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Sample records for achieving personalized medicine

  1. Is personalized medicine achievable in obstetrics?

    PubMed

    Quinney, Sara K; Patil, Avinash S; Flockhart, David A

    2014-12-01

    Personalized medicine seeks to identify the right dose of the right drug for the right patient at the right time. Typically, individualization of therapy is based on the pharmacogenomic makeup of the individual and environmental factors that alter drug disposition and response. In addition to these factors, during pregnancy, a woman's body undergoes many changes that can impact the therapeutic efficacy of medications. Yet, there is minimal research regarding personalized medicine in obstetrics. Adoption of pharmacogenetic testing into the obstetrical care is dependent on evidence of analytical validity, clinical validity, and clinical utility. Here, we briefly present information regarding the potential utility of personalized medicine for treating the obstetric patient for pain with narcotics, hypertension, and preterm labor, and discuss the impediments of bringing personalized medicine to the obstetrical clinic. PMID:25282474

  2. Is Personalized Medicine Achievable in Obstetrics?

    PubMed Central

    Quinney, Sara K; Flockhart, David A; Patil, Avinash S

    2014-01-01

    Personalized medicine seeks to identify the right dose of the right drug for the right patient at the right time. Typically, individualization of therapy is based on the pharmacogenomic make-up of the individual and environmental factors that alter drug disposition and response. In addition to these factors, during pregnancy a woman’s body undergoes many changes that can impact the therapeutic efficacy of medications. Yet, there is minimal research regarding personalized medicine in obstetrics. Adoption of pharmacogenetic testing into the obstetrical care is dependent on evidence of analytical validity, clinical validity, and clinical utility. Here, we briefly present information regarding the potential utility of personalized medicine for treating the obstetric patient for pain with narcotics, hypertension, and preterm labor and discuss the impediments of bringing personalized medicine to the obstetrical clinic. PMID:25282474

  3. Is personalized medicine achievable in obstetrics?

    PubMed

    Quinney, Sara K; Patil, Avinash S; Flockhart, David A

    2014-12-01

    Personalized medicine seeks to identify the right dose of the right drug for the right patient at the right time. Typically, individualization of therapy is based on the pharmacogenomic makeup of the individual and environmental factors that alter drug disposition and response. In addition to these factors, during pregnancy, a woman's body undergoes many changes that can impact the therapeutic efficacy of medications. Yet, there is minimal research regarding personalized medicine in obstetrics. Adoption of pharmacogenetic testing into the obstetrical care is dependent on evidence of analytical validity, clinical validity, and clinical utility. Here, we briefly present information regarding the potential utility of personalized medicine for treating the obstetric patient for pain with narcotics, hypertension, and preterm labor, and discuss the impediments of bringing personalized medicine to the obstetrical clinic.

  4. Immunoinformatics in personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Gulukota, Kamalakar

    2003-01-01

    Diagnosis of human disease has been undergoing steady improvement over the past few centuries. Many ailments that were once considered a single entity have been classified into finer categories on the basis of response to therapy (e.g. type I and type II diabetes), inheritance (e.g. familial and non-familial polyposis coli), histology (e.g. small cell and adenocarcinoma of lung) and most recently transcriptional profiling (e.g. leukaemia, lymphoma). The next dimension in this finer categorization appears to be the typing of the patient rather than the disease i.e. disease X in person of type Y. The problem of personalized medicine is to devise tests which predict the type of individual, especially where the type is correlated with response to therapy. Immunology has been at the forefront of personalized medicine for quite a while, even though the term is not often used in this connection. Blood grouping and cross-matching (for blood transfusion), and anaphylaxis test (for penicillin) are just two examples. In this paper I will argue that immunological tests have an important place in the future of personalized medicine. I will describe methods we developed for personalizing vaccines based on MHC allele frequencies in human populations and methods for predicting peptide binding to class I MHC molecules. In conclusion, I will argue that immunological tests, and consequently immunoinformatics, will play a big role in making personalized medicine a reality. PMID:14712931

  5. [Genomics and personalized medicine].

    PubMed

    Mooser, Vincent

    2014-05-01

    Personalized medicine has a substantial potential to transform the way diseases will be predicted, prevented and treated. The field will greatly benefit from novel DNA sequencing technologies, in particular commoditization of individual whole genome sequencing. This evolution cannot be stopped, and the medical and scientific community, as well as the society at large, have the responsibility to anticipate the expected benefits from this revolution, but also the potential risks associated with it. Massive investments will be needed for the potential of personalized medicine to be realized, and for the field to come to maturity. In particular, a paradigm change in the way clinical research is done is needed. Switzerland and its Western part pro-actively anticipate these changes.

  6. Biobanks and personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Olson, J.E.; Bielinski, S.J.; Ryu, E.; Winkler, E.M.; Takahashi, P.Y.; Pathak, J.; Cerhan, J.R.

    2016-01-01

    We provide a mini-review of how biobanks can support clinical genetics in the era of personalized medicine. We discuss types of biobanks, including disease specific and general biobanks not focused on one disease. We present considerations in setting up a biobank, including consenting and governance, biospecimens, risk factor and related data, informatics, and linkage to electronic health records for phenotyping. We also discuss the uses of biobanks and ongoing considerations, including genotype-driven recruitment, investigations of gene–environment associations, and the re-use of data generated from studies. Finally, we present a brief discussion of some of the unresolved issues, such as return of research results and sustaining biobanks over time. In summary, carefully designed biobanks can provide critical research and infrastructure support for clinical genetics in the era of personalized medicine. PMID:24588254

  7. Pharmacogenomics and Nanotechnology Toward Advancing Personalized Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vizirianakis, Ioannis S.; Amanatiadou, Elsa P.

    The target of personalized medicine to achieve major benefits for all patients in terms of diagnosis and drug delivery can be facilitated by creating a sincere multidisciplinary information-based infrastructure in health care. To this end, nanotechnology, pharmacogenomics, and informatics can advance the utility of personalized medicine, enable clinical translation of genomic knowledge, empower healthcare environment, and finally improve clinical outcomes.

  8. Personalized medicine in psychiatry: problems and promises

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The central theme of personalized medicine is the premise that an individual’s unique physiologic characteristics play a significant role in both disease vulnerability and in response to specific therapies. The major goals of personalized medicine are therefore to predict an individual’s susceptibility to developing an illness, achieve accurate diagnosis, and optimize the most efficient and favorable response to treatment. The goal of achieving personalized medicine in psychiatry is a laudable one, because its attainment should be associated with a marked reduction in morbidity and mortality. In this review, we summarize an illustrative selection of studies that are laying the foundation towards personalizing medicine in major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. In addition, we present emerging applications that are likely to advance personalized medicine in psychiatry, with an emphasis on novel biomarkers and neuroimaging. PMID:23680237

  9. INTELLIGENCE, PERSONALITY AND ACHIEVEMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MUIR, R.C.; AND OTHERS

    A LONGITUDINAL DEVELOPMENTAL STUDY OF A GROUP OF MIDDLE CLASS CHILDREN IS DESCRIBED, WITH EMPHASIS ON A SEGMENT OF THE RESEARCH INVESTIGATING THE RELATIONSHIP OF ACHIEVEMENT, INTELLIGENCE, AND EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE. THE SUBJECTS WERE 105 CHILDREN AGED FIVE TO 6.3 ATTENDING TWO SCHOOLS IN MONTREAL. EACH CHILD WAS ASSESSED IN THE AREAS OF…

  10. [Personalized medicine: equity and access].

    PubMed

    Joly, Yann; Knoppers, Bartha M

    2014-11-01

    Personalized medicine has seen a recent increase in popularity amongst medical researchers and policymakers. Nevertheless, there are persistent legal, ethical, and social questions that need to be explored, particularly related to the criticism that personalized medicine constitutes an elitist model of healthcare. Investigating this critique the current manuscript argues that personalized medicine has the potential to become a positive force for equitable access to better healthcare at a national and international level.

  11. Personalized Medicine: Monogenic Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Goulden, Peter A; Vengoechea, Jaime; McKelvey, Kent

    2015-09-01

    Personalized medicine in diabetes is a topic which has gained significant momentum in recent years (Raz et al. 2013). A rapid rise in the number and combinations of diabetes therapies coupled with an unprecedented rise in diabetes prevalence rates has necessitated diabetes guidelines which emphasize the need for personalized patient-centered care (ADA 2014). There are many questions regarding the role genetics may be able to play in guiding therapy. Recent pharmacogenetic research has revealed polymorphisms that may impact patient response to metformin (Dong et al 2011) and glucagon-like-polypeptide-1 therapies (Smushkin et al. 2012). This may hold promise for helping identify patients who will better respond to specific agents and in the longer-term may help ensure a smooth journey along the therapeutic pathway. Monogenic or "single-gene" diabetes comprises nearly 2% of all cases of type 2 diabetes and provides a model for individualizing care. This review will discuss the diagnosis and treatment of this condition.

  12. Personalized Medicine: Monogenic Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Goulden, Peter A; Vengoechea, Jaime; McKelvey, Kent

    2015-09-01

    Personalized medicine in diabetes is a topic which has gained significant momentum in recent years (Raz et al. 2013). A rapid rise in the number and combinations of diabetes therapies coupled with an unprecedented rise in diabetes prevalence rates has necessitated diabetes guidelines which emphasize the need for personalized patient-centered care (ADA 2014). There are many questions regarding the role genetics may be able to play in guiding therapy. Recent pharmacogenetic research has revealed polymorphisms that may impact patient response to metformin (Dong et al 2011) and glucagon-like-polypeptide-1 therapies (Smushkin et al. 2012). This may hold promise for helping identify patients who will better respond to specific agents and in the longer-term may help ensure a smooth journey along the therapeutic pathway. Monogenic or "single-gene" diabetes comprises nearly 2% of all cases of type 2 diabetes and provides a model for individualizing care. This review will discuss the diagnosis and treatment of this condition. PMID:26390534

  13. [Protein microarrays and personalized medicine].

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiabo; Schneiderhan-Marra, Nicole; Joos, Thomas O

    2011-01-01

    Over the last 10 years, DNA microarrays have achieved a robust analytical performance, enabling their use for analyzing the whole transcriptome or for screening thousands of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in a single experiment. DNA microarrays allow scientists to correlate gene expression signatures with disease progression, to screen for disease-specific mutations, and to treat patients according to their individual genetic profiles; however, the real key is proteins and their manifold functions. It is necessary to achieve a greater understanding of not only protein function and abundance but also their role in the development of diseases. Protein concentrations have been shown to reflect the physiological and pathologic state of an organ, tissue, or cells far more directly than DNA, and proteins can be profiled effectively with protein microarrays, which require only a small amount of sample material. Protein microarrays have become wellestablished tools in basic and applied research, and the first products have already entered the in vitro diagnostics market. This review focuses on protein microarray applications for biomarker discovery and validation, disease diagnosis, and use within the area of personalized medicine. Protein microarrays have proved to be reliable research tools in screening for a multitude of parameters with only a minimal quantity of sample and have enormous potential in applications for diagnostic and personalized medicine.

  14. [Personalized Medicine in Rheumatoid Arthritis].

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Shunichi

    2015-10-01

    Medical strategy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has markedly advanced in recent years. The introductions of biologics and methotrexate as an anchor drug have made it possible to not only suppress pain and inflammation (clinical remission), but also to inhibit joint destruction (structural remission), leading to cure of the disease. In order to achieve this target, it is the most important to diagnose RA early and promote disease remission. However, since the condition and pathology are diverse among patients, optimal treatment for each patient is desired (personalized medicine). Treatment should be performed under consideration of the disease state such as activity, prognosis regarding joint destruction, and complications. It is also important to clarify the patient characteristics, such as responsiveness to the drugs and risk of adverse effects. Biomarkers, such as proteomics and pharmacogenomics (genetic polymorphism, etc.), are indispensable for personalized medicine. We have established a predictive model for methotrexate hepatotoxicity, consisting of 13 SNPs with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 89%, although the model should be validated with a larger-scale prospective study. RA is a multifactorial disorder with clinically heterogeneous features. Gene-environment interaction is closely involved in the production of anti-CCP antibodies (ACPA); thereafter, secondary stimuli of joints may lead to symptoms of RA. Joint injury, emotional stress, and infections often trigger the onset of RA. Cure can be achieved through complete remission by early aggressive treatment and returning to the pre-clinical state of RA with environmental improvement.

  15. Perspective: Balancing Personalized Medicine and Personalized Care

    PubMed Central

    Cornetta, Kenneth; Brown, Candy Gunther

    2013-01-01

    The current description of personalized medicine by the National Institutes of Health is “the science of individualized prevention and therapy.” Although physicians are just beginning to see the promise of genetic medicine coming to fruition, the rapid pace of sequencing technology, informatics, and computer science predict a true revolution in the ability to care for patients in the near future. The enthusiasm expressed by researchers is well founded, but the expectations voiced by the public do not center on advancing technology. Rather, patients are asking for personalized care: a holistic approach that considers an individual’s physical, mental, and spiritual well-being. This perspective considers psychological, religious, and ethical challenges that may arise as the precision of preventive medicine improves. Psychological studies already highlight the barriers to single gene testing and suggest significant barriers to the predictive testing envisioned by personalized medicine. Certain religious groups will likely mount opposition if they believe personalized medicine encourages embryo selection. If the technology prompts cost-containment discussions, those concerned about the sanctity of life may raise ethical objections. Consequently, the availability of new scientific developments does not guarantee advances in treatment because patients may prove unwilling to receive and act upon personalized genetic information. This perspective highlights current efforts to incorporate personalized medicine and personalized care into the medical curriculum, genetic counseling, and other aspects of clinical practice. As these efforts are generally independent, the authors offer recommendations for physicians and educators so that personalized medicine can be implemented in a manner that meets patient expectations for personalized care. PMID:23348082

  16. [Personalized medicine in rheumatology].

    PubMed

    Szekanecz, Zoltán

    2013-03-31

    In rheumatology, especially in arthritides, early diagnosis and aggressive therapy may open up new dimensions of expectations, such as improvement of pain, prevention of structural, functional damage and better quality of life. Targeted (biological) therapy has brought new horizons in rheumatology. As it is a rather expensive treatment modality, it has been urgent to develop tools suitable for the prediction of therapeutic responses. Several clinical, immunological and genetic biomarkers have been established for this purpose. Among clinical markers, male sex, younger age, lower or even higher disease activity at baseline, combination treatment and quitting smoking may lead to better treatment outcome. Immunological biomarkers, such as C-reactive protein, seropositivity, peripheral blood or synovial cellular content have been associated with therapeutic responses. Finally, numerous genes or gene signatures may also predict the efficacy or safety of immunosuppressive drugs. Although sometimes there have been only few studies conducted that led to some controversy, some biomarkers have also been validated. This may lead us to optimism in terms of wider acceptance of personalized medicine in rheumatology. PMID:23524232

  17. [PERSONALIZED MEDICINE: NEW CHALLENGES FOR THE PHYSICIAN].

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J

    2015-01-01

    The clinician has to cope with new advances in medicine. Traditional medicine, which is based upon pathophysiological reasoning and clinical experience, has been reinforced by evidence-based medicine, which relies on levels of evidence provided by controlled clinical trials carried out on cohorts of patients. Since a few years, personalized medicine has been put at the forefront. A therapy tailored to every patient, if possible characterized by biomarkers, among which, since the achievement of the whole human genome sequencing, an increasing number of genetic markers. Personalized medicine should be used as a complement of traditional and evidence-based medicine. Physicians should progressively integrate this new strategy in their therapeutic approach. Hence, clinicians have to face new challenges as far as scientific knowledge, practical applications and physician-patient relationship are concerned.

  18. The Personalized Medicine Coalition: goals and strategies.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, Edward; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S; Silver, Mike

    2005-01-01

    The concept of personalized medicine--that medical care can be tailored to the genomic and molecular profile of the individual--has repercussions that extend far beyond the technology that makes it possible. The adoption of personalized medicine will require changes in healthcare infrastructure, diagnostics and therapeutics business models, reimbursement policy from government and private payers, and a different approach to regulatory oversight. Personalized medicine will shift medical practices upstream from the reactive treatment of disease, to proactive healthcare management including screening, early treatment, and prevention, and will alter the roles of both physician and patient. It will create a greater reliance on electronic medical records and decision support systems in an industry that has a long history of resistance to information technology. Personalized medicine requires a systems approach to implementation. But in a healthcare economy that is highly decentralized and market driven, it is incumbent upon the stakeholders themselves to advocate for a consistent set of policies and legislation that pave the way for the adoption of personalized medicine. To address this need, the Personalized Medicine Coalition (PMC) was formed as a nonprofit umbrella organization of pharmaceutical, biotechnology, diagnostic, and information technology companies, healthcare providers and payers, patient advocacy groups, industry policy organizations, major academic institutions, and government agencies. The PMC provides a structure for achieving consensus positions among these stakeholders on crucial public policy issues, a role which will be vital to translating personalized medicine into widespread clinical practice. In this article, we outline the goals of the PMC, and the strategies it will take to foster communication, debate, and consensus on issues such as genetic discrimination, the reimbursement structures for pharmacogenomic drugs and diagnostics, regulation

  19. The Personalized Medicine Coalition: goals and strategies.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, Edward; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S; Silver, Mike

    2005-01-01

    The concept of personalized medicine--that medical care can be tailored to the genomic and molecular profile of the individual--has repercussions that extend far beyond the technology that makes it possible. The adoption of personalized medicine will require changes in healthcare infrastructure, diagnostics and therapeutics business models, reimbursement policy from government and private payers, and a different approach to regulatory oversight. Personalized medicine will shift medical practices upstream from the reactive treatment of disease, to proactive healthcare management including screening, early treatment, and prevention, and will alter the roles of both physician and patient. It will create a greater reliance on electronic medical records and decision support systems in an industry that has a long history of resistance to information technology. Personalized medicine requires a systems approach to implementation. But in a healthcare economy that is highly decentralized and market driven, it is incumbent upon the stakeholders themselves to advocate for a consistent set of policies and legislation that pave the way for the adoption of personalized medicine. To address this need, the Personalized Medicine Coalition (PMC) was formed as a nonprofit umbrella organization of pharmaceutical, biotechnology, diagnostic, and information technology companies, healthcare providers and payers, patient advocacy groups, industry policy organizations, major academic institutions, and government agencies. The PMC provides a structure for achieving consensus positions among these stakeholders on crucial public policy issues, a role which will be vital to translating personalized medicine into widespread clinical practice. In this article, we outline the goals of the PMC, and the strategies it will take to foster communication, debate, and consensus on issues such as genetic discrimination, the reimbursement structures for pharmacogenomic drugs and diagnostics, regulation

  20. Personalized medicine: Striding from genes to medicines

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Sunita R.

    2010-01-01

    Personalized medicine has the potential of revolutionizing patient care. This treatment modality prescribes therapies specific to individual patients based on pharmacogenetic and pharmacogenomic information. The mapping of the human genome has been an important milestone in understanding the interindividual differences in response to therapy. These differences are attributed to genotypic differences, with consequent phenotypic expression. It is important to note that targeted therapies should ideally be accompanied by a diagnostic marker. However, most efforts are being directed toward developing both these separately; the former by pharmaceutical companies and the later by diagnostic companies. Further, this companion strategy will be successful only when the biomarkers assayed are differentiated on a value-based approach rather than a cost-based approach, especially in countries that reimburse disease management costs. The advantages of using personalized therapies are manifold: targeted patient population; avoidance of drug-related toxicities and optimization of costs in nonresponder patients; reduction in drug development costs, and fewer patients to be tested in clinical trials. The success of personalized therapy in future will depend on a better understanding of pharmacogenomics and the extension of these scientific advances to all countries. PMID:21350731

  1. Insurance Coverage Policies for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Hresko, Andrew; Haga, Susanne B.

    2012-01-01

    Adoption of personalized medicine in practice has been slow, in part due to the lack of evidence of clinical benefit provided by these technologies. Coverage by insurers is a critical step in achieving widespread adoption of personalized medicine. Insurers consider a variety of factors when formulating medical coverage policies for personalized medicine, including the overall strength of evidence for a test, availability of clinical guidelines and health technology assessments by independent organizations. In this study, we reviewed coverage policies of the largest U.S. insurers for genomic (disease-related) and pharmacogenetic (PGx) tests to determine the extent that these tests were covered and the evidence basis for the coverage decisions. We identified 41 coverage policies for 49 unique testing: 22 tests for disease diagnosis, prognosis and risk and 27 PGx tests. Fifty percent (or less) of the tests reviewed were covered by insurers. Lack of evidence of clinical utility appears to be a major factor in decisions of non-coverage. The inclusion of PGx information in drug package inserts appears to be a common theme of PGx tests that are covered. This analysis highlights the variability of coverage determinations and factors considered, suggesting that the adoption of personal medicine will affected by numerous factors, but will continue to be slowed due to lack of demonstrated clinical benefit. PMID:25562360

  2. Insurance coverage policies for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Hresko, Andrew; Haga, Susanne B

    2012-10-30

    Adoption of personalized medicine in practice has been slow, in part due to the lack of evidence of clinical benefit provided by these technologies. Coverage by insurers is a critical step in achieving widespread adoption of personalized medicine. Insurers consider a variety of factors when formulating medical coverage policies for personalized medicine, including the overall strength of evidence for a test, availability of clinical guidelines and health technology assessments by independent organizations. In this study, we reviewed coverage policies of the largest U.S. insurers for genomic (disease-related) and pharmacogenetic (PGx) tests to determine the extent that these tests were covered and the evidence basis for the coverage decisions. We identified 41 coverage policies for 49 unique testing: 22 tests for disease diagnosis, prognosis and risk and 27 PGx tests. Fifty percent (or less) of the tests reviewed were covered by insurers. Lack of evidence of clinical utility appears to be a major factor in decisions of non-coverage. The inclusion of PGx information in drug package inserts appears to be a common theme of PGx tests that are covered. This analysis highlights the variability of coverage determinations and factors considered, suggesting that the adoption of personal medicine will affected by numerous factors, but will continue to be slowed due to lack of demonstrated clinical benefit.

  3. Personality types in academic medicine.

    PubMed

    Wallick, M M; Cambre, K M

    1999-07-01

    Based on Swiss physician-scholar Carl G. Jung's theory of psychological types proposed in the 1920s, Kathleen Cook Briggs and her daughter Isabel Briggs Myers developed the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) three decades later. They applied Jung's dynamic theory to determine how persons take in information, make decisions, and communicate thoughts and feelings. Medical students were of special interest to their research and much has been written since then about the use of the MBTI in medicine. In this study, results of MBTIs administered to 1797 freshmen students at Louisiana State University School of Medicine--New Orleans from 1988 to 1998 are compared with those reported by the MBTI developers and others over the years and throughout the United States. Findings indicate some noteworthy shifts in the psychological profile of medical students over time and among schools that may be due to changes in the delivery of health care, the increase in technology in the practice of medicine, and the dramatic increase of women in medicine. PMID:10474985

  4. Personality types in academic medicine.

    PubMed

    Wallick, M M; Cambre, K M

    1999-07-01

    Based on Swiss physician-scholar Carl G. Jung's theory of psychological types proposed in the 1920s, Kathleen Cook Briggs and her daughter Isabel Briggs Myers developed the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) three decades later. They applied Jung's dynamic theory to determine how persons take in information, make decisions, and communicate thoughts and feelings. Medical students were of special interest to their research and much has been written since then about the use of the MBTI in medicine. In this study, results of MBTIs administered to 1797 freshmen students at Louisiana State University School of Medicine--New Orleans from 1988 to 1998 are compared with those reported by the MBTI developers and others over the years and throughout the United States. Findings indicate some noteworthy shifts in the psychological profile of medical students over time and among schools that may be due to changes in the delivery of health care, the increase in technology in the practice of medicine, and the dramatic increase of women in medicine.

  5. Personality Traits, Learning and Academic Achievements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    There has been an increased interest in personality traits (especially the five-factor model) in relation to education and learning over the last decade. Previous studies have shown a relation between personality traits and learning, and between personality traits and academic achievement. The latter is typically described in terms of Grade Point…

  6. Privacy issues in personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Vaszar, Laszlo T; Cho, Mildred K; Raffin, Thomas A

    2003-03-01

    Pharmacogenomics is the emerging study of why individuals respond differently to drugs. It aims to replace the current 'one size fits all' therapeutic approach with 'personalized medicine' that will use pharmacogenomic tests to predict drug response. In a simple conceptualization, these tests challenge privacy as a result of two factors: how comprehensive is the test and how is the access to samples or digital information controlled. Point-of-care tests are likely to be limited in scope, fit seamlessly into medical records and do not raise qualitatively new ethical and privacy challenges. In order to define practically relevant pharmacogenomic predictive patterns however, large-scale clinical trials and research on human specimens will be required, resulting in large databases of genomic information. The genomic scans' magnitude, stability, implications to kin and ease of dissemination together represent a qualitatively different challenge compared to traditional, self-limited and often temporally transient medical information.

  7. Crowdfunding for Personalized Medicine Research

    PubMed Central

    Fumagalli, Danielle C.; Gouw, Arvin M.

    2015-01-01

    Given the current funding situation of the National Institutes of Health, getting funding for rare disease research is extremely difficult. In light of the enormous potential for research in the rare diseases and the scarcity of research funding, we provide a case study of a novel successful crowdfunding approach at a non-profit organization called Rare Genomics Institute. We partner with biotechnology companies willing to donate their products, such as mouse models, gene editing software, and sequencing services, for which researchers can apply. First, we find that personal stories can be powerful tools to seek funding from sympathetic donors who do not have the same rational considerations of impact and profit. Second, for foundations facing funding restrictions, company donations can be a valuable tool in addition to crowdfunding. Third, rare disease research is particularly rewarding for scientists as they proceed to be pioneers in the field during their academic careers. Overall, by connecting donors, foundations, researchers, and patients, crowdfunding has become a powerful alternative funding mechanism for personalized medicine. PMID:26604866

  8. Crowdfunding for Personalized Medicine Research.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, Danielle C; Gouw, Arvin M

    2015-12-01

    Given the current funding situation of the National Institutes of Health, getting funding for rare disease research is extremely difficult. In light of the enormous potential for research in the rare diseases and the scarcity of research funding, we provide a case study of a novel successful crowdfunding approach at a non-profit organization called Rare Genomics Institute. We partner with biotechnology companies willing to donate their products, such as mouse models, gene editing software, and sequencing services, for which researchers can apply. First, we find that personal stories can be powerful tools to seek funding from sympathetic donors who do not have the same rational considerations of impact and profit. Second, for foundations facing funding restrictions, company donations can be a valuable tool in addition to crowdfunding. Third, rare disease research is particularly rewarding for scientists as they proceed to be pioneers in the field during their academic careers. Overall, by connecting donors, foundations, researchers, and patients, crowdfunding has become a powerful alternative funding mechanism for personalized medicine.

  9. Prakriti-based medicine: A step towards personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Bijoya; Pancholi, Jigisha

    2011-04-01

    The concept of personalized medicine has been around for as long as people have been practicing medicine. From Charaka to Hippocrates, all have practiced the personalized approach for treating a disease. In the 21(st) century, personalized medicine is all about DNA. Whereas the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and epigenetic factors influence drug response and form the basis of personalized medicine, the tridosha theory forms the basis of Prakriti-based medicine. It is well established by now that western allopathic medicine is excellent in handling acute medical crises, whereas Ayurveda has successfully demonstrated an ability to manage chronic disorders that Western medicine has been unable to cure. With effective integration of 'omics' Prakriti-based medicine can play a vital role in this changing scenario of global health wisdom as Ayurveda offers its modalities by way of ahara (diet), vihara (lifestyle), and aushadhi (medication), which are the three pillars of prakriti-based medicine making it a holistic science. Prakriti-based medicine and other traditional medicine systems have the potential to offer remedies to the challenging health issues like adverse drug reactions, drug withdrawals, and economic disparities among few. An integrative global approach could do wonders to health sciences benefiting a broad spectrum of patients. PMID:22408293

  10. [MAJOR DEPRESSION AND PERSONALIZED MEDICINE].

    PubMed

    Pitchot, W

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a major public health problem. According to the World Health Organization (OMS), depression is currently the second cause of disability in developing countries. Depression is also one of the most frequent mental illnesses. When treating depression, the main objective is to achieve complete remission and to prevent recurrence. Unfor-tunately, in clinical practice, this aim is particularly difficult to reach. Indeed, in clinical trials and in naturalistic studies, remission levels are rather low. The challenge is to individualize the treatment of depression taking account clinical specificities, but also advances in the field of biological and genetic research. Today, intense psychiatric research tries to discover biomarkers to predict treatment response. Because individuals are highly different from a biological, psychological and sociological point of view, more personalized therapeutic approaches are recommended. PMID:26285462

  11. [Personalized medicine: expectations, disappointments and hopes].

    PubMed

    Baranov, V S

    2011-01-01

    Impressive advances in the studies of human genome, identification of mutant genes of hereditary diseases and candidate genes of many chronic multifactorial diseases (MFD) laid the foundation of molecular medicine. Its characteristic features, such as the focus on individual prophylactic care, give reason to consider it as personalized predictive medicine (PPM). The fundamental concept behind PPM comprises the notion of genetic passport and its methodological basis is genetic testing (GT). Recent progress in PPM has been achieved due to the introduction of comprehensive genomic screening of associations. At the same time, the contribution of known individual genes to the development of MFD appears to be relatively insignificant which does not allow to identify the main causes of MFD. It gave rise to some scepsis as regards the value of genome as a source of information for practical medicine. Possibilities for the improvement of GT and conditions for the introduction of the available data into clinical practice are discussed. The necessity to attract clinicians to the work on PPM is emphasized. The development of unified MFD gene panels for clinical application and software for the evaluation and interpretation of GT results for doctors and patients is an indispensable condition for the use of PPM knowledge in the healthcare practice. The importance of solution of relevant ethical, juridical, and social issues is underscored.

  12. Fundamentals of Pharmacogenetics in Personalized, Precision Medicine.

    PubMed

    Valdes, Roland; Yin, DeLu Tyler

    2016-09-01

    This article introduces fundamental principles of pharmacogenetics as applied to personalized and precision medicine. Pharmacogenetics establishes relationships between pharmacology and genetics by connecting phenotypes and genotypes in predicting the response of therapeutics in individual patients. We describe differences between precision and personalized medicine and relate principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics to applications in laboratory medicine. We also review basic principles of pharmacogenetics, including its evolution, how it enables the practice of personalized therapeutics, and the role of the clinical laboratory. These fundamentals are a segue for understanding specific clinical applications of pharmacogenetics described in subsequent articles in this issue.

  13. Fundamentals of Pharmacogenetics in Personalized, Precision Medicine.

    PubMed

    Valdes, Roland; Yin, DeLu Tyler

    2016-09-01

    This article introduces fundamental principles of pharmacogenetics as applied to personalized and precision medicine. Pharmacogenetics establishes relationships between pharmacology and genetics by connecting phenotypes and genotypes in predicting the response of therapeutics in individual patients. We describe differences between precision and personalized medicine and relate principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics to applications in laboratory medicine. We also review basic principles of pharmacogenetics, including its evolution, how it enables the practice of personalized therapeutics, and the role of the clinical laboratory. These fundamentals are a segue for understanding specific clinical applications of pharmacogenetics described in subsequent articles in this issue. PMID:27514461

  14. Explaining Math Achievement: Personality, Motivation, and Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilic-Bebek, Ebru

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the statistical significance of student trust next to the well-tested constructs of personality and motivation to determine whether trust is a significant predictor of course achievement in college math courses. Participants were 175 students who were taking undergraduate math courses in an urban public university. The…

  15. Genomes, Populations and Diseases: Ethnic Genomics and Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Stepanov, V.A.

    2010-01-01

    This review discusses the progress of ethnic genetics, the genetics of common diseases, and the concepts of personalized medicine. We show the relationship between the structure of genetic diversity in human populations and the varying frequencies of Mendelian and multifactor diseases. We also examine the population basis of pharmacogenetics and evaluate the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy, along with a review of new achievements and prospects in personalized genomics. PMID:22649660

  16. Making personalized medicine more affordable.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Naomi

    2015-06-01

    Precision medicine holds promise to solve the conundrums of clinical care. Foremost is the well-known but vexing problem of heterogeneity and the tyranny of the mean. Who will respond to a treatment? How can patients avoid the harms of treatments that will not work for them? And if we know who to treat, will that make care more efficient and less costly? But the converse can also be true: treatments become more expensive as the costs of development must be distributed across smaller populations. Next-generation sequencing is making genetic testing radically cheaper. But the costs of medical tests also include false-positive results, incidental findings, and the cascade of follow-up. The affordability of precision medicine is intertwined with the broader issue of affordability of our healthcare system, and will require all stakeholders to assume stewardship for access and sustainability. PMID:25728478

  17. The microeconomics of personalized medicine: today's challenge and tomorrow's promise.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jerel C; Furstenthal, Laura; Desai, Amar A; Norris, Troy; Sutaria, Saumya; Fleming, Edd; Ma, Philip

    2009-04-01

    'Personalized medicine' promises to increase the quality of clinical care and, in some cases, decrease health-care costs. Despite this, only a handful of diagnostic tests have made it to market, with mixed success. Historically, the challenges in this field were scientific. However, as discussed in this article, with the maturation of the '-omics' sciences, it now seems that the major barriers are increasingly related to economics. Overcoming the poor microeconomic alignment of incentives among key stakeholders is therefore crucial to catalysing the further development and adoption of personalized medicine, and we propose several actions that could help achieve this goal. PMID:19300459

  18. The dawn of personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Flaig, Thomas W.; Theodorescu, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Long awaited data from the clinical investigation of bladder cancer in both the neoadjuvant and adjuvant settings were released in 2011, setting the stage for the next generation of work in this area. The findings of a number of studies provide the first steps towards a personalized approach to this disease. PMID:22187014

  19. [ETHICS, MORALS AND SOCIETY IN PERSONALIZED MEDICINE].

    PubMed

    Flugelman, Anath

    2015-09-01

    Following the completion of the human genome project, genomic medicine including personalized medicine, widely based on pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics, is rapidly developing. This breakthrough should benefit humankind thanks to tailoring the most appropriate prevention, interventions and therapies to each individual, minimizing adverse side effects, based on inter-personal genetic variety and polymorphism. Yet wide spectrum ethical, legal and social issues carry significant implications regarding individuals, families, society and public health. The main issues concern genomic information and autonomy, justice and equity, resources allocation and solidarity, challenging the traditional role of medicine and dealing with unlimited boundaries of knowledge. Those issues are not new nor exceptional to genomic medicine, yet their wide unlimited scope and implications on many aspects of life renders them crucial. These aspects will be discussed in light of Beauchamp and Childress' four principles: non-maleficence, beneficence, autonomy and justice, and main moral philosophies, Kant's autonomy, Utilitarianism which promotes the common good, and Rawls' Theory of Justice. PMID:26665754

  20. [ETHICS, MORALS AND SOCIETY IN PERSONALIZED MEDICINE].

    PubMed

    Flugelman, Anath

    2015-09-01

    Following the completion of the human genome project, genomic medicine including personalized medicine, widely based on pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics, is rapidly developing. This breakthrough should benefit humankind thanks to tailoring the most appropriate prevention, interventions and therapies to each individual, minimizing adverse side effects, based on inter-personal genetic variety and polymorphism. Yet wide spectrum ethical, legal and social issues carry significant implications regarding individuals, families, society and public health. The main issues concern genomic information and autonomy, justice and equity, resources allocation and solidarity, challenging the traditional role of medicine and dealing with unlimited boundaries of knowledge. Those issues are not new nor exceptional to genomic medicine, yet their wide unlimited scope and implications on many aspects of life renders them crucial. These aspects will be discussed in light of Beauchamp and Childress' four principles: non-maleficence, beneficence, autonomy and justice, and main moral philosophies, Kant's autonomy, Utilitarianism which promotes the common good, and Rawls' Theory of Justice.

  1. [Personalized medicine: an elusive concept, diversified practices].

    PubMed

    Bateman, Simone

    2014-11-01

    This article proposes a brief inquiry into the field of scientific and medical practices currently referred to as "personalized medicine". Our inquiry identifies four recurring themes in the literature: health care that is tailored to the individual patient, that is enabled by emerging technologies, in which genetics and genomics occupy a prominent place, and which requires the collection of a massive amount of data. Personalized medicine, thus characterized, turns out to be less interested in the uniqueness of each patient's case than in the differences among patients within the same category. The aim of personalized medicine, thus described, is to obtain, with the help of cutting edge technology, more objective biological data on patients, in an attempt to improve the tools it has at its disposal to establish diagnoses, make therapeutic decisions, and provide more effective preventive measures.

  2. [Personalized medicine in radiotherapy: practitioners' perception].

    PubMed

    Britel, Manon; Foray, Nicolas; Préau, Marie

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study was designed to investigate the representations of radiotherapists in relation to personalized medicine. On the basis of current?>' available radiotherapy predictive tests, we tried to understand how these tests could be used in routine radiotherapy practice and in what way this possible change of practices could affect the role of radiotherapists in treatment protocols. In the absence of any available data allowing the construction of a quantitative tool, qualitative data were recorded by individual interviews with radiotherapists. Based on textual data analysis, a second national quantitative phase was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire. Crossover analysis of the two datasets highlighted the interest of radiotherapists in personalized medicine and the use of predictive tests, while indicating certain limitations and concerns in relation to ethical issues related to personalized medicine in oncology and the physician's position. PMID:26752033

  3. Personalized medicine for pathological circadian dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Skelton, Rachel L.; Kornhauser, Jon M.; Tate, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    The recent approval of a therapeutic for a circadian disorder has increased interest in developing additional medicines for disorders characterized by circadian disruption. However, previous experience demonstrates that drug development for central nervous system (CNS) disorders has a high failure rate. Personalized medicine, or the approach to identifying the right treatment for the right patient, has recently become the standard for drug development in the oncology field. In addition to utilizing Companion Diagnostics (CDx) that identify specific genetic biomarkers to prescribe certain targeted therapies, patient profiling is regularly used to enrich for a responsive patient population during clinical trials, resulting in fewer patients required for statistical significance and a higher rate of success for demonstrating efficacy and hence receiving approval for the drug. This personalized medicine approach may be one mechanism that could reduce the high clinical trial failure rate in the development of CNS drugs. This review will discuss current circadian trials, the history of personalized medicine in oncology, lessons learned from a recently approved circadian therapeutic, and how personalized medicine can be tailored for use in future clinical trials for circadian disorders to ultimately lead to the approval of more therapeutics for patients suffering from circadian abnormalities. PMID:26150790

  4. DNA Aptamer Technology for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Hang; Hwang, Kevin; Li, Ji; Torabi, Seyed-Fakhreddin; Lu, Yi

    2014-01-01

    This review highlights recent progress in developing DNA aptamers for personalized medicine, with more focus on in vivo studies for potential clinical applications. Examples include design of aptamers in combination with DNA nanostructures, nanomaterials, or microfluidic devices as diagnostic probes or therapeutic agents for cancers and other diseases. The use of aptamers as targeting agents in drug delivery is also covered. The advantages and future directions of such DNA aptamer-based technology for the continued development of personalized medicine are discussed. PMID:24791224

  5. Future perspectives of personalized medicine in traditional Chinese medicine: a systems biology approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aihua; Sun, Hui; Wang, Ping; Han, Ying; Wang, Xijun

    2012-01-01

    Deconstruction of molecular pathways and advances in enabling technology platforms have opened new horizons for disease management, exploring therapeutic solutions to each individual patient beyond the one-size fits all practice. Application of personalized medicine paradigms aims to achieve the right diagnosis and right treatment for the right patient at the right time at the right cost. With the potential to transform medical practice across global communities, personalized medicine is emerging as the flagship of modern medicine. In recent years, the health care paradigm has shifted from a focus on diseases to a major hot of personalized traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) with holistic approach. TCM focuses on health maintenance, emphasizes on enhancing the body's resistance to diseases and especially showes great advantages in early intervention, personalized and combination therapies, etc. Systems biology, a new science of the 21st century, becomes practically available and resembles TCM in many aspects such as study method and design, and is current key component technologies that serves as the major driving force for translation of the personalized medicine revolution of TCM principles into practice, will advance personalized therapy principles into healthcare management tools for individuals and populations. Such system approach concepts are transforming principles of TCM to modern therapeutic approaches, enable a predictive and preventive medicine and will lead to personalized medicine. To realise the full potential of personalized TCM, we describe the current status of principles and practice of TCM integrated with systems biology platform. Some characteristic examples are presented to highlight the application of this platform to personalized TCM research and development as well as some of the necessary milestones for moving TCM into mainstream health care. PMID:22305254

  6. Future perspectives of personalized medicine in traditional Chinese medicine: a systems biology approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aihua; Sun, Hui; Wang, Ping; Han, Ying; Wang, Xijun

    2012-01-01

    Deconstruction of molecular pathways and advances in enabling technology platforms have opened new horizons for disease management, exploring therapeutic solutions to each individual patient beyond the one-size fits all practice. Application of personalized medicine paradigms aims to achieve the right diagnosis and right treatment for the right patient at the right time at the right cost. With the potential to transform medical practice across global communities, personalized medicine is emerging as the flagship of modern medicine. In recent years, the health care paradigm has shifted from a focus on diseases to a major hot of personalized traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) with holistic approach. TCM focuses on health maintenance, emphasizes on enhancing the body's resistance to diseases and especially showes great advantages in early intervention, personalized and combination therapies, etc. Systems biology, a new science of the 21st century, becomes practically available and resembles TCM in many aspects such as study method and design, and is current key component technologies that serves as the major driving force for translation of the personalized medicine revolution of TCM principles into practice, will advance personalized therapy principles into healthcare management tools for individuals and populations. Such system approach concepts are transforming principles of TCM to modern therapeutic approaches, enable a predictive and preventive medicine and will lead to personalized medicine. To realise the full potential of personalized TCM, we describe the current status of principles and practice of TCM integrated with systems biology platform. Some characteristic examples are presented to highlight the application of this platform to personalized TCM research and development as well as some of the necessary milestones for moving TCM into mainstream health care.

  7. Family and personal correlates of academic achievement.

    PubMed

    García Bacete, F J; Rosel Remírez, J

    2001-04-01

    Researchers and educators raise the question of whether pupils' academic performance can be improved through parental involvement in academic activities. The main objective of the following study is to verify whether parental involvement in school activities and family socioeconomic status are associated with children's academic achievement. 150 Spanish seventh grade pupils completed intelligence tests, and their teachers assessed parents' involvement in the school and estimated parents' cultural levels. To measure academic achievement the pupil's overall grade was taken from the Pupils' Final Evaluation Registers. The education and professional level of the mother and father and home size were obtained from the Pupil Personal Register; these variables define the family socioeconomic status. The data, analyzed through application of structural equations, suggest that academic achievement is directly influenced by the cultural level of the family and the child's intelligence but is indirectly influenced by parental involvement in school activities and the socioeconomic status of the child's family.

  8. Genomic and personalized medicine: foundations and applications.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, Geoffrey S; Willard, Huntington F

    2009-12-01

    The last decade has witnessed a steady embrace of genomic and personalized medicine by senior government officials, industry leadership, health care providers, and the public. Genomic medicine, which is the use of information from genomes and their derivatives (RNA, proteins, and metabolites) to guide medical decision making-is a key component of personalized medicine, which is a rapidly advancing field of health care that is informed by each person's unique clinical, genetic, genomic, and environmental information. As medicine begins to embrace genomic tools that enable more precise prediction and treatment disease, which include "whole genome" interrogation of sequence variation, transcription, proteins, and metabolites, the fundamentals of genomic and personalized medicine will require the development, standardization, and integration of several important tools into health systems and clinical workflows. These tools include health risk assessment, family health history, and clinical decision support for complex risk and predictive information. Together with genomic information, these tools will enable a paradigm shift to a comprehensive approach that will identify individual risks and guide clinical management and decision making, all of which form the basis for a more informed and effective approach to patient care. DNA-based risk assessment for common complex disease, molecular signatures for cancer diagnosis and prognosis, and genome-guided therapy and dose selection are just among the few important examples for which genome information has already enabled personalized health care along the continuum from health to disease. In addition, information from individual genomes, which is a fast-moving area of technological development, is spawning a social and information revolution among consumers that will undoubtedly affect health care decision making. Although these and other scientific findings are making their way from the genome to the clinic, the full

  9. Plasma Medicine: Current Achievements and Future Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laroussi, Mounir

    2012-10-01

    Research on the biomedical applications of low temperature plasmas started with small scale experiments that were simply aimed at discovering what happens to biological cells when exposed to the chemically rich environment of plasma. These early experiments took place in the mid to late 1990s. As interest in this multidisciplinary field dramatically rose, various engineering and physics groups collaborated with biologists and medical experts to investigate the use of plasma technology as a basis for innovative medical approaches to cure various diseases. However, many questions concerning the fundamental mechanisms involved in cell-plasma interaction remained unanswered. As a result various workshops were organized to gather the diverse research community in the field of plasma medicine in order to have a fruitful exchange of ideas regarding the scientific challenges that needed to be surmounted to advance and expand the field's knowledge base. The present GEC workshop continues this important tradition of scientific cooperation since there is still a significant lack of understanding of many of the biochemical and molecular pathways that come into play when biological cells are exposed to plasmas. In this talk, first background information on the various plasma devices developed in our institute will be presented. This will be followed by a summary of our work on the effects of plasmas on prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The talk will be concluded by presenting our vision of the future of the field and an outline of the main challenges that need to be overcome if practical medical applications are to be achieved.

  10. Chasing Mendel: five questions for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Joyner, Michael J; Prendergast, Franklyn G

    2014-06-01

    Ideas about personalized medicine are underpinned in part by evolutionary biology's Modern Synthesis. In this essay we link personalized medicine to the efforts of the early statistical investigators who quantified the heritability of human phenotype and then attempted to reconcile their observations with Mendelian genetics. As information about the heritability of common diseases was obtained, similar efforts were directed at understanding the genetic basis of disease phenotypes. These ideas were part of the rationale driving the Human Genome Project and subsequently the personalized medicine movement. In this context, we discuss: (1) the current state of the genotype-phenotype relationship in humans, (2) the common-disease-common-variant hypothesis, (3) the current ability of 'omic' information to inform clinical decision making, (4) emerging ideas about the therapeutic insight available from rare genetic variants, and (5) the social and behavioural barriers to the wider potential success of personalized medicine. There are significant gaps in knowledge as well as conceptual, intellectual, and philosophical limitations in each of these five areas. We then provide specific recommendations to mitigate these limitations and close by asking if it is time for the biomedical research community to 'stop chasing Mendel?'

  11. Reprogrammed cell delivery for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Wieland, Markus; Fussenegger, Martin

    2012-10-01

    In most approaches, personalized medicine requires time- and cost-intensive characterization of an individual's genetic background in order to achieve the best-adapted therapy. For this purpose, cell-based drug delivery offers a promising alternative. In particular, synthetic biology has introduced the vision of cells being programmable therapeutic production facilities that can be introduced into patients. This review highlights the progress made in synthetic biology-based cell engineering toward advanced drug delivery entities. Starting from basic one-input responsive transcriptional or post-transcriptional gene control systems, the field has reached a level on which cells can be engineered to detect cancer cells, to obtain control over T-cell proliferation, and to restore blood glucose homeostasis upon blue light illumination. Furthermore, a cellular implant was developed that detects blood urate level disorders and acts accordingly to restore homeostasis while another cellular implant was engineered as an artificial insemination device that releases bull sperm into bovine ovarian only during ovulation time by recording endogenous luteinizing hormone levels. Soon, the field will reach a stage at which cells can be reprogrammed to detect multiple metabolic parameters and self-sufficiently treat any disorder connected to them. PMID:22721864

  12. Training the Future Leaders in Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Mason-Suares, Heather; Sweetser, David A.; Lindeman, Neal I.; Morton, Cynthia C.

    2016-01-01

    The era of personalized medicine has arrived, and with it a need for leaders in this discipline. This generation of trainees requires a cadre of new skill sets to lead the implementation of personalized medicine into mainstream healthcare. Traditional training programs no longer provide trainees with all the skills they will need to optimize implementation of this revolution now underway in medicine. Today’s trainees must manage clinical teams, act as clinical and molecular diagnostic consultants, train other healthcare professionals, teach future generations, and be knowledgeable about clinical trials to facilitate genomic-based therapies. To prepare trainees for the transition to junior faculty positions, contemporary genomic training programs must emphasize the development of these management, teaching, and clinical skills. PMID:26751479

  13. Personalized medicine: is it a pharmacogenetic mirage?

    PubMed

    Shah, Rashmi R; Shah, Devron R

    2012-10-01

    The notion of personalized medicine has developed from the application of the discipline of pharmacogenetics to clinical medicine. Although the clinical relevance of genetically-determined inter-individual differences in pharmacokinetics is poorly understood, and the genotype-phenotype association data on clinical outcomes often inconsistent, officially approved drug labels frequently include pharmacogenetic information concerning the safety and/or efficacy of a number of drugs and refer to the availability of the pharmacogenetic test concerned. Regulatory authorities differ in their approach to these issues. Evidence emerging subsequently has generally revealed the pharmacogenetic information included in the label to be premature. Revised drugs labels, together with a flurry of other collateral activities, have raised public expectations of personalized medicine, promoted as 'the right drug at the right dose the first time.' These expectations place the prescribing physician in a dilemma and at risk of litigation, especially when evidence-based information on genotype-related dosing schedules is to all intent and purposes non-existent and guidelines, intended to improve the clinical utility of available pharmacogenetic information or tests, distance themselves from any responsibility. Lack of efficacy or an adverse drug reaction is frequently related to non-genetic factors. Phenoconversion, arising from drug interactions, poses another often neglected challenge to any potential success of personalized medicine by mimicking genetically-determined enzyme deficiency. A more realistic promotion of personalized medicine should acknowledge current limitations and emphasize that pharmacogenetic testing can only improve the likelihood of diminishing a specific toxic effect or increasing the likelihood of a beneficial effect and that application of pharmacogenetics to clinical medicine cannot adequately predict drug response in individual patients. PMID:22591598

  14. Personalized medicine: is it a pharmacogenetic mirage?

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rashmi R; Shah, Devron R

    2012-01-01

    The notion of personalized medicine has developed from the application of the discipline of pharmacogenetics to clinical medicine. Although the clinical relevance of genetically-determined inter-individual differences in pharmacokinetics is poorly understood, and the genotype-phenotype association data on clinical outcomes often inconsistent, officially approved drug labels frequently include pharmacogenetic information concerning the safety and/or efficacy of a number of drugs and refer to the availability of the pharmacogenetic test concerned. Regulatory authorities differ in their approach to these issues. Evidence emerging subsequently has generally revealed the pharmacogenetic information included in the label to be premature. Revised drugs labels, together with a flurry of other collateral activities, have raised public expectations of personalized medicine, promoted as ‘the right drug at the right dose the first time.’ These expectations place the prescribing physician in a dilemma and at risk of litigation, especially when evidence-based information on genotype-related dosing schedules is to all intent and purposes non-existent and guidelines, intended to improve the clinical utility of available pharmacogenetic information or tests, distance themselves from any responsibility. Lack of efficacy or an adverse drug reaction is frequently related to non-genetic factors. Phenoconversion, arising from drug interactions, poses another often neglected challenge to any potential success of personalized medicine by mimicking genetically-determined enzyme deficiency. A more realistic promotion of personalized medicine should acknowledge current limitations and emphasize that pharmacogenetic testing can only improve the likelihood of diminishing a specific toxic effect or increasing the likelihood of a beneficial effect and that application of pharmacogenetics to clinical medicine cannot adequately predict drug response in individual patients. PMID:22591598

  15. Revitalizing Personalized Medicine: Respecting Biomolecular Complexities Beyond Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jayachandran, D; Ramkrishna, U; Skiles, J; Renbarger, J; Ramkrishna, D

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent advancements in “omic” technologies, personalized medicine has not realized its fullest potential due to isolated and incomplete application of gene expression tools. In many instances, pharmacogenomics is being interchangeably used for personalized medicine, when actually it is one of the many facets of personalized medicine. Herein, we highlight key issues that are hampering the advancement of personalized medicine and highlight emerging predictive tools that can serve as a decision support mechanism for physicians to personalize treatments. PMID:24739991

  16. Pharmacogenetics, pharmacogenomics and ayurgenomics for personalized medicine: a paradigm shift.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pooja D

    2015-01-01

    The value of health care can be increased tremendously through individualized medicine. With the promise of individualized medicine, healthcare professionals will be able to better predict disease risk, prevent development of disease and manage treatments more efficiently thereby allowing people to be healthier and active longer. The developments in the area of pharmacogenetics/pharmacogenomics can help the physicians achieve the target of personalized medicine. Personalized medicine will come to mean not just the right drug for the right individual, but the right drug for the specific disease affecting a specific individual. The use of personalized medicine will make clinical trials more efficient by lowering the costs that would arise due to adverse drug effects and prescription of drugs that have been proven ineffective in certain genotypes. The genotypic experiments have laid valuable insights into genetic underpinnings of diseases. However it is being realized that identification of sub-groups within normal controls corresponding to contrasting disease susceptibility could lead to more effective discovery of predictive markers for diseases. However there are no modern methods available to look at the inter-individual differences within ethnically matched healthy populations. Ayurveda, an exquisitely elaborate system of predictive medicine which has been practiced for over 3500 years in India, can help in bridging this gap. In contrast to the contemporary system of medicine, the therapeutic regimen in Ayurveda is implicated on tridoshas and prakriti. According to this system, every individual is born with his or her own basic constitution, which to a great extent regulates inter-individual variability in susceptibility to diseases and response to external environment, diet and drugs. Thus the researchers in India have demonstrated that integration of this stratified approach of Ayurveda into genomics i.e. Ayurgenomics could complement personalized medicine

  17. Pharmacogenetics, pharmacogenomics and ayurgenomics for personalized medicine: a paradigm shift.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pooja D

    2015-01-01

    The value of health care can be increased tremendously through individualized medicine. With the promise of individualized medicine, healthcare professionals will be able to better predict disease risk, prevent development of disease and manage treatments more efficiently thereby allowing people to be healthier and active longer. The developments in the area of pharmacogenetics/pharmacogenomics can help the physicians achieve the target of personalized medicine. Personalized medicine will come to mean not just the right drug for the right individual, but the right drug for the specific disease affecting a specific individual. The use of personalized medicine will make clinical trials more efficient by lowering the costs that would arise due to adverse drug effects and prescription of drugs that have been proven ineffective in certain genotypes. The genotypic experiments have laid valuable insights into genetic underpinnings of diseases. However it is being realized that identification of sub-groups within normal controls corresponding to contrasting disease susceptibility could lead to more effective discovery of predictive markers for diseases. However there are no modern methods available to look at the inter-individual differences within ethnically matched healthy populations. Ayurveda, an exquisitely elaborate system of predictive medicine which has been practiced for over 3500 years in India, can help in bridging this gap. In contrast to the contemporary system of medicine, the therapeutic regimen in Ayurveda is implicated on tridoshas and prakriti. According to this system, every individual is born with his or her own basic constitution, which to a great extent regulates inter-individual variability in susceptibility to diseases and response to external environment, diet and drugs. Thus the researchers in India have demonstrated that integration of this stratified approach of Ayurveda into genomics i.e. Ayurgenomics could complement personalized medicine.

  18. Personalized medicine and the clinical laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Pinho, João Renato Rebello; Sitnik, Roberta; Mangueira, Cristóvão Luis Pitangueira

    2014-01-01

    Personalized medicine is the use of biomarkers, most of them molecular markers, for detection of specific genetic traits to guide various approaches for preventing and treating different conditions. The identification of several genes related to heredity, oncology and infectious diseases lead to the detection of genetic polymorphisms that are involved not only in different clinical progression of these diseases but also in variations in treatment response. Currently, it is possible to detect these polymorphisms using several methodologies: detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms using polymerase chain reaction methods; nucleic acid microarray detection; and nucleic acid sequencing with automatized DNA sequencers using Sanger-derived methods and new generation sequencing. Personalized medicine assays are directed towards detecting genetic variations that alter interactions of drugs with targets or the metabolic pathways of drugs (upstream and downstream) and can be utilized for the selection of drug formulations and detect different immunogenicities of the drug. Personalized medicine applications have already been described in different areas of Medicine and allow specific treatment approaches to be applied to each patient and pathology according to the results of these assays. The application of such a protocol demands an increasing interaction between the clinical laboratory and the clinical staff. For its implementation, a coordinated team composed of basic researchers and physicians highly specialized in their areas supported by a highly specialized team of clinical analysts particularly trained in molecular biology assays is necessary. PMID:25295459

  19. Systems medicine, personalized health and therapy.

    PubMed

    Siest, Gérard; Auffray, Charles; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Murray, Helena; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Ansari, Marc; Marc, Janja; Jacobs, Peter; Meyer, Urs; Van Schaik, Ron H N; Müller, Mathias M; Wevers, Ron A; Simmaco, Maurizio; Kussmann, Martin; Manolopoulos, Vangelis G; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Beastall, Graham; Németh, György

    2015-01-01

    The 7th Santorini Conference was held in Santorini, Greece, and brought together 200 participants from 40 countries in several continents, including Europe, USA but also Japan, Korea, Brazil and South Africa. The attendees had the opportunity to: listen to 60 oral presentations; participate in two lunch symposia; look at 103 posters, which were divided in two groups ('systems medicine and environment' and 'pharmacogenomics and cancer') and attend a dedicated exhibition with six companies. The meeting was organized by the Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) U1122; IGE-PCV and by 'Biologie Prospective' with the collaboration of the European Society of Pharmacogenomics and Theranostics (ESPT), under the auspices of international organizations (e.g., International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory medicine [IFCC], European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine [EFLM], European Diagnostic Manufacturers Association [EDMA], Federation of European Pharmacological Societies [EPHAR], European Science Foundation [ESF]). The 3 days of the conference stimulated intensive discussions on systems biology and the influence of omics technologies on personalized health. Sixty speakers were invited or selected from early abstracts and gave presentations on the following topics: From systems biology to systems medicine/pharmacology; Omics/translating pharmacogenomics/proteomic biomarkers/metabolomics; Human nutrition and health/personalized medicine. We are summarizing here the main topics and presentations, according to the successive sessions.

  20. Systems medicine, personalized health and therapy.

    PubMed

    Siest, Gérard; Auffray, Charles; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Murray, Helena; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Ansari, Marc; Marc, Janja; Jacobs, Peter; Meyer, Urs; Van Schaik, Ron H N; Müller, Mathias M; Wevers, Ron A; Simmaco, Maurizio; Kussmann, Martin; Manolopoulos, Vangelis G; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Beastall, Graham; Németh, György

    2015-01-01

    The 7th Santorini Conference was held in Santorini, Greece, and brought together 200 participants from 40 countries in several continents, including Europe, USA but also Japan, Korea, Brazil and South Africa. The attendees had the opportunity to: listen to 60 oral presentations; participate in two lunch symposia; look at 103 posters, which were divided in two groups ('systems medicine and environment' and 'pharmacogenomics and cancer') and attend a dedicated exhibition with six companies. The meeting was organized by the Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) U1122; IGE-PCV and by 'Biologie Prospective' with the collaboration of the European Society of Pharmacogenomics and Theranostics (ESPT), under the auspices of international organizations (e.g., International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory medicine [IFCC], European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine [EFLM], European Diagnostic Manufacturers Association [EDMA], Federation of European Pharmacological Societies [EPHAR], European Science Foundation [ESF]). The 3 days of the conference stimulated intensive discussions on systems biology and the influence of omics technologies on personalized health. Sixty speakers were invited or selected from early abstracts and gave presentations on the following topics: From systems biology to systems medicine/pharmacology; Omics/translating pharmacogenomics/proteomic biomarkers/metabolomics; Human nutrition and health/personalized medicine. We are summarizing here the main topics and presentations, according to the successive sessions. PMID:26401575

  1. Genomic medicine, precision medicine, personalized medicine: what's in a name?

    PubMed

    Roden, D M; Tyndale, R F

    2013-08-01

    This issue of Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics is devoted to genomic medicine, and a reader may reasonably ask what we mean when we use those words. In the initial issue of the journal Genomics in 1987, McKusick and Ruddle pointed out that the descriptor "genome" had been coined in 1920 as a hybrid of "gene" and "chromosome," and that their new journal would focus on the "newly-developing discipline of mapping/sequencing (including analysis of the information)." A key milestone in the field was the generation of the first draft of a human genome in 2000, but this success really represents only one of many milestones in the journey from Mendel to MiSeq.

  2. Iranian-Islamic traditional medicine: An ancient comprehensive personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zeinalian, Mehrdad; Eshaghi, Mehdi; Naji, Homayoun; Marandi, Sayyed Mohammad Masoud; Sharbafchi, Mohammad Reza; Asgary, Sedigheh

    2015-01-01

    Personalized medicine (PM) is a novel term used for a medical model in which all diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic aspects of a disease are individualized for a patient using specific molecular testing. In Iranian-Islamic traditional medicine (IITM) an ancient paradigm for PM has been described which has been introduced in this paper. We reviewed the ancient resources of IITM and many valid recent studies on personalized medicine and described an ancient feature of personalized medicine in comparison with new ones. According to IITM scholars, every person has an individual temperament which is concluded of four basic humors combination. The individual temper is influenced by internal and external factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, season, and environment. This variability leads to different physical and mental behaviors toward a particular condition; so if we could identify the patient's temper, we would predict his/her health-related behaviors rather than predisposition and prognosis to different diseases, and select the best treatment. This holistic viewpoint of IITM to the human health and disease justifies the variable phenotypes among similar illnesses; the fact around which more advanced high-tech researches are being developed to explore all specific molecular pathways. IITM offers an ancient comprehensive PM (APM) which is more available and inexpensive compared to the modern PM (MPM). Moreover, APM focuses more on fitness than illness in comparison to MPM. It seems more attention to APM introduced by IITM could help us to promote health community. Design studies using high-tech MPM techniques would likely lead to clarification of most molecular aspects of APM. PMID:26605230

  3. Personalized Medicine: Understanding Probabilities and Managing Expectations

    PubMed Central

    Laksman, Zachary

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Personalized medicine promises to represent a transformation in clinical care that will be ushered in by the unprecedented growth and development in the field of human genetics. Further examination of the scientific foundations of this new hope reveals a great number of challenges that lie ahead. While basic science research feverishly races to produce solutions, we continue to wait for the translation of deliverables. Products that have and will come to market may leave our clinical communities and systems exposed and unprepared. At each step, from basic science research to infrastructure development, a great deal of creativity and investment are required before the arsenal of more personalized tools can be assimilated into our current models of health care. This commentary seeks to share perspectives on the current status of personalized medicine from the vantage point of several potential investors, and integrate them into a common set of goals and understanding. We conclude that the stylized model of personalized medicine is more akin to a marketing tool than a literal prediction of the future. PMID:20878362

  4. Implementing Personalized Medicine in the Academic Health Center.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Scott T

    2016-01-01

    Recently we at Partners Health Care had a series of articles in the Journal of Personalized Medicine describing how we are going about implementing Personalized Medicine in an academic health care system [1-10].[...]. PMID:27657137

  5. [Rheumatoid arthritis: problems and significance of personalized medicine].

