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Sample records for achromobacter xylosoxidans strain

  1. Achromobacter xylosoxidans as a new microorganism strain colonizing high-density polyethylene as a key step to its biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Anna; Chyc, Marek; Ryszka, Przemysław; Latowski, Dariusz

    2016-06-01

    This study presents results of research on isolation new bacteria strain Achromobacter xylosoxidans able to effect on the structure of high-density polyethylene (HDPE), polymer resistant to degradation in environment. New strain of A. xylosoxidans PE-1 was isolated from the soil and identified by analysis of the 16S ribosome subunit coding sequences. The substance to be degraded was HDPE in the form of thin foil films. The foil samples were analyzed with Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) as well as scanning electron microscope (SEM), and the results revealed degradation of chemical structure of HDPE. About 9 % loss of weight was also detected as a result of A. xylosoxidans PE-1 effect on HDPE foil. On the basis of comparative spectral analysis of the raw material before the bacteria treatment and the spectrum from a spectra database, it was assumed that the HDPE was the only source of carbon and energy for the microorganisms. No fillers or other additives used in the plastic processing were observed in HDPE before experiments. This is the first communication showing that A. xylosoxidans is able to modify chemical structure of HDPE, what was observed both on FTIR, in mass reduction of HDPE and SEM analysis. We also observed quite good growth of the bacteria also when the HDPE was the sole carbon source in the medium. These results prove that A. xylosoxidans is an organism worth applying in future HDPE biodegradation studies.

  2. Achromobacter xylosoxidans as a new microorganism strain colonizing high-density polyethylene as a key step to its biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Anna; Chyc, Marek; Ryszka, Przemysław; Latowski, Dariusz

    2016-06-01

    This study presents results of research on isolation new bacteria strain Achromobacter xylosoxidans able to effect on the structure of high-density polyethylene (HDPE), polymer resistant to degradation in environment. New strain of A. xylosoxidans PE-1 was isolated from the soil and identified by analysis of the 16S ribosome subunit coding sequences. The substance to be degraded was HDPE in the form of thin foil films. The foil samples were analyzed with Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) as well as scanning electron microscope (SEM), and the results revealed degradation of chemical structure of HDPE. About 9 % loss of weight was also detected as a result of A. xylosoxidans PE-1 effect on HDPE foil. On the basis of comparative spectral analysis of the raw material before the bacteria treatment and the spectrum from a spectra database, it was assumed that the HDPE was the only source of carbon and energy for the microorganisms. No fillers or other additives used in the plastic processing were observed in HDPE before experiments. This is the first communication showing that A. xylosoxidans is able to modify chemical structure of HDPE, what was observed both on FTIR, in mass reduction of HDPE and SEM analysis. We also observed quite good growth of the bacteria also when the HDPE was the sole carbon source in the medium. These results prove that A. xylosoxidans is an organism worth applying in future HDPE biodegradation studies. PMID:27072033

  3. Isolation and Characterization of Numerous Novel Phages Targeting Diverse Strains of the Ubiquitous and Opportunistic Pathogen Achromobacter xylosoxidans

    PubMed Central

    Wittmann, Johannes; Dreiseikelmann, Brigitte; Rohde, Christine; Rohde, Manfred; Sikorski, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    The clinical relevance of nosocomially acquired infections caused by multi-resistant Achromobacter strains is rapidly increasing. Here, a diverse set of 61 Achromobacter xylosoxidans strains was characterized by MultiLocus Sequence Typing and Phenotype MicroArray technology. The strains were further analyzed in regard to their susceptibility to 35 antibiotics and to 34 different and newly isolated bacteriophages from the environment. A large proportion of strains were resistant against numerous antibiotics such as cephalosporines, aminoglycosides and quinolones, whereas piperacillin-tazobactam, ticarcillin, mezlocillin and imipenem were still inhibitory. We also present the first expanded study on bacteriophages of the genus Achromobacter that has been so far a blank slate with respect to phage research. The phages were isolated mainly from several waste water treatment plants in Germany. Morphological analysis of all of these phages by electron microscopy revealed a broad diversity with different members of the order Caudovirales, including the families Siphoviridae, Myoviridae, and Podoviridae. A broad spectrum of different host ranges could be determined for several phages that lysed up to 24 different and in part highly antibiotic resistant strains. Molecular characterisation by DNA restriction analysis revealed that all phages contain linear double-stranded DNA. Their restriction patterns display distinct differences underlining their broad diversity. PMID:24466294

  4. Nosocomial colonization and infection by Achromobacter xylosoxidans.

    PubMed Central

    Reverdy, M E; Freney, J; Fleurette, J; Coulet, M; Surgot, M; Marmet, D; Ploton, C

    1984-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans, a bacterial species named in 1971, is often isolated from aqueous environments, but little has been reported about its pathogenicity in humans, its epidemiological pattern, and its susceptibility to antibiotics and antiseptics. We were faced with an epidemic caused by this microorganism for 18 months in an intensive care unit. Two patients had fatal infections and 37 others were colonized. The source was the deionized water of the hemodialysis system. The 46 isolates were identified by comparison with the reference strain A. xylosoxidans ATCC 27061. The characteristic cellular fatty acids of this species were demonstrated by gas-liquid chromatography. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of 27 antibiotics were determined. The isolates were susceptible to only two: moxalactam at 4 micrograms/ml and ceftazidime at 8 micrograms/ml. The minimal bactericidal concentrations of one disinfectant and three antiseptics were: sodium hypochloride, 109 micrograms/ml; chlorhexidine digluconate in ethanol solution, 15 to 125 micrograms/ml; polyvinylpyrrolidone iodine, 750 micrograms/ml; and iodine ethanol, 312 to 625 micrograms/ml. PMID:6699141

  5. [Isolation of Achromobacter xylosoxidans NS12 and degradation of nitrophenols].

    PubMed

    Wan, Nian-Sheng; Gu, Ji-Dong; Huang, Jin-Hui; Gao, Chuan-De

    2007-02-01

    A nitrophenols-degrading bacterium, strain NS12, was isolated from a mangrove sediment by enrichment culture under aerobic conditions. Based on the analysis of 16S rDNA gene sequence the isolate was identified as Achromobacter xylosoxidans Strain NS12 was able to metabolize both o-nitrophenol (ONP) and p-nitrophenol (PNP) as the sole source of carbon, energy and nitrogen. However, this strain was not able to use 3-nitrophenol (MNP) as the only source of carbon energy and nitrogen for growth. The study demonstrated that when PNP and ONP occurred as a mixed substrate PNP degradation restrained the degradation of ONP and caused the major carbon source shift from ONP to PNP. Moreover, the results showed nitrophenols could be degraded by the indigenous bacteria in mangrove sediment.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of the Broad-Spectrum Xenobiotic Degrader Achromobacter xylosoxidans ADAF13.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Rupa; Damania, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidansADAF13, isolated from farmland soil, possesses a large number of putative degradation genes and pathways that break down a wide variety of aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, endocrine disruptors, and other high-impact xenobiotics. These properties make this strain an excellent candidate for further development as a broad-spectrum bioremediation agent. PMID:27081123

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of the Broad-Spectrum Xenobiotic Degrader Achromobacter xylosoxidans ADAF13

    PubMed Central

    Damania, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans ADAF13, isolated from farmland soil, possesses a large number of putative degradation genes and pathways that break down a wide variety of aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, endocrine disruptors, and other high-impact xenobiotics. These properties make this strain an excellent candidate for further development as a broad-spectrum bioremediation agent. PMID:27081123

  8. Genomic Insights into Intrinsic and Acquired Drug Resistance Mechanisms in Achromobacter xylosoxidans

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yongfei; Zhu, Yuying; Ma, Yanan; Liu, Fei; Lu, Na; Yang, Xi; Luan, Chunguang; Yi, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an opportunistic pathogen known to be resistant to a wide range of antibiotics; however, the knowledge about the drug resistance mechanisms is limited. We used a high-throughput sequencing approach to sequence the genomes of the A. xylosoxidans type strain ATCC 27061 and a clinical isolate, A. xylosoxidans X02736, and then we used different bioinformatics tools to analyze the drug resistance genes in these bacteria. We obtained the complete genome sequence for A. xylosoxidans ATCC 27061 and the draft sequence for X02736. We predicted a total of 50 drug resistance-associated genes in the type strain, including 5 genes for β-lactamases and 17 genes for efflux pump systems; these genes are also conserved among other A. xylosoxidans genomes. In the clinical isolate, except for the conserved resistance genes, we also identified several acquired resistance genes carried by a new transposon embedded in a novel integrative and conjugative element. Our study provides new insights into the intrinsic and acquired drug resistance mechanisms in A. xylosoxidans, which will be helpful for better understanding the physiology of A. xylosoxidans and the evolution of antibiotic resistance in this bacterium. PMID:25487802

  9. Outbreak of long-term intravascular catheter-related bacteremia due to Achromobacter xylosoxidans subspecies xylosoxidans in a hemodialysis unit.

    PubMed

    Tena, D; Carranza, R; Barberá, J R; Valdezate, S; Garrancho, J M; Arranz, M; Sáez-Nieto, J A

    2005-11-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is a rare cause of bacteremia. Over a 2-week period, A. xylosoxidans subsp. xylosoxidans was isolated from blood cultures of four hemodialysis patients with long-term intravascular catheters. A culture from one atomizer that contained diluted 2.5% chlorhexidine, which had been used to disinfect the skin, yielded A. xylosoxidans subsp. xylosoxidans. No further cases were diagnosed once the use of this atomizer was discontinued. Five outbreak-related strains from the four patients and the atomizer were tested by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) under XbaI restriction. The isolates from the first three patients and the atomizer had identical PFGE patterns, confirming the atomizer as the source of the outbreak. The strain isolated from the fourth patient had six more bands than the outbreak strain and was considered possibly related to the outbreak strain. All patients were treated with intravenous levofloxacin. The catheter was removed in only one patient. The three patients in whom the catheter was left in place were also treated with antibiotic lock therapy with levofloxacin. All four patients were cured. This is believed to be the first reported outbreak of central venous catheter-related bacteremia due to A. xylosoxidans and the second reported outbreak with this organism associated with chlorhexidine atomizers. The use of diluted chlorhexidine via atomizers can be dangerous for the care of venous catheters and should be called into question. Patients with long-term intravascular catheter-related bacteremia due to this organism can be treated successfully with systemic antimicrobial therapy in addition to antibiotic lock therapy without catheter removal.

  10. Identification of Achromobacter xylosoxidans by detection of the bla(OXA-114-like) gene intrinsic in this species.

    PubMed

    Turton, Jane F; Mustafa, Nazim; Shah, Jayesh; Hampton, Catherine V; Pike, Rachel; Kenna, Dervla T

    2011-07-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an emerging pathogen among patients with cystic fibrosis. Here we describe a specific PCR for identification of this organism, based on detection of bla(OXA-114-like). Comparison of isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed evidence of cross-infection in some cases, but most patients harbored their own strain.

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of the Cystic Fibrosis Pathogen Achromobacter xylosoxidans NH44784-1996 Complies with Important Pathogenic Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Tim Holm; Hansen, Martin Asser; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Hansen, Lars; Riber, Leise; Cockburn, April; Kolpen, Mette; Rønne Hansen, Christine; Ridderberg, Winnie; Eickhardt, Steffen; Hansen, Marlene; Kerpedjiev, Peter; Alhede, Morten; Qvortrup, Klaus; Burmølle, Mette; Moser, Claus; Kühl, Michael; Ciofu, Oana; Givskov, Michael; Sørensen, Søren J.; Høiby, Niels; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an environmental opportunistic pathogen, which infects an increasing number of immunocompromised patients. In this study we combined genomic analysis of a clinical isolated A. xylosoxidans strain with phenotypic investigations of its important pathogenic features. We present a complete assembly of the genome of A. xylosoxidans NH44784-1996, an isolate from a cystic fibrosis patient obtained in 1996. The genome of A. xylosoxidans NH44784-1996 contains approximately 7 million base pairs with 6390 potential protein-coding sequences. We identified several features that render it an opportunistic human pathogen, We found genes involved in anaerobic growth and the pgaABCD operon encoding the biofilm adhesin poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamin. Furthermore, the genome contains a range of antibiotic resistance genes coding efflux pump systems and antibiotic modifying enzymes. In vitro studies of A. xylosoxidans NH44784-1996 confirmed the genomic evidence for its ability to form biofilms, anaerobic growth via denitrification, and resistance to a broad range of antibiotics. Our investigation enables further studies of the functionality of important identified genes contributing to the pathogenicity of A. xylosoxidans and thereby improves our understanding and ability to treat this emerging pathogen. PMID:23894309

  12. Clinical impact of Achromobacter xylosoxidans colonization/infection in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Firmida, M C; Pereira, R H V; Silva, E A S R; Marques, E A; Lopes, A J

    2016-01-01

    The rate of diagnosis of colonization/infection of the airways with Achromobacter xylosoxidans has increased in cystic fibrosis patients, but its clinical significance is still controversial. This retrospective, case-control study aimed to evaluate the clinical impact of A. xylosoxidans colonization/infection in cystic fibrosis patients. Individuals who were chronically colonized/infected (n=10), intermittently colonized/infected (n=15), and never colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans (n=18) were retrospectively evaluated during two periods that were 2 years apart. Demographic characteristics, clinical data, lung function, and chronic bacterial co-colonization data were evaluated. Of the total study population, 87% were pediatric patients and 65.1% were female. Individuals chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans had decreased forced expiratory volume in 1 s (51.7% in the chronic colonization/infection group vs 82.7% in the intermittent colonization/infection group vs 76% in the never colonized/infected group). Compared with the other two groups, the rate of co-colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was higher in individuals chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans (P=0.002). Changes in lung function over 2 years in the three groups were not significant, although a trend toward a greater decrease in lung function was observed in the chronically colonized/infected group. Compared with the other two groups, there was a greater number of annual hospitalizations in patients chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans (P=0.033). In cystic fibrosis patients, there was an increased frequency of A. xylosoxidans colonization/infection in children, and lung function was reduced in patients who were chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans. Additionally, there were no differences in clinical outcomes during the 2-year period, except for an increased number of hospitalizations in patients with A. xylosoxidans.

  13. Clinical impact of Achromobacter xylosoxidans colonization/infection in patients with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Firmida, M.C.; Pereira, R.H.V.; Silva, E.A.S.R.; Marques, E.A.; Lopes, A.J.

    2016-01-01

    The rate of diagnosis of colonization/infection of the airways with Achromobacter xylosoxidans has increased in cystic fibrosis patients, but its clinical significance is still controversial. This retrospective, case-control study aimed to evaluate the clinical impact of A. xylosoxidans colonization/infection in cystic fibrosis patients. Individuals who were chronically colonized/infected (n=10), intermittently colonized/infected (n=15), and never colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans (n=18) were retrospectively evaluated during two periods that were 2 years apart. Demographic characteristics, clinical data, lung function, and chronic bacterial co-colonization data were evaluated. Of the total study population, 87% were pediatric patients and 65.1% were female. Individuals chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans had decreased forced expiratory volume in 1 s (51.7% in the chronic colonization/infection group vs 82.7% in the intermittent colonization/infection group vs 76% in the never colonized/infected group). Compared with the other two groups, the rate of co-colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was higher in individuals chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans (P=0.002). Changes in lung function over 2 years in the three groups were not significant, although a trend toward a greater decrease in lung function was observed in the chronically colonized/infected group. Compared with the other two groups, there was a greater number of annual hospitalizations in patients chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans (P=0.033). In cystic fibrosis patients, there was an increased frequency of A. xylosoxidans colonization/infection in children, and lung function was reduced in patients who were chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans. Additionally, there were no differences in clinical outcomes during the 2-year period, except for an increased number of hospitalizations in patients with A. xylosoxidans

  14. Uncommon pathogen: Serious manifestation: A rare case of Achromobacter xylosoxidans septic arthritis in immunocompetetant patient.

    PubMed

    Suryavanshi, Kalpana Tikaram; Lalwani, Sanjay K

    2015-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is a rare opportunistic Gram-negative bacilli and rarer etiology of septic arthritis. We present here the first Indian case of septic arthritis due to A. xylosoxidans in 11-month-old male child confirmed by 16S rRNA sequencing. The child was admitted as suspected case of septic arthritis and underwent arthrotomy. Drained pus revealed Gram-negative bacilli, identified as Serratia odorifera by API (bioMérieux, Marcy l'Ιtoile, France), later subjected to VITEK 2 (bioMérieux, Marcy l'Ιtoile, France) identification revealing it to be A. xylosoxidans. It being a rare etiology of septic arthritis confirmation was done with 16S rRNA Sequencing.

  15. Sepsis Caused by Achromobacter Xylosoxidans in a Child with Cystic Fibrosis and Severe Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stobbelaar, Kim; Van Hoorenbeeck, Kim; Lequesne, Monique; De Dooy, Jozef; Ho, Erwin; Vlieghe, Erika; Ieven, Margaretha; Verhulst, Stijn

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 10 Final Diagnosis: Sepsis Symptoms: Fever • hypotension • not tollerating enteral feeds • respiratory deterioration Medication: — Clinical Procedure: IV antibiotics • lungtransplantion Specialty: Pediatrics and Neonatology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen that can be responsible for various severe nosocomial and community-acquired infections. It has been found in immunocompromised patients and patients with several other underlying conditions, but the clinical role of this microorganism in cystic fibrosis is unclear. Case Report: We describe a case of septic shock caused by A. xylosoxidans in a 10-year-old child with cystic fibrosis and severe lung disease. Conclusions: As the prevalence of A. xylosoxidans in cystic fibrosis patients is rising and patient-to-patient transmission is highly probable, further studies are warranted to determine its role and to document the appropriate treatment strategy for eradication and long-term treatment of this organism. PMID:27498677

  16. Sepsis Caused by Achromobacter Xylosoxidans in a Child with Cystic Fibrosis and Severe Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Stobbelaar, Kim; Van Hoorenbeeck, Kim; Lequesne, Monique; De Dooy, Jozef; Ho, Erwin; Vlieghe, Erika; Ieven, Margaretha; Verhulst, Stijn

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen that can be responsible for various severe nosocomial and community-acquired infections. It has been found in immunocompromised patients and patients with several other underlying conditions, but the clinical role of this microorganism in cystic fibrosis is unclear. CASE REPORT We describe a case of septic shock caused by A. xylosoxidans in a 10-year-old child with cystic fibrosis and severe lung disease. CONCLUSIONS As the prevalence of A. xylosoxidans in cystic fibrosis patients is rising and patient-to-patient transmission is highly probable, further studies are warranted to determine its role and to document the appropriate treatment strategy for eradication and long-term treatment of this organism. PMID:27498677

  17. Detection of Achromobacter xylosoxidans in Hospital, Domestic, and Outdoor Environmental Samples and Comparison with Human Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Amoureux, Lucie; Bador, Julien; Fardeheb, Sakina; Mabille, Cédric; Couchot, Charlyne; Massip, Clémence; Salignon, Anne-Lise; Berlie, Guillaume; Varin, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an aerobic nonfermentative Gram-negative rod considered an important emerging pathogen among cystic fibrosis (CF) patients worldwide and among immunocompromised patients. This increased prevalence remains unexplained, and to date no environmental reservoir has been identified. The aim of this study was to identify potential reservoirs of A. xylosoxidans in hospital, domestic, and outdoor environments and to compare the isolates with clinical ones. From 2011 to 2012, 339 samples were collected in Dijon's university hospital, in healthy volunteers' homes in the Dijon area, and in the outdoor environment in Burgundy (soil, water, mud, and plants). We designed a protocol to detect A. xylosoxidans in environmental samples based on a selective medium: MCXVAA (MacConkey agar supplemented with xylose, vancomycin, aztreonam, and amphotericin B). Susceptibility testing, genotypic analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and blaOXA-114 sequencing were performed on the isolates. A total of 50 strains of A. xylosoxidans were detected in hospital (33 isolates), domestic (9 isolates), and outdoor (8 isolates) samples, mainly in hand washing sinks, showers, and water. Most of them were resistant to ciprofloxacin (49 strains). Genotypic analysis and blaOXA-114 sequencing revealed a wide diversity among the isolates, with 35 pulsotypes and 18 variants of oxacillinases. Interestingly, 10 isolates from hospital environment were clonally related to clinical isolates previously recovered from hospitalized patients, and one domestic isolate was identical to one recovered from a CF patient. These results indicate that A. xylosoxidans is commonly distributed in various environments and therefore that CF patients or immunocompromised patients are surrounded by these reservoirs. PMID:24038696

  18. Elucidation of fluoranthene degradative characteristics in a newly isolated Achromobacter xylosoxidans DN002.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan-Ling; Lu, Wei; Wan, Li-Li; Luo, Na

    2015-02-01

    Strain DN002 isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil was identified as Achromobacter xylosoxidans based on morphological and biochemical properties and 16S rRNA phylogeny, and investigated for its potential to utilize numerous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) such as fluoranthene and pyrene as sole carbon and energy resource. Biodegradation studies showed that 500 mg(·)l(-1)fluranthene was degraded to 35.6 ± 0.3 mg(·)l(-1) by DN002 after 14 days incubation. During fluoranthene biodegradation, catechol 2,3 dioxygenase (C23O) activity was augmented 1.5 times more than catechol 1,2 dioxygenase (C12O), which indicated that C23O played a major role in fluoranthene degradation by DN002. Protein profiles were examined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and two-dimensional electrophoresis then analyzed by mass spectrometry induced by fluoranthene; a molecular mass range of 18 ∼ 66 kDa proteins were found upregulated compared with the uninduced control sample, including multiple isoenzymes of β-oxidation and dehydrogenases as well as dioxygenases. Besides, some new proteins, i.e., dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase and aldehyde dehydrogenase family proteins and isocitrate lyase were also synthesized.

  19. Characterization of a novel Achromobacter xylosoxidans specific siphoviruse: phiAxp-1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Erna; Zhao, Jiangtao; Ma, Yanyan; Wei, Xiao; Li, Huan; Lin, Weishi; Wang, Xuesong; Li, Chao; Shen, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Ruixiang; Jiang, Aimin; Yang, Huiying; Yuan, Jing; Zhao, Xiangna

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages have recently been considered as an alternative biocontrol tool because of the widespread occurrence of antimicrobial-resistant Achromobacter xylosoxidans. Herein, we isolated a virulent bacteriophage (phiAxp-1) from a water sample of the Bohai sea of China that specifically infects A. xylosoxidans. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that phage phiAxp-1 belongs to the Siphoviridae. We sequenced the genome of phiAxp-1, which comprises 45,045 bp with 64 open reading frames. Most of the proteins encoded by phiAxp-1 have no similarity to sequences in the public databases. Twenty-one proteins with assigned functions share weak homology with those of other dsDNA bacteriophages infecting diverse hosts, such as Burkholderia phage KL1, Pseudomonas phage 73, Pseudomonas phage vB_Pae-Kakheti25, Pseudomonas phage vB_PaeS_SCH_Ab26, Acinetobacter phage IME_AB3 and Achromobacter phage JWX. The genome can be divided into different clusters for the head and tail structure, DNA replication and mazG. The sequence and genomic organization of bacteriophage phiAxp-1 are clearly distinct from other known Siphoviridae phages; therefore, we propose that it is a member of a novel genus of the Siphoviridae family. Furthermore, one-step growth curve and stability studies of the phage were performed, and the specific receptor of phiAxp-1 was identified as the lipopolysaccharide of A. xylosoxidans. PMID:26908262

  20. Characterization of a novel Achromobacter xylosoxidans specific siphoviruse: phiAxp-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Erna; Zhao, Jiangtao; Ma, Yanyan; Wei, Xiao; Li, Huan; Lin, Weishi; Wang, Xuesong; Li, Chao; Shen, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Ruixiang; Jiang, Aimin; Yang, Huiying; Yuan, Jing; Zhao, Xiangna

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages have recently been considered as an alternative biocontrol tool because of the widespread occurrence of antimicrobial-resistant Achromobacter xylosoxidans. Herein, we isolated a virulent bacteriophage (phiAxp-1) from a water sample of the Bohai sea of China that specifically infects A. xylosoxidans. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that phage phiAxp-1 belongs to the Siphoviridae. We sequenced the genome of phiAxp-1, which comprises 45,045 bp with 64 open reading frames. Most of the proteins encoded by phiAxp-1 have no similarity to sequences in the public databases. Twenty-one proteins with assigned functions share weak homology with those of other dsDNA bacteriophages infecting diverse hosts, such as Burkholderia phage KL1, Pseudomonas phage 73, Pseudomonas phage vB_Pae-Kakheti25, Pseudomonas phage vB_PaeS_SCH_Ab26, Acinetobacter phage IME_AB3 and Achromobacter phage JWX. The genome can be divided into different clusters for the head and tail structure, DNA replication and mazG. The sequence and genomic organization of bacteriophage phiAxp-1 are clearly distinct from other known Siphoviridae phages; therefore, we propose that it is a member of a novel genus of the Siphoviridae family. Furthermore, one-step growth curve and stability studies of the phage were performed, and the specific receptor of phiAxp-1 was identified as the lipopolysaccharide of A. xylosoxidans.

  1. Enhanced chrysene degradation by halotolerant Achromobacter xylosoxidans using Response Surface Methodology.

    PubMed

    Ghevariya, Chirag M; Bhatt, Jwalant K; Dave, Bharti P

    2011-10-01

    Degradation of chrysene, a four ring High Molecular Weight (HMW) Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) is of intense environmental interest, being carcinogenic, teratogenic and mutagenic. Multiple PAH degrading halotolerant Achromobacter xylosoxidans was isolated from crude oil polluted saline site. Response Surface Methodology (RSM) using Central Composite Design (CCD) of Bushnell-Haas medium components was successfully employed for optimization resulting 40.79% chrysene degradation on 4th day. The interactions between variables as chrysene and glucose concentrations, pH and inoculum size on degradation were examined by RSM. Under optimum conditions, A. xylosoxidans exhibited 85.96% chrysene degradation on 5th day. The optimum values predicted by RSM were confirmed through confirmatory experiments. It was also noted that pH and glucose as co-substrate play a dynamic role in enhancement of chrysene degradation. Hence, A. xylosoxidans can be further used for subsequent microcosm and in situ experiments for its potential to remediate PAH contaminated saline and non-saline soils.

  2. Outbreak of Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Ochrobactrum anthropi Infections after Prostate Biopsies, France, 2014.

    PubMed

    Haviari, Skerdi; Cassier, Pierre; Dananché, Cédric; Hulin, Monique; Dauwalder, Olivier; Rouvière, Olivier; Bertrand, Xavier; Perraud, Michel; Bénet, Thomas; Vanhems, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    We report an outbreak of healthcare-associated prostatitis involving rare environmental pathogens in immunocompetent patients undergoing transrectal prostate biopsies at Hôpital Édouard Herriot (Lyon, France) during August 13-October 10, 2014. Despite a fluoroquinolone-based prophylaxis, 5 patients were infected with Achromobacter xylosoxidans and 3 with Ochrobactrum anthropi, which has not been reported as pathogenic in nonimmunocompromised persons. All patients recovered fully. Analysis of the outbreak included case investigation, case-control study, biopsy procedure review, microbiologic testing of environmental and clinical samples, and retrospective review of hospital records for 4 years before the outbreak. The cases resulted from asepsis errors during preparation of materials for the biopsies. A low-level outbreak involving environmental bacteria was likely present for years, masked by antimicrobial drug prophylaxis and a low number of cases. Healthcare personnel should promptly report unusual pathogens in immunocompetent patients to infection control units, and guidelines should explicitly mention asepsis during materials preparation.

  3. Identification and molecular characterization of bacteriophage phiAxp-2 of Achromobacter xylosoxidans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Erna; Yin, Zhe; Ma, Yanyan; Li, Huan; Lin, Weishi; Wei, Xiao; Zhao, Ruixiang; Jiang, Aimin; Yuan, Jing; Zhao, Xiangna

    2016-01-01

    A novel Achromobacter xylosoxidans bacteriophage, phiAxp-2, was isolated from hospital sewage in China. The phage was morphologically and microbiologically characterized, and its one-step growth curve, host range, genomic sequence, and receptor were determined. Its morphology showed that phiAxp-2 belongs to the family Siphoviridae. Microbiological characterization demonstrated that pH 7 is most suitable for phage phiAxp-2; its titer decreased when the temperature exceeded 50 °C; phiAxp-2 is sensitive to ethanol and isopropanol; and the presence of calcium and magnesium ions is necessary to accelerate cell lysis and improve the formation of phiAxp-2 plaques. Genomic sequencing and a bioinformatic analysis showed that phage phiAxp-2 is a novel bacteriophage, consisting of a circular, double-stranded 62,220-bp DNA molecule with a GC content of 60.11% that encodes 86 putative open reading frames (ORFs). The lipopolysaccharide of A. xylosoxidans is involved in the adsorption of phiAxp-2. PMID:27669904

  4. Outbreak of Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Ochrobactrum anthropi Infections after Prostate Biopsies, France, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Cassier, Pierre; Dananché, Cédric; Hulin, Monique; Dauwalder, Olivier; Rouvière, Olivier; Bertrand, Xavier; Perraud, Michel; Bénet, Thomas; Vanhems, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    We report an outbreak of healthcare-associated prostatitis involving rare environmental pathogens in immunocompetent patients undergoing transrectal prostate biopsies at Hôpital Édouard Herriot (Lyon, France) during August 13–October 10, 2014. Despite a fluoroquinolone-based prophylaxis, 5 patients were infected with Achromobacter xylosoxidans and 3 with Ochrobactrum anthropi, which has not been reported as pathogenic in nonimmunocompromised persons. All patients recovered fully. Analysis of the outbreak included case investigation, case–control study, biopsy procedure review, microbiologic testing of environmental and clinical samples, and retrospective review of hospital records for 4 years before the outbreak. The cases resulted from asepsis errors during preparation of materials for the biopsies. A low-level outbreak involving environmental bacteria was likely present for years, masked by antimicrobial drug prophylaxis and a low number of cases. Healthcare personnel should promptly report unusual pathogens in immunocompetent patients to infection control units, and guidelines should explicitly mention asepsis during materials preparation. PMID:27434277

  5. Structure of azurin from Achromobacter xylosoxidans NCIB11015 at 2.5 A resolution.

    PubMed

    Inoue, T; Shibata, N; Nakanishi, H; Koyama, S; Ishii, H; Kai, Y; Harada, S; Kasai, N; Ohshiro, Y; Suzuki, S

    1994-12-01

    The crystal structure of azurin from a denitrifying bacterium, Achromobacter xylosoxidans NCIB11015, has been refined at 2.5 A resolution using diffraction data obtained by means of synchrotron radiation at KEK. Crystals suitable for X-ray experiment were obtained by the macro-seeding method and an intensity data were obtained on imaging plates mounted on a Weissenberg camera (Rmerge = 0.09). The initial model was obtained by the molecular replacement method using the structure of azurin from Alcaligenes denitrificans NCTC8582 as a starting model. The structure was refined by molecular dynamics optimization and the restrained least-squares method to a crystallographic R-value of 0.205. However, the current model gave an electron-density of the side-chain regions of several residues close to the N-terminus quite different from those expected from the amino acid sequences reported. Very recently, two kinds of azurins (Az-I and Az-II) were isolated from this bacterium by a slightly modified purification method and have been characterized and found to have different CD spectra. On analysis of amino acid sequences around the N-terminus, the second azurin (Az-II) was proved to be a new type of azurin in this bacterium. It was consequently revealed that the current model corresponds to a new type of azurin because of the complete agreement between the electron-density and the amino acid sequence of the newly determined 20 residues from the N-terminus. Determination of the whole amino acid sequence of this azurin and further refinement are in progress.

  6. Characterization of novel plant growth promoting endophytic bacterium Achromobacter xylosoxidans from wheat plant.

    PubMed

    Jha, Prabhat; Kumar, Ashok

    2009-07-01

    Nine diazotrophic bacteria were isolated from surface-sterilized roots and culms of wheat variety Malviya-234, which is grown with very low or no inputs of nitrogen fertilizer. Out of the nine bacteria, four showed indole acetic acid (IAA) production, and five were positive for P solubilization. One isolate, WM234C-3, showed appreciable level of nitrogenase activity, IAA production, and P solubilization ability, and was further characterized with a view to exploiting its plant growth promoting activity. Based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis, this isolate was identified as Achromobacter xylosoxidans. Diazotrophic nature of this particular isolate was confirmed by Western blot analysis of dinitrogenase reductase and amplification of nifH. Analysis of the nifH sequence showed close homology with typical diazotrophic bacteria. Endophytic nature and cross-infection ability of WM234C-3 were tested by molecular tagging with gusA fused to a constitutive promoter followed by inoculation onto rice seedlings in axenic conditions. At 21 days after inoculation, the roots showed blue staining, the most intense color being at the emergence of lateral roots and root tips. Microscopic observation confirmed colonization of gus-tagged WM234C-3 in the intercellular spaces of cortical as well as vascular zones of roots. Inoculation of gus-tagged WM234C-3 to rice plants resulted in significant increase in root/shoot length, fresh weight, and chlorophyll a content. Plant growth promoting features coupled with cross-infection ability suggest that this endophytic bacterium may be exploited as agricultural agent for various crops after a thorough and critical pathogenicity test.

  7. A Case of Septic Shock caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans in an Immunocompetent Female Patient after Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy for a Ureteral Stone

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So Yon; Park, In Young; Park, So Yeon; Lee, Jin Seo; Kang, Goeun; Kim, Jae Seok

    2016-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans can cause various types of infections, but its infection in humans is rare. A. xylosoxidans has been reported as a rare etiological agent of infections including primary bacteremia, catheter-related bloodstream infection, endocarditis, otitis, and pneumonia, particularly in immunocompromised hosts. We encountered a case of septic shock caused by A. xylosoxidans in a 52-year-old, immunocompetent woman with no underlying disease, who received extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy to remove a left upper ureteral stone. She was treated with antibiotics to which the organism was susceptible but died as a result of septic shock. PMID:27104016

  8. Direct estimation of the oxygen requirements of Achromobacter xylosoxidans for aerobic degradation of monoaromatic hydrocarbons (BTEX) in a bioscrubber.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, David R; McLellan, P James; Daugulis, Andrew J

    2006-08-01

    The O2 requirements for biomass production and supplying maintenance energy demands during the degradation of both benzene and ethylbenzene by Achromobacter xylosoxidans Y234 were measured using a newly proposed technique involving a bioscrubber. Using this approach, relevant microbial parameter estimates were directly and simultaneously obtained via linear regression of pseudo steady-state data. For benzene and ethylbenzene, the biomass yield on O2, Y(X/O2), was estimated on a cell dry weight (CDW) basis as 1.96 +/- 0.25 mg CDW mgO2(-1) and 0.98 +/- 0.17 mg CDW mgO2(-1), while the specific rate of O2 consumption for maintenance, m(O2), was estimated as 0.041 +/- 0.008 mgO(2) mg CDW(-1) h(-1) and 0.053 +/- 0.022 mgO(2) mg CDW(-1) h(-1), respectively.

