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Sample records for achilles tendon rupture

  1. Achilles Tendon Rupture

    MedlinePlus

    Achilles tendon rupture Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Achilles (uh-KILL-eez) tendon rupture is an injury that affects the back ... but it can happen to anyone. The Achilles tendon is a strong fibrous cord that connects the ...

  2. Complete Achilles tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Landvater, S J; Renström, P A

    1992-10-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures can be treated nonsurgically in the nonathletic or low-end recreational athletic patient, particularly those more than 50 years of age, provided the treating physician does not delay in the diagnosis and treatment (preferably less than 48 hrs and possibly less than 1 week). The patient should be advised of the higher incidence of re-rupture of the tendon when treated nonsurgically. Surgical treatment is recommended for patients who are young and athletic. This is particularly true because the major criticism of surgical treatment has been the complication rate, which has decreased to a low level and to a mild degree, usually not significantly affecting the repair over time. Surgical treatment in these individuals seems to be superior not only in regard to re-rupture but also in assuring the correct apposition of the tendon ends and in placing the necessary tension on the tendon to secure appropriate orientation of the collagen fibers. This in turn allows them to regain full strength, power, endurance, and an early return to sports. Surgery is also recommended for late diagnosed ruptures where there is significant lengthening of the tendon. Surgical technique should involve a medial incision to avoid the sural nerve, absorbable suture, and augmentation with fascia or tendon where there is a gap or late rupture. Postoperatively, the immobilization should be 7 to 10 days in a splint. A walking boot with early motion in plantar flexion or a short leg cast with the tendon under slight tension should thereafter be used for 4 to 5 weeks. An early and well-supervised rehabilitation program should be initiated to restore the patient to the preinjury activity level.

  3. Achilles Tendon Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Wertz, Jess; Galli, Melissa; Borchers, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Achilles tendon (AT) rupture in athletes is increasing in incidence and accounts for one of the most devastating sports injuries because of the threat to alter or end a career. Despite the magnitude of this injury, reliable risk assessment has not been clearly defined, and prevention strategies have been limited. The purpose of this review is to identify potential intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors for AT rupture in aerial and ground athletes stated in the current literature. Evidence Acquisition: A MEDLINE search was conducted on AT rupture, or “injury” and “risk factors” and “athletes” from 1980 to 2011. Emphasis was placed on epidemiology, etiology, and review articles focusing on the risk for lower extremity injury in runners and gymnasts. Thirty articles were reviewed, and 22 were included in this assessment. Results: Aerial and ground athletes share many intrinsic risk factors for AT rupture, including overuse and degeneration of the tendon as well as anatomical variations that mechanically put an athlete at risk. Older athletes, athletes atypical in size for their sport, high tensile loads, leg dominance, and fatigue also may increase risk. Aerial athletes tend to have more extrinsic factors that play a role in this injury due to the varying landing surfaces from heights and technical maneuvers performed at various skill levels. Conclusion: Risk assessment for AT rupture in aerial and ground athletes is multivariable and difficult in terms of developing prevention strategies. Quantitative measures of individual risk factors may help identify major contributors to injury. PMID:24427410

  4. Achilles Tendon Rupture

    MedlinePlus

    ... shoes with proper cushioning in the heels. Increase training intensity slowly. Achilles tendon injuries commonly occur after abruptly increasing training intensity. Increase the distance, duration and frequency of your ...

  5. Achilles tendon rupture in badminton.

    PubMed Central

    Kaalund, S; Lass, P; Høgsaa, B; Nøhr, M

    1989-01-01

    The typical badminton player with an Achilles tendon rupture is 36 years old and, despite limbering up, is injured at the rear line in a sudden forward movement. He resumes work within three months and has a slight lack of dorsiflexion in the ankle as the main complication. Most patients resume badminton within one year, but some finish their sports career, mainly due to fear of a new injury. The investigation discusses predisposing factors and prophylactic measures. PMID:2605439

  6. Achilles tendon rupture in badminton.

    PubMed

    Kaalund, S; Lass, P; Høgsaa, B; Nøhr, M

    1989-06-01

    The typical badminton player with an Achilles tendon rupture is 36 years old and, despite limbering up, is injured at the rear line in a sudden forward movement. He resumes work within three months and has a slight lack of dorsiflexion in the ankle as the main complication. Most patients resume badminton within one year, but some finish their sports career, mainly due to fear of a new injury. The investigation discusses predisposing factors and prophylactic measures.

  7. Treatment of the neglected Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, Nicholas J

    2012-04-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures are best managed acutely. Neglected Achilles tendon ruptures are debilitating injuries and the increased complexity of the situation must be appreciated. Surgical management is recommended, and only in the poorest surgical candidate is conservative treatment entertained. Numerous treatment algorithms and surgical techniques have been described. A V-Y advancement flap and flexor halluces longus tendon transfer have been found to be reliable and achieve good clinical outcomes for defects ranging from 2 cm to 8 cm. This article focuses on the treatment options for the neglected Achilles tendon rupture. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Repair of Achilles tendon ruptures with peroneus brevis tendon augmentation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amarjeet; Nag, Kushal; Roy, Shuvendu P; Gupta, Ramesh Chandra; Gulati, Vaibhav; Agrawal, Nikunj

    2014-04-01

    To report 22 patients who underwent repair of compound Achilles tendon ruptures with peroneus brevis tendon augmentation. Records of 6 women and 19 men aged 21 to 42 (mean, 28) years who underwent repair of compound Achilles tendon ruptures with peroneus brevis tendon augmentation were reviewed. All the wounds were transverse/oblique, minimally contaminated, and could be closed primarily. Patients were evaluated at months 3, 9, and 12, using the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS) questionnaire. Of the 22 patients, 3 developed superficial skin complications that healed gradually, and 2 developed a superficial discharging sinus and underwent minor debridement. No patient had a re-rupture of the Achilles tendon. At the one-year follow-up, all patients achieved good functional outcome in terms of the FAOS. Repair of Achilles tendon ruptures with peroneus brevis tendon augmentation achieved good functional outcome.

  9. Achilles tendon rupture in atypical patient populations.

    PubMed

    Kingsley, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Rupture of the Achilles tendon is a significant injury, and the likelihood of a good recovery is directly associated with early diagnosis and appropriate referral. Such injuries are commonly assessed and identified by practitioners working in 'minors' areas of emergency departments or urgent care settings. The literature frequently describes rupture of the Achilles tendon as 'typically sport-related' affecting 'middle-aged weekend warriors', but this aetiology accounts for only about 70% of such injuries. Factors such as the natural ageing process, obesity and use of some commonly prescribed medications, can increase the risk of developing a tendinopathy and subsequent rupture, often from a seemingly insignificant incident. However, research suggests that injuries in this patient population are more likely be missed on first examination. This article describes risk factors that should alert clinicians to the possibility of Achilles tendon rupture in 'atypical' patient populations.

  10. [Conservative functional treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures].

    PubMed

    Hüfner, T; Gaulke, R; Imrecke, J; Krettek, C; Stübig, T

    2010-09-01

    The conservative functional treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures has developed further over the last 20 years and is basically possible for 60-80% of patients. The treatment leads to success if the indications obtained by dynamic sonography are correctly interpreted (adaptation of the tendon ends up to 20 degrees plantar flexion), if the patient presents sufficient compliance and the physiotherapy is increasingly intensified depending on tendon healing. Modern ortheses allow an increased equinus position and therefore improved protection of the healing tendon. If these factors are present a relatively low re-rupture rate of only 7% can be achieved. The decisive advantage of conservative functional therapy is the avoidance of specific operative risks, such as infection and injury to the sural nerve. After removal of the orthesis the tendon should continue to be modeled using shoe insoles and raised heels.

  11. Spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture in alkaptonuria

    PubMed Central

    Alajoulin, Omar A.; Alsbou, Mohammed S.; Ja’afreh, Somayya O.; Kalbouneh, Heba M.

    2015-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare inborn metabolic disease characterized by accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA). Excretion of HGA in urine causes darkening of urine and its deposition in connective tissues causes dark pigmentation (ochronosis), early degeneration of articular cartilage, weakening of the tendons, and subsequent rupture. In this case report, we present a rare case of a patient presented with unilateral spontaneous rupture of Achilles tendon due to AKU. The patient developed most of the orthopedic manifestations of the disease earlier than typical presentations. Alkaptonuria patients should avoid strenuous exercises and foot straining especially in patients developing early orthopedic manifestations. PMID:26620992

  12. Achilles tendon rupture; assessment of nonoperative treatment.

    PubMed

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner

    2014-04-01

    Acute Achilles tendon rupture is a frequent and potentially disabling injury. Over the past decade a change in treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture away from operative towards non-operative treatment has taken place. However, the optimal non-operative treatment protocol remains to be clarified, particularly the role of weight-bearing during early rehabilitation. Also, there is a need for a clinically applicable and accurate measurement to detect patients in risk of developing Achilles tendon elongation. The aim of this PhD thesis was to evaluate non-operative treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. In study I, a cross-sectional survey was performed investigating the chosen treatment protocols across Scandinavia. In study II, the effect of immediate weight-bearing on patient reported and functional outcomes was investigated in a randomized controlled trial (RCT). In study III, the effect of immediate weight-bearing on the biomechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex was investigated in an RCT. In study IV, validity, reliability and agreement of a novel ultrasound measurement of Achilles tendon length and elongation was tested. Study I found surgery to be the preferred treatment in 83% of departments in Denmark, 92% in Norway, 65% in Sweden, and 30% in Finland (p < 0.001). Study II and III showed no statistically significant effects of controlled early weight-bearing at one year follow-up except from a better health-related quality of life in the weight-bearing group (p=0.009). Compared to the unaffected limb, the affected limb had decreased stiffness (77%, p < 0.001) and strength (93%, p = 0.009) of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex. Study IV showed excellent intra-rater reliability (ICC 0.96, SEM 3.7 mm and MDC 10.3 mm), inter-rater reliability (ICC 0.97, SEM 3.3 mm and MDC 9.3 mm) and validity (measurement error 2%). Treatment algorithms across Scandinavia showed considerable variation, though operative treatment and

  13. [Tendinosis and ruptures of the Achilles tendon].

    PubMed

    Amlang, M H; Zwipp, H

    2012-02-01

    Tendinosis of the Achilles tendon is a degenerative-reparative structural change of the tendon with microdefects, increases in cross-section due to cicatricial tendon regeneration, neoangiogenesis and reduction of elasticity. The previously used term tendinitis is only rarely used for the chronic form since signs of inflammation such as redness and hyperthermia or elevated levels of inflammatory parameters on laboratory testing are generally absent. Duplex sonography with visualization of the neovascularization has become a valuable supplement not only for diagnostics but also for therapy planning. The classic, conservative therapy for painful tendinosis consists of oral anti-inflammatory drugs, pain-adapted load reduction, raising the heel, stretching the calf musculature, and various physiotherapeutic interventions. When conservative treatment over a period of 4 - 6 months fails to produce any or non-adequate pain relief, an indication for surgical treatment should be considered. In the therapy for fresh ruptures of the Achilles tendon further developments in minimally invasive techniques have led to a worldwide paradigm change over the past 10 years. The decisive advantage of minimally invasive surgical techniques is the lower risk of wound infection as compared to the sutures of the open technique. When compared with conservative functional therapy the minimally invasive repair has the advantage of being less dependent on the compliance of the patient since, in the early phase of tendon healing the suture prevents a separation of the tendon ends upon controlled movements. However, not every patient with a ruptured Achilles tendon should be treated with a minimally invasive repair. Open tendon reconstruction and functional conservative therapy are still justified when the correct indication is given. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Endoscopic adhesiolysis for extensive tibialis posterior tendon and Achilles tendon adhesions following compound tendon rupture

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2013-01-01

    Tendon adhesion is one of the most common causes of disability following tendon surgery. A case of extensive peritendinous adhesions of the Achilles tendon and tibialis posterior tendon after compound rupture of the tendons was reported. This was managed by endoscopic adhesiolysis of both tendons. The endoscopic approach allows early postoperative mobilisation which can relieve the tendon adhesion. PMID:24045762

  15. Retrocalcaneal pain after the repair of acute Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2013-08-01

    Pain in the posterosuperior portion of the calcaneus can be caused by a retrocalcaneal bursitis, enlargement of the superior bursal prominence of the calcaneus, insertional Achilles tendinopathy, stress fracture of the calcaneus, or inflammation of an adventitious bursa between the Achilles tendon and the skin. Hypertrophied tendon impinging on the posterosuperior calcaneal tuberosity can be a cause of retrocalcaneal pain after repair of acute rupture of the Achilles tendon. This can be effectively treated by endoscopic calcaneoplasty. Therapeutic, Level IV, Case Report.

  16. [Progress in treatment of acute achilles tendon rupture].

    PubMed

    Nan, Jiang; Xiang, Dayong; Yu, Bin

    2013-05-01

    To review the progress in the treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. Recent literature about the treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture was reviewed and analyzed. Treatments of acute Achilles tendon rupture include operative and non-operative treatments. Operative treatments include open surgery and percutaneous minimally invasive surgery. Compared with non-operative treatment, operative treatment can effectively reduce the re-rupture incidence, but it had higher complication incidences of wound infection and nerve injury. Although early functional rehabilitation during non-operative treatment could reduce the re-rutpture incidence, there is no consistent orthopaedic device and guideline for functional rehabilitation. Both operative and non-operative treatments have advantages and disadvantages for the treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. No consistent conclusion is arrived regarding functional recovery. Future studies should explore the strategy of early functional rehabilitation during non-operative treatment and its mechanism of promoting tendon healing.

  17. [Fluoroquinolone-induced Achilles tendon rupture].

    PubMed

    Maurin, N

    2008-02-01

    A 72-year-old female dialysis patient with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus who was under long-term medication with oral prednisolone due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was given levofloxacin for one week to treat an acute bronchitis (one 500 mg dose on the first day, 125 mg/day orally from second day onwards). One day after the end of levofloxacin treatment, the patient complained about a constant dragging pain above the right heel that receded under local application of diclofenac ointment and inactivity of the right foot. Twelve days after ending administration of levofloxacin, strong pains in the right calf were suddenly felt during normal walking, and active plantar flexion was lost. Palpation showed the right calf to be soft; a distinct gap was found in the middle third of the Achilles tendon. The Thompson test was positive, and the patient was unable to stand on her right toes. Ultrasonography showed a discontinuity of the right Achilles tendon. A spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture after taking fluoroquinolone was diagnosed. Conservative treatment was applied due to the reduced general condition. Initial treatment involved a below-knee plaster cast in equinus position; the cast was replaced on the fourth day by a pneumatic walker, which was also worn during mobilisation by physiotherapy. A typical feature of fluoroquinolone-induced tendinopathy (FIT) is a considerable latency period in some cases between the commencement of treatment with a fluoroquinolone and the onset of FIT symptoms. In addition to fluoroquinolone intake, there are three other predisposing risk factors for tendinopathy: age over 60 years, long-term treatment with systemic glucocorticoids, and chronic kidney disease. The patient showed a combination of all the aforementioned risk factors. In patients with these risk factors, especially among people with a combination of said risk factors - which is frequently the case with nephrologic and dialysis patients, especially

  18. Neglected Achilles tendon rupture with central insertional plantaris tendon hypertrophy: two cases

    PubMed Central

    Swierstra, Bart A.; Verheyen, Cees C. P. M.

    2009-01-01

    A neglected Achilles tendon rupture is often characterized by muscle weakness and an overlengthened repair by scar tissue. Reconstructive surgery is usually performed taking into account the patient’s required level of function. Two surgical cases of neglected Achilles tendon rupture are presented in this article. In both instances it was expected that central fibrosis, possibly after neglected tendon rupture, would be found. However, after longitudinal opening of the tendons, a thickened plantaris tendon was evident at the insertion on the calcaneus in both cases. This hypertrophic tendon occupied most of the diameter of the Achilles tendon. Due to partial or complete rupture of the Achilles tendon, there was notable weakening and tendon transfer-augmentation was performed. A thickened plantaris tendon as a reaction to a neglected rupture of the Achilles tendon is a rare presentation. It can be detected preoperatively by MRI and subsequently preoperative planning can be optimized. PMID:19277842

  19. Chronic Achilles tendon rupture reconstructed using hamstring tendon autograft.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Philip; Mason, Lyndon William; Molloy, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Chronic rupture of the Achilles tendon (delayed diagnosis of more than 4 weeks) can result in retraction of the tendon and inadequate healing. Direct repair may not be possible and augmentation methods are challenging when the defect exceeds 5-6 cm, especially if the distal stump is grossly tendinopathic. We describe our method of Achilles tendon reconstruction with ipsilateral semitendinosis autograft and interference screw fixation in a patient with chronic rupture, a 9 cm defect and gross distal tendinopathy. Patient reported outcome measures consistently demonstrated improved health status at 12 months post surgery: MOXFQ-Index 38-25, EQ5D-5L 18-9, EQ VAS 70-90 and VISA-A 1-64. The patient was back to full daily function, could single leg heel raise and was gradually returning to sport. No complications or adverse events were recorded. Reconstruction of chronic tears of the Achilles tendon with large defects and gross tendinopathy using an ipsilateral semitendinosis autograft and interference screw fixation can achieve satisfactory improvements in patient reported outcomes up to 1 year post-surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Achilles tendon repair

    MedlinePlus

    Achilles tendon rupture-surgery; Percutaneous Achilles tendon rupture repair ... To fix your torn Achilles tendon, the surgeon will: Make a cut down the back of your heel Make several small cuts rather than one large cut ...

  1. Chronic Achilles Tendon Rupture Reconstructed With Achilles Tendon Allograft and Xenograft Combination.

    PubMed

    Hollawell, Shane; Baione, William

    2015-01-01

    More than 20% of acute Achilles tendon injuries are misdiagnosed, leading to chronic or neglected ruptures. Some controversy exists regarding how to best manage an acute Achilles tendon rupture. However, a general consensus has been reached that chronic rupture with ≥3 cm of separation is associated with functional morbidity and, therefore, should be managed operatively. It has been demonstrated that the functional outcomes of surgically treated Achilles ruptures are superior to the nonoperative outcomes in a chronic setting. In the present report, we reviewed 4 patients with chronic Achilles tendon ruptures that were successfully treated with an Achilles tendon interposition allograft and simultaneous augmentation with a xenograft. The median duration of rupture was 11 (range 8 to 16) weeks, the median gap between the proximal and distal segments of the tendon was 4.75 (range 3.5 to 6) cm, and the patients were able to return pain-free to all preinjury activities at a median of 14.5 (range 13.8 to 15.5) weeks, without the need for tendon transfer, lengthening, or additional intervention. The median duration of follow up was 37.25 (range 15.25 to 51.5) months, at which point the mean Foot and Ankle Outcomes Instrument core scale score was 97 ± 1 (mean normative score 53 ± 1), and the Foot and Ankle Outcomes Instrument shoe comfort core scale score was 100 ± 0 (mean normative score 59 ± 0). The combined Achilles allograft plus xenograft augmentation technique appears to be a reasonable option for the surgical treatment of chronic Achilles tendon rupture. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Chronic Achilles Tendon Rupture Treated with Allograft: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Restuccia, Giuseppe; Lippi, Alessandro; Casella, Francesco; Citarelli, Carmine; Sacchetti, Federico; Benifei, Maurizio

    2017-02-07

    In clinical practice, chronic Achilles tendon ruptures are uncommon. Usually, these lesions are discovered four to six weeks after injuries. More frequently, Achilles tendon ruptures are acute and treated with tendon sutures.1 Many surgical techniques are available to treat chronic lesions such as sutures or V-Y elongation with or without augments.2-3 Our case is about a chronic Achilles tendon rupture discovered two years after injury. Our patient came to our attention with a 6 cm tendon gap. We performed tendon repair with cadaver allograft. After four years of follow-up, our patient has a complete functional recovery and he can normally perform daily and working tasks without pain.

  3. Surgical Strategy for the Chronic Achilles Tendon Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu; Yin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic Achilles tendon rupture is usually misdiagnosed and treated improperly. This study aims to better understand the treatment of chronic Achilles tendon rupture. Methods. Patients who were not able to perform a single-limb heel rise were chosen. Pre- and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were conducted. By evaluating the presence or absence of Achilles tendon stumps and the gap length of rupture, V-Y advancement, gastrocnemius fascial turndown flap, or flexor halluces longus tendon transfer were selected for tendon repair. The function of ankle and foot was assessed by American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot scores and Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS). Results. Twenty-nine patients were followed up. One patient had superficial incision infection, which was healed after debridement and oral antibiotics. Three months postoperatively, MRI showed some signs of inflammation, which disappeared at one or two years postoperatively. All patients were able to perform a single-limb heel rise. Mean AOFAS scores and ATRS scores were increased at the latest follow-up. Conclusion. Surgical options can be determined by evaluating the presence of the Achilles tendon stumps and the gap length, which can avoid using the nearby tendon and yield satisfactory functional results. PMID:27847806

  4. Surgical Strategy for the Chronic Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yangjing; Yang, Liu; Yin, Li; Duan, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic Achilles tendon rupture is usually misdiagnosed and treated improperly. This study aims to better understand the treatment of chronic Achilles tendon rupture. Methods. Patients who were not able to perform a single-limb heel rise were chosen. Pre- and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were conducted. By evaluating the presence or absence of Achilles tendon stumps and the gap length of rupture, V-Y advancement, gastrocnemius fascial turndown flap, or flexor halluces longus tendon transfer were selected for tendon repair. The function of ankle and foot was assessed by American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot scores and Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS). Results. Twenty-nine patients were followed up. One patient had superficial incision infection, which was healed after debridement and oral antibiotics. Three months postoperatively, MRI showed some signs of inflammation, which disappeared at one or two years postoperatively. All patients were able to perform a single-limb heel rise. Mean AOFAS scores and ATRS scores were increased at the latest follow-up. Conclusion. Surgical options can be determined by evaluating the presence of the Achilles tendon stumps and the gap length, which can avoid using the nearby tendon and yield satisfactory functional results.

  5. Chronic Achilles Tendon Disorders: Tendinopathy and Chronic Rupture.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, Nicola; Via, Alessio Giai; Oliva, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    Tendinopathy of the Achilles tendon involves clinical conditions in and around the tendon and it is the result of a failure of a chronic healing response. Although several conservative therapeutic options have been proposed, few of them are supported by randomized controlled trials. The management is primarily conservative and many patients respond well to conservative measures. If clinical conditions do not improve after 6 months of conservative management, surgery is recommended. The management of chronic ruptures is different from that of acute ruptures. The optimal surgical procedure is still debated. In this article chronic Achilles tendon disorders are debated and evidence-based medicine treatment strategies are discussed.

  6. New finding in the radiographic diagnosis of Achilles tendon rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Newmark, H.; Mellon, W.S. Jr.; Malhotra, A.K.; Olken, S.M.; Halls, J.

    1982-06-01

    The authors describe a new radiographic sign of rupture of the Achilles tendon system. It is a fracture, with separation through an osteophyte at the insertion of this tendon. Previously reported signs are also discussed as well as the present case report.

  7. Management of chronic Achilles tendon ruptures-A review.

    PubMed

    Malagelada, Francesc; Clark, Callum; Dega, Raman

    2016-08-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures are increasingly common yet up to a fifth of them are undiagnosed after medical consultation. Those undiagnosed will become chronic ruptures causing considerable functional morbidity and represent a challenge to the treating doctor. The purpose of this article is to discuss the presentation and management of chronic Achilles tendon ruptures. Due to the paucity of data, evidence-based recommendations are unavailable. A number of different surgical techniques are presented and a working algorithm is described to aid in the treatment of these lesions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Treatment of Chronic Achilles Tendon Ruptures With Large Defects.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Jamal; Jones, Kennis; Raikin, Steven M

    2016-10-01

    Background When Achilles tendon ruptures become chronic, a defect often forms at the rupture site. There is scant literature regarding the treatment of chronic Achilles ruptures with defects of 6 cm or larger. We examined outcomes from combining a turndown of the proximal, central Achilles with a flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon transfer to treat this condition. Materials Between September 2002 and December 2013, 32 patients presented with a chronic Achilles rupture and a defect of 6 cm or more. Twenty patients were male and 12 were female. Patient age was between 20 and 74 years, with a mean of 53.3 years. Eighteen and 14 patients had their right and left Achilles tendon affected, respectively. The number of days between injury and surgery ranged from 30 to 315 days, with a mean of 102 days. Reconstruction of the Achilles involved a turndown of the proximal, central tendon and FHL augmentation. Final patient follow-up ranged from 18 to 150 months, with a mean of 62.3 months. At surgery, the gap between the ruptured ends of the Achilles ranged from 6 to 12 cm, with a mean gap of 7.5 cm. Full healing was achieved in all 32 patients (100%) by 5 months postoperatively. Mean Foot and Ankle Ability Measures scores increased from 36.3% to 90.2% between initial and latest follow-up (P < .05). Mean visual analogue scales of pain decreased from 6.6 to 1.8 of 10 between first and last encounter (P < .05). Postoperative complications occurred in 5 patients (15.6%), including 3 (9.4%) superficial wound problems, 1 (3.1%) deep wound infection, and 1 (3.1%) deep vein thrombosis. Discussion Outcomes from treating chronic Achilles ruptures with large defects are scant within the orthopaedic literature. Our method of Achilles reconstruction results in a high rate of improved function and pain relief. Therapeutic, Level IV: Case series. © 2016 The Author(s).

  9. [Surgical treatment for chronic achilles tendon rupture and severe scarring].

    PubMed

    Sun, Chuan-Xiu; He, Sheng-Wei; Fang, Xu; Mi, Li-Dong; Du, Guang-Yu; Sun, Xue-Gang

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of autologous semitendinosus and gracilis tendon grafting with anchor repair for the treatment of chronic achilles tendon rupture and severe scarring. From April 2010 to October 2012,26 patients with chronic achilles tendon rupture(with Myerson type III ) and severe scarring were treated with autologous semitendinosus and gracilis tendon grafting with anchor repair. There were 19 males and 7 females,with an average age of 32 years old (ranged, 22 to 47 years). The time from injury to surgery was from 3 to 12 months (7 months on average). The plantar flexion strength of all injuried feet attenuated and single heel rise test were positive in 26 cases before operation. Plaster immobilization and routine rehabilitation therapy were performed after operation. Clinical effects were evaluated by Arner-lindholm criterion and complications were observed after operation. All the patients were followed up from 12 to 24 months with a mean of 16 months. No complications such as achilles tendon re-rupture, wound infection, etc were found during follow-up period. According to the Arner-Lindholm standard, 15 cases got excellent results and 11 good. Using autologous semitendinosus and gracilis tendon grafts with anchor repair to treat chronic achilles tendon rupture and severe scarring is a perfect surgical procedure.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging after operative repair of achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, N; Thorpe, A P; Smith, E W

    2001-06-01

    We performed a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study in 16 consecutive patients who had undergone open repair of a unilateral Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) at an average of 32.5 (SD 3.2) (range 29-36) months from the operation. We measured the widest antero-posterior diameter of the tendon, the longest distance between the insertion of the Achilles tendon on the calcaneum and the musculo-tendinous junction of the soleus muscle on the Achilles tendon, the distance between the insertion of the Achilles tendon on the calcaneum and the point of maximal width of the tendon. We also ascertained whether areas of altered signal were present in and around the tendon. The operated tendons were always significantly thicker than the non-operated ones. There was a non-significant trend for the other measurements to be greater in the operated tendons. In five patients, areas of dishomogeneous signal were present in the operated tendon. These areas were less than 25% of the antero-posterior diameter of the tendon, and were clinically silent. These findings probably represent normal features of long-term tendon healing following open repair of an ATR.

  11. [Comprehensive treatment in Achilles tendon rupture].

    PubMed

    Matus-Jiménez, Juan; Avalos, Cecilia Henríquez

    2007-01-01

    Due to incapacity caused by calcaneal tendon injuries for the reintegration of patients back to their daily activities and/or sparts it is necessary to decrease the time of reinstatement of patients. At present these times have improved by a good surgical technique and an early rehabilitation, and the patient is returned quickly as he sees less disability. It is proposed in this paper a type of surgical treatment and an early rehabilitation program, which have shortened the time of disability and incorporation to their daily activities and sports to eight weeks in 10 patients with Achilles tendon plasty.

  12. A case of "fresh rupture" after open repair of a ruptured Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Rushton, Paul R P; Singh, Alok K; Deshmukh, Rajiv G

    2012-01-01

    We present the case of Achilles tendon rupture in a 54-year-old man while rehabilitating after end-to-end open repair of an acute Achilles tendon rupture. Re-rupture after surgical repair of Achilles tendon is well known. The present case, however, is atypical, because the second rupture occurred significantly proximal to the first rupture. To our knowledge, this is the first time this has been described in English language studies. We have termed this incident a fresh rupture. A gastrocnemius turndown flap was used to repair the fresh rupture, which led to a satisfactory recovery. This case report serves to inform surgeons of the existence of this type of Achilles tendon rupture, while considering the possible etiologies and suggesting a technique that has been shown to be successful in the present case. Copyright © 2012 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Surgical treatment of the neglected achilles tendon rupture with Hyalonect.

    PubMed

    Esenyel, Cem Zeki; Tekin, Cagri; Cakar, Murat; Bayraktar, Kursat; Saygili, Selcuk; Esenyel, Meltem; Tekin, Zeynep N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the management and outcomes of ten patients with chronic Achilles tendon rupture treated with a turndown gastrocnemius-soleus fascial flap wrapped with a surgical mesh (Hyalonect). Ten men with neglected Achilles tendon rupture were treated with a centrally based turndown gastrocnemius fascial flap wrapped with Hyalonect. Hyalonect is a knitted mesh composed of HYAFF, a benzyl ester of hyaluronic acid. The Achilles tendon ruptures were diagnosed more than 1 month after injury. The mean patient age was 41 years. All of the patients had weakness of active plantarflexion. The mean preoperative American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score was 64.8. The functional outcome was excellent. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score was 97.8 at the latest follow-up. There were significant differences between the preoperative and postoperative scores. Ankle range of motion was similar in both ankles. Neither rerupture nor major complication, particularly of wound healing, was observed. For patients with chronic Achilles tendon rupture with a rupture gap of at least 5 cm, surgical repair using a single turndown fascial flap covered with Hyalonect achieved excellent outcomes.

  14. Deficits in heel-rise height and achilles tendon elongation occur in patients recovering from an Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Steele, Robert; Manal, Kurt

    2012-07-01

    Whether an Achilles tendon rupture is treated surgically or not, complications such as muscle weakness, decrease in heel-rise height, and gait abnormalities persist after injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if side-to-side differences in maximal heel-rise height can be explained by differences in Achilles tendon length. Case series; level of evidence, 4. Eight patients (mean [SD] age of 46 [13] years) with acute Achilles tendon rupture and 10 healthy subjects (mean [SD] age of 28 [8] years) were included in the study. Heel-rise height, Achilles tendon length, and patient-reported outcome were measured 3, 6, and 12 months after injury. Achilles tendon length was evaluated using motion analysis and ultrasound imaging. The Achilles tendon length test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.97) was excellent. For the healthy subjects, there were no side-to-side differences in tendon length and heel-rise height. Patients with Achilles tendon ruptures had significant differences between the injured and uninjured side for both tendon length (mean [SD] difference, 2.6-3.1 [1.2-1.4] cm, P = .017-.028) and heel-rise height (mean [SD] difference, -4.1 to -6.1 [1.7-1.8] cm, P = .012-.028). There were significant negative correlations (r = -0.943, P = .002, and r = -0.738, P = .037) between the side-to-side difference in heel-rise height and Achilles tendon length at the 6- and 12-month evaluations, respectively. The side-to-side difference found in maximal heel-rise height can be explained by a difference in Achilles tendon length in patients recovering from an Achilles tendon rupture. Minimizing tendon elongation appears to be an important treatment goal when aiming for full return of function.

  15. Long-term functional outcome of bilateral spontaneous and simultaneous Achilles tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Ellanti, Prasad; Davarinos, Nikos; Burke, Thomas E; D'Souza, Lester G

    2012-10-01

    Bilateral simultaneous ruptures are rare comprising less than 1% of all Achilles tendon ruptures. Risk factors for bilateral ruptures include chronic diseases and medications such as corticosteroids and fluoroquinolones. There is little in the literature on the long-term functional outcome of bilateral Achilles tendon ruptures. This article present a series of 3 cases of simultaneous and spontaneous bilateral Achilles tendon ruptures with a minimum of 5-year follow up suggesting a good functional outcome.

  16. Marked pathological changes proximal and distal to the site of rupture in acute Achilles tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, Nicola; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Maffulli, Gayle D; Rabitti, Carla; Khanna, Anil; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2011-04-01

    A laboratory study was performed to evaluate the histopathological features of the macroscopically intact portion of the Achilles tendon in patients undergoing surgery for an acute rupture of the Achilles tendon. Tendon samples were harvested from 29 individuals (21 men, 8 women; mean age: 46 ± 12) who underwent repair of an Achilles tendon tear tear, and from 11 male patients who died of cardiovascular events (mean age: 61). Three pieces of tendon were harvested: at the rupture site, 4 cm proximal to the site of rupture, 1 cm proximal to the insertion of the Achilles tendon on the calcaneum. Slides were assessed using a semiquantitative grading scale assessing fiber structure and arrangement, rounding of the nuclei, regional variations in cellularity, increased vascularity, decreased collagen stainability, and hyalinization. Intra-observer reliability of the subscore readings was calculated. The pathological features were significantly more pronounced in the samples taken from the site of rupture than in the samples taken proximally and distal to it (0.008 < P < 0.01). There were no significant differences in the mean pathologic sum-scores in the samples taken proximally and distal to the site of rupture. Unruptured Achilles tendons, even at an advanced age, and ruptured Achilles tendons are clearly part of two distinct populations, with the latter demonstrating histopathological evidence of failed healing response even in areas macroscopically normal.

  17. Missed Medial Malleolar Fracture Associated With Achilles Tendon Rupture: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Koji; Taketomi, Shuji; Inui, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kensuke; Sanada, Takaki; Tanaka, Sakae

    2016-01-01

    A 45-year-old man sustained an Achilles tendon rupture while playing futsal. A concomitant medial malleolar fracture was not diagnosed until the patient underwent an operation for Achilles tendon repair. A routine postoperative radiograph showed a minimally displaced medial malleolar fracture. Conservative treatment was chosen for the fracture. The function of the Achilles tendon recovered well, and the fracture was united. A medial malleolar fracture can be missed when an Achilles tendon rupture occurs simultaneously. Thus, surgeons should consider the possibility of medial malleolar fracture associated with an Achilles tendon rupture. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Achilles tendon rupture following surgical management for tendinopathy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Carmont, Michael R; Maffulli, Nicola

    2007-02-27

    Achilles tendinopathy is understood to be a failed healing response. Operative management is utilised following the failure of non-operative methods. We present a case of Achilles tendon rupture, sustained whilst isometrically loading the Achilles tendon during an eccentric loading exercise programme. Bilateral surgical exploration and debridement had previously been performed after conservative management of bilateral Achilles tendinopathy had been unsuccessful.

  19. Validity and reliability of the Achilles tendon total rupture score.

    PubMed

    Ganestam, Ann; Barfod, Kristoffer; Klit, Jakob; Troelsen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    The best treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture remains debated. Patient-reported outcome measures have become cornerstones in treatment evaluations. The Achilles tendon total rupture score (ATRS) has been developed for this purpose but requires additional validation. The purpose of the present study was to validate a Danish translation of the ATRS. The ATRS was translated into Danish according to internationally adopted standards. Of 142 patients, 90 with previous rupture of the Achilles tendon participated in the validity study and 52 in the reliability study. The ATRS showed moderately strong correlations with the physical subscores of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (r = .70 to .75; p < .0001) and Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment-Achilles questionnaire (r = .71; p < .0001). Test-retest of the ATRS showed no significant difference in the mean (2.41; p = .07). The limits of agreement were ±18.53. A strong correlation was found between test and retest (intercorrelation coefficient .908); the standard error of measurement was 6.7, and the minimal detectable change was 18.5. The Danish version of the ATRS showed moderately strong criterion validity. For study and follow-up purposes, the ATRS seems reliable for comparisons of groups of patients. Its usability is limited for repeated assessment of individual patients. The development of analysis guidelines would be desirable. Copyright © 2013 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Achilles tendonopathy and tendon rupture: conservative versus surgical management.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Vincent; James, Ernest

    2004-12-01

    Injuries to the Achilles tendon are common in primary care. Insertional tendonitis, retrocalcaneal bursitis, and paratenonitis are acute injuries usually treated conservatively with rest, ice, anti-inflammatory measures, and physical rehabilitation. Causative factors such as improper training or biomechanical abnormalities must be corrected to prevent reoccurrence. Achilles tendinosis is a chronic condition that does not always cause clinical symptoms. When symptoms occur, they are thought to be due to microtrauma or progressive failure resulting in inflammation. Again, conservative treatment usually relieves symptoms, but treatment may be prolonged. Surgical treatment may occasionally be recommended. With rupture of the Achilles, there exists some controversy regarding the advantage of conservative versus surgical management. Treatment should be based on individual patient considerations and expectations.

  1. Percutaneous repair of the Achilles tendon rupture in athletic population.

    PubMed

    Ververidis, Athanasios N; Kalifis, K Georgios; Touzopoulos, Panagiotis; Drosos, Georgios I; Tilkeridis, Konstantinos E; Kazakos, Konstantinos I

    2016-03-01

    This review was designed in order to study the percutaneous repair of Achilles tendon rupture in athletic population. We present a comprehensive description of clinical, functional outcomes, complications, with emphasis on patients' level, and time of return to sports. We proceeded to a systematic search of Medline (PubMED), Cochrane, and Scopus databases using keywords "Achilles Tendon", "Percutaneous Repair", "Percutaneous suturing", "Subcutaneous repair", "Subcutaneous suturing", "Athletes", and "Athletic" to identify articles or abstracts written in English. Thirteen studies, including 670 patients, could be identified. A variety of percutaneous repair techniques were performed. Re-rupture rate was very low. The most frequent complication was sural nerve damage. Average functional outcomes were satisfying. Up to 91.4% continued practicing sports after surgery. Furthermore, 78-84% returned to the same or higher sports level. Average time of return was 18 weeks in 9 studies. Percutaneous repair of Achilles tendon rupture is an excellent perspective for athletic population. Low re-rupture rate and impressing level of return to sports allow athletes to continue their recreational activities or careers.

  2. Percutaneous Achilles Tendon Lengthening

    MedlinePlus

    ... your primary doctor. Treatments of the Ankle Achilles Tendinosis Surgery Achilles Tendon Rupture Surgery Ankle Arthrodesis Ankle ... for Osteochondral Lesions of the Talus Insertional Achilles Tendinosis Surgery Lateral Ankle Ligament Reconstruction Lateral Ankle Stabilization ...

  3. Ultrasonography of non-traumatic rupture of the Achilles tendon secondary to levofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Cebrian, Paloma; Manjon, Palmira; Caba, Pedro

    2003-02-01

    Rupture of Achilles tendon (AT) is an uncommon complication of treatment with fluoroquinolones. We describe a case of bilateral tendinosis and rupture of the right AT in a patient who began levofloxacin treatment for community acquired pneumonia. Sonography showed thickening and hypoecogenicity of both AT and complete rupture and separation of the right Achilles tendon.

  4. Percutaneous versus open repair of acute Achilles tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Karabinas, Panagiotis K; Benetos, Ioannis S; Lampropoulou-Adamidou, Kalliopi; Romoudis, Pavlos; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Vlamis, John

    2014-05-01

    Controversy exists regarding the optimal treatment for acute Achilles tendon ruptures. Conservative and surgical treatments have been reported with variable results and complications rates. The purpose of this study is to compare the postoperative clinical and functional results of percutaneous versus open repair of acute Achilles tendon ruptures. We present 34 patients with acute Achilles tendon ruptures treated with open and percutaneous surgical repair. There were 15 patients who had open surgical repair and 19 patients who had percutaneous repair. The mean follow-up was 22 months (range 10-24 months) for the open repair group and 20 months (range 9-24 months) for the percutaneous repair group; no patient was lost to follow-up. Postoperative rehabilitation was the same for both groups. Wound healing, complications, ankle range of motion, and patients' return to work, activity level, weight-bearing, and subjective assessment of their treatment were recorded. No significant difference was observed with respect to any of the examined variables between the open and percutaneous repair groups. Tendon healing was observed in all patients of both groups by 7-9 weeks. The mean time of patients' return to work was 7 weeks for the open repair group and 9 weeks for the percutaneous repair group. All patients were capable of full weight bearing by the 8th postoperative week time; the time to return to previous activities including non-contact sports was 5 months for both groups. All patients expressed satisfaction and graded their treatment as good. As expected, cosmetic appearance was significantly better in the percutaneous repair group. One patient who had open repair experienced skin incision pain and dysesthesia and graded his operation as fair. No patient experienced other complications such as re-rupture, infection, sural neuroma, or Achilles tendinitis within the period of this study. The present study showed similarly successful clinical and functional results

  5. Incidence and outcome of rupture of the Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Cretnik, Andrej; Frank, Aleksander

    2004-01-01

    We determined the incidence of complete rupture of the Achilles tendon in the Maribor region (273,609 inhabitants) between 1991 and 1996. During this period, 116 ruptures were treated at Maribor Teaching Hospital. The average incidence was 7 ruptures per 100,000 inhabitants, with a peak incidence of almost 9 per 100,000. Most injuries (65%) occurred during sports activities, with soccer as the major cause of rupture. The average age of patients was 37 years with a male-to-female ratio of 18:1. All patients underwent open surgical repair of the ruptured Achilles tendon, with a minimum follow-up of two years. 19.8% of cases developed complications and in 10.4% of these the complications were major. 1.9% of patients sustained a re-rupture. The mean AOFAS score was 96 points. The patients were subjectively very satisfied with their treatment in 88% of cases. Good functional results with a return to the usual pre-injury activities were achieved in 96% of patients.

  6. [Percutaneus Suture of Achilles Tendon Rupture--Operation for Beginners?].

    PubMed

    Prokop, A; Dolezych, R; Chmielnicki, M

    2016-02-01

    Acute rupture of the Achilles tendon is the most common tendon injury, with an incidence of 30/100,000 population. With the Dresden instruments, operative tendon suture can be standardised and is safe, quick and minimally invasive. With post-operative functional therapy in a walking boot, very good clinical results can be achieved. Is this operation suitable as an educational procedure and is its performance still economic? Between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2013, 212 patients with acute rupture of the Achilles tendon were operated using the Dresden instruments. There were 167 males and 45 females, with an average age of 46 years. 99 operations were performed by trainees, 46 by attending surgical staff, and 57 by a senior surgeon. With the trainees, the mean duration of the operation was 29:53 minutes, and with the attending staff 29:10 minutes (n. s., p > 0.1). The rate of complications (re-rupture, infection, and sural nerve damage) was 5/99 (5 %) for the trainees, 4/46 (8.7 %) for the attending staff, and 3/57 (5.3 %) for the senior surgeon. A total cost analysis yielded a total operative cost of 445.76 € for outpatient surgery. With a billed sum of 490.11 €, net income of 44.35 € per case is generated. In patients with reasonable indications for 2-day short inpatient treatment, total treatment cost was 3232.70 €. Percutaneous suture of the Achilles tendon with the Dresden instruments is a standardised and cost-effective surgical procedure. It is suitable as a "beginner's" procedure that can be performed quickly, safely, and cost-effectively. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Management of acute Achilles tendon rupture with tendon-bundle technique.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Guang; Li, Bing; Yang, Yun-Feng

    2017-02-01

    Objective * These authors contributed equally to this work. To explore tendon-bundle technique for treating Achilles tendon rupture with no defects. Methods Patients with full unilateral Achilles tendon rupture with no defects were included. The Achilles tendon medial edge surgical repair approach was used, revealing horsetail-like rupture bundles. Tendon bundles were anatomically realigned and repaired end-to-end using 5-0 sutures. Patients were followed-up for 1 year, and assessed for differences between the repaired versus healthy limb. Results Out of 24 patients (18 male, 6 female; aged 19-56 years) at 1 year following surgery, mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score was 92.4 ± 5.9; mean differences between the surgically repaired versus contralateral side in dorsiflexion and plantarflexion angle were 3.5 ± 2.3° and 5.6 ± 3.2°, respectively; mean difference in calf circumference between the two sides was 0.9 ± 0.5 cm; and mean increase in Achilles tendon width versus the healthy side was 0.8 ± 0.2 cm. By 1 year post-surgery, there were no significant between-side differences in dorsiflexion and plantarflexion angle, or calf circumference. Conclusions Tendon-bundle surgery resulted in good ankle function restoration and low complication rates. Tendon-bundle surgery may reduce blood supply destruction and maximally preserve Achilles tendon length, and may be effective for treating Achilles tendon rupture with no defects.

  8. Percutaneous suturing of the ruptured Achilles tendon with endoscopic control.

    PubMed

    Doral, Mahmut Nedim; Bozkurt, Murat; Turhan, Egemen; Ayvaz, Mehmet; Atay, Ozgür Ahmet; Uzümcügil, Akin; Leblebicioğlu, Gürsel; Kaya, Defne; Aydoğ, Tolga

    2009-08-01

    A prospective study of modified percutaneous Achilles tendon repair performed between 1999 and 2005 under local infiltration anesthesia is presented; the study evaluated the results of percutaneous repair technique by visualization of the synovia under endoscopic control, followed by early functional postoperative treatment for surgical intervention of acute Achilles tendon ruptures. Sixty-two patients (58 males, 4 females, mean age 32) were treated by percutaneous suturing with modified Bunnel technique under endoscopic control within 10 days after acute total rupture. Physiotherapy was initiated immediately after the operation and patients were encouraged to weight-bearing ambulation with a walking brace-moon boot as tolerated. Full weight-bearing was allowed minimum after 3 weeks postoperatively without brace. The procedure was tolerated in all patients. There were no significant ROM limitation was observed. Two patients experienced transient hypoesthesia in the region of sural nerve that spontaneously resolved in 6 months. Fifty-nine patients (95%) including professional athletes returned to their previous sportive activities, while 18 of them (29%) had some minor complaints. The interval from injury to return to regular work and rehabilitation training was 11.7 weeks (10-13 weeks). At the latest follow-up (mean: 46 months; range: 12-78 months), all the patients had satisfactory results with a mean American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society's ankle-hindfoot score of 94.6. No re-ruptures, deep venous thrombosis or wound problems occurred. The proposed method offers a reasonable treatment option for acute total Achilles tendon rupture with a low number of complications. The rerupture rate and return to preinjury activities are comparable to open and percutaneous without endoscopic control procedures.

  9. Bone Reduction Clamp to Gain Length in Repairing Chronic Achilles Tendon Ruptures.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Patrick S; Pedowitz, David I

    2016-11-01

    Chronic Achilles tendon ruptures occur after an unrecognized, untreated, or misdiagnosed acute Achilles tendon rupture and present a potentially debilitating injury for the patient. Various techniques have been described to reconstruct the Achilles tendon after chronic ruptures. The technique chosen depends on the length of tendon defect that is present after debridement. If the tendon gap is greater than 3 cm, additional techniques are generally used, as direct repair is often not possible. The authors present a novel intraoperative technique using pointed reduction clamps to gain and maintain length of the Achilles tendon to decrease the gap between ends of the Achilles tendon and allow for end-to-end repair when it may have otherwise not been possible. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1223-e1225.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Diagnosis and treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Chiodo, Christopher P; Glazebrook, Mark; Bluman, Eric Michael; Cohen, Bruce E; Femino, John E; Giza, Eric; Watters, William C; Goldberg, Michael J; Keith, Michael; Haralson, Robert H; Turkelson, Charles M; Wies, Janet L; Raymond, Laura; Anderson, Sara; Boyer, Kevin; Sluka, Patrick

    2010-08-01

    This clinical practice guideline is based on a series of systematic reviews of published studies in the available literature on the diagnosis and treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. None of the 16 recommendations made by the work group was graded as strong; most are graded inconclusive; four are graded weak; two are graded as moderate strength; and two are consensus statements. The two moderate-strength recommendations include the suggestions for early postoperative protective weight bearing and for the use of protective devices that allow for postoperative mobilization.

  11. Predictors of Clinical Outcome After Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Nicklas; Petzold, Max; Brorsson, Annelie; Karlsson, Jón; Eriksson, Bengt I; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare

    2014-06-01

    In patients with an acute Achilles tendon rupture, it has not been possible to determine the superiority of a single specific treatment modality over other treatments with respect to symptoms and function. When several pertinent treatment protocols are available for an injury, it is of interest to understand how other variables, such as age, sex, or physical activity level, affect outcome to better individualize the treatment. To investigate predictors of both symptomatic and functional outcomes after an acute Achilles tendon rupture. Cohort study (Prognosis); Level of evidence, 2. Ninety-three patients (79 men and 14 women; mean age, 40 years) were evaluated prospectively at 3, 6, and 12 months. The main outcome measures in this study were the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) for symptoms and maximum heel-rise height for function. The independent variables evaluated as possible predictors of outcome included treatment, sex, age, body mass index (BMI), physical activity level, symptoms, and quality of life. Treatment, age, BMI, physical activity level, heel-rise height at 6 months, and the ATRS at 3 months were eligible for further analysis. Only male sex was included for the prediction models. The 4 different multiple linear regression models (predicting the ATRS at 6 and 12 months and heel-rise height at 6 and 12 months) were significant (P < .001-.002), and the R (2) values for the models were 0.222 to 0.409. Surgical or nonsurgical treatment is a moderate predictor of symptoms and a weak predictor of heel-rise height after an acute Achilles tendon rupture. At the 6-month follow-up, surgical treatment was associated with a larger heel-rise height, but the opposite was seen at 12 months. Surgical treatment resulted in a lower degree of symptoms. Increasing age was a strong predictor of reduced heel-rise height, and an increase in age of 10 years reduced the expected heel-rise height by approximately 8%. A higher BMI was also a strong predictor of a

  12. Compensatory muscle activation caused by tendon lengthening post Achilles tendon rupture

    PubMed Central

    Suydam, Stephen M.; Buchanan, Thomas S.; Manal, Kurt; Silbernagel, Karin Gravare

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to establish a relationship between the lengthening of the Achilles tendon post rupture and surgical repair to muscle activation patterns during walking in order to serve as a reference for post-surgical assessment. Method The Achilles tendon lengths were collected from 4 patients with an Achilles tendon rupture 6 and 12 month post-surgery along with 5 healthy controls via ultrasound. EMG was collected from the triceps surae muscles and tibialis anterior during over-ground walking. Results Achilles lengths at 6 and 12 months post-surgery were significantly longer (p < 0.05) on the involved side compared to the uninvolved side but there were no side to side differences in the healthy controls. The integrated EMG (iEMG) of the involved side was significantly higher than the uninvolved side in the lateral gastrocnemius at 6 months and for the medial gastrocnemius at 12 months in the patients with Achilles tendon rupture; no side to side difference was found in the healthy controls. The triceps surae muscles’ activations were fair to moderately correlated to the Achilles lengths (0.38 < r < 0.52). Conclusions The increased Achilles tendon length and iEMG from the triceps surae muscles indicate that loss of function is primarily caused by anatomical changes in the tendon and the appearance of muscle weakness is due to a lack of force transmission capability. This study indicates that when aiming for full return of function and strength an important treatment goal appears to be to minimize tendon elongation. Level of evidence Prognostic prospective case series. Level IV. PMID:23609529

  13. Compensatory muscle activation caused by tendon lengthening post-Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Suydam, Stephen M; Buchanan, Thomas S; Manal, Kurt; Silbernagel, Karin Gravare

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a relationship between the lengthening of the Achilles tendon post-rupture and surgical repair to muscle activation patterns during walking in order to serve as a reference for post-surgical assessment. The Achilles tendon lengths were collected from 4 patients with an Achilles tendon rupture 6 and 12 months post-surgery along with 5 healthy controls via ultrasound. EMG was collected from the triceps surae muscles and tibialis anterior during overground walking. Achilles lengths at 6 and 12 months post-surgery were significantly longer (p < 0.05) on the involved side compared to the uninvolved side, but there were no side-to-side differences in the healthy controls. The integrated EMG (iEMG) of the involved side was significantly higher than the uninvolved side in the lateral gastrocnemius at 6 months and for the medial gastrocnemius at 12 months in the patients with Achilles tendon rupture; no side-to-side difference was found in the healthy controls. The triceps surae muscles' activations were fair to moderately correlated to the Achilles lengths (0.38 < r < 0.52). The increased Achilles tendon length and iEMG from the triceps surae muscles indicate that loss of function is primarily caused by anatomical changes in the tendon and the appearance of muscle weakness is due to a lack of force transmission capability. This study indicates that when aiming for full return of function and strength, an important treatment goal appears to be to minimize tendon elongation.

  14. The Risk of Achilles Tendon Rupture in the Patients with Achilles Tendinopathy: Healthcare Database Analysis in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Shimozono, Yoshiharu; Kawano, Hirotaka

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Disorders of the Achilles tendon can be broadly classified into acute and chronic entities. Few studies have established chronic Achilles tendinopathy as a precursor to acute Achilles ruptures. In this study, we assessed the relationship between Achilles tendinopathy and rupture, clarifying the incidence of rupture in the setting of underlying tendinopathy. Methods. The United Healthcare Orthopedic Dataset from the PearlDiver Patient Record Database was used to identify patients with ICD-9 codes for Achilles rupture and/or Achilles tendinopathy. The number of patients with acute rupture, chronic tendinopathy, and rupture following a prior diagnosis of tendinopathy was assessed. Results. Four percent of patients with an underlying diagnosis of Achilles tendinopathy went on to sustain a rupture (7,232 patients). Older patients with tendinopathy were most vulnerable to subsequent rupture. Conclusions. The current study demonstrates that 4.0% of patients who were previously diagnosed with Achilles tendinopathy sustained an Achilles tendon rupture. Additionally, older patients with Achilles tendinopathy were most vulnerable. These findings are important as they can help clinicians more objectively council patients with Achilles tendinopathy. PMID:28540301

  15. Type 1 Achilles tendon rupture caused by grooming trauma in a young dog.

    PubMed

    Isaka, M; Befu, M; Matsubara, N; Ishikawa, M; Aono, H; Namba, S

    2014-01-01

    Achilles tendon rupture is uncommon in small animal practice. A 9-month-old, female, mixed breed dog (weighing 2.2kg) was referred to our hospital with a primary complaint of right hind limb lameness. Complete right Achilles tendon rupture was diagnosed by physical examination and radiography. The tendon was surgically repaired the next day by using a three-loop and single near-far-far-near suture methods. Complete healing was achieved by 97 days post-surgery. This report describes the surgical technique used for complete Achilles tendon rupture repair in a young dog.

  16. [Achilles tendon rupture--early functional and surgical options with special emphasis on rehabilitation issues].

    PubMed

    Knobloch, K; Thermann, H; Hüfner, T

    2007-03-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures are one end of a continuum starting with the healthy Achilles tendon via the thickened and painful tendinopathic Achilles tendon with neovascularisation to the complete tendon rupture. Often times chinolone antibiotics, cortisone therapy and valgus foot axis are associated risk factors. Incidence of Achilles tendon ruptures is estimated to be 10/100 000 per year with a mean age of 35-40 years. Physical activity is encountered in 75 % cases of Achilles tendon ruptures. Running is associated with Achilles tendinopathy as the predominant overuse injury in an analysis among 291 athletes with 10 million kilometers exposure. The Achilles tendinopathic rate was 0.016/1000 km differentiated in 0.008/1000 km mid-portion tendinopathy and 0.005/1000 km insertional tendinopathy. Achilles tendinopathy in running overuse injuries is followed by runner's knee (0.013/1000 km), shin splint (0.0104/1000 km) and plantar fasciitis (0.0054/1000 km). Dynamic ultrasound in 20 degrees plantar flexion is of utmost importance for therapeutic decision making. With an adaptation rate of 75 % or more of the ruptured tendon in 20 degrees plantar flexion and a high patient's compliance we perform an early functional conservative treatment regimen in Achilles tendon ruptures. In almost all other cases the percutaneous Achilles tendon repair is indicated, where nervus suralis lesions have to be appreciated. The vulnerable zone is 10-12 cm proximal to the calcaneus at the lateral border of the Achilles tendon with the sural nerve in close proximity with the tendon. Early functional rehabilitation is not associated with a higher risk of rerupture but with improved subjective assessments and should therefore be advocated.

  17. Direct Repair of Chronic Achilles Tendon Ruptures Using Scar Tissue Located Between the Tendon Stumps.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Toshito; Shima, Hiroaki; Mori, Katsunori; Kizawa, Momoko; Neo, Masashi

    2016-07-20

    Several surgical procedures for chronically ruptured Achilles tendons have been reported. Resection of the interposed scar tissue located between the tendon stumps and reconstruction using normal autologous tissue have been well described. We developed a direct repair procedure that uses scar tissue, which obviates the need to use normal autologous tissue. Thirty consecutive patients with Achilles tendon ruptures with a delay in diagnosis of >4 weeks underwent removal of a section of scar and healing tissue with direct primary suture of the ends of the tendon without the use of allograft or autograft. Patients were followed for a mean time of 33 months. Preoperative and postoperative clinical outcomes were measured with the Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) and the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot score. In addition, the patients underwent preoperative and postoperative functional measurements and magnetic resonance imaging. Lastly, we evaluated the histology of the interposed healing tissue. The mean AOFAS scores were 82.8 points preoperatively and 98.1 points postoperatively. The mean postoperative ATRS was 92.0 points. At the time of the latest follow-up, none of the patients had experienced tendon reruptures or difficulties in walking or climbing stairs, and all except 2 patients could perform a single-limb heel rise. All athletes had returned to their pre-injury level of sports participation. Preoperative T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed that 22 Achilles tendons were thickened with diffuse intratendinous high-signal alterations, and 8 Achilles tendons were thinned. Postoperative T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging findings included fusiform-shaped tendon thickening and homogeneous low-signal alterations of the tendons in all patients. Histologically, the interposed scar tissue consisted of dense collagen fibers. Shortening of the tissue between the 2 tendon ends that included healing scar and direct

  18. [Achilles tendon ruptures: 25 year's experience in sport-orthopedic treatment].

    PubMed

    Majewski, M; Widmer, K H; Steinbrück, K

    2002-12-01

    From 1972 - 1996 570 Achilles tendon ruptures in 565 patients were treated in the Sportklinik Stuttgart. The 499 men and 66 women had an average age of 38 years. For the diagnosis of a Achilles tendon rupture Ultrasound and MRI are important procedures, but clinical history and examination are still the best methods to find an Achilles tendon rupture (100%). However,the Actiology of the Achilles tendon rupture is still controversial and cannot be answered by these methods. Opposed to the degenerative theory, biomechanical experiments show that any Achilles tendon can tear when the calf muscle is tensed before the tendon is quickly stretched. We found that 69.8% of the patients with Achilles tendon rupture had a real trauma. Regardless of that, the treatment of the ruptured Achilles tendon has considerably changed over the last ten years. Responsible for this development are the positive experiences at the field of sports medicine with minimally invasive methods and the early functional treatment after knee surgery. Since we use an early functional rehabilitation concept instead of plaster immobilisation, all methods to treat a ruptured Achilles tendon have been improved. 43.5% of the patients after plaster immobilisation and 28.8% of the patients after early functional rehabilitation had a subjectively felt force reduction. Other important selecting criteria are the risk factors related to treatment method. Minimal invasive percutaneous Achilles tendon repair is considerably better than conservative therapy with a high rate of re-rupture (9.8%) and better than the open surgical repair, which carries a higher risk of infection (2.2%)

  19. Achilles Tendon Rupture: Avoiding Tendon Lengthening during Surgical Repair and Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Maquirriain, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Achilles tendon rupture is a serious injury for which the best treatment is still controversial. Its primary goal should be to restore normal length and tension, thus obtaining an optimal function. Tendon elongation correlates significantly with clinical outcome; lengthening is an important cause of morbidity and may produce permanent functional impairment. In this article, we review all factors that may influence the repair, including the type of surgical technique, suture material, and rehabilitation program, among many others. PMID:21966048

  20. Catastrophic Failure of an Infected Achilles Tendon Rupture Repair Managed with Combined Flexor Hallucis Longus and Peroneus Brevis Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Simonson, Devin C; Elliott, Andrew D; Roukis, Thomas S

    2016-01-01

    Deep infection is one of the most devastating complications following repair of an Achilles tendon rupture. Treatment requires not only culture-driven antibiotic therapy, but more importantly, appropriate débridement of some or even all of the Achilles tendon. This may necessitate delayed reconstruction of the Achilles tendon. The authors present a successful case of reconstruction of a chronically infected Achilles tendon in an otherwise healthy 43-year-old man via a multistaged approach using the flexor hallucis longus and peroneus brevis tendons. We also provide a brief review of the literature regarding local tendon transfer used in the reconstruction of Achilles tendon rupture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Subcutaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon and ipsilateral fracture of the medial malleolus.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, Nicola; Richards, Paula J

    2006-07-27

    Although ankle fractures and an Achilles tendon rupture are relatively frequent in isolation, their association in the same injury is uncommon. A 38 year old male tree surgeon fell six meters from a tree, sustaining a subcutaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon and an ipsilateral closed fracture of the medial malleolus. The injuries were diagnosed following clinical examination and imaging. This injury combination is infrequent, and management of the Achilles tendon rupture should take into account the necessity not to secondarily displace the fracture of the medial malleollus.

  2. Subcutaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon and ipsilateral fracture of the medial malleolus

    PubMed Central

    Maffulli, Nicola; Richards, Paula J

    2006-01-01

    Background Although ankle fractures and an Achilles tendon rupture are relatively frequent in isolation, their association in the same injury is uncommon. Case presentation A 38 year old male tree surgeon fell six meters from a tree, sustaining a subcutaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon and an ipsilateral closed fracture of the medial malleolus. The injuries were diagnosed following clinical examination and imaging. Conclusion This injury combination is infrequent, and management of the Achilles tendon rupture should take into account the necessity not to secondarily displace the fracture of the medial malleollus. PMID:16872521

  3. Combined conservative and orthotic management of acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Richard G H; Traynor, Ingrid E R; Kernohan, W George; Eames, Michael H A

    2004-06-01

    There has been considerable debate about the best treatment for acute rupture of the Achilles tendon. At our institution, a well-documented and structured program of nonoperative management of Achilles tendon rupture with use of casts and a removable orthosis was developed. We assessed the results in 140 consecutive patients with a complete rupture of the Achilles tendon who had been treated with our nonoperative regimen at our center between 1992 and 1998. Patients were evaluated on the basis of the subjective results and clinically with physiological testing. Overall, 56% of our patients had an excellent result; 30%, good; 12%, fair; and 2%, poor. The overall complication rate was 8%, with three complete and five partial tendon reruptures, two deep vein thromboses, and one temporary dropfoot. The results of our nonoperative orthotic treatment were better overall than published results of operative repair of acute Achilles tendon rupture. Our patients were quite satisfied with their treatment.

  4. Chronic Achilles tendon rupture reconstruction using a free semitendinosus tendon graft transfer.

    PubMed

    Sarzaeem, Mohammad Mahdi; Lemraski, Mohammad Mahdi Bagherian; Safdari, Farshad

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes following reconstruction of the chronic Achilles tendon ruptures with large gaps (>6 cm) using free semitendinosus tendon graft transfer. There were 11 consecutive patients underwent the above-mentioned surgical technique for the treatment of chronically ruptured Achilles tendon contributed in current study and were followed up prospectively for a mean of 25 ± 3 months. The intraoperative tendon defect was greater than 6 cm in all of the patients. Functional and clinical assessment was performed using The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) and Achilles Tendon Rupture Score (ATRS). The average AOFAS and ATRS improved significantly from 70 ± 5 and 32 ± 6 preoperatively, to 92 ± 5 and 89 ± 4 points post-operatively (P = 0.001). The range of dorsiflexion was significantly limited on the operated side (13 ± 4° vs. 17 ± 4°) (P = 0.04). All patients were able to stand on the tiptoe of injured leg, and no patient walked with a visible limp. Post-operative complications included one patient with symptomatic DVT and 2 patients with superficial infection treated nonoperatively. The technique offers good clinical and functional outcomes and is safe. Reconstruction of the chronic Achilles tendon ruptures with free semitendinosus tendon graft in patients with defects greater than 6 cm is recommended. IV.

  5. Augmented Repair of Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture Using an Allograft Tendon Weaving Technique.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaowei; Huang, Gan; Ji, Ying; Ao, Rong guang; Yu, Baoqing; Zhu, Ya Long

    2015-01-01

    Achilles tendon rupture is a common injury, especially in those who are physically active. Although open surgery is a widely used option for the treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture, the optimal treatment is still disputed. In our study, 59 patients with unilateral, closed, acute rupture of the Achilles tendon were treated by open surgery using an allograft weave to augment the repair. All the surgeries were performed within 1 to 4 days after injury. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score was recorded as 91.20 (range 88 to 95), 95.34 (range 92 to 98), and 98.27 (range 97 to 99) at the 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up visit, respectively. At the final follow-up visit, the mean difference between the mid-calf circumference of the injured and uninjured legs was 0.19 (range -0.03 to 1.50) cm (p = .43). At the final follow-up visit, the mean difference between the vertical distances from the plantar surface of the heel to the ground for the injured and uninjured lower extremities was 0.44 (range -0.03 to 0.5) cm (p = .17). Augmented repair using the allograft tendon weaving technique provided satisfactory tendon strength and functional outcomes and a timely return to the patients' activities. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Percutaneous Repair Technique for Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture with Assistance of Kirschner Wire.

    PubMed

    He, Ze-yang; Chai, Ming-xiang; Liu, Yue-ju; Zhang, Xiao-ran; Zhang, Tao; Song, Lian-xin; Ren, Zhi-xin; Wu, Xi-rui

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is to introduce a self-designed, minimally invasive technique for repairing an acute Achilles tendon rupture percutaneously. Comparing with the traditional open repair, the new technique provides obvious advantages of minimized operation-related lesions, fewer wound complications as well as a higher healing rate. However, a percutaneous technique without direct vision may be criticized by its insufficient anastomosis of Achilles tendon and may also lead to the lengthening of the Achilles tendon and a reduction in the strength of the gastrocnemius. To address the potential problems, we have improved our technique using a percutaneous Kirschner wire leverage process before suturing, which can effectively recover the length of the Achilles tendon and ensure the broken ends are in tight contact. With this improvement in technique, we have great confidence that it will become the treatment of choice for acute Achilles tendon ruptures. © 2015 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Realtime Achilles Ultrasound Thompson (RAUT) Test for the Evaluation and Diagnosis of Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Matthew J; Olson, Kirstina; Heckmann, Nathanael; Charlton, Timothy P

    2017-01-01

    Acute complete Achilles tendon ruptures are commonly missed injuries. We propose the Realtime Achilles Ultrasound Thompson (RAUT) test, a Thompson test under ultrasound visualization, to aid in the diagnosis of these injuries. We hypothesized that RAUT testing would provide improved diagnostic characteristics compared with static ultrasound. Twenty-two consecutive patients with operatively confirmed acute Achilles tendon ruptures were prospectively evaluated with RAUT testing and static ultrasonography. RAUT video recordings and static ultrasound images from both ruptured and uninjured sides were randomized and graded by a group of novice reviewers and a group of expert attendings. From these observations, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for RAUT and static ultrasound were calculated. In addition, κ interobserver coefficients were computed. Forty-seven novice reviewers and 11 foot and ankle attendings made a total of 4136 and 528 observations, respectively. For static ultrasound, sensitivity and specificity were 76.8% and 74.8% for the novice reviewers and 79.6% and 86.4% for the attendings, respectively. For RAUT testing, sensitivity and specificity were 87.2% and 81.1% for the novice group and 86.4% and 91.7% for the attending group, respectively. The κ coefficient was 0.62 and 0.27 for novice and attending RAUT reviewers, indicating substantial and fair agreement, respectively, but only 0.46 and 0.12 for static ultrasonography, representing moderate and slight agreement, respectively. RAUT testing was a sensitive and specific test, providing a cost-effective adjunct to the clinical examination when diagnosing acute Achilles tendon ruptures. This test can be used by surgeons with minimal training in ultrasonography. Level II, diagnostic study.

