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Sample records for achieving patient satisfaction

  1. Patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Bhanu

    2010-09-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important and commonly used indicator for measuring the quality in health care. Patient satisfaction affects clinical outcomes, patient retention, and medical malpractice claims. It affects the timely, efficient, and patient-centered delivery of quality health care. Patient satisfaction is thus a proxy but a very effective indicator to measure the success of doctors and hospitals. This article discusses as to how to ensure patient satisfaction in dermatological practice. PMID:21430827

  2. Patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Bhanu

    2010-09-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important and commonly used indicator for measuring the quality in health care. Patient satisfaction affects clinical outcomes, patient retention, and medical malpractice claims. It affects the timely, efficient, and patient-centered delivery of quality health care. Patient satisfaction is thus a proxy but a very effective indicator to measure the success of doctors and hospitals. This article discusses as to how to ensure patient satisfaction in dermatological practice.

  3. Defining and Measuring Patient Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Graham, Brent

    2016-09-01

    Reporting patient satisfaction has become an increasingly common component of studies evaluating treatment outcomes. However the construct of "patient satisfaction" is one that is complex and context dependent. While there is no question that careful, reliable, and valid measurement of this important aspect of patient care is required, tools for achieving this objective have not been fully developed. Measures of patient satisfaction that reflect the unique role of the hand in everyday life will require the same approach to instrument development as has been used to move forward the field of outcome measurement in general.

  4. Defining and Measuring Patient Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Graham, Brent

    2016-09-01

    Reporting patient satisfaction has become an increasingly common component of studies evaluating treatment outcomes. However the construct of "patient satisfaction" is one that is complex and context dependent. While there is no question that careful, reliable, and valid measurement of this important aspect of patient care is required, tools for achieving this objective have not been fully developed. Measures of patient satisfaction that reflect the unique role of the hand in everyday life will require the same approach to instrument development as has been used to move forward the field of outcome measurement in general. PMID:27570227

  5. Patient satisfaction with antihypertensive therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, K; Chiou, C-F; Plauschinat, C A; Frech, F; Harper, A; Dubois, R

    2005-10-01

    The objective of the study was to assess factors associated with treatment satisfaction among patients receiving antihypertensive therapy. A weighted cross-sectional online survey was conducted with hypertensive patients participating in a chronic disease panel in the US. Patients on monotherapy with medications from the following classes were identified: ACE inhibitors (ACEIs), angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), beta blockers (BBs), calcium channel blockers (CCBs), and diuretics. The control group included patients without treatment. Pairwise comparisons between groups were conducted for factors that may affect patients' satisfaction. The study population had a mean age of 54.7+/-14.2 years and was 56.7% female. Participants with blood pressure (BP) controlled to JNC 7 guidelines were more satisfied with their medication than those with uncontrolled BP (90.3 vs 71.5%, P<0.05). Patients who had not experienced adverse events had higher satisfaction than patients experiencing adverse events (90.9 vs 75.8%, P<0.05). The most frequently self-reported adverse events were frequent urination, sexual dysfunction, and fatigue ranging from 7.0 to 9.6% across classes. The adverse event rates differed by class and were lowest among the ARBs. Patients on ARBs were the most likely to have switched from a previous antihypertensive class as compared to other classes (57.1% ARBs vs 49.8% ACEIs, 38.7% diuretics, 36.3% CCBs, and 31.7% BBs). Physician recommendation was the most common reason for switching. In conclusion, the ability to effectively treat hypertension depends upon a patient's satisfaction with antihypertensive therapy, which may be improved by achieving BP control and minimizing the occurrence of adverse events. PMID:15951740

  6. Patient satisfaction with cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wasfi, Ehab I; Pai, P; Abd-Elsayed, Alaa A

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Measuring the patient satisfaction is a very important issue that will help very much in improving the service provided to patients and improve the level of satisfaction. Aim To evaluate patient satisfaction with the cataract surgery service and identify any areas for improvement, determination of patient satisfaction with referral, out-patient consultation, pre-assessment clinic, surgery and post-operative care, also to report patients' comments relating to improvement in service provision. Methodology A retrospective study was undertaken for 150 patients underwent cataract surgery at Barrow General Hospital, UK, the survey sample was by postal questionnaires. We collected our data from the theatre lists for a period of 4 month. Results This study included 150 patients; the response rate was (72%) 108 patients, Most patients were referred from their general practitioner 86.1%, 93 (86.1%) patients were happy with the time interval from seeing their GP to eye clinic. In the eye out patient department many factors significantly affected the level of patient satisfaction, in general the more information provided for the patient the more the satisfaction. Conclusion Patient satisfaction is on important health outcome old understanding both the domains of satisfaction as well as their relative importance to patients is necessary to improve the overall quality of patient care. Meeting the doctor, presenting all relevant information and giving printed information are very important factors in improving the patient's satisfaction with cataract surgery. PMID:18950523

  7. Why measure patient satisfaction?

    PubMed

    Riskind, Patty; Fossey, Leslie; Brill, Kari

    2011-01-01

    A practice that consistently and continuously measures patient perceptions will be more efficient and effective in its daily operations. With pay-for-performance requirements on the horizon and consumer rating sites already publicizing impressions from physician encounters, a practice needs to know how it is performing through the eyes of the patients. Azalea Orthopedics has used patient feedback to coach its physicians on better patient communication. The Orthopaedic Institute has used patient satisfaction results to reduce wait times and measure the return on investment from its marketing efforts. Patient survey results that are put to work can enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of practice operations as well as position the practice for increased profitability. PMID:21506460

  8. Patient satisfaction: focusing on "excellent".

    PubMed

    Otani, Koichiro; Waterman, Brian; Faulkner, Kelly M; Boslaugh, Sarah; Burroughs, Thomas E; Dunagan, W Claiborne

    2009-01-01

    In an emerging competitive market such as healthcare, managers should focus on achieving excellent ratings to distinguish their organization from others. When it comes to customer loyalty, "excellent" has a different meaning. Customers who are merely satisfied often do not come back. The purpose of this study was to find out what influences adult patients to rate their overall experience as "excellent." The study used patient satisfaction data collected from one major academic hospital and four community hospitals. After conducting a multiple logistic regression analysis, certain attributes were shown to be more likely than others to influence patients to rate their experiences as excellent. The study revealed that staff care is the most influential attribute, followed by nursing care. These two attributes are distinctively stronger drivers of overall satisfaction than are the other attributes studied (i.e., physician care, admission process, room, and food). Staff care and nursing care are under the control of healthcare managers. If improvements are needed, they can be accomplished through training programs such as total quality management or continuous quality improvement, through which staff employees and nurses learn to be sensitive to patients' needs. Satisfying patients' needs is the first step toward having loyal patients, so hospitals that strive to ensure their patients are completely satisfied are more likely to prosper. PMID:19413164

  9. Measuring patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Levin, Roger

    2005-03-01

    Many businesses use customer satisfaction surveys successfully. You may notice that you find one in almost every restaurant or hotel room. I do not think it is a coincidence that the hotel industry provides some of the finest customer service available. When it comes to providing excellent customer service, dental practices can learn from businesses that regularly assess customer satisfaction.

  10. Measuring patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Levin, Roger

    2005-03-01

    Many businesses use customer satisfaction surveys successfully. You may notice that you find one in almost every restaurant or hotel room. I do not think it is a coincidence that the hotel industry provides some of the finest customer service available. When it comes to providing excellent customer service, dental practices can learn from businesses that regularly assess customer satisfaction. PMID:15819351

  11. Patient satisfaction with transgender health services.

    PubMed

    Bockting, W; Robinson, B; Benner, A; Scheltema, K

    2004-01-01

    Measuring patient satisfaction (i.e., patients' subjective evaluation of health care services received) is increasingly important in assessing health care outcomes because of the current emphasis on greater partnership between providers (therapist, doctor, staff) and consumers (patients) in health care. In care of transgender persons, achieving good patient satisfaction is particularly challenging given the primary role mental health professionals play as arbiters of who has access to sex reassignment and when such candidates are ready. Dependence on a mental health professional in this "gate-keeping" role is perceived by some members of the transgender community as unnecessarily pathologizing. This study compared satisfaction ratings of 180 transgender and 837 other sexual health patients with psychotherapeutic, psychiatric, and sexual medicine services provided at a university-based sexual health clinic. Five consecutive surveys conducted during 1993-2002 showed high patient satisfaction. We found few significant differences between transgender and other sexual health patients, except that in 1995, transgender patients had higher satisfaction on their perceived ability to handle the problems that originally had led them to therapy. Survey results helped target areas in need of improvement (e.g., friendliness and courtesy of staff, handling of phone calls), and efforts by the providers to improve services resulted in significant increases in patient satisfaction. These findings put individual complaints in perspective and showed that despite the challenges inherent in providing transgender care good satisfaction can be achieved. We encourage providers to implement quality assurance and improvement procedures to give patients the opportunity to provide feedback and have a voice in shaping their own health care. PMID:15205065

  12. Patient satisfaction with transgender health services.

    PubMed

    Bockting, W; Robinson, B; Benner, A; Scheltema, K

    2004-01-01

    Measuring patient satisfaction (i.e., patients' subjective evaluation of health care services received) is increasingly important in assessing health care outcomes because of the current emphasis on greater partnership between providers (therapist, doctor, staff) and consumers (patients) in health care. In care of transgender persons, achieving good patient satisfaction is particularly challenging given the primary role mental health professionals play as arbiters of who has access to sex reassignment and when such candidates are ready. Dependence on a mental health professional in this "gate-keeping" role is perceived by some members of the transgender community as unnecessarily pathologizing. This study compared satisfaction ratings of 180 transgender and 837 other sexual health patients with psychotherapeutic, psychiatric, and sexual medicine services provided at a university-based sexual health clinic. Five consecutive surveys conducted during 1993-2002 showed high patient satisfaction. We found few significant differences between transgender and other sexual health patients, except that in 1995, transgender patients had higher satisfaction on their perceived ability to handle the problems that originally had led them to therapy. Survey results helped target areas in need of improvement (e.g., friendliness and courtesy of staff, handling of phone calls), and efforts by the providers to improve services resulted in significant increases in patient satisfaction. These findings put individual complaints in perspective and showed that despite the challenges inherent in providing transgender care good satisfaction can be achieved. We encourage providers to implement quality assurance and improvement procedures to give patients the opportunity to provide feedback and have a voice in shaping their own health care.

  13. [Marital satisfaction in neurotic patients].

    PubMed

    Plháková, A; Osecká, L

    1994-06-01

    The authors compared marital satisfaction of men and women in the neurotic and the control group. The examined persons also evaluated satisfaction of their partners and in their parents' marriages. The results of the work suggest, that the neurotic patients were less satisfied in the marriage than the members of the control group. Further, it was found that men were more satisfied than women. Neurotic individuals evaluated their parents' marriages as less satisfactory than persons who had not been treated for neurosis. The results of the research provided evidence that there are some differences in an estimation of the partners' satisfaction between the neurotic and the control group. PMID:8055599

  14. Patient satisfaction surveys and multicollinearity.

    PubMed

    Stratmann, W C; Zastowny, T R; Bayer, L R; Adams, E H; Black, G S; Fry, P A

    1994-01-01

    The measurement of patient satisfaction is now an integral part of hospital market research. Just as consumer satisfaction is a function of the extent to which providers do things right, the value of consumer-oriented market research is directly related to whether the research itself is done right. The use of poorly designed consumer research instruments, no matter how well executed, can cause multicollinearity among the independent variables, which, in turn, can result in misleading conclusions.

  15. Student Satisfaction with Academic Achievement. Institutional Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolar, Steven M.

    In spring 1996, Cumberland County College (CCC), in New Jersey, conducted a survey to determine the level of satisfaction of students with academic advisement services. A 36-item questionnaire developed by American College Testing (ACT) was distributed to 667 degree-seeking students, representing one third of the degree-seeking students enrolled…

  16. Massage Therapy Education Online: Student Satisfaction and Achievement, Part I

    PubMed Central

    McQuillan, David James

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, providers of massage therapy education have, in growing numbers, started to use online technologies to support the learning processes of their students. Using a narrative review of the existing online learning literature, this paper aims to provide a solid pedagogical foundation for these early explorations. It identifies five key factors—instructional pedagogy, quality of instruction, interaction and communication, individual learner qualities, and the online interface—that contribute to student satisfaction and achievement in the online context. The relationships between those factors and the experience of the online learner are discussed with reference to maximization of student satisfaction and achievement. PMID:21589705

  17. Patients Provide Recommendations for Improving Patient Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Moore, Angelo D; Hamilton, Jill B; Krusel, Jessica L; Moore, LeeAntoinette G; Pierre-Louis, Bosny J

    2016-04-01

    National Committee for Quality Assurance recommends patient-centered medical homes incorporate input from patient populations; however, many health care organizations do not. This qualitative study used two open-ended questions from 148 active duty Army Soldiers and their family members to illicit recommendations for primary care providers and clinic leadership that would improve their health care experiences. Content analysis and descriptive statistics were used to analyze responses. Participant responses were related to four major themes: Access to Care, Interpersonal Interaction, Satisfaction of Care, and Quality of Care. Participants were overall satisfied with their care; however, spending less time waiting for appointments and to see the provider or specialist were the most frequently requested improvements related to Access to Care. For Interpersonal Interaction, 82% of the responses recommended that providers be more attentive listeners, courteous, patient, caring, and respectful. Decreasing wait times and improving interpersonal skills would improve health care experiences and patient satisfaction. PMID:27046182

  18. Impacts of Campus Involvement on Hospitality Student Achievement and Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Dean; Lei, Simon A.

    2007-01-01

    Campus involvement affecting satisfaction and academic achievement (overall grade point average) of hospitality undergraduate students at a state university in the Midwest (University X) was investigated through a survey research. A four-part survey instrument was developed to facilitate this study. There were a number of academic, professional,…

  19. Improving Patient Satisfaction with Waiting Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eilers, Gayleen M.

    2004-01-01

    Waiting times are a significant component of patient satisfaction. A patient satisfaction survey performed in the author's health center showed that students rated waiting time lowest of the listed categories--A ratings of 58% overall, 63% for scheduled appointments, and 41% for the walk-in clinic. The center used a quality improvement process and…

  20. Patient satisfaction in Dental Healthcare Centers

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Dena A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to (1) measure the degree of patient satisfaction among the clinical and nonclinical dental services offered at specialty dental centers and (2) investigate the factors associated with the degree of overall satisfaction. Materials and Methods: Four hundred and ninety-seven participants from five dental centers were recruited for this study. Each participant completed a self-administered questionnaire to measure patient satisfaction with clinical and nonclinical dental services. Analysis of variance, t-tests, a general linear model, and stepwise regression analysis was applied. Results: The respondents were generally satisfied, but internal differences were observed. The exhibited highest satisfaction with the dentists’ performance, followed by the dental assistants’ services, and the lowest satisfaction with the center's physical appearance and accessibility. Females, participants with less than a bachelor's degree, and younger individuals were more satisfied with the clinical and nonclinical dental services. The stepwise regression analysis revealed that the coefficient of determination (R2) was 40.4%. The patient satisfaction with the performance of the dentists explained 42.6% of the overall satisfaction, whereas their satisfaction with the clinical setting explained 31.5% of the overall satisfaction. Conclusion: Additional improvements with regard to the accessibility and physical appearance of the dental centers are needed. In addition, interventions regarding accessibility, particularly when booking an appointment, are required. PMID:27403045

  1. Patient Satisfaction after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is one of the most successful and effective surgical options to reduce pain and restore function for patients with severe osteoarthritis. The purpose of this article was to review and summarize the recent literatures regarding patient satisfaction after TKA and to analyze the various factors associated with patient dissatisfaction after TKA. Patient satisfaction is one of the many patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). Patient satisfaction can be evaluated from two categories, determinants of satisfaction and components of satisfaction. The former have been described as all of the patient-related factors including age, gender, personality, patient expectations, medical and psychiatric comorbidity, patient's diagnosis leading to TKA and severity of arthropathy. The latter are all of the processes and technical aspects of TKA, ranging from the anesthetic and surgical factors, type of implants and postoperative rehabilitations. The surgeon- and patient-reported outcomes have been shown to be disparate occasionally. Among various factors that contribute to patient satisfaction, some factors can be managed by the surgeon, which should be improved through continuous research. Furthermore, extensive discussion and explanation before surgery will reduce patient dissatisfaction after TKA. PMID:26955608

  2. Components of Patient Satisfaction After Orthognathic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kufta, Kenneth; Peacock, Zachary S; Chuang, Sung-Kiang; Inverso, Gino; Levin, Lawrence M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare overall patient satisfaction after orthognathic surgery with the following specific categories: appearance, functional ability, general health, sociability, and patient-clinician communication. A 16-question survey was developed and administered to include patients at either 6 or 12 months after orthognathic surgery between June 2013 and June 2014 at the University of Pennsylvania and Massachusetts General Hospital. The predictor variables included age, sex, type of procedure, medical comorbidities, intra- or postoperative complications, and presence of paresthesia. The outcome variable was patient satisfaction overall and in each category based on a Likert scale (0: not satisfied at all to 5: very satisfied).A total of 37 patients completed the survey and had a high overall rate of satisfaction (100% of responses were 4 or 5 on Likert scale). Overall satisfaction had the highest correlation with appearance (ρ=0.52, P=0.0009) followed by sociability (ρ=0.47, P=0.004), patient-clinician communication (ρ=0.38, P=0.02) functionality (ρ=0.19, P=0.26), and general health (ρ = -0.11, P = 0.51). Patients had high satisfaction scores for orthognathic surgery. Satisfaction with postoperative appearance had the strongest correlation with overall satisfaction.

  3. Patient satisfaction with services of the outpatient department

    PubMed Central

    Mohd, Athar; Chakravarty, Abhijit

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients' satisfaction is a useful measure to provide an indicator of quality in healthcare and thus needs to be measured frequently. The aim of the study was to analyse and compare the level of satisfaction of patients attending the Outpatient Department of a Hospital. Methods Study was conducted by using a pre-structured questionnaire with 120 samples. Samples were further stratified into sub-populations of Officers, Junior Commissioned Officers (JCOs) and Other Ranks (ORs) including dependents as study population. Results JCOs predominantly expressed lower satisfaction judgement with several attributes. Overall satisfaction judgement with Outpatient Department services were rated lower by JCOs (2.56) when compared with Officers and ORs (3.10), the difference being statistically significant. Conclusion Statistically significant differences have been identified by this study against various study attributes as well as overall impression towards OPD services among the study groups, which need to be addressed by the hospital leadership to achieve consumer delight. PMID:25378776

  4. Patient satisfaction and normative decision theory.

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, P F

    1995-01-01

    This article explores the application of normative decision theory (NDT) to the challenge of facilitating and measuring patient satisfaction. Patient satisfaction is the appraisal, by an individual, of the extent to which the care provided has met that individual's expectations and preferences. Classic decision analysis provides a graphic and computational strategy to link patient preferences for outcomes to the treatment choices likely to produce the outcomes. Multiple criteria models enable the complex judgment task of measuring patient satisfaction to be decomposed into elemental factors that reflect patient preferences, thus facilitating evaluation of care in terms of factors relevant to the individual patient. Through the application of NDT models, it is possible to use patient preferences as a guide to the treatment planning and care monitoring process and to construct measures of patient satisfaction that are meaningful to the individual. Nursing informatics, with its foundations in both information management and decision sciences, provides the tools and data necessary to promote care provided in accord with patient preferences and to ensure appraisal of satisfaction that aptly captures the complex, multidimensional nature of patient preferences. PMID:7583649

  5. A patient satisfaction theory and its robustness across gender in emergency departments: a multigroup structural equation modeling investigation.

    PubMed

    Aragon, Stephen J; Gesell, Sabina B

    2003-01-01

    This investigation tested the patient-centered Primary Provider Theory of Patient Satisfaction across gender in national random samples of emergency patients. Using multigroup structural equation modeling, the results supported the model's robustness. Physician service, waiting time, and nursing satisfaction explained 48%, 41%, and 11% of overall satisfaction plus 92% and 93% of female and male satisfaction, respectively. Unit increases in physician service satisfaction increased waiting time, nursing, and overall satisfaction by 0.991, 0.844, and 1.031 units, respectively. Unit increases in waiting time satisfaction increased nursing and overall satisfaction by 0.417 and 0.685 units, respectively. A unit increase in nursing satisfaction increased overall service satisfaction by 0.221 units. The investigation offers an alternative paradigm for measuring and achieving emergency department satisfaction, hierarchically related to patient expectations, where the primary provider has the greatest clinical utility to patients, followed by waiting for the primary provider, and then by nursing service.

  6. Patient Race and Provider Predict Patient Satisfaction Following Post-Mastectomy Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shaterian, Ashkaun; Gandy, Jessica; Lalezari, Shadi; Smith, Sarah; Paydar, Keyianoosh

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Post-mastectomy breast reconstruction is commonly performed in the United States with numerous options available to patients and providers. This study evaluated patient race and provider in prediction of patient satisfaction following post-mastectomy breast reconstruction. METHODS The patient satisfaction for women who underwent post mastectomy breast reconstruction at University of California, Irvine Medical Center was evaluated between 2012 and 2014, randomly using Press Ganey Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) surveys. Patient demographics and surgery related variables including type of reconstruction received were determined. RESULTS Between 2012 and 2014, ninety breast reconstruction patients completed a HCAHPS satisfaction survey. Average satisfaction score was 9.67/10. Multivariate linear regression analyses revealed that 34% of the variability in satisfaction scores was accounted for by the variables included in our statistical model. Analyses revealed race/ethnicity and provider to be independent predictors of satisfaction (p<0.05). Satisfaction scores ranged from 6-10 and varied by 11.7% across different providers and 8.9% across different races. The following variables were included, but did not influence patient satisfaction: type, timing, or laterality of reconstruction, presence of post-operative complication, body mass index (BMI), age, presence of comorbidity, and insurance type. CONCLUSION Achieving patient satisfaction is an important outcome of breast reconstruction. This study is one of the first to identify provider and race/ethnicity as predictors of patient satisfaction following breast reconstruction. The information provided here can help inform providers and improve satisfaction for patients undergoing breast reconstruction. PMID:27579266

  7. Patient satisfaction with Mentor inflatable penile prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Whalen, R K; Merrill, D C

    1991-06-01

    Patient satisfaction with the Mentor inflatable penile prosthesis was assessed by sending a thirty-six-item questionnaire to 251 patients who had undergone implantation of the device by the senior author (D.C.M.). A total of 152 (61%) of the patients responded. Recovery time, satisfaction, reasons for dissatisfaction, perceptions of erection quality, and psychosexual parameters were evaluated. Eight-eight percent of the patients were engaging in regular sexual activity. Depending on the definition of satisfaction, 81-89 percent of the respondents reported that they were satisfied with the prosthesis. Sixty-eight percent of the survey group were satisfied with the length, width, and firmness of their prosthetic-induced erection. The majority of patients reported improvement in psychosexual functioning after implantation. Reasons for dissatisfaction included inadequate penile length, insufficient firmness, and difficulty with inflation and deflation of the penile cylinders. PMID:2038786

  8. Is the job satisfaction of primary care team members associated with patient satisfaction?

    PubMed

    Szecsenyi, Joachim; Goetz, Katja; Campbell, Stephen; Broge, Bjoern; Reuschenbach, Bernd; Wensing, Michel

    2011-06-01

    BACKGROUND Previous research has shown a correlation between physician job satisfaction and patient satisfaction with quality of care, but the connection between job satisfaction of other primary care team members and patient satisfaction is yet unclear. OBJECTIVE To evaluate whether there is an association between patient satisfaction and job satisfaction of the members of patient care teams. DESIGN The study was based on data from the European Practice Assessment and used an observational design. SETTING 676 primary care practices in Germany. PARTICIPANTS 47 168 patients, 676 general practitioners (practice principals), 305 physician colleagues (trainees and permanently employed physicians) and 3011 non-physician practice members (nurses, secretaries). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Patient evaluation was measured using the 23-item EUROPEP questionnaire. Job satisfaction was measured using the 10-item Warr-Cook-Wall job satisfaction scale and further items relating to practice structure. Bivariate correlations were applied in which factors of patient satisfaction and practice structure were compared with physicians and non-physicians satisfaction. RESULTS Patient satisfaction correlates positively with the general job satisfaction of the non-physician (r=0.25, p<0.01) and no significant correlation was found for the general job satisfaction of practice principals and physician colleagues. Patients' satisfaction with the practice organisation correlates positively with the general job satisfaction of the non-physicians (r=0.30, p<0.01) and their view of practice structure (r=0.29, p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS The correlation between non-physician team member satisfaction and patient satisfaction was higher than the correlation between satisfaction of physicians and patients. Patients seem to be sensitive to aspects of practice structure.

  9. Is the job satisfaction of primary care team members associated with patient satisfaction?

    PubMed Central

    Goetz, Katja; Campbell, Stephen; Broge, Bjoern; Reuschenbach, Bernd; Wensing, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous research has shown a correlation between physician job satisfaction and patient satisfaction with quality of care, but the connection between job satisfaction of other primary care team members and patient satisfaction is yet unclear. Objective To evaluate whether there is an association between patient satisfaction and job satisfaction of the members of patient care teams. Design The study was based on data from the European Practice Assessment and used an observational design. Setting 676 primary care practices in Germany. Participants 47 168 patients, 676 general practitioners (practice principals), 305 physician colleagues (trainees and permanently employed physicians) and 3011 non-physician practice members (nurses, secretaries). Main outcome measures Patient evaluation was measured using the 23-item EUROPEP questionnaire. Job satisfaction was measured using the 10-item Warr–Cook–Wall job satisfaction scale and further items relating to practice structure. Bivariate correlations were applied in which factors of patient satisfaction and practice structure were compared with physicians and non-physicians satisfaction. Results Patient satisfaction correlates positively with the general job satisfaction of the non-physician (r=0.25, p<0.01) and no significant correlation was found for the general job satisfaction of practice principals and physician colleagues. Patients' satisfaction with the practice organisation correlates positively with the general job satisfaction of the non-physicians (r=0.30, p<0.01) and their view of practice structure (r=0.29, p<0.01). Conclusions The correlation between non-physician team member satisfaction and patient satisfaction was higher than the correlation between satisfaction of physicians and patients. Patients seem to be sensitive to aspects of practice structure. PMID:21262790

  10. Treatment satisfaction of patients with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Schaarschmidt, Marthe-Lisa; Kromer, Christian; Herr, Raphael; Schmieder, Astrid; Goerdt, Sergij; Peitsch, Wiebke K

    2015-05-01

    Treatment satisfaction of patients with psoriasis largely depends on the treatment modality, but evidence on preferences for specific medications is scarce. Here we assessed treatment satisfaction of 200 participants with moderate-to-severe psoriasis from a German University hospital with a 5-point scale and the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication (TSQM) and determined sociodemographic and disease-related influence factors. Participants obtaining biologicals and traditional systemic medications were significantly more satisfied than those receiving phototherapy or topical agents (TSQM = 323.3, 288.0, 260.6 or 266.8; p < 0.001). The highest TSQM score was calculated for ustekinumab (350.1), followed by acitretin (338.1), adalimumab (323.0), fumaric acid esters (304.7), infliximab (300.2), etanercept (298.8), and methotrexate (272.3; p < 0.001). High disease-related quality of life impairment (β = -0.437, p < 0.001) and psoriatic arthritis (β = -0.185, p = 0.005) were associated with decreased satisfaction. Optimising satisfaction is essential to improve adherence and outcome. We show high preferences for biologicals, particularly ustekinumab, but also good satisfaction with certain traditional medications.

  11. Patient satisfaction with anaesthesia care: what is patient satisfaction, how should it be measured, and what is the evidence for assuring high patient satisfaction?

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Thomas; Saal, Detlef; Nuebling, Matthias

    2006-06-01

    Patient satisfaction is a part of outcome quality. Many theories of satisfaction include patients' expectation. One definition of satisfaction is therefore the degree of congruence between expectation and accomplishment. The involvement of patients as well as experts is therefore an important step in the development of an instrument to measure patient satisfaction. Results of single-item ratings or overall satisfaction surveys are over-optimistic and do not represent the true indication of care. The construction of highly standardized (psychometric) questionnaires should include elements of content validity, criterion and construct validity, reliability and practicability. Based on the few available studies in anaesthesia, patient satisfaction is primarily determined by information and communication. There is great potential for improvement in this area. However, we do not know the best way to continuously improve patient satisfaction with anaesthesia care, or to what extent decisions should be shared between the anaesthetist and the patient.

  12. Listening to the customer: implementing a patient satisfaction measurement system.

    PubMed

    Cohen, L; Delaney, P; Boston, P

    1994-01-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important issue in positioning ambulatory medical services. An effective patient satisfaction measurement program not only helps hospital managers improve the quality of clinical and administrative activities, but also helps the hospital remain viable in increasingly competitive markets. A method for the design and measurement of patient satisfaction with outpatient Endoscopy Lab services is described in this article. The survey focuses on the sequence of events experienced by the patient. Outcome measures of primary interest include global patient satisfaction and the likelihood of using the service again if given a choice. Analysis of patient responses shows that global satisfaction with the outpatient experience is positively associated with service return intention. Additional analysis shows that facility cleanliness, privacy and nurse attention are most strongly associated with global patient satisfaction. Results underscore the importance of various service attributes on patient satisfaction and return intention and of the need to further expand the uses of patient satisfaction measurement in the outpatient Endoscopy Lab.

  13. The Influence of Achievement before, during and after Medical School on Physician Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmit Jongbloed, Lodewijk J.; Schönrock-Adema, Johanna; Borleffs, Jan C. C.; Stewart, Roy E.; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2014-01-01

    In this longitudinal study, we investigated the relationship between physicians' prior achievements (before, during and after medical school) and job satisfaction, and tested the two lines of reasoning that prior achievements influence job satisfaction positively or negatively, respectively. The participants were graduates who started their…

  14. Planning crowd events to achieve high participant satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Kendrick, Victoria L; Haslam, Roger A; Waterson, Patrick E

    2012-01-01

    A case study investigation within a large UK university involving semi-structured stakeholder interviews, examined the organisation, coordination, and security within crowd events of various descriptions. Similarities in approaches and priorities emerged with crowd event organisation, primarily attention to safety requirements, in protecting crowd members, venue reputation, and legal obligations. Conversely, attention to and attitudes and beliefs surrounding user experience, crowd comfort and satisfaction, were often based on personal judgment, and appeared to be influenced by budget considerations. The findings suggest a lack of knowledge and usable evidence based guidance for planning crowd events in relation to important aspects affecting participant satisfaction. PMID:22317208

  15. Planning crowd events to achieve high participant satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Kendrick, Victoria L; Haslam, Roger A; Waterson, Patrick E

    2012-01-01

    A case study investigation within a large UK university involving semi-structured stakeholder interviews, examined the organisation, coordination, and security within crowd events of various descriptions. Similarities in approaches and priorities emerged with crowd event organisation, primarily attention to safety requirements, in protecting crowd members, venue reputation, and legal obligations. Conversely, attention to and attitudes and beliefs surrounding user experience, crowd comfort and satisfaction, were often based on personal judgment, and appeared to be influenced by budget considerations. The findings suggest a lack of knowledge and usable evidence based guidance for planning crowd events in relation to important aspects affecting participant satisfaction.

  16. Student Satisfaction with EFL Speaking Classes: Relating Speaking Self-Efficacy and Skills Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asakereh, Ahmad; Dehghannezhad, Maliheh

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between student satisfaction with speaking classes, speaking skills self-efficacy beliefs, and speaking skills achievement. To this end, one hundred Iranian EFL undergraduate students filled out two questionnaires; a research-made and pilot-tested questionnaire for student satisfaction with speaking…

  17. Satisfaction with Care of Patients on Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Paine, Susan S.; Grobert, Megan E.; Stidley, Christine A.; Gabbay, Ezra; Harford, Antonia M.; Zager, Philip G.; Miskulin, Dana C.; Meyer, Klemens B.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Little is known about patients receiving dialysis who respond to satisfaction and experience of care surveys and those who do not respond, nor is much known about the corollaries of satisfaction. This study examined factors predicting response to Dialysis Clinic, Inc. (DCI)’s patient satisfaction survey and factors associated with higher satisfaction among responders. Design, setting, participants, & measurement A total of 10,628 patients receiving in-center hemodialysis care at 201 DCI facilities between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2011, aged ≥18 years, treated during the survey administration window, and at the facility for ≥3 months before survey administration. Primary outcome was response to at least one of the nine survey questions; secondary outcome was overall satisfaction with care. Results Response rate was 77.3%. In adjusted logistic regression (odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals), race other than black (white race, 1.23 [1.10 to 1.37]), missed treatments (1.16 [1.02 to 1.32]) or shortened treatments (≥5 treatments, 1.40 [1.22 to 1.60]), more hospital days (>3 days in the last 3 months, 1.89 [1.66 to 2.15]), and lower serum albumin (albumin level <3.5 g/dl, 1.4 [1.28 to 1.73]) all independently predicted nonresponse. In adjusted linear regression, the following were more satisfied with care: older patients (age ≥63 years, 1.84 [1.78 to 1.90]; age <63 years, 1.91 [1.86 to 1.97]; P<0.001), white patients (1.76 [1.71 to 1.81]) versus black patients (1.93 [1.88 to 1.99]) or those of other race (1.93 [1.83 to 2.03]) (P<0.001), patients with shorter duration of dialysis (≤2.5 years, 1.79 [1.73 to 1.84]; >2.5 years, 1.96 [1.91 to 2.02]; P<0.001), patients who had missed one or fewer treatments (1.83 [1.78 to 1.88]) versus those who had missed more than one treatment (1.92 [1.85 to 1.98]; P=0.002) and those who had shortened treatment (for one treatment or less, 1.84 [1.77 to 1.90]; for two to four treatments, 1

  18. Discordance between patient and surgeon satisfaction after total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Harris, Ian A; Harris, Anita M; Naylor, Justine M; Adie, Sam; Mittal, Rajat; Dao, Alan T

    2013-05-01

    We surveyed 331 patients undergoing total hip or knee arthroplasty pre-operatively, and patients and surgeons were both surveyed 6 and 12 months post-operatively. We identified variables (demographic factors, operative factors and patient expectations) as possible predictors for discordance in patient-surgeon satisfaction. At 12 months, 94.5% of surgeons and 90.3% of patients recorded satisfaction with the outcome. The discordance between patient and surgeon satisfaction was mainly due to patient dissatisfaction-surgeon satisfaction. In an adjusted analysis, the strongest predictors of discordance in patient-surgeon satisfaction were unmet patient expectations and the presence of complications. Advice to potential joint arthroplasty candidates regarding the decision to proceed with surgery should be informed by patient reported outcomes, rather than the surgeon's opinion of the likelihood of success.

  19. Travelling for radiation cancer treatment: patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Margaret I; Gray, Ross E; Mcgowan, Tom; Brunskill, Ian; Steggles, Shawn; Sellick, Scott; Bezjak, Andrea; McLeese, Donna

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted for the purpose of describing cancer patients' satisfaction with their care when they had to travel unexpectedly away from home for treatment. Ontario initiated a rereferral program for cancer patients who needed radiation therapy when the waiting lists in southern Ontario became lengthy. Patients travelled to the United States or northern Ontario for their care. A standardized survey containing 25 items with five-point Likert scale responses was mailed to all patients who participated in the rereferral program, following completion of their treatment. Items covered patient experiences before leaving home, in preparing for travel, and staying at the cancer facilities away from home. A total of 466 (55.8%) patients returned the survey. Overall, patients were satisfied with their care. However, there were a number of areas identified by patients where improvements could be made. These areas included access to support prior to leaving home, access to information about supportive care services while away from home, and sensitivity to personal needs in making arrangements for travel. Provision of information and support are important to cancer patients having to travel for cancer treatment. PMID:15969333

  20. A comparison of governance types and patient satisfaction outcomes.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, L R

    2001-04-01

    Given our dynamic healthcare marketplace, it is imperative to examine the context in which nurses function. A unit level study was conducted to investigate the influence of governance type on organizational culture, nurse work satisfaction, nurse retention, and patient satisfaction. The results of the study will be of value to nurse executives wanting to redesign the context for nursing service to improve outcomes, including nurse and patient satisfaction.

  1. Determinants of Patient Satisfaction During Receipt of Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Famiglietti, Robin M. Neal, Emily C.; Edwards, Timothy J.; Allen, Pamela K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the correlations and relative contributions of components of a radiation oncology-specific patient satisfaction survey to their overall satisfaction scores. Methods and Materials: From September 2006 through August 2012, we prospectively collected data from 8069 patients receiving radiation treatments with a 26-question survey. Each question was rated on a 10-point Likert scale. We analyzed the correlation between scores for each question and the overall satisfaction question. We also dichotomized the scores to reflect satisfaction versus dissatisfaction and used logistic regression to assess the relationship between items in 4 domains (the patient–provider relationship, access and environmental issues, wait times, and educational information) and overall satisfaction. Results: Scores on all questions correlated with overall patient satisfaction scores (P<.0001). Satisfaction with patient–provider relationships had the greatest influence on overall satisfaction (R{sup 2}=0.4219), followed by wait times (R{sup 2}=0.4000), access/environment (R{sup 2}=0.3837), and patient education (R{sup 2}=0.3700). The specific variables with the greatest effect on patient satisfaction were the care provided by radiation therapists (odds ratio 1.91) and pain management (odds ratio 1.29). Conclusions: We found that patients' judgment of provider relationships in an outpatient radiation oncology setting were the greatest contributors to their overall satisfaction ratings. Other measures typically associated with patient satisfaction (phone access, scheduling, and ease of the check-in process) correlated less strongly with overall satisfaction. These findings may be useful for other practices preparing to assess patient ratings of quality of care.

  2. Patient Satisfaction with the Family Physician Program in Sabzevar, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Alireza; Raeissi, Pouran; Saffari, Ehsan; Reissi, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Patient satisfaction with the family physician program is an important factor for more favorable treatment results. Evaluation of patient satisfaction improves the services and approximates them to patient’s preferences. The family physician program has been executed since late March, 2005 in Iran. This study aimed to measure patient satisfaction with family physician services and determines factors affecting the level of satisfaction in order to propose appropriate suggestions for providing medical services based on patients’ expectations. Methods: Forty-one centers provide healthcare services in rural and urban areas. The participants in this study comprised 1263 people. The data were collected by an inventory with 11 items about demographic specifications, waiting time and the importance of physician’s sex and 40 items for assessing the level of patient satisfaction. Results: A total of 1199 patients participated in the current study, 72.1% of them were female and 19.6% waited 10-20 minutes for receiving services. About 55.72% of the participants chose high and very high for the items of the inventory. Total satisfaction with the family physician program decreased with age (p-value= 0.029).Moreover, total satisfaction did not show any significant differences in different groups in terms of sex, place of residence, education level and marital status. Also family physicians’ sex did not affect patient satisfaction significantly. Based on results of regression model, an increase in patients’ age by one year decreased their satisfaction by 0.12 and level of satisfaction in rural patients was lower than that in urban patients by 7.93. Conclusions: The level of patient satisfaction with family physician services was moderate, which mostly arose from the components of the family physician program and services such as the waiting time, costs, welfare facilities, accessibility and the service-providing team rather than patients

  3. Hospital Pre-Admission Orientation and Patient Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Ramona L.

    1987-01-01

    The study examined effects of a physician-delivered orientation on patient satisfaction for a short hospital stay (3 days or less). Using a comparative study design, the researcher found that, when patients had an orientation, satisfaction with services improved, as did perception of the physician's professionalism. (Author/CH)

  4. Patient satisfaction with urodynamics: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Shaw, C; Williams, K; Assassa, P R; Jackson, C

    2000-12-01

    This qualitative study was undertaken to assess patients' views of the urodynamic investigation. The aim was to identify the dimensions important to patients in evaluating satisfaction with this type of procedure and ways in which care could be improved. Unstructured interviews were carried out by four trained interviewers with 21 people (17 female and 4 male) who had undergone the urodynamic investigation at various gynaecology, urology and continence outpatient clinics. The interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. The data was then coded and a thematic analysis carried out. The main theme to emerge was focused on patients' feelings about the procedure. This consisted of a combination of anxiety and embarrassment. Anxiety was because of fear of the unknown and embarrassment at the intimate nature of the procedure and lack of privacy. The interpersonal and communication skills of the health care professional were central in alleviating these negative feelings. The establishment of a friendly relationship based on equality and mutual respect and trust was important in preventing anxiety and embarrassment. A number of practical issues were identified that would contribute to improving the service for patients. It was found that nurses possessed all the attributes required to provide an effective service and recommendations were made that nurses specializing in continence care should take a more active role in urodynamic investigations.

  5. Patient satisfaction measurement in the disease management industry.

    PubMed

    Sen, Shaikat; Fawson, Paul; Cherrington, Graham; Douglas, Kathleen; Friedman, Neal; Maljanian, Rose; Fitzner, Karen; Tang, Pei; Soper, Steven; Wood, Steven

    2005-10-01

    In mid-2004, the Disease Management Association of America (DMAA) Patient Satisfaction Workgroup in association with J.D. Power and Associates (JDPA) conducted a literature review and a member survey to gain an understanding of the nature of patient satisfaction measurement as it pertains to disease management (DM) programs within the DM industry. A review of the relevant literature indicates that perhaps, with the exception of diabetes disease management, there are no prevalent, systematic, or statistically validated approaches for measuring patient satisfaction within the disease management industry. Most existing studies tend to focus on the effectiveness of a disease management program on clinical outcomes, with patient satisfaction measured only as a part of a battery of "outcome" measures. However, many of these studies do find positive associations between patient satisfaction and clinical outcomes. A majority of the 49 respondents who completed the member feedback survey hold relatively high positions in their organizations. The vast majority of respondents indicate their organizations conduct patient satisfaction surveys that assess overall satisfaction, satisfaction with materials and information provided, and with staff members. Patient satisfaction surveys are most common among the five common chronic diseases: diabetes, asthma, congestive heart failure (CHF), coronary artery disease (CAD), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). More than three in four respondents agree that patient satisfaction measurement is important to the long-term success of their programs. Respondents also indicate that along with intelligence on patients' overall satisfaction with the program, they would also like to gain an understanding of whether or not their programs actually help manage the patient's medical condition. Eight survey instruments currently in use and submitted by study participants were also reviewed. Most of these instruments are relatively short

  6. A controlled study of satisfaction among psychobiology research patients.

    PubMed

    Kalman, T P; Talon, N S; Frances, A; Kocsis, J H

    1982-03-01

    Because of the controversy regarding research involving human subjects, the authors designed an 18-item questionnaire to measure research patients' satisfaction with hospital treatment. They compared the questionnaire scores of 25 hospitalized depressed patients treated on a psychobiology study unit with those of 18 comparable patients treated on standard inpatient psychiatric units. Satisfaction was equally high in both groups. Satisfaction and improvement in depression scores were significantly correlated in study unit patients but not among patients on standard units. The authors believe that these data provide valuable information for institutional review boards, potential research subjects and referral sources, researchers, and the public at large.

  7. 78 FR 53195 - Proposed Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment Request... patient satisfaction with VA's dental services. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on the... refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-0764 (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey)'' in any...

  8. Older patient satisfaction with communication during an initial medical encounter.

    PubMed

    Greene, M G; Adelman, R D; Friedmann, E; Charon, R

    1994-05-01

    There has been extensive research on the factors associated with patient satisfaction with communication during medical encounters, however, little attention has been paid to satisfaction among subgroups of patients, including the elderly. It is inappropriate to assume that all patients have the same physician-patient relationship needs, and thus, they will all be satisfied with the same communication approaches during medical visits. In this study, we examine the interactional correlates of older patient satisfaction with an initial visit with a general internist. A multidisciplinary team composed of social scientists and physicians used the Multi-dimensional Interaction Analysis system to code audiotapes. Patients and physicians completed post-visit satisfaction questionnaires. Older patient satisfaction was positively correlated with the following variables: physician questioning and supportiveness on patient-raised topics; patient information-giving on patient-raised topics; the length of the visit; the physician's use of questions worded in the negative; shared laughter between the physician and the patient; and physician satisfaction. These findings suggest that older patients prefer encounters in which: (1) there is physician supportiveness and shared laughter; (2) they are questioned about and given an opportunity to provide information on their own agenda items; and (3) physicians provide some structure for the first meeting through their use of questions worded in the negative. The authors caution that although this sample of older patients appears to be satisfied with a communication style usually considered characteristic of the traditional model of the physician-patient relationship (i.e. a warm interpersonal style and physician-generated structure for the visit), older patients in other settings and future cohorts of elderly patients may prefer other communication approaches. It is also suggested that aspects of communication which provide

  9. The Relationship of Principal Leadership Behaviors with School Climate, Teacher Job Satisfaction, and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Maurice Demond

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine how leadership behaviors of principals relate to school climate, teachers' job satisfaction, and student achievement. The relationship of leadership to student achievement was measured by the school levels based on the administration of the 2006-2007 Mississippi Curriculum Test (MCT). Leadership and…

  10. Applying the Achievement Orientation Model to the Job Satisfaction of Teachers of the Gifted

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegle, Del; McCoach, D. Betsy; Shea, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Factors associated with motivation and satisfaction aid in understanding the processes that enhance achievement and productivity. Siegle and McCoach (2005) proposed a motivational model for understanding student achievement and underachievement that included self-perceptions in three areas (meaningfulness [goal valuation], self-efficacy, and…

  11. Exploring the Impacts of Accelerated Delivery on Student Learning, Achievement and Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Stephen; Martin, Susan; Walker, Ian

    2010-01-01

    This case study examines the impacts on student learning, achievement and satisfaction when year 13 (final year) students at a large UK sixth-form college take a GCE A level in one year instead of the usual two years. Data relating to the entry qualifications and final A level grades achieved by 879 students on both accelerated and non-accelerated…

  12. [Satisfaction of hospitalized patients in a hospital in Apurimac, Peru].

    PubMed

    Sihuin-Tapia, Elsa Yudy; Gómez-Quispe, Oscar Elisban; Ibáñez-Quispe, Vladimiro

    2015-01-01

    In order to determine the satisfaction of hospitalized patients in the Sub-regional Hospital of Andahuaylas, 175 patients were surveyed using the Servqual multidimensional model. The estimate of variables associated with the satisfaction of the hospitalized patients was performed by using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. We found 25.0% satisfaction. Lower levels of satisfaction were associated with having a secondary level education (aOR: 0.05; 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.64) and with having been hospitalized in the surgery department (aOR 0.14, CI: 95%: 0.04 to 0.53). It was concluded that there was a low level of satisfaction with the quality of care received by hospitalized patients and this was associated with the level of education and type of hospital department. PMID:26338391

  13. [Satisfaction of hospitalized patients in a hospital in Apurimac, Peru].

    PubMed

    Sihuin-Tapia, Elsa Yudy; Gómez-Quispe, Oscar Elisban; Ibáñez-Quispe, Vladimiro

    2015-01-01

    In order to determine the satisfaction of hospitalized patients in the Sub-regional Hospital of Andahuaylas, 175 patients were surveyed using the Servqual multidimensional model. The estimate of variables associated with the satisfaction of the hospitalized patients was performed by using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. We found 25.0% satisfaction. Lower levels of satisfaction were associated with having a secondary level education (aOR: 0.05; 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.64) and with having been hospitalized in the surgery department (aOR 0.14, CI: 95%: 0.04 to 0.53). It was concluded that there was a low level of satisfaction with the quality of care received by hospitalized patients and this was associated with the level of education and type of hospital department.

  14. Patient satisfaction and ethnic identity among American Indian older adults.

    PubMed

    Garroutte, Eva Marie; Kunovich, Robert M; Jacobsen, Clemma; Goldberg, Jack

    2004-12-01

    Work in the field of culturally competent medical care draws on studies showing that minority Americans often report lower satisfaction with care than White Americans and recommends that providers should adapt care to patients' cultural needs. However, empirical evidence in support of cultural competence models is limited by reliance upon measurements of racial rather than ethnic identity and also by a near-total neglect of American Indians. This project explored the relationship between ethnic identity and satisfaction using survey data collected from 115 chronically ill American Indian patients >or=50 years at a Cherokee Nation clinic. Satisfaction scores were high overall and comparable to those found in the general population. Nevertheless, analysis using hierarchical linear modeling showed that patients' self-rated American Indian ethnic identity was significantly associated with satisfaction. Specifically, patients who rated themselves high on the measure of American Indian ethnic identity reported reduced scores on satisfaction with health care providers' social skill and attentiveness, as compared to those who rated themselves lower. Significant associations remained after controlling for patients' sex, age, education, marital status, self-reported health, wait time, and number of previous visits. There were no significant associations between patients' American Indian ethnic identity and satisfaction with provider's technical skill and shared decision-making. Likewise, there were no significant associations between satisfaction and a separate measure of White American ethnic identity, although a suggestive trend was observed for satisfaction with provider's social skill. Our findings demonstrate the importance of including measures of ethnic identity in studies of medical satisfaction in racial minority populations. They support the importance of adapting care to patient's cultural needs, and they highlight the particular significance of interpersonal

  15. Patient satisfaction and ethnic identity among American Indian older adults.

    PubMed

    Garroutte, Eva Marie; Kunovich, Robert M; Jacobsen, Clemma; Goldberg, Jack

    2004-12-01

    Work in the field of culturally competent medical care draws on studies showing that minority Americans often report lower satisfaction with care than White Americans and recommends that providers should adapt care to patients' cultural needs. However, empirical evidence in support of cultural competence models is limited by reliance upon measurements of racial rather than ethnic identity and also by a near-total neglect of American Indians. This project explored the relationship between ethnic identity and satisfaction using survey data collected from 115 chronically ill American Indian patients >or=50 years at a Cherokee Nation clinic. Satisfaction scores were high overall and comparable to those found in the general population. Nevertheless, analysis using hierarchical linear modeling showed that patients' self-rated American Indian ethnic identity was significantly associated with satisfaction. Specifically, patients who rated themselves high on the measure of American Indian ethnic identity reported reduced scores on satisfaction with health care providers' social skill and attentiveness, as compared to those who rated themselves lower. Significant associations remained after controlling for patients' sex, age, education, marital status, self-reported health, wait time, and number of previous visits. There were no significant associations between patients' American Indian ethnic identity and satisfaction with provider's technical skill and shared decision-making. Likewise, there were no significant associations between satisfaction and a separate measure of White American ethnic identity, although a suggestive trend was observed for satisfaction with provider's social skill. Our findings demonstrate the importance of including measures of ethnic identity in studies of medical satisfaction in racial minority populations. They support the importance of adapting care to patient's cultural needs, and they highlight the particular significance of interpersonal

  16. Impact of patient satisfaction ratings on physicians and clinical care

    PubMed Central

    Zgierska, Aleksandra; Rabago, David; Miller, Michael M

    2014-01-01

    Background Although patient satisfaction ratings often drive positive changes, they may have unintended consequences. Objective The study reported here aimed to evaluate the clinician-perceived effects of patient satisfaction ratings on job satisfaction and clinical care. Methods A 26-item survey, developed by a state medical society in 2012 to assess the effects of patient satisfaction surveys, was administered online to physician members of a state-level medical society. Respondents remained anonymous. Results One hundred fifty five physicians provided responses (3.9% of the estimated 4,000 physician members of the state-level medical society, or approximately 16% of the state’s emergency department [ED] physicians). The respondents were predominantly male (85%) and practicing in solo or private practice (45%), hospital (43%), or academia (15%). The majority were ED (57%), followed by primary care (16%) physicians. Fifty-nine percent reported that their compensation was linked to patient satisfaction ratings. Seventy-eight percent reported that patient satisfaction surveys moderately or severely affected their job satisfaction; 28% had considered quitting their job or leaving the medical profession. Twenty percent reported their employment being threatened because of patient satisfaction data. Almost half believed that pressure to obtain better scores promoted inappropriate care, including unnecessary antibiotic and opioid prescriptions, tests, procedures, and hospital admissions. Among 52 qualitative responses, only three were positive. Conclusion These pilot-level data suggest that patient satisfaction survey utilization may promote, under certain circumstances, job dissatisfaction, attrition, and inappropriate clinical care among some physicians. This is concerning, especially in the context of the progressive incorporation of patient satisfaction ratings as a quality-of-care metric, and highlights the need for a rigorous evaluation of the optimal methods

  17. Understanding the factors that influence patient satisfaction with ambulance services.

    PubMed

    Bogomolova, Svetlana; Tan, P J; Dunn, S P; Bizjak-Mikic, M

    2016-01-01

    The quality of ambulance services has an immense impact on patients' future well-being and quality of life. Patient satisfaction is one of the key metrics for evaluating the quality of this service. Yet, the patient satisfaction measurement may be limited in its ability to accurately reflect this service quality, and even reflect factors beyond the patient experiences. We analyze 10 years of survey data to reveal a number of factors that systematically bias ambulance satisfaction ratings. Taking into account these biases provides more robust comparison of ambulance performance over time or across different jurisdictions. PMID:27295008

  18. Interaction exchange structure and patient satisfaction with medical interviews.

    PubMed

    Stiles, W B; Putnam, S M; Wolf, M H; James, S A

    1979-06-01

    The verbal interaction between patients and physicians in 52 initial interviews in a university hospital screening clinic was studied using a new discourse coding system. Factor analysis of category frequencies showed that each interview segment, medical history, physical examination, and conclusion, consisted mainly of two or three types of verbal exchange. Patient satisfaction with the interviews, assessed with a questionnaire that yields separate scores for satisfaction with cognitive and affective aspects, was found to be associated with exchanges involving the transmission of information in particular interview segments. Affective satisfaction was associated with transmission of information from patient to physician in "exposition" exchanges during the medical history, in which patients told their story in their own words. Cognitive satisfaction was associated with transmission of information from physician to patient in "feedback" exchanges during the conclusion segment, in which physicians gave patients information about illness and treatment. PMID:449436

  19. Interaction exchange structure and patient satisfaction with medical interviews.

    PubMed

    Stiles, W B; Putnam, S M; Wolf, M H; James, S A

    1979-06-01

    The verbal interaction between patients and physicians in 52 initial interviews in a university hospital screening clinic was studied using a new discourse coding system. Factor analysis of category frequencies showed that each interview segment, medical history, physical examination, and conclusion, consisted mainly of two or three types of verbal exchange. Patient satisfaction with the interviews, assessed with a questionnaire that yields separate scores for satisfaction with cognitive and affective aspects, was found to be associated with exchanges involving the transmission of information in particular interview segments. Affective satisfaction was associated with transmission of information from patient to physician in "exposition" exchanges during the medical history, in which patients told their story in their own words. Cognitive satisfaction was associated with transmission of information from physician to patient in "feedback" exchanges during the conclusion segment, in which physicians gave patients information about illness and treatment.

  20. Patient Satisfaction: What We Can Learn from Other Industries.

    PubMed

    Homisak, Lynn; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Most doctors are appreciated by their patients, and most patients are satisfied with the care they receive from their doctors. However, how many doctors are reaching out and asking, as New York's former Mayor Koch often did, "Hey, how am I doing?" This article reviews two examples of effective methods used by other industries to gather data and evaluate customer satisfaction, and provides ideas and suggestions to measure patient satisfaction in a medical practice. PMID:26223116

  1. Patients tell the story: interrelationships among patient satisfaction, communications with providers, and emergency department care.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Carol Lynn; Macchiaroli, Julia M; Witter, Jacqueline; DeGoias, Elsa; Morote, Elsa-Sophia

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between four variables and patient satisfaction in an emergency department setting in a small community hospital in Suffolk County New York. Patients were assessed utilizing four variables: communications with doctors, communications with nurses, communications with ancillary staff, and environment of ED care. The study adds to the literature on which factors have the greatest influence on patient satisfaction in an emergency department setting. The purpose of the present study was to explore how ED patient satisfaction was influenced by their communications with physicians, nurses, and ancillary staff. Pearson correlation coefficients resulted in a statistically significant correlation between all variables and patient satisfaction. Path analysis showed the interrelationship between the four variables and patient satisfaction. Regression analysis predicted the extent to which each variable influenced patient satisfaction. The strongest predictor of patient satisfaction was communications with ancillary staff.

  2. Community health insurance schemes & patient satisfaction - evidence from India

    PubMed Central

    Devadasan, N.; Criel, Bart; Damme, Wim Van; Lefevre, Pierre; Manoharan, S.; der Stuyft, Patrick Van

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: Quality of care is an important determinant for utilizing health services. In India, the quality of care in most health services is poor. The government recognizes this and has been working on both supply and demand aspects. In particular, it is promoting community health insurance (CHI) schemes, so that patients can access quality services. This observational study was undertaken to measure the level of satisfaction among insured and uninsured patients in two CHI schemes in India. Methods: Patient satisfaction was measured, which is an outcome of good quality care. Two CHI schemes, Action for Community Organisation, Rehabilitation and Development (ACCORD) and Kadamalai Kalanjiam Vattara Sangam (KKVS), were chosen. Randomly selected, insured and uninsured households were interviewed. The household where a patient was admitted to a hospital was interviewed in depth about the health seeking behaviour, the cost of treatment and the satisfaction levels. Results: It was found that at both ACCORD and KKVS, there was no significant difference in the levels of satisfaction between the insured and uninsured patients. The main reasons for satisfaction were the availability of doctors and medicines and the recovery by the patient. Interpretation & conclusions: Our study showed that insured hospitalized patients did not have significantly higher levels of satisfaction compared to uninsured hospitalized patients. If CHI schemes want to improve the quality of care for their clients, so that they adhere to the scheme, the scheme managers need to negotiate actively for better quality of care with empanelled providers. PMID:21321418

  3. Effectiveness of Blended Cooperative Learning Environment in Biology Teaching: Classroom Community Sense, Academic Achievement and Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yapici, I. Ümit

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of Blended Cooperative Learning Environment (BCLE) in biology teaching on students' classroom community sense, their academic achievement and on their levels of satisfaction. In the study, quantitative and qualitative research methods were used together. The study was carried out with 30 students in…

  4. Vocational Identity Achievement as a Mediator of Presence of Calling and Life Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirschi, Andreas; Herrmann, Anne

    2012-01-01

    The present study explores what mechanism might be responsible for the reported link between presence of a calling in one's career and life satisfaction. It is proposed that vocational identity achievement acts as one important mediator of this relation and that the effects can be observed even when controlling for core self-evaluations (CSEs).…

  5. Influence of Structure and Interaction on Student Achievement and Satisfaction in Web-Based Distance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hye-Jung; Rha, Ilju

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the influence of instructional design and management style on student achievement and satisfaction in a web-based distance learning environment. From the literature review, two major instructional design and management styles in web-based distance education were conceptualized as structure and interpersonal interaction. To…

  6. Communication Satisfaction, Organizational Citizenship Behavior and the Relationship to Student Achievement in High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Gayle A.

    2012-01-01

    This study used a correlational design that allowed the researcher to examine the relationship among communication satisfaction, organizational citizenship behaviors (OCB) and student achievement. High school teachers were surveyed from a convenience sample of 12 school districts in Arizona. Established instruments were used to survey…

  7. An Empirical Investigation of Student Achievement and Satisfaction in Different Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Jon; Kim, May; Chen, Steve S.; Ryder, Cynthia E.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of three different methods of instructional delivery (online instruction, traditional face-to-face instruction, and a combination of online and traditional instruction) on student achievement and satisfaction levels used in an undergraduate wellness course at a Midwestern university.…

  8. To Get Involved or Not: The Relation among Extracurricular Involvement, Satisfaction, and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strapp, Chehalis M.; Farr, Rebecca J.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relation among extracurricular involvement in psychology-related activities, satisfaction, and academic achievement in graduating psychology majors. We surveyed 71 seniors (53 women and 18 men, M[subscript age] = 24.84 years) about their involvement in psychology-related activities (e.g., Psi Chi, serving as a research…

  9. Patient satisfaction in four types of dental practice.

    PubMed

    Handelman, S L; Fan-Hsu, J; Proskin, H M

    1990-11-01

    There has been a significant growth in alternative types of dental practice. To determine satisfaction, patients were surveyed in urban private practices, a hospital dental clinic, a neighborhood health center, and a large group practice situated in a shopping center, using a 14-item survey and a 5-point rating scale. Patient satisfaction was related to the following factors in descending order: dentist, staff, efficiency, time-cost, and accessibility. Patients rated private practice most favorably for all factors with the exception of accessibility, which was rated highest for the shopping center practice. Patients rated the hospital least favorably for all factors with the exception of dentist, which was rated least favorably for the shopping center practice. Although private practices were the most favorably perceived, alternative types of practice were also highly rated and met specific patient needs. Satisfaction was greater for older patients, for patients with less education, and for white compared with black patients.

  10. Patients' satisfaction evaluation with the health center of elis province.

    PubMed

    Karavida, Angeliki; Stamouli, Maria-Aggeliki; Balis, Charalampos

    2014-01-01

    Patient satisfaction related to the provided health services is a key indicator of the quality of the health sector. The SERVQUAL model was employed as a way of measuring the level of patient satisfaction with the services of the Health Center of Elis Province. Although certain aspects such as "Assurance" and "Empathy" meet the users' needs, improvements like a detailed medical record and an overhaul of the equipment need to be introduced. PMID:25000072

  11. Patients' satisfaction evaluation with the health center of elis province.

    PubMed

    Karavida, Angeliki; Stamouli, Maria-Aggeliki; Balis, Charalampos

    2014-01-01

    Patient satisfaction related to the provided health services is a key indicator of the quality of the health sector. The SERVQUAL model was employed as a way of measuring the level of patient satisfaction with the services of the Health Center of Elis Province. Although certain aspects such as "Assurance" and "Empathy" meet the users' needs, improvements like a detailed medical record and an overhaul of the equipment need to be introduced.

  12. Patient satisfaction with task shifting of antiretroviral services in Ethiopia: implications for universal health coverage.

    PubMed

    Asfaw, Elias; Dominis, Sarah; Palen, John G H; Wong, Wendy; Bekele, Abebe; Kebede, Amha; Johns, Benjamin

    2014-09-01

    Formalized task shifting structures have been used to rapidly scale up antiretroviral service delivery to underserved populations in several countries, and may be a promising mechanism for accomplishing universal health coverage. However, studies evaluating the quality of service delivery through task shifting have largely ignored the patient perspective, focusing on health outcomes and acceptability to health care providers and regulatory bodies, despite studies worldwide that have shown the significance of patient satisfaction as an indicator of quality. This study aimed to measure patient satisfaction with task shifting of antiretroviral services in hospitals and health centres in four regions of Ethiopia. This cross-sectional study used data collected from a time-motion study of patient services paired with 665 patient exit interviews in a stratified random sample of antiretroviral therapy clinics in 21 hospitals and 40 health centres in 2012. Data were analyzed using f-tests across provider types, and multivariate logistic regression to identify determinants of patient satisfaction. Most (528 of 665) patients were satisfied or somewhat satisfied with the services received, but patients who received services from nurses and health officers were significantly more likely to report satisfaction than those who received services from doctors [odds ratio (OR) 0.26, P < 0.01]. Investments in the health facility were associated with higher satisfaction (OR 1.07, P < 0.01), while costs to patients of over 120 birr were associated with lower satisfaction (OR 0.14, P < 0.05). This study showed high levels of patient satisfaction with task shifting in Ethiopia. The evidence generated by this study complements previous biomedical and health care provider/regulatory acceptability studies to support the inclusion of task shifting as a mechanism for scaling-up health services to achieve universal health coverage, particularly for underserved areas facing severe health worker

  13. Patient satisfaction with task shifting of antiretroviral services in Ethiopia: implications for universal health coverage

    PubMed Central

    Asfaw, Elias; Palen, John G H; Wong, Wendy; Bekele, Abebe; Kebede, Amha; Johns, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Formalized task shifting structures have been used to rapidly scale up antiretroviral service delivery to underserved populations in several countries, and may be a promising mechanism for accomplishing universal health coverage. However, studies evaluating the quality of service delivery through task shifting have largely ignored the patient perspective, focusing on health outcomes and acceptability to health care providers and regulatory bodies, despite studies worldwide that have shown the significance of patient satisfaction as an indicator of quality. This study aimed to measure patient satisfaction with task shifting of antiretroviral services in hospitals and health centres in four regions of Ethiopia. This cross-sectional study used data collected from a time–motion study of patient services paired with 665 patient exit interviews in a stratified random sample of antiretroviral therapy clinics in 21 hospitals and 40 health centres in 2012. Data were analyzed using f-tests across provider types, and multivariate logistic regression to identify determinants of patient satisfaction. Most (528 of 665) patients were satisfied or somewhat satisfied with the services received, but patients who received services from nurses and health officers were significantly more likely to report satisfaction than those who received services from doctors [odds ratio (OR) 0.26, P < 0.01]. Investments in the health facility were associated with higher satisfaction (OR 1.07, P < 0.01), while costs to patients of over 120 birr were associated with lower satisfaction (OR 0.14, P < 0.05). This study showed high levels of patient satisfaction with task shifting in Ethiopia. The evidence generated by this study complements previous biomedical and health care provider/regulatory acceptability studies to support the inclusion of task shifting as a mechanism for scaling-up health services to achieve universal health coverage, particularly for underserved areas facing severe health

  14. Patient satisfaction with task shifting of antiretroviral services in Ethiopia: implications for universal health coverage.

