Science.gov

Sample records for achieving flame retardancy

  1. Flame retardants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troitzsch, J.

    1988-01-01

    The use of flame retardants in plastics has grown only slightly in recent years and will probably grow slowly in the future. The reasons for this are slow economic growth and the absence of fundamentally new requirements for future fire prevention. The trends are toward the increasing use of easily handled, dust-free and well-dispersed flame retardant compounds and master batches; there are no spectacular new developments. In the future, questions of smoke evolution, toxicity and corrosiveness of combustion gases will become increasingly important, especially due to new regulations and rising requirements for environmental protection.

  2. Brominated Flame Retardants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) belong to a large class of compounds known as organohalogens. BFRs are currently the largest marketed flame retardant group due to their high performance efficiency and low cost. In the commercial market, more than 75 different BFRs are recogniz...

  3. Approach for achieving flame retardancy while retaining physical properties in a compatible polymer matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K. (Inventor); Smith, Trent M. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The invention provides polymer blends containing polyhydroxyamide and one or more flammable polymers. The polymer blends are flame retardant and have improved durability and heat stability compared to the flammable polymer portion of the blends. Articles containing the polymer blends are also provided.

  4. Approach for achieving flame retardancy while retaining physical properties in a compatible polymer matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K. (Inventor); Smith, Trent M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The invention provides polymer blends containing polyhydroxyamide and one or more flammable polymers. The polymer blends are flame retardant and have improved durability and heat stability compared to the flammable polymer portion of the blends. Articles containing the polymer blends are also provided.

  5. Flame retardant spandex type polyurethanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howarth, J. T.; Sheth, S.; Sidman, K. R.; Massucco, A. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Flame retardant elastomeric compositions were developed, comprised of: (1) spandex type polyurethane having incorporated into the polymer chain, halogen containing polyols; (2) conventional spandex type polyurethanes in physical admixture flame retardant additives; and (3) fluoroelastomeric resins in physical admixture with flame retardant additives. Methods of preparing fibers of the flame retardant elastomeric materials are presented and articles of manufacture comprised of the elastomeric materials are mentioned.

  6. Flame Retardant Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Lyon, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial aircraft, flame retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured epoxies were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis and microscale combustion calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness of plaques of several cured formulations was determined on single-edge notched bend specimens. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  7. Flame retarded asphalt blend composition

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, R.B.

    1987-04-21

    This patent describes a flame retarded asphalt composition consisting essentially of a blend of: (a) thermoplastic elastomer modified bitumen; (b) 20-30 wt % inert filler; (c) 1-20 wt % of at least one halogenated flame retardant; and (d) 1-5 wt % of at least one inorganic phosphorus containing compound selected from the group consisting of ammonium phosphate compounds and red phosphorus.

  8. Neurotoxicity of brominated flame retardants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been commonly used as commercial flame retardants in a variety of products including plastics and textiles. Despite their decreasing usage worldwide, congeners continue to accumulate in the environment, including soil, dust, food, anima...

  9. INTRODUCTION TO BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are a large and diverse class of major industrial products used to provide fire safety. Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), Hexabromocylocodecane (HBCD), and Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) are the major commercial compounds. TBBPA is a react...

  10. Firefighters and flame retardant activism.

    PubMed

    Cordner, Alissa; Rodgers, Kathryn M; Brown, Phil; Morello-Frosch, Rachel

    2015-02-01

    In the past decade, exposure to flame retardant chemicals has become a pressing health concern and widely discussed topic of public safety for firefighters in the United States. Working through local, state, and national unions and independent health and advocacy organizations, firefighters have made important contributions to efforts to restrict the use of certain flame retardants. Firefighters are key members in advocacy coalitions dedicated to developing new environmental health regulations and reforming flammability standards to reflect the best available fire science. Their involvement has been motivated by substantiated health concerns and critiques of deceptive lobbying practices by the chemical industry. Drawing on observations and interviews with firefighters, fire safety experts, and other involved stakeholders, this article describes why firefighters are increasingly concerned about their exposure to flame retardant chemicals in consumer products, and analyzes their involvement in state and national environmental health coalitions. PMID:25816168

  11. Firefighters and flame retardant activism.

    PubMed

    Cordner, Alissa; Rodgers, Kathryn M; Brown, Phil; Morello-Frosch, Rachel

    2015-02-01

    In the past decade, exposure to flame retardant chemicals has become a pressing health concern and widely discussed topic of public safety for firefighters in the United States. Working through local, state, and national unions and independent health and advocacy organizations, firefighters have made important contributions to efforts to restrict the use of certain flame retardants. Firefighters are key members in advocacy coalitions dedicated to developing new environmental health regulations and reforming flammability standards to reflect the best available fire science. Their involvement has been motivated by substantiated health concerns and critiques of deceptive lobbying practices by the chemical industry. Drawing on observations and interviews with firefighters, fire safety experts, and other involved stakeholders, this article describes why firefighters are increasingly concerned about their exposure to flame retardant chemicals in consumer products, and analyzes their involvement in state and national environmental health coalitions.

  12. TG-FTIR characterization of flame retardant polyurethane foams materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Tang, Y.; Li, F.; Ge, X. G.; Zhang, Z. J.

    2016-07-01

    Dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) and trichloroethyl phosphtate (TCEP) have been used to enhance the flame retardancy of polyurethane foams materials (PUF). Flame retardancy and thermal degradation of PUF samples have been investigated by the LOI tests and thermal analysis. The results indicate that the excellent flame retardancy can be achieved due to the presence of the flame retardant system containing DMMP and TCEP. TG-FTIR reveals that the addition of DMMP/TCEP can not only improve the thermal stability of PUF samples but can also affect the gaseous phase at high temperature.

  13. Flame retardant polyphosphazenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. L.; Karle, D. W.; Kratzer, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    Six polyphosphazene compositions were prepared by reaction of three bis-tertiary phosphines with two phenyl-s-triazine derived diazides. All six polyphosphazenes produced were completely characterized, four of them were furthermore subjected to isothermal gravimetric analysis, smoke density measurements, flammability and oxidative thermal degradation testing. The results of the characterization studies indicate that only low molecular weight oligomers, possibly of a cyclic structure, were obtained in the polymerization reactions. Despite this, however, two of the materials showed no weight loss after 96 hr at 200 C, one did not autoignite at 500 C in air, and all four self extinguished when exposed to a flame as soon as contact between flame and resin was lost. The only toxic decomposition products to be concerned about were found to be hydrogen cyanide and benzene. Under the conditions employed it was proven, however, that the quantities of toxic products are greatly reduced if no ignition takes place, e.g., if thermal decomposition proceeds at a sufficiently low rate.

  14. Engineering Flame Retardant Biodegradable Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shan; Yang, Kai; Guo, Yichen; Zhang, Linxi; Pack, Seongchan; Davis, Rachel; Lewin, Menahem; Ade, Harald; Korach, Chad; Kashiwagi, Takashi; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2013-03-01

    Cellulose-based PLA/PBAT polymer blends can potentially be a promising class of biodegradable nanocomposites. Adding cellulose fiber reinforcement can improve mechanical properties of biodegradable plastics, but homogeneously dispersing hydrophilic cellulose in the hydrophobic polymer matrix poses a significant challenge. We here show that resorcinol diphenyl phosphates (RDP) can be used to modify the surface energy, not only reducing phase separation between two polymer kinds but also allowing the cellulose particles and the Halloysite clay to be easily dispersed within polymer matrices to achieve synergy effect using melt blending. Here in this study we describe the use of cellulose fiber and Halloysite clay, coated with RDP surfactant, in producing the flame retardant polymer blends of PBAT(Ecoflex) and PLA which can pass the stringent UL-94 V0 test. We also utilized FTIR, SEM and AFM nanoindentation to elucidate the role RDP plays in improving the compatibility of biodegradable polymers, and to determine structure property of chars that resulted in composites that could have optimized mechanical and thermal properties. Supported by Garcia Polymer Center and NSF Foundation.

  15. Public health implications of components of plastics manufacture. Flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Pearce, E M; Liepins, R

    1975-06-01

    The four processes involved in the flammability of materials are described and related to the various flame retardance mechanisms that may operate. Following this the four practical approaches used in improving flame retardance of materials are described. Each approach is illustrated with a number of typical examples of flame retardants or synthetic procedures used. This overview of flammability, flame retardance, and flame retardants used is followed by a more detailed examination of most of the plastics manufactured in the United States during 1973, their consumption patterns, and the primary types of flame retardants used in the flame retardance of the most used plastics. The main types of flame retardants are illustrated with a number of typical commercial examples. Statistical data on flame retardant market size, flame retardant growth in plastics, and price ranges of common flame retardants are presented.

  16. Public health implications of components of plastics manufacture. Flame retardants.

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, E M; Liepins, R

    1975-01-01

    The four processes involved in the flammability of materials are described and related to the various flame retardance mechanisms that may operate. Following this the four practical approaches used in improving flame retardance of materials are described. Each approach is illustrated with a number of typical examples of flame retardants or synthetic procedures used. This overview of flammability, flame retardance, and flame retardants used is followed by a more detailed examination of most of the plastics manufactured in the United States during 1973, their consumption patterns, and the primary types of flame retardants used in the flame retardance of the most used plastics. The main types of flame retardants are illustrated with a number of typical commercial examples. Statistical data on flame retardant market size, flame retardant growth in plastics, and price ranges of common flame retardants are presented. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. PMID:1175568

  17. Biodegradation of brominated and organophosphorus flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Waaijers, Susanne L; Parsons, John R

    2016-04-01

    Brominated flame retardants account for about 21% of the total production of flame retardants and many of these have been identified as persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic. Nevertheless, debromination of these chemicals under anaerobic conditions is well established, although this can increase their toxicity. Consequently, the production and use of these chemicals has been restricted and alternative products have been developed. Many of these are brominated compounds and share some of the disadvantages of the chemicals they are meant to replace. Therefore, other, nonbrominated, flame retardants such as organophosphorus compounds are also being used in increasing quantities, despite the fact that knowledge of their biodegradation and environmental fate is often lacking.

  18. PCBs, PBBs and Brominated Flame Retardants

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter introduces selected organohalogen chemicals such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB5), polychiorinated biphenyls (PBBs), and brominated flame retardants (BFRs) with emphasis on the background, physicochemical properties, environmental levels, health effects and possib...

  19. Brominated Flame Retardants and Perfluorinated Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) belong to a large class of chemicals known as organohalogens. It is believed that both BFRs and PFCs saved lives by reducing flammability of materials commonly used and bactericidal (biocidal) properties. Thes...

  20. The Influence of the Distribution State of Flame-retardants and Talc on the Flammability of Polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seino, Makoto; Nomura, Manabu; Matsubara, Shigeyoshi; Kotaki, Masaya; Hamada, Hiroyuki

    Flammability of polymer is a phenomenon of oxidation reaction at near surface of products. Distribution of filler and flame-retardant at surface of products is thought to influence the flammability. So model samples that have various distributions of flame-retardant and filler, were made by using high-speed sandwich injection moldings. In this study, two types of flame-retardant, bromine type and phosphorous type, were used. The model sample which had high flame-retardant content in surface layer and high filler content in core layer, had good flammability and mechanical properties. Especially, phosphorous flame-retardant showed superior effect in that small amount of flame-retardant achieved same flammability as flame-retardant PP without filler. Control of distribution of flame-retardant and filler by using high-speed sandwich injection molding is cost-effective method with low flame-retardant addition.

  1. A polymeric flame retardant additive for rubbers

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.N.; Maiti, S.

    1993-12-31

    Synthesis of a polyphosphonate by the interfacial polymerization of bisphenol-A (BPA) and dichloro-phenyl phosphine oxide (DCPO) using cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (TMAC) as phase transfer catalyst (PTC) was reported. The polyphosphonate was characterized by elemental analysis, IR, TGA, DSC and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. The flame retardancy of the polymer was done by OI study. The polymer was used as a fire retardant additive to rubbers such as natural rubber (NR), styrene-butadiene rubber(SBR), nitrile rubber (NBR) and chloroprene rubber (CR). The efficiency of the fire retardant property of this additive was determined by LOI measurements of the various rubber samples.

  2. BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS: CAUSE FOR CONCERN?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have routinely been added to consumer products for several decades in a successful effort to reduce fire-related injury and property damage. Recently, concern for this emerging class of chemicals has risen due to the occurrence of several class...

  3. HEALTH EFFECTS OF BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS (BFRS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Brominated flame retardant use has increased dramatically in order to provide fire safety to consumers. However, there is growing concern about widespread environmental contamination and potential health risks from some of these products. The most used products...

  4. BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS: WHY DO WE CARE?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) save lives and property by preventing the spread of fires or delaying the time of flashover, enhancing the time people have to escape. The worldwide production of BFRs exceeded 200,000 metric tons in 2003 placing them in the high production vol...

  5. HEALTH ASPECTS OF BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS (BFRS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to reduce the societal costs of fires, flammability standards have been set for consumer products and equipment. Flame retardants containing bromine have constituted the largest share of this market due both to their efficiency and cost. While there are at least 75 dif...

  6. Brominated flame retardants as food contaminants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter reviews analytical methods for the three major brominated flame retardant (BFR) classes in use today, tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBP-A), hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), a "legacy" BFR no longer in use, polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs), and a...

  7. Chemistry and toxicity of flame retardants for plastics.

    PubMed

    Liepins, R; Pearce, E M

    1976-10-01

    An overview of commercially used flame retardants is give. The most used flame retardants are illustrated and the seven major markets, which use 96% of all flame-retarded polymers, are described. Annual flame retardant growth rate for each major market is also projected. Toxicity data are reviewed on only those compositions that are considered commercially significant today. This includes 18 compounds or families of compounds and four inherently flame-retarded polymers. Toxicological studies of flame retardants for most synthetic materials are of recent origin and only a few of the compounds have been evaluated in any great detail. Considerable toxicological problems may exist in the manufacturing of some flame retardants, their by-products, and possible decomposition products.

  8. Chemistry and toxicity of flame retardants for plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Liepins, R; Pearce, E M

    1976-01-01

    An overview of commercially used flame retardants is give. The most used flame retardants are illustrated and the seven major markets, which use 96% of all flame-retarded polymers, are described. Annual flame retardant growth rate for each major market is also projected. Toxicity data are reviewed on only those compositions that are considered commercially significant today. This includes 18 compounds or families of compounds and four inherently flame-retarded polymers. Toxicological studies of flame retardants for most synthetic materials are of recent origin and only a few of the compounds have been evaluated in any great detail. Considerable toxicological problems may exist in the manufacturing of some flame retardants, their by-products, and possible decomposition products. PMID:1026419

  9. Brominated flame retardants: cause for concern?

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, Linda S; Staskal, Daniele F

    2004-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have routinely been added to consumer products for several decades in a successful effort to reduce fire-related injury and property damage. Recently, concern for this emerging class of chemicals has risen because of the occurrence of several classes of BFRs in the environment and in human biota. The widespread production and use of BFRs; strong evidence of increasing contamination of the environment, wildlife, and people; and limited knowledge of potential effects heighten the importance of identifying emerging issues associated with the use of BFRs. In this article, we briefly review scientific issues associated with the use of tetrabromobisphenol A, hexabromocyclododecane, and three commercial mixtures of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and discuss data gaps. Overall, the toxicology database is very limited; the current literature is incomplete and often conflicting. Available data, however, raise concern over the use of certain classes of brominated flame retardants. PMID:14698924

  10. EFFECT OF ORGANOPHOSPHORUS FLAME RETARDANTS ON NEURONAL DEVELOPMENT IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increased use of organophosphorus compounds as alternatives to brominated flame retardants (BFRs) has led to widespread human exposure, There is, however, limited information on their potential health effects. This study compared the effects of nii ne organophosphorus flame...

  11. Nanotechnology finding its way into flame retardancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartel, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Nanotechnology is one of the key technologies of the 21st century. The exploitation of "new" effects that arise from materials structured on the nano-scale has also been proposed successfully for flame retardancy of polymers since the end of the 90s. Of all of the approaches these include, at this time the use of nanocomposites offers the best potential for industrial application, also some other ideas are sketched, such as using electrospun nanofibers mats or layer-by-layer deposits as protection coatings, as well as sub-micrometer multilayer coatings as effective IR-mirrors. The general phenomena, inducing a flow limit in the pyrolysing melt and changing the fire residue, are identified in nanocomposites. Key experiments are performed such as quasi online investigation of the protection layer formation to understand what is going on in detail. The flame retardancy mechanisms are discussed and their impact on fire behaviour quantified. With the latter, the presentation pushes forward the state of the art. For instance, the heat shielding is experimentally quantified for a layered silicate epoxy resin nanocomposite proving that it is the only import mechanism controlling the reduction in peak heat release rate in the investigated system for different irradiations. The flame retardancy performance is assessed comprehensively illuminating not only the strengths but also the weak points of the concepts. Guidelines for materials development are deduced and discussed. Apart from inorganic fillers (layered silicate, boehmite, etc.) not only carbon nanoobjects such as multiwall carbon nanotubes, multilayer graphene and graphene are investigated, but also nanoparticles that are more reactive and harbor the potential for more beneficial interactions with the polymer matrix.

  12. Nanotechnology finding its way into flame retardancy

    SciTech Connect

    Schartel, Bernhard

    2014-05-15

    Nanotechnology is one of the key technologies of the 21{sup st} century. The exploitation of 'new' effects that arise from materials structured on the nano-scale has also been proposed successfully for flame retardancy of polymers since the end of the 90s. Of all of the approaches these include, at this time the use of nanocomposites offers the best potential for industrial application, also some other ideas are sketched, such as using electrospun nanofibers mats or layer-by-layer deposits as protection coatings, as well as sub-micrometer multilayer coatings as effective IR-mirrors. The general phenomena, inducing a flow limit in the pyrolysing melt and changing the fire residue, are identified in nanocomposites. Key experiments are performed such as quasi online investigation of the protection layer formation to understand what is going on in detail. The flame retardancy mechanisms are discussed and their impact on fire behaviour quantified. With the latter, the presentation pushes forward the state of the art. For instance, the heat shielding is experimentally quantified for a layered silicate epoxy resin nanocomposite proving that it is the only import mechanism controlling the reduction in peak heat release rate in the investigated system for different irradiations. The flame retardancy performance is assessed comprehensively illuminating not only the strengths but also the weak points of the concepts. Guidelines for materials development are deduced and discussed. Apart from inorganic fillers (layered silicate, boehmite, etc.) not only carbon nanoobjects such as multiwall carbon nanotubes, multilayer graphene and graphene are investigated, but also nanoparticles that are more reactive and harbor the potential for more beneficial interactions with the polymer matrix.

  13. Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Rahman, F; Langford, K H; Scrimshaw, M D; Lester, J N

    2001-07-25

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether, PBDE, flame retardants are now a world-wide pollution problem reaching even remote areas. They have been found to bioaccumulate and there are concerns over the health effects of exposure to PBDEs, they also have potential endocrine disrupting properties. They are lipophilic compounds so are easily removed from the aqueous environment and are predicted to sorb onto sediments and particulate matter or to fatty tissue, aiding their distribution throughout the environment. PBDEs are structurally similar to PCBs and DDT and, therefore, their chemical properties, persistence and distribution in the environment follow similar patterns. Concentrations of PBDEs found in environmental samples are now higher than those of PCBs. Evidence to date demonstrates that PBDEs are a growing problem in the environment and concern over their fate and effects is warranted. The manufacture of reactive and additive flame retardants is briefly discussed and their fate and behaviour in the environment is assessed. PBDE toxicology is reviewed and methods of analysis are evaluated.

  14. Flame retardant antibacterial cotton high-loft nonwoven fabrics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flame retardant treated gray cotton fibers were blended with antibacterial treated gray cotton fibers and polyester/polyester sheath/core bicomponent fibers to form high-loft fabrics. The high flame retardancy (FR) and antibacterial property of these high lofts were evaluated by limiting oxygen inde...

  15. IN VITRO DERMAL ABSORPTION OF FLAME RETARDANT CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    The use of flame retardant chemicals in furniture fabric could pose a potential health risk to consumers from dermal absorption of these compounds. The objective of this study was to examine the in vitro dermal absorption of two flame retardant chemicals, [14C]-d...

  16. Novel phosphonates triazine derivative as economic flame retardant for cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphorous-containing flame retardants are widely used in standard and engineering plastics, polyurethane foams, thermosets, coatings, and textiles. Organophosphorous flame retardants have been known to be more effective when used in conjunction with nitrogen-containing systems. Their mixture produ...

  17. IN VITRO DERMAL ABSORPTION OF FLAME RETARDANT CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    IN VITRO DERMAL ABSORPTION OF FLAME RETARDANT CHEMICALS. M F Hughes1, B C Edwards1, C T Mitchell1, and B Bhooshan2. 1US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTP, NC; 2US CPSC, LSC, Rockville, MD.
    Two flame retardant chemicals that are candidates for treating furniture fabrics were evaluated for ...

  18. Flame Retardant Applications in Camping Tents and Potential Exposure.

    PubMed

    Keller, Alexander S; Raju, Nikhilesh P; Webster, Thomas F; Stapleton, Heather M

    2014-02-11

    Concern has mounted over health effects caused by exposure to flame retardant additives used in consumer products. Significant research efforts have focused particularly on exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) used in furniture and electronic applications. However, little attention has focused on applications in textiles, particularly textiles meeting a flammability standard known as CPAI-84. In this study, we investigated flame retardant applications in camping tents that met CPAI-84 standards by analyzing 11 samples of tent fabrics for chemical flame retardant additives. Furthermore, we investigated potential exposure by collecting paired samples of tent wipes and hand wipes from 27 individuals after tent setup. Of the 11 fabric samples analyzed, 10 contained flame retardant additives, which included tris(1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate (TDCPP), decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209), triphenyl phosphate, and tetrabromobisphenol-A. Flame retardant concentrations were discovered to be as high as 37.5 mg/g (3.8% by weight) in the tent fabric samples, and TDCPP and BDE-209 were the most frequently detected in these samples. We also observed a significant association between TDCPP levels in tent wipes and those in paired hand wipes, suggesting that human contact with the tent fabric material leads to the transfer of the flame retardant to the skin surface and human exposure. These results suggest that direct contact with flame retardant-treated textiles may be a source of exposure. Future studies will be needed to better characterize exposure, including via inhalation and dermal sorption from air. PMID:24804279

  19. Flame Retardant Applications in Camping Tents and Potential Exposure

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Concern has mounted over health effects caused by exposure to flame retardant additives used in consumer products. Significant research efforts have focused particularly on exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) used in furniture and electronic applications. However, little attention has focused on applications in textiles, particularly textiles meeting a flammability standard known as CPAI-84. In this study, we investigated flame retardant applications in camping tents that met CPAI-84 standards by analyzing 11 samples of tent fabrics for chemical flame retardant additives. Furthermore, we investigated potential exposure by collecting paired samples of tent wipes and hand wipes from 27 individuals after tent setup. Of the 11 fabric samples analyzed, 10 contained flame retardant additives, which included tris(1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate (TDCPP), decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209), triphenyl phosphate, and tetrabromobisphenol-A. Flame retardant concentrations were discovered to be as high as 37.5 mg/g (3.8% by weight) in the tent fabric samples, and TDCPP and BDE-209 were the most frequently detected in these samples. We also observed a significant association between TDCPP levels in tent wipes and those in paired hand wipes, suggesting that human contact with the tent fabric material leads to the transfer of the flame retardant to the skin surface and human exposure. These results suggest that direct contact with flame retardant-treated textiles may be a source of exposure. Future studies will be needed to better characterize exposure, including via inhalation and dermal sorption from air. PMID:24804279

  20. Halogenated flame retardants in the Great Lakes environment.

    PubMed

    Venier, Marta; Salamova, Amina; Hites, Ronald A

    2015-07-21

    Flame retardants are widely used industrial chemicals that are added to polymers, such as polyurethane foam, to prevent them from rapidly burning if exposed to a small flame or a smoldering cigarette. Flame retardants, especially brominated flame retardants, are added to many polymeric products at percent levels and are present in most upholstered furniture and mattresses. Most of these chemicals are so-called "additive" flame retardants and are not chemically bound to the polymer; thus, they migrate from the polymeric materials into the environment and into people. As a result, some of these chemicals have become widespread pollutants, which is a concern given their possible adverse health effects. Perhaps because of their environmental ubiquity, the most heavily used group of brominated flame retardants, the polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), was withdrawn from production and use during the 2004-2013 period. This led to an increasing demand for other flame retardants, including other brominated aromatics and organophosphate esters. Although little is known about the use or production volumes of these newer flame retardants, it is evident that some of these chemicals are also becoming pervasive in the environment and in humans. In this Account, we describe our research on the occurrence of halogenated and organophosphate flame retardants in the environment, with a specific focus on the Great Lakes region. This Account starts with a short introduction to the first generation of brominated flame retardants, the polybrominated biphenyls, and then presents our measurements of their replacement, the PBDEs. We summarize our data on PBDE levels in babies, bald eagles, and in air. Once these compounds came off the market, we began to measure several of the newer flame retardants in air collected on the shores of the Great Lakes once every 12 days. These new measurements focus on a tetrabrominated benzoate, a tetrabrominated phthalate, a hexabrominated diphenoxyethane

  1. Halogenated flame retardants in the Great Lakes environment.

    PubMed

    Venier, Marta; Salamova, Amina; Hites, Ronald A

    2015-07-21

    Flame retardants are widely used industrial chemicals that are added to polymers, such as polyurethane foam, to prevent them from rapidly burning if exposed to a small flame or a smoldering cigarette. Flame retardants, especially brominated flame retardants, are added to many polymeric products at percent levels and are present in most upholstered furniture and mattresses. Most of these chemicals are so-called "additive" flame retardants and are not chemically bound to the polymer; thus, they migrate from the polymeric materials into the environment and into people. As a result, some of these chemicals have become widespread pollutants, which is a concern given their possible adverse health effects. Perhaps because of their environmental ubiquity, the most heavily used group of brominated flame retardants, the polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), was withdrawn from production and use during the 2004-2013 period. This led to an increasing demand for other flame retardants, including other brominated aromatics and organophosphate esters. Although little is known about the use or production volumes of these newer flame retardants, it is evident that some of these chemicals are also becoming pervasive in the environment and in humans. In this Account, we describe our research on the occurrence of halogenated and organophosphate flame retardants in the environment, with a specific focus on the Great Lakes region. This Account starts with a short introduction to the first generation of brominated flame retardants, the polybrominated biphenyls, and then presents our measurements of their replacement, the PBDEs. We summarize our data on PBDE levels in babies, bald eagles, and in air. Once these compounds came off the market, we began to measure several of the newer flame retardants in air collected on the shores of the Great Lakes once every 12 days. These new measurements focus on a tetrabrominated benzoate, a tetrabrominated phthalate, a hexabrominated diphenoxyethane

  2. The flame retardant properties of cyanuric chloride derivatives in cotton textile applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyanuric chloride derivatives are promising flame retardants in cotton textile applications due to their ease of synthesis, high yield, and excellent flame retardant properties as measured by thermogravimetric analyses, limiting oxygen index, and vertical flame testing. Scanning electron microscopic...

  3. Development of Flame Retardants for Engineering Polymers and Polyurethanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desikan, Anantha

    2013-03-01

    With a broad portfolio of brominated, organophosphorus and inorganic flame retardants, ICL Industrial Products (ICL-IP) is engaged in the development of new flame retardants by exploiting the synergism between bromine based, phosphorus based and other halogen-free flame retardants. ICL-IP is also focusing on the development of polymeric and reactive flame retardants. This presentation will give examples of existing and new polymeric and reactive products for applications in thermoplastics, thermosets and polyurethane foam. This presentation will also show examples of phosphorus-bromine synergism allowing partial or complete elimination of antimony trioxide in many thermoplastics for electronic applications. New synergistic combinations of magnesium hydroxide with phosphorus and other halogen-free FRs will be presented. Work done in collaboration with S. Levchik, ICL-IP America, 430 Saw Mill Rriver Rd., Ardsley, NY, 10502, USA and M. Leifer, ICL-IP, P. O. Box 180, Beer Sheva 84101, Israel.

  4. Sorption of Organophosphorus Flame-Retardants on Settled Dust

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dust is an important sink for indoor air pollutants, such as organophosphorus flame-retardants (OPFRs) that are used as additives in industrial and consumer products including electrical and electronic products, furniture, plastics, textile, and building/construction materials. T...

  5. Sorption of Organophosphorus Flame Retardants (OPFRs) on Settled Dust

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organophosphorus flame retardants (OPFRs) are widely used as additives in industrial and consumer products such as electrical and electronic products, furniture, plastics, textiles, and building/construction materials. Due to human exposure and potential health effects, OPFRs inc...

  6. Burning To Learn: An Introduction to Flame Retardants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Presents an activity that demonstrates the effectiveness of flame retardants--substances added to combustible materials to slow down or hinder burning--that can be introduced when discussing combustion reactions or during a practical or everyday chemistry unit. (ASK)

  7. Non-flammable elastomeric fiber from a fluorinated elastomer and containing an halogenated flame retardant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howarth, J. T.; Sheth, S. G.; Sidman, K. R.; Massucco, A. A. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Flame retardant elastomeric compositions are described comprised of either spandex type polyurethane having incorporated into the polymer chain halogen containing polyols, conventional spandex type polyurethanes in physical admixture with flame retardant additives, or fluoroelastomeric resins in physical admixture with flame retardant additives. Methods are described for preparing fibers of the flame retardant elastomeric materials and articles of manufacture comprised of the flame retardant clastomeric materials and non elastic materials such as polybenzimidazoles, fiberglass, nylons, etc.

  8. Environmental monitoring of brominated flame retardants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagula, Mary C.; Kubeldis, Nathan; Nelatury, Charles F.

    2011-06-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are synthetic organobromide compounds which inhibit ignition and combustion processes. Because of their immense ability to retard fire and save life and property, they have been extensively used in many products such as TVs, computers, foam, plastics etc. The five major classes of BFRs are tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), pentabromodiphenyl ether, octabromodiphenyl ether, and decabromodiphenyl ether. The last three are also commonly called PBDEs. BDE-85 and BDE-209 are the two prominent congeners of PBDEs and this study reports the adverse effects of these congeners in rodents. Exposure of rat sciatic nerves to 5 μg/mL and 20 μg/mL of BDE-85 and BDE-209 respectively lead to significant, concentration dependent reduction in nerve conduction function. Glucose absorption in the rat intestinal segments exposed to 5 μg/mL of BDE-85 and BDE-209 was significantly reduced for both the compounds tested. Lastly, mice when exposed to 0.25 mg/kg body weight for four days showed a disruption in oxidant and antioxidant equilibrium. The tissues namely liver and brain have shown increase in the levels of lipid hydroperoxides indicating oxidative stress. Moreover, all the protective enzymes namely superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase, and glutathione S transferase (GST) have shown tissue specific alterations indicating the induction of damaging oxidative stress and setting in of lipid peroxidation in exposed animals. The results indicate monitoring of PBDEs in the environment is essential because levels as low as 5 μg/mL and 0.25 mg/kg body weight were able to cause damage to the functions of rodents.

  9. Flame Retardant Exposure among Collegiate U.S. Gymnasts

    PubMed Central

    Carignan, Courtney C.; Heiger-Bernays, Wendy; McClean, Michael D.; Roberts, Simon C.; Stapleton, Heather M.; Sjödin, Andreas; Webster, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    Gymnastics training facilities contain large volumes of polyurethane foam, a material that often contains additive flame retardants such as PentaBDE. While investigations of human exposure to flame retardants have focused on the general population, potentially higher than background exposures may occur in gymnasts and certain occupational groups. Our objectives were to compare PentaBDE body burden among gymnasts to the general U.S. population and characterize flame retardants levels in gym equipment, air and dust. We recruited 11 collegiate female gymnasts (ages 18–22) from one gym in the Eastern U.S. The geometric mean (GM) concentration of BDE-153 in gymnast sera (32.5 ng/g lipid) was 4–6.5 times higher than general U.S. population groups. Median concentrations of PentaBDE, TBB and TBPH in paired handwipe samples were 2–3 times higher after practice compared to before, indicating the gymnasts contacted these flame retardants during practice. GM concentrations of PentaBDE, TBB and TBPH were 1-3 orders of magnitude higher in gym air and dust than in residences. Our findings suggest that these collegiate gymnasts experienced higher exposures to PentaBDE flame retardants compared to the general U.S. population and that gymnasts may also have increased exposure to other additive flame retardants used in polyurethane foam such as TBB and TBPH. PMID:24195753

  10. Brominated flame retardant exposure of aircraft personnel.

    PubMed

    Strid, Anna; Smedje, Greta; Athanassiadis, Ioannis; Lindgren, Torsten; Lundgren, Håkan; Jakobsson, Kristina; Bergman, Åke

    2014-12-01

    The use of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in aircraft is the result of high fire safety demands. Personnel working in or with aircraft might therefore be exposed to several BFRs. Previous studies have reported PBDE exposure in flight attendants and in passengers. One other group that may be subjected to significant BFR exposure via inhalation, are the aircraft maintenance workers. Personnel exposure both during flights and maintenance of aircraft, are investigated in the present study. Several BFRs were present in air and dust sampled during both the exposure scenarios; PBDEs, hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis (2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane. PBDEs were also analyzed in serum from pilots/cabin crew, maintenance workers and from a control group of individuals without any occupational aircraft exposure. Significantly higher concentrations of PBDEs were found in maintenance workers compared to pilots/cabin crew and control subjects with median total PBDE concentrations of 19, 6.8 and 6.6 pmol g(-1) lipids, respectively. Pilots and cabin crew had similar concentrations of most PBDEs as the control group, except for BDE-153 and BDE-154 which were significantly higher. Results indicate higher concentrations among some of the pilots compared to the cabin crew. It is however, evident that the cabin personnel have lower BFR exposures compared to maintenance workers that are exposed to such a degree that their blood levels are significantly different from the control group. PMID:24745557

  11. Brominated flame retardant exposure of aircraft personnel.

    PubMed

    Strid, Anna; Smedje, Greta; Athanassiadis, Ioannis; Lindgren, Torsten; Lundgren, Håkan; Jakobsson, Kristina; Bergman, Åke

    2014-12-01

    The use of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in aircraft is the result of high fire safety demands. Personnel working in or with aircraft might therefore be exposed to several BFRs. Previous studies have reported PBDE exposure in flight attendants and in passengers. One other group that may be subjected to significant BFR exposure via inhalation, are the aircraft maintenance workers. Personnel exposure both during flights and maintenance of aircraft, are investigated in the present study. Several BFRs were present in air and dust sampled during both the exposure scenarios; PBDEs, hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis (2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane. PBDEs were also analyzed in serum from pilots/cabin crew, maintenance workers and from a control group of individuals without any occupational aircraft exposure. Significantly higher concentrations of PBDEs were found in maintenance workers compared to pilots/cabin crew and control subjects with median total PBDE concentrations of 19, 6.8 and 6.6 pmol g(-1) lipids, respectively. Pilots and cabin crew had similar concentrations of most PBDEs as the control group, except for BDE-153 and BDE-154 which were significantly higher. Results indicate higher concentrations among some of the pilots compared to the cabin crew. It is however, evident that the cabin personnel have lower BFR exposures compared to maintenance workers that are exposed to such a degree that their blood levels are significantly different from the control group.

  12. Cone calorimeter evaluation of two flame retardant cotton fabrics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unbleached (grey) cotton needle punched nonwoven (NW) fabrics with 12.5% polypropylene scrim were treated with two phosphate-nitrogen based fire-retardant (FR) formulations, SRRC-1 and SRRC-2. The SRRC-1 formulation contains diammonium phosphate as the flame retardant chemical along with urea and d...

  13. Flame-retardant additives for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyung, Yoo E.; Vissers, Donald R.; Amine, Khalil

    To enhance the resistance of lithium-ion battery components to ignition and to reduce the flammability of the electrolyte with minimal effect on performance, we added flame-retardant additives to the electrolyte. The flame retardants were selected from a group of organic phosphate compounds, triphenylphosphate (TPP) and tributylphosphate (TBP), to provide superior thermal safety in lithium-ion cells at the fully charged state. The cycling characteristics of the lithium-ion cells containing flame-retardant additives were found to be similar or superior to the cells that contained no additives. Horizontal burning tests of electrolytes were carried out in a flame test chamber referenced by Underwriters Laboratories (UL) test standard 94 (UL 94) and ASTM D4986-98 to evaluate the electrolyes' flammability characteristics. The thermal stability characteristics of the electrodes and electrolytes with and without flame-retardant additives were investigated by accelerating rate calorimetry (ARC). Negative electrode samples with electrolytes containing flame-retardant additives revealed less heat generation and higher-onset decomposition temperatures. The results disclose that the thermal safety of lithium-ion cells can be improved by incorporating small amounts of suitable additives such as triphenylphosphate and tributylphosphate to the electrolyte.

  14. Flame retardation of cellulose-rich fabrics via a simplified layer-by-layer assembly.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun-Chi; Liao, Wang; Deng, Shi-Bi; Cao, Zhi-Jie; Wang, Yu-Zhong

    2016-10-20

    Due to the high cellulose content of cotton (88.0-96.5%), the flame retardation of cotton fabrics can be achieved via an approach for the flame retardation of cellulose. In this work, a facile water-based flame retardant coating was deposited on cotton fabrics by a 'simplified' layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly. The novel coating solution was based on a mild reaction between ammonium polyphosphate (APP) and branched polyethyleneimine (BPEI), and the reaction mechanism was studied. TGA results showed that the char residues of coated fabrics were remarkably increased. The fabric with only 5wt% coating showed self-extinguishing in the horizontal flame test, and the peak heat release rate (pHRR) in cone calorimeter test decreased by 51%. Furthermore, this coating overcame a general drawback of flame-retardant LbL assembly which was easily washed away. Therefore, the simplified LbL method provides a fast, low-cost, eco-friendly and wash-durable flame-retardant finishing for the cellulose-rich cotton fabrics.

  15. Flame retardation of cellulose-rich fabrics via a simplified layer-by-layer assembly.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun-Chi; Liao, Wang; Deng, Shi-Bi; Cao, Zhi-Jie; Wang, Yu-Zhong

    2016-10-20

    Due to the high cellulose content of cotton (88.0-96.5%), the flame retardation of cotton fabrics can be achieved via an approach for the flame retardation of cellulose. In this work, a facile water-based flame retardant coating was deposited on cotton fabrics by a 'simplified' layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly. The novel coating solution was based on a mild reaction between ammonium polyphosphate (APP) and branched polyethyleneimine (BPEI), and the reaction mechanism was studied. TGA results showed that the char residues of coated fabrics were remarkably increased. The fabric with only 5wt% coating showed self-extinguishing in the horizontal flame test, and the peak heat release rate (pHRR) in cone calorimeter test decreased by 51%. Furthermore, this coating overcame a general drawback of flame-retardant LbL assembly which was easily washed away. Therefore, the simplified LbL method provides a fast, low-cost, eco-friendly and wash-durable flame-retardant finishing for the cellulose-rich cotton fabrics. PMID:27474586

  16. Exposure to flame retardant chemicals on commercial airplanes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Flame retardant chemicals are used in materials on airplanes to slow the propagation of fire. These chemicals migrate from their source products and can be found in the dust of airplanes, creating the potential for exposure. Methods To characterize exposure to flame retardant chemicals in airplane dust, we collected dust samples from locations inside 19 commercial airplanes parked overnight at airport gates. In addition, hand-wipe samples were also collected from 9 flight attendants and 1 passenger who had just taken a cross-country (USA) flight. The samples were analyzed for a suite of flame retardant chemicals. To identify the possible sources for the brominated flame retardants, we used a portable XRF analyzer to quantify bromine concentrations in materials inside the airplanes. Results A wide range of flame retardant compounds were detected in 100% of the dust samples collected from airplanes, including BDEs 47, 99, 153, 183 and 209, tris(1,3-dichloro-isopropyl)phosphate (TDCPP), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and bis-(2-ethylhexyl)-tetrabromo-phthalate (TBPH). Airplane dust contained elevated concentrations of BDE 209 (GM: 500 ug/g; range: 2,600 ug/g) relative to other indoor environments, such as residential and commercial buildings, and the hands of participants after a cross-country flight contained elevated BDE 209 concentrations relative to the general population. TDCPP, a known carcinogen that was removed from use in children’s pajamas in the 1970’s although still used today in other consumer products, was detected on 100% of airplanes in concentrations similar to those found in residential and commercial locations. Conclusion This study adds to the limited body of knowledge regarding exposure to flame retardants on commercial aircraft, an environment long hypothesized to be at risk for maximum exposures due to strict flame retardant standards for aircraft materials. Our findings indicate that flame retardants are widely used in many

  17. Analysis of brominated flame retardants in house dust.

    PubMed

    Abb, Magdalena; Stahl, Beate; Lorenz, Wilhelm

    2011-12-01

    The main objective of this study was to create a robust analytical method to analyse the flame retardants decabromodiphenylether (BDE-209), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), and tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA) in house dust in order to estimate the degree of contamination of indoor environment. A liquid chromatography method equipped with a UV-detector and electro spray-tandem mass spectrometry was used to achieve this result. Applying an external calibration for BDE-209, an internal calibration for TBBPA, and a standard addition method for HBCD low limits of quantification were obtained. The analytical procedure was carried out under exclusion of UV-light as the target compounds potentially degrade when being exposed to UV-light. Empirical data were obtained in addition to the dust samples to estimate potential influences of apartment characteristics. A weak correlation between the number of electric devices and TBBPA was found. PMID:21724229

  18. Process for spinning flame retardant elastomeric compositions. [fabricating synthetic fibers for high oxygen environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howarth, J. T.; Sheth, S.; Sidman, K. R.; Massucco, A. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Flame retardant elastomeric compositions comprised of either spandex type polyurethane having halogen containing polyols incorporated into the polymer chain, conventional spandex type polyurethanes in physical admixture with flame retardant additives, or fluoroelastomeric resins in physical admixture with flame retardant additives were developed. Methods are described for preparing fibers of the flame retardant elastomeric materials and manufactured articles as well as nonelastic materials such as polybenzimidazoles, fiberglass, and nylons, for high oxygen environments.

  19. Innovative green technique for preparing of flame retardant cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to its environmentally benign character, microwave-assisted or supercritical carbon dioxide high pressure reactors are considered in green chemistry as a substitute for organic solvents in chemical reactions. In this paper, an innovative approach for preparation of flame retardant cotton fabric ...

  20. PBDE FLAME RETARDANTS: TOXICOLOGY, HEALTH EFFECTS, AND RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants have been routinely added to consumer products for several decades in a successful effort to reduce fire-related injury and property damage. Global production of PBDEs has reached 67,000 metric tons per year. Recently concer...

  1. Green Flame Retardant Cotton Highlofts for Mattresses and Upholstered Furniture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Green flame retardant (FR) barrier fabric is environmentally-friendly because it is from a natural renewable resource, biodegradable, economical, employing greige cotton that is soft to touch. Greige unbleached cotton is cheaper and softer than bleached cotton, thus, increasing its marketability par...

  2. Neurotoxicity and risk assessment of brominated and alternative flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Hester S; Westerink, Remco H S

    2015-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are widely used chemicals that prevent or slow the onset and spreading of fire. Unfortunately, many of these compounds pose serious threats for human health and the environment, indicating an urgent need for safe(r) and less persistent alternative flame retardants (AFRs). As previous research identified the nervous system as a sensitive target organ, the neurotoxicity of past and present flame retardants is reviewed. First, an overview of the neurotoxicity of BFRs in humans and experimental animals is provided, and some common in vitro neurotoxic mechanisms of action are discussed. The combined epidemiological and toxicological studies clearly underline the need for replacing BFRs. Many potentially suitable AFRs are already in use, despite the absence of a full profile of their environmental behavior and toxicological properties. To prioritize the suitability of some selected halogenated and non-halogenated organophosphorous flame retardants and inorganic halogen-free flame retardants, the available neurotoxic data of these AFRs are discussed. The suitability of the AFRs is rank-ordered and combined with human exposure data (serum concentrations, breast milk concentrations and house dust concentrations) and physicochemical properties (useful to predict e.g. bioavailability and persistence in the environment) for a first semi-quantitative risk assessment of the AFRs. As can be concluded from the reviewed data, several BFRs and AFRs share some neurotoxic effects and modes of action. Moreover, the available neurotoxicity data indicate that some AFRs may be suitable substitutes for BFRs. However, proper risk assessment is hampered by an overall scarcity of data, particularly regarding environmental persistence, human exposure levels, and the formation of breakdown products and possible metabolites as well as their toxicity. Until these data gaps in environmental behavioral and toxicological profiles are filled, large scale use of

  3. Part I. improve flame retardant textile. Part II. novel approach layer-by-layer processing for flame retardant textile.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this presentation, new approaches for flame retardant textile by using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and layer-by-layer processing will be discussed. Due to its environmentally benign character, the scCO2 is considered in green chemistry as a substitute for organic solvents in chemical rea...

  4. Part I. Improved flame retardant textiles. Part II. Novel approach to layer-by-layer processing for flame retardant textiles.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this presentation, new approaches for flame retardant textile by using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and layer-by-layer processing will be discussed. Due to its environmentally benign character, the scCO2 is considered in green chemistry as a substitute for organic solvents in chemical re...

  5. Mineralisation and primary biodegradation of aromatic organophosphorus flame retardants in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Jurgens, Sharona S; Helmus, Rick; Waaijers, Susanne L; Uittenbogaard, Dirk; Dunnebier, Dorien; Vleugel, Melissa; Kraak, Michiel H S; de Voogt, Pim; Parsons, John R

    2014-09-01

    Halogen-free flame retardants (HFFRs), such as the aromatic organophosphorus flame retardants (OPFRs) triphenyl phosphate (TPHP), resorcinol bis(diphenylphosphate) (PBDPP) and bisphenol A bis(diphenylphosphate) (BPA-BDPP) have been proposed as potential replacements for brominated flame retardants in polymers and textiles. Although these OPFRs are already marketed, their environmental fate and effects are poorly characterised. The aim of this study was therefore to determine the mineralisation and primary biodegradation of these OPFRs by activated sludge. Mineralisation was monitored by measuring CO2 production by means of GC analysis, whereas primary biodegradation was monitored by LC-MS/MS analysis of the OPFRs and their potential metabolites. TPHP was biodegraded and mineralised most rapidly and achieved the requirement for ready biodegradability (60% of theoretical maximum mineralisation). Primary biodegradation was also rapid for PBDPP, but 60% mineralisation was not achieved within the time of the test, suggesting that transformation products of PBDPP may accumulate. Primary degradation of BPA-BDPP was very slow and very low CO2 production was also observed. Based on these results, TPHP and to a lesser extent PBDPP appear to be suitable replacements for the more environmentally persistent brominated flame retardants. PMID:24997924

  6. Effects of TiO₂ and curing temperatures on flame retardant finishing of cotton.

    PubMed

    Poon, Chin-Kuen; Kan, Chi-Wai

    2015-05-01

    The performance of flame retardancy of cotton cellulose can be influenced by curing conditions. In this study, cotton cellulose was imparted durable flame retardant properties by a reaction between a flame retardant agent (Pyrovatex CP New) and a cross linking agent (Knittex CHN), in the presence of catalysts phosphoric acid and titanium dioxide (TiO2). After treating cotton fabrics at different curing temperatures for different curing time, its flame retardant performance was evaluated by 45° fabric flammability standard test method. For cotton fabrics cured at 150 and 170°C, good flame retardant characteristics were retained even after three home laundering cycles. The use of TiO2 as a co-catalyst in the treatment improved the flame retardant properties and reduced the loss of tearing strength of cotton fabrics. No significant negative effect in the whiteness index was observed, as compared with conventional flame retardant treatment. PMID:25659721

  7. Effects of TiO₂ and curing temperatures on flame retardant finishing of cotton.

    PubMed

    Poon, Chin-Kuen; Kan, Chi-Wai

    2015-05-01

    The performance of flame retardancy of cotton cellulose can be influenced by curing conditions. In this study, cotton cellulose was imparted durable flame retardant properties by a reaction between a flame retardant agent (Pyrovatex CP New) and a cross linking agent (Knittex CHN), in the presence of catalysts phosphoric acid and titanium dioxide (TiO2). After treating cotton fabrics at different curing temperatures for different curing time, its flame retardant performance was evaluated by 45° fabric flammability standard test method. For cotton fabrics cured at 150 and 170°C, good flame retardant characteristics were retained even after three home laundering cycles. The use of TiO2 as a co-catalyst in the treatment improved the flame retardant properties and reduced the loss of tearing strength of cotton fabrics. No significant negative effect in the whiteness index was observed, as compared with conventional flame retardant treatment.

  8. Phosphorylated Cellulose Nanofibrils: A Renewable Nanomaterial for the Preparation of Intrinsically Flame-Retardant Materials.

    PubMed

    Ghanadpour, Maryam; Carosio, Federico; Larsson, Per Tomas; Wågberg, Lars

    2015-10-12

    Cellulose from wood fibers can be modified for use in flame-retardant composites as an alternative to halogen-based compounds. For this purpose, sulfite dissolving pulp fibers have been chemically modified by phosphorylation, and the resulting material has been used to prepare cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) that have a width of approximately 3 nm. The phosphorylation was achieved using (NH4)2HPO4 in the presence of urea, and the degree of substitution by phosphorus was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, conductometric titration, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The presence of phosphate groups in the structure of CNF has been found to noticeably improve the flame retardancy of this material. The nanopaper sheets prepared from phosphorylated CNF showed self-extinguishing properties after consecutive applications of a methane flame for 3 s and did not ignite under a heat flux of 35 kW/m2, as shown by flammability and cone calorimetry measurements, respectively. PMID:26402379

  9. Plasma-enhanced synthesis of green flame retardant cellulosic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totolin, Vladimir

    The natural fiber-containing fabrics and composites are more environmentally friendly, and are used in transportation (automobiles, aerospace), military applications, construction industries (ceiling paneling, partition boards), consumer products, etc. Therefore, the flammability characteristics of the composites based on polymers and natural fibers play an important role. This dissertation presents the development of plasma assisted - green flame retardant coatings for cellulosic substrates. The overall objective of this work was to generate durable flame retardant treatment on cellulosic materials. In the first approach sodium silicate layers were pre-deposited onto clean cotton substrates and cross linked using low pressure, non-equilibrium oxygen plasma. A statistical design of experiments was used to optimize the plasma parameters. The modified cotton samples were tested for flammability using an automatic 45° angle flammability test chamber. Aging tests were conducted to evaluate the coating resistance during the accelerated laundry technique. The samples revealed a high flame retardant behavior and good thermal stability proved by thermo-gravimetric analysis. In the second approach flame retardant cellulosic materials have been produced using a silicon dioxide (SiO2) network coating. SiO 2 network armor was prepared through hydrolysis and condensation of the precursor tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS), prior coating the substrates, and was cross linked on the surface of the substrates using atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) technique. Due to protection effects of the SiO2 network armor, the cellulosic based fibers exhibit enhanced thermal properties and improved flame retardancy. In the third approach, the TEOS/APP treatments were extended to linen fabrics. The thermal analysis showed a higher char content and a strong endothermic process of the treated samples compared with control ones, indicating a good thermal stability. Also, the surface analysis proved

  10. Citric acid based durable and sustainable flame retardant treatment for lyocell fabric.

    PubMed

    Mengal, Naveed; Syed, Uzma; Malik, Samander Ali; Ali Sahito, Iftikhar; Jeong, Sung Hoon

    2016-11-20

    Pyrovatex CP New, is a commonly used organophosphorus based flame retardant (FR) reagent for cellulosic materials. However, it has a drawback of high formaldehyde release when used with methylated melamine (MM) based cross-linker, a known carcinogenous compound. In the present approach, a durable and sustainable flame retarding recipe formulation for lyocell fabrics is developed using citric acid (CA) as a cross-linker. The FR finish was applied by pad-dry-cure process. The treated fabrics were characterized for surface morphology, elemental analysis, TG analysis, char study and FT-IR spectroscopy. Furthermore, flame retardancy, washing durability, formaldehyde release and breaking strength were also assessed, and compared with the conventional MM based FR recipe. The fabric samples treated with 400gL(-1) of FR with either 40 or 80gL(-1) of CA demonstrate flame retardancy even after 10 washing cycles. Furthermore, a 75% reduction in formaldehyde release is achieved. Higher char yield and lower decomposition temperature are found compared to untreated and FR+ MM treated lyocell. Such an improved sustainable recipe formulation can be used for lyocell fabric without any health risk in apparel wear.

  11. Citric acid based durable and sustainable flame retardant treatment for lyocell fabric.

    PubMed

    Mengal, Naveed; Syed, Uzma; Malik, Samander Ali; Ali Sahito, Iftikhar; Jeong, Sung Hoon

    2016-11-20

    Pyrovatex CP New, is a commonly used organophosphorus based flame retardant (FR) reagent for cellulosic materials. However, it has a drawback of high formaldehyde release when used with methylated melamine (MM) based cross-linker, a known carcinogenous compound. In the present approach, a durable and sustainable flame retarding recipe formulation for lyocell fabrics is developed using citric acid (CA) as a cross-linker. The FR finish was applied by pad-dry-cure process. The treated fabrics were characterized for surface morphology, elemental analysis, TG analysis, char study and FT-IR spectroscopy. Furthermore, flame retardancy, washing durability, formaldehyde release and breaking strength were also assessed, and compared with the conventional MM based FR recipe. The fabric samples treated with 400gL(-1) of FR with either 40 or 80gL(-1) of CA demonstrate flame retardancy even after 10 washing cycles. Furthermore, a 75% reduction in formaldehyde release is achieved. Higher char yield and lower decomposition temperature are found compared to untreated and FR+ MM treated lyocell. Such an improved sustainable recipe formulation can be used for lyocell fabric without any health risk in apparel wear. PMID:27561474

  12. Graphene phosphonic acid as an efficient flame retardant.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Jung; Jeon, In-Yup; Seo, Jeong-Min; Dai, Liming; Baek, Jong-Beom

    2014-03-25

    We report the preparation of graphene phosphonic acid (GPA) via a simple and versatile method and its use as an efficient flame retardant. In order to covalently attach phosphorus to the edges of graphene nanoplatelets, graphite was ball-milled with red phosphorus. The cleavage of graphitic C-C bonds during mechanochemical ball-milling generates reactive carbon species, which react with phosphorus in a sealed ball-mill crusher to form graphene phosphorus. Subsequent opening of the crusher in air moisture leads to violent oxidation of graphene phosphorus into GPA (highest oxidation state). The GPA is readily dispersible in many polar solvents, including neutral water, allowing for solution (spray) coating for high-performance, nontoxic flame-retardant applications. PMID:24575902

  13. Environmental Impact of Flame Retardants (Persistence and Biodegradability)

    PubMed Central

    Segev, Osnat; Kushmaro, Ariel; Brenner, Asher

    2009-01-01

    Flame-retardants (FR) are a group of anthropogenic environmental contaminants used at relatively high concentrations in many applications. Currently, the largest market group of FRs is the brominated flame retardants (BFRs). Many of the BFRs are considered toxic, persistent and bioaccumulative. Bioremediation of contaminated water, soil and sediments is a possible solution for the problem. However, the main problem with this approach is the lack of knowledge concerning appropriate microorganisms, biochemical pathways and operational conditions facilitating degradation of these chemicals at an acceptable rate. This paper reviews and discusses current knowledge and recent developments related to the environmental fate and impact of FRs in natural systems and in engineered treatment processes. PMID:19440395

  14. Photochemical and microbial transformation of emerging flame retardants: cause for concern?

    PubMed

    Chen, Da; Hale, Robert C; Letcher, Robert J

    2015-04-01

    Among anthropogenic chemicals, flame retardants have attracted mounting environmental concerns. In recent years, an increasing number of studies have been conducted worldwide to investigate flame-retardant sources, environmental distribution, wildlife and human exposure, and toxicity. Data generated have demonstrated that some flame-retardant substances such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) are persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic to exposed organisms. However, comparatively much less attention has been paid to the mechanisms and products of environmental transformation of flame retardants. This lack of information undermines our understanding of the environmental behavior and fate of flame retardants, as well as the associated risks to environmental and human health. Photochemical and microbial transformation of flame retardants in various matrices and environmental compartments can elevate the toxicological significance of flame retardant exposure, via the formation of, for example, lesser halogenated but more bioaccumulative degradation products and toxic radicals. Such pathways raise concerns related to the environmental safety of some alternative flame retardants that are presumably safe and used to replace PBDEs. To fully assess the environmental risks, more research is needed to investigate the environmental transformation potential of emerging flame retardants including polymeric flame retardants. Enhanced analytical efforts are needed to better characterize transformation products and transient radicals. Additional mesocosm and field studies are needed to elucidate transformation kinetics and consequences under environmentally relevant conditions. PMID:25809099

  15. Use of nanoclay as an environmentally friendly flame retardant synergist in polyamide-6.

    PubMed

    Kaynak, Cevdet; Gunduz, Huseyin Ozgur; Isitman, Nihat Ali

    2010-11-01

    Due to their very high levels of flame retardancy, chlorinated and brominated flame retardants had been the most widely used flame retardant additives in plastics industry. However, these flame retardants lead to formation of very toxic volatiles and by-products during fire. Therefore, the recent trend is to replace all of them with non-halogenated flame retardants. In this respect, the use of nanoclays as a synergist flame retardant is becoming more and more important. Thus, the main aim of this work was to investigate the synergistic flame retardant effect of nanoclays with phosphorous compounds in polyamide-6 composites. For this purpose, exfoliated clay nanocomposites of flame retarded/glass fiber reinforced polyamide-6 were prepared by melt compounding. A flame retardant based on phosphorus compounds was used at various levels in glass fiber reinforced polyamide-6 and nanocomposites. Flammability and fire behaviors were evaluated by limiting oxygen index, UL94 and cone calorimeter tests. Substitution of a certain fraction of the flame retardant with nanoclays was found to significantly reduce the peak heat release rate and delay the ignition in cone calorimeter. Moreover, remarkable improvements were obtained in limiting oxygen index along with maintained UL94 ratings. PMID:21137938

  16. Use of nanoclay as an environmentally friendly flame retardant synergist in polyamide-6.

    PubMed

    Kaynak, Cevdet; Gunduz, Huseyin Ozgur; Isitman, Nihat Ali

    2010-11-01

    Due to their very high levels of flame retardancy, chlorinated and brominated flame retardants had been the most widely used flame retardant additives in plastics industry. However, these flame retardants lead to formation of very toxic volatiles and by-products during fire. Therefore, the recent trend is to replace all of them with non-halogenated flame retardants. In this respect, the use of nanoclays as a synergist flame retardant is becoming more and more important. Thus, the main aim of this work was to investigate the synergistic flame retardant effect of nanoclays with phosphorous compounds in polyamide-6 composites. For this purpose, exfoliated clay nanocomposites of flame retarded/glass fiber reinforced polyamide-6 were prepared by melt compounding. A flame retardant based on phosphorus compounds was used at various levels in glass fiber reinforced polyamide-6 and nanocomposites. Flammability and fire behaviors were evaluated by limiting oxygen index, UL94 and cone calorimeter tests. Substitution of a certain fraction of the flame retardant with nanoclays was found to significantly reduce the peak heat release rate and delay the ignition in cone calorimeter. Moreover, remarkable improvements were obtained in limiting oxygen index along with maintained UL94 ratings.

  17. Photochemical and microbial transformation of emerging flame retardants: cause for concern?

    PubMed

    Chen, Da; Hale, Robert C; Letcher, Robert J

    2015-04-01

    Among anthropogenic chemicals, flame retardants have attracted mounting environmental concerns. In recent years, an increasing number of studies have been conducted worldwide to investigate flame-retardant sources, environmental distribution, wildlife and human exposure, and toxicity. Data generated have demonstrated that some flame-retardant substances such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) are persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic to exposed organisms. However, comparatively much less attention has been paid to the mechanisms and products of environmental transformation of flame retardants. This lack of information undermines our understanding of the environmental behavior and fate of flame retardants, as well as the associated risks to environmental and human health. Photochemical and microbial transformation of flame retardants in various matrices and environmental compartments can elevate the toxicological significance of flame retardant exposure, via the formation of, for example, lesser halogenated but more bioaccumulative degradation products and toxic radicals. Such pathways raise concerns related to the environmental safety of some alternative flame retardants that are presumably safe and used to replace PBDEs. To fully assess the environmental risks, more research is needed to investigate the environmental transformation potential of emerging flame retardants including polymeric flame retardants. Enhanced analytical efforts are needed to better characterize transformation products and transient radicals. Additional mesocosm and field studies are needed to elucidate transformation kinetics and consequences under environmentally relevant conditions.

  18. Toxicity of new generation flame retardants to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Waaijers, Susanne L; Hartmann, Julia; Soeter, A Marieke; Helmus, Rick; Kools, Stefan A E; de Voogt, Pim; Admiraal, Wim; Parsons, John R; Kraak, Michiel H S

    2013-10-01

    There is a tendency to substitute frequently used, but relatively hazardous brominated flame retardants (BFRs) with halogen-free flame retardants (HFFRs). Consequently, information on the persistence, bioaccumulation and toxicity (PBT) of these HFFRs is urgently needed, but large data gaps and inconsistencies exist. Therefore, in the present study the toxicity of a wide range of HFFRs to the water flea Daphnia magna was investigated. Our results revealed that four HFFRs were showing no effect at their Sw (saturated water concentration) and three had a low toxicity (EC50>10 mg L(-1)), suggesting that these compounds are not hazardous. Antimony trioxide had a moderate toxicity (EC50=3.01 mg L(-1), 95% CL: 2.76-3.25) and triphenyl phosphate and the brominated reference compound tetra bromobisphenol A were highly toxic to D. magna (EC50=0.55 mg L(-1), 95% CL: 0.53-0.55 and EC50=0.60 mg L(-1), 95% CL: 0.24-0.97 respectively). Aluminum trihydroxide and bisphenol A bis(diphenyl phosphate) caused limited mortality at Sw (26 and 25% respectively) and have a low solubility (<10 mg L(-1)). Hence, increased toxicity of these compounds may be observed when for instance decreasing pH could increase solubility. By testing all compounds under identical conditions we provided missing insights in the environmental hazards of new generation flame retardants and propose as best candidates for BFR replacements: APP, ALPI, DOPO, MHO, MPP, ZHS and ZS. PMID:23886749

  19. Chemical regulation on fire: rapid policy advances on flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Cordner, Alissa; Mulcahy, Margaret; Brown, Phil

    2013-07-01

    Chemicals that are widely used in consumer products offer challenges to product manufacturers, risk managers, environmental regulators, environmental scientists, and the interested public. However, the factors that cause specific chemicals to rise to the level of regulatory, scientific, and social movement concern and scrutiny are not well documented, and scientists are frequently unclear about exactly how their research impacts policy. Through a case study of advocacy around flame retardant chemicals, this paper traces the pathways through which scientific evidence and concern is marshaled by both advocacy groups and media sources to affect policy change. We focus our analysis around a broad coalition of environmental and public health advocacy organizations and an investigative journalism series published in 2012 in the Chicago Tribune. We demonstrate that the Tribune series both brought the issue to a wider public audience and precipitated government action, including state policy revisions and federal Senate hearings. We also show how a broad and successful flame retardant coalition developed, leveraged a media event, and influenced policy at multiple institutional levels. The analysis draws on over 110 in-depth interviews, literature and Web site reviews, and observations at a flame retardant manufacturing company, government offices, and scientific and advocacy conferences.

  20. Flame retardants and legacy chemicals in Great Lakes' water.

    PubMed

    Venier, Marta; Dove, Alice; Romanak, Kevin; Backus, Sean; Hites, Ronald

    2014-08-19

    The Great Lakes have been the focus of extensive environmental research, but recent data on the aquatic concentrations of emerging compounds, such as flame retardants, are scarce. Water samples from 18 stations on the five Great Lakes were collected in 2011 and 2012 using XAD-2 resin adsorption and analyzed for PCBs, organochlorine pesticides, PAHs, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and emerging flame retardants, including organophosphate flame retardants (OPEs). Total PCB concentrations ranged from 117 ± 18 pg/L in Lake Superior to 623 ± 113 pg/L in Lake Ontario. Among the organochlorine pesticides, the most abundant was dieldrin, with the highest average concentration of 99 ± 26 pg/L in Lake Erie, followed by p,p'-DDD with an average concentration of 37 ± 8 pg/L in Lake Ontario. Total PAH concentrations were higher in Lakes Erie and Ontario than in Lakes Michigan, Huron, and Superior. Total PBDE concentrations were highest in Lake Ontario (227 ± 75 pg/L), and the most abundant congeners were BDE-47, BDE-99, and BDE-209. Total OPE concentrations ranged between 7.3 ± 4.5 ng/L in Lake Huron to 96 ± 43 ng/L in Lake Erie.

  1. Flame retardants: Dust - And not food - Might be the risk.

    PubMed

    de Boer, J; Ballesteros-Gómez, A; Leslie, H A; Brandsma, S H; Leonards, P E G

    2016-05-01

    Flame retardants (FRs) are used to delay ignition of materials such as furniture and electric and electronic instruments. Many FRs are persistent and end up in the environment. Environmental studies on flame retardants (FRs) took off in the late 1990s. Polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) appeared to be bioaccumulative and were found in many organisms all over the world. When PBDEs were banned or their production voluntarily terminated, alternatives appeared on the market that often had similar properties or were of more concern due to their toxicity such as halogenated phosphorus-based FRs. Here we show that in spite of the ban on PBDEs more brominated FRs are being produced, an increasing number of other FRs is being applied and FR levels in our homes are much higher than in the outdoor environment. While nowadays we live in better isolated houses and sit in front of the computer or television, on flame retarded upholstery, we are at risk due to the toxic effects of a suite of FRs. The high exposure to these substances indoors calls for better risk assessments that include mixture effects.

  2. Interlaboratory study of novel halogenated flame retardants: INTERFLAB.

    PubMed

    Melymuk, Lisa; Goosey, Emma; Riddell, Nicole; Diamond, Miriam L

    2015-09-01

    Flame retardants (FRs) have come under considerable scientific and public scrutiny over the past decade. A lack of reference materials and standardized analytical methods has resulted in questions regarding the variation of measurements from different studies. We evaluated this variation by performing an international interlaboratory study assessing analytical capabilities as well as the accuracy and precision of results for a range of flame retardants (International Flame Retardant Laboratory Study, INTERFLAB). Thirteen international research laboratories participated in a blind interlaboratory comparison of 24 FRs. Results demonstrate good precision within replicates of test mixtures from individual laboratories, but problematic accuracy for several FRs and laboratories. Large ranges in the values reported for decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE), tris(1,3-dichloropropyl)phosphate (TDCIPP), tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA), and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) (>50 % relative standard deviations among measured values) and large deviations from the reference values (>25 % bias in accuracy) suggest potential problems for comparability of results. DBDPE, HBCD, and TBBPA had significantly poorer accuracy and precision, suggesting that current analytical methods are not providing reliable results for these FRs.

  3. Playing with fire: the global threat presented by brominated flame retardants justifies urgent substitution.

    PubMed

    Santillo, David; Johnston, Paul

    2003-09-01

    Few would now deny that the use of organobromine compounds to achieve fire retardancy in a diverse array of products and materials has led to contamination of the ecosphere on a widespread scale. This environmental prevalence and persistence of the brominated flame retardants, coupled with growing evidence of their potential for harm, present all too familiar parallels with the previous generation of persistent organic pollutants. Indeed, given the intrinsic properties of these brominated chemicals, the nature and extent of the current problem could well have been predicted in advance. The question is then whether we are prepared to let history repeat itself once more or to take precautionary action now to switch to more sustainable alternatives. The choice facing society is not between brominated flame retardants and unsafe products, but between fire safety leading to global contamination or fire safety achieved in less polluting ways. If we look beyond options for simple chemical-for-chemical substitution to alternative materials and designs, many of the solutions are already available. The remainder could undoubtedly be developed given the incentives to do so. However, a strong and clear policy approach, backed by legislative phase-outs within specified (and challenging) timeframes, will be necessary to break our current dependency on organobromine chemistry. This paper presents the justification for such an approach, reviews those initiatives already underway to replace brominated flame retardants and identifies pathways to the use of more sustainable products in the service of society.

  4. Evaluation of Flame Retardancy, Mechanical Properties, and Bicompatibility of HIPS/PBrS Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liudi; Pack, Seongchan; Beaulieu, Coralie; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2012-02-01

    Our research focused on thermal and mechanical properties of High Impact Polystyrene (HIPS) system. Brominated Polystyrene (PBrS) was incorporated to replace halogenated Flame Retardant (DB) in HIPS blends. We have previously shown that ditallow functionalized clays could become nearly universal class of compatiblizers [si-2006]. Here we show that a new type of surface with Resorcinol bis (biphenyl phosphate) (RDP) could achieve the same goals. We demonstrate the strong compatibilization on the highly immiscible systems of HIPS/PBrS. Furthermore, we show that this system also works well, when a third component, Antimony Trioxide (AO) is added to provide flame retardant properties. Tensile test, dynamic mechanical analysis, and UL-94 flame test were applied to investigate this system. We found that the amount of AO used in flame retardant formulations could be minimized by addition of RDP clay, which could also increase some mechanical properties that Cloisite 20A clay couldn't. Besides, we evaluated the toxicity of Cloiste 20A and RDP clay. Langmuir-Blodgett trough and atomic force microscopy were used to make and check monolayer clay. Confocal Microscopy was used to assess cell morphology. The results showed RDP clay has potential for biomaterial applications.

  5. Engineering Biodegradable Flame Retardant Wood-Plastic Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linxi

    Wood-plastic composites (WPCs), which are produced by blending wood and polymer materials, have attracted increasing attentions in market and industry due to the low cost and excellent performance. In this research, we have successfully engineered WPC by melt blending Polylactic Acid (PLA) and Poly(butylene adipate-co-terphthalate) (PBAT) with recycled wood flour. The thermal property and flammability of the composite are significantly improved by introducing flame retardant agent resorcinol bis(biphenyl phosphate) (RDP). The mechanical and morphological properties are also investigated via multiple techniques. The results show that wood material has increased toughness and impact resistance of the PLA/PBAT polymer matrix. SEM images have confirmed that PLA and PBAT are immiscible, but the incompatibility is reduced by the addition of wood. RDP is initially dispersed in the blends evenly. It migrates to the surface of the sample after flame application, and serves as a barrier between the fire and underlying polymers and wood mixture. It is well proved in the research that RDP is an efficient flame retardant agent in the WPC system.

  6. Analysis and occurrence of emerging brominated flame retardants in the Llobregat River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Paula; Eljarrat, Ethel; Barceló, Damià

    2010-03-01

    SummaryIn response to increasing international regulations on brominated flame retardants (BFR) formulations, alternative additive flame retardants for achieving commercial product fire safety standards are being developed and used. Some of these non-BDE (brominated diphenyl ethers) BFRs are pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB), hexabromobenzene (hexaBBz), and decabromodiphenylethane (deBDethane). The present study investigated the occurrence of these emerging BFRs, together with 38 BDE congeners (from di- to deca-BDE) in sediments sampled from different points along Llobregat basin (Spain) in three different sampling campaigns between 2005 and 2006. Emerging BFRs were detected in all sediment samples analyzed, at concentrations ranging from 3.1 to 9.6 ng/g for PBEB, from 0.4 to 2.4 ng/g for hexaBBz and from 4.8 to 23 ng/g for deBDethane. These levels are lower than concentrations obtained for PBDEs (from nd to 82 ng/g).

  7. Flame retardant treatments of PBI fabric.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temin, S. C.

    1972-01-01

    Fabrics knitted or woven from polybenzimidazole (PBI) fibers were treated to reduce flammability in oxygen atmospheres, particularly that of 5 psia oxygen. Bromination to approximately 15% weight gain of such fabrics led to markedly lower burning rates; samples brominated to over 80% weight gain were self-extinguishing in 5 psia oxygen. The loss in tensile strength of fabrics due to bromination was negligible although shrinkage was observed. Free fibers showed negligible losses on bromination. Treatment of PBI fabric with organophosphorus compounds also achieved self-extinguishing character in 5 psia oxygen but the enhanced flameproofing was largely lost on leaching. Reaction with POCl3 in pyridine led to a permanent reduction in flammability.

  8. Ionizing radiation graft polymerized and modified flame retardant cotton fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, P. R. S.; Agathian, G.; Kumar, Ashok

    2005-03-01

    Halogen free flame retardant cotton (FR cotton) fabric was prepared by grafting 2,3-epoxypropyl methacrylate (GMA) on ordinary or untreated cotton (UT cotton) fabric by γ-rays from 60Co source. Epoxy groups present in GMA grafted cotton (GMA-g-cotton) fabric was reacted with ethylene diamine and subsequently modified with orthophosphoric acid solution to convert in to FR cotton fabric. Effects of imparted dose, concentration of monomer on grafting percentage were studied. The changes in thermal properties after treatment were investigated by using Thermo gravimetric analyser. Limiting oxygen index, char length, time after glow and time after flame were also studied as per ASTM D2863 and IS11871, respectively, for both FR cotton and UT cotton fabrics. The FR cotton fabric was found to pass all the above tests. Washing durability of the FR cotton fabric in different cleaning agents was also studied and a washing solution containing organic solvent mixture is suggested.

