Science.gov

Sample records for achromatic phase shifters

  1. Nulling interferometry without achromatic phase shifters.

    PubMed

    Mieremet, Arjan L; Braat, Joseph J M

    2002-08-01

    In the infrared wavelength region, a typical star is approximately a million times brighter than the planet that surrounds it, which is a major problem when we attempt to detect exoplanets in a direct manner. Nulling interferometry is a technique that one can use to solve this problem by attenuating the stellar light and enhancing that of the planet. Generally, deep nulling is achieved by use of achromatic phase shifters (APSs). Unfortunately, the technology needed to build these APSs is not yet fully developed. We show that deep nulling can also be achieved by using delay lines only. We investigate the nulling depth as a function of the width of the wavelength interval and the number of telescopes. We also show that we can obtain nulling depths of less than 10(-6), which are required for exoplanet detection. Furthermore, we investigate the properties of the transmission map and make a comparison between our system and an APS system. PMID:12153105

  2. Review of Concepts and Constraints for Achromatic Phase Shifters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbia, Y.; Gay, J.; Rivet, J.-P.; Schneider, J.-L.

    2003-03-01

    The search for earth-like exoplanets requires nulling interferometry in the thermal infrared domain. Nulling is needed because the star overshines the planet and the starlight must be eliminated. Thermal infrared is selected so as to record the light radiated by the planet itself , not the one from the star, reflected by the planet, but also because the flux ratio between star and planet is fainter than in the visible. Search for "life" (as known on Earth) requires large bandwidth observation so as to allow spectroscopy [1]. Achromatic Phase Shifters (APS) are crucial components since they govern destructive interference of the lightwaves collected from the star. The effective phase shifts to perform between collected lightwaves depends on the instrumental configuration but the achromaticity of the phase shift is needed in any case so as to achieve the nulling over the largest possible spectral bandwidth, what is required for detection of the planet (signal to noise ratio) and for its spectroscopic study as well. Since several concepts have been devised for Achromatic Phase Shifting, it is important to consider them before selecting the appropriate device in the framework of a nulling interferometry project. Some of them are an extension of concepts already used in optical instrumentation, some others have been specifically devised for large bandwidth nulling missions. Others incidentally revealed applicable to the topic. In this paper we report on various types of APS's, found in the literature. We recall the general constraints to satisfy, the underlying principle, and the critical points pertaining to their use over large bandwidths in the infrared thermal domain for nulling interferometry. The topic is considered in the framework of a space mission since the constraints to meet are covering the ones encountered in ground-based nulling projects, at the exception of the thermal background. Basically two families of concepts are found in the literature : the ones

  3. Broadband Achromatic Phase Shifter for a Nulling Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Lyon, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    Nulling interferometry is a technique for imaging exoplanets in which light from the parent star is suppressed using destructive interference. Light from the star is divided into two beams and a phase shift of radians is introduced into one of the beams. When the beams are recombined, they destructively interfere to produce a deep null. For monochromatic light, this is implemented by introducing an optical path difference (OPD) between the two beams equal to lambda/2, where lambda is the wavelength of the light. For broadband light, however, a different phase shift will be introduced at each wavelength and the two beams will not effectively null when recombined. Various techniques have been devised to introduce an achromatic phase shift a phase shift that is uniform across a particular bandwidth. One popular technique is to use a series of dispersive elements to introduce a wavelength-dependent optical path in one or both of the arms of the interferometer. By intelligently choosing the number, material and thickness of a series of glass plates, a nearly uniform, arbitrary phase shift can be introduced between two arms of an interferometer. There are several constraints that make choosing the number, type, and thickness of materials a difficult problem, such as the size of the bandwidth to be nulled. Several solutions have been found for bandwidths on the order of 20 to 30 percent (Delta(lambda)/lambda(sub c)) in the mid-infrared region. However, uniform phase shifts over a larger bandwidth in the visible regime between 480 to 960 nm (67 percent) remain difficult to obtain at the tolerances necessary for exoplanet detection. A configuration of 10 dispersive glass plates was developed to be used as an achromatic phase shifter in nulling interferometry. Five glass plates were placed in each arm of the interferometer and an additional vacuum distance was also included in the second arm of the interferometer. This configuration creates a phase shift of pi radians with

  4. Experimental evaluation of achromatic phase shifters for mid-infrared starlight suppression.

    PubMed

    Gappinger, Robert O; Diaz, Rosemary T; Ksendzov, Alexander; Lawson, Peter R; Lay, Oliver P; Liewer, Kurt M; Loya, Frank M; Martin, Stefan R; Serabyn, Eugene; Wallace, James K

    2009-02-10

    Phase shifters are a key component of nulling interferometry, one of the potential routes to enabling the measurement of faint exoplanet spectra. Here, three different achromatic phase shifters are evaluated experimentally in the mid-infrared, where such nulling interferometers may someday operate. The methods evaluated include the use of dispersive glasses, a through-focus field inversion, and field reversals on reflection from antisymmetric flat-mirror periscopes. All three approaches yielded deep, broadband, mid-infrared nulls, but the deepest broadband nulls were obtained with the periscope architecture. In the periscope system, average null depths of 4x10(-5) were obtained with a 25% bandwidth, and 2x10(-5) with a 20% bandwidth, at a central wavelength of 9.5 mum. The best short term nulls at 20% bandwidth were approximately 9x10(-6), in line with error budget predictions and the limits of the current generation of hardware. PMID:19209197

  5. Tests of achromatic phase shifters performed on the SYNAPSE test bench: a progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabor, Pavel; Schuller, Peter A.; Chazelas, Bruno; Decaudin, Michel; Labèque, Alain; Duret, Philippe; Rabbia, Yves; Launhardt, Ralf; Gay, Jean; Sodnik, Zoran; Barillot, Marc; Brachet, Frank; Laurent, Thomas; Jacquinod, Sophie; Vandormael, Denis; Loicq, Jérôme; Mawet, Dimitri; Ollivier, Marc; Léger, Alain

    2008-07-01

    The achromatic phase shifter (APS) is a component of the Bracewell nulling interferometer studied in preparation for future space missions (viz. Darwin/TPF-I) focusing on spectroscopic study of Earth-like exo-planets. Several possible designs of such an optical subsystem exist. Four approaches were selected for further study. Thales Alenia Space developed a dielectric prism APS. A focus crossing APS prototype was developed by the OCA, Nice, France. A field reversal APS prototype was prepared by the MPIA in Heidelberg, Germany. Centre Spatial de Liege develops a concept based on Fresnel's rhombs. This paper presents a progress report on the current work aiming at evaluating these prototypes on the Synapse test bench at the Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale in Orsay, France.

  6. The achromatic chessboard, a new concept of a phase shifter for nulling interferometry. V. Experimental demonstration and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickel, D.; Pelat, D.; Rouan, D.; Reess, J.-M.; Chemla, F.; Cohen, M.; Dupuis, O.

    2013-10-01

    Context. To find evidence one day of life on extra solar planets, one will have to directly detect photons of the exoplanet to obtain spectra and to look for specific spectroscopic features. One possible technique is dark fringe interferometry with several telescopes in space. This type of interferometry requires an achromatic π phase shift in one arm of an interferometer. We have already presented a concept of a quasi-achromatic phase shifter that is made of two cellular mirrors in which each cell position and phase shift is specific, so that the behavior of the null depth as a function of the wavelength is flat within a broad range. Aims: We want to experimentally validate this concept of an achromatic phase shifter and measure its performance in two different cases: a transmissive mask, which is made in bulk optics that are machined with ion etching and a reflective one, which is made by using a commercial segmented deformable mirror that is properly controlled. Methods: We assembled a dedicated optical bench, nicknamed DAMNED, to assess the concept and characterize its performance in the visible and to determine the limitations of this phase shifter. We analyze its performance by comparing the experimental results with a numerical instrument model. Results: We tested several transmissive masks and a reflective one. We reached an attenuation of about 2 × 10-3 with a white source (Δλ = 430 to 830 nm) that proved to be the actual achromatic behavior of the phase shifter, despite its modest value. Extrapolated to mid-IR, its performance would be within typical specifications of a space mission as Darwin.

  7. High power phase shifter

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, B.; Gonin, I.; Khabiboulline, T.; Makarov, A.; Solyak, N.; Terechkine, I.; Wildman, D.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    One of the approaches to power distribution system of a superconducting proton linac under discussion at FNAL requires development of a fast-action, megawatt-range phase shifter. Using a couple of this kind of devices with a waveguide hybrid junction can allow independent control of phase and amplitude of RF power at the input of each superconducting cavity, which will result in significant saving in number of klystrons and modulators required for the accelerator. A prototype of a waveguide version of the shifter that uses Yttrium-Iron Garnet (YIG) blocks was developed and tested. This report presents design concept of the device, and main results of simulation and proof-of-principle tests.

  8. Digitally controlled distributed phase shifter

    SciTech Connect

    Hietala, V.M.; Kravitz, S.H.; Vawter, G.A.

    1992-12-31

    A digitally controlled distributed phase shifter is comprised of N phase shifters. Digital control is achieved by using N binary length-weighted electrodes located on the top surface of a waveguide. A control terminal is attached to each electrode thereby allowing the application of a control signal. The control signal is either one of two discrete bias voltages. The application of the discrete bias voltages change the modal index of a portion of the waveguide that corresponds to a length of the electrode to which the bias voltage is applied, thereby causing the phase to change through the underlying portion of the waveguide. The digitally controlled distributed phase shift network has a total phase shift comprised of the sum of the individual phase shifters.

  9. A Truncated Waveguide Phase Shifter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lourie, Nathan P.; Chuss, D. T.; Henry, R.; Wollack, E. J.

    2011-01-01

    The design, fabrication and performance of a simple phase shifter based upon truncated circular and square waveguides is presented. An emphasis is placed upon validation of simple analytical formulae that describe the propagation properties of the structure. A test device is prototyped at approximately 40GHz; however, the concepts explored can be directly extended to millimeter and submillimeter applications.

  10. Phase shifter for antenna beam steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindal, Ravi; Razban, Tchanguiz

    2016-03-01

    Wide band Array Antenna operates in Ku-band (10.7-12.7 GHz) frequency composed of N×N radiating elements. This antenna aims at the reception of television satellite signals. The goal of this research is to provide better possibility of electronic beam control instead of manual or mechanical control, and design compact and low cost phase shifters to be inserted in the feeding network of this antenna. The electronic control of the phase shifter will allow the control of beam steering. The emphasis of this project will be done at the beginning on the design of a good phase shifter in Ku band. The aim of this research is to define, simulate, release and measure a continuous phase shifter. Better reflection loss, low transmission loss, low Cost of array antennas, large range of phase-shifter, phase flatness and bandwidth will be achieved by providing better gain.

  11. Light-driven phase shifter

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.

    1990-01-01

    A light-driven phase shifter is provided for modulating a transmission light beam. A gaseous medium such as argon is provided with electron energy states excited to populate a metastable state. A tunable dye laser is selected with a wavelength effective to deplete the metastable electron state and may be intensity modulated. The dye laser is directed through the gaseous medium to define a first optical path having an index of refraction determined by the gaseous medium having a depleted metastable electron state. A transmission laser beam is also directed through the gaseous medium to define a second optical path at least partially coincident with the first optical path. The intensity of the dye laser beam may then be varied to phase modulate the transmission laser beam.

  12. Array Phase Shifters: Theory and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2007-01-01

    While there are a myriad of applications for microwave phase shifters in instrumentation and metrology, power combining, amplifier linearization, and so on, the most prevalent use is in scanning phased-array antennas. And while this market continues to be dominated by military radar and tracking platforms, many commercial applications have emerged in the past decade or so. These new and potential applications span low-Earth-orbit (LEO) communications satellite constellations and collision warning radar, an aspect of the Intelligent Vehicle Highway System or Automated Highway System. In any case, the phase shifters represent a considerable portion of the overall antenna cost, with some estimates approaching 40 percent for receive arrays. Ferrite phase shifters continue to be the workhorse in military-phased arrays, and while there have been advances in thin film ferrite devices, the review of this device technology in the previous edition of this book is still highly relevant. This chapter will focus on three types of phase shifters that have matured in the past decade: GaAs MESFET monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC), micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS), and thin film ferroelectric-based devices. A brief review of some novel devices including thin film ferrite phase shifters and superconducting switches for phase shifter applications will be provided. Finally, the effects of modulo 2 phase shift limitations, phase errors, and transient response on bit error rate degradation will be considered.

  13. Low distortion automatic phase control circuit. [voltage controlled phase shifter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauge, G.; Pederson, C. W. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A voltage controlled phase shifter is rendered substantially harmonic distortion free over a large dynamic input range by employing two oppositely poled, equally biased varactor diodes as the voltage controlled elements which adjust the phase shift. Control voltages which affect the bias of both diodes equally are used to adjust the phase shift without increasing distortion. A feedback stabilized phase shifter is rendered substantially frequency independent by employing a phase detector to control the phase shift of the voltage controlled phase shifter.

  14. High-Tc superconducting monolithic phase shifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemoto-Kobayashi, June H.; Jackson, Charles M.; Pettiette-Hall, Claire L.; Burch, John F.

    1992-03-01

    A high temperature superconducting (HTS) X-band phase shifter using a distributed Josephson inductance (DJI) approach was designed and fabricated. Phase swings of over 60 deg were measured at 65 K and below, with measurable phase shifts at temperatures above 77 K. High quality HTS films and superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) were deposited by laser ablation. A total of 40 HTS step edge SQUIDs were successfully integrated into a monolithic HTS circuit to produce a phase shifter in a resonant configuration. The magnitude of the Josephson inductance is calculated and a lumped element model is compared to measurements.

  15. Continuously variable voltage-controlled phase shifter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, C. E.

    1970-01-01

    Phase shifter circuit adjusts the phase relationship between a locally generated reference frequency and a received RF signal applied to a phase-coherent detector. It is small enough to be integrated into a receiver subassembly and operates on command from remote control panels.

  16. A Model for Ferroelectric Phase Shifters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.; Qureshi, A. Haq

    2000-01-01

    Novel microwave phase shifters consisting of coupled microstrip lines on thin ferroelectric films have been demonstrated recently. A theoretical model useful for predicting the propagation characteristics (insertion phase shift, dielectric loss, impedance, and bandwidth) is presented here. The model is based on a variational solution for line capacitance and coupled strip transmission line theory.

  17. A 30-GHz Hexagonal Ferrite Phase Shifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, A. S.; Slavin, A. N.; Mantese, J. V.

    2005-03-01

    Highly-anisotropic hexaferrites, such as barium ferrite BaFe12O19 (BFO), are ideal for millimeter wave phase shifters due to a large ferromagnetic resonance frequency at low magnetic bias field H. It enables one to make millimeter-wave devices with compact magnetic systems. Here we discuss the design, fabrication and characterization of a BFO phase shifter. A microstrip line deposited on a ferrite substrate supports the propagation of electromagnetic wave, leading to a phase shift kb, where k is the wave number and b is the length of the microstrip line. As k is a function of the bias H, we obtain a differential phase shift with a change of H. A phase shifter consisting of a single crystal (7 x 7 x 0.5 mm^3) BFO and a 500 μm wide stripline was evaluated at 30 GHz. A differential phase shift of 30 deg. was measured for H=1.2 kOe. The measured value of the insertion loss was about 10 dB. -Work supported by a grant from the Delphi Automotive Corporation.

  18. shifter

    2015-06-01

    Shifter enables application virtualization or containerization in large-scale HPC environments. This technology decreases the effort to port applications to or between HPC sites while increasing reproducibility and scientific productivity. Shifter works by converting application/container images to a common format, and then leverages basic Linux functionality to make that image available to batch jobs run in the HPC environment.

  19. Enhancing FEL Power with Phase Shifters

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, Daniel; Chao, Alex; Huang, Zhirong; /SLAC

    2010-07-30

    Tapering the undulator parameter is a well-known method for maintaining the resonant condition past saturation, and increasing Free Electron Laser (FEL) efficiency. In this paper, we demonstrate that shifting the electron bunch phase relative to the radiation is equivalent to tapering the undulator parameter. Using discrete phase changes derived from optimized undulator tapers for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray FEL, we show that appropriate phase shifts between undulator sections can reproduce the power enhancement of undulator tapers. Phase shifters are relatively easy to implement and operate, and could be used to aid or replace undulator tapers in optimizing FEL performance.

  20. Nanoscale spin wave valve and phase shifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au, Y.; Dvornik, M.; Dmytriiev, O.; Kruglyak, V. V.

    2012-04-01

    We have used micromagnetic simulations to demonstrate a method for controlling the amplitude and phase of spin waves propagating inside a magnonic waveguide. The method employs a nanomagnet formed on top of a magnonic waveguide. The function of the proposed device is controlled by defining the static magnetization direction of the nanomagnet. The result is a valve or phase shifter for spin waves, acting as the carrier of information for computation or data processing within the emerging spin wave logic architectures of magnonics. The proposed concept offers such technically important benefits as energy efficiency, non-volatility, and miniaturization.

  1. Nonlinear multiferroic phase shifters for microwave frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Ustinov, Alexey B.; Kalinikos, Boris A.; Srinivasan, G.

    2014-02-03

    A nonlinear microwave phase shifter based on a planar multiferroic composite has been studied. The multiferroic structure is fabricated in the form of a bilayer consisting of yttrium iron garnet and barium strontium titanate. The principle of operation of the device is based on the linear and nonlinear control of the phase shift of the hybrid spin-electromagnetic waves propagating in the bilayer. The linear control is realized with magnetic and electric fields. The nonlinear control is provided by the input power of microwave signal. The device showed a nonlinear phase shift up to 250°, electric field induced phase shift up to 330°, and magnetic field induced phase shift of more than 180°.

  2. Liquid crystal phase shifters for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woehrle, Christopher D.

    Space communication satellites have historically relied heavily on high gain gimbal dish antennas for performing communications. Reflector dish antennas lack flexibility in anti-jamming capabilities, and they tend to have a high risk associated to them given the need for mechanical mechanisms to beam steer. In recent years, a great amount of investment has been made into phased array antenna technologies. Phased arrays offer increased signal flexibility at reduced financial cost and in system risk. The problem with traditional phased arrays is the significant program cost and overall complexity added to the satellite by integrating antenna elements that require many dedicated components to properly perform adaptive beam steering. Several unique methods have been proposed to address the issues that plague traditional phase shifters slated for space applications. Proposed approaches range from complex mechanical switches (MEMS) and ferroelectric devices to more robust molecular changes. Nematic liquid crystals offer adaptive beam steering capabilities that traditional phased arrays have; however, with the added benefit of reduced system cost, complexity, and increased resilience to space environmental factors. The objective of the work presented is to investigate the feasibility of using nematic liquid crystals as a means of phase shifting individual phased array elements slated for space applications. Significant attention is paid to the survivability and performance of liquid crystal and associated materials in the space environment. Performance regarding thermal extremes and interactions with charged particles are the primary factors addressed.

  3. Achromatic phase retarder applied to MWIR & LWIR dual-band.

    PubMed

    Kang, Guoguo; Tan, Qiaofeng; Wang, Xiaoling; Jin, Guofan

    2010-01-18

    The development of the dual-band IR imaging polarimetry creates the need for achromatic phase retarder used in dual-band. Dielectric grating with the period smaller than the illuminating wavelength presents a strong form-birefringence. With this feature, the combination of several subwavelength gratings can be used as achromatic phase retarders. We proposed a combination of 4 subwavelength structured gratings (SWGs) used as an achromatic quarter-wave plate (QWP) applied to MWIR & LWIR bandwidths. Design method using effective medium theory and optimization algorithms is described in detail. The simulation results led to the possibility of an dual-band achromatic QWP whose retardance deviates from 90 degrees by <+/-0.75 degrees with the fast axis unfixed and by <+/-1.35 degrees with the fast axis fixed over MWIR(3-5microm) & LWIR(8-12microm) bandwiths. PMID:20173997

  4. Soliton-guided phase shifter and beam splitter

    SciTech Connect

    Steiglitz, Ken

    2010-03-15

    We propose, analyze, and study numerically a phase shifter for light wave packets trapped by Kerr solitons in a nonlinear medium. We also study numerically a previously proposed soliton-guided nonpolarizing beam splitter.

  5. 22. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #201, phase shifter service ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #201, phase shifter service platform (level two) - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  6. 36. Perimeter acquisition radar building, phase shifter service platform; level ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. Perimeter acquisition radar building, phase shifter service platform; level three - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  7. A Ka-band GaAs monolithic phase shifter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolov, V.; Geddes, J. J.; Contolatis, A.; Bauhahn, P. E.; Chao, C.

    1983-01-01

    The design and performance of a GaAs monolithic 180-degree one-bit switched line phase shifter test circuit for Ka-band operation is presented. A self-aligned gate (SAG) fabrication technique is also described that reduces resistive parasitics in the switching FET's. Over the 27.5-30 GHz band, typical measured differential insertion phase is within 10-20 deg of the ideal time delay characteristic. Over the same band, the insertion loss for the SAG phase shifter is about 2.5-3 dB per bit. The SAG fabrication technique holds promise in reducing phase shifter insertion loss to about 1.5 dB/bit for 30-GHz operation.

  8. Analysis and Optimization of Thin Film Ferroelectric Phase Shifters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.; VanKeuls, Fred W.; Warner, Joseph D.; Mueller, Carl H.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Miranda, Felix A.; Qureshi, A. Haq; Romanofsky, Robert R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Microwave phase shifters have been fabricated from (YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) or Au)/SrTiO3 and Au/Ba(x)Sr(1-x)TiO3 films on LaAlO3 and MgO substrates. These coupled microstrip devices rival the performance of their semiconductor counter-parts parts at Ku- and K-band frequencies. Typical insertion loss for room temperature ferroelectric phase shifters at K-band is approximately equal 5 dB. An experimental and theoretical investigation of these novel devices explains the role of the ferroelectric film in overall device performance. A roadmap to the development of a 3 dB insertion loss phase shifter that would enable a new type of phased array antenna is discussed.

  9. Silicon graphene waveguide tunable broadband microwave photonics phase shifter.

    PubMed

    Capmany, José; Domenech, David; Muñoz, Pascual

    2014-04-01

    We propose the use of silicon graphene waveguides to implement a tunable broadband microwave photonics phase shifter based on integrated ring cavities. Numerical computation results show the feasibility for broadband operation over 40 GHz bandwidth and full 360° radiofrequency phase-shift with a modest voltage excursion of 0.12 volt. PMID:24718185

  10. High power l-band fast phase shifter

    SciTech Connect

    Terechkine, I.; Khabiboulline, T.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    Following successful testing of a concept prototype of a waveguide-based high power phase shifter, a design of a fast, high power device has been developed. The shifter uses two magnetically biased blocks of Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) positioned along the side walls of a rectangular waveguide. The cross-section of the waveguide is chosen to suppress unwanted RF modes that could otherwise compromise performance of the phase shifter. Static bias field in the YIG blocks is created by employing permanent magnets. Low inductance coils in the same magnetic circuit excite fast component of the bias field. Design of the device ensures effective heat extraction from the YIG blocks and penetration of the fast magnetic field inside the waveguide with minimum delay. This paper summarizes main steps in this development and gives brief description of the system.

  11. 37. Perimeter acquisition radar building, phase shifter service platform, level ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. Perimeter acquisition radar building, phase shifter service platform, level three; This shows the coaxial switches and transmitter output assembly (located only on this level) - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  12. Interference Confocal Microscope Integrated with Spatial Phase Shifter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weibo; Gu, Kang; You, Xiaoyu; Tan, Jiubin; Liu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    We present an interference confocal microscope (ICM) with a new single-body four-step simultaneous phase-shifter device designed to obtain high immunity to vibration. The proposed ICM combines the respective advantages of simultaneous phase shifting interferometry and bipolar differential confocal microscopy to obtain high axis resolution, large dynamic range, and reduce the sensitivity to vibration and reflectance disturbance seamlessly. A compact single body spatial phase shifter is added to capture four phase-shifted interference signals simultaneously without time delay and construct a stable and space-saving simplified interference confocal microscope system. The test result can be obtained by combining the interference phase response and the bipolar property of differential confocal microscopy without phase unwrapping. Experiments prove that the proposed microscope is capable of providing stable measurements with 1 nm of axial depth resolution for either low- or high-numerical aperture objective lenses. PMID:27563909

  13. Achromatic phase shifts utilizing dielectric plates for nulling interferometery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, R. M.; Burge, J. M.

    1998-12-01

    Schemes for detecting planets around other stars using interferometery have been developed which rely on a half wave phase delay to shift the central constructive fringe of an interferometer to a deep, destructive null fringe. To achieve the sensitivity and spectroscopy desired for exo-planets observations, such a null must be achromatic over a broad spectral region. One method for creating such a half wave phase delay achromatically involves the use of pairs of dielectric, plane parallel plates, analogous to the use of two types of glass in an achromatic lens. An analysis of the technique is presented with solutions using single plates to achieve null fringes to a cancellation of 10 exp -4 in the visible, near infrared, and mid infrared for null. Solutions using two matched materials show that nulls to a depth of 10 exp -6 are achievable in 2 um bands in the 7-17 um regime, or to a depth of 10 exp -5 over the entire 7-17 um band. Experimental results using a single plate of BK7 in the visible spectrum verify the technique.

  14. LTCC Phase Shifters Based on Tunable Ferroelectric Composite Thick Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikfalazar, M.; Kohler, C.; Heunisch, A.; Wiens, A.; Zheng, Y.; Schulz, B.; Mikolajek, M.; Sohrabi, M.; Rabe, T.; Binder, J. R.; Jakoby, R.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents, the investigation of tunable components based on LTCC technology, implementing ferroelectric tunable thick-film dielectric. The tunable loaded line phase shifters are fabricated with metal-insulator-metal (MIM) varactors to demonstrate the capabilities of this method for packaging of the tunable components. The MIM varactors consist of one tunable dielectric paste layer that is printed between two silver layers. The tunable ferroelectric paste is optimized for LTCC sintering temperature around 850°C. The phase shifters are fabricated in two different process. They were achieved a figure of merit of 24°/dB (phase shift 192°) at 3 GHz and 18°/dB (phase shift 98°) at 4.4 GHz by using seven unit cells that each unit cell consisting of two MIM varactors.

  15. Achromatic phase matching at third orders of dispersion

    DOEpatents

    Richman, Bruce

    2003-10-21

    Achromatic phase-matching (APM) is used for efficiently multiplying the frequency of broad bandwidth light by using a nonlinear optical medium comprising a second-harmonic generation (SHG) crystal and stationary optical elements whose configuration, properties, and arrangement have been optimized to match the angular dispersion characteristics of the SHG crystal to at least the third order. These elements include prisms and diffraction gratings for directing an input light beam onto the SHG crystal such that each ray wavelength is aligned to match the phase-matching angle for the crystal at each wavelength of light to at least the third order and such that every ray wavelength overlap within the crystal.

  16. Innovative phase shifter for pulse tube operating below 10 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duval, Jean-Marc; Charles, Ivan; Daniel, Christophe; André, Jérôme

    2016-09-01

    Stirling type pulse tubes are classically based on the use of an inertance phase shifter to optimize their cooling power. The limitations of the phase shifting capabilities of these inertances have been pointed out in various studies. These limitations are particularly critical for low temperature operation, typically below about 50 K. An innovative phase shifter using an inertance tube filled with liquid, or fluid with high density or low viscosity, and separated by a sealed metallic diaphragm has been conceived and tested. This device has been characterized and validated on a dedicated test bench. Operation on a 50-80 K pulse tube cooler and on a low temperature (below 8 K) pulse tube cooler have been demonstrated and have validated the device in operation. These developments open the door for efficient and compact low temperature Stirling type pulse tube coolers. The possibility of long life operation has been experimentally verified and a design for space applications is proposed.

  17. Investigation of an electronically tuned 100 GHz superconducting phase shifter

    SciTech Connect

    Tvack, E.K.; Shen, Z.Y.; Dang, H.; Radparvar, M.; Faris, S.M. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation aimed at realizing a tunable superconducting mm-wave phase shifter. The tuning mechanism is based on inductance modulation of NbN microstrips by excess quasiparticle injection. When measured by a dc method, using the interference patterns and resonances of specially designed dc SQUIDs, the inductance of NbN microstrips can be varied by up to 300%. Based on these results, we have designed and fabricated superconducting microstrip interferometers to operate as low power 100 GHz phase shifters. The 100 GHZ signal is coupled into and out of the interferometers by finline antennas. Amplitude modulation of the output is used as the criterion for phase shift in one of the interferometer branches.

  18. Constant-amplitude, frequency- independent phase shifter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deboo, G. J.

    1971-01-01

    Electronic circuit using operational amplifiers provides output with constant phase shift amplitude, with respect to sinusoidal input, over wide range of frequencies. New circuit includes field effect transistor, Q, operational amplifiers, A1 and A2, and phase detector.

  19. Phase shifts and wave-packet displacements in neutron interferometry and a nondispersive, nondefocusing phase shifter

    SciTech Connect

    Lemmel, Hartmut; Wagh, Apoorva G.

    2010-09-15

    A phase shifter in neutron interferometry creates not only a phase shift but also a spatial displacement of the neutron wave packet, leading to a reduced interference contrast. This wave-packet displacement constitutes a major hindrance in measuring large phase shifts. Here we present a nondispersive configuration with two identical phase shifters placed on one path in successive gaps of a symmetric triple Laue (LLL) interferometer. As compared to a single phase shifter, the dual phase shifter generates double the phase shift, yet a net null displacement of the wave packet. The interferometer thus remains fully focused however large the phase shift or the incident wavelength spread, permitting a white incident neutron beam as in the case of a purely topological phase measurement. Misalignment angles of a monolithic nondispersive dual phase shifter are equal and opposite in the two gaps. Its phase therefore remains nondispersive over a much wider angular range and attains a minimum magnitude at the correct orientation, obviating the need to alternate the phase shifter between the two interferometer paths during its alignment. The setup is hence ideally suited for measuring neutron coherent scattering lengths to ultrahigh precision.

  20. Light controlled phase shifter for optofluidics.

    PubMed

    Lucchetti, L; Kushnir, K; Zaltron, A; Simoni, F

    2016-01-15

    We report the light-induced control of optical phase shift by a liquid crystal cell made with LiNbO3:Fe crystals as substrates. We show that a phase shift of a few πs can be easily reached for two orthogonal polarizations due to liquid crystal reorientation driven by the photovoltaic electric field originated in the substrates. This effect is exploited to get all-optical switching with a contrast of about 80%, by 2 s pump pulse. PMID:26766707

  1. Monolithic HTS microwave phase shifter and other devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Charles M.; Kobayashi, June H.; Guillory, Emery B.; Pettiette-Hall, Claire; Burch, John F.

    1992-08-01

    We describe a monolithic high-temperature superconductor (HTS) phase shifter based on the distributed Josephson inductance (DJI) design integrated monolithically into a 10-GHz microstrip line. This microwave circuit incorporates greater than 1000 HTS RF SQUIDS. Recent data demonstrate the performance of this broadband HTS circuit. We observed phase shifts greater than 150 deg in resonant structures, and 20 deg in broadband circuits. The nonlinear inductance of the superconducting transmission line can be used for other novel applications, including parametric amplification. A comparison of the DJI circuit to a series array of Josephson elements (used for pulse sharpening) will contrast these two new and exciting nonlinear transmission line circuits.

  2. RF MEMS Phase Shifters and their Application in Phase Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian; Ponchak, George E.; Zaman, Afroz J.; Lee, Richard Q.

    2005-01-01

    Electronically scanned arrays are required for space based radars that are capable of tracking multiple robots, rovers, or other assets simultaneously and for beam-hopping communication systems between the various assets. ^Traditionally, these phased array antennas used GaAs Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) phase shifters, power amplifiers, and low noise amplifiers to amplify and steer the beam, but the development of RF MEMS switches over the past ten years has enabled system designers to consider replacing the GaAs MMIC phase shifters with RF Micro-Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) phase shifters. In this paper, the implication of replacing the relatively high loss GaAs MMICs with low loss MEMS phase shifters is investigated.

  3. A compact frequency tunable radio frequency phase shifter with patterned Py enabled transmission line

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, B.M. Farid; Divan, Ralu; Rosenmann, Daniel; Wang, Tengxing; Peng, Yujia; Wang, Guoan

    2015-01-01

    A well designed frequency tunable phase shifter using patterned Py with different thickness has been demonstrated. Phase shifter is implemented with a slow wave coplanar wave guide (CPW)transmission line, where the signal line has alternate short narrow and wide sections. Py is patterned on the top of narrow section for high inductance density, and inter-digital capacitor is implemented in wide section for high capacitance density. Compared with phase shifter using regular CPW, the dimension of the developed phase shifter has been reduced from 14.86 mm to4.70 mm at 2 GHz. Phase shifter based on 100 nm and 200 nm thick patterned Py with the same dimensions (14lm10lm) are implemented and investigated comprehensively. FMR frequency of 3.2 GHz and 3.6 GHz without any external magnetic field has been achieved for100 nm and 200 nm thick Py film, respectively. Thicker Py has increased inductance density from 1067.2 nH/m to 1193.2 nH/m while the center frequency of the phase shifter has been shifted to 1.80 GHz. Frequency tunability of the phase shifter has been also demonstrated withDC current. The phase shifter can provide 90phase shift continuously from 2 GHz to 1.80 GHz with DC current from 0 mA to 150 mA. The design concept has great potential in design arbitrary tunable RF components such as filters and couplers.

  4. Millimetre-wave ferrite-loaded laminated waveguide phase shifters embedded in low temperature cofired ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Joey R.

    Phased array antennas, capable of forming multiple agile beams of radiation, are ever-increasing operating frequencies. Systems operating at being deployed at frequencies of 30 GHz and above, a range known as millimetre-waves, include military radar, commercial collision-avoidance radar, inter-satellite communication links, and future wideband mobile internet satellite communications services. Millimetre-wave phase shifters, the topic of this thesis, are key components of many phased array antennas. A phase shifter refers to any device that can dynamically alter the phase, or the timing, of a signal. Although a number of concurrent millimetre-wave phase shifter designs presently exist, none simultaneously satisfies all of the desired requirements, including: light weight, small size, low cost, and good electrical performance. Phase shifters may be broadly categorised based on the material they use, either semiconductor or ferrite. Semiconductor shifters satisfy the former two requirements but suffer from high electrical losses. Conversely, traditional ferrite phase shifters have excellent electrical performance but are bulky and difficult to integrate with other components. Given the superior electrical performance of ferrite phase shifters, a more compact means of fabricating these is proposed in this thesis. In addition, new types of ferrite phase shifters are devised, and these are subsequently made from a chip-packaging technology called low temperature cofired ceramic. The resulting phase shifters are easily fabricated, are simple to interconnect to other integrated circuits, are more compact and lightweight than their predecessors, and have excellent electrical performance at millimetre-wave frequencies. Prototype phase shifters have been successfully manufactured using an experimental ferrite ceramic material and have yielded a maximum phase shift of 53° at 36 GHz for bias currents of -500 to +500 mA. Phased array antennas, capable of forming multiple agile

  5. Magnonic crystals-based tunable microwave phase shifters

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.; Chi, K. H.; Tsai, C. S.

    2014-07-14

    Tunable microwave phase shifters using magnetostatic backward volume waves in yttrium iron garnet/gadolinium gallium garnet thin film-based one-dimensional (1-D) and two-dimensional (2-D) magnonic crystals (MCs) are reported in this paper. Large differential phase shifts with small insertion loss variations were achieved in the passbands neighboring the bandgaps by tuning of the bias magnetic field. Large phase tuning rates up to 13.48 °/(Oe cm) and 25.9 °/(Oe cm) together with small insertion loss variations of 2.08 dB/cm and 0.97 dB/cm were demonstrated in the 1-D and 2-D MCs, respectively. An excellent agreement between the measured and the calculated results based on Walker's equation was obtained.

  6. Monolithic HTS microwave phase shifter and other devices

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, C.M.; Kobayashi, J.H.; Guillory, E.B.; Pettiette-Hall, C.; Burch, J.F. )

    1992-08-01

    We describe a monolithic high-temperature superconductor (HTS) phase shifter based on the distributed Josephson inductance (DJI) design integrated monolithically into a 10-GHz microstrip line. This microwave circuit incorporates >1000 HTS rf SQUIDS. Recent data demonstrate the performance of this broadband HTS circuit. We observed phase shifts greater than 150[degrees] in resonant structures, and 20[degrees] in broadband circuits. The nonlinear inductance of the superconducting transmission line can be used for other novel applications, including parametric amplification. A comparison of the DJI circuit to a series array of Josephson elements (used for pulse sharpening) will contrast these two new and exciting nonlinear transmission line circuits. 19 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Superconducting Coplanar Switch and Phase Shifter for CMB Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordier, G.; Cammilleri, V. D.; Belier, B.; Bleurvacq, N.; Gadot, F.; Ghribi, A.; Piat, M.; Tartari, A.; Zanonni, M.

    2016-08-01

    The next generations of cosmic microwave background (CMB) instruments will be dedicated to the detection and characterization of CMB B-modes. To measure this tiny signal, instruments need to control and minimize systematics. Signal modulation is one way to achieve such a control. A new generation of focal planes will include the entire detection chain. In this context, we present a superconducting coplanar switch driven by DC current. It consists of a superconducting microbridge which commutes between its on (superconducting) and off (normal metal) states, depending on the amplitude of the injected current compared to the critical current. If the current injected inside the bridge is lower than the critical current, the phase of the signal passing through the bridge is tunable. A first prototype of this component working as a switch and as a phase shifter at 10 GHz has been made. The principle, the setup, and the first measurements made at 4 K will be shown.

  8. Ka-Band, MEMS Switched Line Phase Shifters Implemented in Finite Ground Coplanar Waveguide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Ponchak, George E.; Varaljay, Nicholas C.

    2005-01-01

    Ka-band MEMS switched line phase shifters implemented in finite ground coplanar waveguide are described in this paper. The phase shifters are constructed of single-pole double-throw (SPDT) switches with additional reference and phase offset transmission line lengths. The one- and two-bit phase shifters are fabricated on high resistivity (HR) silicon with a dielectric constant, Epsilon(sub T) = 11.7 and a substrate thickness, t = 500microns. The switching architectures integrated within the phase shifters consist of MEMS switches that are doubly anchored cantilever beam capacitive switches with additional high inductive sections (MEMS LC device). The SPDT switch is composed of a T-junction with a MEMS LC device at each output port. The one-bit phase shifter described in this paper has an insertion loss (IL) and return loss (RL) of 0.9 dB and 30 dB while the two-bit described has an IL and RL of 1.8 dB and 30 dB respectively. The one-bit phase shifter's designed offset phase is 22.5deg and actual measured phase shift is 21.8deg. The two-bit phase shifter's designed offset phase is 22.5deg, 45deg, and 67.5deg and the actual measured phase shifts are 21.4deg, 44.2deg, and 65.8deg, respectively.

  9. Multispectral optical metasurfaces enabled by achromatic phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zeyu; Pu, Mingbo; Gao, Hui; Jin, Jinjin; Li, Xiong; Ma, Xiaoliang; Wang, Yanqin; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-10-01

    The independent control of electromagnetic waves with different oscillating frequencies is critical in the modern electromagnetic techniques, such as wireless communications and multispectral imaging. To obtain complete control of different light waves with optical materials, the chromatic dispersion should be carefully controlled, which is however extremely difficult. In this paper, we propose a method to control the behaviors of different light waves through a metasurface which is able to generate achromatic geometric phase. Using this approach, a doughnut-shaped and a solid light spot were achieved at the same focal plane using two light sources with different wavelengths as used in the stimulation emission depletion (STED) microscope system. In order to reveal the full capacity of such method, tight focusing at multiple wavelengths is also represented, where the focal spots of different wavelengths are located at the same position. The results provided here may open a new door to the design of subminiature optical components and integrated optical system operating at multiple wavelengths.

  10. Multispectral optical metasurfaces enabled by achromatic phase transition.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zeyu; Pu, Mingbo; Gao, Hui; Jin, Jinjin; Li, Xiong; Ma, Xiaoliang; Wang, Yanqin; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    The independent control of electromagnetic waves with different oscillating frequencies is critical in the modern electromagnetic techniques, such as wireless communications and multispectral imaging. To obtain complete control of different light waves with optical materials, the chromatic dispersion should be carefully controlled, which is however extremely difficult. In this paper, we propose a method to control the behaviors of different light waves through a metasurface which is able to generate achromatic geometric phase. Using this approach, a doughnut-shaped and a solid light spot were achieved at the same focal plane using two light sources with different wavelengths as used in the stimulation emission depletion (STED) microscope system. In order to reveal the full capacity of such method, tight focusing at multiple wavelengths is also represented, where the focal spots of different wavelengths are located at the same position. The results provided here may open a new door to the design of subminiature optical components and integrated optical system operating at multiple wavelengths. PMID:26503607

  11. Multispectral optical metasurfaces enabled by achromatic phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zeyu; Pu, Mingbo; Gao, Hui; Jin, Jinjin; Li, Xiong; Ma, Xiaoliang; Wang, Yanqin; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    The independent control of electromagnetic waves with different oscillating frequencies is critical in the modern electromagnetic techniques, such as wireless communications and multispectral imaging. To obtain complete control of different light waves with optical materials, the chromatic dispersion should be carefully controlled, which is however extremely difficult. In this paper, we propose a method to control the behaviors of different light waves through a metasurface which is able to generate achromatic geometric phase. Using this approach, a doughnut-shaped and a solid light spot were achieved at the same focal plane using two light sources with different wavelengths as used in the stimulation emission depletion (STED) microscope system. In order to reveal the full capacity of such method, tight focusing at multiple wavelengths is also represented, where the focal spots of different wavelengths are located at the same position. The results provided here may open a new door to the design of subminiature optical components and integrated optical system operating at multiple wavelengths. PMID:26503607

  12. Constant volume gas cell optical phase-shifter

    DOEpatents

    Phillion, Donald W.

    2002-01-01

    A constant volume gas cell optical phase-shifter, particularly applicable for phase-shifting interferometry, contains a sealed volume of atmospheric gas at a pressure somewhat different than atmospheric. An optical window is present at each end of the cell, and as the length of the cell is changed, the optical path length of a laser beam traversing the cell changes. The cell comprises movable coaxial tubes with seals and a volume equalizing opening. Because the cell is constant volume, the pressure, temperature, and density of the contained gas do not change as the cell changes length. This produces an exactly linear relationship between the change in the length of the gas cell and the change in optical phase of the laser beam traversing it. Because the refractive index difference between the gas inside and the atmosphere outside is very much the same, a large motion must be made to change the optical phase by the small fraction of a wavelength that is required by phase-shifting interferometry for its phase step. This motion can be made to great fractional accuracy.

  13. Microwave photonic phase shifter based on birefringence effects in a semiconductor optical amplifier.

    PubMed

    Chen, Han; Sun, Mingming; Ding, Yi; Sun, Xiaohan

    2013-09-01

    A continuously tunable microwave photonic (MWP) phase shifter based on birefringence effects in a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) is presented and the theoretical fundamentals of the design are explained. This proposed device provides a high efficiency phase-shift tuning range beyond 2π rad by controlling the SOA launch power. A prototype of the MWP phase shifter with a frequency of 10 GHz and 2π rad tuning range is experimentally demonstrated. PMID:23988932

  14. Advances in Scanning Reflectarray Antennas Based on Ferroelectric Thin Film Phase Shifters for Deep Space Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2007-01-01

    Though there are a few examples of scanning phased array antennas that have flown successfully in space, the quest for low-cost, high-efficiency, large aperture microwave phased arrays continues. Fixed and mobile applications that may be part of a heterogeneous exploration communication architecture will benefit from the agile (rapid) beam steering and graceful degradation afforded by phased array antennas. The reflectarray promises greater efficiency and economy compared to directly-radiating varieties. Implementing a practical scanning version has proven elusive. The ferroelectric reflectarray, under development and described herein, involves phase shifters based on coupled microstrip patterned on Ba(x)Sr(1-x)TiO3 films, that were laser ablated onto LaAlO3 substrates. These devices outperform their semiconductor counterparts from X- through and K-band frequencies. There are special issues associated with the implementation of a scanning reflectarray antenna, especially one realized with thin film ferroelectric phase shifters. This paper will discuss these issues which include: relevance of phase shifter loss; modulo 2(pi) effects and phase shifter transient effects on bit error rate; scattering from the ground plane; presentation of a novel hybrid ferroelectric-semiconductor phase shifter; and the effect of mild radiation exposure on phase shifter performance.

  15. A solid-state PWM phase-shifter. [Pulse Width Modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ooi, Boon Teck; Dai, Shu Zu; Galiana, F.D. )

    1993-04-01

    The solid-state, pulse width modulated (PWM) phase-shifter is based on gate-turn-off (GTO) thyristors or other valves with force commutation capabilities. Besides serving the phase-shifter function, it offers regulated control over 3 independent quantities: the real power passing through it and the VARs on both sides to which it is connected. The power transferred can be bidirectional and the VARs can be leading or lagging.

  16. Programmable RF photonic phase shifters based on FD-OP for optically controlled beamforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yongfeng; Huang, Shanguo; Gao, Xinlu; Gao, Chao; Wang, Qian; Gu, Wanyi

    2015-08-01

    Programmable RF photonic phase shifter that can achieve a full 360° phase shift with little RF signal amplitude variation and low phase noise (PN) is presented. It is based on a two-dimensional (2D) Fourier-domain optical processor (FD-OP) which comprises an array liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) pixels to control the amplitude and phase of the spectral components by programming. It can realize multiple photonic RF phase shifters simultaneously applied in optical controlled phased array antennas. Experimental results show the RF phase shifter can achieve a continuous 0-360° phase shift with low amplitude variation of <2.5 dB and a phase deviation of <2° at 15 GHz.

  17. The application of taylor weighting, digital phase shifters, and digital attenuators to phased-array antennas.

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, Billy C.

    2008-03-01

    Application of Taylor weighting (taper) to an antenna aperture can achieve low peak sidelobes, but combining the Taylor weighting with quantized attenuators and phase shifters at each radiating element will impact the performance of a phased-array antenna. An examination of array performance is undertaken from the simple point of view of the characteristics of the array factor. Design rules and guidelines for determining the Taylor-weighting parameters, the number of bits required for the digital phase shifter, and the dynamic range and number of bits required for the digital attenuator are developed. For a radar application, when each element is fed directly from a transmit/receive module, the total power radiated by the array will be reduced as a result of the taper. Consequently, the issue of whether to apply the taper on both transmit and receive configurations, or only on the receive configuration is examined with respect to two-way sidelobe performance.

  18. Novel circuit configurations to design loss balanced 0 to 360-deg digital phase shifters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarman, Binboga S.

    1991-03-01

    Four different circuit configurations are proposed for designing wide-range low-loss balanced phase shifters capable of phase shifting between 0 and 360 deg. The phase shifting properties of three-element low/highpass symmetrical ladder networks are employed in the proposed configurations. The circuits include three switching pin diodes suitable for monolithic implementation. A numerical procedure utilized for designing minimum-loss digital phase shifters in which the diode resistance and parasitics may be included among the design parameters is outlined. It is demonstrated that the circuit configurations can yield good phase tracking capabilities up to 20 pct bandwidth with reasonable losses.

  19. Coupled microstrip line microwave phase shifter using ferroelectric thin film varactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Su; Ong, C. K.

    2012-02-01

    This article presents a coupled microstrip line microwave phase shifter using ferroelectric thin film varactors with parallel plate electrodes integrated on high-resistivity silicon substrate. This design is proposed as a component in low-cost beam scanning phased array antennas. The phase shifter structure consists of coupled microstrip line periodically loaded with eight BaxSr1-xTiO3 (BST) varactors and two planar Marchand baluns. The planar Marchand baluns work as the transformers of odd mode excitation and a transmission stop circuit for even mode excitation as well as the impedance matching networks. A differential phase shift of 45° was obtained with a low dc bias of 20 V at frequency of 9 GHz, which corresponds to a figure of merit of ˜23°/dB. These results represent significant progress toward compact size, low loss, and ferroelectric thin film-based phase shifters at room temperature.

  20. Ka-band full-360° analog phase shifter with low insertion loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengyi, Cao; Yang, Lu; Jiaxing, Wei; Jiaxin, Zheng; Xiaohua, Ma; Yue, Hao

    2014-10-01

    A new reflection-type wideband 360° monolithic-microwave integrated-circuit (MMIC) analog phase shifter at the Ka-band is proposed. The phase shifter is designed based on the principle of vector synthesis. Three Lange couplers are employed in the phase shifter, which is fabricated by the standard 0.25-μm GaAs process. We use four 4 × 40 μm GaAs HEMTs as the reflection loads. A microstrip line in parallel with the device is used as an inductance to counteract the parasitic capacitance of the device so that the reflection load performs like a pure resistance and the insertion loss can be decreased. In this phase shifter, a folded Lange coupler is utilized to reduce the size of the chip. The size of the proposed MMIC phase shifter is only 2.0 × 1.2 mm2. The measurement results show that the insertion loss is 5.0 ± 0.8 dB and a 360° continuously tunable range across 27-32 GHz is obtained with miniscule DC power consumption.

  1. A compact, low-loss, tunable phase shifter on defect mitigated dielectrics up to 40 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orloff, Nathan; Long, Christian; Lu, Xifeng; Nair, Hari; Dawley, Natalie; Schlom, Darrell; Booth, James

    With the emergence of the internet-of-things and increased connectivity of modern commerce, consumers have driven demand for wireless spectrum beyond current capacity and infrastructure capabilities. One way the telecommunications industry is addressing this problem is by pushing front-end electronics to higher frequencies, introducing carrier aggregation schemes, and developing spectrum-sharing techniques. Some of these solutions require frequency agile components that are vastly different from what is in today's marketplace. Perhaps the most basic and ubiquitous component in front-end electronics is the phase shifter. Phase shifters are particularly important for compact beam-forming antennas that may soon appear in commercial technology. Here, we demonstrate a compact, tunable phase shifter with very low insertion loss up to 40 GHz on a defect mitigated tunable dielectric. We demonstrate performance compared to barium-doped strontium titanate phase shifters. Such phase shifters could potentially meet the stringent size and performance characteristics demanded by telecommunications industry, readily facilitating massive multiple-input multiple-output antennas in the next-generation of mobile handsets.

  2. Sub-15fs ultraviolet pulses generated by achromatic phase-matching sum-frequency mixing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baozhen; Jiang, Yongliang; Sueda, Keiich; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2009-09-28

    A broadband ultraviolet pulse with a spectral width of 44 nm was generated by achromatic sum-frequency mixing of an 805-nm pulse and ultrabroadband visible pulse. Angular dispersion was introduced to achieve broadband phase matching by a prism pair. The UV pulse was compressed to 13.2 fs with another prism pair, with energy of 600 nJ. PMID:19907556

  3. A PWM quadrature-booster phase shifter for ac power transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, L.A.C.; Joos, G.; Ooi, B.T.

    1997-01-01

    The conventional structures used for phase shifters employ quadrature voltage injection controlled by means of on-load tap changers that require considerable maintenance. Line-commutated thyristor structures have been proposed to replace tap changers, but problems related to filter requirements or the number of switches have limited their utilization. This paper proposes a pulse width modulation (PWM) quadrature-booster phase shifter based on a force-commutated ac controller. It offers features such as fast dynamic response, continuous variation of the phase angle with low harmonic injection, and it requires a simple power structure and can be controlled by adjusting the duty cycle of the switches. The operating principles of the proposed phase shifter are analyzed and their feasibility is demonstrated through digital simulation and experimental implementation.

  4. Fabrication processes of MEMS phase shifters on polymer-based substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianqun; Ativanichayaphong, Thermpon; Cai, Ying; Huang, Wen-Ding; Hsu, Lun-Chen; Davis, W. Alan; Chiao, Mu; Chiao, J.-C.

    2006-12-01

    RF phase shifters find wide applications in telecommunications, satellite systems, personal wireless communication systems, radar systems, tracking systems, and sensors. They have been conventionally manufactured by semiconductor technologies which suffer from high insertion losses due to high RF series resistances. They are expensive due to fabrication and assembly costs. The RF MEMS phase shifters provide low insertion losses, low fabrication costs and high linearity compared with the semiconductor ones. Furthermore, polymer materials have demonstrated low material costs and low RF attenuations. In this work, we proposed to build RF MEMS phase shifters on polymer substrates. The proposed devices were successfully manufactured and tested from DC to 26 GHz. Our experimental results indicated more than 35 degrees phase shifts and low insertion losses.

  5. Design of Pound-Drever-Hall laser frequency stabilization system without phase shifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Juan; Jiao, Mingxing; Xing, Junhong; Li, Zhe

    2015-02-01

    The Pound-Drever-Hall (PDH) laser frequency stabilization is a wide spread adopted technique for narrow linewidth and ultra-stable lasers, and a phase shifter is an important part in a traditional PDH frequency stabilization system. A PDH laser frequency stabilization system without phase shifter was proposed, in which quadrature coherent detection method was used to extract the frequency drifts. Orthogonal reference signals are generated using direct digital frequency synthesizer (DDS) and mixed with the output of a photo-detector. Over-sampling technique and cumulative average algorithm were used to improve the detection resolution and SNR, orthogonal phase sensitive detection algorithm was adopted to obtain the frequency drifts. Both the quadrature demodulation system structure and the signal processing methods were adopted, the systematic detection error is reduced, the anti-noise performance is raised and long term frequency stability is improved with the PDH laser frequency stabilization system without phase shifter.

  6. Epitaxially grown vertical junction phase shifters for improved modulation efficiency in silicon depletion-type modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif Azadeh, S.; Romero-García, S.; Merget, F.; Moscoso-Mártir, A.; von den Driesch, Nils; Buca, D.; Witzens, J.

    2015-05-01

    High-speed silicon modulators based on the plasma effect in reverse-biased p(i)n junction phase shifters have been extensively investigated. The main challenge for such modulators is to maximize their modulation efficiency without compromising high-speed performance and insertion losses. Here, we propose a highly efficient silicon modulator based on a Mach-Zehnder Interferometer in which the doping profile of a vertical pin junction is precisely controlled by means of in-situ doping during silicon epitaxial growth. The precise level of control afforded by this fabrication procedure allows separately optimizing doping concentrations in the immediate vicinity of the junction and in surrounding electrical transport layers at the nanometric scale, enabling high performance levels. Free carrier absorption losses are minimized by implementing high carrier densities only in the waveguide regions where they benefit the most, i.e., in the immediate vicinity of the junction. Since these devices rely entirely on single crystal silicon, performance degradation caused by poor transport and high optical losses in poly- or amorphous silicon (as utilized in similar vertical phase shifter geometries such as semiconductor-insulator-semiconductor capacitive phase shifters) is avoided. Furthermore, unlike conventional plasma effect silicon phase shifters, the bandwidth of the proposed phase shifters is largely independent of the applied reverse voltage and the phase shift versus applied voltage is linearized, making them more suitable for complex modulation formats. The efficiency of the single ended phase shifters is expected to reach a VπL of 0.56 V•cm and absorption losses of α=4.5 dB/mm, a good performance metric for depletion-type modulators. Lumped element Mach-Zehnder Modulators as well as travelling-wave modulators with phase matching based on meandered waveguides have been designed and their RF characteristics simulated and optimized with Ansoft HFSS. First experiments

  7. Bias-free spin-wave phase shifter for magnonic logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, Steven; Lisenkov, Ivan; Nikitov, Sergei; Tyberkevych, Vasyl; Slavin, Andrei

    2016-06-01

    A design of a magnonic phase shifter operating without an external bias magnetic field is proposed. The phase shifter uses a localized collective spin wave mode propagating along a domain wall "waveguide" in a dipolarly-coupled magnetic dot array with a chessboard antiferromagnetic (CAFM) ground state. It is demonstrated numerically that the remagnetization of a single magnetic dot adjacent to the domain wall waveguide introduces a controllable phase shift in the propagating spin wave mode without significant change to the mode amplitude. It is also demonstrated that a logic XOR gate can be realized in the same system.

  8. Liquid crystal terahertz phase shifters with functional indium-tin-oxide nanostructures for biasing and alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chan-Shan; Tang, Tsung-Ta; Pan, Ru-Pin; Yu, Peichen; Pan, Ci-Ling

    2014-04-07

    Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) nanowhiskers (NWhs) obliquely evaporated by electron-beam glancing-angle deposition can serve simultaneously as transparent electrodes and alignment layer for liquid crystal (LC) devices in the terahertz (THz) frequency range. To demonstrate, we constructed a THz LC phase shifter with ITO NWhs. Phase shift exceeding π/2 at 1.0 THz was achieved in a ∼517 μm-thick cell. The phase shifter exhibits high transmittance (∼78%). The driving voltage required for quarter-wave operation is as low as 5.66 V (rms), compatible with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) and thin-film transistor (TFT) technologies.

  9. Low V(π) Silicon photonics modulators with highly linear epitaxially grown phase shifters.

    PubMed

    Azadeh, Saeed Sharif; Merget, Florian; Romero-García, Sebastian; Moscoso-Mártir, Alvaro; von den Driesch, Nils; Müller, Juliana; Mantl, Siegfried; Buca, Dan; Witzens, Jeremy

    2015-09-01

    We report on the design of Silicon Mach-Zehnder carrier depletion modulators relying on epitaxially grown vertical junction diodes. Unprecedented spatial control over doping profiles resulting from combining local ion implantation with epitaxial overgrowth enables highly linear phase shifters with high modulation efficiency and comparatively low insertion losses. A high average phase shifter efficiency of VπL = 0.74 V⋅cm is reached between 0 V and 2 V reverse bias, while maintaining optical losses at 4.2 dB/mm and the intrinsic RC cutoff frequency at 48 GHz (both at 1 V reverse bias). The fabrication process, the sensitivity to fabrication tolerances, the phase shifter performance and examples of lumped element and travelling wave modulators are modeled in detail. Device linearity is shown to be sufficient to support complex modulation formats such as 16-QAM. PMID:26368451

  10. Figures of merit for microwave photonic phase shifters based on semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Sancho, Juan; Lloret, Juan; Gasulla, Ivana; Sales, Salvador; Capmany, José

    2012-05-01

    We theoretically and experimentally compare the performance of two fully tunable phase shifter structures based on semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA) by means of several figures of merit common to microwave photonic systems. A single SOA stage followed by a tailored notch filter is compared with a cascaded implementation comprising three SOA-based phase shifter stages. Attention is focused on the assessment of the RF net gain, noise figure and nonlinear distortion. Recommendations on the performance optimization of this sort of approaches are detailed. PMID:22565677

  11. A Theoretical Model for Thin Film Ferroelectric Coupled Microstripline Phase Shifters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, R. R.; Quereshi, A. H.

    2000-01-01

    Novel microwave phase shifters consisting of coupled microstriplines on thin ferroelectric films have been demonstrated recently. A theoretical model useful for predicting the propagation characteristics (insertion phase shift, dielectric loss, impedance, and bandwidth) is presented here. The model is based on a variational solution for line capacitance and coupled strip transmission line theory.

  12. A tunable millimeter-wave phase shifter driven by dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araromi, O. A.; Romano, P.; Rosset, S.; Perruisseau-Carrier, J.; Shea, H. R.

