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Sample records for achilles tendon rupture

  1. Achilles tendon rupture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Heel cord tear; Calcaneal tendon rupture ... MRI scan to see what type of Achilles tendon tear you have. An MRI is a type ... partial tear means at least some of the tendon is still OK. A full tear means your ...

  2. Achilles Tendon Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Wertz, Jess; Galli, Melissa; Borchers, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Achilles tendon (AT) rupture in athletes is increasing in incidence and accounts for one of the most devastating sports injuries because of the threat to alter or end a career. Despite the magnitude of this injury, reliable risk assessment has not been clearly defined, and prevention strategies have been limited. The purpose of this review is to identify potential intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors for AT rupture in aerial and ground athletes stated in the current literature. Evidence Acquisition: A MEDLINE search was conducted on AT rupture, or “injury” and “risk factors” and “athletes” from 1980 to 2011. Emphasis was placed on epidemiology, etiology, and review articles focusing on the risk for lower extremity injury in runners and gymnasts. Thirty articles were reviewed, and 22 were included in this assessment. Results: Aerial and ground athletes share many intrinsic risk factors for AT rupture, including overuse and degeneration of the tendon as well as anatomical variations that mechanically put an athlete at risk. Older athletes, athletes atypical in size for their sport, high tensile loads, leg dominance, and fatigue also may increase risk. Aerial athletes tend to have more extrinsic factors that play a role in this injury due to the varying landing surfaces from heights and technical maneuvers performed at various skill levels. Conclusion: Risk assessment for AT rupture in aerial and ground athletes is multivariable and difficult in terms of developing prevention strategies. Quantitative measures of individual risk factors may help identify major contributors to injury. PMID:24427410

  3. Achilles tendon rupture rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, R. S.; Parsons, N.; Underwood, M.; Costa, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The evidence base to inform the management of Achilles tendon rupture is sparse. The objectives of this research were to establish what current practice is in the United Kingdom and explore clinicians’ views on proposed further research in this area. This study was registered with the ISRCTN (ISRCTN68273773) as part of a larger programme of research. Methods We report an online survey of current practice in the United Kingdom, approved by the British Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society and completed by 181 of its members. A total of ten of these respondents were invited for a subsequent one-to-one interview to explore clinician views on proposed further research in this area. Results The survey showed wide variations in practice, with patients being managed in plaster cast alone (13%), plaster cast followed by orthoses management (68%), and orthoses alone (19%). Within these categories, further variation existed regarding the individual rehabilitation facets, such as the length of time worn, the foot position within them and weight-bearing status. The subsequent interviews reflected this clinical uncertainty and the pressing need for definitive research. Conclusions The gap in evidence in this area has resulted in practice in the United Kingdom becoming varied and based on individual opinion. Future high-quality randomised trials on this subject are supported by the clinical community. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:65–9 PMID:25868938

  4. Spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture in alkaptonuria

    PubMed Central

    Alajoulin, Omar A.; Alsbou, Mohammed S.; Ja’afreh, Somayya O.; Kalbouneh, Heba M.

    2015-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare inborn metabolic disease characterized by accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA). Excretion of HGA in urine causes darkening of urine and its deposition in connective tissues causes dark pigmentation (ochronosis), early degeneration of articular cartilage, weakening of the tendons, and subsequent rupture. In this case report, we present a rare case of a patient presented with unilateral spontaneous rupture of Achilles tendon due to AKU. The patient developed most of the orthopedic manifestations of the disease earlier than typical presentations. Alkaptonuria patients should avoid strenuous exercises and foot straining especially in patients developing early orthopedic manifestations. PMID:26620992

  5. [Tendinosis and ruptures of the Achilles tendon].

    PubMed

    Amlang, M H; Zwipp, H

    2012-02-01

    Tendinosis of the Achilles tendon is a degenerative-reparative structural change of the tendon with microdefects, increases in cross-section due to cicatricial tendon regeneration, neoangiogenesis and reduction of elasticity. The previously used term tendinitis is only rarely used for the chronic form since signs of inflammation such as redness and hyperthermia or elevated levels of inflammatory parameters on laboratory testing are generally absent. Duplex sonography with visualization of the neovascularization has become a valuable supplement not only for diagnostics but also for therapy planning. The classic, conservative therapy for painful tendinosis consists of oral anti-inflammatory drugs, pain-adapted load reduction, raising the heel, stretching the calf musculature, and various physiotherapeutic interventions. When conservative treatment over a period of 4 - 6 months fails to produce any or non-adequate pain relief, an indication for surgical treatment should be considered. In the therapy for fresh ruptures of the Achilles tendon further developments in minimally invasive techniques have led to a worldwide paradigm change over the past 10 years. The decisive advantage of minimally invasive surgical techniques is the lower risk of wound infection as compared to the sutures of the open technique. When compared with conservative functional therapy the minimally invasive repair has the advantage of being less dependent on the compliance of the patient since, in the early phase of tendon healing the suture prevents a separation of the tendon ends upon controlled movements. However, not every patient with a ruptured Achilles tendon should be treated with a minimally invasive repair. Open tendon reconstruction and functional conservative therapy are still justified when the correct indication is given. PMID:22344862

  6. Augmented repair of acute Achilles tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Zell, R A; Santoro, V M

    2000-06-01

    Twenty-five patients who had an acute Achilles tendon rupture were managed with an augmented repair using the gastrocnemius-soleus fascia. All patients healed their repair and there were no re-ruptures. There was one infection. Augmented repair allowed early functional recovery as evidenced by full ankle motion by four to eight weeks, full unassisted weight bearing by three weeks, cessation of braces by four weeks, and return to work by one to six weeks post-operatively. Augmentation adds a sufficient amount of collagen to allow early range of motion and weight bearing without re-rupture. Disadvantages included a long incision, soft tissue prominence, one infection, and sural nerve injury.

  7. Achilles tendon repair

    MedlinePlus

    Achilles tendon rupture-surgery; Percutaneous Achilles tendon rupture repair ... To fix your torn Achilles tendon, the surgeon will: Make a cut down the back of your heel Make several small cuts rather than one large cut ...

  8. Acute Bilateral Traumatic Achilles Tendon Rupture – A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Jhaveri, Maulik; Golwala, Paresh; Merh, Aditya; Patel, Amit

    2016-01-01

    The Achilles tendon is the strongest tendon in the body, which is commonly ruptured in male athletes. Bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendon is a rare condition with very few reported cases in the literature. It poses a challenge in management, and hence, we report a case with traumatic bilateral Achilles tendon rupture in a young male patient and its management. One side was treated conservatively as the rupture was partial and the other side, which had a complete tear, was operated. At nine months follow-up, the patient has had a satisfactory result and is now bearing full weight without any problems. We suggest this method of treatment to be worthwhile for this unusual entity. PMID:27588227

  9. Achilles tendon rupture associated with injury of the calcaneofibular ligament.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Kazuya; Kasanami, Ryoji; Iwai, Makoto; Takakura, Yoshinori; Kawate, Kenji

    2003-08-01

    A 49-year-old man collided against an infielder when he slid into second base during a recreational baseball game. He was unable to continue in the game due to diffuse pain and swelling of his hindfoot. A rupture of the Achilles tendon was diagnosed incidentally on palpation and observation of a positive Thompson's squeeze test. Subcutaneous hemorrhage at the lateral aspect of the heel and a small bone fragment under the lateral malleolus on an anteroposterior plain radiograph indicated a fracture of the calcaneal wall. At surgery, a complete rupture of the Achilles tendon and an avulsion of the calcaneofibular ligament from the calcaneal wall were seen. Both injuries were surgically repaired, and the patient subsequently did well. The mechanism of injury was thought to be impact hyperdorsiflexion of the ankle with rupture of the Achilles tendon accompanied by an inversion injury. Using a literature search, it was found that this combination of injuries has not been previously reported.

  10. Simultaneous reconstruction of quadriceps tendon rupture after TKA and neglected Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Seuk; Min, Byoung-Hyun; Han, Kyeong-Jin; Cho, Jae Ho; Han, Seung Hwan; Lee, Doo-Hyung; Oh, Kyung Soo

    2010-05-12

    We report a case of simultaneous reconstruction of a quadriceps tendon rupture after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and neglected Achilles tendon rupture, which occurred before TKA with an ipsilateral hamstring autograft. A 64-year-old woman presented with persistent right knee pain. She also had right heel pain and had received multiple steroid injections at the knee joint and heel. On examination, she showed osteoarthritis in the medial and lateral compartments of the knee joint and an Achilles tendon rupture in the ipsilateral limb. There was skin dimpling and the proximal portion of tendon was migrated. We performed TKA, and the postoperative course was satisfactory. She returned 3 months postoperatively, however, with skin dimpling around the suprapatellar area and weakness of knee extension. Her ankle symptoms were also aggravated because she could not use the knee joint freely. We performed simultaneous reconstruction of the quadriceps tendon and the Achilles tendon using an ipsilateral hamstring autograft.Hamstring autograft offers a good alternative treatment option for rupture repair, particularly with concommitant ruptures of multiple sites when primary repair is not possible or the viability of repaired tissue is poor.

  11. Bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendon in patients on steroid therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Haines, J F

    1983-01-01

    Three patients are presented who sustained bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendon while on systemic steroid therapy for chest disease; a fourth patient with polymyalgia rheumatica on steroids is also presented. This is further evidence that tendon rupture can be a direct complication of steroid treatment. The English-language literature on bilateral Achilles tendon rupture is reviewed. PMID:6651370

  12. Practice Patterns in the Care of Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Ujash; Wasserstein, David; Moineddin, Rahim; Jenkinson, Richard; Kreder, Hans; Jaglal, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Over the last decade, there has been a growing body of level I evidence supporting non-operative management (focused on early range of motion and weight bearing) of acute Achilles tendon ruptures. Despite this emerging evidence, there have been very few studies evaluating its uptake. Our primary objective was to determine whether the findings from a landmark trial assessing the optimal management strategy for acute Achilles tendon ruptures influenced the practice patterns of orthopaedic surgeons in Ontario, Canada over a 12-year time period. As a second objective we examined whether patient and provider predictors of surgical repair utilization differed before and after dissemination of the landmark trial results. Methods: Using provincial health administrative databases, we identified Ontario residents ≥ 18 years of age with an acute Achilles tendon rupture from April 2002 to March 2014. The proportion of surgically repaired ruptures was calculated for each calendar quarter and year. A time series analysis using an interventional autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model was used to determine whether changes in the proportion of surgically repaired ruptures were chronologically related to the dissemination of results from a landmark trial by Willits et al. (first quarter, 2009). Spline regression was then used to independently identify critical time-points of change in the surgical repair rate to confirm our findings. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess for differences in patient (baseline demographics) and provider (hospital type) predictors of surgical repair utilization before and after the landmark trial. Results: In 2002, ˜19% of acute Achilles tendon ruptures in Ontario were surgically repaired, however, by 2014 only 6.5% were treated operatively. A statistically significant decrease in the rate of surgical repair (p < 0.001) was observed after the results from a landmark trial were presented at a major

  13. Mediomalleolar fracture combined with Achilles tendon rupture--a rare simultaneous injury of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Pieper, H G; Radas, C B; Quack, G; Krahl, H

    1998-01-01

    Achilles tendon injuries are rarely associated with osseous lesions. The combination of mediomalleolar fracture with Achilles tendon rupture has been reported as a rare combination injury in alpine skiers, but never before in basketball. This report presents an Achilles tendon rupture in a senior basketball player in combination with a non-displaced fracture of the medial malleolus. The osseous lesion was initially missed, because the tendon injury with all typical clinical and sonographical signs predominated. The routine X-ray examination was only done in the lateral and axial plane, because the examiner did not even think of an ankle fracture, since the description of the sports accident and the clinical signs were so typical for a sole tendon injury. This case report should remind us not to exclude an osseous or ligamentous ankle injury in those cases of acute Achilles tendon rupture especially if postoperative swelling and pain persist for a prolonged period.

  14. Complications of the treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Molloy, Andy; Wood, Edward V

    2009-12-01

    Since the first reports in the medical literature of treatment of the Achilles tendon, complications have been recognized from both non-operative and operative techniques. These include tendon rerupture, sural nerve morbidity, wound healing problems, changes in tendon morphology, venous thromboembolism, elongation of the tendon, complex regional pain syndrome, and compartment syndrome. This article delineates the incidence for each of these complications, with differing techniques, methods of avoiding these complications and treatment methods if they occur. PMID:19857846

  15. Early Ankle Mobilization Promotes Healing in a Rabbit Model of Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    PubMed

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Asilehan, Batiza; Wupuer, Aikeremu; Qianman, Bayixiati; Jialihasi, Ayidaer; Tangkejie, Wulanbai; Maimaitiaili, Abudouheilil; Shawutali, Nuerai; Badelhan, Aynaz; Niyazebieke, Hadelebieke; Aizezi, Adili; Aisaiding, Amuding; Bakyt, Yerzat; Aibek, Rakimbaiev; Wuerliebieke, Jianati

    2016-01-01

    The use of early mobilization of the ankle joint without orthosis in the treatment of Achilles tendon rupture has been advocated as the optimal management. The goal of this study was to compare outcomes in a postoperative rabbit model of Achilles tendon rupture between early mobilization and immobilized animals using a differential proteomics approach. In total, 135 rabbits were randomized into the control group (n=15), the postoperative cast immobilization (PCI) group (n=60), and the early mobilization (EM) group (n=60). A rupture of the Achilles tendon was created in each animal model and repaired microsurgically, and tendon samples were removed at 3, 7, 14, and 21 days postoperatively. Proteins were separated using 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and identified using peptide mass fingerprinting, tandem mass spectrometry, NCBI database searches, and bioinformatics analyses. A series of differentially expressed proteins were identified between groups, some of which may play an important role in Achilles tendon healing. Notable candidate proteins that were upregulated in the EM group were identified, such as CRMP-2, galactokinase 1, tropomyosin-4, and transthyretin. The healing of ruptured Achilles tendons appears to be affected at the level of protein expression with the use of early mobilization. The classic postoperative treatment of Achilles tendon rupture with an orthosis ignored the self-protecting instinct of humans. With a novel operative technique, the repaired tendon can persist the load that comes from traction in knee and ankle joint functional movement. In addition, kinesitherapy provided an excellent experimental outcome via a mechanobiological mechanism.

  16. Intraoperative ultrasound assistance for percutaneous repair of the acute Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Giannetti, Silvio; Patricola, Alessandro Antonio; Stancati, Andrea; Santucci, Attillio

    2014-12-01

    Various methods have been used to treat the acute Achilles tendon rupture. Traditional open repair is associated with a higher rate of complications. Percutaneous methods avoid most of the disadvantages of open surgical treatment, but the degree of tendon regeneration cannot be ensured. The authors prospectively followed 40 patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture who underwent percutaneous repair with intraoperative ultrasound assistance an average of 13 months after the injury. No surgery-related complications, such as wounds or deep infections, sural nerve injury, or re-rupture, were detected at follow-up. This technique avoids injury to the sural nerve, minimizes wound complications, and provides a strong repair.

  17. Muscle-tendon glucose uptake in Achilles tendon rupture and tendinopathy before and after eccentric rehabilitation: Comparative case reports.

    PubMed

    Masood, Tahir; Kalliokoski, Kari; Bojsen-Møller, Jens; Finni, Taija

    2016-09-01

    Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) is the most common tendon rupture injury. The consequences of ATR on metabolic activity of the Achilles tendon and ankle plantarflexors are unknown. Furthermore, the effects of eccentric rehabilitation on metabolic activity patterns of Achilles tendon and ankle plantarflexors in ATR patients have not been reported thus far. We present a case study demonstrating glucose uptake (GU) in the Achilles tendon, the triceps surae, and the flexor hallucis longus of a post-surgical ATR patient before and after a 5-month eccentric rehabilitation. At baseline, three months post-surgery, all muscles and Achilles tendon displayed much higher GU in the ATR patient compared to a healthy individual despite lower plantarflexion force. After the rehabilitation, plantarflexion force increased in the operated leg while muscle GU was considerably reduced. The triceps surae muscles showed similar values to the healthy control. When compared to the healthy or a matched patient with Achilles tendon pain after 12 weeks of rehabilitation, Achilles tendon GU levels of ATR patient remained greater after the rehabilitation. Past studies have shown a shift in the metabolic fuel utilization towards glycolysis due to immobilization. Further research, combined with immuno-histological investigation, is needed to fully understand the mechanism behind excessive glucose uptake in ATR cases. PMID:27428528

  18. Complete Achilles tendon rupture after local infiltration of corticosteroids in the treatment of deep retrocalcaneal bursitis.

    PubMed

    Vallone, Ganfranco; Vittorio, Tarallo

    2014-06-01

    Complete rupture of the Achilles tendon is relatively rare, but it is an injury of considerable clinical relevance. A common cause of non-traumatic tendon rupture is local corticosteroid infiltration. Corticosteroid injections may start a degenerative process resulting in partial rupture and subsequent complete rupture of the tendon due to a direct toxic effect, because corticosteroids inhibit production of extracellular matrix collagen and also because of poor local vascularization. This paper describes the case of a patient who presented with complete rupture of the Achilles tendon shortly after administration of local corticosteroid injections in the treatment of deep retrocalcaneal bursitis. This confirms that corticosteroid treatment which is not correctly and accurately administered may be a factor contributing to major injury. It demonstrates that the physician must take all necessary precautions when administering corticosteroid infiltration. It is particularly important that corticosteroid injection is performed under ultrasound guidance which permits visualization of the needle tip and therefore exact identification of the injection site.

  19. Outcome evaluation after Achilles tendon ruptures. A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    SPENNACCHIO, PIETRO; VASCELLARI, ALBERTO; CUCCHI, DAVIDE; CANATA, GIAN LUIGI; RANDELLI, PIETRO

    2016-01-01

    The optimal treatment and the best rehabilitation protocol after an acute Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) remain a matter of controversy in orthopaedic and sports medicine. The use of validated injury-specific outcome instruments is the only way to clarify these issues, in order to ensure that patients receive the best possible treatment. This article describes the most commonly reported outcome measures used to assess patients treated for ATR. On the basis of the available evidence, the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) is the most appropriate outcome measure for evaluating the management of acute ATR. PMID:27386448

  20. Acute Ultrasonography Investigation to Predict Reruptures and Outcomes in Patients With an Achilles Tendon Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Westin, Olof; Nilsson Helander, Katarina; Grävare Silbernagel, Karin; Möller, Michael; Kälebo, Peter; Karlsson, Jón

    2016-01-01

    Background: The optimal treatment for acute Achilles tendon ruptures is still an ongoing debate. Acute ultrasonography (US) investigation to measure the diastasis between the tendon ends has previously been used to classify acute Achilles tendon ruptures; however, no study has used US to predict reruptures and functional outcomes. Purpose: To investigate whether acute US can be used to predict the risk of reruptures and outcomes after treatment of an acute Achilles tendon rupture. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: Forty-five patients (37 men, 8 women) with a mean age of 39 ± 9.2 years (range, 23-59 years) from a cohort of 97 patients participating in a randomized controlled study comparing surgical and nonsurgical treatment were included. US was performed within 72 hours from the index injury. Diastasis between the tendon ends was documented. Reruptures were documented, and the patients’ functional outcomes were measured 12 months after injury. Results: Patients with a diastasis of >10 mm treated nonsurgically had a higher degree of rerupture. In the nonsurgically treated group, 3 of 4 patients with a diastasis of >10 mm suffered from rerupture (P < .001). Moreover, in the nonsurgical group, there was significantly worse outcomes in patients with a diastasis of >5 mm in terms of patient-reported outcomes using the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) (P = .004) and heel-rise height at 12 months (P = .048) compared with the group with a lesser degree of tendon separation. Conclusion: US may be a useful tool to predict the risk of rerupture and greater degree of functional deficit. It may be an important measure in a clinical treatment algorithm for deciding whether a patient will benefit from surgical intervention after an acute Achilles tendon rupture. PMID:27781212

  1. Achilles tendon: US examination

    SciTech Connect

    Fornage, B.D.

    1986-06-01

    Real-time ultrasonography (US) using linear-array probes and a stand-off pad as a ''waterpath'' was performed to evaluate the Achilles tendon in 67 patients (including 24 athletes) believed to have acute or chronic traumatic or inflammatory pathologic conditions. Tendons in 23 patients appeared normal on US scans. The 44 abnormal tendons comprised five complete and four partial ruptures, seven instances of postoperative change, and 28 cases of tendonitis. US depiction of the inner structure of the tendon resulted in the diagnosis of focal abnormalities, including partial ruptures, nodules, and calcifications. Tendonitis was characterized by enlargement and decreased echogenicity of the tendon. The normal US appearance of the Achilles tendon is described.

  2. [Repair of Achilles tendon rupture and early rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Delgado-Brambila, H A; Cristiani, D G; Tinajero, E C; Burgos-Elías, V

    2012-01-01

    The frequency of Achilles tendon tear has increased worldwide. Several factors have been described that help explain the mechanism of injury. The treatment of choice continues to be surgery; conservative treatment is reserved for patients with a high morbidity and mortality. Surgical treatment consists of an open or percutaneous technique. In both modalities we try to achieve prompt mobilization of the operated tendon to obtain better and quicker healing. This prospective study describes our experience with 35 patients enrolled from February 2004 to August 2010. They were treated with open repair, physical rehabilitation and active ankle mobilization before the second postoperative week, and with colchicine. We obtained satisfactory results. Patients recovered complete mobility approximately at postoperative week 6, and from weeks 8 to 10 they could resume their daily work activities and participate in sports and recreational activities. Patients were assessed according to the ATRS classification to measure their clinical results. We had no infections or other major complications. We conclude that the open surgical repair of Achilles tendon tear, prompt mobility, and colchicine provide good results.

  3. Reconstruction of Kuwada grade IV chronic achilles tendon rupture by minimally invasive technique

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Xudong; Wu, Yongping; Tao, Huimin; Yang, Disheng; Huang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Transfer of a flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon can not only reconstruct the Achilles tendon but also provide ischemic tendinous tissues with a rich blood supply to enhance wound healing. This retrospective study aims to investigate clinical outcomes in patients who underwent repair of Kuwada grade IV chronic Achilles tendon rupture with long hallucis longus tendons harvested using a minimally invasive technique. Materials and Methods: 35 patients who were treated for Kuwada grade IV Achilles tendon injuries from July 2006 to June 2011 were included in this retrospective study. The age ranged between 23 and 71 years. The duration from primary injury to surgery ranged from 29 days to 34 months (mean value, 137.6 days). All 35 patients had difficulties in lifting their calves. Thirty two were followed up for a mean 32.2 months (range 18–72 months), whereas three were lost to followup. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed that the tendon rupture gap ranged from 6.0 to 9.2 cm. During surgery, a 2.0 cm minor incision was made vertically in the medial plantar side of the midfoot, and a 1.5 cm minor transverse incision was made in the plantar side of the interphalangeal articulation of the great toe to harvest the FHL tendon, and the tendon was fixed to the calcaneus with suture anchors. Postoperative appearance and function were evaluated by physiotherapists based American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society-ankle and hindfoot score (AOFAS-AH), and Leppilahti Achilles tendon ratings. Results: Results were assessed in 32 patients. Except for one patient who suffered complications because of wound disruption 10 days after the operation, all other patients had primary wound healing, with 28 of 32 able to go up on their toes at last followup. The AOFAS-AH score was increased from preoperative (51.92 ± 7.08) points to (92.56 ± 6.71) points; Leppilahti Achilles tendon score was increased from preoperative (72.56 ± 7.43) to (92.58 ± 5.1). There were

  4. New technical procedure involving Achilles tendon rupture treatment through transcutaneous suture.

    PubMed

    TarniŢă, DănuŢ Nicolae; TarniŢă, Daniela; Grecu, Dan Cristian; Calafeteanu, Dan Marian; Căpitănescu, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    The Achilles tendon is the widest tendon of the human body. Achilles tendon belongs to the extrasynovial tendons group and this allows it a faster recovery, thanks to local hematoma from the peritenon, necessary for the scarification. We concluded that in Achilles tendon rupture treatment it is essential to maintain the tendon covering skin integrity, the peritendinous integrity, to maintain the local hematoma formed during and after tendon rupture, reattaching the ruptured tendon heads and maintain them in this position by suturing them and by relaxing the sural triceps muscle. The percutaneous suture requires five pairs of mirror micro-incisions (5 mm) on one side and the other of the tendon. It is necessary for one of the pairs to be placed to the rupture level. With a surgical needle, we arm the proximal and distal heads of the tendon by different threads. By traction and muscular relaxation, we bring in contact the two ruptured heads and then we knot together the arming threads. The inferior member was cast immobilized in relaxing position for the sural triceps muscle for a 45 days period. Using this technique, we have operated 15 cases in our Clinic. In all the cases, we obtained a healing by first intention of the tegument micro-incisions. After the cast immobilization suppression, during 30 days the patients were in a recovery program. At the end of this program, they have recovered completely the dorsal and plantar flexion and the walking. In four months after the surgery, the esthetic of the area is completely restored, this technique being the only surgical technique that realizes this recovery.

  5. [Percutaneous repair of achilles tendon rupture--a technical note].

    PubMed

    Alexa, O; Veliceasa, B; Puha, C; Popia, I

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of the acute ruptures of the achillean tendon remains controversial. For the time being, there is no consent regarding the ideal therapeutic approach. The therapeutical procedure for the recent achilean tendon tears varies between two possible solutions, one conservative and the other surgical. The choice between these is made based on the type of rupture and the experience of the surgeon. The conservative techniques can have good results in selected cases, but they produce a degree of elongation of the tendon, which may lead to improper functional results. The classical surgical treatment (the open technique) has the handicap of a relatively large, longitudinal incision, which is made in an area with relatively poor skin vascular supply. Also, the vascular supply of the tendon itself is based mainly on perforant, subfascial vessels, which are intercepted during the approach. Taking these facts into consideration, some new, minimally invasive (percutaneous) techniques, were imagined. The principles of the standard percutaneous technique consist of: 1) union of the ruptured ends without using a large surgical approach, thus also avoiding the drainage of the local hematoma and rushing the repair; 2) avoiding damaging of the tendon's vascular supply. This techique leads to a rapid transformation of the collagen fibers into elastic fibers, which are mechanically effective. We present in this paper the method which uses the TENOLIG kit. This kit consists of two wires with anchors at one end and needles at the other end; two washers and two poliethylene disks for securing the distal end of the wire. We obtained good morphological (proven by MRI scan) and functional results with this technique. The postoperative protocol includes immobilization with the foot initially in equinous, then in normal position, with isometric muscle contractions and non-weight-bearing, then removal of the cast and wires at 45 days postoperatively and continuing the recovery by

  6. Application of lariat lock catch knot suture in the achilles tendon rupture

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baocang; Feng, Xiaona; Yan, Ming; Wang, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to summarize the clinical experience of repairing the Achilles tendon rupture by lariat lock catch knot suture. Between January 2011 and February, 2014, 32 cases of the Achilles tendon rupture were treated by lariat lock catch knot suture. There were 26 males and 6 females, with the average age of 39 years (range 17-53 years), including 13 left knees and 19 right knees. 29 wounds healed by first intention, and 3 cases who were performed local flap transfer due to necrosis of skin were healed by second intention. Thirty-two cases were followed up 10-25 months (13 months on average). No re-rupture of Achilles tendon or deep infection occurred during follow-up period. According to Arner-Lindholm assessment standard, the results were excellent in 19 cases and good in 13 cases, the excellent and good rate was 100%. Lariat lock catch knot suture is a safe and effective method for repairing Achilles tendon. PMID:26770612

  7. [Successive ruptures of patellar and Achilles tendons. Anabolic steroids in competitive sports].

    PubMed

    Isenberg, J; Prokop, A; Skouras, E

    2008-01-01

    Derivatives of testosterone or of 19-nor-testosterone are used as anabolics for the purpose of improving performance although the effect of anabolics is known still to be under discussion. The use of anabolic steroids continues among competitive athletes despite increased controls and increasingly frequent dramatic incidents connected with them. Whereas metabolic dysfunction during anabolic use is well documented, ruptures of the large tendons are rarely reported. Within 18 months, a 29-year-old professional footballer needed surgery for rupture of the patellar tendon and of both Achilles tendons. Carefully directed questioning elicited confirmation that he had taken different anabolic steroids regularly for 3 years with the intention of improving his strength. After each operation anabolic steroids were taken again at a high dosage during early convalescence and training. Minimally invasive surgery and open suturing techniques led to complete union of the Achilles tendons in good time. Training and anabolic use (metenolon 300 mg per week) started early after suturing of the patellar tendon including bone tunnels culminated in histologically confirmed rerupture after 8 weeks. After a ligament reconstruction with a semitendinosus tendon graft with subsequent infection, the tendon and reserve traction apparatus were lost. Repeated warnings of impaired healing if anabolic use was continued had been given without success. In view of the high number of unrecorded cases in competitive and athletic sports, we can assume that the use of anabolic steroids is also of quantitative relevance in the operative treatment of tendon ruptures.

  8. The treatment of a rupture of the Achilles tendon using a dedicated management programme.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, A M; Topliss, C; Beard, D; Evans, R M; Williams, P

    2015-04-01

    The Swansea Morriston Achilles Rupture Treatment (SMART) programme was introduced in 2008. This paper summarises the outcome of this programme. Patients with a rupture of the Achilles tendon treated in our unit follow a comprehensive management protocol that includes a dedicated Achilles clinic, ultrasound examination, the use of functional orthoses, early weight-bearing, an accelerated exercise regime and guidelines for return to work and sport. The choice of conservative or surgical treatment was based on ultrasound findings. The rate of re-rupture, the outcome using the Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) and the Achilles Tendon Repair Score, (AS), and the complications were recorded. An elementary cost analysis was also performed. Between 2008 and 2014 a total of 273 patients presented with an acute rupture 211 of whom were managed conservatively and 62 had surgical repair. There were three re-ruptures (1.1%). There were 215 men and 58 women with a mean age of 46.5 years (20 to 86). Functional outcome was satisfactory. Mean ATRS and AS at four months was 53.0 (sd 14), 64.9 (sd 15) (n = 135), six months 67.8 (sd 16), 73.8 (sd 15) (n = 103) and nine months (72.4; sd 14) 72.3 (sd 13) (n = 43). The programme realised estimated cost savings exceeding £91,000 per annum. The SMART programme resulted in a low rate of re-rupture, a satisfactory outcome, a reduced rate of surgical intervention and a reduction in healthcare costs.

  9. Running exercises improve the strength of a partially ruptured Achilles tendon

    PubMed Central

    See, E; Ng, G; Ng, C; Fung, D

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the effects of running and swimming exercises on the functional performance and mechanical strength of a recovering Achilles tendon. Methods: 30 Sprague-Dawley rats had surgical transection of their right medial Achilles tendon. The rats were divided into running (n = 11), swimming (n = 10), and control (n = 9) groups. The running and swimming groups were given daily exercise training, starting from the fifth day after the injury; the control group did not exercise throughout the period of the experiment. An Achilles functional index (AFI) was recorded before the operation and on the third, 10th, and 30th days after the operation. On the 30th day, the rats were killed and their Achilles tendons harvested for biomechanical testing of load relaxation properties, stiffness, and ultimate tensile strength (UTS). The AFI data were analysed by two way analysis of variance; load relaxation, stiffness, and UTS data were analysed by multivariate analysis, with α at 0.05. Results: The UTS of the running group was higher than in the control group (p = 0.015), while there was no significant difference between the swimming and control groups (p = 0.228). Differences in stiffness and load relaxation were non-significant (p = 0.823 and 0.633, respectively). The AFI results did not differ among the three groups (p = 0.242). Conclusions: Running exercises can improve the strength of partially ruptured Achilles tendons at 30 days after injury. PMID:15388547

  10. Evaluation of Elastic Stiffness in Healing Achilles Tendon After Surgical Repair of a Tendon Rupture Using In Vivo Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li-ning; Wan, Wen-bo; Wang, Yue-xiang; Jiao, Zi-yu; Zhang, Li-hai; Luo, Yu-kun; Tang, Pei-fu

    2016-01-01

    Background There has been no published report assessing the mechanical properties of a repaired Achilles tendon after surgery using shear wave elastography (SWE). The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in mechanical properties of the healing Achilles tendon after surgical repair of a tendon rupture using ultrasound SWE and how these changes correlate with tendon function. Material/Methods Twenty-six patients who underwent surgical repair for Achilles tendon rupture were examined with ultrasound SWE coupled with a linear array transducer (4–15 MHz). The elasticity values of the repaired Achilles tendon in a longitudinal view were measured at 12, 24, and 48 weeks postoperatively. Functional outcomes were assessed with the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) rating system at 12, 24, and 48 weeks postoperatively. General linear regression analysis and correlation coefficients were used to analyze the relationship between elasticity and the AOFAS score. Results There were significant differences with respect to the mean elasticity values and functional scores of the repaired Achilles tendon at 12, 24, and 48 weeks postoperatively (all P<0.05). Tendon function was positively correlated with the elasticity of the repaired Achilles tendon (P=0.0003). Conclusions Our findings suggest that SWE can provide biomechanical information for evaluating the mechanical properties of healing Achilles tendon and predict Achilles tendon function. PMID:27072885

  11. Increased unilateral tendon stiffness and its effect on gait 2-6 years after Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Agres, A N; Duda, G N; Gehlen, T J; Arampatzis, A; Taylor, W R; Manegold, S

    2015-12-01

    Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) alters tissue composition, which may affect long-term tendon mechanics and ankle function during movement. However, a relationship between Achilles tendon (AT) properties and ankle joint function during gait remains unclear. The primary hypotheses were that (a) post-ATR tendon stiffness and length differ from the noninjured contralateral side and that (b) intra-patient asymmetries in AT properties correlate to ankle function asymmetries during gait, determined by ankle angles and moments. Ultrasonography and dynamometry were used to assess AT tendon stiffness, strain, elongation, and rest length in both limbs of 20 ATR patients 2-6 years after repair. Three-dimensional ankle angles and moments were determined using gait analysis. Injured tendons exhibited increased stiffness, rest length, and altered kinematics, with higher dorsiflexion and eversion, and lower plantarflexion and inversion. Intra-patient tendon stiffness and tendon length ratios were negatively correlated to intra-patient ratios of the maximum plantarflexion moment and maximum dorsiflexion angle, respectively. These results suggest that after surgical ATR repair, higher AT stiffness, but not a longer AT, may contribute to deficits in plantarflexion moment generation. These data further support the claim that post-ATR tendon regeneration results in the production of a tissue that is functionally different than noninjured tendon.

  12. Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures: Does Surgery Offer Superior Results (and Other Confusing Issues)?

    PubMed

    Cooper, Minton Truitt

    2015-10-01

    Management of acute Achilles tendon rupture is controversial. Although in the past open surgery was considered the gold standard, recent studies have shown improved outcomes with nonoperative management, leading to an increase in popularity of this treatment option. Percutaneous techniques have gained attention and seem to offer excellent results. In addition, as with many other orthopedic conditions, significant concerns and questions exist as to whether or not chemoprophylaxis is indicated in these patients.

  13. Physical activity modulates nerve plasticity and stimulates repair after Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Bring, Daniel K-I; Kreicbergs, Andris; Renstrom, Per A F H; Ackermann, Paul W

    2007-02-01

    In a rat model of tendon rupture using semiquantitative methodology, healing was assessed according to the diameter of newly organized collagen and the occurrence of the sensory neuropeptides (SP, CGRP) in relation to different levels of physical activity. Normally, innervation of the Achilles tendon is confined to the paratenon. After rupture new nerve fibers grow into the tendon proper, but disappear after healing. In a first experiment to establish peak tissue and nerve regeneration after rupture, tendon tissues from freely moving rats were collected consecutively over 16 weeks. A peak increase in organized collagen and nerve ingrowth was observed between week 2 to 4 post rupture. Therefore, in a second experiment week 4 was chosen to assess the effect of physical activity on tendon healing in three groups of rats, that is, wheel running, plaster treated, and freely moving (controls). In the wheel-running group, the diameter of newly organized collagen was 94% ( p = 0.001) greater than that in the plaster-treated group and 48% ( p = 0.02) greater than that in the controls. Inversely, the neuronal occurrence of CGRP in the tendon proper was 57% ( p = 0.02) lower in the wheel-running group than that in the plaster-treated group and 53% ( p = 0.02) lower than that in the controls, suggesting an earlier neuronal in-growth and disappearance in the more active group. Physical activity speeds up tendon healing, which may prove to be linked to accelerated neuronal plasticity.

  14. High voltage pulsed current in collagen realignment, synthesis, and angiogenesis after Achilles tendon partial rupture

    PubMed Central

    Rampazo, Érika P.; Liebano, Richard E.; Pinfildi, Carlos Eduardo; Folha, Roberta A. C.; Ferreira, Lydia M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To verify the efficacy of high voltage pulsed current in collagen realignment and synthesis and in angiogenesis after the partial rupturing of the Achilles tendon in rats. Method Forty male Wistar rats were randomized into four groups of 10 animals each: sham, cathodic stimulation, anodic stimulation, and alternating stimulation. Their Achilles tendons were submitted to direct trauma by a free-falling metal bar. Then, the treatment was administered for six consecutive days after the injury. In the simulation group, the electrodes were positioned on the animal, but the device remained off for 30 minutes. The other groups used a frequency of 120 pps, sensory threshold, and the corresponding polarity. On the seventh day, the tendons were removed and sent for histological slide preparation for birefringence and Picrosirius Red analysis and for blood vessel quantification. Results No significant difference was observed among the groups regarding collagen realignment (types I or III collagen) or quantity of blood vessels. Conclusion High voltage pulsed current for six consecutive days was not effective in collagen realignment, synthesis, or angiogenesis after the partial rupturing of the Achilles tendon in rats. PMID:27556387

  15. Recurrent patellar tendon rupture in a patient after intramedullary nailing of the tibia: reconstruction using an Achilles tendon allograft.

    PubMed

    Jagow, Devin M; Garcia, Branden J; Yacoubian, Stephan V; Yacoubian, Shahan V

    2015-05-01

    Various complications after intramedullary (IM) nailing of the tibia have been reported, the most common of which are anterior knee pain and symptoms similar to patella tendonitis. Complete rupture of the patellar tendon after IM nailing of the tibia has been reported on 2 occasions, in conjunction with predisposing patient factors, such as systemic disease or a proud tibial nail. Patellar tendon ruptures are disabling injuries that can be technically difficult to repair because of the poor quality of remaining tendon tissue, quadriceps muscle atrophy and/or contracture, and scar-tissue formation. Many methods have described the surgical reconstruction of the knee extensor mechanism, which is most commonly performed after total knee arthroplasty. We report the successful surgical and clinical outcome of patellar tendon reconstruction using an Achilles tendon allograft in a patient subject to late and recurrent ruptures after IM nailing of the tibia through a mid-patellar tendon-splitting approach. Seven months after tendon reconstruction, the patient exhibited full knee flexion, an extension lag of 10º, 4/5 quadriceps strength, and return to her baseline ambulatory status.

  16. Medial malleolus fracture of the ankle combined with rupture of the Achilles tendon

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jike; Maruo Holledge, Masumi

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old man fell off a 60-cm-high step, with his ankle in a twisted position, and sustained a closed fracture of the medial malleolus, with an ipsilateral complete Achilles tendon (TA) rupture. The TA rupture was initially missed but diagnosed by ultrasound examination, 2 weeks post-operatively. The ankle fracture was diagnosed from routine radiographs. Such a combination of injuries has been reported infrequently in the literature, but significant similarities have been described in the mechanism of injury and fracture patterns. Nevertheless, three of five reported cases with combined medial malleolus fractures were initially misdiagnosed. PMID:27141047

  17. Open Achilles tendon lacerations.

    PubMed

    Said, M Nader; Al Ateeq Al Dosari, Mohamed; Al Subaii, Nasser; Kawas, Alaa; Al Mas, Ali; Al Ser, Yaser; Abuodeh, Yousef; Shakil, Malik; Habash, Ali; Mukhter, Khalid

    2015-04-01

    In contrast to closed Achilles tendon ruptures, open injuries are rarely reported in the literature. This paper provides information about open Achilles tendon wounds that are eventually seen in the Middle East. The reporting unit, Hamad Medical Corporation, is one of the biggest trauma centers in the Gulf area and the major health provider in Qatar. This is a retrospective study including patients admitted and operated for open Achilles tendon injuries between January 2011 and December 2013. Two hundred and five cases of open Achilles tendon lacerations were operated in Hamad General Hospital in this period. Forty-eight cases showed partial injuries, and the remaining are complete tendons cut. In the same period, fifty-one closed ruptured Achilles tendons were operated in the same trauma unit. In the majority of cases, the open injury resulted from a slip in the floor-leveled traditional toilette seats. Local damage to the toilette seats resulted in sharp edges causing the laceration of the heel if the patient was slipping over the wet floor. This occurrence is the cause in the vast majority of the cases. Wounds were located 1-5 cm proximal to tendon insertion. Standard treatment principles were applied. This included thorough irrigation in the emergency room, intravenous antibiotics, surgical debridement and primary repair within 24 h. Patients were kept in the hospital 1-7 days for intravenous antibiotics and possible dressing changes. Postoperatively below knee slabs were applied in the majority of patients and were kept for about 4 weeks followed by gradual weight bearing and range of motion exercises. Outpatients follow up in 1-2 weeks. Further follow-up visits at around 2-, 4-, 8- and 12-week intervals until complete wound healing and satisfactory rehabilitation outcome. Sixteen cases needed a second procedure. A high incidence of Achilles tendon open injuries is reported. This seems to be related to partially damaged floor-level toilettes in the

  18. Is Operative Treatment of Achilles Tendon Ruptures Superior to Nonoperative Treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Brandon J.; Mascarenhas, Randy; Saltzman, Bryan M.; Walton, David; Lee, Simon; Cole, Brian J.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multiple meta-analyses have been published in efforts to determine whether operative or nonoperative treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures affords superior outcomes. Purpose: To perform a systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses comparing operative and nonoperative treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures to determine which meta-analyses provide the highest level of evidence for treatment recommendations. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A systematic review of the literature was performed to identify meta-analyses that fit the study inclusion criteria. Data were extracted from these meta-analyses regarding patient outcomes and reruptures. Meta-analysis quality was assessed using the Oxman-Guyatt and QUOROM (Quality of Reporting of Meta-analyses) systems. The Jadad algorithm was applied to determine the meta-analyses with the highest level of evidence. Results: Nine meta-analyses met the eligibility criteria, with all but 1 study including level 1 evidence. A total of 5842 patients were included. Seven studies found a higher rate of rerupture in the nonoperative group but a higher rate of complications in the operative group. One study found no differences in rerupture or complication rates, and 1 study found surgery decreased rerupture rates only when compared with nonoperative treatment without a functional brace. Three studies also identified an earlier return to work in the operative group. Almost all (8 of 9) of the meta-analyses had Oxman-Guyatt scores >3, indicating no major flaws. Conclusion: Operative treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures decreases rerupture rates but increases the risk for minor complications when compared with nonoperative treatment. Additionally, surgical treatment may allow earlier return to work. PMID:26665055

  19. Nintendo Wii related Achilles tendon rupture: first reported case and literature review of motion sensing video game injuries.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rohit; Manoharan, Gopikanthan; Moores, Thomas Steven; Patel, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures tend to occur more commonly in healthy men between the ages of 30 and 50 years who have had no previous injury or problem reported in the affected leg. The injury is usually due to sudden forced plantar flexion of the foot, unexpected dorsiflexion of the foot and violent dorsiflexion of a plantar flexed foot, all of which occur during high impact activities. We present the first reported case of interactive activity with Nintendo Wii games that have resulted in Achilles tendon rupture in a 46-year-old man. There have been no previous reports of Achilles tendon rupture with Nintendo Wii usage; it is a relatively uncommon mode of injury and is rare in terms of epidemiology of motion sensing video game injuries. PMID:24827648

  20. Surgical versus conservative treatment following acute rupture of the Achilles tendon: is there a pedobarographic difference?

    PubMed Central

    Karaaslan, Fatih; Mermerkaya, Musa Uğur; Çıraklı, Alper; Karaoğlu, Sinan; Duygulu, Fuat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Controversy remains regarding the optimal treatment method and postoperative rehabilitation of acute Achilles tendon ruptures. In this study, pedobarographic assessments of surgical and conservative treatments were compared. Material and methods A prospective assessment was made of 16 patients (eight surgical, eight conservative) and eight healthy controls using a plantar pressure measurement system. Biomechanical gait parameters were obtained using the Footscan dynamic gait analysis system. Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney U-tests were used for the evaluation of data. Results Nineteen males and five females were assessed, with an average age of 42.0±11.9 years. Follow-up was completed in 16 patients. No statistically significant difference was determined between the two treatment groups with regard to the gait analysis, but a difference was observed with the control group (P<0.001). All patients were able to resume their prior activities after 6 months and regained normal ranges of motion, with a high rate of satisfaction. Most of the patients (75%) were able to return to their pre-injury level of activities. Conclusion Satisfactory results were obtained through conservative treatment of acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon. No significant differences or complications were observed in the group managed conservatively versus the group treated surgically. Further studies including 3D gait analyses and tendon biomechanical research are required to further investigate this issue. PMID:27621640

  1. Surgical versus conservative treatment following acute rupture of the Achilles tendon: is there a pedobarographic difference?

    PubMed Central

    Karaaslan, Fatih; Mermerkaya, Musa Uğur; Çıraklı, Alper; Karaoğlu, Sinan; Duygulu, Fuat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Controversy remains regarding the optimal treatment method and postoperative rehabilitation of acute Achilles tendon ruptures. In this study, pedobarographic assessments of surgical and conservative treatments were compared. Material and methods A prospective assessment was made of 16 patients (eight surgical, eight conservative) and eight healthy controls using a plantar pressure measurement system. Biomechanical gait parameters were obtained using the Footscan dynamic gait analysis system. Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney U-tests were used for the evaluation of data. Results Nineteen males and five females were assessed, with an average age of 42.0±11.9 years. Follow-up was completed in 16 patients. No statistically significant difference was determined between the two treatment groups with regard to the gait analysis, but a difference was observed with the control group (P<0.001). All patients were able to resume their prior activities after 6 months and regained normal ranges of motion, with a high rate of satisfaction. Most of the patients (75%) were able to return to their pre-injury level of activities. Conclusion Satisfactory results were obtained through conservative treatment of acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon. No significant differences or complications were observed in the group managed conservatively versus the group treated surgically. Further studies including 3D gait analyses and tendon biomechanical research are required to further investigate this issue.

  2. Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy accelerates Achilles tendon repair by promoting neurite regeneration☆

    PubMed Central

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Aibai, Minawa; Sabirhazi, Gulnur; Shawutali, Nuerai; Tangkejie, Wulanbai; Badelhan, Aynaz; Nuerduola, Yeermike; Satewalede, Turde; Buranbai, Darehan; Hunapia, Beicen; Jialihasi, Ayidaer; Bai, Jingping; Kizaibek, Murat

    2012-01-01

    Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy facilitates the functional recovery of a ruptured Achilles tendon. However, protein expression during the healing process remains a controversial issue. New Zealand rabbits, aged 14 weeks, underwent tenotomy followed immediately by Achilles tendon microsurgery to repair the Achilles tendon rupture. The tendon was then immobilized or subjected to postoperative early motion treatment (kinesitherapy). Mass spectrography results showed that after 14 days of motion treatment, 18 protein spots were differentially expressed, among which, 12 were up-regulated, consisting of gelsolin isoform b and neurite growth-related protein collapsing response mediator protein 2. Western blot analysis showed that gelsolin isoform b was up-regulated at days 7–21 of motion treatment. These findings suggest that active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy promotes the neurite regeneration of a ruptured Achilles tendon and gelsolin isoform b can be used as a biomarker for Achilles tendon healing after kinesitherapy. PMID:25317130

  3. Comparison of Semi-Invasive "Internal Splinting" and Open Suturing Techniques in Achilles Tendon Rupture Surgery.

    PubMed

    Sarman, Hakan; Muezzinoglu, Umit Sefa; Memisoglu, Kaya; Aydin, Adem; Atmaca, Halil; Baran, Tuncay; Odabas Ozgur, Bahar; Ozgur, Turgay; Kantar, Cengizhan

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate the semi-invasive "internal splinting" (SIIS) method for repair of Achilles tendon rupture relative to open repair with Krakow sutures. Efficacy was evaluated based on the clinical and functional outcomes, postoperative magnetic resonance imaging measurements, isokinetic results, and surgical complication rates. Functional measurements included the Thermann and American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle scores, bilateral ankle dorsiflexion, and plantar flexion measurements. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to compare the bilateral length and thickness of each Achilles tendon. The isokinetic outcomes were evaluated using a Biodex System 3 dynamometer. Of the 45 patients meeting the inclusion criteria, 24 were treated by SIIS and 21 by the open Krackow suture technique. The mean follow-up time for all patients was 43.7 (range 6 to 116) months. In the SIIS group, patients returned to normal daily activities after 7.2 (range 6 to 8) weeks compared with 14.3 (range 12 to 15) weeks in the open surgery group. The AOFAS ankle scores were 93.5 (range 82 to 100) points in the open repair group and 96.2 (range 86 to 100) points in the SIIS group. The Thermann scores were 80.4 (range 53 to 91) points for the open repair group and 87.9 (range 81 to 100) points for the SIIS method. The mean Achilles length on the operated side measured using magnetic resonance imaging was 175.06 (range 110 to 224) mm and 177.76 (range 149 to 214) mm for the open surgery and SIIS groups, respectively. Sensory impairment in the territory of the sural nerve was identified in 1 patient immediately after SIIS surgery, although this defect had completely resolved within 12 months. SIIS yielded better outcomes relative to the open surgery group according to the isokinetic measurements. Taken together, these data indicate the SIIS method for Achilles tendon ruptures performed better in terms of both functional and objective outcomes

  4. Early full weightbearing and functional treatment after surgical repair of acute achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Speck, M; Klaue, K

    1998-01-01

    We prospectively evaluated the clinical outcomes of 20 patients (mean age, 42.8 years) with early full weightbearing and functional treatment after surgical repair of acute Achilles tendon rupture according to a prospective intra- and postoperative protocol. All patients underwent open repair using a Kessler-type suture and simple apposition sutures. The postoperative regimen included a plantigrade splint for 24 hours and 6 weeks of early full weightbearing in a removable walker. All patients were evaluated with clinical and ultrasound examination and according to a new scoring system at 3, 6, and 12 months after repair. After 3 months, the score averaged 73 of 100 points; after 6 months, 86; and after 1 year, 94. All patients reached the same level of sports activities as preoperatively and demonstrated no significant difference in ankle mobility and isokinetic strength. There were no reruptures. One patient had a deep venous thrombosis 3 weeks after the operation after having prematurely stopped thromboprophylaxis. We believe that early careful ankle mobilization and full weightbearing in a removable walker after primary Achilles tendon repair does not increase the risk of rerupture. An accelerated rehabilitation program improves early foot function with excellent recovery of plantar flexion strength and amplitude.

  5. Neglected Achilles Tendon Rupture Treated with Flexor Hallucis Longus transfer with two turndown gastrocnemius fascia flap and reinforced with plantaris tendon.

    PubMed

    Mao, Haijiao; Shi, Zengyuan; Xu, Dachuan; Liu, Zhenxin

    2015-09-01

    Neglected Achilles Tendon Ruptures are commonly seen by orthopaedic surgeons. In cases resistant to conservative treatment, a variety of surgical procedures have been utilized in the past. The senior -surgeon at our institution has utilized a technique -employing two turndown fascia flaps fashioned from the proximal Achilles tendon augmented by a tenomyodesis of the flexor hallucis longus and plantaris tendon. The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical outcome of all patients who underwent this procedure. The medical records of 10 cases that underwent this procedure were retrospectively reviewed. We completed data collection sets using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hind foot scores, isokinetic evaluation, and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 1 year of follow-up. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hind foot scores improved from 64.4±3.54. Isokinetic testing at 30º/sec and 120º/sec revealed an mean deficits of 24.5%, respectively, in the plantar flexion peak torque of the involved ankle than non-involved ankle. The flexor hallucis longus tendon, gastrocnemius fascia flap and plantaris were well -integrated into the Achilles tendon forming a homogenous tendon, which was confirmed in MRI. Our subjective and objective data indicate that the reconstructive technique using flexor hallucis longus transfer with two turndown gastrocnemius fascia flaps and plantaris tendon is a good option for repairing large gap defect of Achilles tendon.

  6. [Damage to large tendons: Achilles, patellar and quadriceps tendons].

    PubMed

    Amlang, M H; Zwipp, H

    2006-07-01

    The etiology and mechanisms of Achilles, patellar and quadriceps tendon ruptures are very similar. Age dependent changes in tendon structure and disorders such gout, diabetes, rheumatic diseases and chronic renal failure are associated causes. The main mechanism of rupture is indirect trauma. Although clinical diagnosis is easy, ruptures are still frequently missed. Sonography is the main standard diagnostic tool. MRI is indicated only in special cases. Open operative repair is the most common treatment for quadriceps and patellar tendon ruptures. Treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures is moving towards an individualized choice of therapy. Percutaneous and other "minimally invasive" techniques will play an increasingly important role.

  7. [Early functional after-care of surgically treated fresh ruptures of the Achilles tendon].

    PubMed

    Thonke, N; Klinger, H M; Nothofer, W; Neugebauer, R

    1994-01-01

    Functional treatment regimens in favour of the idea of keeping up regular limited use of the extremities instead of immobilisation have continuously gained influence in orthopedic surgery. The knowledge that inconsistently used biological systems degenerate has now widely become accepted. Immediate Achilles tendon tension reconstruction by means of minimal surgical incision and simple suture in addition with fibrin-glue was performed in 51 patients. Age, sex-distribution, etiology, preexisting pain, rate of degenerative histologic findings and side of rupture were similar to those reported in former studies with large numbers of patients [2, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13]. Non weightbearing functional walking in a side supported "basketball" sports shoe (Adimed) with gradually reduced heel support (initially 3 cm; complete removal regaining neutral position of the ankle joint after 4 weeks) was advised for 6 weeks, after acute postop swelling has resolved. All tendons healed and up to now (follow up period: 14-48 months - average: 26) no rerupture occurred. One insufficiency resulted from non compliance due to alcoholism.

  8. Augmentation vs Nonaugmentation Techniques for Open Repairs of Achilles Tendon Ruptures with Early Functional Treatment: A Prospective Randomized Study.

    PubMed

    Tezeren, Gündüz; Kuru, Ilhami

    2006-01-01

    A prospective randomized study was conducted in order to compare augmentation technique versus nonaugmentation technique, followed by early functional postoperative treatment, for operative repair of Achilles tendon ruptures. Twenty-four consecutive patients were assigned to two groups. Group I included 12 patients treated with Lindholm augmentation technique, whereas group II included 12 patients treated with modified Kessler end-to-end repair. Thereafter, these patients had postoperative management with a below-knee-cast for three weeks. The physioteraphy was initiated immediately after the cast was removed. Full weight bearing was allowed after five weeks postoperatively in the both groups. Two patients had reruptures in group II, whereas group I had prolonged operative time significantly. The patients with reruptures underwent reoperations and at the most final follow-up, it was observed that they could not resume to sporting activities. The other objective and subjective results were similar between two groups. Because of quite high rerupture rate in the group of patients treated with nonaugmentation technique, we favor functional postoperative treatment with early ankle movement in the patients treated with augmentation technique for the management of acute rupture of the Achilles tendon. Key PointsA prospective randomized study was conducted in order to compare augmentation technique versus nonaugmentation technique, followed by early functional postoperative treatment, for operative repair of Achilles tendon ruptures.Group I included 12 patients treated with Lindholm augmentation technique, whereas group II included 12 patients treated with modified Kessler end-to-end repair.Functional postoperative treatment with early ankle movement in the patients treated with augmentation for the management of acute rupture of the Achilles tendon is recommended.

  9. Augmentation vs Nonaugmentation Techniques for Open Repairs of Achilles Tendon Ruptures with Early Functional Treatment: A Prospective Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Tezeren, Gündüz; Kuru, Ilhami

    2006-01-01

    A prospective randomized study was conducted in order to compare augmentation technique versus nonaugmentation technique, followed by early functional postoperative treatment, for operative repair of Achilles tendon ruptures. Twenty-four consecutive patients were assigned to two groups. Group I included 12 patients treated with Lindholm augmentation technique, whereas group II included 12 patients treated with modified Kessler end-to-end repair. Thereafter, these patients had postoperative management with a below-knee-cast for three weeks. The physioteraphy was initiated immediately after the cast was removed. Full weight bearing was allowed after five weeks postoperatively in the both groups. Two patients had reruptures in group II, whereas group I had prolonged operative time significantly. The patients with reruptures underwent reoperations and at the most final follow-up, it was observed that they could not resume to sporting activities. The other objective and subjective results were similar between two groups. Because of quite high rerupture rate in the group of patients treated with nonaugmentation technique, we favor functional postoperative treatment with early ankle movement in the patients treated with augmentation technique for the management of acute rupture of the Achilles tendon. Key Points A prospective randomized study was conducted in order to compare augmentation technique versus nonaugmentation technique, followed by early functional postoperative treatment, for operative repair of Achilles tendon ruptures. Group I included 12 patients treated with Lindholm augmentation technique, whereas group II included 12 patients treated with modified Kessler end-to-end repair. Functional postoperative treatment with early ankle movement in the patients treated with augmentation for the management of acute rupture of the Achilles tendon is recommended. PMID:24357956

  10. Achilles tendon ruptures stratified by age, race, and cause of injury among active duty U.S. Military members.

    PubMed

    Davis, J J; Mason, K T; Clark, D A

    1999-12-01

    A total of 865 members of the U.S. military underwent repair of Achilles tendon ruptures at U.S. military hospitals during calendar years 1994, 1995, and 1996. The discharge summaries of these patients were analyzed for patient demographic information, including age, race, and causative activity. Patients were then stratified by age, race, and cause of injury. Blacks were at increased risk for undergoing repair of the Achilles tendon compared with nonblacks (overall relative risk = 4.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.63, 4.74; summary odds ratio controlling for age = 3.69, CI = 3.25, 4.19). Participation in the game of basketball accounted for 64.9% of all injuries in black patients and 34.0% of all injuries in nonblack patients. Among those injured, blacks had a significantly increased risk for injury related to playing basketball than nonblacks (relative risk = 1.82, CI = 1.58, 2.10). This finding suggests that there may be other predisposing factor(s) that result in a higher risk of Achilles tendon ruptures in black individuals.

  11. In-depth imaging and quantification of degenerative changes associated with Achilles ruptured tendons by polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnaninchi, P. O.; Yang, Y.; Bonesi, M.; Maffulli, G.; Phelan, C.; Meglinski, I.; El Haj, A.; Maffulli, N.

    2010-07-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a method based on polarization-sensitive optical coherent tomography (PSOCT) for the imaging and quantification of degenerative changes associated with Achilles tendon rupture. Ex vivo PSOCT examinations were performed in 24 patients. The study involved samples from 14 ruptured Achilles tendons, 4 tendinopathic Achilles tendons and 6 patellar tendons (collected during total knee replacement) as non-ruptured controls. The samples were imaged in both intensity and phase retardation modes within 24 h after surgery, and birefringence was quantified. The samples were fixed and processed for histology immediately after imaging. Slides were assessed twice in a blind manner to provide a semi-quantitative histological score of degeneration. In-depth micro structural imaging was demonstrated. Collagen disorganization and high cellularity were observable by PSOCT as the main markers associated with pathological features. Quantitative assessment of birefringence and penetration depth found significant differences between non-ruptured and ruptured tendons. Microstructure abnormalities were observed in the microstructure of two out of four tendinopathic samples. PSOCT has the potential to explore in situ and in-depth pathological change associated with Achilles tendon rupture, and could help to delineate abnormalities in tendinopathic samples in vivo.

  12. Study of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal and Tendon-Derived Stem Cells Transplantation on the Regenerating Effect of Achilles Tendon Ruptures in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Al-ani, Mohanad Kh; Xu, Kang; Sun, Yanjun; Pan, Lianhong; Xu, ZhiLing; Yang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Comparative therapeutic significance of tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) transplantation to treat ruptured Achilles tendon was studied. Three groups of SD rats comprising 24 rats each, designated as TDSCs and BMSCs, and nontreated were studied for regenerative effects through morpho-histological evaluations and ultimate failure load. For possible mechanism in tendon repair/regeneration through TDSCs and BMSCs, we measured Collagen-I (Col-I), Col-III gene expression level by RT-PCR, and Tenascin-C expression via immunofluorescent assay. TDSCs showed higher agility in tendon healing with better appearance density and well-organized longitudinal fibrous structure, though BMSCs also showed positive effects. Initially the ultimate failure load was considerably higher in TDSCs than other two study groups during the weeks 1 and 2, but at week 4 it attained an average or healthy tendon strength of 30.2 N. Similar higher tendency in Col-I/III gene expression level during weeks 1, 2, and 4 was observed in TDSCs treated group with an upregulation of 1.5-fold and 1.1-fold than the other two study groups. Immunofluorescent assay revealed higher expression of Tenascin-C in TDSCs at week 1, while both TDSCs and BMSCs treated groups showed detectable CM-Dil-labelled cells at week 4. Compared with BMSCs, TDSCs showed higher regenerative potential while treating ruptured Achilles tendons in rats. PMID:26339252

  13. Negative pressure wound therapy in the management of late deep infections after open reconstruction of achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Mosser, Philipp; Kelm, Jens; Anagnostakos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Infection is a major complication after open reconstruction of Achilles tendon ruptures. We report on the use of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy in the treatment of late deep infections after open Achilles tendon reconstruction. Six patients (5 males [83.33%], 1 female [16.67%]; mean age, 52.8 [range 37 to 66] years) were been treated using an identical protocol. Surgical management consisted of debridement, lavage, and necrectomy of infected tendon parts. The VAC therapy was used for local wound preconditioning and infection management. A continuous negative pressure of 125 mm Hg was applied on each wound. For final wound closure, a split-thickness skin graft was performed. The skin graft healing process was also supported by VAC therapy during the first 5 days. The VAC dressings were changed a mean average of 3 (range 1 to 4) times until split-thickness skin grafting could be performed. The mean total duration of the VAC therapy was 13.6 ± 5.9 days. The mean hospital stay was 31.2 ± 15.9 days. No complications with regard to bleeding, seroma, or hematoma formation beneath the skin graft were observed. At a mean follow-up duration of 29.9 (range 4 to 65) months, no re-infection or infection persistence was observed. The VAC device seems to be a valuable tool in the treatment of infected tendons. The generalization of these conclusions should await the results of future studies with larger patient series.

  14. Common conditions of the achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Michael F; McCue, Timothy

    2002-05-01

    The Achilles tendon, the largest tendon in the body, is vulnerable to injury because of its limited blood supply and the combination of forces to which it is subjected. Aging and increased activity (particularly velocity sports) increase the chance of injury to the Achilles tendon. Although conditions of the Achilles tendon are occurring with increasing frequency because the aging U.S. population is remaining active, the diagnosis is missed in about one fourth of cases. Injury onset can be gradual or sudden, and the course of healing is often lengthy. A thorough history and specific physical examination are essential to make the appropriate diagnosis and facilitate a specific treatment plan. The mainstay of treatment for tendonitis, peritendonitis, tendinosis, and retrocalcaneobursitis is ice, rest, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but physical therapy, orthoties, and surgery may be necessary in recalcitrant cases. In patients with tendon rupture, casting or surgery is required. Appropriate treatment often leads to full recovery.

  15. Three-Dimensional Gait Analysis Following Achilles Tendon Rupture With Nonsurgical Treatment Reveals Long-Term Deficiencies in Muscle Strength and Function

    PubMed Central

    Tengman, Tine; Riad, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Background: Precise long-term assessment of movement and physical function following Achilles tendon rupture is required for the development and evaluation of treatment, including different regimens of physical therapy. Purpose: To assess intermediate-term (<10 years by conventional thinking) objective measures of physical function following Achilles tendon rupture treated nonsurgically and to compare these with self-reported measures of physical function. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Two to 5 years after Achilles tendon rupture, 9 women and 43 men (mean age, 49.2 years; range, 26-68 years) were assessed by physical examination, performance of 1-legged jumps, and 3-dimensional gait analysis (including calculation of muscle work). Self-reported scores for foot function (Achilles tendon rupture score) and level of physical activity were collected. Twenty age- and sex-matched controls were assessed in the same manner. Results: Physical examination of patients with the knee extended revealed 11.1° of dorsiflexion on the injured side and 9.2° on the uninjured side (P = .020), indicating gastrocnemius muscle lengthening. The 1-legged jump distance was shorter on the injured side (89.5 vs 96.2 cm; P < .001). Gait analysis showed higher peak dorsiflexion (14.3° vs 13.3°; P = .016) and lower concentric (positive) plantar flexor work (16.6 vs 19.9 J/kg; P = .001) in the ankle on the uninjured side. At the same time, eccentric (negative) dorsiflexor work was higher on the injured side (13.2 vs 11.9 J/kg; P = .010). Self-perceived foot function and physical activity were lower in patients than in healthy controls (mean Achilles tendon rupture score, 78.6 and 99.8, respectively). Conclusion: Nonsurgically treated patients with Achilles tendon rupture showed signs of both anatomic and functional lengthening of the tendon. Attenuated muscle strength and function were present during walking as long as 2 to 5 years after rupture, as

  16. Lubricin in human achilles tendon: The evidence of intratendinous sliding motion and shear force in achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu-Long; Wei, Zhuang; Zhao, Chunfeng; Jay, Gregory D; Schmid, Thomas M; Amadio, Peter C; An, Kai-Nan

    2015-06-01

    Achilles tendon is one of the most commonly injured tendons. Mechanical force is regarded as a major causative factor. However, the biomechanics of Achilles tendon and mechanical mechanism of the injuries are unclear. Lubricin expresses at regions exposed to sliding motion and shear force in a number of tissues. This study investigated the distribution and concentration of lubricin in human Achilles tendons for better understanding the biomechanics of Achilles tendon. Achilles tendons were harvested from nine cadavers. Lubricin was extracted from various locations proximal to the calcaneal insertion and quantified with ELISA. The distribution of lubricin was investigated with immunohistochemistry. Lubricin was mainly identified at the interfaces of tendon fascicles, especially in the mid-portion of the tendon. The concentration of lubricin in Achilles tendons varied by individual and the distance from its calcaneal insertion. The distal portion of the tendon had a higher concentration of lubricin than the proximal regions of the tendon. This study suggests the presence of intratendinous sliding motion of fascicles and shear force at interfaces of fascicles in human Achilles tendon. Shear force could be an important mechanical factor for the development of Achilles tendinopathy and rupture.

  17. Achilles tendon reflex measuring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szebeszczyk, Janina; Straszecka, Joanna

    1995-06-01

    The examination of Achilles tendon reflex is widely used as a simple, noninvasive clinical test in diagnosis and pharmacological therapy monitoring in such diseases as: hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, diabetic neuropathy, the lower limbs obstructive angiopathies and intermittent claudication. Presented Achilles tendon reflect measuring system is based on the piezoresistive sensor connected with the cylinder-piston system. To determinate the moment of Achilles tendon stimulation a detecting circuit was used. The outputs of the measuring system are connected to the PC-based data acquisition board. Experimental results showed that the measurement accuracy and repeatability is good enough for diagnostics and therapy monitoring purposes. A user friendly, easy-to-operate measurement system fulfills all the requirements related to recording, presentation and storing of the patients' reflexograms.

  18. Minimally Invasive Approach to Achilles Tendon Pathology.

    PubMed

    Hegewald, Kenneth W; Doyle, Matthew D; Todd, Nicholas W; Rush, Shannon M

    2016-01-01

    Many surgical procedures have been described for Achilles tendon pathology; however, no overwhelming consensus has been reached for surgical treatment. Open repair using a central or paramedian incision allows excellent visualization for end-to-end anastomosis in the case of a complete rupture and detachment and reattachment for insertional pathologies. Postoperative wound dehiscence and infection in the Achilles tendon have considerable deleterious effects on overall functional recovery and outcome and sometimes require plastic surgery techniques to achieve coverage. With the aim of avoiding such complications, foot and ankle surgeons have studied less invasive techniques for repair. We describe a percutaneous approach to Achilles tendinopathy using a modification of the Bunnell suture weave technique combined with the use of interference screws. No direct end-to-end repair of the tendon is performed, rather, the proximal stump is brought in direct proximity of the distal stump, preventing overlengthening and proximal stump retraction. This technique also reduces the suture creep often seen with end-to-end tendon repair by providing a direct, rigid suture to bone interface. We have used the new technique to minimize dissection and exposure while restoring function and accelerating recovery postoperatively. PMID:26385574

  19. Faut-il préférer une technique chirurgicale dans le traitement des ruptures du tendon d'Achille?

    PubMed Central

    Hani, Redouane; Kharmaz, Mohammed; Berrada, Mohammed Saleh

    2015-01-01

    La rupture du tendon d'Achille est de plus en plus fréquente dans le monde et dans notre pays en raison du développement considérable des activités sportives, de l'accroissement de leur intensité et de l'absence de moyens de prévention. Notre travail porte sur une étude concernant 58 cas de rupture du tendon d'Achille, avec un recul moyen compris entre 5 mois et 80 mois. L’âge moyen était de 36 ans, tous les patients inclus ont tous bénéficier d'un traitement chirurgical. Le but de notre étude étant de souligner la supériorité d'une technique chirurgicale par rapport à une autre dans la prise en charge, ainsi qu'une mise au point sur les différents aspects épidémiologiques, cliniques, thérapeutiques et post-thérapeutiques de cette lésion. PMID:26161208

  20. Intermittent pneumatic compression reduces the risk of deep vein thrombosis during post-operative lower limb immobilisation: a prospective randomised trial of acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Domeij-Arverud, E; Labruto, F; Latifi, A; Nilsson, G; Edman, G; Ackermann, P W

    2015-05-01

    Deep vein thrombosis is a common complication of immobilising the lower limb after surgery. We hypothesised that intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) therapy in outpatients who had undergone surgical repair of acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon could reduce the incidence of this problem. A total of 150 patients who had undergone surgical repair of the Achilles tendon were randomised to either treatment with IPC for six hours per day (n = 74) under an orthosis or treatment as usual (n = 74) in a plaster cast without IPC. At two weeks post-operatively, the incidence of deep vein thrombosis was assessed using blinded, double-reported compression duplex ultrasound. At this point, IPC was discontinued and all patients were immobilised in an orthosis for a further four weeks. At six weeks post-operatively, a second compression duplex ultrasound scan was performed. At two weeks, the incidence of deep vein thrombosis was 21% in the treated group and 37% in the control group (p = 0.042). Age over 39 years was found to be a strong risk factor for deep vein thrombosis (odds ratio (OR) = 4.84, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.14 to 10.96). Treatment with IPC, corrected for age differences between groups, reduced the risk of deep vein thrombosis at the two-week point (OR = 2.60; 95% CI 1.15 to 5.91; p =0.022). At six weeks, the incidence of deep vein thrombosis was 52% in the treated group and 48% in the control group (OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.49 to 1.83). IPC appears to be an effective method of reducing the risk of deep vein thrombosis in the early stages of post-operative immobilisation of outpatients. Further research is necessary to elucidate whether it can confer similar benefits over longer periods of immobilisation and in a more heterogeneous group of patients.

