Science.gov

Sample records for achieving turbine throttle

  1. Throttling mud choke apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Claycomb, J.R.

    1983-03-22

    Mud choke apparatus is disclosed, and the preferred embodiment has the form of a hollow, tubular body receiving a mud flow introduced from a lateral port, the flow being directed through an axial passage and past a valve seat. The valve seat is a replaceable, hardened metal liner and is formed with a gradual taper so that the mud flows from the large end through the tapered, smaller end. Thereafter, it flows out of the body through an axial opening. The flow of mud is throttled by a tapered, hardened plug serving as a valve element which is received into the valve seat. A hydraulic cylinder and piston with a connecting rod move the plug. The plug has a surrounding, perpendicular shoulder which seals and seats against a shoulder on the insert to fully close the throttling valve apparatus. Flow is choked by inserting the tapered plug with controlled clearance into the tapered valve seat.

  2. Carburetion system including an adjustable throttle linkage

    SciTech Connect

    Du Bois, C.G.; Falig, J.D.

    1986-03-25

    A throttle linkage assembly is described comprising a throttle shaft rotatable about a throttle shaft axis between an idle position and a wide open throttle position, a throttle plate fixed on the throttle shaft, a driven lever pivotable about the throttle shaft axis between various angles relative to the throttle plate, and means for fixing the driven lever at a selected angle relative to the throttle plate an adjustment lever fixedly connected to the throttle adjacent the driven lever, and means for releasably securing the driven lever to the adjustment lever.

  3. A Historical Systems Study of Liquid Rocket Engine Throttling Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, Erin M.; Frederick, Robert A., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    This is a comprehensive systems study to examine and evaluate throttling capabilities of liquid rocket engines. The focus of this study is on engine components, and how the interactions of these components are considered for throttling applications. First, an assessment of space mission requirements is performed to determine what applications require engine throttling. A background on liquid rocket engine throttling is provided, along with the basic equations that are used to predict performance. Three engines are discussed that have successfully demonstrated throttling. Next, the engine system is broken down into components to discuss special considerations that need to be made for engine throttling. This study focuses on liquid rocket engines that have demonstrated operational capability on American space launch vehicles, starting with the Apollo vehicle engines and ending with current technology demonstrations. Both deep throttling and shallow throttling engines are discussed. Boost and sustainer engines have demonstrated throttling from 17% to 100% thrust, while upper stage and lunar lander engines have demonstrated throttling in excess of 10% to 100% thrust. The key difficulty in throttling liquid rocket engines is maintaining an adequate pressure drop across the injector, which is necessary to provide propellant atomization and mixing. For the combustion chamber, cooling can be an issue at low thrust levels. For turbomachinery, the primary considerations are to avoid cavitation, stall, surge, and to consider bearing leakage flows, rotordynamics, and structural dynamics. For valves, it is necessary to design valves and actuators that can achieve accurate flow control at all thrust levels. It is also important to assess the amount of nozzle flow separation that can be tolerated at low thrust levels for ground testing.

  4. Achieving better cooling of turbine blades using numerical simulation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inozemtsev, A. A.; Tikhonov, A. S.; Sendyurev, C. I.; Samokhvalov, N. Yu.

    2013-02-01

    A new design of the first-stage nozzle vane for the turbine of a prospective gas-turbine engine is considered. The blade's thermal state is numerically simulated in conjugate statement using the ANSYS CFX 13.0 software package. Critical locations in the blade design are determined from the distribution of heat fluxes, and measures aimed at achieving more efficient cooling are analyzed. Essentially lower (by 50-100°C) maximal temperature of metal has been achieved owing to the results of the performed work.

  5. Adjustable throttle linkage for outboard motors

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, W.D.; Miller, G.L.

    1986-02-17

    An adjustable throttle linkage is described for use in controlling operation of an internal combustion engine having a carburetor including a pivotable throttle valve, a throttle valve position control member operably connected to the throttle valve and movable so as to control the position of the throttle valve, and a throttle lever for controlling the position of the throttle valve. The adjustable throttle linkage comprises a connecting link having one end connected to one of the throttle lever and the control member, and having a threaded portion, means for adjustably connecting the threaded portion to the other of the throttle lever and the control member. The adjustable connecting means includes a slot in the other of the throttle lever and the control member, and a rotatable member threaded onto the threaded portion and receive in the slot such that rotation of the rotatable member causes relative movement between the link and the other of the throttle lever and the control member.

  6. Timing and throttle linkage

    SciTech Connect

    Wenstadt, T.D.; Hagen, M.W.

    1986-11-18

    This patent describes a timing throttle control for a spark ignition internal combustion engine having a fuel/air mixing device and a spark timing device. The control comprises a first pivot on the engine, a first lever mounted on the pivot and including a cam slot having a first portion which has a substantially uniform radius about the pivot and a second portion which has a non-constant radii about the first pivot. A control means is connected to the first lever to actuate the first lever about the first pivot, a second pivot on the engine in non-parallel relation to the first pivot. A second lever is mounted on the second pivot and operative to control the timing of the spark timing device, a spherical cam follower is mounted on the second lever and engaged with the cam slot. A third lever is mounted on the third pivot and operatively connected to the fuel/air mixing device. A link interconnects the first level and the third lever.

  7. Dynamic model for controller design of condensate throttling systems.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong; Zeng, De-Liang; Liu, Ji-Zhen; Zhao, Zheng; Li, Ya-zhe

    2015-09-01

    Improving the load adjustment rate of coal-fired power plants in China is very important because of grid load fluctuations and the construction of new large-scale power plants connected to the country's power grid. In this paper, a new application of condensate throttling system for rapid load adjustment is proposed on the basis of the characteristics of turbine-stored energy. To ensure effective and safe operation of the condensate throttling system, a non-linear control model is derived through reasonable simplifications of fundamental physical laws, and the model parameters are identified using experimental data from a 660 MW supercritical coal-fired power plant. The model outputs are compared with actual measured data for different unit loads. Results show that the established model's responses strongly correlate with the actual unit's responses and can be used for controller design. PMID:26206068

  8. Deep Throttle Turbopump Technology Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, T. V.; Guinzburg, A.; McGlynn, R. D.; Williams, M.

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of this viewgraph presentation were to: (1) enhance and demonstrate critical technologies in support of planned RBCC flight test programs; and (2) obtain knowledge of wide flow range as it is applicable to liquid rocket engine turbopumps operating over extreme throttle ranges. This program was set up to demonstrate wide flow range diffuser technologies. The testing phase of the contract to provide data to anchor initial designs was partially successful. Data collected suggest flow phenomena exists at off-design flow rates.

  9. Background and principles of throttles-only flight control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    There have been many cases in which the crew of a multi-engine airplane had to use engine thrust for emergency flight control. Such a procedure is very difficult, because the propulsive control forces are small, the engine response is slow, and airplane dynamics such as the phugoid and dutch roll are difficult to damp with thrust. In general, thrust increases are used to climb, thrust decreases to descend, and differential thrust is used to turn. Average speed is not significantly affected by changes in throttle setting. Pitch control is achieved because of pitching moments due to speed changes, from thrust offset, and from the vertical component of thrust. Roll control is achieved by using differential thrust to develop yaw, which, through the normal dihedral effect, causes a roll. Control power in pitch and roll tends to increase as speed decreases. Although speed is not controlled by the throttles, configuration changes are often available (lowering gear, flaps, moving center-of-gravity) to change the speed. The airplane basic stability is also a significant factor. Fuel slosh and gyroscopic moments are small influences on throttles-only control. The background and principles of throttles-only flight control are described.

  10. 49 CFR 230.88 - Throttles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Throttles. 230.88 Section 230.88 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Throttles...

  11. On instationary mechanisms in cavitating micro throttles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beban, B.; Legat, S.; Schmidt, S. J.; Adams, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    The current investigation presents numerical simulations of cavitating flows in a simplified model of a mushroom valve chamber of a piezo common rail injection system. Two discharge throttles with different step diameters are investigated. The developed models are able to predict relevant features of cavitating flow in fuel injectors. Special attention is put on the investigation of wave dynamics and related instationary mechanisms in the discharge throttle and the valve chamber. To this respect, a compressible flow solver with a homogeneous mixture model and barotropic description of the diesel-like-fluid is utilized. Highly unsteady phenomena are observed in both investigated designs. The structure of the cavitating flow is further analyzed with an emphasis on the interaction between collapsing vapor clouds in the throttle step and reentrant motion in the discharge throttle. Furthermore, numerical simulations reveal significant influence of the throttle step diameter on the cavity dynamics.

  12. Controlling crippled aircraft-with throttles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Fullerton, C. Gordon

    1991-01-01

    A multiengine crippled aircraft, with most or all of the flight control system inoperative, may use engine thrust for control. A study was conducted of the capability and techniques for emergency flight control. Included were light twin engine piston powered airplanes, an executive jet transport, commercial jet transports, and a high performance fighter. Piloted simulations of the B-720, B-747, B-727, MD-11, C-402, and F-15 airplanes were studied, and the Lear 24, PA-30, and F-15 airplanes were flight tested. All aircraft showed some control capability with throttles and could be kept under control in up-and-away flight for an extended period of time. Using piloted simulators, landings with manual throttles-only control were extremely difficult. However, there are techniques that improve the chances of making a survivable landing. In addition, augmented control systems provide major improvements in control capability and make repeatable landings possible. Control capabilities and techniques are discussed.

  13. Deep Throttle Turbopump Technology Design Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinzburg, Adiel; Williams, Morgan; Ferguson, Tom; Garcia, Roberto (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this project is to increase the throttling range of turbopumps from 30 to 120% of the design value, while maintaining high performance levels. Details are given on wide flow range issues, H-Q characteristics, stall characteristics, energy levels, pressure fluctuations at impeller exit, WFR impeller characteristics, commercial diffuser pumps, slotted or tandem vanes, leading edge characteristics, leading edge models, throat models, diffusion passage models, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodologies, and CFD flow cases.

  14. Throttle coil operation of TMX-U

    SciTech Connect

    Correll, D.L.; Byers, J.A.; Casper, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    A tandem-mirror configuration with an axisymmetric central cell, similar to the geometry of MARS (Mirror Advanced Reactor Study) or the Kelley-TDF mode of MFTB-B, can be generated by inserting a 6-tesla, throttle coil in each end of the TMX-U central cell. The throttle coil geometry of TMX-U will test the physics issues associated with axisymmetric tandem-mirror reactors, such issues as: (1) increased radial confinement time for central-cell ions confined by axisymmetric mirror cells and electrostatic potentials; (2) theoretical limits set by the trapped particle instability for the required passing density between the central cell and the end-cell anchor; and (3) pumping of trapped particles within the thermal barrier and transition regions with methods other than neutral beams. The central-cell plasma parameters for the throttle coil geometry are evaluated for two operating points. The first requires heating hardware (neutral beams and ECRH) and vacuum performance at the TMX-U proposal level, yielding plasma parameters, central-cell betas, and plasma confinement exceeding those of the original TMX-U proposal. The second operating point, requiring approximately half the ECRH end-cell performance of the first, is predicted to equal the beta and to exceed the plasma pressure and confinement time of the central cell in the standard TMX-U geometry.

  15. Closed-loop thrust and pressure profile throttling of a nitrous oxide/hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene hybrid rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Zachary W.

    Hybrid motors that employ non-toxic, non-explosive components with a liquid oxidizer and a solid hydrocarbon fuel grain have inherently safe operating characteristics. The inherent safety of hybrid rocket motors offers the potential to greatly reduce overall operating costs. Another key advantage of hybrid rocket motors is the potential for in-flight shutdown, restart, and throttle by controlling the pressure drop between the oxidizer tank and the injector. This research designed, developed, and ground tested a closed-loop throttle controller for a hybrid rocket motor using nitrous oxide and hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene as propellants. The research simultaneously developed closed-loop throttle algorithms and lab scale motor hardware to evaluate the fidelity of the throttle simulations and algorithms. Initial open-loop motor tests were performed to better classify system parameters and to validate motor performance values. Deep-throttle open-loop tests evaluated limits of stable thrust that can be achieved on the test hardware. Open-loop tests demonstrated the ability to throttle the motor to less than 10% of maximum thrust with little reduction in effective specific impulse and acoustical stability. Following the open-loop development, closed-loop, hardware-in-the-loop tests were performed. The closed-loop controller successfully tracked prescribed step and ramp command profiles with a high degree of fidelity. Steady-state accuracy was greatly improved over uncontrolled thrust.

  16. Flight Investigation of an Automatic Throttle Control in Landing Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lina, Lindsay J.; Champine, Robert A.; Morris, Garland J.

    1959-01-01

    A flight investigation of an automatic throttle control in landing approaches has been made. It was found that airspeed could be maintained satisfactorily by the automatic throttle control. Turbulent air caused undesirably large variations of engine power which were uncomfortable and disconcerting; nevertheless, the pilot felt that he could make approaches 5 knots slower with equal assurance when the automatic control was in operation.

  17. Liquid-fuel valve with precise throttling control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdougal, A. R.; Porter, R. N.; Riebling, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    Prototype liquid-fuel valve performs on-off and throttling functions in vacuum without component cold-welding or excessive leakage. Valve design enables simple and rapid disassembly and parts replacement and operates with short working stroke, providing maximum throttling sensitivity commensurate with good control.

  18. Micro throttle pump employing displacement amplification in an elastomeric substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, I. D.; Tracey, M. C.; Davis, J. B.; Tan, C. K. L.

    2005-10-01

    We report a micro throttle pump (MTP) with enhanced throttling resulting from beneficial deformation of its elastomer substrate. In the MTP reported, this has doubled the effective deflection of the piezo electric (PZT) actuator with a consequent five-fold enhancement of throttling ratio. This mode of throttling has been modelled by finite element method and computational fluid dynamic techniques whose predictions agreed well with experimental data from a throttle test structure; providing typical throttling ratios of 8:1 at low pressures. The improved throttles have been incorporated in a prototype, single PZT, MTP, fabricated with double-depth microfluidics, which pumped both water and a suspension of 5 µm polystyrene beads at a maximum flow rate of 630 µl min-1 and a maximum back-pressure of 30 kPa at a pumping frequency of 1.1 kHz. This represents an approximate five-fold enhancement of both performance metrics compared to our previous single PZT device.

  19. Increasing pumping efficiency in a micro throttle pump by enhancing displacement amplification in an elastomeric substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, T.; Johnston, I. D.; Tracey, M. C.; Tan, C. K. L.

    2010-06-01

    Fluid transport is accomplished in a micro throttle pump (MTP) by alternating deformation of a micro channel cast into a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomeric substrate. The active deformation is achieved using a bimorph PZT piezoelectric disc actuator bonded to a glass diaphragm. The bimorph PZT deflects the diaphragm as well as alternately pushing and pulling the elastomer layer providing displacement amplification in the PDMS directly surrounding the micro channel. In order to improve pumping rates we have embedded a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) ring into the PMDS substrate which increases the magnitude of the displacement amplification achieved. FEM simulation of the elastomeric substrate deformation predicts that the inclusion of the PMMA ring should increase the channel deformation. We experimentally demonstrate that inclusion of a PMMA ring, having a diameter equal to that of the circular node of the PZT/glass/PDMS composite, increases in the throttle resistance ratio by 40% and the maximum pumping rate by 90% compared to an MTP with no ring.

  20. Fuel conservation through throttling. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Currens, V.C.; Edwards, R.G.

    1981-12-01

    A study was conducted during the 1980 to 1981 heating season to investigate the hypothesis that reducing the gas flow to residential furnaces might result in more efficient operation. The residential gas-fired furnaces of the two investigators were instrumented to enable the accurate monitoring of gas usage, and throttling valves were installed to permit reducing the gas flow rate. During the winter heating season, different input gas flow rates were set on each furnace, and gas consumed, climatological data, and other pertinent data carefully recorded each day. The net result from the study revealed a 12.5% increase in efficiency when one furnace was operated at 73% rather than at the full gas flow rate, while a 5.4% increase in efficiency was demonstrated from the other furnace when operated at 71% rather than at the full input gas flow rate. This limited study, therefore, illustrated a 9% average increase in efficiency attributable to simply reducing the input gas flow rate by about 30%. As a consequence from this pilot study, the D.O.E. funded a follow-on study whereby the technique will be applied to 12 homes in the Lexington, Kentucky area during the 1981 to 1982 heating season to ascertain if similar increased efficiencies can be demonstrated.

  1. Throttle Up! J-2X Powerpack Test Sets Record

    NASA Video Gallery

    During a record-breaking June 8 test, engineers throttled the J-2X powerpack up and down several times to explore numerous operating points required for the fuel and oxidizer turbopumps. The result...

  2. Experimental Results for an Annular Aerospike with Differential Throttling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph H.; McDaniels, David M.

    2005-01-01

    A) MSFC funded an internal study on Altitude Compensating Nozzles: 1) Develop an ACN design and performance prediction tool. 2) Design, build and test cold flow ACN nozzles. 3) An annular aerospike nozzle was designed and tested. 4) Incorporated differential throttling to assess Thrust Vector Control. B) Objective of the test hardware: 1) Provide design tool verification. 2) Provide benchmark data for CFD calculations. 3) Experimentally measure side force, or TVC, for a differentially throttled annular aerospike.

  3. Liquid-Propellant Rocket Engine Throttling: A Comprehensive Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casiano, Matthew; Hulka, James; Yang, Virog

    2009-01-01

    Liquid-Propellant Rocket Engines (LREs) are capable of on-command variable thrust or thrust modulation, an operability advantage that has been studied intermittently since the late 1930s. Throttleable LREs can be used for planetary entry and descent, space rendezvous, orbital maneuvering including orientation and stabilization in space, and hovering and hazard avoidance during planetary landing. Other applications have included control of aircraft rocket engines, limiting of vehicle acceleration or velocity using retrograde rockets, and ballistic missile defense trajectory control. Throttleable LREs can also continuously follow the most economical thrust curve in a given situation, compared to discrete throttling changes over a few select operating points. The effects of variable thrust on the mechanics and dynamics of an LRE as well as difficulties and issues surrounding the throttling process are important aspects of throttling behavior. This review provides a detailed survey of LRE throttling centered around engines from the United States. Several LRE throttling methods are discussed, including high-pressure-drop systems, dual-injector manifolds, gas injection, multiple chambers, pulse modulation, throat throttling, movable injector components, and hydrodynamically dissipative injectors. Concerns and issues surrounding each method are examined, and the advantages and shortcomings compared.

  4. Northrop Grumman TR202 LOX/GH2 Deep Throttling Pintle Injector Performance, Stability, and Heat Transfer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chianese, S. G.; Gromski, J. M.; Weinstock, V. D.; Majamaki, A. N.; Litchford, R. J.; Foote, J. P.; Wall, T. R.

    2010-01-01

    Engineers from Northrop Grumman and NASA MSFC are teaming to develop deep throttling technologies for future crewed lunar descent engines for NASA s Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) program. A complete TR202 conceptual engine design has been completed. Pintle injector technology development is the current project focus because injector operation relates to many of the overall engine technology challenges, and injector characteristics contribute significantly to combustion chamber and overall cycle design. In order to maximize injector and engine capability provided to lunar mission and vehicle designers, it is important to understand injector performance, stability, and heat transfer characteristics across a large throttle range and over a range of mixture ratios. The mixing and vaporization effectiveness of an injector can be characterized by C* efficiency and energy release efficiency (ERE). Heat transfer characteristics of the injector can be studied using calorimetry chamber hardware. The primary objectives of this test program were: a) Achieve >98 C*% efficiency at high throttle settings (.75% power). b) Avoid low frequency and high frequency instability over a 10:1 throttle range with a high performing injector. c) Measure heat flow to combustion chamber walls, and determine if there is enough heat flow to close a deep throttling expander engine cycle balance, while maintaining reasonable combustion chamber wall temperatures. The TR202 test-bed pintle injector was designed and built for flexibility and operability on the test stand, with a DOE testing approach. Heavy-weight hardware was used for structural margin, though flow passages were flight-like. Throttling of the LOX flow area was achieved by the use of shims that controlled how far the pintle injector LOX slots protruded into the combustion chamber. TR202 test-bed pintle injector testing was conducted at NASA MSFC s test stand 116 and NASA MSFC combustion chamber calorimetry

  5. CECE: Expanding the Envelope of Deep Throttling Technology in Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Hydrogen Rocket Engines for NASA Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giuliano, Victor J.; Leonard, Timothy G.; Lyda, Randy T.; Kim, Tony S.

    2010-01-01

    As one of the first technology development programs awarded by NASA under the Vision for Space Exploration, the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) Deep Throttling, Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine (CECE) program was selected by NASA in November 2004 to begin technology development and demonstration toward a deep throttling, cryogenic engine supporting ongoing trade studies for NASA s Lunar Lander descent stage. The CECE program leverages the maturity and previous investment of a flight-proven hydrogen/oxygen expander cycle engine, the PWR RL10, to develop and demonstrate an unprecedented combination of reliability, safety, durability, throttlability, and restart capabilities in high-energy, cryogenic, in-space propulsion. The testbed selected for the deep throttling demonstration phases of this program was a minimally modified RL10 engine, allowing for maximum current production engine commonality and extensibility with minimum program cost. Four series of demonstrator engine tests have been successfully completed between April 2006 and April 2010, accumulating 7,436 seconds of hot fire time over 47 separate tests. While the first two test series explored low power combustion (chug) and system instabilities, the third test series investigated and was ultimately successful in demonstrating several mitigating technologies for these instabilities and achieved a stable throttling ratio of 13:1. The fourth test series significantly expanded the engine s operability envelope by successfully demonstrating a closed-loop control system and extensive transient modeling to enable lower power engine starting, faster throttle ramp rates, and mission-specific ignition testing. The final hot fire test demonstrated a chug-free, minimum power level of 5.9%, corresponding to an overall 17.6:1 throttling ratio achieved. In total, these tests have provided an early technology demonstration of an enabling cryogenic propulsion concept with invaluable system-level technology data

  6. Development Status of the CECE Cryogenic Deep Throttling Demonstrator Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    As one of the first technology development programs awarded by NASA under the U.S. Space Exploration Policy (USSEP), the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) Deep Throttling, Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine (CECE) program was selected by NASA in November 2004 to begin technology development and demonstration toward a deep throttling, cryogenic engine supporting ongoing trade studies for NASA's Lunar Lander descent stage. The CECE program leverages the maturity and previous investment of a flight-proven hydrogen/oxygen expander cycle engine, the PWR RLI0, to develop and demonstrate an unprecedented combination of reliability, safety, durability, throttlability, and restart capabilities in a high-energy, cryogenic engine. The testbed selected for the deep throttling demonstration phases of this program was a minimally modified RL10 engine, allowing for maximum current production engine commonality and extensibility with minimum program cost. Two series of demonstrator engine tests, the first in April-May 2006 and the second in March-April 2007, have demonstrated in excess of 10:1 throttling of the hydrogen/oxygen expander cycle engine. Both test series have explored a combustion instability ("chug") environment at low throttled power levels. These tests have provided an early demonstration of an enabling cryogenic propulsion concept with invaluable system-level technology data acquisition toward design and development risk mitigation for future CECE Demonstrator engine tests.

  7. Manual Manipulation of Engine Throttles for Emergency Flight Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Fullerton, C. Gordon; Maine, Trindel A.

    2004-01-01

    If normal aircraft flight controls are lost, emergency flight control may be attempted using only engines thrust. Collective thrust is used to control flightpath, and differential thrust is used to control bank angle. Flight test and simulation results on many airplanes have shown that pilot manipulation of throttles is usually adequate to maintain up-and-away flight, but is most often not capable of providing safe landings. There are techniques that will improve control and increase the chances of a survivable landing. This paper reviews the principles of throttles-only control (TOC), a history of accidents or incidents in which some or all flight controls were lost, manual TOC results for a wide range of airplanes from simulation and flight, and suggested techniques for flying with throttles only and making a survivable landing.

  8. Four-way, full-throttling valve concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shockey, J. S.

    1970-01-01

    Valve regulates the flow of a fluid over the limits from full flow in one direction to full flow in the opposite direction. At the midpoint valve position both flow paths are closed. Gradually increasing port size on both flow paths results in good throttling characteristics.

  9. Low Thrust, Deep Throttling, US/CIS Integrated NTRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culver, Donald W.; Kolganov, Vyacheslav; Rochow, Richard F.

    1994-07-01

    In 1993 our international team performed a follow-on ``Nuclear Thermal Rocket Engine (NTRE) Extended Life Feasibility Assessment'' study for the Nuclear Propulsion Office (NPO) at NASAs Lewis Research Center. The main purpose of this study was to complete the 1992 study matrix to assess NTRE designs at thrust levels of 22.5, 11.3, and 6.8 tonnes, using Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) reactor technology. An additional Aerojet goal was to continue improving the NTRE concept we had generated. Deep throttling, mission performance optimized engine design parametrics, and reliability/cost enhancing engine system simplifications were studied, because they seem to be the last three basic design improvements sorely needed by post-NERVA NTRE. Deep throttling improves engine life by eliminating damaging thermal and mechanical shocks caused by after-cooling with pulsed coolant flow. Alternately, it improves mission performance with steady flow after-cooling by minimizing reactor over-cooling. Deep throttling also provides a practical transition from high pressures and powers of the high thrust power cycle to the low pressures and powers of our electric power generating mode. Two deep throttling designs are discussed; a workable system that was studied and a simplified system that is recommended for future study. Mission-optimized engine thrust/weight (T/W) and Isp predictions are included along with system flow schemes and concept sketches.

  10. SECOND FLOOR OF OPERATOR'S ROOM, WITH THROTTLE LEVER ABOVE TORQUE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SECOND FLOOR OF OPERATOR'S ROOM, WITH THROTTLE LEVER ABOVE TORQUE CONVERTER SWITCH, AT LEFT. MAGNETIC SOLENOID IS IN CENTER, HYDRAULIC BRAKE PUMP IS IN UPPER RIGHT, LOOKING WEST. - Mad River Glen, Single Chair Ski Lift, 62 Mad River Glen Resort Road, Fayston, Washington County, VT

  11. Achieving reliable operation of a steam turbine's automatic control and protection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, S. A.; Naumov, A. S.; Shvetsov, D. P.; Krymskii, A. V.

    2011-01-01

    The algorithms, procedures, and modules for making expert estimates of the technical state of automatic control and protection systems for different types of turbines by means of the SPIDER mobile computerized automation system are presented. It is shown that owing to high trustworthiness with which the kind and location of hidden defects of units are determined without disassembling them, repair works can be scheduled in the optimal way and the costs for carrying them out can be reduced.

  12. Preliminary Axial Flow Turbine Design and Off-Design Performance Analysis Methods for Rotary Wing Aircraft Engines. Part 2; Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shu-cheng, S.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, preliminary studies on two turbine engine applications relevant to the tilt-rotor rotary wing aircraft are performed. The first case-study is the application of variable pitch turbine for the turbine performance improvement when operating at a substantially lower shaft speed. The calculations are made on the 75 percent speed and the 50 percent speed of operations. Our results indicate that with the use of the variable pitch turbines, a nominal (3 percent (probable) to 5 percent (hypothetical)) efficiency improvement at the 75 percent speed, and a notable (6 percent (probable) to 12 percent (hypothetical)) efficiency improvement at the 50 percent speed, without sacrificing the turbine power productions, are achievable if the technical difficulty of turning the turbine vanes and blades can be circumvented. The second casestudy is the contingency turbine power generation for the tilt-rotor aircraft in the One Engine Inoperative (OEI) scenario. For this study, calculations are performed on two promising methods: throttle push and steam injection. By isolating the power turbine and limiting its air mass flow rate to be no more than the air flow intake of the take-off operation, while increasing the turbine inlet total temperature (simulating the throttle push) or increasing the air-steam mixture flow rate (simulating the steam injection condition), our results show that an amount of 30 to 45 percent extra power, to the nominal take-off power, can be generated by either of the two methods. The methods of approach, the results, and discussions of these studies are presented in this paper.

  13. Some aspects of flox-methane rocket engine throttling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, D. E.; Hannum, N. P.; Seigwarth, E. J.

    1974-01-01

    Four injector designs and two chamber profiles were experimentally evaluated for structural integrity, combustion efficiency, and resistance to combustion instabilities. Vacuum thrust measurements were used as a primary measure of combustion efficiency. Stability rating to test the sensitivity of the injectors to high frequency combustion was conducted, but not extensively. To map the boundary between stable operation and chugging instability, chamber pressure was throttled downward from 689.5 to 206.9 kN/sq m abs (100 to 30 psia). Best operational results were obtained with an injector configuration having no hydraulic swirlers, a 0.00102-m (0.040-in.) recessed FLOX tube, and a nonflared exit in the methane annulus. This injector design exhibited stable combustion and good integrity of hardware, and it exceeded the design goal efficiency (88 percent) at the 10 to 1 throttled condition.

  14. Diesel engine exhaust particulate filter with intake throttling incineration control

    SciTech Connect

    Ludecke, O.; Rosebrock, T.

    1980-07-08

    A description is given of a diesel engine exhaust filter and particulate incineration system in combination with a diesel engine having a normally unthrottled air induction system for admitting combustion air to the engine and an exhaust system for carrying off spent combustion products exhausted from the engine, said filter and incineration system comprising: a combustion resistant filter disposed in the exhaust system and operative to collect and retain portions of the largely carbonaceous particulate matter contained in the engine exhaust products, said fiber being capable of withstanding without substantial damage internal temperatures sufficient to burn the collected particulate matter, a throttle in the indication system and operable to restrict air flow into the engine to reduce the admittance of excess combustion air and thereby increase engine exhaust gas temperature, and means to actuate said throttle periodically during engine operation to an air flow restricting burn mode capable of raising the particulates in said filter to their combustion temperature under certain engine operating conditions and to maintain said throttle mode for an interval adequate to burn retained particulates in the filter.

  15. Unstable behaviour of RPT when testing turbine characteristics in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, T. K.; Fjørtoft Svarstad, M.

    2014-03-01

    A reversible pump turbine is a machine that can operate in three modes of operation i.e. in pumping mode. in turbine mode and in phase compensating mode (idle speed). Reversible pump turbines have an increasing importance for regulation purposes for obtaining power balance in electric power systems. Especially in grids dominated by thermal energy. reversible pump turbines improve the overall power regulating ability. Increased use of renewables (wind-. wave- and tidal power plants) will utterly demand better regulation ability of the traditional water power systems. enhancing the use of reversible pump turbines. A reversible pump turbine is known for having incredible steep speed - flow characteristics. As the speed increases the flow decreases more than that of a Francis turbines with the same specific speed. The steep characteristics might cause severe stability problems in turbine mode of operation. Stability in idle speed is a necessity for phasing in the generator to the electric grid. In the design process of a power plant. system dynamic simulations must be performed in order to check the system stability. The turbine characteristics will have to be modelled with certain accuracy even before one knows the exact turbine design and have measured characteristics. A representation of the RPT characteristics for system dynamic simulation purposes is suggested and compared with measured characteristics. The model shows good agreement with RPT characteristics measured in The Waterpower Laboratory. Because of the S-shaped characteristics. there is a stability issue involved when measuring these characteristics. Without special measures. it is impossible to achieve stable conditions in certain operational points. The paper discusses the mechanism when using a throttle to achieve system stability. even if the turbine characteristics imply instability.

  16. A 400-kWe high-efficiency steam turbine for industrial cogeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibowitz, H. M.

    1982-01-01

    An advanced state-of-the-art steam turbine-generator developed to serve as the power conversion subsystem for the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories' Solar Total-Energy Project (STEP) is described. The turbine-generator, which is designed to provide 400-kW of net electrical power, represents the largest turbine-generator built specifically for commercial solar-powered cogeneration. The controls for the turbine-generator incorporate a multiple, partial-arc entry to provide efficient off-design performance, as well as an extraction control scheme to permit extraction flow regulation while maintaining 110-spsig pressure. Normal turbine operation is achieved while synchronized to a local utility and in a stand-alone mode. In both cases, the turbine-generator features automatic load control as well as remote start-up and shutdown capability. Tests totaling 200 hours were conducted to confirm the integrity of the turbine's mechanical structure and control function. Performance tests resulted in a measured inlet throttle flow of 8,450 pounds per hour, which was near design conditions.

  17. A 400-kWe high-efficiency steam turbine for industrial cogeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibowitz, H. M.

    1982-07-01

    An advanced state-of-the-art steam turbine-generator developed to serve as the power conversion subsystem for the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories' Solar Total-Energy Project (STEP) is described. The turbine-generator, which is designed to provide 400-kW of net electrical power, represents the largest turbine-generator built specifically for commercial solar-powered cogeneration. The controls for the turbine-generator incorporate a multiple, partial-arc entry to provide efficient off-design performance, as well as an extraction control scheme to permit extraction flow regulation while maintaining 110-spsig pressure. Normal turbine operation is achieved while synchronized to a local utility and in a stand-alone mode. In both cases, the turbine-generator features automatic load control as well as remote start-up and shutdown capability. Tests totaling 200 hours were conducted to confirm the integrity of the turbine's mechanical structure and control function. Performance tests resulted in a measured inlet throttle flow of 8,450 pounds per hour, which was near design conditions.

  18. Test Rig for Evaluating Active Turbine Blade Tip Clearance Control Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lattime, Scott B.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Robbie, Malcolm G.

    2003-01-01

    Improved blade tip sealing in the high pressure compressor and high pressure turbine can provide dramatic improvements in specific fuel consumption, time-on-wing, compressor stall margin and engine efficiency as well as increased payload and mission range capabilities of both military and commercial gas turbine engines. The preliminary design of a mechanically actuated active clearance control (ACC) system for turbine blade tip clearance management is presented along with the design of a bench top test rig in which the system is to be evaluated. The ACC system utilizes mechanically actuated seal carrier segments and clearance measurement feedback to provide fast and precise active clearance control throughout engine operation. The purpose of this active clearance control system is to improve upon current case cooling methods. These systems have relatively slow response and do not use clearance measurement, thereby forcing cold build clearances to set the minimum clearances at extreme operating conditions (e.g., takeoff, re-burst) and not allowing cruise clearances to be minimized due to the possibility of throttle transients (e.g., step change in altitude). The active turbine blade tip clearance control system design presented herein will be evaluated to ensure that proper response and positional accuracy is achievable under simulated high-pressure turbine conditions. The test rig will simulate proper seal carrier pressure and temperature loading as well as the magnitudes and rates of blade tip clearance changes of an actual gas turbine engine. The results of these evaluations will be presented in future works.

  19. Terry turbine controls guide

    SciTech Connect

    Golas, R.S. . Steam Turbine Motor and Generator Div.); Wheeler, K.A. )

    1990-09-01

    While utility experience with Terry turbines has been positive, controls and adjustments of controls have required frequent attention. This technical guide addresses the Terry turbine controls, such as trip system, throttle valve linkage and governors. This guide will familiarize personnel who have not had prior experience with the design, organization and setup of these control systems. This document provides instructions for a broad range of utility personnel on optimum methods for the repair, maintenance, adjustment, and troubleshooting of the Terry turbine controls. The guide includes an engineering description of the operation and prevalent failure mechanisms, preventive and predictive maintenance suggestions, repair and adjustment methods, and spare parts recommendations. This guide will be a standalone updated reference manual. It will include drawings and descriptions affecting all required maintenance on the control system, and does not cover site specific appurtenances. Included are both generic and specific recommendations for utility maintenance engineers and technicians. These recommendations will help implement an effective maintenance or upgrade program for Terry turbine controls. This guide is a valuable resource for operating history and common control related problems. The preparation of this manual included the review of the applicable INPO Standby Turbine-Driven Pump Operating Experience Compilation. Individual utilities can use this guide to review their specific maintenance practices and develop improved procedures where applicable. The guide can also be used by some utilities to upgrade their Terry turbine control system. The guide is applicable to the nuclear industry and any other industry utilizing the Terry turbine models included in the document.

  20. Materials for advanced ultrasupercritical steam turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Purgert, Robert; Shingledecker, John; Saha, Deepak; Thangirala, Mani; Booras, George; Powers, John; Riley, Colin; Hendrix, Howard

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have sponsored a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired power plants capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than the current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of advanced ultrasupercritical (A-USC) steam conditions. A limiting factor in this can be the materials of construction for boilers and for steam turbines. The overall project goal is to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760°C (1400°F)/35MPa (5000 psi). This final technical report covers the research completed by the General Electric Company (GE) and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), with support from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) – Albany Research Center, to develop the A-USC steam turbine materials technology to meet the overall project goals. Specifically, this report summarizes the industrial scale-up and materials property database development for non-welded rotors (disc forgings), buckets (blades), bolting, castings (needed for casing and valve bodies), casting weld repair, and casting to pipe welding. Additionally, the report provides an engineering and economic assessment of an A-USC power plant without and with partial carbon capture and storage. This research project successfully demonstrated the materials technology at a sufficient scale and with corresponding materials property data to enable the design of an A-USC steam turbine. The key accomplishments included the development of a triple-melt and forged Haynes 282 disc for bolted rotor construction, long-term property development for Nimonic 105 for blading and bolting, successful scale-up of Haynes 282 and Nimonic 263 castings using

  1. Summary of the effects of engine throttle response on airplane formation-flying qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Kevin R.

    1992-01-01

    A flight evaluation as conducted to determine the effect of engine throttle response characteristics on precision formation-flying qualities. A variable electronic throttle control system was developed and flight-tested on a TF-104G airplane with a J79-11B engine at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility. Ten research flights were flown to evaluate the effects of throttle gain, time delay, and fuel control rate limiting on engine handling qualities during a demanding precision wing formation task. Handling quality effects of lag filters and lead compensation time delays were also evaluated. Data from pilot ratings and comments indicate that throttle control system time delays and rate limits cause significant degradations in handling qualities. Threshold values for satisfactory (level 1) and adequate (level 2) handling qualities of these key variables are presented.

  2. Flight testing and simulation of an F-15 airplane using throttles for flight control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Maine, Trindel; Wolf, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    Flight tests and simulation studies using the throttles of an F-15 airplane for emergency flight control have been conducted at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility. The airplane and the simulation are capable of extended up-and-away flight, using only throttles for flight path control. Initial simulation results showed that runway landings using manual throttles-only control were difficult, but possible with practice. Manual approaches flown in the airplane were much more difficult, indicating a significant discrepancy between flight and simulation. Analysis of flight data and development of improved simulation models that resolve the discrepancy are discussed. An augmented throttle-only control system that controls bank angle and flight path with appropriate feedback parameters has also been developed, evaluated in simulations, and is planned for flight in the F-15.

  3. A preliminary investigation of the use of throttles for emergency flight control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Fullerton, C. Gordon; Gilyard, Glenn B.; Wolf, Thomas D.; Stewart, James F.

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary investigation was conducted regarding the use of throttles for emergency flight control of a multiengine aircraft. Several airplanes including a light twin-engine piston-powered airplane, jet transports, and a high performance fighter were studied during flight and piloted simulations. Simulation studies used the B-720, B-727, MD-11, and F-15 aircraft. Flight studies used the Lear 24, Piper PA-30, and F-15 airplanes. Based on simulator and flight results, all the airplanes exhibited some control capability with throttles. With piloted simulators, landings using manual throttles-only control were extremely difficult. An augmented control system was developed that converts conventional pilot stick inputs into appropriate throttle commands. With the augmented system, the B-720 and F-15 simulations were evaluated and could be landed successfully. Flight and simulation data were compared for the F-15 airplane.

  4. A cryogenic heat exchanger with bypass and throttling and its thermodynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, X.; Liu, D. L.; Wang, L. Y.; Shen, J.; Gan, Z. H.

    2015-12-01

    A precooled Joule-Thomson (J-T) cooler refrigerates at liquid helium temperature. Its third stage heat exchanger works below 20 K. Hot fluid cannot be sufficiently cooled due to nonidealism of the heat exchanger and helium-4 properties. In a J-T cycle of low pressure ratio, the heat exchanger with bypass and throttling improves the refrigeration capacity. Bypass and throttling reduces the temperature difference and entropy generation within the heat exchanger.

  5. Numerical simulation of turbulent flow in the throttle of the MBIR reactor's low-pressure chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarunichev, V. A.; Orlova, E. E.; Lemekhov, Yu. V.; Shpanskii, V. A.

    2015-08-01

    This work in devoted to numerical calculation of turbulent flow in a labyrinth-type throttle. A system of such throttles is installed at the inlet to the MBIR reactor's low-pressure chamber and serves for setting up the required pressure difference and coolant flow rate. MBIR is a multipurpose fourthgeneration fast-neutron research reactor intended for investigating new kinds of nuclear fuel, structural materials, and coolants. The aim of this work is to develop a verified procedure for carrying out 3D calculation of the throttle using CFD modeling techniques. The investigations on determining the throttle hydraulic friction coefficient were carried out in the range of Reynolds numbers Re = 52000-136000. The reactor coolant (liquid sodium) was modeled by tap water. The calculations were carried out using high-Reynolds-number turbulence models with the near-wall functions k-ɛ and RNG k-ɛ, where k is the turbulent pulsation kinetic energy and ɛ is the turbulence kinetic energy dissipation rate. The obtained results have shown that the calculated value of hydraulic friction coefficient differs from its experimental value by no more than 10%. The developed procedure can be applied in determining the hydraulic friction coefficient of a modified labyrinth throttle design. The use of such calculation will make it possible to predict an experiment with the preset accuracy.

  6. Application of the NEXT Ion Thruster Lifetime Assessment to Thruster Throttling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanNoord, Jonathan L.; Herman, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    Ion thrusters are low thrust, high specific impulse devices with typical operational lifetimes of 10,000 to 30,000 hr over a range of throttling conditions. The NEXT ion thruster is the latest generation of ion thrusters under development. The NEXT ion thruster currently has a qualification level propellant throughput requirement of 450 kg of xenon, which corresponds to roughly 22,000 hr of operation at the highest input power throttling point. This paper will provide a brief review the previous life assessment predictions for various throttling conditions. A further assessment will be presented examining the anticipated accelerator grid hole wall erosion and related electron backstreaming limit. The continued assessment of the NEXT ion thruster indicates that the first failure mode across the throttling range is expected to be in excess of 36,000 hr of operation from charge exchange induced groove erosion. It is at this duration that the groove is predicted to penetrate the accelerator grid possibly resulting in structural failure. Based on these lifetime and mission assessments, a throttling approach is presented for the Long Duration Test to demonstrate NEXT thruster lifetime and validate modeling.

  7. Turbine Manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The machinery pictured is a set of Turbodyne steam turbines which power a sugar mill at Bell Glade, Florida. A NASA-developed computer program called NASTRAN aided development of these and other turbines manufactured by Turbodyne Corporation's Steam Turbine Division, Wellsville, New York. An acronym for NASA Structural Analysis Program, NASTRAN is a predictive tool which advises development teams how a structural design will perform under service use conditions. Turbodyne uses NASTRAN to analyze the dynamic behavior of steam turbine components, achieving substantial savings in development costs. One of the most widely used spinoffs, NASTRAN is made available to private industry through NASA's Computer Software Management Information Center (COSMIC) at the University of Georgia.

  8. Throttle control linkage for internal combustion engines and method of set-up

    SciTech Connect

    Hendron, S.S.; Williams, N.E.

    1992-10-06

    This patent describes throttle control linkage for an internal combustion engine having a pivotally-mounted injector lever for movement between a first predetermined position and a second predetermined position to control a fuel injector pump; It comprises: a throttle control lever mounted for movement between a first predetermined position and a second predetermined position; a pivotally-mounted bellcrank having an arcuate slot formed therein; first linkage means operatively connected between the arcuate slot and the pivotally-mounted injector lever; the arcuate slot formed along a predetermined radius from the connection of the second linkage means on the pivotally-mounted injector lever when the throttle control lever and the pivotally-mounted injector lever are positioned in the first predetermined position.

  9. Effect of throttling on interface behavior and liquid residuals in weightlessness. [in flat-bottomed tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symons, E. P.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study liquid-vapor interface behavior and subsequent vapor ingestion in a flat-bottomed cylindrical tank following a single-step throttling in outflow rate in a weightless environment. A throttling process in which the final Weber number was one-tenth of the initial Weber number tended to excite large-amplitude symmetric slosh, with the amplitude generally increasing as initial Weber number increased. As expected, liquid residuals were lower than those obtained without throttling and, for moderate values of initial Weber number, could be adequately predicted by assuming that all draining took place at the final Weber number. At large values of Weber number, residuals tended to be lower than this predicted value.

  10. Northrop Grumman TR202 LOX/LH2 Deep Throttling Engine Technology Project Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gromski, Jason; Majamaki, Annik; Chianese, Silvio; Weinstock, Vladimir; Kim, Tony S.

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project is currently developing enabling propulsion technologies in support of future lander missions. To meet lander requirements, several technical challenges need to be overcome, one of which is the ability for the descent engine(s) to operate over a deep throttle range with cryogenic propellants. To address this need, PCAD has enlisted Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS) in a technology development effort associated with the TR202 engine. The TR202 is a LOX/LH2 expander cycle engine driven by independent turbopump assemblies and featuring a variable area pintle injector similar to the injector used on the TR200 Apollo Lunar Module Descent Engine (LMDE). Since the Apollo missions, NGAS has continued to mature deep throttling pintle injector technology. The TR202 program has completed two series of pintle injector testing. The first series of testing used ablative thrust chambers and demonstrated igniter operation as well as stable performance at discrete points throughout the designed 10:1 throttle range. The second series was conducted with calorimeter chambers and demonstrated injector performance at discrete points throughout the throttle range as well as chamber heat flow adequate to power an expander cycle design across the throttle range. This paper provides an overview of the TR202 program, describing the different phases and key milestones. It describes how test data was correlated to the engine conceptual design. The test data obtained has created a valuable database for deep throttling cryogenic pintle technology, a technology that is readily scalable in thrust level.

  11. Dynamical behaviour of three-way throttle valve with pressure gradient stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vašina, Martin; Hružík, Lumír; Bureček, Adam; Sikora, Roman

    2015-05-01

    Three-way throttle valves with pressure gradient stabilization are used in order to ensure constant flow independently of load changes of hydraulic motors in hydraulic systems. These valves are used to vibration damping in hydraulic systems too. For this reason, it is suitable to install the valves close to hydraulic motors. The valves also have a positive influence on an increasing of system eigenfrequency. The paper deals with investigation of dynamical behaviour and eigenfrequency of a three-way throttle valve with pressure gradient stabilization in consequence of transient changes.

  12. VASIMR VX-200 thruster throttling optimization from 30 to 200 kW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squire, Jared; Olsen, Chris; Chang-Diaz, Franklin; Longmier, Benjamin; Ballenger, Maxwell; Carter, Mark; Glover, Tim; McCaskill, Greg

    2012-10-01

    The VASIMR^ VX-200 experimental plasma thruster incorporates a 40 kW helicon plasma source with a 180 kW Ion Cyclotron Heating (ICH) acceleration stage integrated in a superconducting magnet. Argon propellant mass flow is injected up to 140 mg/s. Rapid plasma start up (< 100 ms) and high pumping speed (> 10^5 liters/s) in a 150 m^3 vacuum chamber achieve performance measurements with the charge exchange mean-free-path greater than 1 m in the background neutral gas (pressure < 10-5 Torr). The thruster efficiency at 200 kW total power is 72 ± 9%, the ratio of effective jet power to input RF power, with an Isp = 4900 ± 300 seconds (flow velocity of 49 km/s), and an ion flux of 1.7 ± 0.1 x 10^21/s. The thrust increases steadily with power to 5.8 ± 0.4 N until the power is maximized and there is no indication of saturation. The plasma density near the device exit exceeds 10^18 m-3 with a power density over 5 MW/m^2. An extensive study of thruster performance, efficiency and thrust-to-power ratio, as a function of Ar propellant flow rate and ICH-to-helicon RF power ratio has been carried out over a total power range of 30 to 200 kW. Optimized throttling set points are determined. The experimental configuration and results of this study are presented.

  13. High Frequency Acoustic Response Characterization and Analysis of the Deep Throttling Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casiano, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    The Common Extensive Cryogenic Engine program demonstrated the operation of a deep throttling engine design. The program, spanning five years from August 2005 to July 2010, funded testing through four separate engine demonstration test series. Along with successful completion of multiple objectives, a discrete response of approximately 4000 Hz was discovered and explored throughout the program. The typical low-amplitude acoustic response was evident in the chamber measurement through almost every operating condition; however, at certain off-nominal operating conditions, the response became discrete with higher amplitude. This paper summarizes the data reduction, characterization, and analysis of the 4,000 Hz response for the entire program duration, using the large amount of data collected. Upon first encountering the response, new objectives and instrumentation were incorporated in future test series to specifically collect 4,000 Hz data. The 4,000 Hz response was identified as being related to the first tangential acoustic mode by means of frequency estimation and spatial decomposition. The latter approach showed that the effective node line of the mode was aligned with the manifold propellant inlets with standing waves and quasi-standing waves present at various times. Contour maps that contain instantaneous frequency and amplitude trackings of the response were generated as a significant improvement to historical manual approaches of data reduction presentation. Signal analysis and dynamic data reduction also uncovered several other features of the response including a stable limit cycle, the progressive engagement of subsequent harmonics, the U-shaped time history, an intermittent response near the test-based neutral stability region, other acoustic modes, and indications of modulation with a separate subsynchronous response. Although no engine damage related to the acoustic mode was noted, the peak-to-peak fluctuating pressure amplitude achieved 12.1% of the

  14. Analysis of gas turbine engines using water and oxygen injection to achieve high Mach numbers and high thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henneberry, Hugh M.; Snyder, Christopher A.

    1993-01-01

    An analysis of gas turbine engines using water and oxygen injection to enhance performance by increasing Mach number capability and by increasing thrust is described. The liquids are injected, either separately or together, into the subsonic diffuser ahead of the engine compressor. A turbojet engine and a mixed-flow turbofan engine (MFTF) are examined, and in pursuit of maximum thrust, both engines are fitted with afterburners. The results indicate that water injection alone can extend the performance envelope of both engine types by one and one-half Mach numbers at which point water-air ratios reach 17 or 18 percent and liquid specific impulse is reduced to some 390 to 470 seconds, a level about equal to the impulse of a high energy rocket engine. The envelope can be further extended, but only with increasing sacrifices in liquid specific impulse. Oxygen-airflow ratios as high as 15 percent were investigated for increasing thrust. Using 15 percent oxygen in combination with water injection at high supersonic Mach numbers resulted in thrust augmentation as high as 76 percent without any significant decrease in liquid specific impulse. The stoichiometric afterburner exit temperature increased with increasing oxygen flow, reaching 4822 deg R in the turbojet engine at a Mach number of 3.5. At the transonic Mach number of 0.95 where no water injection is needed, an oxygen-air ratio of 15 percent increased thrust by some 55 percent in both engines, along with a decrease in liquid specific impulse of 62 percent. Afterburner temperature was approximately 4700 deg R at this high thrust condition. Water and/or oxygen injection are simple and straightforward strategies to improve engine performance and they will add little to engine weight. However, if large Mach number and thrust increases are required, liquid flows become significant, so that operation at these conditions will necessarily be of short duration.

  15. Logic Model Checking of Unintended Acceleration Claims in the 2005 Toyota Camry Electronic Throttle Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamble, Ed; Holzmann, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    Part of the US DOT investigation of Toyota SUA involved analysis of the throttle control software. JPL LaRS applied several techniques, including static analysis and logic model checking, to the software. A handful of logic models were built. Some weaknesses were identified; however, no cause for SUA was found. The full NASA report includes numerous other analyses

  16. Throttling Impacts on Hall Thruster Performance, Erosion, and Qualification for NASA Science Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dankanich, John W.; DeHoyos, Amado

    2007-01-01

    With the SMART-1, Department of Defense, and commercial industry successes in Hall thruster technologies, NASA has started considering Hall thrusters for science missions. The recent Discovery proposals included a Hall thruster science mission and the In-Space Propulsion Project is investing in Hall thruster technologies. As the confidence in Hall thrusters improve, ambitious multi-thruster missions are being considered. Science missions often require large throttling ranges due to the 1/r(sup 2) power drop-off from the sun. Deep throttling of Hall thrusters will impact the overall system performance. Also, Hall thrusters can be throttled with both current and voltage, impacting erosion rates and performance. Last, electric propulsion thruster lifetime qualification has previously been conducted with long duration full power tests. Full power tests may not be appropriate for NASA science missions, and a combination of lifetime testing at various power levels with sufficient analysis is recommended. Analyses of various science missions and throttling schemes using the Aerojet BPT-4000 and NASA 103M HiVHAC thruster are presented.

  17. Summary of the effects of engine throttle response on airplane formation-flying qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Kevin R.

    1993-01-01

    A flight evaluation was conducted to determine the effect of engine throttle response characteristics on precision formation-flying qualities. A variable electronic throttle control system was developed and flight-tested on a TF-104G airplane with a J79-11B engine at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility. This airplane was chosen because of its known, very favorable thrust response characteristics. Ten research flights were flown to evaluate the effects of throttle gain, time delay, and fuel control rate limiting on engine handling qualities during a demanding precision wing formation task. Handling quality effects of lag filters and lead compensation time delays were also evaluated. The Cooper and Harper Pilot Rating Scale was used to assign levels of handling quality. Data from pilot ratings and comments indicate that throttle control system time delays and rate limits cause significant degradations in handling qualities. Threshold values for satisfactory (level 1) and adequate (level 2) handling qualities of these key variables are presented. These results may provide engine manufacturers with guidelines to assure satisfactory handling qualities in future engine designs.

  18. Northrop Grumman TR202 LOX/LH2 Deep Throttling Engine Project Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gromski, J.; Majamaki, A. N.; Chianese, S. G.; Weinstock, V. D.; Kim, T.