    2014-03-01

    We present the successful operation of the first dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) driven tunable millimeter-wave phase shifter. The development of dynamically reconfigurable microwave/millimeter-wave (MW/MMW) antenna devices is becoming a prime need in the field of telecommunications and sensing. The real time updating of antenna characteristics such as coverage or operation frequency is particularly desired. However, in many circumstances currently available technologies suffer from high EM losses, increased complexity and cost. Conversely, reconfigurable devices based on DEAs offer low complexity, low electromagnetic (EM) losses and analogue operation. Our tunable phase shifter consists of metallic strips suspended a fixed distance above a coplanar waveguide (CPW) by planar DEAs. The planar actuators displace the metallic strips (10 mm in length) in-plane by 500 μm, modifying the EM field distribution, resulting in the desired phase shift. The demanding spacing (50 +/-5 μm between CPW and metallic strips) and parallel alignment criteria required for optimal device operation are successfully met in our device design and validated using bespoke methods. Our current device, approximately 60 mm x 60 mm in planar dimensions, meets the displacement requirements and we observe a considerable phase shift (~95° at 25 GHz) closely matching numerical simulations. Moreover, our device achieves state of the art performance in terms of phase shift per EM loss ~235°/dB (35 GHz), significantly out performing other phase shifter technologies, such as MMIC phase shifters.

  13. Novel Phased Array Scanning Employing A Single Feed Without Using Individual Phase Shifters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Host, Nicholas K.; Chen, Chi-Chih; Volakis, John L.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2012-01-01

    Phased arrays afford many advantages over mechanically steered systems. However, they are also more complex, heavy, and most of all costly. The high cost mainly originates from the complex feeding structure. This paper proposes a novel feeding scheme to eliminate all phase shifters and achieve scanning via one-dimensional motion. Beam scanning is achieved via a series fed array incorporating feeding transmission lines whose wave velocity can be mechanically adjusted. Along with the line design, ideal element impedances to be used in conjunction with the line are derived. Practical designs are shown which achieve scanning to +/-30deg from boresight. Finally, a prototype is fabricated and measured, demonstrating the concept.

  14. A Ku band 5 bit MEMS phase shifter for active electronically steerable phased array applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Anesh K.; Gautam, Ashu K.; Farinelli, Paola; Dutta, Asudeb; Singh, S. G.

    2015-03-01

    The design, fabrication and measurement of a 5 bit Ku band MEMS phase shifter in different configurations, i.e. a coplanar waveguide and microstrip, are presented in this work. The development architecture is based on the hybrid approach of switched and loaded line topologies. All the switches are monolithically manufactured on a 200 µm high resistivity silicon substrate using 4 inch diameter wafers. The first three bits (180°, 90° and 45°) are realized using switched microstrip lines and series ohmic MEMS switches whereas the fourth and fifth bits (22.5° and 11.25°) consist of microstrip line sections loaded by shunt ohmic MEMS devices. Individual bits are fabricated and evaluated for performance and the monolithic device is a 5 bit Ku band (16-18 GHz) phase shifter with very low average insertion loss of the order of 3.3 dB and a return loss better than 15 dB over the 32 states with a chip area of 44 mm2. A total phase shift of 348.75° with phase accuracy within 3° is achieved over all of the states. The performance of individual bits has been optimized in order to achieve an integrated performance so that they can be implemented into active electronically steerable antennas for phased array applications.

  15. Active phase drift cancellation for optic-fiber frequency transfer using a photonic radio-frequency phase shifter.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jianguo; Wu, Guiling; Hu, Liang; Zou, Weiwen; Chen, Jianping

    2014-04-15

    We propose an active photonic phase drift cancellation scheme for frequency transfer over optical fiber based on a linear photonic RF phase shifter. The photonic RF phase shifter consists of a dual parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator and optical filter with the assistance of the local microwave signal. The phase drift induced by fiber transmission can be compensated by simply tuning the bias voltage of the modulator. The principle of the phase cancellation scheme based on the photonic phase shifter is demonstrated and validated experimentally by transferring a 0.5 GHz reference signal over a 20 km single-mode fiber with a root mean square jitter of less than 0.5 ps. PMID:24978989

  16. Generation of phase-coded microwave signals using a polarization-modulator-based photonic microwave phase shifter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yamei; Pan, Shilong

    2013-03-01

    A scheme for the generation of phase-coded microwave signals using an electrically tunable photonic microwave phase shifter is proposed and demonstrated. The photonic phase shifter is based on a single-sideband polarization modulator (PolM), and the tuning of the phase shifter is implemented by a second PolM. By introducing an RF signal to the first PolM and an electrical coding signal to the second PolM, a phase-coded microwave signal with binary phase codes or polyphase codes is achieved. An experiment is performed. The simple and flexible operation, high coding rate, large frequency range, excellent transmission performance, and high stability of the system is confirmed. PMID:23455292

  17. Approaches for Achieving Broadband Achromatic Phase Shifts for Visible Nulling Coronagraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Lyon, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    Visible nulling coronagraphy is one of the few approaches to the direct detection and characterization of Jovian and Terrestrial exoplanets that works with segmented aperture telescopes. Jovian and Terrestrial planets require at least 10(exp -9) and 10(exp -10) image plane contrasts, respectively, within the spectral bandpass and thus require a nearly achromatic pi-phase difference between the arms of the interferometer. An achromatic pi-phase shift can be achieved by several techniques, including sequential angled thick glass plates of varying dispersive materials, distributed thin-film multilayer coatings, and techniques that leverage the polarization-dependent phase shift of total-internal reflections. Herein we describe two such techniques: sequential thick glass plates and Fresnel rhomb prisms. A viable technique must achieve the achromatic phase shift while simultaneously minimizing the intensity difference, chromatic beam spread and polarization variation between each arm. In this paper we describe the above techniques and report on efforts to design, model, fabricate, align the trades associated with each technique that will lead to an implementations of the most promising one in Goddard's Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC).

  18. Frequency-multiplying microwave photonic phase shifter for independent multichannel phase shifting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yamei; Pan, Shilong

    2016-03-15

    A frequency-multiplying microwave photonic phase shifter with independent multichannel phase shifting capability is proposed and demonstrated using an integrated polarization division multiplexing dual-parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator (PDM-DPMZM) and a polarizer. By building a proper power distribution network to drive the PDM-DPMZM, two sidebands along two orthogonal polarization directions are generated with a spacing of two or four times the frequency of the driving signal. Leading the signal to a polarizer and a photodetector, a frequency-doubled or frequency-quadrupled signal with its phase adjusted by the polarization direction of the polarizer is achieved. The magnitude of the signal remains almost unchanged when the phase is adjusted. The proposed approach features compact configuration, scalable independent phase-shift channels and wide bandwidth, which can find applications in beam forming and analog signal processing for millimeter-wave or terahertz applications. PMID:26977684

  19. Fully tunable 360° microwave photonic phase shifter based on a single semiconductor optical amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancho, Juan; Lloret, Juan; Gasulla, Ivana; Sales, Salvador; Capmany, José

    2011-08-01

    A fully tunable microwave photonic phase shifter involving a single semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) is proposed and demonstrated. 360° microwave phase shift has been achieved by tuning the carrier wavelength and the optical input power injected in an SOA while properly profiting from the dispersion feature of a conveniently designed notch filter. It is shown that the optical filter can be advantageously employed to switch between positive and negative microwave phase shifts. Numerical calculations corroborate the experimental results showing an excellent agreement.

  20. Radio frequency phase shifters for launching waves in a magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrucci, L.; Casanova, M.R.; Maglione, V.; Montiron, G.; Riccardi, C.; Barisoni, D.; Fontanesi, M.; Galassi, A.; Sindoni, E.

    1995-04-01

    A variable phase-shifting system, able to generate phase-shifted replicas of the same reference input signal, has been designed to properly feed the antenna system within a plasma device. The system is based on a phase-locked loop used as a voltage controlled phase shifter and is able to provide four phase-shifted output signals. The phase differences between adjacent outputs can be varied between 0{degree} and 100{degree}, and are maintained equal to each other, with a precision of less than 3{degree} in the range 2.5--10 MHz. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  1. Pupil phase apodization for achromatic imaging of extra- solar planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weidong

    2004-09-01

    Direct imaging of extra-solar planets in the visible and infrared region has generated great interest among scientists and the general public as well. However, this is a challenging problem. Difficulties of detecting a planet (faint source) are caused, mostly, by two factors: sidelobes caused by starlight diffraction from the edge of the pupil and the randomly scattered starlight caused by the phase errors from the imperfections in the optical system. While the latter difficulty can be corrected by high density active deformable mirrors with advanced phase sensing and control technology, the optimized strategy for suppressing the diffraction sidelobes is still an open question. In this thesis, I present a new approach to the sidelobe reduction problem: pupil phase apodization. It is based on a discovery that an anti-symmetric spatial phase modulation pattern imposed over a pupil or a relay plane causes diffracted starlight suppression sufficient for imaging of extra-solar planets. Numerical simulations with specific square pupil (side D) phase functions, such as f(x,y)=a[ln ((1+3)+ 2x/D)/((1+3)-2x/D) . ((1+3)+2y/D)/((1+3)-2y/D)] demonstrate annulling in at least one quadrant of the diffraction plane to the contrast level of better than 10-12 with an inner working angle down to 3.5λ/D (with a = 3 and 3 = 10-3). Furthermore, our computer experiments show that phase apodization remains effective throughout a broad spectrum (60% of the central wavelength) covering the entire visible light range. In addition to the specific phase functions that can yield deep sidelobe reduction on one quadrant; we also found that a modified Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm can help to find small sized (101 x 101 element) discrete phase functions if regional sidelobe reduction is desired. Our simulation shows that a 101 x 101 segmented but gapless active mirror can also generate a dark region with Inner Working Distance about 2.8λ/D in one quadrant. Phase-only modulation has the additional

  2. Apparatus and methods for using achromatic phase matching at high orders of dispersion

    DOEpatents

    Richman, Bruce; Trebino, Rick; Bisson, Scott; Sidick, Erkin

    2001-01-01

    Achromatic phase-matching (APM) is used for efficiently multiplying the frequency of broad bandwidth light by using a nonlinear optical medium comprising a second-harmonic generation (SHG) crystal. Stationary optical elements whose configuration, properties, and arrangement have been optimized to match the dispersion characteristics of the SHG crystal to at least the second order. These elements include a plurality of prismatic elements for directing an input light beam onto the SHG crystal such that each ray wavelength is aligned to match the phase-matching angle for the crystal at each wavelength of light to at least the second order and such that every ray wavelength overlap within the crystal.

  3. Comparative study of bolometric and non-bolometric switching elements for microwave phase shifters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabib-Azar, Massood; Bhasin, Kul B.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1991-01-01

    The performance of semiconductor and high critical temperature superconductor switches is compared as they are used in delay-line-type microwave and millimeter-wave phase shifters. Such factors as their ratios of the off-to-on resistances, parasitic reactances, power consumption, speed, input-to-output isolation, ease of fabrication, and physical dimensions are compared. Owing to their almost infinite off-to-on resistance ratio and excellent input-to-output isolation, bolometric superconducting switches appear to be quite suitable for use in microwave phase shifters; their only drawbacks are their speed and size. The SUPERFET, a novel device whose operation is based on the electric field effect in high critical temperature ceramic superconductors is also discussed. Preliminary results indicate that the SUPERFET is fast and that it can be scaled; therefore, it can be fabricated with dimensions comparable to semiconductor field-effect transistors.

  4. Monolithic mm-wave phase shifter using optically activated superconducting switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R. (Inventor); Bhasin, Kul B. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A phase shifter is disclosed having a reference path and a delay path, light sources, and superconductive switches. Each of the superconductive switches is terminated in a virtual short circuit, which may be a radial stub. Switching between the reference path and delayed path is accomplished by illuminating the superconductive switches connected to the desired path, while not illuminating the superconductive switches connected to the other path.

  5. Interplay Between Thin Film Ferroelectric Composition, Microstructure and Microwave Phase Shifter Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Carl H.; VanKeuls, Frederick W.; Romanofsky, Robert R.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2003-01-01

    One of the keys to successfully incorporating ferroelectric films into Ku-band (12 to 18 GHz) phase shifters is to establish the composition, microstructure, and thickness required to meet the tuning needs, and tailor the film properties to meet these needs. Optimal performance is obtained when the film composition and device design are such that the device performance is limited by odd mode dielectric losses, and these losses are minimized as much as possible while still maintaining adequate tunability. The parameters required to maintain device performance will vary slightly depending on composition, but we can conclude that the best tuning-to-loss figures of merit (K-factor) are obtained when there is minimal variation between the in-plane and out-of-plane lattice parameters, and the full-width half maximum values of the BSTO (002) peaks are less than approximately 0.04 deg. We have observed that for phase shifters in which the ferroelectric crystalline quality and thickness are almost identical, higher losses are observed in films with higher BaISr ratios. The best performance was observed in phase shifters with Ba:Sr = 30:70. The superiority of this composition was attributed to several interacting factors: the B a: Sr ratio was such that the Curie temperature (180 K) was far removed from room temperature, the crystalline quality of the film was excellent, and there was virtually no difference between the inplane and out-of-plane lattice parameters of the film.

  6. A wideband photonic microwave phase shifter using polarization-dependent intensity modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiyu; Sun, Wenhui; Wang, Wenting; Tong, Youwan; Zheng, Jianyu; Yuan, Haiqing; Wang, Xin; Bai, Jinhua; Yu, Lijuan; Liu, Jianguo; Zhu, Ninghua

    2015-12-01

    We present a tunable and wideband microwave photonic phase shifter based on polarization-dependence of the LiNbO3 Mach-Zehender modulator (MZM). In the proposed device, an orthogonal single sideband modulation is implemented by using a MZM and an optical band-pass filter. With the polarizer to synthesize the polarization orthogonal optical carrier and sideband, the phase of the optical microwave signal output from the polarizer can be tuned from 0 to 360° by simply adjusting the polarization direction of the lights whereas the amplitude keeps constant. A full range tunable phase shifting in the frequency range of 10-35 GHz is achieved.

  7. Silicon photonics thermal phase shifter with reduced temperature range

    DOEpatents

    Lentine, Anthony L; Kekatpure, Rohan D; DeRose, Christopher; Davids, Paul; Watts, Michael R

    2013-12-17

    Optical devices, phased array systems and methods of phase-shifting an input signal are provided. An optical device includes a microresonator and a waveguide for receiving an input optical signal. The waveguide includes a segment coupled to the microresonator with a coupling coefficient such that the waveguide is overcoupled to the microresonator. The microresonator received the input optical signal via the waveguide and phase-shifts the input optical signal to form an output optical signal. The output optical signal is coupled into the waveguide via the microresonator and transmitted by the waveguide. At an operating point of the optical device, the coupling coefficient is selected to reduce a change in an amplitude of the output optical signal and to increase a change in a phase of the output optical signal, relative to the input optical signal.

  8. High frequency performance extending to millimeter-waves in inverted-microstrip-line-type LC phase shifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nose, T.; Ito, Y.; Iisaka, Takuya; Chien, L.-C.; Catanescu, O.; Golvin, A.; Isota, Y.; Sasamori, T.; Ito, R.; Honma, M.

    2013-03-01

    Various liquid crystal (LC) phase shifters that operate in the super-high-frequency electromagnetic-wave regions have been investigated using planar-type excellent waveguides such as the microstrip line (MSL) and coplanar waveguide (CPW). First planar-type LC phase shifters were constructed using MSL, which was developed as an excellent planar waveguide for super-high-frequency electromagnetic waves. CPW-type LC phase shifters have attracted continued attention, because when they are used, all the signal and ground electrodes are at the same surface, which leads to ease in integration for constructing various functional devices. However, they suffer from an essential drawback of degradation in the phase shift magnitude, which is because the propagating electromagnetic waves encounter the permittivity of both the substrate and the LC materials, which reduces the modulation effect of the LC materials to less than half. In this work, a novel MSL-type LC phase shifter is investigated to achieve excellent phase shifting performance while maintaining ease in integration, as offered by the CPW-type phase shifter. Several device structural parameters are investigated to improve the transmission and phase shifting properties. Some LC materials are also tested for further improvement in the high-frequency operation extended to the millimeter-wave region.

  9. A K-Band Linear Phased Array Antenna Based on Ba(0.60)Sr(0.40)TiO3 Thin Film Phase Shifters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, R.; Bernhard, J.; Washington, G.; VanKeuls, F.; Miranda, F.; Cannedy, C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes the development of a 23.675 GHz linear 16-element scanning phased array antenna based on thin ferroelectric film coupled microstripline phase shifters and microstrip patch radiators.

  10. Millimeter-wave diode-grid phase shifters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Wayne W.; Stolt, Kjell S.; Jou, Christina F.; Luhmann, Neville C., Jr.; Chen, Howard Z.

    1988-01-01

    Monolithic diode grids have been fabricated on 2-cm square gallium-arsenide wafers with 1600 Schottky-barrier varactor diodes. Shorted diodes are detected with a liquid-crystal technique, and the bad diodes are removed with an ultrasonic probe. A small-aperture reflectometer that uses wavefront division interference was developed to measure the reflection coefficient of the grids. A phase shift of 70 deg with a 7-dB loss was obtained at 93 GHz when the bias on the diode grid was changed from -3 V to 1 V. A simple transmission-line grid model, together with the measured low-frequency parameters for the diodes, was shown to predict the measured performance over the entire capacitive bias range of the diodes, as well as over the complete reactive tuning range provided by a reflector behind the grid, and over a wide range of frequencies from 33 GHz to 141 GHz. This shows that the transmission-line model and the measured low-frequency diode parameters can be used to design an electronic beam-steering array and to predict its performance. An electronic beam-steering array made of a pair of grids using state-of-the-art diodes with 5-ohm series resistances would have a loss of 1.4 dB at 90 GHz.

  11. Microwave properties of Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO3 thin film coplanar phase shifters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suherman, P. M.; Jackson, T. J.; Tse, Y. Y.; Jones, I. P.; Chakalova, R. I.; Lancaster, M. J.; Porch, A.

    2006-05-01

    Coplanar waveguide transmission lines have been used to show that the temperature dependent properties of Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO3 thin films used for microwave phase shifters in the frequency range 45 MHz-50 GHz are correlated strongly with the microstructure of the films. The highest tunability and figure of merit of the phase shifters were obtained for films with the narrowest ferroelectric-paraelectric phase transition range, lowest mosaic spread, and widest columnar microstructure. The study also showed that the operating temperature plays an important role in achieving the optimum phase shift for microwave applications.

  12. ACHROMATIC EIGHT-OCTANT PHASE-MASK CORONAGRAPH USING PHOTONIC CRYSTAL

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Naoshi; Baba, Naoshi; Nishikawa, Jun; Yokochi, Kaito; Tamura, Motohide; Abe, Lyu

    2010-05-01

    We designed and manufactured a photonic-crystal mask which can be used for an achromatic eight-octant phase-mask (EOPM) coronagraph for direct detection of extrasolar planets. Laboratory experiments of the EOPM coronagraph were carried out using two laser light sources as a simulated star (wavelengths of 532 and 633 nm). As a result, we attained high extinction of the simulated starlight in both the wavelengths. Halo intensity levels of about 10{sup -6} and 10{sup -7} were achieved at an angular distance of 3 and 13{lambda}/D, respectively. We also discuss several issues, such as an effect of phase aberration on the coronagraphic performance, a transmittance of the proposed EOPM, and a novel two-channel coronagraphic configuration to improve system throughput.

  13. Achromatic approach to phase-based multi-modal imaging with conventional X-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Endrizzi, Marco; Vittoria, Fabio A; Kallon, Gibril; Basta, Dario; Diemoz, Paul C; Vincenzi, Alessandro; Delogu, Pasquale; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Olivo, Alessandro

    2015-06-15

    Compatibility with polychromatic radiation is an important requirement for an imaging system using conventional rotating anode X-ray sources. With a commercially available energy-resolving single-photon-counting detector we investigated how broadband radiation affects the performance of a multi-modal edge-illumination phase-contrast imaging system. The effect of X-ray energy on phase retrieval is presented, and the achromaticity of the method is experimentally demonstrated. Comparison with simulated measurements integrating over the energy spectrum shows that there is no significant loss of image quality due to the use of polychromatic radiation. This means that, to a good approximation, the imaging system exploits radiation in the same way at all energies typically used in hard-X-ray imaging. PMID:26193618

  14. Finite Ground Coplanar Waveguide Shunt MEMS Switches for Switched Line Phase Shifters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Simons, Rainee N.; Scardelletti, Maximillian; Varaljay, Nicholas C.

    2000-01-01

    Switches with low insertion loss and high isolation are required for switched line phase shifters and the transmit/receive switch at the front end of communication systems. A Finite Ground Coplanar (FGC) waveguide capacitive, shunt MEMS switch has been implemented on high resistivity Si. The switch has demonstrated an insertion loss of less than 0.3 dB and a return loss greater than 15 dB from 10 to 20, GHz. The switch design, fabrication, and characteristics are presented.

  15. Determination of birefringence and slow axis distribution using an interferometric measurement system with liquid crystal phase shifter.

    PubMed

    Nose, Toshiaki; Kamata, Keisuke; Takeuchi, Toru; Okano, Keiju; Fujita, Naoko; Muraguchi, Hajime; Ozaki, Noriaki; Honma, Michinori; Ito, Ryouta

    2014-11-01

    It is known that liquid crystal (LC) cells are useful as compact and easy-to-handle phase shifters that are readily coupled into the optics of standard microscope systems. Here, a uniformly aligned molecular LC phase shifter is introduced into a polarization microscope to attain a birefringence imaging system, using the phase-shift interferometric technique. Since the birefringence can be determined accurately only when the optical axis of the sample is parallel or perpendicular to the slow axis (variable axis) of the LC phase shifter, an improved data analysis method is proposed for determining the birefringence independently of the direction; a simple method of determining the slow axis distribution is also demonstrated. Measurements of the birefringence and slow axis distribution properties of a potato starch particle are demonstrated to confirm the novel determination method. PMID:25402881

  16. A high-power microwave circular polarizer and its application on phase shifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Hao; Hu, Yongmei; Chang, Chao; Guo, Letian

    2016-04-01

    A high-power waveguide dual circular polarizer was theoretically designed and proof-of-principle was experimentally tested. It consists of two incident rectangular waveguides with a perpendicular H-plane junction, one circular waveguide with a pair of trapezoidal grooves coupled in E-plane at the top, a spherical crown located at the bottom, and an iris at the perpendicular junction of two rectangular waveguides. When wave incidents at one of the two separated rectangular waveguides, it, respectively, generates a left-hand circular polarized wave or a right-hand circular polarized wave in the circular waveguide. By adding a dumbbell-like metal plug driven with a high speed servomotor, a movable short circuit is formed along the circular waveguide to adjust the output RF phase of the rectangular port, realizing a high-speed high-power phase shifter. The C-band high power microwave (HPM) experiments were carried out, and the power capacity of the HPM polarizer and phase shifter was demonstrated to reach gigawatt level.

  17. Photonic-assisted microwave phase shifter using a DMZM and an optical bandpass filter.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Sun, Wen Hui; Wang, Wen Ting; Wang, Li Xian; Liu, Jian Guo; Zhu, Ning Hua

    2014-03-10

    We propose and demonstrate a photonic-assisted wideband 360° microwave phase shifter based on a conventional dual-drive Mach-Zehnder modulator (DMZM) and an optical bandpass filter (OBPF). The two arms of the DMZM are driven by the fundamental microwave signal to be phase shifted and its frequency doubled component, respectively. The OBPF followed after the DMZM is used to remove the optical carrier and the sidebands at either side of the optical carrier. As a result, only two sidebands corresponding to the fundamental microwave signal and its frequency doubled component, respectively, are left. Moreover, the phase shift between the two sidebands can be continuously tunable by adjusting the bias voltage of the DMZM. This phase shift is mapped to the fundamental microwave signal which is recovered by beating the two sidebands in a photodetector (PD). The proposed approach is theoretically analyzed and experimentally verified. PMID:24663892

  18. All-prism achromatic phase matching for tunable second-harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Richman, B A; Bisson, S E; Trebino, R; Sidick, E; Jacobson, A

    1999-05-20

    Achromatic phase matching (APM) involves dispersing the light entering a nonlinear optical crystal so that a wide range of wavelengths is simultaneously phase matched. We constructed an APM apparatus consisting of six prisms, the final dispersion angle of which was optimized to match to second order in wavelength the type I phase-matching angle of beta barium borate (BBO). With this apparatus, we doubled tunable fundamental light from 620 to 700 nm in wavelength using a 4-mm-long BBO crystal. An analogous set of six prisms after the BBO crystal, optimized to second order in second-harmonic wavelength, realigned the output second-harmonic beams. Computer simulations predict that adjustment of a single prism can compensate angular misalignment of any or all the prisms before the crystal, and similarly for the prisms after the crystal. We demonstrated such compensation with the experimental device. The simulations also indicate that the phase-matching wavelength band can be shifted and optimized for different crystal lengths. PMID:18319927

  19. Aluminum nitride electro-optic phase shifter for backend integration on silicon.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shiyang; Lo, Guo-Qiang

    2016-06-13

    An AlN electro-optic phase shifter with a parallel plate capacitor structure is fabricated on Si using the back-end complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology, which is feasible for multilayer photonics integration. The modulation efficiency (Vπ⋅Lπ product) measured from the fabricated waveguide-ring resonators and Mach-Zehnder Interferometer (MZI) modulators near the 1550-nm wavelength is ∼240 V⋅cm for the transverse electric (TE) mode and ∼320 V⋅cm for the transverse magnetic (TM) mode, from which the Pockels coefficient of the deposited AlN is deduced to be ∼1.0 pm/V for both TE and TM modes. The methods for further modulation efficiency improvement are addressed. PMID:27410270

  20. Broadband, Low-Loss Phase Shifters Based on Thin Ferroelectric Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Several different types of microwave transmission line phase shifters based on thin ferroelectic films have been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. These include a series of coupled microstrip lines, slotline incorporating Marchand balms, odd-mode coplanar strips, and hybrid devices incorporating a switch to toggle the output termination between an open and virtual short circuit. A review of the theory of operation of each of these devices will be presented along with measured performance. Also, devices of the first variety have been subjected to total dose (proton) radiation exposure using a 200 MeV beam energy with a total dose up to nearly 1 kRad (Si). Results of these radiation tests will be discussed.

  1. Optically controlled microwave phase shifter based on nonlinear polarization rotation in a highly nonlinear fiber.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Sun, Wen Hui; Wang, Wen Ting; Zhu, Ning Hua

    2014-06-01

    This Letter reports an optically controlled microwave phase shifter with an ultra-wideband working bandwidth and a full 360° phase shifting range based on nonlinear polarization rotation (NPR) in a highly nonlinear fiber (HNLF). A continuous wave probe light is modulated by a polarization modulator (PolM) that is driven by a microwave signal to be phase shifted. The optical carrier and the first-order sidebands of the probe light experience different phase shifts due to the NPR induced by the control light in the HNLF. An optical bandpass filter is used to realize single-sideband modulation of the probe light by removing one of the first-order sidebands, as well as to reject the control light. After detecting by a photodetector, the phase of the recovered microwave signal is continuously tunable by adjusting the power of the control light. The proposed approach is theoretically analyzed and experimentally verified. A full 360° tunable phase shift is realized over an ultra-wideband frequency range from 8 to 38 GHz when the power of the control light is tuned from 0 to 570 mW. PMID:24876035

  2. Optically tunable full 360° microwave photonic phase shifter using three cascaded silicon-on-insulator microring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehteshami, Nasrin; Zhang, Weifeng; Yao, Jianping

    2016-08-01

    A broadband optically tunable microwave phase shifter with a tunable phase shift covering the entire 360° range using three cascaded silicon-on-insulator (SOI) microring resonators (MRRs) that are optically pumped is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The phase tuning is implemented based on the thermal nonlinear effect in the MRRs. By optically pumping the MRRs, the stored light in the MRRs is absorbed due to two photon absorption (TPA) to generate free carriers, which result in free carrier absorption (FCA). The FCA effect would lead to the heating of the MRRs and cause a redshift in the phase response, which is used to implement a microwave phase shifter with a tunable phase shift. The device is designated and fabricated on an SOI platform, which is experimentally evaluated. The experimental results show that by optically pumping the MRRs, a broadband microwave photonic phase shifter with a bandwidth of 7 GHz from 16 to 23 GHz with a tunable phase shift covering the entire 360° phase shift range is achieved.

  3. MWP phase shifters integrated in PbS-SU8 waveguides.

    PubMed

    Hervás, Javier; Suárez, Isaac; Pérez, Joaquín; Cantó, Pedro J Rodríguez; Abargues, Rafael; Martínez-Pastor, Juan P; Sales, Salvador; Capmany, José

    2015-06-01

    We present new kind of microwave phase shifters (MPS) based on dispersion of PbS colloidal quantum dots (QDs) in commercially available photoresist SU8 after a ligand exchange process. Ridge PbS-SU8 waveguides are implemented by integration of the nanocomposite in a silicon platform. When these waveguides are pumped at wavelengths below the band-gap of the PbS QDs, a phase shift in an optically conveyed (at 1550 nm) microwave signal is produced. The strong light confinement produced in the ridge waveguides allows an improvement of the phase shift as compared to the case of planar structures. Moreover, a novel ridge bilayer waveguide composed by a PbS-SU8 nanocomposite and a SU8 passive layer is proposed to decrease the propagation losses of the pump beam and in consequence to improve the microwave phase shift up to 36.5° at 25 GHz. Experimental results are reproduced by a theoretical model based on the slow light effect produced in a semiconductor waveguide due to the coherent population oscillations. The resulting device shows potential benefits respect to the current MPS technologies since it allows a fast tunability of the phase shift and a high level of integration due to its small size. PMID:26072799

  4. Integrated Optics Achromatic Nuller for Stellar Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ksendzov, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    This innovation will replace a beam combiner, a phase shifter, and a mode conditioner, thus simplifying the system design and alignment, and saving weight and space in future missions. This nuller is a dielectric-waveguide-based, four-port asymmetric coupler. Its nulling performance is based on the mode-sorting property of adiabatic asymmetric couplers that are intrinsically achromatic. This nuller has been designed, and its performance modeled, in the 6.5-micrometer to 9.25-micrometer spectral interval (36% bandwidth). The calculated suppression of starlight for this 15-cm-long device is 10(exp -5) or better through the whole bandwidth. This is enough to satisfy requirements of a flagship exoplanet-characterization mission. Nulling interferometry is an approach to starlight suppression that will allow the detection and spectral characterization of Earth-like exoplanets. Nulling interferometers separate the light originating from a dim planet from the bright starlight by placing the star at the bottom of a deep, destructive interference fringe, where the starlight is effectively cancelled, or nulled, thus allowing the faint off-axis light to be much more easily seen. This process is referred to as nulling of the starlight. Achromatic nulling technology is a critical component that provides the starlight suppression in interferometer-based observatories. Previously considered space-based interferometers are aimed at approximately 6-to-20-micrometer spectral range. While containing the spectral features of many gases that are considered to be signatures of life, it also offers better planet-to-star brightness ratio than shorter wavelengths. In the Integrated Optics Achromatic Nuller (IOAN) device, the two beams from the interferometer's collecting telescopes pass through the same focusing optic and are incident on the input of the nuller.

  5. Design, development and characterization of an x-band 5 bit DMTL phase shifter using an inline MEMS bridge and MAM capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Sukomal; Koul, Shiban K.

    2014-09-01

    A radio frequency micro-electro-mechanical system (RF-MEMS) 5 bit phase shifter based on a distributed MEMS transmission line concept with excellent phase accuracy and good repeatability is presented in this paper. The phase shifter is built with three fixed-fixed beams; one is switchable with electrostatic actuation and the other two are fixed for a metal-air-metal (MAM) capacitor. The design is based on a coplanar waveguide (CPW) configuration using alumina substrate. Gold-based surface micromachining is used to develop the individual primary phase bits (11.25°/22.5°/45°/90°/180°), which are fundamental building blocks of the complete 5 bit phase shifter. All of the primary phase bits are cascaded together to build the complete phase shifter. Detailed design methodology and performance analysis of the unit cell phase shifter has been carried out with structural and parametric optimization using an in-line bridge and MAM capacitors. The mechanical, electrical, transient, intermodulation distortion (IMD), temperature distribution, power handling and loss performances of the MEMS bridge have been experimentally obtained and validated using simulations up to reasonable extent. A single unit cell is able to provide 31 dB return loss, maximum insertion loss of 0.085 dB and a differential phase shift of 5.95° (at 10 GHz) over the band of interest. Furthermore, all primary phase bits are individually tested to ensure overall optimum phase shifter performance. The complete 5 bit phase shifter demonstrates an average insertion loss of 4.72 dB with return loss of better than 12 dB within 8-12 GHz using periodic placement of 62 unit cells and a maximum phase error of ±3.2° has been obtained at 10 GHz. Finally, the x-band 5 bit phase shifter is compared with the present state-of-the-art. The performance of the 5 bit phase shifter when mounted inside a test jig has been experimentally investigated and the results are presented. The total area of

  6. Slow-Wave Phase Shifters, Based on Thin Ferroelectric Films, for Reflectarray Antennas. Frequency-Agile Radio: Systems and Technlogies, WMG 139

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed relatively broadband K- and Ka-band phase shifters using synthetic (slow-wave) transmission lines employing coupled microstripline "varactors". The tunable coupled microstripline circuits are based on laser ablated BaSrTiO films on lanthanum aluminate substrates. A model and design criteria for these novel circuits will be presented, along with measured performance including anomalous phase delay characteristics. The critical role of phase shifter loss and transient response in reflectarray antennas will be emphasized.

  7. Tunable Phase Shifter Based on Inkjet-Printed Ferroelectric MIM Varactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikfalazar, Mohammad; Wiens, Alex; Mikolajek, Morten; Friederich, Andreas; Kohler, Christian; Sohrabi, Mojtaba; Zheng, Yuliang; Kienemund, Daniel; Melnyk, Sergiy; Binder, Joachim R.; Jakoby, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for the fabrication of tunable multilayer ferroelectric components based on inkjet printing. Inkjet printing is a low-cost technology for selective film fabrication and has high potential for the preparation of tunable dielectric layers for radio frequency and microwave applications. With this technology, tunable metal-insulator-metal (MIM) capacitor is fabricated, that is composed of inkjet-printed Barium-Strontium-Titanate striplines and photo-lithographically structured gold electrodes. Compared to coplanar capacitors, such MIM varactors require significantly lower DC-voltage for tuning. By applying 20 V across a 1 μm-thick BST film, a tunability of 33% is achieved at 8 GHz and tunability of 60% by applying 50 V. To demonstrate the field of application of this MIM varactor, a tunable phase shifter is designed and fabricated at 8 GHz. A phase shift of 143° and a figure of merit (FoM) of 28°/dB are achieved by applying maximum 50 V tuning voltage.

  8. Thin-Film Ferro Electric-Coupled Microstripline Phase Shifters With Reduced Device Hysteresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.; Romanofsky, Robert; Mueller, Carl H.; VanKeuls, Frederick

    2010-01-01

    This work deals with the performance of coupled microstripline phase shifters (CMPS) fabricated using BaxSr 1 -xTiO 3 (BST) ferroelectric thin films. The CMPS were fabricated using commercially available pulsed laser deposition BST films with Ba:Sr ratios of 30:70 and 20:80. Microwave characterization of these CMPS was performed at upper Kuband frequencies, particularly at frequencies near 16 and 18 GHz. X-ray diffraction studies indicate that the 30:70 films exhibit almost a 1:1 ratio between the in-plane and out-of-plane lattice parameters, suggesting that their cubics create strain -free films suitable for producing CMPS devices with reduced hysteresis in the paraelectric state. The quality of performance of the CMPS was studied based on their relative phase shift and insertion loss within the DC bias range of 0 to 400 V (i.e., E-field ranges within 0 to 53 V/micron). The performance of the CMPS was tested as a function of temperature to investigate their operation in the paraelectric, as well as in the ferroelectric, state (i.e., above and below the Curie temperature, respectively). The novel behavior discussed here is based on the experimental observation of the CMPS. This behavior, observed for the aforementioned cation ratio, highlights the relevance of good crystalline structure for high-quality CMPS.

  9. Electrically and magnetically tunable phase shifters based on a barium strontium titanate-yttrium iron garnet layered structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, J. H.; Liu, H.; Avrutin, V.; Rowe, E.; Özgür, Ü.; Morkoç, H.; Song, Y.-Y.; Wu, M.

    2010-09-01

    We report on the tuning of permittivity and permeability of a ferroelectric/ferromagnetic bilayer structure which can be used as a microwave phase shifter with two degrees of tuning freedom. The structure was prepared by the growth of a yttrium iron garnet (YIG) layer on a gadolinium gallium garnet substrate by liquid phase epitaxy, the growth of a barium strontium titanate (BST) layer on the YIG layer through pulsed laser deposition, and then the fabrication of a coplanar waveguide on the top of BST through e-beam evaporation and trilayer liftoff techniques. The phase shifters exhibit a differential phase shift of 38°/cm at 6 GHz through permittivity tuning under an applied electric field of ˜75 kV/cm and a static magnetic field of 1700 Oe. By tuning the permeability through the applied magnetic field we increase the differential phase shift to 52°/cm and simultaneously obtain a better match to the zero applied electric field condition, resulting in an improvement in the return loss from 22.4 to 24.9 dB. Additionally, we demonstrate the use of a lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) layer to tune the permeability of the YIG layer. This tuning relies on the piezoelectric and magnetostrictive effects of PMN-PT and YIG, respectively. Tuning of the ferromagnetic response through strain and magnetostriction as opposed to applied magnetic field can potentially pave the way for low power consumption, continuously and rapidly tunable, impedance matched phase shifters.

  10. Numerical analysis of dual-wavelength nonreciprocal phase shifter for magneto-optical isolators on silicon-on-insulator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tianze; Sun, Yiling; Ouyang, Zhengbiao

    2014-11-01

    The wavelength dependence of the nonreciprocal phase shift (NPS) in a magneto-optical (MO) waveguide is investigated from the aspect of the geometrical structure. In an MO nonreciprocal waveguide, the effect of the waveguide dispersion on the NPS is being demonstrated to compensate the dispersion of the Faraday rotation coefficients. By accurately controlling the structure parameter of the MO waveguide, the wavelength-insensitive NPS can be obtained. According to this principle, we proposed the dual-wavelength nonreciprocal phase shifter at the wavelengths of 1.31 and 1.55 μm.

  11. 10-25 GHz frequency reconfigurable MEMS 5-bit phase shifter using push-pull actuator based toggle mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Sukomal; Koul, Shiban K.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a frequency tunable 5-bit true-time-delay digital phase shifter using radio frequency microelectromechanical system (RF MEMS) technology. The phase shifter is based on the distributed MEMS transmission line (DMTL) concept utilizing a MEMS varactor. The main source of frequency tuning in this work is a bridge actuation mechanism followed by capacitance variation. Two stages of actuation mechanisms (push and pull) are used to achieve a 2:1 tuning ratio. Accurate control of the actuation voltage between the pull to push stages contributes differential phase shift over the band of interest. The functional behavior of the push-pull actuation over the phase shifter application is theoretically established, experimentally investigated and validated with simulation. The phase shifter is fabricated monolithically using a gold based surface micromachining process on an alumina substrate. The individual primary phase-bits (11.25°/22.5°/45°/90°/180°) that are the fundamental building blocks of the complete 5-bit phase shifter are designed, fabricated and experimentally characterized from 10-25 GHz for specific applications. Finally, the complete 5-bit phase shifter demonstrates an average phase error of 4.32°, 2.8°, 1° and 1.58°, an average insertion loss of 3.76, 4.1, 4.2 and 4.84 dB and an average return loss of 11.7, 12, 14 and 11.8 dB at 10, 12, 17.2 and 25 GHz, respectively. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first reported band tunable stand alone 5-bit phase shifter in the literature which can work over the large spectrum for different applications. The total area of the 5-bit phase shifter is 15.6 mm2. Furthermore, the cold-switched reliability of the unit cell and the complete 5-bit MEMS phase shifter are extensively investigated and presented.

  12. Intermodulation and harmonic distortion in slow light Microwave Photonic phase shifters based on Coherent Population Oscillations in SOAs.

    PubMed

    Gasulla, Ivana; Sancho, Juan; Capmany, José; Lloret, Juan; Sales, Salvador

    2010-12-01

    We theoretically and experimentally evaluate the propagation, generation and amplification of signal, harmonic and intermodulation distortion terms inside a Semiconductor Optical Amplifier (SOA) under Coherent Population Oscillation (CPO) regime. For that purpose, we present a general optical field model, valid for any arbitrarily-spaced radiofrequency tones, which is necessary to correctly describe the operation of CPO based slow light Microwave Photonic phase shifters which comprise an electrooptic modulator and a SOA followed by an optical filter and supplements another recently published for true time delay operation based on the propagation of optical intensities. The phase shifter performance has been evaluated in terms of the nonlinear distortion up to 3rd order, for a modulating signal constituted of two tones, in function of the electrooptic modulator input RF power and the SOA input optical power, obtaining a very good agreement between theoretical and experimental results. A complete theoretical spectral analysis is also presented which shows that under small signal operation conditions, the 3rd order intermodulation products at 2Ω1 + Ω2 and 2Ω2 + Ω1 experience a power dip/phase transition characteristic of the fundamental tones phase shifting operation. PMID:21164914

  13. A gallium-arsenide digital phase shifter for clock and control signal distribution in high-speed digital systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fouts, Douglas J.

    1992-01-01

    The design, implementation, testing, and applications of a gallium-arsenide digital phase shifter and fan-out buffer are described. The integrated circuit provides a method for adjusting the phase of high-speed clock and control signals in digital systems, without the need for pruning cables, multiplexing between cables of different lengths, delay lines, or similar techniques. The phase of signals distributed with the described chip can be dynamically adjusted in eight different steps of approximately 60 ps per step. The IC also serves as a fan-out buffer and provides 12 in-phase outputs. The chip is useful for distributing high-speed clock and control signals in synchronous digital systems, especially if components are distributed over a large physical area or if there is a large number of components.

  14. Ultra-wideband 4 × 4 Phased Array Containing Exponentially Tapered Slot Antennas and a True-Time Delay Phase Shifter at UHF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, J.; Jung, M.; Bonney, J.; Caspary, R.; Schüür, J.; Schöbel, J.

    For angular scanning a true-time array is developed for UHF ultra-wideband (UWB) applications in time and/or frequency domain. It is based on a 4 × 4 array with antipodal exponentially tapered slot antennas (ETSA, Vivaldi) and a 3-bit phase shifter. Distances of antenna elements are designed to be compromise between gain, scanning angle, side/grating lobe levels. The uniform spaced and fed array maximizes the overall gain. After defining the antenna shape, corrugations are introduced to improve antenna matching and gain pattern. Nine equally spaced beam positions for a 90° scanning angle are induced by an optimized 3-bit phase shifter on high permittivity substrate, while 4 bits are usually needed. Parasitic resonances are avoided by using PIN diodes in single pole double throw configuration. All components and the complete array system are simulated and verified in frequency domain with good agreement. Adaptation to UWB pulses is possible.

  15. Broadband tunable microwave photonic phase shifter with low RF power variation in a high-Q AlN microring.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianwen; Sun, Changzheng; Xiong, Bing; Wang, Jian; Wang, Lai; Han, Yanjun; Hao, Zhibiao; Li, Hongtao; Luo, Yi; Yan, Jianchang; Wei, Tong Bo; Zhang, Yun; Wang, Junxi

    2016-08-01

    An all-optically tunable microwave photonic phase shifter is demonstrated based on an epitaxial aluminum nitride (AlN) microring with an intrinsic quality factor of 3.2×106. The microring adopts a pedestal structure, which allows overcoupling with 700 nm gap size and facilitates the fabrication process. A phase shift for broadband signals from 4 to 25 GHz is demonstrated by employing the thermo-optic effect and the separate carrier tuning technique. A phase tuning range of 0°-332° is recorded with a 3 dB radio frequency (RF) power variation and 48 mW optical power consumption. In addition, AlN exhibits intrinsic second-order optical nonlinearity. Thus, our work presents a novel platform with a low propagation loss and the capability of electro-optic modulation for applications in integrated microwave photonics. PMID:27472628

  16. Phase-shifter edge effects on attenuated phase-shifting mask image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Alfred K. K.; Ferguson, Richard A.; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    1994-05-01

    Edge effects of space, line, and linespace patterns in attenuated phase-shifting masks are studied using experimentally measured aerial images from the IBM AIMS tool, the scalar and thin mask approximations in SPLAT, and the rigorous electromagnetic simulator TEMPEST. The inadequacy of the thin mask approximation cannot be anticipated from comparisons of in- focus images of isolated line features as the experimentally measured image and the predictions from SPLAT and TEMPEST agree well. However, the scalar and thin mask approximations are not suitable for out of focus image prediction for all pattern types because the presence of the glass edges causes a focus shift of about 0.1 micrometers . Printing small isolated spaces and dense linespace patterns is more robust than isolated lines in the attenuated PSM technology.

  17. Design and development of a CPW-based 5-bit switched-line phase shifter using inline metal contact MEMS series switches for 17.25 GHz transmit/receive module application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Sukomal; Koul, Shiban K.

    2014-01-01

    A radio frequency micro-electro-mechanical system (RF-MEMS) phase shifter based on switchable delay line concept with maximum desirable phase shift and good reliability is presented in this paper. The phase shifter is based on the switchable reference and delay line configurations with inline metal contact series switches that employs MEMS systems based on electrostatic actuation and implemented using coplanar waveguide (CPW) configuration. Electromechanical behaviour of the MEMS switch has been extensively investigated using commercially available simulation tools and validated using system level simulation. A detailed design and performance analysis of the phase shifter has been carried out as a function of various structural parameters with reference to the gold-based surface micromachining process on alumina substrate. The mechanical, electrical, transient, intermodulation distortion (IMD) and loss performance of an MEMS switch have been experimentally investigated. The individual primary phase-bits (11.25°/22.5°/45°/90°/180°) that are fundamental building blocks of a complete 5-bit phase shifter have been designed, fabricated and experimentally characterized. Furthermore, two different 5-bit switched-line phase shifters, that lead to 25% size reduction and result in marked improvement in the reliability of the complete 5-bit phase shifter with 30 V actuation voltage, have been developed. The performance comparison between two different CPW-based switched-line phase shifters have been extensively investigated and validated. The complete 5-bit phase shifter demonstrates an average insertion loss of 5.4 dB with a return loss of better than 14 dB at 17.25 GHz. The maximum phase error of 1.3° has been obtained at 17.25 GHz from these 5-bit phase shifters.

  18. Compaction managed mirror bend achromat

    DOEpatents

    Douglas, David

    2005-10-18

    A method for controlling the momentum compaction in a beam of charged particles. The method includes a compaction-managed mirror bend achromat (CMMBA) that provides a beamline design that retains the large momentum acceptance of a conventional mirror bend achromat. The CMMBA also provides the ability to tailor the system momentum compaction spectrum as desired for specific applications. The CMMBA enables magnetostatic management of the longitudinal phase space in Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs) thereby alleviating the need for harmonic linearization of the RF waveform.

  19. High-contrast grating MEMS optical phase-shifters for two-dimensional free-space beam steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megens, Mischa; Yoo, Byung-Wook; Chan, Trevor; Yang, Weijian; Sun, Tianbo; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J.; Wu, Ming C.; Horsley, David A.

    2014-02-01

    We report an optical phased array (OPA) for two-dimensional free-space beam steering. The array is composed of tunable MEMS all-pass filters (APFs) based on polysilicon high contrast grating (HCG) mirrors. The cavity length of each APF is voltage controlled via an electrostatically-actuated HCG top mirror and a fixed DBR bottom mirror. The HCG mirrors are composed of only a single layer of polysilicon, achieving >99% reflectivity through the use of a subwavelength grating patterned into the polysilicon surface. Conventional metal-coated MEMS mirrors must be thick (1-50 μm) to prevent warpage arising from thermal and residual stress. The single material construction used here results in a high degree of flatness even in a thin 350 nm HCG mirror. Relative to beamsteering systems based on a single rotating MEMS mirror, which are typically limited to bandwidths below 50 kHz, the MEMS OPA described here has the advantage of greatly reduced mass and therefore achieves a bandwidth over 500 kHz. The APF structure affords large (~2π) phase shift at a small displacement (< 50 nm), an order-of-magnitude smaller than the displacement required in a single-mirror phase-shifter design. Precise control of each all-pass-filter is achieved through an interferometric phase measurement system, and beam steering is demonstrated using binary phase patterns.

  20. Wide spectral range multiple orders and half-wave achromatic phase retarders fabricated from two lithium tantalite single crystal plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emam-Ismail, M.

    2015-11-01

    In a broad spectral range (300-2500 nm), we report the use of channeled spectra formed from the interference of polarized white light to extract the dispersion of the phase birefringence Δnp(λ) of the x- and y-cuts of lithium tantalite (LiTaO3:LT) plates. A new method named as wavenumber difference method is used to extract the spectral behavior of the phase birefringence of the x- and y- cuts of LT plates. The correctness of the obtained birefringence data is confirmed by using Jones vector method through recalculating the plates thicknesses. The spectral variation of the phase birefringence Δnp(λ) of the x- and y-cuts of LT plates is fitted to Cauchy dispersion function with relative error for both x- and y-cuts of order 2.4×10-4. The group birefringence dispersion Δng (λ) of the x- and y-cuts of LT plates is also calculated and fitted to Ghosh dispersion function with relative error for both x- and y-cuts of order 2.83×10-4. Furthermore, the phase retardation introduced by the x- and y-cuts of LT plates is also calculated. It is found that the amount of phase retardation confirms that the x- and y-cuts of LT plates can act as a multiple order half- and quarter-wave plates working at many different wavelengths through the spectral range 300-2500 nm. For the x- and y-cuts of LT plates, a large difference between group and phase birefringence is observed at a short wavelength (λ=300 nm); while such difference progressively diminished at longer wavelength (λ=2000 nm). In the near infrared region (NIR) region (700-2500 nm), a broad spectral full width at half maximum (FWHM) is observed for either x- or y-cut of LT plate which can act as if it is working as a zero order wave plate. Finally, an achromatic half-wave plate working at 598 nm and covering a wide spectral range (300-900 nm) is demonstrated experimentally by combining both x- and y-cuts of LT plates.

  1. Tuning method for phase shifters with very low first field integral errors for the European X-ray Free Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuhui; Pflueger, Joachim

    2015-03-01

    For the long gap tunable undulator systems of the European XFEL, 91 phase shifters are needed. They need to fulfil stringent and demanding field integral tolerances if their strengths, i.e., their magnetic gaps, are changed. In order to avoid additional correctors, their first field integral errors must not exceed ±0.004 Tmm for self-amplified spontaneous emission operation at 1 Å. For longer wavelengths there are slightly relaxed requirements. In addition, a good field range of ±0.5 mm is required. Phase shifters are manufactured by using state of the art techniques such as measurement and sorting of magnets, measurement and sorting of subassemblies, etc. In spite of these efforts, inhomogeneities of the permanent magnet material as well as mechanic manufacturing errors, which cannot be avoided and lead to violations of the demanding first field integral specifications. Therefore, a fast and robust shimming technique was developed for the serial production of these devices. It is based on measured signatures of shims with different geometries and uses symmetry properties of shims placed on different positions and poles with different polarity. In this paper, the specifications for the phase shifters in the European XFEL are derived first. Then the method is described in detail and results are presented, which demonstrate that all requirements can be fulfilled.

  2. Research on a Defects Detection Method in the Ferrite Phase Shifter Cementing Process Based on a Multi-Sensor Prognostic and Health Management (PHM) System.

    PubMed

    Wan, Bo; Fu, Guicui; Li, Yanruoyue; Zhao, Youhu

    2016-01-01

    The cementing manufacturing process of ferrite phase shifters has the defect that cementing strength is insufficient and fractures always appear. A detection method of these defects was studied utilizing the multi-sensors Prognostic and Health Management (PHM) theory. Aiming at these process defects, the reasons that lead to defects are analyzed in this paper. In the meanwhile, the key process parameters were determined and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) tests during the cure process of resin cementing were carried out. At the same time, in order to get data on changing cementing strength, multiple-group cementing process tests of different key process parameters were designed and conducted. A relational model of cementing strength and cure temperature, time and pressure was established, by combining data of DSC and process tests as well as based on the Avrami formula. Through sensitivity analysis for three process parameters, the on-line detection decision criterion and the process parameters which have obvious impact on cementing strength were determined. A PHM system with multiple temperature and pressure sensors was established on this basis, and then, on-line detection, diagnosis and control for ferrite phase shifter cementing process defects were realized. It was verified by subsequent process that the on-line detection system improved the reliability of the ferrite phase shifter cementing process and reduced the incidence of insufficient cementing strength defects. PMID:27517935

  3. High-Precision Time Delay Control with Continuous Phase Shifter for Pump-Probe Experiments Using Synchrotron Radiation Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Yoshihito; Ohshima, Takashi; Moritomo, Yutaka; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Takata, Masaki

    2010-06-23

    Brilliant pulsed x-ray synchrotron radiation (SR) is useful for pump-probe experiment such as time-resolved x-ray diffraction, x-ray absorption fine structure, and x-ray spectroscopy. For laser pump-SR x-ray probe experiments, short pulsed lasers are generally synchronized to the SR master oscillator controlling the voltage for acceleration of electron bunches in an accelerator, and the interval between the laser and the SR pulses is changed around the time scale of target phenomenon. Ideal delay control produces any time delay as keeping the time-precision and pointing-stability of optical pulses at a sample position. We constructed the time delay control module using a continuous phase shifter of radio frequency signal and a frequency divider, which can produce the delayed trigger pulses to the laser without degradation of the time precision and the pointing stability. A picoseconds time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiment was demonstrated at SPring-8 storage ring for fast lattice response by femtosecond pulsed laser irradiation, and suggested the possibility of accurate sound velocity measurement. A delay control unit operating with subpicosecond precision has also been designed for femtosecond pump-probe experiments using a free electron laser at SPring-8 campus.

  4. Achromatic phase-matching second harmonic generation for a tunable laser

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Alexander Gerson; Bisson, Scott; Trebino, Rick

    1998-01-01

    An optical system uses a nonlinear optical medium to alter the frequency of a relatively narrow band light source tunable over a plurality of different frequencies using an optical system for passively directing light to the nonlinear medium at a correct phase matching angle. In this manner, the light from the tunable light source can be efficiently frequency-doubled or frequency-tripled without the need of moving parts. An all prism design provides a system of optimal efficiency.

  5. Achromatic phase-matching second harmonic generation for a tunable laser

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, A.G.; Bisson, S.; Trebino, R.

    1998-01-20

    An optical system uses a nonlinear optical medium to alter the frequency of a relatively narrow band light source tunable over a plurality of different frequencies using an optical system for passively directing light to the nonlinear medium at a correct phase matching angle. In this manner, the light from the tunable light source can be efficiently frequency-doubled or frequency-tripled without the need of moving parts. An all prism design provides a system of optimal efficiency. 6 figs.

  6. Self-assembled monolayers and chemical derivatization of Ba 0.5Sr 0.5TiO 3 thin films: Applications in phase shifter devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Cruz, Angel L.; Keuls, Fred W. Van; Miranda, Félix A.; Cabrera, Carlos R.

    2005-11-01

    Thin films of barium strontium titanate (Ba 1- xSr x TiO 3 (BSTO)) have been used in coupled microstrip phase shifters (CMPS) for possible insertion in satellite and wireless communication platforms primarily because of their high dielectric constant, low loss, large tunability, and good structural stability. In an attempt to improve the figure of merit K (phase shift °/dB of loss) of phase shifters, modification of the metal/BSTO interface of these devices has been done through surface modification of the BSTO layer using a self-assembled monolayer approach. The impact of this nanotechnology promises to reduce RF losses by improving the quality of the metal/BSTO interface. In this study, compounds such as 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS), 16-mercaptohexadecanois acid (MHDA) and 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) were used to form the self-assembled monolayers on the BSTO surface. As a result of the previous modification, chemical derivatization of the self-assembled monolayers was done in order to increase the chain length. Chemical derivatization was done using 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APS) and 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid. Surface chemical analysis was done to reveal the composition of the derivatization via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR). Low and high frequencies measurements of phase shifters were done in order measure the performance of these devices for insertion in antennas. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization of modified BSTO thin films with MPS showed a binding energy peak at 162.9 eV, indicative of a possible S sbnd O interaction: sulfur of the mercapto compound, MPS, used to modify the surface with the oxygen site of the BSTO thin film. This interaction is at higher binding energies compared with the thiolate interaction. This behavior is observed with the other mercapto compounds such as: MHDA and MPA. An FT-IR analysis present a band at 780 cm -1, which is characteristic of an O

  7. Achromatic shearing phase sensor for generating images indicative of measure(s) of alignment between segments of a segmented telescope's mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip (Inventor); Walker, Chanda Bartlett (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An achromatic shearing phase sensor generates an image indicative of at least one measure of alignment between two segments of a segmented telescope's mirrors. An optical grating receives at least a portion of irradiance originating at the segmented telescope in the form of a collimated beam and the collimated beam into a plurality of diffraction orders. Focusing optics separate and focus the diffraction orders. Filtering optics then filter the diffraction orders to generate a resultant set of diffraction orders that are modified. Imaging optics combine portions of the resultant set of diffraction orders to generate an interference pattern that is ultimately imaged by an imager.

  8. Broadband Multifunctional Efficient Meta-Gratings Based on Dielectric Waveguide Phase Shifters.

    PubMed

    Khorasaninejad, Mohammadreza; Capasso, Federico

    2015-10-14

    Molding the wavefront of light is a basic principle of any optical design. In conventional optical components such as lenses and waveplates, the wavefront is controlled via propagation phases in a medium much thicker than the wavelength. Metasurfaces instead typically produce the required phase changes using subwavelength-sized resonators as phase shift elements patterned across a surface. This "flat optics" approach promises miniaturization and improved performance. Here we introduce metasurfaces which use dielectric ridge waveguides (DRWs) as phase shift elements in which the required phase accumulation is achieved via propagation over a subwavelength distance. By engineering the dispersive response of DRWs, we experimentally realize high resolving power meta-gratings with broadband (λ = 1.2-1.7 μm) and efficient routing (splitting and bending) into a single diffraction order, thus overcoming the limits of blazed gratings. In addition, we demonstrate polarization beam splitting capabilities with large suppression ratios. PMID:26372331

  9. Full range complex spectral domain optical coherence tomography without additional phase shifters.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Bernhard; Pircher, Michael; Götzinger, Erich; Hitzenberger, Christoph K

    2007-10-01

    We demonstrate a new full range complex spectral domain optical coherence tomography (FRC SD-OCT) method. Other than FRC SD-OCT systems reported in literature, which employed devices such as electro-/acousto optic modulators or piezo-driven mirrors providing the phase modulations necessary for retrieval of the complex-valued signal, the system presented works without any additional phase shifting device. The required phase shift is introduced by the galvanometer scanner used for transversally scanning the sample beam. By means of a slight displacement of the probe beam with respect to the scanning mirror's pivot axis, the sample arm length and thus the phase is continuously modulated as the beam is scanned in lateral direction. From such modulated spectral data, the complex-valued data yielding a twofold increase of accessible depth range can be calculated using an algorithm based on the Hilbert transform. To demonstrate the performance of our method quantitative measurements of the suppression of mirror images as a function of induced phase shift were performed. In order to validate the FRC SD-OCT technique for high-speed imaging of biological tissue, we present full-range images of the human anterior chamber in vivo. PMID:19550607

  10. A substrate-modified CPW-based linear microwave phase shifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulandhaisamy, Indhumathi; Kumar, Shrivastav Arun; Kanagasabai, Malathi

    2015-10-01

    A novel method for achieving linear phase shift is proposed over the frequency range of 2 - 6 GHz. Dielectric characterization of FR4 substrate interfaced with air as well as water produces the phase shift. The substrate property is modified by introducing a plain rectangular packet and W-shaped packet within the FR4 substrate. The overall dimension of the proposed structure is 30 × 60 mm2. Across the entire proposed frequency range, the reflection coefficient is less than -10 dB. The proposed coplanar waveguide with water- and air-stacked FR4 substrate is simulated, fabricated, and measured for its linear phase shifting characteristics analyzed in ISM 2.45, 3.3, and 5.8 GHz bands. The analysis over the entire band depicts that the differential shift in phase is directly proportional to the effective dielectric constant of the material used. The design will be more useful in automotive anti-collision radars in military, cellular base stations, and satellite communications.

