose to call elements from this class states with strong positive partial transposes (SPPTs). We conjecture that all SPPT states are separable.

  10. Partially Premixed Flame (PPF) Research for Fire Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puri, Ishwar K.; Aggarwal, Suresh K.; Lock, Andrew J.; Hegde, Uday

    2004-01-01

    Incipient fires typically occur after the partial premixing of fuel and oxidizer. The mixing of product species into the fuel/oxidizer mixture influences flame stabilization and fire spread. Therefore, it is important to characterize the impact of different levels of fuel/oxidizer/product mixing on flame stabilization, liftoff and extinguishment under different gravity conditions. With regard to fire protection, the agent concentration required to achieve flame suppression is an important consideration. The initial stage of an unwanted fire in a microgravity environment will depend on the level of partial premixing and the local conditions such as air currents generated by the fire itself and any forced ventilation (that influence agent and product mixing into the fire). The motivation of our investigation is to characterize these impacts in a systematic and fundamental manner.

  11. Merits of partial shielding in dumping sediment spoils.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jacob Hjelmager; Saremi, Sina; Jimenez, Carlos; Hadjioannou, Louis

    2015-12-15

    The commonly adopted method of dumping dredge spoil at sea using split-hull barges leads to considerable sediment loss to the water column and a subsequent dispersion of fine material that can pose a risk to sensitive "downstream" habitats such as coral reefs. Containing sediment loads using stitched closed geotextile bags is practiced for minimizing loss of contaminated sediment, but is expensive in terms of operational efficiency. Following promising observations from initial laboratory trials, the plunging of partially shielded sediment loads, released on open sea, was studied. The partial shielding was achieved with rigid, open containers as well as flexible, open bags. The loss of sediment from these modes of shielding was measured, and it was observed that even limited and unstitched shielding can be effective in debilitating the entrainment of water into the descending load. In particular, long-sleeved flexible bags practically self-eliminated the exposure of the load and thus losses. PMID:26597564

  12. Matter coupling in partially constrained vielbein formulation of massive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, Antonio De; Mukohyama, Shinji; Gümrükçüoğlu, A. Emir; Heisenberg, Lavinia E-mail: emir.gumrukcuoglu@nottingham.ac.uk E-mail: shinji.mukohyama@ipmu.jp

    2016-01-01

    We consider a linear effective vielbein matter coupling without introducing the Boulware-Deser ghost in ghost-free massive gravity. This is achieved in the partially constrained vielbein formulation. We first introduce the formalism and prove the absence of ghost at all scales. As next we investigate the cosmological application of this coupling in this new formulation. We show that even if the background evolution accords with the metric formulation, the perturbations display important different features in the partially constrained vielbein formulation. We study the cosmological perturbations of the two branches of solutions separately. The tensor perturbations coincide with those in the metric formulation. Concerning the vector and scalar perturbations, the requirement of absence of ghost and gradient instabilities yields slightly different allowed parameter space.

  13. Partial synchronization in stochastic dynamical networks with switching communication channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chi; Ho, Daniel W. C.; Lu, Jianquan; Kurths, Jürgen

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, the partial synchronization problem of stochastic dynamical networks (SDNs) is investigated. Unlike the existing models, the SDN considered in this paper suffers from a class of communication constraint—only part of nodes' states can be transmitted. Thus, less nodes' states can be used to synchronize the SDN, which makes the analysis of the synchronization problem much harder. A set of channel matrices are introduced to reflect such kind of constraint. Furthermore, due to unpredictable environmental changes, the channel matrices can switch among some communication modes. The switching considered here is governed by a Markov process. To overcome the difficulty, a regrouping method is employed to derive our main results. The obtained conditions guarantee that partial synchronization can be achieved for SDNs under switching communication constraint. Finally, numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results and how the communication constraint influences synchronization result.

  14. Partially entangled states bridge in quantum teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiao-Fei; Yu, Xu-Tao; Shi, Li-Hui; Zhang, Zai-Chen

    2014-10-01

    The traditional method for information transfer in a quantum communication system using partially entangled state resource is quantum distillation or direct teleportation. In order to reduce the waiting time cost in hop-by-hop transmission and execute independently in each node, we propose a quantum bridging method with partially entangled states to teleport quantum states from source node to destination node. We also prove that the designed specific quantum bridging circuit is feasible for partially entangled states teleportation across multiple intermediate nodes. Compared to two traditional ways, our partially entanglement quantum bridging method uses simpler logic gates, has better security, and can be used in less quantum resource situation.