  9. Enhanced biodegradation of total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (TPAHs) by marine halotolerant Achromobacter xylosoxidans using Triton X-100 and β-cyclodextrin--a microcosm approach.

    PubMed

    Dave, Bharti P; Ghevariya, Chirag M; Bhatt, Jwalant K; Dudhagara, Dushyant R; Rajpara, Rahul K

    2014-02-15

    Ability of Achromobacter xylosoxidans, a chrysene degrading marine halotolerant bacterium to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) using a cost effective laboratory microcosm approach, was investigated. Effect of variables as chrysene, glucose as a co-substrate, Triton X-100 as a non-ionic surfactant and β-cyclodextrin as a PAHs solubilizer was examined on degradation of low molecular weight (LMW) and high molecular weight (HMW) PAHs. A total of eleven PAHs detected from polluted saline soil were found to be degraded. Glucose, in combination with Triton X-100 and β-cyclodextrin resulted in 2.8 and 1.4-fold increase in degradation of LMW PAHs and 7.59 and 2.23-fold increase in degradation of HMW PAHs, respectively. Enhanced biodegradation of total PAHs (TPAHs) by amendments with Triton X-100 and β-cyclodextrin using Achromobacter xylosoxidans can prove to be promising approach for in situ bioremediation of marine sites contaminated with PAHs.

  10. Characterization of cycP gene expression in Achromobacter xylosoxidans NCIMB 11015 and high-level heterologous synthesis of cytochrome c' in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Harris, Roger L; Barbieri, Sonia; Paraskevopoulos, Kostas; Murphy, Loretta M; Eady, Robert R; Hasnain, S Samar; Sawers, R Gary

    2010-01-01

    The cycP gene encoding a periplasmic cytochrome c' from the denitrifying beta-proteobacterium Achromobacter xylosoxidans was characterized. The genes flanking cycP encode components of a mobile genetic element characteristic of the beta-proteobacteria, suggesting that cycP has inserted within a transposon or insertion element. The gene therefore does not form part of a denitrification operon or gene cluster. The level of expression of the cycP gene and the level of synthesis of its corresponding gene product were found to increase by maximally 3-fold anaerobically. Expression of cycP appears to occur mainly by non-specific read-through transcription from portions of the insertion element. Conditions were developed for high-level overproduction of cytochrome c' in Escherichia coli, which resulted in signal peptide cleavage concomitant with secretion of the protein into the periplasm. Using a single-step purification, 20-30 mg of pure protein were isolated from a 1-litre culture. Based on UV-visible spectrophotometry the dimeric protein was shown to have a full complement of haem and to be indistinguishable from the native protein purified from A. xylosoxidans. This system provides an excellent platform to facilitate biochemical and structural dissection of the mechanism underlying the novel specificity of NO binding to the proximal face of the haem.

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Achromobacter sp. Strain AR476-2, Isolated from a Cellulolytic Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Kurth, Daniel; Romero, Cintia M.; Fernandez, Pablo M.; Ferrero, Marcela A.

    2016-01-01

    Achromobacter sp. AR476-2 is a noncellulolytic strain previously isolated from a cellulolytic consortium selected from samples of insect gut. Its genome sequence could contribute to the unraveling of the complex interaction of microorganisms and enzymes involved in the biodegradation of lignocellulosic biomass in nature. PMID:27340069

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Achromobacter sp. Strain AR476-2, Isolated from a Cellulolytic Consortium.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Daniel; Romero, Cintia M; Fernandez, Pablo M; Ferrero, Marcela A; Martinez, M Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    Achromobacter sp. AR476-2 is a noncellulolytic strain previously isolated from a cellulolytic consortium selected from samples of insect gut. Its genome sequence could contribute to the unraveling of the complex interaction of microorganisms and enzymes involved in the biodegradation of lignocellulosic biomass in nature. PMID:27340069

  13. Isolation and molecular characterisation of Achromobacter phage phiAxp-3, an N4-like bacteriophage

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yanyan; Li, Erna; Qi, Zhizhen; Li, Huan; Wei, Xiao; Lin, Weishi; Zhao, Ruixiang; Jiang, Aimin; Yang, Huiying; Yin, Zhe; Yuan, Jing; Zhao, Xiangna

    2016-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans, an opportunistic pathogen, is responsible for various nosocomial and community-acquired infections. We isolated phiAxp-3, an N4-like bacteriophage that infects A. xylosoxidans, from hospital waste and studied its genomic and biological properties. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that, with a 67-nm diameter icosahedral head and a 20-nm non-contractile tail, phiAxp-3 has features characteristic of Podoviridae bacteriophages (order Caudovirales). With a burst size of 9000 plaque-forming units and a latent period of 80 min, phiAxp-3 had a host range limited to only four A. xylosoxidans strains of the 35 strains that were tested. The 72,825 bp phiAxp-3 DNA genome, with 416-bp terminal redundant ends, contains 80 predicted open reading frames, none of which are related to virulence or drug resistance. Genome sequence comparisons place phiAxp-3 more closely with JWAlpha and JWDelta Achromobacter phages than with other N4 viruses. Using proteomics, we identified 25 viral proteins from purified phiAxp-3 particles. Notably, investigation of the phage phiAxp-3 receptor on the surface of the host cell revealed that lipopolysaccharide serves as the receptor for the adsorption of phage phiAxp-3. Our findings advance current knowledge about A. xylosoxidans phages in an age where alternative therapies to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria are urgently needed. PMID:27094846

  14. Characterization of Achromobacter Species in Cystic Fibrosis Patients: Comparison of blaOXA-114 PCR Amplification, Multilocus Sequence Typing, and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Elenice R. A.; Ferreira, Alex G.; Leão, Robson S.; Leite, Cassiana C. F.; Carvalho-Assef, Ana Paula; Albano, Rodolpho M.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular methodologies were used to identify 28 Achromobacter spp. from patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) identified 17 Achromobacter xylosoxidans isolates (all blaOXA-114 positive), nine Achromobacter ruhlandii isolates (all blaOXA-114 positive), one Achromobacter dolens isolate, and one Achromobacter insuavis isolate. All less common species were misidentified as A. xylosoxidans by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Chronic colonization by clonally related A. ruhlandii isolates was demonstrated. PMID:26400790

  15. Molecular Characterization of Achromobacter Isolates from Cystic Fibrosis and Non-Cystic Fibrosis Patients in Madrid, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Barrado, Laura; Brañas, Patricia; Orellana, M. Ángeles; Martínez, M. Teresa; García, Gloria; Otero, Joaquín R.

    2013-01-01

    Multilocus sequence typing and nrdA sequence analysis identified 6 different species or genogroups and 13 sequence types (STs) among 15 Achromobacter isolates from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and 7 species or genogroups and 11 STs among 11 isolates from non-CF patients. Achromobacter xylosoxidans was the most frequently isolated species among CF patients. PMID:23536401

  16. Hospital Acquired Pneumonia Due to Achromobacter spp. in a Geriatric Ward in China: Clinical Characteristic, Genome Variability, Biofilm Production, Antibiotic Resistance and Integron in Isolated Strains

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Pan, Fei; Guo, Jun; Yan, Weifeng; Jin, Yi; Liu, Changting; Qin, Long; Fang, Xiangqun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) due to Achromobacter has become a substantial concern in recent years. However, HAP due to Achromobacter in the elderly is rare. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on 15 elderly patients with HAP due to Achromobacter spp., in which the sequence types (STs), integrons, biofilm production and antibiotic resistance of the Achromobacter spp. were examined. Results: The mean age of the 15 elderly patients was 88.8 ± 5.4 years. All patients had at least three underlying diseases and catheters. Clinical outcomes improved in 10 of the 15 patients after antibiotic and/or mechanical ventilation treatment, but three patients had chronic infections lasting more than 1 year. The mortality rate was 33.3% (5/15). All strains were resistant to aminoglycosides, aztreonam, nitrofurantoin, and third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins (except ceftazidime and cefoperazone). Six new STs were detected. The most frequent ST was ST306. ST5 was identified in two separate buildings of the hospital. ST313 showed higher MIC in cephalosporins, quinolones and carbapenems, which should be more closely considered in clinical practice. All strains produced biofilm and had integron I and blaOXA-114-like. The main type was blaOXA-114q. The variable region of integron I was different among strains, and the resistance gene of the aminoglycosides was most commonly inserted in integron I. Additionally, blaPSE-1 was first reported in this isolate. Conclusion: Achromobacter spp. infection often occurs in severely ill elders with underlying diseases. The variable region of integrons differs, suggesting that Achromobacter spp. is a reservoir of various resistance genes. PMID:27242678

  17. Transformation Assay for Identification of Psychrotrophic Achromobacters

    PubMed Central

    Juni, Elliot; Heym, Gloria A.

    1980-01-01

    The finding that many psychrotrophic, gram-negative, nonmotile, oxidase-positive coccobacilli (achromobacters) are competent for genetic transformation made possible the development of a transformation assay that permits recognition of genetically related strains. It has been demonstrated that 109 independently isolated achromobacters are genetically related since deoxyribonucleic acid samples from all of these organisms were able to transform a single competent auxotrophic strain to prototrophy. Genetically interacting bacteria included strains that lacked one or more of the characteristics typical for most achromobacters. An oxidase-negative mutant of one of these strains reacted positively in the transformation assay, unlike other oxidase-negative bacteria. Achromobacters were derived from fish, poultry, irradiated foods, seawater, and other sources. One strain previously classified as Micrococcus cryophilus has been shown to be related to the achromobacters. Two achromobacters had an optimum growth temperature of 35°C and behaved as typical mesophiles. The moraxellae and Acinetobacter were shown to be unrelated to the achromobacters by using the transformation assay. The ready demonstration of genetic relatedness provides a new basis for taxonomic grouping of the psychrotrophic achromobacters. Images PMID:16345673

  18. Genotypic and Phenotypic Applications for the Differentiation and Species-Level Identification of Achromobacter for Clinical Diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Gomila, Margarita; Prince-Manzano, Claudia; Svensson-Stadler, Liselott; Busquets, Antonio; Erhard, Marcel; Martínez, Deny L.; Lalucat, Jorge; Moore, Edward R. B.

    2014-01-01

    The Achromobacter is a genus in the family Alcaligenaceae, comprising fifteen species isolated from different sources, including clinical samples. The ability to detect and correctly identify Achromobacter species, particularly A. xylosoxidans, and differentiate them from other phenotypically similar and genotypically related Gram-negative, aerobic, non-fermenting species is important for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), as well as for nosocomial and other opportunistic infections. Traditional phenotypic profile-based analyses have been demonstrated to be inadequate for reliable identifications of isolates of Achromobacter species and genotypic-based assays, relying upon comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses are not able to insure definitive identifications of Achromobacter species, due to the inherently conserved nature of the gene. The uses of alternative methodologies to enable high-resolution differentiation between the species in the genus are needed. A comparative multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA) of four selected ‘house-keeping’ genes (atpD, gyrB, recA, and rpoB) assessed the individual gene sequences for their potential in developing a reliable, rapid and cost-effective diagnostic protocol for Achromobacter species identifications. The analysis of the type strains of the species of the genus and 46 strains of Achromobacter species showed congruence between the cluster analyses derived from the individual genes. The MLSA gene sequences exhibited different levels of resolution in delineating the validly published Achromobacter species and elucidated strains that represent new genotypes and probable new species of the genus. Our results also suggested that the recently described A. spritinus is a later heterotypic synonym of A. marplatensis. Strains were analyzed, using whole-cell Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-Of-Flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), as an alternative phenotypic profile-based method with the potential to

  19. Isolation and characterization of a new strain of Achromobacter sp. with beta-lactam antibiotic acylase activity.

    PubMed

    Plhácková, K; Becka, S; Skrob, F; Kyslík, P

    2003-10-01

    A bacterial strain producing a beta-lactam antibiotic acylase, able to hydrolyze ampicillin to 6-aminopenicillanic acid more efficiently than penicillin G, was isolated from soil and characterized. The isolate was identified as Achromobacter sp. using the phenotypic characteristics, composition of cellular fatty acids and 16S rRNA gene sequence. The enzyme synthesis was fully induced by phenylacetic acid (PAA) at a concentration of 2 g l(-1). PAA at concentrations up to 12 g l(-1) had no negative effect on the specific activity of acylase and biomass production, but slowed down the specific growth rate. Benzoic or 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acids can also induce synthesis of the enzyme. The inducers were metabolized in all cases. Acylase activity in cell-free extracts was determined with various substrates; ampicillin, cephalexin and amoxicillin were hydrolyzed 1.5- and 2-times faster than penicillin G. A high stability of acylase activity was observed over a wide range of pH (5.0-8.5) and at temperatures above 55 degrees C. PMID:12827318

  20. Achromobacter denitrificans Strain YD35 Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Controls NADH Production To Allow Tolerance to Extremely High Nitrite Levels

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Yuki; Shimizu, Motoyuki; Fujita, Tomoya; Nakamura, Akira; Takizawa, Noboru

    2014-01-01

    We identified the extremely nitrite-tolerant bacterium Achromobacter denitrificans YD35 that can grow in complex medium containing 100 mM nitrite (NO2−) under aerobic conditions. Nitrite induced global proteomic changes and upregulated tricarboxylate (TCA) cycle enzymes as well as antioxidant proteins in YD35. Transposon mutagenesis generated NO2−-hypersensitive mutants of YD35 that had mutations at genes for aconitate hydratase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase in the TCA cycle and a pyruvate dehydrogenase (Pdh) E1 component, indicating the importance of TCA cycle metabolism to NO2− tolerance. A mutant in which the pdh gene cluster was disrupted (Δpdh mutant) could not grow in the presence of 100 mM NO2−. Nitrite decreased the cellular NADH/NAD+ ratio and the cellular ATP level. These defects were more severe in the Δpdh mutant, indicating that Pdh contributes to upregulating cellular NADH and ATP and NO2−-tolerant growth. Exogenous acetate, which generates acetyl coenzyme A and then is metabolized by the TCA cycle, compensated for these defects caused by disruption of the pdh gene cluster and those caused by NO2−. These findings demonstrate a link between NO2− tolerance and pyruvate/acetate metabolism through the TCA cycle. The TCA cycle mechanism in YD35 enhances NADH production, and we consider that this contributes to a novel NO2−-tolerating mechanism in this strain. PMID:24413603

  1. Unstable generalized transduction in Achromobacter.

    PubMed

    Woods, D R; Thomson, J A

    1975-05-01

    Six auxotrophic markers of a halotolerant collagenolytic strain of Achromobacter were transduced by four alpha hages. Abortive transduction was also demonstrated. The generalized transduction system is unusual as the transductants were unstable, characteristic of transduction by lysogeny. The Achromobacter strain is a cryptic lysogen for alpha and purified transductants were either sensitive or resistant to alpha. Purified clones from four resistant transductants and one sensitive transductant liberated phage spontaneously. The host ranges of these spontaneous phage differed from that of the alpha phage used for the transduction experiment. Some initially resistant transductants became simi-sensitive to alpha (efficiency to plating) e.o.p. (10minus-1 to 10minus-2) after repeated cloning.

  2. Novel cyanide-hydrolyzing enzyme from Alcaligenes xylosoxidans subsp. denitrificans.

    PubMed Central

    Ingvorsen, K; Højer-Pedersen, B; Godtfredsen, S E

    1991-01-01

    A cyanide-metabolizing bacterium, strain DF3, isolated from soil was identified as Alcaligenes xylosoxidans subsp. denitrificans. Whole cells and cell extracts of strain DF3 catalyzed hydrolysis of cyanide to formate and ammonia (HCN + 2H2O----HCOOH + NH3) without forming formamide as a free intermediate. The cyanide-hydrolyzing activity was inducibly produced in cells during growth in cyanide-containing media. Cyanate (OCN-) and a wide range of aliphatic and aromatic nitriles were not hydrolyzed by intact cells of A. xylosoxidans subsp. denitrificans DF3. Strain DF3 hydrolyzed cyanide with great efficacy. Thus, by using resting induced cells at a concentration of 11.3 mg (dry weight) per ml, the cyanide concentration could be reduced from 0.97 M (approximately 25,220 ppm) to less than 77 nM (approximately 0.002 ppm) in 55 h. Enzyme purification established that cyanide hydrolysis by A. xylosoxidans subsp. denitrificans DF3 was due to a single intracellular enzyme. The soluble enzyme was purified approximately 160-fold, and the first 25 NH2-terminal amino acids were determined by automated Edman degradation. The molecular mass of the active enzyme (purity, greater than 97% as determined by amino acid sequencing) was estimated to be greater than 300,000 Da. The cyanide-hydrolyzing enzyme of A. xylosoxidans subsp. denitrificans DF3 was tentatively named cyanidase to distinguish it from known nitrilases (EC 3.5.5.1) which act on organic nitriles. Images PMID:1872607

  3. Achromobacter sediminum sp. nov., isolated from deep subseafloor sediment of South Pacific Gyre.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zenghu; Fan, Xiaoyang; Gao, Xin; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2014-07-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped, motile bacterium with a subpolar or lateral flagellum, designated strain XH089(T), was isolated from deep-sea sediment sample collected from the South Pacific Gyre (41°51' S 153°06' W) during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 329. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain XH089(T) belonged to the genus Achromobacter and showed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities with Achromobacter ruhlandii ATCC 15749(T) (96.95%), Achromobacter denitrificans DSM 30026(T) (96.70%) and Achromobacter marplatensis B2(T) (96.66%). The DNA G+C content of strain XH089(T) was 66.5 mol%. The major fatty acids were C16: 0 and C17: 0 cyclo. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, three unknown phospholipids and four unknown polar lipids. On the basis of data from the polyphasic analysis, strain XH089(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Achromobacter, for which the name Achromobacter sediminum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is XH089(T) ( = DSM 27279(T) = JCM 19223(T)). PMID:24711589

  4. Achromobacter sediminum sp. nov., isolated from deep subseafloor sediment of South Pacific Gyre.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zenghu; Fan, Xiaoyang; Gao, Xin; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2014-07-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped, motile bacterium with a subpolar or lateral flagellum, designated strain XH089(T), was isolated from deep-sea sediment sample collected from the South Pacific Gyre (41°51' S 153°06' W) during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 329. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain XH089(T) belonged to the genus Achromobacter and showed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities with Achromobacter ruhlandii ATCC 15749(T) (96.95%), Achromobacter denitrificans DSM 30026(T) (96.70%) and Achromobacter marplatensis B2(T) (96.66%). The DNA G+C content of strain XH089(T) was 66.5 mol%. The major fatty acids were C16: 0 and C17: 0 cyclo. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, three unknown phospholipids and four unknown polar lipids. On the basis of data from the polyphasic analysis, strain XH089(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Achromobacter, for which the name Achromobacter sediminum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is XH089(T) ( = DSM 27279(T) = JCM 19223(T)).

  5. Alcaligenes xylosoxidans endophthalmitis following phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation.

    PubMed

    Robert, Pierre-Yves; Chainier, Delphine; Garnier, Fabien; Ploy, Marie-Cécile; Parneix, Pierre; Adenis, Jean-Paul; Martin, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Five consecutive cases of endophthalmitis that developed after cataract extraction by a single surgeon using the same operating room during one morning session are described. Following preoperative topical administration of ciprofloxacin, surgery consisted of phacoemulsification with peristaltic pump and fluid venting, polymethylmethacrylate intraocular lens implantation, and corneal suture. No complications occurred during surgery. All five patients developed endophthalmitis caused by infection with Alcaligenes xylosoxidans in less than 24 hours. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to prove similarity between strains. Bacterial inquiry on contamination of the operating room environment revealed massive colonization of phacoemulsifier irrigation channels by Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria from an unestablished source. Four of the five patients ultimately recovered visual acuity better than 20/60.

  6. Stenotrophomonas, Achromobacter, and nonmelioid Burkholderia species: antimicrobial resistance and therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Iain J; Peleg, Anton Y

    2015-02-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Achromobacter xylosoxidans, and nonmelioid Burkholderia species, namely, Burkholderia cepacia complex, collectively are a group of troublesome nonfermenters. Although not inherently virulent organisms, these environmental Gram negatives can complicate treatment in those who are immunocompromised, critically ill in the intensive care unit and those patients with suppurative lung disease, such as cystic fibrosis. Through a range of intrinsic antimicrobial resistance mechanisms, virulence factors, and the ability to survive in biofilms, these opportunistic pathogens are well suited to persist, both in the environment and the host. Treatment recommendations are hindered by the difficulties in laboratory identification, the lack of reproducibility of antimicrobial susceptibility testing, the lack of clinical breakpoints, and the absence of clinical outcome data. Despite trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole often being the mainstay of treatment, resistance is widely encountered, and alternative regimens, including combination therapy, are often used. This review will highlight the important aspects and unique challenges that these three nonfermenters pose, and, in the absence of clinical outcome data, our therapeutic recommendations will be based on reported antimicrobial susceptibility and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profiles.

  7. Distribution of glyphosate and methylphosphonate catabolism systems in soil bacteria Ochrobactrum anthropi and Achromobacter sp.

    PubMed

    Sviridov, Alexey V; Shushkova, Tatyana V; Zelenkova, Nina F; Vinokurova, Natalya G; Morgunov, Igor G; Ermakova, Inna T; Leontievsky, Alexey A

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial strains capable of utilizing methylphosphonic acid (MP) or glyphosate (GP) as the sole sources of phosphorus were isolated from soils contaminated with these organophosphonates. The strains isolated from MP-contaminated soils grew on MP and failed to grow on GP. One group of the isolates from GP-contaminated soils grew only on MP, while the other one grew on MP and GP. Strains Achromobacter sp. MPS 12 (VKM B-2694), MP degraders group, and Ochrobactrum anthropi GPK 3 (VKM B-2554D), GP degraders group, demonstrated the best degradative capabilities towards MP and GP, respectively, and were studied for the distribution of their organophosphonate catabolism systems. In Achromobacter sp. MPS 12, degradation of MP was catalyzed by C-P lyase incapable of degrading GP (C-P lyase I). Adaptation to growth on GP yielded the strain Achromobacter sp. MPS 12A, which retained its ability to degrade MP via C-P lyase I and was capable of degrading GP with formation of sarcosine, thus suggesting the involvement of a GP-specific C-P lyase II. O. anthropi GPK 3 also degraded MP via C-P lyase I, but degradation of GP in it was initiated by glyphosate oxidoreductase, which was followed by product transformation via the phosphonatase pathway.

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Achromobacter sp. clonal selection leads to successive waves of contamination of water in dental care units.

    PubMed

    Abdouchakour, Fatima; Dupont, Chloé; Grau, Delphine; Aujoulat, Fabien; Mournetas, Patricia; Marchandin, Hélène; Parer, Sylvie; Gibert, Philippe; Valcarcel, Jean; Jumas-Bilak, Estelle

    2015-11-01

    Dental care unit waterlines (DCUWs) consist of complex networks of thin tubes that facilitate the formation of microbial biofilms. Due to the predilection toward a wet environment, strong adhesion, biofilm formation, and resistance to biocides, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a major human opportunistic pathogen, is adapted to DCUW colonization. Other nonfermentative Gram-negative bacilli, such as members of the genus Achromobacter, are emerging pathogens found in water networks. We reported the 6.5-year dynamics of bacterial contamination of waterlines in a dental health care center with 61 dental care units (DCUs) connected to the same water supply system. The conditions allowed the selection and the emergence of clones of Achromobacter sp. and P. aeruginosa characterized by multilocus sequence typing, multiplex repetitive elements-based PCR, and restriction fragment length polymorphism in pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, biofilm formation, and antimicrobial susceptibility. One clone of P. aeruginosa and 2 clones of Achromobacter sp. colonized successively all of the DCUWs: the last colonization by P. aeruginosa ST309 led to the closing of the dental care center. Successive dominance of species and clones was linked to biocide treatments. Achromobacter strains were weak biofilm producers compared to P. aeruginosa ST309, but the coculture of P. aeruginosa and Achromobacter enhanced P. aeruginosa ST309 biofilm formation. Intraclonal genomic microevolution was observed in the isolates of P. aeruginosa ST309 collected chronologically and in Achromobacter sp. clone A. The contamination control was achieved by a complete reorganization of the dental health care center by removing the connecting tubes between DCUs. PMID:26296724

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Achromobacter sp. Clonal Selection Leads to Successive Waves of Contamination of Water in Dental Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Abdouchakour, Fatima; Dupont, Chloé; Grau, Delphine; Aujoulat, Fabien; Mournetas, Patricia; Marchandin, Hélène; Parer, Sylvie; Gibert, Philippe; Valcarcel, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Dental care unit waterlines (DCUWs) consist of complex networks of thin tubes that facilitate the formation of microbial biofilms. Due to the predilection toward a wet environment, strong adhesion, biofilm formation, and resistance to biocides, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a major human opportunistic pathogen, is adapted to DCUW colonization. Other nonfermentative Gram-negative bacilli, such as members of the genus Achromobacter, are emerging pathogens found in water networks. We reported the 6.5-year dynamics of bacterial contamination of waterlines in a dental health care center with 61 dental care units (DCUs) connected to the same water supply system. The conditions allowed the selection and the emergence of clones of Achromobacter sp. and P. aeruginosa characterized by multilocus sequence typing, multiplex repetitive elements-based PCR, and restriction fragment length polymorphism in pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, biofilm formation, and antimicrobial susceptibility. One clone of P. aeruginosa and 2 clones of Achromobacter sp. colonized successively all of the DCUWs: the last colonization by P. aeruginosa ST309 led to the closing of the dental care center. Successive dominance of species and clones was linked to biocide treatments. Achromobacter strains were weak biofilm producers compared to P. aeruginosa ST309, but the coculture of P. aeruginosa and Achromobacter enhanced P. aeruginosa ST309 biofilm formation. Intraclonal genomic microevolution was observed in the isolates of P. aeruginosa ST309 collected chronologically and in Achromobacter sp. clone A. The contamination control was achieved by a complete reorganization of the dental health care center by removing the connecting tubes between DCUs. PMID:26296724

  10. A preliminary neutron diffraction analysis of Achromobacter protease I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Yuki; Masaki, Takeharu; Yamada, Taro; Kurihara, Kazuo; Tanaka, Ichiro; Niimura, Nobuo

    2010-11-01

    Achromobacter protease I (API, E.C. 3.4.21.50) is one of the serine proteases produced by Achromobacter lyticus M497-1. API is distinct from the other tripsin type protease in its lysine specificity. The neutron structure analysis of catalytic triad with Trp169 and His210 was presented. His57 was double protonated and formed hydrogen bonds to Ser194Oγ and Asp113Oδ1, Oδ2.

  11. Efficient biodegradation of naphthalene by a newly characterized indigenous Achromobacter sp. FBHYA2 isolated from Tehran Oil Refinery Complex.

    PubMed

    Farjadfard, Sima; Borghei, Seyyed Mehdi; Hassani, Amir Hessam; Yakhchali, Bagher; Ardjmand, Mehdi; Zeinali, Majid

    2012-01-01

    A bacterial strain, FBHYA2, capable of degrading naphthalene, was isolated from the American Petroleum Institute (API) separator of the Tehran Oil Refinery Complex (TORC). Strain FBHYA2 was identified as Achromobacter sp. based on physiological and biochemical characteristics and also phylogenetic similarity of 16S rRNA gene sequence. The optimal growth conditions for strain FBHYA2 were pH 6.0, 30 °C and 1.0% NaCl. Strain FBHYA2 can utilize naphthalene as the sole source of carbon and energy and was able to degrade naphthalene aerobically very fast, 48 h for 96% removal at 500 mg/L concentration. The physiological response of Achromobacter sp., FBHYA2 to several hydrophobic chemicals (aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons) was also investigated. No biosurfactant was detected during bacterial growth on any aliphatic/aromatic hydrocarbons. The results of hydrophobicity measurements showed no significant difference between naphthalene- and LB-grown cells. The capability of the strain FBHYA2 to degrade naphthalene completely and rapidly without the need to secrete biosurfactant may make it an ideal candidate to remediate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated sites. PMID:22744691

  12. OXA-258 from Achromobacter ruhlandii: a Species-Specific Marker

    PubMed Central

    Papalia, Mariana; Almuzara, Marisa; Cejas, Daniela; Traglia, German; Ramírez, Maria Soledad; Galanternik, Laura; Vay, Carlos; Radice, Marcela

    2013-01-01

    A new blaOXA-258 gene is described as a species-specific taxonomic marker for Achromobacter ruhlandii isolates (all recovered from cystic fibrosis patients). Even though OXA-258 differs from OXA-114 variants, isolates could be misidentified as A. xiloxosidans by the amplification of an inner fragment from the OXA-coding gene. A robust identification of A. ruhlandii can be achieved by sequencing this single OXA gene, as well as by a more laborious recently proposed multilocus sequence-typing (MLST) scheme. PMID:23467601

  13. Cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of Achromobacter protease I gene.

    PubMed

    Ohara, T; Makino, K; Shinagawa, H; Nakata, A; Norioka, S; Sakiyama, F

    1989-12-01

    Achromobacter protease I (API) is a lysine-specific serine protease which hydrolyzes specifically the lysyl peptide bond. A gene coding for API was cloned from Achromobacter lyticus M497-1. Nucleotide sequence of the cloned DNA fragment revealed that the gene coded for a single polypeptide chain of 653 amino acids. The N-terminal 205 amino acids, including signal peptide and the threonine/serine-rich C-terminal 180 amino acids are flanking the 268 amino acid-mature protein which was identified by protein sequencing. Escherichia coli carrying a plasmid containing the cloned API gene overproduced and secreted a protein of Mr 50,000 (API') into the periplasm. This protein exhibited a distinct endopeptidase activity specific for lysyl bonds as well. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of API' was the same as mature API, suggesting that the enzyme retained the C-terminal extended peptide chain. The present experiments indicate that API, an extracellular protease produced by gram-negative bacteria, is synthesized in vivo as a precursor protein bearing long extended peptide chains at both N and C termini. PMID:2684982

  14. Evidence for cooperative mineralization of diuron by Arthrobacter sp. BS2 and Achromobacter sp. SP1 isolated from a mixed culture enriched from diuron exposed environments.

    PubMed

    Devers-Lamrani, Marion; Pesce, Stéphane; Rouard, Nadine; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice

    2014-12-01

    Diuron was found to be mineralized in buffer strip soil (BS) and in the sediments (SED) of the Morcille river in the Beaujolais vineyard repeatedly treated with this herbicide. Enrichment cultures from BS and SED samples led to the isolation of three bacterial strains transforming diuron to 3,4-dichloroaniline (3,4-DCA) its aniline derivative. 16S rRNA sequencing revealed that they belonged to the genus Arthrobacter (99% of similarity to Arthrobacter globiformis strain K01-01) and were designated as Arthrobacter sp. BS1, BS2 and SED1. Diuron-degrading potential characterized by sequencing of the puhA gene, characterizing the diuron-degradaing potential, revealed 99% similarity to A. globiformis strain D47 puhA gene isolated a decade ago in the UK. These isolates were also able to use chlorotoluron for their growth. Although able to degrade linuron and monolinuron to related aniline derivatives they were not growing on them. Enrichment cultures led to the isolation of a strain from the sediments entirely degrading 3,4-DCA. 16S rRNA sequence analysis showed that it was affiliated to the genus Achromobacter (99% of similarity to Achromobacter sp. CH1) and was designated as Achromobacter sp. SP1. The dcaQ gene encoding enzyme responsible for the transformation of 3,4-DCA to chlorocatechol was found in SP1 with 99% similarity to that of Comamonas testosteroni WDL7. This isolate also used for its growth a range of anilines (3-chloro-4-methyl-aniline, 4-isopropylaniline, 4-chloroaniline, 3-chloroaniline, 4-bromoaniline). The mixed culture composed of BS2 and SP1 strains entirely mineralizes (14)C-diuron to (14)CO2. Diuron-mineralization observed in the enrichment culture could result from the metabolic cooperation between these two populations. PMID:25061887

  15. Achromobacter Species Isolated from Cystic Fibrosis Patients Reveal Distinctly Different Biofilm Morphotypes.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Signe M; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Meyer, Rikke L

    2016-01-01

    Achromobacter species have attracted attention as emerging pathogens in cystic fibrosis. The clinical significance of Achromobacter infection is not yet fully elucidated; however, their intrinsic resistance to antimicrobials and ability to form biofilms renders them capable of establishing long-term chronic infections. Still, many aspects of Achromobacter biofilm formation remain uncharacterized. In this study, we characterized biofilm formation in clinical isolates of Achromobacter and investigated the effect of challenging the biofilm with antimicrobials and/or enzymes targeting the extracellular matrix. In vitro biofilm growth and subsequent visualization by confocal microscopy revealed distinctly different biofilm morphotypes: a surface-attached biofilm morphotype of small aggregates and an unattached biofilm morphotype of large suspended aggregates. Aggregates consistent with our in vitro findings were visualized in sputum samples from cystic fibrosis patients using an Achromobacter specific peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) probe, confirming the presence of Achromobacter biofilms in the CF lung. High antibiotic tolerance was associated with the biofilm phenotype, and biocidal antibiotic concentrations were up to 1000 fold higher than for planktonic cultures. Treatment with DNase or subtilisin partially dispersed the biofilm and reduced the tolerance to specific antimicrobials, paving the way for further research into using dispersal mechanisms to improve treatment strategies. PMID:27681927

  16. Achromobacter Species Isolated from Cystic Fibrosis Patients Reveal Distinctly Different Biofilm Morphotypes

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Signe M.; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Meyer, Rikke L.