  11. Analysis and design of tunable wideband microwave photonics phase shifter based on Fabry-Perot cavity and Bragg mirrors in silicon-on-insulator waveguide.

    PubMed

    Qu, Pengfei; Zhou, Jingran; Chen, Weiyou; Li, Fumin; Li, Haibin; Liu, Caixia; Ruan, Shengping; Dong, Wei

    2010-04-20

    We designed a microwave (MW) photonics phase shifter, consisting of a Fabry-Perot filter, a phase modulation region (PMR), and distributed Bragg reflectors, in a silicon-on-insulator rib waveguide. The thermo-optics effect was employed to tune the PMR. It was theoretically demonstrated that the linear MW phase shift of 0-2pi could be achieved by a refractive index variation of 0-9.68x10(-3) in an ultrawideband (about 38?GHz-1.9?THz), and the corresponding tuning resolution was about 6.92 degrees / degrees C. The device had a very compact size. It could be easily integrated in silicon optoelectronic chips and expected to be widely used in the high-frequency MW photonics field. PMID:20411021

  12. Thin Film Ba(x)Sr(1-x)TiO3 Ku- and K-Band Phase Shifters Grown on MgO Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanKeuls, F. W.; Mueller, C. H.; Miranda, F. A.; Romanofsky, R. R.; Horwitz, J. S.; Chang, W.; Kim, W. J.

    1999-01-01

    We report measurements of gold circuits fabricated on four Ba(x)Sr(1-x)TiO3 films doped with 1% Mn grown on MgO substrates by laser ablation. Low frequency measurements of epsilon(sub r) and tan(delta) on interdigital capacitors are compared with high frequency measurements of phase shift and insertion loss on coupled microstrip phase shifters done on the same films. The variation in temperature of both high and low frequency device parameters is compared. Annealed and unannealed films are compared. Room temperature figures of merit of phase shift per insertion loss of up to 58.4 C/dB at 18 GHz and 400 V dc bias were measured.

  13. Pb0.3Sr0.7TiO3 thin films for high-frequency phase shifter applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, M.; Karan, N. K.; Katiyar, R. S.; Bhalla, A. S.; Miranda, F. A.; Keuls, F. W. Van

    2004-07-01

    Pb0.3Sr0.7TiO3(PST30) thin films were synthesized on platinized silicon (Pt /Si) and lanthanum aluminate (LAO) substrates using chemical solution deposition technique. The films on LAO substrate were highly (100) oriented, whereas the films on Pt /Si substrate were polycrystalline. The low dielectric loss in the PST30/LAO films makes them attractive for fabricating tunable dielectric devices. An eight-element coupled microstrip phase shifter was fabricated on PST30/LAO film and tested in the frequency range ˜15-17GHz. The maximum figure of merit (κ =phase shift per dB loss) of ˜56°/dB was obtained for PST30 film, which was better than commonly observed value in pure barium strontium titanate films. This makes PST30 a potential candidate material for further investigations for microwave applications.

  14. Room Temperature Thin Film Ba(x)Sr(1-x)TiO3 Ku-Band Coupled MicrostripPhase Shifters: Effects of Film Thickness, Doping, Annealing and Substrate Choice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanKeuls, F. W.; Mueller, C. H.; Miranda, F. A.; Romanofsky, R. R.; Canedy, C. L.; Aggarwal, S.; Venkatesan, T.; Ramesh, R.; Horwitz, S.; Chang, W.

    1999-01-01

    We report on measurements taken on over twenty Ku-band coupled microstrip phase shifters (CMPS) using thin ferroelectric films of Ba(x)Sr(1-x)TiO3. This CMPS design is a recent innovation designed to take advantage of the high tunability and tolerate the high dielectric constant of ferroelectric films at Ku- and K-band frequencies. These devices are envisioned as a component in low-cost steerable beam phased area antennas, Comparisons are made between devices with differing film thickness, annealed vs unannealed, Mn-doped vs. undoped, and also substrates of LaAlO3 and MgO. A comparison between the CMPS structure and a CPW phase shifter was also made oil the same ferroelectric film.

  15. Applications of Kinetic Inductance: Parametric Amplifier & Phase Shifter, 2DEG Coupled Co-planar Structures & Microstrip to Slotline Transition at RF Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surdi, Harshad

    Kinetic inductance springs from the inertia of charged mobile carriers in alternating electric fields and it is fundamentally different from the magnetic inductance which is only a geometry dependent property. The magnetic inductance is proportional to the volume occupied by the electric and magnetic fields and is often limited by the number of turns of the coil. Kinetic inductance on the other hand is inversely proportional to the density of electrons or holes that exert inertia, the unit mass of the charge carriers and the momentum relaxation time of these charge carriers, all of which can be varied merely by modifying the material properties. Highly sensitive and broadband signal amplifiers often broaden the field of study in astrophysics. Quantum-noise limited travelling wave kinetic inductance parametric amplifiers offer a noise figure of around 0.5 K +/- 0.3 K as compared to 20 K in HEMT signal amplifiers and can be designed to operate to cover the entire W-band (75 GHz -- 115 GHz). The research cumulating to this thesis involves applying and exploiting kinetic inductance properties in designing a W-band orthogonal mode transducer, quadratic gain phase shifter with a gain of ~49 dB over a meter of microstrip transmission line. The phase shifter will help in measuring the maximum amount of phase shift Deltaφmax(I) that can be obtained from half a meter transmission line which helps in predicting the gain of a travelling wave parametric amplifier. In another project, a microstrip to slot line transition is designed and optimized to operate at 150 GHz and 220 GHz frequencies, that is used as a part of horn antenna coupled microwave kinetic inductance detector proposed to operate from 138 GHz to 250 GHz. In the final project, kinetic inductance in a 2D electron gas (2DEG) is explored by design, simulation, fabrication and experimentation. A transmission line model of a 2DEG proposed by Burke (1999), is simulated and verified experimentally by fabricating a

  16. Investigations of sol gel-derived highly (100)-oriented Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO3 : MgO composite thin films for phase-shifter applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, M.; Majumder, S. B.; Katiyar, R. S.; Bhalla, A. S.; Miranda, F. A.; van Keuls, F. W.

    2005-02-01

    Sol gel deposition of highly oriented Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO3 : MgO composite thin films has shown desirable dielectric constant reduction and higher figure of merit for phase-shifter applications. In this multilayer configuration, MgO distributed homogeneously through the Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO3 (BST50) matrix, and it helped in tailoring the dielectric constant and reducing the loss tangent significantly. In the present study, the high-frequency dielectric behavior of the films has been evaluated by fabricating an eight-element coupled microstrip phase shifter and measuring the degree of phase shift and insertion loss as a function of applied voltage at room temperature. An increase in phase-shifter figure of merit (degree of phase shift per dB insertion loss) from 28°/dB for pure BST50 to 71°/dB for a BST50 : MgO film (at 14 GHz and 333 kV/cm) has been observed.

  17. The Achromatic Interfero Coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbia, Yves; Gay, Jean; Rivet, Jean-Pierre

    2007-04-01

    We report on the Achromatic Interfero Coronagraph, a focal imaging device which aims at rejecting the energy contribution of a point-like source set on-axis, so as to make detectable its angularly-close environment (applicable to stellar environment: circumstellar matter, faint companions, planetary systems, but also conceivably to Active Galactic Nucleii and multiple asteroïds). With AIC, starlight rejection is based on destructive interference, which allows exploration of the star's neighbourhood at an angular resolution better than the diffraction limit of the hosting telescope. Thanks to the focus crossing property of light, rejection is achromatic thus yielding a large spectral bandwidth of work. Descriptions and comments are given regarding the principle, the device itself, the constraints and limitations, and the theoretical performance. Results are presented which demonstrate the close-sensing capability and which show images of a companion obtained in laboratory and ‘on the sky’ as well. A short pictorial description of the alternative AIC concepts, CIAXE and Open-Air CIAXE, currently under study, is given. To cite this article: Y. Rabbia et al., C. R. Physique 8 (2007).

  18. Several Microstrip-Based Conductor/Thin Film Ferroelectric Phase Shifter Designs Using (YBa2Cu3O(7 - Delta), Au)/SrTiO3/LaAlO3 Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanKeuls, F. W.; Romanofsky, R. R.; Miranda, F. A.

    1998-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and tested several novel microstrip-base YBa2Cu3O7-delta/SrTiO3/LaAlO3 (YBCO/STO/LAO) and Au/SrTiO3ALO3 (Au/STO/LAO) phase shifters. The first design consists of eight coupled microstrip phase shifters (CMPS) in series. This design using YBCO achieved a relative insertion phase shift (Delta f) of 484 degrees with a figure of merit of 80 degrees/dB at Vdc = 375 V, 16 GHz, and 40 K. A Delta f of 290 degrees was observed while maintaining the insertion loss below 4.5 dB. At 77 K, a Delta of 420 degrees was obtained for this phase shifter at the same bias and frequency. Both results correspond to an effective coupling length of 0.33 cm. A second compact design, consisting of an Au meander line and a CMPS section was also tested. Of the two samples tested, the best showed a figure of merit of 43 degrees/dB with Delta f = 290 degrees and 6.8 dB loss, at 40 K, 10 GHz and 400 V. Experimental and modeling results on these circuits will be discussed in the context of potential applications.

  19. Achromatic lattice comparison for light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.L.; Crosbie, E.A.; Cho, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The next generation of synchrotron light sources are being designed to support a large number of undulators and require long dispersion-free insertion regions. With less demand for radiation from the dipole magnets, the storage ring cost per undulator beam can be reduced by decreasing the number of dipole magnets and increasing the number of dispersion free straight sections. The two simplest achromatic lattices are the Chasman-Green or double-bend achromatic (DBA) and the three-bend achromat (TBA). The DBA in its simplest form consists of a single horizontally-focussing quadrupole between the two dipole magnets. Since this quadrupole strength is fixed by the achromatic condition, the natural emittance (/var epsilon//sub n/) may vary as the beta functions in the insertion region (IR) are varied. The expanded Chasman-Green (also DBA) uses multiple quadrupoles in the dispersive section to provide emittance control independent of the beta functions in the IR. Although this provides flexibility in the ID beta functions, the horizontal phase advance is constrained to /phi/ /approx equal/ 180/degree/ between approximately the centers of the dipole magnets. If small /var epsilon//sub n/ is required, the horizontal phase advance between the dipoles will be near one and the lattice properties will be dominated by this systematic resonance. The TBA lattice places a third dipole between the DBA dipoles, eliminating the 180/degree/ horizontal phase advance constraint. However, the requirement of small /var epsilon//sub n/ limits the range of tune, since /mu//sub x/ /approx equal/ 1.29 in the dipoles alone for /var epsilon//sub n/ near its minimum value. The minimum emittance is five times smaller for the TBA than for the DBA with the same number of periods and, therefore, its phase advance can be relaxed more than the DBA for the same natural emittance. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Quadriwave Lateral Shearing Interferometry in an Achromatic and Continuously Self-imaging Regime for Future X-ray Phase Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    J Rizzi; T Weitkamp; N Guerineau; M Idir; P Mercere; G Druart; G Vincent; P da Silva; J Primont

    2011-12-31

    We present in this Letter a type of quadriwave lateral shearing interferometer for x-ray phase imaging. This device is based on a phase chessboard, and we take advantage of the large spectrum of the source to produce interferograms with a propagation-invariant contrast. Such a grating has been created for hard x-ray interferometry and experimentally tested on a synchrotron beamline at Soleil.

  1. Achromatic Interaction Point Design

    SciTech Connect

    Guimei Wang,, Yaroslav Derbenev, S.Alex Bogacz, P. Chevtsov, Andre Afanaciev, Charles Ankenbrandt, Valentin Ivanov, Rolland P. Johnson

    2009-05-01

    Designers of high-luminosity energy-frontier muon colliders must provide strong beam focusing in the interaction regions. However, the construction of a strong, aberration-free beam focus is difficult and space consuming, and long straight sections generate an off-site radiation problem due to muon decay neutrinos that interact as they leave the surface of the earth. Without some way to mitigate the neutrino radiation problem, the maximum c.m. energy of a muon collider will be limited to about 3.5 TeV. A new concept for achromatic low beta design is being developed, in which the interaction region telescope and optical correction elements, are installed in the bending arcs. The concept, formulated analytically, combines space economy, a preventative approach to compensation for aberrations, and a reduction of neutrino flux concentration. An analytical theory for the aberration-free, low beta, spatially compact insertion is being developed.

  2. Simultaneous second- and third- order spectral phase control of Ti:sapphire laser pulses using achromatic doublet prisms.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Alexander; Fuerbach, Alexander

    2016-03-20

    The standard technique commonly utilized to introduce large amounts of negative group delay dispersion (GDD) into the beam path of ultrashort laser pulses with low insertion losses is the use of a pair of prisms in a double pass configuration. However, one disadvantage of this approach is the unavoidable introduction of additional high-order spectral phase errors, most notably third-order dispersion (TOD) due to the characteristics of the refractive index of available optical materials. In this paper we provide an overview of the dispersive properties of more than 100 common types of optical glasses, used either as a bulk stretcher or in a prism compressor configuration. In addition, we present a novel method that enables independent control of GDD and TOD in a prism-only setup. The performance of different prism combinations is analyzed numerically, and design guidelines are given. PMID:27140563

  3. The role of input chirp on phase shifters based on slow and fast light effects in semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Xue, Weiqi; Chen, Yaohui; Ohman, Filip; Mørk, Jesper

    2009-02-01

    We experimentally investigate the initial chirp dependence of slow and fast light effects in a semiconductor optical amplifier followed by an optical filter. It is shown that the enhancement of the phase shift due to optical filtering strongly depends on the chirp of the input optical signal. We demonstrate approximately 120 degrees phase delay as well as approximately 170 degrees phase advance at a microwave frequency of 19 GHz for different optimum values of the input chirp. The experimental results are shown to be in good agreement with numerical results based on a four-wave mixing model. Finally, a simple physical explanation based on an analytical perturbative approach is presented. PMID:19188968

  4. Broadband Achromatic Telecentric Lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouroulis, Pantazis

    2007-01-01

    A new type of lens design features broadband achromatic performance as well as telecentricity, using a minimum number of spherical elements. With appropriate modifications, the lens design form can be tailored to cover the range of response of the focal-plane array, from Si (400-1,000 nm) to InGaAs (400-1,700 or 2,100 nm) or InSb/HgCdTe reaching to 2,500 nm. For reference, lenses typically are achromatized over the visible wavelength range of 480-650 nm. In remote sensing applications, there is a need for broadband achromatic telescopes, normally satisfied with mirror-based systems. However, mirror systems are not always feasible due to size or geometry restrictions. They also require expensive aspheric surfaces. Non-obscured mirror systems can be difficult to align and have a limited (essentially one-dimensional) field of view. Centrally obscured types have a two-dimensional but very limited field in addition to the obscuration. Telecentricity is a highly desirable property for matching typical spectrometer types, as well as for reducing the variation of the angle of incidence and cross-talk on the detector for simple camera types. This rotationally symmetric telescope with no obscuration and using spherical surfaces and selected glass types fills a need in the range of short focal lengths. It can be used as a compact front unit for a matched spectrometer, as an ultra-broadband camera objective lens, or as the optics of an integrated camera/spectrometer in which the wavelength information is obtained by the use of strip or linear variable filters on the focal plane array. This kind of camera and spectrometer system can find applications in remote sensing, as well as in-situ applications for geological mapping and characterization of minerals, ecological studies, and target detection and identification through spectral signatures. Commercially, the lens can be used in quality-control applications via spectral analysis. The lens design is based on the rear landscape

  5. Microwave phase shifter with controllable power response based on slow- and fast-light effects in semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Xue, Weiqi; Sales, Salvador; Capmany, José; Mørk, Jesper

    2009-04-01

    We suggest and experimentally demonstrate a method for increasing the tunable rf phase shift of semiconductor waveguides while at the same time enabling control of the rf power. This method is based on the use of slow- and fast-light effects in a cascade of semiconductor optical amplifiers combined with the use of spectral filtering to enhance the role of refractive index dynamics. A continuously tunable phase shift of approximately 240 degrees at a microwave frequency of 19 GHz is demonstrated in a cascade of two semiconductor optical amplifiers, while maintaining an rf power change of less than 1.6 dB. The technique is scalable to more amplifiers and should allow realization of an rf phase shift of 360 degrees. PMID:19340174

  6. Full-range spectral domain optical coherence tomography using fiber-based sample scanner as self-phase shifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Eun Jung; Shin, Jun Geun; Lee, Jae Hwi; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2012-06-01

    We propose full-range spectral domain optical coherence tomography equipped with a fiber-based sample scanner, which is used for sample scanning and phase shifting for full-range image at the same time. For a fiber-based sample scanner, since the fiber tip oscillates as a free standing cantilever in general, unintentional phase shift occurs inevitably. The unintentional phase shift was used for eliminating the bothersome complex conjugate ghost image of OCT. In addition, fiber was tilted a few degree to give proper phase shift. In this scheme, moreover, image can be obtained without any physical modification of the scanner. To realize this technique, we constructed the SD-OCT system and fabricated a magnetically actuated single-body lensed fiber scanner due to advantages of simple design, low operating voltage, cost-effectiveness and low insertion loss. The scanner was made of lensed fiber loaded with an iron-based bead and a solenoid which is placed perpendicular to the lensed fiber. When a sinusoidal current is applied into the solenoid, the lensed fiber oscillated due to magnetic force between the iron-based bead and the solenoid. With the suggested full range method, we obtained contrast enhanced full-range SD OCT images of pearl and tooth. This simple and effective method can be applied to any fiber-based scanner and it has great potential as a handheld probe/endoscopic probe in biomedical imaging field.

  7. Building achromatic refractive beam shapers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Shealy, David

    2014-10-01

    Achromatic beam shapers can provide beam shaping in a certain spectral band and are very important for various laser techniques, such as, applications based on ultra-short pulse lasers with pulse width <100 fs, confocal microscopy, multicolour holography, life sciences fluorescence techniques, where several lasers in spectrum 405-650 nm are used simultaneously, for example 405-650 nm. Conditions of energy re-distribution and zero wave aberration are strictly fulfilled in ordinary plano-aspheric lens pair beam shapers for a definite wavelength only. Hence, these beam shapers work efficiently in relatively narrow, few nm spectrum. To provide acceptable beam quality for refractive beam shaping over a wide spectrum, an achromatizing design condition should be added. Consequently, the typical beam shaper design contains more than two-lenses, to avoid any damaging and other undesirable effects the lenses of beam shaper should be air-spaced. We suggest a two-step method of designing the beam shaper: 1) achromatizing of each plano-aspheric lens using a buried achromatizing surface ("chromatic radius"), then each beam shaper component presents a cemented doublet lens, 2) "splitting" the cemented lenses and realizing air-spaced lens design using optical systems design software. This method allows for using an achromatic design principle during the first step of the design, and then, refining the design by using optimization software. We shall present examples of this design procedure for an achromatic Keplerian beam shaper and for the design of an achromatic Galilean type of beam shaper. Experimental results of operation of refractive beam shapers will be presented as well.

  8. Achromatic axially symmetric wave plate.

    PubMed

    Wakayama, Toshitaka; Komaki, Kazuki; Otani, Yukitoshi; Yoshizawa, Toru

    2012-12-31

    An achromatic axially symmetric wave plate (AAS-WP) is proposed that is based on Fresnel reflections. The wave plate does not introduce spatial dispersion. It provides retardation in the wavelength domain with an axially symmetric azimuthal angle. The optical configuration, a numerical simulation, and the optical properties of the AAS-WP are described. It is composed of PMMA. A pair of them is manufactured on a lathe. In the numerical simulation, the achromatic angle is estimated and is used to design the devices. They generate an axially symmetric polarized beam. The birefringence distribution is measured in order to evaluate the AAS-WPs. PMID:23388751

  9. Achromatic and uncoupled medical gantry

    DOEpatents

    Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Kayran, Dmitry; Litvinenko, Vladimir; MacKay, William W.

    2011-11-22

    A medical gantry that focus the beam from the beginning of the gantry to the exit of the gantry independent of the rotation angle of the gantry by keeping the beam achromatic and uncoupled, thus, avoiding the use of collimators or rotators, or additional equipment to control the beam divergence, which may cause beam intensity loss or additional time in irradiation of the patient, or disadvantageously increase the overall gantry size inapplicable for the use in the medical treatment facility.

  10. Achromatic Metasurface Lens at Telecommunication Wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Khorasaninejad, Mohammadreza; Aieta, Francesco; Kanhaiya, Pritpal; Kats, Mikhail A; Genevet, Patrice; Rousso, David; Capasso, Federico

    2015-08-12

    Nanoscale optical resonators enable a new class of flat optical components called metasurfaces. This approach has been used to demonstrate functionalities such as focusing free of monochromatic aberrations (i.e., spherical and coma), anomalous reflection, and large circular dichroism. Recently, dielectric metasurfaces that compensate the phase dispersion responsible for chromatic aberrations have been demonstrated. Here, we utilize an aperiodic array of coupled dielectric nanoresonators to demonstrate a multiwavelength achromatic lens. The focal length remains unchanged for three wavelengths in the near-infrared region (1300, 1550, and 1800 nm). Experimental results are in agreement with full-wave simulations. Our findings are an essential step toward a realization of broadband flat optical elements. PMID:26168329

  11. Achromatic and Uncoupled Medical Gantry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoupas, N.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V.

    One of the functions of a medical gantry is to irradiate a tumor from different angles to reduce the dose received by the healthy tissue which surrounds the tumor. The rotation of the gantry rotates also its quadrupoles that focus the beam, as a result the beam is "coupled" in the sense that the horizontal motion of the beam particles is affected by the vertical motion and vice-versa therefore the beam spot size at the tumor may vary with the angular orientation of the gantry. Although such a beam-coupling is inevitable in a rotated gantry in which the horizontal plane is not the symmetry plane of the quadrupoles, it is possible to find a solution that the optics of the gantry"appears uncoupled" at any angular orientation of the gantry. As we show in the paper, the condition of an uncoupled gantry is equivalent to an uncoupled linear-beam-transport-matrix which is independent of the angular orientation of the gantry, therefore the beam spot size at the location of the tumor is independent of the orientation of the gantry. In this paper we present the theoretical basis to generate the beam optics for a gantry which is constrained to provide uncoupled and also achromatic beamtransport to the location of the tumor. In addition we present the layout of the magnetic elements and the optics of a medical gantrywhich satisfies the achromaticity and uncoupled conditions.

  12. Photomultiplier sensitivity improvement by using wavelength shifters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozma, Peter; Bajgar, Robert; Kozma, Petr, Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Photomultiplier quantum sensitivity in the UV region of the photomultipliers FEU-85, FEU-130 and FEU-140 can be improved by a wave-shifter covering. The best results were obtained for PMMA-polymethylmetacrylate and P-P' diphenylstilbene wavelength shifters.

  13. Effects of shifter edge topography on through focus performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotta, Shoji; Pistor, Thomas V.; Adam, Konstantinos; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of the topography of the phase-shifting mask on the aerial image characteristics in DUV lithography. The calculation of near fields is carried out through simulation of the mask with TEMPEST and linking the resultant near fields to EM-Aerial for imaging. It is shown that the Fourier spectrum for an alternating phase-shifting mask can be decomposed into Fourier spectra for single openings. The amplitude and phase of the diffraction orders for the single opening are utilized for the systematic analysis of the shifter edge topography. The analysis framework developed in this paper clearly identifies the effects of the wall of the phase shifter, the residual transmittance through the chromium area, and the cross-talk between adjacent features. This analysis framework also allows these effects be merged in design. The near field profile in the vicinity of the shifter wall is also investigated for different feature sizes, and the optimum design for different feature sizes is discussed. The effect of the wall angle profile is shown to be acceptable.

  14. Principle of a coaxial Achromatic Interfero Coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, J.; Fressin, F.; Rivet, J.-P.

    We describe here the principle of a new type of coronagraph, based on the incident flux division with pupil reversal and phase shift on one beam, then recombination with destructive interferences at the center orf the field. This concept of nulling has already been used in the Interferometrical Achromatic Interfero-Coronagraph (AIC, Gay & Rabbia [CITE]), which lies on a Michelson interferometer interferomùetry which does not allow an easy insertion in the focal facility of a telescope. The variant under consideration has a completely coaxial design with an original and very compact optical combination. It is based upon two coaxial thick lenses in the same medium, stuck one to each other with a very narrow gap in between and a proper coating of the interfaces. The very geometry of the device ensures moreover the permanent and rigorous cophasing of the interferometer. The optical combination which fulfills this problem is unique and presents a range of properties which ease its insertion in the focal instrumentation of existing telescopes or next generation ones.

  15. Uncoupled achromatic tilted S-bend

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas,N.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V.; MacKay, W.W.

    2008-06-23

    A particular section of the electron beam transport line, to be used in the e-cooling project [l] of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), is constrained to displace the trajectory with both horizontal and vertical offsets so that the outgoing beamline is parallel to the incoming beamline. We also require that section be achromatic in both planes. This mixed horizontal and vertical achromatic Sbend is accomplished by rotating the two dipoles and the quadrupoles of the line, about the longitudinal axis of the incoming beam. However such a rotation of the magnetic elements may couple the transported beam through the first order beam transfer matrix (linear coupling). In this paper we study a sufficient condition, that the first order transport matrix (R-matrix) can satisfy, so that this section of beam transfer line is both achromatic and linearly uncoupled. We provide a complete solution for the beam optics which satisfies both conditions.

  16. Simultaneous contrast and gamut relativity in achromatic color perception.

    PubMed

    Vladusich, Tony

    2012-09-15

    Simultaneous contrast refers to the respective whitening or blackening of physically identical image regions surrounded by regions of low or high luminance, respectively. A common method of measuring the strength of this effect is achromatic color matching, in which subjects adjust the luminance of a target region to achieve an achromatic color match with another region. Here I present psychophysical data questioning the assumption--built into many models of achromatic color perception--that achromatic colors are represented as points in a one-dimensional (1D) perceptual space, or an absolute achromatic color gamut. I present an alternative model in which the achromatic color gamut corresponding to a target region is defined relatively, with respect to surround luminance. Different achromatic color gamuts in this model correspond to different 1D lines through a 2D perceptual space composed of blackness and whiteness dimensions. Each such line represents a unique gamut of achromatic colors ranging from black to white. I term this concept gamut relativity. Achromatic color matches made between targets surrounded by regions of different luminance are shown to reflect the relative perceptual distances between points lying on different gamut lines. The model suggests a novel geometrical approach to simultaneous contrast and achromatic color matching in terms of the vector summation of local luminance and contrast components, and sets the stage for a unified computational theory of achromatic color perception. PMID:22902644

  17. Geometric phase-shifting for low-coherence interference microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, M.; Svahn, P.; Cherel, L.; Sheppard, C. J. R.

    2002-06-01

    A low-coherence Linnik interference microscope using high numerical aperture optics has been constructed. The system uses a tungsten halogen lamp and Köhler illumination, with separate control over field and aperture stops, so that experiments can be conducted with a range of different operating conditions. The novel feature of the system is the use of an achromatic phase-shifter operating on the principle of the geometric phase, achieved by using a polarising beam splitter, a quarter wave plate and a rotating polariser. Image information is extracted from the visibility of the fringes, the position of the visibility peak along the scanning axis yielding the height of the test surface at the corresponding point.

  18. Achromatic optical correlator for white light pattern recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Liu, Hua-Kuang; Chen, Ming; Cai, Luzhong

    1987-01-01

    An achromatic optical correlator using spatially multiplexed achromatic matched spatial filters (MSFs) for white light optical pattern recognition is presented. The MSF array is synthesizd using a monochromatic laser and its achromaticity is achieved by adjusting the scale and spatial carrier frequency of each MSF to accommodate the wavelength variations in white light correlation detections. Systems analysis and several experimental results showing the correlation peak intensity using white-light illumination are presented.

  19. Achromatic synesthesias - a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Melero, H; Ríos-Lago, M; Peña-Melián, A; Álvarez-Linera, J

    2014-09-01

    Grapheme-color synesthetes experience consistent, automatic and idiosyncratic colors associated with specific letters and numbers. Frequently, these specific associations exhibit achromatic synesthetic qualities (e.g. white, black or gray). In this study, we have investigated for the first time the neural basis of achromatic synesthesias, their relationship to chromatic synesthesias and the achromatic congruency effect in order to understand not only synesthetic color but also other components of the synesthetic experience. To achieve this aim, functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments were performed in a group of associator grapheme-color synesthetes and matched controls who were stimulated with real chromatic and achromatic stimuli (Mondrians), and with letters and numbers that elicited different types of grapheme-color synesthesias (i.e. chromatic and achromatic inducers which elicited chromatic but also achromatic synesthesias, as well as congruent and incongruent ones). The information derived from the analysis of Mondrians and chromatic/achromatic synesthesias suggests that real and synesthetic colors/achromaticity do not fully share neural mechanisms. The whole-brain analysis of BOLD signals in response to the complete set of synesthetic inducers revealed that the functional peculiarities of the synesthetic brain are distributed, and reflect different components of the synesthetic experience: a perceptual component, an (attentional) feature binding component, and an emotional component. Additionally, the inclusion of achromatic experiences has provided new evidence in favor of the emotional binding theory, a line of interpretation which constitutes a bridge between grapheme-color synesthesia and other developmental modalities of the phenomenon. PMID:24845620

  20. High-speed analog achromatic intensity modulator.

    PubMed

    Stockley, J E; Sharp, G D; Doroski, D; Johnson, K M

    1994-05-15

    We report what is to our knowledge the first implementation of a broadband analog intensity modulator composed of two chiral smectic liquid-crystal half-wave retarders. A reflection-mode intensity modulator employing a single active device has also demonstrated achromatic transmission. A quantitative theory for chromatic compensation is presented. By optimum selection of liquid-crystal retardance and orientation, intensity transmission is uniform throughout the visible. The chiral smectic liquid-crystal devices used in the implementation are capable of switching in less than 20 micros. PMID:19844436

  1. Achromatic orbital angular momentum generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Frédéric; Mand, Harjaspreet; Mirhosseini, Mohammad; Karimi, Ebrahim; Boyd, Robert W.

    2014-12-01

    We describe a novel approach for generating light beams that carry orbital angular momentum (OAM) by means of total internal reflection in an isotropic medium. A continuous space-varying cylindrically symmetric reflector, in the form of two glued hollow axicons, is used to introduce a nonuniform rotation of polarization into a linearly polarized input beam. This device acts as a full spin-to-orbital angular momentum convertor. It functions by switching the helicity of the incoming beam's polarization, and by conservation of total angular momentum thereby generates a well-defined value of OAM. Our device is broadband, since the phase shift due to total internal reflection is nearly independent of wavelength. We verify the broad-band behaviour by measuring the conversion efficiency of the device for three different wavelengths corresponding to the RGB colours, red, green and blue. An average conversion efficiency of 95% for these three different wavelengths is observed. This device may find applications in imaging from micro- to astronomical systems where a white vortex beam is needed.

  2. An analytical study of double bend achromat lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Fakhri, Ali Akbar Kant, Pradeep; Singh, Gurnam; Ghodke, A. D.

    2015-03-15

    In a double bend achromat, Chasman-Green (CG) lattice represents the basic structure for low emittance synchrotron radiation sources. In the basic structure of CG lattice single focussing quadrupole (QF) magnet is used to form an achromat. In this paper, this CG lattice is discussed and an analytical relation is presented, showing the limitation of basic CG lattice to provide the theoretical minimum beam emittance in achromatic condition. To satisfy theoretical minimum beam emittance parameters, achromat having two, three, and four quadrupole structures is presented. In this structure, different arrangements of QF and defocusing quadruple (QD) are used. An analytical approach assuming quadrupoles as thin lenses has been followed for studying these structures. A study of Indus-2 lattice in which QF-QD-QF configuration in the achromat part has been adopted is also presented.

  3. An analytical study of double bend achromat lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhri, Ali Akbar; Kant, Pradeep; Singh, Gurnam; Ghodke, A. D.

    2015-03-01

    In a double bend achromat, Chasman-Green (CG) lattice represents the basic structure for low emittance synchrotron radiation sources. In the basic structure of CG lattice single focussing quadrupole (QF) magnet is used to form an achromat. In this paper, this CG lattice is discussed and an analytical relation is presented, showing the limitation of basic CG lattice to provide the theoretical minimum beam emittance in achromatic condition. To satisfy theoretical minimum beam emittance parameters, achromat having two, three, and four quadrupole structures is presented. In this structure, different arrangements of QF and defocusing quadruple (QD) are used. An analytical approach assuming quadrupoles as thin lenses has been followed for studying these structures. A study of Indus-2 lattice in which QF-QD-QF configuration in the achromat part has been adopted is also presented.

  4. An analytical study of double bend achromat lattice.

    PubMed

    Fakhri, Ali Akbar; Kant, Pradeep; Singh, Gurnam; Ghodke, A D

    2015-03-01

    In a double bend achromat, Chasman-Green (CG) lattice represents the basic structure for low emittance synchrotron radiation sources. In the basic structure of CG lattice single focussing quadrupole (QF) magnet is used to form an achromat. In this paper, this CG lattice is discussed and an analytical relation is presented, showing the limitation of basic CG lattice to provide the theoretical minimum beam emittance in achromatic condition. To satisfy theoretical minimum beam emittance parameters, achromat having two, three, and four quadrupole structures is presented. In this structure, different arrangements of QF and defocusing quadruple (QD) are used. An analytical approach assuming quadrupoles as thin lenses has been followed for studying these structures. A study of Indus-2 lattice in which QF-QD-QF configuration in the achromat part has been adopted is also presented. PMID:25832220

  5. Slow-light-based optical frequency shifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian; Bao, Yupan; Thuresson, Axel; Nilsson, Adam N.; Rippe, Lars; Kröll, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically a controllable way of shifting the frequency of an optical pulse by using a combination of spectral hole burning, slow light effect, and linear Stark effect in a rare-earth-ion-doped crystal. We claim that the solid angle of acceptance of a frequency shift structure can be close to 2 π , which means that the frequency shifter could work not only for optical pulses propagating in a specific spatial mode but also for randomly scattered light. As the frequency shift is controlled solely by an external electric field, it works also for weak coherent light fields and can be used, for example, as a frequency shifter for quantum memory devices in quantum communication.

  6. Visible-Frequency Dielectric Metasurfaces for Multiwavelength Achromatic and Highly Dispersive Holograms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Dong, Fengliang; Li, Qi-Tong; Yang, Dong; Sun, Chengwei; Chen, Jianjun; Song, Zhiwei; Xu, Lihua; Chu, Weiguo; Xiao, Yun-Feng; Gong, Qihuang; Li, Yan

    2016-08-10

    Dielectric metasurfaces built up with nanostructures of high refractive index represent a powerful platform for highly efficient flat optical devices due to their easy-tuning electromagnetic scattering properties and relatively high transmission efficiencies. Here we show visible-frequency silicon metasurfaces formed by three kinds of nanoblocks multiplexed in a subwavelength unit to constitute a metamolecule, which are capable of wavefront manipulation for red, green, and blue light simultaneously. Full phase control is achieved for each wavelength by independently changing the in-plane orientations of the corresponding nanoblocks to induce the required geometric phases. Achromatic and highly dispersive meta-holograms are fabricated to demonstrate the wavefront manipulation with high resolution. This technique could be viable for various practical holographic applications and flat achromatic devices. PMID:27398793

  7. Passive, achromatic, nearly isochronous bending system

    DOEpatents

    Douglas, David R.; Yunn, Byung C.

    2004-05-18

    A particle beam bending system having a geometry that applies active bending only beyond the chord of the orbit for any momentum component. Using this bending configuration, all momentum components emerge dispersed in position only; all trajectories are parallel by construction. Combining a pair of such bends with reflective symmetry produces a bend cell that is, by construction, achromatic to all orders. By the particular choice of 45.degree. individual bends, a pair of such achromats can be used as the basis of a 180.degree. recirculation arc. Other rational fractions of a full 180.degree. bend serve equally well (e.g., 2 bends/cell.times.90.degree./bend.times.1 cell /arc; 2 bends/cell.times.30.degree./bend.times.3 cells/arc, etc), as do combinations of multiple bending numerologies (e.g., 2 bends/cell.times.22.5.degree./bend.times.2 cells+2 bends/cell.times.45.degree./bend.times.1 cell). By the choice of entry pole face rotation of the first magnet and exit pole face rotation of the second magnet (with a value to be determined from the particular beam stability requirements imposed by the choice of bending angle and beam properties to be used in any particular application), desirable focusing properties can be introduced and beam stability can be insured.

  8. ACHRO: A program to help design achromatic bends

    SciTech Connect

    Rusthoi, D.

    1993-01-01

    ACHRO is a very simple 2000-line. FORTRAN code that provides help for the designer of the achromatic bend. Given a beam momentum, the program calculates the required drift lengths and dipole parameters which it will apply to any one of several different types of achromats. The types of achromats that the code helps to design include the Enge dual-270,'' the Brown 2-dipole, the Leboutet 3-dipole, and the Enge 4-dipole, as well as the periodic systems which can be designed to any order in symmetric, nonsymmetric and stair-step varieties. Given the dimensions into which a bend must fit, ACHRO will calculate the geometrical parameters in an X-Y plane for a single or multiple achromat, and for achromatic S-bend'' configurations where possible. ACHRO makes it very easy to optimize a bend with respect to drift lengths and magnet parameters by allowing the user to change parameter values and see the resulting calculation. Used in conjunction with a beam-transport code, ACHRO makes it possible for a designer to consider various types of achromatic bends in the same beamline layout in order to compare important bend characteristics such as dispersion, Isochronicity, sensitivity, geometric and chromatic aberrations, aperture requirements, space for diagnostics, etc., all of which are largely a function of the geometry and the type of achromat selected.

  9. ACHRO: A program to help design achromatic bends

    SciTech Connect

    Rusthoi, D.

    1993-03-01

    ACHRO is a very simple 2000-line. FORTRAN code that provides help for the designer of the achromatic bend. Given a beam momentum, the program calculates the required drift lengths and dipole parameters which it will apply to any one of several different types of achromats. The types of achromats that the code helps to design include the Enge dual-270,`` the Brown 2-dipole, the Leboutet 3-dipole, and the Enge 4-dipole, as well as the periodic systems which can be designed to any order in symmetric, nonsymmetric and stair-step varieties. Given the dimensions into which a bend must fit, ACHRO will calculate the geometrical parameters in an X-Y plane for a single or multiple achromat, and for achromatic ``S-bend`` configurations where possible. ACHRO makes it very easy to optimize a bend with respect to drift lengths and magnet parameters by allowing the user to change parameter values and see the resulting calculation. Used in conjunction with a beam-transport code, ACHRO makes it possible for a designer to consider various types of achromatic bends in the same beamline layout in order to compare important bend characteristics such as dispersion, Isochronicity, sensitivity, geometric and chromatic aberrations, aperture requirements, space for diagnostics, etc., all of which are largely a function of the geometry and the type of achromat selected.

  10. Design of achromatic and apochromatic plastic micro-objectives.

    PubMed

    Greisukh, Grigoriy I; Ezhov, Evgeniy G; Levin, Il'ya A; Stepanov, Sergei A

    2010-08-10

    The possibility and the efficiency of using a single diffractive lens to achromatize and apochromatize micro-objectives with plastic lenses are shown. In addition, recommendations are given on assembling the starting configurations of the objectives and calculating the design parameters required for subsequent optimization. It is also shown that achievable optical performance of achromatic and apochromatic micro-objectives with plastic lenses satisfy the qualifying standards for cell-phone objectives and closed-circuit television (CCTV) cameras. PMID:20697440

  11. Performance of an Achromatic Focal Plane Mask for Exoplanet Imaging Coronagraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Kevin; Belikov, Ruslan; Pluzhnik, Eugene; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Wilson, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Coronagraph technology combined with wavefront control is close to achieving the contrast and inner working angle requirements in the lab necessary to observe the faint signal of an Earth-like exoplanet in monochromatic light. An important remaining technological challenge is to achieve high contrast in broadband light. Coronagraph bandwidth is largely limited by chromaticity of the focal plane mask, which is responsible for blocking the stellar PSF. The size of a stellar PSF scales linearly with wavelength; ideally, the size of the focal plane mask would also scale with wavelength. A conventional hard-edge focal plane mask has a fixed size, normally sized for the longest wavelength in the observational band to avoid starlight leakage. The conventional mask is oversized for shorter wavelengths and blocks useful discovery space. Recently we presented a solution to the size chromaticity challenge with a focal plane mask designed to scale its effective size with wavelength. In this paper, we analyze performance of the achromatic size-scaling focal plane mask within a Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) coronagraph. We present results from wavefront control around the achromatic focal plane mask, and demonstrate the size-scaling effect of the mask with wavelength. The edge of the dark zone, and therefore the inner working angle of the coronagraph, scale with wavelength. The achromatic mask enables operation in a wider band of wavelengths compared with a conventional hard-edge occulter.

  12. An achromat for the ANU 14UD linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, B. A.; Stuchbery, A. E.; Weisser, D. C.

    1994-06-01

    A compact magnetic achromat has been designed and constructed to deliver the horizontal output beam of the ANU 14UD Pelletron tandem accelerator to a superconducting booster accelerator to be located in part of the experimental hall of the laboratory. The achromat provides 90° deflection of the ion beam and is fully achromatic with respect to energy spread in the beam. Due to space constraints in the laboratory, it has been necessary to locate the beam chopping device and bunching cryostat upstream of the 90° bend, thereby requiring that the beam trajectory following the bend be independent of beam energy. The optical performance of the achromat has been investigated in first order using the matrix transfer beam calculation code TRANSPORT, and in high order using the particle tracking code RAYTRACE. In first order, the achromat is shown to have precise achromatism and to be isochronous with the exception of small and predictable time waist shifts. High order calculations lead to an expectation of less than 6% worsening of the transverse beam emittance and less than 9 ps timing degradation for 170 MeV 59Ni 13+, an isotope of interest in accelerator mass spectrometry. The effect on the transmission of this isotope through the subsequent acceleration stages and beam-optical elements is negligible.

  13. The achromatic locus: effect of navigation direction in color space.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Tushar; Perales, Esther; Xiao, Kaida; Hird, Emily; Karatzas, Dimosthenis; Wuerger, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    An achromatic stimulus is defined as a patch of light that is devoid of any hue. This is usually achieved by asking observers to adjust the stimulus such that it looks neither red nor green and at the same time neither yellow nor blue. Despite the theoretical and practical importance of the achromatic locus, little is known about the variability in these settings. The main purpose of the current study was to evaluate whether achromatic settings were dependent on the task of the observers, namely the navigation direction in color space. Observers could either adjust the test patch along the two chromatic axes in the CIE u*v* diagram or, alternatively, navigate along the unique-hue lines. Our main result is that the navigation method affects the reliability of these achromatic settings. Observers are able to make more reliable achromatic settings when adjusting the test patch along the directions defined by the four unique hues as opposed to navigating along the main axes in the commonly used CIE u*v* chromaticity plane. This result holds across different ambient viewing conditions (Dark, Daylight, Cool White Fluorescent) and different test luminance levels (5, 20, and 50 cd/m(2)). The reduced variability in the achromatic settings is consistent with the idea that internal color representations are more aligned with the unique-hue lines than the u* and v* axes. PMID:24464164

  14. Achromatic Focal Plane Mask for Exoplanet Imaging Coronagraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Kevin Edward; Belikov, Ruslan; Guyon, Olivier; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Wilson, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in coronagraph technologies for exoplanet imaging have achieved contrasts close to 1e10 at 4 lambda/D and 1e-9 at 2 lambda/D in monochromatic light. A remaining technological challenge is to achieve high contrast in broadband light; a challenge that is largely limited by chromaticity of the focal plane mask. The size of a star image scales linearly with wavelength. Focal plane masks are typically the same size at all wavelengths, and must be sized for the longest wavelength in the observational band to avoid starlight leakage. However, this oversized mask blocks useful discovery space from the shorter wavelengths. We present here the design, development, and testing of an achromatic focal plane mask based on the concept of optical filtering by a diffractive optical element (DOE). The mask consists of an array of DOE cells, the combination of which functions as a wavelength filter with any desired amplitude and phase transmission. The effective size of the mask scales nearly linearly with wavelength, and allows significant improvement in the inner working angle of the coronagraph at shorter wavelengths. The design is applicable to almost any coronagraph configuration, and enables operation in a wider band of wavelengths than would otherwise be possible. We include initial results from a laboratory demonstration of the mask with the Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization coronagraph.

  15. Wavelength-shifter Readout of Scintillation Counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauletta, Giovanni

    1998-04-01

    A compact system for reading out the scintillation counters of the CDF muon upgrade has been developed and tested. The system relies on wavelength-shifter (wls) fiber ribbon, glued to the side of 1.5 to 2 cm - thick counters, to collect and transfer the light from the scintillator to a small(Hamamatsu R5600) phototube, embedded in one corner of the counter. Prototype counters were constructed from polystyrene-based scintillator(Manufactured by Monocristal Institute at Kharkov under Dubna supervision.) using y11 - doped wls fibers(Manufactured by Kuraray.) for readout. Their response to cosmic ray muons was measured and found to be adequate for up to more than 3 m when the light collection was enhanced by mirroring the wls fiber ends furthest from the photomultiplier.

  16. Effect of wavelength shifter on Indus-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhri, Ali Akbar; Ghodke, A. D.; Singh, Gurnam

    2010-01-01

    The Indus-1 is a 450 MeV synchrotron radiation source for the production of VUV radiation ( λc=61 Å). In order to produce the radiation of shorter wavelength ( λc=31 Å), a superconducting wavelength shifter (WLS) with a peak field of 3 T is being considered for Indus-1. In the Indus-1 beam lifetime is short; therefore, WLS will be kept on during beam injection. To predict WLS effect, Smith's Hamiltonian for Halbach's magnetic field model has been re-derived to estimate linear and nonlinear component under the compensated electron beam trajectory transformation. To minimize the linear effects of WLS, various linear compensation schemes and its effects on Indus-1 operation are presented.

  17. Lightness dependence of achromatic loci in color-appearance coordinates.

    PubMed

    Kuriki, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Shifts in the appearance of color under different illuminant chromaticity are known to be incomplete, and fit nicely with a simple linear transformation of cone responses that aligns the achromatic points under two illuminants. Most chromaticity-transfer functions with von-Kries-like transformations use only one set of values to fit the color shifts from one illuminant to another. However, an achromatic point shifts its chromaticity depending on the lightness of the test stimulus. This lightness dependence of the achromatic-point locus is qualitatively similar to a phenomenon known as the Helson-Judd effect. The present study suggests that the lightness dependency of achromatic points appears to be a general trend, which is supported by the results from deriving the optimal von-Kries coefficients for different lightness levels that best fit the color shifts under a different illuminant chromaticity. Further, we report that such a lightness dependence of the achromatic-point loci can be represented simply as a straight line in coordinates defined using color-appearance models such as CIECAM when normalized for daylight. PMID:25713543

  18. OPTIMIZING THE DYNAMIC APERTURE FOR TRIPLE BEND ACHROMATIC LATTICES.

    SciTech Connect

    KRAMER, S.L.; BENGTSSON, J.

    2006-06-26

    The Triple Bend Achromatic (TBA) lattice has the potential for lower natural emittance per period than the Double Bend Achromatic (DBA) lattice for high brightness light sources. However, the DBA has been chosen for 3rd generation light sources more often due to the higher number of undulator straight section available for a comparable emittance. The TBA has considerable flexibility in linear optics tuning while maintaining this emittance advantage. We have used the tune and chromaticity flexibility of a TBA lattice to minimize the lowest order nonlinearities to implement a 3rd order achromatic tune, while maintaining a constant emittance. This frees the geometric sextupoles to counter the higher order nonlinearities. This procedure is being used to improve the nonlinear dynamics of the TBA as a proposed lattice for NSLS-II facility. The flexibility of the TBA lattice will also provide for future upgrade capabilities of the beam parameters.

  19. Design and laboratory demonstration of an achromatic vector vortex coronagraph.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Naoshi; Hamaguchi, Shoki; Sakamoto, Moritsugu; Fukumoto, Ryohei; Ise, Akitoshi; Oka, Kazuhiko; Baba, Naoshi; Tamura, Motohide

    2013-03-25

    A vector vortex coronagraph (VVC) is one of promising means for imaging extremely faint objects around bright stars such as exoplanets. We present a design of an achromatic VVC, in which an axially-symmetric half-wave plate (AHP) is placed between crossed polarization filters (circular polarizer and analyzer). The circular polarizer and the analyzer are both composed of a polarizer and a quarter-wave plate (QWP). We demonstrate, via Jones calculus and Fourier analysis, that the achromatic stellar elimination can theoretically be realized by optimal polarization filters, even when chromatic AHP and QWPs are used. We carried out laboratory demonstrations of the designed VVC using a photonic-crystal AHP. As a result, we observed achromatic coronagraphic performance, a light suppression level of 7 × 10(-5), over a wavelength from 543 nm to 633 nm. PMID:23546123

  20. Fully achromatic nulling interferometer (FANI) for high SNR exoplanet characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénault, François

    2015-09-01

    Space-borne nulling interferometers have long been considered as the best option for searching and characterizing extrasolar planets located in the habitable zone of their parent stars. Solutions for achieving deep starlight extinction are now numerous and well demonstrated. However they essentially aim at realizing an achromatic central null in order to extinguish the star. In this communication is described a major improvement of the technique, where the achromatization process is extended to the entire fringe pattern. Therefore higher Signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and appreciable simplification of the detection system should result. The basic principle of this Fully achromatic nulling interferometer (FANI) consists in inserting dispersive elements along the arms of the interferometer. Herein this principle is explained and illustrated by a preliminary optical system design. The typical achievable performance and limitations are discussed and some initial tolerance requirements are also provided.

  1. Color analysis of apparently achromatic automotive paints by visible microspectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Kopchick, Kristin A; Bommarito, Christopher R

    2006-03-01

    Chromatic secondary pigments are utilized in achromatic automotive paints to create unique paint systems. These pigments may not be observable in reflected light; however, utilizing visible microspectrophotometry (MSP) discriminating data may be gathered. This study analyzed 160 apparently achromatic automotive paints via this technique for spectral evidence of secondary pigmentation. These results were compared with visual observations made via polarizing light microscopy. Positive spectral results were attained in approximately 25% of the black and gray/silver topcoat sample sets, whereas the white topcoat and gray undercoat set yielded no probative spectral data. The black sample set did yield several samples that produced spectral evidence of pigmentation when no visual chromatic data was observed. The results of this study suggest that paint analysis schemes should incorporate visible MSP for apparently achromatic black and gray/silver paint samples. PMID:16566767

  2. An Investigation of the Eighteenth-Century Achromatic Telescope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaecks, Duane H.

    2010-01-01

    The optical quality and properties of over 200 telescopes residing in museums and private collections have been measured and tested with the goal of obtaining new information about the early development of the achromatic lens (1757-1770). Quantitative measurements of the chromatic and spherical aberration of telescope objective lenses were made…

  3. Suppression of the emittance growth induced by coherent synchrotron radiation in triple-bend achromats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xi-Yang; Jiao, Yi; Xu, Gang; Cui, Xiao-Hao

    2015-05-01

    The coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) effect in a bending path plays an important role in transverse emittance dilution in high-brightness light sources and linear colliders, where the electron beams are of short bunch length and high peak current. Suppression of the emittance growth induced by CSR is critical to preserve the beam quality and help improve the machine performance. It has been shown that the CSR effect in a double-bend achromat (DBA) can be analyzed with the two-dimensional point-kick analysis method. In this paper, this method is applied to analyze the CSR effect in a triple-bend achromat (TBA) with symmetric layout, which is commonly used in the optics designs of energy recovery linacs (ERLs). A condition of cancelling the CSR linear effect in such a TBA is obtained, and is verified through numerical simulations. It is demonstrated that emittance preservation can be achieved with this condition, and to a large extent, has a high tolerance to the fluctuation of the initial transverse phase space distribution of the beam. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11475202, 11405187) and Youth Innovation Promotion Association of Chinese Academy of Sciences (2015009)

  4. The contribution of chromatic and achromatic valence to spectral saturation.

    PubMed

    Fuld, K

    1991-01-01

    The spectral efficiency of the achromatic and opponent chromatic channels was measured in three subjects by use of heterochromatic flicker photometry and hue cancellation, respectively. Heterochromatic brightness matching was also used for measuring achromatic spectral efficiency. These data were then used to predict spectral saturation based on Hurvich and Jameson's (1957; Psychological Review, 64, 384-404) opponent colors model. A standard color-naming procedure and a saturation matching technique were used for measures of spectral saturation. The ratio of saturation of short-wave to long-wave lights was found to be less than that predicted by the linear valence model. Allowing for nonlinearity at the opponent site of the yellow-blue channel plus a desaturating signal from the rods provided a good fit between data and theory. PMID:2017884

  5. Solar energy converter employing a fluorescent wavelength shifter

    SciTech Connect

    Garlick, G.F.J.

    1986-04-22

    A solar converter is described which consists of: (a) a zinc selenide fluorescent wavelength shifter including a fluorescent zinc selenide substrate having anti-reflecting coatings on opposite sides thereof and operative to convert predetermined wavelengths of solar radiation to radiation of different wavelengths for transmission to an adjacent solar cell, the fluorescent wavelength shifter having a response spectra extending between about 0.3 and 0.47 micrometers wavelength; (b) a gallium arsenide or aluminum gallium arsenide solar cell having a pn junction therein and an anti-reflective coating on one surface and further having a response spectra extending from approximately 0.47 micrometers to approximately 0.9 micrometers and operative to convert sunlight radiation of these wavelengths to output power; and (c) means for adhesively bonding one of the anti-reflectingly coated sides of the fluorescent wavelength shifter to the anti-reflective coating of the solar cell and for simultaneously providing good optical matching and transparency between these anti-reflecting coatings, whereby the pn junction of the solar cell converts radiation wavelengths within the fluorescence spectrum of the wavelength shifter to useful output power and thereby enhances and optimizes the solar conversion efficiency of the solar converter.

  6. Optimized achromatic phase-matching system and method

    DOEpatents

    Trebino, R.; DeLong, K.; Hayden, C.

    1997-07-15

    An optical system for efficiently directing a large bandwidth light (e.g., a femtosecond laser pulse) onto a nonlinear optical medium includes a plurality of optical elements for directing an input light pulse onto a nonlinear optical medium arranged such that the angle {theta}{sub in} which the light pulse directed onto the nonlinear optical medium is substantially independent of a position x of the light beam entering the optical system. The optical system is also constructed such that the group velocity dispersion of light pulses passing through the system can be tuned to a desired value including negative group velocity dispersion. 15 figs.

  7. Fabrication of Achromatic Infrared Wave Plate by Direct Imprinting Process on Chalcogenide Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Itsunari; Yamashita, Naoto; Tani, Kunihiko; Einishi, Toshihiko; Saito, Mitsunori; Fukumi, Kouhei; Nishii, Junji

    2012-07-01

    An achromatic infrared wave plate was fabricated by forming a subwavelength grating on the chalcogenide glass using direct imprint lithography. A low toxic chalcogenide glass (Sb-Ge-Sn-S system) substrate was imprinted with a grating of 1.63-µm depth, a fill factor of 0.7, and 3-µm period using glassy carbon as a mold at 253 °C and 3.8 MPa. Phase retardation of the element reached around 30° at 8.5-10.5 µm wavelengths, and the transmittance exceeded that of a flat substrate over 8 µm wavelength. Fabrication of the mid-infrared wave plate is thereby less expensive than that of conventional crystalline wave plates.

  8. Visible–infrared achromatic imaging by wavefront coding with wide-angle automobile camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Mitsuhiko; Sakita, Koichi; Shimano, Takeshi; Sugiyama, Takashi; Shibasaki, Susumu

    2016-09-01

    We perform an experiment of achromatic imaging with wavefront coding (WFC) using a wide-angle automobile lens. Our original annular phase mask for WFC was inserted to the lens, for which the difference between the focal positions at 400 nm and at 950 nm is 0.10 mm. We acquired images of objects using a WFC camera with this lens under the conditions of visible and infrared light. As a result, the effect of the removal of the chromatic aberration of the WFC system was successfully determined. Moreover, we fabricated a demonstration set assuming the use of a night vision camera in an automobile and showed the effect of the WFC system.

  9. Achromatic polarization manipulation by dispersion management of anisotropic meta-mirror with dual-metasurface.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yinghui; Yan, Lianshan; Pan, Wei; Luo, Bin

    2015-10-19

    A dual-metasurface-based reflective device ("meta-mirror") has been proposed for broadband polarization manipulation, which is composed of orthogonal metallic cut-wire arrays separated from a grounded plane with different distances. The reflective phases of orthogonally linearly-polarized components can be independently adjusted by changing the dimensions of the cut-wire pairs. Benefiting from the fully released dispersion management ability in both dimensions, achromatic (i.e., ultra-broadband) polarization manipulation can be achieved. The suggested approach has been numerically verified in both microwave and optical band. Moreover, experimental characterization in microwave regime has demonstrated the broadband polarization manipulation ability within 5 - 30 GHz. The underlying physical mechanism of dispersion engineering was explained in general equivalent circuit theory and transmission line model. PMID:26480416

  10. Achromatic half-wave plate for submillimeter instruments in cosmic microwave background astronomy: experimental characterization.

    PubMed

    Pisano, Giampaolo; Savini, Giorgio; Ade, Peter A R; Haynes, Vic; Gear, Walter K

    2006-09-20

    An achromatic half-wave plate (HWP) to be used in millimeter cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiments has been designed, manufactured, and tested. The design is based on the 5-plates Pancharatnam recipe and it works in the frequency range 85-185 GHz. A model has been used to predict the transmission, reflection, absorption, and phase shift as a function of frequency. The HWP has been tested by using coherent radiation from a back-wave oscillator to investigate its modulation efficiency and with incoherent radiation from a polarizing Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) to explore its frequency behavior. The FTS measurements have been fitted with an optical performance model which is in excellent agreement with the data. A detailed analysis of the data also allows a precise determination of the HWP fast and slow axes in the frequency band of operation. A list of the HWP performance characteristics is reported including estimates of its cross polarization. PMID:16946775

  11. Achromatic wide-view circular polarizers for a high-transmittance vertically-aligned liquid crystal cell.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seung-Won; Yoon, Tae-Hoon

    2014-08-15

    We propose an optical compensation scheme through which we can eliminate the off-axis light leakage in a vertically-aligned liquid crystal cell with circular polarizers. In this scheme, four uniaxial films with complementary dispersion characteristics are used to compensate one another, resulting in achromatic effective phase retardation for off-axis angles. By using the proposed optical compensation, a contrast ratio higher than 2000:1 can be realized over the entire 55° viewing cone in a multi-domain vertical-alignment liquid crystal cell with circular polarizers. PMID:25121848

  12. Tracking a phase-shift-keyed signal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villarreal, S.; Lenett, S. D.; Kobayashi, H. S.; Pawlowski, J. F.

    1977-01-01

    In detector, phase shifter is used to generate negative phase shift opposing detected phase angle. This produces converted series sideband and component carrier, with residual carrier signal and converted series sideband and component carrier added together to produce tracking signal.

  13. Searching for new green wavelength shifters in polystyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Pla-Dalmau, A.; Foster, G.W.; Zhang, G.