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project is currently developing enabling propulsion technologies in support of the Exploration Initiative, with a particular focus on the needs of the Altair Project. To meet Altair requirements, several technical challenges need to be overcome, one of which is the ability for the lunar descent engine(s) to operate over a deep throttle range with cryogenic propellants. To address this need, PCAD has enlisted Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS) in a technology development effort associated with the TR202, a LOX/LH2 expander cycle engine driven by independent turbopump assemblies and featuring a variable area pintle injector similar to the injector used on the TR200 Apollo Lunar Module Descent Engine (LMDE). Since the Apollo missions, NGAS has continued to mature deep throttling pintle injector technology. The TR202 program has completed two phases of pintle injector testing. The first phase of testing used ablative thrust chambers and demonstrated igniter operation as well as stable performance at several power levels across the designed 10:1 throttle range. The second phase of testing was performed on a calorimeter chamber and demonstrated injector performance at various power levels (75%, 50%, 25%, 10%, and 7.5%) across the throttle range as well as chamber heat flux to show that the engine can close an expander cycle design across the throttle range. This paper provides an overview of the TR202 program. It describes the different phases of the program with the key milestones of each phase. It then shows when those milestones were met. Next, it describes how the test data was used to update the conceptual design and how the test data has created a database for deep throttling cryogenic pintle technology that is readily scaleable and can be used to again update the design once the Altair program's requirements are firm. The final section of the paper describes the path forward, which includes

  19. CECE: A Deep Throttling Demonstrator Cryogenic Engine for NASA's Lunar Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giuliano, Victor J.; Leonard, Timothy G.; Adamski, Walter M.; Kim, Tony S.

    2007-01-01

    As one of the first technology development programs awarded under NASA's Vision for Space Exploration, the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) Deep Throttling, Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine (CECE) program was selected by NASA in November 2004 to begin technology development and demonstration toward a deep throttling, cryogenic Lunar Lander engine for use across multiple human and robotic lunar exploration mission segments with extensibility to Mars. The CECE program leverages the maturity and previous investment of a flight-proven hydrogen/oxygen expander cycle engine, the RL10, to develop and demonstrate an unprecedented combination of reliability, safety, durability, throttlability, and restart capabilities in a high-energy, cryogenic engine. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and NASA Glenn Research Center personnel were integral design and analysis team members throughout the requirements assessment, propellant studies and the deep throttling demonstrator elements of the program. The testbed selected for the initial deep throttling demonstration phase of this program was a minimally modified RL10 engine, allowing for maximum current production engine commonality and extensibility with minimum program cost. In just nine months from technical program start, CECE Demonstrator No. 1 engine testing in April/May 2006 at PWR's E06 test stand successfully demonstrated in excess of 10:1 throttling of the hydrogen/oxygen expander cycle engine. This test provided an early demonstration of a viable, enabling cryogenic propulsion concept with invaluable system-level technology data acquisition toward design and development risk mitigation for both the subsequent CECE Demonstrator No. 2 program and to the future Lunar Lander Design, Development, Test and Evaluation effort.

  20. Bilateral inferior turbinate osteoma.

    PubMed

    Sahemey, R; Warfield, A T; Ahmed, S

    2016-01-01

    Osteomas are the most common benign osteoclastic tumours of the paranasal sinuses. However, nasal cavity and turbinate osteomas are extremely rare. Only nine middle turbinate, three inferior turbinate and one inferior turbinate osteoma cases have been reported to date. The present case report describes the management and follow-up of symptomatic bilateral inferior turbinate osteoma.A 60-year-old female presented with symptoms of bilateral nasal obstruction and right-sided epiphora. Radiological investigation found hypertrophic bony changes involving both inferior turbinates. The patient was managed successfully by endoscopic inferior turbinectomies in order to achieve a patent airway, with no further recurrence of tumour after 3 months postoperatively.To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of bilateral inferior turbinate osteoma. We describe a safe and minimally invasive method of tumour resection, which has a better cosmetic outcome compared with other approaches. PMID:27534890

  1. A numerical investigation of the cooling effect of compressed natural gas throttling on engine delivery ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Yacoub, Y.; Marbun, L.; Bata, R.

    1999-01-01

    A theoretical study was conducted to investigate the cooling effect of throttling compressed natural gas during the pressure regulation process. The concept of using this effect in cooling down the induction air was investigated. A thermodynamic model was developed for a typical fuel delivery system used on a vehicle fueled with compressed natural gas. The model was based on a set of integral conservation laws applied to each component of the fueling system. Several heat exchanging arrangements between the throttled gas and the inlet air were examined. The effect of the added heat exchanger on engine delivery ratio was examined for different engine sizes as well as for different operating conditions. An increase of 1 to 2.5% in engine delivery ratio was predicted due to the added heat exchanger.

  2. Tandem mirror experiment upgrade (TMX-U) throttle, mechanical design, construction, installation, and alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Pedrotti, L.R.; Wong, R.L.

    1983-12-02

    We will soon add a high-field axisymmetric throttle region to the central cell of the TMX-U. Field amplitude will be adjusted between 2.25 and 6.0 T. This field is produced by adding a high-field solenoid and a cee coil to each end of the central cell. We describe these coils as well as the additions to the restraint structure. We analyzed the stresses within the solenoid using the STANSOL code. In addition, we performed a finite-element structural analysis of the complete magnet set with the SAP4 code. Particular attention was paid to the transition section where the new magnets were added and where the currents in the existing magnets were increased. The peak temperature rise in the throttle coil was calculated to be 41/sup 0/C above ambient.

  3. Man-vehicle systems research facility advanced aircraft flight simulator throttle mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurasaki, S. S.; Vallotton, W. C.

    1985-01-01

    The Advanced Aircraft Flight Simulator is equipped with a motorized mechanism that simulates a two engine throttle control system that can be operated via a computer driven performance management system or manually by the pilots. The throttle control system incorporates features to simulate normal engine operations and thrust reverse and vary the force feel to meet a variety of research needs. While additional testing to integrate the work required is principally now in software design, since the mechanical aspects function correctly. The mechanism is an important part of the flight control system and provides the capability to conduct human factors research of flight crews with advanced aircraft systems under various flight conditions such as go arounds, coupled instrument flight rule approaches, normal and ground operations and emergencies that would or would not normally be experienced in actual flight.

  4. Cold Flow Testing for Liquid Propellant Rocket Injector Scaling and Throttling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Jeremy R.; Moser, Marlow D.; Hulka, James; Jones, Gregg

    2006-01-01

    Scaling and throttling of combustion devices are important capabilities to demonstrate in development of liquid rocket engines for NASA's Space Exploration Mission. Scaling provides the ability to design new injectors and injection elements with predictable performance on the basis of test experience with existing injectors and elements, and could be a key aspect of future development programs. Throttling is the reduction of thrust with fixed designs and is a critical requirement in lunar and other planetary landing missions. A task in the Constellation University Institutes Program (CUIP) has been designed to evaluate spray characteristics when liquid propellant rocket engine injectors are scaled and throttled. The specific objectives of the present study are to characterize injection and primary atomization using cold flow simulations of the reacting sprays. These simulations can provide relevant information because the injection and primary atomization are believed to be the spray processes least affected by the propellant reaction. Cold flow studies also provide acceptable test conditions for a university environment. Three geometric scales - 1/4- scale, 1/2-scale, and full-scale - of two different injector element types - swirl coaxial and shear coaxial - will be designed, fabricated, and tested. A literature review is currently being conducted to revisit and compile the previous scaling documentation. Because it is simple to perform, throttling will also be examined in the present work by measuring primary atomization characteristics as the mass flow rate and pressure drop of the six injector element concepts are reduced, with corresponding changes in chamber backpressure. Simulants will include water and gaseous nitrogen, and an optically accessible chamber will be used for visual and laser-based diagnostics. The chamber will include curtain flow capability to repress recirculation, and additional gas injection to provide independent control of the

  5. CFD simulation and optimization of the capillary throttling of air-flotation unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bin, Huang; Yi, Jiajing; Tao, Jiayue; Lu, Rongsheng

    2016-01-01

    With respect to orifice throttling or compensating, capillary throttling has following advantages: smaller mass flow rate and stronger anti-interference ability. This paper firstly gives the required average pressure of air-film when shipping a piece of LCD glass. Then, dimensional flow model of the capillary throttling of air-flotation unit is established. Based on the model, we firstly analyze the flowing process of the lubricated air through the capillary. Secondly, the pressure distribution equation of air-film is derived from the Navier-Stokes Equation. Furthermore, the approximate functional relations between model parameters and static characteristics of the air-film, such as mass flow rate, static bearing capacity, are obtained and then influence of the former on the latter is analyzed . Finally, according to the continuity of air flow, the function relation between model parameters and pressure of core nodes in the air-film is also derived. On foundation of theoretical analysis, the impacts of each model parameter on static characteristics of the air-film flow field, are respectively simulated and analyzed by CFD software Fluent. Based on these simulations and analysis, radius and length of the capillary, density of the gas supply orifices and other model parameters are optimized. Finally, the best unit model is acquired, which greatly improves the static working performance of air-film in air-flotation unit. Research results of this paper can provide guidance and basis for the design and optimization of air-flotation transporting system.

  6. The Evolution of Utilizing Manual Throttles to Avoid Low LH2 NPSP at the SSME Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henfling, Rick

    2011-01-01

    Even before the first flight of the Space Shuttle, it was understood low liquid hydrogen (LH2) Net Positive Suction Pressure (NPSP) at the inlet to the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) can have adverse effects on engine operation. A number of failures within both the External Tank (ET) and the Orbiter Main Propulsion System could result in a low LH2 NPSP condition. Operational workarounds were developed to take advantage of the onboard crew s ability to manually throttle down the SSMEs, which alleviated the low LH2 NPSP condition. A throttling down of the SSME resulted in an increase in NPSP, mainly due to the reduction in frictional flow losses while at a lower throttle setting. As engineers refined their understanding of the NPSP requirements for the SSME (through a robust testing program), the operational techniques evolved to take advantage of these additional capabilities. Currently the procedure, which for early Space Shuttle missions required a Return-to-Launch-Site abort, now would result in a nominal Main Engine Cut Off (MECO) and no loss of mission objectives.

  7. Manual Throttles-Only Control Effectivity for Emergency Flight Control of Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Richard; Burcham, Frank W., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    If normal aircraft flight controls are lost, emergency flight control may be attempted using only the thrust of engines. Collective thrust is used to control flightpath, and differential thrust is used to control bank angle. One issue is whether a total loss of hydraulics (TLOH) leaves an airplane in a recoverable condition. Recoverability is a function of airspeed, altitude, flight phase, and configuration. If the airplane can be recovered, flight test and simulation results on several transport-class airplanes have shown that throttles-only control (TOC) is usually adequate to maintain up-and-away flight, but executing a safe landing is very difficult. There are favorable aircraft configurations, and also techniques that will improve recoverability and control and increase the chances of a survivable landing. The DHS and NASA have recently conducted a flight and simulator study to determine the effectivity of manual throttles-only control as a way to recover and safely land a range of transport airplanes. This paper discusses TLOH recoverability as a function of conditions, and TOC landability results for a range of transport airplanes, and some key techniques for flying with throttles and making a survivable landing. Airplanes evaluated include the B-747, B-767, B-777, B-757, A320, and B-737 airplanes.

  8. Hermetic turbine generator

    DOEpatents

    Meacher, John S.; Ruscitto, David E.

    1982-01-01

    A Rankine cycle turbine drives an electric generator and a feed pump, all on a single shaft, and all enclosed within a hermetically sealed case. The shaft is vertically oriented with the turbine exhaust directed downward and the shaft is supported on hydrodynamic fluid film bearings using the process fluid as lubricant and coolant. The selection of process fluid, type of turbine, operating speed, system power rating, and cycle state points are uniquely coordinated to achieve high turbine efficiency at the temperature levels imposed by the recovery of waste heat from the more prevalent industrial processes.

  9. Carburator/mixing chamber and dual throttle control apparatus for gasoline engine

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, M.A.

    1987-06-23

    A method is described for providing a fuel-air mixture to an intake manifold of an internal combustion engine, the method comprising the steps of: (a) providing a mixing chamber having first, second and third inlet ports and an outlet port each in open communication with the interior of the mixing chamber; positioning the mixing chamber between the base of a conventional carburetor and the inlet of an intake manifold of the engine to allow a mixture of air and a mist of gasoline droplets produced by the carburetor to pass through the first inlet port into the interior of the mixing chamber; to allow gas to flow from the interior of the mixing chamber through the outlet port into the inlet of the intake manifold; (b) completely vaporizing an amount of liquid fuel externally of the mixing chamber and the carburetor; and (c) partially opening a first throttle valve disposed to control flow of gas through the outlet port, while causing a second throttle valve contained in the carburetor to remain in a substantially closed configuration causing the intake manifold to draw the externally vaporized fuel and outside air that does not pass through the carburetor into the interior of the mixing chamber through the second and third inlet ports, respectively. The entire vaporized fuel is mixed with the outside air in the interior of the mixing chamber causing the intake manifold to draw the mixture of air and entirely vaporized fuel through the first throttle valve into the intake manifold while preventing significant amounts of air and fuel mist from passing from the carburetor through the first inlet port into the interior of the mixing chamber. The outside air drawn through the third inlet port does not pass through the carburetor.

  10. Northrop Grumman TR202 LOX/GH2 Deep Throttling Pintle Injector Fabrication and Demonstration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstock, V. D.; Chianese, S.G.; Majamaki, A. N.; Litchford, R. J.; Foote, J. P.; Wall, T. R.

    2010-01-01

    NASA s Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project is developing enabling propulsion technologies in support of in support of the Exploration Initiative with a particular focus on the needs of the Altair Lunar Lander. To address Altair's need for deep-throttling cryogenic engines, PCAD has enlisted Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS) in a technology development effort associated with a LOX/LH2 expander cycle engine known as the TR202. This engine features independent turbopump assemblies and a variable area pintle injector similar to that used on the TR200 Apollo Lunar Module Descent Engine (LMDE). The TR202 program has completed a Conceptual Design (CoDR) of a possible throttling engine and has designed and built injector test hardware to demonstrate stable high performance over a 10:1 throttling range while providing the heat flux necessary to close the engine cycle. NGAS has partnered with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), which supplied the ablative and calorimeter thrust chambers for the injector test program and provided the test facility as well as test and engineering support personnel. An extensive hot-fire test campaign comprising more than 50 tests was initiated and successfully completed during 2009 on MSFC's Test Stand 116 using pressure-fed liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen propellants. All planned test objectives were met. The test program was structured in two distinct phases: Phase 1 relied on ablative chambers to demonstrate injector hardware durability and to obtain early deep-throttling results, while Phase 2 used a water-cooled calorimeter chamber to obtain detailed performance and heat flux measurements at various power levels and mixture ratios. This paper focuses on the early part of the test program and describes final hardware build and test integration efforts, injector water flow testing, igniter and engine operational sequence development, and results from the ablative chamber tests. Challenges

  11. Turbinate surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Turbinectomy; Turbinoplasty; Turbinate reduction; Nasal airway surgery ... There are several types of turbinate surgery: Turbinectomy: All or part of the lower turbinate is taken out. This can be done in several different ways, but sometimes a ...

  12. The implementation and operation of a variable-response electronic throttle control system for a TF-104G aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, Bradford; Sengupta, Upal

    1989-01-01

    During some flight programs, researchers have encountered problems in the throttle response characteristics of high-performance aircraft. To study and to help solve these problems, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ames Research Center's Dryden Flight Research Facility (Ames-Dryden) conducted a study using a TF-104G airplane modified with a variable-response electronic throttle control system. Ames-Dryden investigated the effects of different variables on engine response and handling qualities. The system provided transport delay, lead and lag filters, second-order lags, command rate and position limits, and variable gain between the pilot's throttle command and the engine fuel controller. These variables could be tested individually or in combination. Ten research flights were flown to gather data on engine response and to obtain pilot ratings of the various system configurations. The results should provide design criteria for engine-response characteristics. The variable-response throttle components and how they were installed in the TF-104G aircraft are described. How the variable-response throttle was used in flight and some of the results of using this system are discussed.

  13. Evaluation of the Rotational Throttle Interface for Converting Aircraft Utilizing the NASA Ames Vertical Motion Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozovski, David; Theodore, Colin R.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to compare a conventional helicopter Thrust Control Lever (TCL) to the Rotational Throttle Interface (RTI) for tiltrotor aircraft. The RTI is designed to adjust its orientation to match the angle of the tiltrotor s nacelles. The underlying principle behind the design is to increase pilot awareness of the vehicle s configuration state (i.e. nacelle angle). Four test pilots flew multiple runs on seven different experimental courses. Three predominant effects were discovered in the testing of the RTI: 1. Unintentional binding along the control axis resulted in difficulties with precision power setting, 2. Confusion in which way to move the throttle grip was present during RTI transition modes, and 3. Pilots were not able to distinguish small angle differences during RTI transition. In this experiment the pilots were able to successfully perform all of the required tasks with both inceptors although the handling qualities ratings were slightly worse for the RTI partly due to unforeseen deficiencies in the design. Pilots did however report improved understanding of nacelle movement during transitions with the RTI.

  14. Ceramics for ATS industrial turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Wenglarz, R.; Ali, S.; Layne, A.

    1996-05-01

    US DOE and most US manufacturers of stationary gas turbines are participating in a major national effort to develop advanced turbine systems (ATS). The ATS program will achieve ultrahigh efficiencies, environmental superiority, and cost competitiveness compared with current combustion turbine systems. A major factor in the improved efficiencies of simple cycle ATS gas turbines will be higher operating efficiencies than curren engines. These temperatures strain the limits of metallic alloy and flow-path cooling technologies. Ceramics materials offer a potential alterative to cooled turbine alloys for ATS turbines due to higher melting points than metallics. This paper evaluates ceramics technology and plant economic issues for ATS industrial turbine systems. A program with the objective of demonstrating first-stage ceramic vanes in a commerical industrial turbine is also described.

  15. CECE: Expanding the Envelope of Deep Throttling in Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Hydrogen Rocket Engines For NASA Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giuliano, Victor J.; Leonard, Timothy G.; Lyda, Randy T.; Kim, Tony S.

    2010-01-01

    As one of the first technology development programs awarded by NASA under the Vision for Space Exploration, the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) Deep Throttling, Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine (CECE) program was selected by NASA in November 2004 to begin technology development and demonstration toward a deep throttling, cryogenic engine supporting ongoing trade studies for NASA s Lunar Lander descent stage. The CECE program leverages the maturity and previous investment of a flight-proven hydrogen/oxygen expander cycle engine, the PWR RL10, to develop technology and demonstrate an unprecedented combination of reliability, safety, durability, throttlability, and restart capabilities in a high-energy cryogenic engine. The testbed selected for the deep throttling demonstration phases of this program was a minimally modified RL10 engine, allowing for maximum current production engine commonality and extensibility with minimum program cost. Three series of demonstrator engine tests, the first in April-May 2006, the second in March-April 2007 and the third in November-December 2008, have demonstrated up to 13:1 throttling (104% to 8% thrust range) of the hydrogen/oxygen expander cycle engine. The first two test series explored a propellant feed system instability ("chug") environment at low throttled power levels. Lessons learned from these two tests were successfully applied to the third test series, resulting in stable operation throughout the 13:1 throttling range. The first three tests have provided an early demonstration of an enabling cryogenic propulsion concept, accumulating over 5,000 seconds of hot fire time over 27 hot fire tests, and have provided invaluable system-level technology data toward design and development risk mitigation for the NASA Altair and future lander propulsion system applications. This paper describes the results obtained from the highly successful third test series as well as the test objectives and early results obtained from a

  16. Preliminary Flight Results of a Fly-by-throttle Emergency Flight Control System on an F-15 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Maine, Trindel A.; Fullerton, C. Gordon; Wells, Edward A.

    1993-01-01

    A multi-engine aircraft, with some or all of the flight control system inoperative, may use engine thrust for control. NASA Dryden has conducted a study of the capability and techniques for this emergency flight control method for the F-15 airplane. With an augmented control system, engine thrust, along with appropriate feedback parameters, is used to control flightpath and bank angle. Extensive simulation studies were followed by flight tests. The principles of throttles only control, the F-15 airplane, the augmented system, and the flight results including actual landings with throttles-only control are discussed.

  17. The Evolution of Utilizing Manual Throttles to Avoid Excessively Low LH2 NPSP at the SSME Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henfling, Rick

    2011-01-01

    In the late 1970s, years before the Space Shuttle flew its maiden voyage, it was understood low liquid hydrogen (LH2) Net Positive Suction Pressure (NPSP) at the inlet to the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) could have adverse effects on engine operation. A number of failures within both the External Tank (ET) and the Orbiter Main Propulsion System (MPS) could result in a low LH2 NPSP condition, which at extremely low levels can result in cavitation of SSME turbomachinery. Operational workarounds were developed to take advantage of the onboard crew s ability to manually throttle down the SSMEs (via the Pilot s Speedbrake/Throttle Controller), which alleviated the low LH2 NPSP condition. Manually throttling the SSME to a lower power level resulted in an increase in NPSP, mainly due to the reduction in frictional flow losses while at the lower throttle setting. Early in the Space Shuttle Program s history, the relevant Flight Rule for the Booster flight controllers in Mission Control did not distinguish between ET and Orbiter MPS failures and the same crew action was taken for both. However, after a review of all Booster operational techniques following the Challenger disaster in the late 1980s, it was determined manually throttling the SSME to a lower power was only effective for Orbiter MPS failures and the Flight Rule was updated to reflect this change. The Flight Rule and associated crew actions initially called for a single throttle step to minimum power level when a low threshold for NPSP was met. As engineers refined their understanding of the NPSP requirements for the SSME (through a robust testing program), the operational techniques evolved to take advantage of the additional capabilities. This paper will examine the evolution of the Flight rule and associated procedure and how increases in knowledge about the SSME and the Space Shuttle vehicle as a whole have helped shape their development. What once was a single throttle step when NPSP decreased to a

  18. The Evolution of Utilizing Manual Throttling to Avoid Excessively Low LH2 NPSP at the SSME Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henfling, Rick

    2010-01-01

    In the late 1970s, years before the Space Shuttle flew its maiden voyage, it was understood low liquid hydrogen (LH2) Net Positive Suction Pressure (NPSP) at the inlet to the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) could have adverse effects on engine operation. A number of failures within both the External Tank (ET) and the Orbiter Main Propulsion System (MPS) could result in a low LH2 NPSP condition, which at extremely low levels can result in cavitation of SSME turbomachinery. Operational workarounds were developed to take advantage of the onboard crew s ability to manually throttle down the SSMEs (via the Pilot s Speedbrake/Throttle Controller), which alleviated the low LH2 NPSP condition. Manually throttling the SSME to a lower power level resulted in an increase in NPSP, mainly due to the reduction in frictional flow losses while at the lower throttle setting. Early in the Space Shuttle Program s history, the relevant Flight Rule for the Booster flight controller in Mission Control did not distinguish between ET and Orbiter MPS failures and the same crew action was taken for both. However, after a review of all Booster operational techniques following the Challenger disaster in the late 1980s, it was determined manually throttling the SSME to a lower power was only effective for Orbiter MPS failures and the Flight Rule was updated to reflect this change. The Flight Rule and associated crew actions initially called for a single throttle step to minimum power level when a low threshold for NPSP was met. As engineers refined their understanding of the NPSP requirements for the SSME (through a robust testing program), the operational techniques evolved to take advantage of the additional capabilities. This paper will examine the evolution of the Flight rule and associated procedure and how increases in knowledge about the SSME and the Space Shuttle vehicle as a whole have helped shape their development. What once was a single throttle step when NPSP decreased to a

  19. Preliminary flight test results of a fly-by-throttle emergency flight control system on an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Maine, Trindel A.; Fullerton, C. G.; Wells, Edward A.

    1993-01-01

    A multi-engine aircraft, with some or all of the flight control system inoperative, may use engine thrust for control. NASA Dryden has conducted a study of the capability and techniques for this emergency flight control method for the F-15 airplane. With an augmented control system, engine thrust, along with appropriate feedback parameters, is used to control flightpath and bank angle. Extensive simulation studies have been followed by flight tests. This paper discusses the principles of throttles-only control, the F-15 airplane, the augmented system, and the flight results including landing approaches with throttles-only control to within 10 ft of the ground.

  20. Numerical investigation of supersonic flow breakdown at the inlet duct throttling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gounko, Yu. P.; Mazhul, I. I.; Nurutdinov, V. I.

    2014-04-01

    The work presents the results of investigating the process of supersonic flow deceleration in a duct of the two-dimensional inlet throttled by variation of the outlet cross-sectional area. An inlet with three external compression shock waves designed for the freestream Mach number Md = 7 was considered as an example for the investigation. A one-dimensional analysis of the conditions for realization of the supersonic flow deceleration regimes in the inlet duct with two throats — in the inlet entrance and at the inlet duct outlet, has been carried out. The parametric numerical computations of two-dimensional inviscid or turbulent flows in the inlet were performed with the use of the Euler and Navier—Stokes codes of the program package FLUENT. The critical conditions for the nonuniform flow in the outlet throat bringing to choking the inlet duct were determined.

  1. Throttling capability of a 30 kW class ammonia arcjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodfellow, K. D.; Polk, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    The throttling capabilities of a 30 kW class ammonia arcjet and its compatibility with a breadboard power conditioning unit (PCU) were tested in two series of tests. The first series was performed to determine the performance and operating characteristics of the arcjet and the PCU over a range of power levels and propellant flow rates. The power levels for the tests were nominally between 10 and 30 kW, with some operation below 10 kW at the lower flow rates. The ammonia flow rates varied between 0.16 and 0.35 g/s. The second series of tests was an extensive investigation of operation below 12 kW using three cathode spacings. The ammonia flow rates were between 0.115 and 0.335 g/s. Operation of the arcjet from 1.5 kW up to the 30 kW design point was demonstrated with the PCU.

  2. Performance Cycle Analysis of a Two-Spool, Separate-Exhaust Turbofan With Interstage Turbine Burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liew, K. H.; Urip, E.; Yang, S. L.; Mattingly, J. D.; Marek, C. J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the performance cycle analysis of a dual-spool, separate-exhaust turbofan engine, with an Interstage Turbine Burner serving as a secondary combustor. The ITB, which is located at the transition duct between the high- and the low-pressure turbines, is a relatively new concept for increasing specific thrust and lowering pollutant emissions in modern jet engine propulsion. A detailed performance analysis of this engine has been conducted for steady-state engine performance prediction. A code is written and is capable of predicting engine performances (i.e., thrust and thrust specific fuel consumption) at varying flight conditions and throttle settings. Two design-point engines were studied to reveal trends in performance at both full and partial throttle operations. A mission analysis is also presented to assure the advantage of saving fuel by adding ITB.

  3. Advanced turbine study. [airfoil coling in rocket turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Experiments to determine the available increase in turbine horsepower achieved by increasing turbine inlet temperature over a range of 1800 to 2600 R, while applying current gas turbine airfoil cling technology are discussed. Four cases of rocket turbine operating conditions were investigated. Two of the cases used O2/H2 propellant, one with a fuel flowrate of 160 pps, the other 80 pps. Two cases used O2/CH4 propellant, each having different fuel flowrates, pressure ratios, and inlet pressures. Film cooling was found to be the required scheme for these rocket turbine applications because of the high heat flux environments. Conventional convective or impingement cooling, used in jet engines, is inadequate in a rocket turbine environment because of the resulting high temperature gradients in the airfoil wall, causing high strains and low cyclic life. The hydrogen-rich turbine environment experienced a loss, or no gain, in delivered horsepower as turbine inlet temperature was increased at constant airfoil life. The effects of film cooling with regard to reduced flow available for turbine work, dilution of mainstream gas temperature and cooling reentry losses, offset the relatively low specific work capability of hydrogen when increasing turbine inlet temperature over the 1800 to 2600 R range. However, the methane-rich environment experienced an increase in delivered horsepower as turbine inlet temperature was increased at constant airfoil life. The results of a materials survey and heat transfer and durability analysis are discussed.

  4. Technology Challenges for Deep-Throttle Cryogenic Engines for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Kendall K.; Nelson, Karl W.

    2005-01-01

    Historically, cryogenic rocket engines have not been used for in-space applications due to their additional complexity, the mission need for high reliability, and the challenges of propellant boil-off. While the mission and vehicle architectures are not yet defined for the lunar and Martian robotic and human exploration objectives, cryogenic rocket engines offer the potential for higher performance and greater architecture/mission flexibility. In-situ cryogenic propellant production could enable a more robust exploration program by significantly reducing the propellant mass delivered to low earth orbit, thus warranting the evaluation of cryogenic rocket engines versus the hypergolic bi-propellant engines used in the Apollo program. A multi-use engine. one which can provide the functionality that separate engines provided in the Apollo mission architecture, is desirable for lunar and Mars exploration missions because it increases overall architecture effectiveness through commonality and modularity. The engine requirement derivation process must address each unique mission application and each unique phase within each mission. The resulting requirements, such as thrust level, performance, packaging, bum duration, number of operations; required impulses for each trajectory phase; operation after extended space or surface exposure; availability for inspection and maintenance; throttle range for planetary descent, ascent, acceleration limits and many more must be addressed. Within engine system studies, the system and component technology, capability, and risks must be evaluated and a balance between the appropriate amount of technology-push and technology-pull must be addressed. This paper will summarize many of the key technology challenges associated with using high-performance cryogenic liquid propellant rocket engine systems and components in the exploration program architectures. The paper is divided into two areas. The first area describes how the mission

  5. Technology Challenges for Deep-Throttle Cryogenic Engines for Space Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Kendall K.; Nelson, Karl W.

    2005-02-01

    Historically, cryogenic rocket engines have not been used for in-space applications due to their additional complexity, the mission need for high reliability, and the challenges of propellant boil-off. While the mission and vehicle architectures are not yet defined for the lunar and Martian robotic and human exploration objectives, cryogenic rocket engines offer the potential for higher performance and greater architecture/mission flexibility. In-situ cryogenic propellant production could enable a more robust exploration program by significantly reducing the propellant mass delivered to low earth orbit, thus warranting the evaluation of cryogenic rocket engines versus the hypergolic bipropellant engines used in the Apollo program. A multi-use engine, one which can provide the functionality that separate engines provided in the Apollo mission architecture, is desirable for lunar and Mars exploration missions because it increases overall architecture effectiveness through commonality and modularity. The engine requirement derivation process must address each unique mission application and each unique phase within each mission. The resulting requirements, such as thrust level, performance, packaging, burn duration, number of operations; required impulses for each trajectory phase; operation after extended space or surface exposure; availability for inspection and maintenance; throttle range for planetary descent, ascent, acceleration limits and many more must be addressed. Within engine system studies, the system and component technology, capability, and risks must be evaluated and a balance between the appropriate amount of technology-push and technology-pull must be addressed. This paper will summarize many of the key technology challenges associated with using high-performance cryogenic liquid propellant rocket engine systems and components in the exploration program architectures. The paper is divided into two areas. The first area describes how the mission

  6. MOD-2 wind turbine development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, L. H.; Andrews, J. S.; Zimmerman, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    The development of the Mod-2 turbine, designed to achieve a cost of electricity for the 100th production unit that will be competitive with conventional electric power generation is discussed. The Mod-2 wind turbine system (WTS) background, project flow, and a chronology of events and problem areas leading to Mod-2 acceptance are addressed. The role of the participating utility during site preparation, turbine erection and testing, remote operation, and routine operation and maintenance activity is reviewed. The technical areas discussed pertain to system performance, loads, and controls. Research and technical development of multimegawatt turbines is summarized.

  7. Fuel control for gas turbine with continuous pilot flame

    DOEpatents

    Swick, Robert M.

    1983-01-01

    An improved fuel control for a gas turbine engine having a continuous pilot flame and a fuel distribution system including a pump drawing fuel from a source and supplying a line to the main fuel nozzle of the engine, the improvement being a control loop between the pump outlet and the pump inlet to bypass fuel, an electronically controlled throttle valve to restrict flow in the control loop when main nozzle demand exists and to permit substantially unrestricted flow without main nozzle demand, a minimum flow valve in the control loop downstream of the throttle valve to maintain a minimum pressure in the loop ahead of the flow valve, a branch tube from the pilot flame nozzle to the control loop between the throttle valve and the minimum flow valve, an orifice in the branch tube, and a feedback tube from the branch tube downstream of the orifice to the minimum flow valve, the minimum flow valve being operative to maintain a substantially constant pressure differential across the orifice to maintain constant fuel flow to the pilot flame nozzle.

  8. A simulator application of a 'hands-on throttle and stick' concept to a transport pilot/autopilot interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busquets, A. M.; Parrish, R. V.; Hogge, T. W.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents the initial experiences garnered in applying a multifunction control strategy, based on the U.S. Air Force's 'Hands-On Throttle-and-Stick' concept for fighter aircraft to a transport aircraft simulator. The multifunction control strategy involves the activation of various flight system/subsystem operations (such as guidance and control, communication, and navigation functions) by use of menu displays and throttle and stick switches. The initial application of this multifunction control (MFC) concept was developed around a pilot/autopilot interface, contrasting a conventional, dedicated autopilot interface to an MFC implementation. The simulator characteristics and autopilot functions, as well as the conventional interface and MFC hardware/software, which were utilized in the application, are described herein. Initial pilot reaction and suggested improvements to this particular implementation are discussed. The paper terminates with a glance at plans for improvements and future applications based on the outcome of this initial study.

  9. Steam Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Turbonetics Energy, Inc.'s steam turbines are used as power generating systems in the oil and gas, chemical, pharmaceuticals, metals and mining, and pulp and paper industries. The Turbonetics line benefited from use of NASA research data on radial inflow steam turbines and from company contact with personnel of Lewis Research Center, also use of Lewis-developed computer programs to determine performance characteristics of turbines.

  10. Liquid rocket engine turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Criteria for the design and development of turbines for rocket engines to meet specific performance, and installation requirements are summarized. The total design problem, and design elements are identified, and the current technology pertaining to these elements is described. Recommended practices for achieving a successful design are included.

  11. Achieving energy efficiency during collective communications

    SciTech Connect

    Sundriyal, Vaibhav; Sosonkina, Masha; Zhang, Zhao

    2012-09-13

    Energy consumption has become a major design constraint in modern computing systems. With the advent of petaflops architectures, power-efficient software stacks have become imperative for scalability. Techniques such as dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (called DVFS) and CPU clock modulation (called throttling) are often used to reduce the power consumption of the compute nodes. To avoid significant performance losses, these techniques should be used judiciously during parallel application execution. For example, its communication phases may be good candidates to apply the DVFS and CPU throttling without incurring a considerable performance loss. They are often considered as indivisible operations although little attention is being devoted to the energy saving potential of their algorithmic steps. In this work, two important collective communication operations, all-to-all and allgather, are investigated as to their augmentation with energy saving strategies on the per-call basis. The experiments prove the viability of such a fine-grain approach. They also validate a theoretical power consumption estimate for multicore nodes proposed here. While keeping the performance loss low, the obtained energy savings were always significantly higher than those achieved when DVFS or throttling were switched on across the entire application run

  12. Turbine system

    DOEpatents

    McMahan, Kevin Weston; Dillard, Daniel Jackson

    2016-05-03

    A turbine system is disclosed. The turbine system includes a transition duct having an inlet, an outlet, and a passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The turbine system further includes a turbine section connected to the transition duct. The turbine section includes a plurality of shroud blocks at least partially defining a hot gas path, a plurality of buckets at least partially disposed in the hot gas path, and a plurality of nozzles at least partially disposed in the hot gas path. At least one of a shroud block, a bucket, or a nozzle includes means for withstanding high temperatures.

  13. The value of steam turbine upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, K.; Olear, D.

    2005-11-01

    Technological advances in mechanical and aerodynamic design of the turbine steam path are resulting in higher reliability and efficiency. A recent study conducted on a 390 MW pulverized coal-fired unit revealed just how much these new technological advancements can improve efficiency and output. The empirical study showed that the turbine upgrade raised high pressure (HP) turbine efficiency by 5%, intermediate pressure (IP) turbine efficiency by 4%, and low pressure (LP) turbine efficiency by 2.5%. In addition, the unit's highest achievable gross generation increased from 360 MW to 371 MW. 3 figs.

  14. Advancing gas turbine technology: Evolution and revolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehn, S.E.

    1995-05-01

    This article describes advances made in gas turbine technology as manufacturers introduce aero-derived advances in the pursuit of more power. The rise in the application of gas turbines for electric power generation is attributable to many factors. The first is an abundance of cheap natural gas. The second reason is the very high (54 percent to 58 percent) combined-cycle efficiencies being achieved with commercially available technology right now. Reliability and availability are cited third. Low environmental impact was cited as the fourth reason why gas turbines are so popular. Fifth are gas turbine`s low capital costs.

  15. Ceramic stationary gas turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Roode, M. van

    1995-10-01

    The performance of current industrial gas turbines is limited by the temperature and strength capabilities of the metallic structural materials in the engine hot section. Because of their superior high-temperature strength and durability, ceramics can be used as structural materials for hot section components (blades, nozzles, combustor liners) in innovative designs at increased turbine firing temperatures. The benefits include the ability to increase the turbine inlet temperature (TIT) to about 1200{degrees}C ({approx}2200{degrees}F) or more with uncooled ceramics. It has been projected that fully optimized stationary gas turbines would have a {approx}20 percent gain in thermal efficiency and {approx}40 percent gain in output power in simple cycle compared to all metal-engines with air-cooled components. Annual fuel savings in cogeneration in the U.S. would be on the order of 0.2 Quad by 2010. Emissions reductions to under 10 ppmv NO{sub x} are also forecast. This paper describes the progress on a three-phase, 6-year program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, to achieve significant performance improvements and emissions reductions in stationary gas turbines by replacing metallic hot section components with ceramic parts. Progress is being reported for the period September 1, 1994, through September 30, 1995.

  16. Ceramic stationary gas turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Roode, M. van

    1995-12-31

    The performance of current industrial gas turbines is limited by the temperature and strength capabilities of the metallic structural materials in the engine hot section. Because of their superior high-temperature strength and durability, ceramics can be used as structural materials for hot section components (blades, nozzles, combustor liners) in innovative designs at increased turbine firing temperatures. The benefits include the ability to increase the turbine inlet temperature (TIT) to about 1200{degrees}C ({approx}2200{degrees}F) or more with uncooled ceramics. It has been projected that fully optimized stationary gas turbines would have a {approx}20 percent gain in thermal efficiency and {approx}40 percent gain in output power in simple cycle compared to all metal-engines with air-cooled components. Annual fuel savings in cogeneration in the U.S. would be on the order of 0.2 Quad by 2010. Emissions reductions to under 10 ppmv NO{sub x} are also forecast. This paper describes the progress on a three-phase, 6-year program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, to achieve significant performance improvements and emissions reductions in stationary gas turbines by replacing metallic hot section components with ceramic parts. Progress is being reported for the period September 1, 1994, through September 30, 1995.

  17. Pilot-in-the-Loop Evaluation of a Yaw Rate to Throttle Feedback Control with Enhanced Engine Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Guo, Ten-Huei; Sowers, T. Shane; Chicatelli, Amy K.; Fulton, Christopher E.; May, Ryan D.; Owen, A. Karl

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation and evaluation of a yaw rate to throttle feedback system designed to replace a damaged rudder. It can act as a Dutch roll damper and as a means to facilitate pilot input for crosswind landings. Enhanced propulsion control modes were implemented to increase responsiveness and thrust level of the engine, which impact flight dynamics and performance. Piloted evaluations were performed to determine the capability of the engines to substitute for the rudder function under emergency conditions. The results showed that this type of implementation is beneficial, but the engines' capability to replace the rudder is limited.

  18. Kshara application for turbinate hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Kotrannavar, Vijay Kumar S; Angadi, Savita S

    2013-10-01

    Nasapratinaha (nasal obstruction) is a commonly encountered disease in clinical practice. It is one of the nasal disorders, explained in Ayurveda, having nasal obstruction leading to difficulty in breathing as the main cardinal feature. In contemporary science, this condition can be correlated with various diseases such as turbinate hypertrophy, deviated nasal septum, nasal mass, mucosal congestion, allergic rhinitis, and others; among which turbinate hypertrophy is a common cause. Turbinate hypertrophy can be treated with surgical and medical methods. The medical treatment has limitation for prolonged use because of health purpose, surgical approaches too have failed to achieve desired results in turbinate hypertrophy due to complications and high recurrence rate. The medical and surgical managements have their own limitations, merits, and demerits like synechiae formation, rhinitis sicca, severe bleeding, or osteonecrosis of the turbinate bone A parasurgical treatment explained in Ayurveda, known as kshara pratisarana, which is a minimal invasive and precise procedure for this ailment, tried to overcome this problem. 'Kshara Karma' is a popular treatment modality in Ayurveda, which has been advocated in disorders of nose like arbuda (tumor) and adhimamsa (muscular growth). Clinical observation has shown its effectiveness in the management of turbinate hypertrophy. A case report of 45-year-old male who presented with complaints of frequent nasal obstruction, nasal discharge, discomfort in nose, and headache; and diagnosed as turbinate hypertrophy has been presented here. The patient was treated with one application of Kshara over the turbinates. The treatment was effective and no recurrence was noticed in the follow up. PMID:24459392

  19. H gas turbine combined cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Corman, J.

    1995-10-01

    A major step has been taken in the development of the Next Power Generation System - {open_quotes}H{close_quotes} Technology Combined Cycle. This new gas turbine combined-cycle system increases thermal performance to the 60% level by increasing gas turbine operating temperature to 1430 C (2600 F) at a pressure ratio of 23 to 1. Although this represents a significant increase in operating temperature for the gas turbine, the potential for single digit NOx levels (based upon 15% O{sub 2}, in the exhaust) has been retained. The combined effect of performance increase and environmental control is achieved by an innovative closed loop steam cooling system which tightly integrates the gas turbine and steam turbine cycles. The {open_quotes}H{close_quotes} Gas Turbine Combined Cycle System meets the goals and objectives of the DOE Advanced Turbine System Program. The development and demonstration of this new system is being carried out as part of the Industrial/Government cooperative agreement under the ATS Program. This program will achieve first commercial operation of this new system before the end of the century.

  20. Two stage turbine for rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, Joseph P.

    1993-11-01

    The aerodynamic design and rig test evaluation of a small counter-rotating turbine system is described. The advanced turbine airfoils were designed and tested by Pratt & Whitney. The technology represented by this turbine is being developed for a turbopump to be used in an advanced upper stage rocket engine. The advanced engine will use a hydrogen expander cycle and achieve high performance through efficient combustion of hydrogen/oxygen propellants, high combustion pressure, and high area ratio exhaust nozzle expansion. Engine performance goals require that the turbopump drive turbines achieve high efficiency at low gas flow rates. The low mass flow rates and high operating pressures result in very small airfoil heights and diameters. The high efficiency and small size requirements present a challenging turbine design problem. The shrouded axial turbine blades are 50 percent reaction with a maximum thickness to chord ratio near 1. At 6 deg from the tangential direction, the nozzle and blade exit flow angles are well below the traditional design minimum limits. The blade turning angle of 160 deg also exceeds the maximum limits used in traditional turbine designs.

  1. Two stage turbine for rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.

    1993-01-01

    The aerodynamic design and rig test evaluation of a small counter-rotating turbine system is described. The advanced turbine airfoils were designed and tested by Pratt & Whitney. The technology represented by this turbine is being developed for a turbopump to be used in an advanced upper stage rocket engine. The advanced engine will use a hydrogen expander cycle and achieve high performance through efficient combustion of hydrogen/oxygen propellants, high combustion pressure, and high area ratio exhaust nozzle expansion. Engine performance goals require that the turbopump drive turbines achieve high efficiency at low gas flow rates. The low mass flow rates and high operating pressures result in very small airfoil heights and diameters. The high efficiency and small size requirements present a challenging turbine design problem. The shrouded axial turbine blades are 50 percent reaction with a maximum thickness to chord ratio near 1. At 6 deg from the tangential direction, the nozzle and blade exit flow angles are well below the traditional design minimum limits. The blade turning angle of 160 deg also exceeds the maximum limits used in traditional turbine designs.

  2. ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Gaul

    2004-04-21

    Natural gas combustion turbines are rapidly becoming the primary technology of choice for generating electricity. At least half of the new generating capacity added in the US over the next twenty years will be combustion turbine systems. The Department of Energy has cosponsored with Siemens Westinghouse, a program to maintain the technology lead in gas turbine systems. The very ambitious eight year program was designed to demonstrate a highly efficient and commercially acceptable power plant, with the ability to fire a wide range of fuels. The main goal of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program was to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost effective competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Performance targets were focused on natural gas as a fuel and included: System efficiency that exceeds 60% (lower heating value basis); Less than 10 ppmv NO{sub x} emissions without the use of post combustion controls; Busbar electricity that are less than 10% of state of the art systems; Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) equivalent to current systems; Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals; and Commercial systems by the year 2000. In a parallel effort, the program was to focus on adapting the ATS engine to coal-derived or biomass fuels. In Phase 1 of the ATS Program, preliminary investigators on different gas turbine cycles demonstrated that net plant LHV based efficiency greater than 60% was achievable. In Phase 2 the more promising cycles were evaluated in greater detail and the closed-loop steam-cooled combined cycle was selected for development because it offered the best solution with least risk for achieving the ATS Program goals for plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity and RAM. Phase 2 also involved conceptual ATS engine and plant design and technology developments in aerodynamics, sealing

  3. PRODUCTION OF SOUND BY UNSTEADY THROTTLING OF FLOW INTO A RESONANT CAVITY, WITH APPLICATION TO VOICED SPEECH

    PubMed Central

    Howe, M. S.; McGowan, R. S.

    2011-01-01

    An analysis is made of the sound generated by the time-dependent throttling of a nominally steady stream of air through a small orifice into a flow-through resonant cavity. This is exemplified by the production of voiced speech, where air from the lungs enters the vocal tract through the glottis at a time variable volume flow rate Q(t) controlled by oscillations of the glottis cross-section. Voicing theory has hitherto determined Q from a heuristic, reduced complexity ‘Fant’ differential equation (G. Fant, Acoustic Theory of Speech Production, 1960). A new self-consistent, integro-differential form of this equation is derived in this paper using the theory of aerodynamic sound, with full account taken of the back-reaction of the resonant tract on the glottal flux Q. The theory involves an aeroacoustic Green’s function (G) for flow-surface interactions in a time-dependent glottis, so making the problem non-self-adjoint. In complex problems of this type it is not usually possible to obtain G in an explicit analytic form. The principal objective of the paper is to show how the Fant equation can still be derived in such cases from a consideration of the equation of aerodynamic sound and from the adjoint of the equation governing G in the neighbourhood of the ‘throttle’. The theory is illustrated by application to the canonical problem of throttled flow into a Helmholtz resonator. PMID:21666824

  4. Emergency Flight Control of a Twin-Jet Commercial Aircraft using Manual Throttle Manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Jennifer H.; Cogan, Bruce R.; Fullerton, C. Gordon; Burken, John J.; Venti, Michael W.; Burcham, Frank W.

    2007-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) created the PCAR (Propulsion-Controlled Aircraft Recovery) project in 2005 to mitigate the ManPADS (man-portable air defense systems) threat to the commercial aircraft fleet with near-term, low-cost proven technology. Such an attack could potentially cause a major FCS (flight control system) malfunction or other critical system failure onboard the aircraft, despite the extreme reliability of current systems. For the situations in which nominal flight controls are lost or degraded, engine thrust may be the only remaining means for emergency flight control [ref 1]. A computer-controlled thrust system, known as propulsion-controlled aircraft (PCA), was developed in the mid 1990s with NASA, McDonnell Douglas and Honeywell. PCA's major accomplishment was a demonstration of an automatic landing capability using only engine thrust [ref 11. Despite these promising results, no production aircraft have been equipped with a PCA system, due primarily to the modifications required for implementation. A minimally invasive option is TOC (throttles-only control), which uses the same control principles as PCA, but requires absolutely no hardware, software or other aircraft modifications. TOC is pure piloting technique, and has historically been utilized several times by flight crews, both military and civilian, in emergency situations stemming from a loss of conventional control. Since the 1990s, engineers at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) have studied TOC, in both simulation and flight, for emergency flight control with test pilots in numerous configurations. In general, it was shown that TOC was effective on certain aircraft for making a survivable landing. DHS sponsored both NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, CA) and United Airlines (Denver, Colorado) to conduct a flight and simulation study of the TOC characteristics of a twin-jet commercial transport, and assess the ability of a crew to control an aircraft down to

  5. An experimental investigation into the effect of Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) turbine array spacing on turbine efficiency and turbine wake characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzenmuller, Nick; Aliseda, Alberto

    2012-11-01

    Three 1/45 MHK turbine scale models were tested in a flume at various array spacings. The model turbines were instrumented to measure torque and angular velocity. Incident flow on the turbines and in the wakes was characterized via PIV and ADV measurements. Flow characteristics: mean velocity, turbulence intensity, and vorticity are correlated with turbine performance. Tip speed ratio (TSR) similarity (although not Reynolds number) of the turbines is achieved by controlling the applied load with magnetic brakes inside the model turbine nacelles. Wake characteristics and turbine efficiencies were investigated at a range of TSRs, with the goal of ``tuning'' an array to maximize overall array efficiency. Grids were placed in the flume upstream of the turbine array in order to change the turbulence intensity of the flow incident to the array. High levels of turbulence intensity in the incident flow is consistent with natural conditions in tidal currents, and has a strong effect on turbine wake dissipation. These experiments used a ``reference model'' turbine geometry developed for DOE at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for the purpose of facilitating the comparison of experimental and numerical results in marine hydrokinetic turbine research.

  6. Turbine design review text

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Three-volume publication covers theoretical, design, and performance aspects of turbines. Volumes cover thermodynamic and fluid-dynamic concepts, velocity diagram design, turbine blade aerodynamic design, turbine energy losses, supersonic turbines, radial-inflow turbines, turbine cooling, and aerodynamic performance testing.

  7. TEDANN: Turbine engine diagnostic artificial neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Kangas, L.J.; Greitzer, F.L.; Illi, O.J. Jr.

    1994-03-17

    The initial focus of TEDANN is on AGT-1500 fuel flow dynamics: that is, fuel flow faults detectable in the signals from the Electronic Control Unit`s (ECU) diagnostic connector. These voltage signals represent the status of the Electro-Mechanical Fuel System (EMFS) in response to ECU commands. The EMFS is a fuel metering device that delivers fuel to the turbine engine under the management of the ECU. The ECU is an analog computer whose fuel flow algorithm is dependent upon throttle position, ambient air and turbine inlet temperatures, and compressor and turbine speeds. Each of these variables has a representative voltage signal available at the ECU`s J1 diagnostic connector, which is accessed via the Automatic Breakout Box (ABOB). The ABOB is a firmware program capable of converting 128 separate analog data signals into digital format. The ECU`s J1 diagnostic connector provides 32 analog signals to the ABOB. The ABOB contains a 128 to 1 multiplexer and an analog-to-digital converter, CP both operated by an 8-bit embedded controller. The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) developed and published the hardware specifications as well as the micro-code for the ABOB Intel EPROM processor and the internal code for the multiplexer driver subroutine. Once the ECU analog readings are converted into a digital format, the data stream will be input directly into TEDANN via the serial RS-232 port of the Contact Test Set (CTS) computer. The CTS computer is an IBM compatible personal computer designed and constructed for tactical use on the battlefield. The CTS has a 50MHz 32-bit Intel 80486DX processor. It has a 200MB hard drive and 8MB RAM. The CTS also has serial, parallel and SCSI interface ports. The CTS will also host a frame-based expert system for diagnosing turbine engine faults (referred to as TED; not shown in Figure 1).

  8. Wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Cheney, Jr., Marvin C.

    1982-01-01

    A wind turbine of the type having an airfoil blade (15) mounted on a flexible beam (20) and a pitch governor (55) which selectively, torsionally twists the flexible beam in response to wind turbine speed thereby setting blade pitch, is provided with a limiter (85) which restricts unwanted pitch change at operating speeds due to torsional creep of the flexible beam. The limiter allows twisting of the beam by the governor under excessive wind velocity conditions to orient the blades in stall pitch positions, thereby preventing overspeed operation of the turbine. In the preferred embodiment, the pitch governor comprises a pendulum (65,70) which responds to changing rotor speed by pivotal movement, the limiter comprising a resilient member (90) which engages an end of the pendulum to restrict further movement thereof, and in turn restrict beam creep and unwanted blade pitch misadjustment.

  9. Wind Turbine Contingency Control Through Generator De-Rating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan; Goebel, Kai; Balas, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Maximizing turbine up-time and reducing maintenance costs are key technology drivers for wind turbine operators. Components within wind turbines are subject to considerable stresses due to unpredictable environmental conditions resulting from rapidly changing local dynamics. In that context, systems health management has the aim to assess the state-of-health of components within a wind turbine, to estimate remaining life, and to aid in autonomous decision-making to minimize damage to the turbine. Advanced contingency control is one way to enable autonomous decision-making by providing the mechanism to enable safe and efficient turbine operation. The work reported herein explores the integration of condition monitoring of wind turbines with contingency control to balance the trade-offs between maintaining system health and energy capture. The contingency control involves de-rating the generator operating point to achieve reduced loads on the wind turbine. Results are demonstrated using a high fidelity simulator of a utility-scale wind turbine.