    2016-01-01

    Achromobacter species have attracted attention as emerging pathogens in cystic fibrosis. The clinical significance of Achromobacter infection is not yet fully elucidated; however, their intrinsic resistance to antimicrobials and ability to form biofilms renders them capable of establishing long-term chronic infections. Still, many aspects of Achromobacter biofilm formation remain uncharacterized. In this study, we characterized biofilm formation in clinical isolates of Achromobacter and investigated the effect of challenging the biofilm with antimicrobials and/or enzymes targeting the extracellular matrix. In vitro biofilm growth and subsequent visualization by confocal microscopy revealed distinctly different biofilm morphotypes: a surface-attached biofilm morphotype of small aggregates and an unattached biofilm morphotype of large suspended aggregates. Aggregates consistent with our in vitro findings were visualized in sputum samples from cystic fibrosis patients using an Achromobacter specific peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) probe, confirming the presence of Achromobacter biofilms in the CF lung. High antibiotic tolerance was associated with the biofilm phenotype, and biocidal antibiotic concentrations were up to 1000 fold higher than for planktonic cultures. Treatment with DNase or subtilisin partially dispersed the biofilm and reduced the tolerance to specific antimicrobials, paving the way for further research into using dispersal mechanisms to improve treatment strategies. PMID:27681927

  17. Achromobacter Species Isolated from Cystic Fibrosis Patients Reveal Distinctly Different Biofilm Morphotypes

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Signe M.; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Meyer, Rikke L.

    2016-01-01

    Achromobacter species have attracted attention as emerging pathogens in cystic fibrosis. The clinical significance of Achromobacter infection is not yet fully elucidated; however, their intrinsic resistance to antimicrobials and ability to form biofilms renders them capable of establishing long-term chronic infections. Still, many aspects of Achromobacter biofilm formation remain uncharacterized. In this study, we characterized biofilm formation in clinical isolates of Achromobacter and investigated the effect of challenging the biofilm with antimicrobials and/or enzymes targeting the extracellular matrix. In vitro biofilm growth and subsequent visualization by confocal microscopy revealed distinctly different biofilm morphotypes: a surface-attached biofilm morphotype of small aggregates and an unattached biofilm morphotype of large suspended aggregates. Aggregates consistent with our in vitro findings were visualized in sputum samples from cystic fibrosis patients using an Achromobacter specific peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) probe, confirming the presence of Achromobacter biofilms in the CF lung. High antibiotic tolerance was associated with the biofilm phenotype, and biocidal antibiotic concentrations were up to 1000 fold higher than for planktonic cultures. Treatment with DNase or subtilisin partially dispersed the biofilm and reduced the tolerance to specific antimicrobials, paving the way for further research into using dispersal mechanisms to improve treatment strategies.

  18. Delivery of benzene to Alcaligenes xylosoxidans by solid polymers in a two-phase partitioning bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Daugulis, Andrew J; Amsden, Brian G; Bochanysz, Justina; Kayssi, Ahmed

    2003-07-01

    Toxic levels of benzene were decreased to sub-inhibitory levels in a bioreactor via absorption by polymer beads or cylinders (poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) or poly(styrene-co-butadiene)). After inoculation with Alcaligenes xylosoxidans, the remaining benzene in the aqueous phase as well as the benzene taken up by the polymers was degraded to completion. The capacity of these polymers for benzene, and benzene diffusivity within the polymers were also determined.

  19. Characterization of the transcriptome of Achromobacter sp. HZ01 with the outstanding hydrocarbon-degrading ability.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yue-Hui; Deng, Mao-Cheng; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Wu, Chou-Fei; Xiao, Xi; Zhu, Qing; Sun, Xian-Xian; Zhou, Qian-Zhi; Peng, Juan; Yuan, Jian-Ping; Wang, Jiang-Hai

    2016-06-15

    Microbial remediation has become one of the most important strategies for eliminating petroleum pollutants. Revealing the transcript maps of microorganisms with the hydrocarbon-degrading ability contributes to enhance the degradation of hydrocarbons and further improve the effectiveness of bioremediation. In this study, we characterized the transcriptome of hydrocarbon-degrading Achromobacter sp. HZ01 after petroleum treatment for 16h. A total of 38,706,280 and 38,954,413 clean reads were obtained by RNA-seq for the petroleum-treated group and control, respectively. By an effective de novo assembly, 3597 unigenes were obtained, including 3485 annotated transcripts. Petroleum treatment had significantly influenced the transcriptional profile of strain HZ01, involving 742 differentially expressed genes. A part of genes were activated to exert specific physiological functions, whereas more genes were down-regulated including specific genes related to cell motility, genes associated with glycometabolism, and genes coding for ribosomal proteins. Identification of genes related to petroleum degradation revealed that the fatty acid metabolic pathway and a part of monooxygenases and dehydrogenases were activated, whereas the TCA cycle was inactive. Additionally, terminal oxidation might be a major aerobic pathway for the degradation of n-alkanes in strain HZ01. The newly obtained data contribute to better understand the gene expression profiles of hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms after petroleum treatment, to further investigate the genetic characteristics of strain HZ01 and other related species and to develop cost-effective and eco-friendly strategies for remediation of crude oil-polluted environments.

  20. The heavy metal tolerant soil bacterium Achromobacter sp. AO22 contains a unique copper homeostasis locus and two mer operons.

    PubMed

    Ng, Shee Ping; Palombo, Enzo A; Bhave, Mrinal

    2012-06-01

    Copper-containing compounds are introduced into the environment through agricultural chemicals, mining, and metal industries and cause severe detrimental effects on ecosystems. Certain microorganisms exposed to these stressors exhibit molecular mechanisms to maintain intracellular copper homeostasis and avoid toxicity. We have previously reported that the soil bacterial isolate Achromobacter sp. AO22 is multi-heavy metal tolerant and exhibits a mer operon associated with a Tn21 type transposon. The present study reports that AO22 also hosts a unique cop locus encoding copper homeostasis determinants. The putative cop genes were amplified from the strain AO22 using degenerate primers based on reported cop and pco sequences, and a constructed 10,552 base pair contig (GenBank Accession No. GU929214). BLAST analyses of the sequence revealed a unique cop locus of 10 complete open reading frames, designated copSRABGOFCDK, with unusual separation of copCD from copAB. The promoter areas exhibit two putative cop boxes, and copRS appear to be transcribed divergently from other genes. The putative protein CopA may be a copper oxidase involved in export to the periplasm, CopB is likely extracytoplasmic, CopC may be periplasmic, CopD is cytoplasmic/ inner membrane, CopF is a P-type ATPase, and CopG, CopO, and CopK are likely copper chaperones. CopA, B, C, and D exhibit several potential copper ligands and CopS and CopR exhibit features of two-component regulatory systems. Sequences flanking indicate the AO22 cop locus may be present within a genomic island. Achromobacter sp. strain AO22 is thus an ideal candidate for understanding copper homeostasis mechanisms and exploiting them for copper biosensor or biosorption systems. PMID:22573150

  1. Pseudomonads and Achromobacters in the Spoilage of Irradiated Haddock of Different Preirradiation Quality

    PubMed Central

    Laycock, R. A.; Regier, L. W.

    1970-01-01

    The effect of initial quality of fish on postirradiation (100 krad) changes in the bacterial flora of haddock fillets during aerobic storage at 3 C has been investigated, with emphasis on the Pseudomonas and Achromobacter groups. The quality was related to the length of time the eviscerated fish had been stored in ice prior to filleting. Increased numbers of organisms, in particular Pseudomonas putrefaciens, were found initially on fillets cut from older fish. Pseudomonads were reduced by 2 to 3 log orders by irradiation, and achromobacters and gram-positive isolates predominated in the immediate postirradiation flora. Little difference could be detected in either types or relative proportions of organisms occurring during storage of unirradiated fish of different quality. Pseudomonads outgrew achromobacters and dominated the spoilage flora in all cases. After spoilage, however, the growth rate of pseudomonads declined markedly. In irradiated fish, achromobacters predominated throughout storage. In fish of better initial quality, bacterial numbers were 1 to 2 log orders higher at spoilage than in their unirradiated counterparts and in the poorer quality of irradiated samples. The increased number of organisms was accompanied by a radical change in the character of the predominant achromobacters. Pseudomonads were found to increase in numbers during storage of irradiated fish, in particular in poorer quality fish on which they were initially present in higher numbers. Detection of pseudomonads, even when present in high numbers, was found to be limited by the identification techniques normally used. PMID:16349884

  2. Bioflocculant production and biosorption of zinc and lead by a novel bacterial species, Achromobacter sp. TERI-IASST N, isolated from oil refinery waste.

    PubMed

    Subudhi, Sanjukta; Batta, Neha; Pathak, Mihirjyoti; Bisht, Varsha; Devi, Arundhuti; Lal, Banwari; Al khulifah, Bader

    2014-10-01

    A bioflocculant-producing bacterial isolate designated as 'TERI-IASST N' was isolated from activated sludge samples collected from an oil refinery. This isolate demonstrated maximum bioflocculation activity (74%) from glucose among 15 different bioflocculant-producing bacterial strains isolated from the sludge samples and identified as Achromobacter sp. based on 16S rRNA gene sequence. Optimization of pH and supplementation of urea as nitrogen source in the production medium enhanced the flocculation activity of strain TERI-IASST N to 84% (at pH 6). This strain revealed maximum flocculation activity (90%) from sucrose compared to the flocculation activity observed from other carbon sources as investigated (glucose, lactose, fructose, maltose and starch). Ca(2+) served as the suitable divalent cation for maximum bioflocculation activity of TERI-IASST strain N. Maximum flocculation activity was observed at optimum C/N ratio of 1. Flocculation activity of this strain decreased to 75% in the presence of heavy metals; Zn, Pb, Ni, Cu and Cd. In addition strain N revealed considerable biosorption of Zn (430mgL(-1)) and Pb (30mgL(-1)). Bioflocculant yield of strain N was 10.5gL(-1). Fourier transform infrared spectrum indicated the presence of carboxyl, hydroxyl, and amino groups, typical of glycoprotein. Spectroscopic analysis of bioflocculant by nuclear magnetic resonance revealed that it is a glycoprotein, consisting of 57% total sugar and 13% protein.

  3. Achromobacter denitrificans SP1 produces pharmaceutically active 25C prodigiosin upon utilizing hazardous di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, S; Sarath Josh, M K; Balachandran, S; Sudha Devi, R; Sadasivam, R; Thirugnanam, P E; Doble, Mukesh; Anderson, Robin C; Benjamin, Sailas

    2014-11-01

    This first report describes the purification and identification of an orange-red pigment produced by Achromobacter denitrificans strain SP1 (isolated from sewage sludge heavily contaminated with plastics) during its growth in a simple basal salt medium supplemented with the hazardous di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) blended in PVC blood bag (in situ) or free DEHP (ex situ) as carbon source. The cell-bound pigment was elucidated, characterized at molecular level, and described as an unusual 25C prodigiosin analog for the first time. At laboratory conditions (in flasks), the dry cell mass was 75.2mg/g blood bag, which upon extraction yielded 7.1mg prodigiosin; at this stage the pH of the medium was dropped from 7.2 to 3.5. Considering its pharmaceutical importance, taking 10 known prodigiosins as controls, this 25C prodigiosin was subjected to molecular docking studies, showed comparable and promising binding efficiencies with the crucial molecular human targets like cycloxygenase-2, ZAP-70 kinase and Jak-3 kinase.

  4. Taxonomic Significance of Phenethyl Alcohol Production by Achromobacter Isolates from Fishery Sources1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, T. C.; Levin, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The formation of phenethyl alcohol from L-phenylalanine and ethanol by achromobacter isolates of fishery origin was found to be taxonomically significant for such organisms. Phenylpyruvate, the direct oxidative deamination product of L-phenylalanine, was found to serve as an intermediate precursor to phenethyl alcohol formation. Among ten Acinetobacter isolates examined, none produced phenethyl alcohol. Among nine Moraxella isolates examined, one produced phenethyl alcohol. PMID:4422523

  5. Bioaugmentation with Endophytic Bacterium E6S Homologous to Achromobacter piechaudii Enhances Metal Rhizoaccumulation in Host Sedum plumbizincicola

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ying; Zhang, Chang; Oliveira, Rui S.; Freitas, Helena; Luo, Yongming

    2016-01-01

    Application of hyperaccumulator-endophyte symbiotic systems is a potential approach to improve phytoremediation efficiency, since some beneficial endophytic bacteria are able to detoxify heavy metals, alter metal solubility in soil, and facilitate plant growth. The objective of this study was to isolate multi-metal resistant and plant beneficial endophytic bacteria and to evaluate their role in enhancing plant growth and metal accumulation/translocation. The metal resistant endophytic bacterial strain E6S was isolated from stems of the Zn/Cd hyperaccumulator plant Sedum plumbizincicola growing in metalliferous mine soils using Dworkin and Foster salts minimal agar medium with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) as the sole nitrogen source, and identified as homologous to Achromobacter piechaudii based on morphological and biochemical characteristics, partial 16S rDNA sequence and phylogenetic analysis. Strain E6S showed high level of resistance to various metals (Cd, Zn, and Pb). Besides utilizing ACC, strain E6S exhibited plant beneficial traits, such as solubilization of phosphate and production of indole-3-acetic acid. Inoculation with E6S significantly increased the bioavailability of Cd, Zn, and Pb in soil. In addition, bacterial cells bound considerable amounts of metal ions in the following order: Zn > Cd >Pb. Inoculation of E6S significantly stimulated plant biomass, uptake and bioaccumulation of Cd, Zn, and Pb. However, E6S greatly reduced the root to shoot translocation of Cd and Zn, indicating that bacterial inoculation assisted the host plant to uptake and store heavy metals in its root system. Inoculation with the endophytic bacterium E6S homologous to A. piechaudii can improve phytostabilization of metalliferous soils due to its effective ability to enhance in situ metal rhizoaccumulation in plants. PMID:26870079

  6. Bioaugmentation with Endophytic Bacterium E6S Homologous to Achromobacter piechaudii Enhances Metal Rhizoaccumulation in Host Sedum plumbizincicola.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ying; Zhang, Chang; Oliveira, Rui S; Freitas, Helena; Luo, Yongming

    2016-01-01

    Application of hyperaccumulator-endophyte symbiotic systems is a potential approach to improve phytoremediation efficiency, since some beneficial endophytic bacteria are able to detoxify heavy metals, alter metal solubility in soil, and facilitate plant growth. The objective of this study was to isolate multi-metal resistant and plant beneficial endophytic bacteria and to evaluate their role in enhancing plant growth and metal accumulation/translocation. The metal resistant endophytic bacterial strain E6S was isolated from stems of the Zn/Cd hyperaccumulator plant Sedum plumbizincicola growing in metalliferous mine soils using Dworkin and Foster salts minimal agar medium with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) as the sole nitrogen source, and identified as homologous to Achromobacter piechaudii based on morphological and biochemical characteristics, partial 16S rDNA sequence and phylogenetic analysis. Strain E6S showed high level of resistance to various metals (Cd, Zn, and Pb). Besides utilizing ACC, strain E6S exhibited plant beneficial traits, such as solubilization of phosphate and production of indole-3-acetic acid. Inoculation with E6S significantly increased the bioavailability of Cd, Zn, and Pb in soil. In addition, bacterial cells bound considerable amounts of metal ions in the following order: Zn > Cd >Pb. Inoculation of E6S significantly stimulated plant biomass, uptake and bioaccumulation of Cd, Zn, and Pb. However, E6S greatly reduced the root to shoot translocation of Cd and Zn, indicating that bacterial inoculation assisted the host plant to uptake and store heavy metals in its root system. Inoculation with the endophytic bacterium E6S homologous to A. piechaudii can improve phytostabilization of metalliferous soils due to its effective ability to enhance in situ metal rhizoaccumulation in plants. PMID:26870079

  7. Efficacy of polysaccharide from Alcaligenes xylosoxidans MSA3 administration as protection against γ-radiation in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Amal I.; Ghoneim, Mona A. M.; Mahmoud, Manal G.; Asker, Mohsen M. S.; Mohamed, Saher S.

    2016-01-01

    Damage to normal tissues is a consequence of both therapeutic and accidental exposures to ionizing radiation. A water-soluble heteropolysaccharide called AXEPS, composed of glucose, galactose, rhamnose and glucouronic acid in a molar ratio of nearly 1.0:1.6:0.4:2.3, respectively, was isolated from culture medium of strain Alcaligenes xylosoxidans MSA3 by ethanol precipitation followed by freeze-drying. Chemical analysis, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) and chromatographic studies revealed that the molecular weight was 1.6 × 104 g mol−1. This study was designed to investigate the radioprotective and biological effects of AXEPS in alleviating the toxicity of ionizing radiation in female albino rats. A total of 32 female albino rats were divided into four groups. In the control group, rats were administered vehicle by tube for four weeks. The second group was administered AXEPS (100 mg/kg) orally by gavage for four weeks. Animals in the third group were exposed to whole-body γ-rays (5 Gy) and remained for 2 weeks without treatment. The fourth group received AXEPS (100 mg/kg) orally by gavage for two weeks before being exposed to whole-body γ-rays (5 Gy), then 24 h post γ-rays, they received AXEPS (100 mg/kg) in a treatment continuing till the end of the experiment (15 days after the whole–body γ-irradiation). Oral administration of AXEPS (100 mg/kg) significantly reversed the oxidative stress effects of radiation, as evidenced by the decrease in DNA damage in the bone marrow. Assessment of apoptosis and cell proliferation markers revealed that caspase-3 significantly increased in the irradiated group. Moreover, a significant decrease in the hematological constituents of peripheral blood, the chemotactic index and CD8+ T cells were observed in animals in the irradiation-only group, whereas an increase in the lymphocyte index was observed in animals in that group. In contrast, AXEPS treatment prevented these alterations. From our results, we conclude that

  8. Efficacy of polysaccharide from Alcaligenes xylosoxidans MSA3 administration as protection against γ-radiation in female rats.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Amal I; Ghoneim, Mona A M; Mahmoud, Manal G; Asker, Mohsen M S; Mohamed, Saher S

    2016-03-01

    Damage to normal tissues is a consequence of both therapeutic and accidental exposures to ionizing radiation. A water-soluble heteropolysaccharide called AXEPS, composed of glucose, galactose, rhamnose and glucouronic acid in a molar ratio of nearly 1.0:1.6:0.4:2.3, respectively, was isolated from culture medium of strain Alcaligenes xylosoxidans MSA3 by ethanol precipitation followed by freeze-drying. Chemical analysis, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) and chromatographic studies revealed that the molecular weight was 1.6 × 10(4) g mol(-1). This study was designed to investigate the radioprotective and biological effects of AXEPS in alleviating the toxicity of ionizing radiation in female albino rats. A total of 32 female albino rats were divided into four groups. In the control group, rats were administered vehicle by tube for four weeks. The second group was administered AXEPS (100 mg/kg) orally by gavage for four weeks. Animals in the third group were exposed to whole-body γ-rays (5 Gy) and remained for 2 weeks without treatment. The fourth group received AXEPS (100 mg/kg) orally by gavage for two weeks before being exposed to whole-body γ-rays (5 Gy), then 24 h post γ-rays, they received AXEPS (100 mg/kg) in a treatment continuing till the end of the experiment (15 days after the whole-body γ-irradiation). Oral administration of AXEPS (100 mg/kg) significantly reversed the oxidative stress effects of radiation, as evidenced by the decrease in DNA damage in the bone marrow. Assessment of apoptosis and cell proliferation markers revealed that caspase-3 significantly increased in the irradiated group. Moreover, a significant decrease in the hematological constituents of peripheral blood, the chemotactic index and CD8+ T cells were observed in animals in the irradiation-only group, whereas an increase in the lymphocyte index was observed in animals in that group. In contrast, AXEPS treatment prevented these alterations. From our results, we conclude that

  9. Efficacy of polysaccharide from Alcaligenes xylosoxidans MSA3 administration as protection against γ-radiation in female rats.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Amal I; Ghoneim, Mona A M; Mahmoud, Manal G; Asker, Mohsen M S; Mohamed, Saher S

    2016-03-01

    Damage to normal tissues is a consequence of both therapeutic and accidental exposures to ionizing radiation. A water-soluble heteropolysaccharide called AXEPS, composed of glucose, galactose, rhamnose and glucouronic acid in a molar ratio of nearly 1.0:1.6:0.4:2.3, respectively, was isolated from culture medium of strain Alcaligenes xylosoxidans MSA3 by ethanol precipitation followed by freeze-drying. Chemical analysis, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) and chromatographic studies revealed that the molecular weight was 1.6 × 10(4) g mol(-1). This study was designed to investigate the radioprotective and biological effects of AXEPS in alleviating the toxicity of ionizing radiation in female albino rats. A total of 32 female albino rats were divided into four groups. In the control group, rats were administered vehicle by tube for four weeks. The second group was administered AXEPS (100 mg/kg) orally by gavage for four weeks. Animals in the third group were exposed to whole-body γ-rays (5 Gy) and remained for 2 weeks without treatment. The fourth group received AXEPS (100 mg/kg) orally by gavage for two weeks before being exposed to whole-body γ-rays (5 Gy), then 24 h post γ-rays, they received AXEPS (100 mg/kg) in a treatment continuing till the end of the experiment (15 days after the whole-body γ-irradiation). Oral administration of AXEPS (100 mg/kg) significantly reversed the oxidative stress effects of radiation, as evidenced by the decrease in DNA damage in the bone marrow. Assessment of apoptosis and cell proliferation markers revealed that caspase-3 significantly increased in the irradiated group. Moreover, a significant decrease in the hematological constituents of peripheral blood, the chemotactic index and CD8+ T cells were observed in animals in the irradiation-only group, whereas an increase in the lymphocyte index was observed in animals in that group. In contrast, AXEPS treatment prevented these alterations. From our results, we conclude that

  10. Structure of a new azurin from the denitrifying bacterium Alcaligenes xylosoxidans at high resolution.

    PubMed

    Dodd, F E; Hasnain, S S; Abraham, Z H; Eady, R R; Smith, B E

    1995-11-01

    It has been reported previously that Alcaligenes xylosoxidans (NC1MB 11015) grown under denitrifying conditions produces two azurins instead of the single previously identified azurin [Dodd, Hasnain, Hunter, Abraham, Debenham, Kanzler, Eldridge, Eady, Ambler & Smith (1995). Biochemistry. In the press]. The new azurin, called azurin II, has been crystallized as blue elongated rectangular prisms with the tetragonal space group P4(1)22 and unit-cell parameters a = b = 52.65, c = 100.63 A. X-ray crystallographic data extending to 1.9 A resolution were collected by the Weissenberg method using 200 x 400 mm image plates and synchrotron X-rays of wavelength 0.97 A. The three-dimensional structure of azurin II has been solved by the molecular-replacement method using the structure of azurin from Alcaligenes denitrificans NCTC 8582 with which this new azurin shows a close homology. The quality of the initial map was sufficient to predict a number of sequence differences. The model is currently refined to an R-factor of 18.8% with X-ray data between 8.5 and 1.9 A. The final model of 961 protein atoms, one Cu atom and 50 water molecules has r.m.s. deviations from ideality of 0.009 A for bond lengths and 1.7 degrees for bond angles. The overall structure is similar to that of the azurin from A. denitrificans NCTC 8582. It has a beta-barrel structure with the Cu atom located near the top end of the molecule. The Cu atom is coordinated to Ndelta of His46 and His117 at 2.02 A and to Sgamma of Cys112 at 2.12 A, while the carbonyl O atom of Gly45 and Sdelta atom of Met121 provide the additional interactions at 2.75 and 3.26 A, respectively.

  11. Nickel(II)-substituted azurin I from Alcaligenes xylosoxidans as characterized by resonance Raman spectroscopy at cryogenic temperature.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Marzena B; Czernuszewicz, Roman S

    2009-05-01

    Metal-substituted blue copper proteins (cupredoxins) have been successfully used to study the effect of metal-ion identity on their active-site properties, specifically the coordination geometry and metal-ligand bond strengths. In this work, low-temperature (77 K) resonance Raman (RR) spectra of the blue copper protein Alcaligenes xylosoxidans azurin I and its Ni(II) derivative are reported. A detailed analysis of all observed bands is presented and responsiveness to metal substitution is discussed in terms of structural and bonding changes. The native cupric site exhibits a RR spectrum characteristic of a primarily trigonal planar (type 1) coordination geometry, identified by the nu(Cu-S)(Cys) markers at 373, 399, 409, and 430 cm(-1). Replacement of Cu(II) with Ni(II) results in optical and RR spectra that reveal (1) a large hypsochromic shift in the main (Cys)S --> M(II) charge-transfer absorption from 622 to 440 nm, (2) greatly reduced metal-thiolate bonding interaction, indicated by substantially lower nu(Ni-S)(Cys) stretching frequencies, (3) elevation of the cysteine nu(C( beta )-S) stretching, amide III, and rho (s)(C( beta )H(2)) scissors vibrational modes, and (4) primarily four-coordinated, trigonally distorted tetrahedral geometry of the Ni(II) site that is marked by characteristic nu(Ni-S)(Cys) stretching RR bands at 347, 364, and 391 cm(-1). Comparisons of the electronic and vibrational properties between A. xylosoxidans azurin I and its closely structurally related azurin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa are made and discussed. For cupric azurins, the intensity-weighted average M(II)-S(Cys) stretching frequencies are calculated to be nu(Cu-S)(iwa) = 406.3 and 407.6 cm(-1), respectively. These values decreased to nu(Ni-S)(iwa) = 359.3 and 365.5 cm(-1), respectively, after Ni(II) --> Cu(II) exchange, suggesting that the metal-thiolate interactions are similar in the two native proteins but are much less alike in their Ni(II)-substituted forms.

  12. Investigations of the structure of 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase from Achromobacter.

    PubMed

    Schiele, U; Niedermeier, R; Stürzer, M; Lynen, F

    1975-12-01

    It was shown by gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecylsulphate solution that 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase from Achromobacter IVS is composed of two different subunits with molecular weights of about 78000 and 96000, respectively. The biotin is bound to the heavier subunit. It was previously found that 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase contains four biotin molecules per complex. A complex composed of four of each subunit would thus have a molecular weight of about 700000. This is compatible with the molecular weight of 760000 determined earlier by analytical ultracentrifugation. Both subunits were isolated preparatively. As the subunits, unlike the complex, are very sensitive to oxygen, special precautions had to be taken during isolation. The biotin-containing subunit was isolated by chromatography on DEAE-cellulose in 5 M urea. It no longer catalyzed the overall reaction, yet could still carboxylate free biotin. The biotin-free subunit was separated after dissociation of the enzyme by three-days' dialysis at pH 9.8 under nitrogen. On chromatography over a Sepharose-bound avidin column, the biotin-subunit was fixed and the biotin-free subunit was eluted unretarded. The latter subunit showed no enzymic activity. After the addition of the biotin-containing subunit, overall activity was regenerated. The speed of reassociation is very much enhanced by 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA. It was shown by reassociation experiments under different conditions that probably an initial complex, AxBy is formed, possessing a binding site for 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA. Upon the binding of this substrate the conformation may be changed to a form favourable for reconstitution. Finally, the structures of biotin enzymes from different sources are compared. In the course of evolution there is a tendency toward integration of the different constituent proteins into only one polypeptide chain.

  13. Isolation and characterization of a novel hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium Achromobacter sp. HZ01 from the crude oil-contaminated seawater at the Daya Bay, southern China.

    PubMed

    Deng, Mao-Cheng; Li, Jing; Liang, Fu-Rui; Yi, Meisheng; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Yuan, Jian-Ping; Peng, Juan; Wu, Chou-Fei; Wang, Jiang-Hai

    2014-06-15

    Microorganisms play an important role in the biodegradation of petroleum contaminants, which have attracted great concern due to their persistent toxicity and difficult biodegradation. In this paper, a novel hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium HZ01 was isolated from the crude oil-contaminated seawater at the Daya Bay, South China Sea, and identified as Achromobacter sp. Under the conditions of pH 7.0, NaCl 3% (w/v), temperature 28 °C and rotary speed 150 rpm, its degradability of the total n-alkanes reached up to 96.6% after 10 days of incubation for the evaporated diesel oil. Furthermore, Achromobacter sp. HZ01 could effectively utilize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as its sole carbon source, and could remove anthracene, phenanthrene and pyrence about 29.8%, 50.6% and 38.4% respectively after 30 days of incubation. Therefore, Achromobacter sp. HZ01 may employed as an excellent degrader to develop one cost-effective and eco-friendly method for the bioremediation of marine environments polluted by crude oil.

  14. Metabolic and structural changes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Achromobacter CDC and Agrobacterium radiobacter cells injured in parenteral fluids.

    PubMed

    Papapetropoulou, M; Papageorgakopoulou, N

    1994-01-01

    The long term metabolic changes of three oxidase positive microorganisms (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Agrobacterium radiobacter and Achromobacter CDC) all isolated from aquatic environment, were defined after they were inoculated in three parenteral fluids: Lactated Ringer's solution, Sodium Chloride 0.9% and Dextrose 5%. The number of microorganisms introduced into the parenteral products was adjusted to 10(5) bacteria/ml and left at room temperature (20-22 degrees C) for 30 days. Their enzymatic and protein profile as compared with their initial characteristics after they were grown in broth, were measured using API 20NE batteries of tests and gel electrophoresis. In L-R and NaCl 0.9% fluids, P. aeruginosa and Ag. radiobacter lost the ability to hydrolyse urea while Ac CDC retained this ability. In Dextrose 5% fluid the microorganisms lost most of their metabolic characters. The protein patterns in SDS-PAGE of samples prepared from cells of the tested microorganisms showed marked differences (in P. aeruginosa) to minor differences (in Ag. radiobacter and Ac CDC) while new proteins with M(r) > 66KDa revealed Ag. radiobacter cells. The gelatinolytic zymogram shows also differences between bacterial cells grown in nutrient broth and those that remained in parenteral fluids. These changes reflect the stress of the tested bacteria in an unfavorable condition. The alterations of injured bacteria could render them unable to grow on routine, for sterilization testing, culture media.

  15. Biodegradable and biocompatible epoxidized vegetable oil modified thermostable poly(vinyl chloride): thermal and performance characteristics post biodegradation with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Achromobacter sp.

    PubMed

    Das, Gautam; Bordoloi, Naba K; Rai, Sudhir K; Mukherjee, Ashis K; Karak, Niranjan

    2012-03-30

    The increased production of municipal solid waste by the disposal of plastic materials heightens the urgency to develop biodegradable materials for daily use. In vitro-biodegradation study on poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) plasticized by epoxidized Mesua ferrea L. seed oil at three different weight percentages (PVC/ENO ratio of 75/25, 50/50 and 25/75) was conducted by using Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Achromobacter sp. bacteria. The test bacterial species were able to grow on the polymer matrix by using it as a source of energy; however the pristine PVC did not support the microbial growth. The PVC/ENO material of 25/75 ratio showed the highest percent (%) of biodegradation compared to other tested systems. The bacterial count and the dry biomass post 180 days of inoculation in 25/75 plasticized PVC suggested bacterial growth at the expense of degradation of the system. The tensile strength of 25/75 PVC/ENO system, post 180 days of inoculation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Achromobacter sp. decreased by about 53% and 43% respectively. Further, surface erosion phenomenon and structural change of the matrix after bacterial growth, as studied by FTIR and SEM analysis of PVC/ENO of 25/75 ratio exhibited noticeable deterioration post 180 days of inoculation.

  16. Purification and synergistic antibacterial activity of arginine derived cyclic dipeptides, from Achromobacter sp. associated with a rhabditid entomopathogenic nematode against major clinically relevant biofilm forming wound bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Deepa, Indira; Kumar, Sasidharan N.; Sreerag, Ravikumar S.; Nath, Vishnu S.; Mohandas, Chellapan

    2015-01-01

    Skin and chronic wound infections caused by various pathogenic bacteria are an increasing and urgent health problem worldwide. In the present investigation ethyl acetate extract of an Achromobacter sp. associated with a Rhabditis entomopathogenic nematode (EPN), displayed promising antibacterial property and was further purified by silica gel column chromatography to get three different cyclic dipeptides (CDPs). Based on the spectral data and Marfey's analyses, the CDPs were identified as cyclo(D-Leu-D-Arg) (1), cyclo(L-Trp-L-Arg) (2), and cyclo(D-Trp-D-Arg) (3), respectively. Three CDPs were active against all the 10 wound associated bacteria tested. The significant antibacterial activity was recorded by CDP 3, and highest activity of 0.5 μg/ml was recorded against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The synergistic antibacterial activities of CDPs and ampicillin were assessed using the checkerboard microdilution method. The results of the current study recorded that the combined effects of CDPs and ampicillin principally recorded synergistic activity. Interestingly, the combination of CDPs and ampicillin also recorded enhanced inhibition of biofilm formation by bacteria. Moreover, CDPs significantly stimulate the production of IL-10 and IL-4 (anti-inflammatory cytokines) by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. CDPs do not make any significant effect on the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines like TNF-α. The three CDPs have been studied for their effect on intracellular S. aureus in murine macrophages (J774) using 24 h exposure to 0.5X, 1X, and 2X MIC concentrations. Significant decrease in intracellular S. aureus burden was recorded by CDPs. CDPs also recorded no cytotoxicity toward FS normal fibroblast, VERO, and L231 normal lung epithelial cell lines. Antimicrobial activity of the arginine containing CDPs against the wound associated bacteria is reported here for the first. Moreover, this is also the first report on the production of

  17. Purification and synergistic antibacterial activity of arginine derived cyclic dipeptides, from Achromobacter sp. associated with a rhabditid entomopathogenic nematode against major clinically relevant biofilm forming wound bacteria.