    PubMed

    Asfaw, Elias; Dominis, Sarah; Palen, John G H; Wong, Wendy; Bekele, Abebe; Kebede, Amha; Johns, Benjamin

    2014-09-01

    Formalized task shifting structures have been used to rapidly scale up antiretroviral service delivery to underserved populations in several countries, and may be a promising mechanism for accomplishing universal health coverage. However, studies evaluating the quality of service delivery through task shifting have largely ignored the patient perspective, focusing on health outcomes and acceptability to health care providers and regulatory bodies, despite studies worldwide that have shown the significance of patient satisfaction as an indicator of quality. This study aimed to measure patient satisfaction with task shifting of antiretroviral services in hospitals and health centres in four regions of Ethiopia. This cross-sectional study used data collected from a time-motion study of patient services paired with 665 patient exit interviews in a stratified random sample of antiretroviral therapy clinics in 21 hospitals and 40 health centres in 2012. Data were analyzed using f-tests across provider types, and multivariate logistic regression to identify determinants of patient satisfaction. Most (528 of 665) patients were satisfied or somewhat satisfied with the services received, but patients who received services from nurses and health officers were significantly more likely to report satisfaction than those who received services from doctors [odds ratio (OR) 0.26, P < 0.01]. Investments in the health facility were associated with higher satisfaction (OR 1.07, P < 0.01), while costs to patients of over 120 birr were associated with lower satisfaction (OR 0.14, P < 0.05). This study showed high levels of patient satisfaction with task shifting in Ethiopia. The evidence generated by this study complements previous biomedical and health care provider/regulatory acceptability studies to support the inclusion of task shifting as a mechanism for scaling-up health services to achieve universal health coverage, particularly for underserved areas facing severe health worker

  15. Personality Style in Patients Looking for Tooth Bleaching and Its Correlation with Treatment Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Martin, Javier; Rivas, Vanessa; Vildósola, Patricio; Moncada, Laura; Oliveira Junior, Osmir B; Saad, José Roberto C; Fernandez, Eduardo; Moncada, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    In the last years the focus in dentistry has shifted to an "esthetic dentistry" approach, where patients are concerned about reaching a better look of their teeth. Vital tooth bleaching is a technique with immediate results, which improves the appearance and patient's self-esteem. The aim of this study was to recognize personality characteristics determined by the Millon Index of Personality Styles of participants looking for tooth bleaching and to correlate them to satisfaction with the treatment. Forty participants were included and filled out the Millon Index of Personality Styles form before treatment. Expectation about tooth bleaching was quantified from 1 to 5. Patients were treated with bleaching agent according to manufacturer's directions. One week after treatment, the patient's satisfaction was quantified from 1 to 5. Prevailing personality characteristics were determined. Expectations and satisfaction values of all patients were correlated with each of the presented personality scales by Spearman Rho test. Ten scales prevailed over their counterpart. Median of patient's expectation was 2 and satisfaction 4. Only the score of a single characteristic (extraversing) showed statistically significant correlation with patient satisfaction. Patients looking for tooth bleaching treatment seem to have common personality characteristics. Almost all of them wanted to achieve a moderate change in teeth color and the result of the treatment was usually satisfactory.

  16. Personality Style in Patients Looking for Tooth Bleaching and Its Correlation with Treatment Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Martin, Javier; Rivas, Vanessa; Vildósola, Patricio; Moncada, Laura; Oliveira Junior, Osmir B; Saad, José Roberto C; Fernandez, Eduardo; Moncada, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    In the last years the focus in dentistry has shifted to an "esthetic dentistry" approach, where patients are concerned about reaching a better look of their teeth. Vital tooth bleaching is a technique with immediate results, which improves the appearance and patient's self-esteem. The aim of this study was to recognize personality characteristics determined by the Millon Index of Personality Styles of participants looking for tooth bleaching and to correlate them to satisfaction with the treatment. Forty participants were included and filled out the Millon Index of Personality Styles form before treatment. Expectation about tooth bleaching was quantified from 1 to 5. Patients were treated with bleaching agent according to manufacturer's directions. One week after treatment, the patient's satisfaction was quantified from 1 to 5. Prevailing personality characteristics were determined. Expectations and satisfaction values of all patients were correlated with each of the presented personality scales by Spearman Rho test. Ten scales prevailed over their counterpart. Median of patient's expectation was 2 and satisfaction 4. Only the score of a single characteristic (extraversing) showed statistically significant correlation with patient satisfaction. Patients looking for tooth bleaching treatment seem to have common personality characteristics. Almost all of them wanted to achieve a moderate change in teeth color and the result of the treatment was usually satisfactory. PMID:27007348

  17. Long-term patient satisfaction of gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures

    PubMed Central

    Triantafyllou, Konstantinos; Gkolfakis, Paraskevas; Triantafyllou, Maria; Ndini, Xhoela; Melissaratou, Anastasia; Moustafa, Giannis-Aimant; Xanthopoulou, Eleni; Tziatzios, Georgios; Vlachonikolou, Georgia; Papadopoulos, Vasilios; Pantelakis, Evdoxos; Malli, Chrysoula; Dimitriadis, George D.

    2016-01-01

    Background We prospectively assessed patient satisfaction in a Greek Academic endoscopy facility. Methods Consecutive outpatients filled a satisfaction questionnaire right after their endoscopy (D1), 3 days (D3) and 3 months (M3) later. Overall patient satisfaction was measured by their willingness to repeat endoscopy in our facility and to further recommend it. Participant satisfaction regarding pre-procedural, procedural and post-procedural issues was measured using a five-step Likert scale in 19 items with 4 and 5 scores indicating favorable responses. Pareto analysis was used to determine service issues requiring improvement. Late adverse events were recorded at D3 and M3 assessments. Results Over six months, 501 patients participated (89.4% and 87.8% response rate at D3 and M3 assessments, respectively). More than 97% of the participants would repeat the procedure in our facility and would recommend our endoscopy service, at all three assessments. Pareto analysis identified waiting time until the appointment and on the day of the examination, discomfort during and after the endoscopy, time to obtain the pathology report and overall management of the patient problems as the issues requiring improvement. No predictor of high satisfaction score has been identified. No serious late adverse events were reported. Conclusion Despite the overall high levels of patient satisfaction, management of patient discomfort and organizational issues need improvement. PMID:27065732

  18. Which kind of psychometrics is adequate for patient satisfaction questionnaires?

    PubMed Central

    Konerding, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    The construction and psychometric analysis of patient satisfaction questionnaires are discussed. The discussion is based upon the classification of multi-item questionnaires into scales or indices. Scales consist of items that describe the effects of the latent psychological variable to be measured, and indices consist of items that describe the causes of this variable. Whether patient satisfaction questionnaires should be constructed and analyzed as scales or as indices depends upon the purpose for which these questionnaires are required. If the final aim is improving care with regard to patients’ preferences, then these questionnaires should be constructed and analyzed as indices. This implies two requirements: 1) items for patient satisfaction questionnaires should be selected in such a way that the universe of possible causes of patient satisfaction is covered optimally and 2) Cronbach’s alpha, principal component analysis, exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and analyses with models from item response theory, such as the Rasch Model, should not be applied for psychometric analyses. Instead, multivariate regression analyses with a direct rating of patient satisfaction as the dependent variable and the individual questionnaire items as independent variables should be performed. The coefficients produced by such an analysis can be applied for selecting the best items and for weighting the selected items when a sum score is determined. The lower boundaries of the validity of the unweighted and the weighted sum scores can be estimated by their correlations with the direct satisfaction rating. While the first requirement is fulfilled in the majority of the previous patient satisfaction questionnaires, the second one deviates from previous practice. Hence, if patient satisfaction is actually measured with the final aim of improving care with regard to patients’ preferences, then future practice should be changed so that the second

  19. Tuberculosis Control Program and patient satisfaction, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Portela, Margareth Crisóstomo; Lima, Sheyla Maria Lemos; Brito, Cláudia; Ferreira, Vanja Maria Bessa; Escosteguy, Claudia Caminha; de Vasconcellos, Maurício Teixeira Leite

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate factors associated with users’ satisfaction in the Tuberculosis Control Program. METHODS A cross-sectional study of 295 patients aged ≥ 18 years, with two or more outpatient visits in the Tuberculosis Control Program, in five cities in the metropolitan region of Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Southeastern Brazil, in 2010. Considering an estimated population of 4,345 patients, the sampling plan included 15 health care units participating in the program, divided into two strata: units in Rio de Janeiro City, selected with probability proportional to the monthly average number of outpatient visits, and units in the other four cities. In the units, four temporal clusters of five patients each were selected with equal probability, totaling 300 patients. A questionnaire investigating the users’ clinical and sociodemographic variables and aspects of care and service in the program relevant to user satisfaction was applied to the patients. Descriptive statistics about users and their satisfaction with the program were obtained, and the effects of factors associated with satisfaction were estimated. RESULTS Patients were predominantly males (57.7%), with a mean age of 40.9 and with low level of schooling. The mean treatment time was 4.1 months, mostly self-administered (70.4%). Additionally, 25.8% had previously been treated for tuberculosis. There was a high level of satisfaction, especially regarding medication provision, and respect to patients by the health professionals. Patients who were younger (≤ 30), those on self-administered treatment, and with graduate level, showed less satisfaction. Suggestions to improve the services include having more doctors (70.0%), and offering exams in the same place of attendance (55.1%). CONCLUSIONS Patient satisfaction with the Tuberculosis Control Program was generally high, although lower among younger patients, those with university education and those on self-administered treatment. The study indicates the need

  20. Information booklets about cancer: factors influencing patient satisfaction and utilization.

    PubMed

    Butow, P; Brindle, E; McConnell, D; Boakes, R; Tattersall, M

    1998-02-01

    Providing patients with adequate information is an important component of care. This exploratory study investigated factors influencing patient satisfaction with and utilization of information booklets. The research was conducted in two stages. In stage 1, five commonly used cancer information booklets were reviewed by 36 Australian patients who were either receiving chemotherapy or had just completed treatment. Data were collected on patient satisfaction with, preference for and utilization of information booklets. In addition data were collected on variables identified in the literature as potentially influencing patient satisfaction, including patient characteristics, presentation and readability of booklets, and the timing of provision. A high level of satisfaction was found for all five information booklets, although a clear preference for one particular booklet emerged. The most notable feature of this booklet was its readability level (grade 8); in contrast the other booklets were written at levels equivalent to grades 11-12. Stage 2 focused on the side effects of patient information preference style on their satisfaction and recall of information presented in two booklets in the course of their treatment. No differences were found between patients who seek information and those who avoid it. The findings of this study suggest that patients' information needs may be better met if information booklets are written in plain English, and presented to patients prior to treatment. Future studies incorporating a larger sample of patients and greater selection and variety of information booklets are required to further determine if patient characteristics and features of booklet presentation influence patient satisfaction and preference. PMID:9732653

  1. [Patient satisfaction and geriatric care - an empirical study].

    PubMed

    Clausen, G; Borchelt, M; Janssen, C; Loos, S; Mull, L; Pfaff, H

    2006-02-01

    Patients' satisfaction has become a central concept in quality assurance. Despite progress in research in this area is still a lack of data for geriatric patients. Referring to the consumer model, satisfaction can be described as a difference between expectations and assessed performance. The aim of this study is to analyze satisfaction among geriatric patients in an in-patient setting. A personal interview was performed 1-2 days before discharge. Patients suffering for dementia or with problems to communicate were excluded. 124 of 268 geriatric patients who were discharged in 2003 were included (inclusion rate 46.3%). 119 were willing to participate (response rate 96.0%). Respondents were between 61 and 96 years old, 39% were male and 42% had serious functional limitations at time of admission. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed three significant predictors of a combined index of satisfaction and expectations: a) quality of hotel services; b) experience of neglect; c) provision of medical information and skills. In summary, standardized personal questionnaires can provide valid and reliable data of geriatric patients. Satisfaction of elderly patients is negatively affected by neglect and positively influenced by provision of medical information and a good hotel services. PMID:16502227

  2. The metaphor of patients as customers: implications for measuring satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Hudak, Pamela L; McKeever, Patricia; Wright, James G

    2003-02-01

    The use of satisfaction surveys in health care reflects the current tendency to think metaphorically of patients as "customers." This article reflects critically on the logic underlying this metaphor because metaphors are integral to the meaning of concepts. We argue that because the metaphor works differently when considering satisfaction with the process of care and satisfaction with treatment outcome, there are theoretical reasons for assessing these concepts from different perspectives. It seems reasonable to ask patients to rate their satisfaction with the processes of care or services received (e.g., hospital food, the physical environment) in much the same way they would rate services received at a repair shop or restaurant. When evaluating satisfaction with treatment outcome, however, the customer metaphor is problematic because the body is made an object when it is conceived of as the repairable possession of a customer. We conclude that measures of satisfaction with treatment outcome should be based on the assumption that rather than having bodies, people are embodied. Hence, the validity of satisfaction with treatment outcome would be enhanced by questions about psychologic, social, and experiental aspects of treatment outcome. PMID:12654403

  3. The metaphor of patients as customers: implications for measuring satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Hudak, Pamela L; McKeever, Patricia; Wright, James G

    2003-02-01

    The use of satisfaction surveys in health care reflects the current tendency to think metaphorically of patients as "customers." This article reflects critically on the logic underlying this metaphor because metaphors are integral to the meaning of concepts. We argue that because the metaphor works differently when considering satisfaction with the process of care and satisfaction with treatment outcome, there are theoretical reasons for assessing these concepts from different perspectives. It seems reasonable to ask patients to rate their satisfaction with the processes of care or services received (e.g., hospital food, the physical environment) in much the same way they would rate services received at a repair shop or restaurant. When evaluating satisfaction with treatment outcome, however, the customer metaphor is problematic because the body is made an object when it is conceived of as the repairable possession of a customer. We conclude that measures of satisfaction with treatment outcome should be based on the assumption that rather than having bodies, people are embodied. Hence, the validity of satisfaction with treatment outcome would be enhanced by questions about psychologic, social, and experiental aspects of treatment outcome.

  4. Patient satisfaction in Malaysia's busiest outpatient medical care.

    PubMed

    Ganasegeran, Kurubaran; Perianayagam, Wilson; Manaf, Rizal Abdul; Jadoo, Saad Ahmed Ali; Al-Dubai, Sami Abdo Radman

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore factors associated with patient satisfaction of outpatient medical care in Malaysia. A cross-sectional exit survey was conducted among 340 outpatients aged between 13 and 80 years after successful clinical consultations and treatment acquirements using convenience sampling at the outpatient medical care of Tengku Ampuan Rahimah Hospital (HTAR), Malaysia, being the country's busiest medical outpatient facility. A survey that consisted of sociodemography, socioeconomic, and health characteristics and the validated Short-Form Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (PSQ-18) scale were used. Patient satisfaction was the highest in terms of service factors or tangible priorities, particularly "technical quality" and "accessibility and convenience," but satisfaction was low in terms of service orientation of doctors, particularly the "time spent with doctor," "interpersonal manners," and "communication" during consultations. Gender, income level, and purpose of visit to the clinic were important correlates of patient satisfaction. Effort to improve service orientation among doctors through periodical professional development programs at hospital and national level is essential to boost the country's health service satisfaction. PMID:25654133

  5. Patient satisfaction among liver transplant recipients: single-center survey.

    PubMed

    Stiavetti, E; Matteucci, R; Giannessi, E; Ducci, J; Baldoni, L; De Simone, P; Filipponi, F

    2010-01-01

    A single-center survey using a semistructured questionnaire was conducted in liver transplantation recipients at discharge after the primary surgery. The objectives of the study were to assess patient satisfaction and to identify critical points that negatively affected their perception of the quality of care received, and to derive information to enable improvement in current standards of care. The questionnaire included 5 sections about quality and 1 section for suggestions. Patients were asked to provide answers on a 5-item Likert scale. Areas assessed included quality of staff, organization, boarding, privacy, and transfer of care. Among 51 recipients, satisfaction was high (>50%) in all areas. Lower satisfaction scores were given for room services, diet, and background music. The most frequently reported area of dissatisfaction (12%) was lack of availability of in-hospital physical rehabilitation programs. Despite overall satisfaction with quality of care, recipients reported lack of appropriate physical rehabilitation programs in the early posttransplantation period. PMID:20692452

  6. Patient satisfaction with glaucoma therapy: reality or myth?

    PubMed

    Lemij, Hans G; Hoevenaars, Juliette Gmm; van der Windt, Cees; Baudouin, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    While safe and effective treatments for glaucoma exist, their effectiveness is compromised by poor compliance. Patients who have problems with their topical glaucoma medication are acknowledged to be at higher risk for poor compliance, frequent medication switching, and surgery. Patient satisfaction with therapy and its associated benefits have until recently taken second place to efficacy. The present study is a transverse cross-sectional epidemiological survey among glaucoma patients receiving therapy with prostaglandin analogs. The primary objective was to determine and characterize patient satisfaction with glaucoma therapy, and the secondary objective was to identify factors that may contribute to poor patient satisfaction. Ophthalmologists in the Netherlands included 199 patients and 164 were analyzed. Patients were predominantly elderly with early, primary, open angle glaucoma. Eighty-nine percent of them stated they were satisfied or very satisfied with their treatment. However, signs of ocular surface disorder on ophthalmological examination were evident in 44% of patients, corneal fluorescein staining was positive in 28% of patients, and 38% of patients were using tear substitutes. The prevalence of blepharitis/meibomian gland dysfunction and dry eye was more than twice as high after the commencement of therapy compared with before therapy. Univariate analysis revealed that patient dissatisfaction with their glaucoma therapy was statistically significantly (P<0.001) associated with the presence of ocular surface disease, hyperemia, ocular signs, symptoms upon and between instillation, and the use of tear substitutes. Apparently, patients in the present study are satisfied with their treatment; 89% expressed satisfaction compared with only 11% who professed dissatisfaction. The results suggest that even if local adverse events and ocular surface disease, in particular, contribute to glaucoma patient dissatisfaction, only a minority of patients expressed

  7. Patient satisfaction with glaucoma therapy: reality or myth?

    PubMed

    Lemij, Hans G; Hoevenaars, Juliette Gmm; van der Windt, Cees; Baudouin, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    While safe and effective treatments for glaucoma exist, their effectiveness is compromised by poor compliance. Patients who have problems with their topical glaucoma medication are acknowledged to be at higher risk for poor compliance, frequent medication switching, and surgery. Patient satisfaction with therapy and its associated benefits have until recently taken second place to efficacy. The present study is a transverse cross-sectional epidemiological survey among glaucoma patients receiving therapy with prostaglandin analogs. The primary objective was to determine and characterize patient satisfaction with glaucoma therapy, and the secondary objective was to identify factors that may contribute to poor patient satisfaction. Ophthalmologists in the Netherlands included 199 patients and 164 were analyzed. Patients were predominantly elderly with early, primary, open angle glaucoma. Eighty-nine percent of them stated they were satisfied or very satisfied with their treatment. However, signs of ocular surface disorder on ophthalmological examination were evident in 44% of patients, corneal fluorescein staining was positive in 28% of patients, and 38% of patients were using tear substitutes. The prevalence of blepharitis/meibomian gland dysfunction and dry eye was more than twice as high after the commencement of therapy compared with before therapy. Univariate analysis revealed that patient dissatisfaction with their glaucoma therapy was statistically significantly (P<0.001) associated with the presence of ocular surface disease, hyperemia, ocular signs, symptoms upon and between instillation, and the use of tear substitutes. Apparently, patients in the present study are satisfied with their treatment; 89% expressed satisfaction compared with only 11% who professed dissatisfaction. The results suggest that even if local adverse events and ocular surface disease, in particular, contribute to glaucoma patient dissatisfaction, only a minority of patients expressed

  8. Predictors of Patient Satisfaction With Pain Management in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Fallon, Echo; Fung, Sierra; Rubal-Peace, Georgina; Patanwala, Asad E

    2016-01-01

    To identify predictors of patient satisfaction with pain control measured after emergency department (ED) discharge. This was a prospective, cross-sectional study conducted in an academic, urban ED in the United States. Adult patients with a pain-related complaint were interviewed via telephone within 72 hr of discharge from the ED. A standardized questionnaire was used to obtain demographic and clinical information. The primary outcome of interest was patient satisfaction with pain management in the ED measured using the following question: "How often was your pain well controlled in the ED?" (0-10 scale; 0 = never, 10 = always). Linear regression analyses were used to identify predictors of pain satisfaction. The study included 75 patients. The mean age of patients was 43 ± 18 years, and the majority of patients were female (n = 47; 63%). There were 24 patients (32%) who had chronic pain conditions, 23 (31%) with depression, and 2 patients who admitted to using heroin. In the multivariate regression analysis, patient perception of enough pain medication provision (coefficient = 2.81; 95% CI [1.35, 4.26]; p < 0.001), staff helpfulness (coefficient = 0.35; 95% CI [0.10, 0.59]; p = 0.006), report of generalized pain (coefficient = -1.62; 95% CI [-2.87, -0.36]; p = 0.013), and lowest pain score achieved in the ED (coefficient = -0.30; 95% CI [-0.53, -0.04]; p = 0.021) was significantly associated with patient satisfaction (model R = 0.57). Patient perception of enough pain medication provision, staff helpfulness, lowest pain scores achieved, and patient report of generalized pain were associated with satisfaction with pain management in the ED. PMID:27139133

  9. An instrument assessing patient satisfaction with day care in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Patient satisfaction is an important indicator of quality of care in hospitals. Reliable and valid instruments to measure clinical and outpatient satisfaction already exist. Recently hospitals have increasingly provided day care, i.e., admitting patients for one day without an overnight stay. This article describes the adaption of the ‘Core questionnaire for the assessment of Patient Satisfaction’ (COPS) for general Day care (COPS-D), and the subsequent validation of the COPS-D. Methods The clinical COPS was supplemented with items to cover two new dimensions: Pre-admission visit and Operation Room. It was sent to a sample of day care patients of five general Dutch hospitals to investigate dimensionality, acceptability, reliability, construct and external validity. Construct validity was established by correlating the dimensions of the COPS-D with patients’ overall satisfaction. Results The COPS-D was returned by 3802 patients (response 46%). Factor analysis confirmed its’ structure: Pre-intake visit, Admission, Operation room, Nursing care, Medical care, Information, Autonomy and Discharge and aftercare (extraction communality 0.63-0.90). The internal consistency of the eight dimensions was good (α = 0.82-0.90); the item internal consistency corrected for overlap was satisfactory (>0.40); all inter-item correlations were higher than 0.45 but not too high (<0.90). The construct validity of all dimensions was good (r from 0.52-0.62, p < 0.01). The Information dimension had the strongest correlation with overall day care satisfaction. Conclusions The COPS-D is a reliable and valid instrument for measuring satisfaction with day care. It complements the model of measuring patient satisfaction with clinical and outpatient care given in hospitals. It also fulfils the conditions made while developing the clinical and outpatient COPS: a short, core instrument to screen patient satisfaction. PMID:22624677

  10. With patient satisfaction under increasing scrutiny, consider patient callbacks.

    PubMed

    2011-07-01

    Under the final rules for Medicare's value-based purchasing program, one-third of the funding that is set aside to reward quality will be based on how patients rate their hospital experience. However, some EDs are already working to maximize patient satisfaction by implementing programs or policies whereby patients who have been discharged are routinely called to make sure their recovery is going well, as well as to intervene if there is an opportunity for service recovery. There are benefits to having ED clinicians make the follow-up calls themselves, but some health care organizations are also reaping benefits by having non-clinicians collect feedback on individual clinicians as well as specific facilities. In addition to potentially boosting quality and customer service, experts say callbacks are useful in curbing malpractice litigation. To avoid pushback among staff, consider beginning a program of patient callbacks by asking clinicians to call back just two patients per shift worked, and to share their experiences with colleagues. For maximum value, experts recommend that patient callbacks be made within one to four days of discharge. PMID:21749006

  11. Leadership in nursing and patient satisfaction in hospital context.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Elisabete Maria Garcia Teles; Gaspar, Maria Filomena Mendes

    2016-06-01

    Objectives to know the quality of the leadership relationship from the perspective of a chief nurse and nurse, patient satisfaction, the relationship between the quality of the relationship perceived for both and patient satisfaction. Methods a quantitative, transverse and correlational approach. Non-probabilistic convenience sample consists of 15 chief nurses, 342 nurses, 273 patients. Data collected at the Central Lisbon Hospital Center, between January and March 2013, through the LMX-7, CLMX-7 and SUCEH21 scales. Statistical analysis was performed through SPSS ® Statistics 19. Results the chief nurse considers the quality of the leadership relationship good, the nurses consider it satisfactory, patients are considered to be satisfied with nursing care; there is a statistically significant correlation between the quality of the leadership relationship from the perspective of chief nurses and patient satisfaction, there is no statistically significant correlation between the quality of the leadership relationship in the nurse's perspective and satisfaction. Conclusion the chief nurse has a major role in patient satisfaction. PMID:27253595

  12. Patient satisfaction with hospitalists: facility-level analyses.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Bradley R; Drevs, Kathryn E; Ayala, Louis J; Malott, Donald L

    2011-01-01

    Despite concerns and disagreements about the impact of hospitalist models on health care, hospitalists are becoming the dominant means of providing inpatient care, and models continue to diversify. Understanding their impact and the factors that influence their adoption is essential. This study examined hospitalists' impact on patient satisfaction, considering a host of characteristics. Cross-sectional data received in calendar year 2008, aggregated to the facility level, represent 1777 hospitals (41% of which employed hospitalists) and 2 648 275 patients. Press Ganey's psychometrically sound inpatient satisfaction survey consists of 38 items (10 sections) rated on a 5-point Likert-type scale. Findings suggest that facilities with hospitalists may have an advantage regarding satisfaction with nursing and personal issues (eg, privacy, emotional needs, response to complaints), both of which may be related to broader communication issues. Moreover, teaching (overall satisfaction) and large facilities (satisfaction with admissions, nursing, and tests/treatments) might especially benefit from the presence of hospitalists. Exploring how specific hospitalist functions influence patient satisfaction may reap rewards.

  13. Information Booklets about Cancer: Factors Influencing Patient Satisfaction and Utilisation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butow, Phyllis; Brindle, Elizabeth; McConnell, David; Boakes, Robert; Tattersall, Martin

    1998-01-01

    Explored factors influencing patient satisfaction with and utilization of information booklets. Patients (N=36) rated five booklets, and strongly preferred one with a grade-eight reading level. The relationship of preference and recall was investigated. No difference between those who seek or avoid information was found. Additional findings are…

  14. THE EFFECT OF OUTPATIENT SERVICE QUALITY ON PATIENT SATISFACTION IN TEACHING HOSPITALS IN IRAN

    PubMed Central

    Pouragha, Behrouz; Zarei, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The quality of services plays a primary role in achieving patient satisfaction. The main purpose of this study was to explore the effect of outpatient service quality on patient satisfaction in teaching hospitals in Iran. Methods: this cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014. The study sample included 500 patients were selected with systematic random method from the outpatient departments (clinics) of four teaching hospitals in Tehran. The survey instrument was a questionnaire consisted of 44 items, which were confirmed its reliability and validity. The data were analyzed by using descriptive statistics, Pearson’s correlation, and multivariate regression methods with the SPSS.18 software. Results: According to the findings of this study, the majority of patients had a positive experience in the outpatient departments of the teaching hospitals and thus evaluated the services as good. Perceived service costs, physician consultation, physical environment, and information to patient were found to be the most important determinants of outpatient satisfaction. Conclusion: The results suggest that improving the quality of consultation, providing information to the patients during examination and consultation, creating value for patients by reducing costs or improving service quality, and enhancing the physical environment quality of the clinic can be regarded as effective strategies for the management of teaching hospitals toward increasing outpatient satisfaction. PMID:27047262

  15. Involvement of a Surgical Service Improves Patient Satisfaction in Patients Admitted with Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Schmocker, Ryan K.; Vang, Xia; Cherney Stafford, Linda M.; Leverson, Glen E.; Winslow, Emily R.

    2015-01-01

    Background For patients with small bowel obstruction (SBO), surgical care has been associated with improved outcomes; however it remains unknown how it impacts satisfaction. Methods Patients admitted for SBO who completed the hospital satisfaction survey were eligible. Only those with adhesions or hernias were included. Chart review extracted structural characteristics and outcomes. Results 47 patients were included; 74% (n=35) were admitted to a surgical service. 26% (n=12) were admitted to medicine, and 50% of those (n=6) had surgical consultation. Patients with surgical involvement as the consulting or primary service (SURG) had higher satisfaction with the hospital than those cared for by the medical service (80% SURG; 33% MED, p=0.015). SURG patients also had higher satisfaction with physicians (74% SURG; 44% MED; p=0.015). Conclusions Surgical involvement during SBO admissions is associated with increased patient satisfaction, and adds further weight to the recommendation that these patients be cared for by surgeons. PMID:25886702

  16. HIGH PATIENT SATISFACTION WITH NURSE PRACTITIONER DELIVERED SERVICES AT TWO HEALTH CENTRES IN URBAN JAMAICA.

    PubMed

    Jones, Khadene; Hepburn-Brown, Cerese; Anderson-Johnson, Pauline; Lindo, Jascinth Lm

    2014-07-19

    Abstract Background: Nurse practitioners are playing an increasing role in the delivery of primary healthcare. Patient satisfaction with their services patients is an important factor to the expansion of their role in the health services. Objective: To explore the level of patient satisfaction with nurse practitioner delivered services at two health centres in urban Jamaica. Method: A cross sectional survey of 120 adult clients (age ≥18 years old) seen by Nurse Practitioner at a Type 3 or Type 5 health centre in Kingston, Jamaica was conducted using a modified self-administered Nurse Practitioner Satisfaction Survey questionnaire. Data were analyzed using SPSS® version 18 for Windows®. Results: The study achieved response rate of 91.6% (n=120). The majority were females (77%) with an average age of 40 ± 16 years. Most (63%) were from the Type 5 health centre and the rest (37%) were from a Type 3 facility. The mean general satisfaction score was 81 out of a possible 90 and 83% of the respondents reported they were very satisfied with another 17% expressing that they were satisfied with the nurse practitioner services at both facilities. No respondent was dissatisfied. The mean satisfaction score was significantly higher among respondents 40 years and older than that of their younger counterparts. Socio demographic and organization characteristics were not associated with the mean satisfaction score. Conclusions: A high level of satisfaction exists among patients seen by nurse practitioners at two facilities in Kingston, Jamaica. This may represent an opportunity for expanded role of Nurse practitioners in the delivery of primary in Jamaica.

  17. Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy with ceftriaxone for acute tonsillopharyngitis: efficacy, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and safety

    PubMed Central

    Al Alawi, Samah; Abdulkarim, Somaya; Elhennawy, Hazem; Al-Mansoor, Anwar; Al Ansari, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Background Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) is the administration of intravenous antimicrobial therapy to patients in an outpatient setting. It may be used for patients who have infections that require parenteral treatment but who are otherwise stable enough to not require admission as inpatients. Objective We aimed to review the treatment of patients with acute tonsillopharyngitis at the OPAT health care clinic in the Bahrain Defense Force Royal Medical Services (BDF-RMS), with regard to efficacy, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and safety. Methods A retrospective case notes review was conducted for all patients admitted to the OPAT clinic in the BDF-RMS with acute tonsillopharyngitis treated with ceftriaxone, between March 2012 and March 2014. Results In the period between March 2012 and March 2014, 97 patients with acute tonsillopharyngitis were treated with ceftriaxone for a minimum of 3 days at the OPAT clinic. In total, 94.8% of patients completed the prescribed course of ceftriaxone. Total cure was achieved in 89.7% of patients. Usage of the OPAT clinic led to cost savings of 10,693 BD, while total bed days saved were 301 over the 2-year period examined by this study. Participants in the program expressed high satisfaction rates, and the average (± standard deviation) score on a patient satisfaction survey was 4.41 (± 0.31) out of a total of 5. This study highlights the efficacy, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and safety of the OPAT clinic service for the treatment of acute tonsillopharyngitis with ceftriaxone. We found a 45.5% drop in admission rate for acute tonsillopharyngitis after starting the OPAT service clinic and that 301 bed days were saved through this treatment. Conclusion This study showed that the management of acute tonsillopharyngitis with ceftriaxone in the OPAT clinic is safe, clinically effective, and cost effective, with low rates of complications/readmissions and high levels of patient

  18. The Influence of Gatekeeping and Utilization Review on Patient Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Eve A; Hays, Ron D; Mitchinson, Allison; Lee, Martin; Siu, Albert L

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the influence of utilization review and denial of specialty referrals on patient satisfaction with overall medical care, willingness to recommend one’s physician group to a friend, and desire to disenroll from the health plan. DESIGN Two cross-sectional questionnaires: one of physician groups and one of patient satisfaction. SETTING Eighty-eight capitated physician groups in California. PARTICIPANTS Participants were 11,710 patients enrolled in a large California network-model HMO in 1993 who received care in one of the 88 physician groups. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Our main measures were how groups conducted utilization review for specialty referrals and tests, patient-reported denial of specialty referrals, and patient satisfaction with overall medical care. Patients in groups that required preauthorization for access to many types of specialists were significantly (p≤ .001) less satisfied than patients in groups that had few preauthorization requirements, even after adjusting for patient and other group characteristics. Patients who had wanted to see a specialist in the previous year but did not see one were significantly less satisfied than those who had wanted to see a specialist and actually saw one (p < .001). In addition, patients who did not see a specialist when desired were more likely to want to disenroll from the health plan than patients who saw the specialist (40% vs 18%, p≤ .001) and more likely not to recommend their group to a friend (38% vs 13%, p≤ .001). CONCLUSIONS Policies that limited direct access to specialists, and especially denial of patient-desired referrals, were associated with significantly lower patient satisfaction, increased desire to disenroll, and lower likelihood of recommending the group to a friend. Health plans and physician groups need to take these factors into account when designing strategies to reduce specialty care use. PMID:10337038

  19. What type of general practice do patients prefer? Exploration of practice characteristics influencing patient satisfaction.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, R; Streatfield, J

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: General practice is currently experiencing a large number of developments. Studies of patient satisfaction are required to guide the changes that many general practitioners are introducing. AIM: A study set out to examine the characteristics of general practices that influence patient satisfaction. METHOD: In 1991-92, a surgery satisfaction questionnaire of demonstrated reliability and validity was administered to 220 patients in each of 89 general practices. A further questionnaire completed by a member of practice staff collected information about practice characteristics including total list size, number, age and sex of practice partners, training status, fundholding status, presence of a practice manager and whether there was a personal list system. Stepwise multiple regression analyses were undertaken to identify those practice characteristics that influenced patient satisfaction. RESULTS: The mean of the response rates of patients completing questionnaires in each practice was 82%. An increasing total list size of patients registered with practices was associated with decreasing levels of general satisfaction and decreased satisfaction with accessibility, availability, continuity of care, medical care and premises. The presence of a personal list system was associated with increased levels of general satisfaction and increased satisfaction with accessibility, availability, continuity of care and medical care. Training practices were associated with decreased levels of general satisfaction and decreased satisfaction with availability and continuity of care. CONCLUSION: The patients of practices in this study preferred smaller practices, non-training practices and practices that had personal list systems. Practice organization should be reviewed in order to ensure that the trend towards larger practices that provide a wider range of services does not lead to a decline in patient satisfaction. General practitioners should have personal list systems

  20. Patient health satisfaction survey in connecticut correctional facilities.

    PubMed

    Tanguay, Sandra; Trestman, Robert; Weiskopf, Connie

    2014-04-01

    Although routine in the community, patient satisfaction surveys are relatively rare in correctional settings. This article describes the development of an instrument specifically adapted to the correctional environment and population, the statewide implementation of the survey, the initial results, and the quality improvement initiatives evolving from this effort.

  1. Study on Patient Satisfaction in the Government Allopathic Health Facilities of Lucknow District, India

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Ranjeeta; Idris, MZ; Bhushan, Vidya; Khanna, Anish; Agarwal, Monika; Singh, SK

    2009-01-01

    Background: The outcome of any disease is influenced by the decisions to seek care, timely arrival at appropriate diagnostic and treatment services and the receipt of adequate care from service providers. Satisfaction in service provision is increasingly being used as a measure of health system performance. Satisfaction manifests itself in the distribution, access and utilization of health services. Objectives: To determine the areas and causes of low satisfaction among the patients and suggest methods for improvement. Materials and Methods: Multistage stratified random sampling was used to select the government allopathic health facilities of Lucknow district and systematic random sampling for the selection of the patients for the interview. Results: The accessibility was difficult in 42% patients and waiting time more than 30 min for 62.5% of those attending the tertiary level health facility. The satisfaction with the duration of the outpatient department (OPD) (64.6%) and the presence of signboards (46.6%) was also found to be low. The overall satisfaction regarding the doctor-patient communication was more than 60% at all the levels of health care facilities but that with the examination and consultation was less than 60% at the primary level as compared to more than 80% elsewhere. The most important motivating factor for the visit to the tertiary (48.2%) and secondary level (71.9%, 67.1%) of health facilities was the faith on doctors or health facility. Conclusions: The level of patient satisfaction is severely deficient in several areas and needs improvement for the achievement of optimal health of the people. PMID:19876453

  2. 75 FR 32539 - Agency Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activities Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activities Under OMB Review... Form 10-0503).'' Title: Survey of Healthcare Experiences, Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey, VA...

  3. Deepening the understanding of hospital patient satisfaction: fulfillment and equity effects.

    PubMed

    Swan, J E; Sawyer, J C; Van Matre, J G; McGee, G W

    1985-01-01

    Patient satisfaction surveys are widely used tools. However, they provide limited managerial information. Additional, useful insights can be gained by analyzing factors that determine satisfaction. This study reports on fulfillment of expectations equity and satisfaction survey items as predictors of overall satisfaction with, and intentions to use, a hospital.

  4. Patient satisfaction in 21st century medicine: revolution or evolution?

    PubMed

    Sommers, Paul A; Dropik, Ron; Heilman, Greg; Vaughan, Tim

    2007-01-01

    The Moment-of-Truth (MOT) patient satisfaction system was created to address each patient's medical care and service needs at the "point-of-care," before the patient leaves the medical facility. The MOT system is patient-centered by actively involving each patient in his or her own healthcare evaluation, planning, and continuous quality improvement. Patient needs are aligned with the required healthcare resources, which simultaneously produce information that can be acted upon "immediately," at the point-of-care, with "a sense of urgency"-addressing patient expectations each and every time the patient encounters the healthcare system. Major changes that occurred in medical service delivery at Hudson Hospital after implementation of the MOT system included a change in the focus of healthcare delivery toward the patient each and every time medical care or service occurred by placing the patient at the center of the care continuum; the ability to capture and react to what the patient needed at the place and time the patient needed it; and the incorporation of patient satisfaction as a way of doing business, throughout the healthcare organization. Results in 2007 to date have averaged 98% among responding patients indicating that they would recommend the Hudson Hospital to family and friends.

  5. Predictors of Patient Satisfaction with Tertiary Hospitals in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Hye-Sook; Peck, Eun Hee; Moon, Hee Soo; Yeom, Hye-A

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the general and system-related predictors of outpatient satisfaction with tertiary health care institutions in Korea. A cross-sectional descriptive study design was employed. The subjects were 1,194 outpatients recruited from 29 outpatient clinics of a university medical center in Korea. Measurements included 5 outpatient service domains (i.e., doctor service, nurse service, technician service, convenience, and physical environment of facility) and patient satisfaction. Of the five domains, nurse service was the domain with the highest mean score (M = 4.21) and convenience was the domain with the lowest mean score (M = 3.77). The most significant predictor of patient satisfaction was the constructs of convenience (β = 0.21). The results of this study suggest that the concept of patient satisfaction with health care institutions in modern hospitals reflects an integrative process that includes not only the concerned health care personnel but also improved convenience such as user-friendly reservation system and comfortable waiting areas. PMID:25722886

  6. Lean Manufacturing Improves Emergency Department Throughput and Patient Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Kane, Marlena; Chui, Kristen; Rimicci, Janet; Callagy, Patrice; Hereford, James; Shen, Sam; Norris, Robert; Pickham, David

    2015-09-01

    A multidisciplinary team led by nursing leadership and physicians developed a plan to meet increasing demand and improve the patient experience in the ED without expanding the department's current resources. The approach included Lean tools and engaged frontline staff and physicians. Applying Lean management principles resulted in quicker service, improved patient satisfaction, increased capacity, and reduced resource utilization. Incorporating continuous daily management is necessary for sustainment of continuous improvement activities. PMID:26252725

  7. Lean Manufacturing Improves Emergency Department Throughput and Patient Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Kane, Marlena; Chui, Kristen; Rimicci, Janet; Callagy, Patrice; Hereford, James; Shen, Sam; Norris, Robert; Pickham, David

    2015-09-01

    A multidisciplinary team led by nursing leadership and physicians developed a plan to meet increasing demand and improve the patient experience in the ED without expanding the department's current resources. The approach included Lean tools and engaged frontline staff and physicians. Applying Lean management principles resulted in quicker service, improved patient satisfaction, increased capacity, and reduced resource utilization. Incorporating continuous daily management is necessary for sustainment of continuous improvement activities.

  8. 78 FR 79079 - Agency Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey); Activities under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey); Activities under OMB Review... . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900- 0764 (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey)'' in any correspondence....gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-0764 (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey)'' in...

  9. 75 FR 16912 - Proposed Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment Request... measure patients' satisfaction with VA's dental services. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on..., Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey, VA Form 10-0503. OMB Control Number: 2900-New (VA Form 10-0503)....

  10. A Path Analysis of Basic Need Support, Self-Efficacy, Achievement Goals, Life Satisfaction and Academic Achievement Level among Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diseth, Age; Danielsen, Anne G.; Samdal, Oddrun

    2012-01-01

    Teachers' support of basic psychological needs, self-efficacy, achievement goals, life satisfaction and academic achievement level was measured in a sample of 240 secondary school students (8th and 10th grades). Correlation analysis showed significant positive relations between all of the variables, except for the relation between need support of…

  11. Keeping the customer satisfied: issues in the interpretation and use of patient satisfaction surveys.

    PubMed

    Scott, A; Smith, R D

    1994-12-01

    Patient satisfaction and customer focus are increasingly important objectives set for health services. The patient satisfaction survey is becoming the main method of assessing this aspect of health care. In competitive environments, those institutions that show that they respond to consumers' needs are in a better position to attract funding. The use of patient satisfaction surveys in quality assurance-type activities is also increasing. In these contexts, however, the way in which patient satisfaction surveys should be interpreted and used to maximise the satisfaction of patients has received little critical attention. Problems in interpreting the results of satisfaction surveys arise from the weak conceptual foundation of patient satisfaction, which has been well documented in the literature. The objective of this paper is to show that using current formulations of patient satisfaction surveys in quality assurance-type activities and competitive environments may not lead to the maximisation of patients' satisfaction with health services. If the satisfaction of patients is to be maximised then it is necessary to extend the current conceptual basis of patient satisfaction to recognise explicitly the decision-making contexts in which the results will be used. This paper identifies the manner by which this extension should occur by considering some of the problems and pitfalls of interpreting and using the results of surveys to maximise patients' satisfaction.

  12. [Measuring patient satisfaction in an emergency unit of a Swiss university hospital: concept clarification and results (part 1)].

    PubMed

    Müller-Staub, Maria; Meer, Ruth; Briner, Gabi; Probst, Marie-Therese; Needham, Ian

    2008-06-01

    This article reports parts of a comprehensive study examining ambulatory patients' satisfaction with nursing care in a Swiss emergency department. Former studies have focused on patients discharged to hospital wards while nursing specific patient satisfaction results are missing. Patient satisfaction entails the following three dimensions: "Interaction/interpersonal dimension", "information/patient participation", and "nurses' knowledge". A descriptive cross-sectional study examined patient satisfaction using a revised version of the questionnaire "Patient satisfaction with nursing care" in a convenience sample of 114 patients. The instrument measures patient satisfaction by means of 37 items on a 5-point Likert-scale. As target values 85% of the maximum scores in each dimension were chosen as cut-off scores. Total scores and their means were computed for all dimensions of patient satisfaction and criterion validity was analyzed. Concurrently, the psychometric characteristics of the measurement instrument were tested. No patient achieved the maximum total score and the target values for "Interaction/interpersonal dimension", information/patient participation, and "nurses' knowledge" were not attained. The items "I had trust in the nurses" and "During conversation/while talking with nurses, no disturbing others were present" showed the highest scores in the "Interaction/interpersonal" dimension. The item "Nurses showed interest about what the illness means for my daily life" showed the lowest scores. In the dimensions "information/patient participation" and "nurses knowledge", patients missed nurses' caring for their psychological/emotional wellbeing, thirst, hunger and self-care deficits in bathing/hygiene. The overall results were not generally low, but demonstrate potential for quality enhancement. The measurement instrument showed good reliability (Cronbachs' alpha .83, .82, .70) and criterion validity was supported. Further results will be presented and

  13. Adolescents' academic achievement and life satisfaction: the role of parents' education.

    PubMed

    Crede, Julia; Wirthwein, Linda; McElvany, Nele; Steinmayr, Ricarda

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on the background of positive psychology, there has only recently been a focus on adolescents' life satisfaction (LS) in the context of education. Studies examining the relationship between adolescents' academic achievement and LS have shown conflicting results and the reasons are not fully understood. The present study investigated the role of parents' education as a potential moderator of the relationship between adolescents' academic achievement and LS. A sample of German high school students (N = 411) reported parents' educational attainment, as an indicator of family socio-economic status, and students' academic achievement was operationalized by grade point average in five subjects. Results indicated that only mothers' education functioned as a moderator of the relationship between academic achievement and students' LS. The association between academic achievement and LS was only found in the group of students whose mothers had achieved the same or a higher education (at least high school diploma) as their own children. Fathers' educational attainment, however, was not a significant moderator of the respective relationship. Directions for future research and the differential influences of fathers' and mothers' education are discussed with regard to potential underlying processes.

  14. Patient satisfaction with a new nurse practitioner service.

    PubMed

    Barr, M; Johnston, D; McConnell, D

    2000-07-01

    In the UK the role of the Nurse Practitioner (NP) has been slower to develop than in the USA (Tye 1997). However, since its inception, studies of the role have found positive results in areas of patient satisfaction (Touche Ross 1994). James and Pyrgos (1989) reported 94% of patients suitable to seen by a NP would use a NP if introduced. A study by Freij et al. (1996) concluded that emergency NPs were as competent at interpreting X-rays as casualty officers. Despite such evidence, Meek et al. (1995) noted opposition to this new advanced practice from other disciplines who wished to maintain the 'status quo'. In light of these findings, a study was undertaken to examine the new NP Service at Antrim Hospital, Northern Ireland. A patient satisfaction survey, a retrospective X-ray audit and a subjective assessment by other disciplines, were carried out in order to evaluate the service.

  15. An Integrated Model of Patient and Staff Satisfaction Using Queuing Theory

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Ali; Clarkson, P. John; Young, Terry

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the connection between patient satisfaction, waiting time, staff satisfaction, and service time. It uses a variety of models to enable improvement against experiential and operational health service goals. Patient satisfaction levels are estimated using a model based on waiting (waiting times). Staff satisfaction levels are estimated using a model based on the time spent with patients (service time). An integrated model of patient and staff satisfaction, the effective satisfaction level model, is then proposed (using queuing theory). This links patient satisfaction, waiting time, staff satisfaction, and service time, connecting two important concepts, namely, experience and efficiency in care delivery and leading to a more holistic approach in designing and managing health services. The proposed model will enable healthcare systems analysts to objectively and directly relate elements of service quality to capacity planning. Moreover, as an instrument used jointly by healthcare commissioners and providers, it affords the prospect of better resource allocation. PMID:27170899

  16. A systematic review of hospital foodservice patient satisfaction studies.

    PubMed

    Dall'Oglio, Immacolata; Nicolò, Rosanna; Di Ciommo, Vincenzo; Bianchi, Natalia; Ciliento, Gaetano; Gawronski, Orsola; Pomponi, Manuel; Roberti, Marco; Tiozzo, Emanuela; Raponi, Massimiliano

    2015-04-01

    The quality of hospital foodservice is one of the most relevant items of health care quality perceived by patients and by their families. Patient satisfaction is considered a way of measuring the quality of services provided. The purpose of this study was to retrieve and review the literature describing patient satisfaction with hospital foodservices. The systematic review was conducted on three electronic archives, PubMed, Excerpta Medica Database, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (1988 through 2012), to search for any articles reporting patient satisfaction with hospital foodservices. A total of 319 studies were identified. After removing duplicates, 149 abstracts were reviewed, particular attention being given to the presence of a description of the tool used. Thirty-one articles were selected and the full texts were reviewed. Half the studies (n=15) were performed in North America. Patient satisfaction scores were generally high, with some variation among hospitals and different modes of food delivery that was investigated through intervention studies. Qualitative studies were also reported (ethnographic-anthropologic methods with interviews and focus groups). Quantitative tools were represented by questionnaires, some of which relied on previous literature and only a few were validated with factorial analysis and/or Cronbach's α for internal consistency. Most analyses were conducted assuming a parametric distribution of results, an issue not primarily tested. More studies on the quality of hospital foodservice have been carried out in North America than in Europe. Also, a variety of tools, most of which have not been validated, have been used by the different investigating facilities. PMID:25634093

  17. Personal Factors Determining Patient Satisfaction with All-Ceramic Crown Treatment for Single Anterior Teeth.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yun; Zhan, DeSong

    2016-01-01

    The Eysenck Personality Questionnaire's (EPQ) N value (neuroticism) was used to evaluate information from 158 patients before ceramic crown treatment. Patient satisfaction was also evaluated using a satisfaction questionnaire 2 weeks post treatment. Patient expectations were not correlated with sex, age, or N value, and sex was not correlated with patient satisfaction other than in relation to crown shape. Total esthetic satisfaction and feature improvement were positively correlated with age, while satisfaction for five specific criteria was negatively correlated with N value and overall expectation. These observations underscore the importance of considering the physical and psychologic aspects of patient care when planning dental treatment. PMID:27611752

  18. Hospital accreditation and patient satisfaction: testing the relationship.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Albert J

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a study that examines the relationship between two principal measures of institutional healthcare quality: accreditation scores and independently measured patient-satisfaction ratings. This study involved a retrospective review and comparison of summative and selected categorical hospital accreditation scores from the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations and independently measured patient satisfaction ratings. A total of 41 acute care, 200-plus bed, not-for-profit hospitals in New Jersey and eastern Pennsylvania were included. Correlation and multiple-regression statistical methods were employed. The results revealed no relationship between these quality indicators on a summative level and no meaningful pattern categorical relationships. This finding suggests a disassociation between these two quality indicators, thus supporting the use of a balanced scorecard approach to hospital quality management. The study also revealed certain shortcomings in these two quality indicators, relating to insufficient score variability, which should be considered by those using such data to manage quality outcomes. PMID:14763320

  19. Patient Satisfaction With Breast and Colorectal Cancer Survivorship Care Plans

    PubMed Central

    Sprague, Brian L.; Dittus, Kim L.; Pace, Claire M.; Dulko, Dorothy; Pollack, Lori A.; Hawkins, Nikki A.; Geller, Berta M.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer survivors face several challenges following the completion of active treatment, including uncertainty about late effects of treatment and confusion about coordination of follow-up care. The authors evaluated patient satisfaction with personalized survivorship care plans designed to clarify those issues. The authors enrolled 48 patients with breast cancer and 10 patients with colorectal cancer who had completed treatment in the previous two months from an urban academic medical center and a rural community hospital. Patient satisfaction with the care plan was assessed by telephone interview. Overall, about 80% of patients were very or completely satisfied with the care plan, and 90% or more agreed that it was useful, it was easy to understand, and the length was appropriate. Most patients reported that the care plan was very or critically important to understanding an array of survivorship issues. However, only about half felt that it helped them better understand the roles of primary care providers and oncologists in survivorship care. The results provide evidence that patients with cancer find high value in personalized survivorship care plans, but the plans do not eliminate confusion regarding the coordination of follow-up care. Future efforts to improve care plans should focus on better descriptions of how survivorship care will be coordinated. PMID:23722604

  20. Disposable circumcision suture device: clinical effect and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Lv, Bo-Dong; Zhang, Shi-Geng; Zhu, Xuan-Wen; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Gang; Chen, Min-Fu; Shen, Hong-Liang; Pei, Zai-Jun; Chen, Zhao-Dian

    2014-01-01

    In our experience patients undergoing circumcision are mostly concerned about pain and penile appearances. We conducted a prospective randomized trial to assess the benefits of a new disposable circumcision suture device (DCSD). A total of 942 patients were equally divided into three groups (conventional circumcision, Shang ring and disposable suture device group). Patients in the DCSD group were anesthetized with compound 5% lidocaine cream, the others with a 2% lidocaine penile block. Operation time, intra-operative blood loss, incision healing time, intra-operative and post-operative pain, the penile appearance and overall satisfaction degree were measured. Operation time and intra-operative blood loss were significantly lower in the Shang ring and suture device groups compared to the conventional group (P < 0.001). Intra-operative pain was less in the suture device group compared with the other two groups (P < 0.001); whereas post-operative pain was higher in the conventional group compared to the other two groups (P < 0.001). Patients in the suture device (80.57%) and Shang ring (73.57%) groups were more satisfied with penile appearances compared with the conventional circumcision group (20.06%, P < 0.05). Patients in suture device group also healed markedly faster than the conventional group (P < 0.01). The overall satisfaction rate was better in the suture device group (78.66%) compared with the conventional (47.13%) and Shang ring (50.00%) groups (P < 0.05). The combination of DCSD and lidocaine cream resulted in shorter operation and incision healing times, reduced intra-operative and post-operative pain and improved patient satisfaction with the cosmetic appearances. PMID:24759586

  1. Organizational performance impacting patient satisfaction in Ontario hospitals: a multilevel analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patient satisfaction in health care constitutes an important component of organizational performance in the hospital setting. Satisfaction measures have been developed and used to evaluate and improve hospital performance, quality of care and physician practice. In order to direct improvement strategies, it is necessary to evaluate both individual and organizational factors that can impact patients’ perception of care. The study aims were to determine the dimensions of patient satisfaction, and to analyze the individual and organizational determinants of satisfaction dimensions in hospitals. Methods We used patient and hospital survey data as well as administrative data collected for a 2008 public hospital report in Ontario, Canada. We evaluated the clustering of patient survey items with exploratory factor analysis and derived plausible dimensions of satisfaction. A two-level multivariate model was fitted to analyze the determinants of satisfaction. Results We found eight satisfaction factors, with acceptable to good level of loadings and good reliability. More than 95% of variation in patient satisfaction scores was attributable to patient-level variation, with less than 5% attributable to hospital-level variation. The hierarchical models explain 5 to 17% of variation at the patient level and up to 52% of variation between hospitals. Individual patient characteristics had the strongest association with all dimensions of satisfaction. Few organizational performance indicators are associated with patient satisfaction and significant determinants differ according to the satisfaction dimension. Conclusions The research findings highlight the importance of adjusting for both patient-level and organization-level characteristics when evaluating patient satisfaction. Better understanding and measurement of organization-level activities and processes associated with patient satisfaction could contribute to improved satisfaction ratings and care quality. PMID

  2. Distinguishing service quality from patient satisfaction in developing health care marketing strategies.

    PubMed

    Taylor, S A

    1994-01-01

    The marketing function in health care is increasingly becoming strategic in nature. The quality of care provided and the level of patient satisfaction are emerging as the core of many marketing strategies in health services as a means to achieve a distinctive competency in ever-more competitive markets. Therefore, it is not surprising that few issues have generated more discussion in both practitioner and research circles. Nonetheless, according to the health services literature, service quality and patient satisfaction have confounded many, the outcome of which may be an inability of health care managers to effectively derive, implement, and control marketing strategies. This article identifies emerging literature that assists in overcoming these limitations. PMID:10134419

  3. Communicating information to patients. Patient satisfaction and adherence as associated with resident skill.

    PubMed

    Falvo, D; Tippy, P

    1988-06-01

    A study investigated the degree to which residents' communication of specific information about medications and follow-up appointments had an impact on patient recall, satisfaction, and adherence. Twenty-nine interactions between patients and residents were taped and analyzed by two trained observers. Patients were interviewed immediately after their interactions with residents to assess their ability to recall instructions and to assess their levels of satisfaction with the visit. Patients' overall global satisfaction with their interactions was highly correlated with their ratings of resident information giving (Pearson r = .90, P less than .001). Patients who expressed higher levels of satisfaction also had higher recall rates (Pearson r = .39, P less than .01), although overall patient recall rate was only slightly above 50 percent. Observers' analysis of residents giving information reveals a mean performance rating of 40 percent. Only 31 percent of patients returned for their follow-up appointments. The study suggests that information itself may not be so important in determining patient satisfaction as are patients' perceptions that physicians attempt to give them information. Such information may, however, have greater impact on patient adherence with physician recommendations.

  4. An empirical investigation of two competing models of patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Mishra, D P; Singh, J; Wood, V

    1991-01-01

    This paper empirically examines two competing models of patient satisfaction. Specifically, a five factor SERVQUAL model proposed by Parasuraman et al. (1988) and a tripartite model posited by Smith, Bloom, and Davis (1986) are examined. The two models are tested via factor analysis based on data collected from a field survey of hospital patients. The results of this study indicate that the five dimensional SERVQUAL model is not supported by data. On the other hand, there is general support for the tripartite model. Implications of our results for health care practitioners and researchers are discussed. Future directions for research are also outlined.

  5. Sleeping Pill Administration Time and Patient Subjective Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Seockhoon; Youn, Soyoung; Yi, Kikyoung; Park, Boram; Lee, Suyeon

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Taking hypnotic agents 30 min before bedtime is the usual suggested administration time, but some patients report dissatisfaction with their sleeping pills. We investigated whether the timing of sleeping pill administration influences patient subjective satisfaction with these drugs. Methods: One hundred twelve patients with primary insomnia currently taking benzodiazepine or nonbenzodiazepine gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonists as sleeping pills were selected. The time of administration for their sleeping pills, bedtime, sleep onset time, and wake up time were obtained from their medical records. Subjects were also categorized into satisfied or dissatisfied groups. Results: Hypnotic agents administration time (p < 0.001) and bedtime (p < 0.001), but not sleep onset or wake up time, occurred later in the night in the satisfied group. The durations from administration of pills to sleep onset (33.6 ± 20.7 min) and to wake up time (7.2 ± 1.2 h) were significantly shorter in the satisfied group when compared to the dissatisfied group (135.9 ± 73.4 min and 9.3 ± 1.5 h for time to sleep onset and wake up, respectively). Logistic regression analysis revealed that patient subjective satisfaction with hypnotic agents could be predicted by a short duration from administration of pills to sleep onset (odds ratio = 0.01; 95% confidence interval [0.001–0.09]) and a short duration from administration of pills to wake up time (0.53; [0.31–0.89], F = 49.9, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Taking sleeping pills at a later time and a shorter interval between pill administration and wake up time may increase patient subjective satisfaction with hypnotic agents. We propose that physicians advise patients to take sleeping pills approximately 7 h before their usual getting-out-of-bed time instead of the current standard of 30 min before bedtime. Citation: Chung S, Youn S, Yi K, Park B, Lee S. Sleeping pill administration time and patient subjective satisfaction. J

  6. Utilizing patient satisfaction surveys to prepare for Medicaid managed care.

    PubMed

    Fields, T T; Gomez, P S

    2001-02-01

    To prepare for Medicaid managed care, a community health center incorporated the business principle of continuous quality improvement, often used in the private sector to improve customer service, into its planning process. The initial endeavor was to create a patient satisfaction survey that was appropriate for the uniqueness of the community. The survey, taken monthly, resulted in both staff and patients making active improvements in the clinic environment. Staff showed more enthusiasm, and patients were more assertive in their attitudes toward the clinic. The empowerment of the patient to take ownership in the clinic will be coupled with the next step of the formalized plan, that of educating patients on the steps necessary to ensure that their Medicaid managed care facility will be the local community health center. PMID:11217229

  7. Patient satisfaction analysis on service quality of dental health care based on empathy and responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Dewi, Fellani Danasra; Sudjana, Grita; Oesman, Yevis Marty

    2011-01-01

    Background: Transformation of health care is underway from sellers’ market to consumers’ market, where the satisfaction of the patients’ need is a primary concern while defining the service quality. Hence, commitment to provide a high-quality service and achieving patients’ satisfaction becomes an important issue for dental health care provider. The aim of this research is to investigate the quality of dental health care service based on empathy and responsiveness aspects. Methods: A total of 90 questionnaires were completed by the dental patients who came to dental polyclinic located in Government Hospital, West Java, Indonesia. The questionnaire was concerned on two dimensions of service quality model, i.e. empathy and responsiveness. The obtained data were analyzed using inferential statistics (t test) and also descriptive statistics with importance–performance analysis. Results: All the attributes tested by t test showed that perception and expectation differed significantly, except for responsiveness, i.e. ability of dental assistants in assisting the dentist (t test 0.505patient satisfaction is the response given by administration staff related to long waiting time (t test 5.377), followed by dental assistant's knowledge about the patient's need during treatment (t test 4.822) and explanation that was given by dentist (t test 4.700). Conclusion: It can be inferred from IPA that priority should be given to dentist's communication and dental assistant's knowledge toward patient's needs to enhance the service quality. PMID:22135687

  8. Editorial Commentary: Love My Surgeon, Love My Surgery: Patient Satisfaction Matters After Hip Arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Krych, Aaron J

    2016-08-01

    Patient satisfaction following hip arthroscopy is currently underreported and lacks uniformity when published. While current patient reported outcomes are important, they may not reflect overall patient satisfaction because it is complex and multifactorial. However, assessment and documentation of patient satisfaction following hip arthroscopy is critical to demonstrating value and quality. Therefore, it is of pressing importance that the hip arthroscopy community develops an accurate score that is consistent, valid, and reliable.

  9. Editorial Commentary: Love My Surgeon, Love My Surgery: Patient Satisfaction Matters After Hip Arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Krych, Aaron J

    2016-08-01

    Patient satisfaction following hip arthroscopy is currently underreported and lacks uniformity when published. While current patient reported outcomes are important, they may not reflect overall patient satisfaction because it is complex and multifactorial. However, assessment and documentation of patient satisfaction following hip arthroscopy is critical to demonstrating value and quality. Therefore, it is of pressing importance that the hip arthroscopy community develops an accurate score that is consistent, valid, and reliable. PMID:27495866

  10. Customer satisfaction in medical service encounters -- a comparison between obstetrics and gynecology patients and general medical patients.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching-Sheng; Weng, Hui-Ching; Chang, Hsin-Hsin; Hsu, Tsuen-Ho

    2006-03-01

    This study is concerned with the "service encounter", and seeks to describe, by use of the Service Encounter Evaluation Model, how the processes involved in the service encounter affect customer satisfaction. Its findings have implications for management practice and research directions, and recommendations are made. With the implementation of a national health insurance scheme, an ever-prospering economy and continually improving educational levels in Taiwan, demand among citizens for good health and medical care is ever increasing. Obstetrics and gynecology patients often differ greatly from general patients, in terms of their moods and emotions. This research involved an empirical study, whose subjects were 590 customers of general clinics and 339 customers of gynecology clinics, in various medical centers in southern Taiwan. By factor analysis, the study established four influencing factors, which were "Medical professionals", "Nursing professionals", "Service personnel" and "Space and facilities". Using the Linear Structural Relation Model (LISREL), it found that medical professionals, nursing professionals, service personnel and space and facilities were effective predictors of medical treatment satisfaction. We also found that the greatest positive impact on overall medical treatment satisfaction resulted from rises in satisfaction with medical professionals, but that the least impact was achieved in relation to service personnel in the general and gynecology clinics. PMID:16547902

  11. Job satisfaction of intensive care nurses practising primary nursing. A comparison with those practising total patient care.

    PubMed

    Manley, K; Cruse, S; Keogh, S

    1996-01-01

    This study compares the job satisfaction experienced by intensive care nurses practising primary nursing with those who practised total patient care in an a earlier study using the same tool. Differences in the job aspects of; challenge, initiative, seeing work through, output/goals, knowledge and skills appear to be associated with the organisational approach. Some similarities exist between the two units-nurses gained most sense of achievement from: seeing patients improve, personal achievement, giving care and camaraderie. In both units nurses wanted greater opportunities for inter-professional involvement and decision-making. Primary nursing as an organisational approach may provide opportunities for increasing the amount of challenge, decision-making, opportunities for using initiative, seeing work through and subsequently job satisfaction in intensive care nursing. Further study of the job satisfaction of nurses practising primary nursing in ICU is recommended, but sizes and return rates need to be optimised.

