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Sample records for achieving viral suppression

  1. Factors associated with retention and viral suppression among a cohort of HIV+ women of color.

    PubMed

    Blank, Arthur E; Fletcher, Jason; Verdecias, Niko; Garcia, Iliana; Blackstock, Oni; Cunningham, Chinazo

    2015-01-01

    Access to sustained HIV medical care is critical to achieving viral suppression. However, a variety of factors may impede or facilitate retention in care or becoming virally suppressed. Though retention and suppression are often treated separately, this study examined both in a cohort of 921 HIV+ women of color who participated in eight demonstration programs across the US. For women who met the inclusion criteria, 83% (n = 587) were retained and 73% (n = 357) were virally suppressed. Average age of women retained was 40.9, and 41.9 for those virally suppressed. The majority were African American/Black or Hispanic/Latina, single, and had no children less than 18 years of age, had health insurance, a high school degree or higher, were stably housed, and unemployed. Some factors associated with retention in care were indecision about seeking HIV medical care (AOR = 0.42) and having children under the age of 18 (AOR = 0.59). Some factors associated with being virally suppressed were living with others (AOR = 0.58), current substance abuse (AOR = 0.38), and fair/poor health (AOR = 0.40). The findings suggest different processes and social mechanisms may influence retention and viral suppression. Interventions seeking to improve retention in care may require tailored program components and strategies that focus on improving viral suppression. PMID:25458205

  2. Rapid HIV Viral Load Suppression in those Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy at First Visit after HIV Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Hoenigl, Martin; Chaillon, Antoine; Moore, David J; Morris, Sheldon R; Mehta, Sanjay R; Gianella, Sara; Amico, K Rivet; Little, Susan J

    2016-01-01

    Expert guidelines for antiretroviral therapy (ART) now recommend ART as soon as possible in all HIV infected persons to reduce the risk of disease progression and prevent transmission. The goal of this observational study was to evaluate the impact of very early ART initiation and regimen type on time to viral suppression. We evaluated time to viral suppression among 86 persons with newly-diagnosed HIV infection who initiated ART within 30 days of diagnosis. A total of 36 (42%) had acute, 27 (31%) early, and 23 (27%) had established HIV infection. The median time from an offer of immediate ART to starting ART was 8 days. A total of 56/86 (65%) initiated an integrase inhibitor-based regimen and 30/86 (35%) a protease inhibitor-based regimen. The time to viral suppression was significantly shorter in those receiving an integrase inhibitor- versus a protease inhibitor-based regimen (p = 0.022). Twenty-two (26%) initiated ART at their HIV care intake visit and 79% of these participants achieved viral suppression at week 12, 82% at week 24 and 88% at week 48. ART initiated at the intake visit led to rapid and reliable viral suppression in acute, early and chronic HIV infection, in particular when integrase inhibitor-based regimens were used. PMID:27597312

  3. Rapid HIV Viral Load Suppression in those Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy at First Visit after HIV Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Hoenigl, Martin; Chaillon, Antoine; Moore, David J.; Morris, Sheldon R.; Mehta, Sanjay R.; Gianella, Sara; Amico, K. Rivet; Little, Susan J.

    2016-01-01

    Expert guidelines for antiretroviral therapy (ART) now recommend ART as soon as possible in all HIV infected persons to reduce the risk of disease progression and prevent transmission. The goal of this observational study was to evaluate the impact of very early ART initiation and regimen type on time to viral suppression. We evaluated time to viral suppression among 86 persons with newly-diagnosed HIV infection who initiated ART within 30 days of diagnosis. A total of 36 (42%) had acute, 27 (31%) early, and 23 (27%) had established HIV infection. The median time from an offer of immediate ART to starting ART was 8 days. A total of 56/86 (65%) initiated an integrase inhibitor-based regimen and 30/86 (35%) a protease inhibitor-based regimen. The time to viral suppression was significantly shorter in those receiving an integrase inhibitor- versus a protease inhibitor-based regimen (p = 0.022). Twenty-two (26%) initiated ART at their HIV care intake visit and 79% of these participants achieved viral suppression at week 12, 82% at week 24 and 88% at week 48. ART initiated at the intake visit led to rapid and reliable viral suppression in acute, early and chronic HIV infection, in particular when integrase inhibitor-based regimens were used. PMID:27597312

  4. The Impact of Age on Retention in Care and Viral Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Yehia, Baligh R.; Rebeiro, Peter; Althoff, Keri N.; Agwu, Allison L.; Horberg, Michael A.; Samji, Hasina; Napravnik, Sonia; Mayer, Kenneth; Tedaldi, Ellen; Silverberg, Michael J.; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Burchell, Ann N.; Rourke, Sean B.; Rachlis, Anita; Mayor, Angel; Gill, M. John; Zinski, Anne; Ohl, Michael; Anastos, Kathryn; Abraham, Alison G.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Moore, Richard D.; Gebo, Kelly A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Retention in care is important for all HIV-infected persons and is strongly associated with initiation of antiretroviral therapy and viral suppression. However, it is unclear how retention in care and age interact to effect viral suppression. We evaluated whether the association between retention and viral suppression differed by age at entry into care. Methods Cross-sectional analysis (2006-2010) involving 17,044 HIV-infected adults in 14 clinical cohorts across the U.S. and Canada. Patients contributed one year of data during their first full calendar year of clinical observation. Poisson regression examined associations between retention measures [U.S. National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), 6-month gap, and 3-month visit constancy] and viral suppression (HIV RNA ≤200 copies/mL) by age group: 18-29, 30-39, 40–49, 50–59, and ≥60 years old. Results Overall, 89% of patients were retained in care using the NHAS measure, 74% with the DHHS indicator, 85% did not have a 6-month gap, and 62% had visits in 3-4 quarters of the year; 54% achieved viral suppression. For each retention measure, the association with viral suppression was significant for only the younger age groups (18-29 and 30-39 years): 18-29 [adjusted prevalence ratio (APR)=1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.03-1.70]; 30-39 (APR=1.23, CI=1.01-1.49); 40-49 (APR=1.06, CI=0.90-1.22); 50-59 (APR=0.92, CI=0.75-1.13); ≥60 years (APR=0.99, CI=0.63-1.56) using the NHAS measure as a representative example. Conclusions These results have important implications for improving viral control among younger adults, emphasizing the crucial role retention in care plays in supporting viral suppression in this population. PMID:25559604

  5. Psychiatric Distress, Drug Use, and HIV Viral Load Suppression in Russia.

    PubMed

    Ustinov, A; Suvorova, A; Belyakov, A; Makhamatova, A; Levina, O; Krupitsky, E; Lioznov, D; Niccolai, L; Heimer, R

    2016-08-01

    To explore the influence of psychiatric distress and substance use on viral load suppression in HIV-infected patients taking ART we analyzed socio-demographic characteristics, CD4+ cells count and viral loads, the Symptom Check List-90 and the Addiction Severity Index of 75 patients who had taken ART for at least 6 month. Using viral load data as the marker of ART success, we divided the sample into two groups. Comparison of the groups showed that education, marriage, and female gender are predictors of optimal viral load suppression. Overall results failed to demonstrate substance use and psychiatric distress as predictors of viral load suppression. PMID:26809193

  6. Viral degradasome hijacks mitochondria to suppress innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Ramansu; Majumdar, Tanmay; Dhar, Jayeeta; Chattopadhyay, Saurabh; Bandyopadhyay, Sudip K; Verbovetskaya, Valentina; Sen, Ganes C; Barik, Sailen

    2013-01-01

    The balance between the innate immunity of the host and the ability of a pathogen to evade it strongly influences pathogenesis and virulence. The two nonstructural (NS) proteins, NS1 and NS2, of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are critically required for RSV virulence. Together, they strongly suppress the type I interferon (IFN)-mediated innate immunity of the host cells by degrading or inhibiting multiple cellular factors required for either IFN induction or response pathways, including RIG-I, IRF3, IRF7, TBK1 and STAT2. Here, we provide evidence for the existence of a large and heterogeneous degradative complex assembled by the NS proteins, which we named “NS-degradasome” (NSD). The NSD is roughly ∼300-750 kD in size, and its degradative activity was enhanced by the addition of purified mitochondria in vitro. Inside the cell, the majority of the NS proteins and the substrates of the NSD translocated to the mitochondria upon RSV infection. Genetic and pharmacological evidence shows that optimal suppression of innate immunity requires mitochondrial MAVS and mitochondrial motility. Together, we propose a novel paradigm in which the mitochondria, known to be important for the innate immune activation of the host, are also important for viral suppression of the innate immunity. PMID:23877405

  7. A Sorting Signal Suppresses IFITM1 Restriction of Viral Entry*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kun; Jia, Rui; Li, Minghua; Zheng, Yi-Min; Miao, Chunhui; Yao, Yunfang; Ji, Hong-Long; Geng, Yunqi; Qiao, Wentao; Albritton, Lorraine M.; Liang, Chen; Liu, Shan-Lu

    2015-01-01

    The interferon-induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) broadly inhibit virus infections, particularly at the viral entry level. However, despite this shared ability to inhibit fusion, IFITMs differ in the potency and breadth of viruses restricted, an anomaly that is not fully understood. Here, we show that differences in the range of viruses restricted by IFITM1 are regulated by a C-terminal non-canonical dibasic sorting signal KRXX that suppresses restriction of some viruses by governing its intracellular distribution. Replacing the two basic residues with alanine (KR/AA) increased restriction of jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus and 10A1 amphotropic murine leukemia virus. Deconvolution microscopy revealed an altered subcellular distribution for KR/AA, with fewer molecules in LAMP1-positive lysosomes balanced by increased levels in CD63-positive multivesicular bodies, where jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus pseudovirions are colocalized. IFITM1 binds to cellular adaptor protein complex 3 (AP-3), an association that is lost when the dibasic motif is altered. Although knockdown of AP-3 itself decreases some virus entry, expression of parental IFITM1, but not its KR/AA mutant, potentiates inhibition of viral infections in AP-3 knockdown cells. By using the substituted cysteine accessibility method, we provide evidence that IFITM1 adopts more than one membrane topology co-existing in cellular membranes. Because the C-terminal dibasic sorting signal is unique to human IFITM1, our results provide novel insight into understanding the species- and virus-specific antiviral effect of IFITMs. PMID:25527505

  8. A sorting signal suppresses IFITM1 restriction of viral entry.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Jia, Rui; Li, Minghua; Zheng, Yi-Min; Miao, Chunhui; Yao, Yunfang; Ji, Hong-Long; Geng, Yunqi; Qiao, Wentao; Albritton, Lorraine M; Liang, Chen; Liu, Shan-Lu

    2015-02-13

    The interferon-induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) broadly inhibit virus infections, particularly at the viral entry level. However, despite this shared ability to inhibit fusion, IFITMs differ in the potency and breadth of viruses restricted, an anomaly that is not fully understood. Here, we show that differences in the range of viruses restricted by IFITM1 are regulated by a C-terminal non-canonical dibasic sorting signal KRXX that suppresses restriction of some viruses by governing its intracellular distribution. Replacing the two basic residues with alanine (KR/AA) increased restriction of jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus and 10A1 amphotropic murine leukemia virus. Deconvolution microscopy revealed an altered subcellular distribution for KR/AA, with fewer molecules in LAMP1-positive lysosomes balanced by increased levels in CD63-positive multivesicular bodies, where jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus pseudovirions are colocalized. IFITM1 binds to cellular adaptor protein complex 3 (AP-3), an association that is lost when the dibasic motif is altered. Although knockdown of AP-3 itself decreases some virus entry, expression of parental IFITM1, but not its KR/AA mutant, potentiates inhibition of viral infections in AP-3 knockdown cells. By using the substituted cysteine accessibility method, we provide evidence that IFITM1 adopts more than one membrane topology co-existing in cellular membranes. Because the C-terminal dibasic sorting signal is unique to human IFITM1, our results provide novel insight into understanding the species- and virus-specific antiviral effect of IFITMs. PMID:25527505

  9. Viral re-suppression and detection of drug resistance following interruption of a suppressive NNRTI-based regimen

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Zoe; Phillips, Andrew; Cohen, Cal; Neuhaus, Jacquie; Baxter, John; Emery, Sean; Hirschel, Bernard; Hullsiek, Kathy Huppler; Stephan, Christoph; Lundgren, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Background Interruption of an NNRTI-regimen is often necessary, but must be performed with caution because NNRTIs have a low genetic barrier to resistance. Limited data exist to guide clinical practice on the best interruption strategy to use. Methods Patients in the drug-conservation arm of SMART who interrupted a fully suppressive NNRTI-regimen were evaluated. From 2003, SMART recommended interruption of an NNRTI by: a staggered-interruption, where the NNRTI was stopped before the NRTIs; or by replacing the NNRTI with another drug before interruption. Simultaneous-interruption of all ARVs was discouraged. Re-suppression rates four-to-eight months after re-initiating NNRTI-therapy were assessed, as was the detection of drug-resistance mutations within two months of the treatment interruption in a subset (N=141). Results Overall, 601/688 (87.4%) patients who re-started an NNRTI achieved viral re-suppression. The adjusted odds ratio (95% CI) for achieving re-suppression was 1.94 (1.02-3.69) for patients with a staggered-interruption and 3.64 (1.37-9.64) for those with a switched-interruption compared to patients with a simultaneous-interruption. At least one NNRTI-mutation was detected in the virus of 16.4% patients with simultaneous-interruption, 12.5% patients with staggered-interruption and 4.2% patients with switched-interruption. Fewer patients with detectable mutations (i.e. 69.2%) achieved HIV-RNA≤400 copies/mL compared to those in whom no mutations were detected (i.e. 86.7%), p=0.05. Conclusions In patients who interrupt a suppressive NNRTI-regimen, the choice of interruption-strategy may influence re-suppression rates when re-starting a similar regimen. NNRTI drug-resistance mutations were observed in a relatively high proportion of patients. These data provide additional support for a staggered- or switched-interruption strategy for NNRTI drugs. PMID:18981767

  10. Viral Suppression and Resistance in a Cohort of Perinatally-HIV Infected (PHIV+) Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Maria Letícia; Santos, Edwiges; Benamor Teixeira, Maria de Lourdes; Poletti, Monica; Sousa, Carolina; Gouvea, Maria Isabel; Nielsen-Saines, Karin; João, Esaú

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to describe viral suppression and antiretroviral (ARV) resistance mutations in an ongoing cohort of perinatally-infected HIV+ (PHIV+) pregnant women. Descriptive analysis was performed using SPSS 18.0. From 2011 to 2014, we followed 22 PHIV+ pregnant women. Median age at prenatal entry was 19 years (Interquartile range (IQR) 17.6–21.0); 86% had an AIDS diagnosis; 81% had disclosed their HIV status to partner 11. The median age at HIV diagnosis was 8.3 y (IQR 4.0–13.6), the median age at sexual debut was 16 years (IQR 14–18). At the time of prenatal care initiation, four (18%) were on their first antiretroviral treatment (ART), eight (36%) in their second regimen and nine (41%) in their third regimen or beyond, and one had no data. Seventeen of 22 (77%) had HIV-viral load (VL) > 50 copies/mL at prenatal care entry, 16 had a genotyping exam performed. Seventeen of 22 PHIV+ had VL results near delivery: 7/17 (41%) had VL < 50 copies/mL. Among those who had genotyping at prenatal entry, 11/16 (69%) had mutations associated with ARV resistance. The most frequent major mutations were K103N, M184V, T215, M41L, D67N at reverse transcriptase gene and M46, I54V and V82A at protease gene. No vertical transmissions occurred. Management of pregnancy among PHIV+ is challenging. Individualized ART are needed to achieve viral suppression in a highly ART-exposed subpopulation. PMID:27338425

  11. Viral Suppression and Resistance in a Cohort of Perinatally-HIV Infected (PHIV+) Pregnant Women.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Maria Letícia; Santos, Edwiges; Benamor Teixeira, Maria de Lourdes; Poletti, Monica; Sousa, Carolina; Gouvea, Maria Isabel; Nielsen-Saines, Karin; João, Esaú

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to describe viral suppression and antiretroviral (ARV) resistance mutations in an ongoing cohort of perinatally-infected HIV+ (PHIV+) pregnant women. Descriptive analysis was performed using SPSS 18.0. From 2011 to 2014, we followed 22 PHIV+ pregnant women. Median age at prenatal entry was 19 years (Interquartile range (IQR) 17.6-21.0); 86% had an AIDS diagnosis; 81% had disclosed their HIV status to partner 11. The median age at HIV diagnosis was 8.3 y (IQR 4.0-13.6), the median age at sexual debut was 16 years (IQR 14-18). At the time of prenatal care initiation, four (18%) were on their first antiretroviral treatment (ART), eight (36%) in their second regimen and nine (41%) in their third regimen or beyond, and one had no data. Seventeen of 22 (77%) had HIV-viral load (VL) > 50 copies/mL at prenatal care entry, 16 had a genotyping exam performed. Seventeen of 22 PHIV+ had VL results near delivery: 7/17 (41%) had VL < 50 copies/mL. Among those who had genotyping at prenatal entry, 11/16 (69%) had mutations associated with ARV resistance. The most frequent major mutations were K103N, M184V, T215, M41L, D67N at reverse transcriptase gene and M46, I54V and V82A at protease gene. No vertical transmissions occurred. Management of pregnancy among PHIV+ is challenging. Individualized ART are needed to achieve viral suppression in a highly ART-exposed subpopulation. PMID:27338425

  12. The HIV Care Continuum: Changes over Time in Retention in Care and Viral Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Yehia, Baligh R.; Stephens-Shields, Alisa J.; Fleishman, John A.; Berry, Stephen A.; Agwu, Allison L.; Metlay, Joshua P.; Moore, Richard D.; Christopher Mathews, W.; Nijhawan, Ank; Rutstein, Richard; Gaur, Aditya H.; Gebo, Kelly A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The HIV care continuum (diagnosis, linkage to care, retention in care, receipt of antiretroviral therapy (ART), viral suppression) has been used to identify opportunities for improving the delivery of HIV care. Continuum steps are typically calculated in a conditional manner, with the number of persons completing the prior step serving as the base population for the next step. This approach may underestimate the prevalence of viral suppression by excluding patients who are suppressed but do not meet standard definitions of retention in care. Understanding how retention in care and viral suppression interact and change over time may improve our ability to intervene on these steps in the continuum. Methods We followed 17,140 patients at 11 U.S. HIV clinics between 2010-2012. For each calendar year, patients were classified into one of five categories: (1) retained/suppressed, (2) retained/not-suppressed, (3) not-retained/suppressed, (4) not-retained/not-suppressed, and (5) lost to follow-up (for calendar years 2011 and 2012 only). Retained individuals were those completing ≥2 HIV medical visits separated by ≥90 days in the year. Persons not retained completed ≥1 HIV medical visit during the year, but did not meet the retention definition. Persons lost to follow-up had no HIV medical visits in the year. HIV viral suppression was defined as HIV-1 RNA ≤200 copies/mL at the last measure in the year. Multinomial logistic regression was used to determine the probability of patients’ transitioning between retention/suppression categories from 2010 to 2011 and 2010 to 2012, adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, HIV risk factor, insurance status, CD4 count, and use of ART. Results Overall, 65.8% of patients were retained/suppressed, 17.4% retained/not-suppressed, 10.0% not-retained/suppressed, and 6.8% not-retained/not-suppressed in 2010. 59.5% of patients maintained the same status in 2011 (kappa=0.458) and 53.3% maintained the same status in 2012

  13. CRISPR/Cas9 cleavage of viral DNA efficiently suppresses hepatitis B virus

    PubMed Central

    Ramanan, Vyas; Shlomai, Amir; Cox, David B.T.; Schwartz, Robert E.; Michailidis, Eleftherios; Bhatta, Ankit; Scott, David A.; Zhang, Feng; Rice, Charles M.; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is prevalent, deadly, and seldom cured due to the persistence of viral episomal DNA (cccDNA) in infected cells. Newly developed genome engineering tools may offer the ability to directly cleave viral DNA, thereby promoting viral clearance. Here, we show that the CRISPR/Cas9 system can specifically target and cleave conserved regions in the HBV genome, resulting in robust suppression of viral gene expression and replication. Upon sustained expression of Cas9 and appropriately chosen guide RNAs, we demonstrate cleavage of cccDNA by Cas9 and a dramatic reduction in both cccDNA and other parameters of viral gene expression and replication. Thus, we show that directly targeting viral episomal DNA is a novel therapeutic approach to control the virus and possibly cure patients. PMID:26035283

  14. The Perilous Road from HIV Diagnosis in the Hospital to Viral Suppression in the Outpatient Clinic.

    PubMed

    Colasanti, Jonathan; Goswami, Neela D; Khoubian, Jonathan J; Pennisi, Eugene; Root, Christin; Ziemer, Dorothy; Armstrong, Wendy S; Del Rio, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    The HIV care continuum has received considerable attention in recent years, however, few care continua focus on the population of patients who are diagnosed during an inpatient hospital admission. We aimed to describe the HIV care continuum for patients newly diagnosed during hospitalization through 24-month follow-up. A retrospective chart review of HIV patients diagnosed at Grady Memorial Hospital from 2011 to 2012 was performed and records were matched to Georgia Department of Public Health HIV/AIDS surveillance data. Descriptive statistics and statistical tests of independence were utilized. Ninety-four new diagnoses were confirmed during the 2-year study period. Median age was 43 years (interquartile range [IQR] 30-51), 77% were male, 72% were non-Hispanic Black, 31% were men who have sex with men (MSM), and 77% were uninsured. Median CD4 count at diagnosis was 134 cells/μL (IQR 30-307). Eighty-four percent received their diagnosis before hospital discharge, 68% linked to care by 90 days, 73% were retained for 12 months, 48% were virologically suppressed by 12 months, 58% were retained for 24 continuous months, and 38% achieved continuous viral suppression (VS) during the initial 24 months after diagnosis. Late diagnosis is a persistent problem in hospitalized patients. Despite relative success with linkage to care and 12-month retention in care, a minority of patients maintained retention and VS for 24 continuous months. PMID:27005488

  15. RNA based viral silencing suppression in plant pararetroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Hohn, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The 35S promoter of cauliflower mosaic virus and that of other plant pararetroviruses gives rise to an RNA, which is both a pre-genome and a polycistronic mRNA. The 600 nucleotide long very structured leader of this RNA is also transcribed separately. The resulting 8S RNA is then converted to a double strand giving rise to a huge set of siRNAs, which suppress silencing. In this Mini-Review I discuss how this versatile stretch of 600 nts constitutes a masterpiece of evolution. PMID:26113850

  16. 80% Viral Suppression by 2020? Understanding the Concept of Engagement in HIV Care and A Call to Action for Nursing.

    PubMed

    Mignano, Jamie L

    2016-01-01

    An updated National HIV/AIDS Strategy released in July 2015 emphasized closing the gaps in the HIV care continuum and a goal of 80% viral suppression by 2020. Engagement in HIV care describes an individual's interaction with the health care system to achieve key clinical and behavioral outcomes along the HIV care continuum. The goal of this concept analysis is to explicate engagement in HIV care by defining the concept, and identifying its antecedents, consequences, and research-related gaps. Research, practice, and policy implications involve leveraging the multiple entry points in the health care system where nurses encounter persons living with HIV. PMID:27301911

  17. Early Viral Suppression Improves Neurocognitive Outcomes in HIV-infected Children

    PubMed Central

    CROWELL, Claudia S.; HUO, Yanling; TASSIOPOULOS, Katherine; MALEE, Kathleen M.; YOGEV, Ram; HAZRA, Rohan; RUTSTEIN, Richard M.; NICHOLS, Sharon L.; SMITH, Renee A.; WILLIAMS, Paige L.; OLESKE, James; MULLER, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate the association of age of viral suppression and central nervous system penetration effectiveness (CPE) score with neurocognitive functioning among school-age children with perinatally-acquired HIV infection (PHIV+). Design We analyzed data from two U.S.-based multisite prospective cohort studies. Methods Multivariable general linear regression models were used to evaluate associations of age at viral suppression and CPE scores [of initial ART regimen and weighted average] with WISC-III or WISC-IV neurocognitive assessments [full scale IQ (FSIQ); performance IQ/ perceptual reasoning index (PIQ/PRI); and verbal IQ/ verbal comprehension index (VIQ/VCI)], adjusted for demographic and clinical covariates. Sensitivity analyses were stratified by birth cohort (before vs after 1996). Results 396 PHIV+ children were included. Estimated differences in mean FSIQ (comparing virally suppressed vs. unsuppressed children) by each age cutoff were 3.7, 2.2, 3.2, 4.4, and 3.9 points at ages 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively. For PIQ/PRI, estimated mean differences were 3.7, 2.4, 2.2, 4.6, and 4.5 at ages 1 through 5 respectively. In both cases, these differences were significant only at the age 4 and 5 thresholds. After stratifying by birth cohort the association between age at suppression and cognitive function persisted only among those born after 1996. Age at viral suppression was not associated with VIQ/VCI; CPE score was not associated with FSIQ, verbal comprehension or perceptual reasoning indices. Conclusions Virologic suppression during infancy or early childhood is associated with improved neurocognitive outcomes in school-aged PHIV+ children. In contrast, CPE scores showed no association with neurocognitive outcomes. PMID:25686678

  18. Retention in Care and Viral Suppression Among Persons Living With HIV/AIDS in New York City, 2006–2010

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Qiang; Wiewel, Ellen W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We estimated the proportions of persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in New York City (NYC) retained in care and virally suppressed. Methods. We used routinely reported laboratory surveillance data to measure trends in retention in care and viral suppression in PLWHA in NYC from 2006 through 2010. Our denominator excluded persons lacking any HIV-related laboratory tests during the 5 years prior to the year of analysis. Results. The proportion of patients retained in care (≥ 1 care visit in a calendar year) was stable, at 82.5% in 2006 and 81.8% in 2010. However, the proportion of persons with evidence of viral suppression increased significantly, from 44.3% to 59.1%. Blacks were least likely to have viral suppression (adjusted prevalence ratio [APR] = 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.87, 0.90). A U-shaped relationship between age and viral suppression was observed, with the 20- to 29-year age group least likely to have a suppressed viral load. Conclusions. Higher and more plausible proportions retained in care and virally suppressed than national estimates may reflect the difference in methodology and our comprehensive HIV-related laboratory reporting system. PMID:25033144

  19. Antiretroviral Therapy and Viral Suppression Among Foreign-Born HIV-Infected Persons Receiving Medical Care in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Tanya R.; Lin, Xia; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Immigrants to the United States are more likely to be diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection compared with native-born persons. Navigating access to healthcare in the United States can be challenging for foreign-born persons, and HIV treatment outcomes may be suboptimal for these persons. We compared characteristics of and assessed disparities in clinical outcomes of foreign-born persons in care for HIV in the United States. The Medical Monitoring Project is a complex sample, cross-sectional survey designed to be nationally representative of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States. Using data from 2009, 2010, and 2011, we conducted descriptive analyses and multivariable logistic regression to assess associations between foreign-born status and antiretroviral therapy (ART) prescription, and between foreign-born status and viral suppression. In all, 13.4% of HIV-infected persons were self-identified as foreign-born; the most common regions of birth were Central America and Mexico (45.4%) and the Caribbean (16.0%). Nearly 90% of foreign-born persons were diagnosed with HIV after entry into the United States. Compared with US-born persons, foreign-born persons were more likely to be younger, Hispanic, less educated, and uninsured. The prevalence of ART prescription (prevalence ratio 1.00; 95% confidence interval 0.98–1.02) was not significantly different between foreign-born and US-born persons. A higher percentage of foreign-born persons achieved viral suppression compared with US-born persons (prevalence ratio 1.05; 95% confidence interval 1.00–1.09). No major disparities in ART prescription and viral suppression were found between foreign-born and US-born HIV-infected persons receiving medical care, despite higher percentages being uninsured. PMID:26986128

  20. JP-8 jet fuel exposure suppresses the immune response to viral infections.

    PubMed

    Harris, D T; Sakiestewa, D; Titone, D; He, X; Hyde, J; Witten, M

    2008-05-01

    The US Air Force has implemented the widespread use of JP-8 jet fuel in its operations, although a thorough understanding of its potential effects upon exposed personnel is unclear. Previous work has reported that JP-8 exposure is immunosuppressive. Exposure of mice to JP-8 for 1A h/day resulted in immediate secretion of two immunosuppressive agents, namely, interleukin-10 and prostaglandin E2. Thus, it was of interest to determine if jet fuel exposure might alter the immune response to infectious agents. The Hong Kong influenza model was used for these studies. Mice were exposed to 1000A mg/m(3) JP-8 (1A h/day) for 7A days before influenza viral infection. Animals were infected intra-nasally with virus and followed in terms of overall survival as well as immune responses. All surviving animals were killed 14A days after viral infection. In the present study, JP-8 exposure increased the severity of the viral infection by suppressing the anti-viral immune responses. That is, exposure of mice to JP-8 for 1A h/day for 7A days before infection resulted in decreased immune cell viability after exposure and infection, a greater than fourfold decrease in immune proliferative responses to mitogens, as well as an overall loss of CD3(+), CD4(+), and CD8(+) T cells from the lymph nodes, but not the spleens, of infected animals. These changes resulted in decreased survival of the exposed and infected mice, with only 33% of animals surviving as compared with 50% of mice infected but not jet fuel-exposed (and 100% of mice exposed only to JP-8). Thus, short-term, low-concentration JP-8 jet fuel exposures have significant suppressive effects on the immune system which can result in increased severity of viral infections. PMID:19022873

  1. Food insecurity, CD4 counts, and incomplete viral suppression among HIV+ patients from Texas Children's Hospital: A pilot study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our goal was to determine the relationship between food insecurity and CD4 counts and viral suppression among pediatric HIV-positive patients. Food insecurity was assessed by validated survey. CD4 counts and viral load were abstracted from patients’ charts. We used linear regression for the dependen...

  2. Inhibition of LSD1 reduces herpesvirus infection, shedding, and recurrence by promoting epigenetic suppression of viral genomes

    PubMed Central

    Hill, James M.; Quenelle, Debra C.; Cardin, Rhonda D.; Vogel, Jodi L.; Clement, Christian; Bravo, Fernando J.; Foster, Timothy P.; Bosch-Marce, Marta; Raja, Priya; Lee, Jennifer S.; Bernstein, David I.; Krause, Philip R.; Knipe, David M.; Kristie, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    The high prevalence of Herpesviruses in the population and the maintenance of lifelong latent reservoirs are challenges to the control of herpetic diseases, despite the availability of antiviral pharmaceuticals that target viral DNA replication. In addition to oral and genital lesions, herpes simplex virus infections and recurrent reactivations from the latent pool can result in severe pathology including neonatal infection and mortality, blindness due to ocular keratitis, and viral-induced complications in immunosuppressed individuals. Herpesviruses, like their cellular hosts, are subject to the regulatory impacts of chromatin and chromatin modulation machinery that promotes or suppresses gene expression. The initiation of herpes simplex virus infection and reactivation from latency is dependent on a transcriptional coactivator complex that contains two required histone demethylases, LSD1 and JMJD2s. Inhibition of either of these enzymes results in heterochromatic suppression of the viral genome and a block to infection and reactivation in vitro. Here, the concept of epigenetic suppression of viral infection is demonstrated in three animal models of herpes simplex virus infection and disease. Inhibition of LSD1 via treatment of animals with the monoamine oxidase inhibitor tranylcypromine results in suppression of viral lytic infection, subclinical shedding, and reactivation from latency in vivo. Phenotypic suppression is correlated with enhanced epigenetic suppression of the viral genome and suggests that, even during latency, the chromatin state of the virus is dynamic. Given the expanding development of epipharmaceuticals, this approach has substantial potential for anti-herpetic treatments with distinct advantages over the present pharmaceutical options. PMID:25473037

  3. Suppression of Fcγ-receptor-mediated antibody effector function during persistent viral infection.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Douglas H; Elsaesser, Heidi; Lux, Anja; Timmerman, John M; Morrison, Sherie L; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Nimmerjahn, Falk; Brooks, David G

    2015-02-17

    Understanding how viruses subvert host immunity and persist is essential for developing strategies to eliminate infection. T cell exhaustion during chronic viral infection is well described, but effects on antibody-mediated effector activity are unclear. Herein, we show that increased amounts of immune complexes generated in mice persistently infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) suppressed multiple Fcγ-receptor (FcγR) functions. The high amounts of immune complexes suppressed antibody-mediated cell depletion, therapeutic antibody-killing of LCMV infected cells and human CD20-expressing tumors, as well as reduced immune complex-mediated cross-presentation to T cells. Suppression of FcγR activity was not due to inhibitory FcγRs or high concentrations of free antibody, and proper FcγR functions were restored when persistently infected mice specifically lacked immune complexes. Thus, we identify a mechanism of immunosuppression during viral persistence with implications for understanding effective antibody activity aimed at pathogen control. PMID:25680277

  4. Sexual risk behaviour and viral suppression among HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Mattson, Christine L.; Freedman, Mark; Fagan, Jennifer L.; Frazier, Emma L.; Beer, Linda; Huang, Ping; Valverde, Eduardo E.; Johnson, Christopher; Sanders, Catherine; McNaghten, A.D.; Sullivan, Patrick; Lansky, Amy; Mermin, Jonathan; Heffelfinger, James; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe the prevalence and association of sexual risk behaviours and viral suppression among HIV-infected adults in the United States. Design: Cross-sectional analysis of weighted data from a probability sample of HIV-infected adults receiving outpatient medical care. The facility and patient response rates were 76 and 51%, respectively. Methods: We analysed 2009 interview and medical record data. Sexual behaviours were self-reported in the past 12 months. Viral suppression was defined as all viral load measurements in the medical record during the past 12 months less than 200 copies/ml. Results: An estimated 98 022 (24%) HIV-infected adults engaged in unprotected vaginal or anal sex; 50 953 (12%) engaged in unprotected vaginal or anal sex with at least one partner of negative or unknown HIV status; 23 933 (6%) did so while not virally suppressed. Persons who were virally suppressed were less likely than persons who were not suppressed to engage in vaginal or anal sex [prevalence ratio, 0.88; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.82–0.93]; unprotected vaginal or anal sex (prevalence ratio, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.73–0.98); and unprotected vaginal or anal sex with a partner of negative or unknown HIV status (prevalence ratio, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.64–0.99). Conclusion: The majority of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the U.S. did not engage in sexual risk behaviours that have the potential to transmit HIV, and of the 12% who did, approximately half were not virally suppressed. Persons who were virally suppressed were less likely than persons who were not suppressed to engage in sexual risk behaviours. PMID:25000558

  5. Adeno-Associated Viral Vector-Induced Overexpression of Neuropeptide Y Y2 Receptors in the Hippocampus Suppresses Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woldbye, David P. D.; Angehagen, Mikael; Gotzsche, Casper R.; Elbrond-Bek, Heidi; Sorensen, Andreas T.; Christiansen, Soren H.; Olesen, Mikkel V.; Nikitidou, Litsa; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Kanter-Schlifke, Irene; Kokaia, Merab

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy using recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors overexpressing neuropeptide Y in the hippocampus exerts seizure-suppressant effects in rodent epilepsy models and is currently considered for clinical application in patients with intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Seizure suppression by neuropeptide Y in the hippocampus is…

  6. Informal Caregiver Characteristics Associated with Viral Load Suppression Among Current or Former Injection Drug Users Living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Mary M; Robinson, Allysha C; Nguyen, Trang Q; Knowlton, Amy R

    2015-11-01

    Few studies have examined the association between having an informal (unpaid) caregiver and viral suppression among persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV) who are on antiretroviral therapy. The current study examined relationships between caregivers' individual and social network characteristics and care recipient viral suppression. Baseline data were from the BEACON study caregivers and their HIV seropositive former or current drug using care recipients, of whom 89 % were African American (N = 258 dyads). Using adjusted logistic regression, care recipient's undetectable viral load was positively associated with caregiver's limited physical functioning and negatively associated with caregivers having few family members to turn to for problem solving, a greater number of current drug users in their network, and poorer perceptions of the care recipient's mental health. Results further understandings of interpersonal relationship factors important to PLHIV's health outcomes, and the need for caregiving relationship-focused intervention to promote viral suppression among PLHIV. PMID:25969180

  7. A viral histone H4 suppresses insect insulin signal and delays host development.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Gu, Xiaojun; Kim, Yonggyun

    2016-10-01

    Parasitization by an endoparasitoid wasp, Cotesia plutellae, alters host development of Plutella xylostella by extending larval period and preventing metamorphosis. Insulin signal plays a crucial role in mediating insect development and controlling blood sugar level in insects. In this study, three insulin-like peptide genes (PxILP1-3) were predicted from the genome of P. xylostella. However, only PxILP1 was confirmed to be expressed in P. xylostella. Starvation suppressed the expression level of PxILP1 and up-regulated plasma trehalose level. RNA interference against PxILP1 mimicked starvation effect and extended the larval period of P. xylostella. Parasitized larvae exhibited significantly lower levels of PxILP1 expression compared to nonparasitized larvae. Injection of wasp-symbiotic polydnavirus C. plutellae bracovirus (CpBV) also suppressed PxILP1 expression and extended the larval period. Injection of a viral segment (CpBV-S30) containing a viral histone H4 (CpBV-H4) also suppressed PxILP1 expression. Co-injection of CpBV-S30 and double-stranded RNA (dsCpBV-H4) specific to CpBV-H4 rescued the suppression of PxILP1 expression. Injection of CpBV-S30 significantly extended larval development. Co-injection of CpBV-S30 with dsCpBV-H4 rescued the delay of larval development. Injection of a bovine insulin to parasitized larvae prevented parasitoid development. These results indicate that parasitism of C. plutellae can down-regulate host insulin signaling with the help of parasitic factor CpBV-H4. PMID:27216029

  8. Antiretroviral Therapy Use, Medication Adherence, and Viral Suppression Among PLWHA with Panic Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Sam, Tanyka Suzanne; Hutton, Heidi E; Lau, Bryan; McCaul, Mary E; Keruly, Jeanne; Moore, Richard; Chander, Geetanjali

    2015-11-01

    Panic symptoms are prevalent among PLWHAs, yet few studies have examined their relationship with HIV outcomes. Using data from an observational cohort study in Baltimore, MD, we examined the association between panic symptoms and antiretroviral therapy (ART) use, medication adherence, and viral suppression. Data were analyzed using generalized estimating equations and adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, cocaine and/or heroin use, clinic enrollment time, alcohol use, and depressive symptoms. Between June 2010 and September 2012, 1195 individuals participated in 2080 audio computer assisted interviews; 9.9 % (n = 118) of individuals endorsed current panic symptoms. In multivariate analysis, panic symptoms were associated with decreased ART use (IRR 0.94; p = 0.05). Panic symptoms were neither associated with medication adherence nor viral suppression. These findings were independent of depressive symptoms and substance use. Panic symptoms are under-recognized in primary care settings and present an important barrier to ART use. Further studies investigating the reasons for this association are needed. PMID:25903506

  9. Violence Screening and Viral Load Suppression Among HIV-Positive Women of Color

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Jason; Precht, Allison; Matoff-Stepp, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recent research suggests intimate partner violence (IPV) is commonly experienced by many people living with HIV/AIDS, which can complicate their care. We introduce a novel approach to screening for history of violence among 102 women of color living with HIV and receiving care at an outpatient public health clinic. Using a composite measure composed of data from a variety of screening tools, we were able to determine that 70.6% of the women had a history of violence using the composite measure, and that 43% screened positive using multiple screening tools. Although overall viral load suppression rate was high at 81.4%, women with a history of violence were less likely to be virally suppressed when compared to those without such a history (76.4% versus 93.3%, p<0.05). Our findings suggest using a variety of screening questions at entry and at follow-up care appointments may be key to identifying and supporting women survivors who may not disclose violence when first asked. Future research should foster further development, analysis, and use of a variety of screening tools such as those used in this study. PMID:25561308

  10. HIV Infection Care and Viral Suppression Among People Who Inject Drugs, 28 U.S. Jurisdictions, 2012-2013

    PubMed Central

    Karch, Debra L.; Gray, Kristen Mahle; Shi, Jing; Hall, H. Irene

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Assess outcomes along the care continuum for HIV-infected people who inject drugs (PWID), by type of facility and stage of infection at diagnosis. Methods: Data reported by 28 jurisdictions to the National HIV Surveillance System by December 2014 were used to identify PWID aged ≥13 years, diagnosed with HIV infection before December 31, 2013. Analyses used the CDC definition of linkage to care (LTC), retention in care (RIC), and viral suppression (VS), and are stratified by age, sex, race/ethnicity, and type of facility and stage of HIV infection at diagnosis. Results: Of 1,409 PWID diagnosed with HIV in 2013, 1,116 (79.2%) were LTC with the lowest percentages among males (78.4%); blacks (77.5%) ages 13-24 years (69.0%); those diagnosed in early stage infection (71.6%); and at screening, diagnostic, or referral agencies (60.0%). Of 80,958 PWID living with HIV in 2012, 40,234 (49.7%) were RIC and 34,665 (42.8%) achieved VS. The lowest percentages for RIC and VS were among males (47.1% and 41.3% respectively); those diagnosed with late stage disease (47.1% and 42.4%); and young people. Whites had the lowest RIC (47.0%) while blacks had the lowest VS (41.1%). Conclusion: Enhanced LTC activities are needed for PWID diagnosed at screening, diagnostic or referral agencies versus those diagnosed at inpatient or outpatient settings, especially among young people and blacks diagnosed in early stage infection. Less than half of PWID are retained in care or reach viral suppression indicating the need for continued engagement and return to care activities over the long term. PMID:27386014

  11. A Highly Intensified ART Regimen Induces Long-Term Viral Suppression and Restriction of the Viral Reservoir in a Simian AIDS Model

    PubMed Central

    Della Corte, Alessandro; Collins, Matt; Yalley-Ogunro, Jake; Greenhouse, Jack; Iraci, Nunzio; Acosta, Edward P.; Barreca, Maria Letizia; Lewis, Mark G.; Savarino, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Stably suppressed viremia during ART is essential for establishing reliable simian models for HIV/AIDS. We tested the efficacy of a multidrug ART (highly intensified ART) in a wide range of viremic conditions (103–107 viral RNA copies/mL) in SIVmac251-infected rhesus macaques, and its impact on the viral reservoir. Eleven macaques in the pre-AIDS stage of the disease were treated with a multidrug combination (highly intensified ART) consisting of two nucleosidic/nucleotidic reverse transcriptase inhibitors (emtricitabine and tenofovir), an integrase inhibitor (raltegravir), a protease inhibitor (ritonavir-boosted darunavir) and the CCR5 blocker maraviroc. All animals stably displayed viral loads below the limit of detection of the assay (i.e. <40 RNA copies/mL) after starting highly intensified ART. By increasing the sensitivity of the assay to 3 RNA copies/mL, viral load was still below the limit of detection in all subjects tested. Importantly, viral DNA resulted below the assay detection limit (<2 copies of DNA/5*105 cells) in PBMCs and rectal biopsies of all animals at the end of the follow-up, and in lymph node biopsies from the majority of the study subjects. Moreover, highly intensified ART decreased central/transitional memory, effector memory and activated (HLA-DR+) effector memory CD4+ T-cells in vivo, in line with the role of these subsets as the main cell subpopulations harbouring the virus. Finally, treatment with highly intensified ART at viral load rebound following suspension of a previous anti-reservoir therapy eventually improved the spontaneous containment of viral load following suspension of the second therapeutic cycle, thus leading to a persistent suppression of viremia in the absence of ART. In conclusion, we show, for the first time, complete suppression of viral load by highly intensified ART and a likely associated restriction of the viral reservoir in the macaque AIDS model, making it a useful platform for testing potential cures for

  12. An omitted level: an examination of relational orientations and viral suppression among HIV serodiscordant male couples.

    PubMed

    Gamarel, Kristi E; Neilands, Torsten B; Golub, Sarit A; Johnson, Mallory O

    2014-06-01

    Couples' adopting a relational orientation, when partners regard themselves as a collective unit, is associated with optimal health. HIV-positive men and their HIV-negative partners (N = 116 serodiscordant male couples) were surveyed. Logistic regression showed greater relational orientations of HIV-positive [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 7.87; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.63 to 38.05] and HIV-negative partners (aOR = 6.16; 95% CI: 1.43 to 26.59) and HIV-positive partners' higher income (aOR = 2.95; 95% CI: 1.13 to 7.70) and lower depression (aOR = 0.39; 95% CI: 0.15 to 0.97) were associated with viral suppression with no evidence of mediation by adherence. Incorporating relationship dynamics into biomedical strategies is a promising avenue for research and intervention. PMID:24662295

  13. Short Communication: HIV-1 Infection Suppresses Circulating Viral Restriction microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Sun, Li; Wang, Xu; Liang, Hao; Ye, Li; Zhou, Li; Liang, Bing-Yu; Li, Jie-Liang; Liu, Man-Qing; Peng, Jin-Song; Zhou, Dun-Jin; Gui, Xi-En; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2016-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) participate in host innate immunity against HIV-1 infection. We examined the impact of HIV-1 infection on viral restriction miRNAs in plasma of HIV-1-infected subjects. HIV-1-infected subjects had significantly lower plasma levels of HIV-1 restriction miRNAs (miRs-29a, -29b, -125b, -223, -198, and -382) than control subjects. Further in vitro studies showed that HIV-1 infection of macrophages suppressed production of the extracellular miRs-29b, -125b, and -223. These data demonstrate the compelling evidence that HIV-1 infection impairs host innate immunity by inhibiting antiviral miRNAs, which provide a possible mechanism for HIV-1 persistence in the host. PMID:26607272

  14. Adeno-Associated Viral-Mediated Catalase Expression Suppresses Optic Neuritis in Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, John; Qi, Xiaoping; Hauswirth, William W.

    1998-11-01

    Suppression of oxidative injury by viral-mediated transfer of the human catalase gene was tested in the optic nerves of animals with experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE). EAE is an inflammatory autoimmune disorder of primary central nervous system demyelination that has been frequently used as an animal model for the human disease multiple sclerosis (MS). The optic nerve is a frequent site of involvement common to both EAE and MS. Recombinant adeno-associated virus containing the human gene for catalase was injected over the right optic nerve heads of SJL/J mice that were simultaneously sensitized for EAE. After 1 month, cell-specific catalase activity, evaluated by quantitation of catalase immunogold, was increased approximately 2-fold each in endothelia, oligodendroglia, astrocytes, and axons of the optic nerve. Effects of catalase on the histologic lesions of EAE were measured by computerized analysis of the myelin sheath area (for demyelination), optic disc area (for optic nerve head swelling), extent of the cellular infiltrate, extravasated serum albumin labeled by immunogold (for blood-brain barrier disruption), and in vivo H2O2 reaction product. Relative to control, contralateral optic nerves injected with the recombinant virus without a therapeutic gene, catalase gene inoculation reduced demyelination by 38%, optic nerve head swelling by 29%, cellular infiltration by 34%, disruption of the blood-brain barrier by 64%, and in vivo levels of H2O2 by 61%. Because the efficacy of potential treatments for MS are usually initially tested in the EAE animal model, this study suggests that catalase gene delivery by using viral vectors may be a therapeutic strategy for suppression of MS.

  15. HIV-1 antibody 3BNC117 suppresses viral rebound in humans during treatment interruption.

    PubMed

    Scheid, Johannes F; Horwitz, Joshua A; Bar-On, Yotam; Kreider, Edward F; Lu, Ching-Lan; Lorenzi, Julio C C; Feldmann, Anna; Braunschweig, Malte; Nogueira, Lilian; Oliveira, Thiago; Shimeliovich, Irina; Patel, Roshni; Burke, Leah; Cohen, Yehuda Z; Hadrigan, Sonya; Settler, Allison; Witmer-Pack, Maggi; West, Anthony P; Juelg, Boris; Keler, Tibor; Hawthorne, Thomas; Zingman, Barry; Gulick, Roy M; Pfeifer, Nico; Learn, Gerald H; Seaman, Michael S; Bjorkman, Pamela J; Klein, Florian; Schlesinger, Sarah J; Walker, Bruce D; Hahn, Beatrice H; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2016-07-28

    Interruption of combination antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1-infected individuals leads to rapid viral rebound. Here we report the results of a phase IIa open label clinical trial evaluating 3BNC117,a broad and potent neutralizing antibody against the CD4 binding site of the HIV-1 Env protein, during analytical treatment interruption in 13 HIV-1-infected individuals. Participants with 3BNC117-sensitive virus outgrowth cultures were enrolled. Results show that two or four 30 mg kg(-1) 3BNC117 infusions,separated by 3 or 2 weeks, respectively, are generally well tolerated.Infusions are associated with a delay in viral rebound of 5-9 weeks after two infusions, and up to 19 weeks after four infusions, or an average of 6.7 and 9.9 weeks, respectively, compared with 2.6 weeks for historical controls (P < 0.00001). Rebound viruses arise predominantly from a single provirus. In most individuals,emerging viruses show increased resistance, indicating escape.However, 30% of participants remained suppressed until antibody concentrations waned below 20 μg ml(-1), and the viruses emerging in all but one of these individuals showed no apparent resistance to 3BCN117, suggesting failure to escape over a period of 9-19 weeks.We conclude that the administration of 3BNC117 exerts strong selective pressure on HIV-1 emerging from latent reservoirs during analytical treatment interruption in humans. PMID:27338952

  16. Inhibition of DNA Methylation Suppresses Intestinal Tumor Organoids by Inducing an Anti-Viral Response

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Yoshimasa; Nakaoka, Toshiaki; Sakai, Kasumi; Muramatsu, Toshihide; Toshimitsu, Kohta; Kimura, Masaki; Kanai, Takanori; Sato, Toshiro; Saito, Hidetsugu

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have proposed that the major anti-tumor effect of DNA methylation inhibitors is induction of interferon-responsive genes via dsRNAs-containing endogenous retroviruses. Recently, a 3D culture system for stem cells known as organoid culture has been developed. Lgr5-positive stem cells form organoids that closely recapitulate the properties of original tissues. To investigate the effect of DNA demethylation on tumor organoids, we have established organoids from intestinal tumors of ApcMin/+ (Min) mice and subjected them to 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-CdR) treatment and Dnmt1 knockdown. DNA demethylation induced by 5-Aza-CdR treatment and Dnmt1 knockdown significantly reduced the cell proliferation of the tumor organoids. Microarray analyses of the tumor organoids after 5-Aza-CdR treatment and Dnmt1 knockdown revealed that interferon-responsive genes were activated by DNA demethylation. Gene ontology and pathway analyses clearly demonstrated that these genes activated by DNA demethylation are involved in the anti-viral response. These findings indicate that DNA demethylation suppresses the proliferation of intestinal tumor organoids by inducing an anti-viral response including activation of interferon-responsive genes. Treatment with DNA methylation inhibitors to activate a growth-inhibiting immune response may be an effective therapeutic approach for colon cancers. PMID:27143627

  17. Increased Intrathecal Immune Activation in Virally Suppressed HIV-1 Infected Patients with Neurocognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Edén, Arvid; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Heaton, Robert K.; Nilsson, Staffan; Zetterberg, Henrik; Fuchs, Dietmar; Franklin, Donald; Price, Richard W.; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott L.; Gisslén, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although milder forms of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) remain prevalent, a correlation to neuronal injury has not been established in patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART). We examined the relationship between mild HAND and CSF neurofilament light protein (NFL), a biomarker of neuronal injury; and CSF neopterin, a biomarker of CNS immunoactivation, in virally suppressed patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Design and Methods We selected 99 subjects on suppressive ART followed longitudinally from the CNS HIV Anti-Retroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) study. Based on standardized comprehensive neurocognitive performance (NP) testing, subjects were classified as neurocognitively normal (NCN; n = 29) or impaired (NCI; n = 70). The NCI group included subjects with asymptomatic (ANI; n = 37) or mild (MND; n = 33) HAND. CSF biomarkers were analyzed on two occasions. Results Geometric mean CSF neopterin was 25% higher in the NCI group (p = 0.04) and NFL and neopterin were significantly correlated within the NCI group (r = 0.30; p<0.001) but not in the NCN group (r = -0.13; p = 0.3). Additionally, a trend towards higher NFL was seen in the NCI group (p = 0.06). Conclusions Mild HAND was associated with increased intrathecal immune activation, and the correlation between neopterin and NFL found in NCI subjects indicates an association between neurocognitive impairment, CNS inflammation and neuronal damage. Together these findings suggest that NCI despite ART may represent an active pathological process within the CNS that needs further characterization in prospective studies. PMID:27295036

  18. Substance abuse, violence, and HIV/AIDS (SAVA) syndemic effects on viral suppression among HIV positive women of color.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Kristen A; Messer, Lynne C; Quinlivan, E Byrd

    2015-01-01

    The combined epidemics of substance abuse, violence, and HIV/AIDS, known as the SAVA syndemic, contribute to the disproportionate burden of disease among people of color in the US. To examine the association between HIV viral load suppression and SAVA syndemic variables, we used baseline data from 563 HIV+ women of color treated at nine HIV medical and ancillary care sites participating in HRSA's Special Project of National Significance Women of Color (WOC) Initiative. Just under half the women (n=260) were virally suppressed. Five psychosocial factors contributing to the SAVA syndemic were examined in this study: substance abuse, binge drinking, intimate partner violence, poor mental health, and sexual risk taking. Associations among the psychosocial factors were assessed and clustering confirmed. A SAVA score was created by summing the dichotomous (present/absent) psychosocial measures. Using generalized estimating equation (GEE) models to account for site-level clustering and individual-covariates, a higher SAVA score (0 to 5) was associated with reduced viral suppression; OR (adjusted)=0.81, 95% CI: 0.66, 0.99. The syndemic approach represents a viable framework for understanding viral suppression among HIV positive WOC, and suggests the need for comprehensive interventions that address the social/environmental contexts of patients' lives. PMID:25397666

  19. Elevated Plasma Viral Loads in Romidepsin-Treated Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Rhesus Macaques on Suppressive Combination Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Del Prete, Gregory Q; Oswald, Kelli; Lara, Abigail; Shoemaker, Rebecca; Smedley, Jeremy; Macallister, Rhonda; Coalter, Vicky; Wiles, Adam; Wiles, Rodney; Li, Yuan; Fast, Randy; Kiser, Rebecca; Lu, Bing; Zheng, Jim; Alvord, W Gregory; Trubey, Charles M; Piatak, Michael; Deleage, Claire; Keele, Brandon F; Estes, Jacob D; Hesselgesser, Joseph; Geleziunas, Romas; Lifson, Jeffrey D

    2016-03-01

    Replication-competent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) persists in infected people despite suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), and it represents a major obstacle to HIV functional cure or eradication. We have developed a model of cART-mediated viral suppression in simian human immunodeficiency virus (SIV) mac239-infected Indian rhesus macaques and evaluated the impact of the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) romidepsin (RMD) on viremia in vivo. Eight macaques virologically suppressed to clinically relevant levels (<30 viral RNA copies/ml of plasma), using a three-class five-drug cART regimen, received multiple intravenous infusions of either RMD (n = 5) or saline (n = 3) starting 31 to 54 weeks after cART initiation. In vivo RMD treatment resulted in significant transient increases in acetylated histone levels in CD4(+) T cells. RMD-treated animals demonstrated plasma viral load measurements for each 2-week treatment cycle that were significantly higher than those in saline control-treated animals during periods of treatment, suggestive of RMD-induced viral reactivation. However, plasma virus rebound was indistinguishable between RMD-treated and control-treated animals for a subset of animals released from cART. These findings suggest that HDACi drugs, such as RMD, can reactivate residual virus in the presence of suppressive antiviral therapy and may be a valuable component of a comprehensive HIV functional cure/eradication strategy. PMID:26711758

  20. Substance Abuse, Violence, and HIV/AIDS (SAVA) Syndemic Effects on Viral Suppression Among HIV Positive Women of Color

    PubMed Central

    Messer, Lynne C.; Quinlivan, E. Byrd

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The combined epidemics of substance abuse, violence, and HIV/AIDS, known as the SAVA syndemic, contribute to the disproportionate burden of disease among people of color in the US. To examine the association between HIV viral load suppression and SAVA syndemic variables, we used baseline data from 563 HIV+ women of color treated at nine HIV medical and ancillary care sites participating in HRSA's Special Project of National Significance Women of Color (WOC) Initiative. Just under half the women (n=260) were virally suppressed. Five psychosocial factors contributing to the SAVA syndemic were examined in this study: substance abuse, binge drinking, intimate partner violence, poor mental health, and sexual risk taking. Associations among the psychosocial factors were assessed and clustering confirmed. A SAVA score was created by summing the dichotomous (present/absent) psychosocial measures. Using generalized estimating equation (GEE) models to account for site-level clustering and individual-covariates, a higher SAVA score (0 to 5) was associated with reduced viral suppression; OR (adjusted)=0.81, 95% CI: 0.66, 0.99. The syndemic approach represents a viable framework for understanding viral suppression among HIV positive WOC, and suggests the need for comprehensive interventions that address the social/environmental contexts of patients' lives. PMID:25397666

  1. Relationship Dynamics and Partner Beliefs About Viral Suppression: A Longitudinal Study of Male Couples Living with HIV/AIDS (The Duo Project).

    PubMed

    Conroy, Amy A; Gamarel, Kristi E; Neilands, Torsten B; Dilworth, Samantha E; Darbes, Lynae A; Johnson, Mallory O

    2016-07-01

    Accurate beliefs about partners' viral suppression are important for HIV prevention and care. We fit multilevel mixed effects logistic regression models to examine associations between partners' viral suppression beliefs and objective HIV RNA viral load tests, and whether relationship dynamics were associated with accurate viral suppression beliefs over time. Male couples (N = 266 couples) with at least one HIV-positive partner on antiretroviral therapy completed five assessments over 2 years. Half of the 407 HIV-positive partners were virally suppressed. Of the 40 % who had inaccurate viral load beliefs, 80 % assumed their partner was suppressed. The odds of having accurate viral load beliefs decreased over time (OR = 0.83; p = 0.042). Within-couple differences in dyadic adjustment (OR = 0.66; p < 0.01) and commitment (OR = 0.82; p = 0.022) were negatively associated with accurate viral load beliefs. Beliefs about a partner's viral load may factor into sexual decision-making and social support. Couple-based approaches are warranted to improve knowledge of partners' viral load. PMID:27150895

  2. Viral protein suppresses oxidative burst and salicylic acid-dependent autophagy and facilitates bacterial growth on virus-infected plants.

    PubMed

    Zvereva, Anna S; Golyaev, Victor; Turco, Silvia; Gubaeva, Ekaterina G; Rajeswaran, Rajendran; Schepetilnikov, Mikhail V; Srour, Ola; Ryabova, Lyubov A; Boller, Thomas; Pooggin, Mikhail M

    2016-08-01

    Virus interactions with plant silencing and innate immunity pathways can potentially alter the susceptibility of virus-infected plants to secondary infections with nonviral pathogens. We found that Arabidopsis plants infected with Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) or transgenic for CaMV silencing suppressor P6 exhibit increased susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) and allow robust growth of the Pst mutant hrcC-, which cannot deploy effectors to suppress innate immunity. The impaired antibacterial defense correlated with the suppressed oxidative burst, reduced accumulation of the defense hormone salicylic acid (SA) and diminished SA-dependent autophagy. The viral protein domain required for suppression of these plant defense responses is dispensable for silencing suppression but essential for binding and activation of the plant target-of-rapamycin (TOR) kinase which, in its active state, blocks cellular autophagy and promotes CaMV translation. Our findings imply that CaMV P6 is a versatile viral effector suppressing both silencing and innate immunity. P6-mediated suppression of oxidative burst and SA-dependent autophagy may predispose CaMV-infected plants to bacterial infection. PMID:27120694

  3. Suppressing RNA silencing with small molecules and the viral suppressor of RNA silencing protein p19.

    PubMed

    Danielson, Dana C; Filip, Roxana; Powdrill, Megan H; O'Hara, Shifawn; Pezacki, John P

    2015-08-01

    RNA silencing is a gene regulatory and host defense mechanism whereby small RNA molecules are engaged by Argonaute (AGO) proteins, which facilitate gene knockdown of complementary mRNA targets. Small molecule inhibitors of AGO represent a convenient method for reversing this effect and have applications in human therapy and biotechnology. Viral suppressors of RNA silencing, such as p19, can also be used to suppress the pathway. Here we assess the compatibility of these two approaches, by examining whether synthetic inhibitors of AGO would inhibit p19-siRNA interactions. We observe that aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA) is a potent inhibitor of p19's ability to bind siRNA (IC50 = 0.43 μM), oxidopamine does not inhibit p19:siRNA interactions, and suramin is a mild inhibitor of p19:siRNA interactions (IC50 = 430 μM). We observe that p19 and suramin are compatible inhibitors of RNA silencing in human hepatoma cells. Our data suggests that at least some inhibitors of AGO may be used in combination with p19 to inhibit RNA silencing at different points in the pathway. PMID:26079891

  4. Improvements in HIV Care Engagement and Viral Load Suppression Following Enrollment in a Comprehensive HIV Care Coordination Program

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Mary K.; Chamberlin, Stephanie A.; Robbins, Rebekkah S.; Myers, Julie E.; Braunstein, Sarah L.; Mitts, Beau J.; Harriman, Graham A.; Nash, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Background. Substantial evidence gaps remain regarding human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) intervention strategies that improve engagement in care (EiC) and viral load suppression (VLS). We assessed EiC and VLS before and after enrollment in a comprehensive intervention for persons at risk of poor HIV care outcomes. Methods. New York City's Ryan White Part A HIV Care Coordination Program (CCP), launched at 28 agencies in 2009, applies multiple strategies to promote optimal utilization of medical and social services. Using laboratory test records from an HIV surveillance registry, we examined pre–post outcomes among 3641 CCP clients enrolled before April 2011. For the year before and after enrollment, we assessed EiC (defined as ≥2 tests, ≥90 days apart, with ≥1 in each half-year) and VLS (defined as viral load [VL] ≤200 copies/mL on latest VL test in the second half of the year). We estimated relative risks (RRs), comparing pre- and postenrollment proportions achieving EiC and VLS. Results. Among newly diagnosed clients, 90.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 87.9%–93.2%) and 66.2% (95% CI, 61.9%–70.6%) achieved EiC and VLS, respectively. Among previously diagnosed clients, EiC increased from 73.7% to 91.3% (RR = 1.24; 95% CI, 1.21–1.27) and VLS increased from 32.3% to 50.9% (RR = 1.58; 95% CI, 1.50–1.66). Clients without evidence of HIV care during the 6 months preenrollment contributed most to overall improvements. Pre–post improvements were robust, retaining statistical significance within most sociodemographic and clinical subgroups, and in 89% (EiC) and 75% (VLS) of CCP agencies. Conclusions. Clients in comprehensive HIV care coordination for persons with evident barriers to care showed substantial and consistent improvement in short-term outcomes. PMID:25301208

  5. Interferon Alpha Induces Sustained Changes in NK Cell Responsiveness to Hepatitis B Viral Load Suppression In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Upkar S.; Peppa, Dimitra; Micco, Lorenzo; Singh, Harsimran D.; Carey, Ivana; Foster, Graham R.; Maini, Mala K.; Kennedy, Patrick T. F.

    2016-01-01

    NK cells are important antiviral effectors, highly enriched in the liver, with the potential to regulate immunopathogenesis in persistent viral infections. Here we examined whether changes in the NK pool are induced when patients with eAg-positive CHB are ‘primed’ with PegIFNα and importantly, whether these changes are sustained or further modulated long-term after switching to nucleos(t)ides (sequential NUC therapy), an approach currently tested in the clinic. Longitudinal sampling of a prospectively recruited cohort of patients with eAg+CHB showed that the cumulative expansion of CD56bright NK cells driven by 48-weeks of PegIFNα was maintained at higher than baseline levels throughout the subsequent 9 months of sequential NUCs. Unexpectedly, PegIFNα-expanded NK cells showed further augmentation in their expression of the activating NK cell receptors NKp30 and NKp46 during sequential NUCs. The expansion in proliferating, functional NK cells was more pronounced following sequential NUCs than in comparison cohorts of patients treated with de novo NUCs or PegIFNα only. Reduction in circulating HBsAg concentrations, a key goal in the path towards functional cure of CHB, was only achieved in those patients with enhancement of NK cell IFNγ and cytotoxicity but decrease in their expression of the death ligand TRAIL. In summary, we conclude that PegIFNα priming can expand a population of functional NK cells with an altered responsiveness to subsequent antiviral suppression by NUCs. Patients on sequential NUCs with a distinct NK cell profile show a decline in HBsAg, providing mechanistic insights for the further optimisation of treatment strategies to achieve sustained responses in CHB. PMID:27487232

  6. Effects of CD4 monitoring frequency on clinical endpoints in clinically stable HIV-infected patients with viral suppression

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jin Young; Boettiger, David; Law, Matthew; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Yunihastuti, Evy; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Lee, Man Po; Sim, Benedict LH; Oka, Shinichi; Wong, Wingwai; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Kantipong, Pacharee; Phanuphak, Praphan; Ng, Oon Tek; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Zhang, Fujie; Pujari, Sanjay; Ditangco, Rossana; Ratanasuwan, Winai; Merati, Tuti Parwati; Saphonn, Vonthanak; Sohn, Annette H.; Choi, Jun Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background Current treatment guidelines for HIV infection recommend routine CD4+ lymphocyte (CD4) count monitoring in patients with viral suppression. This may have a limited impact on influencing care as clinically meaningful CD4 decline rarely occurs during viral suppression. Methods In a regional HIV observational cohort in the Asia-Pacific, patients with viral suppression (2 consecutive viral loads <400 copies/mL) and a CD4 count ≥200 cells/μL who had CD4 testing 6 monthly were analyzed. Main study endpoints were occurrence of one CD4 count <200 cells/μL (single CD4<200) and two CD4 counts <200 cells/μL within a 6-month period (confirmed CD4<200). A comparison of time to single and confirmed CD4<200 with biannual or annual CD4 assessment was performed by generating a hypothetical group comprised of the same patients with annual CD4 testing by removing every second CD4 count. Results Among 1538 patients, the rate of single CD4<200 was 3.45/100 patient-years, and of confirmed CD4<200 was 0.77/100 patient-years. During 5 years of viral suppression, patients with baseline CD4 200-249 cells/μL were significantly more likely to experience confirmed CD4<200 compared with patients with higher baseline CD4 (hazard ratio 55.47 [95% confidence interval 7.36–418.20], p<0.001 versus baseline CD4 ≥500 cells/μL). Cumulative probabilities of confirmed CD4<200 was also higher in patients with baseline CD4 200-249 cells/μL compared with patients with higher baseline CD4. There was no significant difference in time to confirmed CD4<200 between biannual and annual CD4 measurement (p=0.336). Conclusions Annual CD4 monitoring in virally suppressed HIV patients with a baseline CD4 ≥250 cells/μL may be sufficient for clinical management. PMID:25850606

  7. Thyroid hormone-dependent epigenetic suppression of herpes simplex virus-1 gene expression and viral replication in differentiated neuroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Figliozzi, Robert W; Chen, Feng; Balish, Matthew; Ajavon, Amakoe; Hsia, S Victor

    2014-11-15

    A global HSV-1 gene repression occurs during latency in sensory neurons where most viral gene transcriptions are suppressed. The molecular mechanisms of gene silencing and how stress factors trigger the reactivation are not well understood. Thyroid hormones are known to be altered due to stress, and with its nuclear receptor impart transcriptional repression or activation depending upon the hormone level. Therefore we hypothesized that triiodothyronine (T3) treatment of infected differentiated neuron like cells would reduce the ability of HSV-1 to produce viral progeny compared to untreated infected cells. Previously we identified putative thyroid hormone receptor elements (TREs) within the promoter regions of HSV-1 thymidine kinase (TK) and other key genes. Searching for a human cell line that can model neuronal HSV-1 infection, we performed HSV-1 infection experiments on differentiated human neuroendocrine cells, LNCaP. Upon androgen deprivation these cells undergo complete differentiation and exhibit neuronal-like morphology and physiology. These cells were readily infected by our HSV-1 recombinant virus, expressing GFP and maintaining many processes iconic of dendritic morphology. Our results demonstrated that differentiated LNCaP cells produced suppressive effects on HSV-1 gene expression and replication compared to its undifferentiated counterpart and T3 treatment has further decreased the viral plaque counts compared to untreated cells. Upon washout of the T3 viral plaque counts were restored, indicating an increase of viral replication. The qRT-PCR experiments using primers for TK showed reduced expression under T3 treatment. ChIP assays using a panel of antibodies for H3 lysine 9 epigenetic marks showed increased repressive marks on the promoter regions of TK. In conclusion we have demonstrated a T3 mediated quiescent infection in differentiated LNCaP cells that has potential to mimic latent infection. In this HSV-1 infection model thyroid hormone

  8. Thyroid Hormone-dependent Epigenetic Suppression of Herpes Simplex Virus-1 Gene Expression and Viral Replication in Differentiated Neuroendocrine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Figliozzi, Robert W.; Chen, Feng; Balish, Matthew; Ajavon, Amakoe; Hsia, S. Victor

    2014-01-01

    A global HSV-1 gene repression occurs during latency in sensory neurons where most viral gene transcriptions are suppressed. The molecular mechanisms of gene silencing and how stress factors trigger the reactivation are not well understood. Thyroid hormones are known to be altered due to stress, and with its nuclear receptor impart transcriptional repression or activation depending upon the hormone level. Therefore we hypothesized that triiodothyronine (T3) treatment of infected differentiated neuron like cells would reduce the ability of HSV-1 to produce viral progeny compared to untreated infected cells. Previously we identified putative thyroid hormone receptor elements (TREs) within the promoter regions of HSV-1 thymidine kinase (TK) and other key genes. Searching for a human cell line that can model neuronal HSV-1 infection, we performed HSV-1 infection experiments on differentiated human neuroendocrine cells, LNCaP. Upon androgen deprivation these cells undergo complete differentiation and exhibit neuronal-like morphology and physiology. These cells were readily infected by our HSV-1 recombinant virus, expressing GFP and maintaining many processes iconic of dendritic morphology. Our results demonstrated that differentiated LNCaP cells produced suppressive effects on HSV-1 gene expression and replication compared to its undifferentiated counterpart and T3 treatment have further decreased the viral plaque counts compared to untreated cells. Upon washout of the T3 viral plaque counts were restored, indicating an increase of viral replication. The qRT-PCR experiments using primers for TK showed reduced expression under T3 treatment. ChIP assays using a panel of antibodies for H3 lysine 9 epigenetic marks showed increased repressive marks on the promoter regions of TK. In conclusion we have demonstrated a T3 mediated quiescent infection in differentiated LNCaP cells that has potential to mimic latent infection. In this HSV-1 infection model thyroid hormone

  9. Influence of CD4+ T cell counts on viral evolution in HIV-infected individuals undergoing suppressive HAART.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Eric; Colon, Maria C; Almodovar, Sharilyn; Maldonado, Irvin M; Gonzalez, Sandra; Costa, Sonia E; Hill, Martin D; Mendoza, Rafael; Sepulveda, Gladys; Yanagihara, Richard; Nerurkar, Vivek; Kumar, Rakesh; Yamamura, Yasuhiro; Scott, Walter A; Kumar, Anil

    2004-12-01

    We analyzed the viral C2-V4 envelope diversity, glycosylation patterns, and dS/dN ratios of plasma HIV-1 in an attempt to better understand the complex interaction between viral quasispecies and the host-selective pressures pre- and post-HAART. Phylogenetic analysis of the envelope gene of five patients revealed monophyletic clustering in patients with higher CD4+ T cell counts and sequence intermingling in those with lower CD4+ T cells in relation to the stage of HAART. Our analyses also showed clear shifts in N-linked glycosylation patterns in patients with higher CD4+ T cells, suggesting possible distinct immunological pressures pre- and post-HAART. The relative preponderance of synonymous/nonsynonymous changes in the envelope region suggested a positive selection in patients with higher CD4+ T cells, whereas lack of evidence for positive selection was found in the patients with lower CD4+ T cells. An exception to the last analysis occurred in the only patient who reached complete viral suppression, maybe due to drug pressure exerted over the pol gene that may obscure the immune pressure/selection at the envelope in this analysis. All these indications may suggest that even when HAART generates viral suppression, quasispecies evolve in the envelope gene probably resulting from host-selective pressure. PMID:15527839

  10. Antiretroviral Therapy and Viral Suppression Among Foreign-Born HIV-Infected Persons Receiving Medical Care in the United States: A Complex Sample, Cross-Sectional Survey.