  8. Semitendinosus Tendon Autograft for Reconstruction of Large Defects in Chronic Achilles Tendon Ruptures.

    PubMed

    Dumbre Patil, Sampat Shivajirao; Dumbre Patil, Vaishali Sampat; Basa, Vikas Rajeshwarrao; Dombale, Ajay Birappa

    2014-07-01

    Chronic Achilles tendon ruptures are associated with considerable functional morbidity. When treated operatively, debridement of degenerated tendon ends may create large defects. Various procedures to reconstruct large defects have been described. We present a simple technique in which an autologous semitendinosus tendon graft is used to reconstruct defects larger than 5 cm in chronic Achilles tendon ruptures. The purpose of this study was to describe our operative technique and its functional outcome. Achilles ruptures of more than 6 weeks duration were considered for the study. We treated 35 patients (20 males, 15 females) with symptomatic chronic Achilles tendon ruptures. The mean age was 47.4 years (range, 30 to 59). The smallest defect that we had reconstructed was 5 cm, and the largest was 9 cm in length. The average follow-up duration was 30.7 months (range, 20 to 42). Postoperatively, the strength of gastrocsoleus was measured by manual muscle testing (MMT) in non-weight-bearing and weight-bearing positions. All operated patients showed satisfactory functional outcome, good soft tissue healing, and no reruptures. The preoperative weight-bearing MMT of 2/5 improved to 4/5 or 5/5 postoperatively. In all patients, postoperative non-weight-bearing MMT was 5/5. All patients returned to their prerupture daily activity. We present a technique that is simple, with low morbidity. We believe it is a valuable option especially when allografts are not available. It is inexpensive as suture anchors or tenodesis screws are not used. This can be a useful option if other tendons (flexor hallucis longus, peroneus brevis, etc) are not available for transfer. Level IV, retrospective case series. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Cross cultural adaptation of the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score with reliability, validity and responsiveness evaluation.

    PubMed

    Carmont, Michael R; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Nilsson-Helander, Katarina; Mei-Dan, Omer; Karlsson, Jon; Maffulli, Nicola

    2013-06-01

    The Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) was developed because of the need for a reliable, valid and sensitive instrument to evaluate symptoms and their effects on physical activity in patients following either conservative or surgical management of an Achilles tendon rupture. Prior to using the score in larger randomized trial in an English-speaking population, we decided to perform reliability, validity and responsiveness evaluations of the English version of the ATRS. Even though the score was published in English, the actual English version has not be validated and compared to the results of the Swedish version. From 2009 to 2010, all patients who received treatment for Achilles tendon rupture were followed up using the English version of the ATRS. Patients were asked to complete the score at 3, 6 and 12 months following treatment for Achilles tendon rupture. The ATRS was completed on arrival in the outpatient clinic and again following consultation. The outcomes of 49 (13 female and 36 male) patients were assessed. The mean (SD) age was 49 (12) years, and 27 patients had treatment for a left-sided rupture, 22 the right. All patients received treatment for ruptured Achilles tendons: 38 acute percutaneous repair, 1 open repair, 5 an Achilles tendon reconstruction using a Peroneus Brevis tendon transfer for delayed presentation, 1 gracilis augmented repair for re-rupture and 4 non-operative treatment for mid-portion rupture. The English version of ATRS was shown to have overall excellent reliability (ICC = 0.986). There was no significant difference between the results with the English version and the Swedish version when compared at the 6-month- or 12-month (n.s.) follow-up appointments. The effect size was 0.93. The minimal detectable change was 6.75 points. The ATRS was culturally adapted to English and shown to be a reliable, valid and responsive method of testing functional outcome following an Achilles tendon rupture.

  10. Achilles Tendonitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... You Prevent Achilles Tendonitis? Take these steps to reduce your risk of Achilles tendonitis: Stay in good shape year-round and try to keep your muscles as strong as they can be. Strong, flexible muscles work more efficiently and put less stress on your tendon. Increase the intensity and length ...

  11. Percutaneous repair followed by accelerated rehabilitation for acute Achilles tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Al-Mouazzen, Louay; Rajakulendran, Karthig; Najefi, Ali; Ahad, Nurul

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the outcome after percutaneous repair followed by accelerated rehabilitation for acute Achilles tendon ruptures. 21 men and 9 women (mean age, 41 years) underwent percutaneous repair by a single senior surgeon for acute Achilles tendon ruptures, followed by early weight bearing and accelerated rehabilitation. Outcome measures included the Achilles tendon re-rupture rate, the Achilles tendon total rupture score (ATRS) at 3 and 6 months, the incidence of sural nerve injury, wound infection, wound dehiscence, patient satisfaction, and the time to return to pre-rupture activity. The mean follow-up period was 12.5 months. The mean ATRS score improved from 57.65 at 3 months to 86.95 at 6 months (p<0.001). No patient had intra-operative complications, tendon re-rupture, sural nerve injury, wound dehiscence, or deep infection. Two patients developed a superficial wound infection, which was resolved with oral flucloxacillin. Two patients had a mass at the transverse incision, but neither had any symptoms or functional restriction. All patients were able to bear full weight comfortably without the walker boot at 8 weeks, and return to their work by 3 months. The mean time to return to pre-rupture activity, including sports, was 10.4 months. The mean satisfaction rate was 87% at 6 months. Percutaneous repair of the Achilles tendon followed by early weight bearing and accelerated rehabilitation achieves good functional outcome.

  12. Novel surgical technique and early kinesiotherapy for acute Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Sabirhazi, Gulnur; Chen, Jiangtao; Aldyarhan, Kayrat; Zheyiken, Jangannuer; Zhao, Qin; Bai, Jingping

    2012-12-01

    This prospective study was performed to investigate the contribution of early kinesiotherapy, the active exercise and movement of the ankle and knee joints, following a novel surgical technique for reconstruction of the acutely ruptured Achilles tendon and the underlying mechanisms involved. One hundred and seven patients with an acute Achilles tendon rupture received postoperative early kinesiotherapy treatment following the novel ``Pa-bone'' surgical technique. Clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Achilles tendon rupture score, a score for measuring outcomes related to symptoms and physical activity, and bilateral ultrasonographic examination of the Achilles tendon. Range-of-motion recovery equal to the intact side averaged 7~weeks. Double-legged heel rises and sustained single-leg heel rise exercises were possible at an average of 1~week and 60± 2 days, respectively. All patients could perform single-leg heel rise of the injured foot for 60± 23 seconds at an average of 12 weeks. No rerupture was observed. In addition, ultrasonographic examination revealed that the cross-sectional areas of the ruptured tendon were significantly larger than those of the healthy side. Overall reconstruction of the Achilles tendon was obtained for most of the patients. Postoperative early kinesiotherapy treatment following Pa-bone surgical technique resulted in excellent clinical outcomes and contributed to the overall reconstruction of the Achilles tendon.

  13. A minimally invasive "overwrapping" technique for repairing neglected ruptures of the Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2014-01-01

    About 10% to 25% of acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon go undiagnosed for some time beyond what would be optimal for repair and a return to optimal function. Managing these chronic or neglected ruptures is a surgical challenge, because the tendon ends retract and atrophy and could develop a short, fibrous distal stump. In the present report, a patient with a ruptured right Achilles tendon, neglected for approximately 10 years, is described. The chronically injured tendon was successfully treated by overwrapping the interposed scar at the rupture site. This minimally invasive technique restored tension to the tendon, a prerequisite for which was the presence of functional triceps surae, confirmed by identification of gross contraction of the muscle during tiptoeing. The procedure is contraindicated when the scar tissue is not intact and does not have sufficient laxity to allow adequate dorsiflexion of the ankle after overwrapping the tendon or when the triceps surae are nonfunctional.

  14. The effect of electroacupuncture on tendon repair in a rat Achilles tendon rupture model.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Motohiro; Nakajima, Miwa; Oi, Yuki; Hojo, Tatsuya; Itoi, Megumi; Kitakoji, Hiroshi

    2015-02-01

    To examine the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on early post-rupture tendon repair in a rat model of Achilles tendon rupture using histological and mechanical evaluation. An Achilles tendon rupture model was prepared in 90 Wistar rats, which were randomly assigned to EA, manual acupuncture or control groups. Rats in the EA group received EA (pulse width 5 ms; stimulation frequency 50 Hz; stimulation strength 20 μA; stimulation time 20 min) daily from 1 day following model preparation until the day of assessment (either 7 or 10 days after model preparation), when the region of interest was sampled to assess tendon repair using in vitro methods. Total cell count and the number of cells staining positive for transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and basic fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF) were measured. Tension tests were performed 10 days after model preparation to measure the maximum breaking strength of the repaired tendon. Both the total cell count and the number of cells positive for b-FGF were significantly higher in the EA group (p<0.05). In the EA group only, immunostaining showed strong expression of TGF-β1 7 days after model preparation (p<0.05). Maximum breaking strength of the repaired tendon 10 days after model preparation was significantly higher in the EA group (p<0.01). The marked increase in cell count and growth factor expression as well as increased tendon strength in the EA group suggest that EA may be a useful method for promoting tendon repair. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Outcomes of functional weight-bearing rehabilitation of Achilles tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Gillian; Sinclair, Victoria F; McLaughlin, Charles; Barrie, James

    2013-08-01

    The introduction of functional rehabilitation for patients with Achilles tendon rupture has dramatically changed treatment programs for this condition. The authors introduced a functional weight-bearing protocol for patients with an acute Achilles tendon rupture treated operatively and nonoperatively in 2002. They hypothesized that no significant differences would exist in the rerupture rates and functional outcomes between the groups. Between 2002 and 2008, the authors collected data on 80 consecutive patients treated with a weight-bearing functional orthosis for complete Achilles tendon rupture. Following evidence-based counseling, 51 patients chose nonoperative treatment and 29 chose operative treatment. Outcome measures included rerupture rates, other complications, and functional scoring. The nonoperative group was a decade older (median age, 47 years [range, 27-80 years]) than the operative group (median age, 37 years [range, 24-55 years]). Rerupture was noted in 2 (4%) patients in the nonoperative treatment group and 1 (3%) patient in the operative group. Two (7%) patients in the operative group developed superficial wound infections and reported no nerve injuries. Median Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score was 82 points in the nonoperative group and 94 in the operative group. Median Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment-Achilles tendinopathy questionnaire scores were 60 and 91 for the nonoperative and operative groups, respectively. Both groups had low rerupture rates. Functional scores, using the newly validated Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score, were lower in the nonoperative group. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. An Alternative Bundle-to-Bundle Suturing Technique for Repairing Fresh Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingjing; Yu, Bin; Xie, Ming; Huang, Ruokun; Xiao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The main concern about conventional Achilles tendon repair surgical techniques is how to maintain the initial strength of the ruptured Achilles tendon through complicated suturing methods. The primary surgical problem lies in the properties of the soft tissue; the deterioration of the Achilles tendon, especially in its elasticity; and the surface lubricity of the local tissues. In the present study, we describe an innovative bundle-to-bundle suturing method that addresses these potential problems. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Muscle-tendon glucose uptake in Achilles tendon rupture and tendinopathy before and after eccentric rehabilitation: Comparative case reports.

    PubMed

    Masood, Tahir; Kalliokoski, Kari; Bojsen-Møller, Jens; Finni, Taija

    2016-09-01

    Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) is the most common tendon rupture injury. The consequences of ATR on metabolic activity of the Achilles tendon and ankle plantarflexors are unknown. Furthermore, the effects of eccentric rehabilitation on metabolic activity patterns of Achilles tendon and ankle plantarflexors in ATR patients have not been reported thus far. We present a case study demonstrating glucose uptake (GU) in the Achilles tendon, the triceps surae, and the flexor hallucis longus of a post-surgical ATR patient before and after a 5-month eccentric rehabilitation. At baseline, three months post-surgery, all muscles and Achilles tendon displayed much higher GU in the ATR patient compared to a healthy individual despite lower plantarflexion force. After the rehabilitation, plantarflexion force increased in the operated leg while muscle GU was considerably reduced. The triceps surae muscles showed similar values to the healthy control. When compared to the healthy or a matched patient with Achilles tendon pain after 12 weeks of rehabilitation, Achilles tendon GU levels of ATR patient remained greater after the rehabilitation. Past studies have shown a shift in the metabolic fuel utilization towards glycolysis due to immobilization. Further research, combined with immuno-histological investigation, is needed to fully understand the mechanism behind excessive glucose uptake in ATR cases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Application of internal fixation of steel-wire limited loop in early Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Wei, Jia-Sen; Hou, Zhao-Yang; Hu, Jiong; Cao, Yan-Guang; Chen, Qi-Xin

    2013-11-01

    To explore the clinical effect and safety of internal fixation of steel-wire limited loop in early Achilles tendon rupture. Seventy-six patients respectively with early transected and avulsed types of Achilles tendon rupture were selected and treated with internal fixation of steel-wire limited loop. The patients began to take exercise for their lower limbs through continous passive motion as early as possible after surgical repair, and the loops were removed after 3-5 months. Six months later, the condition of complications including Achilles tendon re-rupture, wound fistula, wound infection and skin necrosis, cutaneous sensation in sural nerve dominance region, time back to preinjury work or learning as well as time to physical activities were observed. One year later, the therapeutic effect was evaluated, and the maximum circumferences of bilateral legs and ruptured plane circumferences of Achilles tendon were measured. The wound of all patients healed well, no complications like Achilles tendon re-rupture, wound fistula, wound infection and skin necrosis occured, and the cutaneous sensation in sural nerve dominance region was normal. The mean time back to preinjury work or learning as well as to pysical activities of all patients were respectively 10 and 22 weeks. Seventy out of 76 patients (92.1%) achieved an excellent effect, and 6 (7.9%) good effect. The excellent and good rate came up to 100%. The maximum circumference in the affected leg decreased to 2 mm averagely compared with the offside, while the ruptured plane circumferences of Achilles tendon in the affected side increased to 2.2 mm compared with the offside. For early Achilles tendon rupture, internal fixation of steel-wire limited loop can recover the ankle function better, return to the preinjury state in the shortest time, and has few complications. Copyright © 2013 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Achilles tendon total rupture score: a study of responsiveness, internal consistency and convergent validity on patients with acute Achilles tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Rebecca S; Achten, Juul; Lamb, Sarah E; Parsons, Nicholas; Costa, Matthew L

    2012-02-29

    The Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score was developed by a research group in 2007 in response to the need for a patient reported outcome measure for this patient population. Beyond this original development paper, no further validation studies have been published.Consequently the purpose of this study was to evaluate internal consistency, convergent validity and responsiveness of this newly developed patient reported outcome measure within patients who have sustained an isolated acute Achilles tendon rupture. Sixty-four eligible patients with an acute rupture of their Achilles tendon completed the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score alongside two further patient reported outcome measures (Disability Rating Index and EQ 5D). These were completed at baseline, six weeks, three months, six months and nine months post injury. The Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score was evaluated for internal consistency, using Cronbach's alpha, convergent validity, through correlation analysis and responsiveness, by analysing floor and ceiling effects and calculating its relative efficiency in comparison to the Disability Rating Index and EQ 5D scores. The Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score demonstrated high internal consistency (Cronbachs alpha > 0.8) and correlated significantly (p < 0.001) with the Disability Rating Index at five time points (pre-injury, six weeks, three, six and nine months) with correlation coefficients between -0.5 and -0.9. However, the confidence intervals were wide. Furthermore, the ability of the new score to detect clinically important changes over time (responsiveness) was shown to be greater than the Disability Rating Index and EQ 5D. A universally accepted outcome measure is imperative to allow comparisons to be made across practice. This is the first study to evaluate aspects of validity of this newly developed outcome measure, outside of the developing centre. The ATRS demonstrated high internal consistency and responsiveness, with limited convergent

  20. Minimally invasive reconstruction of chronic achilles tendon ruptures using the ipsilateral free semitendinosus tendon graft and interference screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, Nicola; Loppini, Mattia; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Maffulli, Gayle D; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2013-05-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures represent more than 40% of all tendon ruptures requiring surgical management. About 20% of acute Achilles tendon tears are not diagnosed at the time of injury and become chronic, necessitating more complicated management than fresh injuries. Several techniques for the reconstruction of chronic tears of the Achilles tendon have been described, but the superiority of one technique over the others has not been demonstrated. Mini-invasive reconstruction of the Achilles tendon, with a gap lesion larger than 6 cm, using the ipsilateral free semitendinosus tendon graft will result in improvement of the overall function with a low rate of complications. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Between 2008 and 2010, the authors prospectively enrolled 28 consecutive patients (21 men and 7 women; median age, 46 years) with chronic closed ruptures of the Achilles tendon who had undergone reconstruction with a free semitendinosus tendon graft. They assessed the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS), maximum calf circumference, and isometric plantarflexion strength before surgery and at the last follow-up. Outcome of surgery and rate of complications were also recorded. The median follow-up after surgery was 31.4 months. The overall result of surgery was excellent/good in 26 (93%) of 28 patients. The ATRS improved from 42 (range, 29-55) to 86 (range, 78-95) (P < .0001). In the operated leg, the maximum calf circumference and isometric plantarflexion strength were significantly improved after surgery (P < .0001); however, their values remained significantly lower than those of the opposite side (P < .0001). All patients were able to walk on tiptoes and returned to their preinjury working occupation. No infections were recorded. Mini-invasive reconstruction of the Achilles tendon, with a gap lesion larger than 6 cm, using the ipsilateral free semitendinosus tendon graft provides a significant improvement of symptoms and function, although calf

  1. A rare case of ciprofloxacin-induced bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Trevor G

    2009-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone antibiotics have been widely used for over 25 years. Their key adverse effect is tendinopathy. A 76-year-old woman developed bilateral Achilles tendinopathy on the fourth day of fluoroquinolone use. Her doctor advised her to complete the course; however, she went on to sustain bilateral tendoachilles rupture. The patient undertook self-referral to a Primary Care Musculoskeletal Assessment Service, where bilateral Achilles tendon rupture was confirmed by ultrasonography. Surgical repair of both tendons was undertaken. Several months postoperatively the patient was discharged. Fluoroquinolone-related tendinopathy can occur within hours of commencing the medication or up to 6 months post cessation. The incidence of Achilles tendon disorders significantly outweighs pathology in other tendons. Men are up to four times more susceptible than women, hence bilateral rupture in a 76-year-old woman is rare. Patients prescribed fluoroquinolones presenting with tendinopathy require consideration of dose reduction or cessation of fluoroquinolone therapy.

  2. Complete Achilles tendon rupture after local infiltration of corticosteroids in the treatment of deep retrocalcaneal bursitis.

    PubMed

    Vallone, Ganfranco; Vittorio, Tarallo

    2014-06-01

    Complete rupture of the Achilles tendon is relatively rare, but it is an injury of considerable clinical relevance. A common cause of non-traumatic tendon rupture is local corticosteroid infiltration. Corticosteroid injections may start a degenerative process resulting in partial rupture and subsequent complete rupture of the tendon due to a direct toxic effect, because corticosteroids inhibit production of extracellular matrix collagen and also because of poor local vascularization. This paper describes the case of a patient who presented with complete rupture of the Achilles tendon shortly after administration of local corticosteroid injections in the treatment of deep retrocalcaneal bursitis. This confirms that corticosteroid treatment which is not correctly and accurately administered may be a factor contributing to major injury. It demonstrates that the physician must take all necessary precautions when administering corticosteroid infiltration. It is particularly important that corticosteroid injection is performed under ultrasound guidance which permits visualization of the needle tip and therefore exact identification of the injection site.

  3. Achilles tendon disorders.

    PubMed

    Weinfeld, Steven B

    2014-03-01

    Achilles tendon disorders include tendinosis, paratenonitis, insertional tendinitis, retrocalcaneal bursitis, and frank rupture. Patients present with pain and swelling in the posterior aspect of the ankle. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound are helpful in confirming the diagnosis and guiding treatment. Nonsurgical management of Achilles tendon disorders includes nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, physical therapy, bracing, and footwear modification. Surgical treatment includes debridement of the diseased area of the tendon with direct repair. Tendon transfer may be necessary to augment the strength of the Achilles tendon. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessment of Postoperative Tendon Quality in Patients With Achilles Tendon Rupture Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Tendon Fiber Tracking.

    PubMed

    Sarman, Hakan; Atmaca, Halil; Cakir, Ozgur; Muezzinoglu, Umit Sefa; Anik, Yonca; Memisoglu, Kaya; Baran, Tuncay; Isik, Cengiz

    2015-01-01

    Although pre- and postoperative imaging of Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) has been well documented, radiographic evaluations of postoperative intratendinous healing and microstructure are still lacking. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is an innovative technique that offers a noninvasive method for describing the microstructure characteristics and organization of tissues. DTI was used in the present study for quantitative assessment of fiber continuity postoperatively in patients with acute ATR. The data from 16 patients with ATR from 2005 to 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. The microstructure of ART was evaluated using tendon fiber tracking, tendon continuity, fractional anisotropy, and apparent diffusion coefficient values by way of DTI. The distal and proximal portions were measured separately in both the ruptured and the healthy extremities of each patient. The mean patient age was 41.56 ± 8.49 (range 26 to 56) years. The median duration of follow-up was 21 (range 6 to 80) months. The tendon fractional anisotropy values of the ruptured Achilles tendon were significantly lower statistically than those of the normal side (p = .001). However, none of the differences between the 2 groups with respect to the distal and proximal apparent diffusion coefficient were statistically significant (p = .358 and p = .899, respectively). In addition, the fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient measurements were not significantly different in the proximal and distal regions of the ruptured tendons compared with the healthy tendons. The present study used DTI and fiber tracking to demonstrate the radiologic properties of postoperative Achilles tendons with respect to trajectory and tendinous fiber continuity. Quantifying DTI and fiber tractography offers an innovative and effective tool that might be able to detect microstructural abnormalities not appreciable using conventional radiologic techniques.

  5. Clinical Outcomes and Complications of Percutaneous Achilles Repair System Versus Open Technique for Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Andrew R; Jones, Carroll P; Cohen, Bruce E; Davis, W Hodges; Ellington, J Kent; Anderson, Robert B

    2015-11-01

    Limited incision techniques for acute Achilles tendon ruptures have been developed in recent years to improve recovery and reduce postoperative complications compared with traditional open repair. The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to analyze the clinical outcomes and postoperative complications between acute Achilles tendon ruptures treated using a percutaneous Achilles repair system (PARS [Arthrex, Inc, Naples, FL]) versus open repair and evaluate the overall outcomes for operatively treated Achilles ruptures. Between 2005 and 2014, 270 consecutive cases of operatively treated acute Achilles tendon ruptures were reviewed (101 PARS, 169 open). Patients with Achilles tendinopathy, insertional ruptures, chronic tears, or less than 3-month follow-up were excluded. Operative treatment consisted of a percutaneous technique (PARS) using a 2-cm transverse incision with FiberWire (Arthrex, Inc, Naples, FL) sutures or open repair using a 5- to 8-cm posteromedial incision with FiberWire in a Krackow fashion reinforced with absorbable sutures. Patient demographics were recorded along with medical comorbidities, activity at injury, time from injury to surgery, length of follow-up, return to baseline activities by 5 months, and postoperative complications. The most common activity during injury for both groups was basketball (PARS: 39%, open: 47%). A greater number of patients treated with PARS were able to return to baseline physical activities by 5 months compared with the open group (PARS: 98%, open: 82%; P = .0001). There were no significant differences (P > .05) between groups in rates of rerupture (P = 1.0), sural neuritis (P = .16), wound dehiscence (P = .74), superficial (P = .29) and/or deep infection (P = .29), or reoperation (P = .13). There were no deep vein thromboses (DVTs) or reruptures in either group. In the PARS group, there were no cases of sural neuritis, 3 cases (3%) of superficial wound dehiscence, and 2 reoperations (2%) for superficial

  6. Prospective randomized clinical trial of aggressive rehabilitation after acute Achilles tendon ruptures repaired with Dresden technique.

    PubMed

    De la Fuente, Carlos; Peña y Lillo, Roberto; Carreño, Gabriel; Marambio, Hugo

    2016-03-01

    Rupture of the Achilles tendon is a common injury during working years. Aggressive rehabilitation may provide better outcomes, but also a greater chance of re-rupture. To determine if aggressive rehabilitation has better clinical outcomes for Achilles tendon function, Triceps surae function, one-leg heel rise capacity and lower complication rate during twelve weeks after percutaneous Achilles tendon repair compared to conventional rehabilitation. Randomized controlled trial. Thirty-nine patients were prospectively randomized. The aggressive group (n=20, 41.4 ± 8.3 years) received rehabilitation from the first day after surgery. The conventional group (n=19, 41.7 ± 10.7 years) rested for 28 days, before rehabilitation started. The statistical parameters were the Achilles tendon rupture score (ATRS), verbal pain scale, time to return to work, pain medication consumption, Achilles tendon strength, dorsiflexion range of motion (RoM), injured-leg calf circumference, calf circumference difference, one-leg heel rise repetition and difference, re-rupture rate, strength deficit rate, and other complication rates. Mixed-ANOVA and Bonferroni's post hoc test were performed for multiple comparisons. Student's t-test was performed for parameters measured on the 12th week. The aggressive group with respect to the conventional group had a higher ATRS; lower verbal pain score; lower pain medication consumption; early return to work; higher Achilles tendon strength; higher one-leg heel rise repetitions; and lower one-leg heel rise difference. The re-rupture rate was 5% and 5%, the strength deficit rate was 42% and 5%, and other complications rate was 11% and 15% in the conventional and aggressive group, respectively. Patients with Dresden repair and aggressive rehabilitation have better clinical outcomes, Achilles tendon function and one-leg heel rise capacity without increasing the postoperative complications rate after 12 weeks compared to rehabilitation with immobilization and

  7. Surgical repair of acute Achilles tendon rupture with an end-to-end tendon suture and tendon flap.

    PubMed

    Corradino, B; Di Lorenzo, S; Calamia, C; Moschella, F

    2015-08-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures are becoming more common. Complications after open or minimally invasive surgery are: recurrent rupture (2-8%), wound breakdown, deep infections, granuloma, and fistulas. The authors expose their experience with a personal technique. In 8 patients with acute rupture of Achilles tendon the surgery was performed at least 25 days after trauma. Clinical exam and MR demonstrated in all case a total lesion of tendon. After a posterolateral skin incision the tendon stumps were debrided and suture in end-to-end fashion. A tendon flap was harvested from the proximal part of the tendon, in order to protect and reinforce the suture itself. A plaster cast was applied for 3 weeks and the patients started the rehabilitation protocol. After 4 months all patients returned to pre-injury daily activities. The mean follow up was 13 months (ranged between 6 and 24 months). No major complications occurred. The posterolateral skin incision, not above the tendon, preserves the vascularity of the soft tissues, allows identifying and not accidentally injuring the sural nerve, and prevents the cutaneous scar is overlapped the tendon. In this way is favoured physiological tendon sliding. The preparation of the flap tendon does not weaken the overall strength of the tendon and protects the tendon suture. The tension on sutured stumps is less than being spread over a larger area. In our sample of 8 patients the absence of short-and long-term complications and the rapid functional recovery after surgery suggest that the technique used is safe and effective. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Flexor hallucis tendon transfer combined with an interference screw reconstruction for chronic Achilles tendon rupture of Kuwada IV].

    PubMed

    Du, Jun-feng; Zhu, Yang-yi

    2015-05-01

    To explore the clinical effect of interference screw and flexor hallucis longus tendon as augmentation material in repair of chronic Achilles tendon rupture. From September 2010 to June 2012,26 patients with chronic Achilles tendon rupture were treated, including 18 males and 8 females with an average age of 44.2 years old (20 to 66 years old). All patients were unilateral damage. MRI showed the Achilles tendon.ends' distance was 6.0 to 9.0 cm. The postoperative complications were observed. The curative effect was assessed by American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society and Leppilahti score. All the 26 patients were followed up for 18 to 68 months (means 30.4 months). No neurological injury and infection of incision occurred, all patients were stage I incision healing. The shape and function of the ankle were recovered well. The average AOFAS score increased from 52.27±12.30 preoperatively to 90.92±6.36 postoperatively. Leppilahti Achilles Tendon Repair score increased from 34.23±12.86 preoperatively to 90.00±5.10 postoperatively. The flexor hallucis tendon transfer with an interference screw technique for repairing the chronic Achilles tendon rupture of type IV of Kuwada had advantages of simple operation, quick recovery, firm tendon fixation, and less complications.

  9. Division Tenorrhaphy: A Novel Technique for Chronic or Failed Nonoperatively Treated Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    PubMed

    Doty, Jesse; Katsuura, Yoshihiro; Richardson, Nicholas

    2017-06-01

    Here we describe a modified open technique for the repair of a ruptured Achilles tendon using multiple looped sutures with the creation of interdigitating tendon stumps maximizing surface area for suture application as well as allowing for significant tissue overlay. This technique produces a high strength repair that is useful in cases of extensive degeneration or poor-quality tissue. Degenerative tissue may be encountered with chronic ruptures or failed nonoperative treatment, as well as those ruptures that occur at the proximal myotendinous junction. We present 2 cases in which the technique was utilized: one of a failed nonoperatively treated rupture and another of a chronic rupture. The technique was found to be successful for both patients with improvement in visual analogue scale, Achilles tendon total rupture score, American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Score, and Foot and Ankle Disability Index. Level IV.

  10. Early Ankle Mobilization Promotes Healing in a Rabbit Model of Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    PubMed

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Asilehan, Batiza; Wupuer, Aikeremu; Qianman, Bayixiati; Jialihasi, Ayidaer; Tangkejie, Wulanbai; Maimaitiaili, Abudouheilil; Shawutali, Nuerai; Badelhan, Aynaz; Niyazebieke, Hadelebieke; Aizezi, Adili; Aisaiding, Amuding; Bakyt, Yerzat; Aibek, Rakimbaiev; Wuerliebieke, Jianati

    2016-01-01

    The use of early mobilization of the ankle joint without orthosis in the treatment of Achilles tendon rupture has been advocated as the optimal management. The goal of this study was to compare outcomes in a postoperative rabbit model of Achilles tendon rupture between early mobilization and immobilized animals using a differential proteomics approach. In total, 135 rabbits were randomized into the control group (n=15), the postoperative cast immobilization (PCI) group (n=60), and the early mobilization (EM) group (n=60). A rupture of the Achilles tendon was created in each animal model and repaired microsurgically, and tendon samples were removed at 3, 7, 14, and 21 days postoperatively. Proteins were separated using 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and identified using peptide mass fingerprinting, tandem mass spectrometry, NCBI database searches, and bioinformatics analyses. A series of differentially expressed proteins were identified between groups, some of which may play an important role in Achilles tendon healing. Notable candidate proteins that were upregulated in the EM group were identified, such as CRMP-2, galactokinase 1, tropomyosin-4, and transthyretin. The healing of ruptured Achilles tendons appears to be affected at the level of protein expression with the use of early mobilization. The classic postoperative treatment of Achilles tendon rupture with an orthosis ignored the self-protecting instinct of humans. With a novel operative technique, the repaired tendon can persist the load that comes from traction in knee and ankle joint functional movement. In addition, kinesitherapy provided an excellent experimental outcome via a mechanobiological mechanism. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Achilles tendon repair with acellular tissue graft augmentation in neglected ruptures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel K

    2007-01-01

    Neglected Achilles tendon rupture injuries present surgical challenges because of the quality and quantity of tendon tissue during repair combined with the magnitude of mechanical forces placed on this tendon. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of an acellular human dermal tissue matrix, GRAFTJACKET, as an augmentation material in neglected Achilles tendon repair. Nine patients with neglected Achilles tendon ruptures were evaluated and followed up for a minimum of 20 months. Primary repair was followed by augmentation with the graft and suturing circumferentially around the tendon. Patients were placed in an early, functional rehabilitation program with postoperative evaluation at 3, 6, and 12 months. Outcome scores were calculated based on the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot scoring system. At 20 to 30 months postoperative follow-up range, there has been no incidence of re-rupture or recurrent pain. The average return-to-activity time was 15.2 +/- 1.7 weeks. The results from this retrospective clinical series suggest that using an acellular human dermal tissue matrix to augment neglected Achilles tendon rupture primary repair offers desirable return-to-activity time points and viable surgical alternative over previously reported surgical options.

  12. Dual Fixation of Calcaneal Tuberosity Avulsion with Concomitant Achilles Tendon Rupture: A Novel Hybrid Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kusnezov, Nicholas; Rensing, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Fracture of the calcaneal tuberosity with a concomitant Achilles tendon rupture presents a difficult challenge for the treating surgeon. The ultimate goal of treatment is to restore function of both the gastrocnemius-soleus complex and the Achilles tendon. This particular subset of fractures occurs often in diabetics and elderly patients with osteoporosis making fixation of the displaced fragment rather complex. If the Achilles tendon disruption is only discovered later once the fracture is healed, subsequent management is difficult with surgical treatment being more morbid. While this is a rare injury, the consequences of a missed chronic Achilles tendon disruption are severe with significant dysfunction. It is therefore important to have a high index of suspicion for concomitant injury and to be prepared for dual fixation. We present a novel hybrid surgical fixation technique, which may be used in this instance. PMID:28357147

  13. Partial achilles tendon rupture presenting with giant hematoma; MRI findings of 4 year follow up.

    PubMed

    Sarsilmaz, Aysegul; Varer, Makbule; Coskun, Gulten; Apaydın, Melda; Oyar, Orhan

    2011-12-01

    In the young population, spontaneous rupture of Achilles tendon is very rare. The big hematoma is also rare finding of the Achilles tendon partial rupture. It is usually seen with complete rupture. We presented imaging findings of 4 years follow up of the spontaneous partial rupture of Achilles tendon presenting with giant expanding hematoma and mimicking complete rupture radiologically. We discussed the alterations of tendon signal intensity and result of conservative therapy after partial rupture with big hematoma in the long term. A 29 year-old man, applied with pain and swelling in the retrocalcaneal region of left ankle. He did not have chronic metabolic disease. He was not active in physical activities. X-ray radiograms were normal. At magnetic resonance images (MRI), there was an intratendinous big hematoma, subcutanous fat planes were edematous around tendon. The diagnosis was partial rupture and giant hematoma. Hematoma was drained. The conservative treatment was applied and his complaints disappeared. After treatment, approximately 4 years later, control MRI showed thickened and hypointense tendon in all images. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison between tenocutaneous suture and Kessler suture techniques in treating acute closed Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wen-Ge; Li, Huan; Zhu, Ya-Ping; Liu, Zhi-wei

    2014-06-01

    To compare the effectiveness of tenocutaneous suture and conventional Kessler suture techniques in treating acute closed Achilles tendon rupture. A total of 33 patients with acute closed Achilles tendon rupture who were admitted to our hospital from February 1998 to December 2008 underwent repair with either a tenocutaneous suture or Kessler suture technique. All patients were followed up for 1-5 years (mean, 3 years). According to the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot scale, the excellence rate was 91% in the Kessler suture group and 98% in the tenocutaneous suture group, with a significant difference between groups. Our tenocutaneous suture technique is an effective method for treating Achilles tendon rupture. It has certain advantages compared with the conventional incision method and is worthy of wide clinical application. Copyright © 2014 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Outcomes of acute Achilles tendon rupture repair with bone marrow aspirate concentrate augmentation.

    PubMed

    Stein, Benjamin E; Stroh, David Alex; Schon, Lew C

    2015-05-01

    Optimal treatment of acute Achilles tendon ruptures remains controversial. Positive results using stem-cell-bearing concentrates have been reported with other soft-tissue repairs, but no studies exist on outcomes of bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC) augmentation in primary Achilles tendon repair. We reviewed patients with sport-related Achilles tendon ruptures treated via open repair augmented with BMAC injection from 2009 to 2011. Data on operative complications, strength, range of motion, rerupture, calf circumference and functional improvement through progressive return to sport and the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) were analysed. A total of 27 patients (28 tendons) treated with open repair and BMAC injection were identified (mean age 38.3 ± 9.6 years). At mean follow-up of 29.7 ± 6.1 months, there were no reruptures. Walking without a boot was at 1.8 ± 0.7 months, participation in light activity was at 3.4 ± 1.8 months and 92% (25 of 27) of patients returned to their sport at 5.9 ± 1.8 months. Mean ATRS at final follow-up was 91 (range 72-100) points. One case of superficial wound dehiscence healed with local wound care. No soft-tissue masses, bone formation or tumors were observed in the operative extremity. Excellent results, including no re-ruptures and early mobilisation, were observed in this small cohort with open Achilles tendon repair augmented by BMAC. No adverse outcomes of biologic treatment were observed with this protocol. The efficacy of BMAC in the operative repair of acute Achilles tendon ruptures warrants further study. IV - Therapeutic.

  16. Minimally invasive flexor hallucis longus transfer in management of acute achilles tendon rupture associated with tendinosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2012-04-01

    Chronic tendinopathy is characterized by pain in the tendon, generally at the start and completion of exercise. However, tendinosis may lead to decreased blood flow, increased stiffness of the tendon and reduced tensile strength, and predispose to rupture. Operative treatment is indicated to restore the function of the Achilles tendon and alleviate the prerupture heel cord pain. A case of acute Achilles tendon rupture with extensive tendinosis that was successfully treated with minimally invasive flexor hallucis longus transfer is reported.

  17. Acute achilles tendon ruptures: incidence of injury and surgery in Sweden between 2001 and 2012.

    PubMed

    Huttunen, Tuomas T; Kannus, Pekka; Rolf, Christer; Felländer-Tsai, Li; Mattila, Ville M

    2014-10-01

    Population-based incidence rates and trends of acute Achilles tendon ruptures are not known. It is also not known whether recent high-quality randomized controlled trials not favoring surgery have had an effect on treatment protocols. To assess the incidence of acute Achilles tendon ruptures in Sweden and to examine the trends in surgical treatment. Descriptive epidemiology study. We conducted a nationwide registry-based study including all adult (≥18 years of age) inpatient and outpatient hospital visits because of an acute Achilles tendon rupture in Sweden between 2001 and 2012. We identified a total of 27,702 patients (21,979 men, 79%) with acute Achilles tendon ruptures between 2001 and 2012. In 2001, the sex-specific incidence of acute Achilles tendon ruptures was 47.0 (per 100,000 person-years) in men and 12.0 in women. In 2012, the corresponding values were 55.2 in men and 14.7 in women, with an increase of 17% in men and 22% in women. The proportion of surgically treated patients declined from 43% in 2001 to 28% in 2012 in men and from 34% in 2001 to 22% in 2012 in women. The incidence of acute Achilles tendon ruptures in Sweden is increasing. The most probable reason for this increase is the rise in the number of older adults participating in high-demand sports. The proportion of surgically treated patients is decreasing most likely because of recent high-quality randomized controlled trials and their meta-analyses supporting similar results between surgical and nonsurgical approaches. © 2014 The Author(s).

  18. The seasonal variation of Achilles tendon ruptures in Vancouver, Canada: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Scott, Alex; Grewal, Navdeep; Guy, Pierre

    2014-02-11

    To examine the seasonal distribution of tendon ruptures in a large cohort of patients from Vancouver, Canada. Retrospective chart review. Acute Achilles tendon rupture cases that occurred from 1987 to 2010 at an academic hospital in Vancouver, Canada. Information was extracted from an orthopaedic database. No direct contact was made with the participants. The following information was extracted from the OrthoTrauma database: age, sex, date of injury and season (winter, spring, summer and autumn), date of surgery if date of injury was unknown and type of injury (sport related or non-sport related/unspecified). Only acute Achilles tendon rupture cases were included; chronic cases were excluded along with those that were conservatively managed. The primary outcome was to determine the seasonal pattern of Achilles tendon rupture. Secondary outcomes, such as differences in gender and mechanism of sport (non-sport vs sport related), were also assessed. There were 543 cases in total; 83% of the cases were men (average age 39.3) and 17% were women (average age 37.3). In total, 76% of cases were specified as sport related. The distribution of injuries varied significantly across seasons (χ(2), p<0.05), with significantly more cases occurring in spring. The increase in the number of cases in spring was due to sport-related injuries, whereas non-sport-related cases were distributed evenly throughout the year. The seasonality of sport-related Achilles tendon ruptures should be considered when developing preventive strategies and when timing their delivery.

  19. Outcome evaluation after Achilles tendon ruptures. A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    SPENNACCHIO, PIETRO; VASCELLARI, ALBERTO; CUCCHI, DAVIDE; CANATA, GIAN LUIGI; RANDELLI, PIETRO

    2016-01-01

    The optimal treatment and the best rehabilitation protocol after an acute Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) remain a matter of controversy in orthopaedic and sports medicine. The use of validated injury-specific outcome instruments is the only way to clarify these issues, in order to ensure that patients receive the best possible treatment. This article describes the most commonly reported outcome measures used to assess patients treated for ATR. On the basis of the available evidence, the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) is the most appropriate outcome measure for evaluating the management of acute ATR. PMID:27386448

  20. Surgery in the Standing Position by a Surgeon with Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    PubMed

    Yasuhara, Takao; Kuwahara, Ken; Sasada, Susumu; Toyoshima, Atsuhiko; Morimoto, Jun; Kin, Kyohei; Manabe, Hiroaki; Miyoshi, Yasuyuki; Kusumegi, Akira; Takahashi, Yuichi; Ito, Kiyoshi; Date, Isao

    2016-12-01

    Unexpected injuries can have a profound effect on a surgeon's performance and thus on patients and surgical departments. Here we describe a technique for performing surgery in the standing position, as done by a surgeon with an Achilles tendon rupture. During his prescribed 45-day non-weight-bearing period for the left ankle after surgery for an Achilles tendon rupture, the surgeon was able to participate in 15 surgeries as an operator or assistant, due to his use of a combination of injured-leg genuflection on a stool and a 'Surgical Body Support' device. Similarly injured surgeons may benefit from such support.

  1. Acute Ultrasonography Investigation to Predict Reruptures and Outcomes in Patients With an Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    PubMed

    Westin, Olof; Nilsson Helander, Katarina; Grävare Silbernagel, Karin; Möller, Michael; Kälebo, Peter; Karlsson, Jón

    2016-10-01

    The optimal treatment for acute Achilles tendon ruptures is still an ongoing debate. Acute ultrasonography (US) investigation to measure the diastasis between the tendon ends has previously been used to classify acute Achilles tendon ruptures; however, no study has used US to predict reruptures and functional outcomes. To investigate whether acute US can be used to predict the risk of reruptures and outcomes after treatment of an acute Achilles tendon rupture. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Forty-five patients (37 men, 8 women) with a mean age of 39 ± 9.2 years (range, 23-59 years) from a cohort of 97 patients participating in a randomized controlled study comparing surgical and nonsurgical treatment were included. US was performed within 72 hours from the index injury. Diastasis between the tendon ends was documented. Reruptures were documented, and the patients' functional outcomes were measured 12 months after injury. Patients with a diastasis of >10 mm treated nonsurgically had a higher degree of rerupture. In the nonsurgically treated group, 3 of 4 patients with a diastasis of >10 mm suffered from rerupture (P < .001). Moreover, in the nonsurgical group, there was significantly worse outcomes in patients with a diastasis of >5 mm in terms of patient-reported outcomes using the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) (P = .004) and heel-rise height at 12 months (P = .048) compared with the group with a lesser degree of tendon separation. US may be a useful tool to predict the risk of rerupture and greater degree of functional deficit. It may be an important measure in a clinical treatment algorithm for deciding whether a patient will benefit from surgical intervention after an acute Achilles tendon rupture.

  2. Ultrasonographic Classification of Achilles Tendon Ruptures as a Rationale for Individual Treatment Selection

    PubMed Central

    Amlang, Michael H.; Zwipp, Hans; Friedrich, Adina; Peaden, Adam; Bunk, Alfred; Rammelt, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. This work introduces a distinct sonographic classification of Achilles tendon ruptures which has proven itself to be a reliable instrument for an individualized and differentiated therapy selection for patients who have suffered an Achilles tendon rupture. Materials and Methods. From January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2005, 273 patients who suffered from a complete subcutaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon (ASR) were clinically and sonographically evaluated. The sonographic classification was organized according to the location of the rupture, the contact of the tendon ends, and the structure of the interposition between the tendon ends. Results. In 266 of 273 (97.4%) patients the sonographic classification of the rupture of the Achilles tendon was recorded. Type 1 was detected in 54 patients (19.8%), type 2a in 68 (24.9%), type 2b in 33 (12.1%), type 3a in 20 (7.3%), type 3b in 61 (22.3%), type 4 in 20 (7.3%), and type 5 in 10 (3.7%). Of the patients with type 1 and fresh ASR, 96% (n = 47) were treated nonoperative-functionally, and 4% (n = 2) were treated by percutaneous suture with the Dresden instrument (pDI suture). Of the patients classified as type 2a with fresh ASR, 31 patients (48%) were treated nonoperatively-functionally and 33 patients (52%) with percutaneous suture with the Dresden instrument (pDI suture). Of the patients with type 3b and fresh ASR, 94% (n = 34) were treated by pDI suture and 6% (n = 2) by open suture according to Kirchmayr and Kessler. Conclusion. Unlike the clinical classification of the Achilles tendon rupture, the sonographic classification is a guide for deriving a graded and differentiated therapy from a broad spectrum of treatments. PMID:24977069

  3. Achilles tendon rupture: physiotherapy and endoscopy-assisted surgical treatment of a common sports injury.

    PubMed

    Doral, Mahmut Nedim; Bozkurt, Murat; Turhan, Egemen; Dönmez, Gürhan; Demirel, Murat; Kaya, Defne; Ateşok, Kıvanç; Atay, Ozgür Ahmet; Maffulli, Nicola

    2010-12-13

    Although the Achilles tendon (AT) is the strongest tendon in the human body, rupture of this tendon is one of the most common sports injuries in the athletic population. Despite numerous nonoperative and operative methods that have been described, there is no universal agreement about the optimal management strategy of acute total AT ruptures. The management of AT ruptures should aim to minimize the morbidity of the injury, optimize rapid return to full function, and prevent complications. Since endoscopy-assisted percutaneous AT repair allows direct visualization of the synovia and protects the paratenon that is important in biological healing of the AT, this technique becomes a reasonable treatment option in AT ruptures. Furthermore, Achilles tendoscopy technique may decrease the complications about the sural nerve. Also, early functional postoperative physiotherapy following surgery may improve the surgical outcomes.

  4. Achilles tendon rupture: physiotherapy and endoscopy-assisted surgical treatment of a common sports injury

    PubMed Central

    Doral, Mahmut Nedim; Bozkurt, Murat; Turhan, Egemen; Dönmez, Gürhan; Demirel, Murat; Kaya, Defne; Ateşok, Kıvanç; Atay, Özgür Ahmet; Maffulli, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    Although the Achilles tendon (AT) is the strongest tendon in the human body, rupture of this tendon is one of the most common sports injuries in the athletic population. Despite numerous nonoperative and operative methods that have been described, there is no universal agreement about the optimal management strategy of acute total AT ruptures. The management of AT ruptures should aim to minimize the morbidity of the injury, optimize rapid return to full function, and prevent complications. Since endoscopy-assisted percutaneous AT repair allows direct visualization of the synovia and protects the paratenon that is important in biological healing of the AT, this technique becomes a reasonable treatment option in AT ruptures. Furthermore, Achilles tendoscopy technique may decrease the complications about the sural nerve. Also, early functional postoperative physiotherapy following surgery may improve the surgical outcomes. PMID:24198562

  5. A Case of Heel Cord Pain After Repair of Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture: Treated by Endoscopic Adhesiolysis of the Achilles Tendon.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-10-01

    The causes of heel cord pain after repair of acute rupture of the Achilles tendon are unclear. The proposed etiologies include nonabsorbable suture granuloma formation, alteration of the pain receptors threshold in the tendon, and distension of the paratenon by the hypertrophied tendon, underlying tendinopathy, postrepair neovascularization, and peritendinous fibrous adhesion. We present an endoscopic technique of adhesiolysis of the Achilles tendon to deal with the various possible causes of postrepair heel cord pain. Therapeutic, Level 4: Case report. © 2015 The Author(s).

  6. Early motion for Achilles tendon ruptures: is surgery important? A randomized, prospective study.

    PubMed

    Twaddle, Bruce C; Poon, Peter

    2007-12-01

    Comparisons of surgically and nonsurgically treated Achilles tendon ruptures have demonstrated that those treated with surgery allow earlier motion and tend to show superior results. However, early motion enhances tendon healing with or without surgery and may be the important factor in optimizing outcomes in patients with Achilles tendon rupture. There is no difference in the outcome of acute Achilles tendon rupture treated nonoperatively or operatively if controlled early motion is allowed as part of the rehabilitation program. Randomized, controlled clinical trial; Level of evidence, 1. Patients with acute rupture of the Achilles tendon were randomized to surgery or no surgery, with both groups receiving early motion controlled in a removable orthosis, progressing to full weightbearing at 8 weeks from treatment. Both groups were followed prospectively for 12 months with measurements of range of motion, calf circumference, and the Musculoskeletal Functional Assessment Instrument (MFAI) outcome score; any reruptures and any complications were noted. Both groups were comparable for age and sex. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in plantar flexion, dorsiflexion, calf circumference, or the MFAI scores measured at 2, 8, 12, 26, or 52 weeks. One patient in each group was noncompliant and required surgical rerepair of the tendon. There were no differences in complications and a similar low number of reruptures in both groups. This study supports early motion as an acceptable form of rehabilitation in both surgically and nonsurgically treated patients with comparable functional results and a low rerupture rate. There appears to be no difference between the 2 groups, suggesting that controlled early motion is the important part of treatment of ruptured Achilles tendon.

  7. Percutaneous, Minimally Invasive Repair of Traumatic and Simultaneous Rupture of Both Achilles Tendons: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Zietek, Pawel; Karaczun, Maciej; Kruk, Bartosz; Szczypior, Karina

    2016-01-01

    Achilles injury is a common musculoskeletal disorder. Bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendon, however, is much less common and usually occurs spontaneously. Complete, traumatic, and bilateral ruptures are rare and typically require long periods of immobilization before the patient can return to full weightbearing. A 52-year-old male was hospitalized for bilateral traumatic rupture to both Achilles tendons. No risk factors for tendon rupture were found. Blood samples revealed no peripheral blood pathologic features. Both tendons were repaired with percutaneous, minimally invasive surgery using the Achillon(®) tendon suture system. Rehabilitation was begun 4 weeks later. An ankle-foot orthosis was prescribed to provide ankle support with an adjustable range of movement, and active plantar flexion was set at 0° to 30°. The patient remained non-weightbearing with the ankle-foot orthosis device and performed active range-of-motion exercises. At 8 weeks after surgery, we recommended that he begin walking with partial weightbearing using a foot-tibial orthosis with the range of motion set to 45° plantar flexion and 15° dorsiflexion. At 10 weeks postoperatively, he was encouraged to return to full weightbearing on both feet. Beginning rehabilitation as soon as possible after minimally invasive surgery, compared with 6 weeks of immobilization after surgery, provided a rapid resumption to full weightbearing. We emphasize the clinical importance of a safe, simple treatment program that can be followed for a patient with damage to the Achilles tendons. To our knowledge, ours is the first report of minimally invasive repair of bilateral simultaneous traumatic rupture of the Achilles tendon. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Rehabilitation of Achilles tendon ruptures: is early functional rehabilitation daily routine?

    PubMed

    Frankewycz, B; Krutsch, W; Weber, J; Ernstberger, A; Nerlich, M; Pfeifer, Christian G

    2017-03-01

    Ruptures of the Achilles tendon are the most common tendon injuries of the lower extremities. Besides the initial operative or non-operative treatment, rehabilitation of patients plays a crucial role for tendon healing and long-term outcome. As only limited evidence is available for optimized rehabilitation regimen and guidelines for the initial (e.g., first 6 weeks) rehabilitation are limited, this study investigated the current rehabilitation concepts after Achilles tendon rupture. We analyzed 213 written rehabilitation protocols that are provided by orthopedic and trauma surgery institutions throughout Germany in terms of recommendations for weight-bearing, range of motion (ROM), physiotherapy, and choice of orthosis. All protocols for operatively and non-operatively treated Achilles tendon ruptures were included. Descriptive analysis was carried out and statistical analysis applied where appropriate. Of 213 institutions, 204 offered rehabilitation protocols for Achilles tendon rupture and, therefore, 243 protocols for operative and non-operative treatment could be analyzed. While the majority of protocols allowed increased weight-bearing over time, significant differences were found for durations of fixed plantar flexion between operative (o) and non-operative (n) treatments [fixed 30° (or 20)° to 15° (or 10)°: 3.6 weeks (±0.1; o) vs 4.7 weeks (±0.3; n) (p ≤ 0.0001) and fixed 15° (or 10)° to 0°: 5.8 weeks (±0.1; o) vs 6.6 weeks (±0.2; n) (p ≤ 0.001)]. The mean time of the recommended start of physiotherapy is at 2.9 weeks (±0.2; o) vs 3.3 weeks (±0.4; n), respectively. Our study shows that a huge variability in rehabilitation after Achilles tendon rupture exists. This study shows different strategies in rehabilitation of Achilles tendon ruptures using a convertible vacuum brace system. To improve patient care, further clinical as well as biomechanical studies need to be conducted. This study might serve as basis for prospective

  9. Augmented Repair of an Achilles Tendon Rupture Using the Flexor Digitorum Lateralis Tendon in a Toy Poodle.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Masaaki

    2016-11-01

    To report appositional augmentation of Achilles tendon rupture in a toy breed dog with an intact flexor digitorum lateralis (FDL) muscle tendon. Clinical case report. Two-year-old spayed female Toy Poodle with Achilles tendon rupture. The Achilles tendon was accidentally ruptured by hair clippers during grooming. The dog demonstrated a plantigrade stance without digital flexion of the right hind limb. The ruptured gastrocnemius and superficial digital flexor tendons were sutured to their respective cut ends using a simple locking loop pattern under a surgical microscope. The repair site was appositionally augmented by the caudally retracted intact FDL. An aluminum splint was applied on the plantar aspect to immobilize the tarsal joint for the first 2 weeks, after which a soft bandage was applied for another 2 weeks. At the 7 month follow-up no lameness was detected during walking and no complications associated with decreased FDL function such as digital contracture were observed. The range of motion of the tarsal joint had improved and could be flexed to ∼60° and extended fully. Use of the FDL is feasible for augmenting Achilles tendon repair in toy breed dogs. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  10. Achilles Tendonitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... up. Tight calf muscles or muscles that lack flexibility decrease a person's range of motion and put an extra strain on the tendon. Running or exercising on a hard or uneven surface or doing lunges or plyometrics without adequate training. A traumatic injury to the Achilles tendon. How ...

  11. [Repair of Achilles tendon rupture and early rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Delgado-Brambila, H A; Cristiani, D G; Tinajero, E C; Burgos-Elías, V

    2012-01-01

    The frequency of Achilles tendon tear has increased worldwide. Several factors have been described that help explain the mechanism of injury. The treatment of choice continues to be surgery; conservative treatment is reserved for patients with a high morbidity and mortality. Surgical treatment consists of an open or percutaneous technique. In both modalities we try to achieve prompt mobilization of the operated tendon to obtain better and quicker healing. This prospective study describes our experience with 35 patients enrolled from February 2004 to August 2010. They were treated with open repair, physical rehabilitation and active ankle mobilization before the second postoperative week, and with colchicine. We obtained satisfactory results. Patients recovered complete mobility approximately at postoperative week 6, and from weeks 8 to 10 they could resume their daily work activities and participate in sports and recreational activities. Patients were assessed according to the ATRS classification to measure their clinical results. We had no infections or other major complications. We conclude that the open surgical repair of Achilles tendon tear, prompt mobility, and colchicine provide good results.

  12. Reconstruction of Kuwada grade IV chronic achilles tendon rupture by minimally invasive technique

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Xudong; Wu, Yongping; Tao, Huimin; Yang, Disheng; Huang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Transfer of a flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon can not only reconstruct the Achilles tendon but also provide ischemic tendinous tissues with a rich blood supply to enhance wound healing. This retrospective study aims to investigate clinical outcomes in patients who underwent repair of Kuwada grade IV chronic Achilles tendon rupture with long hallucis longus tendons harvested using a minimally invasive technique. Materials and Methods: 35 patients who were treated for Kuwada grade IV Achilles tendon injuries from July 2006 to June 2011 were included in this retrospective study. The age ranged between 23 and 71 years. The duration from primary injury to surgery ranged from 29 days to 34 months (mean value, 137.6 days). All 35 patients had difficulties in lifting their calves. Thirty two were followed up for a mean 32.2 months (range 18–72 months), whereas three were lost to followup. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed that the tendon rupture gap ranged from 6.0 to 9.2 cm. During surgery, a 2.0 cm minor incision was made vertically in the medial plantar side of the midfoot, and a 1.5 cm minor transverse incision was made in the plantar side of the interphalangeal articulation of the great toe to harvest the FHL tendon, and the tendon was fixed to the calcaneus with suture anchors. Postoperative appearance and function were evaluated by physiotherapists based American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society-ankle and hindfoot score (AOFAS-AH), and Leppilahti Achilles tendon ratings. Results: Results were assessed in 32 patients. Except for one patient who suffered complications because of wound disruption 10 days after the operation, all other patients had primary wound healing, with 28 of 32 able to go up on their toes at last followup. The AOFAS-AH score was increased from preoperative (51.92 ± 7.08) points to (92.56 ± 6.71) points; Leppilahti Achilles tendon score was increased from preoperative (72.56 ± 7.43) to (92.58 ± 5.1). There were

  13. Ultrasound-guided minimally invasive surgery for achilles tendon rupture: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen-Chie; Chen, Pei-Yu; Wang, Ting-Ming; Wang, Chung-Li

    2012-07-01

    Many surgeons prefer surgical repair for Achilles tendon ruptures in an attempt to reduce the risk of rerupture. To minimize wound complications, the use of minimally invasive surgery has become more popular recently. In line with this, the use of ultrasound to guide Achilles tendon repair is reported in this study. From March 2005 to January 2008, 23 patients with Achilles tendon rupture were repaired by the same surgeon. The ages of the patients ranged from 19 to 67 years old, with an average of 43 years old. The repair of the Achilles tendon was achieved through a stab wound under the guidance of ultrasonography. A control group consisted of 25 patients who received traditional open Achilles tendon repair. The average operation time was 52 minutes, and the average wound size was 1.1 cm. The short leg cast was removed 4 weeks after the surgery, and serial casting was used for another 3 to 4 weeks. The postoperative AOFAS ankle-hindfoot scores were 98.7 in the experimental group, 96.5 in the control group with no significant difference. The rates of local infection, stiffness of the ankle, pain of the scar and sural nerve injury were better in the experimental group than in the control group with significant difference. Ultrasound-guided surgery was a good choice due to its availability and real-time soft tissue visualization. It can further minimize the size of the surgical wound. Our method has the potential to achieve reliable results.

  14. New technical procedure involving Achilles tendon rupture treatment through transcutaneous suture.

    PubMed

    TarniŢă, DănuŢ Nicolae; TarniŢă, Daniela; Grecu, Dan Cristian; Calafeteanu, Dan Marian; Căpitănescu, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    The Achilles tendon is the widest tendon of the human body. Achilles tendon belongs to the extrasynovial tendons group and this allows it a faster recovery, thanks to local hematoma from the peritenon, necessary for the scarification. We concluded that in Achilles tendon rupture treatment it is essential to maintain the tendon covering skin integrity, the peritendinous integrity, to maintain the local hematoma formed during and after tendon rupture, reattaching the ruptured tendon heads and maintain them in this position by suturing them and by relaxing the sural triceps muscle. The percutaneous suture requires five pairs of mirror micro-incisions (5 mm) on one side and the other of the tendon. It is necessary for one of the pairs to be placed to the rupture level. With a surgical needle, we arm the proximal and distal heads of the tendon by different threads. By traction and muscular relaxation, we bring in contact the two ruptured heads and then we knot together the arming threads. The inferior member was cast immobilized in relaxing position for the sural triceps muscle for a 45 days period. Using this technique, we have operated 15 cases in our Clinic. In all the cases, we obtained a healing by first intention of the tegument micro-incisions. After the cast immobilization suppression, during 30 days the patients were in a recovery program. At the end of this program, they have recovered completely the dorsal and plantar flexion and the walking. In four months after the surgery, the esthetic of the area is completely restored, this technique being the only surgical technique that realizes this recovery.

  15. Epidemiology of Achilles tendon ruptures: increasing incidence over a 33-year period.

    PubMed

    Lantto, I; Heikkinen, J; Flinkkilä, T; Ohtonen, P; Leppilahti, J

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the epidemiology of total Achilles tendon ruptures and complication rates after operative and nonoperative treatments over a 33-year period in Oulu, Finland. Patients with Achilles tendon ruptures from 1979 to 2011 in Oulu were identified from hospital patient records. Demographic data, treatment method, and complications were collected retrospectively from medical records. Overall and sex- and age-specific incidence rates were calculated with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The overall incidence per 100,000 person-years increased from 2.1 (95% CI 0.3-7.7) in 1979 to 21.5 (95% CI 14.6-30.6) in 2011. The incidence increased in all age groups. The mean annual increase in incidence was 2.4% (95% CI 1.3-4.7) higher for non-sports-related ruptures than for sports-related ruptures (P = 0.036). The incidence of sports-related ruptures increased during the second 11-year period whereas the incidence of non-sports-related ruptures increased steadily over the entire study period. Infection was four times more common after operative treatment compared with nonoperative treatment, re-rupture rates were similar. The incidence of Achilles tendon ruptures increased in all age groups over a 33-year period. Increases were mainly due to sports-related injuries in the second 11-year period and non-sports-related injuries in the last 11-year period. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Acute Achilles tendon rupture: a questionnaire follow-up of 487 patients.

    PubMed

    Bergkvist, Dan; Åström, Ingrid; Josefsson, Per-Olof; Dahlberg, Leif E

    2012-07-03

    The optimum treatment of acute total Achilles tendon rupture remains controversial. In the present study, the outcomes of surgical and nonsurgical treatment in a large number of patients were compared on the basis of patient age and sex. The records of all 487 patients with an acute total Achilles tendon rupture that had occurred between 2002 and 2006 and had been treated at one of two university hospitals in Sweden were manually reviewed. Surgical treatment was primarily used at Hospital 1, whereas nonoperative functional treatment was primarily used at Hospital 2. At one to seven years after the rupture, the majority of the patients were evaluated for complications, the Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score was calculated, a heel-raise test was performed, and calf circumference was measured. The outcomes of surgical and nonsurgical treatment were compared on the basis of patient age and sex. The mean age at the time of the injury was forty-five years. In the surgical treatment group at Hospital 1, six (3%) of 201 patients had a re-rupture and three (1.5%) had an infection. In the nonsurgical treatment group at Hospital 2, the rate of re-rupture rate was 6.6% (fifteen of 227). When the results for the surgical treatment group at Hospital 1 were compared with those for the nonsurgical treatment group at Hospital 2, there was no significant difference in terms of the mean Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (81.7 compared with 78.9; p = 0.1), but both the difference in the heel-raise test (p = 0.01) and the difference in calf circumference (1.4 compared with 2.0 cm; p = 0.01) reached significance in favor of surgery. Nonsurgically managed female patients showed significant worsening of the Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score and heel-raise test with increasing age at the time of injury. The good Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score in the nonsurgically managed group, together with the relatively low rate of re-ruptures and other complications in these patients, makes

  17. [No influence of physiotherapy on outcome after open repair of achilles tendon ruptures?].

    PubMed

    Ateschrang, A; Gratzer, C; Rolauffs, B; Glatzle, J; Weise, K; Braun, A

    2008-12-01

    Many studies have been performed to analyse the influence of surgical techniques and the postoperative aftercare after Achilles tendon ruptures on the outcome. However, there is no study investigating the influence of physiotherapy on outcome after surgical repair and standardised early functional rehabilitation of Achilles tendon rupture, so that this was the objective of the present study. In this retrospective study, 104 patients with Achilles tendon ruptures, all treated by open repair followed by a standardised early rehabilitation, were evaluated by the Thermann score. The average age was 42 years. We could identify 3 patient groups. Group I (n=23) did not receive any physiotherapy. Group II (n=41) received physiotherapy for 3-6 weeks, and group III (n=40) received more than 6 weeks of physiotherapy. Physiotherapy consisted of 3 units per week. Each unit lasted for 30 min. All groups were compared statistically via variance analysis. Group I scored on average 88.8 points, group II 88.6 and group III 87.0 points. There were no statistically significant differences between the three groups (p=0.50). The age of patients had also no relevant influence on the outcome (p=0.48). Physiotherapy and age of the patients involved were not found to influence the outcome after open augmented repair of Achilles tendon ruptures followed by a standardised early rehabilitation. These results should be confirmed by a prospective randomised trial. Also elderly patients participating in demanding sport activities should receive a surgical repair.

  18. Clinical assessment is sufficient to allow outcome evaluation following surgical management of Achilles tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Todorov, Atanas; Schaub, Frederic; Blanke, Fabian; Heisterbach, Patricia; Sachser, Franciska; Gösele, Andreas; Majewski, Martin

    2015-01-01

    cross-sectional study in otherwise healthy athletic adults with a unilateral Achilles tendon rupture. define the relationships of active range of motion, calf circumference or number of heel raises to a full set of isokinetic parameters. Achilles tendon ruptures commonly occur during sports and create a considerable amount of morbidity. The benefits of different treatments are difficult to determine. Complex and expensive isokinetic testing is often required. If a simple force measurement could replace this testing, large clinical trials would be more easily feasible. 74 patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture and surgical treatment were evaluated retrospectively. Active range of motion (ROM), ratio of ROM, number of heel raises, ratio of heel raises, calf circumference and isokintetic measurements were recorded. Regression using a Bayesian elastic net showed the most important correlations. Active range of motion showed a significant correlation to peak torque angle at flexion and extension as well as increased sports activity. There was a negative correlation to percutaneous therapy. Active Heel raise showed a positive correlation to peak torque at dorsal extension and increased sports activity as well as a negative correlation to high postoperative pain, where as calf circumference was positive correlated to peak torque at dorsal extension and body height as well as negative correlated to female gender. device independent measures, like range of Motion, and amount of Heel raise, are an excellent tool providing similar information compared to isokinetic testing and could be used to evaluate clinical outcome after Achilles tendon rupture.

  19. Achilles tendon: US examination

    SciTech Connect

    Fornage, B.D.

    1986-06-01

    Real-time ultrasonography (US) using linear-array probes and a stand-off pad as a ''waterpath'' was performed to evaluate the Achilles tendon in 67 patients (including 24 athletes) believed to have acute or chronic traumatic or inflammatory pathologic conditions. Tendons in 23 patients appeared normal on US scans. The 44 abnormal tendons comprised five complete and four partial ruptures, seven instances of postoperative change, and 28 cases of tendonitis. US depiction of the inner structure of the tendon resulted in the diagnosis of focal abnormalities, including partial ruptures, nodules, and calcifications. Tendonitis was characterized by enlargement and decreased echogenicity of the tendon. The normal US appearance of the Achilles tendon is described.

