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Sample records for achr cluster formation

  1. Acetylcholine Receptor (AChR) Clustering Is Regulated Both by Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β (GSK3β)-dependent Phosphorylation and the Level of CLIP-associated Protein 2 (CLASP2) Mediating the Capture of Microtubule Plus-ends*

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sreya; Sladecek, Stefan; Pemble, Hayley; Wittmann, Torsten; Slotman, Johan A.; van Cappellen, Wiggert; Brenner, Hans-Rudolf; Galjart, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The postsynaptic apparatus of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) traps and anchors acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) at high density at the synapse. We have previously shown that microtubule (MT) capture by CLASP2, a MT plus-end-tracking protein (+TIP), increases the size and receptor density of AChR clusters at the NMJ through the delivery of AChRs and that this is regulated by a pathway involving neuronal agrin and several postsynaptic kinases, including GSK3. Phosphorylation by GSK3 has been shown to cause CLASP2 dissociation from MT ends, and nine potential phosphorylation sites for GSK3 have been mapped on CLASP2. How CLASP2 phosphorylation regulates MT capture at the NMJ and how this controls the size of AChR clusters are not yet understood. To examine this, we used myotubes cultured on agrin patches that induce AChR clustering in a two-dimensional manner. We show that expression of a CLASP2 mutant, in which the nine GSK3 target serines are mutated to alanine (CLASP2–9XS/9XA) and are resistant to GSK3β-dependent phosphorylation, promotes MT capture at clusters and increases AChR cluster size, compared with myotubes that express similar levels of wild type CLASP2 or that are noninfected. Conversely, myotubes expressing a phosphomimetic form of CLASP2 (CLASP2–8XS/D) show enrichment of immobile mutant CLASP2 in clusters, but MT capture and AChR cluster size are reduced. Taken together, our data suggest that both GSK3β-dependent phosphorylation and the level of CLASP2 play a role in the maintenance of AChR cluster size through the regulated capture and release of MT plus-ends. PMID:25231989

  2. Synapse formation between isolated axons requires presynaptic soma and redistribution of postsynaptic AChRs.

    PubMed

    Meems, Ryanne; Munno, David; van Minnen, Jan; Syed, Naweed I

    2003-05-01

    The involvement of neuronal protein synthetic machinery and extrinsic trophic factors during synapse formation is poorly understood. Here we determine the roles of these processes by reconstructing synapses between the axons severed from identified Lymnaea neurons in cell culture, either in the presence or absence of trophic factors. We demonstrate that, although synapses are maintained between isolated pre- and postsynaptic axons for several days, the presynaptic, but not the postsynaptic, cell body, however, is required for new synapse formation between soma-axon pairs. The formation of cholinergic synapses between presynaptic soma and postsynaptic axon requires gene transcription and protein synthesis solely in the presynaptic neuron. We show that this synaptogenesis is contingent on extrinsic trophic factors present in brain conditioned medium (CM). The CM-induced excitatory synapse formation is mediated through receptor tyrosine kinases. We further demonstrate that, although the postsynaptic axon does not require new protein synthesis for synapse formation, its contact with the presynaptic cell in CM, but not in defined medium (no trophic factors), differentially alters its responsiveness to exogenously applied acetylcholine at synaptic compared with extrasynaptic sites. Together, these data suggest a synergetic action of cell-cell signaling and trophic factors to bring about specific changes in both pre- and postsynaptic neurons during synapse formation.

  3. An unusual beta-spectrin associated with clustered acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The clustering of acetylcholine receptors (AChR) in the postsynaptic membrane is an early event in the formation of the neuromuscular junction. The mechanism of clustering is still unknown, but is generally believed to be mediated by the postsynaptic cytoskeleton. We have identified an unusual isoform of beta-spectrin which colocalizes with AChR in AChR clusters isolated from rat myotubes in vitro. A related antigen is present postsynaptically at the neuromuscular junction of the rat. Immunoprecipitation, peptide mapping and immunofluorescence show that the beta-spectrin in AChR clusters resembles but is distinct from the beta-spectrin of human erythrocytes. alpha-Spectrin appears to be absent from AChR clusters. Semiquantitative immunofluorescence techniques indicate that there are from two to seven beta-spectrin molecules present for every clustered AChR, the higher values being obtained from rapidly prepared clusters, the lower values from clusters that require several minutes or more for isolation. Upon incubation of isolated AChR clusters for 1 h at room temperature, beta-spectrin is slowly depleted and the AChR redistribute into microaggregates. The beta-spectrin that remains associated with the myotube membrane is concentrated at these microaggregates. beta- Spectrin is quantitatively lost from clusters upon digestion with chymotrypsin, which causes AChR to redistribute in the plane of the membrane. These results suggest that AChR in clusters is closely linked to an unusual isoform of beta-spectrin. PMID:2645300

  4. The formation of complex acetylcholine receptor clusters requires MuSK kinase activity and structural information from the MuSK extracellular domain

    PubMed Central

    Mazhar, Sania; Herbst, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Efficient synaptic transmission at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) requires the topological maturation of the postsynaptic apparatus from an oval acetylcholine receptor (AChR)-rich plaque into a complex pretzel-shaped array of branches. However, compared to NMJ formation very little is known about the mechanisms that regulate NMJ maturation. Recently the process of in vivo transformation from plaque into pretzel has been reproduced in vitro by culturing myotubes aneurally on laminin-coated substrate. It was proposed that the formation of complex AChR clusters is regulated by a MuSK-dependent muscle intrinsic program. To elucidate the structure–function role of MuSK in the aneural maturation of AChR pretzels, we used muscle cell lines expressing MuSK mutant and chimeric proteins. Here we report, that besides its role during agrin-induced AChR clustering, MuSK kinase activity is also necessary for substrate-dependent cluster formation. Constitutive-active MuSK induces larger AChR clusters, a faster cluster maturation on laminin and increases the anchorage of AChRs to the cytoskeleton compared to MuSK wild-type. In addition, we find that the juxtamembrane region of MuSK, which has previously been shown to regulate agrin-induced AChR clustering, is unable to induce complex AChR clusters on laminin substrate. Most interestingly, MuSK kinase activity is not sufficient for laminin-dependent AChR cluster formation since the MuSK ectodomain is also required suggesting a so far undiscovered instructive role for the extracellular domain of MuSK. PMID:22210232

  5. Arecoline inhibits and destabilizes agrin-induced acetylcholine receptor cluster formation in C2C12 myotubes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yung-Fu; Liu, Ting-Yuan; Liu, Shao-Tung

    2013-10-01

    Areca nut (Areca catechu) is chewed as a medical and psychoactive food by roughly 10% of the world population. Areca nut chewing may lead to low birth weight, premature delivery and impaired muscle development. Our previous study showed that arecoline, a major alkaloid in the areca nut, inhibited the myogenic differentiation of C2C12 myoblastic cells. The clustering of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in the postsynaptic membrane at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) by agrin, a signaling protein released by motor neurons, is critical for the development of functional muscles. Here, we further investigate whether arecoline affects the AChR clustering using cultured C2C12 myotubes. Rhodamine-conjugated α-bungarotoxin was used to detect the presence of AChR clusters. Our results showed that arecoline inhibited the formation of agrin-induced AChR clusters and destabilized agrin-induced or spontaneous AChR cluster formation. In addition, arecoline inhibited the expression of myogenin in C2C12 myotubes. These results shed light on the important role of arecoline on the detrimental effect of areca nut to muscle development. PMID:23933062

  6. MuSK Myasthenia Gravis IgG4 Disrupts the Interaction of LRP4 with MuSK but Both IgG4 and IgG1-3 Can Disperse Preformed Agrin-Independent AChR Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Koneczny, Inga; Cossins, Judith; Waters, Patrick; Beeson, David; Vincent, Angela

    2013-01-01

    A variable proportion of patients with generalized myasthenia gravis (MG) have autoantibodies to muscle specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK). During development agrin, released from the motor nerve, interacts with low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-4 (LRP4), which then binds to MuSK; MuSK interaction with the intracellular protein Dok7 results in clustering of the acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) on the postsynaptic membrane. In mature muscle, MuSK helps maintain the high density of AChRs at the neuromuscular junction. MuSK antibodies are mainly IgG4 subclass, which does not activate complement and can be monovalent, thus it is not clear how the antibodies cause disruption of AChR numbers or function to cause MG. We hypothesised that MuSK antibodies either reduce surface MuSK expression and/or inhibit the interaction with LRP4. We prepared MuSK IgG, monovalent Fab fragments, IgG1-3 and IgG4 fractions from MuSK-MG plasmas. We asked whether the antibodies caused endocytosis of MuSK in MuSK-transfected cells or if they inhibited binding of LRP4 to MuSK in co-immunoprecipitation experiments. In parallel, we investigated their ability to reduce AChR clusters in C2C12 myotubes induced by a) agrin, reflecting neuromuscular development, and b) by Dok7- overexpression, producing AChR clusters that more closely resemble the adult neuromuscular synapse. Total IgG, IgG4 or IgG1-3 MuSK antibodies were not endocytosed unless cross-linked by divalent anti-human IgG. MuSK IgG, Fab fragments and IgG4 inhibited the binding of LRP4 to MuSK and reduced agrin-induced AChR clustering in C2C12 cells. By contrast, IgG1-3 antibodies did not inhibit LRP4-MuSK binding but, surprisingly, did inhibit agrin-induced clustering. Moreover, both IgG4 and IgG1-3 preparations dispersed agrin-independent AChR clusters in Dok7-overexpressing C2C12 cells. Thus interference by IgG4 antibodies of the LRP4-MuSK interaction will be one pathogenic mechanism of MuSK antibodies, but IgG1-3 Mu

  7. The formation of star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, Bradley C.

    The ability of HST to resolve objects ten times smaller than possible from the ground has re-juvenated the study of young star clusters. A recurrent morphological theme found in nearby resolved systems is the observation of young (typically 1-10 Myr), massive (103 - 104 Msolar), compact (ρ≍105 Msolar pc-3) clusters which have evacuated the gas and dust from a spherical region around themselves. New stars are being triggered into formation along the edges of the envelopes, with pillars (similar to the Eagle Nebula) of molecular gas streaming away from the regions of star formation. The prototype for these objects is 30 Doradus. Another major theme has been the discovery of large numbers of young (typically 1-500 Myr), massive (103 - 108 Msolar), compact star clusters in merging, starbursting, and even some barred and spiral galaxies. The brightest of these clusters have all the attributes expected of protoglobular clusters, hence allowing us to study the formation of globular clusters in the local universe rather than trying to ascertain how they formed ≍14 Gyr ago. The prototype is the Antennae Galaxy.

  8. Scale free processes in stellar cluster formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastian, Nate

    2015-08-01

    I will review what is known about stellar cluster formation, focussing on scale free processes, such as how lower mass open clusters related to their giant cousins, the young massive clusters, and potentially globular cluster as well.

  9. Sorbs1 and -2 Interact with CrkL and Are Required for Acetylcholine Receptor Cluster Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hallock, Peter T.; Chin, Sherry; Blais, Steven; Neubert, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Crk and CrkL are noncatalytic adaptor proteins necessary for the formation of neuromuscular synapses which function downstream of muscle-specific kinase (MuSK), a receptor tyrosine kinase expressed in skeletal muscle, and the MuSK binding protein Dok-7. How Crk/CrkL regulate neuromuscular endplate formation is not known. To better understand the roles of Crk/CrkL, we identified CrkL binding proteins using mass spectrometry and have identified Sorbs1 and Sorbs2 as two functionally redundant proteins that associate with the initiating MuSK/Dok-7/Crk/CrkL complex, regulate acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering in vitro, and are localized at synapses in vivo. PMID:26527617

  10. Star formation and substructure in galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Seth A.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Wegner, Gary A.; Einasto, Maret; Vennik, Jaan

    2014-03-10

    We investigate the relationship between star formation (SF) and substructure in a sample of 107 nearby galaxy clusters using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Several past studies of individual galaxy clusters have suggested that cluster mergers enhance cluster SF, while others find no such relationship. The SF fraction in multi-component clusters (0.228 ± 0.007) is higher than that in single-component clusters (0.175 ± 0.016) for galaxies with M{sub r}{sup 0.1}<−20.5. In both single- and multi-component clusters, the fraction of star-forming galaxies increases with clustercentric distance and decreases with local galaxy number density, and multi-component clusters show a higher SF fraction than single-component clusters at almost all clustercentric distances and local densities. Comparing the SF fraction in individual clusters to several statistical measures of substructure, we find weak, but in most cases significant at greater than 2σ, correlations between substructure and SF fraction. These results could indicate that cluster mergers may cause weak but significant SF enhancement in clusters, or unrelaxed clusters exhibit slightly stronger SF due to their less evolved states relative to relaxed clusters.

  11. Formation and Assembly of Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Stephen

    The formation of stars and star clusters is a major unresolved problem in astrophysics. It is central to modeling stellar populations and understanding galaxy luminosity distributions in cosmological models. Young massive clusters are major components of starburst galaxies, while globular clusters are cornerstones of the cosmic distance scale and represent vital laboratories for studies of stellar dynamics and stellar evolution. Yet how these clusters form and how rapidly and efficiently they expel their natal gas remain unclear, as do the consequences of this gas expulsion for cluster structure and survival. Also unclear is how the properties of low-mass clusters, which form from small-scale instabilities in galactic disks and inform much of our understanding of cluster formation and star-formation efficiency, differ from those of more massive clusters, which probably formed in starburst events driven by fast accretion at high redshift, or colliding gas flows in merging galaxies. Modeling cluster formation requires simulating many simultaneous physical processes, placing stringent demands on both software and hardware. Simulations of galaxies evolving in cosmological contexts usually lack the numerical resolution to simulate star formation in detail. They do not include detailed treatments of important physical effects such as magnetic fields, radiation pressure, ionization, and supernova feedback. Simulations of smaller clusters include these effects, but fall far short of the mass of even single young globular clusters. With major advances in computing power and software, we can now directly address this problem. We propose to model the formation of massive star clusters by integrating the FLASH adaptive mesh refinement magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code into the Astrophysical Multi-purpose Software Environment (AMUSE) framework, to work with existing stellar-dynamical and stellar evolution modules in AMUSE. All software will be freely distributed on-line, allowing

  12. Properties and Formation of Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharina, M. E.

    2016-03-01

    Many key problems in astrophysics involve research on the properties of star clusters, for example: stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis, the history of star formation in galaxies, formation dynamics of galaxies and their subsystems, the calibration of the fundamental distance scale in the universe, and the luminosity functions of stars and star clusters. This review is intended to familiarize the reader with modern observational and theoretical data on the formation and evolution of star clusters in our galaxy and others. Unsolved problems in this area are formulated and research on ways to solve them is discussed. In particular, some of the most important current observational and theoretical problems include: (1) a more complete explanation of the physical processes in molecular clouds leading to the formation and evolution of massive star clusters; (2) observation of these objects in different stages of evolution, including protoclusters, at wavelengths where interstellar absorption is minimal; and, (3) comparison of the properties of massive star clusters in different galaxies and of galaxies during the most active star formation phase at different red shifts. The main goal in solving these problems is to explain the variations in the abundance of chemical elements and in the multiple populations of stars in clusters discovered at the end of the twentieth century.

  13. Star and cluster formation in NGC 1275

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richer, Harvey B.; Crabtree, Dennis R.; Fabian, A. C.; Lin, D. N. C.

    1993-01-01

    Luminous, blue, and unresolved objects have been found by imaging the nuclear region of the central galaxy in the Perseus Cluster, NGC 1275. Stellar formation in a cooling flow in which gas clouds confined by weak magnetic fields are allowed to remain at low densities is favored. Cloud-cloud collisions and coagulation in the high cloud density environment at the center of the galaxy then causes some clouds to become gravitationally unstable and to form globular clusters.

  14. Quenching star formation in cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taranu, Dan S.; Hudson, Michael J.; Balogh, Michael L.; Smith, Russell J.; Power, Chris; Oman, Kyle A.; Krane, Brad

    2014-05-01

    In order to understand the processes that quench star formation in cluster galaxies, we construct a library of subhalo orbits drawn from Λ cold dark matter cosmological N-body simulations of four rich clusters. We combine these orbits with models of star formation followed by environmental quenching, comparing model predictions with observed bulge and disc colours and stellar absorption line-strength indices of luminous cluster galaxies. Models in which the bulge stellar populations depend only on the galaxy subhalo mass while the disc is quenched upon infall are acceptable fits to the data. An exponential disc quenching time-scale of 3-3.5 Gyr is preferred. Quenching in lower mass groups prior to infall (`pre-processing') provides better fits, with similar quenching time-scales. Models with short (≲1 Gyr) quenching time-scales yield excessively steep cluster-centric gradients in disc colours and Balmer line indices, even if quenching is delayed for several Gyr. The data slightly prefer models where quenching occurs only for galaxies falling within ˜0.5r200. These results imply that the environments of rich clusters must impact star formation rates of infalling galaxies on relatively long time-scales, indicative of gentler quenching mechanisms such as slow `strangulation' over more rapid ram-pressure stripping.

  15. The Formation of Galaxies and Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Stephen; Morrison, Nancy D.

    1985-01-01

    Summarizes recent research on the formation of galaxies and clusters, focusing on research examining how the materials in galaxies seen today separated from the universal expansion and collapsed into stable bodies. A list of six nontechnical books and articles for readers with less background is included. (JN)

  16. Globular cluster formation - The fossil record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Stephen D.; Lin, Douglas N. C.

    1992-01-01

    Properties of globular clusters which have remained unchanged since their formation are used to infer the internal pressures, cooling times, and dynamical times of the protocluster clouds immediately prior to the onset of star formation. For all globular clusters examined, it is found that the cooling times are much less than the dynamical times, implying that the protoclusters must have been maintained in thermal equilibrium by external heat sources, with fluxes consistent with those found in previous work, and giving the observed rho-T relation. Self-gravitating clouds cannot be stably heated, so that the Jeans mass forms an upper limit to the cluster masses. The observed dependence of protocluster pressure upon galactocentric position implies that the protocluster clouds were in hydrostatic equilibrium after their formation. The pressure dependence is well fitted by that expected for a quasi-statically evolving background hot gas, shock heated to its virial temperature. The observations and inferences are combined with previous theoretical work to construct a picture of globular cluster formation.

  17. Electrochemical formation of Au clusters in polyaniline

    SciTech Connect

    Hatchett, D.W.; Josowicz, M.; Janata, J.; Baer, D.R.

    1999-10-01

    The reduction of chloroaurate and the incorporation of Au clusters in polyaniline, PANI, films have been investigated. The chloroaurate complex is generated at the electrode surface during Cl{sup {minus}} doping of Au/PANI. FTIE and UV/vis data indicate that chloroaurate interacts with PANI and that its reduction to metallic Au occurs preferentially at the nitrogen linkages. The voltammetric and XPS results show that the uptake of both protons and anions is suppressed by the formation of Au clusters due to this interaction. The ability to reduce chloroaurate in PANI films is also demonstrated for Pt electrodes coated with PANI in solutions containing KAuCl{sub 4}. The preliminary results indicate that Au cluster size distribution remains fairly constant regardless of the method used.

  18. Local-density-driven clustered star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, G.; Pfalzner, S.

    2013-01-01

    Context. A positive power-law trend between the local surface densities of molecular gas, Σgas, and young stellar objects, Σ ⋆ , in molecular clouds of the solar neighbourhood has recently been identified. How it relates to the properties of embedded clusters, in particular to the recently established radius-density relation, has so far not been investigated. Aims: We model the development of the stellar component of molecular clumps as a function of time and initial local volume density. Our study provides a coherent framework able to explain both the molecular-cloud and embedded-cluster relations quoted above. Methods: We associate the observed volume density gradient of molecular clumps to a density-dependent free-fall time. The molecular clump star formation history is obtained by applying a constant star formation efficiency per free-fall time, ɛff. Results: For the volume density profiles typical of observed molecular clumps (i.e. power-law slope ≃ -1.7), our model gives a star-gas surface-density relation of the form Σ⋆ ∝ Σgas2, which agrees very well with the observations. Taking the case of a molecular clump of mass M0 ≃ 104 M⊙ and radius R ≃ 6 pc experiencing star formation during 2 Myr, we derive what star formation efficiency per free-fall time matches the normalizations of the observed and predicted (Σ ⋆ , Σgas) relations best. We find ɛff ≃ 0.1. We show that the observed growth of embedded clusters, embodied by their radius-density relation, corresponds to a surface density threshold being applied to developing star-forming regions. The consequences of our model in terms of cluster survivability after residual star-forming gas expulsion are that, owing to the locally high star formation efficiency in the inner part of star-forming regions, global star formation efficiency as low as 10% can lead to the formation of bound gas-free star clusters.

  19. Radiative Feedback in Star Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, J. E.

    2002-12-01

    We present the results of simulations of star cluster formation including for the first time radiative feedback from massive young stars. We use a new fast algorithm able to perform simple radiative transfer in three dimensions in highly inhomogeneous environments, characteristic of star-forming regions such as the Orion Molecular Cloud. Taking as our initial conditions the end result of a simulation performed by Bonnell and Bate (Bonnell and Bate, 2002) of the formation of a star cluster from a molecular cloud containing 1000 Jeans masses of gas, we study the effects of the photoionising radiation emitted by the first massive star to form within the cloud. We find that, if the gas density in the immediate vicinity of the star is insufficient to absorb the stellar radiation, photoionisation heating is an efficient mechanism for expelling gas from the cluster. For the sake of simplicity, we have only modelled the feedback of a single star, but in principle, the code can simulate the action of an arbitrary number of radiation sources. The simulations were performed in the context of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code of Bate et al (Bate, 1995). This work was sponsored by the UK Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council, and simulations were performed on the United Kingdom Astrophysical Fluids Facility SGI Origin 3800 at Leicester University, UK.

  20. Nanodroplet cluster formation in ionic liquid microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanan; Voigt, Andreas; Hilfert, Liane; Sundmacher, Kai

    2008-08-01

    A common ionic liquid (IL), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (bmimBF(4)), is used as polar solvent to induce the formation of a reverse bmimBF(4)-in-toluene IL microemulsion with the aid of the nonionic surfactant Triton X-100. The swelling process of the microemulsion droplets by increasing bmimBF(4) content is detected by dynamic light scattering (DLS), conductivity, UV/Vis spectroscopy, and freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy (FF-TEM). The results show that the microemulsion droplets initially formed are enlarged by the addition of bmimBF(4). However, successive addition of bmimBF(4) lead to the appearance of large-sized microemulsion droplet clusters (200-400 nm). NMR spectroscopic analysis reveal that the special structures and properties of bmimBF(4) and Triton X-100 together with the polar nature of toluene contribute to the formation of such self-assemblies. These unique self-assembled structures of IL-based microemulsion droplet clusters may have some unusual and unique properties with a number of interesting possibilities for potential applications. PMID:18576451

  1. The formation of discs in clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Paul C.

    2010-11-01

    We review the properties of the discs that form around ‘sink particles’ in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of cluster formation, similar to those of Bate et al. (2003) and Bonnell et al. (2004), and compare them to the observed properties of discs in nearby star-forming regions. Contrary to previous suggestions, discs can form and survive in such an environment, despite the chaotic effects of competitive accretion. We find the discs are typically massive, with ratios of disc mass to central object mass of around 0.1, or higher, being typical. Naturally, the evolution of these discs is dominated by gravitational torques, and the more massive examples exhibit strong m=2 spiral modes. We also find that they can continuously grow over a period of 100,000 years, provided the central object is a single sink particle and the local density of sink particles is low. Discs that form around sink particles in the very centres of clusters tend to be shorter lived, but a single star can lose and gain a disc several times during the main accretion phase. However due to the nature of the turbulence in the cluster, the disc orientation can change dramatically over this time period, since disc-sink systems can accrete from counter-rotating envelopes. Since the competitive accretion process brings in material from large distances, the associated angular momentum can be higher than one would expect for an isolated star formation model. As such, we find that the discs are typically several hundred of AUs in extent, with the largest keplerian structures having radii of ~ 2000AU.

  2. Formation of Education Clusters as a Way to Improve Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aitbayeva, Gul'zamira D.; Zhubanova, Mariyash K.; Kulgildinova, Tulebike A.; Tusupbekova, Gulsum M.; Uaisova, Gulnar I.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to analyze basic prerequisites formation and development factors of educational clusters of the world's leading nations for studying the possibility of cluster policy introduction and creating educational clusters in the Republic of Kazakhstan. The authors of this study concluded that educational cluster could be…

  3. Spectroscopic Elucidation of First Steps of Supported Bimetallic Cluster Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, A.; Gates, B.C.

    2009-12-23

    Initial steps of bimetallic Ru-Os cluster formation on MgO in the presence of H{sub 2} are analyzed by EXAFS and IR spectroscopy. Ru-Os bond formation takes place after decarbonylation of Ru{sub 3} clusters and subsequently, at higher temperatures, of Os{sub 3} clusters to generate coordinative unsaturation.

  4. Sarcomeric Pattern Formation by Actin Cluster Coalescence

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Benjamin M.; Fischer-Friedrich, Elisabeth; Gov, Nir S.; Safran, Samuel A.

    2012-01-01

    Contractile function of striated muscle cells depends crucially on the almost crystalline order of actin and myosin filaments in myofibrils, but the physical mechanisms that lead to myofibril assembly remains ill-defined. Passive diffusive sorting of actin filaments into sarcomeric order is kinetically impossible, suggesting a pivotal role of active processes in sarcomeric pattern formation. Using a one-dimensional computational model of an initially unstriated actin bundle, we show that actin filament treadmilling in the presence of processive plus-end crosslinking provides a simple and robust mechanism for the polarity sorting of actin filaments as well as for the correct localization of myosin filaments. We propose that the coalescence of crosslinked actin clusters could be key for sarcomeric pattern formation. In our simulations, sarcomere spacing is set by filament length prompting tight length control already at early stages of pattern formation. The proposed mechanism could be generic and apply both to premyofibrils and nascent myofibrils in developing muscle cells as well as possibly to striated stress-fibers in non-muscle cells. PMID:22685394

  5. A WISE VIEW OF STAR FORMATION IN LOCAL GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Sun Mi; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Stern, Daniel; Stanford, Spencer A.; Brodwin, Mark; Jarrett, Thomas

    2011-12-10

    We present results from a systematic study of star formation in local galaxy clusters using 22 {mu}m data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The 69 systems in our sample are drawn from the Cluster Infall Regions Survey, and all have robust mass determinations. The all-sky WISE data enable us to quantify the amount of star formation, as traced by 22 {mu}m, as a function of radius well beyond R{sub 200}, and investigate the dependence of total star formation rate upon cluster mass. We find that the fraction of star-forming galaxies increases with cluster radius but remains below the field value even at 3R{sub 200}. We also find that there is no strong correlation between the mass-normalized total specific star formation rate and cluster mass, indicating that the mass of the host cluster does not strongly influence the total star formation rate of cluster members.

  6. Dehydration-mediated cluster formation of nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sungsook; Joon Lee, Sang

    2015-01-01

    Drying procedure is a powerful method to modulate the bottom-up assembly of basic building component. The initially weak attraction between the components screened in a solution strengthens as the solvent evaporates, organizing the components into structures. Drying is process-dependent, irreversible, and nonequilibrated, thus the mechanism and the dynamics are influenced by many factors. Therefore, the interaction of the solvent and the elements during the drying procedure as well as the resulting pattern formations are strongly related. Nonetheless still many things are open in questions in terms of their dynamics. In this study, nanoscale dehydration procedure is experimentally investigated using a nanoparticle (NP) model system. The role of water is verified in a single NP scale and the patterns of collective NP clusters are determined. Stepwise drying procedures are proposed based on the location from which water is removed. Effective water exodus from a unit NP surface enhances the attractive interaction in nanoscale and induces heterogeneous distribution in microscale. This study provides fundamental proof of systematic relation between the dehydration process and the resultant cluster patterns in hierarchical multiscales. PMID:26077841

  7. Dehydration-mediated cluster formation of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sungsook; Joon Lee, Sang

    2015-06-01

    Drying procedure is a powerful method to modulate the bottom-up assembly of basic building component. The initially weak attraction between the components screened in a solution strengthens as the solvent evaporates, organizing the components into structures. Drying is process-dependent, irreversible, and nonequilibrated, thus the mechanism and the dynamics are influenced by many factors. Therefore, the interaction of the solvent and the elements during the drying procedure as well as the resulting pattern formations are strongly related. Nonetheless still many things are open in questions in terms of their dynamics. In this study, nanoscale dehydration procedure is experimentally investigated using a nanoparticle (NP) model system. The role of water is verified in a single NP scale and the patterns of collective NP clusters are determined. Stepwise drying procedures are proposed based on the location from which water is removed. Effective water exodus from a unit NP surface enhances the attractive interaction in nanoscale and induces heterogeneous distribution in microscale. This study provides fundamental proof of systematic relation between the dehydration process and the resultant cluster patterns in hierarchical multiscales.

  8. The physics and modes of star cluster formation: observations.

    PubMed

    Lada, Charles J

    2010-02-28

    Stellar clusters are born in cold and dusty molecular clouds and the youngest clusters are embedded to various degrees in a dusty dark molecular material. Such embedded clusters can be considered protocluster systems. The most deeply buried examples are so heavily obscured by dust that they are only visible at infrared wavelengths. These embedded protoclusters constitute the nearest laboratories for a direct astronomical investigation of the physical processes of cluster formation and early evolution. I review the present state of empirical knowledge concerning embedded-cluster systems and discuss the implications for understanding their formation and subsequent evolution to produce bound stellar clusters.

  9. Numerical study of cluster formation in binary charged colloids.

    PubMed

    Okuzono, Tohru; Odai, Kana; Masuda, Tatsuhiro; Toyotama, Akiko; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-07-01

    Cluster formation of oppositely charged colloidal particles is studied numerically. A simple Brownian dynamics method with a screened-Coulomb (Yukawa) potential is employed for numerical simulations. An equilibrium phase which consists of clusters and unassociated particles is obtained. It is shown that the equilibrium association number of clusters and their shapes are determined by charge numbers and charge ratio of the binary particles. The phase diagram of cluster formation for various charge numbers and their ratios is obtained. A simple relation between the association number and the charge ratio is found. It is demonstrated that in the case of high charge ratio the cluster takes a multilayer structure which is highly symmetric. It is also pointed out that the cluster-particle interaction changes dynamically in the cluster formation process, which is involved in the selection of final cluster structure. PMID:27575181

  10. Numerical study of cluster formation in binary charged colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuzono, Tohru; Odai, Kana; Masuda, Tatsuhiro; Toyotama, Akiko; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-07-01

    Cluster formation of oppositely charged colloidal particles is studied numerically. A simple Brownian dynamics method with a screened-Coulomb (Yukawa) potential is employed for numerical simulations. An equilibrium phase which consists of clusters and unassociated particles is obtained. It is shown that the equilibrium association number of clusters and their shapes are determined by charge numbers and charge ratio of the binary particles. The phase diagram of cluster formation for various charge numbers and their ratios is obtained. A simple relation between the association number and the charge ratio is found. It is demonstrated that in the case of high charge ratio the cluster takes a multilayer structure which is highly symmetric. It is also pointed out that the cluster-particle interaction changes dynamically in the cluster formation process, which is involved in the selection of final cluster structure.

  11. Reversible cluster formation in concentrated monoclonal antibody solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrin, P. Douglas; Porcar, Lionel; Falus, Peter; Zarraga, Isidro; Wagner, Norm; Liu, Yun

    2015-03-01

    Protein cluster formation in solution is of fundamental interest for both academic research and industrial applications. Recently, industrial scientists are also exploring the effect of reversible cluster formation on biopharmaceutical processing and delivery. However, despite of its importance, the understanding of protein clusters at concentrated solutions remains scientifically very challenging. Using the neutron spin echo technique to study the short time dynamics of proteins in solutions, we have recently systematically studied cluster formation in a few monoclonal antibody (mAb) solutions and their relation with solution viscosity. We show that the existence of anisotropic attraction can cause the formation of finite sized clusters, which increases the solution viscosity. Interestingly, once clusters form at relatively low concentrations, the average size of clusters in solutions remains almost constant over a wide range of concentrations similar to that of micelle formation. For a different mAb we have also investigated, the attraction is mostly induced by hydrophobic patches. As a result, these mAbs form large clusters with loosely linked proteins. In both cases, the formation of clusters all increases the solution viscosity substantially. However, due to different physics origins of cluster formation, solutions viscosities for these two different types of mAbs need to be controlled by different ways.

  12. Formation of Massive Stars in Massive Young Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinnecker, H.

    2004-12-01

    There are two scenarios for the formation of massive stars: the ``accretion'' and the ``coalescence'' scenario. Here we discuss the conditions for coalescence (mergers) to occur in very dense young star clusters. We also ask whether the observed multiplicity of tight massive stars in young clusters is consistent with failed mergers and tidal capture. Finally, we propose some ideas for the origin of many massive stars in the heart of the 30 Doradus cluster and other extragalactic starburst clusters. We believe that all massive star formation is triggered and propose a 4-stage process of massive star birth in dense clusters.

  13. Recycling of Acetylcholine Receptors at Ectopic Postsynaptic Clusters Induced by Exogenous Agrin in Living Rats

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Hans Rudolf; Akaaboune, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    During the development of the neuromuscular junction, motor axons induce the clustering of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) and increase their metabolic stability in the muscle membrane. Here, we asked whether the synaptic organizer agrin might regulate the metabolic stability and density of AChRs by promoting the recycling of internalized AChRs, which would otherwise be destined for degradation, into synaptic sites. We show that at nerve-free AChR clusters induced by agrin in extrasynaptic membrane, internalized AChRs are driven back into the ectopic synaptic clusters where they intermingle with pre-existing and new receptors. The extent of AChR recycling depended on the strength of the agrin stimulus, but not on the development of junctional folds, another hallmark of mature postsynaptic membranes. In chronically denervated muscles, in which both AChR stability and recycling are significantly decreased by muscle inactivity, agrin maintained the amount of recycled AChRs at agrin-induced clusters at a level similar to that at denervated original endplates. In contrast, AChRs did not recycle at agrin-induced clusters in C2C12 or primary myotubes. Thus, in muscles in vivo, but not in cultured myotubes, neural agrin promotes the recycling of AChRs and thereby increases their metabolic stability. PMID:25093969

  14. Probing Massive Star Cluster Formation with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kelsey

    2015-08-01

    Observationally constraining the physical conditions that give rise to massive star clusters has been a long-standing challenge. Now with the ALMA Observatory coming on-line, we can finally begin to probe the birth environments of massive clusters in a variety of galaxies with sufficient angular resolution. In this talk I will give an overview of ALMA observations of galaxies in which candidate proto-super star cluster molecular clouds have been identified. These new data probe the physical conditions that give rise to super star clusters, providing information on their densities, pressures, and temperatures. In particular, the observations indicate that these clouds may be subject to external pressures of P/k > 108 K cm-3, which is consistent with the prevalence of optically observed adolescent super star clusters in interacting galaxy systems and other high pressure environments. ALMA observations also enable an assessement of the molecular cloud chemical abundances in the regions surrounding super star clusters. Molecular clouds associated with existing super star clusters are strongly correlated with HCO+ emission, but appear to have relatively low ratio of CO/HCO+ emission compared to other clouds, indicating that the super star clusters are impacting the molecular abundances in their vicinity.

  15. The era of star formation in galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Brodwin, M.; Stanford, S. A.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Mancone, C. L.; Gettings, D. P.; Zeimann, G. R.; Snyder, G. F.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Pope, A.; Alberts, S.; Eisenhardt, P. R.; Stern, D.; Moustakas, L. A.; Brown, M. J. I.; Chary, R.-R.; Dey, Arjun; Galametz, A.; Jannuzi, B. T.; Miller, E. D.; Moustakas, J.

    2013-12-20

    We analyze the star formation properties of 16 infrared-selected, spectroscopically confirmed galaxy clusters at 1 < z < 1.5 from the Spitzer/IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS). We present new spectroscopic confirmation for six of these high-redshift clusters, five of which are at z > 1.35. Using infrared luminosities measured with deep Spitzer/Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer observations at 24 μm, along with robust optical + IRAC photometric redshifts and spectral-energy-distribution-fitted stellar masses, we present the dust-obscured star-forming fractions, star formation rates, and specific star formation rates in these clusters as functions of redshift and projected clustercentric radius. We find that z ∼ 1.4 represents a transition redshift for the ISCS sample, with clear evidence of an unquenched era of cluster star formation at earlier times. Beyond this redshift, the fraction of star-forming cluster members increases monotonically toward the cluster centers. Indeed, the specific star formation rate in the cores of these distant clusters is consistent with field values at similar redshifts, indicating that at z > 1.4 environment-dependent quenching had not yet been established in ISCS clusters. By combining these observations with complementary studies showing a rapid increase in the active galactic nucleus (AGN) fraction, a stochastic star formation history, and a major merging episode at the same epoch in this cluster sample, we suggest that the starburst activity is likely merger-driven and that the subsequent quenching is due to feedback from merger-fueled AGNs. The totality of the evidence suggests we are witnessing the final quenching period that brings an end to the era of star formation in galaxy clusters and initiates the era of passive evolution.

  16. OT2_baltieri_5: Star formation in proto-clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altieri, B.

    2011-09-01

    Massive clusters of galaxies have been found to date from as early as 3-4 billion years after the Big Bang. Cosmological simulations using the current cold dark matter model predict that these systems should descend from 'proto-clusters' - early overdensities of massive galaxies that merge hierarchically to form a cluster. These protocluster regions themselves are built up hierarchically and so are expected to contain extremely massive galaxies, progenitors of the quiescent behemoths observed in cores of the present day massive galaxy clusters. Observational evidence for this picture, however, is sparse because high-redshift proto-clusters are rare and difficult to observe. Here we propose to probe with Herschel SPIRE the very beginning of the cluster and massive galaxies formation process by observing 5 proto-clusters at 3formation at such high redshift, to compare the properties of the proto-cluster galaxies with those of field galaxies at similar redshift. Determining whether cluster galaxies differ from field galaxies when the proto-cluster was still forming, tells us whether any of the difference observed today is driven by nature as apposed to nurture.

  17. Improving performance through concept formation and conceptual clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Douglas H.

    1992-01-01

    Research from June 1989 through October 1992 focussed on concept formation, clustering, and supervised learning for purposes of improving the efficiency of problem-solving, planning, and diagnosis. These projects resulted in two dissertations on clustering, explanation-based learning, and means-ends planning, and publications in conferences and workshops, several book chapters, and journals; a complete Bibliography of NASA Ames supported publications is included. The following topics are studied: clustering of explanations and problem-solving experiences; clustering and means-end planning; and diagnosis of space shuttle and space station operating modes.

  18. Clustering and Pattern Formation in Chemorepulsive Active Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebchen, Benno; Marenduzzo, Davide; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Cates, Michael E.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate that migration away from self-produced chemicals (chemorepulsion) generates a generic route to clustering and pattern formation among self-propelled colloids. The clustering instability can be caused either by anisotropic chemical production, or by a delayed orientational response to changes of the chemical environment. In each case, chemorepulsion creates clusters of a self-limiting area which grows linearly with self-propulsion speed. This agrees with recent observations of dynamic clusters in Janus colloids (albeit not yet known to be chemorepulsive). More generally, our results could inform design principles for the self-assembly of chemorepulsive synthetic swimmers and/or bacteria into nonequilibrium patterns.

  19. Clustering and Pattern Formation in Chemorepulsive Active Colloids.

    PubMed

    Liebchen, Benno; Marenduzzo, Davide; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Cates, Michael E

    2015-12-18

    We demonstrate that migration away from self-produced chemicals (chemorepulsion) generates a generic route to clustering and pattern formation among self-propelled colloids. The clustering instability can be caused either by anisotropic chemical production, or by a delayed orientational response to changes of the chemical environment. In each case, chemorepulsion creates clusters of a self-limiting area which grows linearly with self-propulsion speed. This agrees with recent observations of dynamic clusters in Janus colloids (albeit not yet known to be chemorepulsive). More generally, our results could inform design principles for the self-assembly of chemorepulsive synthetic swimmers and/or bacteria into nonequilibrium patterns.

  20. Clustering and Pattern Formation in Chemorepulsive Active Colloids.

    PubMed

    Liebchen, Benno; Marenduzzo, Davide; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Cates, Michael E

    2015-12-18

    We demonstrate that migration away from self-produced chemicals (chemorepulsion) generates a generic route to clustering and pattern formation among self-propelled colloids. The clustering instability can be caused either by anisotropic chemical production, or by a delayed orientational response to changes of the chemical environment. In each case, chemorepulsion creates clusters of a self-limiting area which grows linearly with self-propulsion speed. This agrees with recent observations of dynamic clusters in Janus colloids (albeit not yet known to be chemorepulsive). More generally, our results could inform design principles for the self-assembly of chemorepulsive synthetic swimmers and/or bacteria into nonequilibrium patterns. PMID:26722949

  1. Lithium Formate Ion Clusters Formation during Electrospray Ionization: Evidence of Magic Number Clusters by Mass Spectrometry and ab initio Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Anil K.; Bogdanov, Bogdan

    2015-02-10

    Small cationic and anionic clusters of lithium formate were generated by electrospray ionization and their fragmentations were studied by tandem mass spectrometry. Singly as well as multiply charged clusters were formed with the general formulae, (HCOOLi)nLi+, (HCOOLi)nLimm+, (HCOOLi)nHCOO- and (HCOOLi)n(HCOO)mm-. Several magic number cluster ions were observed in both the positive and negative ion modes although more predominant in the positive ion mode with (HCOOLi)3Li+ being the most abundant and stable cluster ions. Fragmentations of singly charged clusters proceed first by the loss of a dimer unit ((HCOOLi)2) followed by sequential loss of monomer units (HCOOLi). In the case of positive cluster ions, all fragmentations lead to the magic cluster (HCOOLi)3Li+ at higher collision energies which later fragments to dimer and monomer ions in lower abundance. Quantum mechanical calculations performed for smaller cluster ions showed that the trimer ion has a closed ring structure similar to the phenalenylium structure with three closed rings connected to the lithium ion. Further additions of monomer units result in similar symmetric structures for hexamer and nonamer cluster ions. Thermochemical calculations show that trimer cluster ion is relatively more stable than neighboring cluster ions, supporting the experimental observation of a magic number cluster with enhanced stability.

  2. Formation and Levitation of Unconfined Droplet Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, S.; Ruff, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    Combustion experiments using arrays of droplets seek to provide a link between single droplet combustion phenomena and the behavior of complex spray combustion systems. Both single droplet and droplet array studies have been conducted in microgravity to better isolate the droplet interaction phenomena and eliminate or reduce the confounding effects of buoyancy-induced convection. In most experiments involving droplet arrays, the droplets are supported on fibers to keep them stationary and close together before the combustion event. The presence of the fiber, however, disturbs the combustion process by introducing a source of heat transfer and asymmetry into the configuration. As the number of drops in a droplet array increases, supporting the drops on fibers becomes less practical because of the cumulative effect of the fibers on the combustion process. The overall objective of this research is to study the combustion of well-characterized drop clusters in a microgravity environment. Direct experimental observations and measurements of the combustion of droplet clusters would fill a large gap in our current understanding of droplet and spray combustion and provide unique experimental data for the verification and improvement of spray combustion models. This paper describes current work on the design and performance of an apparatus to generate and stabilize droplet clusters using acoustic and electrostatic forces.

  3. Clustered star formation and the origin of stellar masses.

    PubMed

    Pudritz, Ralph E

    2002-01-01

    Star clusters are ubiquitous in galaxies of all types and at all stages of their evolution. We also observe them to be forming in a wide variety of environments, ranging from nearby giant molecular clouds to the supergiant molecular clouds found in starburst and merging galaxies. The typical star in our galaxy and probably in others formed as a member of a star cluster, so star formation is an intrinsically clustered and not an isolated phenomenon. The greatest challenge regarding clustered star formation is to understand why stars have a mass spectrum that appears to be universal. This review examines the observations and models that have been proposed to explain these fundamental issues in stellar formation.

  4. PHAT Star Clusters in M31: Insight on Environmental Dependence of Star & Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Lent C.; Dalcanton, Julianne; Seth, Anil; Beerman, Lori; Lewis, Alexia; Fouesneau, Morgan; Weisz, Daniel R.; Andromeda Project Team, PHAT Team

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical studies of star cluster formation suggest that the star formation efficiency (SFE) of a cluster's progenitor cloud dictates whether or not a gravitationally bound grouping will emerge from an embedded region after gas expulsion. I measure the fraction of stars formed in long-lived clusters relative to unbound field stars on a spatial resolved basis in the Andromeda galaxy. These observations test theoretical predictions that star clusters are formed within a hierarchical interstellar medium at peaks in the gas density where local SFEs are enhanced and regions become stellar dominated. Using data from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey and ancillary observations of M31's gas phase, I investigate how cluster formation correlates with galactic environment and galaxy-scale properties of the star formation. We construct a sample of >2700 star clusters through a crowd-sourced visual search of the high spatial resolution HST imaging data. Our catalog uses ~2 million image classifications collected by the Andromeda Project citizen science website to provide an unparalleled census of clusters that spans ~4 orders of magnitude in mass (50% completeness at ~500 M⊙ at <100 Myr) and increases the number of known clusters within the PHAT survey footprint by a factor of ~6. Cluster ages and masses are obtained by fitting to color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of individually resolved stars within each cluster. Furthermore, we insure our ability to accurately interpret cluster age and mass distributions through careful catalog completeness characterization, made possible by thousands of synthetic cluster tests included during catalog construction work. We combine our high quality cluster sample with spatially resolved star formation histories, derived from CMD fitting of PHAT's photometry of ~117 million resolved field stars. We derived the fraction of stars formed in long-lived clusters and show that only a few percent of coeval stars are found in

  5. Hα star formation rates of z > 1 galaxy clusters in the IRAC shallow cluster survey

    SciTech Connect

    Zeimann, Gregory R.; Stanford, S. A.; Brodwin, Mark; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Mancone, Conor; Snyder, Gregory F.; Stern, Daniel; Eisenhardt, Peter; Dey, Arjun; Moustakas, John

    2013-12-20

    We present Hubble Space Telescope near-IR spectroscopy for 18 galaxy clusters at 1.0 Cluster Survey. We use Wide Field Camera 3 grism data to spectroscopically identify Hα emitters in both the cores of galaxy clusters as well as in field galaxies. We find a large cluster-to-cluster scatter in the star formation rates within a projected radius of 500 kpc, and many of our clusters (∼60%) have significant levels of star formation within a projected radius of 200 kpc. A stacking analysis reveals that dust reddening in these star-forming galaxies is positively correlated with stellar mass and may be higher in the field than the cluster at a fixed stellar mass. This may indicate a lower amount of gas in star-forming cluster galaxies than in the field population. Also, Hα equivalent widths of star-forming galaxies in the cluster environment are still suppressed below the level of the field. This suppression is most significant for lower mass galaxies (log M {sub *} < 10.0 M {sub ☉}). We therefore conclude that environmental effects are still important at 1.0 clusters with log M {sub *} ≲ 10.0 M {sub ☉}.

  6. Teenage suicide cluster formation and contagion: implications for primary care

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Lars; Lindqvist, Per; Eriksson, Anders

    2006-01-01

    Background We have previously studied unintentional as well as intentional injury deaths among teenagers living in the four northernmost counties, forming approximately 55% of Sweden with 908,000 inhabitants in 1991. During this work, we found what we suspected to be a suicide cluster among teenagers and we also suspected contagion since there were links between these cases. In this present study, we investigate the occurrence of suicide clustering among teenagers, analyze cluster definitions, and suggest preventive measures. Methods A retrospective study of teenager suicides autopsied at the Department of Forensic Medicine in Umeå, Sweden, during 1981 through 2000. Police reports, autopsy protocols, and medical records were studied in all cases, and the police officers that conducted the investigation at the scene were interviewed in all cluster cases. Parents of the suicide victims of the first cluster were also interviewed. Two aggregations of teenager suicides were detected and evaluated as possible suicide clusters using the US Centers for Disease Control definition of a suicide cluster. Results Two clusters including six teenagers were confirmed, and contagion was established within each cluster. Conclusion The general practitioner is identified as a key person in the aftermath of a teenage suicide since the general practitioner often meet the family, friends of the deceased, and other acquaintances early in the process after a suicide. This makes the general practitioner suitable to initiate contacts with others involved in the well-being of the young, in order to prevent suicide cluster formation and para-suicidal activities. PMID:16707009

  7. Wnt4 Participates in the Formation of Vertebrate Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Strochlic, Laure; Falk, Julien; Goillot, Evelyne; Sigoillot, Séverine; Bourgeois, Francine; Delers, Perrine; Rouvière, Jérôme; Swain, Amanda; Castellani, Valérie; Schaeffer, Laurent; Legay, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation requires the highly coordinated communication of several reciprocal signaling processes between motoneurons and their muscle targets. Identification of the early, spatially restricted cues in target recognition at the NMJ is still poorly documented, especially in mammals. Wnt signaling is one of the key pathways regulating synaptic connectivity. Here, we report that Wnt4 contributes to the formation of vertebrate NMJ in vivo. Results from a microarray screen and quantitative RT-PCR demonstrate that Wnt4 expression is regulated during muscle cell differentiation in vitro and muscle development in vivo, being highly expressed when the first synaptic contacts are formed and subsequently downregulated. Analysis of the mouse Wnt4−/− NMJ phenotype reveals profound innervation defects including motor axons overgrowing and bypassing AChR aggregates with 30% of AChR clusters being unapposed by nerve terminals. In addition, loss of Wnt4 function results in a 35% decrease of the number of prepatterned AChR clusters while Wnt4 overexpression in cultured myotubes increases the number of AChR clusters demonstrating that Wnt4 directly affects postsynaptic differentiation. In contrast, muscle structure and the localization of several synaptic proteins including acetylcholinesterase, MuSK and rapsyn are not perturbed in the Wnt4 mutant. Finally, we identify MuSK as a Wnt4 receptor. Wnt4 not only interacts with MuSK ectodomain but also mediates MuSK activation. Taken together our data reveal a new role for Wnt4 in mammalian NMJ formation that could be mediated by MuSK, a key receptor in synaptogenesis. PMID:22253844

  8. Expression of human AChR extracellular domain mutants with improved characteristics.

    PubMed

    Lazaridis, Konstantinos; Zisimopoulou, Paraskevi; Giastas, Petros; Bitzopoulou, Kalliopi; Evangelakou, Panagiota; Sideri, Anastasia; Tzartos, Socrates J

    2014-02-01

    The muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) has a central role in neuromuscular transmission, and is the major target in the autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis (MG). We created mutants of the extracellular domains (ECDs) of the human α1, β1, δ and ε AChR subunits, whereby their Cys-loop was exchanged for that of the acetylcholine binding protein. The mutants were expressed in Pichia pastoris and had improved solubility resulting in 2- to 43-fold higher expression yields compared to the wild type. An additional mutant was created for the α1 ECD restoring its glycosylation site within the Cys-loop and its α-bungarotoxin binding ability. Furthermore, we constructed dimeric and pentameric concatamers of the mutant ECDs. All concatamers were successfully expressed as soluble secreted proteins, although the pentamers had about 10-fold lower expression than the dimers and were more susceptible to fragmentation. Initial crystallizations with the mutant ECDs were promising, and we reproducibly obtained crystals of the β1 ECD, diffracting at ~12 Å. Further optimization is underway to obtain crystals suitable for high resolution crystallography. The proteins described herein are useful tools in structural studies of the human muscle AChR and can be used in applications requiring high yields such as therapeutic adsorbents for MG autoantibodies. PMID:24246999

  9. The Star Cluster Mass-Galactocentric Radius Relation: Implications for Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weijia; de Grijs, Richard; Fan, Zhou; Cameron, Ewan

    2016-01-01

    Whether or not the initial star cluster mass function is established through a universal, galactocentric-distance-independent stochastic process, on the scales of individual galaxies, remains an unsolved problem. This debate has recently gained new impetus through the publication of a study that concluded that the maximum cluster mass in a given population is not solely determined by size-of-sample effects. Here, we revisit the evidence in favor and against stochastic cluster formation by examining the young (≲ a few × {10}8 year old) star cluster mass-galactocentric radius relation in M33, M51, M83, and the Large Magellanic Cloud. To eliminate size-of-sample effects, we first adopt radial bin sizes containing constant numbers of clusters, which we use to quantify the radial distribution of the first- to fifth-ranked most massive clusters using ordinary least-squares fitting. We supplement this analysis with an application of quantile regression, a binless approach to rank-based regression taking an absolute-value-distance penalty. Both methods yield, within the 1σ to 3σ uncertainties, near-zero slopes in the diagnostic plane, largely irrespective of the maximum age or minimum mass imposed on our sample selection, or of the radial bin size adopted. We conclude that, at least in our four well-studied sample galaxies, star cluster formation does not necessarily require an environment-dependent cluster formation scenario, which thus supports the notion of stochastic star cluster formation as the dominant star cluster-formation process within a given galaxy.

  10. SIGNATURES OF STAR CLUSTER FORMATION BY COLD COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsova, Aleksandra; Hartmann, Lee; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier

    2015-12-10

    Subvirial gravitational collapse is one mechanism by which star clusters may form. Here we investigate whether this mechanism can be inferred from observations of young clusters. To address this question, we have computed smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the initial formation and evolution of a dynamically young star cluster through cold (subvirial) collapse, starting with an ellipsoidal, turbulently seeded distribution of gas, and forming sink particles representing (proto)stars. While the initial density distributions of the clouds do not have large initial mass concentrations, gravitational focusing due to the global morphology leads to cluster formation. We use the resulting structures to extract observable morphological and kinematic signatures for the case of subvirial collapse. We find that the signatures of the initial conditions can be erased rapidly as the gas and stars collapse, suggesting that kinematic observations need to be made early in cluster formation and/or at larger scales, away from the growing cluster core. Our results emphasize that a dynamically young system is inherently evolving on short timescales, so that it can be highly misleading to use current-epoch conditions to study aspects such as star formation rates as a function of local density. Our simulations serve as a starting point for further studies of collapse including other factors such as magnetic fields and stellar feedback.

  11. Mass distributions of star clusters for different star formation histories in a galaxy cluster environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, C.; Pflamm-Altenburg, J.; Kroupa, P.

    2015-10-01

    Clusters of galaxies usually contain rich populations of globular clusters (GCs). We investigate how different star formation histories (SFHs) shape the final mass distribution of star clusters. We assumed that every star cluster population forms during a formation epoch of length δt at a constant star-formation rate (SFR). The mass distribution of such a population is described by the embedded cluster mass function (ECMF), which is a pure power law extending to an upper limit Mmax. Since the SFR determines Mmax, the ECMF implicitly depends on the SFR. Starting with different SFHs, the time-evolution of the SFR, each SFH is divided into formation epochs of length δt at different SFRs. The requested mass function arises from the superposition of the star clusters of all formation epochs. An improved optimal sampling technique is introduced that allows generating number and mass distributions, both of which accurately agree with the ECMF. Moreover, for each SFH the distribution function of all involved SFRs, F(SFR), is computed. For monotonically decreasing SFHs, we found that F(SFR) always follows a power law. With F(SFR), we developed the theory of the integrated galactic embedded cluster mass function (IGECMF). The latter describes the distribution function of birth stellar masses of star clusters that accumulated over a formation episode much longer than δt. The IGECMF indeed reproduces the mass distribution of star clusters created according to the superposition principle. Interestingly, all considered SFHs lead to a turn-down with increasing star cluster mass in their respective IGECMFs in a similar way as is observed for GC systems in different galaxy clusters, which offers the possibility of determining the conditions under which a GC system was assembled. Although assuming a pure power-law ECMF, a Schechter-like IGECMF emerges from the superposition principle. In the past decade, a turn-down at the high-mass end has been observed in the cluster initial

  12. GAMMA RAYS FROM STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Storm, Emma M.; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Profumo, Stefano

    2012-08-20

    Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission, presumably from non-thermal processes connected to the acceleration of cosmic-ray nuclei and electrons. The detection of gamma rays from starburst galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity. Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 {mu}m) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star-forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study, we apply the functional relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities of galaxies derived by the Fermi Collaboration to a sample of the best candidate galaxy clusters for detection in gamma rays in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with star formation in galaxy clusters. We find that several clusters have predicted gamma-ray emission from star formation that are within an order of magnitude of the upper limits derived in Ackermann et al. based on non-detection by Fermi-LAT. Given the current gamma-ray limits, star formation likely plays a significant role in the gamma-ray emission in some clusters, especially those with cool cores. We predict that both Fermi-LAT over the course of its lifetime and the future Cerenkov Telescope Array will be able to detect gamma-ray emission from star-forming galaxies in clusters.

  13. Lithium formate ion clusters formation during electrospray ionization: Evidence of magic number clusters by mass spectrometry and ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Anil; Bogdanov, Bogdan

    2015-02-14

    Small cationic and anionic clusters of lithium formate were generated by electrospray ionization and their fragmentations were studied by tandem mass spectrometry (collision-induced dissociation with N{sub 2}). Singly as well as multiply charged clusters were formed in both positive and negative ion modes with the general formulae, (HCOOLi){sub n}Li{sup +}, (HCOOLi){sub n}Li{sub m}{sup m+}, (HCOOLi){sub n}HCOO{sup −}, and (HCOOLi){sub n}(HCOO){sub m}{sup m−}. Several magic number cluster (MNC) ions were observed in both the positive and negative ion modes although more predominant in the positive ion mode with (HCOOLi){sub 3}Li{sup +} being the most abundant and stable cluster ion. Fragmentations of singly charged positive clusters proceed first by the loss of a dimer unit ((HCOOLi){sub 2}) followed by the loss of monomer units (HCOOLi) although the former remains the dominant dissociation process. In the case of positive cluster ions, all fragmentations lead to the magic cluster (HCOOLi){sub 3}Li{sup +} as the most abundant fragment ion at higher collision energies which then fragments further to dimer and monomer ions at lower abundances. In the negative ion mode, however, singly charged clusters dissociated via sequential loss of monomer units. Multiply charged clusters in both positive and negative ion modes dissociated mainly via Coulomb repulsion. Quantum chemical calculations performed for smaller cluster ions showed that the trimer ion has a closed ring structure similar to the phenalenylium structure with three closed rings connected to the central lithium ion. Further additions of monomer units result in similar symmetric structures for hexamer and nonamer cluster ions. Thermochemical calculations show that trimer cluster ion is relatively more stable than neighboring cluster ions, supporting the experimental observation of a magic number cluster with enhanced stability.

  14. New insights on the formation of nuclear star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillard, Nicolas; Emsellem, Eric; Renaud, Florent

    2016-10-01

    Nuclear clusters (NCs) are common stellar systems in the centres of galaxies. Yet, the physical mechanisms involved in their formation are still debated. Using a parsec-resolution hydrodynamical simulation of a dwarf galaxy, we propose an updated formation scenario for NCs. In this `wet migration scenario', a massive star cluster forms in the gas-rich disc, keeping a gas reservoir, and growing further while it migrates to the centre via a combination of interactions with other substructures and dynamical friction. A wet merger with another dense cluster and its own gas reservoir can occur, although this is not a prerequisite for the actual formation of the NC. The merging process does significantly alter the properties of the NC (mass, morphology, star formation history), also quenching the ongoing local star formation activity, thus leading to interesting observational diagnostics for the physical origin of NCs. A population of lower mass clusters co-exist during the simulation, but these are either destroyed via tidal forces, or have high angular momentum preventing them to interact with the NC and contribute to its growth. The proposed updated scenario emphasizes the role of gas reservoirs associated with the densest star clusters formed in a gas-rich low-mass galaxy.

  15. STAR FORMATION AND RELAXATION IN 379 NEARBY GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Seth A.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Wegner, Gary A.

    2015-06-10

    We investigate the relationship between star formation (SF) and level of relaxation in a sample of 379 galaxy clusters at z < 0.2. We use data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to measure cluster membership and level of relaxation, and to select star-forming galaxies based on mid-infrared emission detected with the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer. For galaxies with absolute magnitudes M{sub r} < −19.5, we find an inverse correlation between SF fraction and cluster relaxation: as a cluster becomes less relaxed, its SF fraction increases. Furthermore, in general, the subtracted SF fraction in all unrelaxed clusters (0.117 ± 0.003) is higher than that in all relaxed clusters (0.097 ± 0.005). We verify the validity of our SF calculation methods and membership criteria through analysis of previous work. Our results agree with previous findings that a weak correlation exists between cluster SF and dynamical state, possibly because unrelaxed clusters are less evolved relative to relaxed clusters.

  16. The physics and modes of star cluster formation: simulations.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Cathie

    2010-02-28

    We review progress in numerical simulations of star cluster formation. These simulations involve the bottom-up assembly of clusters through hierarchical mergers, which produces a fractal stellar distribution at young (approx. 0.5 Myr) ages. The resulting clusters are predicted to be mildly aspherical and highly mass-segregated, except in the immediate aftermath of mergers. The upper initial mass function within individual clusters is generally somewhat flatter than for the aggregate population. Recent work has begun to clarify the factors that control the mean stellar mass in a star-forming cloud and also the efficiency of star formation. The former is sensitive to the thermal properties of the gas while the latter depends both on the magnetic field and the initial degree of gravitational boundedness of the natal cloud. Unmagnetized clouds that are initially bound undergo rapid collapse, which is difficult to reverse by ionization feedback or stellar winds.

  17. Formation and evolution of black holes in dense star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Sanghamitra

    Using supercomputer simulations combining stellar dynamics and stellar evolution, we have studied various problems related to the existence of black holes in dense star clusters. We consider both stellar and intermediate-mass black holes, and we focus on massive, dense star clusters, such as old globular clusters and young, so called "super star clusters." The first problem concerns the formation of intermediate-mass black holes in young clusters through the runaway collision instability. A promising mechanism to form intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) is runaway mergers in dense star clusters, where main-sequence stars collide re- peatedly and form a very massive star (VMS), which then collapses to a black hole (BH). Here we study the effects of primordial mass segregation and the importance of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) on the runaway growth of VMSs using a dynamical Monte Carlo code to model systems with N as high as 10^6 stars. Our Monte Carlo code includes an explicittreatment of all stellar collisions. We place special emphasis on the possibility of top-heavy IMFs, as observed in some very young massive clusters. We find that both primordial mass segregation and the shape of the IMF affect the rate of core collapse of star clusters and thus the time of the runaway. When we include primordial mass segregation we generally see a decrease in core collapse time (tcc). Although for smaller degrees of primordial mass segregation this decrease in tcc is mostly due to the change in the density profile of the cluster, for highly mass-segregated (primordial) clusters, it is the increase in the average mass in the core which reduces the central relaxation time, decreasing tcc. Finally, flatter IMFs generally increase the average mass in the whole cluster, which increases tcc. For the range of IMFs investigated in this thesis, this increase in tcc is to some degree balanced by stellar collisions, which accelerate core collapse. Thus there is no

  18. Globular Cluster Formation Triggered by the Initial Starburst in Galaxy Formation.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi; Trentham; Ikeuchi

    1999-11-20

    We propose and investigate a new formation mechanism for globular clusters in which they form within molecular clouds that are formed in the shocked regions created by galactic winds driven by successive supernova explosions shortly after the initial burst of massive star formation in the galactic centers. The globular clusters have a radial distribution that is more extended than that of the stars because the clusters form as pressure-confined condensations in a shell that is moving outward radially at high velocity. In addition, the model is consistent with existing observations of other global properties of globular clusters, as far as comparisons can be made.

  19. Formation of [4Fe-4S] clusters in the mitochondrial iron-sulfur cluster assembly machinery.

    PubMed

    Brancaccio, Diego; Gallo, Angelo; Mikolajczyk, Maciej; Zovo, Kairit; Palumaa, Peep; Novellino, Ettore; Piccioli, Mario; Ciofi-Baffoni, Simone; Banci, Lucia

    2014-11-19

    The generation of [4Fe-4S] clusters in mitochondria critically depends, in both yeast and human cells, on two A-type ISC proteins (in mammals named ISCA1 and ISCA2), which perform a nonredundant functional role forming in vivo a heterocomplex. The molecular function of ISCA1 and ISCA2 proteins, i.e., how these proteins help in generating [4Fe-4S] clusters, is still unknown. In this work we have structurally characterized the Fe/S cluster binding properties of human ISCA2 and investigated in vitro whether and how a [4Fe-4S] cluster is assembled when human ISCA1 and ISCA2 interact with the physiological [2Fe-2S](2+) cluster-donor human GRX5. We found that (i) ISCA2 binds either [2Fe-2S] or [4Fe-4S] cluster in a dimeric state, and (ii) two molecules of [2Fe-2S](2+) GRX5 donate their cluster to a heterodimeric ISCA1/ISCA2 complex. This complex acts as an "assembler" of [4Fe-4S] clusters; i.e., the two GRX5-donated [2Fe-2S](2+) clusters generate a [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster. The formation of the same [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster-bound heterodimeric species is also observed by having first one [2Fe-2S](2+) cluster transferred from GRX5 to each individual ISCA1 and ISCA2 proteins to form [2Fe-2S](2+) ISCA2 and [2Fe-2S](2+) ISCA1, and then mixing them together. These findings imply that such heterodimeric complex is the functional unit in mitochondria receiving [2Fe-2S] clusters from hGRX5 and assembling [4Fe-4S] clusters before their transfer to the final target apo proteins.

  20. Probing Globular Cluster Formation in Low Metallicity Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kelsey E.; Hunt, Leslie K.; Reines, Amy E.

    2008-12-01

    The ubiquitous presence of globular clusters around massive galaxies today suggests that these extreme star clusters must have been formed prolifically in the earlier universe in low-metallicity galaxies. Numerous adolescent and massive star clusters are already known to be present in a variety of galaxies in the local universe; however most of these systems have metallicities of 12 + log(O/H) > 8, and are thus not representative of the galaxies in which today's ancient globular clusters were formed. In order to better understand the formation and evolution of these massive clusters in environments with few heavy elements, we have targeted several low-metallicity dwarf galaxies with radio observations, searching for newly-formed massive star clusters still embedded in their birth material. The galaxies in this initial study are HS 0822+3542, UGC 4483, Pox 186, and SBS 0335-052, all of which have metallicities of 12 + log(O/H) < 7.75. While no thermal radio sources, indicative of natal massive star clusters, are found in three of the four galaxies, SBS 0335-052 hosts two such objects, which are incredibly luminous. The radio spectral energy distributions of these intense star-forming regions in SBS 0335-052 suggest the presence of ~12,000 equivalent O-type stars, and the implied star formation rate is nearing the maximum starburst intensity limit.

  1. Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury. XVI. Star Cluster Formation Efficiency and the Clustered Fraction of Young Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L. Clifton; Seth, Anil C.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Beerman, Lori C.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Lewis, Alexia R.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Bell, Eric F.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Larsen, Søren S.; Sandstrom, Karin; Skillman, Evan D.

    2016-08-01

    We use the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury survey data set to perform spatially resolved measurements of star cluster formation efficiency (Γ), the fraction of stellar mass formed in long-lived star clusters. We use robust star formation history and cluster parameter constraints, obtained through color–magnitude diagram analysis of resolved stellar populations, to study Andromeda’s cluster and field populations over the last ˜300 Myr. We measure Γ of 4%–8% for young, 10–100 Myr-old populations in M31. We find that cluster formation efficiency varies systematically across the M31 disk, consistent with variations in mid-plane pressure. These Γ measurements expand the range of well-studied galactic environments, providing precise constraints in an H i-dominated, low-intensity star formation environment. Spatially resolved results from M31 are broadly consistent with previous trends observed on galaxy-integrated scales, where Γ increases with increasing star formation rate surface density (ΣSFR). However, we can explain observed scatter in the relation and attain better agreement between observations and theoretical models if we account for environmental variations in gas depletion time (τ dep) when modeling Γ, accounting for the qualitative shift in star formation behavior when transitioning from a H2-dominated to a H i-dominated interstellar medium. We also demonstrate that Γ measurements in high ΣSFR starburst systems are well-explained by τ dep-dependent fiducial Γ models.

  2. Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury. XVI. Star Cluster Formation Efficiency and the Clustered Fraction of Young Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L. Clifton; Seth, Anil C.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Beerman, Lori C.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Lewis, Alexia R.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Bell, Eric F.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Larsen, Søren S.; Sandstrom, Karin; Skillman, Evan D.

    2016-08-01

    We use the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury survey data set to perform spatially resolved measurements of star cluster formation efficiency (Γ), the fraction of stellar mass formed in long-lived star clusters. We use robust star formation history and cluster parameter constraints, obtained through color-magnitude diagram analysis of resolved stellar populations, to study Andromeda’s cluster and field populations over the last ˜300 Myr. We measure Γ of 4%-8% for young, 10-100 Myr-old populations in M31. We find that cluster formation efficiency varies systematically across the M31 disk, consistent with variations in mid-plane pressure. These Γ measurements expand the range of well-studied galactic environments, providing precise constraints in an H i-dominated, low-intensity star formation environment. Spatially resolved results from M31 are broadly consistent with previous trends observed on galaxy-integrated scales, where Γ increases with increasing star formation rate surface density (ΣSFR). However, we can explain observed scatter in the relation and attain better agreement between observations and theoretical models if we account for environmental variations in gas depletion time (τ dep) when modeling Γ, accounting for the qualitative shift in star formation behavior when transitioning from a H2-dominated to a H i-dominated interstellar medium. We also demonstrate that Γ measurements in high ΣSFR starburst systems are well-explained by τ dep-dependent fiducial Γ models.

  3. Actin at receptor-rich domains of isolated acetylcholine receptor clusters.

    PubMed

    Bloch, R J

    1986-04-01

    Acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clusters of cultured rat myotubes, isolated by extraction with saponin (Bloch, R. J., 1984, J. Cell Biol. 99:984-993), contain a polypeptide that co-electrophoreses with purified muscle actins. A monoclonal antibody against actin reacts in immunoblots with this polypeptide and with purified actins. In indirect immunofluorescence, the antibody stains isolated AChR clusters only at AChR domains, strips of membrane within clusters that are rich in receptor. It also stains the postsynaptic region of the neuromuscular junction of adult rat skeletal muscle. Semiquantitative immunofluorescence analyses show that labeling by antiactin of isolated analyses show that labeling by antiactin of isolated AChR clusters is specific and saturable and that it varies linearly with the amount of AChR in the cluster. Filaments of purified gizzard myosin also bind preferentially at AChR-rich regions, and this binding is inhibited by MgATP. These experiments suggest that actin is associated with AChR-rich regions of receptor clusters. Depletion of actin by extraction of isolated clusters at low ionic strength selectively releases the actin-like polypeptide from the preparation. Simultaneously, AChRs redistribute within the plane of the membrane of the isolated clusters. Similarly, brief digestion with chymotrypsin reduces immunofluorescence staining and causes AChR redistribution. Treatments that deplete AChR from clusters in intact cells also reduce immunofluorescent staining for actin in isolated muscle membrane fragments. Upon reversal of these treatments, cluster reformation occurs in regions of the membrane that also stain for actin. I conclude that actin is associated with AChR domains and that changes in this association are accompanied by changes in the organization of isolated AChR clusters.

  4. Clusters in the inner spiral arms of M 51: The cluster IMF and the formation history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bik, A.; Lamers, H. J. G. L. M.; Bastian, N.; Panagia, N.; Romaniello, M.

    2003-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of the HST-WFPC2 observations of the interacting galaxy M 51. From the observations in 5 broadband filters (UBVRI) and two narrowband filters (Hα and [OIII]) we study the cluster population in a region of 3.2 x 3.2 kpc2 in the inner spiral arms of M 51, at a distance of about 1 to 3 kpc from the nucleus. We found 877 cluster candidates and we derived their ages, initial masses and extinctions by means of a comparison between the observed spectral energy distribution and the predictions from cluster synthesis models for instantaneous star formation and solar metallicity. The lack of [OIII] emission in even the youngest clusters with strong Hα emission, indicates the absence of the most massive stars and suggests a mass upper limit of about 25 to 30 Msun. The mass versus age distribution of the clusters shows a drastic decrease in the number of clusters with age, much more severe than can be expected on the basis of evolutionary fading of the clusters. This indicates that cluster dispersion is occurring on a timescale of 10 Myr or longer. The cluster initial mass function has been derived from clusters younger than 10 Myr by a linear regression fit of the cumulative mass distribution. This results in an exponent alpha = -d log N(M) /d log (M) = 2.1 +/- 0.3 in the range of 2.5x 103 < M < 5x 104 M\\odot but with an overabundance of clusters with M > 2x 104 Msun. In the restricted range of 2.5x 103 < M < 2x 104 Msun we find alpha = 2.0 +/- 0.05. This exponent is very similar to the value derived for clusters in the interacting Antennae galaxies, and to the exponent of the mass distribution of the giant molecular clouds in our Galaxy. To study the possible effects of the interaction of M 51 with its companion NGC 5195 about 400 Myr ago, which triggered a huge starburst in the nucleus, we determined the cluster formation rate as a function of time for clusters with an initial mass larger than 104 Msun. There is no evidence for a

  5. Formation of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dengkai

    2014-09-01

    Observations reveal the presence of multiple stellar populations (MSPs) in globular clusters (GCs) that exhibit wide abundance variations and multiple sequences in their Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams. We present a scenario for the formation of MSPs in GCs. In this scenario, initial GCs are single-generation clusters, and our model predicts that the anomalous-abundance stars observed in GCs are the merged and accreted stars produced by binary interactions, which are rapidly rotating stars at the moment of their formation. A stellar population with binaries can reproduce two important observational pieces of evidence of MSPs, the Na-O anticorrelation and the multiple sequences in the HR diagram.

  6. The Formation and Dynamical Evolution of Young Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, M. S.; Portegies Zwart, S.