    PubMed

    Myers, Tanya R; Lin, Xia; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2016-03-01

    Immigrants to the United States are more likely to be diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection compared with native-born persons. Navigating access to healthcare in the United States can be challenging for foreign-born persons, and HIV treatment outcomes may be suboptimal for these persons. We compared characteristics of and assessed disparities in clinical outcomes of foreign-born persons in care for HIV in the United States. The Medical Monitoring Project is a complex sample, cross-sectional survey designed to be nationally representative of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States. Using data from 2009, 2010, and 2011, we conducted descriptive analyses and multivariable logistic regression to assess associations between foreign-born status and antiretroviral therapy (ART) prescription, and between foreign-born status and viral suppression. In all, 13.4% of HIV-infected persons were self-identified as foreign-born; the most common regions of birth were Central America and Mexico (45.4%) and the Caribbean (16.0%). Nearly 90% of foreign-born persons were diagnosed with HIV after entry into the United States. Compared with US-born persons, foreign-born persons were more likely to be younger, Hispanic, less educated, and uninsured. The prevalence of ART prescription (prevalence ratio 1.00; 95% confidence interval 0.98-1.02) was not significantly different between foreign-born and US-born persons. A higher percentage of foreign-born persons achieved viral suppression compared with US-born persons (prevalence ratio 1.05; 95% confidence interval 1.00-1.09). No major disparities in ART prescription and viral suppression were found between foreign-born and US-born HIV-infected persons receiving medical care, despite higher percentages being uninsured. PMID:26986128

  11. Type I and Type II Interferon Coordinately Regulate Suppressive Dendritic Cell Fate and Function during Viral Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Cameron R.; Champhekar, Ameya; Tullius, Michael V.; Dillon, Barbara Jane; Zhen, Anjie; de la Fuente, Justin Rafael; Herskovitz, Jonathan; Elsaesser, Heidi; Snell, Laura M.; Wilson, Elizabeth B.; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Kitchen, Scott G.; Horwitz, Marcus A.; Bensinger, Steven J.; Smale, Stephen T.; Brooks, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Persistent viral infections are simultaneously associated with chronic inflammation and highly potent immunosuppressive programs mediated by IL-10 and PDL1 that attenuate antiviral T cell responses. Inhibiting these suppressive signals enhances T cell function to control persistent infection; yet, the underlying signals and mechanisms that program immunosuppressive cell fates and functions are not well understood. Herein, we use lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection (LCMV) to demonstrate that the induction and functional programming of immunosuppressive dendritic cells (DCs) during viral persistence are separable mechanisms programmed by factors primarily considered pro-inflammatory. IFNγ first induces the de novo development of naive monocytes into DCs with immunosuppressive potential. Type I interferon (IFN-I) then directly targets these newly generated DCs to program their potent T cell immunosuppressive functions while simultaneously inhibiting conventional DCs with T cell stimulating capacity. These mechanisms of monocyte conversion are constant throughout persistent infection, establishing a system to continuously interpret and shape the immunologic environment. MyD88 signaling was required for the differentiation of suppressive DCs, whereas inhibition of stimulatory DCs was dependent on MAVS signaling, demonstrating a bifurcation in the pathogen recognition pathways that promote distinct elements of IFN-I mediated immunosuppression. Further, a similar suppressive DC origin and differentiation was also observed in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, HIV infection and cancer. Ultimately, targeting the underlying mechanisms that induce immunosuppression could simultaneously prevent multiple suppressive signals to further restore T cell function and control persistent infections. PMID:26808628

  12. Type I and Type II Interferon Coordinately Regulate Suppressive Dendritic Cell Fate and Function during Viral Persistence.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Cameron R; Champhekar, Ameya; Tullius, Michael V; Dillon, Barbara Jane; Zhen, Anjie; de la Fuente, Justin Rafael; Herskovitz, Jonathan; Elsaesser, Heidi; Snell, Laura M; Wilson, Elizabeth B; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Kitchen, Scott G; Horwitz, Marcus A; Bensinger, Steven J; Smale, Stephen T; Brooks, David G

    2016-01-01

    Persistent viral infections are simultaneously associated with chronic inflammation and highly potent immunosuppressive programs mediated by IL-10 and PDL1 that attenuate antiviral T cell responses. Inhibiting these suppressive signals enhances T cell function to control persistent infection; yet, the underlying signals and mechanisms that program immunosuppressive cell fates and functions are not well understood. Herein, we use lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection (LCMV) to demonstrate that the induction and functional programming of immunosuppressive dendritic cells (DCs) during viral persistence are separable mechanisms programmed by factors primarily considered pro-inflammatory. IFNγ first induces the de novo development of naive monocytes into DCs with immunosuppressive potential. Type I interferon (IFN-I) then directly targets these newly generated DCs to program their potent T cell immunosuppressive functions while simultaneously inhibiting conventional DCs with T cell stimulating capacity. These mechanisms of monocyte conversion are constant throughout persistent infection, establishing a system to continuously interpret and shape the immunologic environment. MyD88 signaling was required for the differentiation of suppressive DCs, whereas inhibition of stimulatory DCs was dependent on MAVS signaling, demonstrating a bifurcation in the pathogen recognition pathways that promote distinct elements of IFN-I mediated immunosuppression. Further, a similar suppressive DC origin and differentiation was also observed in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, HIV infection and cancer. Ultimately, targeting the underlying mechanisms that induce immunosuppression could simultaneously prevent multiple suppressive signals to further restore T cell function and control persistent infections. PMID:26808628

  13. Durable hematologic complete response and suppression of HTLV-1 viral load following alemtuzumab in zidovudine/IFN-α–refractory adult T-cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mone, Andrew; Puhalla, Shannon; Whitman, Susan; Baiocchi, Robert A.; Cruz, Julio; Vukosavljevic, Tamara; Banks, Amy; Eisenbeis, Charles F.; Byrd, John C.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Porcu, Pierluigi

    2005-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is a highly chemoresistant and usually fatal T-cell malignancy due to the human T-cell lymphotropic virus-1 (HTLV-1). After chemotherapy failure, antiretrovirals and interferon-α (IFN-α) produce brief responses followed by progression and death. More effective agents and new approaches to detect and treat minimal residual disease are needed. ATL cells express CD52, the target of the antibody alemtuzumab, which is active in a preclinical model of ATL and is cytotoxic for p53-deficient cells. A patient with refractory chronic ATL in transformation achieved longer than a 1-year complete hematologic response following 12 weeks of outpatient subcutaneous alemtuzumab. Persistent suppression of HTLV-1 viral load, even at recovery of T cells, after alemtuzumab and efficient in vitro complement-mediated cytotoxicity of primary ATL cells with mutated TP53 were observed. The unprecedented response and the profound suppression of HTLV-1 viral load observed in this patient suggest that further clinical investigation of alemtuzumab in ATL is warranted. PMID:16076875

  14. Durable hematologic complete response and suppression of HTLV-1 viral load following alemtuzumab in zidovudine/IFN-{alpha}-refractory adult T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mone, Andrew; Puhalla, Shannon; Whitman, Susan; Baiocchi, Robert A; Cruz, Julio; Vukosavljevic, Tamara; Banks, Amy; Eisenbeis, Charles F; Byrd, John C; Caligiuri, Michael A; Porcu, Pierluigi

    2005-11-15

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is a highly chemoresistant and usually fatal T-cell malignancy due to the human T-cell lymphotropic virus-1 (HTLV-1). After chemotherapy failure, antiretrovirals and interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) produce brief responses followed by progression and death. More effective agents and new approaches to detect and treat minimal residual disease are needed. ATL cells express CD52, the target of the antibody alemtuzumab, which is active in a preclinical model of ATL and is cytotoxic for p53-deficient cells. A patient with refractory chronic ATL in transformation achieved longer than a 1-year complete hematologic response following 12 weeks of outpatient subcutaneous alemtuzumab. Persistent suppression of HTLV-1 viral load, even at recovery of T cells, after alemtuzumab and efficient in vitro complement-mediated cytotoxicity of primary ATL cells with mutated TP53 were observed. The unprecedented response and the profound suppression of HTLV-1 viral load observed in this patient suggest that further clinical investigation of alemtuzumab in ATL is warranted. PMID:16076875

  15. Viral suppression in adolescents on antiretroviral treatment: A review of the literature and critical appraisal of methodological challenges

    PubMed Central

    Ferrand, Rashida A; Briggs, Datonye; Ferguson, Jane; Penazzato, Martina; Armstrong, Alice; MacPherson, Peter; Ross, David A; Kranzer, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Background Medication adherence is often sub-optimal for adolescents with HIV, and establishing correct weight-based antiretroviral therapy dosing is difficult, contributing to virological failure. This review aimed to determine the proportion of adolescents achieving virological suppression after initiating ART. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE and Web of Science databases were searched. Studies published between January 2004 and September 2014 including ≥ 50 adolescents taking ART and reporting on the proportion of virological suppressed participants were included. Results From a total of 5316 potentially relevant citations, 20 studies were included. Only 8 studies reported the proportion of adolescents that were virologically suppressed at a specified time point. The proportion of adolescents with virological suppression at 12 months ranged from 27%-89%. Conclusion Adolescent achievement of HIV virological suppression was highly variable. Improved reporting of virological outcomes from a wider range of settings is required to support efforts to improve HIV care and treatment for adolescents. PMID:26681359

  16. Pur-Alpha Induces JCV Gene Expression and Viral Replication by Suppressing SRSF1 in Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sariyer, Ilker Kudret; Sariyer, Rahsan; Otte, Jessica; Gordon, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Objective PML is a rare and fatal demyelinating disease of the CNS caused by the human polyomavirus, JC virus (JCV), which occurs in AIDS patients and those on immunosuppressive monoclonal antibody therapies (mAbs). We sought to identify mechanisms that could stimulate reactivation of JCV in a cell culture model system and targeted pathways which could affect early gene transcription and JCV T-antigen production, which are key steps of the viral life cycle for blocking reactivation of JCV. Two important regulatory partners we have previously identified for T-antigen include Pur-alpha and SRSF1 (SF2/ASF). SRSF1, an alternative splicing factor, is a potential regulator of JCV whose overexpression in glial cells strongly suppresses viral gene expression and replication. Pur-alpha has been most extensively characterized as a sequence-specific DNA- and RNA-binding protein which directs both viral gene transcription and mRNA translation, and is a potent inducer of the JCV early promoter through binding to T-antigen. Methods and Results Pur-alpha and SRSF1 both act directly as transcriptional regulators of the JCV promoter and here we have observed that Pur-alpha is capable of ameliorating SRSF1-mediated suppression of JCV gene expression and viral replication. Interestingly, Pur-alpha exerted its effect by suppressing SRSF1 at both the protein and mRNA levels in glial cells suggesting this effect can occur independent of T-antigen. Pur-alpha and SRSF1 were both localized to oligodendrocyte inclusion bodies by immunohistochemistry in brain sections from patients with HIV-1 associated PML. Interestingly, inclusion bodies were typically positive for either Pur-alpha or SRSF1, though some cells appeared to be positive for both proteins. Conclusions Taken together, these results indicate the presence of an antagonistic interaction between these two proteins in regulating of JCV gene expression and viral replication and suggests that they play an important role during viral

  17. Measles virus-induced immune suppression in the cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) model depends on viral glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Niewiesk, S; Eisenhuth, I; Fooks, A; Clegg, J C; Schnorr, J J; Schneider-Schaulies, S; ter Meulen, V

    1997-01-01

    Immune suppression during measles accounts for most of the morbidity and mortality associated with the virus infection. Experimental study of this phenomenon has been hampered by the lack of a suitable animal model. We have used the cotton rat to demonstrate that mitogen-induced proliferation of spleen cells from measles virus-infected animals is impaired. Proliferation inhibition is seen in all lymphocyte subsets and is not dependent on viral replication. Cells which express the viral glycoproteins (hemagglutinin and fusion protein) transiently by transfection induce proliferation inhibition after intraperitoneal inoculation, whereas application of a recombinant measles virus in which measles virus glycoproteins are replaced with the vesicular stomatitis virus G protein does not have an antiproliferative effect. Therefore, in vivo expression of measles virus glycoproteins is sufficient and necessary to induce inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation. PMID:9311794

  18. Chronic binge alcohol consumption does not diminish effectiveness of continuous antiretroviral suppression of viral load in SIV-infected macaques

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Patricia E.; Amedee, Angela M.; Veazey, Ron; Dufour, Jason; Volaufova, Julia; Bagby, Gregory J.; Nelson, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Background Alcohol use disorders (AUD) are a frequent comorbidity in a large percentage of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). PLWHA with comorbid AUDs are consistently found to perform poorly at most levels of the HIV treatment cascade, resulting in a higher likelihood of virologic non-suppression. This has been partly attributed to lower rates of persistence with and adherence to antiretroviral therapies (ART). Focus groups of in-care PLWHA identify the need to suspend ART on drinking days because of the potential for toxicity and/or lack of therapeutic effectiveness. The aim of this study was to examine whether chronic binge alcohol (CBA) consumption decreases the effectiveness of uninterrupted ART, specifically that of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) tenofovir and emtricitabine in suppressing viral replication, or results in drug toxicity in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infected rhesus macaques. Methods Daily CBA or isocaloric sucrose (SUC) administration was initiated three months prior to intrarectal SIVmac251 inoculation and continued throughout the study period. ART was initiated 2.5 months after SIV infection and continued through the study period. Results CBA administration did not prevent or delay the ART-mediated reduction in viral load. Following ART, circulating levels of total protein and creatinine were significantly higher than baseline values in both sucrose- and alcohol-treated animals, but still within a normal range. No evidence of ART toxicity was observed in either CBA- or SUC-administered macaques. Conclusions These findings indicate that CBA does not attenuate effectiveness of NRTI suppression of viral load, nor does it appear to interact with NRTI to produce toxicity during the initial 2 months of treatment. We conclude that while efforts to reduce AUD in PLWHA should be a priority, and that counseling on the importance of adherence to ART even on drinking days should also be promoted. PMID:25257285

  19. CD4 Cell Count and the Risk of AIDS or Death in HIV-Infected Adults on Combination Antiretroviral Therapy with a Suppressed Viral Load: A Longitudinal Cohort Study from COHERE

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Most adults infected with HIV achieve viral suppression within a year of starting combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). It is important to understand the risk of AIDS events or death for patients with a suppressed viral load. Methods and Findings Using data from the Collaboration of Observational HIV Epidemiological Research Europe (2010 merger), we assessed the risk of a new AIDS-defining event or death in successfully treated patients. We accumulated episodes of viral suppression for each patient while on cART, each episode beginning with the second of two consecutive plasma viral load measurements <50 copies/µl and ending with either a measurement >500 copies/µl, the first of two consecutive measurements between 50–500 copies/µl, cART interruption or administrative censoring. We used stratified multivariate Cox models to estimate the association between time updated CD4 cell count and a new AIDS event or death or death alone. 75,336 patients contributed 104,265 suppression episodes and were suppressed while on cART for a median 2.7 years. The mortality rate was 4.8 per 1,000 years of viral suppression. A higher CD4 cell count was always associated with a reduced risk of a new AIDS event or death; with a hazard ratio per 100 cells/µl (95% CI) of: 0.35 (0.30–0.40) for counts <200 cells/µl, 0.81 (0.71–0.92) for counts 200 to <350 cells/µl, 0.74 (0.66–0.83) for counts 350 to <500 cells/µl, and 0.96 (0.92–0.99) for counts ≥500 cells/µl. A higher CD4 cell count became even more beneficial over time for patients with CD4 cell counts <200 cells/µl. Conclusions Despite the low mortality rate, the risk of a new AIDS event or death follows a CD4 cell count gradient in patients with viral suppression. A higher CD4 cell count was associated with the greatest benefit for patients with a CD4 cell count <200 cells/µl but still some slight benefit for those with a CD4 cell count ≥500 cells/µl. Please see later in the article for the

  20. Structural Determinants of Antiretroviral Therapy Use, HIV Care Attendance, and Viral Suppression among Adolescents and Young Adults Living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Kahana, Shoshana Y.; Jenkins, Richard A.; Bruce, Douglas; Fernandez, Maria I.; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B.; Bauermeister, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The authors examined associations between structural characteristics and HIV disease management among a geographically diverse sample of behaviorally and perinatally HIV-infected adolescents and young adults in the United States. Methods The sample included 1891 adolescents and young adults living with HIV (27.8% perinatally infected; 72.2% behaviorally infected) who were linked to care through 20 Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions Units. All completed audio computer–assisted self-interview surveys. Chart abstraction or blood draw provided viral load data. Geographic-level variables were extracted from the United States Census Bureau (e.g., socioeconomic disadvantage, percent of Black and Latino households, percent rural) and Esri Crime (e.g., global crime index) databases as Zip Code Tabulation Areas. AIDSVu data (e.g., prevalence of HIV among youth) were extracted at the county-level. Using HLM v.7, the authors conducted means-as-outcomes random effects multi-level models to examine the association between structural-level and individual-level factors and (1) being on antiretroviral therapy (ART) currently; (2) being on ART for at least 6 months; (3) missed HIV care appointments (not having missed any vs. having missed one or more appointments) over the past 12 months; and (4) viral suppression (defined by the corresponding assay cutoff for the lower limit of viral load at each participating site which denoted nondetectability vs. detectability). Results Frequencies for the 4 primary outcomes were as follows: current ART use (n = 1120, 59.23%); ART use for ≥6 months (n = 861, 45.53%); at least one missed HIV care appointment (n = 936, 49.50); and viral suppression (n = 577, 30.51%). After adjusting for individual-level factors, youth living in more disadvantaged areas (defined by a composite score derived from 2010 Census indicators including percent poverty, percent receiving public assistance, percent of female, single

  1. Multiscale model for the effects of adaptive immunity suppression on the viral therapy of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva, Leticia R.; Silva, Hallan S.; Ferreira, Silvio C.; Martins, Marcelo L.

    2013-04-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy—the use of viruses that specifically kill tumor cells—is an innovative and highly promising route for treating cancer. However, its therapeutic outcomes are mainly impaired by the host immune response to the viral infection. In this paper, we propose a multiscale mathematical model to study how the immune response interferes with the viral oncolytic activity. The model assumes that cytotoxic T cells can induce apoptosis in infected cancer cells and that free viruses can be inactivated by neutralizing antibodies or cleared at a constant rate by the innate immune response. Our simulations suggest that reprogramming the immune microenvironment in tumors could substantially enhance the oncolytic virotherapy in immune-competent hosts. Viable routes to such reprogramming are either in situ virus-mediated impairing of CD8+ T cells motility or blockade of B and T lymphocytes recruitment. Our theoretical results can shed light on the design of viral vectors or new protocols with neat potential impacts on the clinical practice.

  2. Extreme resistance as a host counter-counter defense against viral suppression of RNA silencing.

    PubMed

    Sansregret, Raphaël; Dufour, Vanessa; Langlois, Mathieu; Daayf, Fouad; Dunoyer, Patrice; Voinnet, Olivier; Bouarab, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    RNA silencing mediated by small RNAs (sRNAs) is a conserved regulatory process with key antiviral and antimicrobial roles in eukaryotes. A widespread counter-defensive strategy of viruses against RNA silencing is to deploy viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs), epitomized by the P19 protein of tombusviruses, which sequesters sRNAs and compromises their downstream action. Here, we provide evidence that specific Nicotiana species are able to sense and, in turn, antagonize the effects of P19 by activating a highly potent immune response that protects tissues against Tomato bushy stunt virus infection. This immunity is salicylate- and ethylene-dependent, and occurs without microscopic cell death, providing an example of "extreme resistance" (ER). We show that the capacity of P19 to bind sRNA, which is mandatory for its VSR function, is also necessary to induce ER, and that effects downstream of P19-sRNA complex formation are the likely determinants of the induced resistance. Accordingly, VSRs unrelated to P19 that also bind sRNA compromise the onset of P19-elicited defense, but do not alter a resistance phenotype conferred by a viral protein without VSR activity. These results show that plants have evolved specific responses against the damages incurred by VSRs to the cellular silencing machinery, a likely necessary step in the never-ending molecular arms race opposing pathogens to their hosts. PMID:23785291

  3. HIV-1 Rev protein specifies the viral RNA export pathway by suppressing TAP/NXF1 recruitment.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Ichiro; Mabuchi, Naoto; Ohno, Mutsuhito

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear RNA export pathways in eukaryotes are often linked to the fate of a given RNA. Therefore, the choice of export pathway should be well-controlled to avoid an unfavorable effect on gene expression. Although some RNAs could be exported by more than one pathway, little is known about how the choice is regulated. This issue is highlighted when the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Rev protein induces the export of singly spliced and unspliced HIV-1 transcripts. How these RNAs are exported is not well understood because such transcripts should have the possibility of utilizing CRM1-dependent export via Rev or cellular TAP/NXF1-dependent export via the transcription/export (TREX) complex, or both. Here we found that Rev suppressed TAP/NXF1-dependent export of model RNA substrates that recapitulated viral transcripts. In this effect, Rev interacted with the cap-binding complex and inhibited the recruitment of the TREX complex. Thus, Rev controls the identity of the factor occupying the cap-proximal region that determines the RNA export pathway. This ribonucleoprotein remodeling activity of Rev may favor viral gene expression. PMID:24753416

  4. The helicase senataxin suppresses the antiviral transcriptional response and controls viral biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Matthew S.; Rialdi, Alexander; Ho, Jessica Sook Yuin; Tilove, Micah; Martinez-Gil, Luis; Moshkina, Natasha P.; Peralta, Zuleyma; Noel, Justine; Melegari, Camilla; Maestre, Ana; Mitsopoulos, Panagiotis; Madrenas, Joaquín; Heinz, Sven; Benner, Chris; Young, John A. T.; Feagins, Alicia R.; Basler, Christopher; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Becherel, Olivier J.; Lavin, Martin F.; van Bakel, Harm; Marazzi, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The human helicase senataxin (SETX) is implicated in the neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS4) and ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2). Here, we reveal a role for SETX in controlling the antiviral response. Cells depleted for SETX and AOA2 patient-derived SETX-deficient cells exhibit increased expression of antiviral mediators in response to infection. Mechanistically, we propose a model whereby SETX attenuates RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) activity at genes stimulated upon viral sensing, thus controlling the magnitude of the host response to pathogens and the biogenesis of numerous RNA viruses (e. g. Influenza A virus and West Nile virus). Our data indicate a potentially causal link between SETX inborn errors, susceptibility to infection and development of neurologic disorders. PMID:25822250

  5. Experiments in DIII-D toward achieving rapid shutdown with runaway electron suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Hollmann, E. M.; Commaux, Nicolas JC; Eidietis, N. W.; Evans, T. E.; Humphreys, D. A.; James, A. N.; Jernigan, T. C.; Parks, P. B.; Strait, E. J.; Wesley, J. C.; Yu, J.H.; Austin, M. E.; Baylor, Larry R; Brooks, N. H.; Izzo, V. A.; Jackson, G. L.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Wu, W.

    2010-01-01

    Experiments have been performed in the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] toward understanding runaway electron formation and amplification during rapid discharge shutdown, as well as toward achieving complete collisional suppression of these runaway electrons via massive delivery of impurities. Runaway acceleration and amplification appear to be well explained using the zero-dimensional (0D) current quench toroidal electric field. 0D or even one-dimensional modeling using a Dreicer seed term, however, appears to be too small to explain the initial runaway seed formation. Up to 15% of the line-average electron density required for complete runaway suppression has been achieved in the middle of the current quench using optimized massive gas injection with multiple small gas valves firing simultaneously. The novel rapid shutdown techniques of massive shattered pellet injection and shell pellet injection have been demonstrated for the first time. Experiments using external magnetic perturbations to deconfine runaways have shown promising preliminary results. (C) 2010 American Institute of Physics. [doi:10.1063/1.3309426

  6. Reducing Viral Load Measurements to Once a Year in Patients on Stable, Virologically Suppressive Cart Regimen: Findings from the Australian HIV Observational Database

    PubMed Central

    Rafiee, Mahshid; Kariminia, Azar; Wright, Stephen; Mills, Graham; Woolley, Ian; Smith, Don; Templeton, David J.; Law, Matthew G.; Petoumenos, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    Reducing viral-load measurements to annual testing in virologically suppressed patients increases the estimated mean time those patients remain on a failing regimen by 6 months. This translates to an increase in the proportion of patients with at least one Thymidine Analogue Mutation from 10% to 32% over one year. PMID:26618053

  7. Cytokine Diedel and a viral homologue suppress the IMD pathway in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Lamiable, Olivier; Kellenberger, Christine; Kemp, Cordula; Troxler, Laurent; Pelte, Nadège; Boutros, Michael; Marques, Joao Trindade; Daeffler, Laurent; Hoffmann, Jules A; Roussel, Alain; Imler, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-19

    Viruses are obligatory intracellular parasites that suffer strong evolutionary pressure from the host immune system. Rapidly evolving viral genomes can adapt to this pressure by acquiring genes that counteract host defense mechanisms. For example, many vertebrate DNA viruses have hijacked cellular genes encoding cytokines or cytokine receptors to disrupt host cell communication. Insect viruses express suppressors of RNA interference or apoptosis, highlighting the importance of these cell intrinsic antiviral mechanisms in invertebrates. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a family of proteins encoded by insect DNA viruses that are homologous to a 12-kDa circulating protein encoded by the virus-induced Drosophila gene diedel (die). We show that die mutant flies have shortened lifespan and succumb more rapidly than controls when infected with Sindbis virus. This reduced viability is associated with deregulated activation of the immune deficiency (IMD) pathway of host defense and can be rescued by mutations in the genes encoding the homolog of IKKγ or IMD itself. Our results reveal an endogenous pathway that is exploited by insect viruses to modulate NF-κB signaling and promote fly survival during the antiviral response. PMID:26739560

  8. Cytokine Diedel and a viral homologue suppress the IMD pathway in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Lamiable, Olivier; Kellenberger, Christine; Kemp, Cordula; Troxler, Laurent; Pelte, Nadège; Boutros, Michael; Daeffler, Laurent; Hoffmann, Jules A.; Roussel, Alain; Imler, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Viruses are obligatory intracellular parasites that suffer strong evolutionary pressure from the host immune system. Rapidly evolving viral genomes can adapt to this pressure by acquiring genes that counteract host defense mechanisms. For example, many vertebrate DNA viruses have hijacked cellular genes encoding cytokines or cytokine receptors to disrupt host cell communication. Insect viruses express suppressors of RNA interference or apoptosis, highlighting the importance of these cell intrinsic antiviral mechanisms in invertebrates. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a family of proteins encoded by insect DNA viruses that are homologous to a 12-kDa circulating protein encoded by the virus-induced Drosophila gene diedel (die). We show that die mutant flies have shortened lifespan and succumb more rapidly than controls when infected with Sindbis virus. This reduced viability is associated with deregulated activation of the immune deficiency (IMD) pathway of host defense and can be rescued by mutations in the genes encoding the homolog of IKKγ or IMD itself. Our results reveal an endogenous pathway that is exploited by insect viruses to modulate NF-κB signaling and promote fly survival during the antiviral response. PMID:26739560

  9. Small RNA binding is a common strategy to suppress RNA silencing by several viral suppressors

    PubMed Central

    Lakatos, Lóránt; Csorba, Tibor; Pantaleo, Vitantonio; Chapman, Elisabeth J; Carrington, James C; Liu, Yu-Ping; Dolja, Valerian V; Calvino, Lourdes Fernández; López-Moya, Juan José; Burgyán, József

    2006-01-01

    RNA silencing is an evolutionarily conserved system that functions as an antiviral mechanism in higher plants and insects. To counteract RNA silencing, viruses express silencing suppressors that interfere with both siRNA- and microRNA-guided silencing pathways. We used comparative in vitro and in vivo approaches to analyse the molecular mechanism of suppression by three well-studied silencing suppressors. We found that silencing suppressors p19, p21 and HC-Pro each inhibit the intermediate step of RNA silencing via binding to siRNAs, although the molecular features required for duplex siRNA binding differ among the three proteins. None of the suppressors affected the activity of preassembled RISC complexes. In contrast, each suppressor uniformly inhibited the siRNA-initiated RISC assembly pathway by preventing RNA silencing initiator complex formation. PMID:16724105

  10. Small RNA binding is a common strategy to suppress RNA silencing by several viral suppressors.

    PubMed

    Lakatos, Lóránt; Csorba, Tibor; Pantaleo, Vitantonio; Chapman, Elisabeth J; Carrington, James C; Liu, Yu-Ping; Dolja, Valerian V; Calvino, Lourdes Fernández; López-Moya, Juan José; Burgyán, József

    2006-06-21

    RNA silencing is an evolutionarily conserved system that functions as an antiviral mechanism in higher plants and insects. To counteract RNA silencing, viruses express silencing suppressors that interfere with both siRNA- and microRNA-guided silencing pathways. We used comparative in vitro and in vivo approaches to analyse the molecular mechanism of suppression by three well-studied silencing suppressors. We found that silencing suppressors p19, p21 and HC-Pro each inhibit the intermediate step of RNA silencing via binding to siRNAs, although the molecular features required for duplex siRNA binding differ among the three proteins. None of the suppressors affected the activity of preassembled RISC complexes. In contrast, each suppressor uniformly inhibited the siRNA-initiated RISC assembly pathway by preventing RNA silencing initiator complex formation. PMID:16724105

  11. Understanding Cross-Sectional Racial, Ethnic, and Gender Disparities in Antiretroviral Use and Viral Suppression Among HIV Patients in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Linda; Mattson, Christine L.; Bradley, Heather; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To examine racial/ethnic and gender disparities in antiretroviral (ART) use and viral suppression among HIV-infected persons in care and identify factors that might account for observed disparities. The Medical Monitoring Project (MMP) is a complex sample survey of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States. We used weighted interview and medical record data collected 06/2009 to 05/2012 to estimate the prevalence of ART use and viral suppression among gender-stratified racial/ethnic groups. We used χ2 tests to identify significant differences in outcomes between white men versus other groups, and logistic regression models to identify the most parsimonious set of factors that could account for each observed difference. We found no significant disparity in ART use between white and Hispanic men, and no disparities between white men and white and Hispanic women after adjustment for disease stage, age, and poverty. Disparities in ART use between white men and black persons persisted after adjusting for other factors, but the observed differences were relatively small. Differences in ART use and adherence, demographic characteristics, and social determinants of health such as poverty, education, and insurance accounted for the observed disparities in viral suppression between white men and all groups except black men. In our model, accounting for these factors reduced the prevalence difference in viral suppression between white and black men by almost half. We found that factors associated with disparities differed among men and women of the same race/ethnicity, lending support to the assertion that gender affects access to care and health status among HIV-infected patients. In addition to supporting efforts to increase ART use and adherence among persons living with HIV, our analysis provides evidence for the importance of social determinants of health in understanding racial/ethnic and gender differences in ART use and viral suppression

  12. Understanding Cross-Sectional Racial, Ethnic, and Gender Disparities in Antiretroviral Use and Viral Suppression Among HIV Patients in the United States.

    PubMed

    Beer, Linda; Mattson, Christine L; Bradley, Heather; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2016-03-01

    To examine racial/ethnic and gender disparities in antiretroviral (ART) use and viral suppression among HIV-infected persons in care and identify factors that might account for observed disparities. The Medical Monitoring Project (MMP) is a complex sample survey of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States. We used weighted interview and medical record data collected 06/2009 to 05/2012 to estimate the prevalence of ART use and viral suppression among gender-stratified racial/ethnic groups. We used χ² tests to identify significant differences in outcomes between white men versus other groups, and logistic regression models to identify the most parsimonious set of factors that could account for each observed difference. We found no significant disparity in ART use between white and Hispanic men, and no disparities between white men and white and Hispanic women after adjustment for disease stage, age, and poverty. Disparities in ART use between white men and black persons persisted after adjusting for other factors, but the observed differences were relatively small. Differences in ART use and adherence, demographic characteristics, and social determinants of health such as poverty, education, and insurance accounted for the observed disparities in viral suppression between white men and all groups except black men. In our model, accounting for these factors reduced the prevalence difference in viral suppression between white and black men by almost half. We found that factors associated with disparities differed among men and women of the same race/ethnicity, lending support to the assertion that gender affects access to care and health status among HIV-infected patients. In addition to supporting efforts to increase ART use and adherence among persons living with HIV, our analysis provides evidence for the importance of social determinants of health in understanding racial/ethnic and gender differences in ART use and viral suppression. PMID

  13. Hepatitis C Virus NS2 Protein Triggers Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Suppresses its Own Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    von dem Bussche, Annette; Machida, Raiki; Li, Ke; Loevinsohn, Gideon; Khander, Amrin; Wang, Jianguo; Wakita, Takaji; Wands, Jack R.; Li, Jisu

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims We previously reported that the NS2 protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) inhibits the expression of reporter genes driven by a variety of cellular and viral promoters. The aim of the study was to determine whether the broad transcriptional repression is caused by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Methods Phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2α and HCV replication were detected by Western and Northern blot, respectively. De novo protein synthesis was measured by metabolic labeling. Activation of ER stress responsive genes was determined by promoter reporter assay, as well as mRNA and protein measurement by real time PCR and Western blot. Results Transient or inducible NS2 protein expression increased eIF2α phosphorylation and reduced de novo protein synthesis. It up-regulated promoter activities and transcript levels of ER stress inducible genes including GRP78, ATF6, and GADD153, as well as GRP78 protein level. The same effect was observed when NS2 was synthesized as part of the core-E1-E2-p7-NS2 polypeptide. NS2 protein also inhibited reporter gene expression from the HCV internal ribosome entry site and consequently reduced HCV replication. The full-length HCV replicon activated GRP78, ATF6, and GADD153 promoters more efficiently than the subgenomic replicon lacking the coding sequence for both the structural proteins and NS2. Abrogation of HCV infection/replication, by an inhibitor of the NS3 protease, relieved ER stress. Conclusions HCV infection can induce ER stress, with NS2 protein being a major mediator. The stress can be relieved by a feedback mechanism. PMID:20801537

  14. CD4+ cell count recovery in naïve patients initiating cART, who achieved and maintained plasma HIV-RNA suppression

    PubMed Central

    Costagliola, Dominique; Lacombe, Jean-Marc; Ghosn, Jade; Delaugerre, Constance; Pialoux, Gilles; Cuzin, Lise; Launay, Odile; Ménard, Amélie; de Truchis, Pierre; Mary-Krause, Murielle; Weiss, Laurence; Delfraissy, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A key objective of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) is to reach and maintain high CD4 cell counts to provide long-term protection against AIDS-defining opportunistic infections and malignancies, as well as other comorbidities. However, a high proportion of patients present late for care. Our objective was to assess CD4 cell count recovery up to seven years in naïve patients initiating cART with at least three drugs in usual clinical care. Methods From the French Hospital Database on HIV, we selected naïve individuals initiating cART from 2000 with at least two years of follow-up. Participants were further required to have achieved viral load suppression by six months after initiating cART and were censored in case of virological failure. We calculated the proportion of patients (Kaplan-Meier estimates) who achieved CD4 recovery to >500/mm3 according to baseline CD4 cell count. Results A total of 15,025 patients were analyzed with a median follow-up on ART of 65.5 months (IQR: 42.3–96.0). At cART initiation, the median age was 38.6 years (IQR: 32.2–46.0), 9734 (64.8%) were men, median CD4 cell count was 239 (IQR: 130–336) and 2668 (17.8%) had a prior AIDS event. Results are presented in the Table 1. Conclusions This study shows that CD4 cell counts continue to increase seven years after cART initiation, whatever the baseline CD4 cell count. Failing to achieve CD4 recovery with continuous viral load suppression is rare for naïve patients initiating cART in routine clinical practice, but takes substantially longer in patients who initiate antiretroviral therapy at low CD4 cell counts. PMID:25393990

  15. Type I Interferon Induced Epigenetic Regulation of Macrophages Suppresses Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Acute Respiratory Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kroetz, Danielle N.; Allen, Ronald M.; Schaller, Matthew A.; Cavallaro, Cleyton; Ito, Toshihiro; Kunkel, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is an airborne pathogen that causes significant morbidity and mortality each year. Macrophages (Mϕ) are the first immune population to encounter IAV virions in the lungs and are required to control infection. In the present study, we explored the mechanism by which cytokine signaling regulates the phenotype and function of Mϕ via epigenetic modification of chromatin. We have found that type I interferon (IFN-I) potently upregulates the lysine methyltransferase Setdb2 in murine and human Mϕ, and in turn Setdb2 regulates Mϕ-mediated immunity in response to IAV. The induction of Setdb2 by IFN-I was significantly impaired upon inhibition of the JAK-STAT signaling cascade, and chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that both STAT1 and interferon regulatory factor 7 bind upstream of the transcription start site to induce expression. The generation of Setdb2LacZ reporter mice revealed that IAV infection results in systemic upregulation of Setdb2 in myeloid cells. In the lungs, alveolar Mϕ expressed the highest level of Setdb2, with greater than 70% lacZ positive on day 4 post-infection. Silencing Setdb2 activity in Mϕ in vivo enhanced survival in lethal IAV infection. Enhanced host protection correlated with an amplified antiviral response and less obstruction to the airways. By tri-methylating H3K9, Setdb2 silenced the transcription of Mx1 and Isg15, antiviral effectors that inhibit IAV replication. Accordingly, a reduced viral load in knockout mice on day 8 post-infection was linked to elevated Isg15 and Mx1 transcript in the lungs. In addition, Setdb2 suppressed the expression of a large number of other genes with proinflammatory or immunomodulatory function. This included Ccl2, a chemokine that signals through CCR2 to regulate monocyte recruitment to infectious sites. Consistently, knockout mice produced more CCL2 upon IAV infection and this correlated with a 2-fold increase in the number of inflammatory monocytes and alveolar Mϕ in the

  16. Type I Interferon Induced Epigenetic Regulation of Macrophages Suppresses Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Acute Respiratory Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Kroetz, Danielle N; Allen, Ronald M; Schaller, Matthew A; Cavallaro, Cleyton; Ito, Toshihiro; Kunkel, Steven L

    2015-12-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is an airborne pathogen that causes significant morbidity and mortality each year. Macrophages (Mϕ) are the first immune population to encounter IAV virions in the lungs and are required to control infection. In the present study, we explored the mechanism by which cytokine signaling regulates the phenotype and function of Mϕ via epigenetic modification of chromatin. We have found that type I interferon (IFN-I) potently upregulates the lysine methyltransferase Setdb2 in murine and human Mϕ, and in turn Setdb2 regulates Mϕ-mediated immunity in response to IAV. The induction of Setdb2 by IFN-I was significantly impaired upon inhibition of the JAK-STAT signaling cascade, and chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that both STAT1 and interferon regulatory factor 7 bind upstream of the transcription start site to induce expression. The generation of Setdb2LacZ reporter mice revealed that IAV infection results in systemic upregulation of Setdb2 in myeloid cells. In the lungs, alveolar Mϕ expressed the highest level of Setdb2, with greater than 70% lacZ positive on day 4 post-infection. Silencing Setdb2 activity in Mϕ in vivo enhanced survival in lethal IAV infection. Enhanced host protection correlated with an amplified antiviral response and less obstruction to the airways. By tri-methylating H3K9, Setdb2 silenced the transcription of Mx1 and Isg15, antiviral effectors that inhibit IAV replication. Accordingly, a reduced viral load in knockout mice on day 8 post-infection was linked to elevated Isg15 and Mx1 transcript in the lungs. In addition, Setdb2 suppressed the expression of a large number of other genes with proinflammatory or immunomodulatory function. This included Ccl2, a chemokine that signals through CCR2 to regulate monocyte recruitment to infectious sites. Consistently, knockout mice produced more CCL2 upon IAV infection and this correlated with a 2-fold increase in the number of inflammatory monocytes and alveolar Mϕ in the

  17. Postpartum Loss to HIV Care and HIV Viral Suppression among Previously Diagnosed HIV-Infected Women with a Live Birth in New York State

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mother-to-child-transmission of HIV in the United States has been greatly reduced, with clear benefits for the child. However, little is known about factors that predict maternal loss to HIV care in the postpartum year. This retrospective cohort study included 980 HIV-positive women, diagnosed with HIV at least one year before pregnancy, who had a live birth during 2008–2010 in New York State. Women who did not meet the following criterion in the 12 months after the delivery-related hospital discharge were considered to be lost to HIV care: two or more laboratory tests (CD4 or HIV viral load), separated by at least 90 days. Adjusted relative risks (aRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for predictors of postpartum loss to HIV care were identified with Poisson regression, solved using generalized estimating equations. Having an unsuppressed (>200 copies/mL) HIV viral load in the postpartum year was also evaluated. Overall, 24% of women were loss to HIV care during the postpartum year. Women with low participation in HIV care during preconception were more likely to be lost to HIV care during the postpartum year (aRR: 2.70; 95% CI: 2.09–3.49). In contrast, having a low birth weight infant was significantly associated with a decreased likelihood of loss to HIV care (aRR: 0.72; 95% CI: 0.53–0.98). While 75% of women were virally suppressed at the last viral load before delivery only 44% were continuously suppressed in the postpartum year; 12% had no viral load test reported in the postpartum year and 44% had at least one unsuppressed viral load test. Lack of engagement in preconception HIV-related health care predicts postpartum loss to HIV care for HIV-positive parturient women. Many women had poor viral control during the postpartum period, increasing the risk of disease progression and infectivity. PMID:27513953

  18. Simulating Patterns of Patient Engagement, Treatment Adherence, and Viral Suppression: A System Dynamics Approach to Evaluating HIV Care Management

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Brian; Palma, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Abstract System dynamics (SD) modeling belongs to the rapidly evolving, interdisciplinary field of system science research. This field adds value to more traditional health research by contributing to the design and testing of complex integrated models of change, to examine health system performance and patient outcomes. Using selected milestones in HIV care management to frame our simulation research, we created a SD model to examine three patient subgroups of women of color (WOC) represented in our multi-site cohort, classified by their health care seeking status at baseline. Asked to reflect on their circumstance 6 months prior to enrollment in the MSE cohort, 53% noted they were receiving some care (In Care, n=341), 31% that they had been seeking care (Seeking Care, n=201), and 16% that they were undecided about seeking care (i.e., answered that they may or may not look for care) for treatment of their HIV (May or May Not Seek Care, n=103). Our SD model compared simulated patterns of patient retention over 24 months in relation to: (1) access to antiretroviral therapy (ART), (2) adherence to ART, and (3) viral suppression. Assessed patterns yielded insights about system capacities and constraints in the context of the SPNS initiative under evaluation. PMID:25561309

  19. Suppression of Jasmonic Acid-Mediated Defense by Viral-Inducible MicroRNA319 Facilitates Virus Infection in Rice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Ding, Zuomei; Wu, Kangcheng; Yang, Liang; Li, Yang; Yang, Zhen; Shi, Shan; Liu, Xiaojuan; Zhao, Shanshan; Yang, Zhirui; Wang, Yu; Zheng, Luping; Wei, Juan; Du, Zhenguo; Zhang, Aihong; Miao, Hongqin; Li, Yi; Wu, Zujian; Wu, Jianguo

    2016-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are pivotal modulators of plant development and host-virus interactions. However, the roles and action modes of specific miRNAs involved in viral infection and host susceptibility remain largely unclear. In this study, we show that Rice ragged stunt virus (RRSV) infection caused increased accumulation of miR319 but decreased expression of miR319-regulated TCP (TEOSINTE BRANCHED/CYCLOIDEA/PCF) genes, especially TCP21, in rice plants. Transgenic rice plants overexpressing miR319 or downregulating TCP21 exhibited disease-like phenotypes and showed significantly higher susceptibility to RRSV in comparison with the wild-type plants. In contrast, only mild disease symptoms were observed in RRSV-infected lines overexpressing TCP21 and especially in the transgenic plants overexpressing miR319-resistant TCP21. Both RRSV infection and overexpression of miR319 caused the decreased endogenous jasmonic acid (JA) levels along with downregulated expression of JA biosynthesis and signaling-related genes in rice. However, treatment of rice plants with methyl jasmonate alleviated disease symptoms caused by RRSV and reduced virus accumulation. Taken together, our results suggest that the induction of miR319 by RRSV infection in rice suppresses JA-mediated defense to facilitate virus infection and symptom development. PMID:27381440

  20. Doubly Spliced RNA of Hepatitis B Virus Suppresses Viral Transcription via TATA-Binding Protein and Induces Stress Granule Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Kuen-Nan; Chong, Chin-Liew; Chou, Yu-Chi; Huang, Chien-Chiao; Wang, Yi-Ling; Wang, Shao-Win; Chen, Mong-Liang

    2015-01-01

    infected with other HBV genotypes. Using cultured human hepatoma cells as a model of HBV infection, we found that the expression of 2.2DS-RNA caused a decrease in HBV replication. In cultured cells, the ectopic expression of 2.2DS-RNA obviously reduced the intracellular levels of HBV mRNAs. Our analysis of the 2.2DS-RNA-mediated suppression of viral RNA expression showed that 2.2DS-RNA inhibited transcription via binding to the TATA-binding protein and stress granule proteins. Our findings suggest that the 2.2DS-RNA acts as a suppressive noncoding RNA that modulates HBV replication, which may in turn influence the development of chronic hepatitis B. PMID:26339052

  1. Full Viral Suppression, Low-Level Viremia, and Quantifiable Plasma HIV-RNA at the End of Pregnancy in HIV-Infected Women on Antiretroviral Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Baroncelli, Silvia; Pirillo, Maria F.; Tamburrini, Enrica; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Pinnetti, Carmela; Antoni, Anna Degli; Galluzzo, Clementina M.; Stentarelli, Chiara; Amici, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There is limited information on full viral suppression and low-level HIV-RNA viremia in HIV-infected women at the end of pregnancy. We investigated HIV-RNA levels close to delivery in women on antiretroviral treatment in order to define rates of complete suppression, low-level viremia, and quantifiable HIV-RNA, exploring as potential determinants some clinical and viroimmunological variables. Plasma samples from a national study in Italy, collected between 2003 and 2012, were used. According to plasma HIV-RNA levels, three groups were defined: full suppression (target not detected), low-level viremia (target detected but <37 copies/ml), and quantifiable HIV-RNA (≥37 copies/ml). Multivariable logistic regression was used to define determinants of full viral suppression and of quantifiable HIV-RNA. Among 107 women evaluated at a median gestational age of 35 weeks, 90 (84.1%) had HIV-RNA <37 copies/ml. Most of them (59/90, 65.6%) had full suppression, with the remaining (31/90, 34.4%) showing low-level viremia (median: 11.9 copies/ml; IQR 7.4–16.3). Among the 17 women with quantifiable viral load, median HIV-RNA was 109 copies/ml (IQR 46–251), with only one case showing resistance (mutation M184V; rate: 9.1%). In multivariable analyses, women with higher baseline HIV-RNA levels and with hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection were significantly more likely to have quantifiable HIV-RNA in late pregnancy. Full viral suppression was significantly more likely with nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based regimens and significantly less likely with higher HIV-RNA in early pregnancy. No cases of HIV transmission occurred. In conclusion, HIV-infected pregnant women showed a high rate of viral suppression and a low resistance rate before delivery. In most cases no target HIV-RNA was detected in plasma, suggesting a low risk of subsequent virological rebound and development of resistance. Women with high levels of HIV-RNA in early pregnancy and

  2. Brief Report: Food Insufficiency Is Associated With Lack of Sustained Viral Suppression Among HIV-Infected Pregnant and Breastfeeding Ugandan Women

    PubMed Central

    Natureeba, Paul; Nyafwono, Dorcas; Plenty, Albert; Mwesigwa, Julia; Nzarubara, Bridget; Clark, Tamara D.; Ruel, Theodore D.; Achan, Jane; Charlebois, Edwin D.; Cohan, Deborah; Kamya, Moses R.; Havlir, Diane V.; Young, Sera L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Food insecurity is associated with poor virologic outcomes, but this has not been studied during pregnancy and breastfeeding. We assessed sustained viral suppression from 8 weeks on antiretroviral therapy to 48 weeks postpartum among 171 pregnant and breastfeeding Ugandan women; 74.9% experienced food insufficiency. In multivariable analysis, food insufficiency [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 0.38, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.16 to 0.91], higher pretreatment HIV-1 RNA (aOR 0.55 per 10-fold increase, 95% CI: 0.37 to 0.82), and lopinavir/ritonavir versus efavirenz (aOR 0.49, 95% CI: 0.24 to 0.96) were associated with lower odds of sustained viral suppression. Interventions to address food security may improve virologic outcomes among HIV-infected women. PMID:26397935

  3. Brief Report: Food Insufficiency Is Associated With Lack of Sustained Viral Suppression Among HIV-Infected Pregnant and Breastfeeding Ugandan Women.

    PubMed

    Koss, Catherine A; Natureeba, Paul; Nyafwono, Dorcas; Plenty, Albert; Mwesigwa, Julia; Nzarubara, Bridget; Clark, Tamara D; Ruel, Theodore D; Achan, Jane; Charlebois, Edwin D; Cohan, Deborah; Kamya, Moses R; Havlir, Diane V; Young, Sera L

    2016-03-01

    Food insecurity is associated with poor virologic outcomes, but this has not been studied during pregnancy and breastfeeding. We assessed sustained viral suppression from 8 weeks on antiretroviral therapy to 48 weeks postpartum among 171 pregnant and breastfeeding Ugandan women; 74.9% experienced food insufficiency. In multivariable analysis, food insufficiency [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 0.38, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.16 to 0.91], higher pretreatment HIV-1 RNA (aOR 0.55 per 10-fold increase, 95% CI: 0.37 to 0.82), and lopinavir/ritonavir versus efavirenz (aOR 0.49, 95% CI: 0.24 to 0.96) were associated with lower odds of sustained viral suppression. Interventions to address food security may improve virologic outcomes among HIV-infected women. PMID:26397935

  4. A single tablet regimen is associated with higher adherence and viral suppression than multiple tablet regimens in HIV+ homeless and marginally housed people

    PubMed Central

    Bangsberg, David R; Ragland, Kathleen; Monk, Alex; Deeks, Steven G

    2013-01-01

    Although, single tablet regimen (STR) efavirenz, emtricibine, and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (EFV/FTC/TDF) may be appealing in HIV infected persons who are at high risk for non-adherence, the degree to which this simplified formulation affects adherence is not known. The virologic effectiveness of this STR in a potentially non-adherent population remains a concern, given the rapid selection of drug-resistance seen with these drugs. We performed a prospective observational study assessing adherence and virologic response to EFV/FTC/TDF STR among a cohort of homeless and marginally housed individuals. We compared adherence and viral suppression to historical controls followed in the same cohort. Adherence was higher in EFV/FTC/TDF STR regimen compared to non-one-pill once daily therapy (p=0.0060) after controlling for multiple confounders. Viral suppression (HIV RNA <50 c/ml) was greater in EFV/FTC/TDF STR than non-one pill daily regimens (69.2% vs 46.5%; p=0.02), but there was no difference in viral suppression after controlling for adherence. Once daily EFV/TNF/FTC STR appears to be a reasonable option for individuals with multiple barriers to adherence. Randomized clinical trials addressing various therapeutic strategies for this patient population are needed. PMID:21045636

  5. The impact of transient combination antiretroviral treatment in early HIV infection on viral suppression and immunologic response in later treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pantazis, Nikos; Touloumi, Giota; Meyer, Laurence; Olson, Ashley; Costagliola, Dominique; Kelleher, Anthony D.; Lutsar, Irja; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Fisher, Martin; Moreno, Santiago; Porter, Kholoud

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Effects of transient combination antiretroviral treatment (cART) initiated during early HIV infection (EHI) remain unclear. We investigate whether this intervention affects viral suppression and CD4+ cell count increase following its reinitiation in chronic infection (CHI). Design: Longitudinal observational study. Methods: We identified adult patients from Concerted Action of Seroconversion to AIDS and Death in Europe who seroconverted after 1/1/2000, had a 12 months or less HIV test interval and initiated cART from naive. We classified individuals as ‘pretreated in EHI’ if treated within 6 months of seroconversion, interrupted for at least 12 weeks, and reinitiated during CHI. Statistical analysis was performed using survival analysis methods and mixed models. Results: Pretreated and initiated in CHI groups comprised 202 and 4263 individuals, with median follow-up after CHI treatment 4.5 and 3 years, respectively. Both groups had similar virologic response and relapse rates (P = 0.585 and P = 0.206) but pretreated individuals restarted treatment with higher baseline CD4+ cell count (∼80 cells/μl; P < 0.001) and retained significantly higher CD4+ cell count for more than 3 years after treatment (re)initiation. Assuming common baseline CD4+ cell count, differences in CD4+ cell count slopes were nonsignificant. Immunovirologic response to CHI treatment was not associated with timing or duration of the transient treatment. Conclusion: Although treatment interruptions are not recommended, stopping cART initiated in EHI does not seem to reduce the chance of a successful outcome of treatment in CHI. PMID:26636925

  6. Assessing the HIV Care Continuum in Latin America: progress in clinical retention, cART use and viral suppression

    PubMed Central

    Rebeiro, Peter F; Cesar, Carina; Shepherd, Bryan E; De Boni, Raquel B; Cortés, Claudia P; Rodriguez, Fernanda; Belaunzarán-Zamudio, Pablo; Pape, Jean W; Padgett, Denis; Hoces, Daniel; McGowan, Catherine C; Cahn, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We assessed trends in HIV Care Continuum outcomes associated with delayed disease progression and reduced transmission within a large Latin American cohort over a decade: clinical retention, combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) use and viral suppression (VS). Methods Adults from Caribbean, Central and South America network for HIV epidemiology clinical cohorts in seven countries contributed data between 2003 and 2012. Retention was defined as two or more HIV care visits annually, >90 days apart. cART was defined as prescription of three or more antiretroviral agents annually. VS was defined as HIV-1 RNA <200 copies/mL at last measurement annually. cART and VS denominators were subjects with at least one visit annually. Multivariable modified Poisson regression was used to assess temporal trends and examine associations between age, sex, HIV transmission mode, cohort, calendar year and time in care. Results Among 18,799 individuals in retention analyses, 14,380 in cART analyses and 13,330 in VS analyses, differences existed between those meeting indicator definitions versus those not by most characteristics. Retention, cART and VS significantly improved from 2003 to 2012 (63 to 77%, 74 to 91% and 53 to 82%, respectively; p<0.05, each). Female sex (risk ratio (RR)=0.97 vs. males) and injection drug use as HIV transmission mode (RR=0.83 vs. male sexual contact with males (MSM)) were significantly associated with lower retention, but unrelated with cART or VS. MSM (RR=0.96) significantly decreased the probability of cART compared with heterosexual transmission. Conclusions HIV Care Continuum outcomes improved over time in Latin America, though disparities for vulnerable groups remain. Efforts must be made to increase retention, cART and VS, while engaging in additional research to sustain progress in these settings. PMID:27065108

  7. Gender Differences in Psychosocial Factors Associated with HIV Viral Suppression Among African-American Injection Drug Users.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Allysha C; Knowlton, Amy R

    2016-02-01

    Research suggests gender differences exist in achieving undetectable viral load (UVL) among persons living with HIV (PLHIV), and that psychosocial health factors may play a role. The present study examined these factors among African-American PLHIV enrolled in the BEACON study. Participants completed self-report surveys and gave biomarker data. Poisson regression with robust standard errors was implemented. Men with moderate religious activity had 1.3 times the likelihood of UVL as men with low religious activity (p < 0.10; N = 199). Men with 1-2 mental illness diagnoses had 1.3 times the likelihood of UVL as men with none (p < 0.05). Women using 1-2 substances had 28 % lower likelihood of UVL than non-using women (N = 122; p < 0.10). Finally, women with frequent doctor-patient communication had 35 % higher likelihood of UVL as women with less doctor-patient communication (p < 0.05). Results suggest that social support, substance use, and mental illness function differently among men and women. Healthcare professionals should employ gender-specific interventions to address and improve HIV health outcomes. PMID:26143248

  8. Suppression of antiviral silencing by cucumber mosaic virus 2b protein in Arabidopsis is associated with drastically reduced accumulation of three classes of viral small interfering RNAs.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Pendon, Juan A; Li, Feng; Li, Wan-Xiang; Ding, Shou-Wei

    2007-06-01

    We investigated the genetic pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana targeted during infection by cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) 2b protein, known to suppress non-cell-autonomous transgene silencing and salicylic acid (SA)-mediated virus resistance. We show that 2b expressed from the CMV genome drastically reduced the accumulation of 21-, 22-, and 24-nucleotide classes of viral small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) produced by Dicer-like4 (DCL4), DCL2, and DCL3, respectively. The defect of a CMV 2b-deletion mutant (CMV-Delta2b) in plant infection was efficiently rescued in Arabidopsis mutants producing neither 21- nor 22-nucleotide viral siRNAs. Since genetic analysis further identifies a unique antiviral role for DCL3 upstream of DCL4, our data indicate that inhibition of the accumulation of distinct viral siRNAs plays a key role in 2b suppression of antiviral silencing. Strikingly, disease symptoms caused by CMV-Delta2b in Arabidopsis mutants defective in antiviral silencing were as severe as those caused by CMV, demonstrating an indirect role for the silencing suppressor activity in virus virulence. We found that production of CMV siRNAs without 2b interference depended largely on RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 (RDR1) inducible by SA. Given the known role of RDR6-dependent transgene siRNAs in non-cell-autonomous silencing, our results suggest a model in which 2b inhibits the production of RDR1-dependent viral siRNAs that confer SA-dependent virus resistance by directing non-cell-autonomous antiviral silencing. PMID:17586651

  9. Influence of Jail Incarceration and Homelessness Patterns on Engagement in HIV Care and HIV Viral Suppression among New York City Adults Living with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sungwoo; Nash, Denis; Hollod, Laura; Harris, Tiffany G.; Lennon, Mary Clare; Thorpe, Lorna E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Both homelessness and incarceration are associated with housing instability, which in turn can disrupt continuity of HIV medical care. Yet, their impacts have not been systematically assessed among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Methods We studied a retrospective cohort of 1,698 New York City PLWHA with both jail incarceration and homelessness during 2001–05 to evaluate whether frequent transitions between jail incarceration and homelessness were associated with a lower likelihood of continuity of HIV care during a subsequent one-year follow-up period. Using matched jail, single-adult homeless shelter, and HIV registry data, we performed sequence analysis to identify trajectories of these events and assessed their influence on engagement in HIV care and HIV viral suppression via marginal structural modeling. Results Sequence analysis identified four trajectories; 72% of the cohort had sporadic experiences of both brief incarceration and homelessness, whereas others experienced more consistent incarceration or homelessness during early or late months. Trajectories were not associated with differential engagement in HIV care during follow-up. However, compared with PLWHA experiencing early bouts of homelessness and later minimal incarceration/homelessness events, we observed a lower prevalence of viral suppression among PLWHA with two other trajectories: those with sporadic, brief occurrences of incarceration/homelessness (0.67, 95% CI = 0.50,0.90) and those with extensive incarceration experiences (0.62, 95% CI = 0.43,0.88). Conclusions Housing instability due to frequent jail incarceration and homelessness or extensive incarceration may exert negative influences on viral suppression. Policies and services that support housing stability should be strengthened among incarcerated and sheltered PLWHA to reduce risk of adverse health conditions. PMID:26599877

  10. Pathogenesis of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus infection: effects of suppression of antibody response on viral mRNA levels and on development of acute disease.

    PubMed Central

    Alexandersen, S; Storgaard, T; Kamstrup, N; Aasted, B; Porter, D D

    1994-01-01

    We suppressed the B-cell development and antibody response in mink by using treatment with polyclonal anti-immunoglobulin M (anti-IgM) to study the effects of antiviral antibodies on development of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV)-induced disease in more detail. Newborn mink kits were injected intraperitoneally with 1 mg of either anti-IgM or a control preparation three times a week for 30 to 34 days. At 21 days after birth, groups of mink kits were infected with the highly virulent United isolate of ADV. At selected time points, i.e., postinfection days 9, 13, 29, and 200, randomly chosen mink kits were sacrificed, and blood and tissues were collected for analyses. The efficacy of immunosuppressive treatment was monitored by electrophoretic techniques and flow cytometry. Effects of treatment on viral replication, on viral mRNA levels, and on development of acute or chronic disease were determined by histopathological, immunoelectrophoretic, and molecular hybridization techniques. Several interesting findings emerged from these studies. First, antiviral antibodies decreased ADV mRNA levels more than DNA replication. Second, suppression of B-cell development and antibody response in mink kits infected at 21 days of age resulted in production of viral inclusion bodies in alveolar type II cells. Some of these kits showed mild clinical signs of respiratory disease, and one kit died of respiratory distress; however, clinical signs were seen only after release of immunosuppression, suggesting that the production of antiviral antibodies, in combination with the massive amounts of free viral antigen present, somehow is involved in the induction of respiratory distress. It is suggested that the antiviral antibody response observed in mink older than approximately 14 days primarily, by a yet unknown mechanism, decreases ADV mRNA levels which, if severe enough, results in restricted levels of DNA replication and virion production. Furthermore, such a restricted ADV

  11. Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus-encoded viral FLICE inhibitory protein (vFLIP) K13 suppresses CXCR4 expression by upregulating miR-146a

    PubMed Central

    Punj, Vasu; Matta, Hittu; Schamus, Sandra; Tamewitz, Aletheia; Anyang, Bean; Chaudhary, Preet M.