  9. Inhalation a significant exposure route for chlorinated organophosphate flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Schreder, Erika D; Uding, Nancy; La Guardia, Mark J

    2016-05-01

    Chlorinated organophosphate flame retardants (ClOPFRs) are widely used as additive flame retardants in consumer products including furniture, children's products, building materials, and textiles. Tests of indoor media in homes, offices, and other environments have shown these compounds are released from products and have become ubiquitous indoor pollutants. In house dust samples from Washington State, U.S.A., ClOPFRs were the flame retardants detected in the highest concentrations. Two ClOPFRs, tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl)phosphate (TDCPP or TDCIPP) and tris(2-chloroethyl)phosphate (TCEP), have been designated as carcinogens, and there is growing concern about the toxicity of the homologue tris(1-chloro-2-propyl)phosphate (TCPP or TCIPP). In response to concerns about exposure to these compounds, the European Union and a number of U.S. states have taken regulatory action to restrict their use in certain product categories. To better characterize exposure to ClOPFRs, inhalation exposure was assessed using active personal air samplers in Washington State with both respirable and inhalable particulate fractions collected to assess the likelihood particles penetrate deep into the lungs. Concentrations of ∑ClOPFRs (respirable and inhalable) ranged from 97.1 to 1190 ng m(-3) (mean 426 ng m(-3)), with TCPP detected at the highest concentrations. In general, higher levels were detected in the inhalable particulate fraction. Total intake of ClOPFRs via the inhalation exposure route was estimated to exceed intake via dust ingestion, indicating that inhalation is an important route that should be taken into consideration in assessments of these compounds.

  10. Inhalation a significant exposure route for chlorinated organophosphate flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Schreder, Erika D; Uding, Nancy; La Guardia, Mark J

    2016-05-01

    Chlorinated organophosphate flame retardants (ClOPFRs) are widely used as additive flame retardants in consumer products including furniture, children's products, building materials, and textiles. Tests of indoor media in homes, offices, and other environments have shown these compounds are released from products and have become ubiquitous indoor pollutants. In house dust samples from Washington State, U.S.A., ClOPFRs were the flame retardants detected in the highest concentrations. Two ClOPFRs, tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl)phosphate (TDCPP or TDCIPP) and tris(2-chloroethyl)phosphate (TCEP), have been designated as carcinogens, and there is growing concern about the toxicity of the homologue tris(1-chloro-2-propyl)phosphate (TCPP or TCIPP). In response to concerns about exposure to these compounds, the European Union and a number of U.S. states have taken regulatory action to restrict their use in certain product categories. To better characterize exposure to ClOPFRs, inhalation exposure was assessed using active personal air samplers in Washington State with both respirable and inhalable particulate fractions collected to assess the likelihood particles penetrate deep into the lungs. Concentrations of ∑ClOPFRs (respirable and inhalable) ranged from 97.1 to 1190 ng m(-3) (mean 426 ng m(-3)), with TCPP detected at the highest concentrations. In general, higher levels were detected in the inhalable particulate fraction. Total intake of ClOPFRs via the inhalation exposure route was estimated to exceed intake via dust ingestion, indicating that inhalation is an important route that should be taken into consideration in assessments of these compounds. PMID:26775187

  11. Environmental release and behavior of brominated flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Isao; Sakai, Shin-ichi

    2003-09-01

    Recently, environmental problems relating to brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have become a matter of greater concern than ever before, because of the recent marked increase in levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) found in human milk in Sweden and North America. The question that arises is whether environmental levels of PBDEs and other BFRs will continue to increase, causing toxic effects to humans. In an attempt to elucidate the current state of the science of BFRs, we review the consumer demand for BFRs (mainly in Japan), the characteristics of waste flame-retarded products, sources of emission, environmental behavior, routes of exposure of humans, temporal trends, and thermal-breakdown products of BFRs. At present, flame-retarded consumer products manufactured 10-20 years ago, when PBDEs were frequently used, are being dumped. The possible major sources of emission of BFRs into the environment are effluent and flue gases from BFR factories and other facilities processing BFRs. With respect to the environmental behavior of BFRs, the lower brominated compounds are, on the whole, predicted to be more volatile, more water soluble, and more bioaccumulative than the higher brominated compounds. The most probable route for exposure of the general human population to PBDEs, especially the lower brominated congeners, is through the diet. The release of BFRs from consumer products treated with these compounds could also lead to human exposure. Temporal trends in PBDE levels in the environment and in humans worldwide seem to vary considerably, depending on the regions or country, with possible reflections of the historic and current use of PBDEs. The environment and the general human population are also exposed to the thermal-breakdown products of PBDEs, such as polybrominated and mixed brominated/chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PBDDs/DFs and mixed PXDDs/DFs).

  12. Persistence, bioaccumulation, and toxicity of halogen-free flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Waaijers, Susanne L; Kong, Deguo; Hendriks, Hester S; de Wit, Cynthia A; Cousins, Ian T; Westerink, Remco H S; Leonards, Pim E G; Kraak, Michiel H S; Admiraal, Wim; de Voogt, Pim; Parsons, John R

    2013-01-01

    Polymers are synthetic organic materials having a high carbon and hydrogen content, which make them readily combustible. Polymers have many indoor uses and their flammability makes them a fire hazard. Therefore, flame retardants (FRs) are incorporated into these materials as a safety measure. Brominated flame retardants (BFRs), which accounted for about 21% of the total world market of FRs, have several unintended negative effects on the environment and human health. Hence, there is growing interest in finding appropriate alternative halogen-free flame retardants (HFFRs). Many of these HFFRs are marketed already, although their environ- mental behavior and toxicological properties are often only known to a limited extent, and their potential impact on the environment cannot yet be properly assessed. Therefore, we undertook this review to make an inventory of the available data that exists (up to September 2011) on the physical-chemical properties, pro- duction volumes, persistence, bioaccumulation, and toxicity (PBT) of a selection of HFFRs that are potential replacements for BFRs in polymers. Large data gaps were identified for the physical-chemical and the PBT properties of the reviewed HFFRs. Because these HFFRs are currently on the market, there is an urgent need to fill these data gaps. Enhanced transparency of methodology and data are needed to reevaluate certain test results that appear contradictory, and, if this does not provide new insights, further research should be performed. TPP has been studied quite extensively and it is clearly persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic. So far, RDP and BDP have demonstrated low to high ecotoxicity and persistence. The compounds ATH and ZB exerted high toxicity to some species and ALPI appeared to be persistent and has low to moderate reported ecotoxicity. DOPO and MPP may be persistent, but this view is based merely on one or two studies, clearly indicating a lack of information. Many degradation studies have been

  13. Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Multifunctional Flame Retardant Based on Brucite, 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane, and Alginate and Its Applications in Ethylene-Vinyl Acetate Resin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiliang; Yang, Xiaomei; Peng, Hui; Wang, Fang; Liu, Xiu; Yang, Yunguo; Hao, Jianwei

    2016-04-20

    An efficient and multifunctional brucite/3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES)/nickel alginate/APTES (B/A/Nia/A) hybrid flame retardant was fabricated via the layer-by-layer assembly technique with brucite, silane coupling agents, nickel chloride, and sodium alginate. The morphology, chemical composition, and structure of the hybrid flame retardant were characterized. The results confirmed the multilayer structure and indicated that the assembled driving forces were electrostatic interactions, dehydration condensation, hydrogen bonds, and coordination bonds. When used in ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) resin, the multifunctional flame retardant had better performance than brucite in improving the flame retardancy, smoke suppression, and mechanical properties. With 130 phr loading, the multifunctional flame retardant achieved a limiting oxygen index value of 32.3% and a UL 94 V-0 rating, whereas the brucite achieved only 31.1% and a V-2 rating, respectively. The peak heat release rate and total heat released decreased by 41.5% and 8.9%, respectively. The multifunctional flame retardant had an excellent performance in reducing the smoke, CO, and CO2 production rates. These improvements could be attributed to the catalyzing carbonization of nickel compounds and the formation of more protective char layers. Moreover, the elongation at break increased by 97.5%, which benefited from the improved compatibility and the sacrificial bonds in the nickel alginate. The mechanism of flame retardant, smoke suppression, and toughening is proposed.

  14. Effects on heat stress of a flame-retardant ensemble for aluminum smelters.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Vizcaíno, C; Bernard, T E

    2000-01-01

    A common belief is that a flame-retardant clothing ensemble will increase the level of heat stress over ordinary cotton work clothes. This is supported by bench tests on fabrics that indicate higher insulation and vapor resistance values for flame-retardant clothing. This research compared a flame-retardant clothing ensemble for an aluminum smelter (Zirpo wool shirt and FR8 denim pants) with typical cotton work clothing. Four young men walked on a treadmill at two work levels inside a climatic chamber under controlled conditions of heat stress. During each test, heart rate, core temperature, and skin temperatures were continuously monitored and recorded every 5 min. After a physiological steady state was achieved, temperature and humidity were slowly increased to maintain a relative humidity of 50%. The critical condition was the time when thermal regulatory control was lost (called the inflection point, marked by a steady increase in core temperature). The climatic conditions at the inflection point were used to assign a critical wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT). A three-way analysis of variance examined the effects on critical WBGT of clothing, work level, subjects, and the interaction between clothing and work level. There were no significant findings. Therefore, there should be no difference in the level of heat stress between the two clothing ensembles under the same environmental and work conditions. PMID:11192222

  15. [Flame retardants--use and hazards for human].

    PubMed

    Góralczyk, Katarzyna; Struciński, Paweł; Czaja, Katarzyna; Hernik, Agnieszka; Ludwicki, Jan K

    2002-01-01

    Flame retardants (FRs) are chemicals which added to materials during or after manufacture, inhibit or even suppress the combustion process due to their thermal stability. Large quantities of FRs are added to the plastic material (resins) in variety of electrical and electronic appliances including television and computer casing. The other uses of these compounds include production of building materials, upholstered furniture, textiles, wall covering, carpets, hydraulic fluids as well as vehicles and aircraft. Taking into account the chemical structure, there are five main groups of FRs: brominated, chlorinated, phosphorous-containing, nitrogen-containing (i.e. melamines) and inorganic compounds. Halogenated compounds, especially polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), a class of brominated flame retardants, due to their lipophilic characteristics and persistence have become ubiquitous environmental contaminants. There are indications that PBDEs may affect hormone function acting as endocrine disruption and may be toxic for developing brain. These compounds have been associated with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in humans, a variety of cancers in rodents and disruption of thyroid hormones balance. Similarly to other persistent halogenated compounds they are also able to affect the xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes activity. PBDEs are now found as residues in sediments, wildlife and human (milk, serum adipose tissue) samples. The predominant congeners in environmental samples, including human specimens are two congeners: 47 and 99. Currently, the estimated daily intake of PBDEs by adult humans is equal 51 ng x day-1 while by breast-fed infants equals 110 ng x day-1. PMID:12621885

  16. Catalytic degradation of brominated flame retardants by copper oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dror, I.; Yecheskel, Y.; Berkowitz, B.

    2013-12-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have been added to various products like plastic, textile, electronics and synthetic polymers at growing rates. In spite of the clear advantages of reducing fire damages, many of these BFRs may be released to the environment after their beneficial use which may lead to contamination of water resources. In this work we present the catalytic degradation of two brominated flame retardants (BFRs), tribromoneopentyl alcohol (TBNPA) and 2,4 dibromophenol (2,4-DBP) by copper oxide nanoparticles (nCuO) in aqueous solution. The degradation kinetics, the debromination, and the formation of intermediates by nCuO catalysis are compared to Fenton oxidation and to reduction by nano zero-valent iron (nZVI). The two studied BFRs are shown to degrade fully by the nCuO system within hours to days. Shorter reaction times showed differences in reaction pathways and kinetics for the two compounds. The 2,4-DBP showed faster degradation than TBNPA, by nCuO catalysis. Relatively high resistance to degradation was recorded for 2,4-DBP with nZVI, yielding 20% degradation after 24 h, while the TBNPA was degraded by 85% within 12 hours. A catalytic mechanism for radical generation and BFR degradation by nCuO is proposed. It is further suggested that H2O2 plays an essential role in the activation of the catalyst.

  17. [Flame retardants--use and hazards for human].

    PubMed

    Góralczyk, Katarzyna; Struciński, Paweł; Czaja, Katarzyna; Hernik, Agnieszka; Ludwicki, Jan K

    2002-01-01

    Flame retardants (FRs) are chemicals which added to materials during or after manufacture, inhibit or even suppress the combustion process due to their thermal stability. Large quantities of FRs are added to the plastic material (resins) in variety of electrical and electronic appliances including television and computer casing. The other uses of these compounds include production of building materials, upholstered furniture, textiles, wall covering, carpets, hydraulic fluids as well as vehicles and aircraft. Taking into account the chemical structure, there are five main groups of FRs: brominated, chlorinated, phosphorous-containing, nitrogen-containing (i.e. melamines) and inorganic compounds. Halogenated compounds, especially polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), a class of brominated flame retardants, due to their lipophilic characteristics and persistence have become ubiquitous environmental contaminants. There are indications that PBDEs may affect hormone function acting as endocrine disruption and may be toxic for developing brain. These compounds have been associated with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in humans, a variety of cancers in rodents and disruption of thyroid hormones balance. Similarly to other persistent halogenated compounds they are also able to affect the xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes activity. PBDEs are now found as residues in sediments, wildlife and human (milk, serum adipose tissue) samples. The predominant congeners in environmental samples, including human specimens are two congeners: 47 and 99. Currently, the estimated daily intake of PBDEs by adult humans is equal 51 ng x day-1 while by breast-fed infants equals 110 ng x day-1.

  18. [Brominated flame retardants: environmental contamination, exposure sources and potential negative health effects].

    PubMed

    Fiore, Maria; Floridia, Adriana; Oliveri Conti, Gea; Ledda, Caterina; Mauceri, Cristina; Ferrante, Margherita

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes recent evidence regarding brominated flame retardants. These represent the most common type of flame retardants used and recent studies have highlighted their presence in various concentrations in different environmental matrices, including areas distant from production areas, and in human biological samples. Many doubts persist regarding exposure sources, toxicity, metabolism and transformation processes once these products are released into the environment.

  19. Understanding the mechanism of action of triazine-phosphonate derivatives as flame retardants for cotton fabrics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Countless hours of research and studies on triazine, phosphonate and their combination have provided insightful information into their flame retardant properties on polymeric systems. However, only limited number of studies shed light on the mechanism of flame retardant cotton fabrics. The purpose...

  20. Synthesis of Novel Flame Retardant Organophosphorus Compounds for the Application to Cotton Textile

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flame retardancy of textiles is an important property in apparel, bedding, curtains, and other household items. Chemical treatment is one method to increase flame retardancy of textile such as cotton, linenes, and silks. Halogenated compounds (containing chlorine or bromine atoms) have been shown to...

  1. Permanent flame retardant finishing of textiles by allyl-functionalized polyphosphazenes.

    PubMed

    Mayer-Gall, Thomas; Knittel, Dierk; Gutmann, Jochen S; Opwis, Klaus

    2015-05-13

    Despite their excellent flame retardant properties, polyphosphazenes are currently not used as flame retardant agents for textile finishing, because a permanent fixation on the substrate surface has failed so far. Here, we present the successful synthesis and characterization of a noncombustible and foam-forming polyphosphazene derivative, that can be immobilized durably on cotton and different cotton/polyester blended fabrics using photoinduced grafting reactions. The flame retardant properties are improved, a higher limiting oxygen index is found, and the modified textiles pass several standardized flammability tests. As flame retardant mechanism a synergistic effect between the immobilized polyphosphazene and the textile substrate was observed. The polyphosphazene finishing induces an earlier decomposition of the material with a reduced mass loss in thermogravimetric analysis. The decomposition of cotton and polyester leads to the formation of phosphorus oxynitride, which forms a protecting barrier layer on the fiber surface. In addition, the permanence of the flame retardant finishing was proven by laundry and abrasion tests. PMID:25902050

  2. Permanent flame retardant finishing of textiles by allyl-functionalized polyphosphazenes.

    PubMed

    Mayer-Gall, Thomas; Knittel, Dierk; Gutmann, Jochen S; Opwis, Klaus

    2015-05-13

    Despite their excellent flame retardant properties, polyphosphazenes are currently not used as flame retardant agents for textile finishing, because a permanent fixation on the substrate surface has failed so far. Here, we present the successful synthesis and characterization of a noncombustible and foam-forming polyphosphazene derivative, that can be immobilized durably on cotton and different cotton/polyester blended fabrics using photoinduced grafting reactions. The flame retardant properties are improved, a higher limiting oxygen index is found, and the modified textiles pass several standardized flammability tests. As flame retardant mechanism a synergistic effect between the immobilized polyphosphazene and the textile substrate was observed. The polyphosphazene finishing induces an earlier decomposition of the material with a reduced mass loss in thermogravimetric analysis. The decomposition of cotton and polyester leads to the formation of phosphorus oxynitride, which forms a protecting barrier layer on the fiber surface. In addition, the permanence of the flame retardant finishing was proven by laundry and abrasion tests.

  3. Effects of Several Flame Retardants and Curing Agents on the Fire and Mechanical Properties of Epoxy Resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pei; Min, Yang; Ban, Da-Ming

    2016-05-01

    Effect of different flame retardant (FR) and curing agent on the epoxy resin was investigated by limiting oxygen index (LOI), mechanical properties and FTIR. The results show that flame retardant effect of PODOPP is better than PSDPP. The curing agent order is: m-phenylenediamine>ethanediamine> polyethylene polyamine. The effect of flame retardant behaviors better when synergist OMMT was added.

  4. Exposures, Mechanisms, and Impacts of Endocrine-Active Flame Retardants

    PubMed Central

    Dishaw, Laura; Macaulay, Laura; Roberts, Simon C.; Stapleton, Heather M.

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes the endocrine and neurodevelopmental effects of two current-use additive flame retardants (FRs), tris (1,3-dichloro-isopropyl) phosphate (TDCPP) and Firemaster® 550 (FM 550), and the recently phased-out polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), all of which were historically or are currently used in polyurethane foam applications. Use of these chemicals in consumer products has led to widespread exposure in indoor environments. PBDEs and their hydroxylated metabolites appear to primarily target the thyroid system, likely due to their structural similarity to endogenous thyroid hormones. In contrast, much less is known about the toxicity of TDCPP and FM550. However, recent in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that both should be considered endocrine disruptors as studies have linked TDCPP exposure with changes in circulating hormone levels, and FM 550 exposure with changes in adipogenic and osteogenic pathways. PMID:25306433

  5. A superhydrophobic sponge with excellent absorbency and flame retardancy.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Changping; Ai, Kelong; Li, Xingbo; Lu, Lehui

    2014-05-26

    Frequent oil spillages and the industrial discharge of organic solvents have not only caused severe environmental and ecological damage, but also create a risk of fire and explosion. Therefore, it is imperative, but also challenging, to find high-performance absorbent materials that are both effective and less flammable. Here we present a superior superhydrophobic sponge that exhibits excellent absorption performance through a combination of its superhydrophobicity, high porosity, and robust stability. More importantly, it inherits the intrinsic flame-retardant nature of the raw melamine sponge, and is thus expected to reduce the risk of fire and explosion when being used as an absorbent for flammable oils and organic compounds. Moreover, the fabrication of this sponge is easy to scale up, since it does not use a complicated process or sophisticated equipment. These characteristics make the sponge a much more competitive product than the commercial absorbent, nonwoven polypropylene fabric. PMID:24711147

  6. [ORGANOPHOSPHORUS FLAME RETARDANTS - TOXICITY AND INFLUENCE ON HUMAN HEALTH].

    PubMed

    Bruchajzer, Elżbieta; Frydrych, Barbara; Szymańska, Jadwiga Anna

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphorus flame retardants (flame retardants, FRs) have been used for several decades in many industries, including the production of dyes, varnishes, adhesives, synthetic resins, polyvinyl chloride, hydraulic fluids, plastics and textiles. Their importance in recent times has increased due to i.a., significantly reduced use of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) - persistent organic pollutants, dangerous for the environment. The aim of this study was to review the available literature data concerning phosphorous FRs primarily for neurotoxic, fertility, reproductive and carcinogenic effects. The analysis concerned the following most commonly used substances: tris(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate (TEHP), tris(2-butoxyethyl)phosphate (TBEP), triphenyl phosphate (TPP), tris(2-chloroethyl)phosphate (TCEP), tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)-phosphonium chloride (THPC), tributyl phosphate (TBP), tricresyl phosphate (TCP), tris(2-chloroisopropyl)phosphate (TCPP), tris(1,3-dichloroisopropyl)phosphate (TDCP) and tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)phosphonium sulphate (THPS). In animal studies neurotoxic effects were found after exposure to TBEP, THPC, TBP and TCP, while in humans they were observed only after exposure to TCP. TCEP, THPS, TBP, TCP and TDCP caused disorders in fertility and/or fetal development of animals. Adverse effects on reproduction in humans may be caused by TPP, TCP, and TDCP. In laboratory animals the development of tumors was observed after high doses of TEHP, TCEP, TBP and TDCP. None of these compounds is classified as a human carcinogen. The environmental toxicity of phosphate FRs is low (except for TPP, TCEP and TBEP). They are not stable compounds, in living organisms they are metabolised and quickly excreted. Therefore, they can be used as an alternative to PBDEs. PMID:26294315

  7. Symptomatology during hypoxic exposure to flame-retardant chamber atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Knight, D R; Cymerman, A; Devine, J A; Burse, R L; Fulco, C S; Rock, P B; Tappan, D V; Messier, A A; Carhart, H

    1990-01-01

    Hypoxia was studied in 12 men during 63-h exposures to 17 and 13% O2, with the subjects serving as their own controls by repeating the measurements in 21% O2. All test atmospheres were contaminated with 0.9% CO2 to simulate the condition of living aboard submarines. The mean SaO2's were 97-98% in all conditions of 21% O2, 96% in 17% O2 (n.s.), and 92% in 13% O2 (P less than 0.05). The blood concentrations of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate were elevated in 13 and 17% O2 (P less than 0.05). Seventeen percent O2 did not cause significant symptoms of environmental stress; however, 13% O2 caused symptoms of acute mountain sickness in 5 of 12 men. In the last 7 h of exposure to 17% O2, reduction of the barometric pressure to 576 Torr reduced the ambient PO2 to 98 Torr (similar to the PO2 of 13% O2 at normobaric pressure). This induced symptoms of acute mountain sickness in 3 of 11 men. All symptomatology and physiologic changes were reversed during recovery in 21% O2. Monitoring devices indicated the presence of volatile organic contaminants at a mean concentration of 6.1 ppm in the chamber atmosphere. Combustion tests in the occupied chamber showed that flame propagation was retarded by lowering the O2 concentration from 21 to 13-17%. We conclude that men can live comfortably in a normobaric, flame-retardant atmosphere consisting of 17% O2-0.9% CO2-6.1 ppm volatile organic compounds-balance N2. PMID:2107616

  8. [ORGANOPHOSPHORUS FLAME RETARDANTS - TOXICITY AND INFLUENCE ON HUMAN HEALTH].

    PubMed

    Bruchajzer, Elżbieta; Frydrych, Barbara; Szymańska, Jadwiga Anna

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphorus flame retardants (flame retardants, FRs) have been used for several decades in many industries, including the production of dyes, varnishes, adhesives, synthetic resins, polyvinyl chloride, hydraulic fluids, plastics and textiles. Their importance in recent times has increased due to i.a., significantly reduced use of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) - persistent organic pollutants, dangerous for the environment. The aim of this study was to review the available literature data concerning phosphorous FRs primarily for neurotoxic, fertility, reproductive and carcinogenic effects. The analysis concerned the following most commonly used substances: tris(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate (TEHP), tris(2-butoxyethyl)phosphate (TBEP), triphenyl phosphate (TPP), tris(2-chloroethyl)phosphate (TCEP), tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)-phosphonium chloride (THPC), tributyl phosphate (TBP), tricresyl phosphate (TCP), tris(2-chloroisopropyl)phosphate (TCPP), tris(1,3-dichloroisopropyl)phosphate (TDCP) and tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)phosphonium sulphate (THPS). In animal studies neurotoxic effects were found after exposure to TBEP, THPC, TBP and TCP, while in humans they were observed only after exposure to TCP. TCEP, THPS, TBP, TCP and TDCP caused disorders in fertility and/or fetal development of animals. Adverse effects on reproduction in humans may be caused by TPP, TCP, and TDCP. In laboratory animals the development of tumors was observed after high doses of TEHP, TCEP, TBP and TDCP. None of these compounds is classified as a human carcinogen. The environmental toxicity of phosphate FRs is low (except for TPP, TCEP and TBEP). They are not stable compounds, in living organisms they are metabolised and quickly excreted. Therefore, they can be used as an alternative to PBDEs.

  9. Performance of carbon material derived from starch mixed with flame retardant as electrochemical capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubota, Toshiki; Morita, Masaki; Murakami, Naoya; Ohno, Teruhisa

    2014-12-01

    Carbon materials derived from starch with an added flame retardant, such as melamine polyphosphate, melamine sulfate, guanylurea phosphate, or guanidine phosphate, were synthesized for investigating the performance as the electrode of an electrochemical capacitor. The yield after the heat treatment of the carbonization reaction increased by the addition of these flame retardants up to 800 °C. Although both the specific surface area and electrical resistivity are almost independent of the addition of the flame retardants, the capacitance values are improved with the addition of the flame retardants. The nitrogen atoms derived from the flame retardants are introduced to some extent into the synthesized carbon material. Moreover, the phosphorous atoms or the sulfur atoms derived from the flame retardants are doped into the synthesized carbon material. The method applied in this study, that is, the addition of flame retardants before the carbonization process can be used for the doping of the hetero atom such as N, P and S into the carbon material.

  10. Investigation of Flame Retardancy, Mechanical Properties, and Bicompatibility of Polystyrene Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liudi; Pack, Seongchan; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2013-03-01

    Our research focused on thermal, mechanical properties, and cytotoxicity of Polystyrene system. Brominated Polystyrene was incorporated to replace halogenated Flame Retardant in Polystyrene blends. We have previously shown that ditallow functionalized clays could become nearly universal class of compatiblizers [si-2006]. Here we show that a new type of surface with Resorcinol bis (biphenyl phosphate) (RDP) could achieve the same goal. We demonstrate the strong compatibilization on this highly immiscible system. Furthermore, we show that this system also works well, when a flame retardant Antimony Trioxide (AO) is added. Tensile test, dynamic mechanical analysis, and UL-94 flame test were applied to investigate this system. We found that the amount of AO used could be minimized by adding RDP clay, which could also increase some mechanical properties that Cloisite 20A clay couldn't. Besides, we evaluated the cytotoxicity of Cloiste 20A and RDP clay. These clays were tested both within PS blends and as a monolayer film. Langmuir-Blodgett trough and atomic force microscopy were used to make and check monolayer clay. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to assess cell morphology. The results showed RDP clay has potential for biomaterial applications. Supported by NSF-DMR-MRSEC.

  11. Improve the flame retardancy of cellulose fibers by grafting zinc ion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, KeKe; Zong, Lu; Tan, Yeqiang; Ji, Quan; Yun, Weicai; Shi, Ran; Xia, Yanzhi

    2016-01-20

    Zinc ion as the only flame retardant of cellulose fibers was successfully grafted onto cellulose fibers. Grafting maleic anhydride onto cellulose fibers via homogeneous acylation reaction between N,N-dimethyl formamide (DMF) as the first step. Then, graft zinc ion onto the formed cellulose fibers was conducted with zinc carbonate. The resulting copolymers were characterized by FTIR. Flame retardancy and thermal degradation of zinc-ion-modified cellulose fibers (cellulose-Zn fibers) was investigated by limiting oxygen index (LOI), cone calorimeter (CONE), XRD, TG and SEM. Zinc ion could effectively improve flame retardancy and thermal degradation when its content increases up to 4.96 wt%.

  12. Identification of flame retardants in polyurethane foam collected from baby products.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Heather M; Klosterhaus, Susan; Keller, Alex; Ferguson, P Lee; van Bergen, Saskia; Cooper, Ellen; Webster, Thomas F; Blum, Arlene

    2011-06-15

    With the phase-out of PentaBDE in 2004, alternative flame retardants are being used in polyurethane foam to meet flammability standards. However, insufficient information is available on the identity of the flame retardants currently in use. Baby products containing polyurethane foam must meet California state furniture flammability standards, which likely affects the use of flame retardants in baby products throughout the U.S. However, it is unclear which products contain flame retardants and at what concentrations. In this study we surveyed baby products containing polyurethane foam to investigate how often flame retardants were used in these products. Information on when the products were purchased and whether they contained a label indicating that the product meets requirements for a California flammability standard were recorded. When possible, we identified the flame retardants being used and their concentrations in the foam. Foam samples collected from 101 commonly used baby products were analyzed. Eighty samples contained an identifiable flame retardant additive, and all but one of these was either chlorinated or brominated. The most common flame retardant detected was tris(1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate (TDCPP; detection frequency 36%), followed by components typically found in the Firemaster550 commercial mixture (detection frequency 17%). Five samples contained PBDE congeners commonly associated with PentaBDE, suggesting products with PentaBDE are still in-use. Two chlorinated organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) not previously documented in the environment were also identified, one of which is commercially sold as V6 (detection frequency 15%) and contains tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) as an impurity. As an addition to this study, we used a portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer to estimate the bromine and chlorine content of the foam and investigate whether XRF is a useful method for predicting the presence of halogenated flame

  13. Identification of flame retardants in polyurethane foam collected from baby products.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Heather M; Klosterhaus, Susan; Keller, Alex; Ferguson, P Lee; van Bergen, Saskia; Cooper, Ellen; Webster, Thomas F; Blum, Arlene

    2011-06-15

    With the phase-out of PentaBDE in 2004, alternative flame retardants are being used in polyurethane foam to meet flammability standards. However, insufficient information is available on the identity of the flame retardants currently in use. Baby products containing polyurethane foam must meet California state furniture flammability standards, which likely affects the use of flame retardants in baby products throughout the U.S. However, it is unclear which products contain flame retardants and at what concentrations. In this study we surveyed baby products containing polyurethane foam to investigate how often flame retardants were used in these products. Information on when the products were purchased and whether they contained a label indicating that the product meets requirements for a California flammability standard were recorded. When possible, we identified the flame retardants being used and their concentrations in the foam. Foam samples collected from 101 commonly used baby products were analyzed. Eighty samples contained an identifiable flame retardant additive, and all but one of these was either chlorinated or brominated. The most common flame retardant detected was tris(1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate (TDCPP; detection frequency 36%), followed by components typically found in the Firemaster550 commercial mixture (detection frequency 17%). Five samples contained PBDE congeners commonly associated with PentaBDE, suggesting products with PentaBDE are still in-use. Two chlorinated organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) not previously documented in the environment were also identified, one of which is commercially sold as V6 (detection frequency 15%) and contains tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) as an impurity. As an addition to this study, we used a portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer to estimate the bromine and chlorine content of the foam and investigate whether XRF is a useful method for predicting the presence of halogenated flame

  14. Identification of Flame Retardants in Polyurethane Foam Collected from Baby Products

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    With the phase-out of PentaBDE in 2004, alternative flame retardants are being used in polyurethane foam to meet flammability standards. However, insufficient information is available on the identity of the flame retardants currently in use. Baby products containing polyurethane foam must meet California state furniture flammability standards, which likely affects the use of flame retardants in baby products throughout the U.S. However, it is unclear which products contain flame retardants and at what concentrations. In this study we surveyed baby products containing polyurethane foam to investigate how often flame retardants were used in these products. Information on when the products were purchased and whether they contained a label indicating that the product meets requirements for a California flammability standard were recorded. When possible, we identified the flame retardants being used and their concentrations in the foam. Foam samples collected from 101 commonly used baby products were analyzed. Eighty samples contained an identifiable flame retardant additive, and all but one of these was either chlorinated or brominated. The most common flame retardant detected was tris(1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate (TDCPP; detection frequency 36%), followed by components typically found in the Firemaster550 commercial mixture (detection frequency 17%). Five samples contained PBDE congeners commonly associated with PentaBDE, suggesting products with PentaBDE are still in-use. Two chlorinated organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) not previously documented in the environment were also identified, one of which is commercially sold as V6 (detection frequency 15%) and contains tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) as an impurity. As an addition to this study, we used a portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer to estimate the bromine and chlorine content of the foam and investigate whether XRF is a useful method for predicting the presence of halogenated flame

  15. Improve the flame retardancy of cellulose fibers by grafting zinc ion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, KeKe; Zong, Lu; Tan, Yeqiang; Ji, Quan; Yun, Weicai; Shi, Ran; Xia, Yanzhi

    2016-01-20

    Zinc ion as the only flame retardant of cellulose fibers was successfully grafted onto cellulose fibers. Grafting maleic anhydride onto cellulose fibers via homogeneous acylation reaction between N,N-dimethyl formamide (DMF) as the first step. Then, graft zinc ion onto the formed cellulose fibers was conducted with zinc carbonate. The resulting copolymers were characterized by FTIR. Flame retardancy and thermal degradation of zinc-ion-modified cellulose fibers (cellulose-Zn fibers) was investigated by limiting oxygen index (LOI), cone calorimeter (CONE), XRD, TG and SEM. Zinc ion could effectively improve flame retardancy and thermal degradation when its content increases up to 4.96 wt%. PMID:26572337

  16. Smoke suppression properties of ferrite yellow on flame retardant thermoplastic polyurethane based on ammonium polyphosphate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xilei; Jiang, Yufeng; Jiao, Chuanmei

    2014-02-15

    This article mainly studies smoke suppression properties and synergistic flame retardant effect of ferrite yellow (FeOOH) on flame retardant thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) composites using ammonium polyphosphate (APP) as a flame retardant agent. Smoke suppression properties and synergistic flame retardant effect of FeOOH on flame retardant TPU composites were intensively investigated by smoke density test (SDT), cone calorimeter test (CCT), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and thermal-gravimetric analysis (TGA). Remarkably, the SDT results show that FeOOH can effectively decrease the amount of smoke production with or without flame. On the other hand, the CCT data reveal that the addition of FeOOH can apparently reduce heat release rate (HRR), total heat release (THR), and total smoke release (TSR), etc. Here, FeOOH is considered to be an effective smoke suppression agent and a good synergism with APP in flame retardant TPU composites, which can greatly improve the structure of char residue realized by TGA and SEM results. PMID:24389005

  17. Detection of halogenated flame retardants in polyurethane foam by particle induced X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maley, Adam M.; Falk, Kyle A.; Hoover, Luke; Earlywine, Elly B.; Seymour, Michael D.; DeYoung, Paul A.; Blum, Arlene; Stapleton, Heather M.; Peaslee, Graham F.

    2015-09-01

    A novel application of particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) has been developed to detect the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardant chemicals in polyurethane foams. Traditional Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) methods for the detection and identification of halogenated flame retardants in foams require extensive sample preparation and data acquisition time. The elemental analysis of the halogens in polyurethane foam performed by PIXE offers the opportunity to identify the presence of halogenated flame retardants in a fraction of the time and sample preparation cost. Through comparative GC-MS and PIXE analysis of 215 foam samples, excellent agreement between the two methods was obtained. These results suggest that PIXE could be an ideal rapid screening method for the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardants in polyurethane foams.

  18. Formulation of intumescent flame retardant coatings containing natural-based tea saponin.

    PubMed

    Qian, Wei; Li, Xiang-Zhou; Wu, Zhi-Ping; Liu, Yan-Xin; Fang, Cong-Cong; Meng, Wei

    2015-03-18

    Natural product tea saponin (TS), extracted from the nutshell of camellia (Camellia oleifera Abel, Theaceae), was introduced into intumescent flame retardant formulations as blowing agent and carbon source. The formulations of the flame retardant system were optimized to get the optimum proportion of TS, and intumescent flame retardant coatings containing tea saponin (TS-IFRCs) were then prepared. It was found that TS can significantly affect the combustion behavior and the thermal stability of TS-IFRCs evaluated by cone calorimetry and simultaneous thermal analyzer, respectively. It was shown that TS, degraded to water vapor and carbon at high temperatures, can combine with other components to form a well-developed char layer. The char layer was supposed to inhibit erosion upon exposure to heat and oxygen and enhance the flame retardancy of TS-IFRCs. In addition, the smoke release of TS-IFRCs was also studied, which provided a low amount of smoke production.

  19. Versatile and fast gas chromatographic determination of frequently used brominated flame retardants in styrenic polymers.

    PubMed

    Pöhlein, Manfred; Bertran, Raquel Urpi; Wolf, Marion; van Eldik, Rudi

    2008-09-01

    Two versatile and fast methods to identify and quantify brominated flame retardants (BrFRs) in styrenic polymers were developed. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) as well as gas chromatography with electron-capture detection (GC/ECD), both following ultrasonic-supported dissolution and precipitation (USDP), were applied. The substance range includes poly-brominated biphenyls (PBBs) and diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), as well as other commonly used flame retardants (FRs), including two phosphate-based flame retardants. The methods were verified using congener standards and flame-retardant polymer samples. Good recoveries were found. Overall run time for the analysis, including sample preparation, is less than 60 min. PMID:18687441

  20. Migration of Organophorus Flame Retardants From Closed cell form to Settled Dust

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many industrial and consumer products, such as electrical and electronic products, furniture, plastics, textile, and building materials are manufactured with organophosphorus flame retardants (OPFRs). OPFRs can leach or diffuse out of the products and are released to the surround...

  1. BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS: WHAT WE KNOW, AND WHAT WE DON’T

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) represent a large and diverse class of high volume industrial chemicals which have been developed to provide fire safety. There are many other BFRs which have been used and are under development. Historically, polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) ...

  2. Acute Neurobehavorial Toxicity of Flame Retardant Replacement Compounds in Zebrafish Larvae

    EPA Science Inventory

    As polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are phased out, numerous compounds areemerging as potential replacement flame retardants for use in consumer and electronicproducts. Little is known, however, about the neurobehavioral toxicity of thesereplacements. This study evaluated t...

  3. Acute and Developmental Behavioral Effects of Flame Retardants and Related Chemicals in Zebrafish

    EPA Science Inventory

    As polybrominated diphenyl ethers are phased out, numerous compounds are emerging as potential replacement flame retardants for use in consumer and electronic products. Little is known, however, about the neurobehavioral toxicity of these replacements. This study evaluated the ne...

  4. Thermal and mechanical behavior of flame retardant epoxy-polyesterurethane blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, R. H.; Hirani, A. V.; Kachhia, P. H.

    2016-05-01

    Polyesterurethanes are used in different applications due to their unique combination of the properties like toughness, flexibility, solvent resistance, etc. Nowadays flame retardant properties of polymers are of commercial interest because of their potential use in high performance applications. In the present study attempts have been taken to improve the flame retardant properties of conventional epoxy resin by incorporating phosphorus based polyesterurethane. Polyesterurethane has been synthesized in the laboratory and characterized by chemical and instrumental analysis techniques. Thermal stability and char value of the blends have been determined using thermogravimetric analysis technique. Limiting Oxygen Index (LOI) and UL-94 test methods have been used to determine the flame retardant properties of neat polymer and their blends in film form. Mechanical properties like tensile strength, elongation and impact resistance of the blends have been found out. Polyblend of epoxy resin with phosphorus based polyesterurethane has improved flame retardant properties compare to neat epoxy resin.

  5. Characterization of organophosphorus flame retardants' sorption on building materials and consumer products

    EPA Science Inventory

    Better understanding the transport mechanisms of organophosphorus flame-retardants (OPFRs) in the residential environment is important to more accurately estimate their indoor exposure and develop risk management strategies that protect human health. This study describes an impro...

  6. OVERVIEW AND EVALUATION OF NEUROBEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF FLAME RETARDANTS IN LABORATORY ANIMALS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants are used worldwide and have been detected in numerous environmental, including human, samples. Concern has been raised regarding their potential developmental neurotoxic effects. There is an emerging literature on behavioral...

  7. In vitro dermal absorption of flame retardant chemicals.

    PubMed

    Hughes, M F; Edwards, B C; Mitchell, C T; Bhooshan, B

    2001-12-01

    Flame retardant chemicals may be used in furniture fabric in the future to reduce the flammability of the fabric. As a part of the process to evaluate the potential for exposure to these chemicals, this study examined the in vitro dermal absorption of two flame retardant chemicals. The chemicals were [14C]decabromodiphenyl oxide (DBDPO) and [14C]tris-(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl)phosphate (TDCP). Skin from the adult hairless female mouse (SKH1) was removed and mounted in flow-through diffusion cells. The chemicals, at three dose levels (DBDPO: 6, 30 and 60 nmol; TDCP: 20, 100 and 200 pmol), were applied in a volatile vehicle (tetrahydrofuran for DBDPO; acetone for TDCP) to the skin. Fractions of receptor fluid, pumped below the skin, were collected over a 24-h period. The skin was washed with solvent (tetrahydrofuran for DBDPO; ethanol for TDCP) to remove unabsorbed chemical 24 h after application. The receptor fluid, skin wash and skin were analyzed for chemical-derived radioactivity. The skin from the high-dose group of both chemicals, and the receptor fluid from TDCP high-dose samples, were analyzed for parent compound and metabolites by HPLC. The 24-h cumulative percent of the dose of DBDPO in the receptor fluid was very low (0.07-0.34%). The applied dose of DBDPO detected in the skin ranged from 2 to 20%. The lowest dose of DBDPO had the highest percentage of the dose (20%) in the skin. The major portion of the applied dose was removed by washing the skin 24 h after application of DBDPO, and ranged from 77 to 92%. HPLC analysis of homogenate extract prepared from the high-dose of DBDPO-treated skin showed the presence of DBDPO and a minor unknown peak. TDCP was readily detected in the receptor fluid; 39-57% of the applied dose of TDCP was in the receptor fluid by 24 h. The solvent wash removed 11-25% of the dose from the skin and 28-35% remained in it. HPLC analysis of the skin homogenate extract and receptor fluid extract from the TDCP high-dose treated samples

  8. [Brominated flame retardants: environmental contamination, exposure sources and potential negative health effects].

    PubMed

    Fiore, Maria; Floridia, Adriana; Oliveri Conti, Gea; Ledda, Caterina; Mauceri, Cristina; Ferrante, Margherita

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes recent evidence regarding brominated flame retardants. These represent the most common type of flame retardants used and recent studies have highlighted their presence in various concentrations in different environmental matrices, including areas distant from production areas, and in human biological samples. Many doubts persist regarding exposure sources, toxicity, metabolism and transformation processes once these products are released into the environment. PMID:26722829

  9. Intumescent flame-retardant and self-healing superhydrophobic coatings on cotton fabric.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shanshan; Li, Xiang; Li, Yang; Sun, Junqi

    2015-04-28

    Flame-retardant and self-healing superhydrophobic coatings are fabricated on cotton fabric by a convenient solution-dipping method, which involves the sequential deposition of a trilayer of branched poly(ethylenimine) (bPEI), ammonium polyphosphate (APP), and fluorinated-decyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (F-POSS). When directly exposed to flame, such a trilayer coating generates a porous char layer because of its intumescent effect, successfully giving the coated fabric a self-extinguishing property. Furthermore, the F-POSS embedded in cotton fabric and APP/bPEI coating produces a superhydrophobic surface with a self-healing function. The coating can repetitively and autonomically restore the superhydrophobicity when the superhydrophobicity is damaged. The resulting cotton fabric, which is flame-resistant, waterproof, and self-cleaning, can be easily cleaned by simple water rinsing. Thus, the integration of self-healing superhydrophobicity with flame retardancy provides a practical way to resolve the problem of washing durability of the flame-retardant coatings. The flame-retardant and superhydrophobic fabric can endure more than 1000 cycles of abrasion under a pressure of 44.8 kPa without losing its flame retardancy and self-healing superhydrophobicity, showing potential applications as multifunctional advanced textiles.

  10. Intumescent flame-retardant and self-healing superhydrophobic coatings on cotton fabric.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shanshan; Li, Xiang; Li, Yang; Sun, Junqi

    2015-04-28

    Flame-retardant and self-healing superhydrophobic coatings are fabricated on cotton fabric by a convenient solution-dipping method, which involves the sequential deposition of a trilayer of branched poly(ethylenimine) (bPEI), ammonium polyphosphate (APP), and fluorinated-decyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (F-POSS). When directly exposed to flame, such a trilayer coating generates a porous char layer because of its intumescent effect, successfully giving the coated fabric a self-extinguishing property. Furthermore, the F-POSS embedded in cotton fabric and APP/bPEI coating produces a superhydrophobic surface with a self-healing function. The coating can repetitively and autonomically restore the superhydrophobicity when the superhydrophobicity is damaged. The resulting cotton fabric, which is flame-resistant, waterproof, and self-cleaning, can be easily cleaned by simple water rinsing. Thus, the integration of self-healing superhydrophobicity with flame retardancy provides a practical way to resolve the problem of washing durability of the flame-retardant coatings. The flame-retardant and superhydrophobic fabric can endure more than 1000 cycles of abrasion under a pressure of 44.8 kPa without losing its flame retardancy and self-healing superhydrophobicity, showing potential applications as multifunctional advanced textiles. PMID:25777158

  11. Synthesis, structural and flammability studies of novel phosphonates triazine derivative as economic flame retardant for cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organophosphorous flame retardants have been known to be more effective when used in conjunction with nitrogen-containing systems. Their mixture produces incombustible non-toxic gases which can dilute the concentration of the oxygen near the flame, and the charred layers become protective barriers t...

  12. Development of the phosphorus and nitrogen containing flame retardant for value added cotton product

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is our desire to develop new crosslinking agents for cotton textiles that afford useful flame protection regardless of fabric construction. Herein we present the synthesis and the application of the triazine and piperazine derivatives as flame retardant on cotton. Novel phosphorus-nitrogen contai...

  13. Flame Retardant Effect of Aerogel and Nanosilica on Engineered Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K.; Smith, Trent M.; Roberson, Luke B.; Yang, Feng; Nelson, Gordon L.

    2010-01-01

    Aerogels are typically manufactured vIa high temperature and pressure-critical-point drying of a colloidal metal oxide gel filled with solvents. Aerogel materials derived from silica materials represent a structural morphology (amorphous, open-celled nanofoams) rather than a particular chemical constituency. Aerogel is not like conventional foams in that it is a porous material with extreme microporosity and composed of individual features only a few nanometers in length with a highly porous dendriticlike structure. This unique substance has unusual properties such as low thermal conductivity, refractive index and sound suppression; in addition to its exceptional ability to capture fast moving dust. The highly porous nature of the aerogel's structure provides large amounts of surface area per unit weight. For instance, a silica aerogel material with a density of 100 kilograms per cubic meters can have surface areas of around 800 to 1500 square meters per gram depending on the precursors and process utilized to produce it. To take advantage of the unique properties of silica aerogels, especially the ultra light weight and low thermal conductivity, their composites with various engineering polymers were prepared and their flammability was investigated by Cone Calorimetry. The flammability of various polystyrene/silica aerogel nanocomposites were measured. The combination of these nanocomposites with a NASA patented flame retardant SINK were also studied. The results were compared with the base polymer to show the differences between composites with different forms of silica.

  14. Catalytic degradation of brominated flame retardants by copper oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yecheskel, Yinon; Dror, Ishai; Berkowitz, Brian

    2013-09-01

    The catalytic degradation of two brominated flame retardants (BFRs), tribromoneopentyl alcohol (TBNPA) and 2,4 dibromophenol (2,4-DBP) by copper oxide nanoparticles (nCuO) was investigated. The degradation kinetics, the debromination, and the formation of intermediates by nCuO catalysis were also compared to Fenton oxidation and nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) reduction methods. BFRs have been added to various products like plastic, textile, electronics and synthetic polymers at growing rates. In spite of the clear advantages of reducing fire damages, many of these BFRs may be released to the environment after their beneficial use and become contaminants. The two studied BFRs were fully degraded with sufficient time (hours to days) and oxidation agent (H2O2). Shorter reaction times showed differences in reaction pathway and kinetics. The 2,4-DBP showed faster degradation than TBNPA, by nCuO catalysis. Relatively high resistance to degradation was recorded for 2,4-DBP with nZVI, yielding 20% degradation after 24h, while the TBNPA was degraded by 85% within 12h. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) measurements show generation of both hydroxyl and superoxide radicals. In addition, inhibition of 2,4-DBP degradation in the presence of spin traps implies a radical degradation mechanism. A catalytic mechanism for radical generation and BFR degradation by nCuO is proposed. It is further suggested that H2O2 plays an essential role in the activation of the catalyst. PMID:23786809

  15. Ecotoxicity and biodegradability of new brominated flame retardants: a review.

    PubMed

    Ezechiáš, M; Covino, S; Cajthaml, T

    2014-12-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have been routinely used as additives in a number of consumer products for several decades in order to reduce the risk of fire accidents. Concerns about the massive use of these substances have increased due to their possible toxicity, endocrine disrupting properties and occurrence in almost all the environmental compartments, including humans and wildlife organisms. Several conventional BFRs (e.g. polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDE)) have been included in the list of Persistent Organic Pollutants and their use has been restricted because of their established toxicity and environmental persistence. Over the past few years, these compounds have been replaced with "new" BFRs (NBFRs). Despite the fact that NBFRs are different chemical molecules than traditional BFRs, most of physical-chemical properties (e.g. aromatic moiety, halogen substitution, lipophilic character) are common to both groups; therefore, their fate in the environment is potentially similar to the banned BFRs. Therefore, this article has been compiled to summarize the published scientific data regarding the biodegradability of the most widely used NBFRs, a key factor in their potential persistency in the environment, and their ecotoxicological effects on humans and test organisms. The data reviewed here document that the mechanisms through NBFRs exibit their ecotoxicity and the processes leading to their biotransformation in the environment are still poorly understood. Thus emphasis is placed on the need for further research in these areas is therefore emphasized, in order to avoid the massive use of further potentially harmful and recalcitrant substances of anthropogenic origin.

  16. Catalytic degradation of brominated flame retardants by copper oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yecheskel, Yinon; Dror, Ishai; Berkowitz, Brian

    2013-09-01

    The catalytic degradation of two brominated flame retardants (BFRs), tribromoneopentyl alcohol (TBNPA) and 2,4 dibromophenol (2,4-DBP) by copper oxide nanoparticles (nCuO) was investigated. The degradation kinetics, the debromination, and the formation of intermediates by nCuO catalysis were also compared to Fenton oxidation and nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) reduction methods. BFRs have been added to various products like plastic, textile, electronics and synthetic polymers at growing rates. In spite of the clear advantages of reducing fire damages, many of these BFRs may be released to the environment after their beneficial use and become contaminants. The two studied BFRs were fully degraded with sufficient time (hours to days) and oxidation agent (H2O2). Shorter reaction times showed differences in reaction pathway and kinetics. The 2,4-DBP showed faster degradation than TBNPA, by nCuO catalysis. Relatively high resistance to degradation was recorded for 2,4-DBP with nZVI, yielding 20% degradation after 24h, while the TBNPA was degraded by 85% within 12h. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) measurements show generation of both hydroxyl and superoxide radicals. In addition, inhibition of 2,4-DBP degradation in the presence of spin traps implies a radical degradation mechanism. A catalytic mechanism for radical generation and BFR degradation by nCuO is proposed. It is further suggested that H2O2 plays an essential role in the activation of the catalyst.

  17. Surface nanomodification of cotton fiber for flame retardant application.

    PubMed

    Paosawatyanyong, Boonchoat; Jermsutjarit, Piyarat; Bhanthumnavin, Worawan

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents efficient surface modification methodology to increase fire resistance properties of cotton by radio frequency (RF) plasma-induced graft copolymerization of vinyl phosphate ester as nanometer residue structure onto cotton surface. Methacryloyloxyethyl diphenyl phosphate (MEDP) monomer was synthesized and grafted onto the surface of cotton fabric by argon RF plasma at ambient temperature. Under optimum RF power (30 W), amounts of MEDP and N,N methylenebisacrylamide cross linking agent were varied to obtain optimum graft copolymerization conditions. Untreated and treated cotton were characterized by attenuated total reflectance infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy to investigate their functional group characteristics. This showed a strong covalent attachment between the surface of cotton and flame retardant material as the carbonyl functionality of the MEDP was clearly observed in the spectra. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis also showed grafted material as nanometer residue on cotton surface. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) revealed that the decomposition of phosphorus compound which occurs at lower temperature than the cotton itself resulted in the formation of char which covers cotton surface. This protects the fabric surface from further burning, therefore, higher amounts of remaining materials were observed as char in all cases. Furthermore, limiting oxygen index (LOI) had increased from 19 in untreated to 28 in grafted cotton. Detailed analysis on structural and thermal properties as well as surface grafting efficiency are presented. PMID:22524051

  18. Brominated flame retardants in Canadian chicken egg yolks

    PubMed Central

    Rawn, D.F.K.; Sadler, A.; Quade, S.C.; Sun, W.-F.; Lau, B.P.-Y.; Kosarac, I.; Hayward, S.; Ryan, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Chicken eggs categorised as conventional, omega-3 enriched, free range and organic were collected at grading stations in three regions of Canada between 2005 and 2006. Free run eggs, which were only available for collection from two regions, were also sampled during this time frame. Egg yolks from each of these egg types (n = 162) were analysed to determine brominated flame retardant levels, specifically polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD). PBDEs were detected in 100% of the 162 samples tested, while HBCD was observed in 85% of the egg yolks. Total PBDE concentrations in egg yolks ranged from 0.018 to 20.9 ng g−1 lipid (median = 3.03 ng g−1 lipid), with PBDE 209 identified as being the major contributor to ΣPBDE concentrations. In addition to PBDE 209, PBDE 99, 47, 100, 183 and 153 were important contributors to ΣPBDE concentrations. Total HBCD concentrations ranged from below the limit of detection to a maximum concentration of 71.9 ng g−1 lipid (median = 0.053 ng g−1 lipid). The α-isomer was the dominant contributor to ΣHBCD levels in Canadian egg yolks and was the most frequently detected HBCD isomer. ΣPBDE levels exhibited large differences in variability between combinations of region and type. ΣHBCD concentrations were not significantly different among regions, although differences were observed between the different types of egg yolks analysed in the present study. PMID:21623506

  19. Surface nanomodification of cotton fiber for flame retardant application.

    PubMed

    Paosawatyanyong, Boonchoat; Jermsutjarit, Piyarat; Bhanthumnavin, Worawan

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents efficient surface modification methodology to increase fire resistance properties of cotton by radio frequency (RF) plasma-induced graft copolymerization of vinyl phosphate ester as nanometer residue structure onto cotton surface. Methacryloyloxyethyl diphenyl phosphate (MEDP) monomer was synthesized and grafted onto the surface of cotton fabric by argon RF plasma at ambient temperature. Under optimum RF power (30 W), amounts of MEDP and N,N methylenebisacrylamide cross linking agent were varied to obtain optimum graft copolymerization conditions. Untreated and treated cotton were characterized by attenuated total reflectance infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy to investigate their functional group characteristics. This showed a strong covalent attachment between the surface of cotton and flame retardant material as the carbonyl functionality of the MEDP was clearly observed in the spectra. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis also showed grafted material as nanometer residue on cotton surface. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) revealed that the decomposition of phosphorus compound which occurs at lower temperature than the cotton itself resulted in the formation of char which covers cotton surface. This protects the fabric surface from further burning, therefore, higher amounts of remaining materials were observed as char in all cases. Furthermore, limiting oxygen index (LOI) had increased from 19 in untreated to 28 in grafted cotton. Detailed analysis on structural and thermal properties as well as surface grafting efficiency are presented.

  20. Occurrence of organophosphate flame retardants in drinking water from China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Yu, Nanyang; Zhang, Beibei; Jin, Ling; Li, Meiying; Hu, Mengyang; Zhang, Xiaowei; Wei, Si; Yu, Hongxia

    2014-05-01

    Several organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) have been identified as known or suspected carcinogens or neurotoxic substances. Given the potential health risks of these compounds, we conducted a comprehensive survey of nine OPFRs in drinking water in China. We found total concentrations of OPFRs in tap water ranging from 85.1 ng/L to 325 ng/L, and tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBEP), triphenyl phosphate (TPP), and tris(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCPP) were the most common components. Similar OPFR concentrations and profiles were observed in water samples processed through six different waterworks in Nanjing, China. However, boiling affected OPFR levels in drinking water by either increasing (e.g., TBEP) or decreasing (e.g., tributyl phosphate, TBP) concentrations depending on the particular compound and the state of the indoor environment. We also found that bottled water contained many of the same major OPFR compounds with concentrations 10-25% lower than those in tap water, although TBEP contamination in bottled water remained a concern. Finally, we concluded that the risk of ingesting OPFRs through drinking water was not a major health concern for either adults or children in China. Nevertheless, drinking water ingestion represents an important exposure pathway for OPFRs.

  1. Brominated flame retardants and seafood safety: a review.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Rebeca; Cunha, Sara C; Casal, Susana

    2015-04-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs), frequently applied to industrial and household products to make them less flammable, are highly persistent in the environment and cause multi-organ toxicity in human and wildlife. Based on the review of BFRs presence in seafood published from 2004 to 2014, it is clear that such pollutants are not ideally controlled as the surveys are too restricted, legislation inexistent for some classes, the analytical methodologies diversified, and several factors as food processing and eating habits are generally overlooked. Indeed, while a seafood rich diet presents plenty of nutritional benefits, it can also represent a potential source of these environmental contaminants. Since recent studies have shown that dietary intake constitutes a main route of human exposure to BFRs, it is of major importance to review and enhance these features, since seafood constitutes a chief pathway for human exposure and biomagnification of priority environmental contaminants. In particular, more objective studies focused on the variability factors behind contamination levels, and subsequent human exposure, are necessary to support the necessity for more restricted legislation worldwide.

  2. Brominated flame retardants and seafood safety: a review.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Rebeca; Cunha, Sara C; Casal, Susana

    2015-04-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs), frequently applied to industrial and household products to make them less flammable, are highly persistent in the environment and cause multi-organ toxicity in human and wildlife. Based on the review of BFRs presence in seafood published from 2004 to 2014, it is clear that such pollutants are not ideally controlled as the surveys are too restricted, legislation inexistent for some classes, the analytical methodologies diversified, and several factors as food processing and eating habits are generally overlooked. Indeed, while a seafood rich diet presents plenty of nutritional benefits, it can also represent a potential source of these environmental contaminants. Since recent studies have shown that dietary intake constitutes a main route of human exposure to BFRs, it is of major importance to review and enhance these features, since seafood constitutes a chief pathway for human exposure and biomagnification of priority environmental contaminants. In particular, more objective studies focused on the variability factors behind contamination levels, and subsequent human exposure, are necessary to support the necessity for more restricted legislation worldwide. PMID:25700249

  3. Organophosphorous flame retardants in biota from Svalbard, Norway.

    PubMed

    Hallanger, Ingeborg G; Sagerup, Kjetil; Evenset, Anita; Kovacs, Kit M; Leonards, Pim; Fuglei, Eva; Routti, Heli; Aars, Jon; Strøm, Hallvard; Lydersen, Christian; Gabrielsen, Geir Wing

    2015-12-15

    Eight arctic species, including fish, birds and mammals, from diverse habitats (marine and terrestrial) within the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway, were screened for 14 organophosphorus flame retardant (PFR) compounds. Ten PFRs were detected: tris(2-chloroethyl)phosphate (TCEP), tris(2-chloroisopropyl)phosphate (TCIPP), tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl)phosphate (TDCIPP), triphenyl phosphate (TPHP); 2-ethylhexyl diphenyl phosphate (EHDPP); tris(2-butoxyethyl)phosphate (TBOEP); tritolyl phosphate (TCrP); triisobutyl phosphate (TIBP); tris(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate (TEHP); and butyl diphenyl phosphate (DPhBP). The greatest number of different PFR compounds, and the highest detection frequency were measured in capelin (Mallotus villotus), and the lowest in Brünnich's guillemot (Uria lomvia). The highest concentrations of ΣPFR, as well as the highest concentration of a single PFR compound, TBOEP, were measured in arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus). The presence of PFR compounds in arctic biota indicates that these compounds can undergo long-range transport and are, to some degree, persistent and bioaccumulated. The potential for biomagnification from fish to higher trophic levels seems to be limited. PMID:26453403

  4. Flame retardant brominated styrene-based polymers. VII. Applications of dibromostyrene graft latices

    SciTech Connect

    Favstritsky, N.A.; Wang, J.L.

    1995-12-01

    The dibromostyrene graft lattices possessing desired physical properties combined with flame retardancy have passed five different flammability tests for the following applications: textile backcoating (MVSS-302 flammability test), contact adhesive (exposure to a 3 in blue methane Bunsen burner flame), latex binder (exposure to a 4 in high, 1950{degrees}F propane flame from a Fisher burner), latex sealant (the Butler chimney flammability test, AST4 D-3014) and latex paint (the limiting oxygen index test, ASTM D-2863).

  5. Brominated and chlorinated flame retardants in San Francisco Bay sediments and wildlife.

    PubMed

    Klosterhaus, Susan L; Stapleton, Heather M; La Guardia, Mark J; Greig, Denise J

    2012-10-15

    Restrictions on the use of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have resulted in the use of alternative flame retardants in consumer products to comply with flammability standards. In contrast to PBDEs, information on the occurrence and fate of these alternative compounds in the environment is limited, particularly in the United States. In this study, a survey of flame retardants in San Francisco Bay was conducted to evaluate whether PBDE replacement chemicals and other current use flame retardants were accumulating in the Bay food web. In addition to PBDEs, brominated and chlorinated flame retardants (hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and Dechlorane Plus (DP)) were detected in Bay sediments and wildlife. Median concentrations of PBDEs, HBCD, and DP, respectively, were 4.3, 0.3, and 0.2 ng g⁻¹ dry weight (dw) in sediments; 1670, <6.0, and 0.5 ng g⁻¹ lipid weight (lw) in white croaker (Genyonemus lineatus); 1860, 6.5, and 1.3 ng g⁻¹ lw in shiner surfperch (Cymatogaster aggregata); 5500, 37.4, and 0.9 ng g⁻¹ lw in eggs of double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus); 770, 7.1, and 0.9 ng g⁻¹ lw in harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) adults; and 330, 3.5, and <0.1 ng g⁻¹ lw in harbor seal (P. vitulina) pups. Two additional flame retardants, pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6 tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) were detected in sediments but with less frequency and at lower concentrations (median concentrations of 0.01 and 0.02 ng g⁻¹ dw, respectively) compared to the other flame retardants. PBEB was also detected in each of the adult harbor seals and in 83% of the pups (median concentrations 0.2 and 0.07 ng g⁻¹ lw, respectively). The flame retardants hexabromobenzene (HBB), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE), bis(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (TBPH), and 2-ethylhexyl 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (TBB), were not detected in sediments and BTBPE, HBB and TBB were not detected in wildlife samples. Elevated concentrations of some flame retardants

  6. Microwave-assisted extraction of organophosphate flame retardants and plasticizers from indoor dust samples.

    PubMed

    García, M; Rodríguez, I; Cela, R

    2007-06-01

    A procedure for the determination of eight organophosphate flame retardants and plasticizers in dust samples is presented. Microwave-assisted extraction and gas chromatography (GC) with nitrogen-phosphorus detection (NPD) were used for sample preparation and analytes quantification, respectively. Influence of different variables (type and volume of organic solvent, temperature, time, agitation, etc.) on the yield of the extraction step was evaluated. The most important factor was the type of solvent, with the highest efficiencies corresponding to acetone. Under final conditions 10 mL of this solvent were employed. The extraction was carried out at 130 degrees C and satisfactory yields, similar to those obtained with the Soxhlet technique, were achieved. Due to the high content of organic carbon in dust samples, primary acetone extracts had to be subjected to intensive clean-up. Dilution with ultrapure water followed by concentration on a reversed-phase sorbent and further purification using silica, allowed a significant reduction of co-extracted interferences. Application of the developed methodology to indoor dust from private houses showed important concentrations of several organophosphate esters. The highest levels, up to 19 microg/g, corresponded to tris(butoxyethyl) phosphate; moreover, average values of two chlorinated compounds, used as flame retardants and considered as the most concerning species in the group, exceeded the 1 microg/g level. PMID:17140588

  7. Phosphorus flame retardants: properties, production, environmental occurrence, toxicity and analysis.

    PubMed

    van der Veen, Ike; de Boer, Jacob

    2012-08-01

    Since the ban on some brominated flame retardants (BFRs), phosphorus flame retardants (PFRs), which were responsible for 20% of the flame retardant (FR) consumption in 2006 in Europe, are often proposed as alternatives for BFRs. PFRs can be divided in three main groups, inorganic, organic and halogen containing PFRs. Most of the PFRs have a mechanism of action in the solid phase of burning materials (char formation), but some may also be active in the gas phase. Some PFRs are reactive FRs, which means they are chemically bound to a polymer, whereas others are additive and mixed into the polymer. The focus of this report is limited to the PFRs mentioned in the literature as potential substitutes for BFRs. The physico-chemical properties, applications and production volumes of PFRs are given. Non-halogenated PFRs are often used as plasticisers as well. Limited information is available on the occurrence of PFRs in the environment. For triphenyl phosphate (TPhP), tricresylphosphate (TCP), tris(2-chloroethyl)phosphate (TCEP), tris(chloropropyl)phosphate (TCPP), tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl)phosphate (TDCPP), and tetrekis(2-chlorethyl)dichloroisopentyldiphosphate (V6) a number of studies have been performed on their occurrence in air, water and sediment, but limited data were found on their occurrence in biota. Concentrations found for these PFRs in air were up to 47 μg m(-3), in sediment levels up to 24 mg kg(-1) were found, and in surface water concentrations up to 379 ng L(-1). In all these matrices TCPP was dominant. Concentrations found in dust were up to 67 mg kg(-1), with TDCPP being the dominant PFR. PFR concentrations reported were often higher than polybrominated diphenylether (PBDE) concentrations, and the human exposure due to PFR concentrations in indoor air appears to be higher than exposure due to PBDE concentrations in indoor air. Only the Cl-containing PFRs are carcinogenic. Other negative human health effects were found for Cl-containing PFRs as well as

  8. Phosphorus flame retardants: properties, production, environmental occurrence, toxicity and analysis.

    PubMed

    van der Veen, Ike; de Boer, Jacob

    2012-08-01

    Since the ban on some brominated flame retardants (BFRs), phosphorus flame retardants (PFRs), which were responsible for 20% of the flame retardant (FR) consumption in 2006 in Europe, are often proposed as alternatives for BFRs. PFRs can be divided in three main groups, inorganic, organic and halogen containing PFRs. Most of the PFRs have a mechanism of action in the solid phase of burning materials (char formation), but some may also be active in the gas phase. Some PFRs are reactive FRs, which means they are chemically bound to a polymer, whereas others are additive and mixed into the polymer. The focus of this report is limited to the PFRs mentioned in the literature as potential substitutes for BFRs. The physico-chemical properties, applications and production volumes of PFRs are given. Non-halogenated PFRs are often used as plasticisers as well. Limited information is available on the occurrence of PFRs in the environment. For triphenyl phosphate (TPhP), tricresylphosphate (TCP), tris(2-chloroethyl)phosphate (TCEP), tris(chloropropyl)phosphate (TCPP), tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl)phosphate (TDCPP), and tetrekis(2-chlorethyl)dichloroisopentyldiphosphate (V6) a number of studies have been performed on their occurrence in air, water and sediment, but limited data were found on their occurrence in biota. Concentrations found for these PFRs in air were up to 47 μg m(-3), in sediment levels up to 24 mg kg(-1) were found, and in surface water concentrations up to 379 ng L(-1). In all these matrices TCPP was dominant. Concentrations found in dust were up to 67 mg kg(-1), with TDCPP being the dominant PFR. PFR concentrations reported were often higher than polybrominated diphenylether (PBDE) concentrations, and the human exposure due to PFR concentrations in indoor air appears to be higher than exposure due to PBDE concentrations in indoor air. Only the Cl-containing PFRs are carcinogenic. Other negative human health effects were found for Cl-containing PFRs as well as

  9. Method for producing flame retardant porous products and products produced thereby

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, I.O.

    1998-08-04

    A method for fire retarding porous products used for thermal energy storage and products produced thereby is provided. The method includes treating the surface of the phase change material-containing porous products with a urea fire-retarding agent. Upon exposure to a flame, the urea forms an adduct with the phase change material which will not sustain combustion (is self-extinguishing) in air. No halogens or metal oxides are contained in the fire retardant, so no potentially noxious halide smoke or fumes are emitted if the product is continuously exposed to a flame. 1 fig.

  10. Method for producing flame retardant porous products and products produced thereby

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1998-08-04

    A method for fire retarding porous products used for thermal energy storage and products produced thereby is provided. The method includes treating the surface of the phase change material-containing porous products with a urea fire-retarding agent. Upon exposure to a flame, the urea forms an adduct with the phase change material which will not sustain combustion (is self-extinguishing) in air. No halogens or metal oxides are contained in the fire retardant, so no potentially noxious halide smoke or fumes are emitted if the product is continuously exposed to a flame.

  11. Method for Producing Flame Retardant Porous Products and Products Produced Thereby

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1998-08-04

    A method for fire retarding porous products used for thermal energy storage and products produced thereby is provided. The method includes treating the surface of the phase change material-containing porous products with a urea fire-retarding agent. Upon exposure to a flame, the urea forms an adduct with the phase change material which will not sustain combustion (is self-extinguishing) in air. No halogens or metal oxides are contained in the fire retardant, so no potentially noxious halide smoke or fumes are emitted if the product is continuously exposed to a flame.

  12. Polybrominated diphenyl ether flame retardants in the North American environment.

    PubMed

    Hale, Robert C; Alaee, Mehran; Manchester-Neesvig, Jon B; Stapleton, Heather M; Ikonomou, Michael G

    2003-09-01

    North America consumes over half of the world's production of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants. About 98% of global demand for the Penta-BDE mixture, the constituents of which are the most bioaccumulative and environmentally widespread, resides here. However, research on the environmental distribution of PBDEs in North America has lagged behind that in Northern Europe. Examination of available governmentally maintained release data suggests that Deca-BDE use in the US substantially exceeds that in Canada. Penta-BDE use probably follows a similar pattern. PBDE demand in Mexico is uncertain, but is assumed to be comparatively modest. Recent research examining air, water, sediment, sewage sludge and aquatic biota suggests that Penta-BDE constituents are present in geographically disparate locations in the US and Canada. The less brominated congeners have been observed in areas distant from their known use or production, e.g. the Arctic. PBDEs have been detected in low concentrations in North American air, water and sediment, but much higher levels in aquatic biota. Increased burdens as a function of position in the food web have been noted. PBDE concentrations in US and Canadian sewage sludges appear to be at least 10-fold greater than European levels and may be a useful barometer of release. In general, PBDE concentrations in environmental media reported in North America are comparable or exceed those observed elsewhere in the world. In contrast to Europe, environmental burdens are increasing over time here, consistent with the greater consumption of the commercial mixtures. However, data remain relatively scarce. Deca-BDE in the North American environment appears largely restricted to points of release, e.g. urban areas and those where PBDE-containing sewage sludges have been applied. This lack of redistribution is likely due to its extremely low volatility and water solubility. Penta-BDE and Deca-BDE products are used in different applications

  13. Human health risk associated with brominated flame-retardants (BFRs).

    PubMed

    Lyche, Jan L; Rosseland, Carola; Berge, Gunnar; Polder, Anuschka

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this review are to assess the human exposure and human and experimental evidence for adverse effects of brominated flame-retardants (BFRs) with specific focus on intake from seafood. The leakage of BFRs from consumer products leads to exposure of humans from fetal life to adulthood. Fish and fish products contain the highest levels of BFRs and dominate the dietary intake of frequent fish eaters in Europe, while meat, followed by seafood and dairy products accounted for the highest US dietary intake. House dust is also reported as an important source of exposure for children as well as adults. The levels of BFRs in the general North American populations are higher than those in Europe and Japan and the highest levels are detected in infants and toddlers. The daily intake via breast milk exceeds the RfD in 10% of US infants. BFRs including PBDEs, HBCDs and TBBP-A have induced endocrine-, reproductive- and behavior effects in laboratory animals. Furthermore, recent human epidemiological data demonstrated association between exposure to BFRs and similar adverse effects as observed in animal studies. Fish including farmed fish and crude fish oil for human consumption may contain substantial levels of BFRs and infants and toddlers consuming these products on a daily basis may exceed the tolerable daily intake suggesting that fish and fish oil alone represent a risk to human health. This intake comes in addition to exposure from other sources (breast milk, other food, house dust). Because potential harmful concentrations of BFRs and other toxicants occur in fish and fish products, research on a wider range of products is warranted, to assess health hazard related to the contamination of fish and fish products for human consumption.