  15. Serum metabolite profiles of postoperative fatigue syndrome in rat following partial hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ye; Yang, Rui; Jiang, Xin; Yang, Yajuan; Peng, Fei; Yuan, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative fatigue syndrome is a general complication after surgery. However, there is no ‘‘gold standard’’ for fatigue assessment due to the lack of objective biomarkers. In this study, a rodent model of postoperative fatigue syndrome based on partial hepatectomy was firstly established and serum metabonomic method based on ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with Q-TOF mass spectrometry was applied. Partial least-squares discriminant analysis was used to identify the differential metabolites in 70% partial hepatectomy rats relative to sham rats and 30% partial hepatectomy rats, which showed 70% partial hepatectomy group was significantly distinguishable from 30% partial hepatectomy group and sham group. Eighteen serum metabolites responsible for the discrimination were identified. The levels of hypoxanthine, kynurenine, tryptophan, uric acid, phenylalanine, palmitic acid, arachidonic acid and oleic acid showed progressive elevation from sham group to 30% partial hepatectomy group to 70% partial hepatectomy group, and levels of valine, tyrosine, isoleucine, linoleyl carnitine, palmitoylcarnitine, lysophosphatidylcholine (16:0), lysophosphatidylcholine (20:3), citric acid, succinic acid and hippuric acid showed progressive declining trend from sham group to 30% partial hepatectomy group to 70% partial hepatectomy group. These potential biomarkers help to understand of etiology, pathophysiology and treatment of postoperative fatigue syndrome. PMID:27257346

  16. Serum metabolite profiles of postoperative fatigue syndrome in rat following partial hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ye; Yang, Rui; Jiang, Xin; Yang, Yajuan; Peng, Fei; Yuan, Hongbin

    2016-05-01

    Postoperative fatigue syndrome is a general complication after surgery. However, there is no ''gold standard'' for fatigue assessment due to the lack of objective biomarkers. In this study, a rodent model of postoperative fatigue syndrome based on partial hepatectomy was firstly established and serum metabonomic method based on ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with Q-TOF mass spectrometry was applied. Partial least-squares discriminant analysis was used to identify the differential metabolites in 70% partial hepatectomy rats relative to sham rats and 30% partial hepatectomy rats, which showed 70% partial hepatectomy group was significantly distinguishable from 30% partial hepatectomy group and sham group. Eighteen serum metabolites responsible for the discrimination were identified. The levels of hypoxanthine, kynurenine, tryptophan, uric acid, phenylalanine, palmitic acid, arachidonic acid and oleic acid showed progressive elevation from sham group to 30% partial hepatectomy group to 70% partial hepatectomy group, and levels of valine, tyrosine, isoleucine, linoleyl carnitine, palmitoylcarnitine, lysophosphatidylcholine (16:0), lysophosphatidylcholine (20:3), citric acid, succinic acid and hippuric acid showed progressive declining trend from sham group to 30% partial hepatectomy group to 70% partial hepatectomy group. These potential biomarkers help to understand of etiology, pathophysiology and treatment of postoperative fatigue syndrome. PMID:27257346

  17. The Role of Cognitive Factors in Chemistry Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandran, Sarath; And Others

    Evidence from the research literature suggests that a variety of cognitive factors are responsible for chemistry achievement. This investigation examined the role that four cognitive factors, namely, prior knowledge, formal reasoning ability, memory capacity and field independence/dependence, play on achievement in chemistry as measured by tests…

  18. Teacher Evaluation and Student Achievement. Student Assessment Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stronge, James H.; Tucker, Pamela D.