    1993-12-01

    A series of commercially available fluorescent compounds was tested as wavelength shifters in polystyrene for the tile/fiber SDC calorimeter. The objective was to find a green-fluorescing compound with short decay time (3--7 ns). Transmittance, fluorescence, and decay time measurements were performed in order to characterize each compound in polystyrene. These samples were also studies for radiation-induced damage.

  14. Optical properties of new wide heterogeneous waveguides with thermo optical shifters.

    PubMed

    De Leonardis, Francesco; Tsarev, Andrei V; Passaro, Vittorio M

    2008-12-22

    We present analysis and simulation of novel silicon-on-insulator (SOI) heterogeneous waveguides with thermo-optic phase shifters. New structure design contains a p-n junction on both sides of SOI ridge waveguide with 220 nm x 35 microm silicon core. Strongly mode-dependent optical losses (by additional free charge absorption) provide quasi-singe-mode behavior of wide waveguide with mode size approximately 10 microm. Local heater produces an efficient phase shifting by small temperature increase (DeltaT approximately 2K), switching power (< 40 mW) and switching time (< 10 micros). Mode optical losses are significantly decreased at high heating (DeltaT approximately 120 K). PMID:19104563

  15. Ultra-broadband achromatic imaging with diffractive photon sieves

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaonan; Hu, Jingpei; Lin, Yu; Xu, Feng; Zhu, Xiaojun; Pu, Donglin; Chen, Linsen; Wang, Chinhua

    2016-01-01

    Diffractive optical elements suffer from large chromatic aberration due to the strong wavelength-dependent nature in diffraction phenomena, and therefore, diffractive elements can work only at a single designed wavelength, which significantly limits the applications of diffractive elements in imaging. Here, we report on a demonstration of a wavefront coded broadband achromatic imaging with diffractive photon sieves. The broadband diffraction imaging is implemented with a wavefront coded pinhole pattern that generates equal focusing power for a wide range of operating wavelength in a single thin-film element without complicated auxiliary optical system. Experimental validation was performed using an UV-lithography fabricated wavefront coded photon sieves. Results show that the working bandwidth of the wavefront coded photon sieves reaches 28 nm compared with 0.32 nm of the conventional one. Further demonstration of the achromatic imaging with a bandwidth of 300 nm is also performed with a wavefront coded photon sieves integrated with a refractive element. PMID:27328713

  16. Ultra-broadband achromatic imaging with diffractive photon sieves.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaonan; Hu, Jingpei; Lin, Yu; Xu, Feng; Zhu, Xiaojun; Pu, Donglin; Chen, Linsen; Wang, Chinhua

    2016-01-01

    Diffractive optical elements suffer from large chromatic aberration due to the strong wavelength-dependent nature in diffraction phenomena, and therefore, diffractive elements can work only at a single designed wavelength, which significantly limits the applications of diffractive elements in imaging. Here, we report on a demonstration of a wavefront coded broadband achromatic imaging with diffractive photon sieves. The broadband diffraction imaging is implemented with a wavefront coded pinhole pattern that generates equal focusing power for a wide range of operating wavelength in a single thin-film element without complicated auxiliary optical system. Experimental validation was performed using an UV-lithography fabricated wavefront coded photon sieves. Results show that the working bandwidth of the wavefront coded photon sieves reaches 28 nm compared with 0.32 nm of the conventional one. Further demonstration of the achromatic imaging with a bandwidth of 300 nm is also performed with a wavefront coded photon sieves integrated with a refractive element. PMID:27328713

  17. Contrast polarity and edge integration in achromatic color perception.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Michael E; Zemach, Iris K

    2007-08-01

    Previous work has shown that the achromatic color of a target patch embedded in simple two-dimensional display depends not only on the luminance contrast between the target and its immediate surround but also on the contrasts of other nearby edges. Quantitative models have been proposed in which the target color is modeled as a spatially weighted sum of edge contrasts in which the target edge receives the largest weight. Rudd and Arrington [Vision Res.41, 3649 (2001)] elaborated on this idea to include an additional mechanism whereby effects of individual color-inducing edges are "partially blocked" by edges lying along the path between the inducing edge and the target. We tested the blockage model in appearance matching experiments performed with disk-and-single-ring stimuli having all four possible combinations of inner and outer ring edge contrast polarities. Evidence was obtained for both "blockage" (attenuation) and "antiblockage" (amplification) of achromatic color induction signals, depending on the contrast polarities of the inner and outer ring edges. A neural model is proposed to account for our data on the basis of the contrast gain control occurring between cortical edge detector neurons. PMID:17621319

  18. Metrology of achromatic diffractive features on chalcogenide lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scordato, M.; Nelson, J.; Schwertz, K.; Mckenna, P.; Bagwell, J.

    2015-10-01

    Achromatic diffractive features on lenses are widely used in industry for color correction, however there is not a welldefined standard to quantify the performance of the lenses. One metric used to qualify a lens is the sag deviation from the nominal lens profile. Imperfections in the manufacturing of the diffractive feature may cause scattering and performance loss. This is not reflected in sag deviation measurements, therefore performance measurements are required. There are different quantitative approaches to measuring the performance of an achromatic diffractive lens. Diffraction efficiency, a measure of optical power throughput, is a common design metric used to define the percent drop from the modulation transfer function (MTF) metric. The line spread function (LSF) shows a layout of the intensity with linear distance and an ensquared energy specification can be implemented. The MTF is a common analysis tool for assemblies and can be applied to a single element. These functional tests will be performed and compared with diffractive lenses manufactured by different tool designs. This paper displays the results found with various instruments. Contact profilometry was used to inspect the profile of the diffractive elements, and a MTF bench was used to characterize lens performance. Included will be a discussion comparing the results of profile traces and beam profiles to expected diffraction efficiency values and the effects of manufacturing imperfections.

  19. Achromatic registration of quadrature components of the optical spectrum in spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Shilyagin, P A; Gelikonov, G V; Gelikonov, V M; Moiseev, A A; Terpelov, D A

    2014-07-31

    We have thoroughly investigated the method of simultaneous reception of spectral components with the achromatised quadrature phase shift between two portions of a reference wave, designed for the effective suppression of the 'mirror' artefact in the resulting image obtained by means of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT). We have developed and experimentally tested a phase-shifting element consisting of a beam divider, which splits the reference optical beam into the two beams, and of delay lines being individual for each beam, which create a mutual phase difference of π/2 in the double pass of the reference beam. The phase shift achromatism over a wide spectral range is achieved by using in the delay lines the individual elements with different dispersion characteristics. The ranges of admissible adjustment parameters of the achromatised delay line are estimated for exact and inexact conformity of the geometric characteristics of its components to those calculated. A possibility of simultaneous recording of the close-to-quadrature spectral components with a single linear photodetector element is experimentally confirmed. The suppression of the artefact mirror peak in the OCT-signal by an additional 9 dB relative to the level of its suppression is experimentally achieved when the air delay line is used. Two-dimensional images of the surface positioned at an angle to the axis of the probe beam are obtained with the correction of the 'mirror' artefact while maintaining the dynamic range of the image. (laser biophotonics)

  20. Size, weight, and power reduction regimes in achromatic gradient-index singlets.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Sawyer D; Brocker, Donovan E; Nagar, Jogender; Werner, Douglas H

    2016-05-01

    By analyzing the limitations that achromatic gradient-index (GRIN) lens solutions in the radial and axial extremes place on lens thickness and surface curvature, a radial-axial hybrid GRIN theory is developed in order to overcome these restrictions and expose a larger solution space. With the achromatic hybrid GRIN theory, the trade-offs between thickness, curvature, and GRIN type can be directly studied in the context of size, weight, and power (SWaP) reduction. Finally, the achromatic solution space of a silicon-germanium-based material system is explored, and several designs are verified with ray tracing. PMID:27140376

  1. Symmetric Achromatic Low-Beta Collider Interaction Region Design Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, Vasiliy S.; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Lin, Fanglei; Johnson, Rolland P.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new symmetry-based concept for an achromatic low-beta collider interaction region design. A specially-designed symmetric Chromaticity Compensation Block (CCB) induces an angle spread in the passing beam such that it cancels the chromatic kick of the final focusing quadrupoles. Two such CCB?s placed symmetrically around an interaction point allow simultaneous compensation of the 1st-order chromaticities and chromatic beam smear at the IP without inducing significant 2nd-order aberrations. We first develop an analytic description of this approach and explicitly formulate 2nd-order aberration compensation conditions at the interaction point. The concept is next applied to develop an interaction region design for the ion collider ring of an electron-ion collider. We numerically evaluate performance of the design in terms of momentum acceptance and dynamic aperture. The advantages of the new concept are illustrated by comparing it to the conventional distributed-sextupole chromaticity compensation scheme.

  2. A Second-Order Achromat Design Based on FODO Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    Two dipole doglegs are widely used to translate the beam axis horizontally or vertically. Quadrupoles are placed between the two consecutive dipoles to match first order dispersion and provide betatron focusing. Similarly a four dipole chicane is usually employed to form a bypass region, where the beam axis is transversely shifted first, then translated back to the original axis. In order to generate an isochronous section, quadrupoles are again needed to tune the first order transfer matrix element R{sub 56} equaling zero. Usually sextupoles are needed to correct second order dispersion in the bending plane, for both the dogleg optics and the chicane (with quad) optics. In this paper, an alternative optics design is introduced, which is based on a simple FODO cell and does not need sextupoles assistance to form a second-order achromat. It may provide a similar function of either a dogleg or a bypass, by using 2 or 4 of such combined supercells.

  3. Common-path achromatic rotational-shearing coronagraph.

    PubMed

    Tavrov, Alexander; Korablev, Oleg; Ksanfomaliti, Leonid; Rodin, Alexander; Frolov, Pavel; Nishikwa, Jun; Tamura, Motohide; Kurokawa, Takashi; Takeda, Mitsuo

    2011-06-01

    To suppress starlight for direct exoplanet observation, we propose a common-path achromatic rotational-shearing coronagraph (CP-ARC), which is an interferocoronagraph with an angular-adjustable field rotator. The CP-ARC aims to maintain unwanted detection of stellar light, which can be suppressed incompletely by interference because of the finite diameter of the star. Compared to the previous interferocoronagraph, which had a nonadjustable 180° field rotation, the proposed CP-ARC can improve the coronagraphic contrast by several orders if the CP-ARC is combined with medium or large telescopes where the companion-star separation is optically resolved by more than a few Airy radii. The CP-ARC is made robust against mechanical disturbances due to the common-path interferometer principle. PMID:21633419

  4. Light detection and the wavelength shifter deposition in DEAP-3600

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broerman, B.; Retière, F.

    2016-02-01

    The Dark matter Experiment using Argon Pulse-shape discrimination (DEAP) uses liquid argon as a target medium to perform a direct-detection dark matter search. The 3600 kg liquid argon target volume is housed in a spherical acrylic vessel and viewed by a surrounding array of photomultiplier tubes. Ionizing particles in the argon volume produce scintillation light which must be wavelength shifted to be detected by the photomultiplier tubes. Argon scintillation and wavelength shifting, along with details on the application of the wavelength shifter to the inner surface of the acrylic vessel are presented.

  5. Fabrication and measurements of hybrid Nb/Al Josephson junctions and flux qubits with π-shifters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakova, A. V.; Fedorov, K. G.; Shulga, K. V.; Ryazanov, V. V.; Bolginov, V. V.; Oboznov, V. A.; Egorov, S. V.; Shkolnikov, V. O.; Wolf, M. J.; Beckmann, D.; Ustinov, A. V.

    2015-02-01

    We describe fabrication and testing of composite flux qubits combining Nb- and Al-based superconducting circuit technology. This hybrid approach to making qubits allows for employing π-phase shifters fabricated using well-established Nb-based technology of superconductor-ferromagnet-superconductor Josephson junctions. The important feature here is to obtain high interface transparency between Nb and Al layers without degrading sub-micron shadow mask. We achieve this by in situ Ar etching using e-beam gun. Shadow-evaporated Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions with Nb bias pads show the expected current-voltage characteristics with reproducible critical currents. Using this technique, we fabricated composite Nb/Al flux qubits with Nb/CuNi/Nb π-shifters and measured their magnetic field response. The observed offset between the field responses of the qubits with and without π-junction is attributed to the π phase shift. The reported approach can be used for implementing a variety of hybrid Nb/Al superconducting quantum circuits.

  6. CIAXE: co-axial achromatic interferential coronagraph: first laboratory results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allouche, Fatmé; Gay, Jean; Rabbia, Yves; Assus, Pierre

    2010-07-01

    In 1996, Jean Gay and Yves Rabbia presented their Achromatic Interferential Coronagraph (AIC) for detecting and imaging faint companions (ultimately exoplanets) in the neighboring of a star. As presented then, the Michleson-like Interferometer configuration of the AIC hardens its insertion into an existing (coaxial) optical train, the output beam of the AIC being delivered at right angle from the input beam. To overcome this, they reconfigured the AIC into a compact and fully axial coronagraph, the CIAXE, which main feature consists of using two thick lenses machined in the same optical material. For the CIAXE to deliver the output beam along the same axis as the input beam, the two lenses are coaxially disposed on the optical axis and are separated, at their common spherical contact surface by a thin air gap acting like a beam splitter. We have set up a laboratory experiment aiming at validating the principle of the concept. Our first step was to equalize the thicknesses of the two lenses, so as to make zero the optical path difference between both arms. For this, the (residual) value of the OPD has been evaluated and then the lenses have been re-machined so as to decrease as far as technologically possible, the thicknesses mismatch. As a second step, a micro-controlled rotation around the common curvature center of the spherical surfaces of the lenses is applied. This allows a fine tuning of the residual OPD at the required accuracy level. Are presented here test bench, steps and results.

  7. Edge detection depends on achromatic channel in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yanqiong; Ji, Xiaoxiao; Gong, Haiyun; Gong, Zhefeng; Liu, Li

    2012-10-01

    Edges represent important information in object recognition, and thus edge detection is crucial for animal survival. Various types of edges result from visual contrast, such as luminance contrast and color contrast. So far, the molecular and neural mechanisms underlying edge detection and the relationship between different edge information-processing pathways have been largely undemonstrated. In the present study, using a color light-emitting-diode-based Buridan's paradigm, we demonstrated that a blue/green demarcation is able to generate edge-orientation behavior in the adult fly. There is a blue/green intensity ratio, the so-called point of equal luminance, at which wild-type flies did not show obvious orientation behavior towards edges. This suggests that orientation behavior towards edges is dependent on luminance contrast in Drosophila. The results of mutants ninaE(17) and sev(LY3);rh5(2);rh6(1) demonstrated that achromatic R1-R6 photoreceptor cells, but not chromatic R7/R8 photoreceptor cells, were necessary for orientation behavior towards edges. Moreover, ectopic expression of rhodopsin 4 (Rh4), Rh5 or Rh6 could efficiently restore the edge-orientation defect in the ninaE(17) mutant. Altogether, our results show that R1-R6 photoreceptor cells are both necessary and sufficient for orientation behavior towards edges in Drosophila. PMID:22735352

  8. Low voltage to high voltage level shifter and related methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mentze, Erik J. (Inventor); Hess, Herbert L. (Inventor); Buck, Kevin M. (Inventor); Cox, David F. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A shifter circuit comprises a high and low voltage buffer stages and an output buffer stage. The high voltage buffer stage comprises multiple transistors arranged in a transistor stack having a plurality of intermediate nodes connecting individual transistors along the stack. The transistor stack is connected between a voltage level being shifted to and an input voltage. An inverter of this stage comprises multiple inputs and an output. Inverter inputs are connected to a respective intermediate node of the transistor stack. The low voltage buffer stage has an input connected to the input voltage and an output, and is operably connected to the high voltage buffer stage. The low voltage buffer stage is connected between a voltage level being shifted away from and a lower voltage. The output buffer stage is driven by the outputs of the high voltage buffer stage inverter and the low voltage buffer stage.

  9. Spatial vision of the achromat: spatial frequency and orientation-specific adaptation.

    PubMed Central

    Greenlee, M W; Magnussen, S; Nordby, K

    1988-01-01

    1. The psychophysical technique of selective adaptation to stationary sine-wave gratings of varying spatial frequency and orientation was used to investigate the central processing of spatial information in the visual system of the complete achromat. 2. For adapting spatial frequencies of 1 and 2 cycles/deg, the spatial frequency and orientation selectivity of contrast threshold elevation is similar for achromatic and trichromatic vision. 3. For adapting frequencies below 1 cycle/deg, the achromat shows threshold elevations of normal magnitude with symmetrical spatial frequency and orientation tuning for adapting frequencies as low as 0.09 cycles/deg with 'bandwidth' estimates similar to those found at high frequencies in the trichromat. Below 0.66 cycles/deg no after-effect could be obtained in the trichromat, and the frequency tuning at 0.66 cycles/deg was skewed towards higher frequencies. 4. The interocular transfer of low-frequency adaptation in the achromat was 50%, which is the same value obtained at higher frequencies. 5. The time course of the decay of low spatial frequency adaptation in the achromat was similar to that found at higher frequencies. 6. Control experiments show no low-frequency adaptation in peripheral vision or in central vision in the dark-adapted trichromat indicating that low spatial frequency adaptation cannot be elicited through the rod system of the trichromat. 7. It is proposed that the observed range shift of adaptable spatial frequency mechanisms in the achromat's visual cortex is the result of an arrest at an early stage of sensory development. The visual cortex of the achromat is comparable, with respect to spatial processing, to that of the young, visually normal human infant. PMID:3261791

  10. Spatially and spectrally engineered spin-orbit interaction for achromatic virtual shaping

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Mingbo; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Yanqin; Li, Xiong; Ma, Xiaoliang; Hu, Chenggang; Wang, Changtao; Huang, Cheng; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    The geometries of objects are deterministic in electromagnetic phenomena in all aspects of our world, ranging from imaging with spherical eyes to stealth aircraft with bizarre shapes. Nevertheless, shaping the physical geometry is often undesired owing to other physical constraints such as aero- and hydro-dynamics in the stealth technology. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to change the traditional law of reflection as well as the electromagnetic characters without altering the physical shape, by utilizing the achromatic phase shift stemming from spin-orbit interaction in ultrathin space-variant and spectrally engineered metasurfaces. The proposal is validated by full-wave simulations and experimental characterization in optical wavelengths ranging from 600 nm to 2800 nm and microwave frequencies in 8-16 GHz, with echo reflectance less than 10% in the whole range. The virtual shaping as well as the revised law of reflection may serve as a versatile tool in many realms, including broadband and conformal camouflage and Kinoform holography, to name just a few. PMID:25959663

  11. Spatially and spectrally engineered spin-orbit interaction for achromatic virtual shaping.

    PubMed

    Pu, Mingbo; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Yanqin; Li, Xiong; Ma, Xiaoliang; Hu, Chenggang; Wang, Changtao; Huang, Cheng; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    The geometries of objects are deterministic in electromagnetic phenomena in all aspects of our world, ranging from imaging with spherical eyes to stealth aircraft with bizarre shapes. Nevertheless, shaping the physical geometry is often undesired owing to other physical constraints such as aero- and hydro-dynamics in the stealth technology. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to change the traditional law of reflection as well as the electromagnetic characters without altering the physical shape, by utilizing the achromatic phase shift stemming from spin-orbit interaction in ultrathin space-variant and spectrally engineered metasurfaces. The proposal is validated by full-wave simulations and experimental characterization in optical wavelengths ranging from 600 nm to 2800 nm and microwave frequencies in 8-16 GHz, with echo reflectance less than 10% in the whole range. The virtual shaping as well as the revised law of reflection may serve as a versatile tool in many realms, including broadband and conformal camouflage and Kinoform holography, to name just a few. PMID:25959663

  12. Chromatic-achromatic perimetry in four clinic cases: Glaucoma and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cabezos, Inmaculada; Luque, Maria José; de Fez, Dolores; Moncho, Vicenta; Camps, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Background: Some diseases that affect the visual system may show loss of chromatic-achromatic sensitivity before obvious physical signs appear in the usual examination of the eye's posterior segment. A perimetric study has been conducted with four typical patients with glaucoma and diabetes, at different stages of the disease. Materials and Methods: In addition to the standard white-on-white (standard automated perimetry [SAP]), a test battery has been used to study patient's contrast sensitivity, using stimuli with different chromatic, spatial, and temporal content (multichannel perimetry). The choice of stimuli tries to maximize the response of different visual mechanisms: Achromatic (parvocellular and magnocellular origin); chromatic red-green (parvocellular origin); and chromatic blue-yellow (koniocellular origin). Results: The results seem to indicate losses in the achromatic-parvocellular perimetry and both chromatic perimetry tests, undetected by conventional SAP. Conclusions: Our results illustrate that our patients without visible retinal alterations show signs of suspicion in multichannel perimetry. PMID:25827546

  13. Wavelength Shifters and Interactions of EDTA with Acrylic & LAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Yuvraj; SNO+ Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The SNO + experiment, an upgrade to the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, will use linear alkyl-benzene (LAB) liquid scintillator to probe new physics, including 0 νββ decay. Event detection efficiency is heavily affected by radioactive backgrounds, two sources being Rn-222 and Po-210 daughters, some of which has become embedded in the SNO + acrylic vessel after years underground. The leading candidate for polonium leaching is Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Before deployment on-site, EDTA's effects on the mechanical integrity of acrylic must be determined. It also must not be soluble in LAB or must be removed before scintillator fill of the vessel, as its presence would result in reduced light yield due to scattering. It was found that EDTA had negligible effects on the Young's Modulus of acrylic. EDTA is also slightly soluble in LAB, but can be completely removed by rinsing with water. Additionally, the study of the light yield and alpha/beta timing profiles of two wavelength shifters - bisMSB and perylene - is critical to determining which should be added to the 0 νββ isotope (tellurium) LAB cocktail. Small-scale results hint that perylene might be better, but this is being confirmed with larger-scale tests. The SNO + experiment, an upgrade to the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, will use linear alkyl-benzene (LAB) liquid scintillator to probe new physics, including 0 νββ decay. Event detection efficiency is heavily affected by radioactive backgrounds, two sources being Rn-222 and Po-210 daughters, some of which has become embedded in the SNO + acrylic vessel after years underground. The leading candidate for polonium leaching is Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Before deployment on-site, EDTA's effects on the mechanical integrity of acrylic must be determined. It also must not be soluble in LAB or must be removed before scintillator fill of the vessel, as its presence would result in reduced light yield due to scattering. It was found that EDTA

  14. Status of Studies of Achromat-based 6D Ionization Cooling Rings for Muons

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, X.; Kirk, H.; Cline, D.; Garren, A.A.; Berg, J.S.

    2011-09-04

    Six dimensional ionization cooling of muons is needed to achieve the necessary luminosity for a muon collider. If that cooling could occur over multiple turns in a closed ring, there would be significant cost savings over a single-pass cooling channel. We report on the status of a cooling ring with achromatic arcs. The achromatic design permits the design to easily switch between a closed ring and a snaking geometry on injection or extraction from the ring. The ring is designed with sufficient space in each superperiod for injection and extraction magnets. We describe the ring's lattice design, performance, and injection/extraction requirements.

  15. Distributed phased array architecture study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourgeois, Brian

    1987-01-01

    Variations in amplifiers and phase shifters can cause degraded antenna performance, depending also on the environmental conditions and antenna array architecture. The implementation of distributed phased array hardware was studied with the aid of the DISTAR computer program as a simulation tool. This simulation provides guidance in hardware simulation. Both hard and soft failures of the amplifiers in the T/R modules are modeled. Hard failures are catastrophic: no power is transmitted to the antenna elements. Noncatastrophic or soft failures are modeled as a modified Gaussian distribution. The resulting amplitude characteristics then determine the array excitation coefficients. The phase characteristics take on a uniform distribution. Pattern characteristics such as antenna gain, half power beamwidth, mainbeam phase errors, sidelobe levels, and beam pointing errors were studied as functions of amplifier and phase shifter variations. General specifications for amplifier and phase shifter tolerances in various architecture configurations for C band and S band were determined.

  16. Generic conditions for suppressing the coherent synchrotron radiation induced emittance growth in a two-dipole achromat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Yi; Cui, Xiaohao; Huang, Xiyang; Xu, Gang

    2014-06-01

    The effect of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) becomes evident, and leads to increased beam energy spread and transverse emittance dilution, as both the emittance and bunch length of the electron beams are continuously pushed down in present and forthcoming high-brightness light sources and linear colliders. Suppressing this effect is important to preserve the expected machine performance. Methods of the R-matrix analysis and the Courant-Snyder formalism analysis have been proposed to evaluate and to suppress the emittance growth due to CSR in achromatic cells. In this paper a few important modifications are made on these two methods, which enable us to prove that these two methods are equivalent to each other. With the modified analysis, we obtain explicit and generic conditions of cancelling the CSR-driven emittance excitation in a single achromat consisting of two dipoles of arbitrary bending angles. In spite of the fact that the analysis constrains itself in a linear regime, based on the assumption that CSR-induced particle energy deviation is proportional to both θ and ρ1/3, with θ being the bending angle and ρ the bending radius, it is demonstrated through ELEGANT simulations that the conditions derived from this analysis are still effective in suppressing the emittance growth when a more detailed one-dimensional CSR model is considered. In addition, it illustrates that the emittance growth can be reduced to a lower level with the proposed conditions than with the other two approaches, such as matching the beam envelope to the CSR kick and setting the cell-to-cell betatron phase advance to an appropriate value.

  17. Light Readout Optimisation using Wavelength Shifter - Reflector Combinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavrokoridis, Konstantinos

    2011-07-01

    The use of reflectors coated with a wavelength shifter (WLS) along with standard bialkali PMTs is an economical method for an efficient readout system for vacuum ultra violet (VUV) light produced in large liquid argon detectors. Various thicknesses of tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) were deposited by spraying and vacuum evaporation onto both specular 3MTM-foil and diffuse TetratexTM (TTX) reflectors. 128 nm VUV light generated in 1 bar argon gas by a 5.4 MeV α source was detected by a 3-inch bialkali borosilicate PMT within a 1 m tube lined internally with a TPB coated reflector. The light collection was recorded as a function of separation between source and PMT for each combination of coating and reflector for distances up to 1m. Reflection coefficients of TPB coated reflectors were measured using a spectroradiometer. WLS coating on the PMT window was also studied. The optimum coating and reflector combination was TPB evaporated on TTX. Measurements with coating thicknesses of 0.2 mg/cm2 and 1.0 mg/cm2 yielded a similar performance. The best PMT window coating is obtained by TPB evaporation of 0.05 mg/cm2.

  18. New Light on an Old Question: Who Invented the Achromatic Telescope?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudd, M. Eugene; Jaecks, Duane H.; Willach, Rolf; Sorrenson, Richard; Abrahams, Peter

    A discussion of the events leading up to the invention of the achromatic telescope, including topics on spherical aberration and Franciscus Maurolycus, the discovery of chromatic aberration, Issac Newton, John Dollond and his experiments, Samuel Klingenstierna, patent trials, and letters from Dollond and Ramsden.

  19. Achromatic and isochronous lattice design of P2DT bending section in RAON accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Jang, Hyojae; Hong, In-Seok; Jeon, Dong-O.

    2015-09-01

    In RAON heavy ion accelerator, generally, the In-flight Fragmentation (IF) and Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) systems are employed in order to produce various isotope beams. Out of the isotope beams, the beams generated by the ISOL system are transported from the low energy linac SCL3 to the high energy driver linac SCL2. The post-accelerator to the driver linac transport (P2DT) section that consists of the charge stripper section, the 180° bending section, and the SCL2 matching section is placed between the SCL3 and the SCL2. In this P2DT section, however, the transverse and longitudinal emittance growth can aggravate the beam acceptance of the SCL2. Besides, the growth at the P2DT 180° bending section is considered a significant issue because of the unexpected achromatic effect. Therefore an achromatic and isochronous lattice design should be devised to prevent the transverse and longitudinal emittance from increasing while the multi-charge beams flow through the bending section. This study reports an improved design for the achromatic and isochronous lattice up to the second-order. After satisfying the first-order achromatic and isochronous condition by adjusting the field strength of quadrupoles with this design, the simple and efficient method will be utilized with the aim of getting the minimum number of sextupoles. The research on the collimator for the charge selection at the bending section will be also represented by using the designed lattice.

  20. All-optical generation of a 21 GHz microwave carrier by incorporating a double-Brillouin frequency shifter.

    PubMed

    Shee, Y G; Mahdi, M A; Al-Mansoori, M H; Yaakob, S; Mohamed, R; Zamzuri, A K; Man, A; Ismail, A; Hitam, S

    2010-05-01

    An all-optical generation of a microwave carrier at 21 GHz that incorporates a double-Brillouin frequency shifter is presented. The frequency shift of approximately 21 GHz is achieved by generating the second-order Brillouin Stokes signal from the Brillouin pump. This is accomplished through the circulation and isolation of its first-order Stokes signal in the optical fiber. The Brillouin pump signal is heterodyned with its second-order Brillouin Stokes signal at a high-speed photodetector, and the output beating frequency is equal to the offset between these two signals. The generated microwave carrier is measured at 21.3968 GHz, and the carrier phase noise as low as -58.67 dBc/Hz is achieved. PMID:20436603

  1. Improving dye laser efficiency with uv absorbers and wavelength shifters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Matheson, K L; Thorne, J M

    1981-01-01

    The nonuniform heating in flashlamp pumped dye lasers forms refractive index gradients in the dye solution. These gradients distort the wavefront of the laser beam resulting in limited output power, limited pulse repetition rate, and limited attainable linewidth. The theorectical bases for using uv absorbers and wavelength shifters to eliminate light of detrimental wavelengths and thereby improve dye laser efficiency are described, and the results of experiments for evaluating 12 uv absorbers and 12 wavelength filters for use as possible pump light filters are presented. These experiments showed that the appropriate uv absorber or wavelength shifter to be used with a given laser dye is based on the absorption spectrum of the dye. If a uv absorber is needed, then the compound should be chosen so that its long wavelength absorption peak is just to the short wavelength side of the absorption peaks of the laser dye. If a wavelength shifter is needed, then the compound should be chosen so that there is maximum overlap between the fluorescence spectrum of the shifter and the absorption spectrum of the dye. Tabulated data are presented which can be used to selected protectors and shifters for specific dyes. (LCL)

  2. Design and modeling of a cost-effective achromatic Fresnel lens for concentrating photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Vallerotto, Guido; Victoria, Marta; Askins, Stephen; Herrero, Rebeca; Domínguez, César; Antón, Ignacio; Sala, Gabriel

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a novel Fresnel lens capable of significantly reducing chromatic aberration in solar applications. The optical performance of this achromatic lens has been analyzed through ray-tracing simulations, showing a concentration factor three times higher than that attained by a classic silicone on glass (SOG) Fresnel lens while maintaining the same acceptance angle. This should avoid the need for a secondary optical element, reducing the cost associated with its manufacturing and assembly and increasing the module reliability. The achromatic lens is made of inexpensive plastic and elastomer which allows a highly scalable and cost-competitive manufacturing process similar to the one currently used for the fabrication of SOG Fresnel lenses. PMID:27607727

  3. Production of ultra cold neutrons by a doppler shifter with pulsed neutrons at J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishima, K.; Imajo, S.; Hino, M.; Ino, T.; Iwashita, Y.; Katayama, R.; Kitaguchi, M.; Oda, T.; Shimizu, H. M.; Utsuro, M.; Yamashita, S.; Yoshioka, T.

    2014-07-01

    Ultracold neutrons (UCNs) are neutrons whose kinetic energy is around a few hundred nanoelectronvolts. Neutrons with such small kinetic energy can be trapped in a material vessel or magnetic fields. Because of these unique characteristics, UCNs are used for some important experiments of fundamental physics. The Doppler shifter is a device to produce UCN by slowing them down by the reflection on a mirror moving with half of the velocity of incoming neutrons. A Doppler shifter using a quadruple-stack of monochromatic supermirrors that reflects neutrons with a velocity around 68m/s [1, Hino et al.(2010)] was fabricated, and operated with a pulsed neutron source of J-PARC. An important feature of the Doppler shifter is the use of a pulsed neutron beam. Unlike in continuous neutron beams, the neutron velocity can be selected by choosing a time slice in a pulsed neutron bunch. Thus the UCN production improves by ~80 times in the case of J-PARC. We successfully produced the UCNs by the Doppler shifter: the measured UCN production rate is consistent with the simulations.

  4. Behavioural and electrophysiological chromatic and achromatic contrast sensitivity in an achromatopsic patient.

    PubMed Central

    Heywood, C A; Nicholas, J J; Cowey, A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--In cases of incomplete achromatopsia it is unclear whether residual visual function is mediated by intact striate cortex or results from incomplete lesions to extrastriate cortical visual areas. A patient with complete cerebral achromatopsia was tested to establish the nature of his residual vision and to determine the integrity of striate cortex function. METHODS--Behavioural contrast sensitivity, using the method of adjustment, and averaged visually evoked cortical potentials were measured to sinusoidally modulated chromatic and achromatic gratings in an achromatopsic patient and a normal observer. Eye movements were measured in the patient using a Skalar infrared monitoring system. RESULTS--The patient's chromatic contrast sensitivity was normal, indicating that despite his dense colour blindness his occipital cortex still processed information about spatial variations in hue. His sensitivity to achromatic gratings was depressed particularly at high spatial frequencies, possibly because of his jerk nystagmus. These behavioural results were reinforced by the nature of visually evoked responses to chromatic and achromatic gratings, in which total colour blindness coexisted with an almost normal cortical potential to isoluminant chromatic gratings. CONCLUSIONS--The results show that information about chromatic contrast is present in some cortical areas, and coded in a colour-opponent fashion, in the absence of any perceptual experience of colour. PMID:8648330

  5. Orientation tuning of binocular summation: a comparison of colour to achromatic contrast

    PubMed Central

    Gheiratmand, Mina; Cherniawsky, Avital S.; Mullen, Kathy T.

    2016-01-01

    A key function of the primary visual cortex is to combine the input from the two eyes into a unified binocular percept. At low, near threshold, contrasts a process of summation occurs if the visual inputs from the two eyes are similar. Here we measure the orientation tuning of binocular summation for chromatic and equivalent achromatic contrast. We derive estimates of orientation tuning by measuring binocular summation as a function of the orientation difference between two sinusoidal gratings presented dichoptically to different eyes. We then use a model to estimate the orientation bandwidth of the neural detectors underlying the binocular combination. We find that orientation bandwidths are similar for chromatic and achromatic stimuli at both low (0.375 c/deg) and mid (1.5 c/deg) spatial frequencies, with an overall average of 29 ± 3 degs (HWHH, s.e.m). This effect occurs despite the overall greater binocular summation found for the low spatial frequency chromatic stimuli. These results suggest that similar, oriented processes underlie both chromatic and achromatic binocular contrast combination. The non-oriented detection process found in colour vision at low spatial frequencies under monocular viewing is not evident at the binocular combination stage. PMID:27168119

  6. The effect of contrast intensity and polarity in the achromatic watercolor effect.

    PubMed

    Cao, Bo; Yazdanbakhsh, Arash; Mingolla, Ennio

    2011-01-01

    The watercolor effect (WCE) is a filling-in phenomenon in a region demarcated by two thin abutting lines. The perceived chromaticity of the region is similar to that of the interior line. We develop a series of achromatic WCE stimuli to induce lightness changes analogous to the induced chromaticity in the chromatic version of the WCE. We use a variation of the paired-comparison paradigm to quantify the induced lightness of the filled-in regions to regions with real luminance variations. The luminance of the inner line is fixed, while the luminance of the outer line varies across stimuli. Data from seven subjects (five naive) confirm that an achromatic WCE exists. Moreover, outer lines with both high and low luminances can generate a WCE with an inner line of a moderate luminance. All subjects show a single peak of the effect strength for both polarity conditions, which is never at the extreme luminance levels. Most subjects show an inverted U curve for effect strength as a function of the contrast of the outer lines against the background. Results suggest that the contrast difference between the outer line and the inner line affects the existence and the strength of the achromatic WCE in a nonlinear way. PMID:21436347

  7. Orientation tuning of binocular summation: a comparison of colour to achromatic contrast.

    PubMed

    Gheiratmand, Mina; Cherniawsky, Avital S; Mullen, Kathy T

    2016-01-01

    A key function of the primary visual cortex is to combine the input from the two eyes into a unified binocular percept. At low, near threshold, contrasts a process of summation occurs if the visual inputs from the two eyes are similar. Here we measure the orientation tuning of binocular summation for chromatic and equivalent achromatic contrast. We derive estimates of orientation tuning by measuring binocular summation as a function of the orientation difference between two sinusoidal gratings presented dichoptically to different eyes. We then use a model to estimate the orientation bandwidth of the neural detectors underlying the binocular combination. We find that orientation bandwidths are similar for chromatic and achromatic stimuli at both low (0.375 c/deg) and mid (1.5 c/deg) spatial frequencies, with an overall average of 29 ± 3 degs (HWHH, s.e.m). This effect occurs despite the overall greater binocular summation found for the low spatial frequency chromatic stimuli. These results suggest that similar, oriented processes underlie both chromatic and achromatic binocular contrast combination. The non-oriented detection process found in colour vision at low spatial frequencies under monocular viewing is not evident at the binocular combination stage. PMID:27168119

  8. Achromatic vector vortex beams from a glass cone

    PubMed Central

    Radwell, N.; Hawley, R. D.; Götte, J. B.; Franke-Arnold, S.

    2016-01-01

    The reflection of light is governed by the laws first described by Augustin-Jean Fresnel: on internal reflection, light acquires a phase shift, which depends on its polarization direction with respect to the plane of incidence. For a conical reflector, the cylindrical symmetry is echoed in an angular variation of this phase shift, allowing us to create light modes with phase and polarization singularities. Here we observe the phase and polarization profiles of light that is back reflected from a solid glass cone and, in the case of circular input light, discover that not only does the beam contain orbital angular momentum but can trivially be converted to a radially polarized beam. Importantly, the Fresnel coefficients are reasonably stable across the visible spectrum, which we demonstrate by measuring white light polarization profiles. This discovery provides a highly cost-effective technique for the generation of broadband orbital angular momentum and radially polarized beams. PMID:26861191

  9. Wide-band six-region phase mask coronagraph.

    PubMed

    Hou, Fanzhen; Cao, Qing; Zhu, Minning; Ma, Ourui

    2014-01-27

    An achromatic six-region phase mask coronagraph, used for the detection of exoplanets, is proposed. The mask has six regions in angular direction and could work in wideband. Furthermore, a six-level phase mask, as an example of the six-region phase mask, is theoretically investigated. According to numerical simulations, this specific mask has a deep elimination of starlight, good performance of achromatism and small inner working angle. As a single phase mask, the ratio of the remaining starlight of the six-level phase mask to the total incident starlight is less than 0.001 when the wavelength is between 500 nm and 600 nm. PMID:24515197

  10. Feed-forward digital phase and amplitude correction system

    DOEpatents

    Yu, D.U.L.; Conway, P.H.

    1994-11-15

    Phase and amplitude modifications in repeatable RF pulses at the output of a high power pulsed microwave amplifier are made utilizing a digital feed-forward correction system. A controlled amount of the output power is coupled to a correction system for processing of phase and amplitude information. The correction system comprises circuitry to compare the detected phase and amplitude with the desired phase and amplitude, respectively, and a digitally programmable phase shifter and attenuator and digital logic circuitry to control the phase shifter and attenuator. The phase and amplitude of subsequent are modified by output signals from the correction system. 11 figs.

  11. Feed-forward digital phase and amplitude correction system

    DOEpatents

    Yu, David U. L.; Conway, Patrick H.

    1994-01-01

    Phase and amplitude modifications in repeatable RF pulses at the output of a high power pulsed microwave amplifier are made utilizing a digital feed-forward correction system. A controlled amount of the output power is coupled to a correction system for processing of phase and amplitude information. The correction system comprises circuitry to compare the detected phase and amplitude with the desired phase and amplitude, respectively, and a digitally programmable phase shifter and attenuator and digital logic circuitry to control the phase shifter and attenuator. The Phase and amplitude of subsequent are modified by output signals from the correction system.

  12. Coplanar waveguide fed phased array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Ponchak, George E.; Lee, R. Q.; Fernandez, N. S.

    1990-01-01

    A K-band four element linear phased array was designed and tested. Coplanar waveguide (CPW) is used for the microwave distribution system. A CPW to twin strip transition is used to interface with the printed dipole antennas. MMIC phased shifters are used for phase control.

  13. Control of phased-array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoilenko, V. I.; Shishov, Iu. A.

    Principles and algorithms for the control of phased arrays are described. Particular consideration is given to algorithms for the control of phase distribution, adaptive arrays, beam-steerable arrays, the design of phase shifters, the compensation of beam-pointing errors, and the calibration of high-gain antenna pointing.

  14. Integrated optical frequency shifter in silicon-organic hybrid (SOH) technology.

    PubMed

    Lauermann, M; Weimann, C; Knopf, A; Heni, W; Palmer, R; Koeber, S; Elder, D L; Bogaerts, W; Leuthold, J; Dalton, L R; Rembe, C; Freude, W; Koos, C

    2016-05-30

    We demonstrate for the first time a waveguide-based frequency shifter on the silicon photonic platform using single-sideband modulation. The device is based on silicon-organic hybrid (SOH) electro-optic modulators, which combine conventional silicon-on-insulator waveguides with highly efficient electro-optic cladding materials. Using small-signal modulation, we demonstrate frequency shifts of up to 10 GHz. We further show large-signal modulation with optimized waveforms, enabling a conversion efficiency of -5.8 dB while suppressing spurious side-modes by more than 23 dB. In contrast to conventional acousto-optic frequency shifters, our devices lend themselves to large-scale integration on silicon substrates, while enabling frequency shifts that are several orders of magnitude larger than those demonstrated with all-silicon serrodyne devices. PMID:27410095

  15. Catenary optics for achromatic generation of perfect optical angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Pu, Mingbo; Li, Xiong; Ma, Xiaoliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Changtao; Hu, Chenggang; Gao, Ping; Huang, Cheng; Ren, Haoran; Li, Xiangping; Qin, Fei; Yang, Jing; Gu, Min; Hong, Minghui; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-10-01

    The catenary is the curve that a free-hanging chain assumes under its own weight, and thought to be a "true mathematical and mechanical form" in architecture by Robert Hooke in the 1670s, with nevertheless no significant phenomena observed in optics. We show that the optical catenary can serve as a unique building block of metasurfaces to produce continuous and linear phase shift covering [0, 2π], a mission that is extremely difficult if not impossible for state-of-the-art technology. Via catenary arrays, planar optical devices are designed and experimentally characterized to generate various kinds of beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM). These devices can operate in an ultra-broadband spectrum because the anisotropic modes associated with the spin-orbit interaction are almost independent of the incident light frequency. By combining the optical and topological characteristics, our approach would allow the complete control of photons within a single nanometric layer. PMID:26601283

  16. Catenary optics for achromatic generation of perfect optical angular momentum

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Mingbo; Li, Xiong; Ma, Xiaoliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Changtao; Hu, Chenggang; Gao, Ping; Huang, Cheng; Ren, Haoran; Li, Xiangping; Qin, Fei; Yang, Jing; Gu, Min; Hong, Minghui; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    The catenary is the curve that a free-hanging chain assumes under its own weight, and thought to be a “true mathematical and mechanical form” in architecture by Robert Hooke in the 1670s, with nevertheless no significant phenomena observed in optics. We show that the optical catenary can serve as a unique building block of metasurfaces to produce continuous and linear phase shift covering [0, 2π], a mission that is extremely difficult if not impossible for state-of-the-art technology. Via catenary arrays, planar optical devices are designed and experimentally characterized to generate various kinds of beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM). These devices can operate in an ultra-broadband spectrum because the anisotropic modes associated with the spin-orbit interaction are almost independent of the incident light frequency. By combining the optical and topological characteristics, our approach would allow the complete control of photons within a single nanometric layer. PMID:26601283

  17. A tale of two retinal domains: near-optimal sampling of achromatic contrasts in natural scenes through asymmetric photoreceptor distribution.

    PubMed

    Baden, Tom; Schubert, Timm; Chang, Le; Wei, Tao; Zaichuk, Mariana; Wissinger, Bernd; Euler, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    For efficient coding, sensory systems need to adapt to the distribution of signals to which they are exposed. In vision, natural scenes above and below the horizon differ in the distribution of chromatic and achromatic features. Consequently, many species differentially sample light in the sky and on the ground using an asymmetric retinal arrangement of short- (S, "blue") and medium- (M, "green") wavelength-sensitive photoreceptor types. Here, we show that in mice this photoreceptor arrangement provides for near-optimal sampling of natural achromatic contrasts. Two-photon population imaging of light-driven calcium signals in the synaptic terminals of cone-photoreceptors expressing a calcium biosensor revealed that S, but not M cones, preferred dark over bright stimuli, in agreement with the predominance of dark contrasts in the sky but not on the ground. Therefore, the different cone types do not only form the basis of "color vision," but in addition represent distinct (achromatic) contrast-selective channels. PMID:24314730

  18. Demonstration of achromatic cold-neutron microscope utilizing axisymmetric focusing mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D.; Khaykovich, B.; Hussey, D.; Jacobson, D.; Arif, M.; Gubarev, M. V.; Ramsey, B. D.; Moncton, D. E.

    2013-05-06

    An achromatic cold-neutron microscope with magnification 4 is demonstrated. The image-forming optics is composed of nested coaxial mirrors of full figures of revolution, so-called Wolter optics. The spatial resolution, field of view, and depth of focus are measured and found consistent with ray-tracing simulations. Methods of increasing the resolution and magnification are discussed, as well as the scientific case for the neutron microscope. In contrast to traditional pinhole-camera neutron imaging, the resolution of the microscope is determined by the mirrors rather than by the collimation of the beam, leading to possible dramatic improvements in the signal rate and resolution.

  19. Development of achromatic full-field hard x-ray microscopy with two monolithic imaging mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, S.; Kino, H.; Yasuda, S.; Kohmura, Y.; Okada, H.; Ishikawa, T.; Yamauchi, K.

    2015-09-01

    Advanced Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror optics using two monolithic imaging mirrors was developed to realize an achromatic, high-resolution, and a high-stability full-field X-ray microscope. The mirror consists of an elliptical section and a hyperbolic section on a quartz glass substrate, in which the geometry follows the Wolter (type I) optics rules. A preliminary test was performed at SPring-8 using X-rays monochromatized to 9.881 keV. A 100-nm feature on a Siemens star chart could be clearly observed.

  20. Super-achromatic microprobe for ultrahigh-resolution endoscopic OCT imaging at 800 nm (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wu; Alemohammad, Milad; Yu, Xiaoyun; Yu, Shaoyong; Li, Xingde

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we report a super-achromatic microprobe made with fiber-optic ball lens to enable ultrahigh-resolution endoscopic OCT imaging. An axial resolution of ~2.4 µm (in air) can be achieved with a 7-fs Ti:Sapphire laser. The microprobe has minimal astigmatism which affords a high transverse resolution of ~5.6 µm. The miniaturized microprobe has an outer diameter of ~520 µm including the encasing metal guard and can be used to image small luminal organs. The performance of the ultrahigh-resolution OCT microprobe was demonstrated by imaging rat esophagus, guinea pig esophagus, and mouse rectum in vivo.

  1. Multi-stage shifter for subsecond time resolution of emulsion gamma-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokujo, H.; Aoki, S.; Takahashi, S.; Kamada, K.; Mizutani, S.; Nakagawa, R.; Ozaki, K.

    2013-02-01

    To observe gamma-ray sources precisely, a balloon-borne experiment with a new type of detector, the emulsion gamma-ray telescope, is planned. A multi-stage shifter mechanism based on the concept of an analog clock serves as a time stamper with subsecond time resolution and uses multiple moving stages mounted on the emulsion chambers. This new technique was employed in a test experiment using a small-scale model in a short-duration balloon flight. Tracks recorded in nuclear emulsion were read by a fully automated scanning system, were reconstructed, and time information were assigned by analysis of their position displacements in the shifter layers. The estimated time resolution was 0.06-0.15 s. The number of tracks passing through the detector was counted every second, and hadron jets were detected as significant excesses observed in the counting rate. In future, the multi-stage shifter is greatly contributing to ongoing efforts to increase the effective area of emulsion gamma-ray telescopes.

  2. Measurements of achromatic and chromatic contrast sensitivity functions for an extended range of adaptation luminance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kil Joong; Mantiuk, Rafal; Lee, Kyoung Ho

    2013-03-01

    Inspired by the ModelFest and ColorFest data sets, a contrast sensitivity function was measured for a wide range of adapting luminance levels. The measurements were motivated by the need to collect visual performance data for natural viewing of static images at a broad range of luminance levels, such as can be found in the case of high dynamic range displays. The detection of sine-gratings with Gaussian envelope was measured for achromatic color axis (black to white), two chromatic axes (green to red and yellow-green to violet) and two mixed chromatic and achromatic axes (dark-green to light-pink, and dark yellow to light-blue). The background luminance varied from 0.02 to 200 cd/m2. The spatial frequency of the gratings varied from 0.125 to 16 cycles per degree. More than four observers participated in the experiments and they individually determined the detection threshold for each stimulus using at least 20 trials of the QUEST method. As compared to the popular CSF models, we observed higher sensitivity drop for higher frequencies and significant differences in sensitivities in the luminance range between 0.02 and 2 cd/m2. Our measurements for chromatic CSF show a significant drop in sensitivity with luminance, but little change in the shape of the CSF. The drop of sensitivity at high frequencies is significantly weaker than reported in other studies and assumed in most chromatic CSF models.

  3. The Role of Contrast in the Perception of Achromatic Transparency: Comment on Singh and Anderson (2002) and Anderson (2003)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Marc K.

    2008-01-01

    M. Singh and B. L. Anderson proposed a perceptual theory of achromatic transparency in which the perceived transmittance of a perceived transparent filter is determined by the ratio of the Michelson contrast seen in the region of transparency to that of the background seen directly. Subsequently, B. L. Anderson, M. Singh, and J. Meng proposed that…

  4. Evaluation of wavelength shifters for spectral separation of barium fluoride emissions

    SciTech Connect

    DeVol, T.A.

    1993-10-01

    BaF{sub 2} has the advantage over other scintillators, when comparing radiation hardness, scintillation decay time, and fast scintillation yield. Since the fast BaF{sub 2} emissions have peak wavelengths of 220, 195, and 170 nm, a wavelength shifter (WLS) is needed. Organic fluors were evaluated as WLS components. Results indicate that spectral separation using WLS is possible, but not to the extent desired; other techniques must be used also. Alternative scintillators, such as CeF{sub 3}, should be investigated.

  5. Evaluation of the range shifter model for proton pencil-beam scanning for the Eclipse v.11 treatment planning system.

    PubMed

    Matysiak, Witold; Yeung, Daniel; Slopsema, Roelf; Li, Zuofeng

    2016-01-01

    Existing proton therapy pencil-beam scanning (PBS) systems have limitations on the minimum range to which a patient can be treated. This limitation arises from practical considerations, such as beam current intensity, layer spacing, and delivery time. The range shifter (RS) - a slab of stopping material inserted between the nozzle and the patient - is used to reduce the residual range of the incident beam so that the treatment ranges can be extended to shallow depths. Accurate modeling of the RS allows one to calculate the beam spot size entering the patient, given the proton energy, for arbitrary positions and thicknesses of the RS in the beam path. The Eclipse version 11 (v11) treatment planning system (TPS) models RS-induced beam widening by incorporating the scattering properties of the RS material into the V-parameter. Monte Carlo simulations with Geant4 code and analytical calculations using the Fermi-Eyges (FE) theory with Highland approximation of multiple Coulomb scattering (MCS) were employed to calculate proton beam widening due to scattering in the RS. We demonstrated that both methods achieved consistent results and could be used as a benchmark for evaluating the Eclipse V-parameter model. In most cases, the V-parameter model correctly predicted the beam spot size after traversing the RS. However, Eclipse did not enforce the constraint for a nonnegative covariance matrix when fitting the spot sizes to derive the phase space parameters, which resulted in incorrect calculations under specific conditions. In addition, Eclipse v11 incorrectly imposed limits on the individual values of the phase space parameters, which could lead to incorrect spot size values in the air calculated for beams with spot sigmas <3.8 mm. Notably, the TPS supplier (Varian) and hardware vendor (Ion Beam Applications) inconsistently refer to the RS position, which may result in improper spot size calculations. PMID:27074461

  6. Achromatic flat optical components via compensation between structure and material dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Li, Xiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhao, Zeyu; Ma, Xiaoliang; Wang, Yanqin; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-01-01

    Chromatism causes great quality degradation of the imaging system, especially for diffraction imaging. The most commonly method to overcome chromatism is refractive/diffractive hybrid optical system which, however, sacrifices the light weight and integration property of diffraction elements. A method through compensation between the structure dispersion and material dispersion is proposed to overcome the chromatism in flat integrated optical components. This method is demonstrated by making use of silver nano-slits waveguides to supply structure dispersion of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguide to compensate the material dispersion of metal. A broadband deflector and lens are designed to prove the achromatic property of this method. The method demonstrated here may serve as a solution of broadband light manipulation in flat integrated optical systems.

  7. The achromatic design of an atmospheric dispersion corrector for extremely large telescopes.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Mehdi; Goncharov, Alexander V

    2011-08-29

    For off-zenith observations with ground-based astronomical telescopes, the effect of atmospheric dispersion relative to diffraction on image size increases with telescope diameter. Correction of atmospheric dispersion in extremely large telescopes (ELTs) might become critical. A common solution for ELTs is to use linear atmospheric dispersion correctors (ADCs). In spite of their simplicity, the intrinsic chromatic aberrations of linear ADCs could render diffraction-limited imaging impossible when used in a fast focus. The chromatic problems of the linear ADC in ELTs can be resolved by replacing the linear ADC by the achromatic ADC designs presented here, which provide diffraction-limited image quality and offer several opto-mechanical advantages over linear ADCs. PMID:21935071

  8. Binary Star Measurements with a 17th Century, Long-Focal, Non-Achromatic Refractor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, Alan

    2010-10-01

    As part of the evaluation of my long-focal, non-achromatic refractor of the type developed during the first century, i.e., the 17th century, of optical astronomy, I have observed 175 double and multiple stars. After having observed most of these binary stars visually, I decided to see if it would be possible to measure their position angles and separations. Thus, I built a micrometer and began a program to determine if - and how accurately - I could measure the characteristics of these binaries. To my great surprise, the average error of the measured position angles is only 2 degrees and that of the separations is only 1 arc-second - values that are almost a good as modern measurements. These results further indicate that these very early and relatively primitive telescopes were much better that modern astronomical historians believe.

  9. Achromatic flat optical components via compensation between structure and material dispersions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Li, Xiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhao, Zeyu; Ma, Xiaoliang; Wang, Yanqin; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-01-01

    Chromatism causes great quality degradation of the imaging system, especially for diffraction imaging. The most commonly method to overcome chromatism is refractive/diffractive hybrid optical system which, however, sacrifices the light weight and integration property of diffraction elements. A method through compensation between the structure dispersion and material dispersion is proposed to overcome the chromatism in flat integrated optical components. This method is demonstrated by making use of silver nano-slits waveguides to supply structure dispersion of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguide to compensate the material dispersion of metal. A broadband deflector and lens are designed to prove the achromatic property of this method. The method demonstrated here may serve as a solution of broadband light manipulation in flat integrated optical systems. PMID:26794855

  10. ACHROMATIC LOW-BETA INTERACTION REGION DESIGN FOR AN ELECTRON-ION COLLIDER

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliy Morozov, Yaroslav Derbenev

    2011-09-01

    An achromatic Interaction Region (IR) design concept is presented with an emphasis on its application at an electron-ion collider. A specially-designed symmetric Chromaticity Compensation Block (CCB) induces an angle spread in the passing beam such that it cancels the chromatic kick of the final focusing quadrupoles. Two such CCB's placed symmetrically around an interaction point (IP) allow simultaneous compensation of the 1st-order chromaticities and chromatic beam smear at the IP without inducing significant 2nd-order aberrations. Special attention is paid to the difference in the electron and ion IR design requirements. We discuss geometric matching of the electron and ion IR footprints. We investigate limitations on the momentum acceptance in this IR design.

  11. Achromatic flat optical components via compensation between structure and material dispersions.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Li, Xiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhao, Zeyu; Ma, Xiaoliang; Wang, Yanqin; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-01-01

    Chromatism causes great quality degradation of the imaging system, especially for diffraction imaging. The most commonly method to overcome chromatism is refractive/diffractive hybrid optical system which, however, sacrifices the light weight and integration property of diffraction elements. A method through compensation between the structure dispersion and material dispersion is proposed to overcome the chromatism in flat integrated optical components. This method is demonstrated by making use of silver nano-slits waveguides to supply structure dispersion of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguide to compensate the material dispersion of metal. A broadband deflector and lens are designed to prove the achromatic property of this method. The method demonstrated here may serve as a solution of broadband light manipulation in flat integrated optical systems. PMID:26794855

  12. Full complex spectrum simultaneous obtaining SD-OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Gelikonov, Valentin M.; Shilyagin, Pavel A.

    2011-03-01

    An efficient technique of simultaneous obtaining of quadrature spectral components of interference signal in spectrometer-based OCT is proposed. The components are obtained in air-spaced non-polarization interferometer by partition of reference beam onto two parts and using an achromatic phase shifter. Several setups of phase sifter are described and compared.

  13. Electronically controlled optical beam-steering by an active phased array of metallic nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    DeRose, C T; Kekatpure, R D; Trotter, D C; Starbuck, A; Wendt, J R; Yaacobi, A; Watts, M R; Chettiar, U; Engheta, N; Davids, P S

    2013-02-25

    An optical phased array of nanoantenna fabricated in a CMOS compatible silicon photonics process is presented. The optical phased array is fed by low loss silicon waveguides with integrated ohmic thermo-optic phase shifters capable of 2π phase shift with ∼ 15 mW of applied electrical power. By controlling the electrical power to the individual integrated phase shifters fixed wavelength steering of the beam emitted normal to the surface of the wafer of 8° is demonstrated for 1 × 8 phased arrays with periods of both 6 and 9 μm. PMID:23482053

  14. Sector Shifters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natale, Jo Anna

    1994-01-01

    Several superintendents have recently left school administration for careers in private education companies such as Education Alternatives, Inc., the Edison Project, and Sylvan Learning Systems, Inc. Former superintendents from New York, Rochester, Saint Paul, and Detroit reflect on their reasons for switching careers. Salary considerations…

  15. Active membrane phased array radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moussessian, Alina; Del Castillo, Linda; Huang, John; Sadowy, Greg; Hoffman, James; Smith, Phil; Hatake, Toshiro; Derksen, Chuck; Lopez, Bernardo; Caro, Ed

    2005-01-01

    We have developed the first membrane-based active phased array in L-band (1.26GHz). The array uses membrane compatible Transmit/Receive (T/R) modules (membrane T/R) for each antenna element. We use phase shifters within each T/R module for electronic beam steering. We will discuss the T/R module design and integration with the membrane, We will also present transmit and receive beam-steering results for the array.

  16. Effective contrast of colored stimuli in the mesopic range: a metric for perceived contrast based on achromatic luminance contrast.

    PubMed

    Walkey, Helen C; Barbur, John L; Harlow, J Alister; Hurden, Antony; Moorhead, Ian R; Taylor, Julie A F

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about how color signals and cone- and rod-based luminance signals contribute to perceived contrast in the mesopic range. In this study the perceived contrast of colored, mesopic stimuli was matched with that of spatially equivalent achromatic stimuli. The objective was to develop a metric for perceived contrast in the mesopic range in terms of an equivalent achromatic luminance contrast, referred to here as effective contrast. Stimulus photopic luminance contrast, scotopic luminance contrast, and chromatic difference from the background all contributed to effective contrast over the mid-mesopic range, but their contributions were not independent and varied markedly with background luminance. Surprisingly, color made a significant contribution to effective contrast from 10 to approximately 0.003 cd m(-2). A model describing this relationship is introduced (R2 = 0.89) and compared with predictions of mesopic luminance contrast obtained from a number of models proposed as systems of mesopic photometry. PMID:15669611

  17. Effective contrast of colored stimuli in the mesopic range: a metric for perceived contrast based on achromatic luminance contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkey, Helen C.; Barbur, John L.; Harlow, J. Alister; Hurden, Antony; Moorhead, Ian R.; Taylor, Julie A. F.