  10. Development of Advanced Seals for Industrial Turbine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupp, Raymond E.; Aksit, Mahmut F.; Ghasripoor, Farshad; Turnquist, Norman A.; Dinc, Saim; Mortzheim, Jason; Demiroglu, Mehmet

    2002-10-01

    A critical area being addressed to improve industrial turbine performance is reducing the parasitic leakage flows through the various static and dynamic seals. Implementation of advanced seals into General Electric (GE) industrial turbines has progressed well over the last few years with significant operating performance gains achieved. Advanced static seals have been placed in gas turbine hot gas-path junctions and steam turbine packing ring segment end gaps. Brush seals have significantly decreased labyrinth seal leakages in gas turbine compressors and turbine interstages, steam turbine interstage and end packings, industrial compressor shaft seals, and generator seals. Abradable seals are being developed for blade-tip locations in various turbine locations. This presentation summarizes the status of advanced seal development for industrial turbines at GE.

  11. Flow Integrating Section for a Gas Turbine Engine in Which Turbine Blades are Cooled by Full Compressor Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, W. Gene

    1999-11-14

    Routing of full compressor flow through hollow turbine blades achieves unusually effective blade cooling and allows a significant increase in turbine inlet gas temperature and, hence, engine efficiency. The invention, ''flow integrating section'' alleviates the turbine dissipation of kinetic energy of air jets leaving the hollow blades as they enter the compressor diffuser.

  12. Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect

    Joesph Fadok

    2008-01-01

    Siemens has developed a roadmap to achieve the DOE goals for efficiency, cost reduction, and emissions through innovative approaches and novel technologies which build upon worldwide IGCC operational experience, platform technology, and extensive experience in G-class operating conditions. In Phase 1, the technologies and concepts necessary to achieve the program goals were identified for the gas turbine components and supporting technology areas and testing plans were developed to mitigate identified risks. Multiple studies were conducted to evaluate the impact in plant performance of different gas turbine and plant technologies. 2015 gas turbine technologies showed a significant improvement in IGCC plant efficiency, however, a severe performance penalty was calculated for high carbon capture cases. Thermodynamic calculations showed that the DOE 2010 and 2015 efficiency targets can be met with a two step approach. A risk management process was instituted in Phase 1 to identify risk and develop mitigation plans. For the risks identified, testing and development programs are in place and the risks will be revisited periodically to determine if changes to the plan are necessary. A compressor performance prediction has shown that the design of the compressor for the engine can be achieved with additional stages added to the rear of the compressor. Tip clearance effects were studied as well as a range of flow and pressure ratios to evaluate the impacts to both performance and stability. Considerable data was obtained on the four candidate combustion systems: diffusion, catalytic, premix, and distributed combustion. Based on the results of Phase 1, the premixed combustion system and the distributed combustion system were chosen as having the most potential and will be the focus of Phase 2 of the program. Significant progress was also made in obtaining combustion kinetics data for high hydrogen fuels. The Phase 1 turbine studies indicate initial feasibility of the

  13. Apparatus and methods of reheating gas turbine cooling steam and high pressure steam turbine exhaust in a combined cycle power generating system

    DOEpatents

    Tomlinson, Leroy Omar; Smith, Raub Warfield

    2002-01-01

    In a combined cycle system having a multi-pressure heat recovery steam generator, a gas turbine and steam turbine, steam for cooling gas turbine components is supplied from the intermediate pressure section of the heat recovery steam generator supplemented by a portion of the steam exhausting from the HP section of the steam turbine, steam from the gas turbine cooling cycle and the exhaust from the HP section of the steam turbine are combined for flow through a reheat section of the HRSG. The reheated steam is supplied to the IP section inlet of the steam turbine. Thus, where gas turbine cooling steam temperature is lower than optimum, a net improvement in performance is achieved by flowing the cooling steam exhausting from the gas turbine and the exhaust steam from the high pressure section of the steam turbine in series through the reheater of the HRSG for applying steam at optimum temperature to the IP section of the steam turbine.

  14. Kshara application for turbinate hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kotrannavar, Vijay Kumar S.; Angadi, Savita S.

    2013-01-01

    Nasapratinaha (nasal obstruction) is a commonly encountered disease in clinical practice. It is one of the nasal disorders, explained in Ayurveda, having nasal obstruction leading to difficulty in breathing as the main cardinal feature. In contemporary science, this condition can be correlated with various diseases such as turbinate hypertrophy, deviated nasal septum, nasal mass, mucosal congestion, allergic rhinitis, and others; among which turbinate hypertrophy is a common cause. Turbinate hypertrophy can be treated with surgical and medical methods. The medical treatment has limitation for prolonged use because of health purpose, surgical approaches too have failed to achieve desired results in turbinate hypertrophy due to complications and high recurrence rate. The medical and surgical managements have their own limitations, merits, and demerits like synechiae formation, rhinitis sicca, severe bleeding, or osteonecrosis of the turbinate bone A parasurgical treatment explained in Ayurveda, known as kshara pratisarana, which is a minimal invasive and precise procedure for this ailment, tried to overcome this problem. ‘Kshara Karma’ is a popular treatment modality in Ayurveda, which has been advocated in disorders of nose like arbuda (tumor) and adhimamsa (muscular growth). Clinical observation has shown its effectiveness in the management of turbinate hypertrophy. A case report of 45-year-old male who presented with complaints of frequent nasal obstruction, nasal discharge, discomfort in nose, and headache; and diagnosed as turbinate hypertrophy has been presented here. The patient was treated with one application of Kshara over the turbinates. The treatment was effective and no recurrence was noticed in the follow up. PMID:24459392

  15. Single Rotor Turbine

    DOEpatents

    Platts, David A.

    2004-10-26

    A rotor for use in turbine applications has a centrifugal compressor having axially disposed spaced apart fins forming passages and an axial turbine having hollow turbine blades interleaved with the fins and through which fluid from the centrifugal compressor flows.

  16. SMART POWER TURBINE

    SciTech Connect

    Nirm V. Nirmalan

    2003-11-01

    Gas turbines are the choice technology for high-performance power generation and are employed in both simple and combined cycle configurations around the world. The Smart Power Turbine (SPT) program has developed new technologies that are needed to further extend the performance and economic attractiveness of gas turbines for power generation. Today's power generation gas turbines control firing temperatures indirectly, by measuring the exhaust gas temperature and then mathematically calculating the peak combustor temperatures. But temperatures in the turbine hot gas path vary a great deal, making it difficult to control firing temperatures precisely enough to achieve optimal performance. Similarly, there is no current way to assess deterioration of turbine hot-gas-path components without shutting down the turbine. Consequently, maintenance and component replacements are often scheduled according to conservative design practices based on historical fleet-averaged data. Since fuel heating values vary with the prevalent natural gas fuel, the inability to measure heating value directly, with sufficient accuracy and timeliness, can lead to maintenance and operational decisions that are less than optimal. GE Global Research Center, under this Smart Power Turbine program, has developed a suite of novel sensors that would measure combustor flame temperature, online fuel lower heating value (LHV), and hot-gas-path component life directly. The feasibility of using the ratio of the integrated intensities of portions of the OH emission band to determine the specific average temperature of a premixed methane or natural-gas-fueled combustion flame was demonstrated. The temperature determined is the temperature of the plasma included in the field of view of the sensor. Two sensor types were investigated: the first used a low-resolution fiber optic spectrometer; the second was a SiC dual photodiode chip. Both methods worked. Sensitivity to flame temperature changes was remarkably

  17. Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Advanced Turbine Technology Application Project (ATTAP) activities during the past year were highlighted by test-bed engine design and development activities; ceramic component design; materials and component characterization; ceramic component process development and fabrication; component rig testing; and test-bed engine fabrication and testing. Although substantial technical challenges remain, all areas exhibited progress. Test-bed engine design and development activity included engine mechanical design, power turbine flow-path design and mechanical layout, and engine system integration aimed at upgrading the AGT-5 from a 1038 C metal engine to a durable 1371 C structural ceramic component test-bed engine. ATTAP-defined ceramic and associated ceramic/metal component design activities include: the ceramic combustor body, the ceramic gasifier turbine static structure, the ceramic gasifier turbine rotor, the ceramic/metal power turbine static structure, and the ceramic power turbine rotors. The materials and component characterization efforts included the testing and evaluation of several candidate ceramic materials and components being developed for use in the ATTAP. Ceramic component process development and fabrication activities are being conducted for the gasifier turbine rotor, gasifier turbine vanes, gasifier turbine scroll, extruded regenerator disks, and thermal insulation. Component rig testing activities include the development of the necessary test procedures and conduction of rig testing of the ceramic components and assemblies. Four-hundred hours of hot gasifier rig test time were accumulated with turbine inlet temperatures exceeding 1204 C at 100 percent design gasifier speed. A total of 348.6 test hours were achieved on a single ceramic rotor without failure and a second ceramic rotor was retired in engine-ready condition at 364.9 test hours. Test-bed engine fabrication, testing, and development supported improvements in ceramic component technology

  18. Plan Turbines 3 & 4, Side View Turbines ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Plan - Turbines 3 & 4, Side View - Turbines 3 & 4, Section A-A - American Falls Water, Power & Light Company, Island Power Plant, Snake River, below American Falls Dam, American Falls, Power County, ID

  19. Wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Traudt, R.F.

    1986-12-30

    This patent describes a wind turbine device having a main rotatable driven shaft, elongated blades operatively mounted on the main shaft for unitary rotation with the main shaft. The blade extends substantially radially away from the main shaft and is adapted to fold downwind under naturally occurring forces and simultaneously feather in direct response to the folding movement. A means associated with the blades is included for increasing the rate of fold relative to the rate of feather as the speed of rotation increases.

  20. Heat Transfer in Gas Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.

    2001-01-01

    The turbine gas path is a very complex flow field. This is due to a variety of flow and heat transfer phenomena encountered in turbine passages. This manuscript provides an overview of the current work in this field at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Also, based on the author's preference, more emphasis is on the computational work. There is much more experimental work in progress at GRC than that reported here. While much has been achieved, more needs to be done in terms of validating the predictions against experimental data. More experimental data, especially on film cooled and rough turbine blades, are required for code validation. Also, the combined film cooling and internal cooling flow computation for a real blade is yet to be performed. While most computational work to date has assumed steady state conditions, the flow is clearly unsteady due to the presence of wakes. All this points to a long road ahead. However, we are well on course.

  1. Effect of Chord Size on Weight and Cooling Characteristics of Air-Cooled Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esgar, Jack B; Schum, Eugene F; Curren, Arthur N

    1958-01-01

    An analysis has been made to determine the effect of chord size on the weight and cooling characteristics of shell-supported, air-cooled gas-turbine blades. In uncooled turbines with solid blades, the general practice has been to design turbines with high aspect ratio (small blade chord) to achieve substantial turbine weight reduction. With air-cooled blades, this study shows that turbine blade weight is affected to a much smaller degree by the size of the blade chord.

  2. Engineering stategies and implications of using higher plants for throttling gas and water exchange in a controlled ecological life support system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberland, Dennis; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Corey, Kenneth A.

    1993-01-01

    Engineering stategies for advanced life support systems to be used on Lunar and Mars bases involve a wide spectrum of approaches. These range from purely physical-chemical life support strategies to purely biological approaches. Within the context of biological based systems, a bioengineered system can be devised that would utilize the metabolic mechanisms of plants to control the rates of CO2 uptake and O2 evolution (photosynthesis) and water production (transpiration). Such a mechanism of external engineering control has become known as throttling. Research conducted at the John F. Kennedy Space Center's Controlled Ecological Life Support System Breadboard Project has demonstrated the potential of throttling these fluxes by changing environmental parameters affecting the plant processes. Among the more effective environmental throttles are: light and CO2 concentration for controllingthe rate of photsynthesis and humidity and CO2 concentration for controlling transpiration. Such a bioengineered strategy implies control mechanisms that in the past have not been widely attributed to life support systems involving biological components and suggests a broad range of applications in advanced life support system design.

  3. Single-crystal superalloy drives turbine advances

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, K.

    1995-04-01

    In searching for ways to improve power-to-weight ratios and fuel efficiency, gas turbine engine manufacturers invest heavily in the development and testing of new alloys. Their goal is to find turbine airfoil materials that can handle the higher operating temperatures, increased component stresses, and faster rotational speeds that are needed to increase turbine performance. Major turbine engine manufacturers find they can achieve these objectives through ultra-high performance, single-crystal superalloys -- a group of nickel-base materials that exhibit outstanding strength and surface stability at temperatures up to 85{percent} of their melting points. One such superalloy is CMSX-4, co-engineered by ingot maker Cannon-Muskegon and turbine engine manufacturers Rolls-Royce and Allison Engine Company. It is currently being used in such applications as Allison`s advanced airfoil programs.

  4. Performance (Off-Design) Cycle Analysis for a Turbofan Engine With Interstage Turbine Burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liew, K. H.; Urip, E.; Yang, S. L.; Mattingly, J. D.; Marek, C. J.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the performance of a steady-state, dual-spool, separate-exhaust turbofan engine, with an interstage turbine burner (ITB) serving as a secondary combustor. The ITB, which is located in the transition duct between the high- and the low-pressure turbines, is a relatively new concept for increasing specific thrust and lowering pollutant emissions in modern jet-engine propulsion. A detailed off-design performance analysis of ITB engines is written in Microsoft(Registered Trademark) Excel (Redmond, Washington) macrocode with Visual Basic Application to calculate engine performances over the entire operating envelope. Several design-point engine cases are pre-selected using a parametric cycle-analysis code developed previously in Microsoft(Registered Trademark) Excel, for off-design analysis. The off-design code calculates engine performances (i.e. thrust and thrust-specific-fuel-consumption) at various flight conditions and throttle settings.

  5. Recent developments in turbine blade internal cooling.

    PubMed

    Han, J C; Dutta, S

    2001-05-01

    This paper focuses on turbine blade internal cooling. Internal cooling is achieved by passing the coolant through several rib-enhanced serpentine passages inside the blade and extracting the heat from the outside of the blades. Both jet impingement and pin-fin-cooling are also used as a method of internal cooling. In the past number of years there has been considerable progress in turbine blade internal cooling research and this paper is limited to reviewing a few selected publications to reflect recent developments in turbine blade internal cooling. PMID:11460626

  6. Energy efficient engine high-pressure turbine detailed design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thulin, R. D.; Howe, D. C.; Singer, I. D.

    1982-01-01

    The energy efficient engine high-pressure turbine is a single stage system based on technology advancements in the areas of aerodynamics, structures and materials to achieve high performance, low operating economics and durability commensurate with commercial service requirements. Low loss performance features combined with a low through-flow velocity approach results in a predicted efficiency of 88.8 for a flight propulsion system. Turbine airfoil durability goals are achieved through the use of advanced high-strength and high-temperature capability single crystal materials and effective cooling management. Overall, this design reflects a considerable extension in turbine technology that is applicable to future, energy efficient gas-turbine engines.

  7. NEXT GENERATION TURBINE PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    William H. Day

    2002-05-03

    both heat and peaking power (Block 2 engine); (2) Repowering of an older coal-fired plant (Block 2 engine); (3) Gas-fired HAT cycle (Block 1 and 2 engines); (4) Integrated gasification HAT (Block 1 and 2 engines). Also under Phase I of the NGT Program, a conceptual design of the combustion system has been completed. An integrated approach to cycle optimization for improved combustor turndown capability has been employed. The configuration selected has the potential for achieving single digit NO{sub x}/CO emissions between 40 percent and 100 percent load conditions. A technology maturation plan for the combustion system has been proposed. Also, as a result of Phase I, ceramic vane technology will be incorporated into NGT designs and will require less cooling flow than conventional metallic vanes, thereby improving engine efficiency. A common 50 Hz and 60 Hz power turbine was selected due to the cost savings from eliminating a gearbox. A list of ceramic vane technologies has been identified for which the funding comes from DOE, NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and P&W.

  8. Fixed pitch wind turbine system utilizing aerodynamic stall

    SciTech Connect

    Migliori, A.; Humphrey, J.; Midyette, J. III

    1984-01-24

    A fixed-pitch wind turbine system utilizing a permanent magnet alternator. Optimum output power is achieved by controlling the load on the stator output armature of the permanent magnet alternator. Energy is stored in the ac utility grid utilizing a synchronous inverter which couples energy from the alternator for storage in the ac utility grid in a controlled manner to regulate the rotational speed of the wind turbine and thereby extract a substantially optimum amount of output power from the wind turbine.

  9. Wind Turbines Benefit Crops

    SciTech Connect

    Takle, Gene

    2010-01-01

    Ames Laboratory associate scientist Gene Takle talks about research into the effect of wind turbines on nearby crops. Preliminary results show the turbines may have a positive effect by cooling and drying the crops and assisting with carbon dioxide uptake.

  10. Wind Turbines Benefit Crops

    ScienceCinema

    Takle, Gene

    2013-03-01

    Ames Laboratory associate scientist Gene Takle talks about research into the effect of wind turbines on nearby crops. Preliminary results show the turbines may have a positive effect by cooling and drying the crops and assisting with carbon dioxide uptake.

  11. Computational Tools to Assess Turbine Biological Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Strickler, Brad; Weisbeck, Molly; Dotson, Curtis L.

    2014-07-24

    Public Utility District No. 2 of Grant County (GCPUD) operates the Priest Rapids Dam (PRD), a hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River in Washington State. The dam contains 10 Kaplan-type turbine units that are now more than 50 years old. Plans are underway to refit these aging turbines with new runners. The Columbia River at PRD is a migratory pathway for several species of juvenile and adult salmonids, so passage of fish through the dam is a major consideration when upgrading the turbines. In this paper, a method for turbine biological performance assessment (BioPA) is demonstrated. Using this method, a suite of biological performance indicators is computed based on simulated data from a CFD model of a proposed turbine design. Each performance indicator is a measure of the probability of exposure to a certain dose of an injury mechanism. Using known relationships between the dose of an injury mechanism and frequency of injury (dose–response) from laboratory or field studies, the likelihood of fish injury for a turbine design can be computed from the performance indicator. By comparing the values of the indicators from proposed designs, the engineer can identify the more-promising alternatives. We present an application of the BioPA method for baseline risk assessment calculations for the existing Kaplan turbines at PRD that will be used as the minimum biological performance that a proposed new design must achieve.

  12. Control of hydrostatic transmission wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabhandharaks, Danop

    In this study, we proposed a control strategy for a wind turbine that employed a hydrostatic transmission system for transmitting power from the wind turbine rotor via a hydraulic transmission line to a ground level generator. Wind turbine power curve tracking was achieved by controlling the hydraulic pump displacement and, at the other end of the hydraulic line, the hydraulic motor displacement was controlled so that the overall transmission loss was minimized. Steady state response, dynamic response, and system stability were assessed. The maximum transmission efficiency obtained ranged from 79% to 84% at steady state when the proposed control strategy was implemented. The leakage and friction losses of the hydraulic components were the main factors that compromised the efficiency. The simulation results showed that the system was stable and had fast and well-damped transient response. Double wind turbine system sharing hydraulic pipes, a hydraulic motor, and a generator were also studied. The hydraulic pipe diameter used in the double-turbine system increased by 27% compared to the single-turbine system in order to make the transmission coefficient comparable between both systems. The simulation results suggested that the leakage losses were so significant that the efficiency of the system was worsened compared with the single-turbine system. Future studies of other behavioral aspects and practical issues such as fluid dynamics, structure strength, materials, and costs are needed.

  13. Sliding vane geometry turbines

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Harold Huimin; Zhang, Jizhong; Hu, Liangjun; Hanna, Dave R

    2014-12-30

    Various systems and methods are described for a variable geometry turbine. In one example, a turbine nozzle comprises a central axis and a nozzle vane. The nozzle vane includes a stationary vane and a sliding vane. The sliding vane is positioned to slide in a direction substantially tangent to an inner circumference of the turbine nozzle and in contact with the stationary vane.

  14. Large wind turbine generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Donovon, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    The development associated with large wind turbine systems is briefly described. The scope of this activity includes the development of several large wind turbines ranging in size from 100 kW to several megawatt levels. A description of the wind turbine systems, their programmatic status and a summary of their potential costs is included.

  15. Design Tools to Assess Hydro-Turbine Biological Performance: Priest Rapids Dam Turbine Replacement Project

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Strickler, Brad; Weisbeck, Molly; Dotson, Curtis L.

    2013-06-25

    Over the past two decades, there have been many studies describing injury mechanisms associated with turbine passage, the response of various fish species to these mechanisms, and the probability of survival through dams. Although developing tools to design turbines that improve passage survival has been difficult and slow, a more robust quantification of the turbine environment has emerged through integrating physical model data, fish survival data, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies. Grant County Public Utility District (GCPUD) operates the Priest Rapids Dam (PRD), a hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River in Washington State. The dam contains 10 Kaplan-type turbine units that are now almost 50 years old. The Utility District plans to refit all of these aging turbines with new turbines. The Columbia River at PRD is a migratory pathway for several species of juvenile and adult salmonids, so passage of fish through the dam is a major consideration when replacing the turbines. In this presentation, a method for turbine biological performance assessment (BioPA) is introduced. Using this method, a suite of biological performance indicators is computed based on simulated data from a CFD model of a proposed turbine design. Each performance indicator is a measure of the probability of exposure to a certain dose of an injury mechanism. Using known relationships between the dose of an injury mechanism and frequency of injury (dose–response) from laboratory or field studies, the likelihood of fish injury for a turbine design can be computed from the performance indicator. By comparing the values of the indicators from proposed designs, the engineer can identify the more-promising alternatives. We will present application of the BioPA method for baseline risk assessment calculations for the existing Kaplan turbines at PRD that will be used as the minimum biological performance that a proposed new design must achieve.

  16. Advanced IGCC/Hydrogen Gas Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect

    York, William; Hughes, Michael; Berry, Jonathan; Russell, Tamara; Lau, Y. C.; Liu, Shan; Arnett, Michael; Peck, Arthur; Tralshawala, Nilesh; Weber, Joseph; Benjamin, Marc; Iduate, Michelle; Kittleson, Jacob; Garcia-Crespo, Andres; Delvaux, John; Casanova, Fernando; Lacy, Ben; Brzek, Brian; Wolfe, Chris; Palafox, Pepe; Ding, Ben; Badding, Bruce; McDuffie, Dwayne; Zemsky, Christine

    2015-07-30

    The objective of this program was to develop the technologies required for a fuel flexible (coal derived hydrogen or syngas) gas turbine for IGCC that met DOE turbine performance goals. The overall DOE Advanced Power System goal was to conduct the research and development (R&D) necessary to produce coal-based IGCC power systems with high efficiency, near-zero emissions, and competitive capital cost. To meet this goal, the DOE Fossil Energy Turbine Program had as an interim objective of 2 to 3 percentage points improvement in combined cycle (CC) efficiency. The final goal is 3 to 5 percentage points improvement in CC efficiency above the state of the art for CC turbines in IGCC applications at the time the program started. The efficiency goals were for NOx emissions of less than 2 ppm NOx (@15 % O2). As a result of the technologies developed under this program, the DOE goals were exceeded with a projected 8 point efficiency improvement. In addition, a new combustion technology was conceived of and developed to overcome the challenges of burning hydrogen and achieving the DOE’s NOx goal. This report also covers the developments under the ARRA-funded portion of the program that include gas turbine technology advancements for improvement in the efficiency, emissions, and cost performance of gas turbines for industrial applications with carbon capture and sequestration. Example applications could be cement plants, chemical plants, refineries, steel and aluminum plants, manufacturing facilities, etc. The DOE’s goal for more than 5 percentage point improvement in efficiency was met with cycle analyses performed for representative IGCC Steel Mill and IGCC Refinery applications. Technologies were developed in this program under the following areas: combustion, larger latter stage buckets, CMC and EBC, advanced materials and coatings, advanced configurations to reduce cooling, sealing and rotor purge flows, turbine aerodynamics, advanced sensors, advancements in first

  17. Gas turbine engine active clearance control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deveau, Paul J. (Inventor); Greenberg, Paul B. (Inventor); Paolillo, Roger E. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Method for controlling the clearance between rotating and stationary components of a gas turbine engine are disclosed. Techniques for achieving close correspondence between the radial position of rotor blade tips and the circumscribing outer air seals are disclosed. In one embodiment turbine case temperature modifying air is provided in flow rate, pressure and temperature varied as a function of engine operating condition. The modifying air is scheduled from a modulating and mixing valve supplied with dual source compressor air. One source supplies relatively low pressure, low temperature air and the other source supplies relatively high pressure, high temperature air. After the air has been used for the active clearance control (cooling the high pressure turbine case) it is then used for cooling the structure that supports the outer air seal and other high pressure turbine component parts.

  18. Turbine Imaging Technology Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Moursund, Russell A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2004-12-31

    The goal of this project was to identify and evaluate imaging alternatives for observing the behavior of juvenile fish within an operating Kaplan turbine unit with a focus on methods to quantify fish injury mechanisms inside an operating turbine unit. Imaging methods are particularly needed to observe the approach and interaction of fish with turbine structural elements. This evaluation documents both the opportunities and constraints for observing juvenile fish at specific locations during turbine passage. The information may be used to acquire the scientific knowledge to make structural improvements and create opportunities for industry to modify turbines and improve fish passage conditions.

  19. IGCC performance comparison for variations in gasifier type and gas turbine firing temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stochl, R. J.; Nainiger, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    Performance estimates were made for a series of integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power systems using three generic types of coal gasification subsystems. The objectives of this study were (1) to provide a self consistent comparison of IGCC systems using different types of gasifiers and different oxidants and (2) to use this framework of cases to evaluate the effect of a gas turbine firing temperature and cooling approach an overall system efficiency. The basic IGCC systems considered included both air and oxygen blown versions of a fluidized bed gasifier, represented by the Westinghouse design, and an entrained bed gasifier, represented by the Texaco design. Also considered were systems using an oxygen blown, fixed bed gasifier, represented by the British Gas Corporation (BGC) slagging gasifier. All of these gasifiers were integrated with a combined cycle using a gas turbine firing temperature of 1700 K (2600 F) and a compressor pressure ratio of 16:1. Steam turbine throttle conditions were chosen to be 16.6 MPa/811 K (2400 psia/1000 F) with a single reheat to 810 K (1000 F). Some of these cases were modified to allow the evaluation of the effect of gas turbine firing temperature. Turbine firing temperatures from state of the art 1365 K (2000 F) to an advanced technology 1920 K (3000 F) were analyzed. A turbine cooling technology that maintains metal temperatures below acceptable limits was assumed for each level of firing temperature. System performance comparisons were made using three advanced turbine cooling technologies for the 1920 K (3000 F) firing temperature. The results indicate that the IGCC using the BGC gasifier had the highest net system efficiency (42.1 percent) of the five gasification cases considered.

  20. Large horizontal axis wind turbine development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, W. H.; Thomas, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    An overview of the NASA activities concerning ongoing wind systems oriented toward utility application is presented. First-generation-technology large wind turbines were designed and are in operation at selected utility sites. In order to make a significant energy impact, costs of 2 to 3 cents per kilowatt hour must be achieved. The federal program continues to fund the development by industry of wind turbines which can meet the cost goals of 2 to 3 cents per kilowatt hour. Lower costs are achieved through the incorporation of new technology and innovative system design to reduce weight and increase energy capture.

  1. Wind turbine rotor assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, H. W.

    1984-11-20

    A vertical axis wind turbine having a horizontal arm member which supports an upright blade assembly. Bearing structure coupling the blade assembly to the turbine arm permits blade movement about its longitudinal axis as well as flexing motion of the blade assembly about axes perpendicular to the longitudinal axis. A latching mechanism automatically locks the blade assembly to its supporting arm during normal turbine operation and automatically unlocks same when the turbine is at rest. For overspeed prevention, a centrifugally actuated arm functions to unlatch the blade assembly permitting same to slipstream or feather into the wind. Manually actuated means are also provided for unlatching the moving blade assembly. The turbine arm additionally carries a switching mechanism in circuit with a turbine generator with said mechanism functioning to open and hence protect the generator circuit in the event of an overspeed condition of the turbine.

  2. An overview of DOE's wind turbine development programs

    SciTech Connect

    Laxson, A.S.; Hock, S.M.; Musial, W.D. ); Goldman, P.R. )

    1992-12-01

    The development of technologically advanced, higher efficiency wind turbines continues to be a high priority of the US wind industry. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting and sponsoring a range of programs aimed at assisting the wind industry with system design, development, and testing. The overall goal is to develop systems that can compete with conventional electric generation at $0.05/kWh at 5.8 m/s (13 mph sites) by the mid-1990s, and with fossil-fuel-based generators $0.04/kWh at 5.8 m/s sites by the year 2000. These goals will be achieved through several programs. The Value Engineered Turbine (VET) Program will promote the rapid development of US capability to manufacture wind turbines to take advantage of near-term market opportunities. These value-engineered turbines will stem from units with known and well-documented records of performance. The Advanced Wind Turbine Program will assist US industry to develop and integrate advanced technologies into utility-grade wind turbines for the near term (1993--1995), and to develop a new generation of innovative turbines for the year 2000. The Utility Wind Turbine Performance Verification Program, a collaborative agreement between the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and DOE, will deploy and evaluate commercial-prototype wind turbines in typical utility operating environments to provide a bridge from development programs currently under way to commercial purchases of utility-grade wind turbines.

  3. An overview of DOE's wind turbine development programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laxson, A. S.; Hock, S. M.; Musial, W. D.; Goldman, P. R.

    1992-12-01

    The development of technologically advanced, higher efficiency wind turbines continues to be a high priority of the US wind industry. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting and sponsoring a range of programs aimed at assisting the wind industry with system design, development, and testing. The overall goal is to develop systems that can compete with conventional electric generation at $0.05/kWh at 5.8 m/s (13 mph sites) by the mid-1990s, and with fossil-fuel-based generators $0.04/kWh at 5.8 m/s sites by the year 2000. These goals will be achieved through several programs. The Value Engineered Turbine (VET) Program will promote the rapid development of US capability to manufacture wind turbines to take advantage of near-term market opportunities. These value-engineered turbines will stem from units with known and well-documented records of performance. The Advanced Wind Turbine Program will assist US industry to develop and integrate advanced technologies into utility-grade wind turbines for the near term (1993-1995), and to develop a new generation of innovative turbines for the year 2000. The Utility Wind Turbine Performance Verification Program, a collaborative agreement between the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and DOE, will deploy and evaluate commercial-prototype wind turbines in typical utility operating environments to provide a bridge from development programs currently under way to commercial purchases of utility-grade wind turbines.

  4. Durability Challenges for Next Generation of Gas Turbine Engine Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive fuel burn and carbon dioxide emission reduction goals for future gas turbine engines will require higher overall pressure ratio, and a significant increase in turbine inlet temperature. These goals can be achieved by increasing temperature capability of turbine engine hot section materials and decreasing weight of fan section of the engine. NASA is currently developing several advanced hot section materials for increasing temperature capability of future gas turbine engines. The materials of interest include ceramic matrix composites with 1482 - 1648 C temperature capability, advanced disk alloys with 815 C capability, and low conductivity thermal barrier coatings with erosion resistance. The presentation will provide an overview of durability challenges with emphasis on the environmental factors affecting durability for the next generation of gas turbine engine materials. The environmental factors include gaseous atmosphere in gas turbine engines, molten salt and glass deposits from airborne contaminants, impact from foreign object damage, and erosion from ingestion of small particles.

  5. Steam turbine development for advanced combined cycle power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Oeynhausen, H.; Bergmann, D.; Balling, L.; Termuehlen, H.

    1996-12-31

    For advanced combined cycle power plants, the proper selection of steam turbine models is required to achieve optimal performance. The advancements in gas turbine technology must be followed by advances in the combined cycle steam turbine design. On the other hand, building low-cost gas turbines and steam turbines is desired which, however, can only be justified if no compromise is made in regard to their performance. The standard design concept of two-casing single-flow turbines seems to be the right choice for most of the present and future applications worldwide. Only for very specific applications it might be justified to select another design concept as a more suitable option.

  6. A status of the Turbine Technology Team activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Lisa W.

    1992-01-01

    The recent activities of the Turbine Technology Team of the Consortium for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Application in Propulsion Technology is presented. The team consists of members from the government, industry, and universities. The goal of this team is to demonstrate the benefits to the turbine design process attainable through the application of CFD. This goal is to be achieved by enhancing and validating turbine design tools for improved loading and flowfield definition and loss prediction, and transferring the advanced technology to the turbine design process. In order to demonstrate the advantages of using CFD early in the design phase, the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) turbines for the National Launch System (NLS) were chosen on which to focus the team's efforts. The Turbine Team activities run parallel to the STME design work.

  7. Coalescing Wind Turbine Wakes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Sirnivas, S.; Moriarty, P.; Nielsen, F. G.; Skaare, B.; Byklum, E.

    2015-06-18

    A team of researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Statoil used large-eddy simulations to numerically investigate the merging wakes from upstream offshore wind turbines. Merging wakes are typical phenomena in wind farm flows in which neighboring turbine wakes consolidate to form complex flow patterns that are as yet not well understood. In the present study, three 6-MW turbines in a row were subjected to a neutrally stable atmospheric boundary layer flow. As a result, the wake from the farthest upstream turbine conjoined the downstream wake, which significantly altered the subsequent velocity deficit structures, turbulence intensity, and the globalmore » meandering behavior. The complexity increased even more when the combined wakes from the two upstream turbines mixed with the wake generated by the last turbine, thereby forming a "triplet" structure. Although the influence of the wake generated by the first turbine decayed with downstream distance, the mutated wakes from the second turbine continued to influence the downstream wake. Two mirror-image angles of wind directions that yielded partial wakes impinging on the downstream turbines yielded asymmetric wake profiles that could be attributed to the changing flow directions in the rotor plane induced by the Coriolis force. In conclusion, the turbine wakes persisted for extended distances in the present study, which is a result of low aerodynamic surface roughness typically found in offshore conditions« less

  8. Coalescing Wind Turbine Wakes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Sirnivas, S.; Moriarty, P.; Nielsen, F. G.; Skaare, B.; Byklum, E.

    2015-06-18

    A team of researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Statoil used large-eddy simulations to numerically investigate the merging wakes from upstream offshore wind turbines. Merging wakes are typical phenomena in wind farm flows in which neighboring turbine wakes consolidate to form complex flow patterns that are as yet not well understood. In the present study, three 6-MW turbines in a row were subjected to a neutrally stable atmospheric boundary layer flow. As a result, the wake from the farthest upstream turbine conjoined the downstream wake, which significantly altered the subsequent velocity deficit structures, turbulence intensity, and the global meandering behavior. The complexity increased even more when the combined wakes from the two upstream turbines mixed with the wake generated by the last turbine, thereby forming a "triplet" structure. Although the influence of the wake generated by the first turbine decayed with downstream distance, the mutated wakes from the second turbine continued to influence the downstream wake. Two mirror-image angles of wind directions that yielded partial wakes impinging on the downstream turbines yielded asymmetric wake profiles that could be attributed to the changing flow directions in the rotor plane induced by the Coriolis force. In conclusion, the turbine wakes persisted for extended distances in the present study, which is a result of low aerodynamic surface roughness typically found in offshore conditions

  9. Turbine turbobrake systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodisman, Michael I.

    Short duration rotating turbine facilities are a recent development in the field of turbine research. Turbine braking devices can be used to maintain the turbine at the desired test speed, resulting in a longer usable test time. The Isentropic Light Piston Cascade at the Defence Research Agency in Pyestock will perform heat transfer and aerodynamic tests on the first stage of a Rolls-Royce turbine (MT1) linked to a new type of brake, the 'axial turbo brake'. The axial turbo brake is driven by the turbine's exhaust gas and is isolated from the turbine by a choked throat. The turbo brake's power absorption must be controlled to match the power developed by the turbine stage for a constant speed run. Both the turbo brake blade shape and novel power control system were developed from tests on a 0.17 scale test rig. The turbo brake's braking is controlled through by-pass of flow over the blade tips and partial blockage of the turbo brake's exit annulus. Also described is the mechanical design, development and manufacture of the full size turbo brake, turbine disc and turbine blades, which have been successfully spun tested to their overspeed condition. Finally, a theory for self-pumping turbo brakes is developed. These devices would have additional applications because they do not require a supply of high pressure gas to drive them.

  10. Turbine engine interstage seal

    SciTech Connect

    Clevenger, L.L.

    1993-08-10

    A seal structure is described for a turbine engine, the turbine engine including a housing surrounding a centrifugal compressor having a rotor, and a radial inflow turbine including a turbine rotor, the compressor rotor and the turbine rotor being disposed in back-to-back relation, the turbine rotor being drivingly connected with the compressor rotor and axially spaced therefrom to define an annular gap there between, the gap radially bounded at its outer periphery by the housing and at its inner periphery by an annular surface intermediate the compressor rotor and the turbine rotor an annular sealing member disposed in the gap to control air flow from the compressor toward the turbine; the annular sealing member the first axial direction, and a third annular wall portion joining with the second annular wall portion and extending inward therefrom towards the surface intermediate the compressor rotor and the turbine rotor, and biasing means cooperating with the housing for urging the seal structure toward the turbine rotor.

  11. Coalescing Wind Turbine Wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Sirnivas, S.; Moriarty, P.; Nielsen, F. G.; Skaare, B.; Byklum, E.

    2015-06-01

    A team of researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Statoil used large-eddy simulations to numerically investigate the merging wakes from upstream offshore wind turbines. Merging wakes are typical phenomena in wind farm flows in which neighboring turbine wakes consolidate to form complex flow patterns that are as yet not well understood. In the present study, three 6-MW turbines in a row were subjected to a neutrally stable atmospheric boundary layer flow. As a result, the wake from the farthest upstream turbine conjoined the downstream wake, which significantly altered the subsequent velocity deficit structures, turbulence intensity, and the global meandering behavior. The complexity increased even more when the combined wakes from the two upstream turbines mixed with the wake generated by the last turbine, thereby forming a “triplet” structure. Although the influence of the wake generated by the first turbine decayed with downstream distance, the mutated wakes from the second turbine continued to influence the downstream wake. Two mirror-image angles of wind directions that yielded partial wakes impinging on the downstream turbines yielded asymmetric wake profiles that could be attributed to the changing flow directions in the rotor plane induced by the Coriolis force. The turbine wakes persisted for extended distances in the present study, which is a result of low aerodynamic surface roughness typically found in offshore conditions.

  12. Larger Turbines and the Future Cost of Wind Energy (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, E.; Hand, M.

    2011-03-01

    The move to larger turbines has been observed in the United States and around the world. Turbine scaling increases energy capture while reducing general project infrastructure costs and landscape impacts, each of which of can reduce the cost of wind energy. However, scaling in the absence of innovation, can increase turbine costs. The ability of turbine designers and manufacturers to continue to scale turbines, while simultaneously reducing costs, is an important factor in long-term viability of the industry. This research seeks to better understand how technology innovation can allow the continued development of larger turbines on taller towers while also achieving lower cost of energy. Modeling incremental technology improvements identified over the past decade demonstrates that cost reductions on the order of 10%, and capacity factor improvements on the order of 5% (for sites with annual mean wind speed of 7.25 m/s at 50m), are achievable for turbines up to 3.5 MW. However, to achieve a 10% cost reduction and a 10% capacity factor improvement for turbines up to 5 MW, additional technology innovations must be developed and implemented.

  13. 30. VICTOR WATER TURBINE, STILWELLBIERCE CO., DAYTON, OHIO. SIMILAR TURBINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. VICTOR WATER TURBINE, STILWELL-BIERCE CO., DAYTON, OHIO. SIMILAR TURBINE TO LEFT (DOUBLE TURBINE SYSTEM), PHOTO TAKEN FROM PENSTOCK. - Prattville Manufacturing Company, Number One, 242 South Court Street, Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  14. Development of next generation 1500C class advanced combustion turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, S.; Tskuda, Y.; Akita, E.; Tomita, Y.

    1998-07-01

    The full load test run of the 501G combustion turbine has just finished at Takasago combined cycle plant in MHI, Japan. The 501G has power output of 230MW at turbine inlet temperature of 1,500 C and can achieve combined net efficiency of 52%. The NO{sub x} level proved to be less than 25 ppm. The 501G and 701G1 combustion turbines are large heavy-duty single shaft combustion turbines which combine the proven reliability and efficiency of the F series with the latest low NO{sub x} combustion technology and the state-of-the-art cooling technique. As the full load test run has proved, it is a highly advanced designed turbine with documented high temperature, low NO{sub x} and high efficiency. This combined with time proven design concepts has created a new powerful combustion turbine, which will satisfy the large combustion turbine power generation needs for the next decades. The 501G turbine is the 60Hz, 3,600 rpm heavy duty combustion turbine rated at 230MW at a turbine inlet of 1,500 C fired on natural gas fuel. The combined cycle net efficiency is 58%. Verification tests for various components have been conducted through the last 3 years and since February '97 a full scale-full load test is being performed to verify the high performance, reliability and maintainability. The 701G1 is a 3,000 rpm combustion turbine designed for the 50 Hz power generation utilities and industrial service. The first 701G1 gas turbine is expected to begin commercial operation in 1999 in Tohoku Electric Power Co. Higashi Nilgata Power Plant No.4, in Japan. This paper describes the features of the next generation 1,500 C class advanced combustion turbines. Aerodynamic, cooling and mechanical design improvement is discussed along with the evolutionary changes based on time proven design concepts.

  15. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett Lee; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

    2006-09-19

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  16. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

    2007-02-27

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  17. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

    2006-07-11

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  18. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

    2006-10-10

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  19. Small turbines, big unknown

    SciTech Connect

    Gipe, P.

    1995-07-01

    While financial markets focus on the wheeling and dealing of the big wind companies, the small wind turbine industry quietly keeps churning out its smaller but effective machines. Some, the micro turbines, are so small they can be carried by hand. Though worldwide sales of small wind turbines fall far short of even one large windpower plant, figures reach $8 million to $10 million annually and could be as much as twice that if batteries and engineering services are included.

  20. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    2002-04-01

    Blade fatigue life is an important element in determining the economic viability of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT). VAWT-SAL Vertical Axis Wind Turbine- Stochastic Aerodynamic Loads Ver 3.2 numerically simulates the stochastic (random0 aerodynamic loads of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) created by the atomspheric turbulence. The program takes into account the rotor geometry, operating conditions, and assumed turbulence properties.

  1. ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEM FEDERAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Macri

    2003-10-01

    Rolls-Royce Corporation has completed a cooperative agreement under Department of Energy (DOE) contract DE-FC21-96MC33066 in support of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program to stimulate industrial power generation markets. This DOE contract was performed during the period of October 1995 to December 2002. This final technical report, which is a program deliverable, describes all associated results obtained during Phases 3A and 3B of the contract. Rolls-Royce Corporation (formerly Allison Engine Company) initially focused on the design and development of a 10-megawatt (MW) high-efficiency industrial gas turbine engine/package concept (termed the 701-K) to meet the specific goals of the ATS program, which included single digit NOx emissions, increased plant efficiency, fuel flexibility, and reduced cost of power (i.e., $/kW). While a detailed design effort and associated component development were successfully accomplished for the 701-K engine, capable of achieving the stated ATS program goals, in 1999 Rolls-Royce changed its focus to developing advanced component technologies for product insertion that would modernize the current fleet of 501-K and 601-K industrial gas turbines. This effort would also help to establish commercial venues for suppliers and designers and assist in involving future advanced technologies in the field of gas turbine engine development. This strategy change was partly driven by the market requirements that suggested a low demand for a 10-MW aeroderivative industrial gas turbine, a change in corporate strategy for aeroderivative gas turbine engine development initiatives, and a consensus that a better return on investment (ROI) could be achieved under the ATS contract by focusing on product improvements and technology insertion for the existing Rolls-Royce small engine industrial gas turbine fleet.

  2. Rampressor Turbine Design

    SciTech Connect

    Ramgen Power Systems

    2003-09-30

    The design of a unique gas turbine engine is presented. The first Rampressor Turbine engine rig will be a configuration where the Rampressor rotor is integrated into an existing industrial gas turbine engine. The Rampressor rotor compresses air which is burned in a traditional stationary combustion system in order to increase the enthalpy of the compressed air. The combustion products are then expanded through a conventional gas turbine which provides both compressor and electrical power. This in turn produces shaft torque, which drives a generator to provide electricity. The design and the associated design process of such an engine are discussed in this report.

  3. Wind Turbine Structural Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. R. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    A workshop on wind turbine structural dynamics was held to review and document current United States work on the dynamic behavior of large wind turbines, primarily of the horizontal-axis type, and to identify and discuss other wind turbine configurations that may have lower cost and weight. Information was exchanged on the following topics: (1) Methods for calculating dynamic loads; (2) Aeroelasticity stability (3) Wind loads, both steady and transient; (4) Critical design conditions; (5) Drive train dynamics; and (6) Behavior of operating wind turbines.

  4. Experimental turbine VT-400

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitek, Pavel; Milčák, Petr; Noga, Tomáš

    2016-03-01

    The experimental air turbine VT400 is located in hall laboratories of the Department of Power System Engineering. It is a single-stage air turbine located in the suction of the compressor. It is able to solve various problems concerning the construction solution of turbine stages. The content of the article will deal mainly with the description of measurements on this turbine. The up-to-now research on this test rig will be briefly mentioned, too, as well as the description of the ongoing reconstruction.

  5. Aquantis Ocean Current Turbine Development Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, Alex J.

    2014-08-23

    The Aquantis® Current Plane (“C-Plane”) technology developed by Dehlsen Associates, LLC (DA) and Aquantis, Inc. is an ocean current turbine designed to extract kinetic energy from ocean currents. The technology is capable of achieving competitively priced base-load, continuous, and reliable power generation from a source of renewable energy not before possible in this scale or form.

  6. Can advanced gas turbines meet all demands

    SciTech Connect

    Makansi, J.

    1993-07-01

    This article examines the wisdom of the power industry's reliance on the gas turbine for satisfying all demands placed on today's power plants, including lowering NO[sub x] emissions. The topics of the article include the price of environmentalism, durability and reliability problems, performance impacts of achieving low NO[sub x] emissions, balance of plant problems and fuel issues.

  7. Single shaft automotive gas turbine engine characterization test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    An automotive gas turbine incorporating a single stage centrifugal compressor and a single stage radial inflow turbine is described. Among the engine's features is the use of wide range variable geometry at the inlet guide vanes, the compressor diffuser vanes, and the turbine inlet vanes to achieve improved part load fuel economy. The engine was tested to determine its performance in both the variable geometry and equivalent fixed geometry modes. Testing was conducted without the originally designed recuperator. Test results were compared with the predicted performance of the nonrecuperative engine based on existing component rig test maps. Agreement between test results and the computer model was achieved.

  8. FloWind`s advanced EHD series wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, B.

    1995-09-01

    The EHD series is a class of advanced, utility-grade vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) designed to maximize the profit derivable from any given wind site. The EHD (extended height-to-diameter) rotor geometry is varied to optimize energy capture depending on the characteristics of the wind site and the turbine`s location in the power plant array. By varying rotor height (42--63 meters (138--207 feet)) and diameter (17--21 meters (56--69 feet)) an optimal balance between swept area, aerodynamic efficiency, and wake loss is achieved with minimal modification to the turbine`s major components. In the fall of 19963, FloWind pultruded three blades for the first EHD wind turbine. These 48.8 meter (160 foot) long blades represented the largest structural protrusions ever fabricated. In January, 1994 the first EHD wind turbine was installed at FloWind`s wind power plant in Tehachapi, California and a full modal survey was carried out be researchers from the Sandia National Laboratories. Preliminary testing of the machine is underway and results from these tests have been compared directly to structural loads calculated by FloWind`s ANSYS dynamic model of the turbine. Results of the modal survey, predicted loads, and measured turbine operating data will be presented.

  9. Experimental characterization of marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbine array performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzenmuller, Nickolas; Aliseda, Alberto

    2013-11-01

    Three scale model horizontal axis MHK turbines (1:45) were tested in a flume at various array spacings. The scale rotors are based on the full-scale Department of Energy Reference Model 1, modified to reproduce the hydrodynamic performance of the full-scale turbine at the reduced experimental Reynolds number (105 vs 106, based on chord length). Flow incident on the turbines and in the wakes was characterized via PIV and ADV measurements. Tip speed ratio (TSR) similarity of the turbines is achieved by controlling the applied load with magnetic particle brakes. Single turbines were characterized at various mean freestream velocities to explore the effect of Reynolds number on turbine performance. Measured turbine efficiencies of ~40% are similar to efficiencies predicted from full-scale simulations, indicating similar energy extraction at scale. Wake characteristics and turbine efficiencies have been investigated at a range of TSRs, with the goal of determining array spacing and operating conditions that maximize overall array efficiency. Free surface deformations were measured near the rotor plane for various vertical positions of the turbine relative to the free surface and compared to numerical simulation results.

  10. Throttling Characteristics of the RL10 Derivative Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine -- Demo 1.6 and 1.7 Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devine, Matthew K.; Hulka, James; Adamski, Walt; Brown, Corey

    2010-01-01

    The Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine (CECE) is a deep throttling cryogenic Lunar Module Descent Engine (LMDE) technology development demonstrator based on the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) RL10 engine. Previous testing on this engine occurred during 2006 as Demo 1.0, then Demo 1.5 in 2007, Demo 1.6 in 2008 and finally Demo 1.7 in 2010. A review of Demo 1.0, 1.5, and preliminary results of 1.6 were reported in previous JANNAF papers. Demo 1.6 was tested at the PWR E-6 test facility in November 2008. The primary goal of this series was to mitigate low frequency combustion instability observed at low power levels. To mitigate the chug, the Demo 1.6 injector was modified from the previous configurations to include an approximately 0.050 inch thick teflon-type spray-on insulation to reduce heat transfer to the LOX manifold, which was believed to be a significant contributor to the low power instability. In addition, gaseous helium injection into the LOX manifold was used as a means to stabilize the system. Also explored in this test series was mitigation for a low power 1 Hz fuel system oscillation caused by sub-critical hydrogen boiling in the chamber cooling jacket. Reduced area gas venturis were utilized to avoid the 1 Hz fuel-size oscillation by keeping the cooling jacket supercritical down to lower engine power levels. Demo 1.7 began testing in March 2010. Its primary objectives were to demonstrate closed loop control capability on mixture ratio and chamber pressure, start to lower power levels and increased throttling ramp rates. Secondary test objectives that are discussed include multiple engine starts, higher mixture ratio excursions and additional time at low power level. While the complete test series and data reduction is not yet complete for Demo 1.7, an overview and up-to-date status is provided.

  11. Performance and market evaluation of the bladeless turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett-Price, B.A.; Barnhart, J.S.; Eschbach, E.J.

    1982-10-01

    The three-inch diameter prototype bladeless turbine was tested with air over a range of inlet pressures from 20 to 100 psia and speeds of 10, 20, 30 and 40 thousand rpm. The peak efficiency of 22.5 percent was recorded at a pressure of 98 psia and a speed of 40,000 rpm. Efficiency increased slightly with speed and inlet pressure over the range of test conditions. The test program was somewhat hindered by mechanical failures. The turbine bearings in particular were unreliable, with two instances of outright failure and numerous cases of erratic performance. A model of the bladeless turbine was developed to aid in interpreting the experimental results. A macroscopic approach, incorporating several favorable assumptions, was taken to place a reasonable upper bound on turbine efficiency. The model analytically examines the flow through the air inlet nozzles and the interaction between the fluid jet and the turbine blades. The analysis indicates that the maximum possible efficiency of a tangential flow turbine with straight axial blades is 50 percent. This is a direct consequence of turning the fluid only 90 degrees relative to the turbine blade. The adoption of the bladeless turbine as the expander in an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) will depend to a great extent on the efficiency of the turbine. The market potential for ORC technology will also impact the adoption of the bladeless turbine. Other expanders have demonstrated efficiencies of 60 to 80% in ORC systems. The Gamell turbine had a peak test efficiency of 22.5% and a maximum theoretical efficiency of 50%. Costs of the turbine are highly uncertain, relying to a great extent on cost reductions achieved through quantity production and through learning.

  12. Single rotor turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Platts, David A.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented a turbine engine with a single rotor which cools the engine, functions as a radial compressor, pushes air through the engine to the ignition point, and acts as an axial turbine for powering the compressor. The invention engine is designed to use a simple scheme of conventional passage shapes to provide both a radial and axial flow pattern through the single rotor, thereby allowing the radial intake air flow to cool the turbine blades and turbine exhaust gases in an axial flow to be used for energy transfer. In an alternative embodiment, an electric generator is incorporated in the engine to specifically adapt the invention for power generation. Magnets are embedded in the exhaust face of the single rotor proximate to a ring of stationary magnetic cores with windings to provide for the generation of electricity. In this alternative embodiment, the turbine is a radial inflow turbine rather than an axial turbine as used in the first embodiment. Radial inflow passages of conventional design are interleaved with radial compressor passages to allow the intake air to cool the turbine blades.

  13. Turbine disc sealing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Diakunchak, Ihor S.

    2013-03-05

    A disc seal assembly for use in a turbine engine. The disc seal assembly includes a plurality of outwardly extending sealing flange members that define a plurality of fluid pockets. The sealing flange members define a labyrinth flow path therebetween to limit leakage between a hot gas path and a disc cavity in the turbine engine.

  14. Ceramic Cerami Turbine Nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1997-04-01

    A turbine nozzle vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes an outer shroud and an inner shroud having a plurality of horizontally segmented vanes therebetween being positioned by a connecting member positioning segmented vanes in functional relationship one to another. The turbine nozzle vane assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component.

  15. Graphene in turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, D. K.; Swain, P. K.; Sahoo, S.

    2016-07-01

    Graphene, the two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterial, draws interest of several researchers due to its many superior properties. It has extensive applications in numerous fields. A turbine is a hydraulic machine which extracts energy from a fluid and converts it into useful work. Recently, Gudukeya and Madanhire have tried to increase the efficiency of Pelton turbine. Beucher et al. have also tried the same by reducing friction between fluid and turbine blades. In this paper, we study the advantages of using graphene as a coating on Pelton turbine blades. It is found that the efficiency of turbines increases, running and maintenance cost is reduced with more power output. By the application of graphene in pipes, cavitation will be reduced, durability of pipes will increase, operation and maintenance cost of water power plants will be less.