    PubMed

    Deepa, Indira; Kumar, Sasidharan N; Sreerag, Ravikumar S; Nath, Vishnu S; Mohandas, Chellapan

    2015-01-01

    Skin and chronic wound infections caused by various pathogenic bacteria are an increasing and urgent health problem worldwide. In the present investigation ethyl acetate extract of an Achromobacter sp. associated with a Rhabditis entomopathogenic nematode (EPN), displayed promising antibacterial property and was further purified by silica gel column chromatography to get three different cyclic dipeptides (CDPs). Based on the spectral data and Marfey's analyses, the CDPs were identified as cyclo(D-Leu-D-Arg) (1), cyclo(L-Trp-L-Arg) (2), and cyclo(D-Trp-D-Arg) (3), respectively. Three CDPs were active against all the 10 wound associated bacteria tested. The significant antibacterial activity was recorded by CDP 3, and highest activity of 0.5 μg/ml was recorded against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The synergistic antibacterial activities of CDPs and ampicillin were assessed using the checkerboard microdilution method. The results of the current study recorded that the combined effects of CDPs and ampicillin principally recorded synergistic activity. Interestingly, the combination of CDPs and ampicillin also recorded enhanced inhibition of biofilm formation by bacteria. Moreover, CDPs significantly stimulate the production of IL-10 and IL-4 (anti-inflammatory cytokines) by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. CDPs do not make any significant effect on the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines like TNF-α. The three CDPs have been studied for their effect on intracellular S. aureus in murine macrophages (J774) using 24 h exposure to 0.5X, 1X, and 2X MIC concentrations. Significant decrease in intracellular S. aureus burden was recorded by CDPs. CDPs also recorded no cytotoxicity toward FS normal fibroblast, VERO, and L231 normal lung epithelial cell lines. Antimicrobial activity of the arginine containing CDPs against the wound associated bacteria is reported here for the first. Moreover, this is also the first report on the production of

  18. The Crystal Structure of D-Threonine Aldolase from Alcaligenes xylosoxidans Provides Insight into a Metal Ion Assisted PLP-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, Michael K.; Oberdorfer, Gustav; Steinkellner, Georg; Riegler-Berket, Lina; Mink, Daniel; van Assema, Friso; Schürmann, Martin; Gruber, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Threonine aldolases catalyze the pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) dependent cleavage of threonine into glycine and acetaldehyde and play a major role in the degradation of this amino acid. In nature, L- as well as D-specific enzymes have been identified, but the exact physiological function of D-threonine aldolases (DTAs) is still largely unknown. Both types of enantio-complementary enzymes have a considerable potential in biocatalysis for the stereospecific synthesis of various β-hydroxy amino acids, which are valuable building blocks for the production of pharmaceuticals. While several structures of L-threonine aldolases (LTAs) have already been determined, no structure of a DTA is available to date. Here, we report on the determination of the crystal structure of the DTA from Alcaligenes xylosoxidans (AxDTA) at 1.5 Å resolution. Our results underline the close relationship of DTAs and alanine racemases and allow the identification of a metal binding site close to the PLP-cofactor in the active site of the enzyme which is consistent with the previous observation that divalent cations are essential for DTA activity. Modeling of AxDTA substrate complexes provides a rationale for this metal dependence and indicates that binding of the β-hydroxy group of the substrate to the metal ion very likely activates this group and facilitates its deprotonation by His193. An equivalent involvement of a metal ion has been implicated in the mechanism of a serine dehydratase, which harbors a metal ion binding site in the vicinity of the PLP cofactor at the same position as in DTA. The structure of AxDTA is completely different to available structures of LTAs. The enantio-complementarity of DTAs and LTAs can be explained by an approximate mirror symmetry of crucial active site residues relative to the PLP-cofactor. PMID:25884707

  19. Decreased dissociation of the 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase complex from Achromobacter in the presence of 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA. A possible regulatory mechanism for the intracellular degradation of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Schiele, U; Stürzer, M

    1975-12-01

    By inactivation of different concentrations of 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase from Achromobacter IVS with a fixed concentration of iodoacetamide, it was demonstrated that the degree of dissociation of the complex is considerably lower in the presence of 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA. ATP did not produce this effect. This property could serve to regulate the intracellular degradation of the enzyme, if the dissociated subunits were attacked preferentially.

  20. Evaluation of colistin susceptibility in multidrug-resistant clinical isolates from cystic fibrosis, France.

    PubMed

    Biswas, S; Dubus, J-C; Reynaud-Gaubert, M; Stremler, N; Rolain, J-M

    2013-11-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients has led to the use of colistin drug and the emergence of colistin-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. The aim of this study was to compare the disk diffusion and Etest methods for colistin susceptibility testing on MDR bacteria associated with CF from Marseille, France. Forty-nine MDR clinical isolates (27 Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, 22 Achromobacter xylosoxidans) were used in this study. Disk diffusion and Etest assays were used to assess the reliability of these two techniques. For S. maltophilia, 25 out of 27 isolates had low minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs, 0.125-0.75 mg/L), whereas two isolates displayed high MICs (32 mg/L). Similarly, 19 out of 22 A. xylosoxidans isolates had low MICs (0.75-3.0 mg/L), whereas three isolates had high MICs (32-256 mg/L). The diameters of zone inhibition with a 50-μg colistin disk displayed a good correlation with the MICs obtained by the Etest. Susceptible and resistant strains were eventually separated using a disk diffusion assay at a cut-off of ≤ 12 mm for a 50-μg disk. Colistin displayed excellent activity against S. maltophilia and A. xylosoxidans and the disk diffusion assay could be confidently used to determine the susceptibility to colistin for MDR Gram-negative bacteria in the context of CF.

  1. Essential Oil from Origanum vulgare Completely Inhibits the Growth of Multidrug-Resistant Cystic Fibrosis Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Pesavento, Giovanna; Maggini, Valentina; Maida, Isabel; Lo Nostro, Antonella; Calonico, Carmela; Sassoli, Chiara; Perrin, Elena; Fondi, Marco; Mengoni, Alessio; Chiellini, Carolina; Vannacci, Alfredo; Gallo, Eugenia; Gori, Luigi; Bogani, Patrizia; Bilia, Anna Rita; Campana, Silvia; Ravenni, Novella; Dolce, Daniela; Firenzuoli, Fabio; Fani, Renato

    2016-06-01

    Essential oils (EOs) are known to inhibit the growth of a wide range of microorganisms. Particularly interesting is the possible use of EOs to treat multidrug-resistant cystic fibrosis (CF) pathogens. We tested the essential oil (EO) from Origanum vulgare for in vitro antimicrobial activity, against three of the major human opportunistic pathogens responsible for respiratory infections in CF patients; these are methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Achromobacter xylosoxidans. Antibiotic susceptibility of each strain was previously tested by the standard disk diffusion method. Most strains were resistant to multiple antibiotics and could be defined as multi-drug-resistant (MDR). The antibacterial activity of O. vulgare EO (OEO) against a panel of 59 bacterial strains was evaluated, with MIC and MBC determined at 24, 48 and 72 hours by a microdilution method. The OEO was effective against all tested strains, although to a different extent. The MBC and MIC of OEO for S. aureus strains were either lower or equal to 0.50%, v/v, for A. xylosoxidans strains were lower or equal to 1% and 0.50%, v/v, respectively; and for S. maltophilia strains were lower or equal to 0.25%, v/v. The results from this study suggest that OEO might exert a role as an antimicrobial in the treatment of CF infections. PMID:27534136

  2. Essential Oil from Origanum vulgare Completely Inhibits the Growth of Multidrug-Resistant Cystic Fibrosis Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Pesavento, Giovanna; Maggini, Valentina; Maida, Isabel; Lo Nostro, Antonella; Calonico, Carmela; Sassoli, Chiara; Perrin, Elena; Fondi, Marco; Mengoni, Alessio; Chiellini, Carolina; Vannacci, Alfredo; Gallo, Eugenia; Gori, Luigi; Bogani, Patrizia; Bilia, Anna Rita; Campana, Silvia; Ravenni, Novella; Dolce, Daniela; Firenzuoli, Fabio; Fani, Renato

    2016-06-01

    Essential oils (EOs) are known to inhibit the growth of a wide range of microorganisms. Particularly interesting is the possible use of EOs to treat multidrug-resistant cystic fibrosis (CF) pathogens. We tested the essential oil (EO) from Origanum vulgare for in vitro antimicrobial activity, against three of the major human opportunistic pathogens responsible for respiratory infections in CF patients; these are methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Achromobacter xylosoxidans. Antibiotic susceptibility of each strain was previously tested by the standard disk diffusion method. Most strains were resistant to multiple antibiotics and could be defined as multi-drug-resistant (MDR). The antibacterial activity of O. vulgare EO (OEO) against a panel of 59 bacterial strains was evaluated, with MIC and MBC determined at 24, 48 and 72 hours by a microdilution method. The OEO was effective against all tested strains, although to a different extent. The MBC and MIC of OEO for S. aureus strains were either lower or equal to 0.50%, v/v, for A. xylosoxidans strains were lower or equal to 1% and 0.50%, v/v, respectively; and for S. maltophilia strains were lower or equal to 0.25%, v/v. The results from this study suggest that OEO might exert a role as an antimicrobial in the treatment of CF infections.

  3. Evaluation of pyrrolidonyl arylamidase for the identification of nonfermenting Gram-negative rods.

    PubMed

    Bombicino, Karina A; Almuzara, Marisa N; Famiglietti, Angela M R; Vay, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the activity of pyrrolidonyl arylamidase (PYR) for the differentiation and identification of nonfermenting gram negative rods (NFGNR), 293 isolates were tested. A 24 h culture of each test organism was prepared. From this a 108-109 cfu/mL suspension was added to 0.25 mL of sterile physiologic solution. A PYR disk was then added and the test was incubated for 30 minutes at 35-37 degrees C, at environmental atmosphere. Reading was done by adding 1 drop of cinnamaldehyde reagent. Strains of Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter haemolyticus, Alcaligenes faecalis, Bergeyella zoohelcum, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Bordetella hinzii, Brevundimonas diminuta, Brevundimonas vesicularis, Brucella ovis, Brucella spp., Brucella suis, Burkholderia cepacia complex, Moraxella catarrhalis, Moraxella lacunata, Moraxella nonliquefaciens, Moraxella osloensis, Oligella ureolytica, Pseudomonas alcaligenes, Pseudomonas mendocina, Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Pseudomonas Vb3, Psychrobacter phenylpyruvicus, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia were PYR negative. On the other hand Achromobacter piechaudii, Achromobacter denitrificans, Achromobacter xylosoxidans, Burkholderia gladioli, Chryseobacterium gleum-indologenes, Comamonas testosroni, Cupriavidus pauculus, Delftia acidovorans, Elizabethkingia meningoseptica, Myroides spp., Ochrobactrum anthropi, Pseudomonas oryzihabitans, Ralstonia pickettii, Rhizobium radiobacter, Shewanella spp., Sphingobacterium multivorum, Sphingobacterium spiritivorum, and Weeksella virosa were PYR positive. Finally, Acinetobacter lwoffii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Roseomonas spp., and Sphingomonas paucimobilis-parapaucimobilis were PYR variable. PYR testing should be considered as a useful tool to facilitate the identification of NFGNR.

  4. Evaluation of pyrrolidonyl arylamidase for the identification of nonfermenting Gram-negative rods.

    PubMed

    Bombicino, Karina A; Almuzara, Marisa N; Famiglietti, Angela M R; Vay, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the activity of pyrrolidonyl arylamidase (PYR) for the differentiation and identification of nonfermenting gram negative rods (NFGNR), 293 isolates were tested. A 24 h culture of each test organism was prepared. From this a 108-109 cfu/mL suspension was added to 0.25 mL of sterile physiologic solution. A PYR disk was then added and the test was incubated for 30 minutes at 35-37 degrees C, at environmental atmosphere. Reading was done by adding 1 drop of cinnamaldehyde reagent. Strains of Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter haemolyticus, Alcaligenes faecalis, Bergeyella zoohelcum, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Bordetella hinzii, Brevundimonas diminuta, Brevundimonas vesicularis, Brucella ovis, Brucella spp., Brucella suis, Burkholderia cepacia complex, Moraxella catarrhalis, Moraxella lacunata, Moraxella nonliquefaciens, Moraxella osloensis, Oligella ureolytica, Pseudomonas alcaligenes, Pseudomonas mendocina, Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Pseudomonas Vb3, Psychrobacter phenylpyruvicus, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia were PYR negative. On the other hand Achromobacter piechaudii, Achromobacter denitrificans, Achromobacter xylosoxidans, Burkholderia gladioli, Chryseobacterium gleum-indologenes, Comamonas testosroni, Cupriavidus pauculus, Delftia acidovorans, Elizabethkingia meningoseptica, Myroides spp., Ochrobactrum anthropi, Pseudomonas oryzihabitans, Ralstonia pickettii, Rhizobium radiobacter, Shewanella spp., Sphingobacterium multivorum, Sphingobacterium spiritivorum, and Weeksella virosa were PYR positive. Finally, Acinetobacter lwoffii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Roseomonas spp., and Sphingomonas paucimobilis-parapaucimobilis were PYR variable. PYR testing should be considered as a useful tool to facilitate the identification of NFGNR. PMID:16822636

  5. Carbazole degradation in the soil microcosm by tropical bacterial strains

    PubMed Central

    Salam, Lateef B.; Ilori, Matthew O.; Amund, Olukayode O.

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, three bacterial strains isolated from tropical hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and phylogenetically identified as Achromobacter sp. strain SL1, Pseudomonas sp. strain SL4 and Microbacterium esteraromaticum strain SL6 displayed angular dioxygenation and mineralization of carbazole in batch cultures. In this study, the ability of these isolates to survive and enhance carbazole degradation in soil were tested in field-moist microcosms. Strain SL4 had the highest survival rate (1.8 x 107 cfu/g) after 30 days of incubation in sterilized soil, while there was a decrease in population density in native (unsterilized) soil when compared with the initial population. Gas chromatographic analysis after 30 days of incubation showed that in sterilized soil amended with carbazole (100 mg/kg), 66.96, 82.15 and 68.54% were degraded by strains SL1, SL4 and SL6, respectively, with rates of degradation of 0.093, 0.114 and 0.095 mg kg−1 h−1. The combination of the three isolates as inoculum in sterilized soil degraded 87.13% carbazole at a rate of 0.121 mg kg−1 h−1. In native soil amended with carbazole (100 mg/kg), 91.64, 87.29 and 89.13% were degraded by strains SL1, SL4 and SL6 after 30 days of incubation, with rates of degradation of 0.127, 0.121 and 0.124 mg kg−1 h−1, respectively. This study successfully established the survivability (> 106 cfu/g detected after 30 days) and carbazole-degrading ability of these bacterial strains in soil, and highlights the potential of these isolates as seed for the bioremediation of carbazole-impacted environments. PMID:26691461

  6. Carbazole degradation in the soil microcosm by tropical bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Salam, Lateef B; Ilori, Matthew O; Amund, Olukayode O

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, three bacterial strains isolated from tropical hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and phylogenetically identified as Achromobacter sp. strain SL1, Pseudomonas sp. strain SL4 and Microbacterium esteraromaticum strain SL6 displayed angular dioxygenation and mineralization of carbazole in batch cultures. In this study, the ability of these isolates to survive and enhance carbazole degradation in soil were tested in field-moist microcosms. Strain SL4 had the highest survival rate (1.8 x 107 cfu/g) after 30 days of incubation in sterilized soil, while there was a decrease in population density in native (unsterilized) soil when compared with the initial population. Gas chromatographic analysis after 30 days of incubation showed that in sterilized soil amended with carbazole (100 mg/kg), 66.96, 82.15 and 68.54% were degraded by strains SL1, SL4 and SL6, respectively, with rates of degradation of 0.093, 0.114 and 0.095 mg kg-1 h-1. The combination of the three isolates as inoculum in sterilized soil degraded 87.13% carbazole at a rate of 0.121 mg kg-1 h-1. In native soil amended with carbazole (100 mg/kg), 91.64, 87.29 and 89.13% were degraded by strains SL1, SL4 and SL6 after 30 days of incubation, with rates of degradation of 0.127, 0.121 and 0.124 mg kg-1 h-1, respectively. This study successfully established the survivability (> 106 cfu/g detected after 30 days) and carbazole-degrading ability of these bacterial strains in soil, and highlights the potential of these isolates as seed for the bioremediation of carbazole-impacted environments.

  7. Isolation of multiple drug-resistant enteric bacteria from feces of wild Western Lowland Gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) in Gabon.

    PubMed

    Mbehang Nguema, Pierre Philippe; Okubo, Torahiko; Tsuchida, Sayaka; Fujita, Shiho; Yamagiwa, Juichi; Tamura, Yutaka; Ushida, Kazunari

    2015-05-01

    Prevalence of drug-resistant bacteria in wildlife can reveal the actual level of anthropological burden on the wildlife. In this study, we isolated two multiple drug-resistant strains, GG6-2 and GG6-1-1, from 27 fresh feces of wild western lowland gorillas in Moukalaba-Doudou National Park, Gabon. Isolates were identified as Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Providencia sp., respectively. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of the following 12 drugs-ampicillin (ABPC), cefazolin (CEZ), cefotaxime (CTX), streptomycin (SM), gentamicin (GM), kanamycin (KM), tetracycline (TC), nalidixic acid (NA), ciprofloxacin (CPFX), colistin (CL), chloramphenicol (CP) and trimethoprim (TMP)-were determined. Isolate GG6-2 was resistant to all antimicrobials tested and highly resistant to CTX, SM, TC, NA and TMP. Isolate GG6-1-1 was resistant to ABPC, CEZ, TC, CL, CP and TMP.

  8. Isolation of multiple drug-resistant enteric bacteria from feces of wild Western Lowland Gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) in Gabon

    PubMed Central

    MBEHANG NGUEMA, Pierre Philippe; OKUBO, Torahiko; TSUCHIDA, Sayaka; FUJITA, Shiho; YAMAGIWA, Juichi; TAMURA, Yutaka; USHIDA, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    Prevalence of drug-resistant bacteria in wildlife can reveal the actual level of anthropological burden on the wildlife. In this study, we isolated two multiple drug-resistant strains, GG6-2 and GG6-1-1, from 27 fresh feces of wild western lowland gorillas in Moukalaba-Doudou National Park, Gabon. Isolates were identified as Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Providencia sp., respectively. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of the following 12 drugs—ampicillin (ABPC), cefazolin (CEZ), cefotaxime (CTX), streptomycin (SM), gentamicin (GM), kanamycin (KM), tetracycline (TC), nalidixic acid (NA), ciprofloxacin (CPFX), colistin (CL), chloramphenicol (CP) and trimethoprim (TMP)—were determined. Isolate GG6-2 was resistant to all antimicrobials tested and highly resistant to CTX, SM, TC, NA and TMP. Isolate GG6-1-1 was resistant to ABPC, CEZ, TC, CL, CP and TMP. PMID:25649412

  9. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase-containing rhizobacteria protect Ocimum sanctum plants during waterlogging stress via reduced ethylene generation.

    PubMed

    Barnawal, Deepti; Bharti, Nidhi; Maji, Deepamala; Chanotiya, Chandan Singh; Kalra, Alok

    2012-09-01

    Ocimum sanctum grown as rain-fed crop, is known to be poorly adapted to waterlogged conditions. Many a times the crop suffers extreme damages because of anoxia and excessive ethylene generation due to waterlogging conditions present under heavy rain. The usefulness of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase-containing plant growth promoting rhizobacteria was investigated under waterlogging stress. The comparison of herb yield and stress induced biochemical changes of waterlogged and non-waterlogged plants with and without ACC deaminase-containing microbiological treatments were monitored in this study. Ten plant growth promoting rhizobacteria strains containing ACC-deaminase were isolated and characterized. Four selected isolates Fd2 (Achromobacter xylosoxidans), Bac5 (Serratia ureilytica), Oci9 (Herbaspirillum seropedicae) and Oci13 (Ochrobactrum rhizosphaerae) had the potential to protect Ocimum plants from flood induced damage under waterlogged glass house conditions. Pot experiments were conducted to evaluate the potential of these ACC deaminase-containing selected strains for reducing the yield losses caused by waterlogging conditions. Bacterial treatments protected plants from waterlogging induced detrimental changes like stress ethylene production, reduced chlorophyll concentration, higher lipid peroxidation, proline concentration and reduced foliar nutrient uptake. Fd2 (A. xylosoxidans) induced maximum waterlogging tolerance as treated waterlogged plants recorded maximum growth and herb yield (46.5% higher than uninoculated waterlogged plants) with minimum stress ethylene levels (53% lower ACC concentration as compared to waterlogged plants without bacterial inoculation) whereas under normal non-waterlogged conditions O. rhizosphaerae was most effective in plant growth promotion. PMID:22846334

  10. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase-containing rhizobacteria protect Ocimum sanctum plants during waterlogging stress via reduced ethylene generation.

    PubMed

    Barnawal, Deepti; Bharti, Nidhi; Maji, Deepamala; Chanotiya, Chandan Singh; Kalra, Alok

    2012-09-01

    Ocimum sanctum grown as rain-fed crop, is known to be poorly adapted to waterlogged conditions. Many a times the crop suffers extreme damages because of anoxia and excessive ethylene generation due to waterlogging conditions present under heavy rain. The usefulness of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase-containing plant growth promoting rhizobacteria was investigated under waterlogging stress. The comparison of herb yield and stress induced biochemical changes of waterlogged and non-waterlogged plants with and without ACC deaminase-containing microbiological treatments were monitored in this study. Ten plant growth promoting rhizobacteria strains containing ACC-deaminase were isolated and characterized. Four selected isolates Fd2 (Achromobacter xylosoxidans), Bac5 (Serratia ureilytica), Oci9 (Herbaspirillum seropedicae) and Oci13 (Ochrobactrum rhizosphaerae) had the potential to protect Ocimum plants from flood induced damage under waterlogged glass house conditions. Pot experiments were conducted to evaluate the potential of these ACC deaminase-containing selected strains for reducing the yield losses caused by waterlogging conditions. Bacterial treatments protected plants from waterlogging induced detrimental changes like stress ethylene production, reduced chlorophyll concentration, higher lipid peroxidation, proline concentration and reduced foliar nutrient uptake. Fd2 (A. xylosoxidans) induced maximum waterlogging tolerance as treated waterlogged plants recorded maximum growth and herb yield (46.5% higher than uninoculated waterlogged plants) with minimum stress ethylene levels (53% lower ACC concentration as compared to waterlogged plants without bacterial inoculation) whereas under normal non-waterlogged conditions O. rhizosphaerae was most effective in plant growth promotion.

  11. Natural Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.

    1997-01-01

    Logarithmic strain is the preferred measure of strain used by materials scientists, who typically refer to it as the "true strain." It was Nadai who gave it the name "natural strain," which seems more appropriate. This strain measure was proposed by Ludwik for the one-dimensional extension of a rod with length l. It was defined via the integral of dl/l to which Ludwik gave the name "effective specific strain." Today, it is after Hencky, who extended Ludwik's measure to three-dimensional analysis by defining logarithmic strains for the three principal directions.

  12. Natural Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a consistent and thorough development of the strain and strain-rate measures affiliated with Hencky. Natural measures for strain and strain-rate, as I refer to them, are first expressed in terms of of the fundamental body-metric tensors of Lodge. These strain and strain-rate measures are mixed tensor fields. They are mapped from the body to space in both the Eulerian and Lagrangian configurations, and then transformed from general to Cartesian fields. There they are compared with the various strain and strain-rate measures found in the literature. A simple Cartesian description for Hencky strain-rate in the Lagrangian state is obtained.

  13. Phylogeny of bacteria isolated from Rhabditis sp. (Nematoda) and identification of novel entomopathogenic Serratia marcescens strains.

    PubMed

    Tambong, James T

    2013-02-01

    Twenty-five bacterial strains isolated from entomopathogenic nematodes were characterized to the genus level by 16S rRNA phylogeny and BLAST analyses. Bacteria strains isolated could be affiliated with seven genera. Microbacterium-like isolates phylogenetically affiliated with M. oxydans while those of Serratia were highly similar to S. marcescens. 16S rRNA sequences of Bacillus isolates matched those of both B. mycoides and B. weihenstephanesis. One isolate each matched Pseudomonas mosselii, Rheinheimera aquimaris, Achromobacter marplatensis, or Staphylococcus hominis. Serratia isolates were examined further for their pathogenicity to Galleria mellonella larvae. All the Serratia isolates exhibited potent pathogenicity toward G. mellonella larvae and possessed a metalloprotease gene encoding for a novel serralysin-like protein. The nucleotide sequence of the metalloprotease gene had 60 synonymous and 8 nonsynonymous substitutions when compared to the closest genBank entry, S. marcescens E-15, with an insertion of a new aspartic acid residue. Tajima's test for equality of evolutionary rate was significant between the metalloprotease gene sequence of S. marcescens strain DOAB 216-82 (this study) and strain E-15. This new insecticidal metalloprotease gene and/or its product could have applications in agricultural biotechnology.

  14. Strain Gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    HITEC Corporation developed a strain gage application for DanteII, a mobile robot developed for NASA. The gage measured bending forces on the robot's legs and warned human controllers when acceptable forces were exceeded. HITEC further developed the technology for strain gage services in creating transducers out of "Indy" racing car suspension pushrods, NASCAR suspension components and components used in motion control.

  15. Comparative genomics of non-pseudomonal bacterial species colonising paediatric cystic fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Ormerod, Kate L.; George, Narelle M.; Fraser, James A.; Wainwright, Claire

    2015-01-01

    The genetic disorder cystic fibrosis is a life-limiting condition affecting ∼70,000 people worldwide. Targeted, early, treatment of the dominant infecting species, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, has improved patient outcomes; however, there is concern that other species are now stepping in to take its place. In addition, the necessarily long-term antibiotic therapy received by these patients may be providing a suitable environment for the emergence of antibiotic resistance. To investigate these issues, we employed whole-genome sequencing of 28 non-Pseudomonas bacterial strains isolated from three paediatric patients. We did not find any trend of increasing antibiotic resistance (either by mutation or lateral gene transfer) in these isolates in comparison with other examples of the same species. In addition, each isolate contained a virulence gene repertoire that was similar to other examples of the relevant species. These results support the impaired clearance of the CF lung not demanding extensive virulence for survival in this habitat. By analysing serial isolates of the same species we uncovered several examples of strain persistence. The same strain of Staphylococcus aureus persisted for nearly a year, despite administration of antibiotics to which it was shown to be sensitive. This is consistent with previous studies showing antibiotic therapy to be inadequate in cystic fibrosis patients, which may also explain the lack of increasing antibiotic resistance over time. Serial isolates of two naturally multi-drug resistant organisms, Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, revealed that while all S. maltophilia strains were unique, A. xylosoxidans persisted for nearly five years, making this a species of particular concern. The data generated by this study will assist in developing an understanding of the non-Pseudomonas species associated with cystic fibrosis. PMID:26401445

  16. Specific and functional diversity of endophytic bacteria from pine wood nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus with different virulence.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Qin; Yuan, Wei-Min; Tian, Xiao-Jing; Fan, Ben; Fang, Xin; Ye, Jian-Ren; Ding, Xiao-Lei

    2013-01-01

    Pine wilt disease (PWD) caused by the pine wood nematode (PWN), Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, is one of the most devastating diseases of Pinus spp. The PWN was therefore listed as one of the most dangerous forest pests in China meriting quarantine. Virulence of the PWN is closely linked with the spread of PWD. However, main factors responsible for the virulence of PWNs are still unclear. Recently epiphytic bacteria carried by PWNs have drawn much attention. But little is known about the relationship between endophytic bacteria and virulence of B. xylophilus. In this research, virulence of ten strains of B. xylophilus from different geographical areas in six provinces of China and four pine species were tested with 2-year-old seedlings of Pinus thunbergii. Endophytic bacteria were isolated from PWNs with different virulence to investigate the relationship between the bacteria and PWN virulence. Meanwhile, the carbon metabolism of endophytic bacteria from highly and low virulent B. xylophilus was analyzed using Biolog plates (ECO). The results indicated that ten strains of PWNs showed a wide range of virulence. Simultaneously, endophytic bacteria were isolated from 90% of the B. xylophilus strains. The dominant endophytic bacteria in the nematodes were identified as species of Stenotrophomonas, Achromobacter, Ewingella, Leifsonia, Rhizobium, and Pseudomonas using molecular and biochemical methods. Moreover, S. maltophilia, and A. xylosoxidans subsp. xylosoxidans were the predominant strains. Most of the strains (80%) from P. massoniana contained either S. maltophilia, A. xylosoxidans, or both species. There was a difference between the abilities of the endophytic bacteria to utilize carbon sources. Endophytic bacteria from highly virulent B. xylophilus had a relatively high utilization rate of carbohydrate and carboxylic acids, while bacteria from low virulent B. xylophilus made better use of amino acids. In conclusion, endophytic bacteria widely exist in B. xylophilus

  17. Effect of volatile organic compounds from bacteria on nematodes.

    PubMed

    Xu, You-Yao; Lu, Hao; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Ke-Qin; Li, Guo-Hong

    2015-09-01

    The five studied bacterial strains could produce volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that kill nematodes. Based on their 16S rRNA sequences, these strains were identified as Pseudochrobactrum saccharolyticum, Wautersiella falsenii, Proteus hauseri, Arthrobacter nicotianae, and Achromobacter xylosoxidans. The bacterial VOCs were extracted using solid-phase micro-extraction (SPME) and subsequently identified by GC/MS analysis. The VOCs covered a wide range of aldehydes, ketones, alkyls, alcohols, alkenes, esters, alkynes, acids, ethers, as well as heterocyclic and phenolic compounds. Among the 53 VOCs identified, 19 candidates, produced by different bacteria, were selected to test their nematicidal activity (NA) against Caenorhabditis elegans and Meloidogyne incognita. The seven compounds with the highest NAs were acetophenone, S-methyl thiobutyrate, dimethyl disulfide, ethyl 3,3-dimethylacrylate, nonan-2-one, 1-methoxy-4-methylbenzene, and butyl isovalerate. Among them, S-methyl thiobutyrate showed a stronger NA than the commercial insecticide dimethyl disulfide. It was reported for the first time here that the five bacterial strains as well as S-methyl thiobutyrate, ethyl 3,3-dimethylacrylate, 1-methoxy-4-methylbenzene, and butyl isovalerate possess NA. These strains and compounds might provide new insights in the search for novel nematicides.

  18. High temperature strain gage apparent strain compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Harlan K.; Moore, T. C., Sr.

    1992-01-01

    Once an installed strain gage is connected to a strain indicating device and the instrument is balanced, a subsequent change in temperature of the gage installation will generally produce a resistance change in the gage. This purely temperature-induced resistance will be registered by the indicating device as a strain and is referred to as 'apparent strain' to distinguish it from strain due to applied stress. One desirable technique for apparent strain compensation is to employ two identical gages with identical mounting procedures which are connected with a 'half bridge' configuration where gages see the same thermal environment but only one experiences a mechanical strain input. Their connection in adjacent arms of the bridge will then balance the thermally induced apparent strains and, in principle, only the mechanical strain remains. Two approaches that implement this technique are discussed.

  19. Geobacteraceae strains and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Lovley, Derek R.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Yi, Hana

    2015-07-07

    Embodiments of the present invention provide a method of producing genetically modified strains of electricigenic microbes that are specifically adapted for the production of electrical current in microbial fuel cells, as well as strains produced by such methods and fuel cells using such strains. In preferred embodiments, the present invention provides genetically modified strains of Geobacter sulfurreducens and methods of using such strains.

  20. Muscle strain treatment

    MedlinePlus

    Treatment - muscle strain ... Question: How do you treat a muscle strain ? Answer: Rest the strained muscle and apply ice for the first few days after the injury. Anti-inflammatory medicines or acetaminophen ( ...

  1. Muscle strain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A muscle strain is the stretching or tearing of muscle fibers. A muscle strain can be caused by sports, exercise, a ... something that is too heavy. Symptoms of a muscle strain include pain, tightness, swelling, tenderness, and the ...

  2. Superlattice strain gage

    DOEpatents

    Noel, B.W.; Smith, D.L.; Sinha, D.N.

    1988-06-28

    A strain gage comprising a strained-layer superlattice crystal exhibiting piezoelectric properties is described. A substrate upon which such a strained-layer superlattice crystal has been deposited is attached to an element to be monitored for strain. A light source is focused on the superlattice crystal and the light reflected from, passed through, or emitted from the crystal is gathered and compared with previously obtained optical property data to determine the strain in the element. 8 figs.

  3. Superlattice strain gage

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Smith, Darryl L.; Sinha, Dipen N.

    1990-01-01

    A strain gage comprising a strained-layer superlattice crystal exhibiting piezoelectric properties is described. A substrate upon which such a strained-layer superlattice crystal has been deposited is attached to an element to be monitored for strain. A light source is focused on the superlattice crystal and the light reflected from, passed through, or emitted from the crystal is gathered and compared with previously obtained optical property data to determine the strain in the element.

  4. Biodegradation of 2,4,6-tribromophenol during transport in fractured chalk.

    PubMed

    Arnon, Shai; Adar, Eilon; Ronen, Zeev; Nejidat, Ali; Yakirevich, Alexander; Nativ, Ronit

    2005-02-01

    The effect of physicochemical conditions (residence time, oxygen concentrations, and chalk characteristics) on the biodegradation of 2,4,6-tribromophenol (TBP) during transport was investigated in low-permeability fractured-chalk cores. Long-term (approximately 600 d) biodegradation experiments were conducted in two cores (approximately 21 cm diameter, 31 and 44 cm long, respectively), intersected by a natural fracture. TBP was used as a model contaminant and as the sole carbon source for aerobic microbial activity. Bacterial isolates were recovered and identified by both Biolog identification kit and 16S rDNA sequences from batch enrichment cultures. One of the strains, with 98% similarity (based on the 16S rDNA data) to Achromobacter xylosoxidans, was shown to have the ability to degrade TBP in the presence of chalk. The decrease in TBP concentration along the fracture due to biodegradation was not affected by reducing the residence time from 49 to 8 min. In contrast, adding oxygen to the water at the inlet and increasing the flow rates improved TBP removal. Although the matrix pore-size distribution limits microbial activity to the fracture void, the chalk appears to provide an excellent environment for biodegradation activity. Approximately 90% of TBP removal occurred within 10 cm of the TBP source, indicating that in-situ bioremediation can be used to remove organic contaminants in low-permeability fractured rocks if nutrient-delivery pathways within the aquifer are secured.

  5. Revisited distribution of nonfermenting Gram-negative bacilli clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Jacquier, H; Carbonnelle, E; Corvec, S; Illiaquer, M; Le Monnier, A; Bille, E; Zahar, J R; Beretti, J L; Jauréguy, F; Fihman, V; Tankovic, J; Cattoir, V

    2011-12-01

    Nonfermenting Gram-negative bacilli (NF-GNB) are ubiquitous environmental opportunistic bacteria frequently misidentified by conventional phenotypic methods. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of NF-GNB species by 16 S rRNA gene sequencing (used as reference method) and to compare performances of biochemical tests and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). From nine French hospitals, 188 NF-GNB isolates (except P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii) were prospectively collected from 187 clinical samples between December 2008 and May 2009. By using the genotypic approach, 173 (92%) and 188 (100%) isolates were identified to the species and genus level, respectively. They covered 35 species and 20 genera, with a predominance of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Achromobacter xylosoxidans, and Pseudomonas putida group bacteria. Of the 173 species-level identified strains, concordant identification to the species-level was obtained for 75.1%, 83% and 88.9% of isolates with API 20 NE strip, the VITEK-2 (ID-GN card) system and MALDI-TOF-MS, respectively. By excluding S. maltophilia isolates accurately identified by the three methods, genus-level identification was much higher for MALDI-TOF-MS (92.9%), compared with API 20 NE and VITEK-2 (76.2% and 80.8%, respectively). In conclusion, MALDI-TOF-MS represents a rapid, inexpensive, and accurate tool for routine identification of NF-GNB in human clinical samples.