  12. A Demonstration of the Impact of Response Bias on the Results of Patient Satisfaction Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Mazor, Kathleen M; Clauser, Brian E; Field, Terry; Yood, Robert A; Gurwitz, Jerry H

    2002-01-01

    Objectives The purposes of the present study were to examine patient satisfaction survey data for evidence of response bias, and to demonstrate, using simulated data, how response bias may impact interpretation of results. Data Sources Patient satisfaction ratings of primary care providers (family practitioners and general internists) practicing in the context of a group-model health maintenance organization and simulated data generated to be comparable to the actual data. Study Design Correlational analysis of actual patient satisfaction data, followed by a simulation study where response bias was modeled, with comparison of results from biased and unbiased samples. Principal Findings A positive correlation was found between mean patient satisfaction rating and response rate in the actual patient satisfaction data. Simulation results suggest response bias could lead to overestimation of patient satisfaction overall, with this effect greatest for physicians with the lowest satisfaction scores. Conclusions Findings suggest that response bias may significantly impact the results of patient satisfaction surveys, leading to overestimation of the level of satisfaction in the patient population overall. Estimates of satisfaction may be most inflated for providers with the least satisfied patients, thereby threatening the validity of provider-level comparisons. PMID:12479503

  13. The Multidisciplinary Hemodialysis Patient Satisfaction Scale: Reliability, Validity, and Scale Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Pamela Davis; Brantley, Philip J.; McKnight, G. Tipton; Jones, Glenn N.; Springer, Annette

    1997-01-01

    The development and preliminary reliability and validity studies are reported for the Multidisciplinary Hemodialysis Patient Satisfaction Scale, a 110-item Likert scale that assesses satisfaction with team health care services. The methods used to construct subscales may have implications for other psychometric studies of satisfaction and quality…

  14. Minority ethnicity patient satisfaction and experience: results of the National Cancer Patient Experience Survey in England

    PubMed Central

    Pinder, Richard J; Ferguson, Jamie; Møller, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to explore the differential patient satisfaction reported by patients with cancer who are from ethnic minority backgrounds, examining patient-reported experience of interacting with medical and nursing staff. Setting As a secondary analysis, we collated data collected over two consecutive annual rounds of the National Cancer Patient Experience Survey (NCPES) from September 2012 to November 2013. Participants There were 138 878 responses from 155 hospital trusts across the National Health Service in England, representing a response rate of 63.9% based on the total identified cohort of patients receiving cancer care over those 2 years. Outcomes We used the results of the annual survey, which sought to assess overall patient satisfaction along with patient experience of interacting with clinical nurse specialists, hospital doctors and ward nurses. Results Ethnic minority patients reported lower satisfaction and less positive experiences of care overall. While some of this difference appeared related to demographic and socioeconomic variation, ethnic minority patients remained less positive than those in the White British group, after statistical adjustment. Ethnic minority patients also reported lower confidence in, and less understanding of, healthcare professionals, including clinical nurse specialists, doctors and ward nurses. Conclusions Given the diversity of the British population, as well as the clustering of ethnic minority patients in certain urban areas, a better understanding of the expectations and additional needs of ethnic minority patients is required to improve their experience of and satisfaction with cancer care. PMID:27354083

  15. A cross-sectional study to assess inhalation device handling and patient satisfaction in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Miravitlles, Marc; Montero-Caballero, Jéssica; Richard, Frank; Santos, Salud; Garcia-Rivero, Juan Luis; Ortega, Francisco; Ribera, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Delivery of inhaled medications via an inhaler device underpins the effectiveness of treatment for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Correct inhaler technique among patients is also a predictor of achieving treatment compliance and adherence. Reporting of patient satisfaction with inhalers is therefore gaining increasing attention and is now recognized as an important patient-reported outcome in clinical trials involving patients with COPD or asthma. In this cross-sectional study, we use the validated Patient Satisfaction and Preference Questionnaire (PASAPQ) to assess the handling and satisfaction for Respimat® Soft Mist™ Inhaler (SMI) compared with the Breezhaler® dry powder inhaler (DPI) among patients with COPD in Spain. Patients were already assigned to therapy with either SPIRIVA® (tiotropium) Respimat® or with Hirobriz®/Onbrez®/Oslif® (indacaterol) Breezhaler® for at least 3 but not more than 6 months before completing the PASAPQ at a single visit to the study site. The primary endpoint of the trial was the mean total PASAPQ score. Secondary endpoints were the performance score domain of the PASAPQ, the convenience score domain of the PASAPQ, and the overall satisfaction score of the PASAPQ. For the primary endpoint, the mean PASAPQ total score in the Respimat® and Breezhaler® groups was 80.7 and 79.9, respectively (difference of 0.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] −2.9 to 4.5; P=0.67). The mean total performance scores were 82.5 and 78.2 (difference of 4.3, 95% CI −0.3 to 8.9; P=0.06), and the mean total convenience scores were 78.6 and 81.9 (difference of −3.3, 95% CI −7.0 to 0.4; P=0.08) for the Respimat® and Breezhaler® groups, respectively. Patients gave the Respimat® SMI and the Breezhaler® DPI overall satisfaction PASAPQ scores of 6.0 and 5.9, respectively, which shows that patients were satisfied with these inhalers. PMID:27013871

  16. A comparison of patient satisfaction among prepaid and fee-for-service patients.

    PubMed

    Murray, J P

    1987-02-01

    This study compares levels of patient satisfaction (a valid, indirect measurement of quality of care) between prepaid and fee-for-service patients. A chart audit approach was used to determine whether prepaid and fee-for-service patients seen in an academic family health center at the end of the first six months of a new cost-containment program were comparable in terms of demographic characteristics and indirect measures of health and health behavior. Next, using a 26-item patient satisfaction questionnaire, 436 patients from a single group of providers in the same family health center seen six months after the programs began were randomly surveyed. Sociodemographic and health-related characteristics of prepaid and fee-for-service patients were similar for both groups in the chart audit. There was no statistically significant difference between the overall satisfaction levels of prepaid and fee-for-service patients. Individual constructs that comprise general satisfaction were also statistically similar except for an unexpected finding of dissimilar levels of satisfaction with "physician conduct/humaneness" (P less than .05). Assessed from at least one standpoint, cost containment does not seem to affect overall quality of care, but further investigation is needed, especially in the realm of "physician conduct/humaneness."

  17. Individuation in Slovene emerging adults: its associations with demographics, transitional markers, achieved criteria for adulthood, and life satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Zupančič, Maja; Komidar, Luka; Levpušček, Melita Puklek

    2014-12-01

    The study investigated associations of Slovene emerging adults' age, gender, living situation, romantic relationship, and employment status with aspects of individuation in relation to mother and father. Controlling for demographic variables and transitional markers of adulthood, we further explored the contribution of individuation measures to individuals' perceptions of achieved criteria for adulthood and life satisfaction. The participants provided self-reports on the Individuation Test for Emerging Adults, the Satisfaction With Life Scale, and the list of Achieved Criteria for Adulthood. Age and living out of parental home were positively associated with self-reliance in relation to both parents, whereas female gender was related to higher levels of connectedness and seeking parental support. Along with age and involvement in a romantic relationship, connectedness and self-reliance predicted adulthood criteria attainment and life satisfaction. The results support the models of individuation that emphasize growing autonomy and retaining connectedness to parents as pathways towards personal adjustments.

  18. Customer care. Patient satisfaction in the prehospital setting.

    PubMed

    Doering, G T

    1998-09-01

    The focus of the study was to prioritize six emergency medical service treatment factors in terms of their impact upon patient satisfaction in the prehospital setting. The six treatment areas analyzed were: EMS response time; medical care provided on scene; explanation of care by the provider; the provider's ability to reduce patient anxiety; the provider's ability to meet the patient's non-medical needs; and the level of courtesy/politeness shown by the EMS provider toward the patient. Telephone interviews were conducted with both patients and bystanders to obtain their perception of how well the system met their needs. The study analyzed how the six issues were rated and then evaluated the impact an individual's low score in a category had on that person's overall rating of the service provided. The overall satisfaction rating is not a calculated score, but an overall score specified by the respondent. The effect each issue had on the respondent's overall rating was determined by averaging the overall ratings for a category's low scorers, averaging the overall ratings for high scorers and then measuring the difference. Results of the study indicate that the factor with the greatest negative impact on patient satisfaction came from a perceived lack of crew courtesy and politeness. Respondents who indicated a fair to poor score in this category decreased their overall score by 60.2%. Ratings in other categories yielded the following results: When respondents rated the response time as fair to poor, their average overall rating showed an 18.4% decrease. When respondents rated the quality of medical care as fair to poor, their average overall rating showed a decrease of 22.6%. When the crew's ability to explain what was happening to the patient was rated as fair to poor, the average overall score dropped 33.6%. When the EMT's and medic's ability to reduce the patient's anxiety was rated fair to poor, average overall score declined by 32.6%. Finally, when the crew

  19. Customer care. Patient satisfaction in the prehospital setting.

    PubMed

    Doering, G T

    1998-09-01

    The focus of the study was to prioritize six emergency medical service treatment factors in terms of their impact upon patient satisfaction in the prehospital setting. The six treatment areas analyzed were: EMS response time; medical care provided on scene; explanation of care by the provider; the provider's ability to reduce patient anxiety; the provider's ability to meet the patient's non-medical needs; and the level of courtesy/politeness shown by the EMS provider toward the patient. Telephone interviews were conducted with both patients and bystanders to obtain their perception of how well the system met their needs. The study analyzed how the six issues were rated and then evaluated the impact an individual's low score in a category had on that person's overall rating of the service provided. The overall satisfaction rating is not a calculated score, but an overall score specified by the respondent. The effect each issue had on the respondent's overall rating was determined by averaging the overall ratings for a category's low scorers, averaging the overall ratings for high scorers and then measuring the difference. Results of the study indicate that the factor with the greatest negative impact on patient satisfaction came from a perceived lack of crew courtesy and politeness. Respondents who indicated a fair to poor score in this category decreased their overall score by 60.2%. Ratings in other categories yielded the following results: When respondents rated the response time as fair to poor, their average overall rating showed an 18.4% decrease. When respondents rated the quality of medical care as fair to poor, their average overall rating showed a decrease of 22.6%. When the crew's ability to explain what was happening to the patient was rated as fair to poor, the average overall score dropped 33.6%. When the EMT's and medic's ability to reduce the patient's anxiety was rated fair to poor, average overall score declined by 32.6%. Finally, when the crew

  20. Patient-Reported Outcomes and Total Health Care Expenditure in Prediction of Patient Satisfaction: Results From a National Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiping; Chen, Wei; Bounsanga, Jerry; Cheng, Christine; Franklin, Jeremy D; Crum, Anthony B; Voss, Maren W; Hon, Shirley D

    2015-01-01

    Background Health care quality is often linked to patient satisfaction. Yet, there is a lack of national studies examining the relationship between patient satisfaction, patient-reported outcomes, and medical expenditure. Objective The aim of this study is to examine the contribution of physical health, mental health, general health, and total health care expenditures to patient satisfaction using a longitudinal, nationally representative sample. Methods Using data from the 2010-2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, analyses were conducted to predict patient satisfaction from patient-reported outcomes and total health care expenditures. The study sample consisted of adult participants (N=10,157), with sampling weights representative of 233.26 million people in the United States. Results The results indicated that patient-reported outcomes and total health care expenditure were associated with patient satisfaction such that higher physical and mental function, higher general health status, and higher total health care expenditure were associated with higher patient satisfaction. Conclusions We found that patient-reported outcomes and total health care expenditure had a significant relationship with patient satisfaction. As more emphasis is placed on health care value and quality, this area of research will become increasingly needed and critical questions should be asked about what we value in health care and whether we can find a balance between patient satisfaction, outcomes, and expenditures. Future research should apply big data analytics to investigate whether there is a differential effect of patient-reported outcomes and medical expenditures on patient satisfaction across different medical specialties. PMID:27227131

  1. A Systematic Review of Applying Patient Satisfaction Outcomes in Plastic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Clapham, Philip J.; Pushman, Allison G.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Background We performed a systematic review of patient satisfaction studies in the Plastic Surgery literature. The specific aim was to evaluate the status of satisfaction research that has been undertaken to date and to identify areas for improvement. Methods Four medical databases were searched using satisfaction and Plastic Surgery related search terms. Quality of selected articles was assessed by two trained reviewers. Results Out of the total of 2,936 articles gleaned by the search, 178 were included in the final review. The majority of the articles (58%) in our review examined patient satisfaction in breast surgery populations. Additionally, 53% of the articles were limited in scope and only measured features of care in one or two domains of satisfaction. Finally, the majority of the studies (68%) were based solely on the use of ad-hoc satisfaction measurement instruments that did not undergo a formal development. Conclusion Given the important policy implications of patient satisfaction data within Plastic Surgery, we found a need to further refine research on patient satisfaction in Plastic Surgery. The scarcity of satisfaction research in the craniofacial, hand, and other reconstructive specialties, as well as the narrow scope of satisfaction measurement and the use of unvalidated instruments are current barriers preventing Plastic Surgery patient satisfaction studies from producing meaningful results. PMID:20517109

  2. Patient satisfaction with ambulatory healthcare services: waiting time and filling time.

    PubMed

    Dansky, K H; Miles, J

    1997-01-01

    Customer satisfaction is an important measure of service quality in healthcare organizations. This study investigated the relationship between patient waiting and satisfaction with ambulatory healthcare services, with waiting times divided into segments of the patient-care episode. Two management techniques to alter perceptions of waiting were also examined. Regression models measuring the effect of waiting times on satisfaction found that the total time spent waiting for the clinician was the most significant predictor of patient satisfaction. Informing patients how long their wait would be and being occupied during the wait were also significant predictors of patient satisfaction. These results show that waiting times, even if they cannot be shortened, can be managed more effectively to improve patient satisfaction. PMID:10167452

  3. Patient satisfaction with ambulatory healthcare services: waiting time and filling time.

    PubMed

    Dansky, K H; Miles, J

    1997-01-01

    Customer satisfaction is an important measure of service quality in healthcare organizations. This study investigated the relationship between patient waiting and satisfaction with ambulatory healthcare services, with waiting times divided into segments of the patient-care episode. Two management techniques to alter perceptions of waiting were also examined. Regression models measuring the effect of waiting times on satisfaction found that the total time spent waiting for the clinician was the most significant predictor of patient satisfaction. Informing patients how long their wait would be and being occupied during the wait were also significant predictors of patient satisfaction. These results show that waiting times, even if they cannot be shortened, can be managed more effectively to improve patient satisfaction.

  4. Public Reporting of Hospital Patient Satisfaction: The Rhode Island Experience

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Judith K.; Boni, Cathy E.; Kochurka, Kimberly A.; Nolan, Patricia; Petrillo, Marcia; Sofaer, Shoshanna; Waters, William

    2002-01-01

    This article describes a collaborative process for legislatively mandated public reporting of health care performance in Rhode Island that began with hospital patient satisfaction. The goals of the report were both quality improvement and public accountability. Key features addressed include: the legislative context for public reporting; widespread participation of stakeholders; the structure for decisionmaking; and the use of formative testing with cognitive interviews to get responses of consumers and others about the report's readability and comprehensibility. This experience and the lessons learned can guide other States considering public reporting on health care performance. PMID:12500470

  5. Data-Driven Identification of Risk Factors of Patient Satisfaction at a Large Urban Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Lee, Nathan J.; Glicksberg, Benjamin S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey is the first publicly reported nationwide survey to evaluate and compare hospitals. Increasing patient satisfaction is an important goal as it aims to achieve a more effective and efficient healthcare delivery system. In this study, we develop and apply an integrative, data-driven approach to identify clinical risk factors that associate with patient satisfaction outcomes. Methods We included 1,771 unique adult patients who completed the HCAHPS survey and were discharged from the inpatient Medicine service from 2010 to 2012. We collected 266 clinical features including patient demographics, lab measurements, medications, disease categories, and procedures. We developed and applied a data-driven approach to identify risk factors that associate with patient satisfaction outcomes. Findings We identify 102 significant risk factors associating with 18 surveyed questions. The most significantly recurrent clinical risk factors were: self-evaluation of health, education level, Asian, White, treatment in BMT oncology division, being prescribed a new medication. Patients who were prescribed pregabalin were less satisfied particularly in relation to communication with nurses and pain management. Explanation of medication usage was associated with communication with nurses (q = 0.001); however, explanation of medication side effects was associated with communication with doctors (q = 0.003). Overall hospital rating was associated with hospital environment, communication with doctors, and communication about medicines. However, patient likelihood to recommend hospital was associated with hospital environment, communication about medicines, pain management, and communication with nurse. Conclusions Our study identified a number of putatively novel clinical risk factors for patient satisfaction that suggest new opportunities to better understand and manage patient satisfaction

  6. A measure of treatment response: patient and physician satisfaction with traditional NSAIDs for osteoarthritis control

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Stephanie D; Everett, Sharlette V; Taylor, Thomas N; Watson, Douglas J; Taylor-Stokes, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The clinical response to traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (tNSAIDs) varies substantially. The objective of this study was to describe physicians’ and patients’ perceptions of response to tNSAIDs as measured by satisfaction with control of patients’ osteoarthritis (OA). Patients and methods A cross-sectional survey was undertaken in 2009 in Germany, Spain, and the UK. Linked physician and patient questionnaires collected data on OA management, degree of pain and disability, and satisfaction with OA control. Results The study included 363 treating physicians and 713 patients receiving tNSAIDs. Patient mean (standard deviation) age was 65.5 (11.0) years (range 36–94 years); 60% were women; 86% were white; and one-quarter were obese. Dissatisfaction with control of patients’ OA was expressed by physicians or their patients, or both, for 51% of patients, including 208 patients (31%) with mild OA and 478 patients (60%) with moderate or severe OA. Overall, 37% of patients reported dissatisfaction and 34% had a physician who reported dissatisfaction. Patient and physician assessments were the same in 70% of cases; Cohen’s κ coefficient was 0.34 (95% confidence interval 0.26–0.41), indicating fair agreement. Of those reporting dissatisfaction, most physicians (79%) and patients (64%) believed that the current control was the best that could be achieved. The most common reasons for which physicians reported dissatisfaction were inadequate response (56%), side effects (11.1%), and poor tolerance (7.8%). Conclusion One-half of patients or their treating physicians were dissatisfied with the control of OA provided by tNSAID therapy; moreover, most believed it was the best control that could be achieved.

  7. Using Public Reports of Patient Satisfaction for Hospital Quality Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Judith K; Giannotti, Tierney E; Sofaer, Shoshanna; Duquette, Cathy E; Waters, William J; Petrillo, Marcia K

    2006-01-01

    Objective To explore the impact of statewide public reporting of hospital patient satisfaction on hospital quality improvement (QI), using Rhode Island (RI) as a case example. Data Source Primary data collected through semi-structured interviews between September 2002 and January 2003. Study Design The design is a retrospective study of hospital executives at all 11 general and two specialty hospitals in RI. Respondents were asked about hospital QI activities at several points throughout the public reporting process, as well as about hospital structure and processes to accomplish QI. Qualitative analysis of the interview data proceeded through an iterative process to identify themes and categories in the data. Principal Findings Data from the standardized statewide patient satisfaction survey process were used by hospitals to identify and target new QI initiatives, evaluate performance, and monitor progress. While all hospitals fully participated in the public reporting process, they varied in the stage of development of their QI activities and adoption of the statewide standardized survey for ongoing monitoring of their QI programs. Most hospitals placed responsibility for QI within each department, with results reported to top management, who were perceived as giving strong support for QI. The external environment facilitated QI efforts. Conclusion Public reporting of comparative data on patient views can enhance and reinforce QI efforts in hospitals. The participation of key stakeholders facilitated successful implementation of statewide public reporting. This experience in RI offers lessons for other states or regions as they move to public reporting of hospital quality data. PMID:16704506

  8. The Effects of Cooperative and Collaborative Strategies on Student Achievement and Satisfaction in Blended and Online Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickel, Christine E.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether cooperative versus collaborative strategies used for a group project had differential effects on students' achievement, process and solution satisfaction, value and preference for collaboration, and perceptions of community of inquiry in online and blended environments. The study sample consisted of…

  9. The Relationship between Self-Determination, Achievement Goal Orientation and Satisfaction with the Learning Experience: Working with Adult Lifelong Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodd, Jane

    2013-01-01

    This exploratory study investigated how self-perceptions of self-determination and of achievement goal orientation were related to self-perceptions of satisfaction with the learning experience in a population of 495 adults engaged in non-formal lifelong learning through participation as amateur members of the United States Dressage Association.…

  10. The Effect of Prior Knowledge and Feedback Type Design on Student Achievement and Satisfaction in Introductory Accounting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Donald P.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of student prior knowledge and feedback type on student achievement and satisfaction in an introductory managerial accounting course using computer-based formative assessment tools. The study involved a redesign of the existing Job Order Costing unit using the ADDIE model of instructional design. The…

  11. Ubiquitous Laptop Usage in Higher Education: Effects on Student Achievement, Student Satisfaction, and Constructivist Measures in Honors and Traditional Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurst, Christian; Smarkola, Claudia; Gaffney, Mary Anne

    2008-01-01

    Three years of graduating business honors cohorts in a large urban university were sampled to determine whether the introduction of ubiquitous laptop computers into the honors program contributed to student achievement, student satisfaction and constructivist teaching activities. The first year cohort consisted of honors students who did not have…

  12. Using a Multidimensional Measure of Resilience to Explain Life Satisfaction and Academic Achievement of Adults with Reading Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stack-Cutler, Holly L.; Parrila, Rauno K.; Torppa, Minna

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the impact of intrapersonal and interpersonal resilience, persistence, and number of difficulties in addition to reading problems on life satisfaction (general, social, and self) and academic achievement. A total of 120 adults with reading difficulties who either were completing a university degree or were recent graduates responded to…

  13. Patient satisfaction after Nd:YAG laser-assisted lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Lesley; Vasconez, Henry C

    2011-05-01

    Laser-assisted lipoplasty has potential attractive advantages over traditional liposuction, though review of the literature reveals some variation in outcomes. The patient's perspective regarding the procedure and outcome is described from the results of a survey administered to sequential patients undergoing laser-assisted lipoplasty in an office setting. The average perception of reduction in size is 3.94 on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being the most noticeable. The average perception of improvement in skin appearance is 3.1 (1-5, with 5 being most noticeable). The overall satisfaction is 3.78 (1-5, with 5 being very satisfied). Return to normal activity was 1.5 days. Of all the respondents, 75% took only 0 to 1 pain pills after the procedure. Though we found a positive patient response to the technique, further study is needed to answer remaining questions. PMID:21451378

  14. Mexican patient satisfaction in a rural Minnesota primary care clinic.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Katelyn

    2008-08-01

    The Latino population in rural Minnesota has grown significantly in recent years. Despite the increase, few studies have considered whether these newcomers are satisfied with the care they receive from local medical clinics. This article describes the results of a pilot study that assessed 20 Mexican patients' satisfaction with care they received in a primary care clinic in rural central Minnesota. Participants were interviewed using questions from Stewart's Interpersonal Care Survey and open-ended questions. Results showed the patients were generally satisfied with their health care. However, they suggested improvements in the areas of communication and involvement in decisions. Answers to the open-ended questions suggested that even though patients seemed satisfied with their care, they still strongly desired a bilingual physician.

  15. Patient satisfaction with nursing care in a regional university hospital in southern Spain.

    PubMed

    González-Valentín, Araceli; Padín-López, Susana; de Ramón-Garrido, Enrique

    2005-01-01

    Patient satisfaction is a valid indicator for measurement of service quality. Patients' opinions are important because dissatisfaction suggests opportunities for improvement. We evaluated the satisfaction of patients with nursing care in a regional university hospital in southern Spain and determined the relevant sociodemographic and attendance characteristics. A cross-sectional descriptive study was undertaken using the SERVQUAL questionnaire. Reliability and validity of the SERVQUAL instrument were established. The only interaction considered was gender and education level. Analysis of covariance showed that the only factors significantly associated with lower patient satisfaction were female gender, higher educational level, lower overall satisfaction with the hospital, and not knowing the name of the nurse.

  16. Patient satisfaction with nursing care in a regional university hospital in southern Spain.

    PubMed

    González-Valentín, Araceli; Padín-López, Susana; de Ramón-Garrido, Enrique

    2005-01-01

    Patient satisfaction is a valid indicator for measurement of service quality. Patients' opinions are important because dissatisfaction suggests opportunities for improvement. We evaluated the satisfaction of patients with nursing care in a regional university hospital in southern Spain and determined the relevant sociodemographic and attendance characteristics. A cross-sectional descriptive study was undertaken using the SERVQUAL questionnaire. Reliability and validity of the SERVQUAL instrument were established. The only interaction considered was gender and education level. Analysis of covariance showed that the only factors significantly associated with lower patient satisfaction were female gender, higher educational level, lower overall satisfaction with the hospital, and not knowing the name of the nurse. PMID:15686078

  17. Willing to wait?: The influence of patient wait time on satisfaction with primary care

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Roger T; Camacho, Fabian T; Balkrishnan, Rajesh

    2007-01-01

    Background This study examined the relationship between patient waiting time and willingness to return for care and patient satisfaction ratings with primary care physicians. Methods Cross-sectional survey data on a convenience sample of 5,030 patients who rated their physicians on a web-based survey developed to collect detailed information on patient experiences with health care. The survey included self-reported information on wait times, time spent with doctor, and patient satisfaction. Results Longer waiting times were associated with lower patient satisfaction (p < 0.05), however, time spent with the physician was the strongest predictor of patient satisfaction. The decrement in satisfaction associated with long waiting times is substantially reduced with increased time spent with the physician (5 minutes or more). Importantly, the combination of long waiting time to see the doctor and having a short doctor visit is associated with very low overall patient satisfaction. Conclusion The time spent with the physician is a stronger predictor of patient satisfaction than is the time spent in the waiting room. These results suggest that shortening patient waiting times at the expense of time spent with the patient to improve patient satisfaction scores would be counter-productive. PMID:17328807

  18. Patient-centered transfer process for patients admitted through the ED boosts satisfaction, improves safety.

    PubMed

    2013-02-01

    To improve safety and patient flow, administrators at Hallmark Health System, based in Melrose, MA, implemented a new patient-centered transfer process for patients admitted through the ED at the health system's two hospitals. Under the new approach, inpatient nurses come down to the ED to take reports on new patients in a process that includes the ED care team as well as family members. The inpatient nurses then accompany the patients up to their designated floors. Since the new patient-transfer process was implemented in June 2012, patient satisfaction has increased by at least one point on patient satisfaction surveys. Administrators anticipate that medical errors or omissions related to the handoff process will show a drop of at least 50%, when data is tabulated.

  19. Exploring the relationship between accreditation and patient satisfaction – the case of selected Lebanese hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Haj-Ali, Wissam; Bou Karroum, Lama; Natafgi, Nabil; Kassak, Kassem

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patient satisfaction is one of the vital attributes to consider when evaluating the impact of accreditation systems. This study aimed to explore the impact of the national accreditation system in Lebanon on patient satisfaction. Methods: An explanatory cross-sectional study of six hospitals in Lebanon. Patient satisfaction was measured using the SERVQUAL tool assessing five dimensions of quality (reliability, assurance, tangibility, empathy, and responsiveness). Independent variables included hospital accreditation scores, size, location (rural/urban), and patient demographics. Results: The majority of patients (76.34%) were unsatisfied with the quality of services. There was no statistically significant association between accreditation classification and patient satisfaction. However, the tangibility dimension – reflecting hospital structural aspects such as physical facility and equipment was found to be associated with patient satisfaction. Conclusion: This study brings to light the importance of embracing more adequate patient satisfaction measures in the Lebanese hospital accreditation standards. Furthermore, the findings reinforce the importance of weighing the patient perspective in the development and implementation of accreditation systems. As accreditation is not the only driver of patient satisfaction, hospitals are encouraged to adopt complementary means of promoting patient satisfaction. PMID:25396210

  20. The effect of surgeon empathy and emotional intelligence on patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Weng, Hui-Ching; Steed, James F; Yu, Shang-Won; Liu, Yi-Ten; Hsu, Chia-Chang; Yu, Tsan-Jung; Chen, Wency

    2011-12-01

    We investigated the associations of surgeons' emotional intelligence and surgeons' empathy with patient-surgeon relationships, patient perceptions of their health, and patient satisfaction before and after surgical procedures. We used multi-source approaches to survey 50 surgeons and their 549 outpatients during initial and follow-up visits. Surgeons' emotional intelligence had a positive effect (r = .45; p < .001) on patient-rated patient-surgeon relationships. Patient-surgeon relationships had a positive impact on patient satisfaction before surgery (r = .95; p < .001). Surgeon empathy did not have an effect on patient-surgeon relationships or patient satisfaction prior to surgery. But after surgery, surgeon empathy appeared to have a significantly positive and indirect effect on patient satisfaction through the mediating effect of patients' self-reported health status (r = .21; p < .001). Our study showed that long-term patient satisfaction with their surgeons is affected less by emotional intelligence than by empathy. Furthermore, empathy indirectly affects patient satisfaction through its positive effect on health outcomes, which have a direct effect on patients' satisfaction with their surgeons.

  1. [The satisfaction of personal needs in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Sukhova, E V

    2005-01-01

    The founder of humanistic psychology A. Maslow divided the needs of a personality into several levels--from the lowest to the highest ones. Higher-leveled needs rise when the lower-leveled needs are satisfied. A great deal of factors affect the origination and satisfaction of needs, but they are always interrelated with social values. The extent to which personality needs are satisfied in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis has not been studied. A special questionnaire has been drawn up to study the extent to which personality needs are met. Its suitability has been determined, by using a group of patients with bronchial asthma. The extent to which personality needs are satisfied in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis was studied in 178 patients with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis and 253 patients with fibrocavernous pulmonary tuberculosis. The results have shown that the extent to which personality needs are satisfied in patients with tuberculosis is lower than that in apparently healthy individuals of the same social status. In females with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis, the needs for safety are satisfied to a lesser extent. In those with fibrocavernous pulmonary tuberculosis, the extent to which the physiological, safety, and self-realization needs is decreased. In males with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis, the physiological, noetic, and self-realization needs are satisfied to a lesser extent. In those with fibrocavernous pulmonary tuberculosis, the extent to which the physiological, safety, group decision-making, noetic and self-realization needs is decreased. PMID:15801639

  2. Improving Patient Satisfaction Through Computer-Based Questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew J; Reiter, Michael J; Crist, Brett D; Schultz, Loren G; Choma, Theodore J

    2016-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome measures are helping clinicians to use evidence-based medicine in decision making. The use of computer-based questionnaires to gather such data may offer advantages over traditional paper-based methods. These advantages include consistent presentation, prompts for missed questions, reliable scoring, and simple and accurate transfer of information into databases without manual data entry. The authors enrolled 308 patients over a 16-month period from 3 orthopedic clinics: spine, upper extremity, and trauma. Patients were randomized to complete either electronic or paper validated outcome forms during their first visit, and they completed the opposite modality at their second visit, which was approximately 7 weeks later. For patients with upper-extremity injuries, the Penn Shoulder Score (PSS) was used. For patients with lower-extremity injuries, the Foot Function Index (FFI) was used. For patients with lumbar spine symptoms, the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was used. All patients also were asked to complete the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) Health Status Survey, version 1. The authors assessed patient satisfaction with each survey modality and determined potential advantages and disadvantages for each. No statistically significant differences were found between the paper and electronic versions for patient-reported outcome data. However, patients strongly preferred the electronic surveys. Additionally, the paper forms had significantly more missed questions for the FFI (P<.0001), ODI (P<.0001), and PSS (P=.008), and patents were significantly less likely to complete these forms (P<.0001). Future research should focus on limiting the burden on responders, individualizing forms and questions as much as possible, and offering alternative environments for completion (home or mobile platforms).

  3. [Patient satisfaction regarding further telephone contact following attempted suicide].

    PubMed

    Gruat, G; Cottencin, O; Ducrocq, F; Duhem, S; Vaiva, G

    2010-06-01

    At a time when increasing importance is given to providing satisfaction to the users of health services, it is surprising that this concept has hardly ever been examined in the field of suicide. Although suicide (prevention and management) is an important part of public health, there seems to be little interest in finding out patients' opinions about the healthcare services which are offered to them. Back in 1976, some authors found a link between the risk of suicide and a low level of satisfaction of healthcare. To date, only two studies looking at management of suicidal patients have included an assessment of patient satisfaction (a strong link between dissatisfaction and suicidal risk was found). During the SYSCALL study, which measured the impact of systematic recontacting by telephone on recurrence of suicide, in the weeks following a suicide attempt, we aimed to find out if this procedure and its methods were well-accepted by the patients. When the patients were first recontacted, 13 months after the suicide attempt, and included in our study, we assessed by means of a questionnaire, their experience of being faced with this intervention, and its impact on their future. Of the 605 patients included, 312 were put into the control group, 147 were recontacted at the end of the first month, and 146 at the end of the third month. The rate of repeat suicide attempts in the year following the initial attempt, was significantly lower in the group that was recontacted after one month, than in the control group [12% against 22%; P=0.03]. It would therefore seem that systematic recontacting by telephone one month after attempted suicide may have contributed in reducing the risk of an early repeat suicide attempt. Of the 482 patients whom we managed to contact by 13 months, 254 had filled out the questionnaire about their subjective experience, in writing or by telephone, this making a response rate of 52.7%. Amongst the patients who replied, female patients are over

  4. Risser patient satisfaction scale: a validation study in Greek cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The current healthcare climate is characterized by a constant battle for the provision of quality care with limited resources and with patient satisfaction receiving increased attention, there is a need for reliable and valid assessment measures. This study describes the adaptation, testing and validation of the Risser Patient satisfaction Scale in an oncology care setting in Greece. The rationale for this study lies in the scarcity of such measures in the Greek language. Methods This is a test retest validation study in Greece. Data were collected from 298 hospitalized cancer patients. The validation methodology included the assessment of the item internal consistency, using the Cronbach alpha coefficient. The test-retest reliability was tested by the Kappa correlation coefficient. Results The scale demonstrated very good psychometric properties. The internal consistency of the instrument was good, Cronbach’s alpha was found to be 0.78 (p<0.001) and Kappa coefficient for reproducibility was found to be K=0.89 (95% CI: 0.83-0.91 p<0.0001). Conclusion The findings demonstrated strong agreement of the scale, suggesting that the Greek version offers substantial reliability. This study provides a valid and reliable tool to assess patient satisfaction in oncology settings. Means to monitor patient satisfaction, a key aspect of the policy agenda for quality care remain important for nurse leaders to develop better care in oncology settings. PMID:23190625

  5. Patient Satisfaction of Surgical Treatment of Clitoral Phimosis and Labial Adhesions Caused by Lichen Sclerosus

    PubMed Central

    King, Michelle; Rieff, Mollie; Krapf, Jill; Goldstein, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    with surgical correction of clitoral phimosis and lysis of vulvar adhesions for VGF caused by LS. Patients reported improvement in clitoral sensation and ability to achieve orgasm, as well as decreased dyspareunia. Surgical correction of vulvar scarring is a viable option to restore vulvar anatomy and sexual function in appropriate candidates with anogenital LS. Flynn AN, King M, Rieff M, Krapf J, and Goldstein AT. Patient satisfaction of surgical treatment of clitoral phimosis and labial adhesions caused by lichen sclerosus. Sex Med 2015;3:251–255. PMID:26797058

  6. An alternative to satisfaction surveys: let the patients talk.

    PubMed

    Alemi, Farrokh; Jasper, Harry

    2014-01-01

    We propose to replace the standardized 27-item hospital version of the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) survey with 1-item questionnaire that asks "What worked well and what needs improvement?" Sentiment analysis can take the responses to this single question and reconstruct a report on frequency of dissatisfied customers and reasons for dissatisfaction similar to reports received from longer surveys. This article shows, by way of an example, how benchmarked and quantitative reports can be generated from patients' comments. The CAHPS survey asks more leading questions, is less granular in its feedback, has lower response rate, has costly repeated reminders, and may not be as timely as sentiment analysis of a single, open-ended question. This article also shows the implementation of the proposed approach in one critical access hospital and its affiliated clinic and calls for additional research to compare sentiment analysis and CAHPS satisfaction surveys.

  7. Attitudes about racism, medical mistrust, and satisfaction with care among African American and white cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    LaVeist, T A; Nickerson, K J; Bowie, J V

    2000-01-01

    The authors examine determinants of satisfaction with medical care among 1,784 (781 African American and 1,003 white) cardiac patients. Patient satisfaction was modeled as a function of predisposing factors (gender, age, medical mistrust, and perception of racism) and enabling factors (medical insurance). African Americans reported less satisfaction with care. Although both black and white patients tended not to endorse the existence of racism in the medical care system, African American patients were more likely to perceive racism. African American patients were significantly more likely to report mistrust. Multivariate analysis found that the perception of racism and mistrust of the medical care system led to less satisfaction with care. When perceived racism and medical mistrust were controlled, race was no longer a significant predictor of satisfaction.

  8. How are organisational climate models and patient satisfaction related? A competing value framework approach.

    PubMed

    Ancarani, Alessandro; Di Mauro, Carmela; Giammanco, Maria Daniela

    2009-12-01

    Patient satisfaction has become an important indicator of process quality inside hospitals. Even so, the improvement of patient satisfaction cannot simply follow from the implementation of new incentives schemes and organisational arrangements; it also depends on hospitals' cultures and climates. This paper studies the impact of alternative models of organisational climate in hospital wards on patient satisfaction. Data gathered from seven public hospitals in Italy are used to explore this relationship. The theoretical approach adopted is the Competing Value Framework which classifies organisations according to their inward or outward focus and according to the importance assigned to control vs. flexibility. Results show that both a model stressing openness, change and innovation and a model emphasising cohesion and workers' morale are positively related to patient satisfaction, while a model based on managerial control is negatively associated with patient satisfaction.

  9. How are organisational climate models and patient satisfaction related? A competing value framework approach.

    PubMed

    Ancarani, Alessandro; Di Mauro, Carmela; Giammanco, Maria Daniela

    2009-12-01

    Patient satisfaction has become an important indicator of process quality inside hospitals. Even so, the improvement of patient satisfaction cannot simply follow from the implementation of new incentives schemes and organisational arrangements; it also depends on hospitals' cultures and climates. This paper studies the impact of alternative models of organisational climate in hospital wards on patient satisfaction. Data gathered from seven public hospitals in Italy are used to explore this relationship. The theoretical approach adopted is the Competing Value Framework which classifies organisations according to their inward or outward focus and according to the importance assigned to control vs. flexibility. Results show that both a model stressing openness, change and innovation and a model emphasising cohesion and workers' morale are positively related to patient satisfaction, while a model based on managerial control is negatively associated with patient satisfaction. PMID:19850393

  10. [Treatment satisfaction of patients with borderline personality disorder in inpatient schema therapy].

    PubMed

    Reiss, Neele; Vogel, Friederike; Nill, Marco; Graf-Morgenstern, Mechthild; Finkelmeier, Britta; Lieb, Klaus

    2013-02-01

    Patients with severe and chronic psychiatric disorders, such as Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD), are hospitalized frequently, but we often find a high ambivalence regarding treatment in this group of patients. 31 patients with severe BPD participated in an inpatient Schema Therapy (ST) treatment program and evaluated both the intensive ST treatment program and group therapy elements regarding their treatment -satisfaction. A high global treatment satisfaction with the ST treatment program was demonstrated and we found a higher treatment satisfaction in patients with than without BPD specific symptom reductions. Remarkable differences in treatment satisfaction showed when looking at the evaluation of group therapies. The results of the present study demonstrate treatment satisfaction of BPD patients in inpatient ST and give directions for the future development of these programs.

  11. Cryolipolysis for noninvasive body contouring: clinical efficacy and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Nils; Mai, Sophia V; Luebberding, Stefanie; Sadick, Neil S

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a number of modalities have become available for the noninvasive reduction of adipose tissue, including cryolipolysis, radiofrequency, low-level laser, and high-intensity focused ultrasound. Each technology employs a different mechanism of action to cause apoptosis or necrosis of the targeted adipocytes. Among these technologies, cryolipolysis has not only been commercially available for the longest time, but has also been best researched including in vitro and animal models and randomized controlled clinical trials in humans. The principle behind cryolipolysis exploits the premise that adipocytes are more susceptible to cooling than other skin cells. The precise application of cold temperatures triggers apoptosis of the adipocytes, which invokes an inflammatory response and leads to slow digestion by surrounding macrophages. In clinical studies, cryolipolysis was shown to reduce subcutaneous fat at the treatment site by up to 25% after one treatment. Improvements were seen in 86% of treated subjects. At 73%, the patient satisfaction rate is higher than with other technologies used for noninvasive lipolysis. Cryolipolysis has been proven to be a very safe method for body contouring, and is accomplished with only minimal discomfort. Expected side effects are temporary erythema, bruising, and transient numbness that usually resolve within 14 days after treatment. With a prevalence of 0.1%, the most common complaint is late-onset pain, occurring 2 weeks post-procedure, which resolves without intervention. Although no procedure has been accepted as the gold standard for noninvasive body contouring as yet, cryolipolysis is considered to be both safe and efficient with a high patient satisfaction rate.

  12. The relationship of learning motivation, achievement and satisfaction for nurses learning simple excel VBA information systems programming.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ying Li; Chien, Tsai Feng; Kuo, Ming Chuan; Chang, Polun

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to understand the relationship between participating nurses' motivation, achievement and satisfaction before and after they learned to program in Excel Visual Basic for Applications (Excel VBA). We held a workshop to train nurses in developing simple Excel VBA information systems to support their clinical or administrative practices. Before and after the workshop, the participants were evaluated on their knowledge of Excel VBA, and a questionnaire was given to survey their learning motivation and satisfaction. Statistics softwares Winsteps and SPSS were used for data analysis. Results show that the participants are more knowledgeable about VBA as well as more motivated in learning VBA after the workshop. Participants were highly satisfied with the overall arrangement of the workshop and instructors, but didn't have enough confidence in promoting the application of Excel VBA themselves. In addition, we were unable to predict the participants' achievement by their demographic characteristics or pre-test motivation level.

  13. Treatment satisfaction and recovery in Saami and Norwegian patients following psychiatric hospital treatment: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Sørlie, Tore; Nergård, Jens-Ivar

    2005-06-01

    Treatment, treatment satisfaction and recovery in Saami and Norwegian patients treated in a psychiatric hospital were compared. Although half of the Saami patients preferred to speak Saami with their therapists, only one patient did. The extensive use of traditional helpers was only partly recognized. Despite no differences in type and amount of treatment or symptom-change during the hospital stay, the Saami patients showed less satisfaction with all investigated treatment parameters including contact with staff, treatment alliance, information and global treatment satisfaction. There was less agreement between the ratings of the therapists and the Saami patients. Suggestions for improvements are made.

  14. An investigation on pharmacy functions and services affecting satisfaction of patients with prescriptions in community pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Hidehiko; Nakajima, Fumio; Tada, Yuichirou; Yoshikawa, Emi; Iwahashi, Yoshiki; Fujita, Kenji; Hayase, Yukitoshi

    2009-05-01

    Various functions expected by patient expects are needed with progress in the system for separation of dispensing and prescribing functions. In this investigation, the relationship between patient satisfaction and pharmacy function were analyzed quantitatively. A questionnaire survey was conducted in 178 community pharmacies. Questions on pharmacy functions and services totaled 87 items concerning information service, amenities, safety, personnel training, etc. The questionnaires for patients had five-grade scales and composed 11 items (observed variables). Based on the results, "the percentage of satisfied patients" was determined. Multivariate analysis was performed to investigate the relationship between patient satisfaction and pharmacy functions or services provided, to confirm patient's evaluation of the pharmacy, and how factors affected comprehensive satisfaction. In correlation analysis, "the number of pharmacists" and "comprehensive satisfaction" had a negative correlation. Other interesting results were obtained. As a results of factor analysis, three latent factors were obtained: the "human factor," "patients' convenience," and "environmental factor," Multiple regression analysis showed that the "human factor" affected "comprehensive satisfaction" the most. Various pharmacy functions and services influence patient satisfaction, and improvement in their quality increases patient satisfaction. This will result in the practice of patient-centered medicine.

  15. Lean-driven improvements slash wait times, drive up patient satisfaction scores.

    PubMed

    2012-07-01

    Administrators at LifePoint Hospitals, based in Brentwood, TN, used lean manufacturing techniques to slash wait times by as much as 30 minutes and achieve double-digit increases in patient satisfaction scores in the EDs at three hospitals. In each case, front-line workers took the lead on identifying opportunities for improvement and redesigning the patient-flow process. As a result of the new efficiencies, patient volume is up by about 25% at all three hospitals. At each hospital, the improvement process began with Kaizen, a lean process that involves bringing personnel together to flow-chart the current system, identify problem areas, and redesign the process. Improvement teams found big opportunities for improvement at the front end of the flow process. Key to the approach was having a plan up front to deal with non-compliance. To sustain improvements, administrators gather and disseminate key metrics on a daily basis.

  16. Lean-driven improvements slash wait times, drive up patient satisfaction scores.

    PubMed

    2012-07-01

    Administrators at LifePoint Hospitals, based in Brentwood, TN, used lean manufacturing techniques to slash wait times by as much as 30 minutes and achieve double-digit increases in patient satisfaction scores in the EDs at three hospitals. In each case, front-line workers took the lead on identifying opportunities for improvement and redesigning the patient-flow process. As a result of the new efficiencies, patient volume is up by about 25% at all three hospitals. At each hospital, the improvement process began with Kaizen, a lean process that involves bringing personnel together to flow-chart the current system, identify problem areas, and redesign the process. Improvement teams found big opportunities for improvement at the front end of the flow process. Key to the approach was having a plan up front to deal with non-compliance. To sustain improvements, administrators gather and disseminate key metrics on a daily basis. PMID:22838052

  17. 78 FR 53506 - Proposed Information Collection (Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Patient Satisfaction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Patient Satisfaction... forms of information technology. Titles: Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Patient...

  18. Associations of Quality of Life with Service Satisfaction in Psychotic Patients: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Petkari, Eleni; Pietschnig, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Background Quality of life (QoL) has gained increasing attention as a desired outcome of psychosocial treatments targeting psychotic patients. Yet, the relationship between the patients’ satisfaction with services and QoL has not been clearly established, perhaps due to the multidimensionality of the QoL concept and the variability in its assessment. Aim This is the first systematic meta-analysis of all available evidence assessing the relationship between QoL and service satisfaction. Methods: In all, 19 studies reporting data of 21 independent samples (N = 5,337) were included in the present meta-analysis. In moderator analyses, effects of age, sex, diagnoses (schizophrenia vs. other psychoses), treatment context (inpatients vs. outpatients), study design (cross-sectional vs. longitudinal), and QoL domain (subjective vs. health-related) were examined. Results Analyses revealed a highly significant medium-sized effect (r = .30, p < .001) for the associations of QoL and service satisfaction. Effect sizes were significantly stronger for subjective than health-related quality of life (r = .35 vs. r = .14, respectively). Moreover, associations with subjective QoL remained largely robust when accounting for moderating variables, although there was a trend of stronger associations for outpatients compared to inpatients. In contrast, effect sizes for health-related QoL were small and only observable for samples with longitudinal designs. Conclusion Associations between QoL and service satisfaction appear to be robust but are differentiated in regard to QoL domain. Our findings suggest that agents responsible for service design and implementation need to take the patients’ perception of the service adequacy for achieving QoL enhancement into account. PMID:26275139

  19. Visual Outcomes, Patient Satisfaction and Spectacle Independence with a Trifocal Diffractive Intraocular Lens

    PubMed Central

    Kretz, Florian Tobias Alwin; Choi, Chul Young; Müller, Matthias; Gerl, Matthias; Gerl, Ralf Helmar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate visual outcomes following implantation of a trifocal diffractive intraocular lens (IOL) and to analyze their correlation with patient satisfaction and ease of performing daily tasks. Methods This was a prospective study enrolling 100 eyes of 50 patients undergoing cataract surgery with implantation of trifocal IOL AT LISA tri 839MP. Visual and refractive outcomes were evaluated during a 3-month follow-up. Postoperatively, a questionnaire was used to evaluate patient satisfaction with regard to surgical outcome, spectacle independence, perception of photic phenomena, and ease of performing some vision-related activities. Results A total of 91%, 87%, and 79% of eyes achieved a monocular uncorrected distance, near, and intermediate visual acuity of 0.1 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution or better, respectively. After the surgery, 96% of the patients could perform their daily activities without problems. The mean spectacle independence scores for reading, doing computer work, and for distance were 10.33 ± 12.47, 5.71 ± 11.90, and 3.92 ± 9.77, respectively (scale: 0 = no spectacles needed; 40 = spectacles always needed). No correlation was found between spectacle independence and visual outcome (-0.101 ≤ r ≤ 0.244, p ≥ 0.087). Mean scores (0 = no symptoms; 40 = strong symptoms) for glare at night, ghost images, and halos were 15.15 ± 12.02, 4.49 ± 7.92, and 13.34 ± 10.82, respectively. No correlation was found between photic phenomena and visual outcome (-0.199 ≤ r ≤ 0.209, p ≥ 0.150). A total of 80% of patients reported satisfaction with the surgery outcome, and 86% would recommend the surgery to friends and family. Conclusions Implantation of the AT LISA tri 839MP IOL after cataract surgery provides effective visual restoration associated with a minimal level of photic phenomena, a positive impact on the performance of vision-related daily activities, and a high level of postoperative patient satisfaction. PMID:27247517

  20. Therapy satisfaction and adherence in patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis: the THEPA-MS survey

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Rocco; Kullmann, Jennifer S.; Ziemssen, Tjalf

    2016-01-01

    Background: Improved clinical effectiveness and therefore positive modification of multiple sclerosis (MS) with basic therapy can be achieved by long-term regular intake of drugs as prescribed but investigations have shown that a high percentage of patients do not take their medications as prescribed. Objectives: We assessed the satisfaction and adherence of patients with MS with their current disease-modifying treatment under clinical practice conditions. We compared different facets of satisfaction as well as their internal relationship and identified predictors in an exploratory manner. Methods: Therapy satisfaction in patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis (THEPA-MS) was a noninterventional, prospective cross-sectional study performed throughout Germany in 2013 and 2014, and included patients with clinically isolated syndrome or relapsing–remitting MS. We applied a standardized approach to document satisfaction and adherence by patient-reported outcomes (Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication) as well as by physician ratings. Results: Of 3312 patients with a mean age of 43.7 years, 73.3% were women and the mean level of disability according to the Expanded Disability Status Scale was 2.29; 13.3% did not receive any medication at the time of documentation, 21.3% received interferon β1a intramuscularly, 20.7% had interferon β1a subcutaneously, 17.0% had interferon β1b subcutaneously and 23.7% had glatiramer acetate. Adherence rates varied between 60% (lifetime) and 96.5% (current medication). Differences between current medications were found for side effects and convenience scores but not for effectiveness, satisfaction and adherence. Higher global satisfaction and effectiveness were associated with fewer relapses, longer duration of medication, lower disability score and the absence of several side effects. Conclusion: In a connected model of patient satisfaction, effectiveness, side effects, convenience and adherence

  1. The Relationship among Student Basic Need Satisfaction, Approaches to Learning, Reporting of Avoidance Strategies and Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betoret, Fernando Domenech; Artiga, Amparo Gomez

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: This study examines the relationship between student basic need satisfaction (autonomy, competence, relatedness and belonging), their reporting of approaches to learning (deep and surface), their reporting of avoidance strategies (avoidance of effort and challenge, avoidance of help seeking and preference to avoid novelty) and…

  2. Enhancing Job Satisfaction for Teachers: A Strategy for Achieving Transformation of Secondary Education in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dabo, Steve Azi; Augustine, Azi Sambo

    2016-01-01

    The neglect of teachers' needs have impacted negatively on our educational system in Nigeria. Indeed, the teaching profession has suffered untold hardship for quite sometimes now. This paper uses a theoretical approach to x-ray the factors responsible for poor job satisfaction among secondary school teachers. The paper also examines teachers' job…

  3. The Effect of Student Choice of Online Discussion Format on Tiered Achievement and Student Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, ShinYi; Overbaugh, Richard C.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated whether providing students with the choice of chat versus threaded discussion boards for online discourse is an effective instructional strategy in terms of student learning and satisfaction. The sample was teacher education students enrolled in face-to-face (FTF) and online sections of one undergraduate foundations course.…

  4. Can Learning Style Predict Student Satisfaction with Different Instruction Methods and Academic Achievement in Medical Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurpinar, Erol; Alimoglu, Mustafa Kemal; Mamakli, Sumer; Aktekin, Mehmet

    2010-01-01

    The curriculum of our medical school has a hybrid structure including both traditional training (lectures) and problem-based learning (PBL) applications. The purpose of this study was to determine the learning styles of our medical students and investigate the relation of learning styles with each of satisfaction with different instruction methods…

  5. Patient satisfaction with nursing care at a university hospital in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Uzun, O

    2001-10-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important measure of service quality (SQ) in health care organizations. Patients' satisfaction and their expectations of care are valid indicators of quality nursing care. This article reports the results of a survey patient satisfaction with nursing care, administered by interview to 422 adults discharged from a university hospital in Turkey. The direct measurement of patient satisfaction with nursing care is a new phenomenon for this university hospital, and this was the first time that such an evaluation had been done in this particular hospital. In this study, SERVQUAL scale was used for determining patient satisfaction with nursing care. Weighted scores in dimensions of SERVQUAL were generally low, and there were statistically significant differences in means paired t-tests (p < .01). Sociodemographic characteristics of the patients (age, gender, education level) with regard to patient satisfaction were determined. Several statistically significant differences were found between the sociodemographic characteristics and weighted scores for dimensions of SERVQUAL (p < 0.5). According to results, the SQ gap scores for five dimensions were negative to meet expectations. The negative scores for tangibles, reliability, responsiveness, assurance, and empathy indicate areas needing improvement. In this hospital, results of this study support the need for nurses to take steps to improve patient satisfaction with nursing care.

  6. Healthcare Provider-Patient Communication: A Satisfaction Study in the Outpatient Clinic at Hospital Kuala Lumpur

    PubMed Central

    AZIZAM, Nor Azmaniza; SHAMSUDDIN, Khadija

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is growing interest in research on patient satisfaction with healthcare provider (HCP) communication as a measure of healthcare quality and HCPs’ communication competency. This study aimed to determine the levels of patient satisfaction with healthcare provider-patient communication (HCP-PC) and its associated factors at the outpatient clinic at Hospital Kuala Lumpur. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on a convenience sample in July 2012 using self-administered questionnaires for the data collection. Both overall and domain-specific satisfaction were measured, with the three domains being exchanging information (EI), socio-emotional behaviour (SB), and communication style (CS). Results: The findings show that 92.8% of the 283 respondents were satisfied with overall HCP-PC, 89.5% with EI, 91.3% with SB, and 72.2% with CS. Satisfaction was statistically higher among Malays for CS and higher among those with low education and poor health for EI, SB and CS. EI and overall communication satisfaction were also higher among patients who reported short wait times, and patients who were in gender concordance with their HCPs showed higher SB satisfaction. Conclusion: Basic and continuous communication skills training and patient activation programs should be established to increase patient satisfaction. Health information technology use should be actively promoted to allow for structured and standardised information exchange between HCPs and patients. PMID:26715897

  7. Patient satisfaction with nursing care at a university hospital in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Uzun, O

    2001-10-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important measure of service quality (SQ) in health care organizations. Patients' satisfaction and their expectations of care are valid indicators of quality nursing care. This article reports the results of a survey patient satisfaction with nursing care, administered by interview to 422 adults discharged from a university hospital in Turkey. The direct measurement of patient satisfaction with nursing care is a new phenomenon for this university hospital, and this was the first time that such an evaluation had been done in this particular hospital. In this study, SERVQUAL scale was used for determining patient satisfaction with nursing care. Weighted scores in dimensions of SERVQUAL were generally low, and there were statistically significant differences in means paired t-tests (p < .01). Sociodemographic characteristics of the patients (age, gender, education level) with regard to patient satisfaction were determined. Several statistically significant differences were found between the sociodemographic characteristics and weighted scores for dimensions of SERVQUAL (p < 0.5). According to results, the SQ gap scores for five dimensions were negative to meet expectations. The negative scores for tangibles, reliability, responsiveness, assurance, and empathy indicate areas needing improvement. In this hospital, results of this study support the need for nurses to take steps to improve patient satisfaction with nursing care. PMID:11668854

  8. 75 FR 62635 - Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program... needed to determine patients' satisfaction with services provided by or through the Michael E. DeBakey.... Title: Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program, VA Form 10-0476. OMB...

  9. Life Satisfaction among Highly Achieving Students in Hong Kong: Do Gratitude and the "Good-Enough Mindset" Add to the Contribution of Perfectionism in Prediction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, David W.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated whether gratitude and the "good-enough mindset" added to the contribution of perfectionism in predicting life satisfaction in 245 Chinese highly achieving students in Hong Kong. Participants completed self-report questionnaires that included scales on life satisfaction, positive and negative perfectionism (perfectionistic…

  10. A new measure of patient satisfaction with ocular hypotensive medications: The Treatment Satisfaction Survey for Intraocular Pressure (TSS-IOP)

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Mark J; Stewart, William C; Fain, Joel M; Stewart, Jeanette A; Dhawan, Ravinder; Mozaffari, Essy; Lohs, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Purpose To validate the treatment-specific Treatment Satisfaction Survey for Intraocular Pressure (TSS-IOP). Methods Item content was developed by 4 heterogeneous patient focus groups (n = 32). Instrument validation involved 250 patients on ocular hypotensive medications recruited from ophthalmology practices in the Southern USA. Participants responded to demographic and test questions during a clinic visit. Standard psychometric analyses were performed on the resulting data. Sample Of the 412 patients screened, 253 consented to participate, and 250 provided complete datasets. The sample included 44% male (n = 109), 44% Black (n = 109) and 57% brown eyed (n = 142) participants, with a mean age of 64.6 years (SD 13.1) and a history of elevated IOP for an average of 8.4 yrs (SD 7.8). A majority was receiving monotherapy (60%, n = 151). Results A PC Factor analysis (w/ varimax rotation) of the 31 items yielded 5 factors (Eigenvalues > 1.0) explaining 70% of the total variance. Weaker and conceptually redundant items were removed and the remaining 15 items reanalyzed. The satisfaction factors were; Eye Irritation (EI; 4 items), Convenience of Use (CofU; 3 items), Ease of Use (EofU; 3 items), Hyperemia (HYP; 3 items), and Medication Effectiveness (EFF; 2 items). Chronbach's Alphas ranged from .80 to .86. Greater distributional skew was found for less common experiences (i.e., HYP & EI with 65% & 48.4% ceilings) than for more common experiences (i.e., EofU, CofU, EFF with 10.8%, 20.8% & 15.9% ceilings). TSS-IOP scales converged with conceptually related scales on a previously validated measure of treatment satisfaction, the TSQM (r = .36 to .77). Evidence of concurrent criterion-related validity was found. Patients' symptomatic ratings of eye irritation, hyperemia and difficulties using the medication correlated with satisfaction on these dimensions (r = .30-.56, all p < .001). Clinicians' ratings of IOP control, severity of side effects and problematic medication use

  11. Associations between adult attachment characteristics, medical burden, and life satisfaction among older primary care patients.

    PubMed

    Kirchmann, Helmut; Nolte, Tobias; Runkewitz, Kristin; Bayerle, Lisa; Becker, Simone; Blasczyk, Verena; Lindloh, Julia; Strauss, Bernhard

    2013-12-01

    We investigated whether attachment security, measured by the Adult Attachment Prototype Rating (AAPR), was correlated with life satisfaction, independent of sociodemographic characteristics, medical burden, and age-related coping strategies in a sample of 81 patients (69-73 years) recruited from the register of a general primary care practice. Furthermore, we examined whether patients classified as AAPR-secure reported better adjustment to medical burden in terms of higher life satisfaction than did insecure patients. Attachment security was independently related to life satisfaction. Moreover, the association between medical burden and lower life satisfaction was significantly stronger for insecure than for secure participants. Our findings indicate that interventions to improve attachment security or coping processes related to attachment could help older adults retain life satisfaction.

  12. Consulting with a surgeon before breast cancer surgery: patient question asking and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Venetis, Maria K; Robinson, Jeffrey D; Kearney, Thomas

    2013-08-01

    Research has found a negative association between patient question asking and aspects of their satisfaction. In the context of surgical oncology, the aim of this exploratory study was to test the association between patient question asking and 3 indices of their satisfaction. Participants included 51 women who were newly diagnosed with breast cancer engaged in presurgical consultations with a surgical oncologist from a National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center in the Northeastern United States. Outcomes were patients' postconsultation reports of their satisfaction with the treatment plan, intentions to adhere to the treatment plan, and satisfaction with the surgeon. The main predictor was the frequency of patients' self-initiated questions coded from videotapes of consultations. The frequency of patients' self-initiated questions was negatively associated with their satisfaction with the treatment plan (p = .02), intentions to adhere to the treatment plan (p = .02), and satisfaction with the surgeon (p = .07). Results can be explained in terms of patients' perceptions that the surgeon's information was insufficient or inadequate. Future research needs to identify the specific content of patients' questions and how such content might be associated with satisfaction.

  13. Factors Contributing to Patient Satisfaction with Rehabilitation Following Stroke.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, M. S.; Smith, D. S.

    1998-01-01

    A study that investigated the satisfaction of 60 Australian stroke survivors with their rehabilitative progress over 12 months found satisfaction with progress improved with time and was influenced by the return to previous lifestyle activities, depression, family functioning, understanding of stroke, and clarity of expectations on admission to…

  14. Patient expectations and their satisfaction in the context of public hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Berhane, Adugnaw; Enquselassie, Fikre

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient expectations have been recognized as a factor for patient satisfaction in medical consultations. Although various studies explored the relationship between patient expectations and patient satisfaction in developed countries, there is a lack of research evidence in Ethiopia where the meeting of patient expectations could relate to satisfaction. Objective To assess the relationship between patients’ expectations and their satisfaction in the consultation of patients at the outpatient department. Study design Data were collected regarding preconsultation expectations and postconsultation experiences of adult patients attending nine public hospitals. A systematic random sampling method was used where every fifth patient attending an outpatient department was selected. The patients were interviewed before consultation and after consultation to assess whether their pre-consultation expectations were met and to assess how satisfied they were with the consultation. Cronbach’s alpha statistic was used to assess the reliability of the expectation questionnaires, and paired t-test was used to assess any differences between previsit expectations and postvisit experiences. Logistic regression techniques were used to assess variables considered as independent factors for patient satisfaction. Results A total of 776 patients were interviewed, giving a response rate of 92.3%. About 93.7% mentioned a diagnosis for their condition as a reason for their current hospital visits. There is a significant difference between preconsultation expectation and postconsultation expectation. Postconsultation expectation, perceived health status, and perceived control on health were factors identified as increasing patient satisfaction. In addition, the presence of any disappointments or worries, previous experience in health care, and extent of influence on the consultation had a negative influence on satisfaction. Conclusion Postconsultation expectation impacts patient

  15. Impact of Standardized New Medication Education Program on Postdischarge Patients' Knowledge and Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Jones, Tammie R; Coke, Lola

    2016-10-01

    This study, implemented on 2 medical-surgical units, evaluated the impact of a standardized, evidence-based new medication education program. Outcomes evaluated included patient postdischarge knowledge of new medication purpose and side effects, patient satisfaction with new medication, and Medicare reimbursement earn-back potential. As a result, knowledge scores for new medication purpose and side effects were high post intervention. Patient satisfaction with new medication education increased. Value-based purchasing reimbursement earn-back potential improved. PMID:27681515

  16. Impact of Standardized New Medication Education Program on Postdischarge Patients' Knowledge and Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Jones, Tammie R; Coke, Lola

    2016-10-01

    This study, implemented on 2 medical-surgical units, evaluated the impact of a standardized, evidence-based new medication education program. Outcomes evaluated included patient postdischarge knowledge of new medication purpose and side effects, patient satisfaction with new medication, and Medicare reimbursement earn-back potential. As a result, knowledge scores for new medication purpose and side effects were high post intervention. Patient satisfaction with new medication education increased. Value-based purchasing reimbursement earn-back potential improved.

  17. Quality Improvement Project to Improve Patient Satisfaction With Pain Management: Using Human-Centered Design.

    PubMed

    Trail-Mahan, Tracy; Heisler, Scott; Katica, Mary

    2016-01-01

    In this quality improvement project, our health system developed a comprehensive, patient-centered approach to improving inpatient pain management and assessed its impact on patient satisfaction across 21 medical centers. Using human-centered design principles, a bundle of 6 individual and team nursing practices was developed. Patient satisfaction with pain management, as measured by the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems pain composite score, increased from the 25th to just under the 75th national percentile.