  20. Positional effects of the knee and ankle on the ends of acute Achilles tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Wray, Walter H; Regan, Conor; Patel, Sagar; May, Ryan; Parekh, Selene G

    2009-10-01

    Conservative management of acute Achilles tendon ruptures in a plantarflexed short leg cast or functional brace is a viable alternative to surgery. The ideal plantarflexion angle to allow the free ends of the tendon to oppose one another has not been clearly defined. The purpose of this cadaveric study was to define a plantarflexion angle where the free Achilles tendon ends reliably oppose one another. Ten cadaveric legs amputated at the distal femur were obtained. A laceration of the Achilles tendon was made 4 cm above the calcaneal insertion. A joint-spanning external fixator was placed across the knee. With differing degrees of knee flexion (0, 45, and 90 degrees), the diastasis between the free ends of the Achilles tendon was measured as the ankle was moved from 20 degrees of dorsiflexion to 30 degrees of plantarflexion (-20, -10, neutral, 10, 20, and 30 degrees). Regardless of knee flexion angle, the ankle plantarflexion angle where the free ends of the Achilles tendon opposed one another was 28.0 (95% confidence interval: 25.0-33.6) degrees. The ideal ankle angle in which to immobilize patients appears tightly clustered around 28 degrees of plantarflexion.

  1. Subject-specific finite element analysis to characterize the influence of geometry and material properties in Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Shim, Vickie B; Fernandez, Justin W; Gamage, Prasad B; Regnery, Camille; Smith, David W; Gardiner, Bruce S; Lloyd, David G; Besier, Thor F

    2014-11-28

    Achilles tendon injuries including rupture are one of the most frequent musculoskeletal injuries, but the mechanisms for these injuries are still not fully understood. Previous in vivo and experimental studies suggest that tendon rupture mainly occurs in the tendon mid-section and predominantly more in men than women due to reasons yet to be identified. Therefore we aimed to investigate possible mechanisms for tendon rupture using finite element (FE) analysis. Specifically, we have developed a framework for generating subject-specific FE models of human Achilles tendon. A total of ten 3D FE models of human Achilles tendon were generated. Subject-specific geometries were obtained using ultrasound images and a mesh morphing technique called Free Form Deformation. Tendon material properties were obtained by performing material optimization that compared and minimized difference in uniaxial tension experimental results with model predictions. Our results showed that both tendon geometry and material properties are highly subject-specific. This subject-specificity was also evident in our rupture predictions as the locations and loads of tendon ruptures were different in all specimens tested. A parametric study was performed to characterize the influence of geometries and material properties on tendon rupture. Our results showed that tendon rupture locations were dependent largely on geometry while rupture loads were more influenced by tendon material properties. Future work will investigate the role of microstructural properties of the tissue on tendon rupture and degeneration by using advanced material descriptions.

  2. Functional outcomes of conservatively managed acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, J E; Nasr, P; Fountain, D M; Berman, L; Robinson, A H N

    2017-01-01

    This prospective cohort study aims to determine if the size of the tendon gap following acute rupture of the Achilles tendon shows an association with the functional outcome following non-operative treatment. All patients presenting within two weeks of an acute unilateral rupture of the Achilles tendon between July 2012 and July 2015 were considered for the study. In total, 38 patients (nine female, 29 male, mean age 52 years; 29 to 78) completed the study. Dynamic ultrasound examination was performed to confirm the diagnosis and measure the gap between ruptured tendon ends. Outcome was assessed using dynamometric testing of plantarflexion and the Achilles tendon Total Rupture score (ATRS) six months after the completion of a rehabilitation programme. Patients with a gap ≥ 10 mm with the ankle in the neutral position had significantly greater peak torque deficit than those with gaps < 10 mm (mean 23.3%; 7% to 52% vs 14.3%; 0% to 47%, p = 0.023). However, there was no difference in ATRS between the two groups (mean score 87.2; 74 to 100 vs 87.4; 68 to 97, p = 0.467). There was no significant correlation between gap size and torque deficit (τ = 0.103), suggesting a non-linear relationship. There was also no significant correlation between ATRS and peak torque deficit (τ = -0.305). This is the first study to identify an association between tendon gap and functional outcome in acute rupture of the Achilles tendon. We have identified 10 mm as a gap size at which deficits in plantarflexion strength become significantly greater, however, the precise relationship between gap size and plantarflexion strength remains unclear. Large, multicentre studies will be needed to clarify this relationship and identify population subgroups in whom deficits in peak torque are reflected in patient-reported outcome measures. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:87-93. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  3. The management of chronic rupture of the Achilles tendon: minimally invasive peroneus brevis tendon transfer.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, N; Oliva, F; Costa, V; Del Buono, A

    2015-03-01

    We hypothesised that a minimally invasive peroneus brevis tendon transfer would be effective for the management of a chronic rupture of the Achilles tendon. In 17 patients (three women, 14 men) who underwent minimally invasive transfer and tenodesis of the peroneus brevis to the calcaneum, at a mean follow-up of 4.6 years (2 to 7) the modified Achilles tendon total rupture score (ATRS) was recorded and the maximum circumference of the calf of the operated and contralateral limbs was measured. The strength of isometric plantar flexion of the gastrocsoleus complex and of eversion of the ankle were measured bilaterally. Functional outcomes were classified according to the four-point Boyden scale. At the latest review, the mean maximum circumference of the calf of the operated limb was not significantly different from the pre-operative mean value, (41.4 cm, 32 to 50 vs 40.6 cm, 33 to 46; p = 0.45), and not significantly less than that of the contralateral limb (43.1 cm, 35 to 52; p = 0.16). The mean peak torque (244.6 N, 125 to 367) and the strength of eversion of the operated ankle (149.1 N, 65 to 240) were significantly lower (p < 0.01) than those of the contralateral limb (mean peak torque 289, 145 to 419; strength of eversion: 175.2, 71 to 280). The mean ATRS significantly improved from 58 pre-operatively (35 to 68) to 91 (75 to 97; 95% confidence interval 85.3 to 93.2) at the time of final review. Of 13 patients who practised sport at the time of injury, ten still undertook recreational activities. This procedure may be safely performed, is minimally invasive, and allows most patients to return to pre-injury sport and daily activities. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  4. Less invasive Achilles tendon reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Carmont, Michael R; Maffulli, Nicola

    2007-10-26

    The optimal management of chronic ruptures of the Achilles tendon is surgical reconstruction. Reconstruction of the Achilles tendon using peroneus brevis has been widely reported. Classically, these procedures involve relatively long surgical wounds in a relatively hypovascular area which is susceptible to wound breakdown. We describe our current method of peroneus brevis reconstruction for the Achilles tendon using two para-midline incisions. This technique allows reconstruction of the Achilles tendon using peroneus brevis preserving skin integrity over the site most prone to wound breakdown, and can be especially used to reconstruct the Achilles tendon in the presence of previous surgery.

  5. Less invasive Achilles tendon reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Carmont, Michael R; Maffulli, Nicola

    2007-01-01

    Background The optimal management of chronic ruptures of the Achilles tendon is surgical reconstruction. Reconstruction of the Achilles tendon using peroneus brevis has been widely reported. Classically, these procedures involve relatively long surgical wounds in a relatively hypovascular area which is susceptible to wound breakdown. Results We describe our current method of peroneus brevis reconstruction for the Achilles tendon using two para-midline incisions. Conclusion This technique allows reconstruction of the Achilles tendon using peroneus brevis preserving skin integrity over the site most prone to wound breakdown, and can be especially used to reconstruct the Achilles tendon in the presence of previous surgery. PMID:17963499

  6. Results of accelerated postoperative rehabilitation using novel "suture frame" repair of Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Joseph C; Williams, Gary T; Bismil, Quamar; Shaw, David L; Schilders, Ernest

    2012-01-01

    The management of Achilles tendon rupture is a much-debated subject. In recent years, there has been much interest in early postoperative mobilization. We present the results of our Achilles tendon repair technique and accelerated rehabilitation program. The technique we propose uses the strength of a 1-loop polydioxanone "suture frame" to enable restoration of the tendon length, immediate positioning of the foot in a near-plantigrade position, and an accelerated rehabilitation program. We followed up 15 cases of Achilles tendon rupture treated with this technique. The initial follow-up was a review of case notes and a telephone questionnaire. All patients were subsequently invited for a clinical follow-up visit, and 11 patients (68.75%) attended. No cases of infection or repeat rupture occurred. The return to work (mean 5.6 weeks) and return to sport (mean 4.8 months) were relatively rapid. Regarding overall satisfaction on a scale of 0 to 10, the median was 9 (range 8 to 10). Of the 11 patients who attended the clinical follow-up visit, the mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Surgery ankle-hindfoot score was 94.5 points (range 83 to 100). The Achilles rupture repair scores (including isokinetic muscle strength) were good or excellent in all but 1 patient, whose result was fair. Of the 11 patients, 10 reported complete satisfaction with their outcome. Our technique with accelerated rehabilitation is safe and effective in the management of acute Achilles tendon rupture. It facilitates an early return to work and recreational sports, with excellent overall patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2012 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Augmented Versus Nonaugmented Repair of Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Jun; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Quan; Lin, Xiang-Jin

    2017-04-01

    Although simple end-to-end repair of the Achilles tendon is common, many augmented repair protocols have been implemented for acute Achilles tendon rupture. However, whether augmented repair is better than nonaugmented repair of an acute Achilles tendon rupture is still unknown. To conduct a meta-analysis to determine whether augmented surgical repair of an acute Achilles tendon rupture improved subjective patient satisfaction without an increase in rerupture rates. Secondary outcomes assessed included infections, ankle range of motion, calf muscle strength, and minor complications. Meta-analysis. A systematic literature search of peer-reviewed articles was conducted to identify all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing augmented repair and nonaugmented repair for acute Achilles tendon rupture from January 1980 to August 2016 in the electronic databases of PubMed, Web of Science (SCI-E/SSCI/A&HCI), and EMBASE. The keywords (Achilles tendon rupture) AND (surg* OR operat* OR repair* OR augment* OR non-augment* OR end-to-end OR sutur*) were combined, and results were limited to human RCTs and controlled clinical trials published in the English language. Four RCTs involving 169 participants were eligible for inclusion; 83 participants were treated with augmented repair and 86 were treated with nonaugmented repair. Augmented repair led to similar responses when compared with nonaugmented repair for acute Achilles tendon rupture (93% vs 90%, respectively; P = .53). The rerupture rates showed no significant difference for augmented versus nonaugmented repair (7.2% vs 9.3%, respectively; P = .69). No differences in superficial and deep infections occurred in augmented (7 infections) and nonaugmented (8 infections) repair groups during postoperative follow-up ( P = .89). The average incisional infection rate was 8.4% with augmented repair and 9.3% with nonaugmented repair. No significant differences in other complications were found between augmented (7.2%) and

  8. Platelet-rich plasma activates tendon-derived stem cells to promote regeneration of Achilles tendon rupture in rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kang; Al-Ani, Mohanad Kh; Sun, Yanjun; Xu, Wei; Pan, Lianhong; Song, Yang; Xu, ZhiLing; Pan, Xin; Yang, Li

    2017-04-01

    This study investigates whether platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an activator of tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) to promote regeneration of Achilles tendon post-rupture in rats. In the in vitro study, PRGF (activated PRP) significantly enhanced cell DNA synthesis, improved viability and promoted proliferation, while facilitating cell migration and the recruitment of TDSCs. In addition, TDSCs were mixed with collagen and PRP to form collagen-TDSC constructs (CTC) and PRP-collagen-TDSC constructs (PCTCs). After 3 weeks of culture in vitro, we found that most of the encapsulated TDSCs in the CTCs and PCTCs were still alive, while cells in the PCTCs showed a more aligned arrangement compared to the CTCs. In addition, the micro-structure of PCTC showed more obvious fibre-like tissues and formed a cyclic microvascular structure. The tenocyte-related genes types I and III collagen, Tenascin-C and Scleraxis of TDSCs in the PCTCs and CTCs were upregulated with time, and PCTCs showed more significance than CTCs (p < 0.05). After in vivo transplantation, the CTCs and PCTCs showed stimulatory effects on Achilles tendon healing. Moreover, the PCTCs improved the macroscopic appearance, histological morphology and biomechanical strength of ruptured Achilles tendon better than CTC. These results indicate that PRP can activate TDSCs to improve the quality of Achilles tendon rupture healing in the early stages. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Application of lariat lock catch knot suture in the achilles tendon rupture

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baocang; Feng, Xiaona; Yan, Ming; Wang, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to summarize the clinical experience of repairing the Achilles tendon rupture by lariat lock catch knot suture. Between January 2011 and February, 2014, 32 cases of the Achilles tendon rupture were treated by lariat lock catch knot suture. There were 26 males and 6 females, with the average age of 39 years (range 17-53 years), including 13 left knees and 19 right knees. 29 wounds healed by first intention, and 3 cases who were performed local flap transfer due to necrosis of skin were healed by second intention. Thirty-two cases were followed up 10-25 months (13 months on average). No re-rupture of Achilles tendon or deep infection occurred during follow-up period. According to Arner-Lindholm assessment standard, the results were excellent in 19 cases and good in 13 cases, the excellent and good rate was 100%. Lariat lock catch knot suture is a safe and effective method for repairing Achilles tendon. PMID:26770612

  10. Repair of Achilles tendon rupture using autologous semitendinosus graft in a kidney transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Ryohei; Natsuume, Takashi; Yoneda, Kenji; Fuji, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Insertional Achilles tendon injuries can be difficult to treat when minimal tendon tissue remains for anastomosis. Moreover, in the chronic case with tendon shortening, operative repair can be more difficult than acute rupture. It is particularly desirable to reinforce the tendons, in addition to performing primary repair, in patients with renal or systemic diseases because of the accelerated collagen degeneration. Many techniques have been described for the surgical management of Achilles tendon rupture; however, none has shown clear superiority. We report the case of a 50-year-old renal transplant patient with a spontaneous distal Achilles tendon injury that we repaired using the pull-out technique reinforced with an autologous semitendinosus graft. At 2 years postoperatively, the ankle-hindfoot scale score was 92 points, and the postoperative course was without complication. We believe that the free hamstring tendon autograft is advantageous for this repair, because it is easy to handle, has limited donor site morbidity, and preserves the structures around the ankle. Copyright © 2014 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Endoscopic-assisted achilles tendon reconstruction with free hamstring tendon autograft for chronic rupture of achilles tendon: clinical and isokinetic evaluation.

    PubMed

    El Shazly, Ossama; Abou El Soud, Maged M; El Mikkawy, Dalia M E; El Ganzoury, Ibrahim; Ibrahim, Ayman Mohamed

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the clinical and functional outcome of endoscopic-assisted reconstruction of chronic ruptures of the Achilles tendon using free hamstring tendon autograft. We present a case series of 15 patients who had chronic ruptures of the Achilles tendon (>6 weeks earlier) and underwent endoscopic-assisted reconstruction with a free hamstring autograft. The graft loop was passed through and fixed to the proximal stump of the tendon. The graft was then passed through suture to the distal stump and finally inserted into a tunnel in the anterior calcaneus to the Achilles tendon insertion and fixed with an bioabsorbable interference screw. The mean follow-up period was 27 months (SD, 3 months; range, 24 to 33 months). All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging preoperatively, immediately postoperatively, and at follow-up 2 years postoperatively. All patients were functionally evaluated with the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) score for the hindfoot preoperatively and postoperatively. Calf muscle power was evaluated by isokinetic strength testing at 2 years' follow-up. The mean size of the gap on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging was 49 mm (SD, 9 mm). The mean preoperative AOFAS score was 32.6 (SD, 7.5). There was a statistically significant improvement in the postoperative AOFAS score after 2 years to 90.8 (SD, 3.54) (P < .05). The mean time of return to all daily activities (except running and other sports) was 12.6 weeks (SD, 1.39 weeks). Isokinetic testing showed a nonsignificant deficit (<10%) between the involved and uninvolved plantar flexors and dorsiflexors with regard to peak torque, average power, and total work. Endoscopic-assisted Achilles tendon reconstruction with free hamstring tendon autograft for chronic ruptures of the Achilles tendon showed good to excellent results in all patients. Isokinetic testing showed a nonsignificant deficit between the involved and uninvolved sides at 2 years' follow-up. Level IV, therapeutic

  12. [Successive ruptures of patellar and Achilles tendons. Anabolic steroids in competitive sports].

    PubMed

    Isenberg, J; Prokop, A; Skouras, E

    2008-01-01

    Derivatives of testosterone or of 19-nor-testosterone are used as anabolics for the purpose of improving performance although the effect of anabolics is known still to be under discussion. The use of anabolic steroids continues among competitive athletes despite increased controls and increasingly frequent dramatic incidents connected with them. Whereas metabolic dysfunction during anabolic use is well documented, ruptures of the large tendons are rarely reported. Within 18 months, a 29-year-old professional footballer needed surgery for rupture of the patellar tendon and of both Achilles tendons. Carefully directed questioning elicited confirmation that he had taken different anabolic steroids regularly for 3 years with the intention of improving his strength. After each operation anabolic steroids were taken again at a high dosage during early convalescence and training. Minimally invasive surgery and open suturing techniques led to complete union of the Achilles tendons in good time. Training and anabolic use (metenolon 300 mg per week) started early after suturing of the patellar tendon including bone tunnels culminated in histologically confirmed rerupture after 8 weeks. After a ligament reconstruction with a semitendinosus tendon graft with subsequent infection, the tendon and reserve traction apparatus were lost. Repeated warnings of impaired healing if anabolic use was continued had been given without success. In view of the high number of unrecorded cases in competitive and athletic sports, we can assume that the use of anabolic steroids is also of quantitative relevance in the operative treatment of tendon ruptures.

  13. Surgical repair of symptomatic chronic achilles tendon rupture using synthetic graft augmentation.

    PubMed

    Shoaib, Ahmed; Mishra, Viren

    2017-09-01

    Surgical repair of symptomatic chronic Achilles tendon (TA) rupture is a challenging problem due to the presence of a large defect between tendon edges. We report the results of surgical repair of symptomatic chronic TA rupture by synthetic graft augmentation. Seven consecutive patients with a symptomatic chronic TA rupture underwent surgical repair by VY plasty and augmentation with bio-absorbable synthetic graft (Artelon(®)). In all patients, the intraoperative tendon gap after debridement was more than 5cm (Myerson Grade 3). The total duration of plaster immobilization was 10 weeks. The complications were recorded prospectively and functional outcome was assessed by AOFAS score and Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS). At a mean follow up of 29 months there was no re-rupture or deep infection. All patients reported good functional outcome as shown by AOFAS and ATRS scores. There were no graft related complications. At final follow up, six patients were able to do single stance heel raise however, calf wasting was noted in all patients. Tendon repair augmented by absorbable synthetic graft is an acceptable technique in Myerson Grade 3 chronic symptomatic TA ruptures. Level IV, Case series. Copyright © 2016 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The treatment of a rupture of the Achilles tendon using a dedicated management programme.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, A M; Topliss, C; Beard, D; Evans, R M; Williams, P

    2015-04-01

    The Swansea Morriston Achilles Rupture Treatment (SMART) programme was introduced in 2008. This paper summarises the outcome of this programme. Patients with a rupture of the Achilles tendon treated in our unit follow a comprehensive management protocol that includes a dedicated Achilles clinic, ultrasound examination, the use of functional orthoses, early weight-bearing, an accelerated exercise regime and guidelines for return to work and sport. The choice of conservative or surgical treatment was based on ultrasound findings. The rate of re-rupture, the outcome using the Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) and the Achilles Tendon Repair Score, (AS), and the complications were recorded. An elementary cost analysis was also performed. Between 2008 and 2014 a total of 273 patients presented with an acute rupture 211 of whom were managed conservatively and 62 had surgical repair. There were three re-ruptures (1.1%). There were 215 men and 58 women with a mean age of 46.5 years (20 to 86). Functional outcome was satisfactory. Mean ATRS and AS at four months was 53.0 (sd 14), 64.9 (sd 15) (n = 135), six months 67.8 (sd 16), 73.8 (sd 15) (n = 103) and nine months (72.4; sd 14) 72.3 (sd 13) (n = 43). The programme realised estimated cost savings exceeding £91,000 per annum. The SMART programme resulted in a low rate of re-rupture, a satisfactory outcome, a reduced rate of surgical intervention and a reduction in healthcare costs. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  15. Ruptured human Achilles tendon has elevated metabolic activity up to 1 year after repair.

    PubMed

    Eliasson, Pernilla; Couppé, Christian; Lonsdale, Markus; Svensson, René B; Neergaard, Christian; Kjær, Michael; Friberg, Lars; Magnusson, S Peter

    2016-09-01

    Following Achilles tendon rupture, running is often allowed after 6 months. However, tendon healing is slow and the metabolic status of the tendon at this point is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate tendon metabolism (glucose uptake) and vascularization at 3, 6 and 12 months after Achilles tendon rupture as measured using PET and power Doppler ultrasonography (PDUS). The study group comprised 23 patients with surgically repaired Achilles tendon rupture who were investigated at 3 months (n = 7), 6 months (n = 7) and 12 months (n = 9) after surgery. The triceps surae complex was loaded over 20 min of slow treadmill walking while a radioactive tracer ((18)F-FDG) was administered prior to PET. Vascularization was measured in terms of PDUS flow activity, and patient-reported outcomes were scored using the Achilles tendon rupture score (ATRS) and sports assessment (VISA-A) questionnaire. Relative glucose uptake ((18)F-FDG) was higher in repaired tendons than in intact tendons at all time-points (6, 3 and 1.6 times higher at 3, 6 and 12 months, respectively; P ≤ 0.001), and was also higher in the tendon core than in the periphery at 3 and 6 months (P ≤ 0.02), but lower at 12 months (P = 0.06). Relative glucose uptake was negatively related to ATRS at 6 months after repair (r = -0.89, P ≤ 0.01). PDUS flow activity was higher in repaired tendons than in intact tendons at 3 and 6 months (P < 0.05 for both), but had normalized by 12 months. These data demonstrate that the healing process as determined by metabolic activity and vascularization continues for 6 months after injury when large loads are typically allowed on the tendon. Indeed, metabolic activity remained elevated for more than 1 year after injury despite normalized vascularization. The robust negative correlation between tendon metabolism and patient-reported outcome suggests that a high metabolic activity 6 months after the injury may be

  16. Combined flexor hallucis longus tendon transfer and gastrocnemius recession for reconstruction of gapped chronic achilles tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Elgohary, Hatem Elsayed Ahmed; Elmoghazy, Nabil A; Abd Ellatif, Mohammed Serry

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the functional outcomes after a combined FHL transfer and a gastrocnemius recession for treatment of chronic ruptures of Achilles tendon with a gap and to investigate the patient's satisfaction about the great toe function after transfer. 19 patients with chronic rupture of the Achilles tendon with a gap were treated with a flexor halluces longus tendon transfer combined with a gastrocnemius recession, Clinical diagnosis depends on the presence of gap in the tendon on examination, inability of tip toe walking on the affected side and positive calf-squeeze test, MRI was used to confirm the clinical diagnosis. American Orthopedic Foot & Ankle Society hind foot score was used for assessment of the results. The AOFAS score improved significantly from a mean of 65 preoperatively to 94 at the last follow up (p<0.001), there was no significant difference in the final outcome between patients with FHL tendon weaved through the stump of the Achilles tendon and those with trans osseous tunnels, the mean AOFAS score at the last follow up was 94.2, 93.8 respectively, no patient complained of big toe dysfunction. Management of chronic rupture of the Achilles tendon with a gap with flexor halluces longus tendon transfer combined with a gastrocnemius recession is a safe and reliable method with a significantly improved functional outcome, muscle advancement through gastrocnemius recession decreases the length of the gap without affecting the muscle function, flexor halluces longus tendon transfer doesn't harm the big toe function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Surgical management of Achilles tendon re-ruptures: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, Nicola; Oliva, Francesco; Del Buono, Angelo; Florio, Antonietta; Maffulli, Gayle

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare outcomes of different minimally invasive techniques for reconstruction of Achilles tendon re-ruptures. We prospectively enrolled 21 patients undergoing minimally invasive reconstruction using a transfer of the ipsilateral peroneus brevis (PB) (five patients) or the free ipsilateral semitendinosus tendon (ST) graft with or without interference screw fixation (ten and six patients, respectively). We assessed the maximum calf circumference and isometric plantar flexion strength before surgery and at the last follow up. The Achilles tendon total rupture score (ATRS) and number of single-leg heel lifts on the affected leg were evaluated at the last follow up. The median follow up was 39 months. The outcome of surgery was excellent/good in 17 (81 %) of 21 patients. In the operated leg, the maximum calf circumference and isometric plantar flexion strength were significantly improved after surgery (P < 0.0001). The average ATRS was 86 (range 79-92), and the average number of single-legged heel lifts was 33 (range 11-48). No further re-ruptures were recorded. Minimally invasive ipsilateral PB transfer and free ipsilateral ST graft with or without interference screw fixation are safe and effective procedures to reconstruct the Achilles tendon after a re-rupture, providing a significant improvement of the symptoms and function in the mid term.

  18. The seasonal variation of Achilles tendon ruptures in Vancouver, Canada: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Alex; Grewal, Navdeep; Guy, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the seasonal distribution of tendon ruptures in a large cohort of patients from Vancouver, Canada. Design Retrospective chart review. Setting Acute Achilles tendon rupture cases that occurred from 1987 to 2010 at an academic hospital in Vancouver, Canada. Information was extracted from an orthopaedic database. Participants No direct contact was made with the participants. The following information was extracted from the OrthoTrauma database: age, sex, date of injury and season (winter, spring, summer and autumn), date of surgery if date of injury was unknown and type of injury (sport related or non-sport related/unspecified). Only acute Achilles tendon rupture cases were included; chronic cases were excluded along with those that were conservatively managed. Primary and secondary outcomes The primary outcome was to determine the seasonal pattern of Achilles tendon rupture. Secondary outcomes, such as differences in gender and mechanism of sport (non-sport vs sport related), were also assessed. Results There were 543 cases in total; 83% of the cases were men (average age 39.3) and 17% were women (average age 37.3). In total, 76% of cases were specified as sport related. The distribution of injuries varied significantly across seasons (χ2, p<0.05), with significantly more cases occurring in spring. The increase in the number of cases in spring was due to sport-related injuries, whereas non-sport-related cases were distributed evenly throughout the year. Conclusions The seasonality of sport-related Achilles tendon ruptures should be considered when developing preventive strategies and when timing their delivery. PMID:24519875

  19. Functional rehabilitation of patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture: a meta-analysis of current evidence.

    PubMed

    Mark-Christensen, Troels; Troelsen, Anders; Kallemose, Thomas; Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner

    2016-06-01

    The optimal treatment for acute Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) is continuously debated. Recent studies have proposed that the choice of either operative or non-operative treatment may not be as important as rehabilitation, suggesting that functional rehabilitation should be preferred over traditional immobilization. The purpose of this meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was to compare functional rehabilitation to immobilization in the treatment of ATR. This meta-analysis was conducted using the databases: PubMed, EMBASE, Rehabilitation and Sports Medicine Source, AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane Library and PEDro using the search terms: "Achilles tendon," "rupture," "mobilization" and "immobilization". Seven RCTs involving 427 participants were eligible for inclusion, with a total of 211 participants treated with functional rehabilitation and 216 treated with immobilization. Re-rupture rate, other complications, strength, range of motion, duration of sick leave, return to sport and patient satisfaction were examined. There were no statistically significant differences between groups. A trend favoring functional rehabilitation was seen regarding the examined outcomes. Functional rehabilitation after acute Achilles tendon rupture does not increase the rate of re-rupture or other complications. A trend toward earlier return to work and sport, and increased patient satisfaction was found when functional rehabilitation was used. The present literature is of low-to-average quality, and the basic constructs of the examined treatment and study protocols vary considerably. Larger, randomized controlled trials using validated outcome measures are needed to confirm the findings. II.

  20. The Effectiveness of Open Repair Versus Percutaneous Repair for an Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Heidi; David, Shannon

    2016-12-01

    Clinical Scenario: There are 2 approaches available for surgical repair of the Achilles tendon: open or percutaneous. However, there is controversy over which repair is superior. Focused Clinical Question: Which type of surgery is better in providing the best overall patient outcome, open or percutaneous repair, in physically active men and women with acute Achilles tendon ruptures? Summary of Search, "Best Evidence" Appraised, and Key Findings: The literature was searched for studies of level 3 evidence or higher that investigated the effectiveness of open repair versus percutaneous repair on acute Achilles tendon ruptures in physically active men and women. The literature search resulted in 3 studies for possible inclusion. All 3 good-quality studies were included. Clinical Bottom Line: There is supporting evidence to indicate that percutaneous repair is the best option for Achilles tendon surgery when it comes to the physically active population. Percutaneous repair has faster surgery times, less risk of complications, and faster recovery times over having an open repair, although it is acknowledged that every patient has a different situation and best individual option may vary patient to patient.

  1. Treatment of ruptured Achilles tendon: Operative or non-operative procedure?

    PubMed

    Cukelj, Fabijan; Bandalovic, Ante; Knezevic, Josip; Pavic, Arsen; Pivalica, Bozen; Bakota, Bore

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of non-operative and surgical procedures in the treatment of ruptured Achilles tendon in athletes (professional and amateur). Ninety professional or amateur athletes with rupture of the Achilles tendon were included in the study between 1998 and 2013. The athletes were aged between 25 and 40 years (mean 34.83±4.65). A total of 30 athletes underwent an open procedure, 30 were treated with a percutaneous method and 30 were treated non-operatively. All operated patients were tested one year after the surgical procedure. An isokinetic dynamometer was used to compare the open and percutaneous methods. The results for the patients who were treated using the percutaneous method were 15% better than those for the patients who underwent the open procedure; the results for the group treated conservatively were 20% better than those for the group treated percutaneously. The percutaneous method was easier technically than the open method. Time spent in hospital was 14.5 times shorter with the percutaneous procedure compared with the open procedure (percutaneous procedure: range 0.5-2 days, mean 0.79±0.36; open procedure: range 10-24 days, mean 11.46±2.70; p<0.00). Return to sport activities was twice as fast with the percutaneous procedure compared with the open procedure. There were no postoperative infections or reruptured Achilles tendon in the group treated with the percutaneous procedure. One patient in the group treated with the open procedure had postoperative infection (4.2%). In the non-surgical (conservatively treated) group, there were three reruptures of the Achilles tendon within one year, and one patient developed adhesions that resulted in loss of function and had to undergo an operation. The percutaneous method is the best method of surgical treatment for Achilles tendon rupture. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Reliability and validation of the Dutch Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score.

    PubMed

    Opdam, K T M; Zwiers, R; Wiegerinck, J I; Kleipool, A E B; Haverlag, R; Goslings, J C; van Dijk, C N

    2016-07-14

    Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) have become a cornerstone for the evaluation of the effectiveness of treatment. The Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) is a PROM for outcome and assessment of an Achilles tendon rupture. The aim of this study was to translate the ATRS to Dutch and evaluate its reliability and validity in the Dutch population. A forward-backward translation procedure was performed according to the guidelines of cross-cultural adaptation process. The Dutch ATRS was evaluated for reliability and validity in patients treated for a total Achilles tendon rupture from 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2014 in one teaching hospital and one academic hospital. Reliability was assessed by the intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), Cronbach's alpha and minimal detectable change (MDC). We assessed construct validity by calculation of Spearman's rho correlation coefficient with domains of the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS), Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment-Achilles questionnaire (VISA-A) and Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) for pain in rest and during running. The Dutch ATRS had a good test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.852) and a high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.96). MDC was 30.2 at individual level and 3.5 at group level. Construct validity was supported by 75 % of the hypothesized correlations. The Dutch ATRS had a strong correlation with NRS for pain during running (r = -0.746) and all the five subscales of the Dutch FAOS (r = 0.724-0.867). There was a moderate correlation with the VISA-A-NL (r = 0.691) and NRS for pain in rest (r = -0.580). The Dutch ATRS shows an adequate reliability and validity and can be used in the Dutch population for measuring the outcome of treatment of a total Achilles tendon rupture and for research purposes. Diagnostic study, Level I.

  3. Professional Athletes' Return to Play and Performance After Operative Repair of an Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    PubMed

    Trofa, David P; Miller, J Chance; Jang, Eugene S; Woode, Denzel R; Greisberg, Justin K; Vosseller, J Turner

    2017-06-01

    Most Achilles tendon ruptures are sports related. However, few studies have examined and compared the effect of surgical repair for complete ruptures on return to play (RTP), play time, and performance across multiple sports. To examine RTP and performance among professional athletes after Achilles tendon repair and compare pre- versus postoperative functional outcomes of professional athletes from different major leagues in the United States. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. National Basketball Association (NBA), National Football League (NFL), Major League Baseball (MLB), and National Hockey League (NHL) athletes who sustained a primary complete Achilles tendon rupture treated surgically between 1989 and 2013 were identified via public injury reports and press releases. Demographic information and performance-related statistics were recorded for 2 seasons before and after surgery and compared with matched controls. Statistical analyses were used to assess differences in recorded metrics. Of 86 athletes screened, 62 met inclusion criteria including 25 NBA, 32 NFL, and 5 MLB players. Nineteen (30.6%) professional athletes with an isolated Achilles tendon rupture treated surgically were unable to return to play. Among athletes who successfully returned to play, game participation averaged 75.4% ( P < .001) and 81.9% ( P = .002) of the total games played the season before injury at 1 and 2 years postoperatively, respectively. Play time was significantly decreased and athletes performed significantly worse compared with preoperative levels at 1 and 2 years after injury ( P < .001). When players were compared with matched controls, an Achilles tendon rupture resulted in fewer games played ( P < .001), decreased play time ( P = .025), and worse performance statistics ( P < .001) at 1 year but not 2 years postoperatively ( P > .05). When individual sports were compared, NBA players were most significantly affected, experiencing significant decreases in games played

  4. Evaluation of Elastic Stiffness in Healing Achilles Tendon After Surgical Repair of a Tendon Rupture Using In Vivo Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-ning; Wan, Wen-bo; Wang, Yue-xiang; Jiao, Zi-yu; Zhang, Li-hai; Luo, Yu-kun; Tang, Pei-fu

    2016-04-09

    BACKGROUND There has been no published report assessing the mechanical properties of a repaired Achilles tendon after surgery using shear wave elastography (SWE). The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in mechanical properties of the healing Achilles tendon after surgical repair of a tendon rupture using ultrasound SWE and how these changes correlate with tendon function. MATERIAL AND METHODS Twenty-six patients who underwent surgical repair for Achilles tendon rupture were examined with ultrasound SWE coupled with a linear array transducer (4-15 MHz). The elasticity values of the repaired Achilles tendon in a longitudinal view were measured at 12, 24, and 48 weeks postoperatively. Functional outcomes were assessed with the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) rating system at 12, 24, and 48 weeks postoperatively. General linear regression analysis and correlation coefficients were used to analyze the relationship between elasticity and the AOFAS score. RESULTS There were significant differences with respect to the mean elasticity values and functional scores of the repaired Achilles tendon at 12, 24, and 48 weeks postoperatively (all P<0.05). Tendon function was positively correlated with the elasticity of the repaired Achilles tendon (P=0.0003). CONCLUSIONS Our findings suggest that SWE can provide biomechanical information for evaluating the mechanical properties of healing Achilles tendon and predict Achilles tendon function.

  5. Evaluation of Elastic Stiffness in Healing Achilles Tendon After Surgical Repair of a Tendon Rupture Using In Vivo Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li-ning; Wan, Wen-bo; Wang, Yue-xiang; Jiao, Zi-yu; Zhang, Li-hai; Luo, Yu-kun; Tang, Pei-fu

    2016-01-01

    Background There has been no published report assessing the mechanical properties of a repaired Achilles tendon after surgery using shear wave elastography (SWE). The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in mechanical properties of the healing Achilles tendon after surgical repair of a tendon rupture using ultrasound SWE and how these changes correlate with tendon function. Material/Methods Twenty-six patients who underwent surgical repair for Achilles tendon rupture were examined with ultrasound SWE coupled with a linear array transducer (4–15 MHz). The elasticity values of the repaired Achilles tendon in a longitudinal view were measured at 12, 24, and 48 weeks postoperatively. Functional outcomes were assessed with the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) rating system at 12, 24, and 48 weeks postoperatively. General linear regression analysis and correlation coefficients were used to analyze the relationship between elasticity and the AOFAS score. Results There were significant differences with respect to the mean elasticity values and functional scores of the repaired Achilles tendon at 12, 24, and 48 weeks postoperatively (all P<0.05). Tendon function was positively correlated with the elasticity of the repaired Achilles tendon (P=0.0003). Conclusions Our findings suggest that SWE can provide biomechanical information for evaluating the mechanical properties of healing Achilles tendon and predict Achilles tendon function. PMID:27072885

  6. Achilles tendon rupture: effect of early mobilization in rehabilitation after surgical repair.

    PubMed

    Sorrenti, Samiul J

    2006-06-01

    Surgical and nonsurgical treatments of Achilles tendon ruptures are available. Nonsurgical treatment using immobilization does not have the varying degrees of infection as seen with surgical procedures, but it frequently is linked to muscle atrophy, weakness, and higher rates of rerupture than surgical treatment. This study reports the results of 64 patients with Achilles tendon ruptures treated surgically and with early mobilization. Surgery of the ruptured tendon involved dividing the proximal stump into two separate strands and the distal stump into a single strand. The repair was advanced to a V-Y formation, and nonabsorbable sutures were used for repair. After wound closure, an early mobilization rehabilitation program was initiated, which consisted of wearing a moveable ankle brace for 4 to 6 weeks in 0 to 15 degrees of dorsiflexion and 10 weeks of regular exercises. All 64 patients resumed normal activities in an average of 3.3 months regardless of whether the rupture was acute or chronic. Tendons healed with no reruptures. There were 13 complications, all wound infections, which healed when treated with antibiotics. The infection rate dropped markedly when wounds were inspected and dressings changed 1 week postoperatively, instead of at 2 weeks. Surgery combined with early mobilization reduces range of motion loss, increases blood supply, and reduces the degree of muscle atrophy that typically occurs after Achilles tendon rupture, thereby decreasing the time to resumption of normal activities. Applying tension to the tendon also improved strength of the calf muscles and improved ankle movement. The main concern with early mobilization is rerupture, but this was lessened by patients carefully following the weightbearing and early mobilization protocols. The results of this study strengthen the argument to employ early mobilization rehabilitation after surgical repair.

  7. Achilles tendon rupture: a review of etiology, population, anatomy, risk factors, and injury prevention.

    PubMed

    Hess, Gregory William

    2010-02-01

    Sports participation has undergone an increase in recent decades. Injury due to sporting activity has also recently risen. The Achilles tendon has been one of the most common sports-related injuries. A 2 in 100,000 individual Achilles tendon injury rate increased to a 12 in 100,000 individual injury rate in less than 10 years. The injury is typically observed in men in the fourth to fifth decades of life. Male to female injury ratios range from 2:1 to 12:1. Running, jumping, and agility activities involving eccentric loading and explosive plyometric contractions are usual mechanisms. Natural aging allows predisposing chronic degeneration of the tendon. Blood flow decreases and stiffness increases with aging to decrease the ability to withstand stress. Noninflammatory tendinosis and chronic tendinopathy are 2 separate processes proposed for tendon degeneration and subsequent rupture. Rupture typically occurs 2 to 6 cm proximal to the calcaneal insertion. Predisposing factors are grouped into 2 categories: intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors. Avoidance of degenerative changes within the tendon is the primary method to prevent rupture. Regular physical activity as athletes age also promotes tendon hypertrophy, increases nutrient delivery, and reduces collagen fiber fatigue.

  8. [PART-KESSLER TECHNIQUE WITH SUTURE ANCHOR IN REPAIR OF SPONTANEOUS Achilles TENDON RUPTURE].

    PubMed

    Qi, Jie; Duan, Liang; Li, Weiwei; Wei, Wenbo

    2016-02-01

    To summarize the application and experience of repairing spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture by part-Kessler technique with suture anchor. Between January 2011 and December 2013, 31 patients with spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture were treated by part-Kessler technique with suture anchor. Of 31 cases, 23 were male and 8 were female, aged 16-53 years (mean, 38 years). The left side was involved in 15 cases and the right side in 16 cases. The causes of injury included sudden heel pain and walking weakness during sports in 22 cases; no surefooted down-stairs, slip, and carrying heavy loads in 9 cases. The distance from broken site to the calcaneus adhension of Achilles tendon was 3-6 cm (mean, 4.2 cm). The time from injury to operation was 7 hours to 4 days (mean, 36.8 hours). All incisions healed by first intention without nerve injury or adhering with skin. The patients were followed up 6-24 months (mean, 15 months). All patients could complete 25 times heel raising without difficulty at 6 months after operation. No Achilles tendon rupture occurred again during follow-up. At 6 months after operation, the range of motion of the ankle joint in dorsiflexion and plantar flexion showed no significant difference between normal and affected sides (t=0.648, P=0.525; t=0.524, P=0.605). The circumference of the affected leg was significantly smaller than that of normal leg at 6 months after operation (t=2.074, P=0.041), but no significant difference was found between affected and normal sides at 12 months after operation (t=0.905, P=0.426). The American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scores at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after operation were significantly higher than preoperative score (P<0.05); the score at 6 months after operation was significantly lower than that at other time points (P<0.05), but no significant difference was shown between the other time points (P>0.05). Repairing spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture by part-Kessler technique with suture anchor

  9. Long-term results after functional nonoperative treatment of achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Hufner, Tobias M; Brandes, Dirk B; Thermann, Hajo; Richter, Martinus; Knobloch, Karsten; Krettek, Christian

    2006-03-01

    Nonoperative treatment of complete Achilles tendon ruptures generally involves a long period of cast immobilization and is associated with frequent reruptures. Functional nonoperative treatment of complete Achilles tendon ruptures involves the use of a high-shaft boot with a 3-cm hindfoot elevation, in which physical therapy is begun after 3 weeks of wear. We reviewed our long-term results with this treatment protocol to determine its effectiveness. The indications for nonoperative treatment, defined by ultrasound, were a distance of 10 mm or less between the tendon ends with the ankle in neutral position and complete apposition of the tendon ends in 20 degrees of plantarflexion. From 1990 to 1996, 168 patients were treated; 125 (74%) were available for followup at a mean of 5.5 (2 to 12.7) years after the injury. Good or excellent results were achieved in 92 (73.5%) with complete rehabilitation and return to sports activity at their pre-injury levels. Satisfactory (9%) and poor results (17.5%) were due to pain in the Achilles tendon region, a lengthened Achilles tendon, markedly reduced strength, or a marked reduction of calf size in 25 patients (76%). Eight patients (6.4%) sustained a rerupture. Functional nonoperative treatment achieved good results in patients who had precise sonographic evaluation and who were compliant. As a result of our study, we modified our protocol: (1) a repeat ultrasound examination is done by an experienced sonographer 2 to 5 days after the first to confirm the indications for nonoperative treatment, (2) the use of the 3-cm hindfoot elevation is extended from 6 to 8 weeks to provide a longer protection of the tendon, and (3) patients then wear shoes with 1-cm hindfoot elevation for another 3 months.

  10. Collagens, Proteoglycans, MMP-2, MMP-9 and TIMPs in Human Achilles Tendon Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Karousou, Evgenia; Ronga, Mario; Vigetti, Davide; Passi, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Tendon integrity depends on the extracellular matrix (ECM) metabolism which is regulated by proteolytic enzymes. However, it is unclear which enzymes play a role in tendon rupture. We studied the ECM of 19 ruptured human Achilles tendons, comparing the composition of specimens harvested close to the rupture with specimens harvested from an apparently healthy area in the same tendon. We compared gene expression of collagen Type I, decorin, and versican including enzymes involved in their metabolism as matrix metalloproteases (MMP-2 and -9) and tissue inhibitory of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1 and -2) using real-time PCR, zymography and FACE analysis. We found greater gene expression of proteoglycan core protein decorin and versican, collagen Type I, MMPs and TIMPs in the tendon rupture. Zymography analysis, reflecting expression of enzymatic activity, confirmed the gene expression data at protein level. Carbohydrate content was greater in the macroscopically healthy area than in the ruptured area. In the ruptured area, we found increased core protein synthesis but without the normal glycosaminoglycan production. The tissue in the area of rupture undergoes marked rearrangement at molecular levels and supports the role of MMPs in the pathology. PMID:18425559

  11. Long-term Results of Chronic Achilles Tendon Ruptures Repaired With V-Y Tendon Plasty and Fascia Turndown.

    PubMed

    Guclu, Berk; Basat, H Cagdas; Yildirim, Tugrul; Bozduman, Omer; Us, Ali Kemal

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the long-term follow-up results of V-Y tendon plasty with fascia turndown, for repairing chronic Achilles tendon ruptures. Seventeen patients (12 males, 5 females), who were diagnosed with chronic Achilles tendon rupture and met the inclusion criteria, were included in the study. These patients received treatment by means of V-Y tendon plasty with fascia turndown from January 1995 to December 2001. Clinical outcomes of the patients were assessed by using isokinetic strength testing, questioning the patient regarding residual discomfort, pain, or swelling and having the ability to perform heel rises and using American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society's (AOFAS's) Ankle-Hind Foot Scale score. Mean follow-up duration was 16 years (13-18 years). Mean time from the injury to operative treatment was 7 months. Mean operative defect of Achilles tendon in neutral position after debridement was 6 cm. During the follow-up, the mean calf atrophy was 3.4 cm. The mean 30 degrees/s plantarflex and 120 degrees/s plantarflex peak torques were 89 and 45 Nm, respectively. The mean 30 degrees/s plantarflex peak torque deficiency was 16%. The mean 120 degrees/s plantarflex peak torque deficiency was 17%. The average peak torque deficiency was 17%. The pre- and postoperative mean AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot Scale scores were 64 and 95, respectively. No patient had a rerupture. Superficial wound infection was treated with oral antibiotic therapy in 2 patients (11%). The V-Y tendon plasty with fascia turndown for repairing chronic Achilles tendon ruptures yielded results comparable with the literature regarding clinical outcomes. This method did not require synthetic materials for augmentation and was an economic alternative compared to other repair methods. Level III, retrospective comparative study. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Increased unilateral tendon stiffness and its effect on gait 2-6 years after Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Agres, A N; Duda, G N; Gehlen, T J; Arampatzis, A; Taylor, W R; Manegold, S

    2015-12-01

    Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) alters tissue composition, which may affect long-term tendon mechanics and ankle function during movement. However, a relationship between Achilles tendon (AT) properties and ankle joint function during gait remains unclear. The primary hypotheses were that (a) post-ATR tendon stiffness and length differ from the noninjured contralateral side and that (b) intra-patient asymmetries in AT properties correlate to ankle function asymmetries during gait, determined by ankle angles and moments. Ultrasonography and dynamometry were used to assess AT tendon stiffness, strain, elongation, and rest length in both limbs of 20 ATR patients 2-6 years after repair. Three-dimensional ankle angles and moments were determined using gait analysis. Injured tendons exhibited increased stiffness, rest length, and altered kinematics, with higher dorsiflexion and eversion, and lower plantarflexion and inversion. Intra-patient tendon stiffness and tendon length ratios were negatively correlated to intra-patient ratios of the maximum plantarflexion moment and maximum dorsiflexion angle, respectively. These results suggest that after surgical ATR repair, higher AT stiffness, but not a longer AT, may contribute to deficits in plantarflexion moment generation. These data further support the claim that post-ATR tendon regeneration results in the production of a tissue that is functionally different than noninjured tendon.

  13. A novel modification of Bosworth's technique to repair zone I Achilles tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Pavan Kumar, Avadhanam; Shashikiran, Raviprakash; Raghuram, Choulapalle

    2013-03-01

    Zone I ruptures of the Achilles tendon and chronic ruptures in zone II with a gap of more than 6 cm are difficult to treat. We describe a technique that is very well suited to this type of rupture. Seventy-eight patients with chronic rupture of the Achilles tendon were operated on between January 1996 and December 2010. We used a modification of the Bosworth technique in which a strip of the gastrocnemius aponeurosis was taken, made into a tendon-like structure and passed through the calcaneum after making a drill hole; then it was sutured back to the proximal stump. The Leppilahti scoring system was used to evaluate these patients. Sixty-two patients had excellent results, 8 had good results, 4 had fair results, 2 had poor results, and 2 were lost to follow-up at the end of 1 year. Nearly all patients resumed work at 6 months postoperatively, had normal walking and stair climbing, and regained normal dorsiflexion. Our technique is ideally suited to zone I ruptures (where no distal stump is available for repair) and ruptures in zone II where end-to-end repair is not possible.

  14. Evaluation of absorbable and nonabsorbable sutures for repair of achilles tendon rupture with a suture-guiding device.

    PubMed

    Kocaoglu, Baris; Ulku, Tekin Kerem; Gereli, Arel; Karahan, Mustafa; Turkmen, Metin

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the functional and clinical results of Achilles tendon repairs with an Achilles tendon suture-guiding device using nonabsorbable versus absorbable sutures. We hypothesized that the absorbable suture would have clinical results comparable to those of the nonabsorbable suture for Achilles tendon repair with an Achilles tendon suture-guiding system. From January 2010 to September 2013, 48 consecutive patients who had sustained a spontaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon underwent operative repair with an Achilles tendon suture-guiding device using 2 different suture types. All ruptures were acute. The patients were divided equally into 2 groups according to suture type. In the nonabsorbable suture group, No. 2 braided nonabsorbable polyethylene terephthalate sutures were used, and in the absorbable suture group, braided absorbable polyglactin sutures were used. The average age of the patients was 38 years (range, 28-50 years). Functional outcome scores and complications were evaluated. All patients had an intact Achilles repair after surgery. The American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot clinical outcome scores were 98 (range, 90-100) in the nonabsorbable suture group and 96.8 (range, 87-100) in the absorbable suture group. All patients returned to their previous work. The absorbable suture group had fewer postoperative complications (0%) than the nonabsorbable suture group (12.5%) (P < .05). Use of an absorbable suture in the treatment of Achilles tendon repair by an Achilles tendon suture-guiding system was associated with a lower incidence of suture reaction; however, functionally the results were not notably different from those using a traditional nonabsorbable suture. We conclude that repair with absorbable sutures is appropriate for Achilles tendon ruptures. Level II, prospective comparative study. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Major functional deficits persist 2 years after acute Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Nicklas; Nilsson-Helander, Katarina; Karlsson, Jón; Eriksson, Bengt I; Thomée, Roland; Faxén, Eva; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this prospective randomized controlled study was to evaluate the long-term results after an acute Achilles tendon rupture in patients treated surgically or non-surgically. The focus was to evaluate whether any improvements occurred between the one and 2-year evaluation. Eighty-one patients (67 men, 14 women) with a mean (SD) age of 42 (9.1) were included in this study. Forty-two patients were treated surgically, and 39 treated non-surgically otherwise the treatment was identical for the two groups. All patients were evaluated using the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS), the Physical Activity Scale (PAS) and validated functional tests one and 2 years after injury. There were significant functional deficits on the injured side compared with the contralateral side 2 years after Achilles tendon rupture, regardless of treatment. Only minor improvements, even though statistically significant, occurred between the 1- and 2-year evaluations. The physical activity level remained significantly reduced as compared with prior to injury, but the ATRS mean was relatively high in both groups (89 and 90). This long-term follow-up indicates that the majority of patients with an Achilles tendon rupture have not fully recovered (in regards to symptoms, physical activity level and function) 2 years after injury regardless of surgical or non-surgical treatment. Furthermore, only minor improvements occur between the 1- and 2-year evaluations. This indicates that to enhance the final outcome the focus should be on improvements in treatment within the first year. The patients appear to have adjusted to their impairments since the patient-reported outcome is relatively high in spite of functional deficits and lower activity level compared with pre-injury. Prospective randomized study, Level I.

  16. Clinical assessment is sufficient to allow outcome evaluation following surgical management of Achilles tendon ruptures

    PubMed Central

    Todorov, Atanas; Schaub, Frederic; Blanke, Fabian; Heisterbach, Patricia; Sachser, Franciska; Gösele, Andreas; Majewski, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Summary Study design cross-sectional study in otherwise healthy athletic adults with a unilateral Achilles tendon rupture. Objectives define the relationships of active range of motion, calf circumference or number of heel raises to a full set of isokinetic parameters. Background Achilles tendon ruptures commonly occur during sports and create a considerable amount of morbidity. The benefits of different treatments are difficult to determine. Complex and expensive isokinetic testing is often required. If a simple force measurement could replace this testing, large clinical trials would be more easily feasible. Methods 74 patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture and surgical treatment were evaluated retrospectively. Active range of motion (ROM), ratio of ROM, number of heel raises, ratio of heel raises, calf circumference and isokintetic measurements were recorded. Regression using a Bayesian elastic net showed the most important correlations. Results Active range of motion showed a significant correlation to peak torque angle at flexion and extension as well as increased sports activity. There was a negative correlation to percutaneous therapy. Active Heel raise showed a positive correlation to peak torque at dorsal extension and increased sports activity as well as a negative correlation to high postoperative pain, where as calf circumference was positive correlated to peak torque at dorsal extension and body height as well as negative correlated to female gender. Conclusion device independent measures, like range of Motion, and amount of Heel raise, are an excellent tool providing similar information compared to isokinetic testing and could be used to evaluate clinical outcome after Achilles tendon rupture. PMID:26261784

  17. Achilles tendon injuries in athletes.

    PubMed

    Kvist, M

    1994-09-01

    Two-thirds of Achilles tendon injuries in competitive athletes are paratenonitis and one-fifth are insertional complaints (bursitis and insertion tendinitis). The remaining afflictions consist of pain syndromes of the myotendineal junction and tendinopathies. The majority of Achilles tendon injuries from sport occur in males, mainly because of their higher rates of participation in sport, but also with tendinopathies a gender difference is probably indicated. Athletes in running sports have a high incidence of Achilles tendon overuse injuries. About 75% of total and the majority of partial tendon ruptures are related to sports activities usually involving abrupt repetitive jumping and sprinting movements. Mechanical factors and a sedentary lifestyle play a role in the pathology of these injuries. Achilles tendon overuse injuries occur at a higher rate in older athletes than most other typical overuse injuries. Recreational athletes with a complete Achilles tendon rupture are about 15 years younger than those with other spontaneous tendon ruptures. Following surgery, about 70 to 90% of athletes have a successful comeback after Achilles tendon injury. Surgery is required in about 25% of athletes with Achilles tendon overuse injuries and the frequency of surgery increases with patient age and duration of symptoms as well as occurrence of tendinopathic changes. However, about 20% of injured athletes require a re-operation for Achilles tendon overuse injuries, and about 3 to 5% are compelled to abandon their sports career because of these injuries. Myotendineal junction pain should be treated conservatively. Partial Achilles tendon ruptures are primarily treated conservatively, although the best treatment method of chronic partial rupture seems to be surgery. Complete Achilles tendon ruptures of athletes are treated surgically, because this increases the likelihood of athletes reaching preinjury activity levels and minimises the risk of re-ruptures. Marked forefoot

  18. High voltage pulsed current in collagen realignment, synthesis, and angiogenesis after Achilles tendon partial rupture

    PubMed Central

    Rampazo, Érika P.; Liebano, Richard E.; Pinfildi, Carlos Eduardo; Folha, Roberta A. C.; Ferreira, Lydia M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To verify the efficacy of high voltage pulsed current in collagen realignment and synthesis and in angiogenesis after the partial rupturing of the Achilles tendon in rats. Method Forty male Wistar rats were randomized into four groups of 10 animals each: sham, cathodic stimulation, anodic stimulation, and alternating stimulation. Their Achilles tendons were submitted to direct trauma by a free-falling metal bar. Then, the treatment was administered for six consecutive days after the injury. In the simulation group, the electrodes were positioned on the animal, but the device remained off for 30 minutes. The other groups used a frequency of 120 pps, sensory threshold, and the corresponding polarity. On the seventh day, the tendons were removed and sent for histological slide preparation for birefringence and Picrosirius Red analysis and for blood vessel quantification. Results No significant difference was observed among the groups regarding collagen realignment (types I or III collagen) or quantity of blood vessels. Conclusion High voltage pulsed current for six consecutive days was not effective in collagen realignment, synthesis, or angiogenesis after the partial rupturing of the Achilles tendon in rats. PMID:27556387

  19. High voltage pulsed current in collagen realignment, synthesis, and angiogenesis after Achilles tendon partial rupture.

    PubMed

    Rampazo, Érika P; Liebano, Richard E; Pinfildi, Carlos Eduardo; Folha, Roberta A C; Ferreira, Lydia M

    2016-06-16

    To verify the efficacy of high voltage pulsed current in collagen realignment and synthesis and in angiogenesis after the partial rupturing of the Achilles tendon in rats. Forty male Wistar rats were randomized into four groups of 10 animals each: sham, cathodic stimulation, anodic stimulation, and alternating stimulation. Their Achilles tendons were submitted to direct trauma by a free-falling metal bar. Then, the treatment was administered for six consecutive days after the injury. In the simulation group, the electrodes were positioned on the animal, but the device remained off for 30 minutes. The other groups used a frequency of 120 pps, sensory threshold, and the corresponding polarity. On the seventh day, the tendons were removed and sent for histological slide preparation for birefringence and Picrosirius Red analysis and for blood vessel quantification. No significant difference was observed among the groups regarding collagen realignment (types I or III collagen) or quantity of blood vessels. High voltage pulsed current for six consecutive days was not effective in collagen realignment, synthesis, or angiogenesis after the partial rupturing of the Achilles tendon in rats.

  20. High voltage pulsed current in collagen realignment, synthesis, and angiogenesis after Achilles tendon partial rupture.

    PubMed

    Rampazo, Érika P; Liebano, Richard E; Pinfildi, Carlos Eduardo; Folha, Roberta A C; Ferreira, Lydia M

    2016-01-01

    To verify the efficacy of high voltage pulsed current in collagen realignment and synthesis and in angiogenesis after the partial rupturing of the Achilles tendon in rats. Forty male Wistar rats were randomized into four groups of 10 animals each: sham, cathodic stimulation, anodic stimulation, and alternating stimulation. Their Achilles tendons were submitted to direct trauma by a free-falling metal bar. Then, the treatment was administered for six consecutive days after the injury. In the simulation group, the electrodes were positioned on the animal, but the device remained off for 30 minutes. The other groups used a frequency of 120 pps, sensory threshold, and the corresponding polarity. On the seventh day, the tendons were removed and sent for histological slide preparation for birefringence and Picrosirius Red analysis and for blood vessel quantification. No significant difference was observed among the groups regarding collagen realignment (types I or III collagen) or quantity of blood vessels. High voltage pulsed current for six consecutive days was not effective in collagen realignment, synthesis, or angiogenesis after the partial rupturing of the Achilles tendon in rats.

  1. Recovery of calf muscle endurance 3 months after an Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Brorsson, A; Olsson, N; Nilsson-Helander, K; Karlsson, J; Eriksson, B I; Silbernagel, K G

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate calf muscle endurance in a seated position 3 months after an Achilles tendon rupture and to evaluate how the ability to perform standardized seated heel-rises correlated to the single-leg standing heel-rise test and to patient-reported symptoms evaluated with the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) 3 and 6 months after the injury. Ninety-three patients were included from a cohort of 101 patients participating in a prospective, randomized controlled trial comparing surgical and nonsurgical treatment after Achilles tendon rupture. Forty-seven patients were treated surgically and 46 nonsurgically. Ninety-one patients out of 93 (98%) could perform the standardized seated heel-rises. At the 3-month follow-up, there was a significant difference (P < 0.001) between the injured and the healthy side performing standardized seated heel-rises. There were also significant correlations (r = 0.29-0.37, P = < 0.05) between the standardized seated heel-rises and ATRS 3 and 6 months after injury in the group who could not perform single-leg standing heel-rises. There were no significant differences between the surgical and nonsurgical treatment groups. The evaluation of standardized seated heel-rises appears to be a useful tool to quantify progress and predict future functional performance and patient-reported symptoms. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Preinjury and postinjury running analysis along with measurements of strength and tendon length in a patient with a surgically repaired Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Willy, Richard; Davis, Irene

    2012-06-01

    Case report. The Achilles tendon is the most frequently ruptured tendon, and the incidence of Achilles tendon rupture has increased in the last decade. The rupture generally occurs without any preceding warning signs, and therefore preinjury data are seldom available. This case represents a unique opportunity to compare preinjury running mechanics with postinjury evaluation in a patient with an Achilles tendon rupture. A 23-year-old female sustained a right complete Achilles tendon rupture while playing soccer. Running mechanics data were collected preinjury, as she was a healthy participant in a study on running analysis. In addition, patient-reported symptoms, physical activity level, strength, ankle range of motion, heel-rise ability, Achilles tendon length, and running kinetics were evaluated 1 year after surgical repair. During running, greater ankle dorsiflexion and eversion and rearfoot abduction were noted on the involved side postinjury when compared to preinjury data. In addition, postinjury, the magnitude of all kinetics data was lower on the involved limb when compared to the uninvolved limb. The involved side displayed differences in strength, ankle range of motion, heel rise, and tendon length when compared to the uninvolved side 1 year after injury. Despite a return to normal running routine and reports of only minor limitations with running, considerable changes were noted in running biomechanics 1 year after injury. Calf muscle weakness and Achilles tendon elongation were also found when comparing the involved and uninvolved sides.

  3. Application of Computed Tomography Processed by Picture Archiving and Communication Systems in the Diagnosis of Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hai-Peng; Liu, Xin-Wei; Tian, Jing; Xie, Bing; Yang, Chao; Zhang, Hao; Zhou, Da-Peng

    2016-01-01

    The applications of CT examination in the diagnosis of the acute Achilles tendon rupture (AATR) were investigated. A total of 36 patients with suspected acute Achilles tendon rupture were tested using physical examination, ultrasound, and 3DCT scanning, respectively. Then, surgery was performed for the patients who showed positive result in at least two of the three tests for AATR. 3DVR, MPR, and the other CT scan image processing and diagnosis were conducted in PACS (picture archiving and communication system). PACS was also used to measure the length of distal broken ends of the Achilles tendon (AT) to tendon calcaneal insertion. Our study indicated that CT has the highest accuracy in diagnosis of acute Achilles tendon complete rupture. The length measurement is matched between PACS and those actually measured in operation. CT not only demonstrates more details directly in three dimensions especially with the rupture involved calcaneal insertion flap but also locates the rupture region for percutaneous suture by measuring the length of distal stump in PACS without the effect of the position of ankle. The accuracy of CT diagnosis for Achilles tendon partial rupture is yet to be studied.

  4. Application of Computed Tomography Processed by Picture Archiving and Communication Systems in the Diagnosis of Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jing; Xie, Bing; Zhang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The applications of CT examination in the diagnosis of the acute Achilles tendon rupture (AATR) were investigated. A total of 36 patients with suspected acute Achilles tendon rupture were tested using physical examination, ultrasound, and 3DCT scanning, respectively. Then, surgery was performed for the patients who showed positive result in at least two of the three tests for AATR. 3DVR, MPR, and the other CT scan image processing and diagnosis were conducted in PACS (picture archiving and communication system). PACS was also used to measure the length of distal broken ends of the Achilles tendon (AT) to tendon calcaneal insertion. Our study indicated that CT has the highest accuracy in diagnosis of acute Achilles tendon complete rupture. The length measurement is matched between PACS and those actually measured in operation. CT not only demonstrates more details directly in three dimensions especially with the rupture involved calcaneal insertion flap but also locates the rupture region for percutaneous suture by measuring the length of distal stump in PACS without the effect of the position of ankle. The accuracy of CT diagnosis for Achilles tendon partial rupture is yet to be studied. PMID:28078295

  5. Trends in the Management of Achilles Tendon Ruptures in the United States Medicare Population, 2005-2011

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Brandon J.; Cvetanovich, Gregory L.; Nwachukwu, Ben U.; Villarroel, Leonardo D.; Lin, Johnny L.; Bach, Bernard R.; McCormick, Frank M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Achilles tendon ruptures are one of the most commonly treated injuries by orthopaedic surgeons and general practitioners. Achilles tendon ruptures have classically been thought to affect the middle-aged “weekend warrior” participating in basketball, volleyball, soccer, or any other ground sport that requires speed and agility; however, with a more active elderly population, these tears are becoming more common in older patients. Purpose: To report trends in nonoperative and operative treatment of Achilles tendon tears in the United States from 2005 to 2011 in patients registered with a large Medicare database. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiological study. Methods: Patients who underwent nonoperative and operative treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures by either primary repair or primary repair with graft (International Classification of Diseases 9 [ICD-9] diagnosis code 727.67, Current Procedural Terminology [CPT] codes 27650 and 27652) for the years 2005 to 2011 were identified using the PearlDiver Medicare Database. Demographic and utilization data available within the database were extracted for patients who underwent nonoperative as well as operative treatment for Achilles tendon ruptures. Statistical analysis involved Student t tests, chi-square tests, and linear regression analyses, with statistical significance set at P < .05. Results: From 2005 to 2011, there were a total of 14,127 Achilles tendon ruptures. Of these, 9814 were managed nonoperatively, 3531 were treated with primary repair, and 782 were treated with primary repair with graft. The incidence of Achilles tendon increased from 0.67 per 10,000 in 2005 to 1.08 per 10,000 in 2011 (P < .01). There was no significant difference in the number of Achilles ruptures between males (6636) and females (7582) (P > .05). There was an increase in the overall number of Achilles tendon ruptures over time (1689 in 2005 compared with 2788 in 2011; P < .001) but no difference in the percentage of

  6. The Neglected Achilles Tendon Rupture Repaired With Allograft: A Review of 14 Cases.

    PubMed

    Ofili, Kene P; Pollard, Jason D; Schuberth, John M

    Various surgical techniques have been reported for the repair of neglected Achilles tendon ruptures, including V-Y advancements, synthetic augmentations, and collagen implants. The use of an Achilles tendon allograft allows bridging of large defects without donor site morbidity, with a relative ease of technique and adequate graft availability. The present retrospective report focused on the outcomes of a series of 14 patients with neglected ruptures treated with an Achilles tendon allograft. Patients were included in the present series if they had ≥12 months of postoperative follow-up data available and the allograft had been used without any adjunctive procedures. Of the 14 patients, 6 were female (43%) and 8 were male (57%), with a mean follow-up period of 16.1 ± 3 (range 12 to 27) months. The mean interval from the initial injury to surgery was 6.9 ± 5 (range 1 to 28) months. The mean intraoperative defect size was 7.0 ± 3 (range 4 to 15) cm. A calcaneal block was used in 2 patients (14%). All patients were able to perform a single heel rise at a mean of 27 ± 11 (range 12 to 37) weeks postoperatively. Weightbearing in normal shoe gear was achieved at a mean of 13.5 ± 3 (range 12 to 17) weeks. Complications included 1 delayed union (7%) of the calcaneal bone block. Repair of the neglected Achilles tendon rupture with an allograft appears to be an acceptable approach, with good overall outcomes and low risk. These results suggest that this method of repair compares favorably with established alternatives. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Performance outcomes after repair of complete achilles tendon ruptures in national basketball association players.