    2016-01-01

    Recent observations have revealed a variety of young star clusters, including embedded systems, young massive clusters, and associations. We study the formation and dynamical evolution of these clusters using a combination of simulations and theoretical models. Our simulations start with a turbulent molecular cloud that collapses under its own gravity. The stars are assumed to form in the densest regions in the collapsing cloud after an initial free-fall time of the molecular cloud. The dynamical evolution of these stellar distributions is continued by means of direct N-body simulations. The molecular clouds typical of the Milky Way Galaxy tend to form embedded clusters that evolve to resemble open clusters. The associations were initially considerably more clumpy, but they lost their irregularity in about a dynamical timescale, due to the relaxation process. The densest molecular clouds, which are absent in the Milky Way but are typical in starburst galaxies, form massive, young star clusters. They indeed are rare in the Milky Way. Our models indicate a distinct evolutionary path from molecular clouds to open clusters and associations or to massive star clusters. The mass-radius relation for both types of evolutionary tracks excellently matches the observations. According to our calculations, the time evolution of the half-mass-radius relation for open clusters and associations follows {r}{{h}}/{{pc}}=2.7{({t}{{age}}/{{pc}})}2/3, whereas for massive star clusters {r}{{h}}/{{pc}}=0.34{({t}{{age}}/{{Myr}})}2/3. Both trends are consistent with the observed age-mass-radius relation for clusters in the Milky Way.

  7. Kinematics of a Massive Star Cluster in Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan

    2014-10-01

    We propose to measure the proper motion stellar kinematics of a massive (~10^4Msun), forming proto-star-cluster to test basic theoretical models of formation. This will be the first time such a measurement has been performed. It requires HST-WFC3/IR and is beyond the practical capabilities of ground-based adaptive optics (AO) observations. In contrast to previously-studied massive, young (<10 Myr-old), already-formed clusters, such as NGC3603, Westerlund 1 or the Arches, our target protocluster, G286.21+0.17 (hereafter G286), is still gas-dominated and undergoing active star formation. It has been carefully selected from a complete survey of ~300 dense molecular gas clumps in a 120 sq. deg. region of the Galactic plane. The cluster is also relatively nearby (~2.5 kpc), but not too close that it would span a prohibitively large angular area or suffer from significant saturation problems. Such massive systems are rare and indeed we are unaware of any equivalent, early-stage (i.e., gas dominated) cluster that is closer. Given the depth of its gravitational potential based on its mass and size, the expected proper motions of many independent sub-clusters of stars are detectable at the ~5 sigma level over a 2-year baseline and global contraction of the cluster can be seen if it is happening even at just ~10% of the free-fall rate.

  8. Contraction-induced cluster formation in cardiac cell culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Takahiro; Isomura, Akihiro; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2008-11-01

    The evolution of the spatial arrangement of cells in a primary culture of cardiac tissue derived from newborn rats was studied experimentally over an extended period. It was found that cells attract each other spontaneously to form a clustered structure over the timescale of several days. These clusters exhibit spontaneous rhythmic contraction and have been confirmed to consist of cardiac muscle cells. The addition of a contraction inhibitor (2,3-butanedione-2-monoxime) to the culture medium resulted in the inhibition of both the spontaneous contractions exhibited by the cells as well as the formation of clusters. Furthermore, the formation of clusters is suppressed when high concentrations of collagen are used for coating the substratum to which the cells adhere. From these experimental observations, it was deduced that the cells are mechanically stressed by the tension associated with repeated contractions and that this results in the cells becoming compact and attracting each other, finally resulting in the formation of clusters. This process can be interpreted as modulation of a cellular network by the activity associated with contraction, which could be employed to control cellular networks by modifying the dynamics associated with the contractions in cardiac tissue culture.

  9. DUST-OBSCURED STAR FORMATION IN INTERMEDIATE REDSHIFT GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, Rose A.; Desai, Vandana; Rudnick, Gregory; Poggianti, Bianca; Bell, Eric F.; Hinz, Joannah; Zaritsky, Dennis; Jablonka, Pascale; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Moustakas, John; Rines, Kenneth E-mail: jmoustakas@ucsd.ed

    2010-09-01

    We present Spitzer MIPS 24 {mu}m observations of sixteen 0.4 < z < 0.8 galaxy clusters drawn from the ESO Distant Cluster Survey. This is the first large 24 {mu}m survey of clusters at intermediate redshift. The depth of our imaging corresponds to a total IR luminosity of 8 x 10{sup 10} L{sub sun}, just below the luminosity of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs), and 6{sup +1}{sub -1}% of M{sub V} < -19 cluster members show 24 {mu}m emission at or above this level. We compare with a large sample of coeval field galaxies and find that while the fraction of cluster LIRGs lies significantly below that of the field, the IR luminosities of the field and cluster galaxies are consistent. However, the stellar masses of the EDisCS LIRGs are systematically higher than those of the field LIRGs. A comparison with optical data reveals that {approx}80% of cluster LIRGs are blue and the remaining 20% lie on the red sequence. Of LIRGs with optical spectra, 88{sup +4} {sub -5}% show [O II] emission with EW([O II]) > 5 A, and {approx}75% exhibit optical signatures of dusty starbursts. On average, the fraction of cluster LIRGs increases with projected clustercentric radius but remains systematically lower than the field fraction over the area probed (<1.5x R {sub 200}). The amount of obscured star formation declines significantly over the 2.4 Gyr interval spanned by the EDisCS sample, and the rate of decline is the same for the cluster and field populations. Our results are consistent with an exponentially declining LIRG fraction, with the decline in the field delayed by {approx}1 Gyr relative to the clusters.

  10. Fragmentation energetics of clusters relevant to atmospheric new particle formation.

    PubMed

    Bzdek, Bryan R; DePalma, Joseph W; Ridge, Douglas P; Laskin, Julia; Johnston, Murray V

    2013-02-27

    The exact mechanisms by which small clusters form and grow in the atmosphere are poorly understood, but this process may significantly impact cloud condensation nuclei number concentrations and global climate. Sulfuric acid is the key chemical component to new particle formation (NPF), but basic species such as ammonia are also important. Few laboratory experiments address the kinetics or thermodynamics of acid and base incorporation into small clusters. This work utilizes a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer equipped with surface-induced dissociation to investigate time- and collision-energy-resolved fragmentation of positively charged ammonium bisulfate clusters. Critical energies for dissociation are obtained from Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus/quasi-equilibrium theory modeling of the experimental data and are compared to quantum chemical calculations of the thermodynamics of cluster dissociation. Fragmentation of ammonium bisulfate clusters occurs by two pathways: (1) a two-step pathway whereby the cluster sequentially loses ammonia followed by sulfuric acid and (2) a one-step pathway whereby the cluster loses an ammonium bisulfate molecule. Experimental critical energies for loss of an ammonia molecule and loss of an ammonium bisulfate molecule are higher than the thermodynamic values. If cluster growth is considered the reverse of cluster fragmentation, these results require the presence of an activation barrier to describe the incorporation of ammonia into small acidic clusters and suggest that kinetically (i.e., diffusion) limited growth should not be assumed. An important corollary is that models of atmospheric NPF should be revised to consider activation barriers to individual chemical steps along the growth pathway.

  11. Fragmentation Energetics of Clusters Relevant to Atmospheric New Particle Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bzdek, Bryan R.; Depalma, Joseph W.; Ridge, Douglas P.; Laskin, Julia; Johnston, Murray V.

    2013-02-27

    The exact mechanisms by which small clusters form and grow in the atmosphere are poorly understood, but this process may significantly impact cloud condensation nuclei number concentrations and global climate. Sulfuric acid is the key chemical component to new particle formation, but basic species such as ammonia are also important. However, few laboratory experiments address the kinetics or thermodynamics of acid and base incorporation into small clusters. This work utilizes a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer equipped with surface-induced dissociation (FTICR-SID) to investigate time- and collision energy-resolved fragmentation of positively charged ammonium bisulfate clusters. Critical energies for dissociation are obtained from Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus/Quasi-Equilibrium Theory (RRKM/QET) modeling of the experimental data and are compared to quantum chemical calculations of the thermodynamics of cluster dissociation. Fragmentation of ammonium bisulfate clusters occurs by two pathways: 1) a two-step pathway whereby the cluster sequentially loses ammonia followed by sulfuric acid and 2) a one-step pathway whereby the cluster loses an ammonium bisulfate molecule. Experimental critical energies for loss of an ammonia molecule and loss of an ammonium bisulfate molecule are higher than the thermodynamic values. If cluster growth is considered the reverse of cluster fragmentation, these results require the presence of an activation barrier to describe the incorporation of ammonia into small acidic clusters and suggest that kinetically (i.e. diffusion) limited growth should not be assumed. An important corollary is that models of atmospheric NPF should be revised to consider activation barriers to individual chemical steps along the growth pathway.

  12. Linked Supramolecular Building Blocks for Enhanced Cluster Formation

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, Ross; Palacios, Maria A; Beavers, Christine M; Teat, Simon J; Piligkos, Stergios; Brechin, Euan K; Dalgarno, Scott J

    2015-01-01

    Methylene-bridged calix[4]arenes have emerged as extremely versatile ligand supports in the formation of new polymetallic clusters possessing fascinating magnetic properties. Metal ion binding rules established for this building block allow one to partially rationalise the complex assembly process. The ability to covalently link calix[4]arenes at the methylene bridge provides significantly improved control over the introduction of different metal centres to resulting cluster motifs. Clusters assembled from bis-calix[4]arenes and transition metal ions or 3d-4f combinations display characteristic features of the analogous calix[4]arene supported clusters, thereby demonstrating an enhanced and rational approach towards the targeted synthesis of complex and challenging structures. PMID:25641542

  13. Linked supramolecular building blocks for enhanced cluster formation

    DOE PAGES

    McLellan, Ross; Palacios, Maria A.; Beavers, Christine M.; Teat, Simon J.; Piligkos, Stergios; Brechin, Euan K.; Dalgarno, Scott J.

    2015-01-09

    Methylene-bridged calix[4]arenes have emerged as extremely versatile ligand supports in the formation of new polymetallic clusters possessing fascinating magnetic properties. Metal ion binding rules established for this building block allow one to partially rationalise the complex assembly process. The ability to covalently link calix[4]arenes at the methylene bridge provides significantly improved control over the introduction of different metal centres to resulting cluster motifs. Clusters assembled from bis-calix[4]arenes and transition metal ions or 3d-4f combinations display characteristic features of the analogous calix[4]arene supported clusters, thereby demonstrating an enhanced and rational approach towards the targeted synthesis of complex and challenging structures.

  14. Linked supramolecular building blocks for enhanced cluster formation

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Ross; Palacios, Maria A.; Beavers, Christine M.; Teat, Simon J.; Piligkos, Stergios; Brechin, Euan K.; Dalgarno, Scott J.

    2015-01-09

    Methylene-bridged calix[4]arenes have emerged as extremely versatile ligand supports in the formation of new polymetallic clusters possessing fascinating magnetic properties. Metal ion binding rules established for this building block allow one to partially rationalise the complex assembly process. The ability to covalently link calix[4]arenes at the methylene bridge provides significantly improved control over the introduction of different metal centres to resulting cluster motifs. Clusters assembled from bis-calix[4]arenes and transition metal ions or 3d-4f combinations display characteristic features of the analogous calix[4]arene supported clusters, thereby demonstrating an enhanced and rational approach towards the targeted synthesis of complex and challenging structures.

  15. WITNESSING THE FORMATION OF A BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXY IN A NEARBY X-RAY CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Jesper; Mulchaey, John S.; Bai, Lei; Ponman, Trevor J.; Raychaudhury, Somak; Dariush, Ali

    2010-07-10

    The central dominant galaxies in galaxy clusters constitute the most massive and luminous galaxies in the universe. Despite this, the formation of these brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and the impact of this on the surrounding cluster environment remain poorly understood. Here we present multiwavelength observations of the nearby poor X-ray cluster MZ 10451, in which both processes can be studied in unprecedented detail. Chandra observations of the intracluster medium (ICM) in the cluster core, which harbors two optically bright early-type galaxies in the process of merging, show that the system has retained a cool core and a central metal excess. This suggests that any merger-induced ICM heating and mixing remain modest at this stage. Tidally stripped stars seen around either galaxy likely represent an emerging intracluster light component, and the central ICM abundance enhancement may have a prominent contribution from in situ enrichment provided by these stars. The smaller of the merging galaxies shows evidence for having retained a hot gas halo, along with tentative evidence for some obscured star formation, suggesting that not all BCG major mergers at low redshift are completely dissipationless. Both galaxies are slightly offset from the peak of the ICM emission, with all three lying on an axis that roughly coincides with the large-scale elongation of the ICM. Our data are consistent with a picture in which central BCGs are built up by mergers close to the cluster core, by galaxies infalling on radial orbits aligned with the cosmological filaments feeding the cluster.

  16. Confronting the outflow-regulated cluster formation model with observations

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Fumitaka; Li, Zhi-Yun E-mail: zl4h@virginia.edu

    2014-03-10

    Protostellar outflows have been shown theoretically to be capable of maintaining supersonic turbulence in cluster-forming clumps and keeping the star formation rate per free-fall time as low as a few percent. We aim to test two basic predictions of this outflow-regulated cluster formation model, namely, (1) the clump should be close to virial equilibrium and (2) the turbulence dissipation rate should be balanced by the outflow momentum injection rate, using recent outflow surveys toward eight nearby cluster-forming clumps (B59, L1551, L1641N, Serpens Main Cloud, Serpens South, ρ Oph, IC 348, and NGC 1333). We find, for almost all sources, that the clumps are close to virial equilibrium and the outflow momentum injection rate exceeds the turbulence momentum dissipation rate. In addition, the outflow kinetic energy is significantly smaller than the clump gravitational energy for intermediate and massive clumps with M {sub cl} ≳ a few × 10{sup 2} M {sub ☉}, suggesting that the outflow feedback is not enough to disperse the clump as a whole. The number of observed protostars also indicates that the star formation rate per free-fall time is as small as a few percent for all clumps. These observationally based results strengthen the case for outflow-regulated cluster formation.

  17. Confronting the Outflow-regulated Cluster Formation Model with Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Fumitaka; Li, Zhi-Yun

    2014-03-01

    Protostellar outflows have been shown theoretically to be capable of maintaining supersonic turbulence in cluster-forming clumps and keeping the star formation rate per free-fall time as low as a few percent. We aim to test two basic predictions of this outflow-regulated cluster formation model, namely, (1) the clump should be close to virial equilibrium and (2) the turbulence dissipation rate should be balanced by the outflow momentum injection rate, using recent outflow surveys toward eight nearby cluster-forming clumps (B59, L1551, L1641N, Serpens Main Cloud, Serpens South, ρ Oph, IC 348, and NGC 1333). We find, for almost all sources, that the clumps are close to virial equilibrium and the outflow momentum injection rate exceeds the turbulence momentum dissipation rate. In addition, the outflow kinetic energy is significantly smaller than the clump gravitational energy for intermediate and massive clumps with M cl >~ a few × 102 M ⊙, suggesting that the outflow feedback is not enough to disperse the clump as a whole. The number of observed protostars also indicates that the star formation rate per free-fall time is as small as a few percent for all clumps. These observationally based results strengthen the case for outflow-regulated cluster formation.

  18. Theory of cluster radioactive decay and of cluster formation in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, S.S.; Gupta, R.K.

    1989-05-01

    A new model is proposed for the mechanism of cluster formation and then penetration of the confining nuclear interaction barrier in radioactive nuclei. The cluster formation is treated as a quantum-mechanical fragmentation process and the WKB penetrability is found analytically. Applications of the model are made to /sup 14/C decay of /sup 222-224/Ra and /sup 24/Ne decay of /sup 232/U. The branching ratio for /sup 14/C decay of /sup 232/U is also calculated and is found to be incredibly small as compared to that for its /sup 24/Ne decay.

  19. Formation, stability, and reactivity studies of neutral iron sulfide clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shi; Wang, Zhechen; Bernstein, Elliot

    2014-03-01

    Different methods are used to generate neutral iron sulfide clusters to study their formation, stability, and reactivity, employing a time of flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) with VUV (118 nm) radiation single photon ionization (SPI). Neutral FemSn (m = 1-4, n = 1-6), and hydrogen containing FemSnHx (x >0, n > m) clusters are generated by the reaction of seeded H2S in a helium carrier gas with laser ablated iron metal within a supersonic nozzle. The observed strong signal of association products Fe2S2(SH)0,1 M (M = CO, C2H4, C3H6) suggest that the Fe2S2(SH)0,1 clusters have the high activity for interactions with these small molecules. In order to avoid the effect for reactivity from hydrogen containing clusters, pure FemSnclusters are generated through laser ablation of a mixed iron/sulfur target in the presence of a pure helium carrier gas. (FeS)m (m = 1-4) is observed to be the most stable series. Reaction of CO and H2 on neutral (FeS)1,2clusters is farther investigated both experimentally and theoretically. A size dependent reactivity of iron sulfide clusters toward CO is characterized. The reaction FeS + CO --> Fe + OCS is found for the FeS cluster. Products Fe2S 213COH2 and Fe2S 213COH4 are identified for reactions of 13CO and H2 on Fe2S2 clusters: this suggests that the Fe2S2 cluster has a high catalytic activity for hydrogenation reactions of CO to form formaldehyde and methanol. DFT calculations are performed to explore the potential energy surfaces for the two reactions: Fe2S2 + CO + 2H2 --> Fe2S2 + CH3OH; and Fe2S2 + CO + H2 --> Fe2S2 + CH2O.

  20. Numerical simulation of primary cluster formation in silane plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Nandini; Stoffels, W. W.; Kroesen, G. M. W.

    2003-04-01

    The usage of low-cost silicon-based solar cells is limited by their tendency to degrade on prolonged exposure to sunlight. Current research has indicated that the inclusion of nano-particles in the plasma-deposited film enhances its efficiency considerably. It is therefore essential to identify the plasma operating conditions such that nano-particles are formed and deposited in the film. The early stages of cluster formation, nucleation and coagulation are still open to experimental and theoretical investigation. In this paper, a simulation of the first stage of particle formation in capacitively coupled radio-frequency discharges in SiH4 is attempted. A molecular dynamics based model has been set up to simulate one of the principal reaction pathways in cluster formation. This simulation model appears to produce valid and meaningful trends. Further studies are planned to explore the effect of other parameters and alternate pathways.

  1. The Formation of Hierarchical Systems in Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarseth, S. J.

    Results of star cluster simulations on HARP show that hierarchical systems play an important role for the overall dynamics. Models with 8000 single stars and 2000 primordial binaries reveal a gradual build-up and more than 20 such systems may exist during the later stages of evolution. We concentrate on the formation of hierarchies and their stability. This analysis is facilitated by the use of chain regularization which provides a natural tool for investigating the formation mechanism. Although hierarchies can be considered as newly formed binaries, their mode of formation often leads directly to hard binding energies. Most of these systems are formed by close two-body encounters between binaries, whereas standard binaries form by the classical three-body process and their appearance is therefore coinsiderably less pronounced. Finally, we discuss the implications of persistent higher-order systems for direct N-body simulations of globular clusters.

  2. The Galactic open cluster system: evidence of enhanced formation episodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatti, A. E.

    The exciting debate about the existence of signs of enhanced formation of Galactic open clusters (OCs) is revisited here on the basis of a revised age distribution. By using the recently updated 2009 version of the Dias et al. catalogue of 1787 OCs, we found that the present OC's age distribution presents two primary excesses at t ~ 10-15 Myr and 1.5 Gyr. We interpret both excesses as signs of enhanced formation episodes similar to those that occurred in other galaxies (e.g., M 51, NGC 1705). When restricting the OC sample to those located in the solar neighbourhood, with the aim of avoiding incompleteness effects, we also find that these clusters are engraved with clear signs of enhanced formation at both ages.

  3. Star formation in the massive cluster merger Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawle, T. D.; Altieri, B.; Egami, E.; Pérez-González, P. G.; Richard, J.; Santos, J. S.; Valtchanov, I.; Walth, G.; Bouy, H.; Haines, C. P.; Okabe, N.

    2014-07-01

    We present a comprehensive study of star-forming (SF) galaxies in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Frontier Field recent cluster merger A2744 (z = 0.308). Wide-field, ultraviolet-infrared (UV-IR) imaging enables a direct constraint of the total star formation rate (SFR) for 53 cluster galaxies, with SFRUV+IR = 343 ± 10 M⊙ yr-1. Within the central 4 arcmin (1.1 Mpc) radius, the integrated SFR is complete, yielding a total SFRUV+IR = 201 ± 9 M⊙ yr-1. Focusing on obscured star formation, this core region exhibits a total SFRIR = 138 ± 8 M⊙ yr-1, a mass-normalized SFRIR of ΣSFR = 11.2 ± 0.7 M⊙ yr-1 per 1014 M⊙ and a fraction of IR-detected SF galaxies f_SF = 0.080^{+0.010}_{-0.037}. Overall, the cluster population at z ˜ 0.3 exhibits significant intrinsic scatter in IR properties (total SFRIR, Tdust distribution) apparently unrelated to the dynamical state: A2744 is noticeably different to the merging Bullet cluster, but similar to several relaxed clusters. However, in A2744 we identify a trail of SF sources including jellyfish galaxies with substantial unobscured SF due to extreme stripping (SFRUV/SFRIR up to 3.3). The orientation of the trail, and of material stripped from constituent galaxies, indicates that the passing shock front of the cluster merger was the trigger. Constraints on star formation from both IR and UV are crucial for understanding galaxy evolution within the densest environments.

  4. Formation and characterization of thioglycolic acid-silver cluster complexes.

    PubMed

    Bellina, Bruno; Antoine, Rodolphe; Broyer, Michel; Gell, Lars; Sanader, Željka; Mitrić, Roland; Bonačić-Koutecký, Vlasta; Dugourd, Philippe

    2013-06-21

    Gas phase reactivity observed in an ion trap was used to produce silver clusters protected with thioglycolic acid. Fragmentation pathways as well as optical properties were explored experimentally and theoretically. Sequential losses of SCH2 and CO2 in the ion trap lead to redox reactions with charge transfers between the metal part and the carboxylate and thiolate groups. This allows us to control the number of electrons in the metallic subunit and thus optical properties of the complexes. The presented formation process can be used as a prototype for tuning optical and chemical properties of ligated metal clusters by varying the number of confined electrons within the metallic subunit.

  5. STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN CLASH BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Fogarty, Kevin; Postman, Marc; Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John

    2015-11-10

    The CLASH X-ray selected sample of 20 galaxy clusters contains 10 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) that exhibit significant (>5σ) extinction-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Star formation activity is inferred from photometric estimates of UV and Hα+[N ii] emission in knots and filaments detected in CLASH Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 observations. UV-derived SFRs in these BCGs span two orders of magnitude, including two with a SFR ≳ 100 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. These measurements are supplemented with [O ii], [O iii], and Hβ fluxes measured from spectra obtained with the SOAR telescope. We confirm that photoionization from ongoing star formation powers the line emission nebulae in these BCGs, although in many BCGs there is also evidence of a LINER-like contribution to the line emission. Coupling these data with Chandra X-ray measurements, we infer that the star formation occurs exclusively in low-entropy cluster cores and exhibits a correlation with gas properties related to cooling. We also perform an in-depth study of the starburst history of the BCG in the cluster RXJ1532.9+3021, and create 2D maps of stellar properties on scales down to ∼350 pc. These maps reveal evidence for an ongoing burst occurring in elongated filaments, generally on ∼0.5–1.0 Gyr timescales, although some filaments are consistent with much younger (≲100 Myr) burst timescales and may be correlated with recent activity from the active galactic nucleus. The relationship between BCG SFRs and the surrounding intracluster medium gas properties provide new support for the process of feedback-regulated cooling in galaxy clusters and is consistent with recent theoretical predictions.

  6. Ferrihydrite Formation: The Role of Fe13 Keggin Clusters.

    PubMed

    Weatherill, Joshua S; Morris, Katherine; Bots, Pieter; Stawski, Tomasz M; Janssen, Arne; Abrahamsen, Liam; Blackham, Richard; Shaw, Samuel

    2016-09-01

    Ferrihydrite is the most common iron oxyhydroxide found in soil and is a key sequester of contaminants in the environment. Ferrihydrite formation is also a common component of many treatment processes for cleanup of industrial effluents. Here we characterize ferrihydrite formation during the titration of an acidic ferric nitrate solution with NaOH. In situ SAXS measurements supported by ex situ TEM indicate that initially Fe13 Keggin clusters (radius ∼ 0.45 nm) form in solution at pH 0.12-1.5 and are persistent for at least 18 days. The Fe13 clusters begin to aggregate above ∼ pH 1, initially forming highly linear structures. Above pH ∼ 2 densification of the aggregates occurs in conjunction with precipitation of low molecular weight Fe(III) species (e.g., monomers, dimers) to form mass fractal aggregates of ferrihydrite nanoparticles (∼3 nm) in which the Fe13 Keggin motif is preserved. SAXS analysis indicates the ferrihydrite particles have a core-shell structure consisting of a Keggin center surrounded by a Fe-depleted shell, supporting the surface depleted model of ferrihydrite. Overall, we present the first direct evidence for the role of Fe13 clusters in the pathway of ferrihydrite formation during base hydrolysis, showing clear structural continuity from isolated Fe13 Keggins to the ferrihydrite particle structure. The results have direct relevance to the fundamental understanding of ferrihydrite formation in environmental, engineered, and industrial processes. PMID:27480123

  7. Ferrihydrite Formation: The Role of Fe13 Keggin Clusters.

    PubMed

    Weatherill, Joshua S; Morris, Katherine; Bots, Pieter; Stawski, Tomasz M; Janssen, Arne; Abrahamsen, Liam; Blackham, Richard; Shaw, Samuel

    2016-09-01

    Ferrihydrite is the most common iron oxyhydroxide found in soil and is a key sequester of contaminants in the environment. Ferrihydrite formation is also a common component of many treatment processes for cleanup of industrial effluents. Here we characterize ferrihydrite formation during the titration of an acidic ferric nitrate solution with NaOH. In situ SAXS measurements supported by ex situ TEM indicate that initially Fe13 Keggin clusters (radius ∼ 0.45 nm) form in solution at pH 0.12-1.5 and are persistent for at least 18 days. The Fe13 clusters begin to aggregate above ∼ pH 1, initially forming highly linear structures. Above pH ∼ 2 densification of the aggregates occurs in conjunction with precipitation of low molecular weight Fe(III) species (e.g., monomers, dimers) to form mass fractal aggregates of ferrihydrite nanoparticles (∼3 nm) in which the Fe13 Keggin motif is preserved. SAXS analysis indicates the ferrihydrite particles have a core-shell structure consisting of a Keggin center surrounded by a Fe-depleted shell, supporting the surface depleted model of ferrihydrite. Overall, we present the first direct evidence for the role of Fe13 clusters in the pathway of ferrihydrite formation during base hydrolysis, showing clear structural continuity from isolated Fe13 Keggins to the ferrihydrite particle structure. The results have direct relevance to the fundamental understanding of ferrihydrite formation in environmental, engineered, and industrial processes.

  8. Tetrathiomolybdate Inhibits Copper Trafficking Proteins Through Metal Cluster Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Hamsell M.; Xue, Yi; Robinson, Chandler D.; Canalizo-Hernández, Mónica A.; Marvin, Rebecca G.; Kelly, Rebekah A.; Mondragón, Alfonso; Penner-Hahn, James E.; O’Halloran, Thomas V.

    2010-05-06

    Tetrathiomolybdate (TM) is an orally active agent for treatment of disorders of copper metabolism. Here we describe how TM inhibits proteins that regulate copper physiology. Crystallographic results reveal that the surprising stability of the drug complex with the metallochaperone Atx1 arises from formation of a sulfur-bridged copper-molybdenum cluster reminiscent of those found in molybdenum and iron sulfur proteins. Spectroscopic studies indicate that this cluster is stable in solution and corresponds to physiological clusters isolated from TM-treated Wilson's disease animal models. Finally, mechanistic studies show that the drug-metallochaperone inhibits metal transfer functions between copper-trafficking proteins. The results are consistent with a model wherein TM can directly and reversibly down-regulate copper delivery to secreted metalloenzymes and suggest that proteins involved in metal regulation might be fruitful drug targets.

  9. Formation of young massive clusters from turbulent molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Michiko; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2015-08-01

    We simulate the formation and evolution of young star clusters using smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and direct N-body methods. We start by performing SPH simulations of the giant molecular cloud with a turbulent velocity field, a mass of 10^4 to 10^6 M_sun, and a density between 17 and 1700 cm^-3. We continue the SPH simulations for a free-fall time scale, and analyze the resulting structure of the collapsed cloud. We subsequently replace a density-selected subset of SPH particles with stars. As a consequence, the local star formation efficiency exceeds 30 per cent, whereas globally only a few per cent of the gas is converted to stars. The stellar distribution is very clumpy with typically a dozen bound conglomerates that consist of 100 to 10000 stars. We continue to evolve the stars dynamically using the collisional N-body method, which accurately treats all pairwise interactions, stellar collisions and stellar evolution. We analyze the results of the N-body simulations at 2 Myr and 10 Myr. From dense massive molecular clouds, massive clusters grow via hierarchical merging of smaller clusters. The shape of the cluster mass function that originates from an individual molecular cloud is consistent with a Schechter function with a power-law slope of beta = -1.73 at 2 Myr and beta = -1.67 at 10 Myr, which fits to observed cluster mass function of the Carina region. The superposition of mass functions have a power-law slope of < -2, which fits the observed mass function of star clusters in the Milky Way, M31 and M83. We further find that the mass of the most massive cluster formed in a single molecular cloud with a mass of M_g scales with 6.1 M_g^0.51 which also agrees with recent observation in M51. The molecular clouds which can form massive clusters are much denser than those typical in the Milky Way. The velocity dispersion of such molecular clouds reaches 20 km/s and it is consistent with the relative velocity of the molecular clouds observed near NGC 3603

  10. Observations of Protostellar Outflow Feedback in Clustered Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, F.

    2016-05-01

    We discuss the role of protostellar outflow feedback in clustered star formation using the observational data of recent molecular outflow surveys toward nearby cluster-forming clumps. We found that for almost all clumps, the outflow momentum injection rate is significantly larger than the turbulence dissipation rate. Therefore, the outflow feedback is likely to maintain supersonic turbulence in the clumps. For less massive clumps such as B59, L1551, and L1641N, the outflow kinetic energy is comparable to the clump gravitational energy. In such clumps, the outflow feedback probably affects significantly the clump dynamics. On the other hand, for clumps with masses larger than about 200 M⊙, the outflow kinetic energy is significantly smaller than the clump gravitational energy. Since the majority of stars form in such clumps, we conclude that outflow feedback cannot destroy the whole parent clump. These characteristics of the outflow feedback support the scenario of slow star formation.

  11. Inflammation-induced formation of fat-associated lymphoid clusters

    PubMed Central

    Bénézech, Cécile; Kruglov, Andrei A.; Loo, Yunhua; Nakamura, Kyoko; Zhang, Yang; Nayar, Saba; Jones, Lucy H.; Flores-Langarica, Adriana; McIntosh, Alistair; Marshall, Jennifer; Barone, Francesca; Besra, Gurdyal; Miles, Katherine; Allen, Judith E.; Gray, Mohini; Kollias, George; Cunningham, Adam F.; Withers, David R.; Toellner, Kai Michael; Jones, Nick D.; Veldhoen, Marc; Nedospasov, Sergei A.; McKenzie, Andrew N.J.; Caamaño, Jorge H.

    2015-01-01

    Fat-associated lymphoid clusters (FALCs) are a recently discovered type of lymphoid tissue associated with visceral fat. Here we show that distribution of FALCs was heterogeneous with the pericardium containing large numbers of these clusters. FALCs contributed to the retention of B-1 B cells in the peritoneal cavity through high expression of the chemokine CXCL13 and supported B cell proliferation and germinal center differentiation during peritoneal immune challenges. FALC formation was induced by inflammation, which triggered recruitment of myeloid cells that express tumor necrosis factor (TNF) necessary for TNF receptor-signaling in stromal cells. CD1d-restricted Natural killer T (NKT) cells were likewise required for inducible formation of FALCs. Thus, FALCs support and coordinate innate B and T cell activation during serosal immune responses. PMID:26147686

  12. Autoionization following nanoplasma formation in atomic and molecular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütte, Bernd; Lahl, Jan; Oelze, Tim; Krikunova, Maria; Vrakking, Marc J. J.; Rouzée, Arnaud

    2016-05-01

    Nanoplasmas resulting from the ionization of nano-scale particles by intense laser pulses are typically described by quasiclassical models, where electron emission is understood to take place via thermal processes. Recently, we discovered that, following the interaction of intense near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses with molecular oxygen clusters, electron emission from nanoplasmas can also occur from atomic bound states via autoionization [Schütte et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 123002 (2015)]. Here we extend these studies and demonstrate that the formation and decay of doubly-excited atoms and ions is a very common phenomenon in nanoplasmas. We report on the observation of autoionization involving spin-orbit excited states in molecular oxygen and carbon dioxide clusters as well as in atomic krypton and xenon clusters ionized by intense NIR pulses, for which we find clear bound-state signatures in the electron kinetic energy spectra. By applying terahertz (THz) streaking, we show that the observed autoionization processes take place on a picosecond to nanosecond timescale after the interaction of the NIR laser pulse with the clusters. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by Gerardo Delgado Barrio, Andrey Solov'Yov, Pablo Villarreal, Rita Prosmiti.

  13. Modeling the Formation of Globular Cluster Systems in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Gnedin, Oleg Y.

    2014-11-01

    The mass distribution and chemical composition of globular cluster (GC) systems preserve fossil record of the early stages of galaxy formation. The observed distribution of GC colors within massive early-type galaxies in the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey (ACSVCS) reveals a multi-modal shape, which likely corresponds to a multi-modal metallicity distribution. We present a simple model for the formation and disruption of GCs that aims to match the ACSVCS data. This model tests the hypothesis that GCs are formed during major mergers of gas-rich galaxies and inherit the metallicity of their hosts. To trace merger events, we use halo merger trees extracted from a large cosmological N-body simulation. We select 20 halos in the mass range of 2 × 1012 to 7 × 1013 M ⊙ and match them to 19 Virgo galaxies with K-band luminosity between 3 × 1010 and 3 × 1011 L ⊙. To set the [Fe/H] abundances, we use an empirical galaxy mass-metallicity relation. We find that a minimal merger ratio of 1:3 best matches the observed cluster metallicity distribution. A characteristic bimodal shape appears because metal-rich GCs are produced by late mergers between massive halos, while metal-poor GCs are produced by collective merger activities of less massive hosts at early times. The model outcome is robust to alternative prescriptions for cluster formation rate throughout cosmic time, but a gradual evolution of the mass-metallicity relation with redshift appears to be necessary to match the observed cluster metallicities. We also affirm the age-metallicity relation, predicted by an earlier model, in which metal-rich clusters are systematically several billion younger than their metal-poor counterparts.

  14. Modeling the formation of globular cluster systems in the Virgo cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hui; Gnedin, Oleg Y. E-mail: ognedin@umich.edu

    2014-11-20

    The mass distribution and chemical composition of globular cluster (GC) systems preserve fossil record of the early stages of galaxy formation. The observed distribution of GC colors within massive early-type galaxies in the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey (ACSVCS) reveals a multi-modal shape, which likely corresponds to a multi-modal metallicity distribution. We present a simple model for the formation and disruption of GCs that aims to match the ACSVCS data. This model tests the hypothesis that GCs are formed during major mergers of gas-rich galaxies and inherit the metallicity of their hosts. To trace merger events, we use halo merger trees extracted from a large cosmological N-body simulation. We select 20 halos in the mass range of 2 × 10{sup 12} to 7 × 10{sup 13} M {sub ☉} and match them to 19 Virgo galaxies with K-band luminosity between 3 × 10{sup 10} and 3 × 10{sup 11} L {sub ☉}. To set the [Fe/H] abundances, we use an empirical galaxy mass-metallicity relation. We find that a minimal merger ratio of 1:3 best matches the observed cluster metallicity distribution. A characteristic bimodal shape appears because metal-rich GCs are produced by late mergers between massive halos, while metal-poor GCs are produced by collective merger activities of less massive hosts at early times. The model outcome is robust to alternative prescriptions for cluster formation rate throughout cosmic time, but a gradual evolution of the mass-metallicity relation with redshift appears to be necessary to match the observed cluster metallicities. We also affirm the age-metallicity relation, predicted by an earlier model, in which metal-rich clusters are systematically several billion younger than their metal-poor counterparts.

  15. The origin of the mass function of star clusters: the simulation of star cluster formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Michiko

    2015-08-01

    The mass functions of star clusters have been observed in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, but the origin of the cluster mass function is still unclear. We simulate the formation of star clusters using the combination of smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and direct N-body methods. We start by performing SPH simulations of the giant molecular cloud with a turbulent velocity field. We continue the SPH simulations for a free-fall time scale, and analyze the resulting structure of the collapsed cloud. We subsequently replace a density-selected subset of SPH particles with stars by adopting a local star-formation efficiency proportional to the square root of the local density. As a consequence, the local star formation efficiency exceeds 30 per cent, whereas globally only a few per cent of the gas is converted to stars. The stellar distribution is very clumpy with typically a dozen bound conglomerates that consist of 100 to 10000 stars. We continue to evolve the stars dynamically using the collisional N-body method, which accurately treats all pairwise interactions, stellar collisions and stellar evolution. We analyze the results of the N-body simulations at 2 Myr and 10 Myr. The shape of the cluster mass function that originates from an individual molecular cloud is consistent with a Schechter function with a power-law slope of beta = -1.73 at 2 Myr and beta = -1.67 at 10 Myr, which fits to observed cluster mass function of the Carina region. The superposition of mass functions have a power-law slope of < -2, which fits the observed mass function of star clusters in the Milky Way, M31 and M83. We further find that the mass of the most massive cluster formed in a single molecular cloud with a mass of M_g scales with 6.1 M_g^0.51 which also agrees with recent observation in M51. Furthermore, this relation connects to the observed relation between the mass of the most massive star in a cluster and the total mass of the cluster.

  16. The Relation between Cool Cluster Cores and Herschel-detected Star Formation in Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawle, T. D.; Edge, A. C.; Egami, E.; Rex, M.; Smith, G. P.; Altieri, B.; Fiedler, A.; Haines, C. P.; Pereira, M. J.; Pérez-González, P. G.; Portouw, J.; Valtchanov, I.; Walth, G.; van der Werf, P. P.; Zemcov, M.

    2012-03-01

    We present far-infrared (FIR) analysis of 68 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) at 0.08 < z < 1.0. Deriving total infrared luminosities directly from Spitzer and Herschel photometry spanning the peak of the dust component (24-500 μm), we calculate the obscured star formation rate (SFR). 22+6.2 -5.3% of the BCGs are detected in the far-infrared, with SFR = 1-150 M ⊙ yr-1. The infrared luminosity is highly correlated with cluster X-ray gas cooling times for cool-core clusters (gas cooling time <1 Gyr), strongly suggesting that the star formation in these BCGs is influenced by the cluster-scale cooling process. The occurrence of the molecular gas tracing Hα emission is also correlated with obscured star formation. For all but the most luminous BCGs (L TIR > 2 × 1011 L ⊙), only a small (lsim0.4 mag) reddening correction is required for SFR(Hα) to agree with SFRFIR. The relatively low Hα extinction (dust obscuration), compared to values reported for the general star-forming population, lends further weight to an alternate (external) origin for the cold gas. Finally, we use a stacking analysis of non-cool-core clusters to show that the majority of the fuel for star formation in the FIR-bright BCGs is unlikely to originate from normal stellar mass loss. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  17. Formation of globular clusters induced by external ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Kenji; Umemura, Masayuki; Kitayama, Tetsu

    2009-08-01

    We present a novel scenario for globular cluster (GC) formation, where the ultraviolet (UV) background radiation effectively works so as to produce compact star clusters. Recent observations on the age distributions of GCs indicate that many GCs formed even after the cosmic reionization epoch. This implies that a significant fraction of GCs formed in UV background radiation fields. Also, the star formation in an early-generation of subgalactic objects may be affected by strong UV radiation from pre-formed massive stars, e.g. Population III stars. Here, we explore the formation of GCs in UV radiation fields. For this purpose, we calculate baryon and dark matter (DM) dynamics in spherical symmetry, incorporating the self-shielding effects by solving the radiative transfer of UV radiation. In addition, we prescribe the star formation in cooled gas components and pursue the dynamics of formed stars. As a result, we find that the evolution of subgalactic objects in UV background radiation is separated into three types: (i) prompt star formation, where less massive clouds (~105-8Msolar) are promptly self-shielded and undergo star formation, (ii) delayed star formation, where photoionized massive clouds (>~108Msolar) collapse despite high thermal pressure and are eventually self-shielded to form stars in a delayed fashion, and (iii) supersonic infall, where photoionized less massive clouds (~105-8Msolar) contract with supersonic infall velocity and are self-shielded when a compact core forms. In particular, the type (iii) is a novel type found in the present simulations, and eventually produces a very compact star cluster. The resultant mass-to-light ratios, half-mass radii and velocity dispersions for the three types are compared to the observations of GCs, dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) and ultracompact dwarfs (UCDs). It turns out that the properties of star clusters resulting from supersonic infall match well with those of observed GCs, whereas the other two types are

  18. Turbulence and Vorticity in Galaxy Clusters Generated by Structure Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazza, F.; Jones, T. W.; Brüggen, M.; Brunetti, G.; Gheller, C.; Porter, D.; Ryu, D.

    2016-09-01

    Turbulence is a key ingredient for the evolution of the intracluster medium, whose properties can be predicted with high resolution numerical simulations. We present initial results on the generation of solenoidal and compressive turbulence in the intracluster medium during the formation of a small-size cluster using highly resolved, non-radiative cosmological simulations, with a refined monitoring in time. In this first of a series of papers, we closely look at one simulated cluster whose formation was distinguished by a merger around z ˜ 0.3. We separate laminar gas motions, turbulence and shocks with dedicated filtering strategies and distinguish the solenoidal and compressive components of the gas flows using Hodge-Helmholtz decomposition. Solenoidal turbulence dominates the dissipation of turbulent motions (˜95%) in the central cluster volume at all epochs. The dissipation via compressive modes is found to be more important (˜30% of the total) only at large radii (≥0.5~rvir) and close to merger events. We show that enstrophy (vorticity squared) is good proxy of solenoidal turbulence. All terms ruling the evolution of enstrophy (i.e. baroclinic, compressive, stretching and advective terms) are found to be significant, but in amounts that vary with time and location. Two important trends for the growth of enstrophy in our simulation are identified: first, enstrophy is continuously accreted into the cluster from the outside, and most of that accreted enstrophy is generated near the outer accretion shocks by baroclinic and compressive processes. Second, in the cluster interior vortex stretching is dominant, although the other terms also contribute substantially.

  19. The Formation and Early Evolution of Young Massive Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longmore, S. N.; Kruijssen, J. M. D.; Bastian, N.; Bally, J.; Rathborne, J.; Testi, L.; Stolte, A.; Dale, J.; Bressert, E.; Alves, J.

    We review the formation and early evolution of the most massive (> few 104 M⊙) and dense (radius of a few parsecs) young stellar clusters, focusing on the role that studies of these objects in our Galaxy can play in our understanding of star and planet formation as a whole. Comparing the demographics of young massive cluster (YMC) progenitor clouds and YMCs across the Galaxy shows that gas in the Galactic Center can accumulate to a high enough density that molecular clouds already satisfy the criteria used to define YMCs, without forming stars. In this case formation can proceed in situ — i.e., the stars form at protostellar densities close to the final stellar density. Conversely, in the disk, the gas either begins forming stars while it is being accumulated to high density, in a "conveyor belt" mode, or the timescale to accumulate the gas to such high densities must be much shorter than the star-formation timescale. The distinction between the formation regimes in the two environments is consistent with the predictions of environmentally dependent density thresholds for star formation. This implies that stars in YMCs of similar total mass and radius can have formed at widely different initial protostellar densities. The fact that no strong, systematic variations in fundamental properties (such as the IMF) are observed between YMCs in the disk and Galactic Center suggests that, statistically speaking, stellar mass assembly is not affected by the initial protostellar density. We then review recent theoretical advances and summarize the debate on three key open questions: the initial (proto)stellar distribution, infant (im)mortality, and age spreads within YMCs. We conclude that (1) the initial protostellar distribution is likely hierarchical, (2) YMCs likely experienced a formation history that was dominated by gas exhaustion rather than gas expulsion, (3) YMCs are dynamically stable from a young age, and (4) YMCs have age spreads much smaller than their mean

  20. Sequential clustering of star formations in IC 1396

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ya-Fang; Li, Jin-Zeng

    2013-05-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the H II region IC 1396 and its star forming activity, in which multi-wavelength data ranging from the optical to the near- and far-infrared were employed. The surface density distribution of all the 2MASS sources with a certain detection toward IC 1396 indicates the existence of a compact cluster spatially consistent with the position of the exciting source of the H II region, HD 206267. The spatial distribution of the sources with excessive infrared emission, selected based on archived 2MASS data, reveals the existence of four sub-clusters in this region. One is associated with the open cluster Trumpler 37. The other three are found to be spatially coincident with the bright rims of the H II region. All the sources with excessive emission in the near infrared are cross-identified with AKARI IRC data. An analysis of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the resultant sample leads to the identification of eight CLASS I, 15 CLASS II and 15 CLASS III sources in IC 1396. Optical identification of the sample sources with R magnitudes brighter than 17 mag corroborates the results from the SED analysis. Based on the spatial distribution of the infrared young stellar objects at different evolutionary stages, the surrounding sub-clusters located in the bright rims are believed to be younger than the central one. This is consistent with a scenario of sequential star formation in this region. Imaging data of a dark patch in IC 1396 by Herschel SPIRE, on the other hand, indicate the presence of two far-infrared cores in LDN 1111, which are likely to be a new generation of protostellar objects in formation. So we infer that the star formation process in this H II region was not continuous but rather episodic.

  1. Does ethylene mediate cluster root formation under iron deficiency?

    PubMed

    Zaid, H; El Morabet, R; Diem, H G; Arahou, M

    2003-11-01

    Casuarina glauca develops proteoid (cluster) roots in response to Fe deficiency. This study set out to investigate the possible involvement of ethylene in the initiation and/or the morphogenesis of cluster roots (CR). For this purpose, the effect of Ag+ added as silver thiosulfate, an inhibitor of ethylene action has been studied in plants growing hydroponically. No CR formation was observed in these growth conditions. Inhibition of ethylene biosynthesis by aminoethoxyvinylglycine, 1- aminoisobutyric acid, aminoxyacetic acid or cobalt chloride also eliminated the positive effect of Fe deficiency on CR formation in C. glauca. CR were not formed in Fe- deficient roots in the presence of ethylene inhibitors, suggesting a role for ethylene in the morphological responses to Fe deficiency. Interestingly, treatment of Casuarina plants with the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid stimulated significantly the formation of CR, even if plants are supplied with Fe. However, this stimulation did not reach the level of CR obtained in Fe-deficient plants. These results suggest that an ethylene-mediated signalling pathway is involved in CR formation process in C. glauca. PMID:12967908

  2. Star Formation Activity in CLASH Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogarty, Kevin; Postman, Marc; Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John

    2015-11-01

    The CLASH X-ray selected sample of 20 galaxy clusters contains 10 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) that exhibit significant (>5σ) extinction-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Star formation activity is inferred from photometric estimates of UV and Hα+[N ii] emission in knots and filaments detected in CLASH Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 observations. UV-derived SFRs in these BCGs span two orders of magnitude, including two with a SFR ≳ 100 M⊙ yr-1. These measurements are supplemented with [O ii], [O iii], and Hβ fluxes measured from spectra obtained with the SOAR telescope. We confirm that photoionization from ongoing star formation powers the line emission nebulae in these BCGs, although in many BCGs there is also evidence of a LINER-like contribution to the line emission. Coupling these data with Chandra X-ray measurements, we infer that the star formation occurs exclusively in low-entropy cluster cores and exhibits a correlation with gas properties related to cooling. We also perform an in-depth study of the starburst history of the BCG in the cluster RXJ1532.9+3021, and create 2D maps of stellar properties on scales down to ˜350 pc. These maps reveal evidence for an ongoing burst occurring in elongated filaments, generally on ˜0.5-1.0 Gyr timescales, although some filaments are consistent with much younger (≲100 Myr) burst timescales and may be correlated with recent activity from the active galactic nucleus. The relationship between BCG SFRs and the surrounding intracluster medium gas properties provide new support for the process of feedback-regulated cooling in galaxy clusters and is consistent with recent theoretical predictions. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel

  3. Formation and photodetachment of cold metal cluster negative ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.-S.; Brucat, P. J.; Pettiette, C. L.; Yang, S.; Smalley, R. E.

    1985-10-01

    A general method is described for the formation of cold metal cluser negative ion beams which serve as excellent sources for photodetachment experiments. The method involves the pulsed laser vaporization of a metal target at the throat of a pulsed supersonic helium expansion. By the optimization of source conditions, intense beams (greater than 105 ions/pulse) of both positive and negative ions are produced routinely. Ionization of the metal cluster molecules, either during vaporization or by irradiation with 193 nm light, occurs prior to supersonic expansion and produces a cold plasma entrained in the neural flow that is renitent to stray electric and magnetic fields, unlike photoions produced in the collisionless downstream molecular beam. The enhancement of the negative ion flux by 193 nm irradiation is believed to be evidence for efficient electron attachment of low energy photoelectrons generated in the nozzle region. This attachment process, however, is apparently not effective for molecules containing less than ˜4 metal atoms. Laser irradition of mass-selected cluster anions extracted from these cold ion beams reveal that photodetachment of the metal cluster negative ion is always the preferred pathway, even when fragmentation of the ion is possible. This new negative ion production technique should therefore permit measurement of both electron affinities and photoelectron spectra as a function of cluster size and composition.

  4. Star formation in shocked cluster spirals and their tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roediger, E.; Brüggen, M.; Owers, M. S.; Ebeling, H.; Sun, M.

    2014-09-01

    Recent observations of ram pressure stripped spiral galaxies in clusters revealed details of the stripping process, i.e. the truncation of all interstellar medium phases and of star formation (SF) in the disc, and multiphase star-forming tails. Some stripped galaxies, in particular in merging clusters, develop spectacular star-forming tails, giving them a jellyfish-like appearance. In merging clusters, merger shocks in the intracluster medium (ICM) are thought to have overrun these galaxies, enhancing the ambient ICM pressure and thus triggering SF, gas stripping, and tail formation. We present idealized hydrodynamical simulations of this scenario, including standard descriptions for SF and stellar feedback. To aid the interpretation of recent and upcoming observations, we focus on particular structures and dynamics in SF patterns in the remaining gas disc and in the near tails, which are easiest to observe. The observed jellyfish morphology is qualitatively reproduced for, both, face-on and edge-on stripping. In edge-on stripping, the interplay between the ICM wind and the disc rotation leads to asymmetries along the ICM wind direction and perpendicular to it. The apparent tail is still part of a highly deformed gaseous and young stellar disc. In both geometries, SF takes place in knots throughout the tail, such that the stars in the tails show no ordered age gradients. Significant SF enhancement in the disc occurs only at radii where the gas will be stripped in due course.

  5. Simulating radiative feedback and star cluster formation in GMCs - I. Dependence on gravitational boundedness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Corey S.; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Harris, William E.

    2016-09-01

    Radiative feedback is an important consequence of cluster formation in giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in which newly formed clusters heat and ionize their surrounding gas. The process of cluster formation, and the role of radiative feedback, has not been fully explored in different GMC environments. We present a suite of simulations which explore how the initial gravitational boundedness, and radiative feedback, affect cluster formation. We model the early evolution (<5 Myr) of turbulent, 106 M⊙ clouds with virial parameters ranging from 0.5 to 5. To model cluster formation, we use cluster sink particles, coupled to a raytracing scheme, and a custom subgrid model which populates a cluster via sampling an initial mass function (IMF) with an efficiency of 20 per cent per free-fall time. We find that radiative feedback only decreases the cluster particle formation efficiency by a few per cent. The initial virial parameter plays a much stronger role in limiting cluster formation, with a spread of cluster formation efficiencies of 37-71 per cent for the most unbound to the most bound model. The total number of clusters increases while the maximum mass cluster decreases with an increasing initial virial parameter, resulting in steeper mass distributions. The star formation rates in our cluster particles are initially consistent with observations but rise to higher values at late times. This suggests that radiative feedback alone is not responsible for dispersing a GMC over the first 5 Myr of cluster formation.

  6. Synaptic clustering within dendrites: an emerging theory of memory formation.

    PubMed

    Kastellakis, George; Cai, Denise J; Mednick, Sara C; Silva, Alcino J; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2015-03-01

    It is generally accepted that complex memories are stored in distributed representations throughout the brain, however the mechanisms underlying these representations are not understood. Here, we review recent findings regarding the subcellular mechanisms implicated in memory formation, which provide evidence for a dendrite-centered theory of memory. Plasticity-related phenomena which affect synaptic properties, such as synaptic tagging and capture, synaptic clustering, branch strength potentiation and spinogenesis provide the foundation for a model of memory storage that relies heavily on processes operating at the dendrite level. The emerging picture suggests that clusters of functionally related synapses may serve as key computational and memory storage units in the brain. We discuss both experimental evidence and theoretical models that support this hypothesis and explore its advantages for neuronal function.

  7. Synaptic clustering within dendrites: an emerging theory of memory formation

    PubMed Central

    Kastellakis, George; Cai, Denise J.; Mednick, Sara C.; Silva, Alcino J.; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2015-01-01

    It is generally accepted that complex memories are stored in distributed representations throughout the brain, however the mechanisms underlying these representations are not understood. Here, we review recent findings regarding the subcellular mechanisms implicated in memory formation, which provide evidence for a dendrite-centered theory of memory. Plasticity-related phenomena which affect synaptic properties, such as synaptic tagging and capture, synaptic clustering, branch strength potentiation and spinogenesis provide the foundation for a model of memory storage that relies heavily on processes operating at the dendrite level. The emerging picture suggests that clusters of functionally related synapses may serve as key computational and memory storage units in the brain. We discuss both experimental evidence and theoretical models that support this hypothesis and explore its advantages for neuronal function. PMID:25576663

  8. R-spondin 2 promotes acetylcholine receptor clustering at the neuromuscular junction via Lgr5

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Hiroaki; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ishigaki, Shinsuke; Fukudome, Takayasu; Ito, Kenyu; Tsushima, Mikito; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Okuno, Tatsuya; Yoshimura, Toshiro; Ito, Mikako; Masuda, Akio; Sobue, Gen; Kiyama, Hiroshi; Ishiguro, Naoki; Ohno, Kinji

    2016-01-01

    At the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering is mediated by spinal motor neuron (SMN)-derived agrin and its receptors on the muscle, the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4) and muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK). Additionally, AChR clustering is mediated by the components of the Wnt pathway. Laser capture microdissection of SMNs revealed that a secreted activator of Wnt signaling, R-spondin 2 (Rspo2), is highly expressed in SMNs. We found that Rspo2 is enriched at the NMJ, and that Rspo2 induces MuSK phosphorylation and AChR clustering. Rspo2 requires Wnt ligands, but not agrin, for promoting AChR clustering in cultured myotubes. Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5), an Rspo2 receptor, is also accumulated at the NMJ, and is associated with MuSK via LRP4. Lgr5 is required for Rspo2-mediated AChR clustering in myotubes. In Rspo2-knockout mice, the number and density of AChRs at the NMJ are reduced. The Rspo2-knockout diaphragm has an altered ultrastructure with widened synaptic clefts and sparse synaptic vesicles. Frequency of miniature endplate currents is markedly reduced in Rspo2-knockout mice. To conclude, we demonstrate that Rspo2 and its receptor Lgr5 are Wnt-dependent and agrin-independent regulators of AChR clustering at the NMJ. PMID:27328992

  9. R-spondin 2 promotes acetylcholine receptor clustering at the neuromuscular junction via Lgr5.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hiroaki; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ishigaki, Shinsuke; Fukudome, Takayasu; Ito, Kenyu; Tsushima, Mikito; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Okuno, Tatsuya; Yoshimura, Toshiro; Ito, Mikako; Masuda, Akio; Sobue, Gen; Kiyama, Hiroshi; Ishiguro, Naoki; Ohno, Kinji

    2016-01-01

    At the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering is mediated by spinal motor neuron (SMN)-derived agrin and its receptors on the muscle, the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4) and muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK). Additionally, AChR clustering is mediated by the components of the Wnt pathway. Laser capture microdissection of SMNs revealed that a secreted activator of Wnt signaling, R-spondin 2 (Rspo2), is highly expressed in SMNs. We found that Rspo2 is enriched at the NMJ, and that Rspo2 induces MuSK phosphorylation and AChR clustering. Rspo2 requires Wnt ligands, but not agrin, for promoting AChR clustering in cultured myotubes. Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5), an Rspo2 receptor, is also accumulated at the NMJ, and is associated with MuSK via LRP4. Lgr5 is required for Rspo2-mediated AChR clustering in myotubes. In Rspo2-knockout mice, the number and density of AChRs at the NMJ are reduced. The Rspo2-knockout diaphragm has an altered ultrastructure with widened synaptic clefts and sparse synaptic vesicles. Frequency of miniature endplate currents is markedly reduced in Rspo2-knockout mice. To conclude, we demonstrate that Rspo2 and its receptor Lgr5 are Wnt-dependent and agrin-independent regulators of AChR clustering at the NMJ. PMID:27328992

  10. Modeling Jet and Outflow Feedback during Star Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federrath, Christoph; Schrön, Martin; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2014-08-01

    Powerful jets and outflows are launched from the protostellar disks around newborn stars. These outflows carry enough mass and momentum to transform the structure of their parent molecular cloud and to potentially control star formation itself. Despite their importance, we have not been able to fully quantify the impact of jets and outflows during the formation of a star cluster. The main problem lies in limited computing power. We would have to resolve the magnetic jet-launching mechanism close to the protostar and at the same time follow the evolution of a parsec-size cloud for a million years. Current computer power and codes fall orders of magnitude short of achieving this. In order to overcome this problem, we implement a subgrid-scale (SGS) model for launching jets and outflows, which demonstrably converges and reproduces the mass, linear and angular momentum transfer, and the speed of real jets, with ~1000 times lower resolution than would be required without the SGS model. We apply the new SGS model to turbulent, magnetized star cluster formation and show that jets and outflows (1) eject about one-fourth of their parent molecular clump in high-speed jets, quickly reaching distances of more than a parsec, (2) reduce the star formation rate by about a factor of two, and (3) lead to the formation of ~1.5 times as many stars compared to the no-outflow case. Most importantly, we find that jets and outflows reduce the average star mass by a factor of ~ three and may thus be essential for understanding the characteristic mass of the stellar initial mass function.

  11. Modeling jet and outflow feedback during star cluster formation

    SciTech Connect

    Federrath, Christoph; Schrön, Martin; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2014-08-01

    Powerful jets and outflows are launched from the protostellar disks around newborn stars. These outflows carry enough mass and momentum to transform the structure of their parent molecular cloud and to potentially control star formation itself. Despite their importance, we have not been able to fully quantify the impact of jets and outflows during the formation of a star cluster. The main problem lies in limited computing power. We would have to resolve the magnetic jet-launching mechanism close to the protostar and at the same time follow the evolution of a parsec-size cloud for a million years. Current computer power and codes fall orders of magnitude short of achieving this. In order to overcome this problem, we implement a subgrid-scale (SGS) model for launching jets and outflows, which demonstrably converges and reproduces the mass, linear and angular momentum transfer, and the speed of real jets, with ∼1000 times lower resolution than would be required without the SGS model. We apply the new SGS model to turbulent, magnetized star cluster formation and show that jets and outflows (1) eject about one-fourth of their parent molecular clump in high-speed jets, quickly reaching distances of more than a parsec, (2) reduce the star formation rate by about a factor of two, and (3) lead to the formation of ∼1.5 times as many stars compared to the no-outflow case. Most importantly, we find that jets and outflows reduce the average star mass by a factor of ∼ three and may thus be essential for understanding the characteristic mass of the stellar initial mass function.

  12. Myopathic changes detected by quantitative electromyography in patients with MuSK and AChR positive myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Ana; Basta, Ivana; Stojanovic, Vidosava Rakocevic; Stevic, Zorica; Peric, Stojan; Lavrnic, Dragana

    2016-05-01

    Myopathic changes are frequent a electrophysiological finding in patients with muscle specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) positive myasthenia gravis (MG). The aim of this study was to explore the importance of quantitative electromyography (EMG) in the detection of myopathic changes in MuSK MG patients. Classical and quantitative EMG were performed in 31 MuSK and 28 acetylcholine receptor (AChR) positive MG patients, matched by sex, age, disease duration and severity. Classical EMG revealed the presence of myopathic changes more frequently in MuSK MG compared to AChR MG patients, especially in the facial muscles. Quantitative EMG registered myopathic lesions more frequently than classical EMG, but the frequency was similar between MuSK and AChR MG patients. Quantitative EMG revealed myopathic changes in the majority of both MuSK and AChR positive MG patients. This examination is sensitive, but it cannot be used to differentiate between MG patients belonging to the different disease groups. It should not be used in isolation. Rather, it should complement classical EMG in the detection of myopathic changes.

  13. Thermodynamics of the formation of catalyst clusters for carbon nanotube growth

    SciTech Connect

    Bulyarskii, S. V.; Pyatilova, O. V.; Tsygantsov, A. V.; Basaev, A. S.; Galperin, V. A. Pavlov, A. A.; Shaman, Yu. P.

    2010-12-15

    A fundamental thermodynamic model of formation of catalyst clusters for growing carbon nanotubes has been developed and model predictions have been compared with the experimental data. An expression for the size distribution function of clusters, depending on the conditions of their formation, is obtained. It is shown that surface tension plays an important role in the cluster formation. The surface tension coefficient for iron clusters at 950 deg. C is determined.

  14. Star Formation Efficiency in the Cool Cores of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Michael; Veilleux, Sylvain; Rupke, David S. N.; Mushotzky, Richard; Reynolds, Christopher

    2011-06-01

    We have assembled a sample of high spatial resolution far-UV (Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys/Solar Blind Channel) and Hα (Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter) imaging for 15 cool core galaxy clusters. These data provide a detailed view of the thin, extended filaments in the cores of these clusters. Based on the ratio of the far-UV to Hα luminosity, the UV spectral energy distribution, and the far-UV and Hα morphology, we conclude that the warm, ionized gas in the cluster cores is photoionized by massive, young stars in all but a few (A1991, A2052, A2580) systems. We show that the extended filaments, when considered separately, appear to be star forming in the majority of cases, while the nuclei tend to have slightly lower far-UV luminosity for a given Hα luminosity, suggesting a harder ionization source or higher extinction. We observe a slight offset in the UV/Hα ratio from the expected value for continuous star formation which can be modeled by assuming intrinsic extinction by modest amounts of dust (E(B - V) ~ 0.2) or a top-heavy initial mass function in the extended filaments. The measured star formation rates vary from ~0.05 M sun yr-1 in the nuclei of non-cooling systems, consistent with passive, red ellipticals, to ~5 M sun yr-1 in systems with complex, extended, optical filaments. Comparing the estimates of the star formation rate based on UV, Hα, and infrared luminosities to the spectroscopically determined X-ray cooling rate suggests a star formation efficiency of 14+18 - 8%. This value represents the time-averaged fraction, by mass, of gas cooling out of the intracluster medium, which turns into stars and agrees well with the global fraction of baryons in stars required by simulations to reproduce the stellar mass function for galaxies. This result provides a new constraint on the efficiency of star formation in accreting systems.

  15. The simultaneous formation of massive stars and stellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Rowan J.; Longmore, Steven; Bonnell, Ian

    2009-12-01

    We show that massive stars and stellar clusters are formed simultaneously, the global evolution of the forming cluster is what allows the central stars to become massive. We predict that massive star-forming clumps, such as those observed in Motte et al., contract and grow in mass leading to the formation of massive stars. This occurs as mass is continually channelled from large radii on to the central protostars, which can become massive through accretion. Using smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations of massive star-forming clumps in a giant molecular cloud, we show that clumps are initially diffuse and filamentary, and become more concentrated as they collapse. Simulated interferometry observations of our data provide an explanation as to why young massive star-forming regions show more substructure than older ones. The most massive stars in our model are found within the most bound cluster. Most of the mass accreted by the massive stars was originally distributed throughout the clump at low densities and was later funnelled to the star due to global infall. Even with radiative feedback no massive pre-stellar cores are formed. The original cores are of intermediate mass and gain their additional mass in the protostellar stage. We also find that cores which form low-mass stars exist within the volume from which the high-mass stars accrete, but are largely unaffected by this process.

  16. Cluster formation in liverwort-associated methylobacteria and its implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutschera, U.; Thomas, J.; Hornschuh, M.

    2007-08-01

    Pink-pigmented methylotropic bacteria of the genus Methylobacterium inhabit the surfaces of plant organs. In bryophytes, these methylobacteria enhance cell growth, but the nature of this plant-microbe interaction is largely unknown. In this study, methylobacteria were isolated from the upper surface of the free-living thalli of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha L. Identification of one strain by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene-targeted polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and other data show that these microbes represent an undescribed species of the genus Methylobacterium ( Methylobacterium sp.). The growth-promoting activity of these wild-type methylobacteria was tested and compared with that of the type strain Methylobacterium mesophilicum. Both types of methylobacteria stimulated surface expansion of isolated gemmae from Marchantia polymorpha by about 350%. When suspended in water, the liverwort-associated bacteria ( Methylobacterium sp.) formed dense clusters of up to 600 cells. In liquid cultures of Methylobacterium mesophilicum, single cells were observed, but no clustering occurred. We suggest that the liverwort-associated methylobacteria are co-evolved symbionts of the plants: Cluster formation may be a behavior that enhances the survival of the epiphytic microbes during periods of drought of these desiccation-tolerant lower plants.

  17. Formation of Short-Period Binary Pulsars in Globular Clusters.

    PubMed

    Rasio; Pfahl; Rappaport

    2000-03-20

    We present a new dynamical scenario for the formation of short-period binary millisecond pulsars in globular clusters. Our work is motivated by the recent observations of 20 radio pulsars in 47 Tuc. In a dense cluster such as 47 Tuc, most neutron stars acquire binary companions through exchange interactions with primordial binaries. The resulting systems have semimajor axes in the range approximately 0.1-1 AU and neutron star companion masses approximately 1-3 M middle dot in circle. For many of these systems, we find that when the companion evolves off the main sequence and fills its Roche lobe, the subsequent mass transfer is dynamically unstable. This leads to a common envelope phase and the formation of short-period neutron star-white dwarf binaries. For a significant fraction of these binaries, the decay of the orbit due to gravitational radiation will be followed by a period of stable mass transfer driven by a combination of gravitational radiation and tidal heating of the companion. The properties of the resulting short-period binaries match well those of observed binary pulsars in 47 Tuc. PMID:10702129

  18. Formation of Short-Period Binary Pulsars in Globular Clusters.

    PubMed

    Rasio; Pfahl; Rappaport

    2000-03-20

    We present a new dynamical scenario for the formation of short-period binary millisecond pulsars in globular clusters. Our work is motivated by the recent observations of 20 radio pulsars in 47 Tuc. In a dense cluster such as 47 Tuc, most neutron stars acquire binary companions through exchange interactions with primordial binaries. The resulting systems have semimajor axes in the range approximately 0.1-1 AU and neutron star companion masses approximately 1-3 M middle dot in circle. For many of these systems, we find that when the companion evolves off the main sequence and fills its Roche lobe, the subsequent mass transfer is dynamically unstable. This leads to a common envelope phase and the formation of short-period neutron star-white dwarf binaries. For a significant fraction of these binaries, the decay of the orbit due to gravitational radiation will be followed by a period of stable mass transfer driven by a combination of gravitational radiation and tidal heating of the companion. The properties of the resulting short-period binaries match well those of observed binary pulsars in 47 Tuc.

  19. The life-cycle of young star-clusters; the role of the galactic environment on cluster formation and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamo, Angela

    2015-08-01

    Our understanding of star formation on galactic scales has been fairly grasped (e.g. the rate at which stars form scales proportionally to the molecular gas content) both in the local and high redshift universe. However, our knowledge on how star formation proceeds at small scales (e.g. the fraction of star formation happening in stellar clusters, the time-scales for star-forming regions to dissolve, the impact of the galactic environment on star and cluster formation) remains a challenge. Gravitationally bound young stellar clusters appear to be a commune product of star formation. There are tantalizing similarities between young star clusters and globular clusters, the latter formed by gravitationally bound ancient stellar populations. However, the young and globular cluster populations show statistical properties (mass functions, formation efficiencies, and survival times) that have been claimed incompatible, leaving the two populations being the results of distinct processes of formation. In my contribution, I will discuss the latest results produced with the analysis of the young cluster populations in several nearby galaxies. The use of new statistical methods, the link with dense gas fueling star formation, the access to homogenous datasets show, for the first time, clear evidence of the influence of the galactic environment in shaping the properties of young star cluster populations. After all, the differences between the two cluster populations may not be so pronounced, suggesting that the same physical formation process under different environmental conditions has been (and currently is) at work at high redshift (when globular clusters were formed) and in the local universe.

  20. A CLUSTER IN THE MAKING: ALMA REVEALS THE INITIAL CONDITIONS FOR HIGH-MASS CLUSTER FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Rathborne, J. M.; Contreras, Y.; Longmore, S. N.; Bastian, N.; Jackson, J. M.; Alves, J. F.; Bally, J.; Foster, J. B.; Garay, G.; Kruijssen, J. M. D.; Testi, L.; Walsh, A. J.

    2015-04-01

    G0.253+0.016 is a molecular clump that appears to be on the verge of forming a high-mass cluster: its extremely low dust temperature, high mass, and high density, combined with its lack of prevalent star formation, make it an excellent candidate for an Arches-like cluster in a very early stage of formation. Here we present new Atacama Large Millimeter/Sub-millimeter Array observations of its small-scale (∼0.07 pc) 3 mm dust continuum and molecular line emission from 17 different species that probe a range of distinct physical and chemical conditions. The data reveal a complex network of emission features with a complicated velocity structure: there is emission on all spatial scales, the morphology of which ranges from small, compact regions to extended, filamentary structures that are seen in both emission and absorption. The dust column density is well traced by molecules with higher excitation energies and critical densities, consistent with a clump that has a denser interior. A statistical analysis supports the idea that turbulence shapes the observed gas structure within G0.253+0.016. We find a clear break in the turbulent power spectrum derived from the optically thin dust continuum emission at a spatial scale of ∼0.1 pc, which may correspond to the spatial scale at which gravity has overcome the thermal pressure. We suggest that G0.253+0.016 is on the verge of forming a cluster from hierarchical, filamentary structures that arise from a highly turbulent medium. Although the stellar distribution within high-mass Arches-like clusters is compact, centrally condensed, and smooth, the observed gas distribution within G0.253+0.016 is extended, with no high-mass central concentration, and has a complex, hierarchical structure. If this clump gives rise to a high-mass cluster and its stars are formed from this initially hierarchical gas structure, then the resulting cluster must evolve into a centrally condensed structure via a dynamical process.

  1. COSMOLOGICAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF CLUSTER FORMATION WITH ANISOTROPIC THERMAL CONDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Ruszkowski, M.; Lee, D.; Parrish, I.; Oh, S. Peng E-mail: dongwook@flash.uchicago.edu E-mail: iparrish@astro.berkeley.edu

    2011-10-20

    The intracluster medium (ICM) has been suggested to be buoyantly unstable in the presence of magnetic field and anisotropic thermal conduction. We perform first cosmological simulations of galaxy cluster formation that simultaneously include magnetic fields, radiative cooling, and anisotropic thermal conduction. In isolated and idealized cluster models, the magnetothermal instability (MTI) tends to reorient the magnetic fields radially whenever the temperature gradient points in the direction opposite to gravitational acceleration. Using cosmological simulations of cluster formation we detect radial bias in the velocity and magnetic fields. Such radial bias is consistent with either the inhomogeneous radial gas flows due to substructures or residual MTI-driven field rearrangements that are expected even in the presence of turbulence. Although disentangling the two scenarios is challenging, we do not detect excess bias in the runs that include anisotropic thermal conduction. The anisotropy effect is potentially detectable via radio polarization measurements with LOFAR and the Square Kilometer Array and future X-ray spectroscopic studies with the International X-ray Observatory. We demonstrate that radiative cooling boosts the amplification of the magnetic field by about two orders of magnitude beyond what is expected in the non-radiative cases. This effect is caused by the compression of the gas and frozen-in magnetic field as it accumulates in the cluster center. At z = 0 the field is amplified by a factor of about 10{sup 6} compared to the uniform magnetic field that evolved due to the universal expansion alone. Interestingly, the runs that include both radiative cooling and thermal conduction exhibit stronger magnetic field amplification than purely radiative runs. In these cases, buoyant restoring forces depend on the temperature gradients rather than the steeper entropy gradients. Thus, the ICM is more easily mixed and the winding up of the frozen-in magnetic

  2. The relationship of the postsynaptic 43K protein to acetylcholine receptors in receptor clusters isolated from cultured rat myotubes.