  16. Cascaded humidified advanced turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Nakhamkin, M.; Swenson, E.C.; Cohn, A.; Bradshaw, D.; Taylor, R.; Wilson, J.M.; Gaul, G.; Jahnke, F.; Polsky, M.

    1995-05-01

    This article describes how, by combining the best features of simple- and combined-cycle gas turbine power plants, the CHAT cycle concept offers power producers a clean, more efficient and less expensive alternative to both. The patented cascaded advanced turbine and its cascaded humidified advanced turbine (CHAT) derivative offer utilities and other power producers a practical advanced gas turbine power plant by combining commercially-available gas turbine and industrial compressor technologies in a unique way. Compared to combined-cycle plants, a CHAT power plant has lower emissions and specific capital costs-approximately 20 percent lower than what is presently available. Further, CHAT`s operating characteristics are especially well-suited to load following quick start-up scenarios and they are less susceptible to power degradation from higher ambient air temperature conditions.

  17. Ceramic turbine nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, James E.; Norton, Paul F.

    1996-01-01

    A turbine nozzle and shroud assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes a plurality of segmented vane defining a first vane segment and a second vane segment. Each of the first and second vane segments having a vertical portion. Each of the first vane segments and the second vane segments being positioned in functional relationship one to another within a recess formed within an outer shroud and an inner shroud. The turbine nozzle and shroud assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component.

  18. Ceramic turbine nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, J.E.; Norton, P.F.

    1996-12-17

    A turbine nozzle and shroud assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components have a preestablished rate of thermal expansion greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes a plurality of segmented vane defining a first vane segment and a second vane segment, each of the first and second vane segments having a vertical portion, and each of the first vane segments and the second vane segments being positioned in functional relationship one to another within a recess formed within an outer shroud and an inner shroud. The turbine nozzle and shroud assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component. 4 figs.

  19. Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program conceptual design and product development

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-31

    Achieving the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) goals of 60% efficiency, single-digit NO{sub x}, and 10% electric power cost reduction imposes competing characteristics on the gas turbine system. Two basic technical issues arise from this. The turbine inlet temperature of the gas turbine must increase to achieve both efficiency and cost goals. However, higher temperatures move in the direction of increased NO{sub x} emission. Improved coatings and materials technologies along with creative combustor design can result in solutions to achieve the ultimate goal. GE`s view of the market, in conjunction with the industrial and utility objectives, requires the development of Advanced Gas Turbine Systems which encompass two potential products: a new aeroderivative combined-cycle system for the industrial market, and a combined-cycle system for the utility sector that is based on an advanced frame machine. The GE Advanced Gas Turbine Development program is focused on two specific products: (1) a 70 MW class industrial gas turbine based on the GE90 core technology utilizing an innovative air cooling methodology; (2) a 200 MW class utility gas turbine based on an advanced Ge heavy-duty machine utilizing advanced cooling and enhancement in component efficiency. Both of these activities required the identification and resolution of technical issues critical to achieving ATS goals. The emphasis for the industrial ATS was placed upon innovative cycle design and low emission combustion. The emphasis for the utility ATS was placed on developing a technology base for advanced turbine cooling, while utilizing demonstrated and planned improvements in low emission combustion. Significant overlap in the development programs will allow common technologies to be applied to both products. GE Power Systems is solely responsible for offering GE products for the industrial and utility markets.

  20. Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    ATTAP activities during the past year included test-bed engine design and development, ceramic component design, materials and component characterization, ceramic component process development and fabrication, ceramic component rig testing, and test-bed engine fabrication and testing. Significant technical challenges remain, but all areas exhibited progress. Test-bed engine design and development included engine mechanical design, combustion system design, alternate aerodynamic designs of gasifier scrolls, and engine system integration aimed at upgrading the AGT-5 from a 1038 C (1900 F) metal engine to a durable 1372 C (2500 F) structural ceramic component test-bed engine. ATTAP-defined ceramic and associated ceramic/metal component design activities completed include the ceramic gasifier turbine static structure, the ceramic gasifier turbine rotor, ceramic combustors, the ceramic regenerator disk, the ceramic power turbine rotors, and the ceramic/metal power turbine static structure. The material and component characterization efforts included the testing and evaluation of seven candidate materials and three development components. Ceramic component process development and fabrication proceeded for the gasifier turbine rotor, gasifier turbine scroll, gasifier turbine vanes and vane platform, extruded regenerator disks, and thermal insulation. Component rig activities included the development of both rigs and the necessary test procedures, and conduct of rig testing of the ceramic components and assemblies. Test-bed engine fabrication, testing, and development supported improvements in ceramic component technology that permit the achievement of both program performance and durability goals. Total test time in 1991 amounted to 847 hours, of which 128 hours were engine testing, and 719 were hot rig testing.

  1. Cyclic Structural Analyses of SSME Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.; Manderscheid, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The problems of calculating the structural response of high-temperature space propulsion components such as turbine blades for the fuel turbopump are addressed. The first high-pressure-stage fuel turbine blade (HPFTB) in the liquid-hydrogen turbopump of the space shuttle main engine (SSME) was selected for this study. In the past these blades have cracked in the blade shank region and at the airfoil leading edge adjacent to the platform. To achieve the necessary durability, these blades are currently being cast by using directional solidification. Single-crystal alloys are also being investigated for future SSME applications. The study evaluated the utility of advanced structural analysis methods in assessing the low-cycle fatigue lives of these anisotropic components. The turbine blade airfoil of the high-pressure stage of the SSME fuel turbopump was analyzed because it has a history of rapid crack initiation.

  2. Automotive gas turbine fuel control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A fuel control system is reported for automotive-type gas turbines and particulary advanced gas turbines utilizing variable geometry components to improve mileage and reduce pollution emission. The fuel control system compensates for fuel density variations, inlet temperature variations, turbine vane actuation, acceleration, and turbine braking. These parameters are utilized to control various orifices, spool valves and pistons.

  3. Cooled snubber structure for turbine blades

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Clinton A; Campbell, Christian X; Whalley, Andrew; Marra, John J

    2014-04-01

    A turbine blade assembly in a turbine engine. The turbine blade assembly includes a turbine blade and a first snubber structure. The turbine blade includes an internal cooling passage containing cooling air. The first snubber structure extends outwardly from a sidewall of the turbine blade and includes a hollow interior portion that receives cooling air from the internal cooling passage of the turbine blade.

  4. Advanced turbine systems: Studies and conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    van der Linden, S.; Gnaedig, G.; Kreitmeier, F.

    1993-11-01

    The ABB selection for the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) includes advanced developments especially in the hot gas path of the combustion turbine and new state-of-the-art units such as the steam turbine and the HRSG. The increase in efficiency by more than 10% multiplicative compared to current designs will be based on: (1) Turbine Inlet Temperature Increase; (2) New Cooling Techniques for Stationary and Rotating Parts; and New Materials. Present, projected component improvements that will be introduced with the above mentioned issues will yield improved CCSC turbine performance, which will drive the ATS selected gas-fired reference CC power plant to 6 % LHV or better. The decrease in emission levels requires a careful optimization of the cycle design, where cooling air consumption has to be minimized. All interfaces of the individual systems in the complete CC Plant need careful checks, especially to avoid unnecessary margins in the individual designs. This study is an important step pointing out the feasibility of the ATS program with realistic goals set by DOE, which, however, will present challenges for Phase II time schedule of 18 months. With the approach outlined in this study and close cooperation with DOE, ATS program success can be achieved to deliver low emissions and low cost of electricity by the year 2002. The ABB conceptual design and step approach will lead to early component demonstration which will help accelerate the overall program objectives.

  5. Overview of Advanced Turbine Systems Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, H. A.; Bajura, R. A.

    The US Department of Energy initiated a program to develop advanced gas turbine systems to serve both central power and industrial power generation markets. The Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program will lead to commercial offerings by the private sector by 2002. ATS will be developed to fire natural gas but will be adaptable to coal and biomass firing. The systems will be: highly efficient (15 percent improvement over today's best systems); environmentally superior (10 percent reduction in nitrogen oxides over today's best systems); and cost competitive (10 percent reduction in cost of electricity). The ATS Program has five elements. Innovative cycle development will lead to the demonstration of systems with advanced gas turbine cycles using current gas turbine technology. High temperature development will lead to the increased firing temperatures needed to achieve ATS Program efficiency goals. Ceramic component development/demonstration will expand the current DOE/CE program to demonstrate industrial-scale turbines with ceramic components. Technology base will support the overall program by conducting research and development (R&D) on generic technology issues. Coal application studies will adapt technology developed in the ATS program to coal-fired systems being developed in other DOE programs.

  6. Gas turbine combustor transition

    DOEpatents

    Coslow, Billy Joe; Whidden, Graydon Lane

    1999-01-01

    A method of converting a steam cooled transition to an air cooled transition in a gas turbine having a compressor in fluid communication with a combustor, a turbine section in fluid communication with the combustor, the transition disposed in a combustor shell and having a cooling circuit connecting a steam outlet and a steam inlet and wherein hot gas flows from the combustor through the transition and to the turbine section, includes forming an air outlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit and providing for an air inlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit.

  7. Gas turbine combustor transition

    DOEpatents

    Coslow, B.J.; Whidden, G.L.

    1999-05-25

    A method is described for converting a steam cooled transition to an air cooled transition in a gas turbine having a compressor in fluid communication with a combustor, a turbine section in fluid communication with the combustor, the transition disposed in a combustor shell and having a cooling circuit connecting a steam outlet and a steam inlet and wherein hot gas flows from the combustor through the transition and to the turbine section, includes forming an air outlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit and providing for an air inlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit. 7 figs.

  8. Estimating turbine limit load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, Arthur J.

    1993-01-01

    A method for estimating turbine limit-load pressure ratio from turbine map information is presented and demonstrated. It is based on a mean line analysis at the last-rotor exit. The required map information includes choke flow rate at all speeds as well as pressure ratio and efficiency at the onset of choke at design speed. One- and two-stage turbines are analyzed to compare the results with those from a more rigorous off-design flow analysis and to show the sensitivities of the computed limit-load pressure ratios to changes in the key assumptions.

  9. Aviation turbine fuels, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, E M

    1981-03-01

    Properties of some aviation turbine fuels marketed in the United States during 1980 are presented in this report. The samples represented are typical 1980 production and were analyzed in the laboratories of 17 manufacturers of aviation turbine (jet) fuels. The data were submitted for study, calculation, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE), Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC), Bartlesville, Oklahoma, and the American Petroleum Institute (API). Results for the properties of 98 samples of aviation turbine fuels are included in the report for military grades JP-4 and JP-5 and commercial type Jet A.

  10. Composite turbine bucket assembly

    DOEpatents

    Liotta, Gary Charles; Garcia-Crespo, Andres

    2014-05-20

    A composite turbine blade assembly includes a ceramic blade including an airfoil portion, a shank portion and an attachment portion; and a transition assembly adapted to attach the ceramic blade to a turbine disk or rotor, the transition assembly including first and second transition components clamped together, trapping said ceramic airfoil therebetween. Interior surfaces of the first and second transition portions are formed to mate with the shank portion and the attachment portion of the ceramic blade, and exterior surfaces of said first and second transition components are formed to include an attachment feature enabling the transition assembly to be attached to the turbine rotor or disk.

  11. Wind turbine acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, Harvey H.; Shepherd, Kevin P.

    1990-01-01

    Available information on the physical characteristics of the noise generated by wind turbines is summarized, with example sound pressure time histories, narrow- and broadband frequency spectra, and noise radiation patterns. Reviewed are noise measurement standards, analysis technology, and a method of characterizing wind turbine noise. Prediction methods are given for both low-frequency rotational harmonics and broadband noise components. Also included are atmospheric propagation data showing the effects of distance and refraction by wind shear. Human perception thresholds, based on laboratory and field tests, are given. Building vibration analysis methods are summarized. The bibliography of this report lists technical publications on all aspects of wind turbine acoustics.

  12. Turbine blade vibration dampening

    DOEpatents

    Cornelius, C.C.; Pytanowski, G.P.; Vendituoli, J.S.

    1997-07-08

    The present turbine wheel assembly increases component life and turbine engine longevity. The combination of the strap and the opening combined with the preestablished area of the outer surface of the opening and the preestablished area of the outer circumferential surface of the strap and the friction between the strap and the opening increases the life and longevity of the turbine wheel assembly. Furthermore, the mass ``M`` or combined mass ``CM`` of the strap or straps and the centrifugal force assist in controlling vibrations and damping characteristics. 5 figs.

  13. Turbine blade vibration dampening

    DOEpatents

    Cornelius, Charles C.; Pytanowski, Gregory P.; Vendituoli, Jonathan S.

    1997-07-08

    The present turbine wheel assembly increases component life and turbine engine longevity. The combination of the strap and the opening combined with the preestablished area of the outer surface of the opening and the preestablished area of the outer circumferential surface of the strap and the friction between the strap and the opening increases the life and longevity of the turbine wheel assembly. Furthermore, the mass "M" or combined mass "CM" of the strap or straps and the centrifugal force assist in controlling vibrations and damping characteristics.

  14. Advanced multistage turbine blade aerodynamics, performance, cooling, and heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Fleeter, S.; Lawless, P.B.

    1995-10-01

    The gas turbine has the potential for power production at the highest possible efficiency. The challenge is to ensure that gas turbines operate at the optimum efficiency so as to use the least fuel and produce minimum emissions. A key component to meeting this challenge is the turbine. Turbine performance, both aerodynamics and heat transfer, is one of the barrier advanced gas turbine development technologies. This is a result of the complex, highly three-dimensional and unsteady flow phenomena in the turbine. Improved turbine aerodynamic performance has been achieved with three-dimensional highly-loaded airfoil designs, accomplished utilizing Euler or Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. These design codes consider steady flow through isolated blade rows. Thus they do not account for unsteady flow effects. However, unsteady flow effects have a significant impact on performance. Also, CFD codes predict the complete flow field. The experimental verification of these codes has traditionally been accomplished with point data - not corresponding plane field measurements. Thus, although advanced CFD predictions of the highly complex and three-dimensional turbine flow fields are available, corresponding data are not. To improve the design capability for high temperature turbines, a detailed understanding of the highly unsteady and three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbines is necessary. Thus, unique data are required which quantify the unsteady three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbine blade rows, including the effect of the film coolant flow. This requires experiments in appropriate research facilities in which complete flow field data, not only point measurements, are obtained and analyzed. Also, as design CFD codes do not account for unsteady flow effects, the next logical challenge and the current thrust in CFD code development is multiple-stage analyses that account for the interactions between neighboring blade rows.

  15. Overview of Westinghouse`s Advanced Turbine Systems Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bannister, R.L.; Bevc, F.P.; Diakunchak, I.S.; Huber, D.J.

    1995-10-01

    Westinghouse`s experience with land based gas turbines started in 1945 with the development of a 2000 hp gas turbine-generator set that consisted of a single reduction gear, compressor, 12 combustors and turbine. A thermal efficiency of 18% was obtained. By 1954, Westinghouse had developed a 15 MW unit (with a regenerator and intercooler) that was designed for a full-load simple cycle efficiency of 29%. As the initial step in the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program, Westinghouse has already developed a 230 MW gas turbine that has a simple cycle efficiency of 38.5% without the use of regeneration and intercooler concepts. In 1967, Westinghouse developed its first gas turbine combined cycle, a synergistic combination of the Brayton and the Rankine cycles. In a combined cycle the heat rejected by the higher temperature topping cycle is recovered in the lower temperature bottoming cycle to produce additional power from the energy initially released by the fuel. In this first Westinghouse combined cycle, a 1450{degrees}F burner outlet temperature gas turbine, rated at 25 MW, supplied exhaust heat which was used in a boiler to furnish steam to drive an 85 MW steam turbine. This plant achieved an annual average efficiency of 39.6%.

  16. Turbine instabilities: Case histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laws, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    Several possible causes of turbine rotor instability are discussed and the related design features of a wide range of turbomachinery types and sizes are considered. The instrumentation options available for detecting rotor instability and assessing its severity are also discussed.

  17. Variables in turbine erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baughman, J. R.; Spies, R.

    1970-01-01

    Study of impact erosion in the operation of turbomachinery is undertaken to predict the results for particular designs. The test program investigates the effects of turbine stator blade shape, rotor blade shape, and variations in test conditions.

  18. Gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Lawlor, Shawn P.; Roberts, II, William Byron

    2016-03-08

    A gas turbine engine with a compressor rotor having compressor impulse blades that delivers gas at supersonic conditions to a stator. The stator includes a one or more aerodynamic ducts that each have a converging portion and a diverging portion for deceleration of the selected gas to subsonic conditions and to deliver a high pressure oxidant containing gas to flameholders. The flameholders may be provided as trapped vortex combustors, for combustion of a fuel to produce hot pressurized combustion gases. The hot pressurized combustion gases are choked before passing out of an aerodynamic duct to a turbine. Work is recovered in a turbine by expanding the combustion gases through impulse blades. By balancing the axial loading on compressor impulse blades and turbine impulse blades, asymmetrical thrust is minimized or avoided.

  19. Radial turbine cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelke, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    Radial turbines have been used extensively in many applications including small ground based electrical power generators, automotive engine turbochargers and aircraft auxiliary power units. In all of these applications the turbine inlet temperature is limited to a value commensurate with the material strength limitations and life requirements of uncooled metal rotors. To take advantage of all the benefits that higher temperatures offer, such as increased turbine specific power output or higher cycle thermal efficiency, requires improved high temperature materials and/or blade cooling. Extensive research is on-going to advance the material properties of high temperature superalloys as well as composite materials including ceramics. The use of ceramics with their high temperature potential and low cost is particularly appealing for radial turbines. However until these programs reach fruition the only way to make significant step increases beyond the present material temperature barriers is to cool the radial blading.

  20. Turbines in the sky

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, R.V.; Riple, J.C.

    1987-07-01

    Gas turbines are being investigated as power sources for the proposed Star Wars weapons flatforms. The gas turbine engine offers the best opportunity for exploiting the high-temperature potential of both nuclear and chemical combustion. The use of mature gas turbine technology and existing materials would result in highly reliable PCUs capable of meeting SDI's requirements. However, operation under the temperature limits imposed by existing materials would result in a prohibitively heavy system. Cooled blades would somewhat increase temperature capability; however the turbine's mass, though reduced, would still be unacceptably large. The greatest improvements would result from the ability to operate at temperatures of up to 2000 K, pressures up to 14 MPa, and stress up to 690 MPa.

  1. Turbine nozzle positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Norton, Paul F.; Shaffer, James E.

    1996-01-30

    A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes an outer shroud having a mounting leg with an opening defined therein, a tip shoe ring having a mounting member with an opening defined therein, a nozzle support ring having a plurality of holes therein and a pin positioned in the corresponding opening in the outer shroud, opening in the tip shoe ring and the hole in the nozzle support ring. A rolling joint is provided between metallic components of the gas turbine engine and the nozzle guide vane assembly. The nozzle guide vane assembly is positioned radially about a central axis of the gas turbine engine and axially aligned with a combustor of the gas turbine engine.

  2. Turbine nozzle positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Norton, P.F.; Shaffer, J.E.

    1996-01-30

    A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes an outer shroud having a mounting leg with an opening defined therein, a tip shoe ring having a mounting member with an opening defined therein, a nozzle support ring having a plurality of holes therein and a pin positioned in the corresponding opening in the outer shroud, opening in the tip shoe ring and the hole in the nozzle support ring. A rolling joint is provided between metallic components of the gas turbine engine and the nozzle guide vane assembly. The nozzle guide vane assembly is positioned radially about a central axis of the gas turbine engine and axially aligned with a combustor of the gas turbine engine. 9 figs.

  3. AGT (Advanced Gas Turbine) technology project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    An overall summary documentation is provided for the Advanced Gas Turbine Technology Project conducted by the Allison Gas Turbine Division of General Motors. This advanced, high risk work was initiated in October 1979 under charter from the U.S. Congress to promote an engine for transportation that would provide an alternate to reciprocating spark ignition (SI) engines for the U.S. automotive industry and simultaneously establish the feasibility of advanced ceramic materials for hot section components to be used in an automotive gas turbine. As this program evolved, dictates of available funding, Government charter, and technical developments caused program emphases to focus on the development and demonstration of the ceramic turbine hot section and away from the development of engine and powertrain technologies and subsequent vehicular demonstrations. Program technical performance concluded in June 1987. The AGT 100 program successfully achieved project objectives with significant technology advances. Specific AGT 100 program achievements are: (1) Ceramic component feasibility for use in gas turbine engines has been demonstrated; (2) A new, 100 hp engine was designed, fabricated, and tested for 572 hour at operating temperatures to 2200 F, uncooled; (3) Statistical design methodology has been applied and correlated to experimental data acquired from over 5500 hour of rig and engine testing; (4) Ceramic component processing capability has progressed from a rudimentary level able to fabricate simple parts to a sophisticated level able to provide complex geometries such as rotors and scrolls; (5) Required improvements for monolithic and composite ceramic gas turbine components to meet automotive reliability, performance, and cost goals have been identified; (6) The combustor design demonstrated lower emissions than 1986 Federal Standards on methanol, JP-5, and diesel fuel. Thus, the potential for meeting emission standards and multifuel capability has been initiated

  4. Wind Turbine Drivetrain Condition Monitoring - An Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, S.; Yang, W.

    2013-07-01

    High operation and maintenance costs still hamper the development of the wind industry despite its quick growth worldwide. To reduce unscheduled downtime and avoid catastrophic failures of wind turbines and their components have been and will be crucial to further raise the competitiveness of wind power. Condition monitoring is one of the key tools for achieving such a goal. To enhance the research and development of advanced condition monitoring techniques dedicated to wind turbines, we present an overview of wind turbine condition monitoring, discuss current practices, point out existing challenges, and suggest possible solutions.

  5. Feasibility of water injection into the turbine coolant to permit gas turbine contingency power for helicopter application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanfossen, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    A system which would allow a substantially increased output from a turboshaft engine for brief periods in emergency situations with little or no loss of turbine stress rupture life is proposed and studied analytically. The increased engine output is obtained by overtemperaturing the turbine; however, the temperature of the compressor bleed air used for hot section cooling is lowered by injecting and evaporating water. This decrease in cooling air temperature can offset the effect of increased gas temperature and increased shaft speed and thus keep turbine blade stress rupture life constant. The analysis utilized the NASA-Navy-Engine-Program or NNEP computer code to model the turboshaft engine in both design and off-design modes. This report is concerned with the effect of the proposed method of power augmentation on the engine cycle and turbine components. A simple cycle turboshaft engine with a 16:1 pressure ratio and a 1533 K (2760 R) turbine inlet temperature operating at sea level static conditions was studied to determine the possible power increase and the effect on turbine stress rupture life that could be expected using the proposed emergency cooling scheme. The analysis showed a 54 percent increse in output power can be achieved with no loss in gas generator turbine stress rupture life. A 231 K (415 F) rise in turbine inlet temperature is required for this level of augmentation. The required water flow rate was found to be .0109 kg water per kg of engine air flow.

  6. Radial turbine cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelke, Richard J.

    The technology of high temperature cooled radial turbines is reviewed. Aerodynamic performance considerations are described. Heat transfer and structural analysis are addressed, and in doing so the following topics are covered: cooling considerations, hot side convection, coolant side convection, and rotor mechanical analysis. Cooled rotor concepts and fabrication are described, and the following are covered in this context: internally cooled rotor, hot isostatic pressure bonded rotor, laminated rotor, split blade rotor, and the NASA radial turbine program.

  7. Radial turbine cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelke, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    The technology of high temperature cooled radial turbines is reviewed. Aerodynamic performance considerations are described. Heat transfer and structural analysis are addressed, and in doing so the following topics are covered: cooling considerations, hot side convection, coolant side convection, and rotor mechanical analysis. Cooled rotor concepts and fabrication are described, and the following are covered in this context: internally cooled rotor, hot isostatic pressure bonded rotor, laminated rotor, split blade rotor, and the NASA radial turbine program.

  8. New technology in turbine aerodynamics.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.; Moffitt, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    Cursory review of some recent work that has been done in turbine aerodynamic research. Topics discussed include the aerodynamic effect of turbine coolant, high work-factor (ratio of stage work to square of blade speed) turbines, and computer methods for turbine design and performance prediction. Experimental cooled-turbine aerodynamics programs using two-dimensional cascades, full annular cascades, and cold rotating turbine stage tests are discussed with some typical results presented. Analytically predicted results for cooled blade performance are compared to experimental results. The problems and some of the current programs associated with the use of very high work factors for fan-drive turbines of high-bypass-ratio engines are discussed. Computer programs have been developed for turbine design-point performance, off-design performance, supersonic blade profile design, and the calculation of channel velocities for subsonic and transonic flowfields. The use of these programs for the design and analysis of axial and radial turbines is discussed.

  9. Theory and Performance of Tesla Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanin, Vincent Domenic

    energy conversion efficiency. A modified version of the integral perturbation analysis is presented that incorporates the effects of enhanced drag due to surface microstructuring. Results of the model analysis for smooth disk walls are shown to agree well with experimental performance data for two prototype Tesla turbines, and predictions of performance models developed in earlier investigations. Specifically, experimental efficiencies corelate well with those predicted by the integral perturbation solution, deviating by an average of 29% and a maximum of 52%. Model predictions indicate that enhancement of disk drag by strategic microstructuring of the disk surfaces can significantly increase turbine efficiency. Exploratory calculations with the model indicate that turbine efficiencies exceeding 75% can be achieved by designing for optimal ranges of the governing dimensionless parameters. The same parametric trends in performance are compared to test data for a micro-scale Tesla turbine with water as a working fluid. Experimental efficiencies again correlate well with those predicted by the integral perturbation solution. Exerimental efficiencies show a mean deviation of 52% with efficiencies predicted by the model, and a max deviation of 65%. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model is then compared to both the analytical and experimental turbine efficiencies. The CFD solutions of the flow field are then used to help reconcile areas where the analytical predictions do not match experimental data. CFD predicted efficiencies match the efficiencies predicted by the integral perturbation solution very closely, deviating by an average of only 18%. Based on the results of the CFD simulations and experimental data, conclusions are made about the validity of the integral perturbation solution. The model accurately predicts the flow inside the rotor, but a better treatment of the flow in the inlet to the turbine is necessary. Despite this, the integral perturbation solution is

  10. Wind Turbine Box - energy fluxes around a characteristic wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calaf, Marc; Cortina, Gerard; Sharma, Varun

    2015-11-01

    This research project presents a new tool, so called ``Wind Turbine Box'', that allows for the direct comparison between the flow around a single wind turbine and the flow around a characteristic wind turbine immersed within a large wind farm. The Wind Turbine Box consists of a limited control volume defined around each wind turbine that is timely co-aligned with each corresponding turbine's yaw-angle. Hence it is possible to extract flow statistics around each wind turbine, regardless of whether the turbine is fully isolated or it is plunged within a large wind farm. The Wind Turbine Box tool has been used to compute the energy fluxes around a characteristic wind turbine of a large wind farm to better understand the wake replenishment processes throughout a complete diurnal cycle. The effective loading of the wind farm has been gradually increased, ranging from quasi-isolated wind turbines to a highly packed wind farm. For this purpose, several Large Eddy Simulations have been run, forced with a constant geostrophic wind and a time varying surface temperature extracted from a selected period of the CASES-99 field experiment. Results illustrate the differences in the flow dynamics as it evolves around a characteristic wind turbine within a large wind farm and its asymptotic transition to the fully developed wind turbine array boundary layer.

  11. Turbine Design and Application, Volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    Turbine technology concepts for thermodynamic and fluid dynamics are presented along with velocity diagrams, losses, mechanical design, operation and performance. Designs discussed include: supersonic turbines, radial-inflow turbines, and turbine cooling.

  12. Materials for Advanced Turbine Engines. Volume 1; Power Metallurgy Rene 95 Rotating Turbine Engine Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfouts, W. R.; Shamblen, C. E.; Mosier, J. S.; Peebles, R. E.; Gorsler, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt was made to improve methods for producing powder metallurgy aircraft gas turbine engine parts from the nickel base superalloy known as Rene 95. The parts produced were the high pressure turbine aft shaft for the CF6-50 engine and the stages 5 through 9 compressor disk forgings for the CFM56/F101 engines. A 50% cost reduction was achieved as compared to conventional cast and wrought processing practices. An integrated effort involving several powder producers and a major forging source were included.

  13. Evidence for throttling as a control over localized late-stage Au/Ag mineralization in the Mineral Hill breccia pipe, Golden Sunlight mine, Jefferson County, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Coppinger, W.W.; Porter, E.

    1985-01-01

    A restricted zone of anomalous gold and silver mineralization, coupled with localized intense alteration and textural variations, documents the existence of a natural throttle which controlled Au/Ag emplacement during late-stage mineralization of the Mineral Hill breccia pipe. The zone is roughly funnel-shaped with a maximum width of 10m and a length of 30m. Mineralization and alteration are developed along the trend of a steep-dipping to vertical fracture zone and apparently pinch out at depth. Small displacement post-mineralization cross-faults offset contacts and influence grade distribution within the feature. Breccia texture, nature and intensity of alteration, and ore grade very systematically from the margin to the interior of the zone. The breccia becomes rubbly and friable, with frothy, cellular quartz comprising the matrix and as much as 50 percent of the rock in some locations. Au/Ag grades vary directly with the development of the cellular quartz and are highest in the interior, grading to local background levels in the wallrock. Barite and minor white opaline quartz occur in the matrix adjacent to contacts, diminishing in volume toward the interior. Minor primary hematite occurs in some clasts in the interior. Iron-oxides after sulfides are common throughout the zone. The feature is interpreted as late-stage localized zone of venting and pressure-release developed above a constriction in the Mineral Hill hydrothermal mineralizing system.

  14. 76. TURBINE HALL, UNIT 2 SHOWING BOTH TURBINE AND CONDENSER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    76. TURBINE HALL, UNIT 2 SHOWING BOTH TURBINE AND CONDENSER (SEE ALSO, DRAWING No. 12 OF 13) - Delaware County Electric Company, Chester Station, Delaware River at South end of Ward Street, Chester, Delaware County, PA

  15. 40. VIEW OF TURBINE HALL LOOKING SOUTHWEST AT WESTINGHOUSEPARSONS TURBINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. VIEW OF TURBINE HALL LOOKING SOUTHWEST AT WESTINGHOUSE-PARSONS TURBINE NUMBER 2. THIS UNIT WAS INSTALLED IN 1925. - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Cos Cob Power Plant, Sound Shore Drive, Greenwich, Fairfield County, CT

  16. Heat pipe turbine vane cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Langston, L.; Faghri, A.

    1995-10-01

    The applicability of using heat pipe principles to cool gas turbine vanes is addressed in this beginning program. This innovative concept involves fitting out the vane interior as a heat pipe and extending the vane into an adjacent heat sink, thus transferring the vane incident heat transfer through the heat pipe to heat sink. This design provides an extremely high heat transfer rate and an uniform temperature along the vane due to the internal change of phase of the heat pipe working fluid. Furthermore, this technology can also eliminate hot spots at the vane leading and trailing edges and increase the vane life by preventing thermal fatigue cracking. There is also the possibility of requiring no bleed air from the compressor, and therefore eliminating engine performance losses resulting from the diversion of compressor discharge air. Significant improvement in gas turbine performance can be achieved by using heat pipe technology in place of conventional air cooled vanes. A detailed numerical analysis of a heat pipe vane will be made and an experimental model will be designed in the first year of this new program.

  17. Heat pipe turbine vane cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Langston, L.; Faghri, A.

    1995-12-31

    The applicability of using heat pipe principles to cool gas turbine vanes is addressed in this beginning program. This innovative concept involves fitting out the vane interior as a heat pipe and extending the vane into an adjacent heat sink, thus transferring the vane incident heat transfer through the heat pipe to heat sink. This design provides an extremely high heat transfer rate and a uniform temperature along the vane due to the internal change of phase of the heat pipe working fluid. Furthermore, this technology can also eliminate hot spots at the vane leading and trailing edges and increase the vane life by preventing thermal fatigue cracking. There is also the possibility of requiring no bleed air from the compressor, and therefore eliminating engine performance losses resulting from the diversion of compressor discharge air. Significant improvement in gas turbine performance can be achieved by using heat pipe technology in place of conventional air cooled vanes. A detailed numerical analysis of a heat pipe vane will be made and an experimental model will be designed in the first year of this new program.

  18. AGT-102 automotive gas turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Development of a gas turbine powertrain with a 30% fuel economy improvement over a comparable S1 reciprocating engine, operation within 0.41 HC, 3.4 CO, and 0.40 NOx grams per mile emissions levels, and ability to use a variety of alternate fuels is summarized. The powertrain concept consists of a single-shaft engine with a ceramic inner shell for containment of hot gasses and support of twin regenerators. It uses a fixed-geometry, lean, premixed, prevaporized combustor, and a ceramic radial turbine rotor supported by an air-lubricated journal bearing. The engine is coupled to the vehicle through a widerange continuously variable transmission, which utilizes gearing and a variable-ratio metal compression belt. A response assist flywheel is used to achieve acceptable levels of engine response. The package offers a 100 lb weight advantage in a Chrysler K Car front-wheel-drive installation. Initial layout studies, preliminary transient thermal analysis, ceramic inner housing structural analysis, and detailed performance analysis were carried out for the basic engine.

  19. Turbine inner shroud and turbine assembly containing such inner shroud

    DOEpatents

    Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran; Corman, Gregory Scot; Dean, Anthony John; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Mirdamadi, Massoud

    2001-01-01

    A turbine inner shroud and a turbine assembly. The turbine assembly includes a turbine stator having a longitudinal axis and having an outer shroud block with opposing and longitudinally outward facing first and second sides having open slots. A ceramic inner shroud has longitudinally inward facing hook portions which can longitudinally and radially surround a portion of the sides of the outer shroud block. In one attachment, the hook portions are engageable with, and are positioned within, the open slots.

  20. Floating wind turbine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viterna, Larry A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A floating wind turbine system with a tower structure that includes at least one stability arm extending therefrom and that is anchored to the sea floor with a rotatable position retention device that facilitates deep water installations. Variable buoyancy for the wind turbine system is provided by buoyancy chambers that are integral to the tower itself as well as the stability arm. Pumps are included for adjusting the buoyancy as an aid in system transport, installation, repair and removal. The wind turbine rotor is located downwind of the tower structure to allow the wind turbine to follow the wind direction without an active yaw drive system. The support tower and stability arm structure is designed to balance tension in the tether with buoyancy, gravity and wind forces in such a way that the top of the support tower leans downwind, providing a large clearance between the support tower and the rotor blade tips. This large clearance facilitates the use of articulated rotor hubs to reduced damaging structural dynamic loads. Major components of the turbine can be assembled at the shore and transported to an offshore installation site.

  1. Advanced Micro Turbine System (AMTS) -C200 Micro Turbine -Ultra-Low Emissions Micro Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Capstone Turbine Corporation

    2007-12-31

    In September 2000 Capstone Turbine Corporation commenced work on a US Department of Energy contract to develop and improve advanced microturbines for power generation with high electrical efficiency and reduced pollutants. The Advanced MicroTurbine System (AMTS) program focused on: (1) The development and implementation of technology for a 200 kWe scale high efficiency microturbine system (2) The development and implementation of a 65 kWe microturbine which meets California Air Resources Board (CARB) emissions standards effective in 2007. Both of these objectives were achieved in the course of the AMTS program. At its conclusion prototype C200 Microturbines had been designed, assembled and successfully completed field demonstration. C65 Microturbines operating on natural, digester and landfill gas were also developed and successfully tested to demonstrate compliance with CARB 2007 Fossil Fuel Emissions Standards for NOx, CO and VOC emissions. The C65 Microturbine subsequently received approval from CARB under Executive Order DG-018 and was approved for sale in California. The United Technologies Research Center worked in parallel to successfully execute a RD&D program to demonstrate the viability of a low emissions AMS which integrated a high-performing microturbine with Organic Rankine Cycle systems. These results are documented in AMS Final Report DOE/CH/11060-1 dated March 26, 2007.

  2. Numerical investigation of Marine Hydrokinetic Turbines: methodology development for single turbine and small array simulation, and application to flume and full-scale reference models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javaherchi Mozafari, Amir Teymour

    A hierarchy of numerical models, Single Rotating Reference Frame (SRF) and Blade Element Model (BEM), were used for numerical investigation of horizontal axis Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Turbines. In the initial stage the SRF and BEM were used to simulate the performance and turbulent wake of a flume- and a full-scale MHK turbine reference model. A significant level of understanding and confidence was developed in the implementation of numerical models for simulation of a MHK turbine. This was achieved by simulation of the flume-scale turbine experiments and comparison between numerical and experimental results. Then the developed numerical methodology was applied to simulate the performance and wake of the full-scale MHK reference model (DOE Reference Model 1). In the second stage the BEM was used to simulate the experimental study of two different MHK turbine array configurations (i.e. two and three coaxial turbines). After developing a numerical methodology using the experimental comparison to simulate the flow field of a turbine array, this methodology was applied toward array optimization study of a full-scale model with the goal of proposing an optimized MHK turbine configuration with minimal computational cost and time. In the last stage the BEM was used to investigate one of the potential environmental effects of MHK turbine. A general methodological approach was developed and experimentally validated to investigate the effect of MHK turbine wake on the sedimentation process of suspended particles in a tidal channel.

  3. Variable cycle gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. E.; Foster, T. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A technique, method, and apparatus were designed for varying the bypass ratio and modulating the flow of a gas turbine engine in order to achieve improved mixed mission performance. Embodiments include gas flow control system for management of core and bypass stream pressure comprising diverter valve means downstream of the core engine to selectively mix or separate the core and bypass exhaust streams. The flow control system may also include variable geometry means for maintaining the engine inlet airflow at a matched design level at all flight velocities. Earth preferred embodiment thus may be converted from a high specific thrust mixed flow cycle at supersonic velocities to a lower specific thrust separated flow turbofan system at subsonic velocities with a high degree of flow variability in each mode of operation.

  4. Effect of Detonation through a Turbine Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Matthew T.

    2004-01-01

    Pulse detonation engines (PDE) have been investigated as a more efficient means of propulsion due to its constant volume combustion rather than the more often used constant pressure combustion of other propulsion systems. It has been proposed that a hybrid PDE-gas turbine engine would be a feasible means of improving the efficiency of the typical constant pressure combustion gas turbine cycle. In this proposed system, multiple pulse detonation tubes would replace the conventional combustor. Also, some of the compressor stages may be removed due to the pressure rise gained across the detonation wave. The benefits of higher thermal efficiency and reduced compressor size may come at a cost. The first question that arises is the unsteadiness in the flow created by the pulse detonation tubes. A constant pressure combustor has the advantage of supplying a steady and large mass flow rate. The use of the pulse detonation tubes will create an unsteady mass flow which will have currently unknown effects on the turbine located downstream of the combustor. Using multiple pulse detonation tubes will hopefully improve the unsteadiness. The interaction between the turbine and the shock waves exiting the tubes will also have an unknown effect. Noise levels are also a concern with this hybrid system. These unknown effects are being investigated using TURBO, an unsteady turbomachinery flow simulation code developed at Mississippi State University. A baseline case corresponding to a system using a constant pressure combustor with the same mass flow rate achieved with the pulse detonation hybrid system will be investigated first.

  5. Rotation Motion of Designed Nano-Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingyuan; Wang, Xiaofeng; Zhao, Lina; Gao, Xingfa; Zhao, Yuliang; Zhou, Ruhong

    2014-07-01

    Construction of nano-devices that can generate controllable unidirectional rotation is an important part of nanotechnology. Here, we design a nano-turbine composed of carbon nanotube and graphene nanoblades, which can be driven by fluid flow. Rotation motion of nano-turbine is quantitatively studied by molecular dynamics simulations on this model system. A robust linear relationship is achieved with this nano-turbine between its rotation rate and the fluid flow velocity spanning two orders of magnitude, and this linear relationship remains intact at various temperatures. More interestingly, a striking difference from its macroscopic counterpart is identified: the rotation rate is much smaller (by a factor of ~15) than that of the macroscopic turbine with the same driving flow. This discrepancy is shown to be related to the disruption of water flow at nanoscale, together with the water slippage at graphene surface and the so-called ``dragging effect''. Moreover, counterintuitively, the ratio of ``effective'' driving flow velocity increases as the flow velocity increases, suggesting that the linear dependence on the flow velocity can be more complicated in nature. These findings may serve as a foundation for the further development of rotary nano-devices and should also be helpful for a better understanding of the biological molecular motors.

  6. MATERIALS AND COMPONENT DEVELOPMENT FOR ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    M. A. Alvin

    2009-06-12

    Future hydrogen-fired or oxy-fuel turbines will likely experience an enormous level of thermal and mechanical loading, as turbine inlet temperatures (TIT) approach 1425-1760ºC with pressures of 300-625 psig, respectively. Maintaining the structural integrity of future turbine components under these extreme conditions will require durable thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), high temperature creep resistant metal substrates, and effective cooling techniques. While advances in substrate materials have been limited for the past decades, thermal protection of turbine airfoils in future hydrogen-fired and oxy-fuel turbines will rely primarily on collective advances in TBCs and aerothermal cooling. To support the advanced turbine technology development, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) at the Office of Research and Development (ORD) has initiated a research project effort in collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh (UPitt), and West Virginia University (WVU), working in conjunction with commercial material and coating suppliers, to develop advanced materials, aerothermal configurations, as well as non-destructive evaluation techniques for use in advanced land-based gas turbine applications. This paper reviews technical accomplishments recently achieved in each of these areas.

  7. Advanced turbine design for coal-fueled engines

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.H.; Johnson, B.V.

    1993-04-01

    The investigators conclude that: (1) Turbine erosion resistance was shown to be improved by a factor of 5 by varying the turbine design. Increasing the number of stages and increasing the mean radius reduces the peak predicted erosion rates for 2-D flows on the blade airfoil from values which are 6 times those of the vane to values of erosion which are comparable to those of the vane airfoils. (2) Turbine erosion was a strong function of airfoil shape depending on particle diameter. Different airfoil shapes for the same turbine operating condition resulted in a factor of 7 change in airfoil erosion for the smallest particles studied (5 micron). (3) Predicted erosion for the various turbines analyzed was a strong function of particle diameter and weaker function of particle density. (4) Three dimensional secondary flows were shown to cause increases in peak and average erosion on the vane and blade airfoils. Additionally, the interblade secondary flows and stationary outer case caused unique erosion patterns which were not obtainable with 2-D analyses. (5) Analysis of the results indicate that hot gas cleanup systems are necessary to achieve acceptable turbine life in direct-fired, coal-fueled systems. In addition, serious consequences arise when hot gas filter systems fail for even short time periods. For a complete failure of the filter system, a 0.030 in. thick corrosion-resistant protective coating on a turbine blade would be eroded at some locations within eight minutes.

  8. New method of turbinate hypertrophy treated by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Jiang

    1994-08-01

    Forty-four cases of turbinate hypertrophy are treated by the light fiber insertion of YAG laser, the power density of which is 968 W/cm2. The method consists of the YAG laser irradiation of the anterior area in the turbinate making this membrane pale and then the light fiber is parallely inserted into the inferior turbinate between the membrane and periosteum through the coagulative point. It should be vertically or obliquely inserted in the middle turbinate. The distance between tissues inserted repeatedly is 0.5 cm. The turbinate becomes slightly swollen after operation. The secretion with blood in the nasal cavity increases. The symptoms and signs are relieved in 5 days. Of 44 cases complete recovery was achieved in 28 cases (63.6%); obvious effect was seen in 12 cases (27.3%); improvement in 4 cases (9.1%); and inefficacy in zero. Besides relief of the nasal obstruction the hypersensitive symptoms of the patient with the turbinate hypertrophy resulting from 18 cases of allergic rhinitis are obviously improved. If the operation is not a suitable procedure secondary atrophic rhinitis and turbinate adhesion to the septum may be produced.

  9. Wind turbine spoiler

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, W.N.

    An aerodynamic spoiler system for a vertical axis wind turbine includes spoilers on the blades initially stored near the rotor axis to minimize drag. A solenoid latch adjacent the central support tower releases the spoilers and centrifugal force causes the spoilers to move up the turbine blades away from the rotor axis, thereby producing a braking effect and actual slowing of the associated wind turbine, if desired. The spoiler system can also be used as an infinitely variable power control by regulated movement of the spoilers on the blades over the range between the undeployed and fully deployed positions. This is done by the use of a suitable powered reel and cable located at the rotor tower to move the spoilers.

  10. Turbine airfoil manufacturing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kortovich, C.

    1995-10-01

    The efficiency and effectiveness of the gas turbine engine is directly related to the turbine inlet temperatures. The ability to increase these temperatures has occurred as a result of improvements in materials, design, and processing techniques. A generic sequence indicating the relationship of these factors to temperature capability is schematically shown in Figure 1 for aircraft engine and land based engine materials. A basic contribution that is not captured by the Figure is the significant improvement in process and manufacturing capability that has accompanied each of these innovations. It is this capability that has allowed the designs and innovations to be applied on a high volume, cost effective scale in the aircraft gas turbine market.

  11. Wind Turbine Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Spera, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    This book reviews advances in aerodynamics, structural dynamics and fatigue, wind characteristics, acoustic and electromagnetic emissions, commercial wind power applications, and utility power systems that use wind power plants. The book examines the choices made by inventors, designers, and builders of turbines; absorb their practical lessons; and presents the experience of a wide range of wind-energy professionals. Included are sources of technical information, side-by-side comparisons of commercial wind turbines, technical data on wind turbines of various sizes and types, and fundamental equations for engineers designing and analyzing systems. This book would be useful to practicing engineers, designers, meteorologists, researchers, utility project managers and planners, wind power plant developers, and equipment manufacturers, as well as students and teachers.

  12. Turbine Airfoil Deposition Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    Gas turbine failures associated with sea-salt ingestion and sulfur-containing fuel impurities have directed attention to alkali sulfate deposition and the associated hot corrosion of gas turbine (GT) blades under some GT operating conditions. These salt deposits form thin, molten films which undermine the protective metal oxide coating normally found on GT blades. The prediction of molten salt deposition, flow and oxide dissolution, and their effects on the lifetime of turbine blades are examined. Goals include rationalizing and helping to predict corrosion patterns on operational GT rotor blades and stators, and ultimately providing some of the tools required to design laboratory simulators and future corrosion-resistant high-performance engines. Necessary background developments are reviewed first, and then recent results and tentative conclusions are presented along with a brief account of the present research plans.

  13. Variable stator radial turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogo, C.; Hajek, T.; Chen, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    A radial turbine stage with a variable area nozzle was investigated. A high work capacity turbine design with a known high performance base was modified to accept a fixed vane stagger angle moveable sidewall nozzle. The nozzle area was varied by moving the forward and rearward sidewalls. Diffusing and accelerating rotor inlet ramps were evaluated in combinations with hub and shroud rotor exit rings. Performance of contoured sidewalls and the location of the sidewall split line with respect to the rotor inlet was compared to the baseline. Performance and rotor exit survey data are presented for 31 different geometries. Detail survey data at the nozzle exit are given in contour plot format for five configurations. A data base is provided for a variable geometry concept that is a viable alternative to the more common pivoted vane variable geometry radial turbine.

  14. Upgrading jet turbine technology

    SciTech Connect

    Valenti, M.

    1995-12-01

    This article describes a joint government/industry program that is developing a new breed of turbine components, including bearings, blades, and seals, to double the propulsion capacity of both military and commercial jet engines. Although the tensions of the Cold War have receded with the demise of the Soviet Union, the US continually seeks to improve the operational readiness of its weapon systems. The challenge facing the Pentagon today is maintaining US technological superiority in the face of post-Cold War budget cuts. A model program for doing so is the joint government/industry Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology program, or IHPTET (pronounced ip-tet). The goal of the IHPTET program is to develop technologies that will double the propulsion capability of military turbine engines by the turn of the century.

  15. Gas turbine sealing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Wiebe, David J; Wessell, Brian J; Ebert, Todd; Beeck, Alexander; Liang, George; Marussich, Walter H

    2013-02-19

    A gas turbine includes forward and aft rows of rotatable blades, a row of stationary vanes between the forward and aft rows of rotatable blades, an annular intermediate disc, and a seal housing apparatus. The forward and aft rows of rotatable blades are coupled to respective first and second portions of a disc/rotor assembly. The annular intermediate disc is coupled to the disc/rotor assembly so as to be rotatable with the disc/rotor assembly during operation of the gas turbine. The annular intermediate disc includes a forward side coupled to the first portion of the disc/rotor assembly and an aft side coupled to the second portion of the disc/rotor assembly. The seal housing apparatus is coupled to the annular intermediate disc so as to be rotatable with the annular intermediate disc and the disc/rotor assembly during operation of the gas turbine.

  16. Wind Turbine Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, Harvey H.; Shepherd, Kevin P.

    2009-01-01

    Wind turbine generators, ranging in size from a few kilowatts to several megawatts, are producing electricity both singly and in wind power stations that encompass hundreds of machines. Many installations are in uninhabited areas far from established residences, and therefore there are no apparent environmental impacts in terms of noise. There is, however, the potential for situations in which the radiated noise can be heard by residents of adjacent neighborhoods, particularly those neighborhoods with low ambient noise levels. A widely publicized incident of this nature occurred with the operation of the experimental Mod-1 2-MW wind turbine, which is described in detail elsewhere. Pioneering studies which were conducted at the Mod-1 site on the causes and remedies of noise from wind turbines form the foundation of much of the technology described in this chapter.

  17. Wind turbine system

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, O.J.

    1982-05-18

    A wind turbine system utilizes a bicycle wheel type turbine having airfoils mounted on various spoke pairs. The vertical yaw axis lies in the horizontal projection of the airfoils to offer better control of the system; for example, automatic stowage in the case of excessive wind is provided since the superstructure of the turbine provides a torque around the vertical yaw axis which moves the wheel into a stowed position. At the same time, the wheel diameter can be made larger and thus heavier since the drive connection to the generator also helps support the weight of the wheel, since it is a rim drive. Greater electrical generation is also provided since an air scoop facing into the wind allows the effective generator capacity to be increased with air velocity. Lastly, the radial rate of change of the angle of the airfoils can be closely controlled.

  18. Turbine nozzle attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Norton, Paul F.; Shaffer, James E.

    1995-01-01

    A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes a pair of legs extending radially outwardly from an outer shroud and a pair of mounting legs extending radially inwardly from an inner shroud. Each of the pair of legs and mounting legs have a pair of holes therein. A plurality of members attached to the gas turbine engine have a plurality of bores therein which axially align with corresponding ones of the pair of holes in the legs. A plurality of pins are positioned within the corresponding holes and bores radially positioning the nozzle guide vane assembly about a central axis of the gas turbine engine.

  19. Wind turbine spoiler

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, William N.

    1985-01-01

    An aerodynamic spoiler system for a vertical axis wind turbine includes spoilers on the blades initially stored near the rotor axis to minimize drag. A solenoid latch adjacent the central support tower releases the spoilers and centrifugal force causes the spoilers to move up the turbine blades away from the rotor axis, thereby producing a braking effect and actual slowing of the associated wind turbine, if desired. The spoiler system can also be used as an infinitely variable power control by regulated movement of the spoilers on the blades over the range between the undeployed and fully deployed positions. This is done by the use of a suitable powered reel and cable located at the rotor tower to move the spoilers.

  20. Turbine nozzle attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Norton, P.F.; Shaffer, J.E.

    1995-10-24

    A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and is attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes a pair of legs extending radially outwardly from an outer shroud and a pair of mounting legs extending radially inwardly from an inner shroud. Each of the pair of legs and mounting legs have a pair of holes therein. A plurality of members attached to the gas turbine engine have a plurality of bores therein which axially align with corresponding ones of the pair of holes in the legs. A plurality of pins are positioned within the corresponding holes and bores radially positioning the nozzle guide vane assembly about a central axis of the gas turbine engine. 3 figs.

  1. Wind Turbine With Concentric Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muhonen, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Wind Turbine device is relatively compact and efficient. Converging inner and outer ducts increase pressure difference across blades of wind turbine. Turbine shaft drives alternator housed inside exit cone. Suitable for installation on such existing structures as water towers, barns, houses, and commercial buildings.

  2. Predicting Noise From Wind Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    1990-01-01

    Computer program WINDY predicts broadband noise spectra of horizontal-axis wind-turbine generators. Enables adequate assessment of impact of broadband wind-turbine noise. Effects of turbulence, trailing-edge wakes, and bluntness taken into account. Program has practical application in design and siting of wind-turbine machines acceptable to community. Written in GW-Basic.

  3. Steam generators, turbines, and condensers. Volume six

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Volume six covers steam generators (How steam is generated, steam generation in a PWR, vertical U-tube steam generators, once-through steam generators, how much steam do steam generators make.), turbines (basic turbine principles, impulse turbines, reaction turbines, turbine stages, turbine arrangements, turbine steam flow, steam admission to turbines, turbine seals and supports, turbine oil system, generators), and condensers (need for condensers, basic condenser principles, condenser arrangements, heat transfer in condensers, air removal from condensers, circulating water system, heat loss to the circulating water system, factors affecting condenser performance, condenser auxiliaries).