    This book discusses four approaches to incorporating student achievement in teacher evaluation. Seven chapters discuss: (1) "Teacher Evaluation and Student Achievement: An Introduction to the Issues"; (2) "What is the Relationship between Teaching and Learning?" (e.g., whether teachers are responsible for student learning and how to measure…

  19. Relationships among Projective and Direct Verbal Measures of Achievement Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Satvir

    1979-01-01

    The ways in which projective and nonprojective verbal measures of achievement motivation elicit comparable and dissimilar responses in a "Third World" sample of entrepreneurs and farmers were explored as a test of McClelland's theory of economic growth. Results were generally consistent with the theory of achievement motivation. (Author/JKS)

  20. The "Strategies-for-Achievement" Approach for Teaching Study Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuckman, Bruce W.

    An educational psychology-based study skills program called Strategies for Achievement was developed to teach learning and motivation strategies to college students. It involved teaching student four major achievement strategies: take reasonable risk, take responsibility for outcomes, search the environment (for information), and use feedback.…

  1. Wall pressure fluctuations in rectangular partial enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliaroli, T.; Camussi, R.

    2015-04-01

    Wall pressure fluctuations generated within rectangular partial enclosures (RPEs) have been studied experimentally for a broad range of geometrical parameters. The geometry represents a simplified version of a new generation trapped vortex combustor and consisted of a rectangular cavity connected to a neck of smaller size. Wall pressure fluctuations have been measured through wall mounted microphones providing single and multi-variate pressure statistics both in the physical space and in the Fourier domain. In order to interpret the pressure signals, aerodynamic and acoustic investigations have been carried out as well for several cavity-neck ratios. The analysis of the acoustic response of the cavity has been conducted both numerically and experimentally and a simple theoretical model has been proposed to predict the frequency of the acoustic resonances. The aerodynamic study has been carried out through PIV measurements that provided characterization in terms of the geometrical parameters of both the large-scale vortex generated within the cavity and the recirculation zone formed upstream of the neck. The use of the POD decomposition permitted us to correlate the dynamics of the recirculation with the observed pressure statistics. The aerodynamic and acoustic investigations allowed us to interpret exhaustively the wall pressure cross-statistics and to separate contributions induced by hydrodynamic and purely acoustic pressure fluctuations.

  2. Catalytic partial oxidation of pyrolysis oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennard, David Carl

    2009-12-01

    This thesis explores the catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) of pyrolysis oils to syngas and chemicals. First, an exploration of model compounds and their chemistries under CPO conditions is considered. Then CPO experiments of raw pyrolysis oils are detailed. Finally, plans for future development in this field are discussed. In Chapter 2, organic acids such as propionic acid and lactic acid are oxidized to syngas over Pt catalysts. Equilibrium production of syngas can be achieved over Rh-Ce catalysts; alternatively mechanistic evidence is derived using Pt catalysts in a fuel rich mixture. These experiments show that organic acids, present in pyrolysis oils up to 25%, can undergo CPO to syngas or for the production of chemicals. As the fossil fuels industry also provides organic chemicals such as monomers for plastics, the possibility of deriving such species from pyrolysis oils allows for a greater application of the CPO of biomass. However, chemical production is highly dependent on the originating molecular species. As bio oil comprises up to 400 chemicals, it is essential to understand how difficult it would be to develop a pure product stream. Chapter 3 continues the experimentation from Chapter 2, exploring the CPO of another organic functionality: the ester group. These experiments demonstrate that equilibrium syngas production is possible for esters as well as acids in autothermal operation with contact times as low as tau = 10 ms over Rh-based catalysts. Conversion for these experiments and those with organic acids is >98%, demonstrating the high reactivity of oxygenated compounds on noble metal catalysts. Under CPO conditions, esters decompose in a predictable manner: over Pt and with high fuel to oxygen, non-equilibrium products show a similarity to those from related acids. A mechanism is proposed in which ethyl esters thermally decompose to ethylene and an acid, which decarbonylates homogeneously, driven by heat produced at the catalyst surface. Chapter 4

  3. Resin-bonded cast splints for loosened abutment teeth to anchor a removable partial denture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroshi; Tsue, Fumitake; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2009-03-01

    This case report describes a technique to stabilize loosened abutment teeth by seating resin-bonded cast splints with rest seats and surveyed guide planes to anchor a removable partial denture. This technique can achieve sufficient stability of the abutment teeth and proper support and bracing of the removable partial denture with minimal intervention.