    PubMed

    Bloch, R J; Froehner, S C

    1987-03-01

    We have examined the relationship of acetylcholine receptors (AChR) to the Mr 43,000 receptor-associated protein (43K) in the AChR clusters of cultured rat myotubes. Indirect immunofluorescence revealed that the 43K protein was concentrated at the AChR domains of the receptor clusters in intact rat myotubes, in myotube fragments, and in clusters that had been purified approximately 100-fold by extraction with saponin. The association of the 43K protein with clustered AChR was not affected by buffers of high or low ionic strength, by alkaline pHs up to 10, or by chymotrypsin at 10 micrograms/ml. However, the 43K protein was removed from clusters with lithium diiodosalicylate or at alkaline pH (greater than 10). Upon extraction of 43K, several changes were observed in the AChR population. Receptors redistributed in the plane of the muscle membrane in alkali-extracted samples. The number of binding sites accessible to an anti-AChR monoclonal antibody directed against cytoplasmic epitopes (88B) doubled. Receptors became more susceptible to digestion by chymotrypsin, which destroyed the binding sites for the 88B antibody only after 43K was extracted. These results suggest that in isolated AChR clusters the 43K protein covers part of the cytoplasmic domain of AChR and may contribute to the unique distribution of this membrane protein.

  3. Cluster observes formation of high-beta plasma blobs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, G.; Georgescu, E.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Klecker, B.; Bogdanova, J.; Reme, H.; Frey, H. U.; Vaivads, A.

    2003-04-01

    Late in a sequence of four moderate substorms an 26 July 2001, Cluster observed periods of a few minutes durations of high-beta plasma events (B < 10nT, beta = 2 - 30), connected with dipolarizations of the magnetic field. Cluster was located near 02:45 MLT, at R = 19 Re and at about 5 degrees N GSM. These events began late in the recovery phase of the second and about 5 minutes before onset of the third substorm and lasted for three hours, way beyond the recovery phase of the fourth substorm. The most remarkable observation is that the onset coincided with the arrival of energetic (E ~ 7 keV) O+ ions from the ionosphere, which tended to dominate the plasma composition throughout the remaining time. The magnetic flux and the transverse plasma transport is continuously directed equator- and earthward with oscillatory east-west movements superposed. Periods of order 5 - 10 minutes and strong correlations between the magnetic elevation angle and log(beta) (correlation coefficient 0.78) are highly reminiscent of the high-beta plasma blobs discovered with Equator-S and Geotail between 9 and 11 Re in the late night/early morning sector [Haerendel et al. 1999]. Another feature in common with the Equator-S and Geotail observations is the plasma flow towards low latitudes during the magnetic field recovery. We conclude that Cluster observed the plasma blob formation in the tail plasma sheet, which seems to occur dominantly in the recovery and post-recovery phase of substorms. This is consistent with the finding of Equator-S and Geotail. The origin is a pulsed earthward plasma transport with velocity amplitudes of only several tens of km/s. It needs to be investigated whether the preceeding injection of ionospheric O+ ions into the plasma sheet plays a causal role in the process.

  4. The formation of cluster elliptical galaxies as revealed by extensive star formation.

    PubMed

    Stevens, J A; Ivison, R J; Dunlop, J S; Smail, Ian R; Percival, W J; Hughes, D H; Röttgering, H J A; Van Breugel, W J M; Reuland, M

    2003-09-18

    The most massive galaxies in the present-day Universe are found to lie in the centres of rich clusters. They have old, coeval stellar populations suggesting that the bulk of their stars must have formed at early epochs in spectacular starbursts, which should be luminous phenomena when observed at submillimetre wavelengths. The most popular model of galaxy formation predicts that these galaxies form in proto-clusters at high-density peaks in the early Universe. Such peaks are indicated by massive high-redshift radio galaxies. Here we report deep submillimetre mapping of seven high-redshift radio galaxies and their environments. These data confirm not only the presence of spatially extended regions of massive star-formation activity in the radio galaxies themselves, but also in companion objects previously undetected at any wavelength. The prevalence, orientation, and inferred masses of these submillimetre companion galaxies suggest that we are witnessing the synchronous formation of the most luminous elliptical galaxies found today at the centres of rich clusters of galaxies.

  5. Revisiting the formation of cyclic clusters in liquid ethanol.

    PubMed

    Balanay, Mannix P; Kim, Dong Hee; Fan, Haiyan

    2016-04-21

    The liquid phase of ethanol in pure and in non-polar solvents was studied at room temperature using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies together with theoretical approach. The FT-IR spectra for pure ethanol and solution in cyclohexane at different dilution stages are consistent with (1)H NMR results. The results from both methods were best explained by the results of the density functional theory based on a multimeric model. It is suggested that cyclic trimers and tetramers are dominated in the solution of cyclohexane/hexane with the concentration greater than 0.5M at room temperature. In liquid ethanol, while the primary components at room temperature are cyclic trimers and tetramers, there is a certain amount (∼14%) of open hydroxide group representing the existence of chain like structures in the equilibria. The cyclic cluster model in the liquid and concentrated solution phase (>0.5M) can be used to explain the anomalously lower freezing point of ethanol (159 K) than that of water (273 K) at ambient conditions. In addition, (1)H NMR at various dilution stages reveals the dynamics for the formation of cyclic clusters. PMID:27389215

  6. Revisiting the formation of cyclic clusters in liquid ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balanay, Mannix P.; Kim, Dong Hee; Fan, Haiyan

    2016-04-01

    The liquid phase of ethanol in pure and in non-polar solvents was studied at room temperature using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies together with theoretical approach. The FT-IR spectra for pure ethanol and solution in cyclohexane at different dilution stages are consistent with 1H NMR results. The results from both methods were best explained by the results of the density functional theory based on a multimeric model. It is suggested that cyclic trimers and tetramers are dominated in the solution of cyclohexane/hexane with the concentration greater than 0.5M at room temperature. In liquid ethanol, while the primary components at room temperature are cyclic trimers and tetramers, there is a certain amount (˜14%) of open hydroxide group representing the existence of chain like structures in the equilibria. The cyclic cluster model in the liquid and concentrated solution phase (>0.5M) can be used to explain the anomalously lower freezing point of ethanol (159 K) than that of water (273 K) at ambient conditions. In addition, 1H NMR at various dilution stages reveals the dynamics for the formation of cyclic clusters.

  7. Revisiting the formation of cyclic clusters in liquid ethanol.

    PubMed

    Balanay, Mannix P; Kim, Dong Hee; Fan, Haiyan

    2016-04-21

    The liquid phase of ethanol in pure and in non-polar solvents was studied at room temperature using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies together with theoretical approach. The FT-IR spectra for pure ethanol and solution in cyclohexane at different dilution stages are consistent with (1)H NMR results. The results from both methods were best explained by the results of the density functional theory based on a multimeric model. It is suggested that cyclic trimers and tetramers are dominated in the solution of cyclohexane/hexane with the concentration greater than 0.5M at room temperature. In liquid ethanol, while the primary components at room temperature are cyclic trimers and tetramers, there is a certain amount (∼14%) of open hydroxide group representing the existence of chain like structures in the equilibria. The cyclic cluster model in the liquid and concentrated solution phase (>0.5M) can be used to explain the anomalously lower freezing point of ethanol (159 K) than that of water (273 K) at ambient conditions. In addition, (1)H NMR at various dilution stages reveals the dynamics for the formation of cyclic clusters.

  8. Hierarchical Cluster Formation in Concentrated Monoclonal Antibody Formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrin, P. Douglas; Zarzar, Jonathan; Zarraga, Isidro Dan; Porcar, Lionel; Falus, Peter; Wagner, Norman; Liu, Yun

    Reversible cluster formation has been identified as an underlying cause of large solution viscosities observed in some concentrated monoclonal antibody (mAb) formulations. As high solution viscosity prevents the use of subcutaneous injection as a delivery method for some mAbs, a fundamental understanding of the interactions responsible for high viscosities in concentrated mAb solutions is of significant relevance to mAb applications in human health care as well as of intellectual interest. Here, we present a detailed investigation of a well-studied IgG1 based mAb to relate the short time dynamics and microstructure to significant viscosity changes over a range of pharmaceutically relevant physiochemical conditions. Using a combination of experimental techniques, it is found that upon adding Na2SO4, these antibodies dimerize in solution. Proteins form strongly bounded reversible dimers at dilute concentrations that, when concentrated, interact with each other to form loosely bounded, large, transient clusters. The combined effect of forming strongly bounded dimers and a large transient network is a significant increase in the solution viscosity. Strongly bounded, reversible dimers may exist in many IgG1 based mAb systems such that these results contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of the physical mechanisms producing high viscosities in concentrated protein solutions.

  9. Formation of compact clusters from high resolution hybrid cosmological simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Mark L. A.; Scannapieco, Evan; Gray, William J.

    2013-11-20

    The early universe hosted a large population of small dark matter 'minihalos' that were too small to cool and form stars on their own. These existed as static objects around larger galaxies until acted upon by some outside influence. Outflows, which have been observed around a variety of galaxies, can provide this influence in such a way as to collapse, rather than disperse, the minihalo gas. Gray and Scannapieco performed an investigation in which idealized spherically symmetric minihalos were struck by enriched outflows. Here we perform high-resolution cosmological simulations that form realistic minihalos, which we then extract to perform a large suite of simulations of outflow-minihalo interactions including non-equilibrium chemical reactions. In all models, the shocked minihalo forms molecules through non-equilibrium reaction, and then cools to form dense, chemically homogenous clumps of star-forming gas. The formation of these high-redshift clusters may be observable with the next generation of telescopes and the largest of them should survive to the present-day, having properties similar to halo globular clusters.

  10. The Formation of Cluster Populations Through Direct Galaxy Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Bradley W.; Smith, Beverly J.; Struck, Curtis

    2016-01-01

    Much progress has been made on the question of how globular clusters form. In particular, the study of extragalactic populations of young, high-mass clusters ("super star clusters") has revealed a class of objects can evolve into globular clusters. The process by which these clusters form, and how many survive long enough to become globular clusters, is not wholly understood. Here, we use new data on the colliding galaxy system Arp 261 to investigate the possibility that young, massive clusters form in greater numbers during direct galaxy collisions, compared to less direct tidal collisions.

  11. MOCCA code for star cluster simulations - IV. A new scenario for intermediate mass black hole formation in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giersz, Mirek; Leigh, Nathan; Hypki, Arkadiusz; Lützgendorf, Nora; Askar, Abbas

    2015-12-01

    We discuss a new scenario for the formation of intermediate mass black holes (IMBHs) in dense star clusters. In this scenario, IMBHs are formed as a result of dynamical interactions of hard binaries containing a stellar-mass black hole (BH), with other stars and binaries. We discuss the necessary conditions to initiate the process of intermediate mass BH formation and the influence of an IMBH on the host global globular cluster (GC) properties. We discuss two scenarios for IMBH formation. The SLOW and FAST scenarios. They occur later or earlier in the cluster evolution and require smaller or extremely large central densities, respectively. In our simulations, the formation of IMBHs is highly stochastic. In general, higher formation probabilities follow from larger cluster concentrations (i.e. central densities). We further discuss possible observational signatures of the presence of IMBHs in GCs that follow from our simulations. These include the spatial and kinematic structure of the host cluster, possible radio, X-ray and gravitational wave emissions due to dynamical collisions or mass transfer and the creation of hypervelocity main-sequence escapers during strong dynamical interactions between binaries and an IMBH. All simulations discussed in this paper were performed with the MOCCA (MOnte Carlo Cluster simulAtor) Monte Carlo code. MOCCA accurately follows most of the important physical processes that occur during the dynamical evolution of star clusters but, as with other dynamical codes, it approximates the dissipative processes connected with stellar collisions and binary mergers.

  12. Mechanisms contributing to cluster formation in the inferior olivary nucleus in brainstem slices from postnatal mice

    PubMed Central

    Kølvraa, Mathias; Müller, Felix C; Jahnsen, Henrik; Rekling, Jens C

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The inferior olivary nucleus (IO) in in vitro slices from postnatal mice (P5.5–P15.5) spontaneously generates clusters of neurons with synchronous calcium transients, and intracellular recordings from IO neurons suggest that electrical coupling between neighbouring IO neurons may serve as a synchronizing mechanism. Here, we studied the cluster-forming mechanism and find that clusters overlap extensively with an overlap distribution that resembles the distribution for a random overlap model. The average somatodendritic field size of single curly IO neurons was ∼6400 μm2, which is slightly smaller than the average IO cluster size. Eighty-seven neurons with overlapping dendrites were estimated to be contained in the principal olive mean cluster size, and about six non-overlapping curly IO neurons could be contained within the largest clusters. Clusters could also be induced by iontophoresis with glutamate. Induced clusters were inhibited by tetrodotoxin, carbenoxelone and 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid, suggesting that sodium action potentials and electrical coupling are involved in glutamate-induced cluster formation, which could also be induced by activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors. Spikelets and a small transient depolarizing response were observed during glutamate-induced cluster formation. Calcium transients spread with decreasing velocity during cluster formation, and somatic action potentials and cluster formation are accompanied by large dendritic calcium transients. In conclusion, cluster formation depends on gap junctions, sodium action potentials and spontaneous clusters occur randomly throughout the IO. The relative slow signal spread during cluster formation, combined with a strong dendritic influx of calcium, may signify that active dendritic properties contribute to cluster formation. PMID:24042500

  13. Mechanisms contributing to cluster formation in the inferior olivary nucleus in brainstem slices from postnatal mice.

    PubMed

    Kølvraa, Mathias; Müller, Felix C; Jahnsen, Henrik; Rekling, Jens C

    2014-01-01

    The inferior olivary nucleus (IO) in in vitro slices from postnatal mice (P5.5-P15.5) spontaneously generates clusters of neurons with synchronous calcium transients, and intracellular recordings from IO neurons suggest that electrical coupling between neighbouring IO neurons may serve as a synchronizing mechanism. Here, we studied the cluster-forming mechanism and find that clusters overlap extensively with an overlap distribution that resembles the distribution for a random overlap model. The average somatodendritic field size of single curly IO neurons was ∼6400 μm(2), which is slightly smaller than the average IO cluster size. Eighty-seven neurons with overlapping dendrites were estimated to be contained in the principal olive mean cluster size, and about six non-overlapping curly IO neurons could be contained within the largest clusters. Clusters could also be induced by iontophoresis with glutamate. Induced clusters were inhibited by tetrodotoxin, carbenoxelone and 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid, suggesting that sodium action potentials and electrical coupling are involved in glutamate-induced cluster formation, which could also be induced by activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors. Spikelets and a small transient depolarizing response were observed during glutamate-induced cluster formation. Calcium transients spread with decreasing velocity during cluster formation, and somatic action potentials and cluster formation are accompanied by large dendritic calcium transients. In conclusion, cluster formation depends on gap junctions, sodium action potentials and spontaneous clusters occur randomly throughout the IO. The relative slow signal spread during cluster formation, combined with a strong dendritic influx of calcium, may signify that active dendritic properties contribute to cluster formation.

  14. In Vivo Cluster Formation of Nisin and Lipid II Is Correlated with Membrane Depolarization

    PubMed Central

    Tol, Menno B.; Morales Angeles, Danae

    2015-01-01

    Nisin and related lantibiotics kill bacteria by pore formation or by sequestering lipid II. Some lantibiotics sequester lipid II into clusters, which were suggested to kill cells through delocalized peptidoglycan synthesis. Here, we show that cluster formation is always concomitant with (i) membrane pore formation and (ii) membrane depolarization. Nisin variants that cluster lipid II kill L-form bacteria with similar efficiency, suggesting that delocalization of peptidoglycan synthesis is not the primary killing mechanism of these lantibiotics. PMID:25870072

  15. In vivo cluster formation of nisin and lipid II is correlated with membrane depolarization.

    PubMed

    Tol, Menno B; Morales Angeles, Danae; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Nisin and related lantibiotics kill bacteria by pore formation or by sequestering lipid II. Some lantibiotics sequester lipid II into clusters, which were suggested to kill cells through delocalized peptidoglycan synthesis. Here, we show that cluster formation is always concomitant with (i) membrane pore formation and (ii) membrane depolarization. Nisin variants that cluster lipid II kill L-form bacteria with similar efficiency, suggesting that delocalization of peptidoglycan synthesis is not the primary killing mechanism of these lantibiotics. PMID:25870072

  16. In vivo cluster formation of nisin and lipid II is correlated with membrane depolarization.

    PubMed

    Tol, Menno B; Morales Angeles, Danae; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Nisin and related lantibiotics kill bacteria by pore formation or by sequestering lipid II. Some lantibiotics sequester lipid II into clusters, which were suggested to kill cells through delocalized peptidoglycan synthesis. Here, we show that cluster formation is always concomitant with (i) membrane pore formation and (ii) membrane depolarization. Nisin variants that cluster lipid II kill L-form bacteria with similar efficiency, suggesting that delocalization of peptidoglycan synthesis is not the primary killing mechanism of these lantibiotics.

  17. Cluster formation and phase separation in heteronuclear Janus dumbbells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munaò, G.; O'Toole, P.; Hudson, T. S.; Costa, D.; Caccamo, C.; Sciortino, F.; Giacometti, A.

    2015-06-01

    We have recently investigated the phase behavior of model colloidal dumbbells constituted by two identical tangent hard spheres, with the first being surrounded by an attractive square-well interaction (Janus dumbbells, Munaó et al 2014 Soft Matter 10 5269). Here we extend our previous analysis by introducing in the model the size asymmetry of the hard-core diameters and study the enriched phase scenario thereby obtained. By employing standard Monte Carlo simulations we show that in such ‘heteronuclear Janus dumbbells’ a larger hard-sphere site promotes the formation of clusters, whereas in the opposite condition a gas-liquid phase separation takes place, with a narrow interval of intermediate asymmetries wherein the two phase behaviors may compete. In addition, some peculiar geometrical arrangements, such as lamellæ, are observed only around the perfectly symmetric case. A qualitative agreement is found with recent experimental results, where it is shown that the roughness of molecular surfaces in heterogeneous dimers leads to the formation of colloidal micelles.

  18. Star Formation in Galaxy Clusters Over the Past 10 Billion Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Kim-Vy

    2012-01-01

    Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound systems in the universe and include the most massive galaxies in the universe; this makes galaxy clusters ideal laboratories for disentangling the nature versus nurture aspect of how galaxies evolve. Understanding how galaxies form and evolve in clusters continues to be a fundamental question in astronomy. The ages and assembly histories of galaxies in rich clusters test both stellar population models and hierarchical formation scenarios. Is star formation in cluster galaxies simply accelerated relative to their counterparts in the lower density field, or do cluster galaxies assemble their stars in a fundamentally different manner? To answer this question, I review multi-wavelength results on star formation in galaxy clusters from Coma to the most distant clusters yet discovered at look-back times of 10 billion years (z 2).

  19. Clinical application of clustered-AChR for the detection of SNMG

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guang; Wang, Xiaoqing; Yu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Xiutian; Guan, Yangtai; Jiang, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoantibody-mediated disease of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). However, accumulating evidence has indicated that MG patients whose serum anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies are not detectable (serumnegative MG; SNMG) in routine assays share similar clinical features with anti-AChR antibody-positive MG patients. We hypothesized that SNMG patients would have low-affinity antibodies to AChRs that would not be detectable using traditional methods but that might be detected by binding to AChR on the cell membrane, particularly if they were clustered at the high density observed at the NMJ. We expressed AChR subunits with the clustering protein rapsyn (an AChR-associated protein at the synapse) in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells, and we tested the binding of the antibodies using immunofluorescence. With this approach, AChR antibodies to rapsyn-clustered AChR could be detected in the sera from 45.83% (11/24) of SNMG patients, as confirmed with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). This was the first application in China of cell-based AChR antibody detection. More importantly, this sensitive (and specific) approach could significantly increase the diagnosis rate of SNMG. PMID:26068604

  20. Cluster Formation Triggered by Filament Collisions in Serpens South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Fumitaka; Sugitani, Koji; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Nishitani, Hiroyuki; Dobashi, Kazuhito; Shimoikura, Tomomi; Shimajiri, Yoshito; Kawabe, Ryohei; Yonekura, Yoshinori; Mizuno, Izumi; Kimura, Kimihiko; Tokuda, Kazuki; Kozu, Minato; Okada, Nozomi; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Ogawa, Hideo; Kameno, Seiji; Shinnaga, Hiroko; Momose, Munetake; Nakajima, Taku; Onishi, Toshikazu; Maezawa, Hiroyuki; Hirota, Tomoya; Takano, Shuro; Iono, Daisuke; Kuno, Nario; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2014-08-01

    The Serpens South infrared dark cloud consists of several filamentary ridges, some of which fragment into dense clumps. On the basis of CCS (JN = 43-32), HC3N (J = 5-4), N2H+ (J = 1-0), and SiO (J = 2-1, v = 0) observations, we investigated the kinematics and chemical evolution of these filamentary ridges. We find that CCS is extremely abundant along the main filament in the protocluster clump. We emphasize that Serpens South is the first cluster-forming region where extremely strong CCS emission is detected. The CCS-to-N2H+ abundance ratio is estimated to be about 0.5 toward the protocluster clump, whereas it is about 3 in the other parts of the main filament. We identify six dense ridges with different V LSR. These ridges appear to converge toward the protocluster clump, suggesting that the collisions of these ridges may have triggered cluster formation. The collisions presumably happened within a few × 105 yr because CCS is abundant only for a short time. The short lifetime agrees with the fact that the number fraction of Class I objects, whose typical lifetime is 0.4 × 105 yr, is extremely high, about 70% in the protocluster clump. In the northern part, two ridges appear to have partially collided, forming a V-shape clump. In addition, we detected strong bipolar SiO emission that is due to the molecular outflow blowing out of the protostellar clump, as well as extended weak SiO emission that may originate from the filament collisions.

  1. CLUSTER FORMATION TRIGGERED BY FILAMENT COLLISIONS IN SERPENS SOUTH

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Fumitaka; Kawabe, Ryohei; Shinnaga, Hiroko; Sugitani, Koji; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Kimura, Kimihiko; Tokuda, Kazuki; Kozu, Minato; Okada, Nozomi; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Ogawa, Hideo; Nishitani, Hiroyuki; Mizuno, Izumi; Dobashi, Kazuhito; Shimoikura, Tomomi; Shimajiri, Yoshito; Kameno, Seiji; Momose, Munetake; Nakajima, Taku; and others

    2014-08-20

    The Serpens South infrared dark cloud consists of several filamentary ridges, some of which fragment into dense clumps. On the basis of CCS (J{sub N} = 4{sub 3}-3{sub 2}), HC{sub 3}N (J = 5-4), N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 1-0), and SiO (J = 2-1, v = 0) observations, we investigated the kinematics and chemical evolution of these filamentary ridges. We find that CCS is extremely abundant along the main filament in the protocluster clump. We emphasize that Serpens South is the first cluster-forming region where extremely strong CCS emission is detected. The CCS-to-N{sub 2}H{sup +} abundance ratio is estimated to be about 0.5 toward the protocluster clump, whereas it is about 3 in the other parts of the main filament. We identify six dense ridges with different V {sub LSR}. These ridges appear to converge toward the protocluster clump, suggesting that the collisions of these ridges may have triggered cluster formation. The collisions presumably happened within a few × 10{sup 5} yr because CCS is abundant only for a short time. The short lifetime agrees with the fact that the number fraction of Class I objects, whose typical lifetime is 0.4 × 10{sup 5} yr, is extremely high, about 70% in the protocluster clump. In the northern part, two ridges appear to have partially collided, forming a V-shape clump. In addition, we detected strong bipolar SiO emission that is due to the molecular outflow blowing out of the protostellar clump, as well as extended weak SiO emission that may originate from the filament collisions.

  2. On the formation of cD galaxies and their parent clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovmassian, Hrant M.; Andernach, Heinz

    2012-12-01

    In order to study the mechanism of the formation of cD galaxies, we search for possible dependencies between the K-band luminosity of cD galaxies and the parameters of their host clusters which we select to have a dominant cD galaxy, corresponding to a cluster morphology of Bautz-Morgan type I (BM I). As a comparison sample we use cD galaxies in clusters where they are not dominant, which we define here as non-BM I (NBMI) type clusters. We find that for 71 BM I clusters the absolute K-band luminosity of cD galaxies depends on the cluster richness, but less strongly on the cluster velocity dispersion. Meanwhile, for 35 NBMI clusters the correlation between cD luminosity and cluster richness is weaker, and is absent between cD luminosity and velocity dispersion. In addition, we find that the luminosity of the cD galaxy hosted in BM I clusters tends to increase with the cD's peculiar velocity with respect to the cluster mean velocity. In contrast, for NBMI clusters the cD luminosity decreases with increasing peculiar velocity. Also, the X-ray luminosity of BM I clusters depends on the cluster velocity dispersion, while in NBMI clusters such a correlation is absent. These findings favour the cannibalism scenario for the formation of cD galaxies. We suggest that cD galaxies in clusters of BM I type were formed and evolved preferentially in one and the same cluster. In contrast, cD galaxies in NBMI-type clusters were either originally formed in clusters that later merged with groups or clusters to form the current cluster, or are now in the process of merging.

  3. Insights on Clusters Formation Mechanism by Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry. 2. The Case of Acetone-Water Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apicella, B.; Li, X.; Passaro, M.; Russo, C.

    2016-11-01

    This paper is the second of a series dealing with clusters formation mechanism. In part 1, water clusters with the addition of an electrophilic molecule such as ethanol were studied by Time Of Flight Mass Spectrometry (TOFMS). Mass distributions of molecular clusters of ethanol, water and ethanol-water mixed clusters, were obtained by means of two different ionization methods: Electron Ionization (EI) and picosecond laser Photo-Ionization (PI) at a wavelength of 355 nm. In part 2, the same experimental approach was employed to obtain mass spectra of clusters generated by acetone-water binary mixtures with a different composition. Strong dependence of the mass spectra of clusters with EI and PI on the acetone-water mixing ratio was observed. It was shown that the spectral pattern changes gradually and water-rich cluster signals become fainter while acetone-rich cluster signals become more intensive with increasing acetone concentrations from 0.3% to 40%. Owing to the hydrogen bond acceptor character of acetone, its self-association is discouraged with respect to ethanol. The autocorrelation function (AF) was used to analyze the variation of the water clusters composition with the increase of the acetone concentration in terms of fundamental periodicities. However, although acetone and ethanol present a very different hydrogen-bonding ability, similarly to ethanol-water system, in acetone-water system the formation of water-rich clusters and subsequent metastable fragmentation are the dominant process that determine the clusters distribution, irrespective of the ionization process, while the ionization process significantly affects the acetone-rich clusters distribution.

  4. Insights on Clusters Formation Mechanism by Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry. 2. The Case of Acetone-Water Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apicella, B.; Li, X.; Passaro, M.; Russo, C.

    2016-08-01

    This paper is the second of a series dealing with clusters formation mechanism. In part 1, water clusters with the addition of an electrophilic molecule such as ethanol were studied by Time Of Flight Mass Spectrometry (TOFMS). Mass distributions of molecular clusters of ethanol, water and ethanol-water mixed clusters, were obtained by means of two different ionization methods: Electron Ionization (EI) and picosecond laser Photo-Ionization (PI) at a wavelength of 355 nm. In part 2, the same experimental approach was employed to obtain mass spectra of clusters generated by acetone-water binary mixtures with a different composition. Strong dependence of the mass spectra of clusters with EI and PI on the acetone-water mixing ratio was observed. It was shown that the spectral pattern changes gradually and water-rich cluster signals become fainter while acetone-rich cluster signals become more intensive with increasing acetone concentrations from 0.3% to 40%. Owing to the hydrogen bond acceptor character of acetone, its self-association is discouraged with respect to ethanol. The autocorrelation function (AF) was used to analyze the variation of the water clusters composition with the increase of the acetone concentration in terms of fundamental periodicities. However, although acetone and ethanol present a very different hydrogen-bonding ability, similarly to ethanol-water system, in acetone-water system the formation of water-rich clusters and subsequent metastable fragmentation are the dominant process that determine the clusters distribution, irrespective of the ionization process, while the ionization process significantly affects the acetone-rich clusters distribution.

  5. The formation of primordial binaries in globular clusters by star-disk interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Stephen D.; Clarke, C. J.; Pringle, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    The formation of primordial binaries in globular clusters is examined using simple numerical models. Clusters of protostars collapse until their velocity dispersion rises sufficiently to reverse the infall and the cluster reaches equilibrium. During the collapse, interactions between stars and protostellar disks lead to stellar capture. It is found that binary fraction of a few percent typically result. Binary formation is terminated when the velocity dispersion rises to a point at which most encounters result in disk destruction rather than capture. As a result, much gas is returned to the cluster ISM, limiting the star formation efficiency to a value significantly below 100 percent.

  6. Laser ablation source for formation and deposition of size-selected metal clusters.

    PubMed

    Vucković, S; Svanqvist, M; Popok, V N

    2008-07-01

    This work describes construction of a source and optimisation of its parameters for production of cluster ion beams using material ablation by the second harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (532 nm). The influence of different source parameters such as carrier gas pressure, laser power, delay time between gas, and laser pulses as well as nozzle configuration on the cluster formation are studied. For the current experiments the laser ablation cluster source was optimized for production of Con+ cluster ions. Clusters with n up to 150 atoms are registered by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Deposition of size-selected Co50+ clusters with kinetic energies in the interval of 250-4850 eV/cluster on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite is studied. At the highest impact energies the clusters are implanted. Craters and well-like structures can be seen by scanning tunneling microscopy at impact spots. A decrease in cluster kinetic energy leads to formation of bumplike structures which probably represent damaged graphite areas with incorporated Co atoms. Further decrease in the cluster impact energy to the level of 450-250 eV/cluster creates condition for so-called cluster pinning when the cluster constituents are intact but the energy transferred to the graphite is still enough to produce radiation defects to which the cluster is bound. PMID:18681696

  7. Comments on the Formation of Globular Clusters from Coalesced Clouds.

    PubMed

    Smith

    1999-11-20

    If a substantial fraction of the proto-Galactic halo was constituted of cloudy structures of sizes 1 kpc or larger, then collisions between these clouds would have been common during the infall of the Galaxy. Such collisions would have shaped the properties of the clouds from which globular clusters formed. If Milky Way globular clusters formed from progenitor clouds which in turn had been constructed from the coalescence of smaller cloud structures, then cluster properties that could naturally be accounted for include: (1) the low percentage of stars in globular clusters relative to the halo field, (2) the chemical homogeneity of globular clusters with respect to heavy elements, and (3) the fact that the lowest metallicity globular clusters are not as metal-poor as some halo field stars.

  8. MASSIVE CLUSTERS IN THE INNER REGIONS OF NGC 1365: CLUSTER FORMATION AND GAS DYNAMICS IN GALACTIC BARS

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Galliano, Emmanuel; Alloin, Danielle E-mail: egallian@on.b

    2009-10-01

    Cluster formation and gas dynamics in the central regions of barred galaxies are not well understood. This paper reviews the environment of three 10{sup 7} M {sub sun} clusters near the inner Lindblad resonance (ILR) of the barred spiral NGC 1365. The morphology, mass, and flow of H I and CO gas in the spiral and barred regions are examined for evidence of the location and mechanism of cluster formation. The accretion rate is compared with the star formation rate to infer the lifetime of the starburst. The gas appears to move from inside corotation in the spiral region to looping filaments in the interbar region at a rate of approx6 M {sub sun} yr{sup -1} before impacting the bar dustlane somewhere along its length. The gas in this dustlane moves inward, growing in flux as a result of the accretion to approx40 M {sub sun} yr{sup -1} near the ILR. This inner rate exceeds the current nuclear star formation rate by a factor of 4, suggesting continued buildup of nuclear mass for another approx0.5 Gyr. The bar may be only 1-2 Gyr old. Extrapolating the bar flow back in time, we infer that the clusters formed in the bar dustlane outside the central dust ring at a position where an interbar filament currently impacts the lane. The ram pressure from this impact is comparable to the pressure in the bar dustlane, and both are comparable to the pressure in the massive clusters. Impact triggering is suggested. The isothermal assumption in numerical simulations seems inappropriate for the rarefaction parts of spiral and bar gas flows. The clusters have enough lower-mass counterparts to suggest they are part of a normal power-law mass distribution. Gas trapping in the most massive clusters could explain their [Ne II] emission, which is not evident from the lower-mass clusters nearby.

  9. Hot flow anomaly formation and evolution: Cluster observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shan; Zong, Qiugang; Zhang, Hui

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we have examined the formation and evolution of 513 hot flow anomalies (HFAs) from 2003 to 2009 observed by the Cluster spacecraft. Our results show that an original upstream discontinuity in the vicinity of an HFAs and/or at least one side of the HFA with the convective electric field pointing toward the discontinuity may help an HFA growing, but it is not a necessary condition to generate an HFA. It is shown that a significant part of the thermal energy inside HFAs is converted from the kinetic energy of the solar wind, although additional heating process(es) is required to heat the plasma inside an HFA. In order to learn the evolution of an HFA, we have examined the electron spectrum and ion velocity distribution function (VDF) inside young and mature HFAs. It is found that the particle spectra are good indicators of a young or mature HFA. Inside young HFAs, electron spectra can be fitted by a single drift-κ distribution, while inside mature HFAs it can be fitted by the combination of a drift-Maxwellian distribution with the peak energy below ˜10 eV and a heated electron distribution. On the other hand, ion VDF inside mature HFAs shows a single distribution, whereas the VDF inside young HFAs shows two clear ion populations—one original solar wind and a reflected ion population. It is found that the reflected ion population inside young HFAs can be scattered to more than 180° in the Vpara-Vperp1 plane, where Vperp1 is in the V-B plane but perpendicular to B, which is similar to the foreshock distribution. This indicates that the reflected ion population could be diffusive from all directions rather than the unidirectional beam when an HFA is forming.

  10. Transient cluster formation in sheared non-Brownian suspensions.

    PubMed

    Thøgersen, Kjetil; Dabrowski, Marcin; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders

    2016-02-01

    We perform numerical simulations of non-Brownian suspensions in the laminar flow regime to study the scaling behavior of particle clusters and collisions under shear. As the particle fraction approaches the maximum packing fraction, large transient clusters appear in the system. We use methods from percolation theory to discuss the cluster size distribution. We also give a scaling relation for the percolation threshold as well as system size effects through time-dependent fluctuations of this threshold and relate them to system size. System size effects are important close to the maximum packing fraction due to the divergence of the cluster length scale. We then investigate the transient nature of the clusters through characterization of particle collisions and show that collision times exhibit scale-invariant properties. Finally, we show that particle collision times can be modeled as first-passage processes. PMID:26986381

  11. Direct Proof of the In Vivo Pathogenic Role of the AChR Autoantibodies from Myasthenia Gravis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kordas, Gregory; Lagoumintzis, George; Sideris, Sotirios; Poulas, Konstantinos; Tzartos, Socrates J.

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that the autoantibodies (autoAbs) against muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR) of myasthenia gravis (MG) patients are the main pathogenic factor in MG; however, this belief has not yet been confirmed with direct observations. Although animals immunized with AChR or injected with anti-AChR monoclonal Abs, or with crude human MG Ig fractions exhibit MG symptoms, the pathogenic role of isolated anti-AChR autoAbs, and, more importantly, the absence of pathogenic factor(s) in the autoAb-depleted MG sera has not yet been shown by in vivo studies. Using recombinant extracellular domains of the human AChR α and β subunits, we have isolated autoAbs from the sera of four MG patients. The ability of these isolated anti-subunit Abs and of the Ab-depleted sera to passively transfer experimental autoimmune MG in Lewis rats was investigated. We found that the isolated anti-subunit Abs were at least as efficient as the corresponding whole sera or whole Ig in causing experimental MG. Abs to both α- and β-subunit were pathogenic although the anti-α-subunit were much more efficient than the anti-β-subunit ones. Interestingly, the autoAb-depleted sera were free of pathogenic activity. The later suggests that the myasthenogenic potency of the studied anti-AChR MG sera is totally due to their anti-AChR autoAbs, and therefore selective elimination of the anti-AChR autoAbs from MG patients may be an efficient therapy for MG. PMID:25259739

  12. Effects of Formation Epoch Distribution on X-Ray Luminosity and Temperature Functions of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enoki, Motohiro; Takahara, Fumio; Fujita, Yutaka

    2001-07-01

    We investigate statistical properties of galaxy clusters in the context of a hierarchical clustering scenario, taking into account their formation epoch distribution; this study is motivated by the recent finding by Fujita and Takahara that X-ray clusters form a fundamental plane in which the mass and the formation epoch are regarded as two independent parameters. Using the formalism that discriminates between major mergers and accretion, the epoch of a cluster formation is identified with that of the last major merger. Since tiny mass accretion following formation does not much affect the core structure of clusters, the properties of X-ray emission from clusters are determined by the total mass and density at their formation time. Under these assumptions, we calculate X-ray luminosity and temperature functions of galaxy clusters. We find that the behavior of the luminosity function differs from the model that does not take into account formation epoch distribution; the behavior of the temperature function, however, is not much different. In our model, the luminosity function is shifted to a higher luminosity and shows no significant evolution up to z~1, independent of cosmological models. The clusters are populated on the temperature-luminosity plane, with a finite dispersion. Since the simple scaling model in which the gas temperature is equal to the virial temperature fails to reproduce the observed luminosity-temperature relation, we also consider a model that takes into account the effects of preheating. The preheating model reproduces the observations much more accurately.

  13. Improved resolution of single channel dwell times reveals mechanisms of binding, priming, and gating in muscle AChR.

    PubMed

    Mukhtasimova, Nuriya; daCosta, Corrie J B; Sine, Steven M

    2016-07-01

    The acetylcholine receptor (AChR) from vertebrate skeletal muscle initiates voluntary movement, and its kinetics of activation are crucial for maintaining the safety margin for neuromuscular transmission. Furthermore, the kinetic mechanism of the muscle AChR serves as an archetype for understanding activation mechanisms of related receptors from the Cys-loop superfamily. Here we record currents through single muscle AChR channels with improved temporal resolution approaching half an order of magnitude over our previous best. A range of concentrations of full and partial agonists are used to elicit currents from human wild-type and gain-of-function mutant AChRs. For each agonist-receptor combination, rate constants are estimated from maximum likelihood analysis using a kinetic scheme comprised of agonist binding, priming, and channel gating steps. The kinetic scheme and rate constants are tested by stochastic simulation, followed by incorporation of the experimental step response, sampling rate, background noise, and filter bandwidth. Analyses of the simulated data confirm all rate constants except those for channel gating, which are overestimated because of the established effect of noise on the briefest dwell times. Estimates of the gating rate constants were obtained through iterative simulation followed by kinetic fitting. The results reveal that the agonist association rate constants are independent of agonist occupancy but depend on receptor state, whereas those for agonist dissociation depend on occupancy but not on state. The priming rate and equilibrium constants increase with successive agonist occupancy, and for a full agonist, the forward rate constant increases more than the equilibrium constant; for a partial agonist, the forward rate and equilibrium constants increase equally. The gating rate and equilibrium constants also increase with successive agonist occupancy, but unlike priming, the equilibrium constants increase more than the forward rate

  14. Low Temperature Kinetics of the First Steps of Water Cluster Formation.

    PubMed

    Bourgalais, J; Roussel, V; Capron, M; Benidar, A; Jasper, A W; Klippenstein, S J; Biennier, L; Le Picard, S D

    2016-03-18

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical low temperature kinetic study of water cluster formation. Water cluster growth takes place in low temperature (23-69 K) supersonic flows. The observed kinetics of formation of water clusters are reproduced with a kinetic model based on theoretical predictions for the first steps of clusterization. The temperature- and pressure-dependent association and dissociation rate coefficients are predicted with an ab initio transition state theory based master equation approach over a wide range of temperatures (20-100 K) and pressures (10^{-6}-10  bar). PMID:27035301

  15. THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEM OF NGC 4636 AND FORMATION OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN GIANT ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hong Soo; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Hwang, Ho Seong; Kim, Sang Chul; Arimoto, Nobuo; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Tamura, Naoyuki; Onodera, Masato E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr E-mail: sckim@kasi.re.kr E-mail: yoshihiko.yamada@nao.ac.jp E-mail: monodera@phys.ethz.ch

    2012-11-10

    We present a spectroscopic analysis of the metallicities, ages, and alpha-elements of the globular clusters (GCs) in the giant elliptical galaxy (gE) NGC 4636 in the Virgo Cluster. Line indices of the GCs are measured from the integrated spectra obtained with Faint Object Camera and Spectrograph on the Subaru 8.2 m Telescope. We derive [Fe/H] values of 59 GCs based on the Brodie and Huchra method, and [Z/H], age, and [{alpha}/Fe] values of 33 GCs from the comparison of the Lick line indices with single stellar population models. The metallicity distribution of NGC 4636 GCs shows a hint of a bimodality with two peaks at [Fe/H] = -1.23({sigma} = 0.32) and -0.35({sigma} = 0.19). The age spread is large from 2 Gyr to 15 Gyr and the fraction of young GCs with age <5 Gyr is about 27%. The [{alpha}/Fe] of the GCs shows a broad distribution with a mean value [{alpha}/Fe] Almost-Equal-To 0.14 dex. The dependence of these chemical properties on the galactocentric radius is weak. We also derive the metallicities, ages, and [{alpha}/Fe] values for the GCs in other nearby gEs (M87, M49, M60, NGC 5128, NGC 1399, and NGC 1407) from the line index data in the literature using the same methods as used for NGC 4636 GCs. The metallicity distribution of GCs in the combined sample of seven gEs including NGC 4636 is found to be bimodal, supported by the KMM test with a significance level of >99.9%. All these gEs harbor some young GCs with ages less than 5 Gyr. The mean age of the metal-rich GCs ([Fe/H] >-0.9) is about 3 Gyr younger than that of the metal-poor GCs. The mean value of [{alpha}/Fe] of the gE GCs is smaller than that of the Milky Way GCs. We discuss these results in the context of GC formation in gEs.

  16. [Molecular mechanisms underlying the formation of neuromuscular junction].

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Osamu; Yamanashi, Yuji

    2011-07-01

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is a synapse between a motor neuron and skeletal muscle. The contraction of skeletal muscle is controlled by the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh), which is released from the motor nerve terminal. To achieve efficient neuromuscular transmission, acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) must be densely clustered on the muscle membrane of the NMJ. Failure of AChR clustering is associated with disorders of neuromuscular transmission such as congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS) and myasthenia gravis (MG). Motoneuronal agrin and muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK) are known to play essential roles in the formation and maintenance of NMJs in the central region of each muscle. However, it had been unclear how agrin activates MuSK. Recent studies have elucidated the roles of several key molecules, including the cytoplasmic adaptor protein Dok-7 and LDL receptor-related protein 4 (Lrp4), in agrin-induced MuSK activation. Moreover, new evidence indicates that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) regulates postsynaptic differentiation. In this review, we summarize the latest developments in molecular mechanisms underlying NMJ formation in vertebrates. PMID:21747134

  17. Active transport and cluster formation on 2D networks.

    PubMed

    Greulich, P; Santen, L

    2010-06-01

    We introduce a model for active transport on inhomogeneous networks embedded in a diffusive environment which is motivated by vesicular transport on actin filaments. In the presence of a hard-core interaction, particle clusters are observed that exhibit an algebraically decaying distribution in a large parameter regime, indicating the existence of clusters on all scales. The scale-free behavior can be understood by a mechanism promoting preferential attachment of particles to large clusters. The results are compared with a diffusion-limited aggregation model and active transport on a regular network. For both models we observe aggregation of particles to clusters which are characterized by a finite size scale if the relevant time scales and particle densities are considered. PMID:20556462

  18. Cluster formation as a measure of interpretability in multiple testing.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Juliet Popper

    2008-10-01

    Multiple test procedures are usually compared on various aspects of error control and power. Power is measured as some function of the number of false hypotheses correctly identified as false. However, given equal numbers of rejected false hypotheses, the pattern of rejections, i.e. the particular set of false hypotheses identified, may be crucial in interpreting the results for potential application.In an important area of application, comparisons among a set of treatments based on random samples from populations, two different approaches, cluster analysis and model selection, deal implicitly with such patterns, while traditional multiple testing procedures generally focus on the outcomes of subset and pairwise equality hypothesis tests, without considering the overall pattern of results in comparing methods. An important feature involving the pattern of rejections is their relevance for dividing the treatments into distinct subsets based on some parameter of interest, for example their means. This paper introduces some new measures relating to the potential of methods for achieving such divisions. Following Hartley (1955), sets of treatments with equal parameter values will be called clusters. Because it is necessary to distinguish between clusters in the populations and clustering in sample outcomes, the population clusters will be referred to as P -clusters; any related concepts defined in terms of the sample outcome will be referred to with the prefix outcome. Outcomes of multiple comparison procedures will be studied in terms of their probabilities of leading to separation of treatments into outcome clusters, with various measures relating to the number of such outcome clusters and the proportion of true vs. false outcome clusters. The definitions of true and false outcome clusters and related concepts, and the approach taken here, is in the tradition of hypothesis testing with attention to overall error control and power, but with added consideration of

  19. Formation of dislocation loops during He clustering in bcc Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, N.; Van Swygenhoven, H.; Victoria, M.; Chen, J.

    2011-11-01

    The clustering of helium in bcc (body centered cubic) iron and the growth of a helium bubble are simulated at the atomistic level for the helium-rich vacancy-poor condition. It is shown that a \\frac{1}{2}\\langle 111\\rangle dislocation loop is formed as a sequential collection of <111> crowdions, the latter being the most stable self-interstitial atom configuration in the presence of a He cluster.

  20. [Fe₄S₄]- and [Fe₃S₄]-cluster formation in synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Alessandra; Pandelia, Maria-Eirini; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2011-11-01

    [Fe₄S₄]- and [Fe₃S₄]-clusters are ubiquitous iron-sulfur motifs in biological systems. The [Fe₃S₄] composition is, however, of much lower natural abundance than the more typical [Fe₄S₄]-clusters. In the present study formation of [Fe₃S₄]-clusters has been examined using chemically synthesized model peptides consisting of 33 amino acids (maquettes). Maquettes are effective synthetic analogs for metal-ion binding sites, allowing for a facile modification of the primary coordination sphere of iron-sulfur clusters. Maquettes have been designed following the [FeS]-cluster-binding motif of dimethyl sulfoxide reductase subunit B (DmsB) from Escherichia coli that carries a [Fe₄S₄]-cluster, but incorporates a [Fe₃S₄]-cluster instead upon mutation of one of the coordinating cysteines. The time-dependent formation of iron-sulfur clusters and the effects of exchanging selected amino acids in the model peptides, known to regulate the [Fe₃S₄] to [Fe₄S₄] ratio in the DmsB protein, were monitored by UV/Vis- and EPR-spectroscopy. Exchange of cysteines within the conserved CxxCxxC motif has a much stronger effect on cluster formation and stoichiometry than the exchange of a coordinating external cysteine. Amino acid exchange in the binding motif shows a dependence of the cluster stoichiometry on the amino acid side chain. Formation of [Fe₃S₄]-clusters in maquettes is less favorable compared to native proteins. The [Fe₃S₄] moiety appears to be a rather transient species towards the more stable (final) incorporation of a [Fe₄S₄]-cluster. Results are best described by an assembly mechanism that considers a successive coordination of the iron atoms by the peptide, rather than incorporation of an already pre-formed mercaptoethanol-coordinated [Fe₄S₄]-cluster.

  1. Still Red and Dead? Measuring feedback and star-formation in clusters at z > 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khullar, Gourav; McDonald, Michael; Bleem, Lindsey; Benson, Bradford; Gladders, Michael; South Pole Telescope (SPT) Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Optical and infrared (IR) surveys have discovered that galaxy clusters at z < 1 are "red and dead", characterized by relatively low and inefficient star formation. While most studies of color and luminosity evolution function find that stars in red, early-type cluster galaxies formed at z > 2 and underwent passive evolution thereafter without dominant star formation, some samples indicate that an era of star formation and AGN activity is seen in cluster galaxies at z > 1. Only recently have large samples of z > 1 clusters been identified, mostly through IR and Sunyaev-Zel’dovich (SZ) surveys, which indicate an increase in SFR in clusters at high redshifts and incomplete quenching. Moreover, a robust cluster sample in-hand allows us to understand how galaxy clusters become "red and dead", and the role of astrophysical feedback in this process. The South Pole Telescope (SPT) collaboration has produced mass-limited redshift-independent catalog of 516 clusters from 0.0 < z < 1.7, by observing 2500 sq. degrees of the sky in the mm-band, detecting them using the SZ effect. This catalog contains an estimated 37 massive clusters with z > 1.0, with three newly found systems having a zphot > 1.5. In this work, we focus on a sub-sample of SPT-SZ selected clusters at z > 1.2 with multi-wavelength observations in X-ray (Chandra), infrared (Herschel, Spitzer), optical (Magellan - imaging and spectroscopy), and mm-wavelength (SPT) bands. These observations enable constraints on cluster stellar, baryonic, and total mass, in addition to a host of other information, including the star-formation rate, level of AGN activity, cluster dynamical state, and signatures of astrophysical feedback in the intra-cluster gas. We will describe the overall observing program, early results, and future directions.

  2. Formation of bcc and fcc during the coalescence of free and supported Fe and Ni clusters.

    PubMed

    Li, Guojian; Wang, Qiang; Sui, Xudong; Wang, Kai; Wu, Chun; He, Jicheng

    2015-09-01

    The formation of bcc and fcc during the coalescence of free and supported Fe and Ni clusters has been studied by molecular dynamics simulation using an embedded atom method. Structural evolution of the clusters, coalesced under varying temperature, Ni content and substrate conditions, was explored by interatomic energy, snapshots, pair distribution functions and bond order parameters. The results show that the formation of bcc and fcc is strongly related to Ni content, substrate and coalescence temperature. Free clusters coalesced at 1200 K form bcc at lower Ni contents with fcc forming at higher Ni concentrations and no observable coexistence of bcc and fcc. Differences in coalescence at 1000 K result from the coexistence of bcc and fcc within the Ni range of 50-70%. Free clusters supported on disordered Ni substrates were shown to transform from spherical morphology to islands of supported clusters with preferred epitaxial orientation. The Ni content required to form bcc and fcc coexistence on supported clusters at 1000 K decreased to 30-50% Ni. Free clusters possessing bcc and fcc generally stacked along the bcc (110) and fcc (111) facets, whereas supported clusters stacked along the (111) bcc and (100) fcc planes. Structural transformation was induced by clusters containing greater numbers of atoms. Spread over the substrate enhanced interatomic energy, order substrates affect the epitaxial growth direction and increase the melting points of the supported clusters. This study can be used to predict the nature of fcc and bcc formation in Fe-Ni films.

  3. Processes involved in the formation of silver clusters on silicon surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, S. R.; Chini, T. K.; Datta, D.; Hippler, R.; Shyjumon, I.; Smirnov, B. M.

    2008-12-01

    We analyze scanning electron microscopy measurements for structures formed in the deposition of solid silver clusters onto a silicon(100) substrate and consider theoretical models of cluster evolution onto a surface as a result of diffusion and formation of aggregates of merged clusters. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) data are presented in addition to energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX) measurements of the these films. Solid silver clusters are produced by a DC magnetron sputtering source with a quadrupole filter for selection of cluster sizes (4.1 and 5.6 nm or 1900 and 5000 atoms per cluster in this experiment); the energy of cluster deposition is 0.7 eV/atom. Rapid thermal annealing of the grown films allows analysis of their behavior at high temperatures. The results exhibit formation of cluster aggregates via the diffusion of deposited solid clusters along the surface; an aggregate consists of up to hundreds of individual clusters. This process is essentially described by the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) model, and thus a grown porous film consists of cluster aggregates joined by bridges. Subsequent annealing of this film leads to its melting at temperatures lower than to the melting point of bulk silver. Analysis of evaporation of this film at higher temperatures gives a binding energy in bulk silver of ɛ0= (2.74 ± 0.03) eV/atom.

  4. An H-alpha survey of cluster spirals - Comparison of star formation in clusters and the field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, C.; Whittle, M.

    1993-01-01

    In an objective prism survey of eight nearby Abell clusters, we have detected H-alpha emission from 77 out of a total of 201 CGCG spiral galaxies. We find that detection of H alpha emission is approximately independent of galaxy absolute magnitude, distance to the cluster center, and the presence of a bar. However, tidally distorted spirals are much more likely to be detected than undistorted spirals. Furthermore, there is a strong tendency for tidally distorted spirals to have compact nuclear emission rather than more extended disk-wide emission. When compared to field spirals, we find that late-type (Sc and Sc-Irr) cluster spirals have less H alpha emission, while early-type (Sa and Sab) cluster spirals can have significantly enhanced emission. The enhanced emission is most likely to be due to tidally induced star formation from galaxy-galaxy interactions.

  5. Behavior of Ac during Gd{sub 2}Cl{sub 3} condensed cluster formation

    SciTech Connect

    Mikheev, N.B.; Kamenskaya, A.N.; Rumer, I.A.

    1994-11-01

    The behavior of tracer {sup 228}Ac during Gd{sub 2}Cl{sub 3} condensed cluster formation is studied. The cluster is prepared by electrochemical reduction of GdCl{sub 3}. Actinium does not cocrystallize with the Gd{sub 2}Cl{sub 3} cluster. Its behavior is similar to that of La under analogous conditions. A number of hypotheses requiring further refinement is proposed to explain the results.

  6. First-principles simulations of hydrogen peroxide formation catalyzed by small neutral gold clusters.

    PubMed

    Kacprzak, Katarzyna A; Akola, Jaakko; Häkkinen, Hannu

    2009-08-14

    Energetics and dynamical pathways for hydrogen peroxide formation from H(2) and O(2) bound to neutral gold dimers and tetramers have been investigated by applying several strategies: T = 0 K geometry optimizations, constrained Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations at T = 300 K and metadynamics at T = 300 K. The competing reaction channels for water and hydrogen peroxide formation have been found and characterized. In each case, the reaction barriers for Au cluster catalyzed proton transfer are less than 1 eV. Water formation is a competitive reaction channel, and the relative weight of H(2)O and H(2)O(2) products may depend on the chosen Au cluster size. Dynamic simulations demonstrate the significance of the geometric fluxionality of small catalytic Au clusters. These results indicate that neutral Au clusters could work as catalysts in aerobic H(2)O(2) formation in ambient conditions. PMID:19809667

  7. Modeling Massive Cluster Formation with Stellar Feedback using Flash and AMUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Stephen; Wall, Joshua; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark

    2015-08-01

    Star cluster formation is a complex astrophysical problem combining multiple competing physical processes in a challenging computational environment, placing stringent demands on both software and hardware. Current simulations still fall short of a realistic description of the physical processes at work in star-forming regions. We are developing a hybrid simulation code to explore the formation and assembly of massive star clusters by combining the magnetohydrodynamics code Flash and the AMUSE software environment. Flash handles gas dynamics and star formation through cloud collapse, while AMUSE manages the dynamics and evolution of stars and binary systems. The gravitational interaction between the gas and the stars is treated via a symplectic gravity bridge between the codes in AMUSE. Radiative, wind, and supernova feedback are followed in FLASH based on information provided by the AMUSE system. We present some early results of this work, focusing on cluster formation and assembly, and including simplified models of feedback to study gas expulsion and cluster survival.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation of helium cluster diffusion and bubble formation in bulk tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Chun; Shu, Xiaolin; Tao, Peng; Yu, Yi; Niu, Guo-Jiang; Xu, Yuping; Gao, Fei; Luo, Guang-Nan

    2014-12-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed to investigate the diffusion behavior of helium (He) clusters in tungsten (W), because their diffusion properties provide basic knowledge in understanding the He bubble formation. The binding energy between He and He cluster is shown to be positive, and thus, He is easy to form bubbles by self-trapping. The mean squared displacements (MSDs) were employed to determine the diffusivities of He clusters with different sizes at different temperatures. The He bubble formation at different temperatures with 1% He was also investigated. It is revealed that the formation of He bubbles is strongly associated with the temperature and the diffusivities of the He clusters in W. The results demonstrate the initial stage of the He bubble formation and growth in W.

  9. Point Defect Cluster Formation in Iron Displacement Cascades Up to 50 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, R.E.

    1998-11-30

    The results of molecular dynamics displacement cascade simulations in iron at energies up to 50 keV and temperatures of 100, 600, and 900K are summarized, with a focus on the characterization of interstitial and vacancy clusters that are formed directly within the cascade. The fraction of the surviving point defects contained in clusters, and the size distributions of these in-cascade clusters have been determined. Although the formation of true vacancy clusters appears to be inhibited in iron, a significant degree of vacancy site correlation was observed. These well correlated arrangements of vacancies can be considered nascent clusters, and they have been observed to coalesce during longer term Monte Carlo simulations which permit short range vacancy diffusion. Extensive interstitial clustering was observed. The temperature and cascade energy dependence of the cluster size distributions are discussed in terms of their relevance to microstructural evolution and mechanical property changes in irradiated iron-based alloys.

  10. The regulation of star formation in cool-core clusters: imprints on the stellar populations of brightest cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loubser, S. I.; Babul, A.; Hoekstra, H.; Mahdavi, A.; Donahue, M.; Bildfell, C.; Voit, G. M.

    2016-02-01

    A fraction of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) show bright emission in the ultraviolet and the blue part of the optical spectrum, which has been interpreted as evidence of recent star formation. Most of these results are based on the analysis of broad-band photometric data. Here, we study the optical spectra of a sample of 19 BCGs hosted by X-ray luminous galaxy clusters at 0.15 Cluster Comparison Project sample. We identify plausible star formation histories of the galaxies by fitting simple stellar populations as well as composite populations, consisting of a young stellar component superimposed on an intermediate/old stellar component, to accurately constrain their star formation histories. We detect prominent young (˜200 Myr) stellar populations in four of the 19 galaxies. Of the four, the BCG in Abell 1835 shows remarkable A-type stellar features indicating a relatively large population of young stars, which is extremely unusual even amongst star-forming BCGs. We constrain the mass contribution of these young components to the total stellar mass to be typically between 1 and 3 per cent, but rising to 7 per cent in Abell 1835. We find that the four of the BCGs with strong evidence for recent star formation (and only these four galaxies) are found within a projected distance of 5 kpc of their host cluster's X-ray peak, and the diffuse, X-ray gas surrounding the BCGs exhibits a ratio of the radiative cooling-to-free-fall time (tc/tff) of ≤10. These are also some of the clusters with the lowest central entropy. Our results are consistent with the predictions of the precipitation-driven star formation and active galactic nucleus feedback model, in which the radiatively cooling diffuse gas is subject to local thermal instabilities once the instability parameter tc/tff falls below ˜10, leading to the condensation and precipitation of cold gas. The number of galaxies in our sample where the host cluster satisfies all the

  11. Unveiling hidden properties of young star clusters: differential reddening, star-formation spread, and binary fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonatto, C.; Lima, E. F.; Bica, E.

    2012-04-01

    Context. Usually, important parameters of young, low-mass star clusters are very difficult to obtain by means of photometry, especially when differential reddening and/or binaries occur in large amounts. Aims: We present a semi-analytical approach (ASAmin) that, when applied to the Hess diagram of a young star cluster, is able to retrieve the values of mass, age, star-formation spread, distance modulus, foreground and differential reddening, and binary fraction. Methods: The global optimisation method known as adaptive simulated annealing (ASA) is used to minimise the residuals between the observed and simulated Hess diagrams of a star cluster. The simulations are realistic and take the most relevant parameters of young clusters into account. Important features of the simulations are a normal (Gaussian) differential reddening distribution, a time-decreasing star-formation rate, the unresolved binaries, and the smearing effect produced by photometric uncertainties on Hess diagrams. Free parameters are cluster mass, age, distance modulus, star-formation spread, foreground and differential reddening, and binary fraction. Results: Tests with model clusters built with parameters spanning a broad range of values show that ASAmin retrieves the input values with a high precision for cluster mass, distance modulus, and foreground reddening, but they are somewhat lower for the remaining parameters. Given the statistical nature of the simulations, several runs should be performed to obtain significant convergence patterns. Specifically, we find that the retrieved (absolute minimum) parameters converge to mean values with a low dispersion as the Hess residuals decrease. When applied to actual young clusters, the retrieved parameters follow convergence patterns similar to the models. We show how the stochasticity associated with the early phases may affect the results, especially in low-mass clusters. This effect can be minimised by averaging out several twin clusters in the

  12. STAR FORMATION AND UV COLORS OF THE BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES IN THE REPRESENTATIVE XMM-NEWTON CLUSTER STRUCTURE SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, Megan; Bruch, Seth; Wang, Emily; Voit, G. Mark; Hicks, Amalia K.; Haarsma, Deborah B.; Croston, Judith H.; Pratt, Gabriel W.; O'Connell, Robert W.

    2010-06-01

    We present UV broadband photometry and optical emission-line measurements for a sample of 32 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in clusters of the Representative XMM-Newton Cluster Structure Survey (REXCESS) with z = 0.06-0.18. The REXCESS clusters, chosen to study scaling relations in clusters of galaxies, have X-ray measurements of high quality. The trends of star formation and BCG colors with BCG and host properties can be investigated with this sample. The UV photometry comes from the XMM-Newton Optical Monitor, supplemented by existing archival Galaxy Evolution Explorer photometry. We detected H{alpha} and forbidden line emission in seven (22%) of these BCGs, in optical spectra obtained using the Southern Astrophysical Research Goodman spectrograph. All of these emission-line BCGs occupy clusters classified as cool cores (CCs) based on the central cooling time in the cluster core, for an emission-line incidence rate of 70% for BCGs in REXCESS CC clusters. Significant correlations between the H{alpha} equivalent widths, excess UV production in the BCG, and the presence of dense, X-ray bright intracluster gas with a short cooling time are seen, including the fact that all of the H{alpha} emitters inhabit systems with short central cooling times and high central intracluster medium densities. Estimates of the star formation rates based on H{alpha} and UV excesses are consistent with each other in these seven systems, ranging from 0.1to8 solar masses per year. The incidence of emission-line BCGs in the REXCESS sample is intermediate, somewhat lower than in other X-ray-selected samples ({approx}35%), and somewhat higher than but statistically consistent with optically selected, slightly lower redshift BCG samples ({approx}10%-15%). The UV-optical colors (UVW1 - R {approx}4.7 {+-} 0.3) of REXCESS BCGs without strong optical emission lines are consistent with those predicted from templates and observations of ellipticals dominated by old stellar populations. We see no

  13. Fragmentation and Growth Energetics of Clusters Relevant to Atmospheric New Particle Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzdek, B. R.; DePalma, J. W.; Ridge, D. P.; Laskin, J.; Johnston, M. V.

    2013-12-01

    The exact mechanisms by which small clusters form and grow in the atmosphere are poorly understood, but this process may significantly impact cloud condensation nuclei number concentrations and global climate. Sulfuric acid is the key chemical component to new particle formation. However, basic species such as ammonia are also important. Few laboratory experiments address the kinetics or thermodynamics of acid and base incorporation into small clusters. This work utilizes a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer equipped with surface-induced dissociation (FTICR-SID) to investigate time- and collision energy-resolved fragmentation of positively charged ammonium bisulfate clusters. The assumption underlying the experiment is that cluster growth can be considered the reverse of cluster fragmentation. Critical energies for fragmentation are obtained from Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus/Quasi-Equilibrium Theory (RRKM/QET) modeling of the experimental data and are compared to quantum chemical calculations of the thermodynamics of cluster fragmentation. Fragmentation of ammonium bisulfate clusters occurs by two pathways: 1) a two-step pathway whereby the cluster sequentially loses ammonia followed by sulfuric acid and 2) a one-step pathway whereby the cluster loses an ammonium bisulfate molecule. Experimental critical energies for loss of an ammonia molecule and loss of an ammonium bisulfate molecule are higher than the thermodynamic values. If cluster growth is considered the reverse of cluster fragmentation, these results suggest that these clusters can grow by first adding sulfuric acid and then adding ammonia. Additionally, these results suggest the presence of an activation barrier to describe the incorporation of ammonia into small acidic clusters and therefore imply that kinetically (i.e. diffusion) limited growth should not be assumed. An important corollary is that models of atmospheric new particle formation should be revised to consider

  14. EXTENDED STAR FORMATION IN THE INTERMEDIATE-AGE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD STAR CLUSTER NGC 2209

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Stefan C.; Mackey, A. Dougal; Da Costa, Gary S.

    2012-12-10

    We present observations of the 1 Gyr old star cluster NGC 2209 in the Large Magellanic Cloud made with the GMOS imager on the Gemini South Telescope. These observations show that the cluster exhibits a main-sequence turnoff that spans a broader range in luminosity than can be explained by a single-aged stellar population. This places NGC 2209 amongst a growing list of intermediate-age (1-3 Gyr) clusters that show evidence for extended or multiple epochs of star formation of between 50 and 460 Myr in extent. The extended main-sequence turnoff observed in NGC 2209 is a confirmation of the prediction in Keller et al. made on the basis of the cluster's large core radius. We propose that secondary star formation is a defining feature of the evolution of massive star clusters. Dissolution of lower mass clusters through evaporation results in only clusters that have experienced secondary star formation surviving for a Hubble time, thus providing a natural connection between the extended main-sequence turnoff phenomenon and the ubiquitous light-element abundance ranges seen in the ancient Galactic globular clusters.

  15. Formation of globular clusters induced by external ultraviolet radiation II: Three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Makito; Umemura, Masayuki; Hasegawa, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    We explore the possibility of the formation of globular clusters under ultraviolet (UV) background radiation. One-dimensional spherical symmetric radiation hydrodynamics (RHD) simulations by Hasegawa et al. have demonstrated that the collapse of low-mass (106-7 M⊙) gas clouds exposed to intense UV radiation can lead to the formation of compact star clusters like globular clusters (GCs) if gas clouds contract with supersonic infall velocities. However, three-dimensional effects, such as the anisotropy of background radiation and the inhomogeneity in gas clouds, have not been studied so far. In this paper, we perform three-dimensional RHD simulations in a semi-cosmological context, and reconsider the formation of compact star clusters in strong UV radiation fields. As a result, we find that although anisotropic radiation fields bring an elongated shadow of neutral gas, almost spherical compact star clusters can be procreated from a "supersonic infall" cloud, since photo-dissociating radiation suppresses the formation of hydrogen molecules in the shadowed regions and the regions are compressed by UV heated ambient gas. The properties of resultant star clusters match those of GCs. On the other hand, in weak UV radiation fields, dark matter-dominated star clusters with low stellar density form due to the self-shielding effect as well as the positive feedback by ionizing photons. Thus, we conclude that the "supersonic infall" under a strong UV background is a potential mechanism to form GCs.

  16. STAR CLUSTER FORMATION WITH STELLAR FEEDBACK AND LARGE-SCALE INFLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Matzner, Christopher D.; Jumper, Peter H.

    2015-12-10

    During star cluster formation, ongoing mass accretion is resisted by stellar feedback in the form of protostellar outflows from the low-mass stars and photo-ionization and radiation pressure feedback from the massive stars. We model the evolution of cluster-forming regions during a phase in which both accretion and feedback are present and use these models to investigate how star cluster formation might terminate. Protostellar outflows are the strongest form of feedback in low-mass regions, but these cannot stop cluster formation if matter continues to flow in. In more massive clusters, radiation pressure and photo-ionization rapidly clear the cluster-forming gas when its column density is too small. We assess the rates of dynamical mass ejection and of evaporation, while accounting for the important effect of dust opacity on photo-ionization. Our models are consistent with the census of protostellar outflows in NGC 1333 and Serpens South and with the dust temperatures observed in regions of massive star formation. Comparing observations of massive cluster-forming regions against our model parameter space, and against our expectations for accretion-driven evolution, we infer that massive-star feedback is a likely cause of gas disruption in regions with velocity dispersions less than a few kilometers per second, but that more massive and more turbulent regions are too strongly bound for stellar feedback to be disruptive.

  17. Distinct Roles of Muscle and Motoneuron LRP4 in Neuromuscular Junction Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haitao; Lu, Yisheng; Shen, Chengyong; Patel, Neil; Gan, Lin; Xiong, Wen C.; Mei, Lin

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation requires precise interaction between motoneurons and muscle fibers. LRP4 is a receptor of agrin that is thought to act incis to stimulate MuSK in muscle fibers for postsynaptic differentiation. Here we dissected the roles of LRP4 in muscle fibers and motoneurons in NMJ formation by cell-specific mutation. Studies of muscle-specific mutants suggest that LRP4 is involved in deciding where to form AChR clusters in muscle fibers, postsynaptic differentiation, and axon terminal development. LRP4 in HEK293 cells increased synapsin or SV2 puncta in contacting axons of co-cultured neurons, suggesting a synaptogenic function. Analysis of LRP4 muscle and motoneuron double mutants and mechanistic studies suggest that NMJ formation may also be regulated by LRP4 in motoneurons, which could serve as agrin’s receptor in trans to induce AChR clusters. These observations uncovered distinct roles of LRP4 in motoneurons and muscles in NMJ development. PMID:22794264

  18. β-Catenin gain of function in muscles impairs neuromuscular junction formation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haitao; Lu, Yisheng; Barik, Arnab; Joseph, Anish; Taketo, Makoto Mark; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation requires proper interaction between motoneurons and muscle cells. β-Catenin is required in muscle cells for NMJ formation. To understand underlying mechanisms, we investigated the effect of β-catenin gain of function (GOF) on NMJ development. In HSA-β-catflox(ex3)/+ mice, which express stable β-catenin specifically in muscles, motor nerve terminals became extensively defasciculated and arborized. Ectopic muscles were observed in the diaphragm and were innervated by ectopic phrenic nerve branches. Moreover, extensive outgrowth and branching of spinal axons were evident in the GOF mice. These results indicate that increased β-catenin in muscles alters presynaptic differentiation. Postsynaptically, AChR clusters in HSA-β-catflox(ex3)/+ diaphragms were distributed in a wider region, suggesting that muscle β-catenin GOF disrupted the signal that restricts AChR clustering to the middle region of muscle fibers. Expression of stable β-catenin in motoneurons, however, had no effect on NMJ formation. These observations provide additional genetic evidence that pre- and postsynaptic development of the NMJ requires an intricate balance of β-catenin activity in muscles. PMID:22627288

  19. Distinct roles of muscle and motoneuron LRP4 in neuromuscular junction formation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haitao; Lu, Yisheng; Shen, Chengyong; Patel, Neil; Gan, Lin; Xiong, Wen C; Mei, Lin

    2012-07-12

    Neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation requires precise interaction between motoneurons and muscle fibers. LRP4 is a receptor of agrin that is thought to act in cis to stimulate MuSK in muscle fibers for postsynaptic differentiation. Here we dissected the roles of LRP4 in muscle fibers and motoneurons in NMJ formation by cell-specific mutation. Studies of muscle-specific mutants suggest that LRP4 is involved in deciding where to form AChR clusters in muscle fibers, postsynaptic differentiation, and axon terminal development. LRP4 in HEK293 cells increased synapsin or SV2 puncta in contacting axons of cocultured neurons, suggesting a synaptogenic function. Analysis of LRP4 muscle and motoneuron double mutants and mechanistic studies suggest that NMJ formation may also be regulated by LRP4 in motoneurons, which could serve as agrin's receptor in trans to induce AChR clusters. These observations uncovered distinct roles of LRP4 in motoneurons and muscles in NMJ development. PMID:22794264

  20. β-Catenin gain of function in muscles impairs neuromuscular junction formation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haitao; Lu, Yisheng; Barik, Arnab; Joseph, Anish; Taketo, Makoto Mark; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2012-07-01

    Neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation requires proper interaction between motoneurons and muscle cells. β-Catenin is required in muscle cells for NMJ formation. To understand underlying mechanisms, we investigated the effect of β-catenin gain of function (GOF) on NMJ development. In HSA-β-cat(flox(ex3)/+) mice, which express stable β-catenin specifically in muscles, motor nerve terminals became extensively defasciculated and arborized. Ectopic muscles were observed in the diaphragm and were innervated by ectopic phrenic nerve branches. Moreover, extensive outgrowth and branching of spinal axons were evident in the GOF mice. These results indicate that increased β-catenin in muscles alters presynaptic differentiation. Postsynaptically, AChR clusters in HSA-β-cat(flox(ex3)/+) diaphragms were distributed in a wider region, suggesting that muscle β-catenin GOF disrupted the signal that restricts AChR clustering to the middle region of muscle fibers. Expression of stable β-catenin in motoneurons, however, had no effect on NMJ formation. These observations provide additional genetic evidence that pre- and postsynaptic development of the NMJ requires an intricate balance of β-catenin activity in muscles.

  1. Comparison of defect cluster accumulation and pattern formation in irradiated copper and nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Snead, L.L.; Edwards, D.J.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this study is to compare the contrasting behavior of defect cluster formation in neutron-irradiated copper and nickel specimens. Transmission electron microscopy was used to examine the density and spatial distribution of defect clusters produced in copper and nickel as the result of fission neutron irradiation to damage levels of 0.01 to 0.25 displacements per atom (dpa) at irradiation temperature between 50 and 230{degrees}C. A comparison with published results in the literature indicates that defect cluster wall formation occurs in nickel irradiated at 0.2 to 0.4 T{sub M} in a wide variety of irradiation spectra. Defect cluster wall formation apparently only occurs in copper during low temperature irradiation with electrons and light ions. These results are discussed in terms of the thermal spike model for energetic displacement cascades.