    2009-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-encoded viral FLICE inhibitory protein (vFLIP) K13 is a potent activator of the NF-κB pathway. Here we demonstrate that infection with KHSV and ectopic expression of K13, but not its NF-κB-defective mutant, suppressed the expression of CXCR4. Suppression of CXCR4 by KSHV and K13 was associated with upregulated expression of miR-146a, a microRNA that is known to bind to the 3′ untranslated region of CXCR4 mRNA. Reporter studies identified two NF-κB sites in the promoter of miR-146a that were essential for its activation by K13. Accordingly, ectopic expression of K13, but not its NF-κB-defective mutant or other vFLIPs, strongly stimulated the miR-146a promoter activity, which could be blocked by specific genetic and pharmacological inhibitors of the NF-κB pathway. Finally, expression of CXCR4 was downregulated in clinical samples of KS and this was accompanied by increased expression of miR-146a. Our results demonstrate that K13-induced NF-κB activity suppresses CXCR4 via upregulation of miR-146a. Downregulation of CXCR4 expression by K13 may contribute to KS development by promoting premature release of KSHV-infected endothelial progenitors into the circulation. PMID:20023696

  12. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Monoclonal Antibodies Suppress Acute Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Viremia and Limit Seeding of Cell-Associated Viral Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Pegu, Amarendra; Wang, Keyun; McGinnis, Kathleen; Nason, Martha; Foulds, Kathryn; Letukas, Valerie; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Chen, Xuejun; Todd, John Paul; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Rao, Srinivas; Michael, Nelson L.; Robb, Merlin L.; Mascola, John R.; Koup, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) administered shortly after human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection can suppress viremia and limit seeding of the viral reservoir, but lifelong treatment is required for the majority of patients. Highly potent broadly neutralizing HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) can reduce plasma viremia when administered during chronic HIV-1 infection, but the therapeutic potential of these antibodies during acute infection is unknown. We tested the ability of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein-specific broadly neutralizing MAbs to suppress acute simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) replication in rhesus macaques. Four groups of macaques were infected with SHIV-SF162P3 and received (i) the CD4-binding-site MAb VRC01; (ii) a combination of a more potent clonal relative of VRC01 (VRC07-523) and a V3 glycan-dependent MAb (PGT121); (iii) daily cART, all on day 10, just prior to expected peak plasma viremia; or (iv) no treatment. Daily cART was initiated 11 days after MAb administration and was continued for 13 weeks in all treated animals. Over a period of 11 days after a single administration, MAb treatment significantly reduced peak viremia, accelerated the decay slope, and reduced total viral replication compared to untreated controls. Proviral DNA in lymph node CD4 T cells was also diminished after treatment with the dual MAb. These data demonstrate the virological effect of potent MAbs and support future clinical trials that investigate HIV-1-neutralizing MAbs as adjunctive therapy with cART during acute HIV-1 infection. IMPORTANCE Treatment of chronic HIV-1 infection with potent broadly neutralizing HIV-1 MAbs has been shown to significantly reduce plasma viremia. However, the antiviral effect of MAb treatment during acute HIV-1 infection is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that MAbs targeting the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein both suppress acute SHIV plasma viremia and limit CD4 T cell-associated viral DNA. These

  13. IL2Rβ-dependent signals drive terminal exhaustion and suppress memory development during chronic viral infection.

    PubMed

    Beltra, Jean-Christophe; Bourbonnais, Sara; Bédard, Nathalie; Charpentier, Tania; Boulangé, Moana; Michaud, Eva; Boufaied, Ines; Bruneau, Julie; Shoukry, Naglaa H; Lamarre, Alain; Decaluwe, Hélène

    2016-09-13

    Exhaustion of CD8(+) T cells severely impedes the adaptive immune response to chronic viral infections. Despite major advances in our understanding of the molecular regulation of exhaustion, the cytokines that directly control this process during chronicity remain unknown. We demonstrate a direct impact of IL-2 and IL-15, two common gamma-chain-dependent cytokines, on CD8(+) T-cell exhaustion. Common to both cytokine receptors, the IL-2 receptor β (IL2Rβ) chain is selectively maintained on CD8(+) T cells during chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and hepatitis C virus infections. Its expression correlates with exhaustion severity and identifies terminally exhausted CD8(+) T cells both in mice and humans. Genetic ablation of the IL2Rβ chain on CD8(+) T cells restrains inhibitory receptor induction, in particular 2B4 and Tim-3; precludes terminal differentiation of highly defective PD-1(hi) effectors; and rescues memory T-cell development and responsiveness to IL-7-dependent signals. Together, we ascribe a previously unexpected role to IL-2 and IL-15 as instigators of CD8(+) T-cell exhaustion during chronic viral infection. PMID:27573835

  14. D-Dimer Levels before HIV Seroconversion Remain Elevated Even after Viral Suppression and Are Associated with an Increased Risk of Non-AIDS Events

    PubMed Central

    Freiberg, Matthew S.; Bebu, Ionut; Tracy, Russell; So-Armah, Kaku; Okulicz, Jason; Ganesan, Anuradha; Armstrong, Adam; O’Bryan, Thomas; Rimland, David; Justice, Amy C.; Agan, Brian K.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the excess risk of non-AIDS diseases among HIV infected people is unclear. HIV associated inflammation/hypercoagulability likely plays a role. While antiretroviral therapy (ART) may return this process to pre-HIV levels, this has not been directly demonstrated. We analyzed data/specimens on 249 HIV+ participants from the US Military HIV Natural History Study, a prospective, multicenter observational cohort of >5600 active duty military personnel and beneficiaries living with HIV. We used stored blood specimens to measure D-dimer and Interleukin-6 (IL-6) at three time points: pre-HIV seroconversion, ≥6 months post-HIV seroconversion but prior to ART initiation, and ≥6 months post-ART with documented HIV viral suppression on two successive evaluations. We evaluated the changes in biomarker levels between time points, and the association between these biomarker changes and future non-AIDS events. During a median follow-up of 3.7 years, there were 28 incident non-AIDS diseases. At ART initiation, the median CD4 count was 361cells/mm3; median duration of documented HIV infection 392 days; median time on ART was 354 days. Adjusted mean percent increase in D-dimer levels from pre-seroconversion to post-ART was 75.1% (95% confidence interval 24.6–148.0, p = 0.002). This increase in D-dimer was associated with a significant 22% increase risk of future non-AIDS events (p = 0.03). Changes in IL-6 levels across time points were small and not associated with future non-AIDS events. In conclusion, ART initiation and HIV viral suppression does not eliminate HIV associated elevation in D-dimer levels. This residual pathology is associated with an increased risk of future non-AIDS diseases. PMID:27088215

  15. D-Dimer Levels before HIV Seroconversion Remain Elevated Even after Viral Suppression and Are Associated with an Increased Risk of Non-AIDS Events.

    PubMed

    Freiberg, Matthew S; Bebu, Ionut; Tracy, Russell; So-Armah, Kaku; Okulicz, Jason; Ganesan, Anuradha; Armstrong, Adam; O'Bryan, Thomas; Rimland, David; Justice, Amy C; Agan, Brian K

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the excess risk of non-AIDS diseases among HIV infected people is unclear. HIV associated inflammation/hypercoagulability likely plays a role. While antiretroviral therapy (ART) may return this process to pre-HIV levels, this has not been directly demonstrated. We analyzed data/specimens on 249 HIV+ participants from the US Military HIV Natural History Study, a prospective, multicenter observational cohort of >5600 active duty military personnel and beneficiaries living with HIV. We used stored blood specimens to measure D-dimer and Interleukin-6 (IL-6) at three time points: pre-HIV seroconversion, ≥6 months post-HIV seroconversion but prior to ART initiation, and ≥6 months post-ART with documented HIV viral suppression on two successive evaluations. We evaluated the changes in biomarker levels between time points, and the association between these biomarker changes and future non-AIDS events. During a median follow-up of 3.7 years, there were 28 incident non-AIDS diseases. At ART initiation, the median CD4 count was 361cells/mm3; median duration of documented HIV infection 392 days; median time on ART was 354 days. Adjusted mean percent increase in D-dimer levels from pre-seroconversion to post-ART was 75.1% (95% confidence interval 24.6-148.0, p = 0.002). This increase in D-dimer was associated with a significant 22% increase risk of future non-AIDS events (p = 0.03). Changes in IL-6 levels across time points were small and not associated with future non-AIDS events. In conclusion, ART initiation and HIV viral suppression does not eliminate HIV associated elevation in D-dimer levels. This residual pathology is associated with an increased risk of future non-AIDS diseases. PMID:27088215

  16. Characterizing Class-Specific Exposure-Viral Load Suppression Response of HIV Antiretrovirals Using A Model-Based Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Li, Y F; Zhang, D; Dockendorf, M; Tetteh, E; Rizk, M L; Grobler, J A; Lai, M-T; Gobburu, J; Ankrom, W

    2016-08-01

    We applied model-based meta-analysis of viral suppression as a function of drug exposure and in vitro potency for short-term monotherapy in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected treatment-naïve patients to set pharmacokinetic targets for development of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) and integrase strand transfer inhibitors (InSTIs). We developed class-specific models relating viral load kinetics from monotherapy studies to potency normalized steady-state trough plasma concentrations. These models were integrated with a literature assessment of doses which demonstrated to have long-term efficacy in combination therapy, in order to set steady-state trough concentration targets of 6.17- and 2.15-fold above potency for NNRTIs and InSTIs, respectively. Both the models developed and the pharmacokinetic targets derived can be used to guide compound selection during preclinical development and to predict the dose-response of new antiretrovirals to inform early clinical trial design. PMID:27171172

  17. Cost-effectiveness of entecavir versus lamivudine for the suppression of viral replication in chronic hepatitis B patients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Costa, Anna Maria N; L 'italien, Gilbert; Nita, Marcelo Eidi; Araujo, Evaldo Stanislau A

    2008-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus infection is an important public-health issue. Chronic patients have a higher risk of death due to complications, which increases health-care expenses in. Cost-effectiveness analysis of entecavir (ETV) versus lamivudine (LVD) for treatment of chronic hepatitis B, in e antigen (AgHBe)-positive and negative patients, based on two phase 3, controlled and randomized studies. A decision analysis model was developed, using the following endpoints: cost per patient with undetectable viral load and cost per quality life year (QALY) gained. Risks for complications (compensated or decompensated cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma) were based on the cohort study REVEAL, published in 2006. The REVEAL parameters were applied to the results of the viral load levels obtained from the clinical assay data. The complication costs were based on a study of the disease cost conducted in Brazil, in 2005. The cost data were obtained predominantly from Sistema Unico de Saúde [SUS - Brazilian public health system] payment tables and drug price lists. The utility data were obtained from literature and life expectancy information was based on IBGE data. The analysis perspective was that of SUS. A discount rate of 3% per year was used. For the horizon of time of 10 years, the ETV had an incremental cost of approximately two million Brazilian Reais (R$) compared to LVD. Reducing the number of complications, ETV treatment reduced costs by around 3 million, reducing final costs by 1 million, for AgHBe-positive patients. ETV also reduced the incremental cost per QALY gained. ETV was found to be the most cost-effective alternative for AgHBe-positive and negative patients. PMID:19219274

  18. Human β-D-3 Exacerbates MDA5 but Suppresses TLR3 Responses to the Viral Molecular Pattern Mimic Polyinosinic:Polycytidylic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Semple, Fiona; MacPherson, Heather; Webb, Sheila; Kilanowski, Fiona; Lettice, Laura; McGlasson, Sarah L.; Wheeler, Ann P.; Chen, Valerie; Millhauser, Glenn L.; Melrose, Lauren; Davidson, Donald J.; Dorin, Julia R.

    2015-01-01

    Human β-defensin 3 (hBD3) is a cationic host defence peptide and is part of the innate immune response. HBD3 is present on a highly copy number variable block of six β-defensin genes, and increased copy number is associated with the autoimmune disease psoriasis. It is not known how this increase influences disease development, but psoriasis is a T cell-mediated disease and activation of the innate immune system is required for the initial trigger that leads to the amplification stage. We investigated the effect of hBD3 on the response of primary macrophages to various TLR agonists. HBD3 exacerbated the production of type I Interferon-β in response to the viral ligand mimic polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (polyI:C) in both human and mouse primary cells, although production of the chemokine CXCL10 was suppressed. Compared to polyI:C alone, mice injected with both hBD3 peptide and polyI:C also showed an enhanced increase in Interferon-β. Mice expressing a transgene encoding hBD3 had elevated basal levels of Interferon-β, and challenge with polyI:C further increased this response. HBD3 peptide increased uptake of polyI:C by macrophages, however the cellular response and localisation of polyI:C in cells treated contemporaneously with hBD3 or cationic liposome differed. Immunohistochemistry showed that hBD3 and polyI:C do not co-localise, but in the presence of hBD3 less polyI:C localises to the early endosome. Using bone marrow derived macrophages from knockout mice we demonstrate that hBD3 suppresses the polyI:C-induced TLR3 response mediated by TICAM1 (TRIF), while exacerbating the cytoplasmic response through MDA5 (IFIH1) and MAVS (IPS1/CARDIF). Thus, hBD3, a highly copy number variable gene in human, influences cellular responses to the viral mimic polyI:C implying that copy number may have a significant phenotypic effect on the response to viral infection and development of autoimmunity in humans. PMID:26646717

  19. Human β-Defensin 3 [corrected] Exacerbates MDA5 but Suppresses TLR3 Responses to the Viral Molecular Pattern Mimic Polyinosinic:Polycytidylic Acid.

    PubMed

    Semple, Fiona; MacPherson, Heather; Webb, Sheila; Kilanowski, Fiona; Lettice, Laura; McGlasson, Sarah L; Wheeler, Ann P; Chen, Valerie; Millhauser, Glenn L; Melrose, Lauren; Davidson, Donald J; Dorin, Julia R

    2015-12-01

    Human β-defensin 3 (hBD3) is a cationic host defence peptide and is part of the innate immune response. HBD3 is present on a highly copy number variable block of six β-defensin genes, and increased copy number is associated with the autoimmune disease psoriasis. It is not known how this increase influences disease development, but psoriasis is a T cell-mediated disease and activation of the innate immune system is required for the initial trigger that leads to the amplification stage. We investigated the effect of hBD3 on the response of primary macrophages to various TLR agonists. HBD3 exacerbated the production of type I Interferon-β in response to the viral ligand mimic polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (polyI:C) in both human and mouse primary cells, although production of the chemokine CXCL10 was suppressed. Compared to polyI:C alone, mice injected with both hBD3 peptide and polyI:C also showed an enhanced increase in Interferon-β. Mice expressing a transgene encoding hBD3 had elevated basal levels of Interferon-β, and challenge with polyI:C further increased this response. HBD3 peptide increased uptake of polyI:C by macrophages, however the cellular response and localisation of polyI:C in cells treated contemporaneously with hBD3 or cationic liposome differed. Immunohistochemistry showed that hBD3 and polyI:C do not co-localise, but in the presence of hBD3 less polyI:C localises to the early endosome. Using bone marrow derived macrophages from knockout mice we demonstrate that hBD3 suppresses the polyI:C-induced TLR3 response mediated by TICAM1 (TRIF), while exacerbating the cytoplasmic response through MDA5 (IFIH1) and MAVS (IPS1/CARDIF). Thus, hBD3, a highly copy number variable gene in human, influences cellular responses to the viral mimic polyI:C implying that copy number may have a significant phenotypic effect on the response to viral infection and development of autoimmunity in humans. PMID:26646717

  20. Viral suppressors of RNA-based viral immunity: Host targets

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qingfa; Wang, Xianbing

    2010-01-01

    Discovery of diverse plant and animal viral proteins as suppressors of RNA silencing has provided strong support for an RNA-based viral immunity (RVI), which is now known to specifically destroy viral RNAs by RNA interference in fungi, plants and invertebrates. Here we review several recent studies that have revealed new mechanistic insights into plant and insect viral suppressors of RVI or suggested a role for RNA silencing suppression during mammalian viral infection. PMID:20638637

  1. A novel small-molecule inhibitor of influenza A virus acts by suppressing PA endonuclease activity of the viral polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shuofeng; Chu, Hin; Singh, Kailash; Zhao, Hanjun; Zhang, Ke; Kao, Richard Y. T.; Chow, Billy K. C.; Zhou, Jie; Zheng, Bo-Jian

    2016-01-01

    The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of influenza A virus comprises conserved and independently-folded subdomains with defined functionalities. The N-terminal domain of the PA subunit (PAN) harbors the endonuclease function so that it can serve as a desired target for drug discovery. To identify a class of anti-influenza inhibitors that impedes PAN endonuclease activity, a screening approach that integrated the fluorescence resonance energy transfer based endonuclease inhibitory assay with the DNA gel-based endonuclease inhibitory assay was conducted, followed by the evaluation of antiviral efficacies and potential cytotoxicity of the primary hits in vitro and in vivo. A small-molecule compound ANA-0 was identified as a potent inhibitor against the replication of multiple subtypes of influenza A virus, including H1N1, H3N2, H5N1, H7N7, H7N9 and H9N2, in cell cultures. Combinational treatment of zanamivir and ANA-0 exerted synergistic anti-influenza effect in vitro. Intranasal administration of ANA-0 protected mice from lethal challenge and reduced lung viral loads in H1N1 virus infected BALB/c mice. In summary, ANA-0 shows potential to be developed to novel anti-influenza agents. PMID:26956222

  2. Novel Use of Surveillance Data to Detect HIV-Infected Persons with Sustained High Viral Load and Durable Virologic Suppression in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Terzian, Arpi S.; Bodach, Sara D.; Wiewel, Ellen W.; Sepkowitz, Kent; Bernard, Marie-Antoinette; Braunstein, Sarah L.; Shepard, Colin W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Monitoring of the uptake and efficacy of ART in a population often relies on cross-sectional data, providing limited information that could be used to design specific targeted intervention programs. Using repeated measures of viral load (VL) surveillance data, we aimed to estimate and characterize the proportion of persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in New York City (NYC) with sustained high VL (SHVL) and durably suppressed VL (DSVL). Methods/Principal Findings Retrospective cohort study of all persons reported to the NYC HIV Surveillance Registry who were alive and ≥12 years old by the end of 2005 and who had ≥2 VL tests in 2006 and 2007. SHVL and DSVL were defined as PLWHA with 2 consecutive VLs ≥100,000 copies/mL and PLWHA with all VLs ≤400 copies/mL, respectively. Logistic regression models using generalized estimating equations were used to model the association between SHVL and covariates. There were 56,836 PLWHA, of whom 7% had SHVL and 38% had DSVL. Compared to those without SHVL, persons with SHVL were more likely to be younger, black and have injection drug use (IDU) risk. PLWHA with SHVL were more likely to die by 2007 and be younger by nearly ten years, on average. Conclusions/Significance Nearly 60% of PLWHA in 2005 had multiple VLs, of whom almost 40% had DSVL, suggesting successful ART uptake. A small proportion had SHVL, representing groups known to have suboptimal engagement in care. This group should be targeted for additional outreach to reduce morbidity and secondary transmission. Measures based on longitudinal analyses of surveillance data in conjunction with cross-sectional measures such as community viral load represent more precise and powerful tools for monitoring ART effectiveness and potential impact on disease transmission than cross-sectional measures alone. PMID:22291892

  3. Methamphetamine Use in HIV-infected Individuals Affects T-cell Function and Viral Outcome during Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Massanella, Marta; Gianella, Sara; Schrier, Rachel; Dan, Jennifer M; Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Oliveira, Michelli F; Richman, Douglas D; Little, Susan J; Benson, Constance A; Daar, Eric S; Dube, Michael P; Haubrich, Richard H; Smith, Davey M; Morris, Sheldon R

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the associations between methamphetamine (meth) use, immune function, and the dynamics of HIV and cytomegalovirus [CMV] in the blood and genital tract of HIV-infected ART-suppressed subjects. Self-reported meth use was associated with increased CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell proliferation (Ki67(+), p < 0.005), CD4(+) T-cell activation (CD45RA(-)CD38(+), p = 0.005) and exhaustion (PD-1(+), p = 0.0004) in blood, compared to non-meth users. Meth use was also associated with a trend towards higher blood HIV DNA levels (p = 0.09) and more frequent shedding of CMV in seminal plasma (p = 0.002). To explore possible mechanisms, we compared ex vivo spontaneous and antigen-specific proliferation in PBMC collected from subjects with and without positive meth detection in urine (Utox+ vs. Utox-). Despite higher levels of spontaneous proliferation, lymphocytes from Utox+ meth users had a significantly lower proliferative capacity after stimulation with a number of pathogens (CMV, candida, mycobacterium, toxoplasma, HIV, p < 0.04 in all cases), compared to Utox- participants. Our findings suggest that meth users have greater proliferation and exhaustion of the immune system. Meth use is also associated with a loss of control of CMV replication, which could be related to loss of immune response to pathogens. Future studies should consider meth use as a potential modulator of T-cell responses. PMID:26299251

  4. Methamphetamine Use in HIV-infected Individuals Affects T-cell Function and Viral Outcome during Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Massanella, Marta; Gianella, Sara; Schrier, Rachel; Dan, Jennifer M.; Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Oliveira, Michelli F.; Richman, Douglas D.; Little, Susan J.; Benson, Constance A.; Daar, Eric S.; Dube, Michael P.; Haubrich, Richard H.; Smith, Davey M.; Morris, Sheldon R.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the associations between methamphetamine (meth) use, immune function, and the dynamics of HIV and cytomegalovirus [CMV] in the blood and genital tract of HIV-infected ART-suppressed subjects. Self-reported meth use was associated with increased CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell proliferation (Ki67+, p < 0.005), CD4+ T-cell activation (CD45RA–CD38+, p = 0.005) and exhaustion (PD-1+, p = 0.0004) in blood, compared to non-meth users. Meth use was also associated with a trend towards higher blood HIV DNA levels (p = 0.09) and more frequent shedding of CMV in seminal plasma (p = 0.002). To explore possible mechanisms, we compared ex vivo spontaneous and antigen-specific proliferation in PBMC collected from subjects with and without positive meth detection in urine (Utox+ vs. Utox-). Despite higher levels of spontaneous proliferation, lymphocytes from Utox+ meth users had a significantly lower proliferative capacity after stimulation with a number of pathogens (CMV, candida, mycobacterium, toxoplasma, HIV, p < 0.04 in all cases), compared to Utox- participants. Our findings suggest that meth users have greater proliferation and exhaustion of the immune system. Meth use is also associated with a loss of control of CMV replication, which could be related to loss of immune response to pathogens. Future studies should consider meth use as a potential modulator of T-cell responses. PMID:26299251

  5. High prevalence of low skeletal muscle mass associated with male gender in midlife and older HIV-infected persons despite CD4 cell reconstitution and viral suppression.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Peter; Segal-Maurer, Sorana; Rubin, David S

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic goals for HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy include minimizing risk of future physical disability. Presarcopenia and sarcopenia precede age-associated physical disability. We investigated their prevalence and the predictive value of patient mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) for them. Eighty community-dwelling patients ≥45 years old demonstrating durable viral suppression were evaluated. Sarcopenia was defined as low skeletal muscle index (SMI, skeletal muscle kg/height m(2)) and either low strength or poor performance by handgrip dynamometry and gait speed, respectively. Presarcopenia was defined as low SMI only. MUAC was interpreted according to National Health Statistics percentile. Prevalence of sarcopenia and presarcopenia was 5.0% and 20.0%, respectively. Male gender (odds ratio [OR] 10.72; P < .026), recreational psychoactive substance use (OR 5.13; P < .037), and intravenous drug use transmission category (OR 6.94; P <.0327) were associated with presarcopenia. Higher body mass index (OR 0.80; P < .0007), MUAC (OR 0.83; P < .024), and large skeletal frame (OR 0.09; P < .003) were negatively associated with presarcopenia. Finding that a participant did not have a MUAC <25th percentile on physical examination had a 90.4% negative predictive value for presarcopenia. Although sarcopenia was uncommon, presarcopenia was highly prevalent in midlife and older HIV-infected males. Determination of MUAC percentile may identify those least likely to demonstrate skeletal muscle deficit and improve patient selection for mass and function testing. PMID:24067494

  6. Twelve-Month Antiretroviral Therapy Suppresses Plasma and Genital Viral Loads but Fails to Alter Genital Levels of Cytokines, in a Cohort of HIV-Infected Rwandan Women

    PubMed Central

    Ondoa, Pascale; Gautam, Raju; Rusine, John; Lutter, Rene; Jurriaans, Suzanne; Kootstra, Neeltje; Karita, Etienne; van de Wijgert, Janneke

    2015-01-01

    Background Genital viral load (GVL) is the main determinant of sexual transmission of human immune-deficiency virus (HIV). The effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on local cervico-vaginal immunological factors associated with GVL is poorly described. We aimed to identify the risk factors of detectable GVL, and the impact of ART on HIV genital shedding and its correlates in a cohort of HIV-infected women, attending HIV care in Kigali, Rwanda. Materials and Methods All participants were evaluated for GVL, plasma viral load (PVL), CD4 count, various sexually-transmitted infections (STIs) at baseline and at month 12. Genital concentration of 19 cytokines and mRNA expression of APOBEC3G and BST2, two host HIV restriction factors, were evaluated at baseline in all participants. Cytokine levels were re-assessed at month 12 only in participants eligible for ART at baseline. Risk factors of GVL ≥40copies/mL at baseline and month 12 were assessed using logistic regression. Effect of 12-month ART on various local and systemic immunological parameters was examined using a paired t-test and McNemar as appropriate. Results 96 of the 247 women enrolled in the study were eligible for ART. After 12 months of ART, PVL and GVL decreased to undetectable level in respectively 74 and 88% of treated participants. ART did not affect cytokine levels. HIV genital shedding occurred only when PVL was detectable. At baseline, GVL was independently associated with IL-1β after controlling for PVL, age and N. gonorrhea infection (95% CI 1.32-2.15) and at month 12 with MIP-1β (95% CI 0.96-21.32) after controlling for baseline GVL, PVL and month 12 IL-8. Conclusion Suppressive ART does not necessarily reduce genital level of immune activation. Minimizing all conditions favoring genital inflammation, including active detection and treatment of STIs, might reduce the risk of HIV transmission as supplement to the provision of potent ART. PMID:26010956

  7. Dolutegravir-based monotherapy or dual therapy maintains a high proportion of viral suppression even in highly experienced HIV-1-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Gubavu, Camelia; Prazuck, Thierry; Niang, Mohamadou; Buret, Jennifer; Mille, Catherine; Guinard, Jérôme; Avettand-Fènoël, Véronique; Hocqueloux, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Background Dolutegravir is a powerful, well-tolerated integrase inhibitor with a high genetic barrier to resistance and may thus constitute the backbone of lightened regimens. Methods This was a monocentric, retrospective study. HIV-1-infected patients receiving dolutegravir as monotherapy (mDGV) or dual therapy (dDGV) were systematically identified. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients who maintained undetectable (<50 copies/mL) plasma HIV RNA [plasma viral load (PVL)]. Results We identified 21 patients on mDGV (50 mg/day) and 31 on dDGV (50 or 100 mg/day, with atazanavir ± ritonavir, n = 12; rilpivirine, n = 11; maraviroc, n = 3; lamivudine, n = 3; darunavir/ritonavir, n = 1; or abacavir, n = 1). All of the patients were treatment experienced and 48% had experienced at least one virological failure. The baseline characteristics were as follows (for the mDGV/dDGV patients, respectively): 5%/29% had a history of AIDS; the median (IQR) highest PVL was 4.5 (4.3–5.5)/5.3 (4.7–5.6) log copies/mL; the median (IQR) nadir CD4+ count was 310 (280–468)/199 (134–281) cells/mm3; 100% had undetectable PVL before the mDGV for a median (IQR) duration of 5.9 (3.5–9.9) years/81% had undetectable PVL before the dDGV for a median (IQR) duration of 3.7 (1.4–8.3) years; and the median (IQR) HIV DNA level was 2.7 (2.1–3.1)/2.9 (2.7–3) log copies/106 PBMCs. At the last follow-up visit, 100% and 97% of patients showed undetectable PVL following mDGV and dDGV, respectively [median (IQR) follow-up of 32 (29–45) and 50 (30–74) weeks, respectively]. Conclusions In our experience, dolutegravir-based lightened regimens provided a high proportion of viral suppression, even in highly treatment-experienced patients. PMID:26712907

  8. Genotypic Changes in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Associated with Loss of Suppression of Plasma Viral RNA Levels in Subjects Treated with Ritonavir (Norvir) Monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Eastman, P. Scott; Mittler, John; Kelso, Reed; Gee, Chris; Boyer, Eric; Kolberg, Janice; Urdea, Mickey; Leonard, John M.; Norbeck, Daniel W.; Mo, Hongmei; Markowitz, Martin

    1998-01-01

    Ten subjects received 600 to 1,200 mg of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitor ritonavir per day. Following 2 weeks of therapy, plasma HIV RNA levels decreased by a mean of 1.57 (range, 0.89 to 1.96) log units. With continued therapy, HIV RNA levels began to rise in eight subjects. The initial rise in plasma RNA levels was temporally associated with the development and quantitative increase in the V82 resistance mutation. Doubling times of the V82A mutant virus were estimated to be 2.4 to 4.8 days. An L63P/A mutation was commonly present at baseline even in subjects with a durable virologic response. The concomitant acquisition of an L63P/A mutation with the V82A/F mutation at the time when plasma RNA levels rebounded suggests a role for the L63P/A mutation in improving the fitness of the V82A/F mutation. Subsequent additional genotypic changes at codons 54 and 84 were often associated with further increases in plasma RNA levels. Ongoing viral replication in the presence of drugs resulted in the appearance of additional genotypic changes, including the L90M saquinavir resistance mutation, and decreased phenotypic susceptibility. The relative fitness of the protease V82A ritonavir resistance mutation and reverse transcriptase T215Y/F zidovudine resistance mutation following drug withdrawal were estimated to be 96 to 98% that of the wild type. Durability of the virologic response was associated with plasma RNA levels at the nadir. A virologic response beyond 60 days was not observed unless plasma HIV RNA levels were suppressed below 2,000 copies/ml, consistent with estimates from V82A doubling times for selection of a single resistance mutation to dominate the replicating population. PMID:9573287

  9. Suppression of the asymmetric modes for experimentally achieving gigawatt-level radiation from a Ku-band Cerenkov type oscillator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Shu, Ting; Ju, Jinchuan; Wu, Dapeng; Bai, Zhen

    2014-08-01

    We present the analysis and suppression of asymmetric modes in a Ku-band Cerenkov-type oscillator numerically and experimentally. The asymmetric modes generated in the initial experiments were identified to be HE11, HE21, and HE31 modes, respectively, by analyzing of the dispersion relationships, the simulation results and the experiment phenomenon. The factors, such as the cathode emission uniformity, the diode voltage, guiding magnetic field, and the concentricity play key roles in the excitation and suppression of these asymmetric modes. In the improved experiments, the asymmetric modes were suppressed effectively. In the improved experiments the asymmetric modes are suppressed effectively, and the designed TM01 mode microwave is generated at a frequency of 13.76 GHz with a power of 1.1 GW, which is in good agreement with numerically predications. PMID:25173289

  10. Filter-less fluorescence sensor with high separation ability achieved by the suppression of forward-scattered light in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yong Joon; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Motoharu; Hizawa, Takeshi; Moriwaki, Yu; Dasai, Fumihiro; Kimura, Yasuyuki; Akita, Ippei; Iwata, Tatsuya; Ishida, Makoto; Sawada, Kazuaki

    2016-04-01

    The improvement of a filter-less fluorescence sensor, by suppressing forward scattering in silicon by surface planarization is presented. A fluorescence microscope has been widely used in biochemical fields. However, it is difficult to miniaturize because optical filters and other parts are necessary. We previously developed a filter-less fluorescence sensor. The separation ability of excitation light and fluorescence in the previous device was 550:1. It is necessary to improve the separation ability. This study focuses on the suppression of forward-scattered incident light in silicon, through the enhanced surface planarization of polysilicon, which is the gate electrode material. The separation ability of the filter-less fluorescence sensor was increased from 550:1 to 1250:1 by the suppression of forward-scattered light.

  11. Progressive Proximal-to-Distal Reduction in Expression of the Tight Junction Complex in Colonic Epithelium of Virally-Suppressed HIV+ Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Charlotte Y.; Alden, Stephanie L.; Funderburg, Nicholas T.; Fu, Pingfu; Levine, Alan D.

    2014-01-01

    Effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) dramatically reduces AIDS-related complications, yet the life expectancy of long-term ART-treated HIV-infected patients remains shortened compared to that of uninfected controls, due to increased risk of non-AIDS related morbidities. Many propose that these complications result from translocated microbial products from the gut that stimulate systemic inflammation – a consequence of increased intestinal paracellular permeability that persists in this population. Concurrent intestinal immunodeficiency and structural barrier deterioration are postulated to drive microbial translocation, and direct evidence of intestinal epithelial breakdown has been reported in untreated pathogenic SIV infection of rhesus macaques. To assess and characterize the extent of epithelial cell damage in virally-suppressed HIV-infected patients, we analyzed intestinal biopsy tissues for changes in the epithelium at the cellular and molecular level. The intestinal epithelium in the HIV gut is grossly intact, exhibiting no decreases in the relative abundance and packing of intestinal epithelial cells. We found no evidence for structural and subcellular localization changes in intestinal epithelial tight junctions (TJ), but observed significant decreases in the colonic, but not terminal ileal, transcript levels of TJ components in the HIV+ cohort. This result is confirmed by a reduction in TJ proteins in the descending colon of HIV+ patients. In the HIV+ cohort, colonic TJ transcript levels progressively decreased along the proximal-to-distal axis. In contrast, expression levels of the same TJ transcripts stayed unchanged, or progressively increased, from the proximal-to-distal gut in the healthy controls. Non-TJ intestinal epithelial cell-specific mRNAs reveal differing patterns of HIV-associated transcriptional alteration, arguing for an overall change in intestinal epithelial transcriptional regulation in the HIV colon. These findings suggest that

  12. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Public Home » For Veterans and the Public Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... the Public Veterans and Public Home How is Hepatitis C Treated? Find the facts about the newest ...

  13. A Dual Role for Corneal Dendritic Cells in Herpes Simplex Keratitis: Local Suppression of Corneal Damage and Promotion of Systemic Viral Dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Kai; Harris, Deshea L.; Yamaguchi, Takefumi; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Hamrah, Pedram

    2015-01-01

    The cornea is the shield to the foreign world and thus, a primary site for peripheral infections. However, transparency and vision are incompatible with inflammation and scarring that may result from infections. Thus, the cornea is required to perform a delicate balance between fighting infections and preserving vision. To date, little is known about the specific role of antigen-presenting cells in viral keratitis. In this study, utilizing an established murine model of primary acute herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 keratitis, we demonstrate that primary HSV keratitis results in increased conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) and macrophages within 24 hours after infection. Local depletion of cDCs in CD11c-DTR mice by subconjuntival diphtheria toxin injections, led to increased viral proliferation, and influx of inflammatory cells, resulting in increased scarring and clinical keratitis. In addition, while HSV infection resulted in significant corneal nerve destruction, local depletion of cDCs resulted in a much more severe loss of corneal nerves. Further, local cDC depletion resulted in decreased corneal nerve infection, and subsequently decreased and delayed systemic viral transmission in the trigeminal ganglion and draining lymph node, resulting in decreased mortality of mice. In contrast, sham depletion or depletion of macrophages through local injection of clodronate liposomes had neither a significant impact on the cornea, nor an effect on systemic viral transmission. In conclusion, we demonstrate that corneal cDCs may play a primary role in local corneal defense during viral keratitis and preserve vision, at the cost of inducing systemic viral dissemination, leading to increased mortality. PMID:26332302

  14. lncRHOXF1, a Long Noncoding RNA from the X Chromosome That Suppresses Viral Response Genes during Development of the Early Human Placenta.

    PubMed

    Penkala, Ian; Wang, Jianle; Syrett, Camille M; Goetzl, Laura; López, Carolina B; Anguera, Montserrat C

    2016-06-15

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) can regulate gene expression in a cell-specific fashion during development. Here, we identify a novel lncRNA from the X chromosome that we named lncRHOXF1 and which is abundantly expressed in trophectoderm and primitive endoderm cells of human blastocyst-stage embryos. lncRHOXF1 is a spliced and polyadenylated lncRNA about 1 kb in length that is found in both the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments of in vitro differentiated human trophectoderm progenitor cells. Gain-of-function experiments in human embryonic stem cells, which normally lack lncRHOXF1 RNA, revealed that lncRHOXF1 reduced proliferation and favored cellular differentiation. lncRHOXF1 knockdown using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in human trophectoderm progenitors increased expression of viral response genes, including type I interferon. Sendai virus infection of human trophectoderm progenitor cells increased lncRHOXF1 RNA levels, and siRNA-mediated disruption of lncRHOXF1 during infection reduced the expression of viral response genes leading to higher virus replication. Thus, lncRHOXF1 RNA is the first example of a lncRNA that regulates the host response to viral infections in human placental progenitor cells, and we propose that it functions as a repressor of the viral response during early human development. PMID:27066803

  15. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latent Gene vFLIP Inhibits Viral Lytic Replication through NF-κB-Mediated Suppression of the AP-1 Pathway: a Novel Mechanism of Virus Control of Latency▿

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Feng-Chun; Zhou, Fu-Chun; Xie, Jian-Ping; Kang, Tao; Greene, Whitney; Kuhne, Kurt; Lei, Xiu-Fen; Li, Qui-Hua; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2008-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) latency is central to the evasion of host immune surveillances and induction of KSHV-related malignancies. The mechanism of KSHV latency remains unclear. Here, we show that the KSHV latent gene vFLIP promotes viral latency by inhibiting viral lytic replication. vFLIP suppresses the AP-1 pathway, which is essential for KSHV lytic replication, by activating the NF-κB pathway. Thus, by manipulating two convergent cellular pathways, vFLIP regulates both cell survival and KSHV lytic replication to promote viral latency. These results also indicate that the effect of the NF-κB pathway on KSHV replication is determined by the status of the AP-1 pathway and hence provide a mechanistic explanation for the contradictory role of the NF-κB pathway in KSHV replication. Since the NF-κB pathway is commonly activated during infection of gammaherpesviruses, these findings might have general implications for the control of gammaherpesviral latency. PMID:18305042

  16. Viral Phylodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Volz, Erik M.; Koelle, Katia; Bedford, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Viral phylodynamics is defined as the study of how epidemiological, immunological, and evolutionary processes act and potentially interact to shape viral phylogenies. Since the coining of the term in 2004, research on viral phylodynamics has focused on transmission dynamics in an effort to shed light on how these dynamics impact viral genetic variation. Transmission dynamics can be considered at the level of cells within an infected host, individual hosts within a population, or entire populations of hosts. Many viruses, especially RNA viruses, rapidly accumulate genetic variation because of short generation times and high mutation rates. Patterns of viral genetic variation are therefore heavily influenced by how quickly transmission occurs and by which entities transmit to one another. Patterns of viral genetic variation will also be affected by selection acting on viral phenotypes. Although viruses can differ with respect to many phenotypes, phylodynamic studies have to date tended to focus on a limited number of viral phenotypes. These include virulence phenotypes, phenotypes associated with viral transmissibility, cell or tissue tropism phenotypes, and antigenic phenotypes that can facilitate escape from host immunity. Due to the impact that transmission dynamics and selection can have on viral genetic variation, viral phylogenies can therefore be used to investigate important epidemiological, immunological, and evolutionary processes, such as epidemic spread [2], spatio-temporal dynamics including metapopulation dynamics [3], zoonotic transmission, tissue tropism [4], and antigenic drift [5]. The quantitative investigation of these processes through the consideration of viral phylogenies is the central aim of viral phylodynamics. PMID:23555203

  17. Viral pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Pneumonia - viral; "Walking pneumonia" - viral Images Lungs Respiratory system References Lee FE, Treanor J. Viral infections. In: Mason RJ, VC Broaddus, Martin TR, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel’s Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2010: ...

  18. HTLV-1 Rex Tunes the Cellular Environment Favorable for Viral Replication.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Kazumi; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2016-03-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) Rex is a viral RNA binding protein. The most important and well-known function of Rex is stabilizing and exporting viral mRNAs from the nucleus, particularly for unspliced/partially-spliced mRNAs encoding the structural proteins essential for viral replication. Without Rex, these unspliced viral mRNAs would otherwise be completely spliced. Therefore, Rex is vital for the translation of structural proteins and the stabilization of viral genomic RNA and, thus, for viral replication. Rex schedules the period of extensive viral replication and suppression to enter latency. Although the importance of Rex in the viral life-cycle is well understood, the underlying molecular mechanism of how Rex achieves its function has not been clarified. For example, how does Rex protect unspliced/partially-spliced viral mRNAs from the host cellular splicing machinery? How does Rex protect viral mRNAs, antigenic to eukaryotic cells, from cellular mRNA surveillance mechanisms? Here we will discuss these mechanisms, which explain the function of Rex as an organizer of HTLV-1 expression based on previously and recently discovered aspects of Rex. We also focus on the potential influence of Rex on the homeostasis of the infected cell and how it can exert its function. PMID:26927155

  19. HTLV-1 Rex Tunes the Cellular Environment Favorable for Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Kazumi; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2016-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) Rex is a viral RNA binding protein. The most important and well-known function of Rex is stabilizing and exporting viral mRNAs from the nucleus, particularly for unspliced/partially-spliced mRNAs encoding the structural proteins essential for viral replication. Without Rex, these unspliced viral mRNAs would otherwise be completely spliced. Therefore, Rex is vital for the translation of structural proteins and the stabilization of viral genomic RNA and, thus, for viral replication. Rex schedules the period of extensive viral replication and suppression to enter latency. Although the importance of Rex in the viral life-cycle is well understood, the underlying molecular mechanism of how Rex achieves its function has not been clarified. For example, how does Rex protect unspliced/partially-spliced viral mRNAs from the host cellular splicing machinery? How does Rex protect viral mRNAs, antigenic to eukaryotic cells, from cellular mRNA surveillance mechanisms? Here we will discuss these mechanisms, which explain the function of Rex as an organizer of HTLV-1 expression based on previously and recently discovered aspects of Rex. We also focus on the potential influence of Rex on the homeostasis of the infected cell and how it can exert its function. PMID:26927155

  20. hnRNP A2/B1 interacts with influenza A viral protein NS1 and inhibits virus replication potentially through suppressing NS1 RNA/protein levels and NS1 mRNA nuclear export

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yimeng; Zhou, Jianhong; Du, Yuchun

    2014-01-20

    The NS1 protein of influenza viruses is a major virulence factor and exerts its function through interacting with viral/cellular RNAs and proteins. In this study, we identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1 (hnRNP A2/B1) as an interacting partner of NS1 proteins by a proteomic method. Knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) resulted in higher levels of NS vRNA, NS1 mRNA, and NS1 protein in the virus-infected cells. In addition, we demonstrated that hnRNP A2/B1 proteins are associated with NS1 and NS2 mRNAs and that knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 promotes transport of NS1 mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in the infected cells. Lastly, we showed that knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 leads to enhanced virus replication. Our results suggest that hnRNP A2/B1 plays an inhibitory role in the replication of influenza A virus in host cells potentially through suppressing NS1 RNA/protein levels and NS1 mRNA nucleocytoplasmic translocation. - Highlights: • Cellular protein hnRNP A2/B1 interacts with influenza viral protein NS1. • hnRNP A2/B1 suppresses the levels of NS1 protein, vRNA and mRNA in infected cells. • hnRNP A2/B1 protein is associated with NS1 and NS2 mRNAs. • hnRNP A2/B1 inhibits the nuclear export of NS1 mRNAs. • hnRNP A2/B1 inhibits influenza virus replication.

  1. Suppressing Nitrite-oxidizing Bacteria Growth to Achieve Nitrogen Removal from Domestic Wastewater via Anammox Using Intermittent Aeration with Low Dissolved Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Bin; Bao, Peng; Wei, Yan; Zhu, Guibing; Yuan, Zhiguo; Peng, Yongzhen

    2015-01-01

    Achieving nitrogen removal from domestic wastewater using anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) has the potential to make wastewater treatment energy-neutral or even energy-positive. The challenge is to suppress the growth of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB). This study presents a promising method based on intermittent aeration with low dissolved oxygen to limit NOB growth, thereby providing an advantage to anammox bacteria to form a partnership with the ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). The results showed that NOB was successfully suppressed using that method, with the relative abundance of NOB maintained between 2.0–2.6%, based on Fluorescent in-situ Hybridization. Nitrogen could be effectively removed from domestic wastewater with anammox at a temperature above 20 °C, with an effluent total nitrogen (TN) concentration of 6.6 ± 2.7 mg/L, while the influent TN and soluble chemical oxygen demand were 62.6 ± 3.1 mg/L and 88.0 ± 8.1 mg/L, respectively. PMID:26354321

  2. SIV antigen immunization induces transient antigen-specific T cell responses and selectively activates viral replication in draining lymph nodes in retroviral suppressed rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background HIV infection causes a qualitative and quantitative loss of CD4+ T cell immunity. The institution of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) restores CD4+ T cell responses to many pathogens, but HIV-specific responses remain deficient. Similarly, therapeutic immunization with HIV antigens of chronically infected, ART treated subjects results in poor induction of HIV-specific CD4 responses. In this study, we used a macaque model of ART treatment during chronic infection to study the virologic consequences of SIV antigen stimulation in lymph nodes early after immunization. Rhesus CMV (RhCMV) seropositive, Mamu A*01 positive rhesus macaques were chronically infected with SIVmac251 and treated with ART. The immune and viral responses to SIV gag and RhCMV pp65 antigen immunization in draining lymph nodes and peripheral blood were analyzed. Animals were immunized on contralateral sides with SIV gag and RhCMV pp65 encoding plasmids, which allowed lymph nodes draining each antigen to be obtained at the same time from the same animal for direct comparison. Results We observed that both SIV and RhCMV immunizations stimulated transient antigen-specific T cell responses in draining lymph nodes. The RhCMV-specific responses were potent and sustained (50 days post-immunization) in the periphery, while the SIV-specific responses were transient and extinguished quickly. The SIV antigen stimulation selectively induced transient SIV replication in draining lymph nodes. Conclusions The data are consistent with a model whereby viral replication in response to SIV antigen stimulation limits the generation of SIV antigen-specific responses and suggests a potential mechanism for the early loss and poor HIV-specific CD4+ T cell response observed in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:21752277

  3. Pathogenicity of Pepper mild mottle virus Is Controlled by the RNA Silencing Suppression Activity of Its Replication Protein but Not the Viral Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Shinya; Kubota, Kenji; Kanda, Ayami; Ohki, Takehiro; Meshi, Tetsuo

    2007-04-01

    ABSTRACT Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) infects pepper plants, causing mosaic symptoms on the upper developing leaves. We investigated the relationship between a virus pathogenicity determinant domain and the appearance of mosaic symptoms. Genetically modified PMMoV mutants were constructed, which had a base substitution in the 130K replication protein gene causing an amino acid change or a truncation of the 3' terminal pseudoknot structure. Only one substitution mutant (at amino acid residue 349) failed to cause symptoms, although its accumulation was relatively high. Conversely, the pseudoknot mutants showed the lower accumulation, but they still caused mosaic symptoms as severe as the wild-type virus. Therefore, the level of virus accumulation in a plant does not necessarily correlate with the development of mosaic symptoms. The activity to suppress posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) was impaired in the asymptomatic mutant. Consequently, pathogenicity causing mosaic symptoms should be controlled by combat between host PTGS and its suppression by the 130K replication protein rather than virus accumulation. PMID:18943281

  4. Viral meningitis.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, David R

    2005-01-01

    Viruses probably account for most cases of acute meningitis. Viral meningitis is often assumed to be a largely benign disease. For the commonest pathogens causing meningitis, enteroviruses, this is usually the case; however, for many of the other pathogens causing viral meningitis, and for common pathogens in the immunocompromised or infants, viral meningitis is frequently associated with substantial neurological complications and a significant mortality. Diagnostic methods for rapid and accurate identification of pathogens have improved over recent years, permitting more precise and earlier diagnoses. There have been fewer developments in therapies for viral meningitis, and there remain no effective therapies for most pathogens, emphasising the importance of prevention and early diagnosis. This review focuses on the presentation, diagnosis and management of viral meningitis and also covers the prevention of meningitis for pathogens where effective vaccines are available. PMID:16474042

  5. CD4:CD8 ratio as a frontier marker for clinical outcome, immune dysfunction and viral reservoir size in virologically suppressed HIV-positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei; Mehraj, Vikram; Vyboh, Kishanda; Cao, Wei; Li, Taisheng; Routy, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Absolute CD4 T cell count and plasma viral load have been established as predictors of HIV disease progression, and CD4 T cell count is used as an indicator for initiation of antiretroviral therapy. Following long-term therapy, patients generally present with significant CD4 T cell recovery contrasting with persistently elevated CD8 T cell counts, which leads to a partial restoration of CD4:CD8 ratio. This review focuses on the relevance of the CD4:CD8 ratio on clinical outcomes, immune dysfunction and HIV reservoir size in long-term treated patients. Method We conducted a comprehensive literature review of publications in English language using major electronic databases. Our search was focused on factors contributing to CD4:CD8 T cell ratio and clinical outcome in adult HIV-positive patients in the context of treated infection. Discussion Low CD4:CD8 ratio has been linked to ageing and acts as a predictor of mortality in the general population. This ratio may represent the combined effects of inflammation and immunological changes called “inflammaging.” Although the mechanisms underlying partial correction of the CD4:CD8 ratio and persistently elevated CD8 T cell count in long-term treated patients remain poorly understood, it has been recently indicated that patients with optimal CD4 T cell recovery and low CD4:CD8 ratio still harbour increased immune activation, an immune senescent phenotype and have a higher risk of non-AIDS morbidity and mortality. This review reconsiders CD4:CD8 ratio in the light of advances in the understanding of immune dysfunction and examines its pathophysiological features and implications on clinical outcome and HIV reservoir size in long-term treated HIV-positive adults. Conclusion The CD4:CD8 ratio can contribute to the immunological evaluation of treated patients in a long-term follow-up and may be applied for monitoring both immune dysfunction and viral reservoir size in immune-based clinical trials. PMID:26130226

  6. The Factors Related to CD4+ T-Cell Recovery and Viral Suppression in Patients Who Have Low CD4+ T Cell Counts at the Initiation of HAART: A Retrospective Study of the National HIV Treatment Sub-Database of Zhejiang Province, China, 2014

    PubMed Central

    He, Lin; Pan, Xiaohong; Dou, Zhihui; Huang, Peng; Zhou, Xin; Peng, Zhihang; Zheng, Jinlei; Zhang, Jiafeng; Yang, Jiezhe; Xu, Yun; Jiang, Jun; Chen, Lin; Jiang, Jianmin; Wang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Background Since China has a unique system of delivering HIV care that includes all patients’ records. The factors related to CD4+ T-cell recovery and viral suppression in patients who have low CD4+ T cell counts at the initiation of HAART are understudied in the China despite subsequent virological suppression (viral load < 50 copies/mL) is unknown. Methods The authors conducted a retrospective cohort study using data from the national HIV treatment sub-database of Zhejiang province to identify records of HIV+ patients. Patient records were included if they were ≥ 16 years of age, had an initial CD4 count < 100 cells/μL, were on continuous HAART for at least one year by the end of December 31, 2014; and achieved and maintained continued maximum virological suppression (MVS) (< 50 copies/ml) by 9 months after starting HAART. The primary endpoint for analysis was time to first CD4+ T cell count recovery (≥ 200, 350, 500 cells/μL). Cox proportional hazard regression was used to identify the risk factors for CD4+ T cell count recovery to key thresholds (200–350, 350–500, ≥ 500 cells/μL) by the time of last clinical follow-up (whichever occurred first), key thresholds (follow-up date for analysis), with patients still unable to reach the endpoints being censored by the end December 31, 2014 (follow-up date for analysis). Results Of the 918 patients who were included in the study, and the median CD4+ T cell count was 39 cells/μL at the baseline. At the end of follow-up, 727 (79.2%), 363 (39.5%) and 149 (16.2%) patients had return to ≥ 200, 350, and 500 cells/μL, respectively. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that the rate of patients with CD4+ count recovery to ≥ 200, 350, and 500 cells/μL after 1 year on HAART was 43.6, 8.6, and 2.5%, respectively, after 3 years on treatment was 90.8, 46.3, and 17.9%, respectively, and after 5 years on HAART was 97.1, 72.2, and 36.4%, respectively. The median time to return to 200–350, 350–500, ≥ 500cells

  7. Achievement of sustained viral response after switching treatment from pegylated interferon α-2b to α-2a and ribavirin in patients with recurrence of hepatitis C virus genotype 1 infection after liver transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kawaoka, Tomokazu; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Takahashi, Shoichi; Takaki, Shintaro; Tsuge, Masataka; Nagaoki, Yuko; Hashimoto, Yoshimasa; Katamura, Yoshio; Miki, Daiki; Hiramatsu, Akira; Waki, Koji; Imamura, Michio; Kawakami, Yoshiiku; Aikata, Hiroshi; Ochi, Hidenori; Tashiro, Hirotaka; Ohdan, Hideki; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2012-01-01

    We report a case in which sustained viral response was achieved after switching treatment from pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) α-2b to α-2a and ribavirin (RBV) in patients with recurrence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection after living donor liver transplantation. The patient was a 62-year-old man with liver cirrhosis due to HCV genotype 1b infection. The patient had 8 amino acid (aa) substitutions in the interferon sensitivity-determining region, and had substitutions for mutant and wild-type at aa70 and aa91, respectively, in the core region. The patient had minor genotype (GG) IL28B single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs8099917). He had initially received interferon α-2b and RBV for 2 years, and later developed hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). After surgical resection of HCC, he subsequently received PEG-IFN α-2b and RBV for 1.5 years, without undetectable viremia during the treatment course. Due to recurrence of HCC, the patient received a living donor liver transplantation. Later on, hepatitis C relapsed. For the management of relapse, he received another course of PEG-IFN α-2b and RBV. However, breakthrough viremia occurred. PEG-IFN was thus switched from α-2b to α-2a and RBV for another 17 months. The patient eventually achieved a sustained viral response. PMID:21865660

  8. Viral BLIP dynamics during HAART.

    SciTech Connect

    Markowitz, M.; Louie, M.; Hurley, A.; Ho, David D.; Perelson, Alan S.,; Di Mascio, M.

    2001-01-01

    Intermittent episodes of low-level viremia (blips) are often observed in well-suppressed, HAART-treated patients. It has been reported that viral blips do not correlate with the emergence of new HAART-related mutations; however, increased frequency of blips correlates with slower decay of latently infected cells. Since blips are transient and unpredictable, detailed knowledge about them is difficult to obtain. We present an analysis of the dynamics of viral blips from viral load (VL) measurements on 123 patients for a period of 809k480d (21-1817d) and sampled every 31{+-}12d for a total of 26{+-}15 samples per patient.

  9. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Romidepsin Induces HIV Expression in CD4 T Cells from Patients on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy at Concentrations Achieved by Clinical Dosing

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Datsen George; Chiang, Vicki; Fyne, Elizabeth; Balakrishnan, Mini; Barnes, Tiffany; Graupe, Michael; Hesselgesser, Joseph; Irrinki, Alivelu; Murry, Jeffrey P.; Stepan, George; Stray, Kirsten M.; Tsai, Angela; Yu, Helen; Spindler, Jonathan; Kearney, Mary; Spina, Celsa A.; McMahon, Deborah; Lalezari, Jacob; Sloan, Derek; Mellors, John; Geleziunas, Romas; Cihlar, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Persistent latent reservoir of replication-competent proviruses in memory CD4 T cells is a major obstacle to curing HIV infection. Pharmacological activation of HIV expression in latently infected cells is being explored as one of the strategies to deplete the latent HIV reservoir. In this study, we characterized the ability of romidepsin (RMD), a histone deacetylase inhibitor approved for the treatment of T-cell lymphomas, to activate the expression of latent HIV. In an in vitro T-cell model of HIV latency, RMD was the most potent inducer of HIV (EC50 = 4.5 nM) compared with vorinostat (VOR; EC50 = 3,950 nM) and other histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors in clinical development including panobinostat (PNB; EC50 = 10 nM). The HIV induction potencies of RMD, VOR, and PNB paralleled their inhibitory activities against multiple human HDAC isoenzymes. In both resting and memory CD4 T cells isolated from HIV-infected patients on suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), a 4-hour exposure to 40 nM RMD induced a mean 6-fold increase in intracellular HIV RNA levels, whereas a 24-hour treatment with 1 µM VOR resulted in 2- to 3-fold increases. RMD-induced intracellular HIV RNA expression persisted for 48 hours and correlated with sustained inhibition of cell-associated HDAC activity. By comparison, the induction of HIV RNA by VOR and PNB was transient and diminished after 24 hours. RMD also increased levels of extracellular HIV RNA and virions from both memory and resting CD4 T-cell cultures. The activation of HIV expression was observed at RMD concentrations below the drug plasma levels achieved by doses used in patients treated for T-cell lymphomas. In conclusion, RMD induces HIV expression ex vivo at concentrations that can be achieved clinically, indicating that the drug may reactivate latent HIV in patients on suppressive cART. PMID:24722454

  10. Viral pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    More serious infections can result in respiratory failure, liver failure, and heart failure. Sometimes, bacterial infections occur during or just after viral pneumonia, which may lead to more serious forms ...

  11. Viral arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Infectious arthritis - viral ... Arthritis may be a symptom of many virus-related illnesses. It usually disappears on its own without ... the rubella vaccine, only a few people develop arthritis. No risk factors are known.

  12. Viral Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... much smaller than bacteria. Viruses cause familiar infectious diseases such as the common cold, flu and warts. ... can help prevent you from getting many viral diseases. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  13. Viral Gastroenteritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... stomach, small intestine, and large intestine. Several different viruses can cause viral gastroenteritis, which is highly contagious ... and last for 1 to 3 days. Some viruses cause symptoms that last longer. [ Top ] What are ...

  14. Pharyngitis - viral

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001392.htm Pharyngitis - viral To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pharyngitis , or sore throat, is swelling, discomfort, pain, or ...

  15. Self-interaction of the cucumber mosaic virus 2b protein plays a vital role in the suppression of RNA silencing and the induction of viral symptoms.

    PubMed

    Xu, Aixia; Zhao, Zhijing; Chen, Wenhu; Zhang, Hengmu; Liao, Qiansheng; Chen, Jishuang; Carr, John P; Du, Zhiyou

    2013-10-01

    The cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) 2b protein is an RNA silencing suppressor protein that can also play direct and indirect roles in symptom induction. Previous work has shown that a hybrid virus, FRad35(2b) -CMV (renamed here as CMV-FRad2b-Pro), generated by replacement of the 2b gene of strain Fny-CMV with that from Rad35-CMV, displays markedly lower pathogenicity than Fny-CMV on Nicotiana species. However, the replacement of proline with leucine at position 55 of the 2b protein of CMV-FRad2b-Pro (protein Rad2b-Pro) created a virus (CMV-FRad2b-Leu) that induced severe symptoms. Infection of Arabidopsis thaliana mutants defective in the expression of DICER-like (DCL) endoribonucleases 2 and 4, which mediate antiviral RNA silencing, as well as of dcl3 and dcl2/3/4 triple-mutant plants, indicated that Rad2b-Pro was a weaker RNA silencing suppressor than the protein Rad2b-Leu. This was confirmed in Nicotiana benthamiana using agroinfiltration assays, showing that, compared with either Rad2b-Leu or the Fny2b protein, Rad2b-Pro was ineffective at inhibiting local or systemic silencing of expression of a green fluorescent protein reporter gene. Transgenic expression of Rad2b-Leu, but not of Rad2b-Pro, in Arabidopsis induced symptom-like phenotypes and rescued the accumulation of the 2b-deletion mutant Fny-CMVΔ2b. Bimolecular fluorescent complementation indicated that, in planta, Rad2b-Leu, but not Rad2b-Pro, self-interacts. Thus, self-interaction is crucial to the ability of the 2b protein to suppress silencing and induce a symptom-like phenotype, and is dependent on the properties of the residue at position 55. PMID:23782515

  16. Atazanavir/ritonavir monotherapy as maintenance strategy in HIV-1 treated subjects with viral suppression: 96-week analysis results of the MODAT study

    PubMed Central

    Spagnuolo, Vincenzo; Galli, Laura; Bigoloni, Alba; Nozza, Silvia; d'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Antinori, Andrea; Di Biagio, Antonio; Rusconi, Stefano; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Di Giambenedetto, Simona; Lazzarin, Adriano; Castagna, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The 48-week interim analysis of the MODAT study showed that confirmed virologic failure (CVF) was more frequent in patients simplifying to ATV/r monotherapy compared to maintaining ATV/r-based triple therapy. The DSMB recommended stopping study enrollment but continuing follow-up of enrolled patients. We present the 96-week efficacy analysis. Material and Methods Multicentre, randomized, open-label, non-inferiority trial (non-inferiority margin −10%). Treatment failure (TF) was defined as CVF (two consecutive HIV-RNA >50 cp/mL) or discontinuation for any cause. In the monotherapy arm, patients with CVF re-introduced their previous NRTIs and remained in the study if HIV-RNA <50 copies/mL within 12 weeks of re-intensification. Results 101 patients evaluated (Figure 1): 85% males, 21% HCV-positive, median (IQR) age of 42 (36–48) years, baseline CD4+ 576 (447–743) cells/µL. In the 96-week analysis (ITT; TF=failure), efficacy was 64% (32/50) in the monotherapy arm and 63% (32/51) in the triple-therapy arm (difference +1.3%, 95% CI −17.5–20.1). Fourteen patients in monotherapy and two in triple-therapy arm had CVF; median HIV-RNA was 136 (72–376) copies/mL. In monotherapy arm, no PI or NRTI associated resistance mutations were observed at CVF. All patients who re-intensified re-suppressed. In monotherapy arm, TF was more frequent in HCV-co-infected patients (64% vs 28%; p=0.041). In the secondary analysis (ITT; re-intensification=success), 82% (41/50) in monotherapy arm and 63% (32/51) in triple-therapy arm were on study at week 96 (difference +19.3%, 95% CI 2.2–36.3). SAEs occurred in four (8%) patients in the monotherapy arm (one left basal pneumonia, one acute coronary stenosis, one traumatic lesion, one nephrolithiasis) and two (4%) in the triple therapy arm (one sepsis, one renal failure). Drug-related adverse events (AEs) leading to discontinuation were three (6%) in the monotherapy arm (two AEs occurred in patients after successful re

  17. Viral arthritis.

    PubMed

    Marks, Michael; Marks, Jonathan L

    2016-04-01

    Acute-onset arthritis is a common clinical problem facing both the general clinician and the rheumatologist. A viral aetiology is though to be responsible for approximately 1% of all cases of acute arthritis with a wide range of causal agents recognised. The epidemiology of acute viral arthritis continues to evolve, with some aetiologies, such as rubella, becoming less common due to vaccination, while some vector-borne viruses have become more widespread. A travel history therefore forms an important part of the assessment of patients presenting with an acute arthritis. Worldwide, parvovirus B19, hepatitis B and C, HIV and the alphaviruses are among the most important causes of virally mediated arthritis. Targeted serological testing may be of value in establishing a diagnosis, and clinicians must also be aware that low-titre autoantibodies, such as rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody, can occur in the context of acute viral arthritis. A careful consideration of epidemiological, clinical and serological features is therefore required to guide clinicians in making diagnostic and treatment decisions. While most virally mediated arthritides are self-limiting some warrant the initiation of specific antiviral therapy. PMID:27037381

  18. Systemic Cytokine Levels Do Not Predict CD4(+) T-Cell Recovery After Suppressive Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in Chronic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Norris, Philip J; Zhang, Jinbing; Worlock, Andrew; Nair, Sangeetha V; Anastos, Kathryn; Minkoff, Howard L; Villacres, Maria C; Young, Mary; Greenblatt, Ruth M; Desai, Seema; Landay, Alan L; Gange, Stephen J; Nugent, C Thomas; Golub, Elizabeth T; Keating, Sheila M

    2016-01-01

    Background.  Subjects on suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) who do not achieve robust reconstitution of CD4(+) T cells face higher risk of complications and death. We studied participants in the Women's Interagency HIV Study with good (immunological responder [IR]) or poor (immunological nonresponder [INR]) CD4(+) T-cell recovery after suppressive cART (n = 50 per group) to determine whether cytokine levels or low-level viral load correlated with INR status. Methods.  A baseline sample prior to viral control and 2 subsequent samples 1 and 2 years after viral control were tested. Serum levels of 30 cytokines were measured at each time point, and low-level human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viral load and anti-HIV antibody levels were measured 2 years after viral suppression. Results.  There were minimal differences in cytokine levels between IR and INR subjects. At baseline, macrophage inflammatory protein-3β levels were higher in IR subjects; after 1 year of suppressive cART, soluble vascular endothelial growth factor-R3 levels were higher in IR subjects; and after 2 years of suppressive cART, interferon gamma-induced protein 10 levels were higher in INR subjects. Very low-level HIV viral load and anti-HIV antibody levels did not differ between IR and INR subjects. Conclusions.  These results imply that targeting residual viral replication might not be the optimum therapeutic approach for INR subjects. PMID:26966697

  19. Systemic Cytokine Levels Do Not Predict CD4+ T-Cell Recovery After Suppressive Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in Chronic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Philip J.; Zhang, Jinbing; Worlock, Andrew; Nair, Sangeetha V.; Anastos, Kathryn; Minkoff, Howard L.; Villacres, Maria C.; Young, Mary; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; Desai, Seema; Landay, Alan L.; Gange, Stephen J.; Nugent, C. Thomas; Golub, Elizabeth T.; Keating, Sheila M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Subjects on suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) who do not achieve robust reconstitution of CD4+ T cells face higher risk of complications and death. We studied participants in the Women's Interagency HIV Study with good (immunological responder [IR]) or poor (immunological nonresponder [INR]) CD4+ T-cell recovery after suppressive cART (n = 50 per group) to determine whether cytokine levels or low-level viral load correlated with INR status. Methods. A baseline sample prior to viral control and 2 subsequent samples 1 and 2 years after viral control were tested. Serum levels of 30 cytokines were measured at each time point, and low-level human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viral load and anti-HIV antibody levels were measured 2 years after viral suppression. Results. There were minimal differences in cytokine levels between IR and INR subjects. At baseline, macrophage inflammatory protein-3β levels were higher in IR subjects; after 1 year of suppressive cART, soluble vascular endothelial growth factor-R3 levels were higher in IR subjects; and after 2 years of suppressive cART, interferon gamma-induced protein 10 levels were higher in INR subjects. Very low-level HIV viral load and anti-HIV antibody levels did not differ between IR and INR subjects. Conclusions. These results imply that targeting residual viral replication might not be the optimum therapeutic approach for INR subjects. PMID:26966697

  20. Modeling HIV persistence, the latent reservoir, and viral blips

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Libin; Perelson, Alan S.

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 eradication from infected individuals has not been achieved with the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for a prolonged period of time. The cellular reservoir for HIV-1 in resting memory CD4+ T cells remains a major obstacle to viral elimination. The reservoir does not decay significantly over long periods of time but is able to release replication-competent HIV-1 upon cell activation. Residual ongoing viral replication may likely occur in many patients because low levels of virus can be detected in plasma by sensitive assays and transient episodes of viremia, or HIV-1 blips, are often observed in patients even with successful viral suppression for many years. Here we review our current knowledge of the factors contributing to viral persistence, the latent reservoir, and blips, and mathematical models developed to explore them and their relationships. We show how mathematical modeling can help improve our understanding of HIV-1 dynamics in patients on HAART and of the quantitative events underlying HIV-1 latency, reservoir stability, low-level viremic persistence, and emergence of intermittent viral blips. We also discuss treatment implications related to these studies. PMID:19539630

  1. Viral quasispecies

    PubMed Central

    Andino, Raul; Domingo, Esteban

    2016-01-01

    New generation sequencing is greatly expanding the capacity to examine the composition of mutant spectra of viral quasispecies in infected cells and host organisms. Here we review recent progress in the understanding of quasispecies dynamics, notably the occurrence of intra-mutant spectrum interactions, and implications of fitness landscapes for virus adaptation and de-adaptation. Complementation or interference can be established among components of the same mutant spectrum, dependent on the mutational status of the ensemble. Replicative fitness relates to an optimal mutant spectrum that provides the molecular basis for phenotypic flexibility, with implications for antiviral therapy. The biological impact of viral fitness renders particularly relevant the capacity of new generation sequencing to establish viral fitness landscapes. Progress with experimental model systems is becoming an important asset to understand virus behavior in the more complex environments faced during natural infections. PMID:25824477

  2. VIRAL GASTROENTERITIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two virus types have been clearly shown to have epidemiologic importance in viral gastroenteritis, i.e., rotavirus and Norwalk virus. Four other virus types have been associated with gastroenteritis but their epidemiologic importance is not yet known, i.e., enteric adenovirus, ca...

  3. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with hepatitis? How does a pregnant woman pass hepatitis B virus to her baby? If I have hepatitis B, what does my baby need so that she ... Can I breastfeed my baby if I have hepatitis B? More information on viral hepatitis What is hepatitis? ...

  4. Suppression of chromosomal mutations affecting M/sub 1/ virus replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by a variant of a viral RNA segment (L-A) that encodes coat protein

    SciTech Connect

    Uemura, H.; Wickner, R.B.

    1988-02-01

    For the maintenance of ''killer'' M/sub 1/ double-stranded RNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, more than 30 chromosomal genes are required. The requirement for some of these genes can be completely suppressed by a cytoplasmic element, (B) (for bypass). The authors isolated a mutant unable to maintain (B) (mab) and found that it is allelic to MAK10, one of the three chromosomal MAK genes required for the maintenance of L-A. The heat curing of (B) always coincided with the loss of L-A. To confirm that (B) is located on L-A, the authors purified viral particles containing either L-A or M/sub 1/ from strains with or without (B) activity and transfected these purified particles into a strain which did not have either L-A or M/sub 1/. The transfectants harboring L-A and M/sub 1/ from a (B) strain showed the (B) phenotype, but the transfectants with L-A and M/sub 1/ from a (B-o) strain did not show the (B) phenotype. Furthermore, the transfectants having L-A from a (B) strain and M/sub 1/ from a (B-o) strain also showed the (B) phenotype. Therefore, they concluded that (B) is a property of a variant of L-A. In the transfection experiment, the authors also proved that the superkiller phenotype of the (B) strain is a property of L-A and that L-A wit (B) activity can maintain a higher copy number of M/sub 1/ regardless of the source M/sub 1/ viruslike particles. These data suggest the MAK genes whose mutations are suppressed by (B) are concerned with the protection of M/sub 1/ (+) single-stranded RNA or the formation of M/sub 1/ viruslike particles and that an L-A with more efficient production of M/sub 1/ viruslike particles can completely dispense with the requirement for those MAK genes.