  1. Achilles tendon suture deteriorates tendon capillary blood flow with sustained tissue oxygen saturation – an animal study

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer, Robert; Lorenzen, Johan; Rotter, Robert; Vogt, Peter M; Knobloch, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    Background Treatment of ruptured Achilles tendons currently constitutes of conservative early functional treatment or surgical treatment either by open or minimal invasive techniques. We hypothesize that an experimental Achilles tendon suture in an animal model significantly deteriorates Achilles tendon microcirculation immediately following suturing. Methods Fifteen Achilles tendons of eight male Wistar rats (275–325 g) were included. After preparation of the Achilles tendon with a medial paratendinous approach, Achilles tendon microcirculation was assessed using combined Laser-Doppler and spectrophotometry (Oxygen-to-see) regarding: - tendinous capillary blood flow [arbitrary units AU] - tendinous tissue oxygen saturation [%] - tendinous venous filling pressure [rAU] The main body of the Achilles tendon was measured in the center of the suture with 50 Hz. 10 minutes after Achilles tendon suture (6-0 Prolene), a second assessment of microcirculatory parameters was performed. Results Achilles tendon capillary blood flow decreased by 57% following the suture (70 ± 30 AU vs. 31 ± 16 AU; p < 0.001). Tendinous tissue oxygen saturation remained at the same level before and after suture (78 ± 17% vs. 77 ± 22%; p = 0.904). Tendinous venous filling pressure increased by 33% (54 ± 16 AU vs. 72 ± 20 AU; p = 0.019) after suture. Conclusion Achilles tendon suture in anaesthetised rats causes an acute loss of capillary perfusion and increases postcapillary venous filling pressures indicating venous stasis. The primary hypothesis of this study was confirmed. In contrast, tendinous tissue oxygen saturation remains unchanged excluding acute intratendinous hypoxia within the first 10 minutes after suture. Further changes of oxygen saturation remain unclear. Furthermore, it remains to be determined to what extent reduced capillary blood flow as well as increased postcapillary stasis might influence tendon healing from a microcirculatory point of view in this animal setting

  2. Injury of the Achilles tendon: diagnosis with sonography.

    PubMed

    Kainberger, F M; Engel, A; Barton, P; Huebsch, P; Neuhold, A; Salomonowitz, E

    1990-11-01

    We determined the diagnostic accuracy of sonography for the assessment of injury to the Achilles tendon. After anatomic investigations in three human cadavers, we performed a clinical study in 24 healthy volunteers and 73 symptomatic patients referred for achillodynia or signs of heel thickening or both in whom a clinical diagnosis of acute total rupture was excluded. High-resolution real-time sonography was performed and the results were compared with final clinical diagnoses (55 patients) and surgical findings (18 patients). Fifty-two of the patients had been involved in various sporting activities (long-distance runners, jumpers, and basketball players), three patients had familial hypercholesterolemia, five patients had systemic inflammatory disease, and 13 patients had no known underlying cause. Anatomic investigation demonstrated accurate assessment of tendon structure and thickness. Sonograms were abnormal in 53 patients (sensitivity, 0.72; specificity, 0.83), and the extent of structural disorders of the tendon could be assessed properly. Abnormalities occurred in the form of tendon swelling (45%), abnormal tendon structure (42%), rupture (15%), and peritendinous lesions (47%). No changes were detected in low-grade disease of short duration, which suggests symptoms caused by functional disorders. Sonography is valuable in the diagnosis of various lesions of the Achilles tendon and its surrounding tissue. Furthermore, it can be used to estimate the degree of tendon abnormality and to differentiate between functional and morphologic conditions.

  3. Bilateral Achilles Tendon Ruptures Associated With Ciprofloxacin Use in the Setting of Minimal Change Disease: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Kawtharani, Firas; Masrouha, Karim Z; Afeiche, Nadim

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones are widely used antibiotics; however, numerous side effects have been reported in published studies, including a spectrum of tendinopathies, affecting numerous anatomic sites. Several risk factors have been identified, including advanced age (>60 years), corticosteroid use, renal failure or dialysis, female sex, and nonobesity. We present the case of an elderly male with minimal change disease treated with glucocorticoids and acute kidney injury, who sustained spontaneous nontraumatic bilateral Achilles tendon tears 4 days after initiating ciprofloxacin.

  4. Plyometric training effects on Achilles tendon stiffness and dissipative properties.

    PubMed

    Fouré, Alexandre; Nordez, Antoine; Cornu, Christophe

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of 14 wk of plyometric training on mechanical properties of the Achilles tendon. Nineteen subjects were randomly assigned to trained or control group. Cross-sectional area (CSA), stiffness, and dissipation coefficient of the Achilles tendon were measured before and after the training period. In the trained group, a decrease in dissipation coefficient (-35.0%; P<0.05) and an upward trend in stiffness (+24.1%) of the Achilles tendon was found, without any changes in Achilles tendon CSA (P>0.05). Plyometric training enhances the muscular tension transmission mainly through a reduction in energy dissipated by the tendon. The lack of changes in the Achilles tendon CSA indicates that changes in mechanical properties would mainly result from a qualitative change in tendinous tissues rather than from changes in the geometry of the Achilles tendon.

  5. Nonoperative biological treatment approach for partial Achilles tendon lesion.

    PubMed

    Filardo, Giuseppe; Presti, Mirco Lo; Kon, Elizaveta; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2010-02-01

    Tendon injuries, especially those of the Achilles tendon, are major concerns in sports medicine. The clinical presentation can be acute or chronic and the pathologic findings can range from peritendonitis to full-thickness tendon rupture. Nonsurgical treatment is not always successful; in particular, significant partial ruptures seem to respond poorly to conservative measures and do not improve with time. Surgery is most often considered the favored treatment option for this kind of lesion to obtain pain relief and full functionality with long-standing effects.This article describes a case of a partial tear of the Achilles tendon in a 34-year-old competitive athlete where surgical treatment was avoided in favor of a new biological approach. We applied autologous platelet growth factors through multiple platelet-rich plasma injections; approximately 6.5 billion platelets were injected into the lesion 3 times, 7 days apart. The treatment with platelet-rich plasma and a progressive rehabilitation program allowed the patient to play for 20 minutes in a basketball game 64 days after the trauma and in a full game 75 days after the trauma. To date, 18 months later, he has participated regularly in all the season's games and received no further treatment for his tendon.The fast tissue repair, confirmed by magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging, allowed a swift return to full functionality and competitive sports activity, suggesting a possible role of platelet growth factors in promoting rapid tendon healing with high-quality tissue. This biological approach may represent a less-invasive therapeutic option even in cases where severe tendon lesions are candidates for surgical treatment.

  6. Histopathological and biomechanical evaluation of tenocyte seeded allografts on rat Achilles tendon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Güngörmüş, Cansın; Kolankaya, Dürdane; Aydin, Erkin

    2015-05-01

    Tendon injuries in humans as well as in animals' veterinary medicine are problematic because tendon has poor regenerative capacity and complete regeneration of the ruptured tendon is never achieved. In the last decade there has been an increasing need of treatment methods with different approaches. The aim of the current study was to improve the regeneration process of rat Achilles tendon with tenocyte seeded decellularized tendon matrices. For this purpose, Achilles tendons were harvested, decellularized and seeded as a mixture of three consecutive passages of tenocytes at a density of 1 × 10(6) cells/ml. Specifically, cells with different passage numbers were compared with respect to growth characteristics, cellular senescence and collagen/tenocyte marker production before seeding process. The viability of reseeded tendon constructs was followed postoperatively up to 6 months in rat Achilles tendon by histopathological and biomechanical analysis. Our results suggests that tenocyte seeded decellularized tendon matrix can significantly improve the histological and biomechanical properties of tendon repair tissue without causing adverse immune reactions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first long-term study in the literature which was accomplished to prove the use of decellularized matrix in a clinically relevant model of rat Achilles tendon and the method suggested herein might have important implications for translation into the clinic.

  7. Diagnosing Achilles tendon injuries in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Lynda

    2013-09-01

    Achilles tendon (AT) injury is an overuse injury often seen in professional and recreational athletes. It tends to affect men, particularly those in their thirties and forties, more than women, and is typically seen in people who are intermittently active. To ensure AT ruptures are identified and treated effectively, early intervention in emergency departments (EDs) is crucial. This article discusses how advanced nurse practitioners can use their comprehensive problem-solving, clinical decision-making and clinical judgement skills to manage patients who present with suspected AT injury. It also describes the anatomy of tendon rupture, the aetiology and mechanism of injuries, and the importance of assessment and diagnostic tools, therapeutic techniques and management strategies. Finally, it considers the psychological effect this injury can have on patients, while in the ED and after discharge. A case study is included as an example of ED management.

  8. An unusual cause of Achilles tendon xanthoma.

    PubMed

    Parente, Fabienne; Vesnaver, Matthew; Massie, Rami; Baass, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    Tendinous xanthomas are often thought to be pathognomonic for familial hypercholesterolemia. In this report, we present the case of a young man with a normal lipid profile and Achilles tendon xanthoma. Biochemical and genetic studies confirmed the diagnosis of cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis in this patient. Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis is a rare autosomal recessive disease associated with xanthoma in tendons and the brain as well as progressive neurologic deficits. Unfortunately, this rare form of reversible dementia is thought to be underdiagnosed. Early diagnosis and treatment of this disease with chenodeoxycholic acid is essential and has been shown to greatly improve the patient's symptoms and prognosis. PMID:27578138

  9. [Quadriceps and patellar tendon ruptures].

    PubMed

    Grim, C; Lorbach, O; Engelhardt, M

    2010-12-01

    Ruptures of the quadriceps or patellar tendon are uncommon but extremely relevant injuries. Early diagnosis and surgical treatment with a stable suture construction are mandatory for a good postoperative clinical outcome. The standard methods of repair for quadriceps and patellar tendon injuries include the placement of suture loops through transpatellar tunnels. Reinforcement with either a wire cerclage or a PDS cord is used in patellar tendon repair. The PDS cord can also be applied as augmentation in quadriceps tendon repair. In secondary patellar tendon repair an autologous semitendinosus graft can be used. For chronic quadriceps tendon defects a V-shaped tendon flap with a distal footing is recommended. The different methods of repair should lead to early functional postoperative treatment. The clinical outcome after surgical treatment of patellar and quadriceps tendon ruptures is mainly good.

  10. Ossification of the bilateral Achilles tendon: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Arora, Abhishek J; Arora, Richa

    2015-09-01

    Ossification of the Achilles tendon is a rare clinical entity comprising of one or more segments of variable sized ossified masses in the fibrocartilaginous substance of the tendon. The etiology of ossification of the Achilles tendon is multifactorial with recurrent trauma and surgery comprising major predisposing factors, with others being metabolic, systemic, and infectious diseases. The possibility of a genetic predisposition towards this entity has also been raised, but has not yet been proven. We present a rare case of ossification of the bilateral Achilles tendons without any history of trauma or surgery in a 48-year-old female patient. PMID:26413314

  11. Etiology and pathophysiology of tendon ruptures in sports.

    PubMed

    Kannus, P; Natri, A

    1997-04-01

    Of all spontaneous tendon ruptures, complete Achilles tendon tears are most closely associated with sports activities (1-3). Schönbauer (3) reported that 75% of all ruptures of the Achilles tendon are related to sports. In Plecko & Passl (2) the number was 60%. In our material of 430 cases, the number of sports-related Achilles ruptures was very similar (62%), while only 2% of ruptures of other tendons were sports-related (P < 0.001) (1). Also, the majority of Achilles reruptures occurred in sports. The ruptures occurred most often in soccer (34%), track and field (16%) and basketball (14%). The distribution of Achilles ruptures according to different sports varies considerably from country to country, according to the national sport traditions. For example, in northern and middle Europe, soccer, tennis, track and field, indoor ball games, downhill skiing, and gymnastics are the most common; and in North America, football, basketball, baseball, tennis and downhill skiing dominate the statistics (1, 2, 4). In sports, some Achilles ruptures are not spontaneous or degeneration-induced but may occur as a consequence of the remarkably high forces that are involved in the performance (2). Ruptures in the high jump or triple jump are good examples. In such cases, failure in the neuromuscular protective mechanisms due to fatigue or disturbed co-ordination can frequently be found. The spontaneous complete rupture of the supraspinatus tendon of the rotator cuff does not occur very frequently in sports. Those sports that include high-energy throwing movements, such as American and Finnish baseball, American football, rugby and discuss and javelin throwing, may, however, produce this injury. Partial tears and inflammations of the rotator cuff complex are much more frequent in throwing sports. The complete rupture of the proximal long head of the biceps brachii tendon is rare among competitive and recreational athletes. In our material, under 2% of these ruptures were

  12. Influence of neglecting the curved path of the Achilles tendon on Achilles tendon length change at various ranges of motion

    PubMed Central

    Fukutani, Atsuki; Hashizume, Satoru; Kusumoto, Kazuki; Kurihara, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Achilles tendon length has been measured using a straight‐line model. However, this model is associated with a greater measurement error compared with a curved‐line model. Therefore, we examined the influence of neglecting the curved path of the Achilles tendon on its length change at various ranges of motion. Ten male subjects participated in this study. First, the location of the Achilles tendon was confirmed by using ultrasonography, and markers were attached on the skin over the Achilles tendon path. Then, the three‐dimensional coordinates of each marker at dorsiflexion (DF) 15°, plantarflexion (PF) 0°, PF15°, and PF30° were obtained. Achilles tendon length in the curved‐line model was calculated as the sum of the distances among each marker. On the other hand, Achilles tendon length in the straight‐line model was calculated as the straight distance between the two most proximal and distal markers projected onto the sagittal plane. The difference of the Achilles tendon length change between curved‐line and straight‐line models was calculated by subtracting the Achilles tendon length change obtained in curved‐line model from that obtained in straight‐line model with three different ranges of motion (i.e., PF0°, PF15°, and PF30° from DF15°, respectively). As a result, the difference in Achilles tendon length change between the two models increased significantly as the range of motion increased. In conclusion, neglecting the curved path of the Achilles tendon induces substantial overestimation of its length change when the extent of ankle joint angle change is large. PMID:25303951

  13. In-vitro tensile testing machine for vibration study of fresh rabbit Achilles tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revel, Gian M.; Scalise, Alessandro; Scalise, Lorenzo; Pianosi, Antonella

    2001-10-01

    A lot of people, overall athletic one suffer from tendinitis or complete rupture of the Achilles tendon. This structure becomes inflamed and damaged mainly from a variety of mechanical forces and sometimes due to metabolic problems, such as diabetes or arthritis. Over the past three decades extensive studies have been performed on the structural and mechanical properties of Achilles tendon trying to explain the constitutive equations to describe and foresee tendon behavior. Among the various mechanical parameters, the vibrational behavior is also of interest. Several investigations are performed in order to study how the Achilles tendon vibrations influence the response of the muscle proprioception and human posture. The present article describes how in vitro tensile experiments can be performed, taking into account the need to simulate physiological condition of Achilles tendon and thus approaching some opened problems in the design of the experimental set-up. A new system for evaluating tendon vibrations by non contact techniques is proposed. Preliminary simple elongation tests are made extracting the main mechanical parameters: stress and strain at different fixed stretches, in order to characterize the tissue. Finally, a vibration study is made at each pretensioned tendon level evaluating the oscillating curves caused by a small hammer.

  14. Effect of repeated freezing-thawing on the Achilles tendon of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lianxu; Wu, Yanping; Yu, Jiakuo; Jiao, Zhaode; Ao, Yingfang; Yu, Changlong; Wang, Jianquan; Cui, Guoqing

    2011-06-01

    The increased use of allograft tissue in the reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament has brought more focus to the effect of storage and treatment on allograft. The purpose of this study was to observe the effect of histology and biomechanics on Achilles tendon in rabbits through repeated freezing-thawing before allograft tendon transplantation. Rabbit Achilles tendons were harvested and processed according to the manufacture's protocol of tissue bank, and freezing-thawing was repeated three times (group 1) and ten times (group 2). Those received only one cycle were used as controls. Then, tendons in each group were selected randomly to make for histological observations and biomechanics test. Histological observation showed that the following changes happened as the number of freezing-thawing increased: the arrangement of tendon bundles and collagen fibrils became disordered until ruptured, cells disrupted and apparent gaps appeared between tendon bundle because the formation of ice crystals. There were significant differences between the experimental and control groups in the values of maximum load, energy of maximum load and maximum stress, whereas no significant differences existed in other values such as stiffness, maximum strain, elastic modulus, and energy density. Therefore, repeated freezing-thawing had histological and biomechanical effect on Achilles tendon in rabbits before allograft tendon transplantation. This indicates that cautions should be taken in the repeated freezing-thawing preparation of allograft tendons in clinical application.

  15. Spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Vigneswaran, N; Lee, K; Yegappan, M

    2007-11-01

    Spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon ruptures are uncommon. We present a 30-year-old man with end-stage renal failure, who sustained this injury, and subsequently had surgical repair of both tendons on separate occasions. He has since regained full range of movement of both knees.

  16. The Effects of Irreversible Electroporation on the Achilles Tendon: An Experimental Study in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Mingwei; Ding, Weidong; Xu, Kui; Fan, Qingyu; Li, Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate the potential effects of irreversible electroporation ablation on the Achilles tendon in a rabbit model and to compare the histopathological and biomechanical changes between specimens following electroporation ablation and radiofrequency ablation. Methods A total of 140 six-month-old male New Zealand rabbits were used. The animals were randomly divided into two groups, 70 in the radiofrequency ablation group and 70 in the electroporation group. In situ ablations were applied directly to the Achilles tendons of rabbits using typical electroporation (1800 V/cm, 90 pulses) and radiofrequency ablation (power control mode) protocols. Histopathological and biomechanical evaluations were performed to examine the effects of electroporation ablation and radiofrequency ablation over time. Results Both electroporation and radiofrequency ablation produced complete cell ablation in the target region. Thermal damage resulted in tendon rupture 3 days post radiofrequency ablation. In contrast, electroporation-ablated Achilles tendons preserved their biomechanical properties and showed no detectable rupture at this time point. The electroporation-ablated tendons exhibited signs of recovery, including tenoblast regeneration and angiogenesis within 2 weeks, and the restoration of their integral structure was evident within 12 weeks. Conclusions When applying electroporation to ablate solid tumors, major advantage could be that collateral damage to adjacent tendons or ligaments is minimized due to the unique ability of electroporation ablation to target the cell membrane. This advantage could have a significant impact on the field of tumor ablation near vital tendons or ligaments. PMID:26114962

  17. An in-vivo experimental evaluation of He-Ne laser photostimulation in healing Achilles tendons.

    PubMed

    Elwakil, Tarek F

    2007-03-01

    There is no method of treatment that has been proven to accelerate the rate of tendon healing or to improve the quality of the regenerating tendon. Low level laser photostimulation has gained a considerable attention for enhancing tissue repair in a wide spectrum of applications. However, there is controversy regarding the effectiveness of laser photostimulation for improvement of the healing process of surgically repaired tendons. Accordingly, the present study was conducted to evaluate the role of helium-neon (He-Ne) laser photostimulation on the process of healing of surgically repaired Achilles tendons. Thirty unilateral Achilles tendons of 30 Raex rabbits were transected and immediately repaired. Operated Achilles tendons were randomly divided into two equal groups. Tendons at group A were subjected to He-Ne laser (632.8 nm) photostimulation, while tendons at group B served as a control group. Two weeks later, the repaired Achilles tendons were histopathologically and biomechanically evaluated. The histopathological findings suggest the favorable qualitative pattern of the newly synthesized collagen of the regenerating tendons after He-Ne laser photostimulation. The biomechanical results support the same favorable findings from the functional point of view as denoted by the better biomechanical properties of the regenerating tendons after He-Ne laser photostimulation with statistical significance (p ruptured and injured tendons for a better functional outcome. It could be applied safely and effectively in humans, especially with respect to the proposed long-term clinical outcome. PMID:17160585

  18. An in-vivo experimental evaluation of He-Ne laser photostimulation in healing Achilles tendons.

    PubMed

    Elwakil, Tarek F

    2007-03-01

    There is no method of treatment that has been proven to accelerate the rate of tendon healing or to improve the quality of the regenerating tendon. Low level laser photostimulation has gained a considerable attention for enhancing tissue repair in a wide spectrum of applications. However, there is controversy regarding the effectiveness of laser photostimulation for improvement of the healing process of surgically repaired tendons. Accordingly, the present study was conducted to evaluate the role of helium-neon (He-Ne) laser photostimulation on the process of healing of surgically repaired Achilles tendons. Thirty unilateral Achilles tendons of 30 Raex rabbits were transected and immediately repaired. Operated Achilles tendons were randomly divided into two equal groups. Tendons at group A were subjected to He-Ne laser (632.8 nm) photostimulation, while tendons at group B served as a control group. Two weeks later, the repaired Achilles tendons were histopathologically and biomechanically evaluated. The histopathological findings suggest the favorable qualitative pattern of the newly synthesized collagen of the regenerating tendons after He-Ne laser photostimulation. The biomechanical results support the same favorable findings from the functional point of view as denoted by the better biomechanical properties of the regenerating tendons after He-Ne laser photostimulation with statistical significance (p ruptured and injured tendons for a better functional outcome. It could be applied safely and effectively in humans, especially with respect to the proposed long-term clinical outcome.

  19. Human hamstring tenocytes survive when seeded into a decellularized porcine Achilles tendon extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Lohan, Anke; Stoll, Christiane; Albrecht, Marit; Denner, Andreas; John, Thilo; Krüger, Kay; Ertel, Wolfgang; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula

    2013-01-01

    Tendon ruptures and defects remain major orthopaedic challenges. Tendon healing is a time-consuming process, which results in scar tissue with an altered biomechanical competence. Using a xenogeneic tendon extracellular matrix (ECM) as a natural scaffold, which can be reseeded with autologous human tenocytes, might be a promising approach to reconstruct damaged tendons. For this purpose, the porcine Achilles (AS) tendons serving as a scaffold were histologically characterized in comparison to human cell donor tendons. AS tendons were decellularized and then reseeded with primary human hamstring tenocytes using cell centrifuging, rotating culture and cell injection techniques. Vitality testing, histology and glycosaminoglycan/DNA quantifications were performed to document the success of tendon reseeding. Porcine AS tendons were characterized by a higher cell and sulfated glycosaminoglycan content than human cell donor tendons. Complete decellularization could be achieved, but led to a wash out of sulfated glycosaminoglycans. Nevertheless, porcine tendon could be recellularized with vital human tenocytes. The recellularization led to a slight increase in cell number compared to the native tendon and some glycosaminoglycan recovery. This study indicates that porcine tendon can be de- and recellularized using adult human tenocytes. Future work should optimize cell distribution within the recellularized tendon ECM and consider tendon- and donor species-dependent differences.

  20. Therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells to treat Achilles tendon injuries.

    PubMed

    Vieira, M H C; Oliveira, R J; Eça, L P M; Pereira, I S O; Hermeto, L C; Matuo, R; Fernandes, W S; Silva, R A; Antoniolli, A C M B

    2014-12-12

    Rupture of the Achilles tendon diminishes quality of life. The gold-standard therapy is a surgical suture, but this presents complications, including wound formation and inflammation. These complications spurred evaluation of the therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from adipose tissue. New Zealand rabbits were divided into 6 groups (three treatments with two time points each) evaluated at either 14 or 28 days after surgery: cross section of the Achilles tendon (CSAT); CSAT + Suture; and CSAT + MSC. A comparison between all groups at both time points showed a statistically significant increase in capillaries and in the structural organization of collagen in the healed tendon in the CSAT + Suture and CSAT + MSC groups at the 14-day assessment. Comparison between the two time points within the same group showed a statistically significant decrease in the inflammatory process and an increase in the structural organization of collagen in the CSAT and CSAT + MSC groups. A study of the genomic integrity of the cells suggested a linear correlation between an increase of injuries and culture time. Thus, MSC transplantation is a good alternative for treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures because it may be conducted without surgery and tendon suture and, therefore, has no risk of adverse effects resulting from the surgical wound or inflammation caused by nonabsorbable sutures. Furthermore, this alternative treatment exhibits a better capacity for wound healing and maintaining the original tendon architecture, depending on the arrangement of the collagen fibers, and has important therapeutic potential.

  1. Quadriceps and patellar tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Ramseier, L E; Werner, C M L; Heinzelmann, M

    2006-06-01

    Ruptures of the patellar and/or quadriceps tendon are rare injuries that require immediate repair to re-establish knee extensor continuity and to allow early motion. We evaluated 36 consecutive patients with quadriceps or patellar tendon rupture between 1993 and 2000. There were 37 primary ruptures, 3 reruptures, 21 quadriceps and 19 patellar tendon ruptures. Follow up examination (>24 months postoperatively) included the patient's history, assessment of risk factors, clinical examination of both knees, isometric muscle strength measurements and three specific knee scores, Hospital for Special Surgery Score, Knee Society Score and Turba Score, and a short form SF-36. We evaluated 29 patients (26 men) with 33 ruptures (16 patellar tendon, 17 quadriceps tendon). Seven patients were lost to follow up. We found no difference between the range of motion and muscle strength when the injured leg was compared to the non-injured leg. Risk factors did not influence the four scores, patient satisfaction, pain, muscle strength or range of motion. Multiple injured patients had a significant reduction in muscle strength and circumference, however patient satisfaction did not differ to the non-multiple injured patient group.

  2. [Simultaneous rupture of a patellar tendon and contralateral quadriceps tendon].

    PubMed

    Horas, U; Ernst, S; Meyer, C; Halbsguth, A; Herbst, U

    2006-09-01

    The simultaneous bilateral rupture of the quadriceps tendon is a rare injury; only occasional reports exist about the bilateral simultaneous rupture of the patellar tendon. Degenerative changes of the tendon due to drugs or diseases lead to the rupture. We describe two cases of simultaneous rupture of the patellar and contralateral quadriceps tendons; only one patient had special risks. We report the management of therapy and the functional results using the Lysholm score and Knee Rating Scale.

  3. Achilles tendon biomechanics in response to acute intense exercise.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Michael F; Lillie, Kurtis R; Bergeron, Daniel J; Cota, Kevin C; Yoon, Joseph S; Kraemer, William J; Denegar, Craig R

    2014-05-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a common disorder and is more prevalent in men. Although differences in tendon mechanics between men and women have been reported, understanding of tendon mechanics in young active people is limited. Moreover, there is limited understanding of changes in tendon mechanics in response to acute exercise. Our purpose was to compare Achilles tendon mechanics in active young adult men and women at rest and after light and strenuous activity in the form of repeated jumping with an added load. Participants consisted of 17 men and 14 women (18-30 years) who were classified as being at least moderately physically active as defined by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Tendon force/elongation measures were obtained during an isometric plantarflexion contraction on an isokinetic dynamometer with simultaneous ultrasound imaging of the Achilles tendon approximate to the soleus myotendinous junction. Data were collected at rest, after a 10-minute treadmill walk, and after a fatigue protocol of 100 toe jumps performed in a Smith machine, with a load equaling 20% of body mass. We found greater tendon elongation, decreased stiffness, and lower Young's modulus only in women after the jumping exercise. Force and stress were not different between groups but decreased subsequent to the jumping exercise bout. In general, women had greater elongation and strain, less stiffness, and a lower Young's modulus during plantarflexor contraction. These data demonstrate differences in tendon mechanics between men and women and suggest a potential protective mechanism explaining the lower incidence of Achilles tendinopathy in women.

  4. The anatomical footprint of the Achilles tendon: a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Ballal, M S; Walker, C R; Molloy, A P

    2014-10-01

    We dissected 12 fresh-frozen leg specimens to identify the insertional footprint of each fascicle of the Achilles tendon on the calcaneum in relation to their corresponding muscles. A further ten embalmed specimens were examined to confirm an observation on the retrocalcaneal bursa. The superficial part of the insertion of the Achilles tendon is represented by fascicles from the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle, which is inserted over the entire width of the inferior facet of the calcaneal tuberosity. In three specimens this insertion was in continuity with the plantar fascia in the form of periosteum. The deep part of the insertion of the Achilles tendon is made of fascicles from the soleus tendon, which insert on the medial aspect of the middle facet of the calcaneal tuberosity, while the fascicles of the lateral head of the gastrocnemius tendon insert on the lateral aspect of the middle facet of the calcaneal tuberosity. A bicameral retrocalcaneal bursa was present in 15 of the 22 examined specimens. This new observation and description of the insertional footprint of the Achilles tendon and the retrocalcaneal bursa may allow a better understanding of the function of each muscular part of the gastrosoleus complex. This may have clinical relevance in the treatment of Achilles tendinopathies.

  5. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) assessment of tissue properties for Achilles tendons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yi-Chun; Chen, Yung-Fu; Chen, Pei-Jarn; Lin, Yu-Ching; Chen, Tainsong; Lin, Chii-Jeng

    2007-09-01

    Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) techniques have recently been widely applied for the characterization of tissues. For example, they can be used for the quantification of Achilles tendon properties based on the broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) and the speed of sound (SOS) when the ultrasound wave passes through the tissues. This study is to develop an integrated system to investigate the properties of Achilles tendons using QUS images from UBIS 5000 (DMS, Montpellier, France) and B-mode ultrasound images from HDI 5000 (ATL, Ultramark, USA). Subjects including young (32 females and 17 males; mean age: 23.7 ± 2.0) and middle-aged groups (8 female and 8 males; mean age: 47.3 ± 8.5 s) were recruited and tested for this study. Only subjects who did not exercise regularly and had no record of tendon injury were studied. The results show that the BUA is significantly higher for the young group (45.2 ± 1.6 dB MHz-1) than the middle-age group (40.5 ± 1.9 dB MHz-1), while the SOS is significantly lower for the young (1601.9 ± 11.2 ms-1) compared to the middle-aged (1624.1 ± 8.7 m s-1). On the other hand, the thicknesses of Achilles tendons for both groups (young: 4.31 ± 0.23 mm; middle age: 4.24 ± 0.23 mm) are very similar. For one patient who had an Achilles tendon lengthening (ATL) surgery, the thickness of the Achilles tendon increased from 4 mm to 4.33 mm after the surgery. In addition, the BUA increased by about 7.2% while the SOS decreased by about 0.6%. In conclusion, noninvasive ultrasonic assessment of Achilles tendons is useful for assisting clinical diagnosis and for the evaluation of a therapeutic regimen.

  6. Human Achilles tendon glycation and function in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Couppé, Christian; Svensson, Rene Brüggebusch; Kongsgaard, Mads; Kovanen, Vuokko; Grosset, Jean-Francois; Snorgaard, Ole; Bencke, Jesper; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard; Bandholm, Thomas; Christensen, Tomas Møller; Boesen, Anders; Helmark, Ida Carøe; Aagaard, Per; Kjaer, Michael; Magnusson, Stig Peter

    2016-01-15

    Diabetic patients have an increased risk of foot ulcers, and glycation of collagen may increase tissue stiffness. We hypothesized that the level of glycemic control (glycation) may affect Achilles tendon stiffness, which can influence gait pattern. We therefore investigated the relationship between collagen glycation, Achilles tendon stiffness parameters, and plantar pressure in poorly (n = 22) and well (n = 22) controlled diabetic patients, including healthy age-matched (45-70 yr) controls (n = 11). There were no differences in any of the outcome parameters (collagen cross-linking or tendon stiffness) between patients with well-controlled and poorly controlled diabetes. The overall effect of diabetes was explored by collapsing the diabetes groups (DB) compared with the controls. Skin collagen cross-linking lysylpyridinoline, hydroxylysylpyridinoline (136%, 80%, P < 0.01) and pentosidine concentrations (55%, P < 0.05) were markedly greater in DB. Furthermore, Achilles tendon material stiffness was higher in DB (54%, P < 0.01). Notably, DB also demonstrated higher forefoot/rearfoot peak-plantar-pressure ratio (33%, P < 0.01). Overall, Achilles tendon material stiffness and skin connective tissue cross-linking were greater in diabetic patients compared with controls. The higher foot pressure indicates that material stiffness of tendon and other tissue (e.g., skin and joint capsule) may influence foot gait. The difference in foot pressure distribution may contribute to the development of foot ulcers in diabetic patients.

  7. Tensile properties of fresh human calcaneal (Achilles) tendons.

    PubMed

    Louis-Ugbo, John; Leeson, Benjamin; Hutton, William C

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the tensile properties of fresh human calcaneal (Achilles) tendons. Twenty fresh cadaveric (age range = 57-93 years) bone-Achilles tendon complexes were harvested within 24 hr postmortem. The calcaneus together with 15 cm of the Achilles tendon extending proximally from the insertion on the calcaneus was clamped and biomechanically tested. Each tendon was firmly fixed in clamps in an MTS Systems Corporation MTS testing machine and tension was applied at a displacement rate of 8 cm per minute until the tendon failed. The tensile force and tensile strain (as measured using an extensometer) were recorded and plotted using onboard software. The narrow age range of our donors prevented any meaningful correlation between age and tensile properties; however, the results showed that: 1) the average ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the human Achilles tendon was 1189 N (range = 360-1,965), 2) there was a correlation between left and right legs for UTS, 3) there was a correlation between left and right legs in regard to cross sectional area, and 4) there was no correlation between UTS and cross-sectional area.

  8. Histologic analysis of ruptured quadriceps tendons.

    PubMed

    Trobisch, Per David; Bauman, Matthias; Weise, Kuno; Stuby, Fabian; Hak, David J

    2010-01-01

    Quadriceps tendon ruptures are uncommon injuries. Degenerative changes in the tendon are felt to be an important precondition for rupture. We retrospectively reviewed 45 quadriceps tendon ruptures in 42 patients. Quadriceps tendon ruptures occurred most often in the sixth and seventh decade of life. Men were affected six times as often as women. A tissue sample from the rupture-zone was obtained in 22 cases and histologic analysis was performed. Degenerative changes were present in only 14 (64%) of the 22 samples. We observed an increasing ratio of degenerative to nondegenerative tendons with increasing patient age. Our data suggests that quadriceps tendon rupture, especially in younger patients, can occur in the absence of pathologic tendon degeneration.

  9. Spatial variations in Achilles tendon shear wave speed

    PubMed Central

    DeWall, Ryan J.; Slane, Laura C.; Lee, Kenneth S.; Thelen, Darryl G.

    2014-01-01

    Supersonic shear imaging (SSI) is an ultrasound imaging modality that can provide insight into tissue mechanics by measuring shear wave propagation speed, a property that depends on tissue elasticity. SSI has previously been used to characterize the increase in Achilles tendon shear wave speed that occurs with loading, an effect attributable to the strain-stiffening behavior of the tissue. However, little is known about how shear wave speed varies spatially, which is important, given the anatomical variation that occurs between the calcaneus insertion and the gastrocnemius musculotendon junction. The purpose of this study was to investigate spatial variations in shear wave speed along medial and lateral paths of the Achilles tendon for three different ankle postures: resting ankle angle (R, i.e. neutral), plantarflexed (P; R − 15 deg), and dorsiflexed (D; R + 15 deg). We observed significant spatial and posture variations in tendon shear wave speed in ten healthy young adults. Shear wave speeds in the Achilles free tendon averaged 12 ± 1.2 m/s in a resting position, but decreased to 7.2 ± 1.8 m/s with passive plantarflexion. Distal tendon shear wave speeds often reached the maximum tracking limit (16.3 m/s) of the system when the ankle was in the passively dorsiflexed posture (+15 deg from R). At a fixed posture, shear wave speeds decreased significantly from the free tendon to the gastrocnemius musculotendon junction, with slightly higher speeds measured on the medial side than on the lateral side. Shear wave speeds were only weakly correlated with the thickness and depth of the tendon, suggesting that the distal-to-proximal variations may reflect greater compliance in the aponeurosis relative to the free tendon. The results highlight the importance of considering both limb posture and transducer positioning when using SSI for biomechanical and clinical assessments of the Achilles tendon. PMID:24933528

  10. Can transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation improve achilles tendon healing in rats?

    PubMed Central

    Folha, Roberta A. C.; Pinfildi, Carlos E.; Liebano, Richard E.; Rampazo, Érika P.; Pereira, Raphael N.; Ferreira, Lydia M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tendon injury is one of the most frequent injuries in sports activities. TENS is a physical agent used in the treatment of pain but its influence on the tendon's healing process is unclear. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of TENS on the healing of partial rupture of the Achilles tendon in rats. METHOD: Sixty Wistar rats were submitted to a partial rupture of the Achilles tendon by direct trauma and randomized into six groups (TENS or Sham stimulation) and the time of evaluation (7, 14, and 21 days post-injury). Burst TENS was applied for 30 minutes, 6 days, 100 Hz frequency, 2 Hz burst frequency, 200 µs pulse duration, and 300 ms pulse train duration. Microscopic analyses were performed to quantify the blood vessels and mast cells, birefringence to quantify collagen fiber alignment, and immunohistochemistry to quantify types I and III collagen fibers. RESULTS: A significant interaction was observed for collagen type I (p=0.020) where the TENS group presented lower percentage in 14 days after the lesion (p=0.33). The main group effect showed that the TENS group presented worse collagen fiber alignment (p=0.001) and lower percentage of collagen III (p=0.001) and the main time effect (p=0.001) showed decreased percentage of collagen III at 7 days (p=0.001) and 14 days (p=0.001) after lesion when compared to 21 days. CONCLUSIONS: Burst TENS inhibited collagen I and III production and impaired its alignment during healing of partial rupture of the Achilles tendon in rats. PMID:26647744

  11. Changes in the Achilles tendon reflexes following Skylab missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. T.; Nicogossian, A. E.; Hoffler, G. W.; Johnson, R. L.; Hordinsky, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Postflight measurements of Achilles tendon reflex duration on Skylab crewmen indicate a state of disequilibrium between the flexor and extensor muscle groups with an initial decrease in reflex duration. As the muscles regain strength and mass there occurs an overcompensation reflected by increased reflex duration. Finally, when a normal neuromuscular state is reached the reflex duration returns to baseline value.

  12. Ultrasonic assessment of extracellular matrix content in healing Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Ghorayeb, Sleiman R; Shah, Neil V; Edobor-Osula, Folorunsho; Lane, Lewis B; Razzano, Pasquale; Chahine, Nadeen; Grande, Daniel A

    2012-04-01

    Although several imaging modalities have been utilized to observe tendons, assessing injured tendons by tracking the healing response over time with ultrasound is a desirable method which is yet to be realized. This study examines the use of ultrasound for non-invasive monitoring of the healing process of Achilles tendons after surgical transection. The overall extracellular matrix content of the transection site is monitored and quantified as a function of time. B-mode images (built from successive A-scan signatures) of the injury site were obtained and compared to biomechanical properties. A quantitative measure of tendon healing using the extracellular matrix (ECM) content of the injury site was analyzed using linear regression with all biomechanical measures. Contralateral tendons were used as controls. The trend in the degree of ECM regrowth in the 4 weeks following complete transection of excised tendons was found to be most closely paralleled with that of linear stiffness (R(2) = 0.987, p < .05) obtained with post-ultrasound biomechanical tests. Results suggest that ultrasound can be an effective imaging technique in assessing the degree of tendon healing, and can be used to correlate structural properties of Achilles tendons.

  13. Quadriceps and patellar tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dennis; Stinner, Daniel; Mir, Hassan

    2013-10-01

    The diagnosis of quadriceps and patellar tendon ruptures requires a high index of suspicion and thorough history-taking to assess for medical comorbidities that may predispose patients to tendon degeneration. Radiographic assessment with plain films supplemented by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging when the work-up is equivocal further aids diagnosis; however, advanced imaging is often unnecessary in patients with functional extensor mechanism deficits. Acute repair is preferred, and transpatellar bone tunnels serve as the primary form of fixation when the tendon rupture occurs at the patellar insertion, with or without augmentation depending on surgeon preference. Chronic tears and disruptions following total knee arthroplasty are special cases requiring reconstructions with allograft, synthetic mesh, or autograft. Rehabilitation protocols generally allow immediate weight-bearing with the knee locked in extension and crutch support. Limited arc motion is started early with active flexion and passive extension and then advanced progressively, followed by full active range of motion and strengthening. Complications are few but include quadriceps atrophy, knee stiffness, and rerupture. Outcomes are excellent if repair is done acutely, with poorer outcomes associated with delayed repair.

  14. Achilles tendon stiffness is unchanged one hour after a marathon.

    PubMed

    Peltonen, Jussi; Cronin, Neil J; Stenroth, Lauri; Finni, Taija; Avela, Janne

    2012-10-15

    Overuse-induced injuries have been proposed as a predisposing factor for Achilles tendon (AT) ruptures. If tendons can be overloaded, their mechanical properties should change during exercise. Because there data are lacking on the effects of a single bout of long-lasting exercise on AT mechanical properties, the present study measured AT stiffness before and after a marathon. AT stiffness was determined as the slope of the force-elongation curve between 10 and 80% of maximum voluntary force. AT force-elongation characteristics were measured in an ankle dynamometer using simultaneous motion-capture-assisted ultrasonography. Oxygen consumption and ankle kinematics were also measured on a treadmill at the marathon pace. All measurements were performed before and after the marathon. AT stiffness did not change significantly from the pre-race value of 197±62 N mm(-1) (mean ± s.d.) to the post-race value of 206±59 N mm(-1) (N=12, P=0.312). Oxygen consumption increased after the race by 7±10% (P<0.05) and ankle kinematic data revealed that in nine out of 12 subjects, the marathon induced a change in their foot strike technique. The AT of the physically active individuals seems to be able to resist mechanical changes under physiological stress. We therefore suggest that natural loading, like in running, may not overstress the AT or predispose it to injury. In addition, decreased running economy, as well as altered foot strike technique, was probably attributable to muscle fatigue.

  15. Simultaneous and spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendons rupture.

    PubMed

    Celik, Evrim Coşkun; Ozbaydar, Mehmet; Ofluoglu, Demet; Demircay, Emre

    2012-07-01

    Simultaneous and spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is an uncommon injury that is usually seen in association with multiple medical conditions and some medications. We report a case of simultaneous and spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture that may be related to the long-term use of a statin.

  16. The Gift Box Open Achilles Tendon Repair Method: A Retrospective Clinical Series.

    PubMed

    Labib, Sameh A; Hoffler, C Edward; Shah, Jay N; Rolf, Robert H; Tingan, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    Previous biomechanical studies have shown that the gift box technique for open Achilles tendon repair is twice as strong as a Krackow repair. The technique incorporates a paramedian skin incision with a midline paratenon incision, and a modification of the Krackow stitch is used to reinforce the repair. The wound is closed in layers such that the paratenon repair is offset from paramedian skin incision, further protecting the repair. The present study retrospectively reviews the clinical results for a series of patients who underwent the gift box technique for treatment of acute Achilles tendon ruptures from March 2002 to April 2007. The patients completed the Foot Function Index and the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot scale. The tendon width and calf circumference were measured bilaterally and compared using paired t tests with a 5% α level. A total of 44 subjects, mean age 37.5 ± 8.6 years, underwent surgery approximately 10.8 ± 6.5 days after injury. The response rate was 35 (79.54%) patients for the questionnaire and 20 (45.45%) for the examination. The mean follow-up period was 35.7 ± 20.1 months. The complications included one stitch abscess, persistent pain, and keloid formation. One (2.86%) respondent reported significant weakness. Five (14.29%) respondents indicated persistent peri-incisional numbness. The range of motion was full or adequate. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot scale score was 93.2 ± 6.8) and the mean Foot Function Index score was 7.0 ± 10.5. The calf girth and tendon width differences were statistically significantly between the limbs. The patients reported no repeat ruptures, sural nerve injuries, dehiscence, or infections. We present the outcomes data from patients who had undergone this alternative technique for Achilles tendon repair. The technique is reproducible, with good patient satisfaction and return to activity. The results compared well with the historical

  17. Acute rupture of the tibialis posterior tendon without fracture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Nicolò; Bonifacini, Carlo; Bianchi, Alberto; Moneghini, Laura; Scotto, Gennaro; Sartorelli, Elena

    2014-05-01

    The acute rupture of the tibialis posterior (TP) tendon, compared to an acute rupture of the Achilles tendon, is a quite uncommon disease to be diagnosed in the emergency department setting. In most cases symptoms related to a TP dysfunction, like weakness, pain along the course of the tendon, swelling in the region of the medial malleolus, and the partial or complete loss of the medial arch with a flatfoot deformity precede the complete rupture of the tendon. In this case report, we describe an acute rupture of the TP tendon following a pronation-external rotation injury of the ankle with no association of a medial malleolus fracture and with no history of a prior flatfoot deformity or symptoms. PMID:24901592

  18. Quantitative ultrasound method for assessing stress-strain properties and the cross-sectional area of Achilles tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yi-Chun; Chen, Yung-Fu; Li, Chien-Ming; Lin, Chia-Hung; Yang, Chia-En; Wu, Jian-Xing; Chen, Tainsong

    2013-12-01

    The Achilles tendon is one of the most commonly observed tendons injured with a variety of causes, such as trauma, overuse and degeneration, in the human body. Rupture and tendinosis are relatively common for this strong tendon. Stress-strain properties and shape change are important biomechanical properties of the tendon to assess surgical repair or healing progress. Currently, there are rather limited non-invasive methods available for precisely quantifying the in vivo biomechanical properties of the tendons. The aim of this study was to apply quantitative ultrasound (QUS) methods, including ultrasonic attenuation and speed of sound (SOS), to investigate porcine tendons in different stress-strain conditions. In order to find a reliable method to evaluate the change of tendon shape, ultrasound measurement was also utilized for measuring tendon thickness and compared with the change in tendon cross-sectional area under different stress. A total of 15 porcine tendons of hind trotters were examined. The test results show that the attenuation and broadband ultrasound attenuation decreased and the SOS increased by a smaller magnitude as the uniaxial loading of the stress-strain upon tendons increased. Furthermore, the tendon thickness measured with the ultrasound method was significantly correlated with tendon cross-sectional area (Pearson coefficient = 0.86). These results also indicate that attenuation of QUS and ultrasonic thickness measurement are reliable and potential parameters for assessing biomechanical properties of tendons. Further investigations are needed to warrant the application of the proposed method in a clinical setting.

  19. Modulation of soleus corticospinal excitability during Achilles tendon vibration.

    PubMed

    Lapole, Thomas; Temesi, John; Arnal, Pierrick J; Gimenez, Philippe; Petitjean, Michel; Millet, Guillaume Y

    2015-09-01

    Soleus (SOL) corticospinal excitability has been reported to increase during Achilles tendon vibration. The aim of the present study was to further investigate SOL corticospinal excitability and elucidate the changes to intracortical mechanisms during Achilles tendon vibration. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) were elicited in the SOL by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the corresponding motor cortical area of the leg with and without 50-Hz Achilles tendon vibration. SOL input-output curves were determined. Paired-pulse protocols were also performed to investigate short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF) by conditioning test TMS pulses with sub-threshold TMS pulses at inter-stimulus intervals of 3 and 13 ms, respectively. During Achilles tendon vibration, motor threshold was lower than in the control condition (43 ± 13 vs. 49 ± 11 % of maximal stimulator output; p = 0.008). Input-output curves were also influenced by vibration, i.e. there was increased maximal MEP amplitude (0.694 ± 0.347 vs. 0.268 ± 0.167 mV; p < 0.001), decreased TMS intensity to elicit a MEP of half the maximal MEP amplitude (100 ± 13 vs. 109 ± 9 % motor threshold; p = 0.009) and a strong tendency for decreased slope constant (0.076 ± 0.04 vs. 0.117 ± 0.04; p = 0.068). Vibration reduced ICF (98 ± 61 vs. 170 ± 105 % of test MEP amplitude; p = 0.05), but had no effect on SICI (53 ± 26 vs. 48 ± 22 % of test MEP amplitude; p = 0.68). The present results further document the increased vibration-induced corticospinal excitability in the soleus muscle and suggest that this increase is not mediated by changes in SICI or ICF.

  20. Heel pain and Achilles tendonitis - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... the length of the tendon when walking or running. Your pain and stiffness might increase in the ... or decrease activities that cause pain, such as running or jumping. Do activities that do not strain ...

  1. The effect of dry needling and treadmill running on inducing pathological changes in rat Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bom Soo; Joo, Young Chae; Choi, Byung Hyune; Kim, Kil Hwan; Kang, Joon Soon; Park, So Ra

    2015-11-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a common degenerative condition without a definitive treatment. An adequate chronic animal model of Achilles tendinopathy has not yet been developed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the individual and combined effects of dry needling and treadmill running on the Achilles tendon of rats. Percutaneous dry needling, designed to physically replicate microrupture of collagen fibers in overloaded tendons, was performed on the right Achilles tendon of 80 Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were randomly divided into two groups: a treadmill group, which included rats that underwent daily uphill treadmill running (n = 40), and a cage group, which included rats that could move freely within their cages (n = 40). At the end of weeks 1 and 4, 20 rats from each group were sacrificed, and bilateral Achilles tendons were collected. The harvested tendons were subjected to mechanical testing and histological analysis. Dry needling induced histological and mechanical changes in the Achilles tendons at week 1, and the changes persisted at week 4. The needled Achilles tendons of the treadmill group tended to show more severe histological and mechanical changes than those of the cage group, although these differences were not statistically significant. Dry needling combined with free cage activity or treadmill running produced tendinopathy-like changes in rat Achilles tendons up to 4 weeks after injury. Dry needling is an easy procedure with a short induction period and a high success rate, suggesting it may have relevance in the design of an Achilles tendinopathy model.

  2. Temporal healing in rat achilles tendon: ultrasound correlations.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Connie S; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah E; Okotie, Gregory; Brounts, Sabrina H; Baer, Geoffrey S; Vanderby, Ray

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether a new ultrasound-based technique correlates with mechanical and biological metrics that describe the tendon healing. Achilles tendons in 32 rats were unilaterally transected and allowed to heal without repair. At 7, 9, 14, or 29 days post-injury, tendons were collected and examined for healing via ultrasound image analysis, mechanical testing, and immunohistochemistry. Consistent with previous studies, we observe that the healing tendons are mechanically inferior (ultimate stress, ultimate load, and normalized stiffness) and biologically altered (cellular and ECM factors) compared to contralateral controls with an incomplete recovery over healing time. Unique to this study, we report: (1) Echo intensity (defined by gray-scale brightness in the ultrasound image) in the healing tissue is related to stress and normalized stiffness. (2) Elongation to failure is relatively constant so that tissue normalized stiffness is linearly correlated with ultimate stress. Together, 1 and 2 suggest a method to quantify mechanical compromise in healing tendons. (3) The amount and type of collagen in healing tendons associates with their strength and normalized stiffness as well as their ultrasound echo intensity. (4) A significant increase of periostin in the healing tissues suggests an important but unexplored role for this ECM protein in tendon healing.

  3. Quadriceps Tendon Rupture due to Postepileptic Convulsion

    PubMed Central

    Erkut, Adem; Guvercin, Yilmaz; Sahin, Rifat; Keskin, Davut

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of quadriceps tendon (QT) rupture. QT ruptures can occur in all ages. The cause is mostly traumatic in origin. Spontaneous ruptures that are thought to result from predisposing conditions are rare. Post-convulsion QT ruptures lacking traumas in their history can be overlooked in clinical examinations. This should be born in mind by the attending physician, as early diagnosis and treatment of the condition can lead to satisfactory outcomes. PMID:24944977

  4. Sonographic measurement of Achilles tendon thickness in seronegative spondyloarthropathies

    PubMed Central

    Aydın, Sibel Zehra; Filippucci, Emilio; Atagündüz, Pamir; Yavuz, Şule; Grassi, Walter; Direskeneli, Haner

    2014-01-01

    Objective To define the best cut-off value for identifying Achilles tendon thickening using ultrasound (US) in patients with spondyloarthropathies (SpA) and to assess its diagnostic utility in comparison with different cut-off values used in the literature. Material and Methods One-hundred and one subjects (55 SpA patients and 46 age and body mass index ((BMI)-matched healthy controls (HC)) were investigated. US was performed using a MyLab70 US system (Esaote Biomedica, Genoa, Italy) with a linear probe (6–18 MHz). Three images per Achilles enthesis were stored and the antero-posterior thickness of the enthesis was measured at the level of the Achilles tendon deeper margin insertion into the calcaneal bone on the longitudinal median scan. The best cut-off value for each gender was determined by ROC curve analysis and compared to the other cut-off values in the literature: 1) 5.29 mm for both genders, and 2) 5.5 mm for females and 6.2 mm for males. The number of measurements exceeding the cut-off values as well as sensitivity (SE), specificity (SP), positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values were calculated. Results A significant difference was observed for Achilles enthesis thickness between genders (mean±SD: 4.6±0.7 mm in males vs. 4.0±0.8 mm in females, p<0.00) and between SpA patients and HC (mean±SD: 4.4±0.8 mm in SpA patients vs. 4.0±0.8 mm in HC, p<0.001). The ROC curve analysis revealed the best cut-off value to be 3.7 mm for females and 4.8 mm for males (SE: 43–70%, SP: 59–85%, PPV: 66–79%, NPV: 54–63%). Previously reported cut-off values were found to have high SP (91–98%) but very low SE (2–11%). Conclusion Achilles tendon thickness differs between genders; thus, it is crucial to refer to normal values that are specific for gender. High cut-off values, as previously suggested, showed very low SE in the current study. When Achilles enthesis thickening is used for the purpose of screening enthesitis in SpA patients, a lower cut

  5. Patellar tendon rupture: an ultrasound case report.

    PubMed

    Berg, Kenneth; Peck, Jeff; Boulger, Creagh; Bahner, David P

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses a case in which ultrasound was the primary modality for diagnosis of traumatic patellar tendon rupture. Traditionally, this diagnosis has been made using MRI. This case highlights the growing need for emergency medicine physicians to become facile with bedside ultrasound and its indications as a supplement to traditional musculoskeletal examination. Normal and pathological patellar tendon examinations with ultrasound are discussed in detail. Furthermore, the advantages of ultrasound over the more traditional imaging modalities of x-ray and MRI in cases where tendon rupture is suspected are discussed.

  6. Alterations in the Achilles tendon after inflammation in surrounding tissue

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Cristiano Pedrozo; Guerra, Flávia da Ré; de Oliveira, Letícia Prado; de Almeida, Marcos dos Santos; Pimentel, Edson Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze the characteristics of the Achilles tendon of rats after induction of localized inflammation in the rat paw. Methods In our study three groups were used: inflamed group with carrageenan in rat paw (G1); saline group (G2) and control group (G3). After 4 hours the animals were euthanized and the Achilles tendon removed. Results No significant differences were observed in the analysis of non-collagenous proteins, glycosaminoglycans and hydroxyproline in the groups but a tendency of reduction was verified in G1. As regards the organization of collagen molecules, no differences were observed between groups. With respect to MMPs activity, a stronger presence of the active isoform of MMP-2 in G1 was observed, suggesting that the remodeling was occurring. Conclusion Thus, we conclude that the inflammatory process in rat paw may affect the remodeling of tendons located near the inflamed site. Level of Evidence I, Prognostic Studies - Investigating the Effect of a Patient Characteristic on the Outcome of Disease PMID:24453615

  7. Synaptic failure: The achilles tendon of sphingolipidoses.

    PubMed

    Cantuti-Castelvetri, Ludovico; Bongarzone, Ernesto R

    2016-11-01

    The presence of life-threatening neurological symptoms in more than two-thirds of lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) underscores how vulnerable the nervous system is to lysosomal failure. Neurological dysfunction in LSDs has historically been attributed to the disruption of neuronal and glial homeostasis resulting from the progressive jamming of the endosomal/lysosomal pathway. In neurons, a dysfunctional endosomal-lysosomal system can elicit dire consequences. Given that neurons are largely postmitotic after birth, one can clearly understand that the inability of these cells to proliferate obliterates any possibility of diluting stored lysosomal material by means of cellular division. At its most advanced stage, this situation constitutes a terminal factor in neuronal life, resulting in cell death. However, synaptic deficits in the absence of classical neuronal cell death appear to be common features during the early stages in many LSDs, particularly sphingolipidoses. In essence, failure of synapses to convey their messages, even without major structural damage to the neuronal bodies, is a form of physiological death. This concept of dying-back neuropathology is highly relevant not only for understanding the dynamics of the neurological decline in these diseases, but, more importantly; it might also constitute an important target for molecular therapies to protect perhaps the "Achilles" point in the entire physiological architecture of the brain, thus avoiding an irreversible journey to neuronal demise. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27638588

  8. Can Platelet-Rich Plasma Protect Rat Achilles Tendons From the Deleterious Effects of Triamcinolone Acetonide?

    PubMed Central

    Muto, Tomoyuki; Kokubu, Takeshi; Mifune, Yutaka; Inui, Atsuyuki; Sakata, Ryosuke; Harada, Yoshifumi; Takase, Fumiaki; Ueda, Yasuhiro; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Background Triamcinolone acetonide (TA) injections are widely used for tendinitis but have deleterious effects, including tendon degeneration or tendon rupture. Purpose To investigate whether adding platelet-rich plasma (PRP), a blood fraction that participates in tissue repair processes, to TA can prevent its deleterious effects. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Rat Achilles tendons were injected with TA, TA + PRP, PRP alone, or saline (control). Biomechanical testing and histological analyses were performed on Achilles tendons 1 week after injections. Results The maximum failure loads in the control, TA, TA + PRP, and PRP groups were 31.7 ± 2.3, 19.0 ± 3.6, 31.0 ± 7.1, and 30.2 ± 6.8 N, respectively. The tendon stiffness in the control, TA, TA + PRP, and PRP groups was 12.1 ± 1.8, 7.5 ± 1.8, 11.0 ± 2.8, and 11.3 ± 2.5 N/mm, respectively. The maximum failure load and stiffness were significantly lower in the TA group compared with the other 3 groups. There was no significant difference between the TA + PRP and control groups. Cell invasions, vacuolation, collagen attenuation, and increased type III collagen expression were histologically observed in the TA group; however, these changes were prevented by the simultaneous administration of PRP. Conclusion Administering PRP may prevent deleterious effects caused by TA; therefore, PRP may be used as a protective agent in clinical situations. Clinical Relevance PRP can be useful as a protective agent for sports injury patients receiving local corticosteroid injections. PMID:26673355

  9. Analysis of the effect of phototherapy in model with traumatic Achilles tendon injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Casalechi, Heliodora Leão; de Farias Marques, Anna Cristina; da Silva, Evela Aparecida Pereira; Aimbire, Flávio; Marcos, Rodrigo Labat; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo A B; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camilo; Albertini, Regiane

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of low-intensity laser (LILT) infrared (830 nm) therapy in tendon inflammation, tendinitis induced by mechanical trauma in rat Achilles tendon. For this, we used 65 young male Wistar rats, weighing ± 300 g divided into different groups: C = control (n = 5) and experimental (n = 10/group), with two different times of sacrifice such as treated with L = laser, D = treated with diclofenac, and T = untreated injured. The tendon inflammation was induced by controlled contusion in the medial region of the Achilles tendon of the animals. The treated groups received some kind of intervention every 24 h, all groups were sacrificed on the 7th or 14th day after the trauma. The tendons were dissected, extracted, and sent for analysis. Histological analysis of the L group showed a decrease in the number of inflammatory cells in relation to other groups in both periods studied. The comparative results between the number of inflammatory cells in the control and treated groups at 7 and 14 days showed statistically significant differences. Qualitative analysis findings obtained by the picrosirius red technique under polarized light showed that in 7 days, the T group presented collagen types I and III in the same proportion; group D presented a predominance of type III fibers, while in group L, type I collagen predominated. The 14-day group D showed collagen types I and III in the same proportion, while in group L, there was a predominance of type I fibers. Biomechanical analysis showed that 7-day groups L and C showed similar stiffness and increased breaking strength. The 14-day groups L and C showed greater rupturing strength as well as increased stiffness angle. Group D showed a decrease of maximum traction strength and degree of rigidity. It was concluded that treatment with LIL in the parameters used and the times studied reduces migration of inflammatory cells and improves the quality of repair while reducing the functional

  10. Effect of Calendula officinalis cream on achilles tendon healing.

    PubMed

    Aro, A A; Perez, M O; Vieira, C P; Esquisatto, M A M; Rodrigues, R A F; Gomes, L; Pimentel, E R

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, the scientific community has undertaken research on plant extracts, searching for compounds with pharmacological activities that can be used in diverse fields of medicine. Calendula officinalis L. is known to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and wound healing properties when used to treat skin burns. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of C. officinalis on the initial phase of Achilles tendon healing. Wistar rats were separated in three groups: Calendula (Cal)-rats with a transected tendon were treated with topical applications of C. officinalis cream and then euthanized 7 days after injury; Control (C)-rats were treated with only vehicle after transection; and Normal (N)-rats without tenotomy. Higher concentrations of hydroxyproline (an indicator of total collagen) and non-collagenous proteins were observed in the Cal group in relation to the C group. Zymography showed no difference in the amount of the isoforms of metalloproteinase-2 and of metalloproteinase-9, between C and Cal groups. Polarization microscopy images analysis showed that the Cal group presented a slightly higher birefringence compared with the C group. In sections of tendons stained with toluidine blue, the transected groups presented higher metachromasy as compared with the N group. Immunocytochemistry analysis for chondroitin-6-sulfate showed no difference between the C and Cal groups. In conclusion, the topical application of C. officinalis after tendon transection increases the concentrations of collagen and non-collagenous proteins, as well as the collagen organization in the initial phase of healing.

  11. [Bilateral rupture of the quadriceps tendon].

    PubMed

    Modrego, Francisco J; Molina, Juan

    2004-01-01

    Simultaneous, bilateral, and spontaneous rupture of the quadriceps tendon is a very rare injury. Individuals with this injury are usually predisposed by chronic renal disease with secondary hyperparathyroidism, gout, diabetes, and lupus erythematosus. Often, primary diagnostic confusion can lead to a delay in treatment. Two cases of a bilateral lesion of the quadriceps tendon, that were treated surgically using the technique of Scuderi, followed by an intense rehabilitation programme, are presented. Surgical treatment yields satisfactory results.

  12. Bilateral infrapatellar tendon rupture in a patient with jumper's knee.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, J M; Whitaker, J H

    1991-01-01

    This is the fourth case report of bilateral infrapatellar tendon rupture as a result of indirect trauma in a patient without systemic disease. This is the only report we have found of jumper's knee leading to simultaneous infrapatellar tendon ruptures.

  13. Tendon ruptures: mallet, flexor digitorum profundus.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Peter C; Shin, Steven S

    2012-08-01

    Mallet injuries are the most common closed tendon injury in the athlete. Flexor digitorum profundus ruptures are rare in baseball, but are common injuries in contact sports. The diagnosis for each condition is based on clinical examination, although radiographs should be evaluated for a possible bony component. Treatment for mallet injury depends on the athlete's goals of competition and understanding of the consequences of any treatment chosen. Gripping, throwing, and catching would be restricted or impossible with the injured finger immobilized. Treatment of FDP ruptures is almost always surgical and requires reattachment of the torn tendon to the distal phalanx.

  14. Ultrasound diagnosis and percutaneous treatment of Achilles tendon tethering: a case series.

    PubMed

    He, Lulu; Genin, Jason; Delzell, Patricia

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to report 3 cases of Kager's fat pad scarring and tethering to the deep surface of the Achilles tendon in patients with Achilles tendinosis symptomatology. The 3 patients were diagnosed sonographically by the use of a dynamic maneuver we described and named the "Kager's squeeze" technique. The key finding for diagnosis is the deformation and bowing of the deep fibers of the Achilles tendon during dynamic squeezing of Kager's fat pad. After diagnosis, the patients were treated with ultrasound-guided hydrodissection and scar release to restore normal motion between Kager's fat pad and the Achilles tendon. All 3 patients experienced significant clinical improvement shortly after treatment. Therefore, we suspect that Kager's fat pad scarring with Achilles tendon tethering may mimic or exacerbate Achilles tendinosis symptomatology and should be considered a possible diagnosis when conservative treatments for Achilles tendinosis fail. We demonstrate that Kager's fat pad scarring with Achilles tendon tethering can be diagnosed and treated with a simple in-office hydrodissection technique, leading to improved patient outcomes.

  15. Repair of quadriceps tendon ruptures using suture anchors.

    PubMed

    Richards, David P; Barber, F Alan

    2002-01-01

    The repair of ruptured quadriceps tendon is commonly performed by weaving sutures through the ruptured tendon and then attaching the tendon to the bone by passing these sutures through tunnels in the superior patella. This technical note is the first report we are aware of in the English language literature of a technique that uses suture anchors to attach the tendon to bone.

  16. The effect of dry needling and treadmill running on inducing pathological changes in rat Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bom Soo; Joo, Young Chae; Choi, Byung Hyune; Kim, Kil Hwan; Kang, Joon Soon; Park, So Ra

    2015-11-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a common degenerative condition without a definitive treatment. An adequate chronic animal model of Achilles tendinopathy has not yet been developed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the individual and combined effects of dry needling and treadmill running on the Achilles tendon of rats. Percutaneous dry needling, designed to physically replicate microrupture of collagen fibers in overloaded tendons, was performed on the right Achilles tendon of 80 Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were randomly divided into two groups: a treadmill group, which included rats that underwent daily uphill treadmill running (n = 40), and a cage group, which included rats that could move freely within their cages (n = 40). At the end of weeks 1 and 4, 20 rats from each group were sacrificed, and bilateral Achilles tendons were collected. The harvested tendons were subjected to mechanical testing and histological analysis. Dry needling induced histological and mechanical changes in the Achilles tendons at week 1, and the changes persisted at week 4. The needled Achilles tendons of the treadmill group tended to show more severe histological and mechanical changes than those of the cage group, although these differences were not statistically significant. Dry needling combined with free cage activity or treadmill running produced tendinopathy-like changes in rat Achilles tendons up to 4 weeks after injury. Dry needling is an easy procedure with a short induction period and a high success rate, suggesting it may have relevance in the design of an Achilles tendinopathy model. PMID:26076317

  17. Controlled release of curcumin from curcumin-loaded nanomicelles to prevent peritendinous adhesion during Achilles tendon healing in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weizhong; Li, Xuanyi; Comes Franchini, Mauro; Xu, Ke; Locatelli, Erica; Martin, Robert C; Monaco, Ilaria; Li, Yan; Cui, Shusen

    2016-01-01

    We introduced curcumin-loaded nanomicelles into a tendon-healing model to evaluate their effects on tendon healing and adhesion. Three groups consisting of 36 rats underwent rupture and repair of the Achilles tendon. The treatment group received an injection of curcumin-loaded nanomicelles (gold nanorods [GNRs]-1/curcumin in polymeric nanomicelles [curc@PMs] at a dosage of 0.44 mg curcumin/kg in 0.1 mL saline) into the surgical site and exposed to laser postoperatively at weeks 1, 2, and 3, for three times 10 seconds each, on the surgical site in the rats that underwent tendon rupture and repair, while the other two groups received 0.44 mg curcumin/kg in 0.1 mL saline and 0.1 mL of saline, respectively. The specimens were harvested at 4 weeks and subjected to biomechanical and histological evaluation. The scoring results of tendon adhesion indicated that GNRs-1/curc@PMs group was in the lowest grade of peritendinous adhesions compared to the other groups. Histological assessment further confirmed the preventive effect of GNRs-1/curc@PMs on tendon adhesion. These findings indicated greater tendon strength with less adhesion in the group treated with GNRs-1/curc@PMs combined with laser exposure, and that nanoparticle-based therapy may be applied to prevent adhesion in clinical patients. PMID:27382278

  18. Plasticity of human Achilles tendon mechanical and morphological properties in response to cyclic strain.

    PubMed

    Arampatzis, Adamantios; Peper, Andreas; Bierbaum, Stefanie; Albracht, Kirsten

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of the current study in combination with our previous published data (Arampatzis et al., 2007) was to examine the effects of a controlled modulation of strain magnitude and strain frequency applied to the Achilles tendon on the plasticity of tendon mechanical and morphological properties. Eleven male adults (23.9 ± 2.2 yr) participated in the study. The participants exercised one leg at low magnitude tendon strain (2.97 ± 0.47%), and the other leg at high tendon strain magnitude (4.72 ± 1.08%) of similar frequency (0.5 Hz, 1s loading, 1s relaxation) and exercise volume (integral of the plantar flexion moment over time) for 14 weeks, 4 days per week, 5 sets per session. The exercise volume was similar to the intervention of our earlier study (0.17 Hz frequency; 3s loading, 3s relaxation) allowing a direct comparison of the results. Before and after the intervention ankle joint moment has been measured by a dynamometer, tendon-aponeurosis elongation by ultrasound and cross-sectional area of the Achilles tendon by magnet resonance images (MRI). We found a decrease in strain at a given tendon force, an increase in tendon-aponeurosis stiffness and tendon elastic modulus of the Achilles tendon only in the leg exercised at high strain magnitude. The cross-sectional area (CSA) of the Achilles tendon did not show any statistically significant (P > 0.05) differences to the pre-exercise values in both legs. The results indicate a superior improvement in tendon properties (stiffness, elastic modulus and CSA) at the low frequency (0.17 Hz) compared to the high strain frequency (0.5 Hz) protocol. These findings provide evidence that the strain magnitude applied to the Achilles tendon should exceed the value, which occurs during habitual activities to trigger adaptational effects and that higher tendon strain duration per contraction leads to superior tendon adaptational responses.

  19. Achilles tendon vibration-induced changes in plantar flexor corticospinal excitability.

    PubMed

    Lapole, Thomas; Temesi, John; Gimenez, Philippe; Arnal, Pierrick J; Millet, Guillaume Y; Petitjean, Michel

    2015-02-01

    Daily Achilles tendon vibration has been shown to increase muscle force, likely via corticospinal neural adaptations. The aim of the present study was to determine the extent by which corticospinal excitability is influenced during direct Achilles tendon vibration. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) were elicited in the soleus (SOL), gastrocnemius medialis (GM) and tibialis anterior (TA) by transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortical area of the leg with and without Achilles tendon vibration at various frequencies (50, 80 and 110 Hz). Contralateral homologues were also investigated. SOL and GM MEP amplitude significantly increased by 226 ± 188 and 66 ± 39%, respectively, during Achilles tendon vibration, without any difference between the tested frequencies. No MEP changes were reported for TA or contralateral homologues. Increased SOL and GM MEP amplitude suggests increased vibration-induced corticospinal excitability independent of vibration frequency.

  20. ggstThe role of tendon microcirculation in Achilles and patellar tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Knobloch, Karsten

    2008-01-01

    Tendinopathy is of distinct interest as it describes a painful tendon disease with local tenderness, swelling and pain associated with sonographic features such as hypoechogenic texture and diameter enlargement. Recent research elucidated microcirculatory changes in tendinopathy using laser Doppler flowmetry and spectrophotometry such as at the Achilles tendon, the patellar tendon as well as at the elbow and the wrist level. Tendon capillary blood flow is increased at the point of pain. Tendon oxygen saturation as well as tendon postcapillary venous filling pressures, determined non-invasively using combined Laser Doppler flowmetry and spectrophotometry, can quantify, in real-time, how tendon microcirculation changes over with pathology or in response to a given therapy. Tendon oxygen saturation can be increased by repetitive, intermittent short-term ice applications in Achilles tendons; this corresponds to 'ischemic preconditioning', a method used to train tissue to sustain ischemic damage. On the other hand, decreasing tendon oxygenation may reflect local acidosis and deteriorating tendon metabolism. Painful eccentric training, a common therapy for Achilles, patellar, supraspinatus and wrist tendinopathy decreases abnormal capillary tendon flow without compromising local tendon oxygenation. Combining an Achilles pneumatic wrap with eccentric training changes tendon microcirculation in a different way than does eccentric training alone; both approaches reduce pain in Achilles tendinopathy. The microcirculatory effects of measures such as extracorporeal shock wave therapy as well as topical nitroglycerine application are to be studied in tendinopathy as well as the critical question of dosage and maintenance. Interestingly it seems that injection therapy using color Doppler for targeting the area of neovascularisation yields to good clinical results with polidocanol sclerosing therapy, but also with a combination of epinephrine and lidocaine. PMID:18447938

  1. Middle-aged adults exhibit altered spatial variations in Achilles tendon wave speed

    PubMed Central

    Slane, Laura Chernak; DeWall, Ryan; Martin, Jack; Lee, Kenneth; Thelen, Darryl G.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate spatial variations in measured wave speed in the relaxed and stretched Achilles tendons of young and middle-aged adults. Wave speed was measured from the distal Achilles tendon, soleus aponeurosis, medial gastrocnemius aponeurosis and medial gastrocnemius muscle in healthy young (n = 15, aged 25 ± 4 years) and middle-aged (n = 10, aged 49 ± 4 years) adults in resting, dorsiflexed and plantarflexed postures. In both age groups, Achilles tendon wave speed decreased proximally, with the lowest wave speed measured in the gastrocnemius aponeurosis. Measured wave speed increased with passive dorsiflexion, reflecting the strain-stiffening behavior of tendons. There were no significant aging effects on wave speed in the free tendon or soleus aponeurosis. However, a significant, inverse relationship between gastrocnemius aponeurosis wave speed and age was observed in the dorsiflexed posture. We also observed significantly lower wave speeds in the gastrocnemius muscles of middle-aged adults when compared with young adults. These results suggest that Achilles tendon compliance increases in a distal-to-proximal pattern, with middle-aged adults exhibiting greater compliance in the distal gastrocnemius muscle and tendinous structures. An age-related change in the spatial variation in Achilles tendon compliance could affect localised tissue deformation patterns and injury potential within the triceps surae muscle-tendon units. PMID:26020294

  2. Quadriceps tendon rupture through a superolateral bipartite patella.

    PubMed

    Woods, G William; O'Connor, Daniel P; Elkousy, Hussein A

    2007-10-01

    We report a case of a quadriceps tendon rupture through a bipartite patella. Although quadriceps tendon ruptures and patella fractures are common, rupture through a bipartite patella fragment is rare. This case was managed similar to a quadriceps rupture with an excellent result.