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about how color signals and cone- and rod-based luminance signals contribute to perceived contrast in the mesopic range. In this study the perceived contrast of colored, mesopic stimuli was matched with that of spatially equivalent achromatic stimuli. The objective was to develop a metric for perceived contrast in the mesopic range in terms of an equivalent achromatic luminance contrast, referred to here as effective contrast. Stimulus photopic luminance contrast, scotopic luminance contrast, and chromatic difference from the background all contributed to effective contrast over the mid-mesopic range, but their contributions were not independent and varied markedly with background luminance. Surprisingly, color made a significant contribution to effective contrast from 10 to approximately 0.003 cd m-2. A model describing this relationship is introduced (R2=0.89) and compared with predictions of mesopic luminance contrast obtained from a number of models proposed as systems of mesopic photometry.

  18. Design of a triple-bend isochronous achromat with minimum coherent-synchrotron-radiation-induced emittance growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturini, M.

    2016-06-01

    Using a 1D steady-state free-space coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) model, we identify a special design setting for a triple-bend isochronous achromat that yields vanishing emittance growth from CSR. When a more refined CSR model with transient effects is included in the analysis, numerical simulations show that the main effect of the transients is to shift the emittance growth minimum slightly, with the minimum changing only modestly.

  19. Low cost, electronically steered phased array for general aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strickland, Peter C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a multifaced, phased array antenna developed for general aviation satellite communications applications. The antenna design satisfies all INMARSAT Aeronautical SDM requirements. Unique features of this antenna include an integral LNA and diplexer, integral phase shifters which are shared among the array faces, a serial beam steering interface and low manufacturing cost.

  20. Line Profile Measurements of Atomic Oxygen at 1300 A with a VUV Raman Shifter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Surendra P.; Exberger, Richard J.; Meyer, Scott A.; Gilmore, John O.

    1994-01-01

    We are currently developing an atomic oxygen diagnostic to study the degree of oxygen dissociation in ground-based facilities. The absorption of the (sub 3)P - (sup 3)S(sup 0) resonance triplet in the vacuum ultraviolet is a direct measure of the ground state number density of atomic oxygen. Although the integrated line strength is well known for these transitions, the line profile is not. We report the results of a series of experiments in which the line profile is measured in shock-heated oxygen. An ArF excimer laser and a hydrogen Raman shifter generate tunable VUV radiation at the resonance wavelength. The test gas is dissociated oxygen, generated in the Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. By measuring the absorption of known concentrations of atomic oxygen, we are able to study the absorption line profile. The results will serve as a calibration to apply this diagnostic in other flowfields.

  1. Phased-array components for the High-Temperature Superconducting Space Experiment (HTSSE). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-07

    A new class of X-band phase shifters using the distributed Josephson inductance (DJI) effect were delivered to NRL for the HTS Space Experiment project. Phase shifts were observed above 77 K, and large phase shifts were observed at 65 K and below. This narrow-band device was developed as a first step to a broadband device. A total of 40 HTS SQUIDs were successfully integrated into a monolithic circuit. Measurement of the temperature dependance of the Q of a resonator in June 1990 and in February 1991 showed no significant change due to aging. A total of seven X-band phase shifters were fabricated, and five were delivered to Naval Research Laboratory. The HTS phase shifter consists of a low loss YBa2Cu3O7 microstrip resonator with 40 SQUID devices monolithically imbedded into the transmission line. This narrow-band device was developed as a first step to a broadband device.

  2. Phased array components for the High Temperature Superconducting Space Experiment (HTSSE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-06-01

    A new class of X-band phase shifters using the distributed Josephson inductance (DJI) effect were delivered to NRL for the HTS Space Experiment project. Phase shifts were observed above 77 K, and large phase shifts were observed at 65 K and below. This narrow-band device was developed as a first step to a broadband device. A total of 40 HTS SQUIDs were successfully integrated into a monolithic circuit. Measurement of the temperature dependence of the Q of a resonator in June 1990 and in February 1991 showed no significant change due to aging. A total of seven X-band phase shifters were fabricated, and five were delivered to Naval Research Laboratory. The HTS phase shifter consists of a low loss YBa2Cu3O7 microstrip resonator with 40 SQUID devices monolithically imbedded into the transmission line. This narrow-band device was developed as a first step to a broadband device.

  3. Design of a multi-bend achromat lattice for 3 GeV synchrotron light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eun-San

    2016-03-01

    We present a lattice design for a low-emittance and high-brilliance 3 GeV synchrotron light source that has been widely investigated in the world. We show the design results for a MBA (Multi-Bend Achromat) lattice with an emittance of 1.3 nm and 282.4 m circumference. Each cell has 5 bending magnets that consist of outer two with bending angle of 4.5° and inner three with bending angle of 7°. The lattice is designed to be flexible and consists of 12 straight sections in which one straight section has a length of 5.9 m. We have studied the dynamic aperture in the lattice with machine errors. It is shown that the designed low-emittance lattice provides sufficient dynamic aperture after COD correction. We present the results of variations of emittance, energy spread and dynamic aperture due to in-vacuum undulators in the straight sections. We performed particle tracking after the beam injection to investigate the efficiency of the injection scheme. We show the designed results of an injection scheme that shows the space allocation in injection section and the particle motions of injected beam. Our designed lattice provides a good optimization in terms of the emittance and brilliance as a light source for 3 GeV energy and circumference of 28 m.

  4. Needle-based fluorescence endomicroscopy via structured illumination with a plastic, achromatic objective

    PubMed Central

    Kyrish, Matthew; Dobbs, Jessica; Jain, Shalini; Wang, Xiao; Yu, Dihua; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. In order to diagnose cancer, a sample must be removed, prepared, and examined under a microscope, which is expensive, invasive, and time consuming. Fiber optic fluorescence endomicroscopy, where an image guide is used to obtain high-resolution images of tissue in vivo, has shown promise as an alternative to conventional biopsies. However, the resolution of standard endomicroscopy is limited by the fiber bundle sampling frequency and out-of-focus light. A system is presented which incorporates a plastic, achromatic objective to increase the sampling and which provides optical sectioning via structured illumination to reject background light. An image is relayed from the sample by a fiber bundle with the custom 2.1-mm outer diameter objective lens integrated to the distal tip. The objective is corrected for the excitation and the emission wavelengths of proflavine (452 and 515 nm). It magnifies the object onto the fiber bundle to improve the system’s lateral resolution by increasing the sampling. The plastic lenses were fabricated via single-point diamond turning and assembled using a zero alignment technique. Ex vivo images of normal and neoplastic murine mammary tissues stained with proflavine are captured. The system achieves higher contrast and resolves smaller features than standard fluorescence endomicroscopy. PMID:24002190

  5. Digital halftoning methods for selectively partitioning error into achromatic and chromatic channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulligan, Jeffrey B.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for reducing the visibility of artifacts arising in the display of quantized color images on CRT displays. The method is based on the differential spatial sensitivity of the human visual system to chromatic and achromatic modulations. Because the visual system has the highest spatial and temporal acuity for the luminance component of an image, a technique which will reduce luminance artifacts at the expense of introducing high-frequency chromatic errors is sought. A method based on controlling the correlations between the quantization errors in the individual phosphor images is explored. The luminance component is greatest when the phosphor errors are positively correlated, and is minimized when the phosphor errors are negatively correlated. The greatest effect of the correlation is obtained when the intensity quantization step sizes of the individual phosphors have equal luminances. For the ordered dither algorithm, a version of the method can be implemented by simply inverting the matrix of thresholds for one of the color components.

  6. Needle endomicroscope with a plastic, achromatic objective to perform optical biopsies of breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrish, Matthew; Dobbs, Jessica; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Tkaczyk, Tomasz

    2013-03-01

    In order to diagnose cancer in breast tissue, a sample must be removed, prepared, and examined under a microscope. To provide an alternative to conventional biopsies, an endomicroscope intended to perform optical biopsies is demonstrated. The system provides high resolution, high contrast images in real-time which could allow a diagnosis to be made during surgery without the need for tissue removal. Optical sectioning is achieved via structured illumination to reject out of focus light. An image is relayed between the sample plane and the imaging system by a coherent fiber bundle with an achromatized objective lens at the distal tip of the fiber bundle which is the diameter of a biopsy needle. The custom, plastic objective provides correction for both the excitation and emission wavelengths of proflavine (452 nm and 515 nm, respectively). It also magnifies the object onto the distal tip of the fiber bundle to increase lateral resolution. The lenses are composed of the optical plastics Zeonex E48R, PMMA, and polystyrene. The lenses are fabricated via single point diamond turning and assembled using a zero alignment technique. The lateral resolution and chromatic focal shift were measured and in vitro images of breast carcinoma cells stained with proflavine were captured. The optical biopsy system is able to achieve optical sectioning and to resolve smaller features than the current high resolution microendoscope.

  7. Patterned dual-layer achromatic micro-quarter-wave-retarder array for active polarization imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaojin; Pan, Xiaofang; Fan, Xiaolei; Xu, Ping; Bermak, Amine; Chigrinov, Vladimir G

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we present a liquid-crystal-polymer (LCP)-based dual-layer micro-quarter-wave-retarder (MQWR) array for active polarization image sensors. The proposed MQWRs, for the first time, enable the extraction of the incident light's circularly polarized components in the whole visible regime, which correspond to the fourth parameter of Stokes vector. Compared with the previous implementations, our proposed MQWRs feature high achromaticity, making their applications no longer limited to monochromatic illumination. In addition, the presented thin structure exhibits an overall thickness of 2.43μm, leading to greatly alleviated optical cross-talk between adjacent photo-sensing pixels. Moreover, the reported superior optical performance (e.g. minor transmittance, extinction ratio) validates our optical design and optimization of the proposed MQWRs. Furthermore, the demonstrated simple fabrication recipe offers a cost-effective solution for the monolithic integration between the proposed MQWR array and the commercial solid-state image sensors, which makes the multi-spectral full Stokes polarization imaging system on a single chip feasible. PMID:24718177

  8. Achromatic nested Kirkpatrick–Baez mirror optics for hard X-ray nanofocusing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenjun; Ice, Gene E.; Assoufid, Lahsen; Liu, Chian; Shi, Bing; Khachatryan, Ruben; Qian, Jun; Zschack, Paul; Tischler, Jonathan Z.; Choi, J.-Y.

    2011-01-01

    The first test of nanoscale-focusing Kirkpatrick–Baez (KB) mirrors in the nested (or Montel) configuration used at a hard X-ray synchrotron beamline is reported. The two mirrors are both 40 mm long and coated with Pt to produce a focal length of 60 mm at 3 mrad incident angle, and collect up to a 120 µm by 120 µm incident X-ray beam with maximum angular acceptance of 2 mrad and a broad bandwidth of energies up to 30 keV. In an initial test a focal spot of about 150 nm in both horizontal and vertical directions was achieved with either polychromatic or monochromatic beam. The nested mirror geometry, with two mirrors mounted side-by-side and perpendicular to each other, is significantly more compact and provides higher demagnification than the traditional sequential KB mirror arrangement. Ultimately, nested mirrors can focus larger divergence to improve the diffraction limit of achromatic optics. A major challenge with the fabrication of the required mirrors is the need for near-perfect mirror surfaces near the edge of at least one of the mirrors. Special polishing procedures and surface profile coating were used to preserve the mirror surface quality at the reflecting edge. Further developments aimed at achieving diffraction-limited focusing below 50 nm are underway. PMID:21685674

  9. Achromatic nested Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror optics for hard x-ray nanofocusing.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.; Ice, G. E.; Assoufid, L.; Liu, C.; Shi, B.; Khachatryan, R.; Qian, J.; Zschack, P.; Tischler, J. Z.; Choi, J.-Y.

    2011-07-01

    The first test of nanoscale-focusing Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors in the nested (or Montel) configuration used at a hard X-ray synchrotron beamline is reported. The two mirrors are both 40 mm long and coated with Pt to produce a focal length of 60 mm at 3 mrad incident angle, and collect up to a 120 {micro}m by 120 {micro}m incident X-ray beam with maximum angular acceptance of 2 mrad and a broad bandwidth of energies up to 30 keV. In an initial test a focal spot of about 150 nm in both horizontal and vertical directions was achieved with either polychromatic or monochromatic beam. The nested mirror geometry, with two mirrors mounted side-by-side and perpendicular to each other, is significantly more compact and provides higher demagnification than the traditional sequential KB mirror arrangement. Ultimately, nested mirrors can focus larger divergence to improve the diffraction limit of achromatic optics. A major challenge with the fabrication of the required mirrors is the need for near-perfect mirror surfaces near the edge of at least one of the mirrors. Special polishing procedures and surface profile coating were used to preserve the mirror surface quality at the reflecting edge. Further developments aimed at achieving diffraction-limited focusing below 50 nm are underway.

  10. Achromatic nested Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror optics for hard X-ray nanofocusing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjun; Ice, Gene E; Assoufid, Lahsen; Liu, Chian; Shi, Bing; Khachatryan, Ruben; Qian, Jun; Zschack, Paul; Tischler, Jonathan Z; Choi, J Y

    2011-07-01

    The first test of nanoscale-focusing Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors in the nested (or Montel) configuration used at a hard X-ray synchrotron beamline is reported. The two mirrors are both 40 mm long and coated with Pt to produce a focal length of 60 mm at 3 mrad incident angle, and collect up to a 120 µm by 120 µm incident X-ray beam with maximum angular acceptance of 2 mrad and a broad bandwidth of energies up to 30 keV. In an initial test a focal spot of about 150 nm in both horizontal and vertical directions was achieved with either polychromatic or monochromatic beam. The nested mirror geometry, with two mirrors mounted side-by-side and perpendicular to each other, is significantly more compact and provides higher demagnification than the traditional sequential KB mirror arrangement. Ultimately, nested mirrors can focus larger divergence to improve the diffraction limit of achromatic optics. A major challenge with the fabrication of the required mirrors is the need for near-perfect mirror surfaces near the edge of at least one of the mirrors. Special polishing procedures and surface profile coating were used to preserve the mirror surface quality at the reflecting edge. Further developments aimed at achieving diffraction-limited focusing below 50 nm are underway. PMID:21685674

  11. Achromatic Nested Kirkpatrick-Baez Mirror Optics for Hard X-ray Nanofocusing

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenjun; Ice, Gene E; Assoufid, Lahsen; Liu, Chian; Shi, B.; Khachatryan, Ruben; Qian, J; Zshack, Dr Paul; Tischler, Jonathan Zachary; Choi, Jae-Young

    2011-01-01

    The first test of nanoscale-focusing Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors in the nested (or Montel) configuration used at a hard X-ray synchrotron beamline is reported. The two mirrors are both 40 mm long and coated with Pt to produce a focal length of 60 mm at 3 mrad incident angle, and collect up to a 120 {micro}m by 120 {micro}m incident X-ray beam with maximum angular acceptance of 2 mrad and a broad bandwidth of energies up to 30 keV. In an initial test a focal spot of about 150 nm in both horizontal and vertical directions was achieved with either polychromatic or monochromatic beam. The nested mirror geometry, with two mirrors mounted side-by-side and perpendicular to each other, is significantly more compact and provides higher demagnification than the traditional sequential KB mirror arrangement. Ultimately, nested mirrors can focus larger divergence to improve the diffraction limit of achromatic optics. A major challenge with the fabrication of the required mirrors is the need for near-perfect mirror surfaces near the edge of at least one of the mirrors. Special polishing procedures and surface profile coating were used to preserve the mirror surface quality at the reflecting edge. Further developments aimed at achieving diffraction-limited focusing below 50 nm are underway.

  12. V-band pseudomorphic HEMT MMIC phased array components for space communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, G. L.; Pao, C. K.; Wu, C. S.; Hu, M.; Downey, Alan N.

    1992-01-01

    Recent advances in pseudomorphic high-electron-mobility transistor (PMHEMT) monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) technology have made it the preferred candidate for high performance millimeter-wave components for phased array applications. The development of V-band PMHEMT/MMIC components including power amplifiers and phase shifters is described. For the single-stage MMIC power amplifier employing a 200 micron PMHEMT, we achieved 151.4 mW output power (757.0 mW/mm) with 1.8 dB associated gain and 26.4 percent power-added efficiency at 60 GHz. A two-stage MMIC amplifier utilizing the same devices demonstrated small-signal gain as high as 15 dB at 58 GHz. And, for the phase shifter, a four-bit phase shifter with less than 8 dB insertion loss from 61 to 63 GHz was measured.

  13. Generation of Flat Optical Frequency Comb based on Mach-Zehnder Modulator and Recirculating Frequency Shifter Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shibao; Li, Yulong; Fei, Yue; Hu, Faze

    2014-06-01

    We propose a novel scheme to generate optical frequency comb by using Mach-Zehnder modulator and recirculating frequency shifter loop based on IQ modulator driven by radio frequency clock signals. A system of 4 flat and stable comb lines generation based on Mach-Zehnder modulator is set as the seed light source of the recirculating loop. Through theorical analysis and simulation it is shown that the proposed theoretical model is proved in good agreement with simulation results.

  14. An energy efficient sub-threshold to above-threshold level shifter using a modified Wilson current mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maroof, Naeem; Sohail, Muhammad; Shin, Hyunchul

    2016-07-01

    In this article, a new energy efficient level shifter circuit is described for robust sub-threshold to above-threshold voltage conversion. The design is based on a modification of the Wilson current mirror that minimizes the static current and improves the energy efficiency. The proposed level shifter is capable of converting a 200 mV signal into a 1 V signal and operates correctly across process corners. At the design target (? 200 mV, input signal frequency = 1 MHz), the proposed level shifter exhibits a propagation delay of 20.17 ns, a static power dissipation of 11.07 nW, and the total energy per transition of 113.2 fJ. We compare our results with the design proposed by Lutkemeier and Ruckert (2010). At the design target, the energy delay product of our design is 81.53% that of the reference design and, over all the voltage range of ? from 160 mV to 1 V, the proposed circuit shows an average energy reduction of 14.71% compared to the reference design. Thorough variability analysis was performed using HSPICE Monte Carlo simulations for different values of ?, which reveals the robustness of the proposed design.

  15. Discrimination and detection thresholds: the effect of observer criterion on the spatial properties of chromatic and achromatic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Moorhead, I R; Saunders, J E

    1982-01-01

    Spectral sensitivity functions were determined for structured test targets presented on a white background field. Data obtained for threshold detection of the targets are consistent with results obtained from previous studies which used unstructured test fields showing functions, with three maxima, dependent on opponent colour mechanisms. Data obtained from threshold discrimination measurements show a marked reduction in the blue sensitivity when 1 degree test targets are used. This effect decreases significantly when larger targets are used. A change of the observer's criterion can significantly alter the relative contributions of the achromatic and chromatic channels at threshold. PMID:7135843

  16. [Sensitivity and specificity of flicker perimetry with Pulsar. Comparison with achromatic (white-on-white) perimetry in glaucoma patients].

    PubMed

    Göbel, K; Erb, C

    2013-02-01

    The early detection of functional glaucoma damage plays an increasingly more central role in the diagnosis and treatment of glaucoma disease. Using selective perimetry detection of early glaucomatous defects is more likely and one of these methods is flicker perimetry with Pulsar. Flicker perimetry is used to analyze the temporal visual function in combination with spatial resolution and contrast sensitivity as opposed to standard automated perimetry which measures the differential light sensitivity with a non-specific stimulus. This study showed a higher sensitivity and specificity of Pulsar perimetry in comparison to achromatic perimetry in glaucoma patients. PMID:23338528

  17. Systolic architectures based on barrel shifters for real-time digital signal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T.

    1985-01-01

    The throughput in real-time digital signal processing applications is limited by both the capability of the processors employed for number-crunching operations and the capacity of a supporting communications link. The systolic architectures eliminate the memory bandwidth problems by allowing multiple computations for each memory access and result in a speed-up in the execution time of compute-bound computations. However, the throughput rate in a systolic array is still limited by the computational time needed for one basic cell, which is composed of a multiplier and an accumulator. The multiplier in the basic cell requires either a large chip area if high speed is desired, or a large amount of time if serial architecture is used. The use of barrel shifters as computational elements in systolic arrays was proposed and studied in detail in this thesis. In the new systolic arrays there are two different structures, parallel and cascaded, that can be used to implement FIR filters. A unique cascaded structure was developed in this study that is shown to have better performance and requires significantly less basic cells.

  18. Pulsed ultra-cold neutron production using a Doppler shifter at J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imajo, S.; Mishima, K.; Kitaguchi, M.; Iwashia, Y.; Yamada, N. L.; Hino, M.; Oda, T.; Ino, T.; Shimizu, H. M.; Yamashita, S.; Katayama, R.

    2016-01-01

    We have constructed a Doppler-shifter-type pulsed ultra-cold neutron (UCN) source at the Materials and Life Science Experiment Facility of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex. Very cold neutrons (VCNs) with 136 m s^{-1} velocity in a neutron beam supplied by a pulsed neutron source are decelerated by reflection on an m=10 wide-band multilayer mirror, yielding pulsed UCNs. The mirror is fixed to the tip of a 2000 rpm rotating arm moving with 68 m s^{-1} velocity in the same direction as the VCNs. The repetition frequency of the pulsed UCNs is 8.33 Hz and the time width of the pulse at production is 4.4 ms. In order to increase the UCN flux, a supermirror guide, wide-band monochromatic mirrors, focus guides, and a UCN extraction guide have been newly installed or improved. The 1 MW-equivalent count rate of the output neutrons with longitudinal wavelengths longer than 58 nm is 1.6 × 102 cps, while that of the true UCNs is 80 cps. The spatial density at production is 1.4 UCN cm^{-3}. This new UCN source enables us to research and develop apparatuses necessary for the investigation of the neutron electric dipole moment.

  19. Improving UV-glass PMTs with a p-Terphenyl Wavelength Shifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joosten, Sylvester; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Kaczanowicz, Ed; Rehfuss, Melanie; Duran, Burcu; Paolone, Michael

    2015-10-01

    UV-glass PMTs are often the limiting factor in a Cherenkov detector, due to their poor quantum efficiency (QE) below 300nm due to the UV-glass transparency. The application of a p-Terphenyl wavelength shifter to the face of these PMTs dramatically improves the QE for short wavelengths, rivaling that of a much more expensive quartz PMT. This is especially interesting in the context of multi-anode (MA) PMTs, which are supremely suited for application in future open-environment Cherenkov detectors at very high luminosities due to their small size, lower sensitivity to magnetic fields, and high potential for advanced background rejection. This will become critical at Jefferson Lab entering the 12 GeV era, as well as for a future electron-ion collider. We will discuss the process of coating the PMTs through vacuum evaporation, and the performance testing taking place at Temple University for these multi-anode PMTs, as well as the results obtained with the more traditional 5-inch PMTs that were coated for the low-threshold Cherenkov counter (LTCC) of the CLAS12 spectrometer at Jefferson Lab.

  20. Performance of UV-glass MaPMT with p-Terphenyl Wavelength Shifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehfuss, Melanie; Joosten, Sylvester; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Kaczanowicz, Edward

    2016-03-01

    UV-glass PMTs are often the limiting factor in a Cherenkov detector because of their poor quantum efficiency (QE) below 300nm due to the UV-glass transparency. The application of a p-Terphenyl wavelength shifter to the face of these PMTs dramatically improves the QE for short wavelengths, rivaling that of a much more expensive quartz PMT. This is especially interesting in the context of multi-anode (Ma) PMTs, which are supremely suited for application in future open-environment Cherenkov detectors at very high luminosities due to their small size, lower sensitivity to magnetic fields, and high potential for advanced background rejection due to their pixelization. This will become critical at Jefferson Lab entering the 12 GeV era, as well as for a future electron-ion collider both providing a high luminosity. We will discuss the process of coating the PMTs through vacuum evaporation, and the performance testing taking place at Temple University for Hamamatsu model H12700A-03 multi-anode PMTs as well the background rejection schemes that will be devised using these MaPMTs.

  1. Ageing studies of wavelength shifter fibers for the TILECAL/ATLAS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, J.; Maio, A.; Pina, J.; Santos, J.; Saraiva, J. G.

    2007-09-01

    Natural and accelerated ageing studies for the different components of the TILECAL calorimeter, of the ATLAS experiment, play a central role in forecasting the evolution of the detector's performance throughout its operating life. It is possible that the operation of ATLAS will be extended by 5 years in an upgraded LHC scenario. Such prospect makes these studies even more important, in order to assess the contribution of the natural ageing in relation to the other processes inducing performance loss in the optical components. Among other activities in this LHC/CERN collaboration, the Lisbon calorimetry group is involved in studying the impact of radiation damage and natural ageing in optical characteristics of the TILECAL wavelength shifter (WLS) optical fibers and scintillators, and to reevaluate the light budget of the tile/fiber system. The light yield and the attenuation length of the WLS and scintillating optical fibers are measured using an X- Y table. Results are presented for several sets of WLS optical fibers (Kuraray Y11(200)MSJ) whose characteristics have been monitored since 1999. Most of those 338 fibers are from the mass production for the TILECAL detector: 208 non-aluminized 200 cm fibers, from several production batches, and 128 batch #6 aluminized fibers, with lengths ranging from 114 to 207 cm.

  2. Phased array-fed antenna configuration study: Technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croswell, W. F.; Ball, D. E.; Taylor, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Spacecraft array fed reflector antenna systems were assessed for particular application to a multiple fixed spot beam/multiple scanning spot beam system. Reflector optics systems are reviewed in addition to an investigation of the feasibility of the use of monolithic microwave integrated circuit power amplifiers and phase shifters in each element of the array feed.

  3. Source-Coupled, N-Channel, JFET-Based Digital Logic Gate Structure Using Resistive Level Shifters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasowski, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    A circuit topography is used to create usable, digital logic gates using N (negatively doped) channel junction field effect transistors (JFETs), load resistors, level shifting resistors, and supply rails whose values are based on the DC parametric distributions of these JFETs. This method has direct application to the current state-of-the-art in high-temperature (300 to 500 C and higher) silicon carbide (SiC) device production, and defines an adaptation to the logic gate described in U.S. Patent 7,688,117 in that, by removing the level shifter from the output of the gate structure described in the patent (and applying it to the input of the same gate), a source-coupled gate topography is created. This structure allows for the construction AND/OR (sum of products) arrays that use far fewer transistors and resistors than the same array as constructed from the gates described in the aforementioned patent. This plays a central role when large multiplexer constructs are necessary; for example, as in the construction of memory. This innovation moves the resistive level shifter from the output of the basic gate structure to the front as if the input is now configured as what would be the output of the preceding gate, wherein the output is the two level shifting resistors. The output of this innovation can now be realized as the lone follower transistor with its source node as the gate output. Additionally, one may leave intact the resistive level shifter on the new gate topography. A source-coupled to direct-coupled logic translator will be the result.

  4. On the increase of ultraviolet radiation detection efficiency in nuclear particle detectors with the help of transparent wavelength shifter films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorin, A. M.; Kakauridze, G. D.; Peresypkin, A. I.; Polyakov, V. A.; Rykalin, V. I.; Tzhadadze, E. G.

    1986-11-01

    The performance of transparent wavelength shifters (WLS) on the base of polymethylmethacrylate and organic luminophors has been studied. Measurements have been carried out in the near and far ultraviolet. Using multicomponent WLS covering the photomultiplier (PM) window, the maximum quantum efficiency of the PM photocathode was increased up to 30%. Due to the use of WLS in the gas Cherenkov counter (radiator Fr-12) a photoelectric efficiency 2.3 times higher than for FEU-110 has been obtained. Now the FEU-110 photoelectric efficiency equals to photoelectric efficiency of the 56DUVP PM.

  5. Monolithically integrated enhancement/depletion-mode AlGaN/GaN HEMTs SRAM unit and voltage level shifter using fluorine plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonghe, Chen; Xuefeng, Zheng; Jincheng, Zhang; Xiaohua, Ma; Yue, Hao

    2016-05-01

    A GaN-based E/D mode direct-couple logic 6 transistors SRAM unit and a voltage level shifter were designed and fabricated. E-mode and D-mode AlGaN/GaN HEMTs were integrated in one wafer using fluorine plasma treatment and using a moderate AlGaN barrier layer heterojunction structure. The 6 transistors SRAM unit consists of two symmetrical E/D mode inverters and two E-mode switch HEMTs. The output low and high voltage of the SRAM unit are 0.95 and 0.07 V at a voltage supply of 1 V. The voltage level shifter lowers the supply voltage using four Ni-AlGaN Schottky diodes in a series at a positive supply voltage of 6 V and a negative supply voltage of ‑6 V. By controlling the states of inverter modules of the level shifter in turn, the level shifter offers two channel voltage outputs of ‑0.5 and ‑5 V. The flip voltage of the level shifter is 0.76 V. Both the SRAM unit and voltage shifter operate correctly, demonstrating the promising potential for GaN-based E/D mode digital and analog integrated circuits. Several considerations are proposed to avoid the influence of threshold voltage degradation of D-mode and E-mode HEMT on the operation of the circuit. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61334002), the Opening Project of Science and Technology on Reliability Physics and Application Technology of Electronic Component Laboratory (No. ZHD201206), and the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University (No. NCET-12-0915).

  6. What visual illusions tell us about underlying neural mechanisms and observer strategies for tackling the inverse problem of achromatic perception

    PubMed Central

    Blakeslee, Barbara; McCourt, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Research in lightness perception centers on understanding the prior assumptions and processing strategies the visual system uses to parse the retinal intensity distribution (the proximal stimulus) into the surface reflectance and illumination components of the scene (the distal stimulus—ground truth). It is agreed that the visual system must compare different regions of the visual image to solve this inverse problem; however, the nature of the comparisons and the mechanisms underlying them are topics of intense debate. Perceptual illusions are of value because they reveal important information about these visual processing mechanisms. We propose a framework for lightness research that resolves confusions and paradoxes in the literature, and provides insight into the mechanisms the visual system employs to tackle the inverse problem. The main idea is that much of the debate and confusion in the literature stems from the fact that lightness, defined as apparent reflectance, is underspecified and refers to three different types of judgments that are not comparable. Under stimulus conditions containing a visible illumination component, such as a shadow boundary, observers can distinguish and match three independent dimensions of achromatic experience: apparent intensity (brightness), apparent local intensity ratio (brightness-contrast), and apparent reflectance (lightness). In the absence of a visible illumination boundary, however, achromatic vision reduces to two dimensions and, depending on stimulus conditions and observer instructions, judgments of lightness are identical to judgments of brightness or brightness-contrast. Furthermore, because lightness judgments are based on different information under different conditions, they can differ greatly in their degree of difficulty and in their accuracy. This may, in part, explain the large variability in lightness constancy across studies. PMID:25954181

  7. Laser phase noise compensation in long-range OFDR by using an optical fiber delay loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Fan, Xinyu; Wang, Shuai; Yang, Guangyao; Liu, Qingwen; He, Zuyuan

    2016-04-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel technique to compensate the laser phase noise in long-range OFDR by using an optical fiber delay loop, which mainly consists of a delay fiber and a frequency shifter. The delay fiber is used to shorten the optical path difference between two arms of the interferometer, and the frequency shifter works as a counter for taking the number of lightwave circulated in the loop. The preliminary experiment shows a successful compensation effect, and a 10 cm spatial resolution over 30 km measurement range is realized by using this method.

  8. Shielding Effects of a Building Structure on the Energy Deposit of Cosmic Rays in a Simple Wavelength Shifter-Based Scintillator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiola, Salvatore; La Rocca, Paola; Riggi, Francesco; Riggi, Simone

    2012-01-01

    An experimental setup, based on a plastic scintillator with an embedded wavelength shifter fibre and photosensors at the two ends, has been used to detect cosmic muons in undergraduate laboratory activities. Time and amplitude information from the two photosensors were measured using the time-over-threshold technique. The distribution of the…

  9. A 32-GHz phased array transmit feed for spacecraft telecommunications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. A.; Rascoe, D. L.; Crist, R. A.; Huang, J.; Wamhof, P. D.; Lansing, F. S.

    1992-01-01

    A 21-element phased array transmit feed was demonstrated as part of an effort to develop and evaluate state-of-the-art transmitter and receiver components at 32 and 34 GHz for future deep-space missions. Antenna pattern measurements demonstrating electronic beam steering of the two-dimensional array are reported and compared with predictions based on measured performance of MMIC-based phase shifter and amplifier modules and Vivaldi slotline radiating elements.

  10. Phased-array design for MST and ST radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecklund, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    All of the existing radar systems fully dedicated to clear-air radar studies use some type of phased-array antennas. The effects of beam-steering techniques including feed networks and phase shifters; sidelobe control; ground-clutter suppression; low altitude coverage; arrays with integrated radiating elements and feed networks; analysis of coaxial-collinear antennas; use of arrays with multiple beams; and array testing and measure on structural design of the antenna are discussed.

  11. Reconfigurable, Bi-Directional Flexfet Level Shifter for Low-Power, Rad-Hard Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeGregorio, Kelly; Wilson, Dale G.

    2009-01-01

    Two prototype Reconfigurable, Bi-directional Flexfet Level Shifters (ReBiLS) have been developed, where one version is a stand-alone component designed to interface between external low voltage and high voltage, and the other version is an embedded integrated circuit (IC) for interface between internal low-voltage logic and external high-voltage components. Targeting stand-alone and embedded circuits separately allows optimization for these distinct applications. Both ReBiLS designs use the commercially available 180-nm Flex fet Independently Double-Gated (IDG) SOI CMOS (silicon on insulator, complementary metal oxide semiconductor) technology. Embedded ReBiLS circuits were integrated with a Reed-Solomon (RS) encoder using CMOS Ultra-Low-Power Radiation Tolerant (CULPRiT) double-gated digital logic circuits. The scope of the project includes: creation of a new high-voltage process, development of ReBiLS circuit designs, and adjustment of the designs to maximize performance through simulation, layout, and manufacture of prototypes. The primary technical objectives were to develop a high-voltage, thick oxide option for the 180-nm Flexfet process, and to develop a stand-alone ReBiLS IC with two 8-channel I/O busses, 1.8 2.5 I/O on the low-voltage pins, 5.0-V-tolerant input and 3.3-V output I/O on the high-voltage pins, and 100-MHz minimum operation with 10-pF external loads. Another objective was to develop an embedded, rad-hard ReBiLS I/O cell with 0.5-V low-voltage operation for interface with core logic, 5.0-V-tolerant input and 3.3-V output I/O pins, and 100-MHz minimum operation with 10- pF external loads. A third objective was to develop a 0.5- V Reed-Solomon Encoder with embedded ReBilS I/O: Transfer the existing CULPRiT RS encoder from a 0.35-micron bulk-CMOS process to the ASI 180-nm Flexfet, rad-hard SOI Process. 0.5-V low-voltage core logic. 5.0-V-tolerant input and 3.3-V output I/O pins. 100-MHz minimum operation with 10- pF external loads. The stand

  12. Design considerations for high-power VHF radar transceivers: The Poker Flat MST radar phase control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecklund, W. L.; Johnson, P. E.

    1983-01-01

    Sixty-four separate 50-kW peak-power transmitters are distributed throughout the 200 x 200 meter Poker Flat MST radar antenna array. The relative phase of each transmitter is automatically controlled by a 64-channel unit located in the main building at the edge of the antenna. The phase control unit is described. In operation the RF pulse from a transmitter coupler is power divided and compared with the phase reference in a mixer. The mixer output is low-pass filtered and sampled near the center of the resulting video pulse by an amplifying sample-and-hold integrated circuit. Phase control is effected by maintaining the mixer output pulse near zero volts by amplifying the sample-and-hold output which then drives the voltage-controlled phase shifter in the direction to null the mixer output. The voltage-controlled shifter achieves over 360 deg phase shift in the range from 0.7 to 24 volts. When the voltage into the shifter tracks to either voltage limit the wrap-around control resets the voltage so that the shifter is always operating within its control range.

  13. Design of photonic phased array switches using nano electromechanical systems on silicon-on-insulator integration platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Ali Abdulsattar

    This thesis presents an introduction to the design and simulation of a novel class of integrated photonic phased array switch elements. The main objective is to use nano-electromechanical (NEMS) based phase shifters of cascaded under-etched slot nanowires that are compact in size and require a small amount of power to operate them. The structure of the switch elements is organized such that it brings the phase shifting elements to the exterior sides of the photonic circuits. The transition slot couplers, used to interconnect the phase shifters, are designed to enable biasing one of the silicon beams of each phase shifter from an electrode located at the side of the phase shifter. The other silicon beam of each phase shifter is biased through the rest of the silicon structure of the switch element, which is taken as a ground. Phased array switch elements ranging from 2x2 up to 8x8 multiple-inputs/multiple-outputs (MIMO) are conveniently designed within reasonable footprints native to the current fabrication technologies. Chapter one presents the general layout of the various designs of the switch elements and demonstrates their novel features. This demonstration will show how waveguide disturbances in the interconnecting network from conventional switch elements can be avoided by adopting an innovative design. Some possible applications for the designed switch elements of different sizes and topologies are indicated throughout the chapter. Chapter two presents the design of the multimode interference (MMI) couplers used in the switch elements as splitters, combiners and waveguide crossovers. Simulation data and design methodologies for the multimode couplers of interest are detailed in this chapter. Chapter three presents the design and analysis of the NEMS-operated phase shifters. Both simulations and numerical analysis are utilized in the design of a 0°-180° capable NEMS-operated phase shifter. Additionally, the response of some of the designed photonic phased

  14. An FBG sensor interrogation technique based on a precise optical recirculating frequency shifter driven by RF signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zifei; Yang, Tianxin; Jia, Dongfang; Wang, Zhaoying; Sang, Mei

    2013-03-01

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors have numerous advantages to sense multi-physical quantities such as the temperature and strain simultaneously by monitoring the shift of the returned "Bragg" wavelength resulting from changes in these quantities. Several FBG interrogation systems have been set up using photo detectors instead of an optical spectrum analyzer (OSA) to convert wavelength to time measurements. However, in those systems, it is necessary to use mechanical tuning components to generate fast-speed wavelength-swept light sources for high-precision FBG interrogation. In this paper, a low-cost and delicate wavelength-shift detection system, without any mechanical scanning parts, is proposed and demonstrated. The wavelength scanning system is a recirculating frequency shifter (RFS) which consists of an optical amplifier, an under test FBG sensor and an optical single-sideband (SSB) modulator driven by RF signals at 10 GHz. The measurement accuracy of this system is 0.08nm.

  15. Wide-bandwidth phase lock between a CW laser and a frequency comb based on a feed-forward configuration.

    PubMed

    Sala, T; Gatti, D; Gambetta, A; Coluccelli, N; Galzerano, G; Laporta, P; Marangoni, M

    2012-07-01

    Wide-bandwidth phase lock between the tooth of a frequency comb and a CW extended-cavity diode laser at 1.55 μm is achieved by the use of an acousto-optical frequency shifter in a feed-forward configuration. The coherence properties of the comb are efficiently transferred to the CW laser, whose linewidth is narrowed down to the ∼10 KHz comb level. A maximum control bandwidth of ∼0.6 MHz has been experimentally achieved, limited by the transit time of the acoustic wave inside the frequency shifter. PMID:22743465

  16. MEMS, Ka-Band Single-Pole Double-Throw (SPDT) Switch for Switched Line Phase Shifters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Ponchak, George E.; Varaljay, Nicholas C.

    2002-01-01

    Ka-band MEMS doubly anchored cantilever beam capacitive shunt devices are used to demonstrate a MEMS SPDT switch fabricated on high resistivity silicon (HRS) utilizing finite ground coplanar waveguide (FGC) transmission lines. The SPDT switch has an insertion loss (IL), return loss (RL), and isolation of 0.3dB, 40dB, and 30 dB, respectively at Ka-band.

  17. A 220 GHz reflection-type phased array concept study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedden, Abigail S.; Dietlein, Charles R.; Wikner, David A.

    2011-05-01

    The goal of this project is to enable light-weight, durable, and portable systems capable of performing standoff detection of person-borne improvised explosive devices (PB-IEDs) through the development of millimeter-wave reflection-type phased arrays. Electronic beam steering eliminates the need for complex mechanical scanners that are commonly implemented with millimeter-wave imaging systems and would reduce overall system size and weight. We present a concept study of a 220 GHz reflection-type phased array for the purpose of performing beam scanning of a confocal reflector system. Requirements for effective imaging of the desired target region are established, including spatial resolution, total scan angle, and number of image pixels achievable. We examine the effects of array architecture on beam characteristics as it is scanned off broadside, including Gaussicity and encircled energy. Benchmark requirements are determined and compared with the capabilities of several potential phase shifter technologies, including MEMS-based variable capacitor phase shifters, switches, and varactor diode-based phase shifters.

  18. Spectral sensitivities for illusory contour perception: a manifold linkage of chromatic and achromatic cues with the generation of contours.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, S; Kaihara, T; Takemoto, A; Ido, K; Ejima, Y

    1992-09-01

    Using colored inducing patterns presented as increments upon a white uniform background, the increment thresholds needed for illusory contour perception were measured as a function of the wavelength of inducing pattern. The spectral sensitivity functions were obtained with varying adaptation level and stimulus configuration, high and low background illumination, and line-based and figure-based inducing patterns. The results showed a distinctive feature between the line-based and the figure-based illusory contours. The sensitivity functions for the line-based illusory contours showed the characteristics of non-opponent mechanisms and they were shape invariant with background intensity and spatial variables. On the other hand, the sensitivity functions for the figure-based illusory contours showed non-opponent nature for low background illumination but opponent nature for high background illumination. It is suggested that the generation of illusory contours involves concurrent processing of different cues of luminance and color, and that photopic adaptation level and stimulus configuration control the degree of the contributions of chromatic and achromatic mechanisms to contour formation. PMID:1455742

  19. Perception of achromatic, monochromatic, pure chromatic, and chromatic noisy images by real human-observer under threshold conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasilnikov, Nikolay N.; Krasilnikova, Olga I.; Shelepin, Yury E.

    2000-04-01

    In the experimental verification of the ideal observer theory applicability to observation of: achromatic, monochromatic, pure chromatic and chromatic noisy images by real human- observer under threshold conditions we used the method of comparative measurements. We measured and compared the correct identification probabilities of the test objects in noisy above mentioned images by real human-observer and computer model of ideal observer. For the case when we have no full knowledge about test objects parameters we've developed the modified Zigert-Kotelnikov algorithm and appropriate model. In particular, when all image parameters are a priory known, this algorithm coincides with the ideal observer one. We formulated 3 new laws of matched filtering of exactly known color images and concluded that the probabilities of correct identification by the observer and by the computer model are in good agreement in a wide range of noise intensities. Absence of a priori information about test objects coordinates unlike test objects sizes information influences greatly on the correct identification probabilities. Our results are useful in modeling of human vision under threshold conditions. The developed model may be effectively used for estimation of picture quality impairment on the monitor screen, the diagnostic of the human visual system condition, etc.

  20. Double reference pulsed phase locked loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A double reference pulse phase locked loop is described which measures the phase shift between tone burst signals initially derived from the same periodic signal source (voltage controlled oscillator) and delayed by different amounts because of two different paths. A first path is from the transducer to the surface of a sample and back. A second path is from the transducer to the opposite surface and back. A first pulse phase locked loop including a phase detector and a phase shifter forces the tone burst signal delayed by the second path in phase quadrature with the periodic signal source. A second pulse phase locked loop including a second phase detector forces the tone burst signals delayed by the first path into phase quadrature with the phase shifted periodic signal source.

  1. The NULLTIMATE Testbed: A Progress Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabor, P.

    2010-10-01

    Nulling interferometry has been suggested as the underlying principle for an instrument which could provide direct detection and spectroscopy of Earth-like exoplanets, including searches for potential biomarkers (Darwin/TPF-I). Several aspects of this method require further research and development. The NULLTIMATE testbed at the Institut d’Astrophysique Spatiale in Orsay, France, is a new instrument, built in late 2008. It is designed to test different achromatic phase shifters (focus crossing, field reversal, dielectric plates) at 300 K using various sources ranging from 2 to 10 μm, with special attention to stabilization (optical path difference and beam intensity balance). Its operational parameters (null depth and stability) were tested with a monochromatic laser sources at 2.32 and 3.39 μm and with a supercontinuum source in the K band. This poster presents a progress report on its performance with a focus crossing achromatic phase shifter.

  2. Phase stable RF transport system

    DOEpatents

    Curtin, Michael T.; Natter, Eckard F.; Denney, Peter M.

    1992-01-01

    An RF transport system delivers a phase-stable RF signal to a load, such as an RF cavity of a charged particle accelerator. A circuit generates a calibration signal at an odd multiple frequency of the RF signal where the calibration signal is superimposed with the RF signal on a common cable that connects the RF signal with the load. Signal isolating diplexers are located at both the RF signal source end and load end of the common cable to enable the calibration to be inserted and extracted from the cable signals without any affect on the RF signal. Any phase shift in the calibration signal during traverse of the common cable is then functionally related to the phase shift in the RF signal. The calibration phase shift is used to control a phase shifter for the RF signal to maintain a stable RF signal at the load.

  3. Phase-shifting by means of an electronically tunable lens: quantitative phase imaging of biological specimens with digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Carlos; Doblas, Ana; Saavedra, Genaro; Martínez-Corral, Manuel; García-Sucerquia, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    The use of an electronically tunable lens (ETL) to produce controlled phase shifts in interferometric arrangements is shown. The performance of the ETL as a phase-shifting device is experimentally validated in phase-shifting digital holographic microscopy. Quantitative phase maps of a section of the thorax of a Drosophila melanogaster fly and of human red blood cells have been obtained using our proposal. The experimental results validate the possibility of using the ETL as a reliable phase-shifter device. PMID:27192250

  4. Optical and X-Ray Observations of GRB 060526: A Complex Afterglow Consistent with an Achromatic Jet Break

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, X.; Halpern, J. P.; Morgan, N. D.; Armstrong, E.; Mirabal, N.; Haislip. J. B.; Reichart, D. E.; Stanek, K. Z.

    2007-01-01

    We obtained 98 R-band and 18 B, r', i' images of the optical afterglow of GRB 060526 (z = 3.21) with the MDM 1.3 m, 2.4 m, and the PROMPT telescopes at CTIO over the five nights following the burst trigger. Combining these data with other optical observations reported in GCN and the Swift XRT observations, we compare the optical and X-ray afterglow light curves of GRB 060526. Both the optical and X-ray afterglow light curves show rich features, such as flares and breaks. The densely sampled optical observations provide very good coverage at T > 10(exp 4) s. We observed a break at 2.4 x 10(exp 5) sin the optical afterglow light curve. Compared with the X-ray afterglow light curve, the break is consistent with an achromatic break supporting the beaming models of GRBs. However, the prebreak and postbreak temporal decay slopes are difficult to explain in simple afterglow models. We estimated a jet angle of theta(sub j) approx. 7deg and a prompt emission size of R(sub prompt) approx. 2 x 10(exp 14) cm. In addition, we detected several optical flares with amplitudes of (Delta)m approx. 0.2,0.6, and 0.2 mag. The X-ray afterglows detected by Swift have shown complicated decay patterns. Recently, many well-sampled optical afterglows also show decays with flares and multiple breaks. GRB 060526 provides an additional case of such a complex, well-observed optical afterglow. The accumulated well-sampled afterglows indicate that most of the optical afterglows are complex.

  5. Airborne Electronically Steerable Phased Array (AESPA) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The basic concept and design of a flatplate-fed transmission array are described and system performance requirements are summarized. Particular emphasis is given to the design of the aperture, the radiating element, the phase shifter, the flatplate feed, and the mechanical support structure. Fabrication and testing techniques are considered. Of the three major parameters of interest in demonstrating the performance capabilities of the transmissive array, beamwidth was shown to be the least sensitive to system amplitude and phase errors. Beam pointing angle was also shown to be relatively insensitive to errors. Close agreement between measured and calculated values was found for array gain. The greatest difference was found for array sidelone level.

  6. Performance analysis on quality of optical frequency comb generated by the recirculating frequency shifter based on linear IQ modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lu; Li, Jianping; Lin, Jiachuan; Xi, Lixia; Tang, Xianfeng; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2015-11-01

    An optical frequency comb generator using a modified single-sideband recirculating frequency shifter scheme adopting a linear IQ modulator as the kernel device (SSB-RFS-LIQM) is proposed. The optical comb lines generated by the proposed scheme possess good features such as extreme flatness and high optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR), compared to the quality we can obtain when we use a conventional IQ modulator in the SSB-RFS structure (called SSB-RFS-CIQM scheme). The mechanism of how the SSB-RFS-LIQM works is carefully analyzed with analytical and numerical methods. With the capability of strong suppression of high-order crosstalk and less demand of the gain of erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (and hence less amplified spontaneous noise induced) in the loop, 5.5 dB OSNR improvement can be achieved when 100 extreme flat comb lines are generated using the SSB-RFS-LIQM scheme compared to using the SSB-RFS-CIQM scheme.

  7. Monte Carlo code G3sim for simulation of plastic scintillator detectors with wavelength shifter fiber readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, P. K.; Dugad, S. R.; Gupta, S. K.

    2012-04-01

    A detailed description of a compact Monte Carlo simulation code "G3sim" for studying the performance of a plastic scintillator detector with wavelength shifter (WLS) fiber readout is presented. G3sim was developed for optimizing the design of new scintillator detectors used in the GRAPES-3 extensive air shower experiment. Propagation of the blue photons produced by the passage of relativistic charged particles in the scintillator is treated by incorporating the absorption, total internal, and diffuse reflections. Capture of blue photons by the WLS fibers and subsequent re-emission of longer wavelength green photons is appropriately treated. The trapping and propagation of green photons inside the WLS fiber is treated using the laws of optics for meridional and skew rays. Propagation time of each photon is taken into account for the generation of the electrical signal at the photomultiplier. A comparison of the results from G3sim with the performance of a prototype scintillator detector showed an excellent agreement between the simulated and measured properties. The simulation results can be parametrized in terms of exponential functions providing a deeper insight into the functioning of these versatile detectors. G3sim can be used to aid the design and optimize the performance of scintillator detectors prior to actual fabrication that may result in a considerable saving of time, labor, and money spent.

  8. Monte Carlo code G3sim for simulation of plastic scintillator detectors with wavelength shifter fiber readout.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, P K; Dugad, S R; Gupta, S K

    2012-04-01

    A detailed description of a compact Monte Carlo simulation code "G3sim" for studying the performance of a plastic scintillator detector with wavelength shifter (WLS) fiber readout is presented. G3sim was developed for optimizing the design of new scintillator detectors used in the GRAPES-3 extensive air shower experiment. Propagation of the blue photons produced by the passage of relativistic charged particles in the scintillator is treated by incorporating the absorption, total internal, and diffuse reflections. Capture of blue photons by the WLS fibers and subsequent re-emission of longer wavelength green photons is appropriately treated. The trapping and propagation of green photons inside the WLS fiber is treated using the laws of optics for meridional and skew rays. Propagation time of each photon is taken into account for the generation of the electrical signal at the photomultiplier. A comparison of the results from G3sim with the performance of a prototype scintillator detector showed an excellent agreement between the simulated and measured properties. The simulation results can be parametrized in terms of exponential functions providing a deeper insight into the functioning of these versatile detectors. G3sim can be used to aid the design and optimize the performance of scintillator detectors prior to actual fabrication that may result in a considerable saving of time, labor, and money spent. PMID:22559526

  9. Monte Carlo code G3sim for simulation of plastic scintillator detectors with wavelength shifter fiber readout

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, P. K.; Dugad, S. R.; Gupta, S. K.

    2012-04-15

    A detailed description of a compact Monte Carlo simulation code ''G3sim'' for studying the performance of a plastic scintillator detector with wavelength shifter (WLS) fiber readout is presented. G3sim was developed for optimizing the design of new scintillator detectors used in the GRAPES-3 extensive air shower experiment. Propagation of the blue photons produced by the passage of relativistic charged particles in the scintillator is treated by incorporating the absorption, total internal, and diffuse reflections. Capture of blue photons by the WLS fibers and subsequent re-emission of longer wavelength green photons is appropriately treated. The trapping and propagation of green photons inside the WLS fiber is treated using the laws of optics for meridional and skew rays. Propagation time of each photon is taken into account for the generation of the electrical signal at the photomultiplier. A comparison of the results from G3sim with the performance of a prototype scintillator detector showed an excellent agreement between the simulated and measured properties. The simulation results can be parametrized in terms of exponential functions providing a deeper insight into the functioning of these versatile detectors. G3sim can be used to aid the design and optimize the performance of scintillator detectors prior to actual fabrication that may result in a considerable saving of time, labor, and money spent.

  10. Full 360 deg phase shifting of injection-locked oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangdong; Daryoush, Afshin S.

    1993-01-01

    A novel design is presented to produce analog phase shifts of 0 deg to 360 deg in optically controlled oscillators which are subharmonically injection-locked. The proposed concept was analytically described and experimentally demonstrated by producing a 360 deg phase shift in an 8 GHz oscillator that is indirectly optically injection-locked to a 4 GHz subharmonic frequency. This design concept could eliminate the need for switched delay-line phase shifters in T/R modules of optically controlled phased array antennas, thus making the T/R module more compact and efficient.

  11. Reconfigurable Wave Velocity Transmission Lines for Phased Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Host, Nick; Chen, Chi-Chih; Volakis, John L.; Miranda, Felix

    2013-01-01

    Phased array antennas showcase many advantages over mechanically steered systems. However, they are also more complex, heavy and most importantly costly. This presentation paper presents a concept which overcomes these detrimental attributes by eliminating all of the phase array backend (including phase shifters). Instead, a wave velocity reconfigurable transmission line is used in a series fed array arrangement to allow phase shifting with one small (100mil) mechanical motion. Different configurations of the reconfigurable wave velocity transmission line are discussed and simulated and experimental results are presented.

  12. Manufacturing of ArF chromeless hard shifter for 65-nm technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Keun-Taek; Dieu, Laurent; Hughes, Greg P.; Green, Kent G.; Croffie, Ebo H.; Taravade, Kunal N.

    2003-12-01

    For logic design, Chrome-less Phase Shift Mask is one of the possible solutions for defining small geometry with low MEF (mask enhancement factor) for the 65nm node. There have been lots of dedicated studies on the PCO (Phase Chrome Off-axis) mask technology and several design approaches have been proposed including grating background, chrome patches (or chrome shield) for applying PCO on line/space and contact pattern. In this paper, we studied the feasibility of grating design for line and contact pattern. The design of the grating pattern was provided from the EM simulation software (TEMPEST) and the aerial image simulation software. AIMS measurements with high NA annular illumination were done. Resist images were taken on designed pattern in different focus. Simulations, AIMS are compared to verify the consistency of the process with wafer printed performance.

  13. Focal plane wavefront sensor achromatization: The multireference self-coherent camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delorme, J. R.; Galicher, R.; Baudoz, P.; Rousset, G.; Mazoyer, J.; Dupuis, O.

    2016-04-01

    Context. High contrast imaging and spectroscopy provide unique constraints for exoplanet formation models as well as for planetary atmosphere models. But this can be challenging because of the planet-to-star small angular separation (<1 arcsec) and high flux ratio (>105). Recently, optimized instruments like VLT/SPHERE and Gemini/GPI were installed on 8m-class telescopes. These will probe young gazeous exoplanets at large separations (≳1 au) but, because of uncalibrated phase and amplitude aberrations that induce speckles in the coronagraphic images, they are not able to detect older and fainter planets. Aims: There are always aberrations that are slowly evolving in time. They create quasi-static speckles that cannot be calibrated a posteriori with sufficient accuracy. An active correction of these speckles is thus needed to reach very high contrast levels (>106-107). This requires a focal plane wavefront sensor. Our team proposed a self coherent camera, the performance of which was demonstrated in the laboratory. As for all focal plane wavefront sensors, these are sensitive to chromatism and we propose an upgrade that mitigates the chromatism effects. Methods: First, we recall the principle of the self-coherent camera and we explain its limitations in polychromatic light. Then, we present and numerically study two upgrades to mitigate chromatism effects: the optical path difference method and the multireference self-coherent camera. Finally, we present laboratory tests of the latter solution. Results: We demonstrate in the laboratory that the multireference self-coherent camera can be used as a focal plane wavefront sensor in polychromatic light using an 80 nm bandwidth at 640 nm (bandwidth of 12.5%). We reach a performance that is close to the chromatic limitations of our bench: 1σ contrast of 4.5 × 10-8 between 5 and 17 λ0/D. Conclusions: The performance of the MRSCC is promising for future high-contrast imaging instruments that aim to actively minimize the

  14. Full phase-shifting methodology for 65-nm node lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierrat, Christophe; Driessen, Frank A. J. M.; Vandenberghe, Geert

    2003-06-01

    A new methodology for completely phase-shifting a poly layout without creating local phase conflicts was proposed for lithographic techniques combining one phase-shifting mask and one binary mask exposure1. Critical and non-critical areas of the layout are identified and phase conflicts are avoided by splitting the shifter regions from non-critical areas to non-critical areas without crossing critical areas. The out-of-phase splits of the shifter regions are removed using the binary exposure. Simulation results and experimental data collected for 90nm technology node show no sign of process latitude loss around the areas where the shifters are split. The overlay latitude is commensurate with 90nm technology scanner requirements (tool to itself). Simulation work shows that the two exposures are balancing each other out of focus in the 45-degree cut regions thus ensuring large focus latitude. The focus latitude reported is larger than the main feature process latitude; this result was confirmed experimentally. A set of phase-shifting design rules commensurate with an aggressive 65nm node technology (140nm pitch) was put together. Under these conditions, we have identified certain types of cuts that should be avoided during the generation of the phase-shifting layout; this is primarily the case for cuts in "elbow" structures which exhibit limited process latitude. Other cuts like line-end cuts will have to be modified. In this case we have proposed a side cut when the line-end is facing a perpendicular line with a minimum spacing. Despite these restrictions, test structures for the 65nm technology node were successfully converted with no phase conflicts. Experimental verification done on test structures using a 0.75 NA, 193nm scanner demonstrates 0.33 k1 capability using the full phase methodology.

  15. Digital Phase Meter for a Laser Heterodyne Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loya, Frank

    2008-01-01

    The Digital Phase Meter is based on a modified phase-locked loop. When phase alignment between the reference input and the phase-shifted metrological input is achieved, the loop locks and the phase shift of the digital phase shifter equals the phase difference that one seeks to measure. This digital phase meter is being developed for incorporation into a laser heterodyne interferometer in a metrological apparatus, but could also be adapted to other uses. Relative to prior phase meters of similar capability, including digital ones, this digital phase meter is smaller, less complex, and less expensive. The phase meter has been constructed and tested in the form of a field-programmable gate array (FPGA).

  16. SAR processing with stepped chirps and phased array antennas.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2006-09-01

    Wideband radar signals are problematic for phased array antennas. Wideband radar signals can be generated from series or groups of narrow-band signals centered at different frequencies. An equivalent wideband LFM chirp can be assembled from lesser-bandwidth chirp segments in the data processing. The chirp segments can be transmitted as separate narrow-band pulses, each with their own steering phase operation. This overcomes the problematic dilemma of steering wideband chirps with phase shifters alone, that is, without true time-delay elements.

  17. Reconfigurable Transmission Line for a Series-Fed Ku-Band Phased Array Using a Single Feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Host, Nicholas K.; Chen, Chi-Chih; Volakis, John L.; Miranda. Felix, A.