    PubMed

    Amin, Nirav H; Old, Andrew B; Tabb, Loni P; Garg, Rohit; Toossi, Nader; Cerynik, Douglas L

    2013-08-01

    A complete rupture of the Achilles tendon is a devastating injury. Variables affecting return to competition and performance changes for National Basketball Association (NBA) players are not readily evident. Players in the NBA who ruptured their Achilles tendons and who underwent surgical repair would have more experience in the league, and the performance of those who were able to return to competition would be decreased when compared with their performance before injury and with their control-matched peers. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Data for 18 basketball players with Achilles tendon repair over a 23-year period (1988-2011) were obtained from injury reports, press releases, and player profiles. Variables included age, body mass index (BMI), player position, and number of years playing in the league. Individual season statistics were obtained, and the NBA player efficiency rating (PER) was calculated for 2 seasons before and after injury. Controls were matched by playing position, number of seasons played, and performance statistics. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess the effect of each factor. At the time of injury, the average age was 29.7 years, average BMI was 25.6, and average playing experience was 7.6 years. Seven players never returned to play an NBA game, whereas 11 players returned to play 1 season, with 8 of those players returning for ≥2 seasons. Players who returned missed an average of 55.9 games. The PER was reduced by 4.57 (P = .003) in the first season and by 4.38 (P = .010) in the second season. When compared with controls, players demonstrated a significant decline in the PER the first season (P = .038) and second season (P = .081) after their return. The NBA players who returned to play after repair of complete Achilles tendon ruptures showed a significant decrease in playing time and performance. Thirty-nine percent of players never returned to play.

  8. Chronic Achilles tendon rupture augmented by transposition of the fibularis brevis and fibularis longus muscles.

    PubMed

    Diserens, K A; Venzin, C

    2015-09-01

    A 1 year and 8 months old castrated male Pyrenean mountain dog was presented with an Achilles tendon rupture at least 5 weeks old. The defect between the two tendon ends was 2 cm in full extension of the tarsal joint. A new technique was successfully applied; a transposition and tenodesis of the fibularis brevis and fibularis longus muscles, combined with a 3 loop pulley suture and a tensor fascia lata graft. A transarticular external fixator was used for the first 3.5 weeks after surgery and a splint for the two following weeks. A 3 years follow-up shows the dog walking without any lameness.

  9. The chinese version of achilles tendon total rupture score: cross-cultural adaptation, reliability and validity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jin; Jia, Zhenyu; Zhi, Xin; Li, Xiaoqun; Zhai, Xiao; Cao, Liehu; Weng, Weizong; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Lin; Chen, Xiao; Su, Jiacan

    2017-01-05

    The Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS), which is originally developed in 2007 in Swedish, is the only patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) for specific outcome assessment of an Achilles tendon rupture.Purpose of this study is to translate and cross-culturally adapt Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) into simplified Chinese, and primarily evaluate the responsiveness, reliability and validity. International recognized guideline which was designed by Beaton was followed to make the translation of ATRS from English into simplified Chinese version (CH-ATRS). A prospective cohort study was carried out for the cross-cultural adaptation. There were 112 participants included into the study. Psychometric properties including floor and ceiling effects, Cronbach's alpha, intraclass correlation coefficient, effect size, standard response mean, and construct validity were tested. The mean scores of CH-ATRS are 57.42 ± 13.70. No sign of floor or ceiling effect was found of CH-ATRS. High level of internal consistency was supported by the value of Cronbach's alpha (0.893). ICC (0.979, 95%CI: 0.984-0.993) was high to indicate the high test-retest reliability. Great responsive ness was proved with the high absolute value of ES and SRM (0.84 and 8.98, respectively). The total CH-ATRS score had very good correlation with physical function and body pain subscales of SF-36 (r = -0.758 and r = -0.694, respectively, p < 0.001), while poor correlation with vitality and role physical subscales of SF-36 (r = -0.033 and r = -0.025, respectively, p ≥ 0.05), which supported construct validity of CH-ATRS. This Chinese version of Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (CH-ATRS) can be used as a reliable and valid instrument for Achilles tendon rupture assessing in Chinese-speaking population. Level of evidence II.

  10. [REPAIR OF ACUTE CLOSED ACHILLES TENDON RUPTURES BY CHANNEL-ASSISTED MINIMALLY INVASIVE REPAIR SYSTEM].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Hao, Ming; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Yuan; Liang, Xiangdang; Zhang, Qun; Guo, Yizhu; Zhang, Lihai; Tang, Peifu

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of channel-assisted minimally invasive repair (CAMIR) for acute closed Achilles tendon ruptures. Between January 2011 and June 2012, 30 patients (30 sides) with acute closed Achilles tendon ruptures were treated with CAMIR technique. Among 30 patients, 18 were male and 12 were female with an average age of 30.4 years (range, 22-50 years); the locations were left side in 10 cases and right side in 20 cases. All the causes were sports injury. B-ultrasound was used to confirm the diagnosis, with the average distance from the rupture site to the Achilles tendon insertion of 4.4 cm (range, 2-8 cm). The time from injury to operation was 3 hours to 9 days (median, 4 days). All injuries were repaired by CAMIR technique. The average operation time was 17.0 minutes (range, 10-25 minutes), and the mean incision length was 2.0 cm (range, 1.5-2.5 cm). All the incisions healed by first intention. There was no complication of wound problem, deep vein thrombosis, re-rupture, or sural nerve injury. All cases were followed up 12-24 months with an average of 16 months. At last follow-up, the patients could walk normally with powerful raising heels and restored to normal activity level. MRI imaging suggested the continuity and healing of ruptured tendon. The circumference difference between affected leg and normal leg was less than 1 cm, and the ankle dorsi-extension was 20-30°, plantar flexion was 20-30°. Arner Lindholm score showed that the surgical results were excellent in 28 cases and good in 2 cases, with an excellent and good rate of 100%. CAMIR is a safe and reliable method to repair acute closed Achilles tendon rupture, with many advantages of minimal injury, low re-rupture and infection. Sural nerve injury can be minimized using CAMIR by carefully placing the suture channel with a stab incision and special trocar based on a modified Bunnel suture technique.

  11. Medial malleolus fracture of the ankle combined with rupture of the Achilles tendon

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jike; Maruo Holledge, Masumi

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old man fell off a 60-cm-high step, with his ankle in a twisted position, and sustained a closed fracture of the medial malleolus, with an ipsilateral complete Achilles tendon (TA) rupture. The TA rupture was initially missed but diagnosed by ultrasound examination, 2 weeks post-operatively. The ankle fracture was diagnosed from routine radiographs. Such a combination of injuries has been reported infrequently in the literature, but significant similarities have been described in the mechanism of injury and fracture patterns. Nevertheless, three of five reported cases with combined medial malleolus fractures were initially misdiagnosed. PMID:27141047

  12. Percutaneous versus open repair of the ruptured Achilles tendon: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Cretnik, Andrej; Kosanovic, Milos; Smrkolj, Vladimir

    2005-09-01

    Controversy regarding the optimal treatment of the fresh total Achilles tendon rupture remains. To compare the results of percutaneous and open Achilles tendon repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. The results of 132 consecutive patients with acute complete Achilles tendon rupture who were operated on exclusively with modified percutaneous repair under local anesthesia from 1991 to 1997 and followed up for at least 2 years were compared to the results of 105 consecutive patients who were operated on exclusively with open repair under general or spinal anesthesia in the same period. There were significantly fewer major complications in the group of percutaneous repairs in comparison with the group of open repairs (4.5% vs 12.4%; P = .03), particularly necrosis (0% vs 5.6%; P = .019), and a lower total number of complications (9.7% vs 21%; P = .013). There were slightly more reruptures (3.7% vs 2.8%; P = .680) and sural nerve disturbances (4.5% vs 2.8%; P = .487) in the group of percutaneous repairs, with no statistically significant difference. Functional assessment using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society scale and the Holz score showed no statistically significant difference. The results of the study support the choice of (modified) percutaneous suturing under local anesthesia as the method that brings comparable functional results to open repair, with a significantly lower rate of complications.

  13. A case of spontaneous bilateral Achilles tendon rupture: surgical treatment with early mobilization.

    PubMed

    Yue, Dominic; Al-Hadithy, Nawfal; Domos, Peter

    2014-02-01

    Tendo-Achilles (TA) rupture is the most commonly ruptured tendon in the lower limb despite being one of the toughest tendons. Typically, it occurs unilaterally in middle-aged individuals who participate in strenuous activity. Spontaneous ruptures without any risk factors predisposing the patient is uncommon and for it to occur bilaterally is very rare. To raise awareness of the potential for TA ruptures to occur bilaterally and thus the importance of assessing the TA contralateral to a seemingly unilateral rupture. This is particularly the case in patients with risk factors, which are reviewed in this report. A summary of the main treatment options is also described. We report a case of spontaneous, bilateral TA rupture in a 40-year-old man with no identifiable risk factors. It occurred following a heavy impact during a sports activity and although painful, was able to mobilize slowly. After a clinical examination confirmed the diagnosis, the patient underwent early bilateral surgical repair and subsequently embarked on a comprehensive rehabilitation program with a good functional outcome at follow-up. His return to premorbid work and social life was uneventful. Bilateral TA ruptures are rare but increased awareness would help avoid a tear or rupture of the contralateral side being missed. All patients presenting clinically with any TA rupture should have risk factors reviewed. Surgical repair must be accompanied by a comprehensive rehabilitation program for adequate recovery and return of function.

  14. One-stage treatment of deep infection following repair of Achilles tendon rupture with flexor hallucis longus transfer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang; Moon, Jeong Seok; Seo, Jeong Gook; Lee, Woo Chun

    2009-03-01

    We present one-stage treatment of deep infection following repair of Achilles tendon rupture using flexor hallucis longus transfer. Flexor hallucis longus was used not only to connect the defect in Achillles tendon, but also to control the soft tissue infection with its abundant blood supply, simultaneously. The clinical results for the two patients in this report were excellent without major complication.

  15. [Anchors and peroneous brevis tendon augmentation and plantaris muscle tendon covering for the reconstruction of achilles tendon rupture caused by corticosteroids injection].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Ning

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the clinical therapeutic effects of anchors, peroneus brevis tendon augmentation and plantaris muscle tendon covering on the reconstruction of achilles tendon rupture caused by corticosteroids injection. From March 2005 to April 2010, the clinical data of 10 patients with acute achilles tendon rupture repaired with suture anchors, peroneus brevis tendon augmentation and plantaris muscle tendon covering were retrospectively analyzed. The achilles tendon rupture was caused by corticosteroids injection. There were 8 males and 2 females with a mean age of (46.80 +/- 2.83) years old(ranged from 21 to 68 years). Postoperative complications, the range of movement of affected foot, number of consecutive heel raises and single leg jumpings were recorded. Functional recovery of achilles tendon were assessed according to ankle and hindfoot scores of the American Orthopedic Foot Ankle Society (AOFAS). All patients were followed up for 12 to 18 months with an average of 13.5 months. No wound infection, re-rupture and rejection reaction were found. At the last follow-up, there was no significant difference in the range of movement between affected foot (54.5 +/- 6.3) degrees and unaffected foot (56.8 +/- 3.8) degrees (t = 0.989, P = 0.336). The affected foot could raise heel and do single-leg hops for 10 times continuosly. There was significant difference in AOFAS between preoperative score (67.3 +/- 7.6) and postoperative score (95.5 +/- 7.6) (t = 8.297, P = 0.000);and there was no significant difference between affected foot scores (95.5 +/- 7.6)and unaffected foot scores (98.5 +/- 6.3) (t = 0.961, P = 0.349). Function recovery of achilles tendon: 9 cases were good, 1 case was fine. Anchors, peroneus brevis tendon augmentation and plantaris muscle tendon covering for the reconstruction of achilles tendon rupture caused by corticosteroids injection is a reliable and effective method, with advantage of simple operation, dependable fixation and less complications.

  16. A Prospective Study of Platelet-Rich Plasma as Biological Augmentation for Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture Repair

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jian; Mo, Xiaolian; Li, Tanzhu; Xue, Jianfeng; Mei, Guohua; Li, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    Acute Achilles tendon rupture is one of the most common tendon injuries in adults. We hypothesized that Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) can be used as biological augmentation for surgical treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. Our study is a prospective randomized controlled trial. Patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture undergoing surgical repair were randomly assigned into either control group or PRP group. End-to-end modified Krackow suture was performed in both groups. In the PRP group, PRP was injected into the paratenon sheath and around the ruptured tissue after the tendon was repaired. Postoperatively we evaluated isokinetic muscle strength at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. In addition, ankle ROM, calf circumference, Leppilahti score, and the SF-36 score were evaluated at 6, 12, and 24 months after operation. At 3 months, the PRP group had better isokinetic muscle. The PRP group also achieved higher SF-36 and Leppilahti scores at 6 and 12 months. At 24 months, the PRP group had an improved ankle range of motion compared to the control group. Our study results suggest that PRP can serve as a biological augmentation to acute Achilles tendon rupture repair and improves both short and midterm functional outcomes. PMID:28116306

  17. A Prospective Study of Platelet-Rich Plasma as Biological Augmentation for Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture Repair.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jian; Mo, Xiaolian; Shi, Zhongmin; Li, Tanzhu; Xue, Jianfeng; Mei, Guohua; Li, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    Acute Achilles tendon rupture is one of the most common tendon injuries in adults. We hypothesized that Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) can be used as biological augmentation for surgical treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. Our study is a prospective randomized controlled trial. Patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture undergoing surgical repair were randomly assigned into either control group or PRP group. End-to-end modified Krackow suture was performed in both groups. In the PRP group, PRP was injected into the paratenon sheath and around the ruptured tissue after the tendon was repaired. Postoperatively we evaluated isokinetic muscle strength at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. In addition, ankle ROM, calf circumference, Leppilahti score, and the SF-36 score were evaluated at 6, 12, and 24 months after operation. At 3 months, the PRP group had better isokinetic muscle. The PRP group also achieved higher SF-36 and Leppilahti scores at 6 and 12 months. At 24 months, the PRP group had an improved ankle range of motion compared to the control group. Our study results suggest that PRP can serve as a biological augmentation to acute Achilles tendon rupture repair and improves both short and midterm functional outcomes.

  18. Treatment of acute achilles tendon ruptures. A meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Khan, Riaz J K; Fick, Dan; Keogh, Angus; Crawford, John; Brammar, Tim; Parker, Martyn

    2005-10-01

    There is a lack of consensus regarding the best option for the treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. Treatment can be broadly classified as operative (open or percutaneous) or nonoperative (casting or functional bracing). Postoperative splinting can be performed with a rigid cast (proximal or distal to the knee) or a more mobile functional brace. The aim of this meta-analysis was to identify and summarize the evidence from randomized, controlled trials on the effectiveness of different interventions for the treatment of acute Achilles tendon ruptures. We searched multiple databases (including EMBASE, CINAHL, and MEDLINE) as well as reference lists of articles and contacted authors. Keywords included Achilles tendon, rupture, and tendon injuries. Three reviewers extracted data and independently assessed trial quality with use of a ten-item scale. Twelve trials involving 800 patients were included. There was a variable level of methodological rigor and reporting of outcomes. Open operative treatment was associated with a lower risk of rerupture compared with nonoperative treatment (relative risk, 0.27; 95% confidence interval, 0.11 to 0.64). However, it was associated with a higher risk of other complications, including infection, adhesions, and disturbed skin sensibility (relative risk, 10.60; 95% confidence interval, 4.82 to 23.28). Percutaneous repair was associated with a lower complication rate compared with open operative repair (relative risk, 2.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.06 to 7.62). Patients who had been managed with a functional brace postoperatively (allowing for early mobilization) had a lower complication rate compared with those who had been managed with a cast (relative risk, 1.88; 95% confidence interval, 1.27 to 2.76). Because of the small number of patients involved, no definitive conclusions could be made regarding different nonoperative treatment regimens. Open operative treatment of acute Achilles tendon ruptures significantly reduces

  19. Sonography of the Achilles Tendon After Complete Rupture Repair: What the Radiologist Should Know.

    PubMed

    Gitto, Salvatore; Draghi, Anna Guja; Bortolotto, Chandra; Draghi, Ferdinando

    2016-12-01

    This review aims to provide the radiologist with simple and systematic guidelines for evaluation of the Achilles tendon after complete rupture repair. Currently, there is a plethora of nonsurgical and surgical treatments, but sonographic examination has shown no significant differences between them. A systematic analysis of several parameters (morphologic characteristics, structure, color Doppler vascularization, and mobility) should be undertaken. Morphologically, the repaired tendon is larger, wider, or both. The loss of the fibrillary structure, inhomogeneity, and the surgical material in the context of the tendon are "normal" aspects after a repaired rupture. The presence of fluid collections when affecting greater than 50% of the surface of the tendon and extensive calcifications should be considered pathologic aspects. In the immediate postoperative period, there is the absence of vascularization detectable by color Doppler imaging. During the first 3 months, there is an increase in intratendinous vascularization with hypervascularization. From 3 to 6 months, stabilization and regression of the vascularization occur. Beyond the first 6 months, the hypervascularization is pathologic. The pattern of motion is, generally, reduced considerably more often in surgically treated tendons than in non-surgically treated ones. Elastography generally shows a hard appearance, with only a relatively heterogeneous pattern. In conclusion, a treated tendon will never regain a normal sonographic appearance, and the operator must distinguish between normal posttreatment changes and real pathologic characteristics. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  20. Nintendo Wii related Achilles tendon rupture: first reported case and literature review of motion sensing video game injuries.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rohit; Manoharan, Gopikanthan; Moores, Thomas Steven; Patel, Amit

    2014-05-14

    Achilles tendon ruptures tend to occur more commonly in healthy men between the ages of 30 and 50 years who have had no previous injury or problem reported in the affected leg. The injury is usually due to sudden forced plantar flexion of the foot, unexpected dorsiflexion of the foot and violent dorsiflexion of a plantar flexed foot, all of which occur during high impact activities. We present the first reported case of interactive activity with Nintendo Wii games that have resulted in Achilles tendon rupture in a 46-year-old man. There have been no previous reports of Achilles tendon rupture with Nintendo Wii usage; it is a relatively uncommon mode of injury and is rare in terms of epidemiology of motion sensing video game injuries.

  1. Nintendo Wii related Achilles tendon rupture: first reported case and literature review of motion sensing video game injuries

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rohit; Manoharan, Gopikanthan; Moores, Thomas Steven; Patel, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures tend to occur more commonly in healthy men between the ages of 30 and 50 years who have had no previous injury or problem reported in the affected leg. The injury is usually due to sudden forced plantar flexion of the foot, unexpected dorsiflexion of the foot and violent dorsiflexion of a plantar flexed foot, all of which occur during high impact activities. We present the first reported case of interactive activity with Nintendo Wii games that have resulted in Achilles tendon rupture in a 46-year-old man. There have been no previous reports of Achilles tendon rupture with Nintendo Wii usage; it is a relatively uncommon mode of injury and is rare in terms of epidemiology of motion sensing video game injuries. PMID:24827648

  2. A systematic review of early rehabilitation methods following a rupture of the Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Rebecca S; McGuinness, Katie R; Achten, Juul; Costa, Matthew L

    2012-03-01

    Rupture of the Achilles tendon is a debilitating injury. Advances have led to the development of immediate weight bearing rehabilitation. A range of early rehabilitation methods exist, but further research is required into this new area. The first stage in the investigation of a complex intervention is to identify its defining components. The aim of this review was to systemically identify and summarise, from clinical studies, the individual components that define immediate weight bearing rehabilitation protocols for the treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture's. The electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED and the register of current controlled trials were searched up to March 2010. All study designs and languages were included. Two independent reviewers used pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria to identify all eligible articles. Eligible articles were summarised and critically reviewed, using the extension of the CONSORT statement for non-pharmacological interventions. Two hundred and fifteen articles were screened, nine were included. These studies, presented the results of 424 patients; 236 who had surgery and 188 who were managed non-operatively. There were a range of rehabilitation protocols that were defined by four components. These components consisted of the degree of maintained plantarflexion, whether daily range of movement exercises were permitted, the type of orthotic and for how long it was worn. The efficacy of different immediate weight bearing rehabilitation protocols following an acute rupture of the Achilles tendon remains unclear. Further research is required to evaluate the identified components to optimise rehabilitation. Copyright © 2011 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of Persian Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Noureddin Nakhostin; Naghdi, Soofia; Hasanvand, Sahar; Fakhari, Zahra; Kordi, Ramin; Nilsson-Helander, Katarina

    2016-04-01

    To cross-culturally adapt the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) to Persian language and to preliminary evaluate the reliability and validity of a Persian ATRS. A cross-sectional and prospective cohort study was conducted to translate and cross-culturally adapt the ATRS to Persian language (ATRS-Persian) following steps described in guidelines. Thirty patients with total Achilles tendon rupture and 30 healthy subjects participated in this study. Psychometric properties of floor/ceiling effects (responsiveness), internal consistency reliability, test-retest reliability, standard error of measurement (SEM), smallest detectable change (SDC), construct validity, and discriminant validity were tested. Factor analysis was performed to determine the ATRS-Persian structure. There were no floor or ceiling effects that indicate the content and responsiveness of ATRS-Persian. Internal consistency was high (Cronbach's α 0.95). Item-total correlations exceeded acceptable standard of 0.3 for the all items (0.58-0.95). The test-retest reliability was excellent [(ICC)agreement 0.98]. SEM and SDC were 3.57 and 9.9, respectively. Construct validity was supported by a significant correlation between the ATRS-Persian total score and the Persian Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (PFAOS) total score and PFAOS subscales (r = 0.55-0.83). The ATRS-Persian significantly discriminated between patients and healthy subjects. Explanatory factor analysis revealed 1 component. The ATRS was cross-culturally adapted to Persian and demonstrated to be a reliable and valid instrument to measure functional outcomes in Persian patients with Achilles tendon rupture. II.

  4. Surgical versus conservative treatment following acute rupture of the Achilles tendon: is there a pedobarographic difference?

    PubMed Central

    Karaaslan, Fatih; Mermerkaya, Musa Uğur; Çıraklı, Alper; Karaoğlu, Sinan; Duygulu, Fuat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Controversy remains regarding the optimal treatment method and postoperative rehabilitation of acute Achilles tendon ruptures. In this study, pedobarographic assessments of surgical and conservative treatments were compared. Material and methods A prospective assessment was made of 16 patients (eight surgical, eight conservative) and eight healthy controls using a plantar pressure measurement system. Biomechanical gait parameters were obtained using the Footscan dynamic gait analysis system. Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney U-tests were used for the evaluation of data. Results Nineteen males and five females were assessed, with an average age of 42.0±11.9 years. Follow-up was completed in 16 patients. No statistically significant difference was determined between the two treatment groups with regard to the gait analysis, but a difference was observed with the control group (P<0.001). All patients were able to resume their prior activities after 6 months and regained normal ranges of motion, with a high rate of satisfaction. Most of the patients (75%) were able to return to their pre-injury level of activities. Conclusion Satisfactory results were obtained through conservative treatment of acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon. No significant differences or complications were observed in the group managed conservatively versus the group treated surgically. Further studies including 3D gait analyses and tendon biomechanical research are required to further investigate this issue. PMID:27621640

  5. Treatment of acute Achilles tendon ruptures with Achillon device: clinical outcomes and kinetic gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Ignacio Martínez; Deval, Juan Cervera; Bosch, Marta Navarro; Mediavilla, Daniel Herrero; Garcia, Vicente Pellicer; González, María Sánchez

    2010-12-01

    We reviewed the outcomes of the Achillon minimally invasive suture system and an early semi-functional rehabilitation program for the treatment of acute Achilles tendon ruptures. From December 2006 to April 2008, 18 consecutive patients with acute Achilles tendon ruptures were retrospectively reviewed with an average follow-up of 22 months. Clinical data were assessed with the patient satisfaction and the AOFAS hindfoot score. Biomechanical gait parameters were obtained using the NedAMH/IBV dynamometric platform. At last follow-up the AOFAS score was 98 (range, 89-100) and correlated well with kinetic gait analysis. All patients regained normal range of motion and were able to resume their previous activities after six months, with a high rate of satisfaction. Three patients had scar adhesions. There were no cases of recurrent rupture or nerve injury. The Achillon device allows semi-functional rehabilitation and provides satisfactory results with a low rate of complication. Copyright © 2009 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Treating Achilles tendon rupture in rats with bone-marrow-cell transplantation therapy.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Naofumi; Kushida, Taketoshi; Oe, Kenichi; Umeda, Masayuki; Ikehara, Susumu; Iida, Hirokazu

    2010-12-01

    Bone marrow cells possess multipotentiality and have been used for several treatments. We hypothesized that bone marrow cells might differentiate into regenerated tendon and that several cytokines within bone marrow cells might accelerate tendon healing. Therefore, we treated Achilles tendon ruptures in a rat model with transplantation of whole bone marrow cells. Nine F344/Nslc (Fisher) rats were the source of bone marrow cells and mesenchymal stem cells as well as normal Achilles tendons. Eighty-seven Fisher rats were used for the experiments. The rats were divided into three groups: the BMC group (bone marrow cells injected around the tendon), the MSC group (mesenchymal stem cells injected around the tendon), and the non-treated control group (incision only). Outcome measures included mechanical testing, collagen immunohistochemistry, histological analysis, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to detect expression of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The ultimate failure load in the BMC group was significantly greater than that in the non-treated or the MSC group at seven days after incision (3.8 N vs. 0.9 N or 2.1 N, p < 0.016) and at fourteen days after incision (10.2 N vs. 6.1 N or 8.2 N, p < 0.016). The ultimate failure load in the BMC group at twenty-eight days after incision (33.8 N) was the same as that of normal tendon (34.8 N). The BMC group demonstrated stronger staining for type-III collagen at seven days after incision and stronger staining for type-I collagen at twenty-eight days than did the MSC group. Expression of TGF-β and VEGF in the BMC group was significantly increased compared with that in the other groups at four days after incision (TGF-β: 1.6 vs. 1.3 or 0.6, p < 0.01; VEGF: 1.7 vs. 1.1 or 0.9, p < 0.01). Transplantation of whole bone marrow cells may be a better and more readily available treatment for Achilles tendon rupture than cultured mesenchymal stem cells.

  7. Evolution of the Achilles tendon: The athlete's Achilles heel?

    PubMed

    Malvankar, S; Khan, W S

    2011-12-01

    The Achilles tendon is believed to have first developed two million years ago enabling humans to run twice as fast. However if the Achilles tendon is so important in terms of evolution, then why is this tendon so prone to injury - especially for those more active like athletes. The Achilles tendon had an integral role in evolving apes from a herbivorous diet to early humans who started hunting for food over longer distances, resulting in bipedal locomotion. Evolutionary advantages of the Achilles tendon includes it being the strongest tendon in the body, having an energy-saving mechanism for fast locomotion, allows humans to jump and run, and additionally is a spring and shock absorber during gait. Considering these benefits it is therefore not surprising that studies have shown athletes have thicker Achilles tendons than subjects who are less active. However, contradictory to these findings that show the importance of the Achilles tendon for athletes, it is well known that obtaining an Achilles tendon injury for an athlete can be career-altering. A disadvantage of the Achilles tendon is that the aetiology of its pathology is complicated. Achilles tendon ruptures are believed to be caused by overloading the tensed tendon, like during sports. However studies have also shown athlete Achilles tendon ruptures to have degenerative changes in the tendon. Other flaws of the Achilles tendon are its non-uniform vascularity and incomplete repair system which may suggest the Achilles tendon is on the edge of evolution. Research has shown that there is a genetic influence on the predisposition a person has towards Achilles tendon injuries. So if this tendon is here to stay in our anatomy, and it probably is due to the slow rate of evolution in humans, research in genetic modification could be used to decrease athletes' predisposition to Achilles tendinopathy.

  8. Randomized controlled trial of accelerated rehabilitation versus standard protocol following surgical repair of ruptured Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Porter, Mark D; Shadbolt, Bruce

    2015-05-01

    There is no consensus regarding the optimal management of the acutely ruptured Achilles tendon (TA). Functional bracing alone achieves outcomes similar to those of surgical repair. Surgical repair combined with immediate mobilization may improve the clinical outcome further. The purpose of our study was to determine if an accelerated rehabilitation programme following surgical repair of the ruptured TA could improve clinical outcome, relative to the standard protocol. Patients with an acutely ruptured TA were randomly allocated to undergo an accelerated programme (AP) or standard programme (SP), following surgery. Outcome was assessed at 12 months post-surgery using the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS), the heel-raise height and the time taken to return to running. Fifty-one patients completed the study, 25 in the AP group and 26 in the SP group. At 12 months post-surgery, the ATRS results were similar in the two treatment groups (87.46 in AP with standard error (SE) of 0.735 versus 87.12 in SP with SE of 0.75) while the AP group had less lengthening of the TA (0.385 cm, SE 0.166 versus 1.00 cm, SE 0.169) and a more rapid return to running (17.231 weeks, SE 0.401 versus 21.08 weeks, SE 0.409), than the SP group. The accelerated rehabilitation programme resulted in less tendon lengthening, more rapid return to running, but similar ATRS relative to the standard rehabilitation. Immobilization following TA repair may prolong recovery. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  9. [Effectiveness of a double-tsuge suture method in repairing Achilles tendon ruptures].

    PubMed

    Fu, Chongyang; Qu, Wei; Cheng, Chao; Lu, Ming; Jiang, Huajun; Lü, Decheng

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of a double-tsuge suture method with absorbable polydioxanone-cord (PDS-II) in repair of Achilles tendon ruptures. Between January 2005 and December 2008, 36 patients suffering from Achilles tendon ruptures were treated operatively. Of 36 patients, there were 29 males and 7 females with a mean age of 36 years (range, 21-50 years), including 22 cases of acute closed injuries, 6 cases of fresh open injuries (the time between injury and hospitalization was 1-10 days, mean 6 days), and 8 cases of old closed injuries (the time between injury and hospitalization was 43-63 days, mean 51 days). The injury reasons were sport injury (25 cases), incised injury (6 cases), falling injury (4 cases), and other (1 case). The results of "heel test" and the Thompson sign were positive in all patients. Operation was performed by using a double-tsuge suture method with a No. 0 PDS-II. After the ankle joint was fixed with short leg plaster cast at 30 degrees plantar flexion position for 6 weeks, the cast was removed and then functional exercises were done. Poor healing of incision occurred in 2 cases of old Achilles tendon ruptures and was cured after symptomatic treatment; healing of incision by first intention was achieved in the others. The patients were followed up 12 to 24 months (mean, 15 months). No rerupture, deep venous thromboembolism, or reflex sympathetic dystrophy occurred during follow-up. When compared with the range of motion of ankle joint of normal side, 7 cases had no change, 16 cases had a loss of 1-10 degrees, 12 cases had a loss of 10-20 degrees, and 1 case had a loss of 25 degrees. The average score was 90 (range, 74-96) according to Termann clinical evaluation criterion; the results were excellent in 24 cases, good in 11 cases, and fair in 1 case, and the excellent and good rate was 97.2%. The double-tsuge suture method is easy-to-operate, which has the smallest interference to the blood supply of Achilles tendon because of no

  10. Hypertrophy of the flexor hallucis longus muscle after tendon transfer in patients with chronic Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Oksanen, Maria M; Haapasalo, Heidi H; Elo, Petra P; Laine, Heikki-Jussi

    2014-12-01

    Flexor hallucis longus tendon (FHLT) transfer has become a popular method for reconstructing a chronic Achilles tendon rupture (ATR). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes and possible hypertrophy of the FHL muscle after FHLT transfer in patients with chronic ATR. Seven patients with chronic ATR underwent an FHLT transfer to heel through single incision. The patients were clinically evaluated 27 (16-39) months after the surgery. The patient satisfaction was assessed with Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Scale (ATRS). Isokinetic strength was measured from both legs. The FHL muscle hypertrophy was evaluated from MRI of both legs. All subjects also performed a gait analysis with an instrumented walkway system (GAITRite(®)). The plantar flexion strength was 16.1% (-45, 7-2, 4%) weaker in the operated leg. ATRS scores averaged 70.3. Marked hypertrophy, +52% (9-104%) of the FHL muscle was seen in the operated leg compared to the non-operated leg. The gait analysis did not show any marked pathology in any of the patients. A mean hypertrophy of 52% of the FHL muscle was found after FHLT transfer for the chronic ATR. This indicates strong adaptation capacity of this muscle after FLHT transfer in situation where the function of the gastro-soleus complex was severely impaired preoperatively. The reconstruction of chronic ATR with FHLT transfer provided a good functional outcome and excellent patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2014 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of surgical treatment for ruptured Achilles tendon in 31 athletes.

    PubMed

    Jallageas, R; Bordes, J; Daviet, J-C; Mabit, C; Coste, C

    2013-09-01

    In the past few decades, the incidence of Achilles tendon rupture has increased in parallel with increased sports participation. Although the optimal treatment remains controversial, there is a trend towards surgical treatment in athletes. Surgical repair of ruptured Achilles tendon in athlete results in good functional and objective recovery, irrespective of the type of surgery performed. Subsidiarily, are the results different between percutaneous surgery (PS) and standard open surgery (OS)? This was a cross-sectional study of 31 patients who presented with a ruptured Achilles tendon that occurred during sports participation. Percutaneous surgery was performed in 16 patients and open surgery in 15 patients between 2005 and 2009. The objective recovery status was evaluated by open chain goniometry, measurement of leg muscle atrophy and assessment of isokinetic strength. The functional analysis was based on the delay, level of sports upon return, AOFAS and VAS for pain. Our series of Achilles tendon rupture patients consisted of 88% men and 12% women, with an average age of 38 years. In 71% of cases, the rupture occurred during eccentric loading. After a follow-up of 15 months, the muscle atrophy was 13 mm after PS and 24 mm after OS (P=0.01). A strength deficit of 19% in the plantar flexors was found in the two groups. No patient experienced a rerupture. The return to sports occurred at 130 days after PS and 178 days after OS (P=0.005). The average AOFAS score was 94 and the VAS was 0.5. There were no differences in ankle range of motion between the two groups. The majority (77%) of patients had returned to their preinjury level of sports activity. The return to activities of daily living was slower in our study than in studies based in Anglo-Saxon countries; this can be explained by the different sick leave coverage systems. Percutaneous surgery resulted in a faster return to sports (about 130 days) and less muscle atrophy than open surgery. Our results for

  12. Open Achilles tendon lacerations.

    PubMed

    Said, M Nader; Al Ateeq Al Dosari, Mohamed; Al Subaii, Nasser; Kawas, Alaa; Al Mas, Ali; Al Ser, Yaser; Abuodeh, Yousef; Shakil, Malik; Habash, Ali; Mukhter, Khalid

    2015-04-01

    In contrast to closed Achilles tendon ruptures, open injuries are rarely reported in the literature. This paper provides information about open Achilles tendon wounds that are eventually seen in the Middle East. The reporting unit, Hamad Medical Corporation, is one of the biggest trauma centers in the Gulf area and the major health provider in Qatar. This is a retrospective study including patients admitted and operated for open Achilles tendon injuries between January 2011 and December 2013. Two hundred and five cases of open Achilles tendon lacerations were operated in Hamad General Hospital in this period. Forty-eight cases showed partial injuries, and the remaining are complete tendons cut. In the same period, fifty-one closed ruptured Achilles tendons were operated in the same trauma unit. In the majority of cases, the open injury resulted from a slip in the floor-leveled traditional toilette seats. Local damage to the toilette seats resulted in sharp edges causing the laceration of the heel if the patient was slipping over the wet floor. This occurrence is the cause in the vast majority of the cases. Wounds were located 1-5 cm proximal to tendon insertion. Standard treatment principles were applied. This included thorough irrigation in the emergency room, intravenous antibiotics, surgical debridement and primary repair within 24 h. Patients were kept in the hospital 1-7 days for intravenous antibiotics and possible dressing changes. Postoperatively below knee slabs were applied in the majority of patients and were kept for about 4 weeks followed by gradual weight bearing and range of motion exercises. Outpatients follow up in 1-2 weeks. Further follow-up visits at around 2-, 4-, 8- and 12-week intervals until complete wound healing and satisfactory rehabilitation outcome. Sixteen cases needed a second procedure. A high incidence of Achilles tendon open injuries is reported. This seems to be related to partially damaged floor-level toilettes in the

  13. The modified Bosworth technique for the treatment of acute traumatic Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Efstathopoulos, N; Agoropoulos, Z; Papachristou, G; Karachalios, G G; Kokorogiannis, K; Kaloudis, J

    1996-09-01

    Between 1983 and 1994, 15 patients (range 18 to 62 years) with acute traumatic Achilles tendon rupture, were treated surgically in our Department. We employed a modified Bosworth technique. The modifications were the use of a shorter strip of tendon and more secure fixation of the proximal and distal stump, than the original Bosworth technique. Postoperatively an above - knee plaster cast was applied with the knee flexed 30°-40° and the foot in a relaxed equinus position. The plaster cast was changed to a below - knee after 4 weeks and the foot gradually dorsiflexed to a neutral position until the 8th week, and then the plaster cast was removed. No patient had wound separation, infection or skin sloughs. After an average follow-up of 9 years, no rerupture has been reported and all the patients have returned to their pre injury activities.

  14. Percutaneous Tenolig(®) repair under intra-operative ultrasonography guidance in acute Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Lacoste, S; Féron, J M; Cherrier, B

    2014-12-01

    Acute Achilles tendon rupture can be treated conservatively or surgically. Open surgery restores tendon continuity but carries a risk of skin complications. Tenolig(®) is a device designed for the percutaneous biological treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. Earlier studies found high rates of recurrent tears and nerve injury after Tenolig(®) repair. We hypothesised that intra-operative ultrasonography during Tenolig(®) repair would decrease the post-operative complication rate and improve functional outcomes. We studied 75 consecutive patients with a mean age of 39.9 years. The injury was sports-related in 82.8% of cases. Mean distance from the calcaneal tendon attachment to the tear was 5cm and mean time from injury to repair was 4.2 days. All patients underwent Tenolig(®) repair under ultrasound guidance followed by early rehabilitation therapy with partial weight bearing started after 3 weeks. Mean follow-up was 20.7 months and no patient was lost to follow-up. A single patient (1.3%) experienced rerupture and none had permanent sural nerve damage. Mean time to sports resumption was 8.6 months, with two-thirds of patients returning to their previous level of sporting activities. The mean AOFAS functional score was 95 and the mean ATRS score was 91.3. Our experience suggests that intra-operative ultrasonography, a non-invasive, widely available, and accurate tool, provided improved control of Tenolig(®) suture position. Ultrasonography provided valuable guidance during this demanding procedure and allowed the very early initiation of rehabilitation therapy. Another crucial factor is patient education about the physical therapy programme. Attention to this point allowed us to obtain robust and reliable functional outcomes in a population predominantly composed of athletes. Level IV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy accelerates Achilles tendon repair by promoting neurite regeneration☆

    PubMed Central

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Aibai, Minawa; Sabirhazi, Gulnur; Shawutali, Nuerai; Tangkejie, Wulanbai; Badelhan, Aynaz; Nuerduola, Yeermike; Satewalede, Turde; Buranbai, Darehan; Hunapia, Beicen; Jialihasi, Ayidaer; Bai, Jingping; Kizaibek, Murat

    2012-01-01

    Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy facilitates the functional recovery of a ruptured Achilles tendon. However, protein expression during the healing process remains a controversial issue. New Zealand rabbits, aged 14 weeks, underwent tenotomy followed immediately by Achilles tendon microsurgery to repair the Achilles tendon rupture. The tendon was then immobilized or subjected to postoperative early motion treatment (kinesitherapy). Mass spectrography results showed that after 14 days of motion treatment, 18 protein spots were differentially expressed, among which, 12 were up-regulated, consisting of gelsolin isoform b and neurite growth-related protein collapsing response mediator protein 2. Western blot analysis showed that gelsolin isoform b was up-regulated at days 7–21 of motion treatment. These findings suggest that active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy promotes the neurite regeneration of a ruptured Achilles tendon and gelsolin isoform b can be used as a biomarker for Achilles tendon healing after kinesitherapy. PMID:25317130

  16. Ageing, deep vein thrombosis and male gender predict poor outcome after acute Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Arverud, E Domeij-; Anundsson, P; Hardell, E; Barreng, G; Edman, G; Latifi, A; Labruto, F; Ackermann, P W

    2016-12-01

    Patients with an acute Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) take a long time to heal, have a high incidence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and widely variable functional outcomes. This variation in outcome may be explained by a lack of knowledge of adverse factors, and a subsequent shortage of appropriate interventions. A total of 111 patients (95 men, 16 women; mean age 40.3, standard deviation 8.4) with an acute total ATR were prospectively assessed. At one year post-operatively a uniform outcome score, Achilles Combined Outcome Score (ACOS), was obtained by combining three validated, independent, outcome measures: Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score, heel-rise height test, and limb symmetry heel-rise height. Predictors of ACOS included treatment; gender; age; smoking; body mass index; time to surgery; physical activity level pre- and post-injury; symptoms; quality of life and incidence of DVT. There were three independent variables that correlated significantly with the dichotomised outcome score (ACOS), while there was no correlation with other factors. An age of less than 40 years old was the strongest independent predictor of a good outcome one year after ATR (odds ratio (OR) 0.20, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.08 to 0.51), followed by female gender (OR) 4.18, 95% CI 1.01 to 17.24). Notably, patients who did not have a DVT while immobilised post-operatively had a better outcome (OR 0.31, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.80). Over the age of 40 years, male gender and having a DVT while immobilised are independent negative predictors of outcome in patients with an acute ATR. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:1635-41. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  17. Operative and Nonoperative Management of Achilles Tendon Ruptures in Active Duty Military Population.

    PubMed

    Renninger, Christopher H; Kuhn, Kevin; Fellars, Todd; Youngblood, Scot; Bellamy, Joseph

    2016-03-01

    The optimal management of Achilles tendon ruptures continues to be a subject of debate in orthopedics. These injuries are common in the active duty military population. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively compare the results of operative and nonoperative management of Achilles tendon ruptures in the active duty military population following the publication of a landmark level I study that has influenced practice patterns. All Achilles tendon injuries in active duty patients were identified at a single military institution from January 1, 2011, to January 1, 2014. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied and charts were reviewed. Demographic and treatment information were recorded along with return to duty status, deep vein thrombosis (DVT), rerupture, and other complication data. Rates of DVT, rerupture, other complications, and return to duty (including time to return) were then compared. Demographic data were described. Fifty-seven male patients met inclusion criteria with an average age of 31 years. There were 27 in the operative group and 30 in the nonoperative group. There were no significant differences in group demographics. There were no DVTs in either treatment group. There were no wound complications in the operative group. There were no significant differences in the rates of rerupture, return to duty, or other complications. There were 2 reruptures in the nonoperative group. Both were treated nonoperatively. There was one rerupture in the operative group that was treated nonoperatively. All reruptures were partial tears. Two patients underwent repair with flexor hallucis longus augmentation. Both of these patients were initially managed nonoperatively. When available data on time to return to duty was analyzed, patients who underwent operative management returned to duty on average approximately one and a half months earlier (6.7 vs 8.2 months) than nonoperative patients (P = .04). In 2011, 12% of injuries were treated nonoperatively

  18. Comparison of Semi-Invasive "Internal Splinting" and Open Suturing Techniques in Achilles Tendon Rupture Surgery.

    PubMed

    Sarman, Hakan; Muezzinoglu, Umit Sefa; Memisoglu, Kaya; Aydin, Adem; Atmaca, Halil; Baran, Tuncay; Odabas Ozgur, Bahar; Ozgur, Turgay; Kantar, Cengizhan

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate the semi-invasive "internal splinting" (SIIS) method for repair of Achilles tendon rupture relative to open repair with Krakow sutures. Efficacy was evaluated based on the clinical and functional outcomes, postoperative magnetic resonance imaging measurements, isokinetic results, and surgical complication rates. Functional measurements included the Thermann and American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle scores, bilateral ankle dorsiflexion, and plantar flexion measurements. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to compare the bilateral length and thickness of each Achilles tendon. The isokinetic outcomes were evaluated using a Biodex System 3 dynamometer. Of the 45 patients meeting the inclusion criteria, 24 were treated by SIIS and 21 by the open Krackow suture technique. The mean follow-up time for all patients was 43.7 (range 6 to 116) months. In the SIIS group, patients returned to normal daily activities after 7.2 (range 6 to 8) weeks compared with 14.3 (range 12 to 15) weeks in the open surgery group. The AOFAS ankle scores were 93.5 (range 82 to 100) points in the open repair group and 96.2 (range 86 to 100) points in the SIIS group. The Thermann scores were 80.4 (range 53 to 91) points for the open repair group and 87.9 (range 81 to 100) points for the SIIS method. The mean Achilles length on the operated side measured using magnetic resonance imaging was 175.06 (range 110 to 224) mm and 177.76 (range 149 to 214) mm for the open surgery and SIIS groups, respectively. Sensory impairment in the territory of the sural nerve was identified in 1 patient immediately after SIIS surgery, although this defect had completely resolved within 12 months. SIIS yielded better outcomes relative to the open surgery group according to the isokinetic measurements. Taken together, these data indicate the SIIS method for Achilles tendon ruptures performed better in terms of both functional and objective outcomes

  19. Neuromechanical Modulation of the Achilles Tendon During Bilateral Hopping in Patients with Unilateral Achilles Tendon Rupture, Over 1 Year After Surgical Repair.

    PubMed

    Oda, Hiroyuki; Sano, Kanae; Kunimasa, Yoko; Komi, Paavo V; Ishikawa, Masaki

    2017-06-01

    Patients who have had an Achilles tendon (AT) rupture repaired are potentially at higher risk for re-rupture than those without previous rupture. Little attention has been given to the neuromechanical modulation of muscle-tendon interaction and muscle activation profiles during human dynamic movements after AT rupture repair. The purpose of this study was to examine muscle-tendon behavior and muscle activation during bilateral hopping. We enrolled nine subjects who had undergone surgical repair of unilateral AT rupture within the past 1-2 years. Subjects performed bilateral hopping while we took ultrasound, kinematic, and electromyogram recordings and measurements. AT behaviors were also recorded. We then compared responses between values obtained from the ruptured AT leg (LEGATR) and non-ruptured AT leg (LEGNOR). During hopping, the AT stretching amplitudes were greater in the LEGATR than in the LEGNOR, although the peak AT force and stiffness were smaller in the LEGATR than in the LEGNOR. The AT negative mechanical work did not show any significant differences between both legs. However, positive works were significantly lower in the LEGATR than in the LEGNOR. Electromyogram patterns in both soleus and tibialis anterior muscles clearly differed after ground contact for the LEGATR and the LEGNOR. These results suggest that the repaired ruptured AT can be compliant and have insufficient Young's modulus, which can influence mechanical responses in muscle activities. The modulation of agonist-antagonist muscle activities corresponding to the different levels of stiffness between the LEGATR and the LEGNOR may not be fully functioning during the pre-activation phase.

  20. FROM ACUTE ACHILLES TENDON RUPTURE TO RETURN TO PLAY – A CASE REPORT EVALUATING RECOVERY OF TENDON STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, CLINICAL AND FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES

    PubMed Central

    Zellers, Jennifer A.; Cortes, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Achilles tendon rupture results in significant functional deficits regardless of treatment strategy (surgical versus non-surgical intervention). Recovery post-rupture is highly variable, making comprehensive patient assessment critical. Assessment tools may change along the course of recovery as the patient progresses – for instance, moving from a seated heel-rise to standing heel-rise to jump testing. However, tools that serve as biomarkers for early recovery may be particularly useful in informing clinical decision-making. The purpose of this case report was to describe the progress of a young, athletic individual following Achilles tendon rupture managed non-surgically, using patient reported and functional performance outcome measures and comprehensively evaluating Achilles tendon structure and function incorporating a novel imaging technique (cSWE). Subject Description The subject is a 26 year-old, female basketball coach who sustained an Achilles tendon rupture and was managed non-surgically. Outcome The subject was able to steadily progress using a gradual tendon loading treatment approach well-supported by the literature. Multiple evaluative techniques including the addition of diagnostic ultrasound imaging and continuous shear wave elastography (cSWE) to standard clinical tests and measures were used to assess patient-reported symptoms, tendon structure, and tendon functional performance. Five assessments were performed over the course of 2-14 months post-rupture. By the 14-month follow-up, the subject had achieved full self-reported function. Tendon structural and mechanical properties showed similar shear modulus by 14 months, however, viscosity continued to be lower and tendon length longer on the ruptured side. Functional performance, evidenced by the heel-rise test and jump tests, also showed a positive trajectory, however, deficits of 12-28% remained between ruptured and non-ruptured sides at 14 months. Discussion This case report

  1. Treatment of chronic achilles tendinopathy and ruptures with flexor hallucis tendon transfer: clinical outcome and MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Frederik; Meyer, Patrick; Maiwald, Christian; Zanetti, Marco; Vienne, Patrick

    2008-08-01

    In patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy, augmentation with flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon transfer can be performed to improve pain and functional limitations. There are no reports of postoperative imaging for evaluating tendon integration, inflammatory alterations or degeneration of the FHL muscle. The purpose of this study was to evaluate postoperative MR imaging based on clinical outcome and isokinetic strength. 13 patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy (10 ruptures) underwent augmentation with FHL transfer. Clinical parameters, isokinetic strength and outcome measurements (AOFAS, SF-36) were evaluated at an average followup of 46.5 months. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of postoperative MRI were conducted using the non-operated side for comparison. All patients had a significant reduction of pain. The operated side had a torque deficit of 35% for plantar flexion. Ten patients returned to their former level of activity. MRI showed a complete integration of the FHL tendon in six patients. Fatty atrophy in the triceps surae was found in ten patients. The FHL was free of degeneration in all patients. Hypertrophy of the FHL of more than 15% was observed in eight patients. Augmentation with FHL transfer is a valuable option in the treatment of chronic Achilles tendinopathy with and without rupture. Our results demonstrate high patient satisfaction without donor site morbidity. The FHL tendon is well integrated into the Achilles tendon. Hypertrophy of the FHL muscle suggests functional incorporation into plantar flexion. The primary benefit of the operation is pain relief and increased muscle strength.

  2. Clinical failure after Dresden repair of mid-substance Achilles tendon rupture: human cadaveric testing.

    PubMed

    De la Fuente, Carlos; Carreño, Gabriel; Soto, Miguel; Marambio, Hugo; Henríquez, Hugo

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the angle of clinical failure during cyclical mobilization exercises in the Achilles tendon of human cadaveric specimens that were repaired using the Dresden technique and FiberWire(®) No. 2. The secondary aim was to identify the secure limit of mobilization, the type of failure, and the type of apposition. The lower limbs of eight males (mean age: 60.3 ± 6.3 years) were repaired with the Dresden technique following complete, percutaneous mid-substance Achilles tendon rupture. A basal tension of 10 N at 30° of plantarflexion was placed on each specimen. The angle of the ankle during clinical failure (tendon ends separation >5 mm) was then tested via cyclical exercises (i.e. 100 cycles between 30° and 15° of plantarflexion; 100 cycles between 15° of plantarflexion and 0°; 100 cycles between 0° and 15° of dorsiflexion; and 100 cycles between 15° of dorsiflexion and full dorsiflexion). Clinical failure was determined using the Laplacian edge detection filter, and the angle of clinical failure was obtained using a rotatory potentiometer aligned in relation to the intermalleolar axis of each foot specimen. The type of failure (knot, tendon, or suture) and apposition (termino-terminal or non-termino-terminal) were determined. Descriptive statistics were used to obtain the mean; standard deviation; 95 % confidence interval; 1st, 25th, 50th, 75th, and 100th percentiles; and the standard error of the mean for angle data. Proportions were used to describe the type of failure and apposition. The main results were a mean angle of clinical failure equal to 12.5° of plantarflexion, a limit of mobilization equal to 14.0° of plantarflexion, tendon failure type, and non-termino-terminal apposition in all specimens. While the mean angle of clinical failure in human cadaveric models was 12.5° of plantarflexion, after 14.0° of plantarflexion, the percutaneous Dresden technique was found insecure for cyclical mobilization

  3. Biomechanical evaluation of varying the number of loops in a repair of a physiological model of Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Grieco, Preston W; Frumberg, David B; Weinberg, Maxwell; Pivec, Robert; Naziri, Qais; Uribe, Jaime A

    2015-04-01

    Numerous suturing techniques have been described to treat Achilles tendon ruptures. No prior studies have evaluated frayed tendon ends on construct strength and whether this allows for less extensile exposure. Forty bovine Achilles tendons were divided into groups: 1 control and 4 experimental. Experimental groups were sectioned with ends frayed longitudinally in 2 mm intervals for 2 cm with no fraying for the control group. Four-stand Krackow sutures were used for repairs with 3 loops in the control group, 2 loops in frayed section for experimental groups, and varying numbers of loops (1-4) in healthy tendon. Samples were tested in loading cells at 100 N and 190 N for 1000 cycles. Gap width and maximum load failure were measured. Gapping was <5 mm in controls at 100 N-190 N, significantly lower than experimentals. Greatest gapping occurred in groups with 1-2 loops in healthy tendon (10.9-13.9 mm). Most early catastrophic failures (5/8) occurred in groups with 1-2 loops in healthy tendon. Two failures at 100 N occurred in 1-loop healthy tendons. The least failures occurred in controls (2/8), at 190 N. Suture loops incorporated into frayed tendon portions predisposed repairs to significantly greater gapping and lower maximal failure forces than 4-strand Krackow repairs in unfrayed tendons. We cannot recommend attempting more limited exposures with sutures in frayed tendon as this may lead to early repair failure. We provided a physiologic model utilizing frayed tendon ends that resembles in vivo Achilles tendon rupture. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Procollagen markers in microdialysate can predict patient outcome after Achilles tendon rupture

    PubMed Central

    Alim, Md Abdul; Svedman, Simon; Edman, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients who sustain acute Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) exhibit variable and mostly impaired long-term functional, and patient-reported outcomes. However, there exists a lack of early predictive markers of long-term outcomes to facilitate the development of improved treatment methods. The aim of this study was to assess markers of tendon callus production in patients with ATR in terms of outcome, pain, and fatigue. Study design and setting Prospective cohort study; level of evidence 2. Outpatient orthopaedic/sports medicine department. Patients A total of 65 patients (57 men, 8 women; mean age 41±7 years) with ATR were prospectively assessed. Assessments Markers of tendon callus production, procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (PINP) and procollagen type III N-terminal propeptide (PIIINP), were assessed 2 weeks postoperatively using microdialysis followed by enzymatic quantification. Normalised procollagen levels (n-PINP and n-PIIINP) were calculated as the ratio of procollagen to total protein content. Pain and fatigue were assessed at 1 year using reliable questionnaires Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS). Results Patients exhibited fatigue (77.6%) and pain (44.1%) to some extent. Higher levels of n-PINP (R=0.38, p=0.016) and n-PIIINP (R=0.33, p=0.046) were significantly associated with less pain in the limb. Increased concentrations of PINP (R=−0.47, p=0.002) and PIIINP (R=−0.37, p=0.024) were related to more self-reported fatigue in the leg. The results were corroborated by multiple linear regression analyses. Conclusions Assessment of procollagen markers in early tendon healing can predict long-term patient-reported outcomes after ATR. These novel findings suggest that procollagen markers could be used to facilitate the development of improved treatment methods in patients who sustain ATR. Trial registration numbers NCT01317160: Results. NCT02318472: Pre-results. PMID:27900179

  5. Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture Treated by Double Side-Locking Loop Suture Technique With Early Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Wataru; Imade, Shinji; Innami, Ken; Kawano, Hirotaka; Takao, Masato

    2017-02-01

    Although early accelerated rehabilitation is recommended for the treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture, most traditional rehabilitation techniques require some type of brace. We retrospectively analyzed 44 feet of 44 patients (25 male and 19 female) with a mean age of 31.8 years who had an acute Achilles tendon rupture related to athletic activity. Patients had been treated by a double side-locking loop suture (SLLS) technique using double antislip knots between stumps and had undergone early accelerated rehabilitation, including active and passive range of motion exercises on the day following the operation and full weight-bearing at 4 weeks. No brace was applied postoperatively. The evaluation criteria included the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society Ankle-Hindfoot Scale (AOFAS) score; active plantar flexion and dorsiflexion angles; and the intervals between surgery and the time when patients could walk normally without any support, perform double-leg heel raises, and perform 20 continuous single-leg heel raises of the operated foot. Despite postoperative early accelerated rehabilitation, the AOFAS score and active dorsiflexion angles improved over time (6, 12, and 24 weeks and 2 years). A mean of 4.3 ± 0.6 weeks was required for patients to be able to walk normally without any support. The mean period to perform double-leg heel raises and 20 continuous single-leg heel raises of the injured foot was 8.0 ± 1.3 weeks and 10.9 ± 2.1 weeks, respectively. All patients, except one who was engaged in classical ballet, could return to their preinjury level of athletic activities, and the interval between operation and return to athletic activities was 17.1 ± 3.7 weeks. The double SLLS technique with double antislip knots between stumps adjusted the tension of the sutured Achilles tendon at the ideal ankle position and provided good clinical outcomes following accelerated rehabilitation after surgery without the use of a brace. Level IV, retrospective case

  6. Is percutaneous suturing superior to open fibrin gluing in acute Achilles tendon rupture?

    PubMed

    Knobe, Matthias; Gradl, Gertraud; Klos, Kajetan; Corsten, Johannes; Dienstknecht, Thomas; Rath, Bjoern; Sönmez, Tolga Taha; Hoeckle, Christian; Pape, Hans-Christoph

    2015-03-01

    Open fibrin gluing is reported to enable anatomical reconstruction with less soft tissue compromise than suture repair. Our main objective was to compare the complication rate, function, pain and disability of the two operative approaches of percutaneous suture using the Paessler technique and open fibrin gluing. Sixty-four patients (two centres, retrospective cohort study, 2000-2009) who had undergone acute Achilles tendon repair with either percutaneous suture (n = 27; 44 years) or open fibrin glue (n = 37; 45 years) took part in a follow-up examination after a median of 63 months (range, six to 180). Ankle range of motion, calf and ankle circumferences and return to work and sports activities were evaluated. Isokinetic und sonographic evaluation results were retrieved. Complications were noted in 22 patients (34 %). Delayed wound healing without evidence of surgical site infection was found in three patients in the fibrin group and two patients in the suture group. Postoperative scar tenderness described as pain at the rim of the shoe was significantly more frequent in the suture group (p = 0.03). Re-rupture requiring re-operation occurred in one patient. Transient paresthesia of the heel occurred in 12 patients. No sural nerve lesions were reported. There was no significant difference between groups regarding lower leg circumference, disability, or function. Ultrasound and isokinetic measurements did not reveal a significant difference between the two methods. The present study suggests that open fibrin gluing is a reasonable alternative to percutaneous repair of acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon and both techniques can yield reliably good results.

  7. Reconstruction of neglected achilles tendon ruptures with gastrocnemius flaps: excellent results in long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Seker, Ali; Kara, Adnan; Armagan, Raffi; Oc, Yunus; Varol, Ali; Sezer, Hasan Basri

    2016-10-01

    Repair of the neglected achilles tendon ruptures can be challenging due to retraction of tendon stumps. Different repair and augmentation techniques were described. This study aims to investigate long-term results of neglected achilles tendon rupture repair with gastrocnemius flaps. Between 1995 and 2005, 21 neglected achilles tendon rupture reconstructions were performed with using gastrocnemius fascial flaps. Mean age was 32.1 years. Mean period between rupture and operation was 8.4 weeks. Ankle range of motion, calf circumference, heel raise test, Visual Analog Scale (VAS), American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot and Foot and Ankle Disability Index (FADI) scores were checked. The average gap length was 6.4 cm. Mean follow-up was 145.3 months. Median dorsiflexion/plantar flexion values for operated and uneffected sides were 18°/30° and 19°/30°, respectively. The mean values for AOFAS and FADI scores were 98.5 points and 98.9 %, respectively. VAS score was 0 point for all patients. With the numbers available, no significant difference could be detected in terms of ankle range of motion, calf circumference measures and dynamometric analysis. Mean time for return to daily activities was 11.1 (8-16) weeks after surgery. Prerupture activity level was achieved 14.1 months postoperatively. All patients were able to perform heel raise test. Repair of neglected achilles tendon ruptures with gastrocnemius flaps has satisfactory long-term results.

  8. Neglected Achilles Tendon Rupture Treated with Flexor Hallucis Longus transfer with two turndown gastrocnemius fascia flap and reinforced with plantaris tendon.

    PubMed

    Mao, Haijiao; Shi, Zengyuan; Xu, Dachuan; Liu, Zhenxin

    2015-09-01

    Neglected Achilles Tendon Ruptures are commonly seen by orthopaedic surgeons. In cases resistant to conservative treatment, a variety of surgical procedures have been utilized in the past. The senior -surgeon at our institution has utilized a technique -employing two turndown fascia flaps fashioned from the proximal Achilles tendon augmented by a tenomyodesis of the flexor hallucis longus and plantaris tendon. The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical outcome of all patients who underwent this procedure. The medical records of 10 cases that underwent this procedure were retrospectively reviewed. We completed data collection sets using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hind foot scores, isokinetic evaluation, and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 1 year of follow-up. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hind foot scores improved from 64.4±3.54. Isokinetic testing at 30º/sec and 120º/sec revealed an mean deficits of 24.5%, respectively, in the plantar flexion peak torque of the involved ankle than non-involved ankle. The flexor hallucis longus tendon, gastrocnemius fascia flap and plantaris were well -integrated into the Achilles tendon forming a homogenous tendon, which was confirmed in MRI. Our subjective and objective data indicate that the reconstructive technique using flexor hallucis longus transfer with two turndown gastrocnemius fascia flaps and plantaris tendon is a good option for repairing large gap defect of Achilles tendon.

  9. Achilles tendon rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Strom, Adam C; Casillas, Mark M

    2009-12-01

    The operative management of acute Achilles tendon rupture marks the beginning of a comprehensive rehabilitation program. The goals of the rehabilitation program start with the reduction of pain and swelling and the recovery of ankle motion and power. They conclude with the restoration of coordinated activity and safe return to athletic activity. The rehabilitation protocol is directed by the injury and the quality of the repair, along with the patient's age, medical and social history, and athletic inclination. The protocol is dynamic and responsive to changing clinical findings.

  10. Operative treatment of chronic irreparable Achilles tendon ruptures with large flexor hallucis longus tendon transfers.

    PubMed

    Rahm, Stefan; Spross, Christian; Gerber, Fabienne; Farshad, Mazda; Buck, Florian M; Espinosa, Norman

    2013-08-01

    Transfer of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon aims to restore function and relieve pain in chronic Achilles tendon (AT) disease. The goal of the present study was to investigate the clinical and radiographic outcomes of FHL transfer to the AT and to compare the transtendinous technique to the transosseous technique. We hypothesized that the type of technique would have a notable impact on outcome. Forty patients (42 ankles) were retrospectively reviewed and divided into group 1 (transtendinous technique, 22 patients/24 ankles) and group 2 (transosseous technique, 18 patients/18 ankles). Outcome parameters included the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot score, Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment-Achilles (VISA-A) score, Foot Function Index (FFI), and Short Form-36 (SF-36) scores. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lower leg was performed preoperatively to assess muscle quality and fatty infiltration. Postoperatively, isokinetic plantar flexion strength was assessed using a Con-Trex dynamometer. In group 1 (follow-up, 73 months; age, 52 years), the AOFAS score improved from 66 points to 89 points (P < .001) with average values for the VISA-A of 76 points, FFI-D pain 15%, and FFI-D function 22%. In group 2 (follow-up, 35 months; age, 56 years), the AOFAS score increased from 59 points to 85 points (P < .001) with mean values for the VISA-A 76 points, FFI-D pain 25%, and FFI-D function 24%. At follow-up, the average SF-36 score in group 1 was 66% and in group 2 was 77%. Isokinetic testing at 30 deg/s in group 1 revealed notable weakness in the operated ankle averaging 54.7 N·m (75% of normal), and in group 2 the average was 58.2 N·m (77% of normal). No statistically significant differences were found between the groups. The hypothesis was disproved. Both techniques for FHL transfer to AT, intratendinous and transosseous, provided good to excellent clinical and functional outcome in the treatment of irreparable AT disease. Level III

  11. Suture-Only Repair Versus Suture Anchor–Augmented Repair for Achilles Tendon Ruptures With a Short Distal Stump

    PubMed Central

    Boin, Michael A.; Dorweiler, Matthew A.; McMellen, Christopher J.; Gould, Gregory C.; Laughlin, Richard T.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Chronic noninsertional Achilles tendinosis can result in an acute Achilles tendon rupture with a short distal stump. In such tendon ruptures, there is a limited amount of adequate tissue that can hold suture, thus presenting a challenge for surgeons who elect to treat the rupture operatively. Hypothesis: Adding suture anchors to the repair construct may result in biomechanically stronger repairs compared with a suture-only technique. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Nine paired Achilles-calcaneus complexes were harvested from cadavers. An artificial Achilles rupture was created 2 cm proximal to the insertion on the calcaneus. One specimen from each cadaver was assigned to a suture-only or a suture anchor–augmented repair. The contralateral specimen of the same cadaver received the opposing repair. Cyclic testing was then performed at 10 to 100 N for 2000 cycles, and load-to-failure testing was performed at 0.2 mm/s. This was followed by analysis of repair displacement, gapping at repair site, peak load to failure, and failure mode. Results: The suture anchor–augmented repair exhibited a 116% lower displacement compared with the suture-only repair (mean ± SD, 1.54 ± 1.13 vs 3.33 ± 1.47 mm, respectively; P < .03). The suture anchor–augmented repair also exhibited a 45% greater load to failure compared with the suture-only repair (303.50 ± 102.81 vs 209.09 ± 48.12 N, respectively; P < .04). Conclusion: Suture anchor–augmented repairs performed on acute Achilles tendon ruptures with a short distal stump are biomechanically stronger than suture-only repairs. Clinical Relevance: Our results support the use of suture anchor–augmented repairs for a biomechanically stronger construct in Achilles tendon ruptures with a short distal stump. Biomechanically stronger repairs may lead to less tendon repair gapping and failure, increasing the ability to start early active rehabilitation protocols and thus improving patient outcomes

  12. Is percutaneous repair better than open repair in acute Achilles tendon rupture?

    PubMed

    Henríquez, Hugo; Muñoz, Roberto; Carcuro, Giovanni; Bastías, Christian

    2012-04-01

    Open repair of Achilles tendon rupture has been associated with higher levels of wound complications than those associated with percutaneous repair. However, some studies suggest there are higher rerupture rates and sural nerve injuries with percutaneous repair. We compared the two types of repairs in terms of (1) function (muscle strength, ankle ROM, calf and ankle perimeter, single heel rise tests, and work return), (2) cosmesis (length scar, cosmetic appearance), and (3) complications. We retrospectively reviewed 32 surgically treated patients with Achilles rupture: 17 with percutaneous repair and 15 with open repair. All patients followed a standardized rehabilitation protocol. The minimum followup was 6 months (mean, 18 months; range, 6-48 months). We observed similar values of plantar flexor strength, ROM, calf and ankle perimeter, and single heel raising test between the groups. Mean time to return to work was longer for patients who had open versus percutaneous repair (5.6 months versus 2.8 months). Mean scar length was greater in the open repair group (9.5 cm versus 2.9 cm). Cosmetic appearance was better in the percutaneous group. Two wound complications and one rerupture were found in the open repair group. One case of deep venous thrombosis occurred in the percutaneous repair group. All complications occurred before 6 months after surgery. We identified no patients with nerve injury. Percutaneous repair provides function similar to that achieved with open repair, with a better cosmetic appearance, a lower rate of wound complications, and no apparent increase in the risk of rerupture. Level III, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  13. Mechanical properties during healing of Achilles tendon ruptures to predict final outcome: A pilot Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis in 10 patients

    PubMed Central

    Schepull, Thorsten; Kvist, Joanna; Andersson, Christer; Aspenberg, Per

    2007-01-01

    Background There are presently few methods described for in vivo monitoring of the mechanics of healing human tendon ruptures, and no methods for prediction of clinical outcome. We tested if Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA) can be used to follow the restoration of mechanical properties during healing of ruptured Achilles tendons, and if early measurements can predict clinical results. Methods Achilles tendon repair was studied with RSA in 10 patients with a total rupture. Tantalum beads were implanted in conjunction with surgical repair. The patients were evaluated at 6, 12 and 18 weeks, and after 1 year. RSA was performed with two different mechanical loadings, and the strain induced by increasing load was measured. The transverse area was determined by ultrasound. CT scan at 12 weeks confirmed that the tantalum beads were located within the tendons. Functional testing was done after 1 year. A heel raise index was chosen as primary clinical outcome variable. Results The strain was median 0.90, 0.32 and 0.14 percent per 100 N tendon force at 6 weeks, 18 weeks and one year respectively. The error of measurement was 0.04 percent units at 18 weeks. There was a large variation between patients, which appears to reflect biological variation. From 6 to 18 weeks, there was a negative correlation between increase in transverse area and increase in material properties, suggesting that healing is regulated at the organ level, to maximize stiffness. Modulus of elasticity during this time correlated with a heel raise index at one year (Rho = 0.76; p = 0.02). Conclusion We conclude that the RSA method might have potential for comparing different treatments of Achilles tendon ruptures. PMID:18039357

  14. Scaffold-free Scleraxis-programmed tendon progenitors aid in significantly enhanced repair of full-size Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chi-Fen; Alberton, Paolo; Loffredo-Verde, Eva; Volkmer, Elias; Pietschmann, Matthias; Müller, Peter; Schieker, Matthias; Docheva, Denitsa

    2016-05-01

    Currently there is no effective approach to enhance tendon repair, hence we aimed to identify a suitable cell source for tendon engineering utilizing an established clinically relevant animal model for tendon injury. We compared, by in-depth histomorphometric evaluation, the regenerative potential of uncommitted human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) and Scleraxis (Scx)-programmed tendon progenitors (hMSC-Scx) in the healing of a full-size of rat Achilles tendon defect. Our analyses clearly demonstrated that implantation of hMSC-Scx, in contrast to hMSC and empty defect, results in smaller diameters, negligible ectopic calcification and advanced cellular organization and matrix maturation in the injured tendons. Scaffold-free delivery of hMSC-Scx aids in enhanced repair in a clinically translatable Achilles tendon injury model.