  4. SSME HPFTP/AT Turbine Blade Platform Featherseal Damper Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, S. K.

    1999-01-01

    During the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSM) HPFtP/AT development program, engine hot fire testing resulted in turbine blade fatigue cracks. The cracks were noted after only a few tests and a several hundred seconds versus the design goal of 60 tests and >30,000 seconds. Subsequent investigation attributed the distress to excessive steady and dynamic loads. To address these excessive turbine blade loads, Pratt & Whitney Liquid Space Propulsion engineers designed and developed retrofitable turbine blade to blade platform featherseal dampers. Since incorporation of these dampers, along with other turbine blade system improvements, there has been no observed SSME HPFTP/AT turbine blade fatigue cracking. The high time HPFTP/AT blade now has accumulated 32 starts and 19,200 seconds hot fire test time. Figure #1 illustrates the HPFTP/AT turbine blade platform featherseal dampers. The approached selected was to improve the turbine blade structural capability while simultaneously reducing loads. To achieve this goal, the featherseal dampers were designed to seal the blade to blade platform gap and damp the dynamic motions. Sealing improves the steady stress margins by increasing turbine efficiency and improving turbine blade attachment thermal conditioning. Load reduction was achieved through damping. Thin Haynes 188 sheet metal was selected based on its material properties (hydrogen resistance, elongation, tensile strengths, etc.). The 36,000 rpm wheel speed of the rotor result in a normal load of 120#/blade. The featherseals then act as micro-slip dampers during actual SSME operation. After initial design and analysis (prior to full engine testing), the featherseal dampers were tested in P&W's spin rig facility in West Palm Beach, Florida. Both dynamic strain gages and turbine blade tip displacement measurements were utilized to quantify the featherseal damper effectiveness. Full speed (36,000 rpm), room temperature rig testing verified the elimination of fundamental mode

  5. Advanced wind turbine design

    SciTech Connect

    Jamieson, P.M.; Jaffrey, A.

    1995-09-01

    Garrad Hassan have a project in progress funded by the UK Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) to assess the prospects and cost benefits of advanced wind turbine design. In the course of this work, a new concept, the coned rotor design, has been developed. This enables a wind turbine system to operate in effect with variable rotor diameter augmenting energy capture in light winds and shedding loads in storm conditions. Comparisons with conventional design suggest that a major benefit in reduced cost of wind generated electricity may be possible.

  6. Vertical axis wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij

    2011-03-08

    A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

  7. Multiple piece turbine airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Kimmel, Keith D; Wilson, Jr., Jack W.

    2010-11-02

    A turbine airfoil, such as a rotor blade or a stator vane, for a gas turbine engine, the airfoil formed as a shell and spar construction with a plurality of dog bone struts each mounted within openings formed within the shell and spar to allow for relative motion between the spar and shell in the airfoil chordwise direction while also forming a seal between adjacent cooling channels. The struts provide the seal as well as prevent bulging of the shell from the spar due to the cooling air pressure.

  8. Refurbishing steam turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Valenti, M.

    1997-12-01

    Power-plant operators are reducing maintenance costs of their aging steam turbines by using wire-arc spray coating and shot peening to prolong the service life of components, and by replacing outmoded bearings and seals with newer designs. Steam-turbine operators are pressed with the challenge of keeping their aging machines functioning in the face of wear problems that are exacerbated by the demand for higher efficiencies. These problems include intense thermal cycling during both start-up and shutdown, water particles in steam and solid particles in the air that pit smooth surfaces, and load changes that cause metal fatigue.

  9. Ceramic gas turbine shroud

    DOEpatents

    Shi, Jun; Green, Kevin E.

    2014-07-22

    An example gas turbine engine shroud includes a first annular ceramic wall having an inner side for resisting high temperature turbine engine gasses and an outer side with a plurality of radial slots. A second annular metallic wall is positioned radially outwardly of and enclosing the first annular ceramic wall and has a plurality of tabs in communication with the slot of the first annular ceramic wall. The tabs of the second annular metallic wall and slots of the first annular ceramic wall are in communication such that the first annular ceramic wall and second annular metallic wall are affixed.

  10. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, P.A.

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  11. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1984-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  12. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1982-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  13. Conceptual design study of an improved automotive gas turbine powertrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, C. E. (Editor); Pampreen, R. C. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Automotive gas turbine concepts with significant technological advantages over the spark ignition (SI) engine were assessed. Possible design concepts were rated with respect to fuel economy and near-term application. A program plan which outlines the development of the improved gas turbine (IGT) concept that best met the goals and objectives of the study identifies the research and development work needed to meet the goal of entering a production engineering phase by 1983. The fuel economy goal is to show at least a 20% improvement over a conventional 1976 SI engine/vehicle system. On the basis of achieving the fuel economy goal, of overall suitability to mechanical design, and of automotive mass production cost, the powertrain selected was a single-shaft engine with a radial turbine and a continuously variable transmission (CVT). Design turbine inlet temperature was 1150 C. Reflecting near-term technology, the turbine rotor would be made of an advanced superalloy, and the transmission would be a hydromechanical CVT. With successful progress in long-lead R&D in ceramic technology and the belt-drive CVT, the turbine inlet temperature would be 1350 C to achieve near-maximum fuel economy.

  14. Advanced turbine design for coal-fueled engines. Phase 1, Erosion of turbine hot gas path blading: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.H.; Johnson, B.V.

    1993-04-01

    The investigators conclude that: (1) Turbine erosion resistance was shown to be improved by a factor of 5 by varying the turbine design. Increasing the number of stages and increasing the mean radius reduces the peak predicted erosion rates for 2-D flows on the blade airfoil from values which are 6 times those of the vane to values of erosion which are comparable to those of the vane airfoils. (2) Turbine erosion was a strong function of airfoil shape depending on particle diameter. Different airfoil shapes for the same turbine operating condition resulted in a factor of 7 change in airfoil erosion for the smallest particles studied (5 micron). (3) Predicted erosion for the various turbines analyzed was a strong function of particle diameter and weaker function of particle density. (4) Three dimensional secondary flows were shown to cause increases in peak and average erosion on the vane and blade airfoils. Additionally, the interblade secondary flows and stationary outer case caused unique erosion patterns which were not obtainable with 2-D analyses. (5) Analysis of the results indicate that hot gas cleanup systems are necessary to achieve acceptable turbine life in direct-fired, coal-fueled systems. In addition, serious consequences arise when hot gas filter systems fail for even short time periods. For a complete failure of the filter system, a 0.030 in. thick corrosion-resistant protective coating on a turbine blade would be eroded at some locations within eight minutes.

  15. Achieving improved cycle efficiency via pressure gain combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Gemmen, R.S.; Janus, M.C.; Richards, G.A.; Norton, T.S.; Rogers, W.A.

    1995-04-01

    As part of the Department of Energy`s Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Program, an investigation is being performed to evaluate ``pressure gain`` combustion systems for gas turbine applications. This paper presents experimental pressure gain and pollutant emission data from such combustion systems. Numerical predictions for certain combustor geometries are also presented. It is reported that for suitable aerovalved pulse combustor geometries studied experimentally, an overall combustor pressure gain of nearly 1 percent can be achieved. It is also shown that for one combustion system operating under typical gas turbine conditions, NO{sub x} and CO emmissions, are about 30 ppmv and 8 ppmv, respectively.

  16. Ceramic regenerator systems development program. [for automobile gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. A.; Fucinari, C. A.; Lingscheit, J. N.; Rahnke, C. J.

    1977-01-01

    Ceramic regenerator cores are considered that can be used in passenger car gas turbine engines, Stirling engines, and industrial/truck gas turbine engines. Improved materials and design concepts aimed at reducing or eliminating chemical attack were placed on durability test in Ford 707 industrial gas turbine engines. The results of 19,600 hours of turbine engine durability testing are described. Two materials, aluminum silicate and magnesium aluminum silicate, continue to show promise toward achieving the durability objectives of this program. A regenerator core made from aluminum silicate showed minimal evidence of chemical attack damage after 6935 hours of engine test at 800 C and another showed little distress after 3510 hours at 982 C. Results obtained in ceramic material screening tests, aerothermodynamic performance tests, stress analysis, cost studies, and material specifications are also included.

  17. Low-cost directionally-solidified turbine blades, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sink, L. W.; Hoppin, G. S., III; Fujii, M.

    1979-01-01

    A low cost process of manufacturing high stress rupture strength directionally-solidified high pressure turbine blades was successfully developed for the TFE731-3 Turbofan Engine. The basic processing parameters were established using MAR-M 247 and employing the exothermic directional-solidification process in trial castings of turbine blades. Nickel-based alloys were evaluated as directionally-solidified cast blades. A new turbine blade, disk, and associated components were then designed using previously determined material properties. Engine tests were run and the results were analyzed and compared to the originally established goals. The results showed that the stress rupture strength of exothermically heated, directionally-solidified MAR-M 247 turbine blades exceeded program objectives and that the performance and cost reduction goals were achieved.

  18. Thermochemically recuperated and steam cooled gas turbine system

    DOEpatents

    Viscovich, Paul W.; Bannister, Ronald L.

    1995-01-01

    A gas turbine system in which the expanded gas from the turbine section is used to generate the steam in a heat recovery steam generator and to heat a mixture of gaseous hydrocarbon fuel and the steam in a reformer. The reformer converts the hydrocarbon gas to hydrogen and carbon monoxide for combustion in a combustor. A portion of the steam from the heat recovery steam generator is used to cool components, such as the stationary vanes, in the turbine section, thereby superheating the steam. The superheated steam is mixed into the hydrocarbon gas upstream of the reformer, thereby eliminating the need to raise the temperature of the expanded gas discharged from the turbine section in order to achieve effective conversion of the hydrocarbon gas.

  19. Reflection error correction of gas turbine blade temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipngetich, Ketui Daniel; Feng, Chi; Gao, Shan

    2016-03-01

    Accurate measurement of gas turbine blades' temperature is one of the greatest challenges encountered in gas turbine temperature measurements. Within an enclosed gas turbine environment with surfaces of varying temperature and low emissivities, a new challenge is introduced into the use of radiation thermometers due to the problem of reflection error. A method for correcting this error has been proposed and demonstrated in this work through computer simulation and experiment. The method assumed that emissivities of all surfaces exchanging thermal radiation are known. Simulations were carried out considering targets with low and high emissivities of 0.3 and 0.8 respectively while experimental measurements were carried out on blades with emissivity of 0.76. Simulated results showed possibility of achieving error less than 1% while experimental result corrected the error to 1.1%. It was thus concluded that the method is appropriate for correcting reflection error commonly encountered in temperature measurement of gas turbine blades.

  20. Thermochemically recuperated and steam cooled gas turbine system

    DOEpatents

    Viscovich, P.W.; Bannister, R.L.

    1995-07-11

    A gas turbine system is described in which the expanded gas from the turbine section is used to generate the steam in a heat recovery steam generator and to heat a mixture of gaseous hydrocarbon fuel and the steam in a reformer. The reformer converts the hydrocarbon gas to hydrogen and carbon monoxide for combustion in a combustor. A portion of the steam from the heat recovery steam generator is used to cool components, such as the stationary vanes, in the turbine section, thereby superheating the steam. The superheated steam is mixed into the hydrocarbon gas upstream of the reformer, thereby eliminating the need to raise the temperature of the expanded gas discharged from the turbine section in order to achieve effective conversion of the hydrocarbon gas. 4 figs.

  1. Turbine meters for liquid measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Wass, D.J.; Allen, C.R.

    1995-12-01

    Liquid turbine meters operate in response to fundamental engineering principles, Operation with a single moving part produces excellent longevity and reliability. Liquid turbine meters display wide rangeability, high accuracy, excellent repeatability, low pressure drop and moderate cost. Liquid turbine meters may be applied to many different fluids with different physical properties and corrosive tendencies. The marriage of liquid turbine meters to electronic instruments allows instantaneous flow calculations and produces the flexibility to display data, store data, transmit data in the most convenient form. Liquid turbine meters should be the first flow measurement instrument considered for liquid measurement applications.

  2. An overview of DOE`s wind turbine development programs

    SciTech Connect

    Laxson, A; Dodge, D; Flowers, L; Loose, R; Goldman, P

    1993-09-01

    The development of technologically advanced, higher efficiency wind turbines continues to be a high priority activity of the US wind industry. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting and sponsoring a range of programs aimed at assisting the wind industry with system design, development, and testing. The overall goal is to develop systems that can compete with conventional electric generation for $.05/kWh at 5.8 m/s (13 mph sites) by the mid-1990s and with fossil-fuel-based generators for $.04/kWh at 5.8 m/s sites by the year 2000. These goals will be achieved through several programs. The Value Engineered Turbine Program will promote the rapid development of US capability to manufacture wind turbines with known and well documented records of performance, cost, and reliability, to take advantage of near-term market opportunities. The Advanced Wind Turbine Program will assist US industry to develop and integrate innovative technologies into utility-grade wind turbines for the near-term (mid 1990s) and to develop a new generation of turbines for the year 2000. The collaborative Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)/DOE Utility Wind Turbine Performance Verification Program will deploy and evaluate commercial-prototype wind turbines in typical utility operating environments, to provide a bridge between development programs currently underway and commercial purchases of utility-grade wind turbines. A number of collaborative efforts also will help develop a range of small systems optimized to work in a diesel hybrid environment to provide electricity for smaller non-grid-connected applications.

  3. Study and program plan for improved heavy duty gas turbine engine ceramic component development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, H. E.

    1977-01-01

    Fuel economy in a commercially viable gas turbine engine was demonstrated through use of ceramic materials. Study results show that increased turbine inlet and generator inlet temperatures, through the use of ceramic materials, contribute the greatest amount to achieving fuel economy goals. Improved component efficiencies show significant additional gains in fuel economy.

  4. Small hydraulic turbine drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostafinski, W. A.

    1970-01-01

    Turbine, driven by the fluid being pumped, requires no external controls, is completely integrated into the flow system, and has bearings which utilize the main fluid for lubrication and cooling. Torque capabilities compare favorably with those developed by positive displacement hydraulic motors.

  5. Turbine blade damping study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominic, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Research results and progress on the performance of bladed systems is reported the different topics discussed include: the study of turbine blade damping; forced vibrations of friction damped beam moistures in two dimensions; and a users manual for a computer program for dynamic analysis of bladed systems.

  6. Advanced turbine systems program

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, C.; Mukavetz, D.W.; Knickerbocker, T.K.; Ali, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    In accordance with the goals of the DOE program, improvements in the gas turbine are the primary focus of Allison activity during Phase I. To this end Allison conducted a survey of potentially applicable gas turbine cycles and selected the advanced combined cycle as reference system. Extensive analysis of two versions of the advanced combined cycle was performed against the requirement for a 60% thermal efficiency (LHV) utility-sized, natural gas fired system. This analysis resulted in technology requirements for this system. Additional analysis determined emissions potential for the system, established a coal-fueled derivative system and a commercialization plan. This report deals with the technical requirements for a system that meets the thermal efficiency goal. Allison initially investigated four basic thermodynamic cycles: Humid air turbine, intercalate-recuperated systems, advanced combined cycle, chemically recuperated cycle. Our survey and cycle analysis indicated that au had the potential of reaching 60% thermal efficiency. We also concluded that engine hot section technology would be a critical technology regardless of which cycle was chosen. Based on this result Allison chose to concentrate on the advanced combined cycle. This cycle is well known and understood by the utility turbine user community and is therefore likely to be acceptable to users.

  7. Advanced turbine systems program

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, C.; Mukavetz, D.W.; Knickerbocker, T.K.; Ali, S.A.

    1992-12-31

    In accordance with the goals of the DOE program, improvements in the gas turbine are the primary focus of Allison activity during Phase I. To this end Allison conducted a survey of potentially applicable gas turbine cycles and selected the advanced combined cycle as reference system. Extensive analysis of two versions of the advanced combined cycle was performed against the requirement for a 60% thermal efficiency (LHV) utility-sized, natural gas fired system. This analysis resulted in technology requirements for this system. Additional analysis determined emissions potential for the system, established a coal-fueled derivative system and a commercialization plan. This report deals with the technical requirements for a system that meets the thermal efficiency goal. Allison initially investigated four basic thermodynamic cycles: Humid air turbine, intercalate-recuperated systems, advanced combined cycle, chemically recuperated cycle. Our survey and cycle analysis indicated that au had the potential of reaching 60% thermal efficiency. We also concluded that engine hot section technology would be a critical technology regardless of which cycle was chosen. Based on this result Allison chose to concentrate on the advanced combined cycle. This cycle is well known and understood by the utility turbine user community and is therefore likely to be acceptable to users.

  8. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The development and progress of the Advanced Gas Turbine engine program is examined. An analysis of the role of ceramics in the design and major engine components is included. Projected fuel economy, emissions and performance standards, and versatility in fuel use are also discussed.

  9. Turbine imaging technology assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Moursund, R. A.; Carlson, T. J.

    2004-12-01

    The goal of this project was to identify and evaluate imaging technologies for observing juvenile fish within a Kaplan turbine, and specifically that would enable scientists to determine mechanisms of fish injury within an operating turbine unit. This report documents the opportunities and constraints for observing juvenile fish at specific locations during turbine passage. These observations were used to make modifications to dam structures and operations to improve conditions for fish passage while maintaining or improving hydropower production. The physical and hydraulic environment that fish experience as they pass through the hydroelectric plants were studied and the regions with the greatest potential for injury were defined. Biological response data were also studied to determine the probable types of injuries sustained in the turbine intake and what types of injuries are detectable with imaging technologies. The study grouped injury-causing mechanisms into two categories: fluid (pressure/cavitation, shear, turbulence) and mechanical (strike/collision, grinding/pinching, scraping). The physical constraints of the environment, together with the likely types of injuries to fish, provided the parameters needed for a rigorous imaging technology evaluation. Types of technology evaluated included both tracking and imaging systems using acoustic technologies (such as sonar and acoustic tags) and optic technologies (such as pulsed-laser videography, which is high-speed videography using a laser as the flash). Criteria for determining image data quality such as frame rate, target detectability, and resolution were used to quantify the minimum requirements of an imaging sensor.

  10. Blade for turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suciu, Gabriel L. (Inventor); Babu, Michael (Inventor); Murdock, James R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A blade for a turbine engine having a centerline. The blade comprises: a root section extending at an angle relative to the centerline; and an airfoil section extending from the root section. The root section is directly adjacent said airfoil section. In other words, the blade is neckless. The blade is part of a rotor assembly, and is preferably a fan blade.

  11. Crescentic ramp turbine stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ching-Pang (Inventor); Tam, Anna (Inventor); Kirtley, Kevin Richard (Inventor); Lamson, Scott Henry (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A turbine stage includes a row of airfoils joined to corresponding platforms to define flow passages therebetween. Each airfoil includes opposite pressure and suction sides and extends in chord between opposite leading and trailing edges. Each platform includes a crescentic ramp increasing in height from the leading and trailing edges toward the midchord of the airfoil along the pressure side thereof.

  12. Piezoelectric wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishore, Ravi Anant; Priya, Shashank

    2013-03-01

    In past few years, there has been significant focus towards developing small scale renewable energy based power sources for powering wireless sensor nodes in remote locations such as highways and bridges to conduct continuous health monitoring. These prior efforts have led to the development of micro-scale solar modules, hydrogen fuel cells and various vibration based energy harvesters. However, the cost effectiveness, reliability, and practicality of these solutions remain a concern. Harvesting the wind energy using micro-to-small scale wind turbines can be an excellent solution in variety of outdoor scenarios provided they can operate at few miles per hour of wind speed. The conventional electromagnetic generator used in the wind mills always has some cogging torque which restricts their operation above certain cut-in wind speed. This study aims to develop a novel piezoelectric wind turbine that utilizes bimorph actuators for electro-mechanical energy conversion. This device utilizes a Savonius rotor that is connected to a disk having magnets at the periphery. The piezoelectric actuators arranged circumferentially around the disk also have magnets at the tip which interacts with the magnetic field of the rotating disk and produces cyclical deflection. The wind tunnel experiments were conducted between 2-12 mph of wind speeds to characterize and optimize the power output of the wind turbine. Further, testing was conducted in the open environment to quantify the response to random wind gusts. An attempt was made towards integration of the piezoelectric wind turbine with the wireless sensor node.

  13. Turbine vane structure

    DOEpatents

    Irwin, John A.

    1980-08-19

    A liquid cooled stator blade assembly for a gas turbine engine includes an outer shroud having a pair of liquid inlets and a pair of liquid outlets supplied through a header and wherein means including tubes support the header radially outwardly of the shroud and also couple the header with the pair of liquid inlets and outlets. A pair of turbine vanes extend radially between the shroud and a vane platform to define a gas turbine motive fluid passage therebetween; and each of the vanes is cooled by an internal body casting of super alloy material with a grooved layer of highly heat conductive material that includes spaced apart flat surface trailing edges in alignment with a flat trailing edge of the casting joined to wall segments of the liner which are juxtaposed with respect to the internal casting to form an array of parallel liquid inlet passages on one side of the vane and a second plurality of parallel liquid return passages on the opposite side of the vane; and a superalloy heat and wear resistant imperforate skin covers the outer surface of the composite blade including the internal casting and the heat conductive layer; a separate trailing edge section includes an internal casting and an outer skin butt connected to the end surfaces of the internal casting and the heat conductive layer to form an easily assembled liquid cooled trailing edge section in the turbine vane.

  14. Wind Turbine Control for Load Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossanyi, E. A.

    2003-07-01

    This article reviews techniques for the control of wind turbines during power production. Pitch control is used primarily to limit power in high winds, but it also has an important effect on structural loads. Particularly as turbines become larger, there is increasing interest in designing controllers to mitigate loads as far as possible. Torque control in variable-speed turbines is used primarily to maximize energy capture below rated wind speed, and to limit the torque above rated, but it can also be used to reduce certain loads. The design of the control algorithms is clearly of prime importance. Additional sensors such as accelerometers and load sensors can also help the controller to achieve its objectives more effectively. By controlling the pitch of each blade independently, it is also possible to achieve important further reductions in loading. It is important to be able to quantify the benefits of any new controller. Although computer simulations are useful, field trials are also vital. The variability of the real wind means that particular care is needed in the design of the trials.

  15. GAS TURBINE REHEAT USING IN SITU COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect

    D.M. Bachovchin; T.E. Lippert; R.A. Newby P.G.A. Cizmas

    2004-05-17

    In situ reheat is an alternative to traditional gas turbine reheat design in which fuel is fed through airfoils rather than in a bulky discrete combustor separating HP and LP turbines. The goals are to achieve increased power output and/or efficiency without higher emissions. In this program the scientific basis for achieving burnout with low emissions has been explored. In Task 1, Blade Path Aerodynamics, design options were evaluated using CFD in terms of burnout, increase of power output, and possible hot streaking. It was concluded that Vane 1 injection in a conventional 4-stage turbine was preferred. Vane 2 injection after vane 1 injection was possible, but of marginal benefit. In Task 2, Combustion and Emissions, detailed chemical kinetics modeling, validated by Task 3, Sub-Scale Testing, experiments, resulted in the same conclusions, with the added conclusion that some increase in emissions was expected. In Task 4, Conceptual Design and Development Plan, Siemens Westinghouse power cycle analysis software was used to evaluate alternative in situ reheat design options. Only single stage reheat, via vane 1, was found to have merit, consistent with prior Tasks. Unifying the results of all the tasks, a conceptual design for single stage reheat utilizing 24 holes, 1.8 mm diameter, at the trailing edge of vane 1 is presented. A development plan is presented.

  16. Experience gained with development of steam turbine projects with the use of standardized modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valamin, A. E.; Kultyshev, A. Yu.; Sakhnin, Yu. A.; Stepanov, M. Yu.

    2014-12-01

    The possibilities of decreasing the amount of work required for preparing manufacture of the equipment of gas-turbine, boiler, and steam-turbine units in the design and technological respects through the use of standardized components are pointed out. In parallel with this, a fewer number of design and technological errors is achieved, due to which better quality of the products is obtained. The need to develop a series of standard equipment sizes used in the composition of a combined-cycle power plant is considered. Examples of designing a steam turbine using well-elaborated and proven components together with new ones required according to the turbine operating conditions are given.

  17. Introducing the VRT gas turbine combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melconian, Jerry O.; Mostafa, Abdu A.; Nguyen, Hung Lee

    1990-07-01

    An innovative annular combustor configuration is being developed for aircraft and other gas turbine engines. This design has the potential of permitting higher turbine inlet temperatures by reducing the pattern factor and providing a major reduction in NO(x) emission. The design concept is based on a Variable Residence Time (VRT) technique which allows large fuel particles adequate time to completely burn in the circumferentially mixed primary zone. High durability of the combustor is achieved by dual function use of the incoming air. The feasibility of the concept was demonstrated by water analogue tests and 3-D computer modeling. The computer model predicted a 50 percent reduction in pattern factor when compared to a state of the art conventional combustor. The VRT combustor uses only half the number of fuel nozzles of the conventional configuration. The results of the chemical kinetics model require further investigation, as the NO(x) predictions did not correlate with the available experimental and analytical data base.

  18. Fiber sensor design for turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Kenneth W., Jr.; Beshears, David L.; Turley, W. Dale; Lewis, Wilfred, III; Noel, Bruce W.

    1991-12-01

    Determination of blade temperatures in the high-speed and turbulent environment of a turbine engine is difficult using standard pyrometry techniques because of the presence of high- temperature flame and the reflective nature of the inspection surfaces. A technique utilizing thermographic phosphor compounds bonded to engine vanes and turbine blades is presented that mitigates the negative effects of blackbody radiation while potentially allowing near real- time acquisition of blade temperature information. Specialized single and dual fiber-optic probes were designed to interrogate both fixed and rotating surfaces by delivering ultraviolet light from a quadrupled Nd:YAG (266 nm) laser to phosphor coatings consisting of Y2O3:Eu, YVO4, and YAG:Tb ceramic compounds. This technique utilizes the temperature- dependent fluorescent emission of a ceramic phosphor coating to discern the temperature of the interrogated surface. By using these methods, surface temperature measurements to 1200 degree(s)C are achievable in the combustion environment.

  19. Darrieus wind-turbine airfoil configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliore, P. G.; Fritschen, J. R.

    1982-06-01

    The purpose was to determine what aerodynamic performance improvement, if any, could be achieved by judiciously choosing the airfoil sections for Darrieus wind turbine blades. Ten different airfoils, having thickness to chord ratios of twelve, fifteen and eighteen percent, were investigated. Performance calculations indicated that the NACA 6-series airfoils yield peak power coefficients at least as great as the NACA. Furthermore, the power coefficient-tip speed ratio curves were broader and flatter for the 6-series airfoils. Sample calculations for an NACA 63 sub 2-015 airfoil showed an annual energy output increase of 17 to 27% depending upon rotor solidity, compared to an NACA 0015 airfoil. An attempt was made to account for the flow curvature effects associated with Darrieus turbines by transforming the NACA 63 sub 2-015 airfoil to an appropriate shape.

  20. Introducing the VRT gas turbine combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melconian, Jerry O.; Mostafa, Abdu A.; Nguyen, Hung Lee

    1990-01-01

    An innovative annular combustor configuration is being developed for aircraft and other gas turbine engines. This design has the potential of permitting higher turbine inlet temperatures by reducing the pattern factor and providing a major reduction in NO(x) emission. The design concept is based on a Variable Residence Time (VRT) technique which allows large fuel particles adequate time to completely burn in the circumferentially mixed primary zone. High durability of the combustor is achieved by dual function use of the incoming air. The feasibility of the concept was demonstrated by water analogue tests and 3-D computer modeling. The computer model predicted a 50 percent reduction in pattern factor when compared to a state of the art conventional combustor. The VRT combustor uses only half the number of fuel nozzles of the conventional configuration. The results of the chemical kinetics model require further investigation, as the NO(x) predictions did not correlate with the available experimental and analytical data base.

  1. DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2003-05-23

    In this reporting period, a milestone was achieved by commencement of testing and operation of the sub-scale hybrid direct fuel cell/turbine (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plant. The operation was initiated subsequent to the completion of the construction of the balance-of-plant (BOP) and implementation of process and control tests of the BOP for the subscale DFC/T hybrid system. The construction efforts consisted of finishing the power plant insulation and completion of the plant instrumentation including the wiring and tubing required for process measurement and control. The preparation work also included the development of procedures for facility shake down, conditioning and load testing of the fuel cell, integration of the microturbine, and fuel cell/gas turbine load tests. At conclusion of the construction, the process and control (PAC) tests of BOP, including the microturbine, were initiated.

  2. Operational-Condition-Independent Criteria Dedicated to Monitoring Wind Turbine Generators: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, W.; Sheng, S.; Court, R.

    2012-08-01

    To date the existing wind turbine condition monitoring technologies and commercially available systems have not been fully accepted for improving wind turbine availability and reducing their operation and maintenance costs. One of the main reasons is that wind turbines are subject to constantly varying loads and operate at variable rotational speeds. As a consequence, the influences of turbine faults and the effects of varying load and speed are coupled together in wind turbine condition monitoring signals. So, there is an urgent need to either introduce some operational condition de-coupling procedures into the current wind turbine condition monitoring techniques or develop a new operational condition independent wind turbine condition monitoring technique to maintain high turbine availability and achieve the expected economic benefits from wind. The purpose of this paper is to develop such a technique. In the paper, three operational condition independent criteria are developed dedicated for monitoring the operation and health condition of wind turbine generators. All proposed criteria have been tested through both simulated and practical experiments. The experiments have shown that these criteria provide a solution for detecting both mechanical and electrical faults occurring in wind turbine generators.

  3. Turbine blade tip gap reduction system

    DOEpatents

    Diakunchak, Ihor S.

    2012-09-11

    A turbine blade sealing system for reducing a gap between a tip of a turbine blade and a stationary shroud of a turbine engine. The sealing system includes a plurality of flexible seal strips extending from a pressure side of a turbine blade generally orthogonal to the turbine blade. During operation of the turbine engine, the flexible seal strips flex radially outward extending towards the stationary shroud of the turbine engine, thereby reducing the leakage of air past the turbine blades and increasing the efficiency of the turbine engine.

  4. High efficiency turbine blade coatings.

    SciTech Connect

    Youchison, Dennis L.; Gallis, Michail A.

    2014-06-01

    The development of advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) that exhibit lower thermal conductivity through better control of electron beam - physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processing is of prime interest to both the aerospace and power industries. This report summarizes the work performed under a two-year Lab-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project (38664) to produce lower thermal conductivity, graded-layer thermal barrier coatings for turbine blades in an effort to increase the efficiency of high temperature gas turbines. This project was sponsored by the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Investment Area. Therefore, particular importance was given to the processing of the large blades required for industrial gas turbines proposed for use in the Brayton cycle of nuclear plants powered by high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). During this modest (~1 full-time equivalent (FTE)) project, the processing technology was developed to create graded TBCs by coupling ion beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) with substrate pivoting in the alumina-YSZ system. The Electron Beam - 1200 kW (EB-1200) PVD system was used to deposit a variety of TBC coatings with micron layered microstructures and reduced thermal conductivity below 1.5 W/m.K. The use of IBAD produced fully stoichiometric coatings at a reduced substrate temperature of 600 oC and a reduced oxygen background pressure of 0.1 Pa. IBAD was also used to successfully demonstrate the transitioning of amorphous PVD-deposited alumina to the -phase alumina required as an oxygen diffusion barrier and for good adhesion to the substrate Ni2Al3 bondcoat. This process replaces the time consuming thermally grown oxide formation required before the YSZ deposition. In addition to the process technology, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo plume modeling and spectroscopic characterization of the PVD plumes were performed. The project consisted of five tasks. These included the production of layered

  5. NEXT GENERATION TURBINE SYSTEM STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Macri

    2002-02-28

    Rolls-Royce has completed a preliminary design and marketing study under a Department of Energy (DOE) cost shared contract (DE-AC26-00NT40852) to analyze the feasibility of developing a clean, high efficiency, and flexible Next Generation Turbine (NGT) system to meet the power generation market needs of the year 2007 and beyond. Rolls-Royce evaluated the full range of its most advanced commercial aerospace and aeroderivative engines alongside the special technologies necessary to achieve the aggressive efficiency, performance, emissions, economic, and flexibility targets desired by the DOE. Heavy emphasis was placed on evaluating the technical risks and the economic viability of various concept and technology options available. This was necessary to ensure the resulting advanced NGT system would provide extensive public benefits and significant customer benefits without introducing unacceptable levels of technical and operational risk that would impair the market acceptance of the resulting product. Two advanced cycle configurations were identified as offering significant advantages over current combined cycle products available in the market. In addition, balance of plant (BOP) technologies, as well as capabilities to improve the reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) of industrial gas turbine engines, have been identified. A customer focused survey and economic analysis of a proposed Rolls-Royce NGT product configuration was also accomplished as a part of this research study. The proposed Rolls-Royce NGT solution could offer customers clean, flexible power generation systems with very high efficiencies, similar to combined cycle plants, but at a much lower specific cost, similar to those of simple cycle plants.

  6. New technology in turbine aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.; Moffitt, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    A cursory review is presented of some of the recent work that has been done in turbine aerodynamic research at NASA-Lewis Research Center. Topics discussed include the aerodynamic effect of turbine coolant, high work-factor (ratio of stage work to square of blade speed) turbines, and computer methods for turbine design and performance prediction. An extensive bibliography is included. Experimental cooled-turbine aerodynamics programs using two-dimensional cascades, full annular cascades, and cold rotating turbine stage tests are discussed with some typical results presented. Analytically predicted results for cooled blade performance are compared to experimental results. The problems and some of the current programs associated with the use of very high work factors for fan-drive turbines of high-bypass-ratio engines are discussed. Turbines currently being investigated make use of advanced blading concepts designed to maintain high efficiency under conditions of high aerodynamic loading. Computer programs have been developed for turbine design-point performance, off-design performance, supersonic blade profile design, and the calculation of channel velocities for subsonic and transonic flow fields. The use of these programs for the design and analysis of axial and radial turbines is discussed.

  7. Turbine repair process, repaired coating, and repaired turbine component

    DOEpatents

    Das, Rupak; Delvaux, John McConnell; Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2015-11-03

    A turbine repair process, a repaired coating, and a repaired turbine component are disclosed. The turbine repair process includes providing a turbine component having a higher-pressure region and a lower-pressure region, introducing particles into the higher-pressure region, and at least partially repairing an opening between the higher-pressure region and the lower-pressure region with at least one of the particles to form a repaired turbine component. The repaired coating includes a silicon material, a ceramic matrix composite material, and a repaired region having the silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material. The repaired turbine component a ceramic matrix composite layer and a repaired region having silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material.

  8. Turbine Aeration Design Software for Mitigating Adverse Environmental Impacts Resulting From Conventional Hydropower Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Gulliver, John S.

    2015-03-01

    Conventional hydropower turbine aeration test-bed for computational routines and software tools for improving environmental mitigation technologies for conventional hydropower systems. In achieving this goal, we have partnered with Alstom, a global leader in energy technology development and United States power generation, with additional funding from the Initiative for Renewable Energy and the Environment (IREE) and the College of Science and Engineering (CSE) at the UMN

  9. An operating 200 kW horizontal axis wind turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunnicutt, C. L.; Linscott, B.; Wolf, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    Output from the 200-kilowatt machine will be enough to meet the power requirements of about 60 families. The experimental wind turbine generator (WTG) is a two-bladed, horizontal-axis, rotor system driving a synchronous electric generator through a step-up gear box located within a nacelle. The nacelle is mounted on top of a 100-foot tower with the rotor located downwind from the tower. The 200-kilowatt rated power output of the wind turbine is achieved at a turbine rotor speed of 40 rpm and a rated wind speed of 18.3 mph. The rated wind speed is defined as the lowest wind speed at which full power is achieved. Attention is given to operational details, aspects of blade design, blade fabrication, the use of strain gages, questions of aeroelastic stability, and an early analysis of test data.

  10. Variable speed, condensing steam turbine and power system

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, D.A.

    1980-09-30

    The variable speed condensing steam turbine is a simplified and effective steam expander which is built mainly of simple, lowcost sheet metal parts and is designed to provide a variable speed/torque output range. The turbine concept is based on the past tesla turbine principle of equally spaced rotor discs to provide a long helical path for steam expansion with high operating efficiency and minimum friction. Unlike the cylindrical tesla turbine this unit is in conical form with uniformly varying diameter discs used to provide a variable speed/torque power output range. A further purpose of having a uniform conical housing and uniformly increasing diameter discs is to achieve maximum steam expansion which will lead to rapid steam condensation, or a precondensation condition for the expended steam passing through the conical turbine. A fuel conservation feature of the condensing turbine is a provision for separating hydrogen gas from a portion of the expanded/expended steam which will be conducted to the external fuel burner of the vapor generator, as part of the complete power system.

  11. Aircraft Turbine Engine Control Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    This lecture will provide an overview of the aircraft turbine engine control research at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Glenn Research Center (GRC). A brief introduction to the engine control problem is first provided with a description of the current state-of-the-art control law structure. A historical aspect of engine control development since the 1940s is then provided with a special emphasis on the contributions of GRC. The traditional engine control problem has been to provide a means to safely transition the engine from one steady-state operating point to another based on the pilot throttle inputs. With the increased emphasis on aircraft safety, enhanced performance and affordability, and the need to reduce the environmental impact of aircraft, there are many new challenges being faced by the designers of aircraft propulsion systems. The Controls and Dynamics Branch (CDB) at GRC is leading and participating in various projects in partnership with other organizations within GRC and across NASA, other government agencies, the U.S. aerospace industry, and academia to develop advanced propulsion controls and diagnostics technologies that will help meet the challenging goals of NASA programs under the Aeronautics Research Mission. The second part of the lecture provides an overview of the various CDB technology development activities in aircraft engine control and diagnostics, both current and some accomplished in the recent past. The motivation for each of the research efforts, the research approach, technical challenges and the key progress to date are summarized. The technologies to be discussed include system level engine control concepts, gas path diagnostics, active component control, and distributed engine control architecture. The lecture will end with a futuristic perspective of how the various current technology developments will lead to an Intelligent and Autonomous Propulsion System requiring none to very minimum pilot interface

  12. Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, John

    2015-09-30

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratories, Siemens has completed the Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development Program to develop an advanced gas turbine for incorporation into future coal-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants. All the scheduled DOE Milestones were completed and significant technical progress was made in the development of new technologies and concepts. Advanced computer simulations and modeling, as well as subscale, full scale laboratory, rig and engine testing were utilized to evaluate and select concepts for further development. Program Requirements of: A 3 to 5 percentage point improvement in overall plant combined cycle efficiency when compared to the reference baseline plant; 20 to 30 percent reduction in overall plant capital cost when compared to the reference baseline plant; and NOx emissions of 2 PPM out of the stack. were all met. The program was completed on schedule and within the allotted budget

  13. Turbine Chemistry Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Nan-Suey; Wey, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    Many of the engine exhaust species resulting in significant environmental impact exist in trace amounts. Recent research, e.g., conducted at MIT-AM, has pointed to the intra-engine environment as a possible site for important trace chemistry activity. In addition, the key processes affecting the trace species activity occurring downstream in the air passages of the turbine and exhaust nozzle are not well understood. Most recently, an effort has been initiated at NASA Glenn Research Center under the UEET Program to evaluate and further develop CFD-based technology for modeling and simulation of intra-engine trace chemical changes relevant to atmospheric effects of pollutant emissions from aircraft engines. This presentation will describe the current effort conducted at Glenn; some preliminary results relevant to the trace species chemistry in a turbine passage will also be presented to indicate the progress to date.

  14. Airborne Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Makani Power is developing an Airborne Wind Turbine (AWT) that eliminates 90% of the mass of a conventional wind turbine and accesses a stronger, more consistent wind at altitudes of near 1,000 feet. At these altitudes, 85% of the country can offer viable wind resources compared to only 15% accessible with current technology. Additionally, the Makani Power wing can be economically deployed in deep offshore waters, opening up a resource which is 4 times greater than the entire U.S. electrical generation capacity. Makani Power has demonstrated the core technology, including autonomous launch, land, and power generation with an 8 meter wingspan, 20 kW prototype. At commercial scale, Makani Power aims to develop a 600 kW, 28 meter wingspan product capable of delivering energy at an unsubsidized cost competitive with coal, the current benchmark for low-cost power.

  15. Advanced turbine study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of an advanced convective cooling concept applied to rocket turbine airfoils which operate in a high pressure hydrogen and methane environment was investigated. The concept consists of a central structural member in which grooves are machined. The grooves are temporarily filled with a removable filler and the entire airfoil is covered with a layer of electroformed nickel, or nickel base alloy. After removal of the filler, the low thermal resistance of the nickel closure causes the wall temperature to be reduced by heat transfer to the coolant. The program is divided in the following tasks: (1) turbine performance appraisal; (2) coolant geometry evaluation; (3) test hardware design and analysis; and (4) test airfoil fabrication.

  16. Turbine seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Little, David A.

    2013-04-16

    A seal assembly that limits gas leakage from a hot gas path to one or more disc cavities in a turbine engine. The seal assembly includes a seal apparatus that limits gas leakage from the hot gas path to a respective one of the disc cavities. The seal apparatus comprises a plurality of blade members rotatable with a blade structure. The blade members are associated with the blade structure and extend toward adjacent stationary components. Each blade member includes a leading edge and a trailing edge, the leading edge of each blade member being located circumferentially in front of the blade member's corresponding trailing edge in a direction of rotation of the turbine rotor. The blade members are arranged such that a space having a component in a circumferential direction is defined between adjacent circumferentially spaced blade members.

  17. Gas turbine sealing apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, John Joseph; Wessell, Brian J.; Liang, George

    2013-03-05

    A sealing apparatus in a gas turbine. The sealing apparatus includes a seal housing apparatus coupled to a disc/rotor assembly so as to be rotatable therewith during operation of the gas turbine. The seal housing apparatus comprises a base member, a first leg portion, a second leg portion, and spanning structure. The base member extends generally axially between forward and aft rows of rotatable blades and is positioned adjacent to a row of stationary vanes. The first leg portion extends radially inwardly from the base member and is coupled to the disc/rotor assembly. The second leg portion is axially spaced from the first leg portion, extends radially inwardly from the base member, and is coupled to the disc/rotor assembly. The spanning structure extends between and is rigidly coupled to each of the base member, the first leg portion, and the second leg portion.

  18. Wind turbine acoustic standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, D. G.; Shepherd, K. P.; Grosveld, F.

    1981-01-01

    A program is being conducted to develop noise standards for wind turbines which minimize annoyance and which can be used to design specifications. The approach consists of presenting wind turbine noise stimuli to test subjects in a laboratory listening chamber. The responses of the subjects are recorded for a range of stimuli which encompass the designs, operating conditions, and ambient noise levels of current and future installations. Results to date have established the threshold of detectability for a range of impulsive stimuli of the type associated with blade/tower wake interactions. The status of the ongoing psychoacoustic tests, the subjective data, and the approach to the development of acoustic criteria/standards are described.

  19. Multiple piece turbine airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Kimmel, Keith D

    2010-11-09

    A turbine airfoil, such as a rotor blade or a stator vane, for a gas turbine engine, the airfoil formed as a shell and spar construction with a plurality of hook shaped struts each mounted within channels extending in a spanwise direction of the spar and the shell to allow for relative motion between the spar and shell in the airfoil chordwise direction while also fanning a seal between adjacent cooling channels. The struts provide the seal as well as prevent bulging of the shell from the spar due to the cooling air pressure. The hook struts have a hooked shaped end and a rounded shaped end in order to insert the struts into the spar.

  20. Turbine vane plate assembly

    DOEpatents

    Schiavo Jr., Anthony L.

    2006-01-10

    A turbine vane assembly includes a turbine vane having first and second shrouds with an elongated airfoil extending between. Each end of the airfoil transitions into a shroud at a respective junction. Each of the shrouds has a plurality of cooling passages, and the airfoil has a plurality of cooling passages extending between the first and second shrouds. A substantially flat inner plate and an outer plate are coupled to each of the first and second shrouds so as to form inner and outer plenums. Each inner plenum is defined between at least the junction and the substantially flat inner plate; each outer plenum is defined between at least the substantially flat inner plate and the outer plate. Each inner plenum is in fluid communication with a respective outer plenum through at least one of the cooling passages in the respective shroud.

  1. Snubber assembly for turbine blades

    DOEpatents

    Marra, John J

    2013-09-03

    A snubber associated with a rotatable turbine blade in a turbine engine, the turbine blade including a pressure sidewall and a suction sidewall opposed from the pressure wall. The snubber assembly includes a first snubber structure associated with the pressure sidewall of the turbine blade, a second snubber structure associated with the suction sidewall of the turbine blade, and a support structure. The support structure extends through the blade and is rigidly coupled at a first end portion thereof to the first snubber structure and at a second end portion thereof to the second snubber structure. Centrifugal loads exerted by the first and second snubber structures caused by rotation thereof during operation of the engine are at least partially transferred to the support structure, such that centrifugal loads exerted on the pressure and suctions sidewalls of the turbine blade by the first and second snubber structures are reduced.

  2. Transition in Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The concept of a large disturbance bypass mechanism for the initiation of transition is reviewed and studied. This mechanism, or some manifestation thereof, is suspected to be at work in the boundary layers present in a turbine flow passage. Discussion is presented on four relevant subtopics: (1) the effect of upstream disturbances and wakes on transition; (2) transition prediction models, code development, and verification; (3) transition and turbulence measurement techniques; and (4) the hydrodynamic condition of low Reynolds number boundary layers.

  3. Superconducting wind turbine generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamsen, A. B.; Mijatovic, N.; Seiler, E.; Zirngibl, T.; Træholt, C.; Nørgård, P. B.; Pedersen, N. F.; Andersen, N. H.; Østergård, J.

    2010-03-01

    We have examined the potential of 10 MW superconducting direct drive generators to enter the European offshore wind power market and estimated that the production of about 1200 superconducting turbines until 2030 would correspond to 10% of the EU offshore market. The expected properties of future offshore turbines of 8 and 10 MW have been determined from an up-scaling of an existing 5 MW turbine and the necessary properties of the superconducting drive train are discussed. We have found that the absence of the gear box is the main benefit and the reduced weight and size is secondary. However, the main challenge of the superconducting direct drive technology is to prove that the reliability is superior to the alternative drive trains based on gearboxes or permanent magnets. A strategy of successive testing of superconducting direct drive trains in real wind turbines of 10 kW, 100 kW, 1 MW and 10 MW is suggested to secure the accumulation of reliability experience. Finally, the quantities of high temperature superconducting tape needed for a 10 kW and an extreme high field 10 MW generator are found to be 7.5 km and 1500 km, respectively. A more realistic estimate is 200-300 km of tape per 10 MW generator and it is concluded that the present production capacity of coated conductors must be increased by a factor of 36 by 2020, resulting in a ten times lower price of the tape in order to reach a realistic price level for the superconducting drive train.

  4. The small turbine revolution

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.L.

    1995-07-01

    Until the mid-1960s, improvements in technology and economies of scale made each new generating unit installed less expensive than the previous one. Later, bigger was still better. Larger units cost less per kilowatt than smaller units. Today, that may be changing. In some situations, distributed generation -the use of small, dispersed units (usually gas turbines) in the place of large central stations- can be the most attractive option.

  5. Gas turbine premixing systems

    DOEpatents

    Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Varatharajan, Balachandar; Evulet, Andrei Tristan; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

    2013-12-31

    Methods and systems are provided for premixing combustion fuel and air within gas turbines. In one embodiment, a combustor includes an upstream mixing panel configured to direct compressed air and combustion fuel through premixing zone to form a fuel-air mixture. The combustor includes a downstream mixing panel configured to mix additional combustion fuel with the fule-air mixture to form a combustion mixture.

  6. Wind turbine generator system

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschbaum, H.S.

    1982-11-02

    Wind turbine generator systems incorporating a multi-speed pole amplitude modulated type dynamo electric machine allow efficient operation at consecutive speeds in a ratio preferably less than 2:1. A current limiting reactor, preferably including an inductance coil, and an over-running clutch, are utilized in conjunction with any multi-speed generation system to alleviate impact on a utility grid during switching among operational speeds.

  7. Airfoils for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Tangler, James L.; Somers, Dan M.

    1996-01-01

    Airfoils for the blade of a wind turbine wherein each airfoil is characterized by a thickness in a range from 16%-24% and a maximum lift coefficient designed to be largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoils include a family of airfoils for a blade 15 to 25 meters in length, a family of airfoils for a blade 1 to 5 meters in length, and a family of airfoils for a blade 5 to 10 meters in length.

  8. Airfoils for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Tangler, J.L.; Somers, D.M.

    1996-10-08

    Airfoils are disclosed for the blade of a wind turbine wherein each airfoil is characterized by a thickness in a range from 16%-24% and a maximum lift coefficient designed to be largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoils include a family of airfoils for a blade 15 to 25 meters in length, a family of airfoils for a blade 1 to 5 meters in length, and a family of airfoils for a blade 5 to 10 meters in length. 10 figs.

  9. Numerical investigation of flow motion and performance of a horizontal axis tidal turbine subjected to a steady current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin-juan; Zheng, Jin-hai; Peng, Yu-xuan; Zhang, Ji-sheng; Wu, Xiu-guang

    2015-04-01

    Horizontal axis tidal turbines have attracted more and more attentions nowadays, because of their convenience and low expense in construction and high efficiency in extracting tidal energy. The present study numerically investigates the flow motion and performance of a horizontal axis tidal turbine with a supporting vertical cylinder under steady current. In the numerical model, the continuous equation and incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved, and the volume of fluid method is employed to track free surface motion. The RNG k- ɛ model is adopted to calculate turbulence transport while the fractional area/volume obstacle representation method is used to describe turbine characteristics and movement. The effects of installation elevation of tidal turbine and inlet velocity on the water elevation, and current velocity, rotating speed and resultant force on turbine are discussed. Based on the comparison of the numerical results, a better understanding of flow structure around horizontal axis tidal turbine and turbine performance is achieved.

  10. Development of environmentally advanced hydropower turbine system design concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, G.F.; Webb, D.R.; Fisher, R.K. Jr.

    1997-08-01

    A team worked together on the development of environmentally advanced hydro turbine design concepts to reduce hydropower`s impact on the environment, and to improve the understanding of the technical and environmental issues involved, in particular, with fish survival as a result of their passage through hydro power sites. This approach brought together a turbine design and manufacturing company, biologists, a utility, a consulting engineering firm and a university research facility, in order to benefit from the synergy of diverse disciplines. Through a combination of advanced technology and engineering analyses, innovative design concepts adaptable to both new and existing hydro facilities were developed and are presented. The project was divided into 4 tasks. Task 1 investigated a broad range of environmental issues and how the issues differed throughout the country. Task 2 addressed fish physiology and turbine physics. Task 3 investigated individual design elements needed for the refinement of the three concept families defined in Task 1. Advanced numerical tools for flow simulation in turbines are used to quantify characteristics of flow and pressure fields within turbine water passageways. The issues associated with dissolved oxygen enhancement using turbine aeration are presented. The state of the art and recent advancements of this technology are reviewed. Key elements for applying turbine aeration to improve aquatic habitat are discussed and a review of the procedures for testing of aerating turbines is presented. In Task 4, the results of the Tasks were assembled into three families of design concepts to address the most significant issues defined in Task 1. The results of the work conclude that significant improvements in fish passage survival are achievable.

  11. Intercooler flow path for gas turbines: CFD design and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, A.K.; Gollahalli, S.R.; Carter, F.L.

    1995-10-01

    The Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program was created by the U.S. Department of Energy to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, and cost competitive gas turbine systems for generating electricity. Intercooling or cooling of air between compressor stages is a feature under consideration in advanced cycles for the ATS. Intercooling entails cooling of air between the low pressure (LP) and high pressure (BP) compressor sections of the gas turbine. Lower air temperature entering the HP compressor decreases the air volume flow rate and hence, the compression work. Intercooling also lowers temperature at the HP discharge, thus allowing for more effective use of cooling air in the hot gas flow path. The thermodynamic analyses of gas turbine cycles with modifications such as intercooling, recuperating, and reheating have shown that intercooling is important to achieving high efficiency gas turbines. The gas turbine industry has considerable interest in adopting intercooling to advanced gas turbines of different capacities. This observation is reinforced by the US Navys Intercooled-Recuperative (ICR) gas turbine development program to power the surface ships. In an intercooler system, the air exiting the LP compressor must be decelerated to provide the necessary residence time in the heat exchanger. The cooler air must subsequently be accelerated towards the inlet of the HP compressor. The circumferential flow nonuniformities inevitably introduced by the heat exchanger, if not isolated, could lead to rotating stall in the compressors, and reduce the overall system performance and efficiency. Also, the pressure losses in the intercooler flow path adversely affect the system efficiency and hence, must be minimized. Thus, implementing intercooling requires fluid dynamically efficient flow path with minimum flow nonuniformities and consequent pressure losses.

  12. Catalytic Combustion for Ultra-Low NOx Hydrogen Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Etemad, Shahrokh; Baird, Benjamin; Alavandi, Sandeep

    2011-06-30

    Precision Combustion, Inc., (PCI) in close collaboration with Solar Turbines, Incorporated, has developed and demonstrated a combustion system for hydrogen fueled turbines that reduces NOx to low single digit level while maintaining or improving current levels of efficiency and eliminating emissions of carbon dioxide. Full scale Rich Catalytic Hydrogen (RCH1) injector was developed and successfully tested at Solar Turbines, Incorporated high pressure test facility demonstrating low single digit NOx emissions for hydrogen fuel in the range of 2200F-2750F. This development work was based on initial subscale development for faster turnaround and reduced cost. Subscale testing provided promising results for 42% and 52% H2 with NOx emissions of less than 2 ppm with improved flame stability. In addition, catalytic reactor element testing for substrate oxidation, thermal cyclic injector testing to simulate start-stop operation in a gas turbine environment, and steady state 15 atm. operation testing were performed successfully. The testing demonstrated stable and robust catalytic element component life for gas turbine conditions. The benefit of the catalytic hydrogen combustor technology includes capability of delivering near-zero NOx without costly post-combustion controls and without requirement for added sulfur control. In addition, reduced acoustics increase gas turbine component life. These advantages advances Department of Energy (DOE’s) objectives for achievement of low single digit NOx emissions, improvement in efficiency vs. postcombustion controls, fuel flexibility, a significant net reduction in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) system net capital and operating costs, and a route to commercialization across the power generation field from micro turbines to industrial and utility turbines.