  4. [The insula in partial epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Isnard, J; Mauguière, F

    2005-01-01

    The role of the insular lobe in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) has often been suggested but never directly demonstrated. In this article, we review data from recent literature and from our stereo-electroencephalographic (SEEG) recordings in patients referred for temporal lobe epilepsy surgery (TLE). Our description of the clinical features of insular lobe seizures is based on data from video and SEEG ictal recordings and direct electric cortical stimulation in a population of 50 consecutive patients whose seizures, on the basis of scalp video EEG recordings, were suspected to originate from, or to rapidly propagate to, the peri-sylvian cortex. A total of 144 intra-insular electrodes have been implanted in this series of patients. In six patients a stereotyped sequence of ictal symptoms could be identified on the basis of electro-clinical correlations. The clinical presentation of insular lobe seizures was that of simple partial seizures occurring in full consciousness, beginning with a sensation of laryngeal constriction followed by paresthesiae that were often unpleasant affecting large cutaneous territories. These initial symptoms were eventually followed by dysarthric speech and/or elementary auditory hallucinations, and seizures often ended with focal dystonic postures. The insular origin of these symptoms was supported by the data from functional cortical mapping of the insula using direct cortical stimulations. We were able to reproduce several of the spontaneous ictal symptoms in the six patients with insular seizures. Moreover, from the whole set of insular stimulations that we performed it could be concluded that the insular cortex is involved in somatic, vegetative and visceral functions to which spontaneous ictal insular symptoms are related. The observation of the insular symptoms sequence at the onset of seizures in patients who are candidates for TLE surgery strongly suggests that the epileptic focus is located in the insular lobe. It entails the risk

  5. Nonlinear Scattering by a Partially Closed Surface Breaking Crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poznić, M.; Pecorari, C.

    2005-04-01

    Nonlinear scattering from a partially closed, two dimensional, surface-breaking crack in a homogenous linear elastic half-space is considered. The boundary conditions along the crack are described in terms of the mechanics of two distributions of nonlinear springs. Both the linear and the nonlinear acoustic response of the crack shows to be highest when the surface breaking crack is insonified by a shear vertical wave at the longitudinal critical angle. The increased efficiency of generation of higher harmonics under the above circumstances suggests a means of localizing the nonlinear crack. Finally, the model provides a simple interpretation of the highly localized nonlinear response of delaminations observed in thin composites.

  6. [Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy: technique and outcomes].

    PubMed

    Colombo, J R; Gill, I S

    2006-05-01

    The indication of laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) has evolved considerably, and the technique is approaching established status at our institution. Over the past 5 years, the senior author has performed more than 450 laparoscopic partial nephrectomies at the Cleveland Clinic. Herein we present our current technique, review contemporary data and oncological outcomes of LPN.

  7. 49 CFR 234.106 - Partial activation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GRADE CROSSING SAFETY, INCLUDING SIGNAL SYSTEMS, STATE ACTION PLANS, AND... Grade Crossings § 234.106 Partial activation. Upon receipt of a credible report of a partial activation... to warn highway users and railroad employees at the subject crossing in the same manner as...

  8. 49 CFR 234.106 - Partial activation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GRADE CROSSING SAFETY, INCLUDING SIGNAL SYSTEMS, STATE ACTION PLANS, AND... Grade Crossings § 234.106 Partial activation. Upon receipt of a credible report of a partial activation... to warn highway users and railroad employees at the subject crossing in the same manner as...

  9. 49 CFR 234.106 - Partial activation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GRADE CROSSING SAFETY, INCLUDING SIGNAL SYSTEMS, STATE ACTION PLANS, AND... Grade Crossings § 234.106 Partial activation. Upon receipt of a credible report of a partial activation... to warn highway users and railroad employees at the subject crossing in the same manner as...

  10. 47 CFR 5.69 - Partial grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Partial grants. 5.69 Section 5.69...) Applications and Licenses § 5.69 Partial grants. In cases in which the Commission grants an application in part... interference that may result to a station if designated application or applications are subsequently...