  15. Diagnostic failure of ciprofloxacin-induced spontaneous bilateral Achilles tendon rupture: case-report and medical-legal considerations.

    PubMed

    Pantalone, A; Abate, M; D'Ovidio, C; Carnevale, A; Salini, V

    2011-01-01

    Rare side-effects of fluoroquinolone therapy are tendinitis and tendon rupture. Many reports have demonstrated that the concomitant use of corticosteroids, in patients aged 60 years or older, increase the risk substantially. We present a case of spontaneous bilateral Achilles tendon rupture induced by ciprofloxacin and methylprednisolone. A 61-year-old woman was diagnosed with Bronchiolitis Obliterans with Organizing Pneumonia (BOOP) and was started on oral ciprofloxacin 500 mg twice daily for 3 weeks and on oral methylprednisolone 16 mg twice daily for 2 weeks. The diagnosis was made after doctors, rather than stop drug therapy and advise complete rest, had mistakenly prescribed for the woman to undergo physiotherapy and local NSAIDs, thus favoring the onset of tendon ruptures and resulting in surgical and legal implications. Inspired by this case, we also submit a brief review on professional liability in Orthopaedics.

  16. Minimally invasive versus open surgery for acute Achilles tendon rupture: a systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingbo; Wang, Chuanying; Huo, Yanqing; Jia, Zhiwei; Wang, Xiqian

    2016-06-06

    A number of meta-analyses have been carried out to evaluate the effects of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) versus open surgery (OS) for acute Achilles tendon rupture. However, discordant findings were seen in these meta-analyses. The present study, performing a systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses regarding MIS versus OS of acute Achilles tendon rupture, aimed to assist decision-makers interpret and choose among conflicting meta-analyses, as well as to offer treatment recommendations based on current best evidence. The literature search was performed to identify systematic reviews comparing MIS with OS for Achilles tendon rupture. Meta-analyses only comprising randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. Two authors individually evaluated the quality of meta-analysis and extracted data. The Jadad decision algorithm was conducted to ascertain which meta-analysis offered the best evidence. A total of four meta-analyses was included. All these meta-analyses comprised RCTs or quasi-RCTs and were determined as Level-II evidence. The scores of the Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) ranged from 7 to 10 (median 9.5). The Jadad algorithm indicated that the best meta-analysis should be chosen according to the search strategies and application of selection. A high-quality meta-analysis with more RCTs was chosen, which suggested that there was no statistically significant difference between MIS and OS regarding rerupture rate, tissue adhesion, sural nerve injury, deep infection, and deep vein thrombosis. However, MIS could decrease superficial infection rate, and had a better patient satisfaction for good to excellent outcomes in comparison to OS. Based on the best available evidence, MIS may be superior to OS for treating acute Achilles tendon rupture. However, due to some limitations, this should be cautiously interpreted, and further high-quality studies are needed.

  17. Surgical Versus Conservative Intervention for Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture: A PRISMA-Compliant Systematic Review of Overlapping Meta-Analyses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Tang, Hao; He, Qianyun; Wei, Qiang; Tong, Dake; Wang, Chuangfeng; Wu, Dajiang; Wang, Guangchao; Zhang, Xin; Ding, Wenbin; Li, Di; Ding, Chen; Liu, Kang; Ji, Fang

    2015-11-01

    Although many meta-analyses comparing surgical intervention with conservative treatment have been conducted for acute Achilles tendon rupture, discordant conclusions are shown. This study systematically reviewed the overlapping meta-analyses relating to surgical versus conservative intervention of acute Achilles tendon rupture to assist decision makers select among conflicting meta-analyses, and to offer intervention recommendations based on the currently best evidence.Multiple databases were comprehensively searched for meta-analyses comparing surgical with conservative treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. Meta-analyses only comprising randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. Two authors independently evaluated the meta-analysis quality and extracted data. The Jadad decision algorithm was applied to ascertain which meta-analysis offered the best evidence.A total of 9 meta-analyses were included. Only RCTs were determined as Level-II evidence. The scores of Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) ranged from 5 to 10 (median 7). A high-quality meta-analysis with more RCTs was selected according to the Jadad decision algorithm. This study found that when functional rehabilitation was used, conservative intervention was equal to surgical treatment regarding the incidence of rerupture, range of motion, calf circumference, and functional outcomes, while reducing the incidence of other complications. Where functional rehabilitation was not performed, conservative intervention could significantly increase rerupture rate.Conservative intervention may be preferred for acute Achilles tendon rupture at centers offering functional rehabilitation, because it shows a similar rerupture rate with a lower risk of other complications when compared with surgical treatment. However, surgical treatment should be considered at centers without functional rehabilitation as this can reduce the incidence of rerupture.

  18. Nonoperative treatment of acute rupture of the achilles tendon: results of a new protocol and comparison with operative treatment.

    PubMed

    Weber, Martin; Niemann, Marco; Lanz, Renate; Müller, Thorsten

    2003-01-01

    Excellent results are reported from both nonoperative and operative treatment of Achilles tendon rupture. To describe a new nonoperative treatment protocol for Achilles tendon ruptures and compare outcomes with operative treatment. Retrospective cohort study. We treated 23 patients nonoperatively with an equinus ankle cast and boot and compared their outcome with that of a group of 24 patients previously treated operatively. Muscle strengthening and walking with full weightbearing were started as soon as tolerated in both groups. Follow-up examinations were performed for 18 nonoperatively treated patients after 23 months and for 15 operatively treated patients after 49 months. Subsidence of pain, return to unaided walking, and return to work was faster in the nonoperatively treated group. Patient satisfaction, return to sports, and ultimate strength was the same for both groups. The complication rate was similar, except for reruptures: four early in the nonoperative group and one late in the operative group. Two types of reruptures occurred in the nonoperative group: 1). normally healing tendon subjected to new trauma, rerupturing in the healing zone, and achieving a good result with continued nonoperative treatment; and 2). tendon failing proximal to the initial rupture at the muscle-tendon junction, without trauma, requiring operative repair and augmentation. Results of operative and nonoperative treatment were equivalent.

  19. Early Protected Weightbearing for Acute Ruptures of the Achilles Tendon: Do Commonly Used Orthoses Produce the Required Equinus?

    PubMed

    Ellison, Philip; Molloy, Andrew; Mason, Lyndon William

    Conservative "functional" management of acute Achilles tendon ruptures has become increasingly popular. Critical to this is the use of the walking orthosis, which positions the ankle in equinus to allow for early weightbearing. Our aim was to test whether 2 common orthoses achieved a satisfactory equinus position. A total of 11 sequentially treated Achilles tendon ruptures were assigned to either a fixed angle walking boot with wedges (FAWW) or an adjustable external equinus-corrected brace (EEB). The lateral radiographs of the cast immobilized tendons showed a mean tibiotalar angle (TTA) of 56° (range 54° to 57°) and a mean tibio-first metatarsal angle (1MTA) of 74° (range 62° to 85°). The FAWW resulted in a mean TTA of 28° (range 15° to 35°) and 1MTA of 37° (range 30° to 45°). The EEB resulted in a TTA of 48° (range 43° to 45°) and 1MTA of 54° (range 47° to 57°). Ankle equinus was significantly greater with the EEB than with the FAWW (p < .05) and similar to that with an equinus cast. The use of wedges produced an equinus appearance through the midfoot but not at the ankle. We express caution in the use of the FAWW because it is unlikely to achieve sufficient ankle equinus to shorten the Achilles tendon. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Declining incidence of surgery for Achilles tendon rupture follows publication of major RCTs: evidence-influenced change evident using the Finnish registry study.

    PubMed

    Mattila, Ville M; Huttunen, Tuomas T; Haapasalo, Heidi; Sillanpää, Petri; Malmivaara, Antti; Pihlajamäki, Harri

    2015-08-01

    Acute Achilles tendon ruptures are common among highly active people. Recently published studies have provided increasing evidence to support non-surgical treatment. This study aimed to assess the incidence trends of surgically treated, acute Achilles tendon ruptures. Our hypothesis, based on the recent literature showing no difference in functional results between surgical and non-surgical treatment, was that the incidence of surgery would be declining. We conducted a nationwide hospital register-based study. All patients 18 years of age or older with a diagnosis of acute Achilles tendon injury, and treated with Achilles tendon repair from 1987 to 2011 in Finland were included in the study. During the 25-year study period in Finland, a total of 15,252 patients received surgical treatment for an acute Achilles tendon rupture. The incidence of surgical treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture in men was 11.1/100,000 person-years in 1987 and 20.5/100,000 person-years in 2011. The corresponding figures in women were 2.5/100,000 person-years in 1987 and 4.2/100,000 person-years in 2011. The highest rates occurred in 2008 in men and 2007 in women, and since then the decrease has been 42% in men and 55% in women. During the past few years, the rate of surgically treated acute Achilles tendon ruptures has declined remarkably. The findings of the present study indicate that orthopaedic surgeons have chosen more often non-surgical treatment option for acute Achilles ruptures. This can be considered as an example, how high-quality scientific evidence can lead to a rapid change in clinical practice. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Biomechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex 6 months post-rupture of the Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    McNair, Peter; Nordez, Antoine; Olds, Margie; Young, Simon W; Cornu, Christophe

    2013-09-01

    We compared the effects of a non-weight bearing protocol (NWB) and a weight bearing (WB) protocol on energy stored, stiffness, and shock absorption in the plantar flexor muscle-tendon unit of patients managed non-operatively following an Achilles tendon rupture. Thirty-eight subjects were randomized to a WB cast fitted with a Bohler iron or a traditional non-weight-bearing cast. At a 6-month follow-up, a biomechanical assessment utilizing an isokinetic dynamometer allowed measurement of peak passive torque, energy stored, shock absorption, and stiffness. The WB group had greater peak passive torque (≈ 20%). Irrespective of group, peak passive torque in unaffected legs was greater (≈ 26%) than affected legs. Across the groups, energy stored in the NWB group was 74% of the WB group. The energy stored in affected legs was 80% of that in unaffected legs. Shock absorption was not significantly different across legs or groups. Irrespective of group, affected legs had significantly less stiffness (20-40%). While the augmentation of plaster with a Bohler iron to allow increased weight bearing had positive effects, deficits in affected compared to unaffected legs irrespective of group were notable, and should be addressed prior to participation in vigorous physical activities. Copyright © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  2. Dynamic ultrasound assessment of the effects of knee and ankle position on Achilles tendon apposition following acute rupture.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Assad A; Ibrahim, Talal; Rennie, Winston J; Furlong, Andrew

    2011-12-21

    Previous reports have suggested that knee flexion improves tendon edge apposition following acute rupture of the Achilles tendon. The aim of the present study was to determine, with use of ultrasonography, the effects of knee and ankle position on the Achilles tendon gap distance in patients with an acute rupture. Twenty-six patients with a unilateral acute complete Achilles tendon rupture that had been confirmed with ultrasonography were recruited within a week after the injury. The mean age at the time of presentation was forty-one years. Ultrasound measurements included the location of the rupture and the gap distance between the superficial tendon edges with the ankle in neutral and the knee extended. The gap distance was sequentially measured with the foot in maximum equinus at the ankle and with 0°, 30°, 60°, and 90° of knee flexion. The mean distance of the rupture from the calcaneal enthesis was 52 mm (range, 40 to 76 mm). The mean gap distance with the ankle in neutral and the knee extended was 12 mm (95% confidence interval, 10 to 13 mm). This distance decreased to 5 mm (95% confidence interval, 4 to 7 mm) when the foot was placed in maximum ankle equinus with 0° of knee flexion and to 4 mm (95% confidence interval, 3 to 5 mm) with 30° of knee flexion, 3 mm (95% confidence interval, 2 to 4 mm) with 60° of knee flexion, and 2 mm (95% confidence interval, 1 to 2 mm) with 90° of knee flexion. Expressing the reduction in gap distance with each successive position as a percentage of the gap distance with the knee extended and the ankle in neutral revealed a mean reduction of 55.7%, 64.4%, 75.4%, and 84.8% with maximum ankle equinus and 0°, 30°, 60°, and 90° of knee flexion, respectively. The difference in gap distance between each of these positions was significant (p < 0.05). Maximum ankle equinus alone significantly reduces the gap distance after acute Achilles tendon rupture. Increasing knee flexion further reduces the gap distance by small

  3. Accelerated rehabilitation following Achilles tendon repair after acute rupture - Development of an evidence-based treatment protocol.

    PubMed

    Brumann, Mareen; Baumbach, Sebastian F; Mutschler, Wolf; Polzer, Hans

    2014-11-01

    The acute rupture of the Achilles tendon is a protracted injury. Surgery is only the beginning of a long rehabilitation period. Therefore, the rehabilitation protocol is an integral aspect to restore the pre-injury activity level. Despite several trials available comparing different treatment regimes, there is still no consensus regarding the optimal protocol. Consequently, the aim of our study was to systematically search the evidence available and define a precise rehabilitation programme after operative repair of acute Achilles tendon rupture based on the trials with the highest level of evidence. We performed a systematic literature search in Medline, Embase and Cochrane library. We identified twelve randomized controlled trials comparing different treatment regimes after operative repair of the Achilles tendon. Five trials compared full to non weight bearing, all applying immobilization in equinus. Immediate full weight bearing led to significant higher patient satisfaction, earlier ambulation and return to pre-injury activity. Four trials compared early ankle mobilization to immobilization. All trials found mobilization to be superior as it shortens time to return to work and sports significantly. Three trials compared the combination of full weight bearing and early ankle mobilization to immobilization. This combination was most beneficial. Patients showed significantly higher satisfaction, less use of rehabilitation resources, earlier return to pre-injury activities and further demonstrated significantly increased calf muscle strength, reduced atrophy and tendon elongation. No study found an increased rerupture rate for the more progressive treatment. In conclusion, the rehabilitation protocol after Achilles tendon repair should allow immediate full weight bearing. After the second postoperative week controlled ankle mobilization by free plantar flexion and limited dorsiflexion at 0° should be applied. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Elevated Knee Joint Kinetics and Reduced Ankle Kinetics Are Present During Jogging and Hopping After Achilles Tendon Ruptures.

    PubMed

    Willy, Richard W; Brorsson, Annelie; Powell, Hayley C; Willson, John D; Tranberg, Roy; Grävare Silbernagel, Karin

    2017-04-01

    Deficits in plantarflexor function are common after an Achilles tendon rupture. These deficits may result in an altered distribution of joint loads during lower extremity tasks. We hypothesized that, regardless of treatment, the Achilles tendon-ruptured limb would exhibit deficits in ankle kinematics and joint power while exhibiting elevated knee joint power and patellofemoral joint loads during walking, jogging, and hopping. We further hypothesized that this loading pattern would be most evident during jogging and hopping. Controlled laboratory study. Thirty-four participants (17 participants treated surgically, 17 treated nonsurgically) were tested at a mean 6.1 ± 2.0 years after an Achilles tendon rupture. Lower extremity kinematics and kinetics were assessed while participants completed walking, jogging, and single-legged hopping trials. Patellofemoral joint stress was calculated via a musculoskeletal model. Data were analyzed via mixed-model repeated analyses of variance (α = .05) and the limb symmetry index (LSI). No differences ( P ≥ .05) were found between the surgical and nonsurgical groups. In both groups, large side-to-side deficits in the plantarflexion angle at toeoff (LSI: 53.5%-73.9%) were noted during walking, jogging, and hopping in the involved limb. Side-to-side deficits in the angular velocity were only present during jogging (LSI: 93.5%) and hopping (LSI: 92.5%). This pattern was accompanied by large deficits in eccentric (LSI: 80.8%-94.7%) and concentric (LSI: 82.2%-84.7%) ankle joint powers in the involved limb during all tasks. Interestingly, only jogging and hopping demonstrated greater knee joint loads when compared with the uninvolved limb. Concentric knee power was greater during jogging (LSI: 117.2%) and hopping (LSI: 115.9%) compared with the uninvolved limb. Similarly, peak patellofemoral joint stress was greater in the involved limb during jogging (LSI: 107.5%) and hopping (LSI: 107.1%), while only hopping had a greater loading

  5. Stable surgical repair with accelerated rehabilitation versus nonsurgical treatment for acute Achilles tendon ruptures: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Nicklas; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Eriksson, Bengt I; Sansone, Mikael; Brorsson, Annelie; Nilsson-Helander, Katarina; Karlsson, Jón

    2013-12-01

    The optimal treatment for acute Achilles tendon ruptures is still a subject of debate. Early loading of the tendon is a factor that has been shown to be beneficial to recovery and to minimize complications. The main outcome of previous studies has been complications such as reruptures and deep infections, without focusing on the functional outcome relevant to the majority of patients who do not experience these complications. To evaluate whether stable surgical repair and early loading of the tendon could improve patient-reported outcome and function after an acute Achilles tendon rupture. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. A total of 100 patients (86 men, 14 women; mean age, 40 years) with an acute total Achilles tendon rupture were randomized to either surgical treatment, including an accelerated rehabilitation protocol, or nonsurgical treatment. The primary outcome was the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS). The patients were evaluated at 3, 6, and 12 months for symptoms, physical activity level, and function. There were no significant differences between the groups in terms of symptoms, physical activity level, or quality of life. There was a trend toward improved function in surgically treated patients; the results were significantly superior when assessed by the drop countermovement jump (95% CI, 0.03-0.15; P = .003) and hopping (95% CI, 0.01-0.33; P = .040). No reruptures occurred in the surgical group, while there were 5 in the nonsurgical group (P = .06). There were 6 superficial infections in the surgically treated group; however, these superficial infections had no bearing on the final outcome. Symptoms, reduced quality of life, and functional deficits still existed 12 months after injury on the injured side in both groups. The results of the present study demonstrate that stable surgical repair with accelerated tendon loading could be performed in all (n = 49) patients without reruptures and major soft tissue

  6. Percutaneous repair of Achilles tendon ruptures with Tenolig: quantitative analysis of postural control and gait pattern.

    PubMed

    Mezzarobba, S; Bortolato, S; Giacomazzi, A; Fancellu, G; Marcovich, R; Valentini, R

    2012-12-01

    Surgical approach in Achilles tendon's rupture involved during the last years has becoming safer and less invasive as possible. Lots of study investigate the outcomes of the mini-invasive technique with Tenolig proving its good results, but never in the long-term. Our study want to emphasize the effectiveness of this treatment exploring the postural and gait patterns in a 24-month follow up. Patients did self-training exercises without specific supervision, instead of a particular postoperative rehabilitation protocol. We compared 21 patients to a control group of 19 health subjects using a clinical examination, a podobarometric and an optokinetic analysis. Data shows no differences in time-distance parameters, despite a reduction of propulsion phase data, confirmed also by kinetic analysis. Podobarometric results show only a decrease in the anterior pressure of the injured limb (p=0.09). In standing an increase of anterior-posterior oscillation of the COP (center of pressure) (p=0.03). The results underline the long-term outcome effectiveness of the technique but some functional alterations remain. This could be the reason of the weakness, which always affected the patients. Reduction of the triceps elongation and restoration of strength during the propulsion phase should be the key points in postoperative physiotherapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Running biomechanics in a long-term monitored recreational athlete with a history of Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Jandacka, Daniel; Zahradnik, David; Foldyna, Karel; Hamill, Joseph

    2013-01-28

    This study represented a unique opportunity to understand changes in the human motion biomechanics during basic locomotion within a time interval of 4 years, when the monitored individual regained his original aerobic fitness, running performance and body mass index as prior to the injury. The participant visited the laboratory a month prior to the injury and during 4 years after the surgery. The surgery, subsequent rehabilitation and a 4-year running training programme in the studied recreational athlete did not completely eliminate the consequences of the Achilles tendon rupture. The function muscle deficit is namely manifested by a lower net plantar flexion moment and a lower net-generated ankle joint power during the take-off in the stance phase. The greater dorsal flexion in the affected ankle joint at the first contact with the ground and consequently higher peaks of ground reaction forces during running are consequences of the longer Achilles tendon in the affected lower extremity and weakened calf muscles.

  8. Calf muscle atrophy and muscle function after non-operative vs operative treatment of achilles tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Häggmark, T; Liedberg, H; Eriksson, E; Wredmark, T

    1986-02-01

    Fifteen operatively and eight non-operatively treated subcutaneous achilles tendon ruptures were randomly selected from 120 surgically and 35 non-surgically treated patients. Their calf muscle function was studied three to five years after treatment. Non-operatively treated patients were found to have a significantly impaired dynamic muscle function of the calf muscles when tested in a specially constructed heel-raise test device. Operatively treated patients did not show any significant impairment of their muscle function. Measurement of muscle area with CT-scanning showed a significant reduction of the calf muscle in the non-operatively treated patient while no such difference could be found in the operatively treated patients. Isokinetic muscle torque did not differ in the two groups of patients, thus Cybex-measurements do not seem to be a discriminating method in studying muscle function after achilles ruptures. On the basis of our findings we recommend that all athletes with achilles tendon ruptures be treated surgically. In non-athletes and older patients non-operative treatment might be considered.

  9. In-depth imaging and quantification of degenerative changes associated with Achilles ruptured tendons by polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnaninchi, P. O.; Yang, Y.; Bonesi, M.; Maffulli, G.; Phelan, C.; Meglinski, I.; El Haj, A.; Maffulli, N.

    2010-07-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a method based on polarization-sensitive optical coherent tomography (PSOCT) for the imaging and quantification of degenerative changes associated with Achilles tendon rupture. Ex vivo PSOCT examinations were performed in 24 patients. The study involved samples from 14 ruptured Achilles tendons, 4 tendinopathic Achilles tendons and 6 patellar tendons (collected during total knee replacement) as non-ruptured controls. The samples were imaged in both intensity and phase retardation modes within 24 h after surgery, and birefringence was quantified. The samples were fixed and processed for histology immediately after imaging. Slides were assessed twice in a blind manner to provide a semi-quantitative histological score of degeneration. In-depth micro structural imaging was demonstrated. Collagen disorganization and high cellularity were observable by PSOCT as the main markers associated with pathological features. Quantitative assessment of birefringence and penetration depth found significant differences between non-ruptured and ruptured tendons. Microstructure abnormalities were observed in the microstructure of two out of four tendinopathic samples. PSOCT has the potential to explore in situ and in-depth pathological change associated with Achilles tendon rupture, and could help to delineate abnormalities in tendinopathic samples in vivo.

  10. Knotless Repair of Achilles Tendon Rupture in an Elite Athlete: Return to Competition in 18 Weeks.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Paul A; Hopper, Graeme P; Wilson, William T; Mackay, Gordon M

    Rupture of the Achilles tendon is an increasingly common injury, particularly in physically active males, and current evidence favors minimally invasive surgical repair. We describe the case of a 36-year-old male elite bobsled athlete with complete rupture of the Achilles tendon. He was treated with surgical repair of the ruptured tendon using an innovative, minimally invasive procedure based on an internal bracing concept and was able to undergo early mobilization and aggressive physiotherapy rehabilitation. His recovery was such that he returned to training at 13 weeks postoperatively and participated in an international competition at 18 weeks, winning a World Cup silver medal. He subsequently raced at the 2014 Winter Olympic Games at 29 weeks after surgery. At >2 years since his injury, he has experienced no complications or reinjury. This represents an exceptional recovery that far exceeds the standard expected for such injuries. The use of this technique for athletes could enable accelerated return to sporting activity and attainment of their preinjury activity levels.

  11. Study of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal and Tendon-Derived Stem Cells Transplantation on the Regenerating Effect of Achilles Tendon Ruptures in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Al-ani, Mohanad Kh; Xu, Kang; Sun, Yanjun; Pan, Lianhong; Xu, ZhiLing; Yang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Comparative therapeutic significance of tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) transplantation to treat ruptured Achilles tendon was studied. Three groups of SD rats comprising 24 rats each, designated as TDSCs and BMSCs, and nontreated were studied for regenerative effects through morpho-histological evaluations and ultimate failure load. For possible mechanism in tendon repair/regeneration through TDSCs and BMSCs, we measured Collagen-I (Col-I), Col-III gene expression level by RT-PCR, and Tenascin-C expression via immunofluorescent assay. TDSCs showed higher agility in tendon healing with better appearance density and well-organized longitudinal fibrous structure, though BMSCs also showed positive effects. Initially the ultimate failure load was considerably higher in TDSCs than other two study groups during the weeks 1 and 2, but at week 4 it attained an average or healthy tendon strength of 30.2 N. Similar higher tendency in Col-I/III gene expression level during weeks 1, 2, and 4 was observed in TDSCs treated group with an upregulation of 1.5-fold and 1.1-fold than the other two study groups. Immunofluorescent assay revealed higher expression of Tenascin-C in TDSCs at week 1, while both TDSCs and BMSCs treated groups showed detectable CM-Dil-labelled cells at week 4. Compared with BMSCs, TDSCs showed higher regenerative potential while treating ruptured Achilles tendons in rats. PMID:26339252

  12. Subcutaneous Achilles tendon rupture: A comparison between open technique and mini-invasive tenorrhaphy with Achillon(®) suture system.

    PubMed

    Daghino, W; Enrietti, E; Sprio, A E; di Prun, N Barbasetti; Berta, G N; Massè, A

    2016-11-01

    Surgical management of Achilles tendon rupture is still controversial: open techniques have a higher rate of soft tissue complications but a lower incidence of re-rupture than percutaneous tenorrhaphies. The aim of our retrospective study was to analyze and compare clinical and functional results in patients treated with either the conventional open or minimally invasive suture treatment with the Achillon(®) system. A retrospective review of 140 patients was performed; 72 were treated with open tenorrhaphy, 68 with the minimally invasive Achillon(®) suture system. With a comparable re-rupture rate, there was a statistically significant reduction in surgical time, incidence of minor complications, time required to return to sport activities and return to work in the minimally invasive group. Achillon(®) mini-invasive suture system is a reliable tool for the Achilles tendon ruptures, able to reduce the incidence of soft tissues complications if compared to the classic open tenorrhaphy, while maintaining strength of the suture and leading to superimposed functional outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Is the Dresden technique a mechanical design of choice suitable for the repair of middle third Achilles tendon ruptures? A biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, C; Carreño-Zillmann, G; Marambio, H; Henríquez, H

    2016-01-01

    To compare the mechanical failure of the Dresden technique for Achilles tendon repair with the double modified Kessler technique controlled repair technique. The maximum resistance of the two repair techniques are also compared. A total of 30 Achilles tendon ruptures in bovine specimens were repaired with an Ethibond(®) suture to 4.5cm from the calcaneal insertion. Each rupture was randomly distributed into one of two surgical groups. After repair, each specimen was subjected to a maximum traction test. The mechanical failure (tendon, suture, or knot) rates (proportions) were compared using the exact Fisher test (α=.05), and the maximum resistances using the Student t test (α=.05). There was a difference in the proportions of mechanical failures, with the most frequent being a tendon tear in the Dresden technique, and a rupture of the suture in the Kessler technique. The repair using the Dresden technique performed in the open mode, compared to the Kessler technique, has a more suitable mechanical design for the repair of middle third Achilles tendon ruptures on developing a higher tensile resistance in 58.7%. However, its most common mechanical failure was a tendon tear, which due to inappropriate loads could lead to lengthening of the Achilles tendon. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Operative versus nonoperative treatment of acute Achilles tendon ruptures: a multicenter randomized trial using accelerated functional rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Willits, Kevin; Amendola, Annunziato; Bryant, Dianne; Mohtadi, Nicholas G; Giffin, J Robert; Fowler, Peter; Kean, Crystal O; Kirkley, Alexandra

    2010-12-01

    To date, studies directly comparing the rerupture rate in patients with an Achilles tendon rupture who are treated with surgical repair with the rate in patients treated nonoperatively have been inconclusive but the pooled relative risk of rerupture favored surgical repair. In all but one study, the limb was immobilized for six to eight weeks. Published studies of animals and humans have shown a benefit of early functional stimulus to healing tendons. The purpose of the present study was to compare the outcomes of patients with an acute Achilles tendon rupture treated with operative repair and accelerated functional rehabilitation with the outcomes of similar patients treated with accelerated functional rehabilitation alone. Patients were randomized to operative or nonoperative treatment for acute Achilles tendon rupture. All patients underwent an accelerated rehabilitation protocol that featured early weight-bearing and early range of motion. The primary outcome was the rerupture rate as demonstrated by a positive Thompson squeeze test, the presence of a palpable gap, and loss of plantar flexion strength. Secondary outcomes included isokinetic strength, the Leppilahti score, range of motion, and calf circumference measured at three, six, twelve, and twenty-four months after injury. A total of 144 patients (seventy-two treated operatively and seventy-two treated nonoperatively) were randomized. There were 118 males and twenty-six females, and the mean age (and standard deviation) was 40.4 ± 8.8 years. Rerupture occurred in two patients in the operative group and in three patients in the nonoperative group. There was no clinically important difference between groups with regard to strength, range of motion, calf circumference, or Leppilahti score. There were thirteen complications in the operative group and six in the nonoperative group, with the main difference being the greater number of soft-tissue-related complications in the operative group. This study

  15. Limited open repair of ruptured Achilles tendons with Bunnel-type sutures.

    PubMed

    Park, H G; Moon, D H; Yoon, J M

    2001-12-01

    A new method of repairing Achilles tendons, which uses a small medial skin incision with a Bunnel-type suture, was performed on 14 patients, and the clinical results were found satisfying. In order to restore the Achilles tendon to its original length, restore tensile strength in the suture site, and minimize injury to the sural nerve, an operative procedure has been devised which uses a limited open repair with a Bunnel-type suture. We followed 14 patients who had undergone the new procedure for a mean interval of 26 months after the injury. They returned to work in six weeks and to playing sports in 25 weeks. There were no cases of late rerupture nor injuries to the sural nerve. This technique approximated the preinjury length and resting tension of the musculo-tendinous apparatus and minimized sural nerve injury.

  16. Effect of In-Ga-Al-P diode laser irradiation on angiogenesis in partial ruptures of Achilles tendon in rats.

    PubMed

    Salate, Ana C B; Barbosa, Gisele; Gaspar, Patrícia; Koeke, Paulo U; Parizotto, Nivaldo A; Benze, Benedito G; Foschiani, Daiane

    2005-10-01

    This study was conducted to analyze the effect of different irradiances of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on angiogenesis after partial rupture of Achilles tendon of rats. Ninety-six animals were divided into three groups subject to treatment during 3, 5, and 7 days post-lesion. Thirty-two animals were used in each group. The groups were further divided into four subgroups with eight animals in each, receiving In-Ga-Al-P laser (660 nm) treatment at (1) mean output of 10 mW, (2) 40 mW during 10 sec, (3) a sham subgroup, and (4) a non-treatment subgroup. Each animal was subjected to a lesion of the Achilles tendon by dropping a 186-g weight from a 20-cm height over the tendon. Treatment was initiated 6 h post-injury for all the groups. Blood vessels were colored with India ink injection and were examined in a video microscope. Laser exposure promoted an increase in blood vessel count when compared to controls. The 40-mW group showed early neovascularization, with the greatest number of microvessels after three laser applications. The 10-mW subgroup showed angiogenesis activity around the same time as the sham laser group did, but the net number of vessels was significantly higher in the former than in the controls. After seven irradiations, the subgroup receiving 40 mW experienced a drop in microvessel number, but it was still higher than in the control groups. LLLT of different intensities seems to promote neovascularization in damaged Achilles tendons of rats after partial rupture compared to controls.

  17. Factors associated with calf muscle endurance recovery 1 year after achilles tendon rupture repair.

    PubMed

    Bostick, Geoff P; Jomha, Nadr M; Suchak, Amar A; Beaupré, Lauren A

    2010-06-01

    Cohort study. To describe calf muscle endurance recovery and to explore factors predictive of poor calf muscle endurance recovery 1 year after surgical repair of an Achilles tendon rupture (ATR). ATR is a common sports-related injury and is often managed with open surgical repair. After ATR repair most patients return to usual activities 6 months after surgery. However, calf endurance impairment can persist up to 6 years, possibly impacting performance of daily activities and sport. A secondary analysis of a 73-patient cohort from a randomized controlled trial assessing the effects of early weight bearing after surgical repair of an ATR was performed. Calf muscle endurance recovery was measured by single-heel raises using a customized counting device at 6 months and 1 year postoperatively. Descriptive statistics were used to outline recovery of calf muscle endurance. Physical and patient-reported outcomes were examined for their association with calf-muscle endurance recovery. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to explore variables associated with recovery of calf endurance 1 year postoperatively. Mean recovery of calf muscle endurance was 76% at 1 year. Multivariate regression analysis showed an association of being female, reporting no resting pain at 3 months, and physical functioning and calf endurance at 6 months, with better recovery of calf endurance at 1 year. Calf muscle endurance at 1 year remained impaired in a considerable portion of the sample. Pain, gender, and physical functioning are likely important factors in determining recovery of calf muscle endurance. Prognosis, level 2b.J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2010;40(6):345-351, Epub 15 April 2010. doi:10.2519/jospt.2010.3204.

  18. Multiple tendon ruptures of unknown etiology.

    PubMed

    Axibal, Derek P; Anderson, John G

    2013-10-01

    Tendon ruptures are common findings in foot and ankle practice. The etiology of tendon ruptures tends to be multifactorial-usually due to a combination of trauma, effects of systemic diseases, adverse effects of medications, and obesity. We present an unusual case of right Achilles tendinitis, left Achilles tendon rupture, bilateral peroneus longus tendon rupture, and left peroneus brevis tendon rupture of unknown etiology. This case report highlights the need for research for other possible, lesser known etiologies of tendon pathology. Therapeutic, Level IV, Case Study.

  19. The Turkish version of the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score: cross-cultural adaptation, reliability and validity.

    PubMed

    Kaya Mutlu, Ebru; Celik, Derya; Kiliçoglu, Önder; Ozdincler, Arzu Razak; Nilsson-Helander, Katarina

    2015-08-01

    The Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) is a questionnaire designed to evaluate pain, symptoms, function and physical activity after Achilles tendon rupture. The purpose of this study was to translate and culturally adapt the ATRS into Turkish and to determine its reliability and validity. The ATRS was translated into Turkish in accordance with the stages recommended by Beaton. Seventy-four patients (73 male; average age: 42.3 ± 7.6; range 27-63 years) suffering from previous Achilles tendon ruptures were included for the study. The ATRS-Turkish was administered twice at 7-14 days intervals with 52 of the 74 patients (51 male, average age: 41.8 ± 7.8) to assess the test-retest reliability. Cronbach's α was used for internal consistency, and the inter-rater correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to calculate the test-retest reliability. The Turkish Short-Form-12 (SF-12) and the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS) were employed for validity estimation. The internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.95) and the test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.98) were excellent. The mean interval between the two tests was 7.1 ± 3.1 days. The mean and standard deviation of the first and second assessment of the ATRS were 78.1 ± 23.1 and 79.1 ± 22.5, respectively. The correlation coefficient between the ATRS-Turkish and the FAOS subscales (pain, symptoms, activities of daily living, sports and recreational activities, and quality of life) were determined (r = 0.82, r = 0.66, r = 0.79, r = 0.83 and r = 0.60, respectively, p < 0.0001). The ATRS-Turkish displayed good correlation with the SF-12 physical component score (r = 0.63, p < 0.001) and no correlation with the SF-12 mental component score (r = 0.22, p = 0.06). The ATRS-Turkish was found to be reliable and valid for outcome evaluation after Achilles tendon ruptures. II.

  20. [The echographic and clinical follow-up of patients operated on for subcutaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon].

    PubMed

    Cinotti, A; Massari, L; Traina, G C; Mannella, P

    1996-01-01

    Thanks to its good long-term results, surgery is the method of choice to treat subcutaneous ruptures of the Achilles tendon. Reconstructed tendons present typical morphological and functional US patterns which depend partly on the kind of surgical reconstruction and partly on the time passed since surgery. The authors report the results of the clinical and US follow-up of a series of 62 surgical patients treated in 7 years for the subcutaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon. The patients were 55 men and 7 women, whose mean age was 36 years (range: 25-65 years). The left-hand side was affected in 38 patients and the right-hand side in 24 patients. All patients were operated on using an end-to-end suture and reinforcement plastic surgery pulling down a gastrocnemius tendon flap. To homogenize the results, all the US exams were performed by the same operator, in the presence of the orthopedic specialist and under the same conditions: both the involved and the contralateral Achilles tendons were studied, longitudinal and transverse scans were performed with the foot in max. plantar and dorsal flexion and, whenever possible, dynamic scans were also performed making the sural triceps contract against resistance. The following parameters were studied clinically: pain (which was absent in 39 patients, occasional in 11, after stress in 9 and on walking in 3 patients), skin scar trophism (which was eutrophic in 53.23% of patients, keloid in 27.42% and hypertrophic in 19.35% of patients), ankle joint excursion (plantar flexion was impaired in 32.3% and dorsal flexion in 36% of patients), walking on tiptoe (in all, 22.6% of patients complained of difficulties walking on tiptoe) and, finally, work activity resumption (which all patients achieved). US depicted the surgical tendons as much bigger than the contralateral ones (3-4 times on the average), which increase in volume lasted throughout the follow-up. In 75% of patients the echo structure of the surgical tendons was

  1. Percutaneous repair of acute Achilles tendon rupture: a functional evaluation study with a minimum 10-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Mavrodontidis, Alexandros; Lykissas, Marios; Koulouvaris, Panayiotis; Pafilas, Dimitrios; Kontogeorgakos, Vasilios; Zalavras, Charalampos

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to present the functional outcomes of percutaneous tenorrhaphy of the Achilles tendon with a minimum follow-up of 10 years. The medical records of patients who underwent percutaneous surgery for acute unilateral Achilles tendon rupture between 2000 and 2004 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 11 male patients met the inclusion criteria and were followed for a mean of 12.6 years (range: 10-13 years). The average age at the time of surgery was 39.3 years (range: 29-53 years). Patients returned to work at an average of 2.7 months (range: 1-4 months) after surgery and to normal daily activities (NDA) at an average of 4.1 months (range: 3-6 months) postoperatively. The mean strength ratio between the injured and normal sides was 90%. Compared with the contralateral normal side, the thickness of the operated tendon increased by a mean of 0.7 cm, while the circumference of the affected calf diminished by a mean of 1.1 cm. No difference in active and passive range of motion (ROM) was recorded between the affected and the contralateral normal ankle joints. Isometric plantar flexion was 87% of normal. Sensory impairment in the territory of the sural nerve was identified in 1 patient immediately after surgery. The sensory defect had completely resolved by 6 months postoperatively. Long-term outcomes of our series support the effectiveness of percutaneous tenorrhaphy in Achilles function rehabilitation of patients with acute ruptures.

  2. Acute achilles tendon ruptures: a comparison of minimally invasive and open approach repairs followed by early rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Tejwani, Nirmal C; Lee, James; Weatherall, Justin; Sherman, Orrin

    2014-10-01

    We retrospectively compared the outcomes of early functional weight-bearing after use of 2 different approaches (minimally invasive, standard) for surgical repair of the Achilles tendon. We reviewed the cases of 63 consecutive patients who underwent repair of an acute closed Achilles tendon rupture and had follow-up of at least 6 months. Of these 63 patients, 33 were treated with a minimally invasive posterolateral approach (minimal group), and 30 were treated with a standard posteromedial approach (standard group). Two weeks after surgery, each patient was allowed to weight-bear as tolerated in a controlled ankle movement boot with a 20° heel wedge. At 6 weeks, the patient was placed in a regular shoe with a heel lift. We examined range of motion and incidence of reruptures, sural nerve injuries, and wound complications at 6 weeks and 3 months and calf strength at 6 months. Neither group had any reruptures. Mean incision length was 2.5 cm (minimal group) and 7.2 cm (standard group). One patient (3.2%) in the minimal group and 6 patients (20%) in the standard group developed a superficial wound infection. Four (12.9%) of 31 minimal patients and no standard patients developed a sural nerve deficit. There were statistically significant differences between the groups' wound complication rates (P=.04) and nerve injury rates (P=.043). At final follow-up, the groups did not differ in their functional outcomes (ability to perform a single heel raise, American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society scores). Used after a minimally invasive posterolateral or standard posteromedial approach, early functional weightbearing is an effective and safe method for treating acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon, and it has a lower rate of soft-tissue complications. A standard posteromedial approach has a higher rate of wound complications, and a minimally invasive posterolateral approach has a higher rate of sural nerve injury.

  3. The AutoQual ultrasound elastography method for quantitative assessment of lateral strain in post-rupture Achilles tendons.

    PubMed

    Brown, Phillip G; Alsousou, Joseph; Cooper, Ashley; Thompson, Mark S; Noble, J Alison

    2013-10-18

    This paper presents the AutoQual elastography method: a novel algorithm that improves the quality of 2D displacement field calculation from ultrasound radio frequency (RF) sequences of acutely ruptured Achilles tendons to determine image-lateral strain fields and has potential use for ligaments and muscles. This method uses 2D bicubic spline interpolation of the RF signal, Quality Determined Search, Automatic Search Range and Adaptive Block Size components as a novel combination that is designed to improve continuity and decrease displacement field noise, especially in areas of low signal strength. We present a simple experiment for quantitatively comparing the AutoQual method to a multiscale (MS) elastography method from ultrasound RF sequences of a 5% agar phantom for rigid body motion and known lateral strain loads with speeds up to 5mm/s. We finally present examples of four in vivo Achilles tendons in various damage states and with manual or artificially controlled passive flexion of the foot. Results show that the AutoQual method offers a substantial improvement on the MS method, achieving similar performance for rigid body tracking at all speeds, a lower normalized square error at all strains induced and a more continuous strain field at higher compression rates. AutoQual also showed a greater average normalized cross correlation for image blocks in the area of interest, a lower standard deviation of the strain field and a visually more acceptable point tracking for in vivo examples. This work demonstrates lateral ultrasound elastography which is robust to the complex passive motion of the Achilles and to various imaging artifacts associated with imaging tendon rupture. This method potentially has a wide clinical application for assessing in vivo strains in and hence mechanical function of any near skin surface tissues that are longitudinally loaded.

  4. Ankle joint proprioception and passive mechanical properties of the calf muscles after an Achilles tendon rupture: a comparison with matched controls.

    PubMed

    Bressel, Eadric; Larsen, Brian T; McNair, Peter J; Cronin, John

    2004-03-01

    To examine if ankle joint proprioception, passive stiffness, and torque relaxation responses of the involved and uninvolved limbs of persons with a previous history of an Achilles tendon rupture were different from matched controls. Quasi-experimental mixed design. The influence of an Achilles tendon rupture on the proprioceptive and kinetic performance of the involved and uninvolved ankle is not known. Twenty persons (mean age, 44.8 years) with a unilateral rupture and 20 matched controls (mean age, 44.2 years) volunteered. Proprioception was tested with a position-matching protocol from which absolute errors were quantified. A dynamometer was used to measure ankle joint angle and passive torque from which stiffness and torque relaxation were calculated. Proprioception absolute errors for the involved and uninvolved limbs of the experimental group were 27% and 31% greater respectively, than values for the control group. Torque relaxation values were greater in the involved limb versus the uninvolved limb or the control group (P=0.003-0.04). In conclusion, participants with a previous history of an Achilles tendon rupture display proprioception deficits in both limbs and greater torque relaxation in the involved limb in comparison to matched controls. Bilateral deficits in ankle joint proprioception, as reported in this study, suggest the uninvolved limb may not serve as an effective control and because proprioception deficits influence some functional tests, Achilles tendon rupture patients may benefit from proprioception training.

  5. Ability to perform a single heel-rise is significantly related to patient-reported outcome after Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Olsson, N; Karlsson, J; Eriksson, B I; Brorsson, A; Lundberg, M; Silbernagel, K G

    2014-02-01

    This study evaluated the short-term recovery of function after an acute Achilles tendon rupture, measured by a single-legged heel-rise test, with main emphasis on the relation to the patient-reported outcomes and fear of physical activity and movement (kinesiophobia). Eighty-one patients treated surgically or non-surgically with early active rehabilitation after Achilles tendon rupture were included in the study. Patient's ability to perform a single-legged heel-rise, physical activity level, patient-reported symptoms, general health, and kinesiophobia was evaluated 12 weeks after the injury. The heel-rise test showed that 40 out of 81 (49%) patients were unable to perform a single heel-rise 12 weeks after the injury. We found that patients who were able to perform a heel-rise were significantly younger, more often of male gender, reported a lesser degree of symptoms, and also had a higher degree of physical activity at 12 weeks. There was also a significant negative correlation between kinesiophobia and all the patient-reported outcomes and the physical activity level. The heel-rise ability appears to be an important early achievement and reflects the general level of healing, which influences patient-reported outcome and physical activity. Future treatment protocols focusing on regaining strength early after the injury therefore seem to be of great importance. Kinesiophobia needs to be addressed early during the rehabilitation process. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Elevation of systemic matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 7 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 in patients with a history of Achilles tendon rupture: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pasternak, B; Schepull, T; Eliasson, P; Aspenberg, P

    2010-07-01

    In this study, serum levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) between patients with a history of Achilles tendon rupture and blood donor controls were compared, and their relation to mechanical properties of the tendons during healing were studied. More than 3 years after injury, serum levels of MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-7, MMP-8, MMP-9 and MMP-13, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 in eight patients who had Achilles tendon rupture were measured. Twelve blood donors served as controls. During the early phase of healing, the tendon modulus of elasticity was calculated from radiostereometric data and tendon cross-sectional area. Patients with a history of Achilles tendon rupture had increased levels of MMP-2 (median difference 10%, p=0.01), MMP-7 (median difference 15%, p=0.02) and TIMP-2 (median difference 36%, p=0.02), compared with controls. Levels of MMP-7, measured 3 years after injury, correlated inversely to tendon modulus of elasticity (r(s)=20.83, p=0.02) and positively to tendon elongation (r(s)=0.74, p=0.05) during the early phase of healing. There was a trend towards positive correlation between MMP-7 and cross-sectional area during the early phase of healing (r(s)=0.67, p=0.08). Patients with a history of Achilles tendon rupture appear to have elevated levels of MMP-2, MMP-7 and TIMP-2 in serum. In these pilot data, the view that the MMP-TIMP system is involved in tendinopathy is supported and that disturbances in proteolytic control might be generalised are suggested.

  7. Acute Achilles tendon rupture: minimally invasive surgery versus non operative treatment, with immediate full weight bearing. Design of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Metz, Roderik; Kerkhoffs, Gino Mmj; Verleisdonk, Egbert-Jan Mm; van der Heijden, Geert J

    2007-11-06

    We present the design of an open randomized multi-centre study on surgical versus conservative treatment of acute Achilles tendon ruptures. The study is designed to evaluate the effectiveness of conservative treatment in reducing complications when treating acute Achilles tendon rupture. At least 72 patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture will be randomized to minimally invasive surgical repair followed by functional rehabilitation using tape bandage or conservative treatment followed by functional rehabilitation with use of a functional bracing system. Both treatment arms use a 7 weeks post-rupture rehabilitation protocol. Four hospitals in the Netherlands will participate. Primary end-point will be reduction in complications other than re-rupture. Secondary end-point will be re-rupturing, time off work, sporting activity post rupture, functional outcome by Leppilahti score and patient satisfaction. Patient follow-up will be 12 month. By making this design study we wish to contribute to more profound research on AT rupture treatment and prevent publication bias for this open-labelled randomized trial. ISRCTN50141196.

  8. Operative versus nonoperative treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture: An analysis of 12,570 patients in a large healthcare database.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dean; Sandlin, M Isiah; Cohen, Jeremiah R; Lord, Elizabeth L; Petrigliano, Frank A; SooHoo, Nelson F

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the latest patient demographics and rerupture rates of operative versus nonoperative treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture in the United States. Patients undergoing treatment of an acute Achilles tendon rupture from 2007 to 2011 were identified by cross-referencing ICD-9-CM and CPT codes through the PearlDiver Patient Record Database. In total, 12,570 patients were treated for an acute Achilles tendon rupture. The ratio of operative to nonoperative treatment increased from 1.41 to 1.65. Males were more likely to undergo surgery than females. There were no significant differences in short-term rerupture rate for operative (2.1%) versus nonoperative (2.4%) treatment. The proportion of patients who received operative treatment for an acute Achilles tendon rupture increased slightly during the 5 year period, suggesting that surgeons in the United States have been slower to adopt nonoperative treatment than their European counterparts. Copyright © 2015 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Return to play post-Achilles tendon rupture: a systematic review and meta-analysis of rate and measures of return to play.

    PubMed

    Zellers, Jennifer A; Carmont, Michael R; Grävare Silbernagel, Karin

    2016-06-03

    This systematic review and meta-analysis sought to identify return to play (RTP) rates following Achilles tendon rupture and evaluate what measures are used to determine RTP. A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed. Studies were assessed for risk of bias and grouped based on repeatability of their measure of RTP determination. PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science and Scopus databases were searched to identify potentially relevant articles. Studies reporting RTP/sport/sport activity in acute, closed Achilles tendon rupture were included. 108 studies encompassing 6506 patients were included for review. 85 studies included a measure for determining RTP. The rate of RTP in all studies was 80% (95% CI 75% to 85%). Studies with measures describing determination of RTP reported lower rates than studies without metrics described, with rates being significantly different between groups (p<0.001). 80 per cent of patients returned to play following Achilles tendon rupture; however, the RTP rates are dependent on the quality of the method used to measure RTP. To further understand RTP after Achilles tendon rupture, a standardised, reliable and valid method is required. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Prospective Use of a Standardized Nonoperative Early Weightbearing Protocol for Achilles Tendon Rupture: 17 Years of Experience.

    PubMed

    Ecker, Timo M; Bremer, Anne K; Krause, Fabian G; Müller, Thorsten; Weber, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Acute traumatic rupture of the Achilles tendon can be treated operatively or nonoperatively. Throughout the literature, there is no consensus regarding the optimal treatment protocol. To report on 17 years of experience with treating this injury with a standardized nonoperative treatment protocol. Case Series; Level of evidence, 4. The treatment protocol was based on a combination of an equinus cast and rehabilitation boot, which promoted immediate full weightbearing and early functional rehabilitation. A total of 171 patients were consecutively treated and prospectively followed from 1996 to 2013. Assessed were subjective parameters such as pain, loss of strength, return to previous activity level, meteosensitivity, and general satisfaction with the treatment outcome. Clinical assessment included testing of plantar flexion strength and endurance, calf circumference, and tendon length. Subjective and clinical parameters were then used to calculate a modified Thermann score. The correlation between tendon lengthening and function was calculated using the Pearson correlation coefficient. A total of 114 patients were followed for a minimum of 12 months (mean, 27 ± 20 months; range, 12-88 months). The mean Thermann score was 82 ± 13 (range, 41-100), and subjective satisfaction was rated "very good" and "good" in 90%. An inverse correlation was found between tendon length and muscle strength (R = -0.3). There were 11 reruptures (8 with and 3 without an adequate trauma). General complications were 5 deep venous thromboses, 1 complex regional pain syndrome, and minor problems such as transient heel pain (n = 3), heel numbness (n = 1), and cast-associated skin abrasions (n = 4). Seventeen years of experience with a nonoperative treatment protocol for acute rupture of the Achilles tendon confirmed good functional outcome and patient satisfaction. Reruptures mostly occurred with new traumatic events in the vulnerable phase from 6 to 12 weeks after the initial injury

  11. Common conditions of the achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Michael F; McCue, Timothy

    2002-05-01

    The Achilles tendon, the largest tendon in the body, is vulnerable to injury because of its limited blood supply and the combination of forces to which it is subjected. Aging and increased activity (particularly velocity sports) increase the chance of injury to the Achilles tendon. Although conditions of the Achilles tendon are occurring with increasing frequency because the aging U.S. population is remaining active, the diagnosis is missed in about one fourth of cases. Injury onset can be gradual or sudden, and the course of healing is often lengthy. A thorough history and specific physical examination are essential to make the appropriate diagnosis and facilitate a specific treatment plan. The mainstay of treatment for tendonitis, peritendonitis, tendinosis, and retrocalcaneobursitis is ice, rest, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but physical therapy, orthoties, and surgery may be necessary in recalcitrant cases. In patients with tendon rupture, casting or surgery is required. Appropriate treatment often leads to full recovery.

  12. Running biomechanics in a long-term monitored recreational athlete with a history of Achilles tendon rupture

    PubMed Central

    Jandacka, Daniel; Zahradnik, David; Foldyna, Karel; Hamill, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    This study represented a unique opportunity to understand changes in the human motion biomechanics during basic locomotion within a time interval of 4 years, when the monitored individual regained his original aerobic fitness, running performance and body mass index as prior to the injury. The participant visited the laboratory a month prior to the injury and during 4 years after the surgery. The surgery, subsequent rehabilitation and a 4-year running training programme in the studied recreational athlete did not completely eliminate the consequences of the Achilles tendon rupture. The function muscle deficit is namely manifested by a lower net plantar flexion moment and a lower net-generated ankle joint power during the take-off in the stance phase. The greater dorsal flexion in the affected ankle joint at the first contact with the ground and consequently higher peaks of ground reaction forces during running are consequences of the longer Achilles tendon in the affected lower extremity and weakened calf muscles. PMID:23362072

  13. Operative versus nonoperative treatment for acute Achilles tendon rupture: a meta-analysis based on current evidence.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Nan; Wang, Bowei; Chen, Anfu; Dong, Fu; Yu, Bin

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, in a meta-analysis, the clinical effectiveness of operative treatment for acute Achilles tendon rupture (AATR) compared with nonoperative treatment. We systematically searched six electronic databases (Medline, Embase, Clinical Ovid, BIOSIS and Cochrane registry of controlled clinical trials) to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in which operative treatment was compared with nonoperative treatment for AATR from 1980 to 2011. Trial quality was assessed using the modified Jadad scale. The data was using fixed-effects and random-effects models with mean differences and risk ratios for continuous and dichotomous variables, respectively. Ten RCTs with a total of 894 patients were screened. The results showed that operative was superior to nonoperative treatment regarding lower risk of re-rupture (P = 0.002) and shorter time for sick leave (P = 0.009) but inferior to nonoperative treatment regarding complication risks (P = 0.004). No significant difference was identified between the two methods regarding the number of patients who successfully returned to pre-injury sports (P = 0.30). Subgroup analyses revealed significant differences in relation to scar adhesion (P < 0.00001), superficial infection (P = 0.05), and sensibility disturbance (P = 0.0003). However, no significant differences were found between the two interventions in relation to deep infection (P = 0.22), deep vein thrombosis (DVT) (P = 0.14), and extreme Achilles tendon lengthening (P = 0.31). Little consensus was obtained in the functional recovery from current trials as a result of an inconsistent assessment system. Compared with conservative treatment, operative treatment can effectively reduce the risk of re-rupture but increase the probability of complications. The increased complication risk may be associated with open repair surgery. However, no sufficient evidence is available from current studies to support the belief that operation may lead to

  14. Differentially expressed proteins on postoperative 3 days healing in rabbit Achilles tendon rupture model after early kinesitherapy.

    PubMed

    Jialili, Ainuer; Jielile, Jiasharete; Abudoureyimu, Shajidan; Sabirhazi, Gulnur; Redati, Darebai; Bai, Jing-Ping; Bin, Liang; Duisabai, Sailike; Aishan, Jiangaguli; Kasimu, Haxiaobieke

    2011-04-01

    Surgical repair of Achilles tendon (AT) rupture should immediately be followed by active tendon mobilization. The optimal time as to when the mobilization should begin is important yet controversial. Early kinesitherapy leads to reduced rehabilitation period. However, an insight into the detailed mechanism of this process has not been gained. Proteomic technique can be used to separate and purify the proteins by differential expression profile which is related to the function of different proteins, but research in the area of proteomic analysis of AT 3 days after repair has not been studied so far. Forty-seven New Zealand white rabbits were randomized into 3 groups. Group A (immobilization group, n equal to 16) received postoperative cast immobilization; Group B (early motion group, n equal to 16) received early active motion treatments immediately following the repair of AT rupture from tenotomy. Another 15 rabbits served as control group (Group C). The AT samples were prepared 3 days following the microsurgery. The proteins were separated employing two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE). PDQuest software version 8.0 was used to identify differentially expressed proteins, followed by peptide mass fingerprint (PMF) and tandem mass spectrum analysis, using the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) protein database retrieval and then for bioinformatics analysis. A mean of 446.33, 436.33 and 462.67 protein spots on Achilles tendon samples of 13 rabbits in Group A, 14 rabbits in Group B and 13 rabbits in Group C were successfully detected in the 2D-PAGE. There were 40, 36 and 79 unique proteins in Groups A, B and C respectively. Some differentially expressed proteins were enzyme with the gel, matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). We successfully identified 9 and 11 different proteins in Groups A and B, such as GAPDH, phosphoglycerate kinase 1, pro-alpha-1 type 1 collagen

  15. Conservative, minimally invasive and open surgical repair for management of acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon: a clinical and functional retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Maffulli, Gayle; Buono, Angelo Del; Richards, Paula; Oliva, Francesco; Maffulli, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background: At present, it is unclear which is the best management for Achilles tendon rupture. Purpose: We assess the clinical, functional and imaging outcomes of active patients undergoing 3 different types of management for acute subcutaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon, including conservative cast immobilization, traditional open surgery and percutaneous repair. Methods: 26 active patients were managed for a rupture of the Achilles Tendon from January 2007 to March 2008. Anthropometric measurements, Functional assessment, Isometric strength, Ultrasonographic assessment, Patient satisfaction, Working life, Physical activity, Functional score and Complications were recorded retrospectively. Results: All 23 (21 men, 2 women) patients were reviewed at a minimum follow-up of 24 months (average 25.7, range 24 to 32 months, SD: 6.3) from the index injury. Thermann scores and patient satisfaction were significantly higher following surgery than conservative management with no significance between open and minimally invasive operated patients. Sensitive disturbances occur in up to 12% of open repairs and 1.8% of patients managed nonsurgically. Conclusions: Clinical and functional outcomes following surgical repair, percutaneous and open, of the Achilles tendon are significantly improved than following conservative management. Level of evidence: Level III. PMID:28717611

  16. Heel pain and Achilles tendonitis -- aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... please enable JavaScript. When you overuse the Achilles tendon, it can become swollen and painful near the ... Achilles tendonitis . More About Your Injury The Achilles tendon connects your calf muscles to your heel bone. ...

  17. Long-Term Results of Mini-Open Repair Technique in the Treatment of Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Taşatan, Ersin; Emre, Tuluhan Yunus; Demircioğlu, Demet Tekdöş; Demiralp, Bahtiyar; Kırdemir, Vecihi

    2016-01-01

    An ideal surgical treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture includes restoring the original length of the tendon, minimizing possible adhesions with the surrounding tissues, minimizing the risk of repeat rupture, alleviating wound problems, and providing an acceptable cosmetic outcome. In the mini-open repair technique, unlike the percutaneous repair technique, the quality of the tenodesis can be visualized without disturbing the healing potential of the surrounding tissues, thus minimizing wound problems. The purpose of the present study was to assess the long-term results of the mini-open repair technique in patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture. A total of 20 consecutive patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture, admitted to our inpatient clinic from October 2003 to March 2008, were included in the present study. The patients underwent Achilles tenodesis with the mini-open repair technique, and each patient was followed up for 5 years. The study was completed in April 2013. The surgical procedure was performed with the assistance of a device designed in our orthosis laboratories, similarly to that defined by Assal et al. Of the 20 patients, 18 were male and 2 were female. Their mean age was 39.3 (range 21 to 55) years. The Achilles tendon rupture was located on the left side in 15 patients (75%) and on the right side in 5 patients (25%). The mean follow-up duration was 58.5 (range 18 to 60) months and no complications occurred during the follow-up period, including repeat rupture, wound site infection, and sural nerve injury. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society scale score for the patients was 99.2 (range 94 to 100) points at the final follow-up visit. All our patients were able to return to work and sporting activities. According to the Trillat scores, the outcome was excellent in 19 patients and good in 1 patient at the 18th postoperative month. No complaint, such as pain or loss of function, that might have a negative effect on the

  18. Three-Dimensional Gait Analysis Following Achilles Tendon Rupture With Nonsurgical Treatment Reveals Long-Term Deficiencies in Muscle Strength and Function.

    PubMed

    Tengman, Tine; Riad, Jacques

    2013-09-01

    Precise long-term assessment of movement and physical function following Achilles tendon rupture is required for the development and evaluation of treatment, including different regimens of physical therapy. To assess intermediate-term (<10 years by conventional thinking) objective measures of physical function following Achilles tendon rupture treated nonsurgically and to compare these with self-reported measures of physical function. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Two to 5 years after Achilles tendon rupture, 9 women and 43 men (mean age, 49.2 years; range, 26-68 years) were assessed by physical examination, performance of 1-legged jumps, and 3-dimensional gait analysis (including calculation of muscle work). Self-reported scores for foot function (Achilles tendon rupture score) and level of physical activity were collected. Twenty age- and sex-matched controls were assessed in the same manner. Physical examination of patients with the knee extended revealed 11.1° of dorsiflexion on the injured side and 9.2° on the uninjured side (P = .020), indicating gastrocnemius muscle lengthening. The 1-legged jump distance was shorter on the injured side (89.5 vs 96.2 cm; P < .001). Gait analysis showed higher peak dorsiflexion (14.3° vs 13.3°; P = .016) and lower concentric (positive) plantar flexor work (16.6 vs 19.9 J/kg; P = .001) in the ankle on the uninjured side. At the same time, eccentric (negative) dorsiflexor work was higher on the injured side (13.2 vs 11.9 J/kg; P = .010). Self-perceived foot function and physical activity were lower in patients than in healthy controls (mean Achilles tendon rupture score, 78.6 and 99.8, respectively). Nonsurgically treated patients with Achilles tendon rupture showed signs of both anatomic and functional lengthening of the tendon. Attenuated muscle strength and function were present during walking as long as 2 to 5 years after rupture, as determined by 3-dimensional gait analysis. More extensive future

  19. Three-Dimensional Gait Analysis Following Achilles Tendon Rupture With Nonsurgical Treatment Reveals Long-Term Deficiencies in Muscle Strength and Function

    PubMed Central

    Tengman, Tine; Riad, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Background: Precise long-term assessment of movement and physical function following Achilles tendon rupture is required for the development and evaluation of treatment, including different regimens of physical therapy. Purpose: To assess intermediate-term (<10 years by conventional thinking) objective measures of physical function following Achilles tendon rupture treated nonsurgically and to compare these with self-reported measures of physical function. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Two to 5 years after Achilles tendon rupture, 9 women and 43 men (mean age, 49.2 years; range, 26-68 years) were assessed by physical examination, performance of 1-legged jumps, and 3-dimensional gait analysis (including calculation of muscle work). Self-reported scores for foot function (Achilles tendon rupture score) and level of physical activity were collected. Twenty age- and sex-matched controls were assessed in the same manner. Results: Physical examination of patients with the knee extended revealed 11.1° of dorsiflexion on the injured side and 9.2° on the uninjured side (P = .020), indicating gastrocnemius muscle lengthening. The 1-legged jump distance was shorter on the injured side (89.5 vs 96.2 cm; P < .001). Gait analysis showed higher peak dorsiflexion (14.3° vs 13.3°; P = .016) and lower concentric (positive) plantar flexor work (16.6 vs 19.9 J/kg; P = .001) in the ankle on the uninjured side. At the same time, eccentric (negative) dorsiflexor work was higher on the injured side (13.2 vs 11.9 J/kg; P = .010). Self-perceived foot function and physical activity were lower in patients than in healthy controls (mean Achilles tendon rupture score, 78.6 and 99.8, respectively). Conclusion: Nonsurgically treated patients with Achilles tendon rupture showed signs of both anatomic and functional lengthening of the tendon. Attenuated muscle strength and function were present during walking as long as 2 to 5 years after rupture, as

  20. Clinical outcome of exercise therapy and early post-operative rehabilitation for treatment of neglected Achilles tendon rupture: a randomized study.

    PubMed

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Badalihan, Ayinazi; Qianman, Bayixiati; Satewalede, Tuerde; Wuerliebieke, Jianati; Kelamu, Mailamuguli; Jialihasi, Ayidaer

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of neglected Achilles tendon rupture is very challenging. This randomized study aimed to compare the clinical outcome of early post-operative rehabilitation (EPR) with post-operative cast immobilization (PCI). Fifty-seven patients with neglected Achilles tendon rupture were randomized to receive EPR (n = 26) or PCI (n = 31) management following surgery. Clinical outcome was monitored by follow-up at weeks 8, 12, 18 and 26 and year 2. The significance of intergroup differences from the Leppilahti scoring system (LSS), ultrasonography, multislice spiral computerized tomography (MSCT) and electromyography was assessed. Ultrasonography and MSCT revealed no occurrence of tendon elongation or adhesion. Four patients could perform sustained single-leg heel-raise exercise for 60 s at post-operative day 40. The PCI group also showed increased post-operative LSS score, but recovery was slower. Post-operative complications, such as ankle joint ankylosis and osteoporosis, only occurred in the PCI group. Compared with cast immobilization, early post-operative rehabilitation results in better clinical outcome and faster overall tendon regeneration of neglected Achilles tendon rupture. II.