  13. Tornado type wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Ch.-T.

    1984-06-05

    A tornado type wind turbine has a vertically disposed wind collecting tower with spaced apart inner and outer walls and a central bore. The upper end of the tower is open while the lower end of the structure is in communication with a wind intake chamber. An opening in the wind chamber is positioned over a turbine which is in driving communication with an electrical generator. An opening between the inner and outer walls at the lower end of the tower permits radially flowing air to enter the space between the inner and outer walls while a vertically disposed opening in the wind collecting tower permits tangentially flowing air to enter the central bore. A porous portion of the inner wall permits the radially flowing air to interact with the tangentially flowing air so as to create an intensified vortex flow which exits out of the top opening of the tower so as to create a low pressure core and thus draw air through the opening of the wind intake chamber so as to drive the turbine.

  14. Tornado type wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Cheng-Ting

    1984-01-01

    A tornado type wind turbine has a vertically disposed wind collecting tower with spaced apart inner and outer walls and a central bore. The upper end of the tower is open while the lower end of the structure is in communication with a wind intake chamber. An opening in the wind chamber is positioned over a turbine which is in driving communication with an electrical generator. An opening between the inner and outer walls at the lower end of the tower permits radially flowing air to enter the space between the inner and outer walls while a vertically disposed opening in the wind collecting tower permits tangentially flowing air to enter the central bore. A porous portion of the inner wall permits the radially flowing air to interact with the tangentially flowing air so as to create an intensified vortex flow which exits out of the top opening of the tower so as to create a low pressure core and thus draw air through the opening of the wind intake chamber so as to drive the turbine.

  15. Power turbine ventilation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakeman, Thomas G. (Inventor); Brown, Richard W. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Air control mechanism within a power turbine section of a gas turbine engine. The power turbine section includes a rotor and at least one variable pitch propulsor blade. The propulsor blade is coupled to and extends radially outwardly of the rotor. A first annular fairing is rotatable with the propulsor blade and interposed between the propulsor blade and the rotor. A second fairing is located longitudinally adjacent to the first fairing. The first fairing and the second fairing are differentially rotatable. The air control mechanism includes a platform fixedly coupled to a radially inner end of the propulsor blade. The platform is generally positioned in a first opening and a first fairing. The platform and the first fairing define an outer space. In a first position corresponding with a first propulsor blade pitch, the platform is substantially conformal with the first fairing. In a second position corresponding with the second propulsor blade pitch, an edge portion of the platform is displaced radially outwardly from the first fairing. When the blades are in the second position and rotating about the engine axis, the displacement of the edge portion with respect to the first fairing allows air to flow from the outer space to the annular cavity.

  16. Smoother Turbine Blades Resist Thermal Shock Better

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czerniak, Paul; Longenecker, Kent; Paulus, Don; Ullman, Zane

    1991-01-01

    Surface treatment increases resistance of turbine blades to low-cycle fatigue. Smoothing removes small flaws where cracks start. Intended for blades in turbines subject to thermal shock of rapid starting. No recrystallization occurs at rocket-turbine operating temperatures.

  17. Experimental and Analytical Investigation of Low - Axial Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irdmusa, Jamshid Zakizadeh

    This study redesigned the blade leading edges of a small low-solidity axial turbine to obtain operational flexibility. Further flexibility was gained by using a low-solidity cascade, which allowed the leading edges to have a higher radius of curvature. The cascade also allowed larger flow deflections, which resulted in higher utilization factors. Because of the smaller frictional surfaces associated with the low-solidity cascade, the losses were minimized and higher performance achieved. Two small low-solidity axial turbines, one with a high profile ratio and the other with a low profile ratio, were tested. Their performances were evaluated by the temperature drop across them and also by measuring their power output in a specially design test rig. The velocity fields at the exit of both turbines were mapped out by a one-component Laser Doppler Velocimeter. The internal flow in the nozzles was visualized by water flow simulation with dye injection. The internal fluid dynamics were stimulated by computer. The inviscid flow computer programs MERIDL and TSONIC from NASA were used to predict the flow field in both turbines. The location of stagnation points at the leading edge, streamline patterns, pressure distributions, and loading coefficients were determined. The Hele-Shaw apparatus was used to verify the computer program predictions. Observed streamline patterns were found to agree with predicted ones. Findings showed that the turbine with conventional leading edges (low profile ratio) was very susceptible to changes in the operating condition, while the turbine with newly designed blades (high profile ratio) had very high operational flexibility, complemented by high performance for a wide range of speeds. Findings also showed that high performance can be achieved with low-solidity cascades without being penalized for the losses due to flow separation. Inviscid computer codes MERIDL and TSONIC were effective in investigating the internal aerodynamics of the

  18. Regenerative superheated steam turbine cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, L. C.; Stovall, T. K.

    1980-01-01

    PRESTO computer program was developed to analyze performance of wide range of steam turbine cycles with special attention given to regenerative superheated steam turbine cycles. It can be used to model standard turbine cycles, including such features as process steam extraction, induction and feedwater heating by external sources, peaking, and high back pressure. Expansion line efficiencies, exhaust loss, leakages, mechanical losses, and generator losses are used to calculate cycle heat rate and generator output. Program provides power engineer with flexible aid for design and analysis of steam turbine systems.

  19. PRESSURIZED SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL/GAS TURBINE POWER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    W.L. Lundberg; G.A. Israelson; R.R. Moritz; S.E. Veyo; R.A. Holmes; P.R. Zafred; J.E. King; R.E. Kothmann

    2000-02-01

    Power systems based on the simplest direct integration of a pressurized solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) generator and a gas turbine (GT) are capable of converting natural gas fuel energy to electric power with efficiencies of approximately 60% (net AC/LHV), and more complex SOFC and gas turbine arrangements can be devised for achieving even higher efficiencies. The results of a project are discussed that focused on the development of a conceptual design for a pressurized SOFC/GT power system that was intended to generate 20 MWe with at least 70% efficiency. The power system operates baseloaded in a distributed-generation application. To achieve high efficiency, the system integrates an intercooled, recuperated, reheated gas turbine with two SOFC generator stages--one operating at high pressure, and generating power, as well as providing all heat needed by the high-pressure turbine, while the second SOFC generator operates at a lower pressure, generates power, and provides all heat for the low-pressure reheat turbine. The system cycle is described, major system components are sized, the system installed-cost is estimated, and the physical arrangement of system components is discussed. Estimates of system power output, efficiency, and emissions at the design point are also presented, and the system cost of electricity estimate is developed.

  20. Composite wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Cheng-Huat

    Researchers in wind energy industry are constantly moving forward to develop higher efficiency wind turbine. One major component for wind turbine design is to have cost effective wind turbine blades. In addition to correct aerodynamic shape and blade geometry, blade performance can be enhanced further through aero-elastic tailoring design and material selections. An analytical tool for blade design has been improved and validated. This analytical tool is utilized to resolve issues related to elastic tailoring design. The investigation looks into two major issues related to the design and fabrication of a bend-twist-coupled blade. Various design parameters for a blade such as materials, laminate lay-up, skin thickness, ply orientation, internal spar, etc. have been examined for designing a bend-twist-coupled blade. The parametric study indicates that the critical design parameters are the ply material, the ply orientation, and the volume fraction ratio between the anisotropic layers and orthotropic layers. To produce a blade having the bend-twist coupling characteristics, the fiber lay-ups at the top and bottom skins of the blade must have a "mirror" lay-up in relation to the middle plane of the blade. Such lay-up causes fiber discontinuation at the seam. The joint design at the seam is one major consideration in fabricating a truly anisotropic blade. A new joint design was proposed and tensile failure tests were carried out for both the old and new joint designs. The tests investigated the effects of different types of joint designs, the laminate lay-up at the joints, and the stacking sequence of the joint retention strength. A major component of a wind turbine blade, D-spar, was designed to maximum coupling. Two D-spars were then fabricated using the new joint design; one of them was subjected to both static and modal testings. Traditionally, wind turbine blades are made of low cost glass material; however, carbon fibers are proposed as alternative material. Our

  1. Modern control design for flexible wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Alan Duane

    Control can improve energy capture and reduce dynamic loads in wind turbines. In the 1970s and 1980s wind turbines used classical control designs to regulate power and speed. The methods used, however, were not always successful. These systems often had bandwidths large enough to destabilize low-damped flexible modes leading to high dynamic load fatigue failures. Modern turbines are larger, mounted on taller towers, and are more dynamically active than their predecessors. Control systems to regulate turbine power and maintain stable closed-loop behavior in the presence of turbulent wind inflow will be critical for these designs. New advanced control approaches and paradigms must account for low-damped flexible modes in order to reduce structural dynamic loading and achieve the 20--25 year operational life required of today's machines. This thesis applies modern state-space control design methods to a two-bladed teetering hub upwind machine located at the National Wind Technology Center. The design objective is to regulate turbine speed and enhance damping in several low-damped flexible modes of the turbine. Starting with simple control algorithms based on linear models, complexity is added incrementally until the desired performance is firmly established. The controls approach is based on the Disturbance Accommodating Control (DAC) method and provides accountability for wind-speed fluctuations. First, controls are designed using the single control input rotor collective pitch to stabilize the 1st drive-train torsion as well as the tower 1st fore-aft bending modes. Generator torque is then incorporated as an additional control input. This reduces some of the demand placed on the rotor collective pitch control system and enhances 1st drive train torsion mode damping. Individual blade pitch control is then used to attenuate wind disturbances having spatial variation over the rotor and effectively reduces blade flap deflections due to wind shear. Finally, results from

  2. Darrieus wind-turbine airfoil configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Migliore, P.G.; Fritschen, J.R.

    1982-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine what aerodynamic performance improvement, if any, could be achieved by judiciously choosing the airfoil sections for Darrieus wind turbine blades. Analysis was limited to machines using two blades of infinite aspect ratio, having rotor solidites from seven to twenty-one percent, and operating at maximum Reynolds numbers of approximately three million. Ten different airfoils, having thickness to chord ratios of twelve, fifteen and eighteen percent, were investigated. Performance calculations indicated that the NACA 6-series airfoils yield peak power coefficients at least as great as the NACA four-digit airfoils which have historically been chosen for Darrieus turbines. Furthermore, the power coefficient-tip speed ratio curves were broader and flatter for the 6-series airfoils. Sample calculations for an NACA 63/sub 2/-015 airfoil showed an annual energy output increase of 17 to 27% depending upon rotor solidity, compared to an NACA 0015 airfoil. An attempt was made to account for the flow curvature effects associated with Darrieus turbines by transforming the NACA 63/sub 2/-015 airfoil to an appropriate shape.

  3. [Injury to fish by turbine plants].

    PubMed

    Bernoth, E M

    1990-04-01

    In the Federal Republic of Germany, 7% of the electric power is generated by Hydro-electric plants. A water current is used to drive a turbine, to generate electricity. Fish are passively drawn into the turbines by the water flow, or they migrate actively downstream (eels). Fish then may be injured or even killed. The national Countries' Fishery Acts are not sufficient to compel the prevention of fish gaining access to the turbines. To compensate for losses to the fishery, the owners of Hydro power plants can re-stock their water supplies. Superior to the Fishery Acts of the various Countries is the Federal Animal Protection Law. According to its principle, it is not allowed to cause pain, suffering or damage to an animal without a reasonable cause. It cannot be the intention of either the Fishery Acts or the Animal Protection Law to compensate losses in the fish population by re-stocking. On the contrary, the damage has to be prevented in advance. A suitable means to achieve this is the combination of electrified barriers with a bypass for fish. PMID:2351051

  4. Built-Environment Wind Turbine Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.; Forsyth, T.; Sinclair, K.; Oteri, F.

    2012-11-01

    Although only a small contributor to total electricity production needs, built-environment wind turbines (BWTs) nonetheless have the potential to influence the public's consideration of renewable energy, and wind energy in particular. Higher population concentrations in urban environments offer greater opportunities for project visibility and an opportunity to acquaint large numbers of people to the advantages of wind projects on a larger scale. However, turbine failures will be equally visible and could have a negative effect on public perception of wind technology. This roadmap provides a framework for achieving the vision set forth by the attendees of the Built-Environment Wind Turbine Workshop on August 11 - 12, 2010, at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The BWT roadmap outlines the stakeholder actions that could be taken to overcome the barriers identified. The actions are categorized as near-term (0 - 3 years), medium-term (4 - 7 years), and both near- and medium-term (requiring immediate to medium-term effort). To accomplish these actions, a strategic approach was developed that identifies two focus areas: understanding the built-environment wind resource and developing testing and design standards. The authors summarize the expertise and resources required in these areas.

  5. Structural Dynamic Behavior of Wind Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thresher, Robert W.; Mirandy, Louis P.; Carne, Thomas G.; Lobitz, Donald W.; James, George H. III

    2009-01-01

    The structural dynamicist s areas of responsibility require interaction with most other members of the wind turbine project team. These responsibilities are to predict structural loads and deflections that will occur over the lifetime of the machine, ensure favorable dynamic responses through appropriate design and operational procedures, evaluate potential design improvements for their impact on dynamic loads and stability, and correlate load and control test data with design predictions. Load prediction has been a major concern in wind turbine designs to date, and it is perhaps the single most important task faced by the structural dynamics engineer. However, even if we were able to predict all loads perfectly, this in itself would not lead to an economic system. Reduction of dynamic loads, not merely a "design to loads" policy, is required to achieve a cost-effective design. The two processes of load prediction and structural design are highly interactive: loads and deflections must be known before designers and stress analysts can perform structural sizing, which in turn influences the loads through changes in stiffness and mass. Structural design identifies "hot spots" (local areas of high stress) that would benefit most from dynamic load alleviation. Convergence of this cycle leads to a turbine structure that is neither under-designed (which may result in structural failure), nor over-designed (which will lead to excessive weight and cost).

  6. Physical and Numerical Model Studies of Cross-flow Turbines Towards Accurate Parameterization in Array Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosnik, M.; Bachant, P.

    2014-12-01

    Cross-flow turbines, often referred to as vertical-axis turbines, show potential for success in marine hydrokinetic (MHK) and wind energy applications, ranging from small- to utility-scale installations in tidal/ocean currents and offshore wind. As turbine designs mature, the research focus is shifting from individual devices to the optimization of turbine arrays. It would be expensive and time-consuming to conduct physical model studies of large arrays at large model scales (to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers), and hence numerical techniques are generally better suited to explore the array design parameter space. However, since the computing power available today is not sufficient to conduct simulations of the flow in and around large arrays of turbines with fully resolved turbine geometries (e.g., grid resolution into the viscous sublayer on turbine blades), the turbines' interaction with the energy resource (water current or wind) needs to be parameterized, or modeled. Models used today--a common model is the actuator disk concept--are not able to predict the unique wake structure generated by cross-flow turbines. This wake structure has been shown to create "constructive" interference in some cases, improving turbine performance in array configurations, in contrast with axial-flow, or horizontal axis devices. Towards a more accurate parameterization of cross-flow turbines, an extensive experimental study was carried out using a high-resolution turbine test bed with wake measurement capability in a large cross-section tow tank. The experimental results were then "interpolated" using high-fidelity Navier--Stokes simulations, to gain insight into the turbine's near-wake. The study was designed to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers for the results to be Reynolds number independent with respect to turbine performance and wake statistics, such that they can be reliably extrapolated to full scale and used for model validation. The end product of

  7. Achieving Space Shuttle Abort-to-Orbit Using the Five-Segment Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craft, Joe; Ess, Robert; Sauvageau, Don

    2003-01-01

    The Five-Segment Booster design concept was evaluated by a team that determined the concept to be feasible and capable of achieving the desired abort-to-orbit capability when used in conjunction with increased Space Shuttle main engine throttle capability. The team (NASA Johnson Space Center, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ATK Thiokol Propulsion, United Space Alliance, Lockheed-Martin Space Systems, and Boeing) selected the concept that provided abort-to-orbit capability while: 1) minimizing Shuttle system impacts by maintaining the current interface requirements with the orbiter, external tank, and ground operation systems; 2) minimizing changes to the flight-proven design, materials, and processes of the current four-segment Shuttle booster; 3) maximizing use of existing booster hardware; and 4) taking advantage of demonstrated Shuttle main engine throttle capability. The added capability can also provide Shuttle mission planning flexibility. Additional performance could be used to: enable implementation of more desirable Shuttle safety improvements like crew escape, while maintaining current payload capability; compensate for off nominal performance in no-fail missions; and support missions to high altitudes and inclinations. This concept is a low-cost, low-risk approach to meeting Shuttle safety upgrade objectives. The Five-Segment Booster also has the potential to support future heavy-lift missions.

  8. 44. KNIGHT WATER IMPULSE TURBINES 12'. THESE TWO TURBINES ARE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. KNIGHT WATER IMPULSE TURBINES 12'. THESE TWO TURBINES ARE SIMILAR TO THOSE THAT POWER THE FOUNDRY AND ENABLE PRODUCTION OF CAST MACHINERY PARTS SUCH AS THOSE IN THE BACKGROUND, RECENTLY MADE FOR RESTORING RAILROAD TURNTABLES IN CAMINO, FOLSOM, PLACERVILLE, AND PARIS, CALIFORNIA. - Knight Foundry, 13 Eureka Street, Sutter Creek, Amador County, CA

  9. 63. VIEW OF TYPICAL TURBINE IN TURBINE WELL IN POWERHOUSE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. VIEW OF TYPICAL TURBINE IN TURBINE WELL IN POWERHOUSE, LOOKING DOWN THE SHAFT FROM JUST ABOVE NORMAL WATER LEVEL. LADDER IS ON DOWNSTREAM WALL. PHOTOGRAPHER STOOD ON DECK SHOWN IN LOWER LEFT CORNER - Swan Falls Dam, Snake River, Kuna, Ada County, ID

  10. Novel Diagnostics to Investigate Turbine-Turbine Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakumar, B. J.; Pol, S.

    2011-11-01

    Strong aerodynamic interactions between upstream wind turbine wakes and downstream turbine blades cause fatigue loads and reduce turbine reliability. The wake structure also mediates the vertical flux of momentum and affects the power output of downstream turbines in turbine arrays. Despite their importance, our current understanding of wake-turbine interactions and wake structure is limited, especially under complex operating conditions such as yawed inflow and dynamic stall. Traditional diagnostics such as sonic anemometers, hotwires, and lidars suffer from interference and accuracy limitations and prove inadequate. At LANL, we have developed a Large Field-of-View Particle Image Velocimeter (LF-PIV) capable of measuring 3 m ×1 m (per camera) wake and inflow regions around a 5m-scale turbine. This scalable diagnostic operates in conjunction with a hub-mounted Rotating PIV (R-PIV) diagnostic to observe blade boundary layer and separation while the turbine is in operation. We discuss the diagnostic development challenges, solutions used to overcome these, and the interesting physics that these diagnostics promise to illuminate. Supported by LANL LDRD grant 20100040DR (PI: Curtt Ammerman).

  11. Probabilistic fatigue methodology and wind turbine reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Lange, C.H.

    1996-05-01

    Wind turbines subjected to highly irregular loadings due to wind, gravity, and gyroscopic effects are especially vulnerable to fatigue damage. The objective of this study is to develop and illustrate methods for the probabilistic analysis and design of fatigue-sensitive wind turbine components. A computer program (CYCLES) that estimates fatigue reliability of structural and mechanical components has been developed. A FORM/SORM analysis is used to compute failure probabilities and importance factors of the random variables. The limit state equation includes uncertainty in environmental loading, gross structural response, and local fatigue properties. Several techniques are shown to better study fatigue loads data. Common one-parameter models, such as the Rayleigh and exponential models are shown to produce dramatically different estimates of load distributions and fatigue damage. Improved fits may be achieved with the two-parameter Weibull model. High b values require better modeling of relatively large stress ranges; this is effectively done by matching at least two moments (Weibull) and better by matching still higher moments. For this purpose, a new, four-moment {open_quotes}generalized Weibull{close_quotes} model is introduced. Load and resistance factor design (LRFD) methodology for design against fatigue is proposed and demonstrated using data from two horizontal-axis wind turbines. To estimate fatigue damage, wind turbine blade loads have been represented by their first three statistical moments across a range of wind conditions. Based on the moments {mu}{sub 1}{hor_ellipsis}{mu}{sub 3}, new {open_quotes}quadratic Weibull{close_quotes} load distribution models are introduced. The fatigue reliability is found to be notably affected by the choice of load distribution model.

  12. Direct FuelCell/Turbine Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2004-11-19

    This report includes the progress in development of Direct Fuel Cell/Turbine. (DFC/T.) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. FCE successfully completed testing of the pre-alpha sub-MW DFC/T power plant. This power plant was constructed by integration of a 250kW fuel cell stack and a microturbine. Following these proof-of-concept tests, a stand-alone test of the microturbine verified the turbine power output expectations at an elevated (representative of the packaged unit condition) turbine inlet temperature. Preliminary design of the packaged sub-MW alpha DFC/T unit has been completed and procurement activity has been initiated. The preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant including the key equipment layout and the site plan was completed. A preliminary cost estimate for the 40 MW DFC/T plant has also been prepared. The tests of the cascaded fuel cell concept for achieving high fuel utilizations were completed. The tests demonstrated that the concept results in higher power plant efficiency. Alternate stack flow geometries for increased power output/fuel utilization capabilities are also being evaluated.

  13. A high flow turbine CPAP system.

    PubMed

    Moran, J L; Jackson, M P; Cameron, D M; Peisach, A R; Cunningham, D N; O'Fathartaigh, M S

    1988-01-01

    A continuous high flow CPAP system incorporating a turbine blower is described. The system achieves inspiratory flow rates of 150 l/min or more by means of reticulated gas flow and inspired oxygen fractions of 0.21-0.95. Positive airway pressure is provided by weighted disc valves and a modified aviation-type CPAP face mask provides electronic communication with the patient. The mobility of the system also enables its use as an intermittent physiotherapy aid. Work of breathing of the system, as assessed by total pressure fluctuations is at a minimum. PMID:3053845

  14. Gas turbine combustor stabilization by heat recirculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganji, A.; Short, J.; Branch, M. C.; Oppenheim, A. K.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of heat recirculation for stabilization of lean mixtures and emission reduction has been studied in detail for a typical aircraft gas turbine combustor. Thermodynamic calculations have indicated temperature and heat recirculation rates for operation of the combustor over a range of combustion zone equivalence ratios and for varying modes of desired engine operation. Calculations indicate the feasibility of stabilizing the combustion zone at equivalence ratios as low as 0.2 with achievable heat recirculation rates. Detailed chemical kinetic calculations suggest that combustor heat release is maintained with reaction completion substantially before the NO forming reactions, even though CO is rapidly oxidized in this same region.

  15. Ceramics for the advanced automotive gas turbine engine: A look at a single shaft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nosek, S. M.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a preliminary analysis of a single shaft regenerative design with a single stage radial turbine are presented to show the fuel economy that can be achieved at high turbine inlet temperatures, with this particular advanced design, if the turbine tip speed and regenerator inlet temperature are not limited. The engine size was 100 hp for application to a 3500 lb auto. The fuel economy was analyzed by coupling the engine to the auto through a continuously variable speed-ratio transmission and operating the system at constant turbine inlet temperature over the Composite Driving Cycle. The fuel was gasoline and the analysis was for a 85 F day. With a turbine inlet temperature of 2500 F the fuel economy was 26.2 mpg, an improvement of 18 percent over that of 22.3 mpg with a turbine inlet temperature of 1900 F. The turbine tip speed needed for best economy with the 2500 F engine was 2530 ft/sec. The regenerator temperature was approximately 2200 F at idle. Disk stresses were estimated for one single stage radial turbine and two two-stage radial-axial turbines and compared with maximum allowable stress curves estimated for a current ceramic material. Results show a need for higher Weibull Modulus, higher strength ceramics.

  16. Ejector-turbine studies and experimental data. Final report, August 1, 1979-October 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Minardi, J.E.; Lawson, M.O.; Krolak, R.V.; Newman, R.K.; von Ohain, H.P.; Salyer, I.O.; Wattendorf, F.L.; Boehman, L.I.; Braden, R.P.

    1982-11-01

    An innovative low-power Rankine turbine concept is described which promises competitive efficiencies, low cost, significant reduction in rpm, low maintenance, and long-life operation over similarly rated turbines. The cycle uses a highly efficient two-fluid ejector which greatly lowers the turbine inlet pressure and temperature. The two-fluid ejector cycle is shown by theoretical studies to be capable of transferring energy at efficiencies in excess of 90% from a high-power flux fluid medium to a low-power flux fluid medium. The volume flow of the thermodynamic fluid can be augmented by as much as one-hundred fold. For very low-power turbine applications this could result in far-more-favorable turbine sizes and rpm. One major application for this type turbine is the heating and cooling with heat pumps. The concept permits engine cycles that cover an extremely broad range of peak temperatures, including those corresponding to stoichiometric combustion of hydrocarbon fuels, waste heat sources, and solar. Actual test data indicated ejector efficiencies as high as 85%. A two-fluid, ejector turbine was designed and tested. The turbine achieved 94% of design power. Additional data indicated that the ejector attached to the turbine operated on the supersonic branch.

  17. Studies of Mini-Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Stacey; Endo, Masaki; Romanko, Michael; Williamson, Chk

    2013-11-01

    Urban environments are inaccessible to large wind turbines of the classical ``windmill'' design. By exploring small-scale vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWTs), wind energy can possibly be harvested from the constrained spaces within cities. We present a comprehensive study of blade offset pitch angle and relative blade size (ratio of blade chordlength/turbine diameter, c/D). We find that the optimal pitch angle for a symmetric blade is the angle at which the midpoint chordline is tangent to the turbine circumference. Also, a turbine with conventional blades of small c/D ratio (c/D = 0.12) - typical of large scale turbines - do not operate well at low Reynolds numbers. On the other hand, the maximum coefficient of power for turbines with larger c/D ratio (c/D = 0.36) is much higher than for the conventional small-blades. As blade size increases, the operating range of TSR (Tip Speed Ratio) also increases, making large-chord turbines more robust to the prevailing wind conditions. Surprisingly, the regime of TSR for maximum power extracted, at these low Reynolds numbers, corresponds with small or even negative power predictions, based on streamtube theory.

  18. Fretting in aircraft turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. L.; Bill, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of fretting in aircraft turbine engines is discussed. Critical fretting can occur on fan, compressor, and turbine blade mountings, as well as on splines, rolling element bearing races, and secondary sealing elements of face type seals. Structural fatigue failures have been shown to occur at fretted areas on component parts. Methods used by designers to reduce the effects of fretting are given.

  19. Fuzzy Regulator Design for Wind Turbine Yaw Control

    PubMed Central

    Koulouras, Grigorios

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes the development of an advanced fuzzy logic controller which aims to perform intelligent automatic control of the yaw movement of wind turbines. The specific fuzzy controller takes into account both the wind velocity and the acceptable yaw error correlation in order to achieve maximum performance efficacy. In this way, the proposed yaw control system is remarkably adaptive to the existing conditions. In this way, the wind turbine is enabled to retain its power output close to its nominal value and at the same time preserve its yaw system from pointless movement. Thorough simulation tests evaluate the proposed system effectiveness. PMID:24693237

  20. Optimum propeller wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderson, R. J.; Archer, R. D.

    1983-12-01

    The Prandtl-Betz-Theodorsen theory of heavily loaded airscrews has been adapted to the design of propeller windmills which are to be optimized for maximum power coefficient. It is shown that the simpler, light-loading, constant-area wake assumption can generate significantly different 'optimum' performance and geometry, and that it is therefore not appropriate to the design of propeller wind turbines when operating in their normal range of high-tip-speed-to-wind-speed ratio. Design curves for optimum power coefficient are presented and an example of the design of a typical two-blade optimum rotor is given.

  1. Turbine airfoil film cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hylton, Larry D.

    1986-10-01

    Emphasis is placed on developing more accurate analytical models for predicting turbine airfoil external heat transfer rates. Performance goals of new engines require highly refined, accurate design tools to meet durability requirements. In order to obtain improvements in analytical capabilities, programs are required which focus on enhancing analytical techniques through verification of new models by comparison with relevant experimental data. The objectives of the current program are to develop an analytical approach, based on boundary layer theory, for predicting the effects of airfoil film cooling on downstream heat transfer rates and to verify the resulting analytical method by comparison of predictions with hot cascade data obtained under this program.

  2. Wind Turbine Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thresher, R. W. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    Recent progress in the analysis and prediction of the dynamic behavior of wind turbine generators is discussed. The following areas were addressed: (1) the adequacy of state of the art analysis tools for designing the next generation of wind power systems; (2) the use of state of the art analysis tools designers; and (3) verifications of theory which might be lacking or inadequate. Summaries of these informative discussions as well as the questions and answers which followed each paper are documented in the proceedings.

  3. Alternative aviation turbine fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J.

    1977-01-01

    The efficient utilization of fossil fuels by future jet aircraft may necessitate the broadening of current aviation turbine fuel specifications. The most significant changes in specifications would be an increased aromatics content and a higher final boiling point in order to minimize refinery energy consumption and costs. These changes would increase the freezing point and might lower the thermal stability of the fuel and could cause increased pollutant emissions, increased smoke and carbon formation, increased combustor liner temperatures, and poorer ignition characteristics. This paper discusses the effects that broadened specification fuels may have on present-day jet aircraft and engine components and the technology required to use fuels with broadened specifications.

  4. Trends in gas turbine development

    SciTech Connect

    Day, W.H.

    1999-07-01

    This paper represents the Gas Turbine Association's view of the gas turbine industry's R and D needs following the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program which is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Some of this information was discussed at the workshop Next Generation Gas Turbine Power Systems, which was held in Austin, TX, February 9--10, 1999, sponsored by DOE-Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), reference 1. The general idea is to establish public-private partnerships to reduce the risks involved in the development of new technologies which results in public benefits. The recommendations in this paper are focused on gas turbines > 30 MW output. Specific GTA recommendations on smaller systems are not addressed here. They will be addressed in conjunction with DOE-Energy Efficiency.

  5. Calculation of gas turbine characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamaev, B. I.; Murashko, V. L.

    2016-04-01

    The reasons and regularities of vapor flow and turbine parameter variation depending on the total pressure drop rate π* and rotor rotation frequency n are studied, as exemplified by a two-stage compressor turbine of a power-generating gas turbine installation. The turbine characteristic is calculated in a wide range of mode parameters using the method in which analytical dependences provide high accuracy for the calculated flow output angle and different types of gas dynamic losses are determined with account of the influence of blade row geometry, blade surface roughness, angles, compressibility, Reynolds number, and flow turbulence. The method provides satisfactory agreement of results of calculation and turbine testing. In the design mode, the operation conditions for the blade rows are favorable, the flow output velocities are close to the optimal ones, the angles of incidence are small, and the flow "choking" modes (with respect to consumption) in the rows are absent. High performance and a nearly axial flow behind the turbine are obtained. Reduction of the rotor rotation frequency and variation of the pressure drop change the flow parameters, the parameters of the stages and the turbine, as well as the form of the characteristic. In particular, for decreased n, nonmonotonic variation of the second stage reactivity with increasing π* is observed. It is demonstrated that the turbine characteristic is mainly determined by the influence of the angles of incidence and the velocity at the output of the rows on the losses and the flow output angle. The account of the growing flow output angle due to the positive angle of incidence for decreased rotation frequencies results in a considerable change of the characteristic: poorer performance, redistribution of the pressure drop at the stages, and change of reactivities, growth of the turbine capacity, and change of the angle and flow velocity behind the turbine.

  6. Full operating range robust hybrid control of a coal-fired boiler/turbine unit - article no. 041011

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, K.; Bentsman, J.; Taft, C.W.

    2008-07-15

    Multi-input-multi-output robust controllers recently designed for the megawatt output/throttle pressure control in a coal-fired power plant boiler/turbine unit have demonstrated performance robustness noticeably superior to that of the currently employed nonlinear PID-based controller. These controllers, however, have been designed only for the range of 150-185 MW around the 185 MW nominal operating point, exhibiting a significant loss of performance in the lower range of 120-150 MW. Through system identification, the reason for this performance loss is demonstrated in the current work to be a pronounced dependence of the boiler/turbine unit steady state gains on the operating point. This problem is addressed via a hybrid control law consisting of two robust controllers and a robust switch between them activated by the set point change. The controllers are designed to cover the corresponding half-ranges of the full operating range. This permits attainment of the desired overall performance as well as reduction of modeling uncertainty induced by the operating point change to approximately 25% of that associated with the previous designs. Robust switching is accomplished through a novel hybrid mode of behavior-robustly controlled discrete transition.

  7. UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS(ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth A. Yackly

    2001-06-01

    The following paper provides an overview of GE's H System{trademark} technology, and specifically, the design, development, and test activities associated with the DOE Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program. There was intensive effort expended in bringing this revolutionary advanced technology program to commercial reality. In addition to describing the magnitude of performance improvement possible through use of H System{trademark} technology, this paper discusses the technological milestones during the development of the first 9H (50Hz) and 7H (60 Hz) gas turbines. To illustrate the methodical product development strategy used by GE, this paper discusses several technologies that were essential to the introduction of the H System{trademark}. Also included are analyses of the series of comprehensive tests of materials, components and subsystems that necessarily preceded full scale field testing of the H System{trademark}. This paper validates one of the basic premises with which GE started the H System{trademark} development program: exhaustive and elaborate testing programs minimized risk at every step of this process, and increase the probability of success when the H System{trademark} is introduced into commercial service. In 1995, GE, the world leader in gas turbine technology for over half a century, in conjunction with the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory's ATS program, introduced its new generation of gas turbines. This H System{trademark} technology is the first gas turbine ever to achieve the milestone of 60% fuel efficiency. Because fuel represents the largest individual expense of running a power plant, an efficiency increase of even a single percentage point can substantially reduce operating costs over the life of a typical gas-fired, combined-cycle plant in the 400 to 500 megawatt range. The H System{trademark} is not simply a state-of-the-art gas turbine. It is an advanced, integrated, combined-cycle system in which every component is

  8. TURBINE COOLING FLOW AND THE RESULTING DECREASE IN TURBINE EFFICIENCY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauntner, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    This algorithm has been developed for calculating both the quantity of compressor bleed flow required to cool a turbine and the resulting decrease in efficiency due to cooling air injected into the gas stream. Because of the trend toward higher turbine inlet temperatures, it is important to accurately predict the required cooling flow. This program is intended for use with axial flow, air-breathing jet propulsion engines with a variety of airfoil cooling configurations. The algorithm results have compared extremely well with figures given by major engine manufacturers for given bulk metal temperatures and cooling configurations. The program calculates the required cooling flow and corresponding decrease in stage efficiency for each row of airfoils throughout the turbine. These values are combined with the thermodynamic efficiency of the uncooled turbine to predict the total bleed airflow required and the altered turbine efficiency. There are ten airfoil cooling configurations and the algorithm allows a different option for each row of cooled airfoils. Materials technology is incorporated and requires the date of the first year of service for the turbine stator vane and rotor blade. The user must specify pressure, temperatures, and gas flows into the turbine. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 3080 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 61K of 8 bit bytes. This program was developed in 1980.

  9. Wind Turbine Blade Design System - Aerodynamic and Structural Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Soumitr

    2011-12-01

    The ever increasing need for energy and the depletion of non-renewable energy resources has led to more advancement in the "Green Energy" field, including wind energy. An improvement in performance of a Wind Turbine will enhance its economic viability, which can be achieved by better aerodynamic designs. In the present study, a design system that has been under development for gas turbine turbomachinery has been modified for designing wind turbine blades. This is a very different approach for wind turbine blade design, but will allow it to benefit from the features inherent in the geometry flexibility and broad design space of the presented system. It starts with key overall design parameters and a low-fidelity model that is used to create the initial geometry parameters. The low-fidelity system includes the axisymmetric solver with loss models, T-Axi (Turbomachinery-AXIsymmetric), MISES blade-to-blade solver and 2D wing analysis code XFLR5. The geometry parameters are used to define sections along the span of the blade and connected to the CAD model of the wind turbine blade through CAPRI (Computational Analysis PRogramming Interface), a CAD neutral API that facilitates the use of parametric geometry definition with CAD. Either the sections or the CAD geometry is then available for CFD and Finite Element Analysis. The GE 1.5sle MW wind turbine and NERL NASA Phase VI wind turbine have been used as test cases. Details of the design system application are described, and the resulting wind turbine geometry and conditions are compared to the published results of the GE and NREL wind turbines. A 2D wing analysis code XFLR5, is used for to compare results from 2D analysis to blade-to-blade analysis and the 3D CFD analysis. This kind of comparison concludes that, from hub to 25% of the span blade to blade effects or the cascade effect has to be considered, from 25% to 75%, the blade acts as a 2d wing and from 75% to the tip 3D and tip effects have to be taken into account

  10. SUSTAINABLE CONCRETE FOR WIND TURBINE FOUNDATIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    BERNDT,M.L.

    2004-06-01

    The use of wind power to generate electricity continues to grow, especially given commitments by various countries throughout the world to ensure that a significant percentage of energy comes from renewable sources. In order to meet such objectives, increasingly larger turbines with higher capacity are being developed. The engineering aspects of larger turbine development tend to focus on design and materials for blades and towers. However, foundations are also a critical component of large wind turbines and represent a significant cost of wind energy projects. Ongoing wind research at BNL is examining two areas: (a) structural response analysis of wind turbine-tower-foundation systems and (b) materials engineering of foundations. This work is investigating the dynamic interactions in wind turbine systems, which in turn assists the wind industry in achieving improved reliability and more cost efficient foundation designs. The results reported herein cover initial studies of concrete mix designs for large wind turbine foundations and how these may be tailored to reduce cost and incorporate sustainability and life cycle concepts. The approach taken was to investigate material substitutions so that the environmental, energy and CO{sub 2}-impact of concrete could be reduced. The use of high volumes of ''waste'' materials in concrete was examined. These materials included fly ash, blast furnace slag and recycled concrete aggregate. In addition, the use of steel fiber reinforcement as a means to improve mechanical properties and potentially reduce the amount of bar reinforcement in concrete foundations was studied. Four basic mixes were considered. These were: (1) conventional mix with no material substitutions, (2) 50% replacement of cement with fly ash, (3) 50% replacement of cement with blast furnace slag and (4) 25% replacement of cement with fly ash and 25% replacement with blast furnace slag. Variations on these mixes included the addition of 1% by volume steel

  11. Preview Scheduled Model Predictive Control For Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laks, Jason H.

    This research investigates the use of model predictive control (MPC) in application to wind turbine operation from start-up to cut-out. The studies conducted are focused on the design of an MPC controller for a 650˜KW, three-bladed horizontal axis turbine that is in operation at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's National Wind Technology Center outside of Golden, Colorado. This turbine is at the small end of utility scale turbines, but it provides advanced instrumentation and control capabilities, and there is a good probability that the approach developed in simulation for this thesis, will be field tested on the actual turbine. A contribution of this thesis is a method to combine the use of preview measurements with MPC while also providing regulation of turbine speed and cyclic blade loading. A common MPC technique provides integral-like control to achieve offset-free operation. At the same time in wind turbine applications, multiple studies have developed "feed-forward" controls based on applying a gain to an estimate of the wind speed changes obtained from an observer incorporating a disturbance model. These approaches are based on a technique that can be referred to as disturbance accommodating control (DAC). In this thesis, it is shown that offset-free tracking MPC is equivalent to a DAC approach when the disturbance gain is computed to satisfy a regulator equation. Although the MPC literature has recognized that this approach provides "structurally stable" disturbance rejection and tracking, this step is not typically divorced from the MPC computations repeated each sample hit. The DAC formulation is conceptually simpler, and essentially uncouples regulation considerations from MPC related issues. This thesis provides a self contained proof that the DAC formulation (an observer-controller and appropriate disturbance gain) provides structurally stable regulation.

  12. Wind turbine rotor

    SciTech Connect

    Baskin, J. M.; Miller, G. E.; Wiesner, W.

    1985-12-10

    A fixed pitch wind turbine rotor is teeter mounted onto a low speed input shaft which is connected to the input of a step-up transmission. The output of the transmission is connected to a rotary pole amplitude modulated induction machine which is operable as a generator at a plurality of discreet speeds of rotation and is also operable as a startup motor for the rotor. A switch responsive to the rotational speed of the wind turbine rotor switches the generator from one speed of operation to the other. The rotor hub and the inner body portions of two blades which extend radially outwardly in opposite directions from the hub, are constructed from steel. The outer end portions of the blade are constructed from a lighter material, such as wood, and are both thinner and narrower than the remainder of the rotor. The outer end section of each blade includes a main body portion and a trailing edge portion which is hinge-connected to the main body portion. Each blade includes a centrifugal force operated positioning means which normally holds the drag brake section in a retracted position, but operates in response to a predetermined magnitude of centrifugal force to move the drag brake section into its deployed position. Each blade has an airfoil cross section and each blade has a plus twist inner portion adjacent the hub changing to first a zero twist and then a minus twist as it extends radially outwardly from the hub.

  13. Adaptive pitch control for variable speed wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Kathryn E.; Fingersh, Lee Jay

    2012-05-08

    An adaptive method for adjusting blade pitch angle, and controllers implementing such a method, for achieving higher power coefficients. Average power coefficients are determined for first and second periods of operation for the wind turbine. When the average power coefficient for the second time period is larger than for the first, a pitch increment, which may be generated based on the power coefficients, is added (or the sign is retained) to the nominal pitch angle value for the wind turbine. When the average power coefficient for the second time period is less than for the first, the pitch increment is subtracted (or the sign is changed). A control signal is generated based on the adapted pitch angle value and sent to blade pitch actuators that act to change the pitch angle of the wind turbine to the new or modified pitch angle setting, and this process is iteratively performed.

  14. Quiet airfoils for small and large wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    Tangler, James L.; Somers, Dan L.

    2012-06-12

    Thick airfoil families with desirable aerodynamic performance with minimal airfoil induced noise. The airfoil families are suitable for a variety of wind turbine designs and are particularly well-suited for use with horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs) with constant or variable speed using pitch and/or stall control. In exemplary embodiments, a first family of three thick airfoils is provided for use with small wind turbines and second family of three thick airfoils is provided for use with very large machines, e.g., an airfoil defined for each of three blade radial stations or blade portions defined along the length of a blade. Each of the families is designed to provide a high maximum lift coefficient or high lift, to exhibit docile stalls, to be relatively insensitive to roughness, and to achieve a low profile drag.

  15. Conceptual design study of improved automotives gas turbine powertrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-two candidate engine concepts and nineteen transmission concepts. Screening of these concepts, predominantly for fuel economy, cost and technical risk, resulted in a recommended powertrain consisting of a single-shaft engine, with a ceramic radial turbine rotor, connected through a differential split-power transmission utilizing a variable stator torque converter and a four speed automatic gearbox. Vehicle fuel economy and performance projections, preliminary design analyses and installation studies in a were completed. A cost comparison with the conventional spark ignited gasoline engine showed that the turbine engine would be more expensive initially, however, lifetime cost of ownership is in favor of the gas turbine. A powertrain research and development plan was constructed to gain information on timing and costs to achieve the required level of technology and demonstrate the engine in a vehicle by the year 1983.

  16. Control of Next Generation Aircraft and Wind Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The first part of this talk will describe some of the exciting new next generation aircraft that NASA is proposing for the future. These aircraft are being designed to reduce aircraft fuel consumption and environmental impact. Reducing the aircraft weight is one approach that will be used to achieve these goals. A new control framework will be presented that enables lighter, more flexible aircraft to maintain aircraft handling qualities, while preventing the aircraft from exceeding structural load limits. The second part of the talk will give an overview of utility-scale wind turbines and their control. Results of collaboration with Dr. Balas will be presented, including new theory to adaptively control the turbine in the presence of structural modes, with the focus on the application of this theory to a high-fidelity simulation of a wind turbine.

  17. Design optimization of a high specific speed Francis turbine runner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, Y.; Kurosawa, S.; Kawajiri, H.

    2012-11-01

    Francis turbine is used in many hydroelectric power stations. This paper presents the development of hydraulic performance in a high specific speed Francis turbine runner. In order to achieve the improvements of turbine efficiency throughout a wide operating range, a new runner design method which combines the latest Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and a multi objective optimization method with an existing design system was applied in this study. The validity of the new design system was evaluated by model performance tests. As the results, it was confirmed that the optimized runner presented higher efficiency compared with an originally designed runner. Besides optimization of runner, instability vibration which occurred at high part load operating condition was investigated by model test and gas-liquid two-phase flow analysis. As the results, it was confirmed that the instability vibration was caused by oval cross section whirl which was caused by recirculation flow near runner cone wall.

  18. Voltaic turbine - A paradigm shift proposed in generating electricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    V, Meera

    2013-12-01

    Sustainable demand for electric power results in a warehouse that naturally favors development of wind turbines that are significantly quieter and more efficient for generating electricity than today's fleet. Achieving this will require a revolutionary new concept, in particular "Magneto Voltaic Power plant" that generate electricity with the help of repulsive force which cause the turbine blades to rotate. The magneto voltaic power plant triggered the original development of wind turbines raising its energy and output power. This paper outlines the main issues involved in replacing the wind source to that of the repulsive force. It's shown that implementation of repulsive force generates electric power at a feasible cost and this would clearly be the enabling technology for generating electricity of the future.

  19. Towers for Offshore Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurian, V. J.; Narayanan, S. P.; Ganapathy, C.

    2010-06-01

    Increasing energy demand coupled with pollution free production of energy has found a viable solution in wind energy. Land based windmills have been utilized for power generation for more than two thousand years. In modern times wind generated power has become popular in many countries. Offshore wind turbines are being used in a number of countries to tap the energy from wind over the oceans and convert to electric energy. The advantages of offshore wind turbines as compared to land are that offshore winds flow at higher speed than onshore winds and the more available space. In some land based settings, for better efficiency, turbines are separated as much as 10 rotor diameters from each other. In offshore applications where only two wind directions are likely to predominate, the distances between the turbines arranged in a line can be shortened to as little as two or four rotor diameters. Today, more than a dozen offshore European wind facilities with turbine ratings of 450 kw to 3.6 MW exist offshore in very shallow waters of 5 to 12 m. Compared to onshore wind turbines, offshore wind turbines are bigger and the tower height in offshore are in the range of 60 to 80 m. The water depths in oceans where offshore turbines can be located are within 30 m. However as the distance from land increases, the costs of building and maintaining the turbines and transmitting the power back to shore also increase sharply. The objective of this paper is to review the parameters of design for the maximum efficiency of offshore wind turbines and to develop types offshore towers to support the wind turbines. The methodology of design of offshore towers to support the wind turbine would be given and the environmental loads for the design of the towers would be calculated for specific cases. The marine corrosion on the towers and the methods to control the corrosion also would be briefly presented. As the wind speeds tend to increase with distance from the shore, turbines build father

  20. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) Technology Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Technical work on the design and effort leading to the testing of a 74.5 kW (100 hp) automotive gas turbine engine is reviewed. Development of the engine compressor, gasifier turbine, power turbine, combustor, regenerator, and secondary system is discussed. Ceramic materials development and the application of such materials in the gas turbine engine components is described.

  1. Turbine Engine Hot Section Technology, 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The Turbine Engine Section Technology (HOST) Project Office of the Lewis Research Center sponsored a workshop to discuss current research pertinent to turbine engine hot section durability problems. Presentations were made concerning hot section environment and the behavior of combustion liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes.

  2. Technical review of Westinghouse`s Advanced Turbine Systems Program

    SciTech Connect

    Diakunchak, I.S.; Bannister, R.L.

    1995-10-01

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program is an ambitious program to develop the necessary technologies, which will result in a significant increase in natural gas-fired power generation plant efficiency, a decrease in cost of electricity and a decrease in harmful emissions. In Phase 1 of the ATS Program, preliminary investigations on different gas turbine cycles demonstrated that net plant efficiency greater than 60% could be achieved. The more promising cycles were evaluated in more detail in Phase 2 in order to select the one that would achieve all of the program goals. The closed-loop cooled combined cycle was selected because it offered the best solution with the least risk for exceeding the ATS Program goals of net plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity, reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM), and commercialization in the year 2000. The Westinghouse ATS plant is based on an advanced gas turbine design combined with an advanced steam. turbine and a high efficiency generator. To enhance achievement of the challenging performance, emissions, and RAM goals, current technologies are being extended and new technologies developed. The attainment of ATS performance goal necessitates advancements in aerodynamics, sealing, cooling, coatings, and materials technologies. To reduce emissions to the required levels, demands a development effort in the following combustion technology areas: premixed ultra low NOx combustion, catalytic combustion, combustion instabilities, and optical diagnostics. To achieve the RAM targets, requires the utilization of proven design features, with quantified risk analysis, and advanced materials, coatings, and cooling technologies. Phase 2 research and development projects currently in progress, as well as those planned for Phase 3, will result in advances in gas turbine technology and greatly contribute to ATS Program success.

  3. Research and development of ceramic gas turbine (CGT302)

    SciTech Connect

    Takehara, I.; Inobe, I.; Tatsumi, T.; Ichikawa, Y.; Kobayashi, H.

    1998-01-01

    The ongoing Japanese Ceramic Gas Turbine (CGT) project, as a part of the New Sunshine Project funded by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI), aims to achieve higher efficiency, lower pollutant emission, and multifuel capability for small to medium sized gas turbine engines to be used in cogeneration systems. The final target of this project is to achieve a thermal efficiency over 42% at a turbine inlet temperature (TIT) of 1350 C. Under this project, Kawasaki Heavy Industries (KHI) is developing the CGT302 (a regenerative twin-spool CGT). The CGT302 has several unique features: simple-shaped ceramic components, KHI`s original binding system for turbine nozzle segments, stress-free structure using ceramic springs and rings, etc. In addition to these features, a high turbine tip speed and a metal plate fin recuperator were adopted. At the end of the fiscal year 1994, an intermediate appraisal was carried out, and the CGT302 was recognized to have successfully achieved its target. The CGT302 endurance test at the intermediate stage required 20 hours` operation of the basic ceramic engine. The actual testing accomplished 40 hours at over 1200 C TIT, which included 30 hours of operation without disassembling. The target thermal efficiency of 30% at 1200 C has almost been reached, 29.2% having been achieved. In 1995 the CGT302 successfully recorded 33.1% at 1190 C of TIT with no trouble. The authors will introduce the current status of R and D of the CGT302 and its unique features in this paper.

  4. Cross-flow turbines: physical and numerical model studies towards improved array simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosnik, M.; Bachant, P.

    2015-12-01

    Cross-flow, or vertical-axis turbines, show potential in marine hydrokinetic (MHK) and wind energy applications. As turbine designs mature, the research focus is shifting from individual devices towards improving turbine array layouts for maximizing overall power output, i.e., minimizing wake interference for axial-flow turbines, or taking advantage of constructive wake interaction for cross-flow turbines. Numerical simulations are generally better suited to explore the turbine array design parameter space, as physical model studies of large arrays at large model scale would be expensive. However, since the computing power available today is not sufficient to conduct simulations of the flow in and around large arrays of turbines with fully resolved turbine geometries, the turbines' interaction with the energy resource needs to be parameterized, or modeled. Most models in use today, e.g. actuator disk, are not able to predict the unique wake structure generated by cross-flow turbines. Experiments were carried out using a high-resolution turbine test bed in a large cross-section tow tank, designed to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers for the results to be Reynolds number independent with respect to turbine performance and wake statistics, such that they can be reliably extrapolated to full scale and used for model validation. To improve parameterization in array simulations, an actuator line model (ALM) was developed to provide a computationally feasible method for simulating full turbine arrays inside Navier--Stokes models. The ALM predicts turbine loading with the blade element method combined with sub-models for dynamic stall and flow curvature. The open-source software is written as an extension library for the OpenFOAM CFD package, which allows the ALM body force to be applied to their standard RANS and LES solvers. Turbine forcing is also applied to volume of fluid (VOF) models, e.g., for predicting free surface effects on submerged MHK devices. An

  5. Advanced Turbine System (ATS) program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, March 1, 1994--May 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    GE has achieved a leadership position in the worldwide gas turbine industry in both industrial/utility markets and in aircraft engines. This design and manufacturing base plus their close contact with the users provides the technology for creation of the next generation advanced power generation systems for both the industrial and utility industries. GE has been active in the definition of advanced turbine systems for several years. These systems will leverage the technology from the latest developments in the entire GE gas turbine product line. These products will be USA based in engineering and manufacturing and are marketed through the GE Industrial and Power Systems. Achieving the advanced turbine system goals of 60% efficiency, 8 ppmvd NO{sub x} and 10% electric power cost reduction imposes competing characteristics on the gas turbine system. Two basic technical issues arise from this. The turbine inlet temperature of the gas turbine must increase to achieve both efficiency and cost goals. However, higher temperatures move in the direction of increased NO{sub x} emission. Improved coating and materials technologies along with creative combustor design can result in solutions to achieve the ultimate goal. GE`s view of the market, in conjunction with the industrial and utility objectives requires the development of Advanced Gas Turbine Systems which encompasses two potential products: a new aeroderivative combined cycle system for the industrial market and a combined cycle system for the utility sector that is based on an advanced frame machine.