  3. Age-related differences in Achilles tendon properties and triceps surae muscle architecture in vivo.

    PubMed

    Stenroth, Lauri; Peltonen, Jussi; Cronin, Neil J; Sipilä, Sarianna; Finni, Taija

    2012-11-01

    This study examined the concurrent age-related differences in muscle and tendon structure and properties. Achilles tendon morphology and mechanical properties and triceps surae muscle architecture were measured from 100 subjects [33 young (24 ± 2 yr) and 67 old (75 ± 3 yr)]. Motion analysis-assisted ultrasonography was used to determine tendon stiffness, Young's modulus, and hysteresis during isometric ramp contractions. Ultrasonography was used to measure muscle architectural features and size and tendon cross-sectional area. Older participants had 17% lower (P < 0.01) Achilles tendon stiffness and 32% lower (P < 0.001) Young's modulus than young participants. Tendon cross-sectional area was also 16% larger (P < 0.001) in older participants. Triceps surae muscle size was smaller (P < 0.05) and gastrocnemius medialis muscle fascicle length shorter (P < 0.05) in old compared with young. Maximal plantarflexion force was associated with tendon stiffness and Young's modulus (r = 0.580, P < 0.001 and r = 0.561, P < 0.001, respectively). Comparison between old and young subjects with similar strengths did not reveal a difference in tendon stiffness. The results suggest that regardless of age, Achilles tendon mechanical properties adapt to match the level of muscle performance. Old people may compensate for lower tendon material properties by increasing tendon cross-sectional area. Lower tendon stiffness in older subjects might be beneficial for movement economy in low-intensity locomotion and thus optimized for their daily activities.

  4. Comparison of Achilles tendon repair techniques in a sheep model using a cross-linked acellular porcine dermal patch and platelet-rich plasma fibrin matrix for augmentation.

    PubMed

    Sarrafian, Tiffany L; Wang, Hali; Hackett, Eileen S; Yao, Jian Q; Shih, Mei-Shu; Ramsay, Heather L; Turner, A Simon

    2010-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to evaluate a cross-linked acellular porcine dermal patch (APD), as well as platelet-rich plasma fibrin matrix (PRPFM), for repair of acute Achilles tendon rupture in a sheep model. The 2 surgically transected tendon ends were reapproximated in groups 1 and 2, whereas a gap was left between the tendon ends in group 3. APD was used to reinforce the repair in group 2, and autologous PRPFM was used to fill the gap, which was also reinforced with APD, in group 3. All sheep were humanely euthanized at 24 weeks after the repair, and biomechanical and histological testing were performed. Tensile strength testing showed a statistically significant difference in elongation between the operated limb and the unoperated contralateral limb in groups 1 and 3, but not in group 2. All operated tendons appeared healed with no apparent fibrosis under light and polarized microscopy. In group 1, all surgical separation sites were identifiable, and healing occurred via increasing tendon thickness. In group 2, healing occurred with new tendon fibers across the separation, without increasing tendon thickness in 2 out of 6 animals. Group 3 showed complete bridging of the gap, with no change in tendon thickness in 2 out of 6 animals. In groups 2 and 3, peripheral integration of the APD to tendon fibers was observed. These findings support the use of APD, alone or with PRPFM, to augment Achilles tendon repair in a sheep model.

  5. Microcirculation in healing and healthy Achilles tendon assessed with invasive laser doppler flowmetry

    PubMed Central

    Arverud, Erica Domeij; Persson-Lindell, Olof; Sundquist, Fredrik; Labruto, Fausto; Edman, Gunnar; Ackermann, Paul W.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Introduction Achilles tendon (AT) rupture exhibits a prolonged healing process with varying clinical outcome. Reduced blood flow to the AT has been considered an underlying factor to AT rupture (ATR) and impaired healing. In vivo measurements using laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) may be a viable method to assess blood flow in healthy and healing AT. Methods 29 persons were included in the study; 9 being ATR patients and 20 healthy subjects without any prior symptoms from the AT. Invasive LDF was used to determine the post-occlusive reactive hyperemia (PORH) in the paratenon after 15 minutes of occlusion of the lower extremities. ATR patients were examined two weeks post-operatively. Results LDF-assessments demonstrated a significantly different (p < 0.001) PORH response in the healing- versus intact- and control AT. In the healing AT, a slow, flattened PORH was observed compared to a fast, high peak PORH in intact, healthy AT. Conclusion in vivo LDF appears to be a feasible method to assess alterations in blood flow in healing and intact AT. The healing ATs capability to react to an ischemic period is clearly impaired, which may be due to the trauma at injury and/or surgery or degenerative changes in the tendon. PMID:27331035

  6. Patellar and quadriceps tendon ruptures--jumper's knee.

    PubMed

    Kelly, D W; Carter, V S; Jobe, F W; Kerlan, R K

    1984-01-01

    We reviewed 13 patients with end stage jumper's knee, 10 with patellar tendon ruptures, and 3 with ruptures of the quadriceps tendon to evaluate our long-term results in treating these tendon ruptures in an athletic population. The focus was on the natural history, the time until return, and the level of return, to athletic activity. Jumper's knee affected all patients to a varying degree prior to rupture. Basketball was the most common sport involved. At followup, averaging 4 1/2 years, patients underwent functional and clinical, as well as Cybex and roentgenographic, evaluations. Results indicated patellar tendon ruptures, where the ruptures are complete, have a more favorable prognosis than those of the quadriceps tendon which are incomplete. All of the latter patients continued to have quadriceps tendinitis following repair. In both groups, the poor results were obtained in patients with chondromalacia and/or patella alta. Cybex testing yielded results of greater than 100% strength in three patients with patellar tendon ruptures, but no patient with quadriceps rupture had comparable test results. There was no apparent relationship between ruptures and cortisone injections. Patellar and quadriceps tendon ruptures from indirect injury in athletes represent the end stage of jumper's knee and result from repetitive microtrauma. Excellent function usually follows repair of patellar tendon ruptures when surgery is performed early and care is taken to restore normal patellar tendon length. Results of quadriceps ruptures are less satisfactory since these ruptures are usually incomplete and all degenerative tissue may not be involved in the healing response.

  7. Sequential rupture of triceps and quadriceps tendons in a dialysis patient using hormone supplements.

    PubMed

    Soo, I; Christiansen, J; Marion, D; Courtney, M; Luyckx, V A

    2011-02-01

    Spontaneous rupture of tendons is rare, and typically occurs in large weight bearing tendons such as the quadriceps, Achilles and patellar tendon, in the context of various chronic diseases including end-stage renal disease. In general, tendon rupture in dialysis patients is associated with hyperparathyroidism, long duration of dialysis, steroid and quinolone use. We present a case of a young man on chronic dialysis who presented with sequential rupture of triceps and quadriceps tendons requiring surgical repair, several months after initiating use of multiple hormone supplements including human growth hormone and androgens. The supplements were obtained over the internet with the aim of improving his kidney function. Although this patient did have hyperparathyroidism, it is likely his PTH elevation was exacerbated by use of human growth hormone, and tendon rupture risk increased by concurrent use of an androgen supplement. This case highlights the fact that dialysis patients do utilize alternative remedies and that there may be unexpected, dialysis-specific complications associated with their use.

  8. Biomechanical and structural response of healing Achilles tendon to fatigue loading following acute injury

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Benjamin R.; Sarver, Joseph J.; Buckley, Mark R.; Voleti, Pramod B.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2013-01-01

    Achilles tendon injuries affect both athletes and the general population, and their incidence is rising. In particular, the Achilles tendon is subject to dynamic loading at or near failure loads during activity, and fatigue induced damage is likely a contributing factor to ultimate tendon failure. Unfortunately, little is known about how injured Achilles tendons respond mechanically and structurally to fatigue loading during healing. Knowledge of these properties remains critical to best evaluate tendon damage induction and the ability of the tendon to maintain mechanical properties with repeated loading. Thus, this study investigated the mechanical and structural changes in healing mouse Achilles tendons during fatigue loading. Twenty four mice received bilateral full thickness, partial width excisional injuries to their Achilles tendons (IACUC approved) and twelve tendons from six mice were used as controls. Tendons were fatigue loaded to assess mechanical and structural properties simultaneously after 0, 1, 3, and 6 weeks of healing using an integrated polarized light system. Results showed that the number of cycles to failure decreased dramatically (37-fold, p<0.005) due to injury, but increased throughout healing, ultimately recovering after 6 weeks. The tangent stiffness, hysteresis, and dynamic modulus did not improve with healing (p<0.005). Linear regression analysis was used to determine relationships between mechanical and structural properties. Of tendon structural properties, the apparent birefringence was able to best predict dynamic modulus (R2=0.88–0.92) throughout healing and fatigue life. This study reinforces the concept that fatigue loading is a sensitive metric to assess tendon healing and demonstrates potential structural metrics to predict mechanical properties. PMID:24280564

  9. Achilles tendon injuries in elite athletes: lessons in pathophysiology from their equine counterparts.

    PubMed

    Patterson-Kane, Janet C; Rich, Tina

    2014-01-01

    Superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) injury in equine athletes is one of the most well-accepted, scientifically supported companion animal models of human disease (i.e., exercise-induced Achilles tendon [AT] injury). The SDFT and AT are functionally and clinically equivalent (and important) energy-storing structures for which no equally appropriate rodent, rabbit, or other analogues exist. Access to equine tissues has facilitated significant advances in knowledge of tendon maturation and aging, determination of specific exercise effects (including early life), and definition of some of the earliest stages of subclinical pathology. Access to human surgical biopsies has provided complementary information on more advanced phases of disease. Importantly, equine SDFT injuries are only a model for acute ruptures in athletes, not the entire spectrum of human tendonopathy (including chronic tendon pain). In both, pathology begins with a potentially prolonged phase of accumulation of (subclinical) microdamage. Recent work has revealed remarkably similar genetic risk factors, including further evidence that tenocyte dysfunction plays an active role. Mice are convenient but not necessarily accurate models for multiple diseases, particularly at the cellular level. Mechanistic studies, including tendon cell responses to combinations of exercise-associated stresses, require a more thorough investigation of cross-species conservation of key stress pathway auditors. Molecular evidence has provided some context for the poor performance of mouse models; equines may provide better systems at this level. The use of horses may be additionally justifiable based on comparable species longevity, lifestyle factors, and selection pressure by similar infectious agents (e.g., herpesviruses) on general cell stress pathway evolution.

  10. Dynamic creep and pre-conditioning of the Achilles tendon in-vivo.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, David; Lum, Corey; Gaydos, Diane; Dunning, Russell

    2009-12-11

    Warm-up exercises are often advocated prior to strenuous exercise, but the warm-up duration and effect on muscle-tendon behavior are not well defined. The gastrocnemius-Achilles tendon complexes of 18 subjects were studied to quantify the dynamic creep response of the Achilles tendon in-vivo and the warm-up dose required for the Achilles tendon to achieve steady-state behavior. A custom testing chamber was used to determine each subject's maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) during an isometric ankle plantar flexion effort. The subject's right knee and ankle were immobilized for one hour. Subjects then performed over seven minutes of cyclic isometric ankle plantar flexion efforts equal to 25-35% of their MVC at a frequency of 0.75 Hz. Ankle plantar flexion effort and images from dual ultrasound probes located over the gastrocnemius muscle-Achilles tendon and the calcaneus-Achilles tendon junction were acquired for eight seconds at the start of each sequential minute of the activity. Ultrasound images were analyzed to quantify the average relative Achilles tendon strain at 25% MVC force (epsilon(25%MVC)) for each minute. The epsilon(25%MVC) increased from 0.3% at the start of activity to 3.3% after seven minutes, giving a total dynamic creep of ~3.0%. The epsilon(25%MVC) increased by more than 0.56% per minute for the first five minutes and increased by less than 0.13% per minute thereafter. Therefore, following a period of inactivity, a low intensity warm-up lasting at least six minutes or producing 270 loading cycles is required for an Achilles tendon to reach a relatively steady-state behavior.

  11. Bilateral patellar tendon rupture associated with statin use

    PubMed Central

    Kearns, Marie C.; Singh, Vinay K.

    2016-01-01

    Patellar tendon rupture is an uncommon clinical presentation, which generally affects the under 40s who are active in sport. Bilateral rupture of both tendons is much rarer. It occurs most frequently in patients with predisposing factors such as corticosteroid use or systemic diseases. The authors present the case of a 56-year-old male on long-term statin therapy who sustained this injury following a fall on ice. He had no known risk factors for tendon rupture. Surgical treatment involved tendon repair using Krakow suture via bony tunnels in the patella. Statins have previously been associated with tendon ruptures at other sites but there have been no published cases of bilateral patellar tendon rupture linked to statin use. We review the literature regarding the association between statins and tendon rupture. PMID:27165749

  12. Gait analysis before and after achilles tendon surgical suture in a single-subject study: a case report.

    PubMed

    Marcolin, Giuseppe; Buriani, Alessandro; Balasso, Alberto; Villaminar, Renato; Petrone, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Achilles tendon rupture is a disabling injury that requires a long recovery time. We describe a unique case of a 46-year-old male who had undergone gait analysis as part of a personal physical examination and who, 16 months later, ruptured his left Achilles tendon while running. With gait kinematic and kinetic data available both before and after his injury, we determined the residual gait asymmetries on his uninjured side and compared the pre- and postinjury measurements. We analyzed his gait at 1, 4, and 7 weeks after his return to full weightbearing. Compared with the preinjury values, at 7 weeks he had almost complete range of motion in his left ankle (-2%) and a slight increase in gait velocity (+6%) and cadence (+3%). The peak power of his injured ankle was 90% of its preinjury value. In contrast, the unaffected ankle was at 118%. These observations suggest that measuring the asymmetries of the gait cycle, especially at the beginning of rehabilitation, can be used to improve treatment. We had the patient strengthen his ankle using a stationary bicycle before he returned to running. Kinetics also appears to be more powerful than kinematics in detecting functional asymmetries associated with reduced calf strength, even 15 weeks after surgery. Gait analysis could be used to predict the effectiveness of rehabilitation protocols and help calibrate and monitor the return to sports participation while preventing overloading muscle and tendon syndromes.

  13. Repair of Achilles tendon defect with autologous ASCs engineered tendon in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dan; Wang, Wenbo; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Peihua; Zhou, Guangdong; Zhang, Wen Jie; Cao, Yilin; Liu, Wei

    2014-10-01

    Adipose derived stem cells (ASCs) are an important cell source for tissue regeneration and have been demonstrated the potential of tenogenic differentiation in vitro. This study explored the feasibility of using ASCs for engineered tendon repair in vivo in a rabbit Achilles tendon model. Total 30 rabbits were involved in this study. A composite tendon scaffold composed of an inner part of polyglycolic acid (PGA) unwoven fibers and an outer part of a net knitted with PGA/PLA (polylactic acid) fibers was used to provide mechanical strength. Autologous ASCs were harvested from nuchal subcutaneous adipose tissues and in vitro expanded. The expanded ASCs were harvested and resuspended in culture medium and evenly seeded onto the scaffold in the experimental group, whereas cell-free scaffolds served as the control group. The constructs of both groups were cultured inside a bioreactor under dynamic stretch for 5 weeks. In each of 30 rabbits, a 2 cm defect was created on right side of Achilles tendon followed by the transplantation of a 3 cm cell-seeded scaffold in the experimental group of 15 rabbits, or by the transplantation of a 3 cm cell-free scaffold in the control group of 15 rabbits. Animals were sacrificed at 12, 21 and 45 weeks post-surgery for gross view, histology, and mechanical analysis. The results showed that short term in vitro culture enabled ASCs to produce matrix on the PGA fibers and the constructs showed tensile strength around 50 MPa in both groups (p > 0.05). With the increase of implantation time, cell-seeded constructs gradually form neo-tendon and became more mature at 45 weeks with histological structure similar to that of native tendon and with the presence of bipolar pattern and D-periodic structure of formed collagen fibrils. Additionally, both collagen fibril diameters and tensile strength increased continuously with significant difference among different time points (p < 0.05). In contrast, cell-free constructs failed to form good

  14. Cross-Linking in Collagen by Nonenzymatic Glycation Increases the Matrix Stiffness in Rabbit Achilles Tendon

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation of connective tissue matrix proteins is a major contributor to the pathology of diabetes and aging. Previously the author and colleagues have shown that nonenzymatic glycation significantly enhances the matrix stability in the Achilles tendon (Reddy et al., 2002, Arch. Biochem. Biophys., 399, 174–180). The present study was designed to gain further insight into glycation-induced collagen cross-linking and its relationship to matrix stiffness in the rabbit Achilles tendon. The glycation process was initiated by incubating the Achilles tendons (n = 6) in phosphate-buffered saline containing ribose, whereas control tendons (n = 6) were incubated in phosphate-buffered saline without ribose. Eight weeks following glycation, the biomechanical attributes as well as the degree of collagen cross-linking were determined to examine the potential associations between matrix stiffness and molecular properties of collagen. Compared to nonglycated tendons, the glycated tendons showed increased maximum load, stress, strain, Young's modulus of elasticity, and toughness indicating that glycation increases the matrix stiffness in the tendons. Glycation of tendons resulted in a considerable decrease in soluble collagen content and a significant increase in insoluble collagen and pentosidine. Analysis of potential associations between the matrix stiffness and degree of collagen cross-linking showed that both insoluble collagen and pentosidine exhibited a significant positive correlation with the maximum load, stress, and strain, Young's modulus of elasticity, and toughness (r values ranging from .61 to .94) in the Achilles tendons. However, the soluble collagen content present in neutral salt buffer, acetate buffer, and acetate buffer containing pepsin showed an inverse relation with the various biomechanical attributes tested (r values ranging from .22 to .84) in the Achilles tendons. The results of the study demonstrate that glycation-induced collagen cross

  15. Lack of tissue renewal in human adult Achilles tendon is revealed by nuclear bomb 14C

    PubMed Central

    Heinemeier, Katja Maria; Schjerling, Peter; Heinemeier, Jan; Magnusson, Stig Peter; Kjaer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Tendons are often injured and heal poorly. Whether this is caused by a slow tissue turnover is unknown, since existing data provide diverging estimates of tendon protein half-life that range from 2 mo to 200 yr. With the purpose of determining life-long turnover of human tendon tissue, we used the 14C bomb-pulse method. This method takes advantage of the dramatic increase in atmospheric levels of 14C, produced by nuclear bomb tests in 1955–1963, which is reflected in all living organisms. Levels of 14C were measured in 28 forensic samples of Achilles tendon core and 4 skeletal muscle samples (donor birth years 1945–1983) with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and compared to known atmospheric levels to estimate tissue turnover. We found that Achilles tendon tissue retained levels of 14C corresponding to atmospheric levels several decades before tissue sampling, demonstrating a very limited tissue turnover. The tendon concentrations of 14C approximately reflected the atmospheric levels present during the first 17 yr of life, indicating that the tendon core is formed during height growth and is essentially not renewed thereafter. In contrast, 14C levels in muscle indicated continuous turnover. Our observation provides a fundamental premise for understanding tendon function and pathology, and likely explains the poor regenerative capacity of tendon tissue.—Heinemeier, K. M., Schjerling, P., Heinemeier, J., Magnusson, S. P., Kjaer, M. Lack of tissue renewal in human adult Achilles tendon is revealed by nuclear bomb 14C. PMID:23401563

  16. A Fibre-Reinforced Poroviscoelastic Model Accurately Describes the Biomechanical Behaviour of the Rat Achilles Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Heuijerjans, Ashley; Matikainen, Marko K.; Julkunen, Petro; Eliasson, Pernilla; Aspenberg, Per; Isaksson, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Background Computational models of Achilles tendons can help understanding how healthy tendons are affected by repetitive loading and how the different tissue constituents contribute to the tendon’s biomechanical response. However, available models of Achilles tendon are limited in their description of the hierarchical multi-structural composition of the tissue. This study hypothesised that a poroviscoelastic fibre-reinforced model, previously successful in capturing cartilage biomechanical behaviour, can depict the biomechanical behaviour of the rat Achilles tendon found experimentally. Materials and Methods We developed a new material model of the Achilles tendon, which considers the tendon’s main constituents namely: water, proteoglycan matrix and collagen fibres. A hyperelastic formulation of the proteoglycan matrix enabled computations of large deformations of the tendon, and collagen fibres were modelled as viscoelastic. Specimen-specific finite element models were created of 9 rat Achilles tendons from an animal experiment and simulations were carried out following a repetitive tensile loading protocol. The material model parameters were calibrated against data from the rats by minimising the root mean squared error (RMS) between experimental force data and model output. Results and Conclusions All specimen models were successfully fitted to experimental data with high accuracy (RMS 0.42-1.02). Additional simulations predicted more compliant and soft tendon behaviour at reduced strain-rates compared to higher strain-rates that produce a stiff and brittle tendon response. Stress-relaxation simulations exhibited strain-dependent stress-relaxation behaviour where larger strains produced slower relaxation rates compared to smaller strain levels. Our simulations showed that the collagen fibres in the Achilles tendon are the main load-bearing component during tensile loading, where the orientation of the collagen fibres plays an important role for the tendon

  17. The twisted structure of the human Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Edama, M; Kubo, M; Onishi, H; Takabayashi, T; Inai, T; Yokoyama, E; Hiroshi, W; Satoshi, N; Kageyama, I

    2015-10-01

    The Achilles tendon (AT) consists of fascicles that originate from the medial head of the gastrocnemius (MG), lateral head of the gastrocnemius (LG), and soleus muscle (Sol). These fascicles are reported to have a twisted structure. However, there is no consensus as to the degree of torsion. The purpose of this study was to investigate the twisted structure of the AT at the level of fascicles that originate from the MG, LG, and Sol, and elucidate the morphological characteristics. Gross anatomical study of 60 Japanese cadavers (111 legs) was used. The AT fascicles originated from the MG, LG, and Sol were fused while twisting among themselves. There were three classification types depending on the degree of torsion. Further fine separation of each fascicle revealed MG ran fairly parallel in all types, whereas LG and Sol, particularly of the extreme type, were inserted onto the calcaneal tuberosity with strong torsion. In addition, the sites of Sol torsion were 3-5 cm proximal to the calcaneal insertion of the AT. These findings provide promising basic data to elucidate the functional role of the twisted structure and mechanisms for the occurrence of AT injury and other conditions.

  18. Slack length of gastrocnemius medialis and Achilles tendon occurs at different ankle angles.

    PubMed

    Hug, François; Lacourpaille, Lilian; Maïsetti, Olivier; Nordez, Antoine

    2013-09-27

    Although muscle-tendon slack length is a crucial parameter used in muscle models, this is one of the most difficult measures to estimate in vivo. The aim of this study was to determine the onset of the rise in tension (i.e., slack length) during passive stretching in both Achilles tendon and gastrocnemius medialis. Muscle and tendon shear elastic modulus was measured by elastography (supersonic shear imaging) during passive plantarflexion (0° and 90° of knee angle, 0° representing knee fully extended, in a random order) in 9 participants. The within-session repeatability of the determined slack length was good at 90° of knee flexion (SEM=3.3° and 2.2° for Achilles tendon and gastrocnemius medialis, respectively) and very good at 0° of knee flexion (SEM=1.9° and 1.9° for Achilles tendon and gastrocnemius medialis, respectively). The slack length of gastrocnemius medialis was obtained at a significantly lower plantarflexed angle than for Achilles tendon at both 0° (P<0.0001; mean difference=19.4±3.8°) and 90° of knee flexion (P<0.0001; mean difference=25.5±7.6°). In conclusion, this study showed that the joint angle at which the tendon falls slack can be experimentally determined using supersonic shear imaging. The slack length of gastrocnemius medialis and Achilles tendon occurred at different joint angles. Although reporting this result is crucial to a better understanding of muscle-tendon interactions, further experimental investigations are required to explain this result.

  19. Biomechanical Evaluation of Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Quadriceps Versus Achilles Tendon Bone Block Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, Brian; Haro, Marc S.; Bogunovic, Ljiljana; Collins, Michael J.; Arns, Thomas A.; Trella, Katie J.; Shewman, Elizabeth F.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Long-term studies of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction suggest that normal stability is not restored in the majority of patients. The Achilles tendon allograft is frequently utilized, although recently, the quadriceps tendon has been introduced as an alternative option due to its size and high patellar bone density. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical strength of PCL reconstructions using a quadriceps versus an Achilles allograft. The hypothesis was that quadriceps bone block allograft has comparable mechanical properties to those of Achilles bone block allograft. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Twenty-nine fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were assigned to 1 of 3 groups: (1) intact PCL, (2) PCL reconstruction with Achilles tendon allograft, or (3) PCL reconstruction with quadriceps tendon allograft. After reconstruction, all supporting capsular and ligamentous tissues were removed. Posterior tibial translation was measured at neutral and 20° external rotation. Each specimen underwent a preload, 2 cyclic loading protocols of 500 cycles, then load to failure. Results: Construct creep deformation was significantly lower in the intact group compared with both Achilles and quadriceps allograft (P = .008). The intact specimens reached the greatest ultimate load compared with both reconstructions (1974 ± 752 N, P = .0001). The difference in ultimate load for quadriceps versus Achilles allograft was significant (P = .048), with the quadriceps group having greater maximum force during failure testing. No significant differences were noted between quadriceps versus Achilles allograft for differences in crosshead excursion during cyclic testing (peak-valley [P-V] extension stretch), creep deformation, or stiffness. Construct stiffness measured during the failure test was greatest in the intact group (117 ± 9 N/mm, P = .0001) compared with the Achilles (43 ± 11 N/mm) and quadriceps (43

  20. Reconstruction of the Achilles tendon and overlying skin defect: 3 case reports.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zai-Rong; Sun, Guang-Feng; Wang, Da-Li; Tang, Xiu-Jun

    2014-09-01

    Although various reconstruction surgery techniques are available to repair posterior heel defects, the compound defects reconstruction is an ongoing surgical challenge. Complex, free tissue flaps are often clinically used in this repair operation but the techniques have some disadvantages, including intraoperative tedious dissections, vascular anastomosis, and postoperative thrombogenesis. Here, we present a single-stage procedure for Achilles tendon and its overlying skin defects repair with a complex posterior tibial artery perforator-based tissue flap on 3 patients. This method can repair the Achilles tendon and the soft tissue defects simultaneously in a relatively short operative time. The prognosis of the 3 operative patients described here was great for participating in exercise and daily work unassisted 18 to 26 months after operation. Clinical results indicate that our operative method can be effective in repair of Achilles tendon and its overlying skin defects without major complications.

  1. The clinical effect of tendon repair for tendon spontaneous rupture after corticosteroid injection in hands

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hui; Yang, Hu; Shen, Hui; Ye, Ganmin; Lin, Xiang-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Corticosteroid injections for hand tendinitis can lead to a rare significant complication of tendon spontaneous rupture. However, only sporadic cases were reported in the literature before. This study was designed to gauge the clinical effect of tendon repair in patients of tendon spontaneous rupture after corticosteroid injection and analyze our experience. This was a retrospective observational study of 13 patients (8 women and 5 men) operated between July 2011 and December 2015 for tendon spontaneous rupture after corticosteroid injection. Demographic data, clinical features, imaging data, and surgical treatments were carefully reviewed. The average age was 52.308 ± 15.381 years (range 29–71). The average injection times were 2.538 ± 1.664 times (range 1–6). The average rupture time (after last injection) was 10.923 ± 9.500 weeks (range 3–32). Nine patients were treated by tendon suture (69% of cases), and 4 patients were treated by tendon grafting (31% of cases). All patients received follow-up in our outpatient clinic. The sites of the tendon rupture (15 tendons of 13 patients had involved) include extensor pollicis longus (6 tendons, 40% of cases), extensor digiti quinti and extensor digiti minimi (4 tendons, 27% of cases), ring finger of extensor digitorum communis (3 tendons, 20% of cases), and middle finger of extensor digitorum communis (2 tendons, 13% of cases). Two patients who had tendon adhesion (15% of cases) were treated by tendon release. One patient who had tendon rerupture (8% of cases) was treated by tendon grafting. No patient had complications of infections, vascular, or nerve injury. Tendon spontaneous rupture is a serious complication after corticosteroid injection for tendinitis. Rigid standard of corticosteroid injection is very important. Magnetic resonance imaging was contributory to preoperative assess tendon defect and can be used to monitor healing quality of tendons during the follow-up. PMID:27741145

  2. Adaptive Remodeling of Achilles Tendon: A Multi-scale Computational Model

    PubMed Central

    Rubenson, Jonas; Umberger, Brian

    2016-01-01

    While it is known that musculotendon units adapt to their load environments, there is only a limited understanding of tendon adaptation in vivo. Here we develop a computational model of tendon remodeling based on the premise that mechanical damage and tenocyte-mediated tendon damage and repair processes modify the distribution of its collagen fiber lengths. We explain how these processes enable the tendon to geometrically adapt to its load conditions. Based on known biological processes, mechanical and strain-dependent proteolytic fiber damage are incorporated into our tendon model. Using a stochastic model of fiber repair, it is assumed that mechanically damaged fibers are repaired longer, whereas proteolytically damaged fibers are repaired shorter, relative to their pre-damage length. To study adaptation of tendon properties to applied load, our model musculotendon unit is a simplified three-component Hill-type model of the human Achilles-soleus unit. Our model results demonstrate that the geometric equilibrium state of the Achilles tendon can coincide with minimization of the total metabolic cost of muscle activation. The proposed tendon model independently predicts rates of collagen fiber turnover that are in general agreement with in vivo experimental measurements. While the computational model here only represents a first step in a new approach to understanding the complex process of tendon remodeling in vivo, given these findings, it appears likely that the proposed framework may itself provide a useful theoretical foundation for developing valuable qualitative and quantitative insights into tendon physiology and pathology. PMID:27684554

  3. Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture while playing basketball.

    PubMed

    Shah, M; Jooma, N

    2002-04-01

    Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is an uncommon injury in healthy people and only a few cases have been reported in athletes. This is the first report of a patient with simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture incurred while playing basketball. The injury was surgically repaired and the patient had a good functional outcome.

  4. Ultrasonographic Measurement of the Achilles and Supraspinatus Tendon Thicknesses in Patients with Chronic Lead Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Baki, AE; Yıldızgören, MT; Kara, M; Ekiz, T; Tutkun, E; Özçakar, L

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The study aimed to assess tendon thickness in patients with chronic occupational lead exposure by using ultrasonography. Methods: Twenty-seven male workers (mean age 32.9 ± 6.2 years, range 25–44 years) with occupational lead exposure and 27 age- and body mass index (BMI)-matched healthy male subjects (mean age 33.1 ± 5.6 years, range 25–44 years) were enrolled. Ultrasonographic measurements were obtained from the supraspinatus and Achilles tendons by using a linear probe (5–10 MHz). Results: Mean Achilles tendon values at long axis (p = 0.034) and tendon cross-sectional area (p = 0.013) were significantly smaller in the lead-exposed group than the control group. On the other hand, no significant difference was found regarding the thickness of the supraspinatus tendon (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Our preliminary results imply that subjects with occupational lead exposure have smaller Achilles tendons than healthy subjects. Chronic lead exposure may affect the tendons due to reduction of collagen synthesis. Further studies are definitely needed to confirm our initial findings. PMID:26624578

  5. Extensor tendon ruptures after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bonnin, M; Lustig, S; Huten, D

    2016-02-01

    Extensor tendon rupture is a rare but serious complication after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that impairs active knee extension, thereby severely affecting knee function. Surgery is usually required. Surgical options range from simple suturing to allograft reconstruction of the entire extensor mechanism and include intermediate methods such as reconstruction using neighbouring tendons or muscles, synthetic ligament implantation, and partial allograft repair. Simple suturing carries a high failure rate and should therefore be routinely combined with tissue augmentation using a neighbouring tendon or a synthetic ligament. After allograft reconstruction, outcomes are variable and long-term complications common. Salvage procedures for managing the most severe cases after allograft failure involve reconstruction using gastrocnemius or vastus flaps. Regardless of the technique used, suturing must be performed under tension, with the knee fully extended, and rehabilitation must be conducted with great caution. Weaknesses of available case-series studies include small sample sizes, heterogeneity, and inadequate follow-up duration. All treatment options are associated with substantial failure rates. The patient should be informed of this fact and plans made for a salvage option. Here, the main techniques and their outcomes are discussed, and a therapeutic strategy is suggested.

  6. Patellar tendon rupture in a basketball player.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sean D; Kulig, Kornelia

    2009-11-01

    The patient was a 21-year-old male who was referred to physical therapy with a 1-week history of right knee pain and stiffness following an injury of traumatic onset. While attempting to jump off of both legs to dunk a basketball during a game, the patient heard and felt a pop in his right knee that was associated with an immediate onset of pain and swelling. He was unable to bear weight following the injury and, therefore, immediately went to the emergency department, where radiographs were completed and interpreted as negative for a fracture. However, the patella for the right knee was superiorly displaced. The patient was issued crutches and referred to physical therapy. At the time of the initial physical therapy examination, the patient was still not able to bear full weight on the right lower extremity or actively fully extend his right knee. Due to concern over possible meniscal, medial collateral ligament, or patellar tendon involvement, the patient's physician was contacted and magnetic resonance imaging was ordered. Five days later, the patient presented with decreased knee effusion and the special tests for the medial collateral ligament and meniscus were negative. However, the patient was still not able to actively extend his knee, suggesting a possible rupture of the patellar tendon, which was later confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging. Surgical repair of the patellar tendon was performed 2 weeks later.

  7. Age-related changes in mechanical properties of the Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Waugh, C M; Blazevich, A J; Fath, F; Korff, T

    2012-02-01

    The stiffness of a tendon, which influences muscular force transfer to the skeleton and increases during childhood, is dependent on its material properties and dimensions, both of which are influenced by chronic loading. The aims of this study were to: (i) determine the independent contributions of body mass, force production capabilities and tendon dimensions to tendon stiffness during childhood; and (ii) descriptively document age-related changes in tendon mechanical properties and dimensions. Achilles tendon mechanical and material properties were determined in 52 children (5-12 years) and 19 adults. Tendon stiffness and Young's modulus (YM) were calculated as the slopes of the force-elongation and stress-strain curves, respectively. Relationships between stiffness vs. age, mass and force, and between YM vs. age, mass and stress were determined by means of polynomial fits and multiple regression analyses. Mass was found to be the best predictor of stiffness, whilst stress was best related to YM (< 75 and 51% explained variance, respectively). Combined, mass and force accounted for up to 78% of stiffness variation. Up to 61% of YM variability could be explained using a combination of mass, stress and age. These results demonstrate that age-related increases in tendon stiffness are largely attributable to increased tendon loading from weight-bearing tasks and increased plantarflexor force production, as well as tendon growth. Moreover, our results suggest that chronic increases in tendon loading during childhood result in microstructural changes which increase the tendon's YM. Regarding the second aim, peak stress increased from childhood to adulthood due to greater increases in strength than tendon cross-sectional area. Peak strain remained constant as a result of parallel increases in tendon length and peak elongation. The differences in Achilles tendon properties found between adults and children are likely to influence force production, and ultimately movement

  8. Lack of tissue renewal in human adult Achilles tendon is revealed by nuclear bomb (14)C.

    PubMed

    Heinemeier, Katja Maria; Schjerling, Peter; Heinemeier, Jan; Magnusson, Stig Peter; Kjaer, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Tendons are often injured and heal poorly. Whether this is caused by a slow tissue turnover is unknown, since existing data provide diverging estimates of tendon protein half-life that range from 2 mo to 200 yr. With the purpose of determining life-long turnover of human tendon tissue, we used the (14)C bomb-pulse method. This method takes advantage of the dramatic increase in atmospheric levels of (14)C, produced by nuclear bomb tests in 1955-1963, which is reflected in all living organisms. Levels of (14)C were measured in 28 forensic samples of Achilles tendon core and 4 skeletal muscle samples (donor birth years 1945-1983) with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and compared to known atmospheric levels to estimate tissue turnover. We found that Achilles tendon tissue retained levels of (14)C corresponding to atmospheric levels several decades before tissue sampling, demonstrating a very limited tissue turnover. The tendon concentrations of (14)C approximately reflected the atmospheric levels present during the first 17 yr of life, indicating that the tendon core is formed during height growth and is essentially not renewed thereafter. In contrast, (14)C levels in muscle indicated continuous turnover. Our observation provides a fundamental premise for understanding tendon function and pathology, and likely explains the poor regenerative capacity of tendon tissue.

  9. Development of cave foot deformity in failed repair of the Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Fortems, Y; Victor, J

    1993-01-01

    Two cases of failed primary repair of the Achilles tendon are reported. Cave foot deformity as an additional clinical sign of this condition is described. A possible biomechanical hypothesis is formulated, and a surgical procedure for correction of the symptoms is described. PMID:8323838

  10. Age-related changes in biomechanical properties of the Achilles tendon in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Y; Hayashi, K; Yamamoto, N; Nagashima, K

    1996-01-01

    We investigated age-related changes in the mechanical properties of rabbit Achilles tendon. The animals used were immature (age 3 weeks, body mass 380 g), young adult (age 8-10 months, body mass 4.1 kg) and old (age 4-5 years, body mass 5.1 kg) rabbits. The cross-sectional area of the tendon increased with growth and the tensile strength of the young adult [67.3 (SEM 4.2) MPa] and old [66.7 (SEM 3.8) MPa] tendon was significantly higher than that of the immature tendon [23.9 (SEM 3.8) MPa]. However, there was no statistically significant difference in tensile strength between mature and old tendons. These differences may be attributable to the change in body mass. The gradient of the stress-strain curves, that is, the tangent modulus of the mature tendon [618.0 (SEM 87.0) MPa], was higher than that of the immature [281.0 (SEM 104.6) MPa] and old [530.5 (SEM 91.0) MPa] tendon, although the difference was not significant. The elongation at failure was approximately 16 percent for all age groups. These results would suggest that rabbit Achilles tendon is highly compliant during growth.

  11. Comparison of structural anisotropic soft tissue models for simulating Achilles tendon tensile behaviour.

    PubMed

    Khayyeri, Hanifeh; Longo, Giacomo; Gustafsson, Anna; Isaksson, Hanna

    2016-08-01

    The incidence of tendon injury (tendinopathy) has increased over the past decades due to greater participation in sports and recreational activities. But little is known about the aetiology of tendon injuries because of our limited knowledge in the complex structure-function relationship in tendons. Computer models can capture the biomechanical behaviour of tendons and its structural components, which is essential for understanding the underlying mechanisms of tendon injuries. This study compares three structural constitutive material models for the Achilles tendon and discusses their application on different biomechanical simulations. The models have been previously used to describe cardiovascular tissue and articular cartilage, and one model is novel to this study. All three constitutive models captured the tensile behaviour of rat Achilles tendon (root mean square errors between models and experimental data are 0.50-0.64). They further showed that collagen fibres are the main load-bearing component and that the non-collagenous matrix plays a minor role in tension. By introducing anisotropic behaviour also in the non-fibrillar matrix, the new biphasic structural model was also able to capture fluid exudation during tension and high values of Poisson׳s ratio that is reported in tendon experiments. PMID:27108350

  12. Normal aging alters in vivo passive biomechanical response of the rat gastrocnemius-Achilles muscle-tendon unit.

    PubMed

    Plate, Johannes F; Wiggins, Walter F; Haubruck, Patrick; Scott, Aaron T; Smith, Thomas L; Saul, Katherine R; Mannava, Sandeep

    2013-02-01

    Predisposition to Achilles tendon (AT) ruptures in middle-aged individuals may be associated with age-related changes to inherent passive biomechanical properties of the gastrocnemius-Achilles (GC-AT) muscle-tendon unit, due to known muscle-tendon structural changes in normal aging. The goal of this study was to determine whether the passive biomechanical response of the GC-AT muscle-tendon unit was altered with age in 6 young (8 months) and 6 middle-aged (24 months) F344xBN hybrid rats from the National Institute on Aging colony. Fung's quasilinear viscoelastic (QLV) model was used to determine in vivo history and time-dependent load-relaxation response of the GC-AT. Effective stiffness and modulus were also estimated using linear regression analysis. Fung's QLV revealed a significantly decreased magnitude of the relaxation response (parameter C, p=0.026) in middle-aged animals compared to young animals (0.108±0.007 vs. 0.144±0.015), with similar time-dependent viscous GC-AT properties (τ(1), τ(2)). The product of elastic parameters (A*B), which represents the initial slope of the elastic response, was significantly increased by 50% in middle-aged rats (p=0.014). Estimated GC-AT stiffness increased 28% at peak tensions in middle-aged rats (2.7±0.2 N/mm) compared to young rats (1.9±0.2 N/mm; p=0.036). While the limitations of this animal model must be considered, the changes we describe could be associated with the observation that GC-AT pathology and injury is more common in middle-aged individuals. Further studies are necessary to characterize the load-to-failure behavior of AT in middle-aged compared to young animals.

  13. Early E-modulus of healing Achilles tendons correlates with late function: similar results with or without surgery.

    PubMed

    Schepull, T; Kvist, J; Aspenberg, P

    2012-02-01

    Non-operative treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures is associated with an increased risk of rerupture. We hypothesized that this is due to inferior mechanical properties during an early phase of healing, and performed a randomized trial, using a new method to measure the mechanical properties. Tantalum markers were inserted in the tendon stumps, and tendon strain at different loadings was measured by stereo-radiography (Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis) at 3, 7 and 19 weeks and 18 months after injury. Thirty patients were randomized to operative or non-operative treatment. The primary out-come variable was an estimate for the modulus of elasticity at 7 weeks. Strain per force, cross-sectional area and tendon elongation were also measured. The functional outcome variable was the heel-raise index after 18 months. There was no difference in the mean modulus of elasticity or other mechanical or functional variables between operative and non-operative treatments at any time-point, but strain per force at 7 and 19 weeks had a significantly larger variation in the non-operative group. This group, therefore, might contain more outliers with poor healing. The modulus of elasticity at 7 weeks correlated with the heel-raise index after 18 months in both treatment groups (r(2) =0.75; P=0.0001). This correlation is an intriguing finding.

  14. Achilles Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Five ailments which can cause pain in the achilles tendon area are: (1) muscular strain, involving the stretching or tearing of muscle or tendon fibers; (2) a contusion, inflammation or infection called tenosynovitis; (3) tendonitis, the inflammation of the tendon; (4) calcaneal bursitis, the inflammation of the bursa between the achilles tendon…

  15. The morphology and symptom history of the Achilles tendons of figure skaters: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Mark; Tillett, Eleanor; Mitchell, Sophie; Maffulli, Nicola; Morrissey, Dylan

    2012-01-01

    Summary This cross-sectional study assessed the prevalence of Achilles tendinopathy symptoms and ultrasound (US) abnormalities in male and female ice skaters, and compared this to age-matched controls. The 20 skaters of mean (sd) age 17.3 (7.9) were recruited from British figure skating clubs. The 17 non-skaters of mean age 18.0 (3.7) were recruited from a secondary school and university. Each group had 12 females. All participants completed a questionnaire, and Achilles tendons were ultrasound-scanned for thickening, hypoechoic areas, paratenon blurring and neovascularization. Skaters experienced significantly more lifetime symptoms (p=0.012) than the control group but there were no differences in present symptoms. Mid-tendon longitudinal thickness and the coefficient of variation (CoV) for longitudinal tendon thickness were significantly greater in the skaters (p=0.001 and p=0.017 respectively). No other ultrasound abnormalities were detected in either group. Figure skaters may be at a greater risk of Achilles tendon problems than the general population and have adaptive changes in their tendons. PMID:23738283

  16. Extended field of view ultrasound imaging to evaluate Achilles tendon length and thickness: a reliability and validity study

    PubMed Central

    Silbernagel, Karin Gravare; Shelley, Kristen; Powell, Stephen; Varrecchia, Shaun

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Achilles tendon structural changes are common after injury and correlate with recovery of function. Having simple, inexpensive, yet valid and reliable measures of Achilles tendon structure are useful both in research and clinical. The purpose of this study was to perform reliability and validity measures of extended field of view (EFOV) ultrasound (US) imaging of the Achilles tendon. Methods eight cadavers (16 tendons) were used for the validation study to compare Achilles tendon length measurements from US images with actual measured length from dissected tendons. Nine healthy subjects (18 tendons) were included in the test-retest evaluation. Results the correlation between the US images and cadaveric measurements was excellent (ICC=0.895) for the length between calcaneus and the gastrocnemius and good (ICC=0.744) for the length between the calcaneus and the soleus. The between-limb reliability was excellent (ICC 0.886–0.940) for the tendon length measurements with standard error of measurements (SEM) of 0.64 cm for calcaneus to soleus and 0.67 cm for calcaneus to gastrocnemius. Between-day test-retest reliability was also excellent (ICC=0.898–0.944). Conclusion this study supports the use of EFOV US imaging as a reliable and valid method to determine Achilles tendon length and thickness, and using the uninjured limb for comparison. PMID:27331037

  17. The Utility of Clinical Measures for the Diagnosis of Achilles Tendon Injuries: A Systematic Review With Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Reiman, Michael; Burgi, Ciara; Strube, Eileen; Prue, Kevin; Ray, Keaton; Elliott, Amanda; Goode, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To summarize and evaluate the current diagnostic accuracy of clinical measures used to diagnose Achilles tendon injuries. Data Sources: A literature search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, and EMBASE databases was conducted with key words related to diagnostic accuracy and Achilles tendon injuries. Study Selection: Original research articles investigating Achilles tendon injuries against an acceptable reference standard were included. Data Extraction: Three studies met the inclusion criteria. Quality assessment was conducted using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2 tool. DerSimonian-Laird random-effects models were used to pool sensitivity (SN), specificity (SP), and diagnostic odds ratios with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Data Synthesis: The SN and negative likelihood ratio (−LR) values for Achilles tendon rupture measures ranged from 0.73 (95% CI = 0.65, 0.81) and 0.30 (95% CI = 0.23, 0.40) to 0.96 (95% CI = 0.93, 0.99) and 0.04 (95% CI = 0.02, 0.10), respectively, whereas SP and positive likelihood ratio (+LR) values ranged from 0.85 (95% CI = 0.72, 0.98) and 6.29 (95% CI = 2.33, 19.96) to 0.93 (95% CI = 0.84, 1.00) and 13.71 (95% CI = 3.54, 51.24), respectively, with the highest SN and SP both reported in the calf-squeeze test. The SN and −LR values for Achilles tendinopathy measures ranged from 0.03 (95% CI = 0.00, 0.08) and 0.97 (95% CI = not reported) to 0.89 (95% CI = 0.75, 0.98) and 0.19 (95% CI = not reported), whereas SP and +LR values ranged from 0.58 (95% CI = 0.38, 0.77) and 2.12 (95% CI = not reported) to 1.00 (95% CI = 1.00, 1.00) and infinity, respectively, with the highest SN and SP reported for morning stiffness and palpation for crepitus. Pooled analyses demonstrated similar diagnostic properties in all 3 clinical measures (arc sign, palpation, and Royal London Hospital test), with SN and −LR ranging from 0.42 (95% CI = 0.23, 0.62) and 0.68 (95% CI = 0.50, 0.93), respectively, for the arc sign, to 0.64 (95% CI

  18. Acute tear of the fascia cruris at the attachment to the Achilles tendon: a new diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Webborn, Nick; Morrissey, Dylan; Sarvananthan, Kasthuri; Chan, Otto

    2015-01-01

    Background The fascia cruris encloses the posterior structures of the calf and connects to the paratenon and the Achilles tendon. We describe the clinical presentation, ultrasound imaging characteristics and the time to the recovery of tears of the fascia cruris at the attachment to the Achilles tendon. Methods Retrospective review of 11 tears of the fascia cruris in the different legs as separate events in 9 patients (6 male and 3 female, mean age 35.52 years, range 11–48) identified using diagnostic ultrasound, after presenting with Achillodynia. Results 11 participants presented at a mean of 4.5 weeks (range 0.5–12) after onset of symptoms. The left Achilles was more commonly injured than the right (7 : 4) and the lateral side more than the medial (6 : 4) with one case with medial and lateral presentation. Clinically, there was swelling and tenderness over the medial or lateral border in the mid to upper portion of the Achilles. 7 of the 11 (63.6%) had functional overpronation. Ultrasound appearances of a tear were identified as hypoechoic area extending from the medial or lateral border of the Achilles extending along the anatomical plane of the fascia cruris. Average return to activity was 5.2 weeks (range 1–22). Participants presenting later had longer recovery but all participants returned to full activity (r=0.4). Conclusions This is the first description of the clinical details and sonographic findings of a tear to the fascia cruris at its attachment to the Achilles tendon. This needs to be considered as a cause of Achillodynia in athletes as recognition will affect the management. PMID:25202137

  19. Strenuous Treadmill Running Induces a Chondrocyte Phenotype in Rat Achilles Tendons

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shao-Yong; Li, Shu-Fen; Ni, Guo-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background Although tendinopathy is common, its underlying pathogenesis is poorly understood. This study aimed to investigate the possible pathogenesis of tendinopathy. Material/Methods In this study, a total of 24 rats were randomly and evenly divided into a control (CON) group and a strenuous treadmill running (STR) group. Animals in the STR group were subjected to a 12-week treadmill running protocol. Subsequently, all Achilles tendons were harvested to perform histological observation or biochemical analyses. Results Histologically, hypercellularity and round cells, as well as disorganized collagen fibrils, were presented in rat Achilles tendon sections from the STR group. Furthermore, our results showed that the expression of aggrecan, collagen type II (Col II), and Sex-Determining Region Y Box 9 (Sox 9) were markedly increased in the STR group compared with that in the CON group. Additionally, the mRNA expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and biglycan was significantly up-regulated in the STR group in contrast to that in CON group. Conclusions These results suggest that a 12-week strenuous treadmill running regimen can induce chondrocyte phenotype in rat Achilles tendons through chondrogenic differentiation of tendon stem cells (TSCs) by BMP-2 signaling. PMID:27742920

  20. Influence of running shoes and cross-trainers on Achilles tendon forces during running compared with military boots.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Jonathan; Taylor, P J; Atkins, S

    2015-06-01

    Military recruits are known to be susceptible to Achilles tendon pathology. The British Army have introduced footwear models, the PT-03 (cross-trainer) and PT1000 (running shoes), in an attempt to reduce the incidence of injuries. The aim of the current investigation was to examine the Achilles tendon forces of the cross-trainer and running shoe in relation to conventional army boots. Ten male participants ran at 4.0 m/s in each footwear condition. Achilles tendon forces were obtained throughout the stance phase of running and compared using repeated-measures ANOVAs. The results showed that the time to peak Achilles tendon force was significantly shorter when running in conventional army boots (0.12 s) in comparison with the cross-trainer (0.13 s) and running shoe (0.13 s). Achilles tendon loading rate was shown to be significantly greater in conventional army boots (38.73 BW/s) in comparison with the cross-trainer (35.14 BW/s) and running shoe (33.57 BW/s). The results of this study suggest that the running shoes and cross-trainer footwear are associated with reductions in Achilles tendon parameters that have been linked to the aetiology of injury, and thus it can be hypothesised that these footwear could be beneficial for military recruits undertaking running exercises.

  1. Sustained Release of Amnion-Derived Cellular Cytokine Solution Facilitates Achilles Tendon Healing in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kueckelhaus, Maximilian; Philip, Justin; Kamel, Rami A.; Canseco, Jose A.; Hackl, Florian; Kiwanuka, Elizabeth; Kim, Mi J.; Wilkie, Ryan; Caterson, Edward J.; Junker, Johan P. E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In the United States, around 50% of all musculoskeletal injuries are soft tissue injuries including ligaments and tendons. The objective of this study is to assess the role of amnion-derived cellular cytokine solution (ACCS) in carboxy-methyl cellulose (CMC) gel in the healing of Achilles tendon in a rat model, and to examine its effects on mechanical properties and collagen content. Methods: Achilles tendons of Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed and transected. The distal and proximal ends were injected with either saline or ACCS in CMC, in a standardized fashion, and then sutured using a Kessler technique. Tendons from both groups were collected at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks postoperatively and assessed for material properties. Collagen studies were performed, including collagen content, collagen cross-linking, tendon hydration, and immunohistochemistry. Tendons were also evaluated histologically for cross-sectional area. Results: Mechanical testing demonstrated that treatment with ACCS in CMC significantly enhances breaking strength, ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and Young's modulus in the tendon repair at early time points. In context, collagen content, as well as collagen cross-linking, was also significantly affected by the treatment. Conclusion: The application of ACCS in CMC has a positive effect on healing tendons by improving mechanical properties at early time points. Previous studies on onetime application of ACCS (not in CMC) did not show significant improvement on tendon healing at any time point. Therefore, the delivery in a slow release media like CMC seems to be essential for the effects of ACCS demonstrated in this study. PMID:25210571

  2. Triceps tendon rupture in weight lifters.

    PubMed

    Sollender, J L; Rayan, G M; Barden, G A

    1998-01-01

    Triceps tendon avulsion injuries are rare. We report four weight lifters with triceps tendon raptures, two of whom had received local steroid injections for pain in the triceps. All four patients had taken oral anabolic steroids before injury. All patients had closed avulsion of the triceps tendon from its insertion into the olecranon. Three patients were injured while bench pressing heavy weights, and one patient was injured while swinging a baseball bat. Satisfactory results were achieved after surgical reinsertion of the tendon.

  3. [Neglected ipsilateral simultaneous ruptures of patellar and quadriceps tendon].

    PubMed

    Karahasanoğlu, İlker; Yoloğlu, Osman; Kerimoğlu, Servet; Turhan, Ahmet Uğur

    2015-01-01

    Neglected patellar and quadriceps tendon rupture is a rare injury, but ipsilateral simultaneous patellar and quadriceps tendon rupture was not described in the literature to our knowledge. In this article, we report a 40-year-old healthy male patient with neglected ipsilateral patellar and quadriceps tendon ruptures treated by peroneus longus tendon autograft. Patient had received some conservative and surgical treatments for patellar fracture before applying to our clinic. After our treatment using peroneus longus autograft and interference nails, patient was immobilized for six weeks in cylindrical cast. Flexion exercises and full weight bearing were started after cast removal. Patient had no complaint at postoperative second year. Patient was a neglected case. Surgical repair and early rehabilitation enabled us to achieve a satisfactory outcome.

  4. Rupture of adductor longus tendon due to ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Mouzopoulos, George; Stamatakos, Mihalis; Vasiliadis, George; Skandalakis, Panagiotis

    2005-12-01

    We present a rare case of spontaneous rupture of the adductor longus tendon induced by ciprofloxacin. A 35-year-old man was diagnosed with pneumonia and was recommended ciprofloxacin 500 mg iv twice a day for 7 days. Three days after receiving the initial dose, he developed discomfort in his left medial thigh, and pain and swelling in the same area followed ten days later. He consulted us when he noted a palpable mass on the medial side of his left thigh, and MRI study revealed adductor longus tendon rupture. There was no obvious underlying disease or other factor causing fragility of his adductor longus tendon. We review the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to fluoroquinolone-related tendon rupture as well as the risk factors and discuss proper management.

  5. Rabbit Achilles tendon full transection model - wound healing, adhesion formation and biomechanics at 3, 6 and 12 weeks post-surgery.

    PubMed

    Meier Bürgisser, Gabriella; Calcagni, Maurizio; Bachmann, Elias; Fessel, Gion; Snedeker, Jess G; Giovanoli, Pietro; Buschmann, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    After tendon rupture repair, two main problems may occur: re-rupture and adhesion formation. Suitable non-murine animal models are needed to study the healing tendon in terms of biomechanical properties and extent of adhesion formation. In this study 24 New Zealand White rabbits received a full transection of the Achilles tendon 2 cm above the calcaneus, sutured with a 4-strand Becker suture. Post-surgical analysis was performed at 3, 6 and 12 weeks. In the 6-week group, animals received a cast either in a 180 deg stretched position during 6 weeks (adhesion provoking immobilization), or were re-casted with a 150 deg position after 3 weeks (adhesion inhibiting immobilization), while in the other groups (3 and 12 weeks) a 180 deg position cast was applied for 3 weeks. Adhesion extent was analyzed by histology and ultrasound. Histopathological scoring was performed according to a method by Stoll et al. (2011), and the main biomechanical properties were assessed. Histopathological scores increased as a function of time, but did not reach values of healthy tendons after 12 weeks (only around 15 out of 20 points). Adhesion provoking immobilization led to an adhesion extent of 82.7±9.7%, while adhesion inhibiting immobilization led to 31.9±9.8% after 6 weeks. Biomechanical properties increased over time, however, they did not reach full strength nor elastic modulus at 12 weeks post-operation. Furthermore, the rabbit Achilles tendon model can be modulated in terms of adhesion formation to the surrounding tissue. It clearly shows the different healing stages in terms of histopathology and offers a suitable model regarding biomechanics because it exhibits similar biomechanics as the human flexor tendons of the hand. PMID:27635037

  6. Rabbit Achilles tendon full transection model – wound healing, adhesion formation and biomechanics at 3, 6 and 12 weeks post-surgery

    PubMed Central

    Meier Bürgisser, Gabriella; Calcagni, Maurizio; Bachmann, Elias; Fessel, Gion; Snedeker, Jess G.; Giovanoli, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT After tendon rupture repair, two main problems may occur: re-rupture and adhesion formation. Suitable non-murine animal models are needed to study the healing tendon in terms of biomechanical properties and extent of adhesion formation. In this study 24 New Zealand White rabbits received a full transection of the Achilles tendon 2 cm above the calcaneus, sutured with a 4-strand Becker suture. Post-surgical analysis was performed at 3, 6 and 12 weeks. In the 6-week group, animals received a cast either in a 180 deg stretched position during 6 weeks (adhesion provoking immobilization), or were re-casted with a 150 deg position after 3 weeks (adhesion inhibiting immobilization), while in the other groups (3 and 12 weeks) a 180 deg position cast was applied for 3 weeks. Adhesion extent was analyzed by histology and ultrasound. Histopathological scoring was performed according to a method by Stoll et al. (2011), and the main biomechanical properties were assessed. Histopathological scores increased as a function of time, but did not reach values of healthy tendons after 12 weeks (only around 15 out of 20 points). Adhesion provoking immobilization led to an adhesion extent of 82.7±9.7%, while adhesion inhibiting immobilization led to 31.9±9.8% after 6 weeks. Biomechanical properties increased over time, however, they did not reach full strength nor elastic modulus at 12 weeks post-operation. Furthermore, the rabbit Achilles tendon model can be modulated in terms of adhesion formation to the surrounding tissue. It clearly shows the different healing stages in terms of histopathology and offers a suitable model regarding biomechanics because it exhibits similar biomechanics as the human flexor tendons of the hand. PMID:27635037

  7. Reconstruction of neglected patellar tendon ruptures using the quadriceps graft.

    PubMed

    Gomes, João Luiz Ellera; de Oliveira Alves, Jairo André; Zimmermann, José Mauro

    2014-08-01

    Several techniques using different grafts have been described for reconstruction of the patellar tendon after a neglected rupture. Retraction of the quadriceps tendon may compromise repair integrity due to progressive stretching of the graft. The authors present a surgical technique using the central one-third of the quadriceps tendon. This is supported by the fact that the resistance to traction of this segment of the quadriceps tendon equals that of a double-looped semitendinosus graft and that the harvesting of this specific graft promotes muscle inhibition, thus protecting the reconstruction during the recovery period.

  8. MR appearance of bilateral, spontaneous patellar tendon rupture in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Gould, E S; Taylor, S; Naidich, J B; Furie, R; Lane, L

    1987-01-01

    Bilateral spontaneous patellar tendon rupture is an unusual complication in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. The ability of magnetic resonance to detect these tendon abnormalities is demonstrated.

  9. A Rare Case of Bilateral Patellar Tendon Ruptures: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Tarazi, Nadim; O'loughlin, Padhraig; Amin, Amin; Keogh, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral patellar tendon ruptures are rare. The majority of case reports describing bilateral patellar tendon ruptures have occurred in patients with predisposing factors to tendinopathy. We describe a case of bilateral patellar tendon rupture sustained following minimal trauma by a patient with no systemic disease or history of steroid use. Due to the rarity of this injury, clinical suspicion is low. It is reported that 38% of patellar tendon ruptures are misdiagnosed initially. Therefore careful history taking and physical examination is integral in ensuring a diagnosis is achieved for early primary repair. We discuss the aetiology of spontaneous tendon rupture and report a literature review of bilateral patellar tendon ruptures. PMID:27200200

  10. Multiparametric MR Imaging Depicts Glycosaminoglycan Change in the Achilles Tendon during Ciprofloxacin Administration in Healthy Men

    PubMed Central

    Juras, Vladimir; Winhofer, Yvonne; Szomolanyi, Pavol; Vosshenrich, Jan; Hager, Benedikt; Wolf, Peter; Weber, Michael; Luger, Anton; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine if quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques (sodium MR imaging, glycosaminoglycan [GAG] chemical exchange saturation transfer [CEST], and T2* mapping) could be used as potential markers for biochemical changes in the Achilles tendon induced by ciprofloxacin intake. Materials and Methods The ethics committee of the Medical University of Vienna approved the protocol (number 1225/2012), and all patients gave written informed consent. Fourteen ankles from seven men (mean age, 32 years ± 12 [standard deviation]) were included in the study. All patients underwent 7-T MR imaging examinations of the Achilles tendon at baseline and 10 days and 5 months after ciprofloxacin intake. Sodium signal and T2* maps were acquired with the variable echo-time sequence and the GAG CEST values were acquired with a three-dimensional radiofrequency spoiled gradient-recalled-echo sequence. Results The mean sodium signal was significantly decreased by 25% in the whole tendon (from baseline to 10 days after ciprofloxacin intake, 130 arbitrary units [au] ± 8 to 98 au ± 5, respectively; P = .023) and returned to baseline after 5 months (116 au ± 10), as observed also at the tendon insertion (baseline, 10 days after ciprofloxacin intake, and 5 months after ciprofloxacin intake, 134 au ± 8, 105 au ± 5, and 119 au ± 9, respectively; P = .034). The mean GAG CEST value in the whole tendon was parallel to the sodium signal with a decrease from baseline to 10 days after ciprofloxacin intake, 4.74% ± 0.75 to 4.50% ± 0.23, respectively (P = .028) and an increase at 5 months after ciprofloxacin intake to 4.88% ± 1.02. Conclusion In conclusion, this study demonstrates a ciprofloxacin-induced reversible reduction of the normalized sodium MR imaging signal and the GAG CEST effect in the Achilles tendon of healthy volunteers. Changes in sodium MR imaging and GAG CEST in men may reflect a decrease of GAG content in the Achilles tendon after ciprofloxacin intake

  11. Plantar fascia anatomy and its relationship with Achilles tendon and paratenon

    PubMed Central

    Stecco, Carla; Corradin, Marco; Macchi, Veronica; Morra, Aldo; Porzionato, Andrea; Biz, Carlo; De Caro, Raffaele

    2013-01-01

    Although the plantar fascia (PF) has been studied quite well from a biomechanical viewpoint, its microscopic properties have been overlooked: nothing is known about its content of elastic fibers, the features of the extracellular matrix or the extent of innervation. From a functional and clinical standpoint, the PF is often correlated with the triceps surae muscle, but the anatomical grounds for this link are not clear. The aim of this work was to focus on the PF macroscopic and microscopic properties and study how Achilles tendon diseases might affect it. Twelve feet from unembalmed human cadavers were dissected to isolate the PF. Specimens from each PF were tested with various histological and immunohistochemical stains. In a second stage, 52 magnetic resonance images (MRI) obtained from patients complaining of aspecific ankle or foot pain were analyzed, dividing the cases into two groups based on the presence or absence of signs of degeneration and/or inflammation of the Achilles tendon. The thickness of PF and paratenon was assessed in the two groups and statistical analyses were conducted. The PF is a tissue firmly joined to plantar muscles and skin. Analyzing its possible connections to the sural structures showed that this fascia is more closely connected to the paratenon of Achilles tendon than to the Achilles tendon, through the periosteum of the heel. The PF extended medially and laterally, continuing into the deep fasciae enveloping the abductor hallucis and abductor digiti minimi muscles, respectively. The PF was rich in hyaluronan, probably produced by fibroblastic-like cells described as ‘fasciacytes’. Nerve endings and Pacini and Ruffini corpuscles were present, particularly in the medial and lateral portions, and on the surface of the muscles, suggesting a role for the PF in the proprioception of foot. In the radiological study, 27 of the 52 MRI showed signs of Achilles tendon inflammation and/or degeneration, and the PF was 3.43 ± 0.48 mm

  12. Low recurrence rate after mini surgery outside the tendon combined with short rehabilitation in patients with midportion Achilles tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Alfredson, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a general opinion that a structured and specific rehabilitation is needed after treatment of midportion Achilles tendinopathy to minimize recurrence of the condition. There is sparse knowledge about the recurrence rates in large patient materials after specific treatments for midportion Achilles tendinopathy. Aim This study aimed to investigate the recurrence rates in a large number of patients with chronic painful midportion Achilles tendinopathy that had been surgically treated with the ultrasound (US) and Doppler (DP)-guided mini-surgical scraping technique. Postoperatively, a relatively simple rehabilitation protocol, including a range of movement exercises and gradually increased walking and biking before allowing free activity, was used. Materials and methods From a database, information about the recurrence rates after US + DP-guided mini-surgical scraping, performed by a single surgeon on 519 tendons with US + DP-verified chronic painful midportion Achilles tendinopathy, was obtained. Results Recurrence of painful midportion Achilles tendinopathy was found in 26 of 519 (5%) operated tendons, 13 from women and 13 from men. In 13 tendons, a close by located plantaris tendon was extirpated during the reoperation. Conclusion In this large material on patients treated with US + DP-guided mini-surgical scraping for midportion Achilles tendinopathy, there were few recurrences, although only a simple and nonspecific rehabilitation protocol was used. PMID:27274323

  13. Drug-Induced Tendon Disorders.

    PubMed

    Knobloch, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced tendon disorders are an often underestimated risk factor. The range from detrimental effects on the tendon include tendinopathy as well as potentially tendon rupture. As for today, four main drug classes have been reported to be associated with potentially deteriorated tendon properties: 1. Corticosteroids, 2. Chinolon antibiotics, 3. Aromatase inhbitors, 4. Statins as HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitors. Most often, the Achilles tendon is affected in terms of tendinopathy and/or subsequent tendon rupture. However, nearly every tendon of the entire body might be affected in a detrimental way by one or a combination of the aformentioned agents. PMID:27535265

  14. Insidious bilateral infrapatellar tendon rupture in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Cooney, L M; Aversa, J M; Newman, J H

    1980-01-01

    A patient with systemic lupus erythematosus developed insidious bilateral infrapatellar tendon rupture initially diagnosed as steroid myopathy. Simultaneous loss of extension at the knee due to quadriceps or infrapatellar tendon ruptures is reviewed. Images PMID:7458438

  15. Subcutaneous rupture of the flexor hallucis longus tendon: a case report.

    PubMed

    Noda, Daisuke; Yoshimura, Ichiro; Kanazawa, Kazuki; Hagio, Tomonobu; Naito, Masatoshi

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that rupture of the flexor hallucis longus tendon can be associated with open injuries and that closed rupture of the flexor hallucis longus tendon is rare. Tendon injuries of the foot can occur secondary to direct, indirect, or repetitive injury. Repetitive tendon injuries can cause tendinitis or stenosing tenosynovitis. Tendinitis is associated with internal tendon injury that can present with tendon thickening, mucinoid degeneration, nodule development, or in situ partial tears. Stenosing tenosynovitis is the development of tendon adhesions within the tendon sheath that interfere with tendon gliding, known as trigger toe. The flexor hallucis longus tendon is susceptible to injury along its entire course. A total of 35 cases of complete or partial closed ruptures of the flexor hallucis longus tendon have been reported. We present the case of complete subcutaneous rupture of the flexor hallucis longus tendon associated with trauma at the proximal phalangeal head. PMID:22153296

  16. Proximal humerus shaft fracture after pectoralis major tendon rupture repair.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Jeff A; Goldberg, Ben; Wolin, Preston

    2011-06-01

    Surgical repair of a complete pectoralis major tendon rupture at the humeral insertion has superior results compared to nonoperative treatment. To our knowledge, a proximal humerus shaft fracture occurring at the site of the bone trough and cortical drill holes after a pectoralis major tendon rupture repair has not been reported in the literature.A 45-year-old man sustained an acute left pectoralis major tendon rupture at the humeral insertion while performing a bench press maneuver. He underwent acute surgical repair. Approximately 8 weeks postoperatively, the patient fell from a standing height and sustained a proximal humerus shaft fracture through the repair site at the bone trough. Three days after the fracture, the patient underwent open reduction and internal fixation of the proximal humerus shaft fracture and exploration of the pectoralis major tendon repair. The fracture was found to be at the level of the repair site, and the pectoralis major tendon was completely intact to the distal fragment. The fracture healed uneventfully, and the patient regained full motion and strength of his extremity with no limitations.Any type of surgical fixation that creates a hole in the humerus or decreases the cross-sectional area such as a bone trough creates a stress riser. Patients undergoing pectoralis tendon repair that involves violating the humerus with a bone trough or hole have a slight risk of postoperative humerus fracture, especially if sustaining an early traumatic event such as a fall. PMID:21667914

  17. Different distributions of operative diagnoses for Achilles tendon overuse injuries in Italian and Finnish athletes

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Kristian; Lempainen, Lasse; Sarimo, Janne; Laitala-Leinonen, Tiina; Orava, Sakari

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background the origin of chronic Achilles tendinopathy (AT) is currently unclear and epidemiological factors, such as ethnicity, may be associated. Methods intraoperative findings from the treatment of 865 Finnish and 156 Italian athletic patients with chronic Achilles tendon related pain were evaluated, retrospectively. The mean age was 34 years (range, 18 to 65 years) in the Finnish and 29 years (range, 17–63 years) in the Italian patients. In total, 786 patients were males and 226 females of which 84 and 87% Finnish, respectively. Data were collected, retrospectively from patient records. The differences in the frequencies of operative findings were assessed for statistical significance. Results retrocalcaneal bursitis, partial tear and chronic paratenonitis were the most prevalent findings in patients with chronic AT undergoing surgery. Tendinosis and chronic paratenonitis were significantly (p=0.011) more common in Finnish athletes. Italian patients exhibited significantly (p<0.001) more insertional calcific tendinopathy (heel spurs) and prominent posterosuperior calcaneal corners (Haglund’s heel). Conclusion ethnicity appears to be associated with specific characteristics of overuse-related Achilles tendon pathology. This is an issue that should be considered in the planning of genetic research on AT. PMID:27331038

  18. The enigmatic diagnosis of posterior tibialis tendon rupture.

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, R. E.; Pfister, M. E.