  2. Formation of new stellar populations from gas accreted by massive young star clusters.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengyuan; de Grijs, Richard; Deng, Licai; Geller, Aaron M; Xin, Yu; Hu, Yi; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André

    2016-01-28

    Stars in clusters are thought to form in a single burst from a common progenitor cloud of molecular gas. However, massive, old 'globular' clusters--those with ages greater than ten billion years and masses several hundred thousand times that of the Sun--often harbour multiple stellar populations, indicating that more than one star-forming event occurred during their lifetimes. Colliding stellar winds from late-stage, asymptotic-giant-branch stars are often suggested to be triggers of second-generation star formation. For this to occur, the initial cluster masses need to be greater than a few million solar masses. Here we report observations of three massive relatively young star clusters (1-2 billion years old) in the Magellanic Clouds that show clear evidence of burst-like star formation that occurred a few hundred million years after their initial formation era. We show that such clusters could have accreted sufficient gas to form new stars if they had orbited in their host galaxies' gaseous disks throughout the period between their initial formation and the more recent bursts of star formation. This process may eventually give rise to the ubiquitous multiple stellar populations in globular clusters. PMID:26819043

  3. Formation of new stellar populations from gas accreted by massive young star clusters.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengyuan; de Grijs, Richard; Deng, Licai; Geller, Aaron M; Xin, Yu; Hu, Yi; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André

    2016-01-28

    Stars in clusters are thought to form in a single burst from a common progenitor cloud of molecular gas. However, massive, old 'globular' clusters--those with ages greater than ten billion years and masses several hundred thousand times that of the Sun--often harbour multiple stellar populations, indicating that more than one star-forming event occurred during their lifetimes. Colliding stellar winds from late-stage, asymptotic-giant-branch stars are often suggested to be triggers of second-generation star formation. For this to occur, the initial cluster masses need to be greater than a few million solar masses. Here we report observations of three massive relatively young star clusters (1-2 billion years old) in the Magellanic Clouds that show clear evidence of burst-like star formation that occurred a few hundred million years after their initial formation era. We show that such clusters could have accreted sufficient gas to form new stars if they had orbited in their host galaxies' gaseous disks throughout the period between their initial formation and the more recent bursts of star formation. This process may eventually give rise to the ubiquitous multiple stellar populations in globular clusters.

  4. Dynein disruption perturbs post-synaptic components and contributes to impaired MuSK clustering at the NMJ: implication in ALS

    PubMed Central

    Vilmont, Valérie; Cadot, Bruno; Vezin, Elsa; Le Grand, Fabien; Gomes, Edgar R.

    2016-01-01

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) allows the transformation of a neuronal message into a mechanical force by muscle contraction and is the target of several neuromuscular disorders. While the neuronal side is under extensive research, the muscle appeared recently to have a growing role in the formation and integrity of the neuromuscular junction. We used an in vitro model of mature myofibers to study the role of dynein on major postsynaptic proteins. We found that dynein affects the expression and the clustering of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs), muscle specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) and Rapsyn. We also show that myofibers with dynein impairment or from an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) model (SOD1G93A) show similar defects in myofiber formation and agrin-induced AChR clustering suggesting a role for dynein impairment in ALS progression. Finally, we found that dynein can affect MuSK traffic through the endosomal pathway. Collectively, our studies show that defects in dynein can lead to impairment of muscle NMJ components’ expression and clustering. We propose that NMJ defects could happen via defective MuSK traffic and that this could be one of the pathological features involved in neurodegeneration such as ALS. PMID:27283349

  5. The rise and fall of star formation in z ˜ 0.2 merging galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroe, Andra; Sobral, David; Dawson, William; Jee, M. James; Hoekstra, Henk; Wittman, David; van Weeren, Reinout J.; Brüggen, Marcus; Röttgering, Huub J. A.

    2015-06-01

    CIZA J2242.8+5301 (`Sausage') and 1RXS J0603.3+4213 (`Toothbrush') are two low-redshift (z ˜ 0.2), massive (˜2 × 1015 M⊙), post-core passage merging clusters, which host-shock waves traced by diffuse radio emission. To study their star formation properties, we uniformly survey the `Sausage' and `Toothbrush' clusters in broad- and narrow-band filters and select a sample of 201 and 463 line emitters, down to a rest-frame equivalent width (13 Å). We robustly separate between Hα and higher redshift emitters using a combination of optical multiband (B, g, V, r, i, z) and spectroscopic data. We build Hα luminosity functions for the entire cluster region, near the shock fronts, and away from the shock fronts and find striking differences between the two clusters. In the dynamically younger, 1 Gyr old `Sausage' cluster we find numerous (59) Hα emitters above a star formation rate (SFR) of 0.17 M⊙ yr-1 surprisingly located in close proximity to the shock fronts, embedded in very hot intracluster medium plasma. The SFR density for the cluster population is at least at the level of typical galaxies at z ˜ 2. Down to the same SFR, the possibly dynamically more evolved `Toothbrush' cluster has only nine Hα galaxies. The cluster Hα galaxies fall on the SFR-stellar mass relation z ˜ 0.2 for the field. However, the `Sausage' cluster has an Hα emitter density >20 times that of blank fields. If the shock passes through gas-rich cluster galaxies, the compressed gas could collapse into dense clouds and excite star formation for a few 100 Myr. This process ultimately leads to a rapid consumption of the molecular gas, accelerating the transformation of gas-rich field spirals into cluster S0s or ellipticals.

  6. The formation of magnetic silicide Fe3Si clusters during ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakirev, N.; Zhikharev, V.; Gumarov, G.

    2014-05-01

    A simple two-dimensional model of the formation of magnetic silicide Fe3Si clusters during high-dose Fe ion implantation into silicon has been proposed and the cluster growth process has been computer simulated. The model takes into account the interaction between the cluster magnetization and magnetic moments of Fe atoms random walking in the implanted layer. If the clusters are formed in the presence of the external magnetic field parallel to the implanted layer, the model predicts the elongation of the growing cluster in the field direction. It has been proposed that the cluster elongation results in the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy in the plane of the implanted layer, which is observed in iron silicide films ion-beam synthesized in the external magnetic field.

  7. Displacement damage rate dependence of defect cluster formation in α-Fe during irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Y.; Morishita, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Hamaguchi, D.; Tanigawa, H.

    2013-05-01

    Formation kinetics of defect clusters in pure iron during irradiation has been numerically investigated by reaction rate theory, with focusing on nucleation process of vacancy clusters (voids) and self-interstitial-atoms (SIA) clusters under a wide range of atomic displacement damage rate (dpa rate) and temperature conditions. In the rate theory model, the size dependence of thermal stability of a defect cluster is treated for a wide range of cluster size. The numerical analysis shows that the nucleation processes of voids and SIA-clusters are quite different from each other. As to the voids, the nucleation rate of voids depends much on temperature and dpa rate, and has the individual peak temperature for each dpa rate, during which the peak temperature increases with increasing dpa rate. This tendency for void nucleation is similar to that for void swelling observed in experiments. As to the SIA-clusters, the nucleation rate of SIA-clusters does not depend much on temperature and has no peak temperatures because of the relatively high thermal stability of an SIA-cluster, indicating that the conventional model (di-interstitial model) is applicable to describe the nucleation of SIA-clusters in a wide range of temperature.

  8. Formation of a protocluster: A virialized structure from gravoturbulent collapse. I. Simulation of cluster formation in a collapsing molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yueh-Ning; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Context. Stars are often observed to form in clusters and it is therefore important to understand how such a region of concentrated mass is assembled out of the diffuse medium. The properties of such a region eventually prescribe the important physical mechanisms and determine the characteristics of the stellar cluster. Aims: We study the formation of a gaseous protocluster inside a molecular cloud and associate its internal properties with those of the parent cloud by varying the level of the initial turbulence of the cloud with a view to better characterize the subsequent stellar cluster formation. Methods: We performed high resolution magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of gaseous protoclusters forming in molecular clouds collapsing under self-gravity. We determined ellipsoidal cluster regions via gas kinematics and sink particle distribution, permitting us to determine the mass, size, and aspect ratio of the cluster. We studied the cluster properties, such as kinetic and gravitational energy, and made links to the parent cloud. Results: The gaseous protocluster is formed out of global collapse of a molecular cloud and has non-negligible rotation owing to angular momentum conservation during the collapse of the object. Most of the star formation occurs in this region, which occupies only a small volume fraction of the whole cloud. This dense entity is a result of the interplay between turbulence and gravity. We identify such regions in simulations and compare the gas and sink particles to observed star-forming clumps and embedded clusters, respectively. The gaseous protocluster inferred from simulation results presents a mass-size relation that is compatible with observations. We stress that the stellar cluster radius, although clearly correlated with the gas cluster radius, depends sensitively on its definition. Energy analysis is performed to confirm that the gaseous protocluster is a product of gravoturbulent reprocessing and that the support of turbulent

  9. Thick disk and pseudobulge formation in a clump cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, S.

    2012-02-01

    Bulges in spiral galaxies have been supposed to be classified into two types: classical bulges or pseudobulges. Classical bulges are thought to form by galactic merger with bursty star formation, whereas pseudobulges are suggested to form by secular evolution. Noguchi (1998,199) suggested another bulge formation scenario, `clump-origin bulge' [1,2]. He demonstrated using a numerical simulation that a galactic disc suffers dynamical instability to form clumpy structures in the early stage of disc formation, then the clumps are sucked into the galactic centre by dynamical friction and merge into a single bulge at the centre. Therefore, clump-origin bulges may have their own unique properties. I perform a high-resolution N-body/SPH simulation for the formation of the clump-origin bulge in an isolated galaxy model and study the formation of the clump-origin bulge. I find that the clump-origin bulge resembles pseudobulges in dynamical properties, a nearly exponential surface density profile, a barred boxy shape and a significant rotation. I also find that this bulge consists of old and metal-rich stars. These natures, old metal-rich population but pseudobulge-like structures, mean that the clump-origin bulge can not be simply classified into classical bulges nor pseudobulges. From these results, I discuss similarities of the clump-origin bulge to the Milky Way (MW) bulge.

  10. Experimental studies of complex crater formation under cluster implantation of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasalovich, S.; Popok, V.; Persson, P.; Campbell, E. E. B.

    2005-10-01

    The results of a systematic study of surface defect formation after energetic Arn+ (n = 12, 22, 32, 54) and Xen+ (n = 4, 16) cluster ion implantation into silicon and sapphire are presented. Implantation energies vary from 3 to 18 keV/ion. Two cases of comparative studies are carried out: the same cluster species are implanted into two different substrates, i.e. Arn+ cluster ions into silicon and sapphire and two different cluster species Arn+ and Xen+ are implanted into the same kind of substrate (silicon). Atomic force, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopies (AFM, SEM and TEM) are used to study the implanted samples. The analysis reveals the formation of two types of surface erosion defects: simple and complex (with centrally positioned hillock) craters. It is found that the ratio of simple to complex crater formation as well as the hillock dimensions depend strongly on the cluster species, size and impact energy as well as on the type of substrate material. Qualitative models describing the two comparative cases of cluster implantation, the case of different cluster species and the case of different substrate materials, are proposed.

  11. Fibroblast cluster formation on 3D collagen matrices requires cell contraction dependent fibronectin matrix organization.

    PubMed

    da Rocha-Azevedo, Bruno; Ho, Chin-Han; Grinnell, Frederick

    2013-02-15

    Fibroblasts incubated on 3D collagen matrices in serum or lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-containing medium self-organize into clusters through a mechanism that requires cell contraction. However, in platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-containing medium, cells migrate as individuals and do not form clusters even though they constantly encounter each other. Here, we present evidence that a required function of cell contraction in clustering is formation of fibronectin (FN) fibrillar matrix. We found that in serum or LPA but not in PDGF or basal medium, cells organized FN (both serum and cellular) into a fibrillar, detergent-insoluble matrix. Cell clusters developed concomitant with FN matrix formation. FN fibrils accumulated beneath cells and along the borders of cell clusters in regions of cell-matrix tension. Blocking Rho kinase or myosin II activity prevented FN matrix assembly and cell clustering. Using siRNA silencing and function-blocking antibodies and peptides, we found that cell clustering and FN matrix assembly required α5β1 integrins and fibronectin. Cells were still able to exert contractile force and compact the collagen matrix under the latter conditions, which showed that contraction was not sufficient for cell clustering to occur. Our findings provide new insights into how procontractile (serum/LPA) and promigratory (PDGF) growth factor environments can differentially regulate FN matrix assembly by fibroblasts interacting with collagen matrices and thereby influence mesenchymal cell morphogenetic behavior under physiologic circumstances such as wound repair, morphogenesis and malignancy. PMID:23117111

  12. Flux dependence of cluster formation in neutron-irradiated weld material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergner, F.; Ulbricht, A.; Hein, H.; Kammel, M.

    2008-03-01

    The effect of neutron flux on the formation of irradiation-induced clusters in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is an unresolved issue. Small-angle neutron scattering was measured for a neutron-irradiated RPV weld material containing 0.22 wt% impurity Cu. The experiment was focused on the influence of neutron flux on the formation of irradiation-induced clusters at fixed fluence. The aim was to separate and tentatively interpret the effect of flux on the characteristics of the cluster size distribution. We have observed a pronounced effect of neutron flux on cluster size, whereas the total volume fraction of irradiation-induced clusters is insensitive to the level of flux. The result is compatible with a rate theory model according to which the range of applied fluxes covers the transition from a flux-independent regime at lower fluxes to a regime of decelerating cluster growth. The results are confronted with measured irradiation-induced changes of mechanical properties. Despite the observed flux effect on cluster size, both yield stress increase and transition temperature shift turned out to be independent of flux. This is in agreement with the volume fraction of irradiation-induced clusters being insensitive to the level of flux.

  13. Formation rates, stability and reactivity of sulfuric acid - amine clusters predicted by computational chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtén, Theo; Ortega, Ismael; Kupiainen, Oona; Olenius, Tinja; Loukonen, Ville; Reiman, Heidi; McGrath, Matthew; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2013-04-01

    Despite the importance of atmospheric particle formation for both climate and air quality, both experiments and non-empirical models using e.g. sulfuric acid, ammonia and water as condensing vapors have so far been unable to reproduce atmospheric observations using realistic trace gas concentrations. Recent experimental and theoretical evidence has shown that this mystery is likely resolved by amines. Combining first-principles evaporation rates for sulfuric acid - dimethylamine clusters with cluster kinetic modeling, we show that even sub-ppt concentrations of amines, together with atmospherically realistic concentrations of sulfuric acid, result in formation rates close to those observed in the atmosphere. Our simulated cluster formation rates are also close to, though somewhat larger than, those measured at the CLOUD experiment in CERN for both sulfuric acid - ammonia and sulfuric acid - dimethylamine systems. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the remaining discrepancy for the sulfuric acid - amine particle formation rates is likely caused by steric hindrances to cluster formation (due to alkyl groups of the amine molecules) rather than by significant errors in the evaporation rates. First-principles molecular dynamic and reaction kinetic modeling shed further light on the microscopic physics and chemistry of sulfuric acid - amine clusters. For example, while the number and type of hydrogen bonds in the clusters typically reach their equilibrium values on a picosecond timescale, and the overall bonding patterns predicted by traditional "static" quantum chemical calculations seem to be stable, the individual atoms participating in the hydrogen bonds continuously change at atmospherically realistic temperatures. From a chemical reactivity perspective, we have also discovered a surprising phenomenon: clustering with sulfuric acid molecules slightly increases the activation energy required for the abstraction of alkyl hydrogens from amine molecules. This implies

  14. On the composition of ammonia-sulfuric-acid ion clusters during aerosol particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schobesberger, S.; Franchin, A.; Bianchi, F.; Rondo, L.; Duplissy, J.; Kürten, A.; Ortega, I. K.; Metzger, A.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Almeida, J.; Amorim, A.; Dommen, J.; Dunne, E. M.; Ehn, M.; Gagné, S.; Ickes, L.; Junninen, H.; Hansel, A.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kirkby, J.; Kupc, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtipalo, K.; Mathot, S.; Onnela, A.; Petäjä, T.; Riccobono, F.; Santos, F. D.; Sipilä, M.; Tomé, A.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Viisanen, Y.; Wagner, P. E.; Wimmer, D.; Curtius, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Baltensperger, U.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of particles from precursor vapors is an important source of atmospheric aerosol. Research at the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) facility at CERN tries to elucidate which vapors are responsible for this new-particle formation, and how in detail it proceeds. Initial measurement campaigns at the CLOUD stainless-steel aerosol chamber focused on investigating particle formation from ammonia (NH3) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4). Experiments were conducted in the presence of water, ozone and sulfur dioxide. Contaminant trace gases were suppressed at the technological limit. For this study, we mapped out the compositions of small NH3-H2SO4 clusters over a wide range of atmospherically relevant environmental conditions. We covered [NH3] in the range from < 2 to 1400 pptv, [H2SO4] from 3.3 × 106 to 1.4 × 109 cm-3 (0.1 to 56 pptv), and a temperature range from -25 to +20 °C. Negatively and positively charged clusters were directly measured by an atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometer, as they initially formed from gas-phase NH3 and H2SO4, and then grew to larger clusters containing more than 50 molecules of NH3 and H2SO4, corresponding to mobility-equivalent diameters greater than 2 nm. Water molecules evaporate from these clusters during sampling and are not observed. We found that the composition of the NH3-H2SO4 clusters is primarily determined by the ratio of gas-phase concentrations [NH3] / [H2SO4], as well as by temperature. Pure binary H2O-H2SO4 clusters (observed as clusters of only H2SO4) only form at [NH3] / [H2SO4] < 0.1 to 1. For larger values of [NH3] / [H2SO4], the composition of NH3-H2SO4 clusters was characterized by the number of NH3 molecules m added for each added H2SO4 molecule n (Δm/Δ n), where n is in the range 4-18 (negatively charged clusters) or 1-17 (positively charged clusters). For negatively charged clusters, Δ m/Δn saturated between 1 and 1.4 for [NH3] / [H2SO4] > 10. Positively

  15. On the composition of ammonia-sulfuric acid clusters during aerosol particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schobesberger, S.; Franchin, A.; Bianchi, F.; Rondo, L.; Duplissy, J.; Kürten, A.; Ortega, I. K.; Metzger, A.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Almeida, J.; Amorim, A.; Dommen, J.; Dunne, E. M.; Ehn, M.; Gagné, S.; Ickes, L.; Junninen, H.; Hansel, A.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kirkby, J.; Kupc, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtipalo, K.; Mathot, S.; Onnela, A.; Petäjä, T.; Riccobono, F.; Santos, F. D.; Sipilä, M.; Tomé, A.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Viisanen, Y.; Wagner, P. E.; Wimmer, D.; Curtius, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Baltensperger, U.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2014-05-01

    The formation of particles from precursor vapors is an important source of atmospheric aerosol. Research at the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) facility at CERN tries to elucidate which vapors are responsible for this new particle formation, and how in detail it proceeds. Initial measurement campaigns at the CLOUD stainless-steel aerosol chamber focused on investigating particle formation from ammonia (NH3) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4). Experiments were conducted in the presence of water, ozone and sulfur dioxide. Contaminant trace gases were suppressed at the technological limit. For this study, we mapped out the compositions of small NH3-H2SO4 clusters over a wide range of atmospherically relevant environmental conditions. We covered [NH3] in the range from <2 to 1400 pptv, [H2SO4] from 3.3 × 106 to 1.4 × 109 cm-3, and a temperature range from -25 to +20 °C. Negatively and positively charged clusters were directly measured by an atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometer, as they initially formed from gas-phase NH3 and H2SO4, and then grew to larger clusters containing more than 50 molecules of NH3 and H2SO4, corresponding to mobility-equivalent diameters greater than 2 nm. Water molecules evaporate from these clusters during sampling and are not observed. We found that the composition of the NH3-H2SO4 clusters is primarily determined by the ratio of gas-phase concentrations [NH3] / [H2SO4], as well as by temperature. Pure binary H2O-H2SO4 clusters (observed as clusters of only H2SO4) only form at [NH3] / [H2SO4]<0.1 to 1. For larger values of [NH3] / [H2SO4], the composition of NH3-H2SO4 clusters was characterized by the number of NH3 molecules m added for each added H2SO4 molecule n (Δm / Δn), where n is in the range 4-18 (negatively charged clusters) or 1-17 (positively charged clusters). For negatively charged clusters, Δm / Δn saturated between 1 and 1.4 for [NH3] / [H2SO4]>10. Positively charged clusters grew on

  16. A parsec-resolution simulation of the Antennae galaxies: formation of star clusters during the merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaud, Florent; Bournaud, Frédéric; Duc, Pierre-Alain

    2015-01-01

    We present a hydrodynamical simulation of an Antennae-like galaxy merger at parsec resolution, including a multicomponent model for stellar feedback and reaching numerical convergence in the global star formation rate for the first time. We analyse the properties of the dense stellar objects formed during the different stages of the interaction. Each galactic encounter triggers a starburst activity, but the varying physical conditions change the triggering mechanism of each starburst. During the first two pericentre passages, the starburst is spatially extended and forms many star clusters. However, the starburst associated with the third, final passage is more centrally concentrated: stars form almost exclusively in the galactic nucleus and no new star cluster is formed. The maximum mass of stars clusters in this merger is more than 30 times higher than those in a simulation of an isolated Milky Way-like galaxy. Antennae-like mergers are therefore a formation channel of young massive clusters possibly leading to globular clusters. Monitoring the evolution of a few clusters reveals the diversity of formation scenarios including the gathering and merger of gas clumps, the monolithic formation and the hierarchical formation in sub-structures inside a single cloud. Two stellar objects formed in the simulation yield the same properties as ultracompact dwarf galaxies. They share the same formation scenario than the most massive clusters, but have a larger radius either since birth, or get it after a violent interaction with the galactic centre. The diversity of environments across space and time in a galaxy merger can account for the diversity of the stellar objects formed, both in terms of mass and size.

  17. The Formation of Cosmic Fullerenes from Arophatic Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micelotta, Elisabetta R.; Jones, Anthony P.; Cami, Jan; Peeters, Els; Bernard-Salas, Jeronimo; Fanchini, Giovanni

    2012-12-01

    Fullerenes have recently been identified in space and they may play a significant role in the gas and dust budget of various astrophysical objects including planetary nebulae (PNe), reflection nebulae, and H II regions. The tenuous nature of the gas in these environments precludes the formation of fullerene materials following known vaporization or combustion synthesis routes even on astronomical timescales. We have studied the processing of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H or HAC) nanoparticles and their specific derivative structures, which we name "arophatics," in the circumstellar environments of young, carbon-rich PNe. We find that UV-irradiation of such particles can result in the formation of fullerenes, consistent with the known physical conditions in PNe and with available timescales.

  18. THE FORMATION OF COSMIC FULLERENES FROM AROPHATIC CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Micelotta, Elisabetta R.; Cami, Jan; Peeters, Els; Fanchini, Giovanni; Jones, Anthony P.; Bernard-Salas, Jeronimo

    2012-12-10

    Fullerenes have recently been identified in space and they may play a significant role in the gas and dust budget of various astrophysical objects including planetary nebulae (PNe), reflection nebulae, and H II regions. The tenuous nature of the gas in these environments precludes the formation of fullerene materials following known vaporization or combustion synthesis routes even on astronomical timescales. We have studied the processing of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H or HAC) nanoparticles and their specific derivative structures, which we name ''arophatics'', in the circumstellar environments of young, carbon-rich PNe. We find that UV-irradiation of such particles can result in the formation of fullerenes, consistent with the known physical conditions in PNe and with available timescales.

  19. Star Formation Activity in a Young Galaxy Cluster at Z = 0.866

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laganá, T. F.; Ulmer, M. P.; Martins, L. P.; da Cunha, E.

    2016-07-01

    The galaxy cluster RX J1257+4738 at z = 0.866 is one of the highest redshift clusters with a richness of multi-wavelength data, and is thus a good target to study the star formation-density relation at early epochs. Using a sample of spectroscopically confirmed cluster members, we derive the star-formation rates (SFRs) of our galaxies using two methods: (1) the relation between SFR and total infrared luminosity extrapolated from the observed Spitzer Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer 24 μm imaging data; and (2) spectral energy distribution fitting using the MAGPHYS code, including eight different bands. We show that, for this cluster, the SFR-density relation is very weak and seems to be dominated by the two central galaxies and the SFR presents a mild dependence on stellar mass, with more massive galaxies having higher SFR. However, the specific SFR (SSFR) decreases with stellar mass, meaning that more massive galaxies are forming fewer stars per unit of mass, and thus suggesting that the increase in star-forming members is driven by cluster assembly and infall. If the environment is somehow driving the star formation, one would expect a relation between the SSFR and the cluster centric distance, but that is not the case. A possible scenario to explain this lack of correlation is the contamination by infalling galaxies in the inner part of the cluster, which may be on their initial pass through the cluster center. As these galaxies have higher SFRs for their stellar mass, they enhance the mean SSFR in the center of the cluster.

  20. Silk matrices promote formation of insulin-secreting islet-like clusters.

    PubMed

    Shalaly, Nancy Dekki; Ria, Massimiliano; Johansson, Ulrika; Åvall, Karin; Berggren, Per-Olof; Hedhammar, My

    2016-06-01

    Ex vivo expansion of endocrine cells constitutes an interesting alternative to be able to match the unmet need of transplantable pancreatic islets. However, endocrine cells become fragile once removed from their extracellular matrix (ECM) and typically become senescent and loose insulin expression during conventional 2D culture. Herein we develop a protocol where 3D silk matrices functionalized with ECM-derived motifs are used for generation of insulin-secreting islet-like clusters from mouse and human primary cells. The obtained clusters were shown to attain an islet-like spheroid shape and to maintain functional insulin release upon glucose stimulation in vitro. Furthermore, in vivo imaging of transplanted murine clusters showed engraftment with increasing vessel formation during time. There was no sign of cell death and the clusters maintained or increased in size throughout the period, thus suggesting a suitable cluster size for transplantation. PMID:26986856

  1. Star formation trends in the unrelaxed, post-merger cluster A2255

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, K. D.; Rieke, G. H.; Bai, L.

    2014-10-10

    The effects of dense environments on normal field galaxies are still up for debate despite much study since Abell published his catalog of nearby clusters in 1958. There are changes in color, morphology, and star formation properties when galaxies fall into groups and clusters, but the specifics of how and where these modifications occur are not fully understood. To look for answers, we focused on star-forming galaxies in A2255, an unrelaxed cluster thought to have recently experienced a merger with another cluster or large group. We used Hα, MIPS 24 μm, and WISE 22 μm to estimate total star formation rates (SFRs) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometry to find stellar masses (M {sub *}) for galaxies out to ∼5 r {sub 200}. We compared the star-forming cluster galaxies with the field SFR-mass distribution and found no enhancement or suppression of star formation in currently star-forming galaxies of high mass (log (M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) ≳ 10). This conclusion holds out to very large distances from the cluster center. However, the core (r {sub proj} < 3 Mpc) has a much lower fraction of star-forming galaxies than anywhere else in the cluster. These results indicate that for the mass range studied here, the majority of the star formation suppression occurs in the core on relatively short timescales, without any enhancement prior to entering the central region. If any significant enhancement or quenching of star formation occurs, it will be in galaxies of lower mass (log (M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) < 10).

  2. The rarity of star formation in brightest cluster galaxies as measured by WISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser-McKelvie, Amelia; Brown, Michael J. I.; Pimbblet, Kevin A.

    2014-10-01

    We present the mid-infrared star formation rates of 245 X-ray selected, nearby (z < 0.1) brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). A homogeneous and volume limited sample of BCGs was created by X-ray selecting clusters with Lx > 1 × 1044 erg s- 1. The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) All WISE Data Release provides the first measurement of the 12 μm star formation indicator for all BCGs in the nearby Universe. Perseus A and Cygnus A are the only galaxies in our sample to have star formation rates of > 40 M⊙ yr- 1, indicating that these two galaxies are highly unusual at current times. Stellar populations of 99 ± 0.6 per cent of local BCGs are (approximately) passively evolving, with star formation rates of < 10 M⊙ yr- 1. We find that in general, star formation produces only modest BCG growth at the current epoch.

  3. Star formation in globular clusters and dwarf galaxies and implications for the early evolution of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Douglas N. C.; Murray, Stephen D.

    1991-01-01

    Based upon the observed properties of globular clusters and dwarf galaxies in the Local Group, we present important theoretical constraints on star formation in these systems. These constraints indicate that protoglobular cluster clouds had long dormant periods and a brief epoch of violent star formation. Collisions between protocluster clouds triggered fragmentation into individual stars. Most protocluster clouds dispersed into the Galactic halo during the star formation epoch. In contrast, the large spread in stellar metallicity in dwarf galaxies suggests that star formation in their pregenitors was self-regulated: we propose the protocluster clouds formed from thermal instability in the protogalactic clouds and show that a population of massive stars is needed to provide sufficient UV flux to prevent the collapsing protogalactic clouds from fragmenting into individual stars. Based upon these constraints, we propose a unified scenario to describe the early epochs of star formation in the Galactic halo as well as the thick and thin components of the Galactic disk.

  4. Analysis of radiation-induced small Cu particle cluster formation in aqueous CuCl2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jayanetti, Sumedha; Mayanovic, Robert A.; Anderson, Alan J.; Bassett, William A.; Chou, I.-Ming

    2001-01-01

    Radition-induced small Cu particle cluster formation in aqueous CuCl2 was analyzed. It was noticed that nearest neighbor distance increased with the increase in the time of irradiation. This showed that the clusters approached the lattice dimension of bulk copper. As the average cluster size approached its bulk dimensions, an increase in the nearest neighbor coordination number was found with the decrease in the surface to volume ratio. Radiolysis of water by incident x-ray beam led to the reduction of copper ions in the solution to themetallic state.

  5. GLOBULAR CLUSTER FORMATION EFFICIENCIES FROM BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARY FEEDBACK

    SciTech Connect

    Justham, Stephen; Peng, Eric W.; Schawinski, Kevin

    2015-08-10

    We investigate a scenario in which feedback from black hole X-ray binaries (BHXBs) sometimes begins inside young star clusters before strong supernova (SN) feedback. Those BHXBs could reduce the gas fraction inside embedded young clusters while maintaining virial equilibrium, which may help globular clusters (GCs) to stay bound when SN-driven gas ejection subsequently occurs. Adopting a simple toy model with parameters guided by BHXB population models, we produce GC formation efficiencies consistent with empirically inferred values. The metallicity dependence of BHXB formation could naturally explain why GC formation efficiency is higher at lower metallicity. For reasonable assumptions about that metallicity dependence, our toy model can produce a GC metallicity bimodality in some galaxies without a bimodality in the field-star metallicity distribution.

  6. FORMATION OF COMPACT STELLAR CLUSTERS BY HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXY OUTFLOWS. III. OBSERVABILITY AND CONNECTION TO HALO GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, William J.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2011-12-01

    The early universe hosted a large population of low-mass virialized 'minihalos', that were not massive enough to form stars on their own. While most minihalos were photoevaporated by ionizing photons from star-forming galaxies, these galaxies also drove large outflows, which in some cases would have reached the minihalos in advance of ionization fronts. In the previous papers in this series, we carried out high-resolution, three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement simulations of outflow-minihalo interactions that included non-equilibrium chemistry, radiative cooling, and turbulent mixing. We found that, for a fiducial set of parameters, minihalos were transformed into dense, chemically homogenous stellar clusters. Here we conduct a suite of simulations that follow these interactions over a wide range of parameters including minihalo mass, minihalo formation redshift, outflow energy, outflow redshift, distance, concentration, and spin. In almost all cases, the shocked minihalos form molecules through non-equilibrium reactions and then cool rapidly to become compact, chemically homogenous stellar clusters. Furthermore, we show that the unique properties of these clusters make them a prime target for direct study with the next generation of telescopes, and that there are many reasons to suspect that their low-redshift counterparts are the observed population of halo globular clusters.

  7. Formation of Reversible Clusters with Controlled Degree of Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Lotfizadeh, Saba; Aljama, Hassan; Reilly, Dan; Matsoukas, Themis

    2016-05-17

    We develop a reversible colloidal system of silica nanoparticles whose state of aggregation is controlled reproducibly from a state of fully dispersed nanoparticles to that of a colloidal gel and back. The surface of silica nanoparticles is coated with various amino silanes to identify a silane capable of forming a monolayer on the surface of the particles without causing irreversible aggregation. Of the three silanes used in this study, N-[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ethylenediamine was found to be capable of producing monolayers up to full surface coverage without inducing irreversible aggregation of the nanoparticles. At near full surface coverage the electrokinetic behavior of the functionalized silica is completely determined by that of the aminosilane. At acidic pH the ionization of the amino groups provides electrosteric stabilization and the system is fully dispersed. At basic pH, the dispersion state is dominated by the hydrophobic interaction between the uncharged aminosilane chains in the aqueous environment and the system forms a colloidal gel. At intermediate pH values the dispersion state is dominated by the balance between electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, and the system exists in clusters whose size is determined solely by the pH. The transformation between states of aggregation is reversible and a reproducible function of pH. The rate of gelation can be controlled to be as fast as minutes while deaggregation is much slower and takes several hours to complete. PMID:27124089

  8. The formation of NGC 3603 young starburst cluster: `prompt' hierarchical assembly or monolithic starburst?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sambaran; Kroupa, Pavel

    2015-02-01

    The formation of very young massive clusters or `starburst' clusters is currently one of the most widely debated topic in astronomy. The classical notion dictates that a star cluster is formed in situ in a dense molecular gas clump. The stellar radiative and mechanical feedback to the residual gas energizes the latter until it escapes the system. The newly born gas-free young cluster eventually readjusts with the corresponding mass-loss. Based on the observed substructured morphologies of many young stellar associations, it is alternatively suggested that even the smooth-profiled massive clusters are also assembled from migrating less massive subclusters. A very young (age ≈ 1 Myr), massive (>104 M⊙) star cluster like the Galactic NGC 3603 young cluster (HD 97950) is an appropriate testbed for distinguishing between the above `monolithic' and `hierarchical' formation scenarios. A recent study by Banerjee & Kroupa demonstrates that the monolithic scenario remarkably reproduces the HD 97950 cluster. In particular, its shape, internal motion and the mass distribution of stars are found to follow naturally and consistently from a single model calculation undergoing ≈70 per cent by mass gas dispersal. In this work, we explore the possibility of the formation of the above cluster via hierarchical assembly of subclusters. These subclusters are initially distributed over a wide range of spatial volumes and have various modes of subclustering in both absence and presence of a background gas potential. Unlike the above monolithic initial system that reproduces HD 97950 very well, the same is found to be prohibitive with hierarchical assembly alone (with/without a gas potential). Only those systems which assemble promptly into a single cluster (in ≲1 Myr) from a close separation (all within ≲2 pc) could match the observed density profile of HD 97950 after a similar gas removal. These results therefore suggest that the NGC 3603 young cluster has formed essentially

  9. Gas cluster ion beam assisted NiPt germano-silicide formation on SiGe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcan, Ahmet S.; Lavoie, Christian; Alptekin, Emre; Jordan-Sweet, Jean; Zhu, Frank; Leith, Allen; Pfeifer, Brian D.; LaRose, J. D.; Russell, N. M.

    2016-04-01

    We report the formation of very uniform and smooth Ni(Pt)Si on epitaxially grown SiGe using Si gas cluster ion beam treatment after metal-rich silicide formation. The gas cluster ion implantation process was optimized to infuse Si into the metal-rich silicide layer and lowered the NiSi nucleation temperature significantly according to in situ X-ray diffraction measurements. This novel method which leads to more uniform films can also be used to control silicide depth in ultra-shallow junctions, especially for high Ge containing devices, where silicidation is problematic as it leads to much rougher interfaces.

  10. Molecular dynamics study of crater formation by core-shell structured cluster impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Takaaki; Seki, Toshio; Matsuo, Jiro

    2012-07-01

    Crater formation processes by the impacts of large clusters with binary atomic species were studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Argon and xenon atoms are artificially organized in core-shell cluster structures with various component ratios and irradiated on a Si(1 0 0) target surface. When the cluster has Xe1000 core covered with 1000 Ar atoms, and impacts at a total of 20 keV, the core Xe cluster penetrates into the deep area, and a crater with a conical shape is left on the target. On the other hand, in the case of a cluster with the opposite structure, Ar1000 core covered with 1000 Xe atoms, the cluster stops at a shallow area of the target. The incident cluster atoms are mixed and tend to spread in a lateral direction, which results in a square shaped crater with a shallower hole and wider opening. The MD simulations suggest that large cluster impacts cause different irradiation effects by changing the structure, even if the component ratio is the same.

  11. FORMATION AND EVOLUTION OF NUCLEAR STAR CLUSTERS WITH IN SITU STAR FORMATION: NUCLEAR CORES AND AGE SEGREGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Aharon, Danor; Perets, Hagai B.

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear stellar cluster (NSCs) are known to exist around massive black holes (MBHs) in galactic nuclei. Two formation scenarios were suggested for their origin: (1) buildup of NSCs from consecutive infall of stellar clusters and (2) continuous in situ star formation. Though the cluster infall scenario has been extensively studied, the in situ formation scenario has been hardly explored. Here we use Fokker-Planck (FP) calculations to study the effects of star formation on the buildup of NSCs and its implications for their long-term evolution and their resulting structure. We use the FP equation to describe the evolution of stellar populations and add appropriate source terms to account for the effects of newly formed stars. We show that continuous star formation even 1-2 pc away from the MBH can lead to the buildup of an NSC with properties similar to those of the Milky Way NSC. We find that the structure of the old stellar population in the NSC with in situ star formation could be very similar to the steady-state Bahcall-Wolf cuspy structure. However, its younger populations do not yet achieve a steady state. In particular, formed/evolved NSCs with in situ star formation contain differential age-segregated stellar populations that are not yet fully mixed. Younger stellar populations formed in the outer regions of the NSC have a cuspy structure toward the NSC outskirts, while showing a core-like distribution inward, with younger populations having larger core sizes. In principal, such a structure can give rise to an apparent core-like radial distribution of younger stars, as observed in the Galactic center.

  12. Initial conditions of formation of starburst clusters: constraints from stellar dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sambaran; Kroupa, Pavel

    2015-08-01

    Recent high resolution observations of dense regions of molecular clouds and massive gaseous clumps with instruments like Herschel and ALMA have revealed intricate and filamentary overdensity structures in them. Such progenitors of massive starburst clusters are in contrast with smooth, centrally-pronounced profiles of the latter. In this work, we intend to constrain massive, substructured stellar distributions that would evolve to cluster-like profiles at very young ages (~Myr), as seen in starburst clusters. Taking the well observed NGC3603 Young Cluster (NYC) as an example, we compute the infall and final merger of filament-like compact (0.1-0.3 pc) subclusters, totalling 10000 M_sun, from a range of spatial scales and modes of sub-clustering, using direct N-body calculations. These calculations infer an allowable span of approx. 2.5 pc from which the subclusters can fall in a gas potential and merge to form a single centrally-dense structure in near dynamical equilibrium, within the young age of NYC (1-2 Myr). However, these merged clusters are too compact and centrally overdense compared to typical young clusters. Our N-body calculations, beginning from such compact initial conditions, show that even stellar wind and supernova mass loss, dynamical heating from retaining black holes, external tidal field and heating due to tight O-star binaries together cannot expand these clusters to their observed sizes, even in 100 Myr. Hence an explosive gas dispersal phase seems essential for forming starburst and other young clusters observed in the Milky Way and in the Local Group which can expand the clusters to their observed sizes and concentrations; including that for NYC with approx. 30% clump star formation efficiency. However, some observed massive but highly extended (>10 pc) , >10 Myr old clusters better fit a slow (several Myr timescale) gas dispersal from parsec-scale initial profiles, which can be the future of embedded systems like W3 Main.

  13. Evidence for a fundamental stellar upper mass limit from clustered star formation, and some implications therof

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroupa, Pavel; Weidner, Carsten

    Theoretical considerations lead to the expectation that stars should not have masses larger than about m_{max*}=60-120M_⊙, while the observational evidence has been ambiguous. Only very recently has a physical stellar mass limit near 150M_⊙ emerged thanks to modern high-resolution observations of local star-burst clusters. But this limit does not appear to depend on metallicity, in contradiction to theory. Important uncertainties remain though. It is now also emerging that star-clusters limit the masses of their constituent stars, such that a well-defined relation between the mass of the most massive star in a cluster and the cluster mass, m_{max}=F(M_{ecl}) ≤ m_{max*}≈ 150M_⊙, exists. One rather startling finding is that the observational data strongly favour clusters being built-up by consecutively forming more-massive stars until the most massive stars terminate further star-formation. The relation also implies that composite populations, which consist of many star clusters, most of which may be dissolved, must have steeper composite IMFs than simple stellar populations such as are found in individual clusters. Thus, for example, 10^5 Taurus-Auriga star-forming groups, each with 20 stars, will ever only sample the IMF below about 1M_⊙. This IMF will therefore not be identical to the IMF of one cluster with 2×, 10^6 stars. The implication is that the star-formation history of a galaxy critically determines its integrated galaxial IMF and thus the total number of supernovae per star and its chemical enrichment history. Galaxy formation and evolution models that rely on an invariant IMF would be wrong.

  14. On the formation of intermetalloid clusters: titanocene(III)diammin as a versatile reactant toward nonastannide Zintl clusters.

    PubMed

    Benda, Christian B; Waibel, Markus; Fässler, Thomas F

    2015-01-01

    The reactivity of TiCp2Cl2 (d(0)) towards Zintl clusters was studied in liquid ammonia (Cp = cyclopentadienyl). Reduction of Ti(IV)Cp2Cl2 and ligand exchange led to the formation of [Ti(III)Cp2(NH3)2](+), also obtainable by recrystallization of [CpTi(III)Cl]2. Upon reaction with [K4Sn9], ligand exchange leads to [TiCp2(η(1)-Sn9)(NH3)](3-). A small variation of the stoichiometry led to the formation of [Ti(η(4)-Sn8)Cp](3-), which cocrystallizes with [TiCp2(NH3)2](+) and [TiCp2(η(1)-Sn9)(NH3)](3-). Finally, the large intermetalloid cluster anion [Ti4Sn15Cp5](n-) (n = 4 or 5) was obtained from the reaction of K12Sn17 and TiCp2Cl2 in liquid ammonia. The isolation of three side products, [K([18]crown-6)]Cp, [K([18]crown-6)]Cp(NH3), and [K([2.2]crypt)]Cp, suggests a stepwise elimination of the Cl(-) and Cp(-) ligands from TiCp2Cl2 and thus gives a hint to the mechanism of the product formation in which [Ti(η(4+2)-Sn8)Cp](3-) has a key role.

  15. GAS RESERVOIRS AND STAR FORMATION IN A FORMING GALAXY CLUSTER AT zbsime0.2

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, Yara L.; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Verheijen, Marc A. W.; Deshev, Boris Z.; Van Gorkom, Jacqueline H.

    2012-09-10

    We present first results from the Blind Ultra-Deep H I Environmental Survey of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. Our survey is the first direct imaging study of neutral atomic hydrogen gas in galaxies at a redshift where evolutionary processes begin to show. In this Letter we investigate star formation, H I content, and galaxy morphology, as a function of environment in Abell 2192 (at z = 0.1876). Using a three-dimensional visualization technique, we find that Abell 2192 is a cluster in the process of forming, with significant substructure in it. We distinguish four structures that are separated in redshift and/or space. The richest structure is the baby cluster itself, with a core of elliptical galaxies that coincides with (weak) X-ray emission, almost no H I detections, and suppressed star formation. Surrounding the cluster, we find a compact group where galaxies pre-process before falling into the cluster, and a scattered population of 'field-like' galaxies showing more star formation and H I detections. This cluster proves to be an excellent laboratory to understand the fate of the H I gas in the framework of galaxy evolution. We clearly see that the H I gas and the star formation correlate with morphology and environment at z {approx} 0.2. In particular, the fraction of H I detections is significantly affected by the environment. The effect starts to kick in in low-mass groups that pre-process the galaxies before they enter the cluster. Our results suggest that by the time the group galaxies fall into the cluster, they are already devoid of H I.

  16. Gas Reservoirs and Star Formation in a Forming Galaxy Cluster at zbsime0.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffé, Yara L.; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Verheijen, Marc A. W.; Deshev, Boris Z.; van Gorkom, Jacqueline H.

    2012-09-01

    We present first results from the Blind Ultra-Deep H I Environmental Survey of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. Our survey is the first direct imaging study of neutral atomic hydrogen gas in galaxies at a redshift where evolutionary processes begin to show. In this Letter we investigate star formation, H I content, and galaxy morphology, as a function of environment in Abell 2192 (at z = 0.1876). Using a three-dimensional visualization technique, we find that Abell 2192 is a cluster in the process of forming, with significant substructure in it. We distinguish four structures that are separated in redshift and/or space. The richest structure is the baby cluster itself, with a core of elliptical galaxies that coincides with (weak) X-ray emission, almost no H I detections, and suppressed star formation. Surrounding the cluster, we find a compact group where galaxies pre-process before falling into the cluster, and a scattered population of "field-like" galaxies showing more star formation and H I detections. This cluster proves to be an excellent laboratory to understand the fate of the H I gas in the framework of galaxy evolution. We clearly see that the H I gas and the star formation correlate with morphology and environment at z ~ 0.2. In particular, the fraction of H I detections is significantly affected by the environment. The effect starts to kick in in low-mass groups that pre-process the galaxies before they enter the cluster. Our results suggest that by the time the group galaxies fall into the cluster, they are already devoid of H I.

  17. THE RICH GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEM OF ABELL 1689 AND THE RADIAL DEPENDENCE OF THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER FORMATION EFFICIENCY

    SciTech Connect

    Alamo-Martínez, K. A.; González-Lópezlira, R. A.; Blakeslee, J. P.; Côté, P.; Ferrarese, L.; Jee, M. J.; Jordán, A.; Meurer, G. R.; Peng, E. W.; West, M. J.

    2013-09-20

    We study the rich globular cluster (GC) system in the center of the massive cluster of galaxies Abell 1689 (z = 0.18), one of the most powerful gravitational lenses known. With 28 Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys orbits in the F814W bandpass, we reach a magnitude I{sub 814} = 29 with ∼>90% completeness and sample the brightest ∼5% of the GC system. Assuming the well-known Gaussian form of the GC luminosity function (GCLF), we estimate a total population of N{sup total}{sub GC}= 162,850{sup +75,450}{sub -51,310} GCs within a projected radius of 400 kpc. As many as half of the GCs may comprise an intracluster component. Even with the sizable uncertainties, which mainly result from the uncertain GCLF parameters, this system is by far the largest GC population studied to date. The specific frequency S{sub N} is high, but not uncommon for central galaxies in massive clusters, rising from S{sub N} ≈ 5 near the center to ∼12 at large radii. Passive galaxy fading would increase S{sub N} by ∼20% at z = 0. We construct the radial mass profiles of the GCs, stars, intracluster gas, and lensing-derived total mass, and we compare the mass fractions as a function of radius. The estimated mass in GCs, M{sub GC}{sup total} = 3.9 × 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}, is comparable to ∼80% of the total stellar mass of the Milky Way. The shape of the GC mass profile appears intermediate between those of the stellar light and total cluster mass. Despite the extreme nature of this system, the ratios of the GC mass to the baryonic and total masses, and thus the GC formation efficiency, are typical of those in other rich clusters when comparing at the same physical radii. The GC formation efficiency is not constant, but varies with radius, in a manner that appears similar for different clusters; we speculate on the reasons for this similarity in profile.

  18. Formation of regular polyicosahedral structure during growth of large Lennard-Jones clusters from their global minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polak, Wiesław Z.

    2016-08-01

    Simulated growth of four global-minimum Lennard-Jones clusters of sizes N = 561, 823, 850 and 923, representing multishell icosahedra and decahedron, always leads to formation of regular polyicosahedral clusters. Observation of cluster structure evolution revealed that new atoms form anti-Mackay islands spreading over the cluster surface by making strong island-island junctions at cluster edges. Analysis of potential energies of atoms composing different local structures shows that energy-driven preference for decahedral arrangement of several atoms initiating the junction of pentagonal symmetry on the cluster surface is responsible for kinetic effect in the cluster growth.

  19. Formation of the Fe-S cluster of ferredoxin in lysed spinach chloroplasts. [Spinacia oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Mitsui, Akira; Matsubara, Hiroshi )

    1991-01-01

    In vitro formation of the {sup 35}S-labeled Fe-S cluster of ferredoxin (Fd) has been achieved by incubating apo-Fd and ({sup 35}S)cysteine with osmotically lysed chloroplasts of spinach (Spinacia oleracea). Correct integration of the {sup 35}S-labeled Fe-S cluster into Fd was verified on the basis of the following: (a) Under nondenaturing conditions, {sup 35}S-labeled holo-Fd showed the same electrophoretic mobility as authentic holo-Fd; (b) {sup 35}S-labeled holo-Fd showed an ability to bind Fd-NADP{sup +} reductase; (c) the {sup 35}S-labeled moiety was removed from the Fd polypeptide by TCA treatment but not by 2-mercaptoethanol treatment; (d) externally added pea II apo-Fd was converted to {sup 35}S-labeled holo-Fd. This reconstitution was dependent on both ATP and light, and formation of the {sup 35}S-labeled Fe-S cluster was observed upon addition of ATP or when an ATP generation-system was constructed in the light. In contrast, ATP-consuming systems abolished the Fe-S cluster formation. A non-hydrolyzable ATP analog was unable to serve as an ATP substitute, indicating the requirement of ATP hydrolysis for cluster formation. GTP was able to substitute for ATP, but CTP and UTP were less effective. Fe-S cluster formation in lysed chloroplasts was stimulated by light even in the presence of added ATP. Light stimulation was inhibited by DCMU or methyl viologen but not by NH{sub 4}{sup +}. NADPH was able to substitute for light, indicating that light energy is required for the production of reducing compounds such as NADPH in addition to the generation of ATP.

  20. CLUSTERED STAR FORMATION AND OUTFLOWS IN AFGL 2591

    SciTech Connect

    Sanna, A.; Carrasco-Gonzalez, C.; Menten, K. M.; Brunthaler, A.; Reid, M. J.; Moscadelli, L.; Rygl, K. L. J.

    2012-02-01

    We report on a detailed study of the water maser kinematics and radio continuum emission toward the most massive and young object in the star-forming region AFGL 2591. Our analysis shows at least two spatial scales of multiple star formation, one projected across 0.1 pc on the sky and another one at about 2000 AU from a ZAMS star of about 38 M{sub Sun }. This young stellar object drives a powerful jet- and wind-driven outflow system with the water masers associated to the outflow walls, previously detected as a limb-brightened cavity in the NIR band. At about 1300 AU to the north of this object a younger protostar drives two bow shocks, outlined by arc-like water maser emission, at 200 AU either side of the source. We have traced the velocity profile of the gas that expands along these arc-like maser structures and compared it with the jet-driven outflow model. This analysis suggests that the ambient medium around the northern protostar is swept up by a jet-driven shock (>66 km s{sup -1}) and perhaps a lower-velocity ({approx}10 km s{sup -1}) wind with an opening angle of about 20 Degree-Sign from the jet axis.

  1. INFRARED AND ULTRAVIOLET STAR FORMATION IN BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES IN THE ACCEPT SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffer, Aaron S.; Donahue, Megan; Hicks, Amalia; Barthelemy, R. S. E-mail: donahue@pa.msu.edu E-mail: ramon.s.barthelemy@wmich.edu

    2012-03-01

    We present infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) photometry for a sample of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). The BCGs are from a heterogeneous but uniformly characterized sample, the Archive of Chandra Cluster Entropy Profile Tables (ACCEPT), of X-ray galaxy clusters from the Chandra X-ray telescope archive with published gas temperature, density, and entropy profiles. We use archival Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), Spitzer Space Telescope, and Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) observations to assemble spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and colors for BCGs. We find that while the SEDs of some BCGs follow the expectation of red, dust-free old stellar populations, many exhibit signatures of recent star formation in the form of excess UV or mid-IR emission, or both. We establish a mean near-UV (NUV) to 2MASS K color of 6.59 {+-} 0.34 for quiescent BCGs. We use this mean color to quantify the UV excess associated with star formation in the active BCGs. We use both fits to a template of an evolved stellar population and library of starburst models and mid-IR star formation relations to estimate the obscured star formation rates (SFRs). We show that many of the BCGs in X-ray clusters with low central gas entropy exhibit enhanced UV (38%) and mid-IR emission (43%) from 8 to 160 {mu}m, above that expected from an old stellar population. These excesses are consistent with ongoing star formation activity in the BCG, star formation that appears to be enabled by the presence of high-density, X-ray-emitting intergalactic gas in the core of the cluster of galaxies. This hot, X-ray-emitting gas may provide the enhanced ambient pressure and some of the fuel to trigger star formation. This result is consistent with previous works that showed that BCGs in clusters with low central gas entropies host H{alpha} emission-line nebulae and radio sources, while clusters with high central gas entropy exhibit none of these features. GALEX UV and Spitzer mid-IR measurements combined

  2. On Iron Enrichment, Star Formation, and Type Ia Supernovae in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenstein, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The nature of star formation and Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) in galaxies in the field and in rich galaxy clusters are contrasted by juxtaposing the buildup of heavy metals in the universe inferred from observed star formation and supernovae rate histories with data on the evolution of Fe abundances in the intracluster medium (ICM). Models for the chemical evolution of Fe in these environments are constructed, subject to observational constraints, for this purpose. While models with a mean delay for SNIa of 3 Gyr and standard initial mass function (IMF) are fully consistent with observations in the field, cluster Fe enrichment immediately tracked a rapid, top-heavy phase of star formation - although transport of Fe into the ICM may have been more prolonged and star formation likely continued beyond redshift 1. The means of this prompt enrichment consisted of SNII yielding greater than or equal to 0.1 solar mass per explosion (if the SNIa rate normalization is scaled down from its value in the field according to the relative number of candidate progenitor stars in the 3 - 8 solar mass range) and/or SNIa with short delay times originating during the rapid star formation epoch. Star formation is greater than 3 times more efficient in rich clusters than in the field, mitigating the overcooling problem in numerical cluster simulations. Both the fraction of baryons cycled through stars, and the fraction of the total present-day stellar mass in the form of stellar remnants, are substantially greater in clusters than in the field.

  3. Neutral molecular cluster formation of sulfuric acid-dimethylamine observed in real time under atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Kürten, Andreas; Jokinen, Tuija; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Junninen, Heikki; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Hutterli, Manuel; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Seinfeld, John H; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Winkler, Paul M; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Curtius, Joachim

    2014-10-21

    For atmospheric sulfuric acid (SA) concentrations the presence of dimethylamine (DMA) at mixing ratios of several parts per trillion by volume can explain observed boundary layer new particle formation rates. However, the concentration and molecular composition of the neutral (uncharged) clusters have not been reported so far due to the lack of suitable instrumentation. Here we report on experiments from the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research revealing the formation of neutral particles containing up to 14 SA and 16 DMA molecules, corresponding to a mobility diameter of about 2 nm, under atmospherically relevant conditions. These measurements bridge the gap between the molecular and particle perspectives of nucleation, revealing the fundamental processes involved in particle formation and growth. The neutral clusters are found to form at or close to the kinetic limit where particle formation is limited only by the collision rate of SA molecules. Even though the neutral particles are stable against evaporation from the SA dimer onward, the formation rates of particles at 1.7-nm size, which contain about 10 SA molecules, are up to 4 orders of magnitude smaller compared with those of the dimer due to coagulation and wall loss of particles before they reach 1.7 nm in diameter. This demonstrates that neither the atmospheric particle formation rate nor its dependence on SA can simply be interpreted in terms of cluster evaporation or the molecular composition of a critical nucleus.

  4. The INfrared Survey of Young Nebulous Clusters (IN-SYNC): Surveying the Dynamics and Star Formation Histories of Young Clusters with APOGEE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covey, Kevin R.; Cottaar, Michiel; Foster, Jonathan B.; Da Rio, Nicola; Tan, Jonathan; Meyer, Michael; Nidever, David L.; Flaherty, Kevin M.; Arce, Hector G.; Rebull, Luisa M.; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Hearty, Fred R.; Majewski, Steven R.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Stassun, Keivan; Wilson, John C.; Zasowski, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Young clusters are the most prolific sites of star formation in the Milky Way, but demographic studies indicate that relatively few of the Milky Way's stellar clusters persist as bound structures for 100 Myrs or longer. Uniform & precise measurements of the stellar populations and internal dynamics of these regions are difficult to obtain, however, particularly for extremely young clusters whose optical visibility is greatly hampered by their parental molecular cloud. The INfrared Survey of Young Nebulous Clusters (IN-SYNC), an SDSS-III ancillary science program, leverages the stability and multiplex capability of the APOGEE spectrograph to obtain high resolution spectra at near-infrared wavelengths, where photospheric emission is better able to penetrate the dusty shrouds that surround sites of active star formation. We summarize our recent measurements of the kinematics and stellar populations of IC 348 and NGC 1333, two young clusters in the Perseus Molecular Cloud, and of the members of the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) and L1641 filament in the Orion molecular complex. These measurements highlight the dynamically 'warm' environment within these young clusters, and suggest a range of stellar radii within these quasi-single-age populations. We close with a preview of plans for continuing this work as part of the APOGEE-2 science portfolio: self-consistent measurements of the kinematics and star formation histories for clusters spanning a range of initial conditions and ages will provide a opportunity to disentangle the mechanisms that drive the formation and dissolution of sites of active star formation.

  5. FORMATION OF COMPACT STELLAR CLUSTERS BY HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXY OUTFLOWS. I. NON-EQUILIBRIUM COOLANT FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, William J.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2010-07-20

    We use high-resolution three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement simulations to investigate the interaction of high-redshift galaxy outflows with low-mass virialized clouds of primordial composition. While atomic cooling allows star formation in objects with virial temperatures above 10{sup 4} K, 'minihalos' below this threshold are generally unable to form stars by themselves. However, these objects are highly susceptible to triggered star formation, induced by outflows from neighboring high-redshift starburst galaxies. Here, we conduct a study of these interactions, focusing on cooling through non-equilibrium molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and hydrogen deuteride (HD) formation. Tracking the non-equilibrium chemistry and cooling of 14 species and including the presence of a dissociating background, we show that shock interactions can transform minihalos into extremely compact clusters of coeval stars. Furthermore, these clusters are all less than {approx}10{sup 6} M {sub sun}, and they are ejected from their parent dark matter halos: properties that are remarkably similar to those of the old population of globular clusters.

  6. Accretion-driven star formation in central dominant galaxies in X-ray clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarazin, C. L.; Oconnell, R. W.

    1983-05-01

    Analytical and observational evidence for the formation of low-mass stars in the gas accreting in the central dominant galaxies in clusters is presented. Observations of the (U-V) and (K-V) color gradients in accreting galaxies are suggested to reveal colors altered by the appearance of young stars, e.g., the excess blue and the A star spectrum detected in NGC 1275. Low-temperature X ray line emissions from accreting galaxies have been partially surveyed with the result that 10 pct of the brightest cluster galaxies in a magnitude-limited sample show evidence of significant accretion. Photometric data from the quasar 3C 48, located in a galaxy with a very blue population, also suggests low-mass star formation, especially when compared to measurements of NGC 1275, which has the highest accretion rate among observed central dominant cluster galaxies. The quasar, however, would not be accreting interstellar gas.

  7. PROGRESSIVE STAR FORMATION IN THE YOUNG GALACTIC SUPER STAR CLUSTER NGC 3603

    SciTech Connect

    Beccari, Giacomo; Spezzi, Loredana; De Marchi, Guido; Andersen, Morten; Paresce, Francesco; Young, Erick; Panagia, Nino; Bond, Howard; Balick, Bruce; Calzetti, Daniela; Carollo, C. Marcella; Disney, Michael J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hall, Donald N. B.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Kimble, Randy A.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Saha, Abhijit

    2010-09-10

    Early Release Science observations of the cluster NGC 3603 with the WFC3 on the refurbished Hubble Space Telescope allow us to study its recent star formation history. Our analysis focuses on stars with H{alpha} excess emission, a robust indicator of their pre-main sequence (PMS) accreting status. The comparison with theoretical PMS isochrones shows that 2/3 of the objects with H{alpha} excess emission have ages from 1 to 10 Myr, with a median value of 3 Myr, while a surprising 1/3 of them are older than 10 Myr. The study of the spatial distribution of these PMS stars allows us to confirm their cluster membership and to statistically separate them from field stars. This result establishes unambiguously for the first time that star formation in and around the cluster has been ongoing for at least 10-20 Myr, at an apparently increasing rate.

  8. Stopping of energetic cobalt clusters and formation of radiation damage in graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Popok, Vladimir N.; Vuckovic, Sasa; Samela, Juha; Jaervi, Tommi T.; Nordlund, Kai; Campbell, Eleanor E. B.

    2009-11-15

    The interaction of energetic (up to 200 eV/atom) size-selected Co{sub n} clusters with HOPG is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Etching of the radiation damaged areas introduced by cluster impacts provides a measure of the depth to which the collision cascades are developed and allows a comparison of these data with the molecular dynamics simulations. Good agreement between the experimental results and modeling is obtained. It is shown that the projected range of the cluster constituents can be linearly scaled with the projected momentum (the cluster momentum divided by surface impact area). With decrease in cluster energies to ca. 10 eV/atom the transition from implantation to pinning is suggested. It is found that even after quite energetic impacts residual clusters remain intact in the shallow graphite layer. These clusters can catalyze reaction of atmospheric oxygen with damaged graphite areas under the thermal heating that leads to the formation of narrow (5-15 nm) random in shape surface channels (trenches) in the top few graphene layers. Thus, small imbedded Co nanoparticles can be used as a processing tool for graphene.

  9. Cluster formation by allelomimesis in real-world complex adaptive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juanico, Dranreb Earl; Monterola, Christopher; Saloma, Caesar

    2005-04-01

    Animal and human clusters are complex adaptive systems and many organize in cluster sizes s that obey the frequency distribution D(s)∝s-τ . The exponent τ describes the relative abundance of the cluster sizes in a given system. Data analyses reveal that real-world clusters exhibit a broad spectrum of τ values, 0.7 (tuna fish schools) ⩽τ⩽4.61 (T4 bacteriophage gene family sizes). Allelomimesis is proposed as an underlying mechanism for adaptation that explains the observed broad τ spectrum. Allelomimesis is the tendency of an individual to imitate the actions of others and two cluster systems have different τ values when their component agents display unequal degrees of allelomimetic tendencies. Cluster formation by allelomimesis is shown to be of three general types: namely, blind copying, information-use copying, and noncopying. Allelomimetic adaptation also reveals that the most stable cluster size is formed by three strongly allelomimetic individuals. Our finding is consistent with available field data taken from killer whales and marmots.

  10. Star formation in grand-design, spiral galaxies. Young, massive clusters in the near-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosbøl, P.; Dottori, H.

    2012-06-01

    Aims: Spiral structure is a prominent feature in many disk galaxies and is often outlined by bright, young objects. We study the distribution of young stellar clusters in grand-design spiral galaxies and thereby determine whether strong spiral perturbations can influence star formation. Methods: Deep, near-infrared JHK-maps were observed for ten nearby, grand-design, spiral galaxies using HAWK-I at the Very Large Telescope. Complete, magnitude-limited candidate lists of star-forming complexes were obtained by searching within the K-band maps. The properties of the complexes were derived from (H - K) - (J - H) diagrams including the identification of the youngest complexes (i.e. ≲7 Myr) and the estimation of their extinction. Results: Young stellar clusters with ages ≲7 Myr have significant internal extinction in the range of AV = 3-7m, while older ones typically have AV < 1m. The cluster luminosity function (CLF) is well-fitted by a power law with an exponent of around -2 and displays no evidence of a high luminosity cut-off. The brightest cluster complexes in the disk reach luminosities of MK = -15.5m or estimated masses of 106 M⊙. At radii with a strong, two-armed spiral pattern, the star formation rate in the arms is higher by a factor of 2-5 than in the inter-arm regions. The CLF in the arms is also shifted towards brighter MK by at least 0.4m. We also detect clusters with colors compatible with Large Magellanic Cloud intermediate age clusters and Milky Way globular clusters. The (J - K) - MK diagram of several galaxies shows, for the brightest clusters, a clear separation between young clusters that are highly attenuated by dust and older ones with low extinction. Conclusions: The gap in the (J - K) - MK diagrams implies that there has been a rapid expulsion of dust at an age around 7 Myr, possibly triggered by supernovae. Strong spiral perturbations concentrate the formation of clusters in the arm regions and shifts their CLF towards brighter magnitudes

  11. Star Cluster Formation and Destruction in the Merging Galaxy NGC 3256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulia, A. J.; Chandar, R.; Whitmore, B. C.

    2016-07-01

    We use the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope to study the rich population of young massive star clusters in the main body of NGC 3256, a merging pair of galaxies with a high star formation rate (SFR) and SFR per unit area (ΣSFR). These clusters have luminosity and mass functions that follow power laws, dN/dL ∝ L α with α = ‑2.23 ± 0.07, and dN/dM ∝ M β with β = ‑1.86 ± 0.34 for τ < 10 Myr clusters, similar to those found in more quiescent galaxies. The age distribution can be described by dN/dτ ∝ τ γ , with γ ≈ ‑0.67 ± 0.08 for clusters younger than about a few hundred million years, with no obvious dependence on cluster mass. This is consistent with a picture where ˜80% of the clusters are disrupted each decade in time. We investigate the claim that galaxies with high ΣSFR form clusters more efficiently than quiescent systems by determining the fraction of stars in bound clusters (Γ) and the CMF/SFR statistic (CMF is the cluster mass function) for NGC 3256 and comparing the results with those for other galaxies. We find that the CMF/SFR statistic for NGC 3256 agrees well with that found for galaxies with ΣSFR and SFRs that are lower by 1–3 orders of magnitude, but that estimates for Γ are only robust when the same sets of assumptions are applied. Currently, Γ values available in the literature have used different sets of assumptions, making it more difficult to compare the results between galaxies.

  12. Star Cluster Formation and Destruction in the Merging Galaxy NGC 3256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulia, A. J.; Chandar, R.; Whitmore, B. C.

    2016-07-01

    We use the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope to study the rich population of young massive star clusters in the main body of NGC 3256, a merging pair of galaxies with a high star formation rate (SFR) and SFR per unit area (ΣSFR). These clusters have luminosity and mass functions that follow power laws, dN/dL ∝ L α with α = -2.23 ± 0.07, and dN/dM ∝ M β with β = -1.86 ± 0.34 for τ < 10 Myr clusters, similar to those found in more quiescent galaxies. The age distribution can be described by dN/dτ ∝ τ γ , with γ ≈ -0.67 ± 0.08 for clusters younger than about a few hundred million years, with no obvious dependence on cluster mass. This is consistent with a picture where ˜80% of the clusters are disrupted each decade in time. We investigate the claim that galaxies with high ΣSFR form clusters more efficiently than quiescent systems by determining the fraction of stars in bound clusters (Γ) and the CMF/SFR statistic (CMF is the cluster mass function) for NGC 3256 and comparing the results with those for other galaxies. We find that the CMF/SFR statistic for NGC 3256 agrees well with that found for galaxies with ΣSFR and SFRs that are lower by 1-3 orders of magnitude, but that estimates for Γ are only robust when the same sets of assumptions are applied. Currently, Γ values available in the literature have used different sets of assumptions, making it more difficult to compare the results between galaxies.

  13. Biosilica formation in spicules of the sponge Suberites domuncula: synchronous expression of a gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Heinz C; Perovic-Ottstadt, Sanja; Grebenjuk, Vladislav A; Engel, Sylvia; Müller, Isabel M; Müller, Werner E G

    2005-06-01

    The formation of spicules is a complicated morphogenetic process in sponges (phylum Porifera). The primmorph system was used to demonstrate that in the demosponge Suberites domuncula the synthesis of the siliceous spicules starts intracellularly and is dependent on the concentration of silicic acid. To understand spicule formation, a cluster of genes was isolated. In the center of this cluster is the silicatein gene, which codes for the enzyme that synthesizes spicules. This gene is flanked by an ankyrin repeat gene at one side and by a tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor and a protein kinase gene at the other side. All genes are strongly expressed in primmorphs and intact animals after exposure to silicic acid, and this expression is restricted to those areas where the spicule formation starts or where spicules are maintained in the animals. Our observations suggest that in S. domuncula a coordinated expression of physically linked genes is essential for the synthesis of the major skeletal elements.

  14. Evidence of enhanced formation episodes in the Galactic open cluster system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatti, A. E.

    2010-04-01

    Aims: The exciting debate about the existence of signs of enhanced formation of Galactic open clusters (OCs) is revisited here on the basis of a revised age distribution. Methods: The data were taken from the recently updated 2009 version of the Dias et al.'s 1787 OC catalogue. Results: We found that the present OC's age distribution presents two primary excesses at t ~ 10-15 Myr and 1.5 Gyr, which are signs of enhanced formation episodes similar to those that occurred in other galaxies (e.g., M 51, NGC 1705). When restricting the OC sample to those located in the solar neighbourhood, with the aim of avoiding incompleteness effects, we also find that these clusters are engraved with clear signs of enhanced formation at both ages.

  15. Dwarf galaxies in the coma cluster: Star formation properties and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Derek M.

    The infall regions of galaxy clusters are unique laboratories for studying the impact of environment on galaxy evolution. This intermediate region links the low-density field environment and the dense core of the cluster, and is thought to host recently accreted galaxies whose star formation is being quenched by external processes associated with the cluster. In this dissertation, we measure the star formation properties of galaxies at the infall region of the nearby rich cluster of galaxies, Coma. We rely primarily on Ultraviolet (UV) data owing to its sensitivity to recent star formation and we place more emphasis on the properties of dwarf galaxies. Dwarf galaxies are good tracers of external processes in clusters but their evolution is poorly constrained as they are intrinsically faint and hence more challenging to detect. We make use of deep GALEX far-UV and near-UV observations at the infall region of the Coma cluster. This area of the cluster has supporting photometric coverage at optical and IR wavelengths in addition to optical spectroscopic data that includes deep redshift coverage of dwarf galaxies in Coma. Our GALEX observations were the deepest exposures taken for a local galaxy cluster. The depth of these images required alternative data analysis techniques to overcome systematic effects that limit the default GALEX pipeline analysis. Specifically, we used a deblending method that improved detection efficiency by a factor of ˜2 and allowed reliable photometry a few magnitudes deeper than the pipeline catalog. We performed deep measurements of the total UV galaxy counts in our field that were used to measure the source confusion limit for crowded GALEX fields. The star formation properties of Coma members were studied for galaxies that span from starbursts to passive galaxies. Star-forming galaxies in Coma tend to have lower specific star formation rates, on average, as compared to field galaxies. We show that the majority of these galaxies are likely

  16. Acceleration of raindrop formation due to the tangling-clustering instability in a turbulent stratified atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Elperin, T; Kleeorin, N; Krasovitov, B; Kulmala, M; Liberman, M; Rogachevskii, I; Zilitinkevich, S

    2015-07-01

    Condensation of water vapor on active cloud condensation nuclei produces micron-size water droplets. To form rain, they must grow rapidly into at least 50- to 100-μm droplets. Observations show that this process takes only 15-20 min. The unexplained physical mechanism of such fast growth is crucial for understanding and modeling of rain and known as "condensation-coalescence bottleneck in rain formation." We show that the recently discovered phenomenon of the tangling clustering instability of small droplets in temperature-stratified turbulence [Phys. Fluids 25, 085104 (2013)] results in the formation of droplet clusters with drastically increased droplet number densities. The mechanism of the tangling clustering instability is much more effective than the previously considered by us the inertial clustering instability caused by the centrifugal effect of turbulent vortices. This is the reason of strong enhancement of the collision-coalescence rate inside the clusters. The mean-field theory of the droplet growth developed in this study can be useful for explanation of the observed fast growth of cloud droplets in warm clouds from the initial 1-μm-size droplets to 40- to 50-μm-size droplets within 15-20 min. PMID:26274274

  17. Monte Carlo modeling of globular star clusters: many primordial binaries and IMBH formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giersz, Mirek; Leigh, Nathan; Marks, Michael; Hypki, Arkadiusz; Askar, Abbas

    2016-02-01

    We will discuss the evolution of star clusters with a large initial binary fraction, up to 95%. The initial binary population is chosen to follow the invariant orbital-parameter distributions suggested by Kroupa (1995). The Monte Carlo MOCCA simulations of star cluster evolution are compared to the observations of Milone et al. (2012) for photometric binaries. It is demonstrated that the observed dependence on cluster mass of both the binary fraction and the ratio of the binary fractions inside and outside of the half mass radius are well recovered by the MOCCA simulations. This is due to a rapid decrease in the initial binary fraction due to the strong density-dependent destruction of wide binaries described by Marks, Kroupa & Oh (2011). We also discuss a new scenario for the formation of intermediate mass black holes in dense star clusters. In this scenario, intermediate mass black holes are formed as a result of dynamical interactions of hard binaries containing a stellar mass black hole, with other stars and binaries. We will discuss the necessary conditions to initiate the process of intermediate mass black hole formation and the dependence of its mass accretion rate on the global cluster properties.

  18. Free energy of cluster formation and a new scaling relation for the nucleation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Diemand, Jürg; Angélil, Raymond

    2014-05-21

    Recent very large molecular dynamics simulations of homogeneous nucleation with (1 − 8) × 10{sup 9} Lennard-Jones atoms [J. Diemand, R. Angélil, K. K. Tanaka, and H. Tanaka, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 074309 (2013)] allow us to accurately determine the formation free energy of clusters over a wide range of cluster sizes. This is now possible because such large simulations allow for very precise measurements of the cluster size distribution in the steady state nucleation regime. The peaks of the free energy curves give critical cluster sizes, which agree well with independent estimates based on the nucleation theorem. Using these results, we derive an analytical formula and a new scaling relation for nucleation rates: ln J{sup ′}/η is scaled by ln S/η, where the supersaturation ratio is S, η is the dimensionless surface energy, and J{sup ′} is a dimensionless nucleation rate. This relation can be derived using the free energy of cluster formation at equilibrium which corresponds to the surface energy required to form the vapor-liquid interface. At low temperatures (below the triple point), we find that the surface energy divided by that of the classical nucleation theory does not depend on temperature, which leads to the scaling relation and implies a constant, positive Tolman length equal to half of the mean inter-particle separation in the liquid phase.