  11. Evaluating Models for Partially Clustered Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Scott A.; Bauer, Daniel J.; Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Partially clustered designs, where clustering occurs in some conditions and not others, are common in psychology, particularly in prevention and intervention trials. This article reports results from a simulation comparing 5 approaches to analyzing partially clustered data, including Type I errors, parameter bias, efficiency, and power. Results…

  12. Exploring Partial Order of European Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annoni, Paola; Bruggemann, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Partial Order Theory has been recently more and more employed in applied science to overcome the intrinsic disadvantage hidden in aggregation, if a multiple attribute system is available. Despite its numerous positive features, there are many practical cases where the interpretation of the partial order can be rather troublesome. In these cases…

  13. Seismoelectric wave propagation numerical modelling in partially saturated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warden, S.; Garambois, S.; Jouniaux, L.; Brito, D.; Sailhac, P.; Bordes, C.

    2013-09-01

    To better understand and interpret seismoelectric measurements acquired over vadose environments, both the existing theory and the wave propagation modelling programmes, available for saturated materials, should be extended to partial saturation conditions. We propose here an extension of Pride's equations aiming to take into account partially saturated materials, in the case of a water-air mixture. This new set of equations was incorporated into an existing seismoelectric wave propagation modelling code, originally designed for stratified saturated media. This extension concerns both the mechanical part, using a generalization of the Biot-Gassmann theory, and the electromagnetic part, for which dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity were expressed against water saturation. The dynamic seismoelectric coupling was written as a function of the streaming potential coefficient, which depends on saturation, using four different relations derived from recent laboratory or theoretical studies. In a second part, this extended programme was used to synthesize the seismoelectric response for a layered medium consisting of a partially saturated sand overburden on top of a saturated sandstone half-space. Subsequent analysis of the modelled amplitudes suggests that the typically very weak interface response (IR) may be best recovered when the shallow layer exhibits low saturation. We also use our programme to compute the seismoelectric response of a capillary fringe between a vadose sand overburden and a saturated sand half-space. Our first modelling results suggest that the study of the seismoelectric IR may help to detect a sharp saturation contrast better than a smooth saturation transition. In our example, a saturation contrast of 50 per cent between a fully saturated sand half-space and a partially saturated shallow sand layer yields a stronger IR than a stepwise decrease in saturation.

  14. Adequacy, Litigation, and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, William

    2008-01-01

    The court system has been an increasingly important forum in the attempts to remedy the persistent achievement gaps in American education. In the past twenty years, school finance adequacy litigation has replaced desegregation as the most widely used legal strategy in these efforts. Despite the widespread use of adequacy litigation, few…

  15. Scheduling and Achievement. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2006-01-01

    To use a block schedule or a traditional schedule? Which structure will produce the best and highest achievement rates for students? The research is mixed on this due to numerous variables such as: (1) socioeconomic levels; (2) academic levels; (3) length of time a given schedule has been in operation; (4) strategies being used in the classrooms;…

  16. School Desegregation and Black Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Thomas; And Others

    Seven papers commissioned by the National Institute of Education in order to clarify the state of recent knowledge about the effects of school desegregation on the academic achievement of black students are contained in this report. The papers, which analyze 19 "core" empirical studies on this topic, include: (1) "What Have Black Children Gained…

  17. Mobility and the Achievement Gap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skandera, Hanna; Sousa, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Research indicates that low achievement scores relate significantly to high school mobility rates. One explanation for this relationship is curricular inconsistency. Some suggest that school choice could contribute to a solution by breaking the link between a child's home address and school address, thus allowing students to remain at one school…

  18. The Racial Academic Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Toneka M.

    2008-01-01

    Closing the racial academic achievement gap is a problem that must be solved in order for future society to properly function. Minorities including African-American and Latino students' standardized test scores are much lower than white students. By the end of fourth grade, African American, Latino, and poor students of all races are two years…

  19. Can Judges Improve Academic Achievement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Jay P.; Trivitt, Julie R.

    2008-01-01

    Over the last 3 decades student achievement has remained essentially unchanged in the United States, but not for a lack of spending. Over the same period a myriad of education reforms have been suggested and per-pupil spending has more than doubled. Since the 1990s the education reform attempts have frequently included judicial decisions to revise…

  20. Game Addiction and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Mehmet; Gumus, Yusuf Yasin; Dincel, Sezen

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between game addiction and academic achievement. The secondary aim was to adapt a self-report instrument to measure game addiction. Three hundred and seventy high school students participated in this study. Data were collected via an online questionnaire that included a brief…