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    The last decade is prominent for significant progress in research in the field of mechanisms underlying development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) opening new prospects in pathogenetic treatment of this disease. A great success of RA pharmacotherapy during the last 10 year period is design of novel genetically engineered biological medicines. Achievements of molecular biology, pharmacological genetics and biological infornmation science promote an individual approach to treatment of RA patients within a new conception of individual medicine which considers personal aspects of genomic and proteomic sciences. This novel approach to treatment of RA patients can improve RA outcomes and noticeably reduce cost of the treatmnent.

  6. Personalized medicine and human genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi-Fan; Goldstein, David B; Angrist, Misha; Cavalleri, Gianpiero

    2014-09-01

    Human genetic diversity has long been studied both to understand how genetic variation influences risk of disease and infer aspects of human evolutionary history. In this article, we review historical and contemporary views of human genetic diversity, the rare and common mutations implicated in human disease susceptibility, and the relevance of genetic diversity to personalized medicine. First, we describe the development of thought about diversity through the 20th century and through more modern studies including genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and next-generation sequencing. We introduce several examples, such as sickle cell anemia and Tay-Sachs disease that are caused by rare mutations and are more frequent in certain geographical populations, and common treatment responses that are caused by common variants, such as hepatitis C infection. We conclude with comments about the continued relevance of human genetic diversity in medical genetics and personalized medicine more generally. PMID:25059740

  7. Pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Manolopoulos, Vangelis G; Dechairo, Bryan; Huriez, Alain; Kühn, Alexander; Llerena, Adrián; van Schaik, Ron H; Yeo, Kiang-Teck J; Ragia, Georgia; Siest, Gerard

    2011-05-01

    The Santorini Conference on prospective biology, genomics and pharmacogenomics occurs every 2 years. On 30 September to 2nd October 2010, the fifth meeting in this series took place in Santorini, Greece. This conference has established a tradition of organizing a workshop each time to address the most recent developments and key issues in pharmacogenomics. This year, the workshop was chaired by Bryan Dechairo and Alain Huriez, and was titled 'Pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine in clinical practice'.

  8. Molecular Dynamics: New Frontier in Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Sneha, P; Doss, C George Priya

    2016-01-01

    The field of drug discovery has witnessed infinite development over the last decade with the demand for discovery of novel efficient lead compounds. Although the development of novel compounds in this field has seen large failure, a breakthrough in this area might be the establishment of personalized medicine. The trend of personalized medicine has shown stupendous growth being a hot topic after the successful completion of Human Genome Project and 1000 genomes pilot project. Genomic variant such as SNPs play a vital role with respect to inter individual's disease susceptibility and drug response. Hence, identification of such genetic variants has to be performed before administration of a drug. This process requires high-end techniques to understand the complexity of the molecules which might bring an insight to understand the compounds at their molecular level. To sustenance this, field of bioinformatics plays a crucial role in revealing the molecular mechanism of the mutation and thereby designing a drug for an individual in fast and affordable manner. High-end computational methods, such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has proved to be a constitutive approach to detecting the minor changes associated with an SNP for better understanding of the structural and functional relationship. The parameters used in molecular dynamic simulation elucidate different properties of a macromolecule, such as protein stability and flexibility. MD along with docking analysis can reveal the synergetic effect of an SNP in protein-ligand interaction and provides a foundation for designing a particular drug molecule for an individual. This compelling application of computational power and the advent of other technologies have paved a promising way toward personalized medicine. In this in-depth review, we tried to highlight the different wings of MD toward personalized medicine. PMID:26827606

  9. Molecular Dynamics: New Frontier in Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Sneha, P; Doss, C George Priya

    2016-01-01

    The field of drug discovery has witnessed infinite development over the last decade with the demand for discovery of novel efficient lead compounds. Although the development of novel compounds in this field has seen large failure, a breakthrough in this area might be the establishment of personalized medicine. The trend of personalized medicine has shown stupendous growth being a hot topic after the successful completion of Human Genome Project and 1000 genomes pilot project. Genomic variant such as SNPs play a vital role with respect to inter individual's disease susceptibility and drug response. Hence, identification of such genetic variants has to be performed before administration of a drug. This process requires high-end techniques to understand the complexity of the molecules which might bring an insight to understand the compounds at their molecular level. To sustenance this, field of bioinformatics plays a crucial role in revealing the molecular mechanism of the mutation and thereby designing a drug for an individual in fast and affordable manner. High-end computational methods, such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has proved to be a constitutive approach to detecting the minor changes associated with an SNP for better understanding of the structural and functional relationship. The parameters used in molecular dynamic simulation elucidate different properties of a macromolecule, such as protein stability and flexibility. MD along with docking analysis can reveal the synergetic effect of an SNP in protein-ligand interaction and provides a foundation for designing a particular drug molecule for an individual. This compelling application of computational power and the advent of other technologies have paved a promising way toward personalized medicine. In this in-depth review, we tried to highlight the different wings of MD toward personalized medicine.

  10. Personal genomes, quantitative dynamic omics and personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Mias, George I.; Snyder, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The rapid technological developments following the Human Genome Project have made possible the availability of personalized genomes. As the focus now shifts from characterizing genomes to making personalized disease associations, in combination with the availability of other omics technologies, the next big push will be not only to obtain a personalized genome, but to quantitatively follow other omics. This will include transcriptomes, proteomes, metabolomes, antibodyomes, and new emerging technologies, enabling the profiling of thousands of molecular components in individuals. Furthermore, omics profiling performed longitudinally can probe the temporal patterns associated with both molecular changes and associated physiological health and disease states. Such data necessitates the development of computational methodology to not only handle and descriptively assess such data, but also construct quantitative biological models. Here we describe the availability of personal genomes and developing omics technologies that can be brought together for personalized implementations and how these novel integrated approaches may effectively provide a precise personalized medicine that focuses on not only characterization and treatment but ultimately the prevention of disease. PMID:25798291

  11. Temperament, Personality and Achievement Goals among Chinese Adolescent Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chen; Zhang, Li-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Temperament and personality have been presumed to affect achievement goals based on the hierarchical model of achievement motivation. This research investigated the relationships of temperament dimensions and the Big Five personality traits to achievement goals based on the 2 x 2 achievement goal framework among 775 Chinese adolescent students.…

  12. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models: approaches for enabling personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Hartmanshenn, Clara; Scherholz, Megerle; Androulakis, Ioannis P

    2016-10-01

    Personalized medicine strives to deliver the 'right drug at the right dose' by considering inter-person variability, one of the causes for therapeutic failure in specialized populations of patients. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling is a key tool in the advancement of personalized medicine to evaluate complex clinical scenarios, making use of physiological information as well as physicochemical data to simulate various physiological states to predict the distribution of pharmacokinetic responses. The increased dependency on PBPK models to address regulatory questions is aligned with the ability of PBPK models to minimize ethical and technical difficulties associated with pharmacokinetic and toxicology experiments for special patient populations. Subpopulation modeling can be achieved through an iterative and integrative approach using an adopt, adapt, develop, assess, amend, and deliver methodology. PBPK modeling has two valuable applications in personalized medicine: (1) determining the importance of certain subpopulations within a distribution of pharmacokinetic responses for a given drug formulation and (2) establishing the formulation design space needed to attain a targeted drug plasma concentration profile. This review article focuses on model development for physiological differences associated with sex (male vs. female), age (pediatric vs. young adults vs. elderly), disease state (healthy vs. unhealthy), and temporal variation (influence of biological rhythms), connecting them to drug product formulation development within the quality by design framework. Although PBPK modeling has come a long way, there is still a lengthy road before it can be fully accepted by pharmacologists, clinicians, and the broader industry. PMID:27647273

  13. Implementing personalized medicine in a cancer center.

    PubMed

    Fenstermacher, David A; Wenham, Robert M; Rollison, Dana E; Dalton, William S

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, the Moffitt Cancer Center partnered with patients, community clinicians, industry, academia, and 17 hospitals in the United States to begin a personalized cancer care initiative called Total Cancer Care. Total Cancer Care was designed to collect tumor specimens and clinical data throughout a patient's lifetime, with the goal of finding "the right treatment, for the right patient, at the right time." Because Total Cancer Care is a partnership with the patient and involves collection of clinical data and tumor specimens for research purposes, a formal protocol and patient consent process was developed, and an information technology platform was constructed to provide a robust "warehouse" for clinical and molecular profiling data. To date, more than 76,000 cancer patients from Moffitt and consortium medical centers have been enrolled in the protocol. The Total Cancer Care initiative has developed many of the capabilities and resources that are building the foundation of personalized medicine.

  14. Implementing Personalized Medicine in a Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Fenstermacher, David A.; Wenham, Robert M.; Rollison, Dana E.; Dalton, William S.

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, the Moffitt Cancer Center partnered with patients, community clinicians, industry, academia, and seventeen hospitals in the United States to begin a personalized cancer care initiative called Total Cancer Care™ . Total Cancer Care was designed to collect tumor specimens and clinical data throughout a patient’s lifetime with the goal of finding “the right treatment, for the right patient, at the right time.” Because Total Cancer Care is a partnership with the patient and involves collection of clinical data and tumor specimens for research purposes, a formal protocol and patient consent process was developed and an information technology platform was constructed to provide a robust “warehouse” for clinical and molecular profiling data. To date, over 76,000 cancer patients from Moffitt and consortium medical centers have been enrolled in the protocol. The TCC initiative has developed many of the capabilities and resources that are building the foundation of personalized medicine. PMID:22157297

  15. Personality Characteristics Associated with Academic Achievement among Developmental College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Allan B.

    This study was conducted to identify the personality characteristics of high achieving developmental, or remedial, students and to discover how personality characteristics relate to academic performance among high-achieving developmental and non-developmental college students to determine if a correlation exists between personality and…

  16. Obesity Genes, Personalized Medicine, and Public Health Policy.

    PubMed

    Caulfield, Timothy

    2015-09-01

    The personalized medicine movement-also known as precision medicine and personalized genomics-has embraced the belief that genetic risk information can be used to motivate healthier choices and meaningful behaviour change. While a genuinely exciting area of research, there are numerous policy issues associated with a focus on the use of genetic risk information to personalize approaches to obesity prevention.

  17. From big data analysis to personalized medicine for all: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Alyass, Akram; Turcotte, Michelle; Meyre, David

    2015-06-27

    Recent advances in high-throughput technologies have led to the emergence of systems biology as a holistic science to achieve more precise modeling of complex diseases. Many predict the emergence of personalized medicine in the near future. We are, however, moving from two-tiered health systems to a two-tiered personalized medicine. Omics facilities are restricted to affluent regions, and personalized medicine is likely to widen the growing gap in health systems between high and low-income countries. This is mirrored by an increasing lag between our ability to generate and analyze big data. Several bottlenecks slow-down the transition from conventional to personalized medicine: generation of cost-effective high-throughput data; hybrid education and multidisciplinary teams; data storage and processing; data integration and interpretation; and individual and global economic relevance. This review provides an update of important developments in the analysis of big data and forward strategies to accelerate the global transition to personalized medicine.

  18. Personalized medicine. Closing the gap between knowledge and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Duarte-Rey, Carolina; Sarmiento-Monroy, Juan C; Bardey, David; Castiblanco, John; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana

    2016-08-01

    Personalized medicine encompasses a broad and evolving field informed by a patient distinctive information and biomarker profile. Although terminology is evolving and some semantic interpretations exist (e.g., personalized, individualized, precision), in a broad sense personalized medicine can be coined as: "To practice medicine as it once used to be in the past using the current biotechnological tools." A humanized approach to personalized medicine would offer the possibility of exploiting systems biology and its concept of P5 medicine, where predictive factors for developing a disease should be examined within populations in order to establish preventive measures on at-risk individuals, for whom healthcare should be personalized and participatory. Herein, the process of personalized medicine is presented together with the options that can be offered in health care systems with limited resources for diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and type 1 diabetes.

  19. Personalized medicine. Closing the gap between knowledge and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Duarte-Rey, Carolina; Sarmiento-Monroy, Juan C; Bardey, David; Castiblanco, John; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana

    2016-08-01

    Personalized medicine encompasses a broad and evolving field informed by a patient distinctive information and biomarker profile. Although terminology is evolving and some semantic interpretations exist (e.g., personalized, individualized, precision), in a broad sense personalized medicine can be coined as: "To practice medicine as it once used to be in the past using the current biotechnological tools." A humanized approach to personalized medicine would offer the possibility of exploiting systems biology and its concept of P5 medicine, where predictive factors for developing a disease should be examined within populations in order to establish preventive measures on at-risk individuals, for whom healthcare should be personalized and participatory. Herein, the process of personalized medicine is presented together with the options that can be offered in health care systems with limited resources for diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and type 1 diabetes. PMID:27302209

  20. Personality Type and Achievement in Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fillmer, H. Thompson

    Research has indicated that there is no teaching method superior to others in promoting reading skills, improving attitudes, or creating interests, and that different types of children evidence varying responses to different methods. Studies such as those of Jung and Myer regarding personality and learning styles provide clues that are useful in…

  1. Personality Correlates of Achievement in a Personnel Evaluation Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuh, Allen J.

    1978-01-01

    Scales from the Guilford-Zimmerman Temperament Survey and from the Thurstone Interest Schedule were correlated with achievement for students in a personnel evaluation course. Achievement was significantly correlated with the emotional stability and personal relations scales. (JKS)

  2. Realizing the promise of personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Aspinall, Mara G; Hamermesh, Richard G

    2007-10-01

    Scientific advances have begun to give doctors the power to customize therapy for individuals. However, adoption of this approach has progressed slowly and unevenly because the trial-and-error treatment model still governs how the health care system develops, regulates, pays for, and delivers therapies. Aspinall, the president of Genzyme Genetics, and Hamermesh, chair of a Harvard Business School initiative to improve leadership in health care organizations, discuss the barriers to personalized medicine and suggest ways to overcome them. The blockbuster model for developing drugs, the authors point out, is still what most major pharmaceutical companies follow, even though its days are numbered. What the industry must embrace in its place is a business model based on a larger portfolio of targeted--and therefore more effective and profitable--treatments, not a limited palette of one-size-fits-all drugs. The current regulatory environment overemphasizes large-scale clinical trials of broad-based therapies. Instead, the focus should be on enrolling subpopulations, based on diagnostic testing, in trials of targeted drug treatments and on monitoring and assessing effectiveness after drugs are approved. A dysfunctional payment system complicates matters by rewarding providers for performance of procedures rather than for accurate diagnosis and effective prevention. Aspinall and Hamermesh call for coordinating regulation and reimbursement so that incentives are provided for the right outcomes. Finally, the authors urge changing physicians' habits through education about genomics, diagnostic testing, and targeted therapies. They say that medical schools and physician organizations must become committed advocates of personalized medicine so that patients and the medical industry can get all the benefits it offers.

  3. Personalized medicine and access to genetic technologies.

    PubMed

    den Exter, André

    2010-01-01

    Personalized medicine started after the Human Genome Project and is a relatively new concept that will dramatically change clinical practice. It offers clear clinical advantages by applying genetic diagnostic tests and then treating the patient with targeted medicines based on his or her genetic make-up. Its potential seems promising but there are quite a few legal concerns. One of these questions deals with the right to health care and access to genetic technologies. In this paper, the author explains the meaning of such a right to health care under international human rights law, its relevance for making genetic services eligible for public funding, how to cope with quality concerns of commercial testing, and finally, the patentability controversy and clinical access to genetic information. Apart from more traditional human rights concerns (consent, privacy, confidentiality) and genetics, States should be aware of the meaning of the equal access concept under international law and its consequences when introducing new technologies such genetic testing and services.

  4. Molecular medicine: a path towards a personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Debora Marques de; Mamede, Marcelo; Souza, Bruno Rezende de; Almeida Barros, Alexandre Guimarães de; Magno, Luiz Alexandre; Alvim-Soares Jr, Antônio; Rosa, Daniela Valadão; Castro Jr, Célio José de; Malloy-Diniz, Leandro; Gomez, Marcus Vinícius; Marco, Luiz Armando De; Correa, Humberto; Romano-Silva, Marco Aurélio

    2012-03-01

    Psychiatric disorders are among the most common human illnesses; still, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying their complex pathophysiology remain to be fully elucidated. Over the past 10 years, our group has been investigating the molecular abnormalities in major signaling pathways involved in psychiatric disorders. Recent evidences obtained by the Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Medicina Molecular (National Institute of Science and Technology - Molecular Medicine, INCT-MM) and others using behavioral analysis of animal models provided valuable insights into the underlying molecular alterations responsible for many complex neuropsychiatric disorders, suggesting that "defects" in critical intracellular signaling pathways have an important role in regulating neurodevelopment, as well as in pathophysiology and treatment efficacy. Resources from the INCT have allowed us to start doing research in the field of molecular imaging. Molecular imaging is a research discipline that visualizes, characterizes, and quantifies the biologic processes taking place at cellular and molecular levels in humans and other living systems through the results of image within the reality of the physiological environment. In order to recognize targets, molecular imaging applies specific instruments (e.g., PET) that enable visualization and quantification in space and in real-time of signals from molecular imaging agents. The objective of molecular medicine is to individualize treatment and improve patient care. Thus, molecular imaging is an additional tool to achieve our ultimate goal.

  5. Leadership Strategies: Achieving Personal and Professional Success.

    PubMed

    Menaker, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Physicians and allied health staff in healthcare are finding themselves in situations characterized by uncertainty, chaos, and ambiguity, with high levels of burnout. A major influence is an aging U.S. population, resulting in increasing cost and reimbursement pressures. Medical group practices need leaders who have the capability to thrive in this environment. This article presents an integrated leadership model offering strategies and insights gained from keeping a journal for 40 years. Strategies to be shared include leading self through learning, leading others by developing relationships, leading organizations by achieving excellence, and achieving work-life integration and synergy. PMID:27443052

  6. Instructional Objectives, Learner Personality and Prediction of Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Russell Victor, Jr.

    This study investigated three questions: the relationship between the use of stated instructional objectives and achievement in audio-tutorial (A-T) instruction, the relationship of learner personality and achievement under conditions of A-T, as well as determining the power of selected batteries of intellective and personality variables to…

  7. Personality Type and Academic Achievement of Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Arul A. S.; Lawrence, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Personality is the man. The successful living of an individual, as a man, depends to a large extent on the academic achievement of that individual, as a student. This article attempts to find out personality type, academic achievement of secondary school students and relationship between them by selecting a sample of 300 secondary school students…

  8. Genome Paths: A Way to Personalized and Predictive Medicine

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The review is devoted to the impact of human genome research on progress in modern medicine. Basic achievements in genome research have resulted in the deciphering of the human genome and creation of a molecular landmarks map of the human haploid genome (HapMap Project), which has made a tremendous contribution to our understanding of common genetic and multifactorial (complex) disorders. Current genome studies mainly focus on genetic testing and gene association studies of multifactorial (complex) diseases, with the purpose of their efficient diagnostics and prevention . Identification of candidate ("predisposition") genes participating in the functional genetic modules underlying each common disorder and the use of this genetic background to elaborate sophisticated measures to efficiently prevent them constitutes a major goal in personalized molecular medicine. The concept of a genetic pass as an individual DNA databank reflecting inherited human predisposition to different complex and monogenic disorders, with special emphasis on its present state, and the numerous difficulties related to the practical implementation of personalized medicine are outlined. The problems related to the uncertainness of the results of genetic testing could be overcome at least partly by means of new technological achievements in genome research methods, such as genome-wide association studies (GWAS), massive parallel DNA sequencing, and genetic and epigenetic profiling. The basic tasks of genomic today could be determined as the need to properly estimate the clinical value of genetic testing and its applicability in clinical practice. Feasible ways towards the gradual implementation of personal genetic data, in line with routine laboratory tests, for the benefit of clinical practice are discussed. PMID:22649616

  9. Economic evaluations of personalized medicine: existing challenges and current developments

    PubMed Central

    Shabaruddin, Fatiha H; Fleeman, Nigel D; Payne, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Personalized medicine, with the aim of safely, effectively, and cost-effectively targeting treatment to a prespecified patient population, has always been a long-time goal within health care. It is often argued that personalizing treatment will inevitably improve clinical outcomes for patients and help achieve more effective use of health care resources. Demand is increasing for demonstrable evidence of clinical and cost-effectiveness to support the use of personalized medicine in health care. This paper begins with an overview of the existing challenges in conducting economic evaluations of genetics- and genomics-targeted technologies, as an example of personalized medicine. Our paper illustrates the complexity of the challenges faced by these technologies by highlighting the variations in the issues faced by diagnostic tests for somatic variations, generally referring to genetic variation in a tumor, and germline variations, generally referring to inherited genetic variation in enzymes involved in drug metabolic pathways. These tests are typically aimed at stratifying patient populations into subgroups on the basis of clinical effectiveness (response) or safety (avoidance of adverse events). The paper summarizes the data requirements for economic evaluations of genetics and genomics-based technologies while outlining that the main challenges relating to data requirements revolve around the availability and quality of existing data. We conclude by discussing current developments aimed to address the challenges of assessing the cost-effectiveness of genetics and genomics-based technologies, which revolve around two central issues that are interlinked: the need to adapt available evaluation methods and identifying who is responsible for generating evidence for these technologies. PMID:26309416

  10. Role of Proteomics in the Development of Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Jain, Kewal K

    2016-01-01

    Advances in proteomic technologies have made import contribution to the development of personalized medicine by facilitating detection of protein biomarkers, proteomics-based molecular diagnostics, as well as protein biochips and pharmacoproteomics. Application of nanobiotechnology in proteomics, nanoproteomics, has further enhanced applications in personalized medicine. Proteomics-based molecular diagnostics will have an important role in the diagnosis of certain conditions and understanding the pathomechanism of disease. Proteomics will be a good bridge between diagnostics and therapeutics; the integration of these will be important for advancing personalized medicine. Use of proteomic biomarkers and combination of pharmacoproteomics with pharmacogenomics will enable stratification of clinical trials and improve monitoring of patients for development of personalized therapies. Proteomics is an important component of several interacting technologies used for development of personalized medicine, which is depicted graphically. Finally, cancer is a good example of applications of proteomic technologies for personalized management of cancer.

  11. The Impact of Personal Digital Assistants on Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bick, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    A positive correlation has been found between laptops and student achievement. Laptops are similar to Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) in many respects. This study seeks to determine the effect of PDA usage on high school student academic achievement. It was hypothesized that a positive correlation between PDA usage and academic achievement in…

  12. Role of Resilient Personality on Lower Achieving First Grade Students' Current and Future Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwok, Oi-man; Hughes, Jan N.; Luo, Wen

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated a measurement model of personality resilience and the contribution of personality resilience to lower achieving first grade students' academic achievement. Participants were 445 ethnically diverse children who at entrance to first grade scored below their school district median on a test of literacy. Participants were…

  13. [The invention of personalized medicine, between technological upheavals and utopia].

    PubMed

    Billaud, Marc; Guchet, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The idea of personalized medicine raises a series of questions. If one considers that the physician takes into account the uniqueness of his patient in the frame of the medical consultation, is the definition of medicine as "personalized" not a pleonasm? If not, why has this ambiguous denomination been adopted? In addition, is this form of medicine a novel discipline capable of revolutionizing therapeutic approaches as claimed in its accompanying discourses or is it in continuity with the molecular conception of biomedicine? Rather than attempting to directly answer these questions, we focused our attention on the organizing concepts, the technological breakthroughs and the transformations in medical practices that characterize this medicine. Following this brief analysis, it appears that the choice of a term as equivocal as personalized medicine and the emphasis on the antagonistic notions of revolution and continuity in medicine are the signs of reshuffling that is emerging between actors in the health care system, in academia and in pharmaceutical companies.

  14. Personality and Academic Achievement in Three Educational Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goh, David S.; Moore, Charles M.

    This study was undertaken to examine the relationship between "Personality fitness" and academic achievement. One hundred seventy-five subjects from three educational levels--university, vocational technical institute, and high school--were administered the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, the Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices and an…

  15. Achieving reimbursement for regenerative medicine products in the USA.

    PubMed

    Ginty, P J; Singh, P B; Smith, D; Hourd, P; Williams, D J

    2010-05-01

    Achieving reimbursement for regenerative medicine products is potentially a greater challenge than gaining US FDA approval, making it a decisive factor in the success or failure of small businesses. However, the mechanisms by which reimbursement is achieved are still seen as something of a 'black box', especially to those outside of the USA. This report aims to provide insights into the mechanisms of reimbursement and variety of payers in the USA, and to act as a starting point for a successful US reimbursement strategy. Fundamental concepts such as coverage, payment and coding are explained and linked with the factors that potentially determine the successful reimbursement of regenerative medicine products, including cost of goods and clinical study design. Finally, important considerations for the design of clinical studies that satisfy both the payers and the FDA are discussed and the key elements of a successful company strategy identified.

  16. An Unfulfilled Promise: Changes Needed to the Drug Approval Process to Make Personalized Medicine a Reality.

    PubMed

    Riley, Margaret Foster

    2015-01-01

    The widespread availability of drugs for personalized medicine has been an aspiration since before the human genome was sequenced. Recently, there is renewed interest; personalized medicine is much in the news. Legislation has been considered with the goal of smoothing, shortening and incentivizing the approval process for therapeutic products. President Obama mentioned the need for new initiatives to achieve such goals in the State of the Union address. But most of these initiatives do not consider the fundamental changes that personalized medicine demands. It requires a statutory structure designed for the development of products applicable for small subpopulations that is very different from our current model which is designed for the development of products for large populations. The current approval process is purposely not designed to consider individual efficacy. It is designed to incentivize reduced variation in clinical trials rather than embracing variation. In addition, it is based on twentieth-century notions of disease focused on phenotype rather than on pathophysiologic pathways. Current foci on the development of companion diagnostics, orphan drugs and post-approval study are important but insufficient. FDA does not have the authority to require the type of standardization, clinical trial design and extensive data reporting and sharing that. is needed to achieve the goals for personalized medicine. In addition, FDA's current drug approval process is too lengthy and cumbersome to deal with the iterative responses personalized medicine entails. If we are serious about wanting to achieve these goals, we will need to entertain such fundamental changes in authority. PMID:26302601

  17. Patient reactions to personalized medicine vignettes: An experimental design

    PubMed Central

    Butrick, Morgan; Roter, Debra; Kaphingst, Kimberly; Erby, Lori H.; Haywood, Carlton; Beach, Mary Catherine; Levy, Howard P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Translational investigation on personalized medicine is in its infancy. Exploratory studies reveal attitudinal barriers to “race-based medicine” and cautious optimism regarding genetically personalized medicine. This study describes patient responses to hypothetical conventional, race-based, or genetically personalized medicine prescriptions. Methods Three hundred eighty-seven participants (mean age = 47 years; 46% white) recruited from a Baltimore outpatient center were randomized to this vignette-based experimental study. They were asked to imagine a doctor diagnosing a condition and prescribing them one of three medications. The outcomes are emotional response to vignette, belief in vignette medication efficacy, experience of respect, trust in the vignette physician, and adherence intention. Results Race-based medicine vignettes were appraised more negatively than conventional vignettes across the board (Cohen’s d = −0.51−0.57−0.64, P < 0.001). Participants rated genetically personalized comparably with conventional medicine (− 0.14−0.15−0.17, P = 0.47), with the exception of reduced adherence intention to genetically personalized medicine (Cohen’s d = −0.38−0.41−0.44, P = 0.009). This relative reluctance to take genetically personalized medicine was pronounced for racial minorities (Cohen’s d =−0.38−0.31−0.25, P = 0.02) and was related to trust in the vignette physician (change in R2 = 0.23, P < 0.001). Conclusions This study demonstrates a relative reluctance to embrace personalized medicine technology, especially among racial minorities, and highlights enhancement of adherence through improved doctor-patient relationships. PMID:21270639

  18. Genomic Discoveries and Personalized Medicine in Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Hong, Huixiao

    2015-01-01

    In the past decades, we have witnessed dramatic changes in clinical diagnoses and treatments due to the revolutions of genomics and personalized medicine. Undoubtedly we also met many challenges when we use those advanced technologies in drug discovery and development. In this review, we describe when genomic information is applied in personal healthcare in general. We illustrate some case examples of genomic discoveries and promising personalized medicine applications in the area of neurological disease particular. Available data suggest that individual genomics can be applied to better treat patients in the near future. PMID:26690205

  19. Personalized Medicine in Respiratory Disease: Role of Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Priyadharshini, V S; Teran, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory diseases affect humanity globally, with chronic lung diseases (e.g., asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, among others) and lung cancer causing extensive morbidity and mortality. These conditions are highly heterogeneous and require an early diagnosis. However, initial symptoms are nonspecific, and the clinical diagnosis is made late frequently. Over the last few years, personalized medicine has emerged as a medical care approach that uses novel technology aiming to personalize treatments according to the particular patient's medical needs. This review highlights the contributions of proteomics toward the understanding of personalized medicine in respiratory disease and its potential applications in the clinic.

  20. Implementing personalized medicine with asymmetric information on prevalence rates.

    PubMed

    Antoñanzas, Fernando; Juárez-Castelló, Carmelo A; Rodríguez-Ibeas, Roberto

    2016-12-01

    Although personalized medicine is becoming the new paradigm to manage some diseases, the economics of personalized medicine have only focused on assessing the efficiency of specific treatments, lacking a theoretical framework analyzing the interactions between pharmaceutical firms and healthcare systems leading to the implementation of personalized treatments. We model the interaction between the hospitals and the manufacturer of a new treatment as an adverse selection problem where the firm does not have perfect information on the prevalence across hospitals of the genetic characteristics of the patients making them eligible to receive a new treatment. As a result of the model, hospitals with high prevalence rates benefit from the information asymmetry only when the standard treatment is inefficient when applied to the patients eligible to receive the new treatment. Otherwise, information asymmetry has no value. Personalized medicine may be fully or partially implemented depending on the proportion of high prevalence hospitals. PMID:27539222

  1. Personalized medicine in psychiatry: ethical challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Evers, Kathinka

    2009-01-01

    Pharmacogenomic developments hold promise for personalized medicine in psychiatry with adjusted therapeutic doses, predictable responses, reduced adverse drug reactions, early diagnosis, and personal health planning. The prospects are exciting, but at the same time, these new techniques stand faced with important scientific, ethical, legal, and social challenges that need to be met in order for the scientific advances to be responsibly applied. This review discusses the ethical balance between challenge and opportunity of personalized medicine in psychiatry under the aspects of adequacy, cost:benefit ratio, and therapeutic equity. It is argued that the promising nature of these therapeutic possibilities makes it all the more important to avoid exaggerating the expectations, and that a sophisticated social infrastructure needs to be developed in order to ensure the realistic and responsible application of personalized medicine in psychiatry.

  2. Personalized medicine in psychiatry: ethical challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Evers, Kathinka

    2009-01-01

    Pharmacogenomic developments hold promise for personalized medicine in psychiatry with adjusted therapeutic doses, predictable responses, reduced adverse drug reactions, early diagnosis, and personal health planning. The prospects are exciting, but at the same time, these new techniques stand faced with important scientific, ethical, legal, and social challenges that need to be met in order for the scientific advances to be responsibly applied. This review discusses the ethical balance between challenge and opportunity of personalized medicine in psychiatry under the aspects of adequacy, costbenefit ratio, and therapeutic equity. It is argued that the promising nature of these therapeutic possibilities makes it all the more important to avoid exaggerating the expectations, and that a sophisticated social infrastructure needs to be developed in order to ensure the realistic and responsible application of personalized medicine in psychiatry. PMID:20135900

  3. Personalized medicine: challenges and opportunities for translational bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Overby, Casey Lynnette; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Personalized medicine can be defined broadly as a model of healthcare that is predictive, personalized, preventive and participatory. Two US President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology reports illustrate challenges in personalized medicine (in a 2008 report) and in use of health information technology (in a 2010 report). Translational bioinformatics is a field that can help address these challenges and is defined by the American Medical Informatics Association as “the development of storage, analytic and interpretive methods to optimize the transformation of increasing voluminous biomedical data into proactive, predictive, preventative and participatory health.” This article discusses barriers to implementing genomics applications and current progress toward overcoming barriers, describes lessons learned from early experiences of institutions engaged in personalized medicine and provides example areas for translational bioinformatics research inquiry. PMID:24039624

  4. Lifetime experiences, the brain and personalized medicine: an integrative perspective.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Bruce S; Getz, Linn

    2013-01-01

    The aim of personalized medicine is to base medical prevention and therapy on the unique health and disease susceptibility profile of each individual. Starting from this idea, we briefly discuss the meaning of the word 'personalized' before analyzing the practical content of personalized healthcare. From a medical perspective, knowledge of a person encompasses both biological and biographical perspectives. The latter includes significant events and experiences throughout the person's lifespan, from conception to the present, in which epigenetic influences play an important role. In practice, we believe personalized medicine should emphasize the development and maintenance of a healthy nervous system. The neurobiological processes involved here depend heavily on the psychosocial environment, in particular the presence of responsible, caring adults and integration in a reasonably fair society. A healthy brain subsequently promotes good health throughout life, both through direct, favorable influences on the body's intrinsic biological pathways, and indirectly by enabling the person to engage in supportive relationships, make wise decisions and take good care of him/herself. From a public health perspective, we conclude that hi-tech personalized medicine based on detailed bio-molecular mapping, monitoring and tailored drug interventions holds promise only as part of a wider, socio-culturally informed approach to the person.

  5. A Population Perspective on How Personalized Medicine Can Improve Health

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Muin J.; Gwinn, Marta; Glasgow, Russell E.; Kramer, Barnett S.

    2012-01-01

    The term P4 medicine is used to denote an evolving field of medicine that uses systems biology approaches and information technologies to enhance wellness rather than just treat disease. Its four components include predictive, preventive, personalized, and participatory medicine. In the current paper, it is argued that in order to fulfill the promise of P4 medicine, a “fifth P” must be integrated--the population perspective--into each of the other four components. A population perspective integrates predictive medicine into the ecologic model of health; applies principles of population screening to preventive medicine; uses evidence-based practice to personalize medicine; and grounds participatory medicine on the three core functions of public health: assessment, policy development, and assurance. Population sciences--including epidemiology; behavioral, social, and communication sciences; and health economics, implementation science, and outcomes research--are needed to show the value of P4 medicine. Balanced strategies that implement both population- and individual-level interventions can best maximize health benefits, minimize harms, and avoid unnecessary healthcare costs. PMID:22608383

  6. From basic research to personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Thibaut, Florence

    2016-01-01

    In the future, precision medicine will enable every clinician to tailor treatment and even prevention strategies to an individual's unique characteristics. In order to reach this goal, we need to collect and analyze many different types of data, from many different sources, including symptoms, genomics, and brain circuitry, as well as family dynamics, environmental exposures, and cultural background. PMID:27757058

  7. [Billroth and Brahms: personal encounter of medicine and music].

    PubMed

    Hadaschik, B A; Hadaschik, E N; Hohenfellner, M

    2012-02-01

    Theodor Billroth and Johannes Brahms shared a decades long personal friendship. The music-loving Billroth influenced the work of the famous composer and in turn Brahms also left traces within Billroth's lifetime achievements. To shed light on the close relationship of medicine and music, this manuscript describes both Billroth's life and surgical career as they were influenced and stimulated by his close friendship to Brahms.Theodor Billroth and Johannes Brahms first met in 1865 in Zurich, Switzerland. After Billroth accepted the chair of surgery at the University of Vienna in 1867, Brahms moved to Vienna in 1869. During the following years, Billroth analyzed most of Brahms' compositions prior to publication. Similar to his effective way of teaching medical students and assistants, Billroth stimulated Brahms to publish many of his later compositions. Brahms on the other hand supported Billroth in writing his essay"Who is musical?". Furthermore, music helped Billroth to cope with the demanding working life of a surgeon.Music and surgery share both structural and emotional analogies. While both professions require meticulous techniques, personal interaction is a prerequisite for success. "Science and art scoop from the same well."

  8. An Exploratory Study of Creativity, Personality and Schooling Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berlin, Noémi; Tavani, Jean-Louis; Beasançon, Maud

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the link between schooling achievement and creativity scores, controlling for personality traits and other individual characteristics. Our study is based on field data collected in a secondary school situated in a Parisian suburb. Four scores of creativity were measured on 9th graders. Verbal divergent thinking negatively predicts…

  9. Temperament and Personality: A Mute Struggle for Language Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behjat, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    There has always been dissatisfaction by language teachers who observe different levels of achievement with students attending the same language class and taking the same instruction. This variation in attaining the desired level of proficiency can be caused by the learners' personality types. The present study was an attempt to explore the degree…

  10. Personality as a Moderator of Context Effects on Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendriks, A. A. Jolijn; Kuyper, Hans; Lubbers, Miranda J.; Van der Werf, Margaretha P. C.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated whether personality moderates group influence of classmates on academic achievement and whether these so-called context effects can be attributed to peer pressure. The sample consisted of 2498 students in their first year of Dutch secondary education. The data were analyzed by a two-level (students within classes) analysis,…

  11. Overview of personalized medicine in the disease genomic era.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kyung-Won; Oh, Bermseok

    2010-10-01

    Sir William Osler (1849-1919) recognized that "variability is the law of life, and as no two faces are the same, so no two bodies are alike, and no two individuals react alike and behave alike under the abnormal conditions we know as disease". Accordingly, the traditional methods of medicine are not always best for all patients. Over the last decade, the study of genomes and their derivatives (RNA, protein and metabolite) has rapidly advanced to the point that genomic research now serves as the basis for many medical decisions and public health initiatives. Genomic tools such as sequence variation, transcription and, more recently, personal genome sequencing enable the precise prediction and treatment of disease. At present, DNA-based risk assessment for common complex diseases, application of molecular signatures for cancer diagnosis and prognosis, genome-guided therapy, and dose selection of therapeutic drugs are the important issues in personalized medicine. In order to make personalized medicine effective, these genomic techniques must be standardized and integrated into health systems and clinical workflow. In addition, full application of personalized or genomic medicine requires dramatic changes in regulatory and reimbursement policies as well as legislative protection related to privacy. This review aims to provide a general overview of these topics in the field of personalized medicine.

  12. Personal Genomic Information Management and Personalized Medicine: Challenges, Current Solutions, and Roles of HIM Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Alzu'bi, Amal; Zhou, Leming; Watzlaf, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the term personalized medicine has received more and more attention in the field of healthcare. The increasing use of this term is closely related to the astonishing advancement in DNA sequencing technologies and other high-throughput biotechnologies. A large amount of personal genomic data can be generated by these technologies in a short time. Consequently, the needs for managing, analyzing, and interpreting these personal genomic data to facilitate personalized care are escalated. In this article, we discuss the challenges for implementing genomics-based personalized medicine in healthcare, current solutions to these challenges, and the roles of health information management (HIM) professionals in genomics-based personalized medicine. PMID:24808804

  13. Predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory medicine: back to the future

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The pioneering work of Jean Dausset on the HLA system established several principles that were later reflected in the Human Genome Project and contributed to the foundations of predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory (P4) medicine. To effectively develop systems medicine, we should take advantage of the lessons of the HLA saga, emphasizing the importance of exploring a fascinating but mysterious biology, now using systems principles, pioneering new technology developments and creating shared biological and information resources. PMID:20804580

  14. Mild Cognitive Impairment, Neurodegeneration, and Personalized Lifestyle Medicine.

    PubMed

    Bland, Jeffrey

    2016-04-01

    The takeaway message of this advancing science surrounding the causes and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases is to recognize MCI symptoms early and intervene with a comprehensive, multifaceted, personalized lifestyle medicine program that is designed to improve neurological function and built on the components described above. The present evidence suggests this approach represents the best medicine available today for beating back the rising tide of cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration. PMID:27330484

  15. Aberrant Learning Achievement Detection Based on Person-Fit Statistics in Personalized e-Learning Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Ming-Tsung; Yu, Pao-Ta

    2011-01-01

    A personalized e-learning service provides learning content to fit learners' individual differences. Learning achievements are influenced by cognitive as well as non-cognitive factors such as mood, motivation, interest, and personal styles. This paper proposes the Learning Caution Indexes (LCI) to detect aberrant learning patterns. The philosophy…

  16. The Translational Genomics Core at Partners Personalized Medicine: Facilitating the Transition of Research towards Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Blau, Ashley; Brown, Alison; Mahanta, Lisa; Amr, Sami S

    2016-01-01

    The Translational Genomics Core (TGC) at Partners Personalized Medicine (PPM) serves as a fee-for-service core laboratory for Partners Healthcare researchers, providing access to technology platforms and analysis pipelines for genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic research projects. The interaction of the TGC with various components of PPM provides it with a unique infrastructure that allows for greater IT and bioinformatics opportunities, such as sample tracking and data analysis. The following article describes some of the unique opportunities available to an academic research core operating within PPM, such the ability to develop analysis pipelines with a dedicated bioinformatics team and maintain a flexible Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) with the support of an internal IT team, as well as the operational challenges encountered to respond to emerging technologies, diverse investigator needs, and high staff turnover. In addition, the implementation and operational role of the TGC in the Partners Biobank genotyping project of over 25,000 samples is presented as an example of core activities working with other components of PPM. PMID:26927185

  17. The Translational Genomics Core at Partners Personalized Medicine: Facilitating the Transition of Research towards Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Blau, Ashley; Brown, Alison; Mahanta, Lisa; Amr, Sami S.

    2016-01-01

    The Translational Genomics Core (TGC) at Partners Personalized Medicine (PPM) serves as a fee-for-service core laboratory for Partners Healthcare researchers, providing access to technology platforms and analysis pipelines for genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic research projects. The interaction of the TGC with various components of PPM provides it with a unique infrastructure that allows for greater IT and bioinformatics opportunities, such as sample tracking and data analysis. The following article describes some of the unique opportunities available to an academic research core operating within PPM, such the ability to develop analysis pipelines with a dedicated bioinformatics team and maintain a flexible Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) with the support of an internal IT team, as well as the operational challenges encountered to respond to emerging technologies, diverse investigator needs, and high staff turnover. In addition, the implementation and operational role of the TGC in the Partners Biobank genotyping project of over 25,000 samples is presented as an example of core activities working with other components of PPM. PMID:26927185

  18. Key aspects of health system change on the path to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Downing, Gregory J

    2009-12-01

    The tools and knowledge base for personalized medicine practices are being developed as a major transformation is underway in our health care system. Although the foundation supporting the scientific and technological applications that enable individualized approaches in health care continues to be framed, an uncertain health care delivery landscape lies ahead, driven by economic, quality-of-care, and other policy considerations. There are commonalities in the needs and the opportunities for personalized medicine and health care system change, and these 2 facets can mutually inform one another. Here, we examine this interface in the dimensions of innovation and costs, health information technology, evidence development and comparative effectiveness, clinical data standards, consumer tools, and patient safety and public health. Indeed, personalized medicine must offer solutions for broader health priorities if it is to achieve its potential impact.

  19. [The invention of personalized medicine, between technological upheavals and utopia].

    PubMed

    Billaud, Marc; Guchet, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The idea of personalized medicine raises a series of questions. If one considers that the physician takes into account the uniqueness of his patient in the frame of the medical consultation, is the definition of medicine as "personalized" not a pleonasm? If not, why has this ambiguous denomination been adopted? In addition, is this form of medicine a novel discipline capable of revolutionizing therapeutic approaches as claimed in its accompanying discourses or is it in continuity with the molecular conception of biomedicine? Rather than attempting to directly answer these questions, we focused our attention on the organizing concepts, the technological breakthroughs and the transformations in medical practices that characterize this medicine. Following this brief analysis, it appears that the choice of a term as equivocal as personalized medicine and the emphasis on the antagonistic notions of revolution and continuity in medicine are the signs of reshuffling that is emerging between actors in the health care system, in academia and in pharmaceutical companies. PMID:26340841

  20. Precision or Personalized Medicine for Cancer Chemotherapy: Is there a Role for Herbal Medicine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhijun; Liu, Xuefeng; Ho, Rebecca Lucinda Ka Yan; Lam, Christopher Wai Kei; Chow, Moses Sing Sum

    2016-01-01

    Although over 100 chemotherapeutic agents are currently available for the treatment of cancer patients, the overall long term clinical benefit is disappointing due to the lack of effectiveness or severe side effects from these agents. In order to improve the therapeutic outcome, a new approach called precision medicine or personalized medicine has been proposed and initiated by the U.S. National Institutes of Health. However, the limited availability of effective medications and the high cost are still the major barriers for many cancer patients. Thus alternative approaches such as herbal medicines could be a feasible and less costly option. Unfortunately, scientific evidence for the efficacy of a majority of herbal medicines is still lacking and their development to meet FDA approval or other regulatory agencies is a big challenge. However, herbal medicines may be able to play an important role in precision medicine or personalized medicine. This review will focus on the existing and future technologies that could speed the development of herbal products for treatment of resistant cancer in individual patients. Specifically, it will concentrate on reviewing the phenotypic (activity based) rather than genotypic (mechanism based) approach to develop herbal medicine useful for personalized cancer chemotherapy.

  1. Personalized medicine: from genotypes, molecular phenotypes and the quantified self, towards improved medicine.

    PubMed

    Dudley, Joel T; Listgarten, Jennifer; Stegle, Oliver; Brenner, Steven E; Parts, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Advances in molecular profiling and sensor technologies are expanding the scope of personalized medicine beyond genotypes, providing new opportunities for developing richer and more dynamic multi-scale models of individual health. Recent studies demonstrate the value of scoring high-dimensional microbiome, immune, and metabolic traits from individuals to inform personalized medicine. Efforts to integrate multiple dimensions of clinical and molecular data towards predictive multi-scale models of individual health and wellness are already underway. Improved methods for mining and discovery of clinical phenotypes from electronic medical records and technological developments in wearable sensor technologies present new opportunities for mapping and exploring the critical yet poorly characterized "phenome" and "envirome" dimensions of personalized medicine. There are ambitious new projects underway to collect multi-scale molecular, sensor, clinical, behavioral, and environmental data streams from large population cohorts longitudinally to enable more comprehensive and dynamic models of individual biology and personalized health. Personalized medicine stands to benefit from inclusion of rich new sources and dimensions of data. However, realizing these improvements in care relies upon novel informatics methodologies, tools, and systems to make full use of these data to advance both the science and translational applications of personalized medicine.

  2. Professional achievements in medicine: too many unresolved questions.

    PubMed

    Jurčević Kozina, Slavica; Malički, Mario

    2012-01-01

    From pre-enrollment assessments, through medical education and post-graduate training, medical schools are trying to educate and facilitate the development of their students so that they become exemplary experts in their future fields. Yet despite the long history of medical education, scientific research has failed to provide correlations between medical schools education processes and achievements of their students. Among the greatest obstacles for this is the primary definition of achievement, and, subsequently, its characteristics and measurement. In this review we present current findings related to medical education, discuss their implications and provide suggestions for medical schools on how to get the best out of their students while facilitating their personal growth. PMID:23311481

  3. Personalized cancer immunotherapy using Systems Medicine approaches.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shailendra K; Jaitly, Tanushree; Schmitz, Ulf; Schuler, Gerold; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Vera, Julio

    2016-05-01

    The immune system is by definition multi-scale because it involves biochemical networks that regulate cell fates across cell boundaries, but also because immune cells communicate with each other by direct contact or through the secretion of local or systemic signals. Furthermore, tumor and immune cells communicate, and this interaction is affected by the tumor microenvironment. Altogether, the tumor-immunity interaction is a complex multi-scale biological system whose analysis requires a systemic view to succeed in developing efficient immunotherapies for cancer and immune-related diseases. In this review we discuss the necessity and the structure of a systems medicine approach for the design of anticancer immunotherapies. We support the idea that the approach must be a combination of algorithms and methods from bioinformatics and patient-data-driven mathematical models conceived to investigate the role of clinical interventions in the tumor-immunity interaction. For each step of the integrative approach proposed, we review the advancement with respect to the computational tools and methods available, but also successful case studies. We particularized our idea for the case of identifying novel tumor-associated antigens and therapeutic targets by integration of patient's immune and tumor profiling in case of aggressive melanoma.

  4. Personalized cancer immunotherapy using Systems Medicine approaches.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shailendra K; Jaitly, Tanushree; Schmitz, Ulf; Schuler, Gerold; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Vera, Julio

    2016-05-01

    The immune system is by definition multi-scale because it involves biochemical networks that regulate cell fates across cell boundaries, but also because immune cells communicate with each other by direct contact or through the secretion of local or systemic signals. Furthermore, tumor and immune cells communicate, and this interaction is affected by the tumor microenvironment. Altogether, the tumor-immunity interaction is a complex multi-scale biological system whose analysis requires a systemic view to succeed in developing efficient immunotherapies for cancer and immune-related diseases. In this review we discuss the necessity and the structure of a systems medicine approach for the design of anticancer immunotherapies. We support the idea that the approach must be a combination of algorithms and methods from bioinformatics and patient-data-driven mathematical models conceived to investigate the role of clinical interventions in the tumor-immunity interaction. For each step of the integrative approach proposed, we review the advancement with respect to the computational tools and methods available, but also successful case studies. We particularized our idea for the case of identifying novel tumor-associated antigens and therapeutic targets by integration of patient's immune and tumor profiling in case of aggressive melanoma. PMID:26174229

  5. Managing the innovation supply chain to maximize personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Waldman, S A; Terzic, A

    2014-02-01

    Personalized medicine epitomizes an evolving model of care tailored to the individual patient. This emerging paradigm harnesses radical technological advances to define each patient's molecular characteristics and decipher his or her unique pathophysiological processes. Translated into individualized algorithms, personalized medicine aims to predict, prevent, and cure disease without producing therapeutic adverse events. Although the transformative power of personalized medicine is generally recognized by physicians, patients, and payers, the complexity of translating discoveries into new modalities that transform health care is less appreciated. We often consider the flow of innovation and technology along a continuum of discovery, development, regulation, and application bridging the bench with the bedside. However, this process also can be viewed through a complementary prism, as a necessary supply chain of services and providers, each making essential contributions to the development of the final product to maximize value to consumers. Considering personalized medicine in this context of supply chain management highlights essential points of vulnerability and/or scalability that can ultimately constrain translation of the biological revolution or potentiate it into individualized diagnostics and therapeutics for optimized value creation and delivery.

  6. Managing the innovation supply chain to maximize personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Waldman, S A; Terzic, A

    2014-02-01

    Personalized medicine epitomizes an evolving model of care tailored to the individual patient. This emerging paradigm harnesses radical technological advances to define each patient's molecular characteristics and decipher his or her unique pathophysiological processes. Translated into individualized algorithms, personalized medicine aims to predict, prevent, and cure disease without producing therapeutic adverse events. Although the transformative power of personalized medicine is generally recognized by physicians, patients, and payers, the complexity of translating discoveries into new modalities that transform health care is less appreciated. We often consider the flow of innovation and technology along a continuum of discovery, development, regulation, and application bridging the bench with the bedside. However, this process also can be viewed through a complementary prism, as a necessary supply chain of services and providers, each making essential contributions to the development of the final product to maximize value to consumers. Considering personalized medicine in this context of supply chain management highlights essential points of vulnerability and/or scalability that can ultimately constrain translation of the biological revolution or potentiate it into individualized diagnostics and therapeutics for optimized value creation and delivery. PMID:24448453

  7. Application of person-centered medicine in addiction

    PubMed Central

    Tarter, Ralph E.; Kirisci, Levent; Ridenour, Ty; Bogen, Debra

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses human individuality within a lifespan developmental perspective. The practical application of an individual differences framework for diagnosis, prevention and treatment of addiction is described. A brief overview of the methods conducive to knowledge development within the rubric of person-centered medicine that are available to practitioners working in office and clinic settings concludes the discussion. PMID:23243492

  8. Epigenome-based personalized medicine in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wenji; Herman, James G; Guo, Mingzhou

    2016-01-01

    Cancer genome sequencing has created an opportunity for precision medicine. Thus far, genetic alterations can only be used to guide treatment for small subsets of certain cancer types with these key alterations. Similar to mutations, epigenetic events are equally suitable for personalized medicine. DNA methylation alterations have been used to identify tumor-specific drug responsive markers. Methylation of MGMT sensitizes gliomas to alkylating agents is an example of epigenetic personalized medicine. Recent studies have revealed that 5-azacytidine and decitabine show activity in myelodysplasia, lung and other cancers. There are currently at least 20 kinds of histone deacetylase inhibitors in clinical testing. Inhibitors targeting other epigenetic regulators are being clinically tested, such as EZH2 inhibitor EPZ-6438.

  9. Pharmacogenomics in Pediatric Patients: Towards Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Maagdenberg, Hedy; Vijverberg, Susanne J H; Bierings, Marc B; Carleton, Bruce C; Arets, Hubertus G M; de Boer, Anthonius; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that drug responses differ among patients with regard to dose requirements, efficacy, and adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The differences in drug responses are partially explained by genetic variation. This paper highlights some examples of areas in which the different responses (dose, efficacy, and ADRs) are studied in children, including cancer (cisplatin), thrombosis (vitamin K antagonists), and asthma (long-acting β2 agonists). For childhood cancer, the replication of data is challenging due to a high heterogeneity in study populations, which is mostly due to all the different treatment protocols. For example, the replication cohorts of the association of variants in TPMT and COMT with cisplatin-induced ototoxicity gave conflicting results, possibly as a result of this heterogeneity. For the vitamin K antagonists, the evidence of the association between variants in VKORC1 and CYP2C9 and the dose is clear. Genetic dosing models have been developed, but the implementation is held back by the impossibility of conducting a randomized controlled trial with such a small and diverse population. For the long-acting β2 agonists, there is enough evidence for the association between variant ADRB2 Arg16 and treatment response to start clinical trials to assess clinical value and cost effectiveness of genotyping. However, further research is still needed to define the different asthma phenotypes to study associations in comparable cohorts. These examples show the challenges which are encountered in pediatric pharmacogenomic studies. They also display the importance of collaborations to obtain good quality evidence for the implementation of genetic testing in clinical practice to optimize and personalize treatment. PMID:27142473

  10. Colorectal cancer: from prevention to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Binefa, Gemma; Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco; Teule, Alex; Medina-Hayas, Manuel

    2014-06-14

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a very heterogeneous disease that is caused by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. CRC develops through a gradual accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes, leading to the transformation of normal colonic mucosa into invasive cancer. CRC is one of the most prevalent and incident cancers worldwide, as well as one of the most deadly. Approximately 1235108 people are diagnosed annually with CRC, and 609051 die from CRC annually. The World Health Organization estimates an increase of 77% in the number of newly diagnosed cases of CRC and an increase of 80% in deaths from CRC by 2030. The incidence of CRC can benefit from different strategies depending on its stage: health promotion through health education campaigns (when the disease is not yet present), the implementation of screening programs (for detection of the disease in its early stages), and the development of nearly personalized treatments according to both patient characteristics (age, sex) and the cancer itself (gene expression). Although there are different strategies for screening and although the number of such strategies is increasing due to the potential of emerging technologies in molecular marker application, not all strategies meet the criteria required for screening tests in population programs; the three most accepted tests are the fecal occult blood test (FOBT), colonoscopy and sigmoidoscopy. FOBT is the most used method for CRC screening worldwide and is also the primary choice in most population-based screening programs in Europe. Due to its non-invasive nature and low cost, it is one of the most accepted techniques by population. CRC is a very heterogeneous disease, and with a few exceptions (APC, p53, KRAS), most of the genes involved in CRC are observed in a small percentage of cases. The design of genetic and epigenetic marker panels that are able to provide maximum coverage in the diagnosis of colorectal neoplasia seems a reasonable strategy

  11. Colorectal cancer: From prevention to personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Binefa, Gemma; Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco; Teule, Àlex; Medina-Hayas, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a very heterogeneous disease that is caused by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. CRC develops through a gradual accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes, leading to the transformation of normal colonic mucosa into invasive cancer. CRC is one of the most prevalent and incident cancers worldwide, as well as one of the most deadly. Approximately 1235108 people are diagnosed annually with CRC, and 609051 die from CRC annually. The World Health Organization estimates an increase of 77% in the number of newly diagnosed cases of CRC and an increase of 80% in deaths from CRC by 2030. The incidence of CRC can benefit from different strategies depending on its stage: health promotion through health education campaigns (when the disease is not yet present), the implementation of screening programs (for detection of the disease in its early stages), and the development of nearly personalized treatments according to both patient characteristics (age, sex) and the cancer itself (gene expression). Although there are different strategies for screening and although the number of such strategies is increasing due to the potential of emerging technologies in molecular marker application, not all strategies meet the criteria required for screening tests in population programs; the three most accepted tests are the fecal occult blood test (FOBT), colonoscopy and sigmoidoscopy. FOBT is the most used method for CRC screening worldwide and is also the primary choice in most population-based screening programs in Europe. Due to its non-invasive nature and low cost, it is one of the most accepted techniques by population. CRC is a very heterogeneous disease, and with a few exceptions (APC, p53, KRAS), most of the genes involved in CRC are observed in a small percentage of cases. The design of genetic and epigenetic marker panels that are able to provide maximum coverage in the diagnosis of colorectal neoplasia seems a reasonable strategy

  12. Potential markets for application of space medicine achievements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, Oleg; Belakovskiy, Mark; Kussmaul, Anna

    2014-11-01

    objects of intellectual property are playing an ever-growing role in an effort to develop a scientific center in particular and a branch on the whole. The range and spectrum of applications of space medicine and biology achievements in sports, extreme, and rehabilitation medicine and preventive maintenance has expanded from year to year.

  13. [ICT Utilization for Healthcare and Personalized Medicine].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Jun

    2015-08-01

    Through medical ICT, a greater quality and efficiency of health care, improved convenience for patients and other people, strengthening of research and development and industrial competitiveness, and the efficiency of social security costs will be offered. In order to achieve these objectives, it is necessary to have an intellectual foundation on which a medical platform is digitally constructed by the ICT for the creation of new services and medical technology. In other words, a system that, based on information systems in the medical field, etc., depending on the purpose of utilization, makes it possible to collect reusable data at the minimum required level will be established and we will then adjust and operate it. In order to enable the reuse of data, the following two mechanisms have to be created: one in which data generated by multiple agencies can be shared among stakeholders through structuring and standardization, and another in which comparable information can be used as a history attributable to individuals over a long period of time. PMID:26638438

  14. An eMERGE Clinical Center at Partners Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Smoller, Jordan W.; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Green, Robert C.; Kathiresan, Sekar; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Talkowski, Michael E.; Murphy, Shawn N.; Weiss, Scott T.

    2016-01-01

    The integration of electronic medical records (EMRs) and genomic research has become a major component of efforts to advance personalized and precision medicine. The Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) network, initiated in 2007, is an NIH-funded consortium devoted to genomic discovery and implementation research by leveraging biorepositories linked to EMRs. In its most recent phase, eMERGE III, the network is focused on facilitating implementation of genomic medicine by detecting and disclosing rare pathogenic variants in clinically relevant genes. Partners Personalized Medicine (PPM) is a center dedicated to translating personalized medicine into clinical practice within Partners HealthCare. One component of the PPM is the Partners Healthcare Biobank, a biorepository comprising broadly consented DNA samples linked to the Partners longitudinal EMR. In 2015, PPM joined the eMERGE Phase III network. Here we describe the elements of the eMERGE clinical center at PPM, including plans for genomic discovery using EMR phenotypes, evaluation of rare variant penetrance and pleiotropy, and a novel randomized trial of the impact of returning genetic results to patients and clinicians. PMID:26805891

  15. H2020 and Beyond: Skip Discrepancy between Theory and Practice of Personalized Medicine. A Position Paper by the Italian Society of Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Borro, Marina; Simmaco, Maurizio; Aceti, Antonio; Barni, Sandro; De Luca, Assunta; Fineschi, Vittorio; Frati, Paola; Girardi, Paolo; Miozzo, Monica; Nati, Giulio; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Santini, Daniele; Marchetti, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Many unsolved practical issues, from technical and scientific to ethical, legal and economic topics, are slowing down the translation of Personalized Medicine principles into medical practice. The Italian Society of Personalized Medicine exposes here its point of view, based on the real-world practice of precision medicine carried-out in Italian healthcare structures. PMID:27194357

  16. The financial hazard of personalized medicine and supportive care.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Pricivel M; Olver, Ian

    2015-12-01

    Personalized medicine is revolutionizing the delivery of oncological care, promising benefits both at the patient and health system levels. The cost of targeted therapies, unfortunately, is becoming more expensive and unaffordable. Where supportive care in cancer concerns the prevention and management of the adverse effects of cancer and its treatment and is the thrust of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer, financing of and value in personalized medicine is an important area of research and engagement for the association. Discussing patients' concerns with and identifying those at most risk for the financial hazard of cancer treatment and offering financial counseling and assistance and/or referral to support networks are potential key areas for (exploring and providing) better supportive care. The time is now to turn the concern of patients and their carers, providers, and other advocates regarding the affordability of cancer treatment into a collective cause towards coordinated action.