    1993-01-01

    Posterior tibialis tendon rupture is a diagnosis that is often missed. This is thought to be secondary to nonspecific clinical findings and the lack of any laboratory or radiographic test to reliably confirm the diagnosis. We report sixteen cases of surgically confirmed posterior tibialis tendon rupture. Based on our review of these patients, the diagnosis of posterior tibialis tendon rupture should be strongly suspected in the adult patient presenting with a history of a twisting ankle injury and generalized medial ankle pain and swelling. A flexible, asymmetric pes planus and forefoot pronation deformity with absence of posterior tibialis tendon function on manual testing is seen on examination. This is associated with loss of ipsilateral heel inversion on bilateral heel rise. The patient is usually unable to perform ipsilateral single leg heel rise and has less severe pes planus of the contralateral foot. This study reviews the presentation, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of posterior tibialis tendon rupture. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7820739

  19. Impact of drying and thiel embalming on mechanical properties of achilles tendons.

    PubMed

    Verstraete, Matthias André; Van Der Straeten, Catherine; De Lepeleere, Bram; Opsomer, Gert-Jan; Van Hoof, Tom; Victor, Jan

    2015-11-01

    Biomechanical research and orthopedic training is regularly carried out on human cadavers. Given the post-mortem decay, these cadavers were usually frozen or embalmed. The embalming method according to Dr. Thiel was often praised for the preservation of natural texture. The main aim of this article was to quantitatively analyze the impact of this embalming technique on the biomechanical properties. To that extent, Achilles tendons (calcaneal tendons) of seven cadavers have been tested. For each cadaver, a first tendon was tested following a fresh-frozen conservation, the other following the Thiel embalming process. The results indicated a significant difference in Young's modulus between both groups (P values = 0.046). The secondary aim of this article was to analyze the impact of exposure to room conditions and associated dehydration on the biomechanical properties of cadaver tissue. Therefore, each tendon was tested before and after 2 hr of exposure to room conditions. The resulting dehydration caused a significant increase of the Young's modulus for the thawed fresh-frozen tendons. The properties of the Thiel embalmed tendons were not significantly altered. In conclusion, this research promoted the use of fresh-frozen specimens for biomechanical testing. Effort should, however, be made to minimize dehydration of the tested specimens. PMID:26378610

  20. Impact of drying and thiel embalming on mechanical properties of achilles tendons.

    PubMed

    Verstraete, Matthias André; Van Der Straeten, Catherine; De Lepeleere, Bram; Opsomer, Gert-Jan; Van Hoof, Tom; Victor, Jan

    2015-11-01

    Biomechanical research and orthopedic training is regularly carried out on human cadavers. Given the post-mortem decay, these cadavers were usually frozen or embalmed. The embalming method according to Dr. Thiel was often praised for the preservation of natural texture. The main aim of this article was to quantitatively analyze the impact of this embalming technique on the biomechanical properties. To that extent, Achilles tendons (calcaneal tendons) of seven cadavers have been tested. For each cadaver, a first tendon was tested following a fresh-frozen conservation, the other following the Thiel embalming process. The results indicated a significant difference in Young's modulus between both groups (P values = 0.046). The secondary aim of this article was to analyze the impact of exposure to room conditions and associated dehydration on the biomechanical properties of cadaver tissue. Therefore, each tendon was tested before and after 2 hr of exposure to room conditions. The resulting dehydration caused a significant increase of the Young's modulus for the thawed fresh-frozen tendons. The properties of the Thiel embalmed tendons were not significantly altered. In conclusion, this research promoted the use of fresh-frozen specimens for biomechanical testing. Effort should, however, be made to minimize dehydration of the tested specimens.

  1. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the Achilles tendon insertion in man

    PubMed Central

    Milz, S; Rufai, A; Buettner, A; Putz, R; Ralphs, JR; Benjamin, M

    2002-01-01

    The distribution of type II collagen in sagittal sections of the Achilles tendon has been used to reconstruct the three-dimensional (3D) shape and position of three fibrocartilages (sesamoid, periosteal and enthesis) associated with its insertion. The results showed that there is a close correspondence between the shape and position of the sesamoid and periosteal fibrocartilages – probably because of their functional interdependence. The former protects the tendon from compression during dorsiflexion of the foot, and the latter protects the superior tuberosity of the calcaneus. When the zone of calcified enthesis fibrocartilage and the subchondral bone are mapped in 3D, the reconstructions show that there is a complex pattern of interlocking between pieces of calcified fibrocartilage and bone at the insertion site. We suggest that this is of fundamental importance in anchoring the tendon to the bone, because the manner in which a tendon insertion develops makes it unlikely that many collagen fibres pass across the tissue boundary from tendon to bone. When force is transmitted to the bone from a loaded tendon, it is directed towards the plantar fascia by a series of highly orientated trabeculae that are clearly visible in 3D in thick resin sections. PMID:11895112

  2. Ex vivo adenoviral transfer of bone morphogenetic protein 12 (BMP-12) cDNA improves Achilles tendon healing in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Majewski, M; Betz, O; Ochsner, P E; Liu, F; Porter, R M; Evans, C H

    2008-08-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the histological and biomechanical effects of BMP-12 gene transfer on the healing of rat Achilles tendons using a new approach employing a genetically modified muscle flap. Biopsies of autologous skeletal muscle were transduced with a type-five, first-generation adenovirus carrying the human BMP-12 cDNA (Ad.BMP-12) and surgically implanted around experimentally transected Achilles tendons in a rat model. The effect of gene transfer on healing was evaluated by mechanical and histological testing after 1, 2, 4 and 8 weeks. One week after surgery, the maximum failure load of the healing tendons was significantly increased in the BMP-12 group, compared with the controls, and the tendon stiffness was significantly higher at 1, 2 and 4 weeks. Moreover, the size of the rupture callus was increased in the presence of BMP-12 and there was evidence of accelerated remodeling of the lesion in response to BMP-12. Histological examination showed a much more organized and homogeneous pattern of collagen fibers at all time points in lesions treated with the BMP-12 cDNA muscle graft. Both single fibrils and the collagen fibers had a greater diameter, with a higher degree of collagen crimp than the collagen of the control groups. This was confirmed by sirius red staining in conjunction with polarized light microscopy, which showed a higher shift of small yellow-green fibers to strong yellow-orange fibers after 2, 4 and 8 weeks in the presence of BMP-12 cDNA. There was also an earlier shift from fibroblasts to fibrocytes within the healing tendon, with less fat cells present in the tendons of the BMP-12 group compared with the controls. Treatment with BMP-12 cDNA-transduced muscle grafts thus produced a promising acceleration and improvement of tendon healing, particularly influencing early tissue regeneration, leading to quicker recovery and improved biomechanical properties of the Achilles tendon. Further development of this approach could have

  3. The use of suture anchors to repair the ruptured quadriceps tendon.

    PubMed

    Bushnell, Brandon D; Whitener, George B; Rubright, James H; Creighton, R Alexander; Logel, Kevin J; Wood, Mark L

    2007-07-01

    Quadriceps tendon rupture is an incapacitating injury that usually requires surgical repair. Traditional repair methods involve transpatellar suture tunnels, but recent reports have introduced the idea of using suture anchors to repair the ruptured tendon. We present 5 cases of our technique of using suture anchors to repair the ruptured quadriceps tendon.

  4. Achilles tendon mechanical properties after both prolonged continuous running and prolonged intermittent shuttle running in cricket batting.

    PubMed

    Houghton, Laurence; Dawson, Brian; Rubenson, Jonas

    2013-08-01

    Effects of prolonged running on Achilles tendon properties were assessed after a 60 min treadmill run and 140 min intermittent shuttle running (simulated cricket batting innings). Before and after exercise, 11 participants performed ramp-up plantar flexions to maximum-voluntary-contraction before gradual relaxation. Muscle-tendon-junction displacement was measured with ultrasonography. Tendon force was estimated using dynamometry and a musculoskeletal model. Gradients of the ramp-up force-displacement curves fitted between 0-40% and 50-90% of the preexercise maximal force determined stiffness in the low- and high-force-range, respectively. Hysteresis was determined using the ramp-up and relaxation force-displacement curves and elastic energy storage from the area under the ramp-up curve. In simulated batting, correlations between tendon properties and shuttle times were also assessed. After both protocols, Achilles tendon force decreased (4% to 5%, P < .050), but there were no changes in stiffness, hysteresis, or elastic energy. In simulated batting, Achilles tendon force and stiffness were both correlated to mean turn and mean sprint times (r = -0.719 to -0.830, P < .050). Neither protocol resulted in fatigue-related changes in tendon properties, but higher tendon stiffness and plantar flexion force were related to faster turn and sprint times, possibly by improving force transmission and control of movement when decelerating and accelerating.

  5. Structural and biomechanical changes in the Achilles tendon after chronic treatment with statins.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, L P; Vieira, C P; Guerra, F D; Almeida, M S; Pimentel, E R

    2015-03-01

    Cases of tendinopathy and tendon ruptures have been reported as side effects associated with statin therapy. This work assessed possible changes in the structural and biomechanical properties of the tendons after chronic treatment with statins. Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: treated with atorvastatin (A-20 and A-80), simvastatin (S-20 and S-80) and the group that received no treatment (C). The doses of statins were calculated using allometric scaling, based on the doses of 80 mg/day and 20 mg/day recommended for humans. The morphological aspect of the tendons in A-20, S-20 and S-80 presented signals consistent with degeneration. Both the groups A-80 and S-80 showed a less pronounced metachromasia in the compression region of the tendons. Measurements of birefringence showed that A-20, A-80 and S-80 groups had a lower degree of organization of the collagen fibers. In all of the groups treated with statins, the thickness of the epitenon was thinner when compared to the C group. In the biomechanical tests the tendons of the groups A-20, A-80 and S-20 were less resistant to rupture. Therefore, statins affected the organization of the collagen fibers and decreased the biomechanical strength of the tendons, making them more predisposed to ruptures. PMID:25544391

  6. Anatomy of the sural nerve in a computer‐assisted model: implications for surgical minimal‐invasive Achilles tendon repair

    PubMed Central

    Citak, Musa; Knobloch, Karsten; Albrecht, Knut; Krettek, Christian; Hufner, Tobias

    2007-01-01

    Background Sural nerve injuries are an evident risk especially of minimal‐invasive surgical Achilles tendon repair. However, detailed anatomical studies focusing on the relationship of the sural nerve with the Achilles tendon at various levels are scarce, even pending in two planes. Aim To determine the position and course of the sural nerve in relation to the Achilles tendon in two planes after trans‐section and computer‐assisted determination. Methods The exact course of the sural nerve was determined in 10 cadavers (55.3 years, 19–89 years), using a computer‐assisted method in two planes (transversal/sagittal). Results The sural nerve crossed the Achilles tendon at 11 (8.7–12.4) cm proximal to the tuber calcanei. The distance between the lateral crossing and the proximal musculotendineus junction was 35 (20–58) mm. Starting from the tuber calcanei, the distance was 2/2 mm (transversal/sagittal plane) at 11 cm proximal to the tuber calcanei, 4/4 mm at 10 cm proximal, 5/6 mm at 9 cm, 8/10 mm at 5 cm and 11/18 mm at the tuber calcanei. Conclusion In the lateral crossing region of the sural nerve and the lateral proximal Achilles tendon 9–12 cm proximal to the tuber calcanei, a close relationship of both anatomical structures can be visualised using computer‐assisted measurements; caution is suggested to prevent sural nerve entrapment in either open or percutaneous Achilles tendon repair. PMID:17347315

  7. Reliability of the Achilles tendon tap reflex evoked during stance using a pendulum hammer.

    PubMed

    Mildren, Robyn L; Zaback, Martin; Adkin, Allan L; Frank, James S; Bent, Leah R

    2016-01-01

    The tendon tap reflex (T-reflex) is often evoked in relaxed muscles to assess spinal reflex circuitry. Factors contributing to reflex excitability are modulated to accommodate specific postural demands. Thus, there is a need to be able to assess this reflex in a state where spinal reflex circuitry is engaged in maintaining posture. The aim of this study was to determine whether a pendulum hammer could provide controlled stimuli to the Achilles tendon and evoke reliable muscle responses during normal stance. A second aim was to establish appropriate stimulus parameters for experimental use. Fifteen healthy young adults stood on a forceplate while taps were applied to the Achilles tendon under conditions in which postural sway was constrained (by providing centre of pressure feedback) or unconstrained (no feedback) from an invariant release angle (50°). Twelve participants repeated this testing approximately six months later. Within one experimental session, tap force and T-reflex amplitude were found to be reliable regardless of whether postural sway was constrained (tap force ICC=0.982; T-reflex ICC=0.979) or unconstrained (tap force ICC=0.968; T-reflex ICC=0.964). T-reflex amplitude was also reliable between experimental sessions (constrained ICC=0.894; unconstrained ICC=0.890). When a T-reflex recruitment curve was constructed, optimal mid-range responses were observed using a 50° release angle. These results demonstrate that reliable Achilles T-reflexes can be evoked in standing participants without the need to constrain posture. The pendulum hammer provides a simple method to allow researchers and clinicians to gather information about reflex circuitry in a state where it is involved in postural control.

  8. In vivo evaluation of the elastic anisotropy of the human Achilles tendon using shear wave dispersion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brum, J.; Bernal, M.; Gennisson, J. L.; Tanter, M.

    2014-02-01

    Non-invasive evaluation of the Achilles tendon elastic properties may enhance diagnosis of tendon injury and the assessment of recovery treatments. Shear wave elastography has shown to be a powerful tool to estimate tissue mechanical properties. However, its applicability to quantitatively evaluate tendon stiffness is limited by the understanding of the physics on the shear wave propagation in such a complex medium. First, tendon tissue is transverse isotropic. Second, tendons are characterized by a marked stiffness in the 400 to 1300 kPa range (i.e. fast shear waves). Hence, the shear wavelengths are greater than the tendon thickness leading to guided wave propagation. Thus, to better understand shear wave propagation in tendons and consequently to properly estimate its mechanical properties, a dispersion analysis is required. In this study, shear wave velocity dispersion was measured in vivo in ten Achilles tendons parallel and perpendicular to the tendon fibre orientation. By modelling the tendon as a transverse isotropic viscoelastic plate immersed in fluid it was possible to fully describe the experimental data (deviation<1.4%). We show that parallel to fibres the shear wave velocity dispersion is not influenced by viscosity, while it is perpendicularly to fibres. Elasticity (found to be in the range from 473 to 1537 kPa) and viscosity (found to be in the range from 1.7 to 4 Pa.s) values were retrieved from the model in good agreement with reported results.

  9. Phaeohyphomycosis infection leading to flexor tendon rupture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chahal, Jaskarndip; Dhotar, Herman S; Anastakis, Dimitri J

    2009-09-01

    A rare previously unreported cause of flexor tendon rupture is described. A 66-year-old man presented with a fully extended left middle finger, accompanied by swelling and purulent drainage. Prior to presentation, he had received a steroid injection for left middle finger stenosing tenosynovitis and subsequently developed culture-proven phaeohyphomycosis fungal infection and secondary enterococcal bacterial infection, requiring pharmacotherapy and incision, drainage, and debridement for abscess formation. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging findings were consistent with the diagnosis of closed flexor tendon rupture of the left middle finger. Antifungal and antibiotic therapy followed by two-stage flexor tendon reconstruction was performed. Six months postoperatively, full passive range of motion was achieved and the proximal interphalangeal and distal interphalangeal joints of the left middle finger actively flexed to 125 degrees and 90 degrees, respectively. PMID:19259746

  10. Viscoelastic properties of healthy achilles tendon are independent of isometric plantar flexion strength and cross-sectional area.

    PubMed

    Suydam, Stephen M; Soulas, Elizabeth M; Elliott, Dawn M; Silbernagel, Karin Gravare; Buchanan, Thomas S; Cortes, Daniel H

    2015-06-01

    Changes in tendon viscoelastic properties are observed after injuries and during healing as a product of altered composition and structure. Continuous Shear Wave Elastography is a new technique measuring viscoelastic properties of soft tissues using external shear waves. Tendon has not been studied with this technique, therefore, the aims of this study were to establish the range of shear and viscosity moduli in healthy Achilles tendons, determine bilateral differences of these parameters and explore correlations of viscoelasticity to plantar flexion strength and tendon area. Continuous Shear Wave Elastography was performed over the free portion of both Achilles tendons from 29 subjects. Isometric plantar flexion strength and cross sectional area were measured. The average shear and viscous moduli was 83.2 kPa and 141.0 Pa-s, respectively. No correlations existed between the shear or viscous modulus and area or strength. This indicates that viscoelastic properties can be considered novel, independent biomarkers. The shear and viscosity moduli were bilaterally equivalent (p = 0.013, 0.017) which allows determining pathologies through side-to-side deviations. The average bilateral coefficient of variation was 7.2% and 9.4% for shear and viscosity modulus, respectively. The viscoelastic properties of the Achilles tendon may provide an unbiased, non-subjective rating system of tendon recovery and optimizing treatment strategies.

  11. Viscoelastic Properties of Healthy Achilles Tendon are Independent of Isometric Plantar Flexion Strength and Cross-Sectional Area

    PubMed Central

    Suydam, Stephen M.; Soulas, Elizabeth M.; Elliott, Dawn M.; Silbernagel, Karin Gravare; Buchanan, Thomas S.; Cortes, Daniel H.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in tendon viscoelastic properties are observed after injuries and during healing as a product of altered composition and structure. Continuous Shear Wave Elastography is a new technique measuring viscoelastic properties of soft tissues using external shear waves. Tendon has not been studied with this technique, therefore, the aims of this study were to establish the range of shear and viscosity moduli in healthy Achilles tendons, determine bilateral differences of these parameters and explore correlations of viscoelasticity to plantar flexion strength and tendon area. Continuous Shear Wave Elastography was performed over the free portion of both Achilles tendons from 29 subjects. Isometric plantar flexion strength and cross sectional area were measured. The average shear and viscous moduli was 83.2kPa and 141.0Pa-s, respectively. No correlations existed between the shear or viscous modulus and area or strength. This indicates that viscoelastic properties can be considered novel, independent biomarkers. The shear and viscosity moduli were bilaterally equivalent (p=0.013,0.017) which allows determining pathologies through side-to-side deviations. The average bilateral coefficient of variation was 7.2% and 9.4% for shear and viscosity modulus, respectively. The viscoelastic properties of the Achilles tendon may provide an unbiased, non-subjective rating system of tendon recovery and optimizing treatment strategies. PMID:25882209

  12. Gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 accelerates healing of transected rat Achilles tendon and in vitro stimulates tendocytes growth.

    PubMed

    Staresinic, M; Sebecic, B; Patrlj, L; Jadrijevic, S; Suknaic, S; Perovic, D; Aralica, G; Zarkovic, N; Borovic, S; Srdjak, M; Hajdarevic, K; Kopljar, M; Batelja, L; Boban-Blagaic, A; Turcic, I; Anic, T; Seiwerth, S; Sikiric, P

    2003-11-01

    In studies intended to improve healing of transected Achilles tendon, effective was a stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (GEPPPGKPADDAGLV, M.W. 1419). Currently in clinical trials for inflammatory bowel disease (PLD-116, PL 14736, Pliva), it ameliorates internal and external wound healing. In rats, the right Achilles tendon transected (5 mm proximal to its calcaneal insertion) presents with a large tendon defect between cut ends. Agents (/kg b.w., i.p., once time daily) (BPC 157 (dissolved in saline, with no carrier addition) (10 microg, 10 ng or 10 pg) or saline (5.0 ml)), were firstly applied at 30 min after surgery, the last application at 24 h before autopsy. Achilles functional index (AFI) was assessed once time daily. Biomechanical, microscopical and macroscopical assessment was on day 1, 4, 7, 10 and 14. Controls generally have severely compromised healing. In comparison, pentadecapeptide BPC 157 fully improves recovery: (i) biomechanically, increased load of failure, load of failure per area and Young's modulus of elasticity; (ii) functionally, significantly higher AFI-values; (iii) microscopically, more mononuclears and less granulocytes, superior formation of fibroblasts, reticulin and collagen; (iv) macroscopically, smaller size and depth of tendon defect, and subsequently the reestablishment of full tendon integrity. Likewise, unlike TGF-beta, pentadecapeptide BPC 157, presenting with no effect on the growth of cultured cell of its own, consistently opposed 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), a negative modulator of the growth. HNE-effect is opposed in both combinations: BPC 157+HNE (HNE growth inhibiting effect reversed into growth stimulation of cultured tendocytes) and HNE+BPC 157(abolished inhibiting activity of the aldehyde), both in the presence of serum and serum deprived conditions. In conclusion, these findings, particularly, Achilles tendon transection fully recovered in rats, peptide stability suitable delivery, usefully favor gastric

  13. Achilles detachment in rat and stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157: Promoted tendon-to-bone healing and opposed corticosteroid aggravation.

    PubMed

    Krivic, Andrija; Anic, Tomislav; Seiwerth, Sven; Huljev, Dubravko; Sikiric, Predrag

    2006-05-01

    Stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (BPC 157, as an antiulcer agent in clinical trials for inflammatory bowel disease; PLD-116, PL 14736, Pliva, no toxicity reported) alone (without carrier) ameliorates healing of tendon and bone, respectively, as well as other tissues. Thereby, we focus on Achilles tendon-to-bone healing: tendon to bone could not be healed spontaneously, but it was recovered by this peptide. After the rat's Achilles tendon was sharply transected from calcaneal bone, agents [BPC 157 (10 microg, 10 ng, 10 pg), 6alpha-methylprednisolone (1 mg), 0.9% NaCl (5 mL)] were given alone or in combination [/kg body weight (b.w.) intraperitoneally, once time daily, first 30-min after surgery, last 24 h before analysis]. Tested at days 1, 4, 7, 10, 14, and 21 after Achilles detachment, BPC 157 improves healing functionally [Achilles functional index (AFI) values substantially increased], biomechanically (load to failure, stiffness, and Young elasticity modulus significantly increased), macro/microscopically, immunohistochemistry (better organization of collagen fibers, and advanced vascular appearance, more collagen type I). 6alpha-Methylprednisolone consistently aggravates the healing, while BPC 157 substantially reduces 6alpha-methylprednisolone healing aggravation. Thus, direct tendon-to-bone healing using stabile nontoxic peptide BPC 157 without a carrier might successfully exchange the present reconstructive surgical methods.

  14. Achilles detachment in rat and stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157: Promoted tendon-to-bone healing and opposed corticosteroid aggravation.

    PubMed

    Krivic, Andrija; Anic, Tomislav; Seiwerth, Sven; Huljev, Dubravko; Sikiric, Predrag

    2006-05-01

    Stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (BPC 157, as an antiulcer agent in clinical trials for inflammatory bowel disease; PLD-116, PL 14736, Pliva, no toxicity reported) alone (without carrier) ameliorates healing of tendon and bone, respectively, as well as other tissues. Thereby, we focus on Achilles tendon-to-bone healing: tendon to bone could not be healed spontaneously, but it was recovered by this peptide. After the rat's Achilles tendon was sharply transected from calcaneal bone, agents [BPC 157 (10 microg, 10 ng, 10 pg), 6alpha-methylprednisolone (1 mg), 0.9% NaCl (5 mL)] were given alone or in combination [/kg body weight (b.w.) intraperitoneally, once time daily, first 30-min after surgery, last 24 h before analysis]. Tested at days 1, 4, 7, 10, 14, and 21 after Achilles detachment, BPC 157 improves healing functionally [Achilles functional index (AFI) values substantially increased], biomechanically (load to failure, stiffness, and Young elasticity modulus significantly increased), macro/microscopically, immunohistochemistry (better organization of collagen fibers, and advanced vascular appearance, more collagen type I). 6alpha-Methylprednisolone consistently aggravates the healing, while BPC 157 substantially reduces 6alpha-methylprednisolone healing aggravation. Thus, direct tendon-to-bone healing using stabile nontoxic peptide BPC 157 without a carrier might successfully exchange the present reconstructive surgical methods. PMID:16583442

  15. Transplantation of Achilles Tendon Treated With Bone Morphogenetic Protein 7 Promotes Meniscus Regeneration in a Rat Model of Massive Meniscal Defect

    PubMed Central

    Ozeki, Nobutake; Muneta, Takeshi; Koga, Hideyuki; Katagiri, Hiroki; Otabe, Koji; Okuno, Makiko; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Kobayashi, Eiji; Matsumoto, Kenji; Saito, Hirohisa; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study was undertaken to examine whether bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP-7) induces ectopic cartilage formation in the rat tendon, and whether transplantation of tendon treated with BMP-7 promotes meniscal regeneration. Additionally, we analyzed the relative contributions of host and donor cells on the healing process after tendon transplantation in a rat model. Methods BMP-7 was injected in situ into the Achilles tendon of rats, and the histologic findings and gene profile were evaluated. Achilles tendon injected with 1 μg of BMP-7 was transplanted into a meniscal defect in rats. The regenerated meniscus and articular cartilage were evaluated at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Achilles tendon from LacZ-transgenic rats was transplanted into the meniscal defect in wild-type rats, and vice versa. Results Injection of BMP-7 into the rat Achilles tendon induced the fibrochondrocyte differentiation of tendon cells and changed the collagen gene profile of tendon tissue to more closely approximate meniscal tissue. Transplantation of the rat Achilles tendon into a meniscal defect increased meniscal size. The rats that received the tendon treated with BMP-7 had a meniscus matrix that exhibited increased Safranin O and type II collagen staining, and showed a delay in articular cartilage degradation. Using LacZ-transgenic rats, we determined that the regeneration of the meniscus resulted from contribution from both donor and host cells. Conclusion Our findings indicate that BMP-7 induces ectopic cartilage formation in rat tendons. Transplantation of Achilles tendon treated with BMP-7 promotes meniscus regeneration and prevents cartilage degeneration in a rat model of massive meniscal defect. Native cells in the rat Achilles tendon contribute to meniscal regeneration. PMID:23897174

  16. Adverse reactions of Achilles tendon xanthomas in three hypercholesterolemic patients after treatment intensification with niacin and bile acid sequestrants.

    PubMed

    Lakey, Wanda C; Greyshock, Nicole; Guyton, John R

    2013-01-01

    Multiple cholesterol-reducing therapies have been shown to induce the regression of tendon xanthoma in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia. We present 3 cases of adverse reactions in Achilles tendon xanthomas after the addition of niacin and bile acid sequestrants to ongoing statin therapy. Reduction in tendon dimensions and marked softening of xanthomas were interpreted as cholesterol removal from heavily infiltrated tissue sites. In 2 cases, changes in the xanthomas occurred despite only minor lipoprotein improvements, raising the possibility of direct drug effects in cholesterol-infiltrated tissue. Intriguingly, recent studies have described niacin receptor-mediated effects in macrophages. In summary, although adverse reactions in Achilles tendon xanthomas appear to be infrequent, clinicians should be aware of this phenomenon in their patients after intensifying lipid treatments, especially with the use of niacin in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia. Xanthoma responses may provide clues to new pharmacologic effects in cholesterol-infiltrated tissues.

  17. Imaging and simulation of Achilles tendon dynamics: Implications for walking performance in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Franz, Jason R; Thelen, Darryl G

    2016-06-14

    The Achilles tendon (AT) is a complex structure, consisting of distinct fascicle bundles arising from each triceps surae muscle that may act as mechanically independent structures. Advances in tissue imaging are rapidly accelerating our understanding of the complexities of functional Achilles tendon behavior, with potentially important implications for musculoskeletal injury and performance. In this overview of our recent contributions to these efforts, we present the results of complementary experimental and computational approaches to investigate AT behavior during walking and its potential relevance to reduced triceps surae mechanical performance due to aging. Our experimental evidence reveals that older tendons exhibit smaller differences in tissue deformations than young adults between regions of the AT presumed to arise from the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. These observations are consistent with a reduced capacity for inter-fascicle sliding within the AT, which could have implications for the mechanical independence of the triceps surae muscles. More uniform AT deformations are also correlated with hallmark biomechanical features of elderly gait - namely, a loss of net ankle moment, power, and positive work during push-off. Simulating age-related reductions in the capacity for inter-fascicle sliding in the AT during walking predicts detriments in gastrocnemius muscle-tendon mechanical performance coupled with underlying shifts in fascicle kinematics during push-off. AT compliance, also suspected to vary due to age, systematically modulates those effects. By integrating in vivo imaging with computational modeling, we have gained theoretical insight into multi-scale biomechanical changes due to aging, hypotheses regarding their functional effects, and opportunities for experiments that validate or invalidate these assertions. PMID:27209552

  18. Cyclic mechanical stimulation rescues achilles tendon from degeneration in a bioreactor system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Lin, Zhen; Ni, Ming; Thien, Christine; Day, Robert E; Gardiner, Bruce; Rubenson, Jonas; Kirk, Thomas B; Smith, David W; Wang, Allan; Lloyd, David G; Wang, Yan; Zheng, Qiujian; Zheng, Ming H

    2015-12-01

    Physiotherapy is one of the effective treatments for tendinopathy, whereby symptoms are relieved by changing the biomechanical environment of the pathological tendon. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we first established a model of progressive tendinopathy-like degeneration in the rabbit Achilles. Following ex vivo loading deprivation culture in a bioreactor system for 6 and 12 days, tendons exhibited progressive degenerative changes, abnormal collagen type III production, increased cell apoptosis, and weakened mechanical properties. When intervention was applied at day 7 for another 6 days by using cyclic tensile mechanical stimulation (6% strain, 0.25 Hz, 8 h/day) in a bioreactor, the pathological changes and mechanical properties were almost restored to levels seen in healthy tendon. Our results indicated that a proper biomechanical environment was able to rescue early-stage pathological changes by increased collagen type I production, decreased collagen degradation and cell apoptosis. The ex vivo model developed in this study allows systematic study on the effect of mechanical stimulation on tendon biology.

  19. The plantaris tendon and a potential role in mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy: an observational anatomical study

    PubMed Central

    van Sterkenburg, Maayke N; Kerkhoffs, Gino M M J; Kleipool, Roeland P; Niek van Dijk, C

    2011-01-01

    The source of pain and the background to the pain mechanisms associated with mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy have not yet been clarified. Intratendinous degenerative changes are most often addressed when present. However, it is questionable if degeneration of the tendon itself is the main cause of pain. Pain is often most prominent on the medial side, 2–7 cm from the insertion onto the calcaneus. The medial location of the pain has been explained to be caused by enhanced stress on the calcaneal tendon due to hyperpronation. However, on this medial side the plantaris tendon is also located. It has been postulated that the plantaris tendon might play a role in these medially located symptoms. To our knowledge, the exact anatomy and relationship between the plantaris- and calcaneal tendon at the level of complaints have not been anatomically assessed. This was the purpose of our study. One-hundred and seven lower extremities were dissected. After opening the superficial fascia and paratendon, the plantaris tendon was bluntly released from the calcaneal tendon moving distally. The incidence of the plantaris tendon, its course, site of insertion and possible connections were documented. When with manual force the plantaris tendon could not be released, it was defined as a ‘connection’ with the calcaneal tendon. In all specimens a plantaris tendon was identified. Nine different sites of insertion were found, mostly medial and fan-shaped onto the calcaneus. In 11 specimens (10%) firm connections were found at the level of the calcaneal tendon mid-portion. Clinical and histological studies are needed to confirm the role of the plantaris tendon in mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy. PMID:21323916

  20. Rupture of the biceps tendon after arthroscopic thermal capsulorrhaphy.

    PubMed

    Hanypsiak, Bryan T; Faulks, Craig; Fine, Kenneth; Malin, Edward; Shaffer, Benjamin; Connell, Marc

    2004-07-01

    The use of thermal energy in the shoulder to tighten capsular tissues through collagen denaturation is well established. Although reported complication rates are low, the natural history of thermal manipulation to both target and collateral tissue is poorly defined. We report two cases of biceps tendon rupture after arthroscopic capsular shrinkage. Both patients were young, athletic men with normal long head biceps tendons at the time of surgery. Each patient experienced a complete tear of the long head with distal muscle retraction, resulting in a "Popeye" deformity, at 3 months postoperatively. One patient elected further surgery with biceps tenodesis. Both patients have returned to their athletic activities with minimal functional deficits.

  1. Orthotic Heel Wedges Do Not Alter Hindfoot Kinematics and Achilles Tendon Force During Level and Inclined Walking in Healthy Individuals.

    PubMed

    Weinert-Aplin, Robert A; Bull, Anthony M J; McGregor, Alison H

    2016-04-01

    Conservative treatments such as in-shoe orthotic heel wedges to treat musculoskeletal injuries are not new. However, weak evidence supporting their use in the management of Achilles tendonitis suggests the mechanism by which these heel wedges works remains poorly understood. It was the aim of this study to test the underlying hypothesis that heel wedges can reduce Achilles tendon load. A musculoskeletal modeling approach was used to quantify changes in lower limb mechanics when walking due to the introduction of 12-mm orthotic heel wedges. Nineteen healthy volunteers walked on an inclinable walkway while optical motion, force plate, and plantar pressure data were recorded. Walking with heel wedges increased ankle dorsiflexion moments and reduced plantar flexion moments; this resulted in increased peak ankle dorsiflexor muscle forces during early stance and reduced tibialis posterior and toe flexor muscle forces during late stance. Heel wedges did not reduce overall Achilles tendon force during any walking condition, but did redistribute load from the medial to lateral triceps surae during inclined walking. These results add to the body of clinical evidence confirming that heel wedges do not reduce Achilles tendon load and our findings provide an explanation as to why this may be the case.

  2. Orthotic Heel Wedges Do Not Alter Hindfoot Kinematics and Achilles Tendon Force During Level and Inclined Walking in Healthy Individuals.

    PubMed

    Weinert-Aplin, Robert A; Bull, Anthony M J; McGregor, Alison H

    2016-04-01

    Conservative treatments such as in-shoe orthotic heel wedges to treat musculoskeletal injuries are not new. However, weak evidence supporting their use in the management of Achilles tendonitis suggests the mechanism by which these heel wedges works remains poorly understood. It was the aim of this study to test the underlying hypothesis that heel wedges can reduce Achilles tendon load. A musculoskeletal modeling approach was used to quantify changes in lower limb mechanics when walking due to the introduction of 12-mm orthotic heel wedges. Nineteen healthy volunteers walked on an inclinable walkway while optical motion, force plate, and plantar pressure data were recorded. Walking with heel wedges increased ankle dorsiflexion moments and reduced plantar flexion moments; this resulted in increased peak ankle dorsiflexor muscle forces during early stance and reduced tibialis posterior and toe flexor muscle forces during late stance. Heel wedges did not reduce overall Achilles tendon force during any walking condition, but did redistribute load from the medial to lateral triceps surae during inclined walking. These results add to the body of clinical evidence confirming that heel wedges do not reduce Achilles tendon load and our findings provide an explanation as to why this may be the case. PMID:26502456

  3. Ankle morbidity after autogenous Achilles tendon harvesting for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jai Gon; Yoo, Jae Chul; Moon, Young Wan; Chang, Moon Jong; Kwon, Jong Won; Kim, Jong Hyun; Kim, Mu Hyun

    2009-06-01

    Although several alternative autografts with reduced morbidity of harvest site have been introduced, no donor site is free of morbidity concerns. The authors report on ankle status after autogenous Achilles tendon harvesting with a minimum 10-year follow-up. From October 1994 to October 1996, a consecutive series of 47 ankles underwent harvesting of the medial third or half of the ipsilateral autogenous Achilles tendon for primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Donor site statuses were evaluated using a modified Thermann's scale. Postoperative isokinetic muscle strength testing was performed, and magnetic resonance images of donor sites were available for selected patients. Thirty-three ankles in the 32 patients were followed for more than 10 years. There were 27 men (84%) and 5 women (16%) with a mean age of 31 years (range 16-52 years) at the time of surgery. The mean duration of follow-up was 12 years and 1 month (range 10 years and 5 months to 13 years and 4 months). Mean postoperative modified Thermann's scale score was 87 (range 45-95; SD 14.3). Twenty-five (76%) ankles achieved very good or good results. A slight decrease in calf circumference <1 cm was seen in the ten ankles, 1-2 cm in the four ankles. Nine ankles were mildly hypersensitive to meteorological changes. Peak torque of ankle plantar flexion was slightly lower on the index limb at both velocities in nine selected patients who carried out performance tests. However, there were no significant differences (5.2% at 30 degrees /s and 2.7% at 120 degrees /s, P = n.s. and P = n.s.). Of the 12 available follow-up magnetic resonance images, the average cross-sectional area of the remaining tendon was 82.01 mm(2) (range 69.05-107.35; SD 10.3), and their average thickness was 7.4 mm (range 6-10.35; SD 1.1). After a minimum 10-year follow-up, the harvesting of autogenous Achilles tendons was not found to significantly jeopardize ankle status. However, it also could not be independent of donor

  4. The effects of a 30-min run on the mechanics of the human Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Farris, Dominic James; Trewartha, Grant; McGuigan, Miranda Polly

    2012-02-01

    Tendinous structures often exhibit reduced stiffness following repeated loading via static muscular contractions. The purpose of this study was to determine if human Achilles tendon (AT) stiffness is affected by the repeated loading experienced during running and if this affects normal muscle-tendon interaction. Twelve male participants (mean ± SD: age 27 ± 5 years, height 1.79 ± 0.06 m, mass 78.6 ± 8.4 kg) completed a 30 min run at 12 kmph on a treadmill. AT properties were determined before and after the run during a series of one-legged hops. During hopping and running, AT length data were acquired from a combination of ultrasound imaging (50 Hz) and kinematic data (200 Hz). AT force was estimated from inverse dynamics during hopping and AT stiffness was computed from plots of AT force and length. AT stiffness was not significantly different post run (pre 163 ± 41 N mm(-1), post 147 ± 52 N mm(-1), P > 0.05) and peak AT strain during the stance phase of running (calculated relative to AT length during standing) was similar at different time points during the run (3.5 ± 1.8% at 1 min, 3.2 ± 1.8% at 15 min and 3.8 ± 2% at 30 min). It was concluded that the loading experienced during a single bout of running does not affect the stiffness of the AT and that the properties of the AT are stable during locomotion. This may have implications for muscle fascicle behaviour and Achilles tendon injury mechanisms. PMID:21643918

  5. Acute effects of Achilles tendon vibration on soleus and tibialis anterior spinal and cortical excitability.

    PubMed

    Lapole, Thomas; Deroussen, François; Pérot, Chantal; Petitjean, Michel

    2012-08-01

    Prolonged vibration is known to alter muscle performance. Attenuation of Ia afferent efficacy is the main mechanism suggested. However, changes in motor cortex excitability could also be hypothesized. The purpose of the present study was therefore to analyze the acute and outlasting effects of 1 h of Achilles tendon vibration (frequency, 50 Hz) on the soleus (SOL) and tibialis anterior (TA) neuromuscular excitability. Spinal excitability was investigated by means of H-reflexes and F-waves while cortical excitability was characterized by motor evoked potentials (MEPs) obtained by transcranial magnetic stimulation. Twelve subjects performed the experimental procedures 3 times: at the beginning of the testing session (PRE), immediately after 1 h of Achilles tendon vibration (POST), and 1 h after the end of vibration (POST-1H). Prolonged vibration led to acute reduced H-reflex amplitudes for SOL only (46.9% ± 7.7% vs. 32.8% ± 7%; p = 0.006). Mainly presynaptic inhibition mechanisms were thought to be involved because of unchanged F-wave persistence and amplitude mean values, suggesting unaffected motoneuronal excitability. While no acute effects were reported for SOL and TA cortical excitability, both muscles were characterized by an outlasting increase in their MEP amplitude (0.64 ± 0.2 mV vs. 0.43 ± 0.18 mV and 2.17 ± 0.56 mV vs. 1.26 ± 0.36 mV, respectively; p < 0.05). The high modulation of Ia afferent input by vibration led to changes in motor cortex excitability that could contribute to the enhancement in muscular activation capacities reported after chronic use of tendon vibration.

  6. Asymmetry of Achilles tendon mechanical and morphological properties between both legs.

    PubMed

    Bohm, S; Mersmann, F; Marzilger, R; Schroll, A; Arampatzis, A

    2015-02-01

    Although symmetry of Achilles tendon (AT) properties between legs is commonly assumed in research and clinical settings, different loading profiles of both legs in daily life (i.e., foot dominance) may affect the tendon properties in a side-depended manner. Therefore, AT properties were examined with regard to symmetry between legs. Thirty-six male healthy adults (28 ± 4 years), who were physically active but not involved in sports featuring dissimilar leg load participated. Mechanical and morphological AT properties of the non-dominant and dominant leg were measured by means of ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging and dynamometry. The AT of the dominant leg featured a significant higher Young's modulus and length (P < 0.05) but a tendency toward lower maximum strain (P = 0.068) compared with the non-dominant leg. The tendon cross-sectional area and stiffness were not significantly different between sides. The absolute asymmetry index of the investigated parameters ranged from 3% to 31% indicating poor AT side symmetry. These findings provide evidence of distinct differences of AT properties between both legs in a population without any sport-specific side-depended leg loading. The observed asymmetry may be a result of different loading profiles of both legs during daily activities (i.e., foot dominance) and challenges the general assumption of symmetrical AT properties between legs.

  7. Effects of acupuncture and heating on blood volume and oxygen saturation of human Achilles tendon in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Keitaro; Yajima, Hiroyoshi; Takayama, Miho; Ikebukuro, Toshihiro; Mizoguchi, Hideyuki; Takakura, Nobuari

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of acupuncture (dry needling) and heating (application of hot pack) treatments on the blood volume and oxygen saturation of the human Achilles tendon in vivo. Nine healthy males participated in this study. During the treatments (acupuncture and heating; both 10 min) and recovery period (30 min), the blood volume and oxygen saturation of the Achilles tendon were measured using red laser lights. During needle insertion, the blood volume and oxygen saturation of the tendon increased significantly from the pre-treatment level and these values remained high throughout the 30-min recovery period. During heating treatment, the blood volume and oxygen saturation of the tendon also increased significantly. Although the increased blood volume was not maintained after removal of the hot pack, the oxygen saturation remained significantly elevated throughout the 30-min recovery period. These results suggested that acupuncture and heating treatments enhanced the blood flow in the tendon. The long-lasting increase, especially with acupuncture treatment, in the blood supply to the tendon implies that these treatments may have therapeutic effects on injured tendons.

  8. Bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture: a rare finding in a healthy man after minimal trauma.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Michael; Forman, Edward S

    2010-03-01

    Quadriceps tendon rupture is an uncommon injury; the incidence of simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is extremely rare. Two distinct categories-individuals older than 50 years and between 27 and 54 years-have been described. Bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is more common in patients older than 50 years and is thought to be the result of tendon weakening due to obesity and arteriosclerosis-induced fibrotic changes, or previous injury.In younger individuals, bilateral simultaneous quadriceps rupture is less frequent and has been associated with anabolic steroid use, but more frequently with underlying comorbid medical conditions such as chronic renal failure, hyperparathyroidism, endocrine disorder, gout, diabetes and obesity, which predispose the patients to tendon rupture. Our case report is unique because we report the simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture following minor trauma in an otherwise healthy 43-year-old man with no predisposing comorbidity.

  9. Simultaneous traumatic rupture of the patellar tendon and the contralateral quadriceps tendon in a healthy individual.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Rachakatla, N; Kerin, C; Kumar, R

    2010-11-05

    A simultaneous traumatic complete rupture of the patellar tendon and the contralateral quadriceps tendon is reported to occur in patients with renal failure and other inflammatory diseases, but is extremely rare in a healthy individual because of the different contributory factors and mechanisms of injury. We present a rare case report of such a combination of injuries in a 48-year-old healthy man. To our knowledge only three such cases have been reported in the English literature. This is an unusual combination and hence there is potential for missed diagnosis leading to suboptimal treatment.

  10. Simultaneous traumatic rupture of the patellar tendon and the contralateral quadriceps tendon in a healthy individual

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S; Rachakatla, N; Kerin, C; Kumar, R

    2010-01-01

    A simultaneous traumatic complete rupture of the patellar tendon and the contralateral quadriceps tendon is reported to occur in patients with renal failure and other inflammatory diseases, but is extremely rare in a healthy individual because of the different contributory factors and mechanisms of injury. We present a rare case report of such a combination of injuries in a 48-year-old healthy man. To our knowledge only three such cases have been reported in the English literature. This is an unusual combination and hence there is potential for missed diagnosis leading to suboptimal treatment. PMID:22791858

  11. A DELPHI STUDY OF RISK FACTORS FOR ACHILLES TENDINOPATHY- OPINIONS OF WORLD TENDON EXPERTS

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Paul J.; Barry, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Achilles tendinopathy can be a debilitating chronic condition for both active and inactive individuals. The identification of risk facors is important both in preventing but also treating tendinopathy, many factors have been proposed but there is a lack of primary epidemiological data. The purpose of this study was to develop a statement of expert consensus on risk factors for Achilles tendinopathy in active and sedentary patient populations to inform a primary epidemiological study. Study design Delphi study Methods and Measures An online Delphi study was completed inviting participation from world tendon experts. The consensus was developed using three rounds of the Delphi technique. The first round developed a complete list of potential risk factors, the second round refined this list but also separated the factors into two population groups – active/athletic and inactive/sedentary. The third round ranked this list in order of perceived importance. Results Forty-four experts were invited to participate, 16 participated in the first round (response rate 40%) and two dropped out in the second round (resulting in a response rate of 35%). A total of 27 intrinsic and eight extrinsic risk factors were identified during round one. During round two only 12 intrinsic and five extrinsic risk factors were identified as important in active/athletic tendinopathy while 14 intrinsic and three extrinsic factors were identified as important for inactive/sedentary tendinopathy. Conclusions Risk factors for Achilles tendinopathy were identified based on expert consensus, and these factors provide a basis for primary epidemiological studies. Plantarflexor strength was identified as the primary modifiable factor in the active/athletic group while systemic factors were identified as important in the inactive/sedentary group, many of the potential factors suggested for either group were non-modifiable. Non-modifiable factors include: previous tendinopathy

  12. Rupture of Flexor Pollicis Longus Tendon: A Complication of Volar Locking Plating of the Distal Radius.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, Aysha Sethunathan; Sreverthana, Shanaka; Harrison, John

    2010-08-01

    We report an unusual case of complete rupture of the flexor pollicis longus tendon following volar locking plating for a distal radius fracture. We believe that the prominence of a distal locking screw head predisposed to the rupture of the tendon. We highlight that correctly attaching the distal locking screws to the plate is essential for obtaining the correct biomechanics of the device and preventing flexor tendon rupture.

  13. Acute simultaneous ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament and patellar tendon.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Hwi; Lee, Gwang Chul; Park, Sung-Hae

    2014-03-01

    Acute simultaneous rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and patellar tendon is a rare injury. We present a case report of a 32-year-old male patient with ruptured ACL and ipsilateral patellar tendon rupture sustained while playing baseball. Surgery was performed on the patellar tendon and the ACL simultaneously. The clinical and radiological outcomes of the treatment were successful. We present this case with a review of the literatures.

  14. Traumatic simultaneous rupture of both flexor tendons in a finger of an athlete.

    PubMed

    Tan, Virak; Mundanthanam, George; Weiland, Andrew J

    2005-10-01

    We report a case of traumatic simultaneous disruption of both finger flexor tendons in a professional athlete. The novelties in this report are (1) the location of the rupture (FDS at midsubstance and FDP at insertion) and (2) the proposition that a normal but diminutive FDS tendon is a contributing factor in the rupture. We recommend that simultaneous rupture of the normal flexor tendons be treated in a similar manner as tendon lacerations. Primary repair, if possible, is the treatment of choice in these acute injuries. Tendon grafting should be reserved for subacute or chronic cases in which restoration of active finger flexion is needed.

  15. Achilles Tendonitis

    MedlinePlus

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  16. BILATERAL PATELLAR TENDON RUPTURE AT DIFFERENT SITES WITHOUT PREDISPOSING SYSTEMIC DISEASE OR STEROID USE

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Benjamin C.; Tancev, Alex; Fowler, Ty

    2009-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral patellar tendon ruptures are extremely rare, and even more rare in patients without systemic disease. We describe bilateral simultaneous patellar tendon disruptions in the absence of systemic disease or steroid usage, with one tendon disruption at the inferior pole and the other an intrasubstance tear. The different locations of the ruptures are also exceedingly rare, as only two cases of non-identical ruptures have ever been reported. We also review all bilateral patellar tendon rupture case reports from English and German literature. PMID:19742095

  17. Achilles tendon loading patterns during barefoot walking and slow running on a treadmill: An ultrasonic propagation study.

    PubMed

    Wulf, M; Wearing, S C; Hooper, S L; Smeathers, J E; Horstmann, T; Brauner, T

    2015-12-01

    Measurement of tendon loading patterns during gait is important for understanding the pathogenesis of tendon "overuse" injury. Given that the speed of propagation of ultrasound in tendon is proportional to the applied load, this study used a noninvasive ultrasonic transmission technique to measure axial ultrasonic velocity in the right Achilles tendon of 27 healthy adults (11 females and 16 males; age, 26 ± 9 years; height, 1.73 ± 0.07 m; weight, 70.6 ± 21.2 kg), walking at self-selected speed (1.1 ± 0.1 m/s), and running at fixed slow speed (2 m/s) on a treadmill. Synchronous measures of ankle kinematics, spatiotemporal gait parameters, and vertical ground reaction forces were simultaneously measured. Slow running was associated with significantly higher cadence, shorter step length, but greater range of ankle movement, higher magnitude and rate of vertical ground reaction force, and higher ultrasonic velocity in the tendon than walking (P < 0.05). Ultrasonic velocity in the Achilles tendon was highly reproducible during walking and slow running (mean within-subject coefficient of variation < 2%). Ultrasonic maxima (P1, P2) and minima (M1, M2) were significantly higher and occurred earlier in the gait cycle (P1, M1, and M2) during running than walking (P < 0.05). Slow running was associated with higher and earlier peaks in loading of the Achilles tendon than walking.

  18. Achilles tendon loading patterns during barefoot walking and slow running on a treadmill: An ultrasonic propagation study.

    PubMed

    Wulf, M; Wearing, S C; Hooper, S L; Smeathers, J E; Horstmann, T; Brauner, T

    2015-12-01

    Measurement of tendon loading patterns during gait is important for understanding the pathogenesis of tendon "overuse" injury. Given that the speed of propagation of ultrasound in tendon is proportional to the applied load, this study used a noninvasive ultrasonic transmission technique to measure axial ultrasonic velocity in the right Achilles tendon of 27 healthy adults (11 females and 16 males; age, 26 ± 9 years; height, 1.73 ± 0.07 m; weight, 70.6 ± 21.2 kg), walking at self-selected speed (1.1 ± 0.1 m/s), and running at fixed slow speed (2 m/s) on a treadmill. Synchronous measures of ankle kinematics, spatiotemporal gait parameters, and vertical ground reaction forces were simultaneously measured. Slow running was associated with significantly higher cadence, shorter step length, but greater range of ankle movement, higher magnitude and rate of vertical ground reaction force, and higher ultrasonic velocity in the tendon than walking (P < 0.05). Ultrasonic velocity in the Achilles tendon was highly reproducible during walking and slow running (mean within-subject coefficient of variation < 2%). Ultrasonic maxima (P1, P2) and minima (M1, M2) were significantly higher and occurred earlier in the gait cycle (P1, M1, and M2) during running than walking (P < 0.05). Slow running was associated with higher and earlier peaks in loading of the Achilles tendon than walking. PMID:25913324

  19. Effects of plyometric training on achilles tendon properties and shuttle running during a simulated cricket batting innings.

    PubMed

    Houghton, Laurence A; Dawson, Brian T; Rubenson, Jonas

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether intermittent shuttle running times (during a prolonged, simulated cricket batting innings) and Achilles tendon properties were affected by 8 weeks of plyometric training (PLYO, n = 7) or normal preseason (control [CON], n = 8). Turn (5-0-5-m agility) and 5-m sprint times were assessed using timing gates. Achilles tendon properties were determined using dynamometry, ultrasonography, and musculoskeletal geometry. Countermovement and squat jump heights were also assessed before and after training. Mean 5-0-5-m turn time did not significantly change in PLYO or CON (pre vs. post: 2.25 ± 0.08 vs. 2.22 ± 0.07 and 2.26 ± 0.06 vs. 2.25 ± 0.08 seconds, respectively). Mean 5-m sprint time did not significantly change in PLYO or CON (pre vs. post: 0.85 ± 0.02 vs. 0.84 ± 0.02 and 0.85 ± 0.03 vs. 0.85 ± 0.02 seconds, respectively). However, inferences from the smallest worthwhile change suggested that PLYO had a 51-72% chance of positive effects but only 6-15% chance of detrimental effects on shuttle running times. Jump heights only increased in PLYO (9.1-11.0%, p < 0.050). Achilles tendon mechanical properties (force, stiffness, elastic energy, strain, modulus) did not change in PLYO or CON. However, Achilles tendon cross-sectional area increased in PLYO (pre vs. post: 70 ± 7 vs. 79 ± 8 mm, p < 0.01) but not CON (77 ± 4 vs. 77 ± 5 mm, p > 0.050). In conclusion, plyometric training had possible benefits on intermittent shuttle running times and improved jump performance. Also, plyometric training increased tendon cross-sectional area, but further investigation is required to determine whether this translates to decreased injury risk.

  20. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with Achilles tendon allografts in revisions and in patients older than 30.

    PubMed

    Grafe, Michael W; Kurzweil, Peter R

    2008-06-01

    We evaluated the results of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using an Achilles tendon allograft in revisions and in patients older than 30. Results from 23 consecutive patients (mean age, 43 years) who underwent ACL reconstruction with fresh-frozen, irradiated (22/23) Achilles allografts were retrospectively reviewed. Seven cases were revisions. Patients were evaluated with physical examination, questionnaires, and x-rays. Twenty of the 23 patients were evaluated a mean of 28 months after surgery. There were 5 failures (21%); 3 acute failures were not evaluated at follow-up. One patient had an infection that required graft removal, 2 patients had mechanical failure of the grafts, and 2 had displacements of more than 5.5 mm as measured with a KT-1000 arthrometer. The 18 clinically successful cases had full motion, no thigh atrophy, and no effusion. Pivot shift scores were 55% A and 45% B on the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scale. Lachman scores were 40% A, 55% B, and 5% C on the IKDC scale. The KT-1000 difference was a mean of 2.9 mm at final follow-up. However, knees loosened a mean of 4.5 mm from the immediate postoperative measurements (P<.0001). Mean Lysholm and Tegner scores were 86.8 and 5.2, respectively. Tibial tunnel diameter increased by 3.1 mm on anteroposterior x-rays and 3.0 mm on lateral x-rays. Five patients developed mild medial compartment arthritis. Four of the 5 grafts with failures were from donors older than 40. Postoperative complications included deep vein thrombosis and inflammatory effusion (white blood cell count, 15,000). Twenty-one percent of ACL reconstructions with Achilles tendon allografts failed. Grafts deemed successful still had significant loosening at final follow-up. Allografts from donors older than 40 may have played a role in these failures. From the data in this study, it appears that surgeons should scrutinize the source of the allograft tissue and the age of the donor.

  1. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with Achilles tendon allografts in revisions and in patients older than 30.

    PubMed

    Grafe, Michael W; Kurzweil, Peter R

    2008-06-01

    We evaluated the results of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using an Achilles tendon allograft in revisions and in patients older than 30. Results from 23 consecutive patients (mean age, 43 years) who underwent ACL reconstruction with fresh-frozen, irradiated (22/23) Achilles allografts were retrospectively reviewed. Seven cases were revisions. Patients were evaluated with physical examination, questionnaires, and x-rays. Twenty of the 23 patients were evaluated a mean of 28 months after surgery. There were 5 failures (21%); 3 acute failures were not evaluated at follow-up. One patient had an infection that required graft removal, 2 patients had mechanical failure of the grafts, and 2 had displacements of more than 5.5 mm as measured with a KT-1000 arthrometer. The 18 clinically successful cases had full motion, no thigh atrophy, and no effusion. Pivot shift scores were 55% A and 45% B on the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scale. Lachman scores were 40% A, 55% B, and 5% C on the IKDC scale. The KT-1000 difference was a mean of 2.9 mm at final follow-up. However, knees loosened a mean of 4.5 mm from the immediate postoperative measurements (P<.0001). Mean Lysholm and Tegner scores were 86.8 and 5.2, respectively. Tibial tunnel diameter increased by 3.1 mm on anteroposterior x-rays and 3.0 mm on lateral x-rays. Five patients developed mild medial compartment arthritis. Four of the 5 grafts with failures were from donors older than 40. Postoperative complications included deep vein thrombosis and inflammatory effusion (white blood cell count, 15,000). Twenty-one percent of ACL reconstructions with Achilles tendon allografts failed. Grafts deemed successful still had significant loosening at final follow-up. Allografts from donors older than 40 may have played a role in these failures. From the data in this study, it appears that surgeons should scrutinize the source of the allograft tissue and the age of the donor. PMID:18716694

  2. Reconstruction of chronic patellar tendon rupture using graft from contralateral patella graft together with reinforcement from flexor tendons. Case report.

    PubMed

    Frois Temponi, Eduardo; de Carvalho, Lúcio Honório; da Silva Bernardes, Cláudio Otávio; Presses Teixeira, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Chronic patellar tendon rupture is a rare disabling injury that is technically difficult to repair. The true prevalence of this injury is unknown. Delayed reconstruction of chronic patellar tendon rupture has yielded suboptimal clinical and functional results. Many different surgical methods for reconstruction of chronic patellar tendon injury have been reported. In this report, we present a case with chronic patellar tendon injury that was addressed using a technique that had not previously been described in the literature, through combining procedures that had been described separately. The reconstruction method presented in this article has the advantages of being easy and reproducible, without a requirement of allografts.

  3. An Investigation of the Immediate Effect of Static Stretching on the Morphology and Stiffness of Achilles Tendon in Dominant and Non-Dominant Legs

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Tsz-chun Roxy; Ngo, Hiu-ching; Lau, Lai-wa; Leung, King-wah; Lo, Man-him; Yu, Ho-fai; Ying, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Aims This study was undertaken to investigate the immediate effect of static stretching on normal Achilles tendon morphology and stiffness, and the different effect on dominant and non-dominant legs; and to evaluate inter-operator and intra-operator reliability of using shear-wave elastography in measuring Achilles tendon stiffness. Methods 20 healthy subjects (13 males, 7 females) were included in the study. Thickness, cross-sectional area and stiffness of Achilles tendons in both legs were measured before and after 5-min static stretching using grey-scale ultrasound and shear-wave elastography. Inter-operator and intra-operator reliability of tendon stiffness measurements of six operators were evaluated. Results Result showed that there was no significant change in the thickness and cross-sectional area of Achilles tendon after static stretching in both dominant and non-dominant legs (p > 0.05). Tendon stiffness showed a significant increase in non-dominant leg (p < 0.05) but not in dominant leg (p > 0.05). The inter-operator reliability of shear-wave elastography measurements was 0.749 and the intra-operator reliability ranged from 0.751 to 0.941. Conclusion Shear-wave elastography is a useful and non-invasive imaging tool to assess the immediate stiffness change of Achilles tendon in response to static stretching with high intra-operator and inter-operator reliability. PMID:27120097

  4. Closed rupture of the flexor tendons caused by carpal bone and joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, H; Kato, H; Hata, Y; Nakatsuchi, Y; Tsuchikane, A

    2007-12-01

    We analysed 21 patients with closed rupture of the flexor tendons caused by carpal bone and joint disorders. The tendon that ruptured depended on the location of the bone perforation into the carpal tunnel. Radiocarpal arthrography was performed in 13 patients and capsular perforation was demonstrated by contrast medium leakage into the carpal canal in 11 patients. This proved a useful diagnostic test. The flexor tendon(s) were reconstructed with free tendon graft in 17 patients, cross-over transfer of flexor tendons from adjacent digits in two and buddying to an adjacent flexor tendon in one patient. Postoperative total active range of motion in the fingers after 13 free tendon graft reconstructions averaged 213 degrees (range 170-265 degrees ). The active range of motion of the thumb-interphalangeal joint after free tendon graft reconstruction in three cases improved from 0 degrees to 33 degrees on average (range 10 degrees -40 degrees ).

  5. Gene targeting of the transcription factor Mohawk in rats causes heterotopic ossification of Achilles tendon via failed tenogenesis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hidetsugu; Ito, Yoshiaki; Shinohara, Masahiro; Yamashita, Satoshi; Ichinose, Shizuko; Kishida, Akio; Oyaizu, Takuya; Kayama, Tomohiro; Nakamichi, Ryo; Koda, Naoki; Yagishita, Kazuyoshi; Lotz, Martin K; Okawa, Atsushi; Asahara, Hiroshi

    2016-07-12

    Cell-based or pharmacological approaches for promoting tendon repair are currently not available because the molecular mechanisms of tendon development and healing are not well understood. Although analysis of knockout mice provides many critical insights, small animals such as mice have some limitations. In particular, precise physiological examination for mechanical load and the ability to obtain a sufficient number of primary tendon cells for molecular biology studies are challenging using mice. Here, we generated Mohawk (Mkx)(-/-) rats by using CRISPR/Cas9, which showed not only systemic hypoplasia of tendons similar to Mkx(-/-) mice, but also earlier heterotopic ossification of the Achilles tendon compared with Mkx(-/-) mice. Analysis of tendon-derived cells (TDCs) revealed that Mkx deficiency accelerated chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation, whereas Mkx overexpression suppressed chondrogenic, osteogenic, and adipogenic differentiation. Furthermore, mechanical stretch stimulation of Mkx(-/-) TDCs led to chondrogenic differentiation, whereas the same stimulation in Mkx(+/+) TDCs led to formation of tenocytes. ChIP-seq of Mkx overexpressing TDCs revealed significant peaks in tenogenic-related genes, such as collagen type (Col)1a1 and Col3a1, and chondrogenic differentiation-related genes, such as SRY-box (Sox)5, Sox6, and Sox9 Our results demonstrate that Mkx has a dual role, including accelerating tendon differentiation and preventing chondrogenic/osteogenic differentiation. This molecular network of Mkx provides a basis for tendon physiology and tissue engineering. PMID:27370800

  6. Simultaneous rupture of the quadriceps tendon and contralateral patellar tendon in a patient with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Muratli, Hasan Hilmi; Celebi, Levent; Hapa, Onur; Biçimoğlu, Ali

    2005-01-01

    Simultaneous quadriceps and patellar tendon rupture is rare. Mechanical factors and coexisting systemic and local factors are taken into consideration in the pathogenesis of these ruptures. In patients with some chronic systemic diseases, simultaneous rupture can occur spontaneously or with minor traumas. We present a case of simultaneous quadriceps and patellar tendon rupture in a 21-year-old man with chronic renal failure in this report. He was treated surgically by osseotendinous repair with suture anchors and supplemental cerclage wire fixation on both sides. He regained his normal knee joint functions 18 months after the operation.

  7. Use of Platelet Rich Plasma and Hyaluronic Acid in the Treatment of Complications of Achilles Tendon Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Pietro; De Angelis, Barbara; Agovino, Annarita; Orlandi, Fabrizio; Migner, Alessandra; Di Pasquali, Camilla; Cervelli, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and hyaluronic acid (HA) constitute a system of tissue growth that can regenerate damaged tissue. This study was performed to evaluate the effect of PRP and HA in treatment of complications of Achilles tendon reconstruction. METHODS We selected ten patients affected by Achilles tendon injuries resulting from post-surgical complications subsequent to tenorrhaphy and have treated them with autologous PRP in combination with HA to evaluate the improvement of lesions with wound closure. RESULTS The treatment with PRP and HA for post-surgical complications of Achilles tendon was effective in healing and regeneration of soft and hard tissues. The healing time was shortened, and the treated area preserved a satisfying strength in plantar flexion and extension of the ankle, denoting to a decisive improvement in texture and a more rapid healing and a good cutaneous elasticity, with a significant reduction of the costs of hospitalization and the pain already the immediate postoperatively. The functional rehabilitation in terms of deambulation and joint mobility was complete. CONCLUSION The treatment we proposed allowed an easier and more rapid wound closure with excellent aesthetic improvement. Furthermore, the minimally invasive technique is well tolerated by patients. PMID:27579267

  8. Reconstruction of chronic patellar tendon rupture with contralateral BTB autograft: a case report.

    PubMed

    Milankov, Miroslav Z; Miljkovic, Natasa; Stankovic, Milan

    2007-12-01

    Chronic patellar tendon rupture is a rare disabling injury that is technically difficult to repair. Many different surgical methods have been reported for the reconstruction of chronic patellar tendon ruptures. We are reporting the use of contralateral bone-tendon-bone (BTB) autograft for chronic patellar tendon rupture reconstruction followed by double-wire loop reinforcement and without postoperative immobilization. One year after the operation, our patient had full knee extension and up to 130 degrees of flexion. He had good quadriceps strength, and isokinetic muscle testing showed no deficit comparing to his right leg. Patient returned to playing basketball in his spare time, without having any limitation.

  9. Use of a turndown quadriceps tendon flap for rupture of the patellar tendon after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lin, Po-Chun; Wang, Jun-Wen

    2007-09-01

    Patellar tendon rupture is a devastating complication after total knee arthroplasty. The results of surgical treatment of this complication were discouraging in most of the reports. We describe a case of rupture of patellar tendon 7 weeks after total knee arthroplasty treated with a turndown quadriceps flap and circumferential wiring. Two years and 6 months after operation, the patient had no extension lag of the knee and knee flexion to 110 degrees .

  10. Patellar Tendon Rupture after Lateral Release without Predisposing Systemic Disease or Steroid Use

    PubMed Central

    De Giorgi, S.; Notarnicola, A.; Vicenti, G.; Moretti, B.

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopic technique for lateral release is the most widely used procedure for the correction of recurrent dislocations of the patella. In the relevant literature, several complications of lateral release are described, but the spontaneous patellar tendon rupture has never been suggested as a possible complication of this surgical procedure. Patellar tendon rupture is a rather infrequent and often unilateral lesion. Nevertheless, in case of systemic diseases (LES, rheumatoid arthritis, and chronic renal insufficiency) that can weaken collagen structures, bilateral patellar tendon ruptures are described. We report a case of a 24-year-old girl with spontaneous rupture of patellar tendon who, at the age of 16, underwent an arthroscopic lateral release for recurrent dislocation of the patella. This is the first case of described spontaneous patellar tendon rupture that occurred some years after an arthroscopic lateral release. PMID:25960904

  11. Regional molecular and cellular differences in the female rabbit Achilles tendon complex: potential implications for understanding responses to loading

    PubMed Central

    Huisman, Elise S; Andersson, Gustav; Scott, Alexander; Reno, Carol R; Hart, David A; Thornton, Gail M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was: (i) to analyze the morphology and expression of extracellular matrix genes in six different regions of the Achilles tendon complex of intact normal rabbits; and (ii) to assess the effect of ovariohysterectomy (OVH) on the regional expression of these genes. Female New Zealand White rabbits were separated into two groups: (i) intact normal rabbits (n = 4); and (ii) OVH rabbits (n = 8). For each rabbit, the Achilles tendon complex was dissected into six regions: distal gastrocnemius (DG); distal flexor digitorum superficialis; proximal lateral gastrocnemius (PLG); proximal medial gastrocnemius; proximal flexor digitorum superficialis; and paratenon. For each of the regions, hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed for histological evaluation of intact normal rabbit tissues and mRNA levels for proteoglycans, collagens and genes associated with collagen regulation were assessed by real-time reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction for both the intact normal and OVH rabbit tissues. The distal regions displayed a more fibrocartilaginous phenotype. For intact normal rabbits, aggrecan mRNA expression was higher in the distal regions of the Achilles tendon complex compared with the proximal regions. Collagen Type I and matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression levels were increased in the PLG compared to the DG in the intact normal rabbit tissues. The tendons from OVH rabbits had lower gene expressions for the proteoglycans aggrecan, biglycan, decorin and versican compared with the intact normal rabbits, although the regional differences of increased aggrecan expression in distal regions compared with proximal regions persisted. The tensile and compressive forces experienced in the examined regions may be related to the regional differences found in gene expression. The lower mRNA expression of the genes examined in the OVH group confirms a potential effect of systemic estrogen on tendon. PMID:24571598

  12. The Healing Effects of Aquatic Activities and Allogenic Injection of Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) on Injuries of Achilles Tendon in Experimental Rat

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi, Hamid; Sheikhani Shahin, Homa; Norouzian, Manijeh; Mehrabani, Davood; Dehghani Nazhvani, Seifollah

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Clinical tendon injuries represent serious and unresolved issues of the case on how the injured tendons could be improved based on natural structure and mechanical strength. The aim of this studies the effect of aquatic activities and alogenic platelet rich plasma (PRP) injection in healing Achilles tendons of rats. METHODS Forty rats were randomly divided into 5 equal groups. Seventy two hours after a crush lesion on Achilles tendon, group 1 underwent aquatic activity for 8 weeks (five sessions per week), group 2 received intra-articular PRP (1 ml), group 3 had aquatic activity together with injection PRP injection after an experimental tendon injury, group 4 did not receive any treatment after tendon injury and the control group with no tendon injuries. of 32 rats. After 8 weeks, the animals were sacrificed and the tendons were transferred in 10% formalin for histological evaluation. RESULTS There was a significant increase in number of fibroblast and cellular density, and collagen deposition in group 3 comparing to other groups denoting to an effective healing in injured tendons. However, there was no significant difference among the studied groups based on their tendons diameter. CONCLUSION Based on our findings on the number of fibroblast, cellular density, collagen deposition, and tendon diameter, it was shown that aquatic activity together with PRP injection was the therapeutic measure of choice enhance healing in tendon injuries that can open a window in treatment of damages to tendons. PMID:25606479

  13. Effect of Footwear Modifications on Oscillations at the Achilles Tendon during Running on a Treadmill and Over Ground: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Meinert, Ilka; Brown, Niklas; Alt, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    Background Achilles tendon injuries are known to commonly occur in runners. During running repeated impacts are transferred in axial direction along the lower leg, therefore possibly affecting the oscillation behavior of the Achilles tendon. The purpose of the present study was to explore the effects of different footwear modifications and different ground conditions (over ground versus treadmill) on oscillations at the Achilles tendon. Methods Oscillations were measured in 20 male runners using two tri-axial accelerometers. Participants ran in three different shoe types on a treadmill and over ground. Data analysis was limited to stance phase and performed in time and frequency space. Statistical comparison was conducted between oscillations in vertical and horizontal direction, between running shoes and between ground conditions (treadmill versus over ground running). Results Differences in the oscillation behavior could be detected between measurement directions with peak accelerations in the vertical being lower than those in the horizontal direction, p < 0.01. Peak accelerations occurred earlier at the distal accelerometer than at the proximal one, p < 0.01. Average normalized power differed between running shoes (p < 0.01) with harder damping material resulting in higher power values. Little to no power attenuation was found between the two accelerometers. Oscillation behavior of the Achilles tendon is not influenced by ground condition. Conclusion Differences in shoe configurations may lead to variations in running technique and impact forces and therefore result in alterations of the vibration behavior at the Achilles tendon. The absence of power attenuation may have been caused by either a short distance between the two accelerometers or high stiffness of the tendon. High stiffness of the tendon will lead to complete transmission of the signal along the Achilles tendon and therefore no attenuation occurs. PMID:27010929

  14. Achilles Tendon Reflex (ATR) in response to short exposures of microgravity and hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujii, M.; Jaweed, M.

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that latency and amplitude of the Achilles tendon reflex (ATR) are reduced after exposure to microgravity for 28 days. The objective of this study was to quantitatively measure the latency of ATR during brief (20 sec) exposure to microgravity in KC-135 parabolic flights. Methods: The ATR was elicited in ten men during parabolic flight with the ankle held neutrally, planarflexed, and dorsiflexed. During flight, the ATR was elicited during the zero G and 1.8 G phases. Postflight testing was performed flying back to the airfield. Latencies to onset of the ATR were calculated and analyses of variance were performed to determine the effect of gravity and ankle position on latency. Result: The mean latencies for zero-G, 1.8-G and postflight with the ankle in the neutral position were 32.7 plus or minus 0.5 ms, and 33.1 plus or minus 0.7 ms respectively, which were not significantly different. There was a trend toward prolongation of latencies postflight. The mean latency for those who were motion sick was 32.1 plus or minus 0.1 ms compared to 34.0 plus or minus 0.3 ms for those who were not sick. Conclusions: These studies indicate that neither the level of gravity nor ankle position significantly affected the latency of the ATR.