  18. Psychosocial and sociodemographic correlates of life satisfaction among patients diagnosed with cancer in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman M; Al Abeiat, Dana D; Alzoghaibi, Ibrahim N; Ghannam, Bushra M; Hanouneh, Salah I

    2015-03-01

    Cancer is a worldwide disease, and the psychosocial concerns are nearly universal among patients with cancer. The purpose of this study is to investigate the psychosocial correlates of life satisfaction among patients diagnosed with cancer in Jordan. A cross-sectional survey using 92 patients diagnosed with cancer used to collect data in regard to life satisfaction, depressive symptoms, psychological distress, coping, and perceived social support. In general, about 50% of patients reported high level of life satisfaction and 50% of the patients reported moderate levels of ability to effectively cope with life situations. Moreover, 78% of patients reported that they had depressive symptoms and 45.3% of them reported that they had moderate to severe depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms had significant and negative correlation with life satisfaction (r = -0.50, p < 0.001), and stress had weak nonsignificant correlation with life satisfaction (r = 0.05, p > 0.05). On the other hand, social support from others has positive and significant correlation with life satisfaction (r = 0.32, p < 0.01). Marital status, times of admission, perceived social support from others, and depressive symptoms were significant predictors of life satisfaction. Health professionals need to integrate their medical care with psychosocial intervention early at admission and during follow-up care, so early detection of psychological disturbances will help to implement effective treatment plans.

  19. Comparison Patients and Staffs Satisfaction in General Versus Special Wards of Hospitals of Jahrom

    PubMed Central

    Taheri, Leila; Jahromi, Marzieh Kargar; Hojat, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Aims: Patient satisfaction is the most important indicator of high-quality health care and is used for the assessment and planning of health care. Also, Job satisfaction is an important factor on prediction and perception of organizational manner. The aim of this study is to identify and compare patient and staff satisfaction in general versus special wards. Material and Method: In order to identify the various indicators of satisfaction and dissatisfaction, a descriptive study (cross sectional) was done to assess patients’ satisfaction with in-patient care at Jahrom University of Medical Science hospitals. The sample size was 600 patients that selected by sequential random sampling technique and are close to their discharge from the hospital. Patients were asked to indicate the scale point which best reflected their level of satisfaction with the treatment or service. Also we assess the staff satisfaction (sample size was 408 staffs) in general ward using a researcher made questionnaire. It should be noted that the participants were anonymous and there was no obligation to participation. We tried to set a secure and comfortable environment for filling out the questionnaire. Results: Among 600 patients, 239 (n = 38.67%) were men and 368 (61.33%) were female. Number of nurses was 408, of which 135 (33.08%) were men and 273 (66.92%) female. There was a significant correlation between working experience and professional factors of personnel. The mean total patient satisfaction in general and special wards is (2.75 ± .35, 3.03 ± .53) respectively. Differences of patient satisfaction in domains such respect, care and confidence in general wards versus special ward were statistically significant, but there was no difference in expect time of patients in these wards. Differences Between the mean patient and staff satisfaction in the general wards versus special wards were statistically significant using independent t-tests (p = .018, p = .029

  20. A pilot mixed methods study of patient satisfaction with chiropractic care for back pain

    PubMed Central

    Polipnick, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Objective Patient satisfaction is important to payers, clinicians, and patients. The concept of satisfaction is multifactorial and measurement is challenging. Our objective was to explore use of a mixed-methods design to examine patient satisfaction with chiropractic care for low back pain. Methods Patients were treated 3 times per week for 3 weeks. Outcomes were collected at Week 3 and Week 4. Qualitative interviews were conducted by the treating clinician and a non-treating staff member. Outcome Measures were the Roland Morris Questionnaire (RMQ), the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), and the Patient Satisfaction Scale (PSS). Interviews were recorded and transcribed, and analyzed for themes and constructs of satisfaction. We compared qualitative interview data with quantitative outcomes, and qualitative data from 2 different interviewers. Results All patients reported high levels of satisfaction. Clinical outcomes were unremarkable with little change noted on VAS and RMQ scores. We categorized patient comments into the same constructs of satisfaction as those identified for the PSS: Quality of Care, Information, Effectiveness, and Caring. An additional construct (Quality of Care) and additional subcategories were identified. Satisfaction with care is not explained by outcome alone. The qualitative data collected from 2 different interviewers had few differences. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that it is feasible to use a mixed-method design to examine patient satisfaction. We were able to refine data collection and analysis procedures for the outcome measures and qualitative interview data. We identified limitations and offer recommendations for the next step: the implementation of a larger study. PMID:18984243

  1. Monetary Resident Incentives: Effect on Patient Satisfaction in an Academic Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Langdorf, Mark I.; Kazzi, A. Antoine; Marwah, Rakesh S.; Bauche, John

    2005-01-01

    Patient satisfaction most be a priority in emergency departments (EDs). The care provided by residents forms much of the patient contact in academic EDs. Objective: To determine if monetary incentives for emergency medicine (EM) residents improve patient satisfaction scores on a mailed survey. Methods: The incentive program ran for nine months, 1999–2000. Press-Ganey surveys responses from ED patients in 456 hospitals; 124 form a peer group of larger, teaching hospitals. Questions relate to: 1) waiting time, 2) taking the problem seriously, 3) treatment information, 4) home care concerns, 5) doctor’s courtesy, and 6) concern with comfort. A 5-point Likert scale ranges from “very poor” (0 points) to “very good” (100). Raw score is the weighted mean, converted to a percentile vs. the peer group. Incentives were three-fold: a year-end event for the EM residents if 80th percentile results were achieved; individual incentives for educational materials of $50/resident (50th percentile), $100 (60th), $150 (70th), or $200 (80th); discount cards for the hospital’s espresso cart. These were distributed by 11 EM faculty (six cards/month) as rewards for outstanding interactions. Program cost was <$8,000, from patient-care revenue. Faculty had similar direct incentives, but nursing and staff incentives were ill defined and indirect. Results: Raw scores ranged from 66.1 (waiting time) to 84.3 (doctor’s courtesy) (n=509 or ∼7.2% of ED volume). Corresponding percentiles were 20th–43rd (mean=31st). We found no difference between the overall scores after the incentives, but three of the six questions showed improvement, with one, “doctors’ courtesy,” reaching 53rd percentile. The faculty funded the 50th percentile reward. Conclusions: Incentives are a novel idea to improve patient satisfaction, but did not foster overall Press-Ganey score improvement. We did find a trend toward improvement for doctor-patient interaction scores. Confounding variables, such

  2. Dyadic Influence of Hope and Optimism on Patient Marital Satisfaction among Couples with Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rock, Emily E.; Steiner, Jennifer L.; Rand, Kevin L.; Bigatti, Silvia M.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE An estimated 10–40% of breast cancer (BC) patients report negative changes to their partnered relationships. Literature suggests that for these patients, marital satisfaction is related to depression and other quality of life factors which are associated with survivorship and treatment response. However, existing literature does not provide a clear explanation of the factors that strengthen vs. create strain in couples facing cancer. Given the benefits of a satisfying relationship to patient quality of life, it is important to better understand factors that put patients at greater risk for marital difficulties. This study examined the differential and combined roles of hope and optimism among BC patients and their partners on patient marital satisfaction. METHOD Fifty-six breast cancer patient-partner dyads completed study questionnaires as part of a larger study. Regression analyses were used to examine the main and interaction effects of patient and partner hope and optimism on patient marital satisfaction. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION Higher patient and partner hope predicted greater patient marital satisfaction, whereas optimism did not. These results are divergent from the literature on optimism and well-being, which shows the importance of studying these two traits concurrently. Interaction effects suggest certain combinations of patient and partner hope and optimism are more beneficial than others for patient marital satisfaction and suggest a dyadic approach is important for investigation of well-being in breast cancer. PMID:24687536

  3. Evaluation of satisfaction among relatives of mentally disabled patients who were users of a dental care protocol under general anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    García-Garraus, José M.; Hernández-García, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: In the field of action of disease associated with dependence the Third Health Plan of Castilla y León aims specifically at promoting the adjustment of health assistance to the needs of disabled people, according to their situation. Our objectives were: General: To know the satisfaction level among relatives or caregivers of people who were treated according to a protocol of dental care for mentally disabled people. Specific: To know if satisfaction is related to any sociodemographic characteristics of patients or to their pathology. Study design: Cross-sectional study by telephone survey, set in the Primary Health Area of Salamanca. The target population includes relatives or caregivers of mentally disabled patients who were sent to the hospital for treatment under general anaesthesia after being attended in Primary Dental Care Units, from 1st of June/2005 to 31st of May/2006. Social and demographic variables and patients’ diseases, as well as level of satisfaction with the service, were studied through a survey. Results: 67.4% of patients’ relatives or caregivers answered the survey, among whom 94.7% (C.I. 95%: 89-100%) were quite or very satisfied with the service in general. Conclusion:The protocol has high acceptance despite its difficulties and it has achieved considerable improvements in several aspects of patients’ life. This level of satisfaction was not related to any sociodemographic or clinical patient characteristics. Nevertheless, accessibility aspects and communication with patients may still be improved. Key words: Health care surveys, dental care for disabled, patient satisfaction. PMID:21743429

  4. Organizational Effects on Patient Satisfaction in Hospital Medical-Surgical Units

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, Cynthia Thornton; Mark, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between hospital context, nursing unit structure, and patient characteristics and patients’ satisfaction with nursing care in hospitals. Background Although patient satisfaction has been widely researched, our understanding of the relationship between hospital context and nursing unit structure and their impact on patient satisfaction is limited. Methods The data source for this study was the Outcomes Research in Nursing Administration Project, a multi-site organizational study to investigate relationships among nurse staffing, organizational context and structure and patient outcomes. The sample for this study was 2720 patients and 3718 RNs in 286 medical-surgical units in 146 hospitals. Results Greater availability of nursing unit support services and higher levels of work engagement were associated with higher levels of patient satisfaction. Older age, better health status and better symptom management were also associated with higher levels of patient satisfaction. Conclusions Organizational factors in hospitals and nursing units, particularly support services on the nursing unit and mechanisms that foster nurses’ work engagement and effective symptom management, are important influences on patient satisfaction. PMID:19423987

  5. The impact of service quality perception on patient satisfaction in Government Hospitals in Southern Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alghamdi, Faris S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To examine the impact of service quality perception on patient satisfaction and determine which dimension from 5 dimensions (tangible, reliability, responsive, assurance, and empathy) has the greatest impact on patient satisfaction. Methods: A total of 183 eligible patients participated in this study. This study was conducted in Al-Baha province, Saudi Arabia from June 2013 to August 2013. We utilized the cross-sectional method, using a modified Assessment of Service Quality questionnaire to collect the data. Results: To test the study hypothesis, multiple regression analysis was carried out. Analysis of variance revealed that the overall result showed a statistically significant impact of health service quality on patient satisfaction (p=0.000). The beta-weights (beta) suggested that the empathy dimension had the greatest influence on patient satisfaction (ß=0.476), followed by tangible (ß=0.198) and responsiveness dimensions (ß=0.164). Conclusion: Patient satisfaction was influenced by health service quality, with the empathy dimension as the greatest influence on patient satisfaction. Therefore, it should be considered a priority by government hospitals to train doctors in interpersonal relationship skills to enhance the doctor-patient relationship. PMID:25316476

  6. The impact of a patient education bundle on neurosurgery patient satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Kliot, Tamara; Zygourakis, Corinna C.; Imershein, Sarah; Lau, Catherine; Kliot, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background: As reimbursements and hospital/physician performance become ever more reliant on Hospital Consumer Assessment of Health Care Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) and other quality metrics, physicians are increasingly incentivized to improve patient satisfaction. Methods: A faculty and resident team at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Department of Neurological Surgery developed and implemented a Patient Education Bundle. This consisted of two parts: The first was preoperative expectation letters (designed to inform patients of what to expect before, during, and after their hospitalization for a neurosurgical procedure); the second was a trifold brochure with names, photographs, and specialty/training information about the attending surgeons, resident physicians, and nurse practitioners on the neurosurgical service. We assessed patient satisfaction, as measured by HCAHPS scores and a brief survey tailored to our specific intervention, both before and after our Patient Education Bundle intervention. Results: Prior to our intervention, 74.6% of patients responded that the MD always explained information in a way that was easy to understand. After our intervention, 78.7% of patients responded that the MD always explained information in a way that was easy to understand. “Neurosurgery Patient Satisfaction survey” results showed that 83% remembered receiving the preoperative letter; of those received the letter, 93% found the letter helpful; and 100% thought that the letter should be continued. Conclusion: Although effects were modest, we believe that patient education strategies, as modeled in our bundle, can improve patients’ hospital experiences and have a positive impact on physician performance scores and hospital ratings. PMID:26664909

  7. Does computer use in patient-physician encounters influence patient satisfaction?

    PubMed Central

    Lelievre, Sarah; Schultz, Karen

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess whether computer use by physicians during the patient-physician encounter influences patient satisfaction in a family medicine teaching centre. DESIGN Cross-sectional mailed survey. SETTING Queen’s University Family Medicine Centre in Kingston, Ont. PARTICIPANTS A random sample of 300 patients from the family medicine centre, all of whom were older than 18 years of age and had visited their family physicians in the past year. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Patient preference for or against computer use by the physician and effect of computer use on various aspects of patient-physician interaction. RESULTS The response rate was 58.3%. Most respondents (51.4%) had no preference about computer use in the office, and most (88.0%) were either “very satisfied” or “satisfied” with their visits. When assessing the influence of patient and visit characteristics on computer preference, only the “doctor’s attitude toward computer use” had a positive correlation with patient preference (P = .0012). Respondents were most likely to indicate “positive” or “very positive” effects of computer use on all aspects of the patient-physician interaction, except “level of distraction of the doctor” and “time spent chatting about nonmedical matters,” which were most commonly reported as being unaffected by computer use. Specifically, 57.1% of respondents thought that computer use had either a “positive” or “very positive” effect on their overall satisfaction with their visits, with another 30.3% believing there was no effect. CONCLUSION Most patients expressed no preference for whether or not computers were used in their physicians’ offices, although computers did seem to have a positive effect on overall satisfaction with visits. Doctors’ attitudes toward computer use influenced their patients’ preferences. PMID:20090064

  8. Relationship between improvements in physical measures and patient satisfaction in rehabilitation after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Nazzal, Mahmoud I; Bashaireh, Khaldoon H; Alomari, Mahmoud A; Nazzal, Mohammad S; Maayah, Mikhled F; Mesmar, Mohammad

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine patient satisfaction with rehabilitation after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Fifty-six patients, aged 45-77 years, were enrolled in a post-TKA comprehensive therapy program focusing on knee strengthening and functional activities. The program lasted 3 months and was conducted for 1 h, twice a day, 5 days per week. Pain scores, number of steps climbed (STp), and maximum walked distance (MWD) were determined before the operation and 3 months after cessation of the rehabilitation program. In addition, knee-flexion range of motion (ROM) was measured before the surgery and immediately, 2 weeks and 3 months after the surgery. Pain decreased whereas MWD and STp increased at 3 months postoperation. In addition, the magnitude of improvement in STp correlated positively with the magnitude of change in MWD and pain. There was a significant increase in knee-flexion ROM at 2 weeks and 3 months postoperation compared with preoperation. The patient age also correlated positively with the magnitude of improvement in knee-flexion ROM after 2 weeks and 3 months of therapy. Improvements in MWD and STp were greater and pain was less, among the satisfied patients compared with unsatisfied ones. The results of this study further confirm the importance of therapy for osteoarthritis patients after TKA. In addition, as older patients are less conditioned, they seem to be more inclined to improvement in functionality with rehabilitation. Satisfied patients seem to achieve larger improvements in functional capacity and pain measures.

  9. [Cognition, needs, satisfaction, and emotional responses for home care in bone marrow transplantation patients].

    PubMed

    Sheu, L C; Chen, T C; Hwang, S L

    1997-12-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is an aggressive treatment which can induce considerable physical and psychological stresses. Patients face various problems in self care and psychological adjustment after discharge from the hospital. The purpose of this study was to explore the cognition, needs, satisfaction, and emotional responses toward home care in BMT patients and the factors influencing them. Forth BMT patients were enrolled from the outpatient clinic of BMT in a medical center. A descriptive research design was adopted. Cognition, needs, satisfaction, anxiety and depression for home care in these patients were collected by questionaires. The results showed that BMT patients had inadequate knowledge about how to care for themselves at home. High need and low satisfaction on disease adjustment and home care were found in these patients. All patients experienced anxiety and depression. Occupation, education, and socioeconomic status were found to affect patient's cognition. Religious belief influenced needs and satisfaction for home care in these patients. Sex and social-economic status emotional reaction of patients. This study will help health personnel understand the cognition, needs and satisfaction for home care in BMT patients. It can be used as a reference for organizing discharge plan and extending the continuity of care for BMT patients.

  10. Twenty-five years of obstetric patient satisfaction in North America: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wilcock, A; Kobayashi, L; Murray, I

    1997-03-01

    The North American literature on obstetric patient satisfaction of the past 25 years was reviewed using two major computerized databases. The articles identified by these searches were supplemented with other research articles identified in reference lists. The review highlights the difficulties inherent in the use of many different methodologies to study obstetric patient satisfaction. The main methodologies have been mailed questionnaires, telephone interviews, and semistructured interviews, with data collection periods ranging from 24 hours to 2 years postpartum. The various approaches to data collection make comparison of results among studies exceedingly difficult. The reluctance of patients to criticize their caregivers has been problematic and is evidenced by satisfaction ratings that are positively skewed. Factors that have been reported to be most influential in obstetric patient satisfaction include communication, control, participation in decision making, presence of a support person, information/prenatal classes, nursing care services, length of stay, and physical environment. The relative importance of these factors, however, has not been ascertained.

  11. 78 FR 76193 - Agency Information Collection (Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Patient Satisfaction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Patient Satisfaction... Retaining Nurses at State Homes).'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Care Coordination Home...

  12. Relationship between Patient Satisfaction and Objective Functional Outcome after Surgical Treatment for Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kevin C.; Haas, Ann

    2009-01-01

    Study Design Prospective Cohort. Introduction Patient satisfaction is increasingly used as a metric of health care outcomes. The relationship between patient satisfaction and functional outcomes metrics is understudied. Purpose To determine the minimum recovery needed in grip strength, key pinch strength, and arc of motion needed for patient satisfaction after treatment of distal radius fracture (DRF) with volar locking plating system placement. Methods A prospective cohort of 125 DRF patients was evaluated 3 months after surgery for grip strength, key pinch strength, wrist arc of motion, and satisfaction with hand strength and wrist arc of motion. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed using patient satisfaction items as the “gold standard” and each functional measure of outcome as a predictor. Results We found that the optimal cut-points to distinguish satisfaction from dissatisfaction occurred when patients had recovered 65% of their grip strength, 87% of their key grip strength, and 95% of the wrist arc of motion, as measured as percents of their uninjured wrists. Conclusions A much greater wrist range of motion must be recovered for patients to be satisfied than what is needed to perform activities of daily living. Level of Evidence Diagnosis Level 2. PMID:19560317

  13. Patient satisfaction with nursing staff in bone marrow transplantation and hematology units.

    PubMed

    Piras, A; Poddigue, M; Angelucci, E

    2010-01-01

    Several validated questionnaires for assessment of hospitalized patient satisfaction have been reported in the literature. Many have been designed specifically for patients with cancer. User satisfaction is one indicator of service quality and benefits. Thus, we conducted a small qualitative survey managed by nursing staff in our Bone Marrow Transplantation Unit and Acute Leukemia Unit, with the objectives of assessing patient satisfaction, determining critical existing problems, and developing required interventions. The sample was not probabilistic. A questionnaire was developed using the Delphi method in a pilot study with 30 patients. Analysis of the data suggested a good level of patient satisfaction with medical and nursing staffs (100%), but poor satisfaction with food (48%), services (38%), and amenities (31%). Limitations of the study were that the questionnaire was unvalidated and the sample was small. However, for the first time, patient satisfaction was directly measured at our hospital. Another qualitative study will be conducted after correction of the critical points that emerged during this initial study, in a larger sample of patients. PMID:20692459

  14. Patients' and personnel's perceptions of service quality and patient satisfaction in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    De Man, Stefanie; Gemmel, Paul; Vlerick, Peter; Van Rijk, Peter; Dierckx, Rudi

    2002-09-01

    Patients' and personnel's perceptions of service quality were analysed to position nuclear medicine organisations in the service triangle theory of Haywood-Farmer [ Int J Production and Operations Management 1988; 6:19-29]. After distinguishing the service quality dimensions of nuclear medicine, a comparison was made between the service quality perceptions of patients ( n=259) and those of personnel ( n=24). We examined the importance of different service quality dimensions by studying their relationship to patient satisfaction. The proposed five dimensions of SERVQUAL, the most commonly used service quality measurement scale, were not confirmed. Patients considered tangibles and assurance as one dimension, while the original empathy dimension was separated into empathy and convenience. Personnel perceived all service quality dimensions as less good than did patients, except for empathy. Results indicated that patients' perception of service quality was correlated with patient satisfaction, especially in terms of reliability and tangibles-assurance. Based on these service quality dimensions, we suggest that nuclear medicine services need to optimise their physical and process component and the technical skills of personnel.

  15. Patients' and personnel's perceptions of service quality and patient satisfaction in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    De Man, Stefanie; Gemmel, Paul; Vlerick, Peter; Van Rijk, Peter; Dierckx, Rudi

    2002-09-01

    Patients' and personnel's perceptions of service quality were analysed to position nuclear medicine organisations in the service triangle theory of Haywood-Farmer [ Int J Production and Operations Management 1988; 6:19-29]. After distinguishing the service quality dimensions of nuclear medicine, a comparison was made between the service quality perceptions of patients ( n=259) and those of personnel ( n=24). We examined the importance of different service quality dimensions by studying their relationship to patient satisfaction. The proposed five dimensions of SERVQUAL, the most commonly used service quality measurement scale, were not confirmed. Patients considered tangibles and assurance as one dimension, while the original empathy dimension was separated into empathy and convenience. Personnel perceived all service quality dimensions as less good than did patients, except for empathy. Results indicated that patients' perception of service quality was correlated with patient satisfaction, especially in terms of reliability and tangibles-assurance. Based on these service quality dimensions, we suggest that nuclear medicine services need to optimise their physical and process component and the technical skills of personnel. PMID:12192553

  16. Patient satisfaction with specialized mental health service for obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patient satisfaction is an important outcome variable that is increasingly used in mental health service evaluation. There are no results available for patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) yet. Methods Using the Verona Service Satisfaction Scale, patient satisfaction with a specialized mental health service was examined in patients with OCD. Results OCD patients were overall satisfied with the professional help provided, whereas satisfaction with the professional involvement of relatives within the treatment and health care process was found to be quite low. Patients with more severe OCD, as measured by the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale, as well as chronically ill and more disabled patients were more likely to be dissatisfied with the overall care they received. Patient satisfaction plays an important role in the long-term course of an illness such OCD. This seems to be decreased so longer illness is not or badly treated. There is a stronger need for involvement of family members in the treatment and health care of patients with OCD. Conclusions More OCD-specific treatment offers have to be established for patients with this long-term illness such as psychotherapy in groups. PMID:24341311

  17. [Evaluation of patients' satisfaction in relation to private or public health care providers].

    PubMed

    Lech, Medard M; Petryka, Irmina

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate of patients satisfaction in relation to private or public health care provider in the Warsaw's (capital of Poland) region. The authors have used original (partially psychometric test) tool named "Skala AB". 590 adult patients were randomly chosen from 20 private and public owned clinics and hospitals. Main outcome of the study was that patients of private owned clinics (but working on contract with general health insurance system) are much more satisfied from the services provided by these clinics than patients treated by local government-owned clinics. In general patients treated in hospitals were more satisfied than patients treated in clinics. Comparison of more detailed determinants of satisfaction, has shown that all health service facilities in study region, in their practices do not consider the "concentration on real needs of patients" as a serious matter and this is the reason of patients dissatisfaction. Level of satisfaction from the services provided by health care facilities did not correlate with gender or age of the respondents. In opposite, the (higher) level of education and place of living (in a big city) have negatively correlated with patients satisfaction. The tool ("Skala AB") used in this survey was found very convenient for evaluation of the patients satisfaction of services provided by health care facilities. PMID:15002261

  18. Influence of the prosthetic arm length (palatal position) of zygomatic implants upon patient satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Pellicer-Chover, Hilario; Cervera-Ballester, Juan; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Bagán, Leticia; Peñarrocha-Diago, María

    2016-01-01

    Background To assess the influence of the prosthetic arm length (palatal position) of zygomatic implants upon patient comfort and stability, speech, functionality and overall satisfaction. Material and Methods A retrospective clinical study was made of patients subjected to rehabilitation of atrophic maxilla with complete maxillary implant-supported fixed prostheses involving a minimum of two zygomatic implants (one on each side) in conjunction with premaxillary implants, and with 12 months of follow-up after implant loading. Subjects used a VAS to score general satisfaction, comfort and stability, speech and functionality, and the results were analyzed in relation to the prosthetic arm length of the zygomatic implants 12 months after prosthetic delivery. Results Twenty-two patients participated in the study, receiving 22 prostheses anchored on 148 implants (44 were zygomatic and 94 were conventional implants). The mean right and left prosthetic arm length was 5.9±2.4 mm and 6.1±2.7 mm, respectively, with no statistically significant differences between them (p=0.576). The mean scores referred to comfort/retention, speech, functionality and overall satisfaction were high - no correlation being found between prosthetic arm length and patient satisfaction (p=0.815). Conclusions No relationship could be identified between prosthetic arm length (palatal position) and patient satisfaction. Key words:Zygomatic implants, patient satisfaction, zygomatic prosthesis, prosthetic arm length. PMID:26946206

  19. Use of the Satisfaction With Amplification in Daily Life Questionnaire to Assess Patient Satisfaction Following Remote Hearing Aid Adjustments (Telefitting)

    PubMed Central

    Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; Battistella, Linamara Rizzo

    2014-01-01

    Background Hearing loss can affect approximately 15% of the pediatric population and up to 40% of the adult population. The gold standard of treatment for hearing loss is amplification of hearing thresholds by means of a hearing aid instrument. A hearing aid is an electronic device equipped with a topology of only three major components of aggregate cost. The gold standard of hearing aid fittings is face-to-face appointments in hearing aid centers, clinics, or hospitals. Telefitting encompasses the programming and adjustments of hearing aid settings remotely. Fitting hearing aids remotely is a relatively simple procedure, using minimal computer hardware and Internet access. Objective This project aimed to examine the feasibility and outcomes of remote hearing aid adjustments (telefitting) by assessing patient satisfaction via the Portuguese version of the Satisfaction With Amplification in Daily Life (SADL) questionnaire. Methods The Brazilian Portuguese version of the SADL was used in this experimental research design. Participants were randomly selected through the Rehabilitation Clinical (Espaco Reouvir) of the Otorhinolaryngology Department Medical School University of Sao Paulo. Of the 8 participants in the study, 5 were female and 3 were male, with a mean age of 71.5 years. The design consisted of two face-to-face sessions performed within 15 working days of each other. The remote assistance took place 15 days later. Results The average scores from this study are above the mean scores from the original SADL normative data. These indicate a high level of satisfaction in participants who were fitted remotely. Conclusions The use of an evaluation questionnaire is a simple yet effective method to objectively assess the success of a remote fitting. Questionnaire outcomes can help hearing stakeholders improve the National Policy on Hearing Health Care in Brazil. The results of this project indicated that patient satisfaction levels of those fitted remotely were

  20. An Empirical Study of the Impact of Service Quality on Patient Satisfaction in Private Hospitals, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Ehsan; Daneshkohan, Abbas; Pouragha, Behrouz; Marzban, Sima; Arab, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Perceived service quality is the most important predictor of patient satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of the service quality on the overall satisfaction of patients in private hospitals of Tehran, Iran. Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the year 2010. The study’s sample consisted of 969 patients who were recruited from eight private general hospitals in Tehran, Iran using consecutive sampling. A questionnaire was used for data collection; contacting 21 items (17 items about service quality and 4 items about overall satisfaction) and its validity and reliability were confirmed. Data analysis was performed using t-test, ANOVA and multivariate regression. Result: this study found a strong relationship between service quality and patient satisfaction. About 45% of the variance in overall satisfaction was explained by four dimensions of perceived service quality. The cost of services, the quality of the process and the quality of interaction had the greatest effects on the overall satisfaction of patients, but not found a significant effect on the quality of the physical environment on patient satisfaction. Conclusions: Constructs related to costs, delivery of service and interpersonal aspect of care had the most positive impact on overall satisfaction of patients. Managers and owners of private hospitals should set reasonable prices compared to the quality of service. In terms of process quality, waiting time for visits, admissions, and surgeries must be declined and services provided at the fastest possible time. It should be emphasized to strengthen of interpersonal aspects of care and communication skills of care providers. PMID:25560338

  1. Association of Nurses' Self-Reported Empathy and Mu Suppression with Patients' Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Goodarzi, Nasser; Azma, Kamran; Tavakolian, Ehsan; Peyvand, Pedram

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study is to explore the association between mu suppression and self-reported empathy in nurses with patients’ satisfaction. Methods: For this correlational study, 30 male nurses, as well as 30 patients took care by these nurses during the week before data gathering, were selected via accessible and random sampling method, respectively. The tools included Jefferson's Scale of Empathy-health professionals, and patient’s satisfaction scale of La Monica-Oberst. Activation of Mirror Neurons System (MNS) was investigated by mu suppression. For this purpose, electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded in three phases: 1) Watching the video of a non-moving hand, 2) Watching the video of a hand being open and closed, and 3) Opening and closing one-self's hand. EEG recordings were analyzed using Matlab R 2014a software. Data were analyzed by Pearson's correlation coefficients and multiple regression analyses. Results: There was no significant correlation between mu suppression in nurses with nurses' self-reported empathy and patients' satisfaction, however, a significant correlation was found between nurses' self-reported empathy and patients' satisfaction. Regression analysis outcomes showed that nurses' self-reported empathy could predict 18.5% (nearly one fifth) of patients' satisfaction variance while mu suppression did not forecast patients' satisfaction significantly. Conclusion: These findings suggested that mu rhythm was a good biomarker neither for nurses' self-reported empathy nor for patients' satisfaction. In addition, it was manifested that patients' satisfaction, at least partly, depended on skills that nurses could learn, since showing empathy is highly learnable. PMID:26464836

  2. Understanding the effects of nurses on the process by which patients develop hospital satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Gotlieb, Jerry B

    2002-10-01

    An understanding of the process by which hospital patients evaluate their nurses could be very useful. However, no theory-based model exists in the nursing literature to explain the relationship among patients' hospital rooms, locus of causality, patients' evaluation of nurses, and hospital satisfaction. This article proposes a model to help fill this void. It also presents empirical evidence supporting the model--a study finding that patients' evaluation of their hospital rooms and their perception of locus of causality affected their evaluations of nurses. The results suggest patients' evaluation of their nurses and rooms are two key variables that affect their overall hospital satisfaction. However, patients' evaluation of nurses appears to have a much greater influence on hospital satisfaction than does patients' evaluation of their rooms. PMID:12465218

  3. Patient Satisfaction and Quality of Life in DIEAP Flap versus Implant Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sgarzani, Rossella; Negosanti, Luca; Morselli, Paolo Giovanni; Vietti Michelina, Veronica; Lapalorcia, Luigi Maria; Cipriani, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    The psychological impact of breast reconstruction has widely been described, and multiple studies show that reconstruction improves the well-being and quality of life of patients. In breast reconstruction, the goal is not only the morphological result, but mainly the patient's perception of it. The objective of our study is to compare the physical and psychosocial well-being and satisfaction concerning the body image of patients who had reconstruction with breast implants to those of patients who had reconstruction with deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flaps. Our results demonstrated a similar quality of life between the two groups, but the satisfaction level was significantly higher in patients who had reconstruction with autologous tissue. Feedback from patients who have already received breast reconstruction may be useful in the decision-making process for future patients and plastic surgeons, enabling both to choose the reconstructive technique with the best long-term satisfaction. PMID:26649331

  4. Critical pathways: effectiveness in achieving patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ireson, C L

    1997-06-01

    Refining the clinical care process to produce high-quality patient outcomes is becoming increasingly important as health care administrators strive for success in a mature managed care environment. This study examines the effect of structuring interventions and the evaluation of patient response, inherent in the critical pathway process, on clinical, length-of-hospital-stay, and financial patient outcomes. This study differs from previous critical pathway trials in that an objective measure of quality was used and the critical pathways were not introduced concurrently with a case management delivery model. The results show that critical pathways may be a significant determinant of improved quality in a managed care environment. The findings also suggest ways to improve nursing practice, nursing education, and nursing informatics.

  5. Development and testing of a 25-item patient satisfaction scale for black South African diabetic outpatients.

    PubMed

    Westaway, M S; Rheeder, P; van Zyl, D G; Seager, J R

    2002-08-01

    Although there is general agreement that patient satisfaction is an integral component of service quality, there is a paucity of South African research on reliable and valid satisfaction measures and the effects of health status on satisfaction. A 25-item patient satisfaction scale was developed and tested for evaluating the quality of health care for black diabetic outpatients. It was hypothesised that: (1) the underlying dimensions of patient satisfaction were interpersonal and organisational; and (2) patients in poor health would be less satisfied with the quality of their care than patients in good health. The questionnaire was administered to 263 black outpatients from Pretoria Academic Hospital and Kalafong Hospital. Factor analysis was conducted on the patient satisfaction scale and three factors, accounting for 71% of the variance, were extracted. The major items on Factor I were helpfulness, communication, support and consideration, representing the interpersonal dimension. Factors II and III were mainly concerned with service logistics and technical expertise, with the emphasis on waiting time, follow-up and thoroughness of examination. The three factors had excellent reliability coefficients, ranging between 0.82 (technical), 0.85 (logistics) and 0.98 (interpersonal). Multiple analyses of co-variance showed that patients in poor general health were significantly less satisfied with the logistical (p = 0.004) and technical (p = 0.007) quality of their care than patients in good health; patients in poor mental health were significantly less satisfied with the interpersonal quality of their care (p = 0.05) than patients in good mental health. These findings provided support for both hypotheses and suggested that patients in poor health attend to different aspects of their care than patients in good health. Of more importance to clinical practice, the results endorsed the need for a multidisciplinary health team comprising nurse/social worker (Factor I

  6. Life satisfaction and health in cancer patients, orthopedic patients and healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Kreitler, S; Chaitchik, S; Rapoport, Y; Kreitler, H; Algor, R

    1993-02-01

    Life satisfaction (LS) is one of a set of constructs defining quality of life. Previous studies showed that LS was sometimes related to health and sometimes not. The study was designed to examine the relation of LS as a general construct to satisfaction in specific domains. We assumed that there is a tendency to maintain an acceptable level of LS even under stressful and threatening conditions, that it is related to optimism and that the likelihood of attaining satisfaction in a particular domain affected the selection of domains on which LS is based. We expected that in cancer patients LS would be related to more domains but not to health. The study was done with 55 head-and-neck cancer patients, of all stages and grades of tumor; 51 orthopedic patients, victims of accidents with good recovery chances; and 55 healthy individuals. The healthy individuals and orthopedic patients were matched (in terms of group values) to the cancer patients in age, gender and education. Single-item measures of LS and optimism, and a questionnaire with 49 multiple-choice items assessing adjustment in 13 domains were administered to all subjects. The results showed that in cancer patients LS was related to most domains but not to health and not to optimism, whereas in the other groups it was related to few domains including health, and also to optimism. The findings support the tendency to maintain LS with the materials available to the individual, and show that health is related to LS only if its maintenance or attainment are realistic goals. Thus, both bottom-up and top-down theories of LS are supported.

  7. Patient Satisfaction with Spanish Pain Centers: Observational Study with More than 3,000 Patients.

    PubMed

    García García, Juan Antonio; Hernández-Puiggròs, Patricia; Tesedo Nieto, Javier; Acín Lázaro, María Pilar; Carrera González, Alfredo; Soler, Miguel José Arranz; Maldonado Vega, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain is a serious problem in Spain. This multicenter, epidemiological 3-month follow-up study investigates pain management efficacy in Spanish centers using patient satisfaction criteria. 3,414 eligible adult patients (65,6% female) with moderate to severe chronic pain from 146 pain centers were included. Patient satisfaction was assessed based onto question 18 of Spanish healthcare barometer-CSI. Pain evolution (Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form (BPI-SF) and visual analog scale (VAS)), quality of life/EuroQol-5, and pain control expectations fulfillment were also assessed. Mean age was 61.3 years. 64.4% of participating centers employed multidisciplinary pain management approach. After 3 months, mean patient satisfaction was 7.8 (1-10) on the CIS barometer. Medical staff received the highest scores, whereas waiting for tests, appointment request to appointment date time, and waiting times at the center the lowest. Mean pain decreased from 7.4 to 4.0; BPI-SF intensity decreased from 6.5 to 3.8; pain control expectations were met in 78.7% of patients; EuroQoL-5D utility index increased from 0.37 to 0.62, p < 0.001, and health status (VAS) from 40.6 to 61.9, p < 0.001. Chronic pain patients (90%) are satisfied with Spanish centers care; 80% had their pain control expectations met. Quality of life improved remarkably: 71% felt moderately to significantly better. However, waiting times need improvement. PMID:27516902

  8. Patient Satisfaction with Spanish Pain Centers: Observational Study with More than 3,000 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Puiggròs, Patricia; Tesedo Nieto, Javier; Acín Lázaro, María Pilar; Carrera González, Alfredo; Soler, Miguel José Arranz; Maldonado Vega, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain is a serious problem in Spain. This multicenter, epidemiological 3-month follow-up study investigates pain management efficacy in Spanish centers using patient satisfaction criteria. 3,414 eligible adult patients (65,6% female) with moderate to severe chronic pain from 146 pain centers were included. Patient satisfaction was assessed based onto question 18 of Spanish healthcare barometer-CSI. Pain evolution (Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form (BPI-SF) and visual analog scale (VAS)), quality of life/EuroQol-5, and pain control expectations fulfillment were also assessed. Mean age was 61.3 years. 64.4% of participating centers employed multidisciplinary pain management approach. After 3 months, mean patient satisfaction was 7.8 (1–10) on the CIS barometer. Medical staff received the highest scores, whereas waiting for tests, appointment request to appointment date time, and waiting times at the center the lowest. Mean pain decreased from 7.4 to 4.0; BPI-SF intensity decreased from 6.5 to 3.8; pain control expectations were met in 78.7% of patients; EuroQoL-5D utility index increased from 0.37 to 0.62, p < 0.001, and health status (VAS) from 40.6 to 61.9, p < 0.001. Chronic pain patients (90%) are satisfied with Spanish centers care; 80% had their pain control expectations met. Quality of life improved remarkably: 71% felt moderately to significantly better. However, waiting times need improvement. PMID:27516902

  9. Patient satisfaction with nursing after surgery due to cervical or lumbar discopathy

    PubMed Central

    Garczyk, Danuta; Jankowski, Roman; Misterska, Ewa; Głowacki, Maciej; Żukiel, Ryszard; Kowalska, Anna M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Relationships between patient satisfaction with nursing and patient clinical data have not been fully resolved in a Polish sample. Our objectives were to determine clinical factors associated with patient satisfaction with nursing and investigate differences between patients treated surgically for cervical or lumbar discopathy and degenerative changes. Material/Methods This prospective and cross-sectional study included 63 consecutively selected patients treated surgically for lumbar discopathy and degenerative spine disease and 41 patients undergoing surgery for cervical discopathy and degenerative spine disease from 1st June 2009 to 31st September 2010 in the Department of Neurosurgery and Neurotraumatology of Poznan University of Medical Sciences. In the first stage of this study, socio-demographic data, medical history, and clinical patient characteristics were collected. A minimum 12-month follow-up formed the second part. Nineteen patients with lumbar discopathy were excluded because they were unable to answer the questionnaire. Finally, 44 consecutively selected patients treated surgically for lumbar discopathy and 41 patients undergoing surgery due to cervical discopathy were evaluated with the Polish version of the Newcastle Satisfaction with Nursing Scale (NSNS-PL). Results In patients with cervical and lumbar discopathy, the average Experiences of Nursing Care Subscale (ENCS) scores were 82.0 (SD 15.1) and 79.0 (SD 13.5), respectively, whereas the average Satisfaction with Nursing Care Subscale (SNCS) scores were 75.6 (SD 18.1) and 74.4 (SD 16.8), respectively. The study groups did not differ in regards to NSNS subscales. Associations between ENCS and SNCS scores were confirmed in both patient groups (rS=.73, p<0.001 and rS=.73, p<0.001, respectively). Conclusions Our study highlights the importance of assessing the association between patient characteristics and patient perception of quality of nursing care. Satisfaction with treatment

  10. Level of Perception of Individualized Care and Satisfaction With Nursing in Orthopaedic Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Tekin, Fatma; Findik, Ummu Yildiz

    2015-01-01

    Lately, individualized nursing care and patient satisfaction are important and current issues being discussed. But there is not enough information for patients undergoing orthopaedic surgery. The aim of this study was to determine the individualized care perception and satisfaction in nursing care levels in orthopaedic surgery patients. This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted with 156 patients who underwent orthopaedic surgery. Data were collected using the personal information form, the Individualized Care Scale, and the Newcastle Satisfaction With Nursing Scale. The Spearman correlation analysis and descriptive statistics were performed. The mean individualized care and satisfaction with nursing care scores were found to be close to the preset maximum value, and it was determined that an increase in the level of awareness about nursing interventions and the level of perceived individualized care caused an increase in satisfaction levels regarding nursing care. Nurses should recognize the importance of performing individualized care in order to increase the level of satisfaction with nursing care in orthopaedic surgery patients. PMID:26575511

  11. Supportive Nursing Care and Satisfaction of Patients Receiving Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Navidian, Ali; Ebrahimi, Hossein; Keykha, Roghaieh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patient satisfaction is the most important criterion in evaluating the quality of care. Besides, its assessment in patients with severe mental disorder treated by electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is highly appropriate. The ECT is accompanied by lower satisfaction and may exacerbate the patients’ condition. Objectives: The current study aimed to determine the effect of supportive nursing care on the satisfaction of patients receiving ECT. Patients and Methods: This randomized controlled trial was conducted in the education center of Baharan psychiatric hospital, Zahedan, Iran. Seventy hospitalized patients receiving ECT were randomly divided into two groups of control (n = 35) and intervention (n = 35).The socio-personal and Webster Satisfaction Questionnaire were used as data collection tools. The intervention group received supportive nursing care by nurses trained in informational, emotional, and physical aspects. The control group received only regular nursing care. The levels of satisfaction were measured and compared between groups, before and after the intervention. Data were analyzed using the SPSS software, and Chi-square, independent and paired t tests, as well as covariance analysis were performed. Results: The results showed similarities in socio-personal characteristics of both groups. However, there was a significant difference (P < 0.001) between the means of satisfaction in the groups, predominantly for the intervention group. In other words, a significant difference (P < 0.001) was observed between the means of satisfaction of the intervention (54.71 ± 5.27) and control (36.28 ± 7.00) groups after intervention by controlling the effect of socio-personal variables. Conclusions: Results of the current study confirmed the effect of supportive nursing care on increasing the level of satisfaction in ECT receiving patients, recommending the use of this therapeutic method. PMID:26473077

  12. Geographic Localization of Housestaff Inpatients Improves Patient-Provider Communication, Satisfaction, and Culture of Safety.

    PubMed

    Olson, Douglas P; Fields, Barry G; Windish, Donna M

    2015-01-01

    This study assesses whether geographic localization of housestaff patients contributes to improved patient knowledge of diagnosis, patient satisfaction, provider satisfaction, and workplace culture of safety. Due to national changes to graduate medical education, housestaff patients were localized to a single general medicine ward. Ninety-three patients prelocalization, 64 patients postlocalization, 26 localized physicians, and 10 localized nurses were surveyed. Validated questionnaires assessed patients' experiences during hospitalization, and physician and nurse job satisfaction. Fifty-seven percent of patients knew their diagnosis prior to localization, compared to 80% postlocalization (p < .0001). Prior to localization, 39% of patients who reported experiencing anxieties or fears during hospitalization felt physicians frequently discussed these emotions with them compared to 85% after localization (p < .0001). Before localization, 51% of patients stated that doctors spent 4 min or more daily with them discussing care, compared to 91% after localization (p < .0001). Both physician and nurse opinion significantly improved regarding some but not all aspects of collaboration, teamwork, patient safety, appropriate handling of errors, and culture of safety. The average length of stay was unchanged and the change in 30-day readmission rate was not statistically significant. Localization of patients to a single inpatient ward improved patient knowledge and satisfaction, and some aspects of interprofessional communication and workplace culture of safety. PMID:26042748

  13. [Patient satisfaction in a laboratory test collection unit].

    PubMed

    de Moura, Gisela Maria Schebella Souto; Hilleshein, Eunice Fabiani; Schardosim, Juliana Machado; Delgado, Kátia Simone

    2008-06-01

    This exploratory descriptive study aimed at identifying customer satisfaction attributes in the field of laboratory tests. Data were collected in 2006, using 104 interviews in a laboratorial unit inside a teaching hospital, using the critical incident technique, and submitted to content analysis. Three attribute categories were identified: time spent in waiting for care, interpersonal contact, and technical skills. These results subsidize the assessment of the current satisfaction survey tool, and point to its reformulation. They also allow the identification of improvement needs in customer attention, and provide elements to be taken into account in personnel selection, training programs, personnel performance assessment.

  14. Using patient satisfaction as a basis for reimbursement: political, financial, and philosophical implications.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Debra

    2012-01-01

    Patient satisfaction has always been important; however, basing monetary value on patients' perceptions is causing a strenuous debate in health care. Hospital administrators and providers alike are scrambling to implement measures to improve patients' experiences of care and avoid cuts in revenue.

  15. The Effect of Surgeon Empathy and Emotional Intelligence on Patient Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weng, Hui-Ching; Steed, James F.; Yu, Shang-Won; Liu, Yi-Ten; Hsu, Chia-Chang; Yu, Tsan-Jung; Chen, Wency

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the associations of surgeons' emotional intelligence and surgeons' empathy with patient-surgeon relationships, patient perceptions of their health, and patient satisfaction before and after surgical procedures. We used multi-source approaches to survey 50 surgeons and their 549 outpatients during initial and follow-up visits.…

  16. Randomized Trial of Telegenetics vs. In-Person Cancer Genetic Counseling: Cost, Patient Satisfaction and Attendance.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Adam H; Datta, Santanu K; Skinner, Celette Sugg; Hollowell, Gail P; Beresford, Henry F; Freeland, Thomas; Rogers, Benjamin; Boling, John; Marcom, P Kelly; Adams, Martha B

    2015-12-01

    Telegenetics-genetic counseling via live videoconferencing-can improve access to cancer genetic counseling (CGC) in underserved areas, but studies on cancer telegenetics have not applied randomized methodology or assessed cost. We report cost, patient satisfaction and CGC attendance from a randomized trial comparing telegenetics with in-person CGC among individuals referred to CGC in four rural oncology clinics. Participants (n = 162) were randomized to receive CGC at their local oncology clinic in-person or via telegenetics. Cost analyses included telegenetics system; mileage; and personnel costs for genetic counselor, IT specialist, and clinic personnel. CGC attendance was tracked via study database. Patient satisfaction was assessed 1 week post-CGC via telephone survey using validated scales. Total costs were $106 per telegenetics patient and $244 per in-person patient. Patient satisfaction did not differ by group on either satisfaction scale. In-person patients were significantly more likely to attend CGC than telegenetics patients (89 vs. 79 %, p = 0.03), with bivariate analyses showing an association between lesser computer comfort and lower attendance rate (Chi-square = 5.49, p = 0.02). Our randomized trial of telegenetics vs. in-person counseling found that telegenetics cost less than in-person counseling, with high satisfaction among those who attended. This study provides support for future randomized trials comparing multiple service delivery models on longer-term psychosocial and behavioral outcomes.

  17. Determinants of patient satisfaction with cataract surgery and length of time on the waiting list

    PubMed Central

    Conner-Spady, B L; Sanmugasunderam, S; Courtright, P; McGurran, J J; Noseworthy, T W

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To assess determinants of patient satisfaction with their waiting time (WT) and cataract surgery outcome. Methods: A prospective cohort of consecutive patients waiting for cataract surgery were assessed by their ophthalmologist. Satisfaction, maximum acceptable waiting time (MAWT), urgency, visual function, visual acuity (VA), and health related quality of life (EQ-5D) were assessed using mailed questionnaires before surgery and 8–10 weeks after surgery. Ordinal logistic regression was used to build explanatory models. Results: 166 patients (61.9% female, mean age 73.4 years) had a mean WT of 16 weeks. Patients whose actual WT was shorter than their MAWT had greater odds of being satisfied with their WT than those whose WT was longer (adjusted OR 3.86, 95% CI 1.38 to 10.74). Improvement in visual function (OR 3.19, 95% CI 1.78 to 5.73), and VA (OR 4.27, 95% CI 1.70 to 10.68) significantly predicted satisfaction with surgery. Models were adjusted for age and sex. Conclusion: Patient perspectives on MAWT and satisfaction with WT are important inputs to the process of determining WT standards for levels of patient priority. Patient expectation of WT may mediate satisfaction with actual WT. PMID:15377556

  18. Factors Affecting Patient Satisfaction With Emergency Department Care: An Italian Rural Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Gabriele; Vencia, Francesco; Mecheroni, Silvana; Dionisi, Susanna; Baragatti, Lorenzo; Nante, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the emergency department satisfaction is strictly linked to the role of the nurses, namely the first interface between patients and hospital services. Objectives: The purpose of the study was to identify areas of emergency nursing activity associated with minor or major patient satisfaction. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted from December 2010 - May 2011, in the rural hospital of Orbetello, Tuscany (Italy). Convenience sampling was used to select patients, namely patients presenting at the emergency unit in the study period. The Consumer Emergency Care Satisfaction Scale was used to collect information on two structured subscale (Caring and Teaching). Results: 259 questionnaire were collected. Analysis indicated that only two characteristics significantly influenced overall satisfaction: “receiving continuous information from personnel about delay” positively effect (OR=7.98; p=0.022) while “waiting time for examination” had a negative effect (OR 0.42; p=0.026) Conclusions: The study was the first conduced in Italy using this instrument that enabled to obtain much important information about patient satisfaction with nursing care received in the emergency department. The results showing improvements must be related to educational aspects, such as explaining patients the colour waiting list, and communication towards patients, such as informing about emergences that cause queue. PMID:25946915

  19. Homeopathy satisfaction in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudian, Ahmad; Sadri, Gholamhosein

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patient satisfaction is a key indicator of the quality and effectiveness of a therapeutic method. Assessing the satisfaction of patients undergoing homeopathic therapy is essential in the early steps of educating the community, if suitable outcomes are to be achieved. Materials and Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in 2008 on 125 patients from the city of Isfahan. Patients aged above 15 years who had referred to the homeopathic practitioners and received homeopathic drugs for at least three times were randomly selected and included in the study. Patient satisfaction was assessed in three main areas (general health, physician performance, and symptoms relief) using a valid questionnaire. The results were compared with those of a similar study conducted in 2004 on 240 patients. Results: Mean score of satisfaction with homeopathic treatment was 77.48 ± 6.36 out of 100. In 2004, it was 77.4 ± 8.13. Median age was 36.41 ± 11.25 years. Median time of therapy was 16.80 ± 17.94 months. The highest level of satisfaction was related to relief of symptoms. Satisfaction of physician performance and improvement of general health came next. The degree of satisfaction with therapy was not significant between the different groups with regard to their sex and different levels of education, but there was significant difference in the duration of treatment. The four symptoms that showed better improvement in 2008 were headache, gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances, fatigue, and insomnia. Conclusions: After using homeopathy for several years, patients’ satisfaction was found to be still high. Shifting the area of satisfaction from general health to relief of symptoms could be related to physicians’ experiments for remedy selection. Scientific centers should do more surveys about the effectiveness of homeopathic treatment. Integration of homeopathy with medicine may bring in more success at less cost. It seems rational to support homeopathy

  20. Improving patient satisfaction at all points in the revenue cycle.

    PubMed

    Dee, J F

    1994-10-01

    A common expectation among consumers, whether in the market for a new automobile, a new home, or healthcare services, is that a certain level of customer service will be provided along with the product or service. And the level of customer service provided substantially influences a consumer's satisfaction with the purchase of a product or service. PMID:10138286

  1. Proactive patient rounding to increase customer service and satisfaction on an orthopaedic unit.

    PubMed

    Tea, Christine; Ellison, Michael; Feghali, Fadia

    2008-01-01

    Customer service and patient satisfaction have become increasingly important in the healthcare industry. Given limited resources and a myriad of choices, on which facets of patient satisfaction should healthcare providers focus? An analysis of 40,000 observations across 4 hospitals found 1 important intervention: timely staff responsiveness. Using the Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA) quality methodology, the goal was set to improve staff responsiveness to orthopaedic patient needs and requests, thus improving patient satisfaction. A model to improve staff responsiveness was systematically developed and implemented. The I Care Rounding model places the emphasis on proactively meeting patient needs through hourly rounding, rather than caregivers providing care in a reactionary mode. After full implementation, positive improvement was demonstrated. PMID:18677250

  2. Environmental Variables That Influence Patient Satisfaction: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    MacAllister, Lorissa; Zimring, Craig; Ryherd, Erica

    2016-10-01

    Patient's perception of care-referred to as patient satisfaction-is of great interest in the healthcare industry, as it becomes more directly tied to the revenue of the health system providers. The perception of care has now become important in addition to the actual health outcome of the patient. The known influencers for the patient perception of care are the patient's own characteristics as well as the quality of service received. In patient surveys, the physical environment is noted as important for being clean and quiet but is not considered a critical part of patient satisfaction or other health outcomes. Patient perception of care is currently measured as patient satisfaction, a systematic collection of perceptions of social interactions from an individual person as well as their interaction with the environment. This exploration of the literature intends to explore the rigorous, statistically tested research conducted that has a spatial predictor variable and a health or behavior outcome, with the intent to begin to further test the relationships of these variables in the future studies. This literature review uses the patient satisfaction framework of components of influence and identifies at least 10 known spatial environmental variables that have been shown to have a direct connection to the health and behavior outcome of a patient. The results show that there are certain features of the spatial layout and environmental design in hospital or work settings that influence outcomes and should be noted in the future research. PMID:27492078

  3. Satisfaction with control of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis: physician and patient perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mozaffarian, Neelufar; Lobosco, Steve; Lu, Peng; Roughley, Adam; Alperovich, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patient satisfaction with disease control of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an important component of medical management. This analysis evaluated patient and physician satisfaction with disease control of SLE, factors associated with satisfaction/dissatisfaction, and the degree of physician–patient concordance of these parameters. Patients and methods Data were extracted from the US Adelphi Real World Lupus Disease Specific Programme®, a cross-sectional survey of 50 rheumatologists, 25 nephrologists, and their patients with non-nephritis SLE (NNSLE) or lupus nephritis (LN). Results Physicians reported moderate or severe disease activity in 25.0% of patients with NNSLE and in 50.5% of patients with LN, and were satisfied with disease control in 78.6% (132/168) and 73.8% (152/206) of patients, respectively. For patients, 75.8% (75/99) with NNSLE were satisfied with their current treatment, compared with 65.5% (74/113) with LN. Physician–patient agreement (70.7%) on the level of satisfaction was “slight” (kappa =0.1445) for NNSLE; patients were more frequently dissatisfied than physicians with regard to joint tenderness, fatigue, anxiety, pain on movement, malar rash, and photosensitivity. Physician–patient agreement (71.4%) on the level of satisfaction was “fair” (kappa =0.3695) for LN; patients expressed greater dissatisfaction than physicians for headache, photosensitivity, and anxiety, whereas physicians were more dissatisfied with regard to joint swelling, kidney function, and blood pressure control. In general, patients with NNSLE or LN who were dissatisfied (or whose physicians were dissatisfied) were more likely to have joint swelling, joint stiffness, malar rash, hair loss, depression, and fatigue, have moderate or severe disease, or to be currently experiencing disease flare. Conclusion These data highlight the patient and physician dissatisfaction with real-world disease control of SLE. PMID:27784995

  4. [Satisfaction scales with health care to cardiovascular diseases: CARDIOSATIS--patient and team].

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Clareci Silva; Bandeira, Marina; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz Pinho; Oliveira, Graziella Lage; Caiaffa, Waleska Teixeira

    2011-01-01

    Satisfaction is an important measure of quality care, of adherence to the treatment and adequate use of health services. The objective here is to build two scales which evaluates team' and patients' satisfaction with cardiovascular disease treatment provided through a distance telecardiology project. The procedure followed international standards for development of measure instruments, including operational definition of satisfaction contents and its area for evaluation; item definition; pre-test and pilot study. The literature review, focal groups and discussion with specialists had delimited the domains to be included in the scales and the elaboration of its items. The CARDIOSATIS-Team included 15 items and the CARDIOSATIS-Patient included 11. Satisfaction was measured through a five-point Likert scale. The scales' items comprised satisfaction with physical structure, human resources, capacity of resolution, attention and care offered by the service and the satisfaction with the received/given care. The scales also included open questions. CARDIOSATIS scales have showed to be an easy and accessible instrument very well accepted by medical team and patients. Preliminary results presented good characteristics of validity and reliability. PMID:21503491

  5. Non surgical predicting factors for patient satisfaction after third molar surgery

    PubMed Central

    Balaguer-Martí, José-Carlos; Aloy-Prósper, Amparo; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David

    2016-01-01

    Background In the third molar surgery, it is important to focus not only on surgical skills, but also on patient satisfaction. Classically studies have been focused on surgery and surgeon’s empathy, but there are non-surgical factors that may influence patient satisfaction. Material and Methods A cross-sectional study was performed on 100 patients undergoing surgical extractions of impacted mandibular third molars treated from October 2013 to July 2014 in the Oral Surgery Unit of the University of Valencia. A questionnaire (20 questions) with a 10-point Likert scale was provided. The questionnaire assessed the ease to find the center, the ease to get oriented within the center, the burocratic procedures, the time from the first visit to the date of surgical intervention, waiting time in the waiting room, the comfort at the waiting room, the administrative staff (kindness and efficiency to solve formalities), medical staff (kindness, efficiency, reliability, dedication), personal data care, clarity in the information received (about the surgery, postoperative care and resolution of the doubts), available means and state of facilities. Outcome variables were overall satisfaction, and recommendation of the center. Statistical analysis was made using the multiple linear regression analysis. Results Significant correlations were found between all variables and overall satisfaction. The multiple regression model showed that the efficiency of the surgeon and the clarity of the information were statistically significant to overall satisfaction and recommendation of the center. The kindness of the administrative staff, available means, the state of facilities and the comfort at the waiting room were statistically significant to the recommendation of the center. Conclusions Patient satisfaction directly depends on the efficiency of the surgeon and clarity of the clinical information received about the procedure. Appreciation of these predictive factors may help clinicians

  6. Improving patient satisfaction with time spent in an orthopedic outpatient clinic

    PubMed Central

    Levesque, Jerry; Bogoch, Earl R.; Cooney, Barb; Johnston, Brenda; Wright, James G.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To determine if patient satisfaction can be improved by changing patients’ expectations of the clinic visit and by decreasing the total time spent in the clinic. Design A prospective comparative analysis carried out in 4 phases. Setting An university-affiliated orthopedic outpatient clinic. Patients All patients seen in the orthopedic outpatient clinic were eligible. Phase 1 determined the total clinic time required by patient type; phase 2 assessed baseline satisfaction; phase 3 altered patients’ expectations; and phase 4 altered patients’ expectations and scheduled visits by patient type. Intervention Patient questionnaires. Main outcome measure Patient satisfaction with time spent in the clinic. Results Of 708 distributed questionnaires, 622 (88%) were completed (547 totally complete, 75 partially complete). Total time spent in the clinic decreased across phases 2, 3 and 4 (mean 99.2, 94.7 and 85.2 minutes, respectively, but was significantly different only between phases 3 and 4; p = 0.05, Duncan’s multiple range test). The percentage of patients who rated their waiting time as “excellent” increased across phases 2, 3 and 4 (14.6%, 18.8% and 31.1%, respectively; p = 0.0004, χ2 test). Conclusion Patient satisfaction can be improved by altering patient expectations and by decreasing the total time spent in clinic. PMID:11129831

  7. Greenlanders in hospital; lack of language understanding is not always a hindrance to intercultural communication. Comparison of interviews of Greenlandic patients and their Danish therapists with respect to concepts of communication, patient satisfaction, disease, and health.

    PubMed

    Elsass, P; Christensen, H P; Falhof, J; Hvolby, A

    1994-04-01

    In four hospitals in Greenland, 50 Greenlandic patients and their Danish therapists have been interviewed about the same topics. The interviews were semistructured with open ended questions on the following subjects: Language difficulties, perception of diagnosis, patients satisfaction and points of criticism, perception of disease and treatment, and experience of health in general. In spite of language difficulties and insufficient communication, patient satisfaction occurred in most of the consultations. There was a tendency towards the elder patients being more satisfied than the younger. It does not seem to be a necessity to achieve a good treatment-result that the patients and the therapists speak the same language and share the same concepts of health and disease. Where the foreign health service can be limited so that it is not viewed as a menace to culturally related concept of disease, the consultations give rise to the best patient-satisfaction. PMID:8018222

  8. Coping mediates the influence of personality on life satisfaction in patients with rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Vollmann, Manja; Pukrop, Jörg; Salewski, Christel

    2016-04-01

    A rheumatic disease can severely impair a person's quality of life. The degree of impairment, however, is not closely related to objective indicators of disease severity. This study investigated the influence and the interplay of core psychological factors, i.e., personality and coping, on life satisfaction in patients with rheumatic diseases. Particularly, it was tested whether coping mediates the effects of personality on life satisfaction. In a cross-sectional design, 158 patients diagnosed with a rheumatic disease completed questionnaires assessing the Big 5 personality traits (BFI-10), several disease-related coping strategies (EFK) and life satisfaction (HSWBS). Data were analyzed using a complex multiple mediation analysis with the Big 5 personality traits as predictors, coping strategies as mediators and life satisfaction as outcome. All personality traits and seven of the nine coping strategies were associated with life satisfaction (rs > |0.16|, ps ≤ 0.05). The mediation analysis revealed that personality traits had no direct, but rather indirect effects on life satisfaction through coping. Neuroticism had a negative indirect effect on life satisfaction through less active problem solving and more depressive coping (indirect effects > -0.03, ps < 0.05). Extraversion, agreeableness, and conscientiousness had positive indirect effects on life satisfaction through more active problem solving, less depressive coping and/or a more active search for social support (indirect effects > 0.06, ps < 0.05). Personality and coping play a role in adjustment to rheumatic diseases. The interplay of these variables should be considered in psychological interventions for patients with rheumatic diseases. PMID:26898985

  9. Coping mediates the influence of personality on life satisfaction in patients with rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Vollmann, Manja; Pukrop, Jörg; Salewski, Christel

    2016-04-01

    A rheumatic disease can severely impair a person's quality of life. The degree of impairment, however, is not closely related to objective indicators of disease severity. This study investigated the influence and the interplay of core psychological factors, i.e., personality and coping, on life satisfaction in patients with rheumatic diseases. Particularly, it was tested whether coping mediates the effects of personality on life satisfaction. In a cross-sectional design, 158 patients diagnosed with a rheumatic disease completed questionnaires assessing the Big 5 personality traits (BFI-10), several disease-related coping strategies (EFK) and life satisfaction (HSWBS). Data were analyzed using a complex multiple mediation analysis with the Big 5 personality traits as predictors, coping strategies as mediators and life satisfaction as outcome. All personality traits and seven of the nine coping strategies were associated with life satisfaction (rs > |0.16|, ps ≤ 0.05). The mediation analysis revealed that personality traits had no direct, but rather indirect effects on life satisfaction through coping. Neuroticism had a negative indirect effect on life satisfaction through less active problem solving and more depressive coping (indirect effects > -0.03, ps < 0.05). Extraversion, agreeableness, and conscientiousness had positive indirect effects on life satisfaction through more active problem solving, less depressive coping and/or a more active search for social support (indirect effects > 0.06, ps < 0.05). Personality and coping play a role in adjustment to rheumatic diseases. The interplay of these variables should be considered in psychological interventions for patients with rheumatic diseases.

  10. Using SERVQUAL for assessing and improving patient satisfaction at a rural health facility in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, B T; Mobeen, N; Azam, S I; Rabbani, F

    2008-01-01

    A cross-sectional study of patient satisfaction with care was conducted over a period of 1 year from March 2004 to March 2005 in a secondary-level hospital in a peri-urban area of Karachi, Pakistan. Using the SERVQUAL tool and exit interviews, data were collected quarterly from a total of 1533 patients. Results sharing and capacity-building workshops were arranged during the 4 phases of the survey to sensitize the staff of the hospital to work towards improving patient satisfaction. The level of satisfaction of the patients with the outpatient health services provided showed a gradual increase from 34.4% to 82.0% over the 1-year period. PMID:18561738

  11. [Estimating the grade of patient satisfaction at the bone marrow transplantation department in Florence hospitals].