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents a novel approach to realize a lowcost phased array using a simple feeding mechanism. Specifically, a single coplanar stripline (CPS) transmission line is used to feed the antenna array elements. By controlling the CPS's dielectric properties using a movable dielectric plunger, scanning is achieved. Due to its simplicity, single feed, and no phase shifters, this approach leads to a dramatic reduction in cost which does not scale for larger arrays.

  18. Analog optical phase modulator based on chiral smectic and polymer cholesteric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockley, Jay E.; Sharp, Gary D.; Serati, Steven A.; Johnson, Kristina M.

    1995-12-01

    A high-speed analog optical phase modulator based on chiral smectic and cholesteric liquid crystals is discussed. The chiral smectic liquid-crystal device functions as a variable-orientation half-wave retarder, whereas the polymer cholesteric liquid-crystal film acts as a polarization-preserving mirror. We use circular Jones calculus to describe optical phase modulation, using a half-wave retarder of variable orientation acting on circularly polarized light. The phase induced by this modulator is achromatic. Analog phase modulation of nearly 360deg is demonstrated with a device switching time of 200 mu s at 25degC .

  19. Millimeter-wave pseudomorphic HEMT MMIC phased array components for space communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, G. L.; Pao, C. K.; Wu, C. S.; Mandolia, G.; Hu, M.; Yuan, S.; Leonard, Regis

    1991-01-01

    Recent advances in pseudomorphic HEMT MMIC (PMHEMT/MMIC) technology have made it the preferred candidate for high performance millimeter-wave components for phased array applications. This paper describes the development of PMHEMT/MMIC components at Ka-band and V-band. Specifically, the following PMHEMT/MMIC components will be described: power amplifiers at Ka-band; power amplifiers at V-band; and four-bit phase shifters at V-band. For the Ka-band amplifier, 125 mW output power with 5.5 dB gain and 21 percent power added efficiency at 2 dB compression point has been achieved. For the V-band amplifier, 112 mW output power with 6 dB gain and 26 percent power added efficiency has been achieved. And, for the V-band phase shifter, four-bit (45 deg steps) phase shifters with less than 8 dB insertion loss from 61 GHz to 63 GHz will be described.

  20. W-band Phased Array Systems using Silicon Integrated Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Young

    This thesis presents the silicon-based on-chip W-band phased array systems. An improved quadrature all-pass filter (QAF) and its implementation in 60--80 GHz active phase shifter using 0.13 microm SiGe BiCMOS technology is presented. It is demonstrated that with the inclusion of an Rs/R in the high Q branches of C and L, the sensitivity to the loading capacitance, therefore the I/Q phase and amplitude errors are minimized. This technique is especially suited for wideband millimeter-wave circuits where the loading capacitance (CL) is comparable to the filter capacitance (C). A prototype 60--80 GHz active phased shifter using the improved QAF is demonstrated. The overall chip size is 1.15 x 0.92 mm2 with the power consumption of 108 mW. The measured S11 and S22 are < -10 dB at 60--80 GHz and 60--73 GHz, respectively. The measured average power gain is 11.0--14.7 dB at 60--79 GHz with the rms gain error of < 1.3 dB at 60--78 GHz for 4-bit phase states. And the rms phase error is < 9.1 degree at 60--78.5 GHz showing wideband 4-bit performance. The measured NF is 9--11.6 dB at 63--75 GHz and the measured P 1dB is -27 dBm at 70 GHz. In another project, a 67--78 GHz 4-bit passive phase shifter using 0.13 microm CMOS switches is demonstrated. The phase shifter is based on a low-pass pi-network. The chip size is 0.45 x 0.3 mm2 without pads and consumes virtually no power. The measured S11 and S22 is < -10 dB at 67--81 GHz for all 16 phase states. The measured gain of 4-bit phase shifter is -19.2 +/- 3.7 dB at 77 GHz with the rms gain error of < 11.25 degree at 67--78 GHz. And the measured rms phase error is < 2.5 dB at 67--78 GHz. The measured P1dB is > 8 dBm and the simulated IIP3 is > 22 dBm. A low-power 76--84 GHz 4-element phased array receiver using the designed passive phase shifter is presented. The power consumption is minimized by using a single-ended design and alternating the amplifiers and phase shifter cells to result in a low noise figure at a low power

  1. KrF excimer laser lithography with a phase-shifting mask for gigabit-scale ultra large scale integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Akira; Terasawa, Tsuneo; Hasegawa, Norio; Asai, Naoko; Tanaka, Toshihiko P.; Okazaki, Shinji

    1996-10-01

    Resolution-enhancement technologies such as alternating-type phase-shifting masks (PSMs), half-tone PSMs, and the off- axis illumination method in optical lithography are necessary for manufacturing gigabit-scale ultra large scale integration (ULSI) devices. Because an alternating-type PSM is the most effective way to enhance resolution, we examine the resolution capabilities of KrF excimer laser lithography combined with the use of an alternating-type PSM through simulations. Our goal is to apply this technique to attain pattern delineation smaller than 200 nm. We simulate light intensity profiles for various types of PSMs in terms of the 3-D mask structure, and find that a PSM structure with a spin-on glass (SOG) phase shifter on a Cr layer that is thinner than in a conventional mask is one of the best choices for KrF excimer laser lithography. We examine potential problems such as the durability of the SOG phase shifters to KrF excimer laser irradiation exposure, and phase angle error due to the surface topography of the Cr aperture patterns. From our experimental results, we confirm that the optical characteristics of the PSM are not degraded, and the phase angle can be controlled with an accuracy sufficient for gigabit-scale ULSI device fabrication. Improved PSMs with a thin Cr layer and SOG phase shifters were successfully used to fabricate several layers of experimental 1-Gbit dynamic random access memory (DRAM) devices with sufficient resolution capability.

  2. Noise characteristics of passive components for phased array applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonmez, M. Kemal; Trew, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a comparative study on noise characteristics of basic power combining/dividing and phase shifting schemes are presented. The theoretical basics of thermal noise in a passive linear multiport are discussed. A new formalism is presented to describe the noise behavior of the passive circuits, and it is shown that the fundamental results are conveniently achieved using this description. The results of analyses concerning the noise behavior of basic power combining/dividing structures (the Wilkinson combiner, 90 deg hybrid coupler, hybrid ring coupler, and the Lange coupler) are presented. Three types of PIN-diode switch phase shifters are analyzed in terms of noise performance.

  3. Ka-Band Phased Array System Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R.; Johnson, S.; Sands, O.; Lambert, K.

    2001-01-01

    Phased Array Antennas (PAAs) using patch-radiating elements are projected to transmit data at rates several orders of magnitude higher than currently offered with reflector-based systems. However, there are a number of potential sources of degradation in the Bit Error Rate (BER) performance of the communications link that are unique to PAA-based links. Short spacing of radiating elements can induce mutual coupling between radiating elements, long spacing can induce grating lobes, modulo 2 pi phase errors can add to Inter Symbol Interference (ISI), phase shifters and power divider network introduce losses into the system. This paper describes efforts underway to test and evaluate the effects of the performance degrading features of phased-array antennas when used in a high data rate modulation link. The tests and evaluations described here uncover the interaction between the electrical characteristics of a PAA and the BER performance of a communication link.

  4. Optical phased array using high-contrast grating all-pass filters for fast beam steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weijian; Sun, Tianbo; Rao, Yi; Chan, Trevor; Megens, Mischa; Yoo, Byung-Wook; Horsley, David A.; Wu, Ming C.; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J.

    2013-03-01

    A novel 8x8 optical phased array based on high-contrast grating (HCG) all-pass filters (APFs) is experimentally demonstrated with high speed beam steering. Highly efficient phase tuning is achieved by micro-electro-mechanical actuation of the HCG to tune the cavity length of the APFs. Using APF phase-shifters allows a large phase shift with an actuation range of only tens of nanometers. The ultrathin HCG further ensures a high tuning speed (0.626 MHz). Both one-dimensional and two-dimensional HCGs are demonstrated as the actuation mirrors of the APF arrays with high beam steering performance.

  5. A design concept for an MMIC (Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit) microstrip phased array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Smetana, Jerry; Acosta, Roberto

    1987-01-01

    A conceptual design for a microstrip phased array with monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplitude and phase controls is described. The MMIC devices used are 20 GHz variable power amplifiers and variable phase shifters recently developed by NASA contractors for applications in future Ka proposed design, which concept is for a general NxN element array of rectangular lattice geometry. Subarray excitation is incorporated in the MMIC phased array design to reduce the complexity of the beam forming network and the number of MMIC components required.

  6. MEMS-based phased arrays for army applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffin, Paul B.; Holt, James C.; Mullins, James H.; Hudson, Tracy; Rock, Janice

    2007-04-01

    The Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) initiated a research and development project several years ago to develop Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS)-based phased arrays to provide rapid beam steering for sensors, optical and Radio Frequency (RF) missile seekers, and RF communication links. In particular, the joint AMRDEC/Army Research Laboratory (ARL) project, which leverages low-cost phased array components developed under the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Low Cost Cruise Missile Defense (LCCMD) project, is developing RF switches, phase shifters, and passive phased sub-arrays to provide a fast scanning capability for pointing, acquisition, tracking, and data communication; and rugged, optical MEMS-based phased arrays to be employed in small volume, low-cost Laser Detection and Ranging (LADAR) seekers. The current status of the project is disclosed in this paper. Critical technical challenges, which include design and fabrication of the RF switches and phase shifters, design and fabrication of micro lens arrays, control of beam steering, scanning angular resolution and array losses, are discussed. Our approach to overcoming the technical barriers and achieving required performance is also discussed. Finally, the validity of a MEMS technology approach against competing low cost technologies is presented.

  7. Method and apparatus for receiving and tracking phase modulated signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villarreal, S.; Lenett, S. D.; Kobayashi, H. S.; Pawlowski, J. F. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An apparatus and technique are described for receiving and tracking analog or digital phase modulated signals from 0 deg to 360 deg phase shift. In order to track a signal with many phases, a detector discerns the phase modulation of the incoming signal and a phase shifter generates a negative phase shift opposite in angle to the detected phase angle. This produces a converted series sideband component barrier signal. The residual carrier signal and the converted series sideband component carrier are added together to produce a tracking carrier signal. The tracking carrier signal is multiplied with the output from a voltage controlled oscillator in the tracking loop to obtain an error signal which drives the voltage controlled oscillator and tracks the incoming signal frequency. The technique is less susceptible to carrier interference which may degrade tracking and tracking may be performed at lower signal to noise ratios and for lower input signal power levels.

  8. High-durability phase-shift film with variable transmittance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozawa, Osamu; Shishido, Hiroaki; Kajiwara, Takenori

    2015-10-01

    In order to maintain the lithographic margin and to have sufficient image resolution, attenuated phase shift masks are widely used as a resolution enhancement technique. To improve the radiation durability of the phase shift film, we have developed low oxidation MoSi shifters, such as A6L2, as one option for improving radiation durability. But to provide the best radiation durability, we have developed a new approach eliminating the molybdenum from the phase shift film and introduced a Silicon-Nitride (Si-N) based attenuated phase shift film. Traditionally the transmittance of the phase shift layer is usually around 6%. In the case of a pure Si3N4 film, the transmittance with 180 degree phase shift is around 18%. But, by controlling film structure with a combination of Si-N the transmittance can be tuned to the customers desired transmission value for high durability Mo free attenuated phase shift films.

  9. Spatial Non-Cyclic Geometric Phase in Neutron Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Filipp, Stefan; Hasegawa, Yuji; Loidl, Rudolf; Rauch, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    We present a split-beam neutron interferometric experiment to test the non-cyclic geometric phase tied to the spatial evolution of the system: the subjacent two-dimensional Hilbert space is spanned by the two possible paths in the interferometer and the evolution of the state is controlled by phase shifters and absorbers. A related experiment was reported previously by some of the authors to verify the cyclic spatial geometric phase. The interpretation of this experiment, namely to ascribe a geometric phase to this particular state evolution, has met severe criticism. The extension to non-cyclic evolution manifests the correctness of the interpretation of the previous experiment by means of an explicit calculation of the non-cyclic geometric phase in terms of paths on the Bloch-sphere. The theoretical treatment comprises the cyclic geometric phase as a special case, which is confirmed by experiment. PMID:27308131

  10. A reevaluation of achromatic spatio-temporal vision: Nonoriented filters are monocular, they adapt, and can be used for decision making at high flicker speeds

    PubMed Central

    Meese, Tim S; Baker, Daniel H

    2011-01-01

    Masking, adaptation, and summation paradigms have been used to investigate the characteristics of early spatio-temporal vision. Each has been taken to provide evidence for (i) oriented and (ii) nonoriented spatial-filtering mechanisms. However, subsequent findings suggest that the evidence for nonoriented mechanisms has been misinterpreted: those experiments might have revealed the characteristics of suppression (eg, gain control), not excitation, or merely the isotropic subunits of the oriented detecting mechanisms. To shed light on this, we used all three paradigms to focus on the ‘high-speed’ corner of spatio-temporal vision (low spatial frequency, high temporal frequency), where cross-oriented achromatic effects are greatest. We used flickering Gabor patches as targets and a 2IFC procedure for monocular, binocular, and dichoptic stimulus presentations. To account for our results, we devised a simple model involving an isotropic monocular filter-stage feeding orientation-tuned binocular filters. Both filter stages are adaptable, and their outputs are available to the decision stage following nonlinear contrast transduction. However, the monocular isotropic filters (i) adapt only to high-speed stimuli—consistent with a magnocellular subcortical substrate—and (ii) benefit decision making only for high-speed stimuli (ie, isotropic monocular outputs are available only for high-speed stimuli). According to this model, the visual processes revealed by masking, adaptation, and summation are related but not identical. PMID:23145234

  11. A Hybrid Reflective/Refractive/Diffractive Achromatic Fiber-Coupled Radiation Resistant Imaging System for Use in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Maxey, L Curt; Ally, Tanya R; Brunson, Aly; Garcia, Frances; Goetz, Kathleen C; Hasse, Katelyn E; McManamy, Thomas J; Shea, Thomas J; Simpson, Marc Livingstone

    2011-01-01

    A fiber-coupled imaging system for monitoring the proton beam profile on the target of the Spallation Neutron Source was developed using reflective, refractive and diffractive optics to focus an image onto a fiber optic imaging bundle. The imaging system monitors the light output from a chromium-doped aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}0{sub 3}:Cr) scintillator on the nose of the target. Metal optics are used to relay the image to the lenses that focus the image onto the fiber. The material choices for the lenses and fiber were limited to high-purity fused silica, due to the anticipated radiation dose of 10{sup 8} R. In the first generation system (which had no diffractive elements), radiation damage to the scintillator on the nose of the target significantly broadened the normally monochromatic (694 nm) spectrum. This created the need for an achromatic design in the second generation system. This was achieved through the addition of a diffractive optic for chromatic correction. An overview of the target imaging system and its performance, with particular emphasis on the design and testing of a hybrid refractive/diffractive high-purity fused silica imaging triplet, is presented.

  12. X-band printed phased array antennas using high-performance CNT/ion gel/Ag transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubb, Peter M.; Bidoky, Fazel; Mahajan, Ankit; Subbaraman, Harish; Li, Wentao; Frisbie, Daniel; Chen, Ray T.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports a fully printed phased array antenna developed on a 125 micron thick flexible Kapton substrate. Switching for the phase delay lines is accomplished using printed carbon nanotube transistors with ion gel dielectric layers. Design of each element of the phased array antenna is reported, including a low loss constant impedance power divider, a phase shifter network, and patch antenna design. Steering of an X-band PAA operating at 10GHz from 0 degrees to 22.15 degrees is experimentally demonstrated. In order to completely package the array with electrical interconnects, a single substrate interconnect scheme is also investigated.

  13. Poly(cyclohexyl 2-cyanoacrylate-co-ethoxyethyl 2-cyanoacrylate) as a positive-tone electron beam resist for phase-shift mask fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Akira; Yonezawa, Masaji; Sato, Mitsuyoshi; Okuyama, T.

    1994-11-01

    Poly(cyclohexyl 2-cyanoacrylate) (PCHCA), a positive tone electron beam resist, has both high sensitivity and high dry-etching durability. Therefore, PCHCA has been successfully used for the fabrication of conventional chromium photomasks using dry-etching. However, when PCHCA was applied to the phase-shift mask fabrication, cracks were observed in resist patterns on the SiO2 shifter layer. The cyclic-alkyl group of PCHCA enhances dry-etching durability but causes the cracks in resist patterns. On the other hand, the noncyclic group prevent cracks, but reduces dry-etching durability. However, the copolymer of cyclohexyl 2- cyanoacrylate and ethoxyethyl 2-cyanoacrylate was delineated on SiO2 without generating cracks and reducing dry-etching durability, with high sensitivity. Using this copolymer, the phase-shift masks having SiO2 shifters with vertical walls were fabricated by dry-etching process in short time.

  14. Frequency Tunable Antennas and Novel Phased Array Feeding Networks for Next Generation Communication Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avser, Bilgehan

    The thesis presents three dual-band frequency tunable antennas for carrier aggregation systems and two new feeding networks for reducing the number of phase shifters in limited-scan arrays. First, single- and dual-feed, dual-frequency, low-profile antennas with independent frequency tuning using varactor diodes are presented. The dual-feed planar inverted F-antenna (PIFA) has two operating frequencies which are independently tuned at 0.7--1.1 GHz and at 1.7--2.3 GHz with better than 10 dB impedance match. The isolation between the high-band and the low-band ports is > 13 dB; hence, one resonant frequency can be tuned without affecting the other. The single-feed contiguous-dual-band antenna has two resonant frequencies, which are independently tuned at 1.2--1.6 GHz at 1.6--2.3 GHz with better than 10 dB impedance match for most of the tuning range. And the single-feed dual-band antenna has two resonant frequencies, which are independently tuned at 0.7--1.0 GHz at 1.7--2.3 GHz with better than 10 dB impedance match for most of the tuning range. The tuning is done using varactor diodes with a capacitance range from 0.8 to 3.8 pF, which is compatible with RF MEMS devices. The antenna volumes are 63 x 100 x 3.15 mm3 on epsilon r = 3.55 substrates and the measured antenna efficiencies vary between 25% and 50% over the tuning range. The application areas are in carrier aggregation systems for fourth generation (4G) wireless systems. Next, a new phased array feeding network that employs random sequences of non-uniform sub-arrays (and a single phase shifter for each sub-array) is presented. When these sequences are optimized, the resulting phased arrays can scan over a wide region with low sidelobe levels. Equations for analyzing the random arrays and an algorithm for optimizing the array sequences are presented. Multiple random-solutions with different number of phase shifters and different set of sub-array groups are analyzed and design guidelines are presented. The

  15. Simple broadband implementation of a phase contrast wavefront sensor for adaptive optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, E. E.; Wallace, J. K.

    2004-01-01

    The most critical element of an adaptive optics system is its wavefront sensor, which must measure the closed-loop difference between the corrected wavefront and an ideal template at high speed, in real time, over a dense sampling of the pupil. Most high-order systems have used Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors, but a novel approach based on Zernike's phase contrast principle appears promising. In this paper we discuss a simple way to achromatize such a phase contrast wavefront sensor, using the pi/2 phase difference between reflected and transmitted rays in a thin, symmetric beam splitter. We further model the response at a range of wavelengths to show that the required transverse dimension of the focal-plane phase-shifting spot, nominally lambda/D, may not be very sensitive to wavelength, and so in practice additional optics to introduce wavelength-dependent transverse magnification achromatizing this spot diameter may not be required. A very simple broadband implementation of the phase contrast wavefront sensor results.

  16. Phased Array Radiometer Calibration Using a Radiated Noise Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Karthik; Limaye, Ashutoch S.; Laymon, Charles A.; Meyer, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Electronic beam steering capability of phased array antenna systems offer significant advantages when used in real aperture imaging radiometers. The sensitivity of such systems is limited by the ability to accurately calibrate variations in the antenna circuit characteristics. Passive antenna systems, which require mechanical rotation to scan the beam, have stable characteristics and the noise figure of the antenna can be characterized with knowledge of its physical temperature [1],[2]. Phased array antenna systems provide the ability to electronically steer the beam in any desired direction. Such antennas make use of active components (amplifiers, phase shifters) to provide electronic scanning capability while maintaining a low antenna noise figure. The gain fluctuations in the active components can be significant, resulting in substantial calibration difficulties [3]. In this paper, we introduce two novel calibration techniques that provide an end-to-end calibration of a real-aperture, phased array radiometer system. Empirical data will be shown to illustrate the performance of both methods.

  17. A design concept for an MMIC microstrip phased array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. Q.; Smetana, J.; Acosta, R.

    1986-01-01

    A conceptual design for a microstrip phased array with monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplitude and phase controls is described. The MMIC devices used are 20 GHz variable power amplifiers and variable phase shifters recently developed by NASA contractors for applications in future Ka band advanced satellite communication antenna systems. The proposed design concept is for a general NxN element array of rectangular lattice geometry. Subarray excitation is incorporated in the MMIC phased array design to reduce the complexity of the beam forming network and the number of MMIC components required. The proposed design concept takes into consideration the RF characteristics and actual phyical dimensions of the MMIC devices. Also, solutions to spatial constraints and interconnections associated with currently available packaging designs are discussed. Finally, the design of the microstrip radiating elements and their radiation characteristics are examined.

  18. Temperature dependence of alpha-induced scintillation in the 1,1,4,4-tetraphenyl-1,3-butadiene wavelength shifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veloce, L. M.; Kuźniak, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Noble, A. J.; Boulay, M. G.; Nadeau, P.; Pollmann, T.; Clark, M.; Piquemal, M.; Schreiner, K.

    2016-06-01

    Liquid noble based particle detectors often use the organic wavelength shifter 1,1,4,4-tetraphenyl-1,3-butadiene (TPB) which shifts UV scintillation light to the visible regime, facilitating its detection, but which also can scintillate on its own. Dark matter searches based on this type of detector commonly rely on pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) for background mitigation. Alpha-induced scintillation therefore represents a possible background source in dark matter searches. The timing characteristics of this scintillation determine whether this background can be mitigated through PSD. We have therefore characterized the pulse shape and light yield of alpha induced TPB scintillation at temperatures ranging from 300 K down to 4 K, with special attention given to liquid noble gas temperatures. We find that the pulse shapes and light yield depend strongly on temperature. In addition, the significant contribution of long time constants above ~50 K provides an avenue for discrimination between alpha decay events in TPB and nuclear-recoil events in noble liquid detectors.

  19. Chromatic input to cells of the magnocellular pathway: mean chromaticity and the relative phase of modulated lights.

    PubMed

    Lee, Barry B; Sun, Hao

    2004-01-01

    If the relative phase of red and green modulated lights is changed, at low temporal frequencies the response of cells of the magnocellular (MC) pathway has been found to be minimal not to counterphase, chromatic modulation (as expected of a luminance mechanism) but shifted to some phase intermediate between luminance and chromatic modulation. The results could only be modeled by assuming interaction between achromatic and chromatic inputs to MC cells. The 'phase shift' resembled that seen with psychophysical threshold measurements using the same stimuli. Psychophysical results also showed that the phase shift is dependent on the chromaticity of a background. The results reported here show that the direction of the phase shift in MC cells is reversed by changing the background from long to short wavelengths and is consistent with psychophysical observations. Cell behavior was again modeled by assuming vector summation of achromatic and chromatic inputs. The reversal of phase-shift direction requires a reversal in polarity of the chromatic input. The underlying physiological mechanism may involve summation of chromatic signals of opposite polarity; if the relative size of these signals depends on the background, this may determine the direction of phase shift. PMID:15518205

  20. A 2x2 W-Band Reference Time-Shifted Phase-Locked Transmitter Array in 65nm CMOS Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Adrian; Virbila, Gabriel; Hsiao, Frank; Wu, Hao; Murphy, David; Mehdi, Imran; Siegel, P. H.; Chang, M-C. Frank

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a complete 2x2 phased array transmitter system operating at W-band (90-95 GHz) which employs a PLL reference time-shifting approach instead of using traditional mm-wave phase shifters. PLL reference shifting enables a phased array to be distributed over multiple chips without the need for coherent mm-wave signal distribution between chips. The proposed phased array transmitter system consumes 248 mW per array element when implemented in a 65 nm CMOS technology.

  1. Electro-optic prism-pair setup for efficient high bandwidth isochronous CEP phase shift or group delay generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobert, Olivier; Mennerat, Gabriel; Cornaggia, Christian; Lupinski, Dominique; Perdrix, Michel; Guillaumet, Delphine; Lepetit, Fabien; Oksenhendler, Thomas; Comte, Michel

    2016-05-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of an electro-optic prism pair pure carrier-envelope phase (CEP) shifter at low voltage (shift of 1 rad for a voltage of 90 V, applied to a crystal of 5 mm aperture). Validating our mathematical model, the experiments prove that this set-up which uses two rubidium titanyl phosphate (RTP) crystals, can be used either as an efficient high bandwidth CEP shifter without modifying the group delay of an ultrashort pulse (isochronous CEP shifter) or alternatively as a group delay generator with quasi-constant CEP (Pure Group Delay generator). These two configurations which correspond to specific geometries are characterized by spectral interferometry with a 800 nm mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser. The results are in very good agreement with the model. In the pure group delay mode, a group delay of 2.3 fs is obtained at 1000 V/cm without significant CEP shift. In the isochronous mode, a shift of 5.5 rad at 1000 V/cm is generated without significant delay. The applied voltage is also lowered by a factor of nearly three in this configuration, compared to the case of an RTP rectangular slab of the same total length.

  2. Possibilities of phase curve observation with stellar coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Pavel; Ksanfomality, Leonid; Tavrov, Alexander; Ananyeva, Vladislava

    Since the discovery and confirmation of the first exoplanet orbiting main-sequence star in 1995 the number of known objects continues to increase. Most of them have been detected by indirect methods (radial velocity, transit method, microlensing, etc.). These methods provide a little information about planets, which is dependable on the method model. Obtained information (mass, radius, temperature) is not enough to explain the exoplanet origin and diversity. Radial velocity and transit methods are sensitive to giant planets close to stars and are not effective in detection of low mass Earth-like exoplanets which are of interest for a possible habitability. It is necessary to know the chemical composition of planets and atmospheres as we do it for Solar System planets. Pursuing the goal to examine planetary spectra and having no direct images of exoplanets orbital phase curves are powerful method of investigation. Both the direct imaging and phase curve observation of Earth-like exoplanets remain a real challenge. The reason is the critical combination of huge brightness contrast between the star and the planet (106 in the mid-IR and 109 in the visible) and the small angular separation between sources (typically 0.1…0.5 arcsec or less). To observe phase curves and to perform a spectroscopic analysis it is proposed to use an achromatic interferometric coronagraph capable of reducing high star-to-planet contrast in a wide spectral range. CP-AIC (Common-Path Achromatic Interferometric Coronagraph) and CP-ARC (Common-Path Achromatic Rotational-Shearing Coronagraph) schemes are studied. 1-meter aperture and CP-AIC operating at IWA = 0.38λ/D reduce star-to-planet contrast by up to 6 orders; 1-meter aperture and CP-ARC operating at IWA = 1…5λ/D reduce contrast by up to 9 orders (in case of CP-ARC larger apertures are preferred for bigger advantage in contrast versus CP-AIC). We show possibility to diminish observable star-to-planet flux ratio and discuss prospect to

  3. A simple and reliable technique to characterize amplitude to phase modulation distortion for high-frequency amplifiers and nonlinear devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauregui, Rigoberto; Portilla, Joaquin; Reynoso-Hernández, J. A.; Hirata-Flores, F. I.

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents a simple and reliable measurement system for characterizing the amplitude to phase modulation (AM-PM) characteristics of high frequency amplifiers and nonlinear devices. The AM-PM measurement system is based on a null detector implemented with a double balanced mixer, and requires a voltmeter and a calibrated phase shifter. A 12 W class A radio frequency power amplifier has been designed using a GaN transistor, and the AM-PM has been measured using both the method proposed in this work and the classical method with a calibrated vector network analyzer. A good correlation between both methods is observed, which validates the proposed method.

  4. Microprocessor-controlled phase analysis for a 2-mm microwave interferometer on the TCA tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Lister, J.B.; Means, R.W.; Oberson, P.

    1982-05-01

    The method of phase analysis is presented for a 2-mm microwave interferometer built to measure the plasma density in a tokamak. Use is made of a fast phase shifter (FPS) constructed from a switchable four-port circulator to resolve the phase ambiguity inherent in a simple interferometer. The phase between 0--2..pi.. is calculated by a microprocessor accessing a look-up table and the total phase is calculated by taking the 0 to 2..pi.. crossings into consideration. It is software controlled and the complete sampling and analysis cycle takes 24 ..mu..s which is sufficiently rapid for the application considered. The phase information is available in analog and digital form.

  5. Microprocessor-controlled phase analysis for a 2-mm microwave interferometer on the TCA tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, J. B.; Means, R. W.; Oberson, P.

    1982-05-01

    The method of phase analysis is presented for a 2-mm microwave interferometer built to measure the plasma density in a tokamak. Use is made of a fast phase shifter (FPS) constructed from a switchable four-port circulator to resolve the phase ambiguity inherent in a simple interferometer. The phase between 0-2π is calculated by a microprocessor accessing a look-up table and the total phase is calculated by taking the 0 to 2π crossings into consideration. It is software controlled and the complete sampling and analysis cycle takes 24 μs which is sufficiently rapid for the application considered. The phase information is available in analog and digital form.

  6. Transverse spatial phase-shifting method used in vibration-compensated interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dong; Zhu, Ri-Hong; Chen, Lei; Li, Jin-Yun

    Based on the conception of temporal phase-shifting interferometry, we have developed a novel technique named transverse spatial phase-shifting method. Only using four photoelectric detectors with a certain spatial array, the method can directly detect wavefront phase variation due to external vibrations. As soon as wavefront variation was determined, some feedback control could be put on interferometer to compensate the vibrations. This method was applied to a Twyman-Green phase-shifting interferometer in which an adaptive vibration-compensated system has been built, it calibrated wavefront phase in real time by a piezoelectric transducer used as both wavefront phase shifter and vibration feedback device, thus fringe pattern could be stabilized and the optical testing would be carried out. Some experimental results were presented.

  7. Achromatic self-referencing interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Feldman, M.

    1994-04-19

    A self-referencing Mach-Zehnder interferometer is described for accurately measuring laser wavefronts over a broad wavelength range (for example, 600 nm to 900 nm). The apparatus directs a reference portion of an input beam to a reference arm and a measurement portion of the input beam to a measurement arm, recombines the output beams from the reference and measurement arms, and registers the resulting interference pattern ([open quotes]first[close quotes] interferogram) at a first detector. Optionally, subportions of the measurement portion are diverted to second and third detectors, which respectively register intensity and interferogram signals which can be processed to reduce the first interferogram's sensitivity to input noise. The reference arm includes a spatial filter producing a high quality spherical beam from the reference portion, a tilted wedge plate compensating for off-axis aberrations in the spatial filter output, and mirror collimating the radiation transmitted through the tilted wedge plate. The apparatus includes a thermally and mechanically stable baseplate which supports all reference arm optics, or at least the spatial filter, tilted wedge plate, and the collimator. The tilted wedge plate is mounted adjustably with respect to the spatial filter and collimator, so that it can be maintained in an orientation in which it does not introduce significant wave front errors into the beam propagating through the reference arm. The apparatus is polarization insensitive and has an equal path length configuration enabling measurement of radiation from broadband as well as closely spaced laser line sources. 3 figures.

  8. Achromatic self-referencing interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Feldman, Mark

    1994-01-01

    A self-referencing Mach-Zehnder interferometer for accurately measuring laser wavefronts over a broad wavelength range (for example, 600 nm to 900 nm). The apparatus directs a reference portion of an input beam to a reference arm and a measurement portion of the input beam to a measurement arm, recombines the output beams from the reference and measurement arms, and registers the resulting interference pattern ("first" interferogram) at a first detector. Optionally, subportions of the measurement portion are diverted to second and third detectors, which respectively register intensity and interferogram signals which can be processed to reduce the first interferogram's sensitivity to input noise. The reference arm includes a spatial filter producing a high quality spherical beam from the reference portion, a tilted wedge plate compensating for off-axis aberrations in the spatial filter output, and mirror collimating the radiation transmitted through the tilted wedge plate. The apparatus includes a thermally and mechanically stable baseplate which supports all reference arm optics, or at least the spatial filter, tilted wedge plate, and the collimator. The tilted wedge plate is mounted adjustably with respect to the spatial filter and collimator, so that it can be maintained in an orientation in which it does not introduce significant wave front errors into the beam propagating through the reference arm. The apparatus is polarization insensitive and has an equal path length configuration enabling measurement of radiation from broadband as well as closely spaced laser line sources.

  9. MSAT-X electronically steered phased array antenna system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, H. H.; Foy, W.; Schaffner, G.; Pagels, W.; Vayner, M.; Nelson, J.; Peng, S. Y.

    1988-01-01

    A low profile electronically steered phased array was successfully developed for the Mobile Satellite Experiment Program (MSAT-X). The newly invented cavity-backed printed crossed-slot was used as the radiating element. The choice of this element was based on its low elevation angle gain coverage and low profile. A nineteen-way radial type unequal power divider and eighteen three-bit diode phase shifters constitute the beamformer module which is used to scan the beams electronically. A complete hybrid mode pointing system was also developed. The major features of the antenna system are broad coverage, low profile, and fast acquisition and tracking performance, even under fading conditions. Excellent intersatellite isolation (better than 26 dB) was realized, which will provide good quality mobile satellite communication in the future.

  10. Performance results of a 300-degree linear phase modulator for spaceborne communications applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, N. R.; Mueller, R. O.

    1993-01-01

    A phase modulator capable of large linear phase deviation, low loss, and wide band operation with good thermal stability was developed for deep space spacecraft transponder (DST) applications at X-band (8.415 GHz) and Ka-band (32 GHz) downlinks. The design uses a two-stage circulator-coupled reflection phase shifter with constant gamma hyperabrupt varactors and an efficient modulator driver circuit to obtain a phase deviation of +/-2.5 rad with better than 8 percent linearity. The measured insertion loss is 6.6 dB +/- 0.35 dB at 8415 MHz. Measured carrier and relative sideband amplitudes resulting from phase modulation by sine wave and square modulating functions agree well with the predicted results.

  11. Report for simultaneous, multiple independently steered beam study for Airborne Electronically Steerable Phased Array (AESPA) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Design concepts of an array for the formation of multiple, simultaneous, independently pointed beams for satellite communication links were investigated through tradeoffs of various approaches which were conceived as possible solutions to the problem. After the preferred approach was selected, a more detailed design was configured and is presented as a candidate system that should be given further consideration for development leading to a preliminary design. This array uses an attenuator and a phase shifter with every element. The aperture excitation necessary to form the four beams is calculated and then placed across the array using these devices. Pattern analysis was performed for two beam and four beam cases with numerous patterns being presented. Parameter evaluation shown includes pointing accuracy and beam shape, sidelobe characteristics, gain control, and beam normalization. It was demonstrated that a 4 bit phase shifter and a 6 bit, 30 dB attenuator were sufficient to achieve adequate pattern performances. The phase amplitude steered multibeam array offers the flexibility of 1 to 4 beams with an increase in gain of 6 dB if only one beam is selected.

  12. Metal vapor Raman frequency shifter

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, D.W.; Liu, C.; Weaver, L.A.

    1980-12-16

    Shifted Raman radiation for an all-hot Raman discharge cell is produced by external laser pumping of a metal halide medium in the cell during an afterglow period following dissociation of the metal halide medium into metal atoms and before recombination to form the original species of the metal halide medium.

  13. Phased array feed design technology for Large Aperture Microwave Radiometer (LAMR) Earth observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuman, H. K.

    1992-01-01

    An assessment of the potential and limitations of phased array antennas in space-based geophysical precision radiometry is described. Mathematical models exhibiting the dependence of system and scene temperatures and system sensitivity on phased array antenna parameters and components such as phase shifters and low noise amplifiers (LNA) are developed. Emphasis is given to minimum noise temperature designs wherein the LNA's are located at the array level, one per element or subarray. Two types of combiners are considered: array lenses (space feeds) and corporate networks. The result of a survey of suitable components and devices is described. The data obtained from that survey are used in conjunction with the mathematical models to yield an assessment of effective array antenna noise temperature for representative geostationary and low Earth orbit systems. Practical methods of calibrating a space-based, phased array radiometer are briefly addressed as well.

  14. Free space optical communication link using a silicon photonic optical phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, William S.; Goetz, Peter G.; Pruessner, Marcel; Mahon, Rita; Ferraro, Mike S.; Park, Doe; Fleet, Erin; DePrenger, Michael J.

    2015-03-01

    Many components for free space optical communication systems have shrunken in size over the last decade. However, the steering systems have remained large and power hungry. Non-mechanical beam steering offers a path to reducing the size of these systems. Optical phased arrays can allow integrated beam steering elements. One of the most important aspects of an optical phased array technology is its scalability to a large number of elements. Silicon photonics can potentially offer this scalability using CMOS foundry techniques. In this paper a small-scale silicon photonic optical phased array is demonstrated for both the transmitter and receiver functions in a free space optical link. The device using an array of thermo-optically controlled waveguide phase shifters and demonstrates one-dimensional steering with a single control electrode. Transmission of a digitized video data stream over the link is shown.

  15. Resonator fiber optic gyro with high backscatter-error suppression using two independent phase-locked lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiangfeng; Smiciklas, Marc; Strandjord, Lee K.; Qiu, Tiequn; Ho, Waymon; Sanders, Glen A.

    2015-09-01

    A resonator fiber optic gyro was constructed using separate lasers for counter-rotating waves to overcome interference between optical backscatter and signal light that causes dead-zone behavior and scale factor nonlinearity. This approach enabled a 2 MHz frequency separation between waves in the resonator; eliminating the intended backscatter error. The two lasers were phase-locked to prevent increased gyro noise due to laser frequency noise. Dead-band-free operation near zero-rate, scale factor linearity of 25 ppm and stability of 11 ppm were demonstrated - the closest results to navigation-grade performance reported to date. The approach is also free of impractical frequency shifter technology.

  16. Mask topography effects in projection printing of phase-shifting masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Alfred K.; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    1994-06-01

    Topography effects of glass edges in phase-shifting masks (PSM's) on image quality are assessed using the rigorous electromagnetic simulation program TEMPEST on three different optical systems for four PSM technologies including alternating, rim, attenuated, and chromeless. The scalar and thin mask approximations used in simulation programs such as SPLAT can be in error by as much as 20% for certain classes of shifter edges. A feature size independent bias of 0.021 lambda /NA per edge is recommended for alternating masks with vertical edges because light is lost near the etched glass edges. No direct electromagnetic interaction between chromium edges and shifter edges was found for rim phase-shifting masks. The rim dimension can thus be designed solely on the basis of the sidelobe level and peak intensity. For attenuated PSM, edge effects are less severe but sidelobe problems occur. For a center to sidelobe contrast of 0.6 over a DOF of 3 RU, a lower transmission of 4% is recommended. For chromeless PSM, the imbalance in image peaks is shown to be affected by the optical stepper parameters. In any PSM technology, it appears that a 360 deg glass protrusion may produce a drastic drop in intensity due to resonance effects.

  17. Correction of phase extraction error in phase-shifting interferometry based on Lissajous figure and ellipse fitting technology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fengwei; Wu, Yongqian; Wu, Fan

    2015-04-20

    The accuracy of phase-shifting interferometers (PSI) is crippled by nonlinearity of the phase shifter and instability of the environment such as vibration and air turbulence. A general algorithm, utilizing Lissajous figures and ellipse fitting, of correcting the phase extraction error in the phase shifting interferometry is described in this paper. By plotting N against D, where N and D represent the numerator and denominator terms of the phase extraction function (i.e. an arctangent function) respectively, a Lissajous ellipse is created. Once the parameters of the ellipse are determined by ellipse fitting, one can transform the ellipse to a unit circle (ETC). Through this process the phase extraction error caused by random phase shift errors can be corrected successfully. Proposed method is non-iterated, adapts to all phase shifting algorithms (PSAs), and has high accuracy. Some factors that may affect the performance of proposed method are discussed in numerical simulations. Optical experiments are implemented to validate the effectiveness of proposed algorithm. PMID:25969117

  18. Adaptive phase-locked fiber array with wavefront phase tip-tilt compensation using piezoelectric fiber positioners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ling; Vorontsov, Mikhail A.; Polnau, Ernst; Weyrauch, Thomas; Beresnev, Leonid A.

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, we present the recent development of a conformal optical system with three adaptive phase-locked fiber elements. The coherent beam combining based on stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm is investigated. We implement both phase-locking control and wavefront phase tip-tilt control in our conformal optical system. The phase-locking control is performed with fiber-coupled lithium niobate phase shifters which are modulated by an AVR micro-processor based SPGD controller. The perturbation rate of this SPGD controller is ~95,000 iterations per second. Phase-locking compensation bandwidth for phase distortion amplitude of 2π-radian phase shift is >100Hz. The tip-tilt control is realized with piezoelectric fiber positioners which are modulated by a computer-based software SPGD controller. The perturbation rate of the tip-tilt SPGD controller is up to ~950 iterations per second. The tip-tilt compensation bandwidth using fiber positioners is ~10Hz at 60-μrad. jitter swing angle.

  19. Phase shifting and the beating of complex waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeports, David

    2011-03-01

    At the introductory level, the demonstration and analysis of sound beating is usually limited to the superposition of two purely sinusoidal waves with equal amplitudes and very similar frequencies. Under such conditions, an observer hears the periodic variation of the loudness of a sound with an unchanging timbre. On the other hand, when complex waves with very similar frequencies are superimposed, each harmonic beats with a frequency proportional to the frequency of the harmonic. Consequently, the resulting sound exhibits a subtle variation of timbre with time. This article extends the normal introductory discussion of beating and explains why electronic phase shifters, devices familiar to many musicians, can produce the sound of beating complex waves.

  20. Analysis of the stability and optimizing operation of the single-side-band modulator based on re-circulating frequency shifter used for the T-bit/s optical communication transmission.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianping; Li, Xuan; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Tian, Feng; Xi, Lixia

    2010-08-16

    The stability of single-sideband (SSB) modulator based recirculating frequency shifter (RFS) is analyzed theoretically. The optimum radio frequency (RF) drive peak-to-peak voltage used to drive the modulator is studied with considering the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise of optical amplifier and crosstalk so as to obtain a maximum overall effective optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR) which is defined to quantify the quality of generated tones. Small desired tones number and lower RF peak-to-peak voltage can reduce the crosstalk effectively. While the trade-off should be considered since the larger desired tones number it is, the higher optimum drive voltage should be used when the SSB-based RFS reached the maximum OSNR. The theoretical results show that the optimum operation condition is helpful to improve the performance of RFS which can be a good application for the T-bit/s optical transmission in practice. PMID:20721146

  1. Design and experimental evaluation of an intracavitary ultrasound phased array system for hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, M T; Hynynen, K

    1994-12-01

    For evaluating the feasibility of treating prostate cancer, a 64-element linear ultrasound phased array applicator for intracavitary hyperthermia was designed and constructed. A 64-channel ultrasound driving system including amplifiers, phase shifters, and RF power meters was also developed to drive the array. The design of the array and driving equipment are presented, as are the results of acoustical field measurements and in vitro perfused phantom studies performed with the array. Several techniques for heating realistically sized tumor volumes were also investigated, including single focus scanning and two techniques for producing multiple stationary foci. The results show that the operation of the array correlated closely with the theoretical model. When producing a single stationary focus, the array was able to increase tissue temperature by 12 degrees C in vitro in perfused phantom. With some minor improvements in array design, intracavitary phased arrays could be evaluated in a clinical environment. PMID:7851919

  2. Digital Interface Board to Control Phase and Amplitude of Four Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Amy E.; Cook, Brian M.; Khan, Abdur R.; Lux, James P.

    2011-01-01

    An increasing number of parts are designed with digital control interfaces, including phase shifters and variable attenuators. When designing an antenna array in which each antenna has independent amplitude and phase control, the number of digital control lines that must be set simultaneously can grow very large. Use of a parallel interface would require separate line drivers, more parts, and thus additional failure points. A convenient form of control where single-phase shifters or attenuators could be set or the whole set could be programmed with an update rate of 100 Hz is needed to solve this problem. A digital interface board with a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) can simultaneously control an essentially arbitrary number of digital control lines with a serial command interface requiring only three wires. A small set of short, high-level commands provides a simple programming interface for an external controller. Parity bits are used to validate the control commands. Output timing is controlled within the FPGA to allow for rapid update rates of the phase shifters and attenuators. This technology has been used to set and monitor eight 5-bit control signals via a serial UART (universal asynchronous receiver/transmitter) interface. The digital interface board controls the phase and amplitude of the signals for each element in the array. A host computer running Agilent VEE sends commands via serial UART connection to a Xilinx VirtexII FPGA. The commands are decoded, and either outputs are set or telemetry data is sent back to the host computer describing the status and the current phase and amplitude settings. This technology is an integral part of a closed-loop system in which the angle of arrival of an X-band uplink signal is detected and the appropriate phase shifts are applied to the Ka-band downlink signal to electronically steer the array back in the direction of the uplink signal. It will also be used in the non-beam-steering case to compensate for

  3. Code-modulated interferometric imaging system using phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Vikas; Greene, Kevin; Floyd, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Millimeter-wave (mm-wave) imaging provides compelling capabilities for security screening, navigation, and bio- medical applications. Traditional scanned or focal-plane mm-wave imagers are bulky and costly. In contrast, phased-array hardware developed for mass-market wireless communications and automotive radar promise to be extremely low cost. In this work, we present techniques which can allow low-cost phased-array receivers to be reconfigured or re-purposed as interferometric imagers, removing the need for custom hardware and thereby reducing cost. Since traditional phased arrays power combine incoming signals prior to digitization, orthogonal code-modulation is applied to each incoming signal using phase shifters within each front-end and two-bit codes. These code-modulated signals can then be combined and processed coherently through a shared hardware path. Once digitized, visibility functions can be recovered through squaring and code-demultiplexing operations. Pro- vided that codes are selected such that the product of two orthogonal codes is a third unique and orthogonal code, it is possible to demultiplex complex visibility functions directly. As such, the proposed system modulates incoming signals but demodulates desired correlations. In this work, we present the operation of the system, a validation of its operation using behavioral models of a traditional phased array, and a benchmarking of the code-modulated interferometer against traditional interferometer and focal-plane arrays.

  4. Phases and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitterman, Moshe

    2014-09-01

    In discussing phase transitions, the first thing that we have to do is to define a phase. This is a concept from thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, where a phase is defined as a homogeneous system. As a simple example, let us consider instant coffee. This consists of coffee powder dissolved in water, and after stirring it we have a homogeneous mixture, i.e., a single phase. If we add to a cup of coffee a spoonful of sugar and stir it well, we still have a single phase -- sweet coffee. However, if we add ten spoonfuls of sugar, then the contents of the cup will no longer be homogeneous, but rather a mixture of two homogeneous systems or phases, sweet liquid coffee on top and coffee-flavored wet sugar at the bottom...

  5. Coronagraphy with 4Q Phase Mask on the VLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouan, Daniel; Riaud, Pierre; Baudrand, Jacques; Lacombe, François

    The high angular resolution provided by adaptive optics allows detailed study of the environment of bright objects such as stars or AGNs, provided that dazzling by the direct and scattered light from the central source does not become the main limitation. Masking the bright source with a coronagraph is the way to alleviate this problem. Rabbia and Gay (this conference) propose a possible solution. We recently described another concept of faint object coronagraph using a phase mask with 4 quadrants, which presents an excellent rejection factor, and that can be rather easily made achromatic. We propose to install such a device within the NAOS/CONICA instrument. We first examine the properties of this device in terms of rejection gain versus the different factors (residual AO phase error, central obscuration, chromatism). We estimate the performances under different conditions of adaptive optics correction with NAOS/CONICA and of phase errors due to chromatism within the K band. Results of realistic simulations at K show that a gain of 10-12 magnitude is reachable. We finally describe some technical aspects of the mask manufacturing and achromatisation using two dispersive materials, as well as the implementation of the 4QC within CONICA.

  6. Evaluation of transparent etch stop layer phase shift mask patterning and comparison with the single trench undercut approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rody, Y.; Martin, P.; Couderc, C.; Sixt, P.; Gardin, C.; Lucas, K.; Patterson, K.; Miramond-Collet, C.; Belledent, J.; Boone, R.; Borjon, A.; Trouiller, Y.

    2005-11-01

    Despite the complexity of AAPSM patterning using the complementary PSM approach with respect to OPC correction, mask making, fab logistics etc, the technique still remains a valuable solution for special products where a low CD dispersion printing process is required. For current and next generation process technologies (90-65nm ground rules), the most common alternating mask solution of single trench etch with or without undercut becomes more difficult to manufacture. Especially challenging is the aspect ratio control of quartz etched trenches as a function of density in order to assure the correct phase angle and sidewall for dense and isolated structures over all phase shifted geometries. In order to solve this problem, a modified mask architecture is proposed, called the Transparent Etch Stop Layer (TESL) phase shift mask. In TESL, a transparent (etch stop) layer is deposited on the quartz substrate, followed by the deposition of a quartz layer having a thickness corresponding to the required phase angle for the used wavelength. On top a Chromium layer will be deposited. The patterning of this mask will be quite similar to the single trench variant. The difference is, that now an overetch can be applied for the phase definition resulting from the high etch selectivity of quartz to the etch stop material. The result of this approach should be that we can better control the phase depth and sidewall angle for dense and isolated structures. In this paper we will discuss the results of the printing tests performed using TESL masks especially with respect to litho process window, and we will compare these with the single trench undercut approach. Simulation results are presented with respect to shifter sidewall profile and TESL thickness in order to optimize image imbalance. Throughout the study we will correlate simulations and measurements to the after-MBOPC CD values for the shifter structures. These results will allow us to determine if the TESL AAPSM approach

  7. Distribution of high-stability 100.04  GHz millimeter wave signal over 60  km optical fiber with fast phase-error-correcting capability.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dongning; Dong, Yi; Shi, Hongxiao; Xia, Zongyang; Liu, Zhangweiyi; Wang, Siwei; Xie, Weilin; Hu, Weisheng

    2014-05-15

    We demonstrate a phase-stabilized remote distribution of 100.04 GHz millimeter wave signal over 60 km optical fiber. The phase error of the remote millimeter wave signal induced by fiber transmission delay variations is detected by dual-heterodyne phase error transfer and corrected with a feedback system based on a fast response acousto-optic frequency shifter. The phase noise within the bandwidth of 300 Hz is effectively suppressed; thus, the fast transmission delay variations can be compensated. The residual phase noise of the remote 100.04 GHz signal reaches -56  dBc/Hz at 1 Hz frequency offset from the carrier, and long-term stability of 1.6×10(-16) at 1000 s averaging time is achieved. The fast phase-noise-correcting capability is evaluated by vibrating part of the transmission fiber link. PMID:24978219

  8. Quantitative evaluation of spatial phase light modulator characteristics in Fresnel incoherent correlation holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Tianlong; Wan, Yuhong; Chen, Hao; Jiang, Zhuqing; Wang, Dayong

    2012-11-01

    Fresnel incoherent correlation holography (FINCH) is one of the methods for recording holograms of 3D samples under incoherent illumination. The FINCH combines the theory of spatial self-coherence and the in-line phase-shift technology together to form a complex hologram. A spatial phase light modulator (SPLM) plays important roles as the dynamic diffraction optical element (DOE) and phase shifter. When the incoherent light generated from each object point of the 3D samples incidents to a SPLM, it can be split into two spatial self-coherent beams with different curvatures. The hologram caused by these two beams can then be captured by an image detector. Three holograms with different phase shift are recorded sequentially for eliminating the zero-order and twin image, and then a complex valued hologram is obtained by superposing the three holograms. In this paper, the modulation characteristics of SPLM and phase shift error in FINCH are investigated. Based on digital holography, phase modulation characteristics of SPLM are measured under coherent and narrow-bandwidth incoherent illumination respectively. Phase shift error due to quasi monochromatic light illumination is then analyzed in FINCH. The effect of phase shift error on the quality of reconstructed image is also investigated. It is demonstrated the FINCH setup has a smaller phase shift error by experiment.

  9. A Broad-Band Phase-Contrast Wave-Front Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, Eric; Wallace, J. Kent

    2005-01-01

    A broadband phase-contrast wave-front sensor has been proposed as a real-time wave-front sensor in an adaptive-optics system. The proposed sensor would offer an alternative to the Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensors now used in high-order adaptive-optics systems of some astronomical telescopes. Broadband sensing gives higher sensitivity than does narrow-band sensing, and it appears that for a given bandwidth, the sensitivity of the proposed phase-contrast sensor could exceed that of a Shack-Hartmann sensor. Relative to a Shack-Hartmann sensor, the proposed sensor may be optically and mechanically simpler. As described below, an important element of the principle of operation of a phase-contrast wave-front sensor is the imposition of a 90deg phase shift between diffracted and undiffracted parts of the same light beam. In the proposed sensor, this phase shift would be obtained by utilizing the intrinsic 90 phase shift between the transmitted and reflected beams in an ideal (thin, symmetric) beam splitter. This phase shift can be characterized as achromatic or broadband because it is 90deg at every wavelength over a broad wavelength range.

  10. Functional composites of plasmas and metamaterials: Flexible waveguides, and variable attenuators with controllable phase shift

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Osamu; Maeda, Jun; Shimomura, Takuya; Urabe, Keiichiro

    2013-07-15

    Numerical predictions and experimental results in this study verify that plasmas with negative permittivity work as functional media for electromagnetic waves and that their composites with metallic metamaterials show further extraordinary properties. Chain structures of individual plasmas with negative permittivity, forming a straight line and a L-shaped bent line, serve flexible waveguides via coupling structures of localized surface waves standing around each plasma. Further progresses as wave controllers are achievable in an array of the composites of plasmas and micro metallic resonators; functions of phase shifters and attenuators are individually controlled, with rotation of working points on the complex refractive index plane by varying gas conditions and permeability modulation. Such proposed sets of flexible combination will lead to advanced scientific products with novel functions.

  11. Fabrication and demonstration of 1 × 8 silicon–silica multi-chip switch based on optical phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayose, Satomi; Hashizume, Yasuaki; Itoh, Mikitaka

    2016-08-01

    We experimentally demonstrated a 1 × 8 silicon–silica hybrid thermo-optic switch based on an optical phased array using a multi-chip integration technique. The switch consists of a silicon chip with optical phase shifters and two silica-based planar lightwave circuit (PLC) chips composed of optical couplers and fiber connections. We adopted a rib waveguide as the silicon waveguide to reduce the coupling loss and increase the alignment tolerance for coupling between silicon and silica waveguides. As a result, we achieved a fast switching response of 81 µs, a high extinction ratio of over 18 dB and a low insertion loss of 4.9–8.1 dB including a silicon–silica coupling loss of 0.5 ± 0.3 dB at a wavelength of 1.55 µm.

  12. White light phase shifting interferometry and color fringe analysis for the detection of contaminants in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Vishesh; Singh, Veena; Ahmad, Azeem; Singh, Gyanendra; Mehta, Dalip Singh

    2016-03-01

    We report white light phase shifting interferometry in conjunction with color fringe analysis for the detection of contaminants in water such as Escherichia coli (E.coli), Campylobacter coli and Bacillus cereus. The experimental setup is based on a common path interferometer using Mirau interferometric objective lens. White light interferograms are recorded using a 3-chip color CCD camera based on prism technology. The 3-chip color camera have lesser color cross talk and better spatial resolution in comparison to single chip CCD camera. A piezo-electric transducer (PZT) phase shifter is fixed with the Mirau objective and they are attached with a conventional microscope. Five phase shifted white light interferograms are recorded by the 3-chip color CCD camera and each phase shifted interferogram is decomposed into the red, green and blue constituent colors, thus making three sets of five phase shifted intererograms for three different colors from a single set of white light interferogram. This makes the system less time consuming and have lesser effect due to surrounding environment. Initially 3D phase maps of the bacteria are reconstructed for red, green and blue wavelengths from these interferograms using MATLAB, from these phase maps we determines the refractive index (RI) of the bacteria. Experimental results of 3D shape measurement and RI at multiple wavelengths will be presented. These results might find applications for detection of contaminants in water without using any chemical processing and fluorescent dyes.

  13. Optical beam forming techniques for phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Te-Kao; Chandler, C.

    1993-01-01

    Conventional phased array antennas using waveguide or coax for signal distribution are impractical for large scale implementation on satellites or spacecraft because they exhibit prohibitively large system size, heavy weight, high attenuation loss, limited bandwidth, sensitivity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) temperature drifts and phase instability. However, optical beam forming systems are smaller, lighter, and more flexible. Three optical beam forming techniques are identified as applicable to large spaceborne phased array antennas. They are (1) the optical fiber replacement of conventional RF phased array distribution and control components, (2) spatial beam forming, and (3) optical beam splitting with integrated quasi-optical components. The optical fiber replacement and the spatial beam forming approaches were pursued by many organizations. Two new optical beam forming architectures are presented. Both architectures involve monolithic integration of the antenna radiating elements with quasi-optical grid detector arrays. The advantages of the grid detector array in the optical process are the higher power handling capability and the dynamic range. One architecture involves a modified version of the original spatial beam forming approach. The basic difference is the spatial light modulator (SLM) device for controlling the aperture field distribution. The original liquid crystal light valve SLM is replaced by an optical shuffling SLM, which was demonstrated for the 'smart pixel' technology. The advantages are the capability of generating the agile beams of a phased array antenna and to provide simultaneous transmit and receive functions. The second architecture considered is the optical beam splitting approach. This architecture involves an alternative amplitude control for each antenna element with an optical beam power divider comprised of mirrors and beam splitters. It also implements the quasi-optical grid phase shifter for phase control and grid

  14. Precision phase control for the radio frequency system of K500 superconducting cyclotron at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som, Sumit; Ghosh, Surajit; Seth, Sudeshna; Mandal, Aditya; Paul, Saikat; Roy, Suprakash

    2013-11-01

    Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC) has commissioned K500 Superconducting cyclotron (SCC) based on MSU and Texas A&M university cyclotrons. The radio frequency (RF) system of SCC has been commissioned with the stringent requirement of various RF parameters. The three-phase RF system of Superconducting cyclotron has been developed in the frequency range 9-27 MHz with amplitude and phase stability of 100 ppm and ±0.1°, respectively. The phase control system has the option to change the relative phase difference between any two RF cavities and maintain the phase stability within ±0.1° during round-the-clock cyclotron operation. The said precision phase loop consists of both analogue In-phase/Quadrature modulator to achieve faster response and also Direct Digital Synthesis based phase shifter to achieve wide dynamic range as well. This paper discusses detail insights into the various issues of phase control for the K500 SCC at VECC, Kolkata.

  15. Precision phase control for the radio frequency system of K500 superconducting cyclotron at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata

    SciTech Connect

    Som, Sumit; Ghosh, Surajit; Seth, Sudeshna; Mandal, Aditya; Paul, Saikat; Roy, Suprakash

    2013-11-15

    Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC) has commissioned K500 Superconducting cyclotron (SCC) based on MSU and Texas A and M university cyclotrons. The radio frequency (RF) system of SCC has been commissioned with the stringent requirement of various RF parameters. The three-phase RF system of Superconducting cyclotron has been developed in the frequency range 9–27 MHz with amplitude and phase stability of 100 ppm and ±0.1°, respectively. The phase control system has the option to change the relative phase difference between any two RF cavities and maintain the phase stability within ±0.1° during round-the-clock cyclotron operation. The said precision phase loop consists of both analogue In-phase/Quadrature modulator to achieve faster response and also Direct Digital Synthesis based phase shifter to achieve wide dynamic range as well. This paper discusses detail insights into the various issues of phase control for the K500 SCC at VECC, Kolkata.