  19. Acceleration of raindrop formation due to the tangling-clustering instability in a turbulent stratified atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Elperin, T; Kleeorin, N; Krasovitov, B; Kulmala, M; Liberman, M; Rogachevskii, I; Zilitinkevich, S

    2015-07-01

    Condensation of water vapor on active cloud condensation nuclei produces micron-size water droplets. To form rain, they must grow rapidly into at least 50- to 100-μm droplets. Observations show that this process takes only 15-20 min. The unexplained physical mechanism of such fast growth is crucial for understanding and modeling of rain and known as "condensation-coalescence bottleneck in rain formation." We show that the recently discovered phenomenon of the tangling clustering instability of small droplets in temperature-stratified turbulence [Phys. Fluids 25, 085104 (2013)] results in the formation of droplet clusters with drastically increased droplet number densities. The mechanism of the tangling clustering instability is much more effective than the previously considered by us the inertial clustering instability caused by the centrifugal effect of turbulent vortices. This is the reason of strong enhancement of the collision-coalescence rate inside the clusters. The mean-field theory of the droplet growth developed in this study can be useful for explanation of the observed fast growth of cloud droplets in warm clouds from the initial 1-μm-size droplets to 40- to 50-μm-size droplets within 15-20 min.

  20. Cooling, AGN Feedback, and Star Formation in Simulated Cool-core Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.; Ruszkowski, Mateusz; Voit, G. Mark; O’Shea, Brian W.; Donahue, Megan

    2015-10-01

    Numerical simulations of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) feedback in cool-core galaxy clusters have successfully avoided classical cooling flows, but often produce too much cold gas. We perform adaptive mesh simulations that include momentum-driven AGN feedback, self-gravity, star formation, and stellar feedback, focusing on the interplay between cooling, AGN heating, and star formation in an isolated cool-core cluster. Cold clumps triggered by AGN jets and turbulence form filamentary structures tens of kpc long. This cold gas feeds both star formation and the supermassive black hole (SMBH), triggering an AGN outburst that increases the entropy of the intracluster medium (ICM) and reduces its cooling rate. Within 1–2 Gyr, star formation completely consumes the cold gas, leading to a brief shutoff of the AGN. The ICM quickly cools and redevelops multiphase gas, followed by another cycle of star formation/AGN outburst. Within 6.5 Gyr, we observe three such cycles. There is good agreement between our simulated cluster and the observations of cool-core clusters. ICM cooling is dynamically balanced by AGN heating, and a cool-core appearance is preserved. The minimum cooling time to free-fall time ratio typically varies between a few and ≳ 20. The star formation rate (SFR) covers a wide range, from 0 to a few hundred {M}ȯ {{yr}}-1, with an average of ∼ 40 {M}ȯ {{yr}}-1. The instantaneous SMBH accretion rate shows large variations on short timescales, but the average value correlates well with the SFR. Simulations without stellar feedback or self-gravity produce qualitatively similar results, but a lower SMBH feedback efficiency (0.1% compared to 1%) results in too many stars.

  1. Using Herschel Far-Infrared Photometry to Constrain Star Formation Rates in CLASH Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Rebecca L.; Postman, Marc; Fogarty, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) program obtained broadband images of 25 massive galaxy clusters in 16 passbands from the UV to the near-IR. The data was taken with the Wide-field Camera 3 (WFC3), and the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These 25 clusters have also been observed in the mid-IR by Spitzer IRAC, the far-IR by the Herschel Space Observatory PACS and SPIRE, and in the x-ray by the Chandra and XMM observatories. We focused on the two brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the survey (MACS1931.8-2653 and RXJ1532.9+3021) that have reddening-corrected UV-derived star formation rates (SFRs) > 100 M⊙ yr-1 as measured by Fogarty et al (2015). The inclusion of Herschel data provides unique constraints on dust content and independent estimates of the star formation rates in these interesting galaxies. We performed photometry on the five Herschel bands (100-500μm), and removed any contamination from other cluster members. We fit a UV-FIR SED to each galaxy to measure the bolometric dust luminosity (Lbol), which we use to derive the FIR obscured SFR. We calculate the sum of the measured UV unobscured SFR from the HST photometry and the FIR obscured SFR from the Herschel photometry to get a total SFR for these two BCGs. We compared this to the reddening-corrected SFRs and found they were in agreement within error. This confirms that the Kennicutt and Calzetti methods for calculating star formation rates are both applicable for these highly star-forming massive cluster galaxies.

  2. Glass formation and cluster evolution in the rapidly solidified monatomic metallic liquid Ta under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dejun; Wen, Dadong; Tian, Zean; Liu, Rangsu

    2016-12-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed to examine the glass formation and cluster evolution during the rapid solidification of monatomic metallic liquid Ta under high pressure. The atomic structures in the systems are characterized by the radical distribution function (RDF), Honeycutt-Anderson (H-A) bond-type index method and cluster-type index method (CTIM). It is observed that the defective icosahedra play the critical role in the formation of Ta monatomic metallic glasses (MGs) rather than (12 0 12 0) perfect icosahedra, which have been identified as the basic local atomic units in many multi-component MGs. With the increase of pressure P, the fraction of icosahedral type clusters decreases remarkably in Ta MGs, while the fraction of bcc type clusters rises evidently. The evolution of vitrification degree (DSRO or DMRO) of the rapidly cooled metal Ta system further reveals that a higher pressure P is disadvantageous to the formation of Ta monatomic MGs. The weaker glass forming ability (GFA) of liquid metal Ta obtained under higher pressure P can be contributed to the decrease of DSRO or DMRO which is induced by increasing high pressure P to some extent.

  3. Cluster formation in fluids with competing short-range and long-range interactions.

    PubMed

    Sweatman, Martin B; Fartaria, Rui; Lue, Leo

    2014-03-28

    We investigate the low density behaviour of fluids that interact through a short-ranged attraction together with a long-ranged repulsion (SALR potential) by developing a molecular thermodynamic model. The SALR potential is a model of effective solute interactions where the solvent degrees of freedom are integrated-out. For this system, we find that clusters form for a range of interaction parameters where attractive and repulsive interactions nearly balance, similar to micelle formation in aqueous surfactant solutions. We focus on systems for which equilibrium behaviour and liquid-like clusters (i.e., droplets) are expected, and find in addition a novel coexistence between a low density cluster phase and a high density cluster phase within a very narrow range of parameters. Moreover, a simple formula for the average cluster size is developed. Based on this formula, we propose a non-classical crystal nucleation pathway whereby macroscopic crystals are formed via crystal nucleation within microscopic precursor droplets. We also perform large-scale Monte Carlo simulations, which demonstrate that the cluster fluid phase is thermodynamically stable for this system.

  4. Massive Young Star Clusters in M33: Stochastic Star Formation Ruled Out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Lópezlira, R. A.; Pflamm-Altenburg, J.; Kroupa, P.

    2014-09-01

    It is widely accepted that the distribution function of the masses of young star clusters is universal and can be purely interpreted as a probability density distribution function with a constant upper mass limit. As a result of this picture, the masses of the most massive objects would be exclusively determined by the size of the sample. Conversely we show, with very high confidence, that the masses of the most massive young (< 10 Myr) star clusters in the flocculent galaxy M33 decrease with increasing galactocentric radius, in contradiction with a constant shape and upper mass limit of the cluster mass function. Moreover, by comparing the radial distributions of gas surface densities and highest cluster masses, we find that M_{max} ∝ Σ_{gas, total}^{3.8 ± 0.3}, M_{max} ∝ Σ_{H_2}^{1.2± 0.1} and M_{max} ∝ Σ_{SFR}^{0.9 ± 0.1}. Hence, in M33 we can rule out stochastic star formation. The change of the maximum cluster mass there must be due to physical causes, i.e., very massive star clusters may require special physical conditions, like high gas surface densities, in order to form.

  5. Globular Clusters, Ultra-Compact Dwarfs, and the Formation of Galaxy Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Eric

    2015-08-01

    Globular clusters (GCs) are a distinctive and ubiquitous constituent of galaxy halos. Their existence alludes to an early epoch of galaxy building characterized by the high star formation rates needed to form massive clusters, and a merging process that produced the extended, spheroidal stellar halos in today's galaxies. While studies of stellar halos are generally limited by low surface brightnesses or the faintness of individual halo stars, GCs are bright and compact, making them excellent tracers of stellar halos out to hundreds of megaparsecs. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) is a CFHT Large Program that has acquired imaging of the 104 square degrees within the Virgo Cluster's virial radius. This deep and contiguous imaging of the nearest galaxy cluster provides us a new view of globular clusters across the full range of galaxy morphology and mass, as well as in the regions between galaxies. It also provides the first complete census of ultra-compact dwarfs (UCDs) in Virgo, objects which may be related to massive GCs and galaxy nuclei. In this talk, I will present what we have learned so far about extragalactic GC systems and UCDs from the NGVS, from both photometry and spectroscopy.

  6. The Celestial Buffet: multiple populations and globular cluster formation in dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Aaron J.; Wadsley, James; Couchman, H. M. P.; Sills, Alison

    2014-04-01

    We present a framework that explains the commonly observed variation in light element abundances in globular clusters. If globular clusters form in the centres of dwarf galaxies, they will be pumped on to larger orbits as star formation progresses. The potential well will only retain the moderate velocity asymptotic giant branch (AGB) ejecta, the expected source of enrichment, but not supernova ejecta. There is no need to increase the initial cluster mass, a requirement of self-enrichment scenarios, as all the stars within the dwarf can contribute. As the clusters move through the dwarf centre they sweep up a mix of AGB ejecta and in-falling pristine gas to form a second generation of stars. The specific mix will vary in time and is thus able to explain the spread in second generation abundances observed in different clusters. The globular clusters will survive to the present day or be stripped as part of the hierarchical merging process of larger galaxies. We illustrate how this process may operate using a high-resolution simulation of a dwarf galaxy at high redshift.

  7. DISSIPATIONLESS FORMATION AND EVOLUTION OF THE MILKY WAY NUCLEAR STAR CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Antonini, Fabio; Capuzzo-Dolcetta, Roberto; Mastrobuono-Battisti, Alessandra; Merritt, David

    2012-05-10

    In one widely discussed model for the formation of nuclear star clusters (NSCs), massive globular clusters spiral into the center of a galaxy and merge to form the nucleus. It is now known that at least some NSCs coexist with supermassive black holes (SMBHs); this is the case, for instance, in the Milky Way. In this paper, we investigate how the presence of an SMBH at the center of the Milky Way impacts the merger hypothesis for the formation of its NSC. Starting from a model consisting of a low-density nuclear stellar disk and the SMBH, we use direct N-body simulations to follow the successive inspiral and merger of globular clusters. The clusters are started on circular orbits of radius 20 pc, and their initial masses and radii are set up in such a way as to be consistent with the galactic tidal field at that radius. These clusters, decayed orbitally in the central region due to their large mass, were followed in their inspiral events; as a result, the total accumulated mass by Almost-Equal-To 10 clusters is about 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun }. Each cluster is disrupted by the SMBH at a distance of roughly 1 pc. The density profile that results after the final inspiral event is characterized by a core of roughly this radius and an envelope with density that falls off {rho} {approx} r{sup -2}. These properties are similar to those of the Milky Way NSC, with the exception of the core size, which in the Milky Way is somewhat smaller. But by continuing the evolution of the model after the final inspiral event, we find that the core shrinks substantially via gravitational encounters in a time (when scaled to the Milky Way) of 10 Gyr as the stellar distribution evolves toward a Bahcall-Wolf cusp. We also show that the luminosity function of the Milky Way NSC is consistent with the hypothesis that 1/2 of the mass comes from old ({approx}10 Gyr) stars, brought in by globular clusters, with the other half due to continuous star formation. We conclude that

  8. Titanium embedded cage structure formation in Al(n)Ti+ clusters and their interaction with Ar.

    PubMed

    Torres, M B; Vega, A; Aguilera-Granja, F; Balbás, L C

    2014-05-01

    Recently, Ar physisorption was used as a structural probe for the location of the Ti dopant atom in aluminium cluster cations, Al(n)Ti(+) [Lang et al., J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 22, 1508 (2011)]. As an experiment result, the lack of Ar complexes for n > nc determines the cluster size for which the Ti atom is located inside of an Al cage. To elucidate the decisive factors for the formation of endohedrally Al(n)Ti(+), experimentalists proposed detailed computational studies as indispensable. In this work, we investigated, using the density functional theory, the structural and electronic properties of singly titanium doped cationic clusters, Al(n)Ti(+) (n = 16-21) as well as the adsorption of an Ar atom on them. The first endohedral doped cluster, with Ti encapsulated in a fcc-like cage skeleton, appears at nc = 21, which is the critical number consistent with the exohedral-endohedral transition experimentally observed. At this critical size the non-crystalline icosahedral growth pattern, related to the pure aluminium clusters, with the Ti atom in the surface, changes into a endohedral fcc-like pattern. The map of structural isomers, relative energy differences, second energy differences, and structural parameters were determined and analyzed. Moreover, we show the critical size depends on the net charge of the cluster, being different for the cationic clusters (nc = 21) and their neutral counterparts (nc = 20). For the Al(n)Ti(+) · Ar complexes, and for n < 21, the preferred Ar adsorption site is on top of the exohedral Ti atom, with adsorption energy in very good agreement with the experimental value. Instead, for n = 21, the Ar adsorption occurs on the top an Al atom with very low absorption energy. For all sizes the geometry of the Al(n)Ti(+) clusters keeps unaltered in the Ar-cluster complexes. This fact indicates that Ar adsorption does not influence the cluster structure, providing support to the experimental technique used. For nc = 21, the smallest size of

  9. Titanium embedded cage structure formation in AlnTi+ clusters and their interaction with Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, M. B.; Vega, A.; Aguilera-Granja, F.; Balbás, L. C.

    2014-05-01

    Recently, Ar physisorption was used as a structural probe for the location of the Ti dopant atom in aluminium cluster cations, AlnTi+ [Lang et al., J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 22, 1508 (2011)]. As an experiment result, the lack of Ar complexes for n > nc determines the cluster size for which the Ti atom is located inside of an Al cage. To elucidate the decisive factors for the formation of endohedrally AlnTi+, experimentalists proposed detailed computational studies as indispensable. In this work, we investigated, using the density functional theory, the structural and electronic properties of singly titanium doped cationic clusters, AlnTi+ (n = 16-21) as well as the adsorption of an Ar atom on them. The first endohedral doped cluster, with Ti encapsulated in a fcc-like cage skeleton, appears at nc = 21, which is the critical number consistent with the exohedral-endohedral transition experimentally observed. At this critical size the non-crystalline icosahedral growth pattern, related to the pure aluminium clusters, with the Ti atom in the surface, changes into a endohedral fcc-like pattern. The map of structural isomers, relative energy differences, second energy differences, and structural parameters were determined and analyzed. Moreover, we show the critical size depends on the net charge of the cluster, being different for the cationic clusters (nc = 21) and their neutral counterparts (nc = 20). For the {Al_nTi^+ {\\cdot} Ar} complexes, and for n < 21, the preferred Ar adsorption site is on top of the exohedral Ti atom, with adsorption energy in very good agreement with the experimental value. Instead, for n = 21, the Ar adsorption occurs on the top an Al atom with very low absorption energy. For all sizes the geometry of the AlnTi+ clusters keeps unaltered in the Ar-cluster complexes. This fact indicates that Ar adsorption does not influence the cluster structure, providing support to the experimental technique used. For nc = 21, the smallest size of

  10. Multicolor photometry of the merging galaxy cluster A2319: Dynamics and star formation properties

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Peng-Fei; Yuan, Qi-Rong; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Xu E-mail: yuanqirong@njnu.edu.cn

    2014-05-01

    Asymmetric X-ray emission and a powerful cluster-scale radio halo indicate that A2319 is a merging cluster of galaxies. This paper presents our multicolor photometry for A2319 with 15 optical intermediate filters in the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) system. There are 142 galaxies with known spectroscopic redshifts within the viewing field of 58' × 58' centered on this rich cluster, including 128 member galaxies (called sample I). A large velocity dispersion in the rest frame, 1622{sub −70}{sup +91} km s{sup –1}, suggests merger dynamics in A2319. The contour map of projected density and localized velocity structure confirm the so-called A2319B substructure, at ∼10' northwest to the main concentration A2319A. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of more than 30,000 sources are obtained in our BATC photometry down to V ∼ 20 mag. A u-band (∼3551 Å) image with better seeing and spatial resolution, obtained with the Bok 2.3 m telescope at Kitt Peak, is taken to make star-galaxy separation and distinguish the overlapping contamination in the BATC aperture photometry. With color-color diagrams and photometric redshift technique, 233 galaxies brighter than h {sub BATC} = 19.0 are newly selected as member candidates after an exclusion of false candidates with contaminated BATC SEDs by eyeball-checking the u-band Bok image. The early-type galaxies are found to follow a tight color-magnitude correlation. Based on sample I and the enlarged sample of member galaxies (called sample II), subcluster A2319B is confirmed. The star formation properties of cluster galaxies are derived with the evolutionary synthesis model, PEGASE, assuming a Salpeter initial mass function and an exponentially decreasing star formation rate (SFR). A strong environmental effect on star formation histories is found in the manner that galaxies in the sparse regions have various star formation histories, while galaxies in the dense regions are found to have shorter SFR time

  11. The Formation and Evolution of the Large Magellanic Cloud from Selected Clusters and Star Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Knut Anders Grova

    We have obtained deep Hubble Space Telescope color-magnitude diagrams of fields centered on the six old LMC globular clusters NGC 1754, NGC 1835, WGC 1898, NGC 1916, NGC 2005, and NGC 2019. The data have been carefully calibrated and the effects of crowding on the photometric accuracy have been thoroughly investigated. The observations have been used to produce V-I,V color-magnitude diagrams of the clusters and of the background field stars, which we have separated from each other through a statistical cleaning technique. The cluster color-magnitude diagrams show that the clusters are old, with main sequence turnoffs at V~ 22.5 and well-developed horizontal branches. We used the slopes of the red giant branches to measure the abundances, which we find to be 0.3 dex higher, on average, than previously measured spectroscopic abundances. In two cases there is significant variable reddening across at least part of the image, but only for NGC 1916 does differential reddening preclude accurate measurements of the CMD characteristics. The mean reddenings of the clusters, measured both from the color of the red giant branch and through comparison with Milky Way clusters, are <=0.10 magnitudes in E(B-V) in all cases. By matching tbe color-magnitude diagrams of the clusters to fiducial sequences of the Milky Way globular clusters M3, M5, and M55, we find that the mean difference of the LMC and Milky Way cluster ages is 1.0 ± 1.2 Gyr, calculated such that a positive difference indicates that the LMC clusters are older. Through Monte Carlo simulations, errors in the individual measurements of the ages relative to Milky Way clusters are found to be ~<1.0 Gyr. We find a similar chronology by comparing the horizontal branch morphologies and abundances with HB evolutionary tracks, assuming that age is the 'second parameter'. These results imply that the LMC formed at the same time as the Milky Way Galaxy. The evolution of the LMC following its formation has been studied through

  12. Mutations Causing Slow-Channel Myasthenia Reveal That a Valine Ring in the Channel Pore of Muscle AChR is Optimized for Stabilizing Channel Gating.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xin-Ming; Okuno, Tatsuya; Milone, Margherita; Otsuka, Kenji; Takahashi, Koji; Komaki, Hirofumi; Giles, Elizabeth; Ohno, Kinji; Engel, Andrew G

    2016-10-01

    We identify two novel mutations in acetylcholine receptor (AChR) causing a slow-channel congenital myasthenia syndrome (CMS) in three unrelated patients (Pts). Pt 1 harbors a heterozygous βV266A mutation (p.Val289Ala) in the second transmembrane domain (M2) of the AChR β subunit (CHRNB1). Pts 2 and 3 carry the same mutation at an equivalent site in the ε subunit (CHRNE), εV265A (p.Val285Ala). The mutant residues are conserved across all AChR subunits of all species and are components of a valine ring in the channel pore, which is positioned four residues above the leucine ring. Both βV266A and εV265A reduce the amino acid size and lengthen the channel opening bursts by fourfold by enhancing gating efficiency by approximately 30-fold. Substitution of alanine for valine at the corresponding position in the δ and α subunit prolongs the burst duration four- and eightfold, respectively. Replacing valine at ε codon 265 either by a still smaller glycine or by a larger leucine also lengthens the burst duration. Our analysis reveals that each valine in the valine ring contributes to channel kinetics equally, and the valine ring has been optimized in the course of evolution to govern channel gating. PMID:27375219

  13. Mutations Causing Slow-Channel Myasthenia Reveal That a Valine Ring in the Channel Pore of Muscle AChR is Optimized for Stabilizing Channel Gating.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xin-Ming; Okuno, Tatsuya; Milone, Margherita; Otsuka, Kenji; Takahashi, Koji; Komaki, Hirofumi; Giles, Elizabeth; Ohno, Kinji; Engel, Andrew G

    2016-10-01

    We identify two novel mutations in acetylcholine receptor (AChR) causing a slow-channel congenital myasthenia syndrome (CMS) in three unrelated patients (Pts). Pt 1 harbors a heterozygous βV266A mutation (p.Val289Ala) in the second transmembrane domain (M2) of the AChR β subunit (CHRNB1). Pts 2 and 3 carry the same mutation at an equivalent site in the ε subunit (CHRNE), εV265A (p.Val285Ala). The mutant residues are conserved across all AChR subunits of all species and are components of a valine ring in the channel pore, which is positioned four residues above the leucine ring. Both βV266A and εV265A reduce the amino acid size and lengthen the channel opening bursts by fourfold by enhancing gating efficiency by approximately 30-fold. Substitution of alanine for valine at the corresponding position in the δ and α subunit prolongs the burst duration four- and eightfold, respectively. Replacing valine at ε codon 265 either by a still smaller glycine or by a larger leucine also lengthens the burst duration. Our analysis reveals that each valine in the valine ring contributes to channel kinetics equally, and the valine ring has been optimized in the course of evolution to govern channel gating.

  14. Ultraviolet Morphology and Unobscured UV Star Formation Rates of CLASH Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, Megan; Connor, Thomas; Fogarty, Kevin; Li, Yuan; Voit, G. Mark; Postman, Marc; Koekemoer, Anton; Moustakas, John; Bradley, Larry; Ford, Holland

    2015-06-01

    Brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) are usually quiescent, but many exhibit star formation. Here we exploit the opportunity provided by rest-frame UV imaging of galaxy clusters in the Cluster Lensing and Supernovae with Hubble (CLASH) Multi-Cycle Treasury Project to reveal the diversity of UV morphologies in BCGs and to compare them with recent simulations of the cool, star-forming gas structures produced by precipitation-driven feedback. All of the CLASH BCGs are detected in the rest-frame UV (280 nm), regardless of their star formation activity, because evolved stellar populations produce a modest amount of UV light that traces the relatively smooth, symmetric, and centrally peaked stellar distribution seen in the near infrared. Ultraviolet morphologies among the BCGs with strong UV excesses exhibit distinctive knots, multiple elongated clumps, and extended filaments of emission that distinctly differ from the smooth profiles of the UV-quiet BCGs. These structures, which are similar to those seen in the few star-forming BCGs observed in the UV at low redshift, are suggestive of bi-polar streams of clumpy star formation, but not of spiral arms or large, kiloparsec-scale disks. Based on the number of streams and lack of culprit companion galaxies, these streams are unlikely to have arisen from multiple collisions with gas-rich galaxies. These star-forming UV structures are morphologically similar to the cold-gas structures produced in simulations of precipitation-driven active galactic nucleus feedback in which jets uplift low-entropy gas to greater altitudes, causing it to condense. Unobscured star formation rates estimated from CLASH UV images using the Kennicutt relation range up to 80 {{M}⊙ } y{{r}-1} in the most extended and highly structured systems. The circumgalactic gas-entropy threshold for star formation in CLASH BCGs at z ˜ 0.2-0.5 is indistinguishable from that for clusters at z\\lt 0.2.

  15. Dynamical Formation of Black Hole Binaries in Globular Clusters and the Origins of GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasio, Frederic A.; Chatterjee, Sourav; Rodriguez, Carl L.

    2016-06-01

    We show that GW150914, the binary black hole merger detected last year by LIGO, could easily have been formed dynamically through interactions in the dense core of an old globular cluster. Using models of globular clusters with detailed N-body dynamics and stellar evolution, we show that a typical cluster can very naturally form a binary black hole with "heavy" components that will merge at low redshift, like GW150914. We describe in some detail the dynamical interaction processes that could form such a system. Finally, we also show that theoretical predictions for this dynamical formation channel are in general far more robust than those from "population synthesis" studies for isolated massive binaries in the field.

  16. Mapping the formation areas of giant molybdenum blue clusters: a spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Botar, Bogdan; Ellern, Arkady; Kogerler, Paul

    2012-05-18

    The self-assembly of soluble molybdenum blue species from simple molybdate solutions has primarily been associated with giant mixed-valent wheel-shaped cluster anions, derived from the {MoV/VI154/176} archetypes, and a {MoV/VI368} lemon-shaped cluster. The combined use of Raman spectroscopy and kinetic precipitation as self-assembly monitoring techniques and single-crystal X-ray diffraction is key to mapping the realm of molybdenum blue species by establishing spherical {MoV/VI102}-type Keplerates as an important giant molybdenum blue-type species. We additionally rationalize the empirical effect of reducing agent concentration on the formation of all three relevant skeletal types: wheel, lemon and spheres. Whereas both wheels and the lemon-shaped {MoV/VI368} cluster are obtained from weakly reduced molybdenum blue solutions, considerably higher reduced solutions lead to {MoV/VI102}-type Keplerates.

  17. Mapping the formation areas of giant molybdenum blue clusters: a spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Botar, Bogdan; Ellern, Arkady; Kögerler, Paul

    2012-08-01

    The self-assembly of soluble molybdenum blue species from simple molybdate solutions has primarily been associated with giant mixed-valent wheel-shaped cluster anions, derived from the {Mo(V/VI)(154/176)} archetypes, and a {Mo(V/VI)(368)} lemon-shaped cluster. The combined use of Raman spectroscopy and kinetic precipitation as self-assembly monitoring techniques and single-crystal X-ray diffraction is key to mapping the realm of molybdenum blue species by establishing spherical {Mo(V/VI)(102)}-type Keplerates as an important giant molybdenum blue-type species. We additionally rationalize the empirical effect of reducing agent concentration on the formation of all three relevant skeletal types: wheel, lemon and spheres. Whereas both wheels and the lemon-shaped {Mo(V/VI)(368)} cluster are obtained from weakly reduced molybdenum blue solutions, considerably higher reduced solutions lead to {Mo(V/VI)(102)}-type Keplerates. PMID:22717474

  18. THE EVOLUTION OF DUSTY STAR FORMATION IN GALAXY CLUSTERS TO z = 1: SPITZER INFRARED OBSERVATIONS OF THE FIRST RED-SEQUENCE CLUSTER SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, T. M. A.; O'Donnell, D.; Coppin, Kristen; Faloon, Ashley; Geach, James E.; Noble, Allison; Yee, H. K. C.; Gilbank, David; Ellingson, Erica; Gladders, Mike; Muzzin, Adam; Wilson, Gillian; Yan, Renbin

    2013-10-01

    We present the results of an infrared (IR) study of high-redshift galaxy clusters with the MIPS camera on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. We have assembled a sample of 42 clusters from the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey-1 over the redshift range 0.3 < z < 1.0 and spanning an approximate range in mass of 10{sup 14-15} M {sub ☉}. We statistically measure the number of IR-luminous galaxies in clusters above a fixed inferred IR luminosity of 2 × 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}, assuming a star forming galaxy template, per unit cluster mass and find it increases to higher redshift. Fitting a simple power-law we measure evolution of (1 + z){sup 5.1±1.9} over the range 0.3 < z < 1.0. These results are tied to the adoption of a single star forming galaxy template; the presence of active galactic nuclei, and an evolution in their relative contribution to the mid-IR galaxy emission, will alter the overall number counts per cluster and their rate of evolution. Under the star formation assumption we infer the approximate total star formation rate per unit cluster mass (ΣSFR/M {sub cluster}). The evolution is similar, with ΣSFR/M {sub cluster} ∼ (1 + z){sup 5.4±1.9}. We show that this can be accounted for by the evolution of the IR-bright field population over the same redshift range; that is, the evolution can be attributed entirely to the change in the in-falling field galaxy population. We show that the ΣSFR/M {sub cluster} (binned over all redshift) decreases with increasing cluster mass with a slope (ΣSFR/M{sub cluster}∼M{sub cluster}{sup -1.5±0.4}) consistent with the dependence of the stellar-to-total mass per unit cluster mass seen locally. The inferred star formation seen here could produce ∼5%-10% of the total stellar mass in massive clusters at z = 0, but we cannot constrain the descendant population, nor how rapidly the star-formation must shut-down once the galaxies have entered the cluster environment. Finally, we show a clear decrease in the number of IR

  19. KAT-7 science verification: cold gas, star formation, and substructure in the nearby Antlia Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Kelley M.; Jarrett, T. H.; Carignan, Claude; Passmoor, Sean S.; Goedhart, Sharmila

    2015-09-01

    The Antlia Cluster is a nearby, dynamically young structure, and its proximity provides a valuable opportunity for detailed study of galaxy and group accretion on to clusters. We present a deep H I mosaic completed as part of spectral line commissioning of the Karoo Array Telescope (KAT-7), and identify infrared counterparts from the Widefield Infrared Survey Explorer extended source catalogue to study neutral atomic gas content and star formation within the cluster. We detect 37 cluster members out to a radius of ˜0.9 Mpc with M_{H I}>5× 10^7 M⊙. Of these, 35 are new H I detections, 27 do not have previous spectroscopic redshift measurements, and one is the Compton thick Seyfert II, NGC 3281, which we detect in H I absorption. The H I galaxies lie beyond the X-ray-emitting region 200 kpc from the cluster centre and have experienced ram pressure stripping out to at least 600 kpc. At larger radii, they are distributed asymmetrically suggesting accretion from surrounding filaments. Combining H I with optical redshifts, we perform a detailed dynamical analysis of the internal substructure, identify large infalling groups, and present the first compilation of the large-scale distribution of H I and star-forming galaxies within the cluster. We find that elliptical galaxy NGC 3268 is at the centre of the oldest substructure and argue that NGC 3258 and its companion population are more recent arrivals. Through the presence of H I and ongoing star formation, we rank substructures with respect to their relative time since accretion on to Antlia.

  20. Searching for the H-alpha 'Smoking Gun' of Prolonged Star Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzia, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    Recently, deep HST images provided conclusive evidence that several massive intermediate-age star clusters {SC} in the LMC and SMC present extended main-sequence turn-offs {eMSTOs}, and in some cases also dual red clumps. This poses serious questions regarding the mechanisms responsible for SC formation. While most recent studies indicate that the eMSTOs are caused by a range in stellar age of about 150-500 Myr among cluster stars, the obvious and important question is: Why has this not been observed yet in SCs in that age range? Our calculations show that prolonged star formation in SCs requires a cluster escape velocity in excess of about 10 km/s, and there really is only one SC in the Local Group that has the right mass and size to be able to retain mass loss in slow winds of the first stellar generation and be young enough to have some of its second stellar generation being still on the pre-main sequence {PMS} and showing emission-line signatures: the 300 Myr old cluster NGC 1856 in the LMC. Since this SC has no adequate HST imaging in the archive to detect an eMSTO, we propose to obtain deep broad-band imaging in F438W, F555W, F814W with WFC3/UVIS to analyze the MSTO and use F656N to search for Balmer-line emission signatures from PMS stars of the secondary stellar generation. The detection of the PMS phase in this cluster {or lack thereof} will have a lasting impact on our understanding of the eMSTO phenomenon. This SC represents a unique opportunity to render insights on the relative importance of various types of polluter stars of the first generation that have been proposed to be responsible for the chemical enrichment of second-generation stars in star clusters.

  1. Ions colliding with clusters of fullerenes—Decay pathways and covalent bond formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, F.; Zettergren, H.; Rousseau, P.; Wang, Y.; Chen, T.; Gatchell, M.; Alexander, J. D.; Stockett, M. H.; Rangama, J.; Chesnel, J. Y.; Capron, M.; Poully, J. C.; Domaracka, A.; Méry, A.; Maclot, S.; Vizcaino, V.; Schmidt, H. T.; Adoui, L.; Alcamí, M.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Martín, F.; Huber, B. A.; Cederquist, H.

    2013-07-01

    We report experimental results for the ionization and fragmentation of weakly bound van der Waals clusters of n C60 molecules following collisions with Ar2 +, He2 +, and Xe20 + at laboratory kinetic energies of 13 keV, 22.5 keV, and 300 keV, respectively. Intact singly charged C60 monomers are the dominant reaction products in all three cases and this is accounted for by means of Monte Carlo calculations of energy transfer processes and a simple Arrhenius-type [C_{60}]_n^+ → C_{60}+ + (n-1)C_{60} evaporation model. Excitation energies in the range of only ˜0.7 eV per C60 molecule in a [C_{60}]_{13}^+ cluster are sufficient for complete evaporation and such low energies correspond to ion trajectories far outside the clusters. Still we observe singly and even doubly charged intact cluster ions which stem from even more distant collisions. For penetrating collisions the clusters become multiply charged and some of the individual molecules may be promptly fragmented in direct knock-out processes leading to efficient formations of new covalent systems. For Ar2 + and He2 + collisions, we observe very efficient C_{119}+ and C_{118}+ formation and molecular dynamics simulations suggest that they are covalent dumb-bell systems due to bonding between C_{59}+ or C_{58}+ and C60 during cluster fragmentation. In the Ar2 + case, it is possible to form even smaller C_{120-2m}+ molecules (m = 2-7), while no molecular fusion reactions are observed for the present Xe20 + collisions.

  2. Ions colliding with clusters of fullerenes-Decay pathways and covalent bond formations

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, F.; Zettergren, H.; Chen, T.; Gatchell, M.; Alexander, J. D.; Stockett, M. H.; Schmidt, H. T.; Cederquist, H.; Rousseau, P.; Chesnel, J. Y.; Capron, M.; Poully, J. C.; Mery, A.; Maclot, S.; Adoui, L.; Wang, Y.; Martin, F.; Rangama, J.; Domaracka, A.; Vizcaino, V. [CIMAP, UMR 6252, CEA and others

    2013-07-21

    We report experimental results for the ionization and fragmentation of weakly bound van der Waals clusters of n C{sub 60} molecules following collisions with Ar{sup 2+}, He{sup 2+}, and Xe{sup 20+} at laboratory kinetic energies of 13 keV, 22.5 keV, and 300 keV, respectively. Intact singly charged C{sub 60} monomers are the dominant reaction products in all three cases and this is accounted for by means of Monte Carlo calculations of energy transfer processes and a simple Arrhenius-type [C{sub 60}]{sub n}{sup +}{yields}C{sub 60}{sup +}+(n-1)C{sub 60} evaporation model. Excitation energies in the range of only {approx}0.7 eV per C{sub 60} molecule in a [C{sub 60}]{sub 13}{sup +} cluster are sufficient for complete evaporation and such low energies correspond to ion trajectories far outside the clusters. Still we observe singly and even doubly charged intact cluster ions which stem from even more distant collisions. For penetrating collisions the clusters become multiply charged and some of the individual molecules may be promptly fragmented in direct knock-out processes leading to efficient formations of new covalent systems. For Ar{sup 2+} and He{sup 2+} collisions, we observe very efficient C{sub 119}{sup +} and C{sub 118}{sup +} formation and molecular dynamics simulations suggest that they are covalent dumb-bell systems due to bonding between C{sub 59}{sup +} or C{sub 58}{sup +} and C{sub 60} during cluster fragmentation. In the Ar{sup 2+} case, it is possible to form even smaller C{sub 120-2m}{sup +} molecules (m= 2-7), while no molecular fusion reactions are observed for the present Xe{sup 20+} collisions.

  3. Haptoglobin phenotype may alter endothelial progenitor cell cluster formation in cerebral small vessel disease.

    PubMed

    Rouhl, R P W; van Oostenbrugge, R J; Damoiseaux, J G M C; Debrus-Palmans, L L; Theunissen, R O M F I H; Knottnerus, I L H; Staals, J E A; Delanghe, J R; Tervaert, J W Cohen; Lodder, J

    2009-02-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease results in silent ischemic lesions (SIL) among which is leukoaraiosis. In this process, endothelial damage is probably involved. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC), are involved in endothelial repair. By restoring the damaged endothelium, EPC could mitigate SIL and cerebral small vessel disease. Haptoglobin 1-1, one of three phenotypes of haptoglobin, relates to SIL and may therefore attenuate the endothelial repair by EPC. Our aim was to quantify EPC number and function and to assess haptoglobin phenotype and its effect on EPC function in patients with a high prevalence of SIL: lacunar stroke patients. We assessed EPC In 42 lacunar stroke patients and 18 controls by flow cytometry and culture with fetal calf serum, patient and control serum. We determined haptoglobin phenotype and cultured EPC with the three different haptoglobin phenotypes. We found that EPC cluster counts were lower in patients (96.9 clusters/well +/- 83.4 (mean +/- SD)), especially in those with SIL (85.0 +/- 64.3), than in controls (174.4 +/- 112.2). Cluster formation was inhibited by patient serum, especially by SIL patient serum, but not by control serum. Patients with haptoglobin 1-1 had less clusters in culture, and when haptoglobin 1-1 was added to EPC cultures, cluster numbers were lower than with the other haptoglobin phenotypes. We conclude that lacunar stroke patients, especially those with SIL, have impaired EPC cluster formation, which may point at decreased endothelial repair potential. The haptoglobin 1-1 phenotype is likely a causative factor in this impairment. PMID:19355924

  4. Linking star formation and galaxy kinematics in the massive cluster Abell 2163

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menacho, Veronica; Verdugo, Miguel

    2015-02-01

    The origin of the morphology-density relation is still an open question in galaxy evolution. It is most likely driven by the combination of the efficient star formation in the highest peaks of the mass distribution at high-z and the transformation by environmental processes at later times as galaxies fall into more massive halos. To gain additional insights about these processes we study the kinematics, star formation and structural properties of galaxies in Abell 2163 a very massive (~4×1015 M⊙, Holz & Perlmutter 2012) merging cluster at z = 0.2. We use high resolution spectroscopy with VLT/VIMOS to derive rotation curves and dynamical masses for galaxies that show regular kinematics. Galaxies that show irregular rotation are also analysed to study the origin of their distortion. This information is combined with stellar masses and structural parameters obtained from high quality CFHT imaging. From narrow band photometry (2.2m/WFI), centered on the redshifted Hα line, we obtain star formation rates. Although our sample is still small, field and cluster galaxies lie in a similar Tully-Fisher relation as local galaxies. Controlling by additional parameters like SFRs or bulge-to-disk ratio do not affect this result. We find however that ~50% of the cluster galaxies display irregular kinematics in contrast to what is found in the field at similar redshifts (~30%, Böhm et al. 2004) and in agreement with other studies in clusters (e.g. Bösch et al. 2013, Kutdemir et al. 2010) which points out to additional processes operating in clusters that distort the galaxy kinematics.

  5. Importance of the initial conditions for star formation - III. Statistical properties of embedded protostellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girichidis, Philipp; Federrath, Christoph; Allison, Richard; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2012-03-01

    We investigate the formation of protostellar clusters during the collapse of dense molecular cloud cores with a focus on the evolution of potential and kinetic energy, the degree of substructure and the early phase of mass segregation. Our study is based on a series of hydrodynamic simulations of dense cores, where we vary the initial density profile and the initial turbulent velocity. In the three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement simulations, we follow the dynamical formation of filaments and protostars until a star formation efficiency of 20 per cent. Despite the different initial configurations, the global ensemble of all protostars in a setup shows a similar energy evolution and forms sub-virial clusters with an energy ratio Ekin/|Epot|˜ 0.2. Concentrating on the innermost central region, the clusters show a roughly virialized energy balance. However, the region of virial balance only covers the innermost ˜10-30 per cent of all the protostars. In all simulations with multiple protostars, the total kinetic energy of the protostars is higher than the kinetic energy of the gas cloud, although the protostars only contain 20 per cent of the total mass. The clusters vary significantly in size, mass and number of protostars, and show different degrees of substructure and mass segregation. Flat density profiles and compressive turbulent modes produce more subclusters than centrally concentrated profiles and solenoidal turbulence. We find that dynamical relaxation and hence dynamical mass segregation is very efficient in all cases from the very beginning of the nascent cluster, i.e. during a phase when protostars constantly form and accrete.

  6. Understanding the In-Situ Star Formation in a z=1.7 Cluster Core Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Tracy

    2014-10-01

    We have discovered a rare beast of a central galaxy within a z=1.7 rich galaxy cluster (estimated ~4x10^14 Msun), forming stars at a prodigious rate of 1200 Msun/yr. This system is infrared bright and its SED and the detection of PAHs at the cluster redshift, implies the IR luminosity is dominated by star formation. Such an extreme system has to date, only been confirmed in the z=0.6 Phoenix cluster (McDonald et al. 2012, 2013, 2014), whereas this object is observed at a much earlier and more active epoch of galaxy and cluster evolution. Here we propose deep HST imaging with WFC3 F160W/F105W to investigate the morphology of the BCG galaxy and its nearest neighbours. Our main goal is to understand the physical processes fuelling the intense starburst, be it a major merger or infalling gas from a cooling flow. We will also characterize the morphological properties (with color information) of the central BCG. These data will be the first of their kind at this redshift and will relate overall formation and evolution of the central galaxy massive parent halo at a cosmological epoch where these processes may begin to dominate.

  7. Investigating star formation properties of galaxies in massive clusters with Herschel and ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, John F.; Baker, Andrew J.; Aguirre, Paula; Barkats, D.; Halpern, Mark; Hilton, Matt; Hughes, John Patrick; Infante, Leopoldo; Lindner, Robert; Marriage, Tobias; Menanteau, Felipe; Sifon, Cristobal; Weiss, Axel; ACT Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    I will present results from an investigation of star formation properties of galaxies residing in two massive z ~ 1 clusters (including the 'El Gordo' merger) that were initially selected via their Sunyaev-Zeldovich decrements by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) southern survey. This study uses new Herschel Space Observatory and Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Cycle 2 observations, which provide information about the dust and cold gas content of galaxies in our targeted clusters. We have detected CO (4-3) and [CI] in individual star-forming cluster galaxies, and also measured stacked continuum and spectral line fluxes at long (e.g., far-infrared, submillimeter, and radio) wavelengths. We use these results to explore the relations between star formation and local environment and cluster dynamical state.This work has been supported by (i) an award issued by JPL/Caltech in association with Herschel, which is a European Space Agency Cornerstone Mission with significant participation by NASA, and (ii) the National Science Foundation through award GSSP SOSPA2-018 from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, which is operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  8. Stellar Masses, Star Formation Rates and X-ray Constraints on Galaxies in the Coma Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrinda, Greg; Desjardins, T. D.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Gallagher, S.; Hammer, D.; Miller, N. A.; Ptak, A.; Tzanavaris, P.; Johnson, K. E.; Walker, L.

    2014-01-01

    We report on new measurements of star formation rates and stellar masses in the “infall” region of the nearby Coma cluster of galaxies. This region is approximately 1 Mpc from the cluster core, where relatively gas-rich galaxies are interacting with the hot intracluster medium, providing an important view of the impact of cluster processes on galaxy evolution. We have used infrared and ultraviolet data available from both ground and spaced-based observations to make these measurements. The star formation rates and stellar mass values were verified via comparison with published results in the Coma core as well as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectral measurements. The infall region has also been observed by XMM-Newton to faint limits to obtain X-ray luminosities for the galaxies in this field. Specifically, we present X-ray photometry of approximately 20 galaxies with XMM-Newton coverage to constrain the X-ray - SFR correlation in a cluster environment. This project was supported by the Baltimore Excellence in STEM Teaching program via summer internship funding to Hrinda.

  9. Spectroscopic study of formation, evolution and interaction of M31 and M33 with star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhou; Yang, Yanbin

    2016-02-01

    The recent studies show that the formation and evolution process of the nearby galaxies are still unclear. By using the Canada France Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) 3.6m telescope, the PanDAS shows complicated substructures (dwarf satellite galaxies, halo globular clusters, extended clusters, star streams, etc.) in the halo of M31 to ~150 kpc from the center of galaxy and M31-M33 interaction has been studied. In our work, we would like to investigate formation, evolution and interaction of M31 and M33, which are the nearest two spiral galaxies in Local Group. The star cluster systems of the two galaxies are good tracers to study the dynamics of the substructures and the interaction. Since 2010, the Xinglong 2.16m, Lijiang 2.4m and MMT 6.5m telescopes have been used for our spectroscopic observations. The radial velocities and Lick absorption-line indices can thus be measured with the spectroscopy and then ages, metallicities and masses of the star clusters can be fitted with the simple stellar population models. These parameters could be used as the input physical parameters for numerical simulations of M31-M33 interaction.

  10. On star formation in stellar systems. I - Photoionization effects in protoglobular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Bodenheimer, P.; Lin, D. N. C.; Noriega-Crespo, A.

    1986-01-01

    The progressive ionization and subsequent dynamical evolution of nonhomogeneously distributed low-metal-abundance diffuse gas after star formation in globular clusters are investigated analytically, taking the gravitational acceleration due to the stars into account. The basic equations are derived; the underlying assumptions, input parameters, and solution methods are explained; and numerical results for three standard cases (ionization during star formation, ionization during expansion, and evolution resulting in a stable H II region at its equilibrium Stromgren radius) are presented in graphs and characterized in detail. The time scale of residual-gas loss in typical clusters is found to be about the same as the lifetime of a massive star on the main sequence.

  11. Controlled Formation and Vibrational Characterization of Large Solvated Ionic Clusters in Cryogenic Ion Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garand, Etienne; Marsh, Brett; Voss, Jonathan; Duffy, Erin M.

    2016-06-01

    An experimental approach for the formation of solvated ionic clusters and their vibrational spectroscopy will be presented. This recently developed apparatus combines an electrospray ionization source, two temperature controlled cryogenic ion traps and a time-of-flight infrared photofragmentation spectrometer, to allow for a universal and controlled formation and characterization of solvent clusters around ionic core as well as product of ion-molecule reaction. Recent results on the spectroscopy of such solvated ions, will be presented and discussed. In particular, this talk will present the structural evolution of glycylglycine as a function of stepwise solvation, and show how the presence of just a few water can modify the geometry of this model peptide. I will also present results solvation of ion that do not form hydrogen bond or strongly interactions with the solvent.

  12. Effect of Temperature on Morphology of Metallic Iron and Formation of Clusters of Iron Ore Pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Alencar, Jean Philippe Santos Gherardi; de Resende, Valdirene Gonzaga; de Castro, Luiz Fernando Andrade

    2016-02-01

    The increase of the reduction temperature in direct reduction furnaces has been a recurring tool due to the benefits that it provides to the process. However, its increase cannot be performed without taking into account some considerations, since the sticking phenomenon is directly correlated with it and could lead to permeability problems and reactor performance. An analysis of the formation of pellets clusters at different temperatures was carried out with focus on morphological characterization of reduced materials to better understand the causes and effects of these actions. The results showed a correlation between the morphology of the metallic iron present in the samples and the clustering index. At low reduction temperatures, 1123 K (850 °C), the iron formed is eroded and deformed and the cluster hardly remains after tumbling. When forming iron with fibrous structure, 1223 K (950 °C), the clustering index increases because of anchor points which make the material to stick together. Finally, under the effect of high temperature and long time, it generates fresh precipitated iron, enhancing the resistance of the clusters so that they cannot be separated.

  13. Line-defect mediated formation of hole and Mo clusters in monolayer molybdenum disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Gyeong Hee; Lee, Jongyeong; Kim, Na Yeon; Lee, Yeongdong; Kim, Youngchan; Kim, Moon J.; Lee, Changgu; Lee, Zonghoon

    2016-03-01

    The production of hole and Mo cluster by electron beam irradiation in molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), which consists of S-Mo-S layers, is monitored over time using atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy. S vacancies are firstly formed due to knocking off of S atoms and then line defects are induced due to accumulation of S vacancies in MoS2 sheet instead of forming a hole. The line defects tend to be merged at a point and a hole is formed subsequently at the point. Mo atoms tend to be clustered discretely as a nano sheet along the edge of the hole due to difference in displacement threshold energy between Mo and S atoms under electron irradiation. After Mo clusters are nearly separated from MoS2 sheet, the clusters are transformed into body-centered cubic nanocrystal of Mo during prolonged electron beam irradiation. The line defect mediated formation of hole and Mo cluster only occurs within a single grain of monolayer MoS2 sheet.

  14. Slow Quenching of Star Formation in OMEGAWINGS Clusters: Galaxies in Transition in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paccagnella, A.; Vulcani, B.; Poggianti, B. M.; Moretti, A.; Fritz, J.; Gullieuszik, M.; Couch, W.; Bettoni, D.; Cava, A.; D'Onofrio, M.; Fasano, G.

    2016-01-01

    The star formation quenching depends on environment, but a full understanding of what mechanisms drive it is still missing. Exploiting a sample of galaxies with masses {M}*\\gt {10}9.8{M}⊙ , drawn from the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) and its recent extension OMEGAWINGS, we investigate the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of stellar mass (M{}*) in galaxy clusters at 0.04\\lt z\\lt 0.07. We use non-member galaxies at 0.02 < z < 0.09 as a field control sample. Overall, we find agreement between the SFR-M{}* relation in the two environments, but detect a population of cluster galaxies with reduced SFRs, which is rare in the field. These transition galaxies are mainly found within the cluster virial radius (R200), but they impact on the SFR-M{}* relation only within 0.6R200. The ratio of transition to pure star-forming galaxies strongly depends on environment, being larger than 0.6 within 0.3R200 and rapidly decreasing with distance, while it is almost flat with M*. As galaxies move downward from the SFR-M{}* main sequence, they become redder and present older luminosity- and mass-weighted ages. These trends, together with the analysis of the star formation histories, suggest that transition galaxies have had a reduced SFR for the past 2-5 Gyr. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the interaction of galaxies with the intracluster medium via strangulation causes a gradual shut down of star formation, giving birth to an evolved population of galaxies in transition from being star forming to becoming passive.

  15. The structure, dynamics, and star formation rate of the Orion nebula cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Da Rio, Nicola; Tan, Jonathan C.; Jaehnig, Karl

    2014-11-01

    The spatial morphology and dynamical status of a young, still-forming stellar cluster provide valuable clues to the conditions during the star formation event and the processes that regulated it. We analyze the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), utilizing the latest censuses of its stellar content and membership estimates over a large wavelength range. We determine the center of mass of the ONC and study the radial dependence of angular substructure. The core appears rounder and smoother than the outskirts, which is consistent with a higher degree of dynamical processing. At larger distances, the departure from circular symmetry is mostly driven by the elongation of the system, with very little additional substructure, indicating a somewhat evolved spatial morphology or an expanding halo. We determine the mass density profile of the cluster, which is well fitted by a power law that is slightly steeper than a singular isothermal sphere. Together with the interstellar medium density, which is estimated from average stellar extinction, the mass content of the ONC is insufficient by a factor ∼1.8 to reproduce the observed velocity dispersion from virialized motions, in agreement with previous assessments that the ONC is moderately supervirial. This may indicate recent gas dispersal. Based on the latest estimates for the age spread in the system and our density profiles, we find that at the half-mass radius, 90% of the stellar population formed within ∼5-8 free-fall times (t {sub ff}). This implies a star formation efficiency per t {sub ff} of ε{sub ff} ∼ 0.04-0.07 (i.e., relatively slow and inefficient star formation rates during star cluster formation).

  16. The Structure, Dynamics, and Star Formation Rate of the Orion Nebula Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Rio, Nicola; Tan, Jonathan C.; Jaehnig, Karl

    2014-11-01

    The spatial morphology and dynamical status of a young, still-forming stellar cluster provide valuable clues to the conditions during the star formation event and the processes that regulated it. We analyze the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), utilizing the latest censuses of its stellar content and membership estimates over a large wavelength range. We determine the center of mass of the ONC and study the radial dependence of angular substructure. The core appears rounder and smoother than the outskirts, which is consistent with a higher degree of dynamical processing. At larger distances, the departure from circular symmetry is mostly driven by the elongation of the system, with very little additional substructure, indicating a somewhat evolved spatial morphology or an expanding halo. We determine the mass density profile of the cluster, which is well fitted by a power law that is slightly steeper than a singular isothermal sphere. Together with the interstellar medium density, which is estimated from average stellar extinction, the mass content of the ONC is insufficient by a factor ~1.8 to reproduce the observed velocity dispersion from virialized motions, in agreement with previous assessments that the ONC is moderately supervirial. This may indicate recent gas dispersal. Based on the latest estimates for the age spread in the system and our density profiles, we find that at the half-mass radius, 90% of the stellar population formed within ~5-8 free-fall times (t ff). This implies a star formation efficiency per t ff of epsilonff ~ 0.04-0.07 (i.e., relatively slow and inefficient star formation rates during star cluster formation).

  17. Cosmology and astrophysics from relaxed galaxy clusters - V. Consistency with cold dark matter structure formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantz, A. B.; Allen, S. W.; Morris, R. G.

    2016-10-01

    This is the fifth in a series of papers studying the astrophysics and cosmology of massive, dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters. Our sample comprises 40 clusters identified as being dynamically relaxed and hot in Papers I and II of this series. Here we use constraints on cluster mass profiles from X-ray data to test some of the basic predictions of cosmological structure formation in the cold dark matter (CDM) paradigm. We present constraints on the concentration-mass relation for massive clusters, finding a power-law mass dependence with a slope of κm = -0.16 ± 0.07, in agreement with CDM predictions. For this relaxed sample, the relation is consistent with a constant as a function of redshift (power-law slope with 1 + z of κζ = -0.17 ± 0.26), with an intrinsic scatter of σln c = 0.16 ± 0.03. We investigate the shape of cluster mass profiles over the radial range probed by the data (typically ˜50 kpc-1 Mpc), and test for departures from the simple Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) form, for which the logarithmic slope of the density profile tends to -1 at small radii. Specifically, we consider as alternatives the generalized NFW (GNFW) and Einasto parametrizations. For the GNFW model, we find an average value of (minus) the logarithmic inner slope of β = 1.02 ± 0.08, with an intrinsic scatter of σβ = 0.22 ± 0.07, while in the Einasto case we constrain the average shape parameter to be α = 0.29 ± 0.04 with an intrinsic scatter of σα = 0.12 ± 0.04. Our results are thus consistent with the simple NFW model on average, but we clearly detect the presence of intrinsic, cluster-to-cluster scatter about the average.

  18. THE STAR FORMATION HISTORY OF THE MILKY WAY'S NUCLEAR STAR CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Pfuhl, O.; Fritz, T. K.; Eisenhauer, F.; Genzel, R.; Gillessen, S.; Ott, T.; Dodds-Eden, K.; Zilka, M.; Sternberg, A.; Maness, H.

    2011-11-10

    We present spatially resolved imaging and integral field spectroscopy data for 450 cool giant stars within 1 pc from Sgr A*. We use the prominent CO bandheads to derive effective temperatures of individual giants. Additionally we present the deepest spectroscopic observation of the Galactic center (GC) so far, probing the number of B9/A0 main-sequence stars (2.2-2.8 M{sub sun}) in two deep fields. From spectrophotometry we construct a Hertzsprung-Russell diagram of the red giant population and fit the observed diagram with model populations to derive the star formation history of the nuclear cluster. We find (1) that the average nuclear star formation rate dropped from an initial maximum {approx}10 Gyr ago to a deep minimum 1-2 Gyr ago and increased again during the last few hundred Myrs, (2) that roughly 80% of the stellar mass formed more than 5 Gyr ago, and (3) that mass estimates within R {approx} 1 pc from Sgr A* favor a dominant star formation mode with a 'normal' Chabrier/Kroupa initial mass function for the majority of the past star formation in the GC. The bulk stellar mass seems to have formed under conditions significantly different from the young stellar disks, perhaps because at the time of the formation of the nuclear cluster the massive black hole and its sphere of influence were much smaller than today.

  19. Theoretical investigation on isomer formation probability and free energy of small C clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zheng-Zhe

    2015-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations are employed to investigate the evolution, formation probability, detailed balance, and isomerization rate of small C cluster isomer at 2500 K. For C10, the isomer formation probability predicted by free energy is in good agreement with molecular dynamics simulation. However, for C20, C30, and C36, the formation probabilities predicted by free energy are not in agreement with molecular dynamics simulations. Although the cluster systems are in equilibrium, detailed balance is not reached. Such results may be attributed to high transformation barriers between cage, bowl, and sheet isomers. In summary, for mesoscopic nanosystems the free energy criterion, which commonly holds for macroscopic systems in dynamic equilibrium, may not provide a good prediction for isomer formation probability. New theoretical criterion should be further investigated for predicting the isomer formation probability of a mesoscopic nanosystem. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11304239) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities.

  20. Pitfalls when observationally characterizing the relative formation rates of stars and stellar clusters in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik; Bastian, Nate

    2016-03-01

    Stars generally form in aggregates, some of which are bound (`clusters') while others are unbound and disperse on short ({˜ }10 { Myr}) time-scales (`associations'). The fraction of stars forming in bound clusters (Γ) is a fundamental outcome of the star formation process. Recent observational and theoretical work has suggested that Γ increases with the gas surface density (Σ) or star formation rate (SFR) surface density (ΣSFR), both within galaxies and between different ones. However, a recent paper by Chandar et al. has challenged these results, showing that the total number of stellar aggregates per unit SFR does not vary systematically with the host galaxy's absolute SFR. In this Letter, we show that no variations are expected when no distinction is made between bound and unbound aggregates, because the sum of these two fractions should be close to unity. We also demonstrate that any scaling of Γ with the absolute SFR is much weaker than with ΣSFR, due to the mass-radius-SFR relation of star-forming `main-sequence' galaxies. The environmental variation of Γ should therefore be probed as a function of area-normalized quantities, such as Σ or ΣSFR. We present a set of guidelines for meaningful observational tests of cluster formation theories and show that these resolve the reported discrepancy.

  1. Titanium-based icosahedral quasicrystals and approximants: Phase formation, cluster structure, and hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majzoub, Eric Hish

    Equilibrium phase formation is reported for ternary Ti-Zr-Ni alloys near the icosahedral phase (i-phase) forming composition. The i-phase forms over a small compositional range from a high-temperature equilibrium phase mixture of the Laves and alpha(Ti/Zr) solid solution phases. Additions of small amounts of Pb, 1--2 at. %, are demonstrated to substantially effect the equilibrium phase formation and extend the stability of the i-phase to nearly 700°C. An electrochemical method was used to hydrogenate Ti-based quasicrystals and their crystal approximants. This technique gives a consistently high hydrogen to metal atom ratio of 1.9, without crystal hydride formation in the quasicrystal. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements of the hydrogen dipole-dipole interaction were made using hydrided i-phase samples. Comparisons with simulations based on hydrogen filling of the approximant-phase tetrahedral interstitials reveals that any filling order is consistent with the experimental data. Studies of the atomic structure of hydrided and unhydrided i-TiZrNi quasicrystal and its approximant are reported. We construct constrained icosahedral glass models using Bergman and Mackay clusters to describe the i-phase in Ti-Zr-Ni and Ti-TM-Si-O. A comparison of simulated and experimental diffraction reveals that, the Bergman and Mackay clusters are the fundamental clusters in i-TiZrNi and i-TiMnSiO, respectively.

  2. Hα Star Formation Rates for z>1 Galaxy Clusters in the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey Using WFC3 IR Grism Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeimann, Gregory; Stanford, A.; Brodwin, M.; Dey, A.; Stern, D.; Gonzalez, A.

    2011-05-01

    We present new HST WFC3 grism data for 17 z>1 galaxy clusters in the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS). Using the G141 grism (λ = 1.10 - 1.65 μm, 46.5 A/pixel), we identified ˜5-15 new cluster members in each cluster candidate with a visual inspection of emission line galaxies in the reduced 1-d and 2-d spectral extractions. Given the redshift range of the cluster candidates and the wavelength coverage of the G141 grism, the emission line most identified was the blended Hα+NII. Correlations found in the literature between the EW of Hα+NII and the line ratio of NII to Hα were used to deblend the two fluxes. Hα emission was used as an indicator of star formation. Our program is sensitive to an unobscured star formation rate of 4 M⊙ / Year for z=1.5 and a nominal 1:4 ratio of NII to Hα. Concurrent MIPS 24μm data allows for the comparison of different SFR tracers. Whenever possible, we also use the ratio of Hβ/Hα to estimate dust obscuration and correct the SFRs. This dataset allows the study of a wide-range of star formation rates in dense cluster cores during the peak epoch of galaxy formation.

  3. THE ACS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY. X. QUANTIFYING THE STAR CLUSTER FORMATION EFFICIENCY OF NEARBY DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, David O.; Dale, Daniel A.; Seth, Anil C.; Johnson, L. Clifton; Weisz, Daniel R.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Olsen, Knut A. G.; Engelbracht, Charles W.

    2012-06-01

    We study the relationship between the field star formation and cluster formation properties in a large sample of nearby dwarf galaxies. We use optical data from the Hubble Space Telescope and from ground-based telescopes to derive the ages and masses of the young (t{sub age} {approx}< 100 Myr) cluster sample. Our data provide the first constraints on two proposed relationships between the star formation rate (SFR) of galaxies and the properties of their cluster systems in the low SFR regime. The data show broad agreement with these relationships, but significant galaxy-to-galaxy scatter exists. In part, this scatter can be accounted for by simulating the small number of clusters detected from stochastically sampling the cluster mass function. However, this stochasticity does not fully account for the observed scatter in our data, suggesting that there may be true variations in the fraction of stars formed in clusters in dwarf galaxies. Comparison of the cluster formation and the brightest cluster in our sample galaxies also provide constraints on cluster destruction models.

  4. A Density Functional Theory Study of Temperature Dependence of Cluster Formation from Sulfuric Acid and Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    lin, H.; Chon, N. L.; Lee, S.

    2013-12-01

    Recent atmospheric nucleation studies have shown that acid-base reactions are essential at the initial step of aerosol nucleation. Ammonia is the most abundant base compound present in the atmosphere. Ammonia can directly interact with sulfuric acid clusters to reduce Gibbs free energy of cluster formation and growth, but the role that ammonia plays in atmospheric nucleation is still not well understood, especially at the molecular cluster level. We have performed density functional theory (BL3YP) and ab initio (MP2) calculations to study energetics of cluster formation for (NH3)m(H2SO4) and (NH3)(H2SO4)n (m, n = 1-6) in the temperature range from 200-300 K. For the model (NH3)m(H2SO4) clusters, bindings were predicted to increase from m = 1 to 6 at 200 K, while the most stable complex at 300 K was found to be at m = 2. For the (NH3)(H2SO4)n complexes, enthalpic contributions dominated and the binding is more stable for larger n. The temperature dependency has stronger effects on the (NH3)m(H2SO4) complexes, among which the lowest free energy shifts from m = 6 at T = 200 K to m = 5 around T = 240 K and further to m = 2 at T ≥ 280 K. The effects on the (NH3)(H2SO4)n complexes are much smaller, while there are similar trends that favor larger n for all temperatures between 200 and 300 K. These results thus indicate that the role of ammonia in atmospheric aerosol nucleation is critical in a wide range of atmospheric temperature conditions.

  5. The big problems in star formation: The star formation rate, stellar clustering, and the initial mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumholz, Mark R.

    2014-06-01

    Star formation lies at the center of a web of processes that drive cosmic evolution: generation of radiant energy, synthesis of elements, formation of planets, and development of life. Decades of observations have yielded a variety of empirical rules about how it operates, but at present we have no comprehensive, quantitative theory. In this review I discuss the current state of the field of star formation, focusing on three central questions: What controls the rate at which gas in a galaxy converts to stars? What determines how those stars are clustered, and what fraction of the stellar population ends up in gravitationally-bound structures? What determines the stellar initial mass function, and does it vary with star-forming environment? I use these three questions as a lens to introduce the basics of star formation, beginning with a review of the observational phenomenology and the basic physical processes. I then review the status of current theories that attempt to solve each of the three problems, pointing out links between them and opportunities for theoretical and numerical work that crosses the scale between them. I conclude with a discussion of prospects for theoretical progress in the coming years.

  6. The early phases of galaxy clusters formation in IR: coupling hydrodynamical simulations with GRASIL-3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granato, Gian Luigi; Ragone-Figueroa, Cinthia; Domínguez-Tenreiro, Rosa; Obreja, Aura; Borgani, Stefano; De Lucia, Gabriella; Murante, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    We compute and study the infrared and sub-mm properties of high-redshift (z ≳ 1) simulated clusters and protoclusters. The results of a large set of hydrodynamical zoom-in simulations including active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback, have been treated with the recently developed radiative transfer code GRASIL-3D, which accounts for the effect of dust reprocessing in an arbitrary geometry. Here, we have slightly generalized the code to adapt it to the present purpose. Then we have post-processed boxes of physical size 2 Mpc encompassing each of the 24 most massive clusters identified at z = 0, at several redshifts between 0.5 and 3, producing IR and sub-mm mock images of these regions and spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the radiation coming out from them. While this field is in its infancy from the observational point of view, rapid development is expected in the near future thanks to observations performed in the far-IR and sub-mm bands. Notably, we find that in this spectral regime our prediction are little affected by the assumption required by this post-processing, and the emission is mostly powered by star formation (SF) rather than accretion on to super massive black hole (SMBH). The comparison with the little observational information currently available, highlights that the simulated cluster regions never attain the impressive star formation rates suggested by these observations. This problem becomes more intriguing taking into account that the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the same simulations turn out to be too massive. It seems that the interplay between the feedback schemes and the star formation model should be revised, possibly incorporating a positive feedback mode.

  7. Concomitant formation of different nature clusters and hardening in reactor pressure vessel steels irradiated by heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, K.; Fukuya, K.; Hojo, T.

    2013-11-01

    Specimens of A533B steels containing 0.04, 0.09 and 0.21 wt%Cu were irradiated at 290 °C to 3 dpa with 3 MeV Fe ions and subjected to atom probe analyses, transmission electron microscopy observations and hardness measurements. The atom probe analysis results showed that two types of solute clusters were formed: Cu-enriched clusters containing Mn, Ni and Si atoms as irradiation-enhanced solute atom clusters and Mn/Ni/Si-enriched clusters as irradiation-induced solute atom clusters. Both cluster types occurred in the highest Cu-content steel and the ratio of Mn/Ni/Si-enriched clusters to Cu-enriched clusters increased with irradiation doses. It was confirmed that the cluster formation was a key factor in the microstructure evolution until the high dose irradiation was reached even in the low Cu content steels though the dislocation loops with much lower density than that of the clusters were observed as matrix damage. The difference in the hardening efficiency due to the difference in the nature of the clusters was small. The irradiation-induced clustering of undersized Si atoms suggested that a clustering driving force other than vacancy-driven diffusion, probably an interstitial mechanism, may become important at higher dose rates.

  8. Core-halo age gradients and star formation in the Orion Nebula and NGS 2024 young stellar clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Getman, Konstantin V.; Feigelson, Eric D.; Kuhn, Michael A.

    2014-06-01

    We analyze age distributions of two nearby rich stellar clusters, the NGC 2024 (Flame Nebula) and Orion Nebula cluster (ONC) in the Orion molecular cloud complex. Our analysis is based on samples from the MYStIX survey and a new estimator of pre-main sequence (PMS) stellar ages, Age{sub JX} , derived from X-ray and near-infrared photometric data. To overcome the problem of uncertain individual ages and large spreads of age distributions for entire clusters, we compute median ages and their confidence intervals of stellar samples within annular subregions of the clusters. We find core-halo age gradients in both the NGC 2024 cluster and ONC: PMS stars in cluster cores appear younger and thus were formed later than PMS stars in cluster peripheries. These findings are further supported by the spatial gradients in the disk fraction and K-band excess frequency. Our age analysis is based on Age{sub JX} estimates for PMS stars and is independent of any consideration of OB stars. The result has important implications for the formation of young stellar clusters. One basic implication is that clusters form slowly and the apparent age spreads in young stellar clusters, which are often controversial, are (at least in part) real. The result further implies that simple models where clusters form inside-out are incorrect and more complex models are needed. We provide several star formation scenarios that alone or in combination may lead to the observed core-halo age gradients.

  9. Proteus mirabilis fimbriae- and urease-dependent clusters assemble in an extracellular niche to initiate bladder stone formation

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, Jessica N.; Norsworthy, Allison N.; Sun, Tung-Tien

    2016-01-01

    The catheter-associated uropathogen Proteus mirabilis frequently causes urinary stones, but little has been known about the initial stages of bladder colonization and stone formation. We found that P. mirabilis rapidly invades the bladder urothelium, but generally fails to establish an intracellular niche. Instead, it forms extracellular clusters in the bladder lumen, which form foci of mineral deposition consistent with development of urinary stones. These clusters elicit a robust neutrophil response, and we present evidence of neutrophil extracellular trap generation during experimental urinary tract infection. We identified two virulence factors required for cluster development: urease, which is required for urolithiasis, and mannose-resistant Proteus-like fimbriae. The extracellular cluster formation by P. mirabilis stands in direct contrast to uropathogenic Escherichia coli, which readily formed intracellular bacterial communities but not luminal clusters or urinary stones. We propose that extracellular clusters are a key mechanism of P. mirabilis survival and virulence in the bladder. PMID:27044107

  10. Analysis of the static properties of cluster formations in symmetric linear multiblock copolymers.

    PubMed

    Fytas, N G; Theodorakis, P E

    2011-06-15

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the static properties of a single linear multiblock copolymer chain under poor solvent conditions varying the block length N, the number of blocks n, and the solvent quality by variation of the temperature T. We study the most symmetrical case, where the number of blocks of monomers of type A, n(A), equals that of monomers B, n(B) (n(A) = n(B) = n/2), the length of all blocks is the same irrespective of their type, and the potential parameters are also chosen symmetrically, as for a standard Lennard-Jones fluid. Under poor solvent conditions the chains collapse and blocks with monomers of the same type form clusters, which are phase separated from the clusters with monomers of the other type. We study the dependence of the size of the clusters formed on n, N and T. Furthermore, we discuss our results with respect to recent simulation data on the phase behaviour of such macromolecules, providing a complete picture for the cluster formations in single multiblock copolymer chains under poor solvent conditions.

  11. Pulsed laser ablation of binary semiconductors: mechanisms of vaporisation and cluster formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bulgakov, A V; Evtushenko, A B; Shukhov, Yu G; Ozerov, I; Marin, W

    2010-12-29

    Formation of small clusters during pulsed ablation of two binary semiconductors, zinc oxide and indium phosphide, in vacuum by UV, visible, and IR laser radiation is comparatively studied. The irradiation conditions favourable for generation of neutral and charged Zn{sub n}O{sub m} and In{sub n}P{sub m} clusters of different stoichiometry in the ablation products are found. The size and composition of the clusters, their expansion dynamics and reactivity are analysed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A particular attention is paid to the mechanisms of ZnO and InP ablation as a function of laser fluence, with the use of different ablation models. It is established that ZnO evapourates congruently in a wide range of irradiation conditions, while InP ablation leads to enrichment of the target surface with indium. It is shown that this radically different character of semiconductor ablation determines the composition of the nanostructures formed: zinc oxide clusters are mainly stoichiometric, whereas In{sub n}P{sub m} particles are significantly enriched with indium. (photonics and nanotechnology)

  12. Variation of lattice constant and cluster formation in GaAsBi

    SciTech Connect

    Puustinen, J.; Schramm, A.; Guina, M.; Wu, M.; Luna, E.; Laukkanen, P.; Laitinen, M.; Sajavaara, T.

    2013-12-28

    We investigate the structural properties of GaAsBi layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs at substrate temperatures between 220–315 °C. Irrespective of the growth temperature, the structures exhibited similar Bi compositions, and good overall crystal quality as deduced from X-Ray diffraction measurements. After thermal annealing at temperatures as low as 500 °C, the GaAsBi layers grown at the lowest temperatures exhibited a significant reduction of the lattice constant. The lattice variation was significantly larger for Bi-containing samples than for Bi-free low-temperature GaAs samples grown as a reference. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry gave no evidence of Bi diffusing out of the layer during annealing. However, dark-field and Z-contrast transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed the formation of GaAsBi clusters with a Bi content higher than in the surrounding matrix, as well as the presence of metallic As clusters. The apparent reduction of the lattice constant can be explained by a two-fold process: the diffusion of the excess As incorporated within As{sub Ga} antisites to As clusters, and the reduction of the Bi content in the GaAs matrix due to diffusion of Bi to GaAsBi clusters. Diffusion of both As and Bi are believed to be assisted by the native point defects, which are present in the low-temperature as-grown material.

  13. Pre-main-sequence accretion and the formation of multiple populations in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Antona, Francesca; Ventura, Paolo; Decressin, Thibaut; Vesperini, Enrico; D'Ercole, Annibale

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the viability of a model in which the chemical anomalies among globular cluster stars are due to accretion of gas on to the protostellar discs of low-mass stars. This model has been suggested as a way to reduce the large initial cluster masses required by other models for the formation of multiple stellar generations. We numerically follow the evolution of the accreting stars, and we show that the structure of the seed star does not remain fully convective for the whole duration of the accretion phase. Stellar populations showing discrete abundances of helium in the core, that seem to be present in some clusters, might be formed with this mechanism only if accretion occurs before the core of the stars become radiative (within 2-3 Myr) or if a thermohaline instability is triggered, to achieve full mixing after the accretion phase ends. We also show that the lithium abundances in accreted structures may vary by orders of magnitude in equal masses obtained by accreting different masses. In addition, the same thermohaline mixing which could provide a homogeneous helium distribution down to the stellar centre, would destroy any lithium surviving in the envelope, so that both helium homogeneity and lithium survival require that the accretion phase be limited to the first couple of million years of the cluster evolution. Such a short accretion phase strongly reduces the amount of processed matter available, and reintroduces the requirement of an extremely large initial mass for the protocluster.