  5. Isolation of Highly Suppressive CD25+FoxP3+ T Regulatory Cells from G-CSF-Mobilized Donors with Retention of Cytotoxic Anti-Viral CTLs: Application for Multi-Functional Immunotherapy Post Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Edward R.; Beloki, Lorea; Newton, Katy; Mackinnon, Stephen; Lowdell, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the effective control of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections post haematopoietic stem cell transplant through the adoptive transfer of donor derived CMV-specific T cells (CMV-T). Strategies for manufacturing CMV immunotherapies has involved a second leukapheresis or blood draw from the donor, which in the unrelated donor setting is not always possible. We have investigated the feasibility of using an aliquot of the original G-CSF-mobilized graft as a starting material for manufacture of CMV-T and examined the activation marker CD25 as a targeted approach for identification and isolation following CMVpp65 peptide stimulation. CD25+ cells isolated from G-CSF-mobilized apheresis revealed a significant increase in the proportion of FoxP3 expression when compared with conventional non-mobilized CD25+ cells and showed a superior suppressive capacity in a T cell proliferation assay, demonstrating the emergence of a population of Tregs not present in non-mobilized apheresis collections. The expansion of CD25+ CMV-T in short-term culture resulted in a mixed population of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells with CMV-specificity that secreted cytotoxic effector molecules and lysed CMVpp65 peptide-loaded phytohaemagglutinin-stimulated blasts. Furthermore CD25 expanded cells retained their suppressive capacity but did not maintain FoxP3 expression or secrete IL-10. In summary our data indicates that CD25 enrichment post CMV stimulation in G-CSF-mobilized PBMCs results in the simultaneous generation of both a functional population of anti-viral T cells and Tregs thus illustrating a potential single therapeutic strategy for the treatment of both GvHD and CMV reactivation following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The use of G-CSF-mobilized cells as a starting material for cell therapy manufacture represents a feasible approach to alleviating the many problems incurred with successive donations and procurement of cells from unrelated donors

  6. Oral immune regulation: a novel method for modulation of anti-viral immunity.

    PubMed

    Margalit, Maya; Ilan, Yaron

    2004-12-01

    Chronic viral infections, including hepatitis B and C and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections, afflict a significant part of the world's population. In many of these diseases, chronicity has been linked to defective anti-viral immunity that damages host tissues without producing viral clearance. Currently available therapeutic measures for chronic viral infections are limited. Oral immune regulation, the manipulation of immune responses towards antigens by their oral administration, is a relatively simple and antigen-specific immune-modulatory tool. Recent evidence suggests that induction of oral immune-regulation towards viral antigens may entail a complex immune effect, characterized by simultaneous enhancement and suppression of different elements of the immune response in a manner that benefits the host. Such manipulation of the immune response towards viruses may achieve a combination of upregulated specific anti-viral immunity and inhibition of immune-mediated damage. Oral immune regulation may prove to be an important addition to the available therapeutic arsenal for chronic viral infections. PMID:15567096

  7. Direct Acting Antivirals for the Treatment of Chronic Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Karayiannis, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The development and evaluation of antiviral agents through carefully designed clinical trials over the last 25 years have heralded a new dawn in the treatment of patients chronically infected with the hepatitis B and C viruses, but not so for the D virus (HBV, HCV, and HDV). The introduction of direct acting antivirals (DDAs) for the treatment of HBV carriers has permitted the long-term use of these compounds for the continuous suppression of viral replication, whilst in the case of HCV in combination with the standard of care [SOC, pegylated interferon (PegIFN), and ribavirin] sustained virological responses (SVRs) have been achieved with increasing frequency. Progress in the case of HDV has been slow and lacking in significant breakthroughs.This paper aims to summarise the current state of play in treatment approaches for chonic viral hepatitis patients and future perspectives. PMID:24278700

  8. Viral Infection in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Cukuranovic, Jovana; Ugrenovic, Sladjana; Jovanovic, Ivan; Visnjic, Milan; Stefanovic, Vladisav

    2012-01-01

    Viruses are among the most common causes of opportunistic infection after transplantation. The risk for viral infection is a function of the specific virus encountered, the intensity of immune suppression used to prevent graft rejection, and other host factors governing susceptibility. Although cytomegalovirus is the most common opportunistic pathogen seen in transplant recipients, numerous other viruses have also affected outcomes. In some cases, preventive measures such as pretransplant screening, prophylactic antiviral therapy, or posttransplant viral monitoring may limit the impact of these infections. Recent advances in laboratory monitoring and antiviral therapy have improved outcomes. Studies of viral latency, reactivation, and the cellular effects of viral infection will provide clues for future strategies in prevention and treatment of viral infections. This paper will summarize the major viral infections seen following transplant and discuss strategies for prevention and management of these potential pathogens. PMID:22654630

  9. IFN-α subtypes: distinct biological activities in anti-viral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gibbert, K; Schlaak, JF; Yang, D; Dittmer, U

    2013-01-01

    During most viral infections, the immediate host response is characterized by an induction of type I IFN. These cytokines have various biological activities, including anti-viral, anti-proliferative and immunomodulatory effects. After induction, they bind to their IFN-α/β receptor, which leads to downstream signalling resulting in the expression of numerous different IFN-stimulated genes. These genes encode anti-viral proteins that directly inhibit viral replication as well as modulate immune function. Thus, the induction of type I IFN is a very powerful tool for the host to fight virus infections. Many viruses evade this response by various strategies like the direct suppression of IFN induction or inhibition of the IFN signalling pathway. Therefore, the therapeutic application of exogenous type I IFN or molecules that induce strong IFN responses should be of great potential for future immunotherapies against viral infections. Type I IFN is currently used as a treatment in chronic hepatitis B and C virus infection, but as yet is not widely utilized for other viral infections. One reason for this restricted clinical use is that type I IFN belongs to a multigene family that includes 13 different IFN-α subtypes and IFN-β, whose individual anti-viral and immunomodulatory properties have so far not been investigated in detail to improve IFN therapy against viral infections in humans. In this review, we summarize the recent achievements in defining the distinct biological functions of type I IFN subtypes in cell culture and in animal models of viral infection as well as their clinical usage in chronic hepatitis virus infections. PMID:23072338

  10. Cytokines and persistent viral infections.

    PubMed

    Beltra, Jean-Christophe; Decaluwe, Hélène

    2016-06-01

    Intracellular pathogens such as the human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C and B or Epstein-Barr virus often cause chronic viral infections in humans. Persistence of these viruses in the host is associated with a dramatic loss of T-cell immune response due to functional T-cell exhaustion. Developing efficient immunotherapeutic approaches to prevent viral persistence and/or to restore a highly functional T-cell mediated immunity remains a major challenge. During the last two decades, numerous studies aimed to identify relevant host-derived factors that could be modulated to achieve this goal. In this review, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of the role of cytokines in preventing or facilitating viral persistence. We concentrate on the impact of multiple relevant cytokines in T-cell dependent immune response to chronic viral infection and the potential for using cytokines as therapeutic agents in mice and humans. PMID:26907634

  11. Balancing viral replication in spleen and liver determines the outcome of systemic virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lang, K S; Lang, P A

    2015-12-01

    The innate immune system limits virus replication during systemic infection by producing type I interferons (IFN-I) but still has to allow viral replication to achieve maximal innate and adaptive immune activation. Some spleen and lymph node resident antigen presenting cells (APCs) show limited response to IFN-I due to expression of the endogenous inhibitor of IFN-I signaling, Usp18. Therefore, virus in this spleen niche replicates despite high levels of IFN-I. This enforced viral replication leads to an exorbitant propagation of viral antigens and viral RNA. Viral antigen leads to massive activation of the adaptive immune system, while viral RNA to activated innate immunity. In contrast to these APCs, liver resident Kupffer cells, take up most of the systemic virus and suppress its replication in response to IFN-I. In addition, virus specific CD8 + T cells which are primed in the spleen migrate to the liver and kill virus infected cells. In this review we discuss the different mechanisms, which influence immune activation in spleen and antiviral mechanisms in the liver and how they determine the outcome of virus infection. PMID:26666281

  12. Viral diseases and pathogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It includes classification of viral infection. It describes common ways of virus entry, replication, and transmission. It introduces the routes of viral invasion and molecular basis for viral pathogenesis....

  13. Viral evolution

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Arshan; Kim, Kyung Mo; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Explaining the origin of viruses remains an important challenge for evolutionary biology. Previous explanatory frameworks described viruses as founders of cellular life, as parasitic reductive products of ancient cellular organisms or as escapees of modern genomes. Each of these frameworks endow viruses with distinct molecular, cellular, dynamic and emergent properties that carry broad and important implications for many disciplines, including biology, ecology and epidemiology. In a recent genome-wide structural phylogenomic analysis, we have shown that large-to-medium-sized viruses coevolved with cellular ancestors and have chosen the evolutionary reductive route. Here we interpret these results and provide a parsimonious hypothesis for the origin of viruses that is supported by molecular data and objective evolutionary bioinformatic approaches. Results suggest two important phases in the evolution of viruses: (1) origin from primordial cells and coexistence with cellular ancestors, and (2) prolonged pressure of genome reduction and relatively late adaptation to the parasitic lifestyle once virions and diversified cellular life took over the planet. Under this evolutionary model, new viral lineages can evolve from existing cellular parasites and enhance the diversity of the world’s virosphere. PMID:23550145

  14. Viral Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Haeman; Boltz, David A.; Webster, Robert G.; Smeyne, Richard Jay

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a debilitating neurological disorder characterized that affects 1-2% of the adult population over 55 years of age. For the vast majority of cases, the etiology of this disorder is unknown, although it is generally accepted that there is a genetic susceptibility to any number of environmental agents. One such agent may be viruses. It has been shown that numerous viruses can enter the nervous system, i.e. they are neurotropic, and induce a number of encephalopathies. One of the secondary consequences of these encephalopathies can be parkinsonism, that is both transient as well as permanent. One of the most highlighted and controversial cases of viral parkinsonism is that which followed the 1918 influenza outbreak and the subsequent induction of von Economo's encephalopathy. In this review, we discuss the neurological sequelae of infection by influenza virus as well as that of other viruses known to induce parkinsonism including Coxsackie, Japanese encephalitis B, St. Louis, West Nile and HIV viruses. PMID:18760350

  15. [Viral superantigens].

    PubMed

    Us, Dürdal

    2016-07-01

    , expression of endogenous SAgs leads to thymic deletion of responding T cells (bearing Vβ6-9+ TCR) due to self-tolerance induction during the fetal life, and protects the host against future exogenous MMTV infections. The SAg of rabies virus is the N protein found in nucleocapsid structure and stimulates Vβ8+TCR-bearing T cells. The SAg-induced polyclonal activation of T cells leads to turn-off the specific immune response, to enhance the immunopathogenesis and facilitates viral transmission from the initial site of infection (the muscle tissue) to the nerve endings. In case of EBV-associated SAg that activates Vβ13+TCR-bearing T cells, it was detected that the SAg activity was not encoded by EBV itself, but instead was due to the transactivation of HERV-K18 by EBV latent membrane proteins, whose env gene encodes the SAg (Sutkowski, et al. 2001). It has been denoted that EBV-induced SAg expression plays a role in the long-term persistence and latency of virus in memory B cells, in the development of autoimmune diseases and in the oncogenesis mechanisms. The proteins which are identified as SAgs of HIV are Nef and gp120. It is believed that, the massive activation of CD4+ T cells (selectively with Vβ-12+, Vβ-5.3+ and Vβ-18+ TCRs) in early stages of infection and clonal deletion, anergy and apoptosis of bystander T cells in the late stages may be due to SAg property of Nef protein, as well as the other mechanisms. However there are some studies indicating that Nef does not act as a SAg (Lapatschek, et al. 2001). HIV gp120 glycoprotein is a B-cell SAg that binds to VH3-expressing B cell receptors and causes polyclonal B cell activation. In addition, binding of gp120 to IgE on the surface of basophiles and mast cells causes activation of those cells, secretion of high level proinflammatory mediators leading to allergic reactions and tissue damage. In a recent study, the depletion (anergy or deletion) of T cell populations bearing Vβ12+, Vβ13+ and Vβ17+ TCR have been

  16. Viral Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ramdass, Priya; Mullick, Sahil; Farber, Harold F

    2015-12-01

    In the vast world of skin diseases, viral skin disorders account for a significant percentage. Most viral skin diseases present with an exanthem (skin rash) and, oftentimes, an accompanying enanthem (lesions involving the mucosal membrane). In this article, the various viral skin diseases are explored, including viral childhood exanthems (measles, rubella, erythema infectiosum, and roseola), herpes viruses (herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus, viral zoonotic infections [orf, monkeypox, ebola, smallpox]), and several other viral skin diseases, such as human papilloma virus, hand, foot, and mouth disease, molluscum contagiosum, and Gianotti-Crosti syndrome. PMID:26612372

  17. Using Wolbachia-based release for suppression of Aedes mosquitoes: insights from genetic data and population simulations.

    PubMed

    Rasić, Gordana; Endersby, Nancy M; Williams, Craig; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2014-07-01

    A novel strategy for suppressing disease transmission by Aedes aegypti, the main vector of dengue, uses releases of mosquitoes infected with the bacterium Wolbachia pipientis. Wolbachia are currently released to interfere with viral transmission, but there is also potential to use strains in mosquito suppression and elimination programs via the deleterious effects of the bacterium on the host. Mosquito suppression depends on target areas being relatively isolated to prevent reinvasion and on local climatic conditions. Here we explored the opportunity for suppression of A. aegypti in central Queensland, Australia, by using microsatellite data and simulations based on CIMSiM models of local weather conditions and breeding container data. Our results indicate that Wolbachia-induced extinctions in central Queensland are possible, although they may eventually be compromised by ongoing mosquito migration between towns until these sources are also suppressed. The results highlight a novel use of deleterious Wolbachia infections to achieve ecological as well as disease-related endpoints. PMID:25154109

  18. 2',3'-dideoxy-beta-L-5-fluorocytidine inhibits duck hepatitis B virus reverse transcription and suppresses viral DNA synthesis in hepatocytes, both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Zoulim, F; Dannaoui, E; Borel, C; Hantz, O; Lin, T S; Liu, S H; Trépo, C; Cheng, Y C

    1996-01-01

    beta-L-Nucleoside analogs represent a new class of potent antiviral agents with low cytotoxicity which provide new hope in the therapy of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections. We evaluated the anti-HBV activity of 2',3'-dideoxy-beta-L-5-fluorocytidine (beta-L-F-ddC), a beta-L-nucleoside analog derived from 2',3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC), in the duck HBV (DHBV) model. This compound was previously shown to inhibit HBV DNA synthesis in a stably transfected hepatoma cell line (F2215). Using a cell-free system for the expression of an enzymatically active DHBV polymerase, we could demonstrate that the triphosphate form of beta-L-F-ddC does inhibit hepadnavirus reverse transcription. In primary duck hepatocyte culture, beta-L-F-ddC showed a potent inhibitory effect on DHBV DNA synthesis which was concentration dependent. Although beta-L-F-ddC was shown to be less active than ddC against the DHBV reverse transcriptase in vitro, beta-L-F-ddC was a stronger inhibitor in hepatocytes. The oral administration of beta-L-F-ddC in experimentally infected ducklings showed that beta-L-F-ddC is a potent inhibitor of viral replication in vivo. Short-term therapy could not prevent a rebound of viral replication after the drug was withdrawn. Preventive therapy with beta-L-F-ddC could delay the onset of viremia by only 1 day compared with the time to the onset of viremia in the control group. The in vivo inhibitory effect of beta-L-F-ddC was much stronger than that of ddC and was not associated with signs of toxicity. Our data show that beta-L-F-ddC inhibits hepadnavirus reverse transcription and is a strong inhibitor of viral replication both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:8834896

  19. Detectable HIV Viral Load in Kenya: Data from a Population-Based Survey

    PubMed Central

    Cherutich, Peter; Kim, Andrea A.; Kellogg, Timothy A.; Sherr, Kenneth; Waruru, Anthony; De Cock, Kevin M.; Rutherford, George W.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction At the individual level, there is clear evidence that Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) transmission can be substantially reduced by lowering viral load. However there are few data describing population-level HIV viremia especially in high-burden settings with substantial under-diagnosis of HIV infection. The 2nd Kenya AIDS Indicator Survey (KAIS 2012) provided a unique opportunity to evaluate the impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART) coverage on viremia and to examine the risks for failure to suppress viral replication. We report population-level HIV viral load suppression using data from KAIS 2012. Methods Between October 2012 to February 2013, KAIS 2012 surveyed household members, administered questionnaires and drew serum samples to test for HIV and, for those found to be infected with HIV, plasma viral load (PVL) was measured. Our principal outcome was unsuppressed HIV viremia, defined as a PVL ≥ 550 copies/mL. The exposure variables included current treatment with ART, prior history of an HIV diagnosis, and engagement in HIV care. All point estimates were adjusted to account for the KAIS 2012 cluster sampling design and survey non-response. Results Overall, 61·2% (95% CI: 56·4–66·1) of HIV-infected Kenyans aged 15–64 years had not achieved virological suppression. The base10 median (interquartile range [IQR]) and mean (95% CI) VL was 4,633 copies/mL (0–51,596) and 81,750 copies/mL (59,366–104,134), respectively. Among 266 persons taking ART, 26.1% (95% CI: 20.0–32.1) had detectable viremia. Non-ART use, younger age, and lack of awareness of HIV status were independently associated with significantly higher odds of detectable viral load. In multivariate analysis for the sub-sample of patients on ART, detectable viremia was independently associated with younger age and sub-optimal adherence to ART. Discussion This report adds to the limited data of nationally-representative surveys to report population- level virological

  20. Expansion of FOXP3+ CD8 T cells with suppressive potential in colorectal mucosa following a pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus infection correlates with diminished antiviral T cell response and viral control.

    PubMed

    Nigam, Pragati; Velu, Vijayakumar; Kannanganat, Sunil; Chennareddi, Lakshmi; Kwa, Suefen; Siddiqui, Mariam; Amara, Rama Rao

    2010-02-15

    FOXP3(+)CD8(+) T cells are present at low levels in humans; however, the function of these cells is not known. In this study, we demonstrate a rapid expansion of CD25(+)FOXP3(+)CD8(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the blood and multiple tissues following a pathogenic SIV infection in rhesus macaques. The expansion was pronounced in lymphoid and colorectal mucosal tissues, preferential sites of virus replication. These CD8 Tregs expressed molecules associated with immune suppressor function such as CTLA-4 and CD39 and suppressed proliferation of SIV-specific T cells in vitro. They also expressed low levels of granzyme B and perforin, suggesting that these cells do not possess killing potential. Expansion of CD8 Tregs correlated directly with acute phase viremia and inversely with the magnitude of antiviral T cell response. Expansion was also observed in HIV-infected humans but not in SIV-infected sooty mangabeys with high viremia, suggesting a direct role for hyperimmune activation and an indirect role for viremia in the induction of these cells. These results suggest an important but previously unappreciated role for CD8 Tregs in suppressing antiviral immunity during immunodeficiency virus infections. These results also suggest that CD8 Tregs expand in pathogenic immunodeficiency virus infections in the nonnatural hosts and that therapeutic strategies that prevent expansion of these cells may enhance control of HIV infection. PMID:20053943

  1. Viral persistence, latent reservoir, and blips: a review on HIV-1 dynamics and modeling during HAART and related treatment implications

    SciTech Connect

    Rong, Libin; Perelson, Alan

    2008-01-01

    HIV-1 eradication from infected individuals has not been achieved with the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for a prolonged period of time. The cellular reservoir for HIV-1 in resting memory CD4{sup +} T cells remains a major obstacle to viral elimination. The reservoir does not decay significantly over long periods of time as is able to release replication competent HIV-1 upon cell activation. Residual ongoing viral replication may likely occur in many patients because low levels of virus can be detected in plasma by sensitive assays and transient episodes of viremia, or HIV-1 blips, are often observed in patients even with successful viral suppression for many years. Here we review our current knowledge of the factors contributing to viral persistence, the latent reservoir, and blips, and mathematical models developed to explore them and their relationships. We show how mathematical modeling can help improve our understanding of HIV-1 dynamics in patients on HAART and the quantitative events underlying HIV-1 latency, reservoir stability, low-level viremic persistence, and emergence of intermittent viral blips. We also discuss treatment implications related to these studies.

  2. Viral interactions with components of the splicing machinery.

    PubMed

    Meyer, F

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genes are often interrupted by stretches of sequence with no protein coding potential or obvious function. After transcription, these interrupting sequences must be removed to give rise to the mature messenger RNA. This fundamental process is called RNA splicing and is achieved by complicated machinery made of protein and RNA that assembles around the RNA to be edited. Viruses also use RNA splicing to maximize their coding potential and economize on genetic space, and use clever strategies to manipulate the splicing machinery to their advantage. This article gives an overview of the splicing process and provides examples of viral strategies that make use of various components of the splicing system to promote their replicative cycle. Representative virus families have been selected to illustrate the interaction with various regulatory proteins and ribonucleoproteins. The unifying theme is fine regulation through protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions with the spliceosome components and associated factors to promote or prevent spliceosome assembly on given splice sites, in addition to a strong influence from cis-regulatory sequences on viral transcripts. Because there is an intimate coupling of splicing with the processes that direct mRNA biogenesis, a description of how these viruses couple the regulation of splicing with the retention or stability of mRNAs is also included. It seems that a unique balance of suppression and activation of splicing and nuclear export works optimally for each family of viruses. PMID:27571697

  3. IFITM Proteins Restrict Viral Membrane Hemifusion

    PubMed Central

    Golfetto, Ottavia; Bungart, Brittani; Li, Minghua; Ding, Shilei; He, Yuxian; Liang, Chen; Lee, James C.; Gratton, Enrico; Cohen, Fredric S.; Liu, Shan-Lu

    2013-01-01

    The interferon-inducible transmembrane (IFITM) protein family represents a new class of cellular restriction factors that block early stages of viral replication; the underlying mechanism is currently not known. Here we provide evidence that IFITM proteins restrict membrane fusion induced by representatives of all three classes of viral membrane fusion proteins. IFITM1 profoundly suppressed syncytia formation and cell-cell fusion induced by almost all viral fusion proteins examined; IFITM2 and IFITM3 also strongly inhibited their fusion, with efficiency somewhat dependent on cell types. Furthermore, treatment of cells with IFN also markedly inhibited viral membrane fusion and entry. By using the Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus envelope and influenza A virus hemagglutinin as models for study, we showed that IFITM-mediated restriction on membrane fusion is not at the steps of receptor- and/or low pH-mediated triggering; instead, the creation of hemifusion was essentially blocked by IFITMs. Chlorpromazine (CPZ), a chemical known to promote the transition from hemifusion to full fusion, was unable to rescue the IFITM-mediated restriction on fusion. In contrast, oleic acid (OA), a lipid analog that generates negative spontaneous curvature and thereby promotes hemifusion, virtually overcame the restriction. To explore the possible effect of IFITM proteins on membrane molecular order and fluidity, we performed fluorescence labeling with Laurdan, in conjunction with two-photon laser scanning and fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). We observed that the generalized polarizations (GPs) and fluorescence lifetimes of cell membranes expressing IFITM proteins were greatly enhanced, indicating higher molecularly ordered and less fluidized membranes. Collectively, our data demonstrated that IFITM proteins suppress viral membrane fusion before the creation of hemifusion, and suggested that they may do so by reducing membrane fluidity and conferring a positive spontaneous

  4. Effect of Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid (SAHA) Administration on the Residual Virus Pool in a Model of Combination Antiretroviral Therapy-Mediated Suppression in SIVmac239-Infected Indian Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Del Prete, Gregory Q.; Shoemaker, Rebecca; Oswald, Kelli; Lara, Abigail; Trubey, Charles M.; Fast, Randy; Schneider, Douglas K.; Kiser, Rebecca; Coalter, Vicky; Wiles, Adam; Wiles, Rodney; Freemire, Brandi; Keele, Brandon F.; Estes, Jacob D.; Quiñones, Octavio A.; Smedley, Jeremy; Macallister, Rhonda; Sanchez, Rosa I.; Wai, John S.; Tan, Christopher M.; Alvord, W. Gregory; Hazuda, Daria J.; Piatak, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Nonhuman primate models are needed for evaluations of proposed strategies targeting residual virus that persists in HIV-1-infected individuals receiving suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). However, relevant nonhuman primate (NHP) models of cART-mediated suppression have proven challenging to develop. We used a novel three-class, six-drug cART regimen to achieve durable 4.0- to 5.5-log reductions in plasma viremia levels and declines in cell-associated viral RNA and DNA in blood and tissues of simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239-infected Indian-origin rhesus macaques, then evaluated the impact of treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; Vorinostat) on the residual virus pool. Ex vivo SAHA treatment of CD4+ T cells obtained from cART-suppressed animals increased histone acetylation and viral RNA levels in culture supernatants. cART-suppressed animals each received 84 total doses of oral SAHA. We observed SAHA dose-dependent increases in acetylated histones with evidence for sustained modulation as well as refractoriness following prolonged administration. In vivo virologic activity was demonstrated based on the ratio of viral RNA to viral DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, a presumptive measure of viral transcription, which significantly increased in SAHA-treated animals. However, residual virus was readily detected at the end of treatment, suggesting that SAHA alone may be insufficient for viral eradication in the setting of suppressive cART. The effects observed were similar to emerging data for repeat-dose SAHA treatment of HIV-infected individuals on cART, demonstrating the feasibility, utility, and relevance of NHP models of cART-mediated suppression for in vivo assessments of AIDS virus functional cure/eradication approaches. PMID:25182644

  5. Tight Junctions Go Viral!

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Flores, Jesús M.; Arias, Carlos F.

    2015-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are highly specialized membrane domains involved in many important cellular processes such as the regulation of the passage of ions and macromolecules across the paracellular space and the establishment of cell polarity in epithelial cells. Over the past few years there has been increasing evidence that different components of the TJs can be hijacked by viruses in order to complete their infectious cycle. Viruses from at least nine different families of DNA and RNA viruses have been reported to use TJ proteins in their benefit. For example, TJ proteins such as JAM-A or some members of the claudin family of proteins are used by members of the Reoviridae family and hepatitis C virus as receptors or co-receptors during their entry into their host cells. Reovirus, in addition, takes advantage of the TJ protein Junction Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A) to achieve its hematogenous dissemination. Some other viruses are capable of regulating the expression or the localization of TJ proteins to induce cell transformation or to improve the efficiency of their exit process. This review encompasses the importance of TJs for viral entry, replication, dissemination, and egress, and makes a clear statement of the importance of studying these proteins to gain a better understanding of the replication strategies used by viruses that infect epithelial and/or endothelial cells. PMID:26404354

  6. Exosomes in Viral Disease.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Monique R; Kashanchi, Fatah; Jacobson, Steven

    2016-07-01

    Viruses have evolved many mechanisms by which to evade and subvert the immune system to ensure survival and persistence. However, for each method undertaken by the immune system for pathogen removal, there is a counteracting mechanism utilized by pathogens. The new and emerging role of microvesicles in immune intercellular communication and function is no different. Viruses across many different families have evolved to insert viral components in exosomes, a subtype of microvesicle, with many varying downstream effects. When assessed cumulatively, viral antigens in exosomes increase persistence through cloaking viral genomes, decoying the immune system, and even by increasing viral infection in uninfected cells. Exosomes therefore represent a source of viral antigen that can be used as a biomarker for disease and targeted for therapy in the control and eradication of these disorders. With the rise in the persistence of new and reemerging viruses like Ebola and Zika, exploring the role of exosomes become more important than ever. PMID:27324390

  7. Suppression of murine type-C RNA virogenes by type-specific oncornavirus vaccines: prospects for prevention of cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Huebner, R J; Gilden, R V; Lane, W T; Toni, R; Trimmer, R W; Hill, P R

    1976-01-01

    Immunization of crossbred and F1 mice with combined killed and live Gross leukemia virus AKR type-C viral vaccines suppressed endogeneous N-type AKR virus up to 10,000-fold for significant periods during early life. Since several previous studies in the same and similar crossbred systems revealed direct correlations between low and high levels of type-C virus early in life with low and high incidences of leukemia and other cancers later in life, we believe that prospects for suppression of spontaneous neoplasms are good; however, 8-14 months will be required to achieve the final results. Should cancers be prevented by serotype-specific vaccines, such evidence would provide conclusive proof of endogenous viral etiology. PMID:174116

  8. Factors Associated with Lack of Viral Suppression at Delivery among HAART-Naïve HIV-Positive Women in the International Maternal Pediatric Adolescent AIDS Clinical Trials Group (IMPAACT) P1025 Study

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Ingrid T.; Leister, Erin; Kacanek, Deborah; Hughes, Michael D.; Bardeguez, Arlene; Livingston, Elizabeth; Stek, Alice; Shapiro, David E.; Tuomala, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Background High delivery maternal plasma HIV-1 RNA level (viral load, VL) is a risk factor for mother to child transmission and poor maternal health. Objective To identify factors associated with detectable VL at delivery despite initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) during pregnancy. Design Multicenter observational study. Setting 67 US AIDS clinical research sites. Patients HIV-1-positive pregnant women who initiated HAART during pregnancy. Measurements Descriptive summaries and associations between socio-demographic, HIV disease, treatment and pregnancy-related risk factors and detectable VL (>400copies/mL) at delivery. Results Between October 2002 and December 2011, 671 women met inclusion criteria and 13% had detectable VL at delivery. Factors associated with detectable VL included multiparity (16.4% vs 8% nulliparous, p=0.002), black non-Hispanic ethnicity (17.6% vs 6.6% Hispanic and 6.6% white/non-Hispanic, p<0.001), 11th grade or less education (17.6% vs.12.1% high school graduate and 6.7% some college or higher, p=0.013), and initiation of HAART in third trimester (23.9% vs 12.3% second and 8.6% first, p=0.002), timing of HIV diagnosis prior to current pregnancy (16.1% vs 11% during current pregnancy, p=0.051), and timing of first prenatal visit in 3rd trimester (33.3% vs 14.3% second and 10.5% first, p=0.002). Women who experienced treatment interruptions or reported poor medication adherence during pregnancy were more likely to have detectable VL at delivery than women with no interruptions or who reported better adherence. Limitations Women entered the study at varying times during pregnancy and for this and other reasons there was incomplete data on many covariates. Conclusions In this large U.S.-based cohort of HIV-1 positive women, 13% of women who initiated HAART during pregnancy had detectable VL at delivery. The timing of HAART initiation and prenatal care along with medication adherence during pregnancy appear to be

  9. Genomic Basis of Plant Pathogen Suppression by Biocontrol Pseudomonas Species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Various plant commensal bacterial species, which naturally colonize the plant rhizosphere, are able to suppress fungal, bacterial, viral and even insect plant pathogens. These biocontrol activities are elicited primarily through the production of secreted exoenzymes and secondary metabolites that ma...

  10. Viruses and viral proteins

    PubMed Central

    Verdaguer, Nuria; Ferrero, Diego; Murthy, Mathur R. N.

    2014-01-01

    For more than 30 years X-ray crystallography has been by far the most powerful approach for determining the structures of viruses and viral proteins at atomic resolution. The information provided by these structures, which covers many important aspects of the viral life cycle such as cell-receptor recognition, viral entry, nucleic acid transfer and genome replication, has extensively enriched our vision of the virus world. Many of the structures available correspond to potential targets for antiviral drugs against important human pathogens. This article provides an overview of the current knowledge of different structural aspects of the above-mentioned processes. PMID:25485129

  11. Viral encephalitis: current treatments and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Renan Barros

    2012-12-01

    Several viruses may cause central nervous system infections that lead to a broad range of clinical manifestations. The course of the viral encephalitis can be acute, sub acute, or chronic. Some viruses have the ability to enter into the brain and cause direct injury, while others activate inflammatory cells that attack the central nervous system (CNS) secondarily. Some types of viral encephalitis occur in previously healthy individuals, while others affect immunocompromised patients. The epidemiology of viral encephalitis has undergone changes in recent years. Factors such as evolving lifestyles and ecological changes have had a considerable impact on the epidemiology of some types of viral encephalitis. The result is a change in the etiology spectrum of viral encephalitis, with new types of encephalitis arising or returning from time to time. Many scientific achievements in neuroimaging, molecular diagnosis, antiviral therapy, immunomodulatory treatments, and neurointensive care have allowed more precise and earlier diagnoses and more efficient treatments, resulting in improved outcomes. Despite these advances, there is still considerable morbidity and mortality related to these disorders. This aim of this article is to review the current knowledge of the current drugs used in the management of the most important viral encephalitis, focusing on the mechanisms of action, efficacy, and side effects of the drugs. In addition, future perspectives in this area will be addressed. Despite the technological advances, much effort has yet to be undertaken to reduce the impact of these potentially devastating diseases. PMID:22640219

  12. VIRAL INFECTIONS DURING PREGNANCY

    PubMed Central

    Silasi, Michelle; Cardenas, Ingrid; Racicot, Karen; Kwon, Ja-Young; Aldo, Paula; Mor, Gil

    2015-01-01

    Viral infections during pregnancy have long been considered benign conditions with a few notable exceptions, such as herpes virus. The recent Ebola outbreak and other viral epidemics and pandemics show how pregnant women suffer worse outcomes (such as preterm labor and adverse fetal outcomes) than the general population and non-pregnant women. New knowledge about the ways the maternal-fetal interface and placenta interact with the maternal immune system may explain these findings. Once thought to be “immunosuppressed”, the pregnant woman actually undergoes an immunological transformation, where the immune system is necessary to promote and support the pregnancy and growing fetus. When this protection is breached, as in a viral infection, this security is weakened and infection with other microorganisms can then propagate and lead to outcomes, such as preterm labor. In this manuscript, we review the major viral infections relevant to pregnancy, and offer potential mechanisms for the associated adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:25582523

  13. Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Related Links About VSPB (Viral Special Pathogens Branch) File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel ...

  14. HIV and Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... prevalent among blacks as among whites. Viral Hepatitis Transmission People can be infected with the three most ... risk for HAV. • • New data suggest that sexual transmission of HCV among MSM with HIV occurs more ...

  15. Viral quasispecies complexity measures.

    PubMed

    Gregori, Josep; Perales, Celia; Rodriguez-Frias, Francisco; Esteban, Juan I; Quer, Josep; Domingo, Esteban

    2016-06-01

    Mutant spectrum dynamics (changes in the related mutants that compose viral populations) has a decisive impact on virus behavior. The several platforms of next generation sequencing (NGS) to study viral quasispecies offer a magnifying glass to study viral quasispecies complexity. Several parameters are available to quantify the complexity of mutant spectra, but they have limitations. Here we critically evaluate the information provided by several population diversity indices, and we propose the introduction of some new ones used in ecology. In particular we make a distinction between incidence, abundance and function measures of viral quasispecies composition. We suggest a multidimensional approach (complementary information contributed by adequately chosen indices), propose some guidelines, and illustrate the use of indices with a simple example. We apply the indices to three clinical samples of hepatitis C virus that display different population heterogeneity. Areas of virus biology in which population complexity plays a role are discussed. PMID:27060566

  16. Viral miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Plaisance-Bonstaff, Karlie; Renne, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Since 2004, more than 200 microRNAs (miRNAs) have been discovered in double-stranded DNA viruses, mainly herpesviruses and polyomaviruses (Nucleic Acids Res 32:D109-D111, 2004). miRNAs are short 22  ±  3 nt RNA molecules that posttranscriptionally regulate gene expression by binding to 3'-untranslated regions (3'UTR) of target mRNAs, thereby inducing translational silencing and/or transcript degradation (Nature 431:350-355, 2004; Cell 116:281-297, 2004). Since miRNAs require only limited complementarity for binding, miRNA targets are difficult to determine (Mol Cell 27:91-105, 2007). To date, targets have only been experimentally verified for relatively few viral miRNAs, which either target viral or host cellular gene expression: For example, SV40 and related polyomaviruses encode miRNAs which target viral large T antigen expression (Nature 435:682-686, 2005; J Virol 79:13094-13104, 2005; Virology 383:183-187, 2009; J Virol 82:9823-9828, 2008) and miRNAs of α-, β-, and γ-herpesviruses have been implicated in regulating the transition from latent to lytic gene expression, a key step in the herpesvirus life cycle. Viral miRNAs have also been shown to target various host cellular genes. Although this field is just beginning to unravel the multiple roles of viral miRNA in biology and pathogenesis, the current data strongly suggest that virally encoded miRNAs are able to regulate fundamental biological processes such as immune recognition, promotion of cell survival, angiogenesis, proliferation, and cell differentiation. This chapter aims to summarize our current knowledge of viral miRNAs, their targets and function, and the challenges lying ahead to decipher their role in viral biology, pathogenesis, and for γ-herepsvirus-encoded miRNAs, potentially tumorigenesis. PMID:21431678

  17. Immigration and viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suraj; Carballo, Manuel; Feld, Jordan J; Janssen, Harry L A

    2015-08-01

    WHO estimates reveal that the global prevalence of viral hepatitis may be as high as 500 million, with an annual mortality rate of up to 1.3 million individuals. The majority of this global burden of disease is borne by nations of the developing world with high rates of vertical and iatrogenic transmission of HBV and HCV, as well as poor access to healthcare. In 2013, 3.2% of the global population (231 million individuals) migrated into a new host nation. Migrants predominantly originate from the developing countries of the south, into the developed economies of North America and Western Europe. This mass migration of individuals from areas of high-prevalence of viral hepatitis poses a unique challenge to the healthcare systems of the host nations. Due to a lack of universal standards for screening, vaccination and treatment of viral hepatitis, the burden of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma continues to increase among migrant populations globally. Efforts to increase case identification and treatment among migrants have largely been limited to small outreach programs in urban centers, such that the majority of migrants with viral hepatitis continue to remain unaware of their infection. This review summarizes the data on prevalence of viral hepatitis and burden of chronic liver disease among migrants, current standards for screening and treatment of immigrants and refugees, and efforts to improve the identification and treatment of viral hepatitis among migrants. PMID:25962882

  18. Factors influencing dust suppressant effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, C.R.; Eisele, T.C.; Chesney, D.J.; Kawatra, S.K.

    2008-11-15

    Water sprays are a common method used to reduce particulate matter (PM) emissions. Various factors such as wettability, surface area coverage, fine particle engulfment rates, interparticle adhesion forces, suppressant penetration and suppressant longevity have all been suggested as critical factors in achieving effective PM control. However, it has not been established which of these factors are the most important. Experimental work indicated that suppressant penetration is the most critical of these factors. The length of time after application that suppressants were effective was also improved by using hygroscopic reagents that retained moisture to prevent evaporation. Maximizing suppressant penetration and improving suppressant longevity led to an average 86% reduction in PM10 concentrations in laboratory dust tower tests.

  19. Concepts in viral pathogenesis II

    SciTech Connect

    Notkins, A.L.; Oldstone, M.B.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper contains papers divided among 10 sections. The section titles are: Viral Structure and Function; Viral Constructs; Oncogenes, Transfection, and Differentiation; Viral Tropism and Entry into Cells; Immune Recognition of Viruses; Evolving Concepts in Viral Pathogenesis Illustrated by Selected Plant and Animal Models; Evolving Concepts in Viral Pathogenesis Illustrated by Selected Diseases in Humans; New Trends in Diagnosis and Epidemiology; and Vaccines and Antiviral Therapy.

  20. Mortality of treated HIV-1 positive individuals according to viral subtype in Europe and Canada: collaborative cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To estimate prognosis by viral subtype in HIV-1-infected individuals from start of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and after viral failure. Design: Collaborative analysis of data from eight European and three Canadian cohorts. Methods: Adults (N>20 000) who started triple ART between 1996 and 2012 and had data on viral subtype were followed for mortality. We estimated crude and adjusted (for age, sex, regimen, CD4+ cell count, and AIDS at baseline, period of starting ART, stratified by cohort, region of origin and risk group) mortality hazard ratios (MHR) by subtype. We estimated MHR subsequent to viral failure defined as two HIV-RNA measurements greater than 500 copies/ml after achieving viral suppression. Results: The most prevalent subtypes were B (15 419; 74%), C (2091; 10%), CRF02AG (1057; 5%), A (873; 4%), CRF01AE (506; 2.4%), G (359; 1.7%), and D (232; 1.1%). Subtypes were strongly patterned by region of origin and risk group. During 104 649 person-years of observation, 1172/20 784 patients died. Compared with subtype B, mortality was higher for subtype A, but similar for all other subtypes. MHR for A versus B were 1.13 (95% confidence interval 0.85,1.50) when stratified by cohort, increased to 1.78 (1.27,2.51) on stratification by region and risk, and attenuated to 1.59 (1.14,2.23) on adjustment for covariates. MHR for A versus B was 2.65 (1.64,4.28) and 0.95 (0.57,1.57) for patients who started ART with CD4+ cell count below, or more than, 100 cells/μl, respectively. There was no difference in mortality between subtypes A, B and C after viral failure. Conclusion: Patients with subtype A had worse prognosis, an observation which may be confounded by socio-demographic factors. PMID:26562844

  1. Lytic to temperate switching of viral communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, B.; Silveira, C. B.; Bailey, B. A.; Barott, K.; Cantu, V. A.; Cobián-Güemes, A. G.; Coutinho, F. H.; Dinsdale, E. A.; Felts, B.; Furby, K. A.; George, E. E.; Green, K. T.; Gregoracci, G. B.; Haas, A. F.; Haggerty, J. M.; Hester, E. R.; Hisakawa, N.; Kelly, L. W.; Lim, Y. W.; Little, M.; Luque, A.; McDole-Somera, T.; McNair, K.; de Oliveira, L. S.; Quistad, S. D.; Robinett, N. L.; Sala, E.; Salamon, P.; Sanchez, S. E.; Sandin, S.; Silva, G. G. Z.; Smith, J.; Sullivan, C.; Thompson, C.; Vermeij, M. J. A.; Youle, M.; Young, C.; Zgliczynski, B.; Brainard, R.; Edwards, R. A.; Nulton, J.; Thompson, F.; Rohwer, F.

    2016-03-01

    Microbial viruses can control host abundances via density-dependent lytic predator–prey dynamics. Less clear is how temperate viruses, which coexist and replicate with their host, influence microbial communities. Here we show that virus-like particles are relatively less abundant at high host densities. This suggests suppressed lysis where established models predict lytic dynamics are favoured. Meta-analysis of published viral and microbial densities showed that this trend was widespread in diverse ecosystems ranging from soil to freshwater to human lungs. Experimental manipulations showed viral densities more consistent with temperate than lytic life cycles at increasing microbial abundance. An analysis of 24 coral reef viromes showed a relative increase in the abundance of hallmark genes encoded by temperate viruses with increased microbial abundance. Based on these four lines of evidence, we propose the Piggyback-the-Winner model wherein temperate dynamics become increasingly important in ecosystems with high microbial densities; thus ‘more microbes, fewer viruses’.

  2. Immunological features underlying viral hemorrhagic fevers.

    PubMed

    Messaoudi, Ilhem; Basler, Christopher F

    2015-10-01

    Several enveloped RNA viruses of the arenavirus, bunyavirus, filovirus and flavivirus families are associated with a syndrome known as viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF). VHF is characterized by fever, vascular leakage, coagulation defects and multi organ system failure. VHF is currently viewed as a disease precipitated by viral suppression of innate immunity, which promotes systemic virus replication and excessive proinflammatory cytokine responses that trigger the manifestations of severe disease. However, the mechanisms by which immune dysregulation contributes to disease remain poorly understood. Infection of nonhuman primates closely recapitulates human VHF, notably Ebola and yellow fever, thereby providing excellent models to better define the immunological basis for this syndrome. Here we review the current state of our knowledge and suggest future directions that will better define the immunological mechanisms underlying VHF. PMID:26163194

  3. Lytic to temperate switching of viral communities.

    PubMed

    Knowles, B; Silveira, C B; Bailey, B A; Barott, K; Cantu, V A; Cobián-Güemes, A G; Coutinho, F H; Dinsdale, E A; Felts, B; Furby, K A; George, E E; Green, K T; Gregoracci, G B; Haas, A F; Haggerty, J M; Hester, E R; Hisakawa, N; Kelly, L W; Lim, Y W; Little, M; Luque, A; McDole-Somera, T; McNair, K; de Oliveira, L S; Quistad, S D; Robinett, N L; Sala, E; Salamon, P; Sanchez, S E; Sandin, S; Silva, G G Z; Smith, J; Sullivan, C; Thompson, C; Vermeij, M J A; Youle, M; Young, C; Zgliczynski, B; Brainard, R; Edwards, R A; Nulton, J; Thompson, F; Rohwer, F

    2016-03-24

    Microbial viruses can control host abundances via density-dependent lytic predator-prey dynamics. Less clear is how temperate viruses, which coexist and replicate with their host, influence microbial communities. Here we show that virus-like particles are relatively less abundant at high host densities. This suggests suppressed lysis where established models predict lytic dynamics are favoured. Meta-analysis of published viral and microbial densities showed that this trend was widespread in diverse ecosystems ranging from soil to freshwater to human lungs. Experimental manipulations showed viral densities more consistent with temperate than lytic life cycles at increasing microbial abundance. An analysis of 24 coral reef viromes showed a relative increase in the abundance of hallmark genes encoded by temperate viruses with increased microbial abundance. Based on these four lines of evidence, we propose the Piggyback-the-Winner model wherein temperate dynamics become increasingly important in ecosystems with high microbial densities; thus 'more microbes, fewer viruses'. PMID:26982729

  4. Modeling Viral Capsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    I present a review of the theoretical and computational methodologies that have been used to model the assembly of viral capsids. I discuss the capabilities and limitations of approaches ranging from equilibrium continuum theories to molecular dynamics simulations, and I give an overview of some of the important conclusions about virus assembly that have resulted from these modeling efforts. Topics include the assembly of empty viral shells, assembly around single-stranded nucleic acids to form viral particles, and assembly around synthetic polymers or charged nanoparticles for nanotechnology or biomedical applications. I present some examples in which modeling efforts have promoted experimental breakthroughs, as well as directions in which the connection between modeling and experiment can be strengthened. PMID:25663722

  5. Viral hepatitis: Indian scenario.

    PubMed

    Satsangi, Sandeep; Chawla, Yogesh K

    2016-07-01

    Viral hepatitis is a cause for major health care burden in India and is now equated as a threat comparable to the "big three" communicable diseases - HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis. Hepatitis A virus and Hepatitis E virus are predominantly enterically transmitted pathogens and are responsible to cause both sporadic infections and epidemics of acute viral hepatitis. Hepatitis B virus and Hepatitis C virus are predominantly spread via parenteral route and are notorious to cause chronic hepatitis which can lead to grave complications including cirrhosis of liver and hepatocellular carcinoma. Around 400 million people all over the world suffer from chronic hepatitis and the Asia-Pacific region constitutes the epicentre of this epidemic. The present article would aim to cover the basic virologic aspects of these viruses and highlight the present scenario of viral hepatitis in India. PMID:27546957

  6. [Viral hepatitis in travellers].

    PubMed

    Abreu, Cândida

    2007-01-01

    Considering the geographical asymmetric distribution of viral hepatitis A, B and E, having a much higher prevalence in the less developed world, travellers from developed countries are exposed to a considerable and often underestimated risk of hepatitis infection. In fact a significant percentage of viral hepatitis occurring in developed countries is travel related. This results from globalization and increased mobility from tourism, international work, humanitarian and religious missions or other travel related activities. Several studies published in Europe and North America shown that more than 50% of reported cases of hepatitis A are travel related. On the other hand frequent outbreaks of hepatitis A and E in specific geographic areas raise the risk of infection in these restricted zones and that should be clearly identified. Selected aspects related with the distribution of hepatitis A, B and E are reviewed, particularly the situation in Portugal according to the published studies, as well as relevant clinical manifestations and differential diagnosis of viral hepatitis. Basic prevention rules considering enteric transmitted hepatitis (hepatitis A and hepatitis E) and parenteral transmitted (hepatitis B) are reviewed as well as hepatitis A and B immunoprophylaxis. Common clinical situations and daily practice "pre travel" advice issues are discussed according to WHO/CDC recommendations and the Portuguese National Vaccination Program. Implications from near future availability of a hepatitis E vaccine, a currently in phase 2 trial, are highlighted. Potential indications for travellers to endemic countries like India, Nepal and some regions of China, where up to 30% of sporadic cases of acute viral hepatitis are caused by hepatitis E virus, are considered. Continued epidemiological surveillance for viral hepatitis is essential to recognize and control possible outbreaks, but also to identify new viral hepatitis agents that may emerge as important global health

  7. Failure of Viral Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug, William S.; Bruinsma, Robijn F.; Michel, Jean-Philippe; Knobler, Charles M.; Ivanovska, Irena L.; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.

    2006-12-01

    We report a combined theoretical and experimental study of the structural failure of viral shells under mechanical stress. We find that discontinuities in the force-indentation curve associated with failure should appear when the so-called Föppl von Kármán (FvK) number exceeds a critical value. A nanoindentation study of a viral shell subject to a soft-mode instability, where the stiffness of the shell decreases with increasing pH, confirms the predicted onset of failure as a function of the FvK number.

  8. Non-viral gene-activated matrices

    PubMed Central

    Tierney, Erica G.; Duffy, Garry P.; Cryan, Sally-Ann; Curtin, Caroline M.; O’Brien, Fergal J.

    2013-01-01

    In the context of producing enhanced therapeutics for regenerative medicine, our laboratory develops gene-activated matrices (GAMs) using non-viral gene therapy (GT) in combination with collagen-based scaffolds engineered specifically for tissue repair. Non-viral vectors have been referred to as a minority pursuit in GT but considering the concerns associated with viral vectors and as transient gene expression is such a key consideration, further research is clearly warranted for tissue engineering (TE) applications. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are well regarded for their capability in bone regeneration but as primary cells, they are difficult to transfect. We have recently optimised the non-viral vector, polyethyleneimine (PEI), to achieve high transfection efficiencies in MSCs. Subsequently, a series of PEI-based GAMs were developed using collagen, collagen-glycosaminoglycan and collagen-nanohydroxyapatite (collagen-nHa) scaffolds whereby transgene expression was detected up to 21 d with the collagen-nHa scaffold providing the most prolonged expression. Moreover, all PEI-based GAMs contained a low plasmid DNA dose of 2 µg which is far below doses often required in previous GAMs. Having successfully developed these GAMs, the ephrinB2 gene has recently been incorporated to produce a novel therapeutic GAM for bone repair. Herein, we discuss our recent investigations in the development and application of non-viral GAMs. PMID:23538777

  9. Viral diseases of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Krogstad, Aric P; Simpson, Janet E; Korte, Scott W

    2005-01-01

    Viral disease in the rabbit is encountered infrequently by the clinical practitioner; however, several viral diseases were reported to occur in this species. Viral diseases that are described in the rabbit primarily may affect the integument, gastrointestinal tract or, central nervous system or maybe multi-systemic in nature. Rabbit viral diseases range from oral papillomatosis, with benign clinical signs, to rabbit hemorrhagic disease and myxomatosis, which may result in significant clinical disease and mortality. The wild rabbit may serve as a reservoir for disease transmission for many of these viral agents. In general, treatment of viral disease in the rabbit is supportive in nature. PMID:15585192

  10. [Host factors and viral factors in hepatitis C treatment].

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Minoru; Enomoto, Nobuyuki

    2015-02-01

    In the interferon-based therapy for hepatitis C, host factors such as age, gender, liver fibrosis and steatosis are important as a therapeutic effect predictor, and viral factors such as HCV genotype, HCV viral load, HCV gene (IL28B, ITPA) are also important. In addition in genotype 1b, ISDR/IRRDR and core amino acid substitution are important. Also in the DAA treatment, viral factors are also important at the view of therapeutic effect and difficulty of acquisition of drug resistance mutation. In addition, the goal of treatment of hepatitis C are suppression of liver fibrosis progression and liver cancer and improvement of quality of life due to this (quality of life: QOL) and life prognosis, it is important to understand the host factors and HCV viral factors. PMID:25764672

  11. WATERBORNE VIRAL GASTROENTERITIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the study of human gastroenteritis, the use of electron microscopy and related techniques has led to the identification of new viral agents which had previously escaped detection by routine cell-culture procedures. Efforts to characterize and further study these agents are cur...

  12. BOVINE VIRAL DIARRHEA VIRUSES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is an umbrella term for two species of viruses, BVDV1 and BVDV2, within the Pestivirus genus of the Flavivirus family. BVDV viruses are further subclassified as cytopathic and noncytopathic based on their activity in cultured epithelial cells. Noncytopathic BVDV p...

  13. BIOMARKERS OF VIRAL EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Viral and protozoan pathogens associated with raw sludge can cause encephalitis, gastroenteritis, hepatitis, myocarditis, and a number of other diseases. Raw sludge that has been treated to reduce these pathogens can be used for land application according to the regulations spec...

  14. Leafhopper viral pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four newly discovered viral pathogens in leafhopper vectors of Pierce’s disease of grapes, have been shown to replicate in sharpshooter leafhoppers; the glassy-winged sharpshooter, GWSS, Homalodisca vitripennis, and Oncometopia nigricans (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae). The viruses were classified as memb...

  15. Transport of viral specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, F B

    1990-01-01

    The diagnosis of viral infections by culture relies on the collection of proper specimens, proper care to protect the virus in the specimens from environmental damage, and use of an adequate transport system to maintain virus activity. Collection of specimens with swabs that are toxic to either virus or cell culture should be avoided. A variety of transport media have been formulated, beginning with early bacteriological transport media. Certain swab-tube combinations have proven to be both effective and convenient. Of the liquid transport media, sucrose-based and broth-based media appear to be the most widely accepted and used. Studies on virus stability show that most viruses tested are sufficiently stable in transport media to withstand a transport time of 1 to 3 days. Some viruses may withstand longer transport times. In many cases, it is not necessary to store virus specimens in a refrigerator or send them to the laboratory on wet ice or frozen on dry ice. However, the specimen should not be exposed to environmental extremes. Modern viral transport media allow for more effective use of viral culture and culture enhancement techniques for the diagnosis of human viral infections. PMID:2187591

  16. Bovine viral diarrhea viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infections with bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) result in significant economic losses for beef and dairy producers worldwide. BVDV is actually an umbrella term for two species of viruses, BVDV1 and BVDV2, within the Pestivirus genus of the Flavivirus family. While denoted as a bovine pathogen...

  17. Integrated Evaluation of Latent Viral Reactivation During Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This application proposes a continuation of our current effort, which has provided the first demonstration of viral reactivation during space flight. We have used the herpesvirus EBV as a model for latent viral reactivation and have shown that increased amounts of EBV DNA were shed by astronauts during space flight. Analysis of the Antarctic space flight analog indicated that the frequency of viral shedding may also increase (along with the increased numbers of virus) during long periods of isolation. However, a number of critical questions remain before the findings may be considered a significant health risk during extended space flight. These include: Are other latent viruses (e.g., other herpesviruses and polyornaviruses) in addition to EBV also reactivated and shed more frequently and/or in higher numbers during space flight? Is the viral reactivation observed in space flight and ground-based analogs mediated through the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis resulting in a decreased cell-mediated immune response? How does detection of viral DNA by PCR analysis correlate with infectious virus? How does the amount of virus found during flight compare with viral levels observed in acute/chronic viral illnesses and in control individuals? This expanded study will examine the phenomenon of viral reactivation from the initiating stress through the HPA axis with the accompanying suppression of the immune system resulting in viral reactivation. This information is essential to determine if latent viral reactivation among crewmembers represents a sufficient medical risk to space travel to require the development of suitable countermeasures.

  18. Viral RNA Silencing Suppression: The Enigma of Bunyavirus NSs Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hedil, Marcio; Kormelink, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae is a family of arboviruses including both plant- and vertebrate-infecting representatives. The Tospovirus genus accommodates plant-infecting bunyaviruses, which not only replicate in their plant host, but also in their insect thrips vector during persistent propagative transmission. For this reason, they are generally assumed to encounter antiviral RNA silencing in plants and insects. Here we present an overview on how tospovirus nonstructural NSs protein counteracts antiviral RNA silencing in plants and what is known so far in insects. Like tospoviruses, members of the related vertebrate-infecting bunyaviruses classified in the genera Orthobunyavirus, Hantavirus and Phlebovirus also code for a NSs protein. However, for none of them RNA silencing suppressor activity has been unambiguously demonstrated in neither vertebrate host nor arthropod vector. The second part of this review will briefly describe the role of these NSs proteins in modulation of innate immune responses in mammals and elaborate on a hypothetical scenario to explain if and how NSs proteins from vertebrate-infecting bunyaviruses affect RNA silencing. If so, why this discovery has been hampered so far. PMID:27455310

  19. Viral RNA Silencing Suppression: The Enigma of Bunyavirus NSs Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hedil, Marcio; Kormelink, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae is a family of arboviruses including both plant- and vertebrate-infecting representatives. The Tospovirus genus accommodates plant-infecting bunyaviruses, which not only replicate in their plant host, but also in their insect thrips vector during persistent propagative transmission. For this reason, they are generally assumed to encounter antiviral RNA silencing in plants and insects. Here we present an overview on how tospovirus nonstructural NSs protein counteracts antiviral RNA silencing in plants and what is known so far in insects. Like tospoviruses, members of the related vertebrate-infecting bunyaviruses classified in the genera Orthobunyavirus, Hantavirus and Phlebovirus also code for a NSs protein. However, for none of them RNA silencing suppressor activity has been unambiguously demonstrated in neither vertebrate host nor arthropod vector. The second part of this review will briefly describe the role of these NSs proteins in modulation of innate immune responses in mammals and elaborate on a hypothetical scenario to explain if and how NSs proteins from vertebrate-infecting bunyaviruses affect RNA silencing. If so, why this discovery has been hampered so far. PMID:27455310

  20. Inflammasome control of viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Lupfer, Christopher; Malik, Ankit; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2015-01-01

    The inflammasome is a caspase-1 containing complex that activates the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 and results in the proinflammatory cell death known as pyroptosis. Numerous recent publications have highlighted the importance of inflammasome activation in the control of virus infection. Inflammasome activation during viral infection is dependent on a variety of upstream receptors including the NOD-Like receptor, RIG-I-Like receptor and AIM2-Like receptor families. Various receptors also function in inflammasome activation in different cellular compartments, including the cytoplasm and the nucleus. The effectiveness of inflammasomes at suppressing virus replication is highlighted by the prevalence and diversity of virus encoded inflammasome inhibitors. Also, the host has a myriad of regulatory mechanisms in place to prevent unwanted inflammasome activation and overt inflammation. Finally, recent reports begin to suggest that inflammasome activation and inflammasome modulation may have important clinical applications. Herein, we highlight recent advances and discuss potential future directions toward understanding the role of inflammasomes during virus infection. PMID:25771504

  1. Viral Membrane Scission

    PubMed Central

    Rossman, Jeremy S.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Virus budding is a complex, multistep process in which viral proteins make specific alterations in membrane curvature. Many different viral proteins can deform the membrane and form a budding virion, but very few can mediate membrane scission to complete the budding process. As a result, enveloped viruses have developed numerous ways of facilitating membrane scission, including hijacking host cellular scission machinery and expressing their own scission proteins. These proteins mediate scission in very different ways, though the biophysical mechanics underlying their actions may be similar. In this review, we explore the mechanisms of membrane scission and the ways in which enveloped viruses use these systems to mediate the release of budding virions. PMID:24099087

  2. Viral membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. PMID:25866377

  3. Viral membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-05-15

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism.

  4. Optimizing Viral Discovery in Bats

    PubMed Central

    Young, Cristin C. W.; Olival, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    Viral discovery studies in bats have increased dramatically over the past decade, yet a rigorous synthesis of the published data is lacking. We extract and analyze data from 93 studies published between 2007–2013 to examine factors that increase success of viral discovery in bats, and specific trends and patterns of infection across host taxa and viral families. Over the study period, 248 novel viruses from 24 viral families have been described. Using generalized linear models, at a study level we show the number of host species and viral families tested best explained number of viruses detected. We demonstrate that prevalence varies significantly across viral family, specimen type, and host taxonomy, and calculate mean PCR prevalence by viral family and specimen type across all studies. Using a logistic model, we additionally identify factors most likely to increase viral detection at an individual level for the entire dataset and by viral families with sufficient sample sizes. Our analysis highlights major taxonomic gaps in recent bat viral discovery efforts and identifies ways to improve future viral pathogen detection through the design of more efficient and targeted sample collection and screening approaches. PMID:26867024

  5. Optimizing Viral Discovery in Bats.

    PubMed

    Young, Cristin C W; Olival, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Viral discovery studies in bats have increased dramatically over the past decade, yet a rigorous synthesis of the published data is lacking. We extract and analyze data from 93 studies published between 2007-2013 to examine factors that increase success of viral discovery in bats, and specific trends and patterns of infection across host taxa and viral families. Over the study period, 248 novel viruses from 24 viral families have been described. Using generalized linear models, at a study level we show the number of host species and viral families tested best explained number of viruses detected. We demonstrate that prevalence varies significantly across viral family, specimen type, and host taxonomy, and calculate mean PCR prevalence by viral family and specimen type across all studies. Using a logistic model, we additionally identify factors most likely to increase viral detection at an individual level for the entire dataset and by viral families with sufficient sample sizes. Our analysis highlights major taxonomic gaps in recent bat viral discovery efforts and identifies ways to improve future viral pathogen detection through the design of more efficient and targeted sample collection and screening approaches. PMID:26867024

  6. ReVOLT: radiation-enhanced viral oncolytic therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Advani, Sunil J.; Mezhir, James J.; Roizman, Bernard; Weichselbaum, Ralph R. . E-mail: rrw@rover.uchicago.edu

    2006-11-01

    Viral oncolytic therapy has been pursued with renewed interest as the molecular basis of carcinogenesis and viral replication has been elucidated. Genetically engineered, attenuated viruses have been rationally constructed to achieve a therapeutic index in tumor cells compared with surrounding normal tissue. Many of these attenuated mutant viruses have entered clinical trials. Here we review the preclinical literature demonstrating the interaction of oncolytic viruses with ionizing radiation and provides a basis for future clinical trials.

  7. Viral evasion of intracellular DNA and RNA sensing.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ying Kai; Gack, Michaela U

    2016-06-01

    The co-evolution of viruses with their hosts has led to the emergence of viral pathogens that are adept at evading or actively suppressing host immunity. Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are key components of antiviral immunity that detect conserved molecular features of viral pathogens and initiate signalling that results in the expression of antiviral genes. In this Review, we discuss the strategies that viruses use to escape immune surveillance by key intracellular sensors of viral RNA or DNA, with a focus on RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs), cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) and interferon-γ (IFNγ)-inducible protein 16 (IFI16). Such viral strategies include the sequestration or modification of viral nucleic acids, interference with specific post-translational modifications of PRRs or their adaptor proteins, the degradation or cleavage of PRRs or their adaptors, and the sequestration or relocalization of PRRs. An understanding of viral immune-evasion mechanisms at the molecular level may guide the development of vaccines and antivirals. PMID:27174148

  8. Virologic suppression among HIV-infected US Air Force members in a highly-structured programme with free access to care.

    PubMed

    Matthews, P E; Le, T; Delmar, J; Okulicz, J F

    2015-11-01

    SummaryThe United States Air Force HIV programme has several features that may enhance antiretroviral therapy outcomes, including free access to healthcare and mandatory clinical visits every six months at a single centre. We evaluated viral load suppression (<50 copies/ml) after 12 months of initial antiretroviral therapy, with extension to 18 and 24 months. Active duty Air Force members were categorised by year of antiretroviral therapy initiation: 2000-2005 (n = 95, 36.1%) and 2006-2011 (n = 168, 63.9%). The median months from HIV diagnosis to initial antiretroviral therapy were shorter in the 2000-2005 group (2.4, IQR 1.2-5.9) compared with the 2006-2011 group (12.6, IQR 2.6-29.0; p < 0.001). Viral load suppression was greater in the 2006-2011 group compared with the 2000-2005 group at 12 months (93.2% versus 78.6%, p = 0.002) and 18 months (91.8% versus 80.3%, p = 0.03), and trended higher at 24 months (90.8% versus 82.5%; p = 0.15). Factors associated with viral load suppression at 12 months in multivariate models included antiretroviral therapy initiation during 2006-2011 (OR 5.22, 95% CI 1.50-18.18) and CD4 count at antiretroviral therapy initiation (OR 2.29, 95% CI 1.19-14.43 per 100 cells/µl increase). Structured programmes that minimise traditional barriers to care combined with the use of contemporary antiretroviral therapy regimens can achieve clinic-wide viral load suppression in >90% of patients. PMID:25505041

  9. Combating emerging viral threats

    PubMed Central

    Bekerman, Elena; Einav, Shirit

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Most approved antiviral therapeutics selectively inhibit proteins encoded by a single virus, thereby providing a “one drug-one bug” solution. As a result of this narrow spectrum of coverage and the high cost of drug development, therapies are currently approved for fewer than ten viruses out of the hundreds known to cause human disease. This perspective summarizes progress and challenges in the development of broad-spectrum antiviral therapies. These strategies include targeting enzymatic functions shared by multiple viruses and host cell machinery by newly discovered compounds or by repurposing approved drugs. These approaches offer new practical means for developing therapeutics against existing and emerging viral threats. PMID:25883340

  10. Equine viral arteritis.

    PubMed

    Balasuriya, Udeni B R

    2014-12-01

    Equine arteritis virus (EAV), the causative agent of equine viral arteritis (EVA), is a respiratory and reproductive disease that occurs throughout the world. EAV infection is highly species-specific and exclusively limited to members of the family Equidae, which includes horses, donkeys, mules, and zebras. EVA is an economically important disease and outbreaks could cause significant losses to the equine industry. The primary objective of this article is to summarize current understanding of EVA, specifically the disease, pathogenesis, epidemiology, host immune response, vaccination and treatment strategies, prevention and control measures, and future directions. PMID:25441113

  11. Viral surveillance and discovery

    PubMed Central

    Lipkin, Walter Ian; Firth, Cadhla

    2014-01-01

    The field of virus discovery has burgeoned with the advent of high throughput sequencing platforms and bioinformatics programs that enable rapid identification and molecular characterization of known and novel agents, investments in global microbial surveillance that include wildlife and domestic animals as well as humans, and recognition that viruses may be implicated in chronic as well as acute diseases. Here we review methods for viral surveillance and discovery, strategies and pitfalls in linking discoveries to disease, and identify opportunities for improvements in sequencing instrumentation and analysis, the use of social media and medical informatics that will further advance clinical medicine and public health. PMID:23602435

  12. Complement and Viral Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stoermer, Kristina A.; Morrison, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    The complement system functions as an immune surveillance system that rapidly responds to infection. Activation of the complement system by specific recognition pathways triggers a protease cascade, generating cleavage products that function to eliminate pathogens, regulate inflammatory responses, and shape adaptive immune responses. However, when dysregulated, these powerful functions can become destructive and the complement system has been implicated as a pathogenic effector in numerous diseases, including infectious diseases. This review highlights recent discoveries that have identified critical roles for the complement system in the pathogenesis of viral infection. PMID:21292294

  13. Viral infections of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Peter J; Donnelly, Thomas M

    2013-05-01

    Viral diseases of rabbits have been used historically to study oncogenesis (e.g. rabbit fibroma virus, cottontail rabbit papillomavirus) and biologically to control feral rabbit populations (e.g. myxoma virus). However, clinicians seeing pet rabbits in North America infrequently encounter viral diseases although myxomatosis may be seen occasionally. The situation is different in Europe and Australia, where myxomatosis and rabbit hemorrhagic disease are endemic. Advances in epidemiology and virology have led to detection of other lapine viruses that are now recognized as agents of emerging infectious diseases. Rabbit caliciviruses, related to rabbit hemorrhagic disease, are generally avirulent, but lethal variants are being identified in Europe and North America. Enteric viruses including lapine rotavirus, rabbit enteric coronavirus and rabbit astrovirus are being acknowledged as contributors to the multifactorial enteritis complex of juvenile rabbits. Three avirulent leporid herpesviruses are found in domestic rabbits. A fourth highly pathogenic virus designated leporid herpesvirus 4 has been described in Canada and Alaska. This review considers viruses affecting rabbits by their clinical significance. Viruses of major and minor clinical significance are described, and viruses of laboratory significance are mentioned. PMID:23642871

  14. [Emergent viral infections].