  15. Low-level laser therapy in IL-1β, COX-2, and PGE2 modulation in partially injured Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    de Jesus, Julio Fernandes; Spadacci-Morena, Diva Denelle; dos Anjos Rabelo, Nayra Deise; Pinfildi, Carlos Eduardo; Fukuda, Thiago Yukio; Plapler, Helio

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated IL-1β, COX-2, and PGE2 modulation in partially injured Achilles tendons treated with low-level laser therapy (LLLT). Sixty-five male Wistar rats were used. Sixty were submitted to a direct injury on Achilles tendon and then distributed into six groups: LASER 1 (a single LLLT application), LASER 3 (three LLLT applications), and LASER 7 (seven LLLT applications) and Sham 1, 3, and 7 (the same injury but LLLT applications were simulated). The five remaining animals were allocated at control group (no procedure performed). LLLT (780 nm) was applied with 70 mW of mean power and 17.5 J/cm(2) of fluency for 10 s, once a day. The tendons were surgically removed and assessed immunohistochemically for IL-1β, COX-2, and PGE2. In comparisons with control (IL-1β: 100.5 ± 92.5 / COX-2: 180.1 ± 97.1 / PGE2: 187.8 ± 128.8) IL-1β exhibited (mean ± SD) near-normal level (p > 0.05) at LASER 3 (142.0 ± 162.4). COX-2 and PGE2 exhibited near-normal levels (p > 0.05) at LASER 3 (COX-2: 176.9 ± 75.4 / PGE2: 297.2 ± 259.6) and LASER 7 (COX-2: 259.2 ± 190.4 / PGE2: 587.1 ± 409.7). LLLT decreased Achilles tendon's inflammatory process.

  16. Spontaneous rupture of the extensor pollicis brevis tendon in a baseball pitcher: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Takuya; Tanase, Yoshihiro; Oribe, Takashi; Watanabe, Yasushi

    2009-01-01

    A 15-year-old pitcher on a boys' Little League baseball team suffered spontaneous rupture of the extensor pollicis brevis (EPB) tendon. Since the EPB tendon was, at surgery, found hypoplastic and non-functional, transfer of the extensor indicis proprius (EIP) tendon was carried out. After a 6-month period of rehabilitation and follow-up, the patient was able to resume playing baseball. Although rupture of the EPB is rare, transfer of the EIP tendon is one of the treatments of choice for such injuries.

  17. Proximal coracobrachialis tendon rupture, subscapularis tendon rupture, and medial dislocation of the long head of the biceps tendon in an adult after traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Saltzman, Bryan M.; Harris, Joshua D.; Forsythe, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Rupture of the coracobrachialis is a rare entity, in isolation or in combination with other muscular or tendinous structures. When described, it is often a result of direct trauma to the anatomic area resulting in rupture of the muscle belly. The authors present a case of a 57-year-old female who suffered a proximal coracobrachialis tendon rupture from its origin at the coracoid process, with concomitant subscapularis tear and medial dislocation of the long head of biceps tendon after first time traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation. Two weeks after injury, magnetic resonance imaging suggested the diagnosis, which was confirmed during combined arthroscopic and open technique. Soft-tissue tenodesis of coracobrachialis to the intact short head of the biceps, tenodesis of the long head of biceps to the intertubercular groove, and double-row anatomic repair of the subscapularis were performed. The patient did well postoperatively, and ultimately at 6 months follow-up, she was without pain, and obtained 160° of active forward elevation, 45° of external rotation, internal rotation to T8, 5/5 subscapularis and biceps strength. Scoring scales had improved from the following preoperative to final follow-up: American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, 53.33-98.33; constant, 10-100; visual analogue scale-pain, 4-0. DASH score was 5. PMID:25937715

  18. Efficacy of Achilles Suture Bridge Technique for Insertional Achilles Tendinosis in an Obese and Athletic Patient.

    PubMed

    Mineta, Kazuaki; Suzue, Naoto; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the efficacy of the suture bridge technique for treating insertional Achilles tendinosis in an obese and athletic patient. A 48-year-old man presented to our department with a 6-month history of left posterior heel pain. The patient was an athlete (triathlon) and appeared obese (height: 197 cm, body weight: 120 kg, body mass index: 30.9). A diagnosis of insertional Achilles tendinosis was made. Because 6 months of conservative treatments had failed, we performed open resection of the calcaneal exostosis and Haglund's deformity along with debridement of the degenerative tissue of the tendon. Wide detachment of the insertion of the Achilles tendon was necessary, and reattachment of the tendon was performed using the Arthrex SpeedBridge(TM) system (Arthrex, Inc., Naples, FL). Six weeks postoperatively, this patient was allowed to walk with full weight bearing. Twelve weeks after surgery, this patient started jogging with neither pain nor evidence of Achilles tendon rupture. The suture bridge technique was effective for the reconstruction of the Achilles tendon in an obese and athletic patient. J. Med. Invest. 63: 310-314, August, 2016.

  19. Reconstruction of compound loss of lateral malleolus and lateral ankle ligaments with double-bundle Achilles tendon-bone allograft.

    PubMed

    Ko, Dukhwan; Jung, Hong-Geun; Kim, Hyeung-June; Cha, Seung-Han; Nam, Kyoung-Mo

    2014-01-01

    Open ankle fracture, including compound loss of the lateral malleolus, lateral ankle ligaments, and overlying skin, is a severe injury and can result in ankle instability and permanent disability. Treatment of this injury is challenging and requires bone grafting and soft tissue reconstruction. In the present report, we describe a unique reconstruction technique for compound loss of the lateral malleolus, lateral ankle ligaments, and the overlying skin using a double-bundle Achilles tendon-bone allograft combined with a reverse sural fasciocutaneous flap. The patient obtained a stable ankle with nearly full range of motion and displayed satisfactory function during the follow-up period.

  20. Re-revision of a patellar tendon rupture in a young professional martial arts athlete.

    PubMed

    Vadalà, A; Iorio, R; Bonifazi, A M; Bolle, G; Ferretti, A

    2012-09-01

    A 27-year-old professional martial arts athlete experienced recurrent right knee patellar tendon rupture on three occasions. He underwent two operations for complete patellar tendon rupture: an end-to-end tenorrhaphy the first time, and revision with a bone-patellar-tendon (BPT) allograft. After the third episode, he was referred to our department, where we performed a surgical reconstruction with the use of hamstring pro-patellar tendon, in a figure-of-eight configuration, followed by a careful rehabilitation protocol. Clinical and radiological follow-ups were realized at 1, 3, and 6 months and 1 and 2 years postop, with an accurate physical examination, the use of recognized international outcome scores, and radiograph and MRI studies. As far as we know, this is the first paper to report a re-revision of a patellar tendon rupture.

  1. Surgical Treatment of Neglected Traumatic Quadriceps Tendon Rupture with Knee Ankylosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hun; Song, Eun-Kyoo; Seon, Jong-Keun; Woo, Seong-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    Quadriceps tendon rupture is an uncommon injury. This disabling condition is the result of direct or indirect trauma. It requires surgical repair to avoid poor outcomes in cases of neglected or chronic rupture. In most acute cases, simple tendon suture or reinsertion is suitable for an extensor mechanism reconstruction of the knee joint. However, chronic lesions often require a tendon graft or flap reconstruction. We report a case of a 15-year-old male who was diagnosed with a chronic quadriceps rupture with a patellar superior pole fracture. We performed quadriceps reconstruction using tibialis anterior allograft tendon and additional screw fixation to reconstruct the extensor mechanism and recover knee joint range of motion to prevent a high-level functional restriction. The treatment was difficult and limited due to neglect for 9-months that led to ankylosis accompanied with nonunion of tibial fracture. Our surgical treatment using allograft tendon resulted in a very good outcome after 30 months of follow-up.

  2. New Imaging Methods for Non-invasive Assessment of Mechanical, Structural, and Biochemical Properties of Human Achilles Tendon: A Mini Review

    PubMed Central

    Fouré, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of tendon play a fundamental role to passively transmit forces from muscle to bone, withstand sudden stretches, and act as a mechanical buffer allowing the muscle to work more efficiently. The use of non-invasive imaging methods for the assessment of human tendon's mechanical, structural, and biochemical properties in vivo is relatively young in sports medicine, clinical practice, and basic science. Non-invasive assessment of the tendon properties may enhance the diagnosis of tendon injury and the characterization of recovery treatments. While ultrasonographic imaging is the most popular tool to assess the tendon's structural and indirectly, mechanical properties, ultrasonographic elastography, and ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging (UHF MRI) have recently emerged as potentially powerful techniques to explore tendon tissues. This paper highlights some methodological cautions associated with conventional ultrasonography and perspectives for in vivo human Achilles tendon assessment using ultrasonographic elastography and UHF MRI. PMID:27512376

  3. New Imaging Methods for Non-invasive Assessment of Mechanical, Structural, and Biochemical Properties of Human Achilles Tendon: A Mini Review.

    PubMed

    Fouré, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of tendon play a fundamental role to passively transmit forces from muscle to bone, withstand sudden stretches, and act as a mechanical buffer allowing the muscle to work more efficiently. The use of non-invasive imaging methods for the assessment of human tendon's mechanical, structural, and biochemical properties in vivo is relatively young in sports medicine, clinical practice, and basic science. Non-invasive assessment of the tendon properties may enhance the diagnosis of tendon injury and the characterization of recovery treatments. While ultrasonographic imaging is the most popular tool to assess the tendon's structural and indirectly, mechanical properties, ultrasonographic elastography, and ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging (UHF MRI) have recently emerged as potentially powerful techniques to explore tendon tissues. This paper highlights some methodological cautions associated with conventional ultrasonography and perspectives for in vivo human Achilles tendon assessment using ultrasonographic elastography and UHF MRI. PMID:27512376

  4. [Rupture of the quadriceps tendon after lateral retinaculum release by arthroscopy].

    PubMed

    Trobisch, P D; Baumann, M; Weise, K; Fischer, R

    2010-06-01

    Complications after arthroscopic surgery of the knee joint are infrequent. Quadriceps tendon ruptures after knee arthroscopy are rarities. Only two cases have been published in the medical literature. This article presents a case of a quadriceps tendon rupture that occurred in a 19-year-old patient 5 weeks after lateral release of the retinaculum by arthroscopy. The late occurrence differentiates this case from the other previously published cases.

  5. Bilateral Spontaneous Midsubstance Patellar Tendon Rupture after Bilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Rajani, Amyn; Dash, Kumar Kaushik; Mahajan, Neetin P; Kumar, Ritesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Patellar tendon rupture can occur due to multiple causes ranging from inflammatory pathologies to episodes of trauma. Extensor mechanism rupture is a rare complication of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In most of these cases, the failure occurs as avulsion of patellar tendon from tibial tuberosity. We report a rare case with bilateral mid-substance patellar tendon rupture one month after bilateral total knee arthroplasty. Case Presentation: A 69-year-old male was operated for bilateral grade 4 osteoarthritis. On day 30 post-operative, he sustained bilateral patellar tendon rupture while getting up from toilet. He had a history of multiple steroid injections in the knee, which could have affected the tendon. The other etiologies could be inherent weakness of tendon due to diabetes and old age and micro-trauma/stretch associated with sudden correction of previous deformity by TKA. The management in our case was done by primary repair along with augmentation by autologous semitendinosus graft and suture anchor. Conclusion: The operating surgeon must be aware of the possibility of patellar tendon rupture following total knee arthroplasty. This will help the surgeon in early recognition and preparedness to handle such complications, should they arise. Surgeons may consider advising caution to both patient and rehabilitation team in cases with old age, chronic diabetes mellitus, and with a history of steroid injections. PMID:27703942

  6. [Partial rupture of the quadriceps tendon in a 6-year-old boy].

    PubMed

    Sesia, S B; Hasler, C-C; Köhler, M; Mayr, J

    2007-10-01

    In children, avulsion fractures of the patella are observed more frequently than ruptures of the quadriceps tendon. In cases of suspected lesions of the quadriceps tendon, conventional x-ray imaging and ultrasound comparison of both patellae is recommended. Arthroscopy is helpful for diagnosing concomitant intra-articular knee lesions and permits evacuation of the hemarthrosis.

  7. Acute Tibialis Posterior Tendon Rupture With Pronation-Type Ankle Fractures.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Derek T; Harris, Joshua D; Cosculluela, Pedro E; Varner, Kevin E

    2016-09-01

    Tibialis posterior tendon rupture in the setting of pronation-type ankle fractures can lead to long-term debility as a result of chronic tendon dysfunction. This rare injury pattern presents a diagnostic challenge because thorough preoperative examination of the function of the tendon is limited by pain, swelling, and inherent instability of the fracture. As such, a high index of suspicion is necessary in ankle fractures with radiographs showing a medial malleolus fracture with an associated suprasyndesmotic fibula fracture. This report describes 3 cases of tibialis posterior tendon rupture associated with pronation-type ankle fractures treated acutely with open reduction and internal fixation and primary tendon repair. Additionally, common features of this injury pattern are discussed based on the current literature. In accordance with this report, the typical mechanism of injury is high energy and includes forced pronation, external rotation, and dorsiflexion of the ankle, which places maximal stress on the tibialis posterior tendon. Rupture most commonly occurs in a relatively hypovascular area of the tendon located at the posteromedial extent of the medial malleolus fracture. In the operative treatment of pronation-type ankle fractures, direct inspection of the tibialis posterior tendon allows for timely diagnosis and treatment of associated ruptures. [Orthopedics.2016; 39(5):e970-e975.]. PMID:27248337

  8. Late quadriceps tendon rupture at the donor site following cruciate ligament reconstruction using central quadriceps tendon graft.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vivek; Madi, Sandesh; Joseph, Amy; Acharya, Kiran

    2015-10-16

    Central quadriceps tendon (CQT) graft has been successfully used as a viable autograft option in cruciate ligament reconstruction of the knee. The prime emphasis in the majority of the literature is given to surgical details of quadriceps graft harvesting and outcome of cruciate ligament reconstruction. There is less discussion about donor site morbidity in CQT graft, and it is less frequent as compared to that in bone patellar tendon bone graft. We report an extremely unusual case of late quadriceps tendon rupture at the donor site following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using CQT graft.

  9. Osteotendinous repair of bilateral spontaneous quadriceps tendon ruptures with the Krackow technique in two patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Kara, Adnan; Sari, Seçkin; Şeker, Ali; Öztürk, Irfan

    2013-01-01

    Although unilateral traumatic quadriceps tendon rupture is a relatively frequent pathology, bilateral non-traumatic spontaneous ruptures are uncommon and are usually associated with chronic renal failure, hyperparathyroidism, gout, and systemic lupus erythematosus. This paper aimed to discuss two patients with chronic renal failure treated with the Krackow suture technique for spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture.

  10. Italian translation of the VISA-A score for tendinopathy of the main body of the Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, Nicola; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Testa, Vittorino; Oliva, Francesco; Capasso, Giovanni; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. To translate and adapt the English VISA-A questionnaire to Italian, to perform reliability and validity evaluations of the Italian VISA-A version in patients with tendinopathy of the main body of the Achilles tendon. Methods. The VISA-A English version was translated into Italian by a bilingual orthopaedic surgeon. The back translation of the Italian version into English was performed by another bilingual orthopaedic surgeon. The original version was compared with the back translation. The VISA-A-I questionnaire was then administered to 50 male athletes (average age 26.4, range 18 - 49 years) with a diagnosis of tendinopathy of the main body of the AT. For test-retest evaluation, the 50 patients were asked to complete the questionnaire at first examination, and 30 minutes following the end of this examination. Results. The kappa statistics for 50 patients was 0.80 (range 0.7 - 0.86). There were no significant differences between the scores immediately after the consultation and 30 minutes later. Conclusions. Italian and the English versions of the VISA-A questionnaire evaluate the same aspects of clinical severity in patients with tendinopathy of the main body of the Achilles tendon.

  11. Platelet-Rich Fibrin Promotes an Accelerated Healing of Achilles Tendon When Compared to Platelet-Rich Plasma in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Franciele; L. Duré, Gustavo; P. Klein, Caroline; F. Bampi, Vinícius; V. Padoin, Alexandre; D. Silva, Vinícius; Braga-Silva, Jefferson

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Autologous platelet concentrate has been used to improve the function and regeneration of injured tissues. Tendinopathies are common in clinical practice, although long-term treatment is required. On the basis of lead time, we compared the effect of using platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) in repairing rat Achilles tendon. METHODS The effectiveness of using PRP and PRF was evaluated after 14 and 28 postoperative days by histological analysis. The quantification of collagen types I and III was performed by Sirius red staining. Qualitatively, the data were verified with hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining. RESULTS In Sirius red staining, no significant treatment differences were found between groups. Statistical difference was observed only between PRP (37.2% collagen) and the control group (16.2%) 14 days after treatment. Intra-groups compared twice showed a difference for collagen I (27.8% and 47.7%) and III (66.9% and 46.0%) in the PRF group. The control group showed differences only in collagen I (14.2% and 40.9%) and no other finding was observed in the PRP group. In H&E staining, PRF showed a better cellular organization when compared to the other groups at 28 days. CONCLUSION Our study suggests that PRF promotes accelerated regeneration of the Achilles tendon in rats, offering promising prospects for future clinical use. PMID:26284178

  12. In vivo quantification of the shear modulus of the human Achilles tendon during passive loading using shear wave dispersion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfenstein-Didier, C.; Andrade, R. J.; Brum, J.; Hug, F.; Tanter, M.; Nordez, A.; Gennisson, J.-L.

    2016-03-01

    The shear wave velocity dispersion was analyzed in the Achilles tendon (AT) during passive dorsiflexion using a phase velocity method in order to obtain the tendon shear modulus (C 55). Based on this analysis, the aims of the present study were (i) to assess the reproducibility of the shear modulus for different ankle angles, (ii) to assess the effect of the probe locations, and (iii) to compare results with elasticity values obtained with the supersonic shear imaging (SSI) technique. The AT shear modulus (C 55) consistently increased with the ankle dorsiflexion (N  =  10, p  <  0.05). Furthermore, the technique showed a very good reproducibility (all standard error of the mean values  <10.7 kPa and all coefficient of variation (CV) values  ⩽0.05%). In addition, independently from the ankle dorsiflexion, the shear modulus was significantly higher in the proximal location compared to the more distal one. The shear modulus provided by SSI was always lower than C55 and the difference increased with the ankle dorsiflexion. However, shear modulus values provided by both methods were highly correlated (R  =  0.84), indicating that the conventional shear wave elastography technique (SSI technique) can be used to compare tendon mechanical properties across populations. Future studies should determine the clinical relevance of the shear wave dispersion analysis, for instance in the case of tendinopathy or tendon tear.

  13. Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture in patient with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yunseok; Kim, Byounggook; Chung, Ju-Hwan; Dan, Jinmyoung

    2011-12-01

    Simultaneous bilateral spontaneous rupture of the quadriceps tendon is a very rare condition and only a few cases have been reported in the literature. The etiology is not clear yet. But it occurs infrequently in patients with chronic metabolic disorders. A 30-year-old female patient with simultaneous bilateral spontaneous quadriceps tendon rupture visited our hospital. She had chronic renal failure and her parathyroid hormone level was elevated due to parathyroid adenoma. We report a surgical repair of both quadriceps tendons of a patient with chronic renal failure as well as management of hyperparathyroidism.

  14. Suture anchor versus suture through tunnel fixation for quadriceps tendon rupture: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Lighthart, William A; Cohen, David A; Levine, Richard G; Parks, Brent G; Boucher, Henry R

    2008-05-01

    This biomechanical study compared suture anchors versus transosseous sutures for repair of quadriceps tendon ruptures using a force of 150 N at a frequency of 0.5 Hz. No significant difference in displacement was found between the 2 techniques with initial loading or with load or no load after 1000 cycles. Displacement after 1000 cycles for suture anchors and bone tunnels was 4.65 and 4.50 mm, respectively. These findings suggest a possible role for suture anchors in repairing quadriceps tendon ruptures. Suture anchors are relatively expensive but require less dissection over the patella and do not involve suture placement about the patella tendon.

  15. Functional results after surgical repair of quadriceps tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    De Baere, T; Geulette, B; Manche, E; Barras, L

    2002-04-01

    We present the long-term results of surgical repair of a traumatic rupture of the quadriceps tendon in a group of 24 patients with a mean age of 58 years. There were 21 male and 3 female patients. Fifteen patients were seen for clinical control after a mean follow-up of 75 months and they all presented with some quadriceps muscle atrophy. Twelve patients had normal knee mobility, three had a flexion deformity of 10 degrees and two had less than 120 degrees of knee flexion. Active knee extension was normal in all patients. Three patients experienced some decrease in stability of their knee joint. Subjectively all patients were satisfied with the result. Nine patients underwent a Cybex-test for evaluation of the isokinetic force of knee flexion and extension, with a comparison between the injured and the uninjured side. For concentric force there was a mean deficit at low speed of 36.1% for the quadriceps muscle; at high speed it was 28.2%. For the knee flexors, the deficits were 30.7% and 27.2% respectively. Regarding eccentric force, the mean deficit for knee extensors was 13.8% and 0.25% respectively and for knee flexors 6.5% and 5.5% respectively.

  16. Simultaneous Bilateral Rupture of the Triceps Tendon in a Renal Transplant Patient

    PubMed Central

    Zaidenberg, Ezequiel E.; Gallucci, Gerardo L.; Boretto, Jorge G.; De Carli, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    The unilateral rupture of the triceps brachii tendon is a rare lesion representing 1% of all tendon injuries. The most common causes are the result of a contraction against resistance (especially weightlifters) and direct trauma. It has also been associated with systemic diseases such as diabetes mellitus, chronic renal failure, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and use of systemic corticosteroids. Simultaneous bilateral rupture of the triceps tendons is less frequent and has been described in association with chronic metabolic disorders, especially in those patients on hemodialysis. This paper presents a case of bilateral triceps tendon rupture of a 36-year-old woman with renal transplantation secondary to chronic renal failure. Early surgical repair was performed using a bone tunnel technique with a nonabsorbable suture. Clinically active extension with 135 degrees of range of motion was achieved. PMID:26366314

  17. Bilateral quadriceps tendon ruptures in a healthy, active duty soldier: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Anthony E; Rose, Stephen D

    2006-12-01

    Unilateral quadriceps tendon ruptures are not uncommon. These injuries have been reported to occur spontaneously and after seemingly trivial trauma in elderly individuals, patients undergoing renal dialysis, and patients with metabolic derangements such as hyperparathyroidism. In young patients, unilateral quadriceps tendon ruptures have been reported as complications of burns, anabolic steroid abuse, and elective orthopedic surgery. Bilateral quadriceps tendon ruptures in young healthy patients are rare injuries. We present the case of a young, healthy, active duty soldier who sustained bilateral quadriceps tendon ruptures after a relatively minor trauma.

  18. Depth-dependent variations in Achilles tendon deformations with age are associated with reduced plantarflexor performance during walking.

    PubMed

    Franz, Jason R; Thelen, Darryl G

    2015-08-01

    The anatomical arrangement of the Achilles tendon (AT), with distinct fascicle bundles arising from the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, may facilitate relatively independent behavior of the triceps surae muscles. A reduced capacity for sliding between adjacent tendon fascicles with age may couple gastrocnemius and soleus muscle behavior, thereby potentially contributing to diminished plantarflexor performance commonly observed in old adults. Nine healthy young (mean age, 23.9 yr) and eight healthy old (69.9 yr) adults walked at three speeds (0.75, 1.00, and 1.25 m/s) on a force-sensing treadmill. We coupled dynamic ultrasound imaging of the free AT with motion capture and inverse dynamic analyses to compute, in part: 1) depth-dependent variations in AT tissue displacements and elongations and 2) net ankle joint kinetics during push-off. The difference in displacements between superficial and deep AT regions, and in their corresponding elongations, did not differ between old and young adults at the slower two walking speeds (P > 0.61). However, old adults walked with 41% smaller depth-dependent variations in free AT displacements and elongations at 1.25 m/s (P = 0.02). These more uniform tendon deformations in old adults most strongly correlated with reduced peak ankle moment (R(2) = 0.40), but also significantly correlated with reduced peak power generation (R(2) = 0.15) and positive ankle work during push-off (R(2) = 0.19) (P > 0.01). Our findings: 1) demonstrate a potential role for nonuniform AT deformations in governing gastrocnemius and soleus muscle-tendon function and 2) allude to altered tendon behavior that may contribute to the age-related reduction in plantarflexor performance during walking.

  19. Operative treatment in case of a closed rupture of the anterior tibial tendon.

    PubMed

    Otte, Stephanie; Klinger, Hans-Michael; Lorenz, Frank; Haerer, Thomas

    2002-04-01

    Closed rupture of the tibial anterior tendon is a rare clinical entity. Case reports in the literature reveal a total of only 49 cases up to the year 2000. According to these reports, the age group affected is 50 to 70 years old, and there are more men than women affected. Although the functional limitation is quite considerable, late diagnosis is common. An appropriate clinical examination, including an exact history taking, should lead to the right diagnosis. Ultrasound examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be helpful. 'Restitutio ad integrum' can only be achieved by operative treatment. If technically possible, reinsertion of the tendon directly into bone or direct tendon repair is preferred. After delayed diagnosis, a secondary reconstruction through tendon transfer or transplantation is often necessary. A 64-year-old woman presented with pain and swelling in the area of the ankle joint 5 months after falling. She showed insecurity in walking, and the heel-walk could not be demonstrated. The distal neurovascular function was intact. The area of the retinaculum showed a swelling, and the tendon was not palpable in comparison with the other forefoot. An intact tendon could not be seen by ultrasound, and MRI confirmed these findings. A complete rupture was noted during the operative revision. The proximal and the distal tendon stumps were found to be thickened and knotted, the proximal stump was also atrophic. An augmented tenoplasty was performed. Afterwards, the tendon was tense in the neutral position. The lower leg was put in a plaster cast for 6 weeks, followed by physiotherapy. Ten months after the operation, the tendon was palpable in the correct position, the dorsal extension was powerful, and the patient did not experience any difficulty. Rupture of the anterior tibial tendon is a rare clinical entity and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pain in the area of the ankle joint. An early operative treatment is advantageous.

  20. Surgical management of acute quadriceps tendon rupture (a case report with literature review).

    PubMed

    Ennaciri, Badr; Montbarbon, Eric; Beaudouin, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Quadriceps tendon rupture is uncommon and often overlooked in emergency. Tearing affects weakening tendon by systemic diseases or some medications. The mechanism is generally indirect. Inability to actively extend the knee associated to a supra-patellar defect evoke easily the diagnosis without other investigations. Surgical repair is realized in emergency to completely restore the extension. We report a case of a patient who has sustained of complete quadriceps tendon tear after a long period of tendon weakening by statin therapy, hypertension and diabetes. The repair has consisted on end-to-end Krackow sutures associated with bone suture to the proximal pole of the patella. Surgeons and emergency physicians must think to this form of extensor apparatus rupture, because early diagnosis leads to early treatment and to best outcomes.

  1. Spontaneous patellar tendon rupture in a case followed up for diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Albayrak, İlknur; Küçük, Adem; Arslan, Şevket; Özbek, Orhan

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous patellar tendon rupture is a rare condition that usually occurs secondary to conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and use of steroids and fluoroquinolones. This paper presents a full-thickness patellar tendon rupture detected with magnetic resonance imaging, which was performed due to pain and swelling that started spontaneously on the front side of the left knee without a history of any trauma, of a 35-year-old male patient who had been followed up for a diagnosis of SLE for approximately 4 months and who had started taking methylprednisolone 4 mg/day 4 months prior, used it for 1 month, and then stopped using it. In patients who are followed up for a diagnosis of SLE, it should be kept in mind that there is a risk of developing a spontaneous tendon rupture secondary to chronic inflammation and use of corticosteroids.

  2. Synovial Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promote Meniscus Regeneration Augmented by an Autologous Achilles Tendon Graft in a Rat Partial Meniscus Defect Model

    PubMed Central

    Ozeki, Nobutake; Muneta, Takeshi; Matsuta, Seiya; Koga, Hideyuki; Nakagawa, Yusuke; Mizuno, Mitsuru; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Mabuchi, Yo; Akazawa, Chihiro; Kobayashi, Eiji; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Although meniscus defects and degeneration are strongly correlated with the later development of osteoarthritis, the promise of regenerative medicine strategies is to prevent and/or delay the disease's progression. Meniscal reconstruction has been shown in animal models with tendon grafting and transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs); however, these procedures have not shown the same efficacy in clinical studies. Here, our aim was to investigate the ability of tendon grafts pretreated with exogenous synovial-derived MSCs to prevent cartilage degeneration in a rat partial meniscus defect model. We removed the anterior half of the medial meniscus and grafted autologous Achilles tendons with or without a 10-minute pretreatment of the tendon with synovial MSCs. The meniscus and surrounding cartilage were evaluated at 2, 4, and 8 weeks (n = 5). Tendon grafts increased meniscus size irrespective of synovial MSCs. Histological scores for regenerated menisci were better in the tendon + MSC group than in the other two groups at 4 and 8 weeks. Both macroscopic and histological scores for articular cartilage were significantly better in the tendon + MSC group at 8 weeks. Implanted synovial MSCs survived around the grafted tendon and native meniscus integration site by cell tracking assays with luciferase+, LacZ+, DiI+, and/or GFP+ synovial MSCs and/or GFP+ tendons. Flow cytometric analysis showed that transplanted synovial MSCs retained their MSC properties at 7 days and host synovial tissue also contained cells with MSC characteristics. Synovial MSCs promoted meniscus regeneration augmented by autologous Achilles tendon grafts and prevented cartilage degeneration in rats. Stem Cells 2015;33:1927–1938 PMID:25993981

  3. Subject-specific measures of Achilles tendon moment arm using ultrasound and video-based motion capture

    PubMed Central

    Manal, Kurt; Cowder, Justin D; Buchanan, Thomas S

    2013-01-01

    The Achilles tendon (AT) moment arm is an important biomechanical parameter most commonly estimated using one of two methods: (A) center of rotation and (B) tendon excursion. Conflicting findings regarding magnitude and whether it changes with contraction intensity have been reported when using these methods. In this study, we present an alternate method of measuring the AT moment arm by combining ultrasound and video-based motion capture. Moment arms for 10 healthy male subjects were measured at five different joint angles in 10° increments ranging from 20° of dorsiflexion (DF) to 20° of plantar flexion (PF). Moment arms were measured at rest and also during maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). For both conditions, the AT moment arm increased in magnitude as the ankle moved from DF to PF. In 20° of DF, the moment arm at rest averaged 34.6 ± 1.8 mm and increased to a maximum value of 36.9 ± 1.9 mm when plantar flexed to 10°. Moment arms during MVC ranged from 35.7 ± 1.8 mm to 38.1 ± 2.6 mm. The moment arms we obtained were much more consistent with literature values derived using ultrasound and tendon excursion compared to center of rotation or in vitro methods. This is noteworthy as the hybrid method is easy to implement and as it is less costly and timing consuming than other methods, including tendon excursion, it is well suited for large-scale studies involving many subjects. PMID:24400141

  4. Effects of Achilles tendon vibration, surface and visual conditions on lower leg electromyography in young adults with and without recurrent ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Lubetzky, Anat V; Price, Robert; McCoy, Sarah W

    2016-07-01

    Functional ankle instability is associated with decreased ankle muscle function. Compliant surfaces and eyes-closed training are commonly used for rehabilitation and prevention of ankle sprains. Brief Achilles tendon vibration is commonly used in the study of postural control. To test the level of activation of tibialis anterior (TIB) and fibularis longus (FIB), bilateral Achilles tendon vibration was applied for the middle 20 s in a series of 60-s trials, when 10 healthy young adults and 10 adults with history of repeated ankle sprains were standing bipedal: on floor, on memory foam, or on a Both Sides Up (BOSU) ball, with eyes open, and on floor and foam with eyes closed. Differences in Integrated surface electromyography (IEMG) of TIB and FIB were significant for both groups pre, during, and post vibration (Friedman Tests, p < 0.001 for all). In both groups, the highest IEMG for TIB was obtained during vibration when standing on foam with eyes closed, whereas the highest IEMG for FIB was obtained during vibration when standing on the BOSU. Bipedal stance on BOSU and brief Achilles tendon vibration may be a useful intervention when a session's goal is to facilitate lower leg muscles activation. Future research should explore training effects as well as the effect of FIB tendon vibration.

  5. Effects of Achilles tendon vibration, surface and visual conditions on lower leg electromyography in young adults with and without recurrent ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Lubetzky, Anat V; Price, Robert; McCoy, Sarah W

    2016-07-01

    Functional ankle instability is associated with decreased ankle muscle function. Compliant surfaces and eyes-closed training are commonly used for rehabilitation and prevention of ankle sprains. Brief Achilles tendon vibration is commonly used in the study of postural control. To test the level of activation of tibialis anterior (TIB) and fibularis longus (FIB), bilateral Achilles tendon vibration was applied for the middle 20 s in a series of 60-s trials, when 10 healthy young adults and 10 adults with history of repeated ankle sprains were standing bipedal: on floor, on memory foam, or on a Both Sides Up (BOSU) ball, with eyes open, and on floor and foam with eyes closed. Differences in Integrated surface electromyography (IEMG) of TIB and FIB were significant for both groups pre, during, and post vibration (Friedman Tests, p < 0.001 for all). In both groups, the highest IEMG for TIB was obtained during vibration when standing on foam with eyes closed, whereas the highest IEMG for FIB was obtained during vibration when standing on the BOSU. Bipedal stance on BOSU and brief Achilles tendon vibration may be a useful intervention when a session's goal is to facilitate lower leg muscles activation. Future research should explore training effects as well as the effect of FIB tendon vibration. PMID:27634090

  6. Spontaneous and simultaneous bilateral rupture of the quadriceps tendon in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta: a case report.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, David; Calvo, Rafael; Vaisman, Alex

    2006-03-01

    Bilateral rupture of the quadriceps tendon is an uncommon and serious injury that usually occurs in middle aged to elderly patients. It is frequently associated with chronic metabolic disorders like diabetes, hyperparathyroidism, gout, chronic renal failure or the chronic use of steroids. We report a case of spontaneous bilateral rupture of the quadriceps tendon in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta.

  7. [Traumatic muscle and tendon ruptures of the lower extremities in sport: adductor muscles, M. rectus femoris and M. biceps femoris].

    PubMed

    Krüger-Franke, M

    2010-12-01

    Ruptures of the adductor muscles, the M. rectus femoris or the M. biceps femoris are sports injuries which need quick and reliable diagnostic management. Treatment of muscle injuries is mostly conservative; complete tendon ruptures or avulsion fractures of the tendons are treated operatively according to the dislocation and the functional loss.

  8. Suture anchor repair of quadriceps tendon rupture after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Won B; Kamath, Atul F; Israelite, Craig L

    2011-08-01

    Disruption of the extensor mechanism after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a devastating complication, usually requiring surgical repair. Although suture anchor fixation is well described for repair of the ruptured native knee quadriceps tendon, no study has discussed the use of suture anchors in quadriceps repair after TKA. We present an illustrative case of successful suture anchor fixation of the quadriceps mechanism after TKA. The procedure has been performed in a total of 3 patients. A surgical technique and brief review of the literature follows. Suture anchor fixation of the quadriceps tendon is a viable option in the setting of rupture after TKA.

  9. Spontaneous and simultaneous bilateral rupture of the quadriceps tendon. A case report.

    PubMed

    Alpantaki, Kaliopi; Papadokostakis, George; Katonis, Pavlos; Hadjpavlou, Alexander

    2004-02-01

    Simultaneous bilateral rupture of the quadriceps tendon has rarely been reported; it generally occurs in association with chronic metabolic disorders, such as chronic renal failure, obesity, diabetes mellitus and secondary hyperparathyroidism. The case presented here was in an 85-year-old man with no known risk factors, who sustained simultaneous and spontaneous rupture of both quadriceps tendons. The patient suffered from spinal stenosis and degenerative changes in the knee menisci. These findings suggest that instability of the knee due to meniscal damage, and quadriceps weakness as a result of spinal stenosis, may have played a significant role in the pathogenesis of this injury.

  10. Nonoperative management of a partial patellar tendon rupture after bone-patellar tendon-bone graft harvest for ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Benner, Rodney W; Shelbourne, K Donald; Freeman, Heather

    2013-12-01

    This is a case report of a young athlete who sustained a partial tear of the patellar tendon after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with a bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) autograft. The injury, diagnostic workup, and decision-making process that lead to the choice of nonsurgical treatment are described. Furthermore, the rehabilitation process is described in detail. The patient returned to his previous level of sports activity and had a good clinical outcome as measured by range of motion, isokinetic quadriceps muscle strength testing, single leg hop testing, and the modified Noyes survey. In the absence of extensor mechanism incompetence or radiographic evidence of significant patella alta, partial ruptures of the patella tendon after ACL reconstruction using a BPTB autograft may be treated nonoperatively.

  11. [A simplified technique for repair of quadriceps tendon rupture by transpatellar PDS-cord].

    PubMed

    Hosseini, H; Agneskirchner, J D; Lobenhoffer, P

    2005-06-01

    Quadriceps tendon ruptures are relatively unusual injuries caused by direct or more frequently indirect trauma. Since complete ruptures lead to loss of active extension of the knee joint, operative treatment is usually indicated. Several techniques are described in the literature. However, relatively little is known about the functional outcome after operative treatment of acute quadriceps tendon ruptures. We present a new operative technique using a 1.3-mm PDS cord passed through a transverse drill hole in the proximal pole of the patella. We operated ten consecutive cases of complete quadriceps tendon ruptures with the technique described between January 2000 and June 2003. Eight of ten patients were evaluated after a mean follow-up time of 38 months by physical examination, IKDC Subjective score, Lysholm and Tegner score as well as an isokinetic test of the quadriceps strength. No complications were noted in this period. The average postoperative scores were 87 (IKDC), 98 (Lysholm), and 4.5 (Tegner). Isokinetic testing showed an average of 25% quadriceps strength deficit. The operative treatment of complete quadriceps tendon ruptures using a PDS cord through a drill hole in the patella is a safe and effective technique permitting functional postoperative treatment.

  12. Attritional Rupture of the Little Finger Flexor Digitorum Profundus Tendon in the Carpal Tunnel in a Patient with Acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Lee, Munn Yi Tina; Jin, Yeo Chong

    2016-02-01

    Spontaneous rupture of flexor tendons within the carpal tunnel is rare in the absence of rheumatoid arthritis. Other predisposing conditions such as gout, infection, pisotriquetrial osteoarthritis, as well as hook of hamate fracture non-union, have previously been reported. However, tendon ruptures of the hand in the presence of acromegaly, as well as spontaneous ruptures within the carpal tunnel, have not been described in the literature. PMID:27454510

  13. Age-related greater Achilles tendon compliance is not associated with larger plantar flexor muscle fascicle strains in senior women.

    PubMed

    Csapo, R; Malis, V; Hodgson, J; Sinha, S

    2014-04-15

    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the age-associated decrease of tendon stiffness would necessitate greater muscle fascicle strains to produce similar levels of force during isometric contraction. Greater fascicle strains could force sarcomeres to operate in less advantageous regions of their force-length and force-velocity relationships, thus impairing the capacity to generate strong and explosive contractions. To test this hypothesis, sagittal-plane dynamic velocity-encoded phase-contrast magnetic resonance images of the gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscle and Achilles tendon (AT) were acquired in six young (YW; 26.1 ± 2.3 yr) and six senior (SW; 76.7 ± 8.3 yr) women during submaximal isometric contraction (35% maximum voluntary isometric contraction) of the plantar flexor muscles. Multiple GM fascicle lengths were continuously determined by automatically tracking regions of interest coinciding with the end points of muscle fascicles evenly distributed along the muscle's proximo-distal length. AT stiffness and Young's modulus were measured as the slopes of the tendon's force-elongation and stress-strain curves, respectively. Despite significantly lower AT stiffness at older age (YW: 120.2 ± 52.3 N/mm vs. SW: 53.9 ± 44.4 N/mm, P = 0.040), contraction-induced changes in GM fascicle lengths were similar in both age groups at equal levels of absolute muscular force (4-5% fascicle shortening in both groups), and even significantly larger in YW (YW: 11-12% vs. SW: 6-8% fascicle shortening) at equal percentage of maximum voluntary contraction. These results suggest that factors other than AT stiffness, such as age-associated changes in muscle composition or fascicle slack, might serve as compensatory adaptations, limiting the degree of fascicle strains upon contraction.

  14. Surgical Treatment of Neglected Traumatic Quadriceps Tendon Rupture with Knee Ankylosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Hun; Seon, Jong-Keun; Woo, Seong-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Quadriceps tendon rupture is an uncommon injury. This disabling condition is the result of direct or indirect trauma. It requires surgical repair to avoid poor outcomes in cases of neglected or chronic rupture. In most acute cases, simple tendon suture or reinsertion is suitable for an extensor mechanism reconstruction of the knee joint. However, chronic lesions often require a tendon graft or flap reconstruction. We report a case of a 15-year-old male who was diagnosed with a chronic quadriceps rupture with a patellar superior pole fracture. We performed quadriceps reconstruction using tibialis anterior allograft tendon and additional screw fixation to reconstruct the extensor mechanism and recover knee joint range of motion to prevent a high-level functional restriction. The treatment was difficult and limited due to neglect for 9-months that led to ankylosis accompanied with nonunion of tibial fracture. Our surgical treatment using allograft tendon resulted in a very good outcome after 30 months of follow-up. PMID:27274474

  15. Smad8/BMP2–Engineered Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induce Accelerated Recovery of the Biomechanical Properties of the Achilles Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Pelled, Gadi; Snedeker, Jess G.; Ben-Arav, Ayelet; Rigozzi, Samuela; Zilberman, Yoram; Kimelman-Bleich, Nadav; Gazit, Zulma; Müller, Ralph; Gazit, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Summary Tendon tissue regeneration is an important goal for orthopedic medicine. We hypothesized that implantation of Smad8/BMP2–engineered MSCs in a full-thickness defect of the Achilles tendon (AT) would induce regeneration of tissue with improved biomechanical properties. A 2 mm defect was created in the distal region of murine ATs. The injured tendons were then sutured together or given implants of genetically engineered MSCs (GE group), nonengineered MSCs (CH3 group), or fibrin gel containing no cells (FG group). Three weeks later the mice were killed, and their healing tendons were excised and processed for histological or biomechanical analysis. A biomechanical analysis showed that tendons that received implants of genetically engineered MSCs had the highest effective stiffness (> 70% greater than natural healing, p < 0.001) and elastic modulus. There were no significant differences in either ultimate load or maximum stress among the treatment groups. Histological analysis revealed a tendon-like structure with elongated cells mainly in the GE group. ATs that had been implanted with Smad8/BMP2–engineered stem cells displayed a better material distribution and functional recovery than control groups. While additional study is required to determine long-term effects of GE MSCs on tendon healing, we conclude that genetically engineered MSCs may be a promising therapeutic tool for accelerating short-term functional recovery in the treatment of tendon injuries. PMID:22696396

  16. Bilateral spontaneous patellar tendon rupture in the absence of concomitant systemic disease or steroid use.

    PubMed

    Greenbaum, B; Perry, J; Lee, J

    1994-11-01

    A case of bilateral patellar tendon rupture in an otherwise healthy 41-year-old man is presented. This is the 15th case reported in the literature. The mechanism of injury is attributed to a flexion moment coupled with a contraction of the quadriceps muscle in nearly all reported cases. Surgical repair produces excellent results. PMID:7854842

  17. A new method of repair for quadriceps tendon ruptures. A case report.

    PubMed

    Maniscalco, P; Bertone, C; Rivera, F; Bocchi, L

    2000-09-01

    Rupture of the quadriceps tendon is an uncommon injury observed predominantly in subjects over 40 years old. Multiple surgical techniques have been employed to repair fresh and neglected ruptures; methods that make use of allograft and augmentation with tissues harvested from around the knee have been reported. We describe a case of surgical repair of a tendon-bone junction rupture in a 64-year-old patient by use of suture anchors to attach the tendon to bone and improve fixation of the soft tissue elements. Clinical diagnosis of rupture was confirmed radiographically and echographically. Surgical repair was performed within 24 hours of injury. Active movement of the knee started after 3 weeks and the patient was permitted to walk without weight-bearing with a knee cage. Three weeks later, he was permitted to walk with full weight-bearing unassisted by crutches; the knee cage was removed 6 weeks after surgery. At his most recent follow-up 24 months postoperative, quadriceps strength was equal to that of the controlateral knee and the patient has returned to sports and daily activities. The surgical method presented here provides a suture of the tendon ends without putting excess stress on the suture line during the period of early knee mobilization. Advantages over other techniques include reduced operative time, easy access to the implantation site, and better resistance of the suture material: the patient is thus able to initiate physical therapy earlier and more aggressively.

  18. Surgical treatment of simultaneous rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament and the patellar tendon.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Kyohei; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Hino, Kazunori; Watanabe, Seiji; Yamaoka, Gotaro; Shirakata, Haruo; Fujii, Yuko; Miura, Hiromasa

    2013-12-01

    Although the rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a common sports injury, a simultaneous rupture of the patellar tendon (PT) is relatively rare. We experienced a case in which a patient simultaneously ruptured the ACL, the medial collateral ligament (MCL), and the PT while sliding during a baseball game. We sutured the PT and MCL during the acute stage, and 7 months later we conducted a double-bundle reconstruction of the ACL. To our knowledge, this is the first report of PT repair using only fiber wire thread, and two-phase double-bundle ACL reconstruction.

  19. Pseudotendon formation causing painful tethering of ruptured flexor carpi radialis tendons.

    PubMed

    Henry, Mark

    2013-06-01

    Six patients (five male, one female) between 51 and 64 years of age sustained ruptures of the right dominant flexor carpi radialis (FCR) tendon. Prior to rupture, within the past 3 months to 1 year, each had received one or two corticosteroid injections of the FCR tendon sheath for stenosing tenosynovitis. Three of six patients demonstrated radiographic findings but none had clinical symptoms of osteoarthritis at the scaphoid-trapezium-trapezoid joint. The pain and disability declared by these patients appeared out of proportion to the relatively innocuous nature of a ruptured FCR tendon, with an average pre-operative Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score of 32. In all patients there was a palpable, tender mass of retracted, ruptured FCR tendon around 6 cm proximal to the wrist crease as well as a palpable cord of pseudotendon formed within the residual sheath. Pain along the course of the pseudotendon was consistently provoked by wrist extension and gripping. The patients were initially treated non-surgically with stretching, manual therapy, ultrasound, and oral medications for 2-4 months. None obtained sufficient relief, and the patients requested more definitive care. The painful tethering of the ruptured FCR was solved by complete excision of both pseudotendon and the retracted tendon stump, resulting in complete relief of symptoms with an average post-operative DASH score of 3. Pre-operative and post-operative DASH scores were analyzed with the paired Student's t-test, using a p-value of 0.05, and found to have a statistically significant difference. PMID:24426661

  20. Synchronous quadriceps tendon rupture and unilateral ACL tear in a weightlifter, associated with anabolic steroid use.

    PubMed

    Fenelon, Christopher; Dalton, David M; Galbraith, John G; Masterson, Eric L

    2016-05-06

    Synchronous quadriceps tendon rupture is rare. A 29-year-old man, an amateur weight lifter, taking androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS), developed sudden onset bilateral pain and swelling of his anterior thighs when attempting to squat 280 kg (620 lb). Examination revealed gross swelling superior to the patella and palpable gaps in both quadriceps tendons. He underwent successful operative repair. MRI revealed a partial tear of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the right knee. This was not reconstructed. Only a few case reports of the association between AAS and quadriceps rupture exist in the literature, with none to the best of our knowledge in the past 10 years. ACL rupture coexisting is very rare, with only two reported cases.

  1. Synchronous quadriceps tendon rupture and unilateral ACL tear in a weightlifter, associated with anabolic steroid use.

    PubMed

    Fenelon, Christopher; Dalton, David M; Galbraith, John G; Masterson, Eric L

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous quadriceps tendon rupture is rare. A 29-year-old man, an amateur weight lifter, taking androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS), developed sudden onset bilateral pain and swelling of his anterior thighs when attempting to squat 280 kg (620 lb). Examination revealed gross swelling superior to the patella and palpable gaps in both quadriceps tendons. He underwent successful operative repair. MRI revealed a partial tear of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the right knee. This was not reconstructed. Only a few case reports of the association between AAS and quadriceps rupture exist in the literature, with none to the best of our knowledge in the past 10 years. ACL rupture coexisting is very rare, with only two reported cases. PMID:27154985

  2. Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture in a patient on chronic haemodialysis. (Short-term results of treatment with transpatellar sutures augmented with a quadriceps tendon flap).

    PubMed

    Kayali, Cemil; Agus, Haluk; Turgut, Ali; Taskiran, Can

    2008-01-01

    Quadriceps tendon ruptures are rare orthopaedic injuries. Although they are generally seen after the age of 50, they may occur in younger patients with certain underlying conditions, including chronic haemodialysis. Several repair techniques have been proposed but the choice of the best method is still a matter of controversy. This paper presents the case of a renal failure patient with 10 years' history of haemodialysis treatment suffering from bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture. The treatment was with transpatellar sutures augmented with a reverse quadriceps tendon flap. His short-term clinical and radiological results are satisfactory.

  3. Traumatic Rupture of the Distal Triceps Tendon (A Series of 7 Cases)

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, H.; Schulz, A.-P.; Breer, S.; Faschingbauer, M.; Kienast, B.

    2015-01-01

    Even non-traumatic ruptures of the triceps tendon are rare, surgical therapy should be recommended in all cases, because of poor results after non-operative treatment. A golden standard for the surgical procedure is not established. A small series of traumatic distal tendon ruptures was treated surgical in our hospital and was followed up after 12 months concerning their function. Very good and good results could be found with a strong reintegration of the tendon by using transosseus sutures with non resorbable suture material. The refixation with suture anchors showed disappointing results with early pull-outs of the anchor. Revision with screw augmentation with a washer had to be performed. Concerning the biomechanical forces, which show up on the olecranon (up to 40 NM), the refixation of the triceps tendon has proved to be extremely resistant against pull out forces. The good results by using non absorbable transosseus sutures led to a standardized procedure in our trauma center, even the rupture is not traumatic. PMID:26664499

  4. Alcoholic extract of tarantula cubensis improves sharp ruptured tendon healing after primary repair in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Oryan, Ahmad; Moshiri, Ali; Meimandi Parizi, Abdolhamid

    2012-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of tarantula cubensis (TC) on the superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) rupture after surgical anastomosis, on day 84-postinjury (DPI) in rabbits. Forty white New Zealand, mature, male rabbits were randomly and evenly divided into treated and control groups. After tenotomy and primary repair, the injured legs were immobilized for 2 weeks. TC was injected subcutaneously over the lesion on 3, 7, and 10 DPI. The control animals received subcutaneous injections of normal saline similarly. Animal's weight, tendon diameter, clinical status, radiographic and ultrasonographic evaluations were recorded at weekly intervals. The animals were euthanized on 84 DPI and the injured tendons and their normal contralaterals were evaluated for histopathologic, histomorphometric, ultrastructural, biomechanical, and percentage dry weight parameters. Treatment significantly improved the clinical performance, cell, collagen and tissue maturation, tissue alignment and remodeling, ultimate strength, stiffness, maximum stress, and dry weight content and decreased the tendon diameter, inflammation, adhesions and degeneration of the injured treated tendons compared to the injured control ones. The present findings showed that TC is effective on sharp ruptured SDFT in rabbits and it could be one of the novel therapeutic options in clinical trial studies. PMID:23431525

  5. Bilateral simultaneous rupture of the quadriceps tendon in a patient with psoriasis: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is not common in the absence of systemic disease. Patients with chronic systemic diseases such as uremia and systemic lupus erythematosus and patients who are being treated with systemic steroids or local steroid injections are more prone to tendon rupture. The tendon can rupture spontaneously or as a result of trauma. We report an unusual case of simultaneous bilateral traumatic quadriceps tendon rupture in a patient with psoriasis who was being treated with topical steroid preparations. Case presentation A 57-year-old Caucasian man with a known history of psoriasis, for which he was being treated with topical steroid preparations, presented to our hospital with clinical signs of bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture after he fell while walking down stairs. The diagnosis was confirmed by bilateral ultrasound scans of the thighs. The patient underwent surgery to repair both quadriceps tendons. Post-operatively, the patient was immobilized first in bilateral cylinder casts for six weeks, then in knee braces for the next four weeks. His knees were actively mobilized during physiotherapy. Conclusion Bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is a rare occurrence in patients with psoriasis who are being treated with topical steroids. PMID:21801390

  6. Regular physical activity reduces the effects of Achilles tendon vibration on postural control for older women.

    PubMed

    Maitre, J; Serres, I; Lhuisset, L; Bois, J; Gasnier, Y; Paillard, T

    2015-02-01

    The aim was to determine in what extent physical activity influences postural control when visual, vestibular, and/or proprioceptive systems are disrupted. Two groups of healthy older women: an active group (74.0 ± 3.8 years) who practiced physical activities and a sedentary group (74.7 ± 6.3 years) who did not, underwent 12 postural conditions consisted in altering information emanating from sensory systems by means of sensory manipulations (i.e., eyes closed, cervical collar, tendon vibration, electromyostimulation, galvanic vestibular stimulation, foam surface). The center of foot pressure velocity was recorded on a force platform. Results indicate that the sensory manipulations altered postural control. The sedentary group was more disturbed than the active group by the use of tendon vibration. There was no clear difference between the two groups in the other conditions. This study suggests that the practice of physical activities is beneficial as a means of limiting the effects of tendon vibration on postural control through a better use of the not manipulated sensory systems and/or a more efficient reweighting to proprioceptive information from regions unaffected by the tendon vibration.

  7. Effect of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB-coated sutures on Achilles tendon healing in a rat model: A histological and biomechanical study

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Stephen H; Grande, Daniel A; Hee, Christopher K; Kestler, Hans K; Roden, Colleen M; Shah, Neil V; Razzano, Pasquale; Dines, David M; Chahine, Nadeen O

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Repairing tendon injuries with recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB has potential for improving surgical outcomes. Augmentation of sutures, a critical component of surgical tendon repair, by coating with growth factors may provide a clinically useful therapeutic device for improving tendon repair. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to (a) coat Vicryl sutures with a defined dose of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB without additional coating excipients (e.g. gelatin), (b) quantify the recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB released from the suture, and (c) use the recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB-coated sutures to enhance tendon repair in a rat Achilles tendon transection model. Methods: Vicryl sutures were coated with 0, 0.3, 1.0, and 10.0 mg/mL concentrations of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB using a dip-coating process. In vitro release was quantified by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Acutely transected rat Achilles tendons were repaired using one of the four suture groups (n = 12 per group). Four weeks following repair, the tensile biomechanical and histological (i.e. collagen organization and angiogenesis) properties were determined. Results: A dose-dependent bolus release of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB occurred within the first hour in vitro, followed by a gradual release over 48 h. There was a significant increase in ultimate tensile strength (p < 0.01) in the two highest recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB dose groups (1.9 ± 0.5 and 2.1 ± 0.5 MPa) relative to controls (1.0 ± 0.2 MPa). The modulus significantly increased (p = 0.031) with the highest recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB dose group (7.2 ± 3.8 MPa) relative to all other groups (control: 3.5 ± 0.9 MPa). No significant differences were identified for the maximum load or stiffness. The histological collagen and angiogenesis scores

  8. Stimulation of tendon repair: mechanical loading, GDFs and platelets. A mini-review

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    The repair of subcutaneous tendon ruptures can be stimulated by a single application of one of several growth factors [e.g. platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) like growth differentiation factor (GDF)-5, -6, -7] or by a thrombocyte concentrate (PRP). The response to these measures is dependent on the mechanical microenvironment, which is crucial for repair. So far, almost all research has been limited to rodent models, mostly using the rat Achilles tendon. Ruptured human Achilles tendons appear to be mechanically loaded in spite of immobilisation. This suggests that the mechanical microenvironment might be favourable for the clinical use of growth factors or platelets for this indication. New methods to quantitate human Achilles tendon repair have been developed. PMID:17583812

  9. Posterior tibial tendon tears in young competitive athletes: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Porter, D A; Baxter, D E; Clanton, T O; Klootwyk, T E

    1998-09-01

    Unlike the Achilles tendon, the posterior tibial tendon does not typically undergo acute rupture. We report two cases of posterior tibial tendon tears occurring in young, athletic individuals (<30 years old) that required operative intervention before the patients could return to competitive sports. We believe that these are the first two reports of posterior tibial tendon tears occurring in this population without the patient having a prior history of steroid injections in the tendon. The tears we observed and described at surgical exploration were chronic and degenerative in nature. We also comment on our approach to treatment of posterior tibial tendon injuries in the athletic population.

  10. Evaluating the effect of low-level laser therapy on healing of tentomized Achilles tendon in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by light microscopical and gene expression examinations.

    PubMed

    Aliodoust, Morteza; Bayat, Mohammad; Jalili, Mohammad Reza; Sharifian, Zainalabedin; Dadpay, Masoomeh; Akbari, Mohammad; Bayat, Mehrnoush; Khoshvaghti, Amir; Bayat, Homa

    2014-07-01

    Tendon healing is impaired in individuals diagnosed with diabetes mellitus (DM). According to research, there is considerable improvement in the healing of surgically tenotomized Achilles tendons following low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in non-diabetic, healthy animals. This study uses light microscopic (LM) and semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) analyses to evaluate the ability of LLLT in healing Achilles tendons from streptozotocin-induced diabetic (STZ-D) rats. A total of 88 rats were randomly divided into two groups, non-diabetic and diabetic. DM was induced in the rats by injections of STZ. The right Achilles tendons of all rats were tenotomized 1 month after administration of STZ. Laser-treated rats were treated with a helium-neon (He-Ne) laser that had a 632.8-nm wavelength and 7.2-mW average power. Experimental group rats received a daily dose of 0.014 J (energy density, 2.9 J/cm(2)). Control rats did not receive LLLT. Animals were sacrificed on days 5, 10, and 15 post-operatively for semi-quantitative LM and semi-quantitative RT-PCR examinations of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1) gene expression. The chi-square test showed that LLLT significantly reduced inflammation in non-diabetic rats compared with their non-diabetic controls (p = 0.02). LLLT significantly decreased inflammation in diabetic rats on days 5 (p = 0.03) and 10 (p = 0.02) compared to the corresponding control diabetic rats. According to the student's t test, LLLT significantly increased TGF-β1 gene expression in healthy (p = 0.000) and diabetic (p = 0.000) rats compared to their relevant controls. The He-Ne laser was effective in altering the inflammatory reaction and increasing TGF-β1 gene production. PMID:24622817

  11. Simultaneous rupture of the patellar tendon and the anterior cruciate ligament: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Chow, Francis Y; Wun, Yiu-Chung; Chow, Yuk-Yin

    2006-10-01

    We report a case of simultaneous rupture of the patellar tendon and the anterior cruciate ligament. This condition was rarely reported in the literature and clinical diagnosis can be difficult. It is frequently associated with injuries of other knee structures. The preferred treatment is immediate primary repair of the patellar tendon and delayed reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament.

  12. Reconstruction of Attritional Rupture of Flexor Tendons with Fascia Lata Graft Following Distal Radius Fracture Malunion.

    PubMed

    Bhat, A K; Acharya, A M; Soni, N

    2016-10-01

    Incidence of multiple flexor tendon rupture following distal radius fractures is rare with very few cases being reported in literature. We present an unusual case of a patient who had come to us with complaints of weakness and paresthesia of the right hand of one month prior and with a past history of dorsal plating for distal radius fracture nine years ago. Radiographs showed a distal radius fracture malunion with intact dorsal plate and protrusion of screws through the volar cortex. On exploration, attritional ruptures of all digital flexors were found with sparing of the Flexor Pollicis Longus tendon. The fibrous mass was excised and flexors reconstructed with a fascia lata graft. Attempt was made to correct the malunion with radial and ulnar osteotomies. At one year the patient had excellent restoration of digital flexion. PMID:27595963

  13. Bilateral simultaneous rupture of the infrapatellar tendon in a recreational athlete. A case report.

    PubMed

    Podesta, L; Sherman, M F; Bonamo, J R

    1991-01-01

    Bilateral rupture of the infrapatellar tendons is a rare event in an otherwise healthy athletic individual. The event is usually quite severe and diagnosis can be readily made on a clinical examination. In the case presented here, predisposing factors consisted of an underlying patella alta and a long history of repetitive trauma to the knee. Prompt diagnosis and surgical repair will lead to a good functional result.

  14. Tendon Homeostasis in Hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Soslowsky, Louis J; Fryhofer, George W

    2016-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a serious health problem that is associated not only with heart disease, but also tendon pathology. In high cholesterol environments (e.g. familial hyperlipidemia), lipids accumulate within the tendon extracellular matrix and form deposits called xanthomas. Lipid-related changes are known to affect several tendon mechanical properties, including stiffness and modulus, in uninjured and injured tendons, alike. Mechanisms to explain these cholesterol-related changes are multiple, including alterations in tenocyte gene and protein expression, matrix turnover, tissue vascularity, and cytokine production. Clinically, rotator cuff tear and Achilles tendon rupture are clearly associated with metabolic derangements, and elevated total cholesterol is often among the specific metabolic parameters implicated. Treatment of hypercholesterolemia using statin medications has also been shown to affect tendon properties, resulting in normalization of tendon thickness and improved tendon healing. Despite current work, the pathophysiology of lipid-related tendon pathology remains incompletely understood, and additional hypothesis-generating studies, including those incorporating whole-genome and whole-transcriptome technologies, will help to point the field in new directions. PMID:27535257

  15. [Bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture and coexistent femoral neck fracture in a patient with chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Kazimoğlu, Cemal; Yağdi, Serhan; Karapinar, Hasan; Sener, Muhittin

    2007-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is a very rare injury mostly seen in patients with chronic renal failure or other systemic chronic diseases. Metabolic acidosis in chronic renal failure predisposes these patients to tendon degeneration. A 37-year-old woman who received hemodialysis for chronic renal failure for two years presented with complaints of severe pain in the left hip and inability to walk. She had a history of two consecutive falls in the past two months. On physical examination, there were joint spaces in both suprapatellar areas, active extension of both knees was inhibited, and movements of the left hip were quite painful. Knee ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture from patellar attachment. At surgery, full-thickness quadriceps tendon tears were repaired with Tycron transpatellar suture anchors. Internal fixation was not considered for hip fracture due to the presence of chronic renal failure, so hemiarthroplasty with bipolar endoprosthesis was performed in the same session for femoral neck fracture. Six months after the operation, the patient was able to walk without support and almost regained her normal knee functions.

  16. A comparative study of the effects of bromelain and fresh pineapple juice on the early phase of healing in acute crush achilles tendon injury.

    PubMed

    Aiyegbusi, Ayoola I; Olabiyi, Olaleye O; Duru, Francis I O; Noronha, Cressie C; Okanlawon, Abayomi O

    2011-04-01

    Bromelain, an enzyme extracted from the stem of the pineapple plant, has been reported to reduce pain and swelling in acute soft tissue injuries, but no study has been done to compare its effect with that of fresh pineapple juice on the healing of acute tendon injuries. This study compared the effects of commercial bromelain and fresh pineapple juice on tenocyte proliferation and the malondialdehyde (MDA) level in the early stage of healing in a crush injury to the Achilles tendon of Sprague-Dawley rats. Twenty-four male rats were divided randomly into three groups of eight rats each; all the rats had induced crush injury to the Achilles tendon: Group 1 (control), no treatment; Group 2, oral bromelain treatment at a dosage of 7 mg/kg of body weight daily; and Group 3, fresh diluted pineapple juice at a dosage of 30 mg/kg of body weight. Treatment was given over the first 14 days post-injury. On day 15 post-injury, the animals were sacrificed, and the tendons were excised and processed for histological study and MDA assay. Results show a significant difference in the tenocyte population between the bromelain group and the control (P < .05), whereas pineapple juice also increased the tenocyte population, although not significantly (P = .36). Pineapple juice, however, significantly lowered the MDA level compared with both the control and bromelain-treated groups. Based on this study, 600 GDU bromelain given at a dosage of 7 mg/kg had a better effect on tenocyte proliferation than fresh pineapple juice given once daily in acute tendon injury.

  17. [Quadriceps tendon insufficiency and rupture : Treatment options in total knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Thiele, K; von Roth, P; Pfitzner, T; Preininger, B; Perka, C

    2016-05-01

    Quadriceps tendon injuries and insufficiencies in total knee arthroplasty are rare, but are followed by a devastating complication that left untreated leads to a complete loss of function of the knee. This review article summarizes the functional anatomy, risk factors, and the prevalence and diagnosis of quadriceps tendon injuries, in addition to the possible management options for partial and complete ruptures. The treatment options are adapted according to the extent of the loss of function (partial, complete) and the duration of the injury (acute vs chronic). Furthermore, the choice of treatment should take into account the quality and availability of primary tissue, the patient's general health, along with their likely functional requirements. Conservative treatment is often justified in partial ruptures with good results. Complete ruptures require surgical intervention and multiple operative techniques are described. Treatment options for acute ruptures include direct primary repair with autogenous or synthetic tissue augmentation. In the case of chronic insufficiency and a lack of soft-tissue surroundings, reconstruction with the aid of a muscle flap or allograft tissue can be considered. All surgical intervention techniques used so far have been fraught with complications and rarely lead to satisfactory results. A new surgical approach to the reconstruction and augmentation of the extensor mechanism consists of the use of a synthetic mesh. The technique is described here in detail.

  18. Post-surgical care of a professional ballet dancer following calcaneal exostectomy and debridement with re-attachment of the left Achilles tendon

    PubMed Central

    Kobsar, Bradley; Alcantara, Joel

    2009-01-01

    The extraordinary physical demands placed upon ballet dancers are only now being appreciated as comparable to that of other highly competitive athletic pursuits. The professional ballet dancer presents with an array of injuries associated with their physically vigorous performance requirements. In keeping with evidence-based practice, we describe the chiropractic care of a professional ballet dancer following surgical calcaneal exostectomy and debridement with re-attachment of the left Achilles tendon. The care provided involves an array of modalities from exercise and rehabilitation to spinal manipulative therapy. PMID:19421349

  19. Achilles and peroneal tendon injuries in the athlete. An expert's perspective.

    PubMed

    Subotnick, S I

    1997-07-01

    Peroneal tendonopathy or injuries are not common but may be troubling to the sports enthusiast. Prompt diagnosis and treatment usually result in complete recovery with conservative measures. Biodynamic orthosis with deep heel cups and a long lateral flange extension often are required for return to activity. MR imaging is helpful in difficult, persistent cases to check for ruptures. Surgery is not commonly performed but if required is usually successful in correcting the pathology. Alternative medicine may improve treatment outcomes. Biomechanical functional analysis and attention to training errors is essential in any lower extremity injury or pathology.

  20. Thompson calf squeezing test: clinical and ultrasound correlations in the follow up of Achille's tenorraphy.

    PubMed

    Leigheb, M; Conte, P; Neri, P; Zorzolo, I; Martinelli, D; Martino, F; Carriero, A; Grassi, F

    2014-09-24

    In the follow up of Achille's tenorraphy, negativization of Thompson calf queezing test is not always omogeneous and absolute. Aim of the paper is to correlate Thompson test to different anatomical-ultrasound and functional parameters. We investigated clinically and by ultrasound 61 patients operated on of Achille's tenorraphy at Novara Hospital with follow-up of 10 to 46 months. Negative controls were contralateral tendons. We excluded patients with previous and/or contralateral Achille's tendon ruptures, those operated after 7 days, diabetics or with autoimmune diseases, if used topic steroids, < 18 years, those rejecting the study. Measured parameters were: age, gender, height, weight, side, open vs percutaneous approach, time from operation, neutral angle and range of motion of the ankle, maximal circumference of the leg, Single Heel Rise Test, Visual-Analogue-Scale Foot and Ankle (VAS FA) score; with ultrasound: length of tendons, mio-tendinous U.S.-structure, dynamic diastasis of tendon scar, tendon sliding. Thompson test is positive if no plantar-flexion of the foot occurs at calf squeezing, negative if plantar-flexion is normal (75% patients) and intermediate if reduced or slight reactive (25%).We found correlation of Thompson test with age (p<0,05) and with tendon length (p>0,05), being intermediate tests more represented in older patients and in those with longer healed tendons. In conclusion post-operative negativization of Thompson test can be incomplete as observed in older patients and in those healed with elongated tendon.

  1. Rapid recovery from spontaneous and simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture in an active, healthy individual.

    PubMed

    Gaheer, Rajinder Singh; Hawkins, Amanda

    2010-07-13

    Bilateral spontaneous quadriceps rupture is an uncommon injury that is usually seen in association with multiple medical conditions and is frequently misdiagnosed. It is rarely seen in healthy, active individuals. This article presents a case of bilateral simultaneous and spontaneous rupture of the quadriceps tendon in a healthy, athletic, active and highly motivated patient with rapid recovery from injury and return to full sport activity within a relatively short period of time. A 65-year-old healthy man felt both knees give way while walking down stairs at home and collapsed, unable to bear weight. He was fit and well, not on any medications and basic laboratory screening was within normal limits. He was an active sportsman, horse rider, swimmer, and long-distance cyclist, and had completed a half marathon 1 month before his injury. He was diagnosed with bilateral quadriceps tendon ruptures. An ultrasound of both knees confirmed the diagnosis of full-thickness rupture. Surgical repair of both quadriceps tendons was performed 3 days after the injury. Bilateral locking brace in 10 degrees of flexion was used to immobilize both knees and protect the repair for 6 weeks. The patient remained nonweight bearing for 2 weeks, then gradual weight bearing was commenced, with full weight bearing at 6 weeks. Intensive isometric quadriceps exercises were started on the second postoperative day. Immobilization of both knees was maintained for 6 weeks, after which full active range of motion (ROM) was initiated. At 16 weeks after the injury he had bilateral ROM from 0 degrees to 120 degrees flexion, with no extension lag. He was horse riding, playing golf, swimming, and walking distances up to 2 miles at that time.

  2. Proximity of Axillary Nerve During Cortical Button Repair of Pectoralis Major Tendon Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Sarah T.; Smith, Geoff C.; Ogunleye, Oluwafunto E.; Clark, Damian A.; Packham, Iain N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Rupture of the pectoralis major (PM) tendon is a rare but severe injury. Several techniques have been described for PM fixation, including a transosseus technique, placing cortical buttons at the superior, middle and inferior PM tendon insertion points. The present cadaveric study investigates the proximity of the posterior branch of the axillary nerve to the drill positions for transosseus PM tendon repair. Methods Twelve cadaveric shoulders were used. The axillary nerve was marked during a preparatory dissection. Drills were passed through the humerus at the superior, middle and inferior insertions of the PM tendon and the drill bits were left in situ. The distance between these and each axillary nerve was measured using computed tomography. Results The superior drill position was in closest proximity to the axillary nerve (three-dimensional distance range 0–18.01 mm, mean 10.74 mm, 95% confidence interval 7.24 mm to 14.24 mm). The middle PM insertion point was also very close to the nerve. Conclusions Caution should be used when performing bicortical drilling of the humerus, especially when drilling at the superior border of the PM insertion. We describe ‘safe’ and ‘danger’ zones for the positioning of cortical buttons through the humerus reflecting the risk posed to the axillary nerve. PMID:27582906

  3. Examining the Relationship Between Pathologies of the Peroneal, Achilles, and Posterior Tibial Tendons: An MRI Review in an Asymptomatic Lateral Ankle Population.