  6. Sprains and Strains

    MedlinePlus

    ... happens. A strain is a stretched or torn muscle or tendon. Tendons are tissues that connect muscle to bone. Twisting or pulling these tissues can ... suddenly or develop over time. Back and hamstring muscle strains are common. Many people get strains playing ...

  7. Can strain magnetize light?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-02-01

    Strain in photonic structures can induce pseudomagnetic fields and Landau levels. Nature Photonics spoke to Mordechai Segev, Mikael Rechtsman, Alexander Szameit and Julia Zeuner about their unique approach.

  8. Light intensity strain analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A process is described for the analysis of the strain field of structures subjected to large deformations involving a low modulus substrate having a high modulus, relatively thin coating. The optical properties of transmittance and reflectance are measured for the coated substrate while stressed and unstressed to indicate the strain field for the coated substrate.

  9. Nanowires enabling strained photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Greil, J.; Bertagnolli, E.; Lugstein, A.; Birner, S.

    2014-04-21

    Photovoltaic nano-devices have largely been relying on charge separation in conventional p-n junctions. Junction formation via doping, however, imposes major challenges in process control. Here, we report on a concept for photovoltaic energy conversion at the nano scale without the need for intentional doping. Our approach relies on charge carrier separation in inhomogeneously strained germanium nanowires (Ge NWs). This concept utilizes the strain-induced gradient in bandgap along tapered NWs. Experimental data confirms the feasibility of strain-induced charge separation in individual vapor-liquid-solid grown Ge NW devices with an internal quantum efficiency of ∼5%. The charge separation mechanism, though, is not inherently limited to a distinct material. Our work establishes a class of photovoltaic nano-devices with its opto-electronic properties engineered by size, shape, and applied strain.

  10. Magnetocaloric materials: Strained relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordblad, Per

    2013-01-01

    The magnetocaloric effect could form the basis for efficient refrigeration technologies. The finding that large and reversible magnetocaloric effects can be induced through a strain-mediated feedback mechanism may expand the range of available magnetocaloric materials.

  11. Sprains and Strains

    MedlinePlus

    ... people at risk for strains. Gymnastics, tennis, rowing, golf, and other sports that require extensive gripping can ... Trials and You was designed to help people learn more about clinical trials, why they matter, and ...

  12. What Are Sprains and Strains?

    MedlinePlus

    ... sprain, one or more ligaments is stretched or torn. What Causes a Sprain? Where Do Sprains Usually ... strain, a muscle or tendon is stretched or torn. What Causes Strains? A strain is caused by ...

  13. Enhanced chrysene degradation by a mixed culture Biorem-CGBD using response surface design.

    PubMed

    Dave, Bharti P; Ghevariya, Chirag M; Bhatt, Jwalant K; Dudhagara, Dushyant R; Rajpara, Rahul K

    2015-05-01

    Degradation of chrysene, a four ringed highly carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) has been demonstrated by bacterial mixed culture Biorem-CGBD comprising Achromobacter xylosoxidans, Pseudomonas sp. and Sphingomonas sp., isolated from crude oil polluted saline sites at Bhavnagar coast, Gujarat, India. A full factorial Central Composite Design (CCD) using Response Surface Methodology (RSM) was applied to construct response surfaces, predicting 41.93% of maximum chrysene degradation with an experimental validation of 66.45% chrysene degradation on 15th day, using a combination of 0.175, 0.175 and 0.385 mL of OD600 = 1 inoculum of A. xylosoxidans, Pseudomonas sp. and Sphingomonas sp., respectively and a regression coefficient (R2) of 0.9485 indicating reproducibility of the experiment. It was observed that chrysene degradation can be successfully enhanced using RSM, making mixed culture Biorem-CGBD a potential bioremediation target for PAH contaminated saline sites.

  14. MEMS Graphene Strain Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Clinton Wen-Chieh

    Graphene is a two dimensional honeycomb structure of sp2 hybridized carbon atoms that has possibilities in many applications due to its excellent mechanical and electrical properties. One application for Graphene is in the field of sensors. Graphene's electronic properties do not degrade when it undergoes mechanical strain which is advantageous for strain sensors. In this thesis, certain properties, such as the piezo-resistivity and flexibility, of graphene will be explored to show how they can be utilized to make a strain sensing device. Our original fabrication process of patterning graphene and the transfer process of graphene onto a flexible substrate will be discussed. The development of a stretchable and flexible graphene based rosette strain sensor will also be detailed. Developing a novel, reliable patterning process for the graphene is the first step to manufacture a stretchable graphene based sensor. The graphene was patterned using a photolithography and etching process that was developed by our research team, then it was transferred to a flexible polymer substrate with the use of a combination of soft lithography and wet etching of the Ni foil with ferric chloride solution. Graphene patterning is an essential step in fabricating reliable and sensitive sensors. With this process, graphene can be consistently patterned into different shapes and sizes. To utilize the graphene as the sensing material it also needs to be transferred onto a flexible substrate. The innovative transfer process developed by our research team consistently adheres graphene to a flexible PDMS substrate while removing the original nickel substrate. In the end, the graphene was transferred from the metal substrate to the desired flexible substrate. This process was repeated multiple times to create a stack and multilayer device. While many graphene-based strain sensors have been developed, they are uni-directional and can only measure the strain applied on the sensor in a principle

  15. Berberine Is a Novel Type Efflux Inhibitor Which Attenuates the MexXY-Mediated Aminoglycoside Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Yuji; Nakashima, Ken-ichi; Nishino, Kunihiko; Kotani, Kenta; Tomida, Junko; Inoue, Makoto; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    The emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa infections is of great concern, as very few agents are effective against strains of this species. Methanolic extracts from the Coptidis Rhizoma (the rhizomes of Coptis japonica var. major Satake) or Phellodendri Cortex (the bark of Phellodendron chinense Schneider) markedly reduced resistance to anti-pseudomonal aminoglycosides (e.g., amikacin) in multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains. Berberine, the most abundant benzylisoquinoline alkaloid in the two extracts, reduced aminoglycoside resistance of P. aeruginosa via a mechanism that required the MexXY multidrug efflux system; berberine also reduced aminoglycoside MICs in Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Burkholderia cepacia, two species that harbor intrinsic multidrug efflux systems very similar to the MexXY. Furthermore this compound inhibited MexXY-dependent antibiotic resistance of other classes including cephalosporins (cefepime), macrolides (erythromycin), and lincosamides (lincomycin) demonstrated using a pseudomonad lacking the four other major Mex pumps. Although phenylalanine-arginine beta-naphthylamide (PAβN), a well-known efflux inhibitor, antagonized aminoglycoside in a MexXY-dependent manner, a lower concentration of berberine was sufficient to reduce amikacin resistance of P. aeruginosa in the presence of PAβN. Moreover, berberine enhanced the synergistic effects of amikacin and piperacillin (and vice versa) in multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains. Thus, berberine appears to be a novel type inhibitor of the MexXY-dependent aminoglycoside efflux in P. aeruginosa. As aminoglycosides are molecules of choice to treat severe infections the clinical impact is potentially important. PMID:27547203

  16. Berberine Is a Novel Type Efflux Inhibitor Which Attenuates the MexXY-Mediated Aminoglycoside Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Morita, Yuji; Nakashima, Ken-Ichi; Nishino, Kunihiko; Kotani, Kenta; Tomida, Junko; Inoue, Makoto; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    The emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa infections is of great concern, as very few agents are effective against strains of this species. Methanolic extracts from the Coptidis Rhizoma (the rhizomes of Coptis japonica var. major Satake) or Phellodendri Cortex (the bark of Phellodendron chinense Schneider) markedly reduced resistance to anti-pseudomonal aminoglycosides (e.g., amikacin) in multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains. Berberine, the most abundant benzylisoquinoline alkaloid in the two extracts, reduced aminoglycoside resistance of P. aeruginosa via a mechanism that required the MexXY multidrug efflux system; berberine also reduced aminoglycoside MICs in Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Burkholderia cepacia, two species that harbor intrinsic multidrug efflux systems very similar to the MexXY. Furthermore this compound inhibited MexXY-dependent antibiotic resistance of other classes including cephalosporins (cefepime), macrolides (erythromycin), and lincosamides (lincomycin) demonstrated using a pseudomonad lacking the four other major Mex pumps. Although phenylalanine-arginine beta-naphthylamide (PAβN), a well-known efflux inhibitor, antagonized aminoglycoside in a MexXY-dependent manner, a lower concentration of berberine was sufficient to reduce amikacin resistance of P. aeruginosa in the presence of PAβN. Moreover, berberine enhanced the synergistic effects of amikacin and piperacillin (and vice versa) in multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains. Thus, berberine appears to be a novel type inhibitor of the MexXY-dependent aminoglycoside efflux in P. aeruginosa. As aminoglycosides are molecules of choice to treat severe infections the clinical impact is potentially important. PMID:27547203

  17. Muscle strain injuries.

    PubMed

    Garrett, W E

    1996-01-01

    One of the most common injuries seen in the office of the practicing physician is the muscle strain. Until recently, little data were available on the basic science and clinical application of this basic science for the treatment and prevention of muscle strains. Studies in the last 10 years represent action taken on the direction of investigation into muscle strain injuries from the laboratory and clinical fronts. Findings from the laboratory indicate that certain muscles are susceptible to strain injury (muscles that cross multiple joints or have complex architecture). These muscles have a strain threshold for both passive and active injury. Strain injury is not the result of muscle contraction alone, rather, strains are the result of excessive stretch or stretch while the muscle is being activated. When the muscle tears, the damage is localized very near the muscle-tendon junction. After injury, the muscle is weaker and at risk for further injury. The force output of the muscle returns over the following days as the muscle undertakes a predictable progression toward tissue healing. Current imaging studies have been used clinically to document the site of injury to the muscle-tendon junction. The commonly injured muscles have been described and include the hamstring, the rectus femoris, gastrocnemius, and adductor longus muscles. Injuries inconsistent with involvement of a single muscle-tendon junction proved to be at tendinous origins rather than within the muscle belly. Important information has also been provided regarding injuries with poor prognosis, which are potentially repairable surgically, including injuries to the rectus femoris muscle, the hamstring origin, and the abdominal wall. Data important to the management of common muscle injuries have been published. The risks of reinjury have been documented. The early efficacy and potential for long-term risks of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents have been shown. New data can also be applied to the field

  18. ConStrains identifies microbial strains in metagenomic datasets

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chengwei; Knight, Rob; Siljander, Heli; Knip, Mikael; Xavier, Ramnik J; Gevers, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    An important fraction of microbial diversity is harbored in strain individuality, so identification of conspecific bacterial strains is imperative for improved understanding of microbial community functions. Limitations in bioinformatics and sequencing technologies have to date precluded strain identification owing to difficulties in phasing short reads to faithfully recover the original strain-level genotypes, which have highly similar sequences. We present ConStrains, an open-source algorithm that identifies conspecific strains from metagenomic sequence data and reconstructs the phylogeny of these strains in microbial communities. The algorithm uses single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) patterns in a set of universal genes to infer within-species structures that represent strains. Applying ConStrains to simulated and host-derived data sets provides insights into microbial community dynamics. PMID:26344404

  19. ConStrains identifies microbial strains in metagenomic datasets.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chengwei; Knight, Rob; Siljander, Heli; Knip, Mikael; Xavier, Ramnik J; Gevers, Dirk

    2015-10-01

    An important fraction of microbial diversity is harbored in strain individuality, so identification of conspecific bacterial strains is imperative for improved understanding of microbial community functions. Limitations in bioinformatics and sequencing technologies have to date precluded strain identification owing to difficulties in phasing short reads to faithfully recover the original strain-level genotypes, which have highly similar sequences. We present ConStrains, an open-source algorithm that identifies conspecific strains from metagenomic sequence data and reconstructs the phylogeny of these strains in microbial communities. The algorithm uses single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) patterns in a set of universal genes to infer within-species structures that represent strains. Applying ConStrains to simulated and host-derived datasets provides insights into microbial community dynamics.

  20. Strain gage barometric transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viton, P.

    1977-01-01

    A strain gage barometric transmitter for measuring the atmospheric pressure in severe environmental conditions is described. This equipment specifications are presented and its performance assessed. It is shown that this barometric sensor can measure the atmospheric pressure with a precision of 0.5 mb during a 6 month period.

  1. Repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed

    Al-Otaibi, S T

    2001-05-01

    Repetitive strain injury is a group of musculoskeletal disorders affecting muscles, tendons, nerves and blood vessels. These disorders could be attributed to occupational causes; however non-occupational causes should be excluded. The management of these cases required a multidisciplinary team approach.

  2. Sadovskii vortex in strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freilich, Daniel; Llewellyn Smith, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    Sadovskii vortices are patches of fluid with uniform vorticity surrounded by a vortex sheet. They were first constructed as models for wakes behind bluff objects. We investigate the Sadovskii vortex in a straining field and examine limiting cases to validate our computational method. One limit is the patch vortex in strain (Moore & Saffman, Aircraft wake turbulence and its detection 1971), where there is no vortex sheet. We solve this as a free-boundary problem, and show that a simple method using the Biot-Savart law quickly gives solutions for stable shapes. When used for the more elongated (stronger straining field) situations, the method also leads to new vortex shapes. In the hollow vortex case, where there is no vortex patch and the circulation is entirely due to the vortex sheet (Llewellyn Smith and Crowdy, J. Fluid Mech. 691 2012), we use the Birkhoff-Rott equation to calculate the velocity of the fluid on the vortex boundary. The combination of these two methods can then be used to calculate the shape and velocity field of the Sadovksii vortex in strain.

  3. Exposure of Sink Drain Microcosms to Triclosan: Population Dynamics and Antimicrobial Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    McBain, Andrew J.; Bartolo, Robert G.; Catrenich, Carl E.; Charbonneau, Duane; Ledder, Ruth G.; Price, Bradford B.; Gilbert, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Recent concern that the increased use of triclosan (TCS) in consumer products may contribute to the emergence of antibiotic resistance has led us to examine the effects of TCS dosing on domestic-drain biofilm microcosms. TCS-containing domestic detergent (TCSD) markedly lowered biofouling at 50% (wt/vol) but was poorly effective at use levels. Long-term microcosms were established and stabilized for 6 months before one was subjected to successive 3-month exposures to TCSD at sublethal concentrations (0.2 and 0.4% [wt/vol]). Culturable bacteria were identified by 16S rDNA sequence analysis, and their susceptibilities to four biocides and six antibiotics were determined. Microcosms harbored ca. 10 log10 CFU/g of biofilm, representing at least 27 species, mainly gamma proteobacteria, and maintained dynamic stability. Viable cell counts were largely unaffected by TCSD exposure, but species diversity was decreased, as corroborated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis. TCS susceptibilities ranged widely within bacterial groups, and TCS-tolerant strains (including aeromonads, pseudomonads, stenotrophomonads, and Alcaligenes spp.) were isolated before and after TCSD exposure. Several TCS-tolerant bacteria related to Achromobacter xylosoxidans became clonally expanded during dosing. TCSD addition did not significantly affect the community profiles of susceptibility to the test biocides or antibiotics. Several microcosm isolates, as well as reference bacteria, caused clearing of particulate TCS in solid media. Incubations of consortia and isolates with particulate TCS in liquid led to putative TCS degradation by the consortia and TCS solubilization by the reference strains. Our results support the view that low-level exposure of environmental microcosms to TCS does not affect antimicrobial susceptibility and that TCS is degradable by common domestic biofilms. PMID:12957932

  4. Highly stretchable miniature strain sensor for large dynamic strain measurement

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Bo; Yao, Shurong; Nie, Xu; Yu, Xun; Blecke, Jill

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new type of highly stretchable strain sensor was developed to measure large strains. The sensor was based on the piezo-resistive response of carbon nanotube (CNT)/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite thin films. The piezo-resistive response of CNT composite gives accurate strain measurement with high frequency response, while the ultra-soft PDMS matrix provides high flexibility and ductility for large strain measurement. Experimental results show that the CNT/PDMS sensor measures large strains (up to 8 %) with an excellent linearity and a fast frequency response. The new miniature strain sensor also exhibits much higher sensitivities than the conventional foil strain gages,more » as its gauge factor is 500 times of that of the conventional foil strain gages.« less

  5. Highly stretchable miniature strain sensor for large dynamic strain measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Yao, Shurong; Nie, Xu; Yu, Xun; Blecke, Jill

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new type of highly stretchable strain sensor was developed to measure large strains. The sensor was based on the piezo-resistive response of carbon nanotube (CNT)/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite thin films. The piezo-resistive response of CNT composite gives accurate strain measurement with high frequency response, while the ultra-soft PDMS matrix provides high flexibility and ductility for large strain measurement. Experimental results show that the CNT/PDMS sensor measures large strains (up to 8 %) with an excellent linearity and a fast frequency response. The new miniature strain sensor also exhibits much higher sensitivities than the conventional foil strain gages, as its gauge factor is 500 times of that of the conventional foil strain gages.

  6. Strain patterns and strain accumulation along plate margins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    Observations of strain accumulation along plate margins in Japan, New Zealand, and the United States indicate that: (1) a typical maximum rate of secular strain accumulation is on the order of 0.3 ppm/a, (2) a substantial part of the strain accumulation process can be attributed to slip at depth on the major plate boundary faults, and (3) some plastic deformation in a zone 100 km or more in width is apparently involved in the strain accumulation process.

  7. High temperature strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Otto J. (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A ceramic strain gage based on reactively sputtered indium-tin-oxide (ITO) thin films is used to monitor the structural integrity of components employed in aerospace propulsion systems operating at temperatures in excess of 1500.degree. C. A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the thick ITO sensors reveals a partially sintered microstructure comprising a contiguous network of submicron ITO particles with well defined necks and isolated nanoporosity. Densification of the ITO particles was retarded during high temperature exposure with nitrogen thus stabilizing the nanoporosity. ITO strain sensors were prepared by reactive sputtering in various nitrogen/oxygen/argon partial pressures to incorporate more nitrogen into the films. Under these conditions, sintering and densification of the ITO particles containing these nitrogen rich grain boundaries was retarded and a contiguous network of nano-sized ITO particles was established.

  8. Sports Hernia: Misdiagnosed Muscle Strain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Manipulative Treatment Becoming a DO Video Library Misdiagnosed Muscle Strain Can Be A Pain Page Content If ... speeds, sports hernias are frequently confused with common muscle strain ,” says Michael Sampson, DO, who practices in ...

  9. Genealogies of mouse inbred strains.

    PubMed

    Beck, J A; Lloyd, S; Hafezparast, M; Lennon-Pierce, M; Eppig, J T; Festing, M F; Fisher, E M

    2000-01-01

    The mouse is a prime organism of choice for modelling human disease. Over 450 inbred strains of mice have been described, providing a wealth of different genotypes and phenotypes for genetic and other studies. As new strains are generated and others become extinct, it is useful to review periodically what strains are available and how they are related to each other, particularly in the light of available DNA polymorphism data from microsatellite and other markers. We describe the origins and relationships of inbred mouse strains, 90 years after the generation of the first inbred strain. Given the large collection of inbred strains available, and that published information on these strains is incomplete, we propose that all genealogical and genetic data on inbred strains be submitted to a common electronic database to ensure this valuable information resource is preserved and used efficiently.

  10. Construction of the Inbred Strain.

    PubMed

    Shinya, Minori

    2016-01-01

    Genetically homogeneous populations such as inbred strains are valuable experimental tools in various fields of biomedical analyses. In many animals, inbred strains are established by consecutive sib-pair mating for a minimum of 20 generations. As the generation proceeds, fitness of the population reduces usually. Therefore, in order to establish inbred strains, the important point is the selection of pairs in good condition at each generation. Here, I describe the procedure and tips for generating inbred strains in zebrafish. PMID:27464804

  11. Strain incompatibility and residual strains in ferroelectric single crystals

    PubMed Central

    Pramanick, A.; Jones, J. L.; Tutuncu, G.; Ghosh, D.; Stoica, A. D.; An, K.

    2012-01-01

    Residual strains in ferroelectrics are known to adversely affect the material properties by aggravating crack growth and fatigue degradation. The primary cause for residual strains is strain incompatibility between different microstructural entities. For example, it was shown in polycrystalline ferroelectrics that residual strains are caused due to incompatibility between the electric-field-induced strains in grains with different crystallographic orientations. However, similar characterization of cause-effect in multidomain ferroelectric single crystals is lacking. In this article, we report on the development of plastic residual strains in [111]-oriented domain engineered BaTiO3 single crystals. These internal strains are created due to strain incompatibility across 90° domain walls between the differently oriented domains. The average residual strains over a large crystal volume measured by in situ neutron diffraction is comparable to previous X-ray measurements of localized strains near domain boundaries, but are an order of magnitude lower than electric-field-induced residual strains in polycrystalline ferroelectrics. PMID:23226595

  12. Strain balanced quantum posts

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Alvarez, D.; Alen, B.; Ripalda, J. M.; Llorens, J. M.; Taboada, A. G.; Briones, F.; Roldan, M. A.; Hernandez-Saz, J.; Hernandez-Maldonado, D.; Herrera, M.; Molina, S. I.

    2011-04-25

    Quantum posts are assembled by epitaxial growth of closely spaced quantum dot layers, modulating the composition of a semiconductor alloy, typically InGaAs. In contrast with most self-assembled nanostructures, the height of quantum posts can be controlled with nanometer precision, up to a maximum value limited by the accumulated stress due to the lattice mismatch. Here, we present a strain compensation technique based on the controlled incorporation of phosphorous, which substantially increases the maximum attainable quantum post height. The luminescence from the resulting nanostructures presents giant linear polarization anisotropy.

  13. Compensated High Temperature Strain Gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A device for measuring strain in substrates at high temperatures in which the thermally induced apparent strain is nulled is described. Two gages are used, one active gage and one compensating gage. Both gages are placed on the substrate to be gaged; the active gage is attached such that it responds to mechanical and thermally induced apparent strain while the compensating gage is attached such that it does not respond to mechanical strain and and measures only thermally induced apparent strain. A thermal blanket is placed over the two gages to maintain the gages at the same temperature. The two gages are wired as adjacent arms of a wheatstone bridge which nulls the thermally induced apparent strain giving a true reading of the mechanical strain in the substrate.

  14. Sadovskii vortex in strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freilich, Daniel; Llewellyn Smith, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    A Sadovskii vortex is a patch of fluid with uniform vorticity surrounded by a vortex sheet. Using a boundary element type method, we investigate the steady states of this flow in an incompressible, inviscid straining flow. Outside the vortex, the fluid is irrotational. In the limiting case where the entire circulation is due to the vortex patch, this is a patch vortex (Moore & Saffman, Aircraft wake turbulence and its detection 1971). In the other limiting case, where all the circulation is due to the vortex sheet, this is a hollow vortex (Llewellyn Smith and Crowdy, J. Fluid Mech. 691, 2012). This flow has two governing nondimensional parameters, relating the strengths of the straining field, vortex sheet, and patch vorticity. We study the relationship between these two parameters, and examine the shape of the resulting vortices. We also work towards a bifurcation diagram of the steady states of the Sadovskii vortex in an attempt to understand the connection between vortex sheet and vortex patch desingularizations of the point vortex. Support from NSF-CMMI-0970113.

  15. Repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed

    van Tulder, Maurits; Malmivaara, Antti; Koes, Bart

    2007-05-26

    Repetitive strain injury remains a controversial topic. The term repetitive strain injury includes specific disorders such as carpal tunnel syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome, Guyon canal syndrome, lateral epicondylitis, and tendonitis of the wrist or hand. The diagnosis is usually made on the basis of history and clinical examination. Large high-quality studies using newer imaging techniques, such as MRI and ultrasonography are few. Consequently, the role of such imaging in diagnosis of upper limb disorders remains unclear. In many cases, no specific diagnosis can be established and complaints are labelled as non-specific. Little is known about the effectiveness of treatment options for upper limb disorders. Strong evidence for any intervention is scarce and the effect, if any, is mainly short-term pain relief. Exercise is beneficial for non-specific upper limb disorders. Immobilising hand braces and open carpal tunnel surgery release are beneficial for carpal tunnel syndrome, and topical and oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and corticosteroid injections are helpful for lateral epicondylitis. Exercise is probably beneficial for neck pain, as are corticosteroid injections and exercise for shoulder pain. Although upper limb disorders occur frequently in the working population, most trials have not exclusively included a working population or assessed effects on work-related outcomes. Further high-quality trials should aim to include sufficient sample sizes, working populations, and work-related outcomes.

  16. Strained-bond semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dow, John D.

    1994-05-01

    Theories of strained-bond semiconductors and superconductors have been developed that promise to have significant impact on future electronic devices of interest to the Air Force. These include: (1) development of a theory of high-temperature superconductivity based on the idea of strained-layer superlattices, (2) elucidation of the physics of doping in Type-2 semiconductor superlattices, which is now central to the development of high-speed field-effect transistors, (3) a theory of dimerization and reconstruction on (001) semiconductor surfaces, (4) theory of Mobius transforms as applied to physics and remote sensing, (5) new understanding of how defects affect the vibrational properties of semiconductors, (6) new methods of efficiently computing the trajectories of atoms in semiconductors by a priori molecular dynamics, (7) elucidation of the criteria affecting quantum-well luminescence from Si, (8) models of the effects of vacancies in large-gap Al(x)Ga(1-x)N alloys, (9) physics of rare-earth-doped silicon, (10) models of Co adsorption to silicon surfaces, (11) theories of how defects affect the properties of large band-gap superlattices, and (12) models of the effects of electronic structure on the properties of semiconductors.

  17. Geodetic strain measurements in Washington.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.; Lisowski, M.; Prescott, W.H.

    1981-01-01

    Two new geodetic measurements of strain accumulation in the state of Washington for the interval 1972-1979 are reported. Near Seattle the average principal strain rates are 0.07 + or - 0.03 mu strain/yr N19oW and -0.13 + or - 0.02 mu strain/yr N71oE, and near Richland (south central Washington) the average principal strain rates are -0.02 + or - 0.01 mu strain/yr N36oW and -0.04 + or - 0.01 mu strain/yr N54oE. Extension is taken as positive, and the uncertainties quoted are standard deviations. A measurement of shear strain accumulation (dilation not determined) in the epoch 1914- 1966 along the north coast of Vancouver Island by the Geodetic Survey of Canada indicates a marginally significant accumulation of right-lateral shear (0.06 + or - 0.03 mu rad/yr) across the plate boundary (N40oW strike). Although there are significant differences in detail, these strain measurements are roughly consistent with a crude dislocation model that represents subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate. The observed accumulation of strain implies that large, shallow, thrust earthquakes should be expected off the coast of Washington and British Columbia. However, this conclusion is not easily reconciled with either observations of elevation change along the Washington coast or the focal mechanism solutions for shallow earthquakes in Washington. -Authors

  18. Echocardiographic assessment of myocardial strain.

    PubMed

    Gorcsan, John; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2011-09-27

    Echocardiographic strain imaging, also known as deformation imaging, has been developed as a means to objectively quantify regional myocardial function. First introduced as post-processing of tissue Doppler imaging velocity converted to strain and strain rate, strain imaging has more recently also been derived from digital speckle tracking analysis. Strain imaging has been used to gain greater understanding into the pathophysiology of cardiac ischemia and infarction, primary diseases of the myocardium, and the effects of valvular disease on myocardial function, and to advance our understanding of diastolic function. Strain imaging has also been used to quantify abnormalities in the timing of mechanical activation for heart failure patients undergoing cardiac resynchronization pacing therapy. Further advances, such as 3-dimensional speckle tracking strain imaging, have emerged to provide even greater insight. Strain imaging has become established as a robust research tool and has great potential to play many roles in routine clinical practice to advance the care of the cardiovascular patient. This perspective reviews the physiology of myocardial strain, the technical features of strain imaging using tissue Doppler imaging and speckle tracking, their strengths and weaknesses, and the state-of-the-art present and potential future clinical applications.

  19. Strain Engineering in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro Neto, Antonio

    2011-03-01

    Graphene is a unique example of a one atom thick metallic membrane. Hence, graphene brings together properties of soft and hard condensed matter systems. The elementary electronic excitations in graphene, the Dirac quasiparticles, couple in a singular way to structural distortions in the form of scalar and vector potentials. Therefore, graphene has an effective electrodynamics where structural deformations couple to the Dirac particles at equal footing to electric and magnetic fields. This so-called strain engineering of the electronic properties of graphene opens doors for a new paradigm in terms of electronic devices, where electronic properties can be manipulated at will using its membrane-like properties. I thank partial support from from DOE Grant DE-FG02-08ER46512 and ONR Grant MURI N00014-09-1-1063.

  20. High temperature strain gage evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, J. I.

    1977-01-01

    The structural thermal test of an advanced ramjet missile section required strain measurements as high as 922 K (1200 F). Since there is relatively little experience in the use of strain gages above the 700-755 K (800-900 F) level, a program was initiated to select and evaluate the best available gage. Candidate gages suitable for measurements up to 922 K (1200 F) were selected. This involved the determination of their operating characteristics, availability, cost, installation aspects, etc. The evaluation involved the following tests: strain as a function of load at room temperature and apparent strain as a function of temperature.

  1. Strain variation in corrugated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuanye; Tantiwanichapan, Khwanchai; Christopher, Jason; Paiella, Roberto; Swan, Anna

    2015-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful non-destructive technique for analyzing strain in graphene. Recently there has been interest in making corrugated graphene devices with varying spatial wavelengths Λ for plasmonic and THz applications. Transferring graphene onto corrugated substrates introduces strain, which if there was perfect clamping (high fraction) would cause a periodic strain variation. However, the strain variation for pattern size smaller than the diffraction limit λ makes it hard to precisely model the strain distribution. Here we present a detailed study on how strain varies in corrugated graphene with sub-diffraction limit periodicity Λ < λ. Mechanically exfoliated graphene was deposited onto sinusoidal shape silicon dioxide gratings with Λ=400 nm period using the pick and place transfer technique. We observed that the graphene is not rigidly clamped, but partially slides to relieve the strain. We model the linewidth variation to extract the local strain variation as well as the sliding in the presence of charge puddling in graphene. The method gives us a better understanding on graphene slippage and strain distribution in graphene on a corrugated substrate with sub-diffraction limit spatial period.

  2. Thermal strain imaging: a review

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Chi Hyung; Shi, Yan; Huang, Sheng-Wen; Kim, Kang; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Thermal strain imaging (TSI) or temporal strain imaging is an ultrasound application that exploits the temperature dependence of sound speed to create thermal (temporal) strain images. This article provides an overview of the field of TSI for biomedical applications that have appeared in the literature over the past several years. Basic theory in thermal strain is introduced. Two major energy sources appropriate for clinical applications are discussed. Promising biomedical applications are presented throughout the paper, including non-invasive thermometry and tissue characterization. We present some of the limitations and complications of the method. The paper concludes with a discussion of competing technologies. PMID:22866235

  3. Hydrogen production from microbial strains

    DOEpatents

    Harwood, Caroline S; Rey, Federico E

    2012-09-18

    The present invention is directed to a method of screening microbe strains capable of generating hydrogen. This method involves inoculating one or more microbes in a sample containing cell culture medium to form an inoculated culture medium. The inoculated culture medium is then incubated under hydrogen producing conditions. Once incubating causes the inoculated culture medium to produce hydrogen, microbes in the culture medium are identified as candidate microbe strains capable of generating hydrogen. Methods of producing hydrogen using one or more of the microbial strains identified as well as the hydrogen producing strains themselves are also disclosed.

  4. Strain correction in interleaved strain-encoded (SENC) cardiac MR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motaal, Abdallah G.; Osman, Nael F.

    2010-03-01

    The strain encoding (SENC) technique directly encodes regional strain of the heart into the acquired MR images and produces two images with two different tunings so that longitudinal strain, on the short-axis view, or circumferential strain on the long-axis view, are measured. Interleaving acquisition is used to shorten the acquisition time of the two tuned images by 50%, but it suffers from errors in the strain calculations due to inter-tunings motion of the heart. In this work, we propose a method to correct for the inter-tunings motion by estimating the motion-induced shift in the spatial frequency of the encoding pattern, which depends on the strain rate. Numerical data was generated to test the proposed method and real images of human subjects were used for validation. The proposed method corrected the measured strain values so they became nearly identical to the original ones. The results show an improvement in strain calculations so as to relax the imaging constraints on spatial and temporal resolutions and improve image quality.

  5. Biomechanical strain of goldsmiths.

    PubMed

    Cândido, Paula Emanuela Fernandes; Teixeira, Juliana Vieira Schmidt; Moro, Antônio Renato Pereira; Gontijo, Leila Amaral

    2012-01-01

    The work of the goldsmiths consists in the manufacture of jewelry. The piece, be it an earring, bracelet or necklace, is hand-assembled. This task requires precision, skill, kindness and patience. In this work, we make use of tools such as cuticle clippers and rounded tip, beads or precious stones and also pieces of metal. This type of activity requires a biomechanical stress of hands and wrists. In order to quantify the biomechanical stress, we performed a case study to measure the movements performed by an assembly of pieces of jewelry. As method for research, filming was done during assembly of parts to a paste, using a Nikon digital camera, for 1 (one) hour. The film was edited by Kinovea software, and the task was divided into cycles, each cycle corresponds to a complete object. In one cycle, there are four two movements of supination and pronation movements of the forearm. The cycle lasts approximately sixteen seconds, totaling 1800 cycles in eight hours. Despite the effort required of the wrists, the activity shows no complaints from the employees, but this fact does not mischaracterizes the ability of employees to acquire repetitive strain injuries and work-related musculoskeletal disorders. PMID:22317096

  6. Biomechanical strain of goldsmiths.

    PubMed

    Cândido, Paula Emanuela Fernandes; Teixeira, Juliana Vieira Schmidt; Moro, Antônio Renato Pereira; Gontijo, Leila Amaral

    2012-01-01

    The work of the goldsmiths consists in the manufacture of jewelry. The piece, be it an earring, bracelet or necklace, is hand-assembled. This task requires precision, skill, kindness and patience. In this work, we make use of tools such as cuticle clippers and rounded tip, beads or precious stones and also pieces of metal. This type of activity requires a biomechanical stress of hands and wrists. In order to quantify the biomechanical stress, we performed a case study to measure the movements performed by an assembly of pieces of jewelry. As method for research, filming was done during assembly of parts to a paste, using a Nikon digital camera, for 1 (one) hour. The film was edited by Kinovea software, and the task was divided into cycles, each cycle corresponds to a complete object. In one cycle, there are four two movements of supination and pronation movements of the forearm. The cycle lasts approximately sixteen seconds, totaling 1800 cycles in eight hours. Despite the effort required of the wrists, the activity shows no complaints from the employees, but this fact does not mischaracterizes the ability of employees to acquire repetitive strain injuries and work-related musculoskeletal disorders.