    PubMed

    Galama, J M

    2001-03-31

    The emergence and re-emergence of viral infections is an ongoing process. Large-scale vaccination programmes led to the eradication or control of some viral infections in the last century, but new viruses are always emerging. Increased travel is leading to a rise in the importation of exotic infections such as dengue and hepatitis E, but also of hepatitis A, which is no longer endemic. Apart from import diseases new viruses have appeared (Nipah-virus and transfusion-transmitted virus). Existing viruses may suddenly cause more severe diseases, e.g. infection by enterovirus 71. The distribution area of a virus may change, e.g. in case of West Nile virus, an Egyptian encephalitis virus that appears to have established itself in the USA. Furthermore, there is no such thing as a completely new virus; it is always an existing virus that has adapted itself to another host or that was already present in humans but has only recently been discovered. A number of factors facilitate the emergence of new infectious diseases. These include intensive animal husbandry and the transport of animals. The unexpected appearance of West Nile virus in the western hemisphere was possibly due to animal transportation. PMID:11305210

  15. Human viral gastroenteritis.

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, M L

    1989-01-01

    During the last 15 years, several different groups of fastidious viruses that are responsible for a large proportion of acute viral gastroenteritis cases have been discovered by the electron microscopic examination of stool specimens. This disease is one of the most prevalent and serious clinical syndromes seen around the world, especially in children. Rotaviruses, in the family Reoviridae, and fastidious fecal adenoviruses account for much of the viral gastroenteritis in infants and young children, whereas the small caliciviruses and unclassified astroviruses, and possibly enteric coronaviruses, are responsible for significantly fewer cases overall. In addition to electron microscopy, enzyme immunoassays and other rapid antigen detection systems have been developed to detect rotaviruses and fastidious fecal adenoviruses in the stool specimens of both nonhospitalized patients and those hospitalized for dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. Experimental rotavirus vaccines have also been developed, due to the prevalence and seriousness of rotavirus infection. The small, unclassified Norwalk virus and morphologically similar viruses are responsible for large and small outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis in older children, adolescents, and adults. Hospitalization of older patients infected with these viruses is usually not required, and their laboratory diagnoses have been limited primarily to research laboratories. Images PMID:2644024

  16. Viral noncoding RNAs: more surprises

    PubMed Central

    Tycowski, Kazimierz T.; Guo, Yang Eric; Lee, Nara; Moss, Walter N.; Vallery, Tenaya K.; Xie, Mingyi

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells produce several classes of long and small noncoding RNA (ncRNA). Many DNA and RNA viruses synthesize their own ncRNAs. Like their host counterparts, viral ncRNAs associate with proteins that are essential for their stability, function, or both. Diverse biological roles—including the regulation of viral replication, viral persistence, host immune evasion, and cellular transformation—have been ascribed to viral ncRNAs. In this review, we focus on the multitude of functions played by ncRNAs produced by animal viruses. We also discuss their biogenesis and mechanisms of action. PMID:25792595

  17. Struggle for Space: Viral Extinction through Competition for Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuesta, José A.; Aguirre, Jacobo; Capitán, José A.; Manrubia, Susanna C.

    2011-01-01

    The design of protocols to suppress the propagation of viral infections is an enduring enterprise, especially hindered by limited knowledge of the mechanisms leading to viral extinction. Here we report on infection extinction due to intraspecific competition to infect susceptible hosts. Beneficial mutations increase the production of viral progeny, while the host cell may develop defenses against infection. For an unlimited number of host cells, a feedback runaway coevolution between host resistance and progeny production occurs. However, physical space limits the advantage that the virus obtains from increasing offspring numbers; thus, infection clearance may result from an increase in host defenses beyond a finite threshold. Our results might be relevant to devise improved control strategies in environments with mobility constraints or different geometrical properties.

  18. Emmprin and KSHV: new partners in viral cancer pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Lu; Bai, Lihua; Lu, Ying; Xu, Zengguang; Reiss, Krys; Valle, Luis Del; Kaleeba, Johnan; Toole, Bryan P.; Parsons, Chris; Qin, Zhiqiang

    2013-01-01

    Emmprin (CD147; basigin) is a multifunctional glycoprotein expressed at higher levels by cancer cells and stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment. Through direct effects within tumor cells and promotion of tumor-stroma interactions, emmprin participates in induction of tumor cell invasiveness, angiogenesis, metastasis and chemoresistance. Although its contribution to cancer progression has been widely studied, the role of emmprin in viral oncogenesis still remains largely unclear, and only a small body of available literature implicates emmprin-associated mechanisms in viral pathogenesis and tumorigenesis. We summarize these data in this review, focusing on the role of emmprin in pathogenesis associated with the Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), a common etiology for cancers arising in the setting of immune suppression. We also discuss future directions for mechanistic studies exploring roles for emmprin in viral cancer pathogenesis. PMID:23743354

  19. Rapid Seeding of the Viral Reservoir Prior to SIV Viremia in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, James B.; Hill, Alison L.; Sanisetty, Srisowmya; Penaloza-MacMaster, Pablo; Liu, Jinyan; Shetty, Mayuri; Parenteau, Lily; Cabral, Crystal; Shields, Jennifer; Blackmore, Stephen; Smith, Jeffrey Y.; Brinkman, Amanda L.; Peter, Lauren E.; Mathew, Sheeba I.; Smith, Kaitlin M.; Borducchi, Erica N.; Rosenbloom, Daniel I.S.; Lewis, Mark G.; Hattersley, Jillian; Li, Bei; Hesselgesser, Joseph; Geleziunas, Romas; Robb, Merlin L.; Kim, Jerome H.; Michael, Nelson L.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-01-01

    The viral reservoir represents a critical challenge facing HIV-1 eradication strategies1–5. However, it remains unclear when and where the viral reservoir is seeded during acute infection and the extent to which it is susceptible to early antiretroviral therapy (ART). Here we show that the viral reservoir is seeded very early following mucosal SIV infection of rhesus monkeys and prior to systemic viremia. We initiated suppressive ART in groups of monkeys on days 3, 7, 10, and 14 following intrarectal SIVmac251 infection. Treatment on day 3 blocked the emergence of viral RNA and proviral DNA in peripheral blood and also substantially reduced levels of proviral DNA in lymph nodes and gastrointestinal mucosa as compared with treatment at later timepoints. In addition, treatment on day 3 abrogated the induction of SIV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses. Nevertheless, following discontinuation of ART after 24 weeks of fully suppressive therapy, virus rebounded in all animals, although animals treated on day 3 exhibited a delayed viral rebound as compared with animals treated on days 7, 10 and 14. The time to viral rebound correlated with total viremia during acute infection and with proviral DNA at the time of ART discontinuation. These data demonstrate that the viral reservoir is seeded very early following intrarectal SIV infection of rhesus monkeys, during the “eclipse” phase, and prior to viremia. This strikingly early seeding of the refractory viral reservoir raises important new challenges for HIV-1 eradication strategies. PMID:25042999

  20. Harnessing RNA interference for the treatment of viral infections.

    PubMed

    Arbuthnot, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Exploiting the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway to inhibit viral gene expression has become an active field of research. The approach has potential for therapeutic application and several viruses are susceptible to RNAi-mediated knockdown. Differences in the characteristics of individual viruses require that viral gene silencing be tailored to specific infections. Important considerations are viral tissue tropism, acute or chronic nature of the infection and the efficiency with which antiviral sequences can be delivered to affected tissue. Both synthetic short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and expressed RNAi activators are being developed for viral therapy. The sustained silencing of expressed antiviral sequences is useful for countering chronic viral infection. siRNAs, which may be chemically modified to improve specificity and stability, are being developed for knockdown of viruses that cause acute or chronic infections. Preventing viral escape from silencing is important and overcoming this problem using combinatorial RNAi or through silencing of host dependency factors is promising. Although improving delivery efficiency and limiting off-target effects remain obstacles, rapid progress continues to be made in the field and it is likely that the goal of achieving licensed RNAi-based viral therapies will soon be realized. PMID:20697601

  1. Nuclear targeting of viral and non-viral DNA.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, E H

    2009-07-01

    The nuclear envelope presents a major barrier to transgene delivery and expression using a non-viral vector. Virus is capable of overcoming the barrier to deliver their genetic materials efficiently into the nucleus by virtue of the specialized protein components with the unique amino acid sequences recognizing cellular nuclear transport machinery. However, considering the safety issues in the clinical gene therapy for treating critical human diseases, non-viral systems are highly promising compared with their viral counterparts. This review summarizes the progress on exploring the nuclear traffic mechanisms for the prominent viral vectors and the technological innovations for the nuclear delivery of non-viral DNA by mimicking those natural processes evolved for the viruses as well as for many cellular proteins. PMID:19552613

  2. Suppression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 activity in vitro by oligonucleotides which form intramolecular tetrads.

    PubMed

    Rando, R F; Ojwang, J; Elbaggari, A; Reyes, G R; Tinder, R; McGrath, M S; Hogan, M E

    1995-01-27

    An oligonucleotide (I100-15) composed of only deoxyguanosine and thymidine was able to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) in culture assay systems. I100-15 did not block virus entry into cells but did reduce viral-specific transcripts. As assessed by NMR and polyacrylamide gel methods, I100-15 appears to form a structure in which two stacked guanosine tetrads are connected by three two-base long loops. Structure/activity experiments indicated that formation of intramolecular guanosine tetrads was necessary to achieve maximum antiviral activity. The single deoxyguanosine nucleotide present in each loop was found to be extremely important for the overall antiviral activity. The toxicity of I100-15 was determined to be well above the 50% effective dose (ED50) in culture which yielded a high therapeutic index (> 100). The addition of a cholesterol moiety to the 3' terminus of I100-15 (I100-23) reduced the ED50 value to less than 50 nM (from 0.12 microM for I100-15) and increased the duration of viral suppression to greater than 21 days (versus 7-10 days for I100-15) after removal of the drug from infected cell cultures. The favorable therapeutic index of such molecules coupled with the prolonged suppression of HIV-1, suggest that such compounds further warrant investigation as potential therapeutic agents. PMID:7829511

  3. [Update chronic viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Ziegenhagen, D J

    2016-03-01

    More than 500,000 people in Germany have chronic viral hepatitis. The interferon-based treatments formerly used in hepatitis B have been widely replaced by life-long oral medication with nucleoside or nucleotide analogues. Treatment for chronic hepatitis C has been improved substantially by the development of new and very expensive drug combinations. Up to 90% of patients can now be cured with certainty, and one to two years after successful treatment there is no relevant risk of recurrence. These individuals expect to receive insurance cover under appropriate conditions. Vaccination programmes are very efficient at decreasing the incidence of hepatitis B, but no vaccine against hepatitis C is likely to become available in the next decade. PMID:27111951

  4. Dengue viral infections

    PubMed Central

    Malavige, G; Fernando, S; Fernando, D; Seneviratne, S

    2004-01-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito borne diseases in the world. They may be asymptomatic or may give rise to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), or dengue shock syndrome. Annually, 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of DHF occur worldwide. Ninety percent of DHF subjects are children less than 15 years of age. At present, dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. No vaccine is available for preventing this disease. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate treatment are vital if disease related morbidity and mortality are to be limited. This review outlines aspects of the epidemiology of dengue infections, the dengue virus and its mosquito vector, clinical features and pathogenesis of dengue infections, and the management and control of these infections. PMID:15466994

  5. Viral Quasispecies Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Sheldon, Julie; Perales, Celia

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Evolution of RNA viruses occurs through disequilibria of collections of closely related mutant spectra or mutant clouds termed viral quasispecies. Here we review the origin of the quasispecies concept and some biological implications of quasispecies dynamics. Two main aspects are addressed: (i) mutant clouds as reservoirs of phenotypic variants for virus adaptability and (ii) the internal interactions that are established within mutant spectra that render a virus ensemble the unit of selection. The understanding of viruses as quasispecies has led to new antiviral designs, such as lethal mutagenesis, whose aim is to drive viruses toward low fitness values with limited chances of fitness recovery. The impact of quasispecies for three salient human pathogens, human immunodeficiency virus and the hepatitis B and C viruses, is reviewed, with emphasis on antiviral treatment strategies. Finally, extensions of quasispecies to nonviral systems are briefly mentioned to emphasize the broad applicability of quasispecies theory. PMID:22688811

  6. Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Racsa, Lori D; Kraft, Colleen S; Olinger, Gene G; Hensley, Lisa E

    2016-01-15

    There are 4 families of viruses that cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF), including Filoviridae. Ebola virus is one virus within the family Filoviridae and the cause of the current outbreak of VHF in West Africa. VHF-endemic areas are found throughout the world, yet traditional diagnosis of VHF has been performed in large reference laboratories centered in Europe and the United States. The large amount of capital needed, as well as highly trained and skilled personnel, has limited the availability of diagnostics in endemic areas except in conjunction with governmental and nongovernmental entities. However, rapid diagnosis of VHF is essential to efforts that will limit outbreaks. In addition, increased global travel suggests VHF diagnoses may be made outside of the endemic areas. Thus, understanding how to diagnose VHF is imperative for laboratories worldwide. This article reviews traditional and current diagnostic modalities for VHF. PMID:26354968

  7. Achieving NHAS 90/90/80 Objectives by 2020: An Interactive Tool Modeling Local HIV Prevalence Projections

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Scott D.; Wortley, Pascale M.; Drenzek, Cherie L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Tools using local HIV data to help jurisdictions estimate future demand for medical and support services are needed. We present an interactive prevalence projection model using data obtainable from jurisdictional HIV surveillance and publically available data. Methods Using viral load data from Georgia’s enhanced HIV/AIDS Reporting System, state level death rates for people living with HIV and the general population, and published estimates for HIV transmission rates, we developed a model for projecting future HIV prevalence. Keeping death rates and HIV transmission rates for undiagnosed, in care/viral load >200, in care/viral load<200, and out of care (no viral load for 12 months) constant, we describe results from simulations with varying inputs projecting HIV incidence and prevalence from 2014 to 2024. Results In this model, maintaining Georgia’s 2014 rates for diagnosis, transitions in care, viral suppression (VS), and mortality by sub-group through 2020, resulted in 85% diagnosed, 59% in care, and 44% VS among diagnosed (85%/58%/44%) with a total of 67 815 PLWH, 33 953 in care, and more than 1000 new cases per year by 2020. Neither doubling the diagnosis rate nor tripling rates of re-engaging out of care PLWH into care alone were adequate to reach 90/90/80 by 2020. We demonstrate a multicomponent scenario that achieved NHAS goals and resulted in 63 989 PLWH, 57 546 in care, and continued annual prevalence increase through 2024. Conclusions Jurisdictions can use this HIV prevalence prediction tool, accessible at https://dph.georgia.gov/hiv-prevalence-projections to assess local capacity to meet future HIV care and social services needs. In this model, achieving 90/90/80 by 2020 in Georgia slowed but did not reverse increases in HIV prevalence, and the number of HIV-infected persons needing care and support services more than doubled. Improving the HIV care infrastructure is imperative. PMID:27459717

  8. Impact of tumor microenvironment on oncolytic viral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wojton, Jeffrey; Kaur, Balveen

    2010-01-01

    Interactions between tumor cells and their microenvironment have been shown to play a very significant role in the initiation, progression, and invasiveness of cancer. These tumor-stromal interactions are capable of altering the delivery and effectiveness of therapeutics into the tumor and are also known to influence future resistance and re-growth after treatment. Here we review recent advances in the understanding of the tumor microenvironment and its response to oncolytic viral therapy. The multifaceted environmental response to viral therapy can influence viral infection, replication, and propagation within the tumor. Recent studies have unveiled the complicated temporal changes in the tumor vasculature post OV treatment, and their impact on tumor biology. Similarly, the secreted extracellular matrix in solid tumors can affect both infection and spread of the therapeutic virus. Together, these complex changes in the tumor microenvironment also modulate the activation of the innate antiviral host immune response, leading to quick and efficient viral clearance. In order to combat these detrimental responses, viruses have been combined with pharmacological adjuvants and “armed” with therapeutic genes in order to suppress the pernicious environmental conditions following therapy. In this review we will discuss the impact of the tumor environment on viral therapy and examine some of the recent literature investigating methods of modulating this environment to enhance oncolysis. PMID:20399700

  9. Natural Killer Cells in Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rehermann, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are traditionally regarded as first-line effectors of the innate immune response, but they also have a distinct role in chronic infection. Here, we review the role of NK cells against hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV), two agents that cause acute and chronic hepatitis in humans. Interest in NK cells was initially sparked by genetic studies that demonstrated an association between NK cell–related genes and the outcome of HCV infection. Viral hepatitis also provides a model to study the NK cell response to both endogenous and exogenous type I interferon (IFN). Levels of IFN-stimulated genes increase in both acute and chronic HCV infection and pegylated IFNα has been the mainstay of HCV and HBV treatment for decades. In chronic viral hepatitis, NK cells display decreased production of antiviral cytokines. This phenotype is found in both HCV and HBV infection but is induced by different mechanisms. Potent antivirals now provide the opportunity to study the reversibility of the suppressed cytokine production of NK cells in comparison with the antigen-induced defect in IFNγ and tumor necrosis factor-α production of virus-specific T cells. This has implications for immune reconstitution in other conditions of chronic inflammation and immune exhaustion, such as human immunodeficiency virus infection and cancer. PMID:26682281

  10. Viral Hepatitis: A through E and Beyond

    MedlinePlus

    Viral Hepatitis: A through E and Beyond NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse What is viral hepatitis? Viral hepatitis is inflammation of the liver caused ...

  11. Regulatory T cells control diabetes without compromising acute anti-viral defense☆

    PubMed Central

    Sachithanantham, Sowbarnika; Dave, Amy; Rodriguez-Calvo, Teresa; Miller, Jacqueline; von Herrath, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    While previous reports have demonstrated the efficacy of regulatory T cell therapy in the prevention of diabetes, systemic immunocompromise and Treg instability remain key safety concerns. Here we examined the influence of induced Treg (iTreg) cell therapy on anti-viral host defense and autoimmune T cell responses during acute viral infection in a murine model of autoimmune diabetes. Protective transfers of iTregs maintained IL-10 expression, and expanded in vivo and controlled diabetes, despite losing FoxP3 expression. Adoptive transfer of iTregs affected neither the primary anti-viral CD8 T cell response nor viral clearance, although a significant and sustained suppression of CD4 T cell responses was observed. Following acute viral clearance, iTregs transferred early suppressed both CD4 and CD8 T cell responses, which resulted in the reversion of diabetes. These observations indicate that iTregs suppress local autoimmune processes while preserving the immunocompetent host's ability to combat acute viral infection. PMID:24858581

  12. MicroRNAs encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus regulate viral life cycle.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chih-Chung; Li, Zhonghan; Chu, Chia-Ying; Feng, Jiaying; Feng, Jun; Sun, Ren; Rana, Tariq M

    2010-10-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is linked with Kaposi's sarcoma and lymphomas. The pathogenesis of KSHV depends on the balance between two phases of the viral cycle: latency and lytic replication. In this study, we report that KSHV-encoded microRNAs (miRNAs) function as regulators by maintaining viral latency and inhibiting viral lytic replication. MiRNAs are short, noncoding, small RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate the expression of messenger RNAs. Of the 12 viral miRNAs expressed in latent KSHV-infected cells, we observed that expression of miR-K3 can suppress both viral lytic replication and gene expression. Further experiments indicate that miR-K3 can regulate viral latency by targeting nuclear factor I/B. Nuclear factor I/B can activate the promoter of the viral immediate-early transactivator replication and transcription activator (RTA), and depletion of nuclear factor I/B by short hairpin RNAs had similar effects on the viral life cycle to those of miR-K3. Our results suggest a role for KSHV miRNAs in regulating the viral life cycle. PMID:20847741

  13. Viral infection, inflammation and schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Kneeland, Rachel E.; Fatemi, S. Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder with genetic and environmental etiologies. Prenatal viral/bacterial infections and inflammation play major roles in the genesis of schizophrenia. In this review, we describe a viral model of schizophrenia tested in mice whereby the offspring of mice prenatally infected with influenza at E7, E9, E16, and E18 show significant gene, protein, and brain structural abnormalities postnatally. Similarly, we describe data on rodents exposed to bacterial infection or injected with a synthetic viral mimic (PolyI:C) also demonstrating brain structural and behavioral abnormalities. Moreover, human serologic data has been indispensible in supporting the viral theory of schizophrenia. Individuals born seropositive for bacterial and viral agents are at a significantly elevated risk of developing schizophrenia. While the specific mechanisms of prenatal viral/bacterial infections and brain disorder are unclear, recent findings suggest that the maternal inflammatory response may be associated with fetal brain injury. Preventive and therapeutic treatment options are also proposed. This review presents data related to epidemiology, human serology, and experimental animal models which support the viral model of schizophrenia. PMID:22349576

  14. Insulated Foamy Viral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Browning, Diana L; Collins, Casey P; Hocum, Jonah D; Leap, David J; Rae, Dustin T; Trobridge, Grant D

    2016-03-01

    Retroviral vector-mediated gene therapy is promising, but genotoxicity has limited its use in the clinic. Genotoxicity is highly dependent on the retroviral vector used, and foamy viral (FV) vectors appear relatively safe. However, internal promoters may still potentially activate nearby genes. We developed insulated FV vectors, using four previously described insulators: a version of the well-studied chicken hypersensitivity site 4 insulator (650cHS4), two synthetic CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)-based insulators, and an insulator based on the CCAAT box-binding transcription factor/nuclear factor I (7xCTF/NF1). We directly compared these insulators for enhancer-blocking activity, effect on FV vector titer, and fidelity of transfer to both proviral long terminal repeats. The synthetic CTCF-based insulators had the strongest insulating activity, but reduced titers significantly. The 7xCTF/NF1 insulator did not reduce titers but had weak insulating activity. The 650cHS4-insulated FV vector was identified as the overall most promising vector. Uninsulated and 650cHS4-insulated FV vectors were both significantly less genotoxic than gammaretroviral vectors. Integration sites were evaluated in cord blood CD34(+) cells and the 650cHS4-insulated FV vector had fewer hotspots compared with an uninsulated FV vector. These data suggest that insulated FV vectors are promising for hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy. PMID:26715244

  15. DENGUE VIRAL INFECTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Gurugama, Padmalal; Garg, Pankaj; Perera, Jennifer; Wijewickrama, Ananda; Seneviratne, Suranjith L

    2010-01-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito-borne diseases in the world. Presently dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. It has been estimated that almost 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) occur worldwide. An increasing proportion of DHF is in children less than 15 years of age, especially in South East and South Asia. The unique structure of the dengue virus and the pathophysiologic responses of the host, different serotypes, and favorable conditions for vector breeding have led to the virulence and spread of the infections. The manifestations of dengue infections are protean from being asymptomatic to undifferentiated fever, severe dengue infections, and unusual complications. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate supportive treatment are often delayed resulting in unnecessarily high morbidity and mortality. Attempts are underway for the development of a vaccine for preventing the burden of this neglected disease. This review outlines the epidemiology, clinical features, pathophysiologic mechanisms, management, and control of dengue infections. PMID:20418983

  16. Background suppression in MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Jeffery L.; Beck, Larry W.; Ferguson, David B.; Haw, James F.

    Pulse sequences for suppressing background signals from spinning modules used in magic-angle spinning NMR are described. These pulse sequences are based on spatially selective composite 90° pulses originally reported by Bax, which provide for no net excitation of spins outside the homogeneous region of the coil. We have achieved essentially complete suppression of background signals originating from our Vespel spinning module (which uses a free-standing coil) in both 1H and 13C spectra without notable loss in signal intensity. Successful modification of both Bloch decay and cross-polarization pulse sequences to include spatially selective pulses was essential to acquire background-free spectra for weak samples. Background suppression was also found to be particularly valuable for both T1 and T1 ϱ, relaxation measurements.

  17. Constrained evolvability of interferon suppression in an RNA virus.

    PubMed

    Garijo, Raquel; Cuevas, José M; Briz, Álvaro; Sanjuán, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Innate immunity responses controlled by interferon (IFN) are believed to constitute a major selective pressure shaping viral evolution. Viruses encode a variety of IFN suppressors, but these are often multifunctional proteins that also play essential roles in other steps of the viral infection cycle, possibly limiting their evolvability. Here, we experimentally evolved a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) mutant carrying a defect in the matrix protein (M∆51) that abolishes IFN suppression and that has been previously used in the context of oncolytic virotherapy. Serial transfers of this virus in normal, IFN-secreting cells led to a modest recovery of IFN blocking capacity and to weak increases in viral fitness. Full-genome ultra-deep sequencing and phenotypic analysis of population variants revealed that the anti-IFN function of the matrix protein was not restored, and that the Mdelta51 defect was instead compensated by changes in the viral phosphoprotein. We also show that adaptation to IFN-secreting cells can be driven by the selection of fast-growing viruses with no IFN suppression capacity, and that these population variants can be trans-complemented by other, IFN-suppressing variants. Our results thus suggest that virus-virus interactions and alternative strategies of innate immunity evasion can determine the evolution of IFN suppression in a virus. PMID:27098004

  18. Constrained evolvability of interferon suppression in an RNA virus

    PubMed Central

    Garijo, Raquel; Cuevas, José M.; Briz, Álvaro; Sanjuán, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Innate immunity responses controlled by interferon (IFN) are believed to constitute a major selective pressure shaping viral evolution. Viruses encode a variety of IFN suppressors, but these are often multifunctional proteins that also play essential roles in other steps of the viral infection cycle, possibly limiting their evolvability. Here, we experimentally evolved a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) mutant carrying a defect in the matrix protein (M∆51) that abolishes IFN suppression and that has been previously used in the context of oncolytic virotherapy. Serial transfers of this virus in normal, IFN-secreting cells led to a modest recovery of IFN blocking capacity and to weak increases in viral fitness. Full-genome ultra-deep sequencing and phenotypic analysis of population variants revealed that the anti-IFN function of the matrix protein was not restored, and that the Mdelta51 defect was instead compensated by changes in the viral phosphoprotein. We also show that adaptation to IFN-secreting cells can be driven by the selection of fast-growing viruses with no IFN suppression capacity, and that these population variants can be trans-complemented by other, IFN-suppressing variants. Our results thus suggest that virus-virus interactions and alternative strategies of innate immunity evasion can determine the evolution of IFN suppression in a virus. PMID:27098004

  19. Statistical Mechanics of Viral Entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yaojun; Dudko, Olga K.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses that have lipid-membrane envelopes infect cells by fusing with the cell membrane to release viral genes. Membrane fusion is known to be hindered by high kinetic barriers associated with drastic structural rearrangements—yet viral infection, which occurs by fusion, proceeds on remarkably short time scales. Here, we present a quantitative framework that captures the principles behind the invasion strategy shared by all enveloped viruses. The key to this strategy—ligand-triggered conformational changes in the viral proteins that pull the membranes together—is treated as a set of concurrent, bias field-induced activated rate processes. The framework results in analytical solutions for experimentally measurable characteristics of virus-cell fusion and enables us to express the efficiency of the viral strategy in quantitative terms. The predictive value of the theory is validated through simulations and illustrated through recent experimental data on influenza virus infection.

  20. Neuroanatomy goes viral!

    PubMed

    Nassi, Jonathan J; Cepko, Constance L; Born, Richard T; Beier, Kevin T

    2015-01-01

    The nervous system is complex not simply because of the enormous number of neurons it contains but by virtue of the specificity with which they are connected. Unraveling this specificity is the task of neuroanatomy. In this endeavor, neuroanatomists have traditionally exploited an impressive array of tools ranging from the Golgi method to electron microscopy. An ideal method for studying anatomy would label neurons that are interconnected, and, in addition, allow expression of foreign genes in these neurons. Fortuitously, nature has already partially developed such a method in the form of neurotropic viruses, which have evolved to deliver their genetic material between synaptically connected neurons while largely eluding glia and the immune system. While these characteristics make some of these viruses a threat to human health, simple modifications allow them to be used in controlled experimental settings, thus enabling neuroanatomists to trace multi-synaptic connections within and across brain regions. Wild-type neurotropic viruses, such as rabies and alpha-herpes virus, have already contributed greatly to our understanding of brain connectivity, and modern molecular techniques have enabled the construction of recombinant forms of these and other viruses. These newly engineered reagents are particularly useful, as they can target genetically defined populations of neurons, spread only one synapse to either inputs or outputs, and carry instructions by which the targeted neurons can be made to express exogenous proteins, such as calcium sensors or light-sensitive ion channels, that can be used to study neuronal function. In this review, we address these uniquely powerful features of the viruses already in the neuroanatomist's toolbox, as well as the aspects of their biology that currently limit their utility. Based on the latter, we consider strategies for improving viral tracing methods by reducing toxicity, improving control of transsynaptic spread, and extending

  1. Neuroanatomy goes viral!

    PubMed Central

    Nassi, Jonathan J.; Cepko, Constance L.; Born, Richard T.; Beier, Kevin T.

    2015-01-01

    The nervous system is complex not simply because of the enormous number of neurons it contains but by virtue of the specificity with which they are connected. Unraveling this specificity is the task of neuroanatomy. In this endeavor, neuroanatomists have traditionally exploited an impressive array of tools ranging from the Golgi method to electron microscopy. An ideal method for studying anatomy would label neurons that are interconnected, and, in addition, allow expression of foreign genes in these neurons. Fortuitously, nature has already partially developed such a method in the form of neurotropic viruses, which have evolved to deliver their genetic material between synaptically connected neurons while largely eluding glia and the immune system. While these characteristics make some of these viruses a threat to human health, simple modifications allow them to be used in controlled experimental settings, thus enabling neuroanatomists to trace multi-synaptic connections within and across brain regions. Wild-type neurotropic viruses, such as rabies and alpha-herpes virus, have already contributed greatly to our understanding of brain connectivity, and modern molecular techniques have enabled the construction of recombinant forms of these and other viruses. These newly engineered reagents are particularly useful, as they can target genetically defined populations of neurons, spread only one synapse to either inputs or outputs, and carry instructions by which the targeted neurons can be made to express exogenous proteins, such as calcium sensors or light-sensitive ion channels, that can be used to study neuronal function. In this review, we address these uniquely powerful features of the viruses already in the neuroanatomist’s toolbox, as well as the aspects of their biology that currently limit their utility. Based on the latter, we consider strategies for improving viral tracing methods by reducing toxicity, improving control of transsynaptic spread, and

  2. Perihepatic lymphadenopathy in children with chronic viral hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber-Dietrich, Dagmar; Pohl, Margret; Cui, Xin-Wu; Braden, Barbara; Chiorean, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess whether lymph node enlargement in the hepatoduodenal ligament occurs in children with chronic viral hepatitis B and C in comparison to healthy controls. Subject and methods In 49 patients with chronic viral hepatitis (38 with chronic hepatitis B, 11 with chronic hepatitis C, 31 male, 18 female; age range 1 to 17 years), and in 51 healthy controls (25 male, 26 female; age range 4 to 16 years), the total perihepatic lymph node volume was assessed using transabdominal ultrasonography as previously described in adult patients. Results Adequate visualization of the liver hilum was achieved in 46/49 (94%) pediatric patients with chronic viral hepatitis and in 46/51 (90%) pediatric healthy controls. In patients with adequate liver hilum visualization, enlarged perihepatic lymph nodes (longitudinal diameter >14 mm) were detected in 32/46 (70%) patients with chronic viral hepatitis and in 5/46 (11%) healthy controls. The total perihepatic lymph nodes volume [mean ± SD] was 1.0 ± 1.2 mL (0.1–5.4 mL) in patients with chronic viral hepatitis and 0.1 ± 0.1 mL (0.0–0.4 mL) in healthy controls (p < 0.05). A maximal lymph node diameter >14 mm identified patients with chronic viral hepatitis with 70% sensitivity and 89% specificity. Conclusion Transabdominal ultrasound can detect lymph nodes within the hepatoduodenal ligament not only in adults but also in children. Paediatric patients with chronic viral hepatitis have significantly enlarged perihepatic lymph nodes compared to controls. Therefore, sonographic assessment of perihepatic lymphadenopathy might be a non-invasive diagnostic tool to screen paediatric patients for chronic viral hepatitis. PMID:26676184

  3. Viral RNAs Are Unusually Compact

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Ajaykumar; Egecioglu, Defne E.; Yoffe, Aron M.; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; Rao, Ayala L. N.; Knobler, Charles M.; Gelbart, William M.

    2014-01-01

    A majority of viruses are composed of long single-stranded genomic RNA molecules encapsulated by protein shells with diameters of just a few tens of nanometers. We examine the extent to which these viral RNAs have evolved to be physically compact molecules to facilitate encapsulation. Measurements of equal-length viral, non-viral, coding and non-coding RNAs show viral RNAs to have among the smallest sizes in solution, i.e., the highest gel-electrophoretic mobilities and the smallest hydrodynamic radii. Using graph-theoretical analyses we demonstrate that their sizes correlate with the compactness of branching patterns in predicted secondary structure ensembles. The density of branching is determined by the number and relative positions of 3-helix junctions, and is highly sensitive to the presence of rare higher-order junctions with 4 or more helices. Compact branching arises from a preponderance of base pairing between nucleotides close to each other in the primary sequence. The density of branching represents a degree of freedom optimized by viral RNA genomes in response to the evolutionary pressure to be packaged reliably. Several families of viruses are analyzed to delineate the effects of capsid geometry, size and charge stabilization on the selective pressure for RNA compactness. Compact branching has important implications for RNA folding and viral assembly. PMID:25188030

  4. In Vitro and In Vivo Characterizations of Pichinde Viral Nucleoprotein Exoribonuclease Functions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qinfeng; Shao, Junjie; Lan, Shuiyun; Zhou, Yanqin; Xing, Junji; Dong, Changjiang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arenaviruses cause severe hemorrhagic fever diseases in humans, and there are limited preventative and therapeutic measures against these diseases. Previous structural and functional analyses of arenavirus nucleoproteins (NPs) revealed a conserved DEDDH exoribonuclease (RNase) domain that is important for type I interferon (IFN) suppression, but the biological roles of the NP RNase in viral replication and host immune suppression have not been well characterized. Infection of guinea pigs with Pichinde virus (PICV), a prototype arenavirus, can serve as a surrogate small animal model for arenavirus hemorrhagic fevers. In this report, we show that mutation of each of the five RNase catalytic residues of PICV NP diminishes the IFN suppression activity and slightly reduces the viral RNA replication activity. Recombinant PICVs with RNase catalytic mutations can induce high levels of IFNs and barely grow in IFN-competent A549 cells, in sharp contrast to the wild-type (WT) virus, while in IFN-deficient Vero cells, both WT and mutant viruses can replicate at relatively high levels. Upon infection of guinea pigs, the RNase mutant viruses stimulate strong IFN responses, fail to replicate productively, and can become WT revertants. Serial passages of the RNase mutants in vitro can also generate WT revertants. Thus, the NP RNase function is essential for the innate immune suppression that allows the establishment of a productive early viral infection, and it may be partly involved in the process of viral RNA replication. IMPORTANCE Arenaviruses, such as Lassa, Lujo, and Machupo viruses, can cause severe and deadly hemorrhagic fever diseases in humans, and there are limited preventative and treatment options against these diseases. Development of broad-spectrum antiviral drugs depends on a better mechanistic understanding of the conserved arenavirus proteins in viral infection. The nucleoprotein (NPs) of all arenaviruses carry a unique exoribonuclease (RNase) domain

  5. System and method for suppressing sublimation using opacified aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeff S. (Inventor); Snyder, G. Jeffrey (Inventor); Calliat, Thierry (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Jones, Steven M. (Inventor); Palk, Jong-Ah (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to a castable, aerogel-based, ultra-low thermal conductivity opacified insulation to suppress sublimation. More specifically, the present invention relates to an aerogel opacified with various opacifying or reflecting constituents to suppress sublimation and provide thermal insulation in thermoelectric modules. The opacifying constituent can be graded within the aerogel for increased sublimation suppression, and the density of the aerogel can similarly be graded to achieve optimal thermal insulation and sublimation suppression.

  6. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is being suppressed by high blood sugar. ... away. The lab measures the glucose and growth hormone (GH) levels in each sample.

  7. Dexamethasone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    Dexamethasone suppression test measures whether adrenocorticotrophic hormone ( ACTH ) secretion by the pituitary can be suppressed. ... During this test, you will receive dexamethasone. This is a strong ... your blood is drawn so that the cortisol level in your blood ...

  8. Dexamethasone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    DST; ACTH suppression test; Cortisol suppression test ... During this test, you will receive dexamethasone. This is a strong man-made (synthetic) glucocorticoid medication. Afterward, your blood is drawn ...

  9. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003376.htm Growth hormone suppression test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is ...

  10. P‐TEFb goes viral

    PubMed Central

    Zaborowska, Justyna; Isa, Nur F.

    2015-01-01

    Positive transcription elongation factor b (P‐TEFb), which comprises cyclin‐dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) kinase and cyclin T subunits, is an essential kinase complex in human cells. Phosphorylation of the negative elongation factors by P‐TEFb is required for productive elongation of transcription of protein‐coding genes by RNA polymerase II (pol II). In addition, P‐TEFb‐mediated phosphorylation of the carboxyl‐terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of pol II mediates the recruitment of transcription and RNA processing factors during the transcription cycle. CDK9 also phosphorylates p53, a tumor suppressor that plays a central role in cellular responses to a range of stress factors. Many viral factors affect transcription by recruiting or modulating the activity of CDK9. In this review, we will focus on how the function of CDK9 is regulated by viral gene products. The central role of CDK9 in viral life cycles suggests that drugs targeting the interaction between viral products and P‐TEFb could be effective anti‐viral agents. PMID:27398404

  11. Viral metagenomics and blood safety.

    PubMed

    Sauvage, V; Eloit, M

    2016-02-01

    The characterization of the human blood-associated viral community (also called blood virome) is essential for epidemiological surveillance and to anticipate new potential threats for blood transfusion safety. Currently, the risk of blood-borne agent transmission of well-known viruses (HBV, HCV, HIV and HTLV) can be considered as under control in high-resource countries. However, other viruses unknown or unsuspected may be transmitted to recipients by blood-derived products. This is particularly relevant considering that a significant proportion of transfused patients are immunocompromised and more frequently subjected to fatal outcomes. Several measures to prevent transfusion transmission of unknown viruses have been implemented including the exclusion of at-risk donors, leukocyte reduction of donor blood, and physicochemical treatment of the different blood components. However, up to now there is no universal method for pathogen inactivation, which would be applicable for all types of blood components and, equally effective for all viral families. In addition, among available inactivation procedures of viral genomes, some of them are recognized to be less effective on non-enveloped viruses, and inadequate to inactivate higher viral titers in plasma pools or derivatives. Given this, there is the need to implement new methodologies for the discovery of unknown viruses that may affect blood transfusion. Viral metagenomics combined with High Throughput Sequencing appears as a promising approach for the identification and global surveillance of new and/or unexpected viruses that could impair blood transfusion safety. PMID:26778104

  12. The Breadth of Expandable Memory CD8+ T Cells Inversely Correlates with Residual Viral Loads in HIV Elite Controllers

    PubMed Central

    Ndhlovu, Zaza M.; Stampouloglou, Eleni; Cesa, Kevin; Mavrothalassitis, Orestes; Alvino, Donna Marie; Li, Jonathan Z.; Wilton, Shannon; Karel, Daniel; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Chen, Huabiao; Pereyra, Florencia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous studies have shown that elite controllers with minimal effector T cell responses harbor a low-frequency, readily expandable, highly functional, and broadly directed memory population. Here, we interrogated the in vivo relevance of this cell population by investigating whether the breadth of expandable memory responses is associated with the magnitude of residual viremia in individuals achieving durable suppression of HIV infection. HIV-specific memory CD8+ T cells were expanded by using autologous epitopic and variant peptides. Viral load was measured by an ultrasensitive single-copy PCR assay. Following expansion, controllers showed a greater increase in the overall breadth of Gag responses than did untreated progressors (P = 0.01) as well as treated progressors (P = 0.0003). Nef- and Env-specific memory cells expanded poorly for all groups, and their expanded breadths were indistinguishable among groups (P = 0.9 for Nef as determined by a Kruskal-Wallis test; P = 0.6 for Env as determined by a Kruskal-Wallis test). More importantly, we show that the breadth of expandable, previously undetectable Gag-specific responses was inversely correlated with residual viral load (r = −0.6; P = 0.009). Together, these data reveal a direct link between the abundance of Gag-specific expandable memory responses and prolonged maintenance of low-level viremia. Our studies highlight a CD8+ T cell feature that would be desirable in a vaccine-induced T cell response. IMPORTANCE Many studies have shown that the rare ability of some individuals to control HIV infection in the absence of antiretroviral therapy appears to be heavily dependent upon special HIV-specific killer T lymphocytes that are able to inhibit viral replication. The identification of key features of these immune cells has the potential to inform rational HIV vaccine design. This study shows that a special subset of killer lymphocytes, known as central memory CD8+ T lymphocytes, is at least

  13. Natural conception in HIV-serodiscordant couples with the infected partner in suppressive antiretroviral therapy: A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Del Romero, Jorge; Baza, María Begoña; Río, Isabel; Jerónimo, Adrián; Vera, Mar; Hernando, Victoria; Rodríguez, Carmen; Castilla, Jesús

    2016-07-01

    The potential of antiretroviral treatment (ART) to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV has increased the number of serodiscordant couples who are considering natural conception. We aim to describe the results of a protocol for reproductive counseling aimed at HIV serodiscordant couples who desire natural conception, in which the infected partner, the index case, is receiving suppressive antiretroviral treatment.A prospective cohort included all HIV serodiscordant couples attended a counseling program in the period 2002 to 2013 who opted for natural conception and met the following criteria: index case on ART with persistent plasma viral suppression for at least the previous 6 months, ART compliance over 95%, preserved immune status, undetectable HIV viral and proviral load in semen in male index cases, and absence of genitourinary infections and fertility problems in both members of the couple.Of the 161 HIV serodiscordant couples included, 133 with male index cases, 66% achieved at least 1 pregnancy, 18% a second one, and 5% a third pregnancy. A total of 144 natural pregnancies occurred and 107 babies were born. The pregnancy rate was 1.9 for each 100 acts of vaginal intercourse, and the mean time to conception was 6.1 months, both independently of the sex of the index case. No case of sexual or vertical HIV transmission occurred.In the absence of fertility problems and under controlled conditions, natural conception might be a safe and effective reproductive method for those HIV serodiscordant couples who choose this reproductive option. PMID:27472733

  14. Latency reversal and viral clearance to cure HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Margolis, David M; Garcia, J Victor; Hazuda, Daria J; Haynes, Barton F

    2016-07-22

    Research toward a cure for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection has joined prevention and treatment efforts in the global public health agenda. A major approach to HIV eradication envisions antiretroviral suppression, paired with targeted therapies to enforce the expression of viral antigen from quiescent HIV-1 genomes, and immunotherapies to clear latent infection. These strategies are targeted to lead to viral eradication--a cure for AIDS. Paired testing of latency reversal and clearance strategies has begun, but additional obstacles to HIV eradication may emerge. Nevertheless, there is reason for optimism that advances in long-acting antiretroviral therapy and HIV prevention strategies will contribute to efforts in HIV cure research and that the implementation of these efforts will synergize to markedly blunt the effect of the HIV pandemic on society. PMID:27463679

  15. Viral suppressors of RNA silencing in Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA silencing is the most effective antiviral adaptive defense mechanism mounted in higher plants to combat viral infection and proliferation. However, viruses have developed a variety of efficient counter-defense mechanisms by suppression of RNA silencing (VSR) in order to successfully impede the h...

  16. Viral vectors for vaccine applications

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Youngjoo

    2013-01-01

    Traditional approach of inactivated or live-attenuated vaccine immunization has resulted in impressive success in the reduction and control of infectious disease outbreaks. However, many pathogens remain less amenable to deal with the traditional vaccine strategies, and more appropriate vaccine strategy is in need. Recent discoveries that led to increased understanding of viral molecular biology and genetics has rendered the used of viruses as vaccine platforms and as potential anti-cancer agents. Due to their ability to effectively induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, viral vectors are deemed as an attractive alternative to the traditional platforms to deliver vaccine antigens as well as to specifically target and kill tumor cells. With potential targets ranging from cancers to a vast number of infectious diseases, the benefits resulting from successful application of viral vectors to prevent and treat human diseases can be immense. PMID:23858400

  17. Noncoding RNPs of Viral Origin

    PubMed Central

    Steitz, Joan; Borah, Sumit; Cazalla, Demian; Fok, Victor; Lytle, Robin; Mitton-Fry, Rachel; Riley, Kasandra; Samji, Tasleem

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Like their host cells, many viruses produce noncoding (nc)RNAs. These show diversity with respect to time of expression during viral infection, length and structure, protein-binding partners and relative abundance compared with their host-cell counterparts. Viruses, with their limited genomic capacity, presumably evolve or acquire ncRNAs only if they selectively enhance the viral life cycle or assist the virus in combating the host’s response to infection. Despite much effort, identifying the functions of viral ncRNAs has been extremely challenging. Recent technical advances and enhanced understanding of host-cell ncRNAs promise accelerated insights into the RNA warfare mounted by this fascinating class of RNPs. PMID:20719877

  18. Noncoding RNPs of viral origin.

    PubMed

    Steitz, Joan; Borah, Sumit; Cazalla, Demian; Fok, Victor; Lytle, Robin; Mitton-Fry, Rachel; Riley, Kasandra; Samji, Tasleem

    2011-03-01

    Like their host cells, many viruses produce noncoding (nc)RNAs. These show diversity with respect to time of expression during viral infection, length and structure, protein-binding partners and relative abundance compared with their host-cell counterparts. Viruses, with their limited genomic capacity, presumably evolve or acquire ncRNAs only if they selectively enhance the viral life cycle or assist the virus in combating the host's response to infection. Despite much effort, identifying the functions of viral ncRNAs has been extremely challenging. Recent technical advances and enhanced understanding of host-cell ncRNAs promise accelerated insights into the RNA warfare mounted by this fascinating class of RNPs. PMID:20719877

  19. An Odyssey to Viral Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Oldstone, Michael B A

    2016-05-23

    This odyssey is mine from early junior high school, where my dreams for adventure were shaped by Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes, Percival Christopher Wren's Beau Geste, and best of all the remarkable explorers in Paul de Kruif's Microbe Hunters. My birth site was in Manhattan (my mother was a Vogue model and my father worked in retail), and I traveled to college at the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, where my love of history and English literature was shaped along with a sufficient exposure to biology, chemistry, and genetics to meet requirements for entering medical school. By the second year at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, through expert teachers such as Theodore (Ted) Woodward and Sheldon (Shelly) Greisman in medicine and Charles Weissmann in virology and microbiology, I found that understanding why and how people became ill was more my cup of tea than identifying and treating their illnesses. Although I was becoming competent in diagnosis and treatment, I left medical school at the end of my sophomore year to seek a more basic understanding of biology and chemistry. I achieved this by working toward a PhD in biochemistry at Johns Hopkins McCollum-Pratt Institute combined with study of rickettsial toxin at Maryland. This was a very important time in my life, because it convinced me that addressing biologic and medical questions in a disciplined scientific manner was what my life voyage should be. That voyage led me initially, through Woodward's contact, to work a summer in Joe Smadel's unit at Walter Reed (Smadel being one of the deans of American virology) and to meet several times with Carleton Gajdusek and then John Enders at Harvard, who pointed me to Frank Dixon at Scripps in La Jolla, California, for postdoctoral training. Dixon was among the founders of modern immunology and a pathfinder for immunopathology. Training by and association with Dixon and his other postdoctoral fellows, my independent position at Scripps, early

  20. Going Viral with Fluorescent Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Lindsey M.

    2015-01-01

    Many longstanding questions about dynamics of virus-cell interactions can be answered by combining fluorescence imaging techniques with fluorescent protein (FP) tagging strategies. Successfully creating a FP fusion with a cellular or viral protein of interest first requires selecting the appropriate FP. However, while viral architecture and cellular localization often dictate the suitability of a FP, a FP's chemical and physical properties must also be considered. Here, we discuss the challenges of and offer suggestions for identifying the optimal FPs for studying the cell biology of viruses. PMID:26202231

  1. Viral IAPs, then and now.

    PubMed

    Clem, Rollie J

    2015-03-01

    The identification, now more than 20 years ago, of the first iap genes in baculoviruses subsequently led to many important discoveries concerning the regulation of apoptosis and other important biological processes in insects and mammals. Currently there are more than 200 known viral IAP homologs in baculoviruses and other families of invertebrate DNA viruses. This review begins with a personal account of the events leading up to the discovery of the first iap genes, followed by a summary of what is currently known about the different types of viral IAPs and their functions in regulating apoptosis, and possibly other cellular processes. PMID:25652775

  2. Cullin E3 Ligases and Their Rewiring by Viral Factors

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, Cathal; Krogan, Nevan J.; Craik, Charles S.; Pick, Elah

    2014-01-01

    The ability of viruses to subvert host pathways is central in disease pathogenesis. Over the past decade, a critical role for the Ubiquitin Proteasome System (UPS) in counteracting host immune factors during viral infection has emerged. This counteraction is commonly achieved by the expression of viral proteins capable of sequestering host ubiquitin E3 ligases and their regulators. In particular, many viruses hijack members of the Cullin-RING E3 Ligase (CRL) family. Viruses interact in many ways with CRLs in order to impact their ligase activity; one key recurring interaction involves re-directing CRL complexes to degrade host targets that are otherwise not degraded within host cells. Removal of host immune factors by this mechanism creates a more amenable cellular environment for viral propagation. To date, a small number of target host factors have been identified, many of which are degraded via a CRL-proteasome pathway. Substantial effort within the field is ongoing to uncover the identities of further host proteins targeted in this fashion and the underlying mechanisms driving their turnover by the UPS. Elucidation of these targets and mechanisms will provide appealing anti-viral therapeutic opportunities. This review is focused on the many methods used by viruses to perturb host CRLs, focusing on substrate sequestration and viral regulation of E3 activity. PMID:25314029

  3. Nucleolin interacts with influenza A nucleoprotein and contributes to viral ribonucleoprotein complexes nuclear trafficking and efficient influenza viral replication

    PubMed Central

    Terrier, Olivier; Carron, Coralie; De Chassey, Benoît; Dubois, Julia; Traversier, Aurélien; Julien, Thomas; Cartet, Gaëlle; Proust, Anaïs; Hacot, Sabine; Ressnikoff, Denis; Lotteau, Vincent; Lina, Bruno; Diaz, Jean-Jacques; Moules, Vincent; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viruses replicate their single-stranded RNA genomes in the nucleus of infected cells and these replicated genomes (vRNPs) are then exported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and plasma membrane before budding. To achieve this export, influenza viruses hijack the host cell export machinery. However, the complete mechanisms underlying this hijacking remain not fully understood. We have previously shown that influenza viruses induce a marked alteration of the nucleus during the time-course of infection and notably in the nucleolar compartment. In this study, we discovered that a major nucleolar component, called nucleolin, is required for an efficient export of vRNPs and viral replication. We have notably shown that nucleolin interacts with the viral nucleoprotein (NP) that mainly constitutes vRNPs. Our results suggest that this interaction could allow vRNPs to “catch” the host cell export machinery, a necessary step for viral replication. PMID:27373907

  4. Nucleolin interacts with influenza A nucleoprotein and contributes to viral ribonucleoprotein complexes nuclear trafficking and efficient influenza viral replication.

    PubMed

    Terrier, Olivier; Carron, Coralie; De Chassey, Benoît; Dubois, Julia; Traversier, Aurélien; Julien, Thomas; Cartet, Gaëlle; Proust, Anaïs; Hacot, Sabine; Ressnikoff, Denis; Lotteau, Vincent; Lina, Bruno; Diaz, Jean-Jacques; Moules, Vincent; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viruses replicate their single-stranded RNA genomes in the nucleus of infected cells and these replicated genomes (vRNPs) are then exported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and plasma membrane before budding. To achieve this export, influenza viruses hijack the host cell export machinery. However, the complete mechanisms underlying this hijacking remain not fully understood. We have previously shown that influenza viruses induce a marked alteration of the nucleus during the time-course of infection and notably in the nucleolar compartment. In this study, we discovered that a major nucleolar component, called nucleolin, is required for an efficient export of vRNPs and viral replication. We have notably shown that nucleolin interacts with the viral nucleoprotein (NP) that mainly constitutes vRNPs. Our results suggest that this interaction could allow vRNPs to "catch" the host cell export machinery, a necessary step for viral replication. PMID:27373907

  5. HIV-1 Reservoirs During Suppressive Therapy.

    PubMed

    Barton, Kirston; Winckelmann, Anni; Palmer, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    The introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART) 20 years ago has dramatically reduced morbidity and mortality associated with HIV-1. Initially there was hope that ART would be curative, but it quickly became clear that even though ART was able to restore CD4(+) T cell counts and suppress viral loads below levels of detection, discontinuation of treatment resulted in a rapid rebound of infection. This is due to persistence of a small reservoir of latently infected cells with a long half-life, which necessitates life-long ART. Over the past few years, significant progress has been made in defining and characterizing the latent reservoir of HIV-1, and here we review how understanding the latent reservoir during suppressive therapy will lead to significant advances in curative approaches for HIV-1. PMID:26875617

  6. Mechanisms of viral clearance and persistence.

    PubMed

    Borrow, P

    1997-01-01

    Using examples predominantly drawn from study of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) model system, this review describes the mechanisms involved in control of virus infections by the cell-mediated immune response, and some of the different strategies viruses have evolved to evade such immune clearance so that they can persist in their hosts. The important role played by the CD8+ cytotoxic lymphocyte (CTL) response in clearance of many systemic virus infections is discussed; and it is emphasized that although CD8+ CTL are classically thought of as lymphocytes which mediate lysis of virus-infected target cells, the principal mechanism by which CD8+ T cells effect clearance of persistent and many acute virus infections via production of antiviral cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma, not via destruction of virus-producing cells. To avoid immune-mediated clearance, viruses frequently use a combination of several different strategies. These can be grouped into mechanisms for avoiding recognition by the immune response (such as establishing latent infections, replicating in immune-privileged sites, down-regulating the expression of immune recognition signals on the surface of infected cells, or undergoing antigenic variation); and mechanisms for suppressing the immune response. The latter include generalized immune suppression mechanisms, and strategies for more precisely disabling the specific immune response such as inducing tolerance or exhaustion of virus-specific CTL. The value of understanding both immune clearance mechanisms and viral evasion strategies in the rational design of immune-based therapies to combat persistent virus infections is discussed. PMID:9429206

  7. The Paradigm of Viral Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welker, Carl B.

    2002-01-01

    Introduces the concepts of idea viruses and viral communication, a technology-based communication that spreads ideas quickly. Explains its applicability in the area of direct marketing and discusses a technology platform that provides the opportunity of sending a message to a large number of people and emotional or pecuniary incentives to…

  8. Asian citrus psyllid viral pathogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A newly discovered viral pathogen of Asian citrus psyllid, AsCP, Diaphorina citri, Kuwayama (Psyllidae: Hemiptera) was classified as a Reoviridae. This virus may serve as a biological control agent for AsCP. The AsCP is an efficient vector of the plant-infecting bacterium (Candidatus Liberibacter as...

  9. Viral obesity: fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Mitra, A K; Clarke, K

    2010-04-01

    The aetiology of obesity is multifactorial. An understanding of the contributions of various causal factors is essential for the proper management of obesity. Although it is primarily thought of as a condition brought on by lifestyle choices, recent evidence shows there is a link between obesity and viral infections. Numerous animal models have documented an increased body weight and a number of physiologic changes, including increased insulin sensitivity, increased glucose uptake and decreased leptin secretion that contribute to an increase in body fat in adenovirus-36 infection. Other viral agents associated with increasing obesity in animals included canine distemper virus, rous-associated virus 7, scrapie, Borna disease virus, SMAM-1 and other adenoviruses. This review attempted to determine if viral infection is a possible cause of obesity. Also, this paper discussed mechanisms by which viruses might produce obesity. Based on the evidence presented in this paper, it can be concluded that a link between obesity and viral infections cannot be ruled out. Further epidemiologic studies are needed to establish a causal link between the two, and determine if these results can be used in future management and prevention of obesity. PMID:19874530

  10. Viral Subversion of Nucleocytoplasmic Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Yarbrough, Melanie L.; Mata, Miguel A.; Sakthivel, Ramanavelan; Fontoura, Beatriz M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Trafficking of proteins and RNA into and out of the nucleus occurs through the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Due to its critical function in many cellular processes, the NPC and transport factors are common targets of several viruses that disrupt key constituents of the machinery to facilitate viral replication. Many viruses such as poliovirus and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) virus inhibit protein import into the nucleus, while viruses such as influenza A virus target and disrupt host mRNA nuclear export. Current evidence indicates that these viruses may employ such strategies to avert the host immune response. Conversely, many viruses co-opt nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to facilitate transport of viral RNAs. Since viral proteins interact with key regulators of the host nuclear transport machinery, viruses have served as invaluable tools of discovery that led to the identification of novel constituents of nuclear transport pathways. In addition, this review explores the importance of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to viral pathogenesis as these studies revealed new antiviral therapeutic strategies and exposed previously unknown cellular mechanisms. Further understanding of nuclear transport pathways will determine whether such therapeutics will be useful treatments for important human pathogens. PMID:24289861

  11. Nosocomial Spread of Viral Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, Celia; Jeffries, Donald J.

    2001-01-01

    Viruses are important causes of nosocomial infection, but the fact that hospital outbreaks often result from introduction(s) from community-based epidemics, together with the need to initiate specific laboratory testing, means that there are usually insufficient data to allow the monitoring of trends in incidences. The most important defenses against nosocomial transmission of viruses are detailed and continuing education of staff and strict adherence to infection control policies. Protocols must be available to assist in the management of patients with suspected or confirmed viral infection in the health care setting. In this review, we present details on general measures to prevent the spread of viral infection in hospitals and other health care environments. These include principles of accommodation of infected patients and approaches to good hygiene and patient management. They provide detail on individual viral diseases accompanied in each case with specific information on control of the infection and, where appropriate, details of preventive and therapeutic measures. The important areas of nosocomial infection due to blood-borne viruses have been extensively reviewed previously and are summarized here briefly, with citation of selected review articles. Human prion diseases, which present management problems very different from those of viral infection, are not included. PMID:11432812

  12. Herbal medicines for viral myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhao Lan; Liu, Zhi Jun; Liu, Jian Ping; Yang, Min; Kwong, Joey

    2012-01-01

    Background Herbal medicines are being used for treating viral diseases including viral myocarditis, and many controlled trials have been done to investigate their efficacy. Objectives To assess the effects of herbal medicines on clinical and indirect outcomes in patients with viral myocarditis. Search strategy We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library Issue 3, 2009, MEDLINE (January 1966 - July 2009), EMBASE (January 1998 - July 2009), Chinese Biomedical Database (1979 - 2009), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (1979 - 2009), Chinese VIP Information (1989 - 2009), Chinese Academic Conference Papers Database and Chinese Dissertation Database (1980 - 2009), AMED (1985 - 2009), LILACS accessed in July 2009 and the trials register of the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field. We handsearched Chinese journals and conference proceedings. No language restrictions were applied. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of herbal medicines (with a minimum of seven days treatment duration) compared with placebo, no intervention, or conventional interventions were included. Trials of herbal medicine plus conventional drug versus drug alone were also included. Only trials that reported adequate description of allocation sequence generation were included. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data and evaluated trial quality. Adverse effects information was collected from the trials. Main results Fourteen randomised trials involving 1463 people were included. All trials were conducted and published in China. Quality of the trials was assessed to be low. No trial had diagnosis of viral myocarditis confirmed histologically, and only a few trials attempted to establish viral aetiology. Nine different herbal medicines were tested in the included trials. The trials reported electrocardiogram results, level of myocardial enzymes, cardiac function, symptoms, and adverse effects

  13. Herbal medicines for viral myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhao Lan; Liu, Zhi Jun; Liu, Jian Ping; Yang, Min; Kwong, Joey

    2011-01-01

    Background Herbal medicines are being used for treating viral diseases including viral myocarditis, and many controlled trials have been done to investigate their efficacy. Objectives To assess the effects of herbal medicines on clinical and indirect outcomes in patients with viral myocarditis. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library Issue 3, 2009, MEDLINE (January 1966 - July 2009), EMBASE (January 1998 - July 2009), Chinese Biomedical Database (1979 - 2009), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (1979 - 2009), Chinese VIP Information (1989 - 2009), Chinese Academic Conference Papers Database and Chinese Dissertation Database (1980 - 2009), AMED (1985 - 2009), LILACS accessed in July 2009 and the trials register of the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field. We handsearched Chinese journals and conference proceedings. No language restrictions were applied. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of herbal medicines (with a minimum of seven days treatment duration) compared with placebo, no intervention, or conventional interventions were included. Trials of herbal medicine plus conventional drug versus drug alone were also included. Only trials that reported adequate description of allocation sequence generation were included. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data and evaluated trial quality. Adverse effects information was collected from the trials. Results Fourteen randomised trials involving 1463 people were included. All trials were conducted and published in China. Quality of the trials was assessed to be low. No trial had diagnosis of viral myocarditis confirmed histologically, and only a few trials attempted to establish viral aetiology. Nine different herbal medicines were tested in the included trials. The trials reported electrocardiogram results, level of myocardial enzymes, cardiac function, symptoms, and adverse effects. Astragalus

  14. Current Good Manufacturing Practice Production of an Oncolytic Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Viral Vector for Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Meseck, M.; Derecho, I.; Lopez, P.; Knoblauch, C.; McMahon, R.; Anderson, J.; Dunphy, N.; Quezada, V.; Khan, R.; Huang, P.; Dang, W.; Luo, M.; Hsu, D.; Woo, S.L.C.; Couture, L.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is an oncolytic virus currently being investigated as a promising tool to treat cancer because of its ability to selectively replicate in cancer cells. To enhance the oncolytic property of the nonpathologic laboratory strain of VSV, we generated a recombinant vector [rVSV(MΔ51)-M3] expressing murine gammaherpesvirus M3, a secreted viral chemokine-binding protein that binds to a broad range of mammalian chemokines with high affinity. As previously reported, when rVSV(MΔ51)-M3 was used in an orthotopic model of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in rats, it suppressed inflammatory cell migration to the virus-infected tumor site, which allowed for enhanced intratumoral virus replication leading to increased tumor necrosis and substantially prolonged survival. These encouraging results led to the development of this vector for clinical translation in patients with HCC. However, a scalable current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP)-compliant manufacturing process has not been described for this vector. To produce the quantities of high-titer virus required for clinical trials, a process that is amenable to GMP manufacturing and scale-up was developed. We describe here a large-scale (50-liter) vector production process capable of achieving crude titers on the order of 109 plaque-forming units (PFU)/ml under cGMP. This process was used to generate a master virus seed stock and a clinical lot of the clinical trial agent under cGMP with an infectious viral titer of approximately 2 × 1010 PFU/ml (total yield, 1 × 1013 PFU). The lot has passed all U.S. Food and Drug Administration-mandated release testing and will be used in a phase 1 clinical translational trial in patients with advanced HCC. PMID:21083425

  15. Current good manufacturing practice production of an oncolytic recombinant vesicular stomatitis viral vector for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Ausubel, L J; Meseck, M; Derecho, I; Lopez, P; Knoblauch, C; McMahon, R; Anderson, J; Dunphy, N; Quezada, V; Khan, R; Huang, P; Dang, W; Luo, M; Hsu, D; Woo, S L C; Couture, L

    2011-04-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is an oncolytic virus currently being investigated as a promising tool to treat cancer because of its ability to selectively replicate in cancer cells. To enhance the oncolytic property of the nonpathologic laboratory strain of VSV, we generated a recombinant vector [rVSV(MΔ51)-M3] expressing murine gammaherpesvirus M3, a secreted viral chemokine-binding protein that binds to a broad range of mammalian chemokines with high affinity. As previously reported, when rVSV(MΔ51)-M3 was used in an orthotopic model of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in rats, it suppressed inflammatory cell migration to the virus-infected tumor site, which allowed for enhanced intratumoral virus replication leading to increased tumor necrosis and substantially prolonged survival. These encouraging results led to the development of this vector for clinical translation in patients with HCC. However, a scalable current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP)-compliant manufacturing process has not been described for this vector. To produce the quantities of high-titer virus required for clinical trials, a process that is amenable to GMP manufacturing and scale-up was developed. We describe here a large-scale (50-liter) vector production process capable of achieving crude titers on the order of 10(9) plaque-forming units (PFU)/ml under cGMP. This process was used to generate a master virus seed stock and a clinical lot of the clinical trial agent under cGMP with an infectious viral titer of approximately 2 × 10(10) PFU/ml (total yield, 1 × 10(13) PFU). The lot has passed all U.S. Food and Drug Administration-mandated release testing and will be used in a phase 1 clinical translational trial in patients with advanced HCC. PMID:21083425

  16. Heat shock protein-90-beta facilitates enterovirus 71 viral particles assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Robert Y.L.; Kuo, Rei-Lin; Ma, Wei-Chieh; Huang, Hsing-I; Yu, Jau-Song; Yen, Sih-Min; Huang, Chi-Ruei; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2013-09-01

    Molecular chaperones are reported to be crucial for virus propagation, but are not yet addressed in Human Enterovirus 71 (EV71). Here we describe the specific association of heat shock protein-90-beta (Hsp90β), but not alpha form (Hsp90α), with EV71 viral particles by the co-purification with virions using sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation, and by the colocalization with viral particles, as assessed by immunogold electron microscopy. The reduction of the Hsp90β protein using RNA interference decreased the correct assembly of viral particles, without affecting EV71 replication levels. Tracking ectopically expressed Hsp90β protein associated with EV71 virions revealed that Hsp90β protein was transmitted to new host cells through its direct association with infectious viral particles. Our findings suggest a new antiviral strategy in which extracellular Hsp90β protein is targeted to decrease the infectivity of EV71 and other enteroviruses, without affecting the broader functions of this constitutively expressed molecular chaperone. - Highlights: • Hsp90β is associated with EV71 virion and is secreted with the release virus. • Hsp90β effects on the correct assembly of viral particles. • Viral titer of cultured medium was reduced in the presence of geldanamycin. • Viral titer was also reduced when Hsp90β was suppressed by siRNA treatment. • The extracellular Hsp90β was also observed in other RNA viruses-infected cells.

  17. Fire Suppression and Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    This report is concerned with the following topics regarding fire suppression:What is the relative effectiveness of candidate suppressants to extinguish a representative fire in reduced gravity, including high-O2 mole fraction, low -pressure environments? What are the relative advantages and disadvantages of physically acting and chemically-acting agents in spacecraft fire suppression? What are the O2 mole fraction and absolute pressure below which a fire cannot exist? What effect does gas-phase radiation play in the overall fire and post-fire environments? Are the candidate suppressants effective to extinguish fires on practical solid fuels? What is required to suppress non-flaming fires (smoldering and deep seated fires) in reduced gravity? How can idealized space experiment results be applied to a practical fire scenario? What is the optimal agent deployment strategy for space fire suppression?