    PubMed

    Marsullo, M; Tozzi, S; Biagini, S; Rinaldi, L

    2000-01-01

    The satisfaction of the patients admitted to the bone marrow transplant unit of Careggi Hospital was evaluated by the nursing team. The aim of the evaluation was to measure the level of satisfaction for the nursing care and services and the areas of improvement. The questionnaire, with 23 questions referring to 5 areas (hotel care, Nurses' reliability, Ability to reassure, to answer to patients' needs and Empathy) derived from the conceptual model of Servqual. Ninety patients were given (or mailed) the questionnaire during a follow-up visit. Patients were asked to answer the questions evaluating each aspect on a scale from 1 (falls short of expectation) to 10 (exceeds all expectations). The answers show a very high satisfaction (> 8) for all the areas except for the food that reported a medium score of 5.2. Further analysis will allow a better understanding of the causes of dissatisfaction. PMID:11107367

  12. [Estimating the grade of patient satisfaction at the bone marrow transplantation department in Florence hospitals].

    PubMed

    Marsullo, M; Tozzi, S; Biagini, S; Rinaldi, L

    2000-01-01

    The satisfaction of the patients admitted to the bone marrow transplant unit of Careggi Hospital was evaluated by the nursing team. The aim of the evaluation was to measure the level of satisfaction for the nursing care and services and the areas of improvement. The questionnaire, with 23 questions referring to 5 areas (hotel care, Nurses' reliability, Ability to reassure, to answer to patients' needs and Empathy) derived from the conceptual model of Servqual. Ninety patients were given (or mailed) the questionnaire during a follow-up visit. Patients were asked to answer the questions evaluating each aspect on a scale from 1 (falls short of expectation) to 10 (exceeds all expectations). The answers show a very high satisfaction (> 8) for all the areas except for the food that reported a medium score of 5.2. Further analysis will allow a better understanding of the causes of dissatisfaction.

  13. [Measuring patient satisfaction in an emergency unit of a Swiss university hospital: occurrence of anxiety, insecurity, worry, pain, dyspnoea, nausea, thirst and hunger, and their correlation with patient satisfaction (part 2)].

    PubMed

    Müller-Staub, Maria; Meer, Ruth; Briner, Gabi; Probst, Marie-Therese; Needham, Ian

    2008-06-01

    This article reports the second part of a comprehensive study examining patient satisfaction with nursing care in ambulatory patients of a Swiss emergency department. A descriptive cross-sectional study examined patient satisfaction, using a revised version of the questionnaire <Patient satisfaction with nursing care> in a convenience sample of 114 patients. The occurrence and intensity of anxiety, insecurity, worry, pain, dyspnoea, nausea, thirst and hunger, and their correlation with patient satisfaction were analyzed. The patients also reported if effective nursing interventions were carried out. Patients suffered from the following states or symptoms: Pain (70%), thirst (45%), insecurity (44%), anxiety (38%), hunger (25%), and nausea (12%). Despite the occurrence of these states or symptoms, not all patients reported receiving effective nursing interventions. Dyspnoea and pain were detected well by nurses and patients received effective nursing interventions. Anxiety, insecurity, nausea, thirst and hunger were not detected well by nurses; and patients often evaluated the nursing interventions they received as ineffective. These results were analyzed and compared with the findings measured by the instrument "Patient satisfaction with nursing care" applying correlations and ANOVA. Patients who suffered from the states or symptoms described above and reported receiving ineffective nursing interventions showed significantly lower patient satisfaction scores than patients not suffering from these states or symptoms. Statistically significant correlations were found between worry, pain, anxiety and patient satisfaction. The results of both studies (part 1+2) (Müller-Staub, Meer, Briner, Probst & Needham, 2008) are discussed, conclusions drawn and implications for practice and research presented.

  14. Perception of service satisfaction and quality of life of patients living with schizophrenia in Lagos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Afe, Taiwo Opekitan; Bello-Mojeed, Mashudat; Ogunsemi, Olawale

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess service-satisfaction and quality of life among patients with schizophrenia in a tertiary psychiatric healthcare facility in Lagos, Nigeria. Methods: Cross-sectional survey of 101 (out of 120) patients diagnosed with schizophrenia attending the outpatient clinic of the Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital Yaba, Lagos, Nigeria. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV diagnosis (SCID), Charleston Psychiatric Out-patient Scale (CPOSS), and the World-Health Organisation Quality of Life –Bref scale (WHOQOL-BREF) was used in assessing diagnosis, patient satisfaction and subjective quality of life respectively. Results: The ages of the patient ranged from 19-81. Males (49.5%) and females (50.5%) had almost equal distribution. Mean duration of attendance was 8.7years ± 8.50. Service satisfaction ranged between 25-60 on the CPOSS. Areas that had higher mean scores on CPOSS were with items (1) Helpfulness of the records clerk (3.70±1.1), (7) Helpfulness of services received (3.69±1.0). Subjective quality of life was high (3.65±1.8), satisfaction with health was also high (3.40±1.1). Service satisfaction correlated with Quality of life at P < 0.00. PMID:27114651

  15. Patients' satisfaction: customer relationship management as a new opportunity for quality improvement in thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Gaetano; Brunelli, Alessandro

    2012-11-01

    Clinical and nonclinical indicators of performance are meant to provide the surgeon with tools to identify weaknesses to be improved. The World Health Organization's Performance Evaluation Systems represent a multidimensional approach to quality measurement based on several categories made of different indicators. Indicators for patient satisfaction may include overall perceived quality, accessibility, humanization and patient involvement, communication, and trust in health care providers. Patient satisfaction is included among nonclinical indicators of performance in thoracic surgery and is increasingly recognized as one of the outcome measures for delivered quality of care.

  16. Patients' satisfaction: customer relationship management as a new opportunity for quality improvement in thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Gaetano; Brunelli, Alessandro

    2012-11-01

    Clinical and nonclinical indicators of performance are meant to provide the surgeon with tools to identify weaknesses to be improved. The World Health Organization's Performance Evaluation Systems represent a multidimensional approach to quality measurement based on several categories made of different indicators. Indicators for patient satisfaction may include overall perceived quality, accessibility, humanization and patient involvement, communication, and trust in health care providers. Patient satisfaction is included among nonclinical indicators of performance in thoracic surgery and is increasingly recognized as one of the outcome measures for delivered quality of care. PMID:23084619

  17. Academic Achievements and Satisfaction of the Clicker-Aided Flipped Business English Writing Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhonggen, Yu; Guifang, Wang

    2016-01-01

    The flipped classroom has been achieving a great success in teaching innovation. This study, aiming to determine the effectiveness of the flipped model in business English writing course, combined the quantitative with the qualitative research methods. Participants were randomly selected from undergraduate students majoring in business English.…

  18. Effects of Student Achievement on Satisfaction of Newly Appointed Teachers: A Cognitive Dissonance Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, I. Phillip; Chounet, F. Paul; Buster, Amy; Sailor, Scott

    2005-01-01

    Research addressing attraction and selection of employees within the public school setting seems to indicate that the higher a school's student achievement the more likely a potential job candidate is to assess a position at that school favorably. However, the validity of this finding has failed to be assessed with "real teachers" accepting actual…

  19. Towards improved healthcare performance: examining technological possibilities and patient satisfaction with wireless body area networks.

    PubMed

    Fensli, Rune; Dale, Jan Gunnar; O'Reilly, Philip; O'Donoghue, John; Sammon, David; Gundersen, Torstein

    2010-08-01

    This paper investigates the benefits of using less intrusive wireless technologies for heart monitoring. By replacing well established heart monitoring devices (i.e. Holter) with wireless ECG based Body Area Networks (BAN), improved healthcare performance can be achieved, reflected in (1) high quality ECG recordings during physical activities and (2) increased patient satisfaction. A small scale clinical trial was conducted to compare both technologies and the results illustrate that the wireless ECG monitor was able to detect ECG signals intended for arrhythmia diagnostics. Furthermore, from a patient's perspective, both technologies were evaluated using three dimensions, namely; hygienic aspects, physical activity, and skin reactions. Results demonstrate that the wireless ECG BAN showed better performance, especially regarding the hygienic aspects. It was also favourable for use during physical activities, and the signal quality of the wireless sensor system demonstrated good performance regarding signal noise and artefact disturbances. This paper concludes that wireless cardiac monitoring systems have significant benefits from a patient's perspective, and further clinical trials should be conducted to further evaluate the new ECG based BAN system, to identify the possibility of widespread adoption and utilisation of wireless technology for arrhythmia diagnostics. PMID:20703932

  20. Relationship between Improvements in Physical Measures and Patient Satisfaction in Rehabilitation after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazzal, Mahmoud I.; Bashaireh, Khaldoon H.; Alomari, Mahmoud A.; Nazzal, Mohammad S.; Maayah, Mikhled F.; Mesmar, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine patient satisfaction with rehabilitation after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Fifty-six patients, aged 45-77 years, were enrolled in a post-TKA comprehensive therapy program focusing on knee strengthening and functional activities. The program lasted 3 months and was conducted for 1 h, twice a day, 5 days per…

  1. Patient and referring health care provider satisfaction with a physiotherapy spinal triage assessment service

    PubMed Central

    Bath, Brenna; Janzen, Bonnie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate participant and referring care provider satisfaction associated with a spinal triage assessment service delivered by physiotherapists in collaboration with orthopedic surgeons. Methods People with low back-related complaints were recruited from those referred to a spinal triage assessment program delivered by physiotherapists. Measures of patient and provider satisfaction were completed at approximately 4 weeks after the assessment. The satisfaction surveys were analyzed quantitatively with descriptive statistics and qualitatively with an inductive thematic approach of open and axial coding. Results A total of 108/115 participants completed the posttest satisfaction survey. Sixty-six percent of participants were “very satisfied” with the service and 55% were “very satisfied” with the recommendations that were made. Only 18% of referring care providers completed the satisfaction survey and 90.5% of those were “very satisfied” with the recommendations. Sixty-one participants and 14 care providers provided comments which revealed a diverse range of themes which were coded into positive (ie, understanding the problem, communication, customer service, efficiency, and management direction), negative (ie, lack of detail, time to follow-up, cost) and neutral related to the triage service, and an “other” category unrelated to the service (ie, chronic symptoms, comorbidities, and limited access to health care.) Conclusion The quantitative results of the participant survey demonstrated very high levels of satisfaction with the service and slightly less satisfaction with the recommendations that were made. Satisfaction of referring care providers with the recommendations and report was also high, but given the low response rate, these results should be interpreted with caution. Qualitative analysis of participant and provider comments revealed a diverse range of themes. These other issues may be important contextual factors that have the

  2. Acceptance of illness and satisfaction with life among malaria patients in rivers state, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Health condition is one of the basic factors affecting satisfaction with life, and the level of illness acceptance. The purpose of the study was to analyse the level of illness acceptance, the level of satisfaction with life among malaria patients, and the level of trust placed in the physician and the nurse. Methods The study employs the method of diagnostic survey based on standardised AIS and SWLS scales, as well as Anderson and Dedrick’s PPTS and PNTS scales. Results The average AIS level was 12 points, while the average level of SwL at the SWLS scale was 16.5 points. The average level of trust in the physician and the nurse amounted to 50.6 points and 51.4 points, respectively. The correlation between the level of illness acceptance and self-evaluated satisfaction with life was statistically significant, with R = 0.56. The marital status influenced the level of illness acceptance with p < 0.05 and the level of satisfaction with life with p < 0.05. The employment status affected the level of satisfaction with life with p < 0.05 and the level of illness acceptance with p < 0.05. Conclusions The majority of malaria patients did not accept their illness, while the level of satisfaction with life was low. The majority of respondents trusted their physician and nurse. There is a statistically significant correlation between the level of illness acceptance and the self-evaluated satisfaction with life. The marital status had a statistically significant effect on the acceptance of illness and the satisfaction with life. The individuals who had a job demonstrated higher levels of quality of life and illness acceptance. PMID:24885562

  3. Patient satisfaction with intravenous acetaminophen: a pooled analysis of five randomized, placebo-controlled studies in the acute postoperative setting.

    PubMed

    Apfel, Christian C; Souza, Kimberly; Portillo, Juan; Dalal, Poorvi; Bergese, Sergio D

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous (IV) acetaminophen has been shown to reduce postoperative pain and opioid consumption, which may lead to increased patient satisfaction. To determine the effect IV acetaminophen has on patient satisfaction, a pooled analysis from methodologically homogenous studies was conducted. We obtained patient-level data from five randomized, placebo-controlled studies in adults undergoing elective surgery in which patient satisfaction was measured using a 4-point categorical rating scale. The primary endpoint was "excellent" satisfaction and the secondary endpoint was "good" or "excellent" satisfaction at 24 hr after first study drug administration. Bivariate analyses were conducted using the chi-square test and Student's t-test and multivariable analyses were conducted using logistic regression analysis. Patients receiving IV acetaminophen were more than twice as likely as those who received placebo to report "excellent" patient satisfaction ratings (32.3% vs. 15.9%, respectively). Of all variables that remained statistically significant in the multivariable analysis (i.e., type of surgery, duration of anesthesia, last pain rating, and opioid consumption), IV acetaminophen had the strongest positive effect on "excellent" patient satisfaction with an odds ratio of 2.76 (95% CI 1.81-4.23). Results for "excellent" or "good" satisfaction were similar. When given as part of a perioperative analgesic regimen, IV acetaminophen was associated with significantly improved patient satisfaction.

  4. Patient satisfaction surveys as a market research tool for general practices.

    PubMed Central

    Khayat, K; Salter, B

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Recent policy developments, embracing the notions of consumer choice, quality of care, and increased general practitioner control over practice budgets have resulted in a new competitive environment in primary care. General practitioners must now be more aware of how their patients feel about the services they receive, and patient satisfaction surveys can be an effective tool for general practices. AIM. A survey was undertaken to investigate the use of a patient satisfaction survey and whether aspects of patient satisfaction varied according to sociodemographic characteristics such as age, sex, social class, housing tenure and length of time in education. METHOD. A sample of 2173 adults living in Medway District Health Authority were surveyed by postal questionnaire in September 1991 in order to elicit their views on general practice services. RESULTS. Levels of satisfaction varied with age, with younger people being consistently less satisfied with general practice services than older people. Women, those in social classes 1-3N, home owners and those who left school aged 17 years or older were more critical of primary care services than men, those in social classes 3M-5, tenants and those who left school before the age of 17 years. CONCLUSION. Surveys and analyses of this kind, if conducted for a single practice, can form the basis of a marketing strategy aimed at optimizing list size, list composition, and service quality. Satisfaction surveys can be readily incorporated into medical audit and financial management. PMID:8204335

  5. General life satisfaction and domain-specific quality of life in chronic schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Kemmler, G; Holzner, B; Neudorfer, C; Meise, U; Hinterhuber, H

    1997-04-01

    Subjective quality of life (QOL) has often been assessed through questionnaires or structured interviews focusing on the person's satisfaction with various life domains. In particular, most QOL instruments for psychiatric patients are based on this concept. We report on a study casting some doubts on the rationale of this approach. We investigated the QOL of 48 chronic schizophrenic outpatients with a long-term disease history (at least 20 years) using a German version of the Lancashire QOL Profile. The interrelations between general life satisfaction, satisfaction with specific life domains, psychological well-being and psychopathology were studied using correlation analysis and multiple linear regression. Of the life domains assessed, only two, namely social relations and health, contributed significantly to the patients' general life satisfaction, while the others (including work, leisure, family relations and housing) did not. The subscales on psychological well-being (self-esteem, affective state) as well as psychopathology were found to be more closely associated with general life satisfaction than almost all life domains considered. The findings are discussed with regard to the specific situation of the group of patients investigated. They give indications that the life domain approach to measuring QOL has its limitations, in particular when applied to patients having adapted to a very restricted everyday life. PMID:9226984

  6. Satisfaction with outpatient physiotherapy: focus groups to explore the views of patients with acute and chronic musculoskeletal conditions.

    PubMed

    Hills, Rosemary; Kitchen, Sheila

    2007-01-01

    Patient satisfaction is generally regarded as an important component in quality health care. However, there has been little satisfaction research in physiotherapy compared with that in other clinical fields with few qualitative studies that have explored patients' perceptions and attitudes toward physiotherapy. We report on the use of focus groups, as part of a multimethod approach of qualitative data collection into patients' satisfaction with their outpatient physiotherapy within the NHS system of care in the United Kingdom. We explored the factors that affect patients' satisfaction with musculoskeletal outpatient physiotherapy. A purposeful sample of patients with acute and chronic musculoskeletal patients who had been discharged from physiotherapy within the previous 4 months was drawn from both an inner city and suburban hospital. Two acute groups (n = 4, n = 10) and two chronic groups (n = 5, n = 11) were convened. A topic guide drew on themes that had emerged from the earlier qualitative phases of the study and guided the discussion in relation to pretreatment, treatment, and outcome stages of physiotherapy care. Sessions were tape-recorded, transcribed, and content was analyzed to code and categorise the primary patterns in the data. Although subjects in both the acute and chronic groups expected that treatment would improve their symptoms and function, they differed in the degree to which they perceived that this was achieved. Both satisfactory and unsatisfactory aspects of care emerged under the principal themes of expectations, communication, perceptions of the therapist, treatment process, and outcome. Those in the acute group were optimistic of a good result, whereas those with chronic degenerative conditions were either doubtful of improvement or unrealistic in their hopes for complete resolution of their symptoms. It was also apparent that subjects could be further divided into one of three groups (positive, negative, ambivalent), depending on the

  7. Development of the NIH PROMIS® Sexual Function and Satisfaction Measures in Patients with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Kathryn E.; Lin, Li; Cyranowski, Jill M.; Reeve, Bryce B.; Reese, Jennifer Barsky; Jeffery, Diana D.; Smith, Ashley Wilder; Porter, Laura S.; Dombeck, Carrie B.; Bruner, Deborah Watkins; Keefe, Francis J.; Weinfurt, Kevin P.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction We describe the development and validation of the PROMIS Sexual Function and Satisfaction (PROMIS SexFS) measures version 1.0 for cancer populations. Aim To develop a customizable self-report measure of sexual function and satisfaction as part of the U.S. National Institutes of Health PROMIS® Network. Methods Our multidisciplinary working group followed a comprehensive protocol for developing psychometrically robust patient reported outcome (PRO) measures including qualitative (scale development) and quantitative (psychometric evaluation) development. We performed an extensive literature review, conducted 16 focus groups with cancer patients and multiple discussions with clinicians, and evaluated candidate items in cognitive testing with patients. We administered items to 819 cancer patients. Items were calibrated using item response theory and evaluated for reliability and validity. Main Outcome Measures The PROMIS Sexual Function and Satisfaction (PROMIS SexFS) measures version 1.0 include 79 items in 11 domains: interest in sexual activity, lubrication, vaginal discomfort, erectile function, global satisfaction with sex life, orgasm, anal discomfort, therapeutic aids, sexual activities, interfering factors, and screener questions. Results In addition to content validity (patients indicate that items cover important aspects of their experiences) and face validity (patients indicate that items measure sexual function and satisfaction), the measure shows evidence for discriminant validity (domains discriminate between groups expected to be different), convergent validity (strong correlations between scores on PROMIS and scores on conceptually-similar older measures of sexual function), as well as favorable test-retest reliability among people not expected to change (inter-class correlations from 2 administrations of the instrument, 1 month apart). Conclusions The PROMIS SexFS offers researchers a reliable and valid set of tools to measure self

  8. Improving patient satisfaction through the consistent use of scripting by the nursing staff.

    PubMed

    Mustard, Lewis W

    2003-09-01

    An exploratory developmental model proposes a new method for responding to patient satisfaction on the basis of the hospital nurse obtaining subjective patient information at the patient's bedside during the first 24 hours of hospital admission and the day before discharge. The personal interview by the nurse uses a guided script, the Voice of the Patient (Figure 1), which is the front sheet in the medical record and a part of the critical medical care documents common to all hospital medical records. The information recorded in the Voice of the Patient actually comprises one-sentence quotes from the patient used by the hospital caregivers in responding to patient satisfaction during hospitalization, when care flaws can be corrected.

  9. Service quality, trust, and patient satisfaction in interpersonal-based medical service encounters

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Interaction between service provider and customer is the primary core of service businesses of different natures, and the influence of trust on service quality and customer satisfaction could not be ignored in interpersonal-based service encounters. However, lack of existing literature on the correlation between service quality, patient trust, and satisfaction from the prospect of interpersonal-based medical service encounters has created a research gap in previous studies. Therefore, this study attempts to bridge such a gap with an evidence-based practice study. Methods We adopted a cross-sectional design using a questionnaire survey of outpatients in seven medical centers of Taiwan. Three hundred and fifty copies of questionnaire were distributed, and 285 valid copies were retrieved, with a valid response rate of 81.43%. The SPSS 14.0 and AMOS 14.0 (structural equation modeling) statistical software packages were used for analysis. Structural equation modeling clarifies the extent of relationships between variables as well as the chain of cause and effect. Restated, SEM results do not merely show empirical relationships between variables when defining the practical situation. For this reason, SEM was used to test the hypotheses. Results Perception of interpersonal-based medical service encounters positively influences service quality and patient satisfaction. Perception of service quality among patients positively influences their trust. Perception of trust among patients positively influences their satisfaction. Conclusions According to the findings, as interpersonal-based medical service encounters will positively influence service quality and patient satisfaction, and the differences for patients’ perceptions of the professional skill and communication attitude of personnel in interpersonal-based medical service encounters will influence patients’ overall satisfaction in two ways: (A) interpersonal-based medical service encounter directly

  10. Doctor-patient relations in dermatology: obligations and rights for a mutual satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Poot, F

    2009-11-01

    The author examines different aspects of patient-doctor relationship in dermatological consultations. At first, a definition of patients satisfaction is given, based on available literature. It has been shown that satisfaction depends on diagnosis, but also on the doctor's ability to provide explanations on the probable cause of the illness, information on how long the symptom will probably last, and if she/he demonstrates empathy. Satisfaction also increases if the illness is serious, but decreases if quality of life linked to the symptom is underestimated by the doctor. After providing a philosophical definition of ethics, which emphasizes the importance of mutual satisfaction of patient and doctor, the concepts of empathy and compassion in patient-doctor relations are defined. Their importance in consultations is underlined, reporting, for example, that doctors with good communication skills experience fewer difficult consultations (8% vs. 23%). Afterwards, the dermatological consultation is analysed in its practical aspects, trying to define a good-quality consultation. First of all, the pitfalls that can affect good time management are analysed, suggesting to structure the consultation using the Soap method. Particular situations are analysed, such as announcing bad news and dealing with borderline patients. Finally, the concept of transference is defined, remembering that doctor-patient relationships can replay some difficult relationship coming from the past, and thus doctors need to be aware of this possibility and learn how to manage it.

  11. Personality assessment in today's health care environment: therapeutic alliance and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Michael P; Erdberg, Philip; Crosier, Marlan; Steinfeld, Bradley

    2007-10-01

    This article addresses the role of personality assessment-specifically the Rorschach (Exner, 2002)-]in the context of the health care industry's increased focus on patient satisfaction. When providing psychotherapy, a challenge to providing patient-centered care turns on understanding and acting on the key aspects of the patient's personality that are crucial to forming an effective alliance. This article includes a description and examples of how personality assessment can enhance therapists' understanding of the ideational, affective, and self-control aspects of complicated patients' problem-solving styles. This enhanced understanding in turn can lead to improved therapeutic alliance between therapists and patients and to increased patient satisfaction with their care. How to provide feedback to the therapist also is addressed.

  12. [The multi-factorial model of satisfaction of medical care by hospital patients suffering from borderline psychic disorders].

    PubMed

    Tsigankov, B D; Maligin, Ya V

    2015-01-01

    The satisfaction of patients with medical care determines their consumer behavior. The factors of satisfaction with medical care vary depending on level of its provision and profile of medical specialty. At that, there are only sporadic studies dedicated to factors of satisfaction with psychiatric care. The study was carried out to examine factors of satisfaction with hospital psychiatric care by patients suffering from depressive and neurotic disorders. The sampling consisted of 356 hospital patients suffering from depressive and neurotic disorders. The survey in written form was carried out using originally developed questionnaire. The statistical analysis was implemented by compiling equation of multiple regression. It is established that key factors of satisfaction include functioning of medical nurses of department, functioning of attending physician, comfort of wards, proportions and quality of psychiatric care capability of physician to empathic listening. The developed mathematical model explains 81% of variation of satisfaction with treatment.

  13. [Acceptance of memory impairment and satisfaction with life in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Morioka, Mizuho; Tanaka, Makoto; Matsubayashi, Kozo; Kita, Toru

    2004-09-01

    In this study, we focused on acceptance of memory impairment and satisfaction with life in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD). We interviewed 71 consecutive patients with AD and asked (1) whether they had memory loss, (2) whether they found trouble in life, and (3) how their daily life was. We categorized the patients into three groups based on awareness of memory loss and reference to the cause of memory loss. Cognitive functions were lower in patients who were not aware of memory loss. The rate of satisfaction with life was the highest in patients who were not aware of memory loss, and was the lowest in patients who complained of memory loss with reference to the cause of memory loss, indicating that patients could hardly accept their lives when memory impairment was a serious issue. However, in these patients, depression scores were not high, suggesting that they may somehow adapt themselves to their current status by defining the reason for memory loss. In patients who complained of memory impairment but did not refer to the cause of memory loss, there was a variation in awareness of memory loss and satisfaction with life. The present study indicated that we have to provide individual care and support for AD patients considering their level of acceptance of memory impairment.

  14. Comparison of psychological aspects and patient satisfaction following breast conserving surgery, simple mastectomy and breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghazal, S K; Fallowfield, L; Blamey, R W

    2000-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess and compare the psychological outcome and satisfaction of patients whom underwent wide local excision, mastectomy alone and mastectomy with breast reconstruction. A total of 577 patients had different types of operations for primary breast cancer (254 (44%) had wide local excision, 202 (35%) had simple mastectomy and 121 (21%) had breast reconstruction). Psychosocial morbidity and satisfaction were studied retrospectively using self-evaluation questionnaires. The three different surgical groups were cross-matched into four different age group. Significant statistical differences existed between the three procedures regarding satisfaction and psychosocial morbidity (anxiety, depression, body image, sexuality and self-esteem) in favour of wide local excision followed by breast reconstruction. Greatest morbidity was seen in the mastectomy group. Patient satisfaction of cosmetic outcome and psychosocial aspects was greater with wide local excision than with breast reconstruction or mastectomy. However, since wide local excision is indicated in only a group of patients, breast reconstruction should be an option available to patients requiring mastectomy.

  15. Development of a questionnaire to measure patients' satisfaction with general practitioners' services.

    PubMed Central

    Grogan, S; Conner, M; Willits, D; Norman, P

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND. It is now a requirement that patients' satisfaction with the services obtained from their general practitioner should be surveyed. AIM. The aim of the study was to produce a reliable and valid multidimensional patient satisfaction questionnaire that could be used in general practice. METHOD. Items were originally derived from patients' responses to open-ended questions. The resulting 148-item Likert-scale questionnaire was completed by 1193 patients. General satisfaction items were removed from the set, and responses to remaining items underwent factor analysis. Subscales were produced from items representing each factor. Reliability and validity of each subscale were examined. RESULTS. Five subscales with a total of 40 items resulted from the factor analysis: doctors, access, nurses, appointments and facilities. Each subscale was internally reliable (Cronbach's alpha coefficient between 0.73 and 0.95), and initial tests of validity suggested that all subscales were valid. CONCLUSION. The study has resulted in a 40-item scale that has been found to be reliable and valid after initial tests. Further work to test the reliability and validity of the final version of the patient satisfaction questionnaire is described. PMID:7492421

  16. 78 FR 6851 - Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program, VA Form...

  17. 77 FR 69550 - Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-19

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program... provided by or through the Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program. DATES: Written comments and... information technology. Title: Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program, VA Form...

  18. 76 FR 624 - Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program.... 2900-New (VA Form 10-0476).'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael...

  19. Comparison of marginal bone loss and patient satisfaction in single and double-implant assisted mandibular overdenture by immediate loading

    PubMed Central

    Khoshhal, Masume; Ebrahimzadeh, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to compare the coronal bone level and patient satisfaction in 1-implant and 2-implant assisted mandibular overdentures. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty patients who had maladaptive mandibular dentures were treated in this study. Patients were randomly divided into two groups. The first group received 1 implant (Simple line II, Implantium, South Korea) in their mandibular midline and the second group received 2 implants in their B and D regions (according to Misch's category). If the primary stability of each implant was at least 60 ISQ, ball attachment was placed and denture relined with soft liner. After 6 weeks, retentive cap incorporated with hard acrylic resin. In the 6 and 12 months recalls, periapical digital radiograph were made and visual analogue scale questionnaires were used to record patient satisfaction. The Friedman test was done for comparing the presurgical and postsurgical parameters in each group and the U-Mann Whitney test (P<.05) was done for comparison of post-treatment results between the two groups. RESULTS All implants achieved sufficient primary stability to be immediately loaded. Patient satisfaction was high, and there were no significant differences between two groups (P>.05). In addition, mean marginal bone loss was 0.6 ± 0.67 mm in the first group and 0.6 ± 0.51 mm in the second group, after 12 month. Mean marginal bone loss showed no significant differences between two groups. CONCLUSION This preliminary one-year result indicated that mandibular overdentures anchored to a single implant can be a safe and cost-effective method as a starting step for implant-overdenture treatment. PMID:26140170

  20. Satisfaction with outpatient physiotherapy: a survey comparing the views of patients with acute and chronic musculoskeletal conditions.

    PubMed

    Hills, Rosemary; Kitchen, Sheila

    2007-01-01

    Patient satisfaction is a complex construct and is regarded as an important component in the assessment of care quality. Investigations into patient satisfaction with care have steadily increased across a range of specialties over the last three decades, but there has been a paucity of studies into satisfaction with physiotherapy. The limitations of previous instruments used to examine satisfaction with outpatient (OP) physiotherapy suggested the need for a new tool. The aim of the survey was to examine the level of satisfaction that patients with acute and chronic musculoskeletal conditions have with their physiotherapy outpatient treatment within the NHS system of care in the UK. Questionnaires were mailed to 420 patients with acute and chronic musculoskeletal conditions who had recently completed a course of OP physiotherapy. The 38-item self-completion questionnaire comprised six subscales; Expectation, Communication, Therapist, Organisation, Outcome, and Satisfaction, scored on a five-point Likert scale. Data were analysed by using SPSS Release 10 for Windows for frequency distribution of scores and regression analysis for factors predictive of satisfaction. The response rate was 66%. Results showed that patients were generally satisfied with the interpersonal, technical, and organisational aspects of care, although there was lower satisfaction with the clinical outcome in both groups. Organisational issues were the key determinants of satisfaction for the whole sample and the chronic group, with the therapist as key determinant for the acute group. Patient satisfaction surveys conducted as part of a continuous quality improvement programme are particularly important in providing therapists with feedback from patients about their experiences of physiotherapy services. This study has successfully used a new questionnaire to examine patients' satisfaction with outpatient physiotherapy in the United Kingdom. Further studies are now needed to validate the new

  1. Factors influencing patient satisfaction with dental appearance and treatments they desire to improve aesthetics

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We assessed factors influencing patients' satisfaction with their dental appearance and the treatments they desired to improve dental aesthetics. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed out among 235 adult patients who visited the Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia dental clinic. A structured, interviewer-guided questionnaire was used to identify patient satisfaction with their general dental appearance, cosmetic elements and desired treatments. Results The 235 patients consisted of 70 males (29.8%) and 165 females (70.2%), of mean age 31.5 years (SD 13.0). Of these patients, 124 (52.8%) were not satisfied with their general dental appearance. In addition, 132 patients (56.2%) were not happy with the color of their teeth, 76 (32.3%), regarded their teeth were poorly aligned, 62 (26.4%), as crowded and 56 (23.4%) protruded. Dissatisfaction with tooth color was significantly higher in female than in male patients (odds ratio [OR] of 1.99 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13-3.50). Tooth whitening was the treatment most desired by patients (48.1%). Results of multiple logistic regression analysis showed that patient dissatisfaction with general dental appearance was significantly associated with female gender (OR = 2.18; 95% CI: 1.18-4.03), unhappiness with tooth color (OR = 3.05; 95% CI: 1.74-5.34) and the opinion that their teeth protruded (OR = 2.91, 95% CI: 1.44-5.91). Conclusions Most patients in this study were not satisfied with their dental appearance with a greater percentage of females expressing dissatisfaction than males. An age was not associated with satisfaction. Unhappiness with tooth color and feelings of having protruding teeth also had a significant negative influence on patient satisfaction with general dental appearance. PMID:21342536

  2. The Effects of Synchronous Class Sessions on Students' Academic Achievement and Levels of Satisfaction in an Online Introduction to Computers Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeShea, Andrea Valene

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental static-group comparison study was to test the theory of transactional distance that relates the inclusion of synchronous class sessions into an online introductory computer course to students' levels of satisfaction and academic achievement at a post-secondary technical college. This study specifically looked…

  3. Patient satisfaction following Bio-Alcamid injection for facial contour defects.

    PubMed

    George, D A; Erel, E; Waters, R

    2012-12-01

    Bio-Alcamid, a polyalkylimide gel, can be injected into subcutaneous tissue as an endoprosthesis for correcting contour deformities and soft tissue defects. We have reviewed its facial uses and longer-term outcomes over a 7-year period, including a patient satisfaction survey. 69 patients were included in the study, 89.9% undergoing treatment secondary to HIV-associated facial lipoatrophy. 55.0% of patients responded to questionnaires: 52.5% experienced severe pain associated with injections, and 50.0% experienced at least one complication (migration, hardening, irregularity). 94.4% stated an improvement in their cheek volume, 77.8% would undergo the procedure again, and 86.1% would recommend the treatment to a friend. Despite the relatively high patient satisfaction, we no longer recommend this treatment to our patients for cosmetic indications, due to significant long-term complication rates.

  4. Health care competition, strategic mission, and patient satisfaction: research model and propositions

    PubMed Central

    Rivers, Patrick A.; Glover, Saundra H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose In all industries, competition among businesses has long been encouraged as a mechanism to increase value for patients. In other words, competition ensures the provision of better products and services to satisfy the needs of customers This paper aims to develop a model that can be used to empirically investigate a number of complex issues and relationships associated with competition in the health care industry. Design/methodology/approach A literature review was conducted. A total of 50 items of literature related to the subject were reviewed.. Various perspectives of competition, the nature of service quality, health system costs, and patient satisfaction in health care are examined Findings A model of the relationship among these variables is developed. The model depicts patient satisfaction as an outcome measure directly dependent on competition. Quality of care and health care systems costs, while also directly dependent on the strategic mission and goals, are considered as determinants of customer satisfaction as well. The model is discussed in the light of propositions for empirical research. Practical implications Empirical studies based on the model proposed in this paper should help identify areas with significant impact on patient satisfaction while maintaining high quality of service at lower costs in a competitive environment. Originality/value The authors develop a research model which included propositions to examine the complex issues of competition in the health care industry. PMID:19579575

  5. How Does Sensitivity Training of Health Care Workers Impact Patient Satisfaction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Vinci, Katrina Marie

    2010-01-01

    Health care of the 21st century is undergoing major changes due to a myriad of social factors affecting every level of society. From financial desperation due to the high cost of health care to the increased awareness of a generation asking for better services, the importance of patient satisfaction is paramount. The Centers for Medicare and…

  6. Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (Lisat-9): Reliability and Validity for Patients with Acquired Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boonstra, Anne M.; Reneman, Michiel F.; Stewart, Roy E.; Balk, Gerlof A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the reliability and discriminant validity of the Dutch version of the life satisfaction questionnaire (Lisat-9 DV) to assess patients with an acquired brain injury. The reliability study used a test-retest design, and the validity study used a cross-sectional design. The setting was the general rehabilitation…

  7. Provider satisfaction and patient outcomes associated with a statewide prison telemedicine program in Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Michelle; Winchell, Tom; Plant, Patty; Wilbright, Wayne; Kaiser, Michael; Butler, Michael K; Goldshore, Matthew; Magnus, Manya

    2010-05-01

    Health information technology including telemedicine offers potential to improve patient care outcomes. As part of the response to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005, the Louisiana State University Health Care Services Division expanded its statewide telemedicine program. The aim of this study was to evaluate provider satisfaction and patient outcomes associated with telemedicine when used for the administration of prisoner medical care. Providers completed a survey following each patient encounter in real-time; questions were adapted from standard satisfaction indices. Statistical methods included uni-, bi-, and multivariable including ordinal regression methods to characterize unadjusted and adjusted factors associated with telemedicine use and provider satisfaction, and patient outcomes. Data were collected between December 2007 and May 2008 and were analyzed using SAS and Stata. Out of 737 patient visits, the majority of patients were African American (68.6%), men (92.9%), seen for either infectious disease or mental health (46.2% and 50.2%), with most surveys completed by a physician (63.1%). Most telemedicine encounters were completed (92.8%), a treatment plan was established (97.0%), the provider perceived that the technology was adequate to conduct visit (93.4%), and a follow-up telemedicine appointment was requested (90.8%). Most providers were satisfied with telemedicine for the visit overall (87.0%), believed that telemedicine improved patient prognosis (88.2%), and perceived that the patient was satisfied (83.0%). This study suggests that telemedicine was an effective and accepted method of healthcare provision.

  8. Patients' satisfaction with inpatient services provided in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, during 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Makarem, Jalil; Larijani, Bagher; Joodaki, Kobra; Ghaderi, Sahar; Nayeri, Fatemeh; Mohammadpoor, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of patient feedback is considered as a critical part of effective and efficient management in developed countries. The main objectives of this study were to assess patient satisfaction with the services provided in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, identify areas of patient dissatisfaction, and find ways to improve patient satisfaction with hospital services. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 3 phases. After 2 initial preparation phases, the valid instrument was applied through telephone interviews with 21476 participants from 26 hospitals during August, 2011 to February, 2013.Using the Satisfaction Survey tool, information of patient's demographic characteristics were collected and patient satisfaction with 15 areas of hospital services and the intent to return the same hospitals were assessed. The mean score of overall satisfaction with hospital services was 16.86 ± 2.72 out of 20. It was found that 58% of participants were highly satisfied with the services provided. Comparison of mean scores showed physician and medical services (17.75 ± 4.02), laboratory and radiology services (17.67 ± 3.66), and privacy and religious issues (17.55 ± 4.32) had the highest satisfaction. The patients were the most dissatisfied with the food services (15.50 ± 5.54). It was also found that 83.7% of the participants intended to return to the same hospital in case of need, which supported the measured satisfaction level. Patient satisfaction in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences was high. It seems that the present study, with its large sample size, has sufficient reliability to express the patient satisfaction status. Moreover, appropriate measures should be taken in some areas (food, cost, and etc.) to increase patient satisfaction. PMID:27471589

  9. Patients' satisfaction with inpatient services provided in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, during 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Makarem, Jalil; Larijani, Bagher; Joodaki, Kobra; Ghaderi, Sahar; Nayeri, Fatemeh; Mohammadpoor, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of patient feedback is considered as a critical part of effective and efficient management in developed countries. The main objectives of this study were to assess patient satisfaction with the services provided in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, identify areas of patient dissatisfaction, and find ways to improve patient satisfaction with hospital services. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 3 phases. After 2 initial preparation phases, the valid instrument was applied through telephone interviews with 21476 participants from 26 hospitals during August, 2011 to February, 2013.Using the Satisfaction Survey tool, information of patient's demographic characteristics were collected and patient satisfaction with 15 areas of hospital services and the intent to return the same hospitals were assessed. The mean score of overall satisfaction with hospital services was 16.86 ± 2.72 out of 20. It was found that 58% of participants were highly satisfied with the services provided. Comparison of mean scores showed physician and medical services (17.75 ± 4.02), laboratory and radiology services (17.67 ± 3.66), and privacy and religious issues (17.55 ± 4.32) had the highest satisfaction. The patients were the most dissatisfied with the food services (15.50 ± 5.54). It was also found that 83.7% of the participants intended to return to the same hospital in case of need, which supported the measured satisfaction level. Patient satisfaction in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences was high. It seems that the present study, with its large sample size, has sufficient reliability to express the patient satisfaction status. Moreover, appropriate measures should be taken in some areas (food, cost, and etc.) to increase patient satisfaction.

  10. Patients' satisfaction with inpatient services provided in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, during 2011-2013

    PubMed Central

    Makarem, Jalil; Larijani, Bagher; Joodaki, Kobra; Ghaderi, Sahar; Nayeri, Fatemeh; Mohammadpoor, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of patient feedback is considered as a critical part of effective and efficient management in developed countries. The main objectives of this study were to assess patient satisfaction with the services provided in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, identify areas of patient dissatisfaction, and find ways to improve patient satisfaction with hospital services. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 3 phases. After 2 initial preparation phases, the valid instrument was applied through telephone interviews with 21476 participants from 26 hospitals during August, 2011 to February, 2013.Using the Satisfaction Survey tool, information of patient's demographic characteristics were collected and patient satisfaction with 15 areas of hospital services and the intent to return the same hospitals were assessed. The mean score of overall satisfaction with hospital services was 16.86 ± 2.72 out of 20. It was found that 58% of participants were highly satisfied with the services provided. Comparison of mean scores showed physician and medical services (17.75 ± 4.02), laboratory and radiology services (17.67 ± 3.66), and privacy and religious issues (17.55 ± 4.32) had the highest satisfaction. The patients were the most dissatisfied with the food services (15.50 ± 5.54). It was also found that 83.7% of the participants intended to return to the same hospital in case of need, which supported the measured satisfaction level. Patient satisfaction in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences was high. It seems that the present study, with its large sample size, has sufficient reliability to express the patient satisfaction status. Moreover, appropriate measures should be taken in some areas (food, cost, and etc.) to increase patient satisfaction. PMID:27471589

  11. Early Patient Satisfaction with Different Treatment Pathways for Trigger Finger and Thumb.

    PubMed

    Becker, Stéphanie J E; Braun, Yvonne; Janssen, Stein J; Neuhaus, Valentin; Ring, David; Mudgal, Chaitanya S

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about factors related to patient satisfaction with treatment for trigger digits. This study tested the null hypothesis that there are no factors associated with treatment satisfaction 2 months after completion of treatment (absence of triggering) or 4 months after the last visit for patients with a trigger thumb or finger. Secondary null hypotheses were: 1) There are no factors associated with a change in patients' preferred treatment before and after consultation with a hand surgeon; and 2) Initial treatment provided is not different from final received treatment. In an observational study, 63 English-speaking adult patients were enrolled after being diagnosed with one or more new idiopathic trigger digits by one of two hand surgeons, but before the hand surgeon discussed treatment options. Patients were asked to fill out questionnaires at enrollment. Final evaluation was by phone. Satisfaction with treatment was not related to the initial treatment or other patient or disease factors. Twenty-three patients (37 %) had a different preference for treatment after talking with a hand surgeon. Involvement of the long and ring fingers were the only factors associated with staying with pre-visit treatment preferences. There was a significant difference in proportions of the various treatments provided at enrollment and final treatment recorded at the final phone evaluation, 14 patients (22 %) had a subsequent alternative form of treatment. Patients' preferences for trigger finger treatment often change after consulting with a hand surgeon and during treatment, but these choices do not affect treatment satisfaction.

  12. Patient sociodemographic characteristics as predictors of satisfaction with medical care: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hall, J A; Dornan, M C

    1990-01-01

    A meta-analysis was performed to examine the relation of patients' sociodemographic characteristics to their satisfaction with medical care. The sociodemographic characteristics were age, ethnicity, sex, socioeconomic status (three indices), marital status, and family size. Greater satisfaction was significantly associated with greater age and less education, and marginally significantly associated with being married and having higher social status (scored as a composite variable emphasizing occupational status). The average magnitudes of relations were very small, with age being the strongest correlate of satisfaction (mean r = 0.13). No overall relationship was found for ethnicity, sex, income, or family size. For all sociodemographic variables, the distribution of correlations was significantly heterogeneous, and statistical contrasts revealed the operation of several moderating variables. The meaning of the overall results and their relation to earlier reviews is discussed. PMID:2138357

  13. Two-factor theory - at the intersection of health care management and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Bohm, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Using data obtained from the 2004 Joint Canadian/United States Survey of Health, an analytic model using principles derived from Herzberg's motivational hygiene theory was developed for evaluating patient satisfaction with health care. The analysis sought to determine whether survey variables associated with consumer satisfaction act as Hertzberg factors and contribute to survey participants' self-reported levels of health care satisfaction. To validate the technique, data from the survey were analyzed using logistic regression methods and then compared with results obtained from the two-factor model. The findings indicate a high degree of correlation between the two methods. The two-factor analytical methodology offers advantages due to its ability to identify whether a factor assumes a motivational or hygienic role and assesses the influence of a factor within select populations. Its ease of use makes this methodology well suited for assessment of multidimensional variables.

  14. Two-factor theory – at the intersection of health care management and patient satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Bohm, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Using data obtained from the 2004 Joint Canadian/United States Survey of Health, an analytic model using principles derived from Herzberg’s motivational hygiene theory was developed for evaluating patient satisfaction with health care. The analysis sought to determine whether survey variables associated with consumer satisfaction act as Hertzberg factors and contribute to survey participants’ self-reported levels of health care satisfaction. To validate the technique, data from the survey were analyzed using logistic regression methods and then compared with results obtained from the two-factor model. The findings indicate a high degree of correlation between the two methods. The two-factor analytical methodology offers advantages due to its ability to identify whether a factor assumes a motivational or hygienic role and assesses the influence of a factor within select populations. Its ease of use makes this methodology well suited for assessment of multidimensional variables. PMID:23055755

  15. A multidisciplinary job retention vocational rehabilitation programme for patients with chronic rheumatic diseases: patients' and occupational physicians' satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    de Buck, P D M; Breedveld, J; van der Giesen, F J; Vliet, V

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate patients' and occupational physicians' satisfaction with the quality of a vocational rehabilitation programme for maintaining work ability in chronic rheumatic diseases. Methods: The vocational rehabilitation programme was developed for patients with rheumatic diseases and consisted of systematic assessment of the problems at work and the development of individual solutions. The programme was run by a multidisciplinary team comprising a rheumatologist, a social worker, a physical and occupational therapist, and a psychologist. Satisfaction ratings were measured using a multidimensional questionnaire involving a rating scale (0–10) and a structured telephone interview. Results: 59 of the 65 patients who participated in the programme (91%) completed the questionnaire. Patients were most satisfied with the interpersonal approach and professional knowledge, and least satisfied with the waiting time for the final report and the practical application of the given advice. Mean satisfaction score was 7.3 (SD 1.0). Twenty eight of the occupational physicians involved were interviewed. They were satisfied with the programme overall; 21 (75%) stated that their role in the vocational rehabilitation process could be defined more clearly, and they would appreciate more contact with the team members, preferably in the early phases. Conclusions: Patients' and occupational physicians' satisfaction with a multidisciplinary vocational rehabilitation programme was good. Areas for improvement mainly concerned the speed of the process and the communication between team members and occupational physicians. PMID:15082488

  16. Satisfaction Levels and Factors Influencing Satisfaction With Use of a Social App for Neonatal and Pediatric Patient Transfer Information Systems: A Questionnaire Study Among Doctors

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Iee; Kim, Sun Jun; Cho, Soo Chul; Kim, Il Nyeo

    2016-01-01

    Background The treatment of neonatal and pediatric patients is limited to certain medical institutions depending on treatment difficulty. Effective patient transfers are necessary in situations where there are limited medical resources. In South Korea, the government has made a considerable effort to establish patient transfer systems using various means, such as websites, telephone, and so forth. However, in reality, the effort has not yet been effective. Objective In this study, we ran a patient transfer information system using a social app for effective patient transfer. We analyzed the results, satisfaction levels, and the factors influencing satisfaction. Methods Naver Band is a social app and mobile community application which in Korea is more popular than Facebook. It facilitates group communication. Using Naver Band, two systems were created: one by the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and the other by the Department of Pediatrics at Chonbuk National University Children's Hospital, South Korea. The information necessary for patient transfers was provided to participating obstetricians (n=51) and pediatricians (n=90). We conducted a survey to evaluate the systems and reviewed the results retrospectively. Results The number of patients transferred was reported to increase by 65% (26/40) obstetricians and 40% (23/57) pediatricians. The time taken for transfers was reported to decrease by 72% (29/40) obstetricians and 59% (34/57) pediatricians. Satisfaction was indicated by 83% (33/40) obstetricians and 89% (51/57) pediatricians. Regarding factors influencing satisfaction, the obstetricians reported communication with doctors in charge (P=.03) and time reduction during transfers (P=.02), whereas the pediatricians indicated review of the diagnosis and treatment of transferred patients (P=.01) and the time reduction during transfers (P=.007). Conclusions The users were highly satisfied and different users indicated different factors of satisfaction. This finding

  17. Patient satisfaction surveys and quality of care: an information paper.

    PubMed

    Farley, Heather; Enguidanos, Enrique R; Coletti, Christian M; Honigman, Leah; Mazzeo, Anthony; Pinson, Thomas B; Reed, Kevin; Wiler, Jennifer L

    2014-10-01

    With passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, payment incentives were created to improve the "value" of health care delivery. Because physicians and physician practices aim to deliver care that is both clinically effective and patient centered, it is important to understand the association between the patient experience and quality health outcomes. Surveys have become a tool with which to quantify the consumer experience. In addition, results of these surveys are playing an increasingly important role in determining hospital payment. Given that the patient experience is being used as a surrogate marker for quality and value of health care delivery, we will review the patient experience-related pay-for-performance programs and effect on emergency medicine, discuss the literature describing the association between quality and the patient-reported experience, and discuss future opportunities for emergency medicine. PMID:24656761

  18. Patient satisfaction with nursing care, evaluation before and after cutback in expenditure and intervention at a surgical clinic.

    PubMed

    Jakobsson, L; Hallberg, I R; Lovén, L; Ottosson, B

    1994-12-01

    After a major cutback in the budget and staffing of a surgical clinic in southern Sweden there was intervention to improve the quality of nursing care and to evaluate the outcome. The intervention consisted of the implementation of: (1) nursing care organized in such a way that it would secure continuity of the nurse-patient relationship, (2) individually planned care by means of diagnostic reasoning, and (3) quality assurance for aspects believed to be connected with quality of care. Patient satisfaction before and after the intervention was assessed by means of a patient questionnaire survey (May 1991; n = 105 and May 1992; n = 137). Patient satisfaction improved significantly in variables related to nursing care viz. overall satisfaction and satisfaction with information and decision making; satisfaction with contact and staff-patient relationship; ward facilities and physical treatment or examinations; and satisfaction with physical nursing care. The results were interpreted to mean that the intervention may have counteracted any negative impact the reduced budget might have had such as the higher patient turn-over and the shorter in-patient periods, and thus seemed to have improved the quality of the nursing care in terms of patient satisfaction.

  19. Osteoporosis Patient Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire in postmenopausal women intermittently treated with oral bisphosphonates: the BRAVO study.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ki Won; Kim, Deog-Yoon; Lee, Yil-Seob; Kang, Moo Il

    2012-05-01

    The Osteoporosis Patient Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (OPSAT-Q) is a psychometric measure of patient satisfaction with bisphosphonate treatment for osteoporosis. The study was a multicenter, nationwide, cross-sectional, patient-reported outcome study conducted to evaluate treatment satisfaction and quality of life using the OPSAT-Q in patients receiving oral bisphosphonate therapy. This study enrolled postmenopausal women from 43 hospitals and 112 clinics who had intermittently taken oral bisphosphonates for treatment of osteoporosis. 4,220 postmenopausal Korean women with a mean age of 65.3 years and a mean body mass index of 22.9 kg/m(2) participated in the study. All items within each subscale domain were more highly correlated with their hypothesized subscale domain relative to the other subscale domains, and all 16 items were significantly correlated with an overall composite satisfaction score (CSS). All scores showed acceptable internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha >0.70, range 0.88-0.91). Comparisons of OPSAT-Q scores were made between selective subgroups of participants: monthly versus weekly administration, years of taking bisphosphonates, smoking habitus, acid-related medication and comorbid conditions. Mean OPSAT-Q subscale domains and CSS were higher for users of monthly bisphosphonates, with shorter duration, non-smokers, and non-users of acid-related medication. Mean OPSAT-Q subscale domain scores of side-effects were high for absence of comorbid conditions. The OPSAT-Q demonstrated acceptable measurement properties, including validity and reliability of subscale domains and CSS, in oriental women with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Postmenopausal women intermittently using oral bisphosphonate therapy reported increased satisfaction with monthly administration, with shorter duration, non-smokers, non-users of acid-related medication, and an absence of comorbid conditions.

  20. A retrospective study of patient outcomes and satisfaction following pinnaplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hope, Nicholas; Smith, Caroline P; Cullen, Jim R; McCluney, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Up to 5% of all children have prominent ears. Psychological distress and bullying adversely affect these children and can cause significant social exclusion. In times of austerity, cosmetic procedures such as surgical correction of prominent ears are felt to be an unnecessary cost to the health service. Materials and methods A retrospective case note review of all patients undergoing pinnaplasty was undertaken. Postoperative outcomes were compared against the Royal College of Surgeons of England standards. The Glasgow Benefit Inventory, a validated post-intervention questionnaire, was then posted out to all patients. Results A total of 72 patients were identified. Average age at procedure was 13 years. Eleven patients were above the age of 19 years. Twenty-eight patients were male and forty-four female. Sixty-two cases underwent bilateral pinnaplasty. No patients developed hematoma, and there were no readmissions within 30 days of surgery. Twenty-nine patients responded to the questionnaire (40%), of whom 27 reported a positive impact on their psychosocial well-being with a mean score of 36. Conclusion Pinnaplasty offers patients an opportunity to alleviate the psychological distress of bullying and harassment secondary to the appearance of prominent ears. PMID:27307775

  1. Patient satisfaction with treatment for alcohol use disorders: comparing patients with and without severe mental health symptoms

    PubMed Central

    McCallum, Stacey L; Andrews, Jane M; Gaughwin, Matthew D; Turnbull, Deborah A; Mikocka-Walus, Antonina A

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies suggest patients with co-occurring alcohol use disorders (AUDs) and severe mental health symptoms (SMHS) are less satisfied with standard AUD treatment when compared to patients with an AUD alone. This study compared patient satisfaction with standard AUD treatment among patients with and without SMHS and explored how standard treatment might be improved to better address the needs of these patients. Methods Eighty-nine patients receiving treatment for an AUD either at an inpatient hospital, outpatient clinic, inpatient detoxification, or residential/therapeutic community services were surveyed. Patient satisfaction with treatment was assessed using the Treatment Perception Questionnaire (range: 0–40). Patients were stratified according to their score on the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale. Forty patients scored in the extremely severe range of depression (score >14) and/or anxiety (score >10) (indicating SMHS) and 49 patients did not. An inductive content analysis was also conducted on qualitative data relating to areas of service improvement. Results Patients with SMHS were found to be equally satisfied with treatment (mean =25.10, standard deviation =8.12) as patients with an AUD alone (mean =25.43, standard deviation =6.91). Analysis revealed that being an inpatient in hospital was associated with reduced treatment satisfaction. Patients with SMHS were found to be significantly less satisfied with staffs’ understanding of the type of help they wanted in treatment, when compared to patients with AUDs alone. Five areas for service improvement were identified, including staff qualities, informed care, treatment access and continuity, issues relating to inpatient stay, and addressing patients’ mental health needs. Conclusion While findings suggest that AUD treatment services adequately meet the needs of patients with SMHS in treatment, patients with SMHS do feel that staff lack understanding of their treatment needs. Findings have

  2. Fibrin glue achieves hemostasis in patients with coagulation disorders.

    PubMed

    Kram, H B; Nathan, R C; Stafford, F J; Fleming, A W; Shoemaker, W C

    1989-03-01

    Fibrin glue (FG), made with highly concentrated human fibrinogen and clotting factors, was used to achieve parenchymal organ hemostasis in patients with disordered coagulation secondary to massive transfusion, chronic disease, and disseminated intravascular coagulation; it was effective in controlling liver hemorrhage in seven patients and in the performance of a splenorrhaphy in one other patient. The coagulation profile was grossly abnormal in all patients, and the mean +/- SD intraoperative blood loss was 5.1 +/- 4.2 L; patients received 14 +/- 10 U of blood perioperatively. The amount of FG required to achieve hemostasis varied directly with the extent of injury and intraoperative blood loss (r = .84), and all patients with a blood loss greater than 4 L required at least 25 mL of FG to stop bleeding. Two patients died postoperatively secondary to cardiac arrest and adult respiratory distress syndrome. Because FG does not depend on adequate platelet or clotting factor levels to be effective, it is especially useful in patients with parenchymal organ hemorrhage and disordered coagulation.

  3. Satisfaction with current psoriasis treatment: misalignment between physician and patient perceptions.

    PubMed

    Korman, N J; Zhao, Y; Pike, J; Roberts, J; Sullivan, E; Kemhus, M

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis patients often report dissatisfaction with treatment. However, the extent to which patients and their treating dermatologists are aligned regarding satisfaction with psoriasis therapy is largely unknown. This was explored using data derived from the Adelphi 2011/2013 Psoriasis Disease Specific Programmes, two real world surveys of US dermatologists and their patients. Physicians and patients independently reported their satisfaction with psoriasis control (satisfied, dissatisfied). Two levels of satisfaction alignment between physician and patient responses were constructed: aligned (same responses) and misaligned (different responses). In addition, dermatologists provided patient treatment history and disease/symptom severity whereas patients reported data on health-related quality of life (HRQoL), using the EuroQOL 5-Dimension Health Questionnaire (EQ-5D) and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), and work productivity using the Work Productivity Activity index (WPAI). Multivariate regressions were employed to examine the relationship between satisfaction alignment, overall disease and symptom severity, HRQoL, and work productivity controlling for differences in patient demographics and comorbidities.From 627 paired dermatologist and psoriasis patient records, 512 (81.7%) and 115 (18.3%) cases fell into the 'aligned' and 'misaligned' groups, respectively. Compared with patients in the aligned group, those in the misaligned group had more moderate to severe psoriasis (82.3% vs. 43.7%), moderate to severe itching (45.6% vs. 27.8%), pain (23.0% vs. 10.6%), and scaling (54.8% vs. 36.1%), and had lower current biologics use (27.0% vs. 42%) (all p<0.05). The misaligned group was associated with reduced HRQoL (lower EQ-5D score: 0.86 vs. 0.91; higher DLQI score: 7.06 vs. 4.23) and greater work productivity loss (higher WPAI scores: 18.27 vs. 11.43) (all p<0.05). Multivariate analyses confirmed these results (p<0.05). Almost 1 in 5 patients were misaligned with

  4. Decomposing the gap in satisfaction with provider communication between English- and Spanish-speaking Hispanic patients.

    PubMed

    Villani, Jennifer; Mortensen, Karoline

    2014-04-01

    Disparities in patient-provider communication exist among racial/ethnic groups. Hispanics report the lowest satisfaction with provider communication compared to whites and blacks; these differences may be due to level of acculturation or patient-provider concordance according to their ability to speak English. Using data from the 2007-2009 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, this study identifies and quantifies the components that constitute the gap in satisfaction with provider communication between English- and Spanish-speaking Hispanics. English-speaking Hispanics are 7.3 percentage points more likely to be satisfied with the amount of time their providers spent with them compared to Spanish-speaking Hispanics. Differences in acculturation between the two groups account for 77% of this gap. Satisfaction with provider listening is 6.8 percentage points higher for English-speaking Hispanics. Hispanics who speak English are more satisfied with provider communication. The gap in satisfaction is largely attributable to differences in health insurance, acculturation, and education.

  5. A study of patients' expectations and satisfaction in Singapore hospitals.

    PubMed

    Lim, P C; Tang, N K

    2000-01-01

    In today's highly competitive healthcare environment, hospitals increasingly realise the need to focus on service quality as a means to improve their competitive position. Customer-based determinants and perceptions of service quality therefore play an important role when choosing a hospital. This paper attempts to determine the expectations and perceptions of patients through the use of a generic, internationally used market research technique called SERVQUAL. An analysis covering 252 patients revealed that there was an overall service quality gap between patients' expectations and perceptions. Thus, improvements are required across all the six dimensions, namely, tangibility, reliability, responsiveness, assurance, empathy and accessibility and affordability.

  6. A study of patients' expectations and satisfaction in Singapore hospitals.

    PubMed

    Lim, P C; Tang, N K

    2000-01-01

    In today's highly competitive healthcare environment, hospitals increasingly realise the need to focus on service quality as a means to improve their competitive position. Customer-based determinants and perceptions of service quality therefore play an important role when choosing a hospital. This paper attempts to determine the expectations and perceptions of patients through the use of a generic, internationally used market research technique called SERVQUAL. An analysis covering 252 patients revealed that there was an overall service quality gap between patients' expectations and perceptions. Thus, improvements are required across all the six dimensions, namely, tangibility, reliability, responsiveness, assurance, empathy and accessibility and affordability. PMID:11484647

  7. Determinants of Patient Satisfaction in Internal Medicine Resident Continuity Clinics: Findings of the Educational Innovations Project Ambulatory Collaborative

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Maureen D.; Warm, Eric; Julian, Katherine A.; Rosenblum, Michael; Thomas, Kris; Drake, Sean; Gwisdalla, Keri Lyn; Langan, Michael; Nabors, Christopher; Pereira, Anne; Smith, Amy; Sweet, David; Varney, Andrew; Francis, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Many internal medicine programs have reorganized their resident continuity clinics to improve the ambulatory care experience for residents. The effect of this redesign on patient satisfaction is largely unknown. Methods Our multi-institutional, cross-sectional study included 569 internal medicine residents from 11 programs participating in the Educational Innovations Project Ambulatory Collaborative. An 11-item patient satisfaction survey from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems was used to assess patient satisfaction, comparing patient satisfaction in traditional models of weekly continuity clinic with 2 new clinic models. We then examined the relationship between patient satisfaction and other practice variables. Results Patient satisfaction responses related to resident listening and communication skills, knowledge of medical history, perception of adequate visit time, overall rating, and willingness to refer to family and friends were significantly better in the traditional and block continuity models than the combination model. Higher ambulatory workload was associated with reduced patient perception of respect shown by the physician. The percentage of diabetic patients with glycated hemoglobin < 8% was positively correlated with number of visits, knowledge of medical history, perception of respect, and higher scores for recommending the physician to others. The percentage of diabetic patients with low density lipoprotein < 100 mg/dL was positively correlated with the physician showing respect. Conclusions Patient satisfaction was similar in programs using block design and traditional models for continuity clinic, and both outperformed the combination model programs. There was a delicate balance between workload and patient perception of the physician showing respect. Care outcome measures for diabetic patients were associated with aspects of patient satisfaction. PMID:26279771

  8. Assessment of the Correlation between Appointment Scheduling and Patient Satisfaction in a Pediatric Dental Setup

    PubMed Central

    Katre, Amar N.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The practice of modern pediatric dentistry requires delivery of quality care in combination with adherence to excellent business as well as time management principles. A definite appointment schedule should be presented to the parents on the first or second appointment. More importantly, the prescribed schedule should be followed to the best of the professional abilities of the pediatric dentist. Aims. The aim of the study was to assess the co-relation between appointment scheduling and patient satisfaction in a pediatric dental setup with the objective of understanding the parameters related to appointment scheduling to increase patient satisfaction. Method. A total of 40 patients, who visited the Department of Pediatric and Preventive Dentistry, YMT Dental College & Hospital, for dental treatment were selected on a random basis. A questionnaire with a set of 6 questions with a rating scale of 1–5 to assess the patient satisfaction related to appointment scheduling was prepared. Results. A significant number of the patients were happy with the existing appointment scheduling system barring a few exceptions. PMID:25610464

  9. [Hospital at home: assessment of early discharge in terms of patients mortality and satisfaction].