  7. Adductor muscle strains in sport.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Stephen J; Tyler, Timothy F

    2002-01-01

    An in-season adductor muscle strain may be debilitating for the athlete. Furthermore, an adductor strain that is treated improperly could become chronic and career threatening. Any one of the six muscles of the adductor group could be involved. The degree of injury can range from a minor strain (Grade I), where minimal playing time is lost, to a severe strain (Grade III) in which there is complete loss of muscle function. Ice hockey and soccer players seem particularly susceptible to adductor muscle strains. In professional ice hockey players throughout the world, approximately 10% of all injuries are groin strains. These injuries, which have been linked to hip muscle weakness, previous injuries to that area, preseason practice sessions and level of experience, may be preventable if such risk factors can be addressed before each season. Hip-strengthening exercises were shown to be an effective method of reducing the incidence of adductor strains in one closely followed National Hockey League ice hockey team. Despite the identification of risk factors and strengthening intervention for ice hockey players, adductor strains continue to occur throughout sport. Clinicians feel an active training programme, along with completely restoring the strength of the adductor muscle group, is the key to successful rehabilitation. Surgical intervention is available if nonoperative treatment fails for 6 months or longer. Adductor release and tenotomy was reported to have limited success in athletes. PMID:11929360

  8. Hypothetical strain-free oligoradicals

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Roald; Eisenstein, Odile; Balaban, Alexandru T.

    1980-01-01

    Several new classes of oligoradicals free of angle strain are suggested and examined by means of molecular orbital calculations. The collapse products of these hypothetical radicals are highly strained molecules. Various electronic strategies for the stabilization of these oligoradicals have been explored. PMID:16592882

  9. Difference Between Strain and Sprain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Provided in this description of the differences between a strain (damage to the muscle or tendon) and a sprain (damage to the ligament) are definitions of mild, moderate, and severe (first, second, and third degree) strains and sprains. A final caution is given that these are two separate and distinct problems and should be treated as such. (DC)

  10. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CELL SURFACE PROPERTIES AND TRANSPORT OF BACTERIA THROUGH SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted to relate the properties of Enterobacter, Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Achromobacter, Flavobacterium, and Arthrobacter strains to their transport with water moving through soil. the bacteria differed markedly in their extent of transport; their hydrophobicity, as...

  11. Strain gage system evaluation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolleris, G. W.; Mazur, H. J.; Kokoszka, E., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A program was conducted to determine the reliability of various strain gage systems when applied to rotating compressor blades in an aircraft gas turbine engine. A survey of current technology strain gage systems was conducted to provide a basis for selecting candidate systems for evaluation. Testing and evaluation was conducted in an F 100 engine. Sixty strain gage systems of seven different designs were installed on the first and third stages of an F 100 engine fan. Nineteen strain gage failures occurred during 62 hours of engine operation, for a survival rate of 68 percent. Of the failures, 16 occurred at blade-to-disk leadwire jumps (84 percent), two at a leadwire splice (11 percent), and one at a gage splice (5 percent). Effects of erosion, temperature, G-loading, and stress levels are discussed. Results of a post-test analysis of the individual components of each strain gage system are presented.

  12. High temperature strain measurement with a resistance strain gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Jih-Fen; Fichtel, ED; Mcdaniel, Amos

    1993-01-01

    A PdCr based electrical resistance strain gage was demonstrated in the laboratory to be a viable sensor candidate for static strain measurement at high temperatures. However, difficulties were encountered while transferring the sensor to field applications. This paper is therefore prepared for recognition and resolution of the problems likely to be encountered with PdCr strain gages in field applications. Errors caused by the measurement system, installation technique and lead wire attachment are discussed. The limitations and some considerations related to the temperature compensation technique used for this gage are also addressed.

  13. Recent advances in echocardiography: strain and strain rate imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mirea, Oana; Duchenne, Jurgen; Voigt, Jens-Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Deformation imaging by echocardiography is a well-established research tool which has been gaining interest from clinical cardiologists since the introduction of speckle tracking. Post-processing of echo images to analyze deformation has become readily available at the fingertips of the user. New parameters such as global longitudinal strain have been shown to provide added diagnostic value, and ongoing efforts of the imaging societies and industry aimed at harmonizing methods will improve the technique further. This review focuses on recent advances in the field of echocardiographic strain and strain rate imaging, and provides an overview on its current and potential future clinical applications. PMID:27158476

  14. Genetic diversity of Rhodopirellula strains.

    PubMed

    Frank, Carsten S; Klockow, Christine; Richter, Michael; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Harder, Jens

    2013-10-01

    Rhodopirellula baltica SH1(T) is a marine planctomycete with 7,325 genes in its genome. Ten strains of the genus Rhodopirellula were studied in whole genome microarray experiments to assess the extent of their genetic relatedness to R. baltica SH1(T). DNA of strains which were previously affiliated with the species R. baltica (OTU A) hybridized with 3,645-5,728 genes of the type strain on the microarray. Strains SH398 and 6C (OTU B), representing a closely related species with an average nucleotide identity of 88 %, showed less hybridization signals: 1,816 and 3,302 genes gave a hybridization signal, respectively. Comparative genomics of eight permanent draft genomes revealed the presence of over 4,000 proteins common in R. baltica SH1(T) and strains of OTU A or B. The genus Rhodopirellula is characterized by large genomes, with over 7,000 genes per genome and a core genome of around 3000 genes. Individual Rhodopirellula strains have a large portion of strain-specific genes. PMID:23975513

  15. Low TCR nanocomposite strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Otto J. (Inventor); Chen, Ximing (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A high temperature thin film strain gage sensor capable of functioning at temperatures above 1400.degree. C. The sensor contains a substrate, a nanocomposite film comprised of an indium tin oxide alloy, zinc oxide doped with alumina or other oxide semiconductor and a refractory metal selected from the group consisting of Pt, Pd, Rh, Ni, W, Ir, NiCrAlY and NiCoCrAlY deposited onto the substrate to form an active strain element. The strain element being responsive to an applied force.

  16. High-temperature capacitive strain measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, E. J.; Egger, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Capacitive strain gage and signal conditioning system measures stress-induced strain and cancels thermal expansion strain at temperatures to 1,500 F (815 C). Gage does not significantly restrain or reinforce specimen.

  17. Anelastic Strain Recovery Analysis Code

    1995-04-05

    ASR4 is a nonlinear least-squares regression of Anelastic Strain Recovery (ASR) data for the purpose of determining in situ stress orientations and magnitudes. ASR4 fits the viscoelastic model of Warpinski and Teufel to measure ASR data, calculates the stress orientations directly, and stress magnitudes if sufficient input data are available. The code also calculates the stress orientation using strain-rosette equations, and it calculates stress magnitudes using Blanton''s approach, assuming sufficient input data are available.

  18. Bacterial Strain Diversity Within Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kirkup, Benjamin C.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Rare bacterial taxa (taxa of low relative frequency) are numerous and ubiquitous in virtually any sample—including wound samples. In addition, even the high-frequency genera and species contain multiple strains. These strains, individually, are each only a small fraction of the total bacterial population. Against the view that wounds contain relatively few kinds of bacteria, this newly recognized diversity implies a relatively high rate of migration into the wound and the potential for diversification during infection. Understanding the biological and medical importance of these numerous taxa is an important new element of wound microbiology. Recent Advances: Only recently have these numerous strains been discovered; the technology to detect, identify, and characterize them is still in its infancy. Multiple strains of both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria have been found in a single wound. In the few cases studied, the distribution of the bacteria suggests microhabitats and biological interactions. Critical Issues: The distribution of the strains, their phenotypic diversity, and their interactions are still largely uncharacterized. The technologies to investigate this level of genomic detail are still developing and have not been largely deployed to investigate wounds. Future Directions: As advanced metagenomics, single-cell genomics, and advanced microscopy develop, the study of wound microbiology will better address the complex interplay of numerous individually rare strains with both the host and each other. PMID:25566411

  19. Metabolism of quaternary carbon compounds: 2,2-dimethylheptane and tertbutylbenzene.

    PubMed Central

    Catelani, D; Colombi, A; Sorlini, C; Treccani, V

    1977-01-01

    Two Achromobacter strains capable of utilizing 2,2-dimethylheptane or tertbutylbenzene as the sole carbon and energy source were isolated from waste-water. Pivalic acid was found in the cultures of Achromobacter A1 containing 2,2-dimethylheptane. From cultures of Achromobacter A2 in the presence of tertbutylbenzene, a diol was isolated and identified as 2,3-dihydro-2,3-dihydroxytertbutylbenzene. Evidence for meta cleavage of the aromatic ring and for accumulation of pivalic acid in the cultures was also obtained. A metabolic pathway for tertbutylbenzene is suggested. PMID:921261

  20. Effects of Temperature and pH on the Activities of Catechol 2,3-dioxygenase Obtained from Crude Oil Contaminated Soil in Ilaje, Ondo State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Olukunle, O.F.; Babajide, O.; Boboye, B.

    2015-01-01

    Enrichment technique was employed for the isolation of the crude oil degrading bacteria. The isolated bacteria were screened for their degradative ability and the best degrading bacteria were selected based on their growth. Specific activities of Catechol-2,3-dioxygenase and effects of temperature and pH and their stabilities on the enzyme relative activities were observed. Bacteria isolated from the soil sample include; Bacillus cereus, B. amyloliquficiens, B. firmus, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Pseudomonas sp. P. fluorescens, P.putida, P.aeruginosa, Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Achromobacter sp. Screening of the degradative ability of the bacteria revealed P. aeruginosa, Bacillus cereus, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and Achromobacter sp. to be the best degraders. The pH and temperature range with time for the enzyme activity were 6.0-8.0 and 30oC-50oC respectively. The enzyme exhibited activity that was slightly more tolerant to alkaline pH. Therefore, engineering of Catechol 2,3-dioxygenase may be employed for application on bioremediation of polluted sites. PMID:26464607

  1. Effects of Temperature and pH on the Activities of Catechol 2,3-dioxygenase Obtained from Crude Oil Contaminated Soil in Ilaje, Ondo State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Olukunle, O F; Babajide, O; Boboye, B

    2015-01-01

    Enrichment technique was employed for the isolation of the crude oil degrading bacteria. The isolated bacteria were screened for their degradative ability and the best degrading bacteria were selected based on their growth. Specific activities of Catechol-2,3-dioxygenase and effects of temperature and pH and their stabilities on the enzyme relative activities were observed. Bacteria isolated from the soil sample include; Bacillus cereus, B. amyloliquficiens, B. firmus, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Pseudomonas sp. P. fluorescens, P.putida, P.aeruginosa, Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Achromobacter sp. Screening of the degradative ability of the bacteria revealed P. aeruginosa, Bacillus cereus, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and Achromobacter sp. to be the best degraders. The pH and temperature range with time for the enzyme activity were 6.0-8.0 and 30(o)C-50(o)C respectively. The enzyme exhibited activity that was slightly more tolerant to alkaline pH. Therefore, engineering of Catechol 2,3-dioxygenase may be employed for application on bioremediation of polluted sites. PMID:26464607

  2. Interspecies Dissemination of a Mobilizable Plasmid Harboring blaIMP-19 and the Possibility of Horizontal Gene Transfer in a Single Patient.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masaki; Matsumura, Yasufumi; Gomi, Ryota; Matsuda, Tomonari; Tanaka, Michio; Nagao, Miki; Takakura, Shunji; Uemoto, Shinji; Ichiyama, Satoshi

    2016-09-01

    Carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacilli have been a global concern over the past 2 decades because these organisms can cause severe infections with high mortality rates. Carbapenemase genes are often carried by mobile genetic elements, and resistance plasmids can be transferred through conjugation. We conducted whole-genome sequencing (WGS) to demonstrate that the same plasmid harboring a metallo-β-lactamase gene was detected in two different species isolated from a single patient. Metallo-β-lactamase-producing Achromobacter xylosoxidans (KUN4507), non-metallo-β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KUN4843), and metallo-β-lactamase-producing K. pneumoniae (KUN5033) were sequentially isolated from a single patient and then analyzed in this study. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing, molecular typing (pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing), and conjugation analyses were performed by conventional methods. Phylogenetic and molecular clock analysis of K. pneumoniae isolates were performed with WGS, and the nucleotide sequences of plasmids detected from these isolates were determined using WGS. Conventional molecular typing revealed that KUN4843 and KUN5033 were identical, whereas the phylogenetic tree analysis revealed a slight difference. These two isolates were separated from the most recent common ancestor 0.74 years before they were isolated. The same resistance plasmid harboring blaIMP-19 was detected in metallo-β-lactamase-producing A. xylosoxidans and K. pneumoniae Although this plasmid was not self-transferable, the conjugation of this plasmid from A. xylosoxidans to non-metallo-β-lactamase-producing K. pneumoniae was successfully performed. The susceptibility patterns for metallo-β-lactamase-producing K. pneumoniae and the transconjugant were similar. These findings supported the possibility of the horizontal transfer of plasmid-borne blaIMP-19 from A. xylosoxidans to K. pneumoniae in a single patient. PMID:27381397

  3. Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas chlororaphis Strain 189

    PubMed Central

    Town, Jennifer; Audy, Patrice; Boyetchko, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis strain 189 is a potent inhibitor of the growth of the potato pathogen Phytophthora infestans. We determined the complete, finished sequence of the 6.8-Mbp genome of this strain, consisting of a single contiguous molecule. Strain 189 is closely related to previously sequenced strains of P. chlororaphis. PMID:27340063

  4. Measuring mine roof bolt strains

    DOEpatents

    Steblay, Bernard J.

    1986-01-01

    A mine roof bolt and a method of measuring the strain in mine roof bolts of this type are disclosed. According to the method, a flat portion on the head of the mine roof bolt is first machined. Next, a hole is drilled radially through the bolt at a predetermined distance from the bolt head. After installation of the mine roof bolt and loading, the strain of the mine roof bolt is measured by generating an ultrasonic pulse at the flat portion. The time of travel of the ultrasonic pulse reflected from the hole is measured. This time of travel is a function of the distance from the flat portion to the hole and increases as the bolt is loaded. Consequently, the time measurement is correlated to the strain in the bolt. Compensation for various factors affecting the travel time are also provided.

  5. Spin transport in graphene superlattice under strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattari, Farhad

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the spin-dependent transport and the spin polarization properties for graphene superlattice with Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI) in the presence of zigzag and armchair direction strain are studied. It is found that for the zigzag direction strain the angular range of the spin-inversion can be efficiently controlled by the strain strength. In addition, the efficiency of spin-inversion and spin-dependent conductivity decreases by increasing the strain strength. When the armchair direction strain is applied to a monolayer graphene superlattice the spin polarization can be observed and increases by increasing the strain strength, whereas for the zigzag direction strain it is zero.

  6. Bromoalkane-degrading Pseudomonas strains

    SciTech Connect

    Shochat, E.; Hermoni, I.; Cohen, Z.; Abeliovich, A.; Belkin, S. )

    1993-05-01

    Many of the xenobiotic compounds extensively used in agriculture and industry, particularly the chlorinated halogenated compounds, have been extensively studied. Brominated organics, also used worldwide in, for example, flame retardants, pesticides, industrial biocides, intermediates in the polymer industry, have received far less attention. Investigations into the biodegradative pathways of aliphatic bromides in particular is very limited. This paper reports the isolation and preliminary characterization of two Pseudomonas strains capable of utilizing a broad range of bromoalkanes as single carbon and energy sources, and describes the emulsification and dehalogenation of hydrophobic bromoakanes by these strains. 37 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of Entamoeba histolytica strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta-Avalos, D.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Silva, E. F.; Orozco, E.; de Menezes, L. F.; Vargas, H.

    2005-06-01

    Pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of E. histolytica are studied using photoacoustic spectroscopy. It is shown that the pathogenic strain presents a spectrum similar to that of iron sulfur proteins. The non-pathogenic strain does not show any relevant absorption at the studied wavelength range. The differences observed between the optical absorption spectra of both strains opens the possibility of using photoacoustic spectroscopy as a reliable and simple technique to identify different types of E. histolytica strains.

  8. Characterization and pathogenicity assessment of gut-associated microbes of muga silkworm Antheraea assamensis Helfer (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae).

    PubMed

    Haloi, Kishor; Kalita, Moni Kankana; Nath, Ramesh; Devi, Dipali

    2016-07-01

    Antheraea assamensis Helfer (muga silkworm) is an economically important endemic insect species of North Eastern Region of India. The silkworm is often susceptible to infection by pathogenic bacteria, leads to a disease commonly known as flacherie which causes 40% loss per annum to the silk industry. In this study, we have reported isolation, characterization and pathogenicity assessment of gut-associated bacteria of healthy and diseased muga silkworms. Thirty five bacterial isolates were screened from the gut of healthy and diseased silkworms by morphological observation and biochemical tests. 11 and 5 strains from healthy and diseased silkworm respectively were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and analyzed. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (DRK1), Ornithinibacillus bavariensis (DRK2), Achromobacter xylosoxidans (KH3) and Staphylococcus aureus (FLG1) strains were commonly found in healthy as well as diseased larvae whereas, Bacillus thuringiensis (MK1) was found only in diseased larvae. Survivability analysis was performed with the identified strains by injection and oral administration (10(4)CFU/ml). The immune response of the silkworm against the pathogen was also studied by phenoloxidase and lysozyme enzyme activity assay, total and differential hemocyte count and phagocytic activity of hemocytes. It was observed that S. aureus, P. aeruginosa and B. thuringiensis significantly reduced the survivability of silkworm (p<0.001) hence found highly pathogenic. The lethal concentrations (LC50) values of the pathogenic strains were calculated at different time intervals (24, 48, 72 and 96h) within the range from 1.38×10(2) to 3.63×10(7)CFU/ml. The pathogenic groups demonstrated inhibition of phenoloxidase activity and decreased in total hemocyte count after 48h of infection. However, the lysozyme activity increased significantly in the pathogenic groups compared to the control (p<0.05). Granulocytes and plasmatocytes showed phagocytosis whereas; other types of cells did

  9. Development of a growth-dependent selection system for identification of L-threonine aldolases.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Dalia; Gröger, Harald; Hummel, Werner

    2015-07-01

    Threonine aldolases (TAs) are useful enzymes for the synthesis of β-hydroxy-α-amino acids due to their capability to catalyze asymmetric aldol reactions. Starting from two prochiral compounds, an aldehyde and glycine, two chiral stereocenters were formed in a single step via C-C bond formation. Owing to poor diastereoselectivity and low activity, the enzymatic synthesis of β-hydroxy-α-amino acids by TAs is still a challenge. For identification of new TAs, a growth-dependent selection system in Pseudomonas putida KT2440 has been developed. This bacterium is able to use aromatic compounds such as benzaldehyde, which is the cleavage product of the TA-mediated retro-aldol reaction of phenylserine, as sole carbon source via the β-ketoadipate pathway. With DL-threo-β-phenylserine as sole carbon source, this strain showed only slight growth in minimal medium. This growth deficiency can be restored by introducing and expressing genes encoding TAs. In order to develop a highly efficient selection system, the gene taPp of P. putida KT2440 encoding a TA was successfully deleted by replacement with an antibiotic resistance cassette. Different growth studies were carried out to prove the operability of the selection system. Genes encoding for L- and D-specific TAs (L-TA genes of Escherichia coli (ltaE) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (gly1) and D-TA gene of Achromobacter xylosoxidans (dtaAX)) were introduced into the selection strain P. putida KT2440ΔtaPp, followed by cultivation on minimal medium supplemented with DL-threo-β-phenylserine. The results demonstrate that only the selection strains with plasmid-encoded L-TAs were able to grow on this racemic amino acid, whereas the corresponding strain harboring the gene coding for a D-specific TA showed no growth. In summary, it can be stated that a powerful screening tool was developed to identify easily by growth new L-specific threonine aldolases or other enzymes from genomic or metagenomic libraries liberating

  10. Chronic occupational repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neil, B. A.; Forsythe, M. E.; Stanish, W. D.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review common repetitive strain injuries (RSIs) that occur in the workplace, emphasizing diagnosis, treatment, and etiology of these conditions. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search from January 1966 to June 1999 focused on articles published since 1990 because RSIs are relatively new diagnoses. MeSH headings that were explored using the thesaurus included "cumulative trauma disorder," "overuse injury," and "repetitive strain injury." The search was limited to English articles only, and preference was given to randomized controlled trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Repetitive strain injuries result from repeated stress to the body's soft tissue structures including muscles, tendons, and nerves. They often occur in patients who perform repetitive movements either in their jobs or in extracurricular activities. Common RSIs include tendon-related disorders, such as rotator cuff tendonitis, and peripheral nerve entrapment disorders, such as carpal tunnel syndrome. A careful history and physical examination often lead to the diagnosis, but newer imaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound, can help in refractory cases. Conservative management with medication, physiotherapy, or bracing is the mainstay of treatment. Surgery is reserved for cases that do not respond to treatment. CONCLUSION: Repetitive strain injury is common; primary care physicians must establish a diagnosis and, more importantly, its relationship to occupation. Treatment can be offered by family physicians who refer to specialists for cases refractory to conservative management. PMID:11228032

  11. Bacteriocins and novel bacterial strains.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Poultry is thought to be a significant source of Campylobacter in human disease. We evaluated anti-Campylobacter activity among 365 Bacillus and Paenibacillus isolates from poultry. One novel antagonistic Bacillus circulans and three Paenibacillus polymyxa strains were identified and further studi...

  12. Mobilomics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mobile Genetic Elements (MGEs) are selfish DNA integrated in the genomes. Their detection is mainly based on consensus–like searches by scanning the investigated genome against the sequence of an already identified MGE. Mobilomics aims at discovering all the MGEs in a genome and understanding their dynamic behavior: The data for this kind of investigation can be provided by comparative genomics of closely related organisms. The amount of data thus involved requires a strong computational effort, which should be alleviated. Results Our approach proposes to exploit the high similarity among homologous chromosomes of different strains of the same species, following a progressive comparative genomics philosophy. We introduce a software tool based on our new fast algorithm, called regender, which is able to identify the conserved regions between chromosomes. Our case study is represented by a unique recently available dataset of 39 different strains of S.cerevisiae, which regender is able to compare in few minutes. By exploring the non–conserved regions, where MGEs are mainly retrotransposons called Tys, and marking the candidate Tys based on their length, we are able to locate a priori and automatically all the already known Tys and map all the putative Tys in all the strains. The remaining putative mobile elements (PMEs) emerging from this intra–specific comparison are sharp markers of inter–specific evolution: indeed, many events of non–conservation among different yeast strains correspond to PMEs. A clustering based on the presence/absence of the candidate Tys in the strains suggests an evolutionary interconnection that is very similar to classic phylogenetic trees based on SNPs analysis, even though it is computed without using phylogenetic information. Conclusions The case study indicates that the proposed methodology brings two major advantages: (a) it does not require any template sequence for the wanted MGEs and (b) it can be applied to

  13. BSD: the Biodegradative Strain Database.

    PubMed

    Urbance, John W; Cole, James; Saxman, Paul; Tiedje, James M

    2003-01-01

    The Biodegradative Strain Database (BSD) is a freely-accessible, web-based database providing detailed information on degradative bacteria and the hazardous substances that they degrade, including corresponding literature citations, relevant patents and links to additional web-based biological and chemical data. The BSD (http://bsd.cme.msu.edu) is being developed within the phylogenetic framework of the Ribosomal Database Project II (RDPII: http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/html) to provide a biological complement to the chemical and degradative pathway data of the University of Minnesota Biocatalysis/Biodegradation Database (UM-BBD: http://umbbd.ahc.umn.edu). Data is accessible through a series of strain, chemical and reference lists or by keyword search. The web site also includes on-line data submission and user survey forms to solicit user contributions and suggestions. The current release contains information on over 250 degradative bacterial strains and 150 hazardous substances. The transformation of xenobiotics and other environmentally toxic compounds by microorganisms is central to strategies for biocatalysis and the bioremediation of contaminated environments. However, practical, comprehensive, strain-level information on biocatalytic/biodegradative microbes is not readily available and is often difficult to compile. Similarly, for any given environmental contaminant, there is no single resource that can provide comparative information on the array of identified microbes capable of degrading the chemical. A web site that consolidates and cross-references strain, chemical and reference data related to biocatalysis, biotransformation, biodegradation and bioremediation would be an invaluable tool for academic and industrial researchers and environmental engineers.

  14. A NEW STRAIN OF TRANSMISSIBLE LEUCEMIA IN FOWLS (STRAIN H).

    PubMed

    Ellermann, V

    1921-03-31

    1. A new strain of fowl leucosis has been transmitted through twelve generations of fowls. 2. An increase in virulence was observed during its passage. This was shown in a shortening of the interval between inoculation and death. The increase in virulence does not affect the number of successful inoculations, which remains approximately constant in from 20 to 40 per cent of the birds employed. 3. As with former strains, the disease manifests itself in various forms; i.e., myeloid and intravascular lymphoid types. A single lymphatic case was observed. 4. In several intravascular cases a diminution in the hemolytic power of the serum was established. This phenomenon was absent in a number of myeloid cases. 5. Active immunization cannot be produced by means of the subcutaneous injection of virulent material. 6. The finding of previous experiments that the virus is filterable has been confirmed. 7. The inoculation of human leucemic material into fowls gave negative results.

  15. Material mechanical characterization method for multiple strains and strain rates

    DOEpatents

    Erdmand, III, Donald L.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Simunovic, Srdjan; Wang, Yanli

    2016-01-19

    A specimen for measuring a material under multiple strains and strain rates. The specimen including a body having first and second ends and a gage region disposed between the first and second ends, wherein the body has a central, longitudinal axis passing through the first and second ends. The gage region includes a first gage section and a second gage section, wherein the first gage section defines a first cross-sectional area that is defined by a first plane that extends through the first gage section and is perpendicular to the central, longitudinal axis. The second gage section defines a second cross-sectional area that is defined by a second plane that extends through the second gage section and is perpendicular to the central, longitudinal axis and wherein the first cross-sectional area is different in size than the second cross-sectional area.

  16. Mapping microscale strain heterogeneity during creep deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintanilla Terminel, A.; Evans, J.

    2013-12-01

    We use a new technique combining microfabrication technology and compression tests to map the strain field at a micrometric scale in polycrystalline materials. This technique allows us to map local strain while measuring macroscopic strain and rheological properties, and provides insight into the relative contribution of various plasticity mechanisms under varying creep conditions. The micro-strain mapping technique was applied to Carrara Marble under different deformation regimes, at 300 MPa and temperatures ranging from 200 to 700 °C. At 600 °C, strain of 10%, and strain rate of 3e-5s-1, the local strain at twin and grain boundaries is up to 5 times greater than the average sample strain. At these conditions, strains averaged across a particular grain may vary by as much as 100%, but the strain field becomes more homogeneous with increasing strain. For example, for the analyzed experiments, the average wavelength of the strain heterogeneity is 70 micrometers at 10% strain, but increases to 110 micrometers at 20%. For a strain of 10%, heterogeneity is increased at slower strain rate (at 1e-5s-1). This increase seems to be associated with a more important role of twin boundary and grain boundary migration. As expected, twin densities are markedly greater at the lower temperature, though it is still unclear whether the relative twin volume is greater. However, twin strains are still important at 600 °C and accommodate an average of 14 % of the total strain at 10% deformation and a strain rate of 3e-5s-1.

  17. Modelling to very high strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bons, P. D.; Jessell, M. W.; Griera, A.; Evans, L. A.; Wilson, C. J. L.

    2009-04-01

    Ductile strains in shear zones often reach extreme values, resulting in typical structures, such as winged porphyroclasts and several types of shear bands. The numerical simulation of the development of such structures has so far been inhibited by the low maximum strains that numerical models can normally achieve. Typical numerical models collapse at shear strains in the order of one to three. We have implemented a number of new functionalities in the numerical platform "Elle" (Jessell et al. 2001), which significantly increases the amount of strain that can be achieved and simultaneously reduces boundary effects that become increasingly disturbing at higher strain. Constant remeshing, while maintaining the polygonal phase regions, is the first step to avoid collapse of the finite-element grid required by finite-element solvers, such as Basil (Houseman et al. 2008). The second step is to apply a grain-growth routine to the boundaries of polygons that represent phase regions. This way, the development of sharp angles is avoided. A second advantage is that phase regions may merge or become separated (boudinage). Such topological changes are normally not possible in finite element deformation codes. The third step is the use of wrapping vertical model boundaries, with which optimal and unchanging model boundaries are maintained for the application of stress or velocity boundary conditions. The fourth step is to shift the model by a random amount in the vertical direction every time step. This way, the fixed horizontal boundary conditions are applied to different material points within the model every time step. Disturbing boundary effects are thus averaged out over the whole model and not localised to e.g. top and bottom of the model. Reduction of boundary effects has the additional advantage that model can be smaller and, therefore, numerically more efficient. Owing to the combination of these existing and new functionalities it is now possible to simulate the

  18. Strains

    MedlinePlus

    Pulled muscle ... can include: Pain and difficulty moving the injured muscle Discolored and bruised skin Swelling ... if you still have pain. Rest the pulled muscle for at least a day. If possible, keep ...

  19. Computational strain gradient crystal plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niordson, Christian F.; Kysar, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    A numerical method for viscous strain gradient crystal plasticity theory is presented, which incorporates both energetic and dissipative gradient effects. The underlying minimum principles are discussed as well as convergence properties of the proposed finite element procedure. Three problems of plane crystal plasticity are studied: pure shear of a single crystal between rigid platens as well as plastic deformation around cylindrical voids in hexagonal close packed and face centered cubic crystals. Effective in-plane constitutive slip parameters for plane strain deformation of specifically oriented face centered cubic crystals are developed in terms of the crystallographic slip parameters. The effect on geometrically necessary dislocation structures introduced by plastic deformation is investigated as a function of the ratio of void radius to plasticity length scale.

  20. Strain tolerant microfilamentary superconducting wire

    DOEpatents

    Finnemore, Douglas K.; Miller, Theodore A.; Ostenson, Jerome E.; Schwartzkopf, Louis A.; Sanders, Steven C.

    1993-02-23

    A strain tolerant microfilamentary wire capable of carrying superconducting currents is provided comprising a plurality of discontinuous filaments formed from a high temperature superconducting material. The discontinuous filaments have a length at least several orders of magnitude greater than the filament diameter and are sufficiently strong while in an amorphous state to withstand compaction. A normal metal is interposed between and binds the discontinuous filaments to form a normal metal matrix capable of withstanding heat treatment for converting the filaments to a superconducting state. The geometry of the filaments within the normal metal matrix provides substantial filament-to-filament overlap, and the normal metal is sufficiently thin to allow supercurrent transfer between the overlapped discontinuous filaments but is also sufficiently thick to provide strain relief to the filaments.

  1. Multiplexed FBG strain measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helsztynski, Jerzy; Lewandowski, Lech; Jasiewicz, Wieslaw; Jedrzejewski, Kazimierz P.

    2008-11-01

    The idea and, design and realization of fiber Bragg grating multiplexing system is given. Special Bragg gratings with very long and linear side slopes were practically realized. They were tuned for different wavelengths distanced 9nm in each measurement channel. The system was applied for strain control. Special spectrophotometer with linear photodiode array was made. For flexible distributed multiplexing of many sensor channels fiber-optic switches were used.

  2. High Temperature Capacitive Strain Gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wnuk, Stephen P., Jr.; Wnuk, Stephen P., III; Wnuk, V. P.

    1990-01-01

    Capacitive strain gages designed for measurements in wind tunnels to 2000 F were built and evaluated. Two design approaches were followed. One approach was based on fixed capacitor plates with a movable ground plane inserted between the plates to effect differential capacitive output with strain. The second approach was based on movable capacitor plates suspended between sapphire bearings, housed in a rugged body, and arranged to operate as a differential capacitor. A sapphire bearing gage (1/4 in. diameter x 1 in. in size) was built with a range of 50,000 and a resolution of 200 microstrain. Apparent strain on Rene' 41 was less than + or - 1000 microstrain from room temperature to 2000 F. Three gage models were built from the Ground Plane Differential concept. The first was 1/4 in. square by 1/32 in. high and useable to 700 F. The second was 1/2 in. square by 1/16 in. high and useable to 1440 F. The third, also 1/2 in. square by 1/16 in. high was expected to operate in the 1600 to 2000 F range, but was not tested because time and funding ended.

  3. Turbulent Plane Wakes Subjected to Successive Strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Michael M.

    2003-01-01

    Six direct numerical simulations of turbulent time-evolving strained plane wakes have been examined to investigate the response of a wake to successive irrotational plane strains of opposite sign. The orientation of the applied strain field has been selected so that the flow is the time-developing analogue of a spatially developing wake evolving in the presence of either a favourable or an adverse streamwise pressure gradient. The magnitude of the applied strain rate a is constant in time t until the total strain e(sup at) reaches about four. At this point, a new simulation is begun with the sign of the applied strain being reversed (the original simulation is continued as well). When the total strain is reduced back to its original value of one, yet another simulation is begun with the sign of the strain being reversed again back to its original sign. This process is done for both initially "favourable" and initially "adverse" strains, providing simulations for each of these strain types from three different initial conditions. The evolution of the wake mean velocity deficit and width is found to be very similar for all the adversely strained cases, with both measures rapidly achieving exponential growth at the rate associated with the cross-stream expansive strain e(sup at). In the "favourably" strained cases, the wake widths approach a constant and the velocity deficits ultimately decay rapidly as e(sup -2at). Although all three of these cases do exhibit the same asymptotic exponential behaviour, the time required to achieve this is longer for the cases that have been previously adversely strained (by at approx. equals 1). These simulations confirm the generality of the conclusions drawn in Rogers (2002) regarding the response of plane wakes to strain. The evolution of strained wakes is not consistent with the predictions of classical self-similar analysis; a more general equilibrium similarity solution is required to describe the results. At least for the cases

  4. Strain Monitoring of Flexible Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litteken, Douglas A.

    2017-01-01

    , such as tensile testing, fatigue testing, and shear testing, but common measurement techniques cannot be used on fabric. Measuring strain in a material and during a test is a critical parameter for an engineer to monitor the structure during the test and correlate to an analytical model. The ability to measure strain in fabric structures is a challenge for NASA. Foil strain gauges, for example, are commonplace on metallic structures testing, but are extremely difficult to interface with a fabric substrate. New strain measuring techniques need to be developed for use with fabric structures. This paper investigates options for measuring strain in fabric structures for both ground testing and in-space structural health monitoring. It evaluates current commercially available options and outlines development work underway to build custom measurement solutions for NASA's fabric structures.