  1. Effect of Early Versus Late Weightbearing in Conservatively Treated Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    El-Akkawi, Ali Imad; Joanroy, Rajzan; Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner; Kallemose, Thomas; Kristensen, Søren Skydt; Viberg, Bjarke

    2017-09-30

    Achilles tendon ruptures can be either surgically or conservatively treated with either early functional mobilization or cast immobilization. The purpose of the present study was to conduct a meta-analysis comparing the effect of early versus late weightbearing in conservatively treated adult patients, including only randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The primary endpoint was rerupture, and the secondary endpoints were strength, quality of life during treatment, range of motion, deep venous thrombosis, return to sports, and return to work. The search for studies was conducted using PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled trials. A search was performed, and 2 reviewers independently screened the studies by title, abstract, and, finally, by reading the full text. Four studies met the inclusion criteria. The reference lists of the included studies were scanned and 1 additional RCT study was included. The critical appraisal skills program checklist was applied for study appraisal. A statistician performed the data management and analysis. No statistically significant differences were found between the 2 treatment groups concerning rerupture (p = .796), return to sports (p = .455), or return to work (p = .888). One RCT found 1 case of deep venous thrombosis in the late weightbearing group. One RCT reported significant improvement in quality of life and one reported a significantly improved range of dorsiflexion in the early weightbearing group. No statistically significant difference was found between early and late weightbearing with conservative treatment regarding the rerupture rate. The results of the other outcomes were limited by the low number of studies included in the present meta-analysis. Larger randomized studies are needed to investigate these outcomes. From the results in the present study, we would recommend early weightbearing when an Achilles tendon rupture is treated conservatively. Copyright © 2017 American College of

  2. Weight bearing the same day versus non-weight bearing for 4 weeks in Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Murat; Erkoc, Mustafa Fatih; Yolcu, Sadiye; Balbaloglu, Ozlem; Öztemur, Zekeriya; Karaaslan, Fatih

    2015-05-01

    Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) often occurs in 40- to 50-year-old men. Multiple studies discuss the correct treatment strategy based on surgical or nonsurgical intervention, including early mobilization. We aimed to compare the outcomes of bearing weight on the same day with non-weight bearing over a 4-week period of ATR patients. Forty-seven ATR patients were conservatively treated and entered into our study. Group 1 consisted of 23 patients treated with partial weight bearing beginning the same day of conservative treatment; Group 2 consisted of 24 patients treated with non-weight bearing after a 4-week period. Patients were at least 18 years old and were followed for 12 months. Evaluation criteria were mechanism of injury, admission time to our clinic, complication rate, and time to return to work. Symptoms and physical activity levels of all patients were assessed on 6 and 12 months after treatment began, according to the Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS), Physical Activity Scale (PAS), and American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot score. Rerupture rates were rate 17.4% (4 patients) in Group 1 and 12.5% (3 patients) in Group 2 (p = 0.81). Time to return to work was shorter in Group 1 compared with Group 2, but it was not statistically significant (p = 0.86). AOFAS, ATRS, and PAS scores at 6 and 12 months showed no significant differences between groups (p = 0.69, p = 0.59, p = 0.89, p = 0.77, p = 0.94, p = 0.66, respectively). This study showed that a well-conducted early-weight-bearing treatment has good clinical outcomes, with a complication rate no higher than non-weight-bearing treatment.

  3. Outcome of a one-stage tensile stress surgical technique and early postoperative rehabilitation in the treatment of neglected achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Badalihan, Ayinazi; Aihemaiti, Amina; Shawutali, Nuerai; Jielile, Jiasharete; Jialihasi, Ayidaer; Tangkejie, Wulanbai; Nuerdoula, Yeermike; Satewalede, Turde; Hunapiya, Beisen; Niyazebieke, Hadelebieke; Hezibieke, Hayilat; Zhao, Qin; Bahetijiang, Ahezhuoli; Kelamu, Mailamuguli; Qianman, Bayixiati

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of single-stage internal traction combined with early postoperative active rehabilitation and the yurt bone suture method, a new surgical technique, on the clinical outcomes after surgical repair of Achilles tendon. A total of 51 patients with neglected Achilles tendon rupture who underwent the yurt bone suture treatment also participated in an accelerated postoperative rehabilitation program. The clinical outcome was evaluated for 18 weeks using the Leppilahti scoring system, bilateral ultrasound examination, and computed tomography examination. The ultrasound and computed tomography examinations revealed that Achilles tendon elongation and adhesion occurred in none of the patients. All the patients could perform the single leg heel raise exercise for a mean of 30 ± 7.6 seconds at 12 weeks postoperatively. In addition, the patients could participate in sport exercises and heavy physical activities by around 13 weeks postoperatively. The mean Leppilahti score was 85.8 ± 3.7 at 8 weeks postoperatively, and it had increased to 96.1 ± 3.2 and 100.0 ± 0.0 at 12 and 18 weeks, respectively, after the operation. The 1-stage internal traction technique, combined with early postoperative active rehabilitation and the yurt bone surgical technique, resulted in good clinical outcomes for the treatment of neglected Achilles tendon rupture. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A novel repair method for the treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture with minimally invasive approach using button implant: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Huri, Gazi; Biçer, Ömer Sunkar; Ozgözen, Levent; Uçar, Yurdanur; Garbis, Nickolas G; Hyun, Yoon Suk

    2013-12-01

    Minimally invasive Q3 repair has been proposed for acute Achilles tendon rupture with low rate of complications. However there are still controversies about optimal technique. In this study we aimed to describe Endobutton-assisted modified Bunnell configuration as a new Achilles tendon repair technique and evaluate its biomechanical properties comparing with native tendon and Krackow technique. 27 ovine Achilles tendons were obtained and randomly placed into 3 groups with 9 specimens ineach. The Achilles tendons were repaired with Endobutton-assisted modified Bunnell technique in group 1, Krackow suture technique in group 2 and group 3 was defined as the control group including native tendons. Unidirectional tensile loading to failure was performed at 25mm/min. Biomechanicalproperties such as peak force to failure (N), stress at peak (MPa), elongation at failure, and Young'smodulus (GPa) was measured for each group. All groups were compared with each other using one-wayANOVA followed by the Tukey HSD multiple comparison test (a=0.05). The average peak force (N) to failure of group 1 and group 2 and control group was 415.6±57.6, 268.1±65.2 and 704.5±85.8, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between native tendon and group 1 for the amount elongation at failure (p>0.05). Regarding the results, we concluded that Endobutton-assisted modified Bunnell technique provides stronger fixation than conventional techniques. It may allow early range of motion and can be easily applied in minimally invasive and percutaneous methods particularly for cases with poor quality tendon at the distal part of rupture. Level II, Biomechanical research study. Copyright © 2013 European Foot and Ankle Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of the early period effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich plasma on the Achilles tendon ruptures in rats.

    PubMed

    Yuksel, Serdar; Guleç, M Akif; Gultekin, M Zeki; Adanır, Oktay; Caglar, Aysel; Beytemur, Ozan; Onur Küçükyıldırım, B; Avcı, Ali; Subaşı, Cansu; İnci, Çiğdem; Karaoz, Erdal

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to histopathologically, biomechanically, and immunohistochemically compare the fourth-week efficiencies of local platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (rBM-MSC) treatments of the Achilles tendon ruptures created surgically in rats. The study included 35 12-month-old male Sprague Dawley rats, with an average weight of 400-500 g. Five rats were used as donors for MSC and PRP, and 30 rats were separated into MSC, PRP, and control groups (n = 10). The Achilles tendons of the rats were cut transversely, the MSC from bone marrow was administered to the MSC group, the PRP group received PRP, and the control group received physiological saline to create the same surgical effect. In previous studies, it was shown that this physiological saline does not have any effect on tendon recovery. Thirty days after the treatment, the rats were sacrificed and their Achilles tendons were examined histopathologically, immunohistochemically, and biomechanically. The use of rBM-MSC and PRP in the Achilles tendon ruptures when the tendon is in its weakest phase positively affected the recovery of the tendon in histopathologic, immunohistochemical, and biomechanical manners compared to the control group (p < 0.05). While the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IFNγ, and IL 1β were significantly low, the levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors playing key roles in tendon recovery, such as IL2, VEGF, transforming growth factor-beta, and HGF, were significantly higher in the MSC group than those of the PRP and control groups (p < 0.05). In the MSC group, the [Formula: see text] (mm) value was significantly higher (p ˂ 0.05) than that in the PRP and control groups. rBM-MSC and PRP promote the recovery of the tendon and increase its structural strength. The use of PRP and MSC provides hope for the treatment of the Achilles tendon ruptures that limit human beings' functionalities and quality of life, particularly for

  6. Fascicles of the adult human Achilles tendon - an anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Szaro, Paweł; Witkowski, Grzegorz; Smigielski, Robert; Krajewski, Paweł; Ciszek, Bogdan

    2009-12-01

    The Achilles or calcaneal tendon is the structural base for the biomechanical work of the ankle joint. The purpose of this study is to describe the internal structure of the human Achilles tendon. The anatomy of the Achilles tendon has been described in lower mammals in which it has three parts which can be dissected from its beginning to the insertion onto the calcaneus. The partial ruptures of each part suggest that the human Achilles tendon may also be composed of parts. The Achilles tendon is one of the most commonly torn tendons in the human body. Each segment of the Achilles tendon described by us can be ruptured separately, which can cause a partial dysfunction in flexion of the ankle joint as observed in clinical practice. We dissected 20 Achilles tendons previously fixed in 10% formaldehyde and 20 fresh-frozen Achilles tendons, paying particular attention to the relationship between the lateral and medial heads of the gastrocnemius and the soleus muscles. The layer-by-layer method and a microscope were used in our study. We found that the medial group of fibers from the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle constitutes the posterior layer of the tendon. The lateral border of the tendon is composed of the fibers from the lateral part of the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle. The fibers from the lateral head of the gastrocnemius muscle constitute the anterior layer of the Achilles tendon. The fibers from the soleus muscle are located in the anteromedial part of the Achilles tendon. Our findings are supported by clinical descriptions and observations of the partial rupture of the Achilles tendon. 2009 Elsevier GmbH.

  7. Increasing incidence of acute Achilles tendon rupture and a noticeable decline in surgical treatment from 1994 to 2013. A nationwide registry study of 33,160 patients.

    PubMed

    Ganestam, Ann; Kallemose, Thomas; Troelsen, Anders; Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the incidence of acute Achilles tendon rupture in Denmark from 1994 to 2013 with focus on sex, age, geographical areas, seasonal variation and choice of treatment. The National Patient Registry was retrospectively searched to find the number of acute Achilles tendon rupture in Denmark during the time period of 1994-2013. Regional population data were retrieved from the services of Statistics Denmark. During the 20-year period, 33,160 ruptures occurred revealing a statistically significant increase in the incidence (p < 0.001, range = 26.95-31.17/100,000/year). Male-to-female ratio was 3:1 and average age 45 years for men and 44 years for women. There was a statistically significant increasing incidence for people over 50 years. A higher incidence in rural compared with urban geographical areas was found, but this was not statistically significant. There was a statistically significant decreasing incidence of patients treated with surgery from 16.9/10(5) in 1994 to 6.3/10(5) in 2013. The incidence of acute Achilles tendon rupture increased from 1994 to 2013 based on increasing incidence in the older population. There was no difference in incidence of acute Achilles tendon rupture in the rural compared with urban geographical areas. A steady decline in surgical treatment was found over the whole period, with a noticeable decline from 2009 to 2013, possibly reflecting a rapid change in clinical practice following a range of high-quality randomized clinical trials (RCT). IV.

  8. Efficacy and complications of open and minimally invasive surgery in acute Achilles tendon rupture: a prospective randomised clinical study--preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Kołodziej, Lukas; Bohatyrewicz, Andrzej; Kromuszczyńska, Justyna; Jezierski, Jarosław; Biedroń, Maciej

    2013-04-01

    Surgical treatment of an acute Achilles tendon rupture can effectively reduce the risk of re-rupture, but it increases the probability of surgical complications. We postulated that a minimally invasive surgical treatment might reduce the number of complications related to open surgery and improve the functional results. We enrolled 47 patients with acute Achilles tendon ruptures in a prospective, randomised trial to compare clinical results and complications between a minimally invasive procedure with the Achillon(®) device and traditional open surgery with Krackow-type sutures. The average patient age was 46 years. The follow up time was 24 months. No Achilles tendon re-rupture or nerve injury occurred in treated patients. There were two cases of wound infections in the open surgery group, and one superficial wound infection occurred in the minimally invasive group. The groups were not significantly different in the amount of pain, range of ankle movements, the single heel-rise test, calf circumference, or time to return to work and sports. After a two year follow-up period, we found no significant differences in clinical outcomes between groups treated with traditional open surgery or minimally invasive surgery.

  9. Functional evaluation of professional athletes treated with a mini-open technique for achilles tendon rupture

    PubMed Central

    Vadalà, Antonio; Lanzetti, Riccardo Maria; Ciompi, Alessandro; Rossi, Cristina; Lupariello, Domenico; Ferretti, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Summary Introduction: in this study we report the functional results of 36 professional athletes treated with a combined percutaneous and mini-open technique. Methods: patients were evaluated with Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment-Achilles questionnaire (VISA-A), the objective 100-points Hannover scale and the Ergo-jump Bosco System device. Results: at a mean 28- month follow-up no re-rupture cases were observed. Six patients had minor complications. The Ergo-jump Bosco System device showed no significant differences in the side-to-side evaluation in regard to strength (−0.94%) and elasticity (+2.44%), while a significant post-operative loss was detected in the endurance trials (−6.78%). The Hannover scale showed an average score of 94.5, while the VISA-A had an average of 93.1. Thirty-one patients resumed their pre-operative sports activity level within five months from surgery. Conclusions: our results showed that the combined mini-open and percutaneous repair is an effective treatment for professional athletes, with satisfactory clinical and functional results, lack of major complications and a quick return to professional sports activity. PMID:25332932

  10. Functional weight-bearing mobilization after Achilles tendon rupture enhances early healing response: a single-blinded randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Valkering, Kars P; Aufwerber, Susanna; Ranuccio, Francesco; Lunini, Enricomaria; Edman, Gunnar; Ackermann, Paul W

    2017-06-01

    Functional weight-bearing mobilization may improve repair of Achilles tendon rupture (ATR), but the underlying mechanisms and outcome were unknown. We hypothesized that functional weight-bearing mobilization by means of increased metabolism could improve both early and long-term healing. In this prospective randomized controlled trial, patients with acute ATR were randomized to either direct post-operative functional weight-bearing mobilization (n = 27) in an orthosis or to non-weight-bearing (n = 29) plaster cast immobilization. During the first two post-operative weeks, 15°-30° of plantar flexion was allowed and encouraged in the functional weight-bearing mobilization group. At 2 weeks, patients in the non-weight-bearing cast immobilization group received a stiff orthosis, while the functional weight-bearing mobilization group continued with increased range of motion. At 6 weeks, all patients discontinued immobilization. At 2 weeks, healing metabolites and markers of procollagen type I (PINP) and III (PIIINP) were examined using microdialysis. At 6 and 12 months, functional outcome using heel-rise test was assessed. Healing tendons of both groups exhibited increased levels of metabolites glutamate, lactate, pyruvate, and of PIIINP (all p < 0.05). Patients in functional weight-bearing mobilization group demonstrated significantly higher concentrations of glutamate compared to the non-weight-bearing cast immobilization group (p = 0.045).The upregulated glutamate levels were significantly correlated with the concentrations of PINP (r = 0.5, p = 0.002) as well as with improved functional outcome at 6 months (r = 0.4; p = 0.014). Heel-rise tests at 6 and 12 months did not display any differences between the two groups. Functional weight-bearing mobilization enhanced the early healing response of ATR. In addition, early ankle range of motion was improved without the risk of Achilles tendon elongation and without altering long-term functional

  11. Lubricin in human achilles tendon: The evidence of intratendinous sliding motion and shear force in achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu-Long; Wei, Zhuang; Zhao, Chunfeng; Jay, Gregory D; Schmid, Thomas M; Amadio, Peter C; An, Kai-Nan

    2015-06-01

    Achilles tendon is one of the most commonly injured tendons. Mechanical force is regarded as a major causative factor. However, the biomechanics of Achilles tendon and mechanical mechanism of the injuries are unclear. Lubricin expresses at regions exposed to sliding motion and shear force in a number of tissues. This study investigated the distribution and concentration of lubricin in human Achilles tendons for better understanding the biomechanics of Achilles tendon. Achilles tendons were harvested from nine cadavers. Lubricin was extracted from various locations proximal to the calcaneal insertion and quantified with ELISA. The distribution of lubricin was investigated with immunohistochemistry. Lubricin was mainly identified at the interfaces of tendon fascicles, especially in the mid-portion of the tendon. The concentration of lubricin in Achilles tendons varied by individual and the distance from its calcaneal insertion. The distal portion of the tendon had a higher concentration of lubricin than the proximal regions of the tendon. This study suggests the presence of intratendinous sliding motion of fascicles and shear force at interfaces of fascicles in human Achilles tendon. Shear force could be an important mechanical factor for the development of Achilles tendinopathy and rupture. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Functional and MRI follow-up after reconstruction of chronic ruptures of the Achilles tendon Myerson type III using the triple-loop plantaris tendon wrapped with central turndown flap: a case series.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Ahmed F; Fouly, Ezzat H; Laklok, Mohammed A; Amin, Mohammed F

    2015-07-15

    Reconstruction of chronic ruptures of the Achilles tendon poses a great challenge for the orthopaedic surgeon both technically and functionally. The aim of this study was to assess the results of a new technique for reconstruction of chronic Achilles tendon ruptures with defects longer than 5 cm using the triple-loop plantaris tendon autograft wrapped in a central turndown flap from the proximal portion of the Achilles tendon. Eighteen patients (14 female and 4 male; mean age, 40.7 years), having chronic ruptures of the Achilles tendon Myerson type III, were enrolled in this study. The mean follow-up period of our patients was 21.8 months. All patients were assessed via the following parameters: lag of interference since the first complaint, length of the defect, length of the turndown flap and length of the harvested plantaris tendon, surgery time, complications, active range of motion at the ankle and the final score. Average values were presented as means. Independent sample t test, Mann Whitney test, paired sample t test and Pearson's correlation coefficient were used to evaluate the clinical and functional results. The results were considered statistically significant if a P value was <0.05. To analyse the time course of the gap following surgery, the data from the first MRI session were compared with those from the second and third sessions using the Wilcoxon's signed rank test. In addition, the paired data of the tendon gap disappearance rate between T1-weighted and T2-weighted images were also compared using the McNemar test. The mean preoperative American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score was 62.2 points while at the patients' last follow-up, the mean postoperative score was 94.9 points. The results of this study confirmed that both the Achilles tendon healing and tendon gap disappearance have been perceived with higher sensitivity in T2-weighted images than in T1-weighted images. We believe that this new technique is biologic, synchronous and

  13. Free gracilis tendon graft for reconstruction of chronic tears of the Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, Nicola; Spiezia, Filippo; Testa, Vittorino; Capasso, Giovanni; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-05-16

    Chronic tears of the Achilles tendon with a tendon gap exceeding 6 cm are a surgical challenge. The purpose of this study is to report the long-term results of reconstruction of such chronic Achilles tendon ruptures with use of a free autologous gracilis tendon graft. Twenty-one patients underwent reconstruction of a chronic rupture of the Achilles tendon. Fifteen patients were available for clinical and functional assessment on the basis of anthropometric measurements, isometric strength testing, and the Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score after a mean duration of follow-up of 10.9 years (range, eight to twelve years). All fifteen patients were able to walk on the tiptoes, and no patient used a heel lift or walked with a visible limp. At an average of 10.9 years of follow-up, the maximum calf circumference of the operatively treated leg remained substantially decreased and the operatively treated limb was significantly weaker than the contralateral, normal limb. Two patients had developed tendinopathy of the contralateral Achilles tendon, one had developed tendinopathy of the reconstructed tendon, and one had ruptured the contralateral Achilles tendon eight years after the index tear. The long-term results of treatment of chronic tears of the Achilles tendon with free gracilis tendon grafting showed that patients retained good functional results despite permanently impaired ankle plantar flexion strength and decreased calf circumference.

  14. Effect of position, time in the season, and playing surface on Achilles tendon ruptures in NFL games: a 2009-10 to 2016-17 review.

    PubMed

    Krill, Michael K; Borchers, James R; Hoffman, Joshua T; Krill, Matthew L; Hewett, Timothy E

    2017-09-01

    Achilles tendon (AT) ruptures are a potentially career-altering and ending injury. Achilles tendon ruptures have a below average return-to-play rate compared to other common orthopaedic procedures for National Football League (NFL) players. The objective of this study was to monitor the incidence and injury rates (IR) of AT ruptures that occurred during the regular season in order to evaluate the influence of player position, time of injury, and playing surface on rupture rates. A thorough online review was completed to identify published injury reports and public information regarding AT ruptures sustained during regular season and post-season games in the National Football League (NFL) during the 2009-10 to 2016-17 seasons. Team schedules, player position details and stadium information was used to determine period of the season of injury and playing surface. IRs were calculated per 100 team games (TG). Injury rate ratios (IRR) were utilized to compare IRs. During eight monitored seasons, there were 44 AT ruptures in NFL games. A majority of AT ruptures were sustained in the first eight games of the regular season (n = 32, 72.7%). There was a significant rate difference for the first and second four-game segments of the regular season compared to the last two four-game segments of the regular season. Defensive players suffered a majority of AT ruptures (n = 32, 72.7%). The IR on grass was 1.00 per 100 TG compared to 1.08 per 100 TG on artificial turf (IRR: 0.93, p = .80). A significant increase in AT ruptures occurred in the first and second four game segments of the regular season compared to the last two-four game segments of the regular season. Defensive players suffered a majority of AT ruptures compared to offensive or specialist players. There was no difference between AT rupture rates and playing surface in games.

  15. The Achilles tendon: fundamental properties and mechanisms governing healing

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Benjamin R.; Gordon, Joshua A.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary This review highlights recent research on Achilles tendon healing, and comments on the current clinical controversy surrounding the diagnosis and treatment of injury. The processes of Achilles tendon healing, as demonstrated through changes in its structure, composition, and biomechanics, are reviewed. Finally, a review of tendon developmental biology and mechano transductive pathways is completed to recognize recent efforts to augment injured Achilles tendons, and to suggest potential future strategies for therapeutic intervention and functional tissue engineering. Despite an abundance of clinical evidence suggesting that current treatments and rehabilitation strategies for Achilles tendon ruptures are equivocal, significant questions remain to fully elucidate the basic science mechanisms governing Achilles tendon injury, healing, treatment, and rehabilitation. PMID:25332943

  16. Surgical versus nonsurgical treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture: a meta-analysis of randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Soroceanu, Alexandra; Sidhwa, Feroze; Aarabi, Shahram; Kaufman, Annette; Glazebrook, Mark

    2012-12-05

    Surgical repair is a common method of treatment of acute Achilles rupture in North America because, despite a higher risk of overall complications, it has been believed to offer a reduced risk of rerupture. However, more recent trials, particularly those using functional bracing with early range of motion, have challenged this belief. The aim of this meta-analysis was to compare surgical treatment and conservative treatment with regard to the rerupture rate, the overall rate of other complications, return to work, calf circumference, and functional outcomes, as well as to examine the effects of early range of motion on the rerupture rate. A literature search, data extraction, and quality assessment were conducted by two independent reviewers. Publication bias was assessed with use of the Egger and Begg tests. Heterogeneity was assessed with use of the I2 test, and fixed or random-effect models were used accordingly. Pooled results were expressed as risk ratios, risk differences, and weighted or standardized mean differences, as appropriate. Meta-regression was employed to identify causes of heterogeneity. Subgroup analysis was performed to assess the effect of early range of motion. Ten studies met the inclusion criteria. If functional rehabilitation with early range of motion was employed, rerupture rates were equal for surgical and nonsurgical patients (risk difference = 1.7%, p = 0.45). If such early range of motion was not employed, the absolute risk reduction achieved by surgery was 8.8% (p = 0.001 in favor of surgery). Surgery was associated with an absolute risk increase of 15.8% (p = 0.016 in favor of nonoperative management) for complications other than rerupture. Surgical patients returned to work 19.16 days sooner (p = 0.0014). There was no significant difference between the two treatments with regard to calf circumference (p = 0.357), strength (p = 0.806), or functional outcomes (p = 0.226). The results of the meta-analysis demonstrate that conservative

  17. Hypotrophy of the soleus muscle in man after achilles tendon rupture. Discussion of findings obtained by computed tomography and morphologic studies.

    PubMed

    Häggmark, T; Eriksson, E

    1979-01-01

    Seven athletes (age range, 35 to 43 years), who sustained total subcutaneous ruptures of the Achilles tendon 2 to 5 cm above its distal insertion, were treated surgically with suturing of the tendon, immobilization of the leg and foot for 6 weeks, and cast changes so as to increase the dorsiflexion of the foot. Needle biopsies were obtained several times from the soleus muscles of both the injured and uninjured legs at a depth of about 5 cm. The cross-sectional area was measured by computed tomography at the same level the tissue was obtained by biopsy. Results of morphologic studies revealed a selective Type I fiber atrophy of the soleus muscle. Computed tomography revealed a 23% decrease in the area of the calf muscles and a 11% total reduction in the cross-sectional area of the calf (about the middle, where the gastrocnemius muscle is transformed into a tendon and where the soleus lies superficially). Mere measurement of the circumference of the calf is judged to be a poor criterion of muscle atrophy when compared with these other means of evaluation of atrophy. The evidence compiled during this study suggests that prompt surgical treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures, with cast changes several times during the period of immobilization and with tension maintained on the muscle, is the most effective treatment regimen we have found for this injury.

  18. Closed flexor tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Netscher, David T; Badal, Justin J

    2014-11-01

    We review different causes, diagnoses, and treatment options of closed flexor tendon disruptions in the hand. A classification of closed tendon ruptures based on their mechanism includes traumatic tendon avulsion, spontaneous midsubstance rupture, attrition rupture, infiltrative tenosynovial rupture, and iatrogenic. Certain conditions result in tendon disruption inflicted by more than 1 of these etiologies. In rheumatoid arthritis, tendon rupture may result from attrition on an exposed rough surface, proliferative tenosynovial tendon infiltration, or steroid use. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Incidence of complications after Achillon® mini-open suture system for repair of acute midsubstance achilles tendon ruptures: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bartel, Annette F P; Elliott, Andrew D; Roukis, Thomas S

    2014-01-01

    The most appropriate operative treatment of acute midsubstance Achilles tendon ruptures is controversial. One approach uses a mini-open, device-assisted suture system (Achillon(®) System(™), Integra LifeSciences Corp, Plainsboro, NJ) that has been generally available since 2002. To date, the incidence of complications with this system has not yet been evaluated. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review of electronic databases and relevant peer-reviewed sources as outlined by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines for the preparation of systematic reviews. Studies that reported acute (injury to surgery interval ≤ 10 days) midsubstance Achilles tendon ruptures repaired with the Achillon(®) mini-open suture system, provided a detailed description of all complications encountered, and a mean follow-up period of 12 months or more and 15 repairs or more were included. A total of 33 studies were identified, of which 8 (24%) met our inclusion criteria involving 253 repairs. Four studies were prospective and involved 169 repairs. The weighted mean age for the entire cohort was 39.5 (range 22 to 82) years, and the weighted mean follow-up period was 19.2 (range 5 to 44) months. The incidence of complications was 8.3% (21 of 253) and included 8 (3.2%) repeat ruptures, 5 (2%) incision problems, 3 (1.2%) sural nerve injuries, 3 (1.2%) suture reactions or irritations, and 2 (0.8%) infections. Our systematic review revealed that this mini-open, device-assisted suture system provides a safe and reproducible technique to repair acute midsubstance Achilles tendon ruptures with an acceptable incidence of complications. Copyright © 2014 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Percutaneous & Mini Invasive Achilles tendon repair

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Rupture of the Achilles tendon is a considerable cause of morbidity with reduced function following injury. Recent studies have shown little difference in outcome between the techniques of open and non-operative treatment using an early active rehabilitation programme. Meta-analyses have shown that non-operative management has increased risk of re-rupture whereas surgical intervention has risks of complications related to the wound and iatrogenic nerve injury. Minimally invasive surgery has been adopted as a way of reducing infections rates and wound breakdown however avoiding iatrogenic nerve injury must be considered. We discuss the techniques and outcomes of percutaneous and minimally invasive repairs of the Achilles tendon. PMID:22082172

  1. Rehabilitation regimen after surgical treatment of acute Achilles tendon ruptures: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiazhang; Wang, Chen; Ma, Xin; Wang, Xu; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Li

    2015-04-01

    The choice of rehabilitation management after the surgical repair of acute Achilles tendon (AT) ruptures remains controversial because of insufficient clinical evidence. The current study analyzes the postoperative rehabilitation of AT ruptures based on the current clinical evidence. To identify and analyze the high-level clinical evidence regarding postoperative rehabilitation after the surgical repair of AT ruptures. Subgroup analyses were also performed to obtain more reliable and specific results. Meta-analysis. The studies were retrieved by searching the Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases through the OVID retrieval engine from 1990 to August 14, 2013. Two independent reviewers critically reviewed the studies using preset inclusion and exclusion criteria. The quality of the eligible studies was assessed by the Cochrane 12-item scale. All included studies were summarized, and their data were extracted. Subgroup analyses were performed according to the different protocols of early functional rehabilitation. Nine studies, consisting of 6 randomized controlled trials and 3 quasi-randomized studies, were ultimately included. A total of 402 patients were identified. Six of the included studies utilized early weightbearing combined with early ankle motion exercises, while the other 3 only employed early ankle motion exercises. The subgroup analyses demonstrated that 11 of the 15 functional outcome measurements were significantly superior for patients who underwent both early weightbearing and ankle motion exercises than for those who underwent conventional cast immobilization. Similar rates of reruptures (odds ratio [OR], 1.36; 95% CI, 0.38-4.91; P = .64) and major complications (OR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.24-1.87; P = .44) as well as a significantly lower rate of minor complications (OR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.27-0.95; P = .03) were also observed in this early functional rehabilitation group. For the patients who solely performed early ankle motion exercises, only 2 of the 14

  2. Acute Achilles tendon rupture: Mini-incision repair with double-Tsuge loop suture vs. open repair with modified Kessler suture.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chongyang; Qu, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Achilles tendon rupture is a common injury of the foot and ankle. However, the optimal treatment strategy for Achilles tendon rupture is still not established. This study was conducted to compare the efficacy and complications of mini-incision repair with double-Tsuge loop sutures and open repair with modified Kessler sutures. We evaluated data from 60 patients with acute closed Achilles tendon ruptures who underwent mini-incision repair with double-Tsuge loop sutures (n = 30) or open repair with modified Kessler sutures (n = 30) from 2006 to 2010 in an ongoing prospective study conducted by us and have finished at least 18-month follow-up or finished the study. The AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot score, ATRS, maximal ankle range of motion and the time to achieve 20 continuous single heel raises after operation were recorded to compare the efficacy. The complications were also evaluated. During a mean follow-up of 25 months after surgery, the time to achieve 20 continuous single heel raises after operation of patients in Group Mini was significantly shorter than patients in Group Open. Moreover, the mini-incision with double-Tsuge repair was associated with a significantly shorter operating time, smaller incision length, and lower rate of complications. The mini-incision with double-Tsuge suture method in our study was shown to provide earlier strength recovery, as well as shorter operation time, less complications and improved cosmetic appearance. Copyright © 2014 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Early functional rehabilitation or cast immobilisation for the postoperative management of acute Achilles tendon rupture? A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    McCormack, R; Bovard, J

    2015-10-01

    To determine which postoperative rehabilitation regime is superior following surgical repair of acute Achilles tendon rupture. The primary outcomes were patient safety and satisfaction. Intervention meta-analysis. The MEDLINE and CINAHL electronic databases were searched from their date of inception until June 2015 using keywords related to acute Achilles tendon rupture, surgical repair and rehabilitation. The electronic database search was supplemented with forward citation tracking using the Web of Science. Randomised controlled trials comparing clinical and/or patient-reported outcomes between patients receiving early functional postoperative ankle motion and weight bearing (bracing group), and traditional ankle immobilisation with a non-weight bearing rigid cast (cast group) were eligible for inclusion. Fourteen articles were identified as potentially eligible; 10 sufficient-quality randomised controlled trials involving 570 patients were included for meta-analysis. A high proportion of patients were able to return to prior employment and sporting activity in both groups. Five of the six trials measuring the time interval showed a faster return to prior sporting level in the bracing group. Subjective patient outcomes were significantly better in the bracing group (for good and excellent results, p=0.01; OR, 3.13; 95% CI 1.30 to 7.53). There was no difference in major complications between the two groups (p=0.21; RD, -0.03; 95% CI -0.06 to 0.01). Dynamometry and anthropometry measurements favoured functional rehabilitation at 6-12 weeks postoperation; however, by 6 months postoperative, the differences were negligible. Compared to traditional ankle immobilisation, with a non-weight bearing cast following surgical repair of acute Achilles tendon rupture, early dynamic functional rehabilitation is as safe with higher patient satisfaction. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to

  4. Treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture in Scandinavia does not adhere to evidence-based guidelines: a cross-sectional questionnaire-based study of 138 departments.

    PubMed

    Barfod, Kristoffer W; Nielsen, Fredrik; Helander, Katarina N; Mattila, Ville M; Tingby, Ola; Boesen, Anders; Troelsen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    The best treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture has been discussed for decades. During the past half decade, evidence has increased in favor of nonoperative treatment and dynamic and weightbearing rehabilitation. We hypothesized that the treatment strategies would show great variation and that adherence to evidence-based recommendations would not be as good as desired. The purpose of the present study was to investigate how acute Achilles tendon rupture is treated in Scandinavia. A questionnaire was distributed to all orthopedic departments treating acute Achilles tendon ruptures in Denmark, Sweden, Norway, and Finland. The questionnaire was returned by 138 of 148 departments (response rate 93%). Two-way tables with Fisher's exact test were used for statistical analysis. In Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and Finland, 19 of 23 (83%), 44 of 48 (92%), 26 of 40 (65%), and 8 of 27 (30%) departments recommended surgical treatment (p < .001). Dynamic rehabilitation was used significantly less often in Denmark (5 of 23 [22%]), Norway (17 of 45 [38%]), and Sweden (11 of 40 [28%]) than in Finland (15 of 26 [58%]; p = .015). A significant difference was found among the countries in the educational level of the performing surgeons (p < .001). Surgical treatment was the treatment of choice in Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish hospitals regardless of the increasing evidence favoring nonoperative treatment. Although increasing evidence has favored dynamic rehabilitation, it has gained limited use across Scandinavia. Weightbearing was used in most hospitals. Surgery was performed by junior surgeons in most hospitals across Scandinavia. Treatment algorithms showed considerable variation and often did not adhere to the clinical evidence. Copyright © 2013 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Is surgical intervention more effective than non-surgical treatment for acute Achilles tendon rupture? A systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yaohong; Lin, Linghan; Li, Hao; Zhao, Yachao; Liu, Longgang; Jia, Zhiwei; Wang, Deli; He, Qing; Ruan, Dike

    2016-12-01

    There is discordance in the results from meta-analyses on surgical versus non-surgical treatment for acute Achilles tendon rupture. We systematically reviewed the overlapping meta-analyses on this topic to provide information that will be helpful to decision makers when selecting treatments based on the current best available evidence. We comprehensively searched multiple databases for systematic reviews that compared surgical and non-surgical treatments for acute Achilles tendon rupture. We only included meta-analyses that comprised randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The methodological quality and extracted data were assessed. The meta-analysis that offered the best evidence was ascertained with the Jadad decision algorithm. Nine meta-analyses were included in our study and all of them included RCTs with Level-II evidence. Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) scores ranged from 5 to 10 (median 7). The Jadad decision algorithm was used to select a high-quality meta-analysis with more RCTs. The results from this study showed that when functional rehabilitation was used, non-surgical intervention was similar to surgical treatment regarding the incidence of range of motion, rerupture, calf circumference and functional outcomes, and the incidence of other complications was reduced. Non-surgical intervention significantly increased the rerupture rate if functional rehabilitation was not considered. The findings of meta-analyses regarding surgical versus non-surgical treatment for acute Achilles tendon rupture are inconsistent. According to this systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses, the current best available evidence suggests that centers offering functional rehabilitation may prefer non-surgical intervention. Surgical treatment may be preferred at centers that do not have functional rehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Comparative study on animal model of acute Achilles tendon rupture with surgical treatment using platelet-rich plasma].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Martínez, J C; Vásquez, C R; Ceja, C B; Fuentes, C C E; Sesma, J F; Benítez, A G

    2012-01-01

    To compare the functional and histologicalal course of two animal model groups with acute Achilles tendon tears using platelet rich plasma. An open clinical trial was conducted with dogs donated by the animal facility of the Autonomous University of Puebla (BUAP, for its acronym in Spanish). Dogs were divided into 2 groups: a control group and a problem group. Intentional surgical Achilles tendon tear was performed to them. The Krackow technique was used to repair the tendon and the control group received platelet rich plasma (PRP) as a clot; the other group did not receive PRP. The dogs were seen at 4 weeks to check functionality using the Farell and Schwarz scale to assess the degree of limping. They were sacrificed at week 5; the tendons were removed and sent to the histopathology lab. Functionality results according to the Farell and Schwarz scale showed grades I and II in the problem group, and grades IV and V in the control group. Histologically, the problem group showed moderate vascular proliferation and abundant fibroblastic proliferation. The control group had mild to moderate vascular proliferation and moderate fibroblastic proliferation. PRP improves tendon healing and this has repercussions on functional recovery.

  7. The structural and mechanical properties of the Achilles tendon 2 years after surgical repair.

    PubMed

    Geremia, Jeam Marcel; Bobbert, Maarten Frank; Casa Nova, Mayra; Ott, Rafael Duvelius; Lemos, Fernando de Aguiar; Lupion, Raquel de Oliveira; Frasson, Viviane Bortoluzzi; Vaz, Marco Aurélio

    2015-06-01

    Acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon affect the tendon's structural and mechanical properties. The long-term effects of surgical repair on these properties remain unclear. To evaluate effects of early mobilization versus traditional immobilization rehabilitation programs 2 years after surgical Achilles tendon repair, by comparing force-elongation and stress-strain relationships of the injured tendon to those of the uninjured tendon. A group of males with previous Achilles tendon rupture (n=18) and a group of healthy male controls (n=9) participated. Achilles tendon rupture group consisted of patients that had received early mobilization (n=9) and patients that had received traditional immobilization with a plaster cast (n=9). Comparisons of tendon structural and mechanical properties were made between Achilles tendon rupture and healthy control groups, and between the uninjured and injured sides of the two rehabilitation groups in Achilles tendon rupture group. Ultrasound was used to determine bilaterally tendon cross-sectional area, tendon resting length, and tendon elongation as a function of torque during maximal voluntary plantar flexion. From these data, Achilles tendon force-elongation and stress-strain relationships were determined. The Achilles tendon rupture group uninjured side was not different from healthy control group. Structural and mechanical parameters of the injured side were not different between the Achilles tendon rupture early mobilization and the immobilization groups. Compared to the uninjured side, the injured side showed a reduction in stress at maximal voluntary force, in Young's modulus and in stiffness. Two years post-surgical repair, the Achilles tendon mechanical properties had not returned to the uninjured contralateral tendon values. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Nonoperative dynamic treatment of acute achilles tendon rupture: the influence of early weight-bearing on clinical outcome: a blinded, randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner; Bencke, Jesper; Lauridsen, Hanne Bloch; Ban, Ilija; Ebskov, Lars; Troelsen, Anders

    2014-09-17

    Dynamic rehabilitation has been suggested to be an important part of nonoperative treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture that results in functional outcome and rerupture rates comparable with those of operative treatment. However, the optimal role of weight-bearing during early rehabilitation remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to compare immediate weight-bearing with non-weight-bearing in a nonoperative dynamic treatment protocol for Achilles tendon rupture. The study was conducted as a blinded, randomized, controlled, parallel superiority trial. Patients eighteen to sixty years of age were eligible for inclusion. Both groups were treated nonoperatively with controlled early motion. The intervention group was allowed full weight-bearing from day one, and the control group was non-weight-bearing for six weeks. The primary outcome was the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) after one year. Secondary outcomes included heel-rise work, health-related quality of life, and the rerupture rate. Outcome assessors were blinded to the intervention. Thirty patients were randomized to each group; twenty-nine in the weight-bearing group and twenty-seven in the control group were analyzed. The only significant difference between the groups was better health-related quality of life in the weight-bearing group at twelve months (p = 0.009). The mean ATRS at twelve months was 73 in the weight-bearing group and 74 in the control group (p = 0.81). At twelve months, the total heel-rise work performed by the injured limb relative to that by the uninjured limb was 53% in the weight-bearing group and 58% in the control group (p = 0.37). There were three reruptures in the weight-bearing group and two in the control group (p = 1.0). The ATRS and heel-rise work results did not differ significantly between the groups. The rerupture rate was 9% overall, and both groups had substantial functional deficits in the injured limb compared with the uninjured limb. Immediate

  9. Nonoperative, dynamic treatment of acute achilles tendon rupture: influence of early weightbearing on biomechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex-a blinded, randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner; Bencke, Jesper; Lauridsen, Hanne Bloch; Dippmann, Christian; Ebskov, Lars; Troelsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Acute Achilles tendon rupture alters the biomechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex that can affect functional performance and the risk of repeat injury. The purpose of the present study was to compare the biomechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex in patients randomized to early weightbearing or non-weightbearing in the nonoperative treatment of Achilles tendon rupture. A total of 60 patients were randomized to full weightbearing from day 1 of treatment or non-weightbearing for 6 weeks. After 6 and 12 months, the peak passive torque at 20° dorsiflexion, the stiffness during slow stretching, and the maximal strength were measured in both limbs. The stiffness of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex in the terminal part of dorsiflexion was significantly increased (p = .024) in the non-weightbearing group at 12 months. The peak passive torque was significantly lower for the affected limb at 6 months (91%; p = .01), and the stiffness was significantly lower for the affected limb during the early part of dorsiflexion at 6 (67%; p < .001) and 12 (77%; p < .001) months. In conclusion, an increased stiffness of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex in the terminal part of dorsiflexion was found in the non-weightbearing group. The altered stiffness and strength in the affected limb could affect the coordination of gait and running. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Heel-Rise Height Deficit 1 Year After Achilles Tendon Rupture Relates to Changes in Ankle Biomechanics 6 Years After Injury.

    PubMed

    Brorsson, Annelie; Willy, Richard W; Tranberg, Roy; Grävare Silbernagel, Karin

    2017-08-01

    It is unknown whether the height of a heel-rise performed in the single-leg standing heel-rise test 1 year after an Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) correlates with ankle biomechanics during walking, jogging, and jumping in the long-term. To explore the differences in ankle biomechanics, tendon length, calf muscle recovery, and patient-reported outcomes at a mean of 6 years after ATR between 2 groups that, at 1-year follow-up, had less than 15% versus greater than 30% differences in heel-rise height. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Seventeen patients with less than 15% (<15% group) and 17 patients with greater than 30% (>30% group) side-to-side difference in heel-rise height at 1 year after ATR were evaluated at a mean (SD) 6.1 (2.0) years after their ATR. Ankle kinematics and kinetics were sampled via standard motion capture procedures during walking, jogging, and jumping. Patient-reported outcome was evaluated with Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS), Physical Activity Scale (PAS), and Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS). Tendon length was evaluated by ultrasonography. The Limb Symmetry Index (LSI = [Injured Side ÷ Healthy Side] × 100) was calculated for side differences. The >30% group had significantly more deficits in ankle kinetics during all activities compared with patients in the <15% group at a mean of 6 years after ATR (LSI, 70%-149% and 84%-106%, respectively; P = .010-.024). The >30% group, compared with the <15% group, also had significantly lower values in heel-rise height (LSI, 72% and 95%, respectively; P < .001) and heel-rise work (LSI, 58% and 91%, respectively; P < .001) and significantly larger side-to-side difference in tendon length (114% and 106%, respectively; P = .012). Achilles tendon length correlated with ankle kinematic variables ( r = 0.38-0.44; P = .015-.027) whereas heel-rise work correlated with kinetic variables ( r = -0.57 to 0.56; P = .001-.047). LSI tendon length correlated negatively with LSI heel-rise height ( r

  11. Outcomes and complications of percutaneous versus open repair of acute Achilles tendon rupture: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Liu, Yang; Kan, Shunli; Zhang, Di; Xu, Hong; Liu, Feifei; Ning, Guangzhi; Feng, Shiqing

    2017-04-01

    Acute Achilles tendon rupture (AATR) is a frequent injury occurring dominantly in young to middle-aged males. Outcomes and complications between percutaneous and open repair are still controversial. Thus, the purpose of this meta-analysis is to evaluate the outcomes and complications of these two operative methods. We searched multiple databases: PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library up to October 2016. Two reviewers independently screened the studies for eligibility, evaluated the quality and extracted data from eligible studies, with confirmation by cross-checking. The major results and conclusions were concluded, and the different complication rates and functional outcomes were compared. Meta-analysis was processed by Rev Man 5.3 software. Five randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and seven retrospective cohort studies involving 815 patients met the inclusion criteria. The sural nerve injury rate in the percutaneous group was significantly higher (RR = 3.52, 95%CI 1.45 to 8.57, P = 0.006). However, deep infection rate in the open group was higher (RR = 0.33, 95%CI 0.11 to 0.96, P = 0.04) and subgroup analysis of five RCTs showed no significant difference (RR = 0.42, 95%CI 0.09 to 2.10, P = 0.29). No significant difference was seen regarding the rate of re-rupture. The time of operation in the percutaneous group was shorter (RR = -1.99, 95%CI -3.81 to -0.80, P = 0.001). American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot score showed statistically different in the two groups. Other functional outcomes were similar in the two groups. Percutaneous repair has the advantages of operation time, deep infection and AOFAS score. The functional outcomes were similar in two treatment groups except AOFAS score. Despite the higher incidence of sural nerve injury, we still believe that percutaneous repair is superior to open repair for treating AATR. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. [The Achilles tendon in sports].

    PubMed

    Segesser, B; Goesele, A; Renggli, P

    1995-06-01

    Achillodynia is a generic term for various types of ailments in the region of the Achilles tendon. For adequate therapy a specific diagnosis is absolutely necessary. Besides an accurate anamnesis and the right choice of terrain and shoes, as well as a clinical examination where one has to specifically keep an eye on muscular imbalance between the gastrocnemius and the soleus muscle and disorders of the ligamentous control of the calcaneus caused by fibular ligament instabilities, a procedure such as radiology, ultrasound, and MR imaging is inevitable. From the differential diagnosis point of view a distinction between peritendinitis, mechanically triggered bursitis (calcaneal and subachilles), bony alterations of the calcaneus (calcaneus spur, Haglund exostosis persistent nucleus of the apophysis, fatigue fracture, etc) and a partial or total rupture (a one-time occurrence or multiple occurrences) has to be made. Occasionally, entrapment of the ramus calcaneus of the sural nerve causes calcaneal pain. If clinically not confirmed, lumbar pain ought to be taken into consideration (discopathy, Bechterew disease, etc). Metabolic disorders (especially uric acid) and underlying rheumatic diseases must be excluded. The therapy of achillodynia includes local and peroral antiphlogistic medication as a concomitant measure. More important is the causal influence of etiological factors, i.e., the correction of muscular imbalance, ensuring control of the calcaneus through bandages and adjustment of sport shoes, changes in training buildup and exercise intensity, just to mention a few. If necessary, surgically splitting the peritendineum, sanitation of a partial rupture, bursectomy and removal of mechanically obstructive exostosis must be done.

  13. Achilles tendon reflex measuring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szebeszczyk, Janina; Straszecka, Joanna

    1995-06-01

    The examination of Achilles tendon reflex is widely used as a simple, noninvasive clinical test in diagnosis and pharmacological therapy monitoring in such diseases as: hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, diabetic neuropathy, the lower limbs obstructive angiopathies and intermittent claudication. Presented Achilles tendon reflect measuring system is based on the piezoresistive sensor connected with the cylinder-piston system. To determinate the moment of Achilles tendon stimulation a detecting circuit was used. The outputs of the measuring system are connected to the PC-based data acquisition board. Experimental results showed that the measurement accuracy and repeatability is good enough for diagnostics and therapy monitoring purposes. A user friendly, easy-to-operate measurement system fulfills all the requirements related to recording, presentation and storing of the patients' reflexograms.

  14. Achilles tendon rupture in an elite athlete following multiple injection therapies.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Bruce; Remedios, Denis; Loosemore, Mike; Maffulli, Nicola

    2008-11-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is common, and its management continues to be challenging, especially in elite athletes. Despite a wide range of novel management options, none guarantees a rapid return to high level sporting activity. Eccentric exercise has been shown to reduce symptoms and normalise imaging abnormalities, but time constraints on professional athletes often make this an unrewarding isolated management strategy. Eccentric exercises concurrent with ongoing training may not be as successful as eccentric training alone, reducing one's confidence in this modality for the "in-season" tendinopathy in the elite athlete. When a professional athlete is faced with a tendinopathy recalcitrant to eccentric exercise, manual therapy and orthotics, a more invasive approach is often attempted to expedite a return to unencumbered training. Numerous injection therapies are described, ranging from homeopathic products to glucocorticosteroids. The robustness of the literature surrounding these techniques is variable, but when an athlete is desperate to return to full training, clinicians working with elite athletes are often tempted to utilise more empirical management options. We present a patient who illustrates the potential dangers of injection therapy in the elite athlete, in particular sequential injection therapy involving vascular sclerosants, which to our knowledge has not previously been described. Written consent for the presentation of this case was obtained from the athlete concerned.

  15. Achilles tendon lesions in sport.

    PubMed

    Williams, J G

    1993-09-01

    Achillodynia (Achilles tendon pain) is a significant source of disability to many people taking part in sports. Papers in the English language published since 1986 are reviewed here, grouped into specific subject areas including biomechanics, pathology, general clinical presentations, experimental treatments, steroids, podiatry and surgery. While there has been no dramatic breakthrough in the field, there have been various interesting advances with particular reference to imaging and conservative management, which will hopefully stimulate further studies. Many problems of Achilles tendon lesions in athletes remain unsolved, however, and much is yet to be done to provide adequate and generally effective methods of prevention and conservative treatment.

  16. Efficacy of early controlled motion of the ankle compared with no motion after non-operative treatment of an acute Achilles tendon rupture: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner; Hansen, Maria Swennergren; Holmich, Per; Troelsen, Anders; Kristensen, Morten Tange

    2016-11-29

    Early controlled ankle motion is widely used in the non-operative treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture, though its safety and efficacy have never been investigated in a randomized setup. The objectives of this study are to investigate if early controlled motion of the ankle affects functional and patient-reported outcomes. The study is performed as a blinded, randomized, controlled trial with patients allocated in a 1:1 ratio to one of two parallel groups. Patients aged from 18 to 70 years are eligible for inclusion. The intervention group performs early controlled motion of the ankle in weeks 3-8 after rupture. The control group is immobilized. In total, 130 patients will be included from one big orthopedic center over a period of 2½ years. The primary outcome is the patient-reported Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score evaluated at 12 months post-injury. Secondary outcome measures are the heel-rise work test, Achilles tendon elongation, and the rate of re-rupture. The primary analysis will be conducted as intention-to-treat analyses. This trial is the first to investigate the safety and efficacy of early controlled motion in the treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture in a randomized setup. The study uses the patient-reported outcome measure, the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score, as the primary endpoint, as it is believed to be the best surrogate measure for the tendon's actual capability to function in everyday life. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02015364 . Registered on 13 December 2013.

  17. Early functional rehabilitation versus traditional immobilization for surgical Achilles tendon repair after acute rupture: a systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jia-Guo; Meng, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Lin; Zeng, Xian-Tie; Kan, Shi-Lian

    2017-01-01

    Several meta-analyses comparing early functional rehabilitation and traditional immobilization following surgical Achilles tendon repair after acute rupture have been published. However, they have led to conflicting conclusions. The aims of this systematic review were to select high-quality meta-analyses from multiple discordant meta-analyses and to provide a postoperative rehabilitation strategy following surgical repair using currently available evidence. We performed a comprehensive search using the PubMed and Embase databases and the Cochrane Library. Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) instrument was used to assess the methodological quality. Three investigators independently applied the Jadad decision algorithm. Their results were then compared to ensure selection of a meta-analysis that provided the highest quality of evidence. Six meta-analyses met the eligibility criteria. AMSTAR scores ranged from 6 to 10. According to the Jadad decision algorithm, a high-quality meta-analysis with a greater number of RCTs was selected. This meta-analysis showed that early functional rehabilitation was superior to cast immobilization in terms of patient satisfaction and the time to return to pre-morbid sporting levels. There were no differences regarding major complications or the time before return to prior employment and sporting activity. Thus, we recommend early functional rehabilitation as the postoperative strategy for acute Achilles tendon ruptures. PMID:28054658

  18. Faut-il préférer une technique chirurgicale dans le traitement des ruptures du tendon d'Achille?

    PubMed Central

    Hani, Redouane; Kharmaz, Mohammed; Berrada, Mohammed Saleh

    2015-01-01

    La rupture du tendon d'Achille est de plus en plus fréquente dans le monde et dans notre pays en raison du développement considérable des activités sportives, de l'accroissement de leur intensité et de l'absence de moyens de prévention. Notre travail porte sur une étude concernant 58 cas de rupture du tendon d'Achille, avec un recul moyen compris entre 5 mois et 80 mois. L’âge moyen était de 36 ans, tous les patients inclus ont tous bénéficier d'un traitement chirurgical. Le but de notre étude étant de souligner la supériorité d'une technique chirurgicale par rapport à une autre dans la prise en charge, ainsi qu'une mise au point sur les différents aspects épidémiologiques, cliniques, thérapeutiques et post-thérapeutiques de cette lésion. PMID:26161208

  19. The Internal Brace for Midsubstance Achilles Ruptures.

    PubMed

    McWilliam, James R; Mackay, Gordon

    2016-07-01

    The efficient and effective function of the Achilles tendon is essential for normal gait and sporting performance. The optimal technique for the operative repair of the Achilles midsubstance rupture remains controversial. Suboptimal outcomes are common even after successful Achilles repair. Factors contributing to poor outcomes include a tenuous soft tissue envelope (leading to wound complications, peritendinous adhesions, and poor tendon healing,) as well as failure to maintain appropriate musculotendinous length, even after successful repair.We present a new technique using the InternalBrace (IB) and a modification of the Percutaneous Achilles Repair System (PARS; Arthrex Inc, Naples, FL), the Achilles Mid-Substance Speed Bridge Repair. This IB approach is knotless, respects the soft tissue envelope, and allows the appropriate musculotendinous length to be set intraoperatively. The IB principle enables direct fixation to bone allowing early mobilization while minimizing the risk of knot slippage, accelerating recovery, and allowing for restoration of normal function. Level V, expert opinion. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Repair of Chronic Achilles Ruptures Has a High Incidence of Venous Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Mark J; DeCarbo, William T; Hofbauer, Mark H; Thun, Joshua D

    2016-11-23

    Background Despite the low incidence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in foot and ankle surgery, some authors report a high incidence of symptomatic DVT following Achilles tendon rupture. The purpose of this study was to identify DVT risk factors inherent to Achilles tendon repair to determine which patients may benefit from prophylaxis. Methods One hundred and thirteen patient charts were reviewed following elective and nonelective Achilles tendon repair. For elective repair of insertional or noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy, parameters examined included lateral versus prone positioning and the presence versus absence of a flexor hallucis longus transfer. For nonelective repair, acute Achilles tendon ruptures were compared to chronic Achilles tendon ruptures. Results Of 113 Achilles tendon repairs, 3 venous thromboembolism (VTE) events (2.65%) occurred including 2 pulmonary emboli (1.77%). Seventeen of these repairs were chronic Achilles tendon ruptures, and all 3 VTE events (17.6%) occurred within this subgroup. Elevated body mass index was associated with VTE in patients with chronic Achilles ruptures although this did not reach significance (P = .064). No VTE events were reported after repair of 28 acute tendon ruptures or after 68 elective repairs of tendinopathy. Two patients with misdiagnosed partial Achilles tendon tears were excluded because they experienced a VTE event 3 weeks and 5 weeks after injury, prior to surgery. Conclusion In our retrospective review, chronic Achilles ruptures had a statistically significant higher incidence of VTE compared with acute Achilles ruptures (P = .048) or elective repair (P = .0069). Pharmaceutical anticoagulation may be considered for repair of chronic ruptures. Repair of acute ruptures and elective repair may not warrant routine prophylaxis due to a lower incidence of VTE.

  1. Bilateral traumatic rupture of Achilles tendons in absence of risk factors treated with percutaneous technique and platelet-rich plasma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Guelfi, Matteo; Pantalone, Andrea; Vanni, Daniele; Rosati, Denise; Guelfi, Marco G B; Salini, Vincenzo

    2014-09-01

    We present a clinical case of a 52-year-old man with bilateral traumatic rupture of the Achilles tendon (AT) in absence of risk factors. In medical history, the patient does not report pre-existing tendon diseases. AT ruptures occurred following a skiing injury in which the forward fall caused a severe stress and elongation of the AT. Associated with tendon injury there was a fracture of the right humeral greater tuberosity. The patient was subjected to percutaneous tenorraphy according to Maffulli's technique and subsequently topical injection of autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) 7 days after the injury. After surgery, the patient followed an accelerated rehabilitation protocol, allowing the weight bearing with guards (Rom-Walker) and crutches to four weeks then freely to 8 weeks. We performed a clinical (AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score) and ultrasonography follow-up at month 1, 3, 6 and 12, with excellent results in the end. To the best of our knowledge bilateral cases like this have not been described in the literature.

  2. Achilles tendon suture deteriorates tendon capillary blood flow with sustained tissue oxygen saturation - an animal study.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Robert; Lorenzen, Johan; Rotter, Robert; Vogt, Peter M; Knobloch, Karsten

    2009-08-12

    Treatment of ruptured Achilles tendons currently constitutes of conservative early functional treatment or surgical treatment either by open or minimal invasive techniques. We hypothesize that an experimental Achilles tendon suture in an animal model significantly deteriorates Achilles tendon microcirculation immediately following suturing. Fifteen Achilles tendons of eight male Wistar rats (275-325 g) were included. After preparation of the Achilles tendon with a medial paratendinous approach, Achilles tendon microcirculation was assessed using combined Laser-Doppler and spectrophotometry (Oxygen-to-see) regarding:- tendinous capillary blood flow [arbitrary units AU]- tendinous tissue oxygen saturation [%]- tendinous venous filling pressure [rAU]The main body of the Achilles tendon was measured in the center of the suture with 50 Hz. 10 minutes after Achilles tendon suture (6-0 Prolene), a second assessment of microcirculatory parameters was performed. Achilles tendon capillary blood flow decreased by 57% following the suture (70 +/- 30 AU vs. 31 +/- 16 AU; p < 0.001). Tendinous tissue oxygen saturation remained at the same level before and after suture (78 +/- 17% vs. 77 +/- 22%; p = 0.904). Tendinous venous filling pressure increased by 33% (54 +/- 16 AU vs. 72 +/- 20 AU; p = 0.019) after suture. Achilles tendon suture in anaesthetised rats causes an acute loss of capillary perfusion and increases postcapillary venous filling pressures indicating venous stasis. The primary hypothesis of this study was confirmed. In contrast, tendinous tissue oxygen saturation remains unchanged excluding acute intratendinous hypoxia within the first 10 minutes after suture. Further changes of oxygen saturation remain unclear. Furthermore, it remains to be determined to what extent reduced capillary blood flow as well as increased postcapillary stasis might influence tendon healing from a microcirculatory point of view in this animal setting.

  3. Midportion Achilles tendinosis and the plantaris tendon.

    PubMed

    Alfredson, Håkan

    2011-10-01

    When re-operating patients with midportion Achilles tendinosis, having had a poor effect of ultrasound (US) and Doppler-guided scraping, the author found the involvement of the plantaris tendon to be a likely reason for the poor result. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of a plantaris tendon in close relation to the Achilles tendon in consecutive patients with midportion Achilles tendinosis undergoing treatment with US and Doppler-guided scraping. This study includes 73 consecutive tendons with chronic painful midportion Achilles tendinosis, where US+Doppler examination showed thickening, irregular tendon structure, hypo-echoic regions, and localised high blood flow outside and inside the ventral Achilles midportion. The tendons were treated with US+Doppler-guided scraping, via a medial incision. If there was a plantaris tendon located in close relation to the medial Achilles, it was extirpated. An invaginated, or 'close by located', enlarged plantaris tendon was found in 58 of 73 (80%) tendons. Preliminary clinical results of the combined procedure, US + Doppler-guided surgical scraping and extirpation of the plantaris tendon, are very promising. A thickened plantaris tendon located in close relation to the medial Achilles seems common in patients with chronic painful midportion tendinosis. The role of the plantaris tendon in midportion Achilles tendinosis needs to be further evaluated and should be kept in mind when treating this condition.

  4. A retrospective comparative study with historical control to determine the effectiveness of platelet-rich plasma as part of nonoperative treatment of acute achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Kaniki, Nicole; Willits, Kevin; Mohtadi, Nicholas G H; Fung, Vincent; Bryant, Dianne

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in the nonoperative treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. This was a comparative study that included a prospective cohort and a historical control group. The control group was formed from a randomized trial in which one arm of the trial underwent nonoperative treatment, including accelerated functional rehabilitation after acute Achilles tendon rupture identical to that performed in the prospective treatment group. Patients in the prospective group were recruited consecutively and were administered 2 injections of PRP during the first 2 weeks after the injury. The primary outcome was isokinetic plantar flexion strength at 1 and 2 years after injury. Secondary outcomes included range of motion (ROM), calf circumference, and Leppilahti score. The ankle-hindfoot scale (American Orthopedic Functional Ankle Scale [AOFAS]) was administered to patients who received the PRP injection in the prospective group but was not measured for the historical group. A total of 73 patients participated in the prospective PRP study group and were compared with a retrospective control group of 72 patients from a previous randomized controlled trial (RCT). The mean difference between groups in isokinetic plantar flexion strength (injured/uninjured) at 1 year after injury was -4.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], -15.9 to 7.3; P = .5) and 2.4% (95% CI, -8.6 to 13.5; P = .7) at 30°/s and 60°/s, respectively. Results at 2 years after injury were -3.1% (95% CI, -13.5 to 7.2; P = .6) and 4.8% (95% CI, -3.5 to 13.1; P = .3) at 30°/s and 60°/s, respectively. All secondary outcomes were also not statistically different. The results of this study suggest that there is no measurable clinical benefit to the addition of PRP to the treatment regimen for nonoperatively treated acute Achilles tendon rupture. Level III, retrospective comparative study. Copyright © 2014 Arthroscopy Association of North America

  5. [Effectiveness of hamstring tendon and flexor hallucis longus tendon autograft for Achilles tendon defects reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Qi, Jin; Xia, Yayi; Wang, Yuliang; Zhao, Lin; Yao, Changjiang

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of hamstring tendon and flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon autograft for Achilles tendon defects reconstruction. Between February 2009 and October 2011, 9 patients (9 feet) with Achilles tendon defect were treated with hamstring tendon and FHL tendon autograft. Of 9 cases, 6 were male and 3 were female with an average age of 43 years (range, 21-65 years), including 5 cases of chronic Achilles tendon ruptures caused by sport injury and 4 cases of Achilles tendon defects caused by resection of tendon lesion (2 cases of hyaline degeneration with necrosis, 1 case of giant cell tumor, and 1 case of chronic inflammation with hyaline degeneration). The disease duration ranged from 31 to 387 days (mean, 137.6 days). The defect length was 5 to 18 cm (mean, 8.6 cm). Functional exercise of the ankle began at 6 weeks after plaster fixation. Dehiscence and effusion occurred in 2 cases and plantar pain caused by injury of tibial nerve in 1 case; primary healing of wound was obtained in the other patients without complication. Nine patients were followed up 19.7 months on average (range, 13-25 months); no re-rupture was observed. There was no significant difference in the dorsal extension between at preoperation and at 1 year and last follow-up after operation (P > 0.05); the ankle plantar flexion at 1 year and last follow-up after operation was significantly larger than that at preoperation (P < 0.05). The ankle plantar flexion and dorsal extension at 1 year and last follow-up after operation were significantly larger than those at 3 months after operation (P < 0.05), but no significant difference was found between at 1 year and last follow-up (P > 0.05). American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) and short-form 36 health survey scale (SF-36) scores were significantly increased at postoperation when compared with scores at preoperation (P < 0.05), and the scores at last follow-up were significantly higher than those at 3 months after

  6. Achilles tendon rupture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... another accident Played a sport like tennis or basketball, with a lot of stopping and sharp turns ... is OK for you to play tennis, racquetball, basketball, and other sports where you stop and start ...

  7. Treatment of myotendinous Achilles ruptures.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Jamal; Repka, Michael; Raikin, Steven M

    2013-08-01

    There is scant literature regarding the treatment of myotendinous Achilles ruptures. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively examine clinical outcomes from uniform nonsurgical treatment of these injuries. Between November 2005 and May 2011, 30 patients presented with an acute, complete myotendinous Achilles rupture. The location of the Achilles injury was confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for all patients. All patients were treated nonsurgically, which involved 3 weeks of non-weight-bearing and then 3 weeks of progressive to full weight-bearing in an Achilles boot. Physical therapy was provided for 4 to 6 weeks after this period of immobilization. 21 patients were male and 9 were female. The patients had a mean age of 40.8 years (range, 24-54). Patients were followed an average of 40.5 months (range, 23-81). Full healing of the Achilles myotendinous junction was achieved clinically in all 30 patients . All patients experienced improved function and less pain at their latest follow-up. Mean Foot and Ankle Ability Measure-Sports (FAAM-Sports) increased from 20.2% at the time of initial presentation to 95.2% at the latest follow-up (P < .05). Mean Visual Analog Scores (VAS) of pain decreased from 8.2 at the time of initial presentation to 1.3 at latest follow-up (P < .01). In all, 23 (76.7%), 6 (20%), and 1 (3.3%) patients rated their satisfaction as excellent, good, and fair, respectively. No patients have developed recurrent myotendinous Achilles ruptures to date. Nonsurgical treatment of myotendinous Achilles ruptures results in a high rate of myotendinous healing with improved patient function and pain relief. Level IV, retrospective case series.

  8. Optimization image of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T2 fast spin echo (FSE) with variation echo train length (ETL) on the rupture tendon achilles case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzamil, Akhmad; Haries Firmansyah, Achmad

    2017-05-01

    The research was done the optimization image of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) T2 Fast Spin Echo (FSE) with variation Echo Train Length (ETL) on the Rupture Tendon Achilles case. This study aims to find the variations Echo Train Length (ETL) from the results of ankle’s MRI image and find out how the value of Echo Train Length (ETL) works on the MRI ankle to produce optimal image. In this research, the used ETL variations were 12 and 20 with the interval 2 on weighting T2 FSE sagittal. The study obtained the influence of Echo Train Length (ETL) on the quality of ankle MRI image sagittal using T2 FSE weighting and analyzed in 25 images of five patients. The data analysis has done quantitatively with the Region of Interest (ROI) directly on computer MRI image planes which conducted statistical tests Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) and Contras to Noise Ratio (CNR). The Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) was the highest finding on fat tissue, while the Contras to Noise Ratio (CNR) on the Tendon-Fat tissue with ETL 12 found in two patients. The statistics test showed the significant SNR value of the 0.007 (p<0.05) of Tendon tissue, 0.364 (p>0.05) of the Fat, 0.912 (p>0.05) of the Fibula, and 0.436 (p>0.05) of the Heel Bone. For the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of the Tendon-FAT tissue was about 0.041 (p>0.05). The results of the study showed that ETL variation with T2 FSE sagittal weighting had difference at Tendon tissue and Tendon-Fat tissue for MRI imaging quality. SNR and CNR were an important aspect on imaging optimization process to give the diagnose information.