    PubMed

    Galli, Melissa M; Protzman, Nicole M; Mandelker, Eiran M; Malhotra, Amit D; Wobst, Garrett M; Schwartz, Edward; Brigido, Stephen A

    2014-07-01

    The hindfoot and ankle are dynamic structures to which the interplay of tendinous pathologies is scarcely understood. Five hundred consecutive ankle magnetic resonance imaging examinations, obtained between December 27, 2011 and April 9, 2013, were reviewed. Patients without a history of hindfoot or ankle trauma or lateral ankle pain were included. The 108 MRIs that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were then re-evaluated by 2 musculoskeletal radiologists. Of these, 55.56% demonstrated pathology of the Achilles tendon (AT), 44.44% demonstrated pathology of the posterior tibial tendon (PTT), 35.19% demonstrated pathology of the peroneus brevis (PB), and 37.96% demonstrated pathology of the peroneus longus (PL). In our asymptomatic patient population, 16 (14.81%) patients demonstrated concomitant pathology of the AT, PTT, and peroneal tendons. There were positive, moderate correlations between graded pathology of the AT and the PTT, rs(106) = 0.32, P = .001; the AT and PB, rs(106) = 0.38, P = 0.001; and the AT and PL, rs(106) = 0.46, P = .001. However, there were no statistically significant correlations between pathology of the PTT and PB, rs(106) = 0.17, P = .08, or the PTT and PL, rs(106) = 0.14, P = .15. These findings suggest an intimate relationship between the AT, PTT, and the peroneal tendons. These individual anatomic structures may have underappreciated functional relationships that could lead to future investigations.

  4. Clinical outcomes after repair of quadriceps tendon rupture: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ciriello, Vincenzo; Gudipati, Suribabu; Tosounidis, Theodoros; Soucacos, P N; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2012-11-01

    The existing evidence regarding the management of quadriceps tendon rupture remains obscure. The aim of the current review is to investigate the characteristics, the different techniques employed and to analyse the clinical outcomes following surgical repair of quadriceps tendon rupture. An Internet based search of the English literature of the last 25 years was carried out. Case reports and non-clinical studies were excluded. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed using the Coleman Methodology Score. All data regarding mechanism and site of rupture, type of treatment, time elapsed between diagnosis and repair, patients' satisfaction, clinical outcome, return to pre-injury activities, complications and recurrence rates were extracted and analysed. Out of 474 studies identified, 12 met the inclusion criteria. The average of Coleman Methodology Score was 50.46/100. In total 319 patients were analysed with a mean age of 57 years (16-85). The mean time of follow-up was 47.5 months (3 months to 24 years). The most common mechanism of injury was simple fall (61.5%). Spontaneous ruptures were reported in 3.2% of cases. The most common sites of tear were noted between 1cm and 2 cm of the superior pole of the patella and, in the older people, at the osseotendinous junction. The most frequently used repair technique was patella drill holes (50% of patients). Simple sutures were used in mid-substance ruptures. Several reinforcement techniques were employed in case of poor quality or retraction of the torn ends of tendon. The affected limb was immobilised in a cast for a period of 3-10 weeks. Quadriceps muscular atrophy and muscle strength deficit were present in most of the cases. Worst results were noted in delayed repairs. Reported complications included heterotopic ossifications in 6.9% of patients, deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism in 2.5%, superficial infection in 1.2% and deep infection in 1.1%. It appears that the type of surgical

  5. Les ruptures traumatiques du tendon quadricipital: à propos de 3 cas

    PubMed Central

    Benyass, Youssef; Chafry, Bouchaib; Koufagued, Kaldadak; Bouabid, Salim; Chagar, Belkacem

    2015-01-01

    Les ruptures traumatiques du tendon quadricipital sont rares, elles surviennent préférentiellement après 40 ans, suite à un traumatisme indirect chez le sportif (flexion contrariée du genou) ou traumatisme banal chez le sédentaire. La tendinopathie préexistante est fréquente. La rupture est le plus souvent totale et siège au corps du tendon 60% des cas ou décallotement quadricipital au bord supérieur de la rotule (40% des cas). Le diagnostic est essentiellement clinique. Les examens complémentaires (échographie et imagerie par résonance magnétique) sont utiles et appuient le diagnostique, mais sont souvent faussement rassurants hormis la radiographie qui montre une rotule basse. Le traitement essentiellement chirurgical associé à la rééducation fonctionnelle donne des résultats largement meilleurs. Le délai d'intervention est un facteur pronostic très important. Les auteurs rapportent 03cas de rupture de tendon quadricipital. L’âge moyen est de 50ans. Ils ont été traités chirurgicalement et revus régulièrement, avec un recul de 16 mois pour apprécier l’évolution. Les résultats ont été très bons chez 02 cas et bon chez 01 cas. L'amélioration a été très nette selon les critères: marche, douleur et reprise d'activité physique. PMID:26985261

  6. The influence of stretching and warm-up exercises on Achilles tendon reflex activity.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, D; Hennig, E M

    1995-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effects of prior exercise (warm-up and stretching) on the electromyographic and force output of mechanically elicited triceps surae reflexes. Fifty male subjects performed eight reflex experiments under each of three successive conditions in one session: (1) no prior exercise, (2) after static stretching of the passive triceps surae (3 min) and (3) after a 10-min warm-up run on a treadmill. Tendon tap reflex force was elicited in the triceps surae of the right leg by means of a standardized reflex hammer and measured in a custom-built fixture. Electromyographic (EMG) signals were recorded with surface electrodes over the medial head of the gastrocnemius (G) and the soleus (S). Low coefficients of variation within subjects contrasted with high between-subject variations, indicating highly individual reflex characteristics. After stretching, reductions in the peak force (-5%; P < 0.05), the force rise rate (-8%; P < 0.01), the half relaxation rate (-5%; N.S.), the EMG amplitudes (G, -16%; S, -17%; P < 0.01) and integrals (G, -15%; S, -18%; P < 0.01), and an increase in EMG latencies (G, +3%; S, +1%; P < 0.01), were found compared with the values obtained without prior exercise. After running, the peak force reached the values obtained without prior exercise (-2%; N.S.), the force rise rate and half relaxation rate increased by 8 and 12%, respectively (P < 0.01), and the impulse (force-time integral; -12%), EMG amplitudes (G, -20%; S, -23%; P < 0.01), integrals (G, -18%; S, -23%; P < 0.01) and latencies (G, -1%; S, -2%; P < 0.01) decreased significantly. The changes in the force characteristics observed after the stretching treatment indicate improved muscle compliance that might reduce the risk of injury. On the other hand, the changes after the additional warm-up run had a more pronounced influence with regard to improved force development and a decreased EMG activity, which can be viewed as a performance

  7. Parsonage-Turner syndrome and a localised swelling around the extensor tendons of the hand: a clinical sign indicating increased risk of rupture of the tendon.

    PubMed

    Vedung, Torbjörn

    2012-10-01

    Two patients presented with intense pain in the shoulder followed by weakness and paralysis of muscles in the shoulder and arm, together with a peculiar swelling on the hand. The swelling seems to predispose to rupture of the extensor tendon. If this tumour is a regular finding in Parsonage-Turner syndrome, it may also help in making a definitive diagnosis.

  8. Rupture of the distal tendon of the biceps brachii. Operative versus non-operative treatment.

    PubMed

    Baker, B E; Bierwagen, D

    1985-03-01

    We did Cybex testing of thirteen patients who had had a rupture of the distal tendon of the biceps brachii. The tests were performed fifteen months to six years after injury. The ten patients who had had a surgical repair through the two-incision technique showed a return to normal levels of strength and endurance with regard to both flexion of the elbow and supination of the forearm. The three patients who had had conservative treatment showed a remaining deficit in those parameters which was clinically evident in several activities, such as use of a screwdriver or baseball bat.

  9. Attritional rupture of the extensor pollicis longus tendon by an osseous spur more than 30 years after wrist injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Kohji; Murase, Tsuyoshi; Moritomo, Hisao; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2014-12-01

    A 46-year-old woman sustained a rupture of the extensor pollicis longus tendon more than 30 years after wrist injury. She was successfully treated with palmaris longus tendon graft and excision of the osseous spur. Attrition of the extensor pollicis longus tendon by a newly formed osseous spur was the major mechanism.

  10. Tendons Involvement in Congenital Metabolic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Abate, Michele; Salini, Vincenzo; Andia, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Congenital metabolic disorders are consequence of defects involving single genes that code for enzymes. Blocking metabolic pathways, the defect leads to the shortage of essential compounds, and/or to the accumulation of huge quantities of precursors, which interfere with normal functions. Only few of these diseases are characterized by a clinically significant tendon involvement.Heterozygous Familial Hypercholesterolaemia results from the inheritance of a mutant low-density lipoprotein receptor gene; patients show high cholesterol levels, precocious coronary artery disease, and may develop tendon xanthomata (mainly in Achilles tendon). The detection of xanthomata is important, because it allows an early diagnosis and treatment of the disorder. Cerebrotendinous Xanthomatosis is a rare genetic metabolic disorder of cholesterol and bile acid metabolism, characterized by accumulation of cholestanol in brain and tendons. Tendon abnormalities are similar to those reported in Heterozygous Familial Hypercholesterolaemia. Alkaptonuria is caused by a deficiency of the enzyme homogentisic acid oxidase. Due to the accumulation of the homogentisic acid, tendons and ligaments are characterized by a typical ochre/yellow pigmentation (ochronosis), with ensuing inflammation, calcification and rupture. In Congenital Hypergalactosemia an increased tendon collagen cross-linking by non-enzymatic galactosylation can be observed. Finally, Congenital Hypophosphatasia may be associated to deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals in rotator cuff, elbow, and Achilles tendons. PMID:27535253

  11. Achilles Tendinosis: Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Roberto Gabriel L.

    2015-01-01

    Athletes usually complain of an ongoing or chronic pain over the Achilles tendon, but recently even non-athletes are experiencing the same kind of pain which affects their daily activities. Achilles tendinosis refers to a degenerative process of the tendon without histologic or clinical signs of intratendinous inflammation. Treatment is based on whether to stimulate or prevent neovascularization. Thus, until now, there is no consensus as to the best treatment for this condition. This paper aims to review the common ways of treating this condition from the conservative to the surgical options. PMID:25729512

  12. Achilles' death: anatomical considerations regarding the most famous trauma of the Trojan War.

    PubMed

    Anagnostopoulou, Sophia; Mavridis, Ioannis

    2013-03-01

    In Greek mythology, Achilles was a hero of the Trojan War, the central character and greatest warrior of Homer's Iliad. As Achilles died because of a small wound on his heel, the term "Achilles' heel" has come to mean a person's principal weakness. But is the human heel a really vulnerable part of our body? Could a non-poisonous arrow have caused Achilles' death? Should an arrow be necessarily poisonous in order to cause a lethal heel would? The purpose of this effort is to explain, from an anatomic point of view, how Achilles heel wounding could have led to his death. The Achilles tendon is the strongest, largest and thickest tendon in the human body and plays an important role in the biomechanics of the lower extremity. The blood supply of the tendon is from the peroneal and posterior tibial arteries. It is quite likely that the arrow which killed Achilles was poisoned. This supposition could be of course enough to cause his death. In case the arrow was not poisoned a rupture of the posterior tibial artery by the arrow could have caused a bleeding, but it seems unlikely for such a bleeding to be lethal. Moreover, a combination of these two theories could have also taken place, i.e. a poisoned arrow traumatizing the posterior tibial artery and hence causing rapid diffusion of the poison as well as bleeding. Furthermore, infectious and/or immunologic bases regarding Achilles' death could be considered. In our opinion, a poisoned arrow was probably the crucial factor leading to the famous inglorious death of this famous glorious Homeric hero. PMID:23425764

  13. Changes of Achilles tendon properties via 12-week PNF based robotic rehabilitation of ankle joints with spasticity and/or contracture.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhihao; Zhou, Yuan; Wang, Ninghua; Gao, Fan; Wang, Long; Wei, Kunlin; Wang, Qining

    2014-01-01

    Ankle joint with spasticity and/or contracture can severely affect mobility and independence of stroke survivors. Due to that, the Achilles tendon(AT) is affected. In this paper, we aim to study changes of AT properties via proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) treatment. A robotic ankle-foot rehabilitation system has been proposed, which consists of a robotic ankle-foot platform and a graphic user interface. In this pilot study, two post-stroke patients participated and carried out a 12-week PNF treatment with the robotic system. The treatment is evaluated quantitatively in AT properties. The evaluation shows that after the PNF treatment, the average decrease of AT length is 4.1 mm (6.5%) and the recovery ratio is 30.4%, while the thickness has no change. The results indicate that the PNF based robotic rehabilitation for ankle joints with spasticity and/or contracture is effective to improve the ankle spasticity/contracture.

  14. Percutaneous Achilles Tendon Lengthening

    MedlinePlus

    ... educational service. The content of FootCareMD, including text, images and graphics, is for informational purposes only. The content is not intended to substitute for professional medical advice, diagnoses or treatments. If you need medical ...

  15. La ténorraphie percutanée dans les ruptures fraîches du tendon calcanéen: à propos de 67 cas

    PubMed Central

    Bessam, Aman; Hassani, Zouhir Ameziane; Kharmaz, Mohamed; Steinmetz, Alain

    2014-01-01

    La rupture du tendon calcanéen est une des lésions les plus fréquentes en pathologie du sport, les deux options thérapeutiques classiques sont le traitement orthopédique et la chirurgie à ciel ouvert. Dans le but de minimiser ces complications, des techniques mini-invasives de ténorraphie percutanée ont été proposées dont les résultats sont encourageants. Il s'agit d'une étude rétrospective d'une série de cas de rupture sous cutanée du tendon d'Achille s’étalant de Avril 2005 au Juin 2012 concernant 67 patients; 11 femmes et 56 hommes avec un âge moyen de 41 ans. La cause principale était un accident de sport dans 45 cas. Le diagnostic était évident à l'examen chez tous les patients. Dans deux cas il s'agissait d'une rerupture survenant à 1 et 5 ans d'un traitement orthopédique. Dans un cas il s'agissait d'une rerupture survenant après une ténorraphie percutanée. Dans deux cas il s'agissait d'une rupture sur tendinopathie chronique. Tous les patients avaient bénéficié d'une radio de la cheville qui avait montré une horizontalisation du calcanéum chez 5 patients et surtout elle n'avait pas montré de fracture associée, alors que 15 patients avaient bénéficié d'une échographie qui a confirmé le diagnostic. Tous les patients avaient été opérés dans un délai de moins de 48 heures Une ténorraphie percutanée a été pratiqué chez tous les patients. Le recul moyen est de 43 mois, trois patients ont été perdus de vue Nous avons noté une reprise des activités professionnelle effective en moyen 90 jours après l'intervention et celle des activités sportive à 6 mois en moyenne L’état cutané local a été jugée bon dans 63 cas. Par ailleurs les complications ont été marquées par un seul cas d'infection ayant nécessité une reprise chirurgical a été noté mise à plat, trois cas de rerupture repris par suture à ciel ouvert, un cas d'algodystrophie et un cas de tendinopathie Il n'y a eu aucune complication

  16. Outcomes of tenodesis of the long head of the biceps tendon more than three months after rupture

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Patrick J; Speziali, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To demonstrate that long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) tenodesis is possible more than 3 mo after rupture. METHODS: From September 2009 to January 2012 we performed tenodesis of the LHBT in 11 individuals (average age 56.9 years, range 42 to 73) more than 3 mo after rupture. All patients were evaluated by Disabilites of the Arm Shoulder and Hand (DASH) and Mayo outcome scores at an average follow-up of 19.1 mo. We similarly evaluated 5 patients (average age 58.2 years, range 45 to 64) over the same time treated within 3 mo of rupture with an average follow-up of 22.5 mo. RESULTS: Tenodesis with an interference screw was possible in all patients more than 3 mo after rupture and 90% had good to excellent outcomes but two had recurrent rupture. All of those who had tenodesis less than 3 mo after rupture had good to excellent outcomes and none had recurrent rupture. No statistical difference was found for DASH and Mayo outcome scores between the two groups (P <0.05). CONCLUSION: Tenodesis of LHBT more than 3 mo following rupture had outcomes similar to tenodesis done within 3 mo of rupture but recurrent rupture occurred in 20%. PMID:27004167

  17. Neglected rupture of the quadriceps tendon in a patient with chronic renal failure (case report and review of the literature).

    PubMed

    Hassani, Zouhir Ameziane; Boufettal, Moncef; Mahfoud, Moustapha; Elyaacoubi, Moradh

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous ruptures of the quadriceps tendon are infrequent injuries, it is seen primarily in patients with predisposing diseases such as gout, rheumatoid arthritis and chronic renal failure. A 32-year-old man had a history of end stage renal disease and received regular hemodialysis treatment for more than 5 years. He was admitted in our service for total functional impotence of the right lower limb with knee pain after a common fall two months ago. The radiogram showed a ''patella baja" with suprapatellar calcifications. The ultrasound and MRI showed an aspect of rupture of the quadriceps tendon in its proximal end with retraction of 3 cm. Quadriceps tendon repair was performed with a lengthening plasty, and the result was satisfactory after a serial rehabilitation program. The diagnosis of quadriceps tendon ruptures needs more attention in patients with predisposing diseases. They should not be unknown because the treatment of neglected lesions is more difficult. We insist on the early surgical repair associated with early rehabilitation that can guarantee recovery of good active extension.

  18. Posterior tibial tendon entrapment within an intact ankle mortise: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Allison M; Bowlin, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The present case report demonstrates a rare finding associated with irreducible ankle fracture dislocations. To our knowledge, posterior tibial tendon entrapment with an intact ankle mortise has not yet been documented in published studies. In the case of our patient, a high-energy, 12-ft fall resulted in a comminuted intra-articular fracture of the medial malleolus, confirmed by the initial radiographs. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging showed the Achilles tendon to be ruptured and the posterior tibial tendon to be both displaced and entrapped between the medial malleolar fracture fragments, preventing initial closed reduction. At operative repair for the ruptured Achilles tendon and the medial malleolus fracture, the posterior tibial tendon was removed from the fracture site and was found to be intact with no evidence of laceration or rupture. The tendon was returned back to its anatomic position, and the tendon sheath was reapproximated. Although uncommon, it is important that entrapment of the posterior tibial tendon be considered in cases of irreducible ankle fracture. This injury type can be addressed during open reduction internal fixation to achieve reduction. PMID:25441277

  19. Green Tea and Glycine Modulate the Activity of Metalloproteinases and Collagen in the Tendinitis of the Myotendinous Junction of the Achilles Tendon.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Cristiano Pedrozo; De Oliveira, LetÍCia Prado; Da Ré Guerra, Flávia; Marcondes, Maria Cristina Cintra; Pimentel, Edson Rosa

    2016-07-01

    The myotendinous junction (MTJ) is the weakest element in the muscle-tendon unit of the heel, and thus the most susceptible to injuries. The scarcity of adequate treatments means that tendinitis is a major concern to athletes and other groups who depend on their physical fitness, although green tea and glycine have both been shown to have beneficial effects on the inflammation. The present study investigated the remodeling effects of green tea and glycine in the MTJ of rats with tendinitis. For this, male Wistar rats were divided into five groups: animals without tendinitis and animals with tendinitis; animals with tendinitis supplied with green tea; animals with tendinitis supplied with a glycine diet; animals with tendinitis supplied with a green tea and glycine diet. Tendinitis was induced and the treatment with green tea (700 mg/kg/day) and a 5% glycine diet lasted 7 days. The treatments regulated the activity of metalloproteinases (MMP)-2, -8, and -9, and induced the synthesis of type I collagen, glycosaminoglycans, and non-collagenous proteins. Changes were also noted in the compaction of the collagen molecules and the amount of tenocytes. When combined, green tea and glycine modulated the inflammatory process and induced the synthesis of the elements involved in the post-lesion recovery of the tissue. The data from the MTJ were different when compared with results already published using the whole Achilles tendon. These data indicate that each region of the inflamed tendon can exhibit different responses during the treatment and therefore, modify its extracellular matrix components to facilitate recovery and repair. Anat Rec, 299:918-928, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27121758

  20. Bilateral consecutive rupture of the quadriceps tendon in a man with BstUI polymorphism of the COL5A1 gene.

    PubMed

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Fazio, Vito; Poeta, Maria Luana; Rabitti, Carla; Franceschi, Francesco; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2010-04-01

    A genetic component has been implicated in tendinopathies involving tendon rupture. Type V collagen, a quantitatively minor fibrillar collagen which forms heterotypic fibrils with type I collagen, plays a role in the regulation of the size and configuration of fibrils of the much more abundant component type I collagen. To date, no data on the genetic component of bilateral rupture of the quadriceps tendon have been reported. We describe the presence of BstUI polymorphism of the COL5A1 gene in a man with bilateral rupture of the quadriceps tendon. The COL5A1 (the variant rs12722, BstUI RFLP) can be a candidate gene associated with the development of bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture.

  1. Decellularized and Engineered Tendons as Biological Substitutes: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Lovati, Arianna B.; Bottagisio, Marta; Moretti, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Tendon ruptures are a great burden in clinics. Finding a proper graft material as a substitute for tendon repair is one of the main challenges in orthopaedics, for which the requirement of a biological scaffold would be different for each clinical application. Among biological scaffolds, the use of decellularized tendon-derived matrix increasingly represents an interesting approach to treat tendon ruptures. We analyzed in vitro and in vivo studies focused on the development of efficient protocols for the decellularization and for the cell reseeding of the tendon matrix to obtain medical devices for tendon substitution. Our review considered also the proper tendon source and preclinical animal models with the aim of entering into clinical trials. The results highlight a wide panorama in terms of allogenic or xenogeneic tendon sources, specimen dimensions, physical or chemical decellularization techniques, and the cell type variety for reseeding from terminally differentiated to undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells and their static or dynamic culture employed to generate implantable constructs tested in different animal models. We try to identify the most efficient approach to achieve an optimal biological scaffold for biomechanics and intrinsic properties, resembling the native tendon and being applicable in clinics in the near future, with particular attention to the Achilles tendon substitution. PMID:26880985

  2. Delayed rupture of flexor tendons in zone V complicated by neuritis 18 years following Galeazzi fracture-dislocation.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Mathias Thomas; Ghosh, Sabyasachi; Shah, Bhavik; Sankar, Thangasamy

    2014-04-16

    We report a rare case of an 84-year-old woman who presented with delayed, complete rupture of superficial (flexor digitorum superficialis) and deep flexor tendons (flexor digitorum profundus) of the third, fourth and fifth digits of the right hand in zone V of the flexor tendons. The patient, who was otherwise healthy, active and independent, incurred a closed fracture of her right wrist 18 years ago, which was treated conservatively. Current X-rays and operative findings confirmed a malunited Galeazzi fracture-dislocation with volar dislocation of the ulna from the distal radioulnar joint. She underwent surgical treatment to improve her hand function and agonising neuritis symptoms, as she was unable to use her middle, ring and little fingers and had developed severe neuritis of the ulnar nerve. Exploration and repair of the flexor tendons, nerve decompressions and Darrach procedure were performed. On follow-up, the patient showed improvement in hand function with the neuritis completely resolved.

  3. Closed Rupture of the Flexor Tendon Secondary to Sclerosis of the Hook of the Hamate: A Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Hosaka, Masato; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    Closed flexor tendon ruptures in the little finger can be caused by fracture or nonunion of the hook of the hamate, but no case of the disorder secondary to the sclerosis and thinning of the hamate hook has been reported. We report two rare cases with this complication due to rough surface of the hamate hook. Carpal tunnel view radiographs and computed tomography showed the sclerosis and thinning of the hook. PMID:27595962

  4. Closed Medial Malleolar Multifragment Fracture With a Posterior Tibialis Tendon Rupture: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Formica, Matteo; Santolini, Federico; Alessio-Mazzola, Mattia; Repetto, Ilaria; Andretta, Angelo; Stella, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Ankle fractures represent an exciting field of traumatology because of the wide variety of clinical presentations, injury mechanisms, and treatment options. Rupture of the posterior tibialis tendon (PTT) with ankle fracture can occur during trauma that involves pronation and external rotation of the foot or, less commonly, secondary to direct trauma to the ankle. This tendon injury is uncommon and probably misdiagnosed in many cases, because of the difficult clinical examination secondary to the pain and swelling. The identification and early treatment of PTT tears is essential for good functional outcomes to prevent the main mid- to long-term complication of disabling acquired flatfoot due to tendon failure. In the present report, we provide a review of the published data regarding ankle fractures associated with PTT rupture and describe our experience with a case of a multifragment medial malleolus fracture and complete rupture of the PTT diagnosed intraoperatively and surgically treated in a 34-year-old male, with 2.5 years of follow-up. PMID:25977150

  5. Flexor Carpi Radialis to Palmaris Longus Tendon Transfer for Spontaneous Rupture of the Flexor Carpi Radialis Tendon-A Review of an Uncommon Finding and Surgical Technique for Operative Correction.

    PubMed

    Shearin, Jonathan Winkworth; Walters, Brian; Yang, S Steven

    2016-10-01

    Spontaneous ruptures of the flexor carpi radialis tendon (FCR) are rare and associated with systemic inflammatory diseases, localized tendinopathy related to scaphotrapezial-trapezoidal arthritis, or chronic immunosuppression from corticosteroids. While most cases do not require operative intervention, some patients develop weakness, impaired range of motion, and persistent pain. Previously reported surgical options include synovectomy, tendon stump resection, and osteophyte removal. We describe a surgical technique for patients with persistent symptomatology following FCR rupture in which the FCR is transposed end-to-side to the palmaris longus tendon. Three cases using this technique are presented with follow-up of 4-9 months that were collected at Lenox Hill Hospital. All three patients did well regarding specific outcome measures: grip strength, range of motion, and functional activity. FCR transfer to palmaris is an alternative to other surgical options for the spontaneous rupture of the FCR tendon in patients who remain symptomatic despite a course of non-operative therapy. PMID:27595965

  6. Partial peroneus longus tendon rupture in professional basketball players: a report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Mitchell E; Selesnick, F Harlan; Murphy, Brian J

    2002-12-01

    Partial tears of the peroneal tendons are rare. Partial longitudinal tears of the peroneus longus tendon are even more rare. We report on 2 professional basketball players who had partial peroneus longus tendon tears beneath the cuboid. A literature review and discussion of treatment is included.

  7. Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture in a patient with hyperparathyroidism undergoing long-term haemodialysis: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mao-Feng; Yang, Hui-Lin; Shi, Wei-Dong

    2013-08-01

    Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is a rare injury that represents < 5% of all quadriceps tendon ruptures. It is generally associated with chronic metabolic disorders and is seen in patients with uraemia undergoing maintenance haemodialysis. The present case was a 46-year-old man who presented with pain and the inability to extend his knees following a minor accident. A physical examination combined with X-radiography and magnetic resonance imaging investigations resulted in a diagnosis of bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture. He had a history of uraemia and had received regular haemodialysis for 7 years. He had high levels of serum parathyroid hormone and he was diagnosed with secondary hyperparathyroidism. Following surgical repair of both quadriceps tendons, in addition to management of the secondary hyperparathyroidism, the patient regained full active mobility of both knee joints and was able to participate in normal activities of daily living.

  8. [Flexor hallucis longus tendon rupture as an impingement lesion induced by os trigonum instability].

    PubMed

    Lohrer, H

    2006-03-01

    A Flexor hallucis longus tendon lesion induced by an unstable Os trigonum has not been described heretofore. A 39 years old karateka complained increasing load induced pain at the posteromedial ankle. Because of this, he was unable to take part in sports activities. Clinical, X-ray and MRI investigation assumed a Flexor hallucis longus tendon tear induced by an impingeing Os trigonum. At surgery a longitudinal and a partial transverse tendon tear was present. The Flexor hallucis longus tendon pulley was narrowed by a partially unstable Os trigonum. Tendon reconstruction, Os trigonum removal and early functional posttreatment resulted in full ability in sport, leisure-time activities and profession five months later.

  9. Effectiveness of xenogenous-based bovine-derived platelet gel embedded within a three-dimensional collagen implant on the healing and regeneration of the Achilles tendon defect in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Moshiri, Ali; Oryan, Ahmad; Meimandi-Parizi, Abdolhamid; Koohi-Hosseinabadi, Omid

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective: Tissue engineering is an option in reconstructing large tendon defects and managing their healing and regeneration. We designed and produced a novel xenogeneic-based bovine platelet, embedded it within a tissue-engineered collagen implant (CI) and applied it in an experimentally induced large tendon defect model in rabbits to test whether bovine platelets could stimulate tendon healing and regeneration in vivo. Methods: One hundred twenty rabbits were randomly divided into two experimental and pilot groups. In all the animals, the left Achilles tendon was surgically excised and the tendon edges were aligned by Kessler suture. Each group was then divided into three groups of control (no implant), treated with CI and treated with collagen-platelet implant. The pilot groups were euthanized at 10, 15, 30 and 40 days post-injury (DPI), and their gross and histologic characteristics were evaluated to study host–graft interaction mechanism. To study the tendon healing and its outcome, the experimental animals were tested during the experiment using hematologic, ultrasonographic and various methods of clinical examinations and then euthanized at 60 DPI and their tendons were evaluated by gross pathologic, histopathologic, scanning electron microscopic, biophysical and biochemical methods. Results: Bovine platelets embedded within a CI increased inflammation at short term while it increased the rate of implant absorption and matrix replacement compared with the controls and CI alone. Treatment also significantly increased diameter, density, amount, alignment and differentiation of the collagen fibrils and fibers and approximated the water uptake and delivery behavior of the healing tendons to normal contralaterals (p < 0.05). Treatment also improved echogenicity and homogenicity of the tendons and reduced peritendinous adhesion, muscle fibrosis and atrophy, and therefore, it improved the clinical scores and physical activity related to the

  10. Salvage Flexor Hallucis Longus Transfer for a Failed Achilles Repair: Endoscopic Technique

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Sérgio; Caetano, Rubén; Corte-Real, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Flexor hallucis longus (FHL) transfer is a well-established treatment option in failed Achilles tendon (AT) repair and has been routinely performed as an open procedure. We detail the surgical steps needed to perform an arthroscopic transfer of the FHL for a chronic AT rupture. The FHL tendon is harvested as it enters in its tunnel beneath the sustentaculum tali; a tunnel is then drilled in the calcaneus as near to the AT footprint as possible. By use of a suture-passing device, the free end of the FHL is advanced to the plantar aspect of the foot. After adequate tension is applied to the construct, the tendon is fixed in place with an interference screw in an inside-out fashion. This minimally invasive approach is a safe and valid alternative to classic open procedures with the obvious advantages of preserving the soft-tissue envelope and using a biologically intact tendon. PMID:26697296

  11. Famotidine suppresses osteogenic differentiation of tendon cells in vitro and pathological calcification of tendon in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kenichi; Hojo, Hironori; Koshima, Isao; Chung, Ung-il; Ohba, Shinsuke

    2012-12-01

    Heterotopic ossification or calcification follows any type of musculoskeletal trauma and is known to occur after arthroplasties of hip, knee, shoulder, or elbow; fractures; joint dislocations; or tendon ruptures. Histamine receptor H2 (Hrh2) has been shown to be effective for reducing pain and decreasing calcification in patients with calcifying tendinitis, which suggested that H2 blockers were effective for the treatment of tendon ossification or calcification. However, the detailed mechanisms of its action on tendon remain to be clarified. We investigated the mechanisms underlying H2 blocker-mediated suppression of tendon calcification, with a focus on the direct action of the drug on tendon cells. Famotidine treatment suppressed the mRNA expressions of Col10a1 and osteocalcin, ossification markers, in a tendon-derived cell line TT-D6, as well as a preosteoblastic one MC3T3-E1. Both of the cell lines expressed Hrh2; histamine treatment induced osteocalcin expression in these cells. Famotidine administration suppressed calcification in the Achilles tendon of ttw mice, a mouse model of ectopic ossification. These data suggest that famotidine inhibits osteogenic differentiation of tendon cells in vitro, and this inhibition may underlie the anti-calcification effects of the drug in vivo. This study points to the use of H2 blockers as a promising strategy for treating heterotopic ossification or calcification in tendon, and provides evidence in support of the clinical use of famotidine.

  12. Tendon progenitor cells in injured tendons have strong chondrogenic potential: the CD105-negative subpopulation induces chondrogenic degeneration.

    PubMed

    Asai, Shuji; Otsuru, Satoru; Candela, Maria Elena; Cantley, Leslie; Uchibe, Kenta; Hofmann, Ted J; Zhang, Kairui; Wapner, Keith L; Soslowsky, Louis J; Horwitz, Edwin M; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2014-12-01

    To study the cellular mechanism of the tendon repair process, we used a mouse Achilles tendon injury model to focus on the cells recruited to the injured site. The cells isolated from injured tendon 1 week after the surgery and uninjured tendons contained the connective tissue progenitor populations as determined by colony-forming capacity, cell surface markers, and multipotency. When the injured tendon-derived progenitor cells (inTPCs) were transplanted into injured Achilles tendons, they were not only integrated in the regenerating area expressing tenogenic phenotype but also trans-differentiated into chondrogenic cells in the degenerative lesion that underwent ectopic endochondral ossification. Surprisingly, the micromass culture of the inTPCs rapidly underwent chondrogenic differentiation even in the absence of exogenous bone morphogenetic proteins or TGFβs. The cells isolated from human ruptured tendon tissues also showed connective tissue progenitor properties and exhibited stronger chondrogenic ability than bone marrow stromal cells. The mouse inTPCs contained two subpopulations one positive and one negative for CD105, a coreceptor of the TGFβ superfamily. The CD105-negative cells showed superior chondrogenic potential in vitro and induced larger chondroid degenerative lesions in mice as compared to the CD105-positive cells. These findings indicate that tendon progenitor cells are recruited to the injured site of tendons and have a strong chondrogenic potential and that the CD105-negative population of these cells would be the cause for chondroid degeneration in injured tendons. The newly identified cells recruited to the injured tendon may provide novel targets to develop therapeutic strategies to facilitate tendon repair.

  13. Diagnostic Characteristics of Standard Radiographs and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Ruptures of the Tibialis Posterior Tendon.

    PubMed

    Ikoma, Kazuya; Ohashi, Suzuyo; Maki, Masahiro; Kido, Masamitsu; Hara, Yusuke; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to diagnose complete rupture (CR) and longitudinal rupture (LR) of the posterior tibial tendon (PTT) from the magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with PTT dysfunction and to analyze and compare the radiographs from each group to identify radiographic indicators related to the progression of PTT injury that would allow the radiographic diagnosis of CR. We evaluated 32 feet in 27 patients with PTT dysfunction (mean age 66.5, range 49 to 82, years). Radiographs were used to acquire weightbearing anteroposterior images of the foot, which were used to measure the talonavicular coverage angle. Lateral images of the foot were also acquired with the patients in the standing position. These were used to measure the lateral talometatarsal angle, calcaneal pitch angle, and medial cuneiform-fifth metatarsal height. From the axial MRI findings, the patients were divided into a CR group and an LR group, and the radiographic attributes of the CR group were analyzed. Of the 32 feet in 27 patients, 12 feet (37.5%) in 11 patients displayed CR and 20 feet (62.5%) in 18 patients displayed LR. The talonavicular coverage angle was 48.3° ± 17.3° in the CR group and 33.6° ± 13.6° in the LR group (p = .012), and the talometatarsal angle was -28.8° ± 22.5° in the CR group and -25.4° ± 14.4° in the LR group (p = .596). The calcaneal pitch angle was 10.4° ± 6.7° in the CR group and 10.2° ± 8.0° in the LR group (p = .935). Finally, the medial cuneiform-fifth metatarsal height was -4.2 ± 7.1 mm in the CR group and 2.1 ± 4.7 mm in the LR group (p = .005). When a medial cuneiform-fifth metatarsal height of ≤0 mm or talonavicular coverage angle of ≥50° was used as the diagnostic criterion for CR on weightbearing radiographs, the sensitivity was 71.4%, specificity 88.9%, and diagnostic accuracy 81.3%; hence, we believe these to be satisfactory diagnostic criteria for CR. PMID:26872525

  14. The influence of increased muscle spindle sensitivity on Achilles tendon jerk and H-reflex in relaxed human subjects.

    PubMed

    Rossi-Durand, Christiane

    2002-01-01

    Whether the fusimotor system contributes to reflex gain changes during reinforcement maneuvers is re-examined in the light of new data. Recently, from direct recordings of spindle afferent activity originating from ankle flexor muscles, we showed that mental computation increased the muscle spindle mechanical sensitivity in completely relaxed human subjects without concomitant alpha-motoneuron activation, providing evidence for selective fusimotor drive activation. In the present study, the effects of mental computation were investigated on monosynaptic reflexes elicited in non-contracting soleus muscle either by direct nerve stimulation (Hoffmann reflex, H) or by tendon tap (Tendinous reflex, T). The aim was to relate the time course of the changes in reflex size to the increase in spindle sensitivity during mental task in order to explore whether fusimotor activation can influence the size of the monosynaptic reflex. The results show changes in reflex amplitude that parallel the increase in muscle spindle sensitivity. When T-reflex is consistently facilitated during mental effort, the H-reflex is either depressed or facilitated, depending on the subjects. These findings suggest that the increased activity in muscle spindle primary endings may account for mental computation-induced changes in both tendon jerk and H-reflex. The facilitation of T-reflex is attributed to the enhanced spindle mechanical sensitivity and the inhibition of H-reflex is attributed to post-activation depression following the increased Ia ongoing discharge. This study supports the view that the fusimotor sensitization of muscle spindles is responsible for changes in both the mechanically and electrically elicited reflexes. It is concluded that the fusimotor drive contributed to adjustment of the size of tendon jerk and H-reflex during mental effort. The possibility that a mental computation task may also operate by reducing the level of presynaptic inhibition is discussed on the basis of H

  15. REHABILITATION OF A SURGICALLY REPAIRED RUPTURE OF THE DISTAL BICEPS TENDON IN AN ACTIVE MIDDLE AGED MALE: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Sayers, Stephen P.; LaFontaine, Tom; Scheussler, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Background: Complete rupture of the distal tendon of the biceps brachii is relatively rare and there is little information to guide therapists in rehabilitation after this injury. The purposes of this case report are to review the rehabilitation concepts used for treating such an injury, and discuss how to modify exercises during rehabilitation based on patient progression while adhering to physician recommended guidelines and standard treatment protocols. Case Presentation: The patient was an active 38‐year old male experienced in weight‐training. He presented with a surgically repaired right distal biceps tendon following an accident on a trampoline adapted with a bungee suspension harness. The intervention focused on restoring range of motion and strengthening of the supporting muscles of the upper extremity without placing undue stress on the biceps brachii. Outcomes: The patient was able to progress from a moderate restriction in ROM to full AROM two weeks ahead of the physician's post‐operative orders and initiate a re‐strengthening protocol by the eighth week of rehabilitation. At the eighth post‐operative week the patient reported no deficits in functional abilities throughout his normal daily activities with his affected upper extremity. Discussion: The results of this case report strengthen current knowledge regarding physical therapy treatment for a distal biceps tendon repair while at the same time providing new insights for future protocol considerations in active individuals. Most current protocols do not advocate aggressive stretching, AROM, or strengthening of a surgically repaired biceps tendon early in the rehabilitation process due to the fear of a re‐rupture. In the opinion of the authors, if full AROM can be achieved before the 6th week of rehabilitation, initiating a slow transition into light strengthening of the biceps brachii may be possible. Level of evidence: 4‐Single Case report PMID:23316429

  16. Ultrasound-guided retro-calcaneal bursa corticosteroid injection for refractory Achilles tendinitis in patients with seronegative spondyloarthropathy: efficacy and follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Puja; Aggarwal, Amita

    2016-06-01

    Ultrasound (US)-guided corticosteroid injection has been shown to be safe and effective for varied causes of plantar fasciitis; however, its use for Achilles tendinitis is controversial. We studied the efficacy and changes in US findings at Achilles enthesitis after corticosteroid injection in patients with spondyloarthropathy (SpA). Patients with SpA with symptomatic Achilles enthesitis, refractory to 6 weeks of full-dose NSAIDs, were offered US-guided local corticosteroid injection. Injected entheses were examined by US (both B mode and power Doppler) at baseline and 6 weeks after injection. Standard OMERACT definitions were used to define enthesitis. Achilles tendon thickness >5.29 mm, 2 cm proximal to insertion in long axis, was considered thickened. Twenty-seven symptomatic Achilles tendons (in 18 patients) were injected with 20 mg methylprednisolone under US guidance baseline, and 6-week follow-up US features were compared. All patients reported improvement in pain (VAS) in the affected tendon after injection (p < 0.0001). Simultaneously, improvement in local inflammatory changes were noted, in the form of significant reduction in tendon thickness (p < 0.0001), vascularity (p < 0.0001), peritendinous oedema (p = 0.001), bursitis and bursal vascularity (p < 0.001 and < 0.0001, respectively). There was no change in bone erosions and enthesophyte. None of the patients had tendon rupture or other injection-related complications at 6 weeks of follow-up. US-guided local corticosteroid injection is an effective and safe modality for refractory Achilles enthesitis in patients with SpA and leads to reversion of acute changes at entheseal site. PMID:26894910

  17. Subcutaneous Rupture of the Extensor Pollicis Longus Tendon after Corticosteroid Injections for DeQuervain's Stenosing Tenovaginitis

    PubMed Central

    Boussakri, Hassan; Bouali, Amara

    2014-01-01

    DeQuervain's stenosing tenovaginitis is a common condition. Nonsurgical treatment by corticosteroid injection has significantly improved the management of this disease. The authors describe a case of subcutaneous rupture of the extensor pollicis longus tendon at the wrist, three months after two corticosteroid injections for DeQuervain's stenosing tenovaginitis. The etiological history has not found any trauma history of the wrist. The aim of our work is to draw attention to this rare complication and discuss its therapeutic management. Our functional results were excellent. PMID:25371839

  18. Open fracture of the acromion associated with a supraspinatus tendon rupture: an exceptional case report.

    PubMed

    Mardy, Abdelhak; Mechchat, Atif; El Ghazi, Amine; El Idrissi, Mohammed; Shimi, Mohammed; El Ibrahimi, Abdelhalim; El Mrini, Abdelmajid

    2014-01-01

    The combination of the acromion Open fracture to a section of the supraspinatus tendon is an exceptional situation. The author reports the case of a young patient with a wound of the posterolateral side of the right shoulder. Screwing was done for the fracture of the acromion after supraspinatus tendon suture with good clinical and radiological outcome after an appropriate rehabilitation. PMID:25918565

  19. Open fracture of the acromion associated with a supraspinatus tendon rupture: an exceptional case report

    PubMed Central

    Mardy, Abdelhak; Mechchat, Atif; El Ghazi, Amine; El Idrissi, Mohammed; Shimi, Mohammed; El Ibrahimi, Abdelhalim; El Mrini, Abdelmajid

    2014-01-01

    The combination of the acromion Open fracture to a section of the supraspinatus tendon is an exceptional situation. The author reports the case of a young patient with a wound of the posterolateral side of the right shoulder. Screwing was done for the fracture of the acromion after supraspinatus tendon suture with good clinical and radiological outcome after an appropriate rehabilitation. PMID:25918565

  20. Chronic Tendonopathy as a Unique Cause of Non Traumatic Triceps Tendon Rupture in a (Risk Factors Free) Bodybuilder: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mangano, Tony; Cerruti, Paola; Repetto, Ilaria; Trentini, Roberto; Giovale, Marcello; Franchin, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Distal triceps tendon rupture is an uncommon lesion rarely due to a non-traumatic mechanism. In these cases, the majority of patients show predisposing factors for tendon degeneration: underlying medical co-morbidities, previous systemic and locally injected corticosteroids and systemic anabolic steroids. A clear evidence for an etiopathogeneticroleforchronictendonopathy in triceps tendon rupture is sti 11 lacking. Case Report: We report the case of a rare non-traumatic complete rupture of the triceps tendon, at the olecranon insertion, occurring in a healthy male middle-aged non-professional bodybuilder. He presented to our attention with a five days history of weakness, swelling and pain at the left elbow, started after a snapping sound during a single arm triceps extension exercise. He was a healthy sportsman, no smoker and no drinker. He had suffered, in the two months before, of mild bilateral exercise-related elbow discomfort, never limiting his sport and daily activities. The man was treated by an early surgical repair. Histological analysis was conducted on intraoperative samples. The treatment allowed complete remission and return to sport practice without functional deficit. Conclusion: An overload-related chronic tendonopathy was identified as the unique factor with causal role in the determinism of the above described lesion. This case highlights, for the first time in literature, that just a chronic tendonopathy, in absence of any other predisposing condition, can lead to a non-traumatic complete triceps tendon rupture. PMID:27299023

  1. Investigation into the cyto-protective and wound healing properties of cryptic peptides from bovine Achilles tendon collagen.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Pradipta; Mehta, Alka; Shanthi, C

    2014-03-25

    Many proteins have concealed regions in their amino acid sequences that when liberated or exposed by conformational changes can exhibit bioactivity. Two such cryptic bioactive peptides, C2 (with cell adhesive properties) and E1 (with cell adhesive and antioxidant properties) have been isolated from bovine tendon collagen. This investigation deals with the efficacy of these peptides in countering externally generated stress and imparting cyto-protection in mammalian cell systems. The cell survival activity was studied with two cell lines, viz., HeLa and Vero, with varying concentrations of five oxidative stress-generating agents. The activities of the peptides in supporting cell adhesion and countering stress were determined in their coated and dissolved forms. C2 and E1 coated dishes registered 8 times (p<0.01) higher rate of cell survival against oxidative stress than collagen coated dishes. E1 increased stress tolerance levels by >100 times in dissolved form and C2, by 8 times in coated form. The peptides supported faster wound closure than collagen under normal as well as stressed condition. Maximum stress tolerance was observed on C2 coated dishes in the presence of E1 in the medium suggesting that both enhanced cell adhesion and antioxidative activities significantly contribute to the cell survival during stress. The present study emphasizes that collagen peptides, apart from providing a suitable surface for cell adhesion, also confer protection to cells against oxidative stress. PMID:24434246

  2. Bioactive, Elastic, and Biodegradable Emulsion Electrospun DegraPol Tube Delivering PDGF-BB for Tendon Rupture Repair.

    PubMed

    Evrova, Olivera; Houska, Joanna; Welti, Manfred; Bonavoglia, Eliana; Calcagni, Maurizio; Giovanoli, Pietro; Vogel, Viola; Buschmann, Johanna

    2016-07-01

    Healing of tendon ruptures represents a major challenge in musculoskeletal injuries and combinations of biomaterials with biological factors are suggested as viable option for improved healing. The standard approach of repair by conventional suture leads to incomplete healing or rerupture. Here, a new elastic type of DegraPol® (DP), a polyester urethane, is explored as a delivery device for platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) to promote tendon healing. Using emulsion electrospinning as an easy method for incorporation of biomolecules within polymers, DegraPol® supports loading and release of PDGF-BB. Morphological, mechanical and delivery device properties of the bioactive DP scaffolds, as well as differences arising due to different electrospinning parameters are studied. Emulsion electrospun DP scaffolds result in thinner fibers than pure DP scaffolds and experience decreased strain at break [%], but high enough for successful surgeon handling. PDGF-BB is released in a sustained manner from emulsion electrospun DP, but not completely, with still large amount of it being inside the polymeric fibers after 30 d. In vitro studies show that the bioactive scaffolds promote tenocyte proliferation in serum free and serum(+) conditions, demonstrating the potential of this surgeon-friendly bioactive delivery device to be used for tendon repair.

  3. Bioactive, Elastic, and Biodegradable Emulsion Electrospun DegraPol Tube Delivering PDGF-BB for Tendon Rupture Repair.

    PubMed

    Evrova, Olivera; Houska, Joanna; Welti, Manfred; Bonavoglia, Eliana; Calcagni, Maurizio; Giovanoli, Pietro; Vogel, Viola; Buschmann, Johanna

    2016-07-01

    Healing of tendon ruptures represents a major challenge in musculoskeletal injuries and combinations of biomaterials with biological factors are suggested as viable option for improved healing. The standard approach of repair by conventional suture leads to incomplete healing or rerupture. Here, a new elastic type of DegraPol® (DP), a polyester urethane, is explored as a delivery device for platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) to promote tendon healing. Using emulsion electrospinning as an easy method for incorporation of biomolecules within polymers, DegraPol® supports loading and release of PDGF-BB. Morphological, mechanical and delivery device properties of the bioactive DP scaffolds, as well as differences arising due to different electrospinning parameters are studied. Emulsion electrospun DP scaffolds result in thinner fibers than pure DP scaffolds and experience decreased strain at break [%], but high enough for successful surgeon handling. PDGF-BB is released in a sustained manner from emulsion electrospun DP, but not completely, with still large amount of it being inside the polymeric fibers after 30 d. In vitro studies show that the bioactive scaffolds promote tenocyte proliferation in serum free and serum(+) conditions, demonstrating the potential of this surgeon-friendly bioactive delivery device to be used for tendon repair. PMID:27071839

  4. Management of chronic Achilles tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    2012-08-01

    Tendons transmit force between muscles and bones and, when stretched, store elastic energy that contributes to movement.(1) The tendinous portion of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles merge to form the Achilles tendon, which is the largest and strongest in the body, but one of the most frequently injured.(2,3) Conservative management options for chronic Achilles tendinopathy include eccentric (lengthening) exercises, extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT), topical nitroglycerin, low level laser therapy, orthoses, splints or injections (e.g. corticosteroids, hyperosmolar dextrose, polidocanol, platelet-rich plasma), while a minority of patients require surgery (using open, percutaneous or endoscopic methods).(4-8) Here we assess the management options for patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy (lasting over 6 weeks).

  5. Identifying factors related to Achilles tendon stress, strain, and stiffness before and after 6 months of growth in youth 10-14 years of age.

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, Jennifer M; Hawkins, David A

    2012-09-21

    The purposes of this study were (1) determine if youth peak Achilles tendon (AT) strain, peak AT stress, and AT stiffness, measured during an isometric plantar flexion, differed after six months (mos) of growth, and (2) determine if sex, physical activity level (Physical Activity Questionnaire (PAQ-C)), and/or growth rate (GR) were related to these properties. AT stress, strain, and stiffness were quantified in 20 boys (13.47±0.81 years) and 22 girls (11.18±0.82 years) at 2 times (0 and 6 mos). GR (change in height in 6 mos) was not significantly different between boys and girls (3.5±1.4 and 3.4±1.1cm/6 mos respectively). Peak AT strain and stiffness (mean 3.8±0.4% and 128.9±153.6N/mm, respectively) did not differ between testing sessions or sex. Peak AT stress (22.1±2.4 and 24.0±2.1MPa at 0 and 6 mos, respectively) did not differ between sex and increased significantly at 6 mos due to a significant decrease in AT cross-sectional area (40.6±1.3 and 38.1±1.6mm(2) at 0 and 6 mos, respectively) with no significant difference in peak AT force (882.3±93.9 and 900.3± 65.5N at 0 and 6 mos, respectively). Peak AT stress was significantly greater in subjects with greater PAQ-C scores (9.1% increase with 1 unit increase in PAQ-C score) and smaller in subjects with faster GRs (13.8% decrease with 1cm/6 mos increase in GR). These results indicate that of the AT mechanical properties quantified, none differed between sex, and only peak AT stress significantly differed after 6 months and was related to GR and physical activity.

  6. IMPROVEMENT OF TENDON REPAIR USING MUSCLE GRAFTS TRANSDUCED WITH TGF-β1 cDNA

    PubMed Central

    Majewski, Martin; Porter, Ryan M.; Betz, Oliver B.; Betz, Volker M.; Clahsen, Harald; Flückiger, Rudolf; Evans, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon rupture is a common injury. Inadequate endogenous repair often leaves patients symptomatic, with tendons susceptible to re-rupture. Administration of certain growth factors improves tendon healing in animal models, but their delivery remains a challenge. Here we evaluated the delivery of TGF-β1 to tendon defects by the implantation of genetically modified muscle grafts. Rat muscle biopsies were transduced with recombinant adenovirus encoding TGF-β1 and grafted onto surgically transected Achilles tendons in recipient animals. Tissue regenerates were compared to those of controls by biomechanical testing as well as histochemical and immunohistochemical analyses. Healing was greatly accelerated when genetically modified grafts were implanted into tendon defects, with the resulting repair tissue gaining nearly normal histological appearance as early as 2 weeks postoperatively. This was associated with decreased deposition of type III collagen in favour of large fibre bundles indicative of type I collagen. These differences in tendon composition coincided with accelerated restoration of mechanical strength. Tendon thickness increased in gene-treated animals at weeks 1 and 2, but by week 8 became significantly lower than that of controls suggesting accelerated remodelling. Thus localised TGF-β1 delivery via adenovirus-modified muscle grafts improved tendon healing in this rat model and holds promise for clinical application. PMID:22354460

  7. The neuromechanical adaptations to Achilles tendinosis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Jen; Kulig, Kornelia

    2015-01-01

    Human movement is initiated, controlled and executed in a hierarchical system including the nervous system, muscle and tendon. If a component in the loop loses its integrity, the entire system has to adapt to that deficiency. Achilles tendon, when degenerated, exhibits lower stiffness. This local mechanical deficit may be compensated for by an alteration of motor commands from the CNS. These modulations in motor commands from the CNS may lead to altered activation of the agonist, synergist and antagonist muscles. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of tendon degeneration on its mechanical properties, the neuromechanical behaviour of the surrounding musculature and the existence of the CNS modulation accompanying tendinosis. We hypothesize that the degenerated tendon will lead to diminished tissue mechanical properties and protective muscle activation patterns, as well as an up-regulated descending drive from the CNS. Strong evidence, as reported in the present study, indicates that tendinotic tendons are more compliant compared to healthy tendons. This unilateral involvement affected the neuromuscular control on the involved side but not the non-involved side. The muscle–tendon unit on the tendinotic side exhibits a lowered temporal efficiency, which leads to altered CNS control. The altered CNS control is then expressed as an adapted muscle activation pattern in the lower leg. Taken together, the findings of the present study illustrate the co-ordinated multi-level adaptations to a mechanical lesion in a tendon caused by pathology. Key points Achilles tendinosis is a localized degenerative musculoskeletal disorder that develops over a long period of time and leads to a compliant human Achilles tendon. We demonstrate that the compliant Achilles tendon elicited a series of adaptations from different levels of the human movement control system, such as the muscle–tendon interaction, CNS control and other muscles in the lower leg. These results

  8. Achilles Tendinitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the calf should be felt during the stretch. Physical Therapy. Physical therapy is very helpful in treating Achilles tendinitis. It ... will be able to return to sports activity. Physical therapy is an important part of recovery. Many patients ...

  9. Using the Literature to Understand Achilles' Fate.

    PubMed

    Rakic, Vesna S

    2016-05-01

    According to Greek mythology, Achilles was fatally wounded in his heel, bled out, and died. Several unproven hypotheses mention poisoning, infection, allergy, hemophilia, thyrotoxic storm (ie, pain and stress), and suicide. The author, a plastic surgeon who often treats chronic wounds, proposes an additional scenario: Although not mortally wounded, Achilles was considered dead, because in his time a wounded hero was as good as a dead hero, so he lived out the remainder of his life as former hero with a chronic wound far away from everyone. To determine whether his injury was enough to cause fatal bleeding and quick death or if other factors might have been in play, a search of the literature was conducted to enhance what is known about Achilles, basically through the tale related in The Iliad and the clinical impact of an Achilles' injury. Search terms utilized included bleeding tibialis posterior artery (3 manuscripts were found) and chronic wound, Achilles tendon (631 manuscripts were located). Although science may not be able to explain how and why Achilles died, the literature supported the conjecture that Achilles probably had a chronic wound with skin and paratenon defect, de- vitalized tendon tissue, bleeding, granulation, and repeated infections. It is interesting to consider the state of his injury and his mind in the making of this legend.

  10. Using the Literature to Understand Achilles' Fate.

    PubMed

    Rakic, Vesna S

    2016-05-01

    According to Greek mythology, Achilles was fatally wounded in his heel, bled out, and died. Several unproven hypotheses mention poisoning, infection, allergy, hemophilia, thyrotoxic storm (ie, pain and stress), and suicide. The author, a plastic surgeon who often treats chronic wounds, proposes an additional scenario: Although not mortally wounded, Achilles was considered dead, because in his time a wounded hero was as good as a dead hero, so he lived out the remainder of his life as former hero with a chronic wound far away from everyone. To determine whether his injury was enough to cause fatal bleeding and quick death or if other factors might have been in play, a search of the literature was conducted to enhance what is known about Achilles, basically through the tale related in The Iliad and the clinical impact of an Achilles' injury. Search terms utilized included bleeding tibialis posterior artery (3 manuscripts were found) and chronic wound, Achilles tendon (631 manuscripts were located). Although science may not be able to explain how and why Achilles died, the literature supported the conjecture that Achilles probably had a chronic wound with skin and paratenon defect, de- vitalized tendon tissue, bleeding, granulation, and repeated infections. It is interesting to consider the state of his injury and his mind in the making of this legend. PMID:27192720

  11. Pitfalls during biomechanical testing - Evaluation of different fixation methods for measuring tendons endurance properties.

    PubMed

    Hangody, Gy; Pánics, G; Szebényi, G; Kiss, R; Hangody, L; Pap, K

    2016-03-01

    The goal of the study was to find a proper technique to fix tendon grafts into an INSTRON loading machine. From 8 human cadavers, 40 grafts were collected. We removed the bone-patella tendon-bone grafts, the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons, the quadriceps tendon-bone grafts, the Achilles tendons, and the peroneus longus tendons from each lower extremity. We tested the tendon grafts with five different types of fixation devices: surgical thread (Premicron 3), general mounting clamp, wire mesh, cement fixation, and a modified clamp for an INSTRON loading machine. The mean failure load in case of surgical thread fixation was (381N ± 26N). The results with the general clamp were (527N ± 45N). The wire meshes were more promising (750N ± 21N), but did not reach the outcomes we desired. Easy slippages of the ends of the tendons from the cement encasements were observed (253N ± 18N). We then began to use Shi's clamp that could produce 977N ± 416N peak force. We combined Shi's clamp with freezing of the graft and the rupture of the tendon itself demonstrated an average force of 2198 N ± 773N. We determined that our modified frozen clamp fixed the specimens against high tensile forces.

  12. Role of tissue engineered collagen based tridimensional implant on the healing response of the experimentally induced large Achilles tendon defect model in rabbits: a long term study with high clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tendon injury is one of the orthopedic conditions poses with a significant clinical challenge to both the surgeons and patients. The major limitations to manage these injuries are poor healing response and development of peritendinous adhesions in the injured area. This study investigated the effectiveness of a novel collagen implant on tendon healing in rabbits. Results Seventy five mature White New-Zealand rabbits were divided into treated (n = 55) and control (n = 20) groups. The left Achilles tendon was completely transected and 2 cm excised. The defects of the treated animals were filled with collagen implants and repaired with sutures, but in control rabbits the defects were sutured similarly but the gap was left untreated. Changes in the injured and normal contralateral tendons were assessed weekly by measuring the diameter, temperature and bioelectrical characteristics of the injured area. Clinical examination was done and scored. Among the treated animals, small pilot groups were euthanized at 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40 and 60 (n = 5 at each time interval) and the remainder (n = 20) and the control animals at 120 days post injury (DPI). The lesions of all animals were examined at macroscopic and microscopic levels and the dry matter content, water delivery and water uptake characteristics of the lesions and normal contralateral tendons of both groups were analyzed at 120 DPI. No sign of rejection was seen in the treated lesions. The collagen implant was invaded by the inflammatory cells at the inflammatory phase, followed by fibroplasia phase in which remnant of the collagen implant were still present while no inflammatory reaction could be seen in the lesions. However, the collagen implant was completely absorbed in the remodeling phase and the newly regenerated tendinous tissue filled the gap. Compared to the controls, the treated lesions showed improved tissue alignment and less peritendinous adhesion, muscle atrophy and fibrosis

  13. The outcome at 15 years of endoscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using hamstring tendon autograft for 'isolated' anterior cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Bourke, H E; Gordon, D J; Salmon, L J; Waller, A; Linklater, J; Pinczewski, L A

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the outcome of 'isolated' anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures treated with anatomical endoscopic reconstruction using hamstring tendon autograft at a mean of 15 years (14.25 to 16.9). A total of 100 consecutive men and 100 consecutive women with 'isolated' ACL rupture underwent four-strand hamstring tendon reconstruction with anteromedial portal femoral tunnel drilling and interference screw fixation by a single surgeon. Details were recorded pre-operatively and at one, two, seven and 15 years post-operatively. Outcomes included clinical examination, subjective and objective scoring systems, and radiological assessment. At 15 years only eight of 118 patients (7%) had moderate or severe osteo-arthritic changes (International Knee Documentation Committee Grades C and D), and 79 of 152 patients (52%) still performed very strenuous activities. Overall graft survival at 15 years was 83% (1.1% failure per year). Patients aged < 18 years at the time of surgery and patients with > 2 mm of laxity at one year had a threefold increase in the risk of suffering a rupture of the graft (p = 0.002 and p = 0.001, respectively). There was no increase in laxity of the graft over time. ACL reconstructive surgery in patients with an 'isolated' rupture using this technique shows good results 15 years post-operatively with respect to ligamentous stability, objective and subjective outcomes, and does not appear to cause osteoarthritis.

  14. Muscular tendinous junction rupture of the posterior tibial tendon after closed bimalleolar ankle fracture.

    PubMed

    Jasqui-Remba, Salomon; Rodriguez-Corlay, Ruy Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    In this case report, we present an acute rupture in the muscular tendinous junction of a posterior tibialis muscle in a bimalleolar closed ankle fracture after a high-energy trauma in a 30-year-old patient with no significant medical history. Fracture was confirmed by simple X-rays, and was treated with an open reduction in which both of the fractures were treated with osteosynthesis material and reparation of the syndesmosis. If left untreated, this uncommon finding can result in a bad postsurgical outcome; we believe this injury is more common but under-reported in the literature. The surgeon should be aware and look specifically for this type of lesion during the procedure. Finding and treating this injury requires special postoperative care, non-weight-bearing instructions and balanced physiotherapy. PMID:26843223

  15. Tendon Transfers in the Rheumatoid Hand for Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Michael Brody; Singh, Hardeep; Wolf, Jennifer Moriatis

    2016-08-01

    Long-standing rheumatoid arthritis can result in spontaneous tendon rupture caused by attrition of the tendons. Ruptures of the ulnar-sided extensor tendons, flexor pollicis longus, and the flexor digitorum profundus can be seen. Primary repair of these tendon ruptures is frequently not possible because of delayed presentation and tendon damage by the disease process. Tendon transfers are the preferred method of treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. At surgery, it is critical to address the underlying cause of rupture to prevent future tendon ruptures. Rates of tendon rupture may decrease due to improved medications for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27387084

  16. Atraumatic quadriceps tendon tear associated with calcific tendonitis.

    PubMed

    Abram, Simon G F; Sharma, Akash D; Arvind, Chinnakonda

    2012-11-27

    Calcific tendonitis of the quadriceps tendon is an uncommon condition. We present the first case of a quadriceps tendon tear associated with calcific tendonitis. In this case, the patient presented with symptoms mimicking a rupture of the quadriceps tendon. This case illustrates that although calcific tendonitis of the quadriceps is a rare condition it is not benign and should be considered when investigating acute symptoms associated with the extensor mechanism of the knee.

  17. Is tendon stiffness correlated to the dissipation coefficient?

    PubMed

    Fouré, A; Cornu, C; Nordez, A

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of Achilles tendon mechanical properties in vivo has received much attention in the literature. Many studies investigated mechanical properties by assessing tendon stiffness. Despite tendon dissipative properties being representative of a storage-recoil process, its determination has received minimal attention in the literature. The aim of this study was to determine if Achilles tendon stiffness is associated with dissipative properties. The cross-sectional area, stiffness and dissipation coefficient of the Achilles tendon were measured in 35 subjects. No significant correlation was found between stiffness and the dissipation coefficient, irrespective of stiffness normalization with cross-sectional area (P > 0.05). Thus, it appears that both stiffness and dissipative properties must be assessed to determine the storage-recoil process capacities of the Achilles tendon in order to precisely characterize changes in the tendon mechanical properties after chronic interventions or rehabilitation programs.

  18. Failure modes and fracture toughness in partially torn ligaments and tendons.

    PubMed

    Von Forell, Gregory A; Hyoung, Peter S; Bowden, Anton E

    2014-07-01

    Ligaments and tendons are commonly torn during injury, yet the likelihood that untreated initial tears could lead to further tearing or even full rupture has proven challenging to predict. In this work, porcine Achilles tendon and human anterior longitudinal ligament samples were tested using both standard fracture toughness methods and complex loading conditions. Failure modes for each of 14 distinct testing cases were evaluated using a total of 131 soft tissue tests. Results showed that these soft tissues were able to completely resist any further crack propagation of an initial tear, regardless of fiber orientation or applied loading condition. Consequently, the major concern for patients with tendon or ligament tears is likely not reduction in ultimate tissue strength due to stress risers at the tip of the tear, but rather a question of whether or not the remaining cross-section is large enough to support the anticipated loading.

  19. Quadriceps tendon rupture and periosteal sleeve avulsion fracture of the proximal patella pole in an active adolescent.

    PubMed

    Bimmel, R; Reddy, K

    2008-07-01

    A unique case of anterior knee pain in an active adolescent is described: a periosteal sleeve avulsion and quadriceps rupture in a young basketball player. The trauma mechanism was without any direct trauma on the knee. A review of overuse-related anterior knee pain in the young and active is presented. A quadriceps rupture with a periosteal sleeve avulsion fracture in an active adolescent is very rare. To our knowledge there are no similar cases described. This article presents a case of a 14-year-old adolescent boy who sustained a quadriceps rupture with a periosteal sleeve avulsion.

  20. Rupture traumatique du tendon tibial postérieur survenue lors d'une fracture fermée de la cheville: à propos d'un cas

    PubMed Central

    Karabila, Mohamed Amine; Azouz, Mohamed; Mhamdi, Younes; Hmouri, Ismail; Kharmaz, Mohamed; Bardouni, Ahmed; Lahlou, Abdou; Mahfoud, Mustapha; Berrada, Mohamed Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Nous rapportons le cas d'une rupture post-traumatique du tendon tibial postérieur survenue lors d'une fracture bimalléolaire de la cheville. Le diagnostic a été posé lors de l'intervention chirurgicale. La réparation du tendon, non dégénératif, a été réalisée en même temps que l'ostéosynthèse. Bien que rare, cette possibilité de lésion tendineuse lors des fractures de la cheville ne doit pas êtreoubliée. Des douleurs résiduelles, un déficit de l'inversion active du pied, une modification de l'arche médiane du pied et à terme une évolution vers un pied plat valgus doivent faire évoquer rétrospectivement le diagnostic. PMID:27022431

  1. Tendon transfers for the drop foot.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Karl M; Jones, Carroll P

    2014-03-01

    The paralytic drop foot represents a challenging problem for even the most experienced orthopedic surgeon. Careful patient selection, thorough preoperative examination and planning, and application of tendon transfer biomechanical and physiologic principles outlined in this article can lead to successful results, either through a posterior tibialis tendon transfer, Bridle transfer, or variations on these procedures. Achilles lengthening or gastrocnemius recession may also be needed at the time of tendon transfer. PMID:24548510

  2. Biomechanical comparison of the four-strand cruciate and Strickland techniques in animal tendons

    PubMed Central

    Iamaguchi, Raquel Bernardelli; Villani, William; Rezende, Marcelo Rosa; Wei, Teng Hsiang; Cho, Alvaro B; dos Santos, Gustavo Bispo; Mattar, Rames

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to compare two four-strand techniques: the traditional Strickland and cruciate techniques. METHODS: Thirty-eight Achilles tendons were removed from 19 rabbits and were assigned to two groups based on suture technique (Group 1, Strickland suture; Group 2, cruciate repair). The sutured tendons were subjected to constant progressive distraction using a universal testing machine (Kratos®). Based on data from the instrument, which were synchronized with the visualized gap at the suture site and at the time of suture rupture, the following data were obtained: maximum load to rupture, maximum deformation or gap, time elapsed until failure, and stiffness. RESULTS: In the statistical analysis, the data were parametric and unpaired, and by Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, the sample distribution was normal. By Student's t-test, there was no significant difference in any of the data: the cruciate repair sutures had slightly better mean stiffness, and the Strickland sutures had longer time-elapsed suture ruptures and higher average maximum deformation. CONCLUSIONS: The cruciate and Strickland techniques for flexor tendon sutures have similar mechanical characteristics in vitro. PMID:24473513

  3. Extracorporeal Shock Wave Treatment (ESWT) enhances the in vitro-induced differentiation of human tendon-derived stem/progenitor cells (hTSPCs)

    PubMed Central

    Leone, Laura; Raffa, Salvatore; Vetrano, Mario; Ranieri, Danilo; Malisan, Florence; Scrofani, Cristina; Vulpiani, Maria Chiara; Ferretti, Andrea; Torrisi, Maria Rosaria; Visco, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is a non-invasive and innovative technology for the management of specific tendinopathies. In order to elucidate the ESWT-mediated clinical benefits, human Tendon-derived Stem/Progenitor cells (hTSPCs) explanted from 5 healthy semitendinosus (ST) and 5 ruptured Achilles (AT) tendons were established. While hTSPCs from the two groups showed similar proliferation rates and stem cell surface marker profiles, we found that the clonogenic potential was maintained only in cells derived from healthy donors. Interestingly, ESWT significantly accelerated hTSPCs differentiation, suggesting that the clinical benefits of ESWT may be ascribed to increased efficiency of tendon repair after injury. PMID:26843618

  4. Biologics for tendon repair☆

    PubMed Central

    Docheva, Denitsa; Müller, Sebastian A.; Majewski, Martin; Evans, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon injuries are common and present a clinical challenge to orthopedic surgery mainly because these injuries often respond poorly to treatment and require prolonged rehabilitation. Therapeutic options used to repair ruptured tendons have consisted of suture, autografts, allografts, and synthetic prostheses. To date, none of these alternatives has provided a successful long-term solution, and often the restored tendons do not recover their complete strength and functionality. Unfortunately, our understanding of tendon biology lags far behind that of other musculoskeletal tissues, thus impeding the development of new treatment options for tendon conditions. Hence, in this review, after introducing the clinical significance of tendon diseases and the present understanding of tendon biology, we describe and critically assess the current strategies for enhancing tendon repair by biological means. These consist mainly of applying growth factors, stem cells, natural biomaterials and genes, alone or in combination, to the site of tendon damage. A deeper understanding of how tendon tissue and cells operate, combined with practical applications of modern molecular and cellular tools could provide the long awaited breakthrough in designing effective tendon-specific therapeutics and overall improvement of tendon disease management. PMID:25446135

  5. The additional value of a night splint to eccentric exercises in chronic midportion Achilles tendinopathy: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    de Vos, R J; Weir, A; Visser, R J A; de Winter, ThC; Tol, J L

    2007-01-01

    Aim To assess whether the use of a night splint is of added benefit on functional outcome in treating chronic midportion Achilles tendinopathy. Methods This was a single‐blind, prospective, single centre, randomised controlled trial set in the Sports Medical Department, The Hague Medical Centre, The Netherlands. Inclusion criteria were: age 18–70 years, active participation in sports, and tendon pain localised at 2–7 cm from distal insertion. Exclusion criteria were: insertional disorders, partial or complete ruptures, or systemic illness. 70 tendons were included and randomised into one of two treatment groups: eccentric exercises with a night splint (night splint group, n = 36) or eccentric exercises only (eccentric group, n = 34). Interventions Both groups completed a 12‐week heavy‐load eccentric training programme. One group received a night splint in addition to eccentric exercises. At baseline and follow‐up at 12 weeks, patient satisfaction, Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment–Achilles questionnaire (VISA‐A) score and reported compliance were recorded by a single‐blind trained researcher who was blinded to the treatment. Results After 12 weeks, patient satisfaction in the eccentric group was 63% compared with 48% in the night splint group. The VISA‐A score significantly improved in both groups; in the eccentric group from 50.1 to 68.8 (p = 0.001) and in the night splint group from 49.4 to 67.0 (p<0.001). There was no significant difference between the two groups in VISA‐A score (p = 0.815) and patient satisfaction (p = 0.261). Conclusion A night splint is not beneficial in addition to eccentric exercises in the treatment of chronic midportion Achilles tendinopathy. PMID:17178774

  6. The tibialis posterior tendon.

    PubMed

    Lhoste-Trouilloud, A

    2012-02-01

    The tibialis posterior tendon is the largest and anteriormost tendon in the medial ankle. It produces plantar flexion and supination of the ankle and stabilizes the plantar vault. Sonographic assessment of this tendon is done with high-frequency, linear-array transducers; an optimal examination requires transverse retromalleolar, longitudinal retromalleolar, and distal longitudinal scans, as well as dynamic studies. Disorders of the posterior tibial tendon include chronic tendinopathy with progressive rupture, tenosynovitis, acute rupture, dislocation and instability, enthesopathies. The most common lesion is a progressive "chewing gum" lesion that develops in a setting of chronic tendinopathy; it is usually seen in overweight women over 50 years of age with valgus flat feet. Medial ankle pain must also be carefully investigated, and the presence of instability assessed with dynamic maneuvers (forced inversion, or dorsiflexion) of the foot. Sonography plays an important role in the investigation of disorders involving the posterior tibial tendon.