    PubMed

    Damiani, G; Pinnarelli, L; Ricciardi, G

    2006-01-01

    New organizational models are essentials for European Hospitals because of restraining budget and ageing of population. Hospital at home is an alternative to inpatient care, effective both in clinical and economic ground. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of Hospital at Home in terms of decreased mortality and patient satisfaction. We carried out a meta-analysis of the literature about hospital at home interventions. We searched Medline (to December 2002), the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (to October 2002) and other bibliographical databases, with a supplementary handsearching of literature. We used the following keywords: hospital at home, home hospitalization, mortality, patient satisfaction, cost, acute hospital care, conventional hospitalization. We included studies respecting the following criteria: analytical or experimental studies aimed at compare early discharge to hospital at home and continued care in an acute hospital. Review Manager 4.2 software was used to collect data and perform statistical analysis. We found 2420 articles searching for the chosen keywords. Twelve studies (2048 patients) were included for death outcome and six studies (1382 patients) were included for satisfaction outcome. The selected studies indicated a greater effect size of patient satisfaction in home patients than hospitalized ones (Odds Ratio: 1.58 95% CI: 1.25, 2.00) and showed no difference in terms of mortality (Risk Difference: -0.01 95% CI: -0.03, 0.02). Our results underline the effectiveness of this organizational model, as an alternative to continued care in an acute hospital. Further useful considerations could be drawn by economic evaluation studies carried out on field. PMID:16649506

  10. Development, validation, and administration of a treatment-satisfaction questionnaire for caregivers of dependent type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    García-Aparicio, Judit; Herrero-Herrero, José-Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Background Satisfaction with treatment is considered a relevant factor for assessing results in clinical practice. However, when assessing satisfaction in dependent patients, the opinion of their caregivers becomes crucial, since implicit in satisfaction is the degree of caregiver involvement, of adherence to treatment, and lastly of better care of these patients. Purpose The purpose of this study was to develop, validate, and administer two versions of a specific questionnaire to assess satisfaction with blood glucose-lowering treatment in caregivers of dependent type 2 diabetic patients. Patients and methods This was an observational, descriptive, epidemiological study conducted in the Los Montalvos Internal Medicine Department at the University Hospital of Salamanca (Spain). Two versions of the questionnaire to assess caregivers’ satisfaction with current treatment and after introducing changes in therapy were created and validated according to model procedures. Once validated, the questionnaires were implemented in 219 cases. Results Cronbach’s α-coefficient, correlation between all the items, intraclass correlation coefficient, and correlation between the obtained scores and satisfaction with blood glucose levels all satisfied the standard for validation. Significant levels of correlation were observed between the degree of satisfaction and the number of daily administrations of the blood glucose-lowering medication (Spearman’s r=−0.21, P<0.05). Caregivers of patients receiving more frequent administration of their antidiabetic medication prior to the change were more satisfied with the change (r=0.24, P<0.001). Similarly, significant correlation was found between the number of daily administrations for blood glucose-lowering medication after the change and the degree of satisfaction (r=−0.43, P<0.001). Conclusion A useful novel instrument to assess caregivers’ satisfaction was validated. When applied to our cohort of cases, the obtained data

  11. Components of patient satisfaction with a dental restorative visit: results from The Dental Practice- Based Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Joseph L.; Rindal, D. Brad; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Qvist, Vibeke; Patel, Sagar; Foy, Pat; Williams, O. Dale; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Identify components of patient satisfaction with a dental restorative visit; and test the hypothesis that certain dentist, patient, and procedural factors are associated with patient satisfaction. Methods 197 practices in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) recruited consecutive patients with defective restorations that were replaced or repaired in permanent teeth. At the end of the treatment visit, each subject was asked to complete a satisfaction survey and mail it directly to the DPBRN Regional Coordinators. Results Analysis of 5,879 satisfaction surveys revealed three satisfaction components which were interpersonal relationship-comfort attributes; material choice-value factors; and sensory-evaluative features. Satisfaction was highest among patients who received care in a private practice model; when the restoration was repaired rather than replaced; or when the restored tooth was not a molar. Conclusion These data suggest that a patient’s judgments of dentist’s skills and quality of care are based on personal interactions with the dentist, the level of comfort, and post-treatment sensitivity. These conclusions have direct implications for patient management before, during and after the procedure. Practice implications When taking a patient-centered approach, dentists should seek to understand how patients evaluate and rate the service provided, facilitating a focus on what each patient values most. PMID:22942147

  12. Patient satisfaction and penile morphology changes with postoperative penile rehabilitation 2 years after Coloplast Titan prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Pryor, Michael B; Carrion, Rafael; Wang, Run; Henry, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    A common complaint after inflatable penile prosthesis surgery is reduced penile length. We previously reported how using the Coloplast Titan inflatable penile prosthesis with aggressive new length measurement technique (NLMT) coupled with postoperative IPP rehabilitation of the implant for 1-year helped to improve patient satisfaction and erectile penile measurements. This is a 2 years follow-up of a prospective, three-center, study of 40 patients who underwent Titan prosthesis placement, with new length measurement technique for erectile dysfunction. Patient instructions were to inflate daily for 6 months and then inflate maximally for 1–2 h daily for 6–24 months. Fifteen penile measurements were taken before and immediately after surgery and at follow-up visits. Measurement changes were improved at 24 months as compared to immediately postoperative and at 12 months. 67.8% of subjects were satisfied with their length at 2 years, and 77% had perceived penile length that was longer (30.8%) or the same (46.2%) as prior to the surgery. 64.3% and 17.9% of subjects had increased and unchanged satisfaction, respectively, with penile length as compared to prior to penile implant surgery. All but one subject (96.5%) was satisfied with the overall function of his implant. This study suggests using the Coloplast Titan with aggressive cylinder sizing, and a postoperative penile rehabilitation inflation protocol can optimize patient satisfaction and erectile penile measurements at 2 years postimplant. PMID:26459782

  13. Patient satisfaction and penile morphology changes with postoperative penile rehabilitation 2 years after Coloplast Titan prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Pryor, Michael B; Carrion, Rafael; Wang, Run; Henry, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    A common complaint after inflatable penile prosthesis surgery is reduced penile length. We previously reported how using the Coloplast Titan inflatable penile prosthesis with aggressive new length measurement technique (NLMT) coupled with postoperative IPP rehabilitation of the implant for 1-year helped to improve patient satisfaction and erectile penile measurements. This is a 2 years follow-up of a prospective, three-center, study of 40 patients who underwent Titan prosthesis placement, with new length measurement technique for erectile dysfunction. Patient instructions were to inflate daily for 6 months and then inflate maximally for 1-2 h daily for 6-24 months. Fifteen penile measurements were taken before and immediately after surgery and at follow-up visits. Measurement changes were improved at 24 months as compared to immediately postoperative and at 12 months. 67.8% of subjects were satisfied with their length at 2 years, and 77% had perceived penile length that was longer (30.8%) or the same (46.2%) as prior to the surgery. 64.3% and 17.9% of subjects had increased and unchanged satisfaction, respectively, with penile length as compared to prior to penile implant surgery. All but one subject (96.5%) was satisfied with the overall function of his implant. This study suggests using the Coloplast Titan with aggressive cylinder sizing, and a postoperative penile rehabilitation inflation protocol can optimize patient satisfaction and erectile penile measurements at 2 years postimplant.

  14. Instruments to assess patient satisfaction after teleconsultation and triage: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Allemann Iseli, Martina; Kunz, Regina; Blozik, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient satisfaction is crucial for the acceptance, use, and adherence to recommendations from teleconsultations regarding health care requests and triage services. Objectives Our objectives are to systematically review the literature for multidimensional instruments that measure patient satisfaction after teleconsultation and triage and to compare these for content, reliability, validity, and factor analysis. Methods We searched Medline, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and PsycINFO for literature on these instruments. Two reviewers independently screened all obtained references for eligibility and extracted data from the eligible articles. The results were presented using summary tables. Results We included 31 publications, describing 16 instruments in our review. The reporting on test development and psychometric characteristics was incomplete. The development process, described by ten of 16 instruments, included a review of the literature (n=7), patient or stakeholder interviews (n=5), and expert consultations (n=3). Four instruments evaluated factor structure, reliability, and validity; two of those four demonstrated low levels of reliability for some of their subscales. Conclusion A majority of instruments on patient satisfaction after teleconsultation showed methodological limitations and lack rigorous evaluation. Users should carefully reflect on the content of the questionnaires and their relevance to the application. Future research should apply more rigorously established scientific standards for instrument development and psychometric evaluation. PMID:25028538

  15. Physicians' career satisfaction, quality of care and patients' trust: the role of community uninsurance.

    PubMed

    Pagán, José A; Balasubramanian, Lakshmi; Pauly, Mark V

    2007-10-01

    There is evidence that health care providers located in communities with relatively large uninsured populations face financial difficulties because of low service demand and high levels of uncompensated care. Data on 4,920 physicians from the 2000-2001 Community Tracking Study Physician Survey and from 25,637 adults from the 2003 Community Tracking Study Household Survey were used to analyze whether the relative size of the local uninsured population is associated with the level of career satisfaction and the quality of care provided by physicians and to assess whether patient trust is associated with the level of community uninsurance. The results indicate that the proportion of uninsured adults in a given community is negatively related to physicians' career satisfaction and the perceived quality of health care provided. Community uninsurance is also negatively related to patient trust in their doctor and positively related to whether insured patients believed that their doctor was influenced by rules from health insurance companies. Physicians in communities with relatively large uninsured populations may have lower career satisfaction and lower perceptions of the quality of care provided due to financial difficulties. Patients in these communities are also less likely to trust their physician.

  16. Patient Satisfaction with Hospital Inpatient Care: Effects of Trust, Medical Insurance and Perceived Quality of Care

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qunhong; Liu, Chaojie; Jiao, Mingli; Hao, Yanhua; Han, Yuzhen; Gao, Lijun; Hao, Jiejing; Wang, Lan; Xu, Weilan; Ren, Jiaojiao

    2016-01-01

    Objective Deteriorations in the patient-provider relationship in China have attracted increasing attention in the international community. This study aims to explore the role of trust in patient satisfaction with hospital inpatient care, and how patient-provider trust is shaped from the perspectives of both patients and providers. Methods We adopted a mixed methods approach comprising a multivariate logistic regression model using secondary data (1200 people with inpatient experiences over the past year) from the fifth National Health Service Survey (NHSS, 2013) in Heilongjiang Province to determine the associations between patient satisfaction and trust, financial burden and perceived quality of care, followed by in-depth interviews with 62 conveniently selected key informants (27 from health and 35 from non-health sectors). A thematic analysis established a conceptual framework to explain deteriorating patient-provider relationships. Findings About 24% of respondents reported being dissatisfied with hospital inpatient care. The logistic regression model indicated that patient satisfaction was positively associated with higher level of trust (OR = 14.995), lower levels of hospital medical expenditure (OR = 5.736–1.829 as compared with the highest quintile of hospital expenditure), good staff attitude (OR = 3.155) as well as good ward environment (OR = 2.361). But patient satisfaction was negatively associated with medical insurance for urban residents and other insurance status (OR = 0.215–0.357 as compared with medical insurance for urban employees). The qualitative analysis showed that patient trust—the most significant predictor of patient satisfaction—is shaped by perceived high quality of service delivery, empathic and caring interpersonal interactions, and a better designed medical insurance that provides stronger financial protection and enables more equitable access to health care. Conclusion At the core of high levels of patient dissatisfaction

  17. Long term recurrence, pain and patient satisfaction after ventral hernia mesh repair

    PubMed Central

    Langbach, Odd; Bukholm, Ida; Benth, Jūratė Šaltytė; Røkke, Ola

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare long term outcomes of laparoscopic and open ventral hernia mesh repair with respect to recurrence, pain and satisfaction. METHODS: We conducted a single-centre follow-up study of 194 consecutive patients after laparoscopic and open ventral hernia mesh repair between March 2000 and June 2010. Of these, 27 patients (13.9%) died and 12 (6.2%) failed to attend their follow-up appointment. One hundred and fifty-three (78.9%) patients attended for follow-up and two patients (1.0%) were interviewed by telephone. Of those who attended the follow-up appointment, 82 (52.9%) patients had received laparoscopic ventral hernia mesh repair (LVHR) while 73 (47.1%) patients had undergone open ventral hernia mesh repair (OVHR), including 11 conversions. The follow-up study included analyses of medical records, clinical interviews, examination of hernia recurrence and assessment of pain using a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS) ruler anchored by word descriptors. Overall patient satisfaction was also determined. Patients with signs of recurrence were examined by magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography scan. RESULTS: Median time from hernia mesh repair to follow-up was 48 and 52 mo after LVHR and OVHR respectively. Overall recurrence rates were 17.1% after LVHR and 23.3% after OVHR. Recurrence after LVHR was associated with higher body mass index. Smoking was associated with recurrence after OVHR. Chronic pain (VAS > 30 mm) was reported by 23.5% in the laparoscopic cohort and by 27.8% in the open surgery cohort. Recurrence and late complications were predictors of chronic pain after LVHR. Smoking was associated with chronic pain after OVHR. Sixty point five percent were satisfied with the outcome after LVHR and 49.3% after OVHR. Predictors for satisfaction were absence of chronic pain and recurrence. Old age and short time to follow-up also predicted satisfaction after LVHR. CONCLUSION: LVHR and OVHR give similar long term results for recurrence, pain and

  18. Introducing Medical Students into the Emergency Department: The Impact upon Patient Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Kiefer, Christopher; Turner, Joseph S.; Layman, Shelley M.; Davis, Stephen M.; Besinger, Bart R.; Humbert, Aloysius

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Performance on patient satisfaction surveys is becoming increasingly important for practicing emergency physicians and the introduction of learners into a new clinical environment may impact such scores. This study aimed to quantify the impact of introducing fourth-year medical students on patient satisfaction in two university-affiliated community emergency departments (EDs). Methods Two community-based EDs in the Indiana University Health (IUH) system began hosting medical students in March 2011 and October 2013, respectively. We analyzed responses from patient satisfaction surveys at each site for seven months before and after the introduction of students. Two components of the survey, “Would you recommend this ED to your friends and family?” and “How would you rate this facility overall?” were selected for analysis, as they represent the primary questions reviewed by the Center for Medicare Services (CMS) as part of value-based purchasing. We evaluated the percentage of positive responses for adult, pediatric, and all patients combined. Results Analysis did not reveal a statistically significant difference in the percentage of positive response for the “would you recommend” question at both clinical sites with regards to the adult and pediatric subgroups, as well as the all-patient group. At one of the sites, there was significant improvement in the percentage of positive response to the “overall rating” question following the introduction of medical students when all patients were analyzed (60.3% to 68.2%, p=0.038). However, there was no statistically significant difference in the “overall rating” when the pediatric or adult subgroups were analyzed at this site and no significant difference was observed in any group at the second site. Conclusion The introduction of medical students in two community-based EDs is not associated with a statistically significant difference in overall patient satisfaction, but was associated with a

  19. Patient satisfaction scores and their relationship to hospital website quality measures.

    PubMed

    Ford, Eric W; Huerta, Timothy R; Diana, Mark L; Kazley, Abby Swanson; Menachemi, Nir

    2013-01-01

    Hospitals and health systems are using web-based and social media tools to market themselves to consumers with increasingly sophisticated strategies. These efforts are designed to shape the consumers' expectations, influence their purchase decisions, and build a positive reputation in the marketplace. Little is known about how these web-based marketing efforts are taking form and if they have any relationship to consumers' satisfaction with the services they receive. The purpose of this study is to assess if a relationship exists between the quality of hospitals' public websites and their aggregated patient satisfaction ratings. Based on analyses of 1,952 U.S. hospitals, our results show that website quality is significantly and positively related to patients' overall rating of the hospital and their intention to recommend the facility to others. The potential for web-based information sources to influence consumer behavior has important implications for policymakers, third-party payers, health care providers, and consumers. PMID:24308412

  20. Follow up of patients who start treatment with antidepressants: treatment satisfaction, treatment compliance, efficacy and safety

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Measuring satisfaction with treatment has proved useful to ascertain the treatment features that are most important to the patients, and to explain increased treatment compliance. However, there are few studies that relate satisfaction to other clinical or self-perceived health status indicators. Recent studies have shown the close relationship between satisfaction with treatment, treatment compliance, and effectiveness. This study attempts to design and validate a scale to evaluate satisfaction with antidepressant drug therapy, assess treatment compliance (self-reported, validated questionnaire, drug accountability and electronic monitorization system), assess efficacy in reducing depressive symptoms and safety in patients who initiate antidepressant drug therapy, as well as to establish predictors of satisfaction, compliance and effectiveness with these drugs. Methods/design This is an observational longitudinal study with a cohort of adults initiating treatment with antidepressant drugs. A multi-centre study will be performed in which 20 Primary Care practices from Castilla-La Mancha are expected to participate. An initial interview and follow-up visits at 15 days, 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months will be conducted with all study participants. 706 subjects will be studied (95% confidence interval, precision ± 3%, expected rate of non-compliance 50%, expected non-responders and lost to follow up rate 15%). The following measurements will be performed: development and validation of a scale of satisfaction with antidepressant therapy, participant and antidepressant characteristics, treatment compliance evaluation (Haynes-Sackett Test, Morisky-Green Test, drug accountability and Medication Event Monitoring System), depression symptom reduction (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale), observation of adverse effects, and beliefs about treatment (The Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire). Discussion Antidepressant drugs are

  1. Patient satisfaction and non-UK educated nurses: a cross-sectional observational study of English National Health Service Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Peter; Sloane, Douglas M; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Ball, Jane E; Aiken, Linda H

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether patient satisfaction with nursing care in National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in England is associated with the proportion of non-UK educated nurses providing care. Design Cross-sectional analysis using data from the 2010 NHS Adult Inpatient Survey merged with data from nurse and hospital administrator surveys. Logistic regression models with corrections for clustering were used to determine whether the proportions of non-UK educated nurses were significantly related to patient satisfaction before and after taking account of other hospital, nursing and patient characteristics. Setting 31 English NHS trusts. Participants 12 506 patients 16 years of age and older with at least one overnight stay that completed a satisfaction survey; 2962 bedside care nurses who completed a nurse survey; and 31 NHS trusts. Main outcome measure Patient satisfaction. Results The percentage of non-UK educated nurses providing bedside hospital care, which ranged from 1% to 52% of nurses, was significantly associated with patient satisfaction. After controlling for potential confounding factors, each 10-point increase in the percentage of non-UK educated nurses diminished the odds of patients reporting good or excellent care by 12% (OR=0.88), and decreased the odds of patients agreeing that they always had confidence and trust in nurses by 13% (OR=0.87). Other indicators of patient satisfaction also revealed lower satisfaction in hospitals with higher percentages of non-UK educated nurses. Conclusions Use of non-UK educated nurses in English NHS hospitals is associated with lower patient satisfaction. Importing nurses from abroad to substitute for domestically educated nurses may negatively impact quality of care. PMID:26634400

  2. User Satisfaction Evaluation of the EHR4CR Query Builder: A Multisite Patient Count Cohort System

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Rey, Iñaki; N'Dja, Aurèle; Cunningham, James; Newe, Axel; Trinczek, Benjamin; Lafitte, Caroline; Sedlmayr, Brita; Fritz, Fleur

    2015-01-01

    The Electronic Health Records for Clinical Research (EHR4CR) project aims to develop services and technology for the leverage reuse of Electronic Health Records with the purpose of improving the efficiency of clinical research processes. A pilot program was implemented to generate evidence of the value of using the EHR4CR platform. The user acceptance of the platform is a key success factor in driving the adoption of the EHR4CR platform; thus, it was decided to evaluate the user satisfaction. In this paper, we present the results of a user satisfaction evaluation for the EHR4CR multisite patient count cohort system. This study examined the ability of testers (n = 22 and n = 16 from 5 countries) to perform three main tasks (around 20 minutes per task), after a 30-minute period of self-training. The System Usability Scale score obtained was 55.83 (SD: 15.37), indicating a moderate user satisfaction. The responses to an additional satisfaction questionnaire were positive about the design of the interface and the required procedure to design a query. Nevertheless, the most complex of the three tasks proposed in this test was rated as difficult, indicating a need to improve the system regarding complicated queries. PMID:26539525

  3. Pectus Excavatum and Pectus Carinatum: Associated Conditions, Family History, and Postoperative Patient Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Kuru, Pinar; Cakiroglu, Aylin; Er, Aynur; Ozbakir, Hincal; Cinel, Ali Emin; Cangut, Busra; Iris, Merve; Canbaz, Berkay; Pıçak, Ebru; Yuksel, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Background Pectus excavatum (PE) and pectus carinatum (PC) are the most common chest wall deformities. In this study, we aimed to characterize how patients obtained information about these deformities, as well as patients’ family history, associated medical problems, and postoperative satisfaction after the Nuss and Abramson procedures. Methods This cross-sectional retrospective study included patients who were operated by a single surgeon between 2006 and 2013. Follow-up calls were made after approval of our institution’s ethics committee. We reached 207 of the 336 PE patients (61.6%) and 73 of the 96 PC patients (76%). Results The majority of the patients were male (85% of the PE patients and 91.8% of the PC patients). The age of diagnosis of PE was 14.52±0.51 years and the age at the time of operation was 17.89±0.42 years; for PC patients, the corresponding ages were 15.23±0.55 years and 16.77±0.55 years, respectively. A total of 70% of the PE patients and 63.8% of the PC patients obtained information about pectus deformities through the Internet. In 27.1% of the PE patients with an associated anomaly, 57.1% (n=13) had scoliosis, while 41.1% of the PC patients with an associated anomaly had kyphosis (n=5). Postoperative satisfaction, as evaluated on a scale from 0 to 10, was 8.17±0.15 for PE patients and 8.37±0.26 for PC patients. The postoperative pain duration was 51.93±5.18 days for PE patients and 38.5±6.88 days for PC patients. Conclusion In this study, we found that most patients with pectus deformities were male. The Internet was an important resource for patients to learn about their deformities. Family history and associated anomalies were identified as important aspects for consideration in the clinical setting. The patients reported high levels of postoperative satisfaction, and pain management was found to be one of the most important elements of postoperative care. PMID:26889443

  4. ["SOS SEIN 84" accelerated breast disease management: Patients satisfaction survey].

    PubMed

    Arnaud, Antoine; Dumuids, Magali; Mège, Alice; de Rauglaudre, Gaëtan; Regis Arnaud, Anne; Martin, Nicole; Dupuy Meurat, Françoise; Dolle, Sabine; Gallon, Elise; Serin, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    In case of a new breast symptom or an abnormal result of breast imaging, some women have a problem finding a quick answer to allay their anxiety. The Institut Sainte-Catherine in Avignon has set up a new form of accelerated disease management through the opening of a new dedicated consultation called SOS SEIN 84. We present the result of a prospective quality study of our first new patients.

  5. Development and testing of a questionnaire to measure patient satisfaction with intermediate care

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, A; Hewitt, G; Matthews, R; Richards, S H; Shepperd, S

    2006-01-01

    Background Individual trials have suggested high levels of general patient satisfaction with intermediate care, but this topic has not been examined in detail. Aims To identify the key elements of patient satisfaction with intermediate care, and to see whether these can be validly measured using a questionnaire. Method A questionnaire was developed on the basis of a literature review and piloting with patients and staff on participating schemes (phase I). In phase II, the questionnaire was tested for validity and reliability in a group of patients recently discharged from two “hospital‐at‐home” intermediate‐care schemes. In phase III, a shortened version of the questionnaire was psychometrically tested in five sites taking part in a national evaluation of intermediate care. Results 96 patients with an average age of 76.5 years took part in phase II. Test–retest reliability was evaluated by repeating the questionnaire 2 weeks later in a subsample of 42 patients. This was “moderate” (κ 0.4–0.6) for 12 questions, “fair” (κ 0.2–0.4) for 6 questions and “poor” (κ 0.1–0.2) for 5 questions. Scores correlated well with the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire (Spearman's r = 0.75, p<0.001). 843 patients (57% of those eligible) from five intermediate‐care schemes took part in phase III. Principal components analysis suggested six factors or subscales: general satisfaction, affective response, cognitive response, timing of discharge, coordination after discharge, and access to pain relief, although the last three factors comprised only one question each. The intraclass correlation coefficients in the first three subscales varied from 0.82 to 0.89. Scores for all subscales differed by scheme, suggesting construct validity. Only one question (on general satisfaction) was found to be redundant. Conclusion The questionnaire, with some minor amendments to improve performance, could be used as a validated tool for audit and research in

  6. A study of patient satisfaction after cataract surgery with implantation of different types of intraocular lenses

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The implementation of capitated payment has driven medical institutions through developing balance billing for medical services. By exploring the patients’ decision-making factors on different self-pay items, a reference for the pricing and sales strategy for the related products can be formed. The major purposes of this study were to analyze the determinants of preoperative selection and postoperative satisfaction with implantation of different types of intraocular lenses in cataract surgery. Methods This cross-sectional study consisted of 127 patients that were 50 years of age and older, and who had phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation in both eyes. Data were collected by using a structured questionnaire. The following parameters were measured: access to medical care, attitude towards receiving medical products at one’s own expense, overall patient satisfaction and postoperative visual clarity. Results The results showed that the patient’s gender, educational level and economic status influenced the type of intraocular lens chosen. Patients in the insurance group cared about access to medical care, and patients in the balance billing group cared about product differentiation. ANOVA results showed no statistically significant differences in the overall satisfaction of the patients among the groups with different types of intraocular lenses. Patients that received cataract surgery with implantation of multifocal intraocular lenses had better vision when trying to view smaller objects and when looking at objects under strong light. Conclusions Manufacturers should increase the number of differences between their products, and health care providers can then recommend the appropriate intraocular lens in accordance with the needs or demands of their patients, and also by keeping in mind the financial constraints of their patients. PMID:23107001

  7. The effects of synchronous class sessions on students' academic achievement and levels of satisfaction in an online introduction to computers course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeShea, Andrea Valene

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental static-group comparison study was to test the theory of transactional distance that relates the inclusion of synchronous class sessions into an online introductory computer course to students' levels of satisfaction and academic achievement at a post-secondary technical college. This study specifically looked at the effects of adding live, synchronous class sessions into an online learning environment using collaboration software such as Blackboard Collaborate and the impact that this form of live interaction had on students' overall levels of satisfaction and academic achievement with the course. A quasi-experiment using the post-test only, static-group comparison design was utilized and conducted in an introductory computer class at a local technical college. It was determined that incorporating live, synchronous class sessions into an online course did not increase students' levels of achievement, nor did it result in improved test scores. Additionally, the study revealed that there was no significant difference in students' levels of satisfaction between those taking online courses using live, synchronous methods and those experiencing traditional online methods. In light of this evidence, further research needs to be conducted to determine if students prefer a completely asynchronous online learning experience or if, when, and how they would prefer a blended approach that offers synchronous sessions as well.

  8. Patient- and person-reports on healthcare: preferences, outcomes, experiences, and satisfaction - an essay.

    PubMed

    Klose, K; Kreimeier, S; Tangermann, U; Aumann, I; Damm, K

    2016-12-01

    With the shift towards patient-centered healthcare, patient- and person-reports of health-related factors, including outcomes, are seen as important determinants for evaluating and improving healthcare. However, a comprehensive, systematic categorization of patient- and person-reports is currently lacking in the literature. This study aims at developing a new classification system with well-defined constructs for patients' and persons' self-reports on health and healthcare. A literature research and evaluation by the Reported Health Outcomes (RHO) Group were used to develop this classification system. The new classification system includes patient- and person-reported preferences, outcomes, experiences, and satisfaction related to healthcare and health outcomes. Moreover, the most constitutive methods to measure these four categories - preferences, outcomes, experiences, and satisfaction - have been described in this article. Even though the value of patients' and persons' perspectives on healthcare is increasingly being recognized, its measurement and implementation presents a lasting challenge to researchers, clinicians, patients, and the general population.

  9. Medical nutrition therapy for hypercholesterolemia positively affects patient satisfaction and quality of life outcomes.

    PubMed

    Delahanty, Linda M; Hayden, Doug; Ammerman, Alice; Nathan, David M

    2002-01-01

    Following a heart-healthy diet to lower cholesterol levels is often assumed to be difficult, to be burdensome, and to have a negative impact on quality of life (QOL). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of medical nutrition therapy (MNT) versus usual care (UC) for hypercholesterolemia on patient satisfaction and QOL. Ninety ambulatory care patients (60 men and 30 women), age 28 to 66, were randomly assigned to receive either MNT from dietitians using a National Cholesterol Education Program-based protocol or UC from their physicians. Patients who received MNT reported no difference in QOL related to the taste or enjoyment of food compared with UC patients. However, the MNT group reported initial improvements in QOL related to the convenience and cost of following a low-fat diet when compared with the UC group. The MNT group also reported significant and lasting improvements in perceived QOL related to self-care compared with the UC group. MNT patients were more satisfied with the interaction at visits, knowledge and ability to manage their cholesterol, eating habits, appearance, time spent exercising, and life in general. Moreover, MNT patients did not report any negative impact related to following a low-fat diet in regard to feeling restricted by diet; interference with lifestyle activities; or difficulty planning, purchasing, or preparing meals or eating away from home. Contrary to popular belief there is no apparent reduction but rather an improvement in some measures of QOL and patient satisfaction with MNT for hypercholesterolemia.

  10. The Effect of Trauma Intervention on the Satisfaction of Patients Admitted to the Emergency Department: A Clinical Trial Study

    PubMed Central

    Zakerimoghadam, Masoumeh; Sadeghi, Somayeh; Ghiyasvandian, Shahrzad; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient satisfaction is a key determinant of the quality of medical care. Moreover, satisfaction can be used as a criterion for examining the adequacy of the care, health, and competency of personnel. Objectives This study was conducted to determine the satisfaction of patients receiving trauma care in the emergency department of a hospital affiliated with Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. Patients and Methods This simple clinical trial was performed on 104 patients admitted for traumatic injury to an emergency department in Iran. Given that patients frequently enter an emergency department for care, the sampling of patients in the department was done on days that were randomly assigned to the study group. The experimental group received trauma intervention in four areas from their admission to the emergency department to their discharge from the hospital, and the control group received routine nursing care. The data were collected through a questionnaire that asked for demographic characteristics and then went on to ask about patient satisfaction. The satisfaction questionnaire was completed after the trauma intervention at the end of patients’ stay in the hospital. The data were analyzed using SPSS 22 software and descriptive statistical tests and analytical tests (independent t and Chi-square). Results The mean score for total satisfaction after trauma intervention in the experimental group (45.6 ± 3.69) was significantly different from that of the control group (32.01 ± 7.78) (P < 0.001). Therefore, the levels of total satisfaction in the experimental and control group were favorable and relatively favorable, respectively. Conclusions In this study, trauma intervention increased satisfaction in patients admitted to the emergency department. Therefore, managers and personnel of hospitals and healthcare training centers are urged to implement trauma intervention in their hospitals or healthcare training centers. PMID:27433350

  11. Feasibility of real-time satisfaction surveys through automated analysis of patients' unstructured comments and sentiments.

    PubMed

    Alemi, Farrokh; Torii, Manabu; Clementz, Laura; Aron, David C

    2012-01-01

    This article shows how sentiment analysis (an artificial intelligence procedure that classifies opinions expressed within the text) can be used to design real-time satisfaction surveys. To improve participation, real-time surveys must be radically short. The shortest possible survey is a comment card. Patients' comments can be found online at sites organized for rating clinical care, within e-mails, in hospital complaint registries, or through simplified satisfaction surveys such as "Minute Survey." Sentiment analysis uses patterns among words to classify a comment into a complaint, or praise. It further classifies complaints into specific reasons for dissatisfaction, similar to broad categories found in longer surveys such as Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems. In this manner, sentiment analysis allows one to re-create responses to longer satisfaction surveys from a list of comments. To demonstrate, this article provides an analysis of sentiments expressed in 995 online comments made at the RateMDs.com Web site. We focused on pediatrician and obstetrician/gynecologist physicians in District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia. We were able to classify patients' reasons for dissatisfaction and the analysis provided information on how practices can improve their care. This article reports the accuracy of classifications of comments. Accuracy will improve as the number of comments received increases. In addition, we ranked physicians using the concept of time-to-next complaint. A time-between control chart was used to assess whether time-to-next complaint exceeded historical patterns and therefore suggested a departure from norms. These findings suggest that (1) patients' comments are easily available, (2) sentiment analysis can classify these comments into complaints/praise, and (3) time-to-next complaint can turn these classifications into numerical benchmarks that can trace impact of improvements over time. The procedures described in the

  12. Patient satisfaction with a home televisiting service based on interactive television over a cable network.

    PubMed

    Valero, M A; Arredondo, M T; del Nogal, F; Rodríguez, J M; Frías, E

    2000-01-01

    Experience shows that high-quality audiovisual contact between remote health carers and patients facilitates a telemedicine service. However, the lack of broadband communication to the home usually prevents domestic televisiting. Deployment of cable networks in Spain has allowed the implementation of a home televisiting service designed for patients with chronic diseases. In a trial, 15 patients received televisits by three specialists and three nurses from the Severo Ochoa Hospital in Madrid. Five patients suffered from chronic pain, five were from the nephrology unit and five had been treated at the intensive-care unit after acute myocardial infarction. Each patient participated in three televisiting sessions, two provided by a specialist and the other by a nurse. The average length of a televisit was 12 min (range 5-21 min). The patients expressed their satisfaction with the service.

  13. The Influence of Learner Readiness on Student Satisfaction and Academic Achievement in an Online Program at Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirmizi, Özkan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the self-perceptions of distance education learners in terms of learner readiness and to determine the predictors of satisfaction and success in distance education. Learner readiness consists of five sub-dimensions: (1) computer/internet self-efficacy, (2) self-directed learning, (3) learner control, (4)…

  14. Patient proactivity: behaviors, attitudes, and its relationship with satisfaction with the American health care delivery system.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, Sam; McCullough, Tammy

    2014-01-01

    A sample of 1,031 U.S. adult residents provided information regarding actions that fall within the realm of patient proactivity, that is to say efforts that are overtly designed to maintain or regain one's health. An assessment of consumers revealed that they engage in, or at least support, behaviors that would be characterized as proactive. Furthermore, there is a significant relationship between some elements of patient proactivity and the level of satisfaction with the American health care system. The relationships are modest, but they offer managerial insight that will benefit those responsible for both delivering and marketing health care. PMID:24617724

  15. The effect of telehealth systems and satisfaction with health expenditure among patients with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Uei, Shu-Lin; Tsai, Chung-Hung; Kuo, Yu-Ming

    2016-04-29

    Telehealth cost analysis has become a crucial issue for governments in recent years. In this study, we examined cases of metabolic syndrome in Hualien County, Taiwan. This research adopted the framework proposed by Marchand to establish a study process. In addition, descriptive statistics, a t test, analysis of variance, and regression analysis were employed to analyze 100 questionnaires. The results of the t$ test revealed significant differences in medical health expenditure, number of clinical visits for medical treatment, average amount of time spent commuting to clinics, amount of time spent undergoing medical treatment, and average number of people accompanying patients to medical care facilities or assisting with other tasks in the past one month, indicating that offering telehealth care services can reduce health expenditure. The statistical analysis results revealed that customer satisfaction has a positive effect on reducing health expenditure. Therefore, this study proves that telehealth care systems can effectively reduce health expenditure and directly improve customer satisfaction with medical treatment. PMID:27163314

  16. Comfort, satisfaction, and anxiolysis in surgical patients using a patient-adjustable comfort warming system: a prospective randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Denise; Greenfield, Mary Lou V H; Anderson, Jane E; Smith, Beverly A; Morris, Michelle

    2010-04-01

    Comfort warming systems aim to produce a comfortable local environment over which the individual patient has control. We studied a patient-adjustable comfort warming system using the Bair PAWS (Patient Adjustable Warming System) (Arizant Healthcare, Inc, Eden Prairie, MN), specifically to study comfort warming rather than therapeutic warming. One-hundred thirty patients were enrolled in this prospective randomized clinical trial, with 58 patients randomized to the patient warming gown, and 72 randomized to the warm blanket group. Groups were similar for gender, age, height, weight, surgical time, body surface area, and body mass index. The patient-adjustable warming system group had perceived greater control and satisfaction at 30 minutes after treatment was initiated compared with the warmed blanket control group. However, there were no differences in satisfaction levels with thermal comfort among those patients contacted one day postoperatively. Additional research is needed to improve external validity of study findings. Further refinement of a nursing definition of thermal comfort should be explored. PMID:20359643

  17. Impact of patient-accessible electronic medical records in rheumatology: use, satisfaction and effects on empowerment among patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To measure the use, satisfaction and impact of a web portal which provides patients with rheumatoid arthritis home access to their electronic medical records (EMR). Methods A pretest-posttest study was conducted among 360 patients. Questionnaires assessed socio-demographics, health literacy, Internet use, disease characteristics, patient-provider relationship and empowerment before and after launching a hospital-based patient web portal. To measure the impact of the portal, patients’ satisfaction with care, trust in their rheumatologist, self-efficacy in patient-provider communication, illness perceptions, and medication adherence were assessed. The post-test included questions on portal use, satisfaction, and self-perceived impact due to portal use. Results 54% of respondents with Internet access had viewed their EMR. Respondents were positive about the ease of use and usefulness of the portal and reported very few problems. Age (P = .03), amount of Internet use (P = .01) and self-perceived Internet skills (P = .03) significantly predicted portal use. Of the respondents who had logged in, 44% reported feeling more involved in their treatment and 37% felt they had more knowledge about their treatment. Significant differences over time were not found on the empowerment-related instruments. Conclusions The current portal succeeded in offering patients access to their EMR in a usable and understandable way. While its true impact is difficult to grasp, a relevant portion of the patients felt more involved in their treatment due to the web portal. Offering patients home EMR access, therefore, appears to be a valuable addition to the care process. PMID:24673997

  18. The role of public relations for image creating in health services: a sample patient satisfaction survey.

    PubMed

    Kirdar, YalçIn

    2007-01-01

    This study discusses the role of public relations for image creating in health services. Hospitals require public relations activities to distinguish them from competitors, provide bidirectional communication between the society and the hospital, and assist to create of a strong hospital image and culture. A satisfaction survey was conducted on 264 patients who have received health services at Maltepe University Hospital. The research focused on how the Hospital's examination, care, catering and physical services; doctor and nurse politeness towards patients and patient relatives, their attitudes and behaviors; examination, check-in, bedding and discharge operations; public relations activities in and out of the hospital were perceived. Another subject of the study was the degree of recommendation of patients who have been served by the hospital's health services to prospective patients seeking treatment.

  19. The role of public relations for image creating in health services: a sample patient satisfaction survey.

    PubMed

    Kirdar, YalçIn

    2007-01-01

    This study discusses the role of public relations for image creating in health services. Hospitals require public relations activities to distinguish them from competitors, provide bidirectional communication between the society and the hospital, and assist to create of a strong hospital image and culture. A satisfaction survey was conducted on 264 patients who have received health services at Maltepe University Hospital. The research focused on how the Hospital's examination, care, catering and physical services; doctor and nurse politeness towards patients and patient relatives, their attitudes and behaviors; examination, check-in, bedding and discharge operations; public relations activities in and out of the hospital were perceived. Another subject of the study was the degree of recommendation of patients who have been served by the hospital's health services to prospective patients seeking treatment. PMID:19042527

  20. Telegenetics use in presymptomatic genetic counselling: patient evaluations on satisfaction and quality of care.

    PubMed

    Otten, Ellen; Birnie, Erwin; Ranchor, Adelita V; van Langen, Irene M

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, online counselling has been introduced in clinical genetics to increase patients' access to care and to reduce time and cost for both patients and professionals. Most telegenetics reports so far evaluated online oncogenetic counselling at remote health centres in regions with large travelling distances, generally showing positive patient outcomes. We think online counselling--including the use of supportive tools that are also available during in-person counseling--of presymptomatic patients in their homes can also be feasible and valuable for patients in relatively small regions. We performed a single-centre pilot study of online genetic counselling for 57 patients who were presymptomatic cardiogenetic (n=17), presymptomatic oncogenetic (n=34) and prenatal (3 couples). One-third of presymptomatic patients we approached consented to online counselling. Patient evaluations of practical aspects, satisfaction and psychological outcomes were assessed and compared with a matched control group. Patients managed to fulfil the preparations, were significantly more satisfied with their counsellor and counselling session than controls and were satisfied with the online counselling more than they expected to be beforehand. Psychological outcomes (decreased anxiety and increased control) did not differ with control patients. Technical problems occurred in almost half of online sessions. Nonetheless, online counselling in patients' homes proved to be feasible and was appreciated by a substantial part of presymptomatic patients at our genetics centre in the Netherlands. Based on these outcomes, we conclude online counselling can be a valuable addition to existing counselling options in regular patient care.

  1. Patient satisfaction in the outpatients' chemotherapy unit of Marmara University, Istanbul, Turkey: a staff survey

    PubMed Central

    Turhal, Nazim S; Efe, Basak; Gumus, Mahmut; Aliustaoglu, Mehmet; Karamanoglu, Ayla; Sengoz, Meric

    2002-01-01

    Background We conducted a survey to find out how patients feel about the care they receive in the outpatient chemotherapy unit of Marmara University Hospital. Methods The American College of Physicians Patient Satisfaction survey translated into Turkish was used. A meeting was held with all involved staff, before conducting the survey, to review the purpose and determine the process. The study was conducted with 100 random patients. Results Consistent with cancer frequency, most patients had either lung, colorectal or breast cancer. Their insurance was government sponsored in close to 90%. The educational levels were above Turkish median but consistent with the area the hospital is serving. They were coming to the unit on average 8.5 months. The responses were not influenced by the surveyed diagnosis, age, sex or educational status (p > 0,05). Particularly health care team's attention, trust and courtesy came forward as strong points. The weaknesses noted as difficulties in booking an outpatient doctor visit appointment because the phone line was busy or the secretary was not courteous, the excessive amount of time and effort it required to get laboratory and radiology results. Conclusion The health care system is basically a service based industry and customer satisfaction is at utmost importance just as in other service-oriented sectors. We hope this study will shed light in that area and Turkish health care providers will pay closer attention to how their patients feel about the services that they are getting. PMID:12443536

  2. Evaluation of satisfaction and complications in patients with existing complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Bilhan, Hakan; Geckili, Onur; Ergin, Selen; Erdogan, Ozge; Ates, Gokcen

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this clinical trial was to assess satisfaction, as well as the frequency and type of prosthetic complications in terms of several variables, in patients with complete dentures that had been supplied at private clinics. The study subjects were 64 patients with a mean age of 63.48 years wearing complete dentures provided at private clinics, and requesting new ones. The degree of patient satisfaction with their dentures was assessed, as well as complications and parameters related to the dentures such as the accuracy of vertical dimensions and centric relation, arrangement and possible malposition of the artificial teeth, and the border length of the denture bases. The most common complication was loss of retention (85.9%), followed by ulceration (44.2%). Mandibular dentures with long vestibular borders showed a significantly higher incidence of epulis fissuratum (P = 0.017), and denture-related sore spots influenced patients' speech ability (P = 0.023). Routine recalls seem to be important for wearers of complete dentures, as several insidious complications may develop and cause damage to the dentures as well as the patients' oral tissues.

  3. Evaluation of Patient Satisfaction of an Outpatient Colonoscopy Service in an Asian Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Wah-Kheong; Goh, Khean-Lee

    2012-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate patient satisfaction towards an outpatient colonoscopy service and analyze areas of dissatisfaction for potential improvement. Method. Consecutive patients attending the outpatient diagnostic colonoscopy service in University of Malaya Medical Centre between 1st February and 31th July 2010 were interviewed using a questionnaire modified from the modified Group Health Association of America-9 (mGHAA-9) questionnaire. Favorable/unfavorable responses to each question, contribution of each question to unfavorable responses, and effect of waiting times on favorable/unfavorable response rates were analyzed. Results. Interview was carried out on 426 patients (52.1% men). Mean age ± standard deviation was 61.3 ± 12.9 years old. Mean waiting times for colonoscopy appointment and on colonoscopy day were 3.8 ± 2.7 months and 1.1 ± 0.8 hours, respectively. The main factors that contributed to unfavorable responses were bowel preparation followed by waiting times for colonoscopy appointment and on colonoscopy day (32.3%, 27.5%, and 19.6%, resp.). Favorable responses diminished to undesirable levels when waiting times for colonoscopy appointment and on colonoscopy day exceeded 1 month and 1 hour, respectively. Conclusion. Bowel preparation and waiting times were main factors for patient dissatisfaction. Waiting times for colonoscopy appointment and on colonoscopy day should not exceed 1 month and 1 hour, respectively, to maintain acceptable levels of patient satisfaction. PMID:22606201

  4. Satisfaction and perceived effectiveness in patients on subcutaneous immunotherapy with a high-dose hypoallergenic pollen extract.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Mosquera, M; Sola Martínez, F J; Montoro de Francisco, A; Chivato Pérez, T; Sánchez Moreno, V; Rodríguez-Marco, A; Hernández-Peña, J

    2016-09-01

    This study was designed to determine the level of satisfaction, tolerance and perceived effectiveness by patients in the first pollen season after starting treatment with Alergovit(®). For this purpose, a nationwide, retrospective, multicentre and cross-sectional observational study was carried on 256 patients. Perceived effectiveness by the patients was measured using a visual analogue scale and was clinically significant in 92.4% of the patients. The satisfaction level was evaluated with a specific questionnaire. 32.5% of the patients were totally satisfied with Allergovit(®) and 48.8% reported a high degree of satisfaction. The treatment was well tolerated by 99.2% of the patients. Our results demonstrate that subcutaneous immunotherapy with Allergovit(®) is effective and well-tolerated in routine clinical practice. PMID:27608475

  5. Device-Training for Individuals with Thoracic and Lumbar Spinal Cord Injury Using a Powered Exoskeleton for Technically Assisted Mobility: Achievements and User Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Gillner, Annett; Borgwaldt, Nicole; Kroll, Sylvia; Roschka, Sybille

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Results of a device-training for nonambulatory individuals with thoracic and lumbar spinal cord injury (SCI) using a powered exoskeleton for technically assisted mobility with regard to the achieved level of control of the system after training, user satisfaction, and effects on quality of life (QoL). Methods. Observational single centre study with a 4-week to 5-week intensive inpatient device-training using a powered exoskeleton (ReWalk™). Results. All 7 individuals with SCI who commenced the device-training completed the course of training and achieved basic competences to use the system, that is, the ability to stand up, sit down, keep balance while standing, and walk indoors, at least with a close contact guard. User satisfaction with the system and device-training was documented for several aspects. The quality of life evaluation (SF-12v2™) indicated that the use of the powered exoskeleton can have positive effects on the perception of individuals with SCI regarding what they can achieve physically. Few adverse events were observed: minor skin lesions and irritations were observed; no falls occurred. Conclusions. The device-training for individuals with thoracic and lumbar SCI was effective and safe. All trained individuals achieved technically assisted mobility with the exoskeleton while still needing a close contact guard. PMID:27610382

  6. Device-Training for Individuals with Thoracic and Lumbar Spinal Cord Injury Using a Powered Exoskeleton for Technically Assisted Mobility: Achievements and User Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Platz, Thomas; Gillner, Annett; Borgwaldt, Nicole; Kroll, Sylvia; Roschka, Sybille

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Results of a device-training for nonambulatory individuals with thoracic and lumbar spinal cord injury (SCI) using a powered exoskeleton for technically assisted mobility with regard to the achieved level of control of the system after training, user satisfaction, and effects on quality of life (QoL). Methods. Observational single centre study with a 4-week to 5-week intensive inpatient device-training using a powered exoskeleton (ReWalk™). Results. All 7 individuals with SCI who commenced the device-training completed the course of training and achieved basic competences to use the system, that is, the ability to stand up, sit down, keep balance while standing, and walk indoors, at least with a close contact guard. User satisfaction with the system and device-training was documented for several aspects. The quality of life evaluation (SF-12v2™) indicated that the use of the powered exoskeleton can have positive effects on the perception of individuals with SCI regarding what they can achieve physically. Few adverse events were observed: minor skin lesions and irritations were observed; no falls occurred. Conclusions. The device-training for individuals with thoracic and lumbar SCI was effective and safe. All trained individuals achieved technically assisted mobility with the exoskeleton while still needing a close contact guard. PMID:27610382

  7. Device-Training for Individuals with Thoracic and Lumbar Spinal Cord Injury Using a Powered Exoskeleton for Technically Assisted Mobility: Achievements and User Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Platz, Thomas; Gillner, Annett; Borgwaldt, Nicole; Kroll, Sylvia; Roschka, Sybille

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Results of a device-training for nonambulatory individuals with thoracic and lumbar spinal cord injury (SCI) using a powered exoskeleton for technically assisted mobility with regard to the achieved level of control of the system after training, user satisfaction, and effects on quality of life (QoL). Methods. Observational single centre study with a 4-week to 5-week intensive inpatient device-training using a powered exoskeleton (ReWalk™). Results. All 7 individuals with SCI who commenced the device-training completed the course of training and achieved basic competences to use the system, that is, the ability to stand up, sit down, keep balance while standing, and walk indoors, at least with a close contact guard. User satisfaction with the system and device-training was documented for several aspects. The quality of life evaluation (SF-12v2™) indicated that the use of the powered exoskeleton can have positive effects on the perception of individuals with SCI regarding what they can achieve physically. Few adverse events were observed: minor skin lesions and irritations were observed; no falls occurred. Conclusions. The device-training for individuals with thoracic and lumbar SCI was effective and safe. All trained individuals achieved technically assisted mobility with the exoskeleton while still needing a close contact guard.

  8. Device-Training for Individuals with Thoracic and Lumbar Spinal Cord Injury Using a Powered Exoskeleton for Technically Assisted Mobility: Achievements and User Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Gillner, Annett; Borgwaldt, Nicole; Kroll, Sylvia; Roschka, Sybille

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Results of a device-training for nonambulatory individuals with thoracic and lumbar spinal cord injury (SCI) using a powered exoskeleton for technically assisted mobility with regard to the achieved level of control of the system after training, user satisfaction, and effects on quality of life (QoL). Methods. Observational single centre study with a 4-week to 5-week intensive inpatient device-training using a powered exoskeleton (ReWalk™). Results. All 7 individuals with SCI who commenced the device-training completed the course of training and achieved basic competences to use the system, that is, the ability to stand up, sit down, keep balance while standing, and walk indoors, at least with a close contact guard. User satisfaction with the system and device-training was documented for several aspects. The quality of life evaluation (SF-12v2™) indicated that the use of the powered exoskeleton can have positive effects on the perception of individuals with SCI regarding what they can achieve physically. Few adverse events were observed: minor skin lesions and irritations were observed; no falls occurred. Conclusions. The device-training for individuals with thoracic and lumbar SCI was effective and safe. All trained individuals achieved technically assisted mobility with the exoskeleton while still needing a close contact guard.

  9. Construct validity of the PROMIS® sexual function and satisfaction measures in patients with cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With data from a diverse sample of patients either in treatment for cancer or post-treatment for cancer, we examine inter-domain and cross-domain correlations among the core domains of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Sexual Function and Satisfaction measures (PROMIS® SexFS) and the corresponding domains from conceptually-similar measures of sexual function, the International Index of Erectile Function and the Female Sexual Function Index. Findings Men (N=389) and women (N=430) were recruited from a tumor registry, oncology clinics, and an internet panel. The PROMIS SexFS, International Index of Erectile Function, and Female Sexual Function Index were used to collect participants’ self-reported sexual function. The domains shared among the measures include desire/interest in sexual activity, lubrication and vaginal discomfort/pain (women), erectile function (men), orgasm, and satisfaction. We examined correlations among different domains within the same instrument (discriminant validity) and correlations among similar domains measured by different instruments (convergent validity). Correlations demonstrating discriminant validity ranged from 0.38 to 0.73 for men and 0.48 to 0.74 for women, while correlations demonstrating convergent validity ranged from 0.62 to 0.83 for men and 0.71 to 0.92 for women. As expected, correlations demonstrating convergent validity were higher than correlations demonstrating discriminant validity, with one exception (orgasm for men). Conclusions Construct validity was supported by convergent and discriminant validity in a diverse sample of patients with cancer. For patients with cancer who may or may not have sexual dysfunction, the PROMIS SexFS measures provide a comprehensive assessment of key domains of sexual function and satisfaction. PMID:23497200

  10. Evaluation of patient satisfaction with nursing care: quantitative or qualitative approach?

    PubMed

    Merkouris, Anastasios; Papathanassoglou, Elizabeth D E; Lemonidou, Chryssoula

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the results, along with the feasibility, applicability and relative merits of paradigm triangulation in the field of nursing care quality by conducting, concurrently, a quantitative and a qualitative study of patient satisfaction. The sample consisted of 200 randomly selected in-patients from two large Greek metropolitan hospitals. Highest ratings were assigned to the technical aspects of care, whilst information delivery items were associated with the lowest ratings. Qualitative analysis revealed a perception of nurses as weak against organisational limitations as the core theme underlying all categories of patients' complaints with nursing care. Seven more common themes were identified. The interpersonal aspect of care was central to patients' experience. The combination of qualitative and quantitative methodology appeared to contribute to the completeness of description and understanding of the phenomenon. PMID:15050847

  11. Social problem-solving, perceived stress, depression and life-satisfaction in patients suffering from tension type and migraine headaches.

    PubMed

    Eskin, Mehmet; Akyol, Ali; Çelik, Emine Yilmaz; Gültekin, Bülent Kadri

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed at investigating social problem solving, perceived stress, depression, and life-satisfaction in patients with tension type and migraine headaches. Forty-nine migraine and 42 tension type headache patients (n = 91) consenting to participate were compared to a total of 49 matched healthy control group. Participants filled in a questionnaire consisting self-report measures of problem solving, perceived stress, depression and life satisfaction. They were also asked about headache duration, frequency, pain severity, psychiatric treatment and sense of control in one's life. T-tests, chi-square, analysis of variance, logistic regression analysis and Pearson product moment correlation coefficient procedures were used to analyze the data. Tension type headache patients reported having had more frequent headaches than the migraine patients but migraine patients reported having had more intense pain than the tension type headache patients. Instances of psychiatric treatment were more common among tension type headache patients than the migraine and the control group. Compared to the healthy controls, headache patients displayed a deficiency in problem solving, higher levels of perceived stress and depression. Levels of problem solving skills in headache patients were related inversely to depression, perceived stress and the number of negative life events but problem solving skills of headache patients was related positively to life-satisfaction. The findings from this study suggested that cognitive behavioral problem solving therapy or training might be a viable option for reducing levels of stress and depression, and to increase life-satisfaction in patients suffering from primary headache.

  12. Uterine preservation for advanced pelvic organ prolapse repair: Anatomical results and patient satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Keshet; Shachar, Inbar Ben; Braun, Naama Marcus

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aims of the current study were to evaluate outcomes and patient satisfaction in cases of uterine prolapse treated with vaginal mesh, while preserving the uterus. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective cohort study that included all patients operated for prolapse repair with trocar-less vaginal mesh while preserving the uterus between October 2010 and March 2013. Data included: patients pre-and post-operative symptoms, POP-Q and operative complications. Success was defined as prolapse < than stage 2. A telephone survey questionnaire was used to evaluate patient's satisfaction. Results: Sixty-six patients with pelvic organ prolapse stage 3, including uterine pro-lapse of at least stage 2 (mean point C at+1.4 (range+8-(-1)) were included. Mean follow-up was 22 months. Success rate of the vaginal mesh procedure aimed to repair uterine prolapse was 92% (61/66), with mean point C at −6.7 (range (-1) - (-9)). No major intra-or post-operative complication occurred. A telephone survey questionnaire was conducted post-operatively 28 months on average. Ninety-eight percent of women were satisfied with the decision to preserve their uterus. Eighteen patients (34%) received prior consultation elsewhere for hysterectomy due to their prolapse, and decided to have the operation at our center in order to preserve the uterus. Conclusions: Uterine preservation with vaginal mesh was found to be a safe and effective treatment, even in cases with advanced uterine prolapse. Most patients prefer to keep their uterus. Uterus preservation options should be discussed with every patient before surgery for pelvic organ prolapse. PMID:27564289

  13. Patients' experiences and satisfaction with health care: results of a questionnaire study of specific aspects of care

    PubMed Central

    Jenkinson, C; Coulter, A; Bruster, S; Richards, N; Chandola, T

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To determine what aspects of healthcare provision are most likely to influence satisfaction with care and willingness to recommend hospital services to others and, secondly, to explore the extent to which satisfaction is a meaningful indicator of patient experience of healthcare services. Design: Postal survey of a sample of patients who underwent a period of inpatient care. Patients were asked to evaluate their overall experience of this episode of care and to complete the Picker Inpatient Survey questionnaire on specific aspects of their care. Sample: Patients aged 18 and over presenting at five hospitals within one NHS trust in Scotland. Method: 3592 questionnaires were mailed to patients' homes within 1 month of discharge from hospital during a 12 month period. Two reminders were sent to non-responders; 2249 (65%) questionnaires were returned. Results: Almost 90% of respondents indicated that they were satisfied with their period of inpatient care. Age and overall self-assessed health were only weakly associated with satisfaction. A multiple linear regression indicated that the major determinants of patient satisfaction were physical comfort, emotional support, and respect for patient preferences. However, many patients who reported their satisfaction with the care they received also indicated problems with their inpatient care as measured on the Picker Inpatient Survey; 55% of respondents who rated their inpatient episode as "excellent" indicated problems on 10% of the issues measured on the Picker questionnaire. Discussion: The evidence suggests that patient satisfaction scores present a limited and optimistic picture. Detailed questions about specific aspects of patients' experiences are likely to be more useful for monitoring the performance of various hospital departments and wards and could point to ways in which delivery of health care could be improved. PMID:12468693

  14. Mid-term Clinical Results and Patient Satisfaction After Uterine Artery Embolization in Women with Symptomatic Uterine Fibroids

    SciTech Connect

    Smeets, Albert J.; Lohle, Paul N. M. Vervest, Harry A. M.; Boekkooi, P. Focco; Lampmann, Leo E.H.

    2006-04-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the mid-term clinical results and patient satisfaction following uterine artery embolization (UAE) in women with symptomatic fibroids. Methods. Between August 1998 and December 2002, 135 patients had UAE for symptomatic uterine fibroids. All patients were asked to fill in a questionnaire. Questions were aimed at changes in bleeding, pain, and bulk-related symptoms. Symptoms after UAE were scored as disappeared, improved, unchanged or worsened. Adverse events were noted, such as vaginal dryness and discharge, menopausal complaints or fibroid expulsion. Patient satisfaction after UAE was assessed. Patient satisfaction of women embolized with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles was compared with satisfaction of women embolized with calibrated microspheres. Results. The questionnaire was returned by 110 of 135 women (81%) at a median time interval of 14 months following UAE. In 10 women additional embolization or hysterectomy had been performed. Of the 110 responders, 86 (78%) were satisfied with the result of UAE. The proportion of satisfied women was higher in the group embolized with calibrated microspheres than in women embolized with PVA, although this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.053). Conclusion. UAE in women with symptomatic uterine fibroids leads to improvement of symptoms and patient satisfaction is good in the vast majority after a median follow-up period of 14 months.

  15. Early assessment of patient satisfaction and health-related quality of life following robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Yong; Jeong, Jeongyun; Kang, Dong Il; Johnson, Kelly; Jang, Thomas; Kim, Isaac Yi

    2010-12-01

    Impairments in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and patient satisfaction after definitive treatment for localized prostate cancer can be significant. We assessed patient satisfaction associated with HRQOL following robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). Prostate cancer-specific HRQOL was assessed using 50 items from the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite and postoperative satisfaction parameters. According to the satisfaction level, 218 consecutive patients were divided into the following three groups: group 1, extremely satisfied (n = 140); group 2, satisfied (n = 54); and group 3, uncertain, dissatisfied and extremely dissatisfied patients (n = 24). Peri-operative characteristics were not significantly different among the three groups. When the mean domain-specific HRQOL subscale scores were compared, there were no statistical differences in urinary and sexual function between groups 1 and 2. Patients in group 2 were more bothered by these domains than those in group 1. Group 3 had significantly lower scores in bowel and hormonal bother than the other groups and significantly lower scores in bowel function when compared to group 1. In daily life related to HRQOL, satisfaction is mainly determined by personal perception and interpretation rather than the objective status of urinary and sexual function. More interestingly, patients in the dissatisfied group were more likely to have bladder and bowel storage symptoms. Additional work is necessary to identify the factors associated with increased risk of pelvic organ storage symptoms following RARP. PMID:27627949

  16. Factors Contributing to Satisfaction with Changes in Physical Function after Orthopedic Surgery for Musculoskeletal Dysfunction in Patients with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Kusumoto, Yasuaki; Nitta, Osamu; Matsuo, Atsushi; Takaki, Kenji; Matsuda, Tadamitsu

    2016-01-01

    Background The recognition of required treatments for cerebral palsy (CP) patients, including orthopedic surgery, differs according to region. This study was performed to identify factors associated with satisfactory changes in physical function after orthopedic surgery. Methods 358 patients were selected for the questionnaire survey. The following information was collected: gender, primary disease, age of initial surgery, total procedural count, operated sites, satisfaction of postoperative rehabilitation frequency, ideal amount of postoperative rehabilitation sessions per week, frequency of voluntary home training per week, satisfaction of the timing of surgery and the current satisfaction with the changes in physical function after the orthopedic surgery. We classified the patients into the satisfied and dissatisfied group according to satisfactory changes in physical function after the surgery. We performed unpaired t-tests and chi-square tests to determine the variables that differed significantly between the groups. Variables with a p value of <0.2 were included in the multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results The logistic model was revised and summed up to two potential predictors of postsurgical satisfaction with physical function: satisfaction with the frequency of postoperative rehabilitation sessions and the orthopedic surgery of the hip (distinction hit ratio, 75.4%). Conclusions This study demonstrated that the frequency of postoperative rehabilitation and history of hip surgery seemed to be related to the satisfaction with the changes in physical function after orthopedic surgery. PMID:27135609

  17. Dental Implants – Perceiving Patients’ Satisfaction in Relation to Clinical and Electromyography Study on Implant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Soumendra

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the satisfaction of patients with posterior implants in relation to the clinical success criteria and surface electromyography (sEMG) findings of the masseter and temporalis muscles. Total 42 subjects were investigated. Twenty one subjects with posterior dental implants were interviewed using a questionnaire and the clinical success criteria were determined based on The International Congress of Oral Implantologists. The myofunction of the masticatory muscles were assessed using sEMG (21 subjects) and compared to the control group of subjects without implants (21 subjects). Out of 21 subjects, all were satisfied with the aesthetics of their implant. Twenty of them (95.2%) were satisfied with its function and stability. As for clinical criteria, 100% (50) of the implants were successful with no pain, mobility or exudates. sEMG findings showed that patients have significantly lower (p<0.01) basal or resting median power frequency but with muscle burst. During chewing, control subjects showed faster chewing action. There was no difference in reaction and recovery time of clenching for both groups. In conclusion, the satisfaction of implant patients was high, and which was in relation to the successful clinical success criteria and sEMG findings. PMID:26465146

  18. Treatment satisfaction of patients undergoing ranibizumab therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration in a real-life setting

    PubMed Central

    Gohil, Rishma; Crosby-Nwaobi, Roxanne; Forbes, Angus; Burton, Ben J; Hykin, Philip; Sivaprasad, Sobha

    2016-01-01

    Context Treatment satisfaction with a loading phase of monthly injections for 3 months followed by a pro-re-nata regimen of ranibizumab in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) remains unclear. Aims The aim was to evaluate the treatment satisfaction of persons with nAMD treated with ranibizumab in a real-life setting. Settings and design A cross-sectional study was conducted across three eye clinics within the National Health Service in the UK, where treatment is provided free at point of contact. Materials and methods A total of 250 patients were selected randomly for the study. Treatment satisfaction was assessed using the Macular Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire. Data were collected on satisfaction of the service provided (Client Service Questionnaire-8) and the patients’ demographic and quality of life and treatment history. Factors governing treatment questionnaire were determined. Results The most important factors that determined the satisfaction were the service provided at the clinic (Client Service Questionnaire-8), health-related quality of life (EQ-5D-3L), and duration of AMD. Visual acuity changes were rated as less important than one would have expected. Conclusion The study result suggested that treatment satisfaction for nAMD was governed by the perception of being reviewed and injected regularly over a long period of time than the actual change in visual acuity from the treatment. PMID:27307715

  19. Assessing Insulin Delivery Device Satisfaction in Patients with Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Snell-Bergeon, Janet K

    2015-11-01

    Over the past several decades, insulin treatment has changed drastically, not only with the development of further insulin analogs but also with the introduction of novel insulin delivery devices such as pumps and pens. In addition, adjunct devices such as continuous glucose monitors and sensor-augmented pumps have become increasingly used in clinical care, increasing the volume of information available to patients and providers. However, with the development of new devices it has become clear that along with the many benefits of these advances, the use of these devices can also present a burden to people with diabetes. For example, some patients report being overwhelmed by too much data when using continuous glucose monitors. Furthermore, there are concerns regarding the accuracy of some of these new devices, particularly for glucose monitoring. As a result, some patients may choose not to use available devices, despite the recognized benefits. Therefore, it is critical to understand how the various insulin delivery devices available currently and in the future affect patients in terms of their diabetes management and perceived burdens and to understand which patient characteristics may predict a lack of satisfaction with these devices. This critical gap in our knowledge is addressed in an article in this issue of the journal through the development of a questionnaire that allows for a better understanding of the impact of insulin delivery devices on quality of life and diabetes management among both type 1 diabetes and insulin-dependent type 2 diabetes patients. The novelty, as well as limitations, of this new instrument for the assessment of insulin delivery device satisfaction are discussed. PMID:26535926

  20. Assessment of satisfaction with different dry powder inhalation devices in Greek patients with COPD and asthma: the ANASA study

    PubMed Central

    Zervas, Eleftherios; Samitas, Konstantinos; Gaga, Mina

    2016-01-01

    Background Poor adherence to inhaled therapy is common in patients with asthma and COPD. An inhaler selection based on patients’ preference could be beneficial to adherence and treatment effectiveness. Properly designed questionnaires can assess patients’ satisfaction with their medication devices. The aim of this study was to estimate, using the Feeling of Satisfaction with Inhaler (FSI-10) questionnaire, the ease of use and satisfaction of patients regarding three different marketed dry powder inhalers (DPIs): Diskus® (DK), Elpenhaler® (EH), and Turbuhaler® (TH). The FSI-10 is a self-completed questionnaire to assess patients’ opinions regarding ease of use, portability, and usability of devices, irrespective of the drug used. Patients and methods We performed a 4-week, open, noninterventional, multicenter, parallel clinical study in 560 asthmatic and 561 COPD patients. During the first visit, patients were classified into three groups according to the DPI they were already using. Patients were regularly receiving their treatments (Seretide DK, Rolenium EH, and Symbicort TH) and agreed to complete the FSI-10 questionnaire in the second visit. Results A total of 517 COPD and 523 asthma patients completed the study. All DPIs tested received satisfactory results, while the EH obtained consistently higher scores in the FSI-10 in both COPD and asthma patients (44.7 and 44.1 vs 41.5 and 43 for TH, 40.8 and 41.4 for DK, P<0.001 and P<0.01, respectively). TH was rated better than DK by asthma patients. Patients suffering with severe COPD tended to express higher feeling of satisfaction than those with moderate or mild disease, irrespective of the device used. Conclusion All DPIs tested were highly acceptable by asthma and COPD patients of different ages; nevertheless, EH received significantly higher ratings in most of the questionnaire domains. COPD patients in advanced stages of the disease generally expressed higher level of satisfaction with their devices

  1. Guillain-Barré syndrome patient's satisfaction with physiotherapy: A two-part observational study.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Diane; Mullins, Rachel

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this observational study was to assess Guillain-Barre´ syndrome (GBS) patients' satisfaction with physiotherapy in the acute and sub-acute setting, and provide an overview of inpatient case management, including the number of complications. Twenty-seven patients admitted to Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital (SCGH) with GBS between 1 May 2005 and 30 April 2010 were considered for inclusion. Nineteen patients consented and a waiver of consent was granted for four other patients. Data were collected from case-note audit (n = 23) and telephone survey (n = 19) during June and July 2011. Participants receiving physiotherapy (n = 16) reported they were satisfied with management (87%), treatment frequency (88%), duration (94%), and timetabling (81%) of treatment and the professionalism and rapport (100%) of physiotherapists. Median length of hospital stay was 20 days (range 5-198) for 23 participants. Physiotherapists documented patient assessment within 2 days from admission (range 1-5). First functional improvements were documented on day 6 (median, range 2-34). Physiotherapists were most commonly first to mobilize patients to sit, stand, transfer, and walk (83%, 82%, 81%, and 90%, respectively). Twenty patients (87%) developed complications during their hospital stay, the most common being low back pain (61%). This study has demonstrated that GBS patients were satisfied with care provided by physiotherapy.