  14. Maternal exposure to brominated flame retardants and infant Apgar Scores

    PubMed Central

    Terrell, Metrecia L.; Hartnett, Kathleen P.; Lim, Hyeyeun; Wirth, Julie; Marcus, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and other persistent organic pollutants have been associated with adverse health outcomes in humans and may be particularly toxic to the developing fetus. We investigated the association between in utero polybrominated biphenyl (PBB) and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposures and infant Apgar scores in a cohort of Michigan residents exposed to PBB through contaminated food after an industrial accident. PBB and PCB concentrations were measured in serum at the time the women were enrolled in the cohort. PBB concentrations were also estimated at the time of conception for each pregnancy using a validated elimination model. Apgar scores, a universal measure of infant health at birth, measured at 1 and 5 minutes, were taken from birth certificates for 613 offspring born to 330 women. Maternal PCB concentrations at enrollment were not associated with below–median Apgar scores in this cohort. However, maternal PBB exposure was associated with a dose–related increase in the odds of a below–median Apgar score at 1 minute and 5 minutes. Among infants whose mothers had an estimated PBB at conception above the limit of detection of 1 part per billion, the odds ratio was 2.32 (95 % CI: 1.22– 4.40); for those with PBB ≥ 2.5 ppb the OR=2.62 (95% CI: 1.38-4.96; test for trend p< 0.01). Likewise, the odds of a below–median 5–minute Apgar increased with higher maternal PBB at conception. It remains critical that future studies examine possible relationships between in utero exposures to brominated compounds and adverse health outcomes. PMID:25203650

  15. DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY OF POLYBROMINATED DIPHENYL ETHER (PBDE) FLAME RETARDANTS

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Lucio G.; Giordano, Gennaro

    2007-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are a class of flame retardants used in a variety of consumer products. In the past 25 years, PBDEs have become ubiquitous environmental contaminants. They have been detected in soil, air, sediments, birds, marine species, fish, house dust, and human tissues, blood and breast milk. Diet and house dust appear to be the major sources of PBDE exposure in the general population, though occupational exposure can also occur. Levels of PBDEs in human tissues are particularly high in North America, compared to Asian and European countries, and have been increasing in the past 30 years. Concentrations of PBDEs are particularly high in breast milk, resulting in high exposure of infants. In addition, for toddlers, dust has been estimated to account for a large percentage of exposure. PBDEs can also cross the placenta, as they have been detected in fetal blood and liver. Tetra-, penta- and hexa BDEs are most commonly present in human tissues. The current greatest concern for potential adverse effects of PBDEs relates to their developmental neurotoxicity. Pre- or postnatal exposure of mice or rats to various PBDEs has been shown to cause long-lasting changes in spontaneous motor activity, mostly characterized as hyperactivity or decreased habituation, and to disrupt performance in learning and memory tests. While a reduction in circulating thyroid hormone (T4) may contribute to the developmental neurotoxicity of PBDEs, direct effects on the developing brain have also been reported. Among these, PBDEs have been shown to affect signal transduction pathways and to cause oxidative stress. Levels of PBDEs causing developmental neurotoxicity in animals are not much dissimilar from levels found in highly exposed infants and toddlers. PMID:17904639

  16. Dechlorane plus, a chlorinated flame retardant, in the Great Lakes.

    PubMed

    Hoh, Eunha; Zhu, Lingyan; Hites, Ronald A

    2006-02-15

    A highly chlorinated flame retardant, Dechlorane Plus (DP), was detected and identified in ambient air, fish, and sediment samples from the Great Lakes region. The identity of this compound was confirmed by comparing its gas chromatographic retention times and mass spectra with those of authentic material. This compound exists as two gas chromatographically separable stereoisomers (syn and anti), the structures of which were characterized by one- and two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance. DP was detected in most air samples, even at remote sites. The atmospheric DP concentrations were higher at the eastern Great Lakes sites (Sturgeon Point, NY, and Cleveland, OH) than those at the western Great Lakes sites (Eagle Harbor, MI, Chicago, IL, and Sleeping Bear Dunes, MI). Atthe Sturgeon Point site, DP concentrations once reached 490 pg/m3. DP atmospheric concentrations were comparable to those of BDE-209 at the eastern Great Lakes sites. DP was also found in sediment cores from Lakes Michigan and Erie. The peak DP concentrations were comparable to BDE-209 concentrations in the sediment core from Lake Erie butwere about 30 times lower than BDE-209 concentrations in the core from Lake Michigan. In the sediment cores, the DP concentrations peaked around 1975-1980, and the surficial concentrations were 10-80% of peak concentrations. Higher DP concentrations in air samples from Sturgeon Point, NY, and in the sediment core from Lake Erie suggest that DP's manufacturing facility in Niagara Falls, NY, may be a source. DP was also detected in archived fish (walleye) from Lake Erie, suggesting that this compound is, at least partially, bioavailable. PMID:16572773

  17. Exposure to flame retardants in electronics recycling sites.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Christina; Hämeilä, Mervi; Tornaeus, Jarkko; Säkkinen, Kirsi; Puttonen, Katriina; Korpi, Anne; Kiilunen, Mirja; Linnainmaa, Markku; Hesso, Antti

    2011-07-01

    Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) contains various hazardous substances such as flame retardants (FRs). Inhalation exposures to many FRs simultaneously among WEEE recycling site workers have been little studied previously. The breathing zone airborne concentrations of five brominated FR compounds tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBP-A), decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE), hexabromocyclododecane, 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane, hexabromobenzene, and one chlorinated FR (Dechlorane Plus®) were measured at four electronics recycling sites in two consecutive years. In addition, concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polybrominated biphenyls were measured. The three most abundant FRs in personal air samples were PBDEs (comprising mostly of deca-BDE), TBBP-A, and DBDPE, with mean concentrations ranging from 21 to 2320 ng m(-)(3), from 8.7 to 430 ng m(-3), and from 3.5 to 360 ng m(-3), respectively. At two of the sites, the emission control actions (such as improvements in ventilation and its maintenance and changes in cleaning habits) proved successful, the mean levels of FRs in personal samples being 10-68 and 14-79% of those from the previous year or alternatively below the limit of quantification. At the two remaining sites, the reductions in FR exposures were less consistent. The concentrations reported may pose a health hazard to the workers, although evaluation of the association between FR exposure and adverse health effects is hampered by lacking occupational exposure limits. Therefore, the exposures should be minimized by adequate control measures and maintaining good occupational hygiene practice.

  18. Maternal exposure to brominated flame retardants and infant Apgar scores.

    PubMed

    Terrell, Metrecia L; Hartnett, Kathleen P; Lim, Hyeyeun; Wirth, Julie; Marcus, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and other persistent organic pollutants have been associated with adverse health outcomes in humans and may be particularly toxic to the developing fetus. We investigated the association between in utero polybrominated biphenyl (PBB) and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposures and infant Apgar scores in a cohort of Michigan residents exposed to PBB through contaminated food after an industrial accident. PBB and PCB concentrations were measured in serum at the time the women were enrolled in the cohort. PBB concentrations were also estimated at the time of conception for each pregnancy using a validated elimination model. Apgar scores, a universal measure of infant health at birth, measured at 1 and 5min, were taken from birth certificates for 613 offspring born to 330 women. Maternal PCB concentrations at enrollment were not associated with below-median Apgar scores in this cohort. However, maternal PBB exposure was associated with a dose-related increase in the odds of a below-median Apgar score at 1min and 5min. Among infants whose mothers had an estimated PBB at conception above the limit of detection of 1 part per billion (ppb) to <2.5ppb, the odds ratio=2.32 (95% CI: 1.22-4.40); for those with PBB⩾2.5ppb the OR=2.62 (95% CI: 1.38-4.96; test for trend p<0.01). Likewise, the odds of a below-median 5min Apgar score increased with higher maternal PBB at conception. It remains critical that future studies examine possible relationships between in utero exposures to brominated compounds and adverse health outcomes.

  19. Piloted Ignition to Flaming in Smoldering Fire-Retarded Polyurethane Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putzeys, O.; Fernandez-Pello, A. C.; Urban, D. L.

    2007-01-01

    Experimental results are presented on the piloted transition from smoldering to flaming in the fire-retarded polyurethane foam Pyrell . The samples are small rectangular blocks with a square cross section, vertically placed in the wall of a vertical wind tunnel. Three of the vertical sample sides are insulated and the fourth side is exposed to an upward oxidizer flow of variable oxygen concentration and to a variable radiant heat flux. The gases emitted from the smoldering reaction pass upwards through a pilot, which consists of a coiled resistance heating wire. In order to compensate for the solid-phase and gas-phase effects of the fire retardants on the piloted transition from smoldering to flaming in Pyrell, it was necessary to assist the process by increasing the power supplied to the smolder igniter and the pilot (compared to that used for non-fire retarded foam). The experiments indicate that the piloted transition from smoldering to flaming occurs when the gaseous mixture at the pilot passes the lean flammability limit. It was found that increasing the oxygen concentration or the external heat flux increases the likelihood of a piloted transition from smoldering to flaming, and generally decreases the time delay to transition. The piloted transition to flaming is observed in oxygen concentrations of 23% and above in both low-density and high-density Pyrell. Comparisons with previous experiments show that the piloted transition from smoldering to flaming is possible under a wider range of external conditions (i.e. lower oxygen concentration) than the spontaneous transition from smoldering to flaming. The results show that the fire retardants in Pyrell are very effective in preventing the piloted transition to flaming in normal air, but Pyrell is susceptible to smoldering and the piloted transition to flaming in oxygen-enriched environments. Therefore, precautions should be taken in the design of applications of Pyrell in oxygen-enriched environments to reduce

  20. Synthesis of brominated acenaphthylenes and their flame-retardant effects on ethylene-propylene-diene terpolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Y.; Hagiwara, M.

    1982-09-01

    Bromoacenaphthylenes and their condensates as flame-retardant reagents were synthesized by bromination of acenaphthylene using ZnCl/sub 2/ - CF/sub 3/COOH or FeCl/sub 3/ as catalysts and subsequent dehydrobromination. The chief components were identified as bromoacenaphthylene monomers when ZnCl/sub 2/ - CF/sub 3/COOH were used, and as their condensates (mostly trimers) in the case of FeCl/sub 3/. Their performance as flame-retardant reagents for ethylene-propylene-diene terpolymer (EPDM) was evaluated by measuring the oxygen index of finished compounds, and flammability by a vertical flammability test based on UL-94-VO. Both the monomers and the condensates demonstrated high flame-retardant effectiveness. The high efficiency was attributed to their excellent dispersity in the base polymer and their characteristic thermal decomposition behavior. In thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), they decomposed in a very wide range of temperature (ca.200-560/sup 0/C), which covers the decomposition range of EPDM. This was attributed to the existence of bromines of different thermal stabilities in one molecule. This paper is a part of a series of studies to develop new flame retardants which can give high flame retardancy as well as stabilty against ionizing radiation to EPDM.

  1. Urinary biomarkers of flame retardant exposure among collegiate U.S. gymnasts.

    PubMed

    Carignan, Courtney C; Fang, Mingliang; Stapleton, Heather M; Heiger-Bernays, Wendy; McClean, Michael D; Webster, Thomas F

    2016-09-01

    Flame retardants are widely used in polyurethane foam materials including gymnastics safety equipment such as pit cubes and landing mats. We previously reported elevated concentrations of flame retardants in the air and dust of a U.S. gymnastics training facility and elevated PentaBDE in the serum of collegiate gymnasts. Our objective in this pilot study was to compare urinary biomarkers of exposure to other flame retardants and additives of polyurethane foam including tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCIPP), triphenyl phosphate (TPHP) and 2-ethylhexyl- 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EH-TBB) in samples collected from 11 collegiate gymnasts before and after a gymnastics practice (n=53 urine samples total). We identified a 50% increase in the TPHP biomarker (p=0.03) from before to after practice, a non-significant 22% increase in the TDCIPP biomarker (p=0.14) and no change for the EH-TBB biomarker. These preliminary results indicate that the gymnastics training environment can be a source of recreational exposure to flame retardants. Such exposures are likely widespread, as we identified flame retardants in 89% of foam samples collected from gyms across the U.S.

  2. Aluminum hypophosphite microencapsulated to improve its safety and application to flame retardant polyamide 6.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hua; Tang, Gang; Hu, Wei-Zhao; Wang, Bi-Bo; Pan, Ying; Song, Lei; Hu, Yuan

    2015-08-30

    Aluminum hypophosphite (AHP) is an effective phosphorus-containing flame retardant. But AHP also has fire risk that it will decompose and release phosphine which is spontaneously flammable in air and even can form explosive mixtures with air in extreme cases. In this paper, AHP has been microencapsulated by melamine cyanurate (MCA) to prepare microencapsulated aluminum hypophosphite (MCAHP) with the aim of enhancing the fire safety in the procedure of production, storage and use. Meanwhile, MCA was a nitrogen-containing flame retardant that can work with AHP via the nitrogen-phosphorus synergistic effect to show improved flame-retardant property than other capsule materials. After microencapsulation, MCA presented as a protection layer inhibit the degradation of AHP and postpone the generation of phosphine. Furthermore, the phosphine concentration could be effectively diluted by inert decomposition products of MCA. These nonflammable decomposition products of MCA could separate phosphine from air delay the oxidizing reaction with oxygen and decrease the heat release rate, which imply that the fire safety of AHP has been improved. Furthermore, MCAHP was added into polyamide 6 to prepare flame retardant polyamide 6 composites (FR-PA6) which show good flame retardancy.

  3. Aluminum hypophosphite microencapsulated to improve its safety and application to flame retardant polyamide 6.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hua; Tang, Gang; Hu, Wei-Zhao; Wang, Bi-Bo; Pan, Ying; Song, Lei; Hu, Yuan

    2015-08-30

    Aluminum hypophosphite (AHP) is an effective phosphorus-containing flame retardant. But AHP also has fire risk that it will decompose and release phosphine which is spontaneously flammable in air and even can form explosive mixtures with air in extreme cases. In this paper, AHP has been microencapsulated by melamine cyanurate (MCA) to prepare microencapsulated aluminum hypophosphite (MCAHP) with the aim of enhancing the fire safety in the procedure of production, storage and use. Meanwhile, MCA was a nitrogen-containing flame retardant that can work with AHP via the nitrogen-phosphorus synergistic effect to show improved flame-retardant property than other capsule materials. After microencapsulation, MCA presented as a protection layer inhibit the degradation of AHP and postpone the generation of phosphine. Furthermore, the phosphine concentration could be effectively diluted by inert decomposition products of MCA. These nonflammable decomposition products of MCA could separate phosphine from air delay the oxidizing reaction with oxygen and decrease the heat release rate, which imply that the fire safety of AHP has been improved. Furthermore, MCAHP was added into polyamide 6 to prepare flame retardant polyamide 6 composites (FR-PA6) which show good flame retardancy. PMID:25867591

  4. An efficient mono-component polymeric intumescent flame retardant for polypropylene: preparation and application.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhu-Bao; Deng, Cong; Tan, Yi; Chen, Ming-Jun; Chen, Li; Wang, Yu-Zhong

    2014-05-28

    We found in our previous study that ethylenediamine- or ethanolamine-modified ammonium polyphosphates could be used alone as an intumescent flame retardant for polypropylene (PP), but their flame-retardant efficiency was not very high. In this present work, a novel highly-efficient mono-component polymeric intumescent flame retardant, piperazine-modified ammonium polyphosphate (PA-APP) was prepared. The oxygen index value of PP containing 22 wt % of PA-APP reached 31.2%, which increased by 58.4% compared with that of PP with equal amount of APP, and the vertical burning test (UL-94) could pass V-0 rating. Cone calorimeter (CC) results indicated that PP/PA-APP composite exhibited superior performance compared with PP/APP composite. For PP containing 25 wt % of PA-APP, fire growth rate (FGR) and smoke production rate (SPR) peak were reduced by 86.4% and 78.2%, respectively, compared with PP blended with 25 wt % APP. The relevant flame-retardant mechanism of PA-APP was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy etc. The P-N-C structure with the alicyclic amine was formed during the thermal decomposition of piperazine salt (-NH2(+)-O-P-), and the rich P-N-C structure facilitated the formation of stable char layer at the later stage, consequently improving the flame-retardant efficiency of APP. PMID:24742305

  5. An efficient mono-component polymeric intumescent flame retardant for polypropylene: preparation and application.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhu-Bao; Deng, Cong; Tan, Yi; Chen, Ming-Jun; Chen, Li; Wang, Yu-Zhong

    2014-05-28

    We found in our previous study that ethylenediamine- or ethanolamine-modified ammonium polyphosphates could be used alone as an intumescent flame retardant for polypropylene (PP), but their flame-retardant efficiency was not very high. In this present work, a novel highly-efficient mono-component polymeric intumescent flame retardant, piperazine-modified ammonium polyphosphate (PA-APP) was prepared. The oxygen index value of PP containing 22 wt % of PA-APP reached 31.2%, which increased by 58.4% compared with that of PP with equal amount of APP, and the vertical burning test (UL-94) could pass V-0 rating. Cone calorimeter (CC) results indicated that PP/PA-APP composite exhibited superior performance compared with PP/APP composite. For PP containing 25 wt % of PA-APP, fire growth rate (FGR) and smoke production rate (SPR) peak were reduced by 86.4% and 78.2%, respectively, compared with PP blended with 25 wt % APP. The relevant flame-retardant mechanism of PA-APP was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy etc. The P-N-C structure with the alicyclic amine was formed during the thermal decomposition of piperazine salt (-NH2(+)-O-P-), and the rich P-N-C structure facilitated the formation of stable char layer at the later stage, consequently improving the flame-retardant efficiency of APP.

  6. Urinary biomarkers of flame retardant exposure among collegiate U.S. gymnasts.

    PubMed

    Carignan, Courtney C; Fang, Mingliang; Stapleton, Heather M; Heiger-Bernays, Wendy; McClean, Michael D; Webster, Thomas F

    2016-09-01

    Flame retardants are widely used in polyurethane foam materials including gymnastics safety equipment such as pit cubes and landing mats. We previously reported elevated concentrations of flame retardants in the air and dust of a U.S. gymnastics training facility and elevated PentaBDE in the serum of collegiate gymnasts. Our objective in this pilot study was to compare urinary biomarkers of exposure to other flame retardants and additives of polyurethane foam including tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCIPP), triphenyl phosphate (TPHP) and 2-ethylhexyl- 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EH-TBB) in samples collected from 11 collegiate gymnasts before and after a gymnastics practice (n=53 urine samples total). We identified a 50% increase in the TPHP biomarker (p=0.03) from before to after practice, a non-significant 22% increase in the TDCIPP biomarker (p=0.14) and no change for the EH-TBB biomarker. These preliminary results indicate that the gymnastics training environment can be a source of recreational exposure to flame retardants. Such exposures are likely widespread, as we identified flame retardants in 89% of foam samples collected from gyms across the U.S. PMID:27395335

  7. Shuttle Environmental Assurance: Brominated Flame Retardants - Concerns, Drivers, Potential Impacts and Mitigation Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark-Ingram, Marceia

    2010-01-01

    Brominated Flame Retardants (BFRs) are widely used in the manufacture of electrical and electronic components and as additives in formulations for foams, plastics and rubbers. The United States (US) and the European Union (EU)have increased regulation and monitoring of of targeted BFRs, such as Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) due to the bioaccumulative effects in humans and animals. In response, manufacturers and vendors of BFR-containing materials are changing flame-retardant additives, sometimes without notifying BFR users. In some instances, Deca-bromodiphenylether (Deca-BDE) and other families of flame retardants are being used as replacement flame retardants for penta-BDE and octa-BDE. The reformulation of the BFR-containing material typically results in the removal of the targeted PBDE and replacement with a non-PBDE chemical or non-targeted PBDE. Many users of PBDE -based materials are concerned that vendors will perform reformulation and not inform the end user. Materials performance such as flammability, adhesion , and tensile strength may be altered due to reformulation. The requalification of newly formulated materials may be required, or replacement materials may have to be identified and qualified. The Shuttle Enviornmental Assurance (SEA) team indentified a risk to the Space Shuttle Program associated with the possibility that targeted PBDEs may be replaced without notification. Resultant decreases in flame retardancy, Liquid Oxygen (LOX) compatibility, or material performance could have serious consequences.

  8. Eco-friendly finishing agent for cotton fabrics to improve flame retardant and antibacterial properties.

    PubMed

    El-Shafei, A; ElShemy, M; Abou-Okeil, A

    2015-03-15

    This research work deals with flame retardant and antibacterial finishing agent for cellulosic fabrics using TiO2 nanoparticles and chitosan phosphate. TiO2 nanoparticles were prepared by sol-gel method using titanium tetraisopropoxide. The size of TiO2 nanoparticles was characterized using transmission electron microscope (TEM). The application of nano TiO2 onto cellulosic fabrics (cotton 100%) was achieved in presence of polycarboxylic acid [1,2,3,4-butane tetracarboxylic acid (BTCA)] with sodium hypophosphite (SHP) as catalyst and chitosan phosphate through conventional pad-dry-cure method. The effect of the finishing on the physical properties, flammability and antibacterial properties of cross-linked fabrics are investigated. Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) was employed to investigate the thermal decomposition behaviour of the treated samples. Limited oxygen indexes (LOI) of the treated cotton fabrics were investigated. The treated cotton fabric also reveals excellent antibacterial properties. PMID:25542111

  9. Advances in Instrumental Analysis of Brominated Flame Retardants: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This review aims to highlight the recent advances and methodological improvements in instrumental techniques applied for the analysis of different brominated flame retardants (BFRs). The literature search strategy was based on the recent analytical reviews published on BFRs. The main selection criteria involved the successful development and application of analytical methods for determination of the target compounds in various environmental matrices. Different factors affecting chromatographic separation and mass spectrometric detection of brominated analytes were evaluated and discussed. Techniques using advanced instrumentation to achieve outstanding results in quantification of different BFRs and their metabolites/degradation products were highlighted. Finally, research gaps in the field of BFR analysis were identified and recommendations for future research were proposed. PMID:27433482

  10. Oxidation of Flame Retardant Tetrabromobisphenol A by Singlet Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Han, S.-K.; Bilski, P.; Karriker, B.; Sik, R.H.; Chignell, C.F.

    2008-01-01

    Wide use of flame retardants can pose an environmental hazard and it is of interest to investigate how they may degrade. We report here that 3,3′,5,5′-tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is subject to photosensitized oxidation involving singlet molecular oxygen (1O2). By using visible light and Rose Bengal or Methylene Blue as 1O2 photosensitizers, we have found that TBBPA is a 1O2 quencher. The quenching rate constant, kq, depends on TBBPA ionization (pK=7.4). In acetonitrile, where TBBPA is undissociated, the kq value is 6.1×105 M-1s-1 for a TBBPA monomer and decreasing to kq=2.9×104M-1s-1 for TBBPA dimers/aggregates. TBBPA dissociates in aqueous solutions, and its kq value is 1.44×109 M-1s-1 in alkaline solution, decreasing to kq=3.9×108 M-1s-1 at pH 7.2. The strong 1O2 quenching by TBBPA anion initiates an efficient oxidation of TBBPA, which results in oxygen consumption in aqueous micellar (e.g. Triton-X 100) solutions containing photosensitizer. This oxygen consumption is mediated by transient radical species, which we detected by using EPR spectroscopy. We observed two major radicals and one minor radical generated from TBBPA by reaction with 1O2 at pH 10. One was identified as the 2,6-dibromo-p-benzosemiquinone radical (a2H = 2.36 G, g = 2.0056). A second radical (aH = 2.10 G, g = 2.0055) could not be identified but was probably a 2,6-dibromo-p-benzosemiquinone radical containing an EPR silent substituent in the 3-position. Spin trapping with 5,5,-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DPMO) showed that other minor radicals (hydroxyl, carbon centered) are also generated during the reaction of TBBPA with 1O2. The photosensitized production of radicals and oxygen consumption were completely inhibited by the azide anion, an efficient physical 1O2 quencher. Because TBBPA is a stable compound that at neutral pH does not absorb much of the atmosphere-filtered solar radiation, its photosensitized oxidation by 1O2 may be the key reaction initiating/mediating TBBPA

  11. Halogenated flame retardants: do the fire safety benefits justify the risks?

    PubMed

    Shaw, Susan D; Blum, Arlene; Weber, Roland; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Rich, David; Lucas, Donald; Koshland, Catherine P; Dobraca, Dina; Hanson, Sarah; Birnbaum, Linda S

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1970s, an increasing number of regulations have expanded the use of brominated and chlorinated flame retardants. Many of these chemicals are now recognized as global contaminants and are associated with adverse health effects in animals and humans, including endocrine and thyroid disruption, immunotoxicity, reproductive toxicity, cancer, and adverse effects on fetal and child development and neurologic function. Some flame retardants such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been banned or voluntarily phased out by manufacturers because of their environmental persistence and toxicity, only to be replaced by other organohalogens of unknown toxicity. Despite restrictions on further production in some countries, consumer products previously treated with banned retardants are still in use and continue to release toxic chemicals into the environment, and the worldwide use of organohalogen retardants continues to increase. This paper examines major uses and known toxic effects of commonly-used organohalogen flame retardants, replacements for those that have been phased out, their combustion by-products, and their effectiveness at reducing fire hazard. Policy and other solutions to maintain fire safety while reducing toxicity are suggested. The major conclusions are: (1) Flammability regulations can cause greater adverse environmental and health impacts than fire safety benefits. (2) The current options for end-of-life disposal of products treated with organohalogens retardants are problematic. (3) Life-cycle analyses evaluating benefits and risks should consider the health and environmental effects of the chemicals, as well as their fire safety impacts. (4) Most fire deaths and most fire injuries result from inhaling carbon monoxide, irritant gases, and soot. The incorporation of organohalogens can increase the yield of these toxic by-products during combustion. (5) Fire-safe cigarettes, fire-safe candles, child-resistant lighters, sprinklers, and

  12. Halogenated flame retardants: do the fire safety benefits justify the risks?

    PubMed

    Shaw, Susan D; Blum, Arlene; Weber, Roland; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Rich, David; Lucas, Donald; Koshland, Catherine P; Dobraca, Dina; Hanson, Sarah; Birnbaum, Linda S

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1970s, an increasing number of regulations have expanded the use of brominated and chlorinated flame retardants. Many of these chemicals are now recognized as global contaminants and are associated with adverse health effects in animals and humans, including endocrine and thyroid disruption, immunotoxicity, reproductive toxicity, cancer, and adverse effects on fetal and child development and neurologic function. Some flame retardants such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been banned or voluntarily phased out by manufacturers because of their environmental persistence and toxicity, only to be replaced by other organohalogens of unknown toxicity. Despite restrictions on further production in some countries, consumer products previously treated with banned retardants are still in use and continue to release toxic chemicals into the environment, and the worldwide use of organohalogen retardants continues to increase. This paper examines major uses and known toxic effects of commonly-used organohalogen flame retardants, replacements for those that have been phased out, their combustion by-products, and their effectiveness at reducing fire hazard. Policy and other solutions to maintain fire safety while reducing toxicity are suggested. The major conclusions are: (1) Flammability regulations can cause greater adverse environmental and health impacts than fire safety benefits. (2) The current options for end-of-life disposal of products treated with organohalogens retardants are problematic. (3) Life-cycle analyses evaluating benefits and risks should consider the health and environmental effects of the chemicals, as well as their fire safety impacts. (4) Most fire deaths and most fire injuries result from inhaling carbon monoxide, irritant gases, and soot. The incorporation of organohalogens can increase the yield of these toxic by-products during combustion. (5) Fire-safe cigarettes, fire-safe candles, child-resistant lighters, sprinklers, and

  13. Size-exclusion simulated moving bed for separating organophosphorus flame retardants from a polymer.

    PubMed

    Weeden, George S; Ling, Lei; Soepriatna, Nicholas H; Wang, Nien-Hwa Linda

    2015-11-27

    Over 500,000t of flame retardants in electronic wastes are consigned to landfills each year. A room-temperature, size-exclusion simulated moving bed (SEC-SMB) was developed to recover high purity (>99%) flame retardants with high yield (>99%). The SSWD method for ternary mixtures was developed for SEC-SMB. Fourteen decision variables were optimized to obtain the lowest separation cost within 1min. The estimated cost is less than 10% of the purchase cost of the flame retardants. The estimated cost of the optimized SEC-SMB is less than 3% of that of a conventional batch SEC processes. Fast start-up methods were developed to reduce the SMB start-up time by more than 18-fold. SEC-SMB can be an economical method for separating small molecules from polymers.

  14. Irradiation crosslinking and halogen-free flame retardation of EVA using hydrotalcite and red phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Chuanmei; Wang, Zhengzhou; Chen, Xilei; Yu, Benyi; Hu, Yuan

    2006-05-01

    Halogen-free flame retarded ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) composites using Mg-Al-CO 3 hydrotalcite (MALDH) and microcapsulated red phosphorus (MRP) have been prepared in a melt process. The flame retardation of the composites has been studied by the limited oxygen index (LOI) and UL-94 methods, and the thermal decomposition by the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The changes of their properties of the composites before and after the Gamma irradiation are compared. The synergistic effect in the flame retardation between MALDH and MRP in EVA has been found. The EVA/MALDH/MRP composites after the irradiation crosslinking result in a great increase in the Vicat softening point. The LOI value, the mechanical properties and thermal stability are also improved for the composites irradiated by a suitable irradiation dose.

  15. Lithium-Ion Electrolytes Containing Flame Retardant Additives for Increased Safety Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C. (Inventor); Smith, Kiah A. (Inventor); Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor); Prakash, Surya G. (Inventor); Krause, Frederick Charles (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The invention discloses various embodiments of Li-ion electrolytes containing flame retardant additives that have delivered good performance over a wide temperature range, good cycle life characteristics, and improved safety characteristics, namely, reduced flammability. In one embodiment of the invention there is provided an electrolyte for use in a lithium-ion electrochemical cell, the electrolyte comprising a mixture of an ethylene carbonate (EC), an ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), a fluorinated co-solvent, a flame retardant additive, and a lithium salt. In another embodiment of the invention there is provided an electrolyte for use in a lithium-ion electrochemical cell, the electrolyte comprising a mixture of an ethylene carbonate (EC), an ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), a flame retardant additive, a solid electrolyte interface (SEI) film forming agent, and a lithium salt.

  16. Organophosphate flame retardants in household dust before and after introduction of new furniture.

    PubMed

    Keimowitz, A R; Strunsky, N; Wovkulich, K

    2016-04-01

    Flame retardant compounds originating from household items collect in household dust, a reasonable proxy for human exposure. Contributions of specific items or behaviors to dust are difficult to separate. This study examined standardized college housing before and after the introduction of new, flame retardant couches in order to explore any effect that changing upholstered furniture may have on flame retardant concentrations in dust. Two contradictory hypotheses were posited: (1) that new furniture might increase flame retardant releases immediately after introduction due to initial off-gassing of new materials or (2) that older furniture would release more flame retardants due to mechanical breakdown of polyurethane foam. This study was designed to determine which of these processes dominated. Prior to the introduction of new furniture, TDCIPP was detected in 12/20 samples at a median concentration of 22 μg/g and TCEP was detected in 1/20 samples at a concentration of 16 μg/g. TDCIPP and TCEP were not detected in any samples (N = 29) after the introduction of new couches. TPHP was detected both before (in 11/20 samples) and after (in 5/29 samples) introduction of new couches; the median concentrations before and after were 63 ± 49 and 16 ± 11 μg/g (standard deviation shown). Introduced couches contained TDCIPP (and not TPHP) at ∼1.25% (w/w). These data support the second hypothesis and indicate that removal of older furniture decreases TDCIPP and TCEP concentrations in dust and may potentially reduce total flame retardant concentrations in dust, at least immediately after introduction of the new furniture. PMID:26841288

  17. Organophosphate flame retardants in household dust before and after introduction of new furniture.

    PubMed

    Keimowitz, A R; Strunsky, N; Wovkulich, K

    2016-04-01

    Flame retardant compounds originating from household items collect in household dust, a reasonable proxy for human exposure. Contributions of specific items or behaviors to dust are difficult to separate. This study examined standardized college housing before and after the introduction of new, flame retardant couches in order to explore any effect that changing upholstered furniture may have on flame retardant concentrations in dust. Two contradictory hypotheses were posited: (1) that new furniture might increase flame retardant releases immediately after introduction due to initial off-gassing of new materials or (2) that older furniture would release more flame retardants due to mechanical breakdown of polyurethane foam. This study was designed to determine which of these processes dominated. Prior to the introduction of new furniture, TDCIPP was detected in 12/20 samples at a median concentration of 22 μg/g and TCEP was detected in 1/20 samples at a concentration of 16 μg/g. TDCIPP and TCEP were not detected in any samples (N = 29) after the introduction of new couches. TPHP was detected both before (in 11/20 samples) and after (in 5/29 samples) introduction of new couches; the median concentrations before and after were 63 ± 49 and 16 ± 11 μg/g (standard deviation shown). Introduced couches contained TDCIPP (and not TPHP) at ∼1.25% (w/w). These data support the second hypothesis and indicate that removal of older furniture decreases TDCIPP and TCEP concentrations in dust and may potentially reduce total flame retardant concentrations in dust, at least immediately after introduction of the new furniture.

  18. Using silicone wristbands to evaluate preschool children's exposure to flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Kile, Molly L; Scott, Richard P; O'Connell, Steven G; Lipscomb, Shannon; MacDonald, Megan; McClelland, Megan; Anderson, Kim A

    2016-05-01

    Silicone wristbands can be used as passive sampling tools for measuring personal environmental exposure to organic compounds. Due to the lightweight and simple design, the wristband may be a useful technique for measuring children's exposure. In this study, we tested the stability of flame retardant compounds in silicone wristbands and developed an analytical approach for measuring 41 flame retardants in the silicone wristband in order to evaluate exposure to these compounds in preschool-aged children. To evaluate the robustness of using wristbands to measure flame retardants, we evaluated the stability of 3 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (BDEs), and 2 organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) in wristbands over 84 days and did not find any evidence of significant loss over time at either 4 or -20°C (p>0.16). We recruited a cohort of 92 preschool aged children in Oregon to wear the wristband for 7 days in order to characterize children's acceptance of the technology, and to characterize their exposure to flame retardants. Seventy-seven parents returned the wristbands for analysis of 35 BDEs, 4 OPFRs, and 2 other brominated flame retardants although 5 were excluded from the exposure assessment due to protocol deviations (n=72). A total of 20 compounds were detected above the limit of quantitation, and 11 compounds including 4 OPFRs and 7 BDEs were detected in over 60% of the samples. Children's gender, age, race, recruitment site, and family context were not significantly associated with returning wristbands or compliance with protocols. Comparisons between flame retardant data and socio-demographic information revealed significant differences in total exposures to both ΣBDEs and ΣOPFRs based on age of house, vacuuming frequency, and family context. These results demonstrate that preschool children in Oregon are exposed to BDEs that are no longer being produced in the United States and to OPFRs that have been used as an alternative to polybrominated compounds

  19. Using silicone wristbands to evaluate preschool children's exposure to flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Kile, Molly L; Scott, Richard P; O'Connell, Steven G; Lipscomb, Shannon; MacDonald, Megan; McClelland, Megan; Anderson, Kim A

    2016-05-01

    Silicone wristbands can be used as passive sampling tools for measuring personal environmental exposure to organic compounds. Due to the lightweight and simple design, the wristband may be a useful technique for measuring children's exposure. In this study, we tested the stability of flame retardant compounds in silicone wristbands and developed an analytical approach for measuring 41 flame retardants in the silicone wristband in order to evaluate exposure to these compounds in preschool-aged children. To evaluate the robustness of using wristbands to measure flame retardants, we evaluated the stability of 3 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (BDEs), and 2 organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) in wristbands over 84 days and did not find any evidence of significant loss over time at either 4 or -20°C (p>0.16). We recruited a cohort of 92 preschool aged children in Oregon to wear the wristband for 7 days in order to characterize children's acceptance of the technology, and to characterize their exposure to flame retardants. Seventy-seven parents returned the wristbands for analysis of 35 BDEs, 4 OPFRs, and 2 other brominated flame retardants although 5 were excluded from the exposure assessment due to protocol deviations (n=72). A total of 20 compounds were detected above the limit of quantitation, and 11 compounds including 4 OPFRs and 7 BDEs were detected in over 60% of the samples. Children's gender, age, race, recruitment site, and family context were not significantly associated with returning wristbands or compliance with protocols. Comparisons between flame retardant data and socio-demographic information revealed significant differences in total exposures to both ΣBDEs and ΣOPFRs based on age of house, vacuuming frequency, and family context. These results demonstrate that preschool children in Oregon are exposed to BDEs that are no longer being produced in the United States and to OPFRs that have been used as an alternative to polybrominated compounds

  20. Enhanced flame retardant property of fiber reactive halogen-free organophosphonate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this paper, we studied the synthesis, characterization, and flammability of the water-soluble, non-halogenated organophosphorus flame retardant (FR), dimethyl-[1,3,5-(3,5-triacryloylhexahydro)triazinyl]-3-oxopropylphosphonate, for application to cotton farbics. The FR was synthesized in a one-st...

  1. Green application of flame retardant cotton fabric using supercritical carbon dioxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to its environmentally benign character, supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) is considered in green chemistry as a substitute for organic solvents in chemical reactions. In this poster, an innovative approach for preparation of flame retardant woven and nonwoven fabrics were obtained by utiliz...

  2. Assessing in-vitro estrogenic effects of currently-used flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Krivoshiev, Boris V; Dardenne, Freddy; Covaci, Adrian; Blust, Ronny; Husson, Steven J

    2016-06-01

    Flame retardants are chemicals that are added to nearly all manufactured materials. Additionally, there has been a steady increase in diseases resulting from endocrine-disruption with an aligned increase in use of chemicals. Given the persistence, potential bioaccumulation, limited toxicological understanding, and vast use of flame retardants, there is a need to investigate potential endocrine-disruptive activity associated with these compounds in an effort for better risk assessment. We therefore used the MCF-7 flow-cytometric proliferation assay in an effort to establish potential estrogen-disrupting effects of twelve currently-used flame retardants. Triphenyl phosphate, tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate, tris(butyl) phosphate, hexabromocyclododecane, and tetrabromobisphenol A showed statistically significant estrogenic activity, with hexabromocyclododecane being the most potent of the five (EC20 of 5.5 μM). Tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate, tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate, tri(2-chloroethyl) phosphate, tris(butyl) phosphate, hexabromocyclododecane, tetrabromobisphenol A, and tris(2,3,-dibromopropyl) isocyanurate harboured anti-estrogenic activity when co-treating with 17β-estradiol, with hexabromocyclododecane showing the highest potency (IC20 of 17.6 μM). Interestingly, some compounds showed both estrogenic and anti-estrogenic effects, indicating both receptor-dependant and -independent mechanisms attributed to some of these compounds, in line with other studies. Multiple currently-used flame retardants may therefore act as xenoestrogens and anti-estrogens, or alter estrogen homeostasis, which could affect endocrine function.

  3. Effects of Organophosphorus Flame Retardants on Spontaneous Activity in Neuronal Networks Grown on Microelectrode Arrays

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF ORGANOPHOSPHORUS FLAME RETARDANTS ON SPONTANEOUS ACTIVITY IN NEURONAL NETWORKS GROWN ON MICROELECTRODE ARRAYS TJ Shafer1, K Wallace1, WR Mundy1, M Behl2,. 1Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, NHEERL, USEPA, RTP, NC, USA, 2National Toxicology Program, NIEHS, RTP, NC...

  4. BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS: WHAT WE KNOW, AND WHAT WE DON�T

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) represent a large and diverse class of high volume industrial chemicals which have been developed to provide fire safety. There are many other BFRs which have been used and are under development. Historically, polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) w...

  5. Flame-retardant contamination of firefighter personal protective clothing - A potential health risk for firefighters.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Barbara M; Baxter, C Stuart

    2016-09-01

    There is a high incidence of cardiovascular disease and certain cancers in firefighters that may be related to their occupational exposure to hazardous substances. Exposure may result from contaminated personal protective gear, as well as from direct exposure at fire scenes. This study characterized flame-retardant contamination on firefighter personal protective clothing to assess exposure of firefighters to these chemicals. Samples from used and unused firefighter protective clothing, including gloves, hoods and a coat wristlet, were extracted with methylene chloride and analyzed by EPA method 8270D Specific Ion Method (SIM) for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Until recently PBDEs were some of the most common flame-retardant chemicals used in the US. Fifteen of the seventeen PBDEs for which analysis was performed were found on at least one clothing swatch. Every clothing sample, including an unused hood and all three layers of an unused glove, held a detectable concentration of at least one PBDE. These findings, along with previous research, suggest that firefighters are exposed to PBDE flame retardants at levels much higher than the general public. PBDEs are found widely dispersed in the environment and still persist in existing domestic materials such as clothing and furnishings. Firefighter exposure to flame retardants therefore merits further study.

  6. Effects of brominated flame retardants on calcium buffering mechanisms in rat brain in vitro.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs; used as additive flame-retardants) have been detected in human blood, adipose tissue, and breast milk. Developmental and long-term exposures to these chemicals may pose a human health risk, especially to children. It has been demonstrated th...

  7. TOXICOKINETICS OF THE FLAME RETARDANT HEXABROMOCYCLODODECANE GAMMA: EFFECT OF DOSE, TIMING, ROUTE, REPEATED EXPOSURE AND METABOLISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    1,2,5,6,9,10-Hexabromocyc1ododecane-gamma (y-HBCD) is the predominate diastereoisomer in the commercial HBCD mixture used as a flame retardant in a wide variety of consumer products. Three main diastereoisomers, alpha (a), beta (B) and gamma (y) comprise the commercial mixture. D...

  8. Flame-retardant contamination of firefighter personal protective clothing - A potential health risk for firefighters.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Barbara M; Baxter, C Stuart

    2016-09-01

    There is a high incidence of cardiovascular disease and certain cancers in firefighters that may be related to their occupational exposure to hazardous substances. Exposure may result from contaminated personal protective gear, as well as from direct exposure at fire scenes. This study characterized flame-retardant contamination on firefighter personal protective clothing to assess exposure of firefighters to these chemicals. Samples from used and unused firefighter protective clothing, including gloves, hoods and a coat wristlet, were extracted with methylene chloride and analyzed by EPA method 8270D Specific Ion Method (SIM) for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Until recently PBDEs were some of the most common flame-retardant chemicals used in the US. Fifteen of the seventeen PBDEs for which analysis was performed were found on at least one clothing swatch. Every clothing sample, including an unused hood and all three layers of an unused glove, held a detectable concentration of at least one PBDE. These findings, along with previous research, suggest that firefighters are exposed to PBDE flame retardants at levels much higher than the general public. PBDEs are found widely dispersed in the environment and still persist in existing domestic materials such as clothing and furnishings. Firefighter exposure to flame retardants therefore merits further study. PMID:27171467

  9. A CASE STUDY ON THE RISKS AND BENEFITS OF DECABDE, A MAJOR BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a proposal for a roundtable presentation at the 2008 Society of Toxicology Annual Meeting. ABSTRACT BODY: Decabromodiphenyl ether (DecaBDE) is a high production volume chemical used as a flame retardant in a variety of consumer applications; examples of uses in h...

  10. Thermal decomposition reactions of cotton fabric treated with piperazine-phosphonates derivatives as a flame retardant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There has been a great scientific interest in exploring the great potential of the piperazine-phosphonates in flame retardant (FR) application on cotton fabric by investigating the thermal decomposition of cotton fabric treated with them. This research tries to understand the mode of action of the t...

  11. Flame Retardant Behavior of Polyelectrolyte-Clay Thin Film Assemblies on Cotton Fabric

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fabric was treated with flame-retardant coatings composed of branched polyethylenimine (BPEI) and sodium montmorillonite (MMT) clay, prepared via layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly. Four coating recipes were created by exposing fabric to aqueous solutions of BPEI (pH 7 or 10) and MMT(0.2 or 1 wt. ...

  12. Toxicokinetics of the Flame Retardant Hexabromocylodecane alpha: Effect of dose, timing, route, repeated exposure and metabolism

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alpha-hexabromocyclododecane (a-HBCD) is an emerging persistent organic pollutant present in the hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) commercial mixture. HBCD is used as an additive flame retardant in a wide variety of household consumer products. Three main stereoisomers, alpha (a), be...

  13. Innovative layer-by-layer processing for flame retardant behavior of cotton fabric

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flame retardant behavior has been prepared by the layer-by layer assemblies of kaolin/casein with inorganic chemicals on cotton fabrics. Three different kinds of cotton fabrics (print cloth, mercerized print cloth, and mercerized twill fabric) were prepared with solutions of mixture of BPEI, urea, ...

  14. Influence of N-P base fiber reactive organophosphorus flame retardant on cotton thermal behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An efficient synergistic effect between a nitrogen-containing organophosphorus compound in the presence of a catalytic amount of chlorine is proposed based on the cyanuric chloride-linked organophosphorus flame retardant, tetraethyl-2,2'-(6-chloro-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diyl)bis(azanediyl)bis(ethane-2,1...

  15. Structural effect of phosphorous-nitrogen containing flame retardant derivatives on thermal behaviors of treated cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present research is aimed at studying the structural effect of two phosphoramidate derivatives such as Diethyl 3-hydroxypropylphosphoramidate and Dimethyl 3-hydroxypropylphosphoramidate as flame retardants (FRs) for cotton. These FRs were obtained in very high yield and purity by one step proced...

  16. Statewide surveillance of halogenated flame retardants in fish in Illinois, USA.

    PubMed

    Widelka, Margaret; Lydy, Michael J; Wu, Yan; Chen, Da

    2016-07-01

    In order to better understand the exposure of aquatic systems to halogenated flame retardant contaminants, the present study investigated a variety of legacy and emerging flame retardants in common carp and largemouth bass collected from 58 stations across Illinois (United States). The data revealed that polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) generally dominated the flame retardant residues in Illinois fish. Concentrations of ΣPBDEs (including all detectable PBDE congeners) ranged from 24.7 to 8270 ng/g lipid weight (median: 135 ng/g lw) in common carp and 15-3870 ng/g lw (median: 360 ng/g lw) in largemouth bass. In addition to PBDEs, Dechlorane analogues (i.e. Dec-603, Dec-604, and Chlordane Plus) were also frequently detected. Median concentrations of ΣDechloranes (including all detected Dechlorane analogues) were 34.4 and 23.3 ng/g lw in common carp and largemouth bass, respectively. Other emerging flame retardants, including tetrabromo-o-chlorotoluene (TBCT), hexabromobenzene (HBBZ), 2-ethylhexyltetrabromobenzoate (EH-TBB), and bis(2-ethylhexyl)-3,4,5,6-tetrabromo-phthalate (BEH-TEBP), were also detected in 40-78% of the fish at the monitored stations. Spatial analysis revealed significantly greater PBDE concentrations in fish living in impaired urban streams and lakes compared to those from the impaired agricultural and unimpaired agricultural/urban waters, demonstrating a significant urban influence on PBDE contamination. Future studies and environmental monitoring are recommended to focus on temporal trends of PBDEs and alternative flame retardants, as well as human exposure risks via edible fishes, in the identified Areas of Concern within Illinois.

  17. Statewide surveillance of halogenated flame retardants in fish in Illinois, USA.

    PubMed

    Widelka, Margaret; Lydy, Michael J; Wu, Yan; Chen, Da

    2016-07-01

    In order to better understand the exposure of aquatic systems to halogenated flame retardant contaminants, the present study investigated a variety of legacy and emerging flame retardants in common carp and largemouth bass collected from 58 stations across Illinois (United States). The data revealed that polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) generally dominated the flame retardant residues in Illinois fish. Concentrations of ΣPBDEs (including all detectable PBDE congeners) ranged from 24.7 to 8270 ng/g lipid weight (median: 135 ng/g lw) in common carp and 15-3870 ng/g lw (median: 360 ng/g lw) in largemouth bass. In addition to PBDEs, Dechlorane analogues (i.e. Dec-603, Dec-604, and Chlordane Plus) were also frequently detected. Median concentrations of ΣDechloranes (including all detected Dechlorane analogues) were 34.4 and 23.3 ng/g lw in common carp and largemouth bass, respectively. Other emerging flame retardants, including tetrabromo-o-chlorotoluene (TBCT), hexabromobenzene (HBBZ), 2-ethylhexyltetrabromobenzoate (EH-TBB), and bis(2-ethylhexyl)-3,4,5,6-tetrabromo-phthalate (BEH-TEBP), were also detected in 40-78% of the fish at the monitored stations. Spatial analysis revealed significantly greater PBDE concentrations in fish living in impaired urban streams and lakes compared to those from the impaired agricultural and unimpaired agricultural/urban waters, demonstrating a significant urban influence on PBDE contamination. Future studies and environmental monitoring are recommended to focus on temporal trends of PBDEs and alternative flame retardants, as well as human exposure risks via edible fishes, in the identified Areas of Concern within Illinois. PMID:27131823

  18. A novel reutilization method for waste printed circuit boards as flame retardant and smoke suppressant for poly (vinyl chloride).

    PubMed

    Xiu, Fu-Rong; Weng, Huiwei; Qi, Yingying; Yu, Gending; Zhang, Zhigang; Zhang, Fu-Shen

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a novel reutilization method for waste printed circuit boards (PCBs) as flame retardant and smoke suppressant for poly (vinyl chloride) (PVC) was successfully testified. A supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) process was applied to treat waste PCBs before they could be used as flame retardants of PVC. The results indicated that SCWO conditions had a significant effect on the flame retarding and smoke suppressing properties of waste PCBs for PVC. Cu2O, CuO, and SnO2 were the main active ingredients in waste PCBs-derived flame retardants. A conversion of Cu elements (Cu(0)→Cu(+)→Cu(2+)) during SCWO process with the increase of reaction temperature was found to be the key influence factor for the flame retarding properties of SCWO-treated PCBs. The experiment results also showed that there was a synergistic effect of flame retardancy between Cu(+) and Cu(2+). After the optimized SCWO treatment, SCWO-treated PCBs significantly improved the flame retardancy and smoke suppression of PVC. Limiting oxygen index (LOI) and char yield (CY) increased with increasing SCWO-treated PCBs content in PVC, while smoke density rating (SDR) and maximum smoke density (MSD) decreased markedly. The mechanical properties of PVC samples were influenced in different degree by adding different content SCWO-treated PCBs. PMID:27179704

  19. A novel reutilization method for waste printed circuit boards as flame retardant and smoke suppressant for poly (vinyl chloride).

    PubMed

    Xiu, Fu-Rong; Weng, Huiwei; Qi, Yingying; Yu, Gending; Zhang, Zhigang; Zhang, Fu-Shen

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a novel reutilization method for waste printed circuit boards (PCBs) as flame retardant and smoke suppressant for poly (vinyl chloride) (PVC) was successfully testified. A supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) process was applied to treat waste PCBs before they could be used as flame retardants of PVC. The results indicated that SCWO conditions had a significant effect on the flame retarding and smoke suppressing properties of waste PCBs for PVC. Cu2O, CuO, and SnO2 were the main active ingredients in waste PCBs-derived flame retardants. A conversion of Cu elements (Cu(0)→Cu(+)→Cu(2+)) during SCWO process with the increase of reaction temperature was found to be the key influence factor for the flame retarding properties of SCWO-treated PCBs. The experiment results also showed that there was a synergistic effect of flame retardancy between Cu(+) and Cu(2+). After the optimized SCWO treatment, SCWO-treated PCBs significantly improved the flame retardancy and smoke suppression of PVC. Limiting oxygen index (LOI) and char yield (CY) increased with increasing SCWO-treated PCBs content in PVC, while smoke density rating (SDR) and maximum smoke density (MSD) decreased markedly. The mechanical properties of PVC samples were influenced in different degree by adding different content SCWO-treated PCBs.

  20. Detection of Organophosphate Flame Retardants in Furniture Foam and US House Dust

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Heather M.; Klosterhaus, Susan; Eagle, Sarah; Fuh, Jennifer; Meeker, John D.; Blum, Arlene; Webster, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    Restrictions on the use of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have resulted in the increased use of alternate flame retardant chemicals to meet flammability standards. However, it has been difficult to determine which chemical formulations are currently being used in high volumes to meet flammability standards since the use of flame retardant formulations in consumer products is not transparent (i.e. not provided to customers). To investigate chemicals being used as replacements for PentaBDE in polyurethane foam, we analyzed foam samples from 26 different pieces of furniture purchased in the United States primarily between 2003 and 2009 using gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Samples included foam from couches, chairs, mattress pads, pillows, and, in one case, foam from a sound proofing system of a laboratory grade dust sieve. Fifteen of the foam samples contained the flame retardant tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP; 1–5% by weight), four samples contained tris(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP; 0.5 –2.2 % by weight), one sample contained brominated chemicals found in a new flame retardant mixture called Firemaster 550 (4.2% by weight), and one foam sample collected from a futon likely purchased prior to 2004 contained PentaBDE (0.5% by weight). Due to the high frequency of detection of the chlorinated phosphate compounds in furniture foam, we analyzed extracts from 50 house dust samples collected between 2002 and 2007 in the Boston, MA area for TDCPP, TCPP, and another high volume use organophosphate-based flame retardant used in foam, triphenylphosphate (TPP). Detection frequencies for TDCPP and TPP in the dust samples were >96% and were log normally distributed, similar to observations for PBDEs. TCPP was positively detected in dust in only 24% of the samples, but detection was significantly limited by a co-elution problem. The geometric mean concentrations for TCPP, TDCPP and TPP in house dust were 570, 1890, and 7360 ng/g, respectively

  1. Flame retardants in the indoor environment -- Part II: release of VOCs (triethylphosphate and halogenated degradation products) from polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Salthammer, T; Fuhrmann, F; Uhde, E

    2003-03-01

    Organophosphate esters, halogenated and non-halogenated, are frequently used for fire protection of building materials. With regard to toxicological profiles it is desired to avoid human exposure in the indoor environment. Moreover, some hazardous volatile organic compounds detected in indoor air are directly linked to the utilization of flame retardants. In this study, different polyurethane (PUR) products for building and indoor use treated with organophosphate flame retardants were tested in 1 m(3) emission test chambers. Emissions of flame retardants and degradation products were measured under living conditions. A PUR hard foam sample showed area-specific emission rates >100 microg/m(2) h for the compound triethylphosphate. During the tests several chlorinated degradation products of organophophorous flame retardants could be identified in the chamber air. PMID:12608925

  2. Phosphoryl-rich flame-retardant ions (FRIONs): towards safer lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Rectenwald, Michael F; Gaffen, Joshua R; Rheingold, Arnold L; Morgan, Alexander B; Protasiewicz, John D

    2014-04-14

    The functionalized catecholate, tetraethyl (2,3-dihydroxy-1,4-phenylene)bis(phosphonate) (H2 -DPC), has been used to prepare a series of lithium salts Li[B(DPC)(oxalato)], Li[B(DPC)2], Li[B(DPC)F2], and Li[P(DPC)3]. The phosphoryl-rich character of these anions was designed to impart flame-retardant properties for their use as potential flame-retardant ions (FRIONs), additives, or replacements for other lithium salts for safer lithium-ion batteries. The new materials were fully characterized, and the single-crystal structures of Li[B(DPC)(oxalato)] and Li[P(DPC)3] have been determined. Thermogravimetric analysis of the four lithium salts show that they are thermally stable up to around 200 °C. Pyrolysis combustion flow calorimetry reveals that these salts produce high char yields upon combustion.

  3. Phosphoryl-rich flame-retardant ions (FRIONs): towards safer lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Rectenwald, Michael F; Gaffen, Joshua R; Rheingold, Arnold L; Morgan, Alexander B; Protasiewicz, John D

    2014-04-14

    The functionalized catecholate, tetraethyl (2,3-dihydroxy-1,4-phenylene)bis(phosphonate) (H2 -DPC), has been used to prepare a series of lithium salts Li[B(DPC)(oxalato)], Li[B(DPC)2], Li[B(DPC)F2], and Li[P(DPC)3]. The phosphoryl-rich character of these anions was designed to impart flame-retardant properties for their use as potential flame-retardant ions (FRIONs), additives, or replacements for other lithium salts for safer lithium-ion batteries. The new materials were fully characterized, and the single-crystal structures of Li[B(DPC)(oxalato)] and Li[P(DPC)3] have been determined. Thermogravimetric analysis of the four lithium salts show that they are thermally stable up to around 200 °C. Pyrolysis combustion flow calorimetry reveals that these salts produce high char yields upon combustion. PMID:24615890

  4. Diphenyloctyl phosphate as a flame-retardant additive in electrolyte for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Eun-Gi; Nam, Tae-Heum; Kim, Jung-Gu; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Moon, Seong-In

    The use of diphenyloctyl phosphate (DPOF) as a flame-retardant additive in liquid electrolyte for Li-ion batteries is investigated. Mesocarbon microbeads (MCMB) and LiCoO 2 are used as the anode and cathode materials, respectively. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used for the analyses. The cell with DPOF shows better electrochemical cell performance than that without DPOF in initial charge/discharge and rate performance tests. In cycling tests, a cell with DPOF-containing electrolyte exhibited better discharge capacity and capacity retention than that of the DPOF-free electrolyte after cycling. These results confirm the viability of using DPOF as a flame-retardant additive for improving the cell performance and thermal stability of electrolytes for Li-ion batteries.

  5. Flame retardant brominated styrene-based polymers. VI. Synthesis and characterization of dibromostyrene graft latices

    SciTech Connect

    Favstritsky, N.A.; Wang, J.L.

    1995-12-01

    Nine dibromostyrene-grafted commercial lattices were prepared in 8 oz bottles by an emulsion polymerization technique. Proper selection of lattices used in conjunction with the dibromostyrene monomer enables production of flame retardant latex products useful in a wide range of coating applications. The prime factor to be considered in the choice of a latex or a latex mixture to be grafted is the glass transition temperature(s) of the polymer(s) in the final latex desired. Lattices chosen for grafting are commercial lattices, such as Rhoplex HA-24 and HA-8, Hystretch V-29, Airflex 465, 4500, 4514 and 4530, Pliolite SBR latex and polybutadiene latex. The graft latex was characterized in terms of glass transition temperature, solids content, bromine content, grafted dibromostyrene and flame retardancy.

  6. Flame retardancy and thermal stability of polyurethane foam composites containing carbon additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Pyoung-Chan; Kim, Bo-Ram; Jeoung, Sun Kyoung; Lee, Geesoo; Han, San Wook; Kim, Hyunchul; Lee, Ki-Dong; Han, Joo-Kwon

    2016-03-01

    Polyurethane (PU) is an important class of polymers that have wide application in a number of different industrial sectors. The goal of this work was the synthesis of flame-retarded PU foam with expandable graphite (EG) or commercial graphene. The flame retardancy and thermal stability of the foams has been studied through cone calorimeter analysis, the limited oxygen index and thermal conductivity. The presence of expandable graphite brings an improvement in fire behavior. In particular, the limited oxygen index increases in a linear way and the highest limited oxygen index values are obtained for EG-PU foams. The results from the cone calorimeter are in agreement with those of oxygen index; EG filled foams show a considerable decrease of maximum-heat release rate (M-HRR) with respect to unfilled foams. The results of thermal conductivity show that an increase in expandable graphite amount in PU foams lead to an increased conductivity.

  7. Influence of intumescent flame retardant and sepiolite on the mechanical and rheological behavior of polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, Salvatore; Acierno, Domenico; Russo, Pietro

    2016-05-01

    The mechanical and dynamic-mechanical properties and the capillary rheological behavior of polypropylene (PP) containing an intumescent flame retardant and sepiolite nanoparticles are investigated. Previous studies demonstrated that the combination of 0.5 wt% of organically modified sepiolite (OSEP) with 12 wt% of flame retardant (ET) allows to obtain interesting fire properties. In this study it is shown that such combination also ensure an improvement of the mechanical properties with respect to both the neat resin and the corresponding binary formulations. This result may be related to the higher degree of crystallinity observed for this ternary formulation by DSC characterization. This advantages are obtained without worsening the processability of the hosting matrix.

  8. Study of a novel phosphorus-containing flame retardant for cotton fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, W. W.; Lu, Y. H.; Xu, F.; Zhang, G. X.; Zhang, F. X.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a high efficiency FR named HPA was applied to treat cotton fabric. The results of LOI values and vertical flammability test showed that HPA treated cotton fabric had the best flame retardancy (LOI value was 36.0%), when the FR concentration is 50 g/L, and cured at 180°C for 7 min. During the process of holding back the combustion, HPA behaves the excellent properties of FR for cotton fabric.

  9. Organophosphate Flame Retardants Act as Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals in MA-10 Mouse Tumor Leydig Cells.

    PubMed

    Schang, Gauthier; Robaire, Bernard; Hales, Barbara F

    2016-04-01

    The organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) have emerged as alternatives to banned brominated flame retardants but little is known about their possible activity as endocrine disruptors. Our goal was to compare the effects of 7 commonly used OPFRsin vitroon MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells to those of a major brominated flame retardant, 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47). The effects of OPFRs and BDE-47 on mitochondrial activity, cell counts, oxidative stress, steroid secretion and gene expression were investigated. BDE-47 and all 7 OPFRs tested significantly reduced MA-10 cell mitochondrial activity (concentrations ≥50 μM) and cell number (concentrations ≥10 μM). All of the OPFRs significantly increased (10 μM, 1.7-4.4-fold) superoxide production whereas BDE-47 had no significant effect. Basal progesterone production was significantly increased (10 μM, 1.5 to 3-fold) by 2-ethylhexyl diphenyl phosphate, isodecyl diphenyl phosphate, isopropylated triphenyl phosphate, tert-butylphenyl diphenyl phosphate, and tricresyl phosphate, while BDE-47, triphenyl phosphate and tri-o-cresyl phosphate had no effect. Interestingly, isopropylated triphenyl phosphate enhanced dbcAMP-stimulated steroid production (∼2-fold), while tri-o-cresyl phosphate decreased (∼2/3) LH-stimulated steroid production. Several OPFRs affected the expression of genes involved in the biosynthesis of progesterone. In conclusion, all the OPFRs tested affected mitochondrial activity, cell survival, and superoxide production. Basal or stimulated steroid secretion was affected by all of the OPFRs except triphenyl phosphate; BDE-47 had no effect. Hence, the OPFRs currently used as alternatives affect Leydig cells to a greater extent than the brominated flame retardants that they have replaced.

  10. Occurrence and Concentrations of Halogenated Flame Retardants in the Atmospheric Fine Particles in Chinese Cities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Di; Lin, Tian; Shen, Kaijun; Li, Jun; Yu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Gan

    2016-09-20

    The concentrations of halogenated flame retardants (HFRs) in PM2.5 were monitored for one year at 10 urban sites in China during 2013-2014. This study investigated four classes of HFRs: nine polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), six nonbromodiphenyl ether (BDE) brominated flame retardants, two dechlorane plus (DP) flame retardants, and three chlorinated organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs). Extremely high concentrations of BDE-209 and DBDPE were observed in only one city (Guangzhou), which was a consequence of the intensive e-waste recycling and disposal operations in the Pearl River Delta. This result differed from the tris(monochloropropyl) phosphate (TCPP) and tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) distributions, which showed high concentrations in most cities, suggesting wide usage and large emissions in China in recent years. The highest TCPP and TCEP concentrations were observed in the summer, indicating that emission from local sources was an important factor controlling the levels in the air. This was not the case for BDE-209 and DBDPE, for which higher concentrations were found in winter. When bound to particulate matter due to low vapor pressure, these compounds may be more persistent in air, and temperature-dependent gas-particle partitioning was a key factor. Moreover, regional pollution and long-range transport had a significant influence on the seasonal distributions of BDE-209 and DBDPE, especially in cities (Guangzhou and Shanghai) close to electrical/electronic waste recycling sites. Residents in urban areas were exposed to higher levels of chlorinated OPFRs. This raises considerable concern, and an appropriate risk assessment is required.

  11. Occurrence and Concentrations of Halogenated Flame Retardants in the Atmospheric Fine Particles in Chinese Cities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Di; Lin, Tian; Shen, Kaijun; Li, Jun; Yu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Gan

    2016-09-20

    The concentrations of halogenated flame retardants (HFRs) in PM2.5 were monitored for one year at 10 urban sites in China during 2013-2014. This study investigated four classes of HFRs: nine polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), six nonbromodiphenyl ether (BDE) brominated flame retardants, two dechlorane plus (DP) flame retardants, and three chlorinated organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs). Extremely high concentrations of BDE-209 and DBDPE were observed in only one city (Guangzhou), which was a consequence of the intensive e-waste recycling and disposal operations in the Pearl River Delta. This result differed from the tris(monochloropropyl) phosphate (TCPP) and tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) distributions, which showed high concentrations in most cities, suggesting wide usage and large emissions in China in recent years. The highest TCPP and TCEP concentrations were observed in the summer, indicating that emission from local sources was an important factor controlling the levels in the air. This was not the case for BDE-209 and DBDPE, for which higher concentrations were found in winter. When bound to particulate matter due to low vapor pressure, these compounds may be more persistent in air, and temperature-dependent gas-particle partitioning was a key factor. Moreover, regional pollution and long-range transport had a significant influence on the seasonal distributions of BDE-209 and DBDPE, especially in cities (Guangzhou and Shanghai) close to electrical/electronic waste recycling sites. Residents in urban areas were exposed to higher levels of chlorinated OPFRs. This raises considerable concern, and an appropriate risk assessment is required. PMID:27539248

  12. Emissions of organophosphate and brominated flame retardants from selected consumer products and building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemmlein, Sabine; Hahn, Oliver; Jann, Oliver

    The emissions of selected flame retardants were measured in 1- and 0.02-m 3 emission test chambers and 0.001-m 3 emission test cells. Four product groups were of interest: insulating materials, assembly foam, upholstery/mattresses, and electronics equipment. The experiments were performed under constant environmental conditions (23°C, 50% RH) using a fixed sample surface area and controlled air flow rates. Tris (2-chloro-isopropyl)phosphate (TCPP) was observed to be one of the most commonly emitted organophosphate flame retardants in polyurethane foam applications. Depending on the sample type, area-specific emission rates (SER a) of TCPP varied between 20 ng m -2 h -1 and 140 μg m -2 h -1. The emissions from electronic devices were measured at 60°C to simulate operating conditions. Under these conditions, unit specific emission rates (SER u) of organophosphates were determined to be 10-85 ng unit -1 h -1. Increasing the temperature increased the emission of several flame retardants by up to a factor of 500. The results presented in this paper indicate that emissions of several brominated and organophosphate flame retardants are measurable. Polybrominated diphenylethers exhibited an SER a of between 0.2 and 6.6 ng m -2 h -1 and an SER u of between 0.6 and 14.2 ng unit -1 h -1. Because of sink effects, i.e., sorption to chamber components, the emission test chambers and cells used in this study have limited utility for substances low vapour pressures, especially the highly brominated compounds; hexabromocyclododecane had an SER a of between 0.1 and 29 ng m -2 h -1 and decabromodiphenylether was not detectable at all.

  13. Influence of radiation-crosslinking on flame retarded polymer materials-How crosslinking disrupts the barrier effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnier, Rodolphe; Caro-Bretelle, Anne-Sophie; Dumazert, Loïc; Longerey, Marc; Otazaghine, Belkacem

    2015-01-01

    Fire behavior of flame retardant-free and flame retarded PP/PA6 blends was studied using pyrolysis-combustion flow calorimeter, cone calorimeter and epiradiator equipped with infrared camera and pyrometer. Blends were previously γ-irradiated in presence of crosslinking agents at various doses (up to 100 kGy) in order to assess the influence of irradiation crosslinking on flame retardancy. Crosslinked specimens exhibit a solid-like behavior under high temperature gradient in cone calorimeter and then distort considerably. The influence of such a behavior depends on the material properties. When the flame retardancy is provided by heat shielding effect, heat distortion disrupts the top protective layer leading to a substantial increase of peak of heat release rate (pHRR). The barrier layer is no longer able to prevent the heat transfer to the underlying condensed phase. In other cases (flame retardant-free blends or flame retardancy provided by other effects than heat shielding), heat distortion has negligible influence on heat release rate curves in cone calorimeter tests.

  14. New brominated flame retardants and their metabolites as activators of the pregnane X receptor.

    PubMed

    Gramec Skledar, Darja; Tomašič, Tihomir; Carino, Adriana; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano; Peterlin Mašič, Lucija

    2016-09-30

    The present study investigated the activities on different nuclear receptors of the new brominated flame retardants 2-ethylhexyl 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (TBB) and bis(2-ethylhexyl) 2,3,4,5-tetrabromophthalate (TBPH), and their main carboxylic acid metabolites 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoic acid (TBBA) and mono(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (TBMEPH). None of selected chemicals exhibited marked activity towards PPARα and PPARγ by the use of transactivation assays in HepG2 cells transfected with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. In contrast, selected flame retardants all exhibited potent agonist activity on pregnane X receptor (PXR), with EC50 values of 5.5μM for TBPH and 2.0μM for its metabolite TBMEPH. Molecular docking of TBPH and TBMEPH to the PXR ligand binding site revealed similar interactions, with differences only for conformation and orientation of the alkyl chains. Additionally, TBPH showed antagonist activity on PXR (IC50, 13.9μM). Moreover, there was significant up-regulation of CYP3A4 expression via PXR activation for TBB and TBPH and their metabolites. Induction of CYP3A4 might cause undesired drug-drug interactions, lower bioavailability of pharmaceutical drugs, higher formation of reactive toxic metabolites, or enhanced elimination of endogenous hormones, such as T3/T4, to lead to endocrine disruption. These data provide new and important insights into the toxicity of these new polybrominated flame retardants, TBB and TBPH, and their metabolites.

  15. Elucidating toxicological mechanisms of current flame retardants using a bacterial gene profiling assay.

    PubMed

    Krivoshiev, Boris V; Dardenne, Freddy; Blust, Ronny; Covaci, Adrian; Husson, Steven J

    2015-12-01

    Flame retardants are ubiquitously used chemicals that have been shown to contaminate environments. Toxicological data is largely limited, with little insight into their molecular modes of action that may give rise to their toxic phenotypes. Such insight would aid more effective risk assessments concerning these compounds, while also improving molecular design. We therefore used a bacterial stress-gene profiling assay to screen twelve currently-used flame retardants to obtain mechanistic insights of toxicity. Both brominated and organophosphate flame retardants were tested. All compounds showed statistically significant inductions of several stress genes when compared to control treatments. Triphenyl phosphate, tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate, tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl)phosphate, tris(butyl)phosphate, and tetrabromobisphenol A elicited (at least) two-fold inductions for any of the stress genes. When looking at absolute induction levels, the promoters induced are indicative of protein perturbation, DNA integrity and membrane integrity. However, normalising for the different induction potentials of the different stress genes and clustering using hierarchical and k-means algorithms indicated that in addition to protein and DNA damage, some compounds also resulted in growth arrest and oxidative damage. This research shows that this assay allows for the determination of toxicological modes-of-action while clustering and accounting for induction potentials of the different genes aids better risk assessment.

  16. [Determination of three organophosphorous flame retardants in textiles by gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Mu, Junze; Li, Xuan; Zhang, Bin; Jiang, Liyuan

    2007-05-01

    A method of simultaneous determination of three organophosphorous flame retardants in textiles by capillary gas chromatograph (GC) combined with nitrogen phosphorus detector (NPD) was developed. The samples were extracted by ultrasonic extraction, filtered by 0.22 microm microporous film and then directly analyzed by GC-NPD. The ultrasonic extraction key factors optimized by the orthogonal design were as follows: the volume ratio of acetone to n-hexane was 2 : 8, the extraction time was 40 min and the solvent volume was 35 mL. The linear ranges of tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tri-o-cresyl phosphate (TOCP) and tris (2,3-dibromopropyl) phosphate (TRIS) were 0.375 8 - 36.38 microg/mL, 0.384 1 - 38.41 microg/mL and 15.78 - 1 010 microg/mL, respectively, and the detection limits were 0.044 mg/kg, 0.053 mg/kg and 0.82 mg/kg, respectively. Textile samples including cotton, flax, nylon, silk and terylene spiked with different levels of the three flame retardants were employed to investigate the method precision and recovery. For aforementioned analytes, the method precisions were 6.2%, 7.7% and 6.5%, respectively and the method recoveries based on spiked studies were in the range of 83.2% - 115.4%. The method is suitable for the determination of three organophosphorous flame retardant residues in textiles in commodity inspection.