  16. MMIC linear-phase and digital modulators for deep space spacecraft X-band transponder applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, Narayan R.; Ali, Fazal

    1991-01-01

    The design concepts, analyses, and development of GaAs monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) linear-phase and digital modulators for the next generation of space-borne communications systems are summarized. The design approach uses a compact lumped element quadrature hybrid and Metal Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MESFET)-varactors to provide low loss and well-controlled phase performance for deep space transponder (DST) applications. The measured results of the MESFET-diode show a capacitance range of 2:1 under reverse bias, and a Q of 38 at 10 GHz. Three cascaded sections of hybrid-coupled reflection phase shifters were modeled and simulations performed to provide an X-band (8415 +/- 50 MHz) DST phase modulator with +/- 2.5 radians of peak phase deviation. The modulator will accommodate downlink signal modulation with composite telemetry and ranging data, with a deviation linearity tolerance of +/- 8 percent and insertion loss of less than 8 +/- 0.5 dB. The MMIC digital modulator is designed to provide greater than 10 Mb/s of bi-phase modulation at X-band.

  17. High-speed 32×32 MEMS optical phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megens, Mischa; Yoo, Byung-Wook; Chan, Trevor; Yang, Weijian; Sun, Tianbo; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J.; Wu, Ming C.; Horsley, David A.

    2014-03-01

    Optical phased arrays (OPAs) with fast response time are of great interest for various applications such as displays, free space optical communications, and lidar. Existing liquid crystal OPAs have millisecond response time and small beam steering angle. Here, we report on a novel 32×32 MEMS OPA with fast response time (<4 microseconds), large field of view (+/-2°), and narrow beam divergence (0.1°). The OPA is composed of high-contrast grating (HCG) mirrors which function as phase shifters. Relative to beam steering systems based on a single rotating MEMS mirror, which are typically limited to bandwidths below 50 kHz, the MEMS OPA described here has the advantage of greatly reduced mass and therefore achieves a bandwidth over 500 kHz. The OPA is fabricated using deep UV lithography to create submicron mechanical springs and electrical interconnects, enabling a high (85%) fill-factor. Each HCG mirror is composed of only a single layer of polysilicon and achieves >99% reflectivity through the use of a subwavelength grating patterned into the mirror's polysilicon surface. Conventional metal-coated MEMS mirrors must be thick (1- 50 μm) to prevent warpage arising from thermal and residual stress. The single material construction used here results in a high degree of flatness even in a thin 400 nm HCG mirror. Beam steering is demonstrated using binary phase patterns and is accomplished with the help of a closed-loop phase control system based on a phase-shifting interferometer that provides in-situ measurement of the phase shift of each mirror in the array.

  18. Achromatic Cooling Channel with Li Lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Balbekov, V.

    2002-04-29

    A linear cooling channel with Li lenses, solenoids, and 201 MHz RF cavities is considered. A special lattice design is used to minimize chromatic aberrations by suppression of several betatron resonances. Transverse emittance of muon beam decreases from 2 mm to 0.5 mm at the channel of about 110 m length. Longitudinal heating is modest, therefore transmission of the channel is rather high: 96% without decay and 90% with decay. Minimal beam emittance achievable by similar channel estimated as about 0.25 mm at surface field of Li lenses 10 T.

  19. Achromatic Emission Velocity Measurements in Luminous Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, S. J.; Fulghum, S. F.; Rostler, P. S.

    1997-01-01

    A new velocity measurement instrument for luminous flows was developed by Science Research Laboratory for NASA. The SIEVE (Segmented Image Emission VElocimeter) instrument uses broadband light emitted by the flow for the velocity measurement. This differs from other velocimetry techniques in that it does not depend on laser illumination and/or light scattering from particles in the flow. The SIEVE is a passive, non-intrusive diagnostic. By moving and adjusting the imaging optics, the SIEVE can provide three-dimensional mapping of a flow field and determine turbulence scale size. A SIEVE instrument was demonstrated on an illuminated rotating disk to evaluate instrument response and noise and on an oxy-acetylene torch to measure flame velocities. The luminous flow in rocket combustors and plumes is an ideal subject for the SIEVE velocity measurement technique.

  20. Achromatic illumination system for small targets

    DOEpatents

    Sigler, Robert D.

    1979-01-01

    A pair of light beams is directed to provide illumination that is substantially uniform from all directions on a small target by a system comprising a pair of corrector windows, a pair of planar reflecting surfaces, a pair of paraboloidal mirrors and a reflecting mirror cavity. The components are arranged so that each of the beams passes through a corrector and is reflected from the planar surface to the paraboloidal mirror, from which it is focused through a hole in the planar surface to the interior of the cavity. The surface of the interior portion of the cavity is shaped to reflect the focused beam three times before the focused reflected beam strikes the target.

  1. Review of OCA activities on nulling testbench PERSEE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénault, François; Girard, Paul; Marcotto, Aurélie; Mauclert, Nicolas; Bailet, Christophe; Clausse, Jean-Michel; Mourard, Denis; Rabbia, Yves; Roussel, Alain; Barillot, Marc; Cassaing, Frédéric; Le Duigou, Jean-Michel

    2010-07-01

    We present a review of our activities on PERSEE (Pégase Experiment for Research and Stabilization of Extreme Extinction) at Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur (OCA). PERSEE is a laboratory testbench aiming at achieving a stabilized nulling ratio better than 10-4 in the astronomical bands K and M, in presence of flight-representative spacecraft perturbations. The bench has been jointly developed by a Consortium of six French institutes and companies, among which OCA was responsible for the star simulator and of the opto-mechanical studies, procurement and manufacturing of the optical train. In this communication are presented the alignment and image quality requirements and the optomechanical design of the illumination module and main optical train, including a periscope Achromatic Phase Shifter (APS), tip-tilt mirrors used to introduce and then compensate for dynamic disturbances, delay lines, beam compressors and fiber injection optics. Preliminary test results of the star simulator are also provided.

  2. Direct Imaging Searches with the Apodizing Phase Plate Coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenworthy, M.; Meshkat, T.; Otten, , G.; Codona, J.

    2014-03-01

    The sensitivity of direct imaging searches for extrasolar planets is limited by the presence of diffraction rings from the primary star. Coronagraphs are angular filters that minimise these diffraction structures whilst allowing light from faint companions to shine through. The Apodizing Phase Plate (APP; Kenworthy 2007) coronagraph is a simple pupil plane optic that suppresses diffraction over a 180 degree region around each star simultaneously, providing easy beam switching observations and requiring no time consuming optical alignment at the telescope. We will present our results on using the APP at the Very Large Telescope in surveys for extrasolar planets around A/F and debris disk hosting stars in the L' band (3.8 microns) in the Southern Hemisphere, where we reach a contrast of 12 magnitudes at 0.5 arcseconds (Meshkat 2013). In Leiden, we are also developing the next generation of broadband achromatic coronagraphs that can simultaneously image both sides of the star using Vector APPs (Snik 2012, Otten 2012). Recent laboratory results showing the potential of this technology for future ELTs will also be presented.

  3. Coronagraph Focal-Plane Phase Masks Based on Photonic Crystal Technology: Recent Progress and Observational Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, Naoshi; Nishikawa, Jun; Sakamoto, Moritsugu; Ise, Akitoshi; Oka, Kazuhiko; Baba, Naoshi; Murakami, Hiroshi; Tamura, Motohide; Traub, Wesley A.; Mawet, Dimitri; Moody, Dwight C.; Kern, Brian D.; Trauger, John T.; Serabyn, Eugene; Hamaguchi, Shoki; Oshiyama, Fumika

    2012-01-01

    Photonic crystal, an artificial periodic nanostructure of refractive indices, is one of the attractive technologies for coronagraph focal-plane masks aiming at direct imaging and characterization of terrestrial extrasolar planets. We manufactured the eight-octant phase mask (8OPM) and the vector vortex mask (VVM) very precisely using the photonic crystal technology. Fully achromatic phase-mask coronagraphs can be realized by applying appropriate polarization filters to the masks. We carried out laboratory experiments of the polarization-filtered 8OPM coronagraph using the High-Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT), a state-of-the-art coronagraph simulator at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). We report the experimental results of 10-8-level contrast across several wavelengths over 10% bandwidth around 800nm. In addition, we present future prospects and observational strategy for the photonic-crystal mask coronagraphs combined with differential imaging techniques to reach higher contrast. We proposed to apply a polarization-differential imaging (PDI) technique to the VVM coronagraph, in which we built a two-channel coronagraph using polarizing beam splitters to avoid a loss of intensity due to the polarization filters. We also proposed to apply an angular-differential imaging (ADI) technique to the 8OPM coronagraph. The 8OPM/ADI mode avoids an intensity loss due to a phase transition of the mask and provides a full field of view around central stars. We present results of preliminary laboratory demonstrations of the PDI and ADI observational modes with the phase-mask coronagraphs.

  4. Phase loop bandwidth measurements on the advanced photon source 352 MHz rf systems

    SciTech Connect

    Horan, D.; Nassiri, A.; Schwartz, C.

    1997-08-01

    Phase loop bandwidth tests were performed on the Advanced Photon Source storage ring 352-MHz rf systems. These measurements were made using the HP3563A Control Systems Analyzer, with the rf systems running at 30 kilowatts into each of the storage ring cavities, without stored beam. An electronic phase shifter was used to inject approximately 14 degrees of stimulated phase shift into the low-level rf system, which produced measureable response voltage in the feedback loops without upsetting normal rf system operation. With the PID (proportional-integral-differential) amplifier settings at the values used during accelerator operation, the measurement data revealed that the 3-dB response for the cavity sum and klystron power-phase loops is approximately 7 kHz and 45 kHz, respectively, with the cavities the primary bandwidth-limiting factor in the cavity-sum loop. Data were taken at various PID settings until the loops became unstable. Crosstalk between the two phase loops was measured.

  5. Moon Phases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, Bob

    2010-01-01

    When teaching Moon phases, the focus seems to be on the sequence of Moon phases and, in some grade levels, how Moon phases occur. Either focus can sometimes be a challenge, especially without the use of models and observations of the Moon. In this month's column, the author describes some of the lessons that he uses to teach the phases of the Moon…

  6. Imaging performance of attenuated phase-shift mask using coherent scattering microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Uk; Jeong, SeeJun; Hong, Seong Chul; Lee, Seung Min; Ahn, Jinho

    2014-03-01

    The half-tone phase shift mask (PSM) has been suggested for better imaging performances like image contrast, NILS and H-V bias compared to the binary mask (BIM) in EUV lithography. In this paper, we measured imaging performance of a fabricated half-tone attenuated PSM with Coherent Scattering Microscopy (CSM) and the results were compared with simulation data obtained by EM-suite tool. We prepared a half-tone attenuated PSM which has 12.7% reflectivity and 180° phase shift with absorber stack of 16.5mn-thick TaN absorber and 24nm-thick Mo phase shifter. With CSM, an actinic inspection tool, we measured the imaging properties of PSM. The diffraction efficiencies of BIM were measured as 31%, 36%, and 44% for 88 nm, 100 nm, and 128 nm mask CD, respectively, while those of PSM were measured as 45%, 62%, and 81%. Also the aerial image at wafer level obtained by CSM with high volume manufacturing tool's (HVM) illumination condition (NA=0.33, σ=0.9) showed higher image contrast and NILS with phase shift effect. And the measured data were consistent with the simulation data.

  7. Phase Sensor for Aligning a Segmented Telescope Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, Philip; Walker, Chanda Barlett

    2006-01-01

    A phase sensor has been developed for use in aligning a segmented telescope mirror to within a fraction of a wavelength in piston. (As used here, piston signifies displacement of a mirror segment along the optical axis of the telescope.) Such precise alignment is necessary in order to realize the full benefit of the large aperture achievable through segmentation. This phase sensor is achromatic. It is based on two-wavelength shearing interferometry, and can be modified to utilize an extended or broad-band (e.g., white) light source. The sensor optics include a ruled diffraction grating and an imaging lens. The sensor can measure the piston shift between segments as well as aberrations of the segments. It can measure the surface error of an individual segment, making it possible to compensate for the error with optimal amount(s) of piston and/or tilt. The precise capture range of the sensor depends partly on the telescope design; the largest relative piston shifts measurable by use of this sensor are of the order of 100 m. The accuracy of the sensor also depends partly on the telescope design; in general, the accuracy is sufficient to enable alignment to within approximately half a wavelength. The interferometric image is digitized and processed by a simple algorithm in real time, and the output of the algorithm can be used to maintain alignment in real time, even in the presence of atmospheric turbulence. The sensor is robust. Through calibration, it can be made insensitive to (and, hence, tolerant of) misalignments and aberrations of its own optics, most aberrations of the telescope as a whole (in contradistinction to aberrations of individual segments), and most aberrations introduced by atmospheric turbulence

  8. Performance characterization of a broadband vector Apodizing Phase Plate coronagraph.

    PubMed

    Otten, Gilles P P L; Snik, Frans; Kenworthy, Matthew A; Miskiewicz, Matthew N; Escuti, Michael J

    2014-12-01

    One of the main challenges for the direct imaging of planets around nearby stars is the suppression of the diffracted halo from the primary star. Coronagraphs are angular filters that suppress this diffracted halo. The Apodizing Phase Plate coronagraph modifies the pupil-plane phase with an anti-symmetric pattern to suppress diffraction over a 180 degree region from 2 to 7 λ/D and achieves a mean raw contrast of 10(-4) in this area, independent of the tip-tilt stability of the system. Current APP coronagraphs implemented using classical phase techniques are limited in bandwidth and suppression region geometry (i.e. only on one side of the star). In this paper, we introduce the vector-APP (vAPP) whose phase pattern is implemented through the vector phase imposed by the orientation of patterned liquid crystals. Beam-splitting according to circular polarization states produces two, complementary PSFs with dark holes on either side. We have developed a prototype vAPP that consists of a stack of three twisting liquid crystal layers to yield a bandwidth of 500 to 900 nm. We characterize the properties of this device using reconstructions of the pupil-plane pattern, and of the ensuing PSF structures. By imaging the pupil between crossed and parallel polarizers we reconstruct the fast axis pattern, transmission, and retardance of the vAPP, and use this as input for a PSF model. This model includes aberrations of the laboratory set-up, and matches the measured PSF, which shows a raw contrast of 10(-3.8) between 2 and 7 λ/D in a 135 degree wedge. The vAPP coronagraph is relatively easy to manufacture and can be implemented together with a broadband quarter-wave plate and Wollaston prism in a pupil wheel in high-contrast imaging instruments. The liquid crystal patterning technique permits the application of extreme phase patterns with deeper contrasts inside the dark holes, and the multilayer liquid crystal achromatization technique enables unprecedented spectral bandwidths

  9. T/R module development for large aperture L-band phased array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil; Andricos, Constantine; Kumley, Kendra; Berkun, Andrew; Hodges, Richard; Spitz, Suzanne

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a transmit / receive (T/R) module for a large L-band space based radar active phased array being developed at JPL. Electrical performance and construction techniques are described, with emphasis on the former. The T/R modules have a bandwidth of more than 80 MHz centered at 1260MHz and support dual, switched polarizations. Phase and amplitude are controlled by a 6-bit phase shifter and a 6-bit attenuator, respectively. The transmitter power amplifier generates 2.4 W into a nominal 50 ohm load with 36% overall efficiency. The receiver noise figure is 4.4 dB including all front-end losses. The module weighs 32 g and has a footprint of 8 cm x 4.5 cm. Fourteen of these T/R modules were fabricated at the JPL Pick-and-Place Facility and were tested using a computer-controlled measurement facility developed at JPL. Calibrated performance of this set of T/R modules is presented and shows good agreement with design predictions.

  10. PHASE DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Kippenhan, D.O.

    1959-09-01

    A phase detector circuit is described for use at very high frequencies of the order of 50 megacycles. The detector circuit includes a pair of rectifiers inverted relative to each other. One voltage to be compared is applied to the two rectifiers in phase opposition and the other voltage to be compared is commonly applied to the two rectifiers. The two result:ng d-c voltages derived from the rectifiers are combined in phase opposition to produce a single d-c voltage having amplitude and polarity characteristics dependent upon the phase relation between the signals to be compared. Principal novelty resides in the employment of a half-wave transmission line to derive the phase opposing signals from the first voltage to be compared for application to the two rectifiers in place of the transformer commonly utilized for such purpose in phase detector circuits for operation at lower frequency.

  11. RF phase stability in the 100-MeV proton linac operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seol, Kyung-Tae

    2015-02-01

    The 100-MeV proton linac of the Korea multi-purpose accelerator complex (KOMAC) has been operated to provide a proton beam to users. The 100-MeV linac consists of a 3-MeV radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator (RFQ), four 20-MeV drift-tube linac (DTL) tanks, two medium-energy beam-transmitter (MEBT) tanks, and seven 100-MeV DTL tanks. The requirements of the field stability are within ±1% in RF amplitude and ±1 degree in RF phase. The RF phase stability is influenced by a RF reference line, RF transmission lines, and a RF control system. The RF reference signal is chosen to be a 300-MHz local oscillator (LO) signal, and a rigid copper coaxial line with temperature control was installed for an RF reference distribution. A phase stability of ±0.1 degrees was measured under a temperature change of ±0.1 °C. A digital feedback control system with a field-programmable gate-array (FPGA) module was adopted for a high RF stability. The RF phase was maintained within ±0.1 degrees with a dummy cavity and was within ±0.3 degrees at RFQ operation. In the case of the 20-MeV DTL tanks, one klystron drives 4 tanks, and the input phases of 4 tanks were designed to be in phase. The input phases of 4 tanks were fixed within ±1 degree by adjusting a phase shifter in each waveguide.

  12. Advanced noise reduction techniques for ultra-low phase noise optical-to-microwave division with femtosecond fiber combs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Xu, Zhenyu; Lours, Michel; Boudot, Rodolphe; Kersalé, Yann; Luiten, Andre N; Le Coq, Yann; Santarelli, Giorgio

    2011-05-01

    We report what we believe to be the lowest phase noise optical-to-microwave frequency division using fiber-based femtosecond optical frequency combs: a residual phase noise of -120 dBc/Hz at 1 Hz offset from an 11.55 GHz carrier frequency. Furthermore, we report a detailed investigation into the fundamental noise sources which affect the division process itself. Two frequency combs with quasi-identical configurations are referenced to a common ultrastable cavity laser source. To identify each of the limiting effects, we implement an ultra-low noise carrier-suppression measurement system, which avoids the detection and amplification noise of more conventional techniques. This technique suppresses these unwanted sources of noise to very low levels. In the Fourier frequency range of ∼200 Hz to 100 kHz, a feed-forward technique based on a voltage-controlled phase shifter delivers a further noise reduction of 10 dB. For lower Fourier frequencies, optical power stabilization is implemented to reduce the relative intensity noise which causes unwanted phase noise through power-to-phase conversion in the detector. We implement and compare two possible control schemes based on an acousto-optical modulator and comb pump current. We also present wideband measurements of the relative intensity noise of the fiber comb. PMID:21622045

  13. The Design of Monolithic AC-coupled 1-Dimensional Voltage-Controlled-Oscillators (VCOs) Phased-array Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lie, Donald Y. C.; Lopez, J.

    2011-04-01

    A fully monolithic 1-Dimensional (1-D) AC-coupled Voltage-Controlled-Oscillators (VCOs) phased-array network design will be presented in this paper. This radio-frequency (RF) VCO array integrates on-chip inductors, varactors and bias current sources and it contains an odd number of VCOs AC-coupled through on-chip switchable resistor networks using MOSFETs. The measured results and SPICE simulated performance of the monolithic unit cell VCO agree reasonably well. Realistic circuit simulations in IBM 7HP 0.18 um BiCMOS design kit indicate promising results of the 1-D coupled-VCO array by showing the design can control the phasing of this on-chip VCO-array by means of tuning the edge elements and/or by varying the coupling strength via different resistor values using the on-chip MOSFET switches. Simulation data shows that it can offer high directivity and a possible element-to-element phase tuning arrangement that allows a ˜±20-30° degree coverage from broadside without the need for phase shifters or additional circuitry complexity. This AC-coupled 1-D VCO array, therefore, shows great potential for RF active antennas applications to perform wide angle beam steering for the highly used S-band.

  14. The plateau phase of gamma-ray burst afterglows in the thick-shell scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leventis, K.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; van der Horst, A. J.

    2014-01-01

    We present analytic calculations of synchrotron radiation from the forward and the reverse shock of gamma-ray burst blast waves, in the thick-shell scenario (i.e. when the reverse shock is relativistic). We show that this scenario can naturally account for the plateau phase, observed early in the afterglows of about half the bursts detected by Swift. We generalize our approach to include power-law luminosity of the central engine and show that when radiation from both regions (forward and reverse shock) is taken into account, a wide range of possibilities emerge, including chromatic and achromatic breaks, frequency-dependent spectral evolution during the injection break and widely varying decay indices in different bands. For both the forward and the reverse shock, we derive formulas for the spectral parameters and the observed flux in different power-law segments of the spectrum, as a function of observer time. We explore the Fb-tb relation (between the observed time of the end of the plateau phase and the flux at that point) in the framework of the presented model and show that model predictions favour the reverse shock as the dominant source of emission in both optical and X-rays. As case studies, we present simultaneous fits to X-ray and optical/IR afterglow data of GRB 080928 and GRB 090423. We identify the end of the plateau phase with the cessation of energy injection and infer the corresponding upper limits to central-engine activity, which are about 1 h for the former and 1.5 h for the latter. We conclude that smooth energy injection through the reverse shock is a plausible explanation for the plateau phase of gamma-ray burst afterglows. During that phase, radiation from the reverse shock is likely to be important, or even dominant, and should be taken into account when fitting model parameters to observations.

  15. Venus Phasing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, Bob

    1997-01-01

    Presents a science activity designed to introduce students to the geocentric and heliocentric models of the universe. Helps students discover why phase changes on Venus knocked Earth out of the center of the universe. (DKM)

  16. The Four-Quadrant Phase-Mask Coronagraph. I. Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouan, D.; Riaud, P.; Boccaletti, A.; Clénet, Y.; Labeyrie, A.

    2000-11-01

    We describe a new type of coronagraph, based on the principle of a phase mask as proposed by Roddier and Roddier a few years ago but using an original mask design found by one of us (D. R.), a four-quadrant binary phase mask (0, π) covering the full field of view at the focal plane. The mutually destructive interferences of the coherent light from the main source produce a very efficient nulling. The computed rejection rate of this coronagraph appears to be very high since, when perfectly aligned and phase-error free, it could in principle reduce the total amount of light from the bright source by a factor of 108, corresponding to a gain of 20 mag in brightness at the location of the first Airy ring, relative to the Airy peak. In the real world the gain is of course reduced by a strong factor, but nulling is still performing quite well, provided that the perturbation of the phase, for instance, due to the Earth's atmosphere, is efficiently corrected by adaptive optics. We show from simulations that a detection at a contrast of 10 mag between a star and a faint companion is achievable in excellent conditions, while 8 mag appears routinely feasible. This coronagraph appears less sensitive to atmospheric turbulence and has a larger dynamic range than other recently proposed nulling techniques: the phase-mask coronagraph (by Roddier and Roddier) or the Achromatic Interfero-Coronagraph (by Gay and Rabbia). We present the principle of the four-quadrant coronagraph and results of a first series of simulations. We compare those results with theoretical performances of other devices. We briefly analyze the different limitations in space or ground-based observations, as well as the issue of manufacturing the device. We also discuss several ways to improve the detection of a faint companion around a bright object. We conclude that, with respect to previous techniques, an instrument equipped with this coronagraph should have better performance and even enable the imaging of

  17. Phase-locked arrays of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, M.E.; Hadley, G.R.; Lear, K.L.; Gourley, P.L.; Vawter, G.A.; Zolper, J.C.; Brennan, T.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1994-05-01

    Vertical Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (VCSELs) are of increasing interest to the photonics community because of their surface-emitting structure, simple fabrication and packaging, wafer-level testability and potential for low cost. Scaling VCSELs to higher power outputs requires increasing the device area, which leads to transverse mode control difficulties if devices become larger than 10-15 microns. One approach to increasing the device size while maintaining a well controlled transverse mode profile is to form coupled or phase-locked, two-dimensional arrays of VCSELs that are individually single-transverse mode. The authors have fabricated and characterized both photopumped and electrically injected two-dimensional VCSEL arrays with apertures over 100 microns wide. Their work has led to an increased understanding of these devices and they have developed new types of devices, including hybrid semiconductor/dielectric mirror VCSEL arrays, VCSEL arrays with etched trench, self-aligned, gold grid contacts and arrays with integrated phase-shifters to correct the far-field pattern.

  18. Cantilever RF-MEMS for monolithic integration with phased array antennas on a PCB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Armenta, C. J.; Porter, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    This article presents the development and operation of a novel electrostatic metal-to-metal contact cantilever radio-frequency microelectromechanical system (RF-MEMS) switch for monolithic integration with microstrip phased array antennas (PAAs) on a printed circuit board. The switch is fabricated using simple photolithography techniques on a Rogers 4003c substrate, with a footprint of 200 µm × 100 µm, based on a 1 µm-thick copper cantilever. An alternative wet-etching technique for effectively releasing the cantilever is described. Electrostatic and electromagnetic measurements show that the RF-MEMS presents an actuation voltage of 90 V for metal-to-metal contact, an isolation of -8.7 dB, insertion loss of -2.5 dB and a return loss of -15 dB on a 50 Ω microstrip line at 12.5 GHz. For proof-of-concept, a beam-steering 2 × 2 microstrip PAA, based on two 1-bit phase shifters suitable for the monolithic integration of the RF-MEMS, has been designed and measured at 12.5 GHz. Measurements show that the beam-steering system presents effective radiation characteristics with scanning capabilities from broadside towards 29° in the H-plane.

  19. Double closed-loop resonant micro optic gyro using hybrid digital phase modulation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Huilian; Zhang, Jianjie; Wang, Linglan; Jin, Zhonghe

    2015-06-15

    It is well-known that the closed-loop operation in optical gyros offers wider dynamic range and better linearity. By adding a stair-like digital serrodyne wave to a phase modulator can be used as a frequency shifter. The width of one stair in this stair-like digital serrodyne wave should be set equal to the optical transmission time in the resonator, which is relaxed in the hybrid digital phase modulation (HDPM) scheme. The physical mechanism for this relaxation is firstly indicated in this paper. Detailed theoretical and experimental investigations are presented for the HDPM. Simulation and experimental results show that the width of one stair is not restricted by the optical transmission time, however, it should be optimized according to the rise time of the output of the digital-to-analogue converter. Based on the optimum parameters of the HDPM, a bias stability of 0.05°/s for the integration time of 400 seconds in 1 h has been carried out in an RMOG with a waveguide ring resonator with a length of 7.9 cm and a diameter of 2.5 cm. PMID:26193493

  20. Improved synthetic-heterodyne Michelson interferometer vibrometer using phase and gain control feedback.

    PubMed

    Galeti, José Henrique; Kitano, Cláudio; Connelly, Michael J

    2015-12-10

    Synthetic-heterodyne demodulation is a useful technique for dynamic displacement and velocity measurement using interferometric sensors as it can provide an output signal which is immune to interferometric drift. With the advent of cost effective, high-speed real-time signal processing systems and software, processing of the complex signals encountered in interferometry has become more feasible. In conventional synthetic-heterodyne demodulation schemes, to obtain the dynamic displacement or vibration of the object under test requires knowledge of the interferometer visibility and also the argument of two Bessel functions. In this paper, a new synthetic-heterodyne demodulation method is described leading to an expression for the dynamic displacement and velocity of the object under test that is significantly less sensitive to the received optical power. In addition, the application of two independent phase and gain feedback loops is used to compensate for the nonideal gain and phase response of the anti-aliasing filter required for the signal acquisition of the received wideband interferometer signal. The efficacy of the improved system is demonstrated by measuring the displacement sensitivity frequency response and linearity of a Piezoelectric Mirror-Shifter (PMS) over a range of 200 Hz-9 kHz. In addition, the system is used to measure the response of the PMS to triangular and impulse type stimuli. The experimental results show excellent agreement with measurements taken using two independent industry standard calibration methods. PMID:26836865

  1. Coded apertures allow high-energy x-ray phase contrast imaging with laboratory sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatyev, K.; Munro, P. R. T.; Chana, D.; Speller, R. D.; Olivo, A.

    2011-07-01

    This work analyzes the performance of the coded-aperture based x-ray phase contrast imaging approach, showing that it can be used at high x-ray energies with acceptable exposure times. Due to limitations in the used source, we show images acquired at tube voltages of up to 100 kVp, however, no intrinsic reason indicates that the method could not be extended to even higher energies. In particular, we show quantitative agreement between the contrast extracted from the experimental x-ray images and the theoretical one, determined by the behavior of the material's refractive index as a function of energy. This proves that all energies in the used spectrum contribute to the image formation, and also that there are no additional factors affecting image contrast as the x-ray energy is increased. We also discuss the method flexibility by displaying and analyzing the first set of images obtained while varying the relative displacement between coded-aperture sets, which leads to image variations to some extent similar to those observed when changing the crystal angle in analyzer-based imaging. Finally, we discuss the method's possible advantages in terms of simplification of the set-up, scalability, reduced exposure times, and complete achromaticity. We believe this would helpful in applications requiring the imaging of highly absorbing samples, e.g., material science and security inspection, and, in the way of example, we demonstrate a possible application in the latter.

  2. Phase Won.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kocher, Erik

    2003-01-01

    Describes ten steps involved in successful renovation of a college recreation center. They are as follows: hire the right architect, be realistic about costs, devise a plan, do a mental walk through, approach the renovation in phases, communicate to users, expect lost revenue and displacement issues, continue to communicate with architects and…

  3. Responses of macaque ganglion cells to the relative phase of heterochromatically modulated lights.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, V C; Lee, B B; Pokorny, J; Martin, P R; Valberg, A

    1992-01-01

    1. We measured the response of macaque ganglion cells to sinusoidally modulated red and green lights as the relative phase, theta, of the lights was varied. 2. At low frequencies, red-green ganglion cells of the parvocellular (PC-) pathway with opponent inputs from middle-wavelength sensitive (M-) and long-wavelength sensitive (L-) cones were minimally sensitive to luminance modulation (theta = 0 deg) and maximally sensitive to chromatic modulation (theta = 180 deg). With increasing frequency, the phase, theta, of minimal amplitude gradually changed, in opposite directions for cells with M- and L-cone centres. 3. At high frequencies (at and above 20 Hz), phasic cells of the magnocellular (MC-) pathway were maximally responsive when theta approximately 0 deg and minimally responsive when theta approximately 180 deg, as expected from an achromatic mechanism. At lower frequencies, the phase of minimal response shifted, for both on- and off-centre cells, to values of theta intermediate between 0 and 180 deg. This phase asymmetry was absent if the centre alone was stimulated with a small field. 4. For PC-pathway cells, it was possible to provide an account of response phase as a function of theta, using a model involving three parameters; phases of the L- and M-cone mechanisms and a L/M cone weighting term. For red-green cells, the phase parameters were monotonically related to temporal frequency and revealed a centre-surround phase difference. The phase difference was linear with a slope of 1-3 deg Hz-1. If this represents a latency difference, it would be 3-8 ms. Otherwise, temporal properties of the M- and L-cones appeared similar if not identical. By addition of a scaling term, the model could be extended to give an adequate account of the amplitude of responses. 5. We were able to activate selectively the surrounds of cells with short-wavelength (S-) cone input to their centres, and so were able to assess L/M cone weighting to the surround. M- and L-cone inputs

  4. Liquid crystal photonics with indium tin oxide nanowhiskers and graphene as functional electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chan-Shan; Pan, Ru-Pin; Pan, Ci-Ling

    2015-03-01

    We have constructed and characterized THz phase shifters based on liquid crystals (LCs) with graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and indium-tin-oxide nanowhiskers (ITO NWhs) as transparent conducting electrodes. A graphene-based phase shifter can achieve a phase shift of π/2 at 1.0 THz with the operating voltage of ~2.2 V (rms) as opposed to ~ 5.6 V (rms) for ITO-NWhs-based phase shifter in previous work. On the other hand, 2π phase shift at 1.0 THz was achieved in an ITO-NWhs-based phase shifter with a multi-sandwiched structure by applying ~2.6 V (rms). The low operation voltage of both two kinds of phase shifters imply compatibility of both type of devices with thin-film transistor (TFT) and complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technologies. The experimental results of phase shifters are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  5. Transition of Bery Phase and Pancharatnam Phase and Phase Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Guolan; Pan, Hui; Wang, Zisheng

    2016-07-01

    Berry Phase and time-dependent Pancharatnam phase are investigated for nuclear spin polarization in a liquid by a rotation magnetic field, where two-state mixture effect is exactly included in the geometric phases. We find that when the system of nuclear spin polarization is in the unpolarized state, the transitive phenomena of both Berry phase and Pancharatnam phase are taken place. For the polarized system, in contrast, such a transition is not taken place. It is obvious that the transitions of geometric phase correspond to the phase change of physical system.

  6. Laboratory implementation of edge illumination X-ray phase-contrast imaging with energy-resolved detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diemoz, P. C.; Endrizzi, M.; Vittoria, F. A.; Hagen, C. K.; Kallon, G.; Basta, D.; Marenzana, M.; Delogu, P.; Vincenzi, A.; De Ruvo, L.; Spandre, G.; Brez, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Olivo, A.

    2015-03-01

    Edge illumination (EI) X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCI) has potential for applications in different fields of research, including materials science, non-destructive industrial testing, small-animal imaging, and medical imaging. One of its main advantages is the compatibility with laboratory equipment, in particular with conventional non-microfocal sources, which makes its exploitation in normal research laboratories possible. In this work, we demonstrate that the signal in laboratory implementations of EI can be correctly described with the use of the simplified geometrical optics. Besides enabling the derivation of simple expressions for the sensitivity and spatial resolution of a given EI setup, this model also highlights the EI's achromaticity. With the aim of improving image quality, as well as to take advantage of the fact that all energies in the spectrum contribute to the image contrast, we carried out EI acquisitions using a photon-counting energy-resolved detector. The obtained results demonstrate that this approach has great potential for future laboratory implementations of EI.

  7. Unfolding wrapped phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treviño-Palacios, Carlos Gerardo

    2015-11-01

    Phase unwrapping is the final step in phase extraction methods, which consists of recovering the correct phase from the wrapped phase by removing 2π discontinuities. The difference between the correct phase and the wrapped phase is the phase wrapping map. A new method for phase unwrapping is presented by identifying the phase wrapping map as a sequence of binary valued intermediate wrapping maps and iteratively removing them producing the correct phase by phase-wrapped unfolding. A path-following algorithm is presented to exemplify the phase wrapped unfolding method.

  8. Development of a sub-100nm integrated imaging system using chromeless phase-shifting imaging with very high NA KrF exposure and off-axis illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, John S.; Conley, Will; Roman, Bernard J.; Litt, Lloyd C.; Lucas, Kevin; Wu, Wei; Van Den Broeke, Douglas J.; Chen, J. Fung; Laidig, Thomas L.; Wampler, Kurt E.; Gerold, David J.; Maslow, Mark J.; Socha, Robert J.; van Praagh, Judith; Droste, Richard

    2002-07-01

    Examining features of varying pitch imaged using phase- shifting masks shows a pitch dependence eon the transmission best suited for optimum imaging. The reason for this deals with the relative magnitude of the zero and higher diffraction orders that are formed as the exposing wavelength passes through the plurality of zero and higher diffraction orders that are formed as the exposing wavelength passes through the plurality of zero and 180- degree phase-shifted regions. Subsequently, some of the diffraction orders are collected and projected to form the image of the object. chromeless Phase-Shift Lithography (CPL) deals with using half-toning structures to manipulate these relative magnitudes of these diffraction orders to ultimately construct the desired projected image. A key feature of CPL is that with the ability to manipulate the diffraction orders, a single weak phase-shifting mask can be made to emulate any weak phase-shifting mask and therefore the optimal imaging condition of any pattern can be placed on a single mask regardless of the type of weak phase- shifter that produces that result. In addition, these structures are used to render the plurality of size, shape and pitch such that the formed images produce their respective desired size and shape with sufficient image process tolerance. These images are typically made under identical exposure conditions, but not limited to single exposure condition. These half toning structures can be used exterior, as assist features, or interior to the primary feature. These structures can range in transmission from 0 percent to 100 percent and they can be phase-shifted relative to the primary features or not. Thus CPL deals with the design, layout, and utilization of transparent and semi- transparent phase-shift masks and their use in an integrated imaging solution of exposure tool, mask and the photoresist recording media. This paper describes the method of diffraction matching, provides an example and reviews some

  9. Four-phase differential phase shift resolver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, P. M.; Wallingford, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    Two systems have been developed to resolve phase uncertainty without transmitting reference signals. In both methods signal is impressed on carrier as differential, rather than absolute, phase shift. At the receiver four-phase demodulation and logic process unambiguously resolves differential phase shift of input carrier.

  10. L-Band Transmit/Receive Module for Phase-Stable Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andricos, Constantine; Edelstein, Wendy; Krimskiy, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has been shown to provide very sensitive measurements of surface deformation and displacement on the order of 1 cm. Future systematic measurements of surface deformation will require this capability over very large areas (300 km) from space. To achieve these required accuracies, these spaceborne sensors must exhibit low temporal decorrelation and be temporally stable systems. An L-band (24-cmwavelength) InSAR instrument using an electronically steerable radar antenna is suited to meet these needs. In order to achieve the 1-cm displacement accuracy, the phased array antenna requires phase-stable transmit/receive (T/R) modules. The T/R module operates at L-band (1.24 GHz) and has less than 1- deg absolute phase stability and less than 0.1-dB absolute amplitude stability over temperature. The T/R module is also high power (30 W) and power efficient (60-percent overall efficiency). The design is currently implemented using discrete components and surface mount technology. The basic T/R module architecture is augmented with a calibration loop to compensate for temperature variations, component variations, and path loss variations as a function of beam settings. The calibration circuit consists of an amplitude and phase detector, and other control circuitry, to compare the measured gain and phase to a reference signal and uses this signal to control a precision analog phase shifter and analog attenuator. An architecture was developed to allow for the module to be bidirectional, to operate in both transmit and receive mode. The architecture also includes a power detector used to maintain a transmitter power output constant within 0.1 dB. The use of a simple, stable, low-cost, and high-accuracy gain and phase detector made by Analog Devices (AD8302), combined with a very-high efficiency T/R module, is novel. While a self-calibrating T/R module capability has been sought for years, a practical and cost-effective solution has

  11. Fully Printed High-Frequency Phased-Array Antenna on Flexible Substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yihong; Lu, Xuejun

    2010-01-01

    To address the issues of flexible electronics needed for surface-to-surface, surface-to-orbit, and back-to-Earth communications necessary for manned exploration of the Moon, Mars, and beyond, a room-temperature printing process has been developed to create active, phased-array antennas (PAAs) on a flexible Kapton substrate. Field effect transistors (FETs) based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), with many unique physical properties, were successfully proven feasible for phased-array antenna systems. The carrier mobility of an individual CNT is estimated to be at least 100,000 sq cm/V(dot)s. The CNT network in solution has carrier mobility as high as 46,770 sq cm/V(dot)s, and has a large current-density carrying capacity of approx. 1,000 mA/sq cm , which corresponds to a high carrying power of over 2,000 mW/ sq cm. Such high carrier mobility, and large current carrying capacity, allows the achievement of high-speed (>100 GHz), high-power, flexible electronic circuits that can be monolithically integrated on NASA s active phasedarray antennas for various applications, such as pressurized rovers, pressurized habitats, and spacesuits, as well as for locating beacon towers for lunar surface navigation, which will likely be performed at S-band and attached to a mobile astronaut. A fully printed 2-bit 2-element phasedarray antenna (PAA) working at 5.6 GHz, incorporating the CNT FETs as phase shifters, is demonstrated. The PAA is printed out at room temperature on 100-mm thick Kapton substrate. Four CNT FETs are printed together with microstrip time delay lines to function as a 2-bit phase shifter. The FET switch exhibits a switching speed of 0.2 ns, and works well for a 5.6-GHz RF signal. The operating frequency is measured to be 5.6 GHz, versus the state-of-the-art flexible FET operating frequency of 52 MHz. The source-drain current density is measured to be over 1,000 mA/sq cm, while the conventional organic FETs, and single carbon nanotube-based FETs, are typically in the m

  12. Oblique electron-cyclotron-emission radial and phase detector of rotating magnetic islands applied to alignment and modulation of electron-cyclotron-current-drive for neoclassical tearing mode stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Volpe, F.; Austin, M. E.; Campbell, G.; Deterly, T.

    2012-10-15

    A two channel oblique electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer was installed on the DIII-D tokamak and interfaced to four gyrotrons. Oblique ECE was used to toroidally and radially localize rotating magnetic islands and so assist their electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) stabilization. In particular, after manipulations operated by the interfacing analogue circuit, the oblique ECE signals directly modulated the current drive in synch with the island rotation and in phase with the island O-point, for a more efficient stabilization. Apart from the different toroidal location, the diagnostic view is identical to the ECCD launch direction, which greatly simplified the real-time use of the signals. In fact, a simple toroidal extrapolation was sufficient to lock the modulation to the O-point phase. This was accomplished by a specially designed phase shifter of nearly flat response over the 1-7 kHz range. Moreover, correlation analysis of two channels slightly above and below the ECCD frequency allowed checking the radial alignment to the island, based on the fact that for satisfactory alignment the two signals are out of phase.

  13. Oblique electron-cyclotron-emission radial and phase detector of rotating magnetic islands applied to alignment and modulation of electron-cyclotron-current-drive for neoclassical tearing mode stabilization.

    PubMed

    Volpe, F; Austin, M E; Campbell, G; Deterly, T

    2012-10-01

    A two channel oblique electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer was installed on the DIII-D tokamak and interfaced to four gyrotrons. Oblique ECE was used to toroidally and radially localize rotating magnetic islands and so assist their electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) stabilization. In particular, after manipulations operated by the interfacing analogue circuit, the oblique ECE signals directly modulated the current drive in synch with the island rotation and in phase with the island O-point, for a more efficient stabilization. Apart from the different toroidal location, the diagnostic view is identical to the ECCD launch direction, which greatly simplified the real-time use of the signals. In fact, a simple toroidal extrapolation was sufficient to lock the modulation to the O-point phase. This was accomplished by a specially designed phase shifter of nearly flat response over the 1-7 kHz range. Moreover, correlation analysis of two channels slightly above and below the ECCD frequency allowed checking the radial alignment to the island, based on the fact that for satisfactory alignment the two signals are out of phase. PMID:23126766

  14. High-speed and high-efficiency Si optical modulator with MOS junction, using solid-phase crystallization of polycrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikata, Junichi; Takahashi, Masashi; Takahashi, Shigeki; Horikawa, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Takahiro

    2016-04-01

    We developed a high-speed and high-efficiency MOS-capacitor-type Si optical modulator (Si-MOD) by applying a low optical loss and a low resistivity of a polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) gate with large grains. To achieve a low resistivity of a poly-Si film, a P-doped poly-Si film based on Si2H6 solid-phase crystallization (SPC) was developed, which showed a comparable resistivity to that of P-doped single-crystal Si. In addition, high-temperature annealing (HTA) after SPC was effective for realizing low optical loss. We designed the optimum Si-MOD structure and demonstrated a very high modulation efficiency of 0.3 V cm, which is very efficient among the Si-MODs developed thus far. High-speed (15 Gbps) operation was achieved with a small footprint of the 200-µm-long phase shifter and a low drive voltage of 1.5 Vpp at a low optical insertion loss of -2.2 dB and 1.55 µm wavelength.

  15. Interferometric phase-contrast X-ray CT imaging of VX2 rabbit cancer at 35keV X-ray energy

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Tohoru; Wu Jin; Tsuchiya, Yoshinori; Lwin, Thet-Thet; Itai, Yuji; Yoneyama, Akio; Hyodo, Kazuyuki

    2004-05-12

    Imaging of large objects at 17.7-keV low x-ray energy causes huge x-ray exposure to the objects even using interferometric phase-contrast x-ray CT (PCCT). Thus, we tried to obtain PCCT images at high x-ray energy of 35keV and examined the image quality using a formalin-fixed VX2 rabbit cancer specimen with 15-mm in diameter. The PCCT system consisted of an asymmetrically cut silicon (220) crystal, a monolithic x-ray interferometer, a phase-shifter, an object cell and an x-ray CCD camera. The PCCT at 35 keV clearly visualized various inner structures of VX2 rabbit cancer such as necrosis, cancer, the surrounding tumor vessels, and normal liver tissue. Besides, image-contrast was not degraded significantly. These results suggest that the PCCT at 35 KeV is sufficient to clearly depict the histopathological morphology of VX2 rabbit cancer specimen.

  16. A chip scale optical Tx/Rx based on silicon photonics from views of multi-mode transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogura, Ichiro; Yashiki, Kenichiro; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Hagihara, Yasuhiko; Nakamura, Takahiro; Kurata, Kazuhiko

    2016-03-01

    This paper focuses on latest progress in experimental and theoretical studies on silicon-based carrier-depletion PN-junction phase shifters in terms of high modulation efficiency for energy-efficient photonic networks of high transmission capacity. Modulation efficiency of rib-waveguide phase shifters having various PN-junction configuration are characterized with respect to DC figure of merit defined for phase shifters using carrier-plasma dispersion as the physical principle of refractive-index modulation. In addition, RF drive voltage required for 10-Gb/s on-off keying is characterized for rib-waveguide phase shifters including lateral and vertical PN-junction configurations.

  17. Study of Optical Phase Lock Loops and the Applications in Coherent Beam Combining and Coherence Cloning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Wei

    Optical Phase-Lock loops (OPLLs) have potential applications in phase coherent optics including frequency synthesis, clock distribution and recovery, jitter and noise reduction, etc. However, most implemented OPLLs are based on solid state lasers, fiber lasers, or specially designed semiconductor lasers, whose bulky size and high cost inhibit the applications of OPLLs. Semiconductor lasers have the advantages of low cost, small size, and high efficiency. In this thesis, I report on a study of OPLLs using commercial SCLs, and explore their novel applications in coherent beam combining and coherence cloning. In chapter 1-3, I will first introduce the theory of OPLLs and presents the experimental study of OPLLs made of different commercial SCLs. To improve the performance of OPLLs, electronic compensations using filter designs are also discussed and studied. In chapter 4-5, I will study the application of OPLLs in coherent beam combining. Using OPLLs, an array of slave lasers can be phase locked to the same master laser at the same frequency, their outputs can then be coherently combined. The phase variations of the element beams due to the optical path-length variations in fibers can be further corrected for by using multi-level OPLLs. This approach eliminates the use of the optical phase/frequency shifters conventionally required in a coherent beam combining system. In the proof of principle experiment, we have combined two lasers with a combining efficiency of 94% using the filled-aperture combining configuration. Furthermore, I will discuss the scalability of a cascaded filled-aperture combining system for the combination of a large number of lasers. OPLLs can also be used to reduce the phase noise of SCLs by locking them to a low noise master laser. In chapter 6, I will describe the theory of coherence cloning using OPLLs and present the experimental measurements of the linewidths and frequency noises of a low noise fiber laser, a free-running and locked slave

  18. Dispersive effects of transverse magnet displacements in rolled arc achromats

    SciTech Connect

    Fieguth, T.; Kheifets, S.; Murray, J.J.

    1986-09-22

    The effect of transverse displacements of combined function magnets is investigated where the disperion in not matched due to roll. This dispersion function is perturbed by displacement of combined function magnets either singly or coherently. In the latter case the effect of a systematic (or DC) offset of magnets is examined. This type of error can occur due to systematics in the placement or the readout of Beam Position Monitors or equivalently by correcting the orbit of a beam of the wrong momentum with respect to the Arc magnet excitation. 5 refs., 18 figs.

  19. CSR-induced emittance growth in achromats: Linear formalism revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturini, M.

    2015-09-01

    We review the R-matrix formalism used to describe Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR)-induced projected emittance growth in electron beam transport lines and establish the connection with a description in terms of the dispersion-invariant function.

  20. Further Exploration of Human Neonatal Chromatic-Achromatic Discrimination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Russell J.

    1995-01-01

    Newborns were habituated to white squares of varying size and luminance and retested with colored squares for recovery of habituation. Newborns could discriminate yellow-green from white in large squares, but not in small squares. They could not discriminate blue, blue-green, or purple from white. Results suggest newborns have little…

  1. Achromatic miniature lens system for coherent Raman scattering microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Richa; Balu, Mihaela; Wilder-Smith, Petra; Potma, Eric O.

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the design and performance of a miniature objective lens optimized for coherent Raman scattering microscopy. The packaged lens assembly has a numerical aperture of 0.51 in water and an outer diameter of 8 mm. The lens system exhibits minimum chromatic aberrations, and produces coherent Raman scattering images with sub-micrometer lateral resolution (0.648 μm) using near-infrared excitation pulses. We demonstrate that despite the small dimensions of the miniature objective, the performance of this lens system is comparable to standard microscope objective lenses, offering opportunities for miniaturizing coherent Raman scattering imaging probes without sacrificing the image quality. PMID:24156075

  2. Experimental realization of an achromatic magnetic mirror based on metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Pisano, Giampaolo; Ade, Peter A R; Tucker, Carole

    2016-06-20

    Our work relates to the use of metamaterials engineered to realize a metasurface approaching the exotic properties of an ideal object not observed in nature, a "magnetic mirror." Previous realizations were based on resonant structures that implied narrow bandwidths and large losses. The working principle of our device is ideally frequency-independent, it does not involve resonances and it does not rely on a specific technology. The performance of our prototype, working at millimeter wavelengths, has never been achieved before and it is superior to any other device reported in the literature, both in the microwave and optical regions. The device inherently has large bandwidth (144%), low losses (<1%), and is almost independent of incidence angle and polarization state, and thus approaches the behavior of an ideal magnetic mirror. Applications of magnetic mirrors range from low-profile antennas, absorbers to optoelectronic devices. Our device can be realized using different technologies to operate in other spectral regions. PMID:27409104

  3. The Rainbow and the Achromatic Telescope: Two Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudd, M. Eugene

    1988-01-01

    Presented are two case studies on the perspective of the history of science. Provided are the contributions of 12 famous scientists with their historical illustrations and diagrams. Five conclusions are drawn from these studies. (YP)

  4. Phase Coexistence in a Dynamic Phase Diagram.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Luigi; Coppola, Luigi; Balog, Sandor; Mortensen, Kell; Ranieri, Giuseppe A; Olsson, Ulf

    2015-08-01

    Metastability and phase coexistence are important concepts in colloidal science. Typically, the phase diagram of colloidal systems is considered at the equilibrium without the presence of an external field. However, several studies have reported phase transition under mechanical deformation. The reason behind phase coexistence under shear flow is not fully understood. Here, multilamellar vesicle (MLV)-to-sponge (L3 ) and MLV-to-Lα transitions upon increasing temperature are detected using flow small-angle neutron scattering techniques. Coexistence of Lα and MLV phases at 40 °C under shear flow is detected by using flow NMR spectroscopy. The unusual rheological behavior observed by studying the lamellar phase of a non-ionic surfactant is explained using (2) H NMR and diffusion flow NMR spectroscopy with the coexistence of planar lamellar-multilamellar vesicles. Moreover, a dynamic phase diagram over a wide range of temperatures is proposed. PMID:26083451

  5. Phase-polarization parallax barriers for an autostereo/stereo/monoscopic display with full-screen resolution at each operation mode.

    PubMed

    Ezhov, Vasily

    2015-10-01

    It is attractive to have a three-mode flat-panel 3D display capable of working in autostereoscopic, stereoscopic-with-passive-glasses, and monoscopic modes and providing full-screen resolution of images at each mode. The concept of autostereoscopic displays simultaneously reproducing two image elements in each display pixel based on information-dependent polarization coding and subsequent decoding was recently proposed. Such a concept allows full-screen resolution in each image view and flickerless 3D images to be observed even at a 60-Hz frame rate. The essential problem of such display implementation is to create the suitable structure of the phase-polarization parallax barrier (PPPB) capable of working properly at a variable polarization state of input light. This paper presents the results of theoretical research of an electrically switchable liquid crystal (LC) PPPB. The Jones matrix notation of the required performance function of the LC PPPB is found. The results of computer modeling of achromatic characteristics of suitable LC structures are discussed to determine the optimum structures for PPPB. The proposed layout of three-mode 3D display with LC PPPB allows it to go from autostereoscopic mode to "stereoscopic-with-passive-glasses" mode and backward by electrical switching the LC PPPB in combination with removing/inserting the output polaroid film. PMID:26479601

  6. Correction of contrast in projection systems by means of phase-controlled prism coatings and band-shifted twist compensators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbluth, Alan E.; Lu, Minhua; Yang, Kei H.; Ho, Kenneth; Singh, Rama N.; Nakasogi, Teruhiro

    2000-04-01

    Projectors that use LCOS lightvalves face special contrast requirements. Most configurations for reflective light valves employ tilted beam-dividing coatings that see both bright and dark polarization states. The optics must then be designed to eliminate polarization mixing at these coatings, which ordinarily arises when the S and P planes for different rays are non-parallel. We show how phase- controlled coatings can exploit the double-pass symmetry of the Plumbicon tri-prism geometry to correct this effect, reducing cross-polarized reflectivity to approximately 1E-3 when the light valve is mirror-like in black-state. Though contrast in different rays varies as a function of both ray skew component and coating angle of incidence, we show that for NA phase dispersion in their black-state, complicating contrast control in the optics. Scatter depolarization at the edges of pixel electrodes is enhanced in these light valves, because the inherent twist causes the backplane polarization to be rotated out of alignment with pixel edges. We show that all of these contrast degradation mechanisms can be addressed by incorporating into the light valve a compensating layer having opposite birefringence to the black-state TN active layer. Moreover, when the compensating layer and driven layer are blue-shifted to a shorter LC thickness than would ordinarily be appropriate for the wavelength band of interest, a highly achromatic response is obtained at all gray levels.

  7. CrowdPhase: crowdsourcing the phase problem

    SciTech Connect

    Jorda, Julien; Sawaya, Michael R.; Yeates, Todd O.

    2014-06-01

    The idea of attacking the phase problem by crowdsourcing is introduced. Using an interactive, multi-player, web-based system, participants work simultaneously to select phase sets that correspond to better electron-density maps in order to solve low-resolution phasing problems. The human mind innately excels at some complex tasks that are difficult to solve using computers alone. For complex problems amenable to parallelization, strategies can be developed to exploit human intelligence in a collective form: such approaches are sometimes referred to as ‘crowdsourcing’. Here, a first attempt at a crowdsourced approach for low-resolution ab initio phasing in macromolecular crystallography is proposed. A collaborative online game named CrowdPhase was designed, which relies on a human-powered genetic algorithm, where players control the selection mechanism during the evolutionary process. The algorithm starts from a population of ‘individuals’, each with a random genetic makeup, in this case a map prepared from a random set of phases, and tries to cause the population to evolve towards individuals with better phases based on Darwinian survival of the fittest. Players apply their pattern-recognition capabilities to evaluate the electron-density maps generated from these sets of phases and to select the fittest individuals. A user-friendly interface, a training stage and a competitive scoring system foster a network of well trained players who can guide the genetic algorithm towards better solutions from generation to generation via gameplay. CrowdPhase was applied to two synthetic low-resolution phasing puzzles and it was shown that players could successfully obtain phase sets in the 30° phase error range and corresponding molecular envelopes showing agreement with the low-resolution models. The successful preliminary studies suggest that with further development the crowdsourcing approach could fill a gap in current crystallographic methods by making it

  8. Diophantine Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouan, D.

    2016-09-01

    What I call Diophantine optics is the exploitation in optics of some remarkable algebraic relations between powers of integers. The name comes from Diophantus of Alexandria, a greek mathematician, known as the father of algebra. He studied polynomial equations with integer coefficients and integer solutions, called diophantine equations. Since constructive or destructive interferences are playing with optical path differences which are multiple integer (odd or even) of λ/2 and that the complex amplitude is a highly non-linear function of the optical path difference (or equivalently of the phase), one can understand that any Taylor development of this amplitude implies powers of integers. This is the link with Diophantine equations. We show how, especially in the field of interferometry, remarkable relations between powers of integers can help to solve several problems, such as achromatization of a phase shifter or deep nulling efficiency. It appears that all the research that was conducted in this frame of thinking, relates to the field of detection of exoplanets, a very active domain of astrophysics today.

  9. Non-equilibrium phases and phase diagrams

    SciTech Connect

    Massalski, T.B.; Rizzo, H.F.

    1988-03-01

    In this paper we consider the degree of usefulness of the phase diagram and the related thermodynamics in predicting and understanding the formation of metastable phases during quenching, or during low-temperature solid-state interdiffusion, or during co-deposition. Recent research has demonstrated that many of such metastable phases are formed because the more stable intermediate phases that are favored thermodynamically are nevertheless bypassed kinetically. The kinetic elimination of intermediate phases provides conditions where a metastable equilibrium can be established at low temperatures between the supercooled liquid and the terminal solid solutions, leading to metastable partitioned two-phase regions. Alternatively, the range of the metastable phases may be governed by the T/sub 0/ principle related to the crossover of the respective free energy curves, or may be controlled mainly by kinetic considerations. Which particular thermodynamic conditions apply appears to depend on the initial form of the phase diagram and the specific technique used. The occurrence of massive transformations also is discussed. 34 refs., 10 figs.

  10. Map-likelihood phasing

    PubMed Central

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2001-01-01

    The recently developed technique of maximum-likelihood density modification [Terwilliger (2000 ▶), Acta Cryst. D56, 965–972] allows a calculation of phase probabilities based on the likelihood of the electron-density map to be carried out separately from the calculation of any prior phase probabilities. Here, it is shown that phase-probability distributions calculated from the map-likelihood function alone can be highly accurate and that they show minimal bias towards the phases used to initiate the calculation. Map-likelihood phase probabilities depend upon expected characteristics of the electron-density map, such as a defined solvent region and expected electron-density distributions within the solvent region and the region occupied by a macromolecule. In the simplest case, map-likelihood phase-probability distributions are largely based on the flatness of the solvent region. Though map-likelihood phases can be calculated without prior phase information, they are greatly enhanced by high-quality starting phases. This leads to the technique of prime-and-switch phasing for removing model bias. In prime-and-switch phasing, biased phases such as those from a model are used to prime or initiate map-likelihood phasing, then final phases are obtained from map-likelihood phasing alone. Map-likelihood phasing can be applied in cases with solvent content as low as 30%. Potential applications of map-likelihood phasing include unbiased phase calculation from molecular-replacement models, iterative model building, unbiased electron-density maps for cases where 2Fo − Fc or σA-weighted maps would currently be used, structure validation and ab initio phase determination from solvent masks, non-crystallographic symmetry or other knowledge about expected electron density. PMID:11717488

  11. CrowdPhase: crowdsourcing the phase problem.

    PubMed

    Jorda, Julien; Sawaya, Michael R; Yeates, Todd O

    2014-06-01

    The human mind innately excels at some complex tasks that are difficult to solve using computers alone. For complex problems amenable to parallelization, strategies can be developed to exploit human intelligence in a collective form: such approaches are sometimes referred to as `crowdsourcing'. Here, a first attempt at a crowdsourced approach for low-resolution ab initio phasing in macromolecular crystallography is proposed. A collaborative online game named CrowdPhase was designed, which relies on a human-powered genetic algorithm, where players control the selection mechanism during the evolutionary process. The algorithm starts from a population of `individuals', each with a random genetic makeup, in this case a map prepared from a random set of phases, and tries to cause the population to evolve towards individuals with better phases based on Darwinian survival of the fittest. Players apply their pattern-recognition capabilities to evaluate the electron-density maps generated from these sets of phases and to select the fittest individuals. A user-friendly interface, a training stage and a competitive scoring system foster a network of well trained players who can guide the genetic algorithm towards better solutions from generation to generation via gameplay. CrowdPhase was applied to two synthetic low-resolution phasing puzzles and it was shown that players could successfully obtain phase sets in the 30° phase error range and corresponding molecular envelopes showing agreement with the low-resolution models. The successful preliminary studies suggest that with further development the crowdsourcing approach could fill a gap in current crystallographic methods by making it possible to extract meaningful information in cases where limited resolution might otherwise prevent initial phasing. PMID:24914965

  12. CrowdPhase: crowdsourcing the phase problem

    PubMed Central

    Jorda, Julien; Sawaya, Michael R.; Yeates, Todd O.