  5. Piezoelectric field in strained GaAs.

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Weng Wah; Wieczorek, Sebastian Maciej

    2005-11-01

    This report describes an investigation of the piezoelectric field in strained bulk GaAs. The bound charge distribution is calculated and suitable electrode configurations are proposed for (1) uniaxial and (2) biaxial strain. The screening of the piezoelectric field is studied for different impurity concentrations and sample lengths. Electric current due to the piezoelectric field is calculated for the cases of (1) fixed strain and (2) strain varying in time at a constant rate.

  6. Haemophilus ducreyi Cutaneous Ulcer Strains Are Nearly Identical to Class I Genital Ulcer Strains

    PubMed Central

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Webb, Kristen M.; Humphreys, Tricia L.; Fortney, Kate R.; Toh, Evelyn; Tai, Albert; Katz, Samantha S.; Pillay, Allan; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Roberts, Sally A.; Munson, Robert S.; Spinola, Stanley M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although cutaneous ulcers (CU) in the tropics is frequently attributed to Treponema pallidum subspecies pertenue, the causative agent of yaws, Haemophilus ducreyi has emerged as a major cause of CU in yaws-endemic regions of the South Pacific islands and Africa. H. ducreyi is generally susceptible to macrolides, but CU strains persist after mass drug administration of azithromycin for yaws or trachoma. H. ducreyi also causes genital ulcers (GU) and was thought to be exclusively transmitted by microabrasions that occur during sex. In human volunteers, the GU strain 35000HP does not infect intact skin; wounds are required to initiate infection. These data led to several questions: Are CU strains a new variant of H. ducreyi or did they evolve from GU strains? Do CU strains contain additional genes that could allow them to infect intact skin? Are CU strains susceptible to azithromycin? Methodology/Principal Findings To address these questions, we performed whole-genome sequencing and antibiotic susceptibility testing of 5 CU strains obtained from Samoa and Vanuatu and 9 archived class I and class II GU strains. Except for single nucleotide polymorphisms, the CU strains were genetically almost identical to the class I strain 35000HP and had no additional genetic content. Phylogenetic analysis showed that class I and class II strains formed two separate clusters and CU strains evolved from class I strains. Class I strains diverged from class II strains ~1.95 million years ago (mya) and CU strains diverged from the class I strain 35000HP ~0.18 mya. CU and GU strains evolved under similar selection pressures. Like 35000HP, the CU strains were highly susceptible to antibiotics, including azithromycin. Conclusions/Significance These data suggest that CU strains are derivatives of class I strains that were not recognized until recently. These findings require confirmation by analysis of CU strains from other regions. PMID:26147869

  7. Modal strain energies in COSMIC NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, B. D.; Venkayya, V. B.

    1989-01-01

    A computer program was developed to take a NASTRAN output file from a normal modes analysis and calculate the modal strain energies of selected elements. The FORTRAN program can determine the modal strain energies for CROD, CBAR, CELAS, CTRMEM, CQDMEM2, and CSHEAR elements. Modal strain energies are useful in estimating damping in structures.

  8. Local strains in waste tank deflagration analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, B.J.; Flanders, H.E. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    In recent years extensive effort has been expended to qualify buried nuclear waste storage tanks under accident conditions. One of these conditions is deflagration of the combustible gases which may build up over time. While much work has been done to calculate the general strain state, less effort has been made to address the local strains at structural discontinuities. An analytical method is presented for calculating these local strains and combining them with the general strain state. A closed form solution of the local strains is compared to a finite element solution.

  9. Siderotyping of Antarctic fluorescent Pseudomonas strains.

    PubMed

    Geoffroy, V A; Meyer, J M

    2004-07-01

    Five fluorescent Pseudomonas strains isolated from Antarctica have been previously recognized as producing three structurally different pyoverdines. In the present work, siderotyping procedures have been used to classify these strains, together with 1282 isolates of different origins, into siderovars. The strain biodiversity encountered within each siderovar, as well as the potential taxonomic value of the siderovars, are described and discussed. It is concluded that a majority of antarctic strains are commonly distributed worldwide. One strain, however, presenting a particular pyoverdine structure found in a unique other isolate, was apparently much more specific to cold environment. PMID:15559975

  10. Strain Engineering of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadgar, Ali; Pasupathy, Abhay; Herman, Irving; Wang, Dennis; Kang, Kyungnam; Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    The application of strain to materials can cause changes to bandwidth, effective masses, degeneracies and even structural phases. In the case of the transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) semiconductors, small strain (around 1 percent) is expected to change band gaps and mobilities, while larger strains are expected to cause phase changes from the triangular 2H phase to orthorhombic 1T' phases. We will describe experimental techniques to apply small and large (around 10 percent) strains to one or few layer samples of the TMD semiconductors, and describe the effect of the strain using optical (Raman, photoluminescence) and cryogenic transport techniques.

  11. Strain flexibility identification of bridges from long-gauge strain measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Xia, Qi; Cheng, YuYao; Wu, ZhiShen

    2015-10-01

    Strain flexibility, defined as the strain response of a structure's element to a unit input force, is import for structural safety evaluation, but its identification is seldom investigated. A novel long-gauge fiber optic sensor has been developed to measure the averaged strain within a long gauge length. Its advantage of measuring both local and global information of the structure offers an excellent opportunity of developing the strain flexibility identification theory. In this article, the method to identify structural strain flexibility from long-gauge dynamic strain measurements is proposed. It includes the following main steps: (a) macro strain frequency response function (FRF) estimation from macro strain measurements and its feature characterization; (b) general strain modal parameter identification; (c) scaling factor calculation, and (d) strain flexibility identification. Numerical and experimental examples successfully verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Demonstration test of burner liner strain measurements using resistance strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, H. P.; Anderson, W. L.

    1984-01-01

    A demonstration test of burner liner strain measurements using resistance strain gages as well as a feasibility test of an optical speckle technique for strain measurement are presented. The strain gage results are reported. Ten Kanthal A-1 wire strain gages were used for low cycle fatigue strain measurements to 950 K and .002 apparent strain on a JT12D burner can in a high pressure (10 atmospheres) burner test. The procedure for use of the strain gages involved extensive precalibration and postcalibration to correct for cooling rate dependence, drift, and temperature effects. Results were repeatable within + or - .0002 to .0006 strain, with best results during fast decels from 950 K. The results agreed with analytical prediction based on an axisymmetric burner model, and results indicated a non-uniform circumferential distribution of axial strain, suggesting temperature streaking.

  13. Straining Graphene Using Thin Film Shrinkage Methods

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical works suggest the possibility and usefulness of strain engineering of graphene by predicting remarkable properties, such as Dirac cone merging, bandgap opening and pseudo magnetic field generation. However, most of these predictions have not yet been confirmed because it is experimentally difficult to control the magnitude and type (e.g., uniaxial, biaxial, and so forth) of strain in graphene devices. Here we report two novel methods to apply strain without bending the substrate. We employ thin films of evaporated metal and organic insulator deposited on graphene, which shrink after electron beam irradiation or heat application. These methods make it possible to apply both biaxial strain and in-plane isotropic compressive strain in a well-controlled manner. Raman spectroscopy measurements show a clear splitting of the degenerate states of the G-band in the case of biaxial strain, and G-band blue shift without splitting in the case of in-plane isotropic compressive strain. In the case of biaxial strain application, we find out the ratio of the strain component perpendicular to the stretching direction is at least three times larger than what was previously observed, indicating that shrinkage of the metal or organic insulator deposited on graphene induces both tensile and compressive strain in this atomically thin material. Our studies present for the first time a viable way to apply strain to graphene without the need to bend the substrate. PMID:24490629

  14. Strain engineering of graphene: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Chen; Sun, Zhimei; Liu, Feng

    2016-02-01

    Graphene has intrigued the science community by many unique properties not found in conventional materials. In particular, it is the strongest two-dimensional material ever measured, being able to sustain reversible tensile elastic strain larger than 20%, which yields an interesting possibility to tune the properties of graphene by strain and thus opens a new field called ``straintronics''. In this article, the current progress in the strain engineering of graphene is reviewed. We first summarize the strain effects on the electronic structure and Raman spectra of graphene. We then highlight the electron-phonon coupling greatly enhanced by the biaxial strain and the strong pseudomagnetic field induced by the non-uniform strain with specific distribution. Finally, the potential application of strain-engineering in the self-assembly of foreign atoms on the graphene surface is also discussed. Given the short history of graphene straintronics research, the current progress has been notable, and many further advances in this field are expected.

  15. Differential receptor usage by measles virus strains.

    PubMed

    Bartz, R; Firsching, R; Rima, B; ter Meulen, V; Schneider-Schaulies, J

    1998-05-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that infection of cells with all measles virus (MV) strains tested was inhibited by antibodies against CD46, although not all strains caused downregulation of the MV receptor CD46 from the surface of human cells. We now show that infection of cells with MV strain WTFb, a variant of wild-type isolate WTF which has been isolated and propagated on human BJAB cells, is not inhibited by antibodies against CD46. In contrast, infection of cells with the closely related strain WTFv, a Vero cell-adapted variant of WTF, is inhibited by antibodies against CD46. This observation led us to investigate the interaction of these viruses and the vaccine strain Edmonston (Edm) with CD46 and target cells. Cellular receptors with high affinity binding for WTFb are present on BJAB cells, but not on transfected CD46-expressing CHO cells. In contrast to the Edm strain, virus particles and solubilized envelope glycoproteins of WTFb have a very limited binding capacity to CD46. Furthermore, we show that recombinant soluble CD46 either does not bind, or binds very weakly, to WTFb glycoproteins expressed on the cell surface. Our findings indicate that wild-type MV strain WTFb and vaccine strain Edm use different binding sites on human cells. In addition, the results suggest that MV strains may alternatively use CD46 and an unknown molecule as receptors, and that the degree of usage of both receptors may be MV strain-specific. PMID:9603316

  16. Modeling competition between yeast strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gee, Maarten; van Mourik, Hilda; de Visser, Arjan; Molenaar, Jaap

    2016-04-01

    We investigate toxin interference competition between S. cerevisiae colonies grown on a solid medium. In vivo experiments show that the outcome of this competition depends strongly on nutrient availability and cell densities. Here we present a new model for S. cerevisiae colonies, calculating the local height and composition of the colonies. The model simulates yeast colonies that show a good fit to experimental data. Simulations of colonies that start out with a homogeneous mixture of toxin producing and toxin sensitive cells can display remarkable pattern formation, depending on the initial ratio of the strains. Simulations in which the toxin producing and toxin sensitive species start at nearby positions clearly show that toxin production is advantageous.

  17. Determining Micromechanical Strain in Nitinol

    SciTech Connect

    Strasberg, Matthew; /SLAC

    2006-09-27

    Nitinol is a superelastic alloy made of equal parts nickel and titanium. Due to its unique shape memory properties, nitinol is used to make medical stents, lifesaving devices used to allow blood flow in occluded arteries. Micromechanical models and even nitinol-specific finite element analysis (FEA) software are insufficient for unerringly predicting fatigue and resultant failure. Due to the sensitive nature of its application, a better understanding of nitinol on a granular scale is being pursued through X-ray diffraction techniques at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Through analysis of powder diffraction patterns of nitinol under increasing tensile loads, localized strain can be calculated. We compare these results with micromechanical predictions in order to advance nitinol-relevant FEA tools. From this we hope to gain a greater understanding of how nitinol fatigues under multi-axial loads.

  18. Job Strain in Shift and Daytime Workers.

    PubMed

    Knutsson; Nilsson

    1997-07-01

    Cross-sectional questionnaire data were used to compare the levels of job strain in shift and daytime workers. Job strain was measured according to Karasek's Demands/Discretion model. Four occupational groups were included: drivers, industrial workers, policemen/watchmen, and cooks. The study subjects were a random sample of 508 daytime workers and 418 shift workers. Job demand did not differentiate between shift and daytime workers, comparing groups broken down by gender and by occupation. The daytime workers reported higher levels of job strain than the shift workers, and women experienced a higher level of job strain than did men. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that only occupational group and gender predicted job strain level. Shiftwork was not significantly associated with job strain in the regression model.

  19. The many shades of prion strain adaptation.

    PubMed

    Baskakov, Ilia V

    2014-01-01

    In several recent studies transmissible prion disease was induced in animals by inoculation with recombinant prion protein amyloid fibrils produced in vitro. Serial transmission of amyloid fibrils gave rise to a new class of prion strains of synthetic origin. Gradual transformation of disease phenotypes and PrP(Sc) properties was observed during serial transmission of synthetic prions, a process that resembled the phenomenon of prion strain adaptation. The current article discusses the remarkable parallels between phenomena of prion strain adaptation that accompanies cross-species transmission and the evolution of synthetic prions occurring within the same host. Two alternative mechanisms underlying prion strain adaptation and synthetic strain evolution are discussed. The current article highlights the complexity of the prion transmission barrier and strain adaptation and proposes that the phenomenon of prion adaptation is more common than previously thought.

  20. Time-Strain Superposition in Polymer Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Paul A.; McKenna, Gregory B.

    1997-03-01

    Time-strain superposition is often used in constitutive modeling to describe the nonlinear viscoelastic reponse of solid-like polymers. While it is true that time-strain superposition does not always work, a more fundamental question arises when it appears to work. Is the master curve obtained by time-strain superposition the same as that obtained in time-temperature superposition? Here we show work from torsional measurements on polycarbonate in the temperature range from 30 to 130 ^oC. We find that at each temperature time-strain superposition can be performed, but that the strain reductions do not give the same master curves as does the temperature reduction. Such behavior suggests that time-strain superposition cannot be used to represent polymeric material behavior and that its utility for estimating long time performance is very limited.

  1. Enterotoxigenicity of aeromonas strains in suckling mice.

    PubMed

    Jánossy, G; Tarján, V

    1980-01-01

    The enterotoxigenicity of 170 Aeromonas strains isolated from different sources (food poisoning, random food sampling, water, faeces) was examined by the suckling mouse test. The strains were grown on Syncaye culture medium covered with sterilized membrane for Kiil-kidney. The culture supernatants were inoculated orally. Ileal loop dilatation was compared to that produced by the international standard enterotoxic Escherichia coli B7A (O148 : H28) and B2C (O6 : H16) strains. Of the 87 Aeromonas hydrophila strains 69, of the 76 Aeromonas punctate subsp. caviae strains 9, the 6 Aeromonas punctata subsp. punctata strains 5, and 1 Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. achromogenes gave a positive reaction in the test.

  2. Strain concentration factor as a function of strain in a design application

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents results for a detailed inelastic finite element analysis for a part of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Control Rod Drive Mechanism. The analysis results indicate that plastic strain concentration factors may in fact be less than corresponding elastic strain concentration factors for nominal strains as low as .2%. This is particularly insightful in that it is presently common practice to approximate inelastic strain concentration factors as the square of the elastic concentration factors. The paper also examines Neuber's relation for predicting strain concentration factors and looks at the variation in the strain concentration factor through the cross-section of the component analyzed.

  3. AN ORGANOTYPIC UNIAXIAL STRAIN MODEL USING MICROFLUIDICS

    PubMed Central

    Dollé, Jean-Pierre; Morrison, Barclay; Schloss, Rene R.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries are the leading cause of disability each year in the US. The most common and devastating consequence is the stretching of axons caused by shear deformation that occurs during rotational acceleration of the brain during injury. The injury effects on axonal molecular and functional events are not fully characterized. We have developed a strain injury model that maintains the three dimensional cell architecture and neuronal networks found in vivo with the ability to visualize individual axons and their response to a mechanical injury. The advantage of this model is that it can apply uniaxial strains to axons that make functional connections between two organotypic slices and injury responses can be observed in real-time and over long term. This uniaxial strain model was designed to be capable of applying an array of mechanical strains at various rates of strain, thus replicating a range of modes of axonal injury. Long term culture, preservation of slice and cell orientation, and slice-slice connection on the device was demonstrated. The device has the ability to strain either individual axons or bundles of axons through the control of microchannel dimensions. The fidelity of the model was verified by observing characteristic responses to various strain injuries which included axonal beading, delayed elastic effects and breakdown in microtubules. Microtubule breakdown was shown to be dependent on the degree of the applied strain field, where maximal breakdown was observed at peak strain and minimal breakdown is observed at low strain. This strain injury model could be a powerful tool in assessing strain injury effects on functional axonal connections. PMID:23233120

  4. Lattice Strain Due to an Atomic Vacancy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shidong; Sellers, Michael S.; Basaran, Cemal; Schultz, Andrew J.; Kofke, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Volumetric strain can be divided into two parts: strain due to bond distance change and strain due to vacancy sources and sinks. In this paper, efforts are focused on studying the atomic lattice strain due to a vacancy in an FCC metal lattice with molecular dynamics simulation (MDS). The result has been compared with that from a continuum mechanics method. It is shown that using a continuum mechanics approach yields constitutive results similar to the ones obtained based purely on molecular dynamics considerations. PMID:19582230

  5. Material approaches to stretchable strain sensors.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaeyoon; You, Insang; Shin, Sangbaie; Jeong, Unyong

    2015-04-27

    With the recent progress made in wearable electronics, devices now require high flexibility and stretchability up to large strain levels (typically larger than 30 % strain). Wearable strain sensors or deformable strain sensors have been gaining increasing research interest because of the rapid development of electronic skins and robotics and because of their biomedical applications. Conventional brittle strain sensors made of metals and piezoresistors are not applicable for such stretchable sensors. This Review summarizes recent advances in stretchable sensors and focuses on material aspects for high stretchability and sensitivity. It begins with a brief introduction to the Wheatstone bridge circuit of conventional resistive strain sensors. Then, studies on the manipulation of materials are reviewed, including waved structural approaches for making metals and semiconductors stretchable, the use of liquid metals, and conductive filler/elastomer composites by using percolation among the fillers. For capacitive strain sensors, the constant conductivity of the electrode is a key factor in obtaining reliable sensors. Possible approaches to developing capacitive strain sensors are presented. This Review concludes with a discussion on the major challenges and perspectives related to stretchable strain sensors.

  6. Diversity among Streptomyces Strains Causing Potato Scab.

    PubMed

    Doering-Saad, C; Kämpfer, P; Manulis, S; Kritzman, G; Schneider, J; Zakrzewska-Czerwinska, J; Schrempf, H; Barash, I

    1992-12-01

    Eighty Streptomyces isolates, including 35 potato scab-inducing strains and 12 reference strains of Streptomyces scabies, were physiologically characterized by a total of 329 miniaturized tests. Overall similarities of all strains were determined by numerical taxonomy, with the unweighted average linkage (UPGMA) algorithm and simple matching (S(sm)) and Jaccard (S(j)) coefficients used as measures for similarity. Three cluster groups (A to C) were defined at a similarity level of 80.1% (S(sm)); these groups contained 14 clusters and 24 unclustered strains defined at a similarity level of 86.5% (S(sm)). Cluster group A contained strains phenotypically related to S. griseus or S. exfoliatus, whereas cluster group B contained strains which were phenotypically related to S. violaceus or S. rochei. The majority of the pathogenic isolates and reference strains were assigned to S. violaceus (57%) and S. griseus (22%). A DNA probe derived from the rRNA operon of S. coelicolor IMET 40271 was used to detect restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RELPs) among 40 pathogenic and nonpathogenic Streptomyces isolates. Southern blots revealed a high degree of diversity among the pathogenic strains tested. No significant correlation between numerical classification and RFLP grouping of Streptomyces strains could be revealed. The results obtained suggest that RFLP data are of minor importance in classification of Streptomyces species and that genes for pathogenicity determinants are spread among different Streptomyces species by mobilizable elements. PMID:16348823

  7. Diversity among Streptomyces Strains Causing Potato Scab

    PubMed Central

    Doering-Saad, Christiane; Kämpfer, Peter; Manulis, Shulamit; Kritzman, Giora; Schneider, Jörg; Zakrzewska-Czerwinska, Jolanta; Schrempf, Hildgund; Barash, Isaac

    1992-01-01

    Eighty Streptomyces isolates, including 35 potato scab-inducing strains and 12 reference strains of Streptomyces scabies, were physiologically characterized by a total of 329 miniaturized tests. Overall similarities of all strains were determined by numerical taxonomy, with the unweighted average linkage (UPGMA) algorithm and simple matching (Ssm) and Jaccard (Sj) coefficients used as measures for similarity. Three cluster groups (A to C) were defined at a similarity level of 80.1% (Ssm); these groups contained 14 clusters and 24 unclustered strains defined at a similarity level of 86.5% (Ssm). Cluster group A contained strains phenotypically related to S. griseus or S. exfoliatus, whereas cluster group B contained strains which were phenotypically related to S. violaceus or S. rochei. The majority of the pathogenic isolates and reference strains were assigned to S. violaceus (57%) and S. griseus (22%). A DNA probe derived from the rRNA operon of S. coelicolor IMET 40271 was used to detect restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RELPs) among 40 pathogenic and nonpathogenic Streptomyces isolates. Southern blots revealed a high degree of diversity among the pathogenic strains tested. No significant correlation between numerical classification and RFLP grouping of Streptomyces strains could be revealed. The results obtained suggest that RFLP data are of minor importance in classification of Streptomyces species and that genes for pathogenicity determinants are spread among different Streptomyces species by mobilizable elements. Images PMID:16348823

  8. Optical fiber sensor technique for strain measurement

    DOEpatents

    Butler, Michael A.; Ginley, David S.

    1989-01-01

    Laser light from a common source is split and conveyed through two similar optical fibers and emitted at their respective ends to form an interference pattern, one of the optical fibers having a portion thereof subjected to a strain. Changes in the strain cause changes in the optical path length of the strain fiber, and generate corresponding changes in the interference pattern. The interference pattern is received and transduced into signals representative of fringe shifts corresponding to changes in the strain experienced by the strained one of the optical fibers. These signals are then processed to evaluate strain as a function of time, typical examples of the application of the apparatus including electrodeposition of a metallic film on a conductive surface provided on the outside of the optical fiber being strained, so that strains generated in the optical fiber during the course of the electrodeposition are measurable as a function of time. In one aspect of the invention, signals relating to the fringe shift are stored for subsequent processing and analysis, whereas in another aspect of the invention the signals are processed for real-time display of the strain changes under study.

  9. High strain rate damage of Carrara marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, Mai-Linh; Billi, Andrea

    2011-10-01

    Several cases of rock pulverization have been observed along major active faults in granite and other crystalline rocks. They have been interpreted as due to coseismic pervasive microfracturing. In contrast, little is known about pulverization in carbonates. With the aim of understanding carbonate pulverization, we investigate the high strain rate (c. 100 s-1) behavior of unconfined Carrara marble through a set of experiments with a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar. Three final states were observed: (1) at low strain, the sample is kept intact, without apparent macrofractures; (2) failure is localized along a few fractures once stress is larger than 100 MPa, corresponding to a strain of 0.65%; (3) above 1.3% strain, the sample is pulverized. Contrary to granite, the transition to pulverization is controlled by strain rather than strain rate. Yet, at low strain rate, a sample from the same marble displayed only a few fractures. This suggests that the experiments were done above the strain rate transition to pulverization. Marble seems easier to pulverize than granite. This creates a paradox: finely pulverized rocks should be prevalent along any high strain zone near faults through carbonates, but this is not what is observed. A few alternatives are proposed to solve this paradox.

  10. Compressive strain rate sensitivity of ballistic gelatin.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jiwoon; Subhash, Ghatu

    2010-02-10

    Gelatin is a popular tissue simulant used in biomedical applications. The uniaxial compressive stress-strain response of gelatin was determined at a range of strain rates. In the quasistatic regime, gelatin strength remained relatively constant. With increase in loading rate, the compressive strength increased from 3kPa at a strain rate of around 0.0013/s to 6MPa at a strain rate of around 3200/s. This dramatic increase in strength of gelatin at high rates is attributed to its shear-thickening behavior and is argued on the basis of hydrocluster formation mechanism and differences in internal energy dissipation mechanism under static and dynamic loading. PMID:19863960

  11. Control of surface wettability via strain engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Wei; Liu, Jefferson Zhe; Zhang, Zhi-Liang; Zhen, Quan-Shui

    2013-08-01

    Reversible control of surface wettability has wide applications in lab-on-chip systems, tunable optical lenses, and microfluidic tools. Using a graphene sheet as a sample material and molecular dynamic simulations, we demonstrate that strain engineering can serve as an effective way to control the surface wettability. The contact angles θ of water droplets on a graphene vary from 72.5° to 106° under biaxial strains ranging from -10% to 10% that are applied on the graphene layer. For an intrinsic hydrophilic surface (at zero strain), the variation of θ upon the applied strains is more sensitive, i.e., from 0° to 74.8°. Overall the cosines of the contact angles exhibit a linear relation with respect to the strains. In light of the inherent dependence of the contact angle on liquid-solid interfacial energy, we develop an analytic model to show the cos θ as a linear function of the adsorption energy E ads of a single water molecule over the substrate surface. This model agrees with our molecular dynamic results very well. Together with the linear dependence of E ads on biaxial strains, we can thus understand the effect of strains on the surface wettability. Thanks to the ease of reversibly applying mechanical strains in micro/nano-electromechanical systems, we believe that strain engineering can be a promising means to achieve the reversibly control of surface wettability.

  12. Measurement of Sorption-Induced Strain

    SciTech Connect

    Eric P. Robertson; Richard L. Christiansen

    2005-05-01

    Strain caused by the adsorption of gases was measured in samples of subbituminous coal from the Powder River basin of Wyoming, U.S.A. and high-volatile bituminous coal from east-central Utah, U.S.A. using an apparatus developed jointly at the Idaho National Laboratory (Idaho Falls, Idaho, U.S.A.) and Colorado School of Mines (Golden, Colorado, U.S.A.). The apparatus can be used to measure strain on multiple small coal samples based on the optical detection of the longitudinal strain instead of the more common usage of strain gauges, which require larger samples and longer equilibration times. With this apparatus, we showed that the swelling and shrinkage processes were reversible and that accurate strain data could be obtained in a shortened amount of time. A suite of strain curves was generated for these coals using gases that included carbon dioxide, nitrogen, methane, helium, and various mixtures of these gases. A Langmuir-type equation was applied to satisfactorily model the strain data obtained for pure gases. The sorption-induced strain measured in the subbituminous coal was larger than the high-volatile bituminous coal for all gases tested over the range of pressures used in the experimentation, with the CO2-induced strain for the subbituminous coal over twice as great at the bituminous coal.

  13. Distributed strain monitoring for bridges: temperature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regier, Ryan; Hoult, Neil A.

    2014-03-01

    To better manage infrastructure assets as they reach the end of their service lives, quantitative data is required to better assess structural behavior and allow for more informed decision making. Distributed fiber optic strain sensors are one sensing technology that could provide comprehensive data for use in structural assessments as these systems potentially allow for strain to be measured with the same accuracy and gage lengths as conventional strain sensors. However, as with many sensor technologies, temperature can play an important role in terms of both the structure's and sensor's performance. To investigate this issue a fiber optic distributed strain sensor system was installed on a section of a two span reinforced concrete bridge on the TransCanada Highway. Strain data was acquired several times a day as well as over the course of several months to explore the effects of changing temperature on the data. The results show that the strain measurements are affected by the bridge behavior as a whole. The strain measurements due to temperature are compared to strain measurements that were taken during a load test on the bridge. The results show that even a small change in temperature can produce crack width and strain changes similar to those due to a fully loaded transport truck. Future directions for research in this area are outlined.

  14. Acceleration and Velocity Sensing from Measured Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi; Truax, Roger

    2016-01-01

    A simple approach for computing acceleration and velocity of a structure from the strain is proposed in this study. First, deflection and slope of the structure are computed from the strain using a two-step theory. Frequencies of the structure are computed from the time histories of strain using a parameter estimation technique together with an Autoregressive Moving Average model. From deflection, slope, and frequencies of the structure, acceleration and velocity of the structure can be obtained using the proposed approach. shape sensing, fiber optic strain sensor, system equivalent reduction and expansion process.

  15. Investigation of a noncontact strain measurement technique

    SciTech Connect

    Damiano, B.; Talarico, L.J.

    1996-05-01

    The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility of a new noncontact technique for directly and continuously monitoring peak strain in rotating components. The technique utilizes the unique strain-sensitive magnetic material properties of transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel alloys to measure strain. These alloys are weakly magnetic when unstrained but become strongly ferromagnetic after mechanical deformation. A computer study was performed to determine whether the strain-induced change in the magnetic material properties of a TRIP steel gage bonded to a rotating component would cause significant perturbations in the magnetic flux of a stationary electromagnet. The effects of strain level, distance between the rotating component and the stationary electromagnet, and motion-induced eddy currents on flux perturbation magnitude were investigated. The calculated results indicate that a TRIP steel strain sensing element can cause a significant perturbation in the magnetic flux of a stationary electromagnet. The magnetic flux perturbation magnitude was found to be inversely proportional to the distance between the magnet face and the TRIP steel element and directly proportional to the TRIP steel strain level. The effect of motion-induced eddy currents on the magnetic flux was found to be negligible. It appears that the technique can be successfully applied to measure peak strain in rotating components; however, the sensitivity of the magnetic flux perturbation magnitude to the distance between the strain sensing element and the electromagnet may require making an independent proximity measurement.

  16. A comparison of eastern North American seismic strain-rates to glacial rebound strain-rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Thomas S.; Bent, Allison L.

    1994-01-01

    Glacial rebound strain-rates computed using a simple Laurentide glacial loading model are of the order of 10(exp -9) per year within the region of glaciation and extending several hundred kilometers beyond. The horizontal strain-rates receive approximately equal contributions from horizontal and vertical velocities, a consequence of the spherical geometry adopted for the Earth model. In the eastern United States and southeastern Canada the computed strain-rates are 1-3 orders of magnitude greater than an estimate of the average seismic strain-rate (Anderson, 1986) and approximately 1 order of magnitude greater than predicted erosional strain-rates. The predicted glacial rebound strain-rates are not, in general, oriented in such a way as to augment the observed state of deviatoric stress, possibly explaining why the seismic strain-rates are much smaller than the glacial rebound strain-rates. An exception to this may be seismically active regions in the St. Lawrence valley.

  17. General Strain Theory and Delinquency: Focusing on the Influences of Key Strain Characteristics on Delinquency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Byongook; Blurton, David; McCluskey, John D.

    2008-01-01

    The study examines the effects of recent, older, and chronic strains and of perceived injustice of strain on delinquency, sampling 777 Korean youth. Seven key strains most likely leading to delinquency, some of which were often overlooked in previous research, were included, and these are family conflict, parental punishment, teachers' punishment,…

  18. [Job strain and drinking behavior].

    PubMed

    Yang, M J; Ho, C K; Fan, L R; Yang, M S

    1996-12-01

    The aim of this survey study was to explore the influence of work on individual's drinking behavior. From October 1994 to March 1995, the present researchers implemented a self-administered questionnaire survey on workers in the manufacturing sector in Metropolitan Kaohsiung area, southern Taiwan. Of the 1,117 subjects selected, 668 (61.8%) stated that they had had one or more drinks during the preceding month. The average daily consumption of alcohol was 0.2 +/- 0.9 drinks (with a range of 0 to 12 drinks and a median of 0.02 drinks). In addition, 188 (28.8%) of the subjects reported having experienced drinking-related problems during the preceding month, and 35 respondents (5.2%) gave escape from job stress as the reason for their drinking in the preceding month. The result of multivariate analyses showed that workers who reported less autonomy in their job were more likely to experience drinking-related problems (odds ratio [OR] = 1.3) and to drinking for psychological relief (OR = 1.2); that workers who reported more demanding job conditions were more likely to drink for escape (OR = 2.5) but had lower levels of drinking (t = -2.5, p = 0.01); and that workers who reported high levels of job strain were more likely to experience drinking-related problems and to drink for relief but had lower levels of drinking. The details and implications of this result will be discussed.

  19. Silicon stress/strain activities at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.

    1986-01-01

    In-house Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) work is described for silicon stress/strain, including the study of fracture mechanics, and on the high-temperature test program in which the low-strain response of silicon sheet materials above 1000 C is being measured and high temperature material property data are being determined.

  20. Attachment techniques for high temperature strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wnuk, Steve P., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Attachment methods for making resistive strain measurements to 2500 F were studied. A survey of available strain gages and attachment techniques was made, and the results are compiled for metal and carbon composite test materials. A theoretical analysis of strain transfer into a bonded strain gage was made, and the important physical parameters of the strain transfer medium, the ceramic matrix, were identified. A pull tester to measure pull-out tests on commonly used strain gage cements indicated that all cements tested displayed adequate strength for good strain transfer. Rokide flame sprayed coatings produced significantly stronger bonds than ceramic cements. An in-depth study of the flame spray process produced simplified installation procedures which also resulted in greater reliability and durability. Application procedures incorporating improvements made during this program are appended to the report. Strain gages installed on carbon composites, Rene' 41, 316 stainless steel, and TZM using attachment techniques developed during this program were successfully tested to 2500 F. Photographs of installation techniques, test procedures, and graphs of the test data are included in this report.