  17. Elucidating toxicological mechanisms of current flame retardants using a bacterial gene profiling assay.

    PubMed

    Krivoshiev, Boris V; Dardenne, Freddy; Blust, Ronny; Covaci, Adrian; Husson, Steven J

    2015-12-01

    Flame retardants are ubiquitously used chemicals that have been shown to contaminate environments. Toxicological data is largely limited, with little insight into their molecular modes of action that may give rise to their toxic phenotypes. Such insight would aid more effective risk assessments concerning these compounds, while also improving molecular design. We therefore used a bacterial stress-gene profiling assay to screen twelve currently-used flame retardants to obtain mechanistic insights of toxicity. Both brominated and organophosphate flame retardants were tested. All compounds showed statistically significant inductions of several stress genes when compared to control treatments. Triphenyl phosphate, tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate, tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl)phosphate, tris(butyl)phosphate, and tetrabromobisphenol A elicited (at least) two-fold inductions for any of the stress genes. When looking at absolute induction levels, the promoters induced are indicative of protein perturbation, DNA integrity and membrane integrity. However, normalising for the different induction potentials of the different stress genes and clustering using hierarchical and k-means algorithms indicated that in addition to protein and DNA damage, some compounds also resulted in growth arrest and oxidative damage. This research shows that this assay allows for the determination of toxicological modes-of-action while clustering and accounting for induction potentials of the different genes aids better risk assessment. PMID:26343755

  18. New brominated flame retardants and their metabolites as activators of the pregnane X receptor.

    PubMed

    Gramec Skledar, Darja; Tomašič, Tihomir; Carino, Adriana; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano; Peterlin Mašič, Lucija

    2016-09-30

    The present study investigated the activities on different nuclear receptors of the new brominated flame retardants 2-ethylhexyl 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (TBB) and bis(2-ethylhexyl) 2,3,4,5-tetrabromophthalate (TBPH), and their main carboxylic acid metabolites 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoic acid (TBBA) and mono(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (TBMEPH). None of selected chemicals exhibited marked activity towards PPARα and PPARγ by the use of transactivation assays in HepG2 cells transfected with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. In contrast, selected flame retardants all exhibited potent agonist activity on pregnane X receptor (PXR), with EC50 values of 5.5μM for TBPH and 2.0μM for its metabolite TBMEPH. Molecular docking of TBPH and TBMEPH to the PXR ligand binding site revealed similar interactions, with differences only for conformation and orientation of the alkyl chains. Additionally, TBPH showed antagonist activity on PXR (IC50, 13.9μM). Moreover, there was significant up-regulation of CYP3A4 expression via PXR activation for TBB and TBPH and their metabolites. Induction of CYP3A4 might cause undesired drug-drug interactions, lower bioavailability of pharmaceutical drugs, higher formation of reactive toxic metabolites, or enhanced elimination of endogenous hormones, such as T3/T4, to lead to endocrine disruption. These data provide new and important insights into the toxicity of these new polybrominated flame retardants, TBB and TBPH, and their metabolites. PMID:27506419

  19. Brominated and chlorinated flame retardants in liver of Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus).

    PubMed

    Strid, Anna; Bruhn, Christoffer; Sverko, Ed; Svavarsson, Jörundur; Tomy, Gregg; Bergman, Åke

    2013-04-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are known brominated flame retardants that have now been banned or phased out in many parts of the world. As a consequence, interest in the environmental occurrence of non-PBDE flame retardants has increased. In the present study several potential PBDE replacement products together with short chained chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) were assessed in Greenland sharks accidentally caught in waters around Iceland between 2001 and 2003. Non-PBDE flame retardants detected were pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) and 2,3,5,6-tetrabromo-p-xylene (TBX). The concentrations were lower than levels of BDE-47 but similar to other PBDE congeners previously reported in Greenland shark. The median concentrations of SCCPs was 430 ng g(-1) fat, similar to individual PCB congeners previously reported. This is the first report of SCCPs, BTBPE, PBEB and TBX in any shark species globally and confirms the usefulness of the Greenland shark as a screening species for environmental contamination in the Arctic and sub-Arctic environment. PMID:23360749

  20. Effects of Hoods and Flame-Retardant Fabrics on WBGT Clothing Adjustment Factors.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Candi D; Bernard, Thomas E

    2008-01-01

    Personal protective clothing (PPC) may include hoods and flame-retardant (FR) fabrics that may affect heat transfer and, thus, the critical wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT crit) to maintain thermal equilibrium. The purpose of this study was to compare the differences in WBGT crit for hooded vs. nonhooded versions of particle barrier and vapor barrier coveralls as well as for coveralls made of two flame-retardant fabrics (INDURA cotton and Nomex). Acclimated men (n = 11) and women (n = 4) walked on a treadmill in a climatic chamber at 180 W/m2 wearing four different ensembles: limited-use, particle barrier coveralls with and without a hood (Tyvek 1427), and limited-use vapor barrier coveralls with and without a hood (Tychem QC, polyethylene-coated Tyvek). Twelve of the participants wore one of two flame-retardant coveralls. All participants wore standard cotton clothing. Progressive exposure testing at 50% relative humidity (rh) was designed so that each subject established a physiological steady-state followed by a clear loss of thermal equilibrium. WBGT crit was the WBGT 5 min prior to a loss of thermal equilibrium. Hooded ensembles had a lower WBGT crit than the nonhooded ensembles. The difference suggested a clothing adjustment of 1 degrees C for hoods. There were no significant differences among the FR ensembles and cotton work cloths, and the proposed clothing adjustment for FR coveralls clothing is 0 degrees C. PMID:18041645

  1. Discrimination of hexabromocyclododecane from new polymeric brominated flame retardant in polystyrene foam by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Jeannerat, Damien; Pupier, Marion; Schweizer, Sébastien; Mitrev, Yavor Nikolaev; Favreau, Philippe; Kohler, Marcel

    2016-02-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD) is a brominated flame retardant (BFR) and major additive to polystyrene foam thermal insulation that has recently been listed as a persistent organic pollutant by the Stockholm Convention. During a 2013/2014 field analytical survey, we measured HBCDD content ranging from 0.2 to 2.4% by weight in 98 polystyrene samples. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analyses indicated that expandable (EPS) and extruded (XPS) polystyrene foams significantly differed in the α/γ HBCDD isomer ratio, with a majority of α and γ isomers in XPS and EPS, respectively. Interestingly, this technique indicated that some recent materials did not contain HBCDD, but demonstrated bromine content when analysed with X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Further investigation by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) was able to discriminate between the BFRs present. In addition to confirming the absence or presence of HBCDD in polystyrene samples, high-field NMR spectroscopy provided evidence of the use of brominated butadiene styrene (BBS) as copolymer in the production of polystyrene. Use of this alternative flame retardant is expected to cause fewer health and environmental concerns. Our results highlight a trend towards the use of copolymerized BFRs as an alternative to HBCDD in polystyrene foam boards. In addition to providing a rapid NMR method to identify polymeric BFR, our analytical approach is a simple method to discriminate between flame-retardants in polystyrene foam insulating materials. PMID:26492426

  2. Discrimination of hexabromocyclododecane from new polymeric brominated flame retardant in polystyrene foam by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Jeannerat, Damien; Pupier, Marion; Schweizer, Sébastien; Mitrev, Yavor Nikolaev; Favreau, Philippe; Kohler, Marcel

    2016-02-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD) is a brominated flame retardant (BFR) and major additive to polystyrene foam thermal insulation that has recently been listed as a persistent organic pollutant by the Stockholm Convention. During a 2013/2014 field analytical survey, we measured HBCDD content ranging from 0.2 to 2.4% by weight in 98 polystyrene samples. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analyses indicated that expandable (EPS) and extruded (XPS) polystyrene foams significantly differed in the α/γ HBCDD isomer ratio, with a majority of α and γ isomers in XPS and EPS, respectively. Interestingly, this technique indicated that some recent materials did not contain HBCDD, but demonstrated bromine content when analysed with X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Further investigation by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) was able to discriminate between the BFRs present. In addition to confirming the absence or presence of HBCDD in polystyrene samples, high-field NMR spectroscopy provided evidence of the use of brominated butadiene styrene (BBS) as copolymer in the production of polystyrene. Use of this alternative flame retardant is expected to cause fewer health and environmental concerns. Our results highlight a trend towards the use of copolymerized BFRs as an alternative to HBCDD in polystyrene foam boards. In addition to providing a rapid NMR method to identify polymeric BFR, our analytical approach is a simple method to discriminate between flame-retardants in polystyrene foam insulating materials.

  3. Flame-Retardant Paper from Wood Fibers Functionalized via Layer-by-Layer Assembly.

    PubMed

    Köklükaya, Oruç; Carosio, Federico; Grunlan, Jaime C; Wågberg, Lars

    2015-10-28

    The highly flammable character of cellulose-rich fibers from wood limits their use in some advanced materials. To suppress the flammability and introduce flame-retardant properties to individual pulp fibers, we deposited nanometer thin films consisting of cationic chitosan (CH) and anionic poly(vinylphosphonic acid) (PVPA) on fibers using the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique. The buildup of the multilayer film was investigated in the presence and absence of salt (NaCl) using model cellulose surfaces and a quartz crystal microbalance technique. Fibers were then treated with the same strategy, and the treated fibers were used to prepare paper sheets. A horizontal flame test (HFT) and cone calorimetry were conducted to evaluate the combustion behavior of paper sheets as a function of the number of bilayers deposited on fibers. In HFT, paper made of fibers coated with 20 CH/PVPA bilayers (BL), self-extinguished the flame, while uncoated fibers were completely consumed. Scanning electron microscopy of charred paper after HFT revealed that a thin shell of the charred polymeric multilayer remained after the cellulose fibers had been completely oxidized. Cone calorimetry demonstrated that the phosphorus-containing thin films (20 BL is ∼25 nm) reduced the peak heat release rate by 49%. This study identifies a unique and highly effective way to impart flame-retardant characteristic to pulp fibers and the papers made from these fibers. PMID:26457504

  4. Flame-Retardant Paper from Wood Fibers Functionalized via Layer-by-Layer Assembly.

    PubMed

    Köklükaya, Oruç; Carosio, Federico; Grunlan, Jaime C; Wågberg, Lars

    2015-10-28

    The highly flammable character of cellulose-rich fibers from wood limits their use in some advanced materials. To suppress the flammability and introduce flame-retardant properties to individual pulp fibers, we deposited nanometer thin films consisting of cationic chitosan (CH) and anionic poly(vinylphosphonic acid) (PVPA) on fibers using the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique. The buildup of the multilayer film was investigated in the presence and absence of salt (NaCl) using model cellulose surfaces and a quartz crystal microbalance technique. Fibers were then treated with the same strategy, and the treated fibers were used to prepare paper sheets. A horizontal flame test (HFT) and cone calorimetry were conducted to evaluate the combustion behavior of paper sheets as a function of the number of bilayers deposited on fibers. In HFT, paper made of fibers coated with 20 CH/PVPA bilayers (BL), self-extinguished the flame, while uncoated fibers were completely consumed. Scanning electron microscopy of charred paper after HFT revealed that a thin shell of the charred polymeric multilayer remained after the cellulose fibers had been completely oxidized. Cone calorimetry demonstrated that the phosphorus-containing thin films (20 BL is ∼25 nm) reduced the peak heat release rate by 49%. This study identifies a unique and highly effective way to impart flame-retardant characteristic to pulp fibers and the papers made from these fibers.

  5. Polybrominated biphenyl and diphenylether flame retardants: analysis, toxicity, and environmental occurrence.

    PubMed

    Pijnenburg, A M; Everts, J W; de Boer, J; Boon, J P

    1995-01-01

    Data on two classes of brominated polyaromatic flame retardants are reviewed with emphasis on analytical aspects, occurrence, fate, and toxicity in the environment. Concentrations of brominated fire retardants are quantified as equivalents of commercial mixtures. Because different congeners behave differently in the environment and show large differences in toxicity, future studies would benefit from the availability of analytical standards of individual congeners. The main environmental properties and mechanisms of toxicity of the PBBs and PBDEs are similar to those of the structurally related PCBs and dibenzodioxins. Although the present concentrations of brominated fire retardants do not yet appear to represent a major environmental risk in marine food chains, their replacement by environmentally less harmful alternatives is recommended.

  6. [Phase transition behavior and thermodynamic analysis of hydrotalcite flame-retardant].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-qing; Liao, Meng-chen; Zeng, Hong-yan; Xu, Sheng; Xu, Li-hua; Zhu, Pei-han; Yang, Yong-jie

    2015-01-01

    The hydrotalcite with the properties of flame-retardant, eliminating smoke, filling and thermostability is a new kind of inorganic flame retardant. In the work, the MgAl hydrotalcite as flame retardant with Mg/Al molar ratio of 4 (MgAl-LDH) was prepared by using urea as the precipitating agent. The thermolysis behavior of the MgAl-LDH flame retardant was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC) as well as self deconvolution and curve-fitting analyses. Thermal phase transition of the MgAl-LDH was clarified, especially the characteristics of the hydroxyl groups (-OH) in the brucite-like layers and the changes in coordinate of the carbonate (CO3(2-)) from the interlayers. Based on thermodynamic data, thermal decomposition process was discussed. By.XRD analysis; it was found that the phase change took place when the decomposition temperature increased. The MgAl-LDH was decarbonated basically to MgAl mixed metal oxides (Mg-Al-O) at 500 °C, and impurity MgAl204 phase formed at 600 °C. According to the analyses of FT-IR, TG-DSC and curve-fitting technique, the hydroxyl groups (-OH) in the brucite-like layers possessed three the ligands such as [Al-OH-Al], [Al-OH-Mg] and [Mg-OH-Mg] modes. Dehydroxylation of the brucite-like layers based on the binding forces, where the [Mg-OH-Mg] among the three modes was the most difficult to be re- moved during the pyrolysis process. In the same way, the CO3(2-) ligands also possessed three modes such as H2O-bridged CO3(2-), monodentate and bidentate coordination modes. Based on the thermodynamic analysis, the thermodynamic properties of the hydrotalcite as flame retardant were evaluated, and the expressions of the Gibbs free energy, (ΔrGθT), as a function of temperature, were derived for the Mg8Al2 (OH)20CO3 crystal. Thermodynamic analysis showed that the removal of -OH from the brucite-like layers was spontaneous process

  7. Transcriptomic and metabolomic approaches to investigate the molecular responses of human cell lines exposed to the flame retardant hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinkang; Williams, Timothy D; Abdallah, Mohamed Abou-Elwafa; Harrad, Stuart; Chipman, James K; Viant, Mark R

    2015-12-01

    The potential for human exposure to the brominated flame retardant, hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) has given rise to health concerns, yet there is relatively limited knowledge about its possible toxic effects and the underlying molecular mechanisms that may mediate any impacts on health. In this study, unbiased transcriptomic and metabolomic approaches were employed to investigate the potential molecular changes that could lead to the toxicity of HBCD under concentrations relevant to human exposure conditions using in vitro models. A concentration-dependent cytotoxic effect of HBCD to A549 and HepG2/C3A cells was observed based on MTT assays or CCK-8 assays with EC50 values of 27.4 μM and 63.0 μM, respectively. Microarray-based transcriptomics and mass spectrometry-based metabolomics revealed few molecular changes in A549 cells or HepG2/C3A cells following a 24-hour exposure to several sub-lethal concentrations (2 to 4000 nM) of HBCD. Quantification of the level of HBCD in the HepG2/C3A exposed cells suggested that the flame retardant was present at concentrations several orders of magnitude higher than those reported to occur in human tissues. We conclude that at the concentrations known to be achievable following exposure in humans, HBCD exhibits no detectable acute toxicity in A549 cells, representative of the lung, or in HepG2/C3A cells, that are hepatocytes with some xenobiotic metabolic capacity.

  8. Phosphate flame retardants and novel brominated flame retardants in home-produced eggs from an e-waste recycling region in China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaobo; Xu, Fuchao; Luo, Xiaojun; Mai, Bixian; Covaci, Adrian

    2016-05-01

    Phosphate flame retardants (PFRs) and novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) (2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromo-benzoate (EH-TBB) and bis-(2-ethylhexyl)-3,4,5,6-tetrabromo-phthalate (BEH-TEBP)) were measured in free-range chicken eggs from three e-waste recycling sites and a negative control site located in Guangdong province, Southern China. BEH-TEBP, tris-(chloroethyl)-phosphate (TCEP), tris-(chloropropyl)-phosphate (∑TCPP, two isomers) and tris-(1,3-dichloroisopropyl)-phosphate (TDCIPP) were detected in more than 50% of eggs samples with low concentrations. The median values of BEH-TEBP and total PFRs were 0.17-0.46 ng/g ww (wet weight) and 1.62-2.59 ng/g ww in eggs from the e-waste sites, respectively. The results indicate that EH-TBB, BEH-TEBP and PFRs are less persistent and bioaccumulative than polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in chicken eggs, and possibly also in other bio-matrices. Triphenyl phosphate (TPHP) were identified in albumen with higher frequencies, but at similar concentrations compared to yolk, while BEH-TEBP was mainly detected in yolk. The estimated daily intake (EDI) of BEH-TEBP and total PFRs from consumption of chicken eggs ranged from 0.03 to 0.09 and 0.32-0.52 ng/kg bw/day for adults, and 0.20-0.54 and 1.89-3.02 ng/kg bw/day for children in e-waste sites, respectively. Indoor dust ingestion seems to be a more important pathway for the intake of these FRs, while egg consumption is probably a more important exposure pathway for PBDEs.

  9. Organo-modified bentonites as new flame retardant fillers in epoxy resin nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benelli, Tiziana; D'Angelo, Emanuele; Mazzocchetti, Laura; Saraga, Federico; Sambri, Letizia; Franchini, Mauro Comes; Giorgini, Loris

    2016-05-01

    The present work deals with two organophilic bentonites, based on nitrogen-containing compounds: these organoclays were synthesized via an ion exchange process starting from pristine bentonite with 6-(4-butylphenyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine (BFTDA) and 11-amino-N-(pyridine-2yl)undecanamide (APUA) and then used for the production of epoxy-based flame retardant nanocomposites. The amount of organic modifier in the organoclays Bento-BFTDA and Bento-APUA was determined with a TGA analysis and is around 0.4mmol/g for both samples. The effect of the organoclays on a commercial epoxy resin nanocomposite's thermo-mechanical and flammability properties was investigated. Composites containing 3wt% and 5wt% of the nanofillers were prepared by solventless addition of each organoclay to the epoxy resin, followed by further addition of the hardener component. For the sake of comparison a similar nanocomposite with the plain unmodified bentonite was produced in similar condition. The nanocomposites's thermo-mechanical properties of all the produced samples were measured and they resulted slightly improved or practically unaffected. On the contrary, when the flame behaviour was assessed in the cone-calorimeter, an encouraging decrease of 17% in the peak heat released rate (pHRR) was obtained at 3wt% loading level with Bento-APUA. This is a promising result, assessing that the APUA modified organoclay might act as flame retardant.

  10. Effects of Novel Brominated Flame Retardants on Steroidogenesis in Primary Porcine Testicular Cells.

    PubMed

    Mankidy, Rishikesh; Ranjan, Bibhuti; Honaramooz, Ali; Giesy, John P

    2013-10-24

    Brominated flame retardants are chemicals with fire quenching properties which are extensively used in manufacturing. Historically, less regulated use of legacy brominated flame retardants (BFRs) for a number of years has resulted in ubiquitous contamination of the environment. As a result, some of the more persistent BFRs have been phased out and are being replaced by a next generation of brominated compounds for which there is little toxicological data. The study investigated effects of 2-ethylhexyl tetrabromobenzoate (TBB), 1,2,5,6-tetrabromocyclooctane (TBCO), and bis-(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (TBPH) on steroidogenesis in a porcine primary testicular cell model. TBB did not affect sex-steroid production in this cell model; rather the data suggest a flux towards synthesis of aldosterone and cortisol via up-regulation of CYP21A2. At the greatest concentrations of TBCO and TBPH tested greater production of sex hormones testosterone (T) and estradiol (E2) was observed. Effects were mediated by regulation of multiple molecular targets in the steroidogenesis pathway; CYP11A in the case of TBPH and CYP17A1 in the case of TBCO. This investigation is the first of its kind to use a testicular mixed population cell model to investigate mechanism(s) of action of three chemically diverse compounds currently used in commercial fire retardants.

  11. Effects of novel brominated flame retardants on steroidogenesis in primary porcine testicular cells.

    PubMed

    Mankidy, Rishikesh; Ranjan, Bibhuti; Honaramooz, Ali; Giesy, John P

    2014-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants are chemicals with fire quenching properties which are extensively used in manufacturing. Historically, less regulated use of legacy brominated flame retardants (BFRs) for a number of years has resulted in ubiquitous contamination of the environment. As a result, some of the more persistent BFRs have been phased out and are being replaced by a next generation of brominated compounds for which there is little toxicological data. The study investigated effects of 2-ethylhexyl tetrabromobenzoate (TBB), 1,2,5,6-tetrabromocyclooctane (TBCO), and bis-(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (TBPH)on steroidogenesis in a porcine primary testicular cell model. TBB did not affect sex-steroid production in this cell model; rather the data suggest a flux towards synthesis of aldosterone and cortisol via up-regulation of CYP21A2. At the greatest concentrations of TBCO and TBPH tested greater production of sex hormones testosterone (T) and estradiol (E2) was observed. Effects were mediated by regulation of multiple molecular targets in the steroidogenesis pathway; CYP11A in the case of TBPH and CYP17A1 in the case of TBCO. This investigation is the first of its kind to use a testicular mixed population cell model to investigate mechanism(s) of action of three chemically diverse compounds currently used in commercial fire retardants.

  12. Detection and speciation of brominated flame retardants in high-impact polystyrene (HIPS) polymers.

    PubMed

    Holbrook, R D; Davis, J M; Scott, K C K; Szakal, C

    2012-05-01

    Polymeric materials have been suggested as possible environmental sources of persistent organic pollutants such as flame retardants. In situ, micrometre-scale characterization techniques for polymer matrix containing flame retardants may provide some insight into the dominant environmental transfer mechanism(s) of these brominated compounds. In this work, we demonstrate that micro X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (μXRF), focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) are promising techniques for the elemental and chemical identification of brominated fire retardant compounds (such as the deca-congener of polybrominated diphenyl ether, BDE-209) within polymeric materials (e.g. high-impact polystyrene or HIPS). Data from μXRF demonstrated that bromine (Br) inclusions were evenly distributed throughout the HIPS samples, whereas FIB SEM-EDS analysis revealed that small antimony (Sb) and Br inclusions are present, and regionally higher concentrations of Br surround the Sb inclusions (compared to the bulk material). Four prominent mass-to-charge ratio peaks (m/z 485, 487, 489 and 491) that correspond to BDE-209 were identified by ToF-SIMS and can be used to chemically distinguish this molecule on the surface of polymeric materials with respect to other brominated organic molecules. These techniques can be important in any study that investigates the route of entry to the environmental surroundings of BDE-containing materials.

  13. Fabric phase sorptive extraction: Two practical sample pretreatment techniques for brominated flame retardants in water.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guiqi; Dong, Sheying; Zhang, Mengfei; Zhang, Haihan; Huang, Tinglin

    2016-09-15

    Sample pretreatment is the critical section for residue monitoring of hazardous pollutants. In this paper, using the cellulose fabric as host matrix, three extraction sorbents such as poly (tetrahydrofuran) (PTHF), poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly (dimethyldiphenylsiloxane) (PDMDPS), were prepared on the surface of the cellulose fabric. Two practical extraction techniques including stir bar fabric phase sorptive extraction (stir bar-FPSE) and magnetic stir fabric phase sorptive extraction (magnetic stir-FPSE) have been designed, which allow stirring of fabric phase sorbent during the whole extraction process. In the meantime, three brominated flame retardants (BFRs) [tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), tetrabromobisphenol A bisallylether (TBBPA-BAE), tetrabromobisphenol A bis(2,3-dibromopropyl)ether (TBBPA-BDBPE)] in the water sample were selected as model analytes for the practical evaluation of the proposed two techniques using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Moreover, various experimental conditions affecting extraction process such as the type of fabric phase, extraction time, the amount of salt and elution conditions were also investigated. Due to the large sorbent loading capacity and unique stirring performance, both techniques possessed high extraction capability and fast extraction equilibrium. Under the optimized conditions, high recoveries (90-99%) and low limits of detection (LODs) (0.01-0.05 μg L(-1)) were achieved. In addition, the reproducibility was obtained by evaluating the intraday and interday precisions with relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 5.1% and 6.8%, respectively. The results indicated that two pretreatment techniques were promising and practical for monitoring of hazardous pollutants in the water sample. Due to low solvent consumption and high repeated use performance, proposed techniques also could meet green analytical criteria.

  14. Fabric phase sorptive extraction: Two practical sample pretreatment techniques for brominated flame retardants in water.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guiqi; Dong, Sheying; Zhang, Mengfei; Zhang, Haihan; Huang, Tinglin

    2016-09-15

    Sample pretreatment is the critical section for residue monitoring of hazardous pollutants. In this paper, using the cellulose fabric as host matrix, three extraction sorbents such as poly (tetrahydrofuran) (PTHF), poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly (dimethyldiphenylsiloxane) (PDMDPS), were prepared on the surface of the cellulose fabric. Two practical extraction techniques including stir bar fabric phase sorptive extraction (stir bar-FPSE) and magnetic stir fabric phase sorptive extraction (magnetic stir-FPSE) have been designed, which allow stirring of fabric phase sorbent during the whole extraction process. In the meantime, three brominated flame retardants (BFRs) [tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), tetrabromobisphenol A bisallylether (TBBPA-BAE), tetrabromobisphenol A bis(2,3-dibromopropyl)ether (TBBPA-BDBPE)] in the water sample were selected as model analytes for the practical evaluation of the proposed two techniques using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Moreover, various experimental conditions affecting extraction process such as the type of fabric phase, extraction time, the amount of salt and elution conditions were also investigated. Due to the large sorbent loading capacity and unique stirring performance, both techniques possessed high extraction capability and fast extraction equilibrium. Under the optimized conditions, high recoveries (90-99%) and low limits of detection (LODs) (0.01-0.05 μg L(-1)) were achieved. In addition, the reproducibility was obtained by evaluating the intraday and interday precisions with relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 5.1% and 6.8%, respectively. The results indicated that two pretreatment techniques were promising and practical for monitoring of hazardous pollutants in the water sample. Due to low solvent consumption and high repeated use performance, proposed techniques also could meet green analytical criteria. PMID:27300591

  15. Novel Multifunctional Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Curing Agent with High Flame-Retardant Efficiency for Epoxy Resin.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yi; Shao, Zhu-Bao; Chen, Xue-Fang; Long, Jia-Wei; Chen, Li; Wang, Yu-Zhong

    2015-08-19

    A novel multifunctional organic-inorganic hybrid was designed and prepared based on ammonium polyphosphate (APP) by cation exchange with diethylenetriamine (DETA), abbreviated as DETA-APP. Then DETA-APP was used as flame-retardant curing agent for epoxy resin (EP). Curing behavior, including the curing kinetic parameters, was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The flame retardance and burning behavior of DETA-APP cured EP were also evaluated. The limiting oxygen index (LOI) value of DETA-APP/EP was enhanced to 30.5% with only 15 wt % of DETA-APP incorporated; and the UL-94 V-0 rating could be easily passed through with only 10 wt % of the hybrid. Compared with DETA/EP, the peak-heat release rate (PHRR), total heat release (THR), total smoke production (TSP), and peak-smoke production release (SPR) of DETA-APP/EP (15 wt % addition), obtained from cone calorimetry, were dropped by 68.3, 79.3, 79.0, and 30.0%, respectively, suggesting excellent flame-retardant and smoke suppression efficiency. The flame-retardant mechanism of DETA-APP/EP has been investigated comprehensively. The results of all the aforementioned studies distinctly confirmed that DETA-APP was an effective flame-retardant curing agent for EP.

  16. Novel Multifunctional Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Curing Agent with High Flame-Retardant Efficiency for Epoxy Resin.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yi; Shao, Zhu-Bao; Chen, Xue-Fang; Long, Jia-Wei; Chen, Li; Wang, Yu-Zhong

    2015-08-19

    A novel multifunctional organic-inorganic hybrid was designed and prepared based on ammonium polyphosphate (APP) by cation exchange with diethylenetriamine (DETA), abbreviated as DETA-APP. Then DETA-APP was used as flame-retardant curing agent for epoxy resin (EP). Curing behavior, including the curing kinetic parameters, was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The flame retardance and burning behavior of DETA-APP cured EP were also evaluated. The limiting oxygen index (LOI) value of DETA-APP/EP was enhanced to 30.5% with only 15 wt % of DETA-APP incorporated; and the UL-94 V-0 rating could be easily passed through with only 10 wt % of the hybrid. Compared with DETA/EP, the peak-heat release rate (PHRR), total heat release (THR), total smoke production (TSP), and peak-smoke production release (SPR) of DETA-APP/EP (15 wt % addition), obtained from cone calorimetry, were dropped by 68.3, 79.3, 79.0, and 30.0%, respectively, suggesting excellent flame-retardant and smoke suppression efficiency. The flame-retardant mechanism of DETA-APP/EP has been investigated comprehensively. The results of all the aforementioned studies distinctly confirmed that DETA-APP was an effective flame-retardant curing agent for EP. PMID:26186089

  17. Rapid methodology to screen flame retardants in upholstered furniture for compliance with new California labeling law (SB 1019).

    PubMed

    Petreas, Myrto; Gill, Ranjit; Takaku-Pugh, Sayaka; Lytle, Eric; Parry, Emily; Wang, Miaomiao; Quinn, John; Park, June-Soo

    2016-06-01

    In response to concerns regarding the widespread use of flame retardants, the California Legislature passed a law (SB1019) requiring labels on furniture products to indicate whether they do or do not contain flame retardants. To support the enforcement of the new law, our laboratory developed a step-wise, screening approach to test for brominated (BFR) and phosphorus-based flame retardants (OPFRs) in several types of furniture components (foam, fabric, batting, plumage, etc.). We used X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) to screen for the presence of Br (and other elements) and Inductively Coupled Plasma - Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) to identify and measure the concentration of P (and other elements). The same samples were also extracted by dichloromethane using sonication and analyzed by a single injection into a Gas Chromatograph - Tandem Mass Spectrometer to obtain concentrations of specific BFRs and OPFRs. Our approach showed excellent screening potential for Br and Sb by XRF and for P by ICP-OES, with both tests having predictive values of a negative equal to 1. To explore and screen for flame retardants in products not included in our current list of target chemicals, we used Liquid Chromatography/Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry operated with electrospray ionization, to identify additional flame retardants to be incorporated in quantitative methods. We are making all our methodologies public to facilitate simple and low cost methods that can help manufacturers and suppliers have their products tested and correctly labeled, ultimately benefitting the consumer.

  18. Rapid methodology to screen flame retardants in upholstered furniture for compliance with new California labeling law (SB 1019).

    PubMed

    Petreas, Myrto; Gill, Ranjit; Takaku-Pugh, Sayaka; Lytle, Eric; Parry, Emily; Wang, Miaomiao; Quinn, John; Park, June-Soo

    2016-06-01

    In response to concerns regarding the widespread use of flame retardants, the California Legislature passed a law (SB1019) requiring labels on furniture products to indicate whether they do or do not contain flame retardants. To support the enforcement of the new law, our laboratory developed a step-wise, screening approach to test for brominated (BFR) and phosphorus-based flame retardants (OPFRs) in several types of furniture components (foam, fabric, batting, plumage, etc.). We used X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) to screen for the presence of Br (and other elements) and Inductively Coupled Plasma - Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) to identify and measure the concentration of P (and other elements). The same samples were also extracted by dichloromethane using sonication and analyzed by a single injection into a Gas Chromatograph - Tandem Mass Spectrometer to obtain concentrations of specific BFRs and OPFRs. Our approach showed excellent screening potential for Br and Sb by XRF and for P by ICP-OES, with both tests having predictive values of a negative equal to 1. To explore and screen for flame retardants in products not included in our current list of target chemicals, we used Liquid Chromatography/Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry operated with electrospray ionization, to identify additional flame retardants to be incorporated in quantitative methods. We are making all our methodologies public to facilitate simple and low cost methods that can help manufacturers and suppliers have their products tested and correctly labeled, ultimately benefitting the consumer. PMID:26991383

  19. Layer by Layer coatings assembled through dipping, vertical or horizontal spray for cotton flame retardancy.

    PubMed

    Alongi, Jenny; Carosio, Federico; Frache, Alberto; Malucelli, Giulio

    2013-01-30

    Silica-based assemblies have been deposited on cotton fibres through Layer by Layer technique in order to enhance their flame retardant properties. To this aim, three different deposition procedures (namely, dipping, vertical and horizontal sprays) have been considered and compared. The resulting morphologies of the deposited assemblies have been thoroughly investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and elemental analysis. SEM observations have demonstrated that only the horizontal spray allows obtaining the deposition of a very homogeneous silica coating when compared to vertical spray or dipping. As a consequence, horizontal spray has proved to ensure the best flame resistance, promoting a substantial increase of the total burning time and final residue, as assessed by flammability tests. Furthermore, cone calorimetry measurements have shown a remarkable increase of the time to ignition, and a significant decrease of heat release rate and total heat release for the fabrics treated by horizontal spray. PMID:23218273

  20. Emission behavior of hexabromocyclododecanes and polybrominated diphenyl ethers from flame-retardant-treated textiles.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Natsuko; Takigami, Hidetaka

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the emission behavior of hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) added to textile products as flame retardants, we used a small stainless steel container (7 cm i.d. × 5.5 cm height, ca. 210 cm(3)) to conduct emission tests on three upholstery textile samples at temperatures of 20, 40, 60, and 80 °C. The textile samples, which were intended for use in curtain manufacture and had been treated with either technical HBCD or technical DecaBDE, emitted HBCDs and PBDEs, including BDE 209, even at room temperature (20 °C), and the emission rates increased with increasing test temperature. These results indicate that flame-retardant-treated upholstery textiles have the potential to be major sources of brominated flame retardant contamination in indoor air and dust. The HBCD diastereomer emission profiles at the test temperatures of 20 and 40 °C were similar to the profiles of the original textile samples; in contrast, at the higher test temperatures, the proportion of α-HBCD was larger (up to 70% of the total HBCD emission) than in the original samples. At the higher test temperatures, the proportions of di- to hexa-BDEs in the emissions were clearly larger than in the original sample, suggesting that the textile products treated with technical DecaBDE could be a source of environmentally relevant PBDE congeners such as BDE 47, 99, and 100. The emission rates of HBCDs from the textiles were two orders of magnitude higher than those of PBDEs, suggesting that HBCDs volatilize more easily from textile products to the indoor environment than PBDEs.

  1. Associations between brominated flame retardants in house dust and hormone levels in men.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Paula I; Stapleton, Heather M; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Hauser, Russ; Meeker, John D

    2013-02-15

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are used in the manufacture of a variety of materials and consumer products in order to meet fire safety standards. BFRs may persist in the environment and have been detected in wildlife, humans and indoor dust and air. Some BFRs have demonstrated endocrine and reproductive effects in animals, but human studies are limited. In this exploratory study, we measured serum hormone levels and flame retardant concentrations [31 polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners and 6 alternate flame retardants] in house dust from men recruited through a US infertility clinic. PBDE congeners in dust were grouped by commercial mixtures (i.e. penta-, octa- and deca-BDE). In multivariable linear regression models adjusted by age and body mass index (BMI), significant positive associations were found between house dust concentrations of pentaBDEs and serum levels of free T4, total T3, estradiol, and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), along with an inverse association with follicle stimulating hormone (FSH). There were also positive associations of octaBDE concentrations with serum free T4, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone and an inverse association of decaBDE concentrations with testosterone. Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) was associated with decreased SHBG and increased free androgen index. Dust concentrations of bis-tribromophenoxyethane (BTBPE) and tetrabromo-diethylhexylphthalate (TBPH) were positively associated with total T3. These findings are consistent with our previous report of associations between PBDEs (BDE 47, 99 and 100) in house dust and hormone levels in men, and further suggest that exposure to contaminants in indoor dust may be leading to endocrine disruption in men.

  2. [Preparation of microencapsulated red phosphorus and its flame-retardant application in PP composites].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen-Jun; Li, Zhe-Zhao; Zhang, Chun-Xiang; Fang, Jin; Yang, Xu-Jie; Lu, Lu-De; Pu, Long-Juan

    2010-05-01

    In the present study, the melamine-formaldehyde prepolymer (MFP) was first synthesized at pH 8-8.5 under about 80 degrees C with melamine, formaldehyde, triethanolamine and methanol as the starting materials. Subsequently, the microencapsulated red phosphorus (MRP) was successfully prepared by in-situ polymerization at pH 5.5 under 65 degrees C, using MFP and red phosphorus (RP) powders as raw materials, and potassium persulphate (KPS) as catalyst. The obtained products were detected by differential scan calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS). It was found that KPS is useful in enhancing the reaction activity of MFP, which can make RP be well encapsulated by melamine-formaldehyde resin (MF) and reduce the reaction time. The DSC, SEM and XPS results show that it won't get well-encapsulated MRP only under acidic condition and without any KPS. When a proper quantity of KPS is employed, the RP particles can be almost completely-encapsulated by MF and the peak temperature of oxidation reaction for MRP is 480 degrees C, which is much higher than that of RP, extending the applications for MRP. The FTIR spectrum demonstrates that the coating material on the surface of RP accurately is MF, in agreement with the reference. Polyproplene (PP) composites with different formulations were prepared by melt extrusion. It was shown that the flame-retardant efficiencies are very low when the PP composites only contain MRP or MH. However, the flame-retardant property can obviously improve if MRP and MH are both used in the PP composites. When PP : MRP: MH = 100 (phr) : 15 (phr) : 50 (phr), the limited oxygen index of the MRP/MH/PP composite is 26%, and vertical firing ranks UL-94 V-0. In addition, the possible flame-retardant mechanism of the PP composites has also been discussed, and further verified by FTIR and Raman spectroscopy.

  3. Durable flame retardant finish for silk fabric using boron hybrid silica sol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiang-hua; Gu, Jiali; Chen, Guo-qiang; Xing, Tie-ling

    2016-11-01

    A hybrid silica sol was prepared via sol gel method using tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) as a precursor and boric acid (H3BO3) as flame retardant additive and then applied to silk fabric. In order to endow silk fabric with durable flame retardancy, 1,2,3,4-butanetetracarboxylic acid (BTCA) was used as cross-linking agent for the sake of strong linkage formation between the hybrid silica sol and silk fabric. The FT-IR and XPS analysis demonstrated the Si-O-B formation in the sol system, as well as the linkage between the sol and silk after the treatment. The limiting oxygen index (LOI) and smoke density test indicated good flame retardancy and smoke suppression of the treated silk fabrics. The micro calorimeter combustion (MCC) test and thermo gravimetric (TG) analysis showed that the treated samples had less weight loss in the high temperature and lower heat release rate when burning. The washing durability evaluation results indicated that there was a distinct improvement for the silk samples treated with BTCA even after 30 times washing. In addition, the influence of the processing order of BTCA and silica sol treatment on the limiting oxygen index (LOI) of the finished silk fabric was also investigated. And the results demonstrated that the sample treated with BTCA first and then with the silica sol exhibited better LOI value (32.3%) than that of the sample by the conversed treatment order. Moreover the tensile property of treated samples was nearly unchanged, but the handle of sol treated samples obviously decreased.

  4. Layered double hydroxide-oxidized carbon nanotube hybrids as highly efficient flame retardant nanofillers for polypropylene

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yanshan; Zhang, Yu; Williams, Gareth R.; O’Hare, Dermot; Wang, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Aqueous miscible organic layered double hydroxides (AMO-LDHs) can act as organophilic inorganic flame retardant nanofillers for unmodified non-polar polymers. In this contribution, AMO [Mg3Al(OH)8](CO3)0.5·yH2O LDH–oxidized carbon nanotube (AMO-LDH–OCNT) hybrids are shown to perform better than the equivalent pure AMO-LDH. A synergistic effect between the AMO-LDH and OCNT was observed; this endows the hybrid material with enhanced flame retardancy, thermal stability, and mechanical properties. The thermal stability of polypropylene (PP) was significantly enhanced by adding AMO-LDH–OCNT hybrids. For PP mixed with AMO-LDH–OCNT hybrids to produce a composite with 10 wt% LDH and 2 wt% OCNT, the 50% weight loss temperature was increased by 43 °C. Further, a system with 10 wt% of AMO-LDH and 1 wt% OCNT showed a peak heat release rate (PHRR) reduction of 40%, greater than the PHRR reduction with PP/20 wt% AMO-LDH (31%). The degree of dispersion (mixability) between AMO-LDH and OCNT has a significant effect on the flame retardant performance of the hybrids. In addition, the incorporation of AMO-LDH–OCNT hybrids led to better mechanical properties, such as higher tensile strength (27.5 MPa) and elongation at break (17.9%), than those composites containing only AMO-LDH (25.6 MPa and 7.5%, respectively). PMID:27752096

  5. Mimicking of Estradiol Binding by Flame Retardants and Their Metabolites: A Crystallographic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gosavi, Rajendrakumar A.; Knudsen, Gabriel A.; Birnbaum, Linda S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Brominated flame retardants (BFRs), used in many types of consumer goods, are being studied because of concerns about possible health effects related to endocrine disruption, immunotoxicity, reproductive toxicity, and neurotoxicity. Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), the most widely used BFR, and human metabolites of certain congeners of polybrominated diphenyl ether (e.g., 3-OH-BDE-47) have been suggested to inhibit estrogen sulfotransferase, potentially affecting estrogen metabolism. Objectives: Our primary goal was to understand the structural mechanism for inhibition of the hormone-metabolizing enzyme estrogen sulfotransferase by certain BFRs. We also sought to understand various factors that facilitate the binding of flame retardants in the enzyme binding pocket. Methods: We used X-ray crystallography to obtain atomic detail of the binding modes of TBBPA and 3-OH-BDE-47 to estrogen sulfotransferase for comparison with binding of the endogenous substrate estradiol. Results: The crystal structures reveal how BFRs mimic estradiol binding as well as the various interactions between the compounds and protein residues that facilitate its binding. In addition, the structures provide insights into the ability of the sulfotransferase substrate binding pocket to accommodate a range of halogenated compounds that satisfy minimal structural criteria. Conclusions: Our results show how BFRs or their metabolites can bind to and inhibit a key hormone-metabolizing enzyme, potentially causing endocrine disruption. Citation: Gosavi RA, Knudsen GA, Birnbaum LS, Pedersen LC. 2013. Mimicking of estradiol binding by flame retardants and their metabolites: a crystallographic analysis. Environ Health Perspect 121:1194–1199; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1306902 PMID:23959441

  6. Associations between brominated flame retardants in house dust and hormone levels in men

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Paula I.; Stapleton, Heather M.; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Hauser, Russ; Meeker, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are used in the manufacture of a variety of materials and consumer products in order to meet fire safety standards. BFRs may persist in the environment and have been detected in wildlife, humans and indoor dust and air. Some BFRs have demonstrated endocrine and reproductive effects in animals, but human studies are limited. In this exploratory study, we measured serum hormone levels and flame retardant concentrations [31 polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners and 6 alternate flame retardants] in house dust from men recruited through a US infertility clinic. PBDE congeners in dust were grouped by commercial mixtures (i.e. penta-, octaand deca-BDE). In multivariable linear regression models adjusted by age and body mass index (BMI), significant positive associations were found between house dust concentrations of pentaBDEs and serum levels of free T4, total T3, estradiol, and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), along with an inverse association with follicle stimulating hormone (FSH). There were also positive associations of octaBDE concentrations with serum free T4, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone and an inverse association of decaBDE concentrations with testosterone. Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) was associated with decreased SHBG and increased free androgen index. Dust concentrations of bis-tribromophenoxyethane (BTBPE) and tetrabromo-diethylhexylphthalate (TBPH) were positively associated with total T3. These findings are consistent with our previous report of associations between PBDEs (BDE 47, 99 and 100) in house dust and hormone levels in men, and further suggest that exposure to contaminants in indoor dust may be leading to endocrine disruption in men. PMID:23333513

  7. Calorimetric evidence of interaction of brominated flame retardants with membrane model.

    PubMed

    Librando, Vito; Accolla, Maria Lorena; Minniti, Zelica; Pappalardo, Matteo; Castelli, Francesco; Cascio, Orazio; Sarpietro, Maria Grazia

    2015-05-01

    The presence of polybrominated flame retardants in the environment seems to be increasing in the past decade. Considering the toxic effects of these pollutants, it is important evaluating the potential interaction with biological membranes for a risk assessment. In this study low and high brominated biphenyls and biphenyl ethers were used to investigate their interaction with biological membrane models constituted by liposomes, using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) technique. The medium influence on membrane absorption was also assessed. The findings indicate that membrane interaction is controlled by compound structural characteristics. The membrane absorption is allowed by lipophilic medium; instead hydrophilic medium prevents membrane permeation.

  8. Sensitivity to a flame retardant, Tris(2,3-dibromopropyl)phosphate (Firemaster LVT 23 P).

    PubMed

    Andersen, K E

    1977-12-01

    Tris(2,3-dibromoprophyl) phosphate (TDB P) is marketed under many different trade names as a flame retardant, used in clothing and home furnishings. DTB P is chemically related to tricresylphosphate (TCP) and triphenylphosphate (TPP) used as plasticizers in plastics and lacquers. The International Contact Dermatitis Research Group (ICDRG) in 1976 examined the incidence of sensitization to TDB P and found two positives among 1103 patients. One of these two cases is reported here in detail. It concerns a woman, aged 56, with spectacle frame dermatitis. The spectacle frame did not contain TDB P and sensitization with another phosphate ester is assumed. PMID:606484

  9. Eco-friendly functionalized superhydrophobic recycled paper with enhanced flame-retardancy.

    PubMed

    Si, Yifan; Guo, Zhiguang

    2016-09-01

    Recycled paper with superhydrophobicity and flame-retardancy has been demonstrated here due to the synergistic action of dopamine-silica trimethylsilyl modified gel powder and stearic acid modified Mg(OH)2. This multifunctional recycled paper displays great self-cleaning and anti-fouling ability and can be used for oil-water separation. Surprisingly, the absorbed organic can be reused as fuel via simple combustion method for multiple cycles. This work will not only expand the usable range of paper but also ease the energy and environment crisis. PMID:27244592

  10. Brominated flame retardants in the European chemicals policy of REACH-Regulation and determination in materials.

    PubMed

    Kemmlein, Sabine; Herzke, Dorte; Law, Robin J

    2009-01-16

    The EU REACH legislation will require the registration of 30,000 currently marketed chemicals, including the main commercial BFRs in use (Deca-BDE, HBCD and TBBP-A). Much of the data needed for registration are already available, thanks to risk assessments of continued production and use already undertaken in the EU. Within the authorisation, substitution by less hazardous chemicals is encouraged. Both qualitative and quantitative methods for the analysis of flame-retarded polymers are needed in order that the identity and concentration of the BFRs can be established and compliance with regulations including the RoHS Directive demonstrated. These are reviewed.

  11. A Versatile and Scalable Approach toward Robust Superhydrophobic Porous Materials with Excellent Absorbency and Flame Retardancy.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Changping; Shen, Mengxia; Ren, Xiaoyan; Ai, Kelong; Lu, Lehui

    2016-08-09

    The frequent oil spillages and the industrial discharge of organic contaminants have not only created severe environmental and ecological crises, but also cause a risk of fire and explosion. These environmental and safety issues emphasize the urgent need for materials that possess superior sorption capability and less flammability and thus can effectively and safely clean up the floating oils and water-insoluble organic compounds. Here we present the successful hydrophobic modification of the flame retardant melamine sponge with a commercial fluorosilicone, by using a facile one-step solvent-free approach and demonstrate that the resultant superhydrophobic sponge not only exhibits extraordinary absorption efficiency (including high capacity, superior selectivity, good recyclability, and simple recycling routes), but also retains excellent flame retardancy and robust stability. In comparison to conventional methods, which usually utilize massive organic solvents, the present approach does not involve any complicated process or sophisticated equipment nor generates any waste liquids, and thus is a more labor-saving, environment-friendly, energy-efficient and cost-effective strategy for the hydrophobic modification. Taking into account the critical role of hydrophobic porous materials, especially in the field of environmental remediation, the approach presented herein would be highly valuable for environmental remediation and industrial applications.

  12. Acute and developmental behavioral effects of flame retardants and related chemicals in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Jarema, Kimberly A.; Hunter, Deborah L.; Shaffer, Rachel M.; Behl, Mamta; Padilla, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    As polybrominated diphenyl ethers are phased out, numerous compounds are emerging as potential replacement flame retardants for use in consumer and electronic products. Little is known, however, about the neurobehavioral toxicity of these replacements. This study evaluated the neurobehavioral effects of acute or developmental exposure to t-butylphenyl diphenyl phosphate (BPDP), 2-ethylhexyl diphenyl phosphate (EHDP), isodecyl diphenyl phosphate (IDDP), isopropylated phenyl phosphate (IPP), tricresyl phosphate (TMPP; also abbreviated TCP), triphenyl phosphate (TPHP; also abbreviated TPP), tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris (1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate (TDCIPP; also abbreviated TDCPP), tri-o-cresyl phosphate (TOCP), and 2,2-,4,4′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) in zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae. Larvae (n ≈ 24 per dose per compound) were exposed to test compounds (0.4–120 µM) at sub-teratogenic concentrations either developmentally or acutely, and locomotor activity was assessed at 6 days post fertilization. When given developmentally, all chemicals except BPDP, IDDP and TBBPA produced behavioral effects. When given acutely, all chemicals produced behavioral effects, with TPHP, TBBPA, EHDP, IPP, and BPDP eliciting the most effects at the most concentrations. The results indicate that these replacement flame retardants may have developmental or pharmacological effects on the vertebrate nervous system. PMID:26348672

  13. Fingerprint analysis of brominated flame retardants and Dechloranes in North Sea sediments.

    PubMed

    Sühring, Roxana; Barber, Jonathan L; Wolschke, Hendrik; Kötke, Danijela; Ebinghaus, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    53 brominated and chlorinated flame retardants were investigated in sediment samples from the German rivers Elbe and Weser, the German Bight, Jadebusen, East Frisian Coast as well as the UK East coast. The aim of the presented study was to investigate the prevalence of different halogenated flame retardant groups as contaminants in North Sea sediments, identify determining factors for the distribution and levels as well as to identify area specific fingerprints that could help identify sources. In order to do that a fast and effective ASE extraction method with an on-line clean-up was developed as well as a GC-EI-MSMS and LC-ESI-MSMS method to analyse PBDEs, MeOBDEs, alternate BFRs, Dechloranes as well as TBBPA and HBCDD. A fingerprinting method was adopted to identify representative area-specific patterns based on detection frequency as well as concentrations of individual compounds. Concentrations in general were low, with<1 ng g(-1) dw for most compounds. Exceptions were the comparably high concentrations of BDE-209 with up to 7 ng g(-1) dw in selected samples and TBBPA in UK samples with 2.7±1.5 ng g(-1) dw. Apart from BDE-209 and TBBPA, alternate BFRs and Dechloranes were predominant in all analysed samples, displaying the increasing relevance of these compounds as environmental contaminants.

  14. Brominated flame retardants in Chinese air before and after the phase out of polybrominated diphenyl ethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen-Long; Qi, Hong; Ma, Wan-Li; Liu, Li-Yan; Zhang, Zhi; Mohammed, Mohammed O. A.; Song, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Zifeng; Li, Yi-Fan

    2015-09-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs), including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and novel non-BDE flame retardants (NBFRs), were analyzed in Chinese air during China's POPs Soil and Air Monitoring Program Phase I (SAMP-I) and Phase II (SAMP-II). The levels of Σ12PBDEs and Σ6NBFRs in urban sites were significantly higher than those in rural sites and background sites. The higher detection rate and concentrations of high molecular weight PBDEs and NBFRs in Phase II indicated the changing of the commercial pattern of BFRs after the phase out of PBDEs in China. Temperature was the major factor affecting the seasonal variations of molecular weight BFRs in atmosphere. A significant correlation between BFRs concentration and gross domestic product (GDP) was observed, with the GDP parameter explained 59.4% and 72.7% of the total variability for Octa-BDEs and low molecular weight NBFRs, respectively. Our findings indicated an evolving commercial usage of BFRs from SAMP-I to SAMP-II, i.e. shifting from lower molecular weight to higher molecular weight congeners in China.

  15. Formation of dioxin-like compounds from the pyrolysis of some halogenated flame retardants

    SciTech Connect

    Alsabbagh, A.M.

    1990-01-01

    Polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polybrominated dibenzofurans as well as polyhalogenated phenazines have been shown to form from the pyrolysis of some flame retardants. In addition, chlorine-bromine exchange was shown to occur in the formation of halogenated dibenzo-p-dioxins and halogenated phenazines when both chlorine and bromine sources are present in the pyrolysis mixture. There was no chlorine-hydrogen exchange observed in the formation of chloro-bromo-dibenzo-dioxins, chloro-bromo-dibenzofurans and chloro-bromophenazines. At high temperatures, the amino-group of the halogenated anilines may be replaced by oxygen and yield halogenated dibenzo-pdioxins and halogenated dibenzofurans, in addition to the halogenated phenazines. The complete substitution of bromine with chlorine was demonstrated to occur, which is probably why chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and chlorinated dibenzofurans are more widely spread than the brominated analogs, since chlorinated compounds are used in much larger quantities than the brominated compounds. The addition of antimony (III) oxide to the flame-retardant formulations showed initial increase in the formation of the halogenated dibenzo-p-dioxins and the halogenated phenazines. The mass spectra of bromo-phenazines, chloro-phenazines and chloro-bromo-phenazines have been presented. The similarity in the structure of the halogenated phenazines and the halogenated dibenzo-p-dioxins may be of interest to be used in the search of compounds with breast cancer therapeutic use, although the toxicity of the halogenated phenazines should be thoroughly investigated.

  16. Brominated flame retardants in the indoor environment - Comparative study of indoor contamination from three countries.

    PubMed

    Venier, Marta; Audy, Ondřej; Vojta, Šimon; Bečanová, Jitka; Romanak, Kevin; Melymuk, Lisa; Krátká, Martina; Kukučka, Petr; Okeme, Joseph; Saini, Amandeep; Diamond, Miriam L; Klánová, Jana

    2016-09-01

    Concentrations of more than 20 brominated flame retardants (FRs), including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and emerging FRs, were measured in air, dust and window wipes from 63 homes in Canada, the Czech Republic and the United States in the spring and summer of 2013. Among the PBDEs, the highest concentrations were generally BDE-209 in all three matrices, followed by Penta-BDEs. Among alternative FRs, EHTBB and BEHTBP were detected at the highest concentrations. DBDPE was also a major alternative FR detected in dust and air. Bromobenzenes were detected at lower levels than PBDEs and other alternative FRs; among the bromobenzenes, HBB and PBEB were the most abundant compounds. In general, FR levels were highest in the US and lowest in the Czech Republic - a geographic trend that reflects the flame retardants' market. No statistically significant differences were detected between bedroom and living room FR concentrations in the same house (n=10), suggesting that sources of FRs are widespread indoors and mixing between rooms. The concentrations of FRs in air, dust, and window film were significantly correlated, especially for PBDEs. We found a significant relationship between the concentrations in dust and window film and in the gas phase for FRs with log KOA values <14, suggesting that equilibrium was reached for these but not compounds with log KOA values >14. This hypothesis was confirmed by a large discrepancy between values predicted using a partitioning model and the measured values for FRs with log KOA values >14.

  17. Acute and developmental behavioral effects of flame retardants and related chemicals in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Jarema, Kimberly A; Hunter, Deborah L; Shaffer, Rachel M; Behl, Mamta; Padilla, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    As polybrominated diphenyl ethers are phased out, numerous compounds are emerging as potential replacement flame retardants for use in consumer and electronic products. Little is known, however, about the neurobehavioral toxicity of these replacements. This study evaluated the neurobehavioral effects of acute or developmental exposure to t-butylphenyl diphenyl phosphate (BPDP), 2-ethylhexyl diphenyl phosphate (EHDP), isodecyl diphenyl phosphate (IDDP), isopropylated phenyl phosphate (IPP), tricresyl phosphate (TMPP; also abbreviated TCP), triphenyl phosphate (TPHP; also abbreviated TPP), tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris (1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate (TDCIPP; also abbreviated TDCPP), tri-o-cresyl phosphate (TOCP), and 2,2-,4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) in zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae. Larvae (n≈24 per dose per compound) were exposed to test compounds (0.4-120 μM) at sub-teratogenic concentrations either developmentally or acutely, and locomotor activity was assessed at 6 days post fertilization. When given developmentally, all chemicals except BPDP, IDDP and TBBPA produced behavioral effects. When given acutely, all chemicals produced behavioral effects, with TPHP, TBBPA, EHDP, IPP, and BPDP eliciting the most effects at the most concentrations. The results indicate that these replacement flame retardants may have developmental or pharmacological effects on the vertebrate nervous system.

  18. A Versatile and Scalable Approach toward Robust Superhydrophobic Porous Materials with Excellent Absorbency and Flame Retardancy.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Changping; Shen, Mengxia; Ren, Xiaoyan; Ai, Kelong; Lu, Lehui

    2016-01-01

    The frequent oil spillages and the industrial discharge of organic contaminants have not only created severe environmental and ecological crises, but also cause a risk of fire and explosion. These environmental and safety issues emphasize the urgent need for materials that possess superior sorption capability and less flammability and thus can effectively and safely clean up the floating oils and water-insoluble organic compounds. Here we present the successful hydrophobic modification of the flame retardant melamine sponge with a commercial fluorosilicone, by using a facile one-step solvent-free approach and demonstrate that the resultant superhydrophobic sponge not only exhibits extraordinary absorption efficiency (including high capacity, superior selectivity, good recyclability, and simple recycling routes), but also retains excellent flame retardancy and robust stability. In comparison to conventional methods, which usually utilize massive organic solvents, the present approach does not involve any complicated process or sophisticated equipment nor generates any waste liquids, and thus is a more labor-saving, environment-friendly, energy-efficient and cost-effective strategy for the hydrophobic modification. Taking into account the critical role of hydrophobic porous materials, especially in the field of environmental remediation, the approach presented herein would be highly valuable for environmental remediation and industrial applications. PMID:27501762

  19. A gamma-radiographic study of wood and polymer combustion and the effects of flame retardants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, S. C.; Nolan, P. F.; Maclenan, M. P.

    1990-12-01

    This paper presents an investigation into using the absorption of gamma-radiation as a nondestructive analysis method for the study of thermally decomposing wood and plastic. A comparison of the decomposition characteristics of flame-retarded materials with those of untreated materials has also been undertaken. 137Cs gamma-rays are passed through 50 mm cubes of wood or plastic, perpendicular to one-dimensional heat flow from a bank of well characterised infrared heaters. The resultant gamma-rays are analysed, and the thermal degradation is indicated by the decrease in absorption of the sample as it decomposes. Simultaneously, temperatures are measured at various points within the samples, and these are used in conjunction with the absorption data to describe the overall decomposition with a first-order kinetic model: {dρ }/{dt } = - A exp( {- E}/{Rθ})(ρ - ρ c) , where ρ and ρc are the density of the sample and the char, respectively, A the pre-exponential factor, E the activation energy, R the universal gas constant and θ the temperature. It is possible to find A and E for each sample and compare them for the different sample types. Results are given for three woods (spruce, Douglas fir and pine), and four different types of flame retardant. The results also reveal the decomposition of thin "slices" of the sample at different depths below the surface.

  20. Characterizing Flame Retardant Applications and Potential Human Exposure in Backpacking Tents.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Genna; Ward, Peyton; Lorenzo, Amelia; Hoffman, Kate; Stapleton, Heather M

    2016-05-17

    Flame retardant (FR) chemicals are applied to products to meet flammability standards; however, exposure to some additive FRs has been shown to be associated with adverse health effects. Previous research on FR exposure has primarily focused on chemicals applied to furniture and electronics; however, camping tents sold in the United States, which often meet flammability standard CPAI-84, remain largely unstudied in regards to their chemical treatments. In this study, FRs from five brands of CPAI-84-compliant, two-person backpacking tents were measured and potential exposure was assessed. Dermal and inhalation exposure levels were assessed by collecting hand wipes from 20 volunteers before and after tent setup and by using active air samplers placed inside assembled tents, respectively. Organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) were the most commonly detected FR in the tent materials and included triphenyl phosphate (TPHP), tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl)phosphate (TDCIPP) and tris(2-chloroethyl)phosphate (TCEP). Levels of OPFRS measured on hand wipes were significantly higher post-tent setup compared to pre setup, and in the case of TDCIPP, levels were 29 times higher post setup. OPFRs were also detected at measurable concentrations in the air inside of treated tents. Significant, positive correlations were found between FR levels in treated textiles and measures of dermal and inhalation exposure. These results demonstrate that dermal exposure to FRs occurs from handling camping tents and that inhalation exposure will likely occur while inside a tent. PMID:27082445

  1. Flame retardants and organochlorine pollutants in bald eagle plasma from the Great Lakes region.

    PubMed

    Venier, Marta; Wierda, Michael; Bowerman, William W; Hites, Ronald A

    2010-08-01

    We report measurements of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and of emerging flame retardants in the plasma of nestling bald eagles sampled from early May to late June of 2005. Concentrations of total PBDEs ranged from 0.35 ng g(-1) ww to 29.3 ng g(-1) ww (average=5.7+/-1.9 ng g(-1) ww). The most abundant congeners were BDE-47, BDE-99, and BDE-100. The fully brominated congener, BDE-209, was detected in approximately one third of the samples at an average concentration of 1.2+/-0.72 ng g(-1) ww. Several emerging flame retardants, such as pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB), hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs), and Dechlorane Plus (DP), were detected in these samples. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides were also detected at levels close to those previously published. A statistically significant relationship was found between total PBDE concentrations and total PCB and p,p'-DDE concentrations, suggesting that these compounds share a common source, which is most likely the eagle's food.

  2. Are some "safer alternatives" hazardous as PBTs? The case study of new flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Gramatica, Paola; Cassani, Stefano; Sangion, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Some brominated flame retardants (BFRs), as PBDEs, are persistent, bioaccumulative, toxic (PBT) and are restricted/prohibited under various legislations. They are replaced by "safer" flame retardants (FRs), such as new BFRs or organophosphorous compounds. However, informations on the PBT behaviour of these substitutes are often lacking. The PBT assessment is required by the REACH regulation and the PBT chemicals should be subjected to authorization. Several new FRs, proposed and already used as safer alternatives to PBDEs, are here screened by the cumulative PBT Index model, implemented in QSARINS (QSAR-Insubria), new software for the development/validation of QSAR models. The results, obtained directly from the chemical structure for the three studied characteristics altogether, were compared with those from the US-EPA PBT Profiler: the two different approaches are in good agreement, supporting the utility of a consensus approach in these screenings. A priority list of the most harmful FRs, predicted in agreement by the two modelling tools, has been proposed, highlighting that some supposed "safer alternatives" are detected as intrinsically hazardous for their PBT properties. This study also shows that the PBT Index could be a valid tool to evaluate appropriate and safer substitutes, a priori from the chemical design, in a benign by design approach, avoiding unnecessary synthesis and tests.

  3. A Versatile and Scalable Approach toward Robust Superhydrophobic Porous Materials with Excellent Absorbency and Flame Retardancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Changping; Shen, Mengxia; Ren, Xiaoyan; Ai, Kelong; Lu, Lehui

    2016-08-01

    The frequent oil spillages and the industrial discharge of organic contaminants have not only created severe environmental and ecological crises, but also cause a risk of fire and explosion. These environmental and safety issues emphasize the urgent need for materials that possess superior sorption capability and less flammability and thus can effectively and safely clean up the floating oils and water-insoluble organic compounds. Here we present the successful hydrophobic modification of the flame retardant melamine sponge with a commercial fluorosilicone, by using a facile one-step solvent-free approach and demonstrate that the resultant superhydrophobic sponge not only exhibits extraordinary absorption efficiency (including high capacity, superior selectivity, good recyclability, and simple recycling routes), but also retains excellent flame retardancy and robust stability. In comparison to conventional methods, which usually utilize massive organic solvents, the present approach does not involve any complicated process or sophisticated equipment nor generates any waste liquids, and thus is a more labor-saving, environment-friendly, energy-efficient and cost-effective strategy for the hydrophobic modification. Taking into account the critical role of hydrophobic porous materials, especially in the field of environmental remediation, the approach presented herein would be highly valuable for environmental remediation and industrial applications.

  4. Dechlorane plus and other flame retardants in tree bark from the northeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xinghua; Hites, Ronald A

    2008-01-01

    Previous work has shown that certain parts of the Great Lakes region are polluted with Dechlorane Plus (DP), a highly chlorinated flame retardant that was used as a replacement for Dechlorane/Mirex. It was suspected that a source of DP to the environment might be its manufacturing facility located in the city of Niagara Falls, New York. To confirm this source location and to determine DP's spatial distribution, 26 tree bark samples were collected in triplicate from the northeastern United States, and the concentrations of DP and several brominated flame retardants (BFRs) were measured. Most concentrations of DP in tree bark were found to be much higher than those of the BFRs. The highest DP concentrations were >100 ng g(-1) bark in the city of Niagara Falls, dropping rapidly with distance from the potential source. A simple one-dimensional, Gaussian diffusion model was used to explain the spatial distribution of DP and to locate the source. The calculated source location was <7 km away from the DP manufacturing plant in Niagara Falls, New York. PMID:18350871

  5. Are some "safer alternatives" hazardous as PBTs? The case study of new flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Gramatica, Paola; Cassani, Stefano; Sangion, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Some brominated flame retardants (BFRs), as PBDEs, are persistent, bioaccumulative, toxic (PBT) and are restricted/prohibited under various legislations. They are replaced by "safer" flame retardants (FRs), such as new BFRs or organophosphorous compounds. However, informations on the PBT behaviour of these substitutes are often lacking. The PBT assessment is required by the REACH regulation and the PBT chemicals should be subjected to authorization. Several new FRs, proposed and already used as safer alternatives to PBDEs, are here screened by the cumulative PBT Index model, implemented in QSARINS (QSAR-Insubria), new software for the development/validation of QSAR models. The results, obtained directly from the chemical structure for the three studied characteristics altogether, were compared with those from the US-EPA PBT Profiler: the two different approaches are in good agreement, supporting the utility of a consensus approach in these screenings. A priority list of the most harmful FRs, predicted in agreement by the two modelling tools, has been proposed, highlighting that some supposed "safer alternatives" are detected as intrinsically hazardous for their PBT properties. This study also shows that the PBT Index could be a valid tool to evaluate appropriate and safer substitutes, a priori from the chemical design, in a benign by design approach, avoiding unnecessary synthesis and tests. PMID:26742016

  6. Acute and developmental behavioral effects of flame retardants and related chemicals in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Jarema, Kimberly A; Hunter, Deborah L; Shaffer, Rachel M; Behl, Mamta; Padilla, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    As polybrominated diphenyl ethers are phased out, numerous compounds are emerging as potential replacement flame retardants for use in consumer and electronic products. Little is known, however, about the neurobehavioral toxicity of these replacements. This study evaluated the neurobehavioral effects of acute or developmental exposure to t-butylphenyl diphenyl phosphate (BPDP), 2-ethylhexyl diphenyl phosphate (EHDP), isodecyl diphenyl phosphate (IDDP), isopropylated phenyl phosphate (IPP), tricresyl phosphate (TMPP; also abbreviated TCP), triphenyl phosphate (TPHP; also abbreviated TPP), tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris (1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate (TDCIPP; also abbreviated TDCPP), tri-o-cresyl phosphate (TOCP), and 2,2-,4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) in zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae. Larvae (n≈24 per dose per compound) were exposed to test compounds (0.4-120 μM) at sub-teratogenic concentrations either developmentally or acutely, and locomotor activity was assessed at 6 days post fertilization. When given developmentally, all chemicals except BPDP, IDDP and TBBPA produced behavioral effects. When given acutely, all chemicals produced behavioral effects, with TPHP, TBBPA, EHDP, IPP, and BPDP eliciting the most effects at the most concentrations. The results indicate that these replacement flame retardants may have developmental or pharmacological effects on the vertebrate nervous system. PMID:26348672

  7. Super flame-retardant lightweight rime-like carbon-phenolic nanofoam

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Haiming; Hong, Changqing; Zhang, Xinghong; Xue, Huafei; Meng, Songhe; Han, Jiecai

    2016-01-01

    The desire for lightweight nanoporous materials with high-performance thermal insulation and efficient anti-ablation resistance for energy conservation and thermal protection/insulation has greatly motivated research and development recently. The main challenge to synthesize such lightweight materials is how to balance the relationship of low thermal conductivity and flame retardancy. Herein, we propose a new concept of lightweight “rime-like” structured carbon-phenolic nanocomposites to solve this problem, where the 3D chopped network-structured carbon fiber (NCF) monoliths are incorporated with nanoporous phenolic aerogel to retain structural and functional integrity. The nanometer-scaled porous phenolic (NP) was synthesized through polymerization-induced phase separation and ambient pressure drying using phenolic resin (PR) solution as reaction source, ethylene glycol (EG) as solvent and hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) as catalyst. We demonstrate that the as-prepared NCF-NP nanocomposite exhibits with a low density of 0.25–0.35 g/cm3, low thermal conductivity of 0.125 Wm−1K−1 and outstanding flame retardancy exceeding 2000 °C under arc-jet wind tunnel simulation environment. Our results show that the synthesis strategy is a promising approach for producing nanocomposites with excellent high-temperature heat blocking property. PMID:27629114

  8. Hair and Nails as Noninvasive Biomarkers of Human Exposure to Brominated and Organophosphate Flame Retardants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liang-Ying; He, Ka; Hites, Ronald A; Salamova, Amina

    2016-03-15

    After the phase-out of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), the use of alternative flame retardants (AFRs), such as FireMaster 550, and of organophosphate esters (OPEs) has increased. However, little is known about human exposure to these chemicals. This lack of biomonitoring studies is partially due to the absence of reliable noninvasive biomarkers of exposure. Human hair and nails can provide integrated exposure measurements, and as such, these matrices can potentially be used as noninvasive biomarkers of exposure to these flame retardants. Paired human hair, fingernail, toenail, and serum samples obtained from 50 adult participants recruited at Indiana University Bloomington campus were analyzed by gas chromatographic mass spectrometry for 36 PBDEs, 9 AFRs, and 12 OPEs. BDE-47, BDE-99, 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (TBB), di(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (TBPH), tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl)phosphate (TDCIPP), and triphenyl phosphate (TPHP) were the most abundant compounds detected in almost all hair, fingernail, and toenail samples. The concentrations followed the order OPEs > TBB+TBPH > Σpenta-BDE. PBDE levels in the hair and nail samples were significantly correlated with their levels in serum (P < 0.05), suggesting that human hair and nails can be used as biomarkers to assess human exposure to PBDEs. PMID:26926265

  9. Brominated flame retardants in the indoor environment - Comparative study of indoor contamination from three countries.

    PubMed

    Venier, Marta; Audy, Ondřej; Vojta, Šimon; Bečanová, Jitka; Romanak, Kevin; Melymuk, Lisa; Krátká, Martina; Kukučka, Petr; Okeme, Joseph; Saini, Amandeep; Diamond, Miriam L; Klánová, Jana

    2016-09-01

    Concentrations of more than 20 brominated flame retardants (FRs), including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and emerging FRs, were measured in air, dust and window wipes from 63 homes in Canada, the Czech Republic and the United States in the spring and summer of 2013. Among the PBDEs, the highest concentrations were generally BDE-209 in all three matrices, followed by Penta-BDEs. Among alternative FRs, EHTBB and BEHTBP were detected at the highest concentrations. DBDPE was also a major alternative FR detected in dust and air. Bromobenzenes were detected at lower levels than PBDEs and other alternative FRs; among the bromobenzenes, HBB and PBEB were the most abundant compounds. In general, FR levels were highest in the US and lowest in the Czech Republic - a geographic trend that reflects the flame retardants' market. No statistically significant differences were detected between bedroom and living room FR concentrations in the same house (n=10), suggesting that sources of FRs are widespread indoors and mixing between rooms. The concentrations of FRs in air, dust, and window film were significantly correlated, especially for PBDEs. We found a significant relationship between the concentrations in dust and window film and in the gas phase for FRs with log KOA values <14, suggesting that equilibrium was reached for these but not compounds with log KOA values >14. This hypothesis was confirmed by a large discrepancy between values predicted using a partitioning model and the measured values for FRs with log KOA values >14. PMID:27248661

  10. Phosphorus-Doped Graphene Oxide Layer as a Highly Efficient Flame Retardant.

    PubMed

    Some, Surajit; Shackery, Iman; Kim, Sun Jun; Jun, Seong Chan

    2015-10-26

    A simple and easy process has been developed to efficiently dope phosphorus into a graphene oxide surface. Phosphorus-doped graphene oxide (PGO) is prepared by the treatment of polyphosphoric acid with phosphoric acid followed by addition of a graphene oxide solution while maintaining a pH of around 5 by addition of NaOH solution. The resulting materials are characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The as-made PGO solution-coated cloth exhibits excellent flame retardation properties. The PGO-coated cloth emits some smoke at the beginning without catching fire for more than 120 s and maintains its initial shape with little shrinkage. In contrast, the pristine cloth catches fire within 5 s and is completely burned within 25 s, leaving trace amounts of black residue. The simple technique of direct introduction of phosphorus into the graphene oxide surface to produce phosphorus-doped oxidized carbon nanoplatelets may be a general approach towards the low-cost mass production of PGO for many practical applications, including flame retardation.

  11. Spatial Distribution and Air-Water Exchange of Organic Flame Retardants in the Lower Great Lakes.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Carrie A; Puggioni, Gavino; Helm, Paul A; Muir, Derek; Lohmann, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    Organic flame retardants (OFRs) such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and novel halogenated flame retardants (NHFRs) are ubiquitous, persistent, and bioaccumulative contaminants that have been used in consumer goods to slow combustion. In this study, polyethylene passive samplers (PEs) were deployed throughout the lower Great Lakes (Lake Erie and Lake Ontario) to measure OFRs in air and water, calculate air-water exchange fluxes, and investigate spatial trends. Dissolved Σ12BDE was greatest in Lake Ontario near Toronto (18 pg/L), whereas gaseous Σ12BDE was greatest on the southern shoreline of Lake Erie (11 pg/m(3)). NHFRs were generally below detection limits. Air-water exchange was dominated by absorption of BDEs 47 and 99, ranging from -964 pg/m(2)/day to -30 pg/m(2)/day. Σ12BDE in air and water was significantly correlated with surrounding population density, suggesting that phased-out PBDEs continued to be emitted from population centers along the Great Lakes shoreline in 2012. Correlation with dissolved Σ12BDE was strongest when considering population within 25 km while correlation with gaseous Σ12BDE was strongest when using population within 3 km to the south of each site. Bayesian kriging was used to predict dissolved Σ12BDE over the lakes, illustrating the utility of relatively highly spatially resolved measurements in identifying potential hot spots for future study.

  12. Super flame-retardant lightweight rime-like carbon-phenolic nanofoam.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Haiming; Hong, Changqing; Zhang, Xinghong; Xue, Huafei; Meng, Songhe; Han, Jiecai

    2016-01-01

    The desire for lightweight nanoporous materials with high-performance thermal insulation and efficient anti-ablation resistance for energy conservation and thermal protection/insulation has greatly motivated research and development recently. The main challenge to synthesize such lightweight materials is how to balance the relationship of low thermal conductivity and flame retardancy. Herein, we propose a new concept of lightweight "rime-like" structured carbon-phenolic nanocomposites to solve this problem, where the 3D chopped network-structured carbon fiber (NCF) monoliths are incorporated with nanoporous phenolic aerogel to retain structural and functional integrity. The nanometer-scaled porous phenolic (NP) was synthesized through polymerization-induced phase separation and ambient pressure drying using phenolic resin (PR) solution as reaction source, ethylene glycol (EG) as solvent and hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) as catalyst. We demonstrate that the as-prepared NCF-NP nanocomposite exhibits with a low density of 0.25-0.35 g/cm(3), low thermal conductivity of 0.125 Wm(-1)K(-1) and outstanding flame retardancy exceeding 2000 °C under arc-jet wind tunnel simulation environment. Our results show that the synthesis strategy is a promising approach for producing nanocomposites with excellent high-temperature heat blocking property. PMID:27629114

  13. Urinary biomonitoring of phosphate flame retardants: levels in California adults and recommendations for future studies.