  6. Energy efficient engine high-pressure turbine component rig performance test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, K. P.

    1983-01-01

    A rig test of the cooled high-pressure turbine component for the Energy Efficient Engine was successfully completed. The principal objective of this test was to substantiate the turbine design point performance as well as determine off-design performance with the interaction of the secondary flow system. The measured efficiency of the cooled turbine component was 88.5 percent, which surpassed the rig design goal of 86.5 percent. The secondary flow system in the turbine performed according to the design intent. Characterization studies showed that secondary flow system performance is insensitive to flow and pressure variations. Overall, this test has demonstrated that a highly-loaded, transonic, single-stage turbine can achieve a high level of operating efficiency.

  7. Investigation of the mixed flow turbine performance under inlet pulsating flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamel, Mohammed; Abidat, Miloud; Litim, Sid Ali

    2012-03-01

    Turbochargers are widely used in Diesel engines as a means of increasing the output power. Most of them are fitted with radial or mixed flow turbines. In applications where high boost pressure is required, radial turbines are replaced by mixed flow turbines which can achieve a maximum efficiency at a lower value of blade speed to isentropic expansion velocity ratio than the usual 0.7 (for radial turbines). This study, performed with the ANSYS-CFX software, presents a numerical performance prediction of a mixed flow turbine under inlet pulsating flow conditions. In addition, the influence of the pulse frequency is studied and the numerical results are compared with those of a one-dimensional model and experimental data.

  8. Variable-Speed Power-Turbine for the Large Civil Tilt Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suchezky, Mark; Cruzen, G. Scott

    2012-01-01

    Turbine design concepts were studied for application to a large civil tiltrotor transport aircraft. The concepts addressed the need for high turbine efficiency across the broad 2:1 turbine operating speed range representative of the notional mission for the aircraft. The study focused on tailoring basic turbine aerodynamic design design parameters to avoid the need for complex, heavy, and expensive variable geometry features. The results of the study showed that good turbine performance can be achieved across the design speed range if the design focuses on tailoring the aerodynamics for good tolerance to large swings in incidence, as opposed to optimizing for best performance at the long range cruise design point. A rig design configuration and program plan are suggested for a dedicated experiment to validate the proposed approach.

  9. Experimental and analytical investigation of low-solidity axial turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Irdmusa, J.Z.

    1990-01-01

    This study redesigned the blade leading edges of a small low-solidity axial turbine to obtain operational flexibility. Further flexibility was gained by using a low-solidity cascade, which allowed the leading edges to have a higher radius of curvature. The cascade also allowed larger flow deflections, which resulted in higher utilization factors. Because of the smaller frictional surfaces associated with the low-solidity cascade, the losses were minimized and higher performance achieved. Two small low-solidity axial turbines, one with a high profile ratio and the other with a low profile ratio, were tested. Their performances were evaluated by the temperature drop across them and also by measuring their power output in a specially design test rig. The internal flow in the nozzles was visualized by water flow simulation with dye injection. The internal fluid dynamics were stimulated by computer. The inviscid flow computer programs MERIDL and TSONIC from NASA were used to predict the flow field in both turbines. The location of stagnation points at the leading edge, streamline patterns, pressure distributions, and loading coefficients were determined. Findings showed that the turbine with conventional leading edges (low profile ratio) was very susceptible to changes in the operating condition, while the turbine with newly designed blades (high profile ratio) had very high operational flexibility, complemented by high performance for a wide range of speeds. Findings also showed that high performance can be achieved with low-solidity cascades without being penalized for the losses due to flow separation. Inviscid computer codes MERIDL and TSONIC were effective in investigating the internal aerodynamics of the turbine rotors.

  10. U.S. Department of Energy Wind Turbine Development Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Migliore, P. G.; Calvert, S. D.

    1999-04-26

    This paper provides an overview of wind-turbine development activities in the Unites States and relates those activities to market conditions and projections. Several factors are responsible for a surge in wind energy development in the United States, including a federal production tax credit, ''green power'' marketing, and improving cost and reliability. More development is likely, as approximately 363 GW of new capacity will be needed by 2020 to meet growing demand and replace retiring units. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is helping two companies develop next-generation turbines intended to generate electricity for $0.025/kWh or less. We expect to achieve this objective through a combination of improved engineering methods and configuration advancements. This should ensure that wind power will compete effectively against advanced combined-cycle plants having projected generating costs of $0.031/kWh in 2005. To address the market for small and intermediate-size wind turbines, DOE is assisting five companies in their attempts to develop new turbines having low capital cost and high reliability. Additional information regarding U.S. wind energy programs is available on the internet site www.nrel.gov/wind/. E-mail addresses for the turbine manufacturers are found in the Acknowledgements.

  11. Chaotic gas turbine subject to augmented Lorenz equations.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kenichiro; Miyano, Takaya; Toriyama, Toshiyuki

    2012-09-01

    Inspired by the chaotic waterwheel invented by Malkus and Howard about 40 years ago, we have developed a gas turbine that randomly switches the sense of rotation between clockwise and counterclockwise. The nondimensionalized expressions for the equations of motion of our turbine are represented as a starlike network of many Lorenz subsystems sharing the angular velocity of the turbine rotor as the central node, referred to as augmented Lorenz equations. We show qualitative similarities between the statistical properties of the angular velocity of the turbine rotor and the velocity field of large-scale wind in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection reported by Sreenivasan et al. [Phys. Rev. E 65, 056306 (2002)]. Our equations of motion achieve the random reversal of the turbine rotor through the stochastic resonance of the angular velocity in a double-well potential and the force applied by rapidly oscillating fields. These results suggest that the augmented Lorenz model is applicable as a dynamical model for the random reversal of turbulent large-scale wind through cessation. PMID:23031014

  12. Advanced solidification processing of an industrial gas turbine engine component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, Mei Ling; Price, Allen; Bellows, Richard S.

    2003-03-01

    This paper will describe the efforts of the Advanced Turbine Airfoil Manufacturing Technology Program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Howmet Research Corporation. The purpose of the program is to develop single-crystal and directionally solidified casting technologies to benefit Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) industrial and utility gas turbine engines. The focus is on defining and implementing advanced Vacuum Induction Melting (VIM) furnace enhancements that provide precise control of mold temperatures during solidification. Emphasis was placed on increasing the total magnitude of thermal gradients while minimizing the difference in maximum and minimum gradients produced during the solidification process. Advanced VIM casting techniques were applied to Solar Turbines Incorporated’s Titan 130 First Stage High Pressure Turbine Blade under the ATS program. A comparison of the advanced VIM casting process to the conventional Bridgeman casting process will be presented as it pertains to the thermal gradients achieved during solidification, microstructure, elemental partitioning characterization, and solution heat treat response.

  13. The combined cycle application of aeroderivative gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Sheard, A.G.; Raine, M.J.

    1998-07-01

    In recent years aeroderivative gas turbines have become an effective alternative to heavy industrial gas turbines. Marketing of aeroderivatives has focused on their simple cycle efficiency advantage. The use of aeroderivatives in combined cycle, however, has also been demonstrated to be competitive, with high net plant efficiency and moderate cost per installed kW. Aeroderivative gas turbines are also capable of achieving high baseload plant availabilities because of the maintenance philosophy of rapid gas turbine or module exchange on site. In this paper the rationale for choosing an aeroderivative over a conventional industrial gas turbine is discussed. Factors affecting the decision to opt for either a simple or combined cycle facility are considered. The economic case is made for combined cycle plant incorporating aeroderivatives, showing a lower total cost of ownership that the alternatives, including an assessment of the key factors necessary to make them viable. The paper continues with a description of an advanced single string power train concept. Implementation of the power train is presented, and its incorporation into an optimized 40 MW Class power station described. Reduction in cost of electricity and installed cost per kW are considered, as well as reduction in project lead time.

  14. Analytical modeling of turbine wakes in yawed conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastankhah, Majid; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Increasing wind energy production has become a unanimous plan for virtually all the developed countries. In addition to constructing new wind farms, this goal can be achieved by making wind farms more efficient. Control strategies in wind farms, such as manipulating the yaw angle of the turbines, have the potential to make wind farms more efficient. Costly numerical simulations or measurements cannot be, however, employed to assess the viability of this strategy in the numerous different scenarios happening in real wind farms. In this study, we aim to develop an inexpensive and simple analytical model that is able for the first time to predict the whole wake of a yawed turbine with an acceptable accuracy. The proposed analytical model is built upon the simplified version of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Apart from the ability of the model to predict wake flows in yawed conditions, it can provide a better understanding of turbine wakes in this complex situation. For example, it can give valuable insights on how the wake deflection varies by changing turbine and incoming flow characteristics, such as the thrust coefficient of the turbine or the ambient turbulence.

  15. Chaotic gas turbine subject to augmented Lorenz equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Kenichiro; Miyano, Takaya; Toriyama, Toshiyuki

    2012-09-01

    Inspired by the chaotic waterwheel invented by Malkus and Howard about 40 years ago, we have developed a gas turbine that randomly switches the sense of rotation between clockwise and counterclockwise. The nondimensionalized expressions for the equations of motion of our turbine are represented as a starlike network of many Lorenz subsystems sharing the angular velocity of the turbine rotor as the central node, referred to as augmented Lorenz equations. We show qualitative similarities between the statistical properties of the angular velocity of the turbine rotor and the velocity field of large-scale wind in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection reported by Sreenivasan [Phys. Rev. E1063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.65.056306 65, 056306 (2002)]. Our equations of motion achieve the random reversal of the turbine rotor through the stochastic resonance of the angular velocity in a double-well potential and the force applied by rapidly oscillating fields. These results suggest that the augmented Lorenz model is applicable as a dynamical model for the random reversal of turbulent large-scale wind through cessation.

  16. Graded Achievement, Tested Achievement, and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-eight studies of grades, over a century, were reviewed using the argument-based approach to validity suggested by Kane as a theoretical framework. The review draws conclusions about the meaning of graded achievement, its relation to tested achievement, and changes in the construct of graded achievement over time. "Graded…

  17. Optimization of hydraulic turbine diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moravec, Prokop; Hliník, Juraj; Rudolf, Pavel

    2016-03-01

    Hydraulic turbine diffuser recovers pressure energy from residual kinetic energy on turbine runner outlet. Efficiency of this process is especially important for high specific speed turbines, where almost 50% of available head is utilized within diffuser. Magnitude of the coefficient of pressure recovery can be significantly influenced by designing its proper shape. Present paper focuses on mathematical shape optimization method coupled with CFD. First method is based on direct search Nelder-Mead algorithm, while the second method employs adjoint solver and morphing. Results obtained with both methods are discussed and their advantages/disadvantages summarized.

  18. Design and aero-acoustic analysis of a counter-rotating wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Vineesh V.

    Wind turbines have become an integral part of the energy business because they are one of the most economical and reliable sources of renewable energy. Conventional wind turbines are capable of capturing less than half of the energy present in the wind. Hence, to make the wind turbines more efficient, it is important to increase their performance. A horizontal axis wind turbine with multiple rotors is one concept that can achieve a higher power conversion rate. Also, a concern for wind energy is the noise generated by wind turbines. Hence, an investigation into the acoustic behavior of a multi-rotor horizontal axis wind turbine is required. In response to the need of a wind turbine design with higher power coefficient, a unique design of a counter-rotating horizontal axis wind turbine (CR-HAWT) is proposed. The Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory is used to aerodynamically design the blades of the two rotors. Modifications are made to the BEM theory to accommodate the interaction of the two rotors. The tower effect on the noise generation of the downwind rotor is investigated. Predictions are made for the total noise generated by the wind turbine at its design operating conditions. A total power coefficient of 65.2% is predicted for the proposed CR-HAWT design. A low tip speed ratio is chosen to minimize the noise generation. The aeroacoustic analysis of the CR-HAWT shows that the noise generated at its design operating conditions is within an acceptable range. Thus, the CR-HAWT is predicted to be a quiet wind turbine with a high power coefficient, making it highly desirable for small wind turbine applications.

  19. 11. Power room, view of Westinghouse steam turbine: turbine RPM6,000, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Power room, view of Westinghouse steam turbine: turbine RPM-6,000, governor RPM-1017, turbine number 8695, manufactured by Westinghouse Electric Manufacturing company, East Pittsburg, Pennsylvania - Norfolk Manufacturing Company Cotton Mill, 90 Milton Street, Dedham, Norfolk County, MA

  20. Pump for spawning channels includes a turbine and motor. Turbine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Pump for spawning channels includes a turbine and motor. Turbine is Berkeley H-17500, model 8C2PH, Serial No. 2889, B.M. No. 4886 - Berkeley Pump Co. The Motor is G.E. Induction Motor, model 5K4256XA3YI, serial no. GAJ728337, Tri-Clad. View looking northeast. - Prairie Creek Fish Hatchery, Hwy. 101, Orick, Humboldt County, CA

  1. Turbine blade cooling

    DOEpatents

    Staub, Fred Wolf; Willett, Fred Thomas

    1999-07-20

    A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

  2. Turbine blade cooling

    DOEpatents

    Staub, Fred Wolf; Willett, Fred Thomas

    2000-01-01

    A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

  3. Turbine blade cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Staub, F.W.; Willett, F.T.

    1999-07-20

    A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number. 13 figs.

  4. Gas turbine combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burd, Steven W. (Inventor); Cheung, Albert K. (Inventor); Dempsey, Dae K. (Inventor); Hoke, James B. (Inventor); Kramer, Stephen K. (Inventor); Ols, John T. (Inventor); Smith, Reid Dyer Curtis (Inventor); Sowa, William A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A gas turbine engine has a combustor module including an annular combustor having a liner assembly that defines an annular combustion chamber having a length, L. The liner assembly includes a radially inner liner, a radially outer liner that circumscribes the inner liner, and a bulkhead, having a height, H1, which extends between the respective forward ends of the inner liner and the outer liner. The combustor has an exit height, H3, at the respective aft ends of the inner liner and the outer liner interior. The annular combustor has a ratio H1/H3 having a value less than or equal to 1.7. The annular combustor may also have a ration L/H3 having a value less than or equal to 6.0.

  5. Multiple piece turbine blade

    DOEpatents

    Kimmel, Keith D

    2012-05-29

    A turbine rotor blade with a spar and shell construction, the spar including an internal cooling supply channel extending from an inlet end on a root section and ending near the tip end, and a plurality of external cooling channels formed on both side of the spar, where a middle external cooling channel is connected to the internal cooling supply channels through a row of holes located at a middle section of the channels. The spar and the shell are held together by hooks that define serpentine flow passages for the cooling air and include an upper serpentine flow circuit and a lower serpentine flow circuit. the serpentine flow circuits all discharge into a leading edge passage or a trailing edge passage.

  6. Turbine Blade Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacKay, Rebecca

    2001-01-01

    The High Speed Research Airfoil Alloy Program developed a fourth-generation alloy with up to an +85 F increase in creep rupture capability over current production airfoil alloys. Since improved strength is typically obtained when the limits of microstructural stability are exceeded slightly, it is not surprising that this alloy has a tendency to exhibit microstructural instabilities after high temperature exposures. This presentation will discuss recent results obtained on coated fourth-generation alloys for subsonic turbine blade applications under the NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program. Progress made in reducing microstructural instabilities in these alloys will be presented. In addition, plans will be presented for advanced alloy development and for computational modeling, which will aid future alloy development efforts.

  7. Sprayed skin turbine component

    DOEpatents

    Allen, David B

    2013-06-04

    Fabricating a turbine component (50) by casting a core structure (30), forming an array of pits (24) in an outer surface (32) of the core structure, depositing a transient liquid phase (TLP) material (40) on the outer surface of the core structure, the TLP containing a melting-point depressant, depositing a skin (42) on the outer surface of the core structure over the TLP material, and heating the assembly, thus forming both a diffusion bond and a mechanical interlock between the skin and the core structure. The heating diffuses the melting-point depressant away from the interface. Subsurface cooling channels (35) may be formed by forming grooves (34) in the outer surface of the core structure, filling the grooves with a fugitive filler (36), depositing and bonding the skin (42), then removing the fugitive material.

  8. Wind turbine rotor aileron

    DOEpatents

    Coleman, Clint; Kurth, William T.

    1994-06-14

    A wind turbine has a rotor with at least one blade which has an aileron which is adjusted by an actuator. A hinge has two portions, one for mounting a stationary hinge arm to the blade, the other for coupling to the aileron actuator. Several types of hinges can be used, along with different actuators. The aileron is designed so that it has a constant chord with a number of identical sub-assemblies. The leading edge of the aileron has at least one curved portion so that the aileron does not vent over a certain range of angles, but vents if the position is outside the range. A cyclic actuator can be mounted to the aileron to adjust the position periodically. Generally, the aileron will be adjusted over a range related to the rotational position of the blade. A method for operating the cyclic assembly is also described.

  9. PREDICTING TURBINE STAGE PERFORMANCE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    This program was developed to predict turbine stage performance taking into account the effects of complex passage geometries. The method uses a quasi-3D inviscid-flow analysis iteratively coupled to calculated losses so that changes in losses result in changes in the flow distribution. In this manner the effects of both the geometry on the flow distribution and the flow distribution on losses are accounted for. The flow may be subsonic or shock-free transonic. The blade row may be fixed or rotating, and the blades may be twisted and leaned. This program has been applied to axial and radial turbines, and is helpful in the analysis of mixed flow machines. This program is a combination of the flow analysis programs MERIDL and TSONIC coupled to the boundary layer program BLAYER. The subsonic flow solution is obtained by a finite difference, stream function analysis. Transonic blade-to-blade solutions are obtained using information from the finite difference, stream function solution with a reduced flow factor. Upstream and downstream flow variables may vary from hub to shroud and provision is made to correct for loss of stagnation pressure. Boundary layer analyses are made to determine profile and end-wall friction losses. Empirical loss models are used to account for incidence, secondary flow, disc windage, and clearance losses. The total losses are then used to calculate stator, rotor, and stage efficiency. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 370/3033 under TSS with a central memory requirement of approximately 4.5 Megs of 8 bit bytes. This program was developed in 1985.

  10. Wind turbine control systems: Dynamic model development using system identification and the fast structural dynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, J.G.; Wright, A.D.; Butterfield, C.P.

    1996-10-01

    Mitigating the effects of damaging wind turbine loads and responses extends the lifetime of the turbine and, consequently, reduces the associated Cost of Energy (COE). Active control of aerodynamic devices is one option for achieving wind turbine load mitigation. Generally speaking, control system design and analysis requires a reasonable dynamic model of {open_quotes}plant,{close_quotes} (i.e., the system being controlled). This paper extends the wind turbine aileron control research, previously conducted at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), by presenting a more detailed development of the wind turbine dynamic model. In prior research, active aileron control designs were implemented in an existing wind turbine structural dynamics code, FAST (Fatigue, Aerodynamics, Structures, and Turbulence). In this paper, the FAST code is used, in conjunction with system identification, to generate a wind turbine dynamic model for use in active aileron control system design. The FAST code is described and an overview of the system identification technique is presented. An aileron control case study is used to demonstrate this modeling technique. The results of the case study are then used to propose ideas for generalizing this technique for creating dynamic models for other wind turbine control applications.

  11. Optimization of Wind Turbine Airfoils/Blades and Wind Farm Layouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaomin

    Shape optimization is widely used in the design of wind turbine blades. In this dissertation, a numerical optimization method called Genetic Algorithm (GA) is applied to address the shape optimization of wind turbine airfoils and blades. In recent years, the airfoil sections with blunt trailing edge (called flatback airfoils) have been proposed for the inboard regions of large wind-turbine blades because they provide several structural and aerodynamic performance advantages. The FX, DU and NACA 64 series airfoils are thick airfoils widely used for wind turbine blade application. They have several advantages in meeting the intrinsic requirements for wind turbines in terms of design point, off-design capabilities and structural properties. This research employ both single- and multi-objective genetic algorithms (SOGA and MOGA) for shape optimization of Flatback, FX, DU and NACA 64 series airfoils to achieve maximum lift and/or maximum lift to drag ratio. The commercially available software FLUENT is employed for calculation of the flow field using the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations in conjunction with a two-equation Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model and a three equation k-kl-o turbulence model. The optimization methodology is validated by an optimization study of subsonic and transonic airfoils (NACA0012 and RAE 2822 airfoils). In this dissertation, we employ DU 91-W2-250, FX 66-S196-V1, NACA 64421, and Flat-back series of airfoils (FB-3500-0050, FB-3500-0875, and FB-3500-1750) and compare their performance with S809 airfoil used in NREL Phase II and III wind turbines; the lift and drag coefficient data for these airfoils sections are available. The output power of the turbine is calculated using these airfoil section blades for a given B and lambda and is compared with the original NREL Phase II and Phase III turbines using S809 airfoil section. It is shown that by a suitable choice of airfoil section of HAWT blade, the power generated

  12. SERI advanced wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Jager, D.

    1992-02-01

    The primary goal of the Solar Energy Research Institute's (SERI) advanced wind turbine blades is to convert the kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical energy in an inexpensive and efficient manner. To accomplish this goal, advanced wind turbine blades have been developed by SERI that utilize unique airfoil technology. Performance characteristics of the advanced blades were verified through atmospheric testing on fixed-pitch, stall-regulated horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Of the various wind turbine configurations, the stall-regulated HAWT dominates the market because of its simplicity and low cost. Results of the atmospheric tests show that the SERI advanced blades produce 10% to 30% more energy than conventional blades. 6 refs.

  13. SERI advanced wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Jager, D.

    1992-02-01

    The primary goal of the Solar Energy Research Institute`s (SERI) advanced wind turbine blades is to convert the kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical energy in an inexpensive and efficient manner. To accomplish this goal, advanced wind turbine blades have been developed by SERI that utilize unique airfoil technology. Performance characteristics of the advanced blades were verified through atmospheric testing on fixed-pitch, stall-regulated horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Of the various wind turbine configurations, the stall-regulated HAWT dominates the market because of its simplicity and low cost. Results of the atmospheric tests show that the SERI advanced blades produce 10% to 30% more energy than conventional blades. 6 refs.

  14. Improved automobile gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kofskey, M. G.; Katsanis, T.; Roelke, R. J.; Mclallin, K. L.; Wong, R. Y.; Schumann, L. F.; Galvas, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    Upgraded engine delivers 100 hp in 3500 lb vehicle. Improved fuel economy is due to combined effects of reduced weight, reduced power-to-weight ratio, increased turbine inlet pressure, and improved component efficiencies at part power.

  15. Turbine Performance Optimization Task Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Lisa W.; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Capability to optimize for turbine performance and accurately predict unsteady loads will allow for increased reliability, Isp, and thrust-to-weight. The development of a fast, accurate aerodynamic design, analysis, and optimization system is required.

  16. High-efficiency wind turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hein, L. A.; Myers, W. N.

    1980-01-01

    Vertical axis wind turbine incorporates several unique features to extract more energy from wind increasing efficiency 20% over conventional propeller driven units. System also features devices that utilize solar energy or chimney effluents during periods of no wind.

  17. SERI advanced wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Jager, D.

    1992-02-01

    The primary goal of the Solar Energy Research Institute's (SERI) advanced wind turbine blades is to convert the kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical energy in an inexpensive and efficient manner. To accomplish this goal, advanced wind turbine blades have been developed by SERI that utilize unique airfoil technology. Performance characteristics of the advanced blades were verified through atmospheric testing on fixed-pitch, stall-regulated horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Of the various wind turbine configurations, the stall-regulated HAWT dominates the market because of its simplicity and low cost. Results of the atmospheric tests show that the SERI advanced blades produce 10 percent to 30 percent more energy than conventional blades.

  18. Gas Turbine Engine Having Fan Rotor Driven by Turbine Exhaust and with a Bypass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suciu, Gabriel L. (Inventor); Chandler, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A gas turbine engine has a core engine incorporating a core engine turbine. A fan rotor is driven by a fan rotor turbine. The fan rotor turbine is in the path of gases downstream from the core engine turbine. A bypass door is moveable from a closed position at which the gases from the core engine turbine pass over the fan rotor turbine, and moveable to a bypass position at which the gases are directed away from the fan rotor turbine. An aircraft is also disclosed.

  19. Coupled Dynamic Modeling of Floating Wind Turbine Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wayman, E. N.; Sclavounos, P. D.; Butterfield, S.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.

    2006-03-01

    This article presents a collaborative research program that the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have undertaken to develop innovative and cost-effective floating and mooring systems for offshore wind turbines in water depths of 10-200 m. Methods for the coupled structural, hydrodynamic, and aerodynamic analysis of floating wind turbine systems are presented in the frequency domain. This analysis was conducted by coupling the aerodynamics and structural dynamics code FAST [4] developed at NREL with the wave load and response simulation code WAMIT (Wave Analysis at MIT) [15] developed at MIT. Analysis tools were developed to consider coupled interactions between the wind turbine and the floating system. These include the gyroscopic loads of the wind turbine rotor on the tower and floater, the aerodynamic damping introduced by the wind turbine rotor, the hydrodynamic damping introduced by wave-body interactions, and the hydrodynamic forces caused by wave excitation. Analyses were conducted for two floater concepts coupled with the NREL 5-MW Offshore Baseline wind turbine in water depths of 10-200 m: the MIT/NREL Shallow Drafted Barge (SDB) and the MIT/NREL Tension Leg Platform (TLP). These concepts were chosen to represent two different methods of achieving stability to identify differences in performance and cost of the different stability methods. The static and dynamic analyses of these structures evaluate the systems' responses to wave excitation at a range of frequencies, the systems' natural frequencies, and the standard deviations of the systems' motions in each degree of freedom in various wind and wave environments. This article in various wind and wave environments. This article explores the effects of coupling the wind turbine with the floating platform, the effects of water depth, and the effects of wind speed on the systems' performance. An economic feasibility analysis of the two concepts

  20. Integrated design and analysis of advanced airfoil shapes for gas turbine engines

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, B.A.; Rooney, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    An integral process in the mechanical design of gas turbine airfoils is the conversion of hot or running geometry into cold or as-manufactured geometry. New and advanced methods of design and analysis must be created that parallel new and technologically advanced turbine components. In particular, to achieve the high performance required of today's gas turbine engines, the industry is forced to design and manufacture increasingly complex airfoil shapes using advanced analysis and modeling techniques. This paper describes a method of integrating advanced, general purpose finite element analysis techniques in the mechanical design process.

  1. Vector control of wind turbine on the basis of the fuzzy selective neural net*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, E. A.; Kovalev, I. V.; Engel, N. E.

    2016-04-01

    An article describes vector control of wind turbine based on fuzzy selective neural net. Based on the wind turbine system’s state, the fuzzy selective neural net tracks an maximum power point under random perturbations. Numerical simulations are accomplished to clarify the applicability and advantages of the proposed vector wind turbine’s control on the basis of the fuzzy selective neuronet. The simulation results show that the proposed intelligent control of wind turbine achieves real-time control speed and competitive performance, as compared to a classical control model with PID controllers based on traditional maximum torque control strategy.

  2. Composite turbine blade design options for Claude (open) cycle OTEC power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Penney, T R

    1985-11-01

    Small-scale turbine rotors made from composites offer several technical advantages for a Claude (open) cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power system. Westinghouse Electric Corporation has designed a composite turbine rotor/disk using state-of-the-art analysis methods for large-scale (100-MW/sub e/) open cycle OTEC applications. Near-term demonstrations using conventional low-pressure turbine blade shapes with composite material would achieve feasibility and modern credibility of the open cycle OTEC power system. Application of composite blades for low-pressure turbo-machinery potentially improves the reliability of conventional metal blades affected by stress corrosion.

  3. Boiler-turbine life extension

    SciTech Connect

    Natzkov, S.; Nikolov, M.

    1995-12-01

    The design life of the main power equipment-boilers and turbines is about 105 working hours. The possibilities for life extension are after normatively regulated control tests. The diagnostics and methodology for Boilers and Turbines Elements Remaining Life Assessment using up to date computer programs, destructive and nondestructive control of metal of key elements of units equipment, metal creep and low cycle fatigue calculations. As well as data for most common damages and some technical decisions for elements life extension are presented.

  4. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Carruthers, William D.; Boyd, Gary L.

    1993-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  5. Rim seal for turbine wheel

    DOEpatents

    Glezer, Boris; Boyd, Gary L.; Norton, Paul F.

    1996-01-01

    A turbine wheel assembly includes a disk having a plurality of blades therearound. A ceramic ring is mounted to the housing of the turbine wheel assembly. A labyrinth rim seal mounted on the disk cooperates with the ceramic ring to seal the hot gases acting on the blades from the disk. The ceramic ring permits a tighter clearance between the labyrinth rim seal and the ceramic ring.

  6. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Carruthers, William D.; Boyd, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  7. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Carruthers, William D.; Boyd, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  8. Gas turbine compressor unit repowering

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.S.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents how a major US gas transmission and storage company restored gas storage peaking capacity by repowering obsolete gas turbine compressor units. Consumers Power Company`s Ray Field located in Macomb County, Michigan, USA, was developed as a 44 BCF working capacity gas storage field in 1966. Due to the high deliverability, the field is operated as a peaking reservoir, handling rates as high as 500 MMCFD on injection and 1,200 MMCFD on withdrawal. Ten 2,750 horsepower gas turbine driven 4-stage centrifugal compressor units were installed in the mid to late 1960`s at the field. The compression is operated 2, 4 and 8 stage, as needed, to cover storage pressures of 450 to 1,800 psig. Each centrifugal compressor is driven by a Pratt Whitney (PW) GG-12 Gas Generator firing into a Cooper-Bessemer (CB) RT-27 Power Turbine. By 1980 parts and maintenance services for the PW GG-12 Gas Generator became very expensive to non-existent. In 1994 Consumers Power committed to a gas turbine unit repowering program as the preferred choice over unit replacement. Two refurbished Solar Centaur T4500 Gas Turbine drives were purchased and installed to repower 2 of the obsolete turbine units. This paper describes the retrofit.

  9. Turbine modifications for district heating

    SciTech Connect

    Sawhney, H.S.; Oliker, I.; Silaghy, F.J.

    1983-01-01

    This paper discusses the technical and economic feasibilities of retrofitting existing turbine-generators and replacing existing turbine-generators with specially designed district heating units. Topics considered include turbine retrofit options (approach and design criteria, district heating equipment), new district heating turbines (approach and design criteria, turbine selection), and heat generation costs. The conclusions of the analysis include: no technical barrier was discovered for converting the Potomac River Power Plant to a cogeneration facility, additional equipment required for the district heating operation is of conventional design, the existing steam turbines and associated system components can be retrofitted for district heating operation, the modified units retain the flexibility of producing 100% electric power output when the district heating load is disconnected, the district heating system uses indirect heating of water by extraction steam (the purity of which is not degraded), about three and a half times more heat can be extracted from units designed specifically for cogeneration than from modified units, and the described methodology can be used for the assessment of retrofitting existing units to cogeneration operation for power plants located close to heat load centers.

  10. Evaluation of feasibility of prestressed concrete for use in wind turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiblein, S.; Londahl, D. S.; Furlong, D. B.; Dreier, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    A preliminary evaluation of the feasibility of the use of prestressed concrete as a material for low cost blades for wind turbines was conducted. A baseline blade design was achieved for an experimental wind turbine that met aerodynamic and structural requirements. Significant cost reductions were indicated for volume production. Casting of a model blade section showed no fabrication problems. Coupled dynamic analysis revealed that adverse rotor tower interactions can be significant with heavy rotor blades.

  11. Design features of the GTD 8000 and GTD 15000 marine gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanov, Viktor I.

    1992-06-01

    An account is given of the design features and performance of the GTD 8000 and GTD 15000 marine gas turbines, whose simple-cycle thermodynamic efficiencyis of the order of 34-35 percent. A development history is presented for the component design improvements through which such performance levels were achieved. Attention is given to the counterflow combustor, bearings, and high pressure compressor/turbine spool rotor joint assembly features. These powerplants are suitable for hydrofoil and hovercraft applications.

  12. Multiple and variable speed electrical generator systems for large wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersen, T. S.; Hughes, P. S.; Kirschbaum, H. S.; Mutone, G. A.

    1982-01-01

    A cost effective method to achieve increased wind turbine generator energy conversion and other operational benefits through variable speed operation is presented. Earlier studies of multiple and variable speed generators in wind turbines were extended for evaluation in the context of a specific large sized conceptual design. System design and simulation have defined the costs and performance benefits which can be expected from both two speed and variable speed configurations.

  13. DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2004-11-01

    This report includes the progress in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine{reg_sign} (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. The operation of sub-MW hybrid Direct FuelCell/Turbine power plant test facility with a Capstone C60 microturbine was initiated in March 2003. The inclusion of the C60 microturbine extended the range of operation of the hybrid power plant to higher current densities (higher power) than achieved in previous tests using a 30kW microturbine. The design of multi-MW DFC/T hybrid systems, approaching 75% efficiency on natural gas, was initiated. A new concept was developed based on clusters of One-MW fuel cell modules as the building blocks. System analyses were performed, including systems for near-term deployment and power plants with long-term ultra high efficiency objectives. Preliminary assessment of the fuel cell cluster concept, including power plant layout for a 14MW power plant, was performed.

  14. Research Strategy for Modeling the Complexities of Turbine Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simoneau, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    The subject of this paper is a NASA research program, known as the Coolant Flow Management Program, which focuses on the interaction between the internal coolant channel and the external film cooling of a turbine blade and/or vane in an aircraft gas turbine engine. The turbine gas path is really a very complex flow field. The combination of strong pressure gradients, abrupt geometry changes and intersecting surfaces, viscous forces, rotation, and unsteady blade/vane interactions all combine to offer a formidable challenge. To this, in the high pressure turbine, we add the necessity of film cooling. The ultimate goal of the turbine designer is to maintain or increase the high level of turbine performance and at the same time reduce the amount of coolant flow needed to achieve this end. Simply stated, coolant flow is a penalty on the cycle and reduces engine thermal efficiency. Accordingly, understanding the flow field and heat transfer associated with the coolant flow is a priority goal. It is important to understand both the film cooling and the internal coolant flow, particularly their interaction. Thus, the motivation for the Coolant Flow Management Program. The paper will begin with a brief discussion of the management and research strategy, will then proceed to discuss the current attack from the internal coolant side, and will conclude by looking at the film cooling effort - at all times keeping sight of the primary goal the interaction between the two. One of the themes of this paper is that complex heat transfer problems of this nature cannot be attacked by single researchers or even groups of researchers, each working alone. It truly needs the combined efforts of a well-coordinated team to make an impact. It is important to note that this is a government/industry/university team effort.

  15. A Review of Materials for Gas Turbines Firing Syngas Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, Thomas; Wright, Ian G

    2009-05-01

    Following the extensive development work carried out in the 1990's, gas turbine combined-cycle (GTCC) systems burning natural gas represent a reliable and efficient power generation technology widely used in many parts of the world. A critical factor was that, in order to operate at the high turbine entry temperatures required for high efficiency operation, aero-engine technology, i.e., single-crystal blades, thermal barrier coatings, and sophisticated cooling techniques had to be rapidly scaled up and introduced into these large gas turbines. The problems with reliability that resulted have been largely overcome, so that the high-efficiency GTCC power generation system is now a mature technology, capable of achieving high levels of availability. The high price of natural gas and concern about emission of greenhouse gases has focused attention on the desirability of replacing natural gas with gas derived from coal (syngas) in these gas turbine systems, since typical systems analyses indicate that IGCC plants have some potential to fulfil the requirement for a zero-emissions power generation system. In this review, the current status of materials for the critical hot gas path parts in large gas turbines is briefly considered in the context of the need to burn syngas. A critical factor is that the syngas is a low-Btu fuel, and the higher mass flow compared to natural gas will tend to increase the power output of the engine. However, modifications to the turbine and to the combustion system also will be necessary. It will be shown that many of the materials used in current engines will also be applicable to units burning syngas but, since the combustion environment will contain a greater level of impurities (especially sulfur, water vapor, and particulates), the durability of some components may be prejudiced. Consequently, some effort will be needed to develop improved coatings to resist attack by sulfur-containing compounds, and also erosion.

  16. TIGER TM : Intelligent continuous monitoring of gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, I.; Hibbert, J.; Milne, R.; Nicol, C.

    1998-07-01

    The field of condition monitoring has been an area of rapid growth, with many specialized techniques being developed to measure or predict the health of a particular item of plant. Much of the most recent work has gone into the diagnosis of problems on rotating machines through the application of vibration analysis techniques. These techniques though useful can have a number of limiting factors, such as the need to install specialized sensors and measurement equipment, or the limited scope of the type of data measured. It was recognized in 1992, that the surveillance and condition monitoring procedures available for critical plant, such as gas turbines, were not as comprehensive as they might be and that a novel approach was required to give the operator the necessary holistic view of the health of the plant. This would naturally provide an assessment of the maintenance practices required to yield the highest possible availability without the need to install extensive new instrumentation. From the above objective, the TIGER system was designed which utilizes available data from the gas turbine control system or additionally the plant DCS to measure the behavior of the gas turbine and its associated sub systems. These measured parameters are then compared with an internal model of the turbine system and used to diagnose incorrect responses and therefore the item that is at fault, allowing the operator to quickly restart the turbine after a trip or perform condition based maintenance at the next scheduled outage. This philosophy has been built into the TIGER system and the purpose of this paper is to illustrate its functionality and some of the innovative techniques used in the diagnosis of real gas turbine problems. This is achieved by discussing three case studies where TIGER was integral in returning the plant to operation more quickly than can normally be expected.

  17. MOD-2 wind turbine farm stability study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinrichsen, E. N.

    1980-01-01

    The dynamics of single and multiple 2.5 ME, Boeing MOD-2 wind turbine generators (WTGs) connected to utility power systems were investigated. The analysis was based on digital simulation. Both time response and frequency response methods were used. The dynamics of this type of WTG are characterized by two torsional modes, a low frequency 'shaft' mode below 1 Hz and an 'electrical' mode at 3-5 Hz. High turbine inertia and low torsional stiffness between turbine and generator are inherent features. Turbine control is based on electrical power, not turbine speed as in conventional utility turbine generators. Multi-machine dynamics differ very little from single machine dynamics.

  18. HUMID AIR TURBINE CYCLE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Tuthill

    2002-07-18

    The Humid Air Turbine (HAT) Cycle Technology Development Program focused on obtaining HAT cycle combustor technology that will be the foundation of future products. The work carried out under the auspices of the HAT Program built on the extensive low emissions stationary gas turbine work performed in the past by Pratt & Whitney (P&W). This Program is an integral part of technology base development within the Advanced Turbine Systems Program at the Department of Energy (DOE) and its experiments stretched over 5 years. The goal of the project was to fill in technological data gaps in the development of the HAT cycle and identify a combustor configuration that would efficiently burn high moisture, high-pressure gaseous fuels with low emissions. The major emphasis will be on the development of kinetic data, computer modeling, and evaluations of combustor configurations. The Program commenced during the 4th Quarter of 1996 and closed in the 4th Quarter of 2001. It teamed the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) with P&W, the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), and a subcontractor on-site at UTRC, kraftWork Systems Inc. The execution of the program started with bench-top experiments that were conducted at UTRC for extending kinetic mechanisms to HAT cycle temperature, pressure, and moisture conditions. The fundamental data generated in the bench-top experiments was incorporated into the analytical tools available at P&W to design the fuel injectors and combustors. The NETL then used the hardware to conduct combustion rig experiments to evaluate the performance of the combustion systems at elevated pressure and temperature conditions representative of the HAT cycle. The results were integrated into systems analysis done by kraftWork to verify that sufficient understanding of the technology had been achieved and that large-scale technological application and demonstration could be undertaken as follow-on activity. An optional program extended the

  19. Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    Westinghouse's Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine System Program (DE-AC2l-86MC23167) was originally split into two major phases - a Basic Program and an Option. The Basic Program also contained two phases. The development of a 6 atm, 7 lb/s, 12 MMBtu/hr slagging combustor with an extended period of testing of the subscale combustor, was the first part of the Basic Program. In the second phase of the Basic Program, the combustor was to be operated over a 3-month period with a stationary cascade to study the effect of deposition, erosion and corrosion on combustion turbine components. The testing of the concept, in subscale, has demonstrated its ability to handle high- and low-sulfur bituminous coals, and low-sulfur subbituminous coal. Feeding the fuel in the form of PC has proven to be superior to CWM type feed. The program objectives relative to combustion efficiency, combustor exit temperature, NO[sub x] emissions, carbon burnout, and slag rejection have been met. Objectives for alkali, particulate, and SO[sub x] levels leaving the combustor were not met by the conclusion of testing at Textron. It is planned to continue this testing, to achieve all desired emission levels, as part of the W/NSP program to commercialize the slagging combustor technology.

  20. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    W. R. Laster; E. Anoshkina

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1 - Implementation Plan, Phase 2 - Validation Testing and Phase 3 - Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  1. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Laster, W. R.; Anoshkina, E.

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1- Implementation Plan, Phase 2- Validation Testing and Phase 3 – Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  2. Combustor development for automotive gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, P.T.; Anderson, D.N.; Williams, J.R.

    1983-09-01

    This paper describes the development of a combustion system for the AGT 100 automotive gas turbine engine. The AGT 100 is a 100 hp engine being developed by Detroit Diesel Allison Division of General Motors Corporation. To achieve optimum fuel economy, the AGT 100 engine operates on a regenerative cycle. A maximum turbine inlet temperature of 1288/sup 0/C (2350/sup 0/F) is reached, and air is supplied to the inlet of the combustor at temperatures as high as 1024/sup 0/C (1875/sup 0/F). To meet the low-emission and high-durability requirements at these conditions, a premix/prevaporization ceramic combustor employing variable geometry to control the temperature in the burning zone has been developed. A test section capable of handling 1024/sup 0/C (1875/sup 0/F) inlet air was designed and fabricated to evaluate this combustor. Testing of both metal (transpiration cooled) and ceramic combustors was conducted. Emissions were measured and found to be a function of burner inlet temperature. At 999/sup 0/C (1830/sup 0/F) burner inlet temperature, NO /SUB x/ emissions were two orders of magnitude below the program goals. At the same temperature but at a different variable-geometry position, the CO was 30 times below the program goal. Considerable testing was conducted to evaluate the behavior of the ceramic materials used in the combustor. No failures occurred during steady-state operation; however, some cracks developed in the dome during extended transient operation.

  3. DIRECT FUEL/CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2004-05-01

    This report includes the progress in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine{reg_sign} (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. FCE successfully completed testing of the pre-alpha DFC/T hybrid power plant. This power plant was constructed by integration of a 250kW fuel cell stack and a microturbine. The tests of the cascaded fuel cell concept for achieving high fuel utilizations were completed. The tests demonstrated that the concept results in higher power plant efficiency. Also, the preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant including the key equipment layout and the site plan was completed.

  4. ADAPTIVE CLEARANCE CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR TURBINE ENGINES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, Keith M.

    2004-01-01

    The Controls and Dynamics Technology Branch at NASA Glenn Research Center primarily deals in developing controls, dynamic models, and health management technologies for air and space propulsion systems. During the summer of 2004 I was granted the privilege of working alongside professionals who were developing an active clearance control system for commercial jet engines. Clearance, the gap between the turbine blade tip and the encompassing shroud, increases as a result of wear mechanisms and rubbing of the turbine blades on shroud. Increases in clearance cause larger specific fuel consumption (SFC) and loss of efficient air flow. This occurs because, as clearances increase, the engine must run hotter and bum more fuel to achieve the same thrust. In order to maintain efficiency, reduce fuel bum, and reduce exhaust gas temperature (EGT), the clearance must be accurately controlled to gap sizes no greater than a few hundredths of an inch. To address this problem, NASA Glenn researchers have developed a basic control system with actuators and sensors on each section of the shroud. Instead of having a large uniform metal casing, there would be sections of the shroud with individual sensors attached internally that would move slightly to reform and maintain clearance. The proposed method would ultimately save the airline industry millions of dollars.

  5. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    W. R. Laster; E. Anoshkina; P. Szedlacsek

    2006-03-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse is conducting a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1-Implementation Plan, Phase 2-Validation Testing and Phase 3-Field Testing. The Phase 1 program has been completed. Phase II was initiated in October 2004. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCL{trademark}) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to react part of the fuel, increasing the fuel/air mixture temperature. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the catalytic concept will be demonstrated through subscale testing. Phase III will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  6. Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    GE has achieved a leadership position in the worldwide gas turbine industry in both industrial/utility markets and in aircraft engines. This design and manufacturing base plus our close contact with the users provides the technology for creation of the next generation advanced power generation systems for both the industrial and utility industries. GE has been active in the definition of advanced turbine systems for several years. These systems will leverage the technology from the latest developments in the entire GE gas turbine product line. These products will be USA based in engineering and manufacturing and are marketed through the GE Industrial and Power Systems. Achieving the advanced turbine system goals of 60% efficiency, 8 ppmvd NOx and 10% electric power cost reduction imposes competing characteristics on the gas turbine system. Two basic technical issues arise from this. The turbine inlet temperature of the gas turbine must increase to achieve both efficiency and cost goals. However, higher temperatures move in the direction of increased NOx emission. Improved coating and materials technologies along with creative combustor design can result in solutions to achieve the ultimate goal.

  7. Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, August 25--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    GE has achieved a leadership position in the worldwide gas turbine industry in both industrial/utility markets and in aircraft engines. This design and manufacturing base plus our close contact with the users provides the technology for creation of the next generation advanced power generation systems for both the industrial and utility industries. GE has been active in the definition of advanced turbine systems for several years. These systems will leverage the technology from the latest developments in the entire GE gas turbine product line. These products will be USA based in engineering and manufacturing and are marketed through the GE Industrial and Power Systems. Achieving the advanced turbine system goals of 60% efficiency, 8 ppmvd NOx and 10% electric power cost reduction imposes competing characteristics on the gas turbine system. Two basic technical issues arise from this. The turbine inlet temperature of the gas turbine must increase to achieve both efficiency and cost goals. However, higher temperatures move in the direction of increased NOx emission. Improved coating and materials technologies along with creative combustor design can result in solutions to achieve the ultimate goal.

  8. Wind turbines and human health.

    PubMed

    Knopper, Loren D; Ollson, Christopher A; McCallum, Lindsay C; Whitfield Aslund, Melissa L; Berger, Robert G; Souweine, Kathleen; McDaniel, Mary

    2014-01-01

    The association between wind turbines and health effects is highly debated. Some argue that reported health effects are related to wind turbine operation [electromagnetic fields (EMF), shadow flicker, audible noise, low-frequency noise, infrasound]. Others suggest that when turbines are sited correctly, effects are more likely attributable to a number of subjective variables that result in an annoyed/stressed state. In this review, we provide a bibliographic-like summary and analysis of the science around this issue specifically in terms of noise (including audible, low-frequency noise, and infrasound), EMF, and shadow flicker. Now there are roughly 60 scientific peer-reviewed articles on this issue. The available scientific evidence suggests that EMF, shadow flicker, low-frequency noise, and infrasound from wind turbines are not likely to affect human health; some studies have found that audible noise from wind turbines can be annoying to some. Annoyance may be associated with some self-reported health effects (e.g., sleep disturbance) especially at sound pressure levels >40 dB(A). Because environmental noise above certain levels is a recognized factor in a number of health issues, siting restrictions have been implemented in many jurisdictions to limit noise exposure. These setbacks should help alleviate annoyance from noise. Subjective variables (attitudes and expectations) are also linked to annoyance and have the potential to facilitate other health complaints via the nocebo effect. Therefore, it is possible that a segment of the population may remain annoyed (or report other health impacts) even when noise limits are enforced. Based on the findings and scientific merit of the available studies, the weight of evidence suggests that when sited properly, wind turbines are not related to adverse health. Stemming from this review, we provide a number of recommended best practices for wind turbine development in the context of human health. PMID:24995266

  9. Wind Turbines and Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Knopper, Loren D.; Ollson, Christopher A.; McCallum, Lindsay C.; Whitfield Aslund, Melissa L.; Berger, Robert G.; Souweine, Kathleen; McDaniel, Mary

    2014-01-01

    The association between wind turbines and health effects is highly debated. Some argue that reported health effects are related to wind turbine operation [electromagnetic fields (EMF), shadow flicker, audible noise, low-frequency noise, infrasound]. Others suggest that when turbines are sited correctly, effects are more likely attributable to a number of subjective variables that result in an annoyed/stressed state. In this review, we provide a bibliographic-like summary and analysis of the science around this issue specifically in terms of noise (including audible, low-frequency noise, and infrasound), EMF, and shadow flicker. Now there are roughly 60 scientific peer-reviewed articles on this issue. The available scientific evidence suggests that EMF, shadow flicker, low-frequency noise, and infrasound from wind turbines are not likely to affect human health; some studies have found that audible noise from wind turbines can be annoying to some. Annoyance may be associated with some self-reported health effects (e.g., sleep disturbance) especially at sound pressure levels >40 dB(A). Because environmental noise above certain levels is a recognized factor in a number of health issues, siting restrictions have been implemented in many jurisdictions to limit noise exposure. These setbacks should help alleviate annoyance from noise. Subjective variables (attitudes and expectations) are also linked to annoyance and have the potential to facilitate other health complaints via the nocebo effect. Therefore, it is possible that a segment of the population may remain annoyed (or report other health impacts) even when noise limits are enforced. Based on the findings and scientific merit of the available studies, the weight of evidence suggests that when sited properly, wind turbines are not related to adverse health. Stemming from this review, we provide a number of recommended best practices for wind turbine development in the context of human health. PMID:24995266

  10. Airfoils for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Tangler, James L.; Somers, Dan M.

    2000-01-01

    Airfoils for the tip and mid-span regions of a wind turbine blade have upper surface and lower surface shapes and contours between a leading edge and a trailing edge that minimize roughness effects of the airfoil and provide maximum lift coefficients that are largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoil in one embodiment is shaped and contoured to have a thickness in a range of about fourteen to seventeen percent, a Reynolds number in a range of about 1,500,000 to 2,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 1.4 to 1.5. In another embodiment, the airfoil is shaped and contoured to have a thickness in a range of about fourteen percent to sixteen percent, a Reynolds number in a range of about 1,500,000 to 3,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 0.7 to 1.5. Another embodiment of the airfoil is shaped and contoured to have a Reynolds in a range of about 1,500,000 to 4,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 1.0 to 1.5.

  11. Vertical wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Danson, D.P.

    1988-08-16

    This patent describes a wind driven turbine of the vertical axis type comprising: (a) a support base; (b) a generally vertical column rotatably mounted to the support base; (c) upper and lower support means respectively mounted on the column for rotation therewith; wind driven blades connected between the upper and lower support means for rotation about the column and each blade being individually rotatable about a blade axis extending longitudinally through the blade to vary a blade angle of attach thereof relative to wind velocity during rotation about the column; and (e) control means for variably adjusting angles of attack of each blade to incident wind, the control means including a connecting rod means having drive means for rotating each blade about the associated blade axis in response to radial movement of the connecting rod means and control shaft pivotally mounted within the column and having a first shaft portion connected to the connecting rod means and a second shaft portion radially offset from the first shaft portion and pivotally connected to radially displace the first portion and thereby the connecting rod means to vary the blade angles of attack during rotation about the column.

  12. Airfoils for wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Tangler, J.L.; Somers, D.M.

    2000-05-30

    Airfoils for the tip and mid-span regions of a wind turbine blade have upper surface and lower surface shapes and contours between a leading edge and a trailing edge that minimize roughness effects of the airfoil and provide maximum lift coefficients that are largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoil in one embodiment is shaped and contoured to have a thickness in a range of about fourteen to seventeen percent, a Reynolds number in a range of about 1,500,000 to 2,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 1.4 to 1.5. In another embodiment, the airfoil is shaped and contoured to have a thickness in a range of about fourteen percent to sixteen percent, a Reynolds number in a range of about 1,500,000 to 3,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 0.7 to 1.5. Another embodiment of the airfoil is shaped and contoured to have a Reynolds in a range of about 1,500,000 to 4,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 1.0 to 1.5.

  13. Wind turbine blade construction

    SciTech Connect

    Basso, R.J.

    1988-03-01

    This patent describes a blade for the rotor of a wind turbine or the like having a root end mounted on the rotor and extending generally radially outwardly from the rotor out to a distal end comprising: (a) a cuff at the root end of the blade for mounting on the rotor, and having a generally cylindrical, radially outwardly directed collar; (b) a generally cylindrical reinforcing strut mounted generally coaxially to the collar, and extending radially outwardly from the rotor throughout a portion of the length of the blade; (c) a hollow spar coaxially mounted around the strut and extending substantially the full length of the blade; (d) an elongated, rigid aerodynamic skin defining the exterior, wind-encountering surfaces of the blade, and being mounted over and bonded to the strut and defining the distal end of the blade; (e) the reinforcing strut being of decreasing diameter toward the distal end of the blade; and (f) the reinforcing strut comprising telescoping tubes of graduated length with the larger diameter tubes being longer than the smaller diameter tubes.

  14. Hybrid Turbine Electric Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viterna, Larry A.

    1997-01-01

    Hybrid electric power trains may revolutionize today's ground passenger vehicles by significantly improving fuel economy and decreasing emissions. The NASA Lewis Research Center is working with industry, universities, and Government to develop and demonstrate a hybrid electric vehicle. Our partners include Bowling Green State University, the Cleveland Regional Transit Authority, Lincoln Electric Motor Division, the State of Ohio's Department of Development, and Teledyne Ryan Aeronautical. The vehicle will be a heavy class urban transit bus offering double the fuel economy of today's buses and emissions that are reduced to 1/10th of the Environmental Protection Agency's standards. At the heart of the vehicle's drive train is a natural-gas-fueled engine. Initially, a small automotive engine will be tested as a baseline. This will be followed by the introduction of an advanced gas turbine developed from an aircraft jet engine. The engine turns a high-speed generator, producing electricity. Power from both the generator and an onboard energy storage system is then provided to a variable-speed electric motor attached to the rear drive axle. An intelligent power-control system determines the most efficient operation of the engine and energy storage system.