  2. Guillain-Barré syndrome patient's satisfaction with physiotherapy: A two-part observational study.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Diane; Mullins, Rachel

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this observational study was to assess Guillain-Barre´ syndrome (GBS) patients' satisfaction with physiotherapy in the acute and sub-acute setting, and provide an overview of inpatient case management, including the number of complications. Twenty-seven patients admitted to Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital (SCGH) with GBS between 1 May 2005 and 30 April 2010 were considered for inclusion. Nineteen patients consented and a waiver of consent was granted for four other patients. Data were collected from case-note audit (n = 23) and telephone survey (n = 19) during June and July 2011. Participants receiving physiotherapy (n = 16) reported they were satisfied with management (87%), treatment frequency (88%), duration (94%), and timetabling (81%) of treatment and the professionalism and rapport (100%) of physiotherapists. Median length of hospital stay was 20 days (range 5-198) for 23 participants. Physiotherapists documented patient assessment within 2 days from admission (range 1-5). First functional improvements were documented on day 6 (median, range 2-34). Physiotherapists were most commonly first to mobilize patients to sit, stand, transfer, and walk (83%, 82%, 81%, and 90%, respectively). Twenty patients (87%) developed complications during their hospital stay, the most common being low back pain (61%). This study has demonstrated that GBS patients were satisfied with care provided by physiotherapy. PMID:23126501

  3. Examining the relationship between patient orientation and job satisfaction in health care: evidence from the nursing profession.

    PubMed

    Harris, Eric G; Dearth, Richard; Paul, Shipra

    2007-01-01

    It is well-known that the United States faces a serious nursing shortage. A number of factors have contributed to the problem including an aging nursing workforce, fewer nursing job candidates, the aging of the baby boom population, and increased nurse dissatisfaction. The current work addresses one issue that is central to the problem: nursing satisfaction/dissatisfaction. Drawing from previous research in the services marketing literature, the work introduces the "patient orientation" construct and suggests that it is a critical motivational factor that is related to nursing satisfaction. Results from an empirical study reveal that the construct is positively related to overall nursing satisfaction while controlling for external factors including pay, benefits, supervisor, and reward satisfaction. Implications for healthcare managers and suggestions for future research are discussed. PMID:19042515

  4. Limb Differences in the Therapeutic Effects of Complex Decongestive Therapy on Edema, Quality of Life, and Satisfaction in Lymphedema Patients

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Sujin; Yoon, Tae Hee; Chang, Hyun Ju; Chu, In Ho; Kim, Jung Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the changing patterns of edema, quality of life (QOL), and patient-satisfaction after complex decongestive therapy (CDT) in three trajectories: arm lymphedema (AL), secondary leg lymphedema (LL) and primary leg lymphedema (PL). Methods Candidates for AL (n=35), LL (n=35) and PL (n=14) were identified from prospective databases. The patients were treated with CDT for 2 weeks, and lymphedema volume was measured before and immediately following the therapy. Patients then self-administered home therapy for 3 months and presented for a follow-up visit. The Korean version of Short Form-36 (SF-36) was used to assess QOL, and we administered a study-specific satisfaction survey. Results There was no significant difference in the volume reductions between the 3 groups. There were no significant differences in all of the measures between PL and LL. Overall initial QOL was significantly lower in patients with LL than in patients with AL. SF-36 scores post-CDT did not differ significantly between AL and LL. Clinically significant differences were noted between AL and LL in the mean values of the satisfaction survey. Conclusion AL, LL, and PL may have different longitudinal courses. We suggest that lower extremity lymphedema patients present more favorable outcomes after CDT with respect to QOL and satisfaction than upper extremity lymphedema patients. Clinicians should approach patients with different therapeutic considerations specific to each type or region of lymphedema before using CDT in clinical practice. PMID:26161340

  5. Patient-reported satisfaction and cosmesis outcomes following laparoscopic adrenalectomy: Laparoendoscopic single-site adrenalectomy vs. conventional laparoscopic adrenalectomy

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Shogo; Ikeda, Kenichiro; Kobayashi, Kanao; Kajiwara, Mitsuru; Teishima, Jun; Matsubara, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We evaluate patient-reported satisfaction and cosmesis of laparoendoscopic single-site adrenalectomy (LESS-A) in comparison with that of conventional laparoscopic adrenalectomy (CLA). Methods: A total of 19 and 104 patients who respectively underwent LESS-A and CLA between May 1996 and June 2011 were included in the study. Questionnaires inquiring about scar pain (0: not painful, 10: very painful), satisfaction (0: not satisfied, 10: very satisfied) and cosmesis (0: very unsightly, 10: very beautiful) on the basis of a visual analogue scale were sent to patients postoperatively. Results: The respondents consisted of 11 and 54 patients who underwent LESS-A and CLA, respectively. There was no significant inter-group difference in age, sex, affected side or body mass index. No significant differences were observed in operative time or estimated blood loss. There were also no significant differences in pain (0.67 vs. 0.57, p = 0.393), satisfaction (8.92 vs. 8.46, p = 0.453), or cosmesis score (8.58 vs. 8.00, p = 0.487) between the LESS-A and CLA groups overall. In female patients, the satisfaction score was significantly higher in the LESS-A group than in the CLA group (10.0 vs. 8.72, p = 0.049). In young patients (<50 years old), the satisfaction score was also significantly higher in the LESS-A group than in the CLA group (9.17 vs. 6.38, p = 0.036). Conclusions: Young patients and female patients who had received LESS-A adrenal surgery were more satisfied with the scar outcomes than were the young patients and female patients who had received CLA. We suggest that this patient subset most values the cosmetic benefits of LESS-A. PMID:24454596

  6. Put a Face to a Name (Part A): The Effects of Photographic Aids on Patient Satisfaction, Clinician Communication, and Quality of Care

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-04

    Effects of Photographic Aids (Photos of Faces) on Patient Recall of Their Clinical Care Team; Effects of Photographic Aids (Photos of Faces) on Clinician-patient Communication; Effects of Photographic Aids (Photos of Faces) on Overall Patient Satisfaction

  7. Patient satisfaction as a predictor of return-to-provider behavior: analysis and assessment of financial implications.

    PubMed

    Garman, Andrew N; Garcia, Joanne; Hargreaves, Marcia

    2004-01-01

    Although customer loyalty is frequently cited as a benefit of patient satisfaction, an empirical link between the two has not, to our knowledge, ever been statistically established in a hospital setting. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between self-reported patient satisfaction measures and subsequent return to the provider for care at a large academic medical center. Data from all adult medical patients responding to a patient satisfaction survey distributed by a large midwestern academic medical center during fiscal year 1997 (n = 1485) were analyzed. Response patterns were examined as they related to whether patients returned to the provider during the subsequent 2-year period. Analyses suggested that return-to-provider was associated with only a minority of the satisfaction items (approx. 11%). All items showing a significant relationship measured perceptions of how well physicians and nurses attended to, and provided information to, patients and their families. Although the size of these relationships was generally small, the estimated financial implications are substantial. Other implications of these findings for planning effective service improvement initiatives as well as improving patient survey design are discussed. PMID:14976909

  8. Orthognathic surgery with or without autologous fat micrograft injection: preliminary report on aesthetic outcomes and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Raffaini, M; Pisani, C

    2015-03-01

    Orthognathic surgery leaves the intrinsic volume of the facial soft tissues untouched, sometimes resulting in unsatisfactory improvements in aesthetics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the aesthetic outcomes and patient satisfaction following bimaxillary orthognathic surgery with or without simultaneous facial lipofilling procedures. The preoperative and postoperative facial appearances of 210 patients were compared through analysis of photographs and postoperative clinical evaluation. A patient questionnaire was used to assess the perceived improvement in aesthetics. One hundred and twenty patients (mean age 20.3 years) underwent bimaxillary orthognathic surgery and simultaneous facial lipofilling procedures (group I). The remaining 90 patients (mean age 19.8 years) underwent skeletal procedures only (group II). The overall aesthetic improvement was similar in the two groups (group I 92.5%, group II 91.1%). Greater higher-level aesthetic improvement scores were recorded for group I (group I 80%, group II 55.6%). The overall patient satisfaction was 98.3% for group I and 97.8% for group II. Greater higher-level satisfaction scores were recorded for group I (group I 14.2%, group II 6.7%). The simultaneous use of the autologous fat micrograft is a promising technique that may improve the aesthetic outcomes of orthognathic surgery, leading to greater patient satisfaction.

  9. Patient satisfaction with mini-implant stabilised full dentures. A 1-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Tomasi, C; Idmyr, B-O; Wennström, J L

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate patient-centred outcomes with regard to function and comfort after placement of mini-implants for stabilisation of complete dentures. The trial was designed as a prospective cohort of 12-months duration and involved 21 subjects in the age of 50-90 years having a full denture in the maxilla or the mandible with poor stability during function. Flapless installation of 2-4 narrow-body Dentatus Atlas(®) implants was performed and retention for the existing denture was obtained by the use of a silicone-based soft lining material (Tuf-Link(®)). Patients' judgement of perceived satisfaction with function and comfort of the dentures was recorded at baseline, 1- and 12-months post-treatment using 10-centimetre visual analogue scales (VAS) and a questionnaire. Clinical examination of the conditions of the peri-implant soft tissues was performed at 12 months. Nineteen of the 21 patients were available for the 12-month follow-up examination. The two drop-out subjects lost all implants within 1 month and rejected retreatment. Further six subjects lost 1-2 implants, but were sucessfully retreated by insertion of new implants. Overall satisfaction, chewing and speaking comfort were all markedly improved from pre-treatment median VAS scores of around 4-5 to median scores of 9·0-10 (10 = optimal) at the final examination. The prevalence of positive answers to questions regarding stability/function of the denture increased significantly to almost 100% for all questions. Treatment involving maxillary dentures and the use of short implants (7-10 mm) was associated with an increased risk of implant failure. The results indicate that placement of mini-implants as retentive elements for full dentures with poor functional stability has a marked positive impact on the patients' perception of oral function and comfort as well as security in social life.

  10. An investigation into the effects of quality improvement method on patients' satisfaction: a semi experimental research in Iran.

    PubMed

    Navipour, Hasan; Nayeri, Nahid Dehghan; Hooshmand, Abbas; Zargar, Marjaneh Taghavi

    2011-01-01

    Today, to increase effectiveness is a Strategy for success of organizations and their viability. In health care organization not only service cost- effectiveness is a major problem for productivity and organizational management but also customer-centred is in first priority. Because of these reasons, most of health organization trend to patient satisfaction for their viability. If complex process implemented for viability without attention to patient satisfaction, this is no success result. The FOCUS PDCA process is a new strategy for effectiveness of service quality. To this reason, the recent research done and its objective is to assess effect of FOCUS PDCA process strategy on patient satisfaction in surgery units of hospitals affiliated to Tehran Medical University. This research is a semi experimental with non- equivalent design. The sample was all of patients who hospitalized in two selected surgery units. Self-report was method of data gathering. Patient satisfaction assessed with questionnaire in pre and posttest. Then manipulation implemented as post-operation care process selected. Modelling and opportunity statement Diagrams prepared and improvement team organized. Flow process, convergences and cause- effect charts used to prepare list of items to be improved. Executive program was written. This include personnel training, standard implementation, election and training of quality control nurses (Q.C Ns), daily QC of caring and providing appropriate feed back to personnel, forming group session for determining corrective actions. Then after 1 month patient satisfaction was assessed. Statistical analysis shows this process increase patient satisfaction and it leads to care effectiveness. The findings of the pre-intervention phase indicated that the satisfaction level had been low in both groups and it is not significantly different in the two groups (P> 0.05). There was a significant difference before and after following intervention in the case study

  11. Patient Satisfaction with Methadone Maintenance Treatment in Vietnam: A Comparison of Different Integrative-Service Delivery Models

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Bach Xuan; Nguyen, Long Hoang; Phan, Huong Thu Thi; Latkin, Carl A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient satisfaction is an important component of quality in healthcare delivery. To inform the expansion of Methadone Maintenance Treatment (MMT) services in Vietnam, we examined the satisfaction of patients with regards to different services delivery models and identified its associated factors. Methods We interviewed 1,016 MMT patients at 5 clinics in Hanoi and Nam Dinh province. The modified SATIS instrument, a 10-item scale, was used to measure three dimensions: “Services quality and convenience”, “Health workers’ capacity and responsiveness” and “Inter-professional care”. Results The average score was high across three SATIS dimensions. However, only one third of patients completely satisfied with general health services and treatment outcomes. Older age, higher education, having any problem in self-care and anxiety/depression were negatively associated with patient’s satisfaction. Meanwhile, patients receiving MMT at clinics, where more comprehensive HIV and general health care services were available, were more likely to report a complete satisfaction. Conclusion Patients were highly satisfied with MMT services in Vietnam. However, treatment for drug users should go beyond methadone maintenance to address complicated health demands of drug users. Integrating MMT with comprehensive HIV and general health services together with improving the capacity of health workers and efficiency of services organisation to provide interconnected health care for drug users are critical for improving the outcomes of the MMT program. PMID:26556036

  12. Assessing Improvement in Quality of Life and Patient Satisfaction following Body Contouring Surgery in Patients with Massive Weight Loss: A Critical Review of Outcome Measures Employed.

    PubMed

    Jabir, Shehab

    2013-01-01

    Body contouring following massive weight loss is a rapidly expanding field in plastic surgery. However, healthcare payers are reluctant to fund such procedures, viewing them as purely cosmetic. This has resulted in a flurry of studies assessing quality of life (QoL) and patient satisfaction following body contouring surgery in this cohort of patients to establish an evidence base to support the idea that body contouring is as much (or even more) a functional procedure as it is cosmetic. However, the methods employed in these studies are seldom ideal, and hence the conclusions are unreliable. The gold standard to assess QoL and patient satisfaction is to use patient specific psychometrically validated patient reported outcome (PRO) measures. Developing such measures consists of a three-step process which includes a review of the current literature, qualitative patient interviews to determine what patients consider the most important, and expert opinion. This study aims to appraise the currently available literature on assessment of QoL and patient satisfaction in body contouring surgery patients. This will hopefully provide an understanding of methodological weaknesses in current studies and inform future investigators of the design of ideal instruments for assessing QoL and patient satisfaction in body contouring patients.

  13. Predictive Factors of Patient Satisfaction with Pharmacy Services in South Korea: A Cross-Sectional Study of National Level Data

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sunkyung; Godwin, Onyeka Peter; Kim, Kyungah; Lee, Euni

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Patient satisfaction has emerged as a prerequisite to improving patients’ health behaviors leading to better health care outcomes. This study was to identify predictive determinants for patient satisfaction with pharmacy services using national-level data. Methods A cross-sectional evaluation was conducted using 2008 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) data. To assess the predictive factors for patient satisfaction with pharmacy services, an ordinal logistic regression model was conducted adjusting for patient characteristics, clinical comorbidities, and perception of health. Results A total of 9,744 people, a representative sample of 48.2 million Koreans, participated in the 2008 KNHANES, of whom 2,188 (23.6%) reported visits to pharmacy within the last 2 weeks prior to the survey. Of the patients who visited the pharmacy, 74.6% reported to be either “very satisfied” or “satisfied,” and 25.4% responded as being “neutral,” “dissatisfied,” or “very dissatisfied.” A multivariate ordinal logistic regression analysis with weighted observations revealed that patients with fair perception of health (adjusted OR 1.32; 95% CI 1.01–1.74; p<0.05) and those with middle to low family incomes (adjusted OR 1.34; 95% CI 1.02–1.76; p<0.05) were more likely to be satisfied with pharmacy services, and employment-based insurers were less likely to be satisfied with pharmacy services (adjusted OR 0.80; 95% CI 0.65–0.97; p<0.05). Conclusion Our findings indicated that three out of four patients expressed satisfaction toward pharmacy services. Middle to low family incomes, fair perception of health, and employee insured individuals were significant predictors of patient satisfaction with pharmacy services. PMID:26540165

  14. Comparison of the efficacy of topical minoxidil 5% and adenosine 0.75% solutions on male androgenetic alopecia and measuring patient satisfaction rate.

    PubMed

    Faghihi, Gita; Iraji, Fariba; Rajaee Harandi, Manijeh; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad-Ali; Askari, Gholamreza

    2013-01-01

    According to the hypothesis on the stimulating effect of adenosine on increasing fibroblast growth factor 7 in dermal papilla cells and its vasorelaxant effect, we performed this study to compare the effect of topical minoxidil 5% and adenosine 0.75% on male pattern androgenetic alopecia. This prospective-randomized study recruited 110 male patients suffering from grade II-V Hamilton androgenetic alopecia. Fifty-five patients received minoxidil 5% (group 1) and adenosine 0.75% (group 2) each. Later, 16 patients were excluded due to allergic reactions or loss to follow up. After 3 and 6 months of treatment, complete and relative recovery rates alongside patient satisfaction rate (faster prevention of primary hair loss and appearance of newly grown hair) were compared between the groups. After 3 months of treatment, relative recovery was achieved in 2.4% and 1.9% of patients in group 1 and group 2, respectively, which was not significantly different (p=0.17). During 6 months, the relative recovery rate did not change either within or between the groups (p=0.99) and after 6 months none of the patients achieved complete recovery. However, the patient satisfaction rate was significantly higher in group 2 (p=0.003). In the light of the results, adenosine has no statistically superiority to minoxidil in the treatment of androgenetic alopecia according to recovery rates. However, the patients were significantly more satisfied with adenosine because of faster prevention of hair loss and appearance of the newly grown hairs. It seems further studies with larger sample size or different drug dosages are required to clarify the findings. PMID:24183218

  15. Patients' perceptions and satisfaction with treatment in a UK osteopathic training clinic.

    PubMed

    Strutt, Rita; Shaw, Quentin; Leach, Janine

    2008-10-01

    This study was a descriptive and exploratory investigation of patient perceptions of treatment at an osteopathic training clinic. An open text questionnaire survey was administered by post in 2000 to all 292 patients attending the clinic in south-east England in 1998-2000. The response rate was 62%. The data were transcribed and the concepts within the data were coded using grounded theory, within an interpretive phenomenological approach. The emergent core theme "underlying personal values" describes how patients manage their search for health. Four main themes were associated with the therapeutic relationship: hope, communication, respect, and trust. Two further themes emerged: one related to the environment of a teaching clinic; and a cross-checking theme described comparisons of the clinic with NHS services and other services. The majority of patients expressed satisfaction with treatment, the explanations they received and their perceived health outcomes. The question about comfort with the manner of treatment drew out important issues around undressing, privacy and gender. This was the first study of patient attitudes in an osteopathic training clinic and has implications for their organization and service delivery. Recommendations are made for the design of future studies in this area.

  16. Consumer satisfaction with occupational health services: should it be measured?

    PubMed Central

    Verbeek, J; van Dijk, F; Rasanen, K; Piirainen, H; Kankaanpaa, E; Hulshof, C

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To find answers in the literature to the questions if, why, and how consumer satisfaction with occupational health services (OHSs) should be measured.
METHODS—Publications about the concept of consumer satisfaction with health care and surveys of consumer satisfaction with occupational health care were reviewed.
RESULTS—For care providers, surveys of consumer satisfaction can be useful to improve quality or as indicators of non-compliant behaviour among patients. For clients, satisfaction surveys can be helpful for choosing between healthcare providers. Satisfaction is made up of an affective component of evaluation and a cognitive component of expectations. Also, in occupational health care, patient satisfaction is measured by dimensions such as the humanness and competence of the care provider similar to health care in general. However, there are dimensions that are specific to occupational health—such as the perceived independence of the physician, unclear reasons for visiting an OHS, and the perceived extent of knowledge of OHS professionals about the patient's working conditions. Dimensions of client satisfaction are mostly similar to patient satisfaction but include more businesslike aspects. They are different for the two groups of client, employers and employees. To measure consumer satisfaction in occupational healthcare specific questionnaires must be constructed. To achieve the highest possible reader satisfaction guidelines are provided for construction of a questionnaire.
CONCLUSIONS—Consumer satisfaction is a complex theoretical concept, but it is relatively easy to measure in practice and can be a valuable tool for quality improvement. Consumers' evaluations of occupational health services will become increasingly important due to changes in the organisation of occupational health care. Occupational healthcare providers are encouraged to measure the consumer satisfaction of their services.


Keywords: consumer

  17. Patient Satisfaction with Community Health Service Centers as Gatekeepers and the Influencing Factors: A Cross-Sectional Study in Shenzhen, China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huiqing; Lin, Yingyu; Dong, Xiaoxin; Yin, Xiaoxu; Lu, Zuxun; Cao, Shiyi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Shenzhen is the first pilot city in China implementing the gatekeeper policy, with community health service (CHS) centers as the gatekeepers. We aim to investigate patient satisfaction with this policy and its influencing factors in Shenzhen. Methods 3,848 patients visiting eight CHS centers in Shenzhen of China between May 1 and July 28, 2013 were recruited. We interviewed them using a structured questionnaire to investigate their satisfaction with the gatekeeper policy of CHS. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to identify influencing factors. Results Of the respondents, 28.17%, 47.27% and 24.56% were satisfied with, neutral to, and not satisfied with the gatekeeper policy respectively. Patient satisfaction with this policy was found to be associated with education level, familiarity with the policy, referral experience, satisfaction with convenience of seeing a doctor, satisfaction with waiting time, satisfaction with medical facility, satisfaction with general medical practitioners’ professional skill, and proportion of expense reimbursed. Conclusions Our investigation shows that patient satisfaction with the gatekeeper policy was low. To improve patient satisfaction, efforts should be made to increase the convenience of seeing a doctor in community, shorten waiting time, improve general medical practitioners’ professional skill, and increase proportion of expense reimbursement. PMID:27552228

  18. Impact of Sequencing of Postmastectomy Radiotherapy and Breast Reconstruction on Timing and Rate of Complications and Patient Satisfaction

    SciTech Connect

    Adesiyun, Tolulope A.; Lee, Bernard T.; Yueh, Janet H.; Chen, Chen; Colakoglu, Salih; Anderson, Katarina E.M.; Nguyen, Minh-Doan T.; Recht, Abram

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: There are few long-term studies of how the sequencing of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) and breast reconstruction (BR) affects the time to development of complications or patient satisfaction with BR. We therefore studied this issue. Methods and Materials: One hundred thirteen women who underwent BR at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (Boston, MA) from 1999-2006 and also received PMRT were included. Complications requiring surgery were categorized as early (within 90 days of BR) or late. The median length of follow-up after BR was 46.5 months. Patients' general and esthetic satisfaction was assessed with a validated questionnaire. Results: Complications occurred among 32% of 57 women receiving PMRT before BR and 44% of 57 patients having BR before PMRT (p = 0.176). Early complications were more frequent in patients who had PMRT first (18%) than for those with BR first (11%) (p = 0.210); conversely, late complication rates in the two groups were 14% and 33%, respectively (p = 0.009). General satisfaction was comparable between the PMRT-first and BR-first groups (68% and 68%, respectively; p = 0.995); esthetic satisfaction rates were also similar (50% and 62%, respectively; p = 0.238). Conclusions: The sequencing of PMRT and BR did not have a substantial impact on the total risk of complications or patients' general and esthetic satisfaction. However, early complications tended to develop in patients having PMRT first, whereas patients having BR first had a higher risk of late complications. Additional study of the effects of sequencing of PMRT on particular types of reconstructions may help devise strategies for reducing these risks.

  19. Patient satisfaction and uptake of private-sector run malaria diagnosis clinics in a post-conflict district in Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background With the incidence of malaria in Sri Lanka declining, intensive parasitological surveillance has been identified as a key strategy to achieve elimination by end 2014. Tropical and Environmental Diseases and Health Associates Private Limited (TEDHA) in collaboration with the Anti-Malaria Campaign established 43 malaria diagnostic laboratories (MDL) in four post-conflict districts of the Northern and Eastern Provinces. This study assesses the patterns of referral of patients with fever for malaria diagnosis by health care providers (HCPs) in four government hospitals in one of the districts of the Northern Province, and patient satisfaction with the laboratory services offered. Methods In this prospective descriptive study, data was collected on the proportion of fever patients being referred by the HCP in hospitals for malaria screening, and the proportion thereof who underwent screening. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was also used to assess patient satisfaction among those attending MDL, which was graded on a scale of 0–4. Results Of patients presenting to the hospitals with fever, only 44.3% were referred for malaria screening; 81.7% of them underwent screening. Referral depended largely on the presence of a permanent staff HCP. Satisfaction levels were high, with 86.55% giving an overall rating of 4. Comfort within the laboratory was rated satisfactory in three of the four hospitals. Conclusions This study demonstrates the success of a public-private partnership in the malaria control programme in Sri Lanka. Malaria is considered low on the differential diagnosis in patients with fever even in previously malaria-endemic areas, due to the declining incidence of malaria and the increase in other febrile illnesses in these areas during the recent past. Private sector run malaria diagnostic services provided free of charge within government hospitals are viable and effective, and had good patient satisfaction ratings. In a country on the

  20. Reconstructive surgery for hypospadias: A systematic review of long-term patient satisfaction with cosmetic outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Julie; Bracka, Aivar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Research on long-term results of hypospadias has focused on surgical techniques and functional outcomes, and it is only recently that patient satisfaction with appearance and psychosocial outcomes have been considered. The aim of this study was to provide an evidence-based systematic review of adolescent and adult patient perceptions of cosmetic outcomes following childhood surgery for hypospadias. Methods: A systematic review was performed in accordance with the PRISMA and PICO guidelines, and studies assessed using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine system. MEDLINE, PsycInfo, EMBASE, and CINAHL databases were searched from 1974 to 2014 for clinical studies containing patient perceptions of appearance, deformity, and social embarrassment following hypospadias surgery. Results: A total of 495 publications were retrieved, of which 28 met the inclusion criteria. Due to study design/outcome measure, heterogeneity data were synthesized narratively. Results indicate (i) patient perceptions of penile size do not differ greatly from the norm; (ii) perceptions of appearance findings are inconsistent, partially due to improving surgical techniques; (iii) patients who are approaching, or have reached, sexual maturity hold more negative perceptions and are more critical about the cosmetic outcomes of surgery than their prepubertal counterparts; (iv) patients report high levels of perceptions of deformity and social embarrassment; and (v) there is a lack of data using validated measurement tools assessing long-term patient perceptions of cosmetic outcomes, particularly with patients who have reached genital maturity. Conclusions: Protocols for clinical postpuberty follow-up and methodologically sound studies, using validated assessment tools, are required for the accurate assessment of cosmetic and psychological outcomes of hypospadias surgery. PMID:27127350

  1. Utility of retrospective pretest ratings of patient satisfaction with health status.

    PubMed

    Kreulen, Grace J; Stommel, Manfred; Gutek, Barbara A; Burns, Lawton R; Braden, Carrie Jo

    2002-06-01

    Outcomes assessment is often difficult to accomplish in evaluation research studies in situations where the gathering of pretest data is impossible or prohibitively expensive. The purpose of this longitudinal study was to investigate the substitutability of retrospective pretest ratings for actual pretest ratings in indexing change in patient satisfaction with health status. The sample consisted of 251 women receiving medical treatment for breast cancer enrolled in the Self-Help Intervention Project (SHIP). ANOVA, ordinary least-squares regression, and pooled time-series regression analysis revealed that retrospective assessments were not significantly different from their prospective counterparts in means and variances and that they differed from current assessments taken at the same time (p<.01). In addition, prospective assessments emerged as a significant independent predictor of corresponding retrospective scores (p<.01), accounting for up to 30% of the recall scores. These findings have implications for inclusion of retrospective pre-post comparisons in outcomes evaluation research.

  2. Development and psychometric evaluation of the FACE-Q satisfaction with appearance scale: a new patient-reported outcome instrument for facial aesthetics patients.

    PubMed

    Pusic, Andrea L; Klassen, Anne F; Scott, Amie M; Cano, Stefan J

    2013-04-01

    Satisfaction with appearance and improved quality of life are key outcomes for patients undergoing facial aesthetic procedures. The FACE-Q is a new patient-reported outcome (PRO) instrument encompassing a suite of independently functioning scales designed to measure a range of important outcomes for facial aesthetics patients. FACE-Q scales were developed with strict adherence to international guidelines for PRO instrument development. This article describes the development and psychometric evaluation of the core FACE-Q scale, the Satisfaction with Facial Appearance scale. Both modern and traditional psychometric methods were used to confirm that this new 10-item scale is a reliable, valid, and responsive measure.

  3. Satisfaction With Methadone Among Heroin-Dependent Patients With Current Substance Use Disorders During Methadone Maintenance Treatment.

    PubMed

    Perez de Los Cobos, Jose; Trujols, Joan; Siñol, Núria; Duran-Sindreu, Santiago; Batlle, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) has long been used to treat heroin-dependent patients. However, satisfaction with methadone in this patient population is unknown. The aim of this cross-sectional case-control study was to evaluate satisfaction with methadone in heroin-dependent patients with current substance use disorders (SUDs). Cases included 152 methadone-maintained patients with current SUD, requiring inpatient detoxification treatment, and controls included 33 methadone-maintained patients in sustained full remission for SUD. Satisfaction with methadone as a medication to treat heroin addiction was measured by using the Scale to Assess Satisfaction with Medications for Addiction Treatment-methadone for heroin addiction (SASMAT-METHER). The SASMAT-METHER subscales assess the following domains: personal functioning and well-being, antiaddictive effect on heroin, and antiaddictive effect on other substances. Compared with patients with remitted SUD, patients with current SUD scored lower on all SASMAT-METHER assessments. In such patients, overall SASMAT-METHER scores were independently and negatively associated with downward desired adjustment of methadone dose and days of heroin use during last month; although various sets of factors were independently associated with each of the SASMAT-METHER subscales, the only determinant of dissatisfaction on all subscales was the desire for downward adjustment of methadone dose. In summary, MMT patients with current SUD are less satisfied with methadone than MMT patients with remitted SUD. In patients with current SUD, downward desired adjustment of methadone dose and days of heroin use during last month are independently associated with overall dissatisfaction with methadone. PMID:26825608

  4. Developing a patient satisfaction questionnaire for services provided in Iranian community pharmacies

    PubMed Central

    Yaghoubifard, Saeed; Rashidian, Arash; Kebriaeezadeh, Abbas; Sheidaei, Ali; Varmaghani, Mehdi; Hashemi-Meshkini, Amir; Zekri, Hedieh-Sadat

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To develop a valid and reliable instrument in the Persian language for evaluating patient satisfaction with services provided in community pharmacies. Methods: We selected a valid and reliable instrument from the literature and translated it to the Persian language. Some new items were added to the first draft based on the special characteristics of the Iranian health system. Then, the feasibility of utilizing the new instrument was assessed. In the third step, we conducted a formal content validity study to calculate content validity indices. Having completed the content validity study, the factorial structure of new instruments was determined by implementing a factorial analysis. Finally, the reliability of the instrument was assessed by assessment of Cronbach's alpha coefficient and test-retest reliability. Findings: The developed instrument demonstrated suitable validity and reliability. The final instrument showed desirable content validity, with inter-rater agreement of 94% and 97% for relevance and clarity, respectively. Scale content validity indices for relevance and clarity were calculated as 96% and 92%, respectively, and comprehensiveness was calculated as 100%. Factor analysis resulted in seven factors with a cumulative variance of 62.14%. In internal consistency reliability, Cronbach's alpha for the whole instrument was 0.912. About test-retest reliability, six items showed almost perfect agreement, 18 items showed substantial agreement, and three items showed moderate agreement. Therefore, test-retest reliability assessment too demonstrated appropriate results. Conclusion: The instrument demonstrated excellent validity and reliability for application in Iran. This instrument is useful for evaluating patient satisfaction with services provided in community pharmacies in the Persian-speaking communities. PMID:27162804

  5. Improving customer satisfaction and quality: hospitals recognized by J.D. power and associates share insights on meeting patient and employee needs.

    PubMed

    2003-08-01

    For 35 years, J.D. Power and Associates has presented its much-coveted awards recognizing product and service quality and customer satisfaction in a variety of industries. This year, the company added a new category: hospitals. To better understand patients' reactions to their hospital experiences, the company looked at five key drivers of customer satisfaction: dignity and respect, speed and efficiency, comfort, information and communication, and emotional support. This issue looks at five hospitals recognized by the company for their service excellence and why they emphasize employee satisfaction as well as patient satisfaction. PMID:12961834

  6. Visual acuity and patient satisfaction at varied distances and lighting conditions after implantation of an aspheric diffractive multifocal one-piece intraocular lens

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Daniel H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study is to evaluate the visual acuity and patient satisfaction at varied distances under photopic and mesopic lighting conditions in patients bilaterally implanted with aspheric diffractive multifocal one-piece intraocular lenses. Methods In this retrospective–prospective study, 16 patients with a mean age of 66.2±9.2 years (range: 50–81 years) who had undergone bilateral phacoemulsification surgery with implantation of a Tecnis multifocal one-piece intraocular lens (ZMB00) were evaluated. Monocular and binocular uncorrected and distance-corrected visual acuities were measured at distance (20 ft), intermediate (70–80 cm), and near (35–40 cm) under photopic (85 cd/m2) and mesopic (3 cd/m2) lighting conditions and were compared using the paired t-test. All patients also completed a subjective questionnaire. Results At a mean follow-up of 9.5±3.9 months, distance, near, and intermediate visual acuity improved significantly from preoperative acuity. Under photopic and mesopic conditions, 93.8% and 62.5% of patients, respectively, had binocular uncorrected intermediate visual acuity of 20/40 or better, and 62.5% and 31.3% of patients had binocular uncorrected near visual acuity of 20/20 or better. All patients were satisfied with their overall vision without using glasses and/or contact lenses when compared with before surgery. A total of 87.5% of patients reported no glare and 68.8% of patients reported no halos around lights at night. Conclusion Tecnis multifocal one-piece intraocular lenses provide good distance, intermediate, and near visual acuity under photopic as well as mesopic lighting conditions. High levels of spectacle independence with low levels of photic phenomenon were achieved, resulting in excellent patient satisfaction. PMID:27536061

  7. Patient satisfaction and time-saving implications of a nurse-led nipple and areola reconstitution service following breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Potter, S; Barker, J; Willoughby, L; Perrott, E; Cawthorn, S J; Sahu, A K

    2007-06-01

    Nipple tattooing is a safe and effective technique for restoration of the nipple-areola complex following breast reconstruction and has a positive impact on patient well-being and body image. This procedure is usually performed by a surgeon, but following appropriate training, a nurse-led nipple tattooing service was established in our unit in December 2005. All 14 patients who had undergone nipple tattooing over a 6 month period were contacted by telephone and questioned about their cosmetic results and satisfaction with the service. Hundred percent of patients were 'satisfied' with their tattoo and all patients rated the nurse-led service as 'excellent'. It was estimated that 20h of consultant time was saved. Our study demonstrates that a nurse-led service is associated with both excellent cosmetic outcomes and high levels of patient satisfaction. It also results in a significant saving of consultant time allowing more effective use of clinic and theatre resources. PMID:17241786

  8. Integrated case management for work-related upper-extremity disorders: impact of patient satisfaction on health and work status.

    PubMed

    Feuerstein, Michael; Huang, Grant D; Ortiz, Jose M; Shaw, William S; Miller, Virginia I; Wood, Patricia M

    2003-08-01

    An integrated case management (ICM) approach (ergonomic and problem-solving intervention) to work-related upper-extremity disorders was examined in relation to patient satisfaction, future symptom severity, function, and return to work (RTW). Federal workers with work-related upper-extremity disorder workers' compensation claims (n = 205) were randomly assigned to usual care or ICM intervention. Patient satisfaction was assessed after the 4-month intervention period. Questionnaires on clinical outcomes and ergonomic exposure were administered at baseline and at 6- and 12-months postintervention. Time from intervention to RTW was obtained from an administrative database. ICM group assignment was significantly associated with greater patient satisfaction. Regression analyses found higher patient satisfaction levels predicted decreased symptom severity and functional limitations at 6 months and a shorter RTW. At 12 months, predictors of positive outcomes included male gender, lower distress, lower levels of reported ergonomic exposure, and receipt of ICM. Findings highlight the utility of targeting workplace ergonomic and problem solving skills. PMID:12915782

  9. Students' Expectations of, and Experiences in E-Learning: Their Relation to Learning Achievements and Course Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paechter, Manuela; Maier, Brigitte; Macher, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Within only a few years, the use of e-learning has increased rapidly in Austria. In certain subjects, up to 60% of university students report using e-learning platforms at least "sometimes" or "frequently" (Unger & Wroblewski, 2006). Yet, which aspects of e-learning do students consider important for their learning achievements and course…

  10. The Use of a Mobile Learning Management System at an Online University and Its Effect on Learning Satisfaction and Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Won Sug; Kang, Minseok

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates online students' acceptance of mobile learning and its influence on learning achievement using an information system success and extended technology acceptance model (TAM). Structural equation modeling was used to test the structure of individual, social, and systemic factors influencing mobile learning's acceptance, and…

  11. Examining the Impact of Patient-Reported Hope for Improvement and Patient Satisfaction with Clinician/Treatment on the Outcome of Major Depressive Disorder Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Vilhauer, Jennice; Kwock, Richard; Wu, Fan; Gohar, Sherif; Collison, Katherine; Thomas, Shannon Nicole; Naghdechi, Lancer; Elashoff, David

    2016-01-01

    Aims This analysis aims at examining if patient-reported variables such as hope for improvement and patient satisfaction with clinician/treatment could influence the outcome major depressive disorder (MDD) treatment, namely depression remission, in the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) trial. Study Design Retrospective cohort study. Place and Duration of Study The STAR*D study was conducted at 18 primary care and 23 psychiatric care settings in the United States from 2001–2007 and was funded by the National Institute of Mental health (NIMH). The analysis contained in this manuscript was conceptualized at the Cedars-Sinai Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences and performed at the UCLA School of Public Health. Methodology Using data from STAR*D, the current study used logistic regression and survival analyses to examine the relationship between depressive symptoms remission and two sets of self-reported factors: Hope for improvement and, Patient satisfaction with treatment/clinician. Results First, more than 90% of STAR*D patients reported having high hope for improvement (agree or strongly agree) and more than 66% endorsed high satisfaction with clinicians and more than 50% expressed high satisfaction with treatments (very or mostly satisfied). Second, hope for improvement was predictive of depression remission (p<0.05). Third, satisfaction with clinician/treatment, did not predict remission. Conclusion This study shows the impact that patients’ subjective hope for improvement can have on predicting depression remission in contrast to satisfaction with clinician/treatment. Future studies should prospectively incorporate patients’ subjective attitudes regarding hope for improvement and satisfaction with clinicians and treatments as mediators and moderators of MDD treatment success. PMID:27294164

  12. Music for patients with hematological malignancies undergoing bone marrow biopsy: a randomized controlled study of anxiety, perceived pain, and patient satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Danhauer, Suzanne C.; Vishnevsky, Tanya; Campbell, Cassie R.; McCoy, Thomas P.; Tooze, Janet A.; Kanipe, Katherine N.; Arrington, Sheila A.; Holland, Elizabeth K.; Lynch, Mary B.; Hurd, David D.; Cruz, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the impact of random assignment to music versus usual care on anxiety, perceived pain level and patient satisfaction in patients undergoing bone marrow biopsies. Method Patients were randomized to music or usual care after completing a baseline questionnaire. All patients completed a post-procedure questionnaire. Results Study participants (N=59) had a mean age of 50.9 years (SD = 13.9; range 22–78). Post-procedure state anxiety (STAI) and pain rating (VAS) were not significantly different between groups (STAI p=0.766; VAS p=0.771). However, patient satisfaction with music was high; 66% of these patients said they very much preferred to listen to music at a future biopsy. Conclusions While there were no significant group differences for the music intervention compared to standard of care for anxiety or perceived pain, additional feedback indicated that patients found the music intervention beneficial and requested use of music during future procedures. PMID:24619452

  13. Faculty Satisfaction in Academic Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyquist, Julie G.; Hitchcock, Maurice A.; Teherani, Arianne

    2000-01-01

    Describes the challenges and elements of satisfaction in academic medicine. Proposes a model of academic faculty satisfaction which postulates that organizational, job-related, and personal factors combine to develop self-knowledge, social knowledge, and satisfaction with outcomes of productivity, retention, and learner-patient satisfaction. (DB)

  14. A Retrospective Study of Cleft lip and palate Patients' Satisfaction after Maxillary Distraction or Traditional Advancement of the Maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Nørholt, Sven Erik; Küseler, Annelise; Jensen, John; Pedersen, Thomas Klit

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To compare cleft lip and palate patients' satisfaction with aesthetics and functional parameters after conventional advancement of the maxilla or by the use of distraction osteogenesis. Material and methods Case series observational study. Group of distraction osteogenesis (DO) consisted of 15 patients treated with distraction osteogenesis while group conventional (CONV) included 10 patients treated with traditional advancement of the maxilla. Patients were asked to fill out a questionnaire about their subjective evaluation of satisfaction with facial aesthetics and functional parameters on a continuous visual analog-scale (VAS) when the treatment was finished. Results The total response rate was 76%. Preoperatively the two groups did not differ significantly according to group characteristics. At follow-up both groups were satisfied with aesthetics and functional parameters. The DO group was less satisfied with the duration of the treatment than the CONV group. There were no statistically significant differences among the groups regarding functional parameters or facial aesthetics. Conclusions Cleft lip and palate patients experienced a high level of satisfaction with functional parameters and aesthetics as a result of surgical maxillary advancement. The patients treated with distraction osteogenesis were less satisfied with the duration of the treatment. Further studies are needed. PMID:24422010

  15. Is patient satisfaction in primary care dependent on structural and organizational characteristics among providers? Findings based on data from the national patient survey in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Glenngård, Anna H

    2013-07-01

    In parallel to market-like reforms in Swedish primary care, the gathering and compilation of comparative information about providers, for example through survey tools, has been improved. Such information is increasingly being used to guide individuals' choice of provider and payers' assessments of provider performance, often without critically reflecting about underlying factors affecting the results. The purpose of this study was to analyze variation in patient satisfaction, with respect to organizational and structural factors, including the mix of registered individuals, among primary care providers, based on information from a national patient survey in primary care and register data in three Swedish county councils. Systematic variation in patient satisfaction was found with respect to both organizational and structural factors, including characteristics of registered individuals. Smaller practices and practices where a high proportion of all visits were with a doctor were associated with higher patient satisfaction. Also practices where registered individuals had a low level of social deprivation and a high overall illness on average were associated with higher patient satisfaction. Factors that are of relevance for how well providers perform according to patient surveys are more or less possible to control for providers. This adds to the complexity for the use of such information by individuals and payers to assess provider performance. PMID:23040560

  16. Reliability and validity of a new measure of patient satisfaction with out of hours primary medical care in the United Kingdom: development of a patient questionnaire.

    PubMed Central

    McKinley, R. K.; Manku-Scott, T.; Hastings, A. M.; French, D. P.; Baker, R.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a reliable, valid measure of patient satisfaction with out of hours care suitable for large scale service evaluation. DESIGN: Focus group meetings and semistructured interviews with patients to identify issues of importance to patients and possible questionnaire items; interviews and two pilot studies to test and identify new questionnaire items; modification or removal of items to eliminate ambiguity and reduce non-response and skewed responses; questionnaire survey of out of hours care. SETTING: Greater Manchester and Leicester. SUBJECTS: 11 general practice patients participated in the focus groups and 28 in the semistructured interviews; 41 in the preliminary interviews; 41 and 378 in the postal pilots; and 1466 in the survey of out of hours care. RESULTS: A 32 item questionnaire was developed. Component analysis indicated seven scales (satisfaction with communication and management, doctor's attitude, continuity of care, delay until visit, access to out of hours care, initial contact person, telephone advice) related to overall satisfaction and containing issues identified as important to patients. Levels of reliability were satisfactory, Cronbach's alpha correlation coefficient exceeding 0.60 for all scales. CONCLUSION: A reliable, valid measure of patient satisfaction has been developed, suitable for large scale evaluation of out of hours care. PMID:9022436

  17. The representation of patient experience and satisfaction in physician rating sites. A criteria-based analysis of English- and German-language sites

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Information on patient experience and satisfaction with individual physicians could play an important role for performance measures, improved health care and health literacy. Physician rating sites (PRSs) bear the potential to be a widely available source for this kind of information. However, patient experience and satisfaction are complex constructs operationalized by multiple dimensions. The way in which PRSs allow users to express and rate patient experience and satisfaction could likely influence the image of doctors in society and the self-understanding of both doctors and patients. This study examines the extent to which PRSs currently represent the constructs of patient experience and satisfaction. Methods First, a systematic review of research instruments for measuring patient experience and satisfaction was conducted. The content of these instruments was analyzed qualitatively to create a comprehensive set of dimensions for patient experience and patient satisfaction. Second, PRSs were searched for systematically in English-language and German-language search engines of Google and Yahoo. Finally, we classified every structured question asked by the different PRS using the set of dimensions of patient experience and satisfaction. Results The qualitative content analysis of the measurement instruments produced 13 dimensions of patient experience and satisfaction. We identified a total of 21 PRSs. No PRSs represented all 13 dimensions of patient satisfaction and experience with its structured questions. The 3 most trafficked English-language PRS represent between 5 and 6 dimensions and the 3 most trafficked German language PRSs between 8 and 11 dimensions The dimensions for patient experience and satisfaction most frequently represented in PRSs included diversely operationalized ones such as professional competence and doctor-patient relationship/support. However, other less complex but nevertheless important dimensions such as communication

  18. High self-assessment of disability and the surgeon's recommendation against surgical intervention may negatively impact satisfaction scores in patients with spinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Marcus D; McEvoy, Sara; Schmidt, Meic H; Bisson, Erica F

    2015-06-01

    OBJECT Patient satisfaction scores have become a common metric for health care quality. Because satisfaction scores are right-skewed, even small differences in mean scores can have a large impact. Little information, however, is available on the specific factors that play a role in satisfaction in patients with spinal disorders. The authors investigated whether disability severity and the surgeon's recommendation for or against surgical intervention were associated with patient satisfaction scores. METHODS The authors conducted a retrospective cohort study involving adult patients who were referred to a spine surgeon for an outpatient evaluation of back pain. Patients completed the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) before their clinic appointment and a Press Ganey patient satisfaction survey after their visit. Patients were grouped by self-assessed disability severity: mild to moderate (ODI < 40%) and severe (≥ 40%). Satisfaction scores were graded from 0 (very poor) to 100 (very good). Nonparametric tests were used to evaluate the association between patient satisfaction and current disability self-assessment. The authors also investigated whether the surgeon's recommendation against surgery negatively affected patient satisfaction. RESULTS One hundred thirty patients completed the ODI questionnaire before and satisfaction surveys after seeing a spine surgeon for a new outpatient back pain consultation. Of these, 68 patients had severe disability, 62 had mild to moderate disability, 67 received a recommendation for surgery, and 63 received a recommendation against surgery. Composite satisfaction scores were lower among patients who had severe disability than among those with mild to moderate disability (median [interquartile range]: 91.7 [83.7-96.4] vs 95.8 [91.0-99.3], respectively; p = 0.0040). Patients who received a recommendation against surgery reported lower satisfaction scores than those who received a recommendation for surgery (91.7 [83.5-95.8] vs 95

  19. Effect of Patient's Personality on Satisfaction with Their Present Complete Denture and after Increasing the Occlusal Vertical Dimension: A Study of Edentulous Egyptian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fouda, Shaimaa M.; Al-Attar, Mohamed S.; Virtanen, Jorma I.; Raustia, Aune

    2014-01-01

    Complete denture wearers often find it difficult to accept a new denture. Personality traits are among the factors that possibly affect patient satisfaction with a complete denture. Our aim was to investigate the influence of patients' personality on satisfaction with their present denture and after an increase in the occlusal vertical dimension (OVD). Sixty edentulous patients with complete dentures (22 men and 38 women, mean age 66 years, and range 50–75 years) participated in the study. The age of their complete dentures ranged from 5 to 16 years. Patients' personalities were evaluated using the Arabic version of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. Their satisfaction with their dentures before and after restoration of the OVD and relining of the mandibular denture was evaluated using two questionnaires (I and II), Patients with a high score of neuroticism were less satisfied with their original dentures and after relining and an increase of OVD compared with patients with an average score in that trait. The personality trait of psychoticism was significant to patients' acceptance of an increase in OVD; that is, patients with a high score were less satisfied with their dentures after increase of OVD than patients with an average score. It is concluded that personality traits affect patients' acceptance of their complete dentures. PMID:25110475

  20. Effects of music therapy on patient satisfaction and health-related quality of life of hospital inpatients.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Susan E; Davis, Beth A; Secic, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    The matched-case control study investigated the effect of inpatient music therapy (MT), including the gift of a compact disc, on patient satisfaction and quality of life. Overall rating of the hospital and likelihood to recommend it (n = 210), and SF-12 quality of life scores (n = 160) were compared between groups. Although no significant difference in overall hospital rating was found, MT patients' recommendation scores were higher (p =.02). The MT patients had marginally better quality of life pain scores (p =.06). Integration of MT with inpatient care can improve the likelihood that patients will recommend the hospital and may impact their perception of pain.

  1. Patient satisfaction with complete dentures fabricated using two neutral zone techniques: a within-subject cross-over pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ladha, Komal; Gupta, Rekha; Gill, Shubhra; Verma, Mahesh

    2014-06-01

    Several studies have compared complete dentures fabricated using conventional and neutral zone (NZ) techniques. However, studies comparing patient satisfaction with complete dentures fabricated using swallowing and phonetic NZ techniques are lacking in literature. To compare patient satisfaction with the complete dentures fabricated using the two NZ techniques. To compare the bucco-lingual dimensions of the NZ records obtained with these techniques. Ten completely edentulous subjects dissatisfied with their existing mandibular complete dentures participated in the study. Five subjects first received the swallowing neutral zone (SNZ) dentures and five the phonetic neutral zone (PNZ) dentures. Tissue conditioner was used as the recording material in both the techniques. After having worn the prosthesis for a minimum of 2 months, subjects responded to a questionnaire that measured their perceptions of various factors associated with the prosthesis. The prostheses were then changed and the procedures repeated. Student t test and non-parametric Mann-Whitney tests were used for statistical analysis. Level of statistical significance was set p < 0.05. There was no statistical significant difference in patient satisfaction with the SNZ and PNZ complete dentures for all the variables assessed. Statistical significant difference was observed for majority of the variables when the two NZ dentures were compared with patients' old dentures. The difference in the mean dimensions of the two NZ records was also found to be statistically insignificant except in the maxillary left premolar region. The study indicated that patient satisfaction with the complete dentures fabricated using SNZ technique did not significantly differ from that of the PNZ technique. Data gathered at the final appointment showed that SNZ dentures were preferred by the patients with regards to esthetics, stability, comfort and ability to chew. For ability to speak, mixed preferences were found.

  2. 2015 Arte Poster Competition First Place Winner: Assessing the Correlation Between Patient Anxiety and Satisfaction for Mohs Surgery.

    PubMed

    Locke, Maren C; Wilkerson, Eric C; Mistur, Rachel L; Nisar, Mahrukh; Love, W Elliot

    2015-09-01

    Skin cancer and the surgical treatment thereof have the potential to be sources of great anxiety for patients. Examination of patient satisfaction, anxiety, and contributing factors has the potential to provide information surgeons can use to implement practices that have an impact on patient anxiety and satisfaction regarding dermatologic surgery. This study used a prospective interview to catalog patients' anxiety and experiences before and during the surgical process. Our results indicate that several pre- and perioperative factors have the potential to decrease a patient's overall anxiety. Notably, 33% of surgical patients reported a decrease in anxiety from the time of diagnosis until the day of surgery. Factors that contributed to this included a call discussing the diagnosis and what to expect on the day of surgery as well as reading written material or searching the internet for more information regarding the procedure. Furthermore, a call from the physician compared to a call from a nurse or other team member showed a greater effect on decreasing anxiety. During the surgical procedure, our results highlight several factors that can decrease a patient's anxiety. Most notably, eating, watching TV, bringing a guest, and engaging in small talk with surgeon and staff during the procedure subjectively decreased patients' anxiety. In summary, our results suggest that patients respond to a variety of factors to reduce anxiety and that each patient derives relief from anxiety in different manners. Therefore, offering a spectrum of comforting or distracting activities during the Mohs procedure is ideal and may reduce the need for pharmacologic anxiolytics.

  3. WBRT vs. APBI: an interim report of patient satisfaction and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bitter, Samantha M.; Heffron-Cartwright, Patricia; Wennerstrom, Christopher; Weatherford, Jared; Einstein, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine differences in patient's reported quality of life and self-reported breast cosmesis between whole breast radiation therapy (WBRT) and accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) via single and multi-lumen high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for women with early stage breast cancer. Material and methods Patient information was retrospectively reviewed and survey data were prospectively collected for women treated between 2004 to 2014 (APBI) and 2012 to 2014 (WBRT). Criteria for APBI treatments were ER+ (after 2010), N0 (after 2010), T < 3 cm, and post-menopausal. All patients were given a survey with modified FACIT (Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy) breast quality of life questions to rate their amount of pain, self-consciousness, low energy, presence of lymphedema, and breast cosmesis. Results 242 APBI patients and 59 WBRT patients were identified. In the WBRT cohort, 34 women met departmental criteria for APBI treatment (WBRT who were APBI eligible). The FACIT survey was completed by 80 women treated with APBI (33%; mean follow-up time of 14 months), and 26 women treated with WBRT who were APBI eligible (76%; mean follow-up time of 26 months). During the first year post-treatment, low energy (p = 0.009), self-consciousness (p = 0.0004), and lymphedema (p = 0.0002) scores were significantly lower in the APBI cohort when compared to women treated with WBRT who were APBI eligible. During the second year post-treatment, women treated with APBI reported significantly better breast cosmesis (p = 0.04). The single-lumen balloon (score = 6.3/10) was found to be associated with worse cosmesis compared to the multi-lumen balloons (Mammosite ML and Contura; score = 8.2/10; p = 0.002). There were no significant differences in rates of recurrence between balloons or treatments (p > 0.05). Conclusions APBI treated patients reported higher cosmetic satisfaction than patients in the matched WBRT cohort. Quality of life scores tended to

  4. [Psychosocial Situation and Patient Satisfaction among Clients of Cancer Counselling Centers in Saxony].

    PubMed

    Götze, Heide; Röder, Heiko; Frenschkowski, Sandra; Mehnert, Anja

    2016-07-01

    Outpatient psychosocial counselling (OPC) centers for those affected by cancer fulfill 2 main purposes: (a) to offer low-threshold psychological, social and legal counselling, and (b) to refer clients to other services. Here we report findings from a user-based assessment of OPC in the state of Saxony, Germany. This study was funded in part by the Saxon State Ministry of Social Affairs and Consumer Protection. We used a paper-based questionnaire to survey 213 clients of OPC in Saxony at 2 points (t1: up to one week after first contact, t2: 4 months after t1). All participants were cancer patients. The survey assessed utilization of services, depressive symptoms (PHQ-9), anxiety (GAD-7), quality of life (SF-8) as well as clients' satisfaction with the counselling service (ZUF-8). The majority of clients (81%) were referred to the OPC from a hospital or rehabilitation center. 46% of patients only had one contact. 78% of counselling sessions treated matters of social law. Patients suffered from 13 problems on average, the most common being fatigue and exhaustion, worries, anxiety, uncertainty about the future, and pain. Half the patients (49%) reported moderate to severe anxiety and 68% showed elevated levels of depressive symptoms. Psychosocial distress did not change significantly over time (GAD-7: p=0.580, PHQ-9: p=0.101). Patients' quality of life was low overall (cut-off<50). At t2, quality of life had particularly increased in physical aspects, but overall quality of life remained lower than in the general population (all subscales: p<0.05). We identified younger age and lower income as risk factors for higher psychosocial distress and lower quality of life. Patients were very satisfied with the counselling they received, 9% reported to be dissatisfied. Our results show that psychosocial distress remains high over a longer period of time at least for some patients. This illustrates the persisting need for long-term support regarding physical, mental and social

  5. Lanthanum carbonate oral powder: satisfaction, preference and adherence in French and Spanish patients with end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Michael; de Sequera, Patricia; Clair, François; Pedersini, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Phosphate binders, such as lanthanum carbonate, control elevated serum-phosphate levels in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Lanthanum carbonate is available in oral powder and tablet form. The aim of this survey was to investigate satisfaction with, preference for, and adherence to lanthanum carbonate oral powder in patients with ESRD. Scope Patients from France and Spain who had been taking lanthanum carbonate powder for at least 4 weeks, and who had experience of other phosphate binders of any formulation, were asked to complete an online or telephone survey. Treatment satisfaction was measured using the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication-9; preference was measured using 5-point Likert scale agreement ratings; and adherence was measured using the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-4. Data were evaluated using bivariate analyses. Findings Overall, 160 patients participated (80 per country). Lanthanum carbonate powder was reported to have a higher effectiveness rating (p<0.05), be more convenient (p<0.05), and provide a higher level of satisfaction (p<0.01) than previous binders. There was an overall preference for lanthanum carbonate powder over previous binders of any formulation (p<0.001). Adherence to medication was similar for all binders analysed: 66.3% of French patients adhered to lanthanum carbonate powder, and 65.0% adhered to previous binder treatment (p=not significant); 52.5% of Spanish patients adhered to lanthanum carbonate powder, and 56.3% adhered to previous binder treatment (p=not significant). Limitations The survey enrolled patients who had already experienced phosphate binders before the study began. Information on patient preferences for and adherence to previous phosphate binders was therefore based on the patients’ memories of these experiences, which may have been subject to change over time. Although most participants completed the online survey in this study, a telephone survey was used for

  6. Does Spanish instruction for emergency medicine resident physicians improve patient satisfaction in the emergency department and adherence to medical recommendations?

    PubMed Central

    Stoneking, LR; Waterbrook, AL; Garst Orozco, J; Johnston, D; Bellafiore, A; Davies, C; Nuño, T; Fatás-Cabeza, J; Beita, O; Ng, V; Grall, KH; Adamas-Rappaport, W

    2016-01-01

    Background After emergency department (ED) discharge, Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency are less likely than English-proficient patients to be adherent to medical recommendations and are more likely to be dissatisfied with their visit. Objectives To determine if integrating a longitudinal medical Spanish and cultural competency curriculum into emergency medicine residency didactics improves patient satisfaction and adherence to medical recommendations in Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency. Methods Our ED has two Emergency Medicine Residency Programs, University Campus (UC) and South Campus (SC). SC program incorporates a medical Spanish and cultural competency curriculum into their didactics. Real-time Spanish surveys were collected at SC ED on patients who self-identified as primarily Spanish-speaking during registration and who were treated by resident physicians from both residency programs. Surveys assessed whether the treating resident physician communicated in the patient’s native Spanish language. Follow-up phone calls assessed patient satisfaction and adherence to discharge instructions. Results Sixty-three patients self-identified as primarily Spanish-speaking from August 2014 to July 2015 and were initially included in this pilot study. Complete outcome data were available for 55 patients. Overall, resident physicians spoke Spanish 58% of the time. SC resident physicians spoke Spanish with 66% of the patients versus 45% for UC resident physicians. Patients rated resident physician Spanish ability as very good in 13% of encounters – 17% for SC versus 5% for UC. Patient satisfaction with their ED visit was rated as very good in 35% of encounters – 40% for SC resident physicians versus 25% for UC resident physicians. Of the 13 patients for whom Spanish was the language used during the medical encounter who followed medical recommendations, ten (77%) of these encounters were with SC resident physicians

  7. Study of patient satisfaction in a surgical unit of a tertiary care teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, P.H.; Gupta, Shakti

    2012-01-01

    Background The hospitals have evolved from being an isolated sanatorium to a place with five star facilities. Patients and their relatives coming to the hospital not only expect world-class treatment, but also other facilities to make their stay comfortable in the hospital. This change in expectation has come due to tremendous growth of media and its exposure, as well as commercialization and improvement in facilities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of patient/relatives satisfaction at tertiary care teaching hospital and feedback from them for improvement of the same. Methods The study was conducted by 1. Review of available national and international literature on the subject. 2. Carrying out survey amongst 50 patients and their relatives at one of the surgical unit by using structured questionnaire. 3. By analyzing the data using appropriate statistical methods. Results Eighty two percent people were satisfied with the service at admission counter while 81% were satisfied with room preparation at the time of admission. The nursing services satisfied 80% of people while 92% were satisfied with explanation about disease and treatment by doctor. The behavior of nurses, doctors and orderlies satisfied 92, 92 and 83% of people. The cleanliness of toilets satisfied only 49% while diet services satisfied 78% of people. Conclusion The five major satisfiers were behavior of doctors, explanation about disease and treatment, courtesy of staff at admission counter, behavior and cooperation of nurses. The five major dissatisfiers were cleanliness of toilets, quality of food, explanation about rules and regulation, behavior of orderlies and sanitary attendant and room preparedness. PMID:25983455

  8. Complementary and Alternative Medicine use, Patient Reported Outcomes, and Treatment Satisfaction among Men with Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Scott D.; Zeliadt, Steven B.; Blough, David K.; Fedorenko, Catherine R.; Fairweather, Megan E.; McDermott, Cara L.; Penson, David F.; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K.; Hamilton, Ann S.; Arora, Neeraj K.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We sought to evaluate the association between complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use, satisfaction with treatment, and patient-reported outcomes following treatment. Methods The Prostate CAncer Therapy Selection Study (PCATS) prospectively surveyed patients newly diagnosed with localized prostate cancer about their treatment decision making process and outcomes. The PCATS study recruited patients in three geographic areas through hospital-based urology clinics and community urology practices. Results More than 700 patients completed the baseline and follow-up surveys. More than 50% of respondents reported using CAM, 39% if prayer was excluded as a type of CAM. In multivariate analysis, factors related to communication with the treating physician, but not CAM use, were associated with treatment satisfaction. The likelihood of stability or improvement in urinary, bowel, and sexual function at 6 months was related to the choice of primary therapy, but unrelated to CAM use. Conclusions In this prospective observational study, CAM use was highly prevalent but unrelated to treatment satisfaction or changes in functional status. The impact of CAM on these endpoints remains to be established in comparative effectiveness studies. PMID:22546381

  9. Standardizing the care of detox patients to achieve quality outcomes.

    PubMed

    Becker, Kathy; Semrow, Sue

    2006-03-01

    Providing appropriate treatment for detoxification patients is both challenging and difficult because alcohol abuse and dependence are largely underestimated in the acute hospital setting. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome is treated not only by addictionologists on chemical dependency units, but also by primary care physicians in acute inpatient settings. The need for consistent inpatient treatment through the use of identified protocols can help provide safe and effective care. The need for consistent, inpatient medical-surgical detoxification treatment in our organization became apparent with the staff's identification of patient care concerns. Using an organizational approach, a multidisciplinary team was created to standardize the care of detoxification patients, beginning with patient admission and ending with discharge and referral for outpatient management. Standardization would ensure consistent assessment and intervention, and improve communication among the clinical team members. A protocol was developed for both the emergency department and the inpatient units. The goals of the team were to decrease the adverse events related to detoxification, such as seizures and aggression, and provide a consistent method of treatment for staff to follow.