    PubMed

    Dodson, Robin E; Van den Eede, Nele; Covaci, Adrian; Perovich, Laura J; Brody, Julia Green; Rudel, Ruthann A

    2014-12-01

    Phosphate flame retardants (PFRs) are abundant and found at the highest concentrations relative to other flame retardant chemicals in house dust; however, little is known about the biological levels of PFRs and their relationship with house dust concentrations. These relationships provide insight into major exposure pathways and potential health risks. We analyzed urine samples from 16 California residents in 2011 for 6 chlorinated and nonchlorinated dialkyl or diaryl phosphates (DAPs), the expected major metabolites of the most prominent PFRs, and qualitatively screened for 18 other metabolites predicted from in vitro studies. We detected all 6 DAPs within the range of previously reported levels, although very few comparisons are available. We found weakly positive nonsignificant correlations between urine and dust concentrations and maxima urine corresponding to maxima dust for the pairs bis(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (BDCIPP)-tris(1,3-dichloro-isopropyl) phosphate (TDCIPP) and bis(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (BCEP)-tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP). Metabolite levels of PFRs were correlated for many PFR combinations, suggesting they commonly co-occur. As far as we know, this is the first study to measure these 6 DAP metabolites simultaneously and to detect other PFR metabolites in US urine samples. We recommend biomonitoring studies include these 6 DAPs as well as several additional compounds detected through qualitative screening and previous ADME studies. PFRs represent a class of poorly studied commercial chemicals with widespread exposure and raise concerns for health effects including carcinogenicity and neurotoxicity. PMID:25388620

  14. Spatial Distribution and Air-Water Exchange of Organic Flame Retardants in the Lower Great Lakes.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Carrie A; Puggioni, Gavino; Helm, Paul A; Muir, Derek; Lohmann, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    Organic flame retardants (OFRs) such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and novel halogenated flame retardants (NHFRs) are ubiquitous, persistent, and bioaccumulative contaminants that have been used in consumer goods to slow combustion. In this study, polyethylene passive samplers (PEs) were deployed throughout the lower Great Lakes (Lake Erie and Lake Ontario) to measure OFRs in air and water, calculate air-water exchange fluxes, and investigate spatial trends. Dissolved Σ12BDE was greatest in Lake Ontario near Toronto (18 pg/L), whereas gaseous Σ12BDE was greatest on the southern shoreline of Lake Erie (11 pg/m(3)). NHFRs were generally below detection limits. Air-water exchange was dominated by absorption of BDEs 47 and 99, ranging from -964 pg/m(2)/day to -30 pg/m(2)/day. Σ12BDE in air and water was significantly correlated with surrounding population density, suggesting that phased-out PBDEs continued to be emitted from population centers along the Great Lakes shoreline in 2012. Correlation with dissolved Σ12BDE was strongest when considering population within 25 km while correlation with gaseous Σ12BDE was strongest when using population within 3 km to the south of each site. Bayesian kriging was used to predict dissolved Σ12BDE over the lakes, illustrating the utility of relatively highly spatially resolved measurements in identifying potential hot spots for future study. PMID:27458653

  15. Urinary Biomonitoring of Phosphate Flame Retardants: Levels in California Adults and Recommendations for Future Studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Phosphate flame retardants (PFRs) are abundant and found at the highest concentrations relative to other flame retardant chemicals in house dust; however, little is known about the biological levels of PFRs and their relationship with house dust concentrations. These relationships provide insight into major exposure pathways and potential health risks. We analyzed urine samples from 16 California residents in 2011 for 6 chlorinated and nonchlorinated dialkyl or diaryl phosphates (DAPs), the expected major metabolites of the most prominent PFRs, and qualitatively screened for 18 other metabolites predicted from in vitro studies. We detected all 6 DAPs within the range of previously reported levels, although very few comparisons are available. We found weakly positive nonsignificant correlations between urine and dust concentrations and maxima urine corresponding to maxima dust for the pairs bis(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (BDCIPP)-tris(1,3-dichloro-isopropyl) phosphate (TDCIPP) and bis(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (BCEP)-tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP). Metabolite levels of PFRs were correlated for many PFR combinations, suggesting they commonly co-occur. As far as we know, this is the first study to measure these 6 DAP metabolites simultaneously and to detect other PFR metabolites in US urine samples. We recommend biomonitoring studies include these 6 DAPs as well as several additional compounds detected through qualitative screening and previous ADME studies. PFRs represent a class of poorly studied commercial chemicals with widespread exposure and raise concerns for health effects including carcinogenicity and neurotoxicity. PMID:25388620

  16. Flame retardants and organochlorine pollutants in bald eagle plasma from the Great Lakes region.

    PubMed

    Venier, Marta; Wierda, Michael; Bowerman, William W; Hites, Ronald A

    2010-08-01

    We report measurements of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and of emerging flame retardants in the plasma of nestling bald eagles sampled from early May to late June of 2005. Concentrations of total PBDEs ranged from 0.35 ng g(-1) ww to 29.3 ng g(-1) ww (average=5.7+/-1.9 ng g(-1) ww). The most abundant congeners were BDE-47, BDE-99, and BDE-100. The fully brominated congener, BDE-209, was detected in approximately one third of the samples at an average concentration of 1.2+/-0.72 ng g(-1) ww. Several emerging flame retardants, such as pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB), hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs), and Dechlorane Plus (DP), were detected in these samples. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides were also detected at levels close to those previously published. A statistically significant relationship was found between total PBDE concentrations and total PCB and p,p'-DDE concentrations, suggesting that these compounds share a common source, which is most likely the eagle's food. PMID:20579684

  17. Super flame-retardant lightweight rime-like carbon-phenolic nanofoam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Haiming; Hong, Changqing; Zhang, Xinghong; Xue, Huafei; Meng, Songhe; Han, Jiecai

    2016-09-01

    The desire for lightweight nanoporous materials with high-performance thermal insulation and efficient anti-ablation resistance for energy conservation and thermal protection/insulation has greatly motivated research and development recently. The main challenge to synthesize such lightweight materials is how to balance the relationship of low thermal conductivity and flame retardancy. Herein, we propose a new concept of lightweight “rime-like” structured carbon-phenolic nanocomposites to solve this problem, where the 3D chopped network-structured carbon fiber (NCF) monoliths are incorporated with nanoporous phenolic aerogel to retain structural and functional integrity. The nanometer-scaled porous phenolic (NP) was synthesized through polymerization-induced phase separation and ambient pressure drying using phenolic resin (PR) solution as reaction source, ethylene glycol (EG) as solvent and hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) as catalyst. We demonstrate that the as-prepared NCF-NP nanocomposite exhibits with a low density of 0.25–0.35 g/cm3, low thermal conductivity of 0.125 Wm‑1K‑1 and outstanding flame retardancy exceeding 2000 °C under arc-jet wind tunnel simulation environment. Our results show that the synthesis strategy is a promising approach for producing nanocomposites with excellent high-temperature heat blocking property.

  18. Organophosphorus flame retardants (PFRs) in human breast milk from several Asian countries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon-Woo; Isobe, Tomohiko; Muto, Mamoru; Tue, Nguyen Minh; Katsura, Kana; Malarvannan, Govindan; Sudaryanto, Agus; Chang, Kwang-Hyeon; Prudente, Maricar; Viet, Pham Hung; Takahashi, Shin; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2014-12-01

    In this study, the concentrations of 10 organophosphorus flame retardants (PFRs) were determined in 89 human breast milk samples collected from Japan, the Philippines and Vietnam. Among the targeted PFRs, tris(2-chloroexyl) phosphate (TCEP) and triphenyl phosphate (TPHP) were the predominant compounds and were detected in more than 60% of samples in all three countries. The concentrations of PFRs in human breast milk were significantly higher (p<0.05) in the Philippines (median 70 ng g(-1) lipid wt.) than those in Japan (median 22 ng g(-1) lipid wt.) and Vietnam (median 10 ng g(-1) lipid wt.). The present results suggest that the usage of products containing PFRs in the Philippines is higher than those of Japan and Vietnam. Comparing with a previous literature survey in Sweden, the levels of PFRs in human breast milk from the Philippines were 1.5-2 times higher, whereas levels in Japan and Vietnam were 4-20 times lower, suggesting that these differences might be due to their variation in the usage of flame-retarded products utilized in each country. When daily intake of PFRs to infants via human breast milk was estimated, some individuals accumulated tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) and TCEP were close to reference dose (RfD). This is the first report to identify PFRs in human breast milk samples from Asian countries.

  19. Spatial distribution of old and emerging flame retardants in Chinese forest soils: sources, trends and processes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qian; Nizzetto, Luca; Li, Jun; Mulder, Marie D; Sáňka, Ondřej; Lammel, Gerhard; Bing, Haijian; Liu, Xin; Jiang, Yishan; Luo, Chunling; Zhang, Gan

    2015-03-01

    The levels and distribution of polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs), novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) and Dechlorane Plus (DP) in soils and their dependence on environmental and anthropological factors were investigated in 159 soil samples from 30 background forested mountain sites across China. Decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE) was the most abundant flame retardant (25-18,000 pg g(-1) and 5-13,000 pg g(-1) in O-horizon and A-horizon, respectively), followed by BDE 209 (nd-5900 pg g(-1) and nd-2400 pg g(-1) in O-horizon and A-horizon, respectively). FRs distributions were primarily controlled by source distribution. The distributions of most phasing-out PBDEs, DP isomers and TBPH were in fact correlated to a population density-based index used as proxy of areas with elevated usage and waste of FR containing products. High concentrations of some NBFRs were however observed in industrialized regions and FR manufacturing plants. Strongly positive correlations were observed between PBDEs and their replacement products suggesting similar emission pattern and environmental behavior. Exposure of mineral subsoils depended on precipitations driving leaching of FRs into the soil core. This was especially evident for some emerging BFRs (TBE, TBPH, and TBB etc.) possibly indicating potential for diffuse groundwater contamination.

  20. Super flame-retardant lightweight rime-like carbon-phenolic nanofoam.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Haiming; Hong, Changqing; Zhang, Xinghong; Xue, Huafei; Meng, Songhe; Han, Jiecai

    2016-09-15

    The desire for lightweight nanoporous materials with high-performance thermal insulation and efficient anti-ablation resistance for energy conservation and thermal protection/insulation has greatly motivated research and development recently. The main challenge to synthesize such lightweight materials is how to balance the relationship of low thermal conductivity and flame retardancy. Herein, we propose a new concept of lightweight "rime-like" structured carbon-phenolic nanocomposites to solve this problem, where the 3D chopped network-structured carbon fiber (NCF) monoliths are incorporated with nanoporous phenolic aerogel to retain structural and functional integrity. The nanometer-scaled porous phenolic (NP) was synthesized through polymerization-induced phase separation and ambient pressure drying using phenolic resin (PR) solution as reaction source, ethylene glycol (EG) as solvent and hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) as catalyst. We demonstrate that the as-prepared NCF-NP nanocomposite exhibits with a low density of 0.25-0.35 g/cm(3), low thermal conductivity of 0.125 Wm(-1)K(-1) and outstanding flame retardancy exceeding 2000 °C under arc-jet wind tunnel simulation environment. Our results show that the synthesis strategy is a promising approach for producing nanocomposites with excellent high-temperature heat blocking property.

  1. Organophosphorus flame retardants (PFRs) in human breast milk from several Asian countries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon-Woo; Isobe, Tomohiko; Muto, Mamoru; Tue, Nguyen Minh; Katsura, Kana; Malarvannan, Govindan; Sudaryanto, Agus; Chang, Kwang-Hyeon; Prudente, Maricar; Viet, Pham Hung; Takahashi, Shin; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2014-12-01

    In this study, the concentrations of 10 organophosphorus flame retardants (PFRs) were determined in 89 human breast milk samples collected from Japan, the Philippines and Vietnam. Among the targeted PFRs, tris(2-chloroexyl) phosphate (TCEP) and triphenyl phosphate (TPHP) were the predominant compounds and were detected in more than 60% of samples in all three countries. The concentrations of PFRs in human breast milk were significantly higher (p<0.05) in the Philippines (median 70 ng g(-1) lipid wt.) than those in Japan (median 22 ng g(-1) lipid wt.) and Vietnam (median 10 ng g(-1) lipid wt.). The present results suggest that the usage of products containing PFRs in the Philippines is higher than those of Japan and Vietnam. Comparing with a previous literature survey in Sweden, the levels of PFRs in human breast milk from the Philippines were 1.5-2 times higher, whereas levels in Japan and Vietnam were 4-20 times lower, suggesting that these differences might be due to their variation in the usage of flame-retarded products utilized in each country. When daily intake of PFRs to infants via human breast milk was estimated, some individuals accumulated tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) and TCEP were close to reference dose (RfD). This is the first report to identify PFRs in human breast milk samples from Asian countries. PMID:24630247

  2. Effects of tetrabromobisphenol A, brominated flame retardant, in ICR mice after prenatal and postnatal exposure.

    PubMed

    Tada, Y; Fujitani, T; Yano, N; Takahashi, H; Yuzawa, K; Ando, H; Kubo, Y; Nagasawa, A; Ogata, A; Kamimura, H

    2006-08-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), brominated flame retardant, is produced in the largest amounts globally for use in plastics or building materials. TBBPA has been detected in sediment, air at the dismantling plant or human serum samples. In the present study, we examined the effects of prenatal and postnatal exposure to TBBPA in mice. TBBPA (99.1% pure) in diet was administered to pregnant ICR mice at doses of 0% (control), 0.01%, 0.1% or 1.0% from gestational day 0 to weaning at postnatal day 27. The average daily food intake and body weight of dams showed no significant differences between the control and treated groups. There were no dose-related effects on reproductive data. Serum concentrations of total-cholesterol and liver weights of treated dams and offspring were higher than those of the control mice. Histological findings in treated dams or offspring showed the increase of focal necrosis of hepatocytes and inflammatory cell infiltration in the liver, and increase of dilation or atrophy of renal tubules and cyst in the kidney. TBBPA was developed as a new, safe class of flame retardant and was not highly toxic. However, the present data suggested that TBBPA caused a lipid metabolic disorder and hepatic or kidney lesion, under these conditions. PMID:16716481

  3. A Versatile and Scalable Approach toward Robust Superhydrophobic Porous Materials with Excellent Absorbency and Flame Retardancy

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Changping; Shen, Mengxia; Ren, Xiaoyan; Ai, Kelong; Lu, Lehui

    2016-01-01

    The frequent oil spillages and the industrial discharge of organic contaminants have not only created severe environmental and ecological crises, but also cause a risk of fire and explosion. These environmental and safety issues emphasize the urgent need for materials that possess superior sorption capability and less flammability and thus can effectively and safely clean up the floating oils and water-insoluble organic compounds. Here we present the successful hydrophobic modification of the flame retardant melamine sponge with a commercial fluorosilicone, by using a facile one-step solvent-free approach and demonstrate that the resultant superhydrophobic sponge not only exhibits extraordinary absorption efficiency (including high capacity, superior selectivity, good recyclability, and simple recycling routes), but also retains excellent flame retardancy and robust stability. In comparison to conventional methods, which usually utilize massive organic solvents, the present approach does not involve any complicated process or sophisticated equipment nor generates any waste liquids, and thus is a more labor-saving, environment-friendly, energy-efficient and cost-effective strategy for the hydrophobic modification. Taking into account the critical role of hydrophobic porous materials, especially in the field of environmental remediation, the approach presented herein would be highly valuable for environmental remediation and industrial applications. PMID:27501762

  4. Developmental exposure of zebrafish larvae to organophosphate flame retardants causes neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liwei; Xu, Wenbin; Peng, Tao; Chen, Haigang; Ren, Lin; Tan, Hana; Xiao, Dan; Qian, Haifeng; Fu, Zhengwei

    2016-01-01

    With the gradual ban on brominated flame retardants (FRs), the application of organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) has increased remarkably. Considering the structural similarity between OPFRs and organophosphate pesticides, hypotheses that OPFRs may interfere with neurodevelopment as organophosphate pesticides are reasonable. In this study, the neurotoxicity of three OPFRs, including tri-n-butyl phosphate (TNBP), tris (2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) and tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), was evaluated in zebrafish larvae and then compared with the neurotoxicity of organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos (CPF). The results showed that similar to CPF, exposure to OPFRs for 5days resulted in significant changes in locomotor behavior, either in free swimming or in photomotor response. However, given the transcriptional changes that occur in nervous system genes in response to OPFRs and CPF, as well as the altered enzyme activity of AChE and its mRNA level, the underlying mechanisms for neurotoxicity among these organophosphate chemicals might be varied. In summary, the results confirm the potential neurodevelopmental toxicity of OPFRs and underscore the importance of identifying the mechanistic targets of the OPFRs with specific moieties. Furthermore, as the neurobehavioral responses are well conserved among vertebrates and the exposure of children to OPFRs is significant, a thorough assessment of the risk of OPFRs exposure during early development should be highly emphasized in future studies. PMID:27018022

  5. Hair and Nails as Noninvasive Biomarkers of Human Exposure to Brominated and Organophosphate Flame Retardants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liang-Ying; He, Ka; Hites, Ronald A; Salamova, Amina

    2016-03-15

    After the phase-out of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), the use of alternative flame retardants (AFRs), such as FireMaster 550, and of organophosphate esters (OPEs) has increased. However, little is known about human exposure to these chemicals. This lack of biomonitoring studies is partially due to the absence of reliable noninvasive biomarkers of exposure. Human hair and nails can provide integrated exposure measurements, and as such, these matrices can potentially be used as noninvasive biomarkers of exposure to these flame retardants. Paired human hair, fingernail, toenail, and serum samples obtained from 50 adult participants recruited at Indiana University Bloomington campus were analyzed by gas chromatographic mass spectrometry for 36 PBDEs, 9 AFRs, and 12 OPEs. BDE-47, BDE-99, 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (TBB), di(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (TBPH), tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl)phosphate (TDCIPP), and triphenyl phosphate (TPHP) were the most abundant compounds detected in almost all hair, fingernail, and toenail samples. The concentrations followed the order OPEs > TBB+TBPH > Σpenta-BDE. PBDE levels in the hair and nail samples were significantly correlated with their levels in serum (P < 0.05), suggesting that human hair and nails can be used as biomarkers to assess human exposure to PBDEs.

  6. Raman spectroscopy based identification of flame retardants in consumer products using an acquired reference spectral library.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, Sutapa; Fang, Huiting

    2015-01-01

    Flame retardants (FRs), a class of commonly used chemical additives in consumer products such as polyurethane foams, are well known for their persistence in the environment, bioaccumulation and potential toxicity [1]. In order to address the potential health concerns and environmental impacts associated with the wide-spread use these chemicals, it is essential to identify them efficiently in the environment and consumer products. Raman spectroscopy (RS) offers an attractive option for the non-invasive, in-situ identification of flame retardants in a variety of sample formats [2-4]. RS based chemical identification relies on the availability of spectral libraries for identification through spectral matching with reference chemicals. Here we present the application of Raman spectroscopy for identifying FR additives in select consumer products using an acquired spectral library of commonly used FRs. The RS based method described here enables simultaneous identification of multiple components within a sample, which can offer important insights into the sources of FR contamination, in addition to identification of the FR component itself. The availability of Raman spectral library of commercially used FRs, such as the one presented here, will facilitate the identification of these chemicals in consumer products.

  7. Developmental exposure of zebrafish larvae to organophosphate flame retardants causes neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liwei; Xu, Wenbin; Peng, Tao; Chen, Haigang; Ren, Lin; Tan, Hana; Xiao, Dan; Qian, Haifeng; Fu, Zhengwei

    2016-01-01

    With the gradual ban on brominated flame retardants (FRs), the application of organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) has increased remarkably. Considering the structural similarity between OPFRs and organophosphate pesticides, hypotheses that OPFRs may interfere with neurodevelopment as organophosphate pesticides are reasonable. In this study, the neurotoxicity of three OPFRs, including tri-n-butyl phosphate (TNBP), tris (2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) and tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), was evaluated in zebrafish larvae and then compared with the neurotoxicity of organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos (CPF). The results showed that similar to CPF, exposure to OPFRs for 5days resulted in significant changes in locomotor behavior, either in free swimming or in photomotor response. However, given the transcriptional changes that occur in nervous system genes in response to OPFRs and CPF, as well as the altered enzyme activity of AChE and its mRNA level, the underlying mechanisms for neurotoxicity among these organophosphate chemicals might be varied. In summary, the results confirm the potential neurodevelopmental toxicity of OPFRs and underscore the importance of identifying the mechanistic targets of the OPFRs with specific moieties. Furthermore, as the neurobehavioral responses are well conserved among vertebrates and the exposure of children to OPFRs is significant, a thorough assessment of the risk of OPFRs exposure during early development should be highly emphasized in future studies.

  8. Understanding the Mechanism of Action of Triazine-Phosphonate Derivatives as Flame Retardants for Cotton Fabric.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Monique M; Al-Abdul-Wahid, M Sameer; Fontenot, Krystal R; Graves, Elena E; Chang, SeChin; Condon, Brian D; Grimm, Casey C; Lorigan, Gary A

    2015-01-01

    Countless hours of research and studies on triazine, phosphonate, and their combination have provided insightful information into their flame retardant properties on polymeric systems. However, a limited number of studies shed light on the mechanism of flame retardancy of their combination on cotton fabrics. The purpose of this research is to gain an understanding of the thermal degradation process of two triazine-phosphonate derivatives on cotton fabric. The investigation included the preparation of diethyl 4,6-dichloro-1,3,5-triazin-2-ylphosphonate (TPN1) and dimethyl (4,6-dichloro-1,3,5-triazin-2-yloxy) methyl phosphonate (TPN3), their application on fabric materials, and the studies of their thermal degradation mechanism. The studies examined chemical components in both solid and gas phases by using attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis coupled with Fourier transform infrared (TGA-FTIR) spectroscopy, and 31P solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (31P solid state NMR), in addition to the computational studies of bond dissociation energy (BDE). Despite a few differences in their decomposition, TPN1 and TPN3 produce one common major product that is believed to help reduce the flammability of the fabric. PMID:26096432

  9. Multifunctional cyclotriphosphazene/hexagonal boron nitride hybrids and their flame retarding bismaleimide resins with high thermal conductivity and thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Jin, Wenqin; Yuan, Li; Liang, Guozheng; Gu, Aijuan

    2014-09-10

    A novel hybridized multifunctional filler (CPBN), cyclotriphosphazene/hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) hybrid, was synthesized by chemically coating hBN with hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene and p-phenylenediamine, its structure was systemically characterized. Besides, CPBN was used to develop new flame retarding bismaleimide/o,o'-diallylbisphenol A (BD) resins with simultaneously high thermal conductivity and thermal stability. The nature of CPBN has a strong influence on the flame behavior of the composites. With the addition of only 5 wt % CPBN to BD resin, the thermal conductivity increases 2 times; meanwhile the flame retardancy of BD resin is remarkably increased, reflected by the increased limited oxygen index, much longer time to ignition, significantly reduced heat release rate. The thermogravimetric kinetics, structures of chars and pyrolysis gases, and cone calorimeter tests were investigated to reveal the unique flame retarding mechanism of CPBN/BD composites. CPBN provides multieffects on improving the flame retardancy, especially in forming a protective char layer, which means a more thermally stable and condensed barrier for heat and mass transfer, and thus protecting the resin from further combustion. PMID:25140735

  10. Fire self-extinguishing cotton fabric: development of piperazine derivatives containing phosphorous-sulfur-nitrogen and their flame retardant and thermal behaviors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent studies have shown interest in flame retardants containing phosphorus, nitrogen and sulfur a combination small molecule with a promising new approach in preparing an important class of flame retardant materials. Tetraethyl piperazine-1,4-diyldiphosphonate (TEPP) and O,O,O',O'-tetramethyl pip...

  11. Occupational exposure of air crews to tricresyl phosphate isomers and organophosphate flame retardants after fume events.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Birgit Karin; Weiss, Tobias; Schütze, Andre; Koslitz, Stephan; Broding, Horst Christoph; Bünger, Jürgen; Brüning, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Aircraft cabin air can possibly be contaminated by tricresyl phosphates (TCP) from jet engine oils during fume events. o-TCP, a known neurotoxin, has been addressed to be an agent that might cause the symptoms reported by cabin crews after fume events. A total of 332 urine samples of pilots and cabin crew members in common passenger airplanes, who reported fume/odour during their last flight, were analysed for three isomers of tricresyl phosphate metabolites as well as dialkyl and diaryl phosphate metabolites of four flame retardants. None of the samples contained o-TCP metabolites above the limit of detection (LOD 0.5 μg/l). Only one sample contained metabolites of m- and p-tricresyl phosphates with levels near the LOD. Median metabolite levels of tributyl phosphate (TBP), tris-(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) and triphenyl phosphate (TPP) (DBP 0.28 μg/l; BCEP 0.33 μg/l; DPP 1.1 μg/l) were found to be significantly higher than in unexposed persons from the general population. Median tris-(2-chloropropyl) phosphate (TCPP) metabolite levels were significantly not higher in air crews than in controls. Health complaints reported by air crews can hardly be addressed to o-TCP exposure in cabin air. Elevated metabolite levels for TBP, TCEP and TPP in air crews might occur due to traces of hydraulic fluid in cabin air (TBP, TPP) or due to release of commonly used flame retardants from the highly flame protected environment in the airplane. A slight occupational exposure of air crews to organophosphates was shown. PMID:23179756

  12. Analysis of flame retardant additives in polymer fractions of waste of electric and electronic equipment (WEEE) by means of HPLC-UV/MS and GPC-HPLC-UV.

    PubMed

    Schlummer, Martin; Brandl, Fritz; Mäurer, Andreas; van Eldik, Rudi

    2005-01-28

    An HPLC-UV/MS method has been developed to identify and quantify flame retardants in post-consumer plastics from waste of electric and electronic equipment (WEEE). Atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation spectra of 15 brominated and phosphate-based flame retardants were recorded and interpreted. The method was applied to detect flame retardant additives in polymer extracts obtained from pressurised liquid extraction of solid polymers. In addition, a screening method was developed for soluble styrene polymers to isolate a flame retardant fraction through the application of gel permeation chromatography (GPC). This fraction was transferred to an online-coupled HPLC column and detected by UV spectroscopy, which allowed a reliable qualitative and quantitative analysis of brominated flame retardants in the polymer solutions.

  13. Assessing the persistence, bioaccumulation potential and toxicity of brominated flame retardants: data availability and quality for 36 alternative brominated flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Stieger, Greta; Scheringer, Martin; Ng, Carla A; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2014-12-01

    Polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD) are major brominated flame retardants (BFRs) that are now banned or under restrictions in many countries because of their persistence, bioaccumulation potential and toxicity (PBT properties). However, there is a wide range of alternative BFRs, such as decabromodiphenyl ethane and tribromophenol, that are increasingly used as replacements, but which may possess similar hazardous properties. This necessitates hazard and risk assessments of these compounds. For a set of 36 alternative BFRs, we searched 25 databases for chemical property data that are needed as input for a PBT assessment. These properties are degradation half-life, bioconcentration factor (BCF), octanol-water partition coefficient (Kow), and toxic effect concentrations in aquatic organisms. For 17 of the 36 substances, no data at all were found for these properties. Too few persistence data were available to even assess the quality of these data in a systematic way. The available data for Kow and toxicity show surprisingly high variability, which makes it difficult to identify the most reliable values. We propose methods for systematic evaluations of PBT-related chemical property data that should be performed before data are included in publicly available databases. Using these methods, we evaluated the data for Kow and toxicity in more detail and identified several inaccurate values. For most of the 36 alternative BFRs, the amount and the quality of the PBT-related property data need to be improved before reliable hazard and risk assessments of these substances can be performed.

  14. Bioaccumulation and biomagnification of classical flame retardants, related halogenated natural compounds and alternative flame retardants in three delphinids from Southern European waters.

    PubMed

    Barón, E; Giménez, J; Verborgh, P; Gauffier, P; De Stephanis, R; Eljarrat, E; Barceló, D

    2015-08-01

    Occurrence and behaviour of classical (PBDEs) and alternative (HNs, HBB, PBEB, DBDPE and HBCD) flame retardants, together with naturally produced MeO-PBDEs, were studied in short-beaked common dolphin (Delphinus delphis), bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and long-finned pilot whale (Globicephala melas) in two sampling locations from Southern European waters. PBDEs, Dec 602, Dec 603, DP, α-HBCD and two MeO-PBDEs were detected in all three species. ∑PBDEs were between 17 and 2680 ng/g lw; ∑HNs were between 1.1 and 59 ng/g lw; α-HBCD levels ranged between 3.2 and 641 ng/g lw; ∑MeO-PBDEs were between 34 and 1966 ng/g lw. Bottlenose dolphins were the most contaminated species and some individuals could present health risk for endocrine disruption since levels found were above the reported threshold (1500 ng/g lw). Stable isotope analysis was used to evaluate the biomagnification capacity of these compounds. PBDEs, MeO-PBDEs and Dec 602 showed a significant positive correlation with trophic position. PMID:25875161

  15. Effects of alpha-zirconium phosphate on thermal degradation and flame retardancy of transparent intumescent fire protective coating

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Weiyi; Zhang, Ping; Song, Lei; Wang, Xin; Hu, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A transparent intumescent fire protective coating was obtained by UV-cured technology. • OZrP could enhance the thermal stability and anti-oxidation of the coating. • OZrP could reduce the combustion properties of the coatings. - Abstract: Organophilic alpha-zirconium phosphate (OZrP) was used to improve the thermal and fire retardant behaviors of the phenyl di(acryloyloxyethyl)phosphate (PDHA)-triglycidyl isocyanurate acrylate (TGICA)-2-phenoxyethyl acrylate (PHEA) (PDHA-TGICA-PHEA) coating. The morphology of nanocomposite coating was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effect of OZrP on the flame retardancy, thermal stability, fireproofing time and char formation of the coatings was investigated by microscale combustion calorimeter (MCC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), laser Raman spectroscopy (LRS) and scanning electric microscope (SEM). The results showed that by adding OZrP, the peak heat release rate and total heat of combustion were significantly reduced. The highest improvement was achieved with 0.5 wt% OZrP. XPS analysis indicated that the performance of anti-oxidation of the coating was improved with the addition of OZrP, and SEM images showed that a good synergistic effect was obtained through a ceramic-like layer produced by OZrP covered on the surface of char.

  16. Photochemical degradation of a brominated flame retardant (tetrabromobisphenol A) in ice under field and laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waligroski, G.; Grannas, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Studies of brominated flame retardants have raised awareness of their potential environmental impact as toxic compounds. Because these compounds are now globally distributed, including in the Polar Regions, it is important to assess their potential fate in the environment. It has been shown that active photochemistry occurs in sunlit snow and ice, but there is little information regarding potential photochemical degradation of brominated flame retardants in snow and ice. The purpose of this research is to investigate the direct and indirect photochemical transformation pathways of a widely used brominated flame retardant, tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA). We have conducted field-based experiments in Barrow, Alaska to investigate the potential photochemical degradation of TBBPA in snow and ice under environmentally-relevant conditions. Field-based results show that TBBPA is efficiently degraded under direct photolysis conditions in frozen aqueous samples under natural Barrow sunlight. In aqueous solution the light absorption properties of TBBPA are pH dependent. Therefore, the photodegradation of TBBPA in snow and ice will be highly pH dependent. Reactions that are pH dependent may be affected by the nature of the liquid-like layers in snow/ice as well as the presence of other solutes that may indirectly affect the local pH experienced by TBBPA in snow and ice samples. In order to establish how the effective pH of liquid-like regions in ice might impact the degradation of TBBPA, various salts (sodium chloride, sodium fluoride, sodium bromide, ammonium chloride, ammonium acetate and ammonium sulfate) were added to aqueous solutions of TBBPA. Upon freezing, these different salts will induce pH differences in the liquid-like regions of the sample due to a phenomenon known as the freezing potential. Observed reactivity differences upon addition of these salts will be evaluated and discussed. Additionally, the presence of natural dissolved organic matter (DOM), an effective

  17. Application of a phosphazene derivative as a flame retardant for cotton fabric using conventional method and supercritical CO2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conventional pad-dry-cure (non-scCO2) and supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) application methods were investigated to study the effectiveness of a phosphazene derivative as a flame retardant on cotton fabric. 1,1',4,5-tetrahydrotrispiro[1,3,2-diazaphosphole-2,2'-[1,3,5,2,4,6]triazatriphosphinine-4...

  18. Guide to PBDE: Toxic Flame Retardant--What Women, Children and School Personnel Need to Know. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2012

    2012-01-01

    Chemical flame-retardants are used in a variety of products to prevent the spread and occurrence of fire. While fire safety is critical, this family of chemicals, known as Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are highly toxic. They are found in carpeting, foam cushions, polyester clothing and bedding, wallpaper, toys, household dust, a variety…

  19. Studies of flammability and thermal degradation for flame retardant cotton fabric with P-N containing derivatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effectiveness of a phosphoramidate Tetraethyl piperazine-1,4- diyldiphosphoramidate (TEPP) as a flame retardant (FR) on cotton twill fabrics was compared with that of a previously studied Diethyl 4- methylpiperazin-1-ylphosphoramidate (DEPP). TEPP was formed in a reaction between two phosphonat...

  20. Toxicokinetics of the Sterioisomer Specific Flame Retardant Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) Gamma: Effect of Dose, Time, and Repeated Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) are high production volume brominated aliphatic cyclic hydrocarbons used as flame-retardants in foams, plastics and textiles. Commercial HBCD is a mixture of three main stereoisomers, alpha (α), beta (β) and gamma (γ). A shift from the high percent...

  1. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry comprehensive analysis of organophosphorus, brominated flame retardants, by-products and formulation intermediates in water.

    PubMed

    Cristale, Joyce; Quintana, Jordi; Chaler, Roser; Ventura, Francesc; Lacorte, Silvia

    2012-06-01

    A multiresidue method based on gas chromatography coupled to quadrupole mass spectrometry was developed to determine organophosphorus flame retardants, polybromodiphenyl ethers (BDEs 28, 47, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183 and 209), new brominated flame retardants, bromophenols, bromoanilines, bromotoluenes and bromoanisoles in water. Two ionization techniques (electron ionization--EI, and electron capture negative ionization--ECNI) and two acquisition modes (selected ion monitoring--SIM, and selected reaction monitoring--SRM) were compared as regards to mass spectral characterization, sensitivity and quantification capabilities. The highest sensitivity, at expenses of identification capacity, was obtained by GC-ECNI-MS/SIM for most of the compounds analyzed, mainly for PBDEs and decabromodiphenyl ethane while GC-EI-MS/MS in SRM was the most selective technique and permitted the identification of target compounds at the pg level, and identification capabilities increased when real samples were analyzed. This method was further used to evaluate the presence and behavior of flame retardants within a drinking water treatment facility. Organophosphorus flame retardants were the only compounds detected in influent waters at levels of 0.32-0.03 μg L⁻¹, and their elimination throughout the different treatment stages was evaluated.

  2. Halogenated flame retardants in baby food from the United States and from China and the estimated dietary intakes by infants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liang-Ying; Salamova, Amina; Hites, Ronald A

    2014-08-19

    Three categories of baby food (formula, cereal, and puree) were bought from United States and Chinese stores in 2013 and analyzed for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and related flame retardants. The primary goal of this project was to investigate whether there were differences in the levels of flame retardants between these two nations' baby foods. The median concentrations of total PBDEs (sum of BDE-17, -28, -47, -49, -99, -100, -153, -183, and -209) were 21 and 36 pg/g fresh weight for the Unites States and Chinese baby foods, respectively. Among non-PBDE flame retardants, hexabromobenzene, Dechlorane Plus (DP), and decabromodiphenylethane were frequently detected (22-57%) with median concentrations of 1.6, 8.7, and 17 pg/g fresh weight for United States samples, and 1.3, 13, and 20 pg/g fresh weight for Chinese samples. In general, the flame retardant concentrations in the United States and Chinese samples were not statistically different, but very high DP concentrations were observed in one Chinese formula sample (4000 pg/g) and in one United States cereal sample (430 pg/g), possibly suggesting contamination of the raw materials or contamination during production of these two samples. A comparison of median estimated daily dietary intake rates of BDE-47, -99, and -153 with existing reference doses for neurodevelopmental toxicity and other existing criteria suggested no concerns for the consumption of these baby foods.

  3. Melamine Polyphosphate - the Reactive and Additive Flame Retardant for Polyurethane Foams.

    PubMed

    Lubczak, Jacek; Lubczak, Renata

    2016-01-01

    Melamine polyphosphate, MPP was applied as reactive and additive flame retardant for thermally resistant polyurethane foams. MPP was hydroxyalkylated with ethylene and propylene carbonates to get oligoetherols with 1,3,5-triazine ring and phosphorus. The structure and physical properties of the products were studied. The polyurethane foams, PUFs obtained from this oligoetherols were self-distinguishing. The addition of powdered MPP into foaming mixture resulted in further decrease of flammability modified PUFs. The MPP-modified PUFs were characterized by physical methods adequate to thermal resistance and flammability of the PUFs. The best MPP-modified PUF showed oxygen index 24.6. All the modified PUFs were remarkably thermally resistant; they could stand long lasting thermal exposure even at 200 °C. PMID:26970791

  4. Brominated flame retardants and organochlorine compounds in duplicate diet samples from a Portuguese academic community.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Sónia D; Sousa, Ana C A; Isobe, Tomohiko; Kunisue, Tatsuya; Nogueira, António J A; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2016-10-01

    Concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDDs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCHs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), chlordane compounds (CHLs) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs), were measured in duplicate diet samples from 21 volunteers at a Portuguese academic community (University of Aveiro). Overall, the levels of the target compounds were low, with detection frequencies varying widely depending on the compounds and with brominated flame retardants (BFRs) registering the lowest detection frequencies. Among PCB congeners, nondioxin-like PCBs were predominant and detected in the majority of the samples. Organochlorine pesticides were also detected in the majority of the samples, with 100% detection for DDTs and HCHs. Estimated daily intakes (EDIs) were calculated using lower and upper bound estimations, and in both cases values were far below the currently established tolerable daily intakes for PCBs and OCs and the reference doses for PBDEs and HBCDDs.

  5. Polyfunctional epoxies - Different molecular weights of brominated polymeric additives as flame retardants in graphite composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, Z.; Gilwee, W. J.; Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    The imparting of flame retardancy to graphite-reinforced composites without incurring mechanical property deterioration is investigated for the case of an experimental, trifunctional epoxy resin incorporating brominated polymeric additives (BPAs) of the diglycidyl type. Such mechanical properties as flexural strength and modulus, and short beam shear strength, were measured in dry and in hot/wet conditions, and the glass transition temperature, flammability, and water absorption were measured and compared with nonbromilated systems. Another comparison was made with a tetrafunctional epoxy system. The results obtained are explained in terms of differences in the polymeric backbone length of the bromine carrier polymer. BPAs are found to be a reliable bromine source for fire inhibition in carbon-reinforced composites without compromise of mechanical properties.

  6. One-step synthesis and flame retardancy of sheaf-like microcrystal antimony oxychloride.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Zhao, Hewei; Li, Lidong; Tian, Ming; Han, Jibing; Zhang, Liqun; Guo, Lin

    2011-10-01

    A mild and facile solution route has been developed for large-scale synthesis of sheaf-like antimony oxychloride Sb8O11CI2 (H2O)6 microcrystal at room temperature. The morphologies and structures of the as-prepared products were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A mechanism for the formation of the sheaf-like microstructure was tentatively proposed. The shape regulation was attributed to the capping mode of the PVP-directed antimony oxychloride crystal. The thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA) were employed to investigate thermal decomposition mechanism and temperature-dependent phase transition of antimony oxychloride Sb8O11CI2 (H2O)6 in the air. The flammable property determined by the cone calorimeter showed excellent flame retardancy when applied this antimony oxychloride in poly (vinyl chloride) (PVC) polymer. PMID:22400215

  7. Brominated flame retardants and organochlorine compounds in duplicate diet samples from a Portuguese academic community.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Sónia D; Sousa, Ana C A; Isobe, Tomohiko; Kunisue, Tatsuya; Nogueira, António J A; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2016-10-01

    Concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDDs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCHs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), chlordane compounds (CHLs) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs), were measured in duplicate diet samples from 21 volunteers at a Portuguese academic community (University of Aveiro). Overall, the levels of the target compounds were low, with detection frequencies varying widely depending on the compounds and with brominated flame retardants (BFRs) registering the lowest detection frequencies. Among PCB congeners, nondioxin-like PCBs were predominant and detected in the majority of the samples. Organochlorine pesticides were also detected in the majority of the samples, with 100% detection for DDTs and HCHs. Estimated daily intakes (EDIs) were calculated using lower and upper bound estimations, and in both cases values were far below the currently established tolerable daily intakes for PCBs and OCs and the reference doses for PBDEs and HBCDDs. PMID:27367176

  8. Phenols, flame retardants and phthalates in water and wastewater - a global problem.

    PubMed

    Ayanda, Olushola Sunday; Olutona, Godwin Oladele; Olumayede, Emmanuel G; Akintayo, Cecilia O; Ximba, Bhekumusa J

    2016-01-01

    Organic pollutants in water and wastewater have been causing serious environmental problems. The arbitrary discharge of wastewater by industries, and handling, use, and disposal constitute a means by which phenols, flame retardants (FRs), phthalates (PAEs) and other toxic organic pollutants enter the ecosystem. Moreover, these organic pollutants are not completely removed during treatment processes and might be degraded into highly toxic derivatives, which has led to their occurrence in the environment. Phenols, FRs and PAEs are thus highly toxic, carcinogenic and mutagenic, and are capable of disrupting the endocrine system. Therefore, investigation to understand the sources, pathways, behavior, toxicity and exposure to phenols, FRs and PAEs in the environment is necessary. Formation of different by-products makes it difficult to compare the efficacy of the treatment processes, most especially when other organic matters are present. Hence, high levels of phenols, FRs and PAEs removal could be attained with in-line combined treatment processes.

  9. Effect of Nitrogen Additives on Flame Retardant Action of Tributyl Phosphate: Phosphorus – Nitrogen Synergism

    SciTech Connect

    Gaan, Sabyasachi; Sun, Gang; Hutches, Katherine; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of nitrogen additives like urea, guanidine carbonate and melamine formaldehyde on the flame retardant efficacy of tributyl phosphate (TBP) has been investigated. From the LOI tests on treated cotton it is clear that the nitrogen additives have synergistic action. Estimation of activation energy of decomposition of treated cotton indicated that nitrogen additives enhance the thermal stability during the burning process. SEM pictures of chars formed after LOI test showed the formation of protective polymeric coating on the surface. The surface of chars formed were evaluated using FTIR-ATR and XPS analysis which showed that the coating was composed of Phosphorus-Nitrogen-Oxygen containing species. Formation of this coating during the burning process could lead to the synergistic interaction of phosphorus and nitrogen. Based on the experimental data we have further proposed several reaction mechanisms which could contribute to synergistic action and formation of protective coating on the surface of char.

  10. Vapor Pressure of Three Brominated Flame Retardants Determined via Knudsen Effusion Method

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jinxia; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2012-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have been used in a variety of consumer products in the past four decades. The vapor pressures for three widely used BFRs, that is, tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), and octabromodiphenyl ethers (octaBDEs) mixtures, were determined using the Knudsen effusion method and compared to those of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209). The values measured extrapolated to 298.15 K are 8.47 × 10−9, 7.47 × 10−10, and 2.33 × 10−9 Pa, respectively. The enthalpies of sublimation for these BFRs were estimated using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation and are 143.6 ± 0.4, 153.7 ± 3.1, and 150.8 ± 3.2 kJ/mole, respectively. In addition, the enthalpies of fusion and melting temperatures for these BFRs were also measured in the present study. PMID:22213441

  11. Phenols, flame retardants and phthalates in water and wastewater - a global problem.

    PubMed

    Ayanda, Olushola Sunday; Olutona, Godwin Oladele; Olumayede, Emmanuel G; Akintayo, Cecilia O; Ximba, Bhekumusa J

    2016-01-01

    Organic pollutants in water and wastewater have been causing serious environmental problems. The arbitrary discharge of wastewater by industries, and handling, use, and disposal constitute a means by which phenols, flame retardants (FRs), phthalates (PAEs) and other toxic organic pollutants enter the ecosystem. Moreover, these organic pollutants are not completely removed during treatment processes and might be degraded into highly toxic derivatives, which has led to their occurrence in the environment. Phenols, FRs and PAEs are thus highly toxic, carcinogenic and mutagenic, and are capable of disrupting the endocrine system. Therefore, investigation to understand the sources, pathways, behavior, toxicity and exposure to phenols, FRs and PAEs in the environment is necessary. Formation of different by-products makes it difficult to compare the efficacy of the treatment processes, most especially when other organic matters are present. Hence, high levels of phenols, FRs and PAEs removal could be attained with in-line combined treatment processes. PMID:27642822

  12. Lithium-Ion Electrolytes Containing Phosphorous-Based, Flame-Retardant Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Smith, Kiah A.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Prakash, G. K. Surya

    2010-01-01

    Future NASA missions aimed at exploring Mars, the Moon, and the outer planets require rechargeable batteries that can operate over a wide temperature range (-60 to +60 C) to satisfy the requirements of various applications. In addition, many of these applications will require improved safety, due to their use by humans. Currently, the state-of-the-art lithium-ion (Li-ion) system has been demonstrated to operate over a wide range of temperatures (-40 to +40 C); however, abuse conditions can often lead to cell rupture and fire. The nature of the electrolyte can greatly affect the propensity of the cell/battery to catch fire, given the flammability of the organic solvents used within. Li-ion electrolytes have been developed that contain a flame-retardant additive in conjunction with fluorinated co-solvents to provide a safe system with a wide operating temperature range. Previous work incorporated fluorinated esters into multi-component electrolyte formulations, which were demonstrated to cover a temperature range from 60 to +60 C. This work was described in Fluoroester Co-Solvents for Low-Temperature Li+ Cells (NPO-44626), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 33, No. 9 (September 2009), p. 37; and Optimized Li-Ion Electrolytes Con tain ing Fluorinated Ester Co-Solvents (NPO-45824), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 3 (March 2010), p. 48. Other previous work improved the safety characteristics of the electrolytes by adding flame-retardant additives such as triphenyl phosphate (TPhPh), tri-butyl phosphate (TBuPh), triethyl phosphate (TEtPh), and bis(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) methyl phosphonate (TFMPo). The current work involves further investigation of other types of flame-retardant additives, including tris(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) phosphate, tris(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) phosphite, triphenylphosphite, diethyl ethylphosphonate, and diethyl phenylphosphonate added to an electrolyte composition intended for wide operating temperatures. In general, many of the formulations investigated in this

  13. Concentrations in air of organobromine, organochlorine and organophosphate flame retardants in Toronto, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoeib, Mahiba; Ahrens, Lutz; Jantunen, Liisa; Harner, Tom

    2014-12-01

    Concentrations of organobromine (BFRs), organochlorine (CFRs) and organophosphate esters flame retardants and plasticizers (PFRs) in air were monitored for over one year at an urban site in Toronto, Canada during 2010-2011. The mean value for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (BDEs) (gas + particle phase) was 38 pg/m3 with BDE-47 and BDE-99 as the dominant congeners. The mean concentrations in air for ∑non-BDE (BFRs and CFRs), was 9.6 pg/m3 - about four times lower than the BDEs. The brominated FRs: TBP-AE, BTBPE, EH-TBB, BEH-TEBP and the chlorinated syn- and anti-DP were detected frequently, ranging from 87% to 96%. Highest concentrations in air among all flame retardant classes were observed for the Σ-PFRs. The yearly mean concentration in air for ΣPFRs was 2643 pg/m3 with detection frequency higher than 80%. Except for TBP-AE and b- DBE-DBCH, non-BDEs (BFRs, CFRs and PFRs) were mainly associated with the particle phase. BDE concentrations in air were positively correlated with temperature indicating that volatilization from local sources was an important factor controlling levels in air. This correlation did not hold for most BFRs, CFRs and PFRs which were mainly on particles. For these compounds, air concentrations in Toronto are likely related to emissions from point sources and advective inputs. This study highlights the importance of urban air monitoring for FRs. Urban air can be considered a sentinel for detecting changes in the use and application of FRs in commercial products.

  14. Brominated flame retardants and Dechloranes in European and American eels from glass to silver life stages.

    PubMed

    Sühring, Roxana; Byer, Jonathan; Freese, Marko; Pohlmann, Jan-Dag; Wolschke, Hendrik; Möller, Axel; Hodson, Peter V; Alaee, Mehran; Hanel, Reinhold; Ebinghaus, Ralf

    2014-12-01

    The populations of American (Anguilla rostrata) and European eels (Anguilla anguilla) have been declining rapidly in the last decades. Organic contaminants are suspected to be one of the possible causes for the decline; however, so far there have been few investigations of the uptake of specific compounds by different life cycle stages (e.g. freshwater or marine stage) and how the contamination patterns develop throughout the eel's life cycle. In the present study we measured concentrations of polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs), alternate brominated flame retardants (alternate BFRs) and Dechloranes (Decs) in different life stages of European and American eels to compare the contamination patterns and their development throughout the eel's life cycle. In general, concentrations of flame retardants (FRs) were similar to or higher in American than in European eels, and a greater number of FRs were detected. PBDE congeners that are characteristic of the Penta-PBDE formulation were the most abundant FRs in all adult eels as well as American glass eels. In European glass eels the alternate BFR 2,3-dibromopropyl-2,4,6-tribromophenylether (DPTE) and Dechlorane Plus were the dominating FRs, with average concentrations of 1.1±0.31 ng g(-1) ww and up to 0.32 ng g(-1) ww respectively. Of the PBDEs BDE-183 was the most abundant congener in European glass eels. Low concentrations (less than 10% of the total contamination) of Tetra and Penta-PBDEs in juvenile European eels indicated that bans of technical Penta-PBDE in the European Union are effective. Enrichment of PBDEs was observed over the life stages of both European and American eels. However, a greater relative contribution of PBDEs to the sum FR contamination in American eels indicated an on-going exposure to these substances. High contributions of alternate BFRs in juvenile eels indicated an increased use of these substances in recent years. Concentrations seemed to be driven primarily by location, rather than life

  15. Distribution of copper, silver and gold during thermal treatment with brominated flame retardants

    SciTech Connect

    Oleszek, Sylwia; Grabda, Mariusz; Shibata, Etsuro; Nakamura, Takashi

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Copper, silver and gold during thermal treatment with brominated flame retardants. • Distribution of copper, silver and gold during thermal processing. • Thermodynamic considerations of the bromination reactions. - Abstract: The growing consumption of electric and electronic equipment results in creating an increasing amount of electronic waste. The most economically and environmentally advantageous methods for the treatment and recycling of waste electric and electronic equipment (WEEE) are the thermal techniques such as direct combustion, co-combustion with plastic wastes, pyrolysis and gasification. Nowadays, this kind of waste is mainly thermally treated in incinerators (e.g. rotary kilns) to decompose the plastics present, and to concentrate metals in bottom ash. The concentrated metals (e.g. copper, precious metals) can be supplied as a secondary raw material to metal smelters, while the pyrolysis of plastics allows the recovery of fuel gases, volatilising agents and, eventually, energy. Indeed, WEEE, such as a printed circuit boards (PCBs) usually contains brominated flame retardants (BFRs). From these materials, hydrobromic acid (HBr) is formed as a product of their thermal decomposition. In the present work, the bromination was studied of copper, silver and gold by HBr, originating from BFRs, such as Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) and Tetrabromobisphenol A-Tetrabromobisophenol A diglycidyl ether (TTDE) polymer; possible volatilization of the bromides formed was monitored using a thermo-gravimetric analyzer (TGA) and a laboratory-scale furnace for treating samples of metals and BFRs under an inert atmosphere and at a wide range of temperatures. The results obtained indicate that up to about 50% of copper and silver can evolve from sample residues in the form of volatile CuBr and AgBr above 600 and 1000 °C, respectively. The reactions occur in the molten resin phase simultaneously with the decomposition of the brominated resin. Gold is

  16. Use of alternative assays to identify and prioritize organophosphorus flame retardants for potential developmental and neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Behl, Mamta; Hsieh, Jui-Hua; Shafer, Timothy J; Mundy, William R; Rice, Julie R; Boyd, Windy A; Freedman, Jonathan H; Hunter, E Sidney; Jarema, Kimberly A; Padilla, Stephanie; Tice, Raymond R

    2015-01-01

    Due to their toxicity and persistence in the environment, brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are being phased out of commercial use, leading to the increased use of alternative chemicals such as the organophosphorus flame retardants (OPFRs). There is, however, limited information on the potential health effects of OPFRs. Due to the structural similarity of the OPFRs to organophosphorus insecticides, there is concern regarding developmental toxicity and neurotoxicity. In response, we evaluated a set of OPFRs (triphenyl phosphate [TPHP]), isopropylated phenyl phosphate [IPP], 2-ethylhexyl diphenyl phosphate [EHDP], tert-butylated phenyl diphenyl phosphate [BPDP], trimethyl phenyl phosphate [TMPP], isodecyl diphenyl phosphate [IDDP], (tris(1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate [TDCIPP], and tris(2-chloroethyl)phosphate [TCEP]) in a battery of cell-based in vitro assays and alternative model organisms and compared the results to those obtained for two classical BFRs (3,3',5,5'-tetrabromobisphenol A [TBBPA] and 2,2'4,4'-brominated diphenyl ether [BDE-47]). The assays used evaluated the effects of chemicals on the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells, the proliferation and growth of human neural stem cells, rat neuronal growth and network activity, and development of nematode (Caenorhabditis elegans) and zebrafish (Danio rerio). All assays were performed in a concentration-response format, allowing for the determination of the point of departure (POD: the lowest concentration where a chemically-induced response exceeds background noise). The majority of OPFRs (8/9) were active in multiple assays in the range of 1-10 μM, most of which had comparable activity to the BFRs TBBPA and BDE-47. TCEP was negative in all assays. The results indicate that the replacement OPFRs, with the exception of TCEP, showed comparable activity to the two BFRs in the assays tested. Based on these results, more comprehensive studies are warranted to further characterize the potential hazard

  17. Classification and toxicity mechanisms of novel flame retardants (NFRs) based on whole genome expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Guan, Miao; Su, Guanyong; Giesy, John P; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2016-02-01

    Recently some novel alternative flame retardants (NFRs), which have been widely applied to meet demands for mandated flame retardation of products, have been detected in various matrices of the environment. However, knowledge on toxic effects and associated molecular mechanisms of these chemicals was limited. Here, toxic mechanisms of action of six NFRs, bis (2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (BEHP), chlorendic acid (Het acid), 2,2-bis (bromomethyl)-1,3-propanediol (BMP), tris (2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBEP), triethyl phosphate (TEP), tributyl phosphate (TBP) were investigated by use of a library containing ∼1820 modified green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing promoter reporter vectors constructed from Escherichia coli K12(E.coli). BEHP, Het acid, BMP, TBEP, TEP, TBP inhibited growth of E. coli with 4 h 10%-inhibition concentrations of 53.0-3102.3 μM. A total of 119, 44, 26, 131, 62, 103 genes out of 336 genes selected during preliminary screening were significantly altered with fold-changes greater than 1.5 by BEHP, Het acid, BMP, TBEP, TEP and TBP, respectively. GO analyses of responsive genes suggested that RNA and primary metabolism process were involved in molecular mechanisms of toxicity. Chemical clustering based on expression of 62 multi-responsive genes showed that BEHP, TBP and TBEP were grouped together, which is consistent with similarity of their chemical structures, especially for BEHP and TBP. Clustering by molecular descriptors and molecular activity by use of the multivariate classification system ToxCast was consistent with that by profiles of multi-responsive genes. The results of this study demonstrated the utility of the E. coli, whole-cell assay for determining mechanisms of toxic action of chemicals.

  18. Determination of brominated flame retardants in Jukskei River catchment area in Gauteng, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Olukunle, O I; Okonkwo, O J; Kefeni, K K; Lupankwa, M

    2012-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are considered to be environmental pollutants due to their toxicity, persistence and ubiquity in the environment. Little information is known about the presence of brominated flame retardants in South Africa's water systems. Therefore, this study examined and compared different extraction methods (liquid-liquid (LL) vs. solid phase (SP) for water, Soxhlet extraction (SE) vs. ultrasonic for sediment) for extraction efficiencies in the determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) in water and sediment from Jukskei River. Clean-up of sample extracts was performed using disposable Pasteur pipettes containing neutral, acidified and basic silica gel. Final extracts, after concentration and dilution to 200 μL were analyzed by injecting 1 μL in the GC-ECD and GC-MS. Results obtained showed good recoveries for most of the tested analytes in water; for LLE, values ranged between 80.5 ± 10.22% and 126.6 ± 1.94%; SPE, 70.41 ± 2.01%-124.78 ± 3.78% (n = 3) and for sediment (73-114%, with an RSD <17%) using SE. The ultrasonic extraction method gave less than 50% recovery for most of the congeners. The concentrations of the BFRs in water samples were less than the detection limit while the concentrations in sediment ranged from 1.95 to 36.61 ng g(-1) dry weight for Σ(11) BFRs. Dichloromethane and n-hexane : acetone (2 : 1, v/v) gave optimum value of recovery for water and sediment respectively. PMID:22277235

  19. Dechlorane plus and other flame retardants in a sediment core from Lake Ontario.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xinghua; Marvin, Chris H; Hites, Ronald A

    2007-09-01

    Our previous research on atmospheric samples suggested that Lake Ontario might receive significant amounts of Dechlorane Plus (DP), a highly chlorinated flame retardant, from the atmosphere and from inputs from DP's manufacturing facility in Niagara Falls, New York. To confirm this suspicion, a sediment core from the central basin of Lake Ontario was analyzed for the two isomers of DP, for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and for 1,2-bis-(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (TBE). The results showed that the concentration of DP in sediment increased rapidly starting in the mid-1970s and reached its peak concentration (310 ng g(-1) dry weight) in the mid-1990s. The peak flux and total inventory of DP were estimated to be 9.3 ng cm(-2) yr(-1) and 120 ng cm(-2), respectively. These values suggest that the total burden of DP in Lake Ontario is approximately 20 tons and that the maximum load rate was approximately 2 tons per year. The highest concentrations of PBDEs and TBE were found in the surficial sediment, with average concentrations of 2.8, 14, and 6.7 ng g(-1) d.w. for PBDE(3-7) (tri-through hepta-BDEs), BDE-209, and TBE, respectively. The surface fluxes were 0.08, 0.43, and 0.20 ng cm(-2) yr(-1), and the inventories were 0.87, 3.9, and 1.8 ng cm(-2) for PBDE3-7, BDE-209, and TBE, respectively. The concentration of DP in Lake Ontario sediment exceeds that of the brominated flame retardants combined. PMID:17937275

  20. Monitoring Indoor Exposure to Organophosphate Flame Retardants: Hand Wipes and House Dust

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Kate; Garantziotis, Stavros; Birnbaum, Linda S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Organophosphate flame retardants (PFRs) are becoming popular replacements for the phased-out polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) mixtures, and they are now commonly detected in indoor environments. However, little is known about human exposure to PFRs because they cannot be easily measured in blood or serum. Objectives: To investigate relationships between the home environment and internal exposure, we assessed associations between two PFRs, tris(1,3-dichloropropyl) phosphate (TDCIPP) and triphenyl phosphate (TPHP), in paired hand wipe and dust samples and concentrations of their metabolites in urine samples (n = 53). We also assessed short-term variation in urinary metabolite concentrations (n = 11 participants; n = 49 samples). Methods: Adult volunteers in North Carolina, USA, completed questionnaires and provided urine, hand wipe, and household dust samples. PFRs and PBDEs were measured in hand wipes and dust, and bis(1,3-dichloropropyl) phosphate (BDCIPP) and diphenyl phosphate (DPHP), metabolites of TDCIPP and TPHP, were measured in urine. Results: TDCIPP and TPHP were detected frequently in hand wipes and dust (> 86.8%), with geometric mean concentrations exceeding those of PBDEs. Unlike PBDEs, dust TDCIPP and TPHP levels were not associated with hand wipes. However, hand wipe levels were associated with urinary metabolites. Participants with the highest hand wipe TPHP mass, for instance, had DPHP levels 2.42 times those of participants with the lowest levels (95% CI: 1.23, 4.77). Women had higher levels of DPHP, but not BDCIPP. BDCIPP and DPHP concentrations were moderately to strongly reliable over 5 consecutive days (intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.81 and 0.51, respectively). Conclusions: PFR exposures are widespread, and hand-to-mouth contact or dermal absorption may be important pathways of exposure. Citation: Hoffman K, Garantziotis S, Birnbaum LS, Stapleton HM. 2015. Monitoring indoor exposure to organophosphate flame retardants

  1. Classification and toxicity mechanisms of novel flame retardants (NFRs) based on whole genome expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Guan, Miao; Su, Guanyong; Giesy, John P; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2016-02-01

    Recently some novel alternative flame retardants (NFRs), which have been widely applied to meet demands for mandated flame retardation of products, have been detected in various matrices of the environment. However, knowledge on toxic effects and associated molecular mechanisms of these chemicals was limited. Here, toxic mechanisms of action of six NFRs, bis (2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (BEHP), chlorendic acid (Het acid), 2,2-bis (bromomethyl)-1,3-propanediol (BMP), tris (2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBEP), triethyl phosphate (TEP), tributyl phosphate (TBP) were investigated by use of a library containing ∼1820 modified green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing promoter reporter vectors constructed from Escherichia coli K12(E.coli). BEHP, Het acid, BMP, TBEP, TEP, TBP inhibited growth of E. coli with 4 h 10%-inhibition concentrations of 53.0-3102.3 μM. A total of 119, 44, 26, 131, 62, 103 genes out of 336 genes selected during preliminary screening were significantly altered with fold-changes greater than 1.5 by BEHP, Het acid, BMP, TBEP, TEP and TBP, respectively. GO analyses of responsive genes suggested that RNA and primary metabolism process were involved in molecular mechanisms of toxicity. Chemical clustering based on expression of 62 multi-responsive genes showed that BEHP, TBP and TBEP were grouped together, which is consistent with similarity of their chemical structures, especially for BEHP and TBP. Clustering by molecular descriptors and molecular activity by use of the multivariate classification system ToxCast was consistent with that by profiles of multi-responsive genes. The results of this study demonstrated the utility of the E. coli, whole-cell assay for determining mechanisms of toxic action of chemicals. PMID:26588597

  2. Effects of Relaxation and EMG Training on Academic Achievement of Educable Retarded Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, John L.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Eight educable mentally retarded boys who participated in a ten-week electromyographic biofeedback training evidenced significant gains in cognition, reading achievement, coordination, memory, and handwriting. (CL)

  3. Development of flame retardant PV module encapsulants: Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Galica, J.P.

    1998-06-01

    This Phase 1 final report covers the work performed by Springborn Testing and Research, Inc., for the period October 1, 1997 to June 30, 1998 under the Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement Number DE-FC36-97GO10255, entitled Development of Flame Retardant PV Module Encapsulants. While use of roof-mounted arrays has always been an attractive means of deploying PV, only within recent years have such building integrated concepts (BIPV) found renewed interest among module makers and end-users. Prior to building integrated and rooftop applications, flammability requirements for modules have not been a great industry concern. However, with growing interest in BIPV and the requirement for building code requirements for commercial and industrial structures, flammability issues have become a barrier to entry for many module constructions into this potentially huge domestic market for PV. The overall goal of the 3 phase PV BONUS two project is to develop and commercialize a line of fire retardant encapsulation materials to serve the emerging building integrated and building mounted PV market. The objectives of the Phase 1 effort are limited to concept development and business planning activities.

  4. A study of the dynamic flammability of radiation cross-linked flame-retardant HDPE/EPDM/silicon-elastomer compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Shaojin; Zhang, Zhicheng; Du, Zhiwen; Teng, Renrui; Wang, Zhengzhou

    2003-04-01

    A dynamic flammability study of flame-retardant compound consisting of HDPE, EPDM and silicon elastomer blended with additives, as wire and cable insulation was made before and after irradiation. The data of RHR, EHC, SEC and the concentration of CO and CO 2 from cone colorimeter shown in the burning process were accessed. By blending silicon elastomer, CO release rate was reduced and the thermal endurance was improved. Oxygen index, mechanical property, morphology of the char formed in dynamical flame and thermal stability were also investigated.

  5. Selective pressurized liquid extraction of replacement and legacy brominated flame retardants from soil.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Thomas J; Morrison, Paul D; Ball, Andrew S; Clarke, Bradley O

    2016-08-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are a class of flame retardant registered as UN POPs due to their persistence in the environment, bioaccumulation potential and toxicity. Replacement novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) have exhibited similar health hazards and environmental distribution, becoming recognized as significant contaminants. This work describes the development and validation of a sensitive and reliable method for the simultaneous quantitation of PBDEs and NBFRs in environmental soil samples using selective pressurized liquid extraction (S-PLE) and gas chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-(EI)-MS/MS). Under optimal conditions, extraction of eight PBDEs (-28, -47, -99, -100, -153, -154, -183 and -209) and five NBFRs; pentabromotoluene (PBT), pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB), hexabromobenzene (HBB), 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EH-TBB) and bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) was performed at 100°C and 1500psi using a 1:1 mixture of hexane and dichloromethane. The method utilized 33mL capacity PLE cells containing, from bottom to top, a single cellulose filter, 3g activated Florisil, 6g acid silica (10% w/w), 3g Na2SO4, another cellulose filter, 2g activated copper powder and 3g soil sample dispersed in 2g Na2SO4 and 1g of Hydromatrix. The method was evaluated by repeated extraction and analysis of all analytes from 3g soil at three spike concentrations. Good recoveries were observed for most analytes at each of the spiking levels with RSD values generally below 20%. MDLs ranged from 0.01 to 4.8ng/g dw for PBDEs and 0.01-0.55ng/g dw for NBFRs. The described one-step combined extraction and cleanup method reduces sample processing times compared with traditional procedures, while delivering comparable analytical performance. The method was successfully applied to environmental soil samples (n=5), detecting PBDEs in each sample and providing the first account of NBFR contamination in Australian soils.

  6. Maternal transfer of emerging brominated and chlorinated flame retardants in European eels.

    PubMed

    Sühring, Roxana; Freese, Marko; Schneider, Mandy; Schubert, Sophia; Pohlmann, Jan-Dag; Alaee, Mehran; Wolschke, Hendrik; Hanel, Reinhold; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Marohn, Lasse

    2015-10-15

    The European eel (Anguilla anguilla) is regarded as a critically endangered species. Scientists are in agreement that the "quality of spawners" is a vital factor for the survival of the species. This quality can be impaired by parasites, disease and pollution. Especially endocrine disrupting organic chemicals pose a potential threat to reproduction and development of offspring. To our knowledge, the findings in this publication for the first time describe maternal transfer of contaminants in eels. We analysed the concentrations of in total 53 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and their halogenated substitutes in muscle, gonads and eggs of artificially matured European eels and in muscle and gonads of untreated European eels that were used for comparison. We found evidence that persistent organic pollutants such as PBDEs, as well as their brominated and chlorinated substitutes are redistributed from muscle tissue to gonads and eggs. Concentrations ranged from 0.001 ng g(-1)ww for sum Dechlorane metabolites (DPMA, aCL10DP, aCl11DP) to 2.1 ng g(-1)ww for TBA in eggs, 0.001 ng g(-1)ww for Dechlorane metabolites to 9.4 ng g(-1)ww for TBA in gonads and 0.002 ng g(-1)ww for Dechlorane metabolites to 54 ng g(-1)ww for TBA in muscle tissue. Average egg muscle ratios (EMRs) for compounds detectable in artificially matured eels from both Schlei Fjord and Ems River ranged from 0.01 for Dechlorane 602 (DDC-DBF) to 10.4 for PBEB. Strong correlations were found between flame retardant concentrations and lipid content in the analysed tissue types, as well as transfer rates and octanol-water partitioning coefficient, indicating that these parameters were the driving factors for the observed maternal transfer. Furthermore, indications were found, that TBP-DBPE, TBP-AE, BATE and TBA have a significant uptake from the surrounding water, rather than just food and might additionally be formed by metabolism or biotransformation processes. Dechloranes seem to be of increasing

  7. Tracing organophosphorus and brominated flame retardants and plasticizers in an estuarine food web.

    PubMed

    Brandsma, Sicco H; Leonards, Pim E G; Leslie, Heather A; de Boer, Jacob

    2015-02-01

    Nine organophosphorus flame retardants (PFRs) were detected in a pelagic and benthic food web of the Western Scheldt estuary, The Netherlands. Concentrations of several PFRs were an order of magnitude higher than those of the brominated flame retardants (BFRs). However, the detection frequency of the PFRs (6-56%) was lower than that of the BFRs (50-97%). Tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP), tris(isobutyl) phosphate (TIBP) and tris(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCIPP) were the dominant PFRs in sediment with median concentrations of 7.0, 8.1 and 1.8 ng/g dry weight (dw), respectively. PFR levels in the suspended particular matter (SPM) were 2-12 times higher than that in sediment. TBOEP, TCIPP, TIBP, tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) and tris(phenyl) phosphate (TPHP) were found in organisms higher in the estuarine food web. The highest PFR concentrations in the benthic food web were found in sculpin, goby and lugworm with median concentrations of 17, 7.4, 4.6 and 2.0 ng/g wet weight (ww) for TBOEP, TIBP, TCIPP and TPHP, respectively. Comparable levels were observed in the pelagic food web, BDE209 was the predominant PBDE in sediment and SPM with median concentrations up to 9.7 and 385 ng/g dw, respectively. BDE47 was predominant in the biotic compartment of the food web with highest median levels observed in sculpin and common tern eggs of 79 ng/g lipid weight (lw) (2.5 ng/g ww) and 80 ng/g lw (11 ng/g ww), respectively. Trophic magnification was observed for all PBDEs with the exception of BDE209. Indications of trophic magnification of PFRs were observed in the benthic food web for TBOEP, TCIPP and TCEP with tentative trophic magnification factors of 3.5, 2.2 and 2.6, respectively (p<0.05). Most of the other PFRs showed trophic dilution in both food webs. The relative high PFR levels in several fish species suggest high emissions and substantial exposure of organisms to PFRs in the Western Scheldt.