  7. Low level laser therapy reduces inflammation in activated Achilles tendinitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjordal, Jan M.; Iversen, Vegard; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Alvaro B.

    2006-02-01

    Objective: Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been forwarded as therapy for osteoarthritis and tendinopathy. Results in animal and cell studies suggest that LLLT may act through a biological mechanism of inflammatory modulation. The current study was designed to investigate if LLLT has an anti-inflammatory effect on activated tendinitis of the Achilles tendon. Methods: Seven patients with bilateral Achilles tendonitis (14 tendons) who had aggravated symptoms by pain-inducing activity immediately prior to the study. LLLT (1.8 Joules for each of three points along the Achilles tendon with 904nm infrared laser) and placebo LLLT were administered to either Achilles tendons in a random order to which patients and therapist were blinded. Inflammation was examined by 1) mini-invasive microdialysis for measuring the concentration of inflammatory marker PGE II in the peritendinous tissue, 2) ultrasound with Doppler measurement of peri- and intratendinous blood flow, 3) pressure pain algometry and 4) single hop test. Results: PGE 2- levels were significantly reduced at 75, 90 and 105 minutes after active LLLT compared both to pre-treatment levels (p=0.026) and to placebo LLLT (p=0.009). Changes in pressure pain threshold (PPT) were significantly different (P=0.012) between groups. PPT increased by a mean value of 0.19 kg/cm2 [95%CI:0.04 to 0.34] after treatment in the active LLLT group, while pressure pain threshold was reduced by -0.20 kg/cm2 [95%CI:-0.45 to 0.05] after placebo LLLT. Conclusion: LLLT can be used to reduce inflammatory musculskeletal pain as it reduces inflammation and increases pressure pain threshold levels in activity-induced pain episodes of Achilles tendinopathy.

  8. Clinical commentary of the evolution of the treatment for chronic painful mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Alfredson, Håkan

    2015-01-01

    The chronic painful Achilles tendon mid-portion was for many years, and still is in many countries, treated with intratendinous revision surgery. However, by coincidence, painful eccentric calf muscle training was tried, and it showed very good clinical results. This finding was unexpected and led to research into the pain mechanisms involved in this condition. Today we know that there are very few nerves inside, but multiple nerves outside, the ventral side of the chronic painful Achilles tendon mid-portion. These research findings have resulted in new treatment methods targeting the regions with nerves outside the tendon, methods that allow for a rapid rehabilitation and fast return to sports. PMID:26537813

  9. Are Sport-Specific Profiles of Tendon Stiffness and Cross-Sectional Area Determined by Structural or Functional Integrity?

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Florian; Kösters, Alexander; Müller, Erich; Seynnes, Olivier R.

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine whether distinct sets of tendon properties are seen in athletes engaged in sports with contrasting requirements for tendon function and structural integrity. Patellar and Achilles tendon morphology and force-deformation relation were measured by combining ultrasonography, electromyography and dynamometry in elite ski jumpers, distance runners, water polo players and sedentary individuals. Tendon cross-sectional area normalized to body mass2/3 was smaller in water polo players than in other athletes (patellar and Achilles tendon; -28 to -24%) or controls (patellar tendon only; -9%). In contrast, the normalized cross-sectional area was larger in runners (patellar tendon only; +26%) and ski jumpers (patellar and Achilles tendon; +21% and +13%, respectively) than in controls. Tendon stiffness normalized to body mass2/3 only differed in ski jumpers, compared to controls (patellar and Achilles tendon; +11% and +27%, respectively) and to water polo players (Achilles tendon only; +23%). Tendon size appears as an adjusting variable to changes in loading volume and/or intensity, possibly to preserve ultimate strength or fatigue resistance. However, uncoupled morphological and mechanical properties indicate that functional requirements may also influence tendon adaptations. PMID:27362657

  10. Photoacoustic microscopy of collagenase-induced Achilles tendinitis in a mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Po-Hsun; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Li, Meng-Lin

    2010-02-01

    Assessments of vascularity are important when assessing inflammation changes in tendon injuries since Achilles tendinitis is often accompanied with neovascularization or hypervascularity. In this study, we have investigated the feasibility of photoacoustic imaging in noninvasive monitoring of morphological and vascular changes in Achilles tendon injuries. Collagenase-induced Achilles tendinitis model of mice was adopted here. During collagenase-induced tendinitis, a 25-MHz photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) was used to image micro-vascular changes in Achilles tendons longitudinally up to 23 days. The positions of vessels imaged by PAM were identified by co-registration of PAM Bmode images with 25-MHz ultrasound (USM) ones. Morphological changes in Achilles tendons due to inflammation and edema were revealed by the PAM and USM images. Proliferation of new blood vessels within the tendons was also observed. Observed micro-vascular changes during tendinitis were similar to the findings in the literatures. This study demonstrates that photoacoustic imaging, owning required sensitivity and penetration, has the potential for high sensitive diagnosis and assessment of treatment performance in tendinopathy.

  11. A treatment algorithm for managing Achilles tendinopathy: new treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Alfredson, Håkan; Cook, J

    2007-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy affects athletes, recreational exercisers and even inactive people. The pathology is not inflammatory; it is a failed healing response. The source of pain in tendinopathy could be related to the neurovascular ingrowth seen in the tendon's response to injury. The treatment of Achilles tendinopathy is primarily conservative with an array of effective treatment options now available to the primary care practitioner. If conservative treatment is not successful, then surgery relieves pain in the majority of cases. Directing a patient through the algorithm presented here will maximise positive treatment outcomes. PMID:17311806

  12. Quadriceps tendon rupture: a biomechanical comparison of transosseous equivalent double-row suture anchor versus transosseous tunnel repair.

    PubMed

    Hart, Nathan D; Wallace, Matthew K; Scovell, J Field; Krupp, Ryan J; Cook, Chad; Wyland, Douglas J

    2012-09-01

    Quadriceps rupture off the patella is traditionally repaired by a transosseous tunnel technique, although a single-row suture anchor repair has recently been described. This study biomechanically tested a new transosseous equivalent (TE) double-row suture anchor technique compared with the transosseous repair for quadriceps repair. After simulated quadriceps-patella avulsion in 10 matched cadaveric knees, repairs were completed by either a three tunnel transosseous (TT = 5) or a TE suture anchor (TE = 5) technique. Double-row repairs were done using two 5.5 Bio-Corkscrew FT (fully threaded) (Arthrex, Inc., Naples, FL, USA) and two 3.5 Bio-PushLock anchors (Arthrex, Inc., Naples, FL, USA) with all 10 repairs done with #2 FiberWire suture (Arthrex, Inc., Naples, FL). Cyclic testing from 50 to 250 N for 250 cycles and pull to failure load (1 mm/s) were undertaken. Gap formation and ultimate tensile load (N) were recorded and stiffness data (N/mm) were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed using a Mann-Whitney U test and survival characteristics examined with Kaplan-Meier test. No significant difference was found between the TE and TT groups in stiffness (TE = 134 +/- 15 N/mm, TT = 132 +/- 26 N/mm, p = 0.28). The TE group had significantly less ultimate tensile load (N) compared with the TT group (TE = 447 +/- 86 N, TT = 591 +/- 84 N, p = 0.04), with all failures occurring at the suture eyelets. Although both quadriceps repairs were sufficiently strong, the transosseous repairs were stronger than the TE suture anchor repairs. The repair stiffness and gap formation were similar between the groups.

  13. Ultrasonographic Tendon Alteration in Relation to Parathyroid Dysfunction in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Dahlia A; El-Azizi, Noran O; Abdel Meged, Ali H; Al-Hoseiny, Sameh A; Hamada, Abdelhady M; Sabry, Moshira H

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To find the nature of tendon involvement in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients on regular hemodialysis (RD), and its relationship to parathyroid hormone (PTH) level using ultrasonography (US). METHOD A total of 50 CKD patients on RD subjected to musculoskeletal examination of knee and ankle, laboratory evaluation, and US of quadriceps tendon and Achilles tendon were involved. RESULTS Ankle joint tenderness was the most frequent sign on examination. US of the Achilles tendons showed tenderness during probing in 44% patients, calcific deposition in 24% patients, abnormal peritendon tissue in 20% patients, and abnormal anteroposterior (A-P) middle and distal one-third thicknesses of the Achilles tendon in 20% and 18% patients, respectively. PTH positively correlated with the duration of dialysis, serum phosphorus level, presence of calcific deposit, and increased thickness of the Achilles tendon. CONCLUSION The most common ultrasonographic finding in CKD patients on RD was Achilles tendon tenderness during probing. PTH level positively correlated with the duration of dialysis, presence of calcific deposit, and increased thickness of Achilles tendon. PMID:25674023

  14. Continuous Shear Wave Elastography: A New Method to Measure Viscoelastic Properties of Tendons in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Daniel H; Suydam, Stephen M; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Buchanan, Thomas S; Elliott, Dawn M

    2015-06-01

    Viscoelastic mechanical properties are frequently altered after tendon injuries and during recovery. Therefore, non-invasive measurements of shear viscoelastic properties may help evaluate tendon recovery and compare the effectiveness of different therapies. The objectives of this study were to describe an elastography method for measuring localized viscoelastic properties of tendons and to discuss the initial results in healthy and injured human Achilles and semitendinosus tendons. The technique used an external actuator to generate the shear waves in the tendon at different frequencies and plane wave imaging to measure shear wave displacements. For each of the excitation frequencies, maps of direction-specific wave speeds were calculated using local frequency estimation. Maps of viscoelastic properties were obtained using a pixel-wise curve fit of wave speed and frequency. The method was validated by comparing measurements of wave speed in agarose gels with those obtained using magnetic resonance elastography. Measurements in human healthy Achilles tendons revealed a pronounced increase in wave speed as a function of frequency, which highlights the importance of tendon viscoelasticity. Additionally, the viscoelastic properties of the Achilles tendon were larger than those reported for other tissues. Measurements in a tendinopathic Achilles tendon indicated that it is feasible to quantify local viscoelastic properties. Similarly, measurement in the semitendinosus tendon revealed substantial differences in viscoelastic properties between the healthy and contralateral tendons. Consequently, this technique has the potential to evaluate localized changes in tendon viscoelastic properties caused by injury and during recovery in a clinical setting.

  15. Tendon repair

    MedlinePlus

    Repair of tendon ... Tendon repair can be performed using: Local anesthesia (the immediate area of the surgery is pain-free) ... a cut on the skin over the injured tendon. The damaged or torn ends of the tendon ...

  16. Distal Triceps Tendon Injuries.

    PubMed

    Keener, Jay D; Sethi, Paul M

    2015-11-01

    Acute triceps ruptures are an uncommon entity, occurring mainly in athletes, weight lifters (especially those taking anabolic steroids), and following elbow trauma. Accurate diagnosis is made clinically, although MRI may aid in confirmation and surgical planning. Acute ruptures are classified on an anatomic basis based on tear location and the degree of tendon involvement. Most complete tears are treated surgically in medically fit patients. Partial-thickness tears are managed according to the tear severity, functional demands, and response to conservative treatment. We favor an anatomic footprint repair of the triceps to provide optimal tendon to bone healing and, ultimately, functional outcome. PMID:26498552

  17. Diagnostic performance of axial-strain sonoelastography in confirming clinically diagnosed Achilles tendinopathy: comparison with B-mode ultrasound and color Doppler imaging.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Chin Chin; Schneider, Michal Elisabeth; Malliaras, Peter; Chadwick, Martine; Connell, David Alister

    2015-01-01

    This primary aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of axial-strain sonoelastography (ASE), B-mode ultrasound (US) and color Doppler US in confirming clinically symptomatic Achilles tendinopathy. The secondary aim was to establish the relationship between the strain ratio during sonoelastography and Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles (VISA-A) scores. The VISA-A questionnaire is a validated clinical rating scale that evaluates the symptoms and dysfunction of the Achilles tendon. One hundred twenty Achilles tendons of 120 consecutively registered patients with clinical symptoms of Achilles tendinopathy and another 120 gender- and age-matched, asymptomatic Achilles tendons of 120 healthy volunteers were assessed with B-mode US, ASE and color Doppler US. Symptomatic patients had significantly higher strain ratio scores and softer Achilles tendon properties compared with controls (p < 0.001). The strain ratio was moderately correlated with VISA-A scores (r = -0.62, p < 0.001). The diagnostic accuracy of B-mode US, ASE and color Doppler US in confirming clinically symptomatic Achilles tendinopathy was 94.7%, 97.8% and 82.5% respectively. There was excellent correlation between the clinical reference standard and the grade of tendon quality on ASE (κ = 0.91, p < 0.05), compared with B-mode US (κ = 0.74, p < 0.05) and color Doppler imaging (κ = 0.49, p < 0.05). ASE is an accurate clinical tool in the evaluation of Achilles tendinopathy, with results comparable to those of B-mode US and excellent correlation with clinical findings. The strain ratio may offer promise as a supplementary tool for the objective evaluation of Achilles tendon properties.

  18. Achilles tendinopathy: A review of the current concepts of treatment.

    PubMed

    Roche, A J; Calder, J D F

    2013-10-01

    The two main categories of Achilles tendon disorder are broadly classified by anatomical location to include non-insertional and insertional conditions. Non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy is often managed conservatively, and many rehabilitation protocols have been adapted and modified, with excellent clinical results. Emerging and popular alternative therapies, including a variety of injections and extracorporeal shockwave therapy, are often combined with rehabilitation protocols. Surgical approaches have developed, with minimally invasive procedures proving popular. The management of insertional Achilles tendinopathy is improved by recognising coexisting pathologies around the insertion. Conservative rehabilitation protocols as used in non-insertional disorders are thought to prove less successful, but such methods are being modified, with improving results. Treatment such as shockwave therapy is also proving successful. Surgical approaches specific to the diagnosis are constantly evolving, and good results have been achieved.

  19. Impact of autologous blood injections in treatment of mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy: double blind randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Fulcher, Mark L; Rowlands, David S; Kerse, Ngaire

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the effectiveness of two peritendinous autologous blood injections in addition to a standardised eccentric calf strengthening programme in improving pain and function in patients with mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy. Design Single centre, participant and single assessor blinded, parallel group, randomised, controlled trial. Setting Single sports medicine clinic in New Zealand. Participants 53 adults (mean age 49, 53% men) with symptoms of unilateral mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy for at least three months. Participants were excluded if they had a history of previous Achilles tendon rupture or surgery or had undergone previous adjuvant treatments such as injectable therapies, glyceryl trinitrate patches, or extracorporeal shockwave therapy. Interventions All participants underwent two unguided peritendinous injections one month apart with a standardised protocol. The treatment group had 3 mL of their own whole blood injected while the control group had no substance injected (needling only). Participants in both groups carried out a standardised and monitored 12 week eccentric calf training programme. Follow-up was at one, two, three and six months. Main outcome measures The primary outcome measure was the change in symptoms and function from baseline to six months with the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles (VISA-A) score. Secondary outcomes were the participant’s perceived rehabilitation and their ability to return to sport. Results 26 participants were randomly assigned to the treatment group and 27 to the control group. In total, 50 (94%) completed the six month study, with 25 in each group. Clear and clinically worthwhile improvements in the VISA-A score were evident at six months in both the treatment (change in score 18.7, 95% confidence interval 12.3 to 25.1) and control (19.9, 13.6 to 26.2) groups. The overall effect of treatment was not significant (P=0.689) and the 95% confidence intervals at all points precluded

  20. Endoscopic-Assisted Flexor Hallucis Longus Transfer: Harvest of the Tendon at Zone 2 or Zone 3.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon transfer is indicated for reconstruction of the Achilles tendon with a gap larger than 5 cm. The tendon can be harvested at zone 2 or zone 3 by minimally invasive techniques with the advantage of minimal soft-tissue dissection. The tendon can be harvested under the sustentaculum tali by zone 2 FHL tendoscopy. It is adequate for FHL transfer to the posterior calcaneal tubercle. If a double-thickness reconstruction of a huge gap of the Achilles tendon is indicated, the tendon can be harvested at the level of the hallux by means of a tendon stripper. However, the interconnection tendon of the master knot of Henry can be split together with the FHL or flexor digitorum longus tendon instead of being cut. Zone 2 FHL tendoscopy can be used to release the split tendon to complete the FHL harvest. PMID:27284516

  1. A biomechanical assessment of tendon repair after radiofrequency treatment.

    PubMed

    Tibor, Lisa M; Leek, Bryan T; Chase, Derek C; Healey, Robert M; Linn, Michael S; Tasto, James P; Amiel, David

    2012-09-01

    After acute tendon injury, rapid mobilization prevents adhesions and improves the ultimate strength of the repair. Radiofrequency (RF) ablation is proposed to enhance angiogenesis in the early stages of healing. The mechanism and effect of RF have not yet been described in an animal model of tendon injury. To investigate the biomechanical effect of bipolar RF on acute injury in a rabbit model of partial Achilles tendon transection and suture repair, RF-treated tendon repairs were compared to untreated tendons. Cross-sectional area, Young's modulus, and ultimate tensile strength were determined. At 6 and 12 weeks after repair, RF-treated tendons had significant increases in cross-sectional area (P<.001; P< .0001) and ultimate tensile strength (P<.0001; P<.01). Young modulus of RF-treated tendons was increased at 6 weeks but not at 12 weeks (P<.01) Compared with untreated tendons, RF-treated tendons showed faster return to mechanical integrity. This may allow earlier rehabilitation.

  2. Conservative management of Achilles Tendinopathy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Papa, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To chronicle the conservative treatment and management of a 77-year old female patient presenting with chronic pain of 8 months duration in the midportion of the achilles tendon diagnosed as achilles tendinopathy. Clinical features: The main clinical feature was pain in the midportion of the achilles tendon, 2 to 6 cm proximal to the calcaneal insertion. Symptom onset was gradual and unrelated to any acute trauma or overt injury mechanism. Intervention and outcome: The conservative treatment approach consisted of medical acupuncture with electrical stimulation, Graston Technique®, eccentric calf training, and rehabilitative exercise prescription. Outcome measures included verbal pain rating scale, lower extremity functional scale (LEFS), and a return to activities of daily living (ADLs). The patient attained long-term resolution of her complaint and at 12 month follow-up reported no recurrence of symptoms. Conclusion: A combination of conservative rehabilitation strategies may be used by chiropractors to treat midportion achilles tendinopathy and allow an individual to return to pain free ADLs in a timely manner. PMID:22997472

  3. Acute Achilles tendinopathy: effect of pain control on leg stiffness.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, J; Kokalj, A

    2014-03-01

    Tendinopathies are a major cause of disability in the athletic population; the main purpose of the treatment of these injuries is to reduce pain and improve function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of NSAIDs on leg stiffness of patients suffering acute unilateral Achilles tendinopathy. Twenty-eight eligible male athletes (aged 39.1 ± 10.3 y) suffering acute Achilles tendinopathy were treated with etoricoxib (120 mg oral once daily) during 7 days. Pain (100-mm visual analogue scale-VAS), analgesic effect (percentage of 100-mm VAS reduction), and leg stiffness were evaluated pre- and post- anti-inflammatory treatment. Results of this study showed that over the 7-day treatment period, etoricoxib provided significant relief of Achilles tendon pain (VAS) compared to that experienced at baseline: 54.5 ± 21.6 and 24.5 ± 24.8, respectively (p<0.001). Leg stiffness showed a significant improvement after one-week NSAID therapy: LSR 0.89 ± 0.1 vs. 0.97 ± 0.1; (p=0.02). In conclusion, findings of this study demonstrated that patients suffering acute unilateral Achilles tendinopathy increased their leg stiffness of the affected side after oral anti-inflammatory therapy. Effective control of tendon pain in the acute phase of such sports-related injuries may contribute to improve capabilities associated with high performance like leg stiffness. PMID:24583548

  4. Platelet-rich plasma: evidence for the treatment of patellar and Achilles tendinopathy--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Di Matteo, B; Filardo, G; Kon, E; Marcacci, M

    2015-04-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been introduced in the clinical practice to treat a growing number of different musculoskeletal pathologies. It is currently applied in the treatment of Achilles and patellar tendinopathies, which are common sport-related injuries very challenging to manage. Aim of the present paper was to review systematically the available clinical evidence concerning the application of PRP in the treatment of patellar and Achilles tendinopathy. A systematic review of the literature was performed according to the following inclusion criteria for relevant articles: (1) clinical reports of any level of evidence, (2) written in the English language, (3) with no time limitation and (4) on the use of PRP to treat conservatively Achilles and patellar tendinopathy. Twenty-two studies were included and analyzed. Two studies on patellar tendinopathy were randomized controlled trials (RCTs), whereas just one RCT was published on Achilles tendon. All the papers concerning patellar tendon reported positive outcome for PRP, which proved to be superior to other traditional approaches such as shock-wave therapy and dry needling. In the case of Achilles tendon, despite the encouraging findings reported by case series, the only RCT available showed no significant clinical difference between PRP and saline solution. The main finding of this study was the paucity of high-level literature regarding the application of PRP in the management of patellar and Achilles tendinopathy. However, the clinical data currently available, although not univocal, suggest considering PRP as a therapeutic option for recalcitrant patellar and Achilles tendinopathies. PMID:25323041

  5. Platelet-rich plasma: evidence for the treatment of patellar and Achilles tendinopathy--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Di Matteo, B; Filardo, G; Kon, E; Marcacci, M

    2015-04-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been introduced in the clinical practice to treat a growing number of different musculoskeletal pathologies. It is currently applied in the treatment of Achilles and patellar tendinopathies, which are common sport-related injuries very challenging to manage. Aim of the present paper was to review systematically the available clinical evidence concerning the application of PRP in the treatment of patellar and Achilles tendinopathy. A systematic review of the literature was performed according to the following inclusion criteria for relevant articles: (1) clinical reports of any level of evidence, (2) written in the English language, (3) with no time limitation and (4) on the use of PRP to treat conservatively Achilles and patellar tendinopathy. Twenty-two studies were included and analyzed. Two studies on patellar tendinopathy were randomized controlled trials (RCTs), whereas just one RCT was published on Achilles tendon. All the papers concerning patellar tendon reported positive outcome for PRP, which proved to be superior to other traditional approaches such as shock-wave therapy and dry needling. In the case of Achilles tendon, despite the encouraging findings reported by case series, the only RCT available showed no significant clinical difference between PRP and saline solution. The main finding of this study was the paucity of high-level literature regarding the application of PRP in the management of patellar and Achilles tendinopathy. However, the clinical data currently available, although not univocal, suggest considering PRP as a therapeutic option for recalcitrant patellar and Achilles tendinopathies.

  6. The role of hind limb tendons in gibbon locomotion: springs or strings?

    PubMed

    Vereecke, Evie E; Channon, Anthony J

    2013-11-01

    Tendon properties have an important effect on the mechanical behaviour of muscles, with compliant tendons allowing near-isometric muscle contraction and facilitating elastic energy storage and recoil. Stiff tendons, in contrast, facilitate rapid force transfer and precise positional control. In humans, the long Achilles tendon contributes to the mechanical efficiency of running via elastic energy storage and recovery, and its presence has been linked to the evolution of habitual bipedalism. Gibbons also possess relatively long hind limb tendons; however, their role is as yet unknown. Based on their large dimensions, and inferring from the situation in humans, we hypothesize that the tendons in the gibbon hind limb will facilitate elastic energy storage and recoil during hind-limb-powered locomotion. To investigate this, we determined the material properties of the gibbon Achilles and patellar tendon in vitro and linked this with available kinematic and kinetic data to evaluate their role in leaping and bipedalism. Tensile tests were conducted on tendon samples using a material testing machine and the load-displacement data were used to calculate stiffness, Young's modulus and hysteresis. In addition, the average stress-in-life and energy absorption capacity of both tendons were estimated. We found a functional difference between the gibbon Achilles and patellar tendon, with the Achilles tendon being more suitable for elastic energy storage and release. The patellar tendon, in contrast, has a relatively high hysteresis, making it less suitable to act as elastic spring. This suggests that the gibbon Achilles tendon might fulfil a similar function as in humans, contributing to reducing the locomotor cost of bipedalism by acting as elastic spring, while the high stiffness of the patellar tendon might favour fast force transfer upon recoil and, possibly, enhance leaping performance.

  7. Canine tendon studies. II. Biomechanical evaluation of normal and regrown canine tendons.

    PubMed

    Walker, P; Amstutz, H C; Rubinfeld, M

    1976-01-01

    Some of the mechanical properties of regrown canine tendons are compared to those of normal tendons of young and mature animals. Patellar and Achilles tendons from 12 beagle dogs were removed and studied with their bone origin and insertions. Mechanical tests were performed within 24 hr and test conditions simulated the physiological function of the tendon in vivo at room temperature. Specimens were soaked in Ringers solution and mounted in an Instron testing machine with load deflection curves plotted automatically. The parameters used for analysis were load extension, stress relaxation, elastic limit, and strain rate dependence. The regrown tendons in young animals appeared to quickly adjust in dimension and structure so that their properties were not significantly different from those of normal tendons on a load extension basis. The normal tendons were stiffer than regrown ones but the modulus of elasticity increased with age. The Achilles were stiffer than patellar tendons. Cyclic loading with 25 kg did not affect reconstructed tendon models, although some increase in stiffness was noted. The elastic modulus decreased with an increase in ambient temperature and increasing strain rate.

  8. Partial tear of the quadriceps tendon in a child.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Geetika; El-Khoury, George

    2008-06-01

    We present a case of partial rupture of the quadriceps tendon in an 8-year-old girl. This is one of the youngest patients reported with a quadriceps tendon rupture, an entity seen predominantly in middle-aged people. The strength of the muscle tendon unit in a child makes tendon injuries extremely unusual as compared to apophyseal avulsions. The MR imaging findings of this unusual pediatric injury are illustrated.

  9. Inflammatory and Metabolic Alterations of Kager's Fat Pad in Chronic Achilles Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Fredberg, Ulrich; Kjær, Søren G.; Quistorff, Bjørn; Langberg, Henning; Hansen, Jacob B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Achilles tendinopathy is a painful inflammatory condition characterized by swelling, stiffness and reduced function of the Achilles tendon. Kager’s fat pad is an adipose tissue located in the area anterior to the Achilles tendon. Observations reveal a close physical interplay between Kager’s fat pad and its surrounding structures during movement of the ankle, suggesting that Kager’s fat pad may stabilize and protect the mechanical function of the ankle joint. Aim The aim of this study was to characterize whether Achilles tendinopathy was accompanied by changes in expression of inflammatory markers and metabolic enzymes in Kager’s fat pad. Methods A biopsy was taken from Kager’s fat pad from 31 patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy and from 13 healthy individuals. Gene expression was measured by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR. Focus was on genes related to inflammation and lipid metabolism. Results Expression of the majority of analyzed inflammatory marker genes was increased in patients with Achilles tendinopathy compared to that in healthy controls. Expression patterns of the patient group were consistent with reduced lipolysis and increased fatty acid β-oxidation. In the fat pad, the pain-signaling neuropeptide substance P was found to be present in one third of the subjects in the Achilles tendinopathy group but in none of the healthy controls. Conclusion Gene expression changes in Achilles tendinopathy patient samples were consistent with Kager’s fat pad being more inflamed than in the healthy control group. Additionally, the results indicate an altered lipid metabolism in Kager’s fat pad of Achilles tendinopathy patients. PMID:25996876

  10. Ultrasound-guided injection of platelet-rich plasma in chronic Achilles and patellar tendinopathy☆

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, G.; Fabbro, E.; Orlandi, D.; Martini, C.; Lacelli, F.; Serafini, G.; Silvestri, E.; Sconfienza, L.M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The efficacy of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in the treatment and healing of chronic tendinopathy through stimulation of cell proliferation and total collagen production has been demonstrated by both in vitro and in vivo studies. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of ultrasound (US)-guided autologous PRP injections in patellar and Achilles tendinopathy. Materials and methods Autologous PRP was injected under US-guidance into the Achilles and patellar tendons (30 Achilles tendons, 28 patellar tendons) in 48 prospectively selected patients (30 males, 18 females, mean age 38 ± 16 years, range 20–61 years). All patients were previously evaluated according to the Victoria Institute of Sport Assessment (VISA) scale, which assessed pain and activity level, and they all underwent US of the tendon before treatment and at follow-up after 20 days and 6 months. Statistical analysis was performed with Chi-square and Wilcoxon tests. Results 20 days after PRP injection the patients presented a non-significant improvement of clinical symptoms. At the 6-month follow-up VISA score increased from a mean value of 57–75.5 (p < .01). US evaluation revealed a reduction of hypoechoic areas in 26 tendons (p < .01) associated with a widespread improvement of fibrillar echotexture of the tendon and reduced hypervascularity at power Doppler. Conclusion PRP injection in patellar and Achilles tendinopathy results in a significant and lasting improvement of clinical symptoms and leads to recovery of the tendon matrix potentially helping to prevent degenerative lesions. US-guidance allows PRP injection into the tendon with great accuracy. PMID:23730392

  11. Current concepts in the management of tendon disorders.

    PubMed

    Rees, J D; Wilson, A M; Wolman, R L

    2006-05-01

    Primary disorders of tendons are common and constitute a high proportion of referrals to rheumatologists. Certain tendons are particularly vulnerable to degenerative pathology; these include the Achilles, patella, elements of the rotator cuff, forearm extensors, biceps brachi and tibialis posterior tendons. Disorders of these tendons are often chronic and can be difficult to manage successfully in the long term. Significant advances have been made in understanding the pathophysiology of these conditions. Histopathological evidence, together with advances in imaging techniques, has made us more appreciative of the degenerative (rather that inflammatory) nature of these conditions. Additionally the presence of neovascularization is now well-recognized in long-standing tendinopathy. We review the mechanical, vascular and developing neural theories that attempt to explain the aetiology of degenerative tendinopathy. We also explore theories of why specific tendons (such as the Achilles and supraspinatus tendons) are particularly prone to degenerative pathology. Traditionally, treatments have placed a heavy emphasis on anti-inflammatory strategies, which are often inappropriate. Recently, however, significant advances in the practical management of tendon disorders have been made. In particular the advent of 'eccentric loading' training programmes has revolutionized the treatment of Achilles tendinopathy in some patients. This concept is currently being extended to include other commonly injured tendons. Other current treatments are reviewed, as are potential future treatments.

  12. Tendonitis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tendon. It can occur as a result of injury, overuse, or with aging as the tendon loses elasticity. Any action that places prolonged repetitive strain on the forearm muscles can cause tendonitis. The ...

  13. p38 MAPK Signaling in Postnatal Tendon Growth and Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Andrew J.; Sarver, Dylan C.; Sugg, Kristoffer B.; Dzierzawski, Justin T.; Gumucio, Jonathan P.; Mendias, Christopher L.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon is a dynamic tissue whose structure and function is influenced by mechanical loading, but little is known about the fundamental mechanisms that regulate tendon growth and remodeling in vivo. Data from cultured tendon fibroblasts indicated that the p38 MAPK pathway plays an important role in tendon fibroblast proliferation and collagen synthesis in vitro. To gain greater insight into the mechanisms of tendon growth, and explore the role of p38 MAPK signaling in this process, we tested the hypotheses that inducing plantaris tendon growth through the ablation of the synergist Achilles tendon would result in rapid expansion of a neotendon matrix surrounding the original tendon, and that treatment with the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 would prevent this growth. Rats were treated with vehicle or SB203580, and subjected to synergist ablation by bilateral tenectomy of the Achilles tendon. Changes in histological and biochemical properties of plantaris tendons were analyzed 3, 7, or 28 days after overload, and comparisons were made to non-overloaded animals. By 28 days after overload, tendon mass had increased by 30% compared to non-overloaded samples, and cross-sectional area (CSA) increased by around 50%, with most of the change occurring in the neotendon. The expansion in CSA initially occurred through the synthesis of a hyaluronic acid rich matrix that was progressively replaced with mature collagen. Pericytes were present in areas of active tendon growth, but never in the original tendon ECM. Inhibition of p38 MAPK resulted in a profound decrease in IL6 expression, and had a modest effect on the expression of other ECM and cell proliferation genes, but had a negligible impact on overall tendon growth. The combined results from this study provided novel insights into tendon mechanobiology, and suggest that p38 MAPK signaling does not appear to be necessary for tendon growth in vivo. PMID:25768932

  14. Updates in biological therapies for knee injuries: tendons.

    PubMed

    Demange, Marco Kawamura; de Almeida, Adriano Marques; Rodeo, Scott A

    2014-09-01

    Tendons are subjected to tendinopathies caused by inflammation, degeneration, and weakening of the tendon, due to overuse and trauma, which may eventually lead to tendon rupture. Recently, there has been increasing interest in biological approaches to augment tissue healing. Tendon healing occurs through a dynamic process with inflammation, cellular proliferation, and tissue remodeling. In this review article, we discuss the more frequently proposed biological therapies for tendon injuries as platelet-rich plasma, mesenchymal stem cells, extracorporeal shockwave, and scaffolds.

  15. Achilles tendinopathy management

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, R. S.; Parsons, N.; Costa, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To conduct a pilot randomised controlled trial to evaluate the feasibility of conducting a larger trial to evaluate the difference in Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment-Achilles (VISA-A) scores at six months between patients with Achilles tendinopathy treated with a platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection compared with an eccentric loading programme. Methods Two groups of patients with mid-substance Achilles tendinopathy were randomised to receive a PRP injection or an eccentric loading programme. A total of 20 patients were randomised, with a mean age of 49 years (35 to 66). All outcome measures were recorded at baseline, six weeks, three months and six months. Results The mean VISA-A score for the injection group at the primary endpoint of six months was 76.0 (95% confidence interval (CI) 58.3 to 93.7) and for the exercise group was 57.4 (95% CI 38.1 to 76.7). There was no statistically significant difference between these scores (p = 0.171), which was expected from such a pilot study. Conclusions This pilot study has been key to providing data to inform a larger study and shows that the methodology is feasible. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2013;2:227–32. PMID:24135556

  16. Tendon Innervation.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Paul W; Salo, Paul; Hart, David A

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of tendon metabolism including the responses to loading is far from being well understood. During the last decade, however, accumulating data show that tendon innervation in addition to afferent functions, via efferent pathways has a regulatory role in tendon homeostasis via a wide range of neuromediators, which coordinate metabolic and neuro-inflammatory pathways.Innervation of intact healthy tendons is localized in the surrounding structures, i.e paratenon, endotenon and epitenon, whereas the tendon proper is practically devoid of neuronal supply. This anatomical finding reflects that the tendon metabolism is regulated from the tendon envelope, i.e. interfascicular matrix (see Chap. 1 ).Tendon innervation after injury and during repair, however, is found as extensive nerve ingrowth into the tendon proper, followed by a time-dependent emergence of different neuronal mediators, which amplify and fine-tune inflammatory and metabolic pathways in tendon regeneration. After healing nerve fibers retract to the tendon envelope.In tendinopathy innervation has been identified to consist of excessive and protracted nerve ingrowth in the tendon proper, suggesting pro-inflammatory, nociceptive and hypertrophic (degenerative) tissue responses.In metabolic disorders such as eg. diabetes impaired tendon healing has been established to be related to dysregulation of neuronal growth factors.Targeted approaches to the peripheral nervous system including neuronal mediators and their receptors may prove to be effective therapies for painful, degenerative and traumatic tendon disorders. PMID:27535247

  17. Tribological characteristics of healthy tendon.

    PubMed

    Theobald, Peter S; Dowson, Duncan; Khan, Ilyas M; Jones, Michael D

    2012-07-26

    Tendons transfer muscular forces efficiently and painlessly, facilitating joint motion. Whilst the tribology of articular cartilage is constantly explored, a poorer understanding remains of tendon lubrication and friction. This study reports experimental data describing the tribological characteristics of tendon and its surrounding tissue, before presenting an arithmetic solution to facilitate numerical modelling. The experimental characteristics of the tensile (i.e. mid-substance) and compressive (i.e. fibrocartilaginous) regions of bovine flexor tendon were investigated using a pin-on-plate tribometer, with immunofluroscence analysis describing the relative intensity and distribution of surface-bound lubricin. Arithmetic analysis considering the digital extensor tendon determined that, in physiological conditions, the tensile tendon region was able to generate elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL). The equivalent region of compressive tendon exhibited a higher intensity of surface-bound lubricin which, it is hypothesised, serves to minimise the increased frictional resistance due to generating only mixed or boundary lubrication regimes. Arithmetic analysis indicates that, given a more favourable biomechanical environment, this region can also generate EHL. Whilst acknowledging the limitations of transferring data from an animal model to a clinical environment, by providing the first data and equations detailing the film thicknesses and lubrication regime for these two tendon regions it is hoped that clinicians, engineers and scientists can consider improved clinical strategies to tackle both tendinopathy and tendon rupture.

  18. Preparation and characterization of decellularized tendon slices for tendon tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ning, Liang-Ju; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Xiao-He; Luo, Jing-Cong; Li, Xiu-Qun; Yang, Zhi-Ming; Qin, Ting-Wu

    2012-06-01

    To develop a naturally derived tendon tissue engineering scaffold with the preservation of the native ultrastructure, tensile strength, and biochemical composition of the tendon extracellular matrix (ECM), decellularized tendon slices (DTSs) were prepared using repetitive freeze/thaw of the intact Achilles tendons, frozen section, and nuclease treatment. The DTSs were characterized in the native ultrastructure, mechanical properties, biochemical composition, and cytocompatibility. Histological examination and DNA quantification analysis confirmed that cells were completely removed from tendon tissue by repetitive freeze/thaw in combination with nuclease treatment 12 h. The intrinsic ultrastructure of tendon tissue was well preserved based on scanning electron microscopy examination. The tensile strength of the DTSs was retained 85.62% of native tendon slice. More than 93% of proteoglycans (fibromodulin, biglycan) and growth factors (TGF-β1, IGF-1, VEGF, and CTGF) inherent in tendon ECM were preserved in the DTSs according to ELISA analysis. Furthermore, the DTSs facilitated attachment and repopulation of NIH-3T3 fibroblasts in vitro. Overall, the DTSs are sheet scaffolds with a combination of elemental mechanical strength and tendon ECM bioactive factors that may have many potential applications in tendon tissue engineering.

  19. Local biochemical and morphological differences in human Achilles tendinopathy: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The incidence of Achilles tendinopathy is high and underlying etiology as well as biochemical and morphological pathology associated with the disease is largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to describe biochemical and morphological differences in chronic Achilles tendinopathy. The expressions of growth factors, inflammatory mediators and tendon morphology were determined in both chronically diseased and healthy tendon parts. Methods Thirty Achilles tendinopathy patients were randomized to an expression-study (n = 16) or a structural-study (n = 14). Biopsies from two areas in the Achilles tendon were taken and structural parameters: fibril density, fibril size, volume fraction of cells and the nucleus/cytoplasm ratio of cells were determined. Further gene expressions of various genes were analyzed. Results Significantly smaller collagen fibrils and a higher volume fraction of cells were observed in the tendinopathic region of the tendon. Markers for collagen and its synthesis collagen 1, collagen 3, fibronectin, tenascin-c, transforming growth factor-β fibromodulin, and markers of collagen breakdown matrix metalloproteinase-2, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and metallopeptidase inhibitor-2 were significantly increased in the tendinopathic region. No altered expressions of markers for fibrillogenesis, inflammation or wound healing were observed. Conclusion The present study indicates that an increased expression of factors stimulating the turnover of connective tissue is present in the diseased part of tendinopathic tendons, associated with an increased number of cells in the injured area as well as an increased number of smaller and thinner fibrils in the diseased tendon region. As no fibrillogenesis, inflammation or wound healing could be detected, the present data supports the notion that tendinopathy is an ongoing degenerative process. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN20896880 PMID:22480275

  20. Effects of mechanical vibration of the foot sole and ankle tendons on cutaneomuscular responses in man.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew C; Mummidisetty, Chaithanya K; Rymer, William Zev; Knikou, Maria

    2013-06-17

    The modulation of cutaneomuscular responses in response to mechanical vibration applied to the foot sole and to the ankle tendons was established in ten healthy subjects. The effects of mechanical vibration applied to the skin adjacent to the tibialis anterior (TA) and Achilles tendons were examined in two subjects. With the subjects seated, mechanical vibration applied to the TA and/or Achilles tendons significantly depressed the cutaneomuscular responses in all subjects, regardless of the frequency (50, 150, 250 Hz) of vibration. Mechanical vibration applied either to the foot sole or to the skin adjacent to the tendons induced no significant effects. The demonstration that mechanical vibration applied to muscle tendons exerts an inhibitory effect on cutaneomuscular responses supports the hypothesis that receptors that mediate body kinesthesia can be used as a vehicle to alter the spinal excitability state. The data suggests that tendon vibration could be utilized in neurological disorders to induce exogenous-mediated potentiation of presynaptic inhibition.

  1. Biceps femoris tendon injuries sustained while playing hockey

    PubMed Central

    Watura, Christopher; Harries, William

    2011-01-01

    A 42-year-old female nurse presented in March 2008 with a left proximal hamstring tendon injury sustained while playing hockey. At surgery, the proximal biceps femoris tendon and semitendonosus were found to be ruptured and were repaired. The patient made a good recovery but sustained a further hockey injury in January 2010 involving a complete tear and rupture of the biceps femoris tendon distally. This was managed conservatively and the patient was able to return to playing hockey 10 months later. Biceps femoris tendon injuries have been reported in sport but this is the first documented case of the injury occurring while playing hockey and is also the first reported case of a biceps tendon rupture proximally (hamstring tendon) followed by distal biceps femoris rupture at the knee in the same leg. PMID:22715185

  2. Ultrasound guided sclerosis of neovessels in painful chronic Achilles tendinosis: pilot study of a new treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ohberg, L; Alfredson, H; Khan, K

    2002-01-01

    Background: The mechanism that causes pain in chronic Achilles tendinosis is not known. However, high resolution colour Doppler ultrasound has shown that neovascularisation may be involved. Objective: To investigate if sclerosing the neovessels would affect the level of tendon pain. Methods: The effect of colour Doppler ultrasound guided injection of a sclerosing agent, polidocanol, against neovessels was studied in 10 patients (seven men and three women, mean age 55 years) with painful chronic mid-portion Achilles tendinosis. Results: Eight patients were satisfied with the results of treatment. There was significantly reduced pain during activity (reported on a visual analogue scale (VAS)) and no remaining neovascularisation after an average of two injections. Two patients were not satisfied, and neovascularisation remained. At the six month follow up, the same eight patients remained satisfied and could perform Achilles tendon loading activities as desired. Their VAS score had decreased from 74 before treatment to 8 (p<0.01). Conclusions: Sclerosing neovessels appears to be an effective treatment for painful chronic Achilles tendinosis, suggesting that neovessels play a key part in causing chronic tendon pain. PMID:12055110

  3. Human Genetic Variation, Sport and Exercise Medicine, and Achilles Tendinopathy: Role for Angiogenesis-Associated Genes.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Masouda; El Khoury, Louis Y; Raleigh, Stuart M; Ribbans, William J; Posthumus, Michael; Collins, Malcolm; September, Alison V

    2016-09-01

    Sport and Exercise Medicine is one of the important subspecialties of 21st century healthcare contributing to improving the physical function, health, and vitality of populations while reducing the prevalence of lifestyle-related diseases. Moreover, sport and exercise are associated with injuries such as Achilles tendinopathy, which is a common tendon injury. The angiogenesis-associated signaling pathway plays a key role in extracellular matrix remodeling, with increased levels of angiogenic cytokines reported after cyclic stretching of tendon fibroblasts. We investigated the variants in angiogenesis genes in relation to the risk of Achilles tendinopathy in two population samples drawn independently from South Africa (SA) and the United Kingdom (UK). The study sample comprised 120 SA and 130 UK healthy controls, and 108 SA and 87 UK participants with Achilles tendinopathy. All participants were genotyped for five functional polymorphisms in the vascular endothelial growth factor, A isoform (VEGFA) (rs699947, rs1570360, rs2010963) and kinase insert-domain receptor (KDR) genes (rs1870377, rs2071559). The VEGFA A-G-G inferred haplotype was associated with an increased risk of Achilles tendinopathy in the SA group (15% in controls vs. 20% in cases, p = 0.048) and the combined SA+UK group (14% in controls vs. 20% in cases, p = 0.009). These new findings implicate the VEGFA gene with Achilles tendinopathy risk, while highlighting the potential biological significance of the angiogenesis signaling pathway in the etiology of Achilles tendinopathy. The evidence suggesting a genetic contribution to the susceptibility of sustaining a tendon injury is growing. We anticipate that high-throughput and multi-omics approaches, building on genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics, may soon uncover the pathophysiology of many diseases in the field of Sports and Exercise Medicine, as a new frontier of global precision medicine. PMID:27631191

  4. Tendon reflex is suppressed during whole-body vibration.

    PubMed

    Karacan, Ilhan; Cidem, Muharrem; Yilmaz, Gizem; Sebik, Oguz; Cakar, Halil Ibrahim; Türker, Kemal Sıtkı

    2016-10-01

    In this study we have investigated the effect of whole body vibration (WBV) on the tendon reflex (T-reflex) amplitude. Fifteen young adult healthy volunteer males were included in this study. Records of surface EMG of the right soleus muscle and accelerometer taped onto the right Achilles tendon were obtained while participant stood upright with the knees in extension, on the vibration platform. Tendon reflex was elicited before and during WBV. Subjects completed a set of WBV. Each WBV set consisted of six vibration sessions using different frequencies (25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50Hz) applied randomly. In each WBV session the Achilles tendon was tapped five times with a custom-made reflex hammer. The mean peak-to-peak (PP) amplitude of T-reflex was 1139.11±498.99µV before vibration. It decreased significantly during WBV (p<0.0001). The maximum PP amplitude of T-reflex was 1333±515μV before vibration. It decreased significantly during WBV (p<0.0001). No significant differences were obtained in the mean acceleration values of Achilles tendon with tapping between before and during vibration sessions. This study showed that T-reflex is suppressed during WBV. T-reflex suppression indicates that the spindle primary afferents must have been pre-synaptically inhibited during WBV similar to the findings in high frequency tendon vibration studies. PMID:27485766

  5. Tendon reflex is suppressed during whole-body vibration.

    PubMed

    Karacan, Ilhan; Cidem, Muharrem; Yilmaz, Gizem; Sebik, Oguz; Cakar, Halil Ibrahim; Türker, Kemal Sıtkı

    2016-10-01

    In this study we have investigated the effect of whole body vibration (WBV) on the tendon reflex (T-reflex) amplitude. Fifteen young adult healthy volunteer males were included in this study. Records of surface EMG of the right soleus muscle and accelerometer taped onto the right Achilles tendon were obtained while participant stood upright with the knees in extension, on the vibration platform. Tendon reflex was elicited before and during WBV. Subjects completed a set of WBV. Each WBV set consisted of six vibration sessions using different frequencies (25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50Hz) applied randomly. In each WBV session the Achilles tendon was tapped five times with a custom-made reflex hammer. The mean peak-to-peak (PP) amplitude of T-reflex was 1139.11±498.99µV before vibration. It decreased significantly during WBV (p<0.0001). The maximum PP amplitude of T-reflex was 1333±515μV before vibration. It decreased significantly during WBV (p<0.0001). No significant differences were obtained in the mean acceleration values of Achilles tendon with tapping between before and during vibration sessions. This study showed that T-reflex is suppressed during WBV. T-reflex suppression indicates that the spindle primary afferents must have been pre-synaptically inhibited during WBV similar to the findings in high frequency tendon vibration studies.

  6. Delayed reconstruction of a quadriceps tendon.

    PubMed

    Pocock, C A J; Trikha, S P; Bell, J S P

    2008-01-01

    Rupture of the quadriceps tendon is an uncommon injury and rapid diagnosis is important because delay in surgical repair generally is believed to adversely affect outcome. One study of 20 patients suggests repair should be done during the first 48 to 72 hours postinjury to achieve a successful outcome and late repair led to unsatisfactory recovery. Cases of delayed tendon repair have been reported, the longest to our knowledge being 11 months before surgical intervention. We present a case of successful outcome of a quadriceps tendon rupture reconstructed at least 8 years after occurrence and a review of the literature of delayed reconstructions. We show that successful restoration of extensor mechanism function can be achieved several years after tendon rupture.

  7. The promoting effect of pentadecapeptide BPC 157 on tendon healing involves tendon outgrowth, cell survival, and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chung-Hsun; Tsai, Wen-Chung; Lin, Miao-Sui; Hsu, Ya-Hui; Pang, Jong-Hwei Su

    2011-03-01

    Pentadecapeptide BPC 157, composed of 15 amino acids, is a partial sequence of body protection compound (BPC) that is discovered in and isolated from human gastric juice. Experimentally it has been demonstrated to accelerate the healing of many different wounds, including transected rat Achilles tendon. This study was designed to investigate the potential mechanism of BPC 157 to enhance healing of injured tendon. The outgrowth of tendon fibroblasts from tendon explants cultured with or without BPC 157 was examined. Results showed that BPC 157 significantly accelerated the outgrowth of tendon explants. Cell proliferation of cultured tendon fibroblasts derived from rat Achilles tendon was not directly affected by BPC 157 as evaluated by MTT assay. However, the survival of BPC 157-treated cells was significantly increased under the H(2)O(2) stress. BPC 157 markedly increased the in vitro migration of tendon fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner as revealed by transwell filter migration assay. BPC 157 also dose dependently accelerated the spreading of tendon fibroblasts on culture dishes. The F-actin formation as detected by FITC-phalloidin staining was induced in BPC 157-treated fibroblasts. The protein expression and activation of FAK and paxillin were determined by Western blot analysis, and the phosphorylation levels of both FAK and paxillin were dose dependently increased by BPC 157 while the total amounts of protein was unaltered. In conclusion, BPC 157 promotes the ex vivo outgrowth of tendon fibroblasts from tendon explants, cell survival under stress, and the in vitro migration of tendon fibroblasts, which is likely mediated by the activation of the FAK-paxillin pathway. PMID:21030672

  8. The effect of decellularized matrices on human tendon stem/progenitor cell differentiation and tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zi; Chen, Xiao; Zhu, Ting; Hu, Jia-jie; Song, Hai-xin; Shen, Wei-liang; Jiang, Liu-yun; Heng, Boon Chin; Ji, Jun-feng; Ouyang, Hong-Wei

    2013-12-01

    It is reported that decellularized collagen matrices derived from dermal skin and bone have been clinically used for tendon repair. However, the varying biological and physical properties of matrices originating from different tissues may influence the differentiation of tendon stem cells, which has not been systematically evaluated. In this study, the effects of collagenous matrices derived from different tissues (tendon, bone and dermis) on the cell differentiation of human tendon stem/progenitor cells (hTSPCs) were investigated, in the context of tendon repair. It was found that all three matrices supported the adhesion and proliferation of hTSPCs despite differences in topography. Interestingly, tendon-derived decellularized matrix promoted the tendinous phenotype in hTSPCs and inhibited their osteogenesis, even under osteogenic induction conditions, through modulation of the teno- and osteolineage-specific transcription factors Scleraxis and Runx2. Bone-derived decellularized matrix robustly induced osteogenic differentiation of hTSPCs, whereas dermal skin-derived collagen matrix had no apparent effect on hTSPC differentiation. Based on the specific biological function of the tendon-derived decellularized matrix, a tissue-engineered tendon comprising TSPCs and tendon-derived matrix was successfully fabricated for Achilles tendon reconstruction. Implantation of this cell-scaffold construct led to a more mature structure (histology score: 4.08 ± 0.61 vs. 8.51 ± 1.66), larger collagen fibrils (52.2 ± 1.6 nm vs. 47.5 ± 2.8 nm) and stronger mechanical properties (stiffness: 21.68 ± 7.1 Nm m(-1) vs.13.2 ± 5.9 Nm m(-1)) of repaired tendons compared to the control group. The results suggest that stem cells promote the rate of repair of Achilles tendon in the presence of a tendinous matrix. This study thus highlights the potential of decellularized matrix for future tissue engineering applications, as well as developing a practical strategy for functional tendon

  9. Achilles tendinosis – a morphometrical study in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Rafael Duarte; Glazebrook, Mark Anthony; Campos, Vinicius Castro; Vasconcelos, Anilton Cesar

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses the morphopathogenesis of Achilles tendinosis, using a rat model and presenting quantitative analysis of time-dependent histological changes. Thirty Wistar rats were used, randomly split in experimental and control groups. Animals of the experimental group were submitted to a treadmill running scheme. Five animals of each group were euthanized at four, eight and sixteen weeks. Achilles tendons were collected and processed routinely for histopath sections. Slides were stained by Hematoxylin-Eosin, Picrosirius Red, Alcian Blue, AgNOR, TUNEL and evaluated morphometrically. Cellular density decreased slightly along the time and was higher in the experimental group than in controls at fourth, eighth and sixteenth weeks. Fiber microtearing, percentual of reticular fibers and glycosaminoglycans content increased along the time and were higher in experimental group than in controls at all-time intervals. AgNOR labeling here interpreted as a marker of transcription activity was higher in the experimental groups than in controls at all-time intervals. Apoptotic cells were more frequent and diffusely distributed in tendinosis samples than in control groups. These results suggest that as mechanical overload is becoming chronic, cellular turnover and matrix deposition increases leading to tendinosis. The combination of staining techniques and morphometry used here to describe the evolution of lesions occurring in a rat model system has proved to be suited for the study of induced Achilles tendinosis. PMID:22076169

  10. Ten weeks of treadmill running decreases stiffness and increases collagen turnover in tendons of old mice.

    PubMed

    Wood, Lauren K; Brooks, Susan V

    2016-02-01

    Increased tendon stiffness in response to mechanical loading is well established in young animals. Given that tendons stiffen with aging, we aimed to determine the effect of increased loading on tendons of old animals. We subjected 28-month-old mice to 10 weeks of uphill treadmill running; sedentary 8- and 28-month-old mice served as controls. Following training, plantaris tendon stiffness and modulus were reduced by approximately half, such that the values were not different from those of tendons from adult sedentary animals. The decrease in plantaris tendon stiffness was accompanied by a similar reduction in the levels of advanced glycation end-product protein adducts in tibialis anterior tendons of trained compared with sedentary old mice. In Achilles tendons, elevated mRNA levels for collagen type 1, matrix-metalloproteinase-8, and lysyl oxidase following training suggest that collagen turnover was likely also increased. The dramatic mechanical and structural changes induced by training occurred independent of changes in cell density or tendon morphology. Finally, Achilles tendon calcification was significantly reduced following exercise. These results demonstrate that, in response to exercise, tendons from old animals are capable of replacing damaged and dysfunctional components of extracellular matrix with tissue that is mechanically and structurally comparable to adult tissue.

  11. Sclerosing injections to treat midportion Achilles tendinosis: a randomised controlled study evaluating two different concentrations of Polidocanol.

    PubMed

    Willberg, Lotta; Sunding, Kerstin; Ohberg, Lars; Forssblad, Magnus; Fahlström, Martin; Alfredson, Håkan

    2008-09-01

    Two to three ultrasound (US) and colour Doppler (CD)-guided injections of the sclerosing substance Polidocanol (5 mg/ml) have been demonstrated to give good clinical results in patients with chronic midportion Achilles tendinopathy. This study aimed to investigate if a higher concentration of Polidocanol (10 mg/ml) would lead to a less number of treatments, and lower volumes, needed for good clinical results. Fifty-two consecutive Achilles tendons (48 patients, mean age 49.6 years) with chronic painful midportion Achilles tendinopathy, were randomised to treatment with Polidocanol 5 mg/ml (group A) or 10 mg/ml (group B). The patients and treating physician were blinded to the concentration of Polidocanol injected. All patients had structural tendon changes and neovascularisation in the Achilles midportion. Treatment was US + CD-guided injections targeting the region with neovascularisation (outside ventral tendon). A maximum of three treatments (6-8 weeks in between) were given before evaluation. Patients not satisfied after three treatments were given additional treatment with Polidocanol 10 mg/ml, up to five treatments. For evaluation, the patients recorded the severity of Achilles tendon pain during activity on a visual analogue scale (VAS), before and after treatment. Patient satisfaction with treatment was also assessed. At follow-up (mean 14 months) after three treatments, 18/26 patients in group A and 19/26 patients in group B were satisfied with the treatment and had a significantly reduced level of tendon pain (P < 0.05). After completion of the study, additional treatments with Polidocanol 10 mg/ml in the not satisfied patients resulted in 26/26 satisfied patients in both groups A and B. In summary, we found no significant differences in the number of satisfied patients, number of injections or volumes given, between patients treated with 5 or 10 mg/ml Polidocanol.

  12. Assessment of dorsal instability of the ulnar head in the distal radioulnar joint: comparison between normal wrist joints and cases of ruptured extensor tendons.

    PubMed

    Naito, Kiyohito; Sugiyama, Yoichi; Aritomi, Kentaro; Nagahama, Yasushi; Tomita, Yoshimasa; Obayashi, Osamu; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, the adaptability of the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) was evaluated using conventional computed tomography (CT) evaluation methods. In addition, we investigated/compared a new method to evaluate dorsal displacement of the ulnar head. Our subjects consisted of 32 healthy volunteers (64 wrists) and 11 patients (13 wrists) with extensor tendon injuries related to dorsal displacement of the ulnar head. To diagnose instability in the DRUJ based on CT scans, the radioulnar line method and the modified radioulnar line method were measured. Instability was evaluated by the new method that the ulnar head was located on the dorsal side from a line involving the peak of Lister's tubercle in parallel to this baseline was regarded as showing abnormal dorsal displacement of the ulnar head. The diagnostic accuracy of each method was calculated. The sensitivities, specificities, false-positive rates, positive predictive values and the negative predictive value of new methods were better than other two methods. The new method that we recommend is simple. Based on the results of this study, an evaluation of normal/abnormal dorsal displacement of the ulnar head in the DRUJ using the new method may be useful for determining the timing of surgery.

  13. Transosseous-Equivalent Repair for Distal Patellar Tendon Avulsion.

    PubMed

    Galos, David K; Konda, Sanjit R; Kaplan, Daniel J; Ryan, William E; Alaia, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Extensor mechanism disruptions are relatively uncommon injuries involving injury to the quadriceps tendon, patella, or patellar tendon. Patellar tendon avulsions from the tibial tubercle in adults are rare; as such, little technical information has been written regarding surgical management of this injury in the adult. Transosseous-equivalent repairs have been described in the management of several types of tendon ruptures, including rotator cuff and distal triceps tendon ruptures, but not previously in patellar injuries. We present a technique for repairing an avulsion injury of the patellar tendon from the tibial tubercle using suture anchors in a transosseous-equivalent manner. This technique for treating distal patellar tendon avulsion injuries likely increases contact area at the repair site while potentially improving fixation strength. PMID:27462538

  14. Eccentric rehabilitation exercise increases peritendinous type I collagen synthesis in humans with Achilles tendinosis.

    PubMed

    Langberg, H; Ellingsgaard, H; Madsen, T; Jansson, J; Magnusson, S P; Aagaard, P; Kjaer, M

    2007-02-01

    It has been shown that 12 weeks of eccentric heavy resistance training can reduce pain in runners suffering from chronic Achilles tendinosis, but the mechanism behind the effectiveness of this treatment is unknown. The present study investigates the local effect of an eccentric training regime on elite soccer players suffering from chronic Achilles tendinosis on the turnover of the peritendinous connective tissue. Twelve elite male soccer players, of whom six suffered from unilateral tendinosis and six were healthy controls, participated in this study. All participants performed 12 weeks of heavy-resistance eccentric training apart from their regular training and soccer activity. Before and after the training period the tissue concentration of indicators of collagen turnover was measured by the use of the microdialysis technique. After training, collagen synthesis was increased in the initially injured tendon (n=6; carboxyterminal propeptide of type I collagen (PICP): pre 3.9+/-2.5 microg/L to post 19.7+/-5.4 microg/L, P<0.05). The collagen synthesis was unchanged in healthy tendons in response to training (n=6; PICP: pre 8.3+/-5.2 microg/L to post 11.5+/-5.0 microg/L, P>0.05). Collagen degradation, measured as carboxyterminal telopeptide region of type I collagen (ICTP), was not affected by training neither in the injured nor in the healthy tendons. The clinical effect of the 12 weeks of eccentric training was determined by using a standardized loading procedure of the Achilles tendons showing a decrease in pain in all the chronic injured tendons (VAS before 44+/-9, after 13+/-9; P<0.05), and all subjects were back playing soccer following the eccentric training regime. The present study demonstrates that chronically injured Achilles tendons respond to 12 weeks of eccentric training by increasing collagen synthesis rate. In contrast, the collagen metabolism in healthy control tendons seems not to be affected by eccentric training. These findings could indicate a

  15. Arthroscopic quadriceps tendon repair: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hidetomo; Shimada, Yoichi; Yamamura, Toshiaki; Yamada, Shin; Sato, Takahiro; Nozaka, Koji; Kijima, Hiroaki; Saito, Kimio

    2015-01-01

    Recently, although some studies of open repair of the tendon of the quadriceps femoris have been published, there have been no reports in the literature on primary arthroscopic repair. In our present study, we present two cases of quadriceps tendon injury arthroscopically repaired with excellent results. Case 1 involved a 68-year-old man who was injured while shifting his weight to prevent a fall. MRI showed complete rupture at the insertion of the patella of the quadriceps tendon. The rupture was arthroscopically repaired using both suture anchor and pull-out suture fixation methods via bone tunnels (hereafter, pull-out fixation). Two years after surgery, retearing was not observed on MRI and both Japan Orthopedic Association (JOA) Knee and Lysholm scores had recovered to 100. Case 2 involved a 50-year-old man who was also injured when shifting his weight to prevent a fall. MRI showed incomplete superficial rupture at the insertion of the patella of the quadriceps tendon. The rupture was arthroscopically repaired using pull-out fixation of six strand sutures. One year after surgery, MRI revealed a healed tendon and his JOA and Lysholm scores were 95 and 100, respectively. Thus, arthroscopic repair may be a useful surgical method for repairing quadriceps tendon injury.

  16. Arthroscopic Quadriceps Tendon Repair: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Hidetomo; Shimada, Yoichi; Yamamura, Toshiaki; Yamada, Shin; Sato, Takahiro; Nozaka, Koji; Kijima, Hiroaki; Saito, Kimio

    2015-01-01

    Recently, although some studies of open repair of the tendon of the quadriceps femoris have been published, there have been no reports in the literature on primary arthroscopic repair. In our present study, we present two cases of quadriceps tendon injury arthroscopically repaired with excellent results. Case 1 involved a 68-year-old man who was injured while shifting his weight to prevent a fall. MRI showed complete rupture at the insertion of the patella of the quadriceps tendon. The rupture was arthroscopically repaired using both suture anchor and pull-out suture fixation methods via bone tunnels (hereafter, pull-out fixation). Two years after surgery, retearing was not observed on MRI and both Japan Orthopedic Association (JOA) Knee and Lysholm scores had recovered to 100. Case 2 involved a 50-year-old man who was also injured when shifting his weight to prevent a fall. MRI showed incomplete superficial rupture at the insertion of the patella of the quadriceps tendon. The rupture was arthroscopically repaired using pull-out fixation of six strand sutures. One year after surgery, MRI revealed a healed tendon and his JOA and Lysholm scores were 95 and 100, respectively. Thus, arthroscopic repair may be a useful surgical method for repairing quadriceps tendon injury. PMID:25815224

  17. The role of animal models in tendon research

    PubMed Central

    Hast, M. W.; Zuskov, A.; Soslowsky, L. J.

    2014-01-01

    Tendinopathy is a debilitating musculoskeletal condition which can cause significant pain and lead to complete rupture of the tendon, which often requires surgical repair. Due in part to the large spectrum of tendon pathologies, these disorders continue to be a clinical challenge. Animal models are often used in this field of research as they offer an attractive framework to examine the cascade of processes that occur throughout both tendon pathology and repair. This review discusses the structural, mechanical, and biological changes that occur throughout tendon pathology in animal models, as well as strategies for the improvement of tendon healing. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:193–202. PMID:24958818

  18. Elastographic characteristics of the metacarpal tendons in horses without clinical evidence of tendon injury.

    PubMed

    Lustgarten, Meghann; Redding, W Rich; Labens, Raphael; Morgan, Michel; Davis, Weston; Seiler, Gabriela S

    2014-01-01

    Tendon and ligament injuries are common causes of impaired performance in equine athletes. Gray-scale ultrasonography is the current standard method for diagnosing and monitoring these injuries, however this modality only provides morphologic information. Elastography is an ultrasound technique that allows detection and measurement of tissue strain, and may provide valuable mechanical information about equine tendon and ligament injuries. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility, reproducibility, and repeatability of elastography; and to describe elastographic characteristics of metacarpal tendons in sound horses. Nineteen legs for 17 clinically sound horses without evidence of musculoskeletal pathology were included. Elastographic images of the superficial and deep digital flexor tendons and the branches of the suspensory ligament (tendon of the interosseous muscle) were described quantitatively and qualitatively. There was no statistically significant difference between operators (P = 0.86) nor within operators (P = 0.93). For qualitative assessments, reproducibility (0.46) was moderate and repeatability (0.78) was good. Similar to human Achilles tendons, equine tendons were classified as predominantly hard using elastography. There was no statistically significant difference in stiffness of the flexor tendons (P = 0.96). No significant difference in stiffness was found with altered leg position during standing (P = 0.84) and while nonweight bearing (P = 0.61). The flexor tendons were softer when imaged in longitudinal versus transverse planes (P < 0.01) however, the suspensory branches were not (P = 0.67). Findings supported future clinical application of elastography as a noninvasive "stall-side" imaging modality for evaluation of the tendons and ligaments of the distal forelimb in horses.

  19. Rupture bilatérale des tendons rotuliens chez un sujet jeune sans notion de maladies systémiques ou de traitement par les corticostéroïdes: à propos d'un cas et revue de la literature

    PubMed Central

    Chagou, Aniss; Rhanim, Abdelkarim; Berrady, Mohammed Ali; Lamrani, Moulay Omar; Oudghiri, Mohammed; Berrada, Mohammed Saleh; El Yaacoubi, Moradh

    2014-01-01

    Les lésions du tendon rotulien sont moins communes que celles du tendon quadricipital. Les lésions bilatérales sont encore plus rares et sont souvent associées à une notion de tendinopathie, d'injection de corticoïdes ou de maladies systémiques tels que le lupus érythémateux, l'ostéomalacie ou l'insuffisance rénale chronique. Nous rapportons le cas d'un patient de 26 ans victime d'une rupture bilatérale du tendon rotulien suite à une réception de saut. Le patient n'avait pas d'antécédents de tendinopathie ni de maladies systémiques. Le diagnostic a été suspecté devant une position anormalement haute des deux rotules avec une impossibilité d'extension active des deux jambes. L’échographie a confirmé le diagnostic. Le patient a été traité par la technique de laçage selon Judet protégée par un cadrage. La rupture bilatérale du tendon rotulien est rare. La plupart des patients rapportent une notion de maladie systémique ou un antécédents de chirurgie du genou. Nous rapportons le cas d'une lésion rare dans la littérature, une rupture bilatérale des tendons rotuliens sans notions de maladies auto-immunes ni de traitement avec des corticostéroïdes. Les lésions bilatérales présentent certaines particularités diagnostiques et thérapeutiques. En effet l'objectivation d'une rotule haute peut être rendu difficile par un aspect controlatéral semblable. Concernant le volet thérapeutique, deux difficultés sont à noter la première réside dans l'absence de référence comparative pour la hauteur patellaire. La deuxième difficulté est l'obligation de différer l'appui à 45 jours. Ce qui est contraignant pour le patient. La technique de laçage décrite par judet couplée à un cadrage provisoire protégeant la suture nous a donné des résultats satisfaisants. PMID:25667711

  20. Extensor tendon injuries in athletes.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Aakash; Jacobs, Bruce; Andoga, Alexandra; Baratz, Mark E

    2014-03-01

    Extensor tendon injuries of the hand and wrist in high-level athletes can cause a delay in return to play and permanently affect their performance. Given the inherent demand for a speedy and complete recovery, orthopedic surgeons must have an understanding of how to best direct an athlete's treatment for these injuries. The extensor anatomy is very intricate and a thorough understanding of the anatomy can help with both diagnosis and treatment. However, untreated or poorly managed injuries are at risk of leading to chronic deformities. We will discuss the diagnosis and management of the most common extensor tendon injuries and tendinopathies of the hand found in athletes: mallet fingers, swan-neck deformities, boutonniere deformities, central slip ruptures, sagittal band ruptures, intersection syndrome, extensor carpi ulnaris tendinitis, and extensor carpi ulnaris subluxation. PMID:24651290

  1. Morphological and biomechanical studies on the common calcaneal tendon in dogs.

    PubMed

    Jopp, I; Reese, S

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous rupture at the distal part of the gastrocnemius tendon (GT) is the second most common non-traumatic tendon injury in dogs, whereas the other strands of the common calcaneal tendon do not seem to have a predisposition to rupture. In order to discover why we investigated the common calcaneal tendons of 63 dogs microscopically and biomechanically. Both the gastrocnemius and superficial digital flexor tendon (SFT) had multiple low vascularized fibrocartilaginous areas within their distal course as opposed to regular parallel fibered areas in the proximal tendon areas. Biomechanical testing revealed that the distal sections in both tendons show a 50% and 70% lower tensile strength (F(max)/kg BW) than the proximal sections (p<0.01), respectively. On the contrary, tensile load (F(max)/mm(2)) only differed minimally between proximal and distal sections in both tendons (8% and 9%, respectively), whereas the tensile load of the distal gastrocnemius tendon is 35% lower than of the distal superficial flexor tendon (p<0.01). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to experimentally show that there are different biomechanical properties within the same tendon. The maximum load to failure is lower in the GT compared to the SFT within the same dog which explains its higher incidence of rupture in the field. The avascular fibrocartilaginous structure in the distal gastrocnemius tendon seems to play a further role in the pathogenesis of spontaneous rupture.