  17. The financial hazard of personalized medicine and supportive care.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Pricivel M; Olver, Ian

    2015-12-01

    Personalized medicine is revolutionizing the delivery of oncological care, promising benefits both at the patient and health system levels. The cost of targeted therapies, unfortunately, is becoming more expensive and unaffordable. Where supportive care in cancer concerns the prevention and management of the adverse effects of cancer and its treatment and is the thrust of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer, financing of and value in personalized medicine is an important area of research and engagement for the association. Discussing patients' concerns with and identifying those at most risk for the financial hazard of cancer treatment and offering financial counseling and assistance and/or referral to support networks are potential key areas for (exploring and providing) better supportive care. The time is now to turn the concern of patients and their carers, providers, and other advocates regarding the affordability of cancer treatment into a collective cause towards coordinated action. PMID:26306523

  18. Personalized medicine for osteoarthritis: where are we now?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Personalized medicine is a much talked about subject that is a timely and important development to healthcare in general and also specifically for patients affected by osteoarthritis. This review uses biomarker examples pertinent to osteoarthritis to highlight the current status of the field, while also highlighting probable future developments. It is not meant to be an exhaustive account. The BIPED(s) [Burden of disease, Investigative, Prognosis, Efficacy, Diagnosis (safety)] classification system is used to organize the discussion of examples. Biomarkers pertaining to burden, investigation, prognosis, efficacy, diagnosis and safety are highlighted. The examples are followed by a discussion of issues related to interpretation and application of biomarker results and approaches to solve the challenges interpretation faces, including graphical, mathematical and synthetic representations. Through this review, it is hoped that a better appreciation can be gained of the potential and pitfalls of personal medicine in the care of patients with osteoarthritis. PMID:23641258

  19. Personalized medicine for osteoarthritis: where are we now?

    PubMed

    Sawitzke, Allen Dale

    2013-04-01

    Personalized medicine is a much talked about subject that is a timely and important development to healthcare in general and also specifically for patients affected by osteoarthritis. This review uses biomarker examples pertinent to osteoarthritis to highlight the current status of the field, while also highlighting probable future developments. It is not meant to be an exhaustive account. The BIPED(s) [Burden of disease, Investigative, Prognosis, Efficacy, Diagnosis (safety)] classification system is used to organize the discussion of examples. Biomarkers pertaining to burden, investigation, prognosis, efficacy, diagnosis and safety are highlighted. The examples are followed by a discussion of issues related to interpretation and application of biomarker results and approaches to solve the challenges interpretation faces, including graphical, mathematical and synthetic representations. Through this review, it is hoped that a better appreciation can be gained of the potential and pitfalls of personal medicine in the care of patients with osteoarthritis.

  20. Semantically enabling pharmacogenomic data for the realization of personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Samwald, Matthias; Coulet, Adrien; Huerga, Iker; Powers, Robert L; Luciano, Joanne S; Freimuth, Robert R; Whipple, Frederick; Pichler, Elgar; Prud’hommeaux, Eric; Dumontier, Michel; Marshall, M Scott

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how each individual’s genetics and physiology influences pharmaceutical response is crucial to the realization of personalized medicine and the discovery and validation of pharmacogenomic biomarkers is key to its success. However, integration of genotype and phenotype knowledge in medical information systems remains a critical challenge. The inability to easily and accurately integrate the results of biomolecular studies with patients’ medical records and clinical reports prevents us from realizing the full potential of pharmacogenomic knowledge for both drug development and clinical practice. Herein, we describe approaches using Semantic Web technologies, in which pharmacogenomic knowledge relevant to drug development and medical decision support is represented in such a way that it can be efficiently accessed both by software and human experts. We suggest that this approach increases the utility of data, and that such computational technologies will become an essential part of personalized medicine, alongside diagnostics and pharmaceutical products. PMID:22256869

  1. The use of personal computers in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Tello, R; Potter, J E; Hill, T C

    1994-01-01

    Consolidating personal computers (PCs) with nuclear medicine technology can create high computational power comparable with that produced by vendor-specific computer equipment, and at more affordable prices. The integration of a standard platform and operating system with a large installed base has enabled our department to maintain itself at the cutting edge of technology with minimal expense. Along with the savings from the purchase of PC software and hardware come the added advantage of rapid training of staff with minimal in-house effort, especially given the vast educational support in the general community. The integration of a standard platform and operating system with a large installed base has provided the nuclear medicine department with computational resources once unheard of because of economies of scale. The acceptance and integration of a pervasive, flexible technology into nuclear medicine have shown that state-of-the-art studies can be performed at low cost. PMID:8122130

  2. The Role of Surgeons in Building a Personalized Medicine Program

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Genevieve M.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda

    2014-01-01

    Changes in technology, with decreases in the cost of molecular profiling, has expanded the interest in creating institution-wide personalized medicine platforms to allow selective assessment of a given patient’s tumor in real time, with the ability to utilize that information for patient care decisions. In order for this approach to function adequately, a multidisciplinary team must be created in an environment with dedicated support at an institutional level. PMID:24964977

  3. Label-Free Microcavity Biosensors: Steps towards Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Amarie, Dragos; Glazier, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Personalized medicine has the potential to improve our ability to maintain health and treat disease, while ameliorating continuously rising healthcare costs. Translation of basic research findings to clinical applications within regulatory compliance is required for personalized medicine to become the new foundation for practice of medicine. Deploying even a few of the thousands of potential diagnostic biomarkers identified each year as part of personalized treatment workflows requires clinically efficient biosensor technologies to monitor multiple biomarkers in patients in real time. This paper discusses a critical component of a regulatory system, a microcavity optical biosensor for label-free monitoring of biomolecular interactions at physiologically-relevant concentrations. While most current biosensor research focuses on improving sensitivity, this paper emphasizes other characteristics a biosensor technology requires to be practical in a clinical setting, presenting robust microcavity biosensors which are easy to manufacture and integrate with microfluidics into flexible and redesignable platforms making the microcavity biosensors deployable for continuous monitoring of biomarkers in body fluids in the clinic, in dense 2D random arrays for high-throughput applications like drug-library screening in interactomics, and of the secretory behavior of single cells in the laboratory. PMID:23443397

  4. The potential applications of Apolipoprotein E in personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Villeneuve, Sylvia; Brisson, Diane; Marchant, Natalie L.; Gaudet, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Personalized medicine uses various individual characteristics to guide medical decisions. Apolipoprotein (ApoE), the most studied polymorphism in humans, has been associated with several diseases. The purpose of this review is to elucidate the potential role of ApoE polymorphisms in personalized medicine, with a specific focus on neurodegenerative diseases, by giving an overview of its influence on disease risk assessment, diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy. This review is not a systematic inventory of the literature, but rather a summary and discussion of novel, influential and promising works in the field of ApoE research that could be valuable for personalized medicine. Empirical evidence suggests that ApoE genotype informs pre-symptomatic risk for a wide variety of diseases, is valuable for the diagnosis of type III dysbetalipoproteinemia, increases risk of dementia in neurodegenerative diseases, and is associated with a poor prognosis following acute brain damage. ApoE status appears to influence the efficacy of certain drugs, outcome of clinical trials, and might also give insight into disease prevention. Assessing ApoE genotype might therefore help to guide medical decisions in clinical practice. PMID:25071563

  5. Personalized medicine - the promised land: are we there yet?

    PubMed

    Li, C

    2011-05-01

    The delivery of personalized genomic medicine (refer Table 1 for a comparison of genomic vs genetic medicine and box 1 for glossary) hinges on obtaining personal genomic data through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) or whole-genome sequencing. After the completion of the human genome project (see box 2 for human genome projects and its derivative projects) in 2003, there appeared to be a period of euphoric optimism that as soon as the cost of sequencing the whole human genome could be brought down to an affordable range, the promise of personalized medicine would become a reality. However, inasmuch as the miraculous technological advancements are making whole-genome data acquisition an inexpensive reality, we are also starting to appreciate that making sense of the enormous amount of genomic data is a far bigger hurdle. Issues, both scientific and ethico-legal, will have to be addressed as genomic data are been pushed for clinical and direct-to-consumer utilization. [Table: see text].

  6. Implementation and utilization of genetic testing in personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Abul-Husn, Noura S; Owusu Obeng, Aniwaa; Sanderson, Saskia C; Gottesman, Omri; Scott, Stuart A

    2014-01-01

    Clinical genetic testing began over 30 years ago with the availability of mutation detection for sickle cell disease diagnosis. Since then, the field has dramatically transformed to include gene sequencing, high-throughput targeted genotyping, prenatal mutation detection, preimplantation genetic diagnosis, population-based carrier screening, and now genome-wide analyses using microarrays and next-generation sequencing. Despite these significant advances in molecular technologies and testing capabilities, clinical genetics laboratories historically have been centered on mutation detection for Mendelian disorders. However, the ongoing identification of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequence variants associated with common diseases prompted the availability of testing for personal disease risk estimation, and created commercial opportunities for direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies that assay these variants. This germline genetic risk, in conjunction with other clinical, family, and demographic variables, are the key components of the personalized medicine paradigm, which aims to apply personal genomic and other relevant data into a patient’s clinical assessment to more precisely guide medical management. However, genetic testing for disease risk estimation is an ongoing topic of debate, largely due to inconsistencies in the results, concerns over clinical validity and utility, and the variable mode of delivery when returning genetic results to patients in the absence of traditional counseling. A related class of genetic testing with analogous issues of clinical utility and acceptance is pharmacogenetic testing, which interrogates sequence variants implicated in interindividual drug response variability. Although clinical pharmacogenetic testing has not previously been widely adopted, advances in rapid turnaround time genetic testing technology and the recent implementation of preemptive genotyping programs at selected medical centers suggest that personalized

  7. A framework for personalized medicine: prediction of drug sensitivity in cancer by proteomic profiling

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The goal of personalized medicine is to provide patients optimal drug screening and treatment based on individual genomic or proteomic profiles. Reverse-Phase Protein Array (RPPA) technology offers proteomic information of cancer patients which may be directly related to drug sensitivity. For cancer patients with different drug sensitivity, the proteomic profiling reveals important pathophysiologic information which can be used to predict chemotherapy responses. Results The goal of this paper is to present a framework for personalized medicine using both RPPA and drug sensitivity (drug resistance or intolerance). In the proposed personalized medicine system, the prediction of drug sensitivity is obtained by a proposed augmented naive Bayesian classifier (ANBC) whose edges between attributes are augmented in the network structure of naive Bayesian classifier. For discriminative structure learning of ANBC, local classification rate (LCR) is used to score augmented edges, and greedy search algorithm is used to find the discriminative structure that maximizes classification rate (CR). Once a classifier is trained by RPPA and drug sensitivity using cancer patient samples, the classifier is able to predict the drug sensitivity given RPPA information from a patient. Conclusion In this paper we proposed a framework for personalized medicine where a patient is profiled by RPPA and drug sensitivity is predicted by ANBC and LCR. Experimental results with lung cancer data demonstrate that RPPA can be used to profile patients for drug sensitivity prediction by Bayesian network classifier, and the proposed ANBC for personalized cancer medicine achieves better prediction accuracy than naive Bayes classifier in small sample size data on average and outperforms other the state-of-the-art classifier methods in terms of classification accuracy. PMID:22759571

  8. Personality and Longevity: Knowns, Unknowns, and Implications for Public Health and Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Benjamin P.; Roberts, Brent; Duberstein, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We review evidence for links between personality traits and longevity. We provide an overview of personality for health scientists, using the primary organizing framework used in the study of personality and longevity. We then review data on various aspects of personality linked to longevity. In general, there is good evidence that higher level of conscientiousness and lower levels of hostility and Type D or “distressed” personality are associated with greater longevity. Limited evidence suggests that extraversion, openness, perceived control, and low levels of emotional suppression may be associated with longer lifespan. Findings regarding neuroticism are mixed, supporting the notion that many component(s) of neuroticism detract from life expectancy, but some components at some levels may be healthy or protective. Overall, evidence suggests various personality traits are significant predictors of longevity and points to several promising directions for further study. We conclude by discussing the implications of these links for epidemiologic research and personalized medicine and lay out a translational research agenda for integrating the psychology of individual differences into public health and medicine. PMID:21766032

  9. The role of psychoneuroimmunology in personalized and systems medicine.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qing

    2012-01-01

    Psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) may provide the scientific basis for personalized and systems medicine. The exploration of the extensive interactions among psychological and behavioral factors, the nervous system, the immune system, and the endocrine system may help understand the mechanisms underlying health, wellness, and diseases. PNI theories based on systems biology methodologies may contribute to the identification of patient patterns for establishing psychological and physiological profiles for personalized medicine. A biopsychosocial model will help elucidate the systemic interrelationships between psychosocial and bio-physiological factors for the development of systems medicine. Many evidences have supported the close relationships between stress, depression, inflammation, and disorders including obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, arthritis, skin diseases, infectious diseases, and sleep disorders. As inflammation is a critical connection among different diseases, the elucidation of the associations may contribute to the findings of systemic therapeutic targets. With the understanding of the translational implications of PNI, integrative interventions in multiple dimensions can be applied to modulate stress responses and promote healthier behaviors. These interventions include combination drug therapies, diets, nutritional supplements, meditation, and other behavioral and mind-body strategies.

  10. Patient-tailored medicine, part two: personalized medicine and the legal landscape.

    PubMed

    Braff, Jeffrey P; Chatterjee, Biswajit; Hochman, Meredith; Kennington, Jessica; Kolavala, Chandana; Layman, Katherine; Parver, Corrine; Rice, Chelsea S; Selby, Myra C; Washlick, John R; Wolf, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    In Part One, the authors addressed the relevance of genetic information, and how race and genetics have affected and may impact the development of medicines, pharmacogenomics, and personalized medicine in the United States. Part Two examines current and proposed federal and state laws and regulations intended to protect individuals from the misuse of genetic information, including uses that discriminate based on genetic predispositions. This Part next explores the potential for litigation against both manufacturers and providers,as well as potential defenses. The authors also discuss legal issues relating to research that relies on the use of genetic information.

  11. Is laboratory medicine ready for the era of personalized medicine? A survey addressed to laboratory directors of hospitals/academic schools of medicine in Europe.

    PubMed

    Malentacchi, Francesca; Mancini, Irene; Brandslund, Ivan; Vermeersch, Pieter; Schwab, Matthias; Marc, Janja; van Schaik, Ron H N; Siest, Gerard; Theodorsson, Elvar; Pazzagli, Mario; Di Resta, Chiara

    2015-06-01

    Developments in "-omics" are creating a paradigm shift in laboratory medicine leading to personalized medicine. This allows the increase in diagnostics and therapeutics focused on individuals rather than populations. In order to investigate whether laboratory medicine is ready to play a key role in the integration of personalized medicine in routine health care and set the state-of-the-art knowledge about personalized medicine and laboratory medicine in Europe, a questionnaire was constructed under the auspices of the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) and the European Society of Pharmacogenomics and Personalised Therapy (ESPT). The answers of the participating laboratory medicine professionals indicate that they are aware that personalized medicine can represent a new and promising health model, and that laboratory medicine should play a key role in supporting the implementation of personalized medicine in the clinical setting. Participants think that the current organization of laboratory medicine needs additional/relevant implementations such as (i) new technological facilities in -omics; (ii) additional training for the current personnel focused on the new methodologies; (iii) incorporation in the laboratory of new competencies in data interpretation and counseling; and (iv) cooperation and collaboration among professionals of different disciplines to integrate information according to a personalized medicine approach.

  12. Systems Cancer Medicine: Towards Realization of Predictive, Preventive, Personalized, and Participatory (P4) Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Qiang; Price, Nathan D.; Hood, Leroy

    2011-01-01

    A grand challenge impeding optimal treatment outcomes for cancer patients arises from the complex nature of the disease: the cellular heterogeneity, the myriad of dysfunctional molecular and genetic networks as results of genetic (somatic) and environmental perturbations. Systems biology, with its holistic approach to understanding fundamental principles in biology, and the empowering technologies in genomics, proteomics, single-cell analysis, microfluidics, and computational strategies, enables a comprehensive approach to medicine, which strives to unveil the pathogenic mechanisms of diseases, identify disease biomarkers and begin thinking about new strategies for drug target discovery. The integration of multi-dimensional high throughput “omics” measurements from tumor tissues and corresponding blood specimens, together with new systems strategies for diagnostics, enables the identification of cancer biomarkers that will enable presymptomatic diagnosis, stratification of disease, assessment of disease progression, evaluation of patient response to therapy, and the identification of reoccurrences. While some aspects of systems medicine are being adopted in clinical oncology practice through companion molecular diagnostics for personalized therapy, the mounting influx of global quantitative data from both wellness and diseases, is shaping up a transformational paradigm in medicine we termed predictive, preventive, personalized, and participatory (P4) medicine, which requires new strategies, both scientific and organizational, to enable bringing this revolution in medicine to patients and to the healthcare system. P4 medicine will have a profound impact on society—transforming the healthcare system, turning around the ever escalating costs of healthcare, digitizing the practice of medicine and creating enormous economic opportunities for those organizations and nations that embrace this revolution PMID:22142401

  13. Individualizing liver transplant immunosuppression using a phenotypic personalized medicine platform.

    PubMed

    Zarrinpar, Ali; Lee, Dong-Keun; Silva, Aleidy; Datta, Nakul; Kee, Theodore; Eriksen, Calvin; Weigle, Keri; Agopian, Vatche; Kaldas, Fady; Farmer, Douglas; Wang, Sean E; Busuttil, Ronald; Ho, Chih-Ming; Ho, Dean

    2016-04-01

    Posttransplant immunosuppressive drugs such as tacrolimus have narrow therapeutic ranges. Inter- and intraindividual variability in dosing requirements conventionally use physician-guided titrated drug administration, which results in frequent deviations from the target trough ranges, particularly during the critical postoperative phase. There is a clear need for personalized management of posttransplant regimens to prevent adverse events and allow the patient to be discharged sooner. We have developed the parabolic personalized dosing (PPD) platform, which is a surface represented by a second-order algebraic equation with experimentally determined coefficients of the equation being unique to each patient. PPD uses clinical data, including blood concentrations of tacrolimus--the primary phenotypic readout for immunosuppression efficacy--to calibrate these coefficients and pinpoint the optimal doses that result in the desired patient-specific response. In this pilot randomized controlled trial, we compared four transplant patients prospectively treated with tacrolimus using PPD with four control patients treated according to the standard of care (physician guidance). Using phenotype to personalize tacrolimus dosing, PPD effectively managed patients by keeping tacrolimus blood trough levels within the target ranges. In a retrospective analysis of the control patients, PPD-optimized prednisone and tacrolimus dosing improved tacrolimus trough-level management and minimized the need to recalibrate dosing after regimen changes. PPD is independent of disease mechanism and is agnostic of indication and could therefore apply beyond transplant medicine to dosing for cancer, infectious diseases, and cardiovascular medicine, where patient response is variable and requires careful adjustments through optimized inputs.

  14. Genetic Knowledge Among Participants in the Coriell Personalized Medicine Collaborative.

    PubMed

    Schmidlen, Tara J; Scheinfeldt, Laura; Zhaoyang, Ruixue; Kasper, Rachel; Sweet, Kevin; Gordon, Erynn S; Keller, Margaret; Stack, Cathy; Gharani, Neda; Daly, Mary B; Jarvis, Joseph; Christman, Michael F

    2016-04-01

    Genetic literacy is essential for the effective integration of genomic information into healthcare; yet few recent studies have been conducted to assess the current state of this knowledge base. Participants in the Coriell Personalized Medicine Collaborative (CPMC), a prospective study assessing the impact of personalized genetic risk reports for complex diseases and drug response on behavior and health outcomes, completed genetic knowledge questionnaires and other surveys through an online portal. To assess the association between genetic knowledge and genetic education background, multivariate linear regression was performed. 4 062 participants completed a genetic knowledge and genetic education background questionnaire. Most were older (mean age: 50), Caucasian (90 %), female (59 %), highly educated (69 % bachelor's or higher), with annual household income over $100 000 (49 %). Mean percent correct was 76 %. Controlling for demographics revealed that health care providers, participants previously exposed to genetics, and participants with 'better than most' self-rated knowledge were significantly more likely to have a higher knowledge score (p < 0.001). Overall, genetic knowledge was high with previous genetic education experience predictive of higher genetic knowledge score. Education is likely to improve genetic literacy, an important component to expanded use of genomics in personalized medicine. PMID:26306685

  15. Cancer subclonal genetic architecture as a key to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2013-12-01

    The future of personalized oncological therapy will likely rely on evidence-based medicine to integrate all of the available evidence to delineate the most efficacious treatment option for the patient. To undertake evidence-based medicine through use of targeted therapy regimens, identification of the specific underlying causative mutation(s) driving growth and progression of a patient's tumor is imperative. Although molecular subtyping is important for planning and treatment, intraclonal genetic diversity has been recently highlighted as having significant implications for biopsy-based prognosis. Overall, delineation of the clonal architecture of a patient's cancer and how this will impact on the selection of the most efficacious therapy remain a topic of intense interest.

  16. Infrastructure for Personalized Medicine at Partners HealthCare

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Scott T.; Shin, Meini Sumbada

    2016-01-01

    Partners HealthCare Personalized Medicine (PPM) is a center within the Partners HealthCare system (founded by Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Hospital) whose mission is to utilize genetics and genomics to improve the care of patients in a cost effective manner. PPM consists of five interconnected components: (1) Laboratory for Molecular Medicine (LMM), a CLIA laboratory performing genetic testing for patients world-wide; (2) Translational Genomics Core (TGC), a core laboratory providing genomic platforms for Partners investigators; (3) Partners Biobank, a biobank of samples (DNA, plasma and serum) for 50,000 Consented Partners patients; (4) Biobank Portal, an IT infrastructure and viewer to bring together genotypes, samples, phenotypes (validated diagnoses, radiology, and clinical chemistry) from the electronic medical record to Partners investigators. These components are united by (5) a common IT system that brings researchers, clinicians, and patients together for optimal research and patient care. PMID:26927187

  17. Pharmacogenetics and personalized medicine: the future for drug prescribing.

    PubMed

    Mitri, Zahi; Esmerian, Maria O; Simaan, Joseph A; Sabra, Ramzi; Zgheib, Nathalie K

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics, the study of interindividual variations in DNA sequence related to drug response, aims at the optimization of treatment regimens based on each patient's unique genetic makeup. Currently, there is a trend towards moving away from the concept of "one drug fits all" to a rather more individualized and personalized medicine. The goal is to define the appropriate drug dose that maximizes efficacy and minimizes toxicity in each individual patient. An example of genotyping for CYP2C9 genetic polymorphisms in patients receiving oral anticoagulants is provided. In spite of its inherent challenges, we hope that pharmacogenetic research and clinical applications expand to improve healthcare outcomes in Lebanon and worldwide. PMID:20549897

  18. Personalized Cancer Medicine: Molecular Diagnostics, Predictive biomarkers, and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez de Castro, D; Clarke, P A; Al-Lazikani, B; Workman, P

    2013-01-01

    The progressive elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of cancer has fueled the rational development of targeted drugs for patient populations stratified by genetic characteristics. Here we discuss general challenges relating to molecular diagnostics and describe predictive biomarkers for personalized cancer medicine. We also highlight resistance mechanisms for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase inhibitors in lung cancer. We envisage a future requiring the use of longitudinal genome sequencing and other omics technologies alongside combinatorial treatment to overcome cellular and molecular heterogeneity and prevent resistance caused by clonal evolution. PMID:23361103

  19. The pharmocogenomics of warfarin: closing in on personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Rettie, Allan E; Tai, Guoying

    2006-08-01

    Warfarin, a coumarin anticoagulant, is used worldwide for the treatment and prevention of thromboembolic disease. Warfarin therapy, however, can be difficult to manage because of the drug's narrow therapeutic index and the wide interindividual variability in patient response. It is now clear that genetic polymorphisms in genes influencing metabolism (CYP2C9) and pharmacodynamic response (VKORC1) are strongly associated with warfarin responsiveness. Optimal warfarin dosing in turn drives other positive anticoagulation-related outcomes. Therefore, a strong basic science argument is emerging for prospective genotyping of warfarin patients. Effective clinical translation would establish warfarin pharmacogenomics as a heuristic model for personalized medicine. PMID:16960144

  20. From "Personalized" to "Precision" Medicine: The Ethical and Social Implications of Rhetorical Reform in Genomic Medicine.

    PubMed

    Juengst, Eric; McGowan, Michelle L; Fishman, Jennifer R; Settersten, Richard A

    2016-09-01

    Since the late 1980s, the human genetics and genomics research community has been promising to usher in a "new paradigm for health care"-one that uses molecular profiling to identify human genetic variants implicated in multifactorial health risks. After the completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003, a wide range of stakeholders became committed to this "paradigm shift," creating a confluence of investment, advocacy, and enthusiasm that bears all the marks of a "scientific/intellectual social movement" within biomedicine. Proponents of this movement usually offer four ways in which their approach to medical diagnosis and health care improves upon current practices, arguing that it is more "personalized," "predictive," "preventive," and "participatory" than the medical status quo. Initially, it was personalization that seemed to best sum up the movement's appeal. By 2012, however, powerful opinion leaders were abandoning "personalized medicine" in favor of a new label: "precision medicine." The new label received a decisive seal of approval when, in January 2015, President Obama unveiled plans for a national "precision medicine initiative" to promote the development and use of genomic tools in health care. PMID:27649826

  1. Jumping on the Train of Personalized Medicine: A Primer for Non- Geneticist Clinicians: Part 3. Clinical Applications in the Personalized Medicine Area

    PubMed Central

    Li, Aihua; Meyre, David

    2014-01-01

    The rapid decline of sequencing costs brings hope that personal genome sequencing will become a common feature of medical practice. This series of three reviews aim to help non-geneticist clinicians to jump into the fast-moving field of personalized genetic medicine. In the first two articles, we covered the fundamental concepts of molecular genetics and the methodologies used in genetic epidemiology. In this third article, we discuss the evolution of personalized medicine and illustrate the most recent success in the fields of Mendelian and complex human diseases. We also address the challenges that currently limit the use of personalized medicine to its full potential. PMID:25598768

  2. Achievements and Limitations of Evidence-Based Medicine.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Desmond J; Julian, Desmond G

    2016-07-12

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) has a long history, but was revived in the early 1990s by a campaign mounted by a movement that took its name. The EBM movement focused attention on the need for greater objectivity in medical decision-making and led to the Cochrane Collaboration, which provides reviews of evidence on the basis of comparative research. Important limitations of EBM's effect on medicine have also emerged. Failure to acknowledge the limitations of clinical trials and systematic reviews has limited their applicability to individual patients' circumstances. An almost exclusive focus on drugs and devices has left vast areas of health care in an evidence vacuum. An overdependence on commissions for its research may have limited its independence in selecting what it investigates. EBM needs to widen its scope beyond drugs and devices to address many areas that often lack evidence at present, notably, health policy, management, and reforms. PMID:27386775

  3. Personalized medicine in diabetes: the role of 'omics' and biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Pearson, E R

    2016-06-01

    Personalized medicine, otherwise called stratified or precision medicine, aims to better target intervention to the individual to maximize benefit and minimize harm. This review discusses how diabetes aetiology, pathophysiology and patient genotype influence response to or side effects of the commonly used diabetes treatments. C-peptide is a useful biomarker that is underused to guide treatment choice, severe insulin deficiency predicts non-response to glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, and thiazolidinediones are more effective in insulin-resistant patients. The field of pharmacogenetics is now yielding clinically important results, with three examples outlined: sulphonylurea sensitivity in patients with HNF1A maturity-onset diabetes of the young; sulphonylurea sensitivity in patients with Type 2 diabetes with reduced function alleles at CYP2C9, resulting in reduced metabolism of sulphonylureas; and severe metformin intolerance associated with reduced function organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1) variants, exacerbated by drugs that also inhibit OCT1. Genome-wide approaches and the potential of other 'omics', including metagenomics and metabolomics, are then outlined, highlighting the complex interacting networks that we need to understand before we can truly personalize diabetes treatments. PMID:26802434

  4. Personalized medicine in psychiatry: new technologies and approaches.

    PubMed

    Costa e Silva, Jorge A

    2013-01-01

    Psychiatric patients tend to exhibit significant interindividual variability in their responses to psychoactive drugs, as well as an irregular clinical course. For these (and other) reasons, increasing numbers of psychiatrists are turning to genotyping for help in selecting the psychopharmacologic agents best suited to an individual patient's distinctive metabolic characteristics and clinical presentation. Fortunately, routine genotyping is already available for gene variations that code for proteins involved in neurotransmission, and for drug-metabolizing enzymes involved in the elimination of many medications. Thus, genotyping-based personalized psychiatry is now in sight. Increasing numbers of clinically useful DNA microarrays are in the development stage, including a simplified procedure for genotyping patients for CYP2D6, which metabolizes a high proportion of the currently prescribed antidepressants and antipsychotics. It has been pointed out that psychiatric disease is rarely a consequence of an abnormality in a single gene, but reflects the perturbations of complex intracellular networks in the brain. Thus, analysis of functional neuronal networks is becoming an essential component of drug development strategies. The integrated use of technologies such as electroencephalography, magnetoencephalography, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), in combination with pharmacogenetics, promises to transform our understanding of the mechanisms of psychiatric disorders and their treatment. The concept of network medicine envisions a time to come when drugs will be used to target a neural network rather than simply components within the network. Personalized medicine in psychiatry is still at an early stage, but it has a very promising future.

  5. Ensemble survival trees for identifying subpopulations in personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Chuan; Chen, James J

    2016-09-01

    Recently, personalized medicine has received great attention to improve safety and effectiveness in drug development. Personalized medicine aims to provide medical treatment that is tailored to the patient's characteristics such as genomic biomarkers, disease history, etc., so that the benefit of treatment can be optimized. Subpopulations identification is to divide patients into several different subgroups where each subgroup corresponds to an optimal treatment. For two subgroups, traditionally the multivariate Cox proportional hazards model is fitted and used to calculate the risk score when outcome is survival time endpoint. Median is commonly chosen as the cutoff value to separate patients. However, using median as the cutoff value is quite subjective and sometimes may be inappropriate in situations where data are imbalanced. Here, we propose a novel tree-based method that adopts the algorithm of relative risk trees to identify subgroup patients. After growing a relative risk tree, we apply k-means clustering to group the terminal nodes based on the averaged covariates. We adopt an ensemble Bagging method to improve the performance of a single tree since it is well known that the performance of a single tree is quite unstable. A simulation study is conducted to compare the performance between our proposed method and the multivariate Cox model. The applications of our proposed method to two public cancer data sets are also conducted for illustration. PMID:27073016

  6. An epidemiological perspective of personalized medicine: the Estonian experience

    PubMed Central

    Milani, L; Leitsalu, L; Metspalu, A

    2015-01-01

    Milani L, Leitsalu L, Metspalu A (University of Tartu). An epidemiological perspective of personalized medicine: the Estonian experience (Review). J Intern Med 2015; 277: 188–200. The Estonian Biobank and several other biobanks established over a decade ago are now starting to yield valuable longitudinal follow-up data for large numbers of individuals. These samples have been used in hundreds of different genome-wide association studies, resulting in the identification of reliable disease-associated variants. The focus of genomic research has started to shift from identifying genetic and nongenetic risk factors associated with common complex diseases to understanding the underlying mechanisms of the diseases and suggesting novel targets for therapy. However, translation of findings from genomic research into medical practice is still lagging, mainly due to insufficient evidence of clinical validity and utility. In this review, we examine the different elements required for the implementation of personalized medicine based on genomic information. First, biobanks and genome centres are required and have been established for the high-throughput genomic screening of large numbers of samples. Secondly, the combination of susceptibility alleles into polygenic risk scores has improved risk prediction of cardiovascular disease, breast cancer and several other diseases. Finally, national health information systems are being developed internationally, to combine data from electronic medical records from different sources, and also to gradually incorporate genomic information. We focus on the experience in Estonia, one of several countries with national goals towards more personalized health care based on genomic information, where the unique combination of elements required to accomplish this goal are already in place. PMID:25339628

  7. Addressing phenoconversion: the Achilles' heel of personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rashmi R; Smith, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    Phenoconversion is a phenomenon that converts genotypic extensive metabolizers (EMs) into phenotypic poor metabolizers (PMs) of drugs, thereby modifying their clinical response to that of genotypic PMs. Phenoconversion, usually resulting from nongenetic extrinsic factors, has a significant impact on the analysis and interpretation of genotype-focused clinical outcome association studies and personalizing therapy in routine clinical practice. The high phenotypic variability or genotype–phenotype mismatch, frequently observed due to phenoconversion within the genotypic EM population, means that the real number of phenotypic PM subjects may be greater than predicted from their genotype alone, because many genotypic EMs would be phenotypically PMs. If the phenoconverted population with genotype–phenotype mismatch, most extensively studied for CYP2D6, is as large as the evidence suggests, there is a real risk that genotype-focused association studies, typically correlating only the genotype with clinical outcomes, may miss clinically strong pharmacogenetic associations, thus compromising any potential for advancing the prospects of personalized medicine. This review focuses primarily on co-medication-induced phenoconversion and discusses potential approaches to rectify some of the current shortcomings. It advocates routine phenotyping of subjects in genotype-focused association studies and proposes a new nomenclature to categorize study populations. Even with strong and reliable data associating patients' genotypes with clinical outcome(s), there are problems clinically in applying this knowledge into routine pharmacotherapy because of potential genotype–phenotype mismatch. Drug-induced phenoconversion during routine clinical practice remains a major public health issue. Therefore, the principal challenges facing personalized medicine, which need to be addressed, include identification of the following factors: (i) drugs that are susceptible to phenoconversion

  8. ePatient Conference Explores Future of Personalized Medicine | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NIH campus in Bethesda, Md. "The ePatient: Digital and Genomic Technologies for Personalized Health Care" was co-sponsored by the Friends of the National Library of Medicine (FNLM), the National Library of Medicine ( ...

  9. Development and Validation of a Personality Assessment Instrument for Traditional Korean Medicine: Sasang Personality Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Han; Lee, Siwoo; Park, Soo Hyun; Jang, Eunsu; Lee, Soo Jin

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Sasang typology is a traditional Korean medicine based on the biopsychosocial perspectives of Neo-Confucianism and utilizes medical herbs and acupuncture for type-specific treatment. This study was designed to develop and validate the Sasang Personality Questionnaire (SPQ) for future use in the assessment of personality based on Sasang typology. Design and Methods. We selected questionnaire items using internal consistency analysis and examined construct validity with explorative factor analysis using 245 healthy participants. Test-retest reliability as well as convergent validity were examined. Results. The 14-item SPQ showed acceptable internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = .817) and test-retest reliability (r = .837). Three extracted subscales, SPQ-behavior, SPQ-emotionality, and SPQ-cognition, were found, explaining 55.77% of the total variance. The SPQ significantly correlated with Temperament and Character Inventory novelty seeking (r = .462), harm avoidance (r = −.390), and NEO Personality Inventory extraversion (r = .629). The SPQ score of the So-Eum (24.43 ± 4.93), Tae-Eum (27.33 ± 5.88), and So-Yang (30.90 ± 5.23) types were significantly different from each other (P < .01). Conclusion. Current results demonstrated the reliability and validity of the SPQ and its subscales that can be utilized as an objective instrument for conducting personalized medicine research incorporating the biopsychosocial perspective. PMID:22567034

  10. Personalized Instruction: The Key to Student Achievement, Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, James W.; Jenkins, John M.

    2008-01-01

    Personalization of learning and instruction is the most critical issue facing contemporary education--not state testing or vouchers or even aging schools. Personalization is an attempt on the part of a school to take into account individual student characteristics and needs and flexible instructional practices in organizing the learning…

  11. Translational research: precision medicine, personalized medicine, targeted therapies: marketing or science?

    PubMed

    Marquet, Pierre; Longeray, Pierre-Henry; Barlesi, Fabrice; Ameye, Véronique; Augé, Pascale; Cazeneuve, Béatrice; Chatelut, Etienne; Diaz, Isabelle; Diviné, Marine; Froguel, Philippe; Goni, Sylvia; Gueyffier, François; Hoog-Labouret, Natalie; Mourah, Samia; Morin-Surroca, Michèle; Perche, Olivier; Perin-Dureau, Florent; Pigeon, Martine; Tisseau, Anne; Verstuyft, Céline

    2015-01-01

    Personalized medicine is based on: 1) improved clinical or non-clinical methods (including biomarkers) for a more discriminating and precise diagnosis of diseases; 2) targeted therapies of the choice or the best drug for each patient among those available; 3) dose adjustment methods to optimize the benefit-risk ratio of the drugs chosen; 4) biomarkers of efficacy, toxicity, treatment discontinuation, relapse, etc. Unfortunately, it is still too often a theoretical concept because of the lack of convenient diagnostic methods or treatments, particularly of drugs corresponding to each subtype of pathology, hence to each patient. Stratified medicine is a component of personalized medicine employing biomarkers and companion diagnostics to target the patients likely to present the best benefit-risk balance for a given active compound. The concept of targeted therapy, mostly used in cancer treatment, relies on the existence of a defined molecular target, involved or not in the pathological process, and/or on the existence of a biomarker able to identify the target population, which should logically be small as compared to the population presenting the disease considered. Targeted therapies and biomarkers represent important stakes for the pharmaceutical industry, in terms of market access, of return on investment and of image among the prescribers. At the same time, they probably represent only the first generation of products resulting from the combination of clinical, pathophysiological and molecular research, i.e. of translational research.

  12. Translating Personality Psychology to Help Personalize Preventive Medicine for Young-Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Israel, Salomon; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Belsky, Daniel W.; Hancox, Robert J.; Poulton, Richie; Roberts, Brent; Thomson, W. Murray; Caspi, Avshalom

    2014-01-01

    The rising number of newly insured young adults brought on by healthcare reform will soon increase demands on primary-care physicians. Physicians will face more young-adult patients which presents an opportunity for more prevention-oriented care. In the current study, we evaluated whether brief observer reports of young adults’ personality traits could predict which individuals would be at greater risk for poor health as they entered midlife. Following the Dunedin Study cohort of 1,000 individuals, we show that very brief measures of young adults’ personalities predicted their midlife physical health across multiple domains (metabolic abnormalities, cardiorespiratory fitness, pulmonary function, periodontal disease, and systemic inflammation). Individuals scoring low on the traits of Conscientiousness and Openness-to-Experience went on to develop poorer health even after accounting for preexisting differences in education, socioeconomic status, smoking, obesity, self-reported health, medical conditions, and family medical history. Moreover, personality ratings from peer informants who knew participants well, and from a nurse and receptionist who had just met participants for the first time, predicted health decline from young adulthood to midlife despite striking differences in level of acquaintance. Personality effect sizes were on par with other well-established health-risk factors such as socioeconomic status, smoking, and self-reported health. We discuss the potential utility of personality measurement to function as an inexpensive and accessible tool for healthcare professionals to personalize preventive medicine. Adding personality information to existing healthcare electronic infrastructures could also advance personality theory by generating opportunities to examine how personality processes influence doctor-patient communication, health service use, and patient outcomes. PMID:24588093

  13. Translating personality psychology to help personalize preventive medicine for young adult patients.

    PubMed

    Israel, Salomon; Moffitt, Terrie E; Belsky, Daniel W; Hancox, Robert J; Poulton, Richie; Roberts, Brent; Thomson, W Murray; Caspi, Avshalom

    2014-03-01

    The rising number of newly insured young adults brought on by health care reform will soon increase demands on primary care physicians. Physicians will face more young adult patients, which presents an opportunity for more prevention-oriented care. In the present study, we evaluated whether brief observer reports of young adults' personality traits could predict which individuals would be at greater risk for poor health as they entered midlife. Following the cohort of 1,000 individuals from the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study (Moffitt, Caspi, Rutter, & Silva, 2001), we show that very brief measures of young adults' personalities predicted their midlife physical health across multiple domains (metabolic abnormalities, cardiorespiratory fitness, pulmonary function, periodontal disease, and systemic inflammation). Individuals scoring low on the traits of Conscientiousness and Openness to Experience went on to develop poorer health even after accounting for preexisting differences in education, socioeconomic status, smoking, obesity, self-reported health, medical conditions, and family medical history. Moreover, personality ratings from peer informants who knew participants well, and from a nurse and receptionist who had just met participants for the first time, predicted health decline from young adulthood to midlife despite striking differences in level of acquaintance. Personality effect sizes were on par with other well-established health risk factors such as socioeconomic status, smoking, and self-reported health. We discuss the potential utility of personality measurement to function as an inexpensive and accessible tool for health care professionals to personalize preventive medicine. Adding personality information to existing health care electronic infrastructures could also advance personality theory by generating opportunities to examine how personality processes influence doctor-patient communication, health service use, and patient

  14. Achievement and Behaviour in Undergraduate Mathematics: Personality Is a Better Predictor than Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alcock, Lara; Attridge, Nina; Kenny, Steven; Inglis, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    We investigated two factors that predict students' achievement and behaviour in undergraduate mathematics: gender and personality. We found that gender predicted students' achievement and behaviour when considered in isolation, but ceased to be predictive when personality profiles were taken into account. Furthermore, personality accounted for…

  15. Current methodological issues in the economic assessment of personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Annemans, Lieven; Redekop, Ken; Payne, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    There is a need for methodological scrutiny in the economic assessment of personalized medicine. In this article, we present a list of 10 specific issues that we argue pose specific methodological challenges that require careful consideration when designing and conducting robust model-based economic evaluations in the context of personalized medicine. Key issues are related to the correct framing of the research question, interpretation of test results, data collection of medical management options after obtaining test results, and expressing the value of tests. The need to formulate the research question clearly and be explicit and specific about the technology being evaluated is essential because various test kits can have the same purpose and yet differ in predictive value, costs, and relevance to practice and patient populations. The correct reporting of sensitivity/specificity, and especially the false negatives and false positives (which are population dependent), of the investigated tests is also considered as a key element. This requires additional structural complexity to establish the relationship between the test result and the consecutive treatment changes and outcomes. This process involves translating the test characteristics into clinical utility, and therefore outlining the clinical and economic consequences of true and false positives and true and false negatives. Information on treatment patterns and on their costs and outcomes, however, is often lacking, especially for false-positive and false-negative test results. The analysis can even become very complex if different tests are combined or sequentially used. This potential complexity can be handled by explicitly showing how these tests are going to be used in practice and then working with the combined sensitivities and specificities of the tests. Each of these issues leads to a higher degree of uncertainty in economic models designed to assess the added value of personalized medicine compared

  16. p-Medicine: From data sharing and integration via VPH models to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Rossi, S; Christ-Neumann, Ml; Rüping, S; Buffa, Fm; Wegener, D; McVie, G; Coveney, Pv; Graf, N; Delorenzi, M

    2011-01-01

    The Worldwide innovative Networking in personalized cancer medicine (WIN) initiated by the Institute Gustave Roussy (France) and The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (USA) has dedicated its 3rd symposium (Paris, 6-8 July 2011) to discussion on gateways to increase the efficacy of cancer diagnostics and therapeutics (http://www.winconsortium.org/symposium.html).Speakers ranged from clinical oncologist to researchers, industrial partners, and tools developers; a famous patient was present: Janelle Hail, a 30-year breast cancer survivor, founder and CEO of the National Breast Cancer Foundation, Inc. (NBCF).The p-medicine consortium found this venue a perfect occasion to present a poster about its activities that are in accordance with the take home message of the symposium.In this communication, we summarize what we presented with particular attention to the interaction between the symposium's topic and content and our project. PMID:22276060

  17. Ethical, legal and social implications of incorporating personalized medicine into healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Brothers, Kyle B; Rothstein, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    As research focused on personalized medicine has developed over the past decade, bioethics scholars have contemplated the ethical, legal and social implications of this type of research. In the next decade, there will be a need to broaden the focus of this work as personalized medicine moves into clinical settings. We consider two broad issues that will grow in importance and urgency. First, we analyze the consequences of the significant increase in health information that will be brought about by personalized medicine. Second, we raise concerns about the potential of personalized medicine to exacerbate existing disparities in healthcare. PMID:25601880

  18. Why personalized medicine will fail if we stay the course

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Edward; Callier, Shawneequa L; Rotimi, Charles N

    2013-01-01

    Genomic science and associated technologies are providing scientists and clinicians with novel insights that are transforming the delivery of healthcare and the overall well-being of society. However, these insights inform us that historical population sampling approaches for investigating rare and common genetic variations are not representative of the complex ancestral backgrounds of today's patients. In order for personalized medicine to be meaningful and applicable to the global populations, we will need to know how common and rare genetic variants found in different parts of the world influence health and drug response. This article demonstrates the importance of increasing ethnic and racial diversity among participants in genomic research, highlights areas of opportunity for improving our understanding of genomic diversity among populations, and provides examples of successful models that help to resolve these concerns. PMID:23543886

  19. Policy perspectives on the emerging pathways of personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Downing, Gregory J.

    2009-01-01

    Remarkable advances in the fundamental knowledge about the biological basis of disease and technical advances in methods to assess genomic information have led the health care system to the threshold of personalized medicine. It is now feasible to consider strategic application of genomic information to guide patient management by being predictive, preemptive, and preventive, and enabling patient participation in medical decisions. Early evidence of this transition has some hallmarks of disruptive innovation to existing health care practices. Presented here is an examination of the changes underway to enable this new concept in health care in the United States, to improve precision and quality of care through innovations aimed at individualized approaches to medical decision making. A broad range of public policy positions will need to be considered for the health care delivery enterprise to accommodate the promise of this new science and technology for the benefit of patients. PMID:20135895

  20. Advances in imaging to allow personalized medicine in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Neurath, Markus F

    2015-08-01

    Crohn's disease is a destructive inflammatory bowel disease of unknown origin that may lead to various complications such as strictures, stenosis, fistulas and colitis-associated neoplasias. However, the course of the disease varies substantially among patients and disease behaviour may also change with time. At diagnosis behaviour is inflammatory in the majority of patients, while penetrating or structuring behaviour become more prominent at later time points. Thus, medication in Crohn's disease needs frequent optimization over time. Therefore, new strategies for prediction of response to therapy are urgently needed. Here, recent advantages in imaging techniques for personalized medicine in Crohn's disease are reviewed. Such advantages include ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and new endoscopic approaches such as molecular endoscopy. It is expected that these novel techniques will lead to marked improvements in the assessment of disease behaviour and the prediction of response to clinical therapy with biologicals. PMID:26002559

  1. Respiratory proteomics: from descriptive studies to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Teran, Luis M; Montes-Vizuet, Rosalia; Li, Xinping; Franz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory diseases are highly prevalent and affect humankind worldwide, causing extensive morbidity and mortality with the environment playing an important role. Given the complex structure of the airways, sophisticated tools are required for early diagnosis; initial symptoms are nonspecific, and the clinical diagnosis is made frequently late. Over the past few years, proteomics has made high technological progress in mass-spectrometry-based protein identification and has allowed us to gain new insights into disease mechanisms and identify potential novel therapeutic targets. This review will highlight the contributions of proteomics toward the understanding of the respiratory proteome listing potential biomarkers and its potential application to the clinic. We also outline the contributions of proteomics to creating a personalized approach in respiratory medicine.

  2. Aptitude, Achievement and Competence in Medicine: A Latent Variable Path Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collin, V. Terri; Violato, Claudio; Hecker, Kent

    2009-01-01

    To develop and test a latent variable path model of general achievement, aptitude for medicine and competence in medicine employing data from the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), pre-medical undergraduate grade point average (UGPA) and demographic characteristics for competence in pre-clinical and measures of competence (United States…

  3. Application of personalized medicine to chronic disease: a feasibility assessment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Personalized Medicine has the potential to improve health outcomes and reduce the cost of care; however its adoption has been slow in Canada. Bridgepoint Health is a complex continuous care provider striving to reduce the burden of polypharmacy in chronic patients. The main goal of the study was to explore the feasibility of utilizing personalized medicine in the treatment of chronic complex patients as a preliminary institutional health technology assessment. We analyzed stroke treatment optimization as a clinical indication that could serve as a “proof of concept” for the widespread implementation of pharmacogenetics. The objectives of the study were three-fold: 1. Review current practice in medication administration for stroke treatment at Bridgepoint Health 2. Critically analyze evidence that pharmacogenetic testing could (or could not) enhance drug selection and treatment efficacy for stroke patients; 3. Assess the cost-benefit potential of a pharmacogenetic intervention for stroke. Review current practice in medication administration for stroke treatment at Bridgepoint Health Critically analyze evidence that pharmacogenetic testing could (or could not) enhance drug selection and treatment efficacy for stroke patients; Assess the cost-benefit potential of a pharmacogenetic intervention for stroke. We conducted a review of stroke treatment practices at Bridgepoint Health, scanned the literature for drug-gene and drug-outcome interactions, and evaluated the potential consequences of pharmacogenetic testing using the ACCE model. There is a substantial body of evidence suggesting that pharmacogenetic stratification of stroke treatment can improve patient outcomes in the long-term, and provide substantial efficiencies for the healthcare system in the short-term. Specifically, pharmacogenetic stratification of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapies for stroke patients may have a major impact on the risk of disease recurrence, and thus should be explored

  4. Forward Individualized Medicine from Personal Genomes to Interactomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiang; Kuivenhoven, Jan A.; Groen, Albert K.

    2015-01-01

    When considering the variation in the genome, transcriptome, proteome and metabolome, and their interaction with the environment, every individual can be rightfully considered as a unique biological entity. Individualized medicine promises to take this uniqueness into account to optimize disease treatment and thereby improve health benefits for every patient. The success of individualized medicine relies on a precise understanding of the genotype-phenotype relationship. Although omics technologies advance rapidly, there are several challenges that need to be overcome: Next generation sequencing can efficiently decipher genomic sequences, epigenetic changes, and transcriptomic variation in patients, but it does not automatically indicate how or whether the identified variation will cause pathological changes. This is likely due to the inability to account for (1) the consequences of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions, and (2) (post)transcriptional as well as (post)translational processes that eventually determine the concentration of key metabolites. The technologies to accurately measure changes in these latter layers are still under development, and such measurements in humans are also mainly restricted to blood and circulating cells. Despite these challenges, it is already possible to track dynamic changes in the human interactome in healthy and diseased states by using the integration of multi-omics data. In this review, we evaluate the potential value of current major bioinformatics and systems biology-based approaches, including genome wide association studies, epigenetics, gene regulatory and protein-protein interaction networks, and genome-scale metabolic modeling. Moreover, we address the question whether integrative analysis of personal multi-omics data will help understanding of personal genotype-phenotype relationships. PMID:26696898

  5. Genomic insights into ayurvedic and western approaches to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Prasher, Bhavana; Gibson, Greg; Mukerji, Mitali

    2016-03-01

    Ayurveda, an ancient Indian system of medicine documented and practised since 1500 B.C., follows a systems approach that has interesting parallels with contemporary personalized genomic medicine approaches to the understanding and management of health and disease. It is based on the trisutra, which are the three aspects of causes, features and therapeutics that are interconnected through a common organizing principle termed 'tridosha'. Tridosha comprise three ascertainable physiological entities; vata (kinetic), pitta (metabolic) and kapha (potential) that are pervasive across systems, work in conjunction with each other, respond to the external environment and maintain homeostasis. Each individual is born with a specific proportion of tridosha that are not only genetically determined but also influenced by the environment during foetal development. Jointly they determine a person's basic constitution, which is termed their 'prakriti'. Development and progressi on of different diseases with their subtypes are thought to depend on the origin and mechanism of perturbation of the doshas, and the aim of therapeutic practice is to ensure that the doshas retain their homeostatic state. Similarly, western systems biology epitomized by translational P4 medicine envisages the integration of multiscalar genetic, cellular, physiological and environmental networks to predict phenotypic outcomes of perturbations. In this perspective article, we aim to outline the shape of a unifying scaffold that may allow the two intellectual traditions to enhance one another. Specifically, we illustrate how a unique integrative 'Ayurgenomics' approach can be used to integrate the trisutra concept of Ayurveda with genomics. We observe biochemical and molecular correlates of prakriti and show how these differ significantly in processes that are linked to intermediate patho-phenotypes, known to take different course in diseases. We also observe a significant enr ichment of the highly connected

  6. Genomic insights into ayurvedic and western approaches to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Prasher, Bhavana; Gibson, Greg; Mukerji, Mitali

    2016-03-01

    Ayurveda, an ancient Indian system of medicine documented and practised since 1500 B.C., follows a systems approach that has interesting parallels with contemporary personalized genomic medicine approaches to the understanding and management of health and disease. It is based on the trisutra, which are the three aspects of causes, features and therapeutics that are interconnected through a common organizing principle termed 'tridosha'. Tridosha comprise three ascertainable physiological entities; vata (kinetic), pitta (metabolic) and kapha (potential) that are pervasive across systems, work in conjunction with each other, respond to the external environment and maintain homeostasis. Each individual is born with a specific proportion of tridosha that are not only genetically determined but also influenced by the environment during foetal development. Jointly they determine a person's basic constitution, which is termed their 'prakriti'. Development and progressi on of different diseases with their subtypes are thought to depend on the origin and mechanism of perturbation of the doshas, and the aim of therapeutic practice is to ensure that the doshas retain their homeostatic state. Similarly, western systems biology epitomized by translational P4 medicine envisages the integration of multiscalar genetic, cellular, physiological and environmental networks to predict phenotypic outcomes of perturbations. In this perspective article, we aim to outline the shape of a unifying scaffold that may allow the two intellectual traditions to enhance one another. Specifically, we illustrate how a unique integrative 'Ayurgenomics' approach can be used to integrate the trisutra concept of Ayurveda with genomics. We observe biochemical and molecular correlates of prakriti and show how these differ significantly in processes that are linked to intermediate patho-phenotypes, known to take different course in diseases. We also observe a significant enr ichment of the highly connected

  7. Perceptions of Personalized Medicine in an Academic Health System: Educational Findings

    PubMed Central

    Vorderstrasse, Allison; Katsanis, Sara Huston; Minear, Mollie A.; Yang, Nancy; Rakhra-Burris, Tejinder; Reeves, Jason W.; Cook-Deegan, Robert; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.; Ann Simmons, Leigh

    2015-01-01

    Objective Prior reports demonstrate that personalized medicine implementation in clinical care is lacking. Given the program focus at Duke University on personalized medicine, we assessed health care providers’ perspectives on their preparation and educational needs to effectively integrate personalized medicine tools and applications into their clinical practices. Methods Data from 78 health care providers who participated in a larger study of personalized and precision medicine at Duke University were analyzed using Qualtrics (descriptive statistics). Individuals age 18 years and older were recruited for the larger study through broad email contacts across the university and health system. All participants completed an online 35-question survey that was developed, pilot-tested, and administered by a team of interdisciplinary researchers and clinicians at the Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine. Results Overall, providers reported being ill-equipped to implement personalized medicine in clinical practice. Many respondents identified educational resources as critical for strengthening personalized medicine implementation in both research and clinical practice. Responses did not differ significantly between specialists and primary providers or by years since completion of the medical degree. Conclusions Survey findings support prior calls for provider and patient education in personalized medicine. Respondents identified focus areas in training, education, and research for improving personalized medicine uptake. Given respondents’ emphasis on educational needs, now may be an ideal time to address these needs in clinical training and public education programs. PMID:26236542

  8. An epidemiological perspective of personalized medicine: the Estonian experience.

    PubMed

    Milani, L; Leitsalu, L; Metspalu, A

    2015-02-01

    The Estonian Biobank and several other biobanks established over a decade ago are now starting to yield valuable longitudinal follow-up data for large numbers of individuals. These samples have been used in hundreds of different genome-wide association studies, resulting in the identification of reliable disease-associated variants. The focus of genomic research has started to shift from identifying genetic and nongenetic risk factors associated with common complex diseases to understanding the underlying mechanisms of the diseases and suggesting novel targets for therapy. However, translation of findings from genomic research into medical practice is still lagging, mainly due to insufficient evidence of clinical validity and utility. In this review, we examine the different elements required for the implementation of personalized medicine based on genomic information. First, biobanks and genome centres are required and have been established for the high-throughput genomic screening of large numbers of samples. Secondly, the combination of susceptibility alleles into polygenic risk scores has improved risk prediction of cardiovascular disease, breast cancer and several other diseases. Finally, national health information systems are being developed internationally, to combine data from electronic medical records from different sources, and also to gradually incorporate genomic information. We focus on the experience in Estonia, one of several countries with national goals towards more personalized health care based on genomic information, where the unique combination of elements required to accomplish this goal are already in place.

  9. Personalized medicine for ARDS: the 2035 research agenda.

    PubMed

    Beitler, Jeremy R; Goligher, Ewan C; Schmidt, Matthieu; Spieth, Peter M; Zanella, Alberto; Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Calfee, Carolyn S; Cavalcanti, Alexandre B

    2016-05-01

    In the last 20 years, survival among patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has increased substantially with advances in lung-protective ventilation and resuscitation. Building on this success, personalizing mechanical ventilation to patient-specific physiology for enhanced lung protection will be a top research priority for the years ahead. However, the ARDS research agenda must be broader in scope. Further understanding of the heterogeneous biology, from molecular to mechanical, underlying early ARDS pathogenesis is essential to inform therapeutic discovery and tailor treatment and prevention strategies to the individual patient. The ARDSne(x)t research agenda for the next 20 years calls for bringing personalized medicine to ARDS, asking simultaneously both whether a treatment affords clinically meaningful benefit and for whom. This expanded scope necessitates standard acquisition of highly granular biological, physiological, and clinical data across studies to identify biologically distinct subgroups that may respond differently to a given intervention. Clinical trials will need to consider enrichment strategies and incorporate long-term functional outcomes. Tremendous investment in research infrastructure and global collaboration will be vital to fulfilling this agenda. PMID:27040103

  10. Personalized medicine for cystic fibrosis: establishing human model systems.

    PubMed

    Mou, Hongmei; Brazauskas, Karissa; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2015-10-01

    With over 1,500 identifiable mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene that result in distinct functional and phenotypical abnormalities, it is virtually impossible to perform randomized clinical trials to identify the best therapeutics for all patients. Therefore, a personalized medicine approach is essential. The only way to realistically accomplish this is through the development of improved in vitro human model systems. The lack of a readily available and infinite supply of human CFTR-expressing airway epithelial cells is a key bottleneck. We propose that a concerted two-pronged approach is necessary for patient-specific cystic fibrosis research to continue to prosper and realize its potential: (1) more effective culture and differentiation conditions for growing primary human airway and nasal epithelial cells and (2) the development of collective protocols for efficiently differentiating disease- and patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) into pure populations of adult epithelial cells. Ultimately, we need a personalized human model system for cystic fibrosis with the capacity for uncomplicated bankability, widespread availability, and universal applicability for patient-specific disease modeling, novel pharmacotherapy investigation and screening, and readily executable genetic modification.

  11. Towards Personalized Medicine: Leveraging Patient Similarity and Drug Similarity Analytics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Wang, Fei; Hu, Jianying; Sorrentino, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The rapid adoption of electronic health records (EHR) provides a comprehensive source for exploratory and predictive analytic to support clinical decision-making. In this paper, we investigate how to utilize EHR to tailor treatments to individual patients based on their likelihood to respond to a therapy. We construct a heterogeneous graph which includes two domains (patients and drugs) and encodes three relationships (patient similarity, drug similarity, and patient-drug prior associations). We describe a novel approach for performing a label propagation procedure to spread the label information representing the effectiveness of different drugs for different patients over this heterogeneous graph. The proposed method has been applied on a real-world EHR dataset to help identify personalized treatments for hypercholesterolemia. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach and suggest that the combination of appropriate patient similarity and drug similarity analytics could lead to actionable insights for personalized medicine. Particularly, by leveraging drug similarity in combination with patient similarity, our method could perform well even on new or rarely used drugs for which there are few records of known past performance. PMID:25717413

  12. Towards personalized medicine: leveraging patient similarity and drug similarity analytics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Wang, Fei; Hu, Jianying; Sorrentino, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The rapid adoption of electronic health records (EHR) provides a comprehensive source for exploratory and predictive analytic to support clinical decision-making. In this paper, we investigate how to utilize EHR to tailor treatments to individual patients based on their likelihood to respond to a therapy. We construct a heterogeneous graph which includes two domains (patients and drugs) and encodes three relationships (patient similarity, drug similarity, and patient-drug prior associations). We describe a novel approach for performing a label propagation procedure to spread the label information representing the effectiveness of different drugs for different patients over this heterogeneous graph. The proposed method has been applied on a real-world EHR dataset to help identify personalized treatments for hypercholesterolemia. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach and suggest that the combination of appropriate patient similarity and drug similarity analytics could lead to actionable insights for personalized medicine. Particularly, by leveraging drug similarity in combination with patient similarity, our method could perform well even on new or rarely used drugs for which there are few records of known past performance. PMID:25717413

  13. The Connection between Personality Type and Achievement in College Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tharp, Gerald D.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses a study where the Myers Briggs Type Indicator was given to 146 students in a general biology course at a large state university. Results indicate that the introverts were the highest achievers and the perceiving types were the lowest achievers. (PR)

  14. Preparing the personal physician for practice: changing family medicine residency training to enable new model practice.