    2014-01-01

    The human mind innately excels at some complex tasks that are difficult to solve using computers alone. For complex problems amenable to parallelization, strategies can be developed to exploit human intelligence in a collective form: such approaches are sometimes referred to as ‘crowdsourcing’. Here, a first attempt at a crowdsourced approach for low-resolution ab initio phasing in macromolecular crystallography is proposed. A collaborative online game named CrowdPhase was designed, which relies on a human-powered genetic algorithm, where players control the selection mechanism during the evolutionary process. The algorithm starts from a population of ‘individuals’, each with a random genetic makeup, in this case a map prepared from a random set of phases, and tries to cause the population to evolve towards individuals with better phases based on Darwinian survival of the fittest. Players apply their pattern-recognition capabilities to evaluate the electron-density maps generated from these sets of phases and to select the fittest individuals. A user-friendly interface, a training stage and a competitive scoring system foster a network of well trained players who can guide the genetic algorithm towards better solutions from generation to generation via gameplay. CrowdPhase was applied to two synthetic low-resolution phasing puzzles and it was shown that players could successfully obtain phase sets in the 30° phase error range and corresponding molecular envelopes showing agreement with the low-resolution models. The successful preliminary studies suggest that with further development the crowdsourcing approach could fill a gap in current crystallographic methods by making it possible to extract meaningful information in cases where limited resolution might otherwise prevent initial phasing. PMID:24914965

  13. Cranial stereotactic radiosurgery: current status of the initial paradigm shifter.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Jason P; Yen, Chun-Po; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Loeffler, Jay S

    2014-09-10

    The concept of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) was first described by Lars Leksell in 1951. It was proposed as a noninvasive alternative to open neurosurgical approaches to manage a variety of conditions. In the following decades, SRS emerged as a unique discipline involving a collegial partnership among neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists, and medical physicists. SRS relies on the precisely guided delivery of high-dose ionizing radiation to an intracranial target. The focused convergence of multiple beams yields a potent therapeutic effect on the target and a steep dose fall-off to surrounding structures, thereby minimizing the risk of collateral damage. SRS is typically administered in a single session but can be given in as many as five sessions or fractions. By providing an ablative effect noninvasively, SRS has altered the treatment paradigms for benign and malignant intracranial tumors, functional disorders, and vascular malformations. Literature on extensive intracranial radiosurgery has unequivocally demonstrated the favorable benefit-to-risk profile that SRS affords for appropriately selected patients. In a departure from conventional radiotherapeutic strategies, radiosurgical principles have recently been extended to extracranial indications such as lung, spine, and liver tumors. The paradigm shift resulting from radiosurgery continues to alter the landscape of related fields. PMID:25113762

  14. Propagating phase interface with intermediate interfacial phase: Phase field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeni, Kasra; Levitas, Valery I.

    2014-05-01

    An advanced three-phase phase field approach (PFA) is suggested for a nonequilibrium phase interface that contains an intermediate phase, in particular, a solid-solid interface with a nanometer-sized intermediate melt (IM). A thermodynamic potential in the polar order parameters is developed that satisfies all thermodynamic equilibrium and stability conditions. The special form of the gradient energy allowed us to include the interaction of two solid-melt interfaces via an intermediate melt and obtain a well-posed problem and mesh-independent solutions. It is proved that for stationary 1D solutions to two Ginzburg-Landau equations for three phases, the local energy at each point is equal to the gradient energy. Simulations are performed for β ↔δ phase transformations (PTs) via IM in an HMX energetic material. The obtained energy IM width dependence is described by generalized force-balance models for short- and long-range interaction forces between interfaces but not far from the melting temperature. A force-balance model is developed that describes phase field results even 100 K below the melting temperature. The effects of the ratios of width and energies of solid-solid and solid-melt interfaces, temperature, and the parameter characterizing interaction of two solid-melt interfaces, on the structure, width, energy of the IM and interface velocity are determined by finite element method. Depending on parameters, the IM may appear by continuous or discontinuous barrierless disordering or via critical nucleus due to thermal fluctuations. The IM may appear during heating and persist during cooling at temperatures well below than it follows from sharp-interface approach. On the other hand, for some parameters when IM is expected, it does not form, producing an IM-free gap. The developed PFA represents a quite general three-phase model and can be extended to other physical phenomena, such as martensitic PTs, surface-induced premelting and PTs, premelting

  15. Simplified phase detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hershey, L. M.

    1979-01-01

    Tanlick sine-wave phase detector gives dc output voltage nearly proportional to phase difference between oscillator signal and reference signal. Device may be used for systems in which signal-to-noise ratio is high.

  16. Digital quadrature phase detection

    DOEpatents

    Smith, J.A.; Johnson, J.A.

    1992-05-26

    A system for detecting the phase of a frequency or phase modulated signal that includes digital quadrature sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal at two times that are one quarter of a cycle of a reference signal apart, determination of the arctangent of the ratio of a first sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal to the second sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal, and a determination of quadrant in which the phase determination is increased by 2[pi] when the quadrant changes from the first quadrant to the fourth quadrant and decreased by 2[pi] when the quadrant changes from the fourth quadrant to the first quadrant whereby the absolute phase of the frequency or phase modulated signal can be determined using an arbitrary reference convention. 6 figs.

  17. Digital quadrature phase detection

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James A.; Johnson, John A.

    1992-01-01

    A system for detecting the phase of a frequency of phase modulated signal that includes digital quadrature sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal at two times that are one quarter of a cycle of a reference signal apart, determination of the arctangent of the ratio of a first sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal to the second sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal, and a determination of quadrant in which the phase determination is increased by 2.pi. when the quadrant changes from the first quadrant to the fourth quadrant and decreased by 2.pi. when the quadrant changes from the fourth quadrant to the first quadrant whereby the absolute phase of the frequency or phase modulated signal can be determined using an arbitrary reference convention.

  18. Phase jitter in a differential phase experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanenbaum, B. S.; Connolly, D. J.; Austin, G. L.

    1973-01-01

    Austin (1971) had concluded that, because of the 'phase jitter,' the differential phase experiment is useful over a more limited height range than the differential absorption experiment. Several observations are presented to show that this conclusion is premature. It is pointed out that the logical basis of the differential absorption experiment also requires that the O- and X-mode echoes, at a given time, come from the same irregularities. Austin's calculations are believed to contain a systematic error above 80 km.

  19. Fully Printed, Flexible, Phased Array Antenna for Lunar Surface Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbaraman, Harish; Hen, Ray T.; Lu, Xuejun; Chen, Maggie Yihong

    2013-01-01

    NASAs future exploration missions focus on the manned exploration of the Moon, Mars, and beyond, which will rely heavily on the development of a reliable communications infrastructure from planetary surface-to-surface, surface-to-orbit, and back to Earth. Flexible antennas are highly desired in many scenarios. Active phased array antennas (active PAAs) with distributed control and processing electronics at the surface of an antenna aperture offer numerous advantages for radar communications. Large-area active PAAs on flexible substrates are of particular interest in NASA s space radars due to their efficient inflatable package that can be rolled up during transportation and deployed in space. Such an inflatable package significantly reduces stowage volume and mass. Because of these performance and packaging advantages, large-area inflatable active PAAs are highly desired in NASA s surface-to-orbit and surface-to-relay communications. To address the issues of flexible electronics, a room-temperature printing process of active phased-array antennas on a flexible Kapton substrate was developed. Field effect transistors (FETs) based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), with many unique physical properties, were successfully proved feasible for the PAA system. This innovation is a new type of fully inkjet-printable, two-dimensional, high-frequency PAA on a flexible substrate at room temperature. The designed electronic circuit components, such as the FET switches in the phase shifter, metal interconnection lines, microstrip transmission lines, etc., are all printed using a special inkjet printer. Using the developed technology, entire 1x4, 2x2, and 4x4 PAA systems were developed, packaged, and demonstrated at 5.3 GHz. Several key solutions are addressed in this work to solve the fabrication issues. The source/drain contact is developed using droplets of silver ink printed on the source/drain areas prior to applying CNT thin-film. The wet silver ink droplets allow the silver to

  20. Perceptions about Moon Phases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rider, Steven

    2002-01-01

    Presents research on different techniques to determine the level of understanding among middle school students regarding the phases of the moon. Quotes student responses to provide some insight into students' level of understanding of general knowledge about the moon, moon phases, and modeling the phases. Presents implications for teachers. (KHR)

  1. Acute phase reaction and acute phase proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Gruys, E.; Toussaint, M.J.M.; Niewold, T.A.; Koopmans, S.J.

    2005-01-01

    A review of the systemic acute phase reaction with major cytokines involved, and the hepatic metabolic changes, negative and positive acute phase proteins (APPs) with function and associated pathology is given. It appears that APPs represent appropriate analytes for assessment of animal health. Whereas they represent non-specific markers as biological effect reactants, they can be used for assessing nutritional deficits and reactive processes, especially when positive and negative acute phase variables are combined in an index. When such acute phase index is applied to separate healthy animals from animals with some disease, much better results are obtained than with single analytes and statistically acceptable results for culling individual animals may be reached. Unfortunately at present no cheap, comprehensive and easy to use system is available for assessing various acute phase proteins in serum or blood samples at the same time. Protein microarray or fluid phase microchip technology may satisfy this need; and permit simultaneous analysis of numerous analytes in the same small volume sample and enable integration of information derived from systemic reactivity and nutrition with disease specific variables. Applying such technology may help to solve health problems in various countries not only in animal husbandry but also in human populations. PMID:16252337

  2. A study of the performance of a nulling interferometer testbed preparatory to the Darwin mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabor, Pavel

    2009-09-01

    Preparations for a future interferometric flagship space mission (Darwin, TPF-I) are under way in order to study Earth-like extrasolar planets in the habitable zones of their parent stars, and more particularly to estimate the proportion of such exoplanets with atmospheric compositions suggesting the presence of biotic photosynthesis. Nulling interferometry operating in the spectral band between 6 and 18 μm may allow distinguishing the emissions of the exoplanet from those of its star and the ambient diffuse sources. The thesis summarises the experimental work performed on the SYNAPSE test bed at the Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale in Orsay. The bench was tested in the K band, from 2.0 to 2.5 μm, as well as with a laser at 3.39 μm. The results confirm the trend observed by other research groups, viz., the performance is better in monochromatic light than in broadband (nulling ratios of 1E-5 monochromatic, and 3E-4 broad band). Extensive experimental study of this phe nomenon is described. In addition to these efforts aiming at a better grasp of nulling interferometry as such, we tested an Achromatic Phase Shifter prototype (a key element in broadband nulling) based on the through-focus principle. We developed a technique of optical path difference stabilisation, where interferometrically combined flux is measured while dithering the optical path difference. We reached stability levels comparable to those required for the future space mission.

  3. High Contrast Vacuum Nuller Testbed (VNT) Contrast, Performance and Null Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Petrone, Peter; Mallik, Udayan; Madison, Timothy; Bolcar, Matthew R.

    2012-01-01

    Herein we report on our contrast assessment and the development, sensing and control of the Vacuum Nuller Testbed to realize a Visible Nulling Coronagraphy (VNC) for exoplanet detection and characterization. Tbe VNC is one of the few approaches that works with filled, segmented and sparse or diluted-aperture telescope systems. It thus spans a range of potential future NASA telescopes and could be flown as a separate instrument on such a future mission. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center has an established effort to develop VNC technologies, and an incremental sequence of testbeds to advance this approach and its critical technologies. We discuss the development of the vacuum Visible Nulling Coronagraph testbed (VNT). The VNT is an ultra-stable vibration isolated testbed that operates under closed-loop control within a vacuum chamber. It will be used to achieve an incremental sequence of three visible-light nulling milestones with sequentially higher contrasts of 10(exp 8), 10(exp 9) and ideally 10(exp 10) at an inner working angle of 2*lambda/D. The VNT is based on a modified Mach-Zehnder nulling interferometer, with a "W" configuration to accommodate a hex-packed MEMS based deformable mirror, a coherent fiber bundle and achromatic phase shifters. We discuss the laboratory results, optical configuration, critical technologies and the null sensing and control approach.

  4. Visible Nulling Coronagraphy Testbed Development for Exoplanet Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Woodruff, Robert A.; Vasudevan, Gopal; Thompson, Patrick; Chen, Andrew; Petrone, Peter; Booth, Andrew; Madison, Timothy; Bolcar, Matthew; Noecker, M. Charley; Kendrick, Stephen; Melnick, Gary; Tolls, Volker

    2010-01-01

    Three of the recently completed NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept (ASMC) studies addressed the feasibility of using a Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC) as the prime instrument for exoplanet science. The VNC approach is one of the few approaches that works with filled, segmented and sparse or diluted aperture telescope systems and thus spans the space of potential ASMC exoplanet missions. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has a well-established effort to develop VNC technologies and has developed an incremental sequence of VNC testbeds to advance the this approach and the technologies associated with it. Herein we report on the continued development of the vacuum Visible Nulling Coronagraph testbed (VNT). The VNT is an ultra-stable vibration isolated testbed that operates under high bandwidth closed-loop control within a vacuum chamber. It will be used to achieve an incremental sequence of three visible light nulling milestones of sequentially higher contrasts of 10(exp 8) , 10(exp 9) and 10(exp 10) at an inner working angle of 2*lambda/D and ultimately culminate in spectrally broadband (>20%) high contrast imaging. Each of the milestones, one per year, is traceable to one or more of the ASMC studies. The VNT uses a modified Mach-Zehnder nulling interferometer, modified with a modified "W" configuration to accommodate a hex-packed MEMS based deformable mirror, a coherent fiber bundle and achromatic phase shifters. Discussed will be the optical configuration laboratory results, critical technologies and the null sensing and control approach.

  5. High Contrast Vacuum Nuller Testbed (VNT) Contrast, Performance and Null Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Petrone, Peter; Mallik, Udayan; Madison, Timothy; Bolcar, Matthew R.

    2012-01-01

    Herein we report on our Visible Nulling Coronagraph high-contrast result of 109 contrast averaged over a focal planeregion extending from 14 D with the Vacuum Nuller Testbed (VNT) in a vibration isolated vacuum chamber. TheVNC is a hybrid interferometriccoronagraphic approach for exoplanet science. It operates with high Lyot stopefficiency for filled, segmented and sparse or diluted-aperture telescopes, thereby spanning the range of potential futureNASA flight telescopes. NASAGoddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has a well-established effort to develop the VNCand its technologies, and has developed an incremental sequence of VNC testbeds to advance this approach and itsenabling technologies. These testbeds have enabled advancement of high-contrast, visible light, nulling interferometry tounprecedented levels. The VNC is based on a modified Mach-Zehnder nulling interferometer, with a W configurationto accommodate a hex-packed MEMS based deformable mirror, a coherent fiber bundle and achromatic phase shifters.We give an overview of the VNT and discuss the high-contrast laboratory results, the optical configuration, criticaltechnologies and null sensing and control.

  6. Vacuum Nuller Testbed (VNT) Performance, Characterization and Null Control: Progress Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Petrone, Peter; Mallik, Udayan; Madison, Timothy; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Noecker, M. Charley; Kendrick, Stephen; Helmbrecht, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Herein we report on the development. sensing and control and our first results with the Vacuum Nuller Testbed to realize a Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC) for exoplanet coronagraphy. The VNC is one of the few approaches that works with filled. segmented and sparse or diluted-aperture telescope systems. It thus spans a range of potential future NASA telescopes and could be Hown as a separate instrument on such a future mission. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has a well-established effort to develop VNC technologies. and has developed an incremental sequence of VNC testbeds to advance this approach and the enabling technologies associated with it. We discuss the continued development of the vacuum Visible Nulling Coronagraph testbed (VNT). Tbe VNT is an ultra-stable vibration isolated testbed that operates under closed-loop control within a vacuum chamber. It will be used to achieve an incremental sequence of three visible-light nulling milestones with sequentially higher contrasts of 10(sup 8), 10(sup 9) and ideally 10(sup 10) at an inner working angle of 2*lambda/D. The VNT is based on a modified Mach-Zehnder nulling interferometer, with a "W" configuration to accommodate a hex-packed MEMS based deformable mirror, a coherent fiber bundle and achromatic phase shifters. We discuss the initial laboratory results, the optical configuration, critical technologies and the null sensing and control approach.

  7. Optimization of chromeless phase mask by comparing scattering bars with zebra patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hye-Young; Lee, Ji-Eun; Kwak, Eun-A.; Kim, Eun-Jin; Park, Seung-Wook; Kim, Sung-Hyuck; Shin, Dong-Soo; Jeong, HeeJun; Oh, Hye-Keun

    2006-03-01

    Resolution enhancement technology (RET) refer to techniques that extend the usable resolution of an imaging system without decreasing the wavelength of light or increasing the numerical aperture (NA) of the imaging tool. Off-axis illumination (OAI) and phase shift mask (PSM) are essentially accompanied with optical proximity correction (OPC) for most devices nowadays. In general, these three techniques do not work in isolation and the most aggressive mainstream lithography approaches use combinations of all RETs. In fact, OAI and PSM are essentially useless for typical chip-manufacturing applications unless accompanied by OPC. For low k I imaging, strong OAI such as Quasar or dipole illumination types is the best. We used dipole illumination in this study. By using strong OAI, the amplitude of the 0 th order is decreased and the amplitude of the 1 st order is increased. Chromeless phase lithography (CPL) is one of PSM technologies and CPL mask is the possible solution for small geometry with low mask error enhancement factor (MEEF). CPL uses only 180 degrees phase-shifter on transparent glass without chromium film to define light-shielding region, destructive interference between light transmitted through the 0 degree and 180 degrees regions produces dark images. To obtain the best resolution, proper OPC is required with CPL. While the most common and straightforward application of OPC is to simply move absorber edges on the mask by giving simple mask bias, the interesting and important additional technique is the use of scattering bars. Also, we can use zebra patterns for the transmission control. Mask intensity transmission changes can impact the image quality. Zebra patterns are formed by adding chromium transverse features. The transmission will be controlled by the zebra pattern density. Technology node with ArF source is studied and the mask optimization is found to be a critical. And the linewidth of scattering bars, transmission (using zebra feature) are

  8. A semiconductor laser with monolithically integrated dynamic polarization control.

    PubMed

    Holmes, B M; Naeem, M A; Hutchings, D C; Marsh, J H; Kelly, A E

    2012-08-27

    We report the first demonstration of a semiconductor laser monolithically integrated with an active polarization controller, which consists of a polarization mode converter followed by an active, differential phase shifter. High speed modulation of the device output polarization is demonstrated via current injection to the phase shifter section. PMID:23037101

  9. Phase microscope imaging in phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Mehta, Shalin B.

    2016-03-01

    Imaging in a bright field or phase contrast microscope is partially coherent. We have found that the image can be conveniently considered and modeled in terms of the Wigner distribution function (WDF) of the object transmission. The WDF of the object has a simple physical interpretation for the case of a slowly varying object. Basically, the image intensity is the spatial marginal of the spatial convolution of the object WDF with the phase space imager kernel (PSIkernel), a rotated version of the transmission cross-coefficient. The PSI-kernel can be regarded as a partially-coherent generalization of the point spread function. This approach can be extended to consider the partial coherence of the image itself. In particular, we can consider the mutual intensity, WDF or ambiguity function of the image. It is important to note that the spatial convolution of the object WDF with the PSI-kernel is not a WDF, and not the WDF of the image. The phase space representations of the image have relevance to phase reconstruction methods such as phase space tomography, or the transport of intensity equation approach, and to the three-dimensional image properties.

  10. PHASE DIFFERENTIAL INDICATING CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Kirsten, F.A.

    1962-01-01

    An electronic circuit for totalizing the net phase difference between two alternating current signals is designed which responds to both increasing and decreasing phase changes. A phase comparator provldes an output pulse for each 360 deg of phase difference occurring, there being a negative pulse for phase shtft in one direction and a positive pulse for a phase shift in the opposite direction. A counting circuit utilizing glow discharge tubes receives the negative and positive pulses at a single input terminal and provides a running net total, pulses of one polarity dded and pulses of the opposite polarity being subtracted. The glow discharge tubes may be decaded to increase the total count capacity. (AEC)

  11. Gymnastics in Phase Space

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Alexander Wu; /SLAC

    2012-03-01

    As accelerator technology advances, the requirements on accelerator beam quality become increasingly demanding. Facing these new demands, the topic of phase space gymnastics is becoming a new focus of accelerator physics R&D. In a phase space gymnastics, the beam's phase space distribution is manipulated and precision tailored to meet the required beam qualities. On the other hand, all realization of such gymnastics will have to obey accelerator physics principles as well as technological limitations. Recent examples of phase space gymnastics include Emittance exchanges, Phase space exchanges, Emittance partitioning, Seeded FELs and Microbunched beams. The emittance related topics of this list are reviewed in this report. The accelerator physics basis, the optics design principles that provide these phase space manipulations, and the possible applications of these gymnastics, are discussed. This fascinating new field promises to be a powerful tool of the future.

  12. Noncommutative Anandan quantum phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passos, E.; Ribeiro, L. R.; Furtado, C.; Nascimento, J. R.

    2007-07-01

    In this work, we study the noncommutative nonrelativistic quantum dynamics of a neutral particle, which possesses permanent magnetic and electric dipole moments, in the presence of external electric and magnetic fields. We use the Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation of the Dirac spinor with a nonminimal coupling to obtain the nonrelativistic limit. In this limit, we study the noncommutative quantum dynamics and obtain the noncommutative Anandan geometric phase. We analyze the situation where the magnetic dipole moment of the particle is zero, and we obtain the noncommutative version of the He-McKellar-Wilkens effect. We demonstrate that this phase in the noncommutative case is a geometric dispersive phase. We also investigate this geometric phase by considering the noncommutativity in the phase space, and the Anandan phase is obtained.

  13. Crystal phase identification

    DOEpatents

    Michael, Joseph R.; Goehner, Raymond P.; Schlienger, Max E.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the crystalline phase and crystalline characteristics of a sample. This invention provides a method and apparatus for unambiguously identifying and determining the crystalline phase and crystalline characteristics of a sample by using an electron beam generator, such as a scanning electron microscope, to obtain a backscattered electron Kikuchi pattern of a sample, and extracting crystallographic and composition data that is matched to database information to provide a quick and automatic method to identify crystalline phases.

  14. Phase Holograms In PMMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maker, Paul D.; Muller, Richard E.

    1994-01-01

    Complex, computer-generated phase holograms written in thin films of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) by process of electron-beam exposure followed by chemical development. Spatial variations of phase delay in holograms quasi-continuous, as distinquished from stepwise as in binary phase holograms made by integrated-circuit fabrication. Holograms more precise than binary holograms. Greater continuity and precision results in decreased scattering loss and increased imaging efficiency.

  15. Frequency stabilization in nonlinear MEMS and NEMS oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Omar Daniel; Antonio, Dario

    2014-09-16

    An illustrative system includes an amplifier operably connected to a phase shifter. The amplifier is configured to amplify a voltage from an oscillator. The phase shifter is operably connected to a driving amplitude control, wherein the phase shifter is configured to phase shift the amplified voltage and is configured to set an amplitude of the phase shifted voltage. The oscillator is operably connected to the driving amplitude control. The phase shifted voltage drives the oscillator. The oscillator is at an internal resonance condition, based at least on the amplitude of the phase shifted voltage, that stabilizes frequency oscillations in the oscillator.

  16. Holographic magnetic phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Lifschytz, Gilad; Lippert, Matthew

    2009-09-15

    We study four-dimensional interacting fermions in a strong magnetic field, using the holographic Sakai-Sugimoto model of intersecting D4- and D8-branes in the deconfined, chiral-symmetric parallel phase. We find that as the magnetic field is varied, while staying in the parallel phase, the fermions exhibit a first-order phase transition in which their magnetization jumps discontinuously. Properties of this transition are consistent with a picture in which some of the fermions jump to the lowest Landau level. Similarities to known magnetic phase transitions are discussed.

  17. Phase Equilibria Diagrams Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 31 NIST/ACerS Phase Equilibria Diagrams Database (PC database for purchase)   The Phase Equilibria Diagrams Database contains commentaries and more than 21,000 diagrams for non-organic systems, including those published in all 21 hard-copy volumes produced as part of the ACerS-NIST Phase Equilibria Diagrams Program (formerly titled Phase Diagrams for Ceramists): Volumes I through XIV (blue books); Annuals 91, 92, 93; High Tc Superconductors I & II; Zirconium & Zirconia Systems; and Electronic Ceramics I. Materials covered include oxides as well as non-oxide systems such as chalcogenides and pnictides, phosphates, salt systems, and mixed systems of these classes.

  18. Phase detection of chaos.

    PubMed

    Follmann, Rosangela; Macau, Elbert E N; Rosa, Epaminondas

    2011-01-01

    A technique, first introduced in the context of pseudoperiodic sound waves, is here applied to the problem of detecting the phase of phase coherent and also phase noncoherent chaotic oscillators. The approach is based on finding sinusoidal fits to segments of the signal, therefore obtaining, for each segment, an appropriate frequency from which a phase can be derived. Central to the method is a judicious choice for the size of a sliding window and for the frequency range, as well as for the window advancing step. The approach is robust against moderate noise levels and three cases are presented for demonstrating the applicability of the method. PMID:21405762

  19. Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Menk, Ralf Hendrik

    2008-11-13

    All standard (medical) x-ray imaging technologies, rely primarily on the amplitude properties of the incident radiation, and do not depend on its phase. This is unchanged since the discovery by Roentgen that the intensity of an x-ray beam, as measured by the exposure on a film, was related to the relative transmission properties of an object. However, recently various imaging techniques have emerged which depend on the phase of the x-rays as well as the amplitude. Phase becomes important when the beam is coherent and the imaging system is sensitive to interference phenomena. Significant new advances have been made in coherent optic theory and techniques, which now promise phase information in medical imaging. The development of perfect crystal optics and the increasing availability of synchrotron radiation facilities have contributed to a significant increase in the application of phase based imaging in materials and life sciences. Unique source characteristics such as high intensity, monochromaticity, coherence and high collimating provide an ideal source for advanced imaging. Phase contrast imaging has been applied in both projection and computed tomography modes, and recent applications have been made in the field of medical imaging. Due to the underlying principle of X-ray detection conventional image receptors register only intensities of wave fields and not their phases. During the last decade basically five different methods were developed that translate the phase information into intensity variations. These methods are based on measuring the phase shift {phi} directly (using interference phenomena), the gradient {nabla}{sub {phi}}, or the Laplacian {nabla}{sup 2}{phi}. All three methods can be applied to polychromatic X-ray sources keeping in mind that the native source is synchrotron radiation, featuring monochromatic and reasonable coherent X-ray beams. Due to the vast difference in the coefficients that are driven absorption and phase effects (factor 1

  20. Substrate-guided wave true-time delay network for phased array antenna steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Zhenhai

    2000-11-01

    Military and civilian wireless communication systems require compact phased array antenna systems with high performance. Unlike narrow-bandwidth phase shifters or bulky and lossy metallic time delay lines, photonic true- time delay lines open the possibility of high-performance antenna systems, while at the same time meeting the stringent weight and size requirements. Substrate-guided wave true-time delay lines, which have many advantages over other proposed structures, are proposed herein. The system structures of one-dimensional and two-dimensional antenna arrays based on the proposed true-time delay modules, along with the corresponding signal distribution methods for both transmit and receive modes were proposed and discussed. To demonstrate the generation and detection of microwave- encoded optical signal sources for the optically controlled antenna array, up to 50 GHz microwave signals with greater than 20 dB signal-to-noise ratios were generated by the optical heterodyning of two lasers with slightly different wavelengths at 786 nm or 1550 nm, demodulated by an ultra-fast photodetector, and then measured by a spectrum analyzer. The diffraction efficiencies of volume holographic gratings recorded on DuPont photopolymer for S-wave, P- wave, and random wave under different wavelengths were investigated in detail. The shrinkage effect of the holographic grating was compensated for by a proposed method shown herein. A simple method was also used to equalize the fanout beams to within +/-5%. Based on the above fabrication techniques, up to 7-bit TTD modules working at 850 nm and 1550 nm, which have the most number of bits and the highest packing density ever reported, were fabricated and packaged. The delay steps of the fabricated delay modules were experimentally confirmed using an original setup based on a femto-second laser, a high-speed photodetector, and the equivalent time sampling technique. The bandwidth of the delay module is experimentally confirmed to

  1. LIGHT NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLS) are hydrocarbons that exist as a separate, immiscible phase when in contact with water and/or air. ifferences in the physical and chemical properties of water and NAPL result in the formation of a physical interface between the liquids which preve...

  2. Templated blue phases.

    PubMed

    Ravnik, Miha; Fukuda, Jun-ichi

    2015-11-21

    Cholesteric blue phases of a chiral liquid crystal are interesting examples of self-organised three-dimensional nanostructures formed by soft matter. Recently it was demonstrated that a polymer matrix introduced by photopolymerization inside a bulk blue phase not only stabilises the host blue phase significantly, but also serves as a template for blue phase ordering. We show with numerical modelling that the transfer of the orientational order of the blue phase to the surfaces of the polymer matrix, together with the resulting surface anchoring, can account for the templating behaviour of the polymer matrix inducing the blue phase ordering of an achiral nematic liquid crystal. Furthermore, tailoring the anchoring conditions of the polymer matrix surfaces can bring about orientational ordering different from those of bulk blue phases, including an intertwined complex of the polymer matrix and topological line defects of orientational order. Optical Kerr response of templated blue phases is explored, finding large Kerr constants in the range of K = 2-10 × 10(-9) m V(-2) and notable dependence on the surface anchoring strength. More generally, the presented numerical approach is aimed to clarify the role and actions of templating polymer matrices in complex chiral nematic fluids, and further to help design novel template-based materials from chiral liquid crystals. PMID:26412643

  3. Demonstrating Phase Changes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohr, Walter

    1995-01-01

    Presents two experiments that demonstrate phase changes. The first experiment explores phase changes of carbon dioxide using powdered dry ice sealed in a piece of clear plastic tubing. The second experiment demonstrates an equilibrium process in which a crystal grows in equilibrium with its saturated solution. (PVD)

  4. Simulation of phase structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, J.

    1995-04-20

    This memo outlines a procedure developed by the author to extract information from phase measurements and produce a simulated phase structure for use in modeling optical systems, including characteristic optics for the Beamlet and NIF laser systems. The report includes an IDL program listing.

  5. Lunar Phases Planisphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shawl, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a lunar phases planisphere with which a user can answer questions about the rising and setting times of the Moon as well as questions about where the Moon will be at a given phase and time. The article contains figures that can be photocopied to make the planisphere. (Contains 2 figures.)

  6. UPVG phase 2 report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The Utility PhotoVoltaic Group (UPVG), supported by member dues and a grant from the US Department of Energy, has as its mission the acceleration of the use of cost-effective small-scale and emerging large-scale applications of photovoltaics for the benefit of electric utilities and their customers. Formed in October, 1992, with the support of the American Public Power Association, Edison Electric Institute, and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, the UPVG currently has 90 members from all sectors of the electric utility industry. The UPVG`s efforts as conceived were divided into four phases: Phase 0--program plan; Phase 1--organization and strategy development; Phase 2--creating market assurance; and Phase 3--higher volume purchases. The Phase 0 effort developed the program plan and was completed early in 1993. The Phase 1 goal was to develop the necessary background information and analysis to lead to a decision as to which strategies could be undertaken by utilities to promote greater understanding of PV markets and achieve increased volumes of PV purchases. This report provides the details of the UPVG`s Phase 2 efforts to initiate TEAM-UP, its multiyear, 50-MW hardware initiative.

  7. Source Wavelet Phase Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghadeh, Diako Hariri; Morley, Christopher Keith

    2016-06-01

    Extraction of propagation wavelet phase from seismic data can be conducted using first, second, third and fourth-order statistics. Three new methods are introduced, which are: (1) Combination of different moments, (2) Windowed continuous wavelet transform and (3) Maximum correlation with cosine function. To compare different methods synthetic data with and without noise were chosen. Results show that first, second and third order statistics are not able to preserve wavelet phase. Kurtosis can preserve propagation wavelet phase but signal-to-noise ratio can affect the extracted phase using this method. So for data set with low signal-to-noise ratio, it will be unstable. Using a combination of different moments to extract the phase is more robust than applying kurtosis. The improvement occurs because zero phase wavelets with reverse polarities have equal maximum kurtosis values hence the correct wavelet polarity cannot be identified. Zero-phase wavelets with reverse polarities have minimum and maximum values for a combination of different-moments method. These properties enable the technique to handle a finite data segment and to choose the correct wavelet polarity. Also, the existence of different moments can decrease sensitivity to outliers. A windowed continuous wavelet transform is more sensitive to signal-to-noise ratio than the combination of different-moments method, also if the scale for the wavelet is incorrect it will encounter with more problems to extract phase. When the effects of frequency bandwidth, signal-to-noise ratio and analyzing window length are considered, the results of extracting phase information from data without and with noise demonstrate that combination of different-moments is superior to the other methods introduced here.

  8. Gas Phase Nanoparticle Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granqvist, Claes; Kish, Laszlo; Marlow, William

    This book deals with gas-phase nanoparticle synthesis and is intended for researchers and research students in nanomaterials science and engineering, condensed matter physics and chemistry, and aerosol science. Gas-phase nanoparticle synthesis is instrumental to nanotechnology - a field in current focus that raises hopes for environmentally benign, resource-lean manufacturing. Nanoparticles can be produced by many physical, chemical, and even biological routes. Gas-phase synthesis is particularly interesting since one can achieve accurate manufacturing control and hence industrial viability.

  9. Microfluidic binary phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelescu, Dan; Menetrier, Laure; Wong, Joyce; Tabeling, Patrick; Salamitou, Philippe

    2004-03-01

    We present a novel binary phase flow regime where the two phases differ substantially in both their wetting and viscous properties. Optical tracking particles are used in order to investigate the details of such multiphase flow inside capillary channels. We also describe microfluidic filters we have developed, capable of separating the two phases based on capillary pressure. The performance of the filters in separating oil-water emulsions is discussed. Binary phase flow has been previously used in microchannels in applications such as emulsion generation, enhancement of mixing and assembly of custom colloidal paticles. Such microfluidic systems are increasingly used in a number of applications spanning a diverse range of industries, such as biotech, pharmaceuticals and more recently the oil industry.

  10. FEL phased array configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shellan, Jeffrey B.

    1986-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of various phased array and shared aperture concepts for FEL configurations are discussed. Consideration is given to the characteristics of intra- and inter-micropulse phasing; intra-macropulse phasing; an internal coupled resonator configuration; and an injection locked oscillator array. The use of a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration with multiple or single master oscillators for FELs is examined. The venetian blind, rotating plate, single grating, and grating rhomb shared aperture concepts are analyzed. It is noted that the shared aperture approach using a grating rhomb and the MOPA concept with a single master oscillator and a coupled resonator are useful for FEL phased array configurations; and the MOPA concept is most applicable.

  11. Coaxial phased array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, H., Jr.

    1980-08-01

    A coaxial antenna array for communicating circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation is disclosed. A pair of open ended antenna cavities is coaxially constructed and operates by excitation of linear radiation elements arranged within each of the cavities. A pair of crossed dipole radiation devices is centered within the inner cavity and operated by means of a phase shifting network circuit to transmit as well as receive circularly polarized radiation. Four monopole radiation devices are symmetrically arranged to operate in the outer cavity in phase quadrature by means of the phase shifting network circuit to both transmit and receive circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation. Combined operation of the two antenna cavities with a 180 deg phase differential between the fields related to the two antenna cavities provides a broad beam, relatively wide frequency bandwidth communication capability. Particular embodiments disclosed feature a generally square cavity array as well as a circular cavity array.

  12. Coaxial phased array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, H., Jr. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A coaxial antenna array for communicating circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation is disclosed. A pair of open ended antenna cavities is coaxially constructed and operates by excitation of linear radiation elements arranged within each of the cavities. A pair of crossed dipole radiation devices is centered within the inner cavity and operated by means of a phase shifting network circuit to transmit as well as receive circularly polarized radiation. Four monopole radiation devices are symmetrically arranged to operate in the outer cavity in phase quadrature by means of the phase shifting network circuit to both transmit and receive circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation. Combined operation of the two antenna cavities with a 180 deg phase differential between the fields related to the two antenna cavities provides a broad beam, relatively wide frequency bandwidth communication capability. Particular embodiments disclosed feature a generally square cavity array as well as a circular cavity array.

  13. ELECTRONIC PHASE CONTROL CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Salisbury, J.D.; Klein, W.W.; Hansen, C.F.

    1959-04-21

    An electronic circuit is described for controlling the phase of radio frequency energy applied to a multicavity linear accelerator. In one application of the circuit two cavities are excited from a single radio frequency source, with one cavity directly coupled to the source and the other cavity coupled through a delay line of special construction. A phase detector provides a bipolar d-c output signal proportional to the difference in phase between the voltage in the two cavities. This d-c signal controls a bias supply which provides a d-c output for varying the capacitnce of voltage sensitive capacitors in the delay line. The over-all operation of the circuit is completely electronic, overcoming the time response limitations of the electromechanical control systems, and the relative phase relationship of the radio frequency voltages in the two caviiies is continuously controlled to effect particle acceleration.

  14. Geometry and Moon Phases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Kenneth W.; Harrell, Marvin E.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity, designed to comply with the National Science Education Standards, that integrates science and mathematics concepts. Mathematical modeling of the moon's phases is employed to show students the role of mathematics in describing scientific phenomena. (DKM)

  15. Digital Receiver Phase Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcin, Martin; Abramovici, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The software of a commercially available digital radio receiver has been modified to make the receiver function as a two-channel low-noise phase meter. This phase meter is a prototype in the continuing development of a phase meter for a system in which radiofrequency (RF) signals in the two channels would be outputs of a spaceborne heterodyne laser interferometer for detecting gravitational waves. The frequencies of the signals could include a common Doppler-shift component of as much as 15 MHz. The phase meter is required to measure the relative phases of the signals in the two channels at a sampling rate of 10 Hz at a root power spectral density <5 microcycle/(Hz)1/2 and to be capable of determining the power spectral density of the phase difference over the frequency range from 1 mHz to 1 Hz. Such a phase meter could also be used on Earth to perform similar measurements in laser metrology of moving bodies. To illustrate part of the principle of operation of the phase meter, the figure includes a simplified block diagram of a basic singlechannel digital receiver. The input RF signal is first fed to the input terminal of an analog-to-digital converter (ADC). To prevent aliasing errors in the ADC, the sampling rate must be at least twice the input signal frequency. The sampling rate of the ADC is governed by a sampling clock, which also drives a digital local oscillator (DLO), which is a direct digital frequency synthesizer. The DLO produces samples of sine and cosine signals at a programmed tuning frequency. The sine and cosine samples are mixed with (that is, multiplied by) the samples from the ADC, then low-pass filtered to obtain in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) signal components. A digital signal processor (DSP) computes the ratio between the Q and I components, computes the phase of the RF signal (relative to that of the DLO signal) as the arctangent of this ratio, and then averages successive such phase values over a time interval specified by the user.

  16. Efficient Bayesian Phase Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, Nathan; Granade, Chris

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a new method called rejection filtering that we use to perform adaptive Bayesian phase estimation. Our approach has several advantages: it is classically efficient, easy to implement, achieves Heisenberg limited scaling, resists depolarizing noise, tracks time-dependent eigenstates, recovers from failures, and can be run on a field programmable gate array. It also outperforms existing iterative phase estimation algorithms such as Kitaev's method.

  17. Efficient Bayesian Phase Estimation.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, Nathan; Granade, Chris

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a new method called rejection filtering that we use to perform adaptive Bayesian phase estimation. Our approach has several advantages: it is classically efficient, easy to implement, achieves Heisenberg limited scaling, resists depolarizing noise, tracks time-dependent eigenstates, recovers from failures, and can be run on a field programmable gate array. It also outperforms existing iterative phase estimation algorithms such as Kitaev's method. PMID:27419551

  18. Phased array antenna control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doland, G. D. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Several new and useful improvements in steering and control of phased array antennas having a small number of elements, typically on the order of 5 to 17 elements are provided. Among the improvements are increasing the number of beam steering positions, reducing the possibility of phase transients in signals received or transmitted with the antennas, and increasing control and testing capacity with respect to the antennas.

  19. Electron microscope phase enhancement

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Jian; Glaeser, Robert M.

    2010-06-15

    A microfabricated electron phase shift element is used for modifying the phase characteristics of an electron beam passing though its center aperture, while not affecting the more divergent portion of an incident beam to selectively provide a ninety-degree phase shift to the unscattered beam in the back focal plan of the objective lens, in order to realize Zernike-type, in-focus phase contrast in an electron microscope. One application of the element is to increase the contrast of an electron microscope for viewing weakly scattering samples while in focus. Typical weakly scattering samples include biological samples such as macromolecules, or perhaps cells. Preliminary experimental images demonstrate that these devices do apply a ninety degree phase shift as expected. Electrostatic calculations have been used to determine that fringing fields in the region of the scattered electron beams will cause a negligible phase shift as long as the ratio of electrode length to the transverse feature-size aperture is about 5:1. Calculations are underway to determine the feasibility of aspect smaller aspect ratios of about 3:1 and about 2:1.

  20. Quantum phase of inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berera, Arjun; Rangarajan, Raghavan

    2013-02-01

    Inflation models can have an early phase of inflation where the evolution of the inflaton is driven by quantum fluctuations before entering the phase driven by the slope of the scalar field potential. For a Coleman-Weinberg potential this quantum phase lasts 107-8 e-foldings. A long period of fluctuation driven growth of the inflation field can possibly take the inflaton past ϕ*, the value of the field where our current horizon scale crosses the horizon; alternatively, even if the field does not cross ϕ*, the inflaton could have high kinetic energy at the end of this phase. Therefore, we study these issues in the context of different models of inflation. In scenarios where cosmological relevant scales leave during the quantum phase, we obtain large curvature perturbations of O(10). We also apply our results to quadratic curvaton models and to quintessence models. In curvaton models we find that inflation must last longer than required to solve the horizon problem, that the curvaton models are incompatible with small field inflation models, and that there may be too large non-Gaussianity. A new phase of thermal fluctuation driven inflation is proposed, in which during inflation the inflaton evolution is governed by fluctuations from a sustained thermal radiation bath rather than by a scalar field potential.

  1. Electron Holography: phases matter.

    PubMed

    Lichte, Hannes

    2013-06-01

    Essentially, all optics is wave optics, be it with light, X-rays, neutrons or electrons. The information transfer from the object to the image can only be understood in terms of waves given by amplitude and phase. However, phases are difficult to measure: for slowly oscillating waves such as sound or low-frequency electromagnetic waves, phases can be measured directly; for high frequencies this has to be done by heterodyne detection, i.e. superposition with a reference and averaging over time. In optics, this is called interferometry. Because interference is mostly very difficult to achieve, phases have often been considered 'hidden variables' seemingly pulling the strings from backstage, only visible by their action on the image intensity. This was almost the case in conventional Electron Microscopy with the phase differences introduced by an object. However, in the face of the urgent questions from solid state physics and materials science, these phases have to be determined precisely, because they encode the most dominant object properties, such as charge distributions and electromagnetic fields. After more than six decades of very patient advancement, electron interferometry and holography offer unprecedented analytical facilities down to an atomic scale. Akira Tonomura has prominently contributed to the present state. PMID:23620338

  2. Compressed sensing phase retrieval with phase diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shun; Hu, Xinqi; Qin, Qiong

    2014-01-01

    The compressed sensing (CS) theory shows that sparse signal can be reconstructed accurately with some randomly observed measurements that are much fewer than what traditional method requires. Since it takes structure of signals into consideration, it has many advantages in the structured signals process. With CS, measuring can be speeded up and the cost of hardware can be decreased significantly. However, it faces great challenge in the amplitude-only measurement. In this article, we study the magnitude-only compressed sensing phase retrieval (CSPR) problem, and propose a practical recovery algorithm. In our algorithm, we introduce the powerful Hybrid-Input-Output algorithm with phase diversity to make our algorithm robust and efficient. A relaxed ℓ0 norm constrain is also introduced to help PR find a sparse solution with fewer measurements, which is demonstrated to be essential and effective to CSPR. We finally successfully apply it into complex-valued object recovery in THz imaging. The numerical results show that the proposed algorithm can recover the object pretty well with fewer measurements than what PR traditionally requires.

  3. Phased array ghost elimination.

    PubMed

    Kellman, Peter; McVeigh, Elliot R

    2006-05-01

    Parallel imaging may be applied to cancel ghosts caused by a variety of distortion mechanisms, including distortions such as off-resonance or local flow, which are space variant. Phased array combining coefficients may be calculated that null ghost artifacts at known locations based on a constrained optimization, which optimizes SNR subject to the nulling constraint. The resultant phased array ghost elimination (PAGE) technique is similar to the method known as sensitivity encoding (SENSE) used for accelerated imaging; however, in this formulation is applied to full field-of-view (FOV) images. The phased array method for ghost elimination may result in greater flexibility in designing acquisition strategies. For example, in multi-shot EPI applications ghosts are typically mitigated by the use of an interleaved phase encode acquisition order. An alternative strategy is to use a sequential, non-interleaved phase encode order and cancel the resultant ghosts using PAGE parallel imaging. Cancellation of ghosts by means of phased array processing makes sequential, non-interleaved phase encode acquisition order practical, and permits a reduction in repetition time, TR, by eliminating the need for echo-shifting. Sequential, non-interleaved phase encode order has benefits of reduced distortion due to off-resonance, in-plane flow and EPI delay misalignment. Furthermore, the use of EPI with PAGE has inherent fat-water separation and has been used to provide off-resonance correction using a technique referred to as lipid elimination with an echo-shifting N/2-ghost acquisition (LEENA), and may further generalized using the multi-point Dixon method. Other applications of PAGE include cancelling ghosts which arise due to amplitude or phase variation during the approach to steady state. Parallel imaging requires estimates of the complex coil sensitivities. In vivo estimates may be derived by temporally varying the phase encode ordering to obtain a full k-space dataset in a scheme

  4. Combustion 2000: Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1999-11-01

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%; NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard); coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign; and cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This Phase, Phase 2, had as its initial objective the development of a complete design base for the construction and operation of a HIPPS prototype plant to be constructed in Phase 3. As part of a descoping initiative, the Phase 3 program has been eliminated and work related to the commercial plant design has been ended. The rescoped program retained a program of engineering research and development focusing on high temperature heat exchangers, e.g. HITAF development (Task 2); a rescoped Task 6 that is pertinent to Vision 21 objectives and focuses on advanced cycle analysis and optimization, integration of gas turbines into complex cycles, and repowering designs; and preparation of the Phase 2 Technical Report (Task 8). This rescoped program deleted all subsystem testing (Tasks 3, 4,and 5) and the development of a site-specific engineering design and test plan for the HIPPS prototype plant (Task 7). Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAF Combustors; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; and Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  5. The NMR phased array.

    PubMed

    Roemer, P B; Edelstein, W A; Hayes, C E; Souza, S P; Mueller, O M

    1990-11-01

    We describe methods for simultaneously acquiring and subsequently combining data from a multitude of closely positioned NMR receiving coils. The approach is conceptually similar to phased array radar and ultrasound and hence we call our techniques the "NMR phased array." The NMR phased array offers the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and resolution of a small surface coil over fields-of-view (FOV) normally associated with body imaging with no increase in imaging time. The NMR phased array can be applied to both imaging and spectroscopy for all pulse sequences. The problematic interactions among nearby surface coils is eliminated (a) by overlapping adjacent coils to give zero mutual inductance, hence zero interaction, and (b) by attaching low input impedance preamplifiers to all coils, thus eliminating interference among next nearest and more distant neighbors. We derive an algorithm for combining the data from the phased array elements to yield an image with optimum SNR. Other techniques which are easier to implement at the cost of lower SNR are explored. Phased array imaging is demonstrated with high resolution (512 x 512, 48-cm FOV, and 32-cm FOV) spin-echo images of the thoracic and lumbar spine. Data were acquired from four-element linear spine arrays, the first made of 12-cm square coils and the second made of 8-cm square coils. When compared with images from a single 15 x 30-cm rectangular coil and identical imaging parameters, the phased array yields a 2X and 3X higher SNR at the depth of the spine (approximately 7 cm). PMID:2266841

  6. On phase reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chung-Min

    This thesis focuses on the mathematical analysis of the optical phase reconstruction problem. Phase information of light waves has played an important role in many optical applications. However, the phase function of a light wave cannot be measured directly. In 1983, Teague proposed the idea of an intensity senor for measuring phase functions of light waves. It uses an elliptic partial differential equation called the Transport of Intensity Equation (TIE), which relates intensity to the phase function of a light wave. Teague's study was followed by Roddier and others. When intensity decreases to zero at the boundary, the equation has singularity since the diffusion coefficient vanishes. In 1996, Gureyev and Nugent claimed that no boundary conditions are needed for getting a unique solution of the TIE in this singular case. We present in this thesis the theoretical analysis of the necessity of boundary conditions for solving the TIE. A hybrid theoretical-numerical boundary condition is also derived for solving the TIE numerically in the case of vanishing intensity at the boundary. Numerical tests and optical simulations over discs verified the potency of this theoretical-numerical hybrid boundary condition and the algorithm. Another approach studied is the Weighted Least Action Principle (WLAP), which is proposed by Rubinstein and Wolansky in the year 2004. The WLAP states a variational principle for finding the light rays mapping between two planes using the intensity profiles on the planes, and it writes the problem of phase reconstruction in the functional form. Minimizing the associated functional, we obtain the ray mapping of the light wave in question. The phase function can be derived from the optimized ray mapping. A numerical algorithm was designed to carry out the process. Simulations and tests are reported to show the feasibility of the methods proposed.

  7. Digital phase-lock loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Jr., Jess B. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved digital phase lock loop incorporates several distinctive features that attain better performance at high loop gain and better phase accuracy. These features include: phase feedback to a number-controlled oscillator in addition to phase rate; analytical tracking of phase (both integer and fractional cycles); an amplitude-insensitive phase extractor; a more accurate method for extracting measured phase; a method for changing loop gain during a track without loss of lock; and a method for avoiding loss of sampled data during computation delay, while maintaining excellent tracking performance. The advantages of using phase and phase-rate feedback are demonstrated by comparing performance with that of rate-only feedback. Extraction of phase by the method of modeling provides accurate phase measurements even when the number-controlled oscillator phase is discontinuously updated.

  8. EUCLIDES: first phase completed!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benschop, Jos P.; Dinger, Udo; Ockwell, David C.

    2000-07-01

    The Extreme UV Concept Lithography Development System (EUCLIDES) program headed by ASM Lithography (ASML), partnered with Carl Zeiss and Oxford Instruments is evaluating EUV lithography for its viability at resolutions of 70 nm and below. From August 1998 through February 2000 the first phase was done. In this phase, the core technologies necessary to demonstrate the technical solutions for the list of possible EUV lithography 'showstoppers' have been developed. This includes: (1) Mirror substrates, (2) High reflectivity multi- layer coatings, (3) Resist outgassing reduction schemes, (4) Vacuum stages. A synchrotron source design was developed to compare synchrotron sources with plasma sources. The consortium also investigated the total system architecture to make sure the system concept meets the requirements of the semiconductor industry at an acceptable cost of ownership. In this paper, an overview of the program objectives is given, followed by an overview of highlights obtained by the various program partners and subcontractors throughout the first phase. Finally, the European partner's plan for the next phase is shown (working in close collaboration with other international consortia). This next phase will eventually lead to EUVL production tools.

  9. Phasing rectangular apertures.

    PubMed

    Baker, K L; Homoelle, D; Utterback, E; Jones, S M

    2009-10-26

    Several techniques have been developed to phase apertures in the context of astronomical telescopes with segmented mirrors. Phasing multiple apertures, however, is important in a wide range of optical applications. The application of primary interest in this paper is the phasing of multiple short pulse laser beams for fast ignition fusion experiments. In this paper analytic expressions are derived for parameters such as the far-field distribution, a line-integrated form of the far-field distribution that could be fit to measured data, enclosed energy or energy-in-a-bucket and center-of-mass that can then be used to phase two rectangular apertures. Experimental data is taken with a MEMS device to simulate the two apertures and comparisons are made between the analytic parameters and those derived from the measurements. Two methods, fitting the measured far-field distribution to the theoretical distribution and measuring the ensquared energy in the far-field, produced overall phase variance between the 100 measurements of less than 0.005 rad(2) or an RMS displacement of less than 12 nm. PMID:19997175

  10. Two-phase flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tacina, Robert R.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental program to characterize the spray from candidate nozzles for icing-cloud simulation is discussed. One canidate nozzle, which is currently used for icing research, has been characterized for flow and drop size. The median-volume diameter (MVD) from this air-assist nozzle is compared with correlations in the literature. The new experimental spray facility is discussed, and the drop-size instruments are discussed in detail. Since there is no absolute standard for drop-size measurements and there are other limitations, such as drop -size range and velocity range, several instruments are used and results are compared. A two-phase model was developed at Pennsylvania State University. The model uses the k-epsilon model of turbulence in the continous phase. Three methods for treating the discrete phase are used: (1) a locally homogeneous flow (LHF) model, (2) a deterministic separated flow (DSF) model, and (3) a stochastic separated flow (SSF) model. In the LHF model both phases have the same velocity and temperature at each point. The DSF model provides interphase transport but ignores the effects of turbulent fluctuations. In the SSF model the drops interact with turbulent eddies whose properties are determined by the k-epsilon turbulence model. The two-phase flow model has been extended to include the effects of evaporation and combustion.

  11. Single-phase to three-phase power conversion interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jinn-Chang; Wang, Yung-Shan; Jou, Hurng-Liahng; Lu, Wei-Tso

    2016-07-01

    This study proposes a single-phase to three-phase power conversion interface which converts the power from a single-phase utility to three-phase power for a three-phase load. The proposed single-phase to three-phase power conversion interface comprises a bridge-type switch set, a set of three-phase inductors, a transformer set and a set of three-phase capacitors. A current-mode control controls the switching of bridge-type switch set, to generate a set of nonzero-sequence (NZS) currents and a set of zero-sequence (ZS) currents. The transformer set is used to decouple the NZS currents and the ZS currents. The NZS currents are used to generate a high-quality three-phase voltage that supplies power to a three-phase load. The ZS currents flow to the single-phase utility so that the utility current is sinusoidal and in phase with the utility voltage. Accordingly, only a bridge-type switch set is used in the single-phase to three-phase power conversion interface to simply the power circuit. A prototype is developed and tested to verify the performance of the proposed single-phase to three-phase power conversion interface.

  12. Phase trombones with bending

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.; Garren, A.

    1985-10-01

    The phase shifting trombones considered up to now for SSC application consisted of sets of evenly spaced quadrupoles separated by drift spaces. One such trombone was placed between a dispersion suppressor and a crossing insertion, so that the trombone had zero dispersion. With such trombones, it is possible to change {beta}{sup *} at constant tune, or to change the tunes by several units without altering the cell phase advances in the arcs. An objection to the above type of phase trombone is that it adds to the circumference, since no bending is included. This objection may or may not be valid depending on the potential usefulness of the drift spaces in them. In this note the authors show an alternative trombone design in which dipoles are included between the quadrupoles as in the normal arc cells. Since these trombones have dispersion, they are placed at the ends of the arcs, to be followed in turn by the dispersion suppressors and crossing insertions.

  13. Controllable tomography phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiu, Peng; Zhou, Xin; Kuang, Cuifang; Xu, Yingke; Liu, Xu

    2015-03-01

    Tomography phase microscopy (TPM) is a new microscopic method that can quantitatively yield the volumetric 3D distribution of a sample's refractive index (RI), which is significant for cell biology research. In this paper, a controllable TPM system is introduced. In this system a circulatory phase-shifting method and piezoelectric ceramic are used which enable the TPM system to record the 3D RI distribution at a more controllable speed, from 1 to 40 fps, than in the other TPM systems reported. The resolution of the RI distribution obtained by this controllable TPM is much better than that in images recorded by phase contrast microscopy and interference tomography microscopy. The realization of controllable TPM not only allows for the application of TPM to the measurement of kinds of RI sample, but also contributes to academic and technological support for the practical use of TPM.

  14. Phase insensitive acoustoelectric transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    Conventional ultrasonic transducers transform acoustic waves into electrical signals preserving phase and amplitude information. When the acoustic wavelength is significantly smaller than the transducer diameter, severe phase modulation of the electrical signal can occur. This results in anomalous attenuation measurements, background noise in nondestructive evaluation, and in general complicates data interpretation. This article describes and evaluates a phase-insensitive transducer based on the acoustoelectric effect. Theory of operation of the acoustoelectric transducer (AET) is discussed, and some optimization procedures outlined for its use. Directivity data for the AET are contrasted with a conventional piezoelectric transducer. In addition, transmission scanning data of phantom flaws in metal plates are presented for both transducers and demonstrate a significant improvement in resolution with the AET.

  15. Electroweak Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Gregory Wayne

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles, and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, _ {T}, is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially sensitive function of T. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase T so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal extensions of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field. Semi-classical reasoning suggests that, when a particle receives a contribution to its mass from the vacuum expectation value of a scalar, under certain conditions, the ground state of particle number one contains a 'dimple' or shallow scalar field condensate around the particle. We argue that this is not the case. A careful analysis, taking into account quantum mechanics, shows that the semi-classical approximation is a poor one. We find that there are no energetically favored one-particle dimple solutions for perturbative couplings.

  16. Electroweak phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.W.

    1991-09-16

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T} is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially function of {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T}. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T} so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field.

  17. Electroweak phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.W.

    1991-09-16

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T} is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially function of {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T}. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T} so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field.

  18. Compressive phase contrast tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia, F.; MacDowell, A.; Marchesini, S.; Padmore, H. A.; Parkinson, D. Y.; Pien, J.; Schirotzek, A.; Yang, C.

    2010-08-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. Interference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher contrast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  19. Linear phase compressive filter

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-06-06

    A phase linear filter for soliton suppression is in the form of a laddered series of stages of non-commensurate low pass filters with each low pass filter having a series coupled inductance (L) and a reverse biased, voltage dependent varactor diode, to ground which acts as a variable capacitance (C). L and C values are set to levels which correspond to a linear or conventional phase linear filter. Inductance is mapped directly from that of an equivalent nonlinear transmission line and capacitance is mapped from the linear case using a large signal equivalent of a nonlinear transmission line. 2 figs.

  20. Linear phase compressive filter

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A phase linear filter for soliton suppression is in the form of a laddered series of stages of non-commensurate low pass filters with each low pass filter having a series coupled inductance (L) and a reverse biased, voltage dependent varactor diode, to ground which acts as a variable capacitance (C). L and C values are set to levels which correspond to a linear or conventional phase linear filter. Inductance is mapped directly from that of an equivalent nonlinear transmission line and capacitance is mapped from the linear case using a large signal equivalent of a nonlinear transmission line.