  2. Chronic Achilles tendinopathy: a case study of treatment incorporating active and passive tissue warm-up, Graston Technique®, ART®, eccentric exercise, and cryotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Miners, Andrew L.; Bougie, Tracy L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe the subjective pain and functional improvements of a patient with chronic Achilles tendinopathy following a treatment plan incorporating active and passive tissue warm-up, followed respectively by soft tissue mobilization utilizing both Graston Technique® and Active Release Techniques®, eccentric exercise, and static stretching in combination with cryotherapy. Background The primary characterization of chronic Achilles tendinopathy is gradual onset of pain and dysfunction focused in one or both Achilles tendons arising secondary to a history of repetitive use or excessive overload. Intervention and Outcome Conservative treatment is commonly the initial strategy for patient management. Tissue heating, soft tissue mobilization, eccentric training, and static stretching with cryotherapy were implemented to reduce pain and improve function. Summary A specific protocol of heat, soft tissue mobilization, eccentric exercise, stretching, and cryotherapy appeared to facilitate a rapid and complete recovery from chronic Achilles tendinopathy. PMID:22131563

  3. Association of Achilles tendinopathy and plantar spurs.

    PubMed

    Vulcano, Ettore; Mani, Sriniwasan B; Mani, Sriniwasan; Do, Huong; Bohne, Walter H; Ellis, Scott J

    2014-10-01

    Plantar spurs and Achilles tendinopathy are common causes of heel pain. In the authors' practice, it was anecdotally noted that patients with Achilles tendinopathy often presented with plantar spurs. Nonetheless, there is a shortage of studies investigating whether Achilles tendinopathy and plantar spurs exist concomitantly. A better understanding of the association between the 2 pathologies might help physicians recognize and treat both conditions, educate patients about Achilles tendinopathy and plantar spurs, and ultimately investigate possible underlying causes of both pathologies that could be addressed together. The authors examined the prevalence of plantar spurs in patients diagnosed with Achilles tendinopathy as well as demographic differences within the unilateral and bilateral Achilles tendinopathy populations. A total of 785 patient records were retrospectively reviewed. Mean patient age was 56.2±15.5 years (46.9% men and 53.1% women). Seventy-two (9.2%) patients were affected bilaterally by Achilles tendinopathy. Lateral radiographs were reviewed by an orthopedic surgeon to identify the presence of plantar spurs. A total of 329 (41.9%) patients with Achilles tendinopathy were found to have a concomitant plantar spur. Patients with unilateral Achilles tendinopathy and a plantar spur were more likely to be women (58.7% vs 49.8%, P=.020) and older (62.7 vs 51.7 years, P<.001). In the bilateral Achilles tendinopathy group, there were 46 (63.9%) patients with at least one foot presenting with a plantar spur. The study's findings suggest a significant association between Achilles tendinopathy and plantar spurs. Older women with Achilles tendinopathy are at greater risk of being affected by plantar spurs. PMID:25275977

  4. Physiological loading of tendons induces scleraxis expression in epitenon fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Mendias, Christopher L; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Bakhurin, Konstantin I; Lynch, Evan B; Brooks, Susan V

    2012-04-01

    Scleraxis is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that plays a central role in promoting fibroblast proliferation and matrix synthesis during the embryonic development of tendons. Mice with a targeted inactivation of scleraxis (Scx(-/-)) fail to properly form limb tendons, but the role that scleraxis has in regulating the growth and adaptation of tendons of adult organisms is unknown. To determine if scleraxis expression changes in response to a physiological growth stimulus to tendons, we subjected adult mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the scleraxis promoter (ScxGFP) to a 6-week-treadmill training program designed to induce adaptive growth in Achilles tendons. Age matched sedentary ScxGFP mice were used as controls. Scleraxis expression was sparsely observed in the epitenon region of sedentary mice, but in response to treadmill training, scleraxis was robustly expressed in fibroblasts that appeared to be emerging from the epitenon and migrating into the superficial regions of tendon fascicles. Treadmill training also led to an increase in scleraxis, tenomodulin, and type I collagen gene expression as measured by qPCR. These results suggest that in addition to regulating the embryonic formation of limb tendons, scleraxis also appears to play an important role in the adaptation of adult tendons to physiological loading.

  5. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy Regenerates the Native Bone-Tendon Junction after Surgical Repair in a Degenerative Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Nourissat, Geoffroy; Diop, Amadou; Maurel, Nathalie; Salvat, Colette; Dumont, Sylvie; Pigenet, Audrey; Gosset, Marjolaine; Houard, Xavier; Berenbaum, Francis

    2010-01-01

    Background The enthesis, which attaches the tendon to the bone, naturally disappears with aging, thus limiting joint mobility. Surgery is frequently needed but the clinical outcome is often poor due to the decreased natural healing capacity of the elderly. This study explored the benefits of a treatment based on injecting chondrocyte and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in a new rat model of degenerative enthesis repair. Methodology The Achilles' tendon was cut and the enthesis destroyed. The damage was repaired by classical surgery without cell injection (group G1, n = 52) and with chondrocyte (group G2, n = 51) or MSC injection (group G3, n = 39). The healing rate was determined macroscopically 15, 30 and 45 days later. The production and organization of a new enthesis was assessed by histological scoring of collagen II immunostaining, glycoaminoglycan production and the presence of columnar chondrocytes. The biomechanical load required to rupture the bone-tendon junction was determined. Principal Findings The spontaneous healing rate in the G1 control group was 40%, close to those observed in humans. Cell injection significantly improved healing (69%, p = 0.0028 for G2 and p = 0.006 for G3) and the load-to-failure after 45 days (p<0.05) over controls. A new enthesis was clearly produced in cell-injected G2 and G3 rats, but not in the controls. Only the MSC-injected G3 rats had an organized enthesis with columnar chondrocytes as in a native enthesis 45 days after surgery. Conclusions Cell therapy is an efficient procedure for reconstructing degenerative entheses. MSC treatment produced better organ regeneration than chondrocyte treatment. The morphological and biomechanical properties were similar to those of a native enthesis. PMID:20805884

  6. Effects of celecoxib on proliferation and tenocytic differentiation of tendon-derived stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Kairui; Zhang, Sheng; Li, Qianqian; Yang, Jun; Dong, Weiqiang; Wang, Shengnan; Cheng, Yirong; Al-Qwbani, Mohammed; Wang, Qiang; Yu, Bin

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Celecoxib has no effects on TDSCs cell proliferation in various concentrations. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of tendon associated transcription factor. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of main tendon associated collagen. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of tendon associated molecules. - Abstract: NSAIDs are often ingested to reduce the pain and improve regeneration of tendon after tendon injury. Although the effects of NSAIDs in tendon healing have been reported, the data and conclusions are not consistent. Recently, tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) have been isolated from tendon tissues and has been suggested involved in tendon repair. Our study aims to determine the effects of COX-2 inhibitor (celecoxib) on the proliferation and tenocytic differentiation of TDSCs. TDSCs were isolated from mice Achilles tendon and exposed to celecoxib. Cell proliferation rate was investigated at various concentrations (0.1, 1, 10 and 100 μg/ml) of celecoxib by using hemocytometer. The mRNA expression of tendon associated transcription factors, tendon associated collagens and tendon associated molecules were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The protein expression of Collagen I, Collagen III, Scleraxis and Tenomodulin were determined by Western blotting. The results showed that celecoxib has no effects on TDSCs cell proliferation in various concentrations (p > 0.05). The levels of most tendon associated transcription factors, tendon associated collagens and tendon associated molecules genes expression were significantly decreased in celecoxib (10 μg/ml) treated group (p < 0.05). Collagen I, Collagen III, Scleraxis and Tenomodulin protein expression were also significantly decreased in celecoxib (10 μg/ml) treated group (p < 0.05). In conclusion, celecoxib inhibits tenocytic differentiation of tendon-derived stem cells but has no effects on cell proliferation.

  7. Acute Pectoralis Major Rupture Captured on Video.

    PubMed

    Ordas Bayon, Alejandro; Sandoval, Enrique; Valencia Mora, María

    2016-01-01

    Pectoralis major (PM) ruptures are uncommon injuries, although they are becoming more frequent. We report a case of a PM rupture in a young male who presented with axillar pain and absence of the anterior axillary fold after he perceived a snap while lifting 200 kg in the bench press. Diagnosis of PM rupture was suspected clinically and confirmed with imaging studies. The patient was treated surgically, reinserting the tendon to the humerus with suture anchors. One-year follow-up showed excellent results. The patient was recording his training on video, so we can observe in detail the most common mechanism of injury of PM rupture. PMID:27595030

  8. Acute Pectoralis Major Rupture Captured on Video

    PubMed Central

    Valencia Mora, María

    2016-01-01

    Pectoralis major (PM) ruptures are uncommon injuries, although they are becoming more frequent. We report a case of a PM rupture in a young male who presented with axillar pain and absence of the anterior axillary fold after he perceived a snap while lifting 200 kg in the bench press. Diagnosis of PM rupture was suspected clinically and confirmed with imaging studies. The patient was treated surgically, reinserting the tendon to the humerus with suture anchors. One-year follow-up showed excellent results. The patient was recording his training on video, so we can observe in detail the most common mechanism of injury of PM rupture. PMID:27595030

  9. HGF mediates the anti-inflammatory effects of PRP on injured tendons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianying; Middleton, Kellie K; Fu, Freddie H; Im, Hee-Jeong; Wang, James H-C

    2013-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) containing hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and other growth factors are widely used in orthopaedic/sports medicine to repair injured tendons. While PRP treatment is reported to decrease pain in patients with tendon injury, the mechanism of this effect is not clear. Tendon pain is often associated with tendon inflammation, and HGF is known to protect tissues from inflammatory damages. Therefore, we hypothesized that HGF in PRP causes the anti-inflammatory effects. To test this hypothesis, we performed in vitro experiments on rabbit tendon cells and in vivo experiments on a mouse Achilles tendon injury model. We found that addition of PRP or HGF decreased gene expression of COX-1, COX-2, and mPGES-1, induced by the treatment of tendon cells in vitro with IL-1β. Further, the treatment of tendon cell cultures with HGF antibodies reduced the suppressive effects of PRP or HGF on IL-1β-induced COX-1, COX-2, and mPGES-1 gene expressions. Treatment with PRP or HGF almost completely blocked the cellular production of PGE2 and the expression of COX proteins. Finally, injection of PRP or HGF into wounded mouse Achilles tendons in vivo decreased PGE2 production in the tendinous tissues. Injection of platelet-poor plasma (PPP) however, did not reduce PGE2 levels in the wounded tendons, but the injection of HGF antibody inhibited the effects of PRP and HGF. Further, injection of PRP or HGF also decreased COX-1 and COX-2 proteins. These results indicate that PRP exerts anti-inflammatory effects on injured tendons through HGF. This study provides basic scientific evidence to support the use of PRP to treat injured tendons because PRP can reduce inflammation and thereby reduce the associated pain caused by high levels of PGE2.

  10. Triceps surae muscle-tendon properties in older endurance- and sprint-trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Stenroth, Lauri; Cronin, Neil J; Peltonen, Jussi; Korhonen, Marko T; Sipilä, Sarianna; Finni, Taija

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that aging is associated with alterations in muscle architecture and tendon properties (Morse CI, Thom JM, Birch KM, Narici MV. Acta Physiol Scand 183: 291-298, 2005; Narici MV, Maganaris CN, Reeves ND, Capodaglio P. J Appl Physiol 95: 2229-2234, 2003; Stenroth L, Peltonen J, Cronin NJ, Sipila S, Finni T. J Appl Physiol 113: 1537-1544, 2012). However, the possible influence of different types of regular exercise loading on muscle architecture and tendon properties in older adults is poorly understood. To address this, triceps surae muscle-tendon properties were examined in older male endurance (OE, n = 10, age = 74.0 ± 2.8 yr) and sprint runners (OS, n = 10, age = 74.4 ± 2.8 yr), with an average of 42 yr of regular training experience, and compared with age-matched [older control (OC), n = 33, age = 74.8 ± 3.6 yr] and young untrained controls (YC, n = 18, age = 23.7 ± 2.0 yr). Compared with YC, Achilles tendon cross-sectional area (CSA) was 22% (P = 0.022), 45% (P = 0.001), and 71% (P < 0.001) larger in OC, OE, and OS, respectively. Among older groups, OS had significantly larger tendon CSA compared with OC (P = 0.033). No significant between-group differences were observed in Achilles tendon stiffness. In older groups, Young's modulus was 31-44%, and maximal tendon stress 44-55% lower, than in YC (P ≤ 0.001). OE showed shorter soleus fascicle length than both OC (P < 0.05) and YC (P < 0.05). These data suggest that long-term running does not counteract the previously reported age-related increase in tendon CSA, but, instead, may have an additive effect. The greatest Achilles tendon CSA was observed in OS followed by OE and OC, suggesting that adaptation to running exercise is loading intensity dependent. Achilles tendon stiffness was maintained in older groups, even though all older groups displayed larger tendon CSA and lower tendon Young's modulus. Shorter soleus muscle fascicles in OE runners may be an adaptation to life

  11. Extra-corporeal pulsed-activated therapy ("EPAT" sound wave) for Achilles tendinopathy: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Amol; Ramdath, Sona; O'Halloran, Patrick; Gerdesmeyer, Ludger; Gollwitzer, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is common and extracorporeal shockwaves have become a popular treatment for this condition, even though previous research has not provided conclusive results regarding its efficacy in cases of Achilles tendinopathy. Our aim was to evaluate 3 weekly shockwave treatments in patients with Achilles tendinopathy, as quantified by the Roles and Maudsley score. A total of 74 tendons in 60 patients were assessed at baseline and at least 1 year posttreatment, including 32 (43.24%) paratendinoses, 23 (31.08%) proximal tendinoses, and 19 (25.68%) insertional tendinoses. The mean age of the participants was 48.6 ± 12.94 years, and patients with paratendinosis (41.44 ± 14.01 years) were statistically significantly younger than those with proximal (53 ± 8.9 years) and insertional (54.26 ± 9.74 years) tendinopathy, and these differences were statistically significant (P = .0012 and P = .0063, respectively). Overall, 58 (78.38%) tendons improved by at least 1 year posttreatment, including 75% in the paratendinosis, 78.26% in the proximal tendinosis, and 84.21% in the insertional tendinosis groups, and no adverse effects were observed. The Roles and Maudsley score improved from 3.22 ± 0.55 to 1.84 ± 1.05 (P < .0001) in the paratendinosis group, 3.39 ± 0.5 to 1.57 ± 0.66 (P < .0001) in the proximal tendinopathy group, and 3.32 ± 0.58 to 1.47 ± 0.7 (P = .0001) in the insertional tendinopathy group. Based on these results, we believe that shockwave therapy serves as a safe, viable, and effective option for the treatment of Achilles tendinopathy.

  12. On muscle, tendon and high heels.

    PubMed

    Csapo, R; Maganaris, C N; Seynnes, O R; Narici, M V

    2010-08-01

    Wearing high heels (HH) places the calf muscle-tendon unit (MTU) in a shortened position. As muscles and tendons are highly malleable tissues, chronic use of HH might induce structural and functional changes in the calf MTU. To test this hypothesis, 11 women regularly wearing HH and a control group of 9 women were recruited. Gastrocnemius medialis (GM) fascicle length, pennation angle and physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA), the Achilles' tendon (AT) length, cross-sectional area (CSA) and mechanical properties, and the plantarflexion torque-angle and torque-velocity relationships were assessed in both groups. Shorter GM fascicle lengths were observed in the HH group (49.6+/-5.7 mm vs 56.0+/-7.7 mm), resulting in greater tendon-to-fascicle length ratios. Also, because of greater AT CSA, AT stiffness was higher in the HH group (136.2+/-26.5 N mm(-1) vs 111.3+/-20.2 N mm(-1)). However, no differences in the GM PCSA to AT CSA ratio, torque-angle and torque-velocity relationships were found. We conclude that long-term use of high-heeled shoes induces shortening of the GM muscle fascicles and increases AT stiffness, reducing the ankle's active range of motion. Functionally, these two phenomena seem to counteract each other since no significant differences in static or dynamic torques were observed. PMID:20639419

  13. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... when the posterior tibial tendon becomes inflamed or torn. As a result, the tendon may not be ... repetitive use. Once the tendon becomes inflamed or torn, the arch will slowly fall (collapse) over time. ...

  14. Tendon latch

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    A latch connects tendons run from a floating platform to a socket in a foundation on the sea floor. The latch includes a latch body having a plurality of dogs disposed within and urgible outward from the latch body. A piston is releasably disposed within the latch body above the dogs and moves downwardly when released to urge the dogs outwardly from the body into latching engagement with the socket. A trigger mechanism in the latch releases the piston when the latch body lands in the socket and contacts a trigger pin projecting upwardly from the bottom of the socket. A series of wedges are disposed exteriorally on the body and inhibit lateral movement of the body relative to the socket when the tendon is subjected to a cycle bending loads.

  15. The application of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) scaffolds for tendon repair in the rat model.

    PubMed

    Webb, William R; Dale, Tina P; Lomas, Alex J; Zeng, Guodong; Wimpenny, Ian; El Haj, Alicia J; Forsyth, Nicholas R; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2013-09-01

    Tendon injuries and defects present a substantial burden to global healthcare economies. There are no synthetic/biosynthesised implants available which can restore full function or match the mechanical properties of native tendon. Therefore, poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHHx) was investigated for its utility as a scaffold in a rat Achilles tendon repair model. Porous PHBHHx tubes and fibres were prepared with particle leaching and extrusion methods, respectively. Collagen gels reinforced by polymer fibres were inserted into the lumen of scaffold tubes to create the operational scaffold unit. Mechanical testing demonstrated that PHBHHx scaffolds had comparable mechanical properties to rat tendon, with maximal loads of 23.73 ± 1.08 N, compared to 17.35 ± 1.76 N in undamaged rat Achilles tendon. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were split into four experimental groups: control, PHBHHx scaffold only, PHBHHx scaffold and collagen, PHBHHx scaffold, collagen and tenocyte compositions for implantation to repair an induced Achilles tendon defect. No secondary immune response to PHBHHx was observed over a 40 days period of implantation. Movement was restored in PHBHHx scaffold-collagen-tenocyte recipient rats at an earlier time point than in other experimental groups, with complete load-bearing and function returning 20 days post-surgery as determined by the Achilles Functional Index. In vitro testing of tendon constructs after 40 days demonstrated reductions in PHBHHx molecular weight and polydispersity index accompanied by an increase in mean chain length indicating degradation of smaller polymer chain subunits. Similarly a reduction in PHBHHx tube ultimate tensile strength and elastic modulus was observed. Histological analysis provided evidence of tissue remodelling and cell alignment. In summary, PHBHHx scaffolds have been successfully applied in an in vivo tendon repair model raising promise for future utility in tissue engineering applications.

  16. A 3-Dimensional Anatomic Study of the Distal Biceps Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Christine; Li, Zhi; Pennings, Amanda; Agur, Anne; Elmaraghy, Amr

    2015-01-01

    Background Complete rupture of the distal biceps tendon from its osseous attachment is most often treated with operative intervention. Knowledge of the overall tendon morphology as well as the orientation of the collagenous fibers throughout the musculotendinous junction are key to intraoperative decision making and surgical technique in both the acute and chronic setting. Unfortunately, there is little information available in the literature. Purpose To comprehensively describe the morphology of the distal biceps tendon. Study Design Descriptive laboratory study. Methods The distal biceps terminal musculature, musculotendinous junction, and tendon were digitized in 10 cadaveric specimens and data reconstructed using 3-dimensional modeling. Results The average length, width, and thickness of the external distal biceps tendon were found to be 63.0, 6.0, and 3.0 mm, respectively. A unique expansion of the tendon fibers within the distal muscle was characterized, creating a thick collagenous network along the central component between the long and short heads. Conclusion This study documents the morphologic parameters of the native distal biceps tendon. Reconstruction may be necessary, especially in chronic distal biceps tendon ruptures, if the remaining tendon morphology is significantly compromised compared with the native distal biceps tendon. Knowledge of normal anatomical distal biceps tendon parameters may also guide the selection of a substitute graft with similar morphological characteristics. Clinical Relevance A thorough description of distal biceps tendon morphology is important to guide intraoperative decision making between primary repair and reconstruction and to better select the most appropriate graft. The detailed description of the tendinous expansion into the muscle may provide insight into better graft-weaving and suture-grasping techniques to maximize proximal graft incorporation. PMID:26665092

  17. Gastrocnemius myotendinous flap for patellar or quadriceps tendon repair, or both.

    PubMed

    Rhomberg, M; Schwabegger, A H; Ninkovic, M; Bauer, T; Ninkovic, M

    2000-08-01

    The authors' experience with simultaneous reconstruction of the quadriceps femoris or patellar tendon or both and soft tissue defect using a musculotendinous unit of the gastrocnemius muscle is presented. Five patients with a partial or complete defect of the quadriceps or patellar tendon or both and additional large soft tissue defects underwent reconstruction applying this technique as a one-stage surgical procedure in different variations. In cases with a partial defect of the tendon or loss of tendon thickness, the thick aponeurosis from the deeper aspect of the gastrocnemius was dissected and transferred as a pedicled tendon flap to reconstruct the tendon defect. In cases with a complete defect of the tendon, the superficial layer of the Achilles tendon together with the deep aponeurotic layer of the gastrocnemius muscle served to reconstruct the tendon. In both procedures the gastrocnemius muscle belly provided soft tissue coverage and was covered with a split thickness skin graft. One patient had a marginal deep necrosis develop that had to be covered with the other gastrocnemius muscle in a second operation. One patient with chronic polyarthritis and infection of his knee prosthesis declined additional reconstruction surgery and had the leg amputated. The average followup was 3.5 years. All patients achieved good results in active extension of the knee with an extension deficit of only 5 degrees to 15 degrees. The range of flexion was at least 90 degrees. The surgical technique described in this report provides functional tendon reconstruction and adequate soft tissue repair simultaneously.

  18. Pleiotropic roles of the matricellular protein Sparc in tendon maturation and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Gehwolf, Renate; Wagner, Andrea; Lehner, Christine; Bradshaw, Amy D.; Scharler, Cornelia; Niestrawska, Justyna A.; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.; Bauer, Hans-Christian; Tempfer, Herbert; Traweger, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Acute and chronic tendinopathies remain clinically challenging and tendons are predisposed to degeneration or injury with age. Despite the high prevalence of tendon disease in the elderly, our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying the age-dependent deterioration of tendon function remains very limited. Here, we show that Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (Sparc) expression significantly decreases in healthy-aged mouse Achilles tendons. Loss of Sparc results in tendon collagen fibrillogenesis defects and Sparc−/− tendons are less able to withstand force in comparison with their respective wild type counterparts. On the cellular level, Sparc-null and healthy-aged tendon-derived cells exhibited a more contracted phenotype and an altered actin cytoskeleton. Additionally, an elevated expression of the adipogenic marker genes PPARγ and Cebpα with a concomitant increase in lipid deposits in aged and Sparc−/− tendons was observed. In summary, we propose that Sparc levels in tendons are critical for proper collagen fibril maturation and its age-related decrease, together with a change in ECM properties favors lipid accretion in tendons. PMID:27586416

  19. Pleiotropic roles of the matricellular protein Sparc in tendon maturation and ageing.

    PubMed

    Gehwolf, Renate; Wagner, Andrea; Lehner, Christine; Bradshaw, Amy D; Scharler, Cornelia; Niestrawska, Justyna A; Holzapfel, Gerhard A; Bauer, Hans-Christian; Tempfer, Herbert; Traweger, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Acute and chronic tendinopathies remain clinically challenging and tendons are predisposed to degeneration or injury with age. Despite the high prevalence of tendon disease in the elderly, our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying the age-dependent deterioration of tendon function remains very limited. Here, we show that Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (Sparc) expression significantly decreases in healthy-aged mouse Achilles tendons. Loss of Sparc results in tendon collagen fibrillogenesis defects and Sparc-/- tendons are less able to withstand force in comparison with their respective wild type counterparts. On the cellular level, Sparc-null and healthy-aged tendon-derived cells exhibited a more contracted phenotype and an altered actin cytoskeleton. Additionally, an elevated expression of the adipogenic marker genes PPARγ and Cebpα with a concomitant increase in lipid deposits in aged and Sparc-/- tendons was observed. In summary, we propose that Sparc levels in tendons are critical for proper collagen fibril maturation and its age-related decrease, together with a change in ECM properties favors lipid accretion in tendons. PMID:27586416

  20. Pleiotropic roles of the matricellular protein Sparc in tendon maturation and ageing.

    PubMed

    Gehwolf, Renate; Wagner, Andrea; Lehner, Christine; Bradshaw, Amy D; Scharler, Cornelia; Niestrawska, Justyna A; Holzapfel, Gerhard A; Bauer, Hans-Christian; Tempfer, Herbert; Traweger, Andreas

    2016-09-02

    Acute and chronic tendinopathies remain clinically challenging and tendons are predisposed to degeneration or injury with age. Despite the high prevalence of tendon disease in the elderly, our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying the age-dependent deterioration of tendon function remains very limited. Here, we show that Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (Sparc) expression significantly decreases in healthy-aged mouse Achilles tendons. Loss of Sparc results in tendon collagen fibrillogenesis defects and Sparc-/- tendons are less able to withstand force in comparison with their respective wild type counterparts. On the cellular level, Sparc-null and healthy-aged tendon-derived cells exhibited a more contracted phenotype and an altered actin cytoskeleton. Additionally, an elevated expression of the adipogenic marker genes PPARγ and Cebpα with a concomitant increase in lipid deposits in aged and Sparc-/- tendons was observed. In summary, we propose that Sparc levels in tendons are critical for proper collagen fibril maturation and its age-related decrease, together with a change in ECM properties favors lipid accretion in tendons.

  1. Parameter maps of 1H residual dipolar couplings in tendon under mechanical load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fechete, R.; Demco, D. E.; Blümich, B.

    2003-11-01

    Proton multipolar spin states associated with dipolar encoded longitudinal magnetization (DELM) and double-quantum (DQ) coherences of bound water are investigated for bovine and sheep Achilles tendon under mechanical load. DELM decay curves and DQ buildup and decay curves reveal changes of the 1H residual dipolar couplings for tendon at rest and under local compression forces. The multipolar spin states are used to design dipolar contrast filters for NMR 1H images of heterogeneous tendon. Heterogeneities in tendon samples were artificially generated by local compression parallel and perpendicular to the tendon plug axis. Quotient images obtained from DQ-filtered images by matched and mismatched excitation/reconversion periods are encoded only by the residual dipolar couplings. Semi-quantitative parameter maps of the residual dipolar couplings of bound water were obtained from these quotient images using a reference elastomer sample. This method can be used to quantify NMR imaging of injured ordered tissues.

  2. The axial injury tolerance of the human foot/ankle complex and the effect of Achilles tension.

    PubMed

    Funk, James R; Crandall, Jeff R; Tourret, Lisa J; MacMahon, Conor B; Bass, Cameron R; Patrie, James T; Khaewpong, Nopporn; Eppinger, Rolf H

    2002-12-01

    Axial loading of the foot/ankle complex is an important injury mechanism in vehicular trauma that is responsible for severe injuries such as calcaneal and tibial pilon fractures. Axial loading may be applied to the leg externally, by the toepan and/or pedals, as well as internally, by active muscle tension applied through the Achilles tendon during pre-impact bracing. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of Achilles tension on fracture mode and to empirically model the axial loading tolerance of the foot/ankle complex. Blunt axial impact tests were performed on forty-three (43) isolated lower extremities with and without experimentally simulated Achilles tension. The primary fracture mode was calcaneal fracture in both groups. However, fracture initiated at the distal tibia more frequently with the addition of Achilles tension (p < 0.05). Acoustic sensors mounted to the bone demonstrated that fracture initiated at the time of peak local axial force. A survival analysis was performed on the injury data set using a Weibull regression model with specimen age, gender, body mass, and peak Achilles tension as predictor variables (R2 = 0.90). A closed-form survivor function was developed to predict the risk of fracture to the foot/ankle complex in terms of axial tibial force. The axial tibial force associated with a 50% risk of injury ranged from 3.7 kN for a 65 year-old 5th percentile female to 8.3 kN for a 45 year-old 50th percentile male, assuming no Achilles tension. The survivor function presented here may be used to estimate the risk of foot/ankle fracture that a blunt axial impact would pose to a human based on the peak tibial axial force measured by an anthropomorphic test device. PMID:12596644

  3. Reduction in tendon elasticity from unloading is unrelated to its hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Kinugasa, Ryuta; Hodgson, John A; Edgerton, V Reggie; Shin, David D; Sinha, Shantanu

    2010-09-01

    Tendinous tissues respond to chronic unloading with adaptive changes in mechanical, elastic, and morphological properties. However, little is known about the changes in the detailed structures of the entire tendinous tissue and whether the change in tendon stiffness is related to morphology. We investigated changes in dimensional (volume, cross-sectional area, segmented lengths) and elastic (Young's modulus) properties of the Achilles tendon and distal aponeurosis in response to chronic unilateral lower limb suspension (ULLS) using velocity encoded phase contrast (VE-PC) and three-dimensional morphometric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Five healthy subjects underwent ULLS for 4 wk. Axial morphometric MRI was acquired along the entire length from the calcaneous to the medial gastrocnemius insertion. An oblique sagittal VE-PC MRI was also acquired. The Young's modulus could be calculated from this cine dynamic sequence of velocity encoded images from the slope of the stress-strain curve during the submaximal isometric plantar flexion. After 4 wk of ULLS, we found significant (46.7%) decrease in maximum plantar flexion torque. The total volumes of entire tendinous tissue (determined as the sum of the Achilles tendon and distal aponeurosis) increased significantly by 6.4% (11.9 vs. 12.7 ml) after ULLS. In contrast, Young's modulus decreased significantly by 10.4% (211.7 vs. 189.6 MPa) for the Achilles tendon and 29.0% for the distal aponeurosis (158.8 vs. 113.0 MPa) following ULLS. There was no significant correlation between relative change in volume and Young's modulus with 4 wk of ULLS. It is suggested that, although tendon hypertrophy can be expected to adversely affect tendon stiffness, the absence of any significant correlation between the magnitude of tendon hypertrophy and reduced Young's modulus indicates that dimensional factors were not critical to the elastic properties.

  4. Effects of isotretinoin treatment on cartilage and tendon thicknesses: an ultrasonographic study.

    PubMed

    Yıldızgören, Mustafa Turgut; Karataş Toğral, Arzu; Baki, Ali Erdem; Ekiz, Timur

    2015-07-01

    Effects of retinoic acid on collagen synthesis and cartilage have previously been shown. However, its effects on cartilage and tendons in humans have not been studied yet. Therefore, in order to provide a morphologic insight, the aim of this study was to measure femoral cartilage, Achilles and supraspinatus tendon thicknesses in patients under systemic isotretinoin treatment by using ultrasound. Fifteen patients (nine F, six M) who used isotretinoin for their acnes were included. All patients were treated with isotretinoin 0.5 mg/kg/day for the first month, and the dosage was escalated up to 1 mg/kg/day thereafter. Distal femoral cartilage, supraspinatus, and Achilles tendons thicknesses have been evaluated both before the treatment and at the end of the third month. Femoral cartilage thicknesses were assessed from three midpoints bilaterally; medial condyle, lateral condyle, and intercondylar area. Short/long-axis diameters and cross-sectional area of the Achilles tendons and axial tendon thicknesses of supraspinatus tendon were evaluated from the nondominant side. The mean age of the patients was 20.1 ± 4.9 years, and body mass index was 21.7 ± 2.5 kg/m(2). Although posttreatment cartilage measurements of 30 knees were lower for the three midpoints, it reached significance only for lateral condyle (p = 0.05). In addition, posttreatment tendon measurements were not statistically significant compared with pretreatment values (all p > 0.05). Systemic isotretinoin treatment seems to make cartilage thinner. Further studies considering histological and molecular evaluations with more sample sizes are awaited. PMID:24985041

  5. Effects of isotretinoin treatment on cartilage and tendon thicknesses: an ultrasonographic study.

    PubMed

    Yıldızgören, Mustafa Turgut; Karataş Toğral, Arzu; Baki, Ali Erdem; Ekiz, Timur

    2015-07-01

    Effects of retinoic acid on collagen synthesis and cartilage have previously been shown. However, its effects on cartilage and tendons in humans have not been studied yet. Therefore, in order to provide a morphologic insight, the aim of this study was to measure femoral cartilage, Achilles and supraspinatus tendon thicknesses in patients under systemic isotretinoin treatment by using ultrasound. Fifteen patients (nine F, six M) who used isotretinoin for their acnes were included. All patients were treated with isotretinoin 0.5 mg/kg/day for the first month, and the dosage was escalated up to 1 mg/kg/day thereafter. Distal femoral cartilage, supraspinatus, and Achilles tendons thicknesses have been evaluated both before the treatment and at the end of the third month. Femoral cartilage thicknesses were assessed from three midpoints bilaterally; medial condyle, lateral condyle, and intercondylar area. Short/long-axis diameters and cross-sectional area of the Achilles tendons and axial tendon thicknesses of supraspinatus tendon were evaluated from the nondominant side. The mean age of the patients was 20.1 ± 4.9 years, and body mass index was 21.7 ± 2.5 kg/m(2). Although posttreatment cartilage measurements of 30 knees were lower for the three midpoints, it reached significance only for lateral condyle (p = 0.05). In addition, posttreatment tendon measurements were not statistically significant compared with pretreatment values (all p > 0.05). Systemic isotretinoin treatment seems to make cartilage thinner. Further studies considering histological and molecular evaluations with more sample sizes are awaited.

  6. Direct Repair without Augmentation of Patellar Tendon Avulsion following TKA

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nishikant; Yadav, Chandrashekhar; Kumar, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Complications involving the extensor mechanism after TKA are potentially disastrous. We are reporting a case of patellar tendon rupture from tibial tuberosity following total knee arthroplasty. We managed it by direct repair with fiberwire using Krackow suture technique without augmentation. Our long term result has been very encouraging. Our method is a safe and better method of management of patellar tendon avulsion following TKA when it happens without any tissue loss. PMID:25632362

  7. Rupture disc

    DOEpatents

    Newton, Robert G.

    1977-01-01

    The intermediate heat transport system for a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor includes a device for rapidly draining the sodium therefrom should a sodium-water reaction occur within the system. This device includes a rupturable member in a drain line in the system and means for cutting a large opening therein and for positively removing the sheared-out portion from the opening cut in the rupturable member. According to the preferred embodiment of the invention the rupturable member includes a solid head seated in the end of the drain line having a rim extending peripherally therearound, the rim being clamped against the end of the drain line by a clamp ring having an interior shearing edge, the bottom of the rupturable member being convex and extending into the drain line. Means are provided to draw the rupturable member away from the drain line against the shearing edge to clear the drain line for outflow of sodium therethrough.

  8. Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 enhances the growth hormone receptor expression in tendon fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chung-Hsun; Tsai, Wen-Chung; Hsu, Ya-Hui; Pang, Jong-Hwei Su

    2014-01-01

    BPC 157, a pentadecapeptide derived from human gastric juice, has been demonstrated to promote the healing of different tissues, including skin, muscle, bone, ligament and tendon in many animal studies. However, the underlying mechanism has not been fully clarified. The present study aimed to explore the effect of BPC 157 on tendon fibroblasts isolated from Achilles tendon of male Sprague-Dawley rat. From the result of cDNA microarray analysis, growth hormone receptor was revealed as one of the most abundantly up-regulated genes in tendon fibroblasts by BPC 157. BPC 157 dose- and time-dependently increased the expression of growth hormone receptor in tendon fibroblasts at both the mRNA and protein levels as measured by RT/real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. The addition of growth hormone to BPC 157-treated tendon fibroblasts dose- and time-dependently increased the cell proliferation as determined by MTT assay and PCNA expression by RT/real-time PCR. Janus kinase 2, the downstream signal pathway of growth hormone receptor, was activated time-dependently by stimulating the BPC 157-treated tendon fibroblasts with growth hormone. In conclusion, the BPC 157-induced increase of growth hormone receptor in tendon fibroblasts may potentiate the proliferation-promoting effect of growth hormone and contribute to the healing of tendon. PMID:25415472

  9. Diabetes alters mechanical properties and collagen fiber re-alignment in multiple mouse tendons.

    PubMed

    Connizzo, Brianne K; Bhatt, Pankti R; Liechty, Kenneth W; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2014-09-01

    Tendons function to transfer load from muscle to bone through their complex composition and hierarchical structure, consisting mainly of type I collagen. Recent evidence suggests that type II diabetes may cause alterations in collagen structure, such as irregular fibril morphology and density, which could play a role in the mechanical function of tendons. Using the db/db mouse model of type II diabetes, the diabetic skin was found to have impaired biomechanical properties when compared to the non-diabetic group. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of diabetes on biomechanics, collagen fiber re-alignment, and biochemistry in three functionally different tendons (Achilles, supraspinatus, patellar) using the db/db mouse model. Results showed that cross-sectional area and stiffness, but not modulus, were significantly reduced in all three tendons. However, the tendon response to load (transition strain, collagen fiber re-alignment) occurred earlier in the mechanical test, contrary to expectations. In addition, the patellar tendon had an altered response to diabetes when compared to the other two tendons, with no changes in fiber re-alignment and decreased collagen content at the midsubstance of the tendon. Overall, type II diabetes alters tendon mechanical properties and the dynamic response to load.

  10. IL-1β Irreversibly Inhibits Tenogenic Differentiation and Alters Metabolism In Injured Tendon-Derived Progenitor Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kairui; Asai, Shuji; Yu, Bin; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2015-01-01

    Tendon injuries are common, and the damaged tendon often turns into scar tissue and never completely regains the original biomechanical properties. Previous studies have reported that the mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β are remarkably up-regulated in injured tendons. To examine how IL-1β impacts tendon repair process, we isolated the injured tendon-derived progenitor cells (inTPCs) from mouse injured Achilles tendons and studied the effects of IL-1β on the inTPCs in vitro. IL-1β treatment strongly reduced expression of tendon cell markers such as scleraxis and tenomodulin, and also down-regulated gene expression of collagen 1, collagen 3, biglycan and fibromodulin in inTPCs. Interestingly, IL-1β stimulated lactate production with increases in hexokinase II and lactate dehydrogenase expression and a decrease in pyruvate dehydrogenase. Inhibition of lactate production restored IL-1β-induced down-regulation of collagen1 and scleraxis expression. Furthermore, IL-1β significantly inhibited adipogenic, chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation of inTPCs. Interestingly, inhibition of tenogenic and adipogenic differentiation was not recovered after removal of IL-1β while chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation abilities were not affected. These findings indicate that IL-1β strongly and irreversibly impairs tenogenic potential and alters glucose metabolism in tendon progenitors appearing in injured tendons. Inhibition of IL-1β may be beneficial for maintaining function of tendon progenitor cells during the tendon repair process. PMID:26051275

  11. Laser Therapy in the Treatment of Achilles Tendinopathy: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumilty, Steve; Munn, Joanne; Haxby Abbott, J.; Mcdonough, Suzanne; Hurley, Deirdre A.; Basford, Jeffrey R.; David Baxter, G.

    2010-05-01

    Background: Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) has emerged as a possible treatment modality for tendinopathies. Human studies have investigated LLLT for Achilles Tendinopathy and the effectiveness remains contentious. Purpose: To assess the clinical effectiveness of Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) in the management of Achilles Tendinopathy. Method: Forty patients were randomised into an active laser or placebo group; all patients, therapists and investigator were blinded to allocation. All patients were given an eccentric exercise program and irradiated 3 times per week for 4 weeks with either an active or placebo laser at 6 standardized points over the affected tendons. Irradiation parameters in the active laser group were: 810 nm, 100 mW, applied to 6 points on the tendon for 30 seconds giving a dose of 3 J per point and 18 J per session; power density 100 mW/cm2. Outcome measures were the VISA-A questionnaire and a visual analogue scale of pain. Patients were measured before treatment, at 4 and 12 weeks. ANCOVA was used to analyze data, using the effects of baseline measurements as a covariate. Results: Within groups, there were significant improvements (p<0.05) at 4 and 12 weeks for all outcome measures, except pain for the laser group at 4 weeks (p = 0.13). Between groups differences at both 4 and 12 weeks showed no significant difference between groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: This use of the above parameters demonstrated no added benefit of LLLT over that of eccentric exercise in the treatment of Achilles Tendinopathy.

  12. Outcome of quadriceps tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Puranik, Gururaj S; Faraj, Adnan

    2006-04-01

    Complete rupture of the quadriceps tendon is a well-described injury. There is a scarcity of literature relating to the outcome of patients with this injury after surgery. We undertook a retrospective analysis of patients who had surgical repair of their quadriceps tendon at our institution over a 13-year period, totalling 21 patients. Males were more commonly affected, with a male/female ratio of 4:1. The peak incidence was in the sixth decade of life. Assessment consisted of the completion of a functional knee questionnaire and a clinical examination. Symptomatic outcome following surgical repair was good with a mean symptom score generated of 19.16 out of a maximum of 25 using the Rougraff et al scoring system. Most of the patients returned to their pre-injury level of activity. Five degrees deficit and extension lag was present in three patients; these patients had the quadriceps repaired using transosseous sutures. Patients who had direct repair of the tendon using the Bunnell technique had lower Rougraff scores than the rest.

  13. Endoscopic Resection of Lipoma of the Patellar Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing; Lee, Man Wai

    2015-01-01

    Synovial lipoma of the patellar tendon is a very rare entity. It can be associated with rupture of the patellar tendon. We present a case of synovial lipoma that was successfully resected endoscopically. The other indications for patellar tendoscopy include chronic patellar tendinitis and tendinosis, recalcitrant bursitis around the tendon, Osgood-Schlatter disease, and jumper's knee. The major potential danger of this endoscopic procedure is iatrogenic damage to the patellar insertion during endoscopic debridement in patients with jumper's knee or the tibial insertion during endoscopic debridement in patients with Osgood-Schlatter disease. PMID:25973368

  14. Posttraumatic posterior tibialis tendon insertional elongation with functional incompetency: a case report.

    PubMed

    Marks, R M; Schon, L C

    1998-03-01

    We present a case report and literature review of distal intrasubstance rupture of the posterior tibial tendon with progressive pes planovalgus secondary to tendon incompetence. Three months after a severe ankle sprain, a 25-year-old basketball player presented with ankle weakness and pain. Treatment by advancement of the posterior tibial tendon to the navicular and medial displacement osteotomy of the calcaneal tuberosity restored alignment, strength, and full function.

  15. Changes in Indirect Markers of Muscle Damage and Tendons After Daily Drop Jumping Exercise with Rapid Load Increase.

    PubMed

    Paleckis, Vidas; Mickevičius, Mantas; Snieckus, Audrius; Streckis, Vytautas; Pääsuke, Mati; Rutkauskas, Saulius; Steponavičiūtė, Rasa; Skurvydas, Albertas; Kamandulis, Sigitas

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess changes in indirect markers of muscle damage and type I collagen degradation, as well as, patellar and Achilles tendon morphological differences during nine daily drop-jumps sessions with constant load alternated with rapid increases in load to test the hypothesis that frequent drop-jump training results in negative muscular and tendon adaptation. Young men (n = 9) performed daily drop jump workouts with progression every 3 days in terms of number of jumps, platform height and squat amplitude. Voluntary and electrically evoked knee extensor torque, muscle soreness, blood plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity and carboxyterminal cross-linked telopeptide (ICTP), patellar and Achilles tendon thickness and cross-sectional area (CSA) were assessed at different time points during the training period and again on days 1, 3, 10 and 17 after the training. The findings were as follows: (1) steady decline in maximal muscle strength with major recovery within 24 hours after the first six daily training sessions; (2) larger decline in electrically induced muscle torque and prolonged recovery during last three training sessions; (3) increase in patellar and Achilles tendons CSA without change in thickness towards the end of training period; (4) increase in jump height but not in muscle strength after whole training period. Our findings suggest that frequent drop-jump sessions with constant load alternated with rapid increases in load do not induce severe muscle damage or major changes in tendons, nonetheless, this type of loading is not advisable for muscle strength improvement. Key pointsFrequent drop jump training induces activation mode dependent muscle torque depression late in the training period.No significant changes in the thickness of patellar and Achilles tendons are observed during frequent training, while CSA increases towards the end of training period.Longitudinal effect for jump height but not for muscle strength is evident after

  16. Transverse Compression of Tendons.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, S T Samuel; Buckley, C Paul; Zavatsky, Amy B

    2016-04-01

    A study was made of the deformation of tendons when compressed transverse to the fiber-aligned axis. Bovine digital extensor tendons were compression tested between flat rigid plates. The methods included: in situ image-based measurement of tendon cross-sectional shapes, after preconditioning but immediately prior to testing; multiple constant-load creep/recovery tests applied to each tendon at increasing loads; and measurements of the resulting tendon displacements in both transverse directions. In these tests, friction resisted axial stretch of the tendon during compression, giving approximately plane-strain conditions. This, together with the assumption of a form of anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model proposed previously for tendon, justified modeling the isochronal response of tendon as that of an isotropic, slightly compressible, neo-Hookean solid. Inverse analysis, using finite-element (FE) simulations of the experiments and 10 s isochronal creep displacement data, gave values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of this solid of 0.31 MPa and 0.49, respectively, for an idealized tendon shape and averaged data for all the tendons and E = 0.14 and 0.10 MPa for two specific tendons using their actual measured geometry. The compression load versus displacement curves, as measured and as simulated, showed varying degrees of stiffening with increasing load. This can be attributed mostly to geometrical changes in tendon cross section under load, varying according to the initial 3D shape of the tendon. PMID:26833218

  17. Transverse Compression of Tendons.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, S T Samuel; Buckley, C Paul; Zavatsky, Amy B

    2016-04-01

    A study was made of the deformation of tendons when compressed transverse to the fiber-aligned axis. Bovine digital extensor tendons were compression tested between flat rigid plates. The methods included: in situ image-based measurement of tendon cross-sectional shapes, after preconditioning but immediately prior to testing; multiple constant-load creep/recovery tests applied to each tendon at increasing loads; and measurements of the resulting tendon displacements in both transverse directions. In these tests, friction resisted axial stretch of the tendon during compression, giving approximately plane-strain conditions. This, together with the assumption of a form of anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model proposed previously for tendon, justified modeling the isochronal response of tendon as that of an isotropic, slightly compressible, neo-Hookean solid. Inverse analysis, using finite-element (FE) simulations of the experiments and 10 s isochronal creep displacement data, gave values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of this solid of 0.31 MPa and 0.49, respectively, for an idealized tendon shape and averaged data for all the tendons and E = 0.14 and 0.10 MPa for two specific tendons using their actual measured geometry. The compression load versus displacement curves, as measured and as simulated, showed varying degrees of stiffening with increasing load. This can be attributed mostly to geometrical changes in tendon cross section under load, varying according to the initial 3D shape of the tendon.

  18. Observation of tendon repair in animal model using second-harmonic-generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Eiji; Minamikawa, Takeo; Sato, Katsuya; Takahashi, Mitsuhiko; Yasui, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    Tendon rupture is a trauma difficult to recover the condition before injury. In previous researches, tensile test and staining method have been widely used to elucidate the mechanism of the repair process from the viewpoints of the mechanical property and the histological findings. However, since both methods are destructive and invasive, it is difficult to obtain both of them for the same sample. If both the mechanical property and the histological findings can be obtained from the same sample, one may obtain new findings regarding mechanisms of tendon repairing process. In this paper, we used second-harmonic-generation (SHG) microscopy, showing high selectivity and good image contrast to collagen molecules as well as high spatial resolution, optical three-dimensional sectioning, deep penetration, and without additional staining. Since SHG light intensity sensitively reflects the structural maturity of collagen molecule and its aggregates, it will be a good indicator for the repairing degree of the ruptured tendon. From comparison of SHG images between the 4-weeks-repaired tendon and the sound tendon in the animal model, we confirmed that SHG light intensity of the repaired tendon was significantly lower than that of the sound tendon, indicating that the collagen structure in the repaired tendon is still immature. Furthermore, we performed both SHG imaging and the tensile test for the same sample, and confirmed a correlation between them. This result shows a potential of SHG light for an indicator of the histological and mechanical recovery of the ruptured tendon.

  19. Biomechanics of Tendon Transfers.

    PubMed

    Livermore, Andrew; Tueting, Jonathan L

    2016-08-01

    The transfer of tendons in the upper extremity is a powerful technique to restore function to a partially paralyzed hand. The biomechanical principles of muscle tension and tendon excursion dictate motor function both in the native as well as transferred states. Appropriately tensioning transferred tendons to maximize the function of the associated muscle remains an area of focused research. Newer methods of tendon coaptation have proven similar in strength to the standard Pulvertaft weave, affording more options to the surgeon. PMID:27387073

  20. Musculoskeletal diseases—tendon

    PubMed Central

    Sakabe, Tomoya; Sakai, Takao

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Tendons establish specific connections between muscles and the skeleton by transferring contraction forces from skeletal muscle to bone thereby allowing body movement. Tendon physiology and pathology are heavily dependent on mechanical stimuli. Tendon injuries clinically represent a serious and still unresolved problem since damaged tendon tissues heal very slowly and no surgical treatment can restore a damaged tendon to its normal structural integrity and mechanical strength. Understanding how mechanical stimuli regulate tendon tissue homeostasis and regeneration will improve the treatment of adult tendon injuries that still pose a great challenge in today's medicine. Source of data This review summarizes the current status of tendon treatment and discusses new directions from the point of view of cell-based therapy and regenerative medicine approach. We searched the available literature using PubMed for relevant original articles and reviews. Growing points Identification of tendon cell markers has enabled us to study precisely tendon healing and homeostasis. Clinically, tissue engineering for tendon injuries is an emerging technology comprising elements from the fields of cellular source, scaffold materials, growth factors/cytokines and gene delivering systems. Areas timely for developing research The clinical settings to establish appropriate microenvironment for injured tendons with the combination of these novel cellular- and molecular-based scaffolds will be critical for the treatment. PMID:21729872

  1. Tendon development and diseases.

    PubMed

    Gaut, Ludovic; Duprez, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    Tendon is a uniaxial connective tissue component of the musculoskeletal system. Tendon is involved in force transmission between muscle and bone. Tendon injury is very common and debilitating but tendon repair remains a clinical challenge for orthopedic medicine. In vertebrates, tendon is mainly composed of type I collagen fibrils, displaying a parallel organization along the tendon axis. The tendon-specific spatial organization of type I collagen provides the mechanical properties for tendon function. In contrast to other components of the musculoskeletal system, tendon biology is poorly understood. An important goal in tendon biology is to understand the mechanisms involved in the production and assembly of type I collagen fibrils during development, postnatal formation, and healing processes in order to design new therapies for tendon repair. In this review we highlight the current understanding of the molecular and mechanical signals known to be involved in tenogenesis during development, and how development provides insights into tendon healing processes. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:5-23. doi: 10.1002/wdev.201 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  2. Pressurized gas filled tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Silcox, W. H.

    1985-06-04

    Pressurized gas filled tubular tendons provide a means for detecting leaks therein. Filling the tendon with a gaseous fluid provides increased buoyancy and reduces the weight supported by the buoyant structure. The use of a corrosion inhibiting gaseous fluid reduces the corrosion of the interior tendon wall.

  3. Tendon Tissue Engineering and Its Role on Healing of the Experimentally Induced Large Tendon Defect Model in Rabbits: A Comprehensive In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Meimandi-Parizi, Abdolhamid; Oryan, Ahmad; Moshiri, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Healing of large tendon defects is challenging. We studied the role of collagen implant with or without polydioxanone (PDS) sheath on the healing of a large Achilles tendon defect model, in rabbits. Sixty rabbits were divided into three groups. A 2 cm gap was created in the left Achilles tendon of all rabbits. In the control lesions, no implant was used. The other two groups were reconstructed by collagen and collagen-PDS implants respectively. The animals were clinically examined at weekly intervals and their lesions were observed by ultrasonography. Blood samples were obtained from the animals and were assessed for hematological analysis and determination of serum PDGF level, at 60 days post injury (DPI). The animals were then euthanized and their lesions were assessed for gross and histopathology, scanning electron microscopy, biomechanical testing, dry matter and hydroxyproline content. Another 65 pilot animals were also studied grossly and histopathologically to define the host implant interaction and graft incorporation at serial time points. The treated animals gained significantly better clinical scoring compared to the controls. Treatment with collagen and collagen-PDS implants significantly increased the biomechanical properties of the lesions compared to the control tendons at 60DPI (P<0.05). The tissue engineered implants also reduced peritendinous adhesion, muscle fibrosis and atrophy, and increased ultrasonographical echogenicity and homogenicity, maturation and differentiation of the collagen fibrils and fibers, tissue alignment and volume of the regenerated tissue compared to those of the control lesions (P<0.05). The implants were gradually absorbed and substituted by the new tendon. Implantation of the bioimplants had a significant role in initiating tendon healing and the implants were biocompatible, biodegradable and safe for application in tendon reconstructive surgery. The results of the present study may be valuable in clinical practice. PMID

  4. Use of a Hunter Rod for Staged Reconstruction of Peroneal Tendons.

    PubMed

    Raikin, Steven M; Schick, Faith A; Karanjia, Homyar N

    2016-01-01

    Peroneal tendon pathology is a commonly reported cause of lateral ankle pain. The causes include cavovarus foot type, overuse, chronic tendinosis, peroneal subluxation or dislocation, acute traumatic split tears, and traumatic rupture. The purpose of the present report is to describe an alternative approach for surgical reconstruction of the peroneal tendons in patients when repair might no longer be effective. The use of a Hunter rod was originally described by Hunter in 1971 for 2-stage reconstruction of tendons in the hand. We present a 2-stage surgical technique with the use of a Hunter rod as a temporary implant to stimulate generation of a healthy peroneal tendon sheath to host a flexor hallucis longus tendon transfer. This has proved to be a successful treatment option for patients with severe peroneal tendon damage and scarring along the peroneal tendon sheath. We offer a sample case to illustrate a patient with such indications.

  5. Management of acute Achilles tendinopathy: effect of etoricoxib on pain control and leg stiffness.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier; Kokalj, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    Tendinopathies are a major cause of disability in the athletic population; the main purpose of the treatment of these injuries is to reduce pain and improve function promptly. The objective of this randomized, active comparator controlled, blinded study was to evaluate etoricoxib efficacy in pain control and leg stiffness in athletes suffering acute unilateral Achilles tendinopathy. Fifty-six eligible male athletes (mean age 37.5 ± 11.0 y) suffering acute Achilles tendinopathy were randomized to receive either etoricoxib 120 mg oral once daily (n=28) or diclofenac 100 mg oral once daily (n=28). Pain (100-mm visual analogue scale-VAS), analgesic effect (percentage of 100-mm VAS reduction), satisfaction with pain management (PGART), and leg stiffness (LSR) were evaluated after one week of anti-inflammatory treatment. Over the 7-day treatment period, both etoricoxib and diclofenac provided significantly relief of Achilles tendon pain compared to that experienced at baseline (mean VAS 26.7 ± 2.2 and 56.4 ± 1.8, respectively; p<.001). Analgesic effect averaged 53.7 ± 38.1% (etoricoxib= 56.4% and diclofenac 50.6%, p=0.64). Patients referred high level of satisfaction with anti-inflammatory treatment (PGART = 2.0 ± 1.3), while leg stiffness showed a significant improvement after one-week therapy (LSR 0.89 ± 0.1 vs. 0.95 ± 0.1; p=0.038). PGART and LSR values within etoricoxib and diclofenac groups were not significant (p=0.46, and p=0.37, respectively). Both drugs were generally well tolerated; patients receiving etoricoxib reported significantly less side effects than those in the diclofenac group (0% and 14,2%, respectively, p=0.037). Etoricoxib is clinically effective in treatment of acute Achilles tendinopathy providing a magnitude of effect comparable to that of diclofenac with fewer side effects. Effective control of tendon pain in the acute phase of such sports-related injuries may be helpful to reduce morbidity and improve capabilities associated with high

  6. Platelet-rich plasma injections for the treatment of refractory Achilles tendinopathy: results at 4 years

    PubMed Central

    Filardo, Giuseppe; Kon, Elizaveta; Di Matteo, Berardo; Di Martino, Alessandro; Tesei, Giulia; Pelotti, Patrizia; Cenacchi, Annarita; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic Achilles tendinopathy is responsible for a severe reduction in physical performance and persistent pain. There is currently a number of therapeutic options and the local administration of growth factors is an emerging treatment strategy. In particular, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a widely used way to provide a local regenerative stimulus for tendon healing. The aim of this study was to document the mid-term results obtained after treating recalcitrant Achilles tendinopathy with injections of high concentrate, leucocyte-rich PRP. Materials and methods Twenty-seven patients (mean age: 44.6 years; 22 men and 5 women) affected by chronic mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy (7 bilateral, for a total of 34 tendons), refractory to previous treatments, were enrolled. Patients were treated with three ultrasound-guided intra-tendinous injections of PRP at 2-week intervals. Patients were prospectively evaluated at baseline, and then at 2, 6, and up to a mean of 54.1 months of follow-up (minimum 30 months), using the following tools: Blanzina, VISA-A, EQ-VAS for general health, and Tegner scores. Results The VISA-A score showed a significant improvement: the baseline score of 49.9±18.1 increased to 62.9±19.8 at 2 months (p=0.002), with a further improvement at 6 months (84.3±17.1, p<0.0005), and stable results at 4.5 years (90.0±13.9). The EQ-VAS score also showed a similar positive trend. An evaluation of the activity level confirmed these findings, showing a significant improvement in the Tegner score over time (p=0.017 for the final evaluation). The longer duration of symptoms before treatment was associated with a slower return to sport (p=0.041). Discussion PRP injections produced good overall results for the treatment of chronic recalcitrant Achilles tendinopathy with a stable outcome up to a medium-term follow-up. Longer symptom duration was related with a more difficult return to sporting activity. PMID:24960641

  7. Radial Nerve Tendon Transfers.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Andre Eu-Jin; Etcheson, Jennifer; Yao, Jeffrey

    2016-08-01

    Radial nerve palsy typically occurs as a result of trauma or iatrogenic injury and leads to the loss of wrist extension, finger extension, thumb extension, and a reduction in grip strength. In the absence of nerve recovery, reconstruction of motor function involves tendon transfer surgery. The most common donor tendons include the pronator teres, wrist flexors, and finger flexors. The type of tendon transfer is classified based on the donor for the extensor digitorum communis. Good outcomes have been reported for most methods of radial nerve tendon transfers as is typical for positional tendon transfers not requiring significant power. PMID:27387076

  8. Fibrillins in Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Giusti, Betti; Pepe, Guglielmina

    2016-01-01

    Tendons among connective tissue, mainly collagen, contain also elastic fibers (EF) made of fibrillin 1, fibrillin 2 and elastin that are broadly distributed in tendons and represent 1–2% of the dried mass of the tendon. Only in the last years, studies on structure and function of EF in tendons have been performed. Aim of this review is to revise data on the organization of EF in tendons, in particular fibrillin structure and function, and on the clinical manifestations associated to alterations of EF in tendons. Indeed, microfibrils may contribute to tendon mechanics; therefore, their alterations may cause joint hypermobility and contractures which have been found to be clinical features in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) and Beals syndrome. The two diseases are caused by mutations in genes FBN1 and FBN2 encoding fibrillin 1 and fibrillin 2, respectively. PMID:27812333

  9. Tendon Structure and Composition.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Screen, Hazel R C

    2016-01-01

    Tendons are soft, fibrous tissues that connect muscle to bone. Their main function is to transfer muscle generated force to the bony skeleton, facilitating movement around a joint, and as such they are relatively passive, inelastic structures, able to resist high forces. Tendons are predominantly composed of collagen, which is arranged in a hierarchical manner parallel to the long axis of the tendon, resulting in high tensile strength. Tendon also contains a range of non-collagenous proteins, present in low amounts, which nevertheless have important functional roles. In this chapter, we describe general tendon composition and structure, and discuss how variations in composition and structure at different levels of the tendon hierarchy confer specific mechanical properties, which are related to tendon function. PMID:27535244

  10. [The most common tendon injury in sports--hammer finger. Origin, classification, diagnosis and rational therapy].

    PubMed

    Rieger, H; Grünert, J; Winckler, S; Brug, E

    1991-09-01

    The closed rupture of the distal digital extensor tendon at its attachment on the terminal phalanx the so-called mallet finger - is seen very often in ball games ("basketball finger", "baseball finger"). Closed rupture with and without a bony fragment can be distinguished. We demonstrate a rational and anatomy related way of treatment.

  11. Pectoralis major tendon repairs in the active-duty population.

    PubMed

    Antosh, Ivan J; Grassbaugh, Jason A; Parada, Stephen A; Arrington, Edward D

    2009-01-01

    Rupture of the pectoralis major tendon is an uncommon injury that typically occurs in young, active people. Of this injury population, active-duty military personnel represent a unique, athletic subset that is commonly treated with operative repair. For the retrospective case series reported here, we hypothesized that active-duty soldiers with acute and chronic pectoralis major tendon ruptures treated with operative repair would have high levels of patient satisfaction, quick return to work and sports, and few long-term complications. We retrospectively reviewed all pectoralis major tendon rupture repairs performed at our institution between 2000 and 2007. Charts were thoroughly reviewed, and patients were asked to complete DASH (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand) and supplemental questionnaires. Paired Student's t test was performed, and Ps were calculated to analyze statistical differences between immediate- and delayed-treatment groups. Fourteen patients were identified. The most common mechanism of injury was bench-pressing weights. Overall DASH, Work Module, and Sports Module scores were good to excellent. There was a statistically significant difference between outcomes for the immediate- and delayed- treatment groups, with the immediate-treatment group having better overall DASH and Work Module scores. Patients had a 30% to 40% objective loss of strength after surgery. Active-duty soldiers reported acceptable overall outcomes after both immediate and delayed treatment for pectoralis major tendon ruptures, but a statistically significant difference was found in overall DASH and Work Module scores between the treatment groups.

  12. Tendon involvement in patients with gout: an ultrasound study of prevalence.

    PubMed

    Ventura-Ríos, Lucio; Sánchez-Bringas, Guadalupe; Pineda, Carlos; Hernández-Díaz, Cristina; Reginato, Anthony; Alva, Magaly; Audisio, Marcelo; Bertoli, Ana; Cazenave, Tomas; Gutiérrez, Marwin; Mora, Claudia; Py, Guillermo; Sedano, Oscar; Solano, Carla; de Miguel, Eugenio

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the present study is to evaluate, by ultrasonography (US), the prevalence in the quadriceps, patellar, and Achilles tendon involvement of gout compared to that of patients with osteoarthritis and asymptomatic marathon runners. This is a multicenter, multinational, transverse cross-sectional, and comparative study comprising 80 patients with the diagnosis of gout according to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, compared with two control groups: 35 patients with generalized osteoarthritis according to the ACR criteria and 35 subjects who were healthy marathon runners. Demographics and clinical characteristics, such as age, gender, comorbidity, disease duration, pain at the enthesis in the knee and ankle, frequency of disease exacerbations, uric acid level more than 7.2 mg at the time of evaluation, and type of treatment, were recorded. All participants were examined by ultrasound at the quadriceps, the patellar at its proximal and distal insertion, and the Achilles tendon to detect intra-tendinous tophus or aggregates according to the OMERACT definitions. Descriptive statistics and differences between groups were analyzed by chi-square test. Sensitivity and specificity by US were calculated. The prevalence of intra-tendinous aggregates and tophi in gout was significant compared with the other groups. Both lesions were the most frequent at the distal patellar insertion, followed by the quadriceps, Achilles, and proximal patellar insertion ones. In patients with osteoarthritis (OA), intra-tendinous hyperechoic aggregates were observed in 20 % of quadriceps tendons and in 11 % of patellar tendons at its proximal insertion, while in the healthy marathon runner group, the Achilles tendon had this kind of lesion in 17 % of the subjects. Neither the OA nor the healthy marathon runners had intra-tendinous tophi. The sensitivity and specificity of US to detect tophi or aggregates were 69.6 and 92 %, respectively, tendon involvement at

  13. The Effects of Mechanical Loading on Tendons - An In Vivo and In Vitro Model Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianying; Wang, James H-C.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical loading constantly acts on tendons, and a better understanding of its effects on the tendons is essential to gain more insights into tendon patho-physiology. This study aims to investigate tendon mechanobiological responses through the use of mouse treadmill running as an in vivo model and mechanical stretching of tendon cells as an in vitro model. In the in vivo study, mice underwent moderate treadmill running (MTR) and intensive treadmill running (ITR) regimens. Treadmill running elevated the expression of mechanical growth factors (MGF) and enhanced the proliferative potential of tendon stem cells (TSCs) in both patellar and Achilles tendons. In both tendons, MTR upregulated tenocyte-related genes: collagen type I (Coll. I ∼10 fold) and tenomodulin (∼3–4 fold), but did not affect non-tenocyte-related genes: LPL (adipocyte), Sox9 (chondrocyte), Runx2 and Osterix (both osteocyte). However, ITR upregulated both tenocyte (Coll. I ∼7–11 fold; tenomodulin ∼4–5 fold) and non-tenocyte-related genes (∼3–8 fold). In the in vitro study, TSCs and tenocytes were stretched to 4% and 8% using a custom made mechanical loading system. Low mechanical stretching (4%) of TSCs from both patellar and Achilles tendons increased the expression of only the tenocyte-related genes (Coll. I ∼5–6 fold; tenomodulin ∼6–13 fold), but high mechanical stretching (8%) increased the expression of both tenocyte (Coll. I ∼28–50 fold; tenomodulin ∼14–48 fold) and non-tenocyte-related genes (2–5-fold). However, in tenocytes, non-tenocyte related gene expression was not altered by the application of either low or high mechanical stretching. These findings indicate that appropriate mechanical loading could be beneficial to tendons because of their potential to induce anabolic changes in tendon cells. However, while excessive mechanical loading caused anabolic changes in tendons, it also induced differentiation of TSCs into non-tenocytes, which may lead to

  14. The effects of mechanical loading on tendons--an in vivo and in vitro model study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianying; Wang, James H-C

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical loading constantly acts on tendons, and a better understanding of its effects on the tendons is essential to gain more insights into tendon patho-physiology. This study aims to investigate tendon mechanobiological responses through the use of mouse treadmill running as an in vivo model and mechanical stretching of tendon cells as an in vitro model. In the in vivo study, mice underwent moderate treadmill running (MTR) and intensive treadmill running (ITR) regimens. Treadmill running elevated the expression of mechanical growth factors (MGF) and enhanced the proliferative potential of tendon stem cells (TSCs) in both patellar and Achilles tendons. In both tendons, MTR upregulated tenocyte-related genes: collagen type I (Coll. I ∼10 fold) and tenomodulin (∼3-4 fold), but did not affect non-tenocyte-related genes: LPL (adipocyte), Sox9 (chondrocyte), Runx2 and Osterix (both osteocyte). However, ITR upregulated both tenocyte (Coll. I ∼7-11 fold; tenomodulin ∼4-5 fold) and non-tenocyte-related genes (∼3-8 fold). In the in vitro study, TSCs and tenocytes were stretched to 4% and 8% using a custom made mechanical loading system. Low mechanical stretching (4%) of TSCs from both patellar and Achilles tendons increased the expression of only the tenocyte-related genes (Coll. I ∼5-6 fold; tenomodulin ∼6-13 fold), but high mechanical stretching (8%) increased the expression of both tenocyte (Coll. I ∼28-50 fold; tenomodulin ∼14-48 fold) and non-tenocyte-related genes (2-5-fold). However, in tenocytes, non-tenocyte related gene expression was not altered by the application of either low or high mechanical stretching. These findings indicate that appropriate mechanical loading could be beneficial to tendons because of their potential to induce anabolic changes in tendon cells. However, while excessive mechanical loading caused anabolic changes in tendons, it also induced differentiation of TSCs into non-tenocytes, which may lead to the development of

  15. Treatment of Tendon Injuries of the Lower Limb with Growth Factors Associated with Autologous Fibrin Scaffold or Collagenous Scaffold.

    PubMed

    Giannotti, Stefano; Dell'Osso, Giacomo; Bottai, Vanna; Ghilardi, Marco; Bugelli, Giulia; Lazzerini, Ilaria; Guido, Giulio

    2015-05-01

    Tendon injuries are an increasing problem in orthopedics as we are faced with a growing demand in sports and recreation and an aging population. Tendons have poor spontaneous regenerative capacity, and often, complete recovery after injury is not achieved. Once injured, tendons do not completely re-acquire the biological and biomechanical properties of normal tendons due to the formation of adhesions and scarring, and often these abnormalities in the arrangement and structure are risk factors for re-injury. These problems associated with the healing of tendon injuries are a challenge for clinicians and surgeons. This study examined 9 cases of subcutaneous injuries including quadriceps tendon (2 cases), patellar tendon (1 case), and Achilles tendon (6 cases), incomplete and complete, treated consecutively. The surgical technique has provided, as appropriate, the termino-terminal tenorraphy, techniques of plastics of rotation flap, reinsertion with suture anchors, and in one case tendon augmentation with cadaver tissue. In cases where we needed mechanical support to the suture, we used preloaded growth factors on porcine collagen scaffold; in cases where we needed only one biological support, we used fibrin scaffold. PMID:26055027

  16. Acute and chronic effects of hyperbaric oxygen therapy on blood circulation of human muscle and tendon in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Keitaro; Ikebukuro, Toshihiro

    2012-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the acute and chronic effects of hyperbaric oxygen therapy on blood circulation of human muscle and tendon in vivo. Using near-infrared spectroscopy and red laser lights, we determined acute changes in blood volume (THb) and oxygen saturation (StO2) of the medial gastrocnemius muscle and Achilles tendon during 60 minutes of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (1.3 atm absolute and 50% O2, experiment 1). In addition, we determined the chronic effects of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (60 minutes, 2 times per week, 6 weeks) on THb and StO2 of muscle and tendon (experiment 2). In experiment 1, THb of the muscle increased gradually from resting level, but StO2 did not change. On the other hand, THb and StO2 of the tendon increased during hyperbaric oxygen therapy. In experiment 2, the pattern of changes in the measured variables during 60 minutes of therapy was similar for both the muscle and tendon between the first and last therapies. During resting, THb and StO2 of the tendon were significantly lower after 6 weeks of therapy, although those of the muscle were not. In conclusion, oxygen saturation of the tendon increased during hyperbaric oxygen therapy, whereas that of the muscle did not. This result would be related to the difference in the treated effects between muscle and tendon. However, oxygen saturation of the tendon, but not the muscle, during resting decreased after 6 weeks of therapy.

  17. Active tendon implants in flexor tendon reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hunter, J M; Singer, D I; Jaeger, S H; Mackin, E J

    1988-11-01

    Forty-five active flexor tendon implants were evaluated after placement in scarred tendon beds of digits II through V. The implant is constructed of silicone rubber with a Dacron core, terminating in a loop proximally and a metal plate distally. Modification of the implant during the period of study has improved its reliability and longevity. The improvement in total active motion (TAM) averaged 72 degrees during implant functioning (stage I) in a group of digits that before operation were classified as 78% Boyes grade 5 (salvage). Complication rate during stage I was 11% (5 out of 45). Of the 27 digits evaluated after implant replacement by tendon autograft (stage II), there was an overall improvement in 62 degrees total active motion with 70% of digits being Boyes grade 5. Many of the complications were believed to be avoidable with experience. This study demonstrates the feasibility of an active tendon implant and the possibility of a permanent prosthesis. PMID:2976074

  18. Nanostructured Tendon-Derived Scaffolds for Enhanced Bone Regeneration by Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Eunkyung; Alberti, Kyle; Lee, Jong Seung; Yang, Kisuk; Jin, Yoonhee; Shin, Jisoo; Yang, Hee Seok; Xu, Qiaobing; Cho, Seung-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Decellularized matrix-based scaffolds can induce enhanced tissue regeneration due to their biochemical, biophysical, and mechanical similarity to native tissues. In this study, we report a nanostructured decellularized tendon scaffold with aligned, nanofibrous structures to enhance osteogenic differentiation and in vivo bone formation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs). Using a bioskiving method, we prepared decellularized tendon scaffolds from tissue slices of bovine Achilles and neck tendons with or without fixation, and investigated the effects on physical and mechanical properties of decellularized tendon scaffolds, based on the types and concentrations of cross-linking agents. In general, we found that decellularized tendon scaffolds without fixative treatments were more effective in inducing osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of hADSCs in vitro. When non-cross-linked decellularized tendon scaffolds were applied together with hydroxyapatite for hADSC transplantation in critical-sized bone defects, they promoted bone-specific collagen deposition and mineralized bone formation 4 and 8 weeks after hADSC transplantation, compared to conventional collagen type I scaffolds. Interestingly, stacking of decellularized tendon scaffolds cultured with osteogenically committed hADSCs and those containing human cord blood-derived endothelial progenitor cells (hEPCs) induced vascularized bone regeneration in the defects 8 weeks after transplantation. Our study suggests that biomimetic nanostructured scaffolds made of decellularized tissue matrices can serve as functional tissue-engineering scaffolds for enhanced osteogenesis of stem cells.

  19. [Application of silk-based tissue engineering scaffold for tendon / ligament regeneration].

    PubMed

    Hu, Yejun; Le, Huihui; Jin, Zhangchu; Chen, Xiao; Yin, Zi; Shen, Weiliang; Ouyang, Hongwei

    2016-03-01

    Tendon/ligament injury is one of the most common impairments in sports medicine. The tra