  14. Influence of the block hydrophilicity of AB2 miktoarm star copolymers on cluster formation in solutions.

    PubMed

    Han, Minwoo; Hong, Minhyung; Sim, Eunji

    2011-05-28

    We investigated the formation of various micelle shapes of lipid-like amphiphilic AB(2) miktoarm star copolymers in a solution, by performing dissipative particle dynamics simulations. AB(2) miktoarm star copolymer molecules are modeled with coarse-grained structures that consist of a relatively hydrophilic head (A) group with a single arm and a hydrophobic tail (B) group with double arms. A decrease in the hydrophilicity of the head group leads to a reduction of the polymer-solvent contact area, causing cluster structure changes from spherical micelles to vesicles. Consequently, a spherical exterior with multi-lamellar or cylindrical phase interior structures forms under poor solvent conditions without the introduction of spherical hard-wall containers. Furthermore we observed that, for small head group lengths, vesicles were formed in much wider range of solvent-head interaction strength than for long head groups, indicating that molecules with short head group offer a superior vesicle forming property. A phase diagram, the structure and kinetics of the cluster formation, a density profile, and a detailed shape analysis are presented to discuss the molecular characteristics of potential candidates for drug carriers that require superior and versatile vesicle forming properties. We also show that, under certain solvent-hydrophilic head group interaction conditions, initially formed cylindrical micelles transform to bilayer fragments through redistribution of copolymers within the cluster.

  15. Local-density driven clustered star formation: Model and (some) implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, G.

    A positive power-law trend between the local surface densities of molecular gas, Σ_gas, and young stellar objects, Σ_stars, in molecular clouds of the solar neighbourhood has recently been identified. How it relates to the properties of embedded clusters has so far not been investigated. To that purpose, we model the development of the stellar component of molecular clumps as a function of time and local volume density. Specifically, we associate the observed volume density gradient of molecular clumps to the density-dependent free-fall time and we obtain the molecular clump star formation history by applying a constant star formation efficiency per free-fall time, ɛ_ff. The model reproduces naturally the observed (Σ_gas, Σ_stars) relation quoted above. The consequences of our model in terms of cluster survivability after residual star-forming gas expulsion and in terms of star age distribution in young gas-free clusters are discussed.

  16. The influence of dynamical structural relaxation of point defect clusters on void formation in irradiated copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura, Y.; Mukouda, I.; Sugio, K.

    1997-11-01

    In the neutron-irradiation experiment with a temperature controlled capsule at JMTR, residual-gas-free copper was irradiated at 200°C and 300°C together with as-received copper. The fluences were 5 × 10 18 n/cm 2 (the low fluence) to 1 × 10 20 n/cm 2 (the high fluence). TEM observation of the irradiated specimens showed that interstitial clusters form a colony at the low fluence which develops into a dislocation structure at the high fluence. Between the colonies only vacancy clusters in the form of voids and stacking fault tetrahedra (sft) were observed. There are no effects of residual gas atoms on the formation of voids at the low fluence although the effects become appreciable at the high fluence. The number of vacancies which are accumulated in a void is 350 times larger than that in a sft at the low fluence. The number density of voids decreased with increasing neutron fluence while the number density of sft increased. The voids form uniformly in copper irradiated to the low fluence while they were observed along dislocations at the high fluence. Computer simulations by molecular dynamics show that small interstitial clusters relax to a bundle of <110> crowdions and move long distances in response to small strain fields. Interstitial clusters move along a <110> direction and can switch to other <110> directions, and form groups of clusters. At high temperature, a dense colony of the clusters forms and develops into a dislocation structure. It is shown that small vacancy clusters relax to movable structures at high temperature. The structure consists of vacancies which are connected in a curved string shape. Along the vacancy strings, many relaxations of a tri-vacancy of Damask- Dienes-Weizer type (3v-sft) were observed. Such a relaxation to the 3v-sft type makes it difficult for a single vacancy evaporation. Small vacancy clusters move and coalesce into larger vacancy clusters. The linkage of the results of experiments and computer-simulations suggests

  17. The influence of the cluster environment on the star formation efficiency of 12 Virgo spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, B.; Wong, O. I.; Braine, J.; Chung, A.; Kenney, J. D. P.

    2012-07-01

    The influence of the environment on gas surface density and star formation efficiency of cluster spiral galaxies is investigated. We extend previous work on radial profiles by a pixel-to pixel analysis looking for asymmetries due to environmental interactions. The star formation rate is derived from GALEX UV and Spitzer total infrared data based on the 8, 24, 70, and 160 μm data. As in field galaxies, the star formation rate for most Virgo galaxies is approximately proportional to the molecular gas mass. Except for NGC 4438, the cluster environment does not affect the star formation efficiency with respect to the molecular gas. Gas truncation is not associated with major changes in the total gas surface density distribution of the inner disk of Virgo spiral galaxies. In three galaxies (NGC 4430, NGC 4501, and NGC 4522), possible increases in the molecular fraction and the star formation efficiency with respect to the total gas, of factors of 1.5 to 2, are observed on the windward side of the galactic disk. A significant increase of the star formation efficiency with respect to the molecular gas content on the windward side of ram pressure-stripped galaxies is not observed. The ram-pressure stripped extraplanar gas of 3 highly inclined spiral galaxies (NGC 4330, NGC 4438, and NGC 4522) shows a depressed star formation efficiency with respect to the total gas, and one of them (NGC 4438) shows a depressed rate even with respect to the molecular gas. The interpretation is that stripped gas loses the gravitational confinement and associated pressure of the galactic disk, and the gas flow is diverging, so the gas density decreases and the star formation rate drops. We found two such regions of low star formation efficiency in the more face-on galaxies NGC 4501 and NGC 4654 which are both undergoing ram pressure stripping. These regions show low radio continuum emission or unusually steep radio spectral index. However, the stripped extraplanar gas in one highly inclined

  18. Outflow Feedback Regulated Massive Star Formation in Parsec-Scale Cluster Forming Clumps

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peng; Li, Zhi-Yun; Abel, Tom; Nakamura, Fumitaka; /Niigata U.

    2010-02-15

    We investigate massive star formation in turbulent, magnetized, parsec-scale clumps of molecular clouds including protostellar outflow feedback using three dimensional numerical simulations of effective resolution 2048{sup 3}. The calculations are carried out using a block structured adaptive mesh refinement code that solves the ideal MHD equations including self-gravity and implements accreting sink particles. We find that, in the absence of regulation by magnetic fields and outflow feedback, massive stars form readily in a turbulent, moderately condensed clump of {approx} 1,600 M{sub {circle_dot}} (containing {approx} 10{sup 2} initial Jeans masses), along with a cluster of hundreds of lower mass stars. The massive stars are fed at high rates by (1) transient dense filaments produced by large-scale turbulent compression at early times, and (2) by the clump-wide global collapse resulting from turbulence decay at late times. In both cases, the bulk of the massive star's mass is supplied from outside a 0.1 pc-sized 'core' that surrounds the star. In our simulation, the massive star is clump-fed rather than core-fed. The need for large-scale feeding makes the massive star formation prone to regulation by outflow feedback, which directly opposes the feeding processes. The outflows reduce the mass accretion rates onto the massive stars by breaking up the dense filaments that feed the massive star formation at early times, and by collectively slowing down the global collapse that fuel the massive star formation at late times. The latter is aided by a moderate magnetic field of strength in the observed range (corresponding to a dimensionless clump mass-to-flux ratio {lambda} {approx} a few); the field allows the outflow momenta to be deposited more efficiently inside the clump. We conclude that the massive star formation in our simulated turbulent, magnetized, parsec-scale clump is outflow-regulated and clump-fed (ORCF for short). An important implication is that the

  19. Formation, migration, and clustering energies of interstitial He in α-quartz and β-cristobalite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kan-Ju; Ding, Hepeng; Demkowicz, Michael J.

    2016-10-01

    Precipitation of implanted helium (He) is detrimental to many nuclear materials. A solid in which implanted He does not precipitate, but rather remains in solution and diffuses readily is potentially of interest for applications requiring resistance to He-induced damage. We use density functional theory (DFT) calculations to examine He interstitial formation, migration, and clustering energies in two SiO2 polymorphs: α-quartz and β-cristobalite. Our findings show greater He solubility and mobility in the latter than in the former. This difference appears to be due primarily to the unlike atomic-level structures of α-quartz and β-cristobalite, rather than their differing densities. Our findings also suggest that He is unlikely to cluster in either material. The behavior of He in α-quartz and β-cristobalite, and similar forms of silica make them promising materials for further investigation for potential use in applications requiring resistance to He-induced damage.

  20. Oriented cluster formation of endohedral Y@C{sub 82} metallofullerenes on clean surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shinohara, Hisanori; Inakuma, Masayasu; Kishida, Masaaki; Yamazaki, Souichi; Hashizume, Tomihiro; Sakurai, Toshio

    1995-09-21

    An oriented head-to-tail cluster formation of an endohedral yttrium metallofullerene, Y@C{sub 82}, on a Cu(111)I x 1 clean surface has been observed directly by the use of a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions. The STM observation reveals that the Y@C{sub 82} molecules preferentially form dimers and one-dimensional clusters at the step edge of the Cu(111) surface. The observed intermolecular distance (11.2 {+-} 0.5 A) is smaller than that of the simple Y@C{sub 82}, Y@C{sub 82} van der Waals distance (11.4 A), indicating the presence of a strong interfullerene interaction. The STM results suggest the presence of strong dipole-dipole and charge-transfer interactions among Y@C{sub 82} fullerenes. Such a molecule has a great similarity to the `superatom` features proposed theoretically in a semiconductor heterostructure. 30 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Using Image Processing Techniques for Cluster Analysis, and Droplet Formation in Phase Separating Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Gregory; Oprisan, Ana; Hegseth, John; Oprisan, Sorinel; Lecoutre, Carole; Garrabos, Yves; Beysens, Daniel

    2009-03-01

    A series of experiments were performed using the Alice II apparatus in microgravity to study phase separation near critical temperature. Using image analysis techniques, we were able to obtain quantitative information regarding the morphology of gas-liquid interface near critical point of pure SF6 fluid in microgravity. Growth laws for liquid and gas clusters were extracted based on image segmentation both with thresholding and k-means clustering. By measuring the image features we analyzed the formation of spherical droplets during late stage of phase separation for a series of full view images. The growth of a wetting layer around the border of the cell containing the fluid was also investigated using image processing techniques.

  2. The HST Legacy Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters: Shedding UV Light on Their Populations and Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotto, Giampaolo

    2013-10-01

    This is a UV-initiative proposal to complement the existing F606W and F814W database of the ACS Globular Cluster {GC} Treasury by imaging most of its clusters through UV/blue WFC3/UVIS filters F275W, F336W and F438W. This "magic trio" of filters has shown an uncanny ability to disentangle and characterize multiple-population {MP} patterns, in a way that is exquisitely sensitive to C, N, and O abundance variations. Combination of these passbands with the optical ones also gives the best leverage for measuring helium enrichment. The dozen clusters so far observed in these bands exhibit a bewildering variety of MP patterns, so that only a wide survey can map the full variance of the phenomenon. This ubiquity of multiple stellar generations in GCs has made the formation of these cornerstone objects more intriguing than ever; GC formation and the origin of their MPs have now become one and the same problem.Our resulting five-band Treasury database will also provide unique tools to address a wide variety of other issues, such as: the advanced evolution of intermediate-mass stars; their chemical yields and contribution to the chemical evolution of galaxies; the calibration of UV-optical colors for unresolved stellar systems; the nature of the second parameter{s} that control the morphology of the horizontal branch; the identification and characterization of blue stragglers, high-energy sources, optical counterparts of millisecond pulsars, and other exotica that tend to congregate in globular clusters. Thus, an extremely wide scientific return will come from this HST legacy database.

  3. THE 100 Myr STAR FORMATION HISTORY OF NGC 5471 FROM CLUSTER AND RESOLVED STELLAR PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Benito, Ruben; Perez, Enrique; Maiz Apellaniz, Jesus; Cervino, Miguel; Diaz, Angeles I. E-mail: angeles.diaz@uam.es E-mail: jmaiz@iaa

    2011-04-15

    We show that star formation in the giant H II region NGC 5471 has been ongoing during the past 100 Myr. Using Hubble Space Telescope/Wide-Field Planetary Camera 2 F547M and F675W, ground-based JHK{sub s} , and GALEX FUV and NUV images, we have conducted a photometric study of the star formation history (SFH) in the massive giant extragalactic H II region NGC 5471 in M101. We perform a photometric study of the color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of the resolved stars and an integrated analysis of the main individual star-forming clusters and of NGC 5471 as a whole. The integrated UV-optical-NIR photometry for the whole region provides two different reference ages, 8 Myr and 60 Myr, revealing a complex SFH, clearly confirmed by the CMD-resolved stellar photometry analysis. The spatial distribution of the stars shows that the star formation in NGC 5471 has proceeded along the whole region during, at least, the last 100 Myr. The current ionizing clusters are enclosed within a large bubble, which is likely to have been produced by the stars that formed in a major event {approx}20 Myr ago.

  4. Cluster formation in water-in-oil microemulsions at percolation: evaluation of the electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordi, F.; Cametti, C.; Rouch, J.; Sciortino, F.; Tartaglia, P.

    1996-06-01

    We study water-in-oil microemulsion systems in the droplet phase and in the vicinity of a percolation transition in the non-percolating region. We focus on the electrical conductivity and permittivity, quantities that show large variations when approaching the percolation threshold. The accepted model for the interpretation of the increasing conductivity - very large compared to that of the bathing oil phase - is related to clustering of the microemulsion droplets and migration of charges within the aggregates. Power laws have been used to interpret the behaviour of the static dielectric properties and scaling functions proposed for the frequency-dependent conductivity and permittivity. We review some relevant experiments in this field and the proposed interpretations, and formulate a phenomenological model of conduction. It is based on the physical picture of cluster formation due to attractive interactions among the constituent water droplets, anomalous diffusion in the bulk of fractal aggregates and polydispersity of the clusters. The model gives quantitative expressions for both conductivity and permittivity over the entire frequency range of the percolative relaxation phenomena, including the static behaviour. A closed expression is derived for the scaling function of a scaling variable which involves frequency, the cut-off cluster size and the parameters of the bulk components. The results are also expressed in the time domain in terms of the polarization time correlation function. The latter exhibits a rather interesting behaviour, since it gradually evolves from an exponential decay to a power-law decay and to a stretched exponential as time increases. The time-scales of the different stages are obtained from the typical decay times of the single droplet and the largest cluster. We have analysed many different sets of data obtained for different microemulsion systems as functions of the composition of the dispersed phase, the temperature and the frequency

  5. Observational and Theoretical Constraints on the Formation and Evolution of Cataclysmic Variables in Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knigge, C.

    2006-08-01

    I will present a critical overview of recent theoretical and observational results regarding the formation and evolution of cataclysmic variables (CVs) in globular clusters (GCs). The overarching goal will be to assess whether the properties of the observed cluster CV population are consistent with expectations based on theoretical predictions and/or direct comparisons to the field CV population. As a starting point, I will take an inventory of the known CV population in GCs, compare its properties to the field CV population and consider to what extent selection effects may be responsible for the differences between them. I will also explore whether physical differences (e.g. in metallicity or primary magnetic field strength) can plausibly explain the observational differences between the two populations. I will go on to consider theoretical predictions for the properties of cluster CVs and show that they depend strongly on the adopted binary evolution recipes (such as the treatment of magnetic braking). This implies that disagreements between predictions and observations of cluster binaries need not imply inadequacies in the treatment of dynamical interactions; they may equally well point to problems with binary evolution prescriptions. This is a serious worry: for example, it is well known that the canonical CV evolution scenario is in serious conflict with several key properties of the field CV population. In a cluster setting, the impact of an erroneous prescription would be exacerbated further by the feedback between stellar dynamics and binary evolution. I will finally consider how to move forward. In particular, I will present results from a recent attempt to empirically calibrate the angular momentum loss (AML) law for field CVs. This AML prescription can be implemented in theoretical models. I will also emphasize the potential of GC surveys to provide CV samples at known distances and with well-understood selection effects. In this sense, GC samples can

  6. Cluster-formation in the Rosette molecular cloud at the junctions of filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Csengeri, T.; Hennemann, M.; Motte, F.; Didelon, P.; Federrath, C.; Bontemps, S.; Di Francesco, J.; Arzoumanian, D.; Minier, V.; André, Ph.; Hill, T.; Zavagno, A.; Nguyen-Luong, Q.; Attard, M.; Bernard, J.-Ph.; Elia, D.; Fallscheer, C.; Griffin, M.; Kirk, J.; Klessen, R.; Könyves, V.; Martin, P.; Men'shchikov, A.; Palmeirim, P.; Peretto, N.; Pestalozzi, M.; Russeil, D.; Sadavoy, S.; Sousbie, T.; Testi, L.; Tremblin, P.; Ward-Thompson, D.; White, G.

    2012-04-01

    Aims: For many years feedback processes generated by OB-stars in molecular clouds, including expanding ionization fronts, stellar winds, or UV-radiation, have been proposed to trigger subsequent star formation. However, hydrodynamic models including radiation and gravity show that UV-illumination has little or no impact on the global dynamical evolution of the cloud. Instead, gravitational collapse of filaments and/or merging of filamentary structures can lead to building up dense high-mass star-forming clumps. However, the overall density structure of the cloud has a large influence on this process, and requires a better understanding. Methods: The Rosette molecular cloud, irradiated by the NGC 2244 cluster, is a template region for triggered star-formation, and we investigated its spatial and density structure by applying a curvelet analysis, a filament-tracing algorithm (DisPerSE), and probability density functions (PDFs) on Herschel column density maps, obtained within the HOBYS key program. Results: The analysis reveals not only the filamentary structure of the cloud but also that all known infrared clusters except one lie at junctions of filaments, as predicted by turbulence simulations. The PDFs of sub-regions in the cloud show systematic differences. The two UV-exposed regions have a double-peaked PDF we interprete as caused by shock compression, while the PDFs of the center and other cloud parts are more complex, partly with a power-law tail. A deviation of the log-normal PDF form occurs at AV ≈ 9m for the center, and around 4m for the other regions. Only the part of the cloud farthest from the Rosette nebula shows a log-normal PDF. Conclusions: The deviations of the PDF from the log-normal shape typically associated with low- and high-mass star-forming regions at AV ≈ 3-4m and 8-10m, respectively, are found here within the very same cloud. This shows that there is no fundamental difference in the density structure of low- and high-mass star

  7. Formation of fragments in heavy-ion collisions using a modified clusterization method

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Supriya; Puri, Rajeev K.

    2011-04-15

    We study the formation and stability of the fragments by extending the minimum spanning tree method (MST) for clusterization. In this extension, each fragment is subjected to a binding-energy check calculated using the modified Bethe-Weizsaecker formula. Earlier, a constant binding-energy cut of 4 MeV/nucleon was imposed. Our results for {sup 197}Au+{sup 197}Au collisions are compared with ALADiN data and also with the calculations based on the simulated annealing technique. We shall show that the present modified version improves the agreement compared to the MST method.

  8. Star formation in the first galaxies - III. Formation, evolution, and characteristics of the first metal-enriched stellar cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Montgomery, Michael H.; Milosavljević, Miloš; Bromm, Volker

    2016-01-01

    We simulate the formation of a low-metallicity (10-2 Z⊙) stellar cluster at redshift z ˜ 14. Beginning with cosmological initial conditions, the simulation utilizes adaptive mesh refinement and sink particles to follow the collapse and evolution of gas past the opacity limit for fragmentation, thus resolving the formation of individual protostellar cores. A time- and location-dependent protostellar radiation field, which heats the gas by absorption on dust, is computed by integration of protostellar evolutionary tracks. The simulation also includes a robust non-equilibrium chemical network that self-consistently treats gas thermodynamics and dust-gas coupling. The system is evolved for 18 kyr after the first protostellar source has formed. In this time span, 30 sink particles representing protostellar cores form with a total mass of 81 M⊙. Their masses range from ˜0.1 to 14.4 M⊙ with a median mass ˜0.5-1 M⊙. Massive protostars grow by competitive accretion while lower mass protostars are stunted in growth by close encounters and many-body ejections. In the regime explored here, the characteristic mass scale is determined by the cosmic microwave background temperature floor and the onset of efficient dust-gas coupling. It seems unlikely that host galaxies of the first bursts of metal-enriched star formation will be detectable with the James Webb Space Telescope or other next-generation infrared observatories. Instead, the most promising access route to the dawn of cosmic star formation may lie in the scrutiny of metal-poor, ancient stellar populations in the Galactic neighbourhood. The observable targets corresponding to the system simulated here are ultra-faint dwarf satellite galaxies such as Boötes II and Willman I.

  9. STAR FORMATION HISTORY OF THE MILKY WAY HALO TRACED BY THE OOSTERHOFF DICHOTOMY AMONG GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Sohee; Lee, Young-Wook

    2015-06-22

    In our recent investigation of the Oosterhoff dichotomy in the multiple population paradigm, we have suggested that the RR Lyrae variables in the globular clusters (GCs) of Oosterhoff groups I, II, and III are produced mostly by first, second, and third generation stars (G1, G2, and G3), respectively. Here we show, for the first time, that the observed dichotomies in the inner and outer halo GCs can be naturally reproduced when these models are extended to all metallicity regimes, while maintaining reasonable agreements in the horizontal-branch type versus [Fe/H] correlations. In order to achieve this, however, specific star formation histories are required for the inner and outer halos. In the inner halo GCs, the star formation commenced and ceased earlier with a relatively short formation timescale between the subpopulations (∼0.5 Gyr), while in the outer halo, the formation of G1 was delayed by ∼0.8 Gyr with a more extended timescale between G1 and G2 (∼1.4 Gyr). This is consistent with the dual origin of the Milky Way halo. Despite the difference in detail, our models show that the Oosterhoff period groups observed in both outer and inner halo GCs are all manifestations of the “population-shift” effect within the instability strip, for which the origin can be traced back to the two or three discrete episodes of star formation in GCs.

  10. Star formation and feedback in LMC Massive Clusters: ALMA and HST analysis of 30 Doradus and N159

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indebetouw, Remy

    2015-08-01

    The Magellanic Clouds offer the opportunity to study star formation at reduced metallicity with no distance ambiguity and minimal line-of-sight confusion. They are arguably unique in that it is observationally tractable to analyze entire galaxies (e.g. our surveys with Spitzer and Herschel) simultaneously with critical subparsec physics, especially using ALMA and HST (1"~0.25pc). I will discuss the effects of the massive cluster R136 on star formation within 100pc in 30 Doradus, and on the formation of new star clusters in N159, a separate region 600pc to the south. These represent two different evolutionary states: 30 Doradus a more evolved cluster in which current star formation has potentially been significantly affected by the previous generations, and N159 a significantly younger region in which massive clusters may still form in the future. Cluster-forming clumps near R136 analyzed with ALMA contain both massive YSOs and low-mass pre-main-sequence stars revealed by HST. Although diffuse molecular gas is photodissociated, the cluster-forming clumps do not have dramatically different properties from parsec-sized clumps in less active Milky Way regions. Cluster-forming clumps and filaments in N159 also contain a rich pre-main-sequence population which we can now relate to the clump-scale dense gas distribution.

  11. Arcus: Exploring the Formation and Evolution of Clusters, Galaxies, and Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Randall K.

    2016-04-01

    We present the scientific motivation and performance for Arcus, an X-ray grating spectrometer mission to be proposed to NASA as a MIDEX in 2016. This mission will observe structure formation at and beyond the edges of clusters and galaxies, feedback from supermassive black holes, the structure of the interstellar medium and the formation and evolution of stars. Key mission design parameters are R = 3000 with >500 cm2 of effective area at the crucial O VII and O VIII lines, with the full bandpass going from ~10-50 Angstroms. Arcus will use the silicon pore optics developed for ESA’s Athena mission, paired with off-plane gratings being developed at the University of Iowa and combined with MIT/Lincoln Labs CCDs. With essentially no consumables, Arcus should achieve its mission goals in under 2 years, after which we anticipate a substantial period of operation as a general observatory.

  12. Star formation and initial mass function studies in young star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Jessy

    This thesis presents results from the comprehensive multi wavelength observational analysis of three young clusters Iassociated with H II regions. The fundamental properties of each region such as radius, distance, reddening etc. are analyzed and their massive members are identified. We observed signatures of both clustered and distributed star formation (SF) in these regions. The K-band luminosity functions (KLFs) and initial mass functions (IMFs) of these regions are found to be consistent with each other and with the Salpeter IMF and are seen to be unaltered irrespective of their diverse environments. The candidate YSOs are identified, their mass, age, age spread, circumstellar disk fraction and SF history of each region are studied. The spatial distribution of the identified YSOs shows that there is a correlation between the locations where YSOs are forming and the locations of ionization fronts created by the massive stars. The three regions are found to be diverse in nature and each region is experiencing multiple epochs of SF at various locations within it during the last ˜ 5 Myr. The newly formed stars are seen to be influenced by the presence of massive stars and the modes of triggering mechanism in each region is found to be different. The results suggest that the multiple epochs of SF and multiple modes of triggering mechanism are a common phenomena within young clusters.

  13. Modeling active galactic nucleus feedback in cool-core clusters: The formation of cold clumps

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-10

    We perform high-resolution (15-30 pc) adaptive mesh simulations to study the impact of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback in cool-core clusters, focusing in this paper on the formation of cold clumps. The feedback is jet-driven with an energy determined by the amount of cold gas within 500 pc of the super-massive black hole. When the intracluster medium in the core of the cluster becomes marginally stable to radiative cooling, with the thermal instability to the free-fall timescale ratio t{sub TI}/t{sub ff} < 3-10, cold clumps of gas start to form along the propagation direction of the AGN jets. By tracing the particles in the simulations, we find that these cold clumps originate from low entropy (but still hot) gas that is accelerated by the jet to outward radial velocities of a few hundred km s{sup –1}. This gas is out of hydrostatic equilibrium and so can cool. The clumps then grow larger as they decelerate and fall toward the center of the cluster, eventually being accreted onto the super-massive black hole. The general morphology, spatial distribution, and estimated Hα morphology of the clumps are in reasonable agreement with observations, although we do not fully replicate the filamentary morphology of the clumps seen in the observations, probably due to missing physics.

  14. Modeling Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback in Cool-core Clusters: The Formation of Cold Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-01

    We perform high-resolution (15-30 pc) adaptive mesh simulations to study the impact of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback in cool-core clusters, focusing in this paper on the formation of cold clumps. The feedback is jet-driven with an energy determined by the amount of cold gas within 500 pc of the super-massive black hole. When the intracluster medium in the core of the cluster becomes marginally stable to radiative cooling, with the thermal instability to the free-fall timescale ratio t TI/t ff < 3-10, cold clumps of gas start to form along the propagation direction of the AGN jets. By tracing the particles in the simulations, we find that these cold clumps originate from low entropy (but still hot) gas that is accelerated by the jet to outward radial velocities of a few hundred km s-1. This gas is out of hydrostatic equilibrium and so can cool. The clumps then grow larger as they decelerate and fall toward the center of the cluster, eventually being accreted onto the super-massive black hole. The general morphology, spatial distribution, and estimated Hα morphology of the clumps are in reasonable agreement with observations, although we do not fully replicate the filamentary morphology of the clumps seen in the observations, probably due to missing physics.

  15. Cluster formation of endohedral metallofullerenes with Y, Gd, and Ho in a solution and on a solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kareev, I. E.; Bubnov, V. P.; Alidzhanov, E. K.; Pashkevich, S. N.; Lantukh, Yu. D.; Letuta, S. N.; Razdobreev, D. A.

    2016-09-01

    The formation of endohedral metallofullerene clusters with Y, Gd, and Ho in an N, N-dimethylformamide solution and on a mica substrate surface has been investigated using static and dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy, respectively. It has been found that the size distribution of the clusters depends on the concentration of endohedral metallofullerenes and on the exposure time of the solution. It has been shown that the clusters are resistant to high temperatures and ultrasound effects. The concentration of endohedral metallofullerenes at which only single clusters are formed in the solutions has been determined. It has been established that an increase in the concentration of endohedral metallofullerenes leads to the agglomeration of single clusters. The fractal dimension has been estimated, and the zeta potential of endohedral metallofullerene clusters has been measured.

  16. Roles of ATP and NADPH in formation of the Fe-S cluster of spinach ferredoxin. [Spinacia oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Mitsui, Akira; Fujita, Yuichi; Matsubara, Hiroshi )

    1991-01-01

    The present study investigated whether ATP and NADPH in the chloroplast system of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) are involved in the supply of ({sup 35}S)sulfide or iron, or in Fe-S cluster formation itself. ({sup 35}S)Sulfide was liberated from ({sup 35}S)cysteine in an NADPH-dependent manner, whereas ATP was not necessary for this process. This desulfhydration of ({sup 35}S)cysteine occurred before the formation of the {sup 35}S-labeled Fe-S cluster, and the amount of radioactivity in ({sup 35}S)sulfide was greater than that in {sup 35}S-labeled holo-Fd by a factor of more than 20. Addition of nonradioactive sulfide (Na{sub 2}S) inhibited competitively formation of the {sup 35}S-labeled Fe-S cluster along with the addition of nonradioactive cysteine, indicating that some of the inorganic sulfide released from cysteine is incorporated into the Fe-S cluster of Fd. ATP hydrolysis was not involved in the production of inorganic sulfide or in the supply of iron for assembly into the Fe-S cluster. However, ATP-dependent Fe-S cluster formation was observed even in the presence of sufficient amounts of ({sup 35}S)sulfide and iron. These results suggest a novel type of ATP-dependent in vivo Fe-S cluster formation that is distinct from in vitro chemical reconstitution. The implications of these results for the possible mechanisms of ATP-dependent Fe-S cluster formation are discussed.

  17. Microscopic mechanism of nanocrystal formation from solution by cluster aggregation and coalescence

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Sergio A.

    2011-01-01

    Solute-cluster aggregation and particle fusion have recently been suggested as alternative routes to the classical mechanism of nucleation from solution. The role of both processes in the crystallization of an aqueous electrolyte under controlled salt addition is here elucidated by molecular dynamics simulation. The time scale of the simulation allows direct observation of the entire crystallization pathway, from early events in the prenucleation stage to the formation of a nanocrystal in equilibrium with concentrated solution. The precursor originates in a small amorphous aggregate stabilized by hydration forces. The core of the nucleus becomes crystalline over time and grows by coalescence of the amorphous phase deposited at the surface. Imperfections of ion packing during coalescence promote growth of two conjoint crystallites. A parameter of order and calculated cohesive energies reflect the increasing crystalline order and stress relief at the grain boundary. Cluster aggregation plays a major role both in the formation of the nucleus and in the early stages of postnucleation growth. The mechanism identified shares common features with nucleation of solids from the melt and of liquid droplets from the vapor. PMID:21428633

  18. Binary interactions as a possible scenario for the formation of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Dengkai; Han, Zhanwen; Li, Lifang E-mail: zhanwenhan@ynao.ac.cn

    2014-07-01

    Observations have revealed the presence of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters (GCs) that exhibit wide abundance variations and multiple sequences in the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram. We present a scenario for the formation of multiple stellar populations in GCs. In this scenario, initial GCs are single-generation clusters, and our model predicts that the stars with anomalous abundances observed in GCs are merged stars and accretor stars produced by binary interactions—rapidly rotating stars at the moment of their formation—and that these stars are more massive than normal single stars in the same evolutionary stage. We find that, due to their own evolution, these rapidly rotating stars have surface abundances, effective temperatures, and luminosities that are different from normal single stars in the same evolutionary stage. This stellar population of binaries reproduces two important points of observational evidence of multiple stellar populations: a Na-O anticorrelation and multiple sequences in the HR diagram. This evidence suggests that binary interactions may be a possible scenario for the formation of multiple stellar populations in GCs.

  19. THE CLUSTERED NATURE OF STAR FORMATION. PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE CLUSTERS IN THE STAR-FORMING REGION NGC 602/N90 IN THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Gennaro, Mario; Schmeja, Stefan; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Tognelli, Emanuele; Prada Moroni, Pier Giorgio

    2012-03-20

    Located at the tip of the wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), the star-forming region NGC 602/N90 is characterized by the H II nebular ring N90 and the young cluster of pre-main-sequence (PMS) and early-type main-sequence stars NGC 602, located in the central area of the ring. We present a thorough cluster analysis of the stellar sample identified with Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys in the region. We show that apart from the central cluster low-mass PMS stars are congregated in 13 additional small, compact sub-clusters at the periphery of NGC 602, identified in terms of their higher stellar density with respect to the average background density derived from star counts. We find that the spatial distribution of the PMS stars is bimodal, with an unusually large fraction ({approx}60%) of the total population being clustered, while the remaining is diffusely distributed in the intercluster area, covering the whole central part of the region. From the corresponding color-magnitude diagrams we disentangle an age difference of {approx}2.5 Myr between NGC 602 and the compact sub-clusters, which appear younger, on the basis of comparison of the brighter PMS stars with evolutionary models, which we accurately calculated for the metal abundance of the SMC. The diffuse PMS population appears to host stars as old as those in NGC 602. Almost all detected PMS sub-clusters appear to be centrally concentrated. When the complete PMS stellar sample, including both clustered and diffused stars, is considered in our cluster analysis, it appears as a single centrally concentrated stellar agglomeration, covering the whole central area of the region. Considering also the hot massive stars of the system, we find evidence that this agglomeration is hierarchically structured. Based on our findings, we propose a scenario according to which the region NGC 602/N90 experiences an active clustered star formation for the last {approx}5 Myr. The central cluster NGC 602 was

  20. Carbon clusters containing two metals atoms: Structures, growth mechanism, and fullerene formation

    SciTech Connect

    Shelimov, K.B.; Jarrold, M.F.

    1996-02-07

    Gas phase ion mobility measurments have been used to probe the structures and interconversion of La{sub 2}C{sub n}{sup +} (n = 1-100) isomers. The smallest La{sub 2}C{sub n}{sup +} clusters (n = 10) appear to be planar rings. However, planar mono and bicylic rings (the dominant isomers for C{sub n}{sup +} and LaC{sub n}{sup +}, n = 30, clusters) are not observed for the larger La{sub 2}C{sub n}{sup +} species. Instead, isomers which appear to be three-dimensional ring complexes dominate for unannealed La{sub 2}C{sub n}{sup +} (n + 17) clusters. The formation of these complexes is probably driven by electrostatic forces. For n = 30 the three-dimensional ring complexes isomerize into metallofullerenes (and metal-containing graphite sheets for n = 30-37). The estimated activation energies for these isomerization processes are about 1eV lower than those estimated for similar processes for planar C{sub n}{sup +} and LaC{sub n}{sup +} rings. Metallofullerenes with two non-endohedral metal atoms (for n = 28-29), one endohedral metal atom (for n = 31-100), and two endohedral metal atoms (for n > 64, only even n), are identified. Fullerene derivatives (presumably fullerene + ring complexes) are abundant in the unannealed isomer distributions for La{sub 2}C{sub n}{sup +} (n > 50) clusters, but readily isomerize into regular fullerenes upon collisional heating. 47 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Formation of clustered DNA damage after high-LET irradiation: a review.

    PubMed

    Hada, Megumi; Georgakilas, Alexandros G

    2008-05-01

    Radiation can cause as well as cure cancer. The risk of developing radiation-induced cancer has traditionally been estimated from cancer incidence among survivors of the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki.(1)) These data provide the best estimate of human cancer risk over the dose range for low linear energy transfer (LET) radiations, such as X- or gamma-rays. The situation of estimating the real biological effects becomes even more difficult in the case of high LET particles encountered in space or as the result of domestic exposure to alpha-particles from radon gas emitters or other radioactive emitters like uranium-238. Complex DNA damage, i.e., the signature of high-LET radiations comprises of closely spaced DNA lesions forming a cluster of DNA damage. The two basic groups of complex DNA damage are double strand breaks (DSBs) and non-DSB oxidative clustered DNA lesions (OCDL). Theoretical analysis and experimental evidence suggest an increased complexity and severity of complex DNA damage with increasing LET (linear energy transfer) and a high mutagenic or carcinogenic potential. Data available on the formation of clustered DNA damage (DSBs and OCDL) by high-LET radiations are often controversial suggesting a variable response to dose and type of radiation. The chemical nature and cellular repair mechanisms of complex DNA damage have been much less characterized than those of isolated DNA lesions like an oxidized base or a single strand break especially in the case of high-LET radiation. This review will focus on the induction of clustered DNA damage by high-LET radiations presenting the earlier and recent relative data. PMID:18413977

  2. Monte Carlo studies of drug nucleation 1: formation of crystalline clusters of bicalutamide in water.

    PubMed

    Persson, Rasmus; Nordholm, Sture; Perlovich, German; Lindfors, Lennart

    2011-03-31

    A computational method of predicting the effects of the metastability of drug solutions is sought. A simple extension of our in silicio approach to thermodynamic drug solubility is tested on the drug bicalutamide for which we performed vapor pressure measurements complementing earlier measurements of aqueous solubility and crystal-water interfacial tension. The free energy of formation of an N-cluster of the drug molecule is estimated semiempirically by use of an Einstein model of the crystal in which experiment supplies the crystal structure, enthalpy of sublimation, and Einstein frequency of vibration. The rigid drug clusters with N from 2 to 14 are extracted from the bulk crystal by minimization of either cluster energy or radius of gyration. The free energy of hydration is estimated by Monte Carlo simulation combined with simplified response theory based on the OPLS-AA/COMPASS force field for the drug-water interaction and the TIP4P water model. The results have been interpreted in terms of an apparent crystal-water interfacial tension according to classical nucleation theory. The energy-minimal and radius of gyration-minimal clusters seem to give very similar crystal-water interfacial tensions for both the monoclinic and the triclinic polymorph. The interfacial tension of the monoclinic polymorph is significantly higher (by around 20%) than that of the triclinic polymorph in accordance with experiment. For the triclinic polymorph a substantial overestimation of the interfacial tension compared to estimates from crystal nucleation experiments is found, mitigated somewhat by an empirical scaling of the simulated binding energies and free energies of hydration.

  3. Globular clusters as the relics of regular star formation in `normal' high-redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik

    2015-12-01

    We present an end-to-end, two-phase model for the origin of globular clusters (GCs). In the model, populations of stellar clusters form in the high-pressure discs of high-redshift (z > 2) galaxies (a rapid-disruption phase due to tidal perturbations from the dense interstellar medium), after which the galaxy mergers associated with hierarchical galaxy formation redistribute the surviving, massive clusters into the galaxy haloes, where they remain until the present day (a slow-disruption phase due to tidal evaporation). The high galaxy merger rates of z > 2 galaxies allow these clusters to be `liberated' into the galaxy haloes before they are disrupted within the high-density discs. This physically motivated toy model is the first to include the rapid-disruption phase, which is shown to be essential for simultaneously reproducing the wide variety of properties of observed GC systems, such as their universal characteristic mass-scale, the dependence of the specific frequency on metallicity and galaxy mass, the GC system mass-halo mass relation, the constant number of GCs per unit supermassive black hole mass, and the colour bimodality of GC systems. The model predicts that most of these observables were already in place at z = 1-2, although under rare circumstances GCs may still form in present-day galaxies. In addition, the model provides important constraints on models for multiple stellar populations in GCs by putting limits on initial GC masses and the amount of pristine gas accretion. The paper is concluded with a discussion of these and several other predictions and implications, as well as the main open questions in the field.

  4. Formation of Clustered DNA Damage after High-LET Irradiation: A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.

    2008-01-01

    Radiation can cause as well as cure cancer. The risk of developing radiation-induced cancer has traditionally been estimated from cancer incidence among survivors of the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These data provide the best estimate of human cancer risk over the dose range for low linear energy transfer (LET) radiations, such as X- or gamma-rays. The situation of estimating the real biological effects becomes even more difficult in the case of high LET particles encountered in space or as the result of domestic exposure to particles from radon gas emitters or other radioactive emitters like uranium-238. Complex DNA damage, i.e., the signature of high-LET radiations comprises by closely spaced DNA lesions forming a cluster of DNA damage. The two basic groups of complex DNA damage are double strand breaks (DSBs) and non-DSB oxidative clustered DNA lesions (OCDL). Theoretical analysis and experimental evidence suggest there is increased complexity and severity of complex DNA damage with increasing LET (linear energy transfer) and a high mutagenic or carcinogenic potential. Data available on the formation of clustered DNA damage (DSBs and OCDL) by high-LET radiations are often controversial suggesting a variable response to dose and type of radiation. The chemical nature and cellular repair mechanisms of complex DNA damage have been much less characterized than those of isolated DNA lesions like an oxidized base or a single strand break especially in the case of high-LET radiation. This review will focus on the induction of clustered DNA damage by high-LET radiations presenting the earlier and recent relative data.

  5. Recent Galaxy Mergers and Residual Star Formation of Red Sequence Galaxies in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Ree, Chang H.; Jaffé, Yara; Demarco, Ricardo; Treister, Ezequiel

    2016-08-01

    This study explored the Galaxy Evolution Explorer ultraviolet (UV) properties of optical red sequence galaxies in four rich Abell clusters at z≤slant 0.1. In particular, we tried to find a hint of merger-induced recent star formation (RSF) in red sequence galaxies. Using the NUV - r\\prime colors of the galaxies, RSF fractions were derived based on various criteria for post-merger galaxies and normal galaxies. Following k-correction, about 36% of the post-merger galaxies were classified as RSF galaxies with a conservative criterion (NUV - r\\prime ≤slant 5), and that number was doubled (˜72%) when using a generous criterion (NUV - r\\prime ≤slant 5.4). The trend was the same when we restricted the sample to galaxies within 0.5 × R 200. Post-merger galaxies with strong UV emission showed more violent, asymmetric features in the deep optical images. The RSF fractions did not show any trend along the clustocentric distance within R 200. We performed a Dressler–Shectman test to check whether the RSF galaxies had any correlation with the substructures in the galaxy clusters. Within R 200 of each cluster, the RSF galaxies did not appear to be preferentially related to the clusters’ substructures. Our results suggested that only 30% of RSF red sequence galaxies show morphological hints of recent galaxy mergers. This implies that internal processes (e.g., stellar mass loss or hot gas cooling) for the supply of cold gas to early-type galaxies may play a significant role in the residual star formation of early-type galaxies at a recent epoch.

  6. Recent Galaxy Mergers and Residual Star Formation of Red Sequence Galaxies in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Ree, Chang H.; Jaffé, Yara; Demarco, Ricardo; Treister, Ezequiel

    2016-08-01

    This study explored the Galaxy Evolution Explorer ultraviolet (UV) properties of optical red sequence galaxies in four rich Abell clusters at z≤slant 0.1. In particular, we tried to find a hint of merger-induced recent star formation (RSF) in red sequence galaxies. Using the NUV - r\\prime colors of the galaxies, RSF fractions were derived based on various criteria for post-merger galaxies and normal galaxies. Following k-correction, about 36% of the post-merger galaxies were classified as RSF galaxies with a conservative criterion (NUV - r\\prime ≤slant 5), and that number was doubled (˜72%) when using a generous criterion (NUV - r\\prime ≤slant 5.4). The trend was the same when we restricted the sample to galaxies within 0.5 × R 200. Post-merger galaxies with strong UV emission showed more violent, asymmetric features in the deep optical images. The RSF fractions did not show any trend along the clustocentric distance within R 200. We performed a Dressler-Shectman test to check whether the RSF galaxies had any correlation with the substructures in the galaxy clusters. Within R 200 of each cluster, the RSF galaxies did not appear to be preferentially related to the clusters’ substructures. Our results suggested that only 30% of RSF red sequence galaxies show morphological hints of recent galaxy mergers. This implies that internal processes (e.g., stellar mass loss or hot gas cooling) for the supply of cold gas to early-type galaxies may play a significant role in the residual star formation of early-type galaxies at a recent epoch.

  7. Embryonic body formation using the tapered soft stencil for cluster culture device.

    PubMed

    Yukawa, Hiroshi; Ikeuchi, Masashi; Noguchi, Hirofumi; Miyamoto, Yoshitaka; Ikuta, Koji; Hayashi, Shuji

    2011-05-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are expected to provide a source of tissue, a renewable cell source for tissue engineering, and a method for in vitro drug screening for patient-specific or disease-specific treatment. A simple technology by which iPS cells can be differentiated effectively and in large quantities is strongly desired. In this paper, a new device (Tapered Soft Stencil for Cluster Culture: TASCL) is proposed for the easy and efficient formation of EBs which can be used in regenerative medicine. This device was compared with the two major methods currently being evaluated, namely the HD method and the Terasaki® plate (MWC substitution), in terms of the efficiency, morphology and acquired number of EB formation. Using the TASCL device, the shape of the EBs formed was almost a perfect sphere, and the formation was also faster than for the two other methods. There was little variability in the number of cells. Moreover, EBs formed using the TASCL device had the ability to differentiate into all three germ layers, and differentiation of EBs from the TASCL culture into hepatic cells was confirmed. In conclusion, it appears that the TASCL device can be utilized for EB formation to generate cells for regenerative medicine applications. PMID:21354615

  8. Multi-wavelength study of X-ray luminous clusters at z ~ 0.3. I. Star-formation activity of cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braglia, F. G.; Pierini, D.; Biviano, A.; Böhringer, H.

    2009-06-01

    Context: The current paradigm of cosmic formation and evolution of galaxy clusters foresees growth mostly through merging. Galaxies in the infall region or in the core of a cluster undergo transformations owing to different environmental stresses. Aims: For two X-ray luminous clusters at redshift z 0.3 with opposite X-ray morphologies (i.e., dynamical states), RXCJ 0014.3-3022 and RXCJ 2308.3-0211, we assess differences in galaxy populations as a function of cluster topography. This is a pilot study for the joint X-ray and optical analysis of the REFLEX-DXL cluster sample. Methods: Cluster large-scale structure and substructure are determined from the combined photometry in the B, V, and R bands, and from multi-object optical spectroscopy at low resolution. Photometric redshifts and broad-band optical colours are determined. A spectral index analysis is performed, based on the [O II](λλ3726, 3728 Å) and Hδ(λ4102 Å) features, and the D4000 break, which are available for more than 100 member galaxies per cluster. Additional far-ultraviolet (FUV) photometry is retrieved from the GALEX archive. Combination of spectral indices and FUV-optical colours provides a picture of the star-formation history in galaxies. Results: In spite of the potential presence of a small fraction of galaxies with obscured star-formation activity, the average star-formation history of cluster members is found to depend on clustercentric distance and, more interestingly, on cluster substructure. The core regions of both clusters mainly host galaxies dominated by old, passively evolving stellar populations, which define the same red sequence in a (B-R) colour-R magnitude diagram. However, a sharp increase in star-formation activity is found along two clearly evident filamentary structures of the merging cluster RXCJ 0014.3-3022, out to its virial radius and beyond. It is produced by luminous (i.e., LR ≥ LRstar) and sub-Lstar galaxies. In contrast, the regular cool-core cluster RXCJ 2308

  9. GM1 cluster mediates formation of toxic Aβ fibrils by providing hydrophobic environments.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Saori; Ueno, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Yano, Yoshiaki; Hoshino, Masaru; Matsuzaki, Katsumi

    2012-10-16

    The conversion of soluble, nontoxic amyloid β-proteins (Aβ) to aggregated, toxic forms rich in β-sheets is considered to be a key step in the development of Alzheimer's disease. Accumulating evidence suggests that lipid-protein interactions play a crucial role in the aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins like Aβ. Our group has previously reported that amyloid fibrils of Aβ formed on membranes containing clusters of GM1 ganglioside (M-fibrils) exhibit greater cytotoxicity than fibrils formed in aqueous solution (W-fibrils) [ Okada ( 2008 ) J. Mol. Biol. 382 , 1066 - 1074 ]. W-fibrils are considered to consist of in-register parallel β-sheets. However, the precise molecular structure of M-fibrils and force driving the formation of toxic fibrils remain unclear. In this study, we hypothesized that low-polarity environments provided by GM1 clusters drive the formation of toxic fibrils and compared the structure and cytotoxicity of W-fibrils, M-fibrils, and aggregates formed in a low-polarity solution mimicking membrane environments. First, we determined solvent conditions which mimic the polarity of raftlike membranes using Aβ-(1-40) labeled with the 7-diethylaminocoumarin-3-carbonyl dye. The polarity of a mixture of 80% 1,4-dioxane and 20% water (v/v) was found to be close to that of raftlike membranes. Aβ-(1-40) formed amyloid fibrils within several hours in 80% dioxane (D-fibrils) or in the presence of raftlike membranes, whereas a much longer incubation time was required for fibril formation in a conventional buffer. D-fibrils were morphologically similar to M-fibrils. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy suggested that M-fibrils and D-fibrils contained antiparallel β-sheets. These fibrils had greater surface hydrophobicity and exhibited significant toxicity against human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, whereas W-fibrils with less surface hydrophobicity were not cytotoxic. We concluded that ganglioside clusters mediate the formation of toxic amyloid fibrils

  10. Spitzer spectroscopy of newly discovered clusters of star formation in Serpens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merín, B.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; Geers, V. C.; Dullemond, C. P.; Harvey, P.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Augereau, J. C.; Kessler, J.; Boogert, A. C. A.; C2d Team

    We have discovered a uniquely rich star-forming region covering 0.5 sq. degrees near the Serpens Core from IRAC/MIPS maps obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope within the Cores to Disks (c2d) Legacy program. The region contains three clusters apparently at different evolutionary stages, suggesting that sequential star formation has taken place. A number of the sources in this sample has been observed with the IRS spectrometer and will be presented and analysed here in relation to the general evolutionary picture for the region. In particular, the spectra contain signatures of silicates allowing the detailed comparison of grain composition, crystallinity, size distribution as well as physical structure of the disks between illustrative objects in the region at different evolutionary stages. 1. Introduction Mounting evidence points to the period between 1 and 10 Myrs as the most probable time-scale for the evolution of the circumstellar disks around young stars and the possible formation of planets. For example, the inner hot dust as traced by near-infrared photometry has been found to disperse within 3-6 Myrs (Haish et al. 2001). The dust has also been observed to crystallize due to thermal annealing in the innermost parts followed by strong radial mixing (van Boekel et al. 2004). Mid-infrared spectra coupled with disk models indicate that disks evolve from a flared geometry to a flat self-shadowed geometry (Meeus et al. 2001), as grains grow and settle to the mid-plane (Dullemond & Dominik 2004). Most of these previous studies are based on spectra of a handful of objects spread across the sky. A better statistical picture of disk evolution can be obtained by comparing disk populations in different co-eval clusters. 2. New star forming clusters in Serpens As part of the Cores to Disks (c2d) Legacy mapping campaign of molecular clouds (Evans et al. 2003), we discovered a region of ~0.5 square degrees in the Serpens molecular cloud (d ~ 250 pc) that is very rich

  11. Support- dependent evolution of oxidation state and nanoassembly formation of subnanometer copper clusters under carbon dioxide conversion conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halder, Avik; Yang, Bing; Kolipaka, Karthika L.; Pellin, Michael; Seifert, Soenke; Vajda, Stefan; Materials Science Division Team

    Size- and support- dependence of the properties of copper clusters have been investigated during carbon dioxide conversion with hydrogen at high reactant concentrations and atmospheric pressure. The model catalyst systems were prepared by depositing size-selected Cun clusters (n = 3, 4, 12 and 20) on various amorphous metal oxide (Al2O3, ZnO, and ZrO2) , and carbon-based (UNCD = ultrananocrystaline diamond) supports. During the temperature ramp, the evolution of the chemical state and size of the particles were characterized by in situ grazing incidence X-ray absorption near edge structure (GIXANES), and grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) respectively. Under reaction conditions the initially oxidized Cu clusters reduced at various temperatures depending on cluster size and support. Clusters supported on ZnO and UNCD were found to be sinter-resistant under reactive gases at elevated temperatures and atmospheric pressures, whereas on ZrO2 support the clusters formed stable aggregates. Clusters on Al2O3 support demonstrated unique properties, where a formation of a nanostructure was observed during heating, which then disintegrated during the cool down. Under applied conditions, Cu4 clusters on Al2O3 were found to be the most efficient in methanol formation.

  12. An Hα survey of eight Abell clusters: the dependence of tidally induced star formation on cluster density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, C.; Whittle, M.

    2000-09-01

    We have undertaken a survey of Hα emission in a substantially complete sample of CGCG galaxies of types Sa and later within 1.5 Abell radii of the centres of eight low-redshift Abell clusters (Abell 262, 347, 400, 426, 569, 779, 1367 and 1656). Some 320 galaxies were surveyed, of which 116 were detected in emission (39 per cent of spirals, 75 per cent of peculiars). Here we present previously unpublished data for 243 galaxies in seven clusters. Detected emission is classified as `compact' or `diffuse'. From an analysis of the full survey sample, we confirm our previous identification of compact and diffuse emission with circumnuclear starburst and disc emission respectively. The circumnuclear emission is associated either with the presence of a bar, or with a disturbed galaxy morphology indicative of ongoing tidal interactions (whether galaxy-galaxy, galaxy-group, or galaxy-cluster). The frequency of such tidally induced (circumnuclear) starburst emission in spirals increases from regions of lower to higher local galaxy surface density, and from clusters with lower to higher central galaxy space density. The percentages of spirals classed as disturbed and of galaxies classified as peculiar show a similar trend. These results suggest that tidal interactions for spirals are more frequent in regions of higher local density and for clusters with higher central galaxy density. The prevalence of such tidal interactions in clusters is expected from recent theoretical modelling of clusters with a non-static potential undergoing collapse and infall. Furthermore, in accord with this picture, we suggest that peculiar galaxies are predominantly ongoing mergers. We conclude that tidal interactions are likely to be the main mechanism for the transformation of spirals to S0s in clusters. This mechanism operates more efficiently in higher density environments, as is required by the morphological type-local surface density (T-Σ) relation for galaxies in clusters. For regions of

  13. Einstein observations of the Hydra A cluster and the efficiency of galaxy formation in groups and clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    David, L. P.; Arnaud, K. A.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.

    1990-01-01

    The Einstein imaging proportional counter observations of the poor cluster of galaxies centered on the radio galaxy Hydra A are examined. From the surface brightness profile, it is found that the X-ray-emitting gas in the Hydra A cluster must be condensing out of the intracluster medium at a rate of 600 solar masses/yr. This is one of the largest mass deposition rates observed in a cluster of galaxies. The ratio of gas mass to stellar mass is compared for a variety of systems, showing that this ratio correlates with the gas temperature.

  14. Molecular clouds toward the super star cluster NGC 3603; possible evidence for a cloud-cloud collision in triggering the cluster formation

    SciTech Connect

    Fukui, Y.; Ohama, A.; Hanaoka, N.; Furukawa, N.; Torii, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Fukuda, T.; Soga, S.; Moribe, N.; Kuroda, Y.; Hayakawa, T.; Kuwahara, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Okuda, T.; Dawson, J. R.; Mizuno, N.; Kawamura, A.; Onishi, T.; Maezawa, H.; Mizuno, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present new large field observations of molecular clouds with NANTEN2 toward the super star cluster NGC 3603 in the transitions {sup 12}CO(J = 2-1, J = 1-0) and {sup 13}CO(J = 2-1, J = 1-0). We suggest that two molecular clouds at 13 km s{sup –1} and 28 km s{sup –1} are associated with NGC 3603 as evidenced by higher temperatures toward the H II region, as well as morphological correspondence. The mass of the clouds is too small to gravitationally bind them, given their relative motion of ∼20 km s{sup –1}. We suggest that the two clouds collided with each other 1 Myr ago to trigger the formation of the super star cluster. This scenario is able to explain the origin of the highest mass stellar population in the cluster, which is as young as 1 Myr and is segregated within the central sub-pc of the cluster. This is the second super star cluster along with Westerlund 2 where formation may have been triggered by a cloud-cloud collision.

  15. Deep near-infrared imaging of W3 Main: constraints on stellar cluster formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bik, A.; Stolte, A.; Gennaro, M.; Brandner, W.; Gouliermis, D.; Hußmann, B.; Tognelli, E.; Rochau, B.; Henning, Th.; Adamo, A.; Beuther, H.; Pasquali, A.; Wang, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Context. Embedded clusters like W3 Main are complex and dynamically evolving systems that represent an important phase in the star formation process. Aims: We aim to characterize of the entire stellar content of W3 Main in a statistical sense, which will then identify possible differences in the evolutionary phase of the stellar populations and find clues about the formation mechanism of this massive embedded cluster. Methods: Deep JHKs imaging is used to derive the disk fraction, Ks-band luminosity functions, and mass functions for several subregions in W3 Main. A two-dimensional completeness analysis using artificial star experiments is applied as a crucial ingredient for assessing realistic completeness limits for our photometry. Results: We find an overall disk fraction of 7.7 ± 2.3%, radially varying from 9.4 ± 3.0% in the central 1 pc to 5.6 ± 2.2% in the outer parts of W3 Main. The mass functions derived for three subregions are consistent with a Kroupa and Chabrier mass function. The mass function of IRSN3 is complete down to 0.14 M⊙ and shows a break at M ~ 0.5 M⊙. Conclusions: We interpret the higher disk fraction in the center as evidence that the cluster center is younger. We find that the evolutionary sequence observed in the low-mass stellar population is consistent with the observed age spread among the massive stars. An analysis of the mass function variations does not show evidence of mass segregation. W3 Main is currently still actively forming stars, showing that the ionizing feedback of OB stars is confined to small areas (~0.5 pc). The FUV feedback might be influencing large regions of the cluster as suggested by the low overall disk fraction. Based on data acquired using the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The LBT is an international collaboration among institutions in Germany, Italy, and the United States. LBT Corporation partners are LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft, Germany, representing the Max Planck Society, the Astrophysical

  16. THE ROLE OF DRY MERGERS FOR THE FORMATION AND EVOLUTION OF BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ruszkowski, M.; Springel, V. E-mail: volker@map-garching.mpg.de

    2009-05-10

    Using a resimulation technique, we perform high-resolution cosmological simulations of dry mergers in a massive (10{sup 15} M {sub sun}) galaxy cluster identified in the Millennium Run. Our initial conditions include well resolved compound galaxy models consisting of dark matter halos and stellar bulges that are used to replace the most massive cluster progenitor halos at redshift z = 3, allowing us to follow the subsequent dry merger processes that build up the cluster galaxies in a self-consistent cosmological setting. By construction, our galaxy models obey the stellar mass-size relation initially. Also, we study both galaxy models with adiabatically contracted and uncompressed halos. We demonstrate that the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) evolves away from the Kormendy relation as defined by the smaller mass galaxies (i.e., the relation bends). This is accompanied by a significantly faster dark matter mass growth within the half-light radius of the BCG compared to the increase in the stellar mass inside the same radius. As a result of the comparatively large number of mergers the BCG experiences, its total mass-to-light ratio becomes significantly higher than in typical elliptical galaxies. We also show that the mixing processes between dark matter and stars lead to a small but numerically robust tilt in the fundamental plane and that the BCG lies on the tilted plane. Our model is consistent with the observed steepening of the logarithmic mass-to-light gradient as a function of the stellar mass. As we have not included effects from gas dynamics or star formation, these trends are exclusively due to N-body and stellar dynamical effects. Surprisingly, we find only tentative weak distortion in the Faber-Jackson relation that depends on the aperture size, unlike expected based on studies of isolated merger simulations. This may be due to differences in the distribution of galaxy orbits, which is given in our approach directly by the cosmological context while it has

  17. Spontaneous formation of stringlike clusters and smectic sheets for colloidal rods confined in thin wedgelike gaps.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hideatsu; Maeda, Yoshiko

    2013-08-20

    Monodispersed colloidal rods of β-FeOOH with sizes ranging from 270 to 580 nm in length and 50 to 80 nm in width were synthesized. Narrow wedgelike gaps (0 to 700 nm in height) were formed around the inner bottom edge of the suspension glass cells. Optical microscopic observations revealed the formation of stringlike clusters of the rods and smectic sheets (by spontaneous side-by-side clustering of the strings) in the isotropic phase of the rod suspensions confined in narrow gaps; the electrolyte (HCl) concentrations of the suspensions are 5-40 mM, at which inter-rod interactions are attractive. The strings exhibit different colors that were used to investigate the structures of the strings with the help of interference color theory for thin films. The results are as follows. (1) The rods, lying flat on the gap bottom, are connected side-by-side and stacked upward to form stringlike clusters with different thicknesses depending on the gap height. (2) The stacking numbers (N(sr)) of the rods are estimated to be 1-5. With N(sr) increasing from 2 to 5, the volume fractions (ϕ) of the rods in the strings increased typically from 0.25-0.3 to 0.35-0.42 to reach limiting values (close to the ϕ values of the rods in the bulk smectic phase). (3) Unexpected low-ϕ strings are found in regions with an intermediate height in the gaps. These behaviors of ϕ may be caused by thermal fluctuations of the strings.

  18. Spontaneous formation of stringlike clusters and smectic sheets for colloidal rods confined in thin wedgelike gaps.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hideatsu; Maeda, Yoshiko

    2013-08-20

    Monodispersed colloidal rods of β-FeOOH with sizes ranging from 270 to 580 nm in length and 50 to 80 nm in width were synthesized. Narrow wedgelike gaps (0 to 700 nm in height) were formed around the inner bottom edge of the suspension glass cells. Optical microscopic observations revealed the formation of stringlike clusters of the rods and smectic sheets (by spontaneous side-by-side clustering of the strings) in the isotropic phase of the rod suspensions confined in narrow gaps; the electrolyte (HCl) concentrations of the suspensions are 5-40 mM, at which inter-rod interactions are attractive. The strings exhibit different colors that were used to investigate the structures of the strings with the help of interference color theory for thin films. The results are as follows. (1) The rods, lying flat on the gap bottom, are connected side-by-side and stacked upward to form stringlike clusters with different thicknesses depending on the gap height. (2) The stacking numbers (N(sr)) of the rods are estimated to be 1-5. With N(sr) increasing from 2 to 5, the volume fractions (ϕ) of the rods in the strings increased typically from 0.25-0.3 to 0.35-0.42 to reach limiting values (close to the ϕ values of the rods in the bulk smectic phase). (3) Unexpected low-ϕ strings are found in regions with an intermediate height in the gaps. These behaviors of ϕ may be caused by thermal fluctuations of the strings. PMID:23876087

  19. Synthesis and formation mechanism of hydrogenated boron clusters B{sub 12}H{sub n} with controlled hydrogen content

    SciTech Connect

    Ohishi, Yuji; Kimura, Kaoru; Yamaguchi, Masaaki; Uchida, Noriyuki; Kanayama, Toshihiko

    2010-08-21

    We present the formation of hydrogen-content-controlled B{sub 12}H{sub n}{sup +} clusters through the decomposition and ion-molecule reactions of the decaborane (B{sub 10}H{sub 14}) and diborane (B{sub 2}H{sub 6}) molecules in an external quadrupole static attraction ion trap. The hydrogen- and boron-contents of the B{sub 10-y}H{sub x}{sup +} cluster are controlled by charge transfer from ambient gas ions. In the process of ionization, a certain number of hydrogen and boron atoms are detached from decaborane ions by the energy caused by charge transfer. The energy caused by the ion-molecule reactions also induces H atom detachment. Ambient gas of Ar leads to the selective generation of B{sub 10}H{sub 6}{sup +}. The B{sub 10}H{sub 6}{sup +} clusters react with B{sub 2}H{sub 6} molecules, resulting in the selective formation of B{sub 12}H{sub 8}{sup +} clusters. Ambient gas of Ne (He) leads to the generation of B{sub 10-y}H{sub x}{sup +} clusters with x=4-10 and y=0-1 (with x=2-10 and y=0-2), resulting in the formation of B{sub 12}H{sub n}{sup +} clusters with n=4-8 (n=2,4-8). The introduction of ambient gas also increases the production of clusters. PBE0/6-311+G(d)//B3LYP/6-31G(d)-level density functional theory calculations are conducted to investigate the structure and the mechanism of formation of B{sub 10-y}H{sub x}{sup +} and B{sub 12}H{sub n}{sup +} clusters.

  20. Formation of prismatic loops from C15 Laves phase interstitial clusters in body-centered cubic iron

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yongfeng; Bai, Xian-Ming; Tonks, Michael R.; Biner, S. Bulent

    2015-03-01

    This Letter reports the transition of C15 phase self-interstitial clusters to loops in body-centered-cubic Iron. Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to evaluate the relative stabilities of difference interstitial cluster configurations including C15 phase structure and <100> and <111>/2 loops. Within a certain size range, C15 cluster are found more stable than loops, and the relative stabilities are reversed beyond that range. In accordance to the crossover in relative stabilities, C15 clusters may grow by absorbing individual interstitials at small sizes and transitions into loops eventually. The transition takes place by nucleation and reaction of <111>/2 loop segments. These observations explain the absence of C15 phase interstitial clusters predicted by density-functional-theory calculations in previous experimental observations. More importantly, the current results provide a new formation mechanism of <100> loops which requires no interaction of loops.

  1. Formation of metallic magnetic clusters in a Kondo-lattice metal: Evidence from an optical study

    PubMed Central

    Kovaleva, N. N.; Kugel, K. I.; Bazhenov, A. V.; Fursova, T. N.; Löser, W.; Xu, Y.; Behr, G.; Kusmartsev, F. V.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic materials are usually divided into two classes: those with localised magnetic moments, and those with itinerant charge carriers. We present a comprehensive experimental (spectroscopic ellipsomerty) and theoretical study to demonstrate that these two types of magnetism do not only coexist but complement each other in the Kondo-lattice metal, Tb2PdSi3. In this material the itinerant charge carriers interact with large localised magnetic moments of Tb(4f) states, forming complex magnetic lattices at low temperatures, which we associate with self-organisation of magnetic clusters. The formation of magnetic clusters results in low-energy optical spectral weight shifts, which correspond to opening of the pseudogap in the conduction band of the itinerant charge carriers and development of the low- and high-spin intersite electronic transitions. This phenomenon, driven by self-trapping of electrons by magnetic fluctuations, could be common in correlated metals, including besides Kondo-lattice metals, Fe-based and cuprate superconductors. PMID:23189239

  2. Tel1(ATM)-mediated interference suppresses clustered meiotic double-strand-break formation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Valerie; Gray, Stephen; Allison, Rachal M; Cooper, Tim J; Neale, Matthew J

    2015-04-01

    Meiotic recombination is a critical step in gametogenesis for many organisms, enabling the creation of genetically diverse haploid gametes. In each meiotic cell, recombination is initiated by numerous DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) created by Spo11, the evolutionarily conserved topoisomerase-like protein, but how these DSBs are distributed relatively uniformly across the four chromatids that make up each chromosome pair is poorly understood. Here we employ Saccharomyces cerevisiae to demonstrate distance-dependent DSB interference in cis (in which the occurrence of a DSB suppresses adjacent DSB formation)--a process that is mediated by the conserved DNA damage response kinase, Tel1(ATM). The inhibitory function of Tel1 acts on a relatively local scale, while over large distances DSBs have a tendency to form independently of one another even in the presence of Tel1. Notably, over very short distances, loss of Tel1 activity causes DSBs to cluster within discrete zones of concerted DSB activity. Our observations support a hierarchical view of recombination initiation where Tel1(ATM) prevents clusters of DSBs, and further suppresses DSBs within the surrounding chromosomal region. Such collective negative regulation will help to ensure that recombination events are dispersed evenly and arranged optimally for genetic exchange and efficient chromosome segregation. PMID:25539084

  3. Cell collectivity regulation within migrating cell cluster during Kupffer's vesicle formation in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Takaaki; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Bessho, Yasumasa

    2015-01-01

    Although cell adhesion is thought to fasten cells tightly, cells that adhere to each other can migrate directionally. This group behavior, called “collective cell migration,” is observed during normal development, wound healing, and cancer invasion. Loss-of-function of cell adhesion molecules in several model systems of collective cell migration results in delay or inhibition of migration of cell groups but does not lead to dissociation of the cell groups, suggesting that mechanisms of cells staying assembled as a single cell cluster, termed as “cell collectivity,” remain largely unknown. During the formation of Kupffer's vesicle (KV, an organ of laterality in zebrafish), KV progenitors form a cluster and migrate together toward the vegetal pole. Importantly, in this model system of collective cell migration, knockdown of cell adhesion molecules or signal components leads to failure of cell collectivity. In this review, we summarize recent findings in cell collectivity regulation during collective migration of KV progenitor cells and describe our current understanding of how cell collectivity is regulated during collective cell migration. PMID:26000276

  4. Molecular gas and star formation in HI-deficient Virgo cluster galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenney, Jeffrey D.; Young, Judith S.

    1987-01-01

    Mapping of the CO emission line in 42 Virgo cluster galaxies reveals that the molecular gas contents and distributions are roughly normal in severaly HI-deficient Virgo spirals. The survival of the molecular component mitigates the impact of the HI-stripping on star formation and subsequent galactic evolution. For spirals which are deficient in HI by a factor of 10, far-infrared, H alpha line, and nonthermal radio continuum luminosities are lower by no more than a factor of 2. The fact that the inner galactic disks are stripped of HI, while CO is normal, suggests that the lifetime of the molecular phase is approximately one billion years in the inner regions of luminous spirals.

  5. On the continuing stellar formation in the central regions of some globular clusters and their relation to the pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komberg, B. V.

    1979-01-01

    The discrepancy between the predicted and observed quantities of gas in the central regions of massive globular clusters is discussed. It is hypothesized that star formation continues in the central regions by means of gas released during stellar evolution or trapped by the central region when the globular clusters pass through the center of the galaxy. Nine globular clusters are indicated at distances less than 1000 ps from which radio pulsars or X-ray sources are observed. It is argued that they could have formed relatively recently in closed pairs in the central regions and then ejected at the stage of supernova bursts with velocities over 100 ks/s.

  6. Neutral hydrogen gas, past and future star formation in galaxies in and around the `Sausage' merging galaxy cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroe, Andra; Oosterloo, Tom; Röttgering, Huub J. A.; Sobral, David; van Weeren, Reinout; Dawson, William

    2015-09-01

    CIZA J2242.8+5301 (z = 0.188, nicknamed `Sausage') is an extremely massive (M200 ˜ 2.0 × 1015 M⊙), merging cluster with shock waves towards its outskirts, which was found to host numerous emission line galaxies. We performed extremely deep Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope H I observations of the `Sausage' cluster to investigate the effect of the merger and the shocks on the gas reservoirs fuelling present and future star formation (SF) in cluster members. By using spectral stacking, we find that the emission line galaxies in the `Sausage' cluster have, on average, as much H I gas as field galaxies (when accounting for the fact cluster galaxies are more massive than the field galaxies), contrary to previous studies. Since the cluster galaxies are more massive than the field spirals, they may have been able to retain their gas during the cluster merger. The large H I reservoirs are expected to be consumed within ˜0.75-1.0 Gyr by the vigorous SF and active galactic nuclei activity and/or driven out by the outflows we observe. We find that the star formation rate (SFR) in a large fraction of H α emission line cluster galaxies correlates well with the radio broad-band emission, tracing supernova remnant emission. This suggests that the cluster galaxies, all located in post-shock regions, may have been undergoing sustained SFR for at least 100 Myr. This fully supports the interpretation proposed by Stroe et al. and Sobral et al. that gas-rich cluster galaxies have been triggered to form stars by the passage of the shock.

  7. Cores and revived cusps of dark matter haloes in disc galaxy formation through clump clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shigeki; Saitoh, Takayuki R.

    2011-12-01

    The cusp-core problem is a controversial problem in galactic dark matter haloes. Cosmological N-body simulations have demonstrated that galactic dark matter haloes have a cuspy density profile at the centre. However, baryonic physics may affect the dark matter density profile. For example, it was suggested that adiabatic contraction of baryonic gas makes the dark matter cusp steeper. However, it is still an open question as to whether the gas falls into the galactic centre in a smooth adiabatic manner. Recent numerical studies suggested that disc galaxies might experience a clumpy phase in the early stage of disc formation, which could also explain the clump clusters and chain galaxies observed in the high-redshift Universe. In this paper, using numerical simulations with an isolated model, we study how the dark matter halo responds to the clumpy nature of baryon components in disc galaxy formation through the clump-cluster phase. Our simulation demonstrates that such a clumpy phase leads to a shallower density profile of the dark matter halo in the central region while clumps fall into the centre due to dynamical friction. This mechanism helps to make the central dark matter density profile shallower in galaxies with virial mass as large as 5.0 × 1011 M⊙. The halo draws the clumps into the galactic centre, while it is kinematically heated by the clumps. We additionally run a dark-matter-only simulation excluding baryonic components and confirm that the resultant shallower density profile is not due to a numerical artefact in the simulation, such as two-body relaxation.

  8. Gas retention and accumulation in stellar clusters and galaxies: Implications for star formation and black hole accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naiman, Jill

    Star formation cannot proceed without the existence of an extensive gas reservoir. In particular, the supply of gas to form stars in dwarf galaxies and star clusters requires overcoming a variety of difficulties - namely, the effectiveness of different feedback mechanisms in removing gas from these shallow gravitational potentials. In addition, the supply of external gas to these systems is determined by the large scale galactic structure in which they reside. This thesis employs computational hydrodynamics coupled with physically realistic subgrid feedback prescriptions to resolve the interplay between the small scale feedback mechanisms and larger scale gas flows to determine the amount of gas a shallow potential can accumulate. First, we consider the flow of gas external to dwarf galaxies and star clusters into their cores as a generalized accretion process. Second, we explore the enhancement of gas accretion rates onto the compact members of young star clusters when the flow of external gas into the cluster cores is large. Third, we discuss how external gas flows initiated by the presence of a massive nuclear star cluster can enhance central massive black hole accretion rates during galaxy mergers. Fourth, we change our focus to exploring internal stellar wind retention in proto-globular clusters as a mechanism to supply gas for multiple episodes of star formation. Finally, the implications of stellar wind retention on the current gas reservoir in globular clusters is discussed.