  8. Selective pressurized liquid extraction of replacement and legacy brominated flame retardants from soil.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Thomas J; Morrison, Paul D; Ball, Andrew S; Clarke, Bradley O

    2016-08-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are a class of flame retardant registered as UN POPs due to their persistence in the environment, bioaccumulation potential and toxicity. Replacement novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) have exhibited similar health hazards and environmental distribution, becoming recognized as significant contaminants. This work describes the development and validation of a sensitive and reliable method for the simultaneous quantitation of PBDEs and NBFRs in environmental soil samples using selective pressurized liquid extraction (S-PLE) and gas chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-(EI)-MS/MS). Under optimal conditions, extraction of eight PBDEs (-28, -47, -99, -100, -153, -154, -183 and -209) and five NBFRs; pentabromotoluene (PBT), pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB), hexabromobenzene (HBB), 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EH-TBB) and bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) was performed at 100°C and 1500psi using a 1:1 mixture of hexane and dichloromethane. The method utilized 33mL capacity PLE cells containing, from bottom to top, a single cellulose filter, 3g activated Florisil, 6g acid silica (10% w/w), 3g Na2SO4, another cellulose filter, 2g activated copper powder and 3g soil sample dispersed in 2g Na2SO4 and 1g of Hydromatrix. The method was evaluated by repeated extraction and analysis of all analytes from 3g soil at three spike concentrations. Good recoveries were observed for most analytes at each of the spiking levels with RSD values generally below 20%. MDLs ranged from 0.01 to 4.8ng/g dw for PBDEs and 0.01-0.55ng/g dw for NBFRs. The described one-step combined extraction and cleanup method reduces sample processing times compared with traditional procedures, while delivering comparable analytical performance. The method was successfully applied to environmental soil samples (n=5), detecting PBDEs in each sample and providing the first account of NBFR contamination in Australian soils

  9. Aryl organophosphate flame retardants induced cardiotoxicity during zebrafish embryogenesis: by disturbing expression of the transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhongkun; Wang, Guowei; Gao, Shixiang; Wang, Zunyao

    2015-04-01

    As a result of the ban on some brominated flame retardants (BFRs), the use of organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) increases, and they are detected in multi-environment media at higher frequency and concentrations. However, the toxicity data of OPFRs, especially those on developmental toxicology are quite limited, which prevents an accurate evaluation of their environmental and health risk. Because a previous study reported that two aryl-OPFRs induced cardiotoxicity during zebrafish embryogenesis, we designed experiments to compare the heart developmental toxicity of a series of aryl-OPFRs with alkyl-OPFRs and explored possible internal mechanism. First, acute toxicity of 9 frequently used OPFRs were studied with zebrafish embryos (2-96 hpf). By comparing the LC50 and EC50 (pericardium edema) data, two aryl-OPFRs, triphenyl phosphate (TPhP) and cresyl diphenyl phosphate (CDP) showed greater heart developmental toxicity than the others. It was also found that the acute toxicity of OPFRs varied mainly depending on their hydrophobicity. Further study on the cardiotoxicity of TPhP and CDP showed that the cardiac looping progress can be impeded by 0.10mg/L TPhP or CDP exposure. Bradycardia and reduction of myocardium were also observed in 0.50 and 1.0mg/L TPhP groups and 0.10, 0.50, and 1.0mg/L CDP groups. 0-48 hpf is the vulnerable window of zebrafish cardiogenesis that can be easily affected by TPhP and CDP. RT-qPCR measurement on the expressions of key transcriptional regulators in cardiogenesis showed that BMP4, NKX2-5, and TBX5 were significantly inhibited at the exposure points of 12 hpf and 24 hpf which may be the internal factors related to the heart developmental toxicity. As zebrafish is a good model organism for human health study, the present results call for a greater attention to the health risk of fetus in pregnant women exposed to such OPFRs. PMID:25661707

  10. Maternal transfer of emerging brominated and chlorinated flame retardants in European eels.

    PubMed

    Sühring, Roxana; Freese, Marko; Schneider, Mandy; Schubert, Sophia; Pohlmann, Jan-Dag; Alaee, Mehran; Wolschke, Hendrik; Hanel, Reinhold; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Marohn, Lasse

    2015-10-15

    The European eel (Anguilla anguilla) is regarded as a critically endangered species. Scientists are in agreement that the "quality of spawners" is a vital factor for the survival of the species. This quality can be impaired by parasites, disease and pollution. Especially endocrine disrupting organic chemicals pose a potential threat to reproduction and development of offspring. To our knowledge, the findings in this publication for the first time describe maternal transfer of contaminants in eels. We analysed the concentrations of in total 53 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and their halogenated substitutes in muscle, gonads and eggs of artificially matured European eels and in muscle and gonads of untreated European eels that were used for comparison. We found evidence that persistent organic pollutants such as PBDEs, as well as their brominated and chlorinated substitutes are redistributed from muscle tissue to gonads and eggs. Concentrations ranged from 0.001 ng g(-1)ww for sum Dechlorane metabolites (DPMA, aCL10DP, aCl11DP) to 2.1 ng g(-1)ww for TBA in eggs, 0.001 ng g(-1)ww for Dechlorane metabolites to 9.4 ng g(-1)ww for TBA in gonads and 0.002 ng g(-1)ww for Dechlorane metabolites to 54 ng g(-1)ww for TBA in muscle tissue. Average egg muscle ratios (EMRs) for compounds detectable in artificially matured eels from both Schlei Fjord and Ems River ranged from 0.01 for Dechlorane 602 (DDC-DBF) to 10.4 for PBEB. Strong correlations were found between flame retardant concentrations and lipid content in the analysed tissue types, as well as transfer rates and octanol-water partitioning coefficient, indicating that these parameters were the driving factors for the observed maternal transfer. Furthermore, indications were found, that TBP-DBPE, TBP-AE, BATE and TBA have a significant uptake from the surrounding water, rather than just food and might additionally be formed by metabolism or biotransformation processes. Dechloranes seem to be of increasing

  11. Preparation and properties of flexible flame-retardant neutron shielding material based on methyl vinyl silicone rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Hao; Tang, Xiaobin; Ni, Minxuan; Chen, Feida; Zhang, Yun; Chen, Da; Qiu, Yunlong

    2015-09-01

    Flexible flame-retardant composites were prepared using high-functional methyl vinyl silicone rubber matrix with B4C, hollow beads, and zinc borate (ZB) as filler materials. As filler content increased, the tensile strength, elongation, and tear strength of the composites initially increased and then decreased. The shore hardness of the composites increased with increasing filler content with a maximum value of 30 HA. The heat insulation properties of the composites with hollow beads were higher than that of the ordinary composites with the same filler mass fraction. When ZB content exceeded 12 wt%, the limit of oxygen index of the composites was higher than 27.1%. With Am-Be neutron as the test radiation source, the transmission of neutron for a 2 cm sample was only 47.8%. Powder surface modification improved the mechanical properties, thermal conductivity, flame retardancy, and neutron shielding performance of the composites, but did not affect shore hardness.

  12. Advanced morphological - behavioral test platform reveals neurodevelopmental defects in embryonic zebrafish exposed to comprehensive suite of halogenated and organophosphate flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Noyes, Pamela D; Haggard, Derik E; Gonnerman, Greg D; Tanguay, Robert L

    2015-05-01

    The increased use of flammable plastics and electronic devices along with stricter fire safety standards has led to the heavy use of flame retardant chemicals in many consumer, commercial, and industrial products. Although flame retardant use has increased, a great deal of uncertainty surrounds their safety with some evidence showing toxicity and risk to human and environmental health. Recent efforts have focused on designing high-throughput biological platforms with nonmammalian models to evaluate and prioritize chemicals with limited hazard information. To complement these efforts, this study used a new morphological and behavioral testing platform with embryonic zebrafish to characterize the developmental toxicity of 44 halogenated and organophosphate flame retardants, including several of their known metabolites. Zebrafish were exposed to flame retardants from 6 to 120 h post fertilization (hpf) across concentrations spanning 4 orders of magnitude (eg, 6.4 nM to 64 µM). Flame retardant effects on survival and development were evaluated at 24 and 120 hpf, and neurobehavioral changes were measured using 2 photomotor response (PMR) assays. Compared to controls, 93% (41/44) of flame retardants studied elicited adverse effects among one or more of the bioassays and concentrations tested with the aryl phosphate ester (APE)-based mono-isopropylated triaryl phosphate and the brominated-bisphenol-A analog tetrabromobisphenol-A producing the greatest array of malformations. Hierarchical clustering showed that APE flame retardants with isopropyl, butyl, and cresyl substituents on phenyl rings clustered tightly and were particularly potent. Both PMR assays were highly predictive of morphological defects supporting their use as nonlethal means of evaluating teratogenicity that could allow for additional evaluations of long-term or delayed effects in older animals. Taken together, evidence presented here indicates that zebrafish neurodevelopment is highly sensitive to

  13. Advanced morphological - behavioral test platform reveals neurodevelopmental defects in embryonic zebrafish exposed to comprehensive suite of halogenated and organophosphate flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Noyes, Pamela D; Haggard, Derik E; Gonnerman, Greg D; Tanguay, Robert L

    2015-05-01

    The increased use of flammable plastics and electronic devices along with stricter fire safety standards has led to the heavy use of flame retardant chemicals in many consumer, commercial, and industrial products. Although flame retardant use has increased, a great deal of uncertainty surrounds their safety with some evidence showing toxicity and risk to human and environmental health. Recent efforts have focused on designing high-throughput biological platforms with nonmammalian models to evaluate and prioritize chemicals with limited hazard information. To complement these efforts, this study used a new morphological and behavioral testing platform with embryonic zebrafish to characterize the developmental toxicity of 44 halogenated and organophosphate flame retardants, including several of their known metabolites. Zebrafish were exposed to flame retardants from 6 to 120 h post fertilization (hpf) across concentrations spanning 4 orders of magnitude (eg, 6.4 nM to 64 µM). Flame retardant effects on survival and development were evaluated at 24 and 120 hpf, and neurobehavioral changes were measured using 2 photomotor response (PMR) assays. Compared to controls, 93% (41/44) of flame retardants studied elicited adverse effects among one or more of the bioassays and concentrations tested with the aryl phosphate ester (APE)-based mono-isopropylated triaryl phosphate and the brominated-bisphenol-A analog tetrabromobisphenol-A producing the greatest array of malformations. Hierarchical clustering showed that APE flame retardants with isopropyl, butyl, and cresyl substituents on phenyl rings clustered tightly and were particularly potent. Both PMR assays were highly predictive of morphological defects supporting their use as nonlethal means of evaluating teratogenicity that could allow for additional evaluations of long-term or delayed effects in older animals. Taken together, evidence presented here indicates that zebrafish neurodevelopment is highly sensitive to

  14. Advanced Morphological — Behavioral Test Platform Reveals Neurodevelopmental Defects in Embryonic Zebrafish Exposed to Comprehensive Suite of Halogenated and Organophosphate Flame Retardants

    PubMed Central

    Noyes, Pamela D.; Haggard, Derik E.; Gonnerman, Greg D.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    The increased use of flammable plastics and electronic devices along with stricter fire safety standards has led to the heavy use of flame retardant chemicals in many consumer, commercial, and industrial products. Although flame retardant use has increased, a great deal of uncertainty surrounds their safety with some evidence showing toxicity and risk to human and environmental health. Recent efforts have focused on designing high-throughput biological platforms with nonmammalian models to evaluate and prioritize chemicals with limited hazard information. To complement these efforts, this study used a new morphological and behavioral testing platform with embryonic zebrafish to characterize the developmental toxicity of 44 halogenated and organophosphate flame retardants, including several of their known metabolites. Zebrafish were exposed to flame retardants from 6 to 120 h post fertilization (hpf) across concentrations spanning 4 orders of magnitude (eg, 6.4 nM to 64 µM). Flame retardant effects on survival and development were evaluated at 24 and 120 hpf, and neurobehavioral changes were measured using 2 photomotor response (PMR) assays. Compared to controls, 93% (41/44) of flame retardants studied elicited adverse effects among one or more of the bioassays and concentrations tested with the aryl phosphate ester (APE)-based mono-isopropylated triaryl phosphate and the brominated-bisphenol-A analog tetrabromobisphenol-A producing the greatest array of malformations. Hierarchical clustering showed that APE flame retardants with isopropyl, butyl, and cresyl substituents on phenyl rings clustered tightly and were particularly potent. Both PMR assays were highly predictive of morphological defects supporting their use as nonlethal means of evaluating teratogenicity that could allow for additional evaluations of long-term or delayed effects in older animals. Taken together, evidence presented here indicates that zebrafish neurodevelopment is highly sensitive to

  15. Synthesis of a Novel Phosphorus-Containing Flame Retardant Curing Agent and Its Application in Epoxy Resins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongkun; Xu, Miaojun; Li, Bin

    2016-03-01

    A novel phosphorus-containing compound diphenyl-(2,5-dihydroxyphenyl)-phosphine oxide defined as DPDHPPO was synthesized and used as flame retardant and curing agent for epoxy resins (EP). The chemical structure was well characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, 1H, 13C and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance. The flame retardant properties, combusting performances and thermal degradation behaviors of the cured epoxy resins were investigated by limiting oxygen index (LOI), vertical burning tests (UL-94), cone calorimeter and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) tests. The morphologies and chemical compositions of char residues for cured epoxy resins were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The water resistant properties were evaluated by putting the samples into distilled water at 70 degrees C for 168 h. The results revealed that the EP/40 wt% DPDHPPO/60 wt% PDA thermosets successfully passed UL-94 V-0 flammability rating and the LOI value was as high as 31.9%. The cone tests results revealed that the incorporation of DPDHPPO efficiently reduced the combustion parameters of epoxy resins thermosets, such as heat release rate (HRR), total heat release (THR) and so on. The TGA results indicated that the introduction of DPDHPPO promoted epoxy resins matrix decomposed ahead of time compared with that of pure EP and led to a higher char yield and thermal stability at high temperature. The morphological structures and analysis of XPS of char residues revealed that DPDHPPO benefited to the formation of a sufficient, compact and homogeneous char layer with rich flame retardant elements on the epoxy resins materials surface during combustion. After water resistance tests, EP/40 wt% DPDHPPO/60 wt% PDA thermosets still remained excellent flame retardancy, the moisture absorption of epoxy resins thermosets decreased with the increase of DPDHPPO contents in the thermosets due to the existing

  16. Chicago's Sanitary and Ship Canal sediment: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, brominated flame retardants, and organophosphate esters.

    PubMed

    Peverly, Angela A; O'Sullivan, Colin; Liu, Liang-Ying; Venier, Marta; Martinez, Andres; Hornbuckle, Keri C; Hites, Ronald A

    2015-09-01

    The Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) links the Great Lakes to the Mississippi River starting in downtown Chicago. In addition to storm water, the CSSC receives water from Chicago's wastewater treatment plants (WWTP). Such effluents are known to be sources of organic pollutants to water and sediment. Therefore in 2013, we collected 10 sediment samples from the CSSC and measured the concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), brominated flame retardants, and organophosphate esters (OPEs). Geometric mean concentrations of the summed concentrations of 16 PAHs ranged from 11,000 to 420,000 ng/g dw, with the highest concentrations located at each end of the canal. Total PCB concentrations had a geometric mean of 1,400 ± 500 ng/g dw. Brominated flame retardants were separated into two groups: polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and non-PBDEs. Concentrations of PBDEs and those of the non-PBDE flame retardants had a geometric average of 83 ± 19 and 7.0 ± 5.8 ng/g dw, respectively. The summed concentrations of 8 OPEs ranged from 470 to 2,800 ng/g dw, with the highest concentration detected at a site located downstream of the Stickney water reclamation plant. Using ANOVA results, some hypotheses on sources to the CSSC could be formulated: downtown Chicago is probably a source of PAHs, the Cal-Sag Channel may be a source of PCBs, and neither the WWTP nor the Cal-Sag Channel seem to be significant sources of brominated flame retardants or OPEs.

  17. Air sampling of flame retardants based on the use of mixed-bed sorption tubes--a validation study.

    PubMed

    Lazarov, Borislav; Swinnen, Rudi; Spruyt, Maarten; Maes, Frederick; Van Campenhout, Karen; Goelen, Eddy; Covaci, Adrian; Stranger, Marianne

    2015-11-01

    An analytical methodology using automatic thermal desorption and gas chromatography mass spectrometry analysis was optimized and validated for simultaneous determination of a set of components from three different flame retardant chemical classes: polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) (PBDE-28, PBDE-47, PBDE-66, PBDE-85, PBDE-99, PBDE-100), organophosphate flame retardants (PFRs) (tributyl phosphate, tripropyl phosphate, tris(2-chloroethyl)phosphate-, tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate, tris(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate, triphenyl phosphate, tris(2-chloro-1-methylethyl) phosphate and tricresylphosphate), and "novel" brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) (pentabromotoluene, 2,3,4,5,6-pentabromoethylbenzene, (2,3-dibromopropyl) (2,4,6-tribromophenyl) ether, hexabromobenzene, and 2-ethylhexyl 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate) in air. The methodology is based on low volume active air sampling of gaseous and particulate air fractions on mixed-bed (polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)/Tenax TA) sorption tubes. The optimized method provides recoveries >88%; a limit of detection in the range of 6-25 pg m(-3) for PBDEs, 6-171 pg m(-3) for PFRs, and 7-41 pg m(-3) for NBFRs; a linearity greater than 0.996; and a repeatability of less than 10% for all studied compounds. The optimized method was compared with a standard method using active air sampling on XAD-2 sorbent material, followed by liquid extraction. On the one hand, the PDMS/Tenax TA method shows comparable results at longer sampling time conditions (e.g., indoor air sampling, personal air sampling). On the other hand, at shorter sampling time conditions (e.g., sampling from emission test chambers), the optimized method detects up to three times higher concentrations and identifies more flame retardant compounds compared to the standard method based on XAD-2 loading.

  18. Chicago's Sanitary and Ship Canal sediment: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, brominated flame retardants, and organophosphate esters.

    PubMed

    Peverly, Angela A; O'Sullivan, Colin; Liu, Liang-Ying; Venier, Marta; Martinez, Andres; Hornbuckle, Keri C; Hites, Ronald A

    2015-09-01

    The Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) links the Great Lakes to the Mississippi River starting in downtown Chicago. In addition to storm water, the CSSC receives water from Chicago's wastewater treatment plants (WWTP). Such effluents are known to be sources of organic pollutants to water and sediment. Therefore in 2013, we collected 10 sediment samples from the CSSC and measured the concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), brominated flame retardants, and organophosphate esters (OPEs). Geometric mean concentrations of the summed concentrations of 16 PAHs ranged from 11,000 to 420,000 ng/g dw, with the highest concentrations located at each end of the canal. Total PCB concentrations had a geometric mean of 1,400 ± 500 ng/g dw. Brominated flame retardants were separated into two groups: polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and non-PBDEs. Concentrations of PBDEs and those of the non-PBDE flame retardants had a geometric average of 83 ± 19 and 7.0 ± 5.8 ng/g dw, respectively. The summed concentrations of 8 OPEs ranged from 470 to 2,800 ng/g dw, with the highest concentration detected at a site located downstream of the Stickney water reclamation plant. Using ANOVA results, some hypotheses on sources to the CSSC could be formulated: downtown Chicago is probably a source of PAHs, the Cal-Sag Channel may be a source of PCBs, and neither the WWTP nor the Cal-Sag Channel seem to be significant sources of brominated flame retardants or OPEs. PMID:25981316

  19. Synthesis of a Novel Phosphorus-Containing Flame Retardant Curing Agent and Its Application in Epoxy Resins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongkun; Xu, Miaojun; Li, Bin

    2016-03-01

    A novel phosphorus-containing compound diphenyl-(2,5-dihydroxyphenyl)-phosphine oxide defined as DPDHPPO was synthesized and used as flame retardant and curing agent for epoxy resins (EP). The chemical structure was well characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, 1H, 13C and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance. The flame retardant properties, combusting performances and thermal degradation behaviors of the cured epoxy resins were investigated by limiting oxygen index (LOI), vertical burning tests (UL-94), cone calorimeter and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) tests. The morphologies and chemical compositions of char residues for cured epoxy resins were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The water resistant properties were evaluated by putting the samples into distilled water at 70 degrees C for 168 h. The results revealed that the EP/40 wt% DPDHPPO/60 wt% PDA thermosets successfully passed UL-94 V-0 flammability rating and the LOI value was as high as 31.9%. The cone tests results revealed that the incorporation of DPDHPPO efficiently reduced the combustion parameters of epoxy resins thermosets, such as heat release rate (HRR), total heat release (THR) and so on. The TGA results indicated that the introduction of DPDHPPO promoted epoxy resins matrix decomposed ahead of time compared with that of pure EP and led to a higher char yield and thermal stability at high temperature. The morphological structures and analysis of XPS of char residues revealed that DPDHPPO benefited to the formation of a sufficient, compact and homogeneous char layer with rich flame retardant elements on the epoxy resins materials surface during combustion. After water resistance tests, EP/40 wt% DPDHPPO/60 wt% PDA thermosets still remained excellent flame retardancy, the moisture absorption of epoxy resins thermosets decreased with the increase of DPDHPPO contents in the thermosets due to the existing

  20. Functionalization of layered double hydroxides by intumescent flame retardant: Preparation, characterization, and application in ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guobo; Fei, Zhengdong; Chen, Xiaoying; Qiu, Fangli; Wang, Xu; Gao, Jianrong

    2012-10-01

    A phosphorussbnd nitrogen containing compound, N-(2-(5,5-dimethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphosphinyl-2-ylamino)-hexylacetamide-2-propyl acid (PAHPA), is synthesized and characterized. A novel flame retardant, namely layered double hydroxides (LDHs) modified with PAHPA (PAHPA-LDHs), is prepared by ion-exchange of LDHs with PAHPA. The results from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis with a high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscope show that PAHPA intercalated LDHs. The X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results show that PAHPA-LDHs achieve well dispersion in ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) matrix and the EVA/PAHPA-LDHs nanocomposites (i.e. EVA filled with 5 wt% PAHPA-LDHs) are formed by polymer melt intercalation. Thermal stability and flammability properties are investigated by thermogravimetric analysis and cone calorimeter tests. The results show that the addition of PAHPA-LDHs improves thermal stability and reduces obviously the flammability of EVA resin. Compared with pure EVA resin, the peak heat release rate of the EVA/PAHPA-LDHs nanocomposites is reduced by about 43%. The results of scanning electron microscopy and TEM indicate that a compact and dense intumescent char is formed for the EVA/PAHPA-LDHs nanocomposites after combustion.

  1. Further improvement of flame retardancy of polyaniline-deposited paper composite through using phytic acid as dopant or co-dopant.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Ding, Chunyue; Qian, Xueren; An, Xianhui

    2015-01-22

    Polyaniline (PANI)-deposited electrically conductive and flame retardant paper composite was prepared using phytic acid (PA) as dopant or co-dopant. PA as doping acid greatly improved the flame retardancy of PANI-deposited paper composite whilst the conductivity was lower compared with using 5-sulfosalicylic acid (SSA) as doping acid. Lower temperature was favorable to obtain PANI-deposited paper composite with both higher conductivity and better flame retardancy. Conductivity of PANI-deposited paper composite increased with increase of doping acid concentration and the suitable PA concentration range was 0.15-0.3 mol/L depending on the requirement of conductivity and flame retardancy. The PANI-deposited paper composite was characterized by SEM, TGA and XPS. The outstanding flame retardancy of PA-doped paper composite was caused by the synergetic effect of PANI coating and H3PO4. Both higher flame retardancy and higher conductivity of PANI-deposited paper composite were obtained by co-doping of SSA with PA.

  2. Fate of flame retardants and the antimicrobial agent triclosan in planted and unplanted biosolid-amended soils.

    PubMed

    Davis, Elizabeth F; Gunsch, Claudia K; Stapleton, Heather M

    2015-05-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the fate of contaminant-laden biosolids is needed to fully evaluate the environmental impacts of biosolid land application. The present study examined the fate of several flame retardants and triclosan in biosolid-amended soil in a 90-d greenhouse experiment. Objectives included evaluating the persistence of these compounds in soil, their phytoaccumulation potential by alfalfa (Medicago sativa), and potential degradation reactions. Concentrations of the polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners BDE-47 and BDE-209 and the antimicrobial triclosan declined significantly over time in biosolid-amended soil planted with alfalfa and then reached a steady state by day 28. In contrast, no significant losses of those analytes were observed from soil in nonvegetated pots. The amount of an analyte lost from vegetated soil ranged from 43% for the flame retardant di(2-ethylhexyl)-2,3,4,5-tetrabromophthalate to 61% for triclosan and was significantly and negatively related to the log octanol-water partition coefficient. Alfalfa roots and shoots were monitored for the compounds, but no clear evidence of phytoaccumulation was observed. Methyl triclosan formation was observed in the biosolid-amended soils during the study period, indicating in situ biotransformation of triclosan. The present study demonstrates that, although they are highly recalcitrant, PBDEs, selected alternate brominated flame retardants, and triclosan are capable of undergoing dissipation from biosolid-amended soils in the presence of plants. PMID:25546022

  3. Occurrence and sources of brominated and organophosphorus flame retardants in dust from different indoor environments in Barcelona, Spain.

    PubMed

    Cristale, Joyce; Hurtado, Alba; Gómez-Canela, Cristian; Lacorte, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the simultaneous presence of eight polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), nine new brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) and ten organophosphorus flame retardants (OPFRs) was investigated in dust samples collected from different indoor environments (homes, schools, theatres, a university and a Research Institute) in Barcelona, Spain. OPFRs were detected at the highest concentrations followed by PBDEs. ∑OPFRs ranged from 2053 to 72,090ngg(-1) and tris(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCIPP) was the most abundant compound. BDE-209 was the main PBDE congener detected (up to 14,990ngg(-1)), while other PBDEs ranged from 2.6 to 118ngg(-1). Among the studied NBFRs, decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE - up to 4432ngg(-1)) followed by bis(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (BEH-TEBP - up to 508ngg(-1)) were detected at the highest concentration, whereas a lower detection frequency was observed for 2-ethylhexyl 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EH-TBB), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), pentabromotoluene (PBT) and hexabromobenzene (HBB). The levels and profile of flame retardants (FRs) were characteristic of each environment, where theatres followed by homes presented the highest concentrations and schools had the lowest levels. Principal Component Analysis permitted to identify the main sources and distribution of all FRs, according to specific uses in each environment. The simultaneous presence of all FR families in indoor dust points to the need to monitor these compounds to minimize human exposure.

  4. A review of chamber experiments for determining specific emission rates and investigating migration pathways of flame retardants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauert, Cassandra; Lazarov, Borislav; Harrad, Stuart; Covaci, Adrian; Stranger, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    The widespread use of flame retardants (FRs) in indoor products has led to their ubiquitous distribution within indoor microenvironments with many studies reporting concentrations in indoor air and dust. Little information is available however on emission of these compounds to air, particularly the measurement of specific emission rates (SERs), or the migration pathways leading to dust contamination. Such knowledge gaps hamper efforts to develop understanding of human exposure. This review summarizes published data on SERs of the following FRs released from treated products: polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs), tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA), novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) and organophosphate flame retardants (PFRs), including a brief discussion of the methods used to derive these SERs. Also reviewed are published studies that utilize emission chambers for investigations/measurements of mass transfer of FRs to dust, discussing the chamber configurations and methods used for these experiments. A brief review of studies investigating correlations between concentrations detected in indoor air/dust and possible sources in the microenvironment is included along with efforts to model contamination of indoor environments. Critical analysis of the literature reveals that the major limitations with utilizing chambers to derive SERs for FRs arise due to the physicochemical properties of FRs. In particular, increased partitioning to chamber surfaces, airborne particles and dust, causes loss through “sink” effects and results in long times to reach steady state conditions inside the chamber. The limitations of chamber experiments are discussed as well as their potential for filling gaps in knowledge in this area.

  5. Phosphorus-containing flame retardant modified layered double hydroxides and their applications on polylactide film with good transparency.

    PubMed

    Ding, Peng; Kang, Bai; Zhang, Jin; Yang, Jingwen; Song, Na; Tang, Shengfu; Shi, Liyi

    2015-02-15

    Polylactide (PLA)/layered double hydroxide (LDH) films with good flame retardant property and transparency were synthesized by solution exfoliation and film casting method. The organic-inorganic interfacial interaction between PLA and NiAl-LDH was carefully modified by 2-carboxylethyl-phenyl-phosphinic acid (CEPPA) to well solve the dispersion problem of NiAl-LDH nanolayers and get enhanced flame retardancy of PLA composites. The results showed the NiAl-LDH/CEPPA (LC) nanolayers had exfoliated structures and were homogenously dispersed in PLA matrixes. All the PLA/LDH films had good transparency even LC content was up to 10 wt%. The PLA/LDH films absorbed the ultraviolet light, which alleviates the embrittlement of PLA films in the using procedure. The flame retardant effect characterized by microscale combustion calorimeter was observed when LC contents increased. The total heat release value of the sample with 10 wt% LC decreased to 9.7 kJ/g from 12.0 kJ/g of virgin PLA.

  6. Occurrence and sources of brominated and organophosphorus flame retardants in dust from different indoor environments in Barcelona, Spain.

    PubMed

    Cristale, Joyce; Hurtado, Alba; Gómez-Canela, Cristian; Lacorte, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the simultaneous presence of eight polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), nine new brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) and ten organophosphorus flame retardants (OPFRs) was investigated in dust samples collected from different indoor environments (homes, schools, theatres, a university and a Research Institute) in Barcelona, Spain. OPFRs were detected at the highest concentrations followed by PBDEs. ∑OPFRs ranged from 2053 to 72,090ngg(-1) and tris(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCIPP) was the most abundant compound. BDE-209 was the main PBDE congener detected (up to 14,990ngg(-1)), while other PBDEs ranged from 2.6 to 118ngg(-1). Among the studied NBFRs, decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE - up to 4432ngg(-1)) followed by bis(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (BEH-TEBP - up to 508ngg(-1)) were detected at the highest concentration, whereas a lower detection frequency was observed for 2-ethylhexyl 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EH-TBB), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), pentabromotoluene (PBT) and hexabromobenzene (HBB). The levels and profile of flame retardants (FRs) were characteristic of each environment, where theatres followed by homes presented the highest concentrations and schools had the lowest levels. Principal Component Analysis permitted to identify the main sources and distribution of all FRs, according to specific uses in each environment. The simultaneous presence of all FR families in indoor dust points to the need to monitor these compounds to minimize human exposure. PMID:27179204

  7. Determination of emerging halogenated flame retardants and polybrominated diphenyl ethers in serum by gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cequier, Enrique; Marcé, Rosa Maria; Becher, Georg; Thomsen, Cathrine

    2013-10-01

    Emerging flame retardants are used in a great variety of household goods and thus have the potential to pollute our indoor environment. Health concerns regarding exposure to these flame retardants demand new methods to survey their occurrence in humans. This work describes development and optimization of an analytical method comprising solid phase extraction and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry for the determination of besides 15 polybrominated diphenyl ethers, 7 emerging halogenated flame retardants in human serum (1,2-bis[2,4,6-tribromophenoxy] ethane, decabromodiphenyl ethane, hexabromobenzene, Dechlorane Plus(®), hexachlorocyclopentenyl-dibromocyclooctane, dechlorane 602 and 603). The method was thoroughly validated at three spiking levels obtaining averaged recoveries >80% with a RSD of 5% (n=12). Accuracies ranged from 88 to 125% except for DBDPE, which averaged 66% with overall RSD of 11% (n=12). Method limits of detection (MLD) ranged from 0.3 to 5.4 pg/mL serum, except for decabromodiphenyl ether and decabromodiphenyl ethane for which MLDs were 14 and 20 pg/mL serum, respectively. In human serum samples from Norway, we were able to detect and quantify hexabromobenzene, 1,2-bis[2,4,6-tribromophenoxy] ethane, Dechlorane Plus(®), Dechlorane 602 and 603. PMID:23992842

  8. Determination of the volatile fraction of phosphorus flame retardants in cushioning foam of upholstered furniture: towards respiratory exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Ghislain, Mylène; Beigbeder, Joana; Dumazert, Loïc; Lopez-Cuesta, José-Marie; Lounis, Mohammed; Leconte, Stéphane; Desauziers, Valérie

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this paper was to highlight potential exposure in indoor air to phosphorus flame retardants (PFRs) due to their use in upholstered furniture. For that, an analytical method of PFRs by headspace coupled to solid-phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME) was developed on cushioning foams in order to determine the PFRs' volatile fraction in the material. Tests on model foams proved the feasibility of the method. The average repeatability (RSD) is 6.3 % and the limits of detection range from 0.33 to 1.29 μg g(-1) of foam, depending on the PFRs. Results showed that some PFRs can actually be emitted in air, leading to a potential risk of exposure by inhalation. The volatile fraction can be high (up to 98 % of the total PFRs amount) and depends on the physicochemical properties of flame retardants, on the textural characteristics of the materials and on the temperature. The methodology developed for cushioning foams could be further applied to other types of materials and can be used to rate them according to their potential releases of phosphorus flame retardants.

  9. Fate of flame retardants and the antimicrobial agent triclosan in planted and unplanted biosolid-amended soils.

    PubMed

    Davis, Elizabeth F; Gunsch, Claudia K; Stapleton, Heather M

    2015-05-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the fate of contaminant-laden biosolids is needed to fully evaluate the environmental impacts of biosolid land application. The present study examined the fate of several flame retardants and triclosan in biosolid-amended soil in a 90-d greenhouse experiment. Objectives included evaluating the persistence of these compounds in soil, their phytoaccumulation potential by alfalfa (Medicago sativa), and potential degradation reactions. Concentrations of the polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners BDE-47 and BDE-209 and the antimicrobial triclosan declined significantly over time in biosolid-amended soil planted with alfalfa and then reached a steady state by day 28. In contrast, no significant losses of those analytes were observed from soil in nonvegetated pots. The amount of an analyte lost from vegetated soil ranged from 43% for the flame retardant di(2-ethylhexyl)-2,3,4,5-tetrabromophthalate to 61% for triclosan and was significantly and negatively related to the log octanol-water partition coefficient. Alfalfa roots and shoots were monitored for the compounds, but no clear evidence of phytoaccumulation was observed. Methyl triclosan formation was observed in the biosolid-amended soils during the study period, indicating in situ biotransformation of triclosan. The present study demonstrates that, although they are highly recalcitrant, PBDEs, selected alternate brominated flame retardants, and triclosan are capable of undergoing dissipation from biosolid-amended soils in the presence of plants.

  10. Sustainable, heat-resistant and flame-retardant cellulose-based composite separator for high-performance lithium ion battery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianjun; Yue, Liping; Kong, Qingshan; Liu, Zhihong; Zhou, Xinhong; Zhang, Chuanjian; Xu, Quan; Zhang, Bo; Ding, Guoliang; Qin, Bingsheng; Duan, Yulong; Wang, Qingfu; Yao, Jianhua; Cui, Guanglei; Chen, Liquan

    2014-01-01

    A sustainable, heat-resistant and flame-retardant cellulose-based composite nonwoven has been successfully fabricated and explored its potential application for promising separator of high-performance lithium ion battery. It was demonstrated that this flame-retardant cellulose-based composite separator possessed good flame retardancy, superior heat tolerance and proper mechanical strength. As compared to the commercialized polypropylene (PP) separator, such composite separator presented improved electrolyte uptake, better interface stability and enhanced ionic conductivity. In addition, the lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2)/graphite cell using this composite separator exhibited better rate capability and cycling retention than that for PP separator owing to its facile ion transport and excellent interfacial compatibility. Furthermore, the lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4)/lithium cell with such composite separator delivered stable cycling performance and thermal dimensional stability even at an elevated temperature of 120°C. All these fascinating characteristics would boost the application of this composite separator for high-performance lithium ion battery. PMID:24488228

  11. Determination of the volatile fraction of phosphorus flame retardants in cushioning foam of upholstered furniture: towards respiratory exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Ghislain, Mylène; Beigbeder, Joana; Dumazert, Loïc; Lopez-Cuesta, José-Marie; Lounis, Mohammed; Leconte, Stéphane; Desauziers, Valérie

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this paper was to highlight potential exposure in indoor air to phosphorus flame retardants (PFRs) due to their use in upholstered furniture. For that, an analytical method of PFRs by headspace coupled to solid-phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME) was developed on cushioning foams in order to determine the PFRs' volatile fraction in the material. Tests on model foams proved the feasibility of the method. The average repeatability (RSD) is 6.3 % and the limits of detection range from 0.33 to 1.29 μg g(-1) of foam, depending on the PFRs. Results showed that some PFRs can actually be emitted in air, leading to a potential risk of exposure by inhalation. The volatile fraction can be high (up to 98 % of the total PFRs amount) and depends on the physicochemical properties of flame retardants, on the textural characteristics of the materials and on the temperature. The methodology developed for cushioning foams could be further applied to other types of materials and can be used to rate them according to their potential releases of phosphorus flame retardants. PMID:27650437

  12. Brominated flame retardants in food and environmental samples from a production area in China: concentrations and human exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Wu, Hui; Li, Qiuxu; Jin, Jun; Wang, Ying

    2015-11-01

    Human exposure to brominated flame retardants (BFRs: decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE), hexabromobenzene (HBB), pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB), pentabromotoluene (PBT), 1,2,3,4,5-pentabromobenzene (PBBz), and 2,3,5,6-tetrabromo-p-xylene (TBX)) in a brominated flame retardant production area (Weifang, Shandong Province, China) was estimated. Thirty food samples, 14 air samples, and 13 indoor dust samples were analyzed. BDE209 and DBDPE were the dominant BFRs in all samples. Higher alternative brominated flame retardant (including DBDPE, HBB, PBEB, PBT, PBBz, and TBX) concentrations were found in vegetables than in fish and meat; thus, plant-original foods might be important alternative BFR sources in the study area. The BDE209 and alternative BFR concentrations in air were 1.5×10(4) to 2.2×10(5) and 620 to 3.6×10(4) pg/m3, respectively. Mean total BFR exposures through the diet, inhalation, and indoor dust ingestion were 570, 3000, and 69 ng/d, respectively (16, 82, and 2% of total intake, respectively). Inhalation was the dominant BFR source except for DBDPE, for which diet dominated. BDE209 contributed 85% of the total BFR intake in the study area.

  13. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers vs alternate brominated flame retardants and Dechloranes from East Asia to the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Möller, Axel; Xie, Zhiyong; Cai, Minghong; Zhong, Guangcai; Huang, Peng; Cai, Minggang; Sturm, Renate; He, Jianfeng; Ebinghaus, Ralf

    2011-08-15

    Marine boundary layer air and seawater samples taken during a polar expedition cruise from East China Sea to the Arctic were analyzed in order to compare the occurrence, distribution, and fate of the banned polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) with their brominated alternatives as well as the chlorinated Dechloranes. The sum of PBDEs (∑(10)PBDEs) in the atmosphere ranged from 0.07 to 8.1 pg m(-3) with BDE-209 being the dominating congener and from not detected (n.d.) to 0.6 pg L(-1) in seawater. Alternate brominated flame retardants (BFRs), especially hexabromobenzene (HBB), (2,3-dibromopropyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (DPTE), pentabromotoluene (PBT), 2-ethylhexyl 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EHTBB), bis-(2-ethylhexyl)-tetrabromophthalate (TBPH), were detected in higher concentrations than PBDEs, even in the high Arctic (0.6 to 15.4 pg m(-3) for sum of alternate BFRs), indicating the change of PBDEs toward alternate BFRs in the environmental predominance. In addition, Dechlorane Plus (DP) as well as Dechlorane 602, 603, and 604 were detected both in the atmosphere and in seawater. The highest concentrations as well as the highest compound variability were observed in East Asian samples suggesting the Asian continent as source of these compounds in the marine environment. The air-seawater exchange indicates strong deposition, especially of alternate BFRs, as well as dry particle-bound deposition of BDE-209 into the ocean. PMID:21751774

  14. Bioaccumulation of highly hydrophobic organohalogen flame retardants from sediments: application of toxicokinetics and passive sampling techniques.

    PubMed

    Li, Huizhen; Zhang, Baozhong; Wei, Yanli; Wang, Fei; Lydy, Michael J; You, Jing

    2014-06-17

    Highly hydrophobic organohalogen flame retardants (HHOFRs) are found ubiquitously in the environment; therefore, a better understanding of their bioavailability is needed. In the current study, bioaccumulation testing using the oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus, and passive sampling (solid-phase microextraction (SPME)) were performed to study the bioaccumulation potential of HHOFRs, including decabromodiphenyl ether (deca-BDE), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE), and dechlorane plus (DP), in laboratory-spiked and field-collected sediments. The HHOFRs were bioavailable to L. variegatus even though their biota-sediment accumulation factors were low (0.016 ± 0.002 to 0.48 ± 0.082 g organic carbon/g lipid, syn-DP > anti-DP > deca-BDE > DBDPE). Hydrophobicity and stereoisomerism affected HHOFR bioavailability. Meanwhile, HHOFR concentrations on the SPME fibers (Cf) correlated with those in biota (Cb), suggesting the potential application of SPME in bioavailability prediction for those compounds. The log Cf to log Cb correlation for deca-BDE and DP had a greater intercept than that for polychlorinated biphenyls (data obtained from the literature) although the slopes were similar, while data for DBDPE fell on the regression line for PCBs, implying some uncertainty in application of SPMEs across chemical classes. The increasing sorptive ability of proteins for HHOFRs in comparison to the less-brominated BDEs suggested that protein-binding should be considered when estimating bioaccumulation potential of HHOFRs in benthic invertebrates.

  15. The partitioning of alkylphenolic surfactants and polybrominated diphenyl ether flame retardants in activated sludge batch tests.

    PubMed

    Langford, Katherine H; Scrimshaw, Mark D; Birkett, Jason W; Lester, John N

    2005-12-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers and nonylphenol polyethoxylates have been reported to be estrogenic and may enter the aquatic environment through the discharge of treated sewage effluent. Therefore, their fate during wastewater treatment processes is an important factor in determining their environmental impact. Batch tests with activated sludge from a Husmann apparatus were used to determine the effects of physico-chemical properties and sludge characteristics on the partitioning of polybrominated diphenyl ether flame retardants and nonylphenol polyethoxylate surfactants during biological wastewater treatment. Hydrophobic compounds, those with high logK(ow) values, were sorbed more rapidly and to a greater extent to the solid phase than more soluble compounds. For these hydrophobic compounds sorption may become an increasingly important removal mechanism as sludge age and therefore solids content increase. The initial rate of partitioning was greatest for the most hydrophobic compounds but all rates diminished with time as a result of progressive saturation of sorbent binding sites, a reduction of sorbate availability and as a consequence of the system reaching equilibrium. The sorption of polybrominated diphenyl ethers fit Freundlich adsorption isotherms demonstrating generally increasing adsorption capacity and efficiency with increasing hydrophobic nature. A correlation between increasing logK(ow) and increasing organic matter content was also observed for both polybrominated diphenyl ethers and nonylphenol polyethoxylates indicating the organic content of mixed liquor will also be influential in removing compounds during wastewater treatment. PMID:15950259

  16. Uptake and biotransformation of structurally diverse brominated flame retardants in zebrafish (Danio rerio) after dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Nyholm, Jenny Rattfelt; Norman, Anna; Norrgren, Leif; Haglund, Peter; Andersson, Patrik L

    2009-05-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) were fed a diet containing a mixture of 11 structurally diverse brominated flame retardants (BFRs) at nominal concentrations of either 1 or 100 nmol/g for up to 42 d, followed by an elimination period of 14 d. Uptake rates and elimination constants for five of the BFRs were calculated from measurements of their concentrations in the male fish during the exposure and elimination phases. Observed uptake efficiencies were highest for 2,4,4'-tribromodiphenyl ether (BDE 28) and 1,2-dibromo-4-(1,2-dibromoethyl)cyclohexane (TBECH) and were lowest for decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 209). Estimated half-lives for TBECH and 2,4,6-tribromophenol were short (<2 d). Four BFR metabolites were identified in the fish: 2,2',3,4',5',6-Hexabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 149), 2,2',4,4',5,6'-hexabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 154), 2,4,6-tribromoanisole, and 1,2,4,5-hexabromobenzene. These metabolites were still present in the zebrafish after the 14-d elimination period. No relationship between the BFR concentrations in the zebrafish and their log octanol-water partition coefficient (Kow) values was found. Generally, low tendencies to bioaccumulate were observed for perbrominated and hydroxylated compounds. The observed accumulation of BFR metabolites in fish, however, shows that low concentration of a BFR does not provide, in isolation, a sound indication that the BFR poses low risks. PMID:19049262

  17. Leaching characteristics of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) from flame-retardant plastics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Jin; Osako, Masahiro; Sakai, Shin-ichi

    2006-10-01

    To investigate the effect of leachant on the leachability of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), we determined the leaching concentrations of PBDEs from flame-retardant plastic samples (TV housings and raw materials before molding processing) that are regarded as a source of PBDEs in landfill sites. The leachants used were distilled water, 20% methanol solution, and dissolved humic solution (DHS) of 1000 mg/l based on organic carbon. The leaching test conditions were a liquid-to-solid ratio of 100:1, and a contact period of five days, with twice-daily agitation in a temperature-controlled room of 30 degrees C without pH or ionic strength control. The leaching concentrations of PBDEs increased with increased content, and were found to be remarkably enhanced when methanol and DHS were used instead of distilled water. The enhancement of leachability in the presence of the latter was attributed to the cosolvency effect, and complex formations between the PBDEs and dissolved humic matter (DHM). PBDE concentrations in the leachate obtained from the leaching test and an actual landfill site revealed a significant presence of congeners below heptabromodiphenyl ethers (H7BDEs), detected in the leachate of the actual landfill, while significant amounts of nonabromodiphenyl ethers (N9BDEs) and decabromodiphenyl ether (D10BDE) were detected in the leachate of the leaching test. PMID:16483632

  18. A new brominated polymeric additive for flame retardant glass-filled polybutylene terephthalate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, Z.; Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.; Bar-Yaacov, Y.; Minke, R.; Touval, I.

    1982-01-01

    Attention is called to the undesirable effects (poor ultraviolet light stability and blooming) sometimes introduced by brominated flame retarders. A brominated polymeric additive (BPA) with little or none of these undesirable side effects is compared with decabromobiphenyl oxide (DBBPO). The additive bears the product name F-2300. It is found to be more easily dispersed than DBBPO. The F-2300 is as effective as the DBBPO in the oxygen index test. The improved efficiency of the F-2300 may be explained by its better dispersion in polybutylene terephthalate (PBT). Glass-filled PBT containing F-2300 is found to be more resistant to UV degradation than DBBPO-containing formulas. Formulations with F-2300 therefore have a longer useful outdoor life. F-2300 is a diglycidyl-type polymer containing 50 percent aromatically bound bromine. Its melting point is 112 C, and it is stable up to 372 C. It is pointed out that since its melts at a relatively low temperature, it can be introduced into the formulation as a large agglomerate and still be dispersed evenly throughout the polymer.

  19. Photochemical transformation of five novel brominated flame retardants: Kinetics and photoproducts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-Nan; Chen, Jingwen; Xie, Qing; Li, Yingjie; Zhou, Chengzhi

    2016-05-01

    Many novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) are used as substitutes of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in recent years. However, little is known about their phototransformation behavior, which may influence the environmental fate of these chemicals. In this study, photochemical behavior of five NBFRs, allyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (ATE), 2-bromoallyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (BATE), 2,3-dibromopropyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (DPTE), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), and 2,4,6-tris(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)-1,3,5-triazine (TTBP-TAZ) was investigated. Results show all the five NBFRs can undergo photochemical transformation under simulated sunlight irradiation. Quantum yields (Φ) of the five NBFRs varied from 0.012 of TTBP-TAZ in hexane to 0.091 of BTBPE in methanol. Half-lives (t1/2) relevant with solar irradiation of these NBFRs were estimated using the determined Φ, and the values are 1.5-12.0 d in summer and 17.1-165.0 d in winter. Debrominated and ether bond cleavage products were identified in the phototransformation of DPTE and BTBPE. Debromination on the phenyl is a main phototransformation pathway for DPTE, and both debromination and ether bond cleavage are main phototransformation pathways for BTBPE. This study is helpful to better understand the phototransformation behavior of the NBFRs.

  20. Breast cancer among women in Michigan following exposure to brominated flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Terrell, Metrecia L; Rosenblatt, Karin A; Wirth, Julie; Cameron, Lorraine L; Marcus, Michele

    2016-08-01

    In this updated follow-up, we investigated the breast cancer experience among women in Michigan exposed to brominated flame retardants, some 30 years following exposure. Michigan residents were enrolled in a study cohort after exposure to polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) through the consumption of contaminated food products. PBB concentrations were measured in serum at the time of enrolment. Cancer experience was determined by linkage to the Michigan Cancer Registry. We conducted a nested case-control study that included 51 women diagnosed with breast cancer during 1974-2004 and 202 age-matched controls. While the data suggest an increase in breast cancer risk with higher PBB exposure, this did not reach statistical significance. The OR of having breast cancer among women with PBB concentrations ≥10 ng/mL compared to women with PBB concentrations at or below the limit of detection of 1 ng/mL was 2.60, 95% CI 0.93 to 7.27, (p=0.07), when adjusted for age and family history of cancer in a first-degree female relative. It remains important to examine exposure to brominated chemicals and possible health effects, and to continue following the cancer experience of participants in this study.

  1. Feasibility study of feces for noninvasive biomonitoring of brominated flame retardants in toddlers.

    PubMed

    Sahlström, Leena M O; Sellström, Ulla; de Wit, Cynthia A; Lignell, Sanna; Darnerud, Per Ola

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of using feces as a noninvasive matrix to estimate serum concentrations of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in toddlers for biomonitoring purposes. Tri- to decabrominated diphenyl ethers (tri-decaBDEs), isomer-specific hexabromocyclododecanes, and 16 emerging BFRs were determined in feces from 22 toddlers (11-15 months of age), and results were compared to previously analyzed matched serum samples. BDE-47, -153, -196, -197, -203, -206, -207, -208, and -209 were detected in the feces creating a matched data set (feces-serum, n = 21). Tetra-octaBDE concentrations were significantly higher (Student's paired comparisons t test, α = 0.05) in serum versus feces with BDE-153 having the highest mean difference between the sample matrices. BDE-209 was found in significantly higher concentrations in feces compared to serum. Significant correlations (Pearson's, α = 0.05) between congener-specific concentrations in feces and serum were found for all BDEs except BDE-197 and -203. The feces-serum associations found can be used to estimate serum concentrations of tetra-decaBDEs from feces concentrations and enable a noninvasive sampling method for biomonitoring BDEs in toddlers.

  2. Organophosphorus flame retardants and plasticizers in air from various indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Marklund, Anneli; Andersson, Barbro; Haglund, Peter

    2005-08-01

    Eleven organophosphorus compounds (OPs) that are used as plasticizers and flame retardants were analysed in duplicate samples of indoor air from 17 domestic and occupational environments. Solid-phase extraction (SPE) columns were used as adsorbents and analysis was performed using GC with a nitrogen phosphorus selective detector. The total amounts of OPs in the air samples ranged between 36 and 950 ng m(-3); tris(chloropropyl) phosphate (TCPP) and tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) being the most abundant (0.4 to 730 ng m(-3)), followed by tributyl phosphate (0.5-120 ng m(-3)). Public buildings tended to have about 3-4 times higher levels of OPs than domestic buildings. The relative amounts of individual OPs varied between the sites and generally reflected the building materials, furniture and consumer products used in the sampled environments. Potential sources of these compounds include, inter alia, acoustic ceilings, upholstered furniture, wall coverings, floor polish and polyvinylchloride floor coverings. A correlation was observed between the TCEP concentrations in the air in the sampled environments and previously reported concentrations in dust, but no such correlation was seen for the heavier and less volatile tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBEP). Based on estimated amounts of indoor air inhaled and dust ingested, adults and children in the sampled environments would be exposed to up to 5.8 microg kg(-1) day(-1) and 57 microg kg(-1) day(-1) total OPs, respectively. PMID:16049584

  3. Trophic magnification of chlorinated flame retardants and their dechlorinated analogs in a fresh water food web.

    PubMed

    Wang, De-Gao; Guo, Ming-Xing; Pei, Wei; Byer, Jonathan D; Wang, Zhuang

    2015-01-01

    Chlorinated flame retardants, particularly dechlorane plus (DP), were widely used in commercial applications and are ubiquitous in the environment. A total of seven species of aquatic organisms were collected concurrently from the region of a chemical production facility in Huai’an, China. DP and structurally related compounds including mirex, dechloranes 602, 603, 604, chlordene plus (CP), DP monoadduct (DPMA), and two dechlorinated breakdown products of DP, decachloropentacyclooctadecadiene (anti-Cl(10)-DP) and undecachloropentacyclooctadecadiene (anti-Cl(11)-DP), were detected in these aquatic organisms. Nitrogen stable isotope ratios were also measured to determine the trophic levels of the organisms. Trophic magnification factors (TMFs) for these chemicals were calculated with values ranging from 1.0 to 3.1. TMFs for CP, mirex, anti-DP, and ∑DP were statistically greater than 1, showing evidence of biomagnification in the food web. Concentration ratios of anti-Cl(11)-DP to anti-DP showed a significant relationship with trophic level, implying that anti-Cl(11)-DP had a higher food-web magnification potential than its precursor. The biota-sediment accumulation factors and TMFs for DP demonstrated stereoselectivity, with syn-DP having a greater bioaccumulation potential than anti-DP in the aquatic environment. PMID:25463253

  4. Report: recycling of flame-retarded plastics from waste electric and electronic equipment (WEEE).

    PubMed

    Schlummer, Martin; Mäurer, Andreas; Leitner, Thomas; Spruzina, Walter

    2006-12-01

    Shredder residues produced in plants processing waste electric and electronic equipment are excluded from material recycling due to a variety of polymeric materials and the presence of brominated flame retardants (BFR), which might contain banned polybrominated diphenyl ethers or toxic polybrominated dioxins and furans (PBDD/F). Herein we present a technological approach to transfer a significant portion of the shredder residue into recycled polymers. The technological approach consists of a density-based enrichment of styrenics, which are subjected to a solvolysis process (CreaSolv process) in a second stage. This stage allows the elimination of non-target polymers and extraction of BFR and PBDD/F. Pilot processing of 11.5 and 50 kg shredder residues indicated a material yield of about 50% in the density stage and 70-80% in the CreaSolv process, and an effective removal of BFR additives. The recycled products were proved to comply with threshold values defined by the European directive on the restriction of hazardous substances (RoHS) and the German Chemikalienverbotsverordnung. Mechanical material properties exhibited high tensile and flexural modules as well as slight impact strength, which qualify the products for applications in new electronic equipment.

  5. Distribution of brominated flame retardants in different dust fractions in air from an electronics recycling facility.

    PubMed

    Julander, Anneli; Westberg, Håkan; Engwall, Magnus; van Bavel, Bert

    2005-11-01

    Twelve air samples were collected from an electronic recycling facility in Sweden representing three different dust fractions; respirable, total and inhalable dust. Four samples were collected from each fraction. The highest concentration of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) #209 (ten bromine atoms) was found in the samples from the inhalable dust fraction (ID), which was 10 times higher than for the "total dust" fraction (TD). The concentration ranges were 157.6-208.6; 13.9-16.7; and 2.8-3.3 ng/m3 for inhalable, total and respirable fractions, respectively. The second most abundant PBDE congener was PBDE #183 (seven bromine atoms), followed by the second most abundant substance 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) in all samples. In addition, decabromodiphenyl ethane (DeBDethane) was tentatively identified in five of the samples. Because of the large differences in air concentrations between the three fractions in ID, TD and RD, it is suggested that the inhalable instead of "total dust" fraction should be used to assess air concentrations, in particular for the larger and higher brominated flame retardants (BFRs).

  6. Photochemical transformation of five novel brominated flame retardants: Kinetics and photoproducts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-Nan; Chen, Jingwen; Xie, Qing; Li, Yingjie; Zhou, Chengzhi

    2016-05-01

    Many novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) are used as substitutes of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in recent years. However, little is known about their phototransformation behavior, which may influence the environmental fate of these chemicals. In this study, photochemical behavior of five NBFRs, allyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (ATE), 2-bromoallyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (BATE), 2,3-dibromopropyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (DPTE), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), and 2,4,6-tris(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)-1,3,5-triazine (TTBP-TAZ) was investigated. Results show all the five NBFRs can undergo photochemical transformation under simulated sunlight irradiation. Quantum yields (Φ) of the five NBFRs varied from 0.012 of TTBP-TAZ in hexane to 0.091 of BTBPE in methanol. Half-lives (t1/2) relevant with solar irradiation of these NBFRs were estimated using the determined Φ, and the values are 1.5-12.0 d in summer and 17.1-165.0 d in winter. Debrominated and ether bond cleavage products were identified in the phototransformation of DPTE and BTBPE. Debromination on the phenyl is a main phototransformation pathway for DPTE, and both debromination and ether bond cleavage are main phototransformation pathways for BTBPE. This study is helpful to better understand the phototransformation behavior of the NBFRs. PMID:26796587

  7. Brominated flame retardants (BFRs): A review on environmental contamination in China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Gang; Bu, Qingwei; Cao, Zhiguo; Du, Xinming; Xia, Jing; Wu, Min; Huang, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) which were detected extensively in environmental and biota samples worldwide, have raised significant concerns during past decades for their persistence, bioaccumulation and potential toxicity to ecological environment and human health. In this paper, we have compiled and reviewed existing literature on the contamination status of BFRs in abiotic and biotic environments in China, including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecane, tetrabromobisphenol A and new BFRs. Temporal trends were also summarized and evaluated. Based on this review, it has been concluded that (1) high concentrations of PBDEs were generally related to the e-waste disposal processing, while the spatial distribution pattern of other BFRs was not necessarily in accordance with this; (2) extremely high concentrations of BFRs in indoor dust emphasized the importance of indoor contamination to human body burdens, while more work need to be done to confirm its contribution; (3) PBDEs in electronics dismantling workers were higher compared to the general population, indicating the occupational exposure should be of particular concern; (4) more data are now becoming available for BFRs in aquatic and terrestrial organisms not previously studied, while studies that consider the occurrence of BFRs in organisms of different trophic levels are still of urgent need for evaluating the fate of BFRs in the food web; and (5) limited data showed a decreasing trend for PBDEs, while more data on time trends of BFR contamination in various matrices and locations are still needed before the impact of regulation of BFRs can be assessed. PMID:26725304

  8. Halogenated Natural Products in Dolphins: Brain-Blubber Distribution and Comparison with Halogenated Flame Retardants.

    PubMed

    Barón, E; Hauler, C; Gallistl, C; Giménez, J; Gauffier, P; Castillo, J J; Fernández-Maldonado, C; de Stephanis, R; Vetter, W; Eljarrat, E; Barceló, D

    2015-08-01

    Halogenated natural products (MHC-1, TriBHD, TetraBHD, MeO-PBDEs, Q1, and related PMBPs) and halogenated flame retardants (PBDEs, HBB, Dec 602, Dec 603, and DP) in blubber and brain are reported from five Alboran Sea delphinids (Spain). Both HNPs and HFRs were detected in brain, implying that they are able to surpass the blood-brain barrier and reach the brain, which represents a new finding for some compounds, such as Q1 and PMBPs, MHC-1, TriBHD, TetraBHD, or Dec 603. Moreover, some compounds (TetraBHD, BDE-153, or HBB) presented higher levels in brain than in blubber. This study evidence the high concentrations of HNPs in the marine environment, especially in top predators. It shows the importance of further monitoring these natural compounds and evaluating their potential toxicity, when most studies focus on anthropogenic compounds only. While no bioaccumulation was found for ∑HNPs, ∑HFRs increased significantly with body size for both common and striped dolphins. Studies evaluating BBB permeation mechanisms of these compounds together with their potential neurotoxic effects in dolphins are recommended.

  9. Size-dependent atmospheric deposition and inhalation exposure of particle-bound organophosphate flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Luo, Pei; Bao, Lian-Jun; Guo, Ying; Li, Shao-Meng; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2016-01-15

    Atmospheric size-fractionated particles were collected at different heights in an e-waste recycling zone (QY) and urban Guangzhou (GZ), China and analyzed for organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs). The total air concentrations of eight OPFRs were 130±130 and 138±127 ng m(-3) in QY and GZ, respectively. Compositional profiles of chlorinated OPFRs were different between QY and GZ, but the size distribution patterns of all OPFRs were not significantly different at different heights. Estimated atmospheric deposition fluxes of OPFRs were 51±67 and 55±13 μg m(-2) d(-1) in QY and GZ, respectively, and the coarse particles (Dp>1.8 μm) dominated both the dry and wet deposition fluxes. Moreover, not all particle-bound OPFRs were inhalable and deposited in the human respiratory tract. The calculated inhalation doses of OPFRs were much lower than the reference doses, suggesting that potential health risk due to inhalation exposure to particle-bound OPFRs in the e-waste recycling zone and urban site was low.

  10. Effects of primary metabolites of organophosphate flame retardants on transcriptional activity via human nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Shinji; Van den Eede, Nele; Covaci, Adrian

    2016-03-14

    Organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) have been used in a wide variety of applications and detected in several environmental matrices, including indoor air and dust. Continuous human exposure to these chemicals is of growing concern. In this study, the agonistic and/or antagonistic activities of 12 primary OPFR-metabolites against ten human nuclear receptors were examined using cell-based transcriptional assays, and compared to those of their parent compounds. As a result, 3-hydroxylphenyl diphenyl phosphate and 4-hydroxylphenyl diphenyl phosphate showed more potent estrogen receptor α (ERα) and ERβ agonistic activity than did their parent, triphenyl phosphate (TPHP). In addition, these hydroxylated TPHP-metabolites also showed ERβ antagonistic activity at higher concentrations and exhibited pregnane X receptor (PXR) agonistic activity as well as androgen receptor (AR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonistic activities at similar levels to those of TPHP. Bis(2-butoxyethyl) 3'-hydroxy-2-butoxyethyl phosphate and 2-hydroxyethyl bis(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate act as PXR agonists at similar levels to their parent, tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate. On the other hand, seven diester OPFR-metabolites and 1-hydroxy-2-propyl bis(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate did not show any receptor activity. Taken together, these results suggest that hydroxylated TPHP-metabolites show increased estrogenicity compared to the parent compound, whereas the diester OPFR-metabolites may have limited nuclear receptor activity compared to their parent triester OPFRs.

  11. Microbial community structure and dynamics in a membrane bioreactor supplemented with the flame retardant dibromoneopentyl glycol.

    PubMed

    Zangi-Kotler, Moran; Ben-Dov, Eitan; Tiehm, Andreas; Kushmaro, Ariel

    2015-11-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are a group of widely used compounds that, due to their limited biodegradability, exhibit excessive persistence in the environment. The persistence and high toxicity of these compounds to the natural biota causes great environmental concern. We investigated the biodegradation of the BFR dibromoneopentyl glycol (DBNPG) under continuous culture conditions using a miniature membrane bioreactor (mMBR) to assess its feasibility as a bioremediation approach. This system demonstrated long-term, stable biodegradation of DBNPG (>90 days), with an average removal rate of about 50%. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene of the microorganisms involved in this process revealed the dominance of reads affiliated with the genus Brevundimonas of the Alphaproteobacteria class during the different mMBR operational stages. The bacterial community was also dominated by reads affiliated with the Sinorhizobium and Sphingopyxis genera within the Alphaproteobacteria class and the Sediminibacterium genus of the Sphingobacteria class. Real-time PCR used to analyze possible changes in the population dynamics of these four dominant groups revealed their consistent presence throughout the long-term mMBR biodegradation activity. Two genera, Brevundimonas and Sphingopyxis, were found to increase in abundance during the acclimation period and then remained relatively stable, forming the main parts of the consortium over the prolonged active stage.

  12. Breast cancer among women in Michigan following exposure to brominated flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Terrell, Metrecia L; Rosenblatt, Karin A; Wirth, Julie; Cameron, Lorraine L; Marcus, Michele

    2016-08-01

    In this updated follow-up, we investigated the breast cancer experience among women in Michigan exposed to brominated flame retardants, some 30 years following exposure. Michigan residents were enrolled in a study cohort after exposure to polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) through the consumption of contaminated food products. PBB concentrations were measured in serum at the time of enrolment. Cancer experience was determined by linkage to the Michigan Cancer Registry. We conducted a nested case-control study that included 51 women diagnosed with breast cancer during 1974-2004 and 202 age-matched controls. While the data suggest an increase in breast cancer risk with higher PBB exposure, this did not reach statistical significance. The OR of having breast cancer among women with PBB concentrations ≥10 ng/mL compared to women with PBB concentrations at or below the limit of detection of 1 ng/mL was 2.60, 95% CI 0.93 to 7.27, (p=0.07), when adjusted for age and family history of cancer in a first-degree female relative. It remains important to examine exposure to brominated chemicals and possible health effects, and to continue following the cancer experience of participants in this study. PMID:27312402

  13. Monitoring of WEEE plastics in regards to brominated flame retardants using handheld XRF.

    PubMed

    Aldrian, Alexia; Ledersteger, Alfred; Pomberger, Roland

    2015-02-01

    This contribution is focused on the on-site determination of the bromine content in waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), in particular waste plastics from television sets (TV) and personal computer monitors (PC) using a handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF) device. The described approach allows the examination of samples in regards to the compliance with legal specifications for polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) directly after disassembling and facilitates the sorting out of plastics with high contents of brominated flame retardants (BFRs). In all, over 3000 pieces of black (TV) and 1600 pieces of grey (PC) plastic waste were analysed with handheld XRF technique for this study. Especially noticeable was the high percentage of pieces with a bromine content of over 50,000ppm for TV (7%) and PC (39%) waste plastics. The applied method was validated by comparing the data of handheld XRF with results obtained by GC-MS. The results showed the expected and sufficiently accurate correlation between these two methods. It is shown that handheld XRF technique is an effective tool for fast monitoring of large volumes of WEEE plastics in regards to BFRs for on-site measurements. PMID:25464945

  14. Does exposure to flame retardants increase the risk for preterm birth?

    PubMed

    Peltier, Morgan R; Koo, Hschi-Chi; Getahun, Darios; Menon, Ramkumar

    2015-02-01

    During the past 40 years, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been widely used as flame retardants and nearly all women have some level of exposure. PBDEs have been isolated from amniotic fluid and cord plasma indicating vertical transmission; however, their effects on pregnancy outcome are largely unknown. Therefore, we quantified PBDE-47, the most common congener in maternal plasma samples collected at the time of labor from women who subsequently had term or preterm birth (PTB). Women were then scored based on whether or not they had very low, low, medium, high or very high peripheral plasma concentrations of PBDE-47. Probit regression analysis suggested that women in the PTB group had a greater chance of scoring higher on this scale (P<0.001). Women with high (OR=3.8, CI: 1.6, 9.7; P=0.003) or very high PBDE-47 concentrations were at greater odds (OR=5.6, CI: 2.2, 15.2; P<0.001) for PTB than women with very low levels of PBDE-47. Results became even more significant after adjustment for maternal race, age, and marital status. These findings suggest that high levels of maternal exposure to PBDEs might increase the risk for PTB. PMID:25542760

  15. Novel brominated flame retardants and dechlorane plus in Greenland air and biota.

    PubMed

    Vorkamp, Katrin; Bossi, Rossana; Riget, Frank F; Skov, Henrik; Sonne, Christian; Dietz, Rune

    2015-01-01

    Following the ban of polybrominated diphenyl ethers, other halogenated flame retardants (FRs) might be used increasingly. This study has analyzed hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)-ethane (BTBPE), 2,3-dibromopropyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (DPTE) and dechloraneplus (DP) in Greenland air over the course of a year. Moreover, BTBPE, DPTE, DP, 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (TBB), bis(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (TBPH) and decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE) were analyzed in samples of polar bear, ringed seal, black guillemot and glaucous gull from Greenland. HBCD in air appeared low, while mean concentrations of syn- and anti-DP were 2.3 and 5.2 pg/m(3), respectively. BTBPE and DPTE were undetectable in air. Detection frequencies in biota were <50% for BTBPE, TBPH and DBDPE, but near 100% for the remaining compounds. Ringed seals from East Greenland had highest mean concentrations of TBB, DPTE, syn- and anti-DP (1.02, 0.078, 0.096 and 0.42 ng/g wet weight, respectively). Our study documents the long-range transport and, to some extent, bioaccumulation of these novel FRs. PMID:25463724

  16. A method for the analysis of multiple novel halogenated flame retardants in cow's milk.

    PubMed

    Rawn, Dorothea F K; Corrigan, Catherine; Ménard, Cathie; Breton, François; Sun, Wing-Fung

    2016-07-01

    A method was developed for the extraction and analysis of cow's milk to measure 21 halogenated flame retardants (FRs), including individual isomers plus eight methoxy-polybrominated diphenyl ethers (MeO-PBDEs). Extraction was performed using homogenisation with acetone:hexane with size exclusion chromatography followed by adsorption chromatography clean-up. Analysis was undertaken using gas chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry. The method was validated in fortified cow's milk with FRs and 2-methoxy-PBDE 68 at three levels (low [12.5-1250 pg g(-)(1)], mid [37.5-5000 pg g(-)(1)] and high [400-10 000 pg g(-)(1)]). Additional methoxy-PBDEs were tested at two fortification levels. Isotope dilution was used to correct for losses during sample preparation and average recoveries ranged from 58% (allyl 2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether [ATE]) to 121% (γ-tetrabromoethylcyclohexane (γ-TBECH)). Limits of detection ranged from 0.055 pg g(-)(1) (6-methoxy-PBDE 47) to 38.9 pg g(-)(1) (decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE)). Matrix effects were overcome through the use of surrogate and performance standards. A single FR (1-bromomethyl-2,3,4,5,6-pentabromobenzene [PBBB]) and two methoxy-PBDEs were detected in commercially available cow's milk collected from local supermarkets in Ottawa, ON, Canada. Detection frequency was < 25% for these compounds and, where present, concentrations were low. PMID:27264991

  17. Monitoring of WEEE plastics in regards to brominated flame retardants using handheld XRF.

    PubMed

    Aldrian, Alexia; Ledersteger, Alfred; Pomberger, Roland

    2015-02-01

    This contribution is focused on the on-site determination of the bromine content in waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), in particular waste plastics from television sets (TV) and personal computer monitors (PC) using a handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF) device. The described approach allows the examination of samples in regards to the compliance with legal specifications for polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) directly after disassembling and facilitates the sorting out of plastics with high contents of brominated flame retardants (BFRs). In all, over 3000 pieces of black (TV) and 1600 pieces of grey (PC) plastic waste were analysed with handheld XRF technique for this study. Especially noticeable was the high percentage of pieces with a bromine content of over 50,000ppm for TV (7%) and PC (39%) waste plastics. The applied method was validated by comparing the data of handheld XRF with results obtained by GC-MS. The results showed the expected and sufficiently accurate correlation between these two methods. It is shown that handheld XRF technique is an effective tool for fast monitoring of large volumes of WEEE plastics in regards to BFRs for on-site measurements.

  18. Atmospheric occurrence and fate of organophosphorus flame retardants and plasticizer at the German coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolschke, Hendrik; Sühring, Roxana; Mi, Wenying; Möller, Axel; Xie, Zhiyong; Ebinghaus, Ralf

    2016-07-01

    This study reports the occurrence and distribution of organophosphor esters (OPEs), used as flame retardants and plasticizer, in the marine atmosphere of the German Coast. From August 2011 to October 2012, 58 high volume air samples (gas/particle phase separately) were collected at the German North Sea coast town Büsum. With the use of a GC-MS/MS System for instrumental analysis, detection limits for OPEs in air samples could be significantly improved compared to the previously used single GC-MS method. The concentration (gas + particle phase) of total OPEs was on average 5 pg/m3, with eight of the nine investigated compounds detectable in over 50% of the samples. A focus of this investigation concerned the partioning of OPEs between the particle and the gas phase. The observed partitioning of OPEs in this study was distinguished from previous studies. While previous studies reported OPEs exclusively in the particle phase, a significant part of the sum OPE concentration (55%) was detected in the gas phase. The contribution of the gas phase even reached up to as high as 88% for individual compounds such as tri-iso-butyl phosphate.

  19. Brominated flame retardants and the formation of dioxins and furans in fires and combustion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengmei; Buekens, Alfons; Li, Xiaodong

    2016-03-01

    The widespread use and increasing inventory of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have caused considerable concern, as a result of BFRs emissions to the environment and of the formation of both polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PBDD/Fs) and mixed polybromochloro-dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PBCDD/Fs or PXDD/Fs). Structural similarities between PBDD/Fs and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) suggest the existence of comparable formation pathways of both PBDD/Fs and PCDD/Fs, yet BFRs also act as specific precursors to form additional PBDD/Fs. Moreover, elementary bromine (Br2) seems to facilitate chlorination by bromination of organics, followed by Br/Cl-exchange based on displacement through the more reactive halogen. Overall, PBDD/Fs form through three possible pathways: precursor formation, de novo formation, and dispersion of parts containing BFRs as impurities and surviving a fire or other events. The present review summarises the formation mechanisms of both brominated (PBDD/Fs) and mixed dioxins (PXDD/Fs with X=Br or Cl) from BFRs, recaps available emissions data of PBDD/Fs and mixed PXDD/Fs from controlled waste incineration, uncontrolled combustion sources and accidental fires, and identifies and analyses the effects of several local factors of influence, affecting the formation of PBDD/Fs and mixed PXDD/Fs during BFRs combustion.

  20. Organophosphate flame retardants in indoor dust from Egypt: implications for human exposure.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Mohamed Abou-Elwafa; Covaci, Adrian

    2014-05-01

    Organophosphate flame retardants (PFRs) have been proposed as alternatives for the phased out PBDE formulations. However, there exists no information on indoor dust contamination with PFRs in Africa. In this study, we report--for the first time--on levels and profiles of PFRs in dust samples from Egyptian houses (n = 20), offices (n = 20), cars (n = 20), and public microenvironments (PMEs; n = 11). Results revealed that PFR levels in Egyptian indoor dust are among the lowest reported worldwide. This may be attributed to less strict fire-safety standards and lack of regulatory actions against PBDEs. Triphenylphosphate was the only PFR detected in all samples with highest average concentration (386 ng g(-1)). While tris-2-chloroethyl phosphate, tris(1-chloro-2-propyl)phosphate and tris-1,3-dichloropropylphosphate showed higher detection frequency (DF = 69%, 57%, and 56%; average = 233, 229, and 144 ng g(-1), respectively), tri(2-butoxyexthyl)phosphate (37%; 294 ng g(-1)) displayed the second highest average concentration. Statistical analysis revealed significantly (P < 0.05) higher concentrations of ΣPFRs in cars (average = 1011 ng g(-1)) and PMEs (2167 ng g(-1)) than in houses (310 ng g(-1)) and offices (450 ng g(-1)). Estimated exposures of adults and toddlers to PFRs via dust ingestion were much lower than the reported reference doses, indicating no immediate health risk to the Egyptian population.

  1. Health effects of haloalkyl phoshpate flame retardants and potential metabolic products

    SciTech Connect

    Holleman, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to produce a state-of-the-art review and assessment of the health effects associated with tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCP) and related compounds which find widespread use as flame retardants. It was intended to support an ongoing evaluation of TDCP within the Office of Toxic Substances. TDCP was demonstrated to be a potent oncogen in a 2-year chronic study in rats. It is probable that the oncogenicity of TDCP is due, in part or in total, to the production of reactive metabolic intermediates which are well-known mutagens. As an example, 1,3-dichloro-2-propanone is a bifunctional alkylating agent with intercalating properties. Its carbonyl functional group is potentially reactive as well. Therefore, it is not surprising that it has been shown to be a very potent in vitro mutagen. This examination of the metabolic pathways of TDCP with emphasis on oxidative processes common to organophosphate compounds, and documentation of the health effects of halogenated carbonyl-containing compounds, which may be generated metabolically, will assist in the assessment of health hazards made in the absence of extensive further testing.