    PubMed

    Green, Larry A; Jones, Samuel M; Fetter, Gerald; Pugno, Perry A

    2007-12-01

    After two years of intensive study, in 2004 the Future of Family Medicine report concluded that the current U.S. health care system is inadequate and unsustainable, and called for changes within the specialty of family medicine to ensure the future health of the American public. With guidance and encouragement from many disciplines and health experts, a set of 10 recommendations was established to accomplish a transformative change in how family physicians serve their patients and how the essential function of primary care is achieved. From these recommendations came a period of innovation and experimentation in the training of family physicians, entitled Preparing the Personal Physician for Practice (P4). The P4 project is a carefully designed and evaluated initiative led by the American Board of Family Medicine and the Association of Family Medicine Residency Directors and administered by TransforMED, a practice redesign initiative of the American Academy of Family Physicians. Fourteen family medicine programs were chosen to participate and will put their innovations into practice from 2007 to 2012, during which time regular evaluation will be conducted. The purpose of P4 is to learn how to improve the graduate medical education of family physicians such that they are prepared to be outstanding personal physicians and to work in the new models of practice now emerging. The innovations tested by P4 residencies are expected to inspire substantial changes in the content, structure, and locations of training of family physicians and to guide future revisions in accreditation and certification requirements. PMID:18046133

  15. Academic Achievement Enhanced by Personal Digital Assistant Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bick, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Research during the past decade suggests that integrating computing technology in general, and mobile computers in particular, into the educational environment has positive effects. This is the first long-term study of high school Personal Digital Assistant use. It involved three-parts, 146 students during four years. Part one found that PDA use…

  16. ZHENG-Omics Application in ZHENG Classification and Treatment: Chinese Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jianye; Fang, Junwei; Sun, Shujun; Chen, Qiwen; Cao, Huijuan; Zheng, Ningning; Zhang, Yongyu; Lu, Aiping

    2013-01-01

    With the hope to provide an effective approach for personalized diagnosis and treatment clinically, traditional chinese medicine (TCM) is being paid increasing attention as a complementary and alternative medicine. It performs treatment based on ZHENG (TCM syndrome) classification, which could be identified clinical special phenotypes by symptoms and signs of patients even if they have a different disease. However, it caused controversy because ZHENG classification only depends on observation, knowledge, and clinical experience of TCM practitioners, which lacks objectivity and repeatability. Although researchers and scientists of TCM have done some work with a lot of beneficial methods, the results could not reach satisfactory with the shortcomings of generalizing the entire state of the body or ignoring the patients' feelings. By total summary, mining, and integration of existing researches, the present paper attempts to introduce a novel macro-microconcept of ZHENG-omics, with the prospect of bright future in providing an objective and repeatable approach for Chinese personalized medicine in an effective way. In this paper, we give the brief introduction and preliminary validation, and discuss strategies and system-oriented technologies for achieving this goal. PMID:23662120

  17. Person-centered medicine and good clinical practice: disease has to be cured, but the patient has to be healed.

    PubMed

    Jakovljević, Miro; Ostojić, Ljerka

    2015-12-01

    Contemporary medicine has been in the process of a paradigm shift. Instead of relatively broad pathological entities, population-based risk assesments, and non-specific "one-size-fits-all" therapies, a new paradigm of predictive, individualized and personalized care and targeted therapy is rolling on the horizon. Person-centered medicine is a term with different meanings which competes in some way to other terms like medicine of the person, patient-centered medicine, personalized and individualzed medicine, integrative and holistic medicine. Clear definition of theoretical framework and clinical practice of person-centered medicine is urgent to prevent dangereous increasing confusion. PMID:26657982

  18. Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine: Medical Student and Physician Attitudes toward Homeless Persons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Ann; Roman, Brenda; Borges, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to explore changes in medical students' attitudes toward homeless persons during the Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine clerkships. Simultaneously, this study explored attitudes toward homeless persons held by Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine residents and faculty in an attempt to uncover the "hidden…

  19. Personality Similarity between Teachers and Their Students Influences Teacher Judgement of Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rausch, Tobias; Karing, Constance; Dörfler, Tobias; Artelt, Cordula

    2016-01-01

    This study examined personality similarity between teachers and their students and its impact on teacher judgement of student achievement in the domains of reading comprehension and mathematics. Personality similarity was quantified through intraclass correlations between personality characteristics of 409 dyads of German teachers and their…

  20. Nutrigenetics and nutraceuticals: the next wave riding on personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Subbiah, M T Ravi

    2007-02-01

    The Human Genome Project and subsequent identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within populations has played a major role in predicting individual response to drugs (pharmacogenetics) leading to the concept of "personalized medicine." Nutritional genomics is a recent off-shoot of this genetic revolution that includes (1) nutrigenomics: the study of interaction of dietary components with the genome and the resulting proteonomic and metabolomic changes; and (2) nutrigenetics: understanding the gene-based differences in response to dietary components and developing nutraceuticals that are most compatible with health based on individual genetic makeup. Despite the extensive data on genetic polymorphisms in humans, its translation into medical practice has been slow because of the time required to accumulate population data on SNP incidence, understand the significance of a given SNP in disease, and develop suitable diagnostic tests. Nutrigenomics revitalized the field by showing that nutrients and botanicals can interact with the genome and modify subsequent gene expression, which has provided a great impetus for nutrigenetic research and nutraceutical development based on nutrigenetics. Polymorphisms in methlyene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) (involved in folate metabolism), apolipoprotein E (Apo E) and ApoA1 (in cardiovascular disease), and leptin/leptin receptor (obesity) genes are some good examples for understanding basic nutrigenetics. Developing nutraceuticals to prevent and manage thrombosis risk in women with thrombophilic gene mutations are discussed in the context of the opportunities that exist at the nutrigenetic/pharmacogenetic interphase leading to "personalized nutrition." Further research on individual differences in genetic profiles and nutrient requirements will help establish nutrigenetics as an essential discipline for nutrition and dietetics practice.

  1. Nutrigenetics and nutraceuticals: the next wave riding on personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Subbiah, M T Ravi

    2007-02-01

    The Human Genome Project and subsequent identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within populations has played a major role in predicting individual response to drugs (pharmacogenetics) leading to the concept of "personalized medicine." Nutritional genomics is a recent off-shoot of this genetic revolution that includes (1) nutrigenomics: the study of interaction of dietary components with the genome and the resulting proteonomic and metabolomic changes; and (2) nutrigenetics: understanding the gene-based differences in response to dietary components and developing nutraceuticals that are most compatible with health based on individual genetic makeup. Despite the extensive data on genetic polymorphisms in humans, its translation into medical practice has been slow because of the time required to accumulate population data on SNP incidence, understand the significance of a given SNP in disease, and develop suitable diagnostic tests. Nutrigenomics revitalized the field by showing that nutrients and botanicals can interact with the genome and modify subsequent gene expression, which has provided a great impetus for nutrigenetic research and nutraceutical development based on nutrigenetics. Polymorphisms in methlyene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) (involved in folate metabolism), apolipoprotein E (Apo E) and ApoA1 (in cardiovascular disease), and leptin/leptin receptor (obesity) genes are some good examples for understanding basic nutrigenetics. Developing nutraceuticals to prevent and manage thrombosis risk in women with thrombophilic gene mutations are discussed in the context of the opportunities that exist at the nutrigenetic/pharmacogenetic interphase leading to "personalized nutrition." Further research on individual differences in genetic profiles and nutrient requirements will help establish nutrigenetics as an essential discipline for nutrition and dietetics practice. PMID:17240315

  2. Objective Academic Achievement and Subjective Personal Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Betty

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between objective academic achievement (OAA) and subjective well-being (SWB). Using a sample of 515 adolescents from ten different high schools across a small country, semi-structured interviews, academic records and observations provided relevant data for the study. OAA was measured from examination results…

  3. The Mediating Roles of Coping and Adjustment in the Relationship between Personality and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perera, Harsha N.; McIlveen, Peter; Oliver, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Existing literature has documented relationships between personality traits and academic achievement as well as some of the mechanisms underlying these links. However, the pathways by which personality traits are associated with achievement during stressful educational circumstances require further investigation. Aims: This study…

  4. Quality and fairness: achieving the paradigm. A personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Laurencin, C T

    1999-05-01

    African Americans and those traditionally underrepresented and discriminated against by society face particular roadblocks in achieving success. In the case of training for orthopaedic surgery selection, this paper presents fundamental concepts addressing misconceptions regarding the pool of underrepresented applicants for positions in orthopaedic surgery residency and the notion and definition of the terms qualified and best qualified regarding the residency applicant pool. The paper underscores the fact, that despite advances in the century, racism continues to be pervasive in America, and efforts at leveling the playing field should be used.

  5. Clinical decision support systems for improving diagnostic accuracy and achieving precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Castaneda, Christian; Nalley, Kip; Mannion, Ciaran; Bhattacharyya, Pritish; Blake, Patrick; Pecora, Andrew; Goy, Andre; Suh, K Stephen

    2015-01-01

    As research laboratories and clinics collaborate to achieve precision medicine, both communities are required to understand mandated electronic health/medical record (EHR/EMR) initiatives that will be fully implemented in all clinics in the United States by 2015. Stakeholders will need to evaluate current record keeping practices and optimize and standardize methodologies to capture nearly all information in digital format. Collaborative efforts from academic and industry sectors are crucial to achieving higher efficacy in patient care while minimizing costs. Currently existing digitized data and information are present in multiple formats and are largely unstructured. In the absence of a universally accepted management system, departments and institutions continue to generate silos of information. As a result, invaluable and newly discovered knowledge is difficult to access. To accelerate biomedical research and reduce healthcare costs, clinical and bioinformatics systems must employ common data elements to create structured annotation forms enabling laboratories and clinics to capture sharable data in real time. Conversion of these datasets to knowable information should be a routine institutionalized process. New scientific knowledge and clinical discoveries can be shared via integrated knowledge environments defined by flexible data models and extensive use of standards, ontologies, vocabularies, and thesauri. In the clinical setting, aggregated knowledge must be displayed in user-friendly formats so that physicians, non-technical laboratory personnel, nurses, data/research coordinators, and end-users can enter data, access information, and understand the output. The effort to connect astronomical numbers of data points, including '-omics'-based molecular data, individual genome sequences, experimental data, patient clinical phenotypes, and follow-up data is a monumental task. Roadblocks to this vision of integration and interoperability include ethical, legal

  6. Strategic aspects of higher education reform to cultivate specialists in diagnostic and biopharma industry as applicable to Predictive, Preventive and Personalized Medicine as the Medicine of the Future.

    PubMed

    Studneva, М; Mandrik, M; Song, Sh; Tretyak, E; Krasnyuk, I; Yamada, Y; Tukavin, A; Ansari, A; Kozlov, I; Reading, C; Ma, Y; Krapfenbauer, K; Svistunov, A; Suchkov, S

    2015-01-01

    Predictive, Preventive and Personalized Medicine as the Medicine of the Future represents an innovative model for advanced healthcare and robust platform for relevant industrial branches for diagnostics and pharmaceutics. However, rapid market penetration of new medicines and technologies demands the implementation of reforms not only in the spheres of biopharmaceutical industries and healthcare, but also in education. Therefore, the problem of the fundamental, modern preparation of specialists in bioengineering and affiliated fields is becoming particularly urgent, and it requires significant revision of training programs of higher education practice into current medical universities. Modernization and integration of widely accepted medical and teaching standards require consolidation of both the natural sciences and medical sciences that may become the conceptual basis for a university medical education. The main goal of this training is not simply to achieve advanced training and expansion of technological skills, but to provide development of novel multifaceted approaches to build academic schools for future generations.

  7. Deep brain stimulation, brain maps and personalized medicine: lessons from the human genome project.

    PubMed

    Fins, Joseph J; Shapiro, Zachary E

    2014-01-01

    Although the appellation of personalized medicine is generally attributed to advanced therapeutics in molecular medicine, deep brain stimulation (DBS) can also be so categorized. Like its medical counterpart, DBS is a highly personalized intervention that needs to be tailored to a patient's individual anatomy. And because of this, DBS like more conventional personalized medicine, can be highly specific where the object of care is an N = 1. But that is where the similarities end. Besides their differing medical and surgical provenances, these two varieties of personalized medicine have had strikingly different impacts. The molecular variant, though of a more recent vintage has thrived and is experiencing explosive growth, while DBS still struggles to find a sustainable therapeutic niche. Despite its promise, and success as a vetted treatment for drug resistant Parkinson's Disease, DBS has lagged in broadening its development, often encountering regulatory hurdles and financial barriers necessary to mount an adequate number of quality trials. In this paper we will consider why DBS-or better yet neuromodulation-has encountered these challenges and contrast this experience with the more successful advance of personalized medicine. We will suggest that personalized medicine and DBS's differential performance can be explained as a matter of timing and complexity. We believe that DBS has struggled because it has been a journey of scientific exploration conducted without a map. In contrast to molecular personalized medicine which followed the mapping of the human genome and the Human Genome Project, DBS preceded plans for the mapping of the human brain. We believe that this sequence has given personalized medicine a distinct advantage and that the fullest potential of DBS will be realized both as a cartographical or electrophysiological probe and as a modality of personalized medicine.

  8. [Bioinformatics in Cancer Clinical Sequencing -- An Emerging Field of Cancer Personalized Medicine].

    PubMed

    Kato, Mamoru

    2016-04-01

    Thus far, bioinformatics has mostly been applied in basic science research. It was initially used to analyze protein sequences in unicellular organisms, aiding discoveries in basic biology. Following the completion of human genome sequencing, it has also facilitated numerous discoveries in basic medicine. Recently, several clinical applications of bioinformatics have been reported. Most relevantly, bioinformatics has been applied to clinical sequencing - an emerging field of personalized medicine, or precision medicine. In this review, I will introduce basic techniques of bioinformatics used in clinical sequencing, avoiding excessive technical details. I will also discuss future directions for data analysis using bioinformatics in the field of personalized medicine.

  9. Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration: Defining Phenotypic Diversity Through Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, David J; Cairns, Nigel J.; Grossman, Murray; McMillan, Corey T.; Lee, Edward B.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) comprises two main classes of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by neuronal/glial proteinaceous inclusions (ie. proteinopathies) including tauopathies (i.e. FTLD-Tau) and TDP-43 proteinopathies (i.e. FTLD-TDP) while other very rare forms of FTLD are known such as FTLD with FUS pathology (FTLD-FUS). This review focuses mainly on FTLD-Tau and FLTD-TDP, which may present as several clinical syndromes: a behavioral/dysexecutive syndrome (behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia); language disorders (primary progressive aphasia variants); and motor disorders (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, corticobasal syndrome, progressive supranuclear palsy syndrome). There is considerable heterogeneity in clinical presentations of underlying neuropathology and current clinical criteria do not reliably predict underlying proteinopathies ante-mortem. In contrast, molecular etiologies of hereditary FTLD are consistently associated with specific proteinopathies. These include MAPT mutations with FTLD-Tau and GRN, C9orf72, VCP and TARDBP with FTLD-TDP. The last decade has seen a rapid expansion in our knowledge of the molecular pathologies associated with this clinically and neuropathologically heterogeneous group of FTLD diseases. Moreover, in view of current limitations to reliably diagnose specific FTLD neuropathologies prior to autopsy, we summarize the current state of the science in FTLD biomarker research including neuroimaging, biofluid and genetic analyses. We propose that combining several of these biomarker modalities will improve diagnostic specificity in FTLD through a personalized medicine approach. The goals of these efforts are to enhance power for clinical trials focused on slowing or preventing progression of spread of tau, TDP-43 and other FTLD-associated pathologies and work towards the goal of defining clinical endophenotypes of FTD. PMID:25549971

  10. Gene patents and personalized medicine - what lies ahead?

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Gene patents have generally not impeded biomedical research, but some problems that arise in genetic diagnostics can be attributed to exclusively licensed gene patents. Gene patents for therapeutics have often been litigated but have received surprisingly little public outcry. In stark contrast, genetic diagnostics have been highly controversial but rarely litigated: no case has gone to trial and there is little case law to guide policy. Most recently the Secretary's Advisory Committee for Genetics Health and Society (SACGHS) released a draft report examining how patenting and licensing affect access to clinical genetic testing in the US. The SACGHS reported that patents neither greatly hindered nor facilitated patient access to genetic testing; both the harms and the benefits of patents on genetic diagnostics have been exaggerated. Problems do occur when patents are exclusively licensed to a single provider and no alternative is available. Courts have been changing the thresholds for what can be patented, and how strongly patents can be enforced. Technologies for sequencing, genotyping and gene expression profiling promise to guide clinical decisions in managing common chronic diseases and infectious diseases, and will likely be an integral part of personalized medicine. Developing such genomic tests may require mapping a complex intellectual property landscape and cutting through thickets of patented DNA sequences and related methods. Our preliminary studies have found patent claims that, if strictly enforced, might block the use of multi-gene tests or full-genome sequence data. Yet new technologies promise to reduce the costs of complete genomic sequencing to prices that are comparable to current genetic tests for a single condition. Courts, companies, and policy makers seem unlikely to allow intellectual property to obstruct such technological advance, but prudent policy will depend on careful analysis and foresight. The SACGHS report signals that the US

  11. Review and Updates in Regenerative and Personalized Medicine, Preclinical Animal Models, and Clinical Care in Cardiovascular Medicine.

    PubMed

    Barbato, Emanuele; Barton, Paul J; Bartunek, Jozef; Huber, Sally; Ibanez, Borja; Judge, Daniel P; Lara-Pezzi, Enrique; Stolen, Craig M; Taylor, Angela; Hall, Jennifer L

    2015-11-01

    The goal of this paper is to provide an updated review for scientists and clinicians on the major areas in cardiovascular medicine published in the Journal. Leading topics in regenerative and personalized medicine are presented along with a critical overview of the field. New standards in large preclinical animal models of pulmonary hypertension and left bundle branch block are highlighted. Finally, clinical care in the areas of atherosclerosis, the aortic valve, platelet biology, and myocarditis is discussed as well as autonomic modulation therapies.

  12. Personalized medicine and treatment approaches in hypertension: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Byrd, James Brian

    2016-01-01

    In the US, hypertension affects one in three adults. Current guideline-based treatment of hypertension involves little diagnostic testing. A more personalized approach to the treatment of hypertension might be of use. Several methods of personalized treatment have been proposed and vetted to varying degrees. The purpose of this narrative review is to discuss the rationale for personalized therapy in hypertension, barriers to its development and implementation, some influential examples of proposed personalization measures, and a view of future efforts. PMID:27103841

  13. Personalized medicine and treatment approaches in hypertension: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, James Brian

    2016-01-01

    In the US, hypertension affects one in three adults. Current guideline-based treatment of hypertension involves little diagnostic testing. A more personalized approach to the treatment of hypertension might be of use. Several methods of personalized treatment have been proposed and vetted to varying degrees. The purpose of this narrative review is to discuss the rationale for personalized therapy in hypertension, barriers to its development and implementation, some influential examples of proposed personalization measures, and a view of future efforts. PMID:27103841

  14. (Video 8 of 8) Omics: Advancing Personalized Medicine from Space to Earth

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA’s Human Research Program (HRP) is releasing the video “Omics: Advancing Personalized Medicine from Space to Earth”, to highlight its Twins Study, coinciding with National Twins Days. This is t...

  15. Prediction of Cancer Drug Resistance and Implications for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Volm, Manfred; Efferth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    treatment options, such as antibody therapy, adoptive immune therapy, hyperthermia, gene therapy, etc. The high accuracy to predict resistant tumors may be exploited to develop new strategies for individualized cancer therapy. This new concept bears the potential of a revival of predictive tests for personalized medicine. PMID:26734568

  16. Personal Construction of Cough Medicine among Young Substance Abusers in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Shek, Daniel T. L.

    2012-01-01

    Although cough medicine abuse is a growing problem in many places, there is no study examining the views of young substance abusers toward cough medicine. The objective of this study was to examine personal constructions of cough medicine abusers via the repertory grid tests (N = 11). Several observations are highlighted from the study. First, personal constructions of cough medicine were mixed, including the benefits and harmful effects of its abuse. Second, although the informants perceived cough medicine to be addictive and harmful, they perceived cough medicine to be less addictive and less harmful than did heroin. Third, while the informants construed cough medicine to be similar to ketamine and marijuana, they also perceived cough medicine to possess some characteristics of heroin. Fourth, relative to the construed similarity between heroin and the gateway drugs (cigarette, beer, and liquor), the informants construed cough medicine to be more similar to the gateway drugs. Finally, a higher level of perceived dissimilarity between cough medicine and gateway drugs was related to a higher level of perceived harm of cough medicine abuse. PMID:22666149

  17. Predictive diagnostics and personalized medicine for the prevention of chronic degenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Progressive increase of mean age and life expectancy in both industrialized and emerging societies parallels an increment of chronic degenerative diseases (CDD) such as cancer, cardiovascular, autoimmune or neurodegenerative diseases among the elderly. CDD are of complex diagnosis, difficult to treat and absorbing an increasing proportion in the health care budgets worldwide. However, recent development in modern medicine especially in genetics, proteomics, and informatics is leading to the discovery of biomarkers associated with different CDD that can be used as indicator of disease’s risk in healthy subjects. Therefore, predictive medicine is merging and medical doctors may for the first time anticipate the deleterious effect of CDD and use markers to identify persons with high risk of developing a given CDD before the clinical manifestation of the diseases. This innovative approach may offer substantial advantages, since the promise of personalized medicine is to preserve individual health in people with high risk by starting early treatment or prevention protocols. The pathway is now open, however the road to an effective personalized medicine is still long, several (diagnostic) predictive instruments for different CDD are under development, some ethical issues have to be solved. Operative proposals for the heath care systems are now needed to verify potential benefits of predictive medicine in the clinical practice. In fact, predictive diagnostics, personalized medicine and personalized therapy have the potential of changing classical approaches of modern medicine to CDD. PMID:21172060

  18. Translation in Data Mining to Advance Personalized Medicine for Health Equity

    PubMed Central

    Estape, Estela S.; Mays, Mary Helen; Sternke, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Personalized medicine is the development of ‘tailored’ therapies that reflect traditional medical approaches, with the incorporation of the patient’s unique genetic profile and the environmental basis of the disease. These individualized strategies encompass disease prevention, diagnosis, as well as treatment strategies. Today’s healthcare workforce is faced with the availability of massive amounts of patient- and disease-related data. When mined effectively, these data will help produce more efficient and effective diagnoses and treatment, leading to better prognoses for patients at both the individual and population level. Designing preventive and therapeutic interventions for those patients who will benefit most while minimizing side effects and controlling healthcare costs, requires bringing diverse data sources together in an analytic paradigm. A resource to clinicians in the development and application of personalized medicine is largely facilitated, perhaps even driven, by the analysis of “big data”. For example, the availability of clinical data warehouses is a significant resource for clinicians in practicing personalized medicine. These “big data” repositories can be queried by clinicians, using specific questions, with data used to gain an understanding of challenges in patient care and treatment. Health informaticians are critical partners to data analytics including the use of technological infrastructures and predictive data mining strategies to access data from multiple sources, assisting clinicians’ interpretation of data and development of personalized, targeted therapy recommendations. In this paper, we look at the concept of personalized medicine, offering perspectives in four important, influencing topics: 1) the availability of ‘big data’ and the role of biomedical informatics in personalized medicine, 2) the need for interdisciplinary teams in the development and evaluation of personalized therapeutic approaches, and 3

  19. An Investigation on Students' Personal Achievement Goals and Perceived Parents' Goal Emphases in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahraman, Nurcan; Sungur-Vural, Semra

    2012-01-01

    This study examined students' personal achievement goals and their perceived parents' goal emphases in science. A total of 295 seventh-grade students completed the Achievement Goal Questionnaire and the Perceived Parent Goal Emphases Scale. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses showed an interaction between perceived parents' mastery approach…

  20. Personality Traits, Self-Esteem and Academic Achievement in Secondary School Students in Campania, Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troncone, Alda; Drammis, Maria Letizia; Labella, Alida

    2014-01-01

    For years educators have attempted to identify the effective predictors of scholastic achievement and several personality variables were described as significantly correlated with grade performance. Since one of the crucial practical implications of identifying the factors involved in academic achievement is to facilitate the teaching-learning…

  1. Primary care providers’ experiences with and perceptions of personalized genomic medicine

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, June C.; Makuwaza, Tutsirai; Manca, Donna P.; Sopcak, Nicolette; Permaul, Joanne A.; O’Brien, Mary Ann; Heisey, Ruth; Eisenhauer, Elizabeth A.; Easley, Julie; Krzyzanowska, Monika K.; Miedema, Baukje; Pruthi, Sandhya; Sawka, Carol; Schneider, Nancy; Sussman, Jonathan; Urquhart, Robin; Versaevel, Catarina; Grunfeld, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess primary care providers’ (PCPs’) experiences with, perceptions of, and desired role in personalized medicine, with a focus on cancer. Design Qualitative study involving focus groups. Setting Urban and rural interprofessional primary care team practices in Alberta and Ontario. Participants Fifty-one PCPs. Methods Semistructured focus groups were conducted and audiorecorded. Recordings were transcribed and analyzed using techniques informed by grounded theory including coding, interpretations of patterns in the data, and constant comparison. Main findings Five focus groups with the 51 participants were conducted; 2 took place in Alberta and 3 in Ontario. Primary care providers described limited experience with personalized medicine, citing breast cancer and prenatal care as main areas of involvement. They expressed concern over their lack of knowledge, in some circumstances relying on personal experiences to inform their attitudes and practice. Participants anticipated an inevitable role in personalized medicine primarily because patients seek and trust their advice; however, there was underlying concern about the magnitude of information and pace of discovery in this area, particularly in direct-to-consumer personal genomic testing. Increased knowledge, closer ties to genetics specialists, and relevant, reliable personalized medicine resources accessible at the point of care were reported as important for successful implementation of personalized medicine. Conclusion Primary care providers are prepared to discuss personalized medicine, but they require better resources. Models of care that support a more meaningful relationship between PCPs and genetics specialists should be pursued. Continuing education strategies need to address knowledge gaps including direct-to-consumer genetic testing, a relatively new area provoking PCP concern. Primary care providers should be mindful of using personal experiences to guide care. PMID:27737998

  2. Marijuana: A Fifty-Year Personal Addiction Medicine Perspective.

    PubMed

    Smith, David E

    2016-01-01

    As of September 2015, the cultivation, possession, and/or use of marijuana is illegal under U.S. federal law as a Schedule I narcotic; however, it is legal in four states and Washington, D.C. Forty-six states allow some form of medicinal marijuana or decriminalization. Marijuana has been used medicinally for thousands of years; Marijuana's regulation by law enforcement in the U.S., rather than the medical community, led to an almost complete halt to academic and scientific research after the 1930s. The late 1960s saw an upsurge in recreational marijuana use by middle-class youth, the majority of whom experienced minimal adverse effects aside from arrest and attendant legal complications. Since the mid-1990s, the use of medicinal marijuana for certain conditions has gained increasing acceptance. Stronger strains and formulations of marijuana pose a risk to the developing brains of adolescents. Within the addiction medicine community, there is currently no consensus on marijuana. In the East, the feeling is primarily that marijuana continue to be proscribed. In the West, where clinicians must face the realities of medicalization, decriminalization, and/or legalization, as well as widespread recreational use, there is more of a movement to minimize adverse effects, particularly on youth.

  3. Marijuana: A Fifty-Year Personal Addiction Medicine Perspective.

    PubMed

    Smith, David E

    2016-01-01

    As of September 2015, the cultivation, possession, and/or use of marijuana is illegal under U.S. federal law as a Schedule I narcotic; however, it is legal in four states and Washington, D.C. Forty-six states allow some form of medicinal marijuana or decriminalization. Marijuana has been used medicinally for thousands of years; Marijuana's regulation by law enforcement in the U.S., rather than the medical community, led to an almost complete halt to academic and scientific research after the 1930s. The late 1960s saw an upsurge in recreational marijuana use by middle-class youth, the majority of whom experienced minimal adverse effects aside from arrest and attendant legal complications. Since the mid-1990s, the use of medicinal marijuana for certain conditions has gained increasing acceptance. Stronger strains and formulations of marijuana pose a risk to the developing brains of adolescents. Within the addiction medicine community, there is currently no consensus on marijuana. In the East, the feeling is primarily that marijuana continue to be proscribed. In the West, where clinicians must face the realities of medicalization, decriminalization, and/or legalization, as well as widespread recreational use, there is more of a movement to minimize adverse effects, particularly on youth. PMID:26757396

  4. Review and Updates in Regenerative and Personalized Medicine, Preclinical Animal Models, and Clinical Care in Cardiovascular Medicine.

    PubMed

    Barbato, Emanuele; Barton, Paul J; Bartunek, Jozef; Huber, Sally; Ibanez, Borja; Judge, Daniel P; Lara-Pezzi, Enrique; Stolen, Craig M; Taylor, Angela; Hall, Jennifer L

    2015-11-01

    The goal of this paper is to provide an updated review for scientists and clinicians on the major areas in cardiovascular medicine published in the Journal. Leading topics in regenerative and personalized medicine are presented along with a critical overview of the field. New standards in large preclinical animal models of pulmonary hypertension and left bundle branch block are highlighted. Finally, clinical care in the areas of atherosclerosis, the aortic valve, platelet biology, and myocarditis is discussed as well as autonomic modulation therapies. PMID:26453460

  5. Benefits, issues, and recommendations for personalized medicine in oncology in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Butts, C.; Kamel–Reid, S.; Batist, G.; Chia, S.; Blanke, C.; Moore, M.; Sawyer, M.B.; Desjardins, C.; Dubois, A.; Pun, J.; Bonter, K.; Ashbury, F.D.

    2013-01-01

    The burden of cancer for Canadian citizens and society is large. New technologies have the potential to increase the use of genetic information in clinical decision-making, furthering prevention, surveillance, and safer, more effective drug therapies for cancer patients. Personalized medicine can have different meanings to different people. The context for personalized medicine in the present paper is genetic testing, which offers the promise of refining treatment decisions for those diagnosed with chronic and life-threatening illnesses. Personalized medicine and genetic characterization of tumours can also give direction to the development of novel drugs. Genetic testing will increasingly become an essential part of clinical decision-making. In Canada, provinces are responsible for health care, and most have unique policies and programs in place to address cancer control. The result is inconsistency in access to and delivery of therapies and other interventions, beyond the differences expected because of demographic factors and clinical education. Inconsistencies arising from differences in resources, policy, and application of evidence-informed personalized cancer medicine exacerbate patient access to appropriate testing and quality care. Geographic variations in cancer incidence and mortality rates in Canada—with the Atlantic provinces and Quebec having higher rates, and British Columbia having the lowest rates—are well documented. Our purpose here is to provide an understanding of current and future applications of personalized medicine in oncology, to highlight the benefits of personalized medicine for patients, and to describe issues and opportunities for improvement in the coordination of personalized medicine in Canada. Efficient and more rapid adoption of personalized medicine in oncology in Canada could help overcome those issues and improve cancer prevention and care. That task might benefit from the creation of a National Genetics Advisory Panel

  6. Systems biology technologies enable personalized traditional Chinese medicine: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xijun; Zhang, Aihua; Sun, Hui; Wang, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), an alternative medicine, focuses on the treatment of human disease via the integrity of the close relationship between body and syndrome analysis. It remains a form of primary care in most Asian countries and its characteristics showcase the great advantages of personalized medicine. Although this approach to disease diagnosis, prognosis and treatment has served the medical establishment well for thousands of years, it has serious shortcomings in the era of modern medicine that stem from its reliance on reductionist principles of experimentation and analysis. In this way, systems biology offers the potential to personalize medicine, facilitating the provision of the right care to the right patient at the right time. We expect that systems biology will have a major impact on future personalized therapeutic approaches which herald the future of medicine. Here we summarize current trends and critically review the potential limitations and future prospects of such treatments. Some characteristic examples are presented to highlight the application of this groundbreaking platform to personalized TCM as well as some of the necessary milestones for moving systems biology of a state-of-the-art nature into mainstream health care.

  7. A national clinical decision support infrastructure to enable the widespread and consistent practice of genomic and personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background In recent years, the completion of the Human Genome Project and other rapid advances in genomics have led to increasing anticipation of an era of genomic and personalized medicine, in which an individual's health is optimized through the use of all available patient data, including data on the individual's genome and its downstream products. Genomic and personalized medicine could transform healthcare systems and catalyze significant reductions in morbidity, mortality, and overall healthcare costs. Discussion Critical to the achievement of more efficient and effective healthcare enabled by genomics is the establishment of a robust, nationwide clinical decision support infrastructure that assists clinicians in their use of genomic assays to guide disease prevention, diagnosis, and therapy. Requisite components of this infrastructure include the standardized representation of genomic and non-genomic patient data across health information systems; centrally managed repositories of computer-processable medical knowledge; and standardized approaches for applying these knowledge resources against patient data to generate and deliver patient-specific care recommendations. Here, we provide recommendations for establishing a national decision support infrastructure for genomic and personalized medicine that fulfills these needs, leverages existing resources, and is aligned with the Roadmap for National Action on Clinical Decision Support commissioned by the U.S. Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology. Critical to the establishment of this infrastructure will be strong leadership and substantial funding from the federal government. Summary A national clinical decision support infrastructure will be required for reaping the full benefits of genomic and personalized medicine. Essential components of this infrastructure include standards for data representation; centrally managed knowledge repositories; and standardized approaches for

  8. Printing Tablets with Fully Customizable Release Profiles for Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yajuan; Soh, Siowling

    2015-12-16

    Personalizing the release profiles of drugs is important for different people with different medical and biological conditions. A technically simple and low-cost method to fabricate fully customizable tablets that can deliver drugs with any type of release profile is described. The customization is intuitively straightforward: the desired profile can simply be "drawn" and printed by a 3D printer.

  9. Human iPSC-derived neurons and lymphoblastoid cells for personalized medicine research in neuropsychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gurwitz, David

    2016-01-01

    The development and clinical implementation of personalized medicine crucially depends on the availability of high-quality human biosamples; animal models, although capable of modeling complex human diseases, cannot reflect the large variation in the human genome, epigenome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome. Although the biosamples available from public biobanks that store human tissues and cells may represent the large human diversity for most diseases, these samples are not always sufficient for developing biomarkers for patient-tailored therapies for neuropsychiatric disorders. Postmortem human tissues are available from many biobanks; nevertheless, collections of neuronal human cells from large patient cohorts representing the human diversity remain scarce. Two tools are gaining popularity for personalized medicine research on neuropsychiatric disorders: human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons and human lymphoblastoid cell lines. This review examines and contrasts the advantages and limitations of each tool for personalized medicine research. PMID:27757061

  10. The economic value of personalized medicine tests: what we know and what we need to know

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Kathryn A.; Sakowski, Julie Ann; Trosman, Julia; Douglas, Michael P.; Liang, Su-Ying; Neumann, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Purpose There is uncertainty about when personalized medicine tests provide economic value. We assessed evidence on the economic value of personalized medicine tests and gaps in the evidence base. Methods We created a unique evidence base by linking data on published cost–utility analyses from the Tufts Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Registry with data measuring test characteristics and reflecting where value analyses may be most needed: (i) tests currently available or in advanced development, (ii) tests for drugs with Food and Drug Administration labels with genetic information, (iii) tests with demonstrated or likely clinical utility, (iv) tests for conditions with high mortality, and (v) tests for conditions with high expenditures. Results We identified 59 cost–utility analyses studies that examined personalized medicine tests (1998–2011). A majority (72%) of the cost/quality-adjusted life year ratios indicate that testing provides better health although at higher cost, with almost half of the ratios falling below $50,000 per quality-adjusted life year gained. One-fifth of the results indicate that tests may save money. Conclusion Many personalized medicine tests have been found to be relatively cost-effective, although fewer have been found to be cost saving, and many available or emerging medicine tests have not been evaluated. More evidence on value will be needed to inform decision making and assessment of genomic priorities. PMID:24232413

  11. New Strategies in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia: Leukemogenesis and Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gojo, Ivana; Karp, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular technology have unraveled the complexity of leukemogenesis and provided the opportunity to design more personalized and pathophysiology-targeted therapeutic strategies. Despite the use of intensive chemotherapy, relapse remains the most common cause for therapeutic failure in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). The interactions between leukemia stem cells (LSC) and marrow microenvironment appear to be critical in promoting therapeutic resistance through progressive acquisition of genetic and epigenetic changes within leukemia cells and immune evasion, resulting in leukemia cell survival. With advances in genomic sequencing efforts, epigenetic and phenotypic characterization, personalized therapeutic strategies aimed at critical leukemia survival mechanisms may be feasible in the near future. Here, we review select novel approaches to therapy of AML such as targeting LSC, altering leukemia/marrow microenvironment interactions, inhibiting DNA repair or cell cycle checkpoints, and augmenting immune-based anti-leukemia activity. PMID:25324141

  12. Health 2050: The Realization of Personalized Medicine through Crowdsourcing, the Quantified Self, and the Participatory Biocitizen

    PubMed Central

    Swan, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    The concepts of health and health care are moving towards the notion of personalized preventive health maintenance and away from an exclusive focus on the cure of disease. This is against the backdrop of contemporary public health challenges that include increasing costs, worsening outcomes, ‘diabesity’ epidemics, and anticipated physician shortages. Personalized preventive medicine could be critical to solving public health challenges at their causal root. This paper sets forth a vision and plan for the realization of preventive medicine by 2050 and examines efforts already underway such as participatory health initiatives, the era of big health data, and qualitative shifts in mindset. PMID:25562203

  13. Golden Helix Pharmacogenomics Days: educational activities on pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Squassina, Alessio; Severino, Giovanni; Grech, Godfrey; Fenech, Anthony; Borg, Joseph; Patrinos, George P

    2012-04-01

    The Golden Helix Pharmacogenomics Days are high-profile international educational scientific meetings discussing pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine. Here, we provide an overview of the scientific lectures and the topics discussed during the 4th Golden Helix Pharmacogenomics Day, held in Cagliari, Italy, on 7 October 2011, and the 5th Golden Helix Pharmacogenomics Day, that was held in Msida, Malta, on 3 December 2011. The scientific programs of both events included scientific and company lectures on pharmacogenomics, bioinformatics and personalized medicine by local and international speakers from Europe and the USA.

  14. Methods Used to Estimate Achievement Effects in Personalized Learning Schools. Working Paper WR-1061-BMGF

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pane, John F.; Baird, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the methods RAND used to analyze achievement for 23 personalized learning (PL) schools for the 2012-13 through 2013-14 academic years. This work was performed at the request of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), as part of a multi-year evaluation contract. The 23 schools were selected from a…

  15. Relationship between Achievement Goals and Students' Self-Reported Personal and Social Responsibility Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Agbuga, Bulent; Xiang, Ping; McBride, Ron E

    2015-01-01

    This study utilized the 2x2 achievement goal model (mastery-approach, mastery-avoidance, performance-approach, performance-avoidance goals) to explore the relationships between achievement goals and self-reported personal and social responsibility behaviors in high school physical education settings. Two hundred and twenty one Turkish students completed questionnaires assessing their achievement goals, personal and social responsibility behaviors. Results of the one-way repeated measures ANOVA revealed significant differences among the four achievement goals, F(3, 660) = 137.05, p < .001, η2 = .39. The result also revealed that students were more likely to endorse the mastery-approach goal than three other goals. The simple correlations revealed mastery-approach and performance-approach goals were positively related to students' self-reported personal (r = .54, p < .001; r = .37, p < .001, respectively) and social responsibility (r = .38, p < .001; r = .22, p < .001, respectively) behaviors. However, hierarchical regression analyses indicated only the mastery-approach goal emerged as the significant positive predictor, b = .52, t(216) = 7.19, p < .001 for personal responsibility behaviors, and b = .41, t(216) = 5.23, p < .001 for social responsibility behaviors. These findings seem to provide convergent evidence that mastery-approach goals are positively related to positive educational outcomes.

  16. Personality Correlates of Academic Achievement and Laboratory Learning of Elementary School Pupils. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butterfield, Earl C.; Weaver, S. Joseph

    This paper reports three studies designed to determine if significant increases could be made in the prediction of elementary school pupils' academic achievement by adding personality measures to intellectual measures after mental age and intelligent quotient leveling. A fourth study examined the utility of leveling pupils on socioeconomic…

  17. l[subscript z] Person-Fit Index to Identify Misfit Students with Achievement Test Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seo, Dong Gi; Weiss, David J.

    2013-01-01

    The usefulness of the l[subscript z] person-fit index was investigated with achievement test data from 20 exams given to more than 3,200 college students. Results for three methods of estimating ? showed that the distributions of l[subscript z] were not consistent with its theoretical distribution, resulting in general overfit to the item response…

  18. Cognitive Abilities and Motivational Processes in Science Achievement and Engagement: A Person-Centered Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, Shun; Roeser, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    This study adopted a person-centered approach to examine organized patterns of psychological factors and their relations to achievement and engagement in a sample of high school students. Four types of students characterized by unique configurations of cognitive, motivational, and affective characteristics were identified in both the male and…

  19. Paradoxical Personality and Academic Achievement in College Students From Buenos Aires.

    PubMed

    Freiberg Hoffmann, Agustín; Fernández Liporace, María Mercedes

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a study on paradoxical personality, defined as a distinctive feature in creative persons, developed with 350 college students from Buenos Aires. Goals aimed at describing and analysing possible significant differences of paradoxical traits in students from diverse majors representing seven different fields of study, and examining the relationship between each bipolar trait and academic achievement. The sample was composed of 7 groups (n = 50 by group) representing fields of study typically offered in public universities, Biology, Computer Science, Engineering, Law, Nutrition, Psychology, and History of Art. Analyses by career provided descriptive information about students of these majors, concerning their paradoxical personality profiles. Correlational studies verified significant associations between academic achievement and most paradoxical traits in majors such as Computer Science, Nutrition and Psychology. Results are discussed regarding practical outcomes and teaching programs.

  20. Achievement-Relevant Personality: Relations with the Big Five and Validation of an Efficient Instrument.

    PubMed

    Briley, Daniel A; Domiteaux, Matthew; Tucker-Drob, Elliot M

    2014-05-01

    Many achievement-relevant personality measures (APMs) have been developed, but the interrelations among APMs or associations with the broader personality landscape are not well-known. In Study 1, 214 participants were measured on 36 APMs and a measure of the Big Five. Factor analytic results supported the convergent and discriminant validity of five latent dimensions: performance, mastery, self-doubt, effort, and intellectual investment. Conscientiousness, neuroticism, and openness to experience had the most consistent associations with APMs. We constructed a more efficient scale- the Multidimensional Achievement-Relevant Personality Scale (MAPS). In Study 2, we replicated the factor structure and external correlates of the MAPS in a sample of 359 individuals. Finally, we validated the MAPS with four indicators of academic performance and demonstrated incremental validity.

  1. Paradoxical Personality and Academic Achievement in College Students From Buenos Aires

    PubMed Central

    Freiberg Hoffmann, Agustín; Fernández Liporace, María Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study on paradoxical personality, defined as a distinctive feature in creative persons, developed with 350 college students from Buenos Aires. Goals aimed at describing and analysing possible significant differences of paradoxical traits in students from diverse majors representing seven different fields of study, and examining the relationship between each bipolar trait and academic achievement. The sample was composed of 7 groups (n = 50 by group) representing fields of study typically offered in public universities, Biology, Computer Science, Engineering, Law, Nutrition, Psychology, and History of Art. Analyses by career provided descriptive information about students of these majors, concerning their paradoxical personality profiles. Correlational studies verified significant associations between academic achievement and most paradoxical traits in majors such as Computer Science, Nutrition and Psychology. Results are discussed regarding practical outcomes and teaching programs. PMID:27247680

  2. Paradoxical Personality and Academic Achievement in College Students From Buenos Aires.

    PubMed

    Freiberg Hoffmann, Agustín; Fernández Liporace, María Mercedes

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a study on paradoxical personality, defined as a distinctive feature in creative persons, developed with 350 college students from Buenos Aires. Goals aimed at describing and analysing possible significant differences of paradoxical traits in students from diverse majors representing seven different fields of study, and examining the relationship between each bipolar trait and academic achievement. The sample was composed of 7 groups (n = 50 by group) representing fields of study typically offered in public universities, Biology, Computer Science, Engineering, Law, Nutrition, Psychology, and History of Art. Analyses by career provided descriptive information about students of these majors, concerning their paradoxical personality profiles. Correlational studies verified significant associations between academic achievement and most paradoxical traits in majors such as Computer Science, Nutrition and Psychology. Results are discussed regarding practical outcomes and teaching programs. PMID:27247680

  3. Achievement-Relevant Personality: Relations with the Big Five and Validation of an Efficient Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Briley, Daniel A.; Domiteaux, Matthew; Tucker-Drob, Elliot M.

    2014-01-01

    Many achievement-relevant personality measures (APMs) have been developed, but the interrelations among APMs or associations with the broader personality landscape are not well-known. In Study 1, 214 participants were measured on 36 APMs and a measure of the Big Five. Factor analytic results supported the convergent and discriminant validity of five latent dimensions: performance, mastery, self-doubt, effort, and intellectual investment. Conscientiousness, neuroticism, and openness to experience had the most consistent associations with APMs. We constructed a more efficient scale– the Multidimensional Achievement-Relevant Personality Scale (MAPS). In Study 2, we replicated the factor structure and external correlates of the MAPS in a sample of 359 individuals. Finally, we validated the MAPS with four indicators of academic performance and demonstrated incremental validity. PMID:24839374

  4. Marriage and Medicine: The Physician as Partner, Parent, and Person

    PubMed Central

    Christie-Seely, J.

    1986-01-01

    Physicians are beginning to see the need to heal themselves, and to change the statistics on their morbidity, mortality, and marital distress. Stress for physicians comes from five sources: the nature of the work, their training, their public image, their families, and themselves. Medical school stress as an ‘initiation rite’ is discussed. Three theoretical frameworks are described which will enable family physicians to take a closer look at their own marriages and families as well as those of patients. A systems orientation will help avoid blame of self or partner or parents; object relations theory clarifies the human tendency to repeat history; a theory connecting self-esteem and communication styles will allow physicians to be more open at work and with their families. The importance of developing priorities and meaningful interests outside medicine is also discussed. PMID:21267270

  5. Conference scene: Latin American Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine Conference.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Kurtz, Guilherme

    2012-10-01

    There are nearly 600 million people living in 24 Latin American countries, speaking two major languages (Portuguese and Spanish) and sharing ancestral roots in America, Europe and Africa. Ethnic and cultural diversity, socioeconomical, scientific and technological disparities across Latin America must be taken into account in the design, interpretation and implications of pharmacogenomic studies in this region. The conference covered some of these aspects, but also took on a more global approach on the growing contribution of genomic information and biotechnological tools to the way medicines are developed, regulated and prescribed to patients. Translation of pharmacogenomics into clinical practice was the topic of a keynote lecture and two debate sessions. A preconference Introductory Course of Pharmacogenomics was offered.

  6. The continuum of personalized cardiovascular medicine: a position paper of the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Sipido, Karin R; Cowie, Martin R; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Fox, Keith A A; Katus, Hugo; Schroeder, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Priori, Silvia

    2014-12-01

    There is strong need to develop the current stratified practice of CVD management into a better personalized cardiovascular medicine, within a broad framework of global patient care. Clinical information obtained from history and physical examination, functional and imaging studies, biochemical biomarkers, genetic/epigenetic data, and pathophysiological insights into disease-driving processes need to be integrated into a new taxonomy of CVDs to allow personalized disease management. This has the potential for major health benefits for the population suffering from cardiovascular diseases.

  7. Personalized Medicine for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Therapies: Are We There Yet?

    PubMed

    Edwards, Bradley A; Landry, Shane; Joosten, Simon A; Hamilton, Garun S

    2016-09-01

    Currently there is no method to predict which treatments for obstructive sleep apnea will have the best outcomes in individual patients. Given that there is increasing interest in a personalized medicine approach to the treatment of a variety of disorders, this review describes the personalized approaches that are currently available for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea as well as future directions for individualized obstructive sleep apnea treatment. PMID:27542876

  8. Precision medicine and personalized breast cancer: combination pertuzumab therapy

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Kerry; Sarangi, Sasmit; Bardia, Aditya; Dizon, Don S

    2014-01-01

    Trastuzumab (Herceptin), a monoclonal antibody directed against the human epidermal growth-factor receptor 2 (HER2), is the poster child for antibody-based targeted therapy in breast cancer. Pertuzumab, another humanized monoclonal antibody, binds to a different domain of HER2 and prevents the formation of HER2:HER3 dimers, which is the most potent heterodimer in the HER family. The combination of trastuzumab and pertuzumab has synergistic activity, and is associated with improved clinical outcomes. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved pertuzumab in combination with trastuzumab-based chemotherapy originally as first-line therapy for metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer in 2012, and more recently as neoadjuvant therapy for localized disease in 2013. Pertuzumab is the first neoadjuvant drug to receive accelerated approval by the FDA based on pathological complete response as the primary end point. In this article, we review the mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, safety, and current role of pertuzumab in the management of breast cancer, as well as ongoing clinical trials and future directions regarding the utility of pertuzumab as a personalized therapeutic option for HER2-positive breast cancer. In the coming years, we anticipate increased utilization of neoadjuvant trials for drug development, biomarker discovery, and validation, and envision conduct of personalized breast cancer clinics in which therapies will be routinely selected based on genetic alterations in the tumor. Regardless of the targeted therapy combinations employed based on tumor genomic profile, trastuzumab and pertuzumab will likely continue to form the backbone of the personalized regimen for HER2-positive breast cancer. PMID:24715764

  9. Science, humanism, judgement, ethics: person-centered medicine as an emergent model of modern clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Miles, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The Medical University of Plovdiv (MUP) has as its motto 'Committed to humanity". But what does humanity in modern medicine mean? Is it possible to practise a form of medicine that is without humanity? In the current article, it is argued that modern medicine is increasingly being practised in a de-personalised fashion, where the patient is understood not as a unique human individual, a person, but rather as a subject or an object and more in the manner of a complex biological machine. Medicine has, it is contended, become distracted from its duty to care, comfort and console as well as to ameliorate, attenuate and cure and that the rapid development of medicine's scientific knowledge is, paradoxically, principally causative. Signal occurrences in the 'patient as a person' movement are reviewed, together with the emergence of the evidence-based medicine (EBM) and patient-centered care (PCC) movements. The characteristics of a model of medicine evolving in response to medicine's current deficiencies--person-centered healthcare (PCH)--are noted and described. In seeking to apply science with humanism, via clinical judgement, within an ethical framework, it is contended that PCH will prove to be far more responsive to the needs of the individual patient and his/her personal circumstances than current models of practice, so that neither a reductive anatomico-pathological, disease-centric model of illness (EBM), nor an aggressive patient-directed, consumerist form of care (PCC) is allowed continued dominance within modern healthcare systems. In conclusion, it is argued that PCH will enable affordable advances in biomedicine and technology to be delivered to patients within a humanistic framework of clinical practice that recognises the patient as a person and which takes full account of his/her stories, values, preferences, goals, aspirations, fears, worries, hopes, cultural context and which responds to his/her psychological, emotional, spiritual and social necessities

  10. [Management of Personal Information in Clinical Laboratory Medicine:--Chairmen's Introductory Remarks].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Shimetani, Naoto

    2014-11-01

    The Japanese Society of Laboratory Medicine has been running its own Medical Safety Committee, and holding a symposium on medical safety during the annual meeting. The medical world is filled with a considerable amount of personal information, including genetic information, the ultimate personal information. We, as medical staff, have to manage such personal information not only in times of peace but also during disasters or emergency situations. In Japan, the Act on the Protection of Personal Information is currently being implemented, but a number of problems remain. Human beings have entered the information technology era, including electrical medical record systems, which is useful for research and education besides medical practice. This is why personal information must be more effectively protected from leakage, misconception, and abuse. We should create a sound system to manage personal information, with the spirit of protecting patient information that originated from the Oath of Hippocrates.

  11. [Management of Personal Information in Clinical Laboratory Medicine:--Chairmen's Introductory Remarks].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Shimetani, Naoto

    2014-11-01

    The Japanese Society of Laboratory Medicine has been running its own Medical Safety Committee, and holding a symposium on medical safety during the annual meeting. The medical world is filled with a considerable amount of personal information, including genetic information, the ultimate personal information. We, as medical staff, have to manage such personal information not only in times of peace but also during disasters or emergency situations. In Japan, the Act on the Protection of Personal Information is currently being implemented, but a number of problems remain. Human beings have entered the information technology era, including electrical medical record systems, which is useful for research and education besides medical practice. This is why personal information must be more effectively protected from leakage, misconception, and abuse. We should create a sound system to manage personal information, with the spirit of protecting patient information that originated from the Oath of Hippocrates. PMID:27509731

  12. Why achievement motivation predicts success in business but failure in politics: the importance of personal control.

    PubMed

    Winter, David G

    2010-12-01

    Several decades of research have established that implicit achievement motivation (n Achievement) is associated with success in business, particularly in entrepreneurial or sales roles. However, several political psychology studies have shown that achievement motivation is not associated with success in politics; rather, implicit power motivation often predicts political success. Having versus lacking control may be a key difference between business and politics. Case studies suggest that achievement-motivated U.S. presidents and other world leaders often become frustrated and thereby fail because of lack of control, whereas power-motivated presidents develop ways to work with this inherent feature of politics. A reevaluation of previous research suggests that, in fact, relationships between achievement motivation and business success only occur when control is high. The theme of control is also prominent in the development of achievement motivation. Cross-national data are also consistent with this analysis: In democratic industrialized countries, national levels of achievement motivation are associated with strong executive control. In countries with low opportunity for education (thus fewer opportunities to develop a sense of personal control), achievement motivation is associated with internal violence. Many of these manifestations of frustrated achievement motivation in politics resemble authoritarianism. This conclusion is tested by data from a longitudinal study of 113 male college students, showing that high initial achievement motivation combined with frustrated desires for control is related to increases in authoritarianism (F-scale scores) during the college years. Implications for the psychology of leadership and practical politics are discussed.

  13. Personalized medicine in diabetes mellitus: current opportunities and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Kleinberger, Jeffrey W; Pollin, Toni I

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects approximately 382 million individuals worldwide and is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Over 40 and nearly 80 genetic loci influencing susceptibility to type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively, have been identified. In addition, there is emerging evidence that some genetic variants help to predict response to treatment. Other variants confer apparent protection from diabetes or its complications and may lead to development of novel treatment approaches. Currently, there is clear clinical utility to genetic testing to find the at least 1% of diabetic individuals who have monogenic diabetes (e.g., maturity-onset diabetes of the young and KATP channel neonatal diabetes). Diagnosing many of these currently underdiagnosed types of diabetes enables personalized treatment, resulting in improved and less invasive glucose control, better prediction of prognosis, and enhanced familial risk assessment. Efforts to enhance the rate of detection, diagnosis, and personalized treatment of individuals with monogenic diabetes should set the stage for effective clinical translation of current genetic, pharmacogenetic, and pharmacogenomic research of more complex forms of diabetes. PMID:25907167

  14. Macrophage responses to implants: prospects for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Gudima, Alexandru; Riabov, Vladimir; Dollinger, Camille; Lavalle, Philippe; Vrana, Nihal Engin

    2015-12-01

    Implants, transplants, and implantable biomedical devices are mainstream solutions for a wide variety of human pathologies. One of the persistent problems around nondegradable metallic and polymeric implants is failure of macrophages to resolve the inflammation and their tendency to stay in a state, named "frustrated phagocytosis." During the initial phase, proinflammatory macrophages induce acute reactions to trauma and foreign materials, whereas tolerogenic anti-inflammatory macrophages control resolution of inflammation and induce the subsequent healing stage. However, implanted materials can induce a mixed pro/anti-inflammatory phenotype, supporting chronic inflammatory reactions accompanied by microbial contamination and resulting in implant failure. Several materials based on natural polymers for improved interaction with host tissue or surfaces that release anti-inflammatory drugs/bioactive agents have been developed for implant coating to reduce implant rejection. However, no definitive, long-term solution to avoid adverse immune responses to the implanted materials is available to date. The prevention of implant-associated infections or chronic inflammation by manipulating the macrophage phenotype is a promising strategy to improve implant acceptance. The immunomodulatory properties of currently available implant coatings need to be improved to develop personalized therapeutic solutions. Human primary macrophages exposed to the implantable materials ex vivo can be used to predict the individual's reactions and allow selection of an optimal coating composition. Our review describes current understanding of the mechanisms of macrophage interactions with implantable materials and outlines the prospects for use of human primary macrophages for diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to personalized implant therapy. PMID:26168797

  15. Personalized medicine in CLL: Current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Rozovski, Uri; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Keating, Michael J.; Estrov, Zeev

    2013-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common hematologic malignancy in the Western Hemisphere. Despite advances in research and the development of effective treatment regimens, CLL is still largely an incurable disease. Although several prognostic factors have been identified in recent years, most of the new prognostic factors are not utilized, and treatment decisions are still based on clinical staging and limited use of cytogenetic analysis. Patients with advanced disease are treated at diagnosis, whereas others, regardless of their prognostic indicators, are offered treatment only at disease progression. Furthermore, treatment guidelines for elderly or “unfit” patients are unavailable because most CLL trials have included mostly younger, healthier patients. Given the heterogeneity of the clinical manifestations and prognosis of CLL, patients are likely to benefit from a personalized therapeutic approach. Recent advances in CLL pathobiology research, the use of high-throughput technologies, and most importantly, the introduction of novel targeted therapies with high efficacy and low toxicity are currently transforming the treatment of CLL. A personalized approach that includes early intervention in selected patients with CLL is likely to bring physicians closer to the goal of attaining cures in most patients with CLL. PMID:23879961

  16. Personalized medicine in diabetes mellitus: current opportunities and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Kleinberger, Jeffrey W; Pollin, Toni I

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects approximately 382 million individuals worldwide and is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Over 40 and nearly 80 genetic loci influencing susceptibility to type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively, have been identified. In addition, there is emerging evidence that some genetic variants help to predict response to treatment. Other variants confer apparent protection from diabetes or its complications and may lead to development of novel treatment approaches. Currently, there is clear clinical utility to genetic testing to find the at least 1% of diabetic individuals who have monogenic diabetes (e.g., maturity-onset diabetes of the young and KATP channel neonatal diabetes). Diagnosing many of these currently underdiagnosed types of diabetes enables personalized treatment, resulting in improved and less invasive glucose control, better prediction of prognosis, and enhanced familial risk assessment. Efforts to enhance the rate of detection, diagnosis, and personalized treatment of individuals with monogenic diabetes should set the stage for effective clinical translation of current genetic, pharmacogenetic, and pharmacogenomic research of more complex forms of diabetes.

  17. Going MAD: development of a "matrix academic division" to facilitate translating research to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Whitcomb, David C

    2011-11-01

    Personalized medicine integrates an individual's genetic and other information for the prevention or treatment of complex disorders, and translational research seeks to identify those data most important to disease processes based on observations at the bench and the bedside. To understand complex disorders such as chronic pancreatitis, inflammatory bowel disease, liver cirrhosis, and other idiopathic chronic inflammatory diseases, physician-scientists must systematically collect data on relevant risks, clinical status, biomarkers, and outcomes. The author describes a "matrix academic division" (MAD), a highly effective academic program created at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center using translational research to rapidly develop personalized medicine for digestive diseases. MAD is designed to capture patient-specific data and biologic samples for analysis of steps in a complex process (reverse engineering), reconstructing the system conceptually and mathematically (disease modeling), and deciphering disease mechanism in individual patients to predict the effects of interventions (personalized medicine). MAD draws on the expertise of the medical school's and medical center's physician-scientists to translate essential disease information between the bed and the bench and to communicate with researchers from multiple domains, including epidemiology, genetics, cell biology, immunology, regenerative medicine, neuroscience, and oncology. The author illustrates this approach by describing its successful application to the reverse engineering of chronic pancreatitis.

  18. "Personal Knowledge" in Medicine and the Epistemic Shortcomings of Scientism.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Hugh Marshall; Walker, Simon Thomas

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we outline a framework for understanding the different kinds of knowledge required for medical practice and use this framework to show how scientism undermines aspects of this knowledge. The framework is based on Michael Polanyi's claim that knowledge is primarily the product of the contemplations and convictions of persons and yet at the same time carries a sense of universality because it grasps at reality. Building on Polanyi's ideas, we propose that knowledge can be described along two intersecting "dimensions": the tacit-explicit and the particular-general. These dimensions supersede the familiar "objective-subjective" dichotomy, as they more accurately describe the relationship between medical science and medical practice. Scientism, we argue, excludes tacit and particular knowledge and thereby distorts "clinical reality" and impairs medical practice and medical ethics.

  19. Soluble biomarkers development in osteoarthritis: from discovery to personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Henrotin, Yves; Sanchez, Christelle; Cornet, Anne; Van de Put, Joachim; Douette, Pierre; Gharbi, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Context: Specific soluble biomarkers could be a precious tool for diagnosis, prognosis and personalized management of osteoarthritic (OA) patients. Objective: To describe the path of soluble biomarker development from discovery to clinical qualification and regulatory adoption toward OA-related biomarker qualification. Methods and results: This review summarizes current guidance on the use of biomarkers in OA in clinical trials and their utility at five stages, including preclinical development and phase 1 to phase 4 trials. It also presents all the available regulatory requirements. Conclusions: The path through the adoption of a specific soluble biomarker for OA is steep but is worth the challenge due to the benefit that it can provide. PMID:26954785

  20. The Importance of Functional Tests in Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Widmer, R. Jay; Lerman, Amir

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the most prevalent disease mainly in the Western society and becoming the leading cause of death worldwide. Standard methods by which healthcare providers screen for cardiovascular disease have only minimally reduced the burden of disease while exponentially increasing costs. As such, more specific and individualized methods for functionally assessing cardiovascular threats are needed to identify properly those at greatest risk, and appropriately treat these patients so as to avoid a fate such as heart attack, stroke, or death. Currently, endothelial function testing—in both the coronary and peripheral circulation—is well established as being associated with the disease process and future cardiovascular events. Improving such testing can lead to a reduction in the risk of future events. Combining this functional assessment of vascular fitness with other, more personalized, testing methods should serve to identify those at the greatest risk of cardiovascular disease earlier and subsequently reduce the affliction of such diseases worldwide. PMID:23908864

  1. "Personal Knowledge" in Medicine and the Epistemic Shortcomings of Scientism.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Hugh Marshall; Walker, Simon Thomas

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we outline a framework for understanding the different kinds of knowledge required for medical practice and use this framework to show how scientism undermines aspects of this knowledge. The framework is based on Michael Polanyi's claim that knowledge is primarily the product of the contemplations and convictions of persons and yet at the same time carries a sense of universality because it grasps at reality. Building on Polanyi's ideas, we propose that knowledge can be described along two intersecting "dimensions": the tacit-explicit and the particular-general. These dimensions supersede the familiar "objective-subjective" dichotomy, as they more accurately describe the relationship between medical science and medical practice. Scientism, we argue, excludes tacit and particular knowledge and thereby distorts "clinical reality" and impairs medical practice and medical ethics. PMID:26615541

  2. Designs and challenges for personalized medicine studies in oncology: focus on the SHIVA trial.

    PubMed

    Le Tourneau, Christophe; Kamal, Maud; Trédan, Olivier; Delord, Jean-Pierre; Campone, Mario; Goncalves, Anthony; Isambert, Nicolas; Conroy, Thierry; Gentien, David; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Pouliquen, Anne-Lise; Servant, Nicolas; Stern, Marc-Henri; Le Corroller, Anne-Gaëlle; Armanet, Sébastien; Rio Frio, Thomas; Paoletti, Xavier

    2012-12-01

    Personalized medicine is defined by the National Cancer Institute as "a form of medicine that uses information about a person's genes, proteins, and environment to prevent, diagnose, and treat disease." In oncology, the term "personalized medicine" arose with the emergence of molecularly targeted agents. The prescription of approved molecularly targeted agents to cancer patients currently relies on the primary tumor location and histological subtype. Predictive biomarkers of efficacy of these modern agents have been exclusively validated in specific tumor types. A major concern today is to determine whether the prescription of molecularly targeted therapies based on tumor molecular abnormalities, independently of primary tumor location and histology, would improve the outcome of cancer patients. This new paradigm requires prospective validation before being implemented in clinical practice. In this paper, we will first review different designs, including observational cohorts, as well as nonrandomized and randomized clinical trials, that have been recently proposed to evaluate the relevance of this approach, and further discuss their advantages and drawbacks. The design of the SHIVA trial, a randomized proof-of-concept phase II trial comparing therapy based on tumor molecular profiling versus conventional therapy in patients with refractory cancer will be detailed. Finally, we will discuss the multiple challenges associated with the implementation of personalized medicine in oncology, as well as perspectives for the future.