  9. Ex-Situ Kinetic Investigations of the Formation of the Poly-Oxo Cluster U38.

    PubMed

    Falaise, Clément; Volkringer, Christophe; Hennig, Christoph; Loiseau, Thierry

    2015-11-01

    The ex-situ qualitative study of the kinetic formation of the poly-oxo cluster U38 , has been investigated after the solvothermal reaction. The resulting products have been characterized by means of powder XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for the solid phase and UV/Vis, X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and NMR spectroscopies for the supernatant liquid phase. The analysis of the different synthesis batches, stopped at different reaction times, revealed the formation of spherical crystallites of UO2 from t=3 h, after the formation of unknown solid phases at an early stage. The crystallization of U38 occurred from t=4 h at the expense of UO2 , and is completed after t=8 h. Starting from pure uranium(IV) species in solution (t=0-1 h), oxidation reactions are observed with a U(IV) /U(VI) ratio of 70:30 for t=1-3 h. Then, the ratio is inversed with a U(IV) /U(VI) ratio of 25/75, when the precipitation of UO2 occurs. Thorough SEM observations of the U38 crystallites showed that the UO2 aggregates are embedded within. This may indicate that UO2 acts as reservoir of uranium(IV), for the formation of U38 , stabilized by benzoate and THF ligands. During the early stages of the U38 crystallization, a transient crystallized phase appeared at t=4 h. Its crystal structure revealed a new dodecanuclear moiety (U12 ), based on the inner hexanuclear core of {U6 O8 } type, decorated by three additional pairs of dinuclear U2 units. The U12 motif is stabilized by benzoate, oxalates, and glycolate ligands. PMID:26418869

  10. Constraining star formation rates in cool-core brightest cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Rupal; Whelan, John T.; Combes, Françoise

    2015-07-01

    We used broad-band imaging data for 10 cool-core brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and conducted a Bayesian analysis using stellar population synthesis to determine the likely properties of the constituent stellar populations. Determination of ongoing star formation rates (SFRs), in particular, has a direct impact on our understanding of the cooling of the intracluster medium (ICM), star formation and AGN-regulated feedback. Our model consists of an old stellar population and a series of young stellar components. We calculated marginalized posterior probability distributions for various model parameters and obtained 68 per cent plausible intervals from them. The 68 per cent plausible interval on the SFRs is broad, owing to a wide range of models that are capable of fitting the data, which also explains the wide dispersion in the SFRs available in the literature. The ranges of possible SFRs are robust and highlight the strength in such a Bayesian analysis. The SFRs are correlated with the X-ray mass deposition rates (the former are factors of 4-50 lower than the latter), implying a picture where the cooling of the ICM is a contributing factor to star formation in cool-core BCGs. We find that 9 out of 10 BCGs have been experiencing starbursts since 6 Gyr ago. While four out of nine BCGs seem to require continuous SFRs, five out of nine seem to require periodic star formation on intervals ranging from 20 to 200 Myr. This time-scale is similar to the cooling time of the ICM in the central (<5 kpc) regions.

  11. A multiwavelength photometric census of AGN and star formation activity in the brightest cluster galaxies of X-ray selected clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, T. S.; Edge, A. C.; Stott, J. P.; Ebeling, H.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Draper, P. W.; Metcalfe, N.; Kaiser, N.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2016-09-01

    Despite their reputation as being `red and dead', the unique environment inhabited by brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) can often lead to a self-regulated feedback cycle between radiatively cooling intracluster gas and star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in the BCG. However the prevalence of `active' BCGs, and details of the feedback involved, are still uncertain. We have performed an optical, UV and mid-IR photometric analysis of the BCGs in 981 clusters at 0.03 < z < 0.5, selected from the ROSAT All Sky Survey. Using Pan-STARRS PS1 3π, GALEX and WISE survey data we look for BCGs with photometric colours which deviate from that of the bulk population of passive BCGs - indicative of AGN and/or star formation activity within the BCG. We find that whilst the majority of BCGs are consistent with being passive, at least 14 per cent of our BCGs show a significant colour offset from passivity in at least one colour index. And, where available, supplementary spectroscopy reveals the majority of these particular BCGs show strong optical emission lines. On comparing BCG `activity' with the X-ray luminosity of the host cluster, we find that BCGs showing a colour offset are preferentially found in the more X-ray luminous clusters, indicative of the connection between BCG `activity' and the intracluster medium.

  12. Reactivity of niobium-carbon cluster ions with hydrogen molecules in relation to formation mechanism of Met-Car cluster ions.

    PubMed

    Miyajima, Ken; Fukushima, Naoya; Mafuné, Fumitaka

    2008-07-01

    It is known that a niobium-carbon Met-Car cluster ion (Nb 8C 12 (+)) and its intermediates (Nb 4C 4 (+), Nb 6C 7 (+), etc.) are selectively formed by the aggregation of the Nb atoms in the presence of hydrocarbons. To elucidate the formation mechanism, we prepared Nb n C m (+) with every combination of n and m in the gas phase by the laser vaporization technique. The reactivity of Nb n C m (+) with H 2 was examined under the multiple collision condition, finding that Nb n C m (+) between Nb 2C 3 (+) and Nb 8C 12 (+) are not reactive with H 2. On the basis of the H 2 affinity of Nb n C m (+) experimentally obtained, we propose a dehydrogenation-controlled formation mechanism of niobium-carbon Met-Car cluster ions.

  13. Four and one more: The formation history and total mass of globular clusters in the Fornax dSph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, T. J. L.; Fraser, M.

    2016-05-01

    We have determined the detailed star formation history and total mass of the globular clusters in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal using archival HST WFPC2 data. Colour-magnitude diagrams were constructed in the F555W and F814W bands and corrected for the effect of Fornax field star contamination, after which we used the routine Talos to derive the quantitative star formation history as a function of age and metallicity. The star formation history of the Fornax globular clusters shows that Fornax 1, 2, 3, and 5 are all dominated by ancient (>10 Gyr) populations. Clusters Fornax 1, 2, and 3 display metallicities as low as [Fe/H] = -2.5, while Fornax 5 is slightly more metal-rich at [Fe/H] = -1.8, consistent with resolved and unresolved metallicity tracers. Conversely, Fornax 4 is dominated by a more metal-rich ([Fe/H] = -1.2) and younger population at 10 Gyr, inconsistent with the other clusters. A lack of stellar populations overlapping with the main body of Fornax argues against the nucleus cluster scenario for Fornax 4. The combined stellar mass in globular clusters as derived from the SFH is (9.57 ± 0.93) × 105 M⊙, which corresponds to 2.5 ± 0.2 percent of the total stellar mass in Fornax. The mass of the four most metal-poor clusters can also be compared to the metal-poor Fornax field to yield a mass fraction of 19.6 ± 3.1 percent. Therefore, the SFH results provide separate supporting evidence for the unusually high mass fraction of the globular clusters compared to the Fornax field population.

  14. Ab initio scaling laws for the formation energy of nanosized interstitial defect clusters in iron, tungsten, and vanadium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, R.; Marinica, M.-C.; Proville, L.; Willaime, F.; Arakawa, K.; Gilbert, M. R.; Dudarev, S. L.

    2016-07-01

    The size limitation of ab initio calculations impedes first-principles simulations of crystal defects at nanometer sizes. Considering clusters of self-interstitial atoms as a paradigm for such crystal defects, we have developed an ab initio-accuracy model to predict formation energies of defect clusters with various geometries and sizes. Our discrete-continuum model combines the discrete nature of energetics of interstitial clusters and continuum elasticity for a crystalline solid matrix. The model is then applied to interstitial dislocation loops with <100 > and 1 /2 <111 > Burgers vectors, and to C15 clusters in body-centered-cubic crystals Fe, W, and V, to determine their relative stabilities as a function of size. We find that in Fe the C15 clusters were more stable than dislocation loops if the number of self-interstitial atoms involved was fewer than 51, which corresponds to a C15 cluster with a diameter of 1.5 nm. In V and W, the 1 /2 <111 > loops represent the most stable configurations for all defect sizes, which is at odds with predictions derived from simulations performed using some empirical interatomic potentials. Further, the formation energies predicted by the discrete-continuum model are reparametrized by a simple analytical expression giving the formation energy of self-interstitial clusters as a function of their size. The analytical scaling laws are valid over a very broad range of defect sizes, and they can be used in multiscale techniques including kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and cluster dynamics or dislocation dynamics studies.

  15. Compound nucleus formation probability PCN defined within the dynamical cluster-decay model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Sahila; Kaur, Arshdeep; Gupta, Raj K.

    2015-01-01

    With in the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM), the compound nucleus fusion/ formation probability PCN is defined for the first time, and its variation with CN excitation energy E* and fissility parameter χ is studied. In DCM, the (total) fusion cross section σfusion is sum of the compound nucleus (CN) and noncompound nucleus (nCN) decay processes, each calculated as the dynamical fragmentation process. The CN cross section σCN is constituted of the evaporation residues (ER) and fusion-fission (ff), including the intermediate mass fragments (IMFs), each calculated for all contributing decay fragments (A1, A2) in terms of their formation and barrier penetration probabilities P0 and P. The nCN cross section σnCN is determined as the quasi-fission (qf) process where P0=1 and P is calculated for the entrance channel nuclei. The calculations are presented for six different target-projectile combinations of CN mass A~100 to superheavy, at various different center-of-mass energies with effects of deformations and orientations of nuclei included in it. Interesting results are that the PCN=1 for complete fusion, but PCN <1 or ≪1 due to the nCN conribution, depending strongly on both E* and χ.

  16. Cosmological constraints from galaxy clustering and the mass-to-number ratio of galaxy clusters: marginalizing over the physics of galaxy formation

    SciTech Connect

    Reddick, Rachel M.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Lu, Yu; Tinker, Jeremy L. E-mail: rwechsler@stanford.edu

    2014-03-10

    Many approaches to obtaining cosmological constraints rely on the connection between galaxies and dark matter. However, the distribution of galaxies is dependent on their formation and evolution as well as on the cosmological model, and galaxy formation is still not a well-constrained process. Thus, methods that probe cosmology using galaxies as tracers for dark matter must be able to accurately estimate the cosmological parameters. This can be done without knowing details of galaxy formation a priori as long as the galaxies are well represented by a halo occupation distribution (HOD). We apply this reasoning to the method of obtaining Ω {sub m} and σ{sub 8} from galaxy clustering combined with the mass-to-number ratio of galaxy clusters. To test the sensitivity of this method to variations due to galaxy formation, we consider several different models applied to the same cosmological dark matter simulation. The cosmological parameters are then estimated using the observables in each model, marginalizing over the parameters of the HOD. We find that for models where the galaxies can be well represented by a parameterized HOD, this method can successfully extract the desired cosmological parameters for a wide range of galaxy formation prescriptions.

  17. A possible formation channel for blue hook stars in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Zhenxin; Chen, Xuemei; Zhang, Fenghui; Han, Zhanwen

    2015-05-01

    The formation mechanism for blue hook (BHk) stars in globular clusters (GCs) is still unclear. Following one of the possible scenarios, called the late hot flash scenario, we propose that a tidally enhanced stellar wind in binary evolution might provide the huge mass loss on the red giant branch (RGB) and produce BHk stars. Employing the detailed stellar evolution code MESA (Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics), we have investigated the contributions of tidally enhanced stellar wind as a possible formation channel for BHk stars in GCs. We evolved the primary stars with different initial orbital periods using the binary module in MESA (version 6208) from the zero-age main-sequence (ZAMS) to the post-horizontal branch (HB) stage, and obtained their evolution parameters, which are compared with the observation. The results are consistent with observations in the colour-magnitude diagram and the log g-Teff plane for NGC 2808, which is an example GC hosting BHk stars. However, the helium abundance in the surface for our models is higher than the one obtained in BHk stars. This discrepancy between our models and observations is possibly due to the fact that gravitational settling and radiative levitation, which are common processes in hot HB stars, are not considered in the models as well as the fact that the flash mixing efficiency might be overestimated in the calculations. Our results suggest that tidally enhanced stellar wind in binary evolution is able to naturally provide the huge mass loss on the RGB needed for the late hot flash scenario, and it is a possible and reasonable formation channel for BHk stars in GCs.

  18. Herschel Observations of the W3 GMC: Clues to the Formation of Clusters of High-mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Martin, P. G.; Polychroni, D.; Motte, F.; Schneider, N.; Bontemps, S.; Hennemann, M.; Men'shchikov, A.; Nguyen Luong, Q.; André, Ph.; Arzoumanian, D.; Bernard, J.-Ph.; Di Francesco, J.; Elia, D.; Fallscheer, C.; Hill, T.; Li, J. Z.; Minier, V.; Pezzuto, S.; Roy, A.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Sadavoy, S. I.; Spinoglio, L.; White, G. J.; Wilson, C. D.

    2013-04-01

    The W3 GMC is a prime target for the study of the early stages of high-mass star formation. We have used Herschel data from the HOBYS key program to produce and analyze column density and temperature maps. Two preliminary catalogs were produced by extracting sources from the column density map and from Herschel maps convolved to 500 μm resolution. Herschel reveals that among the compact sources (FWHM < 0.45 pc), W3 East, W3 West, and W3 (OH) are the most massive and luminous and have the highest column density. Considering the unique properties of W3 East and W3 West, the only clumps with ongoing high-mass star formation, we suggest a "convergent constructive feedback" scenario to account for the formation of a cluster with decreasing age and increasing system/source mass toward the innermost regions. This process, which relies on feedback by high-mass stars to ensure the availability of material during cluster formation, could also lead to the creation of an environment suitable for the formation of Trapezium-like systems. In common with other scenarios proposed in other HOBYS studies, our results indicate that an active/dynamic process aiding in the accumulation, compression, and confinement of material is a critical feature of the high-mass star/cluster formation, distinguishing it from classical low-mass star formation. The environmental conditions and availability of triggers determine the form in which this process occurs, implying that high-mass star/cluster formation could arise from a range of scenarios: from large-scale convergence of turbulent flows to convergent constructive feedback or mergers of filaments. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  19. LoCuSS: THE SLOW QUENCHING OF STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTER GALAXIES AND THE NEED FOR PRE-PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, C. P.; Pereira, M. J.; Egami, E.; Rawle, T. D.; Smith, G. P.; Ziparo, F.; McGee, S. L.; Babul, A.; Finoguenov, A.; Okabe, N.; Moran, S. M.

    2015-06-10

    We present a study of the spatial distribution and kinematics of star-forming galaxies in 30 massive clusters at 0.15 < z < 0.30, combining wide-field Spitzer 24 μm and GALEX near-ultraviolet imaging with highly complete spectroscopy of cluster members. The fraction (f{sub SF}) of star-forming cluster galaxies rises steadily with cluster-centric radius, increasing fivefold by 2r{sub 200}, but remains well below field values even at 3r{sub 200}. This suppression of star formation at large radii cannot be reproduced by models in which star formation is quenched in infalling field galaxies only once they pass within r{sub 200} of the cluster, but is consistent with some of them being first pre-processed within galaxy groups. Despite the increasing f{sub SF}-radius trend, the surface density of star-forming galaxies actually declines steadily with radius, falling ∼15× from the core to 2r{sub 200}. This requires star formation to survive within recently accreted spirals for 2–3 Gyr to build up the apparent over-density of star-forming galaxies within clusters. The velocity dispersion profile of the star-forming galaxy population shows a sharp peak of 1.44 σ{sub ν} at 0.3r{sub 500}, and is 10%–35% higher than that of the inactive cluster members at all cluster-centric radii, while their velocity distribution shows a flat, top-hat profile within r{sub 500}. All of these results are consistent with star-forming cluster galaxies being an infalling population, but one that must also survive ∼0.5–2 Gyr beyond passing within r{sub 200}. By comparing the observed distribution of star-forming galaxies in the stacked caustic diagram with predictions from the Millennium simulation, we obtain a best-fit model in which star formation rates decline exponentially on quenching timescales of 1.73 ± 0.25 Gyr upon accretion into the cluster.

  20. LoCuSS: The Slow Quenching of Star Formation in Cluster Galaxies and the Need for Pre-processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, C. P.; Pereira, M. J.; Smith, G. P.; Egami, E.; Babul, A.; Finoguenov, A.; Ziparo, F.; McGee, S. L.; Rawle, T. D.; Okabe, N.; Moran, S. M.

    2015-06-01

    We present a study of the spatial distribution and kinematics of star-forming galaxies in 30 massive clusters at 0.15 < z < 0.30, combining wide-field Spitzer 24 μm and GALEX near-ultraviolet imaging with highly complete spectroscopy of cluster members. The fraction (fSF) of star-forming cluster galaxies rises steadily with cluster-centric radius, increasing fivefold by 2r200, but remains well below field values even at 3r200. This suppression of star formation at large radii cannot be reproduced by models in which star formation is quenched in infalling field galaxies only once they pass within r200 of the cluster, but is consistent with some of them being first pre-processed within galaxy groups. Despite the increasing fSF-radius trend, the surface density of star-forming galaxies actually declines steadily with radius, falling ˜15× from the core to 2r200. This requires star formation to survive within recently accreted spirals for 2-3 Gyr to build up the apparent over-density of star-forming galaxies within clusters. The velocity dispersion profile of the star-forming galaxy population shows a sharp peak of 1.44 σν at 0.3r500, and is 10%-35% higher than that of the inactive cluster members at all cluster-centric radii, while their velocity distribution shows a flat, top-hat profile within r500. All of these results are consistent with star-forming cluster galaxies being an infalling population, but one that must also survive ˜0.5-2 Gyr beyond passing within r200. By comparing the observed distribution of star-forming galaxies in the stacked caustic diagram with predictions from the Millennium simulation, we obtain a best-fit model in which star formation rates decline exponentially on quenching timescales of 1.73 ± 0.25 Gyr upon accretion into the cluster.

  1. Stellar, brown dwarf and multiple star properties from a radiation hydrodynamical simulation of star cluster formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bate, Matthew R.

    2012-02-01

    We report the statistical properties of stars, brown dwarfs and multiple systems obtained from the largest radiation hydrodynamical simulation of star cluster formation to date that resolves masses down to the opacity limit for fragmentation (a few Jupiter masses). The initial conditions are identical to those of previous barotropic calculations published by Bate, but this time the calculation is performed using a realistic equation of state and radiation hydrodynamics. The calculation uses sink particles to model 183 stars and brown dwarfs, including 28 binaries and 12 higher-order multiple systems, the properties of which are compared to the results from observational surveys. We find that the radiation hydrodynamical/sink particle simulation reproduces many observed stellar properties very well. In particular, whereas using a barotropic equation of state produces more brown dwarfs than stars, the inclusion of radiative feedback results in a stellar mass function and a ratio of brown dwarfs to stars in good agreement with observations of Galactic star-forming regions. In addition, many of the other statistical properties of the stars and brown dwarfs are in reasonable agreement with observations, including multiplicity as a function of primary mass, the frequency of very low mass binaries, and general trends for the mass ratio and separation distributions of binaries. We also examine the velocity dispersion of the stars, the distributions of disc truncation radii due to dynamical interactions, and coplanarity of orbits and sink particle spins in multiple systems. Overall, the calculation produces a cluster of stars whose statistical properties are difficult to distinguish from observed systems, implying that gravity, hydrodynamics and radiative feedback are the primary ingredients for determining the origin of the statistical properties of low-mass stars.

  2. Stellar, brown dwarf and multiple star properties from hydrodynamical simulations of star cluster formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bate, Matthew R.

    2009-01-01

    We report the statistical properties of stars, brown dwarfs and multiple systems obtained from the largest hydrodynamical simulation of star cluster formation to date that resolves masses down to the opacity limit for fragmentation (a few Jupiter masses). The simulation is essentially identical to that of Bate, Bonnell & Bromm except that the initial molecular cloud is larger and more massive. It produces more than 1250 stars and brown dwarfs, providing unprecedented statistical information that can be compared with observational surveys. The calculation uses sink particles to model the stars and brown dwarfs. Part of the calculation is rerun with smaller sink particle accretion radii and gravitational softening to investigate the effect of these approximations on the results. We find that hydrodynamical/sink particle simulations can reproduce many of the observed stellar properties very well. Multiplicity as a function of the primary mass, the frequency of very low mass (VLM) binaries, general trends for the separation and mass ratio distributions of binaries and the relative orbital orientations of triples systems are all in reasonable agreement with observations. We also examine the radial variations of binarity, velocity dispersion and mass function in the resulting stellar cluster and the distributions of disc truncation radii due to dynamical interactions. For VLM binaries, because their separations are typically close, we find that their frequency is sensitive to the sink particle accretion radii and gravitational softening used in the calculations. Using small accretion radii and gravitational softening results in a frequency of VLM binaries similar to that expected from observational surveys (~20 per cent). We also find that VLM binaries evolve from wide, unequal-mass systems towards close equal-mass systems as they form. The two main deficiencies of the calculations are that they overproduce brown dwarfs relative to stars and that there are too few

  3. Accretion of pristine gas and dilution during the formation of multiple-population globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ercole, A.; D'Antona, F.; Vesperini, E.

    2016-10-01

    We study the interaction of the early spherical GC wind powered by Type II supernovae (SNe II) with the surrounding ambient medium consisting of the gaseous disc of a star-forming galaxy at redshift z ≳ 2. The bubble formed by the wind eventually breaks out of the disc, and most of the wind moves directly out of the galaxy and is definitively lost. The fraction of the wind moving nearly parallel to the galactic plane carves a hole in the disc which will contract after the end of the SN activity. During the interval of time between the end of the SN explosions and the `closure' of the hole, very O-poor stars (the Extreme population) can form out of the super-AGB (asymptotic giant branch) ejecta collected in the GC centre. Once the hole contracts, the AGB ejecta mix with the pristine gas, allowing the formation of stars with an oxygen abundance intermediate between that of the very O-poor stars and that of the pristine gas. We show that this mechanism may explain why Extreme populations are present only in massive clusters, and can also produce a correlation between the spread in helium and the cluster mass. Finally, we also explore the possibility that our proposed mechanism can be extended to the case of multiple populations showing bimodality in the iron content, with the presence of two populations characterized by a small difference in [Fe/H]. Such a result can be obtained taking into account the contribution of delayed SN II.

  4. Constraining ultracompact dwarf galaxy formation with galaxy clusters in the local universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeffer, J.; Hilker, M.; Baumgardt, H.; Griffen, B. F.

    2016-05-01

    We compare the predictions of a semi-analytic model for ultracompact dwarf galaxy (UCD) formation by tidal stripping to the observed properties of globular clusters (GCs) and UCDs in the Fornax and Virgo clusters. For Fornax we find the predicted number of stripped nuclei agrees very well with the excess number of GCs+UCDs above the GC luminosity function. GCs+UCDs with masses >107.3 M⊙ are consistent with being entirely formed by tidal stripping. Stripped nuclei can also account for Virgo UCDs with masses >107.3 M⊙ where numbers are complete by mass. For both Fornax and Virgo, the predicted velocity dispersions and radial distributions of stripped nuclei are consistent with that of UCDs within ˜50-100 kpc but disagree at larger distances where dispersions are too high and radial distributions too extended. Stripped nuclei are predicted to have radially biased anisotropies at all radii, agreeing with Virgo UCDs at clustercentric distances larger than 50 kpc. However, ongoing disruption is not included in our model which would cause orbits to become tangentially biased at small radii. We find the predicted metallicities and central black hole masses of stripped nuclei agree well with the metallicities and implied black hole masses of UCDs for masses >106.5 M⊙. The predicted black hole masses also agree well with that of M60-UCD1, the first UCD with a confirmed central black hole. These results suggest that observed GC+UCD populations are a combination of genuine GCs and stripped nuclei, with the contribution of stripped nuclei increasing towards the high-mass end.

  5. Metal-containing carbon clusters. Structures, isomerization, and formation of NbC{sub n}{sup +} clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Clemmer, D.E.; Jarrold, M.E.

    1995-08-30

    Injected ion drift tube techniques, including ion mobility measurements and annealing and fragmentation studies, have been used to examine the isomers present for NbC{sub n}{sup +} (n = 15-50) clusters. Isomers attributed to niobium-containing monocyclic and bicyclic rings, graphitic sheets, and metallofullerenes have been identified. Monocyclic rings, where the niobium atom appears to be either inserted into or bound to the outside of the ring, dominate for NbC{sub n}{sup +} with n < 22. Isomers assigned to bicyclic rings are first observed and become dominant around NbC{sub 22}{sup +}. They probably consist of two rings joined together by a niobium atom. An isomer attributed to NbC{sub n}{sup +} graphitic sheets is present for n > 22 and becomes important for clusters with around 30 carbon atoms. Metallofullerenes are first observed for NbC{sub 28}{sup +} and become a major isomer for clusters with n > 31. Both endohedral metallofullerenes and networked metallofullerenes (where the metal atom is part of the cage) have been identified. For clusters with more than around 30 carbon atoms the NbC{sub n}{sup +} bicyclic rings can be annealed into metallofullerenes and, for the smaller ones, metal-containing graphitic sheets. The isomers observed for NbC{sub n}{sup +} are similar to those found for pure C{sub n}{sup +} and LaC{sub n}{sup +}, but the niobium atom has a substantial effect on the properties and the abundances of the different isomers. 47 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Star Formation Rates in Cooling Flow Clusters: A UV Pilot Study with Archival XMM-Newton Optical Monitor Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, A. K.; Mushotzky, R.

    2005-12-01

    We have analyzed XMM-Newton Optical Monitor UV (180-400 nm) data for a sample of 33 galaxies. Thirty are cluster member galaxies, and nine are central cluster galaxies (CCGs) in cooling flow clusters having mass deposition rates between 8 and 525 Msolar yr-1. By comparing the ratio of UV to 2MASS J-band fluxes, we find a significant UV excess in many, but not all, cooling flow CCGs, consistent with several previous studies based on optical imaging data (McNamara & O'Connell Cardiel et al.; Crawford et al.). This UV excess is a direct indication of the presence of young massive stars and, therefore, recent star formation. Using the Starburst99 model of continuous star formation over a 900 Myr period, we derive star formation rates of 0.2-219 Msolar yr-1 for the cooling flow sample. For two-thirds of this sample, it is possible to equate Chandra/XMM cooling flow mass deposition rates with UV-inferred star formation rates, for a combination of starburst lifetime and IMF slope. This is a pilot study of the well-populated XMM UV cluster archive, and a more extensive follow-up study is currently underway.

  7. Star Formation Rates in Cooling Flow Clusters: A UV Pilot Study with Archival XMM-Newton Optical Monitor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, A. K.; Mushotzky, R.

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed XMM-Newton Optical Monitor (OM) UV (180-400 nm) data for a sample of 33 galaxies. 30 are cluster member galaxies, and nine of these are central cluster galaxies (CCGs) in cooling flow clusters having mass deposition rates which span a range of 8 - 525 solar mass per year. By comparing the ratio of UV to 2MASS J band fluxes, we find a significant UV excess in many, but not all, cooling flow CCGs, a finding consistent with the outcome of previous studies based on optical imaging data (McNamara & O Connell 1989; Cardiel, Gorgas, & Aragon-Salamanca 1998; Crawford et al. 1999). This UV excess is a direct indication of the presence of young massive stars, and therefore recent star formation, in these galaxies. Using the Starburst99 spectral energy distribution (SED) model of continuous star formation over a 900 Myr period, we derive star formation rates of 0.2 - 219 solar mass per year for the cooling flow sample. For 2/3 of this sample it is possible to equate Chandra/XMM cooling flow mass deposition rates with UV inferred star formation rates, for a combination of starburst lifetime and IMF slope. This is a pilot study of the well populated XMM UV cluster archive and a more extensive follow up study is currently underway.

  8. Star Formation Rates in Cooling Flow Clusters: A UV Pilot Study with Archival XMM-Newton Optical Monitor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, A. K.; Mushotzky, R.

    2006-01-01

    We have analyzed XMM-Newton Optical Monitor (OM) UV (180-400 nm) data for a sample of 33 galaxies. 30 are cluster member galaxies, and nine of these are central cluster galaxies (CCGs) in cooling flow clusters having mass deposition rates which span a range of 8 - 525 Solar Mass/yr. By comparing the ratio of UV to 2MASS J band fluxes, we find a significant UV excess in many, but not all, cooling flow CCGs, a finding consistent with the outcome of previous studies based on optical imaging data (McNamara & O'Connell 1989; Cardiel, Gorgas, & Aragon-Salamanca 1998; Crawford et al. 1999). This UV excess is a direct indication of the presence of young massive stars, and therefore recent star formation, in these galaxies. Using the Starburst99 spectral energy distribution (SED) model of continuous star formation over a 900 Myr period, we derive star formation rates of 0.2 - 219 solar Mass/yr for the cooling flow sample. For 2/3 of this sample it is possible to equate Chandra/XMM cooling flow mass deposition rates with UV inferred star formation rates, for a combination of starburst lifetime and IMF slope. This is a pilot study of the well populated XMM UV cluster archive and a more extensive follow up study is currently underway.

  9. Cage Structure Formation of Singly Doped Aluminum Cluster Cations Al n TM + ( TM = Ti, V, Cr)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Sandra M.; Claes, Pieterjan; Neukermans, Sven; Janssens, Ewald

    2011-09-01

    Structural information on free transition metal doped aluminum clusters, Al n TM + ( TM = Ti, V, Cr), was obtained by studying their ability for argon physisorption. Systematic size ( n = 5 - 35) and temperature ( T = 145 - 300 K) dependent investigations reveal that bare Al n + clusters are inert toward argon, while Al n TM + clusters attach one argon atom up to a critical cluster size. This size is interpreted as the geometrical transition from surface-located dopant atoms to endohedrally doped aluminum clusters with the transition metal atom residing in an aluminum cage. The critical size, n crit , is found to be surprisingly large, namely n crit = 16 and n crit = 19 - 21 for TM = V, Cr, and TM = Ti, respectively. Experimental cluster-argon bond dissociation energies have been derived as function of cluster size from equilibrium mass spectra and are in the 0.1-0.3 eV range.

  10. Pair and Cluster Formation in Hybrid Active-Passive Matter Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafnick, Ryan; Garcia, Angel

    2015-03-01

    Systems composed of self-propelling entities, dubbed active matter, are ubiquitous in nature, from flocks of birds and schools of fish to swarms of bacteria and catalytic nanomotors. These systems (both biological and industrial) have applications ranging from micron-scale cargo manipulation and directed transport to water remediation and material processing. When added to a solution with passive (non-self-propelling) particles, active matter leads to new and altered system properties. For example, the diffusion of passive particles increases by orders of magnitude in typical systems, leading to a raised effective temperature. Additionally, particles that normally repel each other exhibit effective attractions which can lead to pair formation and clustering. The nature of these effects depends on both the mechanical collisions of swimmers and the hydrodynamic flow fields they propagate. We computationally examine the effect and dependence of various system parameters, such as particle shape and density, on these properties. This work was funded by NIH grant GM086801 and NSF grant MCB-1050966.

  11. FIRST EVIDENCE OF GLOBULAR CLUSTER FORMATION FROM THE EJECTA OF PROMPT TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujimoto, Takuji; Bekki, Kenji

    2012-06-01

    Recent spectroscopic observations of globular clusters (GCs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) have discovered that one of the intermediate-age GCs, NGC 1718, with [Fe/H] = -0.7 has an extremely low [Mg/Fe] ratio of {approx}-0.9. We propose that NGC 1718 was formed from the ejecta of Type Ia supernovae mixed with very metal-poor ([Fe/H] <-1.3) gas about {approx}2 Gyr ago. The proposed scenario is shown to be consistent with the observed abundances of Fe-group elements such as Cr, Mn, and Ni. In addition, compelling evidence for asymptotic giant branch stars playing a role in chemical enrichment during this GC formation is found. We suggest that the origin of the metal-poor gas is closely associated with efficient gas transfer from the outer gas disk of the Small Magellanic Cloud to the LMC disk. We anticipate that the outer part of the LMC disk contains field stars exhibiting significantly low [Mg/Fe] ratios, formed through the same process as NGC 1718.

  12. Aflatoxin biosynthesis cluster gene cypA is required for G aflatoxin formation.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Kenneth C; Chang, Perng-Kuang; Yu, Jiujiang; Cotty, Peter J

    2004-11-01

    Aspergillus flavus isolates produce only aflatoxins B1 and B2, while Aspergillus parasiticus and Aspergillus nomius produce aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2. Sequence comparison of the aflatoxin biosynthesis pathway gene cluster upstream from the polyketide synthase gene, pksA, revealed that A. flavus isolates are missing portions of genes (cypA and norB) predicted to encode, respectively, a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase and an aryl alcohol dehydrogenase. Insertional disruption of cypA in A. parasiticus yielded transformants that lack the ability to produce G aflatoxins but not B aflatoxins. The enzyme encoded by cypA has highest amino acid identity to Gibberella zeae Tri4 (38%), a P450 monooxygenase previously shown to be involved in trichodiene epoxidation. The substrate for CypA may be an intermediate formed by oxidative cleavage of the A ring of O-methylsterigmatocystin by OrdA, the P450 monooxygenase required for formation of aflatoxins B1 and B2. PMID:15528514

  13. Galaxy and cluster formation in a universe dominated by cold dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Primack, J.R.

    1984-07-01

    The dark matter (DM) that appears to be gravitationally dominant on all astronomical scales larger than the cores of galaxies can be classified, on the basis of its characteristic free-streaming damping mass M/sub D/, as hot (M/sub D/ approx. 10/sup 15/ M/sub mass/), warm (M/sub D/ approx. 10/sup 11/ M/sub mass/), or cold (M/sub D < 10/sup 8/ M/sub mass/). For the case of cold DM, the shape of the DM fluctuation spectrum is determined by (a) the primordial spectrum (on scales larger than the horizon), and (b) stagspansion, the stagnation of the growth of DM fluctuations that enter the horizon while the universe is still radiation-dominated. An attractive feature of the cold dark matter hypothesis is its considerable predictive power: the post-recombination fluctuation spectrum is calculable, and it in turn governs the formation of galaxies and clusters. Good agreement with the data is obtained for a Zeldovich spectrum of primordial fluctuations.

  14. [Success factors in the German healthcare market. Hospitals between cluster formation and privatisation].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, C; Möller, J; Hardt, F; Gabbert, T; Bauer, M

    2007-12-01

    The German hospital market is in a state of transition due to the introduction of diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) and a constant change of the reimbursement, demographic, economical and technical framework. To date mainly public hospitals were bought by private hospital chains, but this trend has currently reached university hospitals. During recent months a consolidation within the market of private hospitals took place, while new market players such as foreign hospital chains, US universities and private equity firms emerged on the scene. The target of the privatisation process, however, turns more and more to larger hospitals. Central key values remain the cluster formation and centralisation of key competences such as food supply, purchasing and pharmacy. Within a network of clinics the representation of different care components (basic, regular and maximum care provider) and care levels (low, normal, intermediate and intensive care) remain important elements of efficient hospital management. Today, successful hospital operation is based on the successful competition for patients and even more for qualified staff. In this aspect, university hospitals could play a decisive role, because of their combination of maximum acute care provision and educational mandate. No such network has yet been formed due to the different interests of the owners, however, given the new market situation this alternative concept could become more attractive.

  15. Formation of a sodium bicarbonate cluster in the structure of sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachenko, M. V.; Kamzin, A. S.

    2015-02-01

    Ceramic sodium-substituted carbonated hydroxyapatite has been synthesized using the method of the solid-phase reaction in the temperature range of 640-820°C in water vapor. It has been established that substitutions of Ca2+ ions in the cation and anion subsystems with Na+ ions and the PO{4/3-} and OH- groups with CO{3/2-} ions lead to a considerable acceleration of the shrinkage and synthesis of dense ceramics at substantially lower temperatures than in the case of unsubstituted hydroxyapatite. Sintering in water vapor leads to densification of carbonate groups in channel positions, which induces the appearance of orderings of A2 and B2 types (bands with wave numbers 867 and 865 cm-1 in IR spectra, respectively) as well as the protonation of carbonate groups both in A and B sites and the formation of sodium bicarbonate clusters (856 and 859 cm-1) in addition to carbonate ordering of A1 and B1 types (879 and 872 cm-1).

  16. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF THE FORMATION OF COLD FRONTS IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES: EFFECTS OF ANISOTROPIC VISCOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kentaro; Ogawa, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Matsumoto, Ryoji E-mail: ogawa@astro.s.chiba-u.ac.jp E-mail: matumoto@astro.s.chiba-u.ac.jp

    2013-05-10

    We carried out three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations to study the effects of plasma viscosity on the formation of sharp discontinuities of density and temperature distributions, cold fronts, in clusters of galaxies. By fixing the gravitational potential that confines the cool, dense plasma in a moving subcluster, we simulated its interaction with the hot, lower density plasma around the subcluster. At the initial state, the intracluster medium (ICM) is assumed to be threaded by uniform magnetic fields. The enhancement of plasma viscosity along the direction of magnetic fields is incorporated as anisotropic viscosity depending on the direction of magnetic fields. We found that the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the surface of the subcluster grows even in models with anisotropic viscosity, because its effects on the velocity shear across the magnetic field lines are suppressed. We also found that magnetic fields around the interface between the subcluster and ICM are amplified even in the presence of viscosity, while magnetic fields behind the subcluster are amplified up to {beta}{sup -1} {approx} 0.01 in models with viscosity, whereas they are amplified up to {beta}{sup -1} {approx} 0.1 in models without viscosity, where {beta} is the ratio of gas pressure to magnetic pressure.

  17. The Epipolythiodiketopiperazine Gene Cluster in Claviceps purpurea: Dysfunctional Cytochrome P450 Enzyme Prevents Formation of the Previously Unknown Clapurines

    PubMed Central

    Tudzynski, Paul; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Claviceps purpurea is an important food contaminant and well known for the production of the toxic ergot alkaloids. Apart from that, little is known about its secondary metabolism and not all toxic substances going along with the food contamination with Claviceps are known yet. We explored the metabolite profile of a gene cluster in C. purpurea with a high homology to gene clusters, which are responsible for the formation of epipolythiodiketopiperazine (ETP) toxins in other fungi. By overexpressing the transcription factor, we were able to activate the cluster in the standard C. purpurea strain 20.1. Although all necessary genes for the formation of the characteristic disulfide bridge were expressed in the overexpression mutants, the fungus did not produce any ETPs. Isolation of pathway intermediates showed that the common biosynthetic pathway stops after the first steps. Our results demonstrate that hydroxylation of the diketopiperazine backbone is the critical step during the ETP biosynthesis. Due to a dysfunctional enzyme, the fungus is not able to produce toxic ETPs. Instead, the pathway end-products are new unusual metabolites with a unique nitrogen-sulfur bond. By heterologous expression of the Leptosphaeria maculans cytochrome P450 encoding gene sirC, we were able to identify the end-products of the ETP cluster in C. purpurea. The thioclapurines are so far unknown ETPs, which might contribute to the toxicity of other C. purpurea strains with a potentially intact ETP cluster. PMID:27390873

  18. The effect of ram-pressure stripping and starvation on the star formation properties of cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boselli, A.; Boissier, S.; Cortese, L.; Gavazzi, G.

    2009-12-01

    We have combined UV to radio centimetric observations of resolved galaxies in the Virgo cluster with multizone, chemo-spectrophotometric models of galaxy evolution especially tailored to take into account the effects of the cluster environment (ram pressure stripping and starvation). This exercise has shown that anemic spirals with truncated radial profiles of the gas component and of the young stellar populations, typical in rich clusters of galaxies, have been perturbed by a recent (˜100 Myr) ram pressure stripping event induced by their interaction with the cluster intergalactic medium. Starvation is not able to reproduce the observed truncated radial profiles. Both ram pressure and starvation induce a decrease of the stellar surface brightness of the perturbed disc, and thus can hardly be invoked to explain the formation of lenticular galaxies inhabiting rich clusters, which are characterised by higher surface brightnesses than early type spirals of similar luminosity. In dwarfs the ram pressure stripping event is so efficient to totally remove their gas thus stopping on short time scales (<2 Gyr) their star formation activity. Low luminosity star forming discs can be transformed in dE galaxies.

  19. Cationic cluster formation versus disproportionation of low-valent indium and gallium complexes of 2,2'-bipyridine

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenthaler, Martin R.; Stahl, Florian; Kratzert, Daniel; Heidinger, Lorenz; Schleicher, Erik; Hamann, Julian; Himmel, Daniel; Weber, Stefan; Krossing, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Group 13 MI compounds often disproportionate into M0 and MIII. Here, however, we show that the reaction of the MI salt of the weakly coordinating alkoxyaluminate [GaI(C6H5F)2]+[Al(ORF)4]− (RF=C(CF3)3) with 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) yields the paramagnetic and distorted octahedral [Ga(bipy)3]2+•{[Al(ORF)4]−}2 complex salt. While the latter appears to be a GaII compound, both, EPR and DFT investigations assign a ligand-centred [GaIII{(bipy)3}•]2+ radical dication. Surprisingly, the application of the heavier homologue [InI(C6H5F)2]+[Al(ORF)4]− leads to aggregation and formation of the homonuclear cationic triangular and rhombic [In3(bipy)6]3+, [In3(bipy)5]3+ and [In4(bipy)6]4+ metal atom clusters. Typically, such clusters are formed under strongly reductive conditions. Analysing the unexpected redox-neutral cationic cluster formation, DFT studies suggest a stepwise formation of the clusters, possibly via their triplet state and further investigations attribute the overall driving force of the reactions to the strong In−In bonds and the high lattice enthalpies of the resultant ligand stabilized [M3]3+{[Al(ORF)4]−}3 and [M4]4+{[Al(ORF)4]−}4 salts. PMID:26478464

  20. Early stages in the formation and stabilization of acetylcholine receptor aggregates on cultured myotubes: sensitivity to temperature and azide.

    PubMed

    Olek, A J; Krikorian, J G; Daniels, M P

    1986-09-01

    We have studied the effects of temperature and sodium azide on the formation and stability of embryonic brain extract (EBX)2-induced acetylcholine receptor (AChR) aggregates on myotubes. Sequential changes in AChR distribution were studied on living myotubes in culture by video-intensified fluorescence microscopy. Aggregate formation was temperature dependent, increasing sharply from 24-36 degrees, maximal at 36-37 degrees, and virtually blocked at 38-40 degrees. Whereas aggregate size increased rapidly with time (up to 4 hr) at 36 degrees, at 18-24 degrees small (less than or equal to 1 micron) "microaggregates" formed and accumulated for up to 10 hr. Aggregates formed within 1.5 hr at the sites of microaggregates (formed after 4 hr at 23 degrees) if the temperature was raised to 36 degrees. However, if EBX was removed, the microaggregates on 50% of myotubes disassembled within 1.5 hr. The formation of microaggregates at 23 degrees and aggregates at 36 degrees was reversibly inhibited by sodium azide. These results show that clusters of microaggregates are the precursors of aggregates, and suggest that microaggregate clouds represent a discrete, labile, ATP-dependent stage in aggregate formation. Aggregates that had formed after 4 hr in the presence of EBX disassembled slowly (within 12-14 hr) following removal of EBX at 36 degrees, and even more slowly at 23-30 degrees. However, a temperature shift to 38 degrees, or the addition of azide, resulted in a rapid but reversible disassembly of aggregates (within 4 hr). Thus, newly formed aggregates appear to be relatively stable structures, while microaggregate clouds are labile, tending to disassemble or evolve into aggregates.

  1. Formation of charged H3O+ and OH- fragments at consistent shifts of protons in water clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednyakov, A. S.; Novakovskaya, Yu. V.

    2016-09-01

    Probable paths of consistent shifts of bridge protons within the hexamolecular rings of dodecamer water cluster at different arrangement of neighboring molecules are determined. As with individual rings, consistent shifts of protons in molecular cages are found to be promoted by contraction/extension of the oxygen skeleton. Transition states characterized by the formation of different numbers of such charged fragments as H3Oδ+, H5O 2 δ+ , and OH-, are identified. Conditions of the relatively long-term (about picoseconds) existence of the fragments in cluster systems are determined.

  2. Formation of a Boundary-Free Dust Cluster in a Low-Pressure Gas-Discharge Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Usachev, A. D.; Zobnin, A. V.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.; Annaratone, B. M.

    2009-01-30

    An attraction between negatively charged micron-sized plastic particles was observed in the bulk of a low-pressure gas-discharge plasma under microgravity conditions. This attraction had led to the formation of a boundary-free dust cluster, containing one big central particle with a radius of about 6 {mu}m and about 30 1 {mu}m-sized particles situated on a sphere with a radius of 190 {mu}m and with the big particle in the center. The stability of this boundary-free dust cluster was possible due to its confinement by the plasma flux on the central dust particle.

  3. Formation of Globular Clusters in Atomic-cooling Halos Via Rapid Gas Condensation and Fragmentation during the Epoch of Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimm, Taysun; Cen, Renyue; Rosdahl, Joakim; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the formation of metal-poor globular clusters (GCs) at the center of two dark matter halos with {M}{{halo}}˜ 4× {10}7 {M}⊙ at z\\gt 10 using cosmological radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. We find that very compact (≲1 pc) and massive (˜ 6× {10}5 {M}⊙ ) clusters form rapidly when pristine gas collapses isothermally with the aid of efficient Lyα emission during the transition from molecular-cooling halos to atomic-cooling halos. Because the local free-fall time of dense star-forming gas is very short (\\ll 1 {{Myr}}), a large fraction of the collapsed gas is turned into stars before stellar feedback processes blow out the gas and shut down star formation. Although the early stage of star formation is limited to a small region of the central star-forming disk, we find that the disk quickly fragments due to metal enrichment from supernovae. Sub-clusters formed in the fragmented clouds eventually merge with the main cluster at the center. The simulated clusters closely resemble the local GCs in mass and size but show a metallicity spread that is much wider than found in the local GCs. We discuss a role of pre-enrichment by Pop III and II stars as a potential solution to the latter issue. Although not without shortcomings, it is encouraging that a naive blind (not tuned) cosmological simulation presents a possible channel for the formation of at least some massive GCs.

  4. Titanium embedded cage structure formation in Al{sub n}Ti{sup +} clusters and their interaction with Ar

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, M. B.; Vega, A.; Balbás, L. C.; Aguilera-Granja, F.

    2014-05-07

    Recently, Ar physisorption was used as a structural probe for the location of the Ti dopant atom in aluminium cluster cations, Al{sub n}Ti{sup +} [Lang et al., J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 22, 1508 (2011)]. As an experiment result, the lack of Ar complexes for n > n{sub c} determines the cluster size for which the Ti atom is located inside of an Al cage. To elucidate the decisive factors for the formation of endohedrally Al{sub n}Ti{sup +}, experimentalists proposed detailed computational studies as indispensable. In this work, we investigated, using the density functional theory, the structural and electronic properties of singly titanium doped cationic clusters, Al{sub n}Ti{sup +} (n = 16–21) as well as the adsorption of an Ar atom on them. The first endohedral doped cluster, with Ti encapsulated in a fcc-like cage skeleton, appears at n{sub c} = 21, which is the critical number consistent with the exohedral-endohedral transition experimentally observed. At this critical size the non-crystalline icosahedral growth pattern, related to the pure aluminium clusters, with the Ti atom in the surface, changes into a endohedral fcc-like pattern. The map of structural isomers, relative energy differences, second energy differences, and structural parameters were determined and analyzed. Moreover, we show the critical size depends on the net charge of the cluster, being different for the cationic clusters (n{sub c} = 21) and their neutral counterparts (n{sub c} = 20). For the Al {sub n} Ti {sup +} · Ar complexes, and for n < 21, the preferred Ar adsorption site is on top of the exohedral Ti atom, with adsorption energy in very good agreement with the experimental value. Instead, for n = 21, the Ar adsorption occurs on the top an Al atom with very low absorption energy. For all sizes the geometry of the Al{sub n}Ti{sup +} clusters keeps unaltered in the Ar-cluster complexes. This fact indicates that Ar adsorption does not influence the cluster structure, providing support

  5. Clusters of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation: formation of short DNA fragments. II. Experimental detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The basic 30-nm chromatin fiber in the mammalian cell consists of an unknown (possibly helical) arrangement of nucleosomes, with about 1.2 kb of DNA per 10-nm length of fiber. Track-structure considerations suggest that interactions of single delta rays or high-LET particles with the chromatin fiber might result in the formation of multiple lesions spread over a few kilobases of DNA (see the accompanying paper: W.R. Holley and A. Chatterjee, Radiat. Res. 145, 188-199, 1996). In particular, multiple DNA double-strand breaks and single-strand breaks may form. To test this experimentally, primary human fibroblasts were labeled with [3H]thymidine and exposed at 0 degrees C to X rays or accelerated nitrogen or iron ions in the LET range of 97-440 keV/microns. DNA was isolated inside agarose plugs and subjected to agarose gel electrophoresis under conditions that allowed good separation of 0.1-2 kb size DNA. The bulk of DNA remained in the well or migrated only a small distance into the gel. It was found that DNA fragments in the expected size range were formed linearly with dose with an efficiency that increased with LET. A comparison of the yield of such fragments with the yield of total DNA double-strand breaks suggests that for the high-LET ions a substantial proportion (20-90%) of DNA double-strand breaks are accompanied within 0.1-2 kb by at least one additional DNA double-strand break. It is shown that these results are in good agreement with theoretical calculations based on treating the 30-nm chromatin fiber as the target for ionizing particles. Theoretical considerations also predict that the clusters will contain numerous single-strand breaks and base damages. It is proposed that such clusters be designated "regionally multiply damaged sites." Postirradiation incubation at 37 degrees C resulted in a decline in the number of short DNA fragments, suggesting a repair activity. The biological significance of regionally multiply damaged sites is presently unknown.

  6. Formation of Large Ag Clusters with Shells of Methane, Ethylene, and Acetylene in He Droplets.

    PubMed

    Loginov, Evgeny; Gomez, Luis F; Sartakov, Boris G; Vilesov, Andrey F

    2016-09-01

    Helium droplets were used to assemble composite metal-molecular clusters. Produced clusters have several hundreds of silver atoms in the core, immersed in a shell consisting of methane, ethylene, or acetylene molecules. The structure of the clusters was studied via infrared spectra of the C-H stretches of the hydrocarbon molecules. The spectra of the clusters containing methane and acetylene show two distinct features due to molecules on the interface with silver core and those in the volume of the neat molecular part of the clusters. The relative intensities of the peaks are in good agreement with the estimates based on the number of the captured particles. Experiments also suggest that selection rules for infrared transitions for molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces are also valid for silver clusters as small as 300 atoms. PMID:27500443

  7. Formation of Cu-Zr-M ternary bulk metallic glasses based on atomic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. H.; Wang, Q.; Wu, J.; Dong, C.

    2008-02-01

    Ternary Cu-Zr-M (M= Al, Ti and Ag) bulk metallic glasses are investigated using a cluster line approach. New bulk metallic glass rods with compositions lying along the cluster line Cu5Zr6-M were fabricated by copper mould suction, where binary cluster Cu5Zr6 is an Archimedean octahedral antiprism, M being about 4~13.2 at.% for Al, 8.3 at.% for Ti and 9 at.% for Ag. The relevant mechanism was discussed in the light of the cluster-plus-glue-atom model.

  8. Assessment of the CCSD and CCSD(T) Coupled-Cluster Methods in Calculating Heats of Formation for Zn Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Michael N.; Yang, Yue; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2009-08-01

    Heats of formation were calculated using coupled-cluster methods for a series of zinc complexes. The calculated values were evaluated against previously conducted computational studies using density functional methods as well as experimental values. Heats of formation for nine neutral ZnXn complexes [X = -Zn, -H, -O, -F2, -S, -Cl, -Cl2, -CH3, (-CH3)2] were determined at the CCSD and CCSD(T) levels using the 6-31G** and TZVP basis sets as well as the LANL2DZ-6-31G** (LACVP**) and LANL2DZ-TZVP hybrid basis sets. The CCSD(T)/6-31G** level of theory was found to predict the heat of formation for the nonalkyl Zn complexes most accurately. The alkyl Zn species were problematic in that none of the methods that were tested accurately predicted the heat of formation for these complexes. In instances where experimental geometric parameters were available, these were most accurately predicted by the CCSD/6-31G** level of theory; going to CCSD(T) did not improve agreement with the experimental values. Coupled-cluster methods did not offer a systemic improvement over DFT calculations for a given functional/basis set combination. With the exceptions of ZnH and ZnF2, there are multiple density functionals that outperform coupled-cluster calculations with the 6-31G** basis set.

  9. ADAP–SLP-76 Binding Differentially Regulates Supramolecular Activation Cluster (SMAC) Formation Relative to T Cell–APC Conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongyan; McCann, Fiona E.; Gordan, John D.; Wu, Xiang; Raab, Monika; Malik, Talat H.; Davis, Daniel M.; Rudd, Christopher E.

    2004-01-01

    T cell–APC conjugation as mediated by leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1)–intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 binding is followed by formation of the supramolecular activation cluster (SMAC) at the immunological synapse. The intracellular processes that regulate SMAC formation and its influence on T cell function are important questions to be addressed. Here, using a mutational approach, we demonstrate that binding of adaptor adhesion and degranulation promoting adaptor protein (ADAP) to SLP-76 differentially regulates peripheral SMAC (pSMAC) formation relative to conjugation. Although mutation of the YDDV sites (termed M12) disrupted SLP-76 SH2 domain binding and prevented the ability of ADAP to increase conjugation and LFA-1 clustering, M12 acted selectively as a dominant negative (DN) inhibitor of pSMAC formation, an effect that was paralleled by a DN effect on interleukin-2 production. ADAP also colocalized with LFA-1 at the immunological synapse. Our findings identify ADAP–SLP-76 binding as a signaling event that differentially regulates SMAC formation, and support a role for SMAC formation in T cell cytokine production. PMID:15477347

  10. The age of the globular cluster NGC 288, the formation of the Galactic halo, and the second parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Bolte, M. )

    1989-06-01

    A differential comparison of precise CCD photometry in the globular clusters NGC 288, NGC 362, and NGC 1261 shows that differences exist in the positions of the main-sequence turnoff in these clusters that are most naturally explained if NGC 288 is some 3 billion yr older than NGC 362 and about 1 to 2 billion yr older than NGC 1261. This implies that the formation time for the Galactic halo is significantly longer than a freefall time. Consideration of the inferred ages and horizontal-branch morphologies of the clusters Pal 12, NGC 288, NGC 362, and NGC 1261, all with similar metal abundances, suggests that age may be the parameter that, after overall metal abundance, most determines horizontal-branch morphology. 56 refs.

  11. Formation of Anomalous Globular Clusters with Metallicity Spreads: A Unified Picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekki, Kenji; Tsujimoto, Takuji

    2016-11-01

    Recent observations have revealed that at least eight globular clusters (GCs) in the Galaxy show internal abundance spreads in [Fe/H]. We investigate the origin of these “anomalous” GCs using numerical simulations of GCs in the dwarfs orbiting around the Galaxy and chemical evolution model of the dwarfs hosting the GCs. The principal results are as follows. GCs formed in a host dwarf galaxy with a total mass of ∼ {10}10 {M}ȯ can merge to form a single nuclear GC before the host is completely destroyed by the Galaxy, if they are massive (\\gt 3× {10}5 {M}ȯ ) and if they are formed in the inner region (R\\lt 400 pc). The GC merger remnants can capture field stars during its spiral-in to nuclear regions. If two GCs are formed from star formation events separated by ∼300 Myr in their host dwarf, then the new GC formed from GC merging can have a [Fe/H] spread of 0.2 dex and a [Ba/Fe] spread of 0.3 dex. GCs formed from GC merging can show a variety of internal abundance spreads depending on the details of their hosts’ chemical evolution. We suggest that anomalous GCs were formed from GC merging that occurred before the destruction of GC host dwarfs, yet after self-enrichment processes responsible for the observed anti-correlations between chemical abundances of light elements. We also suggest that the observed no/little dependence of [Eu/Fe] on [Fe/H] in the Galactic GC M22 is evidence of massive dwarf galaxies hosting these anomalous GCs.

  12. Clusters of DNA induced by ionizing radiation: formation of short DNA fragments. I. Theoretical modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holley, W. R.; Chatterjee, A.

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a general theoretical model for the interaction of ionizing radiation with chromatin. Chromatin is modeled as a 30-nm-diameter solenoidal fiber comprised of 20 turns of nucleosomes, 6 nucleosomes per turn. Charged-particle tracks are modeled by partitioning the energy deposition between primary track core, resulting from glancing collisions with 100 eV or less per event, and delta rays due to knock-on collisions involving energy transfers >100 eV. A Monte Carlo simulation incorporates damages due to the following molecular mechanisms: (1) ionization of water molecules leading to the formation of OH, H, eaq, etc.; (2) OH attack on sugar molecules leading to strand breaks: (3) OH attack on bases; (4) direct ionization of the sugar molecules leading to strand breaks; (5) direct ionization of the bases. Our calculations predict significant clustering of damage both locally, over regions up to 40 bp and over regions extending to several kilobase pairs. A characteristic feature of the regional damage predicted by our model is the production of short fragments of DNA associated with multiple nearby strand breaks. The shapes of the spectra of DNA fragment lengths depend on the symmetries or approximate symmetries of the chromatin structure. Such fragments have subsequently been detected experimentally and are reported in an accompanying paper (B. Rydberg, Radiat, Res. 145, 200-209, 1996) after exposure to both high- and low-LET radiation. The overall measured yields agree well quantitatively with the theoretical predictions. Our theoretical results predict the existence of a strong peak at about 85 bp, which represents the revolution period about the nucleosome. Other peaks at multiples of about 1,000 bp correspond to the periodicity of the particular solenoid model of chromatin used in these calculations. Theoretical results in combination with experimental data on fragmentation spectra may help determine the consensus or average structure of the

  13. Clusters of DNA induced by ionizing radiation: formation of short DNA fragments. I. Theoretical modeling.

    PubMed

    Holley, W R; Chatterjee, A

    1996-02-01

    We have developed a general theoretical model for the interaction of ionizing radiation with chromatin. Chromatin is modeled as a 30-nm-diameter solenoidal fiber comprised of 20 turns of nucleosomes, 6 nucleosomes per turn. Charged-particle tracks are modeled by partitioning the energy deposition between primary track core, resulting from glancing collisions with 100 eV or less per event, and delta rays due to knock-on collisions involving energy transfers >100 eV. A Monte Carlo simulation incorporates damages due to the following molecular mechanisms: (1) ionization of water molecules leading to the formation of OH, H, eaq, etc.; (2) OH attack on sugar molecules leading to strand breaks: (3) OH attack on bases; (4) direct ionization of the sugar molecules leading to strand breaks; (5) direct ionization of the bases. Our calculations predict significant clustering of damage both locally, over regions up to 40 bp and over regions extending to several kilobase pairs. A characteristic feature of the regional damage predicted by our model is the production of short fragments of DNA associated with multiple nearby strand breaks. The shapes of the spectra of DNA fragment lengths depend on the symmetries or approximate symmetries of the chromatin structure. Such fragments have subsequently been detected experimentally and are reported in an accompanying paper (B. Rydberg, Radiat, Res. 145, 200-209, 1996) after exposure to both high- and low-LET radiation. The overall measured yields agree well quantitatively with the theoretical predictions. Our theoretical results predict the existence of a strong peak at about 85 bp, which represents the revolution period about the nucleosome. Other peaks at multiples of about 1,000 bp correspond to the periodicity of the particular solenoid model of chromatin used in these calculations. Theoretical results in combination with experimental data on fragmentation spectra may help determine the consensus or average structure of the

  14. The effect of dust and gas energetics on the clustered star formation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Andrea

    The effect of dust/gas heating and cooling is shown to have a significant effect on the process of clustered star formation. Compared to an isothermal simulation, a simulation with a more accurate description of the equation of state produces an order of magnitude fewer stars as well as stars of much greater mass. The energetics algorithm used to calculate the dust and gas temperature includes the radiative heating of dust, dust-gas collisional heating/cooling, cosmic-ray heating, and molecular cooling. It uses DUSTY, a spherical continuum radiative transfer code, to model the dust temperature distribution around young stellar objects with various luminosities and surrounding gas and dust density distributions. The gas temperature is then determined by assuming energy balance. Before the complete energetics algorithm is included in a simulation, first only the dust heating component is included. The gas temperature is then set solely by the dust temperature. The resultant mass functions of our simulations which include heating are compared to those which assume an isothermal equation of state. We find that including dust heating severely limits star formation; we form at least an order of magnitude fewer objects when we include dust heating compared to an isothermal simulation. The mass functions from our simulations which include heating are much more similar than the mass functions from our isothermal simulations to the observed mass functions, in that they are able to form high-mass stars ( M [Special characters omitted.] 10[Special characters omitted.] ). The distribution of the high-mass objects is well- approximated by the Salpeter initial mass function. Including the complete energetics algorithm in a simulation produces results similar to a simulation with only dust heating. Both simulations have similar density profile parameters. The mass accretion, mass, and luminosity evolution of the sinks is also similar. The average temperature, however, is cooler

  15. Revisiting argon cluster formation in a planar gas jet for high-intensity laser matter interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Y.; Hagmeijer, R.; van der Weide, E. T. A.; Bastiaens, H. M. J.; Boller, K.-J.

    2016-04-01

    We determine the size of argon clusters generated with a planar nozzle, based on the optical measurements in conjunction with theoretical modelling. Using a quasi-one dimensional model for the moments of the cluster size distribution, we determine the influence of critical physical assumptions. These refer to the surface tension depending on the presence of thermal equilibrium, the mass density of clusters, and different methods to model the growth rate of the cluster radius. We show that, despite strong variation in the predicted cluster size, , the liquid mass ratio, g, can be determined with high trustworthiness, because g is predicted as being almost independent of the specific model assumptions. Exploiting this observation, we use the calculated value for g to retrieve the cluster size from optical measurements, i.e., calibrated Rayleigh scattering and interferometry. Based on the measurements of the cluster size vs. the nozzle stagnation pressure, we provide a new power law for the prediction of the cluster size in experiments with higher values of the Hagena parameter (Γ*>104 ) . This range is of relevance for experiments on high-intensity laser matter interactions.

  16. Molecular Dynamics simulations of the electrospray process: formation of NaCl clusters via the charged residue mechanism.

    PubMed

    Konermann, Lars; McAllister, Robert G; Metwally, Haidy

    2014-10-16

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) produces desolvated ions from solution phase analytes for mass spectrometric detection. The final steps of gas phase ion formation from nanometer-sized solvent droplets remain a matter of debate. According to the ion evaporation model (IEM), analytes are ejected from the droplet surface via field emission, whereas the charged residue model (CRM) envisions that ions are released upon droplet evaporation to dryness. Exposure of salt solutions to ESI conditions produces a range of cluster ions. Despite the rich literature on these systems, it is still unclear if these salt clusters form via the CRM or the IEM. The current study explores the formation of Na(n)Cl(m)((n-m)+) clusters from aqueous sodium chloride solution under positive and negative polarity conditions. Molecular dynamics (MD) methods are used for simulating the temporal evolution of charged NaCl-containing water droplets. A trajectory stitching approach is developed for continuously removing evaporated moieties from the simulation, thereby dramatically reducing computational cost. In addition, this procedure ensures adequate temperature control and eliminates evaporative cooling that would otherwise slow down the process. Continuous water evaporation leads to progressive droplet shrinkage, while the emission of solvated single ions ensures that the system remains at ca. 90% of the Rayleigh limit. Early during the process all ions in the droplet behave as freely dissolved species, but after a few nanoseconds at 370 K the systems gradually morph into amorphous wet salt aggregates. Ultimately, free Na(n)Cl(m)((n-m)+) clusters form as the last solvent molecules evaporate. Our data therefore provide direct evidence that sodium chloride cluster formation during ESI proceeds via the CRM. The IEM nonetheless plays an ancillary role, as it allows the system to shed charge (mostly in the form of hydrated Na(+) or Cl(-)) during droplet shrinkage. It appears that this study marks the

  17. Duration of the Early Galactic Formation Epoch: HST Photometry for Red-Horizontal Branch Clusters in the Outer Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesser, J. E.; Stetson, P. B.; McClure, R. D.; van den Bergh, S.; Bolte, M.; Harris, W. E.; van den Berg, D. A.; Bell, R. A.; Fahlman, G. G.; Richer, H. B.; Bond, H. E.

    1997-12-01

    Last year we presented evidence from HST photometry of the low-metallicity cluster NGC 2419 (M_V = -9.5, R_⊙ ~ 90 kpc, [Fe/H] = -2.2) that globular cluster formation began at essentially the same time throughout a region of the Galactic halo now almost 200 kpc in diameter (Harris et al. 1997 AJ 114, 1030). We now turn to the time spread of halo formation, with the ultimate aim of addressing the relative roles of mergers over the first 4 or more Gyrs (Searle & Zinn 1978, ApJ, 225, 357; Lee, Demarque & Zinn 1994 ApJ, 423, 248) versus models favoring a rapid collapse (Eggen, Lynden-Bell & Sandage 1962, ApJ, 236, 748; Stetson, VandenBerg & Bolte 1996, PASP, 108, 560), or some combination of those and other processes. We provide the first reliable measurements from the giant branch through the main-sequence turnoffs of red-horizontal-branch clusters in the outer halo, which are frequently postulated to be younger than most other globular clusters. From WFPC2 F555W (`V') and F814W (`I') photometry for Pal 3 (M_V = -5.2, R_⊙ ~ 87 kpc), Pal 4 (M_V = -5.8, R_⊙ ~ 98 kpc), and Eridanus (M_V = -4.8, R_⊙ ~ 78 kpc), all with [Fe/H] ~ -1.5, we estimate their relative ages by making differential comparisons among them and with respect to inner-halo objects of, presumably, comparable chemical compositions. It seems likely at this stage of our analysis that (a) the three clusters are the same age to our measurement precision of ~ 1 Gyr, and, (b) the CMDs of all three outer halo clusters differ from those of M 3 and M 5 (our template clusters of similar metallicity), in the sense that the outer halo clusters are younger by ~ 3 Gyr, or they are ~ 0.5 dex more metal-rich than currently thought. Large uncertainties in chemical compositions (He, [alpha /Fe], [CNO/Fe]) for outer halo and template clusters alike mask the true interpretation.

  18. Protein Conformational Flexibility Enables the Formation of Dense Liquid Clusters: Tests Using Solution Shear.

    PubMed

    Byington, Michael C; Safari, Mohammad S; Conrad, Jacinta C; Vekilov, Peter G

    2016-07-01

    According to recently proposed two-step nucleation mechanisms, crystal nuclei form within preexisting dense liquid clusters. Clusters with radii about 100 nm, which capture from 10(-7) to 10(-3) of the total protein, have been observed with numerous proteins and shown to host crystal nucleation. Theories aiming to understand the mesoscopic size and small protein fraction held in the clusters have proposed that in solutions of single-chain proteins, the clusters consist of partially misfolded protein molecules. To test this conjecture, we perturb the protein conformation by shearing solutions of the protein lysozyme. We demonstrate that shear rates greater than a threshold applied for longer than 1 h reduce the volume of the cluster population. The likely mechanism of the observed response involves enhanced partial unfolding of lysozyme molecules, which exposes hydrophobic surfaces between the constituent domains to the aqueous solution. PMID:27267087

  19. Self-regulated cooling flows in elliptical galaxies and in cluster cores - Is exclusively low mass star formation really necessary?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.; Djorgovski, S.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Bruzual A., G.

    1986-01-01

    A self-consistent treatment of the heating by supernovae associated with star formation in a spherically symmetric cooling flow in a cluster core or elliptical galaxy is presented. An initial stellar mass function similar to that in the solar neighborhood is adopted. Inferred star-formation rates, within the cooling region - typically the inner 100 kpc around dominant galaxies at the centers of cooling flows in XD clusters - are reduced by about a factor of 2, relative to rates inferred when the heat input from star formation is ignored. Truncated initial mass functions (IMFs) are also considered, in which massive star formation is suppressed in accordance with previous treatments, and colors are predicted for star formation in cooling flows associated with central dominant elliptical galaxies and with isolated elliptical galaxies surrounded by gaseous coronae. The low inferred cooling-flow rates around isolated elliptical galaxies are found to be insensitive to the upper mass cutoff in the IMF, provided that the upper mass cutoff exceeds 2 M solar mass. Comparison with observed colors favors a cutoff in the IMF above 1 M solar mass in at least two well-studied cluster cooling flows, but a normal IMF cannot be excluded definitively. Models for NGC 1275 support a young (less than about 3 Gyr) cooling flow. As for the isolated elliptical galaxies, the spread in colors is consistent with a normal IMF. A definitive test of the IMF arising via star formation in cooling flows requires either UV spectral data or supernova searches in the cooling-flow-centered galaxies.

  20. Cluster-root formation and carboxylate release in three Lupinus species as dependent on phosphorus supply, internal phosphorus concentration and relative growth rate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xing; Pearse, Stuart J.; Lambers, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Some Lupinus species produce cluster roots in response to low plant phosphorus (P) status. The cause of variation in cluster-root formation among cluster-root-forming Lupinus species is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate if cluster-root formation is, in part, dependent on different relative growth rates (RGRs) among Lupinus species when they show similar shoot P status. Methods Three cluster-root-forming Lupinus species, L. albus, L. pilosus and L. atlanticus, were grown in washed river sand at 0, 7·5, 15 or 40 mg P kg−1 dry sand. Plants were harvested at 34, 42 or 62 d after sowing, and fresh and dry weight of leaves, stems, cluster roots and non-cluster roots of different ages were measured. The percentage of cluster roots, tissue P concentrations, root exudates and plant RGR were determined. Key Results Phosphorus treatments had major effects on cluster-root allocation, with a significant but incomplete suppression in L. albus and L. pilosus when P supply exceeded 15 mg P kg−1 sand. Complete suppression was found in L. atlanticus at the highest P supply; this species never invested more than 20 % of its root weight in cluster roots. For L. pilosus and L. atlanticus, cluster-root formation was decreased at high internal P concentration, irrespective of RGR. For L. albus, there was a trend in the same direction, but this was not significant. Conclusions Cluster-root formation in all three Lupinus species was suppressed at high leaf P concentration, irrespective of RGR. Variation in cluster-root formation among the three species cannot be explained by species-specific variation in RGR or leaf P concentration. PMID:24061491

  1. The formation of entropy cores in non-radiative galaxy cluster simulations: smoothed particle hydrodynamics versus adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, C.; Read, J. I.; Hobbs, A.

    2014-06-01

    We simulate cosmological galaxy cluster formation using three different approaches to solving the equations of non-radiative hydrodynamics - classic smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), novel SPH with a higher order dissipation switch (SPHS), and an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) method. Comparing spherically averaged entropy profiles, we find that SPHS and AMR approaches result in a well-defined entropy core that converges rapidly with increasing mass and force resolution. In contrast, the central entropy profile in the SPH approach is sensitive to the cluster's assembly history and shows poor numerical convergence. We trace this disagreement to the known artificial surface tension in SPH that appears at phase boundaries. Varying systematically numerical dissipation in SPHS, we study the contributions of numerical and physical dissipation to the entropy core and argue that numerical dissipation is required to ensure single-valued fluid quantities in converging flows. However, provided it occurs only at the resolution limit and does not propagate errors to larger scales, its effect is benign - there is no requirement to build `sub-grid' models of unresolved turbulence for galaxy cluster simulations. We conclude that entropy cores in non-radiative galaxy cluster simulations are physical, resulting from entropy generation in shocked gas during cluster assembly.

  2. From Boron Cluster to Two-Dimensional Boron Sheet on Cu(111) Surface: Growth Mechanism and Hole Formation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongsheng; Gao, Junfeng; Zhao, Jijun

    2013-01-01

    As attractive analogue of graphene, boron monolayers have been theoretically predicted. However, due to electron deficiency of boron atom, synthesizing boron monolayer is very challenging in experiments. Using first-principles calculations, we explore stability and growth mechanism of various boron sheets on Cu(111) substrate. The monotonic decrease of formation energy of boron cluster BN with increasing cluster size and low diffusion barrier for a single B atom on Cu(111) surface ensure continuous growth of two-dimensional (2D) boron cluster. During growth process, hexagonal holes can easily arise at the edge of a 2D triangular boron cluster and then diffuse entad. Hence, large-scale boron monolayer with mixed hexagonal-triangular geometry can be obtained via either depositing boron atoms directly on Cu(111) surface or soft landing of small planar BN clusters. Our theoretical predictions would stimulate further experiments of synthesizing boron sheets on metal substrates and thus enrich the variety of 2D monolayer materials. PMID:24241341

  3. High-frequency detection of the formation and stabilization of a radiation-induced defect cluster in semiconductor structures

    SciTech Connect

    Puzanov, A. S.; Obolenskiy, S. V. Kozlov, V. A.; Volkova, E. V.; Paveliev, D. G.

    2015-12-15

    The processes of the formation and stabilization of a radiation-induced defect cluster upon the arrival of a fast neutron to the space-charge region of a semiconductor diode are analyzed. The current pulse formed by secondary electrons is calculated and the spectrum of the signal generated by the diode (detector) under the action of an instantaneous neutron flux of the fission spectrum is determined. The possibility of experimental detection of the picosecond radiation-induced transition processes is discussed.