  18. Abuse and Resilience in Relation to HAART Medication Adherence and HIV Viral Load Among Women with HIV in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Mardge; Weber, Kathleen; Cruise, Ruth; Kelso, Gwendolyn

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Abuse is highly prevalent among HIV+ women, leading to behaviors, including lower adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) that result in poor health outcomes. Resilience (functioning competently despite adversity) may buffer the negative effects of abuse. This study investigated how resilience interacted with abuse history in relation to HAART adherence, HIV viral load (VL), and CD4+ cell count among a convenience sample of 138 HIV+ women from the Ruth M. Rothstein CORE Center/Cook County Health and Hospital Systems site of the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). Resilience was measured by the 10-item Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC). HAART adherence (≥95% vs. <95% self reported usage of prescribed medication) and current or prior sexual, physical, or emotional/domestic abuse, were reported during structured interviews. HIV viral load (≥20 vs. <20 copies/mL) and CD4+ count (200 vs. <200 cells/mm) were measured with blood specimens. Multiple logistic regressions, controlling for age, race, income, enrollment wave, substance use, and depressive symptoms, indicated that each unit increase in resilience was significantly associated with an increase in the odds of having ≥95% HAART adherence and a decrease in the odds of having a detectable viral load. Resilience-Abuse interactions showed that only among HIV+ women with sexual abuse or multiple abuses did resilience significantly relate to an increase in the odds of ≥95% HAART adherence. Interventions to improve coping strategies that promote resilience among HIV+ women may be beneficial for achieving higher HAART adherence and viral suppression. PMID:24568654

  19. Suppression of ras-transformants (review).

    PubMed

    Kuzumaki, N

    1991-01-01

    Transforming ras genes are the oncogenes most frequently identified in human cancers. This justifies the intense interest in finding ways to suppress oncogenicity in these gene family-mediated transformants. The methods of suppression can be classified as 1) genetical, 2) biological and 3) pharmacological. Most of the reagents used for the suppression inhibit rodent transformants induced by transfected viral or activated cellular ras oncogenes, but some of the reagents are also effective when applied to natural human transformants that contain activated ras oncogenes. The growth and tumorigenicity of the ras-transformants are suppressed by the inhibition of the integration, transcription, translation or post-translational modification of the ras genes and p21 ras proteins, as well as the inhibition of the expression of genes which collaborate in the ras-transformation or the enhancement of some tumor suppressor genes. These observations offer novel approaches to the investigation of malignant transformation by ras-oncogenes, and have potential application in treatment of ras-oncogene-induced tumors. PMID:2018365

  20. Cholesterol biosynthesis modulation regulates dengue viral replication.

    PubMed

    Rothwell, Christopher; Lebreton, Aude; Young Ng, Chuan; Lim, Joanne Y H; Liu, Wei; Vasudevan, Subhash; Labow, Mark; Gu, Feng; Gaither, L Alex

    2009-06-20

    We performed a focused siRNA screen in an A549 dengue type 2 New Guinea C subgenomic replicon cell line (Rluc-replicon) that contains a Renilla luciferase cassette. We found that siRNA mediated knock down of mevalonate diphospho decarboxylase (MVD) inhibited viral replication of the Rluc-replicon and DEN-2 NGC live virus replication in A549 cells. When the Rluc-replicon A459 cells were grown in delipidated media the replicon expression was suppressed and MVD knock down could further sensitize Renilla expression. Hymeglusin and zaragozic acid A could inhibit DEN-2 NGC live virus replication in K562 cells, while lovastatin could inhibit DEN-2 NGC live virus replication in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Renilla expression could be rescued in fluvastatin treated A549 Rluc-replicon cells after the addition of mevalonate, and partially restored with geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, or farnesyl pyrophosphate. Our data suggest genetic and pharmacological modulation of cholesterol biosynthesis can regulate dengue virus replication. PMID:19419745

  1. Coinfections of the Respiratory Tract: Viral Competition for Resources

    PubMed Central

    Pinky, Lubna; Dobrovolny, Hana M.

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that simultaneous infection of the respiratory tract with at least two viruses is common in hospitalized patients, although it is not clear whether these infections are more or less severe than single virus infections. We use a mathematical model to study the dynamics of viral coinfection of the respiratory tract in an effort to understand the kinetics of these infections. Specifically, we use our model to investigate coinfections of influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, rhinovirus, parainfluenza virus, and human metapneumovirus. Our study shows that during coinfections, one virus can block another simply by being the first to infect the available host cells; there is no need for viral interference through immune response interactions. We use the model to calculate the duration of detectable coinfection and examine how it varies as initial viral dose and time of infection are varied. We find that rhinovirus, the fastest-growing virus, reduces replication of the remaining viruses during a coinfection, while parainfluenza virus, the slowest-growing virus is suppressed in the presence of other viruses. PMID:27196110

  2. Recycling Endosomes and Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Vale-Costa, Sílvia; Amorim, Maria João

    2016-01-01

    Many viruses exploit specific arms of the endomembrane system. The unique composition of each arm prompts the development of remarkably specific interactions between viruses and sub-organelles. This review focuses on the viral–host interactions occurring on the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC), and mediated by its regulatory Ras-related in brain (Rab) GTPase Rab11. This protein regulates trafficking from the ERC and the trans-Golgi network to the plasma membrane. Such transport comprises intricate networks of proteins/lipids operating sequentially from the membrane of origin up to the cell surface. Rab11 is also emerging as a critical factor in an increasing number of infections by major animal viruses, including pathogens that provoke human disease. Understanding the interplay between the ERC and viruses is a milestone in human health. Rab11 has been associated with several steps of the viral lifecycles by unclear processes that use sophisticated diversified host machinery. For this reason, we first explore the state-of-the-art on processes regulating membrane composition and trafficking. Subsequently, this review outlines viral interactions with the ERC, highlighting current knowledge on viral-host binding partners. Finally, using examples from the few mechanistic studies available we emphasize how ERC functions are adjusted during infection to remodel cytoskeleton dynamics, innate immunity and membrane composition. PMID:27005655

  3. Quadratic dynamical decoupling with nonuniform error suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Quiroz, Gregory; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2011-10-15

    We analyze numerically the performance of the near-optimal quadratic dynamical decoupling (QDD) single-qubit decoherence errors suppression method [J. West et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 130501 (2010)]. The QDD sequence is formed by nesting two optimal Uhrig dynamical decoupling sequences for two orthogonal axes, comprising N{sub 1} and N{sub 2} pulses, respectively. Varying these numbers, we study the decoherence suppression properties of QDD directly by isolating the errors associated with each system basis operator present in the system-bath interaction Hamiltonian. Each individual error scales with the lowest order of the Dyson series, therefore immediately yielding the order of decoherence suppression. We show that the error suppression properties of QDD are dependent upon the parities of N{sub 1} and N{sub 2}, and near-optimal performance is achieved for general single-qubit interactions when N{sub 1}=N{sub 2}.

  4. An African swine fever virus Bc1-2 homolog, 5-HL, suppresses apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Afonso, C L; Neilan, J G; Kutish, G F; Rock, D L

    1996-01-01

    Here, we show that the African swine fever virus 5-HL gene is a highly conserved viral gene and contains all known protein domains associated with Bcl-2 activity, including those involved with dimerization, mediating cell death, and protein-binding functions, and that its protein product, p21, suppresses apoptotic cell death in the mammalian lymphoid cell line FL5.12. Thus, 5-HL is a true functional viral member of the Bcl-2 gene family. PMID:8676523

  5. An African swine fever virus Bc1-2 homolog, 5-HL, suppresses apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Afonso, C L; Neilan, J G; Kutish, G F; Rock, D L

    1996-07-01

    Here, we show that the African swine fever virus 5-HL gene is a highly conserved viral gene and contains all known protein domains associated with Bcl-2 activity, including those involved with dimerization, mediating cell death, and protein-binding functions, and that its protein product, p21, suppresses apoptotic cell death in the mammalian lymphoid cell line FL5.12. Thus, 5-HL is a true functional viral member of the Bcl-2 gene family. PMID:8676523

  6. Synthetic DNA vaccine strategies against persistent viral infections

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Daniel O; Talbott, Kendra T; Choo, Daniel K; Shedlock, Devon J; Weiner, David B

    2015-01-01

    The human body has developed an elaborate defense system against microbial pathogens and foreign antigens. However, particular microbes have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to evade immune surveillance, allowing persistence within the human host. In an effort to combat such infections, intensive research has focused on the development of effective prophylactic and therapeutic countermeasures to suppress or clear persistent viral infections. To date, popular therapeutic strategies have included the use of live-attenuated microbes, viral vectors and dendritic-cell vaccines aiming to help suppress or clear infection. In recent years, improved DNA vaccines have now re-emerged as a promising candidate for therapeutic intervention due to the development of advanced optimization and delivery technologies. For instance, genetic optimization of synthetic plasmid constructs and their encoded antigens, in vivo electroporation-mediated vaccine delivery, as well as codelivery with molecular adjuvants have collectively enhanced both transgene expression and the elicitation of vaccine-induced immunity. In addition, the development of potent heterologous prime–boost regimens has also provided significant contributions to DNA vaccine immunogenicity. Herein, the authors will focus on these recent improvements to this synthetic platform in relation to their application in combating persistent virus infection. PMID:23659301

  7. A role for dual viral hits in causation of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Oldstone, Michael B A; Dales, Samuel; Tishon, Antoinette; Lewicki, Hanna; Martin, Lee

    2005-11-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a progressive fatal neurodegenerative disease associated with persistent infection of the central nervous system (CNS) by measles virus (MV), biased hypermutations of the viral genome affecting primarily the matrix (M) gene with the conversion of U to C and A to G bases, high titers of antibodies to MV, and infiltration of B cells and T cells into the CNS. Neither the precipitating event nor biology underlying the MV infection is understood, nor is their any satisfactory treatment. We report the creation of a transgenic mouse model that mimics the cardinal features of SSPE. This was achieved by initially infecting mice expressing the MV receptor with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus Cl 13, a virus that transiently suppressed their immune system. Infection by MV 10 days later resulted in persistent MV infection of neurons. Analysis of brains from infected mice showed the biased U to C hypermutations in the MV M gene and T and B lymphocyte infiltration. These sera contained high titers of antibodies to MV. Thus, a small animal model is now available to both molecularly probe the pathogenesis of SSPE and to test a variety of therapies to treat the disease. PMID:16260490

  8. Viral-templated Palladium Nanocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cuixian

    Despite recent progress on nanocatalysis, there exist several critical challenges in simple and readily controllable nanocatalyst synthesis including the unpredictable particle growth, deactivation of catalytic activity, cumbersome catalyst recovery and lack of in-situ reaction monitoring. In this dissertation, two novel approaches are presented for the fabrication of viral-templated palladium (Pd) nanocatalysts, and their catalytic activities for dichromate reduction reaction and Suzuki Coupling reaction were thoroughly studied. In the first approach, viral template based bottom-up assembly is employed for the Pd nanocatalyst synthesis in a chip-based format. Specifically, genetically displayed cysteine residues on each coat protein of Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) templates provide precisely spaced thiol functionalities for readily controllable surface assembly and enhanced formation of catalytically active Pd nanoparticles. Catalysts with the chip-based format allow for simple separation and in-situ monitoring of the reaction extent. Thorough examination of synthesis-structure-activity relationship of Pd nanoparticles formed on surface-assembled viral templates shows that Pd nanoparticle size, catalyst loading density and catalytic activity of viral-templated Pd nanocatalysts can be readily controlled simply by tuning the synthesis conditions. The viral-templated Pd nanocatalysts with optimized synthesis conditions are shown to have higher catalytic activity per unit Pd mass than the commercial Pd/C catalysts. Furthermore, tunable and selective surface assembly of TMV biotemplates is exploited to control the loading density and location of Pd nanocatalysts on solid substrates via preferential electroless deposition. In addition, the catalytic activities of surface-assembled TMV-templated Pd nanocatalysts were also investigated for the ligand-free Suzuki Coupling reaction under mild reaction conditions. The chip-based format enables simple catalyst separation and

  9. Classical and Modern Approaches Used for Viral Hepatitis Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Heiat, Mohammad; Ranjbar, Reza; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2014-01-01

    Context: Viral hepatitis diagnosis is an important issue in the treatment procedure of this infection. Late diagnosis and delayed treatment of viral hepatitis infections can lead to irreversible liver damages and occurrence of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. A variety of laboratory methods including old and new technologies are being applied to detect hepatitis viruses. Here we have tried to review, categorize, compare and illustrate the classical and modern approaches used for diagnosis of viral hepatitis. Evidence Acquisition: In order to achieve a comprehensive aspect in viral hepatitis detection methods, an extensive search using related keywords was done in major medical library and data were collected, categorized and summarized in different sections. Results: Analyzing of collected data resulted in the wrapping up the hepatitis virus detection methods in separate sections including 1) immunological methods such as enzyme immunoassay (EIA), radio-immunoassay (RIA) immuno-chromatographic assay (ICA), and immuno-chemiluminescence 2) molecular approaches including non-amplification and amplification based methods, and finally 3) advanced biosensors such as mass-sensitive, electrical, electrochemical and optical based biosensors and also new generation of detection methods. Conclusions: Detection procedures in the clinical laboratories possess a large diversity; each has their individual advantages and facilities' differences. PMID:24829586

  10. Molecular Mechanism and Treatment of Viral Hepatitis-Related Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Su, Tung-Hung; Kao, Jia-Horng; Liu, Chun-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a wound-healing response to various chronic stimuli, including viral hepatitis B or C infection. Activated myofibroblasts, predominantly derived from the hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), regulate the balance between matrix metalloproteinases and their tissue inhibitors to maintain extracellular matrix homeostasis. Transforming growth factor-β and platelet-derived growth factor are classic profibrogenic signals that activate HSC proliferation. In addition, proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines coordinate macrophages, T cells, NK/NKT cells, and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells in complex fibrogenic and regression processes. In addition, fibrogenesis involves angiogenesis, metabolic reprogramming, autophagy, microRNA, and epigenetic regulations. Hepatic inflammation is the driving force behind liver fibrosis; however, host single nucleotide polymorphisms and viral factors, including the genotype, viral load, viral mutation, and viral proteins, have been associated with fibrosis progression. Eliminating the underlying etiology is the most crucial antifibrotic therapy. Growing evidence has indicated that persistent viral suppression with antiviral therapy can result in fibrosis regression, reduced liver disease progression, decreased hepatocellular carcinoma, and improved chances of survival. Preclinical studies and clinical trials are currently examining several investigational agents that target key fibrogenic pathways; the results are promising and shed light on this debilitating illness. PMID:24927147

  11. Viral proteases as targets for drug design.

    PubMed

    Skoreński, Marcin; Sieńczyk, Marcin

    2013-01-01

    In order to productively infect a host, viruses must enter the cell and force host cell replication mechanisms to produce new infectious virus particles. The success of this process unfortunately results in disease progression and, in the case of infection with many viral species, may cause mortality. The discoveries of Louis Pasteur and Edward Jenner led to one of the greatest advances in modern medicine - the development of vaccines that generate long-lasting memory immune responses to combat viral infection. Widespread use of vaccines has reduced mortality and morbidity associated with viral infection and, in some cases, has completely eradicated virus from the human population. Unfortunately, several viral species maintain a significant ability to mutate and "escape" vaccine-induced immune responses. Thus, novel anti-viral agents are required for treatment and prevention of viral disease. Targeting proteases that are crucial in the viral life cycle has proven to be an effective method to control viral infection, and this avenue of investigation continues to generate anti-viral treatments. Herein, we provide the reader with a brief history as well as a comprehensive review of the most recent advances in the design and synthesis of viral protease inhibitors. PMID:23016690

  12. Drug Sanctuaries, Low Steady State Viral Loads and Viral Blips.

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, Alan S.,; Callaway, D.; Pomerantz, R. J.; Chen, H. Y.; Markowitz, M.; Ho, David D.; Di Mascio, M.

    2002-01-01

    Patients on HAART for long periods of time obtain viral loads (VLs) below 50 copies/ml. Ultrasensitive VL assays show that some of these patients obtain a low steady state VL, while others continue to exhibit VL declines to below 5 copies/ml. Low steady states can be explained by two-compartment models that incorporate a drug sanctuary. Interestingly, when patients exhibit continued declines below 50 copies/ml the rate of decline has a half-life of {approx} 6 months, consistent with some estimates of the rate of latent cell decline. Some patients, despite having sustained undetectable VLs show periods of transient viremia (blips). I will present some statistical characterization of the blips observed in a set of 123 patients, suggesting that blips are generated largely by random processes, that blips tend to correspond to periods of a few weeks in which VLs are elevated, and that VL decay from the peak of a blip may have two-phases. Using new results suggesting that the viral burst size, N {approx} 5 x 10{sup 4}, we estimate the number of cells needed to produce a blip.

  13. Epidemiological impact of achieving UNAIDS 90-90-90 targets for HIV care in India: a modelling study

    PubMed Central

    Maddali, Manoj V; Gupta, Amita; Shah, Maunank

    2016-01-01

    Objective Recent UNAIDS ‘90-90-90’ targets propose that to end the HIV epidemic by 2030, 90% of persons living with HIV (PLWH) worldwide should know their diagnosis, 90% of diagnosed PLWH should be on antiretroviral therapy (ART) and 90% of PLWH on ART should be virally suppressed by 2020. We sought to quantify the epidemiological impact of achieving these targets in India. Methods We constructed a dynamic-transmission model of the Indian HIV epidemic to project HIV infections and AIDS-related deaths that would occur in India over 15 years. We considered several scenarios: continuation of current care engagement (with early ART initiation), achieving 90-90-90 targets on time and delaying achievement by 5 or 10 years. Results In the base case, assuming continuation of current care engagement, we project 794 000 (95% uncertainty range (UR) 571 000–1 104 000) HIV infections and 689 000 (95% UR 468 000–976 000) AIDS-related deaths in India over 15 years. In this scenario, nearly half of PLWH diagnosed would fail to achieve viral suppression by 2030. With achievement of 90-90-90 targets, India could avert 392 000 (95% UR 248 000–559 000) transmissions (48% reduction) and 414 000 (95% UR 260 000–598 000) AIDS-related deaths (59% reduction) compared to the base-case scenario. Furthermore, fewer than 20 000 (95% UR 12 000–30 000) HIV infections would occur in 2030. Delaying achievement of targets resulted in a similar reduction in HIV incidence by 2030 but at the cost of excess overall infections and mortality. Conclusions India can halve the epidemiological burden of HIV over 15 years with achievement of the UNAIDS 90-90-90 targets. Reaching the targets on time will require comprehensive healthcare strengthening, especially in early diagnosis and treatment, expanded access to second-line and third-line ART and long-term retention in care. PMID:27388363

  14. Graded Achievement, Tested Achievement, and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-eight studies of grades, over a century, were reviewed using the argument-based approach to validity suggested by Kane as a theoretical framework. The review draws conclusions about the meaning of graded achievement, its relation to tested achievement, and changes in the construct of graded achievement over time. "Graded…

  15. NLRs, inflammasomes, and viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Sarah R.; Damania, Blossom

    2012-01-01

    NLR proteins are innate immune sensors that respond to microbial infection. Upon pathogen infection, some NLR proteins form large complexes, called inflammasomes, which activate caspase-1 and induce the production of active IL-1β and IL-18. Activation of inflammasomes can also lead to an inflammatory cell death program, named pyroptosis. In this review, we will discuss the role of various NLR proteins in sensing different viral infections, as well as the strategies used by several RNA and DNA viruses to counteract the antiviral effects of NLR-dependent inflammasomes. PMID:22581934

  16. Endogenized viral sequences in mammals.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Nicholas F; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2016-06-01

    Reverse-transcribed RNA molecules compose a significant portion of the human genome. Many of these RNA molecules were retrovirus genomes either infecting germline cells or having done so in a previous generation but retaining transcriptional activity. This mechanism itself accounts for a quarter of the genomic sequence information of mammals for which there is data. We understand relatively little about the causes and consequences of retroviral endogenization. This review highlights functions ascribed to sequences of viral origin endogenized into mammalian genomes and suggests some of the most pressing questions raised by these observations. PMID:27128186

  17. [Microbiological diagnosis of viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Alonso, Roberto; Aguilera, Antonio; Córdoba, Juan; Fuertes, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Liver inflammation or hepatitis has many different causes, both infectious and non-infectious. Among the former, viral infection is responsible for at least half of all hepatitis worldwide. Different viruses have been described with primary tropism for liver tissue. These microorganisms have been successively named with letters of the alphabet: A, B, C, D, E and G. The aim of this paper is to review this heterogeneous group of viruses in its most basic aspects, including clinical implications, treatment, main control, and prophylactic measures and, of special interest, diagnostic approaches, both serological and molecular, which are used for their detection, quantification and characterization. PMID:25742731

  18. Viral diseases of marine invertebrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, P. T.

    1984-03-01

    Approximately 40 viruses are known from marine sponges; turbellarian and monogenetic flatworms; cephalopod, bivalve, and gastropod mollusks; nereid polychaetes; and isopod and decapod crustaceans. Most of the viruses can be tentatively assigned to the Herpesviridae, Baculoviridae, Iridoviridae, Adenoviridae, Papovaviridae, Reoviridae, “Birnaviridae”, Bunyaviridae, Rhabdoviridae, and Picornaviridae. Viruslike particles found in oysters might be representatives of the Togaviridae and Retroviridae. Enveloped single-stranded RNA viruses from crustaceans have developmental and morphological characteristics intermediate between families, and some show evidence of relationships to the Paramyxoviridae as well as the Bunyaviridae or Rhabdoviridae. Certain small viruses of shrimp cannot be assigned, even tentatively, to a particular family. Some viruses cause disease in wild and captive hosts, others are associated with disease states but may not be primary instigators, and many occur in apparently normal animals. The frequency of viral disease in natural populations of marine invertebrates is unknown. Several viruses that cause disease in captive animals, with or without experimental intervention, have also been found in diseased wild hosts, including herpeslike viruses of crabs and oysters, iridovirus of octopus, and reolike and bunyalike viruses of crabs. Iridolike viruses have been implicated in massive mortalities of cultured oysters. Baculoviruses, and IHHN virus, which is of uncertain affinities, cause economically damaging diseases in cultured penaeid shrimp. Double or multiple viral infection is common in crabs. For example, a reolike virus and associated rhabdolike virus act synergistically to cause paralytic and fatal disease in Callinectes sapidus. Information on host range, most susceptible stage, and viral latency is available only for viruses of shrimp. One baculovirus attacks five species of New World penaeid shrimp. IHHN virus infects three species of

  19. Cough suppression disorders spectrum.

    PubMed

    Reich, Jerome M

    2014-02-01

    Volitional cough suppression, identified exclusively in females, is an unusual causal mechanism for instances of lobar atalectasis and bronchiectasis. It is a postulated mechanism for the genesis of Lady Windermere Syndrome. PMID:24462261

  20. Jet Noise Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  1. Detection of viral RNA by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Vyboh, Kishanda; Ajamian, Lara; Mouland, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    Viruses that infect cells elicit specific changes to normal cell functions which serve to divert energy and resources for viral replication. Many aspects of host cell function are commandeered by viruses, usually by the expression of viral gene products that recruit host cell proteins and machineries. Moreover, viruses engineer specific membrane organelles or tag on to mobile vesicles and motor proteins to target regions of the cell (during de novo infection, viruses co-opt molecular motor proteins to target the nucleus; later, during virus assembly, they will hijack cellular machineries that will help in the assembly of viruses). Less is understood on how viruses, in particular those with RNA genomes, coordinate the intracellular trafficking of both protein and RNA components and how they achieve assembly of infectious particles at specific loci in the cell. The study of RNA localization began in earlier work. Developing lower eukaryotic embryos and neuronal cells provided important biological information, and also underscored the importance of RNA localization in the programming of gene expression cascades. The study in other organisms and cell systems has yielded similar important information. Viruses are obligate parasites and must utilise their host cells to replicate. Thus, it is critical to understand how RNA viruses direct their RNA genomes from the nucleus, through the nuclear pore, through the cytoplasm and on to one of its final destinations, into progeny virus particles. FISH serves as a useful tool to identify changes in steady-state localization of viral RNA. When combined with immunofluorescence (IF) analysis, FISH/IF co-analyses will provide information on the co-localization of proteins with the viral RNA. This analysis therefore provides a good starting point to test for RNA-protein interactions by other biochemical or biophysical tests, since co-localization by itself is not enough evidence to be certain of an interaction. In studying viral RNA

  2. Update on Alcohol and Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gitto, Stefano; Vitale, Giovanni; Villa, Erica; Andreone, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is often associated with viral hepatitis. Although alcohol is known to worsen viral liver disease, the interactions between alcohol and viral hepatitis are not fully understood. Molecular alterations in the liver due to alcohol and viral hepatitis include effects on viral replication, increased oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, and a weakened immune response. Clinically, alcohol enhances disease progression and favors induction of primitive liver neoplasm. The use of new antivirals for hepatitis C and well-established drugs for hepatitis B will determine how viral hepatitis can be controlled in a large percentage of these patients. However, alcohol-related liver disease continues to represent a barrier for access to antivirals, and it remains an unresolved health issue. PMID:26356547

  3. Sustainable HIV Treatment in Africa through Viral Load-Informed Differentiated Care

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Andrew; Shroufi, Amir; Vojnov, Lara; Cohn, Jennifer; Roberts, Teri; Ellman, Tom; Bonner, Kimberly; Rousseau, Christine; Garnett, Geoff; Cambiano, Valentina; Nakagawa, Fumiyo; Ford, Deborah; Bansi-Matharu, Loveleen; Miners, Alec; Lundgren, Jens; Eaton, Jeff; Parkes-Ratanshi, Rosalind; Katz, Zachary; Maman, David; Ford, Nathan; Vitoria, Marco; Doherty, Meg; Dowdy, David; Nichols, Brooke; Murtagh, Maurine; Wareham, Meghan; Palamountain, Kara; Musanhu, Christine Chiedza; Stevens, Wendy; Katzenstein, David; Ciaranello, Andrea; Barnabas, Ruanne; Braithwaite, Scott; Bendavid, Eran; Nathoo, Kusum J; van de Vijver, David; Wilson, David; Holmes, Charles; Bershteyn, Anna; Walker, Simon; Raizes, Elliot; Jani, Ilesh; Nelson, Lisa; Peeling, Rosanna; Terris-Prestholt, Fern; Murungu, Joseph; Mutasa-Apollo, Tsitsi; Hallett, Timothy; Revill, Paul

    2016-01-01

    There are inefficiencies in current approaches to monitoring patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa. Patients typically attend clinics every 1–3 months for clinical assessment, with clinic costs being comparable with costs of drugs themselves, CD4 counts are measured every 6 months, yet patients are rarely switched to second-line therapies. To ensure sustainability of treatment programmes a transition to more cost-effective ART deliver is needed. In contrast to the CD4 count, measurement of the level of HIV RNA in plasma (“viral load”) provides a direct measure of current treatment effect. Viral load informed differentiated care is a means of tailoring care whereby those with suppressed viral load have less frequent clinical visits and attention is paid to those with unsuppressed viral load to promote adherence and timely switching to a second-line regimen. The most feasible approach in many countries to measure viral load is by collecting dried blood spot (DBS) samples for testing in regional laboratories, although there have been concerns over the sensitivity/specificity of DBS to define treatment failure and the delay in receiving results. We use modelling to synthesize available evidence and evaluate the cost-effectiveness of viral load-informed differentiated care, account for limitations of DBS. We find that viral load-informed differentiated care using DBS is expected to be cost-effective and is recommended as the strategy for patient monitoring, although further empirical evidence as the approach is rolled out would be of value. We also explore the potential benefits of future availability of point-of-care (POC) viral load tests. PMID:26633768

  4. Sustainable HIV treatment in Africa through viral-load-informed differentiated care.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Andrew; Shroufi, Amir; Vojnov, Lara; Cohn, Jennifer; Roberts, Teri; Ellman, Tom; Bonner, Kimberly; Rousseau, Christine; Garnett, Geoff; Cambiano, Valentina; Nakagawa, Fumiyo; Ford, Deborah; Bansi-Matharu, Loveleen; Miners, Alec; Lundgren, Jens D; Eaton, Jeffrey W; Parkes-Ratanshi, Rosalind; Katz, Zachary; Maman, David; Ford, Nathan; Vitoria, Marco; Doherty, Meg; Dowdy, David; Nichols, Brooke; Murtagh, Maurine; Wareham, Meghan; Palamountain, Kara M; Chakanyuka Musanhu, Christine; Stevens, Wendy; Katzenstein, David; Ciaranello, Andrea; Barnabas, Ruanne; Braithwaite, R Scott; Bendavid, Eran; Nathoo, Kusum J; van de Vijver, David; Wilson, David P; Holmes, Charles; Bershteyn, Anna; Walker, Simon; Raizes, Elliot; Jani, Ilesh; Nelson, Lisa J; Peeling, Rosanna; Terris-Prestholt, Fern; Murungu, Joseph; Mutasa-Apollo, Tsitsi; Hallett, Timothy B; Revill, Paul

    2015-12-01

    There are inefficiencies in current approaches to monitoring patients on antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa. Patients typically attend clinics every 1 to 3 months for clinical assessment. The clinic costs are comparable with the costs of the drugs themselves and CD4 counts are measured every 6 months, but patients are rarely switched to second-line therapies. To ensure sustainability of treatment programmes, a transition to more cost-effective delivery of antiretroviral therapy is needed. In contrast to the CD4 count, measurement of the level of HIV RNA in plasma (the viral load) provides a direct measure of the current treatment effect. Viral-load-informed differentiated care is a means of tailoring care so that those with suppressed viral load visit the clinic less frequently and attention is focussed on those with unsuppressed viral load to promote adherence and timely switching to a second-line regimen. The most feasible approach to measuring viral load in many countries is to collect dried blood spot samples for testing in regional laboratories; however, there have been concerns over the sensitivity and specificity of this approach to define treatment failure and the delay in returning results to the clinic. We use modelling to synthesize evidence and evaluate the cost-effectiveness of viral-load-informed differentiated care, accounting for limitations of dried blood sample testing. We find that viral-load-informed differentiated care using dried blood sample testing is cost-effective and is a recommended strategy for patient monitoring, although further empirical evidence as the approach is rolled out would be of value. We also explore the potential benefits of point-of-care viral load tests that may become available in the future. PMID:26633768

  5. Sequencing Needs for Viral Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S N; Lam, M; Mulakken, N J; Torres, C L; Smith, J R; Slezak, T

    2004-01-26

    We built a system to guide decisions regarding the amount of genomic sequencing required to develop diagnostic DNA signatures, which are short sequences that are sufficient to uniquely identify a viral species. We used our existing DNA diagnostic signature prediction pipeline, which selects regions of a target species genome that are conserved among strains of the target (for reliability, to prevent false negatives) and unique relative to other species (for specificity, to avoid false positives). We performed simulations, based on existing sequence data, to assess the number of genome sequences of a target species and of close phylogenetic relatives (''near neighbors'') that are required to predict diagnostic signature regions that are conserved among strains of the target species and unique relative to other bacterial and viral species. For DNA viruses such as variola (smallpox), three target genomes provide sufficient guidance for selecting species-wide signatures. Three near neighbor genomes are critical for species specificity. In contrast, most RNA viruses require four target genomes and no near neighbor genomes, since lack of conservation among strains is more limiting than uniqueness. SARS and Ebola Zaire are exceptional, as additional target genomes currently do not improve predictions, but near neighbor sequences are urgently needed. Our results also indicate that double stranded DNA viruses are more conserved among strains than are RNA viruses, since in most cases there was at least one conserved signature candidate for the DNA viruses and zero conserved signature candidates for the RNA viruses.

  6. Population Dynamics of Viral Inactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Krista; Li, Dong; Behrens, Manja; Streletzky, Kiril; Olsson, Ulf; Evilevitch, Alex

    We have investigated the population dynamics of viral inactivation in vitrousing time-resolved cryo electron microscopy combined with light and X-ray scattering techniques. Using bacteriophage λ as a model system for pressurized double-stranded DNA viruses, we found that virions incubated with their cell receptor eject their genome in a stochastic triggering process. The triggering of DNA ejection occurs in a non synchronized manner after the receptor addition, resulting in an exponential decay of the number of genome-filled viruses with time. We have explored the characteristic time constant of this triggering process at different temperatures, salt conditions, and packaged genome lengths. Furthermore, using the temperature dependence we determined an activation energy for DNA ejections. The dependences of the time constant and activation energy on internal DNA pressure, affected by salt conditions and encapsidated genome length, suggest that the triggering process is directly dependent on the conformational state of the encapsidated DNA. The results of this work provide insight into how the in vivo kinetics of the spread of viral infection are influenced by intra- and extra cellular environmental conditions. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1252522.

  7. Stochastic models of viral infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Tom

    2009-03-01

    We develop biophysical models of viral infections from a stochastic process perspective. The entry of enveloped viruses is treated as a stochastic multiple receptor and coreceptor engagement process that can lead to membrane fusion or endocytosis. The probabilities of entry via fusion and endocytosis are computed as functions of the receptor/coreceptor engagement rates. Since membrane fusion and endocytosis entry pathways can lead to very different infection outcomes, we delineate the parameter regimes conducive to each entry pathway. After entry, viral material is biochemically processed and degraded as it is transported towards the nucleus. Productive infections occur only when the material reaches the nucleus in the proper biochemical state. Thus, entry into the nucleus in an infectious state requires the proper timing of the cytoplasmic transport process. We compute the productive infection probability and show its nonmonotonic dependence on both transport speeds and biochemical transformation rates. Our results carry subtle consequences on the dosage and efficacy of antivirals such as reverse transcription inhibitors.

  8. Viral Subversion of the Nuclear Pore Complex

    PubMed Central

    Le Sage, Valerie; Mouland, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) acts as a selective barrier between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and is responsible for mediating communication by regulating the transport of RNA and proteins. Numerous viral pathogens have evolved different mechanisms to hijack the NPC in order to regulate trafficking of viral proteins, genomes and even capsids into and out of the nucleus thus promoting virus replication. The present review examines the different strategies and the specific nucleoporins utilized during viral infections as a means of promoting their life cycle and inhibiting host viral defenses. PMID:23959328

  9. Snapshots: Chromatin Control of Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Knipe, David M.; Lieberman, Paul M.; Jung, Jae U.; McBride, Alison A.; Morris, Kevin V.; Ott, Melanie; Margolis, David; Nieto, Amelia; Nevels, Michael; Parks, Robin J.; Kristie, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    Like their cellular host counterparts, many invading viral pathogens must contend with, modulate, and utilize the host cell’s chromatin machinery to promote efficient lytic infection or control persistent-latent states. While not intended to be comprehensive, this review represents a compilation of conceptual snapshots of the dynamic interplay of viruses with the chromatin environment. Contributions focus on chromatin dynamics during infection, viral circumvention of cellular chromatin repression, chromatin organization of large DNA viruses, tethering and persistence, viral interactions with cellular chromatin modulation machinery, and control of viral latency-reactivation cycles. PMID:23217624

  10. Viral diagnostics in the era of digital PCR

    PubMed Central

    Sedlak, Ruth Hall; Jerome, Keith R.

    2012-01-01

    Unlike quantitative PCR (qPCR), digital PCR (dPCR) achieves sensitive and accurate absolute quantitation of a DNA sample without the need for a standard curve. A single PCR reaction is divided into many separate reactions that each have a positive or negative signal. By applying Poisson statistics, the number of DNA molecules in the original sample is directly calculated from the number of positive and negative reactions. The recent availability of multiple commercial dPCR platforms has led to increased interest in clinical diagnostic applications, such as low viral load detection and low abundance mutant detection, where dPCR could be superior to traditional qPCR.Here we review current literature that demonstrates dPCR’s potential utility in viral diagnostics, particularly through absolute quantification of target DNA sequences and rare mutant allele detection. PMID:23182074

  11. A Comparison of Methods for Analyzing Viral Load Data in Studies of HIV Patients.

    PubMed

    Rose, Charles E; Gardner, Lytt; Craw, Jason; Girde, Sonali; Wawrzyniak, Andrew J; Drainoni, Mari-Lynn; Davila, Jessica; DeHovitz, Jack; Keruly, Jeanne C; Westfall, Andrew O; Marks, Gary

    2015-01-01

    HIV RNA viral load (VL) is a pivotal outcome variable in studies of HIV infected persons. We propose and investigate two frameworks for analyzing VL: (1) a single-measure VL (SMVL) per participant and (2) repeated measures of VL (RMVL) per participant. We compared these frameworks using a cohort of 720 HIV patients in care (4,679 post-enrollment VL measurements). The SMVL framework analyzes a single VL per participant, generally captured within a "window" of time. We analyzed three SMVL methods where the VL binary outcome is defined as suppressed or not suppressed. The omit-participant method uses a 8-month "window" (-6/+2 months) around month 24 to select the participant's VL closest to month 24 and removes participants from the analysis without a VL in the "window". The set-to-failure method expands on the omit-participant method by including participants without a VL within the "window" and analyzes them as not suppressed. The closest-VL method analyzes each participant's VL measurement closest to month 24. We investigated two RMVL methods: (1) repeat-binary classifies each VL measurement as suppressed or not suppressed and estimates the proportion of participants suppressed at month 24, and (2) repeat-continuous analyzes VL as a continuous variable to estimate the change in VL across time, and geometric mean (GM) VL and proportion of participants virally suppressed at month 24. Results indicated the RMVL methods have more precision than the SMVL methods, as evidenced by narrower confidence intervals for estimates of proportion suppressed and risk ratios (RR) comparing demographic strata. The repeat-continuous method had the most precision and provides more information than other considered methods. We generally recommend using the RMVL framework when there are repeated VL measurements per participant because it utilizes all available VL data, provides additional information, has more statistical power, and avoids the subjectivity of defining a "window." PMID

  12. Increased inflammation in sanctuary sites may explain viral blips in HIV infection

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Piovoso, Michael J.; Cardozo, E. Fabian; Zurakowski, Ryan

    2016-05-18

    Here, combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) suppress HIV-1 viral replication, such that viral load in plasma remains below the limit of detection in standard assays. However, intermittent episodes of transient viremia (blips) occur in a set of HIV-patients. Given that follicular hyperplasia occurs during lymphoid inflammation as a normal response to infection, it is hypothesised that when the diameter of the lymph node follicle (LNF) increases and crosses a critical size, a viral blip occurs due to cryptic viremia. To study this hypothesis, a theoretical analysis of a mathematical model is performed to find the conditions for virus suppression in allmore » compartments and different scenarios of LNF size changes are simulated. According to the analysis, blips with duration of around 30 days arise when the diameter rise rate is between 0.02 and 0.03 days–1. Moreover, the final diameter of the site is directly related to the steady states of the virus load after the occurrence of a blip. When the value of R0 is around 2.1, to have a steady-state below the limit of detection after the viral blip, the maximum final diameters should be greater than 0.7 mm so that there is a relative loss of connection between compartments.« less

  13. Increased inflammation in sanctuary sites may explain viral blips in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Cardozo, E Fabian; Piovoso, Michael J; Zurakowski, Ryan

    2016-08-01

    Combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) suppress HIV-1 viral replication, such that viral load in plasma remains below the limit of detection in standard assays. However, intermittent episodes of transient viremia (blips) occur in a set of HIV-patients. Given that follicular hyperplasia occurs during lymphoid inflammation as a normal response to infection, it is hypothesised that when the diameter of the lymph node follicle (LNF) increases and crosses a critical size, a viral blip occurs due to cryptic viremia. To study this hypothesis, a theoretical analysis of a mathematical model is performed to find the conditions for virus suppression in all compartments and different scenarios of LNF size changes are simulated. According to the analysis, blips with duration of around 30 days arise when the diameter rise rate is between 0.02 and 0.03 days(-1). Moreover, the final diameter of the site is directly related to the steady states of the virus load after the occurrence of a blip. When the value of R0 is around 2.1, to have a steady-state below the limit of detection after the viral blip, the maximum final diameters should be greater than 0.7 mm so that there is a relative loss of connection between compartments. PMID:27444025

  14. The role of IL-10 in regulating immunity to persistent viral infections

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Elizabeth B.; Brooks, David G.

    2012-01-01

    The immune system has evolved multipronged responses that are critical to effectively defend the body from invading pathogens and to clear infection. However, the same weapons employed to eradicate infection can have caustic effects on normal bystander cells. Therefore, tight regulation is vital and the host must balance engendering correct and sufficient immune responses to pathogens while limiting errant and excessive immunopathology. To accomplish this task a complex network of positive and negative immune signals are delivered that in most instances successfully eliminate pathogen. However, in response to some viral infections, immune function is rapidly suppressed leading to viral persistence. Immune suppression is a critical obstacle to the control of many persistent virus infections such as HIV, hepatitis C and hepatitis B virus, which together affect more than 500 million individuals worldwide. Thus, the ability to therapeutically enhance immunity is a potentially powerful approach to resolve persistent infections. The host derived cytokine IL-10 is a key player in the establishment and perpetuation of viral persistence. This chapter discusses the role of IL-10 in viral persistence and explores the exciting prospect of therapeutically blocking IL-10 to increase antiviral immunity and vaccine efficacy. PMID:20703965

  15. Suppression of Drug Resistance in Dengue Virus

    PubMed Central

    Mateo, Roberto; Nagamine, Claude M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue virus is a major human pathogen responsible for 400 million infections yearly. As with other RNA viruses, daunting challenges to antiviral design exist due to the high error rates of RNA-dependent RNA synthesis. Indeed, treatment of dengue virus infection with a nucleoside analog resulted in the expected genetic selection of resistant viruses in tissue culture and in mice. However, when the function of the oligomeric core protein was inhibited, no detectable selection of drug resistance in tissue culture or in mice was detected, despite the presence of drug-resistant variants in the population. Suppressed selection of drug-resistant virus correlated with cooligomerization of the targeted drug-susceptible and drug-resistant core proteins. The concept of “dominant drug targets,” in which inhibition of oligomeric viral assemblages leads to the formation of drug-susceptible chimeras, can therefore be used to prevent the outgrowth of drug resistance during dengue virus infection. PMID:26670386

  16. Viral ancestors of antiviral systems.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Luis P

    2011-10-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the 'Big Bang' theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features. PMID:22069523

  17. Addressing viral resistance through vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, Catherine; Schleif, Amanda; Heilman, Carole A

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a serious healthcare concern affecting millions of people around the world. Antiviral resistance has been viewed as a lesser threat than antibiotic resistance, but it is important to consider approaches to address this growing issue. While vaccination is a logical strategy, and has been shown to be successful many times over, next generation viral vaccines with a specific goal of curbing antiviral resistance will need to clear several hurdles including vaccine design, evaluation and implementation. This article suggests that a new model of vaccination may need to be considered: rather than focusing on public health, this model would primarily target sectors of the population who are at high risk for complications from certain infections. PMID:26604979

  18. Viral haemorrhagic fever in children.

    PubMed

    MacDermott, Nathalie E; De, Surjo; Herberg, Jethro A

    2016-05-01

    Viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) are currently at the forefront of the world's attention due to the recentZaire ebolavirusepidemic in West Africa. This epidemic has highlighted the frailty of the world's public health response mechanisms and demonstrated the potential risks to nations around the world of imported cases of epidemic diseases. While imported cases in children are less likely, the potential for such a scenario remains. It is therefore essential that paediatricians are aware of and prepared for potential imported cases of tropical diseases, VHFs being of particular importance due to their propensity to cause nosocomial spread. Examining the four families of viruses-Filoviridae,Arenaviridae,BunyaviridaeandFlaviviridae, we describe the different types of VHFs, with emphasis on differentiation from other diseases through detailed history-taking, their presentation and management from a paediatric perspective. PMID:26787609

  19. Viral Ancestors of Antiviral Systems

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Luis P.

    2011-01-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the ‘Big Bang’ theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features. PMID:22069523

  20. Viral hepatitis vaccination during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yueyuan; Jin, Hui; Zhang, Xuefeng; Wang, Bei; Liu, Pei

    2016-04-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious global public health problem. It is also a common cause of jaundice and gestational complications in pregnant women. Moreover, infected mothers can transmit the virus to their fetus or neonate, which may increase disease burden and decrease quality of life. To date, commercial vaccines have been developed for hepatitis A, B, and E and are available to the general population. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices currently accepts emergency vaccination against hepatitis A and B during pregnancy due to benefits that overweight the potential risks. While there are limited data from trials with limited numbers of samples that suggest the efficacy or safety of hepatitis B and E vaccines in pregnant women, additional data are necessary to provide evidence of vaccination during pregnancy. PMID:26833263

  1. Viral-associated thrombotic microangiopathies.

    PubMed

    Lopes da Silva, Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathies encompass a group of disorders characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia associated with hyaline thrombi (comprised primarily of platelet aggregates in the microcirculation), and varying degrees of end-organ failure. Many primary (genetic) and secondary etiological predisposing factors have been described-namely pregnancy, autoimmune disorders, cancer, drugs and antineoplastic therapy, bone marrow transplantation/solid organ transplantation, and infections. In the setting of infectious diseases, the association with Shiga or Shiga-like exotoxin of Escherichia coli 0157:h7 or Shigella dysenteriae type 1-induced typical hemolytic uremic syndrome is well known. Recently however, an increasing body of evidence suggests that viruses may also play an important role as trigger factors in the pathogenesis of thrombotic microangiopathies. This is a comprehensive review focusing on the current understanding of viral associated/induced endothelial stimulation and damage that ultimately leads to the development of this life-threatening multisystemic disorder. PMID:21727765

  2. Explosion suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Sapko, Michael J.; Cortese, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    An explosion suppression system and triggering apparatus therefor are provided for quenching gas and dust explosions. An electrically actuated suppression mechanism which dispenses an extinguishing agent into the path ahead of the propagating flame is actuated by a triggering device which is light powered. This triggering device is located upstream of the propagating flame and converts light from the flame to an electrical actuation signal. A pressure arming device electrically connects the triggering device to the suppression device only when the explosion is sensed by a further characteristic thereof beside the flame such as the pioneer pressure wave. The light powered triggering device includes a solar panel which is disposed in the path of the explosion and oriented between horizontally downward and vertical. Testing mechanisms are also preferably provided to test the operation of the solar panel and detonator as well as the pressure arming mechanism.

  3. Viral kinetic modeling: state of the art

    SciTech Connect

    Canini, Laetitia; Perelson, Alan S.

    2014-06-25

    Viral kinetic modeling has led to increased understanding of the within host dynamics of viral infections and the effects of therapy. Here we review recent developments in the modeling of viral infection kinetics with emphasis on two infectious diseases: hepatitis C and influenza. We review how viral kinetic modeling has evolved from simple models of viral infections treated with a drug or drug cocktail with an assumed constant effectiveness to models that incorporate drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, as well as phenomenological models that simply assume drugs have time varying-effectiveness. We also discuss multiscale models that include intracellular events in viral replication, models of drug-resistance, models that include innate and adaptive immune responses and models that incorporate cell-to-cell spread of infection. Overall, viral kinetic modeling has provided new insights into the understanding of the disease progression and the modes of action of several drugs. In conclusion, we expect that viral kinetic modeling will be increasingly used in the coming years to optimize drug regimens in order to improve therapeutic outcomes and treatment tolerability for infectious diseases.

  4. Macrophages and the Viral Dissemination Super Highway

    PubMed Central

    Klepper, Arielle; Branch, Andrea D

    2016-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are key components of the innate immune system yet they are often the victims of attack by infectious agents. This review examines the significance of viral infection of macrophages. The central hypothesis is that macrophage tropism enhances viral dissemination and persistence, but these changes may come at the cost of reduced replication in cells other than macrophages. PMID:26949751

  5. Mitochondria Apply the Brake to Viral Immunity.

    PubMed

    Ashton-Rickardt, Philip G

    2016-06-14

    The development and function of cytotoxic CD8 T cells (CTLs), which provide immunity to viral infections, are regulated by changes in mitochondrial respiration. Champagne et al. (2016) describe a new mechanism through which mitochondrial metabolism controls production of ATP required for the secretion of critical anti-viral molecules by CTLs. PMID:27304497

  6. Molecular biology of bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) are arguably the most important viral pathogen of ruminants worldwide and can cause severe economic loss. Clinical symptoms of the disease caused by BVDV range from subclinical to severe acute hemorrhagic syndrome, with the severity of disease being strain depend...

  7. Ethical Considerations in Research Participation Virality.

    PubMed

    Ellis-Barton, Carol

    2016-07-01

    This article seeks to commence and encourage discussion around the upcoming ethical challenges of virality in network structures. When the call for participation in a research project on lupus in Ireland went from an advertisement in a newsletter to a meme (unit of transmissible information) on a closed Facebook page, the ethical considerations of virality were raised. The article analyzes the Association of Internet Researchers guidelines, Facebook policies, and the context of privacy in relation to virality. Virality creates the leverage for methodological pluralism. The nature of the inquiry can determine the method rather than the other way around. Viral ethical considerations are evolving due to the cyber world becoming the primary meme of communication, with flexibility in the researcher's protocol providing opportunities for efficient, cost-effective, and diverse recruitment. PMID:27534590

  8. Non-random patterns in viral diversity

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Simon J.; Islam, Ariful; Johnson, Christine; Navarrete-Macias, Isamara; Liang, Eliza; Jain, Komal; Hitchens, Peta L.; Che, Xiaoyu; Soloyvov, Alexander; Hicks, Allison L.; Ojeda-Flores, Rafael; Zambrana-Torrelio, Carlos; Ulrich, Werner; Rostal, Melinda K.; Petrosov, Alexandra; Garcia, Joel; Haider, Najmul; Wolfe, Nathan; Goldstein, Tracey; Morse, Stephen S.; Rahman, Mahmudur; Epstein, Jonathan H.; Mazet, Jonna K.; Daszak, Peter; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2015-01-01

    It is currently unclear whether changes in viral communities will ever be predictable. Here we investigate whether viral communities in wildlife are inherently structured (inferring predictability) by looking at whether communities are assembled through deterministic (often predictable) or stochastic (not predictable) processes. We sample macaque faeces across nine sites in Bangladesh and use consensus PCR and sequencing to discover 184 viruses from 14 viral families. We then use network modelling and statistical null-hypothesis testing to show the presence of non-random deterministic patterns at different scales, between sites and within individuals. We show that the effects of determinism are not absolute however, as stochastic patterns are also observed. In showing that determinism is an important process in viral community assembly we conclude that it should be possible to forecast changes to some portion of a viral community, however there will always be some portion for which prediction will be unlikely. PMID:26391192

  9. Hepatitis C Viral Kinetics in Special Populations

    PubMed Central

    Dahari, Harel; Layden-Almer, Jennifer E.; Perelson, Alan S.; Layden, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    Mathematical models of hepatitis C viral (HCV) kinetics provide a means of estimating the antiviral effectiveness of therapy, the rate of virion clearance and the rate of loss of HCV-infected cells. They have also proved useful in evaluating the extrahepatic contribution to HCV plasma viremia and they have suggested mechanisms of action for both interferon-α and ribavirin. Viral kinetic models can explain the observed HCV RNA profiles under treatment, e.g., flat partial response, biphasic and triphasic viral decay and viral rebound. Current therapy with (pegylated) interferon-α and ribavirin has a poorer success in patients having insulin resistance, hepatic fibrosis, African American ethnicity, HCV/HIV-coinfection, HCV genotype-1 and high baseline viral load. The use of mathematical modeling and statistical analysis of experimental data have been useful in understanding some of these treatment obstacles. PMID:19148305

  10. Suppression of newborn natural killer cell activity by prostaglandin E2

    SciTech Connect

    Milch, P.O.; Salvatore, W.; Luft, B.; Baker, D.A.

    1988-10-01

    The effect of prostaglandin E2 on natural killer cell activity of cord blood was examined. Natural killer cell activity, determined by chromium 51 release, was significantly reduced after prostaglandin E2 (1 microgram/ml) treatment. Prostaglandin E2 has been found to enhance the cellular spread of herpesvirus. Thus prostaglandins may enhance viral infections indirectly by suppressing natural killer cell activity.

  11. Maize dwarf mosaic can reduce weed suppressive ability of sweet corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize dwarf mosaic (MDM) stunts corn growth, delays development, and is the most prevalent viral disease of sweet corn grown in many regions of North America and Europe. Although weeds evade control in most sweet corn fields, the extent to which MDM influences the weed suppressive ability of the cro...

  12. Comparative Analysis of Measures of Viral Reservoirs in HIV-1 Eradication Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lysenko, Elena S.; Bosch, Ronald J.; Lai, Jun; Chioma, Stanley; Emad, Fatemeh; Abdel-Mohsen, Mohamed; Hoh, Rebecca; Hecht, Frederick; Hunt, Peter; Somsouk, Ma; Wong, Joseph; Johnston, Rowena; Siliciano, Robert F.; Richman, Douglas D.; O'Doherty, Una; Palmer, Sarah; Deeks, Steven G.; Siliciano, Janet D.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 reservoirs preclude virus eradication in patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The best characterized reservoir is a small, difficult-to-quantify pool of resting memory CD4+ T cells carrying latent but replication-competent viral genomes. Because strategies targeting this latent reservoir are now being tested in clinical trials, well-validated high-throughput assays that quantify this reservoir are urgently needed. Here we compare eleven different approaches for quantitating persistent HIV-1 in 30 patients on HAART, using the original viral outgrowth assay for resting CD4+ T cells carrying inducible, replication-competent viral genomes as a standard for comparison. PCR-based assays for cells containing HIV-1 DNA gave infected cell frequencies at least 2 logs higher than the viral outgrowth assay, even in subjects who started HAART during acute/early infection. This difference may reflect defective viral genomes. The ratio of infected cell frequencies determined by viral outgrowth and PCR-based assays varied dramatically between patients. Although strong correlations with the viral outgrowth assay could not be formally excluded for most assays, correlations achieved statistical significance only for integrated HIV-1 DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and HIV-1 RNA/DNA ratio in rectal CD4+ T cells. Residual viremia was below the limit of detection in many subjects and did not correlate with the viral outgrowth assays. The dramatic differences in infected cell frequencies and the lack of a precise correlation between culture and PCR-based assays raise the possibility that the successful clearance of latently infected cells may be masked by a larger and variable pool of cells with defective proviruses. These defective proviruses are detected by PCR but may not be affected by reactivation strategies and may not require eradication to accomplish an effective cure. A molecular understanding of the discrepancy between infected cell

  13. An HIV-Encoded Antisense Long Noncoding RNA Epigenetically Regulates Viral Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Saayman, Sheena; Ackley, Amanda; Turner, Anne-Marie W; Famiglietti, Marylinda; Bosque, Alberto; Clemson, Matthew; Planelles, Vicente; Morris, Kevin V

    2014-01-01

    The abundance of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) and their wide range of functional roles in human cells are fast becoming realized. Importantly, lncRNAs have been identified as epigenetic modulators and consequently play a pivotal role in the regulation of gene expression. A human immunodeficiency virus-encoded antisense RNA transcript has recently been reported and we sought to characterize this RNA and determine its potential role in viral transcription regulation. The intrinsic properties of this human immunodeficiency virus-expressed lncRNA were characterized and the data presented here suggest that it functions as an epigenetic brake to modulate viral transcription. Suppression of this long antisense transcript with small single-stranded antisense RNAs resulted in the activation of viral gene expression. This lncRNA was found to localize to the 5′ long-term repeats (LTR) and to usurp components of endogenous cellular pathways that are involved in lncRNA directed epigenetic gene silencing. Collectively, we find that this viral expressed antisense lncRNA is involved in modulating human immunodeficiency virus gene expression and that this regulatory effect is due to an alteration in the epigenetic landscape at the viral promoter. PMID:24576854

  14. Characterization of novel hepadnaviral RNA species accumulated in hepatoma cells treated with viral DNA polymerase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pinghu; Liu, Fei; Guo, Fang; Zhao, Qiong; Chang, Jinhong; Guo, Ju-Tao

    2016-07-01

    Inhibitors of hepadnaviral DNA polymerases are predicted to inhibit both minus and plus strand of viral DNA synthesis and arrest viral DNA replication at the stage of pregenomic (pg) RNA-containing nucleocapsids. However, analyses of the RNA species of human and duck hepatitis B viruses (HBV and DHBV, respectively) in hepatoma cells treated with viral DNA polymerase inhibitors revealed the genesis of novel RNA species migrating slightly faster than the full-length pgRNA. The DNA polymerase inhibitor-induced accumulation of these RNA species were abolished in the presence of alpha-interferon or HBV nucleocapsid assembly inhibitors. Moreover, they were protected from microccocal nuclease digestion and devoid of a poly-A tail. These characteristics suggest that the novel RNA species are most likely generated from RNase H cleavage of encapsidated pgRNA, after primer translocation and synthesis of the 5' terminal portion of minus strand DNA. In support of this hypothesis, DNA polymerase inhibitor treatment of chicken hepatoma cells transfected with a DHBV genome encoding an RNase H inactive DNA polymerase (E696H) failed to produce such RNA species. Our results thus suggest that the currently available DNA polymerase inhibitors do not efficiently arrest minus strand DNA synthesis at the early stage in hepatocytes. Hence, development of novel antiviral agents that more potently suppress viral DNA synthesis or viral nucleocapsid assembly inhibitors that are mechanistically complementary to the currently available DNA polymerase inhibitors are warranted. PMID:27083116

  15. Photoimmune suppression and photocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Stephen E

    2002-03-01

    The primary cause of non-melanoma skin cancer, the most prevalent form of human neoplasia, is the ultraviolet (UV) radiation found in sunlight. Exposing mice to UV radiation induces skin cancers that are highly antigenic. Upon transfer of an UV-induced skin cancer to a normal syngeneic mouse, the tumor cells are recognized and rapidly destroyed by the immune system of the recipient. This raises the question of how these cancers avoided immune destruction during their development in the UV-irradiated host. This question was answered when it was discovered that in addition to being carcinogenic, UV radiation was also immunosuppressive. Studies with immune suppressed transplantation recipients, and biopsy proven skin cancer patients have confirmed that UV-induced immune suppression is a risk factor for skin cancer development in humans. It is of great importance, therefore, to understand the mechanisms underlying UV-induced immune suppression. The focus of this manuscript will be to use some examples from the more recent scientific literature to review the mechanisms by which UV radiation suppresses the immune response and allows for the progressive outgrowth of antigenic skin tumors. PMID:11861222

  16. Parasitic suppressing circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, J. T.; Raposa, F. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A circuit for suppressing parasitic oscillations across an inductor operating in a resonant mode is described. The circuit includes a switch means and resistive means connected serially across the inductor. A unidirectional resistive-capacitive network is also connected across the inductor and to the switch means to automatically render the switch means conducting when inductive current through the inductor ceases to flow.

  17. Viral genome methylation as an epigenetic defense against geminiviruses.

    PubMed

    Raja, Priya; Sanville, Bradley C; Buchmann, R Cody; Bisaro, David M

    2008-09-01

    Geminiviruses encapsidate single-stranded DNA genomes that replicate in plant cell nuclei through double-stranded DNA intermediates that associate with cellular histone proteins to form minichromosomes. Like most plant viruses, geminiviruses are targeted by RNA silencing and encode suppressor proteins such as AL2 and L2 to counter this defense. These related proteins can suppress silencing by multiple mechanisms, one of which involves interacting with and inhibiting adenosine kinase (ADK), a cellular enzyme associated with the methyl cycle that generates S-adenosyl-methionine, an essential methyltransferase cofactor. Thus, we hypothesized that the viral genome is targeted by small-RNA-directed methylation. Here, we show that Arabidopsis plants with mutations in genes encoding cytosine or histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) methyltransferases, RNA-directed methylation pathway components, or ADK are hypersensitive to geminivirus infection. We also demonstrate that viral DNA and associated histone H3 are methylated in infected plants and that cytosine methylation levels are significantly reduced in viral DNA isolated from methylation-deficient mutants. Finally, we demonstrate that Beet curly top virus L2- mutant DNA present in tissues that have recovered from infection is hypermethylated and that host recovery requires AGO4, a component of the RNA-directed methylation pathway. We propose that plants use chromatin methylation as a defense against DNA viruses, which geminiviruses counter by inhibiting global methylation. In addition, our results establish that geminiviruses can be useful models for genome methylation in plants and suggest that there are redundant pathways leading to cytosine methylation. PMID:18596098

  18. Type I IFN Signaling Is Dispensable during Secondary Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Hosking, Martin P; Flynn, Claudia T; Whitton, J Lindsay

    2016-08-01

    Innate immune responses in general, and type I interferons (T1IFNs) in particular, play an important and often essential role during primary viral infections, by directly combatting the virus and by maximizing the primary adaptive immune response. Several studies have suggested that T1IFNs also contribute very substantially to the secondary (recall) response; they are thought (i) to be required to drive the early attrition of memory T cells, (ii) to support the subsequent expansion of surviving virus-specific memory cells, and (iii) to assist in the suppression and clearance of the infectious agent. However, many of these observations were predicated upon models in which T1IFN signaling was interrupted prior to a primary immune response, raising the possibility that the resulting memory cells might be intrinsically abnormal. We have directly addressed this by using an inducible-Cre model system in which the host remains genetically-intact during the primary response to infection, and in which T1IFN signaling can be effectively ablated prior to secondary viral challenge. We report that, in stark contrast to primary infection, T1IFN signaling is not required during the recall response. IFNαβR-deficient memory CD8+ and CD4+ memory T cells undergo attrition and expansion with kinetics that are indistinguishable from those of receptor-sufficient cells. Moreover, even in the absence of functional T1IFN signaling, the host's immune capacity to rapidly suppress, and then to eradicate, a secondary infection remains intact. Thus, this study shows that T1IFN signaling is dispensable during the recall response to a virus infection. Moreover, two broader implications may be drawn. First, a T cell's requirement for a cytokine is highly dependent on the cell's maturation / differentiation status. Consequently, second, these data underscore the importance of evaluating a gene's impact by modulating its expression or function in a temporally-controllable manner. PMID:27580079

  19. Animal models for viral infection and cell exhaustion

    PubMed Central

    McGary, Colleen S.; Silvestri, Guido; Paiardini, Mirko

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Despite eliciting an early antiviral T cell response, HIV-specific T cells are unable to prevent disease progression, partly due to their loss of effector functions, known as T cell exhaustion. Restoring this T cell functionality represents a critical step for regaining immunological control of HIV-1 replication, and may be fundamental for the development of a functional cure for HIV. In this context, the use of animal models is invaluable for evaluating the efficacy and mechanisms of novel therapeutics aimed at reinvigorating T cell functions. Recent findings While non-human primates continue to be a mainstay for studying HIV pathogenesis and therapies, recent advances in humanized mouse models have improved their ability to recapitulate the features of cell exhaustion during HIV infection. Targeting coinhibitory receptors in HIV- and SIV-infected animals has resulted in viral load reductions, presumably by reinvigorating the effector functions of T cells. Additionally, studies combining PD-1 blockade with suppressive ART provide further support of the use of coinhibitory receptor blockades in restoring T cell function by delaying viral load rebound upon ART interruption. Future in vivo studies should build on recent in vitro data supporting the simultaneous targeting of multiple regulators of cell exhaustion. Summary In this review, we describe the most recent advances in the use of animal models for the study of cell exhaustion following HIV/SIV infection. These findings suggest that the use of animal models is increasingly critical in translating immunotherapeutics into clinical practice. PMID:25023622

  20. Patient management of post-viral fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Ho-Yen, D O

    1990-01-01

    A case definition for post-viral fatigue syndrome is proposed within which various subgroups of patients exist. Any one treatment may not apply to all the subgroups. In particular, patients' experiences do not show that avoidance of exercise is maladaptive. It is proposed that the recently ill often try to exercise to fitness whereas the chronically ill have learnt to avoid exercise. Recovery is more likely to be achieved if patients learn about their illness and do not exhaust their available energy. PMID:2107839

  1. Viral kinetic modeling: state of the art

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Canini, Laetitia; Perelson, Alan S.

    2014-06-25

    Viral kinetic modeling has led to increased understanding of the within host dynamics of viral infections and the effects of therapy. Here we review recent developments in the modeling of viral infection kinetics with emphasis on two infectious diseases: hepatitis C and influenza. We review how viral kinetic modeling has evolved from simple models of viral infections treated with a drug or drug cocktail with an assumed constant effectiveness to models that incorporate drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, as well as phenomenological models that simply assume drugs have time varying-effectiveness. We also discuss multiscale models that include intracellular events in viralmore » replication, models of drug-resistance, models that include innate and adaptive immune responses and models that incorporate cell-to-cell spread of infection. Overall, viral kinetic modeling has provided new insights into the understanding of the disease progression and the modes of action of several drugs. In conclusion, we expect that viral kinetic modeling will be increasingly used in the coming years to optimize drug regimens in order to improve therapeutic outcomes and treatment tolerability for infectious diseases.« less

  2. Viral infections of the folds (intertriginous areas).

    PubMed

    Adışen, Esra; Önder, Meltem

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are considered intracellular obligates with a nucleic acid, either RNA or DNA. They have the ability to encode proteins involved in viral replication and production of the protective coat within the host cells but require host cell ribosomes and mitochondria for translation. The members of the families Herpesviridae, Poxviridae, Papovaviridae, and Picornaviridae are the most commonly known agents for the cutaneous viral diseases, but other virus families, such as Adenoviridae, Togaviridae, Parvoviridae, Paramyxoviridae, Flaviviridae, and Hepadnaviridae, can also infect the skin. Though the cutaneous manifestations of viral infections are closely related to the type and the transmission route of the virus, viral skin diseases may occur in almost any part of the body. In addition to friction caused by skin-to-skin touch, skin folds are warm and moist areas of the skin that have limited air circulation. These features provide a fertile breeding ground for many kinds of microorganisms, including bacteria and fungi. In contrast to specific bacterial and fungal agents that have an affinity for the skin folds, except for viral diseases of the anogenital area, which have well-known presentations, viral skin infections that have a special affinity to the skin folds are not known. Many viral exanthems may affect the skin folds during the course of the infection, but here we focus only on the ones that usually affect the fold areas and also on the less well-known conditions or recently described associations. PMID:26051057

  3. Assembly of viral genomes from metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Saskia L.; Bodewes, Rogier; Ruiz-Gonzalez, Aritz; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Koopmans, Marion P.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Schürch, Anita C.