  3. Personalized Medicine Approaches in Prostate Cancer Employing Patient Derived 3D Organoids and Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bartucci, Monica; Ferrari, Anna C.; Kim, Isaac Yi; Ploss, Alexander; Yarmush, Martin; Sabaawy, Hatem E.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer death in Western men. Despite its prevalence, PCa has proven very difficult to propagate in vitro. PCa represents a complex organ-like multicellular structure maintained by the dynamic interaction of tumoral cells with parenchymal stroma, endothelial and immune cells, and components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The lack of PCa models that recapitulate this intricate system has hampered progress toward understanding disease progression and lackluster therapeutic responses. Tissue slices, monolayer cultures and genetically engineered mouse models (GEMM) fail to mimic the complexities of the PCa microenvironment or reproduce the diverse mechanisms of therapy resistance. Moreover, patient derived xenografts (PDXs) are expensive, time consuming, difficult to establish for prostate cancer, lack immune cell-tumor regulation, and often tumors undergo selective engraftments. Here, we describe an interdisciplinary approach using primary PCa and tumor initiating cells (TICs), three-dimensional (3D) tissue engineering, genetic and morphometric profiling, and humanized mice to generate patient-derived organoids for examining personalized therapeutic responses in vitro and in mice co-engrafted with a human immune system (HIS), employing adaptive T-cell- and chimeric antigen receptor- (CAR) immunotherapy. The development of patient specific therapies targeting the vulnerabilities of cancer, when combined with antiproliferative and immunotherapy approaches could help to achieve the full transformative power of cancer precision medicine. PMID:27446916

  4. Personalized Medicine Approaches in Prostate Cancer Employing Patient Derived 3D Organoids and Humanized Mice.

    PubMed

    Bartucci, Monica; Ferrari, Anna C; Kim, Isaac Yi; Ploss, Alexander; Yarmush, Martin; Sabaawy, Hatem E

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer death in Western men. Despite its prevalence, PCa has proven very difficult to propagate in vitro. PCa represents a complex organ-like multicellular structure maintained by the dynamic interaction of tumoral cells with parenchymal stroma, endothelial and immune cells, and components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The lack of PCa models that recapitulate this intricate system has hampered progress toward understanding disease progression and lackluster therapeutic responses. Tissue slices, monolayer cultures and genetically engineered mouse models (GEMM) fail to mimic the complexities of the PCa microenvironment or reproduce the diverse mechanisms of therapy resistance. Moreover, patient derived xenografts (PDXs) are expensive, time consuming, difficult to establish for prostate cancer, lack immune cell-tumor regulation, and often tumors undergo selective engraftments. Here, we describe an interdisciplinary approach using primary PCa and tumor initiating cells (TICs), three-dimensional (3D) tissue engineering, genetic and morphometric profiling, and humanized mice to generate patient-derived organoids for examining personalized therapeutic responses in vitro and in mice co-engrafted with a human immune system (HIS), employing adaptive T-cell- and chimeric antigen receptor- (CAR) immunotherapy. The development of patient specific therapies targeting the vulnerabilities of cancer, when combined with antiproliferative and immunotherapy approaches could help to achieve the full transformative power of cancer precision medicine. PMID:27446916

  5. Navigating legal constraints in clinical data warehousing: a case study in personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Jefferys, Benjamin R; Nwankwo, Iheanyi; Neri, Elias; Chang, David C W; Shamardin, Lev; Hänold, Stefanie; Graf, Norbert; Forgó, Nikolaus; Coveney, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Personalized medicine relies in part upon comprehensive data on patient treatment and outcomes, both for analysis leading to improved models that provide the basis for enhanced treatment, and for direct use in clinical decision-making. A data warehouse is an information technology for combining and standardizing multiple databases. Data warehousing of clinical data is constrained by many legal and ethical considerations, owing to the sensitive nature of the data being stored. We describe an unconstrained clinical data warehousing architecture, some of the legal constraints that have led us to reconsider this architecture, and the legal and technical solutions to these constraints developed for the clinical data warehouse in the personalized medicine project p-medicine. We also propose some changes to the legal constraints that will further enable clinical research.

  6. Personalized medicine: evidence of normativity in its quantitative definition of health.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Henrik; Hofmann, Bjørn; Getz, Linn

    2016-10-01

    Systems medicine, which is based on computational modelling of biological systems, is emerging as an increasingly prominent part of the personalized medicine movement. It is often promoted as 'P4 medicine' (predictive, preventive, personalized, and participatory). In this article, we test promises made by some of its proponents that systems medicine will be able to develop a scientific, quantitative metric for wellness that will eliminate the purported vagueness, ambiguity, and incompleteness-that is, normativity-of previous health definitions. We do so by examining the most concrete and relevant evidence for such a metric available: a patent that describes a systems medicine method for assessing health and disease. We find that although systems medicine is promoted as heralding an era of transformative scientific objectivity, its definition of health seems at present still normatively based. As such, we argue that it will be open to influence from various stakeholders and that its purported objectivity may conceal important scientific, philosophical, and political issues. We also argue that this is an example of a general trend within biomedicine to create overly hopeful visions and expectations for the future. PMID:27638683

  7. Personalized medicine: evidence of normativity in its quantitative definition of health.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Henrik; Hofmann, Bjørn; Getz, Linn

    2016-10-01

    Systems medicine, which is based on computational modelling of biological systems, is emerging as an increasingly prominent part of the personalized medicine movement. It is often promoted as 'P4 medicine' (predictive, preventive, personalized, and participatory). In this article, we test promises made by some of its proponents that systems medicine will be able to develop a scientific, quantitative metric for wellness that will eliminate the purported vagueness, ambiguity, and incompleteness-that is, normativity-of previous health definitions. We do so by examining the most concrete and relevant evidence for such a metric available: a patent that describes a systems medicine method for assessing health and disease. We find that although systems medicine is promoted as heralding an era of transformative scientific objectivity, its definition of health seems at present still normatively based. As such, we argue that it will be open to influence from various stakeholders and that its purported objectivity may conceal important scientific, philosophical, and political issues. We also argue that this is an example of a general trend within biomedicine to create overly hopeful visions and expectations for the future.

  8. Genetics and Vaccines in the Era of Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Castiblanco, John; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines represent the most successful and sustainable tactic to prevent and counteract infection. A vaccine generally improves immunity to a particular disease upon administration by inducing specific protective and efficient immune responses in all of the receiving population. The main known factors influencing the observed heterogeneity for immune re-sponses induced by vaccines are gender, age, co-morbidity, immune system, and genetic background. This review is mainly focused on the genetic status effect to vaccine immune responses and how this could contribute to the development of novel vaccine candidates that could be better directed and predicted relative to the genetic history of an individual and/or population. The text offers a brief history of vaccinology as a field, a description of the genetic status of the most relevant and studied genes and their functionality and correlation with exposure to specific vaccines; followed by an inside look into autoimmunity as a concern when designing vaccines as well as perspectives and conclusions looking towards an era of personalized and predictive vaccinology instead of a one size fits all approach. PMID:25937813

  9. Graft-versus-host disease biomarkers: omics and personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Paczesny, Sophie; Raiker, Nisha; Brooks, Sam; Mumaw, Christy

    2013-09-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is the most effective form of tumor immunotherapy available to date and the frequency of transplants continues to increase worldwide. However, while allo-HSCT usually induces a beneficial graft-versus leukemia effect, a major source of morbidity and mortality following allo-HSCT is graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Currently available diagnostic and staging tools frequently fail to identify those at higher risk for GVHD morbidity, treatment unresponsiveness, and death. Furthermore, there are shortcomings in the risk stratification of patients before GVHD clinical signs develop. In parallel, recent years have been characterized by an explosive evolution of omics technologies, largely due to technological advancements in chemistry, engineering, and bioinformatics. Building on these opportunities, plasma biomarkers have been identified and validated as promising diagnostic and prognostic tools for acute GVHD. This review summarizes current information on the types of GVHD biomarkers, the omics tools used to identify them, the biomarkers currently validated as acute GVHD markers, and future recommendations for incorporating biomarkers into new grading algorithms for risk-stratifying patients and creating more personalized treatment courses. Future directions will include randomized evaluations of these biomarkers in multicenter prospective studies while extending on the need for biomarkers of chronic GVHD.

  10. The oral microbiome in health and disease and the potential impact on personalized dental medicine.

    PubMed

    Zarco, M F; Vess, T J; Ginsburg, G S

    2012-03-01

    Every human body contains a personalized microbiome that is essential to maintaining health but capable of eliciting disease. The oral microbiome is particularly imperative to health because it can cause both oral and systemic disease. The oral microbiome rests within biofilms throughout the oral cavity, forming an ecosystem that maintains health when in equilibrium. However, certain ecological shifts in the microbiome allow pathogens to manifest and cause disease. Severe forms of oral disease may result in systemic disease at different body sites. Microbiomics and metagenomics are two fields of research that have emerged to identify the presence of specific microbes in the body and understand the nature of the microbiome activity during both health and disease. The analysis of the microbiome and its genomes will pave the way for more effective therapeutic and diagnostic techniques and, ultimately, contribute to the development of personalized medicine and personalized dental medicine.

  11. The oral microbiome in health and disease and the potential impact on personalized dental medicine.

    PubMed

    Zarco, M F; Vess, T J; Ginsburg, G S

    2012-03-01

    Every human body contains a personalized microbiome that is essential to maintaining health but capable of eliciting disease. The oral microbiome is particularly imperative to health because it can cause both oral and systemic disease. The oral microbiome rests within biofilms throughout the oral cavity, forming an ecosystem that maintains health when in equilibrium. However, certain ecological shifts in the microbiome allow pathogens to manifest and cause disease. Severe forms of oral disease may result in systemic disease at different body sites. Microbiomics and metagenomics are two fields of research that have emerged to identify the presence of specific microbes in the body and understand the nature of the microbiome activity during both health and disease. The analysis of the microbiome and its genomes will pave the way for more effective therapeutic and diagnostic techniques and, ultimately, contribute to the development of personalized medicine and personalized dental medicine. PMID:21902769

  12. Personalized sequencing and the future of medicine: discovery, diagnosis and defeat of disease

    PubMed Central

    Esplin, Edward D; Oei, Ling; Snyder, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    The potential for personalized sequencing to individually optimize medical treatment in diseases such as cancer and for pharmacogenomic application is just beginning to be realized, and the utility of sequencing healthy individuals for managing health is also being explored. The data produced requires additional advancements in interpretation of variants of unknown significance to maximize clinical benefit. Nevertheless, personalized sequencing, only recently applied to clinical medicine, has already been broadly applied to the discovery and study of disease. It is poised to enable the earlier and more accurate diagnosis of disease risk and occurrence, guide prevention and individualized intervention as well as facilitate monitoring of healthy and treated patients, and play a role in the prevention and recurrence of future disease. This article documents the advancing capacity of personalized sequencing, reviews its impact on disease-oriented scientific discovery and anticipates its role in the future of medicine. PMID:25493570

  13. Nanodiamonds: The intersection of nanotechnology, drug development, and personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Dean; Wang, Chung-Huei Katherine; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of nanomedicine in cellular, preclinical, and clinical studies has led to exciting advances ranging from fundamental to translational, particularly in the field of cancer. Many of the current barriers in cancer treatment are being successfully addressed using nanotechnology-modified compounds. These barriers include drug resistance leading to suboptimal intratumoral retention, poor circulation times resulting in decreased efficacy, and off-target toxicity, among others. The first clinical nanomedicine advances to overcome these issues were based on monotherapy, where small-molecule and nucleic acid delivery demonstrated substantial improvements over unmodified drug administration. Recent preclinical studies have shown that combination nanotherapies, composed of either multiple classes of nanomaterials or a single nanoplatform functionalized with several therapeutic agents, can image and treat tumors with improved efficacy over single-compound delivery. Among the many promising nanomaterials that are being developed, nanodiamonds have received increasing attention because of the unique chemical-mechanical properties on their faceted surfaces. More recently, nanodiamond-based drug delivery has been included in the rational and systematic design of optimal therapeutic combinations using an implicitly de-risked drug development platform technology, termed Phenotypic Personalized Medicine–Drug Development (PPM-DD). The application of PPM-DD to rapidly identify globally optimized drug combinations successfully addressed a pervasive challenge confronting all aspects of drug development, both nano and non-nano. This review will examine various nanomaterials and the use of PPM-DD to optimize the efficacy and safety of current and future cancer treatment. How this platform can accelerate combinatorial nanomedicine and the broader pharmaceutical industry toward unprecedented clinical impact will also be discussed. PMID:26601235

  14. Traditional, complementary and alternative medical systems and their contribution to personalisation, prediction and prevention in medicine-person-centred medicine.

    PubMed

    Roberti di Sarsina, Paolo; Alivia, Mauro; Guadagni, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Traditional, complementary and alternative medical (TCAM) systems contribute to the foundation of person-centred medicine (PCM), an epistemological orientation for medical science which places the person as a physical, psychological and spiritual entity at the centre of health care and of the therapeutic process. PCM wishes to broaden the bio-molecular reductionistic approach of medical science towards an integration that allows people, doctors, nurses, health-care professionals and patients to become the real protagonists of the health-care scene. The doctor or caregiver needs to act out of empathy to meet the unique value of each human being, which unfolds over the course of a lifetime from conception to natural death. Knowledge of the human being should not be instrumental to economic or political interests, ideology, theories or religious dogma. Research needs to be broadened with methodological tools to investigate person-centred medical interventions. Salutogenesis is a fundamental principle of PCM, promoting health and preventing illness by strengthening the individual's self-healing abilities. TCAM systems also give tools to predict the insurgence of illness and treat it before the appearance of overt organic disease. A task of PCM is to educate people to take better care of their physical, psychological and spiritual health. Health-care education needs to be broadened to give doctors and health-care workers of the future the tools to act in innovative and highly differentiated ways, always guided by deep respect for individual autonomy, personal culture, religion and beliefs. PMID:23126628

  15. Nanomedicine-Based Neuroprotective Strategies in Patient Specific-iPSC and Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Shih-Fan; Liu, Wei-Hsiu; Song, Wen-Shin; Chiang, Kuan-Lin; Ma, Hsin-I; Kao, Chung-Lan; Chen, Ming-Teh

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, nanotechnology has attracted major interests in view of drug delivery systems and therapies against diseases, such as cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and many others. Nanotechnology provides the opportunity for nanoscale particles or molecules (so called “Nanomedicine”) to be delivered to the targeted sites, thereby, reducing toxicity (or side effects) and improving drug bioavailability. Nowadays, a great deal of nano-structured particles/vehicles has been discovered, including polymeric nanoparticles, lipid-based nanoparticles, and mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Nanomedical utilizations have already been well developed in many different aspects, including disease treatment, diagnostic, medical devices designing, and visualization (i.e., cell trafficking). However, while quite a few successful progressions on chemotherapy using nanotechnology have been developed, the implementations of nanoparticles on stem cell research are still sparsely populated. Stem cell applications and therapies are being considered to offer an outstanding potential in the treatment for numbers of maladies. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are adult cells that have been genetically reprogrammed to an embryonic stem cell-like state. Although the exact mechanisms underlying are still unclear, iPSCs are already being considered as useful tools for drug development/screening and modeling of diseases. Recently, personalized medicines have drawn great attentions in biological and pharmaceutical studies. Generally speaking, personalized medicine is a therapeutic model that offers a customized healthcare/cure being tailored to a specific patient based on his own genetic information. Consequently, the combination of nanomedicine and iPSCs could actually be the potent arms for remedies in transplantation medicine and personalized medicine. This review will focus on current use of nanoparticles on therapeutical applications, nanomedicine-based neuroprotective

  16. Nanomedicine-based neuroprotective strategies in patient specific-iPSC and personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Jang, Shih-Fan; Liu, Wei-Hsiu; Song, Wen-Shin; Chiang, Kuan-Lin; Ma, Hsin-I; Kao, Chung-Lan; Chen, Ming-Teh

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, nanotechnology has attracted major interests in view of drug delivery systems and therapies against diseases, such as cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and many others. Nanotechnology provides the opportunity for nanoscale particles or molecules (so called "Nanomedicine") to be delivered to the targeted sites, thereby, reducing toxicity (or side effects) and improving drug bioavailability. Nowadays, a great deal of nano-structured particles/vehicles has been discovered, including polymeric nanoparticles, lipid-based nanoparticles, and mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Nanomedical utilizations have already been well developed in many different aspects, including disease treatment, diagnostic, medical devices designing, and visualization (i.e., cell trafficking). However, while quite a few successful progressions on chemotherapy using nanotechnology have been developed, the implementations of nanoparticles on stem cell research are still sparsely populated. Stem cell applications and therapies are being considered to offer an outstanding potential in the treatment for numbers of maladies. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are adult cells that have been genetically reprogrammed to an embryonic stem cell-like state. Although the exact mechanisms underlying are still unclear, iPSCs are already being considered as useful tools for drug development/screening and modeling of diseases. Recently, personalized medicines have drawn great attentions in biological and pharmaceutical studies. Generally speaking, personalized medicine is a therapeutic model that offers a customized healthcare/cure being tailored to a specific patient based on his own genetic information. Consequently, the combination of nanomedicine and iPSCs could actually be the potent arms for remedies in transplantation medicine and personalized medicine. This review will focus on current use of nanoparticles on therapeutical applications, nanomedicine-based neuroprotective

  17. [Systems biology and personalized medicine: to be or not to be?].

    PubMed

    Sverdlov, E D

    2014-05-01

    The review is devoted to the widely discussed problems of the feasibility of "systems biology" and "P4-personalized (systems) medicine" from the standpoint of complex living systems. The following conclusions are made. 1. It is impossible to reach the ultimate goals of systems biology and medicine based solely on data of genomics and other 'omics'. Systems biology may be efficient for an approximate description of certain functional modules provided that there are experimental data for the majority of the components of the system under study. 2. P4-personalized (systems) medicine based on systems biology is unrealistic fundamentally and technically, as well as from the economic point of view. 3. A possible way is to search for the targets common for all or for large groups of individuals, and the development of postgenomic generalized medicine. 4. Also realistic are some of currently developing options of personalized medicine, such as e. g. the use of patient stem cells that are returned to the patient after culturing, or of gene-modified infiltrating T-lymphocytes in so-called chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) cancer therapy. CAR therapy is a personalized treatment that uses T-lymphocytes taken from a patient and gene-modified in such a way that to recognize and kill cancer cells. 5. Despite of numerous claims, the paradigms of the postgenomic sciences were not changed. Traditional approaches of molecular biology, genetics, biochemistry, and physiology still remain in force in the postgenomic era. They are enforced due to the data obtained by 'omics'. These data may be a base for putting forward and testing hypotheses about the mechanisms of functional processes.

  18. Personalized Medicine Based on Theranostic Radioiodine Molecular Imaging for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging based personalized therapy has been a fascinating concept for individualized therapeutic strategy, which is able to attain the highest efficacy and reduce adverse effects in certain patients. Theranostics, which integrates diagnostic testing to detect molecular targets for particular therapeutic modalities, is one of the key technologies that contribute to the success of personalized medicine. Although the term “theranostics” was used after the second millennium, its basic principle was applied more than 70 years ago in the field of thyroidology with radioiodine molecular imaging. Differentiated thyroid cancer, which arises from follicular cells in the thyroid, is the most common endocrine malignancy, and theranostic radioiodine has been successfully applied to diagnose and treat differentiated thyroid cancer, the applications of which were included in the guidelines published by various thyroid or nuclear medicine societies. Through better pathophysiologic understanding of thyroid cancer and advancements in nuclear technologies, theranostic radioiodine contributes more to modern tailored personalized management by providing high therapeutic effect and by avoiding significant adverse effects in differentiated thyroid cancer. This review details the inception of theranostic radioiodine and recent radioiodine applications for differentiated thyroid cancer management as a prototype of personalized medicine based on molecular imaging. PMID:27239470

  19. Artificial intelligence in medicine and cardiac imaging: harnessing big data and advanced computing to provide personalized medical diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Dilsizian, Steven E; Siegel, Eliot L

    2014-01-01

    Although advances in information technology in the past decade have come in quantum leaps in nearly every aspect of our lives, they seem to be coming at a slower pace in the field of medicine. However, the implementation of electronic health records (EHR) in hospitals is increasing rapidly, accelerated by the meaningful use initiatives associated with the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services EHR Incentive Programs. The transition to electronic medical records and availability of patient data has been associated with increases in the volume and complexity of patient information, as well as an increase in medical alerts, with resulting "alert fatigue" and increased expectations for rapid and accurate diagnosis and treatment. Unfortunately, these increased demands on health care providers create greater risk for diagnostic and therapeutic errors. In the near future, artificial intelligence (AI)/machine learning will likely assist physicians with differential diagnosis of disease, treatment options suggestions, and recommendations, and, in the case of medical imaging, with cues in image interpretation. Mining and advanced analysis of "big data" in health care provide the potential not only to perform "in silico" research but also to provide "real time" diagnostic and (potentially) therapeutic recommendations based on empirical data. "On demand" access to high-performance computing and large health care databases will support and sustain our ability to achieve personalized medicine. The IBM Jeopardy! Challenge, which pitted the best all-time human players against the Watson computer, captured the imagination of millions of people across the world and demonstrated the potential to apply AI approaches to a wide variety of subject matter, including medicine. The combination of AI, big data, and massively parallel computing offers the potential to create a revolutionary way of practicing evidence-based, personalized medicine.

  20. The promise and challenge of personalized medicine: aging populations, complex diseases, and unmet medical need.

    PubMed

    Henney, Adriano M

    2012-06-01

    The concept of personalized medicine is not new. It is being discussed with increasing interest in the medical, scientific, and general media because of the availability of advanced scientific and computational technologies, and the promise of the potential to improve the targeting and delivery of novel medicines. It is also being seen as one approach that may have a beneficial impact on reducing health care budgets. But what are the challenges that need to be addressed in its implementation in the clinic? This article poses some provocative questions and suggests some things that need to be considered.

  1. The promise and challenge of personalized medicine: aging populations, complex diseases, and unmet medical need.

    PubMed

    Henney, Adriano M

    2012-06-01

    The concept of personalized medicine is not new. It is being discussed with increasing interest in the medical, scientific, and general media because of the availability of advanced scientific and computational technologies, and the promise of the potential to improve the targeting and delivery of novel medicines. It is also being seen as one approach that may have a beneficial impact on reducing health care budgets. But what are the challenges that need to be addressed in its implementation in the clinic? This article poses some provocative questions and suggests some things that need to be considered. PMID:22661132

  2. [PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY AND PERSONALIZED MEDICINE: A PARADIGM SHIFT IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF NEW DRUGS].

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J

    2015-01-01

    The cost of pharmacotherapy is increasing in the health care budget. The pharmaceutical industry is facing the exhaustion of medications that are largely prescribed and have a high profitability (blockbusters). Because of patient heterogeneity, there is a great interindividual variability of the responses to drug therapy. Thus, it is essential to better detect potential to avoid waste of resources resulting from the prescription of expensive drugs to poor responders. The development of personalized medicine, or precision medicine, certainly offers opportunities to the pharmaceutical industry, but also exposes it to new big challenges.

  3. Relationship between Patterns of Personality of Campus Leaders and Scholastic Achievement in Elementary Schools: A Test of Holland's Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Linda Ann

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine student achievement as a function of principal personality and assistant principal personality in an elementary school setting. Student achievement, the dependent variable, was fifth grade campus mean scale scores on the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills test for reading, math, and science. Holland's…

  4. A Comparison of Emotional-Motivational (A-R-D Theory) Personality Characteristics in Learning Disabled, Normal Achieving, and High Achieving Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hufano, Linda D.

    The study examined emotional-motivational personality characteristics of 15 learning disabled, 15 normal achieving, and 15 high achieving students (grades 3-5). The study tested the hypothesis derived from the A-R-D (attitude-reinforcer-discriminative) theory of motivation that learning disabled (LD) children differ from normal and high achieving…

  5. Personalized Cardiovascular Medicine Today: A Food and Drug Administration/Center for Drug Evaluation and Research Perspective.

    PubMed

    Blaus, Alison; Madabushi, Rajanikanth; Pacanowski, Michael; Rose, Martin; Schuck, Robert N; Stockbridge, Norman; Temple, Robert; Unger, Ellis F

    2015-10-13

    Over the past decade, personalized medicine has received considerable attention from researchers, drug developers, and regulatory agencies. Personalized medicine includes identifying patients most likely to benefit and those most likely to experience adverse reactions in response to a drug, and tailoring therapy based on pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamic response, as well. Perhaps most exciting is finding ways to identify likely responders through genetic, proteomic, or other tests, so that only likely responders will be treated. However, less precise methods such as identifying historical, demographic, or other indicators of increased or reduced responsiveness are also important aspects of personalized medicine. The cardiovascular field has not used many genetic or proteomic markers, but has regularly used prognostic variables to identify likely responders. The development of biomarker-based approaches to personalized medicine in cardiovascular disease has been challenging, in part, because most cardiovascular therapies treat acquired syndromes, such as acute coronary syndrome and heart failure, which develop over many decades and represent the end result of several pathophysiological mechanisms. More precise disease classification and greater understanding of individual variations in disease pathology could drive the development of targeted therapeutics. Success in designing clinical trials for personalized medicine will require the selection of patient populations with attributes that can be targeted or that predict outcome, and the use of appropriate enrichment strategies once such attributes are identified. Here, we describe examples of personalized medicine in cardiovascular disease, discuss its impact on clinical trial design, and provide insight into the future of personalized cardiovascular medicine from a regulatory perspective.

  6. Genetic and molecular alterations in pancreatic cancer: Implications for personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yantian; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Zongyou; Xiang, Jianbin; William, Fisher E.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Chen, Changyi

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in human genomics and biotechnologies have profound impacts on medical research and clinical practice. Individual genomic information, including DNA sequences and gene expression profiles, can be used for prediction, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment for many complex diseases. Personalized medicine attempts to tailor medical care to individual patients by incorporating their genomic information. In a case of pancreatic cancer, the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States, alteration in many genes as well as molecular profiles in blood, pancreas tissue, and pancreas juice has recently been discovered to be closely associated with tumorigenesis or prognosis of the cancer. This review aims to summarize recent advances of important genes, proteins, and microRNAs that play a critical role in the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer, and to provide implications for personalized medicine in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24172537

  7. Genetic alterations and personalized medicine in melanoma: progress and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Griewank, Klaus G; Scolyer, Richard A; Thompson, John F; Flaherty, Keith T; Schadendorf, Dirk; Murali, Rajmohan

    2014-02-01

    High-throughput sequencing technologies are providing new insights into the genetic alterations involved in melanomagenesis. It appears likely that most genetic events important in the pathogenesis of melanoma will be discovered over the next few years. Genetic analysis is also increasingly being used to direct patient care. In parallel with the discovery of new genes and the elucidation of molecular pathways important in the development of melanoma, therapies targeting these pathways are becoming available. In other words, the age of personalized medicine has arrived, characterized by molecular profiling of melanoma to identify the relevant genetic alterations and the abnormal signaling mechanisms involved, followed by selection of optimal, individualized therapies. In this review, we summarize the key genetic alterations in melanoma and the development of targeted agents against melanomas bearing specific mutations. These developments in melanoma serve as a model for the implementation of personalized medicine for patients with all cancers.

  8. Personalized medicine: myth or reality? The position of Russian clinical pharmacologists

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A personalized medicine, a recent trend of clinical pharmacology, makes possible the individual approach to the choice of the drugs and their dosage. According to the results of a study of the activity of different biomarkers, particularly the isoenzymes of the cytochrome P-450, they provide the efficiency and safety of the pharmacotherapy. The activity of the isoenzymes of the cytochrome P-450 determines an individual pharmacological response and depends on many factors, including genetic ones. The biomarkers of the activity of the isoenzymes of the cytochrome P-450 should be tested in the clinical practice settings using the simple and cheap methods, one of the most available is an immunofluorescent assay. The skilled staff and the centers of personalized medicine are necessary for this approach. PMID:23663439

  9. Translating genetic discoveries to improvements in cardiovascular care: the path to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jennifer L

    2008-03-01

    Research and development has provided us with several solutions to reduce morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular disease. More solutions are anticipated in the areas of clinical medicine, personal handheld devices, and DNA technology that will continue to enhance the era of personalized medicine. Genome-wide association studies have recently identified genetic variants on chromosome 9 (interval 9p21) and chromosome 4 (4q25) that confer increased risk for myocardial infarction and atrial fibrillation, respectively. The regions on these chromosomes containing the SNPs associated with disease contain no known genes - creating a challenge for scientists. Unraveling the code on these chromosomes may reveal a deeper insight into the mechanisms underlying disease and the design of new therapeutics to prevent or slow the progression of the disease. PMID:20559956

  10. Consumer familiarity, perspectives and expected value of personalized medicine with a focus on applications in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Garfeld, Susan; Douglas, Michael P; MacDonald, Karen V; Marshall, Deborah A; Phillips, Kathryn A

    2015-01-01

    Aims Knowledge of consumer perspectives of personalized medicine (PM) is limited. Our study assessed consumer perspectives of PM, with a focus on oncology care, to inform industry, clinician and payer stakeholders' programs and policy. Materials & Methods A nationally representative survey of 602 US consumers' ≥30 years old explored familiarity, perspectives and expected value of PM. Results Most (73%) respondents have not heard of ‘personalized medicine,’ though after understanding the term most (95%) expect PM to have a positive beneft. Consumer's willingness to pay is associated with products' impact on survival, rather than predicting disease risk. If testing indicates consumers are not candidates for oncology therapies, most (84%) would seek a second opinion or want therapy anyway. Conclusions Understanding heterogeneity in consumer perspectives of PM can inform program and policy development. PMID:25620993

  11. [OMICS AND BIG DATA, MAJOR ADVANCES TOWARDS PERSONALIZED MEDICINE OF THE FUTURE?].

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J

    2015-01-01

    The increasing interest for personalized medicine evolves together with two major technological advances. First, the new-generation, rapid and less expensive, DNA sequencing method, combined with remarkable progresses in molecular biology leading to the post-genomic era (transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics). Second, the refinement of computing tools (IT), which allows the immediate analysis of a huge amount of data (especially, those resulting from the omics approaches) and, thus, creates a new universe for medical research, that of analyzed by computerized modelling. This article for scientific communication and popularization briefly describes the main advances in these two fields of interest. These technological progresses are combined with those occurring in communication, which makes possible the development of artificial intelligence. These major advances will most probably represent the grounds of the future personalized medicine.

  12. [OMICS AND BIG DATA, MAJOR ADVANCES TOWARDS PERSONALIZED MEDICINE OF THE FUTURE?].

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J

    2015-01-01

    The increasing interest for personalized medicine evolves together with two major technological advances. First, the new-generation, rapid and less expensive, DNA sequencing method, combined with remarkable progresses in molecular biology leading to the post-genomic era (transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics). Second, the refinement of computing tools (IT), which allows the immediate analysis of a huge amount of data (especially, those resulting from the omics approaches) and, thus, creates a new universe for medical research, that of analyzed by computerized modelling. This article for scientific communication and popularization briefly describes the main advances in these two fields of interest. These technological progresses are combined with those occurring in communication, which makes possible the development of artificial intelligence. These major advances will most probably represent the grounds of the future personalized medicine. PMID:26285450

  13. [Individualized, personalized and stratified medicine: a challenge for allergology in ENT?].

    PubMed

    Chaker, Adam M; Klimek, L

    2015-05-01

    Individualized, personalized or stratified medicine approaches offer emerging opportunities in the field of allergy and ENT. Avoidance of side effects, targeted therapy approaches and stratified prevention promise better outcomes and optimal results for patients. Conceptual incongruencies remain with regard to definitions and perceptions of "personalized medicine". Serious ethical considerations have to be taken into account. The development of pharmacogenomics, molecular phenotyping, genomic sequencing and other -omics opens the door to unique mechanistic therapeutic advances. The molecular allergology and recombinant diagnostics available are tools that offer substantial improved diagnostics for the benefit of allergic patients, e. g. in anaphylaxis and food allergy. For stratified therapeutic approaches, however, regulatory affairs will have to keep pace with medical and scientific discovery.

  14. Towards a global IT system for personalized medicine: the Medicine Safety Code initiative.

    PubMed

    Samwald, Matthias; Minarro-Giménez, José Antonio; Blagec, Kathrin; Adlassnig, Klaus-Peter

    2014-01-01

    The availability of pharmacogenomic data of individual patients can significantly improve physicians' prescribing behavior, lead to a reduced incidence of adverse drug events and an improvement of effectiveness of treatment. The Medicine Safety Code (MSC) initiative is an effort to improve the ability of clinicians and patients to share pharmacogenomic data and to use it at the point of care. The MSC is a standardized two-dimensional barcode that captures individual pharmacogenomic data. The system is backed by a web service that allows the decoding and interpretation of anonymous MSCs without requiring the installation of dedicated software. The system is based on a curated, ontology-based knowledge base representing pharmacogenomic definitions and clinical guidelines. The MSC system performed well in preliminary tests. To evaluate the system in realistic health care settings and to translate it into practical applications, the future participation of stakeholders in clinical institutions, medical researchers, pharmaceutical companies, genetic testing providers, health IT companies and health insurance organizations will be essential.

  15. Top Three Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine Applications at the Nexus of Renal Pathophysiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Bochud, Murielle; Burnier, Michel; Guessous, Idris

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacogenomics is a field with origins in the study of monogenic variations in drug metabolism in the 1950s. Perhaps because of these historical underpinnings, there has been an intensive investigation of 'hepatic pharmacogenes' such as CYP450s and liver drug metabolism using pharmacogenomics approaches over the past five decades. Surprisingly, kidney pathophysiology, attendant diseases and treatment outcomes have been vastly under-studied and under-theorized despite their central importance in maintenance of health, susceptibility to disease and rational personalized therapeutics. Indeed, chronic kidney disease (CKD) represents an increasing public health burden worldwide, both in developed and developing countries. Patients with CKD suffer from high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, which is mainly attributable to cardiovascular events before reaching end-stage renal disease. In this paper, we focus our analyses on renal function before end-stage renal disease, as seen through the lens of pharmacogenomics and human genomic variation. We herein synthesize the recent evidence linking selected Very Important Pharmacogenes (VIP) to renal function, blood pressure and salt-sensitivity in humans, and ways in which these insights might inform rational personalized therapeutics. Notably, we highlight and present the rationale for three applications that we consider as important and actionable therapeutic and preventive focus areas in renal pharmacogenomics: 1) ACE inhibitors, as a confirmed application, 2) VDR agonists, as a promising application, and 3) moderate dietary salt intake, as a suggested novel application. Additionally, we emphasize the putative contributions of gene-environment interactions, discuss the implications of these findings to treat and prevent hypertension and CKD. Finally, we conclude with a strategic agenda and vision required to accelerate advances in this under-studied field of renal pharmacogenomics with vast significance for global

  16. From Metabonomics to Pharmacometabonomics: The Role of Metabolic Profiling in Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Everett, Jeremy R

    2016-01-01

    Variable patient responses to drugs are a key issue for medicine and for drug discovery and development. Personalized medicine, that is the selection of medicines for subgroups of patients so as to maximize drug efficacy and minimize toxicity, is a key goal of twenty-first century healthcare. Currently, most personalized medicine paradigms rely on clinical judgment based on the patient's history, and on the analysis of the patients' genome to predict drug effects i.e., pharmacogenomics. However, variability in patient responses to drugs is dependent upon many environmental factors to which human genomics is essentially blind. A new paradigm for predicting drug responses based on individual pre-dose metabolite profiles has emerged in the past decade: pharmacometabonomics, which is defined as "the prediction of the outcome (for example, efficacy or toxicity) of a drug or xenobiotic intervention in an individual based on a mathematical model of pre-intervention metabolite signatures." The new pharmacometabonomics paradigm is complementary to pharmacogenomics but has the advantage of being sensitive to environmental as well as genomic factors. This review will chart the discovery and development of pharmacometabonomics, and provide examples of its current utility and possible future developments. PMID:27660611

  17. From Metabonomics to Pharmacometabonomics: The Role of Metabolic Profiling in Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Everett, Jeremy R.

    2016-01-01

    Variable patient responses to drugs are a key issue for medicine and for drug discovery and development. Personalized medicine, that is the selection of medicines for subgroups of patients so as to maximize drug efficacy and minimize toxicity, is a key goal of twenty-first century healthcare. Currently, most personalized medicine paradigms rely on clinical judgment based on the patient's history, and on the analysis of the patients' genome to predict drug effects i.e., pharmacogenomics. However, variability in patient responses to drugs is dependent upon many environmental factors to which human genomics is essentially blind. A new paradigm for predicting drug responses based on individual pre-dose metabolite profiles has emerged in the past decade: pharmacometabonomics, which is defined as “the prediction of the outcome (for example, efficacy or toxicity) of a drug or xenobiotic intervention in an individual based on a mathematical model of pre-intervention metabolite signatures.” The new pharmacometabonomics paradigm is complementary to pharmacogenomics but has the advantage of being sensitive to environmental as well as genomic factors. This review will chart the discovery and development of pharmacometabonomics, and provide examples of its current utility and possible future developments. PMID:27660611

  18. From Metabonomics to Pharmacometabonomics: The Role of Metabolic Profiling in Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Everett, Jeremy R.

    2016-01-01

    Variable patient responses to drugs are a key issue for medicine and for drug discovery and development. Personalized medicine, that is the selection of medicines for subgroups of patients so as to maximize drug efficacy and minimize toxicity, is a key goal of twenty-first century healthcare. Currently, most personalized medicine paradigms rely on clinical judgment based on the patient's history, and on the analysis of the patients' genome to predict drug effects i.e., pharmacogenomics. However, variability in patient responses to drugs is dependent upon many environmental factors to which human genomics is essentially blind. A new paradigm for predicting drug responses based on individual pre-dose metabolite profiles has emerged in the past decade: pharmacometabonomics, which is defined as “the prediction of the outcome (for example, efficacy or toxicity) of a drug or xenobiotic intervention in an individual based on a mathematical model of pre-intervention metabolite signatures.” The new pharmacometabonomics paradigm is complementary to pharmacogenomics but has the advantage of being sensitive to environmental as well as genomic factors. This review will chart the discovery and development of pharmacometabonomics, and provide examples of its current utility and possible future developments.

  19. Emerging landscape of genomics in the Electronic Health Record for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Ullman-Cullere, Mollie H; Mathew, Jomol P

    2011-05-01

    The Information Technology (IT) roadmap for personalized medicine requires Electronic Health Records (EHRs), extension of Healthcare IT (HIT) standards, and understanding of how genetics/genomics should be integrated into the clinical applications. For reduced overall costs and development times, these three initiatives should run in parallel. EHRs must contain structured data and infrastructure that enables quality analysis, Clinical Decision Support (CDS) and messaging within the healthcare information network. Fortunately, as a result of sustained financial commitment to nongenetic-based healthcare, the industry has HIT data standards and understanding of EHR functionality that improves patient safety and outcomes while reducing overall healthcare costs. However, the HIT standards and EHR functional requirements, needed for personalized medicine, are only beginning to support simple genetic tests and need significant extension. In addition, our understanding of the clinical implications of genomic data is evolving and translation of new discovery into clinical care remains a challenge. Therefore, priority areas include CDS, educational resources, and knowledgebases for the EHR, clinical and research data warehouses, messaging frameworks, and continued review of healthcare policies and regulations supporting personalized medicine. Where core infrastructure remains to be developed and implemented, funding is needed for pilot projects, data standards, policy, and stakeholder collaboration. PMID:21309042

  20. Tissue Banking, Bioinformatics, and Electronic Medical Records: The Front-End Requirements for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Suh, K. Stephen; Sarojini, Sreeja; Youssif, Maher; Nalley, Kip; Milinovikj, Natasha; Elloumi, Fathi; Russell, Steven; Pecora, Andrew; Schecter, Elyssa; Goy, Andre

    2013-01-01

    Personalized medicine promises patient-tailored treatments that enhance patient care and decrease overall treatment costs by focusing on genetics and “-omics” data obtained from patient biospecimens and records to guide therapy choices that generate good clinical outcomes. The approach relies on diagnostic and prognostic use of novel biomarkers discovered through combinations of tissue banking, bioinformatics, and electronic medical records (EMRs). The analytical power of bioinformatic platforms combined with patient clinical data from EMRs can reveal potential biomarkers and clinical phenotypes that allow researchers to develop experimental strategies using selected patient biospecimens stored in tissue banks. For cancer, high-quality biospecimens collected at diagnosis, first relapse, and various treatment stages provide crucial resources for study designs. To enlarge biospecimen collections, patient education regarding the value of specimen donation is vital. One approach for increasing consent is to offer publically available illustrations and game-like engagements demonstrating how wider sample availability facilitates development of novel therapies. The critical value of tissue bank samples, bioinformatics, and EMR in the early stages of the biomarker discovery process for personalized medicine is often overlooked. The data obtained also require cross-disciplinary collaborations to translate experimental results into clinical practice and diagnostic and prognostic use in personalized medicine. PMID:23818899

  1. The impact of companion diagnostic device measurement performance on clinical validation of personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Li, Meijuan; Yu, Tinghui; Hu, Yun-Fu

    2015-06-30

    A key component of personalized medicine is companion diagnostics that measure biomarkers, for example, protein expression, gene amplification or specific mutations. Most of the recent attention concerning molecular cancer diagnostics has been focused on the biomarkers of response to therapy, such as V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutations in metastatic colorectal cancer, epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in metastatic malignant melanoma. The presence or absence of these markers is directly linked to the response rates of particular targeted therapies with small-molecule kinase inhibitors or antibodies. Therefore, testing for these markers has become a critical step in the target therapy of the aforementioned tumors. The core capability of personalized medicine is the companion diagnostic devices' (CDx) ability to accurately and precisely stratify patients by their likelihood of benefit (or harm) from a particular therapy. There is no reference in the literature discussing the impact of device's measurement performance, for example, analytical accuracy and precision on treatment effects, variances, and sample sizes of clinical trial for the personalized medicine. In this paper, using both analytical and estimation method, we assessed the impact of CDx measurement performance as a function of positive and negative predictive values and imprecision (standard deviation) on treatment effects, variances of clinical outcome, and sample sizes for the clinical trials. PMID:25779099

  2. Asthma pharmacogenetics and the development of genetic profiles for personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Victor E; Meyers, Deborah A; Bleecker, Eugene R

    2015-01-01

    Human genetics research will be critical to the development of genetic profiles for personalized or precision medicine in asthma. Genetic profiles will consist of gene variants that predict individual disease susceptibility and risk for progression, predict which pharmacologic therapies will result in a maximal therapeutic benefit, and predict whether a therapy will result in an adverse response and should be avoided in a given individual. Pharmacogenetic studies of the glucocorticoid, leukotriene, and β2-adrenergic receptor pathways have focused on candidate genes within these pathways and, in addition to a small number of genome-wide association studies, have identified genetic loci associated with therapeutic responsiveness. This review summarizes these pharmacogenetic discoveries and the future of genetic profiles for personalized medicine in asthma. The benefit of a personalized, tailored approach to health care delivery is needed in the development of expensive biologic drugs directed at a specific biologic pathway. Prior pharmacogenetic discoveries, in combination with additional variants identified in future studies, will form the basis for future genetic profiles for personalized tailored approaches to maximize therapeutic benefit for an individual asthmatic while minimizing the risk for adverse events. PMID:25691813

  3. Personalized medicine approaches for colon cancer driven by genomics and systems biology: OncoTrack

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, David; Ogilvie, Lesley A; Hoyle, Nicholas; Keilholz, Ulrich; Lange, Bodo; Lehrach, Hans

    2014-01-01

    The post-genomic era promises to pave the way to a personalized understanding of disease processes, with technological and analytical advances helping to solve some of the world's health challenges. Despite extraordinary progress in our understanding of cancer pathogenesis, the disease remains one of the world's major medical problems. New therapies and diagnostic procedures to guide their clinical application are urgently required. OncoTrack, a consortium between industry and academia, supported by the Innovative Medicines Initiative, signifies a new era in personalized medicine, which synthesizes current technological advances in omics techniques, systems biology approaches, and mathematical modeling. A truly personalized molecular imprint of the tumor micro-environment and subsequent diagnostic and therapeutic insight is gained, with the ultimate goal of matching the “right” patient to the “right” drug and identifying predictive biomarkers for clinical application. This comprehensive mapping of the colon cancer molecular landscape in tandem with crucial, clinical functional annotation for systems biology analysis provides unprecedented insight and predictive power for colon cancer management. Overall, we show that major biotechnological developments in tandem with changes in clinical thinking have laid the foundations for the OncoTrack approach and the future clinical application of a truly personalized approach to colon cancer theranostics. PMID:25074435

  4. Coverage With Evidence Development and Managed Entry in the Funding of Personalized Medicine: Practical and Ethical Challenges for Oncology.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jan R R; Kerridge, Ian; Lipworth, Wendy

    2015-12-01

    Personalized medicines hold promise for many diseases. However, demonstrating the clinical efficacy and cost effectiveness of these medicines can be difficult. It is essential that decision-making processes for funding new medicines, including personalized medicines, are both robust and fit for purpose. We will argue that randomized trials of personalized medicines should be routinely supplemented with other research methods, such as observational research and single-arm studies, and that managed-entry funding programs, such as coverage with evidence development, may offer a means of providing early access to technologies where there is uncertainty about efficacy, safety, and cost effectiveness. These programs, however, raise a number of practical and ethical challenges that need to be worked through and resolved.

  5. Impact of the US Patent System on the promise of personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Louis M; Sieczkiewicz, Gregory J

    2007-09-01

    The biotechnology revolution promises unfathomable future scientific discovery. One of the potential benefits is the accelerated introduction of new diagnostics and treatments to the general public. The right medication for the right patient is the goal of personalized medicine, which directly benefits from many of biotechnology's biggest and most recent advances. The US patent system rewards innovation in medicine and other arts and sciences by granting innovators, for a period of time, the right to exclude others from using what was invented. One of the purposes of the patent system is to trade that right to exclude, and in its stead obtain the patent holder's obligation to fully and publicly disclose the essence of the innovations so that they can be improved, thus advancing the common welfare. A tension exists between personalized medicine's need for access to and use of scientific advances and the patent system's reward of exclusive use or nonuse to innovators. This tension may result in fewer diagnostic and therapeutic tools brought to the market and generally adopted. The risk seems particularly acute with respect to the diagnostic and therapeutic tools arising from genetic testing that hold specific value for a subset of the population. The judicial system has introduced ethical exceptions that overcome a patent holder's right to exclude; these judicial overrides relate to the provision of certain types of medical procedures and the development of certain types of new drugs, and not, apparently, to the use of diagnostic and therapeutic tools essential to the success of personalized medicine. A serious question exists as to whether legislative action is necessary to increase public access to genetic testing. PMID:18022586

  6. Proteomics of pulmonary hypertension: could personalized profiles lead to personalized medicine?

    PubMed

    Colvin, Kelley L; Yeager, Michael E

    2015-02-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a fatal syndrome that arises from a multifactorial and complex background, is characterized by increased pulmonary vascular resistance and right heart afterload, and often leads to cor pulmonale. Over the past decades, remarkable progress has been made in reducing patient symptoms and delaying the progression of the disease. Unfortunately, PH remains a disease with no cure. The substantial heterogeneity of PH continues to be a major limitation to the development of newer and more efficacious therapies. New advances in our understanding of the biological pathways leading to such a complex pathogenesis will require the identification of the important proteins and protein networks that differ between a healthy lung (or right ventricle) and a remodeled lung in an individual with PH. In this article, we present the case for the increased use of proteomics--the study of proteins and protein networks--as a discovery tool for key proteins and protein networks operational in the PH lung. We review recent applications of proteomics in PH, and summarize the biological pathways identified. Finally, we attempt to presage what the future will bring with regard to proteomics in PH and offer our perspectives on the prospects of developing personalized proteomics and custom-tailored therapies. PMID:25408474

  7. Pharmacogenetics in primary care: the promise of personalized medicine and the reality of racial profiling.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Linda M; Kreiner, Meta J

    2013-03-01

    Many anticipate that expanding knowledge of genetic variations associated with disease risk and medication response will revolutionize clinical medicine, making possible genetically based Personalized Medicine where health care can be tailored to individuals, based on their genome scans. Pharmacogenetics has received especially strong interest, with many pharmaceutical developers avidly working to identify genetic variations associated with individual differences in drug response. While clinical applications of emerging genetic knowledge are becoming increasingly available, genetic tests for drug selection are not as yet widely accessible, and many primary care clinicians are unprepared to interpret genetic information. We conducted interviews with 58 primary care clinicians, exploring how they integrate emerging pharmacogenetic concepts into their practices. We found that in their current practices, pharmacogenetic innovations have not led to individually tailored treatment, but instead have encouraged use of essentialized racial/ethnic identity as a proxy for genetic heritage. Current manifestations of Personalized Medicine appear to be reinforcing entrenched notions of inherent biological differences between racial groups, and promoting the belief that racial profiling in health care is supported by cutting-edge scientific authority. Our findings raise concern for how pharmacogenetic innovations will actually affect diverse populations, and how unbiased treatment can be assured.

  8. [The major achievements of medicine in XX-early XXI centuries and their significance for the near future].

    PubMed

    Lisitsyn, Iu P; Zhuravleva, T V

    2012-01-01

    Among major achievements of medicine in XX-early XXI centuries considered as the most outstanding contribution are the development of theory of system of control of functions of organism and its integrity by I.P. Pavlov and his disciples and followers: the concept of psycho-somatic medicine by Z. Freud and social psychology; the theory of stress and general adaptive syndrome by H. Selye and the discovering of nature of many infectious and parasitic diseases. Then establishment of pathogenic impact of extra-environmental factors, decoding of gene chromosomal structure of organism, development of genetic engineering, effective pharmaceuticals, and techniques of treatment and prevention of various inherent and acquired diseases also can be put into this category. The achievements and discoveries in the area of public health, social medicine and hygiene and development of concept of healthy life-style are discussed too. PMID:23350086

  9. Novel theranostic agents for next-generation personalized medicine: small molecules, nanoparticles, and engineered mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Ryosuke; Aubel, Dominique; Fussenegger, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Modern medicine is currently undergoing a paradigm shift from conventional disease treatments based on the diagnosis of a generalized disease state to a more personalized, customized treatment model based on molecular-level diagnosis. This uses novel biosensors that can precisely extract disease-related information from complex biological systems. Moreover, with the recent progress in chemical biology, materials science, and synthetic biology, it has become possible to simultaneously conduct diagnosis and targeted therapy (theranostics/theragnosis) by directly connecting the readout of a biosensor to a therapeutic output. These advances pave the way for more advanced and better personalized treatment for intractable diseases with fewer side effects. In this review, we describe recent advances in the development of cutting-edge theranostic agents that contain both diagnostic and therapeutic functions in a single integrated system. By comparing the advantages and disadvantages of each modality, we discuss the future challenges and prospects of developing ideal theranostic agents for the next generation of personalized medicine.

  10. The timeless influence of Hippocratic ideals on diet, salicytates and personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Karagiannis, Tom C

    2014-01-01

    At a time when superstition and deities were thought to be responsible for health and disease, Hippocrates of Kos emerged as a rational thinker assigning disease to natural causes. His insights, which principally arose from what may be considered almost compulsive examination and comparison, formed the basis of Hippocratic Medicine. There are still unresolved questions regarding the authenticity of the approximately 70 works shaping the Hippocratic Corpus. Assigning authorship precisely presents difficulties and given that the various treatises in the collection appear to span a period of between 100 and 300 years, it is clear that they may not be ascribed to a single author. Ancient commentaries, including translation and annotation by the Hellenic physician Galen and more recently by Emile Littré have helped preserve and structure our knowledge of Hippocratic ideals. Further, a large school of contemporary scholars are constantly refining our understanding. Despite the controversies and uncertainties, the underlying themes of Hippocrates' influence on medicine which involve meticulous observation, comparison, prognosis and prediction are evident. Importantly, the Hippocratic Oath remains a masterpiece of medical morals and ethics, analogous forms of which are still used today. Indeed, the Hippocratic Corpus teaches timeless concepts which do not only relate to medical thought and methodology but also to the more gentle aspects of the art. In this essay Hippocratic observations are considered in relation to three important matters preoccupying modern medicine: a) nutrition, b) drug development and c) personalized medicine. PMID:24563873

  11. Intrinsic Advance Primers: An Investigation of the Effects of Personalized Extraneous Multimedia upon Intrinsic Interest and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Matthew Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if the delivery of personalized extraneous multimedia (PEM) messages prior to the delivery of the primary instructional materials could prime intrinsic interest and have a positive impact upon achievement in comparison to the use of non-personalized extraneous multimedia (NPEM). Extraneous materials are…

  12. The Role of Personal Best (PB) and Dichotomous Achievement Goals in Students' Academic Motivation and Engagement: A Longitudinal Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Andrew J.; Elliot, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the role of prior personal best goals in predicting subsequent academic motivation and engagement. A total of 1160 high school students participated in a longitudinal survey study exploring the extent to which personal best and mastery and performance (dichotomous) achievement goals predict students' academic motivation and…

  13. Broad and Narrow Personality Traits Predicting Academic Achievement over Compulsory Schooling: A Cross-Sectional Study in Two Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zupancic, Maja; Kavcic, Tina; Slobodskaya, Helena R.; Akhmetova, Olga A.

    2016-01-01

    Incremental predictive value of 5 broad and 13 narrow personality traits for academic achievement over and beyond age, gender, parental education, and country was examined in Russian and Slovene 8- to 15-year-olds. Personality data were collected from mothers (Russia: N = 994, Slovenia: N = 624) and adolescents (Russia: N = 481, Slovenia: N = 310)…

  14. THE RELATIONSHIP OF SELECTED PERSONALITY NEEDS TO PARTICIPATION, DROP-OUT, AND ACHIEVEMENT AMONG ADULT LEARNERS (PH.D. THESIS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SCHARLES, HENRY G., JR.

    TO RELATE PERSONALITY NEEDS TO DROPOUT AND ACHIEVEMENT AMONG ADULT LEARNERS, A SAMPLE OF 90 MALES AND 50 FEMALES WAS RANDOMLY DRAWN FROM THE 600 REGISTRANTS IN THE HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA, ADULT EVENING HIGH SCHOOL DURING THE FIRST WEEK OF CLASSES. THE EDWARDS PERSONAL PREFERENCE SCHEDULE WAS ADMINISTERED TO THE SAMPLE, AND THE DATA WAS…

  15. Cancer Subclonal Genetic Architecture as a Key to Personalized Medicine1

    PubMed Central

    Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2013-01-01

    The future of personalized oncological therapy will likely rely on evidence-based medicine to integrate all of the available evidence to delineate the most efficacious treatment option for the patient. To undertake evidence-based medicine through use of targeted therapy regimens, identification of the specific underlying causative mutation(s) driving growth and progression of a patient's tumor is imperative. Although molecular subtyping is important for planning and treatment, intraclonal genetic diversity has been recently highlighted as having significant implications for biopsy-based prognosis. Overall, delineation of the clonal architecture of a patient's cancer and how this will impact on the selection of the most efficacious therapy remain a topic of intense interest. PMID:24403863

  16. Special Review: Caught in the Crosshairs: Targeted Drugs and Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Bibiana I; Hill, Richard; Link, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    All drugs have molecular targets; however, this does not mean that they are targeted therapeutics. Only by the interaction with a disease-specific molecule can the drug be classified as a targeted therapeutic. This is often not clearly defined and might refer to several different therapeutic modalities such as genomically targeted therapy, immune checkpoint therapy, or pharmacokinetic targeting. To develop a precise concept of targeted therapy, it is crucial to understand how drugs were discovered and how our rapidly expanding knowledge concerning disease mechanism is driving a fundamental conceptual change in modern drug discovery and development. In combination with the increasingly detailed analysis of disease at an individual patient level, we believe that it is very timely to consider the past and current approaches involved in the development of new medicines and to discuss the paradigm shift in and basic concepts associated with targeted therapies and personalized medicine. PMID:26588674

  17. PART of the WHOLE: A Case Study in Wellness-Oriented Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Greg; Marigorta, Urko M.; Ojagbeghru, Elohor R.; Park, Subin

    2015-01-01

    We describe the Wellness and Health Omics Linked to the Environment (WHOLE) personalized medicine profile for a 50-year-old Caucasian male living in Atlanta, Georgia. Based on the principle that genomic medicine will be most effective when presented in the context of an individual’s clinical and lifestyle data, we propose the use of a “risk radar” that summarizes health risks in eight domains. Rather than providing overwhelming lists of potentially deleterious genetic variants, we argue that profiles should be palatable, actionable, reproducible, and teachable: the PART principle. Genetic risk scores for this individual are strikingly concordant for his height, body mass index (BMI), waist hip ration (WHR), and cholesterol, and blood transcriptome data agrees with and complements his complete blood counts. Despite enjoying currently good health, his risk radar highlights metabolic disease as his major health concern. PMID:26604864

  18. Bioinformatics Workflow for Clinical Whole Genome Sequencing at Partners HealthCare Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ellen A.; Shakbatyan, Rimma; Evans, Jason; Rossetti, Peter; Graham, Chet; Sharma, Himanshu; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Lebo, Matthew S.

    2016-01-01

    Effective implementation of precision medicine will be enhanced by a thorough understanding of each patient’s genetic composition to better treat his or her presenting symptoms or mitigate the onset of disease. This ideally includes the sequence information of a complete genome for each individual. At Partners HealthCare Personalized Medicine, we have developed a clinical process for whole genome sequencing (WGS) with application in both healthy individuals and those with disease. In this manuscript, we will describe our bioinformatics strategy to efficiently process and deliver genomic data to geneticists for clinical interpretation. We describe the handling of data from FASTQ to the final variant list for clinical review for the final report. We will also discuss our methodology for validating this workflow and the cost implications of running WGS. PMID:26927186

  19. Bioinformatics Workflow for Clinical Whole Genome Sequencing at Partners HealthCare Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ellen A; Shakbatyan, Rimma; Evans, Jason; Rossetti, Peter; Graham, Chet; Sharma, Himanshu; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Lebo, Matthew S

    2016-01-01

    Effective implementation of precision medicine will be enhanced by a thorough understanding of each patient's genetic composition to better treat his or her presenting symptoms or mitigate the onset of disease. This ideally includes the sequence information of a complete genome for each individual. At Partners HealthCare Personalized Medicine, we have developed a clinical process for whole genome sequencing (WGS) with application in both healthy individuals and those with disease. In this manuscript, we will describe our bioinformatics strategy to efficiently process and deliver genomic data to geneticists for clinical interpretation. We describe the handling of data from FASTQ to the final variant list for clinical review for the final report. We will also discuss our methodology for validating this workflow and the cost implications of running WGS. PMID:26927186

  20. The relationship between parenting types and older adolescents' personality, academic achievement, adjustment, and substance use.

    PubMed

    Weiss, L H; Schwarz, J C

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine Baumrind's T3 conceptual framework using a multiple informant design and an older adolescent population. With 178 college students and their families as participants, the present study found many of the predicted relations between parents' child-rearing style (Authoritative, Democratic, Nondirective, Nonauthoritarian-Directive, Authoritarian-Directive, and Unengaged) and their adolescent children's behavior in the 4 domains assessed: personality, adjustment, academic achievement, and substance use. The differences between parenting types on the criterion measures were not as large as reported in Baumrind's study, and significant effects were predominantly due to the poor scores from children with Unengaged and Authoritarian-Directive parents. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for the Authoritative parenting type, the utility of using a typology, and areas for future research.

  1. Use of indigenous and indigenised medicines to enhance personal well-being: a South African case study.

    PubMed

    Cocks, Michelle; Møller, Valerie

    2002-02-01

    An estimated 27 million South Africans use indigenous medicines (Mander, 1997, Medicinal plant marketing and strategies for sustaining the plant supply in the Bushbuckridge area and Mpumalanga Province. Institute for Natural Resources, University of Natal. Pietermaritzburg, South Africa). Although herbal remedies are freely available in amayeza stores, or Xhosa chemists, for self-medication, little is known about the motivations of consumers. According to African belief systems, good health is holistic and extends to the person's social environment. The paper makes a distinction between traditional medicines which are used to enhance personal well-being generally and for cultural purposes, on the one hand, and medicines used to treat physical conditions only, on the other. Drawing on an eight-month study of Xhosa chemists in Eastern Cape Province, South Africa, in 1996, the paper identifies 90 medicines in stock which are used to enhance personal well-being. Just under one-third of all purchases were of medicines to enhance well-being. Remedies particularly popular included medicines believed to ward off evil spirits and bring good luck. The protection of infants with medicines which repel evil spirits is a common practice. Consumer behaviours indicate that the range of medicines available is increased by indigenisation of manufactured traditional medicines and cross-cultural borrowing. Case studies confirm that self- and infant medication with indigenous remedies augmented by indigenised medicines plays an important role in primary health care by allaying the fears and anxieties of everyday life within the Xhosa belief system. thereby promoting personal well-being. PMID:11824915

  2. Strategies to overcome clinical, regulatory, and financial challenges in the implementation of personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Tsimberidou, Apostolia M; Ringborg, Ulrik; Schilsky, Richard L

    2013-01-01

    This article highlights major developments over the last decade in personalized medicine in cancer. Emerging data from clinical studies demonstrate that the use of targeted agents in patients with targetable molecular aberrations improves clinical outcomes. Despite a surge of studies, however, significant gaps in knowledge remain, especially in identifying driver molecular aberrations in patients with multiple aberrations, understanding molecular networks that control carcinogenesis and metastasis, and most importantly, discovering effective targeted agents. Implementation of personalized medicine requires continued scientific and technological breakthroughs; standardization of tumor tissue acquisition and molecular testing; changes in oncology practice and regulatory standards for drug and device access and approval; modification of reimbursement policies by health care payers; and innovative ways to collect and analyze electronic patient information that are linked to prospective clinical registries and rapid learning systems. Informatics systems that integrate clinical, laboratory, radiologic, molecular, and economic data will improve clinical care and will provide infrastructure to enable clinical research. The initiative of the EurocanPlatform aims to overcome the challenges of implementing personalized medicine in Europe by sharing patients, biologic materials, and technological resources across borders. The EurocanPlatform establishes a complete translational cancer research program covering the drug development process and strengthening collaborations among academic centers, pharmaceutical companies, regulatory authorities, health technology assessment organizations, and health care systems. The CancerLinQ rapid learning system being developed by ASCO has the potential to revolutionize how all stakeholders in the cancer community assemble and use information obtained from patients treated in real-world settings to guide clinical practice, regulatory

  3. Getting Personal: Head and Neck Cancer Management in the Era of Genomic Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Birkeland, Andrew C.; Uhlmann, Wendy R.; Brenner, J. Chad; Shuman, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Genetic testing is rapidly becoming an important tool in the management of patients with head and neck cancer. As we enter the era of genomics and personalized medicine, providers should be aware of testing options, counseling resources, and the benefits, limitations and future of personalized therapy. Methods This manuscript offers a primer to assist clinicians treating patients in anticipating and managing the inherent practical and ethical challenges of cancer care in the genomic era. Results Clinical applications of genomics for head and neck cancer are emerging. We discuss the indications for genetic testing, types of testing available, implications for care, privacy/disclosure concerns and ethical considerations. Hereditary genetic syndromes associated with head and neck neoplasms are reviewed, and online genetics resources are provided. Conclusions This article summarizes and contextualizes the evolving diagnostic and therapeutic options that impact the care of patients with head and neck cancer in the genomic era. PMID:25995036

  4. Open Access Integrated Therapeutic and Diagnostic Platforms for Personalized Cardiovascular Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gladding, Patrick A.; Cave, Andrew; Zareian, Mehran; Smith, Kevin; Hussan, Jagir; Hunter, Peter; Erogbogbo, Folarin; Aguilar, Zoraida; Martin, David S.; Chan, Eugene; Homer, Margie L.; Shevade, Abhijit V.; Kassemi, Mohammad; Thomas, James D.; Schlegel, Todd T.