  9. Botulinum toxin improves reduced dorsiflexion after Achilles tendon surgery.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Iris; Lorbach, Olaf; Mehnert, Sabine; Kaps, Manfred; Engelhardt, Martin

    2010-02-01

    Generally, outcome after surgical repair of complete Achilles tendon rupture is good. However, some patients have ongoing problems with dorsiflexion of the ankle joint. We report on eight patients, who did not achieve heel contact because of reduced ankle dorsiflexion 5 months after surgical repair of complete Achilles tendon rupture. All patients received at least three cycles of injections with 200-300 units of Botulinum toxin A (BOTOX) into the gastrocnemius and soleus muscle. Weakening of the triceps surae by Botulinum toxin allowed patients to perform the required exercises and to tolerate casting at night. Thus, all patients were able to tolerate plantigrade foot position 9 months after beginning of Botulinum toxin treatment. At final follow-up after 2 years, pain had significantly improved, and a mean dorsiflexion of 21 degrees was reached. In conclusion, treatment of the calf muscles with BOTOX is a safe and effective method to improve restricted dorsiflexion in patients after Achilles tendon repair.

  10. Minimally invasive, endoscopic Achilles tendon reconstruction using semitendinosus and gracilis tendons with Endobutton stabilization.

    PubMed

    Piontek, Tomasz; Bąkowski, Paweł; Ciemniewska-Gorzela, Kinga; Grygorowicz, Monika

    2016-06-03

    Plantaris tendon, peronus brevis tendon and flexor hallucis longus tendon augmentation, commonly used in Achilles tendon rupture, often lead to weakening of injured foot and they require the immobilization after the surgery. It is essential to develop the technique, which gives no such limitation and allows for immediate functional improvement. We present our method of minimally invasive, endoscopic Achilles tendon reconstruction using semitendinosus and gracilis tendons with Endobutton stabilization. Posterolateral and posteromedial portals were made approximately 3 cm above the posterosuperior part of the calcaneus to clean the area of the Achilles tendon endoscopically. Then the hamstrings are harvested and prepared for the "Endobutton" system. A midline incision of the skin is performed approximately 1 cm above the posterosuperior part of the calcaneus to approach to the posterosuperior part of the calcaneus. Then under fluoroscopy the calcaneus was drilled through using K-wire. The distal end of the graft equipped with an Endobutton loop was entered into the drilled tunnel in the calcaneus. Later, 8 consecutive skin incisions are performed. Proximal ends of the graft were brought out through the native Achilles tendon reaching medial and lateral skin incisions. The final step was to transfer and tie the graft ends through the most proximal skin incision. This minimally invasive, endoscopic technique allows reconstruction of the Achilles tendon using semitendinosus and gracilis tendons with Endobutton stabilization and can be used in so-called "difficult", resistant cases as a "salvage procedure".

  11. Bilateral Patellar Tendon Rupture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    Basamania CJ: Incidence of major tendon ruptures and anterior cruciate ligament tears in US Army soldiers, Am J Sports Med2007; 35(8):1308-1314. 2... ligament or meniscus in is measurement is relatively independent of knee flex o of less than 0.80 indicates patella alta (Fig. Fig. 4: MRI of left...risk of tendon rupture after fluoroquinolone therapy , and requested that pharmaceutical manufacturers include boxed warnings. In healthy adults

  12. Cross-cultural adaptation and multi-centric validation of the Italian version of the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS).

    PubMed

    Vascellari, Alberto; Spennacchio, Pietro; Combi, Alberto; Grassi, Alberto; Patella, Silvio; Bisicchia, Salvatore; Canata, Gian Luigi; Zaffagnini, Stefano

    2016-05-02

    The purpose of this study was to translate the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) into Italian and establish its cultural adaptiveness and validity. The original version of the ATRS was translated into Italian in accordance with the stages recommended by Guillemin. A web-based survey was developed to test the construct validity of the Italian ATRS. Eighty patients with an average age of 45.5 years (SD 11) were included in the study. The ATRS was completed twice at 5 days intervals for test-retest reliability. The intraclass correlation coefficient was used to calculate the test-retest reliability, and Cronbach's α coefficient was used for internal consistency. Validity was evaluated by external correlation (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, r) of the ATRS with the Italian versions of the Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment-Achilles questionnaire (VISA-A), the 17-Italian Foot Function Index (17-FFI), the Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS), and the Short-Form 36 (SF-36). The internal consistency (α = 0.97) and the test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.96) were excellent. The correlation coefficient showed strong correlation of the Italian ATRS with the VISA-A and the LEFS (r = 0.72 and r = 0.70, respectively, p < 0.0001), a weak correlation with the 17-FFI (r = -0.30, p = 0.007), and high-to-moderate correlation with the physical functioning, bodily pain, physical role functioning, social functioning, role emotional, and vitality of the SF-36 (r = 0.75, r = 0.61, r = 0.52, r = 0.49, r = 0.40 and r = 0.34, respectively, p < 0.0001). The Italian version of the ATRS is a valid instrumentation to assess the functional limitations of Italian patients after Achilles tendon rupture. III.

  13. Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score at 3 months can predict patients' ability to return to sport 1 year after injury.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Maria Swennergren; Christensen, Marianne; Budolfsen, Thomas; Østergaard, Thomas Friis; Kallemose, Thomas; Troelsen, Anders; Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner

    2016-04-01

    To investigate how the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) at 3 months and 1 year after injury is associated with a patient's ability to return to work and sports as well as to investigate whether sex and age influence ATRS after 3 months and 1 year. This is a retrospective study analysing the data from the Danish Achilles tendon Database. A total of 366 patients were included. Logistic regression was conducted to describe the effect of ATRS on return to work and sports. The effect of age and sex on ATRS was analysed by linear regression. Three months after injury patients had a significantly increased chance of return to sport after 1 year with an increased ATRS (OR 1.06, p = 0.001) but a non-significant effect on return to work. After 1 year, patients had a significantly increased probability of having returned to sport (OR 1.11, p < 0.001) and also having returned to work (OR 1.05, p = 0.007) with an increased ATRS. Men had an average 7 (p = 0.006) points higher ATRS at 3 months and an average 22 (p = 0.006) points higher at 1 year. ATRS is associated with patients' ability to return to sports and work. ATRS at 3 months can be used as a predictor of the patient's ability to return to sports after 1 year. Hereby, ATRS might help to individualise rehabilitation by identifying patients who do not respond adequately to the chosen treatment. II.

  14. Intermittent pneumatic compression reduces the risk of deep vein thrombosis during post-operative lower limb immobilisation: a prospective randomised trial of acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Domeij-Arverud, E; Labruto, F; Latifi, A; Nilsson, G; Edman, G; Ackermann, P W

    2015-05-01

    Deep vein thrombosis is a common complication of immobilising the lower limb after surgery. We hypothesised that intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) therapy in outpatients who had undergone surgical repair of acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon could reduce the incidence of this problem. A total of 150 patients who had undergone surgical repair of the Achilles tendon were randomised to either treatment with IPC for six hours per day (n = 74) under an orthosis or treatment as usual (n = 74) in a plaster cast without IPC. At two weeks post-operatively, the incidence of deep vein thrombosis was assessed using blinded, double-reported compression duplex ultrasound. At this point, IPC was discontinued and all patients were immobilised in an orthosis for a further four weeks. At six weeks post-operatively, a second compression duplex ultrasound scan was performed. At two weeks, the incidence of deep vein thrombosis was 21% in the treated group and 37% in the control group (p = 0.042). Age over 39 years was found to be a strong risk factor for deep vein thrombosis (odds ratio (OR) = 4.84, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.14 to 10.96). Treatment with IPC, corrected for age differences between groups, reduced the risk of deep vein thrombosis at the two-week point (OR = 2.60; 95% CI 1.15 to 5.91; p =0.022). At six weeks, the incidence of deep vein thrombosis was 52% in the treated group and 48% in the control group (OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.49 to 1.83). IPC appears to be an effective method of reducing the risk of deep vein thrombosis in the early stages of post-operative immobilisation of outpatients. Further research is necessary to elucidate whether it can confer similar benefits over longer periods of immobilisation and in a more heterogeneous group of patients.

  15. Compression therapy promotes proliferative repair during rat Achilles tendon immobilization.

    PubMed

    Schizas, Nikos; Li, Jian; Andersson, Therese; Fahlgren, Anna; Aspenberg, Per; Ahmed, Mahmood; Ackermann, Paul W

    2010-07-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures are treated with an initial period of immobilization, which obstructs the healing process partly by a reduction of blood circulation. Intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) has been proposed to enhance tendon repair by stimulation of blood flow. We hypothesized that daily IPC treatment can counteract the deficits caused by 2 weeks of immobilization post tendon rupture. Forty-eight Sprague-Dawley SD) rats, all subjected to blunt Achilles tendon transection, were divided in three equal groups. Group A was allowed free cage activity, whereas groups B-C were immobilized at the operated hindleg. Group C received daily IPC treatment. Two weeks postrupture the rats were euthanatized and the tendons analyzed with tensile testing and histological assessments of collagen organization and collagen III-LI occurrence. Immobilization significantly reduced maximum force, energy uptake, stiffness, tendon length, transverse area, stress, organized collagen diameter and collagen III-LI occurrence by respectively 80, 75, 77, 22, 47, 65, 49, and 83% compared to free mobilization. IPC treatment improved maximum force 65%, energy 168%, organized collagen diameter 50%, tendon length 25%, and collagen III-LI occurrence 150% compared to immobilization only. The results confirm that immobilization impairs healing after tendon rupture and furthermore demonstrate that IPC-treatment can enhance proliferative tendon repair by counteracting biomechanical and morphological deficits caused by immobilization.

  16. Shear wave elastographic characterization of normal and torn achilles tendons: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiang-Mei; Cui, Li-Gang; He, Ping; Shen, Wei-Wei; Qian, Ya-Jun; Wang, Jin-Rui

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using quantitative shear wave elastography for assessing the functional integrity of the Achilles tendon and to summarize the changes in elasticity of ruptured Achilles tendons in comparison with normal controls. Thirty-six normal and 14 ruptured Achilles tendons were examined with shear wave elastography coupled with a linear array transducer (4-15 MHz). The elasticity value of each Achilles tendon in a longitudinal view was measured. The mean elasticity value ± SD for the normal Achilles tendons was 291.91 ± 4.38 kPa (note that there are saturated measurement phenomena for the normal Achilles tendon, so the actual value will be >300 kPa), whereas the ruptured Achilles tendons had an elasticity value of 56.48 ± 68.59 kPa. A statistically significant difference was found in relation to the findings in healthy volunteers (P = .006). Our results suggest that shear wave elastography is a valuable tool that can provide complementary biomechanical information for evaluating the function of the Achilles tendon.

  17. Operative treatment of chronic distal biceps tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Hamer, Merlin Jake; Caputo, Andrew E

    2008-09-01

    Chronic biceps tendon ruptures typically involve tendon retraction, scarring, and even compromised tissue. Indirect repair, such as tenodesis to the brachialis, does not provide optimal functional recovery. Chronic biceps tendon ruptures can be reconstructed with autogenous grafts (semitendinosis, tensor fascia lata) or allografts (typically Achilles tendon). The complications associated with these grafts include harvest site morbidity and graft incorporation. Using a vascularized local soft tissue source could minimize complications of graft reconstructions. The authors provide a novel reconstructive technique, reconstruction using the lacertus fibrosis, as a local graft source for chronic distal biceps tendon ruptures.

  18. Validation of a novel ultrasound measurement of achilles tendon length.

    PubMed

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner; Riecke, Anja Falk; Boesen, Anders; Hansen, Philip; Maier, Jens Friedrich; Døssing, Simon; Troelsen, Anders

    2015-11-01

    A clinically applicable and accurate method for measuring Achilles tendon length is needed to investigate the influence of elongation of the Achilles tendon after acute rupture. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate an ultrasonographic (US) length measurement of the Achilles tendon-aponeurosis complex. Both legs of 19 non-injured subjects were examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and US. The length from calcaneus to the medial head of m. Gastrocnemius was measured by three independent US examiners. Repeated US measurements were performed and compared to MRI measurements. Intra-rater and inter-rater reliability and the agreement between MRI and US were determined. Data were evaluated using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), the standard error of the measurement (SEM) and the minimal detectable change (MDC). Intra-rater reliability of US assessment showed no significant differences between test days: ICC 0.96, SEM 4 mm and MDC 10 mm. Inter-rater reliability showed a systematic difference between US observers of 2-5 mm (p = 0.001-0.036); ICC 0.97, SEM 3 mm and MDC 9 mm. MRI measurements were on average 4 mm longer than US (p = 0.001). The novel ultrasound measurement showed good reliability and accuracy. For comparison between groups of non-injured subjects differences of more than 4 mm can be detected. For repeated assessment of individual subjects differences of more than 10 mm can be detected. The measurement needs to be further assessed in the setting of acute Achilles tendon rupture. This new ultrasound measurement might allow for length measurement of ruptured Achilles tendons in the acute and chronic state after rupture. II.

  19. Minimally invasive surgery for Achilles tendon pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Maffulli, Nicola; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Spiezia, Filippo; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    Minimally invasive trauma and orthopedic surgery is increasingly common, though technically demanding. Its use for pathologies of the Achilles tendon (AT) hold the promise to allow faster recovery times, shorter hospital stays, and improved functional outcomes when compared to traditional open procedures, which can lead to difficulty with wound healing because of the tenuous blood supply and increased chance of wound breakdown and infection. We present the recent advances in the field of minimally invasive AT surgery for tendinopathy, acute ruptures, chronic tears, and chronic avulsions of the AT. In our hands, minimally invasive surgery has provided similar results to those obtained with open surgery, with decreased perioperative morbidity, decreased duration of hospital stay, and reduced costs. So far, the studies on minimally invasive orthopedic techniques are of moderate scientific quality with short follow-up periods. Multicenter studies with longer follow-up are needed to justify the long-term advantages of these techniques over traditional ones. PMID:24198547

  20. Achilles tendon: US diagnosis of pathologic conditions. Work in progress

    SciTech Connect

    Blei, C.L.; Nirschl, R.P.; Grant, E.G.

    1986-06-01

    Twenty-three patients were prospectively examined with ultra-sound (US) for acute or recurrent Achilles tendon symptoms. Three types of pathologic conditions of the Achilles tendon were found: tendinitis/tenosynovitis, acute tendon trauma, and postoperative changes. US appears to enable differentiation of these conditions and to contribute to the diagnosis of a broad range of Achilles tendon disorders.

  1. To cipro or not to cipro: bilateral achilles ruptures with the use of quinolones.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Jay; Clarke, Terry; Mathew, Bindu

    2015-03-01

    Ciprofloxacin and other fluoroquinolones are commonly used broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents for treating bacterial infections. This class of antibiotic drugs has uncommon adverse effects that include tendonitis, tendon ruptures, and other tendon abnormalities. We describe a patient with spontaneous bilateral complete Achilles tendon rupture after ciprofloxacin treatment. Surgical repair was performed successfully, and the patient completed physical rehabilitation without incident. Care should be exercised when selecting pharmaceutical agents to maintain a positive benefit-to-risk balance.

  2. Substantial creep in healing human Achilles tendons. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Aspenberg, Per; Schepull, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    healing after rupture of the Achilles tendon can be described in terms of mechanical properties of the new-formed tissue, constituting the tendon callus. In previous human studies, the elastic modulus and the density remained almost constant during 3 months after mobilization started, and then improved up to one year. So far, time-dependent deformation of the healing human tendon has not been reported. in a series of 16 patients, operated with Achilles tendon suture, we implanted tantalum beads into the tendon and measured the distance between them repeatedly during 3 min of constant loading, using an ordinary image intensifier. The patients unloaded their leg for 30 min before the test. To avoid bias, all images were investigated in a randomized and blinded order. total strain during 3 min of constant loading at 7 weeks post injury amounted to 5%, and at 19 weeks to 3%. About half of the strain, after the loading was applied, occurred during the second and third min. Considerable strain also occurred just before loading, when the patient was told that a load would be applied, but before this was actually done. the measurements were crude, and this study should be seen as a pilot. Still, visco-elastic properties seem to dominate the mechanical behavior the healing Achilles tendon from start of mobilization to 19 weeks, at least when tested after 30 min rest. This deserves further studies with more precise methods.

  3. Substantial creep in healing human Achilles tendons. A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Aspenberg, Per; Schepull, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background healing after rupture of the Achilles tendon can be described in terms of mechanical properties of the new-formed tissue, constituting the tendon callus. In previous human studies, the elastic modulus and the density remained almost constant during 3 months after mobilization started, and then improved up to one year. So far, time-dependent deformation of the healing human tendon has not been reported. Methods in a series of 16 patients, operated with Achilles tendon suture, we implanted tantalum beads into the tendon and measured the distance between them repeatedly during 3 min of constant loading, using an ordinary image intensifier. The patients unloaded their leg for 30 min before the test. To avoid bias, all images were investigated in a randomized and blinded order. Results total strain during 3 min of constant loading at 7 weeks post injury amounted to 5%, and at 19 weeks to 3%. About half of the strain, after the loading was applied, occurred during the second and third min. Considerable strain also occurred just before loading, when the patient was told that a load would be applied, but before this was actually done. Conclusion the measurements were crude, and this study should be seen as a pilot. Still, visco-elastic properties seem to dominate the mechanical behavior the healing Achilles tendon from start of mobilization to 19 weeks, at least when tested after 30 min rest. This deserves further studies with more precise methods. PMID:26605187

  4. Calcaneoplasty and reattachment of the Achilles tendon for insertional tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Heng An; Chong, Heng An; Yeo, William

    2014-04-01

    To report the one-year outcome of 44 patients treated with a novel technique of calcaneoplasty and reattachment of the Achilles tendon. 15 men and 29 women (mean age, 53 years) with insertional tendinopathy of the Achilles tendon underwent calcaneoplasty, retrocalcaneal bursa excision, debridement and reattachment of the Achilles tendon with suture anchors via a lateral approach. Outcome was measured using the visual analogue score (VAS) for pain, the SF-36 health survey, the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot scores. Patient expectation and satisfaction were also assessed. Of the 44 patients, 37, 43, and 21 were followed up at 3, 6, and 12 months. The mean VAS for pain and AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score improved significantly up to 6 months. The mean SF-36 score improved significantly up to 6 months for physical functioning, role functioning (physical), and bodily pain. Patient expectation and satisfaction also improved significantly. No patient had postoperative infections or rupture. Three patients had delayed wound healing, which resolved after simple dressings. Calcaneoplasty and reattachment of the Achilles tendon via a lateral approach for insertional tendinopathy enables early weight bearing and achieves good outcome and pain relief.

  5. Characterization and Surgical Management of Achilles Tendon Sleeve Avulsions.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jeannie; Easley, Mark E; Nunley, James A

    2016-06-01

    An Achilles sleeve avulsion occurs when the tendon ruptures distally from its calcaneal insertion as a continuous "sleeve." This relatively rare injury pattern may not be appreciated until the time of surgery and can be challenging to treat because, unlike a midsubstance rupture, insufficient tendon remains on the calcaneus to allow for end-to-end repair, and unlike a tuberosity avulsion fracture, any bony element avulsed with the tendon is inadequate for internal fixation. This study aimed to highlight the characteristics of Achilles sleeve avulsions and present the outcomes of operative repair using suture anchor fixation. A retrospective analysis was conducted on 11 consecutive Achilles tendon sleeve avulsions (10 males, 1 female; mean age 44 years) that underwent operative repair between 2008 and 2014. Patient demographics, injury presentation, and operative details were reviewed. Postoperative outcomes were collected at a mean follow-up of 38.4 (range, 12-83.5) months, including the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) Ankle-Hindfoot score, visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, plantarflexion strength, patient satisfaction, and complications. Eight patients (72.7%) had preexisting symptoms of insertional Achilles disease. Ten of 11 (90.9%) injuries were sustained during recreational athletic activity. An Achilles sleeve avulsion was recognized preoperatively in 7 of 11 (64%) cases, where lateral ankle radiographs demonstrated a small radiodensity several centimeters proximal to the calcaneal insertion. Intraoperatively, 90.9% of sleeve avulsions had a concomitant Haglund deformity and macroscopic evidence of insertional tendinopathy. All patients healed after suture anchor repair. The average AOFAS score was 92.8 and VAS score was 0.9. Ten patients (90.9%) were completely satisfied. One complication occurred, consisting of delayed wound healing. Achilles tendon sleeve avulsions predominantly occurred in middle-aged men with preexisting insertional

  6. Achilles tendon injury in kendo players in junior and senior high schools: with a focus on foot function

    PubMed Central

    Kisi, Shinya; Yoshida, Munehito

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] We investigated Achilles tendon injury in Kendo players in junior and senior high schools to obtain a possible indicator for preventing an outbreak of Achilles tendon injury and tendonitis, possible risk factors concerning foot function and morphology were extracted. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 60 Kendo players aged 14–18 years from Wakayama Prefecture, Japan (33 boys and 27 girls). A questionnaire survey was conducted on the past history, current status, time of occurrence about Achilles tendon pain or rupture, and site of Achilles tendon pain or rupture. Based on the responses to the questionnaire, these students were divided into two groups, i.e., those who had a history of Achilles tendon pain (n=30) or rupture (n=3) (pain group) and those who had no history of Achilles tendon pain (no-pain group), and they were examined for foot alignment, flexion and extension Range of motion test of the first toe, flexion and extension muscle strength of the first toe, and opening movement of the toes. [Results] Achilles tendon pain had occurred in 53% of the Kendo players (including 3 who had suffered Achilles tendon rupture). Poor foot alignment and deterioration of opening movement of the toes were noted in the pain group. [Conclusion] Foot alignment was poor and opening function of the toes deteriorated in the pain group, suggesting that these may be some of factors for Achilles tendon injury. Training aimed at improving foot alignment and function is important to prevent and improve Achilles tendon injury. PMID:28265159

  7. Dextrose prolotherapy and corticosteroid injection into rat Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Martins, C A Q; Bertuzzi, R T; Tisot, R A; Michelin, A F; do Prado, J M; Stroher, A; Burigo, M

    2012-10-01

    To assess the mechanical behavior and the histology of collagen fibers after prolotherapy with 12.5% dextrose into rat Achilles tendons and to compare with those of corticosteroid treatment. Out of 60 adult female Wistar rats (70 tendons), 15 received 12.5% dextrose (group I); 15 were treated with corticosteroid injection (group II); and 15 were given 0.9% saline injection (group III), all into the right Achilles tendon, whereas 13 animals received no injections (group IV). Three doses of each substance (groups I, II, and III) were given at a 5-day interval. Collagen fiber color was quantitatively assessed in three samples from each group and in five samples from the control group using picrosirius red staining under polarized and nonpolarized light. Twelve tendons from each group treated with the test substance and 20 tendons from the control group were submitted to the tensile strength test. There was no statistical difference across the groups with respect to maximum load at failure (n.s.) and absorbed energy (n.s.). With respect to tendon rupture, there was no difference between the myotendinous and the tendinous regions (n.s.). However, hematoxylin-eosin staining revealed statistical significance in lymphocytic inflammatory infiltrate (P = 0.008) and in parallel fiber orientation (P = 0.003) when comparing groups to the control group, without significance for either neovascularization (n.s.) or the presence of fibroblasts (n.s.). Likewise, there was no significant difference between the percentage of mature (n.s.) and immature (n.s.) fibers. Dextrose was not deleterious to the tendinous tissue, as it did not change the mechanical and histological properties of Achilles tendons in rats. The data obtained in this study may help clinicians in their daily work as they suggest that injections of 12.5% dextrose caused no harm to the tendons, although the clinical importance in humans still needs to be defined.

  8. [Functional analysis after Achilles tendon repair].

    PubMed

    Moretti, B; Quagliarella, L; Sasanelli, N; Garofalo, R; Moretti, L; Patella, S; Belgiovine, G; Patella, V

    2007-01-01

    The Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) is a severe injury and requires a surgical treatment which can result in functional impairment, limiting unprofessional sports activities. In order to evaluate this potential impairment 20 subjects (SG) who had received surgical treatment for ATR and 20 healthy subjects (CG) were required to execute vertical jump according to counter movement jump and squat jump protocol. For both groups the flying time (Tv) of each foot has been acquired, adopting accelerometric transducers positioned posteriorly at the level of malleolar axis. The SG's Tv is significantly lesser than the CG's one, demonstrating an inferior global performance respect to healthy people and the operated leg has a Tv 6% higher than the contralateral, while in the CG there are no statistical difference between the Tv of the limbs. For seven operated subjects Tv values are lesser than threshold values obtained from CG. For them sports activity which implies high and cyclic stress on the lower limbs could be dangerous. Functional evaluation, consequently, allow to assess impairments not differently estimable.

  9. Achilles tendon reattachment after surgical treatment of insertional tendinosis using the suture bridge technique: a case series.

    PubMed

    Witt, Bryan L; Hyer, Christopher F

    2012-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a clinical diagnosis characterized as a triad of symptoms including pain, swelling, and impaired performance of the diseased tendon. Achilles tendinopathy is divided into Achilles tendonitis and tendinosis based on histopathological examination. Achilles tendinosis is viewed microscopically as disorganized collagen, abnormal neovascularization, necrosis, and mucoid degeneration. Insertional Achilles tendinosis is a degenerative process of the tendon at the junction of the tendon and calcaneus. This disease is initially treated conservatively with activity modification, custom orthotic devices, heel lifts, and immobilization. After 3 to 6 months of conservative therapy has failed to alleviate symptoms, surgical management is indicated. Surgical management of insertional Achilles tendinosis includes Achilles tendon debridement, calcaneal exostosis ostectomy, and retrocalcaneal bursa excision. In this case series, we present 4 patients who underwent surgical management of insertional Achilles tendinosis with complete tendon detachment. All patients underwent reattachment of the Achilles tendon with the suture bridge technique. The Arthrex SutureBridge(®) (Arthrex, Inc., Naples, FL) device uses a series of 4 suture anchors and FiberWire(®) (Arthrex Inc.) to reattach the Achilles tendon to its calcaneal insertion. This hourglass pattern of FiberWire(®) provides a greater area of tendon compression, consequently allowing greater stability and possible earlier return to weightbearing activities. The patients were followed up for approximately 2 years' duration. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. At final follow-up there was no evidence of Achilles tendon ruptures or device failures. All patients were able to return to their activities of daily living without the use of assistive devices. The patients' average visual analog pain scale was 1 (range 0 to 4), and their average foot functional index score was 3.41 (range 0

  10. Management of achilles tendon injury: A current concepts systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Vivek; Jaggard, Matthew; Al-Nammari, Shafic Said; Uzoigwe, Chika; Gulati, Pooja; Ismail, Nizar; Gibbons, Charles; Gupte, Chinmay

    2015-01-01

    Achilles tendon rupture has been on the rise over recent years due to a variety of reasons. It is a debilitating injury with a protracted and sometimes incomplete recovery. Management strategy is a controversial topic and evidence supporting a definite approach is limited. Opinion is divided between surgical repair and conservative immobilisation in conjunction with functional orthoses. A systematic search of the literature was performed. Pubmed, Medline and EmBase databases were searched for Achilles tendon and a variety of synonymous terms. A recent wealth of reporting suggests that conservative regimens with early weight bearing or mobilisation have equivalent or improved rates of re-rupture to operative regimes. The application of dynamic ultrasound assessment of tendon gap may prove crucial in minimising re-rupture and improving outcomes. Studies employing functional assessments have found equivalent function between operative and conservative treatments. However, no specific tests in peak power, push off strength or athletic performance have been reported and whether an advantage in operative treatment exists remains undetermined. PMID:25992315

  11. Achilles Tendon Open Repair Augmented With Distal Turndown Tendon Flap and Posterior Crural Fasciotomy.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Hamza; Selek, Hakan Y; Harput, Gulcan; Oznur, Ali; Baltaci, Gul

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the outcomes after open repair of Achilles tendon rupture augmented with a distal turndown gastrocnemius flap and deep posterior crural fasciotomy based on the modified Lindholm technique. Twenty-three patients with acute Achilles tendon injury underwent open end-to-end tendon repair augmented with a distal turndown gastrocnemius flap and deep posterior compartment fasciotomy. The concentric and eccentric muscle strength was measured using a functional squat system, and dynamic balance was assessed using the Y-balance test with anterior, posteromedial, and posterolateral reach distances. Jump performance was assessed using the vertical jump and 1-leg hop tests. All patients returned to their preinjury activity level, and their mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hindfoot scale score was 98.2 ± 2.3 after surgery. No significant difference was found between the involved and uninvolved extremities in terms of concentric and eccentric muscle strength (p = .82 and p = .53, respectively). In addition, no significant differences were seen between legs in the vertical jump (p = .16), one-leg hop (p = .15), and balance (p > .05) tests. Open end-to-end repair of the Achilles tendon rupture with augmentation and fasciotomy of the deep posterior compartment healed without any major complications. Functional performance of the involved leg after recovery was similar to that of the uninvolved leg. The modified Lindholm surgical technique described in our report appears to be a useful intervention for acute Achilles tendon rupture. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Primary achilles tendon repair with mini-dorsolateral incision technique and accelerated rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Hrnack, Scott A; Crates, John M; Barber, F Alan

    2012-10-01

    No consensus exists for the best primary repair of acute Achilles tendon ruptures. Problems with wound healing and nerve damage can occur. Prolonged immobilization leads to stiffness and calf atrophy. This study assesses the clinical outcome of acute Achilles tendon repairs using a mini-dorsolateral incision followed by a rapid rehabilitation program. A consecutive series of acute Achilles tendon ruptures repaired using a mini-dorsolateral incision were reviewed with a minimum 12 months follow up. Fifteen patients with an average age of 44 (range, 32 to 60) years were followed an average of 45 (range, 14 to 72) months. Two modified, buried core high strength sutures were placed in each torn end of the Achilles tendon reinforced with a running circumferential whip-stitch. Ankle Hindfoot scores, single toe raises, calf circumference, and adverse events were recorded. An accelerated postoperative rehabilitation protocol was followed. Postoperative AOFAS Ankle Hindfoot scores averaged 98.3 [39 pain; 49.6 function; 9.3 alignment]. All patients could single heel raise. Eight of 15 demonstrated atrophy with an average calf circumference loss of 1.0 cm. The only postoperative complication was one case of superficial cellulitis successfully treated with oral antibiotics. There were no sural nerve injuries, wound break down, or re-ruptures at final followup. The repair of acute Achilles tendon ruptures through a minimal lateral incision provided excellent functional outcomes, avoided complications including sural nerve injury, and allowed a return to sports between 4 to 6 months.

  13. Evaluation of normal and pathological Achilles tendon by real-time shear wave elastography.

    PubMed

    Petrescu, Pompiliu HoraŢiu; Izvernariu, Dragoş Andrei; Iancu, Cătălina; Dinu, Gabriel Ovidiu; Crişan, Dan; Popescu, Simona Alina; Şirli, Roxana Lucia Denisa; Nistor, Bogdan Mihai; RăuŢia, Ion Călin; Lăzureanu, Dorela CodruŢa; Dema, Sorin; Prejbeanu, Ion Radu; Sporea, Ioan

    2016-01-01

    Tendinopathy covers a range of several tendon conditions, mostly caused by overuse but at least in Achilles tendon pathology, favored by obesity, diabetes, inflammatory and autoimmune conditions. Subclinical tendon pathology is difficult to diagnose, as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations are sometimes inconclusive and not cost-effective. Elastography is an ultrasound examination method that uses mechanical impulses to produce shear waves in the tissue of interest, then measures the tissue displacement and calculates the shear wave speed or the elastic modulus of the examined tissue. We have used B-mode ultrasonography and shear wave elastography on 80 Achilles tendons from healthy volunteers with or without tendon pathology history, and correlated the data obtained with the clinical parameters of the volunteers, such as age, body mass index (BMI) and sports practice. We have shown that there is no significant correlation between the elastic modulus of the Achilles tendon and age, sports practice and body mass index with the exception of the correlation between the elastic modulus of the right Achilles tendon in men and age. Shear wave elastography has proved to be cost-effective for the evaluation of the Achilles tendon in healthy volunteers and was able to monitor the evolution of one patient with old tendon rupture treated by surgery. It can complete MRI investigation and it can replace B-mode ultrasonography particularly in monitoring the post-surgery evolution.

  14. Intratendinous tears of the Achilles tendon - a new pathology? Analysis of a large 4-year cohort

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Otto; Morton, Sarah; Pritchard, Mel; Parkes, Tina; Malliaras, Peter; Crisp, Tom; Padhiar, Nat; Maffulli, Nicola; King, John; Morrissey, Dylan

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background: Achillodynia is common and includes Achilles tendinopathy, partial Achilles tears and Achilles tendon ruptures. However, we believe an additional pathology should be considered for Achillodynia differentials – the intratendinous tear (ITT). Methods: Examinations of 740 achillodynic patients in one specialist centre were reviewed. ITTs were defined as a clearly visualised echopoor area situated centrally and extending to, but not through the tendon periphery, with pain on palpation and no clinical findings consistent with Achilles rupture. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse differences between pathological sub-groups, and images described qualitatively. Results: 5% (29 males, 8 females) of 740 patients had an ITT. Patients typically presented with a history of sudden onset localised pain and the ability to train but not reach maximal loading. Average age was 36.3 years (range 20–64), significantly lower than mid-tendon tendinopathy (8.48 years; p<0.01). 92% had concurrent Achilles tendinopathy. Elite sportspeople were more highly represented in the ITT than mid-tendon tendi nopathy groups (86.2% ITT group vs 13.8% mid-tendon AT group; p<0.01). Conclusions: ITTs should be actively searched for in patients with Achilles pathology, especially in elite male athletes with a history of high-impact pain. Prospective research is warranted concerning diagnosis and management. Level of evidence: IV. PMID:28717612

  15. Bilateral distal biceps tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Green, Jennifer B; Skaife, Tyler L; Leslie, Bruce M

    2012-01-01

    To determine the incidence of bilateral distal biceps tendon ruptures. A retrospective review of 321 patients who underwent operative repair of a distal biceps tendon rupture between 1988 and 2010 identified 26 patients with bilateral ruptures. We recorded patient age, mechanism of injury, time between symptom onset before the first surgery and subsequent contralateral symptoms, and time between surgeries. Twenty-two bilateral ruptures were confirmed intra-operatively, 3 by MRI, and 1 was lost to follow up. A total of 23 bilateral ruptures (92%) occurred in men. The average age at the initial rupture was 44 years (range, 29-74 y). The average age at subsequent rupture was 48 years (range, 36-79 y). Excluding the 2 women (age 72 and 79 y), the average age at the initial rupture was 42 years and the average age at subsequent rupture was 46 years. The average interval between ruptures was 4.1 years (range, 0.8-13.9 y). The initial rupture occurred in the dominant extremity in 12 cases (50%) and in the nondominant extremity in 10 cases (42%); in 3 patients (8%) the dominance was not documented or ambidextrous. Thirty-three percent were heavy laborers, 3 patients had a smoking history, and 1 patient reported a history of steroid use. Twenty-two patients (88%) had the second side repaired, where we noted that 12 (55%) of the second tendon ruptures were partial tears. The 8% cumulative incidence of bilateral biceps tendon ruptures in a consecutive series of biceps tendon repairs may be higher because not all patients were contacted, which introduced a sampling bias. This 8% rate is markedly higher than the reported rate of 1.2 per 100,000 for an isolated distal biceps tendon rupture. This implies that patients with a distal biceps tendon rupture are at risk for a rupture on the contralateral side. Prognostic III. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of taping on Achilles tendon protection and kendo performance.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Feng-Hua; Chu, I-Hua; Huang, Chun-Hao; Liang, Jing-Min; Wu, Jia-Hroung; Wu, Wen-Lan

    2017-03-02

    It has been reported that there is high rate of Achilles tendon injury among kendo athletes. For protection and support the area, kendo athletes habitually use taping during practice or games. To investigate the effect of various taping techniques on injury prevention and functional performance in kendo athletes. Case-control study. Laboratory. Fifteen University Kendo Team athletes with at least 2 years kendo experience. Athletes completed 5 stepping backwards and striking cycles under four taping conditions: No taping; Athletic taping of ankle joint (AT-Ankle); Athletic taping of Achilles tendon (AT-Achilles); and Kinesio-Tex taping of Achilles tendon (KT-Achilles). Jump distance, lower limb angular motion, left foot-ground contact time, Achilles tendon force (ATF), and soleus and medial gastrocnemius muscle activities. Lowest peak ATF was found in AT-Achilles during heel-down phase, statistically significantly different from KT-Achilles peak force. Significant decline of soleus muscle EMG amplitude was also found when compared to No taping, during heel-down phase and other conditions during pushing phase. Conversely, KT-Achilles showed significant decrease in foot-ground contact time compared with No taping and greater ankle range of motion than in AT-Ankle. To protect the Achilles tendon, AT-Achilles taping is recommended since it tends to decrease ATF. Conversely, to enhance athletes' performance, we recommend KT-Achilles taping to speed up kendo striking motion. However, the Achilles tendon must withstand greatest forces concurrently. This finding implies that AT-Achilles taping can protect the injured Achilles tendon and KT-Achilles taping can enhance performance on the kendo striking motion.

  17. An advanced glycation endproduct (AGE)-rich diet promotes accumulation of AGEs in Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Skovgaard, Dorthe; Svensson, Rene B; Scheijen, Jean; Eliasson, Pernilla; Mogensen, Pernille; Hag, Anne Mette F; Kjær, Michael; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Schjerling, Peter; Magnusson, Stig P; Couppé, Christian

    2017-03-01

    Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) accumulate in long-lived tissue proteins like collagen in bone and tendon causing modification of the biomechanical properties. This has been hypothesized to raise the risk of orthopedic injury such as bone fractures and tendon ruptures. We evaluated the relationship between AGE content in the diet and accumulation of AGEs in weight-bearing animal Achilles tendon. Two groups of mice (C57BL/6Ntac) were fed with either high-fat diet low in AGEs high-fat diet (HFD) (n = 14) or normal diet high in AGEs (ND) (n = 11). AGE content in ND was six to 50-fold higher than HFD The mice were sacrificed at week 40 and Achilles and tail tendons were carefully excised to compare weight and nonweight-bearing tendons. The amount of the AGEs carboxymethyllysine (CML), methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone (MG-H1) and carboxyethyllysine (CEL) in Achilles and tail tendon was measured using ultraperformance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) and pentosidine with high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescent detection. AGEs in Achilles tendon were higher than in tail tendon for CML (P < 0.0001), CEL (P < 0.0001), MG-H1 and pentosidine (for both ND and HFD) (P < 0.0001). The AGE-rich diet (ND) resulted in an increase in CML (P < 0.0001), MG-H1 (P < 0.001) and pentosidine (P < 0.0001) but not CEL, in Achilles and tail tendon. This is the first study to provide evidence for AGE accumulation in injury-prone, weight-bearing Achilles tendon associated with intake of an AGE-rich diet. This indicates that food-derived AGEs may alter tendon properties and the development of tendon injuries.

  18. Simultaneous bilateral patellar tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Moura, Diogo Lino; Marques, José Pedro; Lucas, Francisco Manuel; Fonseca, Fernando Pereira

    2017-01-01

    Bilateral patellar tendon rupture is a rare entity, often associated with systemic diseases and patellar tendinopathy. The authors report a rare case of a 34-year-old man with simultaneous bilateral rupture of the patellar tendon caused by minor trauma. The patient is a retired basketball player with no past complaints of chronic knee pain and a history of steroid use. Surgical management consisted in primary end-to-end tendon repair protected temporarily with cerclage wiring, followed by a short immobilization period and intensive rehabilitation program. Five months after surgery, the patient was able to fully participate in sport activities.

  19. Percutaneous Achilles tendon repair with and without endoscopic control.

    PubMed

    Halasi, Tamás; Tállay, András; Berkes, István

    2003-11-01

    One hundred and fifty six patients were treated using the modified double suture technique for percutaneous Achilles tendon repair between 1994 and 1998. Endoscopy was used in 67 cases. The first ten cases were dropped (learning curve), 57 were followed (E-group). Percutaneous suture without endoscopy was performed in 89 patients. Two could not be followed (went abroad), so this group consists of 87 patients (P-group). Mean age: E-group 37.8 (22-60) years, P-group 38.9 (20-68) years. Male-female ratio: E 49/8, P 74/13. There were 54 and 83 athletes in groups E and P respectively. Follow-up period was 12-60 months. Overall re-rupture rate was 6/144 (4.2%). Two total and 3 partial re-ruptures were in the P-group, and 1 partial was in the E-group. Fusiform thickening of the tendon (delayed healing) occurred in 4 cases in each group. The mean plantar flexion strength compared with the non-affected side was 89% in the P-group and 86% in the E-group. The length of time before returning to sports activity ranged from 4 to 6 months after surgery in both groups. Subjective results were excellent to good in 88% (P-group) and in 89% (E-group) of the cases. On the basis of the results, the percutaneous double suture technique proved to be a simple and safe method for Achilles tendon repair with or without the use of an endoscope. The re-rupture rate was lower in the endoscopic controlled group. The basic goal of the endoscopy was to control the adaptation of the tendon ends. This method yielded further operative possibilities and benefits as well.

  20. A review on animal models and treatments for the reconstruction of Achilles and flexor tendons.

    PubMed

    Bottagisio, Marta; Lovati, Arianna B

    2017-03-01

    Tendon is a connective tissue mainly composed of collagen fibers with peculiar mechanical properties essential to functional movements. The increasing incidence of tendon traumatic injuries and ruptures-associated or not with the loss of tissue-falls on the growing interest in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The use of animal models is mandatory to deepen the knowledge of the tendon healing response to severe damages or acute transections. Thus, the selection of preclinical models is crucial to ensure a successful translation of effective and safe innovative treatments to the clinical practice. The current review is focused on animal models of tendon ruptures and lacerations or defective injuries with large tissue loss that require surgical approaches or grafting procedures. Data published between 2000 and 2016 were examined. The analyzed articles were compiled from Pub Med-NCBI using search terms, including animal model(s) AND tendon augmentation OR tendon substitute(s) OR tendon substitution OR tendon replacement OR tendon graft(s) OR tendon defect(s) OR tendon rupture(s). This article presents the existing preclinical models - considering their advantages and disadvantages-in which translational progresses have been made by using bioactive sutures or tissue engineering that combines biomaterials with cells and growth factors to efficiently treat transections or large defects of Achilles and flexor tendons.

  1. [Operative treatment of extended peritendinous calcifications after open Achilles tendon repair-a case report].

    PubMed

    Kraus, R; Horas, U; Stahl, J-P; Schnettler, R

    2003-08-01

    In the recent literature, there are only a few hints on spontaneous or postoperative heterotopic ossifications of the Achilles tendon region. The strategies of treatment are different, both conservative and operative. Postoperative calcifications are not mentioned as typical complications in the treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures. We describe the case of a 39 year old male suffering of an increasing, painful swelling and a decrease of loading capacity. In clinical, sonographic and radiological investigations,we found large peritendinous calcifications ventral to the intact heel tendon up to 36 mm in diameter. After operative resection of the calcifications and postoperative chemical prophylaxis, the patient has been without pain for 1 year. There was no relapse of the calcifications or re-rupture of the tendon.

  2. Males have Inferior Achilles Tendon Material Properties Compared to Females in a Rodent Model.

    PubMed

    Pardes, A M; Freedman, B R; Fryhofer, G W; Salka, N S; Bhatt, P R; Soslowsky, L J

    2016-10-01

    The Achilles tendon is the most commonly ruptured tendon in the human body. Numerous studies have reported incidence of these injuries to be upwards of five times as common in men than women. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the sex- and hormone-specific differences between Achilles tendon and muscle between female, ovariectomized female (ovarian hormone deficient), and male rats. Uninjured tissues were collected from all groups for mechanical, structural, and histological analysis. Our results showed that while cross-sectional area and failure load were increased in male tendons, female tendons exhibited superior tendon material properties and decreased muscle fiber size. Specifically, linear and dynamic moduli were increased while viscoelastic properties (e.g., hysteresis, percent relaxation) were decreased in female tendons, suggesting greater resistance to deformation under load and more efficient energy transfer, respectively. No differences were identified in tendon organization, cell shape, cellularity, or proteoglycan content. Additionally, no differences in muscle fiber type distribution were observed between groups. In conclusion, inferior tendon mechanical properties and increased muscle fiber size may explain the increased susceptibility for Achilles tendon injury observed clinically in men compared to women.

  3. Effect of taurine on rat Achilles tendon healing.

    PubMed

    Akdemir, Ovunc; Lineaweaver, William C; Cavusoglu, Turker; Binboga, Erdal; Uyanikgil, Yigit; Zhang, Feng; Pekedis, Mahmut; Yagci, Tugay

    2015-01-01

    Taurine has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant characteristics. We have introduced taurine into a tendon-healing model to evaluate its effects on tendon healing and adhesion formation. Two groups of 16 rats underwent diversion and repair of the Achilles tendon. One group received a taurine injection (200 mg/ml) at the repair site, while the other group received 1 ml of saline. Specimens were harvested at 6 weeks and underwent biomechanical and histological evaluation. No tendon ruptured. Average maximum load was significantly greater in the taurine-applied group compared with the control group (p < 0.05). Similarly, average energy uptake was significantly higher in the taurine-applied group compared with the control group (p < 0.05). We observed no significant differences in stiffness in both groups (p > 0.05). After histological assessment, we found that fibroblast proliferation, edema, and inflammation statistically decreased in the treatment group (p < 0.05). These findings could indicate greater tendon strength with less adhesion formation, and taurine may have an effect on adhesion formation.

  4. Achilles tendons hypertrophy in response to high loading training.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, Yael; Milgrom, Charles; Altaras, Talya; Globus, Opher; Zeltzer, Ehud; Finestone, Aharon S

    2014-12-01

    Whether the human Achilles tendon undergoes hypertrophic changes as measured by an increase in cross-sectional area, in response to endurance training exercise remains in question. We investigated the hypothesis that transition from civilian life through 6 months of elite infantry training would induce adaptive Achilles tendon hypertrophy. Seventy-two new elite infantry recruits had the cross-sectional area of their Achilles tendons measured at a point 2.5 cm proximal to the Achilles insertion by ultrasound before beginning elite infantry training. Measurements were repeated by the same ultrasonographer for those recruits who were still in the training program at 6 months. Prior to beginning the study the intraobserver reliability of the ultrasonographer's Achilles tendon measurements was calculated (intraclass correlation coefficient = .96). Fifty-five recruits completed 6 months of training. The mean cross-sectional area of their right Achilles tendon increased from 47.0 ± 11.2 to 50.2 ± 9.6 mm(2) (P = .037) and the left Achilles tendon from 47.2 ± 8.9 to 51.1 ± 8.3 mm(2) (P = .013). The change in cross-sectional area did not correlate with subject height, weight, prior sport history, or jumping and running abilities. An abrupt stimulus of 6 months of elite infantry training was adequate to induce hypertrophic changes in the Achilles tendon. This is the first human prospective study showing an increase in the Achilles tendon cross-sectional area in response to rigorous endurance type training. The finding supports the hypothesis that the Achilles tendon in response to sufficiently high and sustained loading can remodel its morphological properties and thereby strengthen itself. Level II, etiology study. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Influence of neglecting the curved path of the Achilles tendon on Achilles tendon length change at various ranges of motion

    PubMed Central

    Fukutani, Atsuki; Hashizume, Satoru; Kusumoto, Kazuki; Kurihara, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Achilles tendon length has been measured using a straight‐line model. However, this model is associated with a greater measurement error compared with a curved‐line model. Therefore, we examined the influence of neglecting the curved path of the Achilles tendon on its length change at various ranges of motion. Ten male subjects participated in this study. First, the location of the Achilles tendon was confirmed by using ultrasonography, and markers were attached on the skin over the Achilles tendon path. Then, the three‐dimensional coordinates of each marker at dorsiflexion (DF) 15°, plantarflexion (PF) 0°, PF15°, and PF30° were obtained. Achilles tendon length in the curved‐line model was calculated as the sum of the distances among each marker. On the other hand, Achilles tendon length in the straight‐line model was calculated as the straight distance between the two most proximal and distal markers projected onto the sagittal plane. The difference of the Achilles tendon length change between curved‐line and straight‐line models was calculated by subtracting the Achilles tendon length change obtained in curved‐line model from that obtained in straight‐line model with three different ranges of motion (i.e., PF0°, PF15°, and PF30° from DF15°, respectively). As a result, the difference in Achilles tendon length change between the two models increased significantly as the range of motion increased. In conclusion, neglecting the curved path of the Achilles tendon induces substantial overestimation of its length change when the extent of ankle joint angle change is large. PMID:25303951

  6. In-vitro tensile testing machine for vibration study of fresh rabbit Achilles tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revel, Gian M.; Scalise, Alessandro; Scalise, Lorenzo; Pianosi, Antonella

    2001-10-01

    A lot of people, overall athletic one suffer from tendinitis or complete rupture of the Achilles tendon. This structure becomes inflamed and damaged mainly from a variety of mechanical forces and sometimes due to metabolic problems, such as diabetes or arthritis. Over the past three decades extensive studies have been performed on the structural and mechanical properties of Achilles tendon trying to explain the constitutive equations to describe and foresee tendon behavior. Among the various mechanical parameters, the vibrational behavior is also of interest. Several investigations are performed in order to study how the Achilles tendon vibrations influence the response of the muscle proprioception and human posture. The present article describes how in vitro tensile experiments can be performed, taking into account the need to simulate physiological condition of Achilles tendon and thus approaching some opened problems in the design of the experimental set-up. A new system for evaluating tendon vibrations by non contact techniques is proposed. Preliminary simple elongation tests are made extracting the main mechanical parameters: stress and strain at different fixed stretches, in order to characterize the tissue. Finally, a vibration study is made at each pretensioned tendon level evaluating the oscillating curves caused by a small hammer.

  7. Blood flow of the Achilles tendon during military training.

    PubMed

    Mahieu, N; Van Tiggelen, D; De Muynck, M; Dumalin, M; Witvrouw, E

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the vascular response of the Achilles tendon as indicated by power Doppler activity during a military training program of 6 weeks. 49 male military recruits (98 tendons) volunteered for this study. Before and during the military training program, the Achilles tendons were screened with gray-scale ultrasonography and power Doppler US. Reactive tendinopathies of the Achilles tendons were registered by means of a clinical examination, VAS-scores and VISA-A scores. The US examination, the clinical examination, VAS-scores and VISA-A scores showed that 13/98 tendons developed a reactive tendinopathy. 3 of these 13 symptomatic tendons showed intratendinous Doppler activity. In these tendons, pain was always present before the vascular response of the Achilles tendon. Both pain and hypervascularisation remained visible till the end of the basic military training. In 5 asymptomatic tendons with no structural changes of the tendon, a vascular response was seen during one single measurement. It can be hypothesized that there is no relationship between the vascular response of the Achilles tendon and the pain in a reactive tendinopathy. In a reactive tendinopathy, other pain mechanisms must be investigated in future research. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Less-invasive semitendinosus tendon graft augmentation for the reconstruction of chronic tears of the Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, Nicola; Del Buono, Angelo; Spiezia, Filippo; Maffulli, Gayle D; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2013-04-01

    Less-extensive and gentler exposure and dissection of deep soft tissues could reduce the times of recovery and rehabilitation after Achilles tendon reconstruction. A minimally invasive semitendinosus autologous graft reconstruction of the Achilles tendon preserves skin integrity and reduces wound breakdown. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A total of 26 patients underwent minimally invasive semitendinosus autologous graft reconstruction for chronic ruptures to the Achilles tendon. Patients underwent a comparison of preoperative versus postoperative maximum calf circumference and isometric plantarflexion strength and evaluation of postoperative complications. The Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) was administered at the final follow-up appointment. All patients were reviewed at an average of 8.2 years (range, 7-10 years) from surgery. No patient was lost to follow-up. At final follow-up, the maximum calf circumference was significantly higher than preoperatively but significantly lower than the contralateral side. The isometric plantarflexion strength in the operated leg was lower than in the uninjured one. The mean ATRS was 88. Two patients developed a superficial wound infection, both healing within 2 months from the index surgery after systemic antibiotics and local dressings. One patient developed scar adhesion to the distal wound. All patients returned to their preinjury working occupation; 22 patients returned to their preinjury level of activity at a mean of 6.7 months after surgery. This technique is minimally invasive, is safe, and allows most of the patients to return to preinjury daily and sport activities within 9 months from surgery.

  9. Achilles and patellar tendon morphology in dancers with and without tendon pain.

    PubMed

    Kulig, Kornelia; Oki, Kari C; Chang, Yu-Jen; Bashford, Gregory R

    2014-12-01

    To examine Achilles and patellar tendon morphology in dancers with and without tendon pain. Fifty-three dancers with and without Achilles and/or patellar tendon pain participated. Eleven age-matched non-dancers served as controls. Longitudinal ultrasound images of the middle and distal Achilles and proximal and distal patellar tendons were acquired. To assess macromorphology, the thickness of the middle and distal Achilles and proximal and distal patellar tendons were measured. Micromorphology was analyzed by selecting 2 x 2-mm2 regions of interest in the tendons; spectral analysis using the fast Fourier transform was run for several kernels (2 x 2-mm2 subimages) within each image, and the peak spatial frequency (PSF) was extracted. A one-way ANOVA compared asymptomatic, symptomatic, and control tendon thickness and PSF. Macromorphology: There was no significant difference between asymptomatic and symptomatic dancers in middle or distal Achilles tendon thickness and distal patellar tendon thickness. Proximal patellar tendons in control subjects were thinner than those in asymptomatic (p=0.036) and symptomatic (p=0.003) dancers. Micromorphology: There was no significant difference in PSF between asymptomatic and symptomatic dancers and controls in the Achilles or patellar tendon. Increased proximal patellar tendon thickness without changes in tendon micromorphology suggests that tendon adaptations are more likely activity-related and less likely influenced by degeneration.

  10. Eccentric training in Achilles tendinopathy: is it harmful to tendon microcirculation?

    PubMed

    Knobloch, Karsten

    2007-06-01

    Eccentric training has been shown to reduce pain and gain function in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy. However, currently no data are available regarding any potential adverse effects of an eccentric training intervention on Achilles tendon microcirculation. 59 patients (49 (12) years; body mass index 27 (5); 49 mid-portion, 10 chronic insertional tendinopathy) with 64 symptomatic (54 mid-portion, 10 insertional) Achilles tendons were prospectively enrolled. Baseline tendon microcirculation at four distinct tendon positions from the insertion to the proximal mid-portion area was assessed using a laser Doppler system for capillary blood flow, tissue oxygen saturation and postcapillary venous filling pressure. A 12-week daily painful home-based eccentric training regimen was initiated (3x15 repetitions per tendon and day). Achilles tendon capillary blood flow was significantly reduced at the insertion (by 35%, p = 0.008) and the distal mid-portion area (by 45%, p = 0.015) at 2 mm and by 22% (p = 0.007) and 13% (p = 0.122) at 8 mm tissue depths, respectively. Achilles tendon oxygen saturation was not decreased after the 12-week eccentric training regimen throughout the insertion to the proximal mid-portion area (insertion 72 (13) vs 73 (10), proximal mid-portion 63 (13) vs 62 (11), both NS). Achilles tendon postcapillary venous filling pressures were significantly reduced at the insertion (51 (16) vs 41 (19), p = 0.001) and the distal mid-portion (36 (13) vs 32 (12), p = 0.037) at 2 mm and at the insertion at 8 mm (63 (19) vs 51 (13), p = 0.0001). Pain was reduced from 5.4 (2.1) to 3.6 (2.4; p = 0.001) in the mid-portion and from 6 (2.5) to 3.2 (2.7; p = 0.002) in the insertional tendinopathy group. No Achilles tendon rupture or any interruption during the eccentric training was noted among the 59 patients. Daily eccentric training for Achilles tendinopathy is a safe and easy measure, with beneficial effects on the microcirculatory tendon levels without

  11. Surgical tip: Repair of acute Achilles rupture with Krackow suture through a 1.5 cm medial wound.

    PubMed

    Lui, T H

    2010-03-01

    Acute Achilles tendon ruptures is one of the commonest tendon injury of the foot and ankle. The management of this problem is still controversial. Treatment can be classified into non-surgical and surgical types. Surgical management can be subdivided into open repair, percutaneous with or without adjunct of arthroscopy. In compare with non-surgical management, surgical management will decrease the tendon re-rupture rate. However, the possible surgical complications including wound breakdown and sural nerve injury are still quite significant. Percutaneous repair technique has the advantage of less chance of wound breakdown, but the rate of tendon re-rupture is higher than that after open tendon repair, because the repair is usually weaker than that achieved in open repair. Lui have described an endoscopic assisted repair with the Krackow locking suture. However, the technique is complicated and six portal wounds are needed. A simpler way of applying the Krackow suture through the portal wound has been described for reattachment of Achilles tendon insertion after endoscopic calcaneoplasty. We describe a mini-open approach of Achilles tendon repair with the Krackow locking suture. By means of release of the medial edge of the investing fascia, the Achilles tendon can be mobilized easily and the Krackow locking suture can be applied through a 1.5cm medial wound. Hopefully, this can improve the strength of repair and maintaining the advantage of minimally invasive tendon repair.

  12. Human hamstring tenocytes survive when seeded into a decellularized porcine Achilles tendon extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Lohan, Anke; Stoll, Christiane; Albrecht, Marit; Denner, Andreas; John, Thilo; Krüger, Kay; Ertel, Wolfgang; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula

    2013-01-01

    Tendon ruptures and defects remain major orthopaedic challenges. Tendon healing is a time-consuming process, which results in scar tissue with an altered biomechanical competence. Using a xenogeneic tendon extracellular matrix (ECM) as a natural scaffold, which can be reseeded with autologous human tenocytes, might be a promising approach to reconstruct damaged tendons. For this purpose, the porcine Achilles (AS) tendons serving as a scaffold were histologically characterized in comparison to human cell donor tendons. AS tendons were decellularized and then reseeded with primary human hamstring tenocytes using cell centrifuging, rotating culture and cell injection techniques. Vitality testing, histology and glycosaminoglycan/DNA quantifications were performed to document the success of tendon reseeding. Porcine AS tendons were characterized by a higher cell and sulfated glycosaminoglycan content than human cell donor tendons. Complete decellularization could be achieved, but led to a wash out of sulfated glycosaminoglycans. Nevertheless, porcine tendon could be recellularized with vital human tenocytes. The recellularization led to a slight increase in cell number compared to the native tendon and some glycosaminoglycan recovery. This study indicates that porcine tendon can be de- and recellularized using adult human tenocytes. Future work should optimize cell distribution within the recellularized tendon ECM and consider tendon- and donor species-dependent differences.

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells from a hypoxic culture improve and engraft Achilles tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tung-Fu; Yew, Tu-Lai; Chiang, En-Rung; Ma, Hsiao-Li; Hsu, Chih-Yuan; Hsu, Shan-Hui; Hsu, Yuan-Tong; Hung, Shih-Chieh

    2013-05-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from humans cultured under hypoxic conditions increase bone healing capacity. Rat MSCs cultured under hypoxic conditions increase the tendon healing potential after transplantation into injured Achilles tendons. Controlled laboratory study. Biomechanical testing, histological analysis, and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling/collagen immunohistochemistry were performed to demonstrate that augmentation of an Achilles tendon rupture site with hypoxic MSCs increases healing capacity compared with normoxic MSCs and controls. Fifty Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the experiments, with 2 rats as the source of bone marrow MSCs. The cut Achilles tendons in the rats were equally divided into 3 groups: hypoxic MSC, normoxic MSC, and nontreated (vehicle control). The uncut tendons served as normal uncut controls. Outcome measures included mechanical testing in 24 rats, histological analysis, and BrdU labeling/collagen immunohistochemistry in another 24 rats. The ultimate failure load in the hypoxic MSC group was significantly greater than that in the nontreated or normoxic MSC group at 2 weeks after incision (2.1 N/mm(2) vs 1.1 N/mm(2) or 1.9 N/mm(2), respectively) and at 4 weeks after incision (5.5 N/mm(2) vs 1.7 N/mm(2) or 2.7 N/mm(2), respectively). The ultimate failure load in the hypoxic MSC group at 4 weeks after incision (5.5 N/mm(2)) was close to but still significantly less than that of the uncut tendon (7.2 N/mm(2)). Histological analysis as determined by the semiquantitative Bonar histopathological grading scale revealed that the hypoxic MSC group underwent a significant improvement in Achilles tendon healing both at 2 and 4 weeks when compared with the nontreated or normoxic MSC group via statistical analysis. Immunohistochemistry further demonstrated that the hypoxic and normoxic MSC groups had stronger immunostaining for type I and type III collagen than did the nontreated group both at 2 and 4 weeks after

  14. Radial forearm flap plus Flexor Carpi Radialis tendon in Achilles tendon reconstruction: Surgical technique, functional results, and gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Innocenti, Marco; Tani, Massimiliano; Carulli, Christian; Ghezzi, Serena; Raspanti, Andrea; Menichini, Giulio

    2015-11-01

    Wound dehiscence, infection, and necrosis of tendon and overlying skin are severe complications after open repairs of Achilles tendon. A simultaneous reconstruction should be provided in a single stage operation. We evaluated the outcomes of one of the possible options: the radial forearm free flap with Flexor Carpi Radialis (FCR) tendon. Between 2006 and 2014, six patients affected by infection and necrosis after Achilles tendon open repair underwent multi-tissutal reconstruction by a composite radial forearm free flap including a vascularized FCR tendon. The mean skin and tendon defect was respectively 9.8 cm × 4.7 cm and 6.5 cm. After reconstruction, patients underwent clinical examination, including the Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) questionnaire, DASH score, MRI study, and a computer-assisted gait analysis. All flaps survived and no complications were recorded. Full weightbearing was allowed within 2 months after surgery. The mean follow-up was 36.2 months (range 12-96). MRI showed an optimal reconstruction of the tendon. Range of motion was minimally reduced if compared to the contralateral side. Gait analysis showed the recovery of a nearly symmetrical stance phase, time to heel off, and step length of the gate. ATRS and DASH score improved to a mean value of 85.2 (range 83-88) and 8.0 (range 3-15) respectively. This procedure provided an anatomical reconstruction of the Achilles tendon and skin achieving good and objective functional results; donor site morbidity was limited to the sacrifice of the radial artery, which, in our opinion, is a minor drawback if compared to the quality of the results. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Biomechanical properties of Achilles tendon repair augmented with a bioadhesive-coated scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Brodie, Michael; Vollenweider, Laura; Murphy, John L; Xu, Fangmin; Lyman, Arinne; Lew, William D; Lee, Bruce P

    2011-01-01

    The Achilles tendon is the most frequently ruptured tendon. Both acute and chronic (neglected) tendon ruptures can dramatically affect a patient’s quality of life, and require a prolonged period of recovery before return to pre-injury activity levels. This paper describes the use of an adhesive-coated biologic scaffold to augment primary suture repair of transected Achilles tendons. The adhesive portion consisted of a synthetic mimic of mussel adhesive proteins that can adhere to various surfaces in a wet environment, including biologic tissues. When combined with biologic scaffolds such as bovine pericardium or porcine dermal tissues, these adhesive constructs demonstrated lap shear adhesive strengths significantly greater than that of fibrin glue, while reaching up to 60% of the strength of a cyanoacrylate-based adhesive. These adhesive constructs were wrapped around transected cadaveric porcine Achilles tendons repaired with a combination of parallel and three-loop suture patterns. Tensile mechanical testing of the augmented repairs exhibited significantly higher stiffness (22–34%), failure load (24–44%), and energy to failure (27–63%) when compared to control tendons with suture repair alone. Potential clinical implications of this novel adhesive biomaterial are discussed. PMID:21266745

  16. Therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells to treat Achilles tendon injuries.

    PubMed

    Vieira, M H C; Oliveira, R J; Eça, L P M; Pereira, I S O; Hermeto, L C; Matuo, R; Fernandes, W S; Silva, R A; Antoniolli, A C M B

    2014-12-12

    Rupture of the Achilles tendon diminishes quality of life. The gold-standard therapy is a surgical suture, but this presents complications, including wound formation and inflammation. These complications spurred evaluation of the therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from adipose tissue. New Zealand rabbits were divided into 6 groups (three treatments with two time points each) evaluated at either 14 or 28 days after surgery: cross section of the Achilles tendon (CSAT); CSAT + Suture; and CSAT + MSC. A comparison between all groups at both time points showed a statistically significant increase in capillaries and in the structural organization of collagen in the healed tendon in the CSAT + Suture and CSAT + MSC groups at the 14-day assessment. Comparison between the two time points within the same group showed a statistically significant decrease in the inflammatory process and an increase in the structural organization of collagen in the CSAT and CSAT + MSC groups. A study of the genomic integrity of the cells suggested a linear correlation between an increase of injuries and culture time. Thus, MSC transplantation is a good alternative for treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures because it may be conducted without surgery and tendon suture and, therefore, has no risk of adverse effects resulting from the surgical wound or inflammation caused by nonabsorbable sutures. Furthermore, this alternative treatment exhibits a better capacity for wound healing and maintaining the original tendon architecture, depending on the arrangement of the collagen fibers, and has important therapeutic potential.

  17. Augmentation of Achilles tendon repair with extracellular matrix xenograft: a biomechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Magnussen, Robert A; Glisson, Richard R; Moorman, Claude T

    2011-07-01

    Achilles tendon rupture is a frequent injury in athletes and the general public. Cases of chronic rupture or poor tendon quality secondary to tendinopathy are challenging to repair primarily. Commercially available extracellular matrix materials have been utilized in recent years to augment tendon repair. Augmentation of Achilles tendon with extracellular matrix xenograft results in reduced repair site gapping and increased peak failure load in a cadaveric model featuring simulated physiologic loads. Controlled laboratory study. Ten matched pairs of fresh-frozen human lower extremities amputated just below the knee were obtained and each Achilles tendon was sharply tenotomized. One randomly selected specimen from each matched pair underwent Achilles repair using a 4-strand Krackow technique with extracellular matrix xenograft augmentation (TissueMend Soft Tissue Repair Matrix), while the opposite tendon underwent suture repair alone as a control. Each tendon was then subjected to 1000 sinusoidal tensile loading cycles to 86 N during which repair site gapping was monitored, followed by distraction to failure. One pair was used to evaluate the effects of graft orientation and not included in the analysis. Significantly less gapping was noted in the augmented tendon group at all time points after the 10th load cycle (P < .05). The mean repair site gapping after 1000 cycles of loading was 4.0 mm (range, 3.1-5.0 mm) in the augmented group and 6.5 mm (range, 4.1-8.6 mm) in the suture-only group. The ultimate failure load was 821 N (range, 613-1021 N) in the augmented group and 392 N (range, 322-481 N) in the suture-only group (P < .01). The augmentation of Achilles tendon repair with extracellular matrix xenograft decreases gapping and increases load to failure immediately after surgery in a cadaveric model. Tendon repair augmentation may allow more aggressive early rehabilitation, particularly in cases of chronic rupture or poor tendon quality. Further work is necessary

  18. Immediate weight bearing after modified percutaneous Achilles tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vishal C; Chandrakant, Vishal; Lozano-Calderon, Santiago; McWilliam, James

    2012-12-01

    Controversy exists regarding postoperative treatment of Achilles tendon repair. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of immediate weight bearing following modified percutaneous Achilles tendon repair using readily available materials. Fifty-two patients who were treated at a single center from 2000 to 2009 underwent percutaneous Achilles tendon repair by a single surgeon and were allowed immediate weight bearing. They were followed for on average of 2 years postoperatively and evaluated with functional and subjective outcomes. The average American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot scale was 96 points (range, 81 to 100), with 95% confidence interval ranging from 89.1 to 102.9. Subjective evaluation demonstrated that 47 patients (90%) were able to return to a desired level of activity, with an overall complication rate of 11.5%. Immediate weight bearing after percutaneous Achilles tendon repair had a low overall complication rate with good clinical and functional outcomes.