  2. Hair as an indicator of endogenous tissue levels of brominated flame retardants in mammals.

    PubMed

    D'Havé, Helga; Covaci, Adrian; Scheirs, Jan; Schepens, Paul; Verhagen, Ron; De Coen, Wim

    2005-08-15

    Few data are available on brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in terrestrial mammalian wildlife. Moreover, the use of hair in nondestructive monitoring of BFRs in mammals or humans has not been investigated. In the present study, concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and brominated biphenyl 153 (BB 153) were analyzed in tissues of the European hedgehog Erinaceus europaeus. Road kills and carcasses from wildlife rescue centers were used to investigate relationships between concentrations of BFRs in hair and internal tissues, BFR tissue distribution (hair, liver, kidney, muscle, and adipose tissue), and PBDE congener tissue pattern dissimilarities. Liver concentrations of PBDEs and BB 153 were in the ranges 1-1178 and 0-2.5 ng/g of liver wet weight, respectively. PBDEs were predominant in adipose tissue and liver, while accumulation of BB 153 was tissue independent. The less persistent compound BDE 99 was more dominant in hair than in internal tissues. We observed positive relationships between BFR levels in hair and internal tissues for sum PBDEs and BDE 47 (0.37 < r < 0.78). The present study demonstrated that hair is a suitable indicator of PBDE exposure in terrestrial mammals which can be used in nondestructive monitoring schemes.

  3. Synthesis of hydrophobic zinc borate nanoflakes and its effect on flame retardant properties of polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengli; Long, Beihong; Wang, Zichen; Tian, Yumei; Zheng, Yunhui; Zhang, Qian

    2010-04-01

    Zinc borate (2ZnO·3B 2O 3·3.5H 2O) has relatively high dehydration on-set temperature which property permits processing in a wide range of polymer system. But zinc borate particles are hardly dispersed in a polymer matrix so that they prevent their using in industry. To address this problem, we synthesized hydrophobic zinc borate (2ZnO·3B 2O 3·3.5H 2O) nanoflakes by employing solid-liquid reaction of zinc oxide (ZnO) and boric acid (H 3BO 3) in the presence of oleic acid. This method does not bring pollution. By conducting morphological and microscopic analyses, we found that this compound displayed nanoflake morphology with particle size of around 100-200 nm, thickness less than 100 nm and there were uniform mesopores with the diameter about 10 nm within the particles. Furthermore, our products had an effect on flame retardant of polyethylene, especially when the zinc borate was modified by oleic acid.

  4. DNA aptamers for selective identification and separation of flame retardant chemicals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Un-Jung; Kim, Byoung Chan

    2016-09-14

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are group of chemicals which are representative persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and used as brominated flame retardants for many consumer products. PBDEs were phased out since 2009 but are still frequently observed in various environmental matrices and human body. Here, we report ssDNA aptamers which bind to BDE47, one of the PBDE congeners commonly found in various environmental matrices, and show affinity to other major tri-to hepta- BDE congeners. The PBDE specific aptamers were isolated from random library of ssDNA using Mag-SELEX. Two out of 15 sequences, based on their alignment and hairpin loop structures, were chosen to determine dissociation constant with BDE47 and showed from picomolar to nanomolar affinities (200 pM and 1.53 nM). The aptamers displayed high selectivity to the original target, BDE47, and implying general specificity to PBDE backbone with varying affinities to other congeners. Further, we showed that the use of two aptamers together could enhance the separation efficiency of BDE47 and other BDE congeners when dissolved in a solvent compared to use of single aptamer. These aptamers are expected to provide a tool for preliminary screening or quick separation of PBDEs in environmental samples prior to trace quantitative analysis.

  5. Photolysis of brominated flame retardants in textiles exposed to natural sunlight.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Natsuko; Desborough, Jennifer; Harrad, Stuart; Takigami, Hidetaka

    2013-03-01

    Photolytic transformation profiles of technical hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and technical decabromodiphenyl ether (DecaBDE) in flame-retarded textiles exposed to natural sunlight were compared. Textiles that contained approximately 4% HBCDs by weight showed no substantial loss of any of the HBCD diastereomers during the entire exposure period (371 days), indicating that they were resistant to sunlight, that is, that debromination and isomerization of HBCD diastereomers did not occur under the experimental conditions. Exposure of a textile treated with technical DecaBDE resulted in the formation of polybrominated dibenzofurans (PBDFs) as products of photodecomposition of polybrominated diphenyl ethers present in the technical DecaBDE. After 329 days of exposure, the total PBDF concentration reached a maximum of 27 000 ng g(-1), which was approximately 10 times the initial concentration. During the experiment, di- to hexa-BDF congener concentrations increased continuously. Although the concentrations of PBDFs in the textiles were 4–5 orders of magnitude lower than the concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers, it is important to note that PBDFs were formed as a result of sunlight exposure during normal use of products treated with technical DecaBDE.

  6. Halogenated Natural Products in Dolphins: Brain-Blubber Distribution and Comparison with Halogenated Flame Retardants.

    PubMed

    Barón, E; Hauler, C; Gallistl, C; Giménez, J; Gauffier, P; Castillo, J J; Fernández-Maldonado, C; de Stephanis, R; Vetter, W; Eljarrat, E; Barceló, D

    2015-08-01

    Halogenated natural products (MHC-1, TriBHD, TetraBHD, MeO-PBDEs, Q1, and related PMBPs) and halogenated flame retardants (PBDEs, HBB, Dec 602, Dec 603, and DP) in blubber and brain are reported from five Alboran Sea delphinids (Spain). Both HNPs and HFRs were detected in brain, implying that they are able to surpass the blood-brain barrier and reach the brain, which represents a new finding for some compounds, such as Q1 and PMBPs, MHC-1, TriBHD, TetraBHD, or Dec 603. Moreover, some compounds (TetraBHD, BDE-153, or HBB) presented higher levels in brain than in blubber. This study evidence the high concentrations of HNPs in the marine environment, especially in top predators. It shows the importance of further monitoring these natural compounds and evaluating their potential toxicity, when most studies focus on anthropogenic compounds only. While no bioaccumulation was found for ∑HNPs, ∑HFRs increased significantly with body size for both common and striped dolphins. Studies evaluating BBB permeation mechanisms of these compounds together with their potential neurotoxic effects in dolphins are recommended. PMID:26148182

  7. Microbial degradation of the brominated flame retardant TBNPA by groundwater bacteria: laboratory and field study.

    PubMed

    Balaban, Noa; Bernstein, Anat; Gelman, Faina; Ronen, Zeev

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, the biodegradation of the brominated flame retardant tribromoneopentylalcohol (TBNPA) by a groundwater enrichment culture was investigated using a dual carbon ((13)C/(12)C)- bromine ((81)Br/(79)Br) stable isotope analysis. An indigenous aerobic bacterial consortium was enriched from the polluted groundwater underlying an industrial site in the northern Negev Desert, Israel, where TBNPA is an abundant pollutant. Aerobic biodegradation was shown to be rapid, with complete debromination within a few days, whereas anaerobic biodegradation was not observed. Biodegradation under aerobic conditions was accompanied by a significant carbon isotope effect with an isotopic enrichment factor of ɛCbulk = -8.8‰ ± 1.5‰, without any detectable bromine isotope fractionation. It was found that molecular oxygen is necessary for biodegradation to occur, suggesting an initial oxidative step. Based on these results, it was proposed that H abstraction from the C-H bond is the first step of TBNPA biodegradation under aerobic conditions, and that the C-H bond cleavage results in the formation of unstable intermediates, which are rapidly debrominated. A preliminary isotopic analysis of TBNPA in the groundwater underlying the industrial area revealed that there are no changes in the carbon and bromine isotope ratio values downstream of the contamination source. Considering that anoxic conditions prevail in the groundwater of the contaminated site, the lack of isotope shifts in TBNPA indicates the lack of TBNPA biodegradation in the groundwater, in accordance with our findings. PMID:27183339

  8. Bioaccumulation kinetics of brominated flame retardants (polybrominated diphenyl ethers) in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis)

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafsson, K.; Bjoerk, M.; Burreau, S.; Gilek, M. )

    1999-06-01

    Baltic Sea blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, were exposed to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs, IUPAC congeners 47, 99, and 153) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, congeners 31, 52, 77, 118, and 153) in a flow-through experimental setup for 44 d. After the exposure phase, the mussels were allowed to depurate in natural brackish water for 26 d. After analyses, uptake clearance rate coefficients (k[sub u]), depuration rate coefficients (k[sub d]), and bioaccumulation factors (BAF) were calculated. A rapid uptake of all PBDEs and PCBs was observed, especially for PBDE congeners 47 and 99. The depuration rate decreased with increasing hydrophobicity as expected for the PCBs, but for the PBDEs, depuration rate coefficients appeared to be of the same magnitude for all three congeners independently of log K[sub OW]. The BAFs obtained for PBDE 47 and PBDE 99 were higher than for all other substances in the study, severalfold higher than for PCBs of similar hydrophobicity. The presented data indicate that the bioaccumulation potential of PBDEs, extensively used as flame retardants, is similar or higher than that of PCBs for filter feeding organisms such as blue mussels.

  9. QSAR modeling and prediction of the endocrine-disrupting potencies of brominated flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Papa, Ester; Kovarich, Simona; Gramatica, Paola

    2010-05-17

    In the European Union REACH regulation, the chemicals with particularly harmful behaviors, such as endocrine disruptors (EDs), are subject to authorization, and the identification of safer alternatives to these chemicals is required. In this context, the use of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) becomes particularly useful to fill the data gap due to the very small number of experimental data available to characterize the environmental and toxicological profiles of new and emerging pollutants with ED behavior such as brominated flame retardants (BFRs). In this study, different QSAR models were developed on different responses of endocrine disruption measured for several BFRs. The multiple linear regression approach was applied to a variety of theoretical molecular descriptors, and the best models, which were identified from all of the possible combinations of the structural variables, were internally validated for their performance using the leave-one-out (Q(LOO)(2) = 73-91%) procedure and scrambling of the responses. External validation was provided, when possible, by splitting the data sets in training and test sets (range of Q(EXT)(2) = 76-90%), which confirmed the predictive ability of the proposed equations. These models, which were developed according to the principles defined by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development to improve the regulatory acceptance of QSARs, represent a simple tool for the screening and characterization of BFRs.

  10. QSAR classification models for the prediction of endocrine disrupting activity of brominated flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Kovarich, Simona; Papa, Ester; Gramatica, Paola

    2011-06-15

    The identification of potential endocrine disrupting (ED) chemicals is an important task for the scientific community due to their diffusion in the environment; the production and use of such compounds will be strictly regulated through the authorization process of the REACH regulation. To overcome the problem of insufficient experimental data, the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) approach is applied to predict the ED activity of new chemicals. In the present study QSAR classification models are developed, according to the OECD principles, to predict the ED potency for a class of emerging ubiquitary pollutants, viz. brominated flame retardants (BFRs). Different endpoints related to ED activity (i.e. aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonism and antagonism, estrogen receptor agonism and antagonism, androgen and progesterone receptor antagonism, T4-TTR competition, E2SULT inhibition) are modeled using the k-NN classification method. The best models are selected by maximizing the sensitivity and external predictive ability. We propose simple QSARs (based on few descriptors) characterized by internal stability, good predictive power and with a verified applicability domain. These models are simple tools that are applicable to screen BFRs in relation to their ED activity, and also to design safer alternatives, in agreement with the requirements of REACH regulation at the authorization step.

  11. From Clothing to Laundry Water: Investigating the Fate of Phthalates, Brominated Flame Retardants, and Organophosphate Esters.

    PubMed

    Saini, Amandeep; Thaysen, Clara; Jantunen, Liisa; McQueen, Rachel H; Diamond, Miriam L

    2016-09-01

    The accumulation of phthalate esters, brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and organophosphate esters (OPEs) by clothing from indoor air and transfer via laundering to outdoors were investigated. Over 30 days cotton and polyester fabrics accumulated 3475 and 1950 ng/dm(2) ∑5phthalates, 65 and 78 ng/dm(2) ∑10BFRs, and 1200 and 310 ng/dm(2) ∑8OPEs, respectively. Planar surface area concentrations of OPEs and low molecular weight phthalates were significantly greater in cotton than polyester and similar for BFRs and high molecular weight phthalates. This difference was significantly and inversely correlated with KOW, suggesting greater sorption of polar compounds to polar cotton. Chemical release from cotton and polyester to laundry water was >80% of aliphatic OPEs (log KOW < 4), < 50% of OPEs with an aromatic structure, 50-100% of low molecular weight phthalates (log KOW 4-6), and < detection-35% of higher molecular weight phthalates (log KOW > 8) and BFRs (log KOW > 6). These results support the hypothesis that clothing acts an efficient conveyer of soluble semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) from indoors to outdoors through accumulation from air and then release during laundering. Clothes drying could as well contribute to the release of chemicals emitted by electric dryers. The results also have implications for dermal exposure. PMID:27507188

  12. Environmentally friendly flame retardants. A detailed solid-state NMR study of melamine orthophosphate.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Andreas; Litvinov, Victor M; Kentgens, Arno P M

    2007-12-01

    We used solid-state NMR spectroscopy to gain detailed information about the proton positions, proximities and the hydrogen-bonding network in the environmentally friendly flame retardant melamine orthophosphate (MP). High-resolution proton one- and two-dimensional solid-state NMR spectra were obtained at high external magnetic field in combination with fast magic angle spinning of the sample. Furthermore, we recorded homo- and heteronuclear correlation spectra of types (15)N–(15)N, (1)H–(13)C, (1)H–(15)N and (1)H–(31)P. In addition, we determined the geometry of the NH and NH(2) groups in MP by (15)N–(1)H heteronuclear recoupling experiments.We were able to completely assign the different isotropic chemical shifts in MP. Furthermore, we could identify the protonation of the melamine and orthophosphate moieties. The experimental results are discussed in connection with the structural model obtained by powder X-ray diffraction together with a combined molecular modeling-Rietveld refinement approach (De Ridder et al. Helv. Chim. Acta 2004; 87: 1894). We show that the geometry of the NH2 groups can only be successfully estimated by solid-state NMR. PMID:18157843

  13. Potential genotoxicity and risk assessment of a chlorinated flame retardant, Dechlorane Plus.

    PubMed

    Dou, Jing; Jin, Yuan; Li, Yajie; Wu, Bing; Li, Mei

    2015-09-01

    Dechlorane Plus (DP) is a chlorinated flame retardants that is globally ubiquitous. It is a potentially persistent organic pollutant (POPs) and an environmental toxin. However, the toxicity data is still limited and cannot provide a comprehensive environmental ecological risk assessment for DP. In this study, luminous bacteria, Vicia faba and Tetrahymena thermophila were chosen as testing organisms to investigate the acute toxicity and mutagenicity of DP. The concentration gradient of DP used in this study was chosen based on its environmental levels (experiments of luminous bacteria: 0.591, 2.95, 14.8, 73.8, 369 μg L(-1); micronucleus tests: 2.4, 12, 60, 300, 1500 μg L(-1); comet assay: 2.4, 12, 60, 300, 1500 μg L(-1)). For luminous bacteria, the relative luminosities were around 100% in treated groups, which suggested that there is no acute toxicity to luminous bacteria under the studied DP concentrations. The micronucleus test showed no significant difference between treatment and control groups, indicating no genotoxicity of DP. However the comet assay conducted with T. thermophila was relatively sensitive as there was a significant increase in DNA damage when the concentrations of DP increased from 300 to 1500 μg L(-1), while the lower concentrations failed to show any treatment-related differences. Therefore, DP may pose a potential risk at concentration⩾300 μg L(-1). The results provide scientific information on the ecological risk assessment of DP. PMID:25585867

  14. Organophosphate ester flame retardants and plasticizers in human placenta in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jinjian; Xu, Zemin; Huang, Wei; Feng, Limin; Yang, Fangxing

    2016-06-01

    Organophosphate esters (OPEs) have been widely used in various products as alternatives to brominated flame retardants. Although widespread OPE exposure is expected in humans, the accumulation of OPEs has seldom been studied in the human body. In this study, 12 OPE analogs were analyzed in 50 human placentas collected in Eastern China. The concentrations of the 9 most frequently detected OPEs (Σ9OPEs) ranged from 34.4 to 862ng/g lipid weight (lw), with a median of 301ng/g lw. Tri(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) was identified as the most abundant analog, with a median concentration of 142ng/g lw, followed by tributoxyethyl phosphate (TBEP) and triphenyl phosphate (TPhP). Statistical analysis showed no analog of OPEs or Σ9OPEs was positively correlated with the lipid content of the placentas. There were no correlations observed between the OPE concentrations and maternal characteristics. Food consumption habits exhibited weak effects on OPE levels in the placentas. Further investigation is required to determine the effects of OPEs on fetuses due to the expected increase in maternal exposure to these esters. PMID:26950635

  15. DNA aptamers for selective identification and separation of flame retardant chemicals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Un-Jung; Kim, Byoung Chan

    2016-09-14

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are group of chemicals which are representative persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and used as brominated flame retardants for many consumer products. PBDEs were phased out since 2009 but are still frequently observed in various environmental matrices and human body. Here, we report ssDNA aptamers which bind to BDE47, one of the PBDE congeners commonly found in various environmental matrices, and show affinity to other major tri-to hepta- BDE congeners. The PBDE specific aptamers were isolated from random library of ssDNA using Mag-SELEX. Two out of 15 sequences, based on their alignment and hairpin loop structures, were chosen to determine dissociation constant with BDE47 and showed from picomolar to nanomolar affinities (200 pM and 1.53 nM). The aptamers displayed high selectivity to the original target, BDE47, and implying general specificity to PBDE backbone with varying affinities to other congeners. Further, we showed that the use of two aptamers together could enhance the separation efficiency of BDE47 and other BDE congeners when dissolved in a solvent compared to use of single aptamer. These aptamers are expected to provide a tool for preliminary screening or quick separation of PBDEs in environmental samples prior to trace quantitative analysis. PMID:27566357

  16. Novel brominated flame retardants and dechlorane plus in Greenland air and biota.

    PubMed

    Vorkamp, Katrin; Bossi, Rossana; Riget, Frank F; Skov, Henrik; Sonne, Christian; Dietz, Rune

    2015-01-01

    Following the ban of polybrominated diphenyl ethers, other halogenated flame retardants (FRs) might be used increasingly. This study has analyzed hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)-ethane (BTBPE), 2,3-dibromopropyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (DPTE) and dechloraneplus (DP) in Greenland air over the course of a year. Moreover, BTBPE, DPTE, DP, 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (TBB), bis(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (TBPH) and decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE) were analyzed in samples of polar bear, ringed seal, black guillemot and glaucous gull from Greenland. HBCD in air appeared low, while mean concentrations of syn- and anti-DP were 2.3 and 5.2 pg/m(3), respectively. BTBPE and DPTE were undetectable in air. Detection frequencies in biota were <50% for BTBPE, TBPH and DBDPE, but near 100% for the remaining compounds. Ringed seals from East Greenland had highest mean concentrations of TBB, DPTE, syn- and anti-DP (1.02, 0.078, 0.096 and 0.42 ng/g wet weight, respectively). Our study documents the long-range transport and, to some extent, bioaccumulation of these novel FRs.

  17. Emerging brominated flame retardants in the sediment of the Great Lakes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruiqiang; Wei, Hua; Guo, Jiehong; Li, An

    2012-03-20

    The concentrations of 13 currently used brominated flame retardants (BFRs) were analyzed in 16 sediment cores collected from the North American Great Lakes. Among them, 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), 1,2-dibromo-4-(1,2-dibromoethyl)cyclohexane (TBECH), and hexachlorocyclopentadienyl dibromocyclooctane (HCDBCO) were more frequently detected than others. In general, these emerging BFRs have much lower concentrations than polybromodiphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and dechloranes. Inventories of the five BFRs named above, given on a logarithm basis, were found to decrease linearly with the increasing latitude of the sampling locations, but with weaker statistics than those previously reported for the dechloranes. Logarithm of surface fluxes, on the other hand, was found to be a better parameter in correlating with the longitude. With regard to time trends, the exponential increases in concentrations of these BFRs, particularly DBDPE and BTBPE, in recent years are particularly disturbing. The sediment concentration of DBDPE doubles every 3-5 years in Lake Michigan, and approximately every 7 years in Lake Ontario. The corresponding doubling times for BTBPE are about 5 and 7 years in Lakes Ontario and Michigan, respectively, although declines or leveling off were observed in the top sediment layers in Lake Ontario. In contrast to PCBs, PBDEs, and most dechloranes, the correlations between the surface concentration of emerging BFRs and the latitude or longitude of the sampling sites were not strengthened by normalization of the concentration based on the organic matter content of the sediment.

  18. Measurement and human exposure assessment of brominated flame retardants in household products from South China.

    PubMed

    Chen, She-Jun; Ma, Yun-Juan; Wang, Jing; Tian, Mi; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Chen, Da; Mai, Bi-Xian

    2010-04-15

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) were examined in household products in the Pearl River Delta, South China, including electronic appliances, furniture and upholstery, car interiors, and raw materials for electronics. The concentrations of PBDEs derived from penta-BDE mixture were much lower (<111 ng/g) than those for octa- and deca-BDE commercially derived PBDEs, with maximum values of 15,107 and 1,603,343 ng/g, respectively, in all the household products. Our findings suggest the recycling of old electronic products and their reuse might be also a potential important source of discontinued PBDEs to the environment. DBDPE was found in 20.0% of all the samples, ranging from 311 to 268,230 ng/g. PBDE congener profiles in both the household products and raw materials suggest that some less brominated BDEs in the environment may be derived from the decomposition of higher brominated PBDEs in PBDE-containing products in process of the manufacturing, use and/or recycling. Human exposure to PBDEs from household products via inhalation ranged from 175 to 612 pg/kg bw day, accounting for a small proportion of the total daily exposure via indoor inhalation. Despite the low deleterious risk associated with household products with regard to PBDEs, they are of special concern because of the relatively higher exposures observed for young children and further work is required.

  19. High Exposure to Organophosphate Flame Retardants in Infants: Associations with Baby Products.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Kate; Butt, Craig M; Chen, Albert; Limkakeng, Alexander T; Stapleton, Heather M

    2015-12-15

    Infant products containing polyurethane foam are commonly treated with organophosphate flame retardants (PFRs), including tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl)phosphate (TDCIPP) and triphenyl phosphate (TPHP). Infants may have greater exposure due to greater contact with these products, yet little is known about levels of exposure or the factors contributing to higher exposure. We recruited children age 2-18 months from North Carolina to investigate PFR exposure (n = 43; recruited 2014-2015). Parents provided information on potential sources and modifiers of exposure, and reported whether they owned common infant products. We measured five PFR metabolites in urine samples collected from children. TDCIPP and TPHP metabolites (bis(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (BDCIPP) and diphenyl phosphate (DPHP)) were most commonly detected (>93% detect). Other metabolites were detected infrequently (<35% detect). Although we did not observe a clear age trend for infants, BDCIPP levels were substantially higher than those reported for adults (geometric mean = 7.3 ng/mL). The number of infant products owned was strongly associated with BDCIPP; children with >16 products had BDCIPP levels that were 6.8 times those with <13 (p = 0.02). Infants attending daycare centers also had higher BDCIPP levels (3.7 times those of others; p = 0.07), suggesting time spent in this microenvironment contributes to higher exposure. In contrast, DPHP levels were not related to products owned, time in different microenvironments, or behavior. PMID:26551726

  20. Characterization of organophosphorus flame retardants' sorption on building materials and consumer products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Allen, Matthew R.; Roache, Nancy F.

    2016-09-01

    Better understanding the transport mechanisms of organophosphorus flame-retardants (OPFRs) in the residential environment is important to more accurately estimate their indoor exposure and develop risk management strategies that protect human health. This study describes an improved dual small chamber testing method to characterize the sorption of OPFRs on indoor building materials and consumer products. The OPFRs studied were tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCIPP), and tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCIPP). The test materials and products used as sinks include concrete, ceiling tile, vinyl flooring, carpet, latex painted gypsum wallboard, open cell polyurethane foam, mattress pad and liner, polyester clothing, cotton clothing, and uniform shirt. During the tests, the amount of OPFRs absorbed by the materials at different exposure times was determined simultaneously. OPFRs air concentrations at the inlet and inside the test chamber were monitored. The data were used to rank the sorption strength of the OPFRs on different materials. In general, building materials exhibited relatively stronger sorption strength than clothing textiles. The material-air partition and material phase diffusion coefficients were estimated by fitting a sink model to the sorption concentration data for twelve materials with three OPFRs. They are in the range of 2.72 × 105 to 3.99 × 108 (dimensionless) for the material-air partition coefficients and 1.13 × 10-14 to 5.83 × 10-9 (m2/h) for the material phase diffusion coefficients.

  1. Presence and select determinants of organophosphate flame retardants in public swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Teo, Tiffany L L; Coleman, Heather M; Khan, Stuart J

    2016-11-01

    The occurrence of five organophosphate flame retardants (PFRs) consisting of tributyl phosphate (TNBP), tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCIPP), tris(1.3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCIPP) and triphenyl phosphate (TPHP) in swimming pools were investigated. Fifteen chlorinated public swimming pools were sampled, including indoor pools, outdoor pools and spa pools. The analyses were carried out using isotope dilution gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. All five PFRs were detected in swimming pool waters with concentrations ranging from 5-27ng/L (TNBP), 7-293ng/L (TCEP), 62-1180ng/L (TCIPP), 10-670ng/L (TDCIPP) and 8-132ng/L (TPHP). The concentrations of PFRs were generally higher in indoor swimming pools compared to outdoor swimming pools. In municipal water supplies, used to fill the swimming pools in three of the sampling locations, the five PFRs were all below the limit of quantifications, eliminating this as the source. Potential leaching of PFRs from commonly used swimming equipment, including newly purchased kickboards and swimsuits was investigated. These experiments revealed that PFRs leached from swimsuits, and may be a source of PFRs in swimming pools. A quantitative risk assessment revealed that the health risk to PFRs via swimming pools was generally low and below commonly applied health risk benchmarks.

  2. Organophosphorus flame retardants and plasticizers in air from various indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Marklund, Anneli; Andersson, Barbro; Haglund, Peter

    2005-08-01

    Eleven organophosphorus compounds (OPs) that are used as plasticizers and flame retardants were analysed in duplicate samples of indoor air from 17 domestic and occupational environments. Solid-phase extraction (SPE) columns were used as adsorbents and analysis was performed using GC with a nitrogen phosphorus selective detector. The total amounts of OPs in the air samples ranged between 36 and 950 ng m(-3); tris(chloropropyl) phosphate (TCPP) and tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) being the most abundant (0.4 to 730 ng m(-3)), followed by tributyl phosphate (0.5-120 ng m(-3)). Public buildings tended to have about 3-4 times higher levels of OPs than domestic buildings. The relative amounts of individual OPs varied between the sites and generally reflected the building materials, furniture and consumer products used in the sampled environments. Potential sources of these compounds include, inter alia, acoustic ceilings, upholstered furniture, wall coverings, floor polish and polyvinylchloride floor coverings. A correlation was observed between the TCEP concentrations in the air in the sampled environments and previously reported concentrations in dust, but no such correlation was seen for the heavier and less volatile tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBEP). Based on estimated amounts of indoor air inhaled and dust ingested, adults and children in the sampled environments would be exposed to up to 5.8 microg kg(-1) day(-1) and 57 microg kg(-1) day(-1) total OPs, respectively.

  3. Occurrence of organophosphorus flame retardant and plasticizers in three volcanic lakes of central Italy.

    PubMed

    Bacaloni, Alessandro; Cucci, Francesca; Guarino, Chiara; Nazzari, Manuela; Samperi, Roberto; Laganà, Aldo

    2008-03-15

    The concentration levels, distribution, and seasonal fluctuations of 12 organophosphorus flame retardants and plasticizers (OPs), of which some are reported to be toxic to aquatic organisms, were investigated in lakes from June 2006 to June 2007. Three volcanic lakes located in the Lazio area (Central Italy) and characterized by a different anthropical impact were selected. Analysis of lake water samples showed that in closed ecosystems (hydrogeological systems), such as small volcanic lakes, OP contamination may occur even in the absence of industries and treated or untreated waste discharges. The selected substances were found at ng/L concentrations in all lakes. In the two more anthropized lakes tributyl phosphate and tripropyl phosphate were the most abundant OPs, with peaks of respectively 784 and 951 ng/L. Maximum pollution levels were reached in October-November, and concentrations decreased to a minimum value in March-April. Chlorinated OPs showed the same trend, but their concentrations were 1 order of magnitude lower and the level decreasing was shifted with respectto alkyl OPs. On the contrary, tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate concentrations were quite similar among all water samples analyzed, indicating that their sources were different in nature. One of the three lakes is an important source of drinkable water, so nine wells situated in its neighborhood were also examined. No correlation between lake water and groundwater contamination could be found.

  4. Microbial degradation of the brominated flame retardant TBNPA by groundwater bacteria: laboratory and field study.

    PubMed

    Balaban, Noa; Bernstein, Anat; Gelman, Faina; Ronen, Zeev

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, the biodegradation of the brominated flame retardant tribromoneopentylalcohol (TBNPA) by a groundwater enrichment culture was investigated using a dual carbon ((13)C/(12)C)- bromine ((81)Br/(79)Br) stable isotope analysis. An indigenous aerobic bacterial consortium was enriched from the polluted groundwater underlying an industrial site in the northern Negev Desert, Israel, where TBNPA is an abundant pollutant. Aerobic biodegradation was shown to be rapid, with complete debromination within a few days, whereas anaerobic biodegradation was not observed. Biodegradation under aerobic conditions was accompanied by a significant carbon isotope effect with an isotopic enrichment factor of ɛCbulk = -8.8‰ ± 1.5‰, without any detectable bromine isotope fractionation. It was found that molecular oxygen is necessary for biodegradation to occur, suggesting an initial oxidative step. Based on these results, it was proposed that H abstraction from the C-H bond is the first step of TBNPA biodegradation under aerobic conditions, and that the C-H bond cleavage results in the formation of unstable intermediates, which are rapidly debrominated. A preliminary isotopic analysis of TBNPA in the groundwater underlying the industrial area revealed that there are no changes in the carbon and bromine isotope ratio values downstream of the contamination source. Considering that anoxic conditions prevail in the groundwater of the contaminated site, the lack of isotope shifts in TBNPA indicates the lack of TBNPA biodegradation in the groundwater, in accordance with our findings.

  5. The toxic effects of flame retardants: a gene expression study in elucidating their carcinogenicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagula, Mary; Al-Dhumani, Ali; Al-Dhumani, Sajaad; Mastro, Alexandra

    2013-05-01

    Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) are flame retardants widely used in many commercial products, including building materials, electronics, furnishings, motor vehicles, airplanes, plastics, polyurethane foams, and textiles. Although the specific toxic action of these chemicals is not clear, it is reported that they can cause serious damage to the nervous, reproductive, and endocrine systems. These chemicals are branded as "probable carcinogens" by Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Therefore, this study is taken up to investigate the expression of genes namely, TP-53, RAD1, CRADD, and ATM, which are involved in apoptosis, DNA repair and cell cycle regulation. For this study human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) are exposed to 5 μM of BDE-85 (a penta-BDE) and BDE-209 (deca-BDE). The results of this report reveal significant alteration in all the genes under investigation in BDE-85 and BDE-209 exposed cells. The BDE-85 induced responses are significantly more than BDE-209. These results emphasize the congener specific action of PBDEs on the expression of genes relevant to DNA repair and cell division of HUVEC cells.

  6. Rice ingestion is a major pathway for human exposure to organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingli; Zou, Wei; Mu, Li; Chen, Yuming; Ren, Chaoxiu; Hu, Xiangang; Zhou, Qixing

    2016-11-15

    Although organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) have been shown to accumulate in abiotic and biotic environmental compartments, data about OPFRs concentrations in various foods are limited and are none in humans through diets. In this work, the concentrations of 6 typical OPFRs were investigated in 50 rice samples, 75 commonly consumed foods and 45 human hair samples from China. The dietary intakes of OPFRs for adult people via food ingestion were estimated. The concentrations of ΣOPFRs in foods ranged from 0.004ng/g to 287ng/g. OPFRs were detected in 53.3% of the human hair samples. The highest OPFRs concentrations were found in rice and vegetables. Tri(2-chloroethyl)phosphate(TCEP), tris(2-chloroisopropyl)phosphate(TCIPP), and tri(2-ethyltexyl)phosphate(TEHP) were predominant in all food samples. OPFRs concentrations in foods were not significantly affected by the packaging materials. The mean dietary intakes of ΣOPFRs for adult males and females were 539 and 601ng/kg body weight/day, respectively. The greatest contribution to these values is from rice, accounting for approximately 60% of the total intake, particularly from rice protein. Rice ingestion was considered a potential major pathway for human exposure to OPFRs, and regional differences in the levels of OPFRs in foods and dietary differences should be given more attention in the future. PMID:27484948

  7. Bioavailability of classical and novel flame retardants: Effect of fullerene presence.

    PubMed

    Santín, Giselle; Eljarrat, Ethel; Barceló, Damià

    2016-09-15

    To understand the behavior of some emerging flame retardants (FRs) in the environment, a nonexhaustive extraction using Tenax was applied to study their behavior in aquatic ecosystems. Desorption of 8 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), 8 methoxylated PBDEs, 3 emerging brominated FRs and 6 halogenated norbornenes from sediments spiked in the laboratory was studied. Results showed that emerging FRs have a similar bioavailability than that of legacy FRs, already banned. In addition, some parameters such as sediment total organic carbon (TOC), aging or nanomaterial (NMs) presence in the sediment were modified in order to study their effects on the bioavailability of FRs. Bioavailability increases with a diminution of sediment TOC, while diminishes with an increase of aging. The study of effect of NM presence was performed at three different pH (acidic, neutral and basic), and for the three scenarios, FR bioavailability decreased with NM presence. The retention of pollutants in the sediment seems to be favoured by NM presence, minimizing their impact on living organisms. PMID:27177136

  8. Removal of brominated flame retardant from electrical and electronic waste plastic by solvothermal technique.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cong-Cong; Zhang, Fu-Shen

    2012-06-30

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in electrical and electronic (E&E) waste plastic are toxic, bioaccumulative and recalcitrant. In the present study, tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) contained in this type of plastic was tentatively subjected to solvothermal treatment so as to obtain bromine-free plastic. Methanol, ethanol and isopropanol were examined as solvents for solvothermal treatment and it was found that methanol was the optimal solvent for TBBPA removal. The optimum temperature, time and liquid to solid ratio for solvothermal treatment to remove TBBPA were 90°C, 2h and 15:1, respectively. After the treatment with various alcohol solvents, it was found that TBBPA was finally transferred into the solvents and bromine in the extract was debrominated catalyzed by metallic copper. Bisphenol A and cuprous bromide were the main products after debromination. The morphology and FTIR properties of the plastic were generally unchanged after the solvothermal treatment indicating that the structure of the plastic maintained after the process. This work provides a clean and applicable process for BFRs-containing plastic disposal.

  9. Degradation of brominated flame retardant in computer housing plastic by supercritical fluids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanmin; Zhang, Fu-Shen

    2012-02-29

    The degradation process of brominated flame retardant (BFR) and BFR-containing waste computer housing plastic in various supercritical fluids (water, methanol, isopropanol and acetone) was investigated. The results showed that the debromination and degradation efficiencies, final products were greatly affected by the solvent type. Among the four tested solvents, isopropanol was the most suitable solvent for the recovery of oil from BFR-containing plastic for its (1) excellent debromination effectiveness (debromination efficiency 95.7%), (2) high oil production (60.0%) and (3) mild temperature and pressure requirements. However, in this case, the removed bromine mostly existed in the oil. Introduction of KOH into the sc-isopropanol could capture almost all the inorganic bromine from the oil thus bromine-free oil could be obtained. Furthermore, KOH could enhance the depolymerization of the plastic. The obtained oil mainly consisted of single- and duplicate-ringed aromatic compounds in a carbon range of C9-C17, which had alkyl substituents or aliphatic bridges, such as butyl-benzene, (3-methylbutyl)-benzene, 1,1'-(1,3-propanediyl)bis benzene. Phenol, alkyl phenols and esters were the major oxygen-containing compounds in the oil. This study provides an efficient approach for debromination and simultaneous recovering valuable chemicals from BFR-containing plastic in e-waste.

  10. Occurrence and fate of four novel brominated flame retardants in wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Kim, M; Guerra, P; Alaee, M; Smyth, S A

    2014-12-01

    Four novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs), i.e., decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane (BTBPE), pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB), and hexabromobenzene (HBB) were studied in 377 liquid samples and 288 solid samples collected from 20 wastewater treatment plants. Lagoon, primary, secondary, and advanced treatment processes were included, in order to investigate NBFR occurrence and the effects of WWTP operational conditions on NBFR removal. Median influent and effluent levels were 14 to 3,700 and 1.0 to 180 pg/L respectively, with DBDPE being the highest in both. Overall median removal efficiencies for DBDPE, BTBPE, HBB, and PBEB across all process types were 81 to 93, 76 to 98, 61 to 97, and 54 to 97 %, respectively with advanced treatment processes obtaining the best removals. NBFRs removal was related to retention time, surface loading rate, and biomass concentration. Median NBFR levels in treated biosolids were 80 to 32,000 pg/g, influenced by solids treatment processes. PMID:24999183

  11. Synthesis of hydrophobic zinc borate nanoflakes and its effect on flame retardant properties of polyethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Li Shengli; Long Beihong; Wang Zichen; Tian Yumei; Zheng Yunhui; Zhang Qian

    2010-04-15

    Zinc borate (2ZnO.3B{sub 2}O{sub 3}.3.5H{sub 2}O) has relatively high dehydration on-set temperature which property permits processing in a wide range of polymer system. But zinc borate particles are hardly dispersed in a polymer matrix so that they prevent their using in industry. To address this problem, we synthesized hydrophobic zinc borate (2ZnO.3B{sub 2}O{sub 3}.3.5H{sub 2}O) nanoflakes by employing solid-liquid reaction of zinc oxide (ZnO) and boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}) in the presence of oleic acid. This method does not bring pollution. By conducting morphological and microscopic analyses, we found that this compound displayed nanoflake morphology with particle size of around 100-200 nm, thickness less than 100 nm and there were uniform mesopores with the diameter about 10 nm within the particles. Furthermore, our products had an effect on flame retardant of polyethylene, especially when the zinc borate was modified by oleic acid. - Graphical abstract: The contact angle of hydrophobic zinc borate nanoflakes is 129.02 deg. with added 2.0 wt% of oleic acid.

  12. Vapor pressure of three brominated flame retardants determined by using the Knudsen effusion method.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jinxia; Suuberg, Eric M

    2012-03-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have been used in a variety of consumer products in the past four decades. The vapor pressures for three widely used BFRs, that is, tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), and octabromodiphenyl ethers (octaBDEs) mixtures, were determined using the Knudsen effusion method and compared with those of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209). The values measured extrapolated to 298.15 K are 8.47 × 10⁻⁹, 7.47 × 10⁻¹⁰, and 2.33 × 10⁻⁹  Pa, respectively. The enthalpies of sublimation for these BFRs were estimated using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation and are 143.6 ± 0.4, 153.7 ± 3.1, and 150.8 ± 3.2 kJ/mole, respectively. In addition, the enthalpies of fusion and melting temperatures for these BFRs were also measured in the present study.

  13. From Clothing to Laundry Water: Investigating the Fate of Phthalates, Brominated Flame Retardants, and Organophosphate Esters.

    PubMed

    Saini, Amandeep; Thaysen, Clara; Jantunen, Liisa; McQueen, Rachel H; Diamond, Miriam L

    2016-09-01

    The accumulation of phthalate esters, brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and organophosphate esters (OPEs) by clothing from indoor air and transfer via laundering to outdoors were investigated. Over 30 days cotton and polyester fabrics accumulated 3475 and 1950 ng/dm(2) ∑5phthalates, 65 and 78 ng/dm(2) ∑10BFRs, and 1200 and 310 ng/dm(2) ∑8OPEs, respectively. Planar surface area concentrations of OPEs and low molecular weight phthalates were significantly greater in cotton than polyester and similar for BFRs and high molecular weight phthalates. This difference was significantly and inversely correlated with KOW, suggesting greater sorption of polar compounds to polar cotton. Chemical release from cotton and polyester to laundry water was >80% of aliphatic OPEs (log KOW < 4), < 50% of OPEs with an aromatic structure, 50-100% of low molecular weight phthalates (log KOW 4-6), and < detection-35% of higher molecular weight phthalates (log KOW > 8) and BFRs (log KOW > 6). These results support the hypothesis that clothing acts an efficient conveyer of soluble semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) from indoors to outdoors through accumulation from air and then release during laundering. Clothes drying could as well contribute to the release of chemicals emitted by electric dryers. The results also have implications for dermal exposure.

  14. Polybrominated diphenyl ether flame retardants in lichens and mosses from King George Island, maritime Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Yogui, G T; Sericano, J L

    2008-11-01

    Lichens and mosses are considered good indicators of atmospheric pollution as they absorb contaminants directly from the air. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are man-made chemicals used as flame retardants in materials such as plastics, textiles, electronic circuitry and furnishing foam. Few studies have investigated PBDEs in the southern hemisphere including Antarctica. This paper presents the first evaluation of PBDEs in lichens (Usnea antarctica and Usnea aurantiaco-atra) and mosses (Sanionia uncinata) collected at King George Island, maritime Antarctica. PBDEs were detected at low levels in all lichen and moss samples. On average, the levels of PBDEs in mosses (818 pg g(-1) dry weight; 101 ng g(-1) lipid) were significantly higher than in lichens (168 pg g(-1) dry weight; 9.11 ng g(-1) lipid). This difference is most likely due to the differing mechanisms of PBDEs uptake from the atmosphere which are controlled by a number of chemical, environmental and plant variables. Contaminant concentrations were not statistically different at sites close to and distant from human facilities. Long-range atmospheric transport is believed to be the primary source of PBDEs to King George Island. The pattern of congeners in plants resembles those found in commercial mixtures of Penta-BDE. In addition, the presence of BDE-183 in lichens and mosses suggests that other technical formulations (e.g., Octa-BDE and Deca-BDE) have reached Antarctica. Further studies are needed to better understand the role of Antarctic vegetation as a sink for anthropogenic organic pollutants.

  15. Potential genotoxicity and risk assessment of a chlorinated flame retardant, Dechlorane Plus.

    PubMed

    Dou, Jing; Jin, Yuan; Li, Yajie; Wu, Bing; Li, Mei

    2015-09-01

    Dechlorane Plus (DP) is a chlorinated flame retardants that is globally ubiquitous. It is a potentially persistent organic pollutant (POPs) and an environmental toxin. However, the toxicity data is still limited and cannot provide a comprehensive environmental ecological risk assessment for DP. In this study, luminous bacteria, Vicia faba and Tetrahymena thermophila were chosen as testing organisms to investigate the acute toxicity and mutagenicity of DP. The concentration gradient of DP used in this study was chosen based on its environmental levels (experiments of luminous bacteria: 0.591, 2.95, 14.8, 73.8, 369 μg L(-1); micronucleus tests: 2.4, 12, 60, 300, 1500 μg L(-1); comet assay: 2.4, 12, 60, 300, 1500 μg L(-1)). For luminous bacteria, the relative luminosities were around 100% in treated groups, which suggested that there is no acute toxicity to luminous bacteria under the studied DP concentrations. The micronucleus test showed no significant difference between treatment and control groups, indicating no genotoxicity of DP. However the comet assay conducted with T. thermophila was relatively sensitive as there was a significant increase in DNA damage when the concentrations of DP increased from 300 to 1500 μg L(-1), while the lower concentrations failed to show any treatment-related differences. Therefore, DP may pose a potential risk at concentration⩾300 μg L(-1). The results provide scientific information on the ecological risk assessment of DP.

  16. Brominated flame retardants (BFRs): A review on environmental contamination in China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Gang; Bu, Qingwei; Cao, Zhiguo; Du, Xinming; Xia, Jing; Wu, Min; Huang, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) which were detected extensively in environmental and biota samples worldwide, have raised significant concerns during past decades for their persistence, bioaccumulation and potential toxicity to ecological environment and human health. In this paper, we have compiled and reviewed existing literature on the contamination status of BFRs in abiotic and biotic environments in China, including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecane, tetrabromobisphenol A and new BFRs. Temporal trends were also summarized and evaluated. Based on this review, it has been concluded that (1) high concentrations of PBDEs were generally related to the e-waste disposal processing, while the spatial distribution pattern of other BFRs was not necessarily in accordance with this; (2) extremely high concentrations of BFRs in indoor dust emphasized the importance of indoor contamination to human body burdens, while more work need to be done to confirm its contribution; (3) PBDEs in electronics dismantling workers were higher compared to the general population, indicating the occupational exposure should be of particular concern; (4) more data are now becoming available for BFRs in aquatic and terrestrial organisms not previously studied, while studies that consider the occurrence of BFRs in organisms of different trophic levels are still of urgent need for evaluating the fate of BFRs in the food web; and (5) limited data showed a decreasing trend for PBDEs, while more data on time trends of BFR contamination in various matrices and locations are still needed before the impact of regulation of BFRs can be assessed.

  17. Advances in enantioselective analysis of chiral brominated flame retardants. Current status, limitations and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Badea, Silviu-Laurentiu; Niculescu, Violeta Carolina; Ionete, Roxana-Elena; Eljarrat, Ethel

    2016-10-01

    Enantioselective analysis is a powerful tool for the discrimination of biotic and abiotic transformation processes of chiral environmental contaminants because their environmental biodegradation is mostly stereospecific. However, it is challenging when applied to new contaminants since enantioselective analysis methods are currently available only for a limited number of compounds. The enantioselective analysis of chiral novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) either using gas chromatography (GC) or liquid chromatography (LC) with various chiral stationary phases (CSP) coupled with various mass spectrometric techniques was extensively discussed. The elution order of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) enantiomers in chiral LC was reviewed using the experimental LC data combined also with predictions from a multi-mode Hamiltonian dynamics simulation model based on interaction energies of HBCD enantiomers with β-permethylated cyclodextrin. The further development of analytical methodologies for new chiral BFRs using advanced hyphenated analytical techniques, but also the next generation mass spectrometer analyzers (i.e. GC-Qrbitrap MS-MS, LC-Qrbitrap MS-MS), will contribute to a better characterization of the transformation pathways of chiral BFRs.

  18. Does Exposure to Flame Retardants Increase the Risk for Preterm Birth?

    PubMed Central

    Peltier, Morgan R.; Koo, Hschi-Chi; Getahun, Darios; Menon, Ramkumar

    2015-01-01

    During the past 40 years, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been widely used as flame retardants and nearly all women have some level of exposure. PBDEs have been isolated from amniotic fluid and cord plasma indicating vertical transmission; however, their effects on pregnancy outcome are largely unknown. Therefore, we quantified PBDE-47, the most common conger in maternal plasma samples collected at the time of labor from women who subsequently had term or preterm birth (PTB). Women were then scored based on whether or not they had very low, low, medium, high or very high peripheral plasma concentrations of PBDE-47. Probit regression analysis suggested that women in the PTB group had a greater chance of scoring higher on this scale (P < 0.001). Women with high (OR = 3.8, CI: 1.6, 9.7; P = 0.003) or very high PBDE-47 concentrations were at greater odds (OR = 5.6, CI: 2.2, 15.2; P < 0.001) for PTB than women with very low levels of PBDE-47. Results became even more significant after adjustment for maternal race, age, and marital status. These findings suggest that high levels of maternal exposure to PBDEs might increase the risk for PTB. PMID:25542760

  19. Leaching characteristics of heavy metals and brominated flame retardants from waste printed circuit boards.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoyu; Guo, Jie; Lin, Kuangfei; Huang, Kai; Deng, Jingjing

    2013-02-15

    Leaching assessment on five heavy metals (copper, zinc, lead, nickel and cadmium) and two brominated flame retardants (BFRs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), from waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs) were conducted using various leaching methods. The mean leaching concentrations of copper were the highest in both toxicity characteristic leaching procedures (TCLP) and synthetic precipitation leaching procedures (SPLP) tests at 8.6 mg/L and 1.1mg/L, while only lead (6.2mg/L) exceeded the TCLP criteria and Chinese EPA regulatory limit (both 5.0mg/L). However, PBDEs and TBBPA were not detected in TCLP and SPLP tests. Then the BFRs leaching trends and potential leachabilities were further investigated in actual landfill leachates using a modified method. Leaching characteristics that fast-leaching initially followed by slow-desorption over time were generally observed. In landfill leachate tests, the highest leaching concentrations of PBDEs and TBBPA were determined at 30.39 and 12.27 μg/L. Meanwhile, the highest leaching rates were estimated to reach 0.08% and 1.00%, respectively, which were significantly influenced by the dissolved organic carbon contents of extracts, the hydrophobicities of target BFRs and the specific surface areas of WPCBs materials. These results proved that leaching from WPCBs was a significant emission source of BFRs in landfill and electronic waste recycling dumpsite. PMID:23291335

  20. Brominated flame retardants and the formation of dioxins and furans in fires and combustion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengmei; Buekens, Alfons; Li, Xiaodong

    2016-03-01

    The widespread use and increasing inventory of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have caused considerable concern, as a result of BFRs emissions to the environment and of the formation of both polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PBDD/Fs) and mixed polybromochloro-dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PBCDD/Fs or PXDD/Fs). Structural similarities between PBDD/Fs and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) suggest the existence of comparable formation pathways of both PBDD/Fs and PCDD/Fs, yet BFRs also act as specific precursors to form additional PBDD/Fs. Moreover, elementary bromine (Br2) seems to facilitate chlorination by bromination of organics, followed by Br/Cl-exchange based on displacement through the more reactive halogen. Overall, PBDD/Fs form through three possible pathways: precursor formation, de novo formation, and dispersion of parts containing BFRs as impurities and surviving a fire or other events. The present review summarises the formation mechanisms of both brominated (PBDD/Fs) and mixed dioxins (PXDD/Fs with X=Br or Cl) from BFRs, recaps available emissions data of PBDD/Fs and mixed PXDD/Fs from controlled waste incineration, uncontrolled combustion sources and accidental fires, and identifies and analyses the effects of several local factors of influence, affecting the formation of PBDD/Fs and mixed PXDD/Fs during BFRs combustion. PMID:26546701

  1. Distribution of organophosphorus flame retardants in sediments from the Pearl River Delta in South China.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiao-Xin; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Zheng, Xiao-Bo; Li, Zong-Rui; Sun, Run-Xia; Mai, Bi-Xian

    2016-02-15

    Twelve organophosphorus flame retardants (PFRs) were identified in the sediments and the sediment core collected from the rivers and the estuary in the Pearl River Delta, with the aim of investigating their spatial and vertical distributions. The concentrations of PFRs ranged from 8.3 to 470 ng/g dry weight with high levels of PFRs in the urban area and the e-waste recycling region. Generally, TPhP, TCPP, TEHP, TCEP, and TBEP were the dominant compounds of the PFRs, the composition of which varied across the different regions, reflecting the different sources of PFRs. In the estuary, the PFRs mainly derived from the Xijiang River and the Shunde sections. Increased concentrations of halogen-containing PFRs have been observed in the upper layers of the sediment core. Conversely, relatively high concentrations of halogen-free PFRs were observed in the lower layers of the sediment core, indicating different usage patterns or environmental behaviors between the halogen and the non-halogen PFRs in the study area. PMID:26657357

  2. Advances in enantioselective analysis of chiral brominated flame retardants. Current status, limitations and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Badea, Silviu-Laurentiu; Niculescu, Violeta Carolina; Ionete, Roxana-Elena; Eljarrat, Ethel

    2016-10-01

    Enantioselective analysis is a powerful tool for the discrimination of biotic and abiotic transformation processes of chiral environmental contaminants because their environmental biodegradation is mostly stereospecific. However, it is challenging when applied to new contaminants since enantioselective analysis methods are currently available only for a limited number of compounds. The enantioselective analysis of chiral novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) either using gas chromatography (GC) or liquid chromatography (LC) with various chiral stationary phases (CSP) coupled with various mass spectrometric techniques was extensively discussed. The elution order of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) enantiomers in chiral LC was reviewed using the experimental LC data combined also with predictions from a multi-mode Hamiltonian dynamics simulation model based on interaction energies of HBCD enantiomers with β-permethylated cyclodextrin. The further development of analytical methodologies for new chiral BFRs using advanced hyphenated analytical techniques, but also the next generation mass spectrometer analyzers (i.e. GC-Qrbitrap MS-MS, LC-Qrbitrap MS-MS), will contribute to a better characterization of the transformation pathways of chiral BFRs. PMID:27265736

  3. Biotransformation of the flame retardant tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA) by freshwater microalgae.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fu-Qiang; Ying, Guang-Guo; Yang, Bin; Liu, You-Sheng; Lai, Hua-Jie; Zhou, Guang-Jie; Chen, Jun; Zhao, Jian-Liang

    2014-08-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA) is the most widely used brominated flame retardant. However, little is known about its biotransformation by algae in aquatic environments. The authors investigated transformations of TBBPA by 6 freshwater green microalgae and identified its transformation products. Transformation experiments were conducted under axenic conditions in a laboratory for 10 d. The results showed that TBBPA could be transformed by the selected microalgae, with nearly complete removal by Scenedesmus quadricauda and Coelastrum sphaericum following 10-d incubation. Five transformation products were positively identified by mass spectrometry: TBBPA sulfate, TBBPA glucoside, sulfated TBBPA glucoside, TBBPA monomethyl ether, and tribromobisphenol-A. The mechanisms involved in the biotransformation of TBBPA include sulfation, glucosylation, O-methylation, and debromination, which could be an important step for its further degradation. This suggests that microalgae can play an important role in the fate of TBBPA in aquatic environments. The present study is the first report on algal transformation of TBBPA, and the proposed transformation products could have significant environmental implications. PMID:24687216

  4. Five-year trends of selected halogenated flame retardants in the atmosphere of Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Long; Liu, Li-Yan; Song, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Zi-Feng; Qiao, Li-Na; Ma, Wan-Li; Li, Yi-Fan

    2016-01-01

    This study collected 227 pairs of gas phase and particle phase air samples in a typical urban city of Northeast China from 2008 to 2013. Four alternative halogenated flame retardants for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were analyzed, namely 2-ethylhexyl 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EHTBB), bis (2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (BEHTBP), syn-dechlorane plus (syn-DP) and anti-dechlorane plus (anti-DP). The average concentrations for EHTBB and BEHTBP were 5.2 ± 20 and 30 ± 200 pg/m3, respectively, while for syn-DP and anti-DPwere 1.9±5.1 and 5.8±18 pg/m3, respectively. Generally, they were frequently detected in the particle phase, and the gas/particle partitioning suggested they were the maximum partition chemicals. The fractional abundance of EHTBB (fEHTBB) and syn-DP (fsyn)were comparablewith those in other studies. Strong local sources were identified based on the air parcel backward trajectories and the potential source contribution function. The concentrations of these chemicals were significantly increased during this sampling campaign, possibly suggesting their increasing usages from 2008 to 2013 in China.

  5. Organophosphate ester (OPE) flame retardants and plasticizers in the open Mediterranean and Black Seas atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Castro-Jiménez, Javier; Berrojalbiz, Naiara; Pizarro, Mariana; Dachs, Jordi

    2014-03-18

    The presence of organophosphate ester (OPE) flame retardants and plasticizers has been confirmed for the first time in the atmosphere over the Mediterranean and Black Seas. Atmospheric aerosol samples were collected during two West-East oceanographic cruises across the Mediterranean and in the southwest Black Sea. This comprehensive assessment of baseline concentrations of aerosol phase OPEs, spatial distribution, and related deposition fluxes reveals levels ranging from 0.4 to 6.0 ng m(-3) for the ∑14OPEs and a lack of significant differences among sub-basins. Levels measured across the Mediterranean Sea and in the Black Sea are in the upper range or higher than those from previous reports for the marine atmosphere, presumably due to proximity to sources. From 13 to 260 tons of OPEs are estimated to be annually loaded to the Mediterranean Sea open waters from the atmosphere. Tris-(1-chloro-2-propyl)phosphate (TCPP) was the most abundant compound over the atmosphere of all the Mediterranean and Black Sea sub-basins, and therefore the chemical reaching surface waters at a higher extent by dry deposition. The atmospheric deposition fluxes of phosphorus due to OPE deposition is a significant fraction of known atmospheric inputs of new organic phosphorus (P), suggesting the relevant role that anthropogenic organic pollutants could play in the P cycle.

  6. Some of the properties of flame retardant medium density fiberboard made from rubberwood and recycled containers containing aluminum trihydroxide.

    PubMed

    Hashim, R; How, L S; Kumar, R N; Sulaiman, O

    2005-11-01

    The flame retardancy of medium density fiberboard (MDF) made from mixture of rubberwood fibers and recycled old corrugated containers was studied. Aluminum trihydroxide (ATH) was used as a fire retardant additive and mixed with the fibers to manufacture experimental MDF panels using wet process. Phenol formaldehyde (PF) resin in liquid, 2% based on oven dry weight of fibers, was used along with 0%, 10%, 15% and 20% of ATH. The flame retardant test was done using the limiting oxygen index (LOI) test. The other properties investigated include internal bond strength, thickness swelling and water absorption. The results showed that ATH loading increased as the LOI of MDF increased. This demonstrated that ATH could improved the fire retardant property of MDF at sufficient loading. An increase in concentration of ATH showed an increase in the IB values of MDF made without resin. MDF panels made without resin showed a progressive increase in internal bond as the composition of recycled old corrugated containers fiber increased. Addition of resin improved internal bond strength and reduced thickness swelling, and water absorption. Thickness swelling of panel increased as the composition of recycled old corrugated containers fiber increased. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) showed that there is indication of ATH and resin filling the void space in between fibers.

  7. Novel and High Volume Use Flame Retardants in US Couches Reflective of the 2005 PentaBDE Phase Out

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    California’s furniture flammability standard Technical Bulletin 117 (TB 117) is believed to be a major driver of chemical flame retardant (FR) use in residential furniture in the United States. With the phase-out of the polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) FR mixture PentaBDE in 2005, alternative FRs are increasingly being used to meet TB 117; however, it was unclear which chemicals were being used and how frequently. To address this data gap, we collected and analyzed 102 samples of polyurethane foam from residential couches purchased in the United States from 1985 to 2010. Overall, we detected chemical flame retardants in 85% of the couches. In samples purchased prior to 2005 (n = 41) PBDEs associated with the PentaBDE mixture including BDEs 47, 99, and 100 (PentaBDE) were the most common FR detected (39%), followed by tris(1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate (TDCPP; 24%), which is a suspected human carcinogen. In samples purchased in 2005 or later (n = 61) the most common FRs detected were TDCPP (52%) and components associated with the Firemaster550 (FM 550) mixture (18%). Since the 2005 phase-out of PentaBDE, the use of TDCPP increased significantly. In addition, a mixture of nonhalogenated organophosphate FRs that included triphenyl phosphate (TPP), tris(4-butylphenyl) phosphate (TBPP), and a mix of butylphenyl phosphate isomers were observed in 13% of the couch samples purchased in 2005 or later. Overall the prevalence of flame retardants (and PentaBDE) was higher in couches bought in California compared to elsewhere, although the difference was not quite significant (p = 0.054 for PentaBDE). The difference was greater before 2005 than after, suggesting that TB 117 is becoming a de facto standard across the U.S. We determined that the presence of a TB 117 label did predict the presence of a FR; however, lack of a label did not predict the absence of a flame retardant. Following the PentaBDE phase out, we also found an increased number of flame retardants on

  8. The effect of electron-beam irradiation and halogen-free flame retardants on properties of poly butylene terephthalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooshangi, Zhila; Feghhi, Seyed Amir Hossein; Sheikh, Nasrin

    2015-03-01

    Engineering plastics like Poly (butylene terephthalate) due to their desirable properties have various industrial applications. Neat PBT is highly combustible, so it is necessary to improve significantly its fire retardancy to meet the fire safety requirements. The combustion performance of PBT can be improved by addition of appropriate flame retardant additives. In this study we have investigated the effect of halogen free flame retardants, i.e. melamine and aluminum phosphate, and instantaneously electron beam radiation-induced crosslinking in the presence of Triallyl cyanurate on various properties of PBT. The results of gel content showed that a dose range of 200-400 kGy leads to high cross linked structure in this polymer. Also mechanical experiments showed that its structure became rigid and fragile due to irradiation. Radiation crosslinking of this polymer made its dielectric loss coefficient ten times lower than non-irradiated polymer, but had no effect on its dielectric constant. Moreover the addition of the fire retardant additives as impurity decreased the dielectric loss coefficient. TGA analysis in nitrogen exhibited that irradiation increases char formation and use of the fire retardant additives leads to reduction of onset temperature and formation of higher char quantity than pure PBT. According to the results of UL-94, irradiated samples burned with lower speed and less dripping in vertical and horizontal positions than pure polymer. Finally irradiation of the polymers containing fire retardant additives with a dose of 400 kGy led to self-extinguishing and non-dripping and reach to V-0 level in the UL-94 V.

  9. Effect of cellulose acetate butyrate microencapsulated ammonium polyphosphate on the flame retardancy, mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties of intumescent flame-retardant ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer/microencapsulated ammonium polyphosphate/polyamide-6 blends.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bibo; Tang, Qinbo; Hong, Ningning; Song, Lei; Wang, Lei; Shi, Yongqian; Hu, Yuan

    2011-09-01

    Ammonium polyphosphate (APP), a widely used intumescent flame retardant, has been microencapsulated by cellulose acetate butyrate with the aim of enhancing the water resistance of APP and the compatibility between the ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) matrix and APP. The structure of microencapsulated ammonium polyphosphate (MCAPP) was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and water contact angle (WCA). The flame retadancy and thermal stability were investigated by a limiting oxygen index (LOI) test, UL-94 test, cone calorimeter, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The WCA results indicated that MCAPP has excellent water resistance and hydrophobicity. The results demonstrated that MCAPP enhanced interfacial adhesion, mechanical, electrical, and thermal stability of the EVA/MCAPP/polyamide-6 (PA-6) system. The microencapsulation not only imparted EVA/MCAPP/PA-6 with a higher LOI value and UL-94 rating but also could significantly improve the fire safety. Furthermore, the microencapsulated EVA/MCAPP/PA-6 composites can still pass the UL-94 V-0 rating after treatment with water for 3 days at 70 °C, indicating excellent water resistance. This investigation provides a promising formulation for the intumescent flame retardant EVA with excellent properties. PMID:21859130

  10. Effect of cellulose acetate butyrate microencapsulated ammonium polyphosphate on the flame retardancy, mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties of intumescent flame-retardant ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer/microencapsulated ammonium polyphosphate/polyamide-6 blends.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bibo; Tang, Qinbo; Hong, Ningning; Song, Lei; Wang, Lei; Shi, Yongqian; Hu, Yuan

    2011-09-01

    Ammonium polyphosphate (APP), a widely used intumescent flame retardant, has been microencapsulated by cellulose acetate butyrate with the aim of enhancing the water resistance of APP and the compatibility between the ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) matrix and APP. The structure of microencapsulated ammonium polyphosphate (MCAPP) was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and water contact angle (WCA). The flame retadancy and thermal stability were investigated by a limiting oxygen index (LOI) test, UL-94 test, cone calorimeter, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The WCA results indicated that MCAPP has excellent water resistance and hydrophobicity. The results demonstrated that MCAPP enhanced interfacial adhesion, mechanical, electrical, and thermal stability of the EVA/MCAPP/polyamide-6 (PA-6) system. The microencapsulation not only imparted EVA/MCAPP/PA-6 with a higher LOI value and UL-94 rating but also could significantly improve the fire safety. Furthermore, the microencapsulated EVA/MCAPP/PA-6 composites can still pass the UL-94 V-0 rating after treatment with water for 3 days at 70 °C, indicating excellent water resistance. This investigation provides a promising formulation for the intumescent flame retardant EVA with excellent properties.

  11. Bioaccumulation and trophic transfer of some brominated flame retardants in a Lake Winnipeg (Canada) food web.

    PubMed

    Law, Kerri; Halldorson, Thor; Danell, Robert; Stern, Gary; Gewurtz, Sarah; Alaee, Mehran; Marvin, Chris; Whittle, Mike; Tomy, Gregg

    2006-08-01

    The extent of bioaccumulation and trophic transfer of brominated diphenyl ether (BDE) congeners, hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) diastereoisomers (alpha, beta, and gamma), decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE), and bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) was examined in a Lake Winnipeg (Canada) food web. Six species of fish, zooplankton, mussels, sediment, and water from the south basin of the lake were selected for study. Significant positive correlations were found between concentrations of total (sigma) polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs; p < 0.005), sigmaHBCDs (p < 0.0001), BTBPE (p < 0.0001), and lipid content in fish. Strong positive linear relationships also were observed from individual plots of BDE 47, BDE 209, and DBDPE concentrations (lipid wt) and trophic level (based on delta15N), suggesting that these compounds biomagnify in the Lake Winnipeg food web. Biomagnification factors varied for the chemicals studied. Plots of log bioaccumulation factors for mussel and zooplankton versus log octanol-water partition coefficient (Kow) were similar and suggest that neither mussels nor zooplankton are in equilibrium with the water. Fifteen BDE congeners were consistently detected in water (dissolved phase, n = 3), with BDE 47 having the greatest concentration (17 pg/L). The rank order of compounds in water (arithmetic mean +/- standard error) were sigmaPBDEs (49 +/- 12 pg/ L) > alpha-HBCD (11 +/- 2 pg/L) > BTBPE (1.9 +/- 0.6 pg/L). Concentrations of DPDPE, BDE 209, and beta- and -gamma-HBCD isomers were below their respective method detection limits (MDLs) in water. Total PBDE concentrations in sediment (n = 4) were greater than any other brominated flame retardant examined in the present study and ranged from 1,160 to 1,610 ng/g (dry wt), with BDE 209 contributing roughly 50% of the total. The gamma-HBCD isomer was detected at concentrations of 50 +/- 20 pg/g (dry wt) in sediment, whereas BTBPE and DBDPE were consistently below their respective MDLs in sediment. PMID

  12. Thermal Recycling of Brominated Flame Retardants with Fe2O3.

    PubMed

    Altarawneh, Mohammednoor; Ahmed, Oday H; Jiang, Zhong-Tao; Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z

    2016-08-01

    Plastics containing brominated flame retardants (BFRs) constitute the major fraction of nonmetallic content in e-waste. Co-pyrolysis of BFRs with hematite (Fe2O3) represents a viable option for the thermal recycling of BFRs. Consensus of experimental findings confirms the excellent bromine fixation ability of Fe2O3 and the subsequent formation of iron bromides. This contribution provides a comprehensive mechanistic account of the primary reactions between a cluster model of Fe2O3 and major bromine-bearing products from the decomposition of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBA), the most commonly deployed BFR. We estimate the thermo-kinetic parameters for interactions of Fe2O3 with HBr, brominated alkanes and alkenes, bromobenzene, and bromophenol. Dissociative addition of HBr at a Fe-O bond proceeds through a trivial barrier of 8.2 kcal/mol with fitted parameters in the Arrhenius equation of k(T) = 7.96 × 10(11) exp(-6400/RT) s(-1). The facile and irreversible nature for HBr addition to Fe2O3 accords with the experimentally reported 90% reduction in HBr emission when Fe2O3 interacts with TBBA pyrolysates. A detailed kinetic analysis indicates that, transformation of Fe2O3 into iron bromides and oxybromides occurs via successive addition of HBr to Fe(Br)-O(H) entities. Elimination of a water molecule proceeds through an intramolecular H transfer. A direct elimination one-step mechanism operates in the dehydrohalogenation of bromoethane into ethene over Fe2O3. Dissociative decomposition and direct elimination channels assume comparable reaction rates in formation of acetylene from vinyl bromide. Results from this study provide an atomic-based insight into a promising thermal recycling route of e-waste.

  13. Monitoring of WEEE plastics in regards to brominated flame retardants using handheld XRF

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrian, Alexia; Ledersteger, Alfred; Pomberger, Roland

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Specification of an empirical factor for conversion from bromine to PBB and PBDE. • The handheld XRF device was validated for this particular application. • A very large number of over 4600 pieces of monitor housings was analysed. • The recyclable fraction mounts up to 85% for TV but only 53% of PC waste plastics. • A high percentage of pieces with bromine contents of over 50,000 ppm was obtained. - Abstract: This contribution is focused on the on-site determination of the bromine content in waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), in particular waste plastics from television sets (TV) and personal computer monitors (PC) using a handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF) device. The described approach allows the examination of samples in regards to the compliance with legal specifications for polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) directly after disassembling and facilitates the sorting out of plastics with high contents of brominated flame retardants (BFRs). In all, over 3000 pieces of black (TV) and 1600 pieces of grey (PC) plastic waste were analysed with handheld XRF technique for this study. Especially noticeable was the high percentage of pieces with a bromine content of over 50,000 ppm for TV (7%) and PC (39%) waste plastics. The applied method was validated by comparing the data of handheld XRF with results obtained by GC–MS. The results showed the expected and sufficiently accurate correlation between these two methods. It is shown that handheld XRF technique is an effective tool for fast monitoring of large volumes of WEEE plastics in regards to BFRs for on-site measurements.

  14. Brominated flame retardants in children's toys: concentration, composition, and children's exposure and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Chen, She-Jun; Ma, Yun-Juan; Wang, Jing; Chen, Da; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Mai, Bi-Xian

    2009-06-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs), including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE), and polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) were found in children's toys purchased from South China. The median BFR concentrations in the hard plastic toys were 53,000, 5540 ng/g, 101.1 ng/g, and 27.9 ng/g, fortotal PBDEs, DBDPE, BTBPE, and PBBs, respectively,which were notably higher than values in other toys. The PBDE concentrations were below the threshold limit (1000 ppm) required bythe European Commission's Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) and Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) directives in all of the toys, except for one hard plastic toy with a total PBDE concentration of 5,344,000 ng/g. The BFR profiles in the toys were consistent with the patterns of their current production and consumption in China, where PBDEs, specifically decaBDE product, were the dominant BFR, followed by the emerging DBDPE. The relatively high concentrations of octa- and nonaBDEs in the foam toys and the results of principal component analysis (PCA) may suggest the decomposition of highly brominated BDEs during the manufacturing processes of the toys. Daily total PBDE exposures associated with toys via inhalation, mouthing, dermal contact, and oral ingestion ranged from 82.6 to 8992 pg/kg bw-day for children of 3 months to 14 years of age. Higher exposures, predominantly contributed through the mouthing pathway, were observed for infants and toddlers than for the other subgroups. In most cases, children's BFR exposure via the toys likely accounts for a small proportion of their daily BFR exposure, and the hazard quotients for noncancer risk evaluation were far below 1. To the author's knowledge, this is the first study to examine the concentrations of BFRs in toys, and the potential exposures to children. PMID:19569352

  15. Probing the debromination of the flame retardant decabromodiphenyl ether in sediments of a boreal lake.

    PubMed

    Orihel, Diane M; Bisbicos, Tommy; Darling, Colin T R; Dupuis, Alain P; Williamson, Mary; Muir, Derek C G

    2016-03-01

    After decades of use of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) as flame retardants, a large reservoir of these toxins has accumulated in ecosystems worldwide. The present study used an innovative approach to examine whether the fully brominated PBDE decabromodiphenyl ether (decaBDE) degrades to more toxic congeners in aquatic environments. The authors incubated intact sediment microcosms with high-purity [(13)C]decaBDE in a remote boreal lake to assess its debromination under ambient conditions. Although the addition of [(13)C]decaBDE increased total PBDE concentrations in sediment more than 10-fold, the relative amount of [(13)C]decaBDE in sediment did not change significantly over a 1-mo incubation. However, observation of small quantities of lower-brominated [(13)C]BDEs lent support to the hypothesis that decaBDE is slowly debrominated. The authors observed a significant increase in octaBDEs and nonaBDEs in profundal, but not littoral, sediment over 30 d. A second experiment in which sediment was incubated under different light and oxygen regimes yielded a surprising result-oxygen significantly stimulated the formation of octaBDEs and nonaBDEs. The authors also conducted a large-scale in situ enclosure experiment in which they followed the fate of experimentally added decaBDE in sediment over 26 mo, but that study yielded little evidence of decaBDE debromination. Overall, the authors suggest that the debromination of decaBDE occurs very slowly, if at all, in natural sediment of boreal lakes, in contrast to the rapid degradation kinetics reported by most laboratory-based studies, which are usually conducted by dissolving decaBDE in organic solvents. The findings reinforce the need for field studies on contaminant fate to inform environmental policy decisions. PMID:26332257

  16. Non-PBDE halogenated flame retardants in Canadian indoor house dust: sampling, analysis, and occurrence.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xinghua; Kubwabo, Cariton; Rasmussen, Pat E; Wu, Fang

    2016-04-01

    An analytical method was developed for the measurement of 18 novel halogenated flame retardants in house dust. Sample preparation was based on ultrasound-assisted solvent extraction and clean up with solid phase extraction (SPE). Sample extracts were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) operated in electron capture negative ion (ECNI) chemical ionization mode. Baseline data from 351 fresh (active) dust samples collected under the Canadian House Dust Study (CHDS) revealed that five out of 18 target chemicals were present with detection frequencies higher than 90 %. Median (range) concentrations for these five compounds were as follows: 104 (<1.5-13,000) ng/g for 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EHTBB), 8.5 (<1.7-2390) ng/g for 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), 10.2 (<1.7-430) ng/g for hexabromobenzene (HBB), 2.9 (<1.2-1410) ng/g for syn-dechlorane plus (syn-DP) and 5.6 (<1.9-1570) ng/g for anti-dechlorane plus (anti-DP). A comparison of two sampling methods in a subset of 40 homes showed significant positive correlations between samples of "active" dust and samples taken directly from the household vacuum cleaner for all target compounds having median values above their corresponding method detection limits (MDLs). In addition, the method was also applied to the analysis of the targeted compounds in National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) standard reference material (SRM 2585, organic contaminants in house dust). Results from the current study could contribute to the potential certification of target chemicals in SRM 2585.