    2013-01-01

    It is undeniable that the increasing costs in healthcare are a concern. Although technological advancements have been made in healthcare systems, the return on investment made by governments and payers has been poor. The current model of care is unsustainable and is due for an upgrade. In developed nations, a law of diminishing returns has been noted in population health standards, whilst in the developing world, westernized chronic illnesses, such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease have become emerging problems. The reasons for these trends are complex, multifactorial and not easily reversed. Personalized medicine has the potential to have a significant impact on these issues, but for it to be truly successful, interdisciplinary mass collaboration is required. We propose here a vision for open-access advanced analytics for personalized cardiac diagnostics using imaging, electrocardiography and genomics. PMID:25562653

  5. A Perspective on Implementing a Quantitative Systems Pharmacology Platform for Drug Discovery and the Advancement of Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Stern, Andrew M; Schurdak, Mark E; Bahar, Ivet; Berg, Jeremy M; Taylor, D Lansing

    2016-07-01

    Drug candidates exhibiting well-defined pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles that are otherwise safe often fail to demonstrate proof-of-concept in phase II and III trials. Innovation in drug discovery and development has been identified as a critical need for improving the efficiency of drug discovery, especially through collaborations between academia, government agencies, and industry. To address the innovation challenge, we describe a comprehensive, unbiased, integrated, and iterative quantitative systems pharmacology (QSP)-driven drug discovery and development strategy and platform that we have implemented at the University of Pittsburgh Drug Discovery Institute. Intrinsic to QSP is its integrated use of multiscale experimental and computational methods to identify mechanisms of disease progression and to test predicted therapeutic strategies likely to achieve clinical validation for appropriate subpopulations of patients. The QSP platform can address biological heterogeneity and anticipate the evolution of resistance mechanisms, which are major challenges for drug development. The implementation of this platform is dedicated to gaining an understanding of mechanism(s) of disease progression to enable the identification of novel therapeutic strategies as well as repurposing drugs. The QSP platform will help promote the paradigm shift from reactive population-based medicine to proactive personalized medicine by focusing on the patient as the starting and the end point.

  6. A Perspective on Implementing a Quantitative Systems Pharmacology Platform for Drug Discovery and the Advancement of Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Stern, Andrew M; Schurdak, Mark E; Bahar, Ivet; Berg, Jeremy M; Taylor, D Lansing

    2016-07-01

    Drug candidates exhibiting well-defined pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles that are otherwise safe often fail to demonstrate proof-of-concept in phase II and III trials. Innovation in drug discovery and development has been identified as a critical need for improving the efficiency of drug discovery, especially through collaborations between academia, government agencies, and industry. To address the innovation challenge, we describe a comprehensive, unbiased, integrated, and iterative quantitative systems pharmacology (QSP)-driven drug discovery and development strategy and platform that we have implemented at the University of Pittsburgh Drug Discovery Institute. Intrinsic to QSP is its integrated use of multiscale experimental and computational methods to identify mechanisms of disease progression and to test predicted therapeutic strategies likely to achieve clinical validation for appropriate subpopulations of patients. The QSP platform can address biological heterogeneity and anticipate the evolution of resistance mechanisms, which are major challenges for drug development. The implementation of this platform is dedicated to gaining an understanding of mechanism(s) of disease progression to enable the identification of novel therapeutic strategies as well as repurposing drugs. The QSP platform will help promote the paradigm shift from reactive population-based medicine to proactive personalized medicine by focusing on the patient as the starting and the end point. PMID:26962875

  7. A Perspective on Implementing a Quantitative Systems Pharmacology Platform for Drug Discovery and the Advancement of Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Andrew M.; Schurdak, Mark E.; Bahar, Ivet; Berg, Jeremy M.; Taylor, D. Lansing

    2016-01-01

    Drug candidates exhibiting well-defined pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles that are otherwise safe often fail to demonstrate proof-of-concept in phase II and III trials. Innovation in drug discovery and development has been identified as a critical need for improving the efficiency of drug discovery, especially through collaborations between academia, government agencies, and industry. To address the innovation challenge, we describe a comprehensive, unbiased, integrated, and iterative quantitative systems pharmacology (QSP)–driven drug discovery and development strategy and platform that we have implemented at the University of Pittsburgh Drug Discovery Institute. Intrinsic to QSP is its integrated use of multiscale experimental and computational methods to identify mechanisms of disease progression and to test predicted therapeutic strategies likely to achieve clinical validation for appropriate subpopulations of patients. The QSP platform can address biological heterogeneity and anticipate the evolution of resistance mechanisms, which are major challenges for drug development. The implementation of this platform is dedicated to gaining an understanding of mechanism(s) of disease progression to enable the identification of novel therapeutic strategies as well as repurposing drugs. The QSP platform will help promote the paradigm shift from reactive population-based medicine to proactive personalized medicine by focusing on the patient as the starting and the end point. PMID:26962875

  8. The Relationship between Professional Learning Communities, Personal Teacher Efficacy, and Student Achievement at the High School Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Sherri L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this correlational study was to determine if there was a relationship between professional learning community (PLC), personal teacher efficacy (PTE), and student achievement. The study examined teacher perception of PLC implementation and PET as it related to student achievement at the high school level on the Virginia End-of Course…

  9. Motives Emanating from Personality Associated with Achievement in a Finnish Senior High School: Physical Activity, Curiosity, and Family Motives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froiland, John Mark; Mayor, Päivi; Herlevi, Marjaana

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies indicate that intrinsic motivation predicts academic achievement. However, relatively few have examined various subtypes of intrinsic motivation that predict overall achievement, such as motivation for exercise and physical activity. Based upon the 16 basic desires theory of personality, the current study examined the motives of…

  10. The Achievement Flow Motive as an Element of the Autotelic Personality: Predicting Educational Attainment in Three Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busch, Holger; Hofer, Jan; Chasiotis, Athanasios; Campos, Domingo

    2013-01-01

    Human behavior is directed by an implicit and an explicit motivational system. The intrinsic form of the implicit achievement motive has been demonstrated to predict the experience of flow. Thus, this achievement flow motive can be considered an integral component of the autotelic personality, posited in Flow Theory as dispositional difference in…

  11. Validity of a Configural Interpretation of the Intellectual Screening and Achievement Scales of the Personality Inventory for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Thomas S.; Welsh, M. Cay

    1981-01-01

    The ratings of the Achievement and Intellectual Screening scales of the Personality Inventory for Children (PIC) are compared with scores on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R) and the Wide Range Achievement Test (WRAT) to determine the efficacy of using the PIC as an index of children's performance on such measures.…

  12. [Achievements of the Cracow School of Forensic Medicine--on the 200 the anniversary of the Chair of Forensic Medicine--Part I].

    PubMed

    Marek, Zdzisław

    2006-01-01

    The Chair of Forensic Medicine was established at the Jagiellonian University in 1804. Initially, the Cracow academic institution developed along the similar lines as other Chairs of those times. Considerable progress was made thanks to Professor W. Hechel, who headed the Chair since 1834 and initiated intensive research and didactic activities. His successors, mostly Professors Antoni Bryk and Stanisław Janikowski, extended the Chair, strengthening its importance at the University and in the judicial system. The golden age commenced in 1882, when Professor Leon Blumenstock became Head of the Chair. Other founders of the Cracow School of Forensic Medicine include Professors Leon Wachholz and Jan Olbrycht (1895-1962). It was these two eminent scientists that wrote important textbooks, discovered new methods and helped the Cracow institution to become a significant research center of forensic medicine. Their important achievements include the test for COHb determination in blood of victims of carbon monoxide poisoning (the Wachholz-Sieradzki test), the explanation of death mechanisms involved in violent death by drawning, the development of protocols for opinionating and event reconstruction in cases of violent death by poisoning and mechanical injuries, and the widely accepted theory and medicolegal assessment of medical errors. Other outstanding achievements focused on investigations of biological trace evidence, serohematology in determinations of fatherhood, and--what may be the most important--identification of responsibilities and role of an expert in legal proceedings, and many others. The work of several generations of Cracow forensic medicine specialist has culminated in training a cadre of specialists who became heads of the majority of Chairs of Forensic Medicine in Poland, writing numerous textbooks for students, monographs, hundreds of research papers and an enormous number of medico-legal opinions, the participation in almost all major court

  13. Personalized medicine in oncology: where have we come from and where are we going?

    PubMed

    André, Fabrice; Ciccolini, Joseph; Spano, Jean-Philippe; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Mounier, Nicolas; Freyer, Gilles; Blay, Jean-Yves; Milano, Gérard

    2013-06-01

    Current advances in the biology of cancer and emergence of new tools for genome analysis have opened clinical perspectives in oncology, generally termed as 'personalized medicine'. This broad term must encompass previous well-proven strategies, such as pharmacogenetics- and pharmacokinetics-based dosing, with more recently introduced pharmacogenomics approaches, all applied as a means to tailor treatment to a given patient presenting with a given tumor. Despite outstanding results in lung cancer, colorectal cancer and melanoma, only a few predictive biomarkers are currently justified in routine clinical practice. Overall, there is a persistent gap between the growing number of identified deregulated pathways or genetic mutations, both at the tumor and the constitutional levels, and their actual implementation at the bedside as part of clinical routine. This article underlines these limitations and covers several issues that may explain the discrepancy between the plethora of published data about emerging biomarkers, and the relative scarcity of tests eventually reaching a clinically validated application. The main identified difficulties concern invasive and costly prospective biomarker studies and the issue of tumor heterogeneity. Finally, early trial designs for targeted therapies as well as those for conventional cytotoxics may not necessarily address the right questions by skipping critical end points. Proposed solutions point out the use of liquid biopsies and systems biology approaches, for an easier implementation of personalized medicine at the bedside.

  14. Unraveling human complexity and disease with systems biology and personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, Stephen; Chen, Jake Y

    2010-01-01

    We are all perplexed that current medical practice often appears maladroit in curing our individual illnesses or disease. However, as is often the case, a lack of understanding, tools and technologies are the root cause of such situations. Human individuality is an often-quoted term but, in the context of human biology, it is poorly understood. This is compounded when there is a need to consider the variability of human populations. In the case of the former, it is possible to quantify human complexity as determined by the 35,000 genes of the human genome, the 1–10 million proteins (including antibodies) and the 2000–3000 metabolites of the human metabolome. Human variability is much more difficult to assess, since many of the variables, such as the definition of race, are not even clearly agreed on. In order to accommodate human complexity, variability and its influence on health and disease, it is necessary to undertake a systematic approach. In the past decade, the emergence of analytical platforms and bioinformatics tools has led to the development of systems biology. Such an approach offers enormous potential in defining key pathways and networks involved in optimal human health, as well as disease onset, progression and treatment. The tools and technologies now available in systems biology analyses offer exciting opportunities to exploit the emerging areas of personalized medicine. In this article, we discuss the current status of human complexity, and how systems biology and personalized medicine can impact at the individual and population level. PMID:20577569

  15. Empowering Personalized Medicine with Big Data and Semantic Web Technology: Promises, Challenges, and Use Cases

    PubMed Central

    Panahiazar, Maryam; Taslimitehrani, Vahid; Jadhav, Ashutosh; Pathak, Jyotishman

    2015-01-01

    In healthcare, big data tools and technologies have the potential to create significant value by improving outcomes while lowering costs for each individual patient. Diagnostic images, genetic test results and biometric information are increasingly generated and stored in electronic health records presenting us with challenges in data that is by nature high volume, variety and velocity, thereby necessitating novel ways to store, manage and process big data. This presents an urgent need to develop new, scalable and expandable big data infrastructure and analytical methods that can enable healthcare providers access knowledge for the individual patient, yielding better decisions and outcomes. In this paper, we briefly discuss the nature of big data and the role of semantic web and data analysis for generating “smart data” which offer actionable information that supports better decision for personalized medicine. In our view, the biggest challenge is to create a system that makes big data robust and smart for healthcare providers and patients that can lead to more effective clinical decision-making, improved health outcomes, and ultimately, managing the healthcare costs. We highlight some of the challenges in using big data and propose the need for a semantic data-driven environment to address them. We illustrate our vision with practical use cases, and discuss a path for empowering personalized medicine using big data and semantic web technology. PMID:25705726

  16. Infectious Disease Management through Point-of-Care Personalized Medicine Molecular Diagnostic Technologies.

    PubMed

    Bissonnette, Luc; Bergeron, Michel G

    2012-05-02

    Infectious disease management essentially consists in identifying the microbial cause(s) of an infection, initiating if necessary antimicrobial therapy against microbes, and controlling host reactions to infection. In clinical microbiology, the turnaround time of the diagnostic cycle (>24 hours) often leads to unnecessary suffering and deaths; approaches to relieve this burden include rapid diagnostic procedures and more efficient transmission or interpretation of molecular microbiology results. Although rapid nucleic acid-based diagnostic testing has demonstrated that it can impact on the transmission of hospital-acquired infections, we believe that such life-saving procedures should be performed closer to the patient, in dedicated 24/7 laboratories of healthcare institutions, or ideally at point of care. While personalized medicine generally aims at interrogating the genomic information of a patient, drug metabolism polymorphisms, for example, to guide drug choice and dosage, personalized medicine concepts are applicable in infectious diseases for the (rapid) identification of a disease-causing microbe and determination of its antimicrobial resistance profile, to guide an appropriate antimicrobial treatment for the proper management of the patient. The implementation of point-of-care testing for infectious diseases will require acceptance by medical authorities, new technological and communication platforms, as well as reimbursement practices such that time- and life-saving procedures become available to the largest number of patients.

  17. High-Performance Affinity Chromatography: Applications in Drug-Protein Binding Studies and Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Beeram, Sandya R; Bi, Cong; Suresh, D; Zheng, Xiwei; Hage, David S

    2016-01-01

    The binding of drugs with proteins and other agents in serum is of interest in personalized medicine because this process can affect the dosage and action of drugs. The extent of this binding may also vary with a given disease state. These interactions may involve serum proteins, such as human serum albumin or α1-acid glycoprotein, or other agents, such as lipoproteins. High-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) is a tool that has received increasing interest as a means for studying these interactions. This review discusses the general principles of HPAC and the various approaches that have been used in this technique to examine drug-protein binding and in work related to personalized medicine. These approaches include frontal analysis and zonal elution, as well as peak decay analysis, ultrafast affinity extraction, and chromatographic immunoassays. The operation of each method is described and examples of applications for these techniques are provided. The type of information that can be obtained by these methods is also discussed, as related to the analysis of drug-protein binding and the study of clinical or pharmaceutical samples. PMID:26827600

  18. The 3 H and BMSEST Models for Spirituality in Multicultural Whole-Person Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Anandarajah, Gowri

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE The explosion of evidence in the last decade supporting the role of spirituality in whole-person patient care has prompted proposals for a move to a biopsychosocial-spiritual model for health. Making this paradigm shift in today’s multicultural societies poses many challenges, however. This article presents 2 theoretical models that provide common ground for further exploration of the role of spirituality in medicine. METHODS The 3 H model (head, heart, hands) and the BMSEST models (body, mind, spirit, environment, social, transcendent) evolved from the author’s 12-year experience with curricula development regarding spirituality and medicine, 16-year experience as an attending family physician and educator, lived experience with both Hinduism and Christianity since childhood, and a lifetime study of the world’s great spiritual traditions. The models were developed, tested with learners, and refined. RESULTS The 3 H model offers a multidimensional definition of spirituality, applicable across cultures and belief systems, that provides opportunities for a common vocabulary for spirituality. Therapeutic options, from general spiritual care (compassion, presence, and the healing relationship), to specialized spiritual care (eg, by clinical chaplains), to spiritual self-care are discussed. The BMSEST model provides a conceptual framework for the role of spirituality in the larger health care context, useful for patient care, education, and research. Interactions among the 6 BMSEST components, with references to ongoing research, are proposed. CONCLUSIONS Including spirituality in whole-person care is a way of furthering our understanding of the complexities of human health and well-being. The 3 H and BMSEST models suggest a multidimensional and multidisciplinary approach based on universal concepts and a foundation in both the art and science of medicine. PMID:18779550

  19. Personalized medicine and the role of health economics and outcomes research: issues, applications, emerging trends, and future research.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, John C

    2013-01-01

    The decade since the completion of the sequencing of the human genome has witnessed significant advances in the incorporation of genomic information in diagnostic, treatment, and reimbursement practices. Indeed, as case in point, there are now several dozen commercially available genomic tests routinely applied across a wide range of disease states in predictive or prognostic applications. Moreover, many involved in the advancement of personalized medicine would view emerging approaches to stratify patients in meaningful ways beyond genomic information as a signal of the progress made. Yet despite these advances, there remains a general sense of dissatisfaction about the progress of personalized medicine in terms of its contribution to the drug development process, to the efficiency and effectiveness of health care delivery, and ultimately to the provision of the right treatment to the right patient at the right time. Academicians, payers, and manufacturers alike are struggling not only with how to embed the new insights that personalized medicine promises but also with the fundamental issues of application in early drug development, implications for health technology assessment, new demands on traditional health economic and outcomes research methods, and implications for reimbursement and access. In fact, seemingly prosaic issues such as the definition and composition of the term "personalized medicine" are still unresolved. Regardless of these issues, practitioners are increasingly compelled to find practical solutions to the challenges and opportunities presented by the evolving face of personalized medicine today. Accordingly, the articles comprising this Special Issue offer applied perspectives geared toward professionals and policymakers in the field grappling with developing, assessing, implementing, and reimbursing personalized medicine approaches. Starting with a framework with which to characterize personalized medicine, this Special Issue proceeds to

  20. Personalized medicine and the role of health economics and outcomes research: issues, applications, emerging trends, and future research.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, John C

    2013-01-01

    The decade since the completion of the sequencing of the human genome has witnessed significant advances in the incorporation of genomic information in diagnostic, treatment, and reimbursement practices. Indeed, as case in point, there are now several dozen commercially available genomic tests routinely applied across a wide range of disease states in predictive or prognostic applications. Moreover, many involved in the advancement of personalized medicine would view emerging approaches to stratify patients in meaningful ways beyond genomic information as a signal of the progress made. Yet despite these advances, there remains a general sense of dissatisfaction about the progress of personalized medicine in terms of its contribution to the drug development process, to the efficiency and effectiveness of health care delivery, and ultimately to the provision of the right treatment to the right patient at the right time. Academicians, payers, and manufacturers alike are struggling not only with how to embed the new insights that personalized medicine promises but also with the fundamental issues of application in early drug development, implications for health technology assessment, new demands on traditional health economic and outcomes research methods, and implications for reimbursement and access. In fact, seemingly prosaic issues such as the definition and composition of the term "personalized medicine" are still unresolved. Regardless of these issues, practitioners are increasingly compelled to find practical solutions to the challenges and opportunities presented by the evolving face of personalized medicine today. Accordingly, the articles comprising this Special Issue offer applied perspectives geared toward professionals and policymakers in the field grappling with developing, assessing, implementing, and reimbursing personalized medicine approaches. Starting with a framework with which to characterize personalized medicine, this Special Issue proceeds to

  1. Regulation, reimbursement, and the long road of implementation of personalized medicine--a perspective from the United States.

    PubMed

    Frueh, Felix W

    2013-01-01

    There is undisputed evidence that personalized medicine, that is, a more precise assessment of which medical intervention might best serve an individual patient on the basis of novel technology, such as molecular profiling, can have a significant impact on clinical outcomes. The field, however, is still new, and the demonstration of improved effectiveness compared with standard of care comes at a cost. How can we be sure that personalized medicine indeed provides a measurable clinical benefit, that we will be able to afford it, and that we can provide adequate access? The risk-benefit evaluation that accompanies each medical decision requires not only good clinical data but also an assessment of cost and infrastructure needed to provide access to technology. Several examples from the last decade illustrate which types of personalized medicines and diagnostic tests are easily being taken up in clinical practice and which types are more difficult to introduce. And as regulators and payers in the United States and elsewhere are taking on personalized medicine, an interesting convergence can be observed: better, more complete information for both approval and coverage decisions could be gained from a coordination of regulatory and reimbursement questions. Health economics and outcomes research (HEOR) emerges as an approach that can satisfy both needs. Although HEOR represents a well-established approach to demonstrate the effectiveness of interventions in many areas of medical practice, few HEOR studies exist in the field of personalized medicine today. It is reasonable to expect that this will change over the next few years.

  2. Practicing pathology in the era of big data and personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jiang; Taylor, Clive R

    2014-01-01

    The traditional task of the pathologist is to assist physicians in making the correct diagnosis of diseases at the earliest possible stage to effectuate the optimal treatment strategy for each individual patient. In this respect surgical pathology (the traditional tissue diagnosis) is but a tool. It is not, of itself, the purpose of pathology practice; and change is in the air. This January 2014 issue of Applied Immunohistochemistry and Molecular Morphology (AIMM) embraces that change by the incorporation of the agenda and content of the journal Diagnostic Molecular Morphology (DMP). Over a decade ago AIMM introduced and promoted the concept of "molecular morphology," and has sought to publish molecular studies that correlate with the morphologic features that continue to define cancer and many diseases. That intent is now reinforced and extended by the merger with DMP, as a logical and timely response to the growing impact of a wide range of genetic and molecular technologies that are beginning to reshape the way in which pathology is practiced. The use of molecular and genomic techniques already demonstrates clear value in the diagnosis of disease, with treatment tailored specifically to individual patients. Personalized medicine is the future, and personalized medicine demands personalized pathology. The need for integration of the flood of new molecular data, with surgical pathology, digital pathology, and the full range of pathology data in the electronic medical record has never been greater. This review describes the possible impact of these pressures upon the discipline of pathology, and examines possible outcomes. There is a sense of excitement and adventure. Active adaption and innovation are required. The new AIMM, incorporating DMP, seeks to position itself for a central role in this process.

  3. Challenges, Solutions, and Quality Metrics of Personal Genome Assembly in Advancing Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Wenming; Wu, Leihong; Yavas, Gokhan; Simonyan, Vahan; Ning, Baitang; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-01-01

    -response, tailoring drug therapy and detecting tumors. We believe the precision medicine would largely benefit from bioinformatics solutions, particularly for personal genome assembly. PMID:27110816

  4. Intellect: a theoretical framework for personality traits related to intellectual achievements.

    PubMed

    Mussel, Patrick

    2013-05-01

    The present article develops a theoretical framework for the structure of personality traits related to intellectual achievements. We postulate a 2-dimensional model, differentiating between 2 processes (Seek and Conquer) and 3 operations (Think, Learn, and Create). The framework was operationalized by a newly developed measure, which was validated based on 2 samples. Subsequently, in 3 studies (overall N = 1,478), the 2-dimensional structure of the Intellect framework was generally supported. Additionally, subdimensions of the Intellect framework specifically predicted conceptually related criteria, including scholastic performance, vocational interest, and leisure activities. Furthermore, results from multidimensional scaling and higher order confirmatory factor analyses show that the framework allows for the incorporation of several constructs that have been proposed on different theoretical backgrounds, such as need for cognition, typical intellectual engagement, curiosity, intrinsic motivation, goal orientation, and openness to ideas. It is concluded that based on the Intellect framework, these constructs, which have been researched separately in the literature, can be meaningfully integrated. PMID:23527846

  5. Relationship between Personality Profiles and Suicide Attempt via Medicine Poisoning among Hospitalized Patients: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Shafiee-Kandjani, Ali Reza; Amiri, Shahrokh; Arfaie, Asghar; Ahmadi, Azadeh; Farvareshi, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Inflexible personality traits play an important role in the development of maladaptive behaviors among patients who attempt suicide. This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between personality profiles and suicide attempt via medicine poisoning among the patients hospitalized in a public hospital. Materials and Methods. Fifty-nine patients who attempted suicide for the first time and hospitalized in the poisoning ward were selected as the experimental group. Sixty-three patients hospitalized in the other wards for a variety of reasons were selected as the adjusted control group. Millon Clinical Multiaxial Personality Inventory, 3rd version (MCMI-III) was used to assess the personality profiles. Results. The majority of the suicide attempters were low-level graduates (67.8% versus 47.1%, OR = 2.36). 79.7% of the suicide attempters were suffering from at least one maladaptive personality profile. The most common maladaptive personality profiles among the suicide attempters were depressive personality disorder (40.7%) and histrionic personality disorder (32.2%). Among the syndromes the most common ones were anxiety clinical syndrome (23.7%) and major depression (23.7%). Conclusion. Major depression clinical syndrome, histrionic personality disorder, anxiety clinical syndrome, and depressive personality disorder are among the predicators of first suicide attempts for the patients hospitalized in the public hospital due to the medicine poisoning. PMID:27433491

  6. Prospective Molecular Profiling of Canine Cancers Provides a Clinically Relevant Comparative Model for Evaluating Personalized Medicine (PMed) Trials

    PubMed Central

    Mazcko, Christina; Cherba, David; Hendricks, William; Lana, Susan; Ehrhart, E. J.; Charles, Brad; Fehling, Heather; Kumar, Leena; Vail, David; Henson, Michael; Childress, Michael; Kitchell, Barbara; Kingsley, Christopher; Kim, Seungchan; Neff, Mark; Davis, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecularly-guided trials (i.e. PMed) now seek to aid clinical decision-making by matching cancer targets with therapeutic options. Progress has been hampered by the lack of cancer models that account for individual-to-individual heterogeneity within and across cancer types. Naturally occurring cancers in pet animals are heterogeneous and thus provide an opportunity to answer questions about these PMed strategies and optimize translation to human patients. In order to realize this opportunity, it is now necessary to demonstrate the feasibility of conducting molecularly-guided analysis of tumors from dogs with naturally occurring cancer in a clinically relevant setting. Methodology A proof-of-concept study was conducted by the Comparative Oncology Trials Consortium (COTC) to determine if tumor collection, prospective molecular profiling, and PMed report generation within 1 week was feasible in dogs. Thirty-one dogs with cancers of varying histologies were enrolled. Twenty-four of 31 samples (77%) successfully met all predefined QA/QC criteria and were analyzed via Affymetrix gene expression profiling. A subsequent bioinformatics workflow transformed genomic data into a personalized drug report. Average turnaround from biopsy to report generation was 116 hours (4.8 days). Unsupervised clustering of canine tumor expression data clustered by cancer type, but supervised clustering of tumors based on the personalized drug report clustered by drug class rather than cancer type. Conclusions Collection and turnaround of high quality canine tumor samples, centralized pathology, analyte generation, array hybridization, and bioinformatic analyses matching gene expression to therapeutic options is achievable in a practical clinical window (<1 week). Clustering data show robust signatures by cancer type but also showed patient-to-patient heterogeneity in drug predictions. This lends further support to the inclusion of a heterogeneous population of dogs with cancer

  7. Personalized preventive medicine: genetics and the response to regular exercise in preventive interventions.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Claude; Antunes-Correa, Ligia M; Ashley, Euan A; Franklin, Nina; Hwang, Paul M; Mattsson, C Mikael; Negrao, Carlos E; Phillips, Shane A; Sarzynski, Mark A; Wang, Ping-Yuan; Wheeler, Matthew T

    2015-01-01

    Regular exercise and a physically active lifestyle have favorable effects on health. Several issues related to this theme are addressed in this report. A comment on the requirements of personalized exercise medicine and in-depth biological profiling along with the opportunities that they offer is presented. This is followed by a brief overview of the evidence for the contributions of genetic differences to the ability to benefit from regular exercise. Subsequently, studies showing that mutations in TP53 influence exercise capacity in mice and humans are succinctly described. The evidence for effects of exercise on endothelial function in health and disease also is covered. Finally, changes in cardiac and skeletal muscle in response to exercise and their implications for patients with cardiac disease are summarized. Innovative research strategies are needed to define the molecular mechanisms involved in adaptation to exercise and to translate them into useful clinical and public health applications. PMID:25559061

  8. A Personalized Medicine Approach for Asian Americans with the Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2*2 Variant

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Eric R.; Zambelli, Vanessa O.; Small, Bryce A.; Ferreira, Julio C.B.; Chen, Che-Hong; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2015-01-01

    Asian Americans are one of the fastest-growing populations in the United States. A relatively large subset of this population carries a unique loss-of-function point mutation in aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), ALDH2*2. Found in approximately 560 million people of East Asian descent, ALDH2*2 reduces enzymatic activity by approximately 60% to 80% in heterozygotes. Furthermore, this variant is associated with a higher risk for several diseases affecting many organ systems, including a particularly high incidence relative to the general population of esophageal cancer, myocardial infarction, and osteoporosis. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology associated with the ALDH2*2 variant, describe why this variant needs to be considered when selecting drug treatments, and suggest a personalized medicine approach for Asian American carriers of this variant. We also discuss future clinical and translational perspectives regarding ALDH2*2 research. PMID:25292432

  9. Genomics and epigenomics: new promises of personalized medicine for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Michal-Ruth; Barmeyer, Christian; Timmermann, Bernd

    2013-09-01

    Recent years have brought about a marked extension of our understanding of the somatic basis of cancer. Parallel to the large-scale investigation of diverse tumor genomes the knowledge arose that cancer pathologies are most often not restricted to single genomic events. In contrast, a large number of different alterations in the genomes and epigenomes come together and promote the malignant transformation. The combination of mutations, structural variations and epigenetic alterations differs between each tumor, making individual diagnosis and treatment strategies necessary. This view is summarized in the new discipline of personalized medicine. To satisfy the ideas of this approach each tumor needs to be fully characterized and individual diagnostic and therapeutic strategies designed. Here, we will discuss the power of high-throughput sequencing technologies for genomic and epigenomic analyses. We will provide insight into the current status and how these technologies can be transferred to routine clinical usage.

  10. A New Paradigm for Biospecimen Banking in the Personalized Medicine Era

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Sandra A.; Watson, Mark A.; Rossi, Joan; Becker, Colleen M.; Jaques, David P.; Pfeifer, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Banking of high-quality, appropriately consented human tissue is crucial for the understanding of disease pathogenesis and translation of such knowledge into improvements in patient care. Traditionally, tissue banking has been thought of as primarily an academic research activity, but tissue and biospecimen banking is increasingly assuming clinical importance, especially with the advent of genetic and proteomic testing approaches that rely on fresh or fresh frozen tissue. These approaches are part of the revolution in personalized medicine. This revolution’s impact on biorepositories—their mission and day-to-day function—will be profound. Direct patient care will require structuring tissue procurement to become a routine part of patient care. Accordingly tissue banking will expand from its traditional research role in large academic medical centers into the everyday practice of surgical pathology. Successful implementation of this model will require consideration of several financial, medicolegal, and administrative issues. PMID:22031304

  11. Hybrid 3D printing: a game-changer in personalized cardiac medicine?

    PubMed

    Kurup, Harikrishnan K N; Samuel, Bennett P; Vettukattil, Joseph J

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing in congenital heart disease has the potential to increase procedural efficiency and patient safety by improving interventional and surgical planning and reducing radiation exposure. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography are usually the source datasets to derive 3D printing. More recently, 3D echocardiography has been demonstrated to derive 3D-printed models. The integration of multiple imaging modalities for hybrid 3D printing has also been shown to create accurate printed heart models, which may prove to be beneficial for interventional cardiologists, cardiothoracic surgeons, and as an educational tool. Further advancements in the integration of different imaging modalities into a single platform for hybrid 3D printing and virtual 3D models will drive the future of personalized cardiac medicine.

  12. VARIABLE SELECTION FOR QUALITATIVE INTERACTIONS IN PERSONALIZED MEDICINE WHILE CONTROLLING THE FAMILY-WISE ERROR RATE

    PubMed Central

    Gunter, Lacey; Zhu, Ji; Murphy, Susan

    2012-01-01

    For many years, subset analysis has been a popular topic for the biostatistics and clinical trials literature. In more recent years, the discussion has focused on finding subsets of genomes which play a role in the effect of treatment, often referred to as stratified or personalized medicine. Though highly sought after, methods for detecting subsets with altering treatment effects are limited and lacking in power. In this article we discuss variable selection for qualitative interactions with the aim to discover these critical patient subsets. We propose a new technique designed specifically to find these interaction variables among a large set of variables while still controlling for the number of false discoveries. We compare this new method against standard qualitative interaction tests using simulations and give an example of its use on data from a randomized controlled trial for the treatment of depression. PMID:22023676

  13. The Potential of MicroRNAs in Personalized Medicine against Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Saumet, Anne; Mathelier, Anthony; Lecellier, Charles-Henri

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs orchestrate the expression of the genome and impact many, if not all, cellular processes. Their deregulation is thus often causative of human malignancies, including cancers. Numerous studies have implicated microRNAs in the different steps of tumorigenesis including initiation, progression, metastasis, and resistance to chemo/radiotherapies. Thus, microRNAs constitute appealing targets for novel anticancer therapeutic strategies aimed at restoring their expression or function. As microRNAs are present in a variety of human cancer types, microRNA profiles can be used as tumor-specific signatures to detect various cancers (diagnosis), to predict their outcome (prognosis), and to monitor their treatment (theranosis). In this review, we present the different aspects of microRNA biology that make them remarkable molecules in the emerging field of personalized medicine against cancers and provide several examples of their industrial exploitation. PMID:25243170

  14. Hybrid 3D printing: a game-changer in personalized cardiac medicine?

    PubMed

    Kurup, Harikrishnan K N; Samuel, Bennett P; Vettukattil, Joseph J

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing in congenital heart disease has the potential to increase procedural efficiency and patient safety by improving interventional and surgical planning and reducing radiation exposure. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography are usually the source datasets to derive 3D printing. More recently, 3D echocardiography has been demonstrated to derive 3D-printed models. The integration of multiple imaging modalities for hybrid 3D printing has also been shown to create accurate printed heart models, which may prove to be beneficial for interventional cardiologists, cardiothoracic surgeons, and as an educational tool. Further advancements in the integration of different imaging modalities into a single platform for hybrid 3D printing and virtual 3D models will drive the future of personalized cardiac medicine. PMID:26465262

  15. Research Ethics in the Era of Personalized Medicine: Updating Science's Contract with Society

    PubMed Central

    Meslin, Eric M.; Cho, Mildred K.

    2010-01-01

    With the completed sequence of the human genome has come the prospect of substantially improving the quality of life for millions through personalized medicine approaches. Still, any advances in this direction require research involving human subjects. For decades science and ethics have enjoyed an allegiance reflected in a common set of ethical principles and procedures guiding the conduct of research with human subjects. Some of these principles emphasize avoiding harm over maximizing benefit. In this paper we revisit the priority given to these ethical principles – particularly the principles that support a cautious approach to science – and propose a reframing of the ‘social contract’ between science and society that emphasizes reciprocity and meeting public needs. PMID:20805701

  16. Predictive Modeling of Drug Treatment in the Area of Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ogilvie, Lesley A.; Wierling, Christoph; Kessler, Thomas; Lehrach, Hans; Lange, Bodo M. H.

    2015-01-01

    Despite a growing body of knowledge on the mechanisms underlying the onset and progression of cancer, treatment success rates in oncology are at best modest. Current approaches use statistical methods that fail to embrace the inherent and expansive complexity of the tumor/patient/drug interaction. Computational modeling, in particular mechanistic modeling, has the power to resolve this complexity. Using fundamental knowledge on the interactions occurring between the components of a complex biological system, large-scale in silico models with predictive capabilities can be generated. Here, we describe how mechanistic virtual patient models, based on systematic molecular characterization of patients and their diseases, have the potential to shift the theranostic paradigm for oncology, both in the fields of personalized medicine and targeted drug development. In particular, we highlight the mechanistic modeling platform ModCell™ for individualized prediction of patient responses to treatment, emphasizing modeling techniques and avenues of application. PMID:26692759

  17. Ecological and personal predictors of science achievement in an urban center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidubaldi, John Michael

    This study sought to examine selected personal and environmental factors that predict urban students' achievement test scores on the science subject area of the Ohio standardized test. Variables examined were in the general categories of teacher/classroom, student, and parent/home. It assumed that these clusters might add independent variance to a best predictor model, and that discovering relative strength of different predictors might lead to better selection of intervention strategies to improve student performance. This study was conducted in an urban school district and was comprised of teachers and students enrolled in ninth grade science in three of this district's high schools. Consenting teachers (9), students (196), and parents (196) received written surveys with questions designed to examine the predictive power of each variable cluster. Regression analyses were used to determine which factors best correlate with student scores and classroom science grades. Selected factors were then compiled into a best predictive model, predicting success on standardized science tests. Students t tests of gender and racial subgroups confirmed that there were racial differences in OPT scores, and both gender and racial differences in science grades. Additional examinations were therefore conducted for all 12 variables to determine whether gender and race had an impact on the strength of individual variable predictions and on the final best predictor model. Of the 15 original OPT and cluster variable hypotheses, eight showed significant positive relationships that occurred in the expected direction. However, when more broadly based end-of-the-year science class grade was used as a criterion, 13 of the 15 hypotheses showed significant relationships in the expected direction. With both criteria, significant gender and racial differences were observed in the strength of individual predictors and in the composition of best predictor models.

  18. Personalized Medicine: how to Switch from the Concept to the Integration into the Clinical Development Plan to Obtain Marketing Authorization.

    PubMed

    Becquemont, Laurent; Bordet, Régis; Cellier, Dominic

    2012-01-01

    One of the challenges of the coming years is to personalize medicine in order to provide each patient with an individualized treatment plan. The three objectives of personalized medicine are to refine diagnosis, rationalize treatment and engage patients in a preventive approach. Personalization can be characterized by various descriptors whether related to the field, biology, imaging, type of lesion of the entity to be treated, comorbidity factors, coprescriptions or the environment As part of personalized medicine focused on biological markers including genetics or genomics, the integration of the clinical development plan to obtain marketing authorization may be segmented in 3 stages with a known descriptor identified before clinical development, a known descriptor discovered during clinical development or a known descriptor known after clinical development. For each stage, it is important to clearly define the technical optimization elements, to specify the expectations and objectives, to examine the methodological aspects of each clinical development phase and finally to consider the fast changing regulatory requirements in view of the few registered therapeutics complying with the definition of personalized medicine as well as the significant technological breakthroughs according to the screened and selected biomarkers. These considerations should be integrated in view of the time required for clinical development from early phase to MA, i.e. more than 10 years. Moreover, business models related to the economic environment should be taken into account when deciding whether or not to retain a biomarker allowing the selection of target populations in a general population.

  19. From animal models to human disease: a genetic approach for personalized medicine in ALS.

    PubMed

    Picher-Martel, Vincent; Valdmanis, Paul N; Gould, Peter V; Julien, Jean-Pierre; Dupré, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is the most frequent motor neuron disease in adults. Classical ALS is characterized by the death of upper and lower motor neurons leading to progressive paralysis. Approximately 10 % of ALS patients have familial form of the disease. Numerous different gene mutations have been found in familial cases of ALS, such as mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43), fused in sarcoma (FUS), C9ORF72, ubiquilin-2 (UBQLN2), optineurin (OPTN) and others. Multiple animal models were generated to mimic the disease and to test future treatments. However, no animal model fully replicates the spectrum of phenotypes in the human disease and it is difficult to assess how a therapeutic effect in disease models can predict efficacy in humans. Importantly, the genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of ALS leads to a variety of responses to similar treatment regimens. From this has emerged the concept of personalized medicine (PM), which is a medical scheme that combines study of genetic, environmental and clinical diagnostic testing, including biomarkers, to individualized patient care. In this perspective, we used subgroups of specific ALS-linked gene mutations to go through existing animal models and to provide a comprehensive profile of the differences and similarities between animal models of disease and human disease. Finally, we reviewed application of biomarkers and gene therapies relevant in personalized medicine approach. For instance, this includes viral delivering of antisense oligonucleotide and small interfering RNA in SOD1, TDP-43 and C9orf72 mice models. Promising gene therapies raised possibilities for treating differently the major mutations in familial ALS cases. PMID:27400686

  20. Electrodeless electro-hydrodynamic printing of nano-suspensions for personalized medicines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elele, Ezinwa; Shen, Yueyang; Boppana, Rajyalakshmi; Afolabi, Afolawemi; Bilgili, Ecevit A.; Khusid, Boris

    2012-11-01

    Drop-on-demand (DOD) dosing is a promising strategy for manufacturing of personalized medicines. However, current DOD methods developed for chemically and thermally stable, low-viscosity inks are of limited use for pharmaceuticals due to fundamentally different functional requirements. To overcome their deficiency, we developed an electro-hydrodynamic (EHD) DOD method (Appl Phys Lett 97, 233501, 2010) that operates on fluids of up to 30 Pas over a wide range of droplet sizes, does not require direct contact of a fluid with electrodes and provides a precise control over the droplet volume. As most drugs are poorly water soluble, the use of nanoparticles dispersed in water is a promising method for enhancing the drug dissolution rate and bioavailability. The work demonstrates the EHD DOD ability to print aqueous suspensions of drug nanoparticles on highly-porous polymer films. We present a scaling analysis that captures the essential physics of drop evolution. These results show that EHD DOD offers a powerful tool for the evolving field of pharmaceutical technologies for tailoring medicines to individual patient's needs by printing a vast array of predefined amounts of therapeutics arranged in a specific pattern on a porous film. The work was supported by NSF Engineering Research Center on Structured Organic Particulate Systems.

  1. Ethical concerns caused by integrative patient empowerment solutions for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Kuchinke, W

    2013-01-01

    Personalized medicine that promises targeted treatments with high therapeutic effectiveness requires an unmatched degree of participation of the patient. To enable this high degree of patient empowerment, the project p-medicine developed a Patient Empowerment Tool that is part of a clinical research infrastructure consisting of data management, data warehouse, biobank access, imaging, simulation and decision support tools. Patient autonomy is enhanced by giving patients access to their data and by providing means for informed choices and consent. Because the highly integrative nature of the Patient Empowerment Tool raised ethical concerns, an ethical requirements analysis was carried out, resulting in the assignment of five ethical clusters. The one concerned with the Patient Empowerment Tool was used to identify several concerns, like the access to unfavorable information or negative diagnosis, incomprehensible risk/benefit display, and other factors that may overstress certain patients. From the ethical point of view, the user interface should contain different profiles and control mechanisms to protect the patient and to provide an adaptable and intelligent display of information, sufficient guidance and help for users from vulnerable populations as well as for patients with life threatening diseases.

  2. Harnessing next-generation informatics for personalizing medicine: a report from AMIA's 2014 Health Policy Invitational Meeting.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Laura K; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Denny, Joshua C; Freimuth, Robert R; Overby, Casey L; Shah, Nigam; Martin, Ross D; Sarkar, Indra Neil

    2016-03-01

    The American Medical Informatics Association convened the 2014 Health Policy Invitational Meeting to develop recommendations for updates to current policies and to establish an informatics research agenda for personalizing medicine. In particular, the meeting focused on discussing informatics challenges related to personalizing care through the integration of genomic or other high-volume biomolecular data with data from clinical systems to make health care more efficient and effective. This report summarizes the findings (n = 6) and recommendations (n = 15) from the policy meeting, which were clustered into 3 broad areas: (1) policies governing data access for research and personalization of care; (2) policy and research needs for evolving data interpretation and knowledge representation; and (3) policy and research needs to ensure data integrity and preservation. The meeting outcome underscored the need to address a number of important policy and technical considerations in order to realize the potential of personalized or precision medicine in actual clinical contexts.

  3. Improved Student Achievement Using Personalized Online Homework for a Course in Material and Energy Balances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liberatore, Matthew W.

    2011-01-01

    Personalized, online homework was used to supplement textbook homework, quizzes, and exams for one section of a course in material and energy balances. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that students using personalized, online homework earned better grades in the course. The online homework system asks the same questions of…

  4. The Mutual Impact of Personality Traits on Seating Preference and Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemyari, Camellia; Zomorodian, Kamiar; Ahrari, Iman; Tavana, Samar; Parva, Mohammad; Pakshir, Keyvan; Jafari, Peyman; Sahraian, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have investigated the association between students' seating positions and their classroom performance. However, the role of personality traits on seating preference in the classroom has not been well investigated. The aim of the study was to understand how students choose their seats according to their personality traits in a…

  5. [Problem-based learning in a social medicine course--a concept for improving learning achievement and practice relevance].

    PubMed

    Busse, R

    1996-07-01

    In many medical curricula around the world, problem-based learning (PBL), i.e. inductive, usually interdisciplinary learning based on real or constructed cases, has been shown to improve the acquisition of knowledge. Additionally, it is valued positively by students. On the other hand, lecturing is usually valued negatively. Teaching of epidemiology and social medicine is further handicapped by the fact that students consider it irrelevant. In 1994/95, one of 18 social medicine courses for fifth year medical students at Hannover Medical School was problem-based. The following "cases" were used: 1. rheumatic patient with various social medical problems (losing sick pay, receiving status as handicapped person, early retirement etc.), 2. cluster of patients with leukaemia in the surroundings of a nuclear power plant and 3. recent newspaper articles on the effects of the 1993 Health Care Reform Law (dentists refusing to treat patients because of a fixed budget, introduction of prepayment methods in hospital etc.). Evaluation by the students at the end of the course revealed that PBL is well accepted in social medicine. Students rated learning success, relevance of the subject compared to other disciplines and the ability to transfer the acquired knowledge into medical practice well above the traditional courses. Besides lectures, practical courses and seminars, PBL should therefore be used as a standard method of learning in undergraduate medical education.

  6. Translating personalized medicine using new genetic technologies in clinical practice: the ethical issues

    PubMed Central

    Ormond, Kelly E; Cho, Mildred K

    2014-01-01

    The integration of new genetic technologies into clinical practice holds great promise for the personalization of medical care, particularly the use of large-scale DNA sequencing for genome-wide genetic testing. However, these technologies also yield unprecedented amounts of information whose clinical implications are not fully understood, and we are still developing technical standards for measuring sequence accuracy. These technical and clinical challenges raise ethical issues that are similar to but qualitatively different from those that we are accustomed to dealing with for traditional medical genetics. The sheer amount of information afforded by genome sequencing requires rethinking of how to implement core ethical principles including, but not limited to: informed consent, privacy and data ownership and sharing, technology regulation, issues of access, particularly as new technology is integrated into clinical practice, and issues of potential stigma and impact on perceptions of disability. In this article, we will review the issues of informed consent, privacy, data ownership and technology regulation as they relate to the emerging field of personalized medicine and genomics. PMID:25221608

  7. Paving the way to personalized medicine: production of some theragnostic radionuclides at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava S. C.

    2011-06-06

    This paper introduces a relatively novel paradigm that involves specific individual radionuclides or radionuclide pairs that have emissions that allow pre-therapy low-dose imaging plus higher-dose therapy in the same patient. We have made an attempt to sort out and organize a number of such theragnostic radionuclides and radionuclide pairs that may potentially bring us closer to the age-long dream of personalized medicine for performing tailored low-dose molecular imaging (SPECT/CT or PET/CT) to provide the necessary pre-therapy information on biodistribution, dosimetry, the limiting or critical organ or tissue, and the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), etc. If the imaging results then warrant it, it would be possible to perform higher-dose targeted molecular therapy in the same patient with the same radiopharmaceutical. A major problem that remains yet to be fully resolved is the lack of availability, in sufficient quantities, of a majority of the best candidate theragnostic radionuclides in a no-carrier-added (NCA) form. A brief description of the recently developed new or modified methods at BNL for the production of four theragnostic radionuclides, whose nuclear, physical, and chemical characteristics seem to show great promise for personalized cancer therapy are described.

  8. Personal Best (PB) and "Classic" Achievement Goals in the Chinese Context: Their Role in Predicting Academic Motivation, Engagement and Buoyancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Kai; Martin, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Prior research has shown personal best (PB) goals to be significantly related to students' motivation, engagement and achievement. However, research thus far has investigated PB goals only among Western samples and it is unclear to what extent PB goals hold academic merit in the Asian context. It is also unclear whether PB goals explain…

  9. The Effects of Visual Illustrations on Learners' Achievement and Interest in PDA- (Personal Digital Assistant) Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Sanghoon; Kim, Minjeong; Lee, Youngmin; Son, Chanhee; Lee, Miyoung

    2005-01-01

    PDAs (Personal Digital Assistants) have been used widely in educational settings. In this study, the visual illustration of a scientific text (cognitive-interest illustration, emotional-interest illustration, or no illustration) was manipulated to investigate its impact on student interest in instructional materials, achievement, and time spent on…

  10. Functional Maintenance of Differentiated Embryoid Bodies in Microfluidic Systems: A Platform for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Guven, Sinan; Lindsey, Jennifer S.; Poudel, Ishwari; Chinthala, Sireesha; Nickerson, Michael D.; Gerami-Naini, Behzad; Gurkan, Umut A.

    2015-01-01

    Hormone replacement therapies have become important for treating diseases such as premature ovarian failure or menopausal complications. The clinical use of bioidentical hormones might significantly reduce some of the potential risks reportedly associated with the use of synthetic hormones. In the present study, we demonstrate the utility and advantage of a microfluidic chip culture system to enhance the development of personalized, on-demand, treatment modules using embryoid bodies (EBs). Functional EBs cultured on microfluidic chips represent a platform for personalized, patient-specific treatment cassettes that can be cryopreserved until required for treatment. We assessed the viability, differentiation, and functionality of EBs cultured and cryopreserved in this system. During extended microfluidic culture, estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, and anti-müllerian hormone levels were measured, and the expression of differentiated steroidogenic cells was confirmed by immunocytochemistry assay for the ovarian tissue markers anti-müllerian hormone receptor type II, follicle-stimulating hormone receptor, and inhibin β-A and the estrogen biosynthesis enzyme aromatase. Our studies showed that under microfluidic conditions, differentiated steroidogenic EBs continued to secrete estradiol and progesterone at physiologically relevant concentrations (30–120 pg/ml and 150–450 pg/ml, respectively) for up to 21 days. Collectively, we have demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of using a microfluidic chip system with continuous flow for the differentiation and extended culture of functional steroidogenic stem cell-derived EBs, the differentiation of EBs into cells expressing ovarian antigens in a microfluidic system, and the ability to cryopreserve this system with restoration of growth and functionality on thawing. These results present a platform for the development of a new therapeutic system for personalized medicine. PMID:25666845

  11. Functional maintenance of differentiated embryoid bodies in microfluidic systems: a platform for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Guven, Sinan; Lindsey, Jennifer S; Poudel, Ishwari; Chinthala, Sireesha; Nickerson, Michael D; Gerami-Naini, Behzad; Gurkan, Umut A; Anchan, Raymond M; Demirci, Utkan

    2015-03-01

    Hormone replacement therapies have become important for treating diseases such as premature ovarian failure or menopausal complications. The clinical use of bioidentical hormones might significantly reduce some of the potential risks reportedly associated with the use of synthetic hormones. In the present study, we demonstrate the utility and advantage of a microfluidic chip culture system to enhance the development of personalized, on-demand, treatment modules using embryoid bodies (EBs). Functional EBs cultured on microfluidic chips represent a platform for personalized, patient-specific treatment cassettes that can be cryopreserved until required for treatment. We assessed the viability, differentiation, and functionality of EBs cultured and cryopreserved in this system. During extended microfluidic culture, estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, and anti-müllerian hormone levels were measured, and the expression of differentiated steroidogenic cells was confirmed by immunocytochemistry assay for the ovarian tissue markers anti-müllerian hormone receptor type II, follicle-stimulating hormone receptor, and inhibin β-A and the estrogen biosynthesis enzyme aromatase. Our studies showed that under microfluidic conditions, differentiated steroidogenic EBs continued to secrete estradiol and progesterone at physiologically relevant concentrations (30-120 pg/ml and 150-450 pg/ml, respectively) for up to 21 days. Collectively, we have demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of using a microfluidic chip system with continuous flow for the differentiation and extended culture of functional steroidogenic stem cell-derived EBs, the differentiation of EBs into cells expressing ovarian antigens in a microfluidic system, and the ability to cryopreserve this system with restoration of growth and functionality on thawing. These results present a platform for the development of a new therapeutic system for personalized medicine. PMID:25666845

  12. Integrating Resource-Based and Person-Based Approaches to Understanding Wealth Effects on School Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Destin, Mesmin

    2013-01-01

    Wealth and assets have a reliable positive relationship with the achievement outcomes of students. Various approaches to understanding student achievement may inform the understanding of how wealth seems to influence children's educational experiences. This paper describes several perspectives from the student achievement literature within the…

  13. Integrated Database And Knowledge Base For Genomic Prospective Cohort Study In Tohoku Medical Megabank Toward Personalized Prevention And Medicine.

    PubMed

    Ogishima, Soichi; Takai, Takako; Shimokawa, Kazuro; Nagaie, Satoshi; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Nakaya, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The Tohoku Medical Megabank project is a national project to revitalization of the disaster area in the Tohoku region by the Great East Japan Earthquake, and have conducted large-scale prospective genome-cohort study. Along with prospective genome-cohort study, we have developed integrated database and knowledge base which will be key database for realizing personalized prevention and medicine.

  14. Designing Laboratory Exercises for the Undergraduate Molecular Biology/Biochemistry Student: Techniques and Ethical Implications Involved in Personalized Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinlander, Kenneth M.; Hall, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Personalized medicine refers to medical care that involves genetically screening patients for their likelihood to develop various disorders. Commercial genome screening only involves identifying a consumer's genotype for a few single nucleotide polymorphisms. A phenotype (such as an illness) is greatly influenced by three factors: genes, gene…

  15. Predictive value of attitude, cognitive ability, and personality to science achievement in the middle school

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Dale R.

    This article examines the factors of attitude toward science, spatial ability, mathematical ability, and the scientific personality, as measured by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, in a sample of middle school students. Males and females with science grades of A and B were found to have several characteristics of the scientific personality, good grades in mathematics, but negative attitudes toward science. Males and females with science grades of C and D had a more positive attitude toward science, but poor mathematical and spatial abilities and few characteristics of the scientific personality. There were no sex differences except on the Thinking/Feeling (TF) scale of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. As expected females portrayed themselves as preferring the (F) scale, the use of personal values when making decisions and males portrayed themselves as preferring the (T) scale, the use of logical analysis when making decisions.

  16. Mental Functioning, Perceptual Differentiation, Personality, and Achievement among Art and Non-Art Majors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorethy, Rex; Reeves, Dan

    1979-01-01

    College art majors, art education majors, and nonart majors were compared on measures of brain hemisphere dominance, general intelligence, brain functioning, visual perceptual differentiation, grade point average, flexibility-rigidity, and personal-social adjustment. (SJL)

  17. Narrowing the gap of personalized medicine in emerging countries: the case of multiple endocrine neoplasias in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Rodrigo A; Sekiya, Tomoko; Longuini, Viviane C; Coutinho, Flavia L; Lourenço, Delmar M; Toledo, Sergio P A

    2012-01-01

    The finished version of the human genome sequence was completed in 2003, and this event initiated a revolution in medical practice, which is usually referred to as the age of genomic or personalized medicine. Genomic medicine aims to be predictive, personalized, preventive, and also participative (4Ps). It offers a new approach to several pathological conditions, although its impact so far has been more evident in mendelian diseases. This article briefly reviews the potential advantages of this approach, and also some issues that may arise in the attempt to apply the accumulated knowledge from genomic medicine to clinical practice in emerging countries. The advantages of applying genomic medicine into clinical practice are obvious, enabling prediction, prevention, and early diagnosis and treatment of several genetic disorders. However, there are also some issues, such as those related to: (a) the need for approval of a law equivalent to the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act, which was approved in 2008 in the USA; (b) the need for private and public funding for genetics and genomics; (c) the need for development of innovative healthcare systems that may substantially cut costs (e.g. costs of periodic medical followup); (d) the need for new graduate and postgraduate curricula in which genomic medicine is emphasized; and (e) the need to adequately inform the population and possible consumers of genetic testing, with reference to the basic aspects of genomic medicine.

  18. An evidence-based medicine strategy for achieving remission in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Beyer, John L

    2008-01-01

    Controlled trials have demonstrated the efficacy of several classes of drugs for achieving acute response in bipolar mania and depression. For many years, clinical response has been the primary outcome in the majority of short-term efficacy studies. However, there is a growing consensus that the optimal goal in the long-term management of bipolar disorder is remission. The purpose of this article is to briefly summarize the clinical importance of remission in bipolar disorder and to review data on the effectiveness of available treatments for achieving and sustaining remission.

  19. Regenerative Medicine in Organ and Tissue Transplantation: Shortly and Practically Achievable?

    PubMed Central

    Heidary Rouchi, A.; Mahdavi-Mazdeh, M.

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of organ/tissue transplantation, the therapeutic modality of choice in end-stage organ failure, organ shortage has been the main problem in transplantation medicine. Given the so far unsolved obstacle, all hope-raising procedures to possibly tackle this long-lasting problem can draw attentions. In this context, “regenerative medicine” sounds to be more promising compared to other approaches. To consider the huge impact of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation on the treatment of some congenital or acquired hematological or metabolic disorders and some advances to produce tissue engineered materials on one hand, and to take all aspects of this emerging and costly interdisciplinary field of research into consideration, on the other hand, inevitably makes this reality unchanged, in particular in countries with low or middle income, that allograft (from deceased or living donors) will remain for years as the irreplaceable source of organ transplantation. PMID:26306154

  20. Institutional Profile: Golden Helix Institute of Biomedical Research: interdisciplinary research and educational activities in pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Mitropoulos, Konstantinos; Innocenti, Federico; van Schaik, Ron H; Lezhava, Alexander; Tzimas, Giannis; Kollia, Panagoula; Macek, Milan; Fortina, Paolo; Patrinos, George P

    2012-03-01

    The Golden Helix Institute of Biomedical Research is an international nonprofit scientific organization with interdisciplinary research and educational activities in the field of genome medicine in Europe, Asia and Latin America. These activities are supervised by an international scientific advisory council, consisting of world leaders in the field of genomics and translational medicine. Research activities include the regional coordination of the Pharmacogenomics for Every Nation Initiative in Europe, in an effort to integrate pharmacogenomics in developing countries, the development of several national/ethnic genetic databases and related web services and the critical assessment of the impact of genetics and genomic medicine on society in various countries. Educational activities also include the organization of the Golden Helix Symposia(®), which are high-profile scientific research symposia in the field of personalized medicine and the Golden Helix Pharmacogenomics Days, an international educational activity focused on pharmacogenomics, as part of its international pharmacogenomics education and outreach efforts.

  1. Pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine: wicked problems, ragged edges and ethical precipices.

    PubMed

    Fleck, Leonard M

    2012-09-15

    In the age of genomic medicine we can often now do the genetic testing that will permit more accurate personal tailoring of medications to obtain the best therapeutic results. This is certainly a medically and morally desirable result. However, in other areas of medicine pharmacogenomics is generating consequences that are much less ethically benign and much less amenable to a satisfactory ethical resolution. More specifically, we will often find ourselves left with 'wicked problems,' 'ragged edges,' and well-disguised ethical precipices. This will be especially true with regard to these extraordinarily expensive cancer drugs that generally yield only extra weeks or extra months of life. Our key ethical question is this: Does every individual faced with cancer have a just claim to receive treatment with one of more of these targeted cancer therapies at social expense? If any of these drugs literally made the difference between an unlimited life expectancy (a cure) and a premature death, that would be a powerful moral consideration in favor of saying that such individuals had a strong just claim to that drug. However, what we are beginning to discover is that different individuals with different genotypes respond more or less positively to these targeted drugs with some in a cohort gaining a couple extra years of life while others gain only extra weeks or months. Should only the strongest responders have a just claim to these drugs at social expense when there is no bright line that separates strong responders from modest responders from marginal responders? This is the key ethical issue we address. We argue that no ethical theory yields a satisfactory answer to this question, that we need instead fair and respectful processes of rational democratic deliberation.

  2. Self-esteem, personality and achievement in high school: a prospective longitudinal study in Texas.

    PubMed

    Hair, Elizabeth C; Graziano, William G

    2003-12-01

    This research explored four empirical questions: (1) Is self-esteem a better predictor of academic success and adjustment than other aspects of personality? (2) How is self-esteem related to Big-Five dimensions of personality during the transition from middle school to high school? (3) Do dispositions like Agreeableness or Openness relate to an adolescent's adaptation and affect reactions to the self? and (4) Do sources of information about adolescents (e.g., self-rating, other rating, objective "life history") converge? We also explored the general hypothesis that personality, self-esteem, and teachers' ratings of adjustment during the middle school years predict later life outcomes during high school. Overall, results indicate Big-Five personality characteristics were more stable than self-esteem across this transition period. Agreeableness and Openness assessed in middle school are related to later scholastic competence and behavioral conduct, academic success, and adjustment in high school. Results were discussed in terms of personality development and self-evaluation.

  3. Disparities in achieving and sustaining viral suppression among a large cohort of HIV-infected persons in care - Washington, DC.