  15. LP turbine retrofit modernization: Improvements in performance and operation

    SciTech Connect

    Groenedaal, J.C.; Fowls, L.G.; Subbiah, R.; Maxwell, B.P.; Persson, B.

    1996-11-01

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation retrofitted six low pressure (LP) nuclear turbine rotors and associated blade path components at Ringhals 1, a 1960`s vintage English Electric (GEC) unit located near Varobacka, Sweden, and operated by Vattenfall AB. This achieved significant performance improvements and provided improved mechanical features over the original equipment. This paper, discusses design, manufacture, installation, operation and project coordination. The retrofit processes employed for these units can be applied to any potential customers units.

  16. Tuning of PID controllers for boiler-turbine units.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wen; Liu, Jizhen; Fang, Fang; Chen, Yanqiao

    2004-10-01

    A simple two-by-two model for a boiler-turbine unit is demonstrated in this paper. The model can capture the essential dynamics of a unit. The design of a coordinated controller is discussed based on this model. A PID control structure is derived, and a tuning procedure is proposed. The examples show that the method is easy to apply and can achieve acceptable performance. PMID:15535395

  17. Optimization of Turbine Rim Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, J. H.; Tew, D. E.; Stetson, G. M.; Sabnis, J. S.

    2006-01-01

    Experiments are being conducted to gain an understanding of the physics of rim scale cavity ingestion in a turbine stage with the high-work, single-stage characteristics envisioned for Advanced Subsonic Transport (AST) aircraft gas turbine engines fo the early 21st century. Initial experimental measurements to be presented include time-averaged turbine rim cavity and main gas path static pressure measurements for rim seal coolant to main gas path mass flow ratios between 0 and 0.02. The ultimate objective of this work is develop improved rim seal design concepts for use in modern high-work, single sage turbines n order to minimize the use of secondary coolant flow. Toward this objective the time averaged and unsteady data to be obtained in these experiments will be used to 1) Quantify the impact of the rim cavity cooling air on the ingestion process. 2) Quantify the film cooling benefits of the rim cavity purge flow in the main gas path. 3) Quantify the impact of the cooling air on turbine efficiency. 4) Develop/evaluate both 3D CFD and analytical models of the ingestion/cooling process.

  18. Simulating Collisions for Hydrokinetic Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Rakowski, Cynthia L.

    2013-10-01

    Evaluations of blade-strike on an axial-flow Marine Hydrokinetic turbine were conducted using a conventional methodology as well as an alternative modeling approach proposed in the present document. The proposed methodology integrates the following components into a Computa- tional Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model: (i) advanced eddy-resolving flow simulations, (ii) ambient turbulence based on field data, (iii) moving turbine blades in highly transient flows, and (iv) Lagrangian particles to mimic the potential fish pathways. The sensitivity of blade-strike prob- ability to the following conditions was also evaluated: (i) to the turbulent environment, (ii) to fish size and (iii) to mean stream flow velocity. The proposed methodology provided fraction of collisions and offered the capability of analyzing the causal relationships between the flow envi- ronment and resulting strikes on rotating blades. Overall, the conventional methodology largely overestimates the probability of strike, and lacks the ability to produce potential fish and aquatic biota trajectories as they interact with the rotating turbine. By using a set of experimental corre- lations of exposure-response of living fish colliding on moving blades, the occurrence, frequency and intensity of the particle collisions was next used to calculate the survival rate of fish crossing the MHK turbine. This step indicated survival rates always greater than 98%. Although the proposed CFD framework is computationally more expensive, it provides the advantage of evaluating multiple mechanisms of stress and injury of hydrokinetic turbine devices on fish.

  19. A reference Pelton turbine design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solemslie, B. W.; Dahlhaug, O. G.

    2012-09-01

    The designs of hydraulic turbines are usually close kept corporation secrets. Therefore, the possibility of innovation and co-operation between different academic institutions regarding a specific turbine geometry is difficult. A Ph.D.-project at the Waterpower Laboratory, NTNU, aim to design several model Pelton turbines where all measurements, simulations, the design strategy, design software in addition to the physical model will be available to the public. In the following paper a short description of the methods and the test rig that are to be utilized in the project are described. The design will be based on empirical data and NURBS will be used as the descriptive method for the turbine geometry. In addition CFX and SPH simulations will be included in the design process. Each turbine designed and produced in connection to this project will be based on the experience and knowledge gained from the previous designs. The first design will be based on the philosophy to keep a near constant relative velocity through the bucket.

  20. Foundations for offshore wind turbines.

    PubMed

    Byrne, B W; Houlsby, G T

    2003-12-15

    An important engineering challenge of today, and a vital one for the future, is to develop and harvest alternative sources of energy. This is a firm priority in the UK, with the government setting a target of 10% of electricity from renewable sources by 2010. A component central to this commitment will be to harvest electrical power from the vast energy reserves offshore, through wind turbines or current or wave power generators. The most mature of these technologies is that of wind, as much technology transfer can be gained from onshore experience. Onshore wind farms, although supplying 'green energy', tend to provoke some objections on aesthetic grounds. These objections can be countered by locating the turbines offshore, where it will also be possible to install larger capacity turbines, thus maximizing the potential of each wind farm location. This paper explores some civil-engineering problems encountered for offshore wind turbines. A critical component is the connection of the structure to the ground, and in particular how the load applied to the structure is transferred safely to the surrounding soil. We review previous work on the design of offshore foundations, and then present some simple design calculations for sizing foundations and structures appropriate to the wind-turbine problem. We examine the deficiencies in the current design approaches, and the research currently under way to overcome these deficiencies. Designs must be improved so that these alternative energy sources can compete economically with traditional energy suppliers. PMID:14667305

  1. LES investigation of infinite staggered wind-turbine arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaolei; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2014-12-01

    The layouts of turbines affect the turbine wake interactions and thus the wind farm performance. The wake interactions in infinite staggered wind-turbine arrays are investigated and compared with infinite aligned turbine arrays in this paper. From the numerical results we identify three types of wake behaviours, which are significantly different from wakes in aligned wind-turbine arrays. For the first type, each turbine wake interferes with the pair of staggered downstream turbine wakes and the aligned downstream turbine. For the second type, each turbine wake interacts with the first two downstream turbine wakes but does not show significant interference with the second aligned downstream turbine. For the third type, each turbine wake recovers immediately after passing through the gap of the first two downstream turbines and has little interaction with the second downstream turbine wakes The extracted power density and power efficiency are also studied and compared with aligned wind-turbine arrays.

  2. Rugged ATS turbines for alternate fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Wenglarz, R.A.; Nirmalan, N.V.; Daehler, T.G.

    1995-02-01

    A major national effort is directed to developing advanced turbine systems designed for major improvements in efficiency and emissions performance using natural gas fuels. These turbine designs are also to be adaptable for future operation with alternate coal and biomass derived fuels. For several potential alternate fuel applications, available hot gas cleanup technologies will not likely be adequate to protect the turbine flowpath from deposition and corrosion. Past tests have indicated that cooling turbine airfoil surfaces could ruggedized a high temperature turbine flowpath to alleviate deposition and corrosion. Using this specification. ATS turbine that was evaluated. The initial analyses also showed that two-phase cooling offers the most attractive method of those explored to protect a coal-fueled ATS turbine from deposition and corrosion. This paper describes ruggedization approaches, particularly to counter the extreme deposition and corrosion effects of the high inlet temperatures of ATS turbines using alternate fuels.

  3. Advanced industrial gas turbine technology readiness demonstration. Quarterly technical progress report No. 12, 1 December 1979-29 February 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, J. K.; Reeves, G. B.

    1980-03-20

    The component technology base required for improved industrial gas turbine conversion efficiency is discussed. Specific goals are to demonstrate the high-pressure compressor and turbine cooling technologies required to achieve industrial gas turbine efficiencies of 34 to 36% simple cycle and 45 to 48% in combined cycle operation while reducing the number of compressor and turbine parts 80% over state-of-the-art units. The approach involves combining some of the most advanced aircraft turbine cooling and high-pressure compressor technology with the simplicity and ruggedness required of industrial engines to achieve not only improved performance, but also increased durability and low initial cost. The program currently consists of two phases. Phase I, which has been completed, included the conceptual definition of an industrial gas turbine capable of meeting the above goals and the aerothermodynamic designs of compressor and turbine component test rigs. Phase II, which is in progress, consists of component validation testing of the high-pressure compressor and turbine cooling designs which evolved in Phase I. During this quarter, work continued on Phase II, Task III - Compressor Rig Assembly and Test. Assembly of the compressor rig has been completed and final preparation of the rig for transporting to the test facility is in progress.

  4. Fatigue damage of steam turbine shaft at asynchronous connections of turbine generator to electrical network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovsunovsky, A. P.

    2015-07-01

    The investigations of cracks growth in the fractured turbine rotors point out at theirs fatigue nature. The main reason of turbine shafts fatigue damage is theirs periodical startups which are typical for steam turbines. Each startup of a turbine is accompanied by the connection of turbine generator to electrical network. During the connection because of the phase shift between the vector of electromotive force of turbine generator and the vector of supply-line voltage the short-term but powerful reactive shaft torque arises. This torque causes torsional vibrations and fatigue damage of turbine shafts of different intensity. Based on the 3D finite element model of turbine shaft of the steam turbine K-200-130 and the mechanical properties of rotor steel there was estimated the fatigue damage of the shaft at its torsional vibrations arising as a result of connection of turbine generator to electric network.

  5. Wind turbine trailing edge aerodynamic brakes

    SciTech Connect

    Migliore, P G; Miller, L S; Quandt, G A

    1995-04-01

    Five trailing-edge devices were investigated to determine their potential as wind-turbine aerodynamic brakes, and for power modulation and load alleviation. Several promising configurations were identified. A new device, called the spoiler-flap, appears to be the best alternative. It is a simple device that is effective at all angles of attack. It is not structurally intrusive, and it has the potential for small actuating loads. It is shown that simultaneous achievement of a low lift/drag ratio and high drag is the determinant of device effectiveness, and that these attributes must persist up to an angle of attack of 45{degree}. It is also argued that aerodynamic brakes must be designed for a wind speed of at least 45 m/s (100 mph).

  6. Real-Time Closed Loop Modulated Turbine Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyam, Vikram; Culley, Dennis E.; Eldridge, Jeffrey; Jones, Scott; Woike, Mark; Cuy, Michael

    2014-01-01

    It has been noted by industry that in addition to dramatic variations of temperature over a given blade surface, blade-to-blade variations also exist despite identical design. These variations result from manufacturing variations, uneven wear and deposition over the life of the part as well as limitations in the uniformity of coolant distribution in the baseline cooling design. It is proposed to combine recent advances in optical sensing, actuation, and film cooling concepts to develop a workable active, closed-loop modulated turbine cooling system to improve by 10 to 20 the turbine thermal state over the flight mission, to improve engine life and to dramatically reduce turbine cooling air usage and aircraft fuel burn. A reduction in oxides of nitrogen (NOx) can also be achieved by using the excess coolant to improve mixing in the combustor especially for rotorcraft engines. Recent patents filed by industry and universities relate to modulating endwall cooling using valves. These schemes are complex, add weight and are limited to the endwalls. The novelty of the proposed approach is twofold 1) Fluidic diverters that have no moving parts are used to modulate cooling and can operate under a wide range of conditions and environments. 2) Real-time optical sensing to map the thermal state of the turbine has never been attempted in realistic engine conditions.

  7. Energy potential and early operational experience for large wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, W. H.; Thomas, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Projections for the total potential output of large wind turbines in the U.S. are reviewed. NASA has developed nine large windpowered generators, of 100 kW, 200 kW, 2 MW, and 2.5 MW capacities, with rotors 100-300 ft in diameter, and all with horizontal axes. Approximately 214,000 sq miles of the U.S. have been determined as having substantial wind regimes and terrain suitable for large wind turbine siting. This translates into 340,000 Mod 2 (2.5 MW) wind turbines producing 4.9 quads of electricity annually, equivalent to saving 2.5 billion barrels of oil/yr. The cost of electricity is seen as the critical factor in utility acceptance of large wind turbines, and the Mod 2 machines are noted to achieve the 2-4 cents/kWh (1977 dollars) COE which is necessary. Problems such as pollution, including visual, auditory, EM, and land use difficulties are considered, and solutions are indicated.

  8. Power fluctuations smoothing and regulations in wind turbine generator systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babazadehrokni, Hamed

    Wind is one of the most popular renewable energy sources and it has the potential to become the biggest energy source in future. Since the wind does not always blow constantly, the output wind power is not constant which may make some problem for the power grid. According to the grid code which is set by independent system operator, ISO, wind turbine generator systems need to follow some standards such as the predetermined acceptable power fluctuations. In order to smooth the output powers, the energy storage system and some power electronics modules are employed. The utilized power electronics modules in the wind turbine system can pursue many different goals, such as maintaining the voltage stability, frequency stability, providing the available and predetermined output active and reactive power. On the other side, the energy storage system can help achieving some of these goals but its main job is to store the extra energy when not needed and release the stored energy when needed. The energy storage system can be designed in different sizes, material and also combination of different energy storage systems (hybrid designs). Combination of power electronics devises and also energy storage system helps the wind turbine systems to smooth the output power according to the provided standards. In addition prediction of wind speed may improve the performance of wind turbine generator systems. In this research study all these three topics are studied and the obtained results are written in 10 papers which 7 of them are published and three of them are under process.

  9. Materials and Component Development for Advanced Turbine Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Pettit, F.; Meier, G.; Yanar, N.; Chyu, M.; Mazzotta, D.; Slaughter, W.; Karaivanov, V.; Kang, B.; Feng, C.; Chen, R.; Fu, T-C.

    2008-10-01

    In order to meet the 2010-2020 DOE Fossil Energy goals for Advanced Power Systems, future oxy-fuel and hydrogen-fired turbines will need to be operated at higher temperatures for extended periods of time, in environments that contain substantially higher moisture concentrations in comparison to current commercial natural gas-fired turbines. Development of modified or advanced material systems, combined with aerothermal concepts are currently being addressed in order to achieve successful operation of these land-based engines. To support the advanced turbine technology development, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has initiated a research program effort in collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh (UPitt), and West Virginia University (WVU), working in conjunction with commercial material and coating suppliers as Howmet International and Coatings for Industry (CFI), and test facilities as Westinghouse Plasma Corporation (WPC) and Praxair, to develop advanced material and aerothermal technologies for use in future oxy-fuel and hydrogen-fired turbine applications. Our program efforts and recent results are presented.

  10. ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Sy Ali

    2002-03-01

    The market for power generation equipment is undergoing a tremendous transformation. The traditional electric utility industry is restructuring, promising new opportunities and challenges for all facilities to meet their demands for electric and thermal energy. Now more than ever, facilities have a host of options to choose from, including new distributed generation (DG) technologies that are entering the market as well as existing DG options that are improving in cost and performance. The market is beginning to recognize that some of these users have needs beyond traditional grid-based power. Together, these changes are motivating commercial and industrial facilities to re-evaluate their current mix of energy services. One of the emerging generating options is a new breed of advanced fuel cells. While there are a variety of fuel cell technologies being developed, the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) are especially promising, with their electric efficiency expected around 50-60 percent and their ability to generate either hot water or high quality steam. In addition, they both have the attractive characteristics of all fuel cells--relatively small siting footprint, rapid response to changing loads, very low emissions, quiet operation, and an inherently modular design lending itself to capacity expansion at predictable unit cost with reasonably short lead times. The objectives of this project are to:(1) Estimate the market potential for high efficiency fuel cell hybrids in the U.S.;(2) Segment market size by commercial, industrial, and other key markets;(3) Identify and evaluate potential early adopters; and(4) Develop results that will help prioritize and target future R&D investments. The study focuses on high efficiency MCFC- and SOFC-based hybrids and competing systems such as gas turbines, reciprocating engines, fuel cells and traditional grid service. Specific regions in the country have been identified where these

  11. The effect of tip speed ratio on a vertical axis wind turbine at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Colin M.; Leftwich, Megan C.

    2016-05-01

    This work visualizes the flow surrounding a scaled model vertical axis wind turbine at realistic operating conditions. The model closely matches geometric and dynamic properties—tip speed ratio and Reynolds number—of a full-size turbine. The flow is visualized using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) in the midplane upstream, around, and after (up to 4 turbine diameters downstream) the turbine, as well as a vertical plane behind the turbine. Time-averaged results show an asymmetric wake behind the turbine, regardless of tip speed ratio, with a larger velocity deficit for a higher tip speed ratio. For the higher tip speed ratio, an area of averaged flow reversal is present with a maximum reverse flow of -0.04U_∞. Phase-averaged vorticity fields—achieved by syncing the PIV system with the rotation of the turbine—show distinct structures form from each turbine blade. There were distinct differences in results by tip speed ratios of 0.9, 1.3, and 2.2 of when in the cycle structures are shed into the wake—switching from two pairs to a single pair of vortices being shed—and how they convect into the wake—the middle tip speed ratio vortices convect downstream inside the wake, while the high tip speed ratio pair is shed into the shear layer of the wake. Finally, results show that the wake structure is much more sensitive to changes in tip speed ratio than to changes in Reynolds number.

  12. Prospective gas turbine and combined-cycle units for power engineering (a Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ol'khovskii, G. G.

    2013-02-01

    The modern state of technology for making gas turbines around the world and heat-recovery combined-cycle units constructed on their basis are considered. The progress achieved in this field by Siemens, Mitsubishi, General Electric, and Alstom is analyzed, and the objectives these companies set forth for themselves for the near and more distant future are discussed. The 375-MW gas turbine unit with an efficiency of 40% produced by Siemens, which is presently the largest one, is subjected to a detailed analysis. The main specific features of this turbine are that the gas turbine unit's hot-path components have purely air cooling, due to which the installation has enhanced maneuverability. The single-shaft combined-cycle plant constructed on the basis of this turbine has a capacity of 570 MW and efficiency higher than 60%. Programs adopted by different companies for development of new-generation gas turbine units firing synthesis gas and fitted with low-emission combustion chambers and new cooling systems are considered. Concepts of rotor blades for new gas turbine units with improved thermal barrier coatings and composite blades different parts of which are made of materials selected in accordance with the conditions of their operation are discussed.

  13. Vertical axis wind turbine airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij Vasiljevich

    2012-12-18

    A vertical axis wind turbine airfoil is described. The wind turbine airfoil can include a leading edge, a trailing edge, an upper curved surface, a lower curved surface, and a centerline running between the upper surface and the lower surface and from the leading edge to the trailing edge. The airfoil can be configured so that the distance between the centerline and the upper surface is the same as the distance between the centerline and the lower surface at all points along the length of the airfoil. A plurality of such airfoils can be included in a vertical axis wind turbine. These airfoils can be vertically disposed and can rotate about a vertical axis.

  14. Ceramic applications in turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, H. E.; Heitman, P. W.; Lindgren, L. C.; Thrasher, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    The application of ceramic components to demonstrate improved cycle efficiency by raising the operating temperature of the existing Allison IGI 404 vehicular gas turbine engine is discussed. This effort was called the Ceramic Applications in Turbine Engines (CATE) program and has successfully demonstrated ceramic components. Among these components are two design configurations featuring stationary and rotating caramic components in the IGT 404 engine. A complete discussion of all phases of the program, design, materials development, fabrication of ceramic components, and testing-including rig, engine, and vehicle demonstation test are presented. During the CATE program, a ceramic technology base was established that is now being applied to automotive and other gas turbine engine programs. This technology base is outlined and also provides a description of the CATE program accomplishments.

  15. Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database is divided into six files, each corresponding to approximately 16 years of simulation. The files are text files with data in columnar format. The 424MB zipped file containing six data files can be downloaded by the public. The files simulate 10-minute maximum loads for the NREL 5MW wind turbine. The details of the loads simulations can be found in the paper: “Decades of Wind Turbine Loads Simulations”, M. Barone, J. Paquette, B. Resor, and L. Manuel, AIAA2012-1288 (3.69MB PDF). Note that the site-average wind speed is 10 m/s (class I-B), not the 8.5 m/s reported in the paper.

  16. Spin test of turbine rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vavra, M. H.; Hammer, J. E.; Bell, L. E.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental data are presented for the tangential and radial stresses in the disks of the 36,000 horsepower, 4000 rpm turbine for the M-1 engine oxidizer turbopump. The two-stage Curtis turbine is a special light-weight design utilizing thin conical disks with hollow sheet metal blades attached by electron-beam welding techniques. The turbine was fabricated from Inconel 718, a nickel-chromium alloy. The stresses were obtained by strain-gage measurements using a slip-ring assembly to transmit the electrical signals. Measurements were made at different rotative speeds and different thermal loads. In addition to presenting test data, the report describes test equipment, design of associated hardware, test procedures, instrumentation, and tests for the selection and calibration of strain gages.

  17. Wind and solar powered turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, I. D.; Koh, J. L.; Holmes, M. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A power generating station having a generator driven by solar heat assisted ambient wind is described. A first plurality of radially extendng air passages direct ambient wind to a radial flow wind turbine disposed in a centrally located opening in a substantially disc-shaped structure. A solar radiation collecting surface having black bodies is disposed above the fist plurality of air passages and in communication with a second plurality of radial air passages. A cover plate enclosing the second plurality of radial air passages is transparent so as to permit solar radiation to effectively reach the black bodies. The second plurality of air passages direct ambient wind and thermal updrafts generated by the black bodies to an axial flow turbine. The rotating shaft of the turbines drive the generator. The solar and wind drien power generating system operates in electrical cogeneration mode with a fuel powered prime mover.

  18. Dynamics and stability of wind turbine generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinrichsen, E. N.; Nolan, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    Synchronous and induction generators are considered. A comparison is made between wind turbines, steam, and hydro units. The unusual phenomena associated with wind turbines are emphasized. The general control requirements are discussed, as well as various schemes for torsional damping such as speed sensitive stabilizer and blade pitch control. Integration between adjacent wind turbines in a wind farm is also considered.

  19. Radial-radial single rotor turbine

    DOEpatents

    Platts, David A.

    2006-05-16

    A rotor for use in turbine applications has a radial compressor/pump having radially disposed spaced apart fins forming passages and a radial turbine having hollow turbine blades interleaved with the fins and through which fluid from the radial compressor/pump flows. The rotor can, in some applications, be used to produce electrical power.

  20. Turbine Engine Hot Section Technology, 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Presentations were made concerning the development of design analysis tools for combustor liners, turbine vanes, and turbine blades. Presentations were divided into six sections: instrumentation, combustion, turbine heat transfer, structural analysis, fatigue and fracture, surface protective coatings, constitutive behavior of materials, stress-strain response and life prediction methods.

  1. Microprocessor control of a wind turbine generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnecco, A. J.; Whitehead, G. T.

    1978-01-01

    A microprocessor based system was used to control the unattended operation of a wind turbine generator. The turbine and its microcomputer system are fully described with special emphasis on the wide variety of tasks performed by the microprocessor for the safe and efficient operation of the turbine. The flexibility, cost and reliability of the microprocessor were major factors in its selection.

  2. Increasing power generation in horizontal axis wind turbines using optimized flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooney, John A., Jr.

    In order to effectively realize future goals for wind energy, the efficiency of wind turbines must increase beyond existing technology. One direct method for achieving increased efficiency is by improving the individual power generation characteristics of horizontal axis wind turbines. The potential for additional improvement by traditional approaches is diminishing rapidly however. As a result, a research program was undertaken to assess the potential of using distributed flow control to increase power generation. The overall objective was the development of validated aerodynamic simulations and flow control approaches to improve wind turbine power generation characteristics. BEM analysis was conducted for a general set of wind turbine models encompassing last, current, and next generation designs. This analysis indicated that rotor lift control applied in Region II of the turbine power curve would produce a notable increase in annual power generated. This was achieved by optimizing induction factors along the rotor blade for maximum power generation. In order to demonstrate this approach and other advanced concepts, the University of Notre Dame established the Laboratory for Enhanced Wind Energy Design (eWiND). This initiative includes a fully instrumented meteorological tower and two pitch-controlled wind turbines. The wind turbines are representative in their design and operation to larger multi-megawatt turbines, but of a scale that allows rotors to be easily instrumented and replaced to explore new design concepts. Baseline data detailing typical site conditions and turbine operation is presented. To realize optimized performance, lift control systems were designed and evaluated in CFD simulations coupled with shape optimization tools. These were integrated into a systematic design methodology involving BEM simulations, CFD simulations and shape optimization, and selected experimental validation. To refine and illustrate the proposed design methodology, a

  3. Turbine pyrometry for advanced engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, W. H.; Strange, R. R.

    1987-06-01

    The turbine pyrometry requirements for advanced engine designs are examined. The practical use of current optical pyrometer systems is limited to situations where the reflected radiation comprises not more than 50 percent of the total signal. Alternative approaches, including techniques known as 'Advanced Dual Spectral Area Pyrometer', 'Active Pyrometry', passive synchronous detection pyrometry, and techniques that use thermographic phosphors, are discussed. It is suggested that the methods that use thermographic phosphors at low temperatures can be extended to high temperatures and gas turbine engine environment and can be adapted to the vane scanning pyrometer application.

  4. Steam turbine materials and corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Alman, D.E.; Dogan, O.N.; Rawers, J.C.; Schrems, K.K.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

    2007-12-01

    Ultra-supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include power generation from coal at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This project examines the steamside oxidation of candidate alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on applications in high- and intermediate-pressure turbines. As part of this research a concern has arisen about the possibility of high chromia evaporation rates of protective scales in the turbine. A model to calculate chromia evaporation rates is presented.

  5. Improved high pressure turbine shroud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bessen, I. I.; Rigney, D. V.; Schwab, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    A new high pressure turbine shroud material has been developed from the consolidation of prealloyed powders of Ni, Cr, Al and Y. The new material, a filler for cast turbine shroud body segments, is called Genaseal. The development followed the identification of oxidation resistance as the primary cause of prior shroud deterioration, since conversion to oxides reduces erosion resistance and increases spalling under thermal cycled engine conditions. The NICrAlY composition was selected in preference to NIAL and FeCRALY alloys, and was formulated to a prescribed density range that offers suitable erosion resistance, thermal conductivity and elastic modulus for improved behavior as a shroud.

  6. Dynamics modeling and loads analysis of an offshore floating wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonkman, Jason Mark

    -based turbine. Instabilities were also found in the system. The influence of conventional wind turbine blade-pitch control actions on the pitch damping of the floating turbine was also assessed. Design modifications for reducing the platform motions, improving the turbine response, and eliminating the instabilities are suggested. These suggestions are aimed at obtaining cost-effective designs that achieve favorable performance while maintaining structural integrity.

  7. TMF design considerations in turbine airfoils of advanced turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Date, C. G.; Zamrik, S. Y.; Adams, J. H.; Frani, N. E.

    A review of thermal-mechanicalfatigue (TMF) in advanced turbine engines is presented. The review includes examples of typical thermal-mechnical loadings encountered in the design of hot section blades and vanes. Specific issues related to TMF behavior are presented and the associated impact on component life analysis and design is discussed.

  8. Turbulence in vertical axis wind turbine canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinzel, Matthias; Araya, Daniel B.; Dabiri, John O.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental results from three different full scale arrays of vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWTs) under natural wind conditions are presented. The wind velocities throughout the turbine arrays are measured using a portable meteorological tower with seven, vertically staggered, three-component ultrasonic anemometers. The power output of each turbine is recorded simultaneously. The comparison between the horizontal and vertical energy transport for the different turbine array sizes shows the importance of vertical transport for large array configurations. Quadrant-hole analysis is employed to gain a better understanding of the vertical energy transport at the top of the VAWT arrays. The results show a striking similarity between the flows in the VAWT arrays and the adjustment region of canopies. Namely, an increase in ejections and sweeps and decrease in inward and outward interactions occur inside the turbine array. Ejections are the strongest contributor, which is in agreement with the literature on evolving and sparse canopy flows. The influence of the turbine array size on the power output of the downstream turbines is examined by comparing a streamwise row of four single turbines with square arrays of nine turbine pairs. The results suggest that a new boundary layer forms on top of the larger turbine arrays as the flow adjusts to the new roughness length. This increases the turbulent energy transport over the whole planform area of the turbine array. By contrast, for the four single turbines, the vertical energy transport due to turbulent fluctuations is only increased in the near wake of the turbines. These findings add to the knowledge of energy transport in turbine arrays and therefore the optimization of the turbine spacing in wind farms.

  9. Design of low noise wind turbine blades using Betz and Joukowski concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, W. Z.; Hrgovan, I.; Okulov, V.; Zhu, W. J.; Madsen, J.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents the aerodynamic design of low noise wind turbine blades using Betz and Joukowski concepts. The aerodynamic model is based on Blade Element Momentum theory whereas the aeroacoustic prediction model is based on the BPM model. The investigation is started with a 3MW baseline/reference turbine rotor with a diameter of 80 m. To reduce the noise emission from the baseline rotor, the rotor is reconstructed with the low noise CQU-DTU-LN1 series of airfoils which has been tested in the acoustic wind tunnel located at Virginia Tech. Finally, 3MW low noise turbine rotors are designed using the concepts of Betz and Joukowski, and the CQU-DTU-LN1 series of airfoils. Performance analysis shows that the newly designed turbine rotors can achieve an overall noise reduction of 6 dB and 1.5 dB(A) with a similar power output as compared to the reference rotor.

  10. Design and development of a ceramic radial turbine for the AGT101

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finger, D. G.; Gupta, S. K.

    1982-01-01

    An acceptable and feasible ceramic turbine wheel design has been achieved, and the relevant temperature, stress, and success probability analyses are discussed. The design is described, the materials selection presented, and the engine cycle conditions analysis parameters shown. Measured MOR four-point strengths are indicated for room and elevated temperatures, and engine conditions are analyzed for various cycle states, materials, power states, turbine inlet temperatures, and speeds. An advanced gas turbine ceramic turbine rotor thermal and stress model is developed, and cumulative probability of survival is shown for first and third-year properties of SiC and Si3N4 rotors under different operating conditions, computed for both blade and hub regions. Temperature and stress distributions for steady-state and worst-case shutdown transients are depicted.

  11. Development of Fully Coupled Aeroelastic and Hydrodynamic Models for Offshore Wind Turbines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Jonkman, J. M.; Sclavounos, P. D.

    2006-01-01

    Aeroelastic simulation tools are routinely used to design and analyze onshore wind turbines, in order to obtain cost effective machines that achieve favorable performance while maintaining structural integrity. These tools employ sophisticated models of wind-inflow; aerodynamic, gravitational, and inertial loading of the rotor, nacelle, and tower; elastic effects within and between components; and mechanical actuation and electrical responses of the generator and of control and protection systems. For offshore wind turbines, additional models of the hydrodynamic loading in regular and irregular seas, the dynamic coupling between the support platform motions and wind turbine motions, and the dynamic characterization of mooring systems for compliant floating platforms are also important. Hydrodynamic loading includes contributions from hydrostatics, wave radiation, and wave scattering, including free surface memory effects. The integration of all of these models into comprehensive simulation tools, capable of modeling the fully coupled aeroelastic and hydrodynamic responses of floating offshore wind turbines, is presented.

  12. Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, December 1, 1994--February 28, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    Achieving the advanced turbine system goals of 60% efficiency, 8 ppmvd NOx and 10% electric power cost reduction imposes competing characteristics on the gas turbine system. Two basic technical issues arise from this. The turbine inlet temperature of the gas turbine must increase to achieve both efficiency and cost goals. However, higher temperatures move in the direction of increased NOx emission. Improved costing and materials technologies along with creative combustor design can result in solutions to achieve the ultimate goal. The GE Advanced Gas Turbine Development program is focused on two specific products: (1) a 70 MW class industrial gas turbine based on the GE90 core technology utilizing an innovative air cooling methodology; (2) a 200 MW class utility gas turbine based on an advanced GE heavy duty machines utilizing advanced cooling and enhancement in component efficiency. Both of these activities require the identification and resolution of technical issues critical to achieving Advanced Turbine System (ATS) goals. The emphasis for the industrial ATS will be placed upon innovative cycle design and low emission combustion. The emphasis for the utility ATS will be placed upon innovative cycle design and low emission combustion. The emphasis for the utility ATS will be placed on developing a technology base for advanced turbine cooling while utilizing demonstrated and planned improvements in low emissions combustion. Significant overlap in the development programs will allow common technologies to be applied to both products. GE`s Industrial and Power Systems is solely responsible for offering Ge products for the industrial and utility markets. The GE ATS program will be managed fully by this organization with core engine technology being supplied by GE Aircraft Engines (GEAE) and fundamental studies supporting both product developments being conducted by GE Corporate Research and Development (CRD).

  13. Comparing Science Achievement Constructs: Targeted and Achieved

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrara, Steve; Duncan, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    This article illustrates how test specifications based solely on academic content standards, without attention to other cognitive skills and item response demands, can fall short of their targeted constructs. First, the authors inductively describe the science achievement construct represented by a statewide sixth-grade science proficiency test.…

  14. Turbine-Driven Pipe-Cleaning Brush

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werlink, Rudy J.; Rowell, David E.

    1994-01-01

    Simple pipe-cleaning device includes small turbine wheel axially connected, by standoff, to circular brush. Turbine wheel turns on hub bearing attached to end of upstream cable. Turbine-and-brush assembly inserted in pipe with cable trailing upstream and brush facing downstream. Water or cleaning solution pumped through pipe. Cable held at upstream end, so it holds turbine and brush in pipe at location to be cleaned. Flow in pipe turns turbine, which turns wheel, producing desired cleaning action. In addition to brushing action, device provides even mixing of cleaning solution in pipe.

  15. Varieties of Achievement Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukla, Andre; Scher, Hal

    1986-01-01

    A recent article by Nicholls on achievement motivation is criticized on three points: (1) definitions of achievement motives are ambiguous; (2) behavioral consequences predicted do not follow from explicit theoretical assumptions; and (3) Nicholls's account of the relation between his theory and other achievement theories is factually incorrect.…

  16. Motivation and School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maehr, Martin L.; Archer, Jennifer

    Addressing the question, "What can be done to promote school achievement?", this paper summarizes the literature on motivation relating to classroom achievement and school effectiveness. Particular attention is given to how values, ideology, and various cultural patterns impinge on classroom performance and serve to enhance motivation to achieve.…

  17. Mobility and Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Theresa Z.

    A study examined the effect of geographic mobility on elementary school students' achievement. Although such mobility, which requires students to make multiple moves among schools, can have a negative impact on academic achievement, the hypothesis for the study was that it was not a determining factor in reading achievement test scores. Subjects…

  18. PASS and Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, John R.

    Two studies examined the effectiveness of the PASS (Planning, Attention, Simultaneous, and Successive cognitive processes) theory of intelligence in predicting reading achievement scores of normally achieving children and distinguishing children with reading disabilities from normally achieving children. The first study dealt with predicting…

  19. Unsteady flows in a two-dimensional linear cascade with low-pressure turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murawski, Christopher Gabriel

    Experimental studies of unsteady flow phenomena in a low pressure turbine linear cascade are presented. Turbine engine flow passages contain numerous loss mechanisms. The loss mechanisms investigated in this study are low Reynolds number and freestream turbulence effects, secondary flows and wake interactions. Also, a method is implemented which decreases the profile losses due to low Reynolds number effects. The results are presented in three segments. First, the effects of Reynolds number and freestream turbulence intensity on the low-pressure turbine cascade blade are investigated. The condition of the blade's boundary layer is the leading factor controlling the level of profile loss. The losses from the airfoil decrease as the Reynolds number and freestream turbulence increase due to a decrease in the size of the separation zone on the suction side of the turbine airfoil. Boundary layer separation occurs on the suction surface of the turbine. Changes to this region are achieved when attaching different length tail sets to the turbine airfoils which alters the axial chord of each blade. A clear improvement on suction side boundary layer behavior at low Reynolds numbers was seen when the tail extensions were shorter than about 9% of axial chord. Finally, the effect wake disturbance frequency on the secondary flow vortex structure in a turbine cascade is studied. Cylinders are traversed across the front of the blade row to simulate turbine blade disturbances. The response of the secondary flow structure to the movement of the wake generator shuttle with zero, one and multiple wake generator rods are presented. Multiple wake disturbance frequencies are varied from 12 Hz to 52 Hz. Multiple wake disturbance frequency below the axial chord flow frequency enable the secondary flow vortex structure to re-establish itself between each wake disturbance event. Axial chord flow frequency is defined as the axial velocity in the cascade divided by the axial chord length of

  20. High-temperature reactive flow of combustion gases in an expansion turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Godin, T.; Harvey, S.; Stouffs, P.

    1997-07-01

    The analysis of the chemical behavior of the working fluid in gas turbines is usually restricted to the combustion chamber sections. However, the current trend toward higher Turbine Inlet Temperatures (TIT), in order to achieve improved thermal efficiency, will invalidate the assumption of frozen composition of the gases in the first stages of the expansion process. It will become necessary to consider the recombination reactions of the dissociated species, resulting in heat release during expansion. In order to quantify the influence of this reactivity on the performance of high TIT gas turbines, a one-dimensional model of the reactive flow has been developed. Preliminary results were reported in a previous paper. The authors concluded that, in the case of expansion of combustion gases in a subsonic static uncurved distributor nozzle, the residual reactivity must be taken into account above a temperature threshold of around 2,000 K. The present study extend these results by investigating the reactive flow in a complete multistage turbine set, including a transonic first-stage nozzle. A key result of this study is that heat release during the expansion process itself will be considerable in future high-temperature gas turbines, and this will have significant implications for turbine design techniques. Furthermore, they show that, at the turbine exit, the fractions of NO and CO are very different from the values computed at the combustor outlet. In particular, NO production in the early part of the expansion process is very high. Finally, the effects of temperature fluctuations at the turbine inlet are considered. They show that residual chemical reactivity affects the expansion characteristics in gas turbines with TITs comparable to those attained by modern high-performance machines.

  1. A comparative analysis of the economic effect from using cogeneration gas-turbine units and combined-cycle plants in a power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treshchev, D. A.; Loshchakov, I. I.; Romakhova, G. A.

    2010-06-01

    The net cost of heat production at cogeneration stations equipped with gas turbine units, steam turbine units, and combined-cycle plants is analyzed by way of comparison. It is shown that the minimal net cost will be achieved in the case of using certain types of power installations depending on the network tariff for electric energy.

  2. Advanced turbine systems (ATS) program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, September 1 - November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    Achieving the advanced turbine system goals of 60% efficiency, 8 ppmvd NOx, and 10% electric power cost reduction imposes competing characteristics on the gas turbine system: the turbine inlet temperature must increase, although this will lead to increased NOx emission. Improved coating and materials along with creative combustor design can result in solutions. The program is focused on two specific products: a 70 MW class industrial gas turbine based on GE90 core technology utilizing an innovative air cooling methodology, and a 200 MW class utility gas turbine based on an advanced GE heavy duty machines utilizing advanced cooling and enhancement in component efficiency. This report reports on tasks 3-8 for the industrial ATS and the utility ATS. Some impingement heat transfer results are given.

  3. Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly progress report, December 1, 1995--February 29, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    This report describes the overall program status of the General Electric Advanced Gas Turbine Development program, and reports progress on three main task areas. The program is focused on two specific products: (1) a 70-MW class industrial gas turbine based on the GE90 core technology, utilizing a new air cooling methodology; and (2) a 200-MW class utility gas turbine based on an advanced GE heavy-duty machine, utilizing advanced cooling and enhancement in component efficiency. The emphasis for the industrial system is placed on cycle design and low emission combustion. For the utility system, the focus is on developing a technology base for advanced turbine cooling while achieving low emission combustion. The three tasks included in this progress report are on: conversion to a coal-fueled advanced turbine system, integrated program plan, and design and test of critical components. 13 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Aerothermal experiments in turbine rim seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittman, Lionel Obadiah, Jr.

    Purge flows are necessary for ensuring that hot gasses do not penetrate the thermally sensitive rim seal and disk cavity regions of turbines. The temperature and mass flow rate of the purge air can affect the component life and aerodynamic performance of a turbine stage. Therefore it is of interest to understand the basic mechanisms that govern this complex flow problem. The present work focuses on two turbine rim seal investigations. The first focused on temperature measurements in the rim cavity region of a rotating, high-speed, low-pressure turbine as means to quantify a rim seal's effectiveness. The seal had a realistic geometry with a small axial overlap between the stationary and rotating components. The purge flow rate was varied from 0 to 1 percent of the core mass flow rate. The results will describe the temperatures as well as the seal's effectiveness as a function of the purge flow rate, and turbine operating point. The second was a study on the effect of purge flow on the aerodynamic performance of a turbine stage. Exit flow field surveys were taken in both a low pressure turbine stage and a high pressure turbine stage. Also a computational study was done on the low pressure turbine stage to add insight into the effect of purge flow on turbine stage performance. In addition, the computation results provide insight into the effect of purge flow on the low pressure turbine blade passage flow field.

  5. Multistage Simulations of the GE90 Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Mark G.; Vitt, Paul H.; Topp, David A.; Saeidi, Sohrab; Hunter, Scott D.; Dailey, Lyle D.; Beach, Timothy A.

    1999-01-01

    The average passage approach has been used to analyze three multistage configurations of the GE90 turbine. These are a high pressure turbine rig, a low pressure turbine rig and a full turbine configuration comprising 18 blade rows of the GE90 engine at takeoff conditions. Cooling flows in the high pressure turbine have been simulated using source terms. This is the first time a dual-spool cooled turbine has been analyzed in 3D using a multistage approach. There is good agreement between the simulations and experimental results. Multistage and component interaction effects are also presented. The parallel efficiency of the code is excellent at 87.3% using 121 processors on an SGI Origin for the 18 blade row configuration. The accuracy and efficiency of the calculation now allow it to be effectively used in a design environment so that multistage effects can be accounted for in turbine design.

  6. Industrial Advanced Turbine Systems Program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Esbeck, D.W.

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in partnership with industry, has set new performance standards for industrial gas turbines through the creation of the Industrial Advanced Turbine System Program. Their leadership will lead to the development of an optimized, energy efficient, and environmentally friendly gas turbine power systems in this size class (3-to-20 MW). The DOE has already created a positive effect by encouraging gas turbine system manufacturers to reassess their product and technology plans using the new higher standards as the benchmark. Solar Turbines has been a leader in the industrial gas turbine business, and is delighted to have joined with the DOE in developing the goals and vision for this program. We welcome the opportunity to help the national goals of energy conservation and environmental enhancement. The results of this program should lead to the U.S. based gas turbine industry maintaining its international leadership and the creation of highly paid domestic jobs.

  7. Aerodynamic interference between two Darrieus wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Schatzle, P.R.; Klimas, P.C.; Spahr, H.R.

    1981-04-01

    The effect of aerodynamic interference on the performance of two curved bladed Darrieus-type vertical axis wind turbines has been calculated using a vortex/lifting line aerodynamic model. The turbines have a tower-to-tower separation distance of 1.5 turbine diameters, with the line of turbine centers varying with respect to the ambient wind direction. The effects of freestream turbulence were neglected. For the cases examined, the calculations showed that the downwind turbine power decrement (1) was significant only when the line of turbine centers was coincident with the ambient wind direction, (2) increased with increasing tipspeed ratio, and (3) is due more to induced flow angularities downstream than to speed deficits near the downstream turbine.

  8. New guidelines for wind turbine gearboxes

    SciTech Connect

    McNiff, B.; Errichello, R.

    1997-12-31

    The American Gear Manufacturers Association in cooperation with the American Wind Energy Association will soon be publishing AGMA/AWEA 921-A97 {open_quotes}Recommended Practices for Design and Specification of Gearboxes for Wind Turbine Generator Systems.{close_quotes} Much has been learned about the unique operation and loading of gearboxes in wind turbine applications since the burgeoning of the modern wind turbine industry in the early 1980`s. AGMA/AWEA 921-A97 documents this experience in a manner that provides valuable information to assist gear manufacturers and wind turbine designers, operators, and manufacturers in developing reliable wind turbine gearboxes. The document provides information on procurement specification development, wind turbine architecture, environmental considerations, and gearbox load determination, as well as the design, manufacturing, quality assurance, lubrication, operation and maintenance of wind turbine gearboxes. This paper presents the salient parts of the practices recommended in AGMA/AWEA 921-A97.

  9. Dynamic survey of wind turbine vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chih-Hung; Hsu, Keng-Tsang; Cheng, Chia-Chi; Pan, Chieh-Chen; Huang, Chi-Luen; Cheng, Tao-Ming

    2016-04-01

    Six wind turbines were blown to the ground by the wind gust during the attack of Typhoon Soudelor in August 2015. Survey using unmanned aerial vehicle, UAV, found the collapsed wind turbines had been broken at the lower section of the supporting towers. The dynamic behavior of wind turbine systems is thus in need of attention. The vibration of rotor blades and supporting towers of two wind turbine systems have been measured remotely using IBIS, a microwave interferometer. However the frequency of the rotor blade can be analyzed only if the microwave measurements are taken as the wind turbine is parked and secured. Time-frequency analyses such as continuous wavelet transform and reassigned spectrograms are applied to the displacement signals obtained. A frequency of 0.44Hz exists in both turbines B and C at various operating conditions. Possible links between dynamic characteristics and structural integrity of wind turbine -tower systems is discussed.

  10. Manufacture, Installation, and Testing of New Environmentally Friendly Hydropower Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Dotson, C. L.; T. J. Dresser, Jr.; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2007-01-02

    Under the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Hydro Turbine Program, the Public Utility District No. 2 of Grant County (Grant PUD) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) shared in the Advanced Hydro Turbine (AHT) design, production support, field testing, and maintenance evaluation. Based on concerns about the ongoing reliability of the Wanapum turbines, Grant PUD explored replacing the Wanapum turbines with AHTs to increase hydraulic efficiency, improve power output, increase hydraulic capacity, achieve equal or better survival of juvenile salmon passage, and improve water quality by reducing spill during periods of high river flows. In February 2005, under DE-FC36-02ID14410, Grant PUD upgraded Unit No. 8 at the Wanapum development of the Priest Rapids Hydroelectric Project (FERC No. 2114) with the installation of an AHT, the first of ten scheduled turbine upgrades at the Wanapum development. In accordance with the July 23, 2004 FERC Order Modifying and Approving Amendment of License Application and consistent with the December 16, 2004 FERC Order Amending License to incorporate the National Marine Fisheries Service’s Biological Opinion issued May 3, 2004, Grant PUD was required to conduct biological testing on the first installed AHT, proving that the AHT met the specified performance criteria for juvenile salmon passage survival. This report summarizes the results of that biological testing, along with the AHT commissioning testing; Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations used to gain further insight into the results of biological testing; Sensor Fish Device data acquisition of pressure, acceleration, and rotations changes experienced by migrating fish in severe hydraulic environments; and additional biological (C-start behavior) testing.

  11. The HWP-300 wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, P.; McLeish, D.

    1983-12-01

    A 300 kW, 22 m diameter wind turbine has been designed and erected (July 1983) on the site of the North of Scotland Hydro-Electric Board at Burgar Hill in Orkney. The machine and its design concepts are described.

  12. ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2002-04-01

    The activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program for this reporting period are described in this quarterly report. The report is divided into discussions of Membership, Administration, Technology Transfer (Workshop/Education), Research and Miscellaneous Related Activity. Items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

  13. ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2002-02-01

    The activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program for this reporting period are described in this quarterly report. The report is divided into discussions of Membership, Administration, Technology Transfer (Workshop/Education), Research and Miscellaneous Related Activity. Items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

  14. CFD methods for wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suatean, Bogdan; Colidiuc, Alexandra; Galetuse, Slelian

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present different CFD models used to determine the aerodynamic performance of horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT). The models presented have various levels of complexity to calculate the aerodynamic performances of HAWT, starting with a simple model, the actuator line method, and ending with a CFD approach.

  15. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a rotor portion having axially stacked adjacent ceramic rotor parts. A ceramic/ceramic joint structure transmits torque between the rotor parts while maintaining coaxial alignment and axially spaced mutually parallel relation thereof despite thermal and centrifugal cycling.

  16. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a hybrid ceramic/metallic rotor member having ceramic/metal joint structure. The disclosed joint is able to endure higher temperatures than previously possible, and aids in controlling heat transfer in the rotor member.

  17. A High Efficiency PSOFC/ATS-Gas Turbine Power System

    SciTech Connect

    W.L. Lundberg; G.A. Israelson; M.D. Moeckel; S.E. Veyo; R.A. Holmes; P.R. Zafred; J.E. King; R.E. Kothmann

    2001-02-01

    A study is described in which the conceptual design of a hybrid power system integrating a pressurized Siemens Westinghouse solid oxide fuel cell generator and the Mercury{trademark} 50 gas turbine was developed. The Mercury{trademark} 50 was designed by Solar Turbines as part of the US. Department of Energy Advanced Turbine Systems program. The focus of the study was to develop the hybrid power system concept that principally would exhibit an attractively-low cost of electricity (COE). The inherently-high efficiency of the hybrid cycle contributes directly to achieving this objective, and by employing the efficient, power-intensive Mercury{trademark} 50, with its relatively-low installed cost, the higher-cost SOFC generator can be optimally sized such that the minimum-COE objective is achieved. The system cycle is described, major system components are specified, the system installed cost and COE are estimated, and the physical arrangement of the major system components is discussed. Estimates of system power output, efficiency, and emissions at the system design point are also presented. In addition, two bottoming cycle options are described, and estimates of their effects on overall-system performance, cost, and COE are provided.

  18. Final Technical Report Recovery Act: Online Nonintrusive Condition Monitoring and Fault Detection for Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Qiao

    2012-05-29

    The penetration of wind power has increased greatly over the last decade in the United States and across the world. The U.S. wind power industry installed 1,118 MW of new capacity in the first quarter of 2011 alone and entered the second quarter with another 5,600 MW under construction. By 2030, wind energy is expected to provide 20% of the U.S. electricity needs. As the number of wind turbines continues to grow, the need for effective condition monitoring and fault detection (CMFD) systems becomes increasingly important [3]. Online CMFD is an effective means of not only improving the reliability, capacity factor, and lifetime, but it also reduces the downtime, energy loss, and operation and maintenance (O&M) of wind turbines. The goal of this project is to develop novel online nonintrusive CMFD technologies for wind turbines. The proposed technologies use only the current measurements that have been used by the control and protection system of a wind turbine generator (WTG); no additional sensors or data acquisition devices are needed. Current signals are reliable and easily accessible from the ground without intruding on the wind turbine generators (WTGs) that are situated on high towers and installed in remote areas. Therefore, current-based CMFD techniques have great economic benefits and the potential to be adopted by the wind energy industry. Specifically, the following objectives and results have been achieved in this project: (1) Analyzed the effects of faults in a WTG on the generator currents of the WTG operating at variable rotating speed conditions from the perspective of amplitude and frequency modulations of the current measurements; (2) Developed effective amplitude and frequency demodulation methods for appropriate signal conditioning of the current measurements to improve the accuracy and reliability of wind turbine CMFD; (3) Developed a 1P-invariant power spectrum density (PSD) method for effective signature extraction of wind turbine faults with

  19. Progress on 2 MW STI8 gas turbine from Pratt & Whitney Canada

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    In 1995 Pratt & Whitney Canada announced their intention to offer industrial and marine versions of the PW100 series aircraft gas turbine widely used in turboprop applications. The new ST18 gas turbine is rated in the two megawatt range for industrial and marine applications and offers an especially compact and lightweight gas turbine for this output level. As in other aeroderivative designs from Pratt & Whitney Canada, headquartered in Longueuil, Quebec, the ST18 gas turbine features a centrifugal compressor design. The two-stage centrifugal compressor, with a unique high efficiency external pipe diffuser system connecting the low pressure and high pressure compressor, achieves an overall compression ratio of 15:1, with air flow of 7.7 kg/s. A relatively good thermal efficiency level of about 30% is achieved in this design. For exhaust emission control purposes, water injection in excess of a 1:1 ratio is utilized in the reverse flow annular combustion system to achieve less than 35 ppm NO{sub x} on natural gas fuel. This paper provides some of the design details of this gas turbine and changes made for the industrial and marine configuration. 4 figs.

  20. Support and power plant documentation for the gas turbine powered bus demonstration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nigro, D. N.; Stewart, R. G.; Apple, S. A.

    1982-01-01

    The operational experience obtained for the GT404-4 gas turbine engines in the intercity and intracity Bus Demonstration Programs is described for the period January 1980 through September 1981. Support for the engines and automatic transmissions involved in this program provided engineering and field service, spare parts and tools, training, and factory overhauls. the Greyhound (intercity) coaches accumulated 183,054 mi (294,595 km) and 5154 hr of total operation. The Baltimore Transit (intracity) coaches accumulated 40,567 mi (65,285 km) and 1840 hr of total operation. In service, the turbine powered Greyhound and Transit coaches achieved approximately 25% and 40% lower fuel mileage, respectively, than did the production diesel powered coaches. The gas turbine engine will require the advanced ceramic development currently being sponsored by the DOE and NASA to achieve fuel economy equivalent not only to that of today's diesel engines but also to the projected fuel economy of the advanced diesel engines of the 1990s. Sufficient experience was not achieved with the coaches prior to the start of service to identify and eliminate many of the problems associated with the startup of new equipment. Because of these problems, the mean miles between incident were unacceptably low. The future gas turbine system should be developed sufficiently to establish satisfactory durability prior to evaluation in revenue service. Commercialization of the gas turbine bus engine remains a viable goal for the future.