  4. Differences in the Structural Properties and Star-formation Rates of Field and Cluster Galaxies at z~1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Rebecca J.; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Glazebrook, Karl; Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Spitler, Lee R.; Straatman, Caroline M. S.; Cowley, Michael; Nanayakkara, Themiya

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the dependence of galaxy sizes and star formation rates (SFRs) on their environment using a mass-limited sample of quiescent and star-forming galaxies with log(M */{M}ȯ ) ≥ 9.5 at \\bar{z}=0.92 selected from the NEWFIRM medium-band Survey (NMBS). Using the Galaxy Environment Evolution Collaboration 2 spectroscopic cluster catalog and the accurate photometric redshifts from the NMBS, we select quiescent and star-forming cluster (\\bar{σ }=490 km s‑1) galaxies within two virial radius, R vir, intervals of 2 > R vir > 0.5 and R vir < 0.5. Galaxies residing outside of the 2 R vir of both the cluster centers and the additional candidate over-densities are defined as our field sample. Galaxy structural parameters are measured from the COSMOS legacy Hubble Space Telescope/ACS F814W image. The sizes and Sérsic indices of quiescent field and cluster galaxies have the same distribution regardless of R vir. However, cluster star-forming galaxies within 0.5 R vir have lower mass-normalized average sizes by 16+/- 7 % , and a higher fraction of Sérsic indices with n\\gt 1, than field star-forming galaxies. The average SFRs of star-forming cluster galaxies show a trend of decreasing SFR with clustocentric radius. The mass-normalized average SFR of cluster star-forming galaxies is a factor of 2{--}2.5 (7{--}9σ ) lower than that of star-forming galaxies in the field. While we find no significant dependence on environment for quiescent galaxies, the properties of star-forming galaxies are affected, which could be the result of environment acting on their gas content.

  5. Differences in the Structural Properties and Star-formation Rates of Field and Cluster Galaxies at z~1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Rebecca J.; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Glazebrook, Karl; Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Spitler, Lee R.; Straatman, Caroline M. S.; Cowley, Michael; Nanayakkara, Themiya

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the dependence of galaxy sizes and star formation rates (SFRs) on their environment using a mass-limited sample of quiescent and star-forming galaxies with log(M */{M}⊙ ) ≥ 9.5 at \\bar{z}=0.92 selected from the NEWFIRM medium-band Survey (NMBS). Using the Galaxy Environment Evolution Collaboration 2 spectroscopic cluster catalog and the accurate photometric redshifts from the NMBS, we select quiescent and star-forming cluster (\\bar{σ }=490 km s-1) galaxies within two virial radius, R vir, intervals of 2 > R vir > 0.5 and R vir < 0.5. Galaxies residing outside of the 2 R vir of both the cluster centers and the additional candidate over-densities are defined as our field sample. Galaxy structural parameters are measured from the COSMOS legacy Hubble Space Telescope/ACS F814W image. The sizes and Sérsic indices of quiescent field and cluster galaxies have the same distribution regardless of R vir. However, cluster star-forming galaxies within 0.5 R vir have lower mass-normalized average sizes by 16+/- 7 % , and a higher fraction of Sérsic indices with n\\gt 1, than field star-forming galaxies. The average SFRs of star-forming cluster galaxies show a trend of decreasing SFR with clustocentric radius. The mass-normalized average SFR of cluster star-forming galaxies is a factor of 2{--}2.5 (7{--}9σ ) lower than that of star-forming galaxies in the field. While we find no significant dependence on environment for quiescent galaxies, the properties of star-forming galaxies are affected, which could be the result of environment acting on their gas content.

  6. BUDHIES II: a phase-space view of H I gas stripping and star formation quenching in cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffé, Yara L.; Smith, Rory; Candlish, Graeme N.; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Verheijen, Marc A. W.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the effect of ram-pressure from the intracluster medium on the stripping of H I gas in galaxies in a massive, relaxed, X-ray bright, galaxy cluster at z = 0.2 from the Blind Ultra Deep H I Environmental Survey (BUDHIES). We use cosmological simulations, and velocity versus position phase-space diagrams to infer the orbital histories of the cluster galaxies. In particular, we embed a simple analytical description of ram-pressure stripping in the simulations to identify the regions in phase-space where galaxies are more likely to have been sufficiently stripped of their H I gas to fall below the detection limit of our survey. We find a striking agreement between the model predictions and the observed location of H I-detected and non-detected blue (late-type) galaxies in phase-space, strongly implying that ram-pressure plays a key role in the gas removal from galaxies, and that this can happen during their first infall into the cluster. However, we also find a significant number of gas-poor, red (early-type) galaxies in the infall region of the cluster that cannot easily be explained with our model of ram-pressure stripping alone. We discuss different possible additional mechanisms that could be at play, including the pre-processing of galaxies in their previous environment. Our results are strengthened by the distribution of galaxy colours (optical and UV) in phase-space, that suggests that after a (gas-rich) field galaxy falls into the cluster, it will lose its gas via ram-pressure stripping, and as it settles into the cluster, its star formation will decay until it is completely quenched. Finally, this work demonstrates the utility of phase-space diagrams to analyse the physical processes driving the evolution of cluster galaxies, in particular H I gas stripping.

  7. Formation of massive black holes through runaway collisions in dense young star clusters.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Simon F Portegies; Baumgardt, Holger; Hut, Piet; Makino, Junichiro; McMillan, Stephen L W

    2004-04-15

    A luminous X-ray source is associated with MGG 11--a cluster of young stars approximately 200 pc from the centre of the starburst galaxy M 82 (refs 1, 2). The properties of this source are best explained by invoking a black hole with a mass of at least 350 solar masses (350 M(o)), which is intermediate between stellar-mass and supermassive black holes. A nearby but somewhat more massive cluster (MGG 9) shows no evidence of such an intermediate-mass black hole, raising the issue of just what physical characteristics of the clusters can account for this difference. Here we report numerical simulations of the evolution and motion of stars within the clusters, where stars are allowed to merge with each other. We find that for MGG 11 dynamical friction leads to the massive stars sinking rapidly to the centre of the cluster, where they participate in a runaway collision. This produces a star of 800-3,000 M(o) which ultimately collapses to a black hole of intermediate mass. No such runaway occurs in the cluster MGG 9, because the larger cluster radius leads to a mass segregation timescale a factor of five longer than for MGG 11.

  8. Cluster formation and distributions in field ionization of coadsorbed methanol and water on platinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothfuss, C. J.; Medvedev, V. K.; Stuve, E. M.

    2016-08-01

    Pure and mixed clusters of methanol and water were examined with pulsed field desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) as a function of adlayer composition varying from pure water to nominally pure methanol. The experiments were performed on a Pt tip at 165 K and total pressure of approximately 5 × 10-6 Torr. Protonated clusters of up 7 water molecules and up to 4 methanol molecules were detected. For mixed adlayers, mixed clusters involving 1 or 2 water and methanol molecules were observed. The hydronium cluster (H2O)H+ exhibited unusual behavior in that its maximum intensity occurred for an approximately equimolar mixture. This was attributed to direct ionization of a methanol monohydrate species, (CH3OH ṡ H2O). Water production was observed in methanol-rich layers and ascribed to scission of the C-O bond to produce CH3 and OH. The TOF-MS data exhibited significant time lags for most higher mass clusters. The time lags for pure H2O were analyzed in terms of a two-step mechanism involving a trade-off of ion cluster emission and growth, from which the rate constant for cluster growth was estimated as 9 × 10-6 s-1.

  9. A Comparison of Alternative Distributed Dynamic Cluster Formation Techniques for Industrial Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Gholami, Mohammad; Brennan, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate alternative distributed clustering techniques for wireless sensor node tracking in an industrial environment. The research builds on extant work on wireless sensor node clustering by reporting on: (1) the development of a novel distributed management approach for tracking mobile nodes in an industrial wireless sensor network; and (2) an objective comparison of alternative cluster management approaches for wireless sensor networks. To perform this comparison, we focus on two main clustering approaches proposed in the literature: pre-defined clusters and ad hoc clusters. These approaches are compared in the context of their reconfigurability: more specifically, we investigate the trade-off between the cost and the effectiveness of competing strategies aimed at adapting to changes in the sensing environment. To support this work, we introduce three new metrics: a cost/efficiency measure, a performance measure, and a resource consumption measure. The results of our experiments show that ad hoc clusters adapt more readily to changes in the sensing environment, but this higher level of adaptability is at the cost of overall efficiency. PMID:26751447

  10. A Comparison of Alternative Distributed Dynamic Cluster Formation Techniques for Industrial Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Gholami, Mohammad; Brennan, Robert W

    2016-01-06

    In this paper, we investigate alternative distributed clustering techniques for wireless sensor node tracking in an industrial environment. The research builds on extant work on wireless sensor node clustering by reporting on: (1) the development of a novel distributed management approach for tracking mobile nodes in an industrial wireless sensor network; and (2) an objective comparison of alternative cluster management approaches for wireless sensor networks. To perform this comparison, we focus on two main clustering approaches proposed in the literature: pre-defined clusters and ad hoc clusters. These approaches are compared in the context of their reconfigurability: more specifically, we investigate the trade-off between the cost and the effectiveness of competing strategies aimed at adapting to changes in the sensing environment. To support this work, we introduce three new metrics: a cost/efficiency measure, a performance measure, and a resource consumption measure. The results of our experiments show that ad hoc clusters adapt more readily to changes in the sensing environment, but this higher level of adaptability is at the cost of overall efficiency.

  11. Formation of cluster systems in condensed matters and IR spectra of liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, G.; Ignatenko, N.; Krasnych, P.; Melnikov, V.; Cherkasov, E.

    2016-02-01

    Modern approaches to the interpretation of IR spectra of polyatomic liquids are based on cluster models of the structure of matter. First of all it concerns the far infrared region of the spectrum (20-300 cm-1) where rotationally libration motions in the structure of clusters are found. This work is a continuation of research conducted by the authors earlier [G. Melnikov at al. 2015 IOP Conf. Ser Mater. Sci. Eng. 81 p 012032]. The authors have adopted a model in which the appearance of spectral bands is explained by to libration oscillations vibrations of dimers with different configurations in the structure of clusters.

  12. Spontaneous formation of large clusters in a lattice gas above the critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khain, Evgeniy; Khasin, Michael; Sander, Leonard M.

    2014-12-01

    We consider clustering of particles in the lattice gas model above the critical point. We find the probability for large density fluctuations over scales much larger than the correlation length. This fundamental problem is of interest in various biological contexts such as quorum sensing and clustering of motile, adhesive, cancer cells. In the latter case, it may give a clue to the problem of growth of recurrent tumors. We develop a formalism for the analysis of this rare event employing a phenomenological master equation and measuring the transition rates in numerical simulations. The spontaneous clustering is treated in the framework of the eikonal approximation to the master equation.

  13. Distribution of star formation rates during the rapid assembly of NGC 1399 as deduced from its globular cluster system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, C.; Hilker, M.; Kroupa, P.; Pflamm-Altenburg, J.

    2016-10-01

    Ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) share many properties with globular clusters (GCs) and are found in similar environments. Here, a large sample of UCDs and GCs around NGC 1399, the central giant elliptical of the Fornax galaxy cluster, is used to infer their formation history and also to shed light on the formation of NGC 1399 itself. We assumed that all GCs and UCDs in our sample are the result of star cluster (SC) formation processes and used them as tracers of past star formation activities. After correcting our GC/UCD sample for mass loss, we interpreted their overall mass function to be a superposition of SC populations that formed coevally during different formation epochs. The SC masses of each population were distributed according to the embedded cluster mass function (ECMF), a pure power law with the slope - β. Each ECMF was characterized by a stellar upper mass limit, Mmax, which depended on the star formation rate (SFR). We decomposed the observed GC/UCD mass function into individual SC populations and converted Mmax of each SC population to an SFR. The overall distribution of SFRs reveals under which conditions the GC/UCD sample around NGC 1399 formed. Considering the constraints set by the age of the GCs/UCDs and the present stellar mass of NGC 1399, we found that the formation of the GCs/UCDs can be well explained within our framework with values for β below 2.3. This finding agrees very well with the observation of young SCs where β ≈ 2.0 is usually found. Even though we took into account that some of the most massive objects might not be genuine SCs and applied different corrections for the mass loss, we found that these considerations do not influence much the outcome. We derived the peak SFRs to be between approximately 300 and 3000 M⊙ yr-1, which matches the SFRs observed in massive high-redshift sub-millimeter galaxies and an SFR estimate inferred from NGC 1399 based on the so-called downsizing picture, meaning that more massive

  14. Infrared Spectroscopy of Naphthalene Aggregation and Cluster Formation in Argon Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roser, J. E.; Allamondola, L. J.

    2011-01-01

    Fourier-transform mid-infrared absorption spectra of mixed argon/naphthalene matrices at 5 K are shown with ratios of argon-to-naphthalene that vary from 1000 to 0. These spectra show the changes as naphthalene clustering and aggregation occurs, with moderate spectral shifts affecting the C-H vibrational modes and relatively small or no shifts to the C-C and C-C-C vibrational modes. The possible contribution of homogeneous naphthalene clusters to the interstellar unidentified infrared bands is discussed. The contribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) clusters to the 7.7 micron emission plateau and the blue shading of the 12.7 micron emission band are identified as promising candidates for future research. In addition, since PAH clusters are model components of Jupiter and Titan's atmospheres, the information presented here may also be applicable to the spectroscopy of these objects.

  15. INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF NAPHTHALENE AGGREGATION AND CLUSTER FORMATION IN ARGON MATRICES

    SciTech Connect

    Roser, J. E.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2010-10-20

    Fourier-transform, mid-infrared absorption spectra of mixed argon/naphthalene matrices at 5 K are shown with ratios of argon-to-naphthalene that vary from 1000 to 0. These spectra show the changes as naphthalene clustering and aggregation occurs, with moderate spectral shifts affecting the C-H vibrational modes and relatively small or no shifts to the C-C and C-C-C vibrational modes. The possible contribution of homogeneous naphthalene clusters to the interstellar unidentified infrared bands is discussed. The contribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) clusters to the 7.7 {mu}m emission plateau and the blue shading of the 12.7 {mu}m emission band are identified as promising candidates for future research. In addition, since PAH clusters are model components of Jupiter and Titan's atmospheres, the information presented here may also be applicable to the spectroscopy of these objects.

  16. The Luminosities, Sizes, and Velocity Dispersions of Brightest Cluster Galaxies: Implications for Formation History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, Mariangela; Hyde, Joseph B.; Sheth, Ravi K.; Miller, Chris J.; Nichol, Robert C.

    2007-04-01

    The size-luminosity relation of early-type brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), Re ~ L0.88, is steeper than that for the bulk of the early-type galaxy population, for which Re ~ L0.68. This is true if quantities derived from either de Vaucouleurs or Sérsic fits to the surface brightness profiles are used. Contamination from an intracluster light component centered on the BCG, with parameters similar to what has been seen in some recent studies, is not able to account for this difference. In addition, although BCGs are hardly offset from the fundamental plane defined by the bulk of the early-type population, they show considerably smaller scatter. The larger than expected sizes of BCGs, and the increased homogeneity, are qualitatively consistent with models that seek to explain the colors of the most massive galaxies by invoking dry dissipationless mergers, since dissipation tends to reduce the sizes of galaxies, and wet mergers that result in star formation would tend to increase the scatter in luminosity at a fixed size and velocity dispersion. Furthermore, BCGs define the same g - r color-magnitude relation as the bulk of the early-type population. If BCGs formed from dry mergers, then BCG progenitors must have been red for their magnitudes, suggesting that they hosted older stellar populations than is typical for their luminosities. Our findings have two other consequences. First, the Re-L relation of the early-type galaxy population as a whole (i.e., normal plus BCG) exhibits some curvature: the most luminous galaxies tend to have larger sizes than is expected from the Re ~ L0.68 scaling—some of this curvature must be a consequence of the fact that an increasing fraction of the most luminous galaxies are BCGs. The second consequence is suggested by the fact that, despite following a steeper size-luminosity relation, BCGs tend to define a tight relation between dynamical mass Reσ2/G and luminosity. Although this relation is slightly different than that defined

  17. The influence of sodium nanoparticles formation on luminescent properties of fluorophosphate glasses containing molecular clusters and quantum dots of lead selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatova, Zh. O.; Kolobkova, E. V.; Sidorov, A. I.; Nikonorov, N. V.

    2016-08-01

    The influence of sodium nanoparticles and secondary heat treatment conditions on the spectralluminescent characteristics of fluorophosphate glasses with PbSe molecular clusters and quantum dots is studied. Experiments with glasses containing no sodium nanoparticles show that their thermal treatment leads to the formation of molecular clusters with subsequent formation of quantum dots having an intense luminescence. The results of numerical simulation for glasses with sodium nanoparticles shows that heat treatment leads to formation of a sodium fluoride shell on the nanoparticles surface. It is shown that quenching of the luminescence of PbSe molecular clusters and quantum dots takes place in these glasses.

  18. Mo-Cu metal cluster formation and binding in an orange protein isolated from Desulfovibrio gigas.

    PubMed

    Carepo, Marta S P; Pauleta, Sofia R; Wedd, Anthony G; Moura, José J G; Moura, Isabel

    2014-06-01

    The orange protein (ORP) isolated from the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio gigas (11.8 kDa) contains a mixed-metal sulfide cluster of the type [S2MoS2CuS2MoS2](3-) noncovalently bound to the polypeptide chain. The D. gigas ORP was heterologously produced in Escherichia coli in the apo form. Different strategies were used to reconstitute the metal cluster into apo-ORP and obtain insights into the metal cluster synthesis: (1) incorporation of a synthesized inorganic analogue of the native metal cluster and (2) the in situ synthesis of the metal cluster on the addition to apo-ORP of copper chloride and tetrathiomolybdate or tetrathiotungstate. This latter procedure was successful, and the visible spectrum of the Mo-Cu reconstituted ORP is identical to the one reported for the native protein with absorption maxima at 340 and 480 nm. The (1)H-(15)N heteronuclear single quantum coherence spectra of the reconstituted ORP obtained by strategy 2, in contrast to strategy 1, exhibited large changes, which required sequential assignment in order to identify, by chemical shift differences, the residues affected by the incorporation of the cluster, which is stabilized inside the protein by both electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions.

  19. Reversal of Fortune: Confirmation of an Increasing Star Formation-Density Relation in a Cluster at z = 1.62

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Papovich, Casey; Saintonge, Amélie; Brodwin, Mark; Dunlop, James S.; Farrah, Duncan; Finkelstein, Keely D.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Lotz, Jennifer; McLure, Ross J.; Momcheva, Ivelina; Willmer, Christopher N. A.

    2010-08-01

    We measure the rest-frame colors (dust-corrected), infrared luminosities, star formation rates, and stellar masses of 92 galaxies in a Spitzer-selected cluster at z = 1.62. By fitting spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to 10-band photometry (0.4 μm<λobs < 8 μm) and measuring 24 μm fluxes for the 12 spectroscopically confirmed and 80 photometrically selected members, we discover an exceptionally high level of star formation in the cluster core of ~1700 M sun yr-1 Mpc-2. The cluster galaxies define a strong blue sequence in (U-V) color and span a range in color. We identify 17 members with L IR>1011 L sun, and these IR luminous members follow the same trend of increasing star formation with stellar mass that is observed in the field at z ~ 2. Using rates derived from both the 24 μm imaging and SED fitting, we find that the relative fraction of star-forming members triples from the lowest to highest galaxy density regions; e.g., the IR luminous fraction increases from ~8% at Σ ~ 10 gal Mpc-2 to ~25% at Σ >~ 100 gal Mpc-2. The observed increase is a reversal of the well-documented trend at z < 1 and signals that we have reached the epoch when massive cluster galaxies are still forming a substantial fraction of their stars. This work is based in part on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under NASA contract 1407. This Letter also includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. This work is based in part on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  20. miR-434-3p and DNA hypomethylation co-regulate eIF5A1 to increase AChRs and to improve plasticity in SCT rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Fei-Fei; Xia, Qing-Jie; Liu, Wei; Xia, Lei; Qian, Bao-Jiang; You, Ling; He, Mu; Yang, Jin-Liang; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) serve as connections between motor neurons and skeletal muscle and are essential for recovery from spinal cord transection (SCT). Recently, microRNAs have emerged as important potential biotherapeutics for several diseases; however, whether miRNAs operate in the modulation of AChRs remains unknown. We found increased AChRs numbers and function scores in rats with SCT; these increases were reduced following the injection of a eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A1 (eIF5A1) shRNA lentivirus into the hindlimb muscle. Then, high-throughput screening for microRNAs targeting eIF5A1 was performed, and miR-434-3p was found to be robustly depleted in SCT rat skeletal muscle. Furthermore, a highly conserved miR-434-3p binding site was identified within the mRNA encoding eIF5A1 through bioinformatics analysis and dual-luciferase assay. Overexpression or knockdown of miR-434-3p in vivo demonstrated it was a negative post-transcriptional regulator of eIF5A1 expression and influenced AChRs expression. The microarray-enriched Gene Ontology (GO) terms regulated by miR-434-3p were muscle development terms. Using a lentivirus, one functional gene (map2k6) was confirmed to have a similar function to that of miR-434-3p in GO terms. Finally, HRM and MeDIP-PCR analyses revealed that DNA demethylation also up-regulated eIF5A1 after SCT. Consequently, miR-434-3p/eIF5A1 in muscle is a promising potential biotherapy for SCI repair. PMID:26964899

  1. Microsecond Rearrangements of Hydrophobic Clusters in an Initially Collapsed Globule Prime Structure Formation during the Folding of a Small Protein.

    PubMed

    Goluguri, Rama Reddy; Udgaonkar, Jayant B

    2016-07-31

    Determining how polypeptide chain collapse initiates structure formation during protein folding is a long standing goal. It has been challenging to characterize experimentally the dynamics of the polypeptide chain, which lead to the formation of a compact kinetic molten globule (MG) in about a millisecond. In this study, the sub-millisecond events that occur early during the folding of monellin from the guanidine hydrochloride-unfolded state have been characterized using multiple fluorescence and fluorescence resonance energy transfer probes. The kinetic MG is shown to form in a noncooperative manner from the unfolded (U) state as a result of at least three different processes happening during the first millisecond of folding. Initial chain compaction completes within the first 37μs, and further compaction occurs only after structure formation commences at a few milliseconds of folding. The transient nonnative and native-like hydrophobic clusters with side chains of certain residues buried form during the initial chain collapse and the nonnative clusters quickly disassemble. Subsequently, partial chain desolvation occurs, leading to the formation of a kinetic MG. The initial chain compaction and subsequent chain rearrangement appear to be barrierless processes. The two structural rearrangements within the collapsed globule appear to prime the protein for the actual folding transition. PMID:27370109

  2. SpARCS Brightest Cluster Galaxies: Evidence for significant star formation down to z~0.7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaventura, Nina

    2015-08-01

    We present the first stacked Spitzer/Herschel IR broadband SED of the largest and highest-redshift sample of optically selected Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs), from 1014-Msun clusters in the Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (SpARCS). While semi-analytic models of structure formation predict that star formation ceases at very early times in BCGs, leaving them to passively evolve subsequently, the updated models of Tonini et al. (2012) suggest that star formation persists in BCGs to much lower redshifts than originally predicted. To address this tension between various models and gain a better understanding of the mechanisms guiding BCG stellar mass growth since z~2, we identify their dominant source of IR energy output through a comparison of their SEDs to a variety of model templates in the literature, in multiple redshift bins between z = 0.1 and 1.9. We derive estimates of LIR,TOT , SFR and sSFR , M* , Tdust , and various measures of 'starburstiness' (Chary & Elbaz 2011) from the stacked SEDs.From the observed redshift evolution of the SED emerges a picture of a star-forming BCG down to z~0.1, vigorously producing hundreds of solar masses per year at z>~0.7, with high efficiency at z>~1 and mostly between 1 and 10 solar mass at lower redshifts, with a small subset representing extreme sources and likely marking a period of intense merging activity between z = 0.4 and 0.6. We find a significant AGN contribution to the small 24μm-bright subset of the BCG sample down to z~0.4, mostly coexisting with vigorous star formation and indicative of a relatively ineffective AGN feedback mechanism in BCGs.We conclude that the star formation and AGN activity we observe in BCGs down to lower redshifts than expected is due to their unique environment at the centers of galaxy clusters, where they are continuously subjected to galaxy merger events at mid-to-high redshift, and likely cooling flows and the associated AGN response towards lower redshifts

  3. Submillimetre observations of galaxy clusters with the BLAST: the star formation activity in Abell 3112

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braglia, Filiberto G.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Bock, James J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Devlin, Mark J.; Edge, Alastair; Griffin, Matthew; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Halpern, Mark; Hargrave, Peter C.; Hughes, David H.; Klein, Jeff; Marsden, Gaelen; Mauskopf, Philip; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Ngo, Henry; Olmi, Luca; Pascale, Enzo; Patanchon, Guillaume; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Rex, Marie; Scott, Douglas; Semisch, Christopher; Thomas, Nicholas; Truch, Matthew D. P.; Tucker, Carole; Tucker, Gregory S.; Valiante, Elisabetta; Viero, Marco P.; Wiebe, Donald V.

    2011-04-01

    We present observations at 250, 350 and 500 μm of the nearby galaxy cluster Abell 3112 (z= 0.075) carried out with the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope. Five cluster members are individually detected as bright submillimetre (submm) sources. Their far-infrared spectral energy distributions and optical colours identify them as normal star-forming galaxies of high mass, with globally evolved stellar populations. They all have (B-R) colours of 1.38 ± 0.08, transitional between the blue, active population and the red, evolved galaxies that dominate the cluster core. We stack to estimate the mean submm emission from all cluster members, which is determined to be 16.6 ± 2.5, 6.1 ± 1.9 and 1.5 ± 1.3 mJy at 250, 350 and 500 μm, respectively. Stacking analyses of the submm emission of cluster members reveal trends in the mean far-infrared luminosity with respect to clustercentric radius and KS-band magnitude. We find that a large fraction of submm emission comes from the boundary of the inner, virialized region of the cluster, at clustercentric distances around R500. Stacking also shows that the bulk of the submm emission arises in intermediate-mass galaxies with KS magnitude ˜1 mag fainter than the characteristic magnitude ?. The results and constraints obtained in this work will provide a useful reference for the forthcoming surveys to be conducted on galaxy clusters by Herschel.

  4. Formation of nanoscale clusters during the initial stages of CaF{sub 2} growth on miscut Si(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Kidd, T. E.; Davis, S.; Klein, D.; Matveeva, V.; Sifeeva, V.; Becker, N. G.

    2010-09-15

    The initial stages of high temperature CaF{sub 2} growth by molecular beam epitaxy on Si(111) substrates with a 3 deg. miscut were characterized using atomic force microscopy and low energy electron diffraction. At a growth temperature of 750 deg. C, electron diffraction measurements showed that the surface retained the (3x1) surface reconstruction up to a deposition thickness of at least 1.2 nm. The overall topography of the surface was defined by atomically flat terraces decorated with a large number of clusters. These clusters were confined to step edges and were typically 10-20 nm tall. The clusters appear to nucleate at the top of step edges and then grow in size until they extend across the step onto the neighboring terrace below. These results indicate that in this growth regime, the CaF{sub 2} molecules diffuse across terraces to aggregate into relatively large nanostructures after the formation of a thin wetting layer. The unusually rounded features and large heights seen in these clusters appear to arise from the topography of substrate terraces.

  5. Study of the mechanism of chromium cluster formation by laser microprobe mass spectrometry. Correlation with theoretical computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachimi, A.; Poitevin, E.; Krier, G.; Muller, J. F.; Ruiz-Lopez, M. F.

    1995-05-01

    Different stoichiometries of micrometric particles of powdered chromium oxides and salts are examined by time-of-flight laser microprobe mass spectrometry (TOF-LMMS). The negative cluster ion distributions show a good correlation with the stoichiometry of the chromium in the oxide. We have noticed a great spectral similarity between chromium(VI) oxide and hydrated chromium(III), salts leading to difficulties in differentiating these two kinds of compounds and determining the valency of chromium. The formation of CrO4- ions could be associated with product hydration, and could modify the fingerprint spectra of the chromium oxides and salts. We demonstrate that the CrO4- ion arises from collision between molecules present in the plasma generated by laser ablation. The mechanism of cluster formation is closely associated with the presence of neutral or ionized species (water, sulfate, nitrate, etc.). In particular, the hydration effect is very marked in the initial chromium salt. To confirm these results, an FT ion cyclotron MS investigation has been carried out, which allowed determination of the laser power dependence and relative stability of CrO-, CrO-2 and CrO3-. Results from a theoretical study of these types of cluster ions are presented and compared with the experimental data.

  6. FORMATION OF COMPACT STELLAR CLUSTERS BY HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXY OUTFLOWS. II. EFFECT OF TURBULENCE AND METAL-LINE COOLING

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, William J.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2011-06-01

    In the primordial universe, low-mass structures with virial temperatures less than 10{sup 4} K were unable to cool by atomic line transitions, leading to a strong suppression of star formation. On the other hand, these 'minihalos' were highly prone to triggered star formation by interactions from nearby galaxy outflows. In Gray and Scannapieco, we explored the impact of nonequilibrium chemistry on these interactions. Here we turn our attention to the role of metals, carrying out a series of high-resolution three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement simulations that include both metal cooling and a subgrid turbulent mixing model. Despite the presence of an additional coolant, we again find that outflow-minihalo interactions produce a distribution of dense, massive stellar clusters. We also find that these clusters are evenly enriched with metals to a final abundance of Z {approx} 10{sup -2} Z{sub sun}. As in our previous simulations, all of these properties suggest that these interactions may have given rise to present-day halo globular clusters.

  7. Cluster observations showing the indication of the formation of a modified-two-stream instability in the geomagnetic tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlbachler, S.; Langmayr, D.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Erkaev, N. V.; Alexeev, I. V.; Daly, P. W.; Biernat, H. K.

    2009-05-01

    This study presents several observations of the Cluster spacecraft on September 24, 2003 around 15:10 UT, which show necessary prerequisites and consequences for the formation of the so-called modified-two-stream instability (MTSI). Theoretical studies suggest that the plasma is MTSI unstable if (1) a relative drift of electrons and ions is present, which exceeds the Alfvèn speed, and (2) this relative drift or current is in the cross-field direction. As consequences of the formation of a MTSI one expects to observe (1) a field-aligned electron beam, (2) heating of the plasma, and (3) an enhancement in the B-wave spectrum at frequencies in the range of the lower-hybrid-frequency (LHF). In this study we use prime parameter data of the CIS and PEACE instruments onboard the Cluster spacecraft to verify the drift velocities of ions and electrons, FGM data to calculate the expected LHF and Alfvèn velocity, and the direction of the current. The B-wave spectrum is recorded by the STAFF instrument of Cluster. Finally, a field aligned beam of electrons is observed by 3D measurements of the IES instrument of the RAPID unit. Observations are verified using a theoretical model showing the build-up of a MTSI under the given circumstances.

  8. Characterization of the Amicetin Biosynthesis Gene Cluster from Streptomyces vinaceusdrappus NRRL 2363 Implicates Two Alternative Strategies for Amide Bond Formation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gaiyun; Zhang, Haibo; Li, Sumei; Xiao, Ji; Zhang, Guangtao; Zhu, Yiguang; Niu, Siwen; Ju, Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    Amicetin, an antibacterial and antiviral agent, belongs to a group of disaccharide nucleoside antibiotics featuring an α-(1→4)-glycoside bond in the disaccharide moiety. In this study, the amicetin biosynthesis gene cluster was cloned from Streptomyces vinaceusdrappus NRRL 2363 and localized on a 37-kb contiguous DNA region. Heterologous expression of the amicetin biosynthesis gene cluster in Streptomyces lividans TK64 resulted in the production of amicetin and its analogues, thereby confirming the identity of the ami gene cluster. In silico sequence analysis revealed that 21 genes were putatively involved in amicetin biosynthesis, including 3 for regulation and transportation, 10 for disaccharide biosynthesis, and 8 for the formation of the amicetin skeleton by the linkage of cytosine, p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), and the terminal (+)-α-methylserine moieties. The inactivation of the benzoate coenzyme A (benzoate-CoA) ligase gene amiL and the N-acetyltransferase gene amiF led to two mutants that accumulated the same two compounds, cytosamine and 4-acetamido-3-hydroxybenzoic acid. These data indicated that AmiF functioned as an amide synthethase to link cytosine and PABA. The inactivation of amiR, encoding an acyl-CoA-acyl carrier protein transacylase, resulted in the production of plicacetin and norplicacetin, indicating AmiR to be responsible for attachment of the terminal methylserine moiety to form another amide bond. These findings implicated two alternative strategies for amide bond formation in amicetin biosynthesis. PMID:22267658

  9. Characterization of the amicetin biosynthesis gene cluster from Streptomyces vinaceusdrappus NRRL 2363 implicates two alternative strategies for amide bond formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gaiyun; Zhang, Haibo; Li, Sumei; Xiao, Ji; Zhang, Guangtao; Zhu, Yiguang; Niu, Siwen; Ju, Jianhua; Zhang, Changsheng

    2012-04-01

    Amicetin, an antibacterial and antiviral agent, belongs to a group of disaccharide nucleoside antibiotics featuring an α-(1→4)-glycoside bond in the disaccharide moiety. In this study, the amicetin biosynthesis gene cluster was cloned from Streptomyces vinaceusdrappus NRRL 2363 and localized on a 37-kb contiguous DNA region. Heterologous expression of the amicetin biosynthesis gene cluster in Streptomyces lividans TK64 resulted in the production of amicetin and its analogues, thereby confirming the identity of the ami gene cluster. In silico sequence analysis revealed that 21 genes were putatively involved in amicetin biosynthesis, including 3 for regulation and transportation, 10 for disaccharide biosynthesis, and 8 for the formation of the amicetin skeleton by the linkage of cytosine, p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), and the terminal (+)-α-methylserine moieties. The inactivation of the benzoate coenzyme A (benzoate-CoA) ligase gene amiL and the N-acetyltransferase gene amiF led to two mutants that accumulated the same two compounds, cytosamine and 4-acetamido-3-hydroxybenzoic acid. These data indicated that AmiF functioned as an amide synthethase to link cytosine and PABA. The inactivation of amiR, encoding an acyl-CoA-acyl carrier protein transacylase, resulted in the production of plicacetin and norplicacetin, indicating AmiR to be responsible for attachment of the terminal methylserine moiety to form another amide bond. These findings implicated two alternative strategies for amide bond formation in amicetin biosynthesis.

  10. A dual cryogenic ion trap spectrometer for the formation and characterization of solvated ionic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, Brett M.; Voss, Jonathan M.; Garand, Etienne

    2015-11-28

    A new experimental approach is presented in which two separate cryogenic ion traps are used to reproducibly form weakly bound solvent clusters around electrosprayed ions and messenger-tag them for single-photon infrared photodissociation spectroscopy. This approach thus enables the vibrational characterization of ionic clusters comprised of a solvent network around large and non-volatile ions. We demonstrate the capabilities of the instrument by clustering water, methanol, and acetone around a protonated glycylglycine peptide. For water, cluster sizes with greater than twenty solvent molecules around a single ion are readily formed. We further demonstrate that similar water clusters can be formed around ions having a shielded charge center or those that do not readily form hydrogen bonds. Finally, infrared photodissociation spectra of D{sub 2}-tagged GlyGlyH{sup +} ⋅ (H{sub 2}O){sub 1−4} are presented. They display well-resolved spectral features and comparisons with calculations reveal detailed information on the solvation structures of this prototypical peptide.

  11. Divalent Cation-Dependent Formation of Electrostatic PIP2 Clusters in Lipid Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Ellenbroek, Wouter G.; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Christian, David A.; Discher, Dennis E.; Janmey, Paul A.; Liu, Andrea J.

    2011-01-01

    Polyphosphoinositides are among the most highly charged molecules in the cell membrane, and the most common polyphosphoinositide, phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), is involved in many mechanical and biochemical processes in the cell membrane. Divalent cations such as calcium can cause clustering of the polyanionic PIP2, but the origin and strength of the effective attractions leading to clustering has been unclear. In addition, the question of whether the ion-mediated attractions could be strong enough to alter the mechanical properties of the membrane, to our knowledge, has not been addressed. We study phase separation in mixed monolayers of neutral and highly negatively charged lipids, induced by the addition of divalent positively charged counterions, both experimentally and numerically. We find good agreement between experiments on mixtures of PIP2 and 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine and simulations of a simplified model in which only the essential electrostatic interactions are retained. In addition, we find numerically that under certain conditions the effective attractions can rigidify the resulting clusters. Our results support an interpretation of PIP2 clustering as governed primarily by electrostatic interactions. At physiological pH, the simulations suggest that the effective attractions are strong enough to give nearly pure clusters of PIP2 even at small overall concentrations of PIP2. PMID:22067156

  12. Final Report - Modeling the Physics of Damage Cluster Formation in a Cellular Environment Modeling the Physics of Damage Cluster Formation in a Cellular Environment

    SciTech Connect

    L.H. Toburen, Principal Investigator; J.L. Shinpaugh; M. Dingfelder; and G. Lapicki; Co-Investigators

    2007-01-07

    Modern tools of radiobiology are leading to many new discoveries regarding how cells and tissues respond to radiation exposure. We can now irradiate single cells and observe responses in adjacent cells. We can also measure clusters of radiation damage produced in DNA. Our primary objective has been to understand the underling physics associated with these new biological responses. The primary tools available to describe the initial spatial pattern of damage formed by the absorption of ionizing radiation are based on Monte Carlo simulation of the structure of charged particle tracks. Although many Monte Carlo codes exist and considerable progress is being made in the incorporation of detailed macromolecular target structures into these codes, much of the interaction physics is still based on gas phase measurements and/or untested theoretical calculations that focus on water as the transport medium. Our objectives were threefold, (1) to expand the applicability of Monte Carlo track structure simulation to tissue-like material beyond the current focus on water, (2) to incorporate the most recent experimental information on electron interactions in biologically relevant material, and (3) to compare recent measurements of electron emissions induced by charged particles in thin foils with Monte Carlo predictions. We addressed these research objectives in three ways. First we applied theoretical techniques, similar to those used to derive data for water, to obtain cross sections for other condensed phase materials. This served two purposes. One was to provide testability of the theoretical technique by comparison to existing experimental data for electron transport (similar data does not exist for water), and the other was to expand the target database for use in modeling tissue. Second, we carefully reviewed published data, and ongoing experiments, for electron interaction cross-sections in biologically relevant condensed phase material. Results for low-energy electron

  13. Cluster formation in binary charge-stabilized colloidal suspensions confined to a two-dimensional plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanat; Mukherjee, Manjori; Mishra, Pankaj

    2016-09-01

    Hypernetted chain (HNC) integral equation theory has been used to study the structural features of binary charged stabilized colloidal suspensions confined to a two-dimensional plane. The particles interact via purely repulsive Yukawa intermolecular potential, the inverse screening length scaled by the average distance between strongly interacting components of the mixture (dimensionless screening parameter) being 1, 3 and 5. Results of HNC theory for one-component systems are found to be in very good agreement with that of simulation, in the parameter range of our study. Binary Yukawa systems with dimensionless screening parameters 1 and 3 are found to exhibit diffuse clusters of the weakly interacting particles, marked by the emergence of a cluster peak in the corresponding partial structure factor curves. No cluster peak is found in the system with the screening parameter 5. For the entire range of mixture parameters, the strongly interacting particles remain homogeneously distributed.

  14. Toward the 21st Century: Preparing Proactive Visionary Transformational Leaders for Building Learning Communities through Multi-Technology. Leadership I Formative Evaluation of Cluster 54.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groff, Warren H.

    This paper presents a description and formative evaluation of National (Multi-Tech) Cluster III, Nova University's third technology-intensive doctoral program in Child and Youth Studies (CYS) in which formal instruction occurs in clusters, or groups of professionals in different geographic locations who are connected via electronic communications…

  15. FORMATION OF METAL-POOR GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN Ly{alpha} EMITTING GALAXIES IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James

    2012-09-20

    The size, mass, luminosity, and space density of Ly{alpha} emitting (LAE) galaxies observed at intermediate to high redshift agree with expectations for the properties of galaxies that formed metal-poor halo globular clusters (GCs). The low metallicity of these clusters is the result of their formation in low-mass galaxies. Metal-poor GCs could enter spiral galaxies along with their dwarf galaxy hosts, unlike metal-rich GCs, which form in the spirals themselves. Considering an initial GC mass larger than the current mass to account for multiple stellar populations, and considering the additional clusters that are likely to form with massive clusters, we estimate that each GC with a mass today greater than 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} was likely to have formed among a total stellar mass {approx}> 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun }, a molecular mass {approx}> 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }, and 10{sup 7} to 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} of older stars, depending on the relative gas fraction. The star formation rate would have been several M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} lasting for {approx}10{sup 7} yr, and the Ly{alpha} luminosity would have been {approx}> 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. Integrating the LAE galaxy luminosity function above this minimum, considering the average escape probability for Ly{alpha} photons (25%), and then dividing by the probability that a dwarf galaxy is observed in the LAE phase (0.4%), we find agreement between the comoving space density of LAEs and the average space density of metal-poor GCs today. The local galaxy WLM, with its early starburst and old GC, could be an LAE remnant that did not get into a galaxy halo because of its remote location.

  16. ON THE FORMATION TIMESCALE OF MASSIVE CLUSTER ELLIPTICALS BASED ON DEEP NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY AT z {approx} 2

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Masayuki; Kodama, Tadayuki; Koyama, Yusei; Toft, Sune; Zirm, Andrew; Marchesini, Danilo; De Breuck, Carlos; Kurk, Jaron; Tanaka, Ichi

    2013-08-01

    We present improved constraints on the formation timescale of massive cluster galaxies based on rest-frame optical spectra of galaxies in a forming cluster located at z = 2.16. The spectra are obtained with MOIRCS on the Subaru Telescope with an integration time of {approx}7 hr. We achieve accurate redshift measurements by fitting spectral energy distributions using the spectra and broadband photometry simultaneously, allowing us to identify probable cluster members. Clusters at low redshifts are dominated by quiescent galaxies, but we find that quiescent galaxies and star-forming galaxies coexist in this z = 2 system. Interestingly, the quiescent galaxies form a weak red sequence in the process of forming. By stacking the spectra of star-forming galaxies, we observe strong emission lines such as [O II] and [O III] and we obtain a tentative hint of active galactic nucleus activities in these galaxies. On the other hand, the stacked spectrum of the quiescent galaxies reveals a clear 4000 A break with a possible Ca II H+K absorption feature and strong emission lines such as [O II] are absent in the spectrum, confirming the quiescent nature of these galaxies. We then perform detailed spectral analyses of the stacked spectrum, which suggest that these massive quiescent galaxies formed at redshifts between 3 and 4 on a timescale of {approx}< 0.5 Gyr. This short formation timescale is not reproduced in recent numerical simulations. We discuss possible mechanisms for how these galaxies form 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} stellar mass on a short timescale and become red and quiescent by z = 2.

  17. MC2: boosted AGN and star formation activity in CIZA J2242.8+5301, a massive post-merger cluster at z = 0.19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobral, David; Stroe, Andra; Dawson, William A.; Wittman, David; Jee, M. James; Röttgering, Huub; van Weeren, Reinout J.; Brüggen, Marcus

    2015-06-01

    Cluster mergers may play a fundamental role in the formation and evolution of cluster galaxies. Stroe et al. revealed unexpected overdensities of candidate Hα emitters near the ˜1-Mpc-wide shock fronts of the massive (˜2 × 1015 M⊙) `Sausage' merging cluster, CIZA J2242.8+5301. We used the Keck/Deep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph and the William Herschel Telescope/AutoFib2+WYFFOS to confirm 83 Hα emitters in and around the merging cluster. We find that cluster star-forming galaxies in the hottest X-ray gas and/or in the cluster subcores (away from the shock fronts) show high [S II]6716/[S II]6761 and high [S II] 6716/Hα, implying very low electron densities (<30 × lower than all other star-forming galaxies outside the cluster) and/or significant contribution from supernovae, respectively. All cluster star-forming galaxies near the cluster centre show evidence of significant outflows (blueshifted Na D ˜200-300 km s-1), likely driven by supernovae. Strong outflows are also found for the cluster Hα active galactic nucleus (AGN). Hα star-forming galaxies in the merging cluster follow the z ˜ 0 mass-metallicity relation, showing systematically higher metallicity (˜0.15-0.2 dex) than Hα emitters outside the cluster (projected R > 2.5 Mpc). This suggests that the shock front may have triggered remaining metal-rich gas which galaxies were able to retain into forming stars. Our observations show that the merger of impressively massive (˜1015 M⊙) clusters can provide the conditions for significant star formation and AGN activity, but, as we witness strong feedback by star-forming galaxies and AGN (and given how massive the merging cluster is), such sources will likely quench in a few 100 Myr.

  18. FDTD study of the formation of optical vortices associated with core-shell nanoparticle cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md Mahfuzur; Lu, Jin You; Ni, George; Fang, Nicholas Xuanlai; Zhang, Tiejun; Ghaferi, Amal Al

    2015-03-01

    Light absorbing plasmonic metal-dielectric nanoparticles suspended in water, or nanofluids have recently been experimentally demonstrated to produce steam at high efficiencies upon solar illumination. This approach localizes high temperatures to the interior of the liquid through efficient trapping of incoming light via scattering and absorption mechanisms. In suspensions, nanoparticles may form clusters due to surface wetting properties, and little work has focused on understanding the optical properties of clusters. In this work, we use the FDTD method to accurately visualize the optical power flow through various plasmonic metal-silica core-shell nanoparticle pairs at different inter-particle separations (10-100 nm). At these separations phase singularities of the power flow can occur, such as vortices of light inside the dielectric core which can enhance the absorption cross-section of the cluster. We study the conditions required to form these vortices. We also consider titanium nitride as shell, other than the widely studied noble metals to visualize the extinction cross-section of a cluster which depends on the separation, and the permittivity of the dielectric core. The authors would like to acknowledge the valuable support from Masdar Institute and Massachusetts Institute of Technology for the soler thermal project grant.

  19. From solid solution to cluster formation of Fe and Cr in α-Zr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burr, P. A.; Wenman, M. R.; Gault, B.; Moody, M. P.; Ivermark, M.; Rushton, M. J. D.; Preuss, M.; Edwards, L.; Grimes, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    To understand the mechanisms by which the re-solution of Fe and Cr additions increase the corrosion rate of irradiated Zr alloys, the solubility and clustering of Fe and Cr in model binary Zr alloys was investigated using a combination of experimental and modelling techniques - atom probe tomography (APT), x-ray diffraction (XRD), thermoelectric power (TEP) and density functional theory (DFT). Cr occupies both interstitial and substitutional sites in the α-Zr lattice; Fe favours interstitial sites, and a low-symmetry site that was not previously modelled is found to be the most favourable for Fe. Lattice expansion as a function of Fe and Cr content in the α-Zr matrix deviates from Vegard's law and is strongly anisotropic for Fe additions, expanding the c-axis while contracting the a-axis. Matrix content of solutes cannot be reliably estimated from lattice parameter measurements, instead a combination of TEP and APT was employed. Defect clusters form at higher solution concentrations, which induce a smaller lattice strain compared to the dilute defects. In the presence of a Zr vacancy, all two-atom clusters are more soluble than individual point defects and as many as four Fe or three Cr atoms could be accommodated in a single Zr vacancy. The Zr vacancy is critical for the increased apparent solubility of defect clusters; the implications for irradiation induced microstructure changes in Zr alloys are discussed.

  20. Monte Carlo computer simulations and electron microscopy of colloidal cluster formation via emulsion droplet evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Ingmar; Fortini, Andrea; Wagner, Claudia Simone; Wittemann, Alexander; Schmidt, Matthias

    2011-12-01

    We consider a theoretical model for a binary mixture of colloidal particles and spherical emulsion droplets. The hard sphere colloids interact via additional short-ranged attraction and long-ranged repulsion. The droplet-colloid interaction is an attractive well at the droplet surface, which induces the Pickering effect. The droplet-droplet interaction is a hard-core interaction. The droplets shrink in time, which models the evaporation of the dispersed (oil) phase, and we use Monte Carlo simulations for the dynamics. In the experiments, polystyrene particles were assembled using toluene droplets as templates. The arrangement of the particles on the surface of the droplets was analyzed with cryogenic field emission scanning electron microscopy. Before evaporation of the oil, the particle distribution on the droplet surface was found to be disordered in experiments, and the simulations reproduce this effect. After complete evaporation, ordered colloidal clusters are formed that are stable against thermal fluctuations. Both in the simulations and with field emission scanning electron microscopy, we find stable packings that range from doublets, triplets, and tetrahedra to complex polyhedra of colloids. The simulated cluster structures and size distribution agree well with the experimental results. We also simulate hierarchical assembly in a mixture of tetrahedral clusters and droplets, and find supercluster structures with morphologies that are more complex than those of clusters of single particles.

  1. CO J = 2-1 Line Emission in Cluster Galaxies at z ~ 1: Fueling Star Formation in Dense Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagg, Jeff; Pope, Alexandra; Alberts, Stacey; Armus, Lee; Brodwin, Mark; Bussmann, Robert S.; Desai, Vandana; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Melbourne, Jason; Stern, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    We present observations of CO J = 2-1 line emission in infrared-luminous cluster galaxies at z ~ 1 using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Our two primary targets are optically faint, dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) found to lie within 2 Mpc of the centers of two massive (>1014 M ⊙) galaxy clusters. CO line emission is not detected in either DOG. We calculate 3σ upper limits to the CO J = 2-1 line luminosities, L'CO < 6.08 × 109 and <6.63 × 109 K km s-1 pc2. Assuming a CO-to-H2 conversion factor derived for ultraluminous infrared galaxies in the local universe, this translates to limits on the cold molecular gas mass of M_H_2 < 4.86 \\times 10^{9} \\,M_{\\odot } and M_H_2 < 5.30 \\times 10^{9} \\,M_{\\odot }. Both DOGs exhibit mid-infrared continuum emission that follows a power law, suggesting that an active galactic nucleus (AGN) contributes to the dust heating. As such, estimates of the star formation efficiencies in these DOGs are uncertain. A third cluster member with an infrared luminosity, L IR < 7.4 × 1011 L ⊙, is serendipitously detected in CO J = 2-1 line emission in the field of one of the DOGs located roughly two virial radii away from the cluster center. The optical spectrum of this object suggests that it is likely an obscured AGN, and the measured CO line luminosity is L'CO = (1.94 ± 0.35) × 1010 K km s-1 pc2, which leads to an estimated cold molecular gas mass M_H_2 = (1.55 +/- 0.28)\\times 10^{10}\\,M_{\\odot }. A significant reservoir of molecular gas in a z ~ 1 galaxy located away from the cluster center demonstrates that the fuel can exist to drive an increase in star formation and AGN activity at the outskirts of high-redshift clusters. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain).

  2. GALAXY CLUSTERING TOPOLOGY IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY MAIN GALAXY SAMPLE: A TEST FOR GALAXY FORMATION MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yun-Young; Kim, Juhan; Kim, Sungsoo S.; Park, Changbom; Gott, J. Richard; Weinberg, David H.; Vogeley, Michael S.

    2010-09-15

    We measure the topology of the main galaxy distribution using the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, examining the dependence of galaxy clustering topology on galaxy properties. The observational results are used to test galaxy formation models. A volume-limited sample defined by M{sub r} < -20.19 enables us to measure the genus curve with an amplitude of G = 378 at 6 h {sup -1} Mpc smoothing scale, with 4.8% uncertainty including all systematics and cosmic variance. The clustering topology over the smoothing length interval from 6 to 10 h {sup -1} Mpc reveals a mild scale dependence for the shift ({Delta}{nu}) and void abundance (A{sub V}) parameters of the genus curve. We find substantial bias in the topology of galaxy clustering with respect to the predicted topology of the matter distribution, which varies with luminosity, morphology, color, and the smoothing scale of the density field. The distribution of relatively brighter galaxies shows a greater prevalence of isolated clusters and more percolated voids. Even though early (late)-type galaxies show topology similar to that of red (blue) galaxies, the morphology dependence of topology is not identical to the color dependence. In particular, the void abundance parameter A{sub V} depends on morphology more strongly than on color. We test five galaxy assignment schemes applied to cosmological N-body simulations of a {Lambda}CDM universe to generate mock galaxies: the halo-galaxy one-to-one correspondence model, the halo occupation distribution model, and three implementations of semi-analytic models (SAMs). None of the models reproduces all aspects of the observed clustering topology; the deviations vary from one model to another but include statistically significant discrepancies in the abundance of isolated voids or isolated clusters and the amplitude and overall shift of the genus curve. SAM predictions of the topology color dependence are usually correct in sign but incorrect in magnitude

  3. CO J = 2-1 LINE EMISSION IN CLUSTER GALAXIES AT z {approx} 1: FUELING STAR FORMATION IN DENSE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Wagg, Jeff; Pope, Alexandra; Alberts, Stacey; Armus, Lee; Desai, Vandana; Brodwin, Mark; Bussmann, Robert S.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Melbourne, Jason; Stern, Daniel

    2012-06-20

    We present observations of CO J = 2-1 line emission in infrared-luminous cluster galaxies at z {approx} 1 using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Our two primary targets are optically faint, dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) found to lie within 2 Mpc of the centers of two massive (>10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }) galaxy clusters. CO line emission is not detected in either DOG. We calculate 3{sigma} upper limits to the CO J = 2-1 line luminosities, L'{sub CO} < 6.08 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} and <6.63 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}. Assuming a CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor derived for ultraluminous infrared galaxies in the local universe, this translates to limits on the cold molecular gas mass of M{sub H{sub 2}}< 4.86 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} and M{sub H{sub 2}}< 5.30 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }. Both DOGs exhibit mid-infrared continuum emission that follows a power law, suggesting that an active galactic nucleus (AGN) contributes to the dust heating. As such, estimates of the star formation efficiencies in these DOGs are uncertain. A third cluster member with an infrared luminosity, L{sub IR} < 7.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} L{sub Sun }, is serendipitously detected in CO J = 2-1 line emission in the field of one of the DOGs located roughly two virial radii away from the cluster center. The optical spectrum of this object suggests that it is likely an obscured AGN, and the measured CO line luminosity is L'{sub CO} = (1.94 {+-} 0.35) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}, which leads to an estimated cold molecular gas mass M{sub H{sub 2}}= (1.55{+-}0.28) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }. A significant reservoir of molecular gas in a z {approx} 1 galaxy located away from the cluster center demonstrates that the fuel can exist to drive an increase in star formation and AGN activity at the outskirts of high-redshift clusters.

  4. A CHANDRA X-RAY ANALYSIS OF ABELL 1664: COOLING, FEEDBACK, AND STAR FORMATION IN THE CENTRAL CLUSTER GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, C. C.; McNamara, B. R.; Kazemzadeh, F.; Cavagnolo, K. W.; Rafferty, D. A.; BIrzan, L.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Wise, M. W.; Gitti, M.

    2009-05-20

    The brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in the Abell 1664 cluster is unusually blue and is forming stars at a rate of {approx} 23 M {sub sun} yr{sup -1}. The BCG is located within 5 kpc of the X-ray peak, where the cooling time of 3.5 x 10{sup 8} yr and entropy of 10.4 keV cm{sup 2} are consistent with other star-forming BCGs in cooling flow clusters. The center of A1664 has an elongated, 'barlike' X-ray structure whose mass is comparable to the mass of molecular hydrogen, {approx}10{sup 10} M {sub sun} in the BCG. We show that this gas is unlikely to have been stripped from interloping galaxies. The cooling rate in this region is roughly consistent with the star formation rate, suggesting that the hot gas is condensing onto the BCG. We use the scaling relations of BIrzan et al. to show that the active galactic nucleus (AGN) is underpowered compared to the central X-ray cooling luminosity by roughly a factor of three. We suggest that A1664 is experiencing rapid cooling and star formation during a low state of an AGN feedback cycle that regulates the rates of cooling and star formation. Modeling the emission as a single-temperature plasma, we find that the metallicity peaks 100 kpc from the X-ray center, resulting in a central metallicity dip. However, a multi-temperature cooling flow model improves the fit to the X-ray emission and is able to recover the expected, centrally peaked metallicity profile.

  5. ALMA and HST Observations of the Molecular Environment, Star formation Activity and Cluster Dissolution In NGC 1097

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Kartik; Regan, Michael W.; Ngcebetsha, Buntu; Kohno, Kotaro; Teuben, Peter J.; Vogel, Stuart N.; Villard, Eric; Wiklind, Tommy; Lundgren, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Barred spiral galaxies, such as NGC 1097, are an ideal laboratory for studying the interplay between the molecular gas environment and recent star formation activity because there are several dynamically distinct environs (the circumnuclear ring, the bar dust lanes and spurs, the bar end, the inner ring and spiral arms) where the SF activity varies by over three orders of magnitude. We present new ALMA Cycle 1 data showing the CO(1-0), HCN, HCO+, CS, 13CO, C18O emission across the entire disk of NGC 1097 at a resolution of 75 pc (1'). We map the distribution and kinematics of the molecular ISM and quantify the free fall time and shear to constrain what initiates (or inhibits) the star formation activity. By combining the 12m primary array, ACA-7m and total power data we show the most complete maps of NGC 1097. We use the high resolution data to measure the gas inflow rate and accretion onto the circumnuclear ring and constrain the feeding of the central AGN. The 13CO / 12CO ratio across the different environments is used to measure and quantify the diffuse versus dense phases of the molecular ISM across the disk of the galaxy. Finally we compare the ALMA data to new HST UV & optical data to measure the ages and locations of young star clusters. By comparing the cluster age and morphology to the ALMA data we constrain the cluster dissolution time scales as a function of the molecular ISM. Finally we show new JVLA C, X and Ka band continuum data to distinguish between old and young star formation activity.

  6. Infrared absorption imaging of 2D supersonic jet expansions: Free expansion, cluster formation, and shock wave patterns.

    PubMed

    Zischang, Julia; Suhm, Martin A

    2013-07-14

    N2O/He gas mixtures are expanded through a 10 × 0.5 mm(2) slit nozzle and imaged by direct absorption vibrational spectroscopy, employing a HgCdTe focal plane array detector after interferometric modulation. N2O cluster formation in the free supersonic expansion is visualized. The expansion structure behind the frontal shock is investigated as a function of background pressure. At high pressures, a sequence of stationary density peaks along a narrow directed flow channel is characterized. The potential of the technique for the elucidation of aggregation mechanisms is emphasized.

  7. LoCuSS: THE STEADY DECLINE AND SLOW QUENCHING OF STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTER GALAXIES OVER THE LAST FOUR BILLION YEARS

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, C. P.; Pereira, M. J.; Egami, E.; Rawle, T. D.; Smith, G. P.; Sanderson, A. J. R.; Babul, A.; Finoguenov, A.; Merluzzi, P.; Busarello, G.; Okabe, N.

    2013-10-01

    We present an analysis of the levels and evolution of star formation activity in a representative sample of 30 massive galaxy clusters at 0.15 < z < 0.30 from the Local Cluster Substructure Survey, combining wide-field Spitzer/MIPS 24 μm data with extensive spectroscopy of cluster members. The specific SFRs of massive (M > or approx. 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}) star-forming cluster galaxies within r{sub 200} are found to be systematically ∼28% lower than their counterparts in the field at fixed stellar mass and redshift, a difference significant at the 8.7σ level. This is the unambiguous signature of star formation in most (and possibly all) massive star-forming galaxies being slowly quenched upon accretion into massive clusters, their star formation rates (SFRs) declining exponentially on quenching timescales in the range 0.7-2.0 Gyr. We measure the mid-infrared Butcher-Oemler effect over the redshift range 0.0-0.4, finding rapid evolution in the fraction (f{sub SF}) of massive (M{sub K} < – 23.1) cluster galaxies within r{sub 200} with SFRs > 3 M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, of the form f{sub SF}∝(1 + z){sup 7.6±1.1}. We dissect the origins of the Butcher-Oemler effect, revealing it to be due to the combination of a ∼3 × decline in the mean specific SFRs of star-forming cluster galaxies since z ∼ 0.3 with a ∼1.5 × decrease in number density. Two-thirds of this reduction in the specific SFRs of star-forming cluster galaxies is due to the steady cosmic decline in the specific SFRs among those field galaxies accreted into the clusters. The remaining one-third reflects an accelerated decline in the star formation activity of galaxies within clusters. The slow quenching of star formation in cluster galaxies is consistent with a gradual shut down of star formation in infalling spiral galaxies as they interact with the intracluster medium via ram-pressure stripping or starvation mechanisms. The observed sharp decline in star formation activity among cluster

  8. The mechanism of solute-enriched clusters formation in neutron-irradiated pressure vessel steels: The case of Fe-Cu model alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subbotin, A. V.; Panyukov, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    Mechanism of solute-enriched clusters formation in neutron-irradiated pressure vessel steels is proposed and developed in case of Fe-Cu model alloys. The suggested solute-drag mechanism is analogous to the well-known zone-refining process. We show that the obtained results are in good agreement with available experimental data on the parameters of clusters enriched with the alloying elements. Our model explains why the formation of solute-enriched clusters does not happen in austenitic stainless steels with fcc lattice structure. It also allows to quantify the method of evaluation of neutron irradiation dose for the process of RPV steels hardening.

  9. THE FORMATION OF SPHEROIDS IN EARLY-TYPE SPIRALS: CLUES FROM THEIR GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Maybhate, Aparna; Goudfrooij, Paul; Chandar, Rupali; Puzia, Thomas H.

    2010-09-20

    We use deep Hubble Space Telescope images taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) in the F475W and F814W filters to investigate the globular cluster (GC) systems in four edge-on Sa spiral galaxies covering a factor of four in luminosity. The specific frequencies of the blue GCs in the galaxies in our sample fall in the range 0.34-0.84, similar to typical values found for later-type spirals. The number of red GCs associated with the bulges generally increases with the bulge luminosity, similar to what is observed for elliptical galaxies, although the specific frequency of bulge clusters is a factor of 2-3 lower for the lowest luminosity bulges than for the higher-luminosity bulges. We present a new empirical relation between the fraction of red GCs and total bulge luminosity based on the elliptical galaxies studied by ACSVCS (ACS Virgo Cluster Survey) and discuss how this diagram can be used to assess the importance of dissipative processes in building spiral bulges. Our results suggest a picture where dissipative processes, which are expected during gas-rich major mergers, were more important for building luminous bulges of Sa galaxies, whereas secular evolution may have played a larger role in building lower-luminosity bulges in spirals.

  10. Formation and Stabilization of Nano-Sized Pt Clusters on TiO2 Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Donald R.; Liang, Yong; Gan, Shupan

    2000-09-30

    This paper reports experiments related to the stability and size distributions of platinum (Pt) clusters on TiO2 surfaces. Efforts to enhance the efficiency and reliability of microsystems will likely use components or elements with at least one dimension smaller than a micron. The ability to design and fabricate elements at submicron dimensions-nanotechnology-is a rapidly growing area of science and technology. In this paper we describe experiments using newly generated knowledge of surfaces and the nanodimensional information provided by scanning probe microscopy (SPM) that are designed to assist development of a new generation of catalysts for application in microchemical systems. Critical questions for the design of a new catalyst is the ability to fabricate metal clusters of different sizes and their temperature stability. We report on the investigation of nucleation, growth, and temperature stability of self-organized nanoscale Pt clusters on different TiO2 surfaces using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Surfaces examined include anatase (001) and rutile (110), both (1x1) and reconstructed (1x2) forms.

  11. Fast parallel Markov clustering in bioinformatics using massively parallel computing on GPU with CUDA and ELLPACK-R sparse format.

    PubMed

    Bustamam, Alhadi; Burrage, Kevin; Hamilton, Nicholas A

    2012-01-01

    Markov clustering (MCL) is becoming a key algorithm within bioinformatics for determining clusters in networks. However,with increasing vast amount of data on biological networks, performance and scalability issues are becoming a critical limiting factor in applications. Meanwhile, GPU computing, which uses CUDA tool for implementing a massively parallel computing environment in the GPU card, is becoming a very powerful, efficient, and low-cost option to achieve substantial performance gains over CPU approaches. The use of on-chip memory on the GPU is efficiently lowering the latency time, thus, circumventing a major issue in other parallel computing environments, such as MPI. We introduce a very fast Markov clustering algorithm using CUDA (CUDA-MCL) to perform parallel sparse matrix-matrix computations and parallel sparse Markov matrix normalizations, which are at the heart of MCL. We utilized ELLPACK-R sparse format to allow the effective and fine-grain massively parallel processing to cope with the sparse nature of interaction networks data sets in bioinformatics applications. As the results show, CUDA-MCL is significantly faster than the original MCL running on CPU. Thus, large-scale parallel computation on off-the-shelf desktop-machines, that were previously only possible on supercomputing architectures, can significantly change the way bioinformaticians and biologists deal with their data.

  12. Hard X-ray Emission Associated with High-Mass Star Formation in the Young Stellar Cluster NGC 2071

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, S. L.; Audard, M.; Güdel, M.; Meyer, M. R.; Simmons, A. E.

    2008-06-01

    X-ray observations can penetrate high intervening extinction and are thus useful for probing physical conditions in young stellar clusters whose members are optically obscured. Such observations can provide information on magnetic processes at or near the surface of a formative (proto)-star and on mass-loss properties as diagnosed from X-ray emission associated with jets and shocked outflows. We present first results of X-ray observations of the embedded infrared cluster NGC 2071 in the Orion B molecular cloud with XMM-Newton. This cluster is of interest because it is one of the closest regions known to harbor high-mass protostars. We report the detection of hard X-ray emission from the dense central NGC 2071-IR subgroup which contains three massive protostars surrounded by ultracompact H II regions (IRS-1,2,3). The X-ray peak lies within ≈1'' of IRS-1, which drives one of the most powerful outflows known. The unusual X-ray spectrum shows a strong fluorescent Fe emission line at 6.4 keV superimposed on a hard continuum. This line is due to Fe I or weakly ionized Fe and likely originates in cold material near the protostar (i.e. a disk or envelope) that is irradiated by the hard central X-ray source.

  13. Herschel Observations of the W3 GMC (II): Clues to the Formation of Clusters of High-mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Martin, P. G.; Polychroni, D.; Schneider, N.; Motte, F.; Bontemps, S.; Hennemann, M.; Men'shchikov, A.; Nguyen Luong, Q.; Zavagno, A.; André, Ph.; Bernard, J.-Ph.; Di Francesco, J.; Fallscheer, C.; Hill, T.; Könyves, V.; Marston, A.; Pezzuto, S.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Spinoglio, L.; White, G. J.

    2015-08-01

    The W3 giant molecular cloud is a prime target for investigating the formation of high-mass stars and clusters. This second study of W3 within the HOBYS Key Program provides a comparative analysis of subfields within W3 to further constrain the processes leading to the observed structures and stellar population. Probability density functions (PDFs) and cumulative mass distributions (CMDs) were created from dust column density maps, quantified as extinction {A}{{V}}. The shape of the PDF, typically represented with a lognormal function at low {A}{{V}} “breaking” to a power-law tail at high {A}{{V}}, is influenced by various processes including turbulence and self-gravity. The breaks can also be identified, often more readily, in the CMDs. The PDF break from lognormal ({A}{{V}}(SF) ≈ \\6-10 mag) appears to shift to higher {A}{{V}} by stellar feedback, so that high-mass star-forming regions tend to have higher PDF breaks. A second break at {A}{{V}}\\gt 50 mag traces structures formed or influenced by a dynamic process. Because such a process has been suggested to drive high-mass star formation in W3, this second break might then identify regions with potential for hosting high-mass stars/clusters. Stellar feedback appears to be a major mechanism driving the local evolution and state of regions within W3. A high initial star formation efficiency in a dense medium could result in a self-enhancing process, leading to more compression and favorable star formation conditions (e.g., colliding flows), a richer stellar content, and massive stars. This scenario would be compatible with the “convergent constructive feedback” model introduced in our previous Herschel study.

  14. Globular clusters and their contribution to the formation of the Galactic halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carretta, Eugenio

    2016-08-01

    This is a ``biased'' review because I will show recent evidence on the contribution of globular clusters (GCs) to the halo of our Galaxy seen through the lens of the new paradigm of multiple populations in GCs. I will show a few examples where the chemistry of multiple populations helps to answer hot questions including whether and how much GCs did contribute to the halo population, if we have evidence of the GCs-halo link, what are the strengths and weak points concerning this contribution.

  15. Deposition of acrylonitrile cluster ions on solid substrates: thin film formation by intracluster polymerization products.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Sato, Naoki

    2006-03-01

    Cluster anions of acrylonitrile (AN), known to give intracluster anionic polymerization products, were deposited on solid substrates. The obtained films were examined by using infrared absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and gel permeation chromatography with the aid of quantum chemical calculations. The acquired spectroscopic data are similar to those of polyacrylonitrile (PAN), while the normal polymerization of AN or reactions related to PAN seemed not to occur noticeably. On the contrary, the product analysis shows that most of the constituent molecules of the films are formed via cyclohexane-1,3,5-tricarbonitrile (CHTCN), a dominant product of the intracluster polymerization of AN, accompanied by fragmentation and dimerization. PMID:16509718

  16. Methylsilsesquioxane-Based Aerogel Systems-Insights into the Role of the Formation of Molecular Clusters.

    PubMed

    Borba, A; Almangano, M; Portugal, A A; Patrício, R; Simões, P N

    2016-06-16

    Condensed clusters of hydrolyzed methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS) were studied using two complementary approaches: (i) Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was applied along with the hydrolysis and condensation stages of a sol-gel process from the condensation of colloidal suspension of nanoparticles to the solid phase of bulk material; (ii) density functional theory calculations of energies, structural and vibrational data of pertinent MTMS hydrolysis products, specifically, methylsilanetriol-based species with different number of silicon atoms (from two to eight atoms) and different structures/conformations (linear, cyclic, and cage, in a total of 13 structures), were performed at B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level of theory. The calculated infrared spectra show two distinct Si-O-Si stretch vibration bands for models of caged structures. The higher-frequency IR band at ca. 1120 cm(-1) is derived from the antisymmetric Si-O-Si stretch vibration mode, while the lower-frequency band at 1035 cm(-1) is due to the symmetric Si-O-Si stretch and is characteristic of the cyclic clusters, being absent in highly symmetric cage structures. The calculated versus the experimental FTIR spectra of poly(methylsilsesquioxane) (PMSQ) dried aerogel in KBr pellet show that cage/cyclic-like structures prevail over ladder structures (linear) in actual PMSQ. PMID:27213224

  17. Cell-laden microengineered pullulan methacrylate hydrogels promote cell proliferation and 3D cluster formation.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hojae; Ahari, Amir F; Shin, Hyeongho; Nichol, Jason W; Hutson, Che B; Masaeli, Mahdokht; Kim, Su-Hwan; Aubin, Hug; Yamanlar, Seda; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2011-01-01

    The ability to encapsulate cells in three-dimensional (3D) environments is potentially of benefit for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In this paper, we introduce pullulan methacrylate (PulMA) as a promising hydrogel platform for creating cell-laden microscale tissues. The hydration and mechanical properties of PulMA were demonstrated to be tunable through modulation of the degree of methacrylation and gel concentration. Cells encapsulated in PulMA exhibited excellent viability. Interestingly, while cells did not elongate in PulMA hydrogels, cells proliferated and organized into clusters, the size of which could be controlled by the hydrogel composition. By mixing with gelatin methacrylate (GelMA), the biological properties of PulMA could be enhanced as demonstrated by cells readily attaching to, proliferating, and elongating within the PulMA/GelMA composite hydrogels. These data suggest that PulMA hydrogels could be useful for creating complex, cell-responsive microtissues, especially for applications that require controlled cell clustering and proliferation.

  18. Formation of Positively Charged Liquid Helium Clusters in Supercritical Helium and their Solidification upon Compression.

    PubMed

    Tarchouna, Hejer Gharbi; Bonifaci, Nelly; Aitken, Frédéric; Mendoza Luna, Luis Guillermo; von Haeften, Klaus

    2015-08-01

    Positively charged ions were produced in supercritical helium at temperatures from 6 to 10 K and up to 2 MPa using a corona discharge. Their mobility was measured via current-voltage curves, and the hydrodynamic radius was derived using Stokes law. An initial increase and subsequent decrease of hydrodynamic radius was observed and interpreted in terms of growth, compression and solidification of ion clusters. The mobility was modeled using a van der Waals-type thermodynamic state equation for the ion-in-helium mixed system and a temperature-dependent Millikan-Cunningham factor, describing experimental data both in the Knudsen and the Stokes flow region. Regions of maximum hydrodynamic radius and large compressibility were interpreted as boiling points. These points were modeled over a large range of pressures and found to match the Frenkel line of pure helium up to 0.7 MPa, reflecting similarity of density fluctuations in pure supercritical helium and gas-liquid phase transitions of ionic helium clusters. PMID:26267199

  19. Dynamic and physical clustering of gene expression during epidermal barrier formation in differentiating keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jennifer M; Street, Teresa L; Hao, Lizhong; Copley, Richard; Taylor, Martin S; Hayden, Patrick J; Stolper, Gina; Mott, Richard; Hein, Jotun; Moffatt, Miriam F; Cookson, William O C M

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian epidermis is a continually renewing structure that provides the interface between the organism and an innately hostile environment. The keratinocyte is its principal cell. Keratinocyte proteins form a physical epithelial barrier, protect against microbial damage, and prepare immune responses to danger. Epithelial immunity is disordered in many common diseases and disordered epithelial differentiation underlies many cancers. In order to identify the genes that mediate epithelial development we used a tissue model of the skin derived from primary human keratinocytes. We measured global gene expression in triplicate at five times over the ten days that the keratinocytes took to fully differentiate. We identified 1282 gene transcripts that significantly changed during differentiation (false discovery rate <0.01%). We robustly grouped these transcripts by K-means clustering into modules with distinct temporal expression patterns, shared regulatory motifs, and biological functions. We found a striking cluster of late expressed genes that form the structural and innate immune defences of the epithelial barrier. Gene Ontology analyses showed that undifferentiated keratinocytes were characterised by genes for motility and the adaptive immune response. We systematically identified calcium-binding genes, which may operate with the epidermal calcium gradient to control keratinocyte division during skin repair. The results provide multiple novel insights