  17. Transformation of Flame Retardant Tetrabromobisphenol A by Aqueous Chlorine and the Effect of Humic Acid.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Pang, Su-Yan; Jiang, Jin; Ma, Jun; Zhou, Yang; Li, Juan; Wang, Li-Hong; Lu, Xue-Ting; Yuan, Li-Peng

    2016-09-01

    In this work, it was found that the most widely used brominated flame retardant tetrabromobisphenol A (TBrBPA) could be transformed by free chlorine over a wide pH range from 5 to 10 with apparent second-order rate constants from 138 to 3210 M(-1)·s(-1). A total of eight products, including one quinone-like compound (i.e., 2,6-dibromoquinone), two dimers, and several simple halogenated phenols (e.g., 4-(2-hydroxyisopropyl)-2,6-dibromophenol, 2,6-dibromohydroquinone, and 2,4,6-tribromophenol), were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) using a novel precursor ion scan (PIS) approach. A tentative reaction pathway was proposed: chlorine initially oxidized TBrBPA leading to the formation of a phenoxy radical, and then this primary radical and its secondary intermediates (e.g., 2,6-dibromo-4-isopropylphenol carbocation) formed via beta-scission subsequently underwent substitution, dimerization, and oxidation reactions. Humic acid (HA) considerably inhibited the degradation rates of TBrBPA by chlorine even accounting for oxidant consumption. A similar inhibitory effect of HA was also observed in permanganate and ferrate oxidation. This inhibitory effect was possibly attributed to the fact that HA competitively reacted with the phenoxy radical of TBrBPA and reversed it back to parent TBrBPA. This study confirms that chlorine can transform phenolic compounds (e.g., TBrBPA) via electron transfer rather than the well-documented electrophilic substitution, which also have implications on the formation pathway of halo-benzoquinones during chlorine disinfection. These findings can improve the understanding of chlorine chemistry in water and wastewater treatment. PMID:27487036

  18. Brominated flame retardants - Exposure and risk assessment for the general population.

    PubMed

    Fromme, H; Becher, G; Hilger, B; Völkel, W

    2016-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are a large group of different substances used in numerous products to prevent fire hazards. Some of them are persistent in the environment, accumulate in the food chain and are of toxicological concern, while for others current data are limited. Meanwhile, BFRs have been found in many environmental media, foods, and biota including humans. This review presents recent findings obtained from monitoring data in environmental media relevant for human exposure, as well as dietary exposure. In this context, concentrations in indoor and ambient air and in house dust are outlined. Furthermore, we summarize human biomonitoring data on BFR levels in blood and breast milk. Current estimates of the overall exposure of the general population using different relevant subsets are also addressed. All of these data are discussed in relation to currently available toxicological reference values used for risk assessment purposes. Obviously, the exposure of the general population varies considerably in different parts of the world and even within countries. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) show the highest intake during infancy. While the highest intake for BDE 47 for all groups was observed in the US, the total BDE 209 and HBCD intake was highest in the UK. For HBCD and all PBDEs except BDE 209, diet accounts for a large proportion of the total intake during infancy in all countries. With regard to toddlers and adults, the contribution of diet to total intake is high in Germany and the UK, while in the US, the high concentrations of PBDE in dust resulted in a notably smaller proportion of the intake being attributed to diet.

  19. Product screening for sources of halogenated flame retardants in Canadian house and office dust.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Golnoush; Saini, Amandeep; Goosey, Emma; Diamond, Miriam L

    2016-03-01

    Human exposure to halogenated flame retardants (HFRs) such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and their replacements, can be related to exposure to indoor dust and direct contact with HFR-containing products. This study aimed to identify electronic products that contributed to HFRs measured in indoor dust and to develop a screening method for identifying HFRs in hard polymer products. Concentrations of 10 PBDEs and 12 halogenated replacements in dust and surface wipe samples of hard polymer casings of electronic products plus Br in the surfaces of those casing measured using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) were analyzed from 35 homes and 10 offices in Toronto (ON, Canada). HFR concentrations in dust and product wipes were positively correlated. Thus, we hypothesize that electronic products with the highest HFR concentrations contribute the most to concentrations in dust, regardless of the volatility of the HFR. Abundant HFRs in dust and product wipes were PBDEs (BDE-47, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183, 209), TDCPP, DBDPE, EH-TBB and BEHTBP. Older CRT TVs had the highest concentration of BDE-209 of all products tested. This was followed by higher concentrations of HFRs in PCs, Audio/Video (A/V) devices, small household appliances (HHAs) and flat screen TVs. The removal of HFRs from polymer surfaces using wipes supports concerns that HFRs could be transferred from these surfaces to hands as a result of direct contact with HFR-containing products. Surface wipe testing shows promise for screening additive HFRs. In comparison, the Br-content obtained using a handheld XRF analyzer did not correspond to concentrations obtained from surface wipe testing. PMID:26747994

  20. Human dermal absorption of chlorinated organophosphate flame retardants; implications for human exposure.

    PubMed

    Abou-Elwafa Abdallah, Mohamed; Pawar, Gopal; Harrad, Stuart

    2016-01-15

    Tris-2-chloroethyl phosphate (TCEP), tris (1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCIPP) and tris-1,3-dichloropropyl phosphate (TDCIPP) are organophosphate flame retardants (PFRs) widely applied in a plethora of consumer products despite their carcinogenic potential. Human dermal absorption of these PFRs is investigated for the first time using human ex vivo skin and EPISKIN™ models. Results of human ex vivo skin experiments revealed 28%, 25% and 13% absorption of the applied dose (500 ng/cm(2), finite dose) of TCEP, TCIPP and TDCIPP, respectively after 24h exposure. The EPISKIN™ model showed enhanced permeability values (i.e. weaker barrier), that were respectively 16%, 11% and 9% for TCEP, TCIPP and TDCIPP compared to human ex vivo skin. However, this difference was not significant (P>0.05). Estimated permeability constants (Kp, cm/h) showed a significant negative correlation with log Kow for the studied contaminants. The effect of hand-washing on dermal absorption of PFRs was investigated. Washing reduced overall dermal absorption, albeit to varying degrees depending on the physicochemical properties of the target PFRs. Moreover, slight variations of the absorbed dose were observed upon changing the dosing solution from acetone to 20% Tween 80 in water, indicating the potential influence of the dose vehicle on the dermal absorption of PFRs. Finally, estimated dermal uptake of the studied PFRs via contact with indoor dust was higher in UK toddlers (median ΣPFRs=36 ng/kg bw day) than adults (median ΣPFRs=4 ng/kg bw day). More research is required to fully elucidate the toxicological implications of such exposure.

  1. Fate and metabolism of the brominated flame retardant tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) in rice cell suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Songfeng; Cao, Siqi; Wang, Yongfeng; Jiang, Bingqi; Wang, Lianhong; Sun, Feifei; Ji, Rong

    2016-07-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is the brominated flame retardant with the highest production volume and its bioaccumulation in environment has caused both human health and environmental concerns, however the fate and metabolism of TBBPA in plants is unknown. We studied the fate, metabolites, and transformation of (14)C-labeled TBBPA in rice cell suspension culture. During the incubation for 14 days, TBBPA degradation occurred continuously in the culture, accompanied by formation of one anisolic metabolite [2,6-dibromo-4-(2-(2-hydroxy)-propyl)-anisole] (DBHPA) (50% of the degraded TBBPA) and cellular debris-bound residues (46.4%) as well as mineralization (3.6%). The cells continuously accumulated TBBPA in the cytoplasm, while a small amount of DBHPA (2.1% of the initially applied TBBPA) was detectable inside the cells only at the end of incubation. The majority of the accumulated residues in the cells was attributed to the cellular debris-bound residues, accounting for 70-79% of the accumulation after the first incubation day. About 5.4% of the accumulation was associated with cell organelles, which contributed 7.5% to the cellular debris-bound residues. Based on the fate and metabolism of TBBPA in the rice cell suspension culture, a type II ipso-substitution pathway was proposed to describe the initial step for TBBPA degradation in the culture and balance the fate of TBBPA in the cells. To the best of our knowledge, our study provides for the first time the insights into the fate and metabolism of TBBPA in plants and points out the potential role of type II ipso-hydroxylation substitution in degradation of alkylphenols in plants. Further studies are required to reveal the mechanisms for the bound-residue formation (e.g., binding of residues to specific cell wall components), nature of the binding, and toxicological effects of the bound residues and DBHPA.

  2. Brominated flame retardants in offices in Michigan, U.S.A.

    PubMed Central

    Batterman, Stuart; Godwin, Christopher; Chernyak, Sergei; Jia, Chunrong; Charles, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are now ubiquitous contaminants with large reservoirs and high concentrations in buildings. Most of the information documenting BFR levels has been obtained in residences, and other environments that can lead to exposure have received relatively little attention, including offices that contain numerous BFR sources and where individuals spend considerable time. The aim of this study is to characterize BFR concentrations, potential emission sources, and migration pathways in office environments. We measure BFR levels in floor dust, indoor air, ventilation filter dust, and carpets in ten commercial and institutional buildings in Michigan, U.S.A. The median concentration of total BDEs in settled dust was 8754 ng g−1, at the upper range of levels previously reported. Especially elevated levels were found in offices in buildings that contained known or likely BFR sources, e.g., computer servers. A trends analysis in a newly constructed building showed remarkable increases in concentrations of BFRs in settled dust and indoor air, and apparent steady-state levels were reached 5 to 8 months after building completion, a particularly striking finding given that the building was constructed and furnished several years after the voluntary phase-out of the penta- and octa-mixtures. Airborne particulate matter collected in a building's HVAC system filters contained PBDEs, including BDE-209, at levels exceeding the concentration of floor dust. In conjunction with estimates of building air flow rates, filter efficiency and other parameters, mass balance calculations for this building were used to estimate the emission rates and reservoirs of PBDEs. The widespread distribution of BFRs found in offices in both new and old buildings suggests the significance of workplace exposures, the need for controls to minimize human exposure, intra-building migration, and environmental releases of these chemicals, and the need for monitoring in new buildings

  3. Organophosphorus flame retardants and phthalate esters in indoor dust from different microenvironments: Bioaccessibility and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    He, Ruiwen; Li, Yunzi; Xiang, Ping; Li, Chao; Zhou, Chunyang; Zhang, Shujun; Cui, Xinyi; Ma, Lena Q

    2016-05-01

    Incidental ingestion of indoor dust is an important pathway for human exposure to organophosphorus flame retardants (OPFRs) and phthalate esters (PAEs). However, little is known about their bioaccessibility in indoor dust. In this study, indoor dust samples were collected from houses, offices, public microenvironments (PMEs), and university dorms, and physiologically based extraction test (PBET) was used to measure the bioaccessibility of OPFRs and PAEs in these dust samples. Total concentrations of OPFRs in dust samples ranged from 0.01 to 63.2 μg g(-1), with significantly lower concentrations in dorm dust (median = 0.30 μg g(-1)) than those in houses (3.12), offices (5.94), and PMEs (11.6). Total PAEs ranged from 5.49 to 2161 μg g(-1) with significantly lower concentrations in dorm dust (379 μg g(-1)) than those in the other three types of dust (767, 515, and 731 μg g(-1)). When subject to PBET, the bioaccessibility of OPFRs ranged from 8.18% (triphenyl phosphate) to 54.5% (Tris(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate) for OPFRs, and from 1.21% (di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate, DEHP) to 81.1% (dimethyl phthalate) for PAEs. Estimated exposure doses for adults and infants to OPFRs via dust ingestion were much lower than the reference doses (RfD), but intake dose of DEHP for infants was higher than the RfD of 20 μg kg(-1) d(-1). However, the DEHP intake dose did not exceed the RfD after incorporating bioaccessibility into risk assessment. Our data indicated the importance of considering contaminant bioaccessibility during risk assessment of indoor dust. PMID:26585356

  4. Inhibition of thyroid hormone sulfotransferase activity by brominated flame retardants and halogenated phenolics.

    PubMed

    Butt, Craig M; Stapleton, Heather M

    2013-11-18

    Many halogenated organic contaminants (HOCs) are considered endocrine disruptors and affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, often by interfering with circulating levels of thyroid hormones (THs). We investigated one potential mechanism for TH disruption, inhibition of sulfotransferase activity. One of the primary roles of TH sulfation is to support the regulation of biologically active T3 through the formation of inactive THs. We investigated TH sulfotransferase inhibition by 14 hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH BDEs), BDE 47, triclosan, and fluorinated, chlorinated, brominated, and iodinated analogues of 2,4,6-trihalogenated phenol and bisphenol A (BPA). A new mass spectrometry-based method was also developed to measure the formation rates of 3,3'-T2 sulfate (3,3'-T2S). Using pooled human liver cytosol, we investigated the influence of these HOCs on the sulfation of 3,3'-T2, a major substrate for TH sulfation. For the formation of 3,3'-T2S, the Michaelis constant (Km) was 1070 ± 120 nM and the Vmax was 153 ± 6.6 pmol min(-1) (mg of protein)(-1). All chemicals investigated inhibited sulfotransferase activity with the exception of BDE 47. The 2,4,6-trihalogenated phenols were the most potent inhibitors followed by the OH BDEs and then halogenated BPAs. The IC50 values for the OH BDEs were primarily in the low nanomolar range, which may be environmentally relevant. In silico molecular modeling techniques were also used to simulate the binding of OH BDE to SULT1A1. This study suggests that some HOCs, including antimicrobial chemicals and metabolites of flame retardants, may interfere with TH regulation through inhibition of sulfotransferase activity. PMID:24089703

  5. Selective damage to dopaminergic transporters following exposure to the brominated flame retardant, HBCDD

    PubMed Central

    Genskow, Kelly R.; Bradner, Joshua M.; Hossain, Muhammad M.; Richardson, Jason R.; Caudle, W. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Over the last several decades, the use of halogenated organic compounds has become the cause of environmental and human health concerns. Of particular notoriety has been the establishment of the neurotoxicity of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The subsequent banning of PBDEs has led to greatly increased use of 1,2,5,6,9,10-hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD, also known as HBCD) as a flame retardant in consumer products. The physiochemical similarities between HBCDD and PBDEs suggest that HBCDD may also be neurotoxic to the dopamine system, which is specifically damaged in Parkinson disease (PD). The purpose of this study was to assess the neurotoxicity of HBCDD on the nigrostriatal dopamine system using an in vitro and in vivo approach. We demonstrate that exposure to HBCDD (0–25 μM) for 24 hrs causes significant cell death in the SK-N-SH catecholaminergic cell line, as well as reductions in the growth and viability of TH+ primary cultured neurons at lower concentrations (0–10 μM) after 72 hrs of treatment. Assessment of the in vivo neurotoxicity of HBCDD (25 mg/kg for 30 days) resulted in significant reductions in the expression of the striatal dopamine transporter and vesicular monoamine transporter 2, both of which are integral in mediating dopamine homeostasis and neurotransmission in the dopamine circuit. However, no changes were seen in the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase in the dopamine terminal, or striatal levels of dopamine. To date, these are the first data to demonstrate that exposure to HBCDD disrupts the nigrostriatal dopamine system. Given these results and the ubiquitous nature of HBCDD in the environment, its possible role as an environmental risk factor for PD should be further investigated. PMID:26073293

  6. Measurements of Selected Brominated Flame Retardants in Nursing Women: Implications for Human Exposure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We have examined several emerging brominated flame retardants (BFRs) including 2-ethyl-1-hexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (TBB), bis(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (TBPH), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane (BTBPE), 4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1,1,3-trimethyl-3-(2,3,4,5-tetrabromophenyl)-indane (OBIND), and decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) in paired human maternal serum (n = 102) and breast milk (n = 105) collected in 2008–2009 in the Sherbrooke region in Canada. Three legacy BFRs were also included in the study for comparison: decabromobiphenyl (BB-209), 2,2′,4,4′,5,5′-hexabromobiphenyl (BB-153), and 2,2′,4,4′,5,5′-hexabromodiphenyl ethers (BDE-153). TBB, BB-153, and BDE-153 had detection frequencies greater than 55% in both serum and milk samples. Their lipid weight (lw) adjusted median concentrations (ng g–1 lw) in serum and milk were 1.6 and 0.41 for TBB, 0.48 and 0.31 for BB-153, and 1.5 and 4.4 for BDE-153, respectively. The detection frequencies for the other BFRs measured in serum and milk were 16.7% and 32.4% for TBPH, 3.9% and 0.0% for BTBPE, 2.0% and 0.0% for BB-209, 9.8% and 1.0% for OBIND, and 5.9% and 8.6% for DBDPE. The ratio of TBB over the sum of TBB and TBPH (fTBB) in serum (0.23) was lower than that in milk (0.46), indicating TBB has a larger tendency than TBPH to be redistributed from blood to milk. Overall, these data confirm the presence of non-PBDE BFRs in humans, and the need to better understand their sources, routes of exposure, and potential human health effects. PMID:24992303

  7. Levels of Blood Organophosphorus Flame Retardants and Association with Changes in Human Sphingolipid Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fanrong; Wan, Yi; Zhao, Haoqi; Hu, Wenxin; Mu, Di; Webster, Thomas F; Hu, Jianying

    2016-08-16

    While a recent toxicological study has shown that organophosphorus flame retardants (OPFRs) may disrupt sphingolipid homeostasis, epidemiologic evidence is currently lacking. In this study, a total of 257 participants were recruited from Shenzhen, China. Eleven OPFRs were for the first time simultaneously determined in the human blood samples by ultraperformance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Six OPFRs, tributyl phosphate (TNBP), 2-ethylhexyl diphenyl phosphate (EHDPP), tris(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCIPP), tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP), triethyl phosphate (TEP), and TPHP, were detectable in at least 90% of participants, with median concentrations of 37.8, 1.22, 0.71, 0.54, 0.49, and 0.43 ng/mL, respectively. Sphingomyelin (SM) levels in the highest quartile of EHDPP, TPHP, TNBP, TBOEP, TEP, and TCIPP were 45.3% [95% confidence interval; 38.1%, 53.0%], 51.9% (45.5%, 58.6%), 153.6% (145.1%, 162.3%), 20.6% (14.5%, 27.0%), 59.0% (52.1%, 66.2%), and 62.8% (55.2%, 70.6%) higher than those in the lowest quartile, respectively, after adjusting for covariates. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) levels in the highest quartile of EHDPP, TPHP, and TNBP were 36% (-39%, -33%), 16% (-19%, -14%), and 36% (-38%, -33%) lower than those in the lowest quartile, respectively. A similar pattern emerged when exposures were modeled continuously. We for the first time found the associations between OPFRs and changes in human sphingolipid homeostasis. PMID:27434659

  8. Organophosphorus flame retardants and plasticizers in marine and fresh water biota and in human milk.

    PubMed

    Sundkvist, Anneli Marklund; Olofsson, Ulrika; Haglund, Peter

    2010-04-01

    The levels and relative proportions of 11 organophosphorus flame retardants and plasticizers (OPs), some of which are reportedly toxic to aquatic organisms, were investigated in human breast milk and samples of fish and mussels from Swedish lakes and coastal areas in order to assess spatial differences in environmental exposure and spatial and temporal differences in human exposure. Some of the biota samples were collected at locations with known potential sources of OPs, but most were collected in background locations. Tris-2-chloroisopropyl phosphate (TCPP) and triphenyl phosphate (TPP) dominated in the biota with levels ranging from 170 to 770 ng g(-1) for TCPP in perch and between 21 and 180 ng g(-1) for TPP. In milk samples, TCPP (median 45 ng g(-1)) and tributyl phosphate (median 12 ng g(-1)) were the most frequently occurring OPs. Among samples of fish from background locations, the concentrations and profiles of most OPs were quite similar, indicating that their sources were diffuse. However, in fish from sample locations near known sources, there were marked differences in OP concentrations and profiles. Fish from a stream receiving surface water from Arlanda airport displayed high levels of OPs (10 200 ng g(-1)) that are commonly used in aircraft hydraulic fluids. Fish collected at points 1 or 2 km downstream of sewage treatment plants showed significantly higher levels of tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBEP), one of the most typically abundant OP in effluents from such plants. In the milk samples obtained from women in different towns no distinct differences were detected in OP concentrations or profiles. However, the levels of TBEP tended to be higher in milk collected 10 years ago than in milk collected more recently. However, human exposure to OPs through eating fish or to breastfeeding babies seems to be of minor importance in relation to other potential sources, such as indoor dust inhalation and ingestion.

  9. Bromine content and brominated flame retardants in food and animal feed from the UK.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, A R; Mortimer, D; Rose, M; Smith, F; Panton, S; Garcia-Lopez, M

    2016-05-01

    Current occurrence data for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) and hexa-bromocyclododecane (HBCD) measured in most commonly consumed foods (n = 156) and animal feeds (n = 51) sampled in the UK, demonstrates an ongoing ubiquity of these contaminants in human and animal diets. PBDE concentrations for the sum of 17 measured congeners ranged from 0.02 ng/g to 8.91 ng/g whole weight for food, and 0.11 ng/g to 9.63 ng/g whole weight for animal feeds. The highest concentration ranges, and mean values were detected in fish, processed foods and fish feeds. HBCD diastereomers (alpha-HBCD was the most commonly detected) generally occurred at lower concentrations (from <0.01 ng/g to 10.1 ng/g for food and <0.01 ng/g to 0.66 ng/g for animal feed) and less frequently than PBDEs, but tetrabromobisphenol A which was also measured, was rarely detected. The total bromine content of the samples was also determined in an attempt to use a mass balance approach to investigate some of these samples for the occurrence of novel and emerging BFRs. Although the approach was further refined by measuring organic bromine content, the concentrations of bromine were too high (in most cases by orders of magnitude) to allow use of the approach. A selected sub-set of samples was screened by GC-MS, for the presence of novel/emerging brominated flame retardants (PBT, TBX, PBEB, DBHCTD, HCTBPH and OBTMPI) but these were not detected at the higher limits of detection that result from full scan (GC-MS) screening. This data will contribute to the EU wide risk assessment on these contaminants.

  10. Thermal Recycling of Brominated Flame Retardants with Fe2O3.

    PubMed

    Altarawneh, Mohammednoor; Ahmed, Oday H; Jiang, Zhong-Tao; Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z

    2016-08-01

    Plastics containing brominated flame retardants (BFRs) constitute the major fraction of nonmetallic content in e-waste. Co-pyrolysis of BFRs with hematite (Fe2O3) represents a viable option for the thermal recycling of BFRs. Consensus of experimental findings confirms the excellent bromine fixation ability of Fe2O3 and the subsequent formation of iron bromides. This contribution provides a comprehensive mechanistic account of the primary reactions between a cluster model of Fe2O3 and major bromine-bearing products from the decomposition of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBA), the most commonly deployed BFR. We estimate the thermo-kinetic parameters for interactions of Fe2O3 with HBr, brominated alkanes and alkenes, bromobenzene, and bromophenol. Dissociative addition of HBr at a Fe-O bond proceeds through a trivial barrier of 8.2 kcal/mol with fitted parameters in the Arrhenius equation of k(T) = 7.96 × 10(11) exp(-6400/RT) s(-1). The facile and irreversible nature for HBr addition to Fe2O3 accords with the experimentally reported 90% reduction in HBr emission when Fe2O3 interacts with TBBA pyrolysates. A detailed kinetic analysis indicates that, transformation of Fe2O3 into iron bromides and oxybromides occurs via successive addition of HBr to Fe(Br)-O(H) entities. Elimination of a water molecule proceeds through an intramolecular H transfer. A direct elimination one-step mechanism operates in the dehydrohalogenation of bromoethane into ethene over Fe2O3. Dissociative decomposition and direct elimination channels assume comparable reaction rates in formation of acetylene from vinyl bromide. Results from this study provide an atomic-based insight into a promising thermal recycling route of e-waste. PMID:27366936

  11. Flame retardant cotton fibers produced using novel synthesized halogen-free phosphoramide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shariatinia, Zahra; Javeri, Nasrin; Shekarriz, Shahla

    2015-03-15

    Flame retardant cotton fibers were successfully produced using five new nanosized phosphoramide compounds synthesized by ultrasonic method. The (1)H NMR spectra of compounds 1-3 illustrate (3)J(H,H)cis and (3)J(H,H)trans corresponding to the splittings of cis and trans protons present in the CHCH2 bond. Comparing the char lengths of cotton fibers treated with phosphoramides 1-5 indicates that the samples with greater degree of grafting (DG) provide smaller char lengths so that the least and the greatest char lengths are observed for the treated fibers with phosphoramides 1 and 5, respectively. The very close DG and char lengths of compounds 1 and 2 can be described based on their chemical structures containing 4-nitroaniline and 4-chloro-3-trifluoromethyl aniline groups that both can release electrons through their resonance effects to their corresponding PN bonds and enhance the PN system synergistic effect. The TGA/DSC analyses on the treated fibers revealed that the maximum weight losses at 800°C are occurred within the range 43.52% (for fiber treated with 1) to 56.37 (for fiber treated with 5) which are all smaller than that of the raw fiber (56.83%). The in vitro antibacterial activity experiments on phosphoramides 1-5 displayed the greatest and the least antibacterial activities for compounds 2 and 4, respectively. Furthermore, when these phosphoramides are applied on the cotton fibers, they also demonstrate the above order for the antibacterial activities. PMID:25542124

  12. Characterizing the In Vitro Hepatic Biotransformation of the Flame Retardant BDE 99 by Common Carp

    PubMed Central

    Noyes, Pamela D.; Kelly, Shannon M.; Mitchelmore, Carys L.; Stapleton, Heather M.

    2009-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are a class of flame retardant chemicals that are known to biomagnify in aquatic foodwebs. However, significant biotransformation of some congeners via reductive dehalogenation has been observed during in vivo and in vitro laboratory exposures, particularly in fish models. Little information is available on the enzyme systems responsible for catalyzing this metabolic pathway in fish. This study was undertaken to characterize the biotransformation of one primary BDE congener, 2,2′,4,4′,5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-99), using in vitro techniques. Hepatic sub-cellular fractions were first prepared from individual adult common carp (Cyprinus carpio) to examine metabolism in both microsomal and cytosolic sub-cellular fractions. Debromination rates (i.e. BDE-99 biotransformation to BDE-47) were generally higher in the microsomal fraction than in the cytosolic fraction, and some intra-species variability was observed. Further experiments were conducted to determine the biotransformation kinetics and the influence of specific co-factors, inhibitors and competitive substrates on metabolism using pooled carp liver microsomes. The apparent Km and Vmax values were 19.4 μM and 1,120 pmoles hr−1 mg protein−1, respectively. Iodoacetate (IaC) and the two thyroid hormones, reverse triodothyronine (rT3) and thyroxine (T4), significantly inhibited the debromination of BDE-99 in microsomal sub-cellular fractions with IC50 values of 2.2 μM, 0.83 μM, and >1.0 μM, respectively. These results support our hypothesis that deiodinase enzymes may be catalyzing the metabolism of PBDEs in fish liver tissues. Further studies are needed to evaluate metabolic activity in other species and tissues that contain these enzymes. PMID:20080306

  13. Non-PBDE halogenated flame retardants in Canadian indoor house dust: sampling, analysis, and occurrence.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xinghua; Kubwabo, Cariton; Rasmussen, Pat E; Wu, Fang

    2016-04-01

    An analytical method was developed for the measurement of 18 novel halogenated flame retardants in house dust. Sample preparation was based on ultrasound-assisted solvent extraction and clean up with solid phase extraction (SPE). Sample extracts were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) operated in electron capture negative ion (ECNI) chemical ionization mode. Baseline data from 351 fresh (active) dust samples collected under the Canadian House Dust Study (CHDS) revealed that five out of 18 target chemicals were present with detection frequencies higher than 90 %. Median (range) concentrations for these five compounds were as follows: 104 (<1.5-13,000) ng/g for 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EHTBB), 8.5 (<1.7-2390) ng/g for 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), 10.2 (<1.7-430) ng/g for hexabromobenzene (HBB), 2.9 (<1.2-1410) ng/g for syn-dechlorane plus (syn-DP) and 5.6 (<1.9-1570) ng/g for anti-dechlorane plus (anti-DP). A comparison of two sampling methods in a subset of 40 homes showed significant positive correlations between samples of "active" dust and samples taken directly from the household vacuum cleaner for all target compounds having median values above their corresponding method detection limits (MDLs). In addition, the method was also applied to the analysis of the targeted compounds in National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) standard reference material (SRM 2585, organic contaminants in house dust). Results from the current study could contribute to the potential certification of target chemicals in SRM 2585. PMID:26780041

  14. Advanced oxidation kinetics of aqueous trialkyl phosphate flame retardants and plasticizers.

    PubMed

    Watts, Michael J; Linden, Karl G

    2009-04-15

    Trialkyl phosphate esters are a class of anthropogenic organics commonly found in surface waters of Europe and North America, due to their frequent application as flame retardants, plasticizers, and solvents. Four trialkyl phosphate esters were evaluated to determine second-order rates of reaction with ultraviolet- and ozone-generated *OH in water. Tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBEP) was fastest to react with *OH (kOH,TBEP = 1.03 x 10(10) M(-1) s(-1)), followed sequentially by tributyl phosphate (TBP), tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), and tris(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCPP) (kOH,TBP = 6.40 x 10(9), kOH,TCEP = 5.60 x 10(8), and kOH,TCPP = 1.98 x 10(8) M(-1) s(-1)). A two-stage process was used to test the validity of the determined kOH for TBEP and the fastest reacting halogenated alkyl phosphate, TCEP. First, *OH oxidation of TCEP and TBEP, in competition with nitrobenzene was measured in ozonated hydrogen peroxide solutions. Applying multiple regression analysis, it was determined that the UV/H2O2 and O3/H2O2 data sets were statistically identical for each compound. The subsequent validated kOH were used to predict TCEP and TBEP photodegradation in neutral pH, model surface water after chemical oxidant addition and UV irradiation (up to 1000 mJ/cm2). The insignificant difference between the predicted TBEP and TCEP photodegradation and a best-fit of the first-order exponential decay function to the observed TBEP and TCEP concentrations with increasing UV fluence was further evidence of the validity of the determined kOH. TBEP oxidation rates were similar in the surface waters tested. Substantial TCEP oxidation in the model surface water required a significant increase in initial H2O2.

  15. Geographical distribution of non-PBDE-brominated flame retardants in mussels from Asian coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Tomohiko; Ogawa, Shohei P; Ramu, Karri; Sudaryanto, Agus; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2012-09-01

    Hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane (BTBPE), and decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) used as alternatives for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are also persistent in the environment as PBDEs. Limited information on these non-PBDE brominated flame retardants (BFRs) is available; in particular, there are only few publications on environmental pollution by these contaminants in the coastal waters of Asia. In this regard, we investigated the contamination status of HBCDs, BTBPE, and DBDPE in the coastal waters of Asia using mussels as a bioindicator. Concentrations of HBCDs, BTBPE, and DBDPE were determined in green (Perna viridis) and blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) collected from the coastal areas in Cambodia, China (mainland), SAR China (Hong Kong), India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, and Vietnam on 2003-2008. BTBPE and DBDPE were analyzed using GC-MS, whereas HBCDs were determined by LC-MS/MS. HBCDs, BTBPE, and DBDPE were found in mussels at levels ranging from <0.01 to 1,400, <0.1 to 13, and <0.3 to 22 ng/g lipid wt, respectively. Among the three HBCD diastereoisomers, α-HBCD was the dominant isomer followed by γ- and β-HBCDs. Concentrations of HBCDs and DBDPE in mussels from Japan and Korea were higher compared to those from the other Asian countries, indicating extensive usage of these non-PBDE BFRs in Japan and Korea. Higher levels of HBCDs and DBDPE than PBDEs were detected in some mussel samples from Japan. The results suggest that environmental pollution by non-PBDE BFRs, especially HBCDs in Japan, is ubiquitous. This study provides baseline information on the contamination status of these non-PBDE BFRs in the coastal waters of Asia. PMID:22875421

  16. Oxidation of flame retardant tetrabromobisphenol a by aqueous permanganate: reaction kinetics, brominated products, and pathways.

    PubMed

    Pang, Su-Yan; Jiang, Jin; Gao, Yuan; Zhou, Yang; Huangfu, Xiaoliu; Liu, Yongze; Ma, Jun

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the most widely used brominated flame retardant tetrabromobisphenol A (TBrBPA) was shown to exhibit appreciable reactivity toward potassium permanganate [Mn(VII)] in water over a wide pH range of 5-10 with the maxima of second-order rate constants (kMn(VII) = 15-700 M(-1) s(-1)) at pH near its pKa values (7.5/8.5). A novel precursor ion scan (PIS) approach using negative electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (ESI-QqQMS) was adopted and further optimized for fast selective detection of brominated oxidation products of TBrBPA by Mn(VII). By setting PIS of m/z 79 and 81, two major products (i.e., 4-(2-hydroxyisopropyl)-2,6-dibromophenol and 4-isopropylene-2,6-dibromophenol) and five minor ones (including 2,6-dibromophenol, 2,6-dibromo-1,4-benzoquinone, and three dimers) were detected and suggested with chemical structures from their product ion spectra and bromine isotope patterns. Reaction pathways mainly involving the initial one-electron oxidation of TBrBPA and subsequent release and further reactions of 2,6-dibromo-4-isopropylphenol carbocation intermediate were proposed. The effectiveness of Mn(VII) for treatment of TBrBPA in real waters was confirmed. It is important to better understand the reactivity and toxicity of primary brominated products before Mn(VII) can be applied for treatment of TBrBPA-contaminated wastewater and source water. PMID:24295083

  17. Plastics additives in the indoor environment--flame retardants and plasticizers.

    PubMed

    Wensing, M; Uhde, E; Salthammer, T

    2005-03-01

    Phthalic acid esters and phosphororganic compounds (POC) are generally known as semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) and are frequently utilized as plasticizers and flame retardants in commercial products. In the indoor environment, both compound groups are released from a number of sources under normal living conditions and accumulate in air and dust. Therefore, inhalation of air and ingestion of house dust have to be considered as important pathways for the assessment of exposure in living habitats. Especially in the case of very young children, the oral and dermal uptake from house dust might be of relevance for risk assessment. A critical evaluation of indoor exposure to phthalates and POC requires the determination of the target compounds in indoor air and house dust as well as emission studies. The latter are usually carried out under controlled conditions in emission test chambers or cells. Furthermore, chamber testing enables the determination of condensable compounds by fogging sampling. In the case of automobiles, specific scenarios have been developed to study material emissions on a test stand or to evaluate the exposure of users while the vehicle is driving. In this review, results from several studies are summarized and compared for seven phthalic esters and eight POC. The available data for room air and dust differ widely depending on investigated compound and compartment. Room air studies mostly include only a limited number of measurements, which makes a statistical evaluation difficult. The situation is much better for house dust measurements. However, the composition of house dust is very inhomogeneous and the result is strongly dependent on the particle size distribution used for analysis. Results of emission studies are presented for building products, electronic equipment, and automobiles. Daily rates for inhalation and dust ingestion of phthalic esters and POC were calculated from 95-percentiles or maximum values. A comparison of the data

  18. Industry-sponsored research on the potential health and environmental effects of selected brominated flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Hardy, M L; Biesemeier, J; Manor, O; Gentit, W

    2003-09-01

    Modern fire-fighting techniques, equipment and fire-resistant building design has lead to less destruction than in the previous centuries. However, a high fuel load in either a residence or a commercial building can overwhelm even the best firefighters or building construction, and factors affecting the fuel load have changed in recent decades. The fire load in a typical home has doubled over the last 50 years, furnishings typically include those made of petrochemicals that can behave as if containing built-in accelerant, and modern energy-efficient buildings are less able to disperse heat in the event of a fire. Flame retardant chemicals (FRs) are one means used to reduce the risk of fire. FRs are typically added or incorporated chemically into a polymer to slow or hinder the ignition or growth of a fire in low-to-moderate cost commodity polymers. One type of FR contains bromine atoms as the active moiety. The FR industry, either as individual companies or as consortia, has conducted a broad range of studies on the commercial deca-, octa- and pentabromodiphenyl oxide/ether, tetrabromobisphenol A and hexabromocyclododecane products. These five products have data in excess of the OECD Screening Informational Data Set (SIDS) and the U.S. High Production Volume (HPV) program, and sufficient data for the performance of formal EU risk assessments. The objective of this paper is to present the range of data developed by industry consortia and to provide sources for the information. We hope to facilitate further research by assembling references to industry consortia-sponsored research here. PMID:12850097

  19. Comprehensive characterisation of flame retardants in textile furnishings by ambient high resolution mass spectrometry, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and environmental forensic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ionas, Alin C; Ballesteros Gómez, Ana; Uchida, Natsuyo; Suzuki, Go; Kajiwara, Natsuko; Takata, Kyoko; Takigami, Hidetaka; Leonards, Pim E G; Covaci, Adrian

    2015-10-01

    The presence and levels of flame retardants (FRs), such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and organophosphate flame retardants (PFRs), was determined in textile home furnishings, such as carpets and curtains from stores in Belgium. A comprehensive characterisation of FRs in textile was done by ambient high resolution mass spectrometry (qualitative screening), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) (quantitation), and environmental forensic microscopy (surface distribution). Ambient ionisation coupled to a time-of-flight (TOF) high resolution mass spectrometer (direct probe-TOF-MS) was investigated for the rapid screening of FRs. Direct probe-TOF-MS proved to be useful for a first screening step of textiles to detect FRs below the levels required to impart flame retardancy and to reduce, in this way, the number of samples for further quantitative analysis. Samples were analysed by GC-MS to confirm the results obtained by ambient mass spectrometry and to obtain quantitative information. The levels of PBDEs and PFRs were typically too low to impart flame retardancy. Only high levels of BDE-209 (11-18% by weight) were discovered and investigated in localised hotspots by employing forensic microscopy techniques. Most of the samples were made of polymeric materials known to be inherently flame retarded to some extent, so it is likely that other alternative and halogen-free FR treatments/solutions are preferred for the textiles on the Belgian market.

  20. Comprehensive characterisation of flame retardants in textile furnishings by ambient high resolution mass spectrometry, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and environmental forensic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ionas, Alin C; Ballesteros Gómez, Ana; Uchida, Natsuyo; Suzuki, Go; Kajiwara, Natsuko; Takata, Kyoko; Takigami, Hidetaka; Leonards, Pim E G; Covaci, Adrian

    2015-10-01

    The presence and levels of flame retardants (FRs), such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and organophosphate flame retardants (PFRs), was determined in textile home furnishings, such as carpets and curtains from stores in Belgium. A comprehensive characterisation of FRs in textile was done by ambient high resolution mass spectrometry (qualitative screening), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) (quantitation), and environmental forensic microscopy (surface distribution). Ambient ionisation coupled to a time-of-flight (TOF) high resolution mass spectrometer (direct probe-TOF-MS) was investigated for the rapid screening of FRs. Direct probe-TOF-MS proved to be useful for a first screening step of textiles to detect FRs below the levels required to impart flame retardancy and to reduce, in this way, the number of samples for further quantitative analysis. Samples were analysed by GC-MS to confirm the results obtained by ambient mass spectrometry and to obtain quantitative information. The levels of PBDEs and PFRs were typically too low to impart flame retardancy. Only high levels of BDE-209 (11-18% by weight) were discovered and investigated in localised hotspots by employing forensic microscopy techniques. Most of the samples were made of polymeric materials known to be inherently flame retarded to some extent, so it is likely that other alternative and halogen-free FR treatments/solutions are preferred for the textiles on the Belgian market. PMID:26398896

  1. Flame retardant brominated styrene-based polymers. II. Synthesis, characterization and application of dibromostyrene, styrene and butadiene terpolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.L.; Favstritsky, N.A.

    1993-12-31

    Brominated styrene-based polymers having surprisingly good physical properties in combination with flame retardancy are prepared from terpolymers of dibromostyrene, styrene and butadiene. Polymerization compositions were determined by bromine contents (% Br) of the polymers by Schoeninger Combustion Method and {sup 1}H NMR integration. Weight losses (% loss) were measured at 20{degrees}C/min by Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA). Molecular weights were measured by GPC based on a standard molecular weight (MW) of polystyrene (PS)> Flammability of the latex products when used in textile backcoatings was testing by Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 302 (MVSS-302) flammability test. As latexes were used as non-woven binders, flammability was tested by exposure to a 4 in high, 1950{degrees}F propane flame from a Fisher Burner. When latexes were employed for carpet backing, flammability was tested by DOC. FF-1-70 (pill test) flammability tests.

  2. Occurrence of PBDEs and other alternative brominated flame retardants in sludge from wastewater treatment plants in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunggyu; Song, Geum-Ju; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Moon, Hyo-Bang

    2014-02-01

    Studies on the occurrence of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and other alternative brominated flame retardants in the environment are scarce. In this study, PBDEs and non-PBDE brominated flame retardants (NBFRs), including decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), were measured in sludge collected from three types of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Korea. Total concentrations of PBDEs (∑PBDE) in sludge ranged from 298 to 48,000 (mean: 3240) ng/g dry weight. Among 10 NBFRs analyzed, DBDPE and BTBPE were the only ones detected in sludge samples. Concentrations of DBDPE and BTBPE ranged from 1) of DBDPE/BDE 209 were found in sludge from I-WWTPs, reflecting a shift in the usage pattern of BFRs by the Korean industry. The nationwide annual emission fluxes of ∑PBDE, DBDPE and BTBPE via WWTPs to the environment were estimated to be 7400, 480, and 3.7 kg/year, respectively. This is the first study on the occurrence of alternative brominated flame retardants in sludge from Korea.

  3. Exposure to an environmentally relevant mixture of brominated flame retardants affects fetal development in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Berger, Robert G; Lefèvre, Pavine L C; Ernest, Sheila R; Wade, Michael G; Ma, Yi-Qian; Rawn, Dorothea F K; Gaertner, Dean W; Robaire, Bernard; Hales, Barbara F

    2014-06-01

    Brominated flame retardants are incorporated into a wide variety of consumer products and are known to enter into the surrounding environment, leading to human exposure. There is accumulating evidence that these compounds have adverse effects on reproduction and development in humans and animal models. Animal studies have generally characterized the outcome of exposure to a single technical mixture or congener. Here, we determined the impact of exposure of rats prior to mating and during gestation to a mixture representative of congener levels found in North American household dust. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a diet containing 0, 0.75, 250 or 750mg/kg of a mixture of flame retardants (polybrominated diphenyl ethers, hexabromocyclododecane) from two weeks prior to mating to gestation day 20. This formulation delivered nominal doses of 0, 0.06, 20 and 60mg/kg body weight/day. The lowest dose approximates high human exposures based on house dust levels and the dust ingestion rates of toddlers. Litter size and resorption sites were counted and fetal development evaluated. No effects on maternal health, litter size, fetal viability, weights, crown rump lengths or sex ratios were detected. The proportion of litters with fetuses with anomalies of the digits (soft tissue syndactyly or malposition of the distal phalanges) was increased significantly in the low (0.06mg/kg/day) dose group. Skeletal analysis revealed a decreased ossification of the sixth sternebra at all exposure levels. Thus, exposure to an environmentally relevant mixture of brominated flame retardants results in developmental abnormalities in the absence of apparent maternal toxicity. The relevance of these findings for predicting human risk is yet to be determined.

  4. Molecular Design, Graft Polymerization and Performance Evaluation of Radiation Curable Flame Retardant Monomers Derived from Phosphorus-Nitrogen Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Brian Tyndall

    The textile industry is constantly seeking new technologies to make its production more efficient, economical and environmentally friendly. An exciting new strategy to impart value-added functional finishes to textiles is the use of radiation, such as ultraviolet (UV) light, to drive the polymerization of monomers onto the surface of the substrates. These grafted polymeric layers provide the fiber or fabric with interesting new properties, such as antimicrobial behavior, water and oil repellency or flame retardancy. With the aid of a photoinitiator, UV curing can take place very rapidly and the process is waterless and uses less energy than traditional textile wet processing. With these thoughts in mind, this research explores the molecular design, synthesis, UV induced graft polymerization and performance evaluation of nine phosphorus-based flame retardant monomers for cellulosic cotton substrates. All monomers in this work were easily prepared using one-pot reactions procedures. With the assistance of Irgacure 819 photoinitiator, seven of the nine monomers were shown to simultaneously graft and polymerize onto the surface of cotton fabrics under UV radiation. JMPRTM Pro 10 software was used to explore the effect of variables, such as monomer concentration, photoinitiator concentration and UV exposure time, on the yield of the grafted polymeric layer. Burn testing of the treated fabrics in the vertical, 45° and horizontal orientations showed that all nine monomers were effective flame retardants that function via the condensed phase mechanism by encouraging the formation of nonflammable char. These burn test results were validated by thermogravimetric analysis, which demonstrated quantitatively that all nine monomers strongly promote the generation of a protective char. Finally, scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the surface morphology of the treated fabrics and visualize the grafted polymeric layer.

  5. Exposure assessment of organophosphorus and organobromine flame retardants via indoor dust from elementary schools and domestic houses.

    PubMed

    Mizouchi, Shigekazu; Ichiba, Masayoshi; Takigami, Hidetaka; Kajiwara, Natsuko; Takamuku, Toshiyuki; Miyajima, Toru; Kodama, Hiroki; Someya, Takashi; Ueno, Daisuke

    2015-03-01

    To assess the exposure of flame retardants (FRs) for school-children, organophosphorus flame retardants and plasticizers (PFRs) and organobromine flame retardants (BFRs) were determined in the indoor dust samples collected from elementary schools and domestic houses in Japan in 2009 and 2010. PFRs were detected in all the dust samples analyzed and the highest concentration of total PFRs was thousand-fold higher than that of BFRs. Among the PFRs, tris(butoxyethyl)phosphate (TBOEP) showed the highest concentration with a median (med.) of 270,000 ng g(-1) dry weight (3700-5,500,000 ng g(-1) dry weight), followed by tris(methylphenyl)phosphate (TMPPs)>triphenyl phosphate (TPHP)=tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl)phosphate (TDCIPP)=tris(2-chloroisopropyl)phosphate (TCIPP)=tris(2chloroethyl)phosphate (TCEP)>ethylhexyl diphenyl phosphate (EHDPP). Significantly higher concentrations of TBOEP, tri-n-butyl phosphate (TNBP), TPHP, TMPPs, and total-PFRs were found in dust samples from elementary schools than from domestic houses. It might be due to that higher concentrations of TBOEP (as leveling agent) were detected from the floor polisher/wax products collected in those elementary schools. On the other hand, significantly higher concentrations of TCEP, TCIPPs, and total chloroalkyl-PFRs were found in domestic houses than in elementary schools. Exposure assessments of PFRs via indoor dust from elementary schools and domestic houses were conducted by calculating the hazard quotient (HQ). Among PFRs, HQs for TBOEP exceeded 1 (higher than reference dose: RfD) and its highest value was 1.9. To reduce the intake of TBOEP by school-children, it is recommended that the use of floor polisher/wax containing TBOEP be reduced in schools.

  6. Quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling on in vitro endocrine effects and metabolic stability involving 26 selected brominated flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Harju, Mikael; Hamers, Timo; Kamstra, Jorke H; Sonneveld, Edwin; Boon, Jan P; Tysklind, Mats; Andersson, Patrik L

    2007-04-01

    In this work, quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) were developed to aid human and environmental risk assessment processes for brominated flame retardants (BFRs). Brominated flame retardants, such as the high-production-volume chemicals polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), tetrabromobisphenol A, and hexabromocyclododecane, have been identified as potential endocrine disruptors. Quantitative structure-activity relationship models were built based on the in vitro potencies of 26 selected BFRs. The in vitro assays included interactions with, for example, androgen, progesterone, estrogen, and dioxin (aryl hydrocarbon) receptor, plus competition with thyroxine for its plasma carrier protein (transthyretin), inhibition of estradiol sulfation via sulfotransferase, and finally, rate of metabolization. The QSAR modeling, a number of physicochemical parameters were calculated describing the electronic, lipophilic, and structural characteristics of the molecules. These include frontier molecular orbitals, molecular charges, polarities, log octanol/water partitioning coefficient, and two- and three-dimensional molecularproperties. Experimental properties were included and measured for PBDEs, such as their individual ultraviolet spectra (200-320 nm) and retention times on three different high-performance liquid chromatography columns and one nonpolar gas chromatography column. Quantitative structure-activity relationship models based on androgen antagonism and metabolic degradation rates generally gave similar results, suggesting that lower-brominated PBDEs with bromine substitutions in ortho positions and bromine-free meta- and para positions had the highest potencies and metabolic degradation rates. Predictions made for the constituents of the technical flame retardant Bromkal 70-5DE found BDE 17 to be a potent androgen antagonist and BDE 66, which is a relevant PBDE in environmental samples, to be only a weak antagonist.

  7. Occurrence of PBDEs and other alternative brominated flame retardants in sludge from wastewater treatment plants in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunggyu; Song, Geum-Ju; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Moon, Hyo-Bang

    2014-02-01

    Studies on the occurrence of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and other alternative brominated flame retardants in the environment are scarce. In this study, PBDEs and non-PBDE brominated flame retardants (NBFRs), including decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), were measured in sludge collected from three types of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Korea. Total concentrations of PBDEs (∑PBDE) in sludge ranged from 298 to 48,000 (mean: 3240) ng/g dry weight. Among 10 NBFRs analyzed, DBDPE and BTBPE were the only ones detected in sludge samples. Concentrations of DBDPE and BTBPE ranged from 1) of DBDPE/BDE 209 were found in sludge from I-WWTPs, reflecting a shift in the usage pattern of BFRs by the Korean industry. The nationwide annual emission fluxes of ∑PBDE, DBDPE and BTBPE via WWTPs to the environment were estimated to be 7400, 480, and 3.7 kg/year, respectively. This is the first study on the occurrence of alternative brominated flame retardants in sludge from Korea. PMID:23993837

  8. Levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and novel flame retardants in microenvironment dust from Egypt: an assessment of human exposure.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Yasmeen; Shoeib, Tamer

    2015-02-01

    There are very few studies reporting concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and novel flame retardants (FRs) or non-PBDEs in Africa and the Middle East. The present work reported concentrations of fourteen PBDE congeners and eleven non-PBDE flame retardants in dust samples collected from homes (n=17), workplaces (n=9) and cars (n=5) in the greater Cairo region. The median ∑PBDE concentrations were 57, 425 and 1608 ng g(-1) in homes, workplaces and cars respectively. The highest PBDE levels were observed for BDE 209, with a median concentration of 40.2, 366 and 1540 ng g(-1) representing 70% to 95% of the total PBDEs in homes, workplaces and cars respectively. This is about 8 to 46 times greater than the median concentration of the pentaBDE (represented by the most abundant compounds in this formulation, ∑BDE 47, 99 and 100). In the case of non-PBDE flame retardants, a detection frequency between 52% and 100% was observed for several compounds including: hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), hexabromobenzene (HBB), 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EH-TBB), bis (2-ethyl-1-hexyl) tetrabromophthalate (TBPH), 1,2-bis (2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane (TBPE), ally-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (ATE) and Dechlorane Plus (DP). The ∑non-PBDE median concentrations were 8.30, 28.9 and 49.9 ng g(-1) in homes, workplaces and cars respectively with the highest level observed for HBCD in the three microenvironments. The detection of novel flame retardants in indoor environments may be due to their wide usage after the ban of the penta and octa BDE formulation. Results show the levels of PBDEs and non-PBDEs in Egyptian dust to be among the lowest levels reported from other countries. Different dust exposure scenarios using 5th percentile, median, 95th percentile and maximum levels were estimated for adult and children. The estimated dust intake results were several orders of magnitude lower than the oral reference dose values.

  9. Mechanical property and thermal stability of polyurethane composites reinforced with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes and inorganic flame retardant filler.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ho-Joong; Kwon, Younghwan; Kim, Chang Kee

    2014-08-01

    Mechanical properties and thermal stability of polyurethane composites were investigated with a combination of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) molecules and inorganic barium sulfate. These hybrid composites were prepared using one-step method through the incorporation of flexible hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene prepolymer, reactive POSS nanoparticles, and barium sulfate under isophorone diisocyanate curative system. In polyurethane composites, POSS and inorganic barium sulfate were utilized for mechanical reinforcement and flame retardant filler, respectively. The decomposition of POSS molecules during oxyacetylene torch exposure resulted in the formation of silica-based nanosized droplets, contributing on ablation behavior. PMID:25936054

  10. Ultra-Fast Layer-by-Layer Approach for Depositing Flame Retardant Coatings on Flexible PU Foams within Seconds.

    PubMed

    Carosio, F; Alongi, J

    2016-03-01

    In this letter, we are presenting a novel approach for the deposition of layer-by-layer (LbL) coatings capable of conferring flame retardant properties to flexible polyurethane foams exploiting subsecond deposition times. The process yields nanoscale coatings able to reduce by 33% one of the main fire safety parameters, namely the heat release rate peak, with a total treatment time of only 2.5 s. This new approach turned out to be three to 4 orders of magnitude faster than conventional LbL treatments. Such results make it possible for the exploit of LbL as a competitive, efficient and ecofriendly technology at industrial scale.

  11. Effects of selected polybrominated diphenyl ether flame retardants on lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) thymocyte viability, apoptosis, and necrosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Birchmeier, Kelly L.; Smith, Kimberly A.; Passino-Reader, Dora R.; Sweet, Leonard I.; Chernyak, Sergei M.; Adams, Jean V.; Omann, Geneva M.

    2005-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame-retardants have been identified as an emergent contaminants issue in many parts of the world. In vitro analyses were conducted to test the hypothesis that selected PBDEs congeners affect viability, apoptosis, and necrosis of thymocytes from laboratory-reared lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush). At current environmental levels (<1 mg/L), effects of the tested PBDEs on thymocytes were negligible. However, at 100 mg/L, major effects were seen for congener brominated diphenyl ether 47 (BDE-47) and minor effects were seen for congener BDE-99.

  12. Neurobehavioral function and low-level exposure to brominated flame retardants in adolescents: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Animal and in vitro studies demonstrated a neurotoxic potential of brominated flame retardants, a group of chemicals used in many household and commercial products to prevent fire. Although the first reports of detrimental neurobehavioral effects in rodents appeared more than ten years ago, human data are sparse. Methods As a part of a biomonitoring program for environmental health surveillance in Flanders, Belgium, we assessed the neurobehavioral function with the Neurobehavioral Evaluation System (NES-3), and collected blood samples in a group of high school students. Cross-sectional data on 515 adolescents (13.6-17 years of age) was available for the analysis. Multiple regression models accounting for potential confounders were used to investigate the associations between biomarkers of internal exposure to brominated flame retardants [serum levels of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners 47, 99, 100, 153, 209, hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA)] and cognitive performance. In addition, we investigated the association between brominated flame retardants and serum levels of FT3, FT4, and TSH. Results A two-fold increase of the sum of serum PBDE’s was associated with a decrease of the number of taps with the preferred-hand in the Finger Tapping test by 5.31 (95% CI: 0.56 to 10.05, p = 0.029). The effects of the individual PBDE congeners on the motor speed were consistent. Serum levels above the level of quantification were associated with an average decrease of FT3 level by 0.18 pg/mL (95% CI: 0.03 to 0.34, p = 0.020) for PBDE-99 and by 0.15 pg/mL (95% CI: 0.004 to 0.29, p = 0.045) for PBDE-100, compared with concentrations below the level of quantification. PBDE-47 level above the level of quantification was associated with an average increase of TSH levels by 10.1% (95% CI: 0.8% to 20.2%, p = 0.033), compared with concentrations below the level of quantification. We did not observe effects of

  13. Microwave-assisted extraction for qualitative and quantitative determination of brominated flame retardants in styrenic plastic fractions from waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE).

    PubMed

    Vilaplana, Francisco; Ribes-Greus, Amparo; Karlsson, Sigbritt

    2009-04-15

    A fast method for the determination of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in styrenic polymers using microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and liquid chromatography with UV detection (HPLC-UV) was developed. Different extraction parameters (extraction temperature and time, type of solvent, particle size) were first optimised for standard high-impact polystyrene (HIPS) samples containing known amounts of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) and decabromodiphenyl ether (Deca-BDE). Complete extraction of TBBPA was achieved using a combination of polar/non-polar solvent system (isopropanol/n-hexane) and high extraction temperatures (130 degrees C). Lower extraction yields were, however, obtained for Deca-BDE, due to its high molecular weight and its non-polar nature. The developed method was successfully applied to the screening of BFRs in standard plastic samples from waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE); TBBPA could be fully recovered, and Deca-BDE could be identified, together with minor order polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners.

  14. Optimized Li-Ion Electrolytes Containing Triphenyl Phosphate as a Flame-Retardant Additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Krause, Frederick C.

    2011-01-01

    A number of future NASA missions involving the exploration of the Moon and Mars will be human-rated and thus require high-specific-energy rechargeable batteries that possess enhanced safety characteristics. Given that Li-ion technology is the most viable rechargeable energy storage device for near-term applications, effort has been devoted to improving the safety characteristics of this system. There is also a strong desire to develop Li-ion batteries with improved safety characteristics for terrestrial applications, most notably for hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) automotive applications. Therefore, extensive effort has been devoted recently to developing non-flammable electrolytes to reduce the flammability of the cells/battery. A number of electrolyte formulations have been developed, including systems that (1) incorporate greater concentrations of the flame-retardant additive (FRA); (2) use di-2,2,2-trifluoroethyl carbonate (DTFEC) as a co-solvent; (3) use 2,2,2- trifluoroethyl methyl carbonate (TFEMC); (4) use mono-fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) as a co-solvent and/or a replacement for ethylene carbonate in the electrolyte mixture; and (5) utilize vinylene carbonate as a "SEI promoting" electrolyte additive, to build on the favorable results previously obtained. To extend the family of electrolytes developed under previous work, a number of additional electrolyte formulations containing FRAs, most notably triphenyl phosphate (TPP), were investigated and demonstrated in experimental MCMB (mesocarbon micro beads) carbon- LiNi(0.8)Co(0.2)O2 cells. The use of higher concentrations of the FRA is known to reduce the flammability of the electrolyte solution, thus, a concentration range was investigated (i.e., 5 to 20 percent by volume). The desired concentration of the FRA is the highest amount tolerable without adversely affecting the performance in terms of reversibility, ability to operate over a wide temperature range, and

  15. Fate of brominated flame retardants and organochlorine pesticides in urban soil: volatility and degradation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Fiona; Kurt-Karakus, Perihan; Bidleman, Terry F

    2012-03-01

    As the uses of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (BDEs) are being phased out in many countries, soils could become a secondary emission source to the atmosphere. It is also anticipated that the demand for alternative brominated flame retardants (BFRs) will grow, but little is known about their environmental fate in soils. In this study, the volatility and degradation of BFRs and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in soil was investigated. A low organic carbon (5.6%) urban soil was spiked with a suite of BFRs and OCPs, followed by incubation under laboratory condition for 360 days. These included BDE- 17, -28, -47, -99; α- and β-1,2-dibromo-4-(1,2-dibromoethyl)cyclohexane (TBECH), β-1,2,5,6-tetrabromocyclooctane (TBCO), and 2,3-dibromopropyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (DPTE), OCPs: α-hexachlorocyclohexane (α-HCH) and (13)C(6)-α-HCH, trans-chlordane (TC), and (13)C(10)-TC. The volatility of spiked chemicals was investigated using a fugacity meter to measure the soil-air partition coefficient (K(SA)). K(SA) of some spiked BFRs and OCPs increased from Day 10 to 60 or 90 and leveled off afterward. This suggests that the volatility of BFRs and OCPs decreases over time as the chemicals become more strongly bound to the soil. Degradation of alternative BFRs (α- and β-TBECH, β-TBCO, DPTE), BDE-17, and α-HCH ((13)C-labeled and nonlabeled) was evident in soils over 360 days, but no degradation was observed for the BDE-28, -47, -99, and TC ((13)C-labeled and nonlabeled). A method to separate the enantiomers of α-TBECH and β-TBCO was developed and their degradation, along with α-HCH ((13)C-labeled and nonlabeled) was enantioselective. This is the first study which reports the enantioselective degradation of chiral BFRs in soils. Discrepancies between the enantiomer fraction (EF) of chemicals extracted from the soil by dichloromethane (DCM) and air were found. It is suggested that DCM removes both the sequestered and loosely bound fractions of chemicals in soil, whereas

  16. Brominated flame retardants in waste electrical and electronic equipment: substance flows in a recycling plant.

    PubMed

    Morf, Leo S; Tremp, Josef; Gloor, Rolf; Huber, Yvonne; Stengele, Markus; Zennegg, Markus

    2005-11-15

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are synthetic additives mainly used in electrical and electronic appliances and in construction materials. The properties of some BFRs are typical for persistent organic pollutants, and certain BFRs, in particular some polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), are suspected to cause adverse health effects. Global consumption of the most demanded BFRs, i.e., penta-, octa-, and decaBDE, tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), and HBCD, has doubled in the 1990s. Only limited and rather uncertain data are available regarding the occurrence of BFRs in consumer goods and waste fractions as well as regarding emissions during use and disposal. The knowledge of anthropogenic substance flows and stocks is essential for early recognition of environmental impacts and effective chemicals management. In this paper, actual levels of penta-, octa-, and decaBDE, TBBPA, and HBCD in waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) as a major carrier of BFRs are presented. These BFRs have been determined in products of a modern Swiss recycling plant applying gas chromatography/electron capture detection and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis. A substance flow analysis (SFA) technique has been used to characterize the flows of target substances in the recycling process from the bulk WEEE input into the output products. Average concentrations in small size WEEE, representing the relevant electric and electronic appliances in WEEE, sampled in 2003 amounted to 34 mg/kg for pentaBDE, 530 mg/kg for octaBDE, 510 mg/kg for decaBDE, 1420 mg/kg for TBBPA (as an additive), 17 mg/kg for HBCD, 5500 mg/kg for bromine, and 1700 mg/kg for antimony. In comparison to data that have been calculated by SFA for Switzerland from literature for the 1990s, these measured concentrations in small size WEEE were 7 times higher for pentaBDE, unexpectedly about 50% lower for decaBDE, and agreed fairly well for TBBPA (as an additive) and

  17. Brominated flame retardants in the Arctic environment--trends and new candidates.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Cynthia A; Herzke, Dorte; Vorkamp, Katrin

    2010-07-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) containing two to 10 bromines are ubiquitous in the Arctic, in both abiotic and biotic samples. Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is also ubiquitous in the Arctic, with the gamma-HBCD isomer predominating in air, the alpha-HBCD isomer predominating in biota and similar concentrations of alpha-, beta- and gamma-HBCD found in marine sediments. Other brominated flame retardants (BFRs) found in some Arctic samples are polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs), tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), hexabromobenzene (HxBBz), pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB), pentabromotoluene (PBT), and 1,2-dibromo-4-(1,2-dibromoethyl)cyclohexane (TBECH). Temporal trends of tetra- to heptaBDEs and HBCD show increasing concentrations or a tendency to levelling off depending on the matrix (air, sediment, biota) and location, but no uniform picture for the Arctic emerges. BDE-209 concentrations are increasing in air. PBDEs and HBCD spatial trends in seabirds and marine mammals are similar to those seen previously for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), with highest concentrations found in organisms from East Greenland and Svalbard. These trends indicate western Europe and eastern North America as important source regions of these compounds via long range atmospheric transport and ocean currents. Latitudinal trends showed lower concentrations and fluxes of PBDEs at higher latitudes. The tetra-hexaBDEs and alpha-HBCD biomagnify in Arctic food webs. Results for BDE-209 are more conflicting, showing either only low or no biomagnification potential. PBDE and HBCD concentrations are lower in terrestrial organisms and higher in marine top predators such as some killer whale populations in Alaska and glaucous gulls from the Barents Sea area. Higher concentrations are seen near populated areas indicating local sources. Findings of BTBPE, HxBBz, PBEB, PBT and TBECH in seabirds and/or marine mammals indicate that these compounds reach the

  18. Urinary metabolites of organophosphate flame retardants and their variability in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Kate; Daniels, Julie L; Stapleton, Heather M

    2014-02-01

    Organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) are commonly added to consumer products to reduce their flammability. Based on levels of OPFRs in indoor environments, human exposure is likely chronic and ubiquitous. Animal studies suggest that exposure to some OPFRs may result in adverse health impacts, particularly for Tris (1,3-dichloropropyl) phosphate (TDCPP); however, human data on the impacts of exposure to OPFRs are lacking. To design human studies, more information is needed on the stability of measured OPFRs in human samples over time. In this study, we sought to assess the degree of temporal variability of urinary TDCPP and triphenyl phosphate (TPP) metabolites throughout pregnancy in a cohort of women from central North Carolina. Eight pregnant women provided multiple urine samples: 3 during the 18th week of pregnancy, 1 during the 28th week, and 1 shortly after the child's birth. Bis (1,3-dichloropropyl) phosphate (BDCPP) and diphenyl phosphate (DPP), the respective metabolites of TDCPP and TPP, were measured in urine samples using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. BDCPP and DPP were each detected in 38 of 39 urine samples and were not normally distributed. Geometric mean BDCPP and DPP concentrations were 1.3ng/mL (interquartile range (IQR): 0.8, 2.7ng/mL) and 1.9ng/mL (IQR: 0.9, 3.5ng/mL), respectively. BDCPP and DPP were moderately to strongly reliable over one week (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC)=0.5; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.4, 0.7 and ICC=0.7; 95% CI: 0.5, 0.8, respectively), and over the entire pregnancy (ICC=0.5 95% CI: 0.3, 0.7 and ICC=0.6; 95% CI: 0.4, 0.7, respectively). These data suggest that exposures to TDCPP and TPP are widespread and variable for pregnant women, and that a single measure of BDCPP or DPP, taken in the second trimester, likely captures information on the rank order of exposure throughout pregnancy. PMID:24316320

  19. Legacy and current-use brominated flame retardants in the Barn Owl.

    PubMed

    Eulaers, Igor; Jaspers, Veerle L B; Pinxten, Rianne; Covaci, Adrian; Eens, Marcel

    2014-02-15

    The present study investigated the current-use brominated flame retardants (BFRs) tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), simultaneously with legacy polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), in Barn Owls (Tyto alba) collected from two regions with a contrasting degree of urbanisation and vicinity to point sources (Flanders in Belgium versus Normandy in France). Both tissues (muscle, liver, adipose and preen gland) and feathers (primary, tail and body feathers) showed elevated HBCD concentrations in Flanders, close to Europe's sole HBCD production plant in the Netherlands, and identified Normandy as a historical source region for PBDEs. In sharp contrast, the reactive BFR TBBPA bioaccumulated poorly (2.3%) in tissue samples, but was present in 96% of all body feather samples (0.36-7.07ngg(-1)dw), equally in both regions. PBDE concentrations in tissues (7.46-903 ng g(-1)lw) were considerably lower in the investigated Flemish Barn Owls, collected in 2008/2009, compared to specimens collected in 2003/2004 (46-11,000 ng g(-1)lw), possibly suggesting the effectiveness of the 2004 European ban of Penta- and Octa-BDE mixtures. Feathers showed a similar trend and additionally exhibited HBCD concentrations (0.02-333 ng g(-1)dw) surpassing those of PBDEs (0.50-10.4 ng g(-1)dw). While body feathers were a reliable matrix to predict both internal PBDE (0.21 ≤ R(2)≤ 0.67) and HBCD body burdens (0.20 ≤ R(2) ≤ 0.37), the suitability of primary and tail feathers appeared to be confounded by external contamination and moult. In conclusion, the present study clearly showed that the reactive versus additive use of BFRs results in contrasting exposure scenarios in a species higher up the food chain, and therefore may have profound implications for environmental health. In addition, the presented results extend the promising use of feathers as a non-destructive sampling strategy for current-use BFRs, and show that birds of prey are valid early

  20. Flame Retardant Associations Between Children’s Handwipes and House Dust

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Heather M.; Misenheimer, John; Hoffman, Kate; Webster, Thomas F.

    2014-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants (FRs) have been ubiquitously detected at high concentrations in indoor environments; however, with their recent phase-out, more attention is being focused on measurements of exposure to alternative FRs such as organophosphate FRs (OPFRs). In our previous research, we found that PBDE residues measured on children’s handwipes were a strong predictor of serum PBDE levels. Here we build upon this research to examine longitudinal changes in PBDEs in indoor dust and children’s handwipes, and explore the associations between handwipes and dust for alternative FRs. Children from our previous study were re-contacted after approximately two years and new samples of indoor dust and handwipes were collected. PBDE dust-levels were significantly correlated between two different sampling rounds separated by two years; however, PBDE levels in handwipes were not correlated, perhaps suggesting that the sources of PBDEs remained relatively constant in the home, but that behavioral differences in children are changing with age and influencing handwipe levels. OPFRs [i.e. tris (1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate (TDCPP), tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCIPP)], 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EH-TBB, also known as TBB), di(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (BEH-TEBP, also known as TBPH), and 1,2,5,6,9,10-hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) were also ubiquitously detected in house dust samples and geometric mean levels were similar to PBDE levels, or higher in the case of the OPFRs. Significant associations between handwipes and house dust were observed for these alternative FRs, particularly for EH-TBB (rs= 0.54; p<0.001). Increasing house dust levels and age were associated with higher levels of FRs in handwipes, and high hand washing frequency (>5 times/day) was associated with lower FR levels in handwipes. Overall these data suggest that exposure to these alternative FRs will be

  1. The individual and cumulative effect of brominated flame retardant and polyvinylchloride (PVC) on thermal degradation of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) copolymer.

    PubMed

    Brebu, Mihai; Bhaskar, Thallada; Murai, Kazuya; Muto, Akinori; Sakata, Yusaku; Uddin, Md Azhar

    2004-08-01

    Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) copolymers without and with a polybrominated epoxy type flame retardant were thermally degraded at 450 degrees C alone (10 g) and mixed with polyvinylchloride (PVC) (8 g/2 g). Gaseous and liquid products of degradation were analysed by various gas chromatographic methods (GC with TCD, FID, AED, MSD) in order to determine the individual and cumulative effect of bromine and chlorine on the quality and quantity of degradation compounds. It was found that nitrogen, chlorine, bromine and oxygen are present as organic compounds in liquid products, their quantity depends on the pyrolysed polymer or polymer mixture. Bromophenol and dibromophenols were the main brominated compounds that come from the flame retardant. 1-Chloroethylbenzene was the main chlorine compound observed in liquid products. It was also determined that interactions appear at high temperatures during decomposition between the flame retardant, PVC and the ABS copolymer.

  2. Formation of self-extinguishing flame retardant biobased coating on cotton fabrics via Layer-by-Layer assembly of chitin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Pan, Haifeng; Wang, Wei; Pan, Ying; Song, Lei; Hu, Yuan; Liew, Kim Meow

    2015-01-22

    The self-extinguishing coating, consisting of biobased chitin derivatives, phosphorylated chitin and deacetylated chitin (chitosan), was deposited on cotton fabrics via the Layer-by-Layer (LbL) assembled method. The content of phosphorylated chitin prepared on cotton fabrics surface is dependent on the bilayers' number and concentration of phosphorylated chitin. In the vertical flame test, the cotton fabric with 20 bilayers prepared at the high phosphorylated chitin concentration (2 wt%) could extinguish the flame. Microcombustion calorimetry result showed that all coated cotton fabrics showed lower peak heat-release rate and total heat-release values compared with that of the pure one. Thermogravimetric analysis result indicated that thermal and thermal oxidation stability of all coated cotton fabrics were enhanced in the high temperature range (400-700°C). This work provided the flame retardant multilayer films based on fully biobased chitin derivatives on cotton fabrics to enhance its flame retardancy.

  3. Analysis of Flame Retardancy in Polymer Blends by Synchrotron X-ray K-edge Tomography and Interferometric Phase Contrast Movies.

    PubMed

    Olatinwo, Mutairu B; Ham, Kyungmin; McCarney, Jonathan; Marathe, Shashidhara; Ge, Jinghua; Knapp, Gerry; Butler, Leslie G

    2016-03-10

    Underwriters Laboratories 94 test bars have been imaged with X-ray K-edge tomography between 12 and 32 keV to assess the bromine and antimony concentration gradient across char layers of partially burnt samples. Phase contrast tomography on partially burnt samples showed gas bubbles and dark-field scattering ascribed to residual blend inhomogeneity. In addition, single-shot grating interferometry was used to record X-ray movies of test samples during heating (IR and flame) intended to mimic the UL 94 plastics flammability test. The UL 94 test bars were formulated with varying concentrations of a brominated flame retardant, Saytex 8010, and a synergist, Sb2O3, blended into high-impact polystyrene (HIPS). Depending on the sample composition, samples will pass or fail the UL 94 plastics flammability test. Tomography and interferometry imaging show differences that correlate with UL 94 performance. Key features such as char layer, gas bubble formation, microcracks, and dissolution of the flame retardant in the char layer regions are used in understanding the efficiency of the flame retardant and synergist. The samples that pass the UL 94 test have a thick, highly visible char layer as well as an interior rich in gas bubbles. Growth of gas bubbles from flame-retardant thermal decomposition is noted in the X-ray phase contrast movies. Also noteworthy is an absence of bubbles near the burning surface of the polymer; dark-field images after burning suggest a microcrack structure between interior bubbles and the surface. The accepted mechanism for flame retardant activity includes free radical quenching in the f