    2014-01-01

    Viral infections remain a serious global health issue. Metagenomic approaches are increasingly used in the detection of novel viral pathogens but also to generate complete genomes of uncultivated viruses. In silico identification of complete viral genomes from sequence data would allow rapid phylogenetic characterization of these new viruses. Often, however, complete viral genomes are not recovered, but rather several distinct contigs derived from a single entity are, some of which have no sequence homology to any known proteins. De novo assembly of single viruses from a metagenome is challenging, not only because of the lack of a reference genome, but also because of intrapopulation variation and uneven or insufficient coverage. Here we explored different assembly algorithms, remote homology searches, genome-specific sequence motifs, k-mer frequency ranking, and coverage profile binning to detect and obtain viral target genomes from metagenomes. All methods were tested on 454-generated sequencing datasets containing three recently described RNA viruses with a relatively large genome which were divergent to previously known viruses from the viral families Rhabdoviridae and Coronaviridae. Depending on specific characteristics of the target virus and the metagenomic community, different assembly and in silico gap closure strategies were successful in obtaining near complete viral genomes. PMID:25566226

  4. Suppression of Coronavirus Replication by Cyclophilin Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Sato, Yuka; Sasaki, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Coronaviruses infect a variety of mammalian and avian species and cause serious diseases in humans, cats, mice, and birds in the form of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), mouse hepatitis, and avian infectious bronchitis, respectively. No effective vaccine or treatment has been developed for SARS-coronavirus or FIP virus, both of which cause lethal diseases. It has been reported that a cyclophilin inhibitor, cyclosporin A (CsA), could inhibit the replication of coronaviruses. CsA is a well-known immunosuppressive drug that binds to cellular cyclophilins to inhibit calcineurin, a calcium-calmodulin-activated serine/threonine-specific phosphatase. The inhibition of calcineurin blocks the translocation of nuclear factor of activated T cells from the cytosol into the nucleus, thus preventing the transcription of genes encoding cytokines such as interleukin-2. Cyclophilins are peptidyl-prolyl isomerases with physiological functions that have been described for many years to include chaperone and foldase activities. Also, many viruses require cyclophilins for replication; these include human immunodeficiency virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and hepatitis C virus. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to the suppression of viral replication differ for different viruses. This review describes the suppressive effects of CsA on coronavirus replication. PMID:23698397

  5. Suppression of coronavirus replication by cyclophilin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Sato, Yuka; Sasaki, Takashi

    2013-05-01

    Coronaviruses infect a variety of mammalian and avian species and cause serious diseases in humans, cats, mice, and birds in the form of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), mouse hepatitis, and avian infectious bronchitis, respectively. No effective vaccine or treatment has been developed for SARS-coronavirus or FIP virus, both of which cause lethal diseases. It has been reported that a cyclophilin inhibitor, cyclosporin A (CsA), could inhibit the replication of coronaviruses. CsA is a well-known immunosuppressive drug that binds to cellular cyclophilins to inhibit calcineurin, a calcium-calmodulin-activated serine/threonine-specific phosphatase. The inhibition of calcineurin blocks the translocation of nuclear factor of activated T cells from the cytosol into the nucleus, thus preventing the transcription of genes encoding cytokines such as interleukin-2. Cyclophilins are peptidyl-prolyl isomerases with physiological functions that have been described for many years to include chaperone and foldase activities. Also, many viruses require cyclophilins for replication; these include human immunodeficiency virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and hepatitis C virus. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to the suppression of viral replication differ for different viruses. This review describes the suppressive effects of CsA on coronavirus replication. PMID:23698397

  6. Ebola viral disease and pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Caluwaerts, Séverine; Achar, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Ebola viral disease’s interaction with pregnancy is poorly understood and remains a particular challenge for medical and para-medical personnel responding to an outbreak. This review article is written with the benefit of hindsight and experience from the largest recorded Ebola outbreak in history. We have provided a broad overview of the issues that arise for pregnant women and for the professionals treating them during an Ebola outbreak. The discussion focuses on the specifics of Ebola infection in pregnancy and possible management strategies, including the delivery of an infected woman. We have also discussed the wider challenges posed to pregnant women and their carers during an epidemic, including the identification of suspected Ebola-infected pregnant women and the impact of the disease on pre-existing health services. This paper outlines current practices in the field, as well as highlighting the gaps in our knowledge and the paramount need to protect the health-care workers directly involved in the management of pregnant women. PMID:26457118

  7. Viral population estimation using pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Nicholas; Pachter, Lior; Mitsuya, Yumi; Rhee, Soo-Yon; Wang, Chunlin; Gharizadeh, Baback; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Shafer, Robert W; Beerenwinkel, Niko

    2008-04-01

    The diversity of virus populations within single infected hosts presents a major difficulty for the natural immune response as well as for vaccine design and antiviral drug therapy. Recently developed pyrophosphate-based sequencing technologies (pyrosequencing) can be used for quantifying this diversity by ultra-deep sequencing of virus samples. We present computational methods for the analysis of such sequence data and apply these techniques to pyrosequencing data obtained from HIV populations within patients harboring drug-resistant virus strains. Our main result is the estimation of the population structure of the sample from the pyrosequencing reads. This inference is based on a statistical approach to error correction, followed by a combinatorial algorithm for constructing a minimal set of haplotypes that explain the data. Using this set of explaining haplotypes, we apply a statistical model to infer the frequencies of the haplotypes in the population via an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. We demonstrate that pyrosequencing reads allow for effective population reconstruction by extensive simulations and by comparison to 165 sequences obtained directly from clonal sequencing of four independent, diverse HIV populations. Thus, pyrosequencing can be used for cost-effective estimation of the structure of virus populations, promising new insights into viral evolutionary dynamics and disease control strategies. PMID:18437230

  8. Thrombosis Associated with Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Luca; Gerdes, Victor E.A.; Guasti, Luigina; Squizzato, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Viral hepatitis may promote the development of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and, more specifically, portal vein thrombosis (PVT). In this narrative review, we summarize the clinical data and discuss the possible pathogenetic roles of cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and hepatitis A, B, and C viruses (HAV, HBV, HCV) in the occurrence of VTE. CMV is the first qualified candidate to enter the list of VTE minor risk factors, and in the rare case of fulminant infection, both EBV and CMV, like any severe infection or inflammatory disease, increase risk for thrombosis. In chronic hepatitis B and C, it remains controversial whether antiphospholipid antibodies are important for thrombotic complications or merely an epiphenomenon. Retinal vein occlusion described in chronic hepatitis C is usually attributed to the treatment with interferon. Eltrombopag, used for HCV-related thrombocytopenia, has been associated with increased thrombotic risk. The imbalance between procoagulant and anticoagulant factors associated with chronic liver disease may have clinical implications. This may help to explain why these patients are not protected from clinical events such as VTE, PVT, and the progression of liver fibrosis. PMID:26357629

  9. Viral vectors for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Harrop, Richard; Carroll, Miles W

    2006-01-01

    Over the last decade, immunotherapy approaches for the treatment of cancer have been investigated with renewed vigour, perhaps catalyzed by the clinical successes seen with monoclonal antibody and cytokine based therapies. The identification of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) in multiple cancer types has enabled the development of targeted immunotherapies and allayed some of the safety concerns associated with the induction of deleterious autoimmune reactions. In addition to the TAA or therapeutic gene, the antigen delivery system is equally as important for the development of a successful cancer vaccine. One approach to induce a potent and targeted antitumor response is to use viruses to deliver the TAA to cells of the immune system. A diverse array of oncolytic viruses and recombinant viral vectors encoding numerous therapeutic genes or TAAs have been tested in pre-clinical studies and produced results which, in some cases, justify their clinical development as potential cancer immunotherapies. Within the last 5-10 years, many such recombinant vectors have made the transition from pre-clinical research to clinical development and it is these, which are given most weight in this review. PMID:16146772

  10. Comparing viral metagenomics methods using a highly multiplexed human viral pathogens reagent

    PubMed Central

    Li, Linlin; Deng, Xutao; Mee, Edward T.; Collot-Teixeira, Sophie; Anderson, Rob; Schepelmann, Silke; Minor, Philip D.; Delwart, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Unbiased metagenomic sequencing holds significant potential as a diagnostic tool for the simultaneous detection of any previously genetically described viral nucleic acids in clinical samples. Viral genome sequences can also inform on likely phenotypes including drug susceptibility or neutralization serotypes. In this study, different variables of the laboratory methods often used to generate viral metagenomics libraries on the efficiency of viral detection and virus genome coverage were compared. A biological reagent consisting of 25 different human RNA and DNA viral pathogens was used to estimate the effect of filtration and nuclease digestion, DNA/RNA extraction methods, pre-amplification and the use of different library preparation kits on the detection of viral nucleic acids. Filtration and nuclease treatment led to slight decreases in the percentage of viral sequence reads and number of viruses detected. For nucleic acid extractions silica spin columns improved viral sequence recovery relative to magnetic beads and Trizol extraction. Pre-amplification using random RT-PCR while generating more viral sequence reads resulted in detection of fewer viruses, more overlapping sequences, and lower genome coverage. The ScriptSeq library preparation method retrieved more viruses and a greater fraction of their genomes than the TruSeq and Nextera methods. Viral metagenomics sequencing was able to simultaneously detect up to 22 different viruses in the biological reagent analyzed including all those detected by qPCR. Further optimization will be required for the detection of viruses in biologically more complex samples such as tissues, blood, or feces. PMID:25497414

  11. A Tale of Two RNAs during Viral Infection: How Viruses Antagonize mRNAs and Small Non-Coding RNAs in The Host Cell.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Kristina M; Nag, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Viral infection initiates an array of changes in host gene expression. Many viruses dampen host protein expression and attempt to evade the host anti-viral defense machinery. Host gene expression is suppressed at several stages of host messenger RNA (mRNA) formation including selective degradation of translationally competent messenger RNAs. Besides mRNAs, host cells also express a variety of noncoding RNAs, including small RNAs, that may also be subject to inhibition upon viral infection. In this review we focused on different ways viruses antagonize coding and noncoding RNAs in the host cell to its advantage. PMID:27271653

  12. A Tale of Two RNAs during Viral Infection: How Viruses Antagonize mRNAs and Small Non-Coding RNAs in The Host Cell

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Kristina M.; Nag, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Viral infection initiates an array of changes in host gene expression. Many viruses dampen host protein expression and attempt to evade the host anti-viral defense machinery. Host gene expression is suppressed at several stages of host messenger RNA (mRNA) formation including selective degradation of translationally competent messenger RNAs. Besides mRNAs, host cells also express a variety of noncoding RNAs, including small RNAs, that may also be subject to inhibition upon viral infection. In this review we focused on different ways viruses antagonize coding and noncoding RNAs in the host cell to its advantage. PMID:27271653

  13. Viral Evasion of Natural Killer Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Li, Xiaojuan; Kuang, Ersheng

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in antiviral innate defenses because of their abilities to kill infected cells and secrete regulatory cytokines. Additionally, NK cells exhibit adaptive memory-like antigen-specific responses, which represent a novel antiviral NK cell defense mechanism. Viruses have evolved various strategies to evade the recognition and destruction by NK cells through the downregulation of the NK cell activating receptors. Here, we review the recent findings on viral evasion of NK cells via the impairment of NK cell-activating receptors and ligands, which provide new insights on the relationship between NK cells and viral actions during persistent viral infections. PMID:27077876

  14. Some vexations that challenge viral immunology

    PubMed Central

    Rouse, Barry T.; Mueller, Scott N.

    2016-01-01

    The field of viral immunology seeks to understand mechanisms of virus-host interaction with a view of applying this knowledge to the design of effective vaccines and immunomodulators that control viral infections. This brief review discusses several areas of the field that hold substantial promise for translation, but where further work is critically required to find solutions. We emphasize that our fundamental understanding of virus-host relationships is moving in leaps and bounds, but we lag behind in applying this knowledge to the successful control of many viral infections. PMID:27303640

  15. Endosomal vesicles as vehicles for viral genomes

    PubMed Central

    Nour, Adel M.; Modis, Yorgo

    2014-01-01

    The endocytic pathway is the principal cell entry pathway for large cargo and pathogens. Among the wide variety of specialized lipid structures within endosomes, the intraluminal vesicles formed in early endosomes and transferred to late endosomal compartments are emerging as critical effectors of viral infection and immune recognition. Various viruses deliver their genomes into these intraluminal vesicles, which serve as vehicles to transport the genome to the nuclear periphery for replication. When secreted as exosomes, intraluminal vesicles containing viral genomes can infect permissive cells, or activate immune responses in myeloid cells. We therefore propose that endosomal intraluminal vesicles and exosomes are key effectors of viral pathogenesis. PMID:24746011

  16. Dynamical implications of Viral Tiling Theory.

    PubMed

    ElSawy, K M; Taormina, A; Twarock, R; Vaughan, L

    2008-05-21

    The Caspar-Klug classification of viruses whose protein shell, called viral capsid, exhibits icosahedral symmetry, has recently been extended to incorporate viruses whose capsid proteins are exclusively organised in pentamers. The approach, named 'Viral Tiling Theory', is inspired by the theory of quasicrystals, where aperiodic Penrose tilings enjoy 5-fold and 10-fold local symmetries. This paper analyses the extent to which this classification approach informs dynamical properties of the viral capsids, in particular the pattern of Raman active modes of vibrations, which can be observed experimentally. PMID:18353372

  17. Epigenetics and Genetics of Viral Latency.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Paul M

    2016-05-11

    Viral latency can be considered a metastable, nonproductive infection state that is capable of subsequent reactivation to repeat the infection cycle. Viral latent infections have numerous associated pathologies, including cancer, birth defects, neuropathy, cardiovascular disease, chronic inflammation, and immunological dysfunctions. The mechanisms controlling the establishment, maintenance, and reactivation from latency are complex and diversified among virus families, species, and strains. Yet, as examined in this review, common properties of latent viral infections can be defined. Eradicating latent virus has become an important but elusive challenge and will require a more complete understanding of the mechanisms controlling these processes. PMID:27173930

  18. Ocular manifestations of feline viral diseases.

    PubMed

    Stiles, Jean

    2014-08-01

    Feline viral diseases are common and cats can be presented with a variety of clinical manifestations. Ocular disease associated with viral pathogens is not unusual, particularly with viruses causing upper respiratory tract disease in cats, such as feline herpesvirus type 1 and feline calicivirus. These agents mainly cause ocular surface disease. Other viruses, such as feline immunodeficiency virus and feline coronavirus, can cause uveitis, while feline leukemia virus can induce ocular lymphosarcoma. This review covers the most common viral pathogens of cats that cause ocular manifestations, the specific features of the ocular diseases caused by these viruses and therapeutic recommendations. PMID:24461645

  19. Innate immune reconstitution with suppression of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Scully, Eileen P.; Lockhart, Ainsley; Garcia-Beltran, Wilfredo; Palmer, Christine D.; Musante, Chelsey; Rosenberg, Eric; Allen, Todd M.; Chang, J. Judy; Bosch, Ronald J.; Altfeld, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Progressive HIV-1 infection leads to both profound immune suppression and pathologic inflammation in the majority of infected individuals. While adaptive immune dysfunction, as evidenced by CD4+ T cell depletion and exhaustion, has been extensively studied, less is known about the functional capacity of innate immune cell populations in the context of HIV-1 infection. Given the broad susceptibility to opportunistic infections and the dysregulated inflammation observed in progressive disease, we hypothesized that there would be significant changes in the innate cellular responses. Using a cohort of patients with multiple samplings before and after antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation, we demonstrated increased responses to innate immune stimuli following viral suppression, as measured by the production of inflammatory cytokines. Plasma viral load itself had the strongest association with this change in innate functional capacity. We further identified epigenetic modifications in the TNFA promoter locus in monocytes that are associated with viremia, suggesting a molecular mechanism for the observed changes in innate immune function following initiation of ART. These data indicate that suppression of HIV-1 viremia is associated with changes in innate cellular function that may in part determine the restoration of protective immune responses. PMID:27158667

  20. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Townsend, Harold E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto.

  1. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.; Townsend, H.E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto. 6 figures.

  2. Specific interaction between hnRNP H and HPV16 L1 proteins: Implications for late gene auto-regulation enabling rapid viral capsid protein production

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Zi-Zheng; Sun, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Min; Huang, Hui; Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ning-Shao; Miao, Ji; Zhao, Qinjian

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► The RNA-binding hnRNP H regulates late viral gene expression. ► hnRNP H activity was inhibited by a late viral protein. ► Specific interaction between HPV L1 and hnRNP H was demonstrated. ► Co-localization of HPV L1 and hnRNP H inside cells was observed. ► Viral capsid protein production, enabling rapid capsid assembly, was implicated. -- Abstract: Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), including hnRNP H, are RNA-binding proteins that function as splicing factors and are involved in downstream gene regulation. hnRNP H, which binds to G triplet regions in RNA, has been shown to play an important role in regulating the staged expression of late proteins in viral systems. Here, we report that the specific association between hnRNP H and a late viral capsid protein, human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 protein, leads to the suppressed function of hnRNP H in the presence of the L1 protein. The direct interaction between the L1 protein and hnRNP H was demonstrated by complex formation in solution and intracellularly using a variety of biochemical and immunochemical methods, including peptide mapping, specific co-immunoprecipitation and confocal fluorescence microscopy. These results support a working hypothesis that a late viral protein HPV16 L1, which is down regulated by hnRNP H early in the viral life cycle may provide an auto-regulatory positive feedback loop that allows the rapid production of HPV capsid proteins through suppression of the function of hnRNP H at the late stage of the viral life cycle. In this positive feedback loop, the late viral gene products that were down regulated earlier themselves disable their suppressors, and this feedback mechanism could facilitate the rapid production of capsid proteins, allowing staged and efficient viral capsid assembly.

  3. Menstrual suppression: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hillard, Paula Adams

    2014-01-01

    Menstrual suppression to provide relief of menstrual-related symptoms or to manage medical conditions associated with menstrual morbidity or menstrual exacerbation has been used clinically since the development of steroid hormonal therapies. Options range from the extended or continuous use of combined hormonal oral contraceptives, to the use of combined hormonal patches and rings, progestins given in a variety of formulations from intramuscular injection to oral therapies to intrauterine devices, and other agents such as gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists. The agents used for menstrual suppression have variable rates of success in inducing amenorrhea, but typically have increasing rates of amenorrhea over time. Therapy may be limited by side effects, most commonly irregular, unscheduled bleeding. These therapies can benefit women’s quality of life, and by stabilizing the hormonal milieu, potentially improve the course of underlying medical conditions such as diabetes or a seizure disorder. This review addresses situations in which menstrual suppression may be of benefit, and lists options which have been successful in inducing medical amenorrhea. PMID:25018654

  4. Vibrotactile suppression of tinnitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenhardt, Martin L.

    2002-05-01

    At the Society's 142nd meeting, the efficacy of high frequency bone conducted stimulation in suppressing tinnitus was presented. The hypothesized mechanism was the reprogramming of frequency tuning of auditory neurons in the central nervous system, secondarily to peripheral hearing loss. This mechanism is unlikely in cases of tinnitus in the presence of normal audiometric sensitivity. There is the possibility that hearing loss above 10 kHz can play a role in tinnitus, an association not thoroughly explored. Somatomotor stimulation influencing the quality of tinnitus has been reported, as have interconnections of the auditory and somatosensory systems. There would appear to be an evolutionary advantage of linking the sensorimotor organization of the external ear and the auditory function of the brainstem in sound localization. Thus, stimulation of the pinna and post auricular area may be a means of suppressing tinnitus. To that end a thin aluminum ceramic bimorph was constructed to fit on the inner surface of the pinna. When driven by low (<100 Hz) and high (>10 kHz) frequencies multiplied by MHz carriers, demodulation in the skin resulted in vibrotactile stimulation. Tactile stimulation was an adjunct to the high frequencies resulting in a multimodal suppressive effect in a small pilot study.

  5. Viral papillomatosis in Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris).

    PubMed

    Bossart, Gregory D; Ewing, Ruth Y; Lowe, Mark; Sweat, Mark; Decker, Susan J; Walsh, Catherine J; Ghim, Shin-je; Jenson, A Bennett

    2002-02-01

    The Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) is one of the most endangered marine mammals in American coastal waters. Naturally resistant to infectious disease, the manatee immune system appears highly developed to protect it against the harsh marine environment and the effects of human-related injury. In 1997, seven captive Florida manatees developed multiple, cutaneous, pedunculated papillomas over a period of 6 months. Approximately 3 years later, four of the seven manatees developed multiple, cutaneous, sessile papillomas topically and clinically distinct from the initial lesions, some of which are still present. Histologic, ultrastructural, and immunohistochemical features indicated that the two distinct phenotypic lesions were caused by papillomaviruses (PVs). Preliminary immunologic data correlated with daily clinical observations suggested that the manatees were immunologically suppressed and that the papillomas were caused by activation of latent PV infections and reinoculation from active infections. The emergence of PV-induced papillomas in captive manatees, the possibility of activation of latent infection or transmission of active infection to free-ranging manatees, and the underlying cause of immune suppression predisposing manatees to develop viral papillomatosis are serious concerns for the future management of this highly endangered species. PMID:11784121

  6. A Rapid Method for Viral Particle Detection in Viral-Induced Gastroenteritis: A TEM Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, M. John; Barrish, James P.; Hayes, Elizabeth S.; Leer, Laurie C.; Estes, Mary K.; Cubitt, W. D.

    1995-10-01

    Infectious gastroenteritis is a common cause of hospitalization in the pediatric population. The most frequent cause of gastroenteritis is viral in origin. The purpose of this study was to compare a rapid modified negative-staining TEM method with the conventional pseudoreplica technique in detection of viral particles in fecal samples from children with viral gastroenteritis. The modified negative-staining method resulted in a significantly higher (2.5 ± 0.5, p = 0.02) viral rating score than that for the conventional pseudoreplica technique (1.7 ± 0.4). In addition, the preparation time for the negative-staining method was approximately one fifth that for the conventional pseudoreplica technique. Rapid diagnosis of viral gastroenteritis may be made by ultrastructural detection of viral particles in fecal samples using the negative staining technique.

  7. Viruses, anti-viral therapy, and viral vaccines in children with immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Elalfy, Mohsen S; Nugent, Diane

    2016-04-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) might be preceded by silent or overt viral infections. Similarly, anti-viral drugs and viral vaccines could also trigger ITP and might play a central role in its pathogenesis. The seasonal nature of childhood ITP suggests that viral infections might initiate immune responses that increase the predisposition and occurrence of ITP. Active cytomegalovirus or Epstein-Barr virus should be considered in differential diagnosis when thrombocytopenia is associated with lymphadenopathy, especially with splenomegaly. This review will focus on the specific association of ITP in association with viral disease and vaccinations, and will discuss the effectiveness of current therapies in light of our current understanding of viral-associated ITP. PMID:27312173

  8. Class III viral membrane fusion proteins

    PubMed Central

    Backovic, Marija

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Accumulating structural studies of viral fusion glycoproteins have revealed unanticipated structural relationships between unrelated virus families and allowed the grouping of these membrane fusogens into three distinct classes. Here we review the newly identified group of class III viral fusion proteins, whose members include fusion proteins from rhabdoviruses, herpesviruses and baculoviruses. While clearly related in structure, the class III viral fusion proteins exhibit distinct structural features in their architectures as well as in their membrane-interacting fusion loops, which are likely related to their virus-specific differences in cellular entry. Further study of the similarities and differences in the class III viral fusion glycoproteins may provide greater insights into protein:membrane interactions that are key to promoting efficient bilayer fusion during virus entry. PMID:19356922

  9. Illuminating viral infections in the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    McGavern, Dorian B.; Kang, Silvia S.

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections are a major cause of human disease. Although most viruses replicate in peripheral tissues, some have developed unique strategies to move into the nervous system, where they establish acute or persistent infections. Viral infections in the central nervous system (CNS) can alter homeostasis, induce neurological dysfunction and result in serious, potentially life-threatening inflammatory diseases. This Review focuses on the strategies used by neurotropic viruses to cross the barrier systems of the CNS and on how the immune system detects and responds to viral infections in the CNS. A special emphasis is placed on immune surveillance of persistent and latent viral infections and on recent insights gained from imaging both protective and pathogenic antiviral immune responses. PMID:21508982

  10. Severe Viral Infections and Primary Immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jeffrey I.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with severe viral infections are often not thoroughly evaluated for immunodeficiencies. In this review, we summarize primary immunodeficiencies that predispose individuals to severe viral infections. Some immunodeficiencies enhance susceptibility to disease with a specific virus or family of viruses, whereas others predispose to diseases with multiple viruses in addition to disease with other microbes. Although the role of cytotoxic T cells in controlling viral infections is well known, a number of immunodeficiencies that predispose to severe viral diseases have recently been ascribed to defects in the Toll-like receptor–interferon signaling pathway. These immunodeficiencies are rare, but it is important to identify them both for prognostic information and for genetic counseling. Undoubtedly, additional mutations in proteins in the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system will be identified in the future, which will reveal the importance of these proteins in controlling infections caused by viruses and other pathogens. PMID:21960712

  11. [Viral safety of biological medicinal products].

    PubMed

    Stühler, A; Blümel, J

    2014-10-01

    Viral safety of blood donations, plasma products, viral vaccines and gene therapy medicinal products, biotechnical-derived products and tissue and cell therapy products is a particular challenge. These products are manufactured using a variety of human or animal-derived starting materials and reagents; therefore, extensive testing of donors and of cell banks established for production is required. Furthermore, the viral safety of reagents, such as bovine sera, porcine trypsin and human transferrin or albumin needs to be considered. Whenever possible, manufacturing steps for inactivation or removal of viruses should be introduced; however, sometimes it is not possible to introduce such steps for tissues or cell-based medicinal products as the activity and viability of cells will be compromised. It might be possible to implement steps for inactivation or removal of potential contaminating enveloped viruses only for production of small and stable non-enveloped viral gene vectors. PMID:25123140

  12. Viral fitness: definitions, measurement, and current insights

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wargo, Andrew R.; Kurath, Gael

    2012-01-01

    Viral fitness is an active area of research, with recent work involving an expanded number of human, non-human vertebrate, invertebrate, plant, and bacterial viruses. Many publications deal with RNA viruses associated with major disease emergence events, such as HIV-1, influenza virus, and Dengue virus. Study topics include drug resistance, immune escape, viral emergence, host jumps, mutation effects, quasispecies diversity, and mathematical models of viral fitness. Important recent trends include increasing use of in vivo systems to assess vertebrate virus fitness, and a broadening of research beyond replicative fitness to also investigate transmission fitness and epidemiologic fitness. This is essential for a more integrated understanding of overall viral fitness, with implications for disease management in the future.

  13. Viral and host control of cytomegalovirus maturation

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Ritesh; Mocarski, Edward S.

    2012-01-01

    Maturation in herpesviruses initiates in the nucleus of the infected cell with encapsidation of viral DNA to form nucleocapsids and concludes with envelopment in the cytoplasm to form infectious virions that egress the cell. The entire process of virus maturation is orchestrated by protein-protein interactions and enzymatic activities of viral and host origin. Viral tegument proteins play important roles in maintaining the structural stability of capsids and directing the acquisition of virus envelope. Envelopment occurs at modified host membranes and exploits host vesicular trafficking. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge and concepts in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) maturation and their parallels in other herpesviruses with an emphasis on viral and host factors regulating this process. PMID:22633075

  14. Aplastica Anemia And Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cudillo, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (aAA) is a severe and rare disease, characterized by hematopoietic bone marrow failure and peripheral cytopenia. The pathophysiology is immune mediated in most cases, activated T1 lymphocytes have been identified as effector cells. The disease can be successfully treated with combined immunosuppressive therapy or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Hepatitis-associated aplastic anemia (HAA) is a syndrome of bone marrow failure following the development of acute seronegative hepatitis. HAA syndrome most often affects young males who presented severe pancytopenia two to three months after an episode of acute hepatitis. The clinical course of hepatitis is more frequently benign but a fulminant severe course is also described. The bone marrow failure can be explosive and severe and it is usually fatal if untreated, no correlations have been observed between severity of hepatitis and AA. In none of the studies a specific virus could be identified and most cases are seronegative for known hepatitis viruses. The clinical characteristics and response to immunotherapy indicate a central role for immune-mediated mechanism in the pathogenesis of HAA. The initial target organ of the immune response is the liver as suggested by the time interval between hepatitis and the onset of bone marrow failure. Liver histology is characterized by T cell infiltrating the parenchyma as reported in acute hepatitis. Recently in HAA it has been demonstrated intrahepatic and blood lymphocytes with T cell repertoire similar to that of confirmed viral acute hepatitis. The expanded T cell clones return to a normal distribution after response to immunosuppressive treatment, suggesting the antigen or T cell clearance. Therapeutic options are the same as acquired aplastic anemia. PMID:21415960

  15. Single Nanopores in Silicon Nitride Membranes with Applications to Viral Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, M W; Healy, K; Teslich, N; Letant, S E; Siwy, Z S

    2012-03-29

    While current viral sensing methods are extremely sensitive, there is still a need for platforms capable of detecting engineered viruses and being integrated into device architectures for point-of-care assessments. Nanopores could provide a single pathway to achieve these goals.

  16. Comparing Science Achievement Constructs: Targeted and Achieved

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrara, Steve; Duncan, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    This article illustrates how test specifications based solely on academic content standards, without attention to other cognitive skills and item response demands, can fall short of their targeted constructs. First, the authors inductively describe the science achievement construct represented by a statewide sixth-grade science proficiency test.…

  17. Varieties of Achievement Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukla, Andre; Scher, Hal

    1986-01-01

    A recent article by Nicholls on achievement motivation is criticized on three points: (1) definitions of achievement motives are ambiguous; (2) behavioral consequences predicted do not follow from explicit theoretical assumptions; and (3) Nicholls's account of the relation between his theory and other achievement theories is factually incorrect.…

  18. Motivation and School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maehr, Martin L.; Archer, Jennifer

    Addressing the question, "What can be done to promote school achievement?", this paper summarizes the literature on motivation relating to classroom achievement and school effectiveness. Particular attention is given to how values, ideology, and various cultural patterns impinge on classroom performance and serve to enhance motivation to achieve.…

  19. Mobility and Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Theresa Z.

    A study examined the effect of geographic mobility on elementary school students' achievement. Although such mobility, which requires students to make multiple moves among schools, can have a negative impact on academic achievement, the hypothesis for the study was that it was not a determining factor in reading achievement test scores. Subjects…

  20. PASS and Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, John R.

    Two studies examined the effectiveness of the PASS (Planning, Attention, Simultaneous, and Successive cognitive processes) theory of intelligence in predicting reading achievement scores of normally achieving children and distinguishing children with reading disabilities from normally achieving children. The first study dealt with predicting…

  1. The Contribution of Viral Genotype to Plasma Viral Set-Point in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hodcroft, Emma; Hadfield, Jarrod D.; Fearnhill, Esther; Phillips, Andrew; Dunn, David; O'Shea, Siobhan; Pillay, Deenan; Leigh Brown, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Disease progression in HIV-infected individuals varies greatly, and while the environmental and host factors influencing this variation have been widely investigated, the viral contribution to variation in set-point viral load, a predictor of disease progression, is less clear. Previous studies, using transmission-pairs and analysis of phylogenetic signal in small numbers of individuals, have produced a wide range of viral genetic effect estimates. Here we present a novel application of a population-scale method based in quantitative genetics to estimate the viral genetic effect on set-point viral load in the UK subtype B HIV-1 epidemic, based on a very large data set. Analyzing the initial viral load and associated pol sequence, both taken before anti-retroviral therapy, of 8,483 patients, we estimate the proportion of variance in viral load explained by viral genetic effects to be 5.7% (CI 2.8–8.6%). We also estimated the change in viral load over time due to selection on the virus and environmental effects to be a decline of 0.05 log10 copies/mL/year, in contrast to recent studies which suggested a reported small increase in viral load over the last 20 years might be due to evolutionary changes in the virus. Our results suggest that in the UK epidemic, subtype B has a small but significant viral genetic effect on viral load. By allowing the analysis of large sample sizes, we expect our approach to be applicable to the estimation of the genetic contribution to traits in many organisms. PMID:24789308

  2. The contribution of viral genotype to plasma viral set-point in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Hodcroft, Emma; Hadfield, Jarrod D; Fearnhill, Esther; Phillips, Andrew; Dunn, David; O'Shea, Siobhan; Pillay, Deenan; Leigh Brown, Andrew J

    2014-05-01

    Disease progression in HIV-infected individuals varies greatly, and while the environmental and host factors influencing this variation have been widely investigated, the viral contribution to variation in set-point viral load, a predictor of disease progression, is less clear. Previous studies, using transmission-pairs and analysis of phylogenetic signal in small numbers of individuals, have produced a wide range of viral genetic effect estimates. Here we present a novel application of a population-scale method based in quantitative genetics to estimate the viral genetic effect on set-point viral load in the UK subtype B HIV-1 epidemic, based on a very large data set. Analyzing the initial viral load and associated pol sequence, both taken before anti-retroviral therapy, of 8,483 patients, we estimate the proportion of variance in viral load explained by viral genetic effects to be 5.7% (CI 2.8-8.6%). We also estimated the change in viral load over time due to selection on the virus and environmental effects to be a decline of 0.05 log10 copies/mL/year, in contrast to recent studies which suggested a reported small increase in viral load over the last 20 years might be due to evolutionary changes in the virus. Our results suggest that in the UK epidemic, subtype B has a small but significant viral genetic effect on viral load. By allowing the analysis of large sample sizes, we expect our approach to be applicable to the estimation of the genetic contribution to traits in many organisms. PMID:24789308

  3. Scale-up of HIV Viral Load Monitoring--Seven Sub-Saharan African Countries.

    PubMed

    Lecher, Shirley; Ellenberger, Dennis; Kim, Andrea A; Fonjungo, Peter N; Agolory, Simon; Borget, Marie Yolande; Broyles, Laura; Carmona, Sergio; Chipungu, Geoffrey; De Cock, Kevin M; Deyde, Varough; Downer, Marie; Gupta, Sundeep; Kaplan, Jonathan E; Kiyaga, Charles; Knight, Nancy; MacLeod, William; Makumbi, Boniface; Muttai, Hellen; Mwangi, Christina; Mwangi, Jane W; Mwasekaga, Michael; Ng'Ang'A, Lucy W; Pillay, Yogan; Sarr, Abdoulaye; Sawadogo, Souleymane; Singer, Daniel; Stevens, Wendy; Toure, Christiane Adje; Nkengasong, John

    2015-11-27

    To achieve global targets for universal treatment set forth by the Joint United Nations Programme on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) (UNAIDS), viral load monitoring for HIV-infected persons receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) must become the standard of care in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) (1). CDC and other U.S. government agencies, as part of the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, are supporting multiple countries in sub-Saharan Africa to change from the use of CD4 cell counts for monitoring of clinical response to ART to the use of viral load monitoring, which is the standard of care in developed countries. Viral load monitoring is the preferred method for immunologic monitoring because it enables earlier and more accurate detection of treatment failure before immunologic decline. This report highlights the initial successes and challenges of viral load monitoring in seven countries that have chosen to scale up viral load testing as a national monitoring strategy for patients on ART in response to World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations. Countries initiating viral load scale-up in 2014 observed increases in coverage after scale-up, and countries initiating in 2015 are anticipating similar trends. However, in six of the seven countries, viral load testing coverage in 2015 remained below target levels. Inefficient specimen transport, need for training, delays in procurement and distribution, and limited financial resources to support scale-up hindered progress. Country commitment and effective partnerships are essential to address the financial, operational, technical, and policy challenges of the rising demand for viral load monitoring. PMID:26605986

  4. MSLVP: prediction of multiple subcellular localization of viral proteins using a support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Anamika; Rajput, Akanksha; Kumar, Manoj

    2016-07-19

    Knowledge of the subcellular location (SCL) of viral proteins in the host cell is important for understanding their function in depth. Therefore, we have developed "MSLVP", a two-tier prediction algorithm for predicting multiple SCLs of viral proteins. For this study, data sets of comprehensive viral proteins with experimentally validated SCL annotation were collected from UniProt. Non-redundant (90%) data sets of 3480 viral proteins that belonged to single (2715), double (391) and multiple (374) sites were employed. Additionally, 1687 (30% sequence identity) viral proteins were categorised into single (1366), double (167) and multiple (154) sites. Single, double and multiple locations further comprised of eight, four and six categories, respectively. Viral protein locations include the nucleus, cytoplasm, endoplasmic reticulum, extracellular, single-pass membrane, multi-pass membrane, capsid, remaining others and combinations thereof. Support vector machine based models were developed using sequence features like amino acid composition, dipeptide composition, physicochemical properties and their hybrids. We have employed "one-versus-one" as well as "one-versus-other" strategies for multiclass classification. The performance of "one-versus-one" is better than the "one-versus-other" approach during 10-fold cross-validation. For the 90% data set, we achieved an accuracy, a Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) and a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) of 99.99%, 1.00, 1.00; 100.00%, 1.00, 1.00 and 99.90%; 1.00, 1.00 for single, double and multiple locations, respectively. Similar results were achieved for a 30% sequence identity data set. Predictive models for each SCL performed equally well on the independent dataset. The MSLVP web server () can predict subcellular locations i.e. single (8; including single and multi-pass membrane), double (4) and multiple (6). This would be helpful for elucidating the functional annotation of viral proteins and potential drug

  5. Oxygen tension level and human viral infections

    SciTech Connect

    Morinet, Frédéric; Casetti, Luana; François, Jean-Hugues; Capron, Claude; Pillet, Sylvie

    2013-09-15

    The role of oxygen tension level is a well-known phenomenon that has been studied in oncology and radiotherapy since about 60 years. Oxygen tension may inhibit or stimulate propagation of viruses in vitro as well as in vivo. In turn modulating oxygen metabolism may constitute a novel approach to treat viral infections as an adjuvant therapy. The major transcription factor which regulates oxygen tension level is hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). Down-regulating the expression of HIF-1α is a possible method in the treatment of chronic viral infection such as human immunodeficiency virus infection, chronic hepatitis B and C viral infections and Kaposi sarcoma in addition to classic chemotherapy. The aim of this review is to supply an updating concerning the influence of oxygen tension level in human viral infections and to evoke possible new therapeutic strategies regarding this environmental condition. - Highlights: • Oxygen tension level regulates viral replication in vitro and possibly in vivo. • Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1α) is the principal factor involved in Oxygen tension level. • HIF-1α upregulates gene expression for example of HIV, JC and Kaposi sarcoma viruses. • In addition to classical chemotherapy inhibition of HIF-1α may constitute a new track to treat human viral infections.

  6. Generating viral metagenomes from the coral holobiont.

    PubMed

    Weynberg, Karen D; Wood-Charlson, Elisha M; Suttle, Curtis A; van Oppen, Madeleine J H

    2014-01-01

    Reef-building corals comprise multipartite symbioses where the cnidarian animal is host to an array of eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms, and the viruses that infect them. These viruses are critical elements of the coral holobiont, serving not only as agents of mortality, but also as potential vectors for lateral gene flow, and as elements encoding a variety of auxiliary metabolic functions. Consequently, understanding the functioning and health of the coral holobiont requires detailed knowledge of the associated viral assemblage and its function. Currently, the most tractable way of uncovering viral diversity and function is through metagenomic approaches, which is inherently difficult in corals because of the complex holobiont community, an extracellular mucus layer that all corals secrete, and the variety of sizes and structures of nucleic acids found in viruses. Here we present the first protocol for isolating, purifying and amplifying viral nucleic acids from corals based on mechanical disruption of cells. This method produces at least 50% higher yields of viral nucleic acids, has very low levels of cellular sequence contamination and captures wider viral diversity than previously used chemical-based extraction methods. We demonstrate that our mechanical-based method profiles a greater diversity of DNA and RNA genomes, including virus groups such as Retro-transcribing and ssRNA viruses, which are absent from metagenomes generated via chemical-based methods. In addition, we briefly present (and make publically available) the first paired DNA and RNA viral metagenomes from the coral Acropora tenuis. PMID:24847321

  7. Generating viral metagenomes from the coral holobiont

    PubMed Central

    Wood-Charlson, Elisha M.; Suttle, Curtis A.; van Oppen, Madeleine J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Reef-building corals comprise multipartite symbioses where the cnidarian animal is host to an array of eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms, and the viruses that infect them. These viruses are critical elements of the coral holobiont, serving not only as agents of mortality, but also as potential vectors for lateral gene flow, and as elements encoding a variety of auxiliary metabolic functions. Consequently, understanding the functioning and health of the coral holobiont requires detailed knowledge of the associated viral assemblage and its function. Currently, the most tractable way of uncovering viral diversity and function is through metagenomic approaches, which is inherently difficult in corals because of the complex holobiont community, an extracellular mucus layer that all corals secrete, and the variety of sizes and structures of nucleic acids found in viruses. Here we present the first protocol for isolating, purifying and amplifying viral nucleic acids from corals based on mechanical disruption of cells. This method produces at least 50% higher yields of viral nucleic acids, has very low levels of cellular sequence contamination and captures wider viral diversity than previously used chemical-based extraction methods. We demonstrate that our mechanical-based method profiles a greater diversity of DNA and RNA genomes, including virus groups such as Retro-transcribing and ssRNA viruses, which are absent from metagenomes generated via chemical-based methods. In addition, we briefly present (and make publically available) the first paired DNA and RNA viral metagenomes from the coral Acropora tenuis. PMID:24847321

  8. Membrane dynamics associated with viral infection.

    PubMed

    de Armas-Rillo, Laura; Valera, María-Soledad; Marrero-Hernández, Sara; Valenzuela-Fernández, Agustín

    2016-05-01

    Viral replication and spreading are fundamental events in the viral life cycle, accounting for the assembly and egression of nascent virions, events that are directly associated with viral pathogenesis in target hosts. These processes occur in cellular compartments that are modified by specialized viral proteins, causing a rearrangement of different cell membranes in infected cells and affecting the ER, mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, vesicles and endosomes, as well as processes such as autophagic membrane flux. In fact, the activation or inhibition of membrane trafficking and other related activities are fundamental to ensure the adequate replication and spreading of certain viruses. In this review, data will be presented that support the key role of membrane dynamics in the viral cycle, especially in terms of the assembly, egression and infection processes. By defining how viruses orchestrate these events it will be possible to understand how they successfully complete their route of infection, establishing viral pathogenesis and provoking disease. © 2015 The Authors Reviews in Medical Virology Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26817660

  9. Bioinformatics tools for analysing viral genomic data.

    PubMed

    Orton, R J; Gu, Q; Hughes, J; Maabar, M; Modha, S; Vattipally, S B; Wilkie, G S; Davison, A J

    2016-04-01

    The field of viral genomics and bioinformatics is experiencing a strong resurgence due to high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technology, which enables the rapid and cost-effective sequencing and subsequent assembly of large numbers of viral genomes. In addition, the unprecedented power of HTS technologies has enabled the analysis of intra-host viral diversity and quasispecies dynamics in relation to important biological questions on viral transmission, vaccine resistance and host jumping. HTS also enables the rapid identification of both known and potentially new viruses from field and clinical samples, thus adding new tools to the fields of viral discovery and metagenomics. Bioinformatics has been central to the rise of HTS applications because new algorithms and software tools are continually needed to process and analyse the large, complex datasets generated in this rapidly evolving area. In this paper, the authors give a brief overview of the main bioinformatics tools available for viral genomic research, with a particular emphasis on HTS technologies and their main applications. They summarise the major steps in various HTS analyses, starting with quality control of raw reads and encompassing activities ranging from consensus and de novo genome assembly to variant calling and metagenomics, as well as RNA sequencing. PMID:27217183

  10. Viral Metagenomics: MetaView Software

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, C; Smith, J

    2007-10-22

    The purpose of this report is to design and develop a tool for analysis of raw sequence read data from viral metagenomics experiments. The tool should compare read sequences of known viral nucleic acid sequence data and enable a user to attempt to determine, with some degree of confidence, what virus groups may be present in the sample. This project was conducted in two phases. In phase 1 we surveyed the literature and examined existing metagenomics tools to educate ourselves and to more precisely define the problem of analyzing raw read data from viral metagenomic experiments. In phase 2 we devised an approach and built a prototype code and database. This code takes viral metagenomic read data in fasta format as input and accesses all complete viral genomes from Kpath for sequence comparison. The system executes at the UNIX command line, producing output that is stored in an Oracle relational database. We provide here a description of the approach we came up with for handling un-assembled, short read data sets from viral metagenomics experiments. We include a discussion of the current MetaView code capabilities and additional functionality that we believe should be added, should additional funding be acquired to continue the work.

  11. Adsorption of viral particles from the blood plasma of patients with viral hepatitis on nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Baron, A V; Osipov, N V; Yashchenko, S V; Kokotukha, Yu A; Baron, I J; Puzyr, A P; Olkhovskiy, I A; Bondar, V S

    2016-07-01

    Adsorption of viral particles from the blood plasma of patients with viral hepatitis B and C on modified nanodiamonds (MNDs) was shown in the in vitro experiments. PCR method showed the treatment of plasma with MNDs leads to a decrease in the viral load by 2-3 orders of magnitude or more in both cases studied. These results make it possible to predict the applicability of MNDs for the development of new technologies of hemodialysis and plasmapheresis for binding and removal of viral particles from the blood of infected patients. PMID:27599503

  12. Too much of a good thing: Sustained type 1 interferon signaling limits humoral responses to secondary viral infection.

    PubMed

    Teijaro, John R

    2016-02-01

    The induction of a pan-immunosuppressive state is a central feature of persistent viral infections. Over the past decade, multiple pathways have been identified that contribute to immune suppression. Recently, it was revealed that aberrant or sustained type 1 interferon (IFN-I) production or signaling is a central contributor to immune suppression elicited during persistent viral infection. In this issue, Honke et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2016. 46: 372-380] identify that IFN-I signaling promotes an immune suppressive state during persistent lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection by inhibiting enforced virus replication in CD169(+) macrophages. The authors demonstrate that mice infected with a persistent strain of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus have blunted humoral immune responses to a superinfecting vesicular stomatitis virus infection. The absence of virus replication in CD169(+) macrophages was not due to antiviral CD8(+) T cell-mediated killing of CD169(+) macrophages, but required sustained IFN-I responses. In turn, reduction in vesicular stomatitis virus replication in CD169(+) macrophages resulted in a reduction in antigen production, which is necessary for generating optimal humoral responses. This study highlights a novel mechanism by which IFN-I signaling promotes an immune suppressive state during persistent viral infection. PMID:26783074

  13. Optical frequency tripling with improved suppression and sideband selection.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Manoj P; Medeiros, Maria C R; Laurêncio, Paula; Mitchell, John E

    2011-12-12

    A novel optical dispersion tolerant millimetre-wave radio-over-fibre system using optical frequency tripling technique with enhanced and selectable sideband suppression is demonstrated. The implementation utilises cascaded optical modulators to achieve either an optical single sideband (OSSB) or double sideband-suppressed carrier (DSB-SC) signal with high sideband suppression. Our analysis and simulation results indicate that the achievable suppression ratio of this configuration is only limited by other system factors such as optical noise and drifting of the operational conditions. The OSSB transmission system performance is assessed experimentally by the transport of 4 WiMax channels modulating a 10 GHz optical upconverted RF carrier as well as for optical frequency doubling and tripling. The 10 GHz and tripled carrier at 30 GHz are dispersion tolerant resulting both in an average relative constellation error (RCE) of -28.7 dB after 40 km of fibre. PMID:22274056

  14. Viral Nanoparticles for In vivo Tumor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Amy M.; Lee, Karin L.; Yildiz, Ibrahim; Bruckman, Michael A.; Shukla, Sourabh; Steinmetz, Nicole F.

    2012-01-01

    The use of nanomaterials has the potential to revolutionize materials science and medicine. Currently, a number of different nanoparticles are being investigated for applications in imaging and therapy. Viral nanoparticles (VNPs) derived from plants can be regarded as self-assembled bionanomaterials with defined sizes and shapes. Plant viruses under investigation in the Steinmetz lab include icosahedral particles formed by Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) and Brome mosaic virus (BMV), both of which are 30 nm in diameter. We are also developing rod-shaped and filamentous structures derived from the following plant viruses: Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), which forms rigid rods with dimensions of 300 nm by 18 nm, and Potato virus X (PVX), which form filamentous particles 515 nm in length and 13 nm in width (the reader is referred to refs. 1 and 2 for further information on VNPs). From a materials scientist's point of view, VNPs are attractive building blocks for several reasons: the particles are monodisperse, can be produced with ease on large scale in planta, are exceptionally stable, and biocompatible. Also, VNPs are "programmable" units, which can be specifically engineered using genetic modification or chemical bioconjugation methods 3. The structure of VNPs is known to atomic resolution, and modifications can be carried out with spatial precision at the atomic level4, a level of control that cannot be achieved using synthetic nanomaterials with current state-of-the-art technologies. In this paper, we describe the propagation of CPMV, PVX, TMV, and BMV in Vigna ungiuculata and Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Extraction and purification protocols for each VNP are given. Methods for characterization of purified and chemically-labeled VNPs are described. In this study, we focus on chemical labeling of VNPs with fluorophores (e.g. Alexa Fluor 647) and polyethylene glycol (PEG). The dyes facilitate tracking and detection of the VNPs 5-10, and PEG reduces immunogenicity of the

  15. Decoherence suppression in a resonant driving field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minns, R. S.; Kutteruf, M. R.; Commisso, M. A.; Jones, R. R.

    2008-04-01

    Resonant radio frequency (rf) control fields have been employed to suppress decoherence in single quantum bits (qubits) encoded in the probability amplitudes of np fine-structure states in Li Rydberg atoms. As described previously [1], static electric-field tuning of the spin and orbital angular momentum composition of the fine-structure eigenstates enables qubit storage in an approximate decoherence-free subspace in which phase errors due to small stray electric and magnetic fields are strongly suppressed. In addition, it was found that sequences of short electric field pulses could be utilized in a 'bang-bang' dynamic decoupling scheme to improve coherence times. We now show that a continuous resonant rf field can also suppress decoherence in this system. The rf-dressed fine-structure states form a more robust basis in which the energy splitting between the component qubit levels is locked to the drive frequency, and decoherence is essentially eliminated. Measurements of the operational range of rf frequency and field strength required to achieve decoherence suppression are in agreement with the predictions of a two-level model.

  16. Selection of hydrate suppression methods for gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, S.D.; Covington, K.K.; Collie, J.T. III

    1999-07-01

    This paper will discuss and compare the methods used to suppress hydrate formation in natural gas streams. Included in the comparison will be regenerated systems using ethylene glycol and non-regenerated systems using methanol. A comparison will be made between the quantities of methanol and ethylene glycol required to achieve a given a suppression. A discussion of BTEX emissions resulting from the ethylene glycol regenerator along with the effect or process variables on these emissions is also given.

  17. Robust Suppression of HIV Replication by Intracellularly Expressed Reverse Transcriptase Aptamers Is Independent of Ribozyme Processing

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Margaret J; Sharma, Tarun K; Whatley, Angela S; Landon, Linda A; Tempesta, Michael A; Johnson, Marc C; Burke, Donald H

    2012-01-01

    RNA aptamers that bind human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) also inhibit viral replication, making them attractive as therapeutic candidates and potential tools for dissecting viral pathogenesis. However, it is not well understood how aptamer-expression context and cellular RNA pathways govern aptamer accumulation and net antiviral bioactivity. Using a previously-described expression cassette in which aptamers were flanked by two “minimal core” hammerhead ribozymes, we observed only weak suppression of pseudotyped HIV. To evaluate the importance of the minimal ribozymes, we replaced them with extended, tertiary-stabilized hammerhead ribozymes with enhanced self-cleavage activity, in addition to noncleaving ribozymes with active site mutations. Both the active and inactive versions of the extended hammerhead ribozymes increased inhibition of pseudotyped virus, indicating that processing is not necessary for bioactivity. Clonal stable cell lines expressing aptamers from these modified constructs strongly suppressed infectious virus, and were more effective than minimal ribozymes at high viral multiplicity of infection (MOI). Tertiary stabilization greatly increased aptamer accumulation in viral and subcellular compartments, again regardless of self-cleavage capability. We therefore propose that the increased accumulation is responsible for increased suppression, that the bioactive form of the aptamer is one of the uncleaved or partially cleaved transcripts, and that tertiary stabilization increases transcript stability by reducing exonuclease degradation. PMID:22948672

  18. Next generation fire suppressants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Jerry A.

    1995-01-01

    Spectrex, Inc., located in Cedar Grove, NJ is a manufacturer of fire detection and suppression equipment. Spectrex is one of the original pioneers in high speed fire detection and suppression systems for combat vehicles. Spectrex has installed fire suppressions systems in thousands of combat vehicles and ships throughout the world. Additionally, they manufacture flame explosion detectors, ship damage control systems, and optical gas and vapor detectors. The culmination of several years of research and development has recently produced an innovative electro-optical continuous monitoring systems called SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) and SAFEYE that provide fast and reliable gas, vapor, aerosol, flame, and explosion detection. SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) is a self-contained triple spectrum flame detector which scans for oscillating IR radiation (1 to 10 Hz) in the spectral bands ranging from 4.0 to 5.0 microns and uses programmed algorithms to check the ratio and correlation of data received by the three sensors to make the system highly immune to false alarms. It is extremely sensitive as it can detect a 1 x 1 square foot gasoline pan fire at 200 feet in less than 3 seconds. The sensitivity is user programmable, offering 4 ranges of detection. SAFEYE is comprised of a selected number of multispectral ban microprocessors controlled detectors which are in communication with one or more radiation sources that is projected along a 600 feet optical path. The signals from the selected narrow bands are processed and analyzed by highly sophisticated algorithms. It is ideal for high risk, remote, large areas such as petroleum and chemical manufacturing sites, waste dumps, aircraft cargo bays, and ship compartments. The SAFEYE will perform direct readings of the presence or rate of rise of concentrations of gases, vapors, or aerosols at the range of parts per million and provide alarms at various set points at different levels of concentrations.

  19. Next generation fire suppressants

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.A.

    1995-03-01

    Spectrex, Inc., located in Cedar Grove, NJ is a manufacturer of fire detection and suppression equipment. Spectrex is one of the original pioneers in high speed fire detection and suppression systems for combat vehicles. Spectrex has installed fire suppressions systems in thousands of combat vehicles and ships throughout the world. Additionally, they manufacture flame explosion detectors, ship damage control systems, and optical gas and vapor detectors. The culmination of several years of research and development has recently produced an innovative electro-optical continuous monitoring systems called SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) and SAFEYE that provide fast and reliable gas, vapor, aerosol, flame, and explosion detection. SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) is a self-contained triple spectrum flame detector which scans for oscillating IR radiation (1 to 10 Hz) in the spectral bands ranging from 4.0 to 5.0 microns and uses programmed algorithms to check the ratio and correlation of data received by the three sensors to make the system highly immune to false alarms. It is extremely sensitive as it can detect a 1 x 1 square foot gasoline pan fire at 200 feet in less than 3 seconds. The sensitivity is user programmable, offering 4 ranges of detection. SAFEYE is comprised of a selected number of multispectral band microprocessor controlled detectors which are in communication with one or more radiation sources that is projected along a 600 feet optical path. The signals from the selected narrow bands are processed and analyzed by highly sophisticated algorithms. It is ideal for high risk, remote, large areas such as petroleum and chemical manufacturing sites, waste dumps, aircraft cargo bays, and ship compartments. The SAFEYE will perform direct readings of the presence or rate of rise of concentrations of gases, vapors, or aerosols at the range of parts per million and provide alarms at various set points at different levels of concentrations.

  20. Suppression of flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An active aerodynamic control system to control flutter over a large range of oscillatory frequencies is described. The system is not affected by mass, stiffness, elastic axis, or center of gravity location of the system, mode of vibration, or Mach number. The system consists of one or more pairs of leading edge and trailing edge hinged or deformable control surfaces, each pair operated in concert by a stability augmentation system. Torsion and bending motions are sensed and converted by the stability augmentation system into leading and trailing edge control surface deflections which produce lift forces and pitching moments to suppress flutter.

  1. Parvovirus Infection Suppresses Long-Term Repopulating Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Segovia, José C.; Guenechea, Guillermo; Gallego, Jesús M.; Almendral, José M.; Bueren, Juan A.

    2003-01-01

    The functional disturbance of self-renewing and multipotent hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in viral diseases is poorly understood. In this report, we have assessed the susceptibility of mouse HSCs to strain i of the autonomous parvovirus minute virus of mice (MVMi) in vitro and during persistent infection of an immunodeficient host. Purified 5FUr Lin− Sca-1+ primitive hematopoietic precursors were permissive for MVMi genome replication and the expression of viral gene products. The lymphoid and myeloid repopulating capacity of bone marrow (BM) cells was significantly impaired after in vitro infection, although the degree of functional effect proportionally decreased with the posttransplantation time. This indicated that MVMi targets the heterogeneous compartment of repopulating cells with differential affinity and suggests that the virus may persist in some primitive HSCs in the quiescent stage, killing those eventually recruited for proliferative activity. Immunodeficient SCID mice oronasally infected with MVMi were cured of the characteristic virus-induced lethal leukopenia by transplantation of immunocompetent BM grafts. However, two double-stranded viral DNA species, probably uncommon replicative intermediates, remained in the marrow of every transplanted mouse months after infectious virus clearance. Genetic analysis of the rescued mice showed that the infection ensured a stable engraftment of donor hematopoiesis by markedly depleting the pool of endogenous HSCs. The MVMi-induced suppression of HSC functions illustrates the accessibility of this compartment to infection during a natural viral hematological disease. These results may provide clues to understanding delayed hematopoietic syndromes associated with persistent viral infections and to prospective gene delivery to HSCs in vivo. PMID:12857918

  2. Enhanced Antiretroviral Therapy in Rhesus Macaques Improves RT-SHIV Viral Decay Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    North, Thomas W.; Villalobos, Andradi; Hurwitz, Selwyn J.; Deere, Jesse D.; Higgins, Joanne; Chatterjee, Payel; Tao, Sijia; Kauffman, Robert C.; Luciw, Paul A.; Kohler, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Using an established nonhuman primate model, rhesus macaques were infected intravenously with a chimeric simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) consisting of SIVmac239 with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase from clone HXBc2 (RT-SHIV). The impacts of two enhanced (four- and five-drug) highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAART) on early viral decay and rebound were determined. The four-drug combination consisted of an integrase inhibitor, L-870-812 (L-812), together with a three-drug regimen comprising emtricitabine [(−)-FTC], tenofovir (TFV), and efavirenz (EFV). The five-drug combination consisted of one analog for each of the four DNA precursors {using TFV, (−)-FTC, (−)-β-d-(2R,4R)-1,3-dioxolane-2,6-diaminopurine (amdoxovir [DAPD]), and zidovudine (AZT)}, together with EFV. A cohort treated with a three-drug combination of (−)-FTC, TFV, and EFV served as treated controls. Daily administration of a three-, four-, or five-drug combination of antiretroviral agents was initiated at week 6 or 8 after inoculation and continued up to week 50, followed by a rebound period. Plasma samples were collected routinely, and drug levels were monitored using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS-MS). Viral loads were monitored with a standard TaqMan quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) assay. Comprehensive analyses of replication dynamics were performed. RT-SHIV infection in rhesus macaques produced typical viral infection kinetics, with untreated controls establishing persistent viral loads of >104 copies of RNA/ml. RT-SHIV loads at the start of treatment (V0) were similar in all treated cohorts (P > 0.5). All antiretroviral drug levels were measureable in plasma. The four-drug and five-drug combination regimens (enhanced HAART) improved suppression of the viral load (within 1 week; P < 0.01) and had overall greater potency (P < 0.02) than the three-drug regimen (HAART). Moreover, rebound viremia occurred

  3. The risk of viral rebound in the year after delivery in women remaining on antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Huntington, Susie; Thorne, Claire; Newell, Marie-Louise; Anderson, Jane; Taylor, Graham P.; Pillay, Deenan; Hill, Teresa; Tookey, Pat A.; Sabin, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to assess the risk of viral rebound in postpartum women on suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Methods: Using data from the UK Collaborative HIV Cohort (UK CHIC) study and the UK and Ireland National Study of HIV in Pregnancy and Childhood (NSHPC), women with HIV-RNA 50 copies/ml or less at delivery in 2006–2011, who started life-long cART during pregnancy (n = 321) or conceived on cART (n = 618), were matched by age, duration on cART and time period, with at least one control (non-postpartum). The cumulative probability of viral rebound (HIV-RNA >200 copies/ml) was assessed by Kaplan–Meier analysis; adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) for the 0–3 and 3–12 months postdelivery (cases)/pseudo-delivery (controls) were calculated in Cox proportional hazards models. Results: In postpartum women who conceived on cART, 5.9% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 4.0–7.7] experienced viral rebound by 3 months, and 2.2% (1.4–3.0%) of their controls. The risk of viral rebound was higher in postpartum women than in controls during the first 3 months [aHR 2.63 (1.58–4.39)] but not during the 3–12 months postdelivery/pseudo-delivery. In postpartum women who started cART during pregnancy, 27% (22–32%) experienced viral rebound by 3 months, and 3.0% (1.6–4.4%) of their controls. The risk of viral rebound was higher in postpartum women than in controls during both postdelivery/pseudo-delivery periods [<3 months: aHR 6.63 (3.58–12.29); 3–12 months: aHR 4.05 (2.03–8.09)]. Conclusion: In women on suppressive cART, the risk of viral rebound is increased following delivery, especially in the first 3 months, which may be related to reduced adherence, indicating the need for additional adherence support for postpartum women. PMID:26544700

  4. Viral distribution and activity in Antarctic waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guixa-Boixereu, Núria; Vaqué, Dolors; Gasol, Josep M.; Sánchez-Cámara, Jaime; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos

    Variability in abundance of virus-like particles (VLP), VLP decay rates and prokaryotic mortality due to viral infection were determined in three Antarctic areas: Bellingshausen Sea, Bransfield Strait and Gerlache Strait, during December 1995 and February 1996. VLP abundance showed very small spatial variability in the three areas (7×10 6-2×10 7 VLP ml -1). VLP abundance, on the other hand, decreased one order of magnitude from the surface to the bottom, in two stations where deep vertical profiles were sampled. Low seasonal variability in VLP abundance was found when comparing each area separately. Diel VLP variability was also very low. VLP abundance showed the lowest values when solar irradiation was maximal, in two of the three stations where diel cycles were examined. Viral decay rates (VDR) were determined using KCN in two kinds of experiments. Type 1 experiments were performed in 6 stations to determine viral decay. Type 2 experiments were carried out in 2 stations to examine the influence of temperature and organic matter concentration on viral decay. VDR was not influenced by these parameters. Prokaryotic mortality due to viral infection was always higher than that due to bacterivores in the stations where both factors of prokaryotic mortality were measured. Viral infection accounted for all the prokaryotic heterotrophic production in Bellingshausen Sea and Gerlache Strait and for half of the prokaryotic heterotrophic production in Bransfield Strait. These high values of prokaryotic mortality due to viral infection are difficult to reconcile in nature, and more work is necessary to determine the mechanisms involved in the disappearance of viruses.

  5. Raw Sewage Harbors Diverse Viral Populations

    PubMed Central

    Cantalupo, Paul G.; Calgua, Byron; Zhao, Guoyan; Hundesa, Ayalkibet; Wier, Adam D.; Katz, Josh P.; Grabe, Michael; Hendrix, Roger W.; Girones, Rosina; Wang, David; Pipas, James M.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT At this time, about 3,000 different viruses are recognized, but metagenomic studies suggest that these viruses are a small fraction of the viruses that exist in nature. We have explored viral diversity by deep sequencing nucleic acids obtained from virion populations enriched from raw sewage. We identified 234 known viruses, including 17 that infect humans. Plant, insect, and algal viruses as well as bacteriophages were also present. These viruses represented 26 taxonomic families and included viruses with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), positive-sense ssRNA [ssRNA(+)], and dsRNA genomes. Novel viruses that could be placed in specific taxa represented 51 different families, making untreated wastewater the most diverse viral metagenome (genetic material recovered directly from environmental samples) examined thus far. However, the vast majority of sequence reads bore little or no sequence relation to known viruses and thus could not be placed into specific taxa. These results show that the vast majority of the viruses on Earth have not yet been characterized. Untreated wastewater provides a rich matrix for identifying novel viruses and for studying virus diversity. Importance At this time, virology is focused on the study of a relatively small number of viral species. Specific viruses are studied either because they are easily propagated in the laboratory or because they are associated with disease. The lack of knowledge of the size and characteristics of the viral universe and the diversity of viral genomes is a roadblock to understanding important issues, such as the origin of emerging pathogens and the extent of gene exchange among viruses. Untreated wastewater is an ideal system for assessing viral diversity because virion populations from large numbers of individuals are deposited and because raw sewage itself provides a rich environment for the growth of diverse host species and thus their viruses. These studies suggest that

  6. Planck-suppressed operators

    SciTech Connect

    Assassi, Valentin; Baumann, Daniel; Green, Daniel; McAllister, Liam E-mail: dbaumann@damtp.cam.ac.uk E-mail: mcallister@cornell.edu

    2014-01-01

    We show that the recent Planck limits on primordial non-Gaussianity impose strong constraints on light hidden sector fields coupled to the inflaton via operators suppressed by a high mass scale Λ. We study a simple effective field theory in which a hidden sector field is coupled to a shift-symmetric inflaton via arbitrary operators up to dimension five. Self-interactions in the hidden sector lead to non-Gaussianity in the curvature perturbations. To be consistent with the Planck limit on local non-Gaussianity, the coupling to any hidden sector with light fields and natural cubic couplings must be suppressed by a very high scale Λ > 10{sup 5}H. Even if the hidden sector has Gaussian correlations, nonlinearities in the mixing with the inflaton still lead to non-Gaussian curvature perturbations. In this case, the non-Gaussianity is of the equilateral or orthogonal type, and the Planck data requires Λ > 10{sup 2}H.

  7. Viral Nucleases Induce an mRNA Degradation-Transcription Feedback Loop in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Abernathy, Emma; Gilbertson, Sarah; Alla, Ravi; Glaunsinger, Britt

    2015-08-12

    Gamma-herpesviruses encode a cytoplasmic mRNA-targeting endonuclease, SOX, that cleaves most cellular mRNAs. Cleaved fragments are subsequently degraded by the cellular 5'-3' mRNA exonuclease Xrn1, thereby suppressing cellular gene expression and facilitating viral evasion of host defenses. We reveal that mammalian cells respond to this widespread cytoplasmic mRNA decay by altering RNA Polymerase II (RNAPII) transcription in the nucleus. Measuring RNAPII recruitment to promoters and nascent mRNA synthesis revealed that the majority of affected genes are transcriptionally repressed in SOX-expressing cells. The transcriptional feedback does not occur in response to the initial viral endonuclease-induced cleavage, but instead to degradation of the cleaved fragments by cellular exonucleases. In particular, Xrn1 catalytic activity is required for transcriptional repression. Notably, viral mRNA transcription escapes decay-induced repression, and this escape requires Xrn1. Collectively, these results indicate that mRNA decay rates impact transcription and that gamma-herpesviruses use this feedback mechanism to facilitate viral gene expression. PMID:26211836

  8. RNA interference-inducing hairpin RNAs in plants act through the viral defence pathway.

    PubMed

    Fusaro, Adriana F; Matthew, Louisa; Smith, Neil A; Curtin, Shaun J; Dedic-Hagan, Jasmina; Ellacott, Geoff A; Watson, John M; Wang, Ming-Bo; Brosnan, Chris; Carroll, Bernard J; Waterhouse, Peter M

    2006-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is widely used to silence genes in plants and animals. It operates through the degradation of target mRNA by endonuclease complexes guided by approximately 21 nucleotide (nt) short interfering RNAs (siRNAs). A similar process regulates the expression of some developmental genes through approximately 21 nt microRNAs. Plants have four types of Dicer-like (DCL) enzyme, each producing small RNAs with different functions. Here, we show that DCL2, DCL3 and DCL4 in Arabidopsis process both replicating viral RNAs and RNAi-inducing hairpin RNAs (hpRNAs) into 22-, 24- and 21 nt siRNAs, respectively, and that loss of both DCL2 and DCL4 activities is required to negate RNAi and to release the plant's repression of viral replication. We also show that hpRNAs, similar to viral infection, can engender long-distance silencing signals and that hpRNA-induced silencing is suppressed by the expression of a virus-derived suppressor protein. These findings indicate that hpRNA-mediated RNAi in plants operates through the viral defence pathway. PMID:17039251

  9. GP96 Interacts with HHV-6 during Viral Entry and Directs It for Cellular Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Prusty, Bhupesh K.; Siegl, Christine; Gulve, Nitish; Mori, Yasuko; Rudel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    CD46 and CD134 mediate attachment of Human Herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A) and HHV-6B to host cell, respectively. But many cell types interfere with viral infection through rapid degradation of viral DNA. Hence, not all cells expressing these receptors are permissive to HHV-6 DNA replication and production of infective virions suggesting the involvement of additional factors that influence HHV-6 propagation. Here, we used a proteomics approach to identify other host cell proteins necessary for HHV-6 binding and entry. We found host cell chaperone protein GP96 to interact with HHV-6A and HHV-6B and to interfere with virus propagation within the host cell. In human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), GP96 is transported to the cell surface upon infection with HHV-6 and interacts with HHV-6A and -6B through its C-terminal end. Suppression of GP96 expression decreased initial viral binding but increased viral DNA replication. Transient expression of human GP96 allowed HHV-6 entry into CHO-K1 cells even in the absence of CD46. Thus, our results suggest an important role for GP96 during HHV-6 infection, which possibly supports the cellular degradation of the virus. PMID:25470779

  10. Synthesis of minus-strand copies of a viral transgene during viral infections of transgenic plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants can be genetically engineered to express viral sequences, often resulting in resistance to the virus from which the sequence was derived. The generally accepted mechanism for this pathogen induced resistance is gene silencing. Previous work has demonstrated that viral transgenes can be incorp...