  19. The role of tendon microcirculation in Achilles and patellar tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Knobloch, Karsten

    2008-04-30

    Tendinopathy is of distinct interest as it describes a painful tendon disease with local tenderness, swelling and pain associated with sonographic features such as hypoechogenic texture and diameter enlargement. Recent research elucidated microcirculatory changes in tendinopathy using laser Doppler flowmetry and spectrophotometry such as at the Achilles tendon, the patellar tendon as well as at the elbow and the wrist level. Tendon capillary blood flow is increased at the point of pain. Tendon oxygen saturation as well as tendon postcapillary venous filling pressures, determined non-invasively using combined Laser Doppler flowmetry and spectrophotometry, can quantify, in real-time, how tendon microcirculation changes over with pathology or in response to a given therapy. Tendon oxygen saturation can be increased by repetitive, intermittent short-term ice applications in Achilles tendons; this corresponds to 'ischemic preconditioning', a method used to train tissue to sustain ischemic damage. On the other hand, decreasing tendon oxygenation may reflect local acidosis and deteriorating tendon metabolism. Painful eccentric training, a common therapy for Achilles, patellar, supraspinatus and wrist tendinopathy decreases abnormal capillary tendon flow without compromising local tendon oxygenation. Combining an Achilles pneumatic wrap with eccentric training changes tendon microcirculation in a different way than does eccentric training alone; both approaches reduce pain in Achilles tendinopathy. The microcirculatory effects of measures such as extracorporeal shock wave therapy as well as topical nitroglycerine application are to be studied in tendinopathy as well as the critical question of dosage and maintenance. Interestingly it seems that injection therapy using color Doppler for targeting the area of neovascularisation yields to good clinical results with polidocanol sclerosing therapy, but also with a combination of epinephrine and lidocaine.

  20. Ultrasonic evaluations of Achilles tendon mechanical properties poststroke.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Heng; Ren, Yupeng; Wu, Yi-Ning; Liu, Shu Q; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2009-03-01

    Spasticity, contracture, and muscle weakness are commonly observed poststroke in muscles crossing the ankle. However, it is not clear how biomechanical properties of the Achilles tendon change poststroke, which may affect functions of the impaired muscles directly. Biomechanical properties of the Achilles tendon, including the length and cross-sectional area, in the impaired and unimpaired sides of 10 hemiparetic stroke survivors were evaluated using ultrasonography. Elongation of the Achilles tendon during controlled isometric ramp-and-hold and ramping up then down contractions was determined using a block-matching method. Biomechanical changes in stiffness, Young's modulus, and hysteresis of the Achilles tendon poststroke were investigated by comparing the impaired and unimpaired sides of the 10 patients. The impaired side showed increased tendon length (6%; P = 0.04), decreased stiffness (43%; P < 0.001), decreased Young's modulus (38%; P = 0.005), and increased mechanical hysteresis (1.9 times higher; P < 0.001) compared with the unimpaired side, suggesting Achilles tendon adaptations to muscle spasticity, contracture, and/or disuse poststroke. In vivo quantitative characterizations of the tendon biomechanical properties may help us better understand changes of the calf muscle-tendon unit as a whole and facilitate development of more effective treatments.

  1. Ultrasonic evaluations of Achilles tendon mechanical properties poststroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Heng; Ren, Yupeng; Wu, Yi-Ning; Liu, Shu Q.; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2009-01-01

    Spasticity, contracture, and muscle weakness are commonly observed poststroke in muscles crossing the ankle. However, it is not clear how biomechanical properties of the Achilles tendon change poststroke, which may affect functions of the impaired muscles directly. Biomechanical properties of the Achilles tendon, including the length and cross-sectional area, in the impaired and unimpaired sides of 10 hemiparetic stroke survivors were evaluated using ultrasonography. Elongation of the Achilles tendon during controlled isometric ramp-and-hold and ramping up then down contractions was determined using a block-matching method. Biomechanical changes in stiffness, Young's modulus, and hysteresis of the Achilles tendon poststroke were investigated by comparing the impaired and unimpaired sides of the 10 patients. The impaired side showed increased tendon length (6%; P = 0.04), decreased stiffness (43%; P < 0.001), decreased Young's modulus (38%; P = 0.005), and increased mechanical hysteresis (1.9 times higher; P < 0.001) compared with the unimpaired side, suggesting Achilles tendon adaptations to muscle spasticity, contracture, and/or disuse poststroke. In vivo quantitative characterizations of the tendon biomechanical properties may help us better understand changes of the calf muscle-tendon unit as a whole and facilitate development of more effective treatments. PMID:19118156

  2. Quadriceps tendon allografts as an alternative to Achilles tendon allografts: a biomechanical comparison.

    PubMed

    Mabe, Isaac; Hunter, Shawn

    2014-12-01

    Quadriceps tendon with a patellar bone block may be a viable alternative to Achilles tendon for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) if it is, at a minimum, a biomechanically equivalent graft. The objective of this study was to directly compare the biomechanical properties of quadriceps tendon and Achilles tendon allografts. Quadriceps and Achilles tendon pairs from nine research-consented donors were tested. All specimens were processed to reduce bioburden and terminally sterilized by gamma irradiation. Specimens were subjected to a three phase uniaxial tension test performed in a custom environmental chamber to maintain the specimens at a physiologic temperature (37 ± 2 °C) and misted with a 0.9 % NaCl solution. There were no statistical differences in seven of eight structural and mechanical between the two tendon types. Quadriceps tendons exhibited a significantly higher displacement at maximum load and significantly lower stiffness than Achilles tendons. The results of this study indicated a biomechanical equivalence of aseptically processed, terminally sterilized quadriceps tendon grafts with bone block to Achilles tendon grafts with bone block. The significantly higher displacement at maximum load, and lower stiffness observed for quadriceps tendons may be related to the failure mode. Achilles tendons had a higher bone avulsion rate than quadriceps tendons (86 % compared to 12 %, respectively). This was likely due to observed differences in bone block density between the two tendon types. This research supports the use of quadriceps tendon allografts in lieu of Achilles tendon allografts for ACL-R.

  3. Effect of the Position of Immobilization Upon the Tensile Properties in Injured Achilles Tendon of Rat

    PubMed Central

    Min, Yong; Kwon, Young-Bae; Lee, Min-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of the posture of immobilization upon the tensile properties in injured Achilles tendon of rat for an initial period of immobilization. Methods Forty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were used in the present study. Eighteen rats received a total tenotomy of the right Achilles tendon to mimic total rupture and were divided into three groups comprising of 6 rats each. Ankles of group A were immobilized at 60° of plantarflexion. Ankles of group B were immobilized at neutral position. Whereas, those of group C were immobilized at 60° of dorsiflexion. Other 18 rats received hemitenotomy to mimic partial rupture and were divided into three groups. The remaining 6 rats were kept free as control. After 14 days, we dissected the tendons and analyzed maximum force, stiffness, and energy uptake during pulling of the tendons until they ruptured. The tendons of 6 rats in each group and control were reserved for histology. Picrosirius staining was done for the analysis of collagen organization. Results In total tenotomy, tensile properties were significantly different between the control and the intervention groups (p<0.05). Group C showed relatively higher values than the groups A and B with respect to tensile properties (p>0.05). In partial tenotomy, tensile properties were significantly different between the control and the intervention groups (p<0.05). Group C showed significantly higher value than other intervention groups in terms of maximum force and energy uptake (p<0.05). The semiquantitative histologic grading scores were assigned for collagen organization. The scores for dorsiflexion posture were higher than the ones for plantarflexion. Conclusion Dorsiflexion posture in partial ruptured Achilles tendon showed better functional recovery than other immobilized postures. In total ruptured case, the tensile properties showed increasing tendency in dorsiflexion posture. PMID:23525566

  4. The traumatic rupture of the Achilles’ tendon – an analysis of the modern methods of evaluation and treatment

    PubMed Central

    BARDAŞ, CIPRIAN; BENEA, HOREA; MARTIN, ARTUR; TOMOAIA, GHEORGHE

    2013-01-01

    Aims The main aim of this article is an analysis of both advantages and disadvantages of the modern solutions of treatment – percutaneous surgery, in comparison with the classic methods of treatments described in the surgery of Achilles’ tendon. Patients and method The study was conducted on 23 patients admitted to the Orthopedics and Traumatology Clinic of Cluj-Napoca between January 2011–June 2012. Nineteen (19) patients were diagnosed with a complete rupture of the Achilles tendon and 4 patients with a partial rupture. The diagnosis of traumatic Achilles tendon ruptures was usually clinical, the Ultrasound (common or 3D) and the MRI confirmed the lesion and determined its location and extension. We analyzed the diagnostic methods, the elapsed time before surgery, the treatment options depending on lesion’s location, technical difficulties, costs, postoperative care, the average healing time, complications. Results The Ultrasound was performed in 65.2% of the patients (15 patients) for confirming the extension of the lesion and it served for pre-operative planning. In most of the cases, the classical methods of Achilles tendon reconstruction were used (18 cases). The complications rate was about 8%. We diagnosed an iterative Achilles tendon rupture (the patient was initially treated using the percutaneous methods) and a delay in cicatrisation. Conclusions The percutaneous surgical techniques are a viable alternative for the acute ruptures of Achilles tendon, the classic intervention has clear indications in lesions diagnosed late, in the recurrent tendon ruptures. PMID:26527933

  5. Structural integrity is decreased in both Achilles tendons in people with unilateral Achilles tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Docking, Sean I; Rosengarten, Samuel D; Daffy, John; Cook, Jill

    2015-07-01

    A high proportion of Achilles tendinopathy patients develop bilateral symptoms with human and animal studies showing bilateral histological changes associated with overuse/pathology in one tendon. The current study examined changes in tendon structure, assessed semi-quantitatively using ultrasound tissue characterisation, in both the symptomatic and asymptomatic tendon in unilateral Achilles tendinopathy patients in comparison to individuals with no history of tendinopathy. Cross-sectional case-control study. Participants with Achilles tendinopathy (n=21), with varying severity and length of clinical symptoms, and six participants with no history of tendinopathy were recruited. Tendons were scanned using ultrasound tissue characterisation, which captures contiguous transverse ultrasound images every 0.2mm and renders a 3-dimensional image. Ultrasound tissue characterisation quantifies tendon structure by measuring the stability of echopattern over contiguous transverse images. Four echo-types were discriminated and expressed as a percentage. Antero-posterior diameter of all tendons was measured. Significant differences were observed in the proportion of normal tendon structure between all three groups (p<0.01), with the symptomatic tendon containing the least amount of normal tendon structure (symptomatic - 79.5%, asymptomatic - 81.8%, control - 86.4%). The asymptomatic tendon contained significantly less normal tendon in comparison to the control tendon (p=0.008), suggesting the asymptomatic tendon is structurally compromised despite the absence of symptoms. Both Achilles tendons are structurally compromised in patients with unilateral Achilles tendinopathy. Future studies need to investigate whether these changes increase the risk of developing symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Achilles Tendon Loading During Heel-Raising and -Lowering Exercises.

    PubMed

    Revak, Andrew; Diers, Keith; Kernozek, Thomas W; Gheidi, Naghmeh; Olbrantz, Christina

    2017-02-01

    Achilles tendinopathies are common injuries during sport participation, although men are more prone to Achilles tendon injuries than women. Heel-raising and -lowering exercises are typically suggested for Achilles tendon rehabilitation. To compare the estimated Achilles tendon loading variables and the ankle range of motion (ROM) using a musculoskeletal model during commonly performed heel-raising and -lowering exercises. Controlled laboratory study. University biomechanics laboratory. Twenty-one healthy men (age = 21.59 ± 1.92 years, height = 178.22 ± 8.02 cm, mass = 75.81 ± 11.24 kg). Each participant completed 4 exercises: seated heel raising and lowering, bilateral standing heel raising and lowering, bilateral heel raising and unilateral lowering, and unilateral heel raising and lowering. A repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance (α = .05) was used to compare Achilles tendon stress, force, and strain and ankle ROM for each exercise. Kinematic data were recorded at 180 Hz with 15 motion-analysis cameras synchronized with kinetic data collected from a force platform sampled at 1800 Hz. These data were then entered in a musculoskeletal model to estimate force in the triceps surae. For each participant, we determined Achilles tendon stress by measuring cross-sectional images using ultrasound. Peak Achilles tendon loading was lowest when performing the seated heel-raising and -lowering exercise and highest when performing the unilateral heel-raising and -lowering exercise. Loading was greater for the unilateral exercise or portions of the exercise that were performed unilaterally. Bilateral and seated exercises with less weight-bearing force resulted in less Achilles tendon loading. These exercises may serve as progressions during the rehabilitation process before full-body weight-bearing, unilateral exercises are allowed. Ankle ROM did not follow the same order as loading and may need additional monitoring or instruction during rehabilitation.

  7. A novel postoperative immobilization model for murine Achilles tendon sutures.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Yoichiro; Takayama, Yuzo; Kushige, Hiroko; Jacinto, Sandra; Sekido, Mitsuru; Kida, Yasuyuki S

    2016-08-01

    The body's motion and function are all in part effected by a vital tissue, the tendon. Tendon injury often results in limited functioning after postoperative procedures and even for a long time after rehabilitation. Although numerous studies have reported surgical procedures using animal models which have contributed to both basic and clinical research, modeling of tendon sutures or postoperative immobilizations has not been performed on small experimental animals, such as mice. In this study we have developed an easy Achilles tendon suture and postoperative ankle fixation model in a mouse. Right Achilles tendons were incised and 10-0 nylons were passed through the proximal and distal ends using a modified Kessler method. Subsequently, the right ankle was immobilized in a plantarflexed position with novel splints, which were made from readily available extension tubes. Restriction of the tendon using handmade splints reduced swelling, as opposed to fixating with the usual plaster of Paris. Using this method, the usage of the right Achilles tendons began on postoperative days 13.5 ± 4.6, which indicated healing within two weeks. Therefore our simple short-term murine Achilles tendon suture procedure is useful for studying immediate tendon repair mechanisms in various models, including genetically-modified mice. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. [Vacuum sealing drainage combined with discontinuous windowing technique for repairing large area exposed wound of Achilles tendon].

    PubMed

    Che, Yong-qi; Zhao, Jian-qiang; Zhai, Wei; Wang, Wen-liang; Wang, Jun-cheng; Kang, Xiang-hui

    2015-12-01

    To explore clinical effect of vacuum sealing drainage (VSD) combined with discontinuous windowing technique for repairing large area exposed wounds of Achilles tendon. From July 2009 to May 2014, 11 patients with large exposed wounds of Achilles tendon were treated, including 5 males and 6 females with an average age of 43 years old (aged from 7 to 65 years old). Among them, 4 cases were skin necrosis caused by heavy objects abrasion and contusion; 3 cases were caused by distal tibiofibula fractures; 3 cases were caused by bicycle-spoke injuries; 1 case was caused by diabetes. Areas of exposed Achilles tendon were from 6 cmx3 cm to 14 cmx5 cm without tendon rupture or bone exposed. After debridement, discontinuous fenestration on Achilles tendon was made by knife blade parallel with longitudinal axis of Achilles tendon, combined with Vacuum Sealing Drainage (VSD) treatment. After drainage treatment with one VSD cycle (5 to 7 days), abundant fresh granulation tissues were growing on all wounds and survived well after the second phase dermatoplasty. All patients were followed up for 12 to 24 months, the color of skin flap was good, the texture was soft without burst. At 3 to 4 months after operation, subcutaneous fat was appeared under the flap, the skin was sliding, movement of ankle joints was good. No delayed Achilles tendon rupture were occurred. Vacuum sealing drainage (VSD) combined with discontinuous fenestration is a simple, safe and effective method for repairing large area exposed wounds of Achilles tendon,which could minimize the secondary damage caused by wounds of skin flap grafting.

  9. 2D motion analysis of rabbits after Achilles tendon rupture repair and histological analysis of extracted tendons: can the number of animals be reduced by operating both hind legs simultaneously?

    PubMed

    Buschmann, Johanna; Müller, Angela; Nicholls, Flora; Achermann, Rita; Bürgisser, Gabriella Meier; Baumgartner, Walter; Calcagni, Maurizio; Giovanoli, Pietro

    2013-10-01

    Considering the 3Rs principle in animal experiments, there is a demand to perform research experiments with the fewest number of animals possible while warranting the welfare of the animals. Orthopaedic experimental studies involving operations on the hind legs of rabbits are either performed on one hind leg with the second hind leg serving as control or on both hind legs simultaneously (control: rabbits with no operations at all). The Achilles tendon of rabbits was transected and sutured, and the two-dimensional motion pattern of animals having only one leg operated was compared to rabbits having both hind legs operated (control: non-treated animals). Step length, maximum ankle angle, minimum ankle angle and the resulting range of motion of both hind legs were determined weekly over a time span from 3 weeks to 12 weeks post-operation. The results were fitted by a linear mixed effects model including time dependency. Moreover, all tendon specimen were analysed histologically. Tenocyte and tenoblast density, tenocyte and tenoblast nuclei width, inflammation level and collagen fibre alignment were determined. Statistically significant differences in the motion pattern were found when one-leg treated and two-leg treated animals were compared. However, the absolute differences were on average less than 20%. Histologically, 1-leg treated animals had tendon tissue with higher cell density, but lower inflammation and less ondulated collagen fibres compared to 2-leg treated animals; the nuclei width was the same for both groups. With regard to welfare, all animals were fine during the experiments. While comparative studies should be performed with one-leg treated animals due to interaction effects, for proof-of-principle studies, operating two legs per animal may be justified as the welfare of the animals is warranted. This is a great benefit in the sense of the 3Rs because up to 50% of animals can be spared. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Achilles tendon biomechanics in response to acute intense exercise.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Michael F; Lillie, Kurtis R; Bergeron, Daniel J; Cota, Kevin C; Yoon, Joseph S; Kraemer, William J; Denegar, Craig R

    2014-05-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a common disorder and is more prevalent in men. Although differences in tendon mechanics between men and women have been reported, understanding of tendon mechanics in young active people is limited. Moreover, there is limited understanding of changes in tendon mechanics in response to acute exercise. Our purpose was to compare Achilles tendon mechanics in active young adult men and women at rest and after light and strenuous activity in the form of repeated jumping with an added load. Participants consisted of 17 men and 14 women (18-30 years) who were classified as being at least moderately physically active as defined by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Tendon force/elongation measures were obtained during an isometric plantarflexion contraction on an isokinetic dynamometer with simultaneous ultrasound imaging of the Achilles tendon approximate to the soleus myotendinous junction. Data were collected at rest, after a 10-minute treadmill walk, and after a fatigue protocol of 100 toe jumps performed in a Smith machine, with a load equaling 20% of body mass. We found greater tendon elongation, decreased stiffness, and lower Young's modulus only in women after the jumping exercise. Force and stress were not different between groups but decreased subsequent to the jumping exercise bout. In general, women had greater elongation and strain, less stiffness, and a lower Young's modulus during plantarflexor contraction. These data demonstrate differences in tendon mechanics between men and women and suggest a potential protective mechanism explaining the lower incidence of Achilles tendinopathy in women.

  11. Non-surgical treatment of Achilles rupture: Does duration in functional weight bearing orthosis matter?

    PubMed

    Aujla, Randeep; Kumar, Amit; Bhatia, Maneesh

    2016-12-01

    The treatment of acute Achilles tendon ruptures is continually being debated. The success of non-surgical regimes is now evident yet there remains a high rate of surgery in the United States of America and Scandinavia. Recent studies have investigated functional outcome rather than complication rates as primary outcome but the current data are still sparse. We aimed to investigate whether there is any difference in functional outcomes between two dynamic regimes of differing durations for acute Achilles tendon ruptures. The patients in the two groups were matched for age, gender, follow-up duration and mechanism of injury. Forty-four patients were managed in a regime of 11 weeks and another 44 patients for 8 weeks. Demographics, injury details, complications and functional outcome were recorded. The validated Achilles Tendon Rupture Score (ATRS) was used to assess functional outcomes. Minimum follow-up was 1 year. The 11-week group had a mean age of 50.8 years (range: 27-80) with 36 (82%) males. The 8-week group had a mean age of 52.0 years (range: 32-77) with 36 (82%) males. The mean ATRS for the 11-week group was 76.0 (range: 8-100). The mean ATRS for the 8-week group was 76.1 (range: 30-100). There were no re-ruptures in the 11-week group and one in the 8-week group. There were three episodes of venous thromboembolism in the 11-week group and four in the 8-week group. A reduction in duration of dynamic rehabilitation for non-operative treatment of Achilles tendon rupture from 11 weeks to 8 weeks does not lead to a significant detriment in functional outcomes or complication rates. Copyright © 2015 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A composite medial plantar flap for the repair of an achilles' tendon defect: a case report.

    PubMed

    Dumont, C E; Kessler, J

    2001-12-01

    The surgical management of infected necrosis of the Achilles' tendon and overlying skin is very demanding, and reconstruction with vascularized tendon and skin flaps is considered the benchmark procedure. The authors report a 65-year-old man who sustained a chronic wound after operative repair of a chronic rupture of the Achilles' tendon. A pedicled medial plantar flap including the surrounding vascularized plantar aponeurosis was elevated. The plantar aponeurosis was split and used to bridge the 4-cm-long tendon defect. The flap donor site was covered with a thin skin graft. The flap survived completely without recurrence of the infection. At the 7-month follow-up, the reconstructed Achilles' tendon showed a good functional result and a normal range of dorsi- and plantar flexion of the foot. This technique is of great interest in comparison with free flaps because it does not require vascular anastomosis in a septic environment or a secondary debulking operation, yet it still provides both vascularized tendon and skin graft.

  13. Real-time sonoelastography as novel follow-up method in Achilles tendon surgery.

    PubMed

    Busilacchi, A; Olivieri, M; Ulisse, S; Gesuita, R; Skrami, E; Lording, T; Fusini, F; Gigante, A

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the sonoelastographic features of Achilles tendon healing after percutaneous treatment using real-time sonoelastography, a new tool able to quantify deformation in biological tissues. Patients with atraumatic Achilles tendon ruptures, treated with a percutaneous technique, were assessed. Sonoelastographic evaluations were performed at the myotendinous junction, tendon body/lesion site and osteotendinous junction, both for the operated and contralateral side, at 40 days, 6 months and 1 year after surgery. Using standard regions of interest, the "strain index" (SI) was calculated as an indicator of tendon elasticity. Clinical outcomes were assessed by the ATRS questionnaire at 6 months and 1 year post-operatively and correlated with sonoelastographic findings. Sixty healthy tendons from 30 volunteers were used to provide a healthy control range. Twenty-five patients were recruited for this study. The SI in treated tendons showed progressive stiffening over time, especially at myotendinous junction and at the site of the sutured lesion, resulting in significantly higher stiffness than both the contralateral tendon and healthy volunteers. Peak thickness of treated tendons occurred at 6 months, with a tendency to reduce at 1 year, while never achieving a normal physiological state. Greatest remodelling was seen at the lesion site. The contralateral tendon showed significant thickening at the myotendinous and osteotendinous junctions. The SI of the contralateral tendon was found to be stiffer than physiological values found in the control group. ATRS score improved significantly between 6 months and 1 year, being negatively correlated with the SI (p < 0.001). RTSE showed that operatively treated Achilles tendons become progressively stiffer during follow-up, while the ATRS score improved. From a biomechanical point of view, at 1 year after surgery Achilles tendons did not show a "restitutio ad integrum". Real-time sonoelastography provides more

  14. Can platelet-rich plasma have a role in Achilles tendon surgical repair?

    PubMed

    De Carli, Angelo; Lanzetti, Riccardo Maria; Ciompi, Alessandro; Lupariello, Domenico; Vadalà, Antonio; Argento, Giuseppe; Ferretti, Andrea; Vulpiani, M C; Vetrano, M

    2016-07-01

    Our hypothesis was that the Achilles tendon healing process after surgical treatment would be promoted by PRP with a faster return to sports activities. Thirty patients with Achilles tendon rupture and surgically treated with a combined mini-open and percutaneous technique were prospectively enroled in the study. Patients were alternately case-by-case assigned to Group A (control group; 15 patients) or Group B (study group; 15 patients). In Group B, PRP was locally infiltrated both during surgery and 14 days after surgery. Patients in both groups were followed up at 1, 3, 6 and 24 months post-operatively via physical examination, VAS, FAOS and VISA-A scales; ultrasonography (US) and MRI were also conducted at one and 6 months; at the 6-month follow-up, isokinetic and jumping capacity tests were also performed. The VAS, FAOS and VISA-A scale showed no difference between the two groups at 1, 3, 6 and 24 months post-operatively. Isokinetic evaluation showed no differences at both angular speeds. Jumping evaluation showed no difference at 6 months. Also US evaluation showed no differences. MRI data analysis before administration of gadolinium did not reveal significant differences between the two groups. Moreover, after intravenous injection of gadolinium, patients in Group B showed signal enhancement in 30 % of patients compared to 80 % in Group A at 6 months, as indirect evidence of better tendon remodelling (P < 0.05). A substantial equivalence in structural and functional results in Achilles tendon ruptures surgically treated with and without addition of PRP is shown by present study. Clinical results, morphological features and jumping capability were similar in both groups. The addition of PRP to the surgical treatment of Achilles tendon rupture does not appear to offer superior clinical and functional results. IV.

  15. [Achilles tendon xanthoma imaging on ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Eloy de Ávila; Santos, Eduardo Henrique Sena; Tucunduva, Tatiana Cardoso de Mello; Ferrari, Antonio J L; Fernandes, Artur da Rocha Correa

    2015-01-01

    The Achilles tendon xanthoma is a rare disease and has a high association with primary hyperlipidemia. An early diagnosis is essential to start treatment and change the disease course. Imaging exams can enhance diagnosis. This study reports the case of a 60-year-old man having painless nodules on his elbows and Achilles tendons without typical gout crisis, followed in the microcrystalline disease clinic of Unifesp for diagnostic workup. Laboratory tests obtained showed dyslipidemia. The ultrasound (US) showed a diffuse Achilles tendon thickening with hypoechoic areas. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a diffuse tendon thickening with intermediate signal areas, and a reticulate pattern within. Imaging studies showed relevant aspects to diagnose a xanthoma, thus helping in the differential diagnosis.

  16. Functional outcomes of repair of Achilles tendon using a biological open surgical method.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Armağan; Çepni, Serdar Kamil; Sahinkaya, Türker; May, Cüneyt; Mutlu, Harun; Parmaksızoğlu, Atilla Sancar

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the mid-term functional outcomes of ankles following biological open Achilles tendon repair and early postoperative mobilization. The study retrospectively evaluated 22 male patients who underwent one-sided biological open Achilles tendon repair. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot score, isokinetic muscle strength and endurance tests and active angle reproduction test at 15° of dorsiflexion and 20° of plantarflexion of the injured and uninjured sides were measured and compared. Mean age was 38.6 years and mean follow-up was 33.7 months. One patient had rerupture following a blunt trauma 1 month after operation. No other complication was seen. Mean AOFAS hindfoot score was 97.9 (range: 90 to 100). Peak isokinetic torque at 30°/sec (isokinetic muscle strength) and total work at 120°/sec (isokinetic muscle endurance) did not significantly differ between the operated and uninjured ankles. Proprioceptive evaluation with active angle reproduction test at 15°of dorsiflexion and 20° of plantarflexion was similar between the two sides. Biological open Achilles tendon repair with early postoperative mobilization appears to be a convenient intervention for acute Achilles tendon rupture in active young patients. Treatment results in low complication rates and restores ankle strength, endurance and position sense.

  17. Tendon Mineralization Is Progressive and Associated with Deterioration of Tendon Biomechanical Properties, and Requires BMP-Smad Signaling in the Mouse Achilles Tendon Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kairui; Asai, Shuji; Hast, Michael W.; Liu, Min; Usami, Yu; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Soslowsky, Louis J.; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2016-01-01

    Ectopic tendon mineralization can develop following tendon rupture or trauma surgery. The pathogenesis of ectopic tendon mineralization and its clinical impact have not been fully elucidated yet. In this study, we utilized a mouse Achilles tendon injury model to determine whether ectopic tendon mineralization alters the biomechanical properties of the tendon and whether BMP signaling is involved in this condition. A complete transverse incision was made at the midpoint of the right Achilles tendon in 8-week-old CD1 mice and the gap was left open. Ectopic cartilaginous mass formation was found in the injured tendon by 4 weeks post-surgery and ectopic mineralization was detected at 8–10 weeks post-surgery. Ectopic mineralization grew over time and volume of the mineralized materials of 25-weeks samples was about 2.5 fold bigger than that of 10-weeks samples, indicating that injury-induced ectopic tendon mineralization is progressive. In vitro mechanical testing showed that max force, max stress and mid-substance modulus in the 25-weeks samples were significantly lower than the 10-weeks samples. We observed substantial increases in expression of bone morphogenetic protein family genes in injured tendons 1 week post-surgery. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that phosphorylation of both Smad1 and Smad3 were highly increased in injured tendons as early as 1 week post-injury and remained high in ectopic chondrogenic lesions 4 weeks post-injury. Treatment with the BMP receptor kinase inhibitor (LDN193189) significantly inhibited injury-induced tendon mineralization. These findings indicate that injury-induced ectopic tendon mineralization is progressive, involves BMP signaling and associated with deterioration of tendon biomechanical properties. PMID:26825318

  18. The Effect of Sodium Hyaluronate on Ligamentation and Biomechanical Property of Tendon in Repair of Achilles Tendon Defect with Polyethylene Terephthalate Artificial Ligament: A Rabbit Tendon Repair Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengkun; Jiang, Jia; Chen, Shiyi

    2016-01-01

    The Achilles tendon is the most common ruptured tendon of human body. Reconstruction with polyethylene terephthalate (PET) artificial ligament is recommended in some serious cases. Sodium hyaluronate (HA) is beneficial for the healing of tendon injuries. We aimed to determine the effect of sodium hyaluronate in repair of Achilles tendon defect with PET artificial ligament in an animal tendon repair model. Sixteen New Zealand White rabbits were divided into two groups. Eight rabbits repaired with PET were assigned to PET group; the other eight rabbits repaired with PET along with injection of HE were assigned to HA-PET group. All rabbits were sacrificed at 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively for biomechanical and histological examination. The HA-PET group revealed higher biomechanical property compared with the PET group. Histologically, more collagen tissues grew into the HA-PET group compared with PET group. In conclusion, application of sodium hyaluronate can improve the healing of Achilles tendon reconstruction with polyethylene terephthalate artificial ligament. PMID:28105436

  19. Endoscopy-assisted percutaneous repair of acute Achilles tendon tears.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chih-Hao; Yeh, Wen-Lin; Tsai, Min-Chien; Chang, Shih-Sheng; Hsu, Kuo-Yao; Chan, Yi-Sheng

    2013-08-01

    We developed a technique for endoscopy-assisted percutaneous repair of acute Achilles tendon tears. Nineteen patients with acute Achilles tendon tears were prospectively recruited into the study. All patients (18 male, 1 female) had sports-related injuries. Preoperative diagnosis was made from patient history, physical examination, and sonography. The average patient age was 38.7 years, and follow-up averaged 24 months. All patients received endoscopy-assisted percutaneous Achilles tendon repair with modified Bunnell sutures passed by bird beak and No. 5 Ethibond under direct visualization using 4.0-mm arthroscopy. Results were evaluated by physical examination, sonography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). All 19 patients achieved tendon healing. All patients were evaluated by sonography, and the tendons of 16 patients were imaged using MRI to evaluate the extent of healing. Final dorsiflexion was 16 degrees and plantar flexion 26 degrees, and 95% of the patients (18/19) returned to their previous level of sporting activity. One patient developed a superficial infection, and 2 patients had postoperative sural nerve injury with numbness for 1 month. There were no other major complications. Endoscopy-assisted percutaneous repair of the Achilles tendon allowed good tendon healing and return to sports at 6 months. Sural nerve injury during surgery was a potential complication of this procedure. Level IV, retrospective case series.

  20. Tendon end separation with loading in an Achilles tendon repair model: comparison of non-absorbable vs. absorbable sutures.

    PubMed

    Carmont, Michael R; Kuiper, Jan Herman; Grävare Silbernagel, Karin; Karlsson, Jón; Nilsson-Helander, Katarina

    2017-12-01

    Rupture of the Achilles tendon often leads to long-term morbidity, particularly calf weakness associated with tendon elongation. Operative repair of Achilles tendon ruptures leads to reduced tendon elongation. Tendon lengthening is a key problem in the restoration of function following Achilles tendon rupture. A study was performed to determine differences in initial separation, strength and failure characteristics of differing sutures and numbers of core strands in a percutaneous Achilles tendon repair model in response to initial loading. Nineteen bovine Achilles tendons were repaired using a percutaneous/minimally invasive technique with a combination of a modified Bunnell suture proximally and a Kessler suture distally, using non-absorbable 4-strand 6-strand repairs and absorbable 8-strand sutures. Specimens were then cyclically loaded using phases of 10 cycles of 100 N, 100 cycles of 100 N, 100 cycles of 190 N consistent with early range of motion training and weight-bearing, before being loaded to failure. Pre-conditioning of 10 cycles of 100 N resulted in separations of 4 mm for 6-strand, 5.9 mm for 4-strand, but 11.5 mm in 8-strand repairs, this comprised 48.5, 68.6 and 72.7% of the separation that occurred after 100 cycles of 100 N. The tendon separation after the third phase of 100 cycles of 190 N was 17.4 mm for 4-strand repairs, 16.6 mm for 6-strand repairs and 26.6 mm for 8-strand repairs. There were significant differences between the groups (p < 0.0001). Four and six strand non-absorbable repairs had significantly less separation than 8-strand absorbable repairs (p = 0.017 and p = 0.04 respectively). The mean (SEM) ultimate tensile strengths were 4-strand 464.8 N (27.4), 6-strand 543.5 N (49.6) and 8-strand 422.1 N (80.5). Regression analysis reveals no significant difference between the overall strength of the 3 repair models (p = 0.32) (4 vs. 6: p = 0.30, 4 vs. 8: p = 0.87; 6 vs. 8: p = 0.39). The most common mode

  1. Light microscopic histology of quadriceps tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, Nicola; Del Buono, Angelo; Spiezia, Filippo; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-11-01

    To assess histological changes and possible differences in the quadriceps of patients undergoing open repair of the tendon after spontaneous rupture, and subjects with no history of tendon pathology. Biopsies were harvested from the quadriceps tendon of 46 patients (34 men, 12 women) who had reported unilateral atraumatic quadriceps tendon rupture and had undergone surgical repair of the tendon. Samples were also harvested from both the tendons in 11 (N = 11 × 2) patients, nine males and two females, dying from cardiovascular disorders. For each tendon, three slides were randomly selected and examined under light microscopy, and assessed using a semiquantitative grading scale (range 0-21) which considers fibre structure, fibre arrangement, rounding of the nuclei, regional variations in cellularity, increased vascularity, decreased collagen stainability, and hyalinisation. The pathological sum-score averaged 19.2 ± 3.7 in ruptured tendons and 5.6 ± 2.0 in controls, and all variables considered were significantly different between the two groups, showing an association between tendon abnormalities and rupture (0.05 < P < 0.001). This study confirms that the presence of histological degenerative changes in torn quadriceps tendons increases the risk of rupture.

  2. Treatment of a Complex Distal Triceps Tendon Rupture With a New Technique: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Aunon-Martin, Ismael; Prada-Canizares, Alfonso; Jimenez-Diaz, Veronica; Vidal-Bujanda, Carlos; Leon-Baltasar, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The distal triceps tendon rupture is an uncommon injury. The acute treatment is well-defined, but when a delayed diagnosis is made or when a tendon retraction is present the alternatives or reconstruction are limited and sometimes complex. Case Presentation: In this case, we report on a 28-year-old man who presented with a chronic disruption of the distal triceps tendon with a gap of approximately 15 cm. The patient was diagnosed in another center with an inveterate breakage of the distal triceps tendon and was initially treated with an Achilles allograft that was complicated by a wound infection and required more than ten surgeries. Nearly 22 months after the initial trauma, and 12 months after the first surgery, we performed a reconstruction with an Achilles tendon allograft using the new technique of distal attachment. At the 12-month follow-up the patient presented a joint balance from -5º to 110º and presented with no pain. Conclusions: The use of an Achilles tendon allograft provides excellent results in complex distal triceps tendon ruptures. We report the use of a new technique to anchor a distal Achilles allograft. PMID:27148500

  3. Structural tendon changes in patients with acromegaly: assessment of Achilles tendon with sonoelastography.

    PubMed

    Onal, Eda Demil; Ipek, Ali; Evranos, Berna; Idilman, Ilkay Sedakat; Cakir, Bekir; Ersoy, Reyhan

    2016-03-01

    To describe the sonoelastographic appearance of the Achilles tendon in acromegalic patients and to determine whether the blood concentrations of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) are associated with the various sonographic elasticity types of Achilles tendons. Eighty-four Achilles tendons of 42 acromegaly patients and 84 Achilles tendons of 42 healthy volunteers were assessed with sonoelastography. The tendons were classified into two main types according to the elasticity features: type 1 blue/green (hard tissue) and type 2 yellow/red within green (intermediate-soft tissue). Two subtypes of these types were also defined. According to the definition, the elasticity of the tissue was in a spectrum ranging from hard to soft as the type progressed from 1a to 2b. The mean thickness of Achilles tendons in patients with acromegaly was significantly higher compared with healthy Achilles tendons (5.1+/-0.7 mm vs. 4.4+/-0.5, p<0.001), and patients with active disease had thicker Achilles tendons (5.5+/-0.8 mm vs. 4.8+/-0.5 mm in inactive disease, p=0.003). A significantly higher proportion of acromegaly patients had type 2 sonoelastographic appearance of the Achilles tendon (124/252 third; 49.2% vs. 81/252 third; 32.1%, p=0.0001). Activity status of acromegaly and GH/IGF-I levels were similar in patients with different types of elasticity (p>0.05). Sonoelastography revealed structural changes in the tendinous tissue of patients with acromegaly, but it was not sensitive enough to reflect changes in the serum levels of GH/IGF-1.

  4. Crimp morphology in relaxed and stretched rat Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Marco; Fini, Milena; Quaranta, Marilisa; De Pasquale, Viviana; Raspanti, Mario; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Ottani, Vittoria; Ruggeri, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    Fibrous extracellular matrix of tendon is considered to be an inextensible anatomical structure consisting of type I collagen fibrils arranged in parallel bundles. Under polarized light microscopy the collagen fibre bundles appear crimped with alternating dark and light transverse bands. This study describes the ultrastructure of the collagen fibrils in crimps of both relaxed and in vivo stretched rat Achilles tendon. Under polarized light microscopy crimps of relaxed Achilles tendons appear as isosceles or scalene triangles of different size. Tendon crimps observed via SEM and TEM show the single collagen fibrils that suddenly change their direction containing knots. The fibrils appear partially squeezed in the knots, bent on the same plane like bayonets, or twisted and bent. Moreover some of them lose their D-period, revealing their microfibrillar component. These particular aspects of collagen fibrils inside each tendon crimp have been termed 'fibrillar crimps' and may fulfil the same functional role. When tendon is physiologically stretched in vivo the tendon crimps decrease in number (46.7%) (P<0.01) and appear more flattened with an increase in the crimp top angle (165 degrees in stretched tendons vs. 148 degrees in relaxed tendons, P<0.005). Under SEM and TEM, the 'fibrillar crimps' are still present, never losing their structural identity in straightened collagen fibril bundles of stretched tendons even where tendon crimps are not detectable. These data suggest that the 'fibrillar crimp' may be the true structural component of the tendon crimp acting as a shock absorber during physiological stretching of Achilles tendon.

  5. [Effect of early versus late rehabilitation in patients with Achilles tendon tenorrhaphy].

    PubMed

    Vargas-Mena, R; Burgos-Elías, V M; Pérez-González, C S

    2013-01-01

    Achilles tendon tear is a prevalent condition in our setting. There is no consensus in the literature regarding the ideal treatment modality or the right immobilization period before starting physiatrics. The harmful effect of prolonged immobilization is widely known, so the functional results of early versus late physical therapy are compared in patients subjected to surgery for Achilles tendon tear. Ambispective, longitudinal, comparative study in patients over 16 years of age with Achilles tendon rupture treated surgically and referred to rehabilitation; they followed the management protocol established at the service. Retrospective record review was performed for discharged patients and patients admitted after the study initiation date were followed-up prospectively. The evaluation continued by means of a phone interview; results were recorded according to the Achilles Tendon Rupture Score. A total of 115 patients were included; they were classified into two groups according to the time elapsed between the surgery and the onset of physical therapy, as follows: 31 patients in group A, with onset between postoperative days 0 and 21; and 84 patients in group B, with onset after postoperative day 21. Two infectious complications were reported and no re-ruptures. Functional results were 6.52 for group A and 8.18 for group B. The duration of rehabilitation was similar in all patients, regardless of the protocol. The time elapsed between surgery and discharge was shortest in patients who underwent early physical therapy. The functional score is independent from the onset of physical therapy. Surgery followed by early mobilization is a safe practice that does not increase complications and shortens the total time the patients need to resume their daily activities.

  6. Proteomic analysis of differential protein expression of achilles tendon in a rabbit model by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at 21 days postoperation.

    PubMed

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Jialili, Ainuer; Sabirhazi, Gulnur; Shawutali, Nuerai; Redati, Darebai; Chen, Jiangtao; Tang, Bin; Bai, Jingping; Aldyarhan, Kayrat

    2011-10-01

    Postoperative early kinesitherapy has been advocated as an optimal method for treating Achilles tendon rupture. However, an insight into the rationale of how early kinesitherapy contributes to healing of Achilles tendon remains to be achieved, and research in the area of proteomic analysis of Achilles tendon has so far been lacking. Forty-two rabbits were randomized into control group, immobilization group, and early motion group, and received postoperative cast immobilization and early motion treatments. Achilles tendon samples were prepared 21 days following microsurgery, and the proteins were separated with two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Differentially expressed proteins were first recognized by PDQuest software, and then identified using peptide mass fingerprinting, tandem mass spectrometry, and database searching. A total of 463  ±  12, 511  ±  39, and 513  ±  80 protein spots were successfully detected in the two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels for the Achilles tendon samples of rabbits in the control group, immobilization group, and early motion group, respectively. There were 15, 8, and 9 unique proteins in these three groups, respectively, and some differentially expressed proteins were also identified in each group. It was indicated that some of the differentially expressed proteins were involved in various metabolism pathways and may play an important role in healing of Achilles tendon rupture. Postoperative early kinesitherapy resulted in differentially expressed proteins in ruptured Achilles tendon compared with those treated with postoperative cast immobilization. These differentially expressed proteins may contribute to healing of Achilles tendon rupture through a mechanobiological mechanism due to the application of postoperative early kinesitherapy.

  7. Genome-wide association screens for Achilles tendon and ACL tears and tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Thomas R.; Roos, Andrew K.; Kleimeyer, John P.; Ahmed, Marwa A.; Goodlin, Gabrielle T.; Fredericson, Michael; Ioannidis, John P. A.; Avins, Andrew L.; Dragoo, Jason L.

    2017-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy or rupture and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture are substantial injuries affecting athletes, associated with delayed recovery or inability to return to competition. To identify genetic markers that might be used to predict risk for these injuries, we performed genome-wide association screens for these injuries using data from the Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) cohort consisting of 102,979 individuals. We did not find any single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with either of these injuries with a p-value that was genome-wide significant (p<5x10-8). We found, however, four and three polymorphisms with p-values that were borderline significant (p<10−6) for Achilles tendon injury and ACL rupture, respectively. We then tested SNPs previously reported to be associated with either Achilles tendon injury or ACL rupture. None showed an association in our cohort with a false discovery rate of less than 5%. We obtained, however, moderate to weak evidence for replication in one case; specifically, rs4919510 in MIR608 had a p-value of 5.1x10-3 for association with Achilles tendon injury, corresponding to a 7% chance of false replication. Finally, we tested 2855 SNPs in 90 candidate genes for musculoskeletal injury, but did not find any that showed a significant association below a false discovery rate of 5%. We provide data containing summary statistics for the entire genome, which will be useful for future genetic studies on these injuries. PMID:28358823

  8. Twelve-month outcomes following surgical repair of the Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Fox, G; Gabbe, B J; Richardson, M; Oppy, A; Page, R; Edwards, E R; Hau, R; Ekegren, C L

    2016-10-01

    Incidence of Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) has increased over recent years, and debate regarding optimal management has been widely documented. Most papers have focused on surgical success, complications and short term region-specific outcomes. Inconsistent use of standardised outcome measures following surgical ATR repair has made it difficult to evaluate the impact of ATR on a patient's health status post-surgery, and to compare this to other injury types. This study aimed to report the frequency of surgical repairs of the Achilles tendon over a five-year period within an orthopaedic trauma registry, and to investigate return to work (RTW) status, health status and functional outcomes at 12 months post-surgical repair of the Achilles tendon. Two hundred and four adults registered by the Victorian Orthopaedic Trauma Outcomes Registry (VOTOR) who underwent surgical repair of the Achilles tendon between July 2009 and June 2014 were included in this prospective cohort study. The Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS-E), 3-level European Quality of Life 5 Dimension measure (EQ-5D-3L), and RTW status 12 months following surgical ATR repair were collected through structured telephone interviews conducted by trained interviewers. At 12 months, 92% of patients were successfully followed up. Of those working prior to injury, 95% had returned to work. 42% of patients reported a full recovery on the GOS-E scale. The prevalence of problems on the EQ-5D-3L at 12 months was 0.5% for self-care, 11% for anxiety, 13% for mobility, 16% for activity, and 22% for pain. 16% of patients reported problems with more than one domain. The number of surgical repairs of the Achilles tendon within the VOTOR registry decreased by 68% over the five-year study period. Overall, patients recover well following surgical repair of the Achilles tendon. However, in this study, deficits in function persisted for over half of patients at 12 months post-injury. The decreased incidence of surgical Achilles

  9. Early weightbearing and ankle mobilization after open repair of acute midsubstance tears of the achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, Nicola; Tallon, Cheryl; Wong, Jason; Lim, Kim Peng; Bleakney, Robert

    2003-01-01

    To study the effects of early weightbearing and ankle mobilization after acute repair of ruptured Achilles tendon. Comparative longitudinal study. Patients in group 1 were postoperatively immobilized with their ankle in gravity equinus, they were encouraged to bear weight on the operated limb as soon as possible to full weightbearing, and they received a single cast change at 2 weeks, with the ankle accommodated in an anterior splint in a plantigrade position, allowing the ankle to be plantar flexed fully but not dorsiflexed above neutral. Patients in group 2 were immobilized with their ankle in full equinus with a cast change at 2 weeks, when the ankle was immobilized in mid equinus, and at 4 weeks, when the ankle was immobilized in a plantigrade position, and they were advised to bear weight. Patients in group 1 attended fewer outpatient visits, completely discarded their crutches at an average of 2.5 weeks, and more were satisfied with the results of surgery. At ultrasonography, the average thickness of the repaired tendon was 12.1 mm, with no difference in the thickness of the ruptured tendon regardless of postoperative management. There was no significant difference in isometric strength between the two groups. Early weightbearing with the ankle plantigrade is not detrimental to the outcome of repair after acute rupture of the Achilles tendon and shortens the time needed for rehabilitation. However, strength deficit and muscle atrophy are not prevented.

  10. Quantitative US Elastography Can Be Used to Quantify Mechanical and Histologic Tendon Healing in a Rabbit Model of Achilles Tendon Transection.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yohei; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Sasho, Takahisa; Fukawa, Taisuke; Akatsu, Yorikazu; Akagi, Ryuichiro; Yamaguchi, Tadashi; Takahashi, Kenji; Nagashima, Kengo; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2017-05-01

    Purpose To determine the time-dependent change in strain ratios (SRs) at the healing site of an Achilles tendon rupture in a rabbit model of tendon transection and to assess the correlation between SRs and the mechanical and histologic properties of the healing tissue. Materials and Methods Experimental methods were approved by the institutional animal care and use committee. The Achilles tendons of 24 New Zealand white rabbits (48 limbs) were surgically transected. The SRs of Achilles tendons were calculated by using compression-based quantitative ultrasonographic elastography measurements obtained 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after transection. After in vivo elastography, the left Achilles tendon was harvested for mechanical testing of ultimate load, ultimate stress, elastic modulus, and linear stiffness, and the right tendons were harvested for tissue histologic analysis with the Bonar scale. Time-dependent changes in SRs, mechanical parameters, and Bonar scale scores were evaluated by using repeated-measures analysis of variance. The correlation between SRs and each measured variable was evaluated by using the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Results Mean SRs and Bonar scale values decreased as a function of time after transection, whereas mechanical parameters increased (P < .001). SR correlated with ultimate stress (ρ = 0.68, P <.001,) elastic modulus (ρ = 0.74, P <.001), and the Bonar scale (ρ = 0.87, P <.001). Conclusion Quantitative elastography could be a useful method with which to evaluate mechanical and histologic properties of the healing tendon. (©) RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  11. Spatial variations in Achilles tendon shear wave speed

    PubMed Central

    DeWall, Ryan J.; Slane, Laura C.; Lee, Kenneth S.; Thelen, Darryl G.

    2014-01-01

    Supersonic shear imaging (SSI) is an ultrasound imaging modality that can provide insight into tissue mechanics by measuring shear wave propagation speed, a property that depends on tissue elasticity. SSI has previously been used to characterize the increase in Achilles tendon shear wave speed that occurs with loading, an effect attributable to the strain-stiffening behavior of the tissue. However, little is known about how shear wave speed varies spatially, which is important, given the anatomical variation that occurs between the calcaneus insertion and the gastrocnemius musculotendon junction. The purpose of this study was to investigate spatial variations in shear wave speed along medial and lateral paths of the Achilles tendon for three different ankle postures: resting ankle angle (R, i.e. neutral), plantarflexed (P; R − 15 deg), and dorsiflexed (D; R + 15 deg). We observed significant spatial and posture variations in tendon shear wave speed in ten healthy young adults. Shear wave speeds in the Achilles free tendon averaged 12 ± 1.2 m/s in a resting position, but decreased to 7.2 ± 1.8 m/s with passive plantarflexion. Distal tendon shear wave speeds often reached the maximum tracking limit (16.3 m/s) of the system when the ankle was in the passively dorsiflexed posture (+15 deg from R). At a fixed posture, shear wave speeds decreased significantly from the free tendon to the gastrocnemius musculotendon junction, with slightly higher speeds measured on the medial side than on the lateral side. Shear wave speeds were only weakly correlated with the thickness and depth of the tendon, suggesting that the distal-to-proximal variations may reflect greater compliance in the aponeurosis relative to the free tendon. The results highlight the importance of considering both limb posture and transducer positioning when using SSI for biomechanical and clinical assessments of the Achilles tendon. PMID:24933528

  12. Can transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation improve achilles tendon healing in rats?

    PubMed

    Folha, Roberta A C; Pinfildi, Carlos E; Liebano, Richard E; Rampazo, Érika P; Pereira, Raphael N; Ferreira, Lydia M

    2015-01-01

    Tendon injury is one of the most frequent injuries in sports activities. TENS is a physical agent used in the treatment of pain but its influence on the tendon's healing process is unclear. To evaluate the influence of TENS on the healing of partial rupture of the Achilles tendon in rats. Sixty Wistar rats were submitted to a partial rupture of the Achilles tendon by direct trauma and randomized into six groups (TENS or Sham stimulation) and the time of evaluation (7, 14, and 21 days post-injury). Burst TENS was applied for 30 minutes, 6 days, 100 Hz frequency, 2 Hz burst frequency, 200 µs pulse duration, and 300 ms pulse train duration. Microscopic analyses were performed to quantify the blood vessels and mast cells, birefringence to quantify collagen fiber alignment, and immunohistochemistry to quantify types I and III collagen fibers. A significant interaction was observed for collagen type I (p=0.020) where the TENS group presented lower percentage in 14 days after the lesion (p=0.33). The main group effect showed that the TENS group presented worse collagen fiber alignment (p=0.001) and lower percentage of collagen III (p=0.001) and the main time effect (p=0.001) showed decreased percentage of collagen III at 7 days (p=0.001) and 14 days (p=0.001) after lesion when compared to 21 days. Burst TENS inhibited collagen I and III production and impaired its alignment during healing of partial rupture of the Achilles tendon in rats.

  13. Can transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation improve achilles tendon healing in rats?

    PubMed

    Folha, Roberta A C; Pinfildi, Carlos E; Liebano, Richard E; Rampazo, Érika P; Pereira, Raphael N; Ferreira, Lydia M

    2015-09-01

    Tendon injury is one of the most frequent injuries in sports activities. TENS is a physical agent used in the treatment of pain but its influence on the tendon's healing process is unclear. To evaluate the influence of TENS on the healing of partial rupture of the Achilles tendon in rats. Sixty Wistar rats were submitted to a partial rupture of the Achilles tendon by direct trauma and randomized into six groups (TENS or Sham stimulation) and the time of evaluation (7, 14, and 21 days post-injury). Burst TENS was applied for 30 minutes, 6 days, 100 Hz frequency, 2 Hz burst frequency, 200 µs pulse duration, and 300 ms pulse train duration. Microscopic analyses were performed to quantify the blood vessels and mast cells, birefringence to quantify collagen fiber alignment, and immunohistochemistry to quantify types I and III collagen fibers. A significant interaction was observed for collagen type I (p=0.020) where the TENS group presented lower percentage in 14 days after the lesion (p=0.33). The main group effect showed that the TENS group presented worse collagen fiber alignment (p=0.001) and lower percentage of collagen III (p=0.001) and the main time effect (p=0.001) showed decreased percentage of collagen III at 7 days (p=0.001) and 14 days (p=0.001) after lesion when compared to 21 days. Burst TENS inhibited collagen I and III production and impaired its alignment during healing of partial rupture of the Achilles tendon in rats.

  14. Can transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation improve achilles tendon healing in rats?

    PubMed Central

    Folha, Roberta A. C.; Pinfildi, Carlos E.; Liebano, Richard E.; Rampazo, Érika P.; Pereira, Raphael N.; Ferreira, Lydia M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tendon injury is one of the most frequent injuries in sports activities. TENS is a physical agent used in the treatment of pain but its influence on the tendon's healing process is unclear. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of TENS on the healing of partial rupture of the Achilles tendon in rats. METHOD: Sixty Wistar rats were submitted to a partial rupture of the Achilles tendon by direct trauma and randomized into six groups (TENS or Sham stimulation) and the time of evaluation (7, 14, and 21 days post-injury). Burst TENS was applied for 30 minutes, 6 days, 100 Hz frequency, 2 Hz burst frequency, 200 µs pulse duration, and 300 ms pulse train duration. Microscopic analyses were performed to quantify the blood vessels and mast cells, birefringence to quantify collagen fiber alignment, and immunohistochemistry to quantify types I and III collagen fibers. RESULTS: A significant interaction was observed for collagen type I (p=0.020) where the TENS group presented lower percentage in 14 days after the lesion (p=0.33). The main group effect showed that the TENS group presented worse collagen fiber alignment (p=0.001) and lower percentage of collagen III (p=0.001) and the main time effect (p=0.001) showed decreased percentage of collagen III at 7 days (p=0.001) and 14 days (p=0.001) after lesion when compared to 21 days. CONCLUSIONS: Burst TENS inhibited collagen I and III production and impaired its alignment during healing of partial rupture of the Achilles tendon in rats. PMID:26647744

  15. [Tendoscopy of the Achilles tendon. Indications, technique and results].

    PubMed

    Kriegelstein, S; Altenberger, S; Röser, A; Walther, M

    2016-02-01

    Endoscopic surgical techniques are nowadays standard procedures in medicine. The advantages of these minimally invasive techniques compared to open techniques are a smaller access route with reduced tissue damage, reduced scarring and often faster postoperative mobilization. Tendoscopy can be used to treat pathologies of tendons as well as of the surrounding tissues. This article presents the advantages of endoscopic treatment of the Achilles tendon compared to open procedures as well as the chances and limitations of tendoscopy. Surgical instructions for endoscopy of the Achilles tendon are presented and a review of the literature is given. The literature review showed excellent results for pathologies of the paratenon and Achilles tendinitis. Compared to open surgery there was a significantly lower rate of wound healing problems. All articles reported a high reduction of pain level with an early return to sports activities. Limitations of the procedure are extensive intratendinous pathologies and alterations of tendon insertion sites. Tendoscopy of the Achilles tendon is a safe but sometimes challenging minimally invasive technique for the treatment of paratendinopathy.

  16. Elbow tendinopathy and tendon ruptures: epicondylitis, biceps and triceps ruptures.

    PubMed

    Rineer, Craig A; Ruch, David S

    2009-03-01

    Lateral and medial epicondylitis are common causes of elbow pain in the general population, with the lateral variety being more common than the medial by a ratio reportedly ranging from 4:1 to 7:1. Initially thought to be an inflammatory condition, epicondylitis has ultimately been shown to result from tendinous microtearing followed by an incomplete reparative response. Numerous nonoperative and operative treatment options have been employed in the treatment of epicondylitis, without the emergence of a single, consistent, universally accepted treatment protocol. Tendon ruptures about the elbow are much less frequent, but result in more significant disability and loss of function. Distal biceps tendon ruptures typically occur in middle-aged males as a result of an event that causes a sudden, eccentric contraction of the biceps. Triceps tendon ruptures are exceedingly rare but usually have a similar etiology with a forceful eccentric contraction of the triceps that causes avulsion of the tendon from the olecranon. The diagnosis of these injuries is not always readily made. Complete ruptures of the biceps or triceps tendons have traditionally been treated surgically with good results. With regard to biceps ruptures, there continues to be debate about the best surgical approach, as well as the best method of fixation of tendon to bone. This article is not meant to be an exhaustive review of the broad topics of elbow tendinopathy and tendon ruptures, but rather is a review of recently published information on the topics that will assist the clinician in diagnosis and management of these conditions.

  17. A 3D model of the Achilles tendon to determine the mechanisms underlying nonuniform tendon displacements.

    PubMed

    Handsfield, Geoffrey G; Inouye, Joshua M; Slane, Laura C; Thelen, Darryl G; Miller, G Wilson; Blemker, Silvia S

    2017-01-25

    The Achilles is the thickest tendon in the body and is the primary elastic energy-storing component during running. The form and function of the human Achilles is complex: twisted structure, intratendinous interactions, and differential motor control from the triceps surae muscles make Achilles behavior difficult to intuit. Recent in vivo imaging of the Achilles has revealed nonuniform displacement patterns that are not fully understood and may result from complex architecture and musculotendon interactions. In order to understand which features of the Achilles tendon give rise to the nonuniform deformations observed in vivo, we used computational modeling to predict the mechanical contributions from different features of the tendon. The aims of this study are to: (i) build a novel computational model of the Achilles tendon based on ultrashort echo time MRI, (ii) compare simulated displacements with published in vivo ultrasound measures of displacement, and (iii) use the model to elucidate the effects of tendon twisting, intratendon sliding, retrocalcaneal insertion, and differential muscle forces on tendon deformation. Intratendon sliding and differential muscle forces were found to be the largest factors contributing to displacement nonuniformity between tendon regions. Elimination of intratendon sliding or muscle forces reduced displacement nonuniformity by 96% and 85%, respectively, while elimination of tendon twist and the retrocalcaneal insertion reduced displacement nonuniformity by only 35% and 3%. These results suggest that changes in the complex internal structure of the tendon alter the interaction between muscle forces and tendon behavior and therefore may have important implications on muscle function during movement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Calf Endurance and Achilles Tendon Structure in Classical Ballet Dancers.

    PubMed

    Zellers, Jennifer A; van Ostrand, Katrina; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare

    2017-06-15

    Optimal lower leg function is critical for ballet dancers to meet their occupational requirements. Achilles tendon injury is particularly detrimental to ballet dancers. While standardized measures have been validated and incorporated into clinical practice for use in people with Achilles tendon injury, normative ranges specific to the dancer population have not been described. The purpose of this pilot study was to observe the performance of pre-professional ballet students and professional ballet dancers on a well-established test battery for lower leg functional performance as well as ultra-sonographic evaluation of the structure of their Achilles tendons. The dancers in this study had significantly shorter Achilles tendons than non-dancers (p = 0.016). Dancers demonstrated significantly higher maximum heel-rise height on the heel-rise test for calf endurance (p < 0.001) but performed significantly less work than non-dancers (p = 0.014). The results of this study support the use of the heel-rise test as a tool for screening and to guide rehabilitation.

  19. Changes in the Achilles tendon reflexes following Skylab missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. T.; Nicogossian, A. E.; Hoffler, G. W.; Johnson, R. L.; Hordinsky, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Postflight measurements of Achilles tendon reflex duration on Skylab crewmen indicate a state of disequilibrium between the flexor and extensor muscle groups with an initial decrease in reflex duration. As the muscles regain strength and mass there occurs an overcompensation reflected by increased reflex duration. Finally, when a normal neuromuscular state is reached the reflex duration returns to baseline value.

  20. Changes in the Achilles tendon reflexes following Skylab missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. T.; Nicogossian, A. E.; Hoffler, G. W.; Johnson, R. L.; Hordinsky, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Postflight measurements of Achilles tendon reflex duration on Skylab crewmen indicate a state of disequilibrium between the flexor and extensor muscle groups with an initial decrease in reflex duration. As the muscles regain strength and mass there occurs an overcompensation reflected by increased reflex duration. Finally, when a normal neuromuscular state is reached the reflex duration returns to baseline value.

  1. Ultrasound diagnosis of Achilles tendon pathology in runners.

    PubMed Central

    Maffulli, N; Regine, R; Angelillo, M; Capasso, G; Filice, S

    1987-01-01

    The great upsurge in popularity of running activities has increased the number of athletes presenting with pathology of the Achilles tendon. A clinical and ultrasonic study was performed on 47 middle and long distance runners referred to the Authors with such problems. The results of this study can be grouped as follows: 1. paratendonitis: enlargement of the antero-posterior diameter of the tendon, and hyperechogenicity of Kager's triangle; 2. tendonitis (with or without paratendonitis): thickening of the tendon, with the presence of degenerative nodules; 3. enthesopathy: thickening of the distal part of the tendon, enlargement of the hypoechogenic area behind the tendon itself and microcalcification. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:3325127

  2. [Symptoms in area of the Achilles tendon. Etiology and therapeutic considerations].

    PubMed

    Biedert, R

    1991-10-01

    A number of pathologic conditions can produce posterior heel pain, making it difficult to distinguish the exact cause. Only a careful physical examination allows the probable diagnosis, which is the first and most important step in a successful therapy. Pathologically, the Achilles tendon itself may be inflamed secondary to degeneration owing to a decreased blood supply or the result of a partial rupture. The inflammation can also be accompanied by microtears or calcium deposits. In most cases the tendon sheath and the mesotenon are also involved (tenosynovitis). The retrocalcaneal bursa located between the posterior angle of the os calcis and the Achilles tendon may become inflamed and hypertrophic. It is frequently associated with a prominent superior tuberosity of the os calcis. In a few cases there was also an irritation of the bursa between the Achilles tendon and the skin caused by ill-fitting shoes. Over a 3-year period, 102 patients who engaged in different sports were treated for problems in the Achilles tendon area and retrospectively reviewed with a follow up of 18.8 months. Most of them were runners (48%), followed by soccer players (15.7%) and tennis players (5.9%). The mean age was 36 years. In the vast majority of patients (n = 70, 68.6%) nonoperative treatment was successful. In this group there were 45 cases (65%) with postural abnormalities and excessive pronation requiring correction by means of orthotic appliances. In 19 patients (27%) the problems were caused by a muscular imbalance, and in 15 cases (21%) wrong training methods with overuse had caused the inflammation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Temporal Healing of Achilles Tendons After Injury in Rodents Depends on Surgical Treatment and Activity.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Benjamin R; Salka, Nabeel S; Morris, Tyler R; Bhatt, Pankti R; Pardes, Adam M; Gordon, Joshua A; Nuss, Courtney A; Riggin, Corinne N; Fryhofer, George W; Farber, Daniel C; Soslowsky, Louis

    2017-09-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures affect 15 of 100,000 women and 55 of 100,000 men each year. Controversy continues to exist regarding optimal treatment and rehabilitation protocols. The objective of this study was to investigate the temporal effects of surgical repair and immobilization or activity on Achilles tendon healing and limb function after complete transection in rodents. Injured tendons were repaired (n = 64) or left nonrepaired (n = 64). The animals in both cohorts were further randomized into groups immobilized in plantar flexion for 1, 3, or 6 weeks that later resumed cage and treadmill activity for 5, 3, or 0 weeks, respectively (n = 36 for each regimen), which were euthanized at 6 weeks after injury, or into groups immobilized for 1 week and then euthanized (n = 20). At 6 weeks after injury, the groups that had 1 week of immobilization and 5 weeks of activity had increased range of motion and decreased ankle joint toe stiffness compared with the groups that had 3 weeks of immobilization and 3 weeks of activity. The groups with 6 weeks of immobilization and no activity period had decreased tendon cross-sectional area but increased tendon echogenicity and collagen alignment. Surgical treatment dramatically decreased fatigue cycles to failure in repaired tendons from groups with 1 week of immobilization and 5 weeks of activity. Normalized comparisons between 1-week and 6-week postinjury data demonstrated that changes in tendon healing properties (area, alignment, and echogenicity) were maximized by 1 week of immobilization and 5 weeks of activity, compared with 6 weeks of immobilization and no activity period. This study builds on an earlier study of Achilles tendon fatigue mechanics and functional outcomes during early healing by examining the temporal effects of different immobilization and/or activity regimens after initial postinjury immobilization. This study demonstrates how the temporal postinjury healing response of rodent Achilles tendons depends on

  4. Achilles tendon moment arms: the importance of measuring at constant tendon load when using the tendon excursion method.

    PubMed

    Olszewski, Katarzyna; Dick, Taylor J M; Wakeling, James M

    2015-04-13

    Achilles tendon moment arms are commonly measured using the tendon-excursion technique and ultrasound imaging of the muscle-tendon junction. The tendon-excursion technique relies on the assumption that the tendon load is constant and thus it does not stretch. However, previous studies have not enforced this constraint and thus it is not known how sensitive the estimated Achilles tendon moment arms are to varying load during the measurement process. The aim of this study was to compare estimates of Achilles tendon moment arms when calculated using the different constraints of constant force (and thus tendon stretch), constant joint torque, or contraction effort. Achilles tendon moment arms were measured for the medial and lateral gastrocnemii in 8 healthy male subjects across five different ankle angles (-5° dorsiflexion to 35° plantarflexion), and a range of contraction levels. Moment arms were calculated for three different constraints of constant force, torque, or effort. Moment arms were significantly greater for the lateral gastrocnemius than for the medial gastrocnemius. At low contraction levels, including the passive condition, the moment arms increased with plantarflexion, whereas the moment arms decreased with plantarflexion at higher contraction levels. There was no difference between the calculated moment arms using the constant force and the constant torque methods; however both these methods yielded significantly different moment arms when compared to the commonly used constant effort method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.