  10. Patient satisfaction and visiting the doctor: a self-regulating system.

    PubMed

    Mirowsky, J; Ross, C E

    1983-01-01

    In 1974, Aday and Anderson proposed that client satisfaction may affect utilization of physician services, and that utilization, in turn, may affect satisfaction. Since that time, a number of researchers have investigated the issue, adopting increasingly sophisticated approaches. To date, however, the statistical models used to test the hypothesized feedback have not been completely appropriate. We develop and test alternative hypotheses on the reciprocal effects of satisfaction and utilization. Using methods that allow us to specify models with feedback effects, we examine whether satisfaction with the doctor and visits to the doctor form a self-regulating or a self-amplifying system. In both, satisfaction is expected to result in more visits to the doctor, but in a self-regulating system, visits are hypothesized satisfaction. We specify and test the feedback model in two data sets: one based on a cross-sectional survey of pediatric practices in New Haven, Connecticut and the other based on Gray's panel survey of the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program. In both cases the results indicate that satisfaction and visits form a self-regulating system. PMID:6648577

  11. Practice Environments and Job Satisfaction in Patient-Centered Medical Homes

    PubMed Central

    Alidina, Shehnaz; Rosenthal, Meredith B.; Schneider, Eric C.; Singer, Sara J.; Friedberg, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE We undertook a study to evaluate the effects of medical home transformation on job satisfaction in the primary care setting. METHODS We collected primary data from 20 primary care practices participating in medical home pilot projects in Rhode Island and Colorado from 2009 to 2011. We surveyed clinicians and staff about the quality of their practice environments (eg, office chaos, communication, difficulties in providing safe, high-quality care) and job satisfaction at baseline and 30 months, and about stress, burnout, and intention to leave at 30 months. We interviewed practice leaders about the impact of pilot project participation. We assessed longitudinal changes in the practice environment and job satisfaction and, in the final pilot year, examined cross-sectional associations between the practice environment and job satisfaction, stress, burnout, and intention to leave. RESULTS Between baseline and 30 months, job satisfaction improved in Rhode Island (P =.03) but not in Colorado. For both pilot projects, reported difficulties in providing safe, high-quality care decreased (P <.001), but emphasis on quality and the level of office chaos did not change significantly. In cross-sectional analyses, fewer difficulties in providing safe, high-quality care and more open communication were associated with greater job satisfaction. Greater office chaos and an emphasis on electronic information were associated with greater stress and burnout. CONCLUSIONS Medical home transformations that emphasize quality and open communication while minimizing office chaos may offer the best chances of improving job satisfaction. PMID:25024241

  12. Factors that shape the patient's hospital experience and satisfaction with lower limb arthroplasty: an exploratory thematic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lane, J V; Hamilton, D F; MacDonald, D J; Ellis, C; Howie, C R

    2016-01-01

    Objective It is generally accepted that the patients’ hospital experience can influence their overall satisfaction with the outcome of lower limb arthroplasty; however, little is known about the factors that shape the hospital experience. The aim of this study was to develop an understanding of what patients like and do not like about their hospital experience with a view to providing insight into where service improvements could have the potential to improve the patient experience and their satisfaction, and whether they would recommend the procedure. Design A mixed methods (quan-QUAL) approach. Setting Large regional teaching hospital. Participants 216 patients who had completed a postoperative postal questionnaire at 12 months following total knee or total hip arthroplasty. Outcome measures Overall satisfaction with the outcome of surgery, whether to recommend the procedure to another and the rating of patient hospital experience. Free text comments on the best and worst aspects of their hospital stay were evaluated using qualitative thematic analysis. Results Overall, 77% of patients were satisfied with their surgery, 79% reported a good–excellent hospital experience and 85% would recommend the surgery to another. Qualitative analysis revealed clear themes relating to communication, pain relief and the process experience. Comments on positive aspects of the hospital experience were related to feeling well informed and consulted about their care. Comments on the worst aspects of care were related to being made to wait without explanation, moved to different wards and when they felt invisible to the healthcare staff caring for them. Conclusions Positive patient experiences were closely linked to effective patient–health professional interactions and logistics of the hospital processes. Within arthroplasty services, the patient experience of healthcare could be enhanced by further attention to concepts of patient-centred care. Practical examples of this

  13. The influence of a Vascular Surgery Hospitalist program on physician and patient satisfaction, resident education, and resource utilization.

    PubMed

    Cull, David L; Langan, Eugene M; Taylor, Spence M; Carsten, Christopher G; Tong, Angie; Johnson, Brent

    2013-10-01

    A number of surgery practice models have been developed to address general and trauma surgeon workforce shortages and on-call issues and to improve surgeon satisfaction. These include the creation of acute or urgent care surgery services and "surgical hospitalist" programs. To date, no practice models corresponding to those developed for general and trauma surgeons have been proposed to address these same issues among vascular surgeons or other surgical subspecialists. In 2003, our practice established a Vascular Surgery Hospitalist program. Since its inception nearly a decade ago, it has undergone several modifications. We reviewed hospital administrative databases and surveys of faculty, residents, and patients to evaluate the program's impact. Benefits of the Vascular Surgery Hospitalist program include improved surgeon satisfaction, resource utilization, timeliness of patient care, communication among referring physicians and ancillary staff, and resident teaching/supervision. Elements of this program may be applicable to a variety of surgical subspecialty settings.

  14. Loss of relational continuity of care in schizophrenia: associations with patient satisfaction and quality of care

    PubMed Central

    Sanatinia, Rahil; Cowan, Violet; Barnicot, Kirsten; Zalewska, Krysia; Shiers, David; Cooper, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Users of mental health service are concerned about changes in clinicians providing their care, but little is known about their impact. Aims To examine associations between changes in staff, and patient satisfaction and quality of care. Method A national cross-sectional survey of 3379 people aged 18 or over treated in secondary care for schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Results Nearly 41.9% reported at least one change in their key worker during the previous 12 months and 10.5% reported multiple changes. Those reporting multiple changes were less satisfied with their treatment and less likely to report having a care plan, knowing how to obtain help when in a crisis or to have had recommended physical health assessments. Conclusions Frequent changes in staff providing care for people with psychosis are associated with poorer quality of care. Greater efforts need to be made to protect relational continuity of care for such patients. Declaration of interest M.J.C. was co-chair of the expert advisory group on the NICE quality standard on Service User Experience in Adult Mental Health. S.J.C. has previously been a member of the Health and Social Care Board Northern Ireland Formulary Committee. D.S. received a speaker’s fee from Janssen Cilag in 2011. He is a topic expert on NICE guideline for psychosis and schizophrenia in children and young people and a board member of National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) license. PMID:27713834

  15. Certified pediatric nurses' perceptions of job satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Janet; Harrison, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    The Pediatric Nursing Certification Board surveyed a national sample of 1354 hospital-based certified pediatric nurses (CPNs) to determine their perceptions of certification on job satisfaction and other factors. There is a substantial body of literature that demonstrates job satisfaction among nurses positively increases retention and reduces absenteeism and burnout. CPNs seek certification for a personal sense of achievement, professional recognition, and validation of clinical competency. The certified nurse survey respondents had self-reported high levels of job satisfaction and indicated that relationships with colleagues and a supportive work environment were very important to their levels of job satisfaction. The results of this study highlight important factors for hospitals to consider as they plan strategies and cost-effective ways to positively affect patient care and retain qualified pediatric nurses at the bedside.

  16. The effect of laser epilation on recurrence and satisfaction in patients with sacrococcygeal pilonidal disease: a prospective randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Demircan, Firat; Akbulut, Sami; Yavuz, Ridvan; Agtas, Huseyin; Karabulut, Koray; Yagmur, Yusuf

    2015-01-01

    Background: The primary aim of this prospective study was to investigate the effects of laser epilation on patient satisfaction and recurrence in patients who underwent pilonidal sinus surgery. Method: Sixty patients scheduled for pilonidal sinus surgery in our clinic between 2011 and 2012 were enrolled in this prospective randomized controlled study. Patients were divided in two groups of 30 patients each. Only the Karydakis flap reconstruction technique was performed in the first group. Two sessions of laser epilation were applied in the second group in addition to Karydakis flap reconstruction. The patients in the second group underwent laser epilation 2 weeks before and 3 weeks after the surgery for a total of 2 times in a private office. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in terms of age, gender, smoking usage, ASA Score, duration of patient’s complaints, BMI and hospital stay. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in terms of surgical site infection, wound separation, abscess formation at the any time postoperatively. There were statistically significant differences between the two groups in the first week post operation considering the VAS pain score (P<0.03) and VAS satisfaction score (P<0.01). While there were statistically significant differences between the two groups in the first month post operation considering the VAS pain score (P<0.0001), there were no statistically significant differences between the groups in terms of VAS satisfaction score in the first and three month postoperatively. In the telephone interviews done 1 year after the surgery, recurrence were detected in 4% of first group and in 20% of second group. Recurrence rates were significantly higher in the second group (P=0.045). Conclusion: Our results show that laser epilation does not reduce the relapse rates in pilonidal sinus surgery, as expected. It is obvious that prospective randomized studies need to

  17. Exploring patient satisfaction: a secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial of spinal manipulation, home exercise, and medication for acute and subacute neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Leininger, Brent D; Evans, Roni; Bronfort, Gert

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to assess satisfaction with specific aspects of care for acute neck pain and explore the relationship between satisfaction with care, neck pain and global satisfaction. Methods This study was a secondary analysis of patient satisfaction from a randomized trial of spinal manipulation therapy (SMT) delivered by doctors of chiropractic, home exercise and advice (HEA) delivered by exercise therapists, and medication (MED) prescribed by a medical physician for acute/subacute neck pain. Differences in satisfaction with specific aspects of care were analyzed using a linear mixed model. The relationship between specific aspects of care and 1) change in neck pain (primary outcome of the randomized trial) and 2) global satisfaction were assessed using Pearson’s correlation and multiple linear regression. Results Individuals receiving SMT or HEA were more satisfied with the information and general care received than MED group participants. SMT and HEA groups reported similar satisfaction with information provided during treatment; however, the SMT group was more satisfied with general care. Satisfaction with general care (r=−0.75 to −0.77, R2= 0.55 to 0.56) had a stronger relationship with global satisfaction compared to satisfaction with information provided (r=−0.65 to 0.67, R2=0.39 to 0.46). The relationship between satisfaction with care and neck pain was weak (r=0.17 to 0.38, R2=0.08 to 0.21). Conclusions Individuals with acute/subacute neck pain were more satisfied with specific aspects of care from SMT delivered by doctors of chiropractic or HEA interventions compared to MED prescribed by a medical physician. PMID:25199824

  18. Evaluating aesthetics of the nasolabial region in children with cleft lip and palate: professional analysis and patient satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Tatiana Saito; Andre, Marcia

    2012-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate is one of the most common deformities of the craniofacial region, and treatment of this deformity is essential for social reintegration. One of the major goals of surgery and treatment of craniofacial deformities is to improve the aesthetic appearance of the face, and thereby improve the patient’s social acceptability. Here, we present a critical review of the criteria for aesthetic evaluation of the nasolabial region in cleft patients by assessing publications with the highest level of evidence, including professional evaluation, and patient satisfaction. The findings indicate treatment of this condition represents a major challenge for multidisciplinary team care. PMID:23152672

  19. Using a web-based patient-provider messaging system to enhance patient satisfaction among active duty sailors and Marines seen in the psychiatric outpatient clinic: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Abanes, Jane J; Adams, Susie

    2014-03-01

    Patient satisfaction is imperative in providing safe, effective, and quality patient care. Several articles have examined the effect of a secure on-line communication system in the primary care setting to improve the delivery of patient care. This article describes the use of an asynchronous Web-based messaging system in the psychiatric outpatient setting to enhance patient satisfaction among active duty military service members.

  20. Patient satisfaction and perceived quality of care: evidence from a cross-sectional national exit survey of HIV and non-HIV service users in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Dansereau, Emily; Masiye, Felix; Gakidou, Emmanuela; Masters, Samuel H; Burstein, Roy; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the associations between perceived quality of care and patient satisfaction among HIV and non-HIV patients in Zambia. Setting Patient exit survey conducted at 104 primary, secondary and tertiary health clinics across 16 Zambian districts. Participants 2789 exiting patients. Primary independent variables Five dimensions of perceived quality of care (health personnel practice and conduct, adequacy of resources and services, healthcare delivery, accessibility of care, and cost of care). Secondary independent variables Respondent, visit-related, and facility characteristics. Primary outcome measure Patient satisfaction measured on a 1–10 scale. Methods Indices of perceived quality of care were modelled using principal component analysis. Statistical associations between perceived quality of care and patient satisfaction were examined using random-effect ordered logistic regression models, adjusting for demographic, socioeconomic, visit and facility characteristics. Results Average satisfaction was 6.9 on a 10-point scale for non-HIV services and 7.3 for HIV services. Favourable perceptions of health personnel conduct were associated with higher odds of overall satisfaction for non-HIV (OR=3.53, 95% CI 2.34 to 5.33) and HIV (OR=11.00, 95% CI 3.97 to 30.51) visits. Better perceptions of resources and services were also associated with higher odds of satisfaction for both non-HIV (OR=1.66, 95% CI 1.08 to 2.55) and HIV (OR=4.68, 95% CI 1.81 to 12.10) visits. Two additional dimensions of perceived quality of care—healthcare delivery and accessibility of care—were positively associated with higher satisfaction for non-HIV patients. The odds of overall satisfaction were lower in rural facilities for non-HIV patients (OR 0.69; 95% CI 0.48 to 0.99) and HIV patients (OR=0.26, 95% CI 0.16 to 0.41). For non-HIV patients, the odds of satisfaction were greater in hospitals compared with health centres/posts (OR 1.78; 95% CI 1.27 to 2.48) and lower at

  1. Patient preference for involvement, experienced involvement, decisional conflict, and satisfaction with physician: a structural equation model test

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A comprehensive model of the relationships among different shared decision-making related constructs and their effects on patient-relevant outcomes is largely missing. Objective of our study was the development of a model linking decision-making in medical encounters to an intermediate and a long-term endpoint. The following hypotheses were tested: physicians are more likely to involve patients who have a preference for participation and are willing to take responsibility in the medical decision-making process, increased patient involvement decreases decisional conflict, and lower decisional conflict favourably influences patient satisfaction with the physician. Methods This model was tested in a German primary care sample (N = 1,913). Psychometrically tested instruments were administered to assess the following: patients’ preference for being involved in medical decision-making, patients’ experienced involvement in medical decision-making, decisional conflict, and satisfaction with the primary care provider. Structural equation modelling was used to explore multiple associations. The model was tested and adjusted in a development sub-sample and cross-validated in a confirmatory sample. Demographic and clinical characteristics were accounted for as possible confounders. Results Local and global indexes suggested an acceptable fit between the theoretical model and the data. Increased patient involvement was strongly associated with decreased decisional conflict (standardised regression coefficient Β = −.73). Both high experienced involvement (Β = .34) and low decisional conflict (B = -.28) predicted higher satisfaction with the physician. Patients’ preference for involvement was negatively associated with the experienced involvement (B = −.24). Conclusion Altogether, our model could be largely corroborated by the collected empirical data except the unexpected negative association between preference for involvement and

  2. 2015 Arte Poster Competition First Place Winner: Assessing the Correlation Between Patient Anxiety and Satisfaction for Mohs Surgery.

    PubMed

    Locke, Maren C; Wilkerson, Eric C; Mistur, Rachel L; Nisar, Mahrukh; Love, W Elliot

    2015-09-01

    Skin cancer and the surgical treatment thereof have the potential to be sources of great anxiety for patients. Examination of patient satisfaction, anxiety, and contributing factors has the potential to provide information surgeons can use to implement practices that have an impact on patient anxiety and satisfaction regarding dermatologic surgery. This study used a prospective interview to catalog patients' anxiety and experiences before and during the surgical process. Our results indicate that several pre- and perioperative factors have the potential to decrease a patient's overall anxiety. Notably, 33% of surgical patients reported a decrease in anxiety from the time of diagnosis until the day of surgery. Factors that contributed to this included a call discussing the diagnosis and what to expect on the day of surgery as well as reading written material or searching the internet for more information regarding the procedure. Furthermore, a call from the physician compared to a call from a nurse or other team member showed a greater effect on decreasing anxiety. During the surgical procedure, our results highlight several factors that can decrease a patient's anxiety. Most notably, eating, watching TV, bringing a guest, and engaging in small talk with surgeon and staff during the procedure subjectively decreased patients' anxiety. In summary, our results suggest that patients respond to a variety of factors to reduce anxiety and that each patient derives relief from anxiety in different manners. Therefore, offering a spectrum of comforting or distracting activities during the Mohs procedure is ideal and may reduce the need for pharmacologic anxiolytics. PMID:26355630

  3. Measuring patients’ satisfaction with their anti-TNF treatment in severe Crohn’s disease: scoring and psychometric validation of the Satisfaction for PAtients in Crohn’s diseasE Questionnaire (SPACE-Q©)

    PubMed Central

    Gilet, Hélène; Arnould, Benoit; Fofana, Fatoumata; Clerson, Pierre; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; D’Hondt, Olivier; Faure, Patrick; Hagège, Hervé; Nachury, Maria; Nahon, Stéphane; Tucat, Gilbert; Vandromme, Luc; Cazala-Telinge, Ines; Thibout, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Background Severe Crohn’s disease management includes anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) drugs that differ from early-stage treatments regarding efficacy, safety, and convenience. This study aimed to finalize and psychometrically validate the Satisfaction for PAtients in Crohn’s diseasE Questionnaire (SPACE-Q©), developed to measure satisfaction with anti-TNF treatment in patients with severe Crohn’s disease. Methods A total of 279 patients with severe Crohn’s disease receiving anti-TNF therapy completed the SPACE-Q 62-item pilot version at inclusion and 12 and 13 weeks after first anti-TNF injection. The final SPACE-Q scoring was defined using multitrait and regression analyses and clinical relevance considerations. Psychometric validation included clinical validity against Harvey–Bradshaw score, concurrent validity against Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication (TSQM), internal consistency reliability, test–retest reliability, and responsiveness against the patient global impression of change (PGIC). Results Quality of completion was good (55%–67% of patients completed all items). Four items were removed from the questionnaire. Eleven scores were defined within the final 58-item SPACE-Q: disease control; symptoms, anal symptoms, and quality of life transition scales; tolerability; convenience; expectation confirmation toward efficacy, side effects, and convenience; satisfaction with treatment; and motivation. Scores met standards for concurrent validity (correlation between SPACE-Q satisfaction with treatment and TSQM satisfaction scores =0.59), internal consistency reliability (Cronbach’s α=0.67–0.93), test–retest reliability (intraclass correlations =0.62–0.91), and responsiveness (improvement in treatment experience assessed by the SPACE-Q for patients reporting improvement on the PGIC). Significantly different mean scores were observed between groups of patients with different Harvey–Bradshaw disease severity scores

  4. Preference, satisfaction and critical errors with Genuair and Breezhaler inhalers in patients with COPD: a randomised, cross-over, multicentre study

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Sergi; Feimer, Jan; De Soyza, Anthony; Sauleda Roig, Jaume; Haughney, John; Padullés, Laura; Seoane, Beatriz; Rekeda, Ludmyla; Ribera, Anna; Chrystyn, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Background: The specific attributes of inhaler devices can influence patient use, satisfaction and treatment compliance, and may ultimately impact on clinical outcomes in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Aims: To assess patient preference, satisfaction and critical inhaler technique errors with Genuair (a multidose inhaler) and Breezhaler (a single-dose inhaler) after 2 weeks of daily use. Methods: Patients with COPD and moderate to severe airflow obstruction were randomised in a cross-over, open-label, multicentre study to consecutive once-daily inhalations of placebo via Genuair and Breezhaler, in addition to current COPD medication. The primary end point was the proportion of patients who preferred Genuair versus Breezhaler after 2 weeks (Patient Satisfaction and Preference Questionnaire). Other end points included overall satisfaction and correct use of the inhalers after 2 weeks, and willingness to continue with each device. Results: Of the 128 patients enrolled, 127 were included in the safety population (male n=91; mean age 67.6 years). Of the 110 of the 123 patients in the intent-to-treat population who indicated an inhaler preference, statistically significantly more patients preferred Genuair than Breezhaler (72.7 vs. 27.3%; P<0.001). Mean overall satisfaction scores were also greater for Genuair than for Breezhaler (5.9 vs. 5.3, respectively; P<0.001). After 2 weeks, there was no statistically significant difference in the number of patients who made ⩾1 critical inhaler technique error with Breezhaler than with Genuair (7.3 vs. 3.3%, respectively). Conclusions: Patient overall preference and satisfaction was significantly higher with Genuair compared with Breezhaler. The proportion of patients making critical inhaler technique errors was low with Genuair and Breezhaler. PMID:25927321

  5. Comparison of donor-site morbidity and satisfaction between anterolateral thigh and parascapular free flaps in the same patient.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Sebastian; Klinkenberg, Marek; Behr, Bjoern; Hirsch, Tobias; Kremer, Thomas; Hernekamp, Frederick; Kolbenschlag, Jonas; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Kneser, Ulrich; Daigeler, Adrien

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare donor-site morbidity after anterolateral thigh (ALT) and parascapular (PS) free flap harvest in the same patient. A total of 13 patients were included in this study. Because of initial flap loss, each patient received ALT as well as PS free flap transplantation. A total of 10 patients were available for follow-up. The average follow-up time was 44.5 months. Besides physical examination, range of motion and scar dimensions were assessed to objectify donor-site deficiencies. The subjective donor-site morbidity was assessed by the patients using a self-report questionnaire. In addition, patients were requested to state their donor-site preference. ALT donor site revealed more sensitivity deficiencies compared with the PS harvest site (8 vs. 4). The latter provoked less functional impairments (1 vs. 2). Scar dimensions were larger at PS harvest site (25.8 × 4.3 cm vs. 23.3 × 3.6 cm). Patients' satisfaction was in favor of the PS donor site (1.9 vs. 2.7). Among the 10 patients, 7 patients preferred the PS and 3 patients preferred the ALT donor site. Comparison of donor-site morbidities in the same patient reveals a valuable tool to diminish individual bias. Despite the low number of cases, we were able to demonstrate the superiority of PS compared with ALT donor sites.The Level of Evidence of the study is III.

  6. Satisfaction with Life of Schizophrenia Outpatients and Their Caregivers: Differences between Patients with and without Self-Reported Sleep Complaints

    PubMed Central

    Afonso, Pedro; Cañas, Fernando; Bobes, Julio; Bernardo Fernandez, Ivan; Guzman, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia often present sleep complaints, but its relationship with general satisfaction with life (SWL) and burden for caregivers has been understudied. We aimed to assess the differences in SWL between patients with and without self-reported sleep disturbances and that of their caregivers. In a noninterventional study, 811 schizophrenia adult outpatients were screened for their subjective perception of having (or not) sleep disturbances and evaluated with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Patients self-reporting sleep disturbances were significantly more symptomatic (P < 0.001), presented significantly worse family support (P = 0.0236), and self-reported worse SWL in all domains. Caregivers of patients with schizophrenia self-reporting sleep disturbances also reported worse SWL in all domains, as compared to caregivers of patients without subjective sleep disturbances. Patient and caregivers' SWL was significantly correlated to patients' quality of sleep (P < 0.0001 for all domains). Patient' and caregivers' SWL was negatively affected by patients' poor quality of sleep. We found that patients self-reporting sleep disturbances showed greater symptom severity, worse quality of sleep, worse SWL, and less caregiver support. SWL was also worse for caregivers of patients with schizophrenia reporting sleep disturbances. PMID:24288609

  7. Patient and healthcare professional satisfaction with a new, high accuracy blood glucose meter with color range indicator and wireless connectivity.

    PubMed

    Katz, Laurence B; Grady, Mike; Stewart, Lorna; Cameron, Hilary

    2016-07-01

    Accurate self-monitoring of blood glucose is a key component of effective self-management of glycemic control. The OneTouch VerioFlex(™) (OTVF) blood glucose monitoring system (BGMS) was evaluated for accuracy in a clinical setting. Patients also used OTVF for a 1-wk trial period and reported their level of satisfaction with meter features. In a separate study, healthcare professionals used an on-line simulator of the BGMS and answered questions about its potential utility to their patients. OTVF was accurate over a wide glucose range and met lay user and system accuracy blood glucose standards described in ISO15197:2013 as well as the accuracy requirements to fulfill US FDA expectations for 510(k) clearance of BGMS. Patients and healthcare professionals felt the features of OTVF, which has the capability to connect wirelessly to mobile devices and interact wirelessly with diabetes management software, could provide significant benefits to them or their patients.

  8. [Methodological aspects of a study of medical service satisfaction in patients with borderline mental disorders].

    PubMed

    Malygin, Ya V; Tsygankov, B D

    2016-01-01

    The authors discussed a methodology of the study of medical service satisfaction and it's factors: moment of assessment, methodology of data collection, format of data, bench-marking, principles of inclusion of questions into a questionnaire, organizing and frequency of conducting studies.

  9. The Influence of Changing Nurse Documentation Practices Have on Patient Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaney, Charon D.

    2012-01-01

    Health care leaders in the 21st century face challenges that stem from issues concerning quality care in a cost efficient environment while maintaining customer satisfaction. Technology has played a vital part in offering more advanced diagnostic and surgical equipment. The proliferation of technology has resulted in documentation at the…

  10. [Methodological aspects of a study of medical service satisfaction in patients with borderline mental disorders].

    PubMed

    Malygin, Ya V; Tsygankov, B D

    2016-01-01

    The authors discussed a methodology of the study of medical service satisfaction and it's factors: moment of assessment, methodology of data collection, format of data, bench-marking, principles of inclusion of questions into a questionnaire, organizing and frequency of conducting studies. PMID:27635613

  11. Patient and family satisfaction levels in the intensive care unit after elective cardiac surgery: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial of a preoperative patient education intervention

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Patricia; Chiu, Chun Hung; Ho, Ka Man; Gomersall, Charles David; Underwood, Malcolm John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patients and their families are understandably anxious about the risk of complications and unfamiliar experiences following cardiac surgery. Providing information about postoperative care in the intensive care unit (ICU) to patients and families may lead to lower anxiety levels, and increased satisfaction with healthcare. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the effectiveness of preoperative patient education provided for patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. Methods and analysis 100 patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass graft, with or without valve replacement surgery, will be recruited into a 2-group, parallel, superiority, double-blinded randomised controlled trial. Participants will be randomised to either preoperative patient education comprising of a video and ICU tour with standard care (intervention) or standard education (control). The primary outcome measures are the satisfaction levels of patients and family members with ICU care and decision-making in the ICU. The secondary outcome measures are patient anxiety and depression levels before and after surgery. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained from the Joint Chinese University of Hong Kong—New Territories East Cluster Clinical Research Ethics Committee (reference number CREC 2015.308). The findings will be presented at conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals. Study participants will receive a 1-page plain language summary of results. Trial registration number ChiCTR-IOR-15006971. PMID:27334883

  12. Symptomatic reactions, clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction associated with upper cervical chiropractic care: A prospective, multicenter, cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Observational studies have previously shown that adverse events following manipulation to the neck and/or back are relatively common, although these reactions tend to be mild in intensity and self-limiting. However, no prospective study has examined the incidence of adverse reactions following spinal adjustments using upper cervical techniques, and the impact of this care on clinical outcomes. Methods Consecutive new patients from the offices of 83 chiropractors were recruited for this practice-based study. Clinical outcome measures included 1) Neck pain disability index (100-point scale), 2) Oswestry back pain index (100-point scale), 3) 11-point numerical rating scale (NRS) for neck, headache, midback, and low back pain, 4) treatment satisfaction, and 5) Symptomatic Reactions (SR). Data were collected at baseline, and after approximately 2 weeks of care. A patient reaching sub-clinical status for pain and disability was defined as a follow-up score <3 NRS and <10%, respectively. A SR is defined as a new complaint not present at baseline or a worsening of the presenting complaint by >30% based on an 11-point numeric rating scale occurring <24 hours after any upper cervical procedure. Results A total of 1,090 patients completed the study having 4,920 (4.5 per patient) office visits requiring 2,653 (2.4 per patient) upper cervical adjustments over 17 days. Three hundred thirty- eight (31.0%) patients had SRs meeting the accepted definition. Intense SR (NRS ≥8) occurred in 56 patients (5.1%). Outcome assessments were significantly improved for neck pain and disability, headache, mid-back pain, as well as lower back pain and disability (p <0.001) following care with a high level (mean = 9.1/10) of patient satisfaction. The 83 chiropractors administered >5 million career upper cervical adjustments without a reported incidence of serious adverse event. Conclusions Upper cervical chiropractic care may have a fairly common occurrence of mild intensity SRs

  13. Factors that influence nurses' job satisfaction: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Al Maqbali, Mohammed Abdullah

    2015-05-01

    Job satisfaction has become a critical issue for healthcare organisations in recent years, particularly in nursing, because of potential labour shortages, their effect on patient care, and the associated costs. Work satisfaction is a major factor in nurse retention and the delivery of high quality care, but rapid changes in healthcare services have placed more demands on nurses and this has increased the need for organisations to consider ways to sustain and improve nurses' job satisfaction. To achieve this, they need to understand the factors that affect job satisfaction and dissatisfaction. This article reports the results of a literature review that was aimed at examining and reaching a deeper understanding of the factors related to nurses' job satisfaction.

  14. Factors that influence nurses' job satisfaction: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Al Maqbali, Mohammed Abdullah

    2015-05-01

    Job satisfaction has become a critical issue for healthcare organisations in recent years, particularly in nursing, because of potential labour shortages, their effect on patient care, and the associated costs. Work satisfaction is a major factor in nurse retention and the delivery of high quality care, but rapid changes in healthcare services have placed more demands on nurses and this has increased the need for organisations to consider ways to sustain and improve nurses' job satisfaction. To achieve this, they need to understand the factors that affect job satisfaction and dissatisfaction. This article reports the results of a literature review that was aimed at examining and reaching a deeper understanding of the factors related to nurses' job satisfaction. PMID:25921909

  15. The Comparison of Intrathecal Morphine and IV Morphine PCA on Pain Control, Patient Satisfaction, Morphine Consumption, and Adverse Effects in Patients Undergoing Reduction Mammoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Akdağ, Osman; Kara, İnci; Yıldıran, Gokce Unal; Tosun, Zekeriya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Following breast reduction procedures, the level of postoperative pain can be severe, and sufficient pain control influences a patient's physiological, immunological, and psychological status. Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the use of intrathecal morphine (ITM) in breast reduction surgery with patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). Methods: Sixty-two female patients who underwent breast reductions with the same technique participated in this study. The study group (ITM + PCA) included 32 patients; a single shot (0.2 mg) of ITM and intravenous morphine with PCA were administered. In the control group, morphine PCA alone was intravenously administered to 30 patients. Comparisons between the groups of cumulative morphine consumption, visual analog scale scores, and patient satisfaction scores, which were the primary outcome measures, and adverse effects, which were the secondary outcome measures, were conducted. Results: The patients in the 2 groups had similar degrees of pain and satisfaction scores. The study group had lower cumulative morphine consumption (P = .001) than the PCA-only control group; there was no statistically significant difference in adverse effects between the 2 groups. Conclusion: Intrathecal morphine may effectively control pain with lower total morphine consumption following breast reduction surgery. PMID:25987940

  16. The evaluation of direct composite restorations for the worn mandibular anterior dentition - clinical performance and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Poyser, N J; Briggs, P F A; Chana, H S; Kelleher, M G D; Porter, R W J; Patel, M M

    2007-05-01

    This prospective split-mouth clinical trial evaluated the performance and patient satisfaction of 168 Herculite XRV direct composite restorations bonded to the worn anterior dentition of 18 patients with localized anterior tooth surface loss. One hundred and six of these restorations were placed on the mandibular anterior teeth. The restorations increased the anterior occlusal vertical dimension between 0.5 and 5 mm and the posterior occlusal contacts were restored after a mean duration of 6.2 months (range: 3-13 months) in 14 out of the 15 'Dahl' sub-group patients. The restorations were evaluated after 2.5 years of service by five examiners. Four patients and 23 mandibular restorations were lost to follow-up. Multiple clinical and restorative variables were assessed to determine their influence on restoration performance. Complete failure occurred in 6% of the restorations. Circumferential preparation and height of the restorative addition did not influence the performance of the restorations. A Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) was used to assess the patient's opinion regarding sensitivity, aesthetics, longevity and function of the worn mandibular anterior teeth. A statistically significant difference (95% CI) was found between the pre-operative and 1-month review VAS responses for aesthetics and longevity and this was maintained at the 2.5-year review. Direct composite restorations placed at an increased occlusal vertical dimension are a simple and time-efficient method of managing the worn mandibular anterior dentition. Patient's acceptance and adaptation to the technique is good and the results are accompanied with a high level of patient satisfaction that is maintained for the medium-term.

  17. Impact of a hospital improvement initiative in Bangladesh on patient experiences and satisfaction with services: two cross-sectional studies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Bangladesh government implemented a pilot Hospital Improvement Initiative (HII) in five hospitals in Sylhet division between 1998 and 2003. This included management and behaviour change training for staff, waste disposal and procurement, and referral arrangements. Two linked cross-sectional surveys in 2000 and 2003 assessed the impact of the HII, assessing both patients' experience and satisfaction and public views and use of the hospitals. Methods In each survey we asked 300 consecutive outpatients and a stratified random sample of 300 inpatients in the five hospitals about waiting and consultation time, use of an agent for admission, and satisfaction with privacy, cleanliness, and staff behaviour. The field teams observed cleanliness and privacy arrangements, and visited a sample of households in communities near the hospitals to ask about their opinions and use of the hospital services. Analysis examined changes over time in patients' experience and views. Multivariate analysis took account of other variables potentially associated with the outcomes. Survey managers discussed the survey findings with gender stratified focus groups in each sample community. Results Compared with 2000, an outpatient in three of the hospitals in 2003 was more likely to be seen within 10 minutes and for at least five minutes by the doctor, but outpatients were less likely to report receiving all the prescribed medicines from the hospital. In 2003, inpatients were more likely to have secured admission without using an agent. Although patients’ satisfaction with several aspects of care improved, most changes were not statistically significant. Households in 2003 were significantly more likely to rate the hospitals as good than in 2000. Use of the hospitals did not change, except that more households used the medical college hospital for inpatient care in 2003. Focus groups confirmed criticisms of services and suggested improvements. Conclusion Improvements in some

  18. A questionnaire to measure satisfaction with community services for informal carers of stroke patients: construction and initial piloting.

    PubMed

    Simon, Chantal; Little, Paul; Birtwistle, Jon; Kendrick, Tony

    2003-03-01

    Stroke affects 120 000 people each year in the UK and is the most common cause of adult-onset disability. Most stroke patients are cared for at home by informal carers. Support for these carers is provided by the community services, but although single-item measures have shown that there is a relatively high level of dissatisfaction with those services, there is no specific satisfaction measurement instrument. The present study aimed to construct and initially validate a questionnaire to measure carers' satisfaction with community services for clinical and research purposes. Qualitative interviews with a purposive sample of informal carers of stroke patients identified via stroke unit discharge records gave information about content, context and language. Together with information from the carers' literature, this formed the basis of the questionnaire. A self-completion questionnaire proved unacceptable to carers with a very poor response rate (20%). Face-to-face interviews were more acceptable, with the questionnaire taking approximately 10 minutes to administer. All carers approached agreed to take part and only three carers dropped out from follow up, all because of reasons not related to the study. Initial validity and reliability testing with a sample of 44 carers identified through stroke groups and general practice showed good correlation with a single-item satisfaction measure (RHO = 0.797), test-retest reliability (RHO = 0.885) and inter-rater reliability (RHO = 0.868), and a high degree of internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.859). Further validation with larger and more diverse groups of informal carers is needed before the questionnaire can be considered to be a robust and reliable tool. Factor analysis revealed seven factors: information about community support and involving the carer; amount, appropriateness and coordination of services; information about stroke; speed of change and concern about the carer; listening to the carer and being heard

  19. Satisfaction with the Outpatient Encounter

    PubMed Central

    Zandbelt, Linda C; Smets, Ellen MA; Oort, Frans J; Godfried, Mieke H; de Haes, Hanneke CJM

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare patients' and physicians' visit-specific satisfaction in an internal medicine outpatient setting, and to explain their respective views. DESIGN patients' and physicians' background characteristics were assessed prior to outpatient encounters. Immediately after the encounter, both patients and physicians completed a questionnaire assessing satisfaction with the visit. SETTING The outpatient division of an academic teaching hospital. PARTICIPANTS Thirty residents and specialists in general internal medicine, rheumatology, and gastroenterology, and 330 patients having a follow-up appointment with one of these physicians. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS patients' and physicians' visit-specific satisfaction was assessed using 5 Visual Analogue Scales (0 to 100). patients' overall satisfaction was higher than physicians' satisfaction (mean 81 vs. 66), and correlation of patients' and physicians' overall satisfaction with the specific visit was medium sized (r= .28, P < .001). patients' satisfaction ratings were associated with their previsit self-efficacy in communicating with their physician (P < .001) and with visiting a female physician (P < .01). Physicians' satisfaction was associated with patients' higher educational level (P < .05), primary language being Dutch (P < .001), better mental health (P < .05), and preference for receiving less than full information (P < .05). CONCLUSIONS In an outpatient setting, patients' visit-specific satisfaction ratings were substantially higher than, and only moderately associated with, physicians' ratings of the same visit. The dissimilar predictors explaining patients' and physicians' satisfaction suggest that patients and physicians form their opinion about a consultation in different ways. Hence, when evaluating outpatient encounters, physicians' satisfaction has additional value to patients' satisfaction in establishing quality of care. PMID:15566437

  20. A group approach to genetic counselling of cardiomyopathy patients: satisfaction and psychological outcomes sufficient for further implementation.

    PubMed

    Otten, Ellen; Birnie, Erwin; Ranchor, Adelita V; van Tintelen, J Peter; van Langen, Irene M

    2015-11-01

    The introduction of next-generation sequencing in everyday clinical genetics practise is increasing the number of genetic disorders that can be confirmed at DNA-level, and consequently increases the possibilities for cascade screening. This leads to a greater need for genetic counselling, whereas the number of professionals available to provide this is limited. We therefore piloted group genetic counselling for symptomatic cardiomyopathy patients at regional hospitals, to assess whether this could be an acceptable alternative to individual counselling. We performed a cohort study with pre- and post-counselling patient measurements using questionnaires, supplemented with evaluations of the group counselling format by the professionals involved. Patients from eight regional hospitals in the northern part of the Netherlands were included. Questionnaires comprised patient characteristics, psychological measures (personal perceived control (PPC), state and trait anxiety inventory (STAI)), and satisfaction with counsellors, counselling content and design. In total, 82 patients (mean age 57.5 year) attended one of 13 group sessions. Median PPC and STAI scores showed significantly higher control and lower anxiety after the counselling. Patients reported they were satisfied with the counsellors, and almost 75% of patients were satisfied with the group counselling. Regional professionals were also, overall, satisfied with the group sessions. The genetics professionals were less satisfied, mainly because of their perceived large time investment and less-than-expected group interaction. Hence, a group approach to cardiogenetic counselling is feasible, accessible, and psychologically effective, and could be one possible approach to counselling the increasing patient numbers in cardiogenetics.

  1. Comparisons of Internet-Based and Face-to-Face Learning Systems Based on "Equivalency of Experiences" According to Students' Academic Achievements and Satisfactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karatas, Sercin; Simsek, Nurettin

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether "equivalent learning experiences" ensure equivalency, in the Internet-based and face-to-face interaction methods on learning results and student satisfaction. In the experimental process of this study, the effect of the Internet-based and face-to-face learning on the equivalency in learning…

  2. Patient Satisfaction, Empowerment, and Health and Disability Status Effects of a Disease Management-Health Promotion Nurse Intervention among Medicare Beneficiaries with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Bruce; Wamsley, Brenda R.; Liebel, Dianne V.; Saad, Zabedah B.; Eggert, Gerald M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To report the impact on patient and informal caregiver satisfaction, patient empowerment, and health and disability status of a primary care-affiliated disease self-management-health promotion nurse intervention for Medicare beneficiaries with disabilities and recent significant health services use. Design and Methods: The Medicare…

  3. Treatment outcome with implant-retained overdentures: Part II--Patient satisfaction and predictability of subjective treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Cune, M S; de Putter, C; Hoogstraten, J

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of implant-overdenture treatment (IOT) on patients' complaints about dentures and the degree to which subjective treatment outcome could be predicted from baseline patient and treatment characteristics. Four groups of patients were distinguished: one pretreatment group, two posttreatment groups (1 year after treatment) and one reference group of denture wearers, who had not applied for any kind of treatment. They finished a questionnaire with 20 statements on denture complaints. Four scales concerning denture complaints could be distinguished and named after their underlying variables. Differences between the groups were analyzed. IOT treatment was shown to be very effective on a wide range of denture complaints. Little change was seen in patient satisfaction with regard to maxillary dentures when measured on the scales, although many patients wanted improvement in retention and stability for the maxillary denture after IOT treatment in the mandible. Sixteen percent of the denture wearers who had not applied for IOT expressed complaints regarding their mandibular dentures that matched or were more severe than those of the patients that had applied for IOT, before the actual start of treatment. Although generally the subjective treatment outcome of IOT was favorable, it could not be individually predicted from baseline patient and treatment characteristics. PMID:7932261

  4. Structural and Reliability Analysis of a Patient Satisfaction with Cancer-Related Care Measure: A Multi-Site Patient Navigation Research Program Study

    PubMed Central

    Jean-Pierre, Pascal; Fiscella, Kevin; Freund, Karen M; Clark, Jack; Darnell, Julie; Holden, Alan; Post, Doug; Patierno, Steven R; Winters, Paul C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Patient satisfaction (PS) is an important outcome measure of quality of cancer care and one of the four core study outcomes of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored Patient Navigation Research Program (PNRP) to reduce race/ethnicity-based disparities in cancer care. There is no existing PS measure that spans the spectrum of cancer-related care. Objective Develop a Patient Satisfaction with Cancer Care (PSCC) measure that is relevant to patients receiving diagnostic/therapeutic cancer-related care. Methods We developed a conceptual framework, an operational definition of PSCC, and an item pool based on literature review, expert feedback, group discussion and consensus. The 35-item PSCC measure was administered to 891 participants from the multi-site NCI-sponsored PNRP. Principal components analysis (PCA) was conducted for latent structure analysis. Internal consistency was assessed using Cronbach coefficient alpha (α). Divergent analysis was performed using correlation analyses between the PSCC, the Communication and Attitudinal Self-Efficacy (CASE-Cancer), and demographic variables. Results The PCA revealed a one-dimensional measure with items forming a coherent set explaining 62% of the variance in PS. Reliability assessment revealed high internal consistency (α ranging from 0.95 to 0.96). The PSCC demonstrated good face validity, convergent validity and divergent validity as indicated by moderate correlations with subscales of the CASE-Cancer (all ps < 0.01) and non-significant correlations with age, primary language, marital status, and scores on the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM) Long Form (all ps > 0.05). Conclusion The PSCC is a valid tool for assessing satisfaction for cancer-related care for this sample. PMID:20922802

  5. The service encounter in radiology: acing the "moments of truth" to achieve patient-centered care.

    PubMed

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Pysarenko, Kristine

    2015-02-01

    Radiologists are increasingly recognizing their role as direct service providers to patients and seeking to offer an exceptional patient experience as part of high-quality service delivery. Patients' perceptions of service delivery are derived from the chain of numerous individual real-time encounters that occur throughout their visit. These so-called "moments of truth" define the overall experience and form the lasting impression of the given practice in their mind. Providing excellent service can be difficult to achieve in practice given its intangible nature as well as the heterogeneity and unpredictability of the large number of patients, frontline staff, and environmental circumstances that define the patient experience. Thus, broad commitment and team effort among all members of a radiology practice are required. This article explores important areas to be considered by a radiology practice to ensure positive and meaningful patient experiences. Specific ways in which every member within the practice, including schedulers, receptionists, technologists, nurses, and radiologists, can contribute to achieving high-quality patient service are discussed. Examples of patient-oriented language that may be useful in particular scenarios in radiology practice are given. The role of the practice's physical facility, including all aspects of its aesthetics and amenities, as well as of Internet services, in shaping the patient experience is also described. Throughout this work, a proactive approach to promoting a service-oriented organizational culture is provided. By improving the patient experience, these strategies may serve to enhance patients' perceptions of radiology and radiologists. PMID:25572928

  6. Prevalence of sexual desire and satisfaction among patients with screen-detected diabetes and impact of intensive multifactorial treatment: Results from the ADDITION-Denmark study

    PubMed Central

    Giraldi, Annamaria; Kristensen, Ellids; Lauritzen, Torsten; Sandbæk, Annelli; Charles, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective. Sexual problems are common in people with diabetes. It is unknown whether early detection of diabetes and subsequent intensive multifactorial treatment (IT) are associated with sexual health. We report the prevalence of low sexual desire and low sexual satisfaction among people with screen-detected diabetes and compare the impact of intensive multifactorial treatment with the impact of routine care (RC) on these measures. Design. A cross-sectional analysis of the ADDITION-Denmark trial cohort six years post-diagnosis. Setting. 190 general practices around Denmark. Subjects. A total of 968 patients with screen-detected type 2 diabetes. Main outcome measures. Low sexual desire and low sexual satisfaction. Results. Mean (standard deviation, SD) age was 64.9 (6.9) years. The prevalence of low sexual desire was 53% (RC) and 54% (IT) among women, and 24% (RC) and 25% (IT) among men. The prevalence of low sexual satisfaction was 23% (RC) and 18% (IT) among women, and 27% (RC) and 37% (IT) among men. Among men, the prevalence of low sexual satisfaction was significantly higher in the IT group than in the RC group, p = 0.01. Conclusion. Low sexual desire and low satisfaction are frequent among men and women with screen-detected diabetes, and IT may negatively impact men's sexual satisfaction. PMID:25659194

  7. The effects of preoperative, video-assisted anesthesia education in Spanish on Spanish-speaking patients' anxiety, knowledge, and satisfaction: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    West, Amy M; Bittner, Edward A; Ortiz, Vilma E

    2014-06-01

    We studied the effect of an instructional video in Spanish on self-reported anxiety, knowledge about general anesthesia procedures, and satisfaction with the preoperative anesthesia process in patients requiring a Spanish interpreter. This prospective, randomized, nonblinded pilot study took place at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), a university-affiliated tertiary-care hospital. Twenty adult, ASA physical status 1, 2, and 3 patients, scheduled for elective surgery (gynecological, orthopedic, and intrabdominal surgery) during general anesthesia were studied. Anxiety, knowledge, and patient satisfaction were assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). There was a significant reduction in anxiety score in patients who viewed the video compared with those who did not (median reduction 2 vs 0; P = 0.020). There was an increase in satisfaction score in the video group (median increase 2 vs 0; P = 0.046). There was no difference in reported knowledge-improvement scores between the two groups (3.5 vs 4; P = 0.908). In Spanish-speaking patients, the addition of an instructional video in Spanish to a preanesthesia interview decreased anxiety and increased patient satisfaction. PMID:24882604

  8. The effects of preoperative, video-assisted anesthesia education in Spanish on Spanish-speaking patients' anxiety, knowledge, and satisfaction: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    West, Amy M; Bittner, Edward A; Ortiz, Vilma E

    2014-06-01

    We studied the effect of an instructional video in Spanish on self-reported anxiety, knowledge about general anesthesia procedures, and satisfaction with the preoperative anesthesia process in patients requiring a Spanish interpreter. This prospective, randomized, nonblinded pilot study took place at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), a university-affiliated tertiary-care hospital. Twenty adult, ASA physical status 1, 2, and 3 patients, scheduled for elective surgery (gynecological, orthopedic, and intrabdominal surgery) during general anesthesia were studied. Anxiety, knowledge, and patient satisfaction were assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). There was a significant reduction in anxiety score in patients who viewed the video compared with those who did not (median reduction 2 vs 0; P = 0.020). There was an increase in satisfaction score in the video group (median increase 2 vs 0; P = 0.046). There was no difference in reported knowledge-improvement scores between the two groups (3.5 vs 4; P = 0.908). In Spanish-speaking patients, the addition of an instructional video in Spanish to a preanesthesia interview decreased anxiety and increased patient satisfaction.

  9. Patient Impression and Satisfaction of a Self-administered, Automated Medical History-taking Device in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Sanjay; Goldberg, Andrew D.; Menchine, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We evaluated patient impressions and satisfaction of an innovative self-administered, hand-held touch-screen tablet to gather detailed medical information from emergency department (ED) patients in the waiting room prior to physician contact. Methods: Adult, medically stable patients presenting to the ED at Los Angeles County Hospital used the PatientTouch™ system to answer a series of questions about their current history of present illness and past medical/surgical histories in English or Spanish. Patients then completed a survey rating their experience. Results: Among 173 participants, opinion of PatientTouch™ was strongly positive; 93.6% (95%CI 90.0–97.3%) felt the physical product was easy to hold and handle, and 97.1% (94.6–99.6%) felt the questions were detailed enough for them to fully describe their condition; 97.8% (95.4–100.0%) felt using PatientTouch™ would help them organize their thoughts and communicate better with their physician, 94.8% (91.4–98.1%) thought it would improve the quality of their care, and 97.1% (94.6–99.6%) expressed desire to use the product again in the future. Conclusion: The study was conducted at a largely Hispanic county ED, and only patients with 1 of 6 pre-determined chief complaints participated. We did not include a control group to assess if perceived improvements in communication translated to measurable differences. In this pilot study, patients were highly satisfied with all aspects of the PatientTouch™ self-administered, hand-held, touch-screen tablet. Importantly, subjects felt it would help them better communicate with their doctor, would improve their overall quality of care and overwhelmingly expressed a desire to use it in the future. PMID:24695871

  10. Resident trainees do not affect patient satisfaction in an outpatient gastroenterology clinic: A prospective study conducted in a Canadian gastroenterology clinic

    PubMed Central

    Brahmania, Mayur; Young, Madison; Muthiah, Chetty; Ilnyckyj, Alexandra; Duerksen, Donald; Moffatt, Dana C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is little literature regarding how a gastroenterology trainee affects a patient’s interpretation of care during outpatient clinic visits. Improving patient satisfaction is desirable and benefits may include enhanced patient compliance as well as providing trainees with areas for improvement. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate patient satisfaction in an outpatient gastroenterology clinic when seen by a trainee and attending physician versus an attending physician alone. The secondary objective was to evaluate physician characteristics that play a role in creating a positive clinical experience. METHODS: A randomized prospective survey study was conducted over an 11-month period (July 2012 to June 2013) at St Boniface Hospital (Winnipeg, Manitoba). Two gastroenterology fellows (postgraduate year 4 and 5) and nine internal medicine residents (postgraduate year 1 to 3) comprised the ‘trainee’ role, while three academic clinicians comprised the ‘attending’ role. Patients included individuals seen for an initial consultation and were >18 years of age. RESULTS: A total of 211 patients comprised the final study group, with 118 in the attending group and 93 in the trainee group. In univariate analysis, patients more often had a very good experience when seen by an attending physician alone versus a trainee and attending physician (73% versus 56%; P=0.016); however, on multivariate analysis, there was no significant difference in patient satisfaction (OR 0.89; P=0.931). Physician factors found to be associated with high patient satisfaction on multivariate analysis included: addressing all patient concerns (OR 27.56; P=0.021); giving the patient a preliminary diagnosis (OR 78.02; P=0.006); and feeling the physician was thorough (OR 72.53; P=0.029). CONCLUSIONS: The present study did not reveal a difference in patient satisfaction if a patient sees an attending physician alone or with a trainee. Moreover, to improve patient satisfaction in a gastroenterology

  11. Clinical importance of achieving biochemical control with medical therapy in adult patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Christofides, Elena A

    2016-01-01

    In acromegaly, achieving biochemical control (growth hormone [GH] level <1.0 ng/mL and age- and sex-normalized levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 [IGF-1]) through timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment provides an opportunity to improve patient outcomes. Diagnosis of acromegaly is challenging because it is rooted in observing subtle clinical manifestations, and it is typical for acromegaly to evolve for up to 10 years before it is recognized. This results in chronic exposure to elevated levels of GH and IGF-1 and delay in patients receiving appropriate treatment, which consequently increases mortality risk. In this review, the clinical impact of elevated GH and IGF-1 levels, the effectiveness of current therapies, and the potential role of novel treatments for acromegaly will be discussed. Clinical burden of acromegaly and benefits associated with management of GH and IGF-1 levels will be reviewed. Major treatment paradigms in acromegaly include surgery, medical therapy, and radiotherapy. With medical therapies, such as somatostatin analogs, dopamine agonists, and GH receptor antagonists, a substantial proportion of patients achieve reduced GH and normalized IGF-1 levels. In addition, signs and symptoms, quality of life, and comorbidities have also been reported to improve to varying degrees in patients who achieve biochemical control. Currently, there are several innovative therapies in development to improve patient outcomes, patient use, and access. Timely biochemical control of acromegaly ensures that the patient can ultimately improve morbidity and mortality from this disease and its extensive consequences. PMID:27471378

  12. Clinical importance of achieving biochemical control with medical therapy in adult patients with acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Christofides, Elena A

    2016-01-01

    In acromegaly, achieving biochemical control (growth hormone [GH] level <1.0 ng/mL and age- and sex-normalized levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 [IGF-1]) through timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment provides an opportunity to improve patient outcomes. Diagnosis of acromegaly is challenging because it is rooted in observing subtle clinical manifestations, and it is typical for acromegaly to evolve for up to 10 years before it is recognized. This results in chronic exposure to elevated levels of GH and IGF-1 and delay in patients receiving appropriate treatment, which consequently increases mortality risk. In this review, the clinical impact of elevated GH and IGF-1 levels, the effectiveness of current therapies, and the potential role of novel treatments for acromegaly will be discussed. Clinical burden of acromegaly and benefits associated with management of GH and IGF-1 levels will be reviewed. Major treatment paradigms in acromegaly include surgery, medical therapy, and radiotherapy. With medical therapies, such as somatostatin analogs, dopamine agonists, and GH receptor antagonists, a substantial proportion of patients achieve reduced GH and normalized IGF-1 levels. In addition, signs and symptoms, quality of life, and comorbidities have also been reported to improve to varying degrees in patients who achieve biochemical control. Currently, there are several innovative therapies in development to improve patient outcomes, patient use, and access. Timely biochemical control of acromegaly ensures that the patient can ultimately improve morbidity and mortality from this disease and its extensive consequences. PMID:27471378

  13. Patient experience and satisfaction with inpatient service: development of short form survey instrument measuring the core aspect of inpatient experience.

    PubMed

    Wong, Eliza L Y; Coulter, Angela; Hewitson, Paul; Cheung, Annie W L; Yam, Carrie H K; Lui, Siu Fai; Tam, Wilson W S; Yeoh, Eng-Kiong

    2015-01-01

    Patient experience reflects quality of care from the patients' perspective; therefore, patients' experiences are important data in the evaluation of the quality of health services. The development of an abbreviated, reliable and valid instrument for measuring inpatients' experience would reflect the key aspect of inpatient care from patients' perspective as well as facilitate quality improvement by cultivating patient engagement and allow the trends in patient satisfaction and experience to be measured regularly. The study developed a short-form inpatient instrument and tested its ability to capture a core set of inpatients' experiences. The Hong Kong Inpatient Experience Questionnaire (HKIEQ) was established in 2010; it is an adaptation of the General Inpatient Questionnaire of the Care Quality Commission created by the Picker Institute in United Kingdom. This study used a consensus conference and a cross-sectional validation survey to create and validate a short-form of the Hong Kong Inpatient Experience Questionnaire (SF-HKIEQ). The short-form, the SF-HKIEQ, consisted of 18 items derived from the HKIEQ. The 18 items mainly covered relational aspects of care under four dimensions of the patient's journey: hospital staff, patient care and treatment, information on leaving the hospital, and overall impression. The SF-HKIEQ had a high degree of face validity, construct validity and internal reliability. The validated SF-HKIEQ reflects the relevant core aspects of inpatients' experience in a hospital setting. It provides a quick reference tool for quality improvement purposes and a platform that allows both healthcare staff and patients to monitor the quality of hospital care over time. PMID:25860775

  14. The subjective assessment of the effect and satisfaction with dermocosmetics use by patients with skin disturbances

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Atopic dermatitis and different constellations and the severity of symptoms that not meet the criteria for this diagnosis are a common skin disturbances. An important component of the treatment of these diseases and the proper care of sensitive and dry skin is local dermocosmetics use. Aim To assess the frequency of skin disturbances and the effect and satisfaction with Atoperal products use as well as the source of information about these products. Material and methods A questionnaire survey about the type of skin disturbances, the subjective assessment of the effect and satisfaction with Atoperal products use and source of information about these products was performed by 787 general practitioners, internists, pediatricians, dermatologists, allergists and pulmonologists and 252 pharmacists in a group of 51 085 subjects with skin disturbances. Results In the group interviewed by doctors, the most common skin problem was atopic dermatitis (52.5%) and in the group interviewed by pharmacists, pruritus (70.0%). In both groups, respondents after Atoperal products use most frequently reported improving of the skin hydration and greasiness of the skin and reduction of itching. In both groups, over 90.0% of respondents were satisfied or very satisfied with Atoperal products use. In the group surveyed by doctors, 75.5% of respondents obtained information about these products from doctors and 17.4% from pharmacists, while in the group surveyed by pharmacists, 48.9% from pharmacists and 36.1% from doctors. Conclusions Atopic dermatitis was most frequently diagnosed in a group surveyed by doctors. The main skin disturbance that occurred in a group surveyed by pharmacists was skin pruritus. The main effect of Atoperal products use, independent of the place of the survey, included improving of skin hydration and greasiness of the skin and reduction of itching. In a study population, there was a high level of satisfaction from the use of Atoperal products. Doctors

  15. Combined parecoxib and I.V. paracetamol provides additional analgesic effect with better postoperative satisfaction in patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Elseify, Zeinab Ahmed; El-Khattab, Salwa Omar; Khattab, Ahmed Metwally; Atta, Eman Mohammed; Ajjoub, Layal Fares

    2011-01-01

    Background: Adequacy of postoperative analgesia is one of the most important factors that determine early hospital discharge and patients’ ability to resume their normal activities postoperatively. The optimal non-opioid analgesic technique for postoperative pain management would reduce pain and enhance patient satisfaction, and it also facilitates earlier mobilization and rehabilitation by reducing pain-related complications after surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of intravenous paracetamol and parecoxib when used alone, or in combination. Methods: Sixty American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) physical status I and II adult patients who were scheduled for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction were included in this study. Patients were allocated into three groups: group I patients received 1g intravenous paracetamol after induction and another 1 g 4 h later, group II received 40 mg parecoxib after induction, while group III received combination of both drugs (paracetamol 1 g and parecoxib 40 mg). Pain during rest and mobility was assessed in the immediate postoperative period, 2 h and 8 h successively using visual analog scale (VAS). Patient satisfaction was rated according to satisfaction score. Results: Total morphine requirements were lower in group III patients (6.9±2.7 mg) in comparison to group I patients (12.6±3.6 mg) or group II patients (9.8±2.8 mg). The least VAS scores were recorded during knee movement (3.8±1.1) in group III patients compared to group I (6.0±1.8) and group II patients (4.8±1.9). Eight hours postoperatively, group III patients were more satisfied regarding the postoperative pain management. Conclusion: Combination of intravenous paracetamol and parecoxib provided better analgesia and higher patient satisfaction than each drug when used separately. PMID:21655016

  16. Patient Satisfaction, Treatment Experience, and Disability Outcomes in a Population-Based Cohort of Injured Workers in Washington State: Implications for Quality Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Wickizer, Thomas M; Franklin, Gary; Fulton-Kehoe, Deborah; Turner, Judith A; Mootz, Robert; Smith-Weller, Terri

    2004-01-01

    Objective To determine what aspects of patient satisfaction are most important in explaining the variance in patients' overall treatment experience and to evaluate the relationship between treatment experience and subsequent outcomes. Data Sources and Setting Data from a population-based survey of 804 randomly selected injured workers in Washington State filing a workers' compensation claim between November 1999 and February 2000 were combined with insurance claims data indicating whether survey respondents were receiving disability compensation payments for being out of work at 6 or 12 months after claim filing. Study Design We conducted a two-step analysis. In the first step, we tested a multiple linear regression model to assess the relationship of satisfaction measures to patients' overall treatment experience. In the second step, we used logistic regression to assess the relationship of treatment experience to subsequent outcomes. Principal Findings Among injured workers who had ongoing follow-up care after their initial treatment (n=681), satisfaction with interpersonal and technical aspects of care and with care coordination was strongly and positively associated with overall treatment experience (p<0.001). As a group, the satisfaction measures explained 38 percent of the variance in treatment experience after controlling for demographics, satisfaction with medical care prior to injury, job satisfaction, type of injury, and provider type. Injured workers who reported less-favorable treatment experience were 3.54 times as likely (95 percent confidence interval, 1.20–10.95, p=.021) to be receiving time-loss compensation for inability to work due to injury 6 or 12 months after filing a claim, compared to patients whose treatment experience was more positive. PMID:15230925

  17. Expectation and satisfaction of HIV/AIDS patients toward the pharmaceutical care provided at Gondar University Referral Hospital, Northwestern Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Abebe, Tamrat Befekadu; Erku, Daniel Asfaw; Gebresillassie, Begashaw Melaku; Haile, Kaleab Taye; Mekuria, Abebe Basazn

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Measurements of patient satisfaction help to assess the performance of health service provision and predict treatment adherence and outcomes. This study aimed to assess human HIV/AIDS patients’ expectation of and satisfaction with the pharmaceutical service delivered at Gondar University Referral Hospital, Ethiopia. Patients and methods An institution-based cross-sectional study was performed from May 11 to 25, 2015. A total of 291 patients living with HIV/AIDS were included using a simple random sampling method. Data were collected using structured questionnaires measuring expectation and satisfaction of respondents using a Likert scale of 1–5 through face-to-face interviews. The data collected were entered into and analyzed using Statistical Packages for Social Sciences. Comparison was made between those respondents who lived in and outside the town. Results The overall mean expectation and satisfaction of respondents toward pharmacy setting and services were 3.62 and 3.13, respectively. More than half (56.1%) of the participants were dissatisfied with the comfort and convenience of waiting area and private counseling room. Similarly, 69.3% of the respondents claimed that pharmacy professionals did not give information about side effects and drug–drug and drug–food interactions of antiretroviral medications. There was a statistically significant difference between respondents who live in and outside Gondar town in overall expectation (t=3.415, P=0.001) with the pharmacy setting and services. Conclusion In this study, the overall satisfaction level of respondents with pharmaceutical service (pharmacy setting and services) provided at Gondar University Referral Hospital was found to be low, while the overall respondents’ expectation from the pharmaceutical services were exceedingly high. The hospital should implement good dispensing practice systems in relation to the services and continuing professional development to professionals in order to

  18. Intensive care nurses' perception of futility: job satisfaction and burnout dimensions.

    PubMed

    Özden, Dilek; Karagözoğlu, Şerife; Yildirim, Gülay

    2013-06-01

    Suffering repeated experiences of moral distress in intensive car