  11. [Clinical aspects and diagnosis of viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Vince, Adriana

    2003-01-01

    Viral hepatitides are common diseases of modern man in both industrialized and developing countries, with a varying prevalence of particular types and mode of transmission. In current medicine, viral hepatitides are classified in the A-E nomenclature, differentiating viruses that can be etiologically defined with certainty on the basis of serum markers and hepatitides exhibiting all clinical and laboratory characteristics of viral hepatitis but of as yet nondemonstrable causative agents, classified in the non-A, non-E hepatitis group. Two issues are of high relevance in the pathogenesis of viral hepatitides: route of transmission (fecal-oral or parenteral) and basic mechanism of hepatocyte lesion. Although all hepatitis viruses replicate within the hepatocyte, the exact mechanism of hepatocyte necrosis has not yet been fully elucidated, i.e. direct cytotoxicity or hepatoprogressive immune response mediated primarily by the specific cytotoxic CD8 lymphocytes. Depending on the site of entry, the virus replicates in the adjacent lymphatic tissue for some time, followed by primary viremia, virus replication in the lymphoreticular organs (lymph nodes, liver, spleen), and eventual entry in the target cells--hepatocytes, accompanied by a varying grade of necrosis and inflammatory reaction. The clinical and laboratory signs of the disease correspond to the degree of liver necrosis and are not specific for particular types of viral hepatitis. The most frequent symptoms common to all types of viral hepatitis of moderate severity include elevated body temperature persisting for days, fatigue, gradual loss of appetite, nausea, dull pain and discomfort on DRL, vomiting, multiple loose stools, dark urine, jaundice of the skin and mucosa, and light stools. Generally, the ultimate outcome of the disease is elimination of the virus and complete recovery, however, a fulminant course with lethal outcome or transition to chronic disease may also occur, making viral hepatitides a major

  12. Deciphering and Reversing Tumor Immune Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Motz, Greg T.; Coukos, George

    2013-01-01

    Generating an anti-tumor immune response is a multi-step process that is executed by effector T cells that can recognize and kill tumor targets. However, tumors employ multiple strategies to attenuate the effectiveness of T cell-mediated attack. This is achieved by interfering with nearly every step required for effective immunity, from deregulation of antigen-presenting cells, to establishment of a physical barrier at the vasculature that prevents homing of effector tumor-rejecting cells, and through the suppression of effector lymphocytes through the recruitment and activation of immunosuppressive cells like myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), tolerogenic monocytes and T regulatory cells (Tregs). Here, we review the ways in which tumors exert immune suppression and highlight the new therapies that seek to reverse this phenomenon and promote anti-tumor immunity. Understanding anti-tumor immunity, and how it becomes disabled by tumors, will ultimately lead to improved immune therapies and prolonged survival of patients. PMID:23890064

  13. Sleep deprivation suppresses aggression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Matthew S; Mainwaring, Benjamin; Yue, Zhifeng; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances negatively impact numerous functions and have been linked to aggression and violence. However, a clear effect of sleep deprivation on aggressive behaviors remains unclear. We find that acute sleep deprivation profoundly suppresses aggressive behaviors in the fruit fly, while other social behaviors are unaffected. This suppression is recovered following post-deprivation sleep rebound, and occurs regardless of the approach to achieve sleep loss. Genetic and pharmacologic approaches suggest octopamine signaling transmits changes in aggression upon sleep deprivation, and reduced aggression places sleep-deprived flies at a competitive disadvantage for obtaining a reproductive partner. These findings demonstrate an interaction between two phylogenetically conserved behaviors, and suggest that previous sleep experiences strongly modulate aggression with consequences for reproductive fitness. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07643.001 PMID:26216041

  14. Compton suppression through rise-time analysis.

    PubMed

    Selvi, S; Celiktas, C

    2007-11-01

    We studied Compton suppression for 60Co and 137Cs radioisotopes using a signal selection criterion based on contrasting the fall time of the signals composing the photo peak with those composing the Compton continuum. The fall time criterion is employed by using the pulse shape analysis observing the change in the fall times of the gamma-ray pulses. This change is determined by measuring the changes in the rise times related to the fall time of the scintillator and the timing signals related to the fall time of the input signals. We showed that Compton continuum suppression is achieved best via the precise timing adjustment of an analog rise-time analyzer connected to a NaI(Tl) scintillation spectrometer. PMID:17703943

  15. Sleep deprivation suppresses aggression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Matthew S; Mainwaring, Benjamin; Yue, Zhifeng; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances negatively impact numerous functions and have been linked to aggression and violence. However, a clear effect of sleep deprivation on aggressive behaviors remains unclear. We find that acute sleep deprivation profoundly suppresses aggressive behaviors in the fruit fly, while other social behaviors are unaffected. This suppression is recovered following post-deprivation sleep rebound, and occurs regardless of the approach to achieve sleep loss. Genetic and pharmacologic approaches suggest octopamine signaling transmits changes in aggression upon sleep deprivation, and reduced aggression places sleep-deprived flies at a competitive disadvantage for obtaining a reproductive partner. These findings demonstrate an interaction between two phylogenetically conserved behaviors, and suggest that previous sleep experiences strongly modulate aggression with consequences for reproductive fitness. PMID:26216041

  16. Adaptive Modal Identification for Flutter Suppression Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Drew, Michael; Swei, Sean S.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we will develop an adaptive modal identification method for identifying the frequencies and damping of a flutter mode based on model-reference adaptive control (MRAC) and least-squares methods. The least-squares parameter estimation will achieve parameter convergence in the presence of persistent excitation whereas the MRAC parameter estimation does not guarantee parameter convergence. Two adaptive flutter suppression control approaches are developed: one based on MRAC and the other based on the least-squares method. The MRAC flutter suppression control is designed as an integral part of the parameter estimation where the feedback signal is used to estimate the modal information. On the other hand, the separation principle of control and estimation is applied to the least-squares method. The least-squares modal identification is used to perform parameter estimation.

  17. Mumps Virus Induces Protein-Kinase-R-Dependent Stress Granules, Partly Suppressing Type III Interferon Production.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Shin; Yamamoto, Soh; Ogasawara, Noriko; Sato, Toyotaka; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Katoh, Hiroshi; Kubota, Toru; Shiraishi, Tsukasa; Kojima, Takashi; Himi, Tetsuo; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Yokota, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are cytoplasmic granular aggregations that are induced by cellular stress, including viral infection. SGs have opposing antiviral and proviral roles, which depend on virus species. The exact function of SGs during viral infection is not fully understood. Here, we showed that mumps virus (MuV) induced SGs depending on activation of protein kinase R (PKR). MuV infection strongly induced interferon (IFN)-λ1, 2 and 3, and IFN-β through activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) via retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) pathway. MuV-induced IFNs were strongly upregulated in PKR-knockdown cells. MuV-induced SG formation was suppressed by knockdown of PKR and SG marker proteins, Ras-GTPase-activating protein SH3-domain-binding protein 1 and T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1, and significantly increased the levels of MuV-induced IFN-λ1. However, viral titer was not altered by suppression of SG formation. PKR was required for induction of SGs by MuV infection and regulated type III IFN (IFN-λ1) mRNA stability. MuV-induced SGs partly suppressed type III IFN production by MuV; however, the limited suppression was not sufficient to inhibit MuV replication in cell culture. Our results provide insight into the relationship between SGs and IFN production induced by MuV infection. PMID:27560627

  18. Mumps Virus Induces Protein-Kinase-R-Dependent Stress Granules, Partly Suppressing Type III Interferon Production

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Shin; Yamamoto, Soh; Ogasawara, Noriko; Sato, Toyotaka; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Katoh, Hiroshi; Kubota, Toru; Shiraishi, Tsukasa; Kojima, Takashi; Himi, Tetsuo; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Yokota, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are cytoplasmic granular aggregations that are induced by cellular stress, including viral infection. SGs have opposing antiviral and proviral roles, which depend on virus species. The exact function of SGs during viral infection is not fully understood. Here, we showed that mumps virus (MuV) induced SGs depending on activation of protein kinase R (PKR). MuV infection strongly induced interferon (IFN)-λ1, 2 and 3, and IFN-β through activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) via retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) pathway. MuV-induced IFNs were strongly upregulated in PKR-knockdown cells. MuV-induced SG formation was suppressed by knockdown of PKR and SG marker proteins, Ras-GTPase-activating protein SH3-domain-binding protein 1 and T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1, and significantly increased the levels of MuV-induced IFN-λ1. However, viral titer was not altered by suppression of SG formation. PKR was required for induction of SGs by MuV infection and regulated type III IFN (IFN-λ1) mRNA stability. MuV-induced SGs partly suppressed type III IFN production by MuV; however, the limited suppression was not sufficient to inhibit MuV replication in cell culture. Our results provide insight into the relationship between SGs and IFN production induced by MuV infection. PMID:27560627

  19. Molecular imaging of oncolytic viral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Dana; Fong, Yuman

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses have made their mark on the cancer world as a potential therapeutic option, with the possible advantages of reduced side effects and strengthened treatment efficacy due to higher tumor selectivity. Results have been so promising, that oncolytic viral treatments have now been approved for clinical trials in several countries. However, clinical studies may benefit from the ability to noninvasively and serially identify sites of viral targeting via molecular imaging in order to provide safety, efficacy, and toxicity information. Furthermore, molecular imaging of oncolytic viral therapy may provide a more sensitive and specific diagnostic technique to detect tumor origin and, more importantly, presence of metastases. Several strategies have been investigated for molecular imaging of viral replication broadly categorized into optical and deep tissue imaging, utilizing several reporter genes encoding for fluorescence proteins, conditional enzymes, and membrane protein and transporters. Various imaging methods facilitate molecular imaging, including computer tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, single photon emission CT, gamma-scintigraphy, and photoacoustic imaging. In addition, several molecular probes are used for medical imaging, which act as targeting moieties or signaling agents. This review will explore the preclinical and clinical use of in vivo molecular imaging of replication-competent oncolytic viral therapy. PMID:27119098

  20. View and review on viral oncology research

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    To date, almost one and a half million cases of cancer are diagnosed every year in the US and nearly 560,000 Americans are expected to die of cancer in the current year, more than 1,500 people a day (data from the American Cancer Society at http://www.cancer.org/). According to the World Health Organization (WHO), roughly 20% of all cancers worldwide results from chronic infections; in particular, up to 15% of human cancers is characterized by a viral aetiology with higher incidence in Developing Countries. The link between viruses and cancer was one of the pivotal discoveries in cancer research during the past Century. Indeed, the infectious nature of specific tumors has important implications in terms of their prevention, diagnosis, and therapy. In the 21st Century, the research on viral oncology field continues to be vigorous, with new significant and original studies on viral oncogenesis and translational research from basic virology to treatment of cancer. This review will cover different viral oncology aspects, starting from the history of viral oncology and moving to the peculiar features of oncogenic RNA and DNA viruses, with a special focus on human pathogens. PMID:20497566

  1. Molecular imaging of oncolytic viral therapy.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Dana; Fong, Yuman

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses have made their mark on the cancer world as a potential therapeutic option, with the possible advantages of reduced side effects and strengthened treatment efficacy due to higher tumor selectivity. Results have been so promising, that oncolytic viral treatments have now been approved for clinical trials in several countries. However, clinical studies may benefit from the ability to noninvasively and serially identify sites of viral targeting via molecular imaging in order to provide safety, efficacy, and toxicity information. Furthermore, molecular imaging of oncolytic viral therapy may provide a more sensitive and specific diagnostic technique to detect tumor origin and, more importantly, presence of metastases. Several strategies have been investigated for molecular imaging of viral replication broadly categorized into optical and deep tissue imaging, utilizing several reporter genes encoding for fluorescence proteins, conditional enzymes, and membrane protein and transporters. Various imaging methods facilitate molecular imaging, including computer tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, single photon emission CT, gamma-scintigraphy, and photoacoustic imaging. In addition, several molecular probes are used for medical imaging, which act as targeting moieties or signaling agents. This review will explore the preclinical and clinical use of in vivo molecular imaging of replication-competent oncolytic viral therapy. PMID:27119098

  2. Viral suppression function of intracellular antibody against C-terminal domain of rabies virus phosphoprotein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Sun, Lina; Yu, Pengcheng; Li, Aqian; Li, Chuan; Tang, Qing; Li, Dexin; Liang, Mifang

    2015-10-01

    Rabies virus (RV) causes a fatal disease in both human and animals. The disease can be prevented by post-exposure prophylaxis in individuals exposed to RV. However, the neutralization effect is limited after the virus enters into the host cells. So, it is important to identify new targets for rabies therapy. In this study, a human antibody RV1A2 specific to RV phosphoprotein (RV-P) was generated from a human naïve immune antibody library. The antibody recognized all forms of the phosphoproteins including the full length (P1) and short length of the P proteins (P2, P3, P4, and P5). The epitope mapping and the molecular docking of antigen-antibody complex showed that the antibody targets at a conserved epitope of 'VLGWV' ranging from amino acid (aa) 262 to 266 at C-terminal domain of the P protein, which locates at a hydrophobic pocket region in the C-terminal of the RV-P. The aa W265 within the epitope is on the flat surface of the domain, suggesting that it may be a critical amino acid for the functions of the P protein. Our results further showed that intracellular antibody RV1A2 which targets at the C-terminal domain of the P protein could effectively inhibit RV propagation 2-4 days post infection. These results suggest that the conserved C-terminal domain may be used as a new target for drug discovery, which highlights an intracellular inhibition of RV propagation and provides a potential novel way to treat RV infection. PMID:26188200

  3. SUPPRESSION OF VIRAL REPLICATION BY GUANIDINE: A COMPARISON OF HUMAN ADENOVIRUSES AND ENTEROVIRUSES (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comparison was made of the relative sensitivities of laboratory strain human adenoviruses and enteroviruses, and recently isolated human enteroviruses, to the presence of guanidine hydrochloride in cell culture media. The concentration of guanidine hydrochloride used was 100 mi...

  4. Anti-metastatic effects of viral and non-viral mediated Nk4 delivery to tumours.

    PubMed

    Buhles, Alexandra; Collins, Sara A; van Pijkeren, Jan P; Rajendran, Simon; Miles, Michelle; O'Sullivan, Gerald C; O'Hanlon, Deirdre M; Tangney, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The most common cause of death of cancer sufferers is through the occurrence of metastases. The metastatic behaviour of tumour cells is regulated by extracellular growth factors such as hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), a ligand for the c-Met receptor tyrosine kinase, and aberrant expression/activation of the c-Met receptor is closely associated with metastatic progression. Nk4 (also known as Interleukin (IL)32b) is a competitive antagonist of the HGF c-Met system and inhibits c-Met signalling and tumour metastasis. Nk4 has an additional anti-angiogenic activity independent of its HGF-antagonist function. Angiogenesis-inhibitory as well as cancer-specific apoptosis inducing effects make the Nk4 sequence an attractive candidate for gene therapy of cancer. This study investigates the inhibition of tumour metastasis by gene therapy mediated production of Nk4 by the primary tumour. Optimal delivery of anti-cancer genes is vital in order to achieve the highest therapeutic responses. Non-viral plasmid delivery methods have the advantage of safety and ease of production, providing immediate transgene expression, albeit short-lived in most tumours. Sustained presence of anti-angiogenic molecules is preferable with anti-angiogenic therapies, and the long-term expression mediated by Adeno-associated Virus (AAV) might represent a more appropriate delivery in this respect. However, the incubation time required by AAV vectors to reach appropriate gene expression levels hampers efficacy in many fast-growing murine tumour models. Here, we describe murine trials assessing the effects of Nk4 on the spontaneously metastatic Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) model when delivered to primary tumour via plasmid lipofection or AAV2 vector. Intratumoural AAV-Nk4 administration produced the highest therapeutic response with significant reduction in both primary tumour growth and incidence of lung metastases. Plasmid-mediated therapy also significantly reduced metastatic growth, but with moderate

  5. Diagnosis and Control of Viral Diseases of Reproductive Importance: Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis and Bovine Viral Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, Benjamin W; Givens, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Both bovine viral diarrhea virus and bovine herpesvirus 1 can have significant negative reproductive impacts on cattle health. Vaccination is the primary control method for the viral pathogens in US cattle herds. Polyvalent, modified-live vaccines are recommended to provide optimal protection against various viral field strains. Of particular importance to bovine viral diarrhea control is the limitation of contact of pregnant cattle with potential viral reservoirs during the critical first 125 days of gestation. PMID:27140298

  6. Heritability of Creative Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piffer, Davide; Hur, Yoon-Mi

    2014-01-01

    Although creative achievement is a subject of much attention to lay people, the origin of individual differences in creative accomplishments remain poorly understood. This study examined genetic and environmental influences on creative achievement in an adult sample of 338 twins (mean age = 26.3 years; SD = 6.6 years). Twins completed the Creative…

  7. Confronting the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, David

    2007-01-01

    This article talks about the large achievement gap between children of color and their white peers. The reasons for the achievement gap are varied. First, many urban minorities come from a background of poverty. One of the detrimental effects of growing up in poverty is receiving inadequate nourishment at a time when bodies and brains are rapidly…

  8. States Address Achievement Gaps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Kathy

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes 2 state initiatives to address the achievement gap: North Carolina's report by the Advisory Commission on Raising Achievement and Closing Gaps, containing an 11-point strategy, and Kentucky's legislation putting in place 10 specific processes. The North Carolina report is available at www.dpi.state.nc.us.closingthegap; Kentucky's…

  9. Wechsler Individual Achievement Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ronald L.

    1999-01-01

    This article describes the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test, a comprehensive measure of achievement for individuals in grades K-12. Eight subtests assess mathematics reasoning, spelling, reading comprehension, numerical operations, listening comprehension, oral expression, and written expression. Its administration, standardization,…

  10. Inverting the Achievement Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White-Hood, Marian; Shindel, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    Attempting to invert the pyramid to improve student achievement and increase all students' chances for success is not a new endeavor. For decades, educators have strategized, formed think tanks, and developed school improvement teams to find better ways to improve the achievement of all students. Currently, the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) is…

  11. Achievement Test Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Trade and Industrial Education Service.

    The Ohio Trade and Industrial Education Achievement Test battery is comprised of seven basic achievement tests: Machine Trades, Automotive Mechanics, Basic Electricity, Basic Electronics, Mechanical Drafting, Printing, and Sheet Metal. The tests were developed by subject matter committees and specialists in testing and research. The Ohio Trade and…

  12. General Achievement Trends: Maryland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  13. General Achievement Trends: Arkansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  14. General Achievement Trends: Idaho

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  15. General Achievement Trends: Nebraska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  16. General Achievement Trends: Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  17. General Achievement Trends: Iowa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  18. General Achievement Trends: Hawaii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  19. General Achievement Trends: Kentucky

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  20. General Achievement Trends: Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  1. General Achievement Trends: Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  2. General Achievement Trends: Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  3. General Achievement Trends: Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  4. Honoring Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Is the concept of "honor roll" obsolete? The honor roll has always been a way for schools to recognize the academic achievement of their students. But does it motivate students? In this article, several elementary school principals share their views about honoring student achievement. Among others, Virginia principal Nancy Moga said that students…

  5. Aiming at Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Paul

    The Raising Quality and Achievement Program is a 3-year initiative to support further education (FE) colleges in the United Kingdom in their drive to improve students' achievement and the quality of provision. The program offers the following: (1) quality information and advice; (2) onsite support for individual colleges; (3) help with…

  6. Achieving Perspective Transformation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowak, Jens

    Perspective transformation is a consciously achieved state in which the individual's perspective on life is transformed. The new perspective serves as a vantage point for life's actions and interactions, affecting the way life is lived. Three conditions are basic to achieving perspective transformation: (1) "feeling" experience, i.e., getting in…

  7. Achieving Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abowitz, Kathleen Knight

    2011-01-01

    Public schools are functionally provided through structural arrangements such as government funding, but public schools are achieved in substance, in part, through local governance. In this essay, Kathleen Knight Abowitz explains the bifocal nature of achieving public schools; that is, that schools are both subject to the unitary Public compact of…

  8. General Achievement Trends: Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  9. Achievement-Based Resourcing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Mike; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This collection of seven articles examines achievement-based resourcing (ABR), the concept that the funding of educational institutions should be linked to their success in promoting student achievement, with a focus on the application of ABR to postsecondary education in the United Kingdom. The articles include: (1) "Introduction" (Mick…

  10. Confounding roles for type I interferons during bacterial and viral pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Although type I interferons (IFN-I) were initially defined as potent antiviral agents, they can also cause decreased host resistance to some bacterial and viral infections. The many antiviral functions of the IFN-I include direct suppression of viral replication and activation of the immune response against viruses. In addition to their antiviral effects, IFN-I are also protective against several extracellular bacterial infections, in part, by promoting the induction of TNF-α and nitric oxide. In contrast, there is a negative effect of IFN-I on host resistance during chronic infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and acute infections with intracellular bacteria. In the case of LCMV, chronic IFN-I signaling induces adaptive immune system suppression. Blockade of IFN-I signaling removes the suppression and allows CD4 T-cell- and IFN-γ-mediated resolution of the infection. During acute intracellular bacterial infection, IFN-I suppress innate immunity by at least two defined mechanisms. During Francisella infection, IFN-I prevent IL-17 upregulation on γδ T cells and neutrophil recruitment. Following Listeria infection, IFN-I promote the cell death of macrophages and lymphocytes, which leads to innate immune suppression. These divergent findings for the role of IFN-I on pathogen control emphasize the complexity of the interferons system and force more mechanistic evaluation of its role in pathogenesis. This review evaluates IFN-I during infection with an emphasis on work carried out IFN-I-receptor-deficient mice. PMID:24158954

  11. Adapting the Stress Response: Viral Subversion of the mTOR Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Le Sage, Valerie; Cinti, Alessandro; Amorim, Raquel; Mouland, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central regulator of gene expression, translation and various metabolic processes. Multiple extracellular (growth factors) and intracellular (energy status) molecular signals as well as a variety of stressors are integrated into the mTOR pathway. Viral infection is a significant stress that can activate, reduce or even suppress the mTOR signaling pathway. Consequently, viruses have evolved a plethora of different mechanisms to attack and co-opt the mTOR pathway in order to make the host cell a hospitable environment for replication. A more comprehensive knowledge of different viral interactions may provide fruitful targets for new antiviral drugs. PMID:27231932

  12. Transient hypothyroidism associated with viral Human Parechovirus encephalitis in a newborn.

    PubMed

    Dereymaeker, Anneleen; Vanhaesebrouck, Sophie; Jansen, Katrien; Lagae, Lieven; de Vries, Linda; Naulaers, Gunnar

    2015-11-01

    Human Parechovirus type 3 (HPeV-3) is a neurotropic virus which can cause neonatal encephalitis, presenting as encephalopathy with seizures and diffuse white matter lesions on brain imaging. Neurodevelopmental outcome is linked to the extent of white matter abnormalities. We report on a neonate with clinical and biochemical findings of transient central hypothyroidism associated with HPeV-3 encephalitis. The co-occurrence of transient hypothyroidism and viral encephalitis has not been reported in newborns before. Transient suppression of the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroidal axis is described in critically ill babies as the nonthyroidal-illness syndrome. Assessment of thyroid function in neonatal cases of HPeV-3 infection is required to conclude whether a transient hypothyroidism as in nonthyroidal-illness syndrome may be triggered by viral meningo-encephalitis and if treatment may influence neurodevelopmental outcome. PMID:26314768

  13. Adapting the Stress Response: Viral Subversion of the mTOR Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Le Sage, Valerie; Cinti, Alessandro; Amorim, Raquel; Mouland, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central regulator of gene expression, translation and various metabolic processes. Multiple extracellular (growth factors) and intracellular (energy status) molecular signals as well as a variety of stressors are integrated into the mTOR pathway. Viral infection is a significant stress that can activate, reduce or even suppress the mTOR signaling pathway. Consequently, viruses have evolved a plethora of different mechanisms to attack and co-opt the mTOR pathway in order to make the host cell a hospitable environment for replication. A more comprehensive knowledge of different viral interactions may provide fruitful targets for new antiviral drugs. PMID:27231932

  14. T cell inactivation by poxviral B22 family proteins increases viral virulence.

    PubMed

    Alzhanova, Dina; Hammarlund, Erika; Reed, Jason; Meermeier, Erin; Rawlings, Stephanie; Ray, Caroline A; Edwards, David M; Bimber, Ben; Legasse, Alfred; Planer, Shannon; Sprague, Jerald; Axthelm, Michael K; Pickup, David J; Lewinsohn, David M; Gold, Marielle C; Wong, Scott W; Sacha, Jonah B; Slifka, Mark K; Früh, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    Infections with monkeypox, cowpox and weaponized variola virus remain a threat to the increasingly unvaccinated human population, but little is known about their mechanisms of virulence and immune evasion. We now demonstrate that B22 proteins, encoded by the largest genes of these viruses, render human T cells unresponsive to stimulation of the T cell receptor by MHC-dependent antigen presentation or by MHC-independent stimulation. In contrast, stimuli that bypass TCR-signaling are not inhibited. In a non-human primate model of monkeypox, virus lacking the B22R homologue (MPXVΔ197) caused only mild disease with lower viremia and cutaneous pox lesions compared to wild type MPXV which caused high viremia, morbidity and mortality. Since MPXVΔ197-infected animals displayed accelerated T cell responses and less T cell dysregulation than MPXV US2003, we conclude that B22 family proteins cause viral virulence by suppressing T cell control of viral dissemination. PMID:24832205

  15. Current issues in the management of paediatric viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Latifa T F; Roberts, Eve A

    2010-01-01

    Viral hepatitis poses important problems for children. In preschoolers, hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection frequently causes acute liver failure. Vaccinating toddlers against HAV in countries with high endemicity is expected to decrease mortality. HAV vaccine demonstrates efficacy (comparable to immunoglobulin) as post-exposure prophylaxis. A recently developed vaccine against hepatitis E virus (HEV) may benefit fetal health, because pregnant women are most prone to acute liver failure as a result of HEV. Hepatitis B vaccine continues to demonstrate value and versatility for preventing serious liver disease. With chronic infection, undetectable levels of serum HBV DNA complement e-seroconversion as the preferred outcome measure; suppressed viral load correlates with long-term complications better than HBeAg status. Among Taiwanese children, low pretreatment HBV DNA (<2 x 10(8) copies/ml) strongly predicted response to interferon-alpha. Future paediatric studies must incorporate HBV DNA levels. The rationale for routine treatment of immunotolerant hepatitis B during childhood remains uncertain. Any treatment of chronic hepatitis B in childhood requires consideration of the risks and benefits. Childhood hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection results mainly from mother-to-infant transmission. Babies of HCV-infected women should be tested for serum HCV RNA at 1 month of age. If negative, confirmatory anti-HCV antibody testing may be performed between 12 and 15 months of age. Children with chronic hepatitis C may develop progressive fibrosis/cirrhosis, particularly in the setting of obesity and insulin resistance. Treatment of children chronically infected with genotype 2 or 3 is highly successful: combination therapy of pegylated interferon-alpha and ribavirin is well tolerated and superior to pegylated interferon-alpha alone. PMID:19840256

  16. Attacking Postoperative Metastases using Perioperative Oncolytic Viruses and Viral Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Lee-Hwa; Auer, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Surgical resection of solid primary malignancies is a mainstay of therapy for cancer patients. Despite being the most effective treatment for these tumors, cancer surgery has been associated with impaired metastatic clearance due to immunosuppression. In preclinical surgery models and human cancer patients, we and others have demonstrated a profound suppression of both natural killer (NK) and T cell function in the postoperative period and this plays a major role in the enhanced development of metastases following surgery. Oncolytic viruses (OV) were originally designed to selectively infect and replicate in tumors, with the primary objective of directly lysing cancer cells. It is becoming increasingly clear, however, that OV infection results in a profound inflammatory reaction within the tumor, initiating innate and adaptive immune responses against it that is critical for its therapeutic benefit. This anti-tumor immunity appears to be mediated predominantly by NK and cytotoxic T cells. In preclinical models, we found that preoperative OV prevents postoperative NK cell dysfunction and attenuates tumor dissemination. Due to theoretical safety concerns of administering live virus prior to surgery in cancer patients, we characterized safe, attenuated versions of OV, and viral vaccines that could stimulate NK cells and reduce metastases when administered in the perioperative period. In cancer patients, we observed that in vivo infusion with oncolytic vaccinia virus and ex vivo stimulation with viral vaccines promote NK cell activation. These preclinical studies provide a novel and clinically relevant setting for OV therapy. Our challenge is to identify safe and promising OV therapies that will activate NK and T cells in the perioperative period preventing the establishment of micrometastatic disease in cancer patients. PMID:25161958

  17. Modulation of Immune System by Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus: Lessons from Viral Evasion Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye-Ra; Brulois, Kevin; Wong, LaiYee; Jung, Jae U.

    2012-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), a member of the herpesvirus family, has evolved to establish a long-term, latent infection of cells such that while they carry the viral genome gene expression is highly restricted. Latency is a state of cryptic viral infection associated with genomic persistence in their host and this hallmark of KSHV infection leads to several clinical–epidemiological diseases such as KS, a plasmablastic variant of multicentric Castleman’s disease, and primary effusion lymphoma upon immune suppression of infected hosts. In order to sustain efficient life-long persistency as well as their life cycle, KSHV dedicates a large portion of its genome to encode immunomodulatory proteins that antagonize its host’s immune system. In this review, we will describe our current knowledge of the immune evasion strategies employed by KSHV at distinct stages of its viral life cycle to control the host’s immune system. PMID:22403573

  18. ZERO SUPPRESSION FOR RECORDERS

    DOEpatents

    Fort, W.G.S.

    1958-12-30

    A zero-suppression circuit for self-balancing recorder instruments is presented. The essential elements of the circuit include a converter-amplifier having two inputs, one for a reference voltage and the other for the signal voltage under analysis, and a servomotor with two control windings, one coupled to the a-c output of the converter-amplifier and the other receiving a reference input. Each input circuit to the converter-amplifier has a variable potentiometer and the sliders of the potentiometer are ganged together for movement by the servoinotor. The particular noveity of the circuit resides in the selection of resistance values for the potentiometer and a resistor in series with the potentiometer of the signal circuit to ensure the full value of signal voltage variation is impressed on a recorder mechanism driven by servomotor.

  19. Pressure suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.

    1994-10-04

    A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein. 3 figs.

  20. Interference suppression of SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Kochanov, V P

    2011-01-24

    The theory of three-wave SRS is developed, which takes into account nonlinear dispersion of a medium for arbitrary phases of the pump waves at the input to the medium. The effect of interference suppression of SRS is predicted for values of the total phase of the three-wave pump (2n+1){pi} (n=0, {+-}1, {+-}2...), the effect being caused by the destructive interference of polarisations of the nonresonant dipole-allowed transitions. The relation between the contributions of the linear and nonlinear dispersions to the SRS is found. It is shown that at a sufficiently large wave detuning, the anti-Stokes wave amplitude experiences spatial oscillations. (nonlinear-optics phenomena)

  1. Pressure suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.

    1994-01-01

    A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein.

  2. HUMAN VIRAL ONCOGENESIS: A CANCER HALLMARKS ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Mesri, Enrique A.; Feitelson, Mark; Munger, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Approximately twelve percent of all human cancers are caused by oncoviruses. Human viral oncogenesis is complex and only a small percentage of the infected individuals develop cancer and often many years to decades after initial infection. This reflects the multistep nature of viral oncogenesis, host genetic variability and the fact that viruses contribute to only a portion of the oncogenic events. In this review, the Hallmarks of Cancer framework of Hanahan & Weinberg (2000 and 2011) is used to dissect the viral, host and environmental co-factors that contribute to the biology of multistep oncogenesis mediated by established human oncoviruses. The viruses discussed include Epstein Barr Virus (EBV), high-risk Human Papillomaviruses (HPV16/18), Hepatitis B and C viruses (HBV, HCV respectively), Human T-cell lymphotropic virus-1 (HTLV-1) and Kaposi’s sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV). PMID:24629334

  3. [Treatment for viral hepatitis in institutionalized individuals].

    PubMed

    Horvat, Jadranka

    2009-12-01

    The presence and spread of viral hepatitis infection in the prison population is much higher than in the general population. Prisoners represent a combination of several high risk subpopulations and are therefore generally considered a high risk category. When outside the prison system, members of these high risk groups are generally not available for education, prevention and therapy. While within the prison system, they are available for systematic and continuing monitoring and therapy. This includes testing of their HBV, HCV and HIV status. Due to the high incidence of viral hepatitis in the prison population and based on the results of a study from 2007, we established the Prison System Viral Hepatitis Counseling Center. The Center operates within the internal ward of the Prison Hospital. Currently, 42 patients are treated for chronic hepatitis C. The Center's Plan and Operating Program and treatment results are presented. PMID:20198905

  4. Molecular basis of viral and microbial pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rott, R.; Goebel, W.

    1988-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Correlation Between Viroid Structure and Pathogenicty; Antigenicity of the Influenza Haemagglutinia Membrane Glycoprotein; Viral Glycoproteins as Determinants of Pathogenicity; Virus Genes Involved in Host Range and Pathogenicity; Molecular Heterogenetiy of Pathogenic Herpus Viruses; Recombination of Foreign (Viral) DNA with Host Genome: Studies in Vivo and in a Cell-Free system; Disorders of Cellular Neuro-Functions by Persistent Viral Infection; Pathogenic Aspects of Measles Virus-Persistent Infections in Man; Analysis of the Dual Lineage Specificity of E26 Avian Leukemia Virus; Mx Gene Control of Influenza Virus Susceptibility; Shiga and Shika-Like Toxins: A Family of Related Cytokinons; and Molecular Mechanisms of Pathogenicity in Shigella Flexneri.

  5. Controlling Viral Capsid Assembly with Templating

    PubMed Central

    Hagan, Michael F.

    2009-01-01

    We develop coarse-grained models that describe the dynamic encapsidation of functionalized nanoparticles by viral capsid proteins. We find that some forms of cooperative interactions between protein subunits and nanoparticles can dramatically enhance rates and robustness of assembly, as compared to the spontaneous assembly of subunits into empty capsids. For large core-subunit interactions, subunits adsorb onto core surfaces en masse in a disordered manner, and then undergo a cooperative rearrangement into an ordered capsid structure. These assembly pathways are unlike any identified for empty capsid formation. Our models can be directly applied to recent experiments in which viral capsid proteins assemble around the functionalized inorganic nanoparticles [Sun et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci (2007) 104, 1354]. In addition, we discuss broader implications for understanding the dynamic encapsidation of single-stranded genomic molecules during viral replication and for developing multicomponent nanostructured materials. PMID:18643099

  6. Viral croup: diagnosis and a treatment algorithm.

    PubMed

    Petrocheilou, Argyri; Tanou, Kalliopi; Kalampouka, Efthimia; Malakasioti, Georgia; Giannios, Christos; Kaditis, Athanasios G

    2014-05-01

    Viral croup is a frequent disease in early childhood. Although it is usually self-limited, it may occasionally become life-threatening. Mild croup is characterized by the presence of stridor without intercostal retractions, whereas moderate-to-severe croup is accompanied by increased work of breathing. A single dose of orally administered dexamethasone (0.15-0.6 mg/kg) is the mainstay of treatment with addition of nebulized epinephrine only in cases of moderate-to-severe croup. Nebulized budesonide (2 mg) can be given alternatively to children who do not tolerate oral dexamethasone. Exposure to cold air or administration of cool mist are treatment interventions for viral croup that are not supported by published evidence, but breathing heliox can potentially reduce the work of breathing related to upper airway obstruction. In summary, corticosteroids may decrease the intensity of viral croup symptoms irrespective to their severity on presentation to the emergency department. PMID:24596395

  7. Study of viral pathogenesis in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Gaska, Jenna M; Ploss, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Many of the viral pathogens that cause infectious diseases in humans have a highly restricted species tropism, making the study of their pathogenesis and the development of clinical therapies difficult. The improvement of humanized mouse models over the past 30 years has greatly facilitated researchers' abilities to study host responses to viral infections in a cost effective and ethical manner. From HIV to hepatotropic viruses to Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus, humanized mice have led to the identification of factors crucial to the viral life cycle, served as an outlet for testing candidate therapies, and improved our abilities to analyze human immune responses to infection. In tackling both new and old viruses as they emerge, humanized mice will continue to be an indispensable tool. PMID:25618248

  8. Coagulation, Protease Activated Receptors and Viral Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Antoniak, Silvio; Mackman, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    The coagulation protease cascade plays an essential role in hemostasis. In addition, a clot contributes to host defense by limiting the spread of pathogens. Coagulation proteases induce intracellular signaling by cleavage of cell surface receptors called protease-activated receptors (PARs). These receptors allow cells to sense changes in the extracellular environment, such as infection. Viruses activate the coagulation cascade by inducing tissue factor expression and by disrupting the endothelium. Virus infection of the heart can cause myocarditis, cardiac remodeling and heart failure. Recent studies using a mouse model have shown that tissue factor, thrombin and PAR-1 signaling all positively regulate the innate immune during viral myocarditis. In contrast, PAR-2 signaling was found to inhibit interferon-β expression and the innate immune response. These observations suggest that anticoagulants may impair the innate immune response to viral infection and that inhibition of PAR-2 may be a new target to reduce viral myocarditis.. PMID:24203054

  9. Developments in Viral Vector-Based Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ura, Takehiro; Okuda, Kenji; Shimada, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    Viral vectors are promising tools for gene therapy and vaccines. Viral vector-based vaccines can enhance immunogenicity without an adjuvant and induce a robust cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response to eliminate virus-infected cells. During the last several decades, many types of viruses have been developed as vaccine vectors. Each has unique features and parental virus-related risks. In addition, genetically altered vectors have been developed to improve efficacy and safety, reduce administration dose, and enable large-scale manufacturing. To date, both successful and unsuccessful results have been reported in clinical trials. These trials provide important information on factors such as toxicity, administration dose tolerated, and optimized vaccination strategy. This review highlights major viral vectors that are the best candidates for clinical use. PMID:26344749

  10. [Immunosupression and viral infections in rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Vince, Adriana; Dusek, Davorka

    2007-01-01

    Infections are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with rheumatic diseases. Although bacterial pathogens are the most common cause of infections, a wide variety of viral pathogens can also cause serious clinical manifestations mostly due to immunosupressive therapy primarily targeting cellular immunity (steroids, cyclosporins, cyclophosphamid, leflunomid, TNF-alfa antagonists etc.). Depleted cellular immunity can lead to reactivation of latent viruses such as members of Herpesvirus family, or hepatitis B and C viruses. Symptoms of viral infection may mimic exacerbation of rheumatic disease. In this paper authors present the main clinical characteristics, diagnostics and tretment possibilities for most common viral infections in immunosupressed host with a rheumatic disease. PMID:18351141

  11. Latent Herpes Viral Reactivation in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.; Mehta, S. K.; Stowe, R.

    2008-01-01

    Latent viruses are ubiquitous and reactivate during stressful periods with and without symptoms. Latent herpes virus reactivation is used as a tool to predict changes in the immune status in astronauts and to evaluate associated health risks. Methods: Viral DNA was detected by real time polymerase chain reaction in saliva and urine from astronauts before, during and after short and long-duration space flights. Results and Discussion: EpsteinBarr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivated, and viral DNA was shed in saliva (EBV and VZV) or urine (CMV). EBV levels in saliva during flight were 10fold higher than baseline levels. Elevations in EBV specific CD8+ T-cells, viral antibody titers, and specific cytokines were consistent with viral reactivation. Intracellular levels of cytokines were reduced in EBVspecific Tcells. CMV, rarely present in urine of healthy individuals, was shed in urine of 27% of astronauts during all phases of spaceflight. VZV, not found in saliva of asymptomatic individuals, was found in saliva of 50% of astronauts during spaceflight and 35 days after flight. VZV recovered from astronaut saliva was found to be live, infectious virus. DNA sequencing demonstrated that the VZV recovered from astronauts was from the common European strain of VZV. Elevation of stress hormones accompanied viral reactivation indicating involvement of the hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal and sympathetic adrenal-medullary axes in the mechanism of viral reactivation in astronauts. A study of 53 shingles patients found that all shingles patients shed VZV DNA in their saliva and the VZV levels correlated with the severity of the disease. Lower VZV levels in shingles patients were similar to those observed in astronauts. We proposed a rapid, simple, and cost-effective assay to detect VZV in saliva of patients with suspected shingles. Early detection of VZV infection allows early medical intervention.

  12. Three distinct suppressors of RNA silencing encoded by a 20-kb viral RNA genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Rui; Folimonov, Alexey; Shintaku, Michael; Li, Wan-Xiang; Falk, Bryce W.; Dawson, William O.; Ding, Shou-Wei

    2004-11-01

    Viral infection in both plant and invertebrate hosts requires a virus-encoded function to block the RNA silencing antiviral defense. Here, we report the identification and characterization of three distinct suppressors of RNA silencing encoded by the 20-kb plus-strand RNA genome of citrus tristeza virus (CTV). When introduced by genetic crosses into plants carrying a silencing transgene, both p20 and p23, but not coat protein (CP), restored expression of the transgene. Although none of the CTV proteins prevented DNA methylation of the transgene, export of the silencing signal (capable of mediating intercellular silencing spread) was detected only from the F1 plants expressing p23 and not from the CP- or p20-expressing F1 plants, demonstrating suppression of intercellular silencing by CP and p20 but not by p23. Thus, intracellular and intercellular silencing are each targeted by a CTV protein, whereas the third, p20, inhibits silencing at both levels. Notably, CP suppresses intercellular silencing without interfering with intracellular silencing. The novel property of CP suggests a mechanism distinct to p20 and all of the other viral suppressors known to interfere with intercellular silencing and that this class of viral suppressors may not be consistently identified by Agrobacterium coinfiltration because it also induces RNA silencing against the infiltrated suppressor transgene. Our analyses reveal a sophisticated viral counter-defense strategy that targets the silencing antiviral pathway at multiple steps and may be essential for protecting CTV with such a large RNA genome from antiviral silencing in the perennial tree host. RNA interference | citrus tristeza virus | virus synergy | antiviral immunity

  13. Viral and host proteins involved in picornavirus life cycle.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jing-Yi; Chen, Tzu-Chun; Weng, Kuo-Feng; Chang, Shih-Cheng; Chen, Li-Lien; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2009-01-01

    Picornaviruses cause several diseases, not only in humans but also in various animal hosts. For instance, human enteroviruses can cause hand-foot-and-mouth disease, herpangina, myocarditis, acute flaccid paralysis, acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis, severe neurological complications, including brainstem encephalitis, meningitis and poliomyelitis, and even death. The interaction between the virus and the host is important for viral replication, virulence and pathogenicity. This article reviews studies of the functions of viral and host factors that are involved in the life cycle of picornavirus. The interactions of viral capsid proteins with host cell receptors is discussed first, and the mechanisms by which the viral and host cell factors are involved in viral replication, viral translation and the switch from translation to RNA replication are then addressed. Understanding how cellular proteins interact with viral RNA or viral proteins, as well as the roles of each in viral infection, will provide insights for the design of novel antiviral agents based on these interactions. PMID:19925687

  14. Combination therapy including CpG oligodeoxynucleotides and entecavir induces early viral response and enhanced inhibition of viral replication in a woodchuck model of chronic hepadnaviral infection.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhongji; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Pei, Rongjuan; Zhang, Ejuan; Kemper, Thekla; Vollmer, Jörg; Davis, Heather L; Glebe, Dieter; Gerlich, Wolfram; Roggendorf, Michael; Lu, Mengji

    2016-01-01

    CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) stimulate immune cells via TLR9 and are potentially useful immunomodulators for the treatment of chronic viral infections. In the present study, different classes of CpGs were tested for their capacities for innate immune activation and antiviral activities in the woodchuck model. A class P CpG ODN was found to stimulate interferon (IFN) production in woodchuck peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vitro, and following subcutaneous administration in vivo, it was observed to induce IFN and MxA expression in woodchuck PBMCs. Combination treatment with CpG ODN and entecavir (ETV) led to effective suppression of the woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) load in the woodchucks, with early viral responses and inhibition of replication. The woodchuck hepatitis surface antigen (WHsAg) serum concentrations were strongly decreased by CpG and ETV together but not by either agent alone, indicating synergistic effects. However, viral control post-treatment was still transient, similar to that observed with ETV alone. Significantly elevated levels of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) but not of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in some of the woodchucks receiving CpG ODN were noted, but these increases were resolved before the completion of treatment and were not associated with an elevated serum bilirubin level or coagulation disorders, suggesting the absence of a significant safety concern. PMID:26585244

  15. The Art of Engineering Viral Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Pokorski, Jonathan K.; Steinmetz, Nicole F.

    2011-01-01

    Viral nanotechnology is an emerging and highly interdisciplinary field in which viral nanoparticles (VNPs) are applied in diverse areas such as electronics, energy and next-generation medical devices. VNPs have been developed as candidates for novel materials, and are often described as “programmable” because they can be modified and functionalized using a number of techniques. In this review, we discuss the concepts and methods that allow VNPs to be engineered, including (i) bioconjugation chemistries, (ii) encapsulation techniques, (iii) mineralization strategies, and (iv) film and hydrogel development. With all these techniques in hand, the potential applications of VNPs are limited only by the imagination. PMID:21047140

  16. CD4+ T cell recovery during suppression of HIV replication: an international comparison of the immunological efficacy of antiretroviral therapy in North America, Asia and Africa

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Elvin H; Neilands, Torsten B; Thièbaut, Rodolphe; Bosco Bwana, Mwebesa; Nash, Denis; Moore, Richard D; Wood, Robin; Marcel Zannou, Djimon; Althoff, Keri N; Lian Lim, Poh; Nachega, Jean B; Easterbrook, Philippa J; Kambugu, Andrew; Little, Francesca; Nakigozi, Gertrude; Nakanjako, Damalie; Kiggundu, Valerian; Chung Ki Li, Patrick; Bangsberg, David R; Fox, Matthew P; Prozesky, Hans W; Hunt, Peter W; Davies, Mary-Ann; Reynolds, Steven J; Egger, Matthias; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T; Vittinghoff, Eric V; Deeks, Steven G; Martin, Jeffrey N

    2015-01-01

    Background: Even among HIV-infected patients who fully suppress plasma HIV RNA replication on antiretroviral therapy, genetic (e.g. CCL3L1 copy number), viral (e.g. tropism) and environmental (e.g. chronic exposure to microbial antigens) factors influence CD4 recovery. These factors differ markedly around the world and therefore the expected CD4 recovery during HIV RNA suppression may differ globally. Methods: We evaluated HIV-infected adults from North America, West Africa, East Africa, Southern Africa and Asia starting non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based regimens containing efavirenz or nevirapine, who achieved at least one HIV RNA level <500/µl in the first year of therapy and observed CD4 changes during HIV RNA suppression. We used a piecewise linear regression to estimate the influence of region of residence on CD4 recovery, adjusting for socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. We observed 28 217 patients from 105 cohorts over 37 825 person-years. Results: After adjustment, patients from East Africa showed diminished CD4 recovery as compared with other regions. Three years after antiretroviral therapy initiation, the mean CD4 count for a prototypical patient with a pre-therapy CD4 count of 150/µl was 529/µl [95% confidence interval (CI): 517–541] in North America, 494/µl (95% CI: 429–559) in West Africa, 515/µl (95% CI: 508–522) in Southern Africa, 503/µl (95% CI: 478–528) in Asia and 437/µl (95% CI: 425–449) in East Africa. Conclusions: CD4 recovery during HIV RNA suppression is diminished in East Africa as compared with other regions of the world, and observed differences are large enough to potentially influence clinical outcomes. Epidemiological analyses on a global scale can identify macroscopic effects unobservable at the clinical, national or individual regional level. PMID:25859596

  17. (1→3)-β-D-Glucan Levels Correlate With Neurocognitive Functioning in HIV-Infected Persons on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy: A Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Hoenigl, Martin; de Oliveira, Michelli Faria; Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Zhang, Yonglong; Morris, Sheldon; McCutchan, Allen J; Finkelman, Malcolm; Marcotte, Thomas D; Ellis, Ronald J; Gianella, Sara

    2016-03-01

    Microbial translocation from the gut is associated with immune dysfunction, persistent inflammation, and likely plays a role in the pathogenesis of neurocognitive dysfunction during HIV infection. (1→3)-β-D-Glucan (BDG) is a component of most fungal cell walls and might be a useful indicator of gut mucosal barrier impairment. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether higher blood BDG levels correlate with impaired neurocognitive functioning in a cohort of HIV-infected adults with suppressed levels of HIV RNA in blood plasma. In this cross-sectional cohort study, we measured levels of BDG in blood plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) supernatant samples in a cohort of adults with acute/early HIV infection, who initiated antiretroviral therapy (ART) during the earliest phase of infection and achieved suppressed levels of HIV RNA in blood plasma (<50 copies/mL) thereafter. We compared BDG with established biomarkers of microbial translocation, immune activation, and cognitive dysfunction (evaluated by global deficit score). We found that higher blood BDG levels were significantly related to higher global deficit scores, reflecting worse neurocognitive performance (Spearman r = 0.47; P = 0.042) among HIV-infected adults with suppressed viral loads who initiated ART early in infection. Two CSF samples presented elevated BDG levels. Interestingly, these 2 samples originated from the 2 subjects with the highest global deficit scores of the cohort. BDG may be a promising independent biomarker associated with neurocognitive functioning in virologically suppressed HIV-infected individuals. PMID:26986173

  18. (1→3)-β-D-Glucan Levels Correlate With Neurocognitive Functioning in HIV-Infected Persons on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hoenigl, Martin; de Oliveira, Michelli Faria; Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Zhang, Yonglong; Morris, Sheldon; McCutchan, Allen J.; Finkelman, Malcolm; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Gianella, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Microbial translocation from the gut is associated with immune dysfunction, persistent inflammation, and likely plays a role in the pathogenesis of neurocognitive dysfunction during HIV infection. (1→3)-β-D-Glucan (BDG) is a component of most fungal cell walls and might be a useful indicator of gut mucosal barrier impairment. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether higher blood BDG levels correlate with impaired neurocognitive functioning in a cohort of HIV-infected adults with suppressed levels of HIV RNA in blood plasma. In this cross-sectional cohort study, we measured levels of BDG in blood plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) supernatant samples in a cohort of adults with acute/early HIV infection, who initiated antiretroviral therapy (ART) during the earliest phase of infection and achieved suppressed levels of HIV RNA in blood plasma (<50 copies/mL) thereafter. We compared BDG with established biomarkers of microbial translocation, immune activation, and cognitive dysfunction (evaluated by global deficit score). We found that higher blood BDG levels were significantly related to higher global deficit scores, reflecting worse neurocognitive performance (Spearman r = 0.47; P = 0.042) among HIV-infected adults with suppressed viral loads who initiated ART early in infection. Two CSF samples presented elevated BDG levels. Interestingly, these 2 samples originated from the 2 subjects with the highest global deficit scores of the cohort. BDG may be a promising independent biomarker associated with neurocognitive functioning in virologically suppressed HIV-infected individuals. PMID:26986173

  19. [Achievement of therapeutic objectives].

    PubMed

    Mantilla, Teresa

    2014-07-01

    Therapeutic objectives for patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia are achieved by improving patient compliance and adherence. Clinical practice guidelines address the importance of treatment compliance for achieving objectives. The combination of a fixed dose of pravastatin and fenofibrate increases the adherence by simplifying the drug regimen and reducing the number of daily doses. The good tolerance, the cost of the combination and the possibility of adjusting the administration to the patient's lifestyle helps achieve the objectives for these patients with high cardiovascular risk. PMID:25043543

  20. Viral Infection in Adults with Severe Acute Respiratory Infection in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Remolina, Yuly Andrea; Ulloa, María Mercedes; Vargas, Hernán; Díaz, Liliana; Gómez, Sandra Liliana; Saavedra, Alfredo; Sánchez, Edgar; Cortés, Jorge Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify the viral aetiology in adult patients with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) admitted to sentinel surveillance institutions in Bogotá in 2012. Design A cross-sectional study was conducted in which microarray molecular techniques for viral identification were used on nasopharyngeal samples of adult patients submitted to the surveillance system, and further descriptions of clinical features and relevant clinical outcomes, such as mortality, need for critical care, use of mechanical ventilation and hospital stay, were obtained. Setting Respiratory infections requiring hospital admission in surveillance centres in Bogotá, Colombia. Participants Ninety-one adult patients with acute respiratory infection (55% were female). Measurements Viral identification, intensive care unit admission, hospital stay, and mortality. Results Viral identification was achieved for 63 patients (69.2%). Comorbidity was frequently identified and mainly involved chronic pulmonary disease or pregnancy. Influenza, Bocavirus and Adenovirus were identified in 30.8%, 28.6% and 18.7% of the cases, respectively. Admission to the intensive care unit occurred in 42.9% of the cases, while mechanical ventilation was required for 36.3%. The average hospital stay was 9.9 days, and mortality was 15.4%. Antibiotics were empirically used in 90.1% of patients. Conclusions The prevalence of viral aetiology of SARI in this study was high, with adverse clinical outcomes, intensive care requirements and high mortality. PMID:26576054

  1. Theoretical and experimental analysis of the impacts of removable storage media and antivirus software on viral spread

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Chenquan; Yang, Xiaofan

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a new computer virus propagation model, which incorporates the effects of removable storage media and antivirus software, is proposed and analyzed. The global stability of the unique equilibrium of the model is independent of system parameters. Numerical simulations not only verify this result, but also illustrate the influences of removable storage media and antivirus software on viral spread. On this basis, some applicable measures for suppressing virus prevalence are suggested.

  2. A Proteomics Perspective on Viral DNA Sensors in Host Defense and Viral Immune Evasion Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Crow, Marni S.; Javitt, Aaron; Cristea, Ileana M.

    2015-01-01

    The sensing of viral DNA is an essential step of cellular immune response to infections with DNA viruses. These human pathogens are spread worldwide, triggering a wide range of virus-induced diseases, and are associated with high levels of morbidity and mortality. Despite similarities between DNA molecules, mammalian cells have the remarkable ability to distinguish viral DNA from their own DNA. This detection is carried out by specialized antiviral proteins, called DNA sensors. These sensors bind to foreign DNA to activate downstream immune signaling pathways and alert neighboring cells by eliciting the expression of antiviral cytokines. The sensing of viral DNA was shown to occur both in the cytoplasm and nucleus of infected cells, disproving the notion that sensing occurred by simple spatial separation of viral and host DNA. A number of omic approaches, in particular mass spectrometry-based proteomic methods, have significantly contributed to the constantly evolving field of viral DNA sensing. Here, we review the impact of omic methods on the identification of viral DNA sensors, as well as on the characterization of mechanisms involved in host defense or viral immune evasion. PMID:25728651

  3. Viral hepatitis in the Arctic. A review from a Circumpolar Workshop on Viral hepatitis, ICCH13.

    PubMed

    Tulisov, Andrei; McMahon, Brian J; Koch, Anders; Minuk, Gerald; Chulanov, Vladimir; Bruce, Michael G; Uhanova, Julia; Børresen, Malene; Williams, James; Osiowy, Carla; Gelvan, Allan; Alexeeva, Marfa; Larke, Bryce; Watt, Kymberly

    2007-01-01

    This article is a review of the viral hepatitis workshop, held during the 13th International Congress of the Circumpolar Health consists of a review of data on viral hepatitis in the Arctic territories of four countries: Canada, Greenland, Russia and United States (Alaska). The main purpose of the workshop was to exchange knowledge on viral hepatitis in the Arctic and identify further needs for collaborative hepatitis research, which is planned to be implemented through the established Viral Hepatitis Working Group in the Arctic. The review is based on the available published research results, surveillance data and professional opinions of the authors. The information is presented by Arctic country. Viral hepatitis constitutes an important problem among Aboriginal peoples of the Arctic; the incidence of most types of viral hepatitis is higher among indigenous populations than in the general public. However, due to differences in the available information from each of the four Arctic countries, it is difficult to compare differences in types of disease in them. The main areas for future research are: HBV genotypes distribution, relations between different types of HBV, HCV and disease outcomes, HBV mutation rate and specific substitutions in the HBV genome over time in the Arctic, and occurrence of active liver disease in HBsAg carriers living in the Arctic, as well as further research in viral hepatitis A, C, D and E. PMID:17929632

  4. HIV-1 viral diversity and its implications for viral load testing: review of current platforms.

    PubMed

    Luft, LeeAnne M; Gill, M John; Church, Deirdre L

    2011-10-01

    The 2008 Recommendations for care of the International AIDS Society reaffirmed the importance of both accurate and sensitive viral load assessment, and by necessity, access to viral load assays. HIV-1 viral load testing is considered essential when initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART), when monitoring ART response, and when considering switching ART regimens. The demand for accurate, reproducible, and cost-effective viral load assays is therefore a global issue. Although the North American and Western European experience has historically been with HIV-1 group M subtype B virus, this paradigm is changing rapidly as migrants and refugees from developing countries with non-B subtype infections often now present for care in the developed world, and travelers to developing countries acquire non-B subtype infection abroad and present for care at home. Awareness of any clinical or laboratory differences between the common HIV-1 group M subtype B and the newer HIV-1 strains being seen in practice is therefore increasingly important. This review of current HIV-1 viral load testing is focused on the potential value of a standardized genotype assignment for HIV-1 viral subtypes, regular monitoring of the performance of available commercial HIV viral load assays on emerging non-B HIV subtypes, circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) and unique recombinant forms (URFs), and a discussion of the implications for resource-limited settings. PMID:21767972

  5. A Comparison of Methods for Analyzing Viral Load Data in Studies of HIV Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Charles E.; Gardner, Lytt; Craw, Jason; Girde, Sonali; Wawrzyniak, Andrew J.; Drainoni, Mari-Lynn; Davila, Jessica; DeHovitz, Jack; Keruly, Jeanne C.; Westfall, Andrew O.; Marks, Gary

    2015-01-01

    HIV RNA viral load (VL) is a pivotal outcome variable in studies of HIV infected persons. We propose and investigate two frameworks for analyzing VL: (1) a single-measure VL (SMVL) per participant and (2) repeated measures of VL (RMVL) per participant. We compared these frameworks using a cohort of 720 HIV patients in care (4,679 post-enrollment VL measurements). The SMVL framework analyzes a single VL per participant, generally captured within a “window” of time. We analyzed three SMVL methods where the VL binary outcome is defined as suppressed or not suppressed. The omit-participant method uses a 8-month “window” (-6/+2 months) around month 24 to select the participant’s VL closest to month 24 and removes participants from the analysis without a VL in the “window”. The set-to-failure method expands on the omit-participant method by including participants without a VL within the “window” and analyzes them as not suppressed. The closest-VL method analyzes each participant’s VL measurement closest to month 24. We investigated two RMVL methods: (1) repeat-binary classifies each VL measurement as suppressed or not suppressed and estimates the proportion of participants suppressed at month 24, and (2) repeat-continuous analyzes VL as a continuous variable to estimate the change in VL across time, and geometric mean (GM) VL and proportion of participants virally suppressed at month 24. Results indicated the RMVL methods have more precision than the SMVL methods, as evidenced by narrower confidence intervals for estimates of proportion suppressed and risk ratios (RR) comparing demographic strata. The repeat-continuous method had the most precision and provides more information than other considered methods. We generally recommend using the RMVL framework when there are repeated VL measurements per participant because it utilizes all available VL data, provides additional information, has more statistical power, and avoids the subjectivity of defining

  6. Viral resistance evolution fully escapes a rationally designed lethal inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Keller, Thomas E; Molineux, Ian J; Bull, James J

    2009-09-01

    Viruses are notoriously capable of evolving resistance to drugs. However, if the endpoint of resistance evolution is only partial escape, a feasible strategy should be to stack drugs, so the combined effect of partial inhibition by several drugs results in net inhibition. Assessing the feasibility of this approach requires quantitative data on viral fitness before and after evolution of resistance to a drug, as done here with bacteriophage T7. An inhibitory gene expressed from a phage promoter aborts wild-type T7 infections. The effect is so severe that the phage population declines when exposed to the inhibitor but expands a billion-fold per hour in its absence. In prior work, T7 evolved modest resistance to this inhibitor, an expected result. Given the nature of the inhibitor, that it used the phage's own promoter to target the phage's destruction, we anticipated that resistance evolution would be limited as the phage may need to evolve a new regulatory system, with simultaneous changes in its RNA polymerase (RNAP) and many of its promoters to fully escape inhibition. We show here that further adaptation of the partially resistant phage led to complete resistance. Resistance evolution was due to three mutations in the RNAP gene and two other genes; unexpectedly, no changes were observed in promoters. Consideration of other mechanisms of T7 inhibition leaves hope that permanent inhibition of viral growth with drugs can in principle be achieved. PMID:19494036

  7. Retinal transduction profiles by high-capacity viral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Puppo, Agostina; Cesi, Giulia; Marrocco, Elena; Piccolo, Pasquale; Jacca, Sarah; Shayakhmetov, Dmitry M.; Parks, Robin J.; Davidson, Beverly L.; Colloca, Stefano; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Ng, Philip; Donofrio, Gaetano; Auricchio, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Retinal gene therapy with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors is safe and effective in humans. However, the limited cargo capacity of AAV prevents their use for therapy of those inherited retinopathies (IRs) due to mutations in large (>5kb) genes. Viral vectors derived from Adenovirus (Ad), Lentivirus (LV) and Herpesvirus (HV) can package large DNA sequences but do not target efficiently retinal photoreceptors (PRs) where the majority of genes responsible for IRs are expressed. Here, we have evaluated the mouse retinal transduction profiles of vectors derived from 16 different Ad serotypes, 7 LV pseudotypes, and from a bovine HV. Most of the vectors tested transduced efficiently the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We found that LV-GP64 tends to transduce more PRs than the canonical LV-VSVG albeit this was restricted to a narrow region. We observed more extensive PR transduction with HdAd1, 2 and 5/F35++ than with LV, although none of them outperformed the canonical HdAd5 or matched the extension of PR transduction achieved with AAV2/8. PMID:24989814

  8. Mechanisms of Hepatitis C Viral Resistance to Direct Acting Antivirals

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Asma; Felmlee, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    There has been a remarkable transformation in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C in recent years with the development of direct acting antiviral agents targeting virus encoded proteins important for viral replication including NS3/4A, NS5A and NS5B. These agents have shown high sustained viral response (SVR) rates of more than 90% in phase 2 and phase 3 clinical trials; however, this is slightly lower in real-life cohorts. Hepatitis C virus resistant variants are seen in most patients who do not achieve SVR due to selection and outgrowth of resistant hepatitis C virus variants within a given host. These resistance associated mutations depend on the class of direct-acting antiviral drugs used and also vary between hepatitis C virus genotypes and subtypes. The understanding of these mutations has a clear clinical implication in terms of choice and combination of drugs used. In this review, we describe mechanism of action of currently available drugs and summarize clinically relevant resistance data. PMID:26694454

  9. Non-invasive Imaging of Sendai Virus Infection in Pharmacologically Immunocompromised Mice: NK and T Cells, but not Neutrophils, Promote Viral Clearance after Therapy with Cyclophosphamide and Dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Heba H; Vogel, Peter; Srinivasan, Ashok; Russell, Charles J

    2016-09-01

    In immunocompromised patients, parainfluenza virus (PIV) infections have an increased potential to spread to the lower respiratory tract (LRT), resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. Understanding the immunologic defects that facilitate viral spread to the LRT will help in developing better management protocols. In this study, we immunosuppressed mice with dexamethasone and/or cyclophosphamide then monitored the spread of viral infection into the LRT by using a noninvasive bioluminescence imaging system and a reporter Sendai virus (murine PIV type 1). Our results show that immunosuppression led to delayed viral clearance and increased viral loads in the lungs. After cessation of cyclophosphamide treatment, viral clearance occurred before the generation of Sendai-specific antibody responses and coincided with rebounds in neutrophils, T lymphocytes, and natural killer (NK) cells. Neutrophil suppression using anti-Ly6G antibody had no effect on infection clearance, NK-cell suppression using anti-NK antibody delayed clearance, and T-cell suppression using anti-CD3 antibody resulted in no clearance (chronic infection). Therapeutic use of hematopoietic growth factors G-CSF and GM-CSF had no effect on clearance of infection. In contrast, treatment with Sendai virus-specific polysera or a monoclonal antibody limited viral spread into the lungs and accelerated clearance. Overall, noninvasive bioluminescence was shown to be a useful tool to study respiratory viral progression, revealing roles for NK and T cells, but not neutrophils, in Sendai virus clearance after treatment with dexamethasone and cyclophosphamide. Virus-specific antibodies appear to have therapeutic potential. PMID:27589232

  10. Predicting Achievement and Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uguroglu, Margaret; Walberg, Herbert J.

    1986-01-01

    Motivation and nine other factors were measured for 970 students in grades five through eight in a study of factors predicting achievement and predicting motivation. Results are discussed. (Author/MT)

  11. Attractiveness and School Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salvia, John; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the relationship between rated attractiveness and two measures of school performance. Attractive children received significantly higher report cards and, to some degree, higher achievement test scores than their unattractive peers. (Author)

  12. Student Achievement and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flammer, Gordon H.; Mecham, Robert C.

    1974-01-01

    Compares the lecture and self-paced methods of instruction on the basis of student motivation and achieveme nt, comparing motivating and demotivating factors in each, and their potential for motivation and achievement. (Authors/JR)

  13. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Suppression of HIV Infectivity and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Tami; Lynch, Kevin; Dubé, Benoit; Gettes, David R.; Tustin, Nancy B.; Lai, Jian Ping; Metzger, David S.; Blume, Joshua; Douglas, Steven D.; Evans, Dwight L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram would down regulate HIV infectivity and that the greatest effects would be seen in people with depression. Depression is a risk factor for morbidity and mortality in HIV/AIDS. Serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission has been implicated in the pathobiology of depression, and pharmacologic therapies for depression target this system. The 5-HT transporter and 5-HT receptors are widely distributed throughout the central nervous and immune systems. Depression has been associated with suppression of natural killer cells (NK) cells and CD8+ lymphocytes, key regulators of HIV infection. Methods Ex-vivo models for acute and chronic HIV infection were used to study the effects of citalopram on HIV viral infection and replication, in 48 depressed and non-depressed women. For both the acute and chronic infection models, HIV reverse transcriptase (RT) activity was measured in the citalopram treatment condition and the control condition. Results The SSRI significantly downregulated the RT response in both the acute and chronic infection models. Specifically, citalopram significantly decreased the acute HIV infectivity of macrophages. Citalopram also significantly decreased HIV viral replication in the latently infected T-cell line and in the latently infected macrophage cell line. There was no difference in down-regulation by depression status. Conclusions These studies suggest that an SSRI enhances NK/CD8 non-cytolytic HIV suppression in HIV/AIDS and decreases HIV viral infectivity of macrophages, ex vivo, suggesting the need for in vivo studies to determine a potential role for agents targeting serotonin in the host defense against HIV. PMID:20947783

  14. VIRAL GASTROENTERITIS AGENTS AND WATERBORNE DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The application of electron microscopic techniques in the study of human gastroenteritis led in the 1970's to the identification of new viral agents that had previously escaped detection by routine cell culture procedures. These agents have been the focus of study by researchers ...

  15. STUDIES OF WATERBORNE AGENTS OF VIRAL GASTROENTERITIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The etiologic agent of a large outbreak of waterborne viral gastroenteritis was detected employing immune electron microscopy (IEM) and a newly developed solid phase radioimmunoassay (RIA). This agent, referred to as the Snow Mountain Agent (SMA), is 27-32 nm. in diameter, has cu...

  16. Mathematical Modeling of Viral Zoonoses in Wildlife

    PubMed Central

    Allen, L. J. S.; Brown, V. L.; Jonsson, C. B.; Klein, S. L.; Laverty, S. M.; Magwedere, K.; Owen, J. C.; van den Driessche, P.

    2011-01-01

    Zoonoses are a worldwide public health concern, accounting for approximately 75% of human infectious diseases. In addition, zoonoses adversely affect agricultural production and wildlife. We review some mathematical models developed for the study of viral zoonoses in wildlife and identify areas where further modeling efforts are needed. PMID:22639490

  17. Viral skin diseases of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Anna L

    2013-09-01

    This article describes the viral skin diseases affecting the domestic rabbit, the most important being myxomatosis. Transmission and pathogenesis, clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment, and control are described and the article will be of interest to veterinary practitioners who treat rabbits. Shope fibroma virus, Shope papilloma virus, and rabbitpox are also discussed. PMID:24018033

  18. Viral genome sequencing bt random priming methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most emerging health threats are of zoonotic origin. For the overwhelming majority, their causative agents are viruses which include but are not limited to HIV, Influenza, SARS, Ebola, Dengue, and Hantavirus. Of increasing importance therefore is an understanding of the viral diversity to enable b...

  19. Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus: Global Status

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite the success of regional bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) eradication programs, infections with this diverse group of viruses remain a source of economic loss for producers worldwide. There is a wide range of variation among BVDV results in differences in genotype (BVDV1 and BVDV2), biot...

  20. Bovine viral diarrhea virus: biosecurity and control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper discusses the recommended procedures involved in setting up biosecurity and control programs designed to limit bovine viral diarrhea virus infections in beef cattle operations. For the purpose of these discussions, a working definition of a biosecurity plan was considered to be an organiz...