    PubMed

    Castel, Amanda D; Kalmin, Mariah M; Hart, Rachel L D; Young, Heather A; Hays, Harlen; Benator, Debra; Kumar, Princy; Elion, Richard; Parenti, David; Ruiz, Maria Elena; Wood, Angela; D'Angelo, Lawrence; Rakhmanina, Natella; Rana, Sohail; Bryant, Maya; Hebou, Annick; Fernández, Ricardo; Abbott, Stephen; Peterson, James; Wood, Kathy; Subramanian, Thilakavathy; Binkley, Jeffrey; Happ, Lindsey Powers; Kharfen, Michael; Masur, Henry; Greenberg, Alan E

    2016-11-01

    One goal of the HIV care continuum is achieving viral suppression (VS), yet disparities in suppression exist among subpopulations of HIV-infected persons. We sought to identify disparities in both the ability to achieve and sustain VS among an urban cohort of HIV-infected persons in care. Data from HIV-infected persons enrolled at the 13 DC Cohort study clinical sites between January 2011 and June 2014 were analyzed. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were conducted to identify factors associated with achieving VS (viral load < 200 copies/ml) at least once, and Kaplan-Meier (KM) curves and Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify factors associated with sustaining VS and time to virologic failure (VL ≥ 200 copies/ml after achievement of VS). Among the 4311 participants, 95.4% were either virally suppressed at study enrollment or able to achieve VS during the follow-up period. In multivariate analyses, achieving VS was significantly associated with age (aOR: 1.04; 95%CI: 1.03-1.06 per five-year increase) and having a higher CD4 (aOR: 1.05, 95% CI 1.04-1.06 per 100 cells/mm(3)). Patients infected through perinatal transmission were less likely to achieve VS compared to MSM patients (aOR: 0.63, 95% CI 0.51-0.79). Once achieved, most participants (74.4%) sustained VS during follow-up. Blacks and perinatally infected persons were less likely to have sustained VS in KM survival analysis (log rank chi-square p ≤ .001 for both) compared to other races and risk groups. Earlier time to failure was observed among females, Blacks, publically insured, perinatally infected, those with longer standing HIV infection, and those with diagnoses of mental health issues or depression. Among this HIV-infected cohort, most people achieved and maintained VS; however, disparities exist with regard to patient age, race, HIV transmission risk, and co-morbid conditions. Identifying populations with disparate outcomes allows for appropriate targeting

  4. Culture and Drug Profiling of Patient Derived Malignant Pleural Effusions for Personalized Cancer Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Pietilae, Elina; Vlajnic, Tatjana; Baschiera, Betty; Arabi, Leila; Lorber, Thomas; Oeggerli, Martin; Savic, Spasenija; Obermann, Ellen; Singer, Thomas; Rothschild, Sacha I.; Zippelius, Alfred; Roth, Adrian B.; Bubendorf, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The use of patients’ own cancer cells for in vitro selection of the most promising treatment is an attractive concept in personalized medicine. Human carcinoma cells from malignant pleural effusions (MPEs) are suited for this purpose since they have already adapted to the liquid environment in the patient and do not depend on a stromal cell compartment. Aim of this study was to develop a systematic approach for the in-vitro culture of MPEs to analyze the effect of chemotherapeutic as well as targeted drugs. Methods MPEs from patients with solid tumors were selected for this study. After morphological and molecular characterization, they were cultured in medium supplemented with patient-derived sterile-filtered effusion supernatant. Growth characteristics were monitored in real-time using the xCELLigence system. MPEs were treated with a targeted therapeutic (erlotinib) according to the mutational status or chemotherapeutics based on the recommendation of the oncologists. Results We have established a robust system for the ex-vivo culture of MPEs and the application of drug tests in-vitro. The use of an antibody based magnetic cell separation system for epithelial cells before culture allowed treatment of effusions with only moderate tumor cell proportion. Experiments using drugs and drug-combinations revealed dose-dependent and specific growth inhibitory effects of targeted drugs. Conclusions We developed a new approach for the ex-vivo culture of MPEs and the application of drug tests in-vitro using real-time measuring of cell growth, which precisely reproduced the effect of clinically established treatments by standard chemotherapy and targeted drugs. This sets the stage for future studies testing agents against specific targets from genomic profiling of metastatic tumor cells and multiple drug-combinations in a personalized manner. PMID:27548442

  5. Occupational Achievement Motivation as a Function of Biological Sex, Sex-Linked Personality, and Occupation Stereotype.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garland, Howard; Smith, Gail Berwick

    1981-01-01

    Examined predicted sex differences in occupational achievement motivation. Significant sex by occupation stereotype interactions were found supporting the prediction of highest achievement motivation toward sex appropriate occupations. Females did not show significantly lower motivation toward high prestige masculine occupations--inconsistent with…

  6. Gross domestic product, science interest, and science achievement: a person × nation interaction.

    PubMed

    Tucker-Drob, Elliot M; Cheung, Amanda K; Briley, Daniel A

    2014-11-01

    Maximizing science achievement is a critical target of educational policy and has important implications for national and international economic and technological competitiveness. Previous research has identified both science interest and socioeconomic status (SES) as robust predictors of science achievement, but little research has examined their joint effects. In a data set drawn from approximately 400,000 high school students from 57 countries, we documented large Science Interest × SES and Science Interest × Per Capita Gross Domestic Product (GDP) interactions in the prediction of science achievement. Student interest in science is a substantially stronger predictor of science achievement in higher socioeconomic contexts and in higher-GDP nations. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that in higher-opportunity contexts, motivational factors play larger roles in learning and achievement. They add to the growing body of evidence indicating that substantial cross-national differences in psychological effect sizes are not simply a logical possibility but, in many cases, an empirical reality.

  7. The Road to Creative Achievement: A Latent Variable Model of Ability and Personality Predictors

    PubMed Central

    Jauk, Emanuel; Benedek, Mathias; Neubauer, Aljoscha C

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the significance of different well-established psychometric indicators of creativity for real-life creative outcomes. Specifically, we tested the effects of creative potential, intelligence, and openness to experiences on everyday creative activities and actual creative achievement. Using a heterogeneous sample of 297 adults, we performed latent multiple regression analyses by means of structural equation modelling. We found openness to experiences and two independent indicators of creative potential, ideational originality and ideational fluency, to predict everyday creative activities. Creative activities, in turn, predicted actual creative achievement. Intelligence was found to predict creative achievement, but not creative activities. Moreover, intelligence moderated the effect of creative activities on creative achievement, suggesting that intelligence may play an important role in transforming creative activities into publically acknowledged creative achievements. This study supports the view of creativity as a multifaceted construct and provides an integrative model illustrating the potential interplay between its different facets. PMID:24532953

  8. National GDP, Science Interest and Science Achievement: A Person-by-Nation Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Drob, Elliot M. Tucker; Cheung, Amanda K.; Briley, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Maximizing science achievement is a critical target of educational policy, with important implications for national and international economic and technological competitiveness. Previous research has identified both science interest and socioeconomic status (SES) as robust predictors of science achievement, but little research has examined their joint effects. In a dataset drawn from approximately 400,000 high school students from 57 countries, we document large interest by SES and interest by per capita gross domestic product (GDP) interactions in the prediction of science achievement. Student interest in science is a substantially stronger predictor of science achievement in higher socioeconomic contexts and in higher GDP nations. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that, in higher opportunity contexts, motivational factors play larger roles in learning and achievement. They add to the growing body of evidence indicating that substantial cross national differences in psychological effect sizes are not simply a logical possibility, but in many cases, an empirical reality. PMID:25304883

  9. National Library of Medicine Disaster Information Management Research Center: Achieving the vision, 2010–2013

    PubMed Central

    Love, Cynthia B.; Arnesen, Stacey J.; Phillips, Steven J.; Windom, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    From 2010 to 2013, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC) continued to build its programs and services on the foundation laid in its starting years, 2008–2010. Prior to 2008, NLM had a long history of providing health information, training, and tools in response to disasters. Aware of this legacy, the NLM long range plan (Charting a Course for the 21st Century: NLM’s Long Range Plan 2006–2016) called for creation of a center to show “a strong commitment to disaster remediation and to provide a platform for demonstrating how libraries and librarians can be part of the solution to this national problem”. NLM is continuing efforts to ensure that medical libraries have plans for the continuity of their operations, librarians are trained to understand their roles in preparedness and response, online disaster health information resources are available for many audiences and in multiple formats, and research is conducted on tools to enhance the exchange of critical information during and following disasters. This paper describes the 2010–2013 goals and activities of DIMRC and its future plans. PMID:27570333

  10. Looking for a Person-Centered Medicine: Non Conventional Medicine in the Conventional European and Italian Setting

    PubMed Central

    Roberti di Sarsina, Paolo; Iseppato, Ilaria

    2011-01-01

    In Italy, the use of non conventional medicines (NCMs) is spreading among people as in the rest of Europe. Sales of alternative remedies are growing, and likewise the number of medical doctors (MDs) who practise NCM/complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). However, in Italy as in other countries of the European Union, at the present time the juridical/legal status of NCM/CAM is not well established, mainly due to the lack of any national law regulating NCM/CAM professional training, practice and public supply and the absence of government-promoted scientific research in this field. This is an obstacle to safeguarding the patient's interests and freedom of choice, especially now that dissatisfaction with biomedicine is inclining more and more people to look for a holistic and patient-centered form of medicine. PMID:19505973

  11. Effects of Personality Correlates on Achievement Motivation in Traditional and Reentry College Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Carolyn H.

    There is little literature comparing personality differences between traditional (under age 25) and reentry women students (aged 25 and older). The purpose of the present study is to examine these differences. A background questionnaire and five additional scales: (1) the Work and Family Orientation Questionnaire (WOFO-3); (2) the…

  12. Performance-Approach and Performance-Avoidance Classroom Goals and the Adoption of Personal Achievement Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwinger, Malte; Stiensmeier-Pelster, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Background: Students' perceptions of classroom goals influence their adoption of personal goals. To assess different forms of classroom goals, recent studies have favoured an overall measure of performance classroom goals, compared to a two-dimensional assessment of performance-approach and performance-avoidance classroom goals (PAVCG). Aims: This…

  13. Achievement and Personality Characteristics of School Children in Relation to Environment. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolicic, Ivan; Zorman, Leon

    The influences of the urban vs rural environment and socioeconomic status (SES) of the family on the child's success in school and on certain personality characteristics were examined. The urban sample included the children of professional, skilled, and unskilled workers from large and small towns. The rural sample consisted of 50% peasant and 50%…

  14. Personalized Medicine in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST): Clinical Implications of the Somatic and Germline DNA Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ravegnini, Gloria; Nannini, Margherita; Sammarini, Giulia; Astolfi, Annalisa; Biasco, Guido; Pantaleo, Maria A.; Hrelia, Patrizia; Angelini, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. They are characterized by gain of function mutations in KIT or PDGFRA tyrosine kinase receptors, with their consequent constitutive activation. The gold standard therapy is imatinib that offers a good and stable response for approximately 18–36 months. However, resistance is very common and it is vital to identify new biomarkers. Up until now, there have been two main approaches with focus to characterize novel targets. On the one hand, the focus is on the tumor genome, as the final clinical outcome depends mainly from the cancer specific mutations/alterations patterns. However, the germline DNA is important as well, and it is inconceivable to think the patients response to the drug is not related to it. Therefore the aim of this review is to outline the state of the art of the personalized medicine in GIST taking into account both the tumor DNA (somatic) and the patient DNA (germline). PMID:26184165

  15. The many different faces of major depression: it is time for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Korte, S Mechiel; Prins, Jolanda; Krajnc, Anne M; Hendriksen, Hendrikus; Oosting, Ronald S; Westphal, Koen G; Korte-Bouws, Gerdien A H; Olivier, Berend

    2015-04-15

    First line antidepressants are the so-called SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors), e.g. fluvoxamine, fluoxetine, sertraline, paroxetine and escitalopram. Unfortunately, these drugs mostly do not provide full symptom relief and have a slow onset of action. Therefore other antidepressants are also being prescribed that inhibit the reuptake of norepinephrine (e.g. reboxetine, desipramine) or the reuptake of both serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (e.g. venlafaxine, duloxetine, milnacipran). Nevertheless, many patients encounter residual symptoms such as impaired pleasure, impaired motivation, and lack of energy. It is hypothesized that an impaired brain reward system may underlie these residual symptoms. In agreement, there is some evidence that reuptake inhibitors of both norepinephrine and dopamine (e.g. methylphenidate, bupropion, nomifensine) affect these residual symptoms. In the pipeline are new drugs that block all three monoamine transporters for the reuptake of 5-HT, norepinephrine and dopamine, the so-called triple reuptake inhibitors (TRI). The working mechanisms of the above-mentioned antidepressants are discussed, and it is speculated whether depressed patients with different symptoms, sometimes even opposite ones due to atypical or melancholic features, can be matched with the different drug treatments available. In other words, is personalized medicine for major depression an option in the near future? PMID:25592320

  16. Genetic determinants in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and their influence on global personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Michmerhuizen, Nicole L.; Birkeland, Andrew C.; Bradford, Carol R.; Brenner, J. Chad

    2016-01-01

    While sequencing studies have provided an improved understanding of the genetic landscape of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC), there remains a significant lack of genetic data derived from non-Caucasian cohorts. Additionally, there is wide variation in HNSCC incidence and mortality worldwide both between and within various geographic regions. These epidemiologic differences are in part accounted for by varying exposure to environmental risk factors such as tobacco, alcohol, high risk human papilloma viruses and betel quid. However, inherent genetic factors may also play an important role in this variability. As limited sequencing data is available for many populations, the involvement of unique genetic factors in HNSCC pathogenesis from epidemiologically diverse groups is unknown. Here, we review current knowledge about the epidemiologic, environmental, and genetic variation in HNSCC cohorts globally and discuss future studies necessary to further our understanding of these differences. Long-term, a more complete understanding of the genetic drivers found in diverse HNSCC cohorts may help the development of personalized medicine protocols for patients with rare or complex genetic events. PMID:27551333

  17. Genetic determinants in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and their influence on global personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Michmerhuizen, Nicole L; Birkeland, Andrew C; Bradford, Carol R; Brenner, J Chad

    2016-05-01

    While sequencing studies have provided an improved understanding of the genetic landscape of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC), there remains a significant lack of genetic data derived from non-Caucasian cohorts. Additionally, there is wide variation in HNSCC incidence and mortality worldwide both between and within various geographic regions. These epidemiologic differences are in part accounted for by varying exposure to environmental risk factors such as tobacco, alcohol, high risk human papilloma viruses and betel quid. However, inherent genetic factors may also play an important role in this variability. As limited sequencing data is available for many populations, the involvement of unique genetic factors in HNSCC pathogenesis from epidemiologically diverse groups is unknown. Here, we review current knowledge about the epidemiologic, environmental, and genetic variation in HNSCC cohorts globally and discuss future studies necessary to further our understanding of these differences. Long-term, a more complete understanding of the genetic drivers found in diverse HNSCC cohorts may help the development of personalized medicine protocols for patients with rare or complex genetic events. PMID:27551333

  18. The economics of personalized medicine: commercialization as a driver of return on investment.

    PubMed

    Keeling, Peter; Roth, Mollie; Zietlow, Tom

    2012-09-15

    Optimizing commercialization of drugs is the sine qua non of the pharmaceutical industry and intensive work has been done to characterize fully the drivers of drug adoption and understand the resources required to optimize those drivers for full adoption of drugs. Conversely, while the pharmaceutical industry is actively embracing the new personalized medicine (PM) paradigm, much work remains to be done to understand fully what drives adoption of targeted therapies and how to resource those drivers appropriately. While the industry is slowly learning from its early missteps, progress is still inhibited by a lack of understanding of the specific hurdles that individual development teams face in developing and commercializing targeted therapies and the requirement for budgets specifically aimed at driving test adoption. This article considers the benefits of optimizing commercial planning in the PM space and the potential negative impact in potentially failing to optimize that planning. Real world insights are used to illustrate that a far broader commercial lens is required in the PM space and will touch on functional areas not usually included in the context of 'commercial' decisions.

  19. Personalized Medicine Through SNP Testing for Breast Cancer Risk: Clinical Implementation.

    PubMed

    Howe, Rebecca; Miron-Shatz, Talya; Hanoch, Yaniv; Omer, Zehra B; O'Donoghue, Cristina; Ozanne, Elissa M

    2015-10-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have the potential to improve personalized medicine in breast cancer care. As new SNPs are discovered, further enhancing risk classification, SNP testing may serve to complement family history and phenotypic risk factors when assessed in a clinical setting. SNP analysis is particularly relevant to high-risk women who may seek out such information to guide their decision-making around risk-reduction. However, little is known about how high-risk women may respond to SNP testing with regard to clinical decision-making. We examined high-risk women's interest in SNP testing for breast cancer risk through an online survey of hypothetical testing scenarios. Women stated their preferences for sharing test results and selected the most likely follow-up action they would pursue in each of the test result scenarios (above average and below average risk for breast cancer). Four hundred seventy-eight women participated. Most women (89 %) did not know what a SNP was prior to the study. Once SNP testing was described, 75 % were interested in SNP testing. Participants stated an interest in lifestyle interventions for risk-reduction and wanted to discuss their testing results with their doctor or a genetic counselor. Women are interested in SNP testing and are prepared to make lifestyle changes based on testing results. Women's preference for discussing testing results with a healthcare provider aligns with the current trend towards SNP testing in a clinical setting.

  20. Genes, Genetics, and Environment in Type 2 Diabetes: Implication in Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Nabodita; Ali, Sher

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a multifactorial anomaly involving 57 genes located on 16 different chromosomes and 136 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Ten genes are located on chromosome 1, followed by seven genes on chromosome 11 and six genes on chromosomes 3. Remaining chromosomes harbor two to five genes. Significantly, chromosomes 13, 14, 16, 18, 21, 22, X, and Y do not have any associated diabetogenic gene. Genetic components have their own pathways encompassing insulin secretion, resistance, signaling, and β-cell dysfunction. Environmental factors include epigenetic changes, nutrition, intrauterine surroundings, and obesity. In addition, ethnicity plays a role in conferring susceptibility to T2D. This scenario poses a challenge toward the development of biomarker for quick disease diagnosis or for generating a consensus to delineate different categories of T2D patients. We believe, before prescribing a generic drug, detailed genotypic information with the background of ethnicity and environmental factors may be taken into consideration. This nonconventional approach is envisaged to be more robust in the context of personalized medicine and perhaps would cause lot less burden on the patient ensuring better management of T2D.

  1. CYP2D6 Genotyping and Tamoxifen: An Unfinished Story in the Quest for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Jonas A.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.

    2011-01-01

    The philosophy behind personalized medicine is that each patient has a unique biologic profile that should guide the choice of therapy, resulting in an improved treatment outcome, ideally with reduced toxicity. Thus, there has been increasing interest in identifying genetic variations that are predictive of a drug’s efficacy or toxicity. Although it is one of the most effective drugs for treating breast cancer, tamoxifen is not effective in all estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer patients, and it is frequently associated with side effects, such as hot flashes. Relative resistance to tamoxifen treatment may be a result, in part, from impaired drug activation by cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6). Indeed, recent studies have identified allelic variations in CYP2D6 to be an important determinant of tamoxifen’s activity (and toxicity). This article will summarize the current information regarding the influence of the major genotypes and CYP2D6 inhibitors on tamoxifen metabolism, with a focus on its clinical utility and the current level of evidence for CYP2D6 genotyping of patients who are candidates for tamoxifen treatment. PMID:21421116

  2. Resiniferatoxin for Pain Treatment: An Interventional Approach to Personalized Pain Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Iadarola, Michael J.; Gonnella, Gian Luigi

    2015-01-01

    This review examines existing preclinical and clinical studies related to resiniferatoxin (RTX) and its potential uses in pain treatment. Like capsaicin, RTX is a vanilloid receptor (TRPV1) agonist, only more potent. This increased potency confers both quantitative and qualitative advantages in terms of drug action on the TRPV1 containing nerve terminal, which result in an increased efficacy and a long duration of action. RTX can be delivered by a central route of administration through injection into the subarachnoid space around the lumbosacral spinal cord. It can also be administered peripherally into a region of skin or deep tissue where primary afferents nerves terminate, or directly into a nerve trunk or a dorsal root ganglion. The central route is currently being evaluated as a treatment for intractable pain in patients with advanced cancer. Peripheral administration offers the possibility to treat a wide diversity of pain problems because of the ability to bring the treatment to the site of the pain (the peripheral generator). While not all pain disorders are appropriate for RTX, tailoring treatment to an individual patient's needs via a selective and local intervention that chemically targets a specific population of nerve terminals provides a new capability for pain therapy and a simplified and effective approach to personalized pain medicine. PMID:26779292

  3. Integrating precision medicine in the study and clinical treatment of a severely mentally ill person.

    PubMed

    O'Rawe, Jason A; Fang, Han; Rynearson, Shawn; Robison, Reid; Kiruluta, Edward S; Higgins, Gerald; Eilbeck, Karen; Reese, Martin G; Lyon, Gholson J

    2013-01-01

    .Glu429Ala allele in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and the p.Asp7Asn allele in ChAT, encoding choline O-acetyltransferase, with both alleles having been shown to confer an elevated susceptibility to psychoses. We have found thousands of other variants in his genome, including pharmacogenetic and copy number variants. This information has been archived and offered to this person alongside the clinical sequencing data, so that he and others can re-analyze his genome for years to come. Conclusions. To our knowledge, this is the first study in the clinical neurosciences that integrates detailed neuropsychiatric phenotyping, deep brain stimulation for OCD and clinical-grade WGS with management of genetic results in the medical treatment of one person with severe mental illness. We offer this as an example of precision medicine in neuropsychiatry including brain-implantable devices and genomics-guided preventive health care. PMID:24109560

  4. Integrating precision medicine in the study and clinical treatment of a severely mentally ill person

    PubMed Central

    O’Rawe, Jason A.; Fang, Han; Rynearson, Shawn; Robison, Reid; Kiruluta, Edward S.; Higgins, Gerald; Eilbeck, Karen; Reese, Martin G.

    2013-01-01

    .Glu429Ala allele in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and the p.Asp7Asn allele in ChAT, encoding choline O-acetyltransferase, with both alleles having been shown to confer an elevated susceptibility to psychoses. We have found thousands of other variants in his genome, including pharmacogenetic and copy number variants. This information has been archived and offered to this person alongside the clinical sequencing data, so that he and others can re-analyze his genome for years to come. Conclusions. To our knowledge, this is the first study in the clinical neurosciences that integrates detailed neuropsychiatric phenotyping, deep brain stimulation for OCD and clinical-grade WGS with management of genetic results in the medical treatment of one person with severe mental illness. We offer this as an example of precision medicine in neuropsychiatry including brain-implantable devices and genomics-guided preventive health care. PMID:24109560

  5. A personal reflection on social media in medicine: I stand, no wiser than before.

    PubMed

    Weiner, John

    2015-04-01

    Social media has enabled information, communication and reach for health professionals. There are clear benefits to patients and consumers when health information is broadcast. But there are unanswered questions on professionalism, education, and the complex mentoring relationship between doctor and student. This personal perspective raises a number of questions: What is online medical professionalism? Can online medical professionalism be taught? Can online medical professionalism be enforced? Is an online presence necessary to achieve the highest level of clinical excellence? Is there evidence that social media is superior to traditional methods of teaching in medical education? Does social media encourage multitasking and impairment of the learning process? Are there downsides to the perfunctory laconic nature of social media? Does social media waste time that is better spent attaining clinical skills?

  6. Overview of diagnostic/targeted treatment combinations in personalized medicine for breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Tessari, Anna; Palmieri, Dario; Di Cosimo, Serena

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer includes a body of molecularly distinct subgroups, characterized by different presentation, prognosis, and sensitivity to treatments. Significant advances in our understanding of the complex architecture of this pathology have been achieved in the last few decades, thanks to new biotechnologies that have recently come into the research field and the clinical practice, giving oncologists new instruments that are based on biomarkers and allowing them to set up a personalized approach for each individual patient. Here we review the main treatments available or in preclinical development, the biomolecular diagnostic and prognostic approaches that changed our perspective about breast cancer, giving an overview of targeted therapies that represent the current standard of care for these patients. Finally, we report some examples of how new technologies in clinical practice can set in motion the development of new drugs. PMID:24403841

  7. A multi-site feasibility study for personalized medicine in canines with Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A successful therapeutic strategy, specifically tailored to the molecular constitution of an individual and their disease, is an ambitious objective of modern medicine. In this report, we highlight a feasibility study in canine osteosarcoma focused on refining the infrastructure and processes required for prospective clinical trials using a series of gene expression-based Personalized Medicine (PMed) algorithms to predict suitable therapies within 5 days of sample receipt. Methods Tumor tissue samples were collected immediately following limb amputation and shipped overnight from veterinary practices. Upon receipt (day 1), RNA was extracted from snap-frozen tissue, with an adjacent H&E section for pathological diagnosis. Samples passing RNA and pathology QC were shipped to a CLIA-certified laboratory for genomic profiling. After mapping of canine probe sets to human genes and normalization against a (normal) reference set, gene level Z-scores were submitted to the PMed algorithms. The resulting PMed report was immediately forwarded to the veterinarians. Upon receipt and review of the PMed report, feedback from the practicing veterinarians was captured. Results 20 subjects were enrolled over a 5 month period. Tissue from 13 subjects passed both histological and RNA QC and were submitted for genomic analysis and subsequent PMed analysis and report generation. 11 of the 13 samples for which PMed reports were produced were communicated to the veterinarian within the target 5 business days. Of the 7 samples that failed QC, 4 were due to poor RNA quality, whereas 2 were failed following pathological review. Comments from the practicing veterinarians were generally positive and constructive, highlighting a number of areas for improvement, including enhanced education regarding PMed report interpretation, drug availability, affordable pricing and suitable canine dosing. Conclusions This feasibility trial demonstrated that with the appropriate infrastructure

  8. Personalization of the immunosuppressive treatment in renal transplant recipients: the great challenge in "omics" medicine.

    PubMed

    Zaza, Gianluigi; Granata, Simona; Tomei, Paola; Dalla Gassa, Alessandra; Lupo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Renal transplantation represents the most favorable treatment for patients with advanced renal failure and it is followed, in most cases, by a significant enhancement in patients' quality of life. Significant improvements in one-year renal allograft and patients' survival rates have been achieved over the last 10 years primarily as a result of newer immunosuppressive regimens. Despite these notable achievements in the short-term outcome, long-term graft function and survival rates remain less than optimal. Death with a functioning graft and chronic allograft dysfunction result in an annual rate of 3%-5%. In this context, drug toxicity and long-term chronic adverse effects of immunosuppressive medications have a pivotal role. Unfortunately, at the moment, except for the evaluation of trough drug levels, no clinically useful tools are available to correctly manage immunosuppressive therapy. The proper use of these drugs could potentiate therapeutic effects minimizing adverse drug reactions. For this purpose, in the future, "omics" techniques could represent powerful tools that may be employed in clinical practice to routinely aid the personalization of drug treatment according to each patient's genetic makeup. However, it is unquestionable that additional studies and technological advances are needed to standardize and simplify these methodologies.

  9. The Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) Project: Linking Clinical Data with Molecular Analysis to Advance Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Keen, Judy C.; Moore, Helen M.

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of how genetic mutations or variability can directly affect phenotypic outcomes, the development of disease, or determination of a tailored treatment protocol is fundamental to advancing personalized medicine. To understand how a genotype affects gene expression and specific phenotypic traits, as well as the correlative and causative associations between such, the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) Project was initiated The GTEx collection of biospecimens and associated clinical data links extensive clinical data with genotype and gene expression data to provide a wealth of data and resources to study the underlying genetics of normal physiology. These data will help inform personalized medicine through the identification of normal variation that does not contribute to disease. Additionally, these data can lead to insights into how gene variation affects pharmacodynamics and individualized responses to therapy. PMID:25809799

  10. The Information Technology Infrastructure for the Translational Genomics Core and the Partners Biobank at Partners Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Boutin, Natalie; Holzbach, Ana; Mahanta, Lisa; Aldama, Jackie; Cerretani, Xander; Embree, Kevin; Leon, Irene; Rathi, Neeta; Vickers, Matilde

    2016-01-01

    The Biobank and Translational Genomics core at Partners Personalized Medicine requires robust software and hardware. This Information Technology (IT) infrastructure enables the storage and transfer of large amounts of data, drives efficiencies in the laboratory, maintains data integrity from the time of consent to the time that genomic data is distributed for research, and enables the management of complex genetic data. Here, we describe the functional components of the research IT infrastructure at Partners Personalized Medicine and how they integrate with existing clinical and research systems, review some of the ways in which this IT infrastructure maintains data integrity and security, and discuss some of the challenges inherent to building and maintaining such infrastructure.

  11. The Information Technology Infrastructure for the Translational Genomics Core and the Partners Biobank at Partners Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Boutin, Natalie; Holzbach, Ana; Mahanta, Lisa; Aldama, Jackie; Cerretani, Xander; Embree, Kevin; Leon, Irene; Rathi, Neeta; Vickers, Matilde

    2016-01-01

    The Biobank and Translational Genomics core at Partners Personalized Medicine requires robust software and hardware. This Information Technology (IT) infrastructure enables the storage and transfer of large amounts of data, drives efficiencies in the laboratory, maintains data integrity from the time of consent to the time that genomic data is distributed for research, and enables the management of complex genetic data. Here, we describe the functional components of the research IT infrastructure at Partners Personalized Medicine and how they integrate with existing clinical and research systems, review some of the ways in which this IT infrastructure maintains data integrity and security, and discuss some of the challenges inherent to building and maintaining such infrastructure. PMID:26805892

  12. Personal Learning Environments (PLE) in the Academic Achievement of University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallego, Maria Jesus; Gamiz, Vanesa Maria

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this research is to analyze the elements that compose the PLE of pre-service teachers and to determine whether the composition of these environments is related to academic achievement in a course on Information and Communication Technologies in Education. The hypothesis is that a PLE with more components is related to a higher…

  13. The Relationship between Principal Personality Type and Elementary School Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, Tamara Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    Providing effective administrative leadership that has a positive impact on student achievement often is problematic for school principals. Research suggests that collaboration and shared decision making are functions of effective leadership, and according to the premises of effective school instructional leadership, leadership should change with…

  14. Personality and Ability Correlates of Group Interaction and Achievement in Small Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Noreen M.; Cullian, Linda K.

    This study explored the importance of group interaction for learning. It investigated: (1) the relationship between group interaction and achievement, and whether this relationship was constant across ability levels; and (2) the importance of ability, extroversion-introversion, and group composition as predictors of group interaction. The sample…

  15. Achievement Goal Orientations and Subjective Well-Being: A Person-Centred Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuominen-Soini, Heta; Salmela-Aro, Katariina; Niemivirta, Markku

    2008-01-01

    This study examined whether students with different achievement goal orientation profiles differ in terms of subjective well-being (i.e., self-esteem, depressive symptoms, school-related burnout, and educational goal appraisals). Six groups of students with unique motivational profiles were identified. Observed differences in subjective well-being…

  16. Group-based and personalized care in an age of genomic and evidence-based medicine: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Maglo, Koffi N

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses the philosophical and moral foundations of group-based and individualized therapy in connection with population care equality. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently modified its public health policy by seeking to enhance the efficacy and equality of care through the approval of group-specific prescriptions and doses for some drugs. In the age of genomics, when individualization of care increasingly has become a major concern, investigating the relationship between population health, stratified medicine, and personalized therapy can improve our understanding of the ethical and biomedical implications of genomic medicine. I suggest that the need to optimize population health through population substructure-sensitive research and the need to individualize care through genetically targeted therapies are not necessarily incompatible. Accordingly, the article reconceptualizes a unified goal for modern scientific medicine in terms of individualized equal care.

  17. Group-based and personalized care in an age of genomic and evidence-based medicine: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Maglo, Koffi N

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses the philosophical and moral foundations of group-based and individualized therapy in connection with population care equality. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently modified its public health policy by seeking to enhance the efficacy and equality of care through the approval of group-specific prescriptions and doses for some drugs. In the age of genomics, when individualization of care increasingly has become a major concern, investigating the relationship between population health, stratified medicine, and personalized therapy can improve our understanding of the ethical and biomedical implications of genomic medicine. I suggest that the need to optimize population health through population substructure-sensitive research and the need to individualize care through genetically targeted therapies are not necessarily incompatible. Accordingly, the article reconceptualizes a unified goal for modern scientific medicine in terms of individualized equal care. PMID:22643722

  18. What is personalized medicine: sharpening a vague term based on a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently, individualized or personalized medicine (PM) has become a buzz word in the academic as well as public debate surrounding health care. However, PM lacks a clear definition and is open to interpretation. This conceptual vagueness complicates public discourse on chances, risks and limits of PM. Furthermore, stakeholders might use it to further their respective interests and preferences. For these reasons it is important to have a shared understanding of PM. In this paper, we present a sufficiently precise as well as adequate definition of PM with the potential of wide acceptance. Methods For this purpose, in a first step a systematic literature review was conducted to understand how PM is actually used in scientific practice. PubMed was searched using the keywords “individualized medicine”, “individualised medicine”, “personalized medicine” and “personalised medicine” connected by the Boolean operator OR. A data extraction tabloid was developed putting forward a means/ends-division. Full-texts of articles containing the search terms in title or abstract were screened for definitions. Definitions were extracted; according to the means/ends distinction their elements were assigned to the corresponding category. To reduce complexity of the resulting list, summary categories were developed inductively from the data using thematic analysis. In a second step, six well-known criteria for adequate definitions were applied to these categories to derive a so-called precising definition. Results We identified 2457 articles containing the terms PM in title or abstract. Of those 683 contained a definition of PM and were thus included in our review. 1459 ends and 1025 means were found in the definitions. From these we derived the precising definition: PM seeks to improve stratification and timing of health care by utilizing biological information and biomarkers on the level of molecular disease pathways, genetics, proteomics as well as

  19. Personalized Medicine in Cerebrovascular Neurosurgery: Precision Neurosurgical Management of Cerebral Aneurysms and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Achrol, Achal Singh; Steinberg, Gary K.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral aneurysms are common vascular lesions. Little is known about the pathogenesis of these lesions and the process by which they destabilize and progress to rupture. Treatment decisions are motivated by a desire to prevent rupture and the devastating morbidity and mortality associated with resulting subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). For patients presenting with SAH, urgent intervention is required to stabilize the lesion and prevent re-rupture. Those patients fortunate enough to survive a presenting SAH and subsequent securing of their aneurysm must still face a spectrum of secondary sequelae, which can include cerebral vasospasm, delayed ischemia, seizures, cerebral edema, hydrocephalus, and endocrinologic and catecholamine-induced systemic dysfunction in cardiac, pulmonary, and renal systems. Increased focus on understanding the pathophysiology and molecular characteristics of these secondary processes will enable the development of targeted therapeutics and novel diagnostics for improved patient selection in personalized medicine trials for SAH. In unruptured cerebral aneurysms, treatment decisions are less clear and currently based solely on treating larger lesions, using rigid aneurysm size cutoffs generalized from recent studies that are the subject of ongoing controversy. Further compounding this controversy is the fact that the vast majority of aneurysms that come to clinical attention at the time of a hemorrhagic presentation are of smaller size, suggesting that small aneurysms are indeed not benign lesions. As such, patient-specific biomarkers that better predict which aneurysms represent high-risk lesions that warrant clinical intervention are of vital importance. Recent advancements in genomic and proteomic technologies have enabled the identification of molecular characteristics that may prove useful in tracking aneurysm growth and progression and identifying targets for prophylactic therapeutic interventions. Novel quantitative neuroimaging

  20. KNOWLEDGE DRIVEN BINNING AND PHEWAS ANALYSIS IN MARSHFIELD PERSONALIZED MEDICINE RESEARCH PROJECT USING BIOBIN.

    PubMed

    Basile, Anna O; Wallace, John R; Peissig, Peggy; McCarty, Catherine A; Brilliant, Murray; Ritchie, Marylyn D

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technology has presented an opportunity for rare variant discovery and association of these variants with disease. To address the challenges of rare variant analysis, multiple statistical methods have been developed for combining rare variants to increase statistical power for detecting associations. BioBin is an automated tool that expands on collapsing/binning methods by performing multi-level variant aggregation with a flexible, biologically informed binning strategy using an internal biorepository, the Library of Knowledge (LOKI). The databases within LOKI provide variant details, regional annotations and pathway interactions which can be used to generate bins of biologically-related variants, thereby increasing the power of any subsequent statistical test. In this study, we expand the framework of BioBin to incorporate statistical tests, including a dispersion-based test, SKAT, thereby providing the option of performing a unified collapsing and statistical rare variant analysis in one tool. Extensive simulation studies performed on gene-coding regions showed a Bin-KAT analysis to have greater power than BioBin-regression in all simulated conditions, including variants influencing the phenotype in the same direction, a scenario where burden tests often retain greater power. The use of Madsen- Browning variant weighting increased power in the burden analysis to that equitable with Bin-KAT; but overall Bin-KAT retained equivalent or higher power under all conditions. Bin-KAT was applied to a study of 82 pharmacogenes sequenced in the Marshfield Personalized Medicine Research Project (PMRP). We looked for association of these genes with 9 different phenotypes extracted from the electronic health record. This study demonstrates that Bin-KAT is a powerful tool for the identification of genes harboring low frequency variants for complex phenotypes.

  1. G-DOC: A Systems Medicine Platform for Personalized Oncology1

    PubMed Central

    Madhavan, Subha; Gusev, Yuriy; Harris, Michael; Tanenbaum, David M; Gauba, Robinder; Bhuvaneshwar, Krithika; Shinohara, Andrew; Rosso, Kevin; Carabet, Lavinia A; Song, Lei; Riggins, Rebecca B; Dakshanamurthy, Sivanesan; Wang, Yue; Byers, Stephen W; Clarke, Robert; Weiner, Louis M

    2011-01-01

    Currently, cancer therapy remains limited by a “one-size-fits-all” approach, whereby treatment decisions are based mainly on the clinical stage of disease, yet fail to reference the individual's underlying biology and its role driving malignancy. Identifying better personalized therapies for cancer treatment is hindered by the lack of high-quality “omics” data of sufficient size to produce meaningful results and the ability to integrate biomedical data from disparate technologies. Resolving these issues will help translation of therapies from research to clinic by helping clinicians develop patient-specific treatments based on the unique signatures of patient's tumor. Here we describe the Georgetown Database of Cancer (G-DOC), a Web platform that enables basic and clinical research by integrating patient characteristics and clinical outcome data with a variety of high-throughput research data in a unified environment. While several rich data repositories for high-dimensional research data exist in the public domain, most focus on a single-data type and do not support integration across multiple technologies. Currently, G-DOC contains data from more than 2500 breast cancer patients and 800 gastrointestinal cancer patients, G-DOC includes a broad collection of bioinformatics and systems biology tools for analysis and visualization of four major “omics” types: DNA, mRNA, microRNA, and metabolites. We believe that G-DOC will help facilitate systems medicine by providing identification of trends and patterns in integrated data sets and hence facilitate the use of better targeted therapies for cancer. A set of representative usage scenarios is provided to highlight the technical capabilities of this resource. PMID:21969811

  2. KNOWLEDGE DRIVEN BINNING AND PHEWAS ANALYSIS IN MARSHFIELD PERSONALIZED MEDICINE RESEARCH PROJECT USING BIOBIN*

    PubMed Central

    BASILE, ANNA O; WALLACE, JOHN R; PEISSIG, PEGGY; MCCARTY, CATHERINE A; BRILLIANT, MURRAY

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technology has presented an opportunity for rare variant discovery and association of these variants with disease. To address the challenges of rare variant analysis, multiple statistical methods have been developed for combining rare variants to increase statistical power for detecting associations. BioBin is an automated tool that expands on collapsing/binning methods by performing multi-level variant aggregation with a flexible, biologically informed binning strategy using an internal biorepository, the Library of Knowledge (LOKI). The databases within LOKI provide variant details, regional annotations and pathway interactions which can be used to generate bins of biologically-related variants, thereby increasing the power of any subsequent statistical test. In this study, we expand the framework of BioBin to incorporate statistical tests, including a dispersion-based test, SKAT, thereby providing the option of performing a unified collapsing and statistical rare variant analysis in one tool. Extensive simulation studies performed on gene-coding regions showed a Bin-KAT analysis to have greater power than BioBin-regression in all simulated conditions, including variants influencing the phenotype in the same direction, a scenario where burden tests often retain greater power. The use of Madsen-Browning variant weighting increased power in the burden analysis to that equitable with Bin-KAT; but overall Bin-KAT retained equivalent or higher power under all conditions. Bin-KAT was applied to a study of 82 pharmacogenes sequenced in the Marshfield Personalized Medicine Research Project (PMRP). We looked for association of these genes with 9 different phenotypes extracted from the electronic health record. This study demonstrates that Bin-KAT is a powerful tool for the identification of genes harboring low frequency variants for complex phenotypes. PMID:26776191

  3. KNOWLEDGE DRIVEN BINNING AND PHEWAS ANALYSIS IN MARSHFIELD PERSONALIZED MEDICINE RESEARCH PROJECT USING BIOBIN.

    PubMed

    Basile, Anna O; Wallace, John R; Peissig, Peggy; McCarty, Catherine A; Brilliant, Murray; Ritchie, Marylyn D

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technology has presented an opportunity for rare variant discovery and association of these variants with disease. To address the challenges of rare variant analysis, multiple statistical methods have been developed for combining rare variants to increase statistical power for detecting associations. BioBin is an automated tool that expands on collapsing/binning methods by performing multi-level variant aggregation with a flexible, biologically informed binning strategy using an internal biorepository, the Library of Knowledge (LOKI). The databases within LOKI provide variant details, regional annotations and pathway interactions which can be used to generate bins of biologically-related variants, thereby increasing the power of any subsequent statistical test. In this study, we expand the framework of BioBin to incorporate statistical tests, including a dispersion-based test, SKAT, thereby providing the option of performing a unified collapsing and statistical rare variant analysis in one tool. Extensive simulation studies performed on gene-coding regions showed a Bin-KAT analysis to have greater power than BioBin-regression in all simulated conditions, including variants influencing the phenotype in the same direction, a scenario where burden tests often retain greater power. The use of Madsen- Browning variant weighting increased power in the burden analysis to that equitable with Bin-KAT; but overall Bin-KAT retained equivalent or higher power under all conditions. Bin-KAT was applied to a study of 82 pharmacogenes sequenced in the Marshfield Personalized Medicine Research Project (PMRP). We looked for association of these genes with 9 different phenotypes extracted from the electronic health record. This study demonstrates that Bin-KAT is a powerful tool for the identification of genes harboring low frequency variants for complex phenotypes. PMID:26776191

  4. Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... better. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration is in charge of assuring the safety ... prescription and over-the-counter medicines. Even safe drugs can cause unwanted side effects or interactions with ...

  5. An integrated framework to achieve interoperability in person-centric health management.

    PubMed

    Vergari, Fabio; Salmon Cinotti, Tullio; D'Elia, Alfredo; Roffia, Luca; Zamagni, Guido; Lamberti, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    The need for high-quality out-of-hospital healthcare is a known socioeconomic problem. Exploiting ICT's evolution, ad-hoc telemedicine solutions have been proposed in the past. Integrating such ad-hoc solutions in order to cost-effectively support the entire healthcare cycle is still a research challenge. In order to handle the heterogeneity of relevant information and to overcome the fragmentation of out-of-hospital instrumentation in person-centric healthcare systems, a shared and open source interoperability component can be adopted, which is ontology driven and based on the semantic web data model. The feasibility and the advantages of the proposed approach are demonstrated by presenting the use case of real-time monitoring of patients' health and their environmental context.

  6. From space medicine to preventive and personalized health care on earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongaro, Filippo

    2014-11-01

    The experience of human spaceflight has taught us that aging can be modulated, accelerated and decelerated. This is also confirmed by a number of experiments on animal models. However in order to be effective in managing aging and maintaining quality of life, a new approach needs to be adopted, one that many today call functional medicine or anti-aging medicine that in its essence is very similar to the medical approach provided to the astronauts by space agencies. Space medicine therefore can become a vehicle for the promotion of a new way of doing medicine on Earth.

  7. Study on personality dimension negative emotionality affecting academic achievement among Malaysian medical students studying in Malaysia and overseas.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, Vidya; Haque, Mainul; Simbak, Nordin Bin; Jaalam, Kamarudin

    2016-01-01

    Personality dimension negative emotionality is known to be associated with academic achievement. The present study focuses on the influence of negative emotionality (neuroticism) on the medical students' academic achievements. The main objective of this study was to ascertain the negative emotionality scores among the first year Malaysian medical students studying in Malaysia and India, further to find out the association between negative emotionality and their academic achievements. The current study sample includes 60 first year Malaysian medical students from Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Malaysia, and USM-KLE IMP, Belgaum, India. They were selected by convenient sampling technique. The Medico-Psychological questionnaire was used to find out the negative emotionality scores among the students and these scores were compared with academic scores. The data were analyzed using SPSS- 20. Thus, the study result goes with the prediction that there is a significant correlation between academic achievement and negative emotionality. We concluded that negative emotionality has a negative impact on medical student's academic achievement regardless of the fact whether they study in their own country or overseas.

  8. Study on personality dimension negative emotionality affecting academic achievement among Malaysian medical students studying in Malaysia and overseas

    PubMed Central

    Bhagat, Vidya; Haque, Mainul; Simbak, Nordin Bin; Jaalam, Kamarudin

    2016-01-01

    Personality dimension negative emotionality is known to be associated with academic achievement. The present study focuses on the influence of negative emotionality (neuroticism) on the medical students’ academic achievements. The main objective of this study was to ascertain the negative emotionality scores among the first year Malaysian medical students studying in Malaysia and India, further to find out the association between negative emotionality and their academic achievements. The current study sample includes 60 first year Malaysian medical students from Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Malaysia, and USM-KLE IMP, Belgaum, India. They were selected by convenient sampling technique. The Medico-Psychological questionnaire was used to find out the negative emotionality scores among the students and these scores were compared with academic scores. The data were analyzed using SPSS- 20. Thus, the study result goes with the prediction that there is a significant correlation between academic achievement and negative emotionality. We concluded that negative emotionality has a negative impact on medical student’s academic achievement regardless of the fact whether they study in their own country or overseas. PMID:27354836

  9. Standardization as situation-specific achievement: regulatory diversity and the production of value in intercontinental collaborations in stem cell medicine.

    PubMed

    Rosemann, Achim

    2014-12-01

    The article examines the role and challenges of scientific self-governance and standardization in inter-continental clinical research partnerships in stem cell medicine. The paper shows that - due to a high level of regulatory diversity - the enactment of internationally recognized standards in multi-country stem cell trials is a complex and highly situation-specific achievement. Standardization is imposed on a background of regulatory, institutional and epistemic-cultural heterogeneity, and implemented exclusively in the context of select clinical projects. Based on ethnographic data from the first trans-continental clinical trial infrastructure in stem cell medicine between China and the USA, the article demonstrates that locally evolved and international forms of experimental clinical research practices often co-exist in the same medical institutions. Researchers switch back and forth between these schemas, depending on the purposes of their research, the partners they work with, the geographic scale of research projects, and the contrasting demands for regulatory review, that result from these differences. Drawing on Birch's analysis of the role of standardization in international forms of capital production in the biosciences, the article argues that the integration of local knowledge institutions into the global bioeconomy does not necessarily result in the shutting down of localized forms of value production. In emerging fields of medical research, that are regulated in highly divergent ways across geographical regions, the coexistence of distinct modes of clinical translation allows also for the production of multiple forms of economic value, at varying spatial scales. This is especially so in countries with lenient regulations. As this paper shows, the long-standing absence of a regulatory framework for clinical stem cell applications in China, permits the situation-specific adoption of internationally recognized standards in some contexts, while enabling

  10. Personalized medicine in human space flight: using Omics based analyses to develop individualized countermeasures that enhance astronaut safety and performance.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Michael A; Goodwin, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Space flight is one of the most extreme conditions encountered by humans. Advances in Omics methodologies (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics) have revealed that unique differences exist between individuals. These differences can be amplified in extreme conditions, such as space flight. A better understanding of individual differences may allow us to develop personalized countermeasure packages that optimize the safety and performance of each astronaut. In this review, we explore the role of "Omics" in advancing our ability to: (1) more thoroughly describe the biological response of humans in space; (2) describe molecular attributes of individual astronauts that alter the risk profile prior to entering the space environment; (3) deploy Omics techniques in the development of personalized countermeasures; and (4) develop a comprehensive Omics-based assessment and countermeasure platform that will guide human space flight in the future. In this review, we advance the concept of personalized medicine in human space flight, with the goal of enhancing astronaut safety and performance. Because the field is vast, we explore selected examples where biochemical individuality might significantly impact countermeasure development. These include gene and small molecule variants associated with: (1) metabolism of therapeutic drugs used in space; (2) one carbon metabolism and DNA stability; (3) iron metabolism, oxidative stress and damage, and DNA stability; and (4) essential input (Mg and Zn) effects on DNA repair. From these examples, we advance the case that widespread Omics profiling should serve as the foundation for aerospace medicine and research, explore methodological considerations to advance the field, and suggest why personalized medicine may become the standard of care for humans in space.

  11. Personalized comprehensive molecular profiling of high risk osteosarcoma: Implications and limitations for precision medicine

    PubMed Central

    Subbiah, Vivek; Wagner, Michael J.; McGuire, Mary F.; Sarwari, Nawid M.; Devarajan, Eswaran; Lewis, Valerae O.; Westin, Shanon; Kato, Shumei; Brown, Robert E.; Anderson, Pete

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite advances in molecular medicine over recent decades, there has been little advancement in the treatment of osteosarcoma. We performed comprehensive molecular profiling in two cases of metastatic and chemotherapy-refractory osteosarcoma to guide molecularly targeted therapy. Patients and Methods Hybridization capture of >300 cancer-related genes plus introns from 28 genes often rearranged or altered in cancer was applied to >50 ng of DNA extracted from tumor samples from two patients with recurrent, metastatic osteosarcoma. The DNA from each sample was sequenced to high, uniform coverage. Immunohistochemical probes and morphoproteomics analysis were performed, in addition to fluorescence in situ hybridization. All analyses were performed in CLIA-certified laboratories. Molecularly targeted therapy based on the resulting profiles was offered to the patients. Biomedical analytics were performed using QIAGEN's Ingenuity® Pathway Analysis. Results In Patient #1, comprehensive next-generation exome sequencing showed MET amplification, PIK3CA mutation, CCNE1 amplification, and PTPRD mutation. Immunohistochemistry-based morphoproteomic analysis revealed c-Met expression [(p)-c-Met (Tyr1234/1235)] and activation of mTOR/AKT pathway [IGF-1R (Tyr1165/1166), p-mTOR [Ser2448], p-Akt (Ser473)] and expression of SPARC and COX2. Targeted therapy was administered to match the P1K3CA, c-MET, and SPARC and COX2 aberrations with sirolimus+ crizotinib and abraxane+ celecoxib. In Patient #2, aberrations included NF2 loss in exons 2–16, PDGFRα amplification, and TP53 mutation. This patient was enrolled on a clinical trial combining targeted agents temsirolimus, sorafenib and bevacizumab, to match NF2, PDGFRα and TP53 aberrations. Both the patients did not benefit from matched therapy. Conclusions Relapsed osteosarcoma is characterized by complex signaling and drug resistance pathways. Comprehensive molecular profiling holds great promise for tailoring personalized

  12. 2K09 and thereafter : the coming era of integrative bioinformatics, systems biology and intelligent computing for functional genomics and personalized medicine research.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jack Y; Niemierko, Andrzej; Bajcsy, Ruzena; Xu, Dong; Athey, Brian D; Zhang, Aidong; Ersoy, Okan K; Li, Guo-Zheng; Borodovsky, Mark; Zhang, Joe C; Arabnia, Hamid R; Deng, Youping; Dunker, A Keith; Liu, Yunlong; Ghafoor, Arif

    2010-12-01

    Significant interest exists in establishing synergistic research in bioinformatics, systems biology and intelligent computing. Supported by the United States National Science Foundation (NSF), International Society of Intelligent Biological Medicine (http://www.ISIBM.org), International Journal of Computational Biology and Drug Design (IJCBDD) and International Journal of Functional Informatics and Personalized Medicine, the ISIBM International Joint Conferences on Bioinformatics, Systems Biology and Intelligent Computing (ISIBM IJCBS 2009) attracted more than 300 papers and 400 researchers and medical doctors world-wide. It was the only inter/multidisciplinary conference aimed to promote synergistic research and education in bioinformatics, systems biology and intelligent computing. The conference committee was very grateful for the valuable advice and suggestions from honorary chairs, steering committee members and scientific leaders including Dr. Michael S. Waterman (USC, Member of United States National Academy of Sciences), Dr. Chih-Ming Ho (UCLA, Member of United States National Academy of Engineering and Academician of Academia Sinica), Dr. Wing H. Wong (Stanford, Member of United States National Academy of Sciences), Dr. Ruzena Bajcsy (UC Berkeley, Member of United States National Academy of Engineering and Member of United States Institute of Medicine of the National Academies), Dr. Mary Qu Yang (United States National Institutes of Health and Oak Ridge, DOE), Dr. Andrzej Niemierko (Harvard), Dr. A. Keith Dunker (Indiana), Dr. Brian D. Athey (Michigan), Dr. Weida Tong (FDA, United States Department of Health and Human Services), Dr. Cathy H. Wu (Georgetown), Dr. Dong Xu (Missouri), Drs. Arif Ghafoor and Okan K Ersoy (Purdue), Dr. Mark Borodovsky (Georgia Tech, President of ISIBM), Dr. Hamid R. Arabnia (UGA, Vice-President of ISIBM), and other scientific leaders. The committee presented the 2009 ISIBM Outstanding Achievement Awards to Dr. Joydeep Ghosh (UT

  13. 2K09 and thereafter : the coming era of integrative bioinformatics, systems biology and intelligent computing for functional genomics and personalized medicine research

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Significant interest exists in establishing synergistic research in bioinformatics, systems biology and intelligent computing. Supported by the United States National Science Foundation (NSF), International Society of Intelligent Biological Medicine (http://www.ISIBM.org), International Journal of Computational Biology and Drug Design (IJCBDD) and International Journal of Functional Informatics and Personalized Medicine, the ISIBM International Joint Conferences on Bioinformatics, Systems Biology and Intelligent Computing (ISIBM IJCBS 2009) attracted more than 300 papers and 400 researchers and medical doctors world-wide. It was the only inter/multidisciplinary conference aimed to promote synergistic research and education in bioinformatics, systems biology and intelligent computing. The conference committee was very grateful for the valuable advice and suggestions from honorary chairs, steering committee members and scientific leaders including Dr. Michael S. Waterman (USC, Member of United States National Academy of Sciences), Dr. Chih-Ming Ho (UCLA, Member of United States National Academy of Engineering and Academician of Academia Sinica), Dr. Wing H. Wong (Stanford, Member of United States National Academy of Sciences), Dr. Ruzena Bajcsy (UC Berkeley, Member of United States National Academy of Engineering and Member of United States Institute of Medicine of the National Academies), Dr. Mary Qu Yang (United States National Institutes of Health and Oak Ridge, DOE), Dr. Andrzej Niemierko (Harvard), Dr. A. Keith Dunker (Indiana), Dr. Brian D. Athey (Michigan), Dr. Weida Tong (FDA, United States Department of Health and Human Services), Dr. Cathy H. Wu (Georgetown), Dr. Dong Xu (Missouri), Drs. Arif Ghafoor and Okan K Ersoy (Purdue), Dr. Mark Borodovsky (Georgia Tech, President of ISIBM), Dr. Hamid R. Arabnia (UGA, Vice-President of ISIBM), and other scientific leaders. The committee presented the 2009 ISIBM Outstanding Achievement Awards to Dr. Joydeep Ghosh (UT

  14. Genetics, Genomics and Cancer Risk Assessment: State of the art and future directions in the era of personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Blazer, Kathleen R.; MacDonald, Deborah J.; Culver, Julie O.; Offit, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Scientific and technologic advances are revolutionizing our approach to genetic cancer risk assessment, cancer screening and prevention, and targeted therapy, fulfilling the promise of personalized medicine. In this monograph we review the evolution of scientific discovery in cancer genetics and genomics, and describe current approaches, benefits and barriers to the translation of this information to the practice of preventive medicine. Summaries of known hereditary cancer syndromes and highly penetrant genes are provided and contrasted with recently-discovered genomic variants associated with modest increases in cancer risk. We describe the scope of knowledge, tools, and expertise required for the translation of complex genetic and genomic test information into clinical practice. The challenges of genomic counseling include the need for genetics and genomics professional education and multidisciplinary team training, the need for evidence-based information regarding the clinical utility of testing for genomic variants, the potential dangers posed by premature marketing of first-generation genomic profiles, and the need for new clinical models to improve access to and responsible communication of complex disease-risk information. We conclude that given the experiences and lessons learned in the genetics era, the multidisciplinary model of genetic cancer risk assessment and management will serve as a solid foundation to support the integration of personalized genomic information into the practice of cancer medicine. PMID:21858794

  15. Customized care 2020: how medical sequencing and network biology will enable personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Boguski, Mark S; Arnaout, Ramy; Hill, Colin

    2009-01-01

    Applications of next-generation nucleic acid sequencing technologies will lead to the development of precision diagnostics that will, in turn, be a major technology enabler of precision medicine. Terabyte-scale, multidimensional data sets derived using these technologies will be used to reverse engineer the specific disease networks that underlie individual patients' conditions. Modeling and simulation of these networks in the presence of virtual drugs, and combinations of drugs, will identify the most efficacious therapy for precision medicine and customized care. In coming years the practice of medicine will routinely employ network biology analytics supported by high-performance supercomputing.

  16. Public health concerns for anti-obesity medicines imported for personal use through the internet: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Tanimoto, Tsuyoshi; Nakanishi, Yoko; Yoshida, Naoko; Tsuboi, Hirohito; Kimura, Kazuko

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the circulation of anti-obesity medicines via the internet and their quality. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Internet pharmacies and pharmaceutical suppliers accessible from Japan. Participants Anti-obesity medicines were purchased using relevant keywords on Japanese Google search engine. Blogs and advertisement-only sites were excluded. Primary and secondary outcome measures The authenticity of the samples was investigated in collaboration with the manufacturers of the samples and medicine regulatory authorities. Quality of the samples was assessed by pharmacopoeial analyses using high-performance liquid chromatography. Results 82 samples were purchased from 36 internet sites. Approximately half of the sites did not mention a physical address, and 45% of the samples did not contain a package insert. A variety of custom declarations were made for the shipments of the samples: personal health items, supplement, medicines, general merchandise, tea and others. Among 82 samples, 52 samples were analysed to check their pharmacopoeial quality. Authenticity responses were received from only five of 20 manufacturing companies. According to the pharmacopoeial analyses and authenticity investigation, three of the samples were identified as counterfeits and did not contain any active ingredients. Two of these samples were confirmed as counterfeits by the manufacturer of the authentic products. The manufacturer of the other sample did not respond to our request for an authenticity check even after several communication attempts. These counterfeit cases have been reported at the rapid alert system of Western Pacific Region of the WHO. Conclusions Many counterfeit and unapproved anti-obesity medicines may be easily bypassing regulatory checks during shipping and are widely circulated through the internet. Regulatory authorities should take measures to prevent these medicines from entering countries to safeguard their citizens. PMID:22581794

  17. Personal, Electronic, Secure National Library of Medicine Hosts Health Records Conference

    MedlinePlus

    ... care providers in the decisions affecting their care."— Daniel Masys, Chair, Department of Biomedical Informatics, and Professor ... for our patients for quality and safety."— G. Daniel Martich, MD, Professor of Critical Care Medicine, Vice ...

  18. The genetic epidemiology of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: toward a personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Sookoian, Silvia; Pirola, Carlos J

    2012-08-01

    The understanding of the genetic bases of complex diseases such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease opens new opportunities and challenges. This article explores new tools designed toward moving genomic data into clinical medicine, providing putative answers to more practical questions.

  19. From Systems Understanding to Personalized Medicine: Lessons and Recommendations Based on a Multidisciplinary and Translational Analysis of COPD.

    PubMed

    Roca, Josep; Cano, Isaac; Gomez-Cabrero, David; Tegnér, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Systems medicine, using and adapting methods and approaches as developed within systems biology, promises to be essential in ongoing efforts of realizing and implementing personalized medicine in clinical practice and research. Here we review and critically assess these opportunities and challenges using our work on COPD as a case study. We find that there are significant unresolved biomedical challenges in how to unravel complex multifactorial components in disease initiation and progression producing different clinical phenotypes. Yet, while such a systems understanding of COPD is necessary, there are other auxiliary challenges that need to be addressed in concert with a systems analysis of COPD. These include information and communication technology (ICT)-related issues such as data harmonization, systematic handling of knowledge, computational modeling, and importantly their translation and support of clinical practice. For example, clinical decision-support systems need a seamless integration with new models and knowledge as systems analysis of COPD continues to develop. Our experience with clinical implementation of systems medicine targeting COPD highlights the need for a change of management including design of appropriate business models and adoption of ICT providing and supporting organizational interoperability among professional teams across healthcare tiers, working around the patient. In conclusion, in our hands the scope and efforts of systems medicine need to concurrently consider these aspects of clinical implementation, which inherently drives the selection of the most relevant and urgent issues and methods that need further development in a systems analysis of disease.

  20. From Systems Understanding to Personalized Medicine: Lessons and Recommendations Based on a Multidisciplinary and Translational Analysis of COPD.

    PubMed

    Roca, Josep; Cano, Isaac; Gomez-Cabrero, David; Tegnér, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Systems medicine, using and adapting methods and approaches as developed within systems biology, promises to be essential in ongoing efforts of realizing and implementing personalized medicine in clinical practice and research. Here we review and critically assess these opportunities and challenges using our work on COPD as a case study. We find that there are significant unresolved biomedical challenges in how to unravel complex multifactorial components in disease initiation and progression producing different clinical phenotypes. Yet, while such a systems understanding of COPD is necessary, there are other auxiliary challenges that need to be addressed in concert with a systems analysis of COPD. These include information and communication technology (ICT)-related issues such as data harmonization, systematic handling of knowledge, computational modeling, and importantly their translation and support of clinical practice. For example, clinical decision-support systems need a seamless integration with new models and knowledge as systems analysis of COPD continues to develop. Our experience with clinical implementation of systems medicine targeting COPD highlights the need for a change of management including design of appropriate business models and adoption of ICT providing and supporting organizational interoperability among professional teams across healthcare tiers, working around the patient. In conclusion, in our hands the scope and efforts of systems medicine need to concurrently consider these aspects of clinical implementation, which inherently drives the selection of the most relevant and urgent issues and methods that need further development in a systems analysis of disease. PMID:26677188

  1. [Tropical medicine/tropical dermatology training in Tanzania and Ghana: Personal experience and selected case reports].

    PubMed

    Völker, K

    2015-05-01

    As a consultant for dermatology with special interested in tropical diseases, I accepted my employers offer (German Armed Forces) to start my training in tropical medicine and tropical dermatology in Africa. The dermatological part of the training was completed at the Regional Dermatology Training Centre (RDTC) in Moshi, Tanzania. This was followed by tropical medicine training at the Presbyterian Hospital in Agogo, Ghana. In this article, I report on my experiences in Africa and present selected case reports.

  2. Personal networks: a tool for gaining insight into the transmission of knowledge about food and medicinal plants among Tyrolean (Austrian) migrants in Australia, Brazil and Peru

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Investigations into knowledge about food and medicinal plants in a certain geographic area or within a specific group are an important element of ethnobotanical research. This knowledge is context specific and dynamic due to changing ecological, social and economic circumstances. Migration processes affect food habits and the knowledge and use of medicinal plants as a result of adaptations that have to be made to new surroundings and changing environments. This study analyses and compares the different dynamics in the transmission of knowledge about food and medicinal plants among Tyrolean migrants in Australia, Brazil and Peru. Methods A social network approach was used to collect data on personal networks of knowledge about food and medicinal plants among Tyroleans who have migrated to Australia, Brazil and Peru and their descendants. A statistical analysis of the personal network maps and a qualitative analysis of the narratives were combined to provide insight into the process of transmitting knowledge about food and medicinal plants. Results 56 personal networks were identified in all (food: 30; medicinal plants: 26) across all the field sites studied here. In both sets of networks, the main source of knowledge is individual people (food: 71%; medicinal plants: 68%). The other sources mentioned are print and audiovisual media, organisations and institutions. Personal networks of food knowledge are larger than personal networks of medicinal plant knowledge in all areas of investigation. Relatives play a major role as transmitters of knowledge in both domains. Conclusions Human sources, especially relatives, play an important role in knowledge transmission in both domains. Reference was made to other sources as well, such as books, television, the internet, schools and restaurants. By taking a personal network approach, this study reveals the mode of transmission of knowledge about food and medicinal plants within a migrational context. PMID:24398225

  3. Polymalic Acid-based Nano Biopolymers for Targeting of Multiple Tumor Markers: An Opportunity for Personalized Medicine?

    PubMed Central

    Ljubimova, Julia Y.; Ding, Hui; Portilla-Arias, Jose; Patil, Rameshwar; Gangalum, Pallavi R.; Chesnokova, Alexandra; Inoue, Satoshi; Rekechenetskiy, Arthur; Nassoura, Tala; Black, Keith L.; Holler, Eggehard

    2014-01-01

    Tumors with similar grade and morphology often respond differently to the same treatment because of variations in molecular profiling. To account for this diversity, personalized medicine is developed for silencing malignancy associated genes. Nano drugs fit these needs by targeting tumor and delivering antisense oligonucleotides for silencing of genes. As drugs for the treatment are often administered repeatedly, absence of toxicity and negligible immune response are desirable. In the example presented here, a nano medicine is synthesized from the biodegradable, non-toxic and non-immunogenic platform polymalic acid by controlled chemical ligation of antisense oligonucleotides and tumor targeting molecules. The synthesis and treatment is exemplified for human Her2-positive breast cancer using an experimental mouse model. The case can be translated towards synthesis and treatment of other tumors. PMID:24962356

  4. The Promise of Observational Studies (ECLIPSE, SPIROMICS, and COPDGene) in Achieving the Goal of Personalized Treatment of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Rennard, Stephen I

    2015-08-01

    Personalized medicine is based on the concept that individuals differ from one another. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is particularly in need of a personalized medicine strategy. However, while the COPD population is characterized by a marked degree of heterogeneity at the etiologic, mechanistic, physiologic, and clinical levels, efforts to cluster COPD patients into meaningful groups that can guide therapy have been limited. Three large observational studies-the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints (ECLIPSE), the Subpopulations and Intermediate Outcomes in COPD Study (SPIROMICS), and COPDGene-are underway and/or being analyzed. These studies have accumulated a uniquely rich set of clinical and biological data on relatively large cohorts of patients who have already influenced the way in which COPD is viewed. These studies have great potential to advance understanding of COPD so that the goal of personalized treatment can be pursued.

  5. Pain and Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in a National Sample of Persons Living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Zeltzer, Lonnie K.; Dobalian, Aram; Myers, Cynthia D.

    2006-01-01

    The current study investigated the relationship of pain to use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in a U.S. nationally representative sample of 2466 persons with HIV using data from the HIV Cost and Services Utilization Study (HCSUS). Pain was conceptualized as a need characteristic within the context of predisposing, enabling, and need (PEN) characteristics following Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Services Use. Multivariate analyses were used to examine the association of baseline PEN characteristics with CAM use by follow-up (approximately 6 months later), including use of five specific CAM domains. Change in pain from baseline to follow-up was also examined in relation to CAM use. Baseline pain was a strong predictor of CAM use, and increased pain over time was associated with use of unlicensed or underground drugs with potential for harm. These results highlight the importance of medical efforts to control pain in persons living with HIV. PMID:16310616

  6. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Personal Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine among Occupational Therapy Educators in the United States.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Michelle L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a baseline description of American occupational therapy educators' knowledge, attitudes, and personal use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) as a first step in exploring the larger issue of future occupational therapy practitioners' preparedness for meeting clients' occupational needs in today's evolving healthcare environment. Results of this cross-sectional survey highlighted limitations of occupational therapy educators' knowledge of common CAM concepts and therapies across all demographic variables, varying attitudes towards CAM in general and its inclusion in occupational therapy education, and personal use of common CAM therapies. Without increased occupational therapy educator knowledge about CAM and engagement in the current healthcare practices, occupational therapy practitioners are at risk for having a limited role in integrative healthcare.

  7. Students' Big Three Personality Traits, Perceptions of Teacher Interpersonal Behavior, and Mathematics Achievement: An Application of the Model of Reciprocal Causation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charalampous, Kyriakos; Kokkinos, Constantinos M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the application of the Model of Reciprocal Causation (MRC) in examining the relationship between student personality (personal factors), student-perceived teacher interpersonal behavior (environment), and Mathematics achievement (behavior), with the simultaneous investigation of mediating effects…

  8. Practicing a medicine of the whole person: an opportunity for healing.

    PubMed

    Remen, Rachel Naomi

    2008-08-01

    Integrative medicine has been defined in several ways. For some it is a discipline that combines such approaches to the resolution of disease as acupuncture and homeopathy, meditation and imagery with more familiar and accepted health practices, such as surgery, pediatrics, and oncology. For others it is about cultivating awareness and sensitivity beyond symptoms to the mental, emotional, and spiritual needs of the patient. But, integrative medicine is more than the weaving together of techniques, or understanding the intimate interaction of the mental, emotional, and spiritual dimensions of human experience. It is about rethinking the task of medicine and the infrastructure of relationships and beliefs that have limited its power to serve all people.

  9. Practicing a medicine of the whole person: an opportunity for healing.

    PubMed

    Remen, Rachel Naomi

    2008-08-01

    Integrative medicine has been defined in several ways. For some it is a discipline that combines such approaches to the resolution of disease as acupuncture and homeopathy, meditation and imagery with more familiar and accepted health practices, such as surgery, pediatrics, and oncology. For others it is about cultivating awareness and sensitivity beyond symptoms to the mental, emotional, and spiritual needs of the patient. But, integrative medicine is more than the weaving together of techniques, or understanding the intimate interaction of the mental, emotional, and spiritual dimensions of human experience. It is about rethinking the task of medicine and the infrastructure of relationships and beliefs that have limited its power to serve all people. PMID:18638701

  10. Personality assessments and outcomes in medical education and the practice of medicine: AMEE Guide No. 79.

    PubMed

    Hojat, Mohammadreza; Erdmann, James B; Gonnella, Joseph S

    2013-07-01

    In a paradigm of physician performance we propose that both "cognitive" and "noncognitive" components contribute to the performance of physicians-in-training and in-practice. Our review of the relevant literature indicates that personality, as an important factor of the "noncognitive" component, plays a significant role in academic and professional performances. We describe findings on 14 selected personality instruments in predicting academic and professional performances. We question the contention that personality can be validly and reliably assessed from admission interviews, letters of recommendation, essays, and personal statements. Based on conceptual relevance and currently available empirical evidence, we propose that personality attributes such as conscientiousness and empathy should be considered among the measures of choice for the assessment of pertinent aspects of personality in academic and professional performance. Further exploration is needed to search for additional personality attributes pertinent to medical education and patient care. Implications for career counseling, assessments of professional development and medical education outcomes, and potential use as supplementary information for admission decisions are discussed. PMID:23614402

  11. Traditional, complementary and alternative medical systems and their contribution to personalisation, prediction and prevention in medicine—person-centred medicine

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Traditional, complementary and alternative medical (TCAM) systems contribute to the foundation of person-centred medicine (PCM), an epistemological orientation for medical science which places the person as a physical, psychological and spiritual entity at the centre of health care and of the therapeutic process. PCM wishes to broaden the bio-molecular reductionistic approach of medical science towards an integration that allows people, doctors, nurses, health-care professionals and patients to become the real protagonists of the health-care scene. The doctor or caregiver needs to act out of empathy to meet the unique value of each human being, which unfolds over the course of a lifetime from conception to natural death. Knowledge of the human being should not be instrumental to economic or political interests, ideology, theories or religious dogma. Research needs to be broadened with methodological tools to investigate person-centred medical interventions. Salutogenesis is a fundamental principle of PCM, promoting health and preventing illness by strengthening the individual's self-healing abilities. TCAM systems also give tools to predict the insurgence of illness and treat it before the appearance of overt organic disease. A task of PCM is to educate people to take better care of their physical, psychological and spiritual health. Health-care education needs to be broadened to give doctors and health-care workers of the future the tools to act in innovative and highly differentiated ways, always guided by deep respect for individual autonomy, personal culture, religion and beliefs. PMID:23126628

  12. Personal Achievement Reading: Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozeboom, Deborah A.

    Exercises are provided in a set of five workbooks designed to aid students in agricultural programs in building vocabulary and reading skills. Each workbook borrows from terminology of agriculture to provide explanations and exercises for a sequential series of instructional objectives. One workbook concentrates on the ability to determine word…

  13. Personal Achievement Reading: Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swinton, Janet R.

    Exercises are provided in this set of four workbooks designed to aid students in business programs in building vocabulary and reading skills. Each workbook borrows from business terminology to provide explanations and exercises for a sequential series of instructional objectives. One workbook concentrates on developing the ability to determine…

  14. Personalized Medicine: Review and Perspectives of Promising Baseline EEG Biomarkers in Major Depressive Disorder and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    PubMed

    Olbrich, Sebastian; van Dinteren, Rik; Arns, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    Personalized medicine in psychiatry is in need of biomarkers that resemble central nervous system function at the level of neuronal activity. Electroencephalography (EEG) during sleep or resting-state conditions and event-related potentials (ERPs) have not only been used to discriminate patients from healthy subjects, but also for the prediction of treatment outcome in various psychiatric diseases, yielding information about tailored therapy approaches for an individual. This review focuses on baseline EEG markers for two psychiatric conditions, namely major depressive disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. It covers potential biomarkers from EEG sleep research and vigilance regulation, paroxysmal EEG patterns and epileptiform discharges, quantitative EEG features within the EEG main frequency bands, connectivity markers and ERP components that might help to identify favourable treatment outcome. Further, the various markers are discussed in the context of their potential clinical value and as research domain criteria, before giving an outline for future studies that are needed to pave the way to an electrophysiological biomarker-based personalized medicine. PMID:26901357

  15. Commercial Opportunities and Ethical Pitfalls in Personalized Medicine: A Myriad of Reasons to Revisit the Myriad Genetics Saga.

    PubMed

    So, Derek; Joly, Yann

    2013-06-01

    In 1996, the US-based biotechnology company Myriad Genetics began offering genetic diagnostic tests for mutations in the genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, which are linked to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. Since that time, Myriad has been a forerunner in the field of personalized medicine through the use of effective commercialization strategies which have been emulated by other commercial biotechnology companies. Myriad's strategies include patent acquisition and active enforcement, direct-to-consumer advertising, diversification, and trade secrets. These business models have raised substantial ethical controversy and criticism, often related to the company's focus on market dominance and the potential conflict between private sector profitability and the promotion of public health. However, these strategies have enabled Myriad to survive the economic challenges that have affected the biotechnology sector and to become financially successful in the field of personalized medicine. Our critical assessment of the legal, economic and ethical aspects of Myriad's practices over this period allows the identification of the company's more effective business models. It also discusses of the consequences of implementing economically viable models without first carrying out broader reflection on the socio-cultural, ethical and political contexts in which they would apply. PMID:23885284

  16. Prediction of Early Recurrence of Liver Cancer by a Novel Discrete Bayes Decision Rule for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ogihara, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a novel diagnostic method for predicting the early recurrence of liver cancer with high accuracy for personalized medicine. The difficulty with cancer treatment is that even if the types of cancer are the same, the cancers vary depending on the patient. Thus, remarkable attention has been paid to personalized medicine. Unfortunately, although the Tokyo Score, the Modified JIS, and the TNM classification have been proposed as liver scoring systems, none of these scoring systems have met the needs of clinical practice. In this paper, we convert continuous and discrete data to categorical data and keep the natively categorical data as is. Then, we propose a discrete Bayes decision rule that can deal with the categorical data. This may lead to its use with various types of laboratory data. Experimental results show that the proposed method produced a sensitivity of 0.86 and a specificity of 0.49 for the test samples. This suggests that our method may be superior to the well-known Tokyo Score, the Modified JIS, and the TNM classification in terms of sensitivity. Additional comparative study shows that if the numbers of test samples in two classes are the same, this method works well in terms of the F1 measure compared to the existing scoring methods. PMID:27800494

  17. Commercial Opportunities and Ethical Pitfalls in Personalized Medicine: A Myriad of Reasons to Revisit the Myriad Genetics Saga

    PubMed Central

    So, Derek; Joly, Yann

    2013-01-01

    In 1996, the US-based biotechnology company Myriad Genetics began offering genetic diagnostic tests for mutations in the genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, which are linked to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. Since that time, Myriad has been a forerunner in the field of personalized medicine through the use of effective commercialization strategies which have been emulated by other commercial biotechnology companies. Myriad’s strategies include patent acquisition and active enforcement, direct-to-consumer advertising, diversification, and trade secrets. These business models have raised substantial ethical controversy and criticism, often related to the company’s focus on market dominance and the potential conflict between private sector profitability and the promotion of public health. However, these strategies have enabled Myriad to survive the economic challenges that have affected the biotechnology sector and to become financially successful in the field of personalized medicine. Our critical assessment of the legal, economic and ethical aspects of Myriad’s practices over this period allows the identification of the company’s more effective business models. It also discusses of the consequences of implementing economically viable models without first carrying out broader reflection on the socio-cultural, ethical and political contexts in which they would apply. PMID:23885284

  18. Commercial Opportunities and Ethical Pitfalls in Personalized Medicine: A Myriad of Reasons to Revisit the Myriad Genetics Saga.

    PubMed

    So, Derek; Joly, Yann

    2013-06-01

    In 1996, the US-based biotechnology company Myriad Genetics began offering genetic diagnostic tests for mutations in the genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, which are linked to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. Since that time, Myriad has been a forerunner in the field of personalized medicine through the use of effective commercialization strategies which have been emulated by other commercial biotechnology companies. Myriad's strategies include patent acquisition and active enforcement, direct-to-consumer advertising, diversification, and trade secrets. These business models have raised substantial ethical controversy and criticism, often related to the company's focus on market dominance and the potential conflict between private sector profitability and the promotion of public health. However, these strategies have enabled Myriad to survive the economic challenges that have affected the biotechnology sector and to become financially successful in the field of personalized medicine. Our critical assessment of the legal, economic and ethical aspects of Myriad's practices over this period allows the identification of the company's more effective business models. It also discusses of the consequences of implementing economically viable models without first carrying out broader reflection on the socio-cultural, ethical and political contexts in which they would apply.

  19. School Achievement and Personality. Description of School Achievement in Terms of Ability, Trait, Situational and Background Variables. II: Operations at the Variable Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niskanen, Erkki A.

    This monograph contains the second section, operations at the variable level, of a report of studies done in Helsinki, Finland, describing school achievement in terms of ability, trait, situational, and background variables. The report (1) investigates the structure of school achievement, (2) describes school achievement in terms of selected…

  20. The Social Demand for a Medicine Focused on the Person: The Contribution of CAM to Healthcare and Healthgenesis

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    The Non Conventional Medicines have a greater social impact and the demand for such treatments of more than 10 million Italian citizens (male and female) of all ages and social classes and of thousands of Italian families reveals an interest proving that there is a trend reversal, involving also other sectors of the medical and scientific world, which shifts the focus from the symptom to an idea of more general and comprehensive well-being of the person. Over the last few years the scientific debate on Non Conventional Medicines and their integration with the academic or dominant medicine in our western society has favored and legitimated an increase in the demand and has activated a cultural transformation process involving the life styles. The focus is therefore shifted to the self-healing capacities, to the reawakening of the individual potentialities, which support and amplify the benefits of the treatments and the citizens start pretending to be accurately informed in order to choose freely their own health program. PMID:18227933

  1. Sustainable medical research by effective and comprehensive medical skills: overcoming the frontiers by predictive, preventive and personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical research and practice require affordable objectives, sustainable tools, rewarding training strategies and meaningful collaboration. Method Our unit delivers courses on project design and management promoting ideas, useful skills, teaching and exploring implementation of networks and existing collaborations. We investigated the effectiveness of a sustainable approach of comprehensive diagnosis and care and its usefulness within concrete models of research project teaching methodology. Results The model of predictive, preventive and personalized medicine (PPPM) of adolescent hypertension, developed since 1976 and still active, was displayed. This is a paradigm of comprehensive PPPM aimed at the management of a recognized, but actually neglected, societal and clinical problem. The second model was addressed to the analysis of performance of an outpatient diagnostic and therapy unit and its relationship with the emergency department. Part of the patients, 4,057 cancer patients presenting at the emergency care, were addressed to the outpatient diagnostic and therapy unit for further assessment, treatment and follow-up. The stay in DH was 6.3 ± 2.1 non-consecutive days, with shortage of costs, vs. in-hospital stays. Research planning courses, based on these models, ensued in an increase of competitive project submission and successful funding. Discussion Active promotion of interdisciplinary knowledge and skills is warranted. Misleading messages and information are detrimental not only to healthy and sick people but, equally, to all health professionals: efforts for basing on evidence by research any statement are needed. The actual pre-requisite of personalized medicine is the coherent and articulated promotion of the professional quality of staff. Health professionals should and can be skilled in sustainable non-invasive diagnostic procedures, in non-pharmacological intervention, in translational research (from epidemiology to personalized

  2. Academic Achievement: The Unique Contribution of Self-Efficacy Beliefs in Self-Regulated Learning beyond Intelligence, Personality Traits, and Self-Esteem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuffiano, Antonio; Alessandri, Guido; Gerbino, Maria; Kanacri, Bernadette Paula Luengo; Di Giunta, Laura; Milioni, Michela; Caprara, Gian Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the contribution of self-efficacy beliefs in self-regulated learning (SESRL) in predicting academic achievement at the end of junior high school above and beyond the effects of previous academic achievement, gender, socioeconomic status, intelligence, personality traits, and self-esteem. Participants included 170 (87…

  3. Personality.

    PubMed

    Funder, D C

    2001-01-01

    Personality psychology is as active today as at any point in its history. The classic psychoanalytic and trait paradigms are active areas of research, the behaviorist paradigm has evolved into a new social-cognitive paradigm, and the humanistic paradigm is a basis of current work on cross-cultural psychology. Biology and evolutionary theory have also attained the status of new paradigms for personality. Three challenges for the next generation of research are to integrate these disparate approaches to personality (particularly the trait and social-cognitive paradigms), to remedy the imbalance in the person-situation-behavior triad by conceptualizing the basic properties of situations and behaviors, and to add to personality psychology's thin inventory of basic facts concerning the relations between personality and behavior.

  4. Personalized Kampo Medicine Facilitated Both Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Response and Clinical Benefits Induced by Personalized Peptide Vaccination for Advanced Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yutani, Shigeru; Shichijo, Shigeki; Sakamoto, Shinjiro; Naito, Masayasu; Okuda, Koji; Morita, Michi; Yamaguchi, Rin; Itoh, Kyogo

    2016-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated if personalized Kampo medicine (PKM) could facilitate CTL responses and clinical benefits induced by personalized peptide vaccination (PPV), in which HLA-matched vaccines were selected and administered based on the preexisting host immunity, for advanced esophageal cancer (aEC) patients. Among 34 aEC patients entered in the clinical study, 23 patients received PKM and PPV without (n = 12) or with chemotherapy (n = 11), while the remaining 11 patients did not receive PKM but received PPV without (n = 6) or with chemotherapy (n = 5), respectively. Incidence of adverse events was significantly lower or higher in PKM and PPV arm (n = 23) or PPV and chemotherapy arm (n = 16) as compared to that of the counter arm (n = 11 or 18), respectively. Postvaccination PBMCs from the patients undergoing PKM and PPV showed significantly higher CTL responses as compared to the counter arm. The median progression-free survival (PFS) or median survival time (MST) of 34 patients was 2.9 or 7.6 months, respectively. The combination therapy in PPV and PKM arm, but not that in PPV and chemotherapy arm, significantly (P = 0.02) prolonged MST. These results could warrant a next step of prospective clinical study of PKM and PPV for aEC patients. PMID:27703488

  5. Twenty-five years of research on medicinal plants in Latin America: a personal view.

    PubMed

    Calixto, João B

    2005-08-22

    In this short article, I have discussed (on the base of the Web of Science data base search), the expressive progress of Latin American scientific production in peer review journals in the field of plants over the last 25 years. In addition, some effort has been made towards discussing the relevance of medicinal plants for the development of standardized phytomedicines with proof of quality, safety and efficacy, and a few examples of success have been briefly mentioned.

  6. Personal and family perfectionism of Taiwanese college students: relationships with depression, self-esteem, achievement motivation, and academic grades.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kenneth T

    2012-01-01

    An increasing number of perfectionism studies have been conducted across different countries outside of the Western framework. Using an international egalitarian approach that adopts indigenous frameworks and concepts from the cultural context of the population studied is imperative. This study examines different groups of perfectionists with a sample of 348 Taiwanese college students, emphasizing the collectivistic culture. In particular, this is a follow-up study to further explore characteristics of a group with low standards/high discrepancy--a feeling that they are not good enough despite having low standards--found in a previous study with Taiwanese students. More specifically, this study investigates whether the source of the high discrepancy scores among this group is related to having higher perfectionistic standards from their family. Perfectionism was examined not only from a personal/individualistic perspective, but also from a familistic dimension to reflect Taiwanese collectivistic cultural values. Results partially supported the hypotheses--this group reported having higher family discrepancy, but not family standards, than nonperfectionists. However, this group of participants reported lower academic grades, which implies the possibility of their discrepancy being associated with poorer performance. Four cluster groups--adaptive perfectionists, maladaptive perfectionists, nonperfectionists, and those with low standards/high discrepancy--were compared on their levels of depression, self-esteem, achievement motivation, and academic grades. Maladaptive perfectionists reported the highest depression level, while adaptive perfectionists reported the highest self-esteem. Results also show that aspects of personal perfectionism and family perfectionism related to self-esteem differently among this sample. Findings and implications are discussed with consideration of the collectivistic cultural context in Taiwan.

  7. Personalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Rebecca Martin

    1996-01-01

    Describes how a typical high school in Huntington Beach, California, curbed disruptive student behavior by personalizing the school experience for "problem" students. Through mostly volunteer efforts, an adopt-a-kid program was initiated that matched kids' learning styles to adults' personality styles and resulted in fewer suspensions and numerous…

  8. Moving beyond genome sequencing into personalized genomic medicine: biological and computing challenges

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A report of the second annual Beyond the Genome conference held on the 19-22 September 2011 at The Universities at Shady Grove, Rockville, Maryland, USA, where increases in computing that may help make personal genomics a reality were a major focus. PMID:22023790

  9. Can Self-Declared Personal Values Be Used to Identify Those with Family Medicine Career Aspirations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beach, Renee A.; Eva, Kevin W.; Reiter, Harold I.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Self-declaration of personal values has been suggested as a means of identifying students with greater predilection for future primary care careers. While statistically significant differences have been demonstrated, absolute differences between those interested in primary care and those interested in specialist careers tend to be small.…

  10. Towards Personalized Medicine Based on Platelet Function Testing for Stent Thrombosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Godschalk, Thea Cornelia; Hackeng, Christian Marcus; ten Berg, Jurriën Maria

    2012-01-01

    Stent thrombosis (ST) is a severe and feared complication of coronary stenting. Patients who have suffered from ST are usually treated according to the “one-size-fits-all” dosing regimen of aspirin and clopidogrel. Many ST patients show high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HPR) despite this antiplatelet therapy (APT). It has been shown that HPR is a risk factor for major adverse cardiac events. Therefore, ST patients with HPR are at a high risk for recurrent atherothrombotic events. New insights into the variable response to clopidogrel and the advent of stronger P2Y12 inhibitors prasugrel and ticagrelor have changed the attention from a fixed APT treatment strategy towards “personalized APT strategies.” Strategies can be based on platelet function testing, which gives insight into the overall response of a patient to APT. At our outpatient ST clinic, we practice personalized APT based on platelet function testing to guide the cardiologist to a presumed optimal antiplatelet treatment of ST patients. Beside results of platelet function testing, comedication, clinical characteristics, and genetics have to be considered to decide on personalized APT. Ongoing studies have yet to reveal the optimal personalized APT strategy for cardiologists to prevent their patients from atherothrombotic and bleeding events. PMID:23320159

  11. Psychosomatic approach is the new medicine tailored for patient personality with a focus on ethics, economy, and quality.

    PubMed

    Fassino, S

    2010-09-01

    influence the results of treatment projects. Because all these aspects impact upon illness duration and quality of life, affecting both the individual concerned and his or her family, the economic consequences of this psychosomatic approach are important in both general and specialist medicine. Medicine is becoming, and will become even more in the future, an integrated science; human illness and the maintenance of good health may be better understood if all medical disciplines are considered as a whole. The domain of psychosomatic medicine has now extended to coincide with that of medical practice. There is increasing evidence, not only in psychiatry, but in all medical fields, that care of the mental well-being of a person is essential for effective care of the body. Not only mens sana in corpore sano, but also corpus sanus in mente sana.

  12. Taking Personalized Medicine Seriously: Biomarker Approaches in Phase IIb/III Studies in Major Depression and Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Laughren, Thomas; Lamers, Femke; Picard, Rosalind; Walther, Sebastian; Goff, Donald; Sainati, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The success rate in the development of psychopharmacological compounds is insufficient. Two main reasons for failure have been frequently identified: 1) treating the wrong patients and 2) using the wrong dose. This is potentially based on the known heterogeneity among patients, both on a syndromal and a biological level. A focus on personalized medicine through better characterization with biomarkers has been successful in other therapeutic areas. Nevertheless, obstacles toward this goal that exist are 1) the perception of a lack of validation, 2) the perception of an expensive and complicated enterprise, and 3) the perception of regulatory hurdles. The authors tackle these concerns and focus on the utilization of biomarkers as predictive markers for treatment outcome. The authors primarily cover examples from the areas of major depression and schizophrenia. Methodologies covered include salivary and plasma collection of neuroendocrine, metabolic, and inflammatory markers, which identified subgroups of patients in the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety. A battery of vegetative markers, including sleep-electroencephalography parameters, heart rate variability, and bedside functional tests, can be utilized to characterize the activity of a functional system that is related to treatment refractoriness in depression (e.g., the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system). Actigraphy and skin conductance can be utilized to classify patients with schizophrenia and provide objective readouts for vegetative activation as a functional marker of target engagement. Genetic markers, related to folate metabolism, or folate itself, has prognostic value for the treatment response in patients with schizophrenia. Already, several biomarkers are routinely collected in standard clinical trials (e.g., blood pressure and plasma electrolytes), and appear to be differentiating factors for treatment outcome. Given the availability of a wide variety of markers, the further development

  13. Genomics, molecular imaging, bioinformatics, and bio-nano-info integration are synergistic components of translational medicine and personalized healthcare research.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jack Y; Yang, Mary Qu; Arabnia, Hamid R; Deng, Youping

    2008-01-01

    Supported by National Science Foundation (NSF), International Society of Intelligent Biological Medicine (ISIBM), International Journal of Computational Biology and Drug Design and International Journal of Functional Informatics and Personalized Medicine, IEEE 7th Bioinformatics and Bioengineering attracted more than 600 papers and 500 researchers and medical doctors. It was the only synergistic inter/multidisciplinary IEEE conference with 24 Keynote Lectures, 7 Tutorials, 5 Cutting-Edge Research Workshops and 32 Scientific Sessions including 11 Special Research Interest Sessions that were designed dynamically at Harvard in response to the current research trends and advances. The committee was very grateful for the IEEE Plenary Keynote Lectures given by: Dr. A. Keith Dunker (Indiana), Dr. Jun Liu (Harvard), Dr. Brian Athey (Michigan), Dr. Mark Borodovsky (Georgia Tech and President of ISIBM), Dr. Hamid Arabnia (Georgia and Vice-President of ISIBM), Dr. Ruzena Bajcsy (Berkeley and Member of United States National Academy of Engineering and Member of United States Institute of Medicine of the National Academies), Dr. Mary Yang (United States National Institutes of Health and Oak Ridge, DOE), Dr. Chih-Ming Ho (UCLA and Member of United States National Academy of Engineering and Academician of Academia Sinica), Dr. Andy Baxevanis (United States National Institutes of Health), Dr. Arif Ghafoor (Purdue), Dr. John Quackenbush (Harvard), Dr. Eric Jakobsson (UIUC), Dr. Vladimir Uversky (Indiana), Dr. Laura Elnitski (United States National Institutes of Health) and other world-class scientific leaders. The Harvard meeting was a large academic event 100% full-sponsored by IEEE financially and academically. After a rigorous peer-review process, the committee selected 27 high-quality research papers from 600 submissions. The committee is grateful for contributions from keynote speakers Dr. Russ Altman (IEEE BIBM conference keynote lecturer on combining simulation and machine

  14. Personalized medicine in sporadic pancreatic cancer without homologous recombination-deficiency: are we any closer?

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related death in the United States. Most patients are diagnosed at a late stage and despite recent advances in chemotherapeutic approaches, outcomes are poor. With the introduction of combination chemotherapy, novel biomarkers are clearly needed to identify subsets of patients likely to benefit from these therapies. Advances in our understanding of the molecular drivers of pancreatic cancer offer the hope of personalized therapy that may benefit our patients. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the biology of pancreatic cancer and its implication for treatment. We discuss recent advances in targeted therapies and the role of potential biomarkers in predicting response to established therapies. We also review novel therapeutic approaches that may be able to fulfill the promise of personalized therapy for pancreatic cancer. PMID:27747087

  15. Evidence-based medicine meets person-centred care: a collaborative perspective on the relationship.

    PubMed

    Price, Amy I; Djulbegovic, Ben; Biswas, Rakesh; Chatterjee, Pranab

    2015-12-01

    In a recent list-serve, the way forward for evidence-based medicine was discussed. The purpose of this paper was to share the reflections and multiple perspectives discussed in this peer-to-peer encounter and to invite the reader to think with a mind for positive change in the practice of health care. Let us begin with a simple question. What if we dared to look at evidence-based medicine (EBM) and informed shared decision making like two wheels on a bike? They both need to be full of substance, well connected, lubricated and working in balance, propelled and guided by a competent driver, with good vision to get the bike where we want it to go. We need all the tools in the toolkit for the bike to stay operational and to meet the needs of the driver. By the same rationale, evidence alone is necessary but not sufficient for decision making; values are necessary and if neglected, may default to feelings based on social pressures and peer influence. Medical decisions, even shared ones, lack focus without evidence and application. Just as a bike may need a tune up from time to time to maintain optimal performance, EBM may benefit from a tune up where we challenge ourselves to move away from general assumptions and traditions and instead think clearly about the issues we face and how to ask well-formed, specific questions to get the answers to meet the needs we face in health care.

  16. Model-guided therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma: a role for information technology in predictive, preventive and personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Predictive, preventive and personalized medicine (PPPM) may have the potential to eventually improve the nature of health care delivery. However, the tools required for a practical and comprehensive form of PPPM that is capable of handling the vast amounts of medical information that is currently available are currently lacking. This article reviews a rationale and method for combining and integrating diagnostic and therapeutic management with information technology (IT), in a manner that supports patients through their continuum of care. It is imperative that any program devised to explore and develop personalized health care delivery must be firmly rooted in clinically confirmed and accepted principles and technologies. Therefore, a use case, relating to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), was developed. The approach to the management of medical information we have taken is based on model theory and seeks to implement a form of model-guided therapy (MGT) that can be used as a decision support system in the treatment of patients with HCC. The IT structures to be utilized in MGT include a therapy imaging and model management system (TIMMS) and a digital patient model (DPM). The system that we propose will utilize patient modeling techniques to generate valid DPMs (which factor in age, physiologic condition, disease and co-morbidities, genetics, biomarkers and responses to previous treatments). We may, then, be able to develop a statistically valid methodology, on an individual basis, to predict certain diseases or conditions, to predict certain treatment outcomes, to prevent certain diseases or complications and to develop treatment regimens that are personalized for that particular patient. An IT system for predictive, preventive and personalized medicine (ITS-PM) for HCC is presented to provide a comprehensive system to provide unified access to general medical and patient-specific information for medical researchers and health care providers from different

  17. Global metabolic profiling and its role in systems biology to advance personalized medicine in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Schnackenberg, Laura K

    2007-05-01

    Systems biology attempts to elucidate the complex interaction between genes, proteins and metabolites to provide a mechanistic understanding of cellular function and how this function is affected by disease processes, drug toxicity or drug efficacy effects. Global metabolic profiling is an important component of systems biology that can be applied in both preclinical and clinical settings for drug discovery and development, and to study disease mechanisms. The metabolic profile encodes the phenotype, which is composed of the genotype and environmental factors. The phenotypic profile can be used to make decisions about the best course of treatment for an individual patient. Understanding the combined effects of genetics and environment through a systems biology framework will enable the advancement of personalized medicine.

  18. Structure and function of multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins (MATEs) and their relevance to drug therapy and personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Nies, Anne T; Damme, Katja; Kruck, Stephan; Schaeffeler, Elke; Schwab, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    Multidrug and toxin extrusion (MATE; SLC47A) proteins are membrane transporters mediating the excretion of organic cations and zwitterions into bile and urine and thereby contributing to the hepatic and renal elimination of many xenobiotics. Transported substrates include creatinine as endogenous substrate, the vitamin thiamine and a number of drug agents with in part chemically different structures such as the antidiabetic metformin, the antiviral agents acyclovir and ganciclovir as well as the antibiotics cephalexin and cephradine. This review summarizes current knowledge on the structural and molecular features of human MATE transporters including data on expression and localization in different tissues, important aspects on regulation and their functional role in drug transport. The role of genetic variation of MATE proteins for drug pharmacokinetics and drug response will be discussed with consequences for personalized medicine. PMID:27165417

  19. Available Tools to Facilitate Early Patient Access to Medicines in the EU and the USA: Analysis of Conditional Approvals and the Implications for Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Leyens, Lada; Richer, Étienne; Melien, Øyvind; Ballensiefen, Wolfgang; Brand, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Scientific knowledge and our understanding of the human body and diseases have limited any possible treatment tailoring to each patient. The technological advances enabling the integration of various data sets (e.g. '-omics', microbiome, epigenetics and environmental exposure) have facilitated a greater understanding of the human body, the molecular basis of disease and all the factors influencing disease onset, progression and response to treatment, thereby ushering in the era of personalized medicine. We evaluate the regulatory approaches available to facilitate early patient access to efficacious and safe compounds in the EU and the USA in order to make more informed recommendations in the future as to the gaps in regulations for early patient access. An in-depth analysis of conditional approvals (EU) and accelerated approvals (USA) is performed based on the publicly available information (European public assessment reports and a summary review of products approved under both programmes). The types of product, indications, time to approval and type of evidence submitted were analysed. Between 2007 and early 2015, 17 products were conditionally approved in the EU and 25 in the USA, most of them in the area of oncology and based on evidence from phase II clinical trial data. Early approval of promising products based on data from early phases of development is already possible in the EU and the USA. Some of the improvements could entail implementing a rolling assessment of evidence in Europe and extending the scope of early dialogues.

  20. Comprehensive establishment and characterization of orthoxenograft mouse models of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors for personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Castellsagué, Joan; Gel, Bernat; Fernández-Rodríguez, Juana; Llatjós, Roger; Blanco, Ignacio; Benavente, Yolanda; Pérez-Sidelnikova, Diana; García-del Muro, Javier; Viñals, Joan Maria; Vidal, August; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; Terribas, Ernest; López-Doriga, Adriana; Pujana, Miguel Angel; Capellá, Gabriel; Puente, Xose S; Serra, Eduard; Villanueva, Alberto; Lázaro, Conxi

    2015-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are soft-tissue sarcomas that can arise either sporadically or in association with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). These aggressive malignancies confer poor survival, with no effective therapy available. We present the generation and characterization of five distinct MPNST orthoxenograft models for preclinical testing and personalized medicine. Four of the models are patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDTX), two independent MPNSTs from the same NF1 patient and two from different sporadic patients. The fifth model is an orthoxenograft derived from an NF1-related MPNST cell line. All MPNST orthoxenografts were generated by tumor implantation, or cell line injection, next to the sciatic nerve of nude mice, and were perpetuated by 7–10 mouse-to-mouse passages. The models reliably recapitulate the histopathological properties of their parental primary tumors. They also mimic distal dissemination properties in mice. Human stroma was rapidly lost after MPNST engraftment and replaced by murine stroma, which facilitated genomic tumor characterization. Compatible with an origin in a catastrophic event and subsequent genome stabilization, MPNST contained highly altered genomes that remained remarkably stable in orthoxenograft establishment and along passages. Mutational frequency and type of somatic point mutations were highly variable among the different MPNSTs modeled, but very consistent when comparing primary tumors with matched orthoxenografts generated. Unsupervised cluster analysis and principal component analysis (PCA) using an MPNST expression signature of ~1,000 genes grouped together all primary tumor–orthoxenograft pairs. Our work points to differences in the engraftment process of primary tumors compared with the engraftment of established cell lines. Following standardization and extensive characterization and validation, the orthoxenograft models were used for initial preclinical drug testing. Sorafenib (a

  1. Re-focusing the ethical discourse on personalized medicine: a qualitative interview study with stakeholders in the German healthcare system

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years, personalized medicine (PM) has become a highly regarded line of development in medicine. Yet, it is still a relatively new field. As a consequence, the discussion of its future developments, in particular of its ethical implications, in most cases can only be anticipative. Such anticipative discussions, however, pose several challenges. Nevertheless, they play a crucial role for shaping PM’s further developments. Therefore, it is vital to understand how the ethical discourse on PM is conducted, i.e. on what – empirical and normative – assumptions ethical arguments are based regarding PM’s current and future developments. Methods To gather this information, we conducted a qualitative interview study with stakeholders in the German health care system. Our purposive sample included 17 representatives of basic research, clinical research, health economics, regulatory authorities, reimbursement institutions, pharmaceutical industry, patient organizations, as well as clinicians and legal experts involved in PM developments or policy making. We used an interview guide with open-ended questions and analyzed transcriptions of the interviews by means of qualitative content analysis. Results The respondents addressed a multitude of concerns in the context of research on as well as application of personalized preventive and therapeutic measures both on the individual and on the societal level. Interestingly, regarding future developments of PM the ethical evaluation seemed to follow the rule: the less likely its application, the more problematic a PM measure is assessed. The more likely its application, on the other hand, the less problematic it is evaluated. Conclusions The results of our study suggest re-focusing the ethical discourse on PM in Germany towards a constructive ethical monitoring which ensures to include only, nevertheless all of the actual and/or potential concerns that are ethically relevant in order to allow balancing them

  2. Simplistic and complex thought in medicine: the rationale for a person-centered care model as a medical revolution

    PubMed Central

    Reach, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    According to the concept developed by Thomas Kuhn, a scientific revolution occurs when scientists encounter a crisis due to the observation of anomalies that cannot be explained by the generally accepted paradigm within which scientific progress has thereto been made: a scientific revolution can therefore be described as a change in paradigm aimed at solving a crisis. Described herein is an application of this concept to the medical realm, starting from the reflection that during the past decades, the medical community has encountered two anomalies that, by their frequency and consequences, represent a crisis in the system, as they deeply jeopardize the efficiency of care: nonadherence of patients who do not follow the prescriptions of their doctors, and clinical inertia of doctors who do not comply with good practice guidelines. It is proposed that these phenomena are caused by a contrast between, on the one hand, the complex thought of patients and doctors that sometimes escapes rationalization, and on the other hand, the simplification imposed by the current paradigm of medicine dominated by the technical rationality of evidence-based medicine. It is suggested therefore that this crisis must provoke a change in paradigm, inventing a new model of care defined by an ability to take again into account, on an individual basis, the complex thought of patients and doctors. If this overall analysis is correct, such a person-centered care model should represent a solution to the two problems of patients’ nonadherence and doctors’ clinical inertia, as it tackles their cause. These considerations may have important implications for the teaching and the practice of medicine. PMID:27103790

  3. Simplistic and complex thought in medicine: the rationale for a person-centered care model as a medical revolution.

    PubMed

    Reach, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    According to the concept developed by Thomas Kuhn, a scientific revolution occurs when scientists encounter a crisis due to the observation of anomalies that cannot be explained by the generally accepted paradigm within which scientific progress has thereto been made: a scientific revolution can therefore be described as a change in paradigm aimed at solving a crisis. Described herein is an application of this concept to the medical realm, starting from the reflection that during the past decades, the medical community has encountered two anomalies that, by their frequency and consequences, represent a crisis in the system, as they deeply jeopardize the efficiency of care: nonadherence of patients who do not follow the prescriptions of their doctors, and clinical inertia of doctors who do not comply with good practice guidelines. It is proposed that these phenomena are caused by a contrast between, on the one hand, the complex thought of patients and doctors that sometimes escapes rationalization, and on the other hand, the simplification imposed by the current paradigm of medicine dominated by the technical rationality of evidence-based medicine. It is suggested therefore that this crisis must provoke a change in paradigm, inventing a new model of care defined by an ability to take again into account, on an individual basis, the complex thought of patients and doctors. If this overall analysis is correct, such a person-centered care model should represent a solution to the two problems of patients' nonadherence and doctors' clinical inertia, as it tackles their cause. These considerations may have important implications for the teaching and the practice of medicine. PMID:27103790

  4. In Search of the Perfect Business Model: As personalized medicine moves into the mainstream, makers of diagnostics must face a new economic reality. How to develop a value proposition in a healthcare market that is becoming increasingly elastic?

    PubMed

    Carlson, Bob

    2012-01-01

    As personalized medicine edges toward the mainstream, economic realities threaten its existence. But without companion diagnostics, "getting the right drug to the right person" could wind up being just a slogan. What's the right business model? PMID:22606077

  5. MassARRAY determination of somatic oncogenic mutations in solid tumors: Moving forward to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Fleitas, Tania; Ibarrola-Villava, Maider; Ribas, Gloria; Cervantes, Andrés

    2016-09-01

    This article will review the impact of the recently developed MassARRAY technology on our understanding of cancer biology and treatment. Analysis of somatic mutations is a useful tool in selecting personalized therapy, and for predicting the outcome of many solid tumors. Here, we review the literature on the application of MassARRAY technology (Sequenom Hamburg, Germany) to determine the mutation profile of solid tumors from patients. We summarize the use of commercially available panels of mutations - such as OncoCarta™ or other combinations - and their concordance with results obtained by using other technologies, such as next generation sequencing. PMID:27501018

  6. Targeted Nanotheranostics for Future Personalized Medicine: Recent Progress in Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Jo, Sung Duk; Ku, Sook Hee; Won, You-Yeon; Kim, Sun Hwa; Kwon, Ick Chan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, many theranostic nanomaterials have been developed by integrating therapeutic and diagnostic agents in a single regimen. Real-time visualization of nano drug carrier biodistributions, drug release processes and therapeutic responses can provide critical information needed for dynamically optimizing treatment operations in a personalized manner in real time. This review highlights recent progresses in the development of multifunctional nanoparticles possessing both therapeutic and imaging functionalities for cancer therapy. The advantages of using nanoparticle platforms are discussed. Examples demonstrating various combinations of imaging and therapeutic modalities are highlighted. PMID:27375785

  7. Targeted Nanotheranostics for Future Personalized Medicine: Recent Progress in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Sung Duk; Ku, Sook Hee; Won, You-Yeon; Kim, Sun Hwa; Kwon, Ick Chan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, many theranostic nanomaterials have been developed by integrating therapeutic and diagnostic agents in a single regimen. Real-time visualization of nano drug carrier biodistributions, drug release processes and therapeutic responses can provide critical information needed for dynamically optimizing treatment operations in a personalized manner in real time. This review highlights recent progresses in the development of multifunctional nanoparticles possessing both therapeutic and imaging functionalities for cancer therapy. The advantages of using nanoparticle platforms are discussed. Examples demonstrating various combinations of imaging and therapeutic modalities are highlighted. PMID:27375785

  8. [Phronesis: Medicine's indispensable virtue].

    PubMed

    Moreno Villares, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Facing those who defend that Medicine is not but an applied science, Pellegrino argues that the ultimate goal of Medicine is facing to a human being in his illness condition. Thus, it is not sufficient to have scientific knowledge but proximity to man kindness. Cure is not the only goal -achievable in only a few cases- but healing, caring with a person as an ill person and as a person. For this reason, professional competence is not enough; the physician needs to have the necessary dispositions to be a good person, a good professional. To get the goals of Medicine, the physician has to achieve those qualities who allow him to do the good he is intended to, that is, he needs to be virtuous. Prudence -phronesis- is the virtue that allows him to apply a general rule to a particular case and, furthermore, addresses his actions to be not only technically correct, but excellent. Prudence is, then, the link between intellectual virtues and moral virtues. Pellegrino's main objective has been to elaborate a Philosophy of Medicine, different from the Philosophy of Science, useful for clinical practice and used by clinical practitioners. By nurturing prudence, a small bit of the final goal is reached: the healing, the goodness for the sick. This should be possible if we are embedded in a moral community, and for Pellegrino, sharing knowledge and ethical values is the way of being part of a moral community. PMID:24836033

  9. The resonance phenomenon in population persistence: can the same theory guide both national security policies and personalized medicine?

    PubMed Central

    Agur, Zvia

    2014-01-01

    The theory of resonance in population persistence proposes that the survival of a population that is exposed to externally inflicted loss processes (disturbances) during part of its life cycle is dependent on the relation between the average period of the disturbances and the average generation time of the population. This suggests that the size of a population can be controlled by manipulating the period between external disturbances. This theory, first formalized in a study of intertidal Red Sea mollusks exposed to periodic storms, has been found to apply to such seemingly disparate phenomena as the spread of a pathogen among susceptible individuals and the response of malignant cancer cells to chemotherapy. The current article provides a brief review of the evolution of the resonance theory into a tool that can be applied to designing vaccination policies – specifically, in preparedness for bio-terrorism attacks – and in personalized medicine. A personalized protocol based on the resonance theory was applied to a cancer patient, stabilizing his tumor progression, relieving his hematopoietic toxicity, and extending his survival. PMID:24778095

  10. [Personal and dignified death. The role of pastoral care in palliative medicine].

    PubMed

    Breit-Keßler, Susanne

    2016-03-01

    Palliative pastoral care is not about "adding days to life, but about "adding life to days". It does not matter whether the dying process is short or long. What matters is to ensure the best possible quality of life until the very end through mindful companionship. Palliative pastoral care is a path towards a personal dying, dying where the person is taken seriously as an individual until the last moment. Palliative care includes medical assistance, careful care, psychosocial support, and counselling that addresses the spiritual needs of the dying. This palliative care includes inpatient and outpatient hospice work and accompanies not only the patients but also their relatives. It must become the standard procedure in end of life care. The palliative pastoral care also take the needs of medical staff into account: Time-consuming care for the dying exceeds the staff's time budget. A sudden death can be perceived as traumatic. In this case palliative pastoral care must perform the tasks of crisis management, crisis intervention and de-escalation. The debriefing of involved staff can prevent the development of burn-out syndrome. In the view of holistic healthcare, health insurance funds should co-finance pastoral care. Society and humanity benefit from addressing the needs of the dying. In an economically dominated environment it is a social responsibility to make dying humane. PMID:26983110

  11. Management of non-small cell lung cancer in the era of personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Gaetano; Morabito, Alessandro; Leone, Alessandra; Muto, Paolo; Fiore, Francesco; Budillon, Alfredo

    2016-09-01

    Despite major advances in the molecular definition of the disease, screening and therapy, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is still characterized by a disappointing overall survival, depending on subtype and tumor stage. To address this challenge, in the last years the therapeutic algorithm of NSCLC has become much more complex and articulated, with different kinds of drugs, including chemotherapy, targeted-based agents, angiogenesis inhibitors and immunotherapy, and multiple lines of treatments, for patients with squamous and non-squamous hystology, EGFR mutation and ALK rearrangement. This short viewpoint describes the emerging strategies for the management of NSCLC, indicating how a personalized approach, characterized by a specific multidisciplinary involvement, implies a process that starts with early detection and includes surgery and systemic therapy. PMID:27425397

  12. [Clinical nutrition therapy in patients with short bowel syndrome in line with principles of personalized medicine].

    PubMed

    Sahin, Péter; Molnár, Andrea; Varga, Mária; Bíró, Ilona; Kőmíves, Csilla; Fejér, Csaba; Futó, Judit; Tomsits, Erika; Topa, Lajos

    2014-12-21

    Home parenteral nutrition administered in selected care centres has been financed in Hungary since January, 2013. The authors discuss diagnostic issues, treatment and nutrition therapy of short bowel syndrome patients in line with the principles of personalised medicine. The most severe form of short bowel syndrome occurs in patients having jejunostomy, whose treatment is discussed separately. The authors give a detailed overview of home parenteral feeding, its possible complications, outcomes and adaptation of the remaining bowel. They describe how their own care centre operates where they administer home parenteral nutrition to 12 patients with short bowel syndrome (5 females and 7 males aged 51.25±14.4 years). The body mass index was 19.07±5.08 kg/m2 and 20.87±3.3 kg/m2, skeletal muscle mass was 25.7±6.3 kg and 26.45±5.38 kg, and body fat mass was 14.25±8.55 kg and 11.77±2.71 kg at the start of home parenteral nutrition and presently, respectively. The underlying conditions of short bowel syndrome were tumours in 4 patients, bowel ischaemia in four patients, surgical complications in three patients, Crohn's disease in one patient, and Crohn's disease plus tumour in one patient.

  13. Personalized medicine: theranostics (therapeutics diagnostics) essential for rational use of tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonists.

    PubMed

    Bendtzen, Klaus

    2013-04-01

    With the discovery of the central pathogenic role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha in many immunoinflammatory diseases, specific inhibition of this pleiotropic cytokine has revolutionized the treatment of patients with several non-infectious inflammatory disorders. As a result, genetically engineered anti-TNF-alpha antibody constructs now constitute one of the heaviest medicinal expenditures in many countries. All currently used TNF antagonists may dramatically lower disease activity and, in some patients, induce remission. Unfortunately, however, not all patients respond favorably, and safety can be severely impaired by immunogenicity, i.e., the ability of a drug to induce anti-drug antibodies (ADA). Assessment of ADA is therefore an important component of the evaluation of drug safety in both pre-clinical and clinical studies and in the process of developing less immunogenic and safer biopharmaceuticals. Therapeutics diagnostics, also called theranostics, i.e., monitoring functional drug levels and neutralizing ADA in the circulation, is central to more effective use of biopharmaceuticals. Hence, testing-based strategies rather than empirical dose-escalation may provide more cost-effective use of TNF antagonists as this allows therapies tailored according to individual requirements rather than the current universal approach to diagnosis. The objective of the present review is to discuss the reasons for recommending theranostics to implement an individualized use of TNF antagonists and to highlight some of the methodological obstacles that have obscured cost-effective ways of using these therapies.

  14. Cancer: an emergent property of disturbed resource-rich environments? Ecology meets personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ducasse, Hugo; Arnal, Audrey; Vittecoq, Marion; Daoust, Simon P; Ujvari, Beata; Jacqueline, Camille; Tissot, Tazzio; Ewald, Paul; Gatenby, Robert A; King, Kayla C; Bonhomme, François; Brodeur, Jacques; Renaud, François; Solary, Eric; Roche, Benjamin; Thomas, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    For an increasing number of biologists, cancer is viewed as a dynamic system governed by evolutionary and ecological principles. Throughout most of human history, cancer was an uncommon cause of death and it is generally accepted that common components of modern culture, including increased physiological stresses and caloric intake, favor cancer development. However, the precise mechanisms for this linkage are not well understood. Here, we examine the roles of ecological and physiological disturbances and resource availability on the emergence of cancer in multicellular organisms. We argue that proliferation of ‘profiteering phenotypes’ is often an emergent property of disturbed, resource-rich environments at all scales of biological organization. We review the evidence for this phenomenon, explore it within the context of malignancy, and discuss how this ecological framework may offer a theoretical background for novel strategies of cancer prevention. This work provides a compelling argument that the traditional separation between medicine and evolutionary ecology remains a fundamental limitation that needs to be overcome if complex processes, such as oncogenesis, are to be completely understood. PMID:26136819

  15. Challenges and disparities in the application of personalized genomic medicine to populations with African ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Michael D.; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura; Taub, Margaret A.; Shetty, Amol C.; Maloney, Kristin; Jeng, Linda Jo Bone; Ruczinski, Ingo; Levin, Albert M.; Williams, L. Keoki; Beaty, Terri H.; Mathias, Rasika A.; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Boorgula, Meher Preethi; Campbell, Monica; Chavan, Sameer; Ford, Jean G.; Foster, Cassandra; Gao, Li; Hansel, Nadia N.; Horowitz, Edward; Huang, Lili; Ortiz, Romina; Potee, Joseph; Rafaels, Nicholas; Scott, Alan F.; Vergara, Candelaria; Gao, Jingjing; Hu, Yijuan; Johnston, Henry Richard; Qin, Zhaohui S.; Padhukasahasram, Badri; Dunston, Georgia M.; Faruque, Mezbah U.; Kenny, Eimear E.; Gietzen, Kimberly; Hansen, Mark; Genuario, Rob; Bullis, Dave; Lawley, Cindy; Deshpande, Aniket; Grus, Wendy E.; Locke, Devin P.; Foreman, Marilyn G.; Avila, Pedro C.; Grammer, Leslie; Kim, Kwang-YounA; Kumar, Rajesh; Schleimer, Robert; Bustamante, Carlos; De La Vega, Francisco M.; Gignoux, Chris R.; Shringarpure, Suyash S.; Musharoff, Shaila; Wojcik, Genevieve; Burchard, Esteban G.; Eng, Celeste; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Hernandez, Ryan D.; Lizee, Antoine; Pino-Yanes, Maria; Torgerson, Dara G.; Szpiech, Zachary A.; Torres, Raul; Nicolae, Dan L.; Ober, Carole; Olopade, Christopher O.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo; Oluwole, Oluwafemi; Arinola, Ganiyu; Song, Wei; Abecasis, Goncalo; Correa, Adolfo; Musani, Solomon; Wilson, James G.; Lange, Leslie A.; Akey, Joshua; Bamshad, Michael; Chong, Jessica; Fu, Wenqing; Nickerson, Deborah; Reiner, Alexander; Hartert, Tina; Ware, Lorraine B.; Bleecker, Eugene; Meyers, Deborah; Ortega, Victor E.; Pissamai, Maul R. N.; Trevor, Maul R. N.; Watson, Harold; Araujo, Maria Ilma; Oliveira, Ricardo Riccio; Caraballo, Luis; Marrugo, Javier; Martinez, Beatriz; Meza, Catherine; Ayestas, Gerardo; Herrera-Paz, Edwin Francisco; Landaverde-Torres, Pamela; Erazo, Said Omar Leiva; Martinez, Rosella; Mayorga, Alvaro; Mayorga, Luis F.; Mejia-Mejia, Delmy-Aracely; Ramos, Hector; Saenz, Allan; Varela, Gloria; Vasquez, Olga Marina; Ferguson, Trevor; Knight-Madden, Jennifer; Samms-Vaughan, Maureen; Wilks, Rainford J.; Adegnika, Akim; Ateba-Ngoa, Ulysse; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; O'Connor, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    To characterize the extent and impact of ancestry-related biases in precision genomic medicine, we use 642 whole-genome sequences from the Consortium on Asthma among African-ancestry Populations in the Americas (CAAPA) project to evaluate typical filters and databases. We find significant correlations between estimated African ancestry proportions and the number of variants per individual in all variant classification sets but one. The source of these correlations is highlighted in more detail by looking at the interaction between filtering criteria and the ClinVar and Human Gene Mutation databases. ClinVar's correlation, representing African ancestry-related bias, has changed over time amidst monthly updates, with the most extreme switch happening between March and April of 2014 (r=0.733 to r=−0.683). We identify 68 SNPs as the major drivers of this change in correlation. As long as ancestry-related bias when using these clinical databases is minimally recognized, the genetics community will face challenges with implementation, interpretation and cost-effectiveness when treating minority populations. PMID:27725664

  16. Cancer: an emergent property of disturbed resource-rich environments? Ecology meets personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Ducasse, Hugo; Arnal, Audrey; Vittecoq, Marion; Daoust, Simon P; Ujvari, Beata; Jacqueline, Camille; Tissot, Tazzio; Ewald, Paul; Gatenby, Robert A; King, Kayla C; Bonhomme, François; Brodeur, Jacques; Renaud, François; Solary, Eric; Roche, Benjamin; Thomas, Frédéric

    2015-07-01

    For an increasing number of biologists, cancer is viewed as a dynamic system governed by evolutionary and ecological principles. Throughout most of human history, cancer was an uncommon cause of death and it is generally accepted that common components of modern culture, including increased physiological stresses and caloric intake, favor cancer development. However, the precise mechanisms for this linkage are not well understood. Here, we examine the roles of ecological and physiological disturbances and resource availability on the emergence of cancer in multicellular organisms. We argue that proliferation of 'profiteering phenotypes' is often an emergent property of disturbed, resource-rich environments at all scales of biological organization. We review the evidence for this phenomenon, explore it within the context of malignancy, and discuss how this ecological framework may offer a theoretical background for novel strategies of cancer prevention. This work provides a compelling argument that the traditional separation between medicine and evolutionary ecology remains a fundamental limitation that needs to be overcome if complex processes, such as oncogenesis, are to be completely understood. PMID:26136819

  17. [Clinical nutrition therapy in patients with short bowel syndrome in line with principles of personalized medicine].

    PubMed

    Sahin, Péter; Molnár, Andrea; Varga, Mária; Bíró, Ilona; Kőmíves, Csilla; Fejér, Csaba; Futó, Judit; Tomsits, Erika; Topa, Lajos

    2014-12-21

    Home parenteral nutrition administered in selected care centres has been financed in Hungary since January, 2013. The authors discuss diagnostic issues, treatment and nutrition therapy of short bowel syndrome patients in line with the principles of personalised medicine. The most severe form of short bowel syndrome occurs in patients having jejunostomy, whose treatment is discussed separately. The authors give a detailed overview of home parenteral feeding, its possible complications, outcomes and adaptation of the remaining bowel. They describe how their own care centre operates where they administer home parenteral nutrition to 12 patients with short bowel syndrome (5 females and 7 males aged 51.25±14.4 years). The body mass index was 19.07±5.08 kg/m2 and 20.87±3.3 kg/m2, skeletal muscle mass was 25.7±6.3 kg and 26.45±5.38 kg, and body fat mass was 14.25±8.55 kg and 11.77±2.71 kg at the start of home parenteral nutrition and presently, respectively. The underlying conditions of short bowel syndrome were tumours in 4 patients, bowel ischaemia in four patients, surgical complications in three patients, Crohn's disease in one patient, and Crohn's disease plus tumour in one patient. PMID:25497156

  18. Spatial Rotation, Aggression, and Gender in First-Person-Shooter Video Games and Their Influence on Math Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krone, Beth K.

    2012-01-01

    As shown by the neuropsychological educational approach to the cognitive remediation model, first-person-shooter video game play eliminates gender-related deficits in spatial rotation. Spatial rotation increases academic success and decreases social and economic disparities. Per the general aggression model, first-person-shooter video game play…

  19. Personalized respiratory medicine: exploring the horizon, addressing the issues. Summary of a BRN-AJRCCM workshop held in Barcelona on June 12, 2014.

    PubMed

    Agustí, Alvar; Antó, Josep Maria; Auffray, Charles; Barbé, Ferran; Barreiro, Esther; Dorca, Jordi; Escarrabill, Joan; Faner, Rosa; Furlong, Laura I; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Gea, Joaquim; Lindmark, Bertil; Monsó, Eduard; Plaza, Vicente; Puhan, Milo A; Roca, Josep; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan; Sampietro-Colom, Laura; Sanz, Ferran; Serrano, Luis; Sharpe, James; Sibila, Oriol; Silverman, Edwin K; Sterk, Peter J; Sznajder, Jacob I

    2015-02-15

    This Pulmonary Perspective summarizes the content and main conclusions of an international workshop on personalized respiratory medicine coorganized by the Barcelona Respiratory Network ( www.brn.cat ) and the AJRCCM in June 2014. It discusses (1) its definition and historical, social, legal, and ethical aspects; (2) the view from different disciplines, including basic science, epidemiology, bioinformatics, and network/systems medicine; (3) the bottlenecks and opportunities identified by some currently ongoing projects; and (4) the implications for the individual, the healthcare system and the pharmaceutical industry. The authors hope that, although it is not a systematic review on the subject, this document can be a useful reference for researchers, clinicians, healthcare managers, policy-makers, and industry parties interested in personalized respiratory medicine.

  20. The Five-Factor Model of Personality and Its Relationship to Cognitive Style (Rush and Prudence) and Academic Achievement among a Sample of Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barakat, Asia; Othman, Afaf

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to identify the relationship between the five-factor model of personality and its relationship to cognitive style (rush and prudence) and academic achievement among a sample of students. The study is based on descriptive approach for studying the relationship between the variables of the study, results and analysis. The…