  1. Morphological variations of Haemophilus parasuis strains.

    PubMed Central

    Morozumi, T; Nicolet, J

    1986-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis strains isolated from the noses of apparently healthy animals and from animals with pathological conditions were examined for the presence of a capsule, for their ability to agglutinate in acriflavine or after boiling, and for their peptide profile after polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The capsule was identified by precipitation against hexadecyl trimethylammonium bromide (Cetavlon), by demonstration of iridescence, and by means of a capsule-staining method. We found a group of capsulated strains showing a rather coccobacillary morphology compared with the morphology with polymorphism, varying from rod-like to filamentous, in strains without detectable capsules. The strains of the latter group were agglutinated by acriflavine or by boiling. Soluble antigens of capsulated strains reacting with Cetavlon were thermostable and resisted proteolytic enzymes, thus suggesting the presence of an acidic polysaccharide. A few of the capsulated strains did not precipitate with Cetavlon, which indicated that their chemical composition was different. Acriflavine-positive strains belonging to a definite PAGE pattern (type II) seemed to be associated with pathological conditions more frequently than were capsulated strains which were mostly isolated from nasal cavities of apparently healthy pigs. We put forward the hypothesis that the agglutinability in acriflavine, together with the PAGE profile type II, may be associated with particular structures responsible for virulence. Images PMID:3700597

  2. Fiscal Strain in an Era of Retrenchment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hentschke, Guilbert; Yagielski, John

    Preliminary results of a three-year study of fifteen school districts indicate that fiscal strain results from both "intended" and "unintended" factors. The authors construct a model of fiscal strain that combines budget constraints with school district decision-makers' preference functions and indifference curves. Using this model and 1976 and…

  3. Strain engineering in graphene by laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Papasimakis, N.; Mailis, S.; Huang, C. C.; Al-Saab, F.; Hewak, D. W.; Luo, Z.; Shen, Z. X.

    2015-02-09

    We demonstrate that the Raman spectrum of graphene on lithium niobate can be controlled locally by continuous exposure to laser irradiation. We interpret our results in terms of changes to doping and mechanical strain and show that our observations are consistent with light-induced gradual strain relaxation in the graphene layer.

  4. Surfactin production by strains of Bacillus mojavensis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacillus mojavensis, RRC101 is an endophytic bacterium patented for control of fungal diseases in maize and other plants. DNA fingerprint analysis of the rep-PCR fragments of 35 B. mojavensis and 4 B. subtilis strains using the Diversilab genotyping system revealed genotypic distinctive strains alon...

  5. Medically Complex Home Care and Caregiver Strain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moorman, Sara M.; Macdonald, Cameron

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the study: To examine (a) whether the content of caregiving tasks (i.e., nursing vs. personal care) contributes to variation in caregivers' strain and (b) whether the level of complexity of nursing tasks contributes to variation in strain among caregivers providing help with such tasks. Design and methods: The data came from the Cash…

  6. Validation of a Caregiver Strain Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Betsy C.

    1983-01-01

    Outlines the development of a Caregiver Strain Index (CSI) with spouses, family, friends, and neighbors who provided care to recently hospitalized hip surgery and heart patients over 65. Results indicate that the CSI is a brief, easily administered instrument which identifies strain within the sample of informal care providers. (Author/JAC)

  7. Nanocomposite Strain Gauges Having Small TCRs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Otto; Chen, Ximing

    2009-01-01

    Ceramic strain gauges in which the strain-sensitive electrically conductive strips made from nanocomposites of noble metal and indium tin oxide (ITO) are being developed for use in gas turbine engines and other power-generation systems in which gas temperatures can exceed 1,500 F (about 816 C). In general, strain gauges exhibit spurious thermally induced components of response denoted apparent strain. When temperature varies, a strain-gauge material that has a nonzero temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) exhibits an undesired change in electrical resistance that can be mistaken for the change in resistance caused by a change in strain. It would be desirable to formulate straingauge materials having TCRs as small as possible so as to minimize apparent strain. Most metals exhibit positive TCRs, while most semiconductors, including ITO, exhibit negative TCRs. The present development is based on the idea of using the negative TCR of ITO to counter the positive TCRs of noble metals and of obtaining the benefit of the ability of both ITO and noble metals to endure high temperatures. The noble metal used in this development thus far has been platinum. Combinatorial libraries of many ceramic strain gauges containing nanocomposites of various proportions of ITO and platinum were fabricated by reactive co-sputtering from ITO and platinum targets onto alumina- and zirconia-based substrates mounted at various positions between the targets.

  8. Extraordinary strain hardening by gradient structure.

    PubMed

    Wu, XiaoLei; Jiang, Ping; Chen, Liu; Yuan, Fuping; Zhu, Yuntian T

    2014-05-20

    Gradient structures have evolved over millions of years through natural selection and optimization in many biological systems such as bones and plant stems, where the structures change gradually from the surface to interior. The advantage of gradient structures is their maximization of physical and mechanical performance while minimizing material cost. Here we report that the gradient structure in engineering materials such as metals renders a unique extra strain hardening, which leads to high ductility. The grain-size gradient under uniaxial tension induces a macroscopic strain gradient and converts the applied uniaxial stress to multiaxial stresses due to the evolution of incompatible deformation along the gradient depth. Thereby the accumulation and interaction of dislocations are promoted, resulting in an extra strain hardening and an obvious strain hardening rate up-turn. Such extraordinary strain hardening, which is inherent to gradient structures and does not exist in homogeneous materials, provides a hitherto unknown strategy to develop strong and ductile materials by architecting heterogeneous nanostructures.

  9. Two-Dimensional Speckle Strain Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pignatelli, Ricardo; Law, Mark A.; Martinez, Hugo; Altman, Carolyn; Ayres, Nancy; Jefferies, John L.; Ganame, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Two-dimensional speckle-tracking strain imaging (speckle strain imaging) is useful for evaluating left ventricular myocardial function in patients with ischemic heart disease and cardiomyopathy, including hypertrophic and dilated phenotypes. The usefulness of speckle strain imaging in patients with pheochromocytoma who are undergoing adrenal surgery has been described, but we found no reports of the use of this method to evaluate ventricular dysfunction longitudinally in children. Herein, we describe the case of a 10-year-old girl with a paraganglioma, acute junctional tachycardia, and myocardial dysfunction. After control of the tachycardia and partial resection of the tumor, speckle strain imaging enabled clinical management that led to substantial improvement in the patient's initially diffuse myocardial dysfunction. Because conventional echocardiographic methods alone may be inadequate to guide the management of pediatric patients with partially resected neuroendocrine tumors, we recommend speckle strain imaging as an additional noninvasive option for treatment guidance and monitoring of cardiac tissue response. PMID:22412245

  10. Nanoscale strain mapping in battery nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Ulvestad, A. Kim, J. W.; Dietze, S. H.; Shpyrko, O. G.; Cho, H. M.; Meng, Y. S.; Harder, R.; Fohtung, E.

    2014-02-17

    Coherent x-ray diffraction imaging is used to map the local three dimensional strain inhomogeneity and electron density distribution of two individual LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4−δ} cathode nanoparticles in both ex-situ and in-situ environments. Our reconstructed images revealed a maximum strain of 0.4%. We observed different variations in strain inhomogeneity due to multiple competing effects. The compressive/tensile component of the strain is connected to the local lithium content and, on the surface, interpreted in terms of a local Jahn-Teller distortion of Mn{sup 3+}. Finally, the measured strain distributions are discussed in terms of their impact on competing theoretical models of the lithiation process.

  11. Mechanical strain effects on black phosphorus nanoresonators.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cui-Xia; Zhang, Chao; Jiang, Jin-Wu; Park, Harold S; Rabczuk, Timon

    2016-01-14

    We perform classical molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the effects of mechanical strain on single-layer black phosphorus nanoresonators at different temperatures. We find that the resonant frequency is highly anisotropic in black phosphorus due to its intrinsic puckered configuration, and that the quality factor in the armchair direction is higher than in the zigzag direction at room temperature. The quality factors are also found to be intrinsically larger than those in graphene and MoS2 nanoresonators. The quality factors can be increased by more than a factor of two by applying tensile strain, with uniaxial strain in the armchair direction being the most effective. However, there is an upper bound for the quality factor increase due to nonlinear effects at large strains, after which the quality factor decreases. The tension induced nonlinear effect is stronger along the zigzag direction, resulting in a smaller maximum strain for quality factor enhancement. PMID:26649476

  12. Transduction of mechanical strain in bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R. L.

    1995-01-01

    One physiologic consequence of extended periods of weightlessness is the rapid loss of bone mass associated with skeletal unloading. Conversely, mechanical loading has been shown to increase bone formation and stimulate osteoblastic function. The mechanisms underlying mechanotransduction, or how the osteoblast senses and converts biophysical stimuli into cellular responses has yet to be determined. For non-innervated mechanosensitive cells like the osteoblast, mechanotransduction can be divided into four distinct phases: 1) mechanocoupling, or the characteristics of the mechanical force applied to the osteoblast, 2) biochemical coupling, or the mechanism through which mechanical strain is transduced into a cellular biochemical signal, 3) transmission of signal from sensor to effector cell and 4) the effector cell response. This review examines the characteristics of the mechanical strain encountered by osteoblasts, possible biochemical coupling mechanisms, and how the osteoblast responds to mechanical strain. Differences in osteoblastic responses to mechanical strain are discussed in relation to the types of strain encountered and the possible transduction pathways involved.

  13. Strain rate effects in stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Parkins, R.N. . Dept. of Metallurgy and Engineering Materials)

    1990-03-01

    Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was initially developed as a rapid, ad hoc laboratory method for assessing the propensity for metals an environments to promote stress corrosion cracking. It is now clear, however, that there are good theoretical reasons why strain rate, as opposed to stress per se, will often be the controlling parameter in determining whether or not cracks are nucleated and, if so, are propagated. The synergistic effects of the time dependence of corrosion-related reactions and microplastic strain provide the basis for mechanistic understanding of stress corrosion cracking in high-pressure pipelines and other structures. However, while this may be readily comprehended in the context of laboratory slow strain tests, its extension to service situations may be less apparent. Laboratory work involving realistic stressing conditions, including low-frequency cyclic loading, shows that strain or creep rates give good correlation with thresholds for cracking and with crack growth kinetics.

  14. Mechanical strain effects on black phosphorus nanoresonators.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cui-Xia; Zhang, Chao; Jiang, Jin-Wu; Park, Harold S; Rabczuk, Timon

    2016-01-14

    We perform classical molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the effects of mechanical strain on single-layer black phosphorus nanoresonators at different temperatures. We find that the resonant frequency is highly anisotropic in black phosphorus due to its intrinsic puckered configuration, and that the quality factor in the armchair direction is higher than in the zigzag direction at room temperature. The quality factors are also found to be intrinsically larger than those in graphene and MoS2 nanoresonators. The quality factors can be increased by more than a factor of two by applying tensile strain, with uniaxial strain in the armchair direction being the most effective. However, there is an upper bound for the quality factor increase due to nonlinear effects at large strains, after which the quality factor decreases. The tension induced nonlinear effect is stronger along the zigzag direction, resulting in a smaller maximum strain for quality factor enhancement.

  15. New naphthalene-degrading marine Pseudomonas strains

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Valdes, E.; Cozar, E.; Rotger, R. Lalucat, J. ); Ursing, J. )

    1988-10-01

    Over 100 strains that utilized naphthalene as the only carbon and energy source were isolated from samples of marine sediments taken from a heavily polluted area. The isolates were characterized taxonomically and physiologically. Most of these strains belonged to the genus Pseudomonas, and seven of them did not fit any previous taxonomic description. They differed from type strains in a few biochemical characteristics and in the utilization of aromatic compounds. None had catechol 1,2-dioxygenase activity, and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase was responsible for the aromatic ring cleavage. DNA hybridizations demonstrated a close relationship between two isolates and the Pseudomonas stutzeri type strain, and between five isolates and the Pseudomonas testosteroni type strain. On the basis of nutritional and enzymatic characteristics, it was assumed that the seven isolates represent new biovars belonging to the species P. testosteroni and P. stutzeri that are able to degrade aromatic hydrocarbons.

  16. Micro-scale strain mapping technique: a tool to quantify strain partitioning during creep deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintanilla-Terminel, Alejandra; Zimmerman, Mark; Evans, Brian; Kohlstedt, David

    2016-04-01

    Several deformation mechanisms interact to accommodate plastic deformation. Quantifying the contribution of each to the total strain is necessary for establishing a better link between observed microstructures and mechanical data, as well as to allow more confident extrapolation from laboratory to natural conditions. In this contribution, we present the experimental and computational technique involved in micro-scale strain mapping (MSSM). The MSSM technique relies on analyzing the relative displacement of initially regularly spaced markers after deformation. We present several microfabrication techniques that permit us to pattern various rocks with micrometric and nanometric metal markers, as well as the challenges faced in working at high temperatures and pressures. A Hough transform algorithm was used to detect the markers and automate as much as possible the strain analysis. The von Mises strain is calculated for a set of n-points and their relative displacements, which allow us to map the strain at different length scales. We applied the MSSM technique to study strain partitioning during deformation creep of Carrara marble and San Carlos olivine at a confining pressure, Pc, of 300 MPa and homologous temperatures of 0.3 to 0.6. We measured the local strain and strain heterogeneity produced during creep deformation of split cylinders of Carrara marble under conventional triaxial loading to inelastic strains of 11 to 36% at a strain rate of 3x10-5s-1, Pc = 300 MPa and 400o < T <700oC. We conclude that the evolution of deformation structures in marble takes place over a substantial interval in strain and that the duration of this interval depends on strain rate, temperature, and pressure. Our first results on strain mapping of olivine deformed at T = 1150oC and Pc = 300 MPa demonstrate promise for characterizing intragranular strain and better defining the contribution of grain boundary sliding to the total strain.

  17. Micro-scale strain mapping technique: a tool to quantify strain partitioning during creep deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintanilla-Terminel, Alejandra; Zimmerman, Mark; Evans, Brian; Kohlstedt, David

    2016-04-01

    Several deformation mechanisms interact to accommodate plastic deformation. Quantifying the contribution of each to the total strain is necessary for establishing a better link between observed microstructures and mechanical data, as well as to allow more confident extrapolation from laboratory to natural conditions. In this contribution, we present the experimental and computational technique involved in micro-scale strain mapping (MSSM). The MSSM technique relies on analyzing the relative displacement of initially regularly spaced markers after deformation. We present several microfabrication techniques that permit us to pattern various rocks with micrometric and nanometric metal markers, as well as the challenges faced in working at high temperatures and pressures. A Hough transform algorithm was used to detect the markers and automate as much as possible the strain analysis. The von Mises strain is calculated for a set of n-points and their relative displacements, which allow us to map the strain at different length scales. We applied the MSSM technique to study strain partitioning during deformation creep of Carrara marble and San Carlos olivine at a confining pressure, Pc, of 300 MPa and homologous temperatures of 0.3 to 0.6. We measured the local strain and strain heterogeneity produced during creep deformation of split cylinders of Carrara marble under conventional triaxial loading to inelastic strains of 11 to 36% at a strain rate of 3x10‑5s‑1, Pc = 300 MPa and 400o < T <700oC. We conclude that the evolution of deformation structures in marble takes place over a substantial interval in strain and that the duration of this interval depends on strain rate, temperature, and pressure. Our first results on strain mapping of olivine deformed at T = 1150oC and Pc = 300 MPa demonstrate promise for characterizing intragranular strain and better defining the contribution of grain boundary sliding to the total strain.

  18. Assessment of the Microbial Constituents of the Home Environment of Individuals with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) and Their Association with Lower Airways Infections

    PubMed Central

    Heirali, Alya; McKeon, Suzanne; Purighalla, Swathi; Storey, Douglas G.; Rossi, Laura; Costilhes, Geoffrey; Drews, Steven J.; Rabin, Harvey R.; Surette, Michael G.; Parkins, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cystic fibrosis (CF) airways are colonized by a polymicrobial community of organisms, termed the CF microbiota. We sought to define the microbial constituents of the home environment of individuals with CF and determine if it may serve as a latent reservoir for infection. Methods Six patients with newly identified CF pathogens were included. An investigator collected repeat sputum and multiple environmental samples from their homes. Bacteria were cultured under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Morphologically distinct colonies were selected, purified and identified to the genus and species level through 16S rRNA gene sequencing. When concordant organisms were identified in sputum and environment, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was performed to determine relatedness. Culture-independent bacterial profiling of each sample was carried out by Illumina sequencing of the V3 region of the 16s RNA gene. Results New respiratory pathogens prompting investigation included: Mycobacterium abscessus(2), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia(3), Pseudomonas aeruginosa(3), Pseudomonas fluorescens(1), Nocardia spp.(1), and Achromobacter xylosoxidans(1). A median 25 organisms/patient were cultured from sputum. A median 125 organisms/home were cultured from environmental sites. Several organisms commonly found in the CF lung microbiome were identified within the home environments of these patients. Concordant species included members of the following genera: Brevibacterium(1), Microbacterium(1), Staphylococcus(3), Stenotrophomonas(2), Streptococcus(2), Sphingomonas(1), and Pseudomonas(4). PFGE confirmed related strains (one episode each of Sphinogomonas and P. aeruginosa) from the environment and airways were identified in two patients. Culture-independent assessment confirmed that many organisms were not identified using culture-dependent techniques. Conclusions Members of the CF microbiota can be found as constituents of the home environment in individuals with

  19. Amerindian Helicobacter pylori Strains Go Extinct, as European Strains Expand Their Host Range

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-Bello, Maria G.; Pérez, Maria E.; Bortolini, Maria C.; Salzano, Francisco M.; Pericchi, Luis R.; Zambrano-Guzmán, Orlisbeth; Linz, Bodo

    2008-01-01

    We studied the diversity of bacteria and host in the H. pylori-human model. The human indigenous bacterium H. pylori diverged along with humans, into African, European, Asian and Amerindian groups. Of these, Amerindians have the least genetic diversity. Since niche diversity widens the sets of resources for colonizing species, we predicted that the Amerindian H. pylori strains would be the least diverse. We analyzed the multilocus sequence (7 housekeeping genes) of 131 strains: 19 cultured from Africans, 36 from Spanish, 11 from Koreans, 43 from Amerindians and 22 from South American Mestizos. We found that all strains that had been cultured from Africans were African strains (hpAfrica1), all from Spanish were European (hpEurope) and all from Koreans were hspEAsia but that Amerindians and Mestizos carried mixed strains: hspAmerind and hpEurope strains had been cultured from Amerindians and hpEurope and hpAfrica1 were cultured from Mestizos. The least genetically diverse H. pylori strains were hspAmerind. Strains hpEurope were the most diverse and showed remarkable multilocus sequence mosaicism (indicating recombination). The lower genetic structure in hpEurope strains is consistent with colonization of a diversity of hosts. If diversity is important for the success of H. pylori, then the low diversity of Amerindian strains might be linked to their apparent tendency to disappear. This suggests that Amerindian strains may lack the needed diversity to survive the diversity brought by non-Amerindian hosts. PMID:18830403

  20. Strain sensing and far-infrared absorption in strained graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Fenghua; Jin, Guojun

    2013-08-01

    We investigate the uniaxial strain modulated electronic structure and optical absorption of a triangular zigzag graphene quantum dot within the tight-binding approach. According to the symmetry analysis, the electronic structure and optical absorption can be correctly characterized before and after the strain is applied. The redshift or blueshift of the absorption peaks can be observed in the optical spectrum by uniaxial tensile or compressive strain, indicating that the strained triangular zigzag graphene quantum dot can be used as a strain sensor. The influence of dot sizes on the sensor sensitivity is also considered. Furthermore, the robustness of such a function against a single vacancy defect is confirmed. On the other hand, by applying a gate voltage on the strained dot, the Fermi energy is shifted away from zero, obvious far-infrared absorption peaks can appear in the optical spectrum, which means it is possible to realize far-infrared photodetectors based on strained graphene quantum dots.

  1. Reductive dechlorination of methoxychlor by bacterial species of environmental origin: evidence for primary biodegradation of methoxychlor in submerged environments.

    PubMed

    Satsuma, Koji; Masuda, Minoru

    2012-02-29

    Methoxychlor [1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)ethane] is an organochlorine insecticide that undergoes dechlorination in natural submerged environments. We investigated the ability to dechlorinate this compound in seven environmental bacterial species ( Aeromonas hydrophila , Enterobacter amnigenus , Klebsiella terrigena , Bacillus subtilis , Achromobacter xylosoxidans , Acinetobacter calcoaceticus , and Mycobacterium obuense ) and the enteric bacterium Escherichia coli as a positive control. In R2A broth at 25 °C under aerobic, static culture, all species except Ach. xylosoxidans were observed to convert methoxychlor to dechlorinated methoxychlor [1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)ethane]. The medium was aerobic at first, but bacterial growth resulted in the consumption of oxygen and generated microaerobic and weakly reductive conditions. Replacement of the headspace of the culture tubes with nitrogen gas was found to decrease the dechlorination rate. Our findings suggest that extensive bacterial species ubiquitously inhabiting the subsurface water environment play an important role in the primary dechlorination of methoxychlor.

  2. Strain mapping analysis of textile composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Dmitry; Ivanov, Sergey; Lomov, Stepan; Verpoest, Ignaas

    2009-03-01

    The focus of the work is meso-scale analysis (scale level of the fabric unit cell) of textile composite deformation and failure. The surface strain measurement is used for: (1) experimental investigation, which includes study of strain distribution at various stages of deformation, plasticity detection, damage initiation; (2) numerical validation of the correspondent finite element (FE) models. Two examples are considered: carbon-epoxy triaxial-braided and glass polypropylene-woven composite. The surface strain measurement (by digital image correlation technique) accompanies the tensile tests, aiming at: (1) elastic anisotropic constants characterisation, (2) study of non-linear material behaviour (for the thermoplastic composite), (3) control of homogeneity of the macro-strain distribution, and (4) analysis of damage initiation in brittle composites. Validation of meso-FE models by strain measurements encounters difficulties arising from (1) resolution of the strain measurements, (2) irregularities of the initial structure such as random layer nesting, ply interaction, and deviation of yarns from their theoretical position, which affects the measured strain fields. The paper discusses these difficulties and demonstrates a qualitative agreement with the FE analysis of idealised composite configurations.

  3. Regional myocardial contractile function: multiparametric strain mapping.

    PubMed

    Cupps, Brian P; Taggar, Ajay K; Reynolds, Lina M; Lawton, Jennifer S; Pasque, Michael K

    2010-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with tissue tagging enables the quantification of multiple strain indices that can be combined through normalization into a single multiparametric index of regional myocardial contractile function. The aim of this study was to test the ability of multiparametric strain analysis to quantify regional differences in contractile function in an ovine model of myocardial injury. Regional variance in myocardial contractile function was induced in eight sheep by the ligation of the blood supply to the anterior and apical left ventricular (LV) myocardial walls. LV systolic strain was obtained from tissue tagged MRI images. A normal strain database (n=50) defines all parameters of systolic strain and allows normalization of regional function at 15,300 LV points by calculation of a z-score. Multiparametric systolic strain z-scores were therefore determined for 15,300 points in each injured sheep left ventricle. Multiparametric z-scores were found to vary significantly by region (P<0.001). z-Scores in regions remote to the infarct were found to be significantly smaller than those in the regions most likely to include infarcted myocardium. In this pre-clinical evaluation of MRI-based multiparametric strain analysis, it accurately quantified and visually defined regional differences in myocardial contractile function.

  4. Measurement of microstructural strain in cortical bone

    PubMed Central

    NICOLELLA, DANIEL P.; BONEWALD, LYNDA F.; MORAVITS, DONALD E.; LANKFORD, JAMES

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that mechanical factors affect bone remodeling such that increased mechanical demand results in net bone formation, whereas decreased demand results in net bone resorption. Current theories suggest that bone modeling and remodeling is controlled at the cellular level through signals mediated by osteocytes. The objective of this study was to investigate how macroscopically applied bone strains similar in magnitude to those that occur in vivo are manifest at the microscopic level in the bone matrix. Using a digital image correlation strain measurement technique, experimentally determined bone matrix strains around osteocyte lacuna resulting from macroscopic strains of approximately 2,000 microstrain (0.2%) reach levels of over 30,000 microstrain (3%) over fifteen times greater than the applied macroscopic strain. Strain patterns were highly heterogeneous and in some locations similar to observed microdamage around osteocyte lacuna indicating the resulting strains may represent the precursors to microdamage. This information may lead to a better understanding of how bone cells are affected by whole bone functional loading. PMID:16123021

  5. Three-dimensional strain analysis using Mathematica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mookerjee, Matty; Nickleach, Scott

    2011-10-01

    A suite of geological computer programs written in Mathematica is currently available both within the online repository for the Journal of Structural Geology as well as on the first author's website ( http://www.sonoma.edu/users/m/mookerje/ProgramPage.htm). The majority of these programs focus on three-dimensional strain analysis (e.g., determining best-fit strain ellipsoids, plotting elliptical data on either a Flinn or Hsu diagram, and determining error bounds for three-dimensional strain data). This program suite also includes a ternary diagram plotting program, a rose diagram program, an equal area and equal angle projections program, and an instructional program for creating two-dimensional strain path animations. The bulk of this paper focuses on a new method for determining a best-fit ellipsoid from arbitrarily oriented sectional ellipses and methods for determining appropriate error bounds for strain parameters and orientation data. This best-fit ellipsoid method utilizes a least-squares approach and minimizes the error associated with the two-dimensional data-ellipse matrix elements with the corresponding matrix elements from sectional ellipses through a general ellipsoid. Furthermore, a kernel density estimator is utilized to yield reliable error margins for the strain parameters, octahedral shear strain, Flinn's k-value, and Lode's ratio. By assuming a gamma distribution for the simulated principal axes orientations, more realistic error bounds can be estimated for these axes orientations.

  6. Heterogeneity of inelastic strain during creep of Carrara marble: Microscale strain measurement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintanilla-Terminel, Alejandra; Evans, Brian

    2016-08-01

    We combined the split cylinder technique with microfabrication technology to observe strain heterogeneities that were produced during high-pressure transient creep of Carrara marble. Samples were patterned with a custom-designed grid of markers spaced 10 µm apart and containing an embedded coordinate system. The microscale strain measurement (MSSM) technique described here allowed us to analyze the local strain distribution with unprecedented detail over large regions. The description of the strain field is a function of the area over which strain is being computed. The scale at which the strain field can be considered homogeneous can provide insight into the deformation processes taking place. At 400-500°C, when twinning production is prolific, we observe highly strained bands that span several grains. One possible cause for the multigrain bands is the need to relieve strain incompatibilities that result when twins impinge on neighboring grains. At 600-700°C, the strain fields are still quite heterogeneous, and local strain varies substantially within grains and near grain boundaries, but the multigrain slip bands are not present. Deformation is concentrated in much smaller areas within grains and along some grain boundaries. The disappearance of the multigrain slip bands occurs when the deformation conditions allow additional slip systems to be activated. At 600°C, when the total strain is varied from 0.11 to 0.36, the spatial scale of the heterogeneity does not vary, but there are increases in the standard deviation of the distribution of local strains normalized by the total strain; thus, we conclude that the microstructure does not achieve a steady state in this strain interval.

  7. Highly Invasive Listeria monocytogenes Strains Have Growth and Invasion Advantages in Strain Competition

    PubMed Central

    Manthou, Evanthia; Ciolacu, Luminita; Wagner, Martin; Skandamis, Panagiotis N.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Listeria monocytogenes strains can be present in the same food sample; moreover, infection with more than one L. monocytogenes strain can also occur. In this study we investigated the impact of strain competition on the growth and in vitro virulence potential of L. monocytogenes. We identified two strong competitor strains, whose growth was not (or only slightly) influenced by the presence of other strains and two weak competitor strains, which were outcompeted by other strains. Cell contact was essential for growth inhibition. In vitro virulence assays using human intestinal epithelial Caco2 cells showed a correlation between the invasion efficiency and growth inhibition: the strong growth competitor strains showed high invasiveness. Moreover, invasion efficiency of the highly invasive strain was further increased in certain combinations by the presence of a low invasive strain. In all tested combinations, the less invasive strain was outcompeted by the higher invasive strain. Studying the effect of cell contact on in vitro virulence competition revealed a complex pattern in which the observed effects depended only partially on cell-contact suggesting that competition occurs at two different levels: i) during co-cultivation prior to infection, which might influence the expression of virulence factors, and ii) during infection, when bacterial cells compete for the host cell. In conclusion, we show that growth of L. monocytogenes can be inhibited by strains of the same species leading potentially to biased recovery during enrichment procedures. Furthermore, the presence of more than one L. monocytogenes strain in food can lead to increased infection rates due to synergistic effects on the virulence potential. PMID:26529510

  8. Exposing the Three-Dimensional Biogeography and Metabolic States of Pathogens in Cystic Fibrosis Sputum via Hydrogel Embedding, Clearing, and rRNA Labeling

    PubMed Central

    DePas, William H.; Starwalt-Lee, Ruth; Van Sambeek, Lindsey; Ravindra Kumar, Sripriya

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Physiological resistance to antibiotics confounds the treatment of many chronic bacterial infections, motivating researchers to identify novel therapeutic approaches. To do this effectively, an understanding of how microbes survive in vivo is needed. Though much can be inferred from bulk approaches to characterizing complex environments, essential information can be lost if spatial organization is not preserved. Here, we introduce a tissue-clearing technique, termed MiPACT, designed to retain and visualize bacteria with associated proteins and nucleic acids in situ on various spatial scales. By coupling MiPACT with hybridization chain reaction (HCR) to detect rRNA in sputum samples from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, we demonstrate its ability to survey thousands of bacteria (or bacterial aggregates) over millimeter scales and quantify aggregation of individual species in polymicrobial communities. By analyzing aggregation patterns of four prominent CF pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus sp., and Achromobacter xylosoxidans, we demonstrate a spectrum of aggregation states: from mostly single cells (A. xylosoxidans), to medium-sized clusters (S. aureus), to a mixture of single cells and large aggregates (P. aeruginosa and Streptococcus sp.). Furthermore, MiPACT-HCR revealed an intimate interaction between Streptococcus sp. and specific host cells. Lastly, by comparing standard rRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization signals to those from HCR, we found that different populations of S. aureus and A. xylosoxidans grow slowly overall yet exhibit growth rate heterogeneity over hundreds of microns. These results demonstrate the utility of MiPACT-HCR to directly capture the spatial organization and metabolic activity of bacteria in complex systems, such as human sputum. PMID:27677788

  9. Ductile Damage Evolution and Strain Path Dependency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasan, C. C.; Hoefnagels, J. M. P.; Peerlings, R. H. J.; Geers, M. G. D.; ten Horn, C. H. L. J.; Vegter, H.

    2007-04-01

    Forming limit diagrams are commonly used in sheet metal industry to define the safe forming regions. These diagrams are built to define the necking strains of sheet metals. However, with the rise in the popularity of advance high strength steels, ductile fracture through damage evolution has also emerged as an important parameter in the determination of limit strains. In this work, damage evolution in two different steels used in the automotive industry is examined to observe the relationship between damage evolution and the strain path that is followed during the forming operation.

  10. Strain gage balances and buffet gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, A. T.

    1983-01-01

    One-piece strain gage force balances were developed for use in the National Transonic Facility (NTF). This was accomplished by studying the effects of the cryogenic environment on materials, strain gages, cements, solders, and moisture proofing agents, and selecting those that minimized strain gage output changes due to temperature. In addition, because of the higher loads that may be imposed by the NTF, these balances are designed to carry a larger load for a given diameter than conventional balances. Full cryogenic calibrations were accomplished, and wind tunnel results that were obtained from the Langley 0-3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel were used to verify laboratory test results.

  11. Biological characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi strains.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Díaz, R A; Escario, J A; Nogal-Ruiz, J J; Gómez-Barrio, A

    2001-01-01

    Biological parameters of five Trypanosoma cruzi strains from different sources were determined in order to know the laboratory behaviour of natural populations. The parameters evaluated were growth kinetics of epimastigotes, differentiation into metacyclic forms, infectivity in mammalian cells grown in vitro and parasite susceptibility to nifurtimox, benznidazole and gentian violet. Differences in transformation to metacyclic, in the percentage of infected cells as well as in the number of amastigotes per cell were observed among the strains. Regarding to pharmacological assays, Y strain was the most sensitive to the three assayed compounds. These data demonstrate the heterogeneity of natural populations of T. cruzi, the only responsible of infection in humans. PMID:11285475

  12. [Pattern of antimicrobial susceptibility of enterococci strains].

    PubMed

    Hoyos, A; Gutiérrez, J; Piédrola, G

    1995-04-01

    Enterococci resistance to antimicrobials has increased lately. We studied the susceptibility to 12 antimicrobials of 150 enterococci strains coming from hospitalized and outpatients, using the agar dilution method. Teicoplanin, followed by imipenem and amoxicilin-clavulanic acid had the lower minimal inhibitory concentrations. No strains of E faecalis was resistant to ampicillin, whereas 14% of E faecium had minimal inhibitory concentrations over 8 micrograms/ml. The high minimal inhibitory concentrations of cefpirome (64 micrograms/ml) renders this antimicrobial useless in the treatment of enterococcal infections. Betalactamase production and resistance to glucopeptides were not detected. Antimicrobial susceptibility of strains coming for hospitalized or outpatients were similar.

  13. A study of the effect of apparent strain on thermal stress measurement for two types of elevated temperature strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    A weldable type strain gage was used to measure low level thermal stress in an elevated temperature environment. Foil strain gages used in a comparative manner reveal that the apparent strain of weldable strain gages is not sufficiently known to acquire accurate low level thermal stress data. Apparent strain data acquired from coupon tests reveals a large scatter in apparent strain characteristics among the weldable strain gages. It is concluded that apparent strain data for individual weldable strain gages must be required prior to installation if valid thermal stress data is to be obtained through the temperature range of room temperature to 755 K (900 F).

  14. Rat Strain Ontology: structured controlled vocabulary designed to facilitate access to strain data at RGD

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Rat Genome Database (RGD) ( http://rgd.mcw.edu/) is the premier site for comprehensive data on the different strains of the laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus). The strain data are collected from various publications, direct submissions from individual researchers, and rat providers worldwide. Rat strain, substrain designation and nomenclature follow the Guidelines for Nomenclature of Mouse and Rat Strains, instituted by the International Committee on Standardized Genetic Nomenclature for Mice. While symbols and names aid in identifying strains correctly, the flat nature of this information prohibits easy search and retrieval, as well as other data mining functions. In order to improve these functionalities, particularly in ontology-based tools, the Rat Strain Ontology (RS) was developed. Results The Rat Strain Ontology (RS) reflects the breeding history, parental background, and genetic manipulation of rat strains. This controlled vocabulary organizes strains by type: inbred, outbred, chromosome altered, congenic, mutant and so on. In addition, under the chromosome altered category, strains are organized by chromosome, and further by type of manipulations, such as mutant or congenic. This allows users to easily retrieve strains of interest with modifications in specific genomic regions. The ontology was developed using the Open Biological and Biomedical Ontology (OBO) file format, and is organized on the Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG) structure. Rat Strain Ontology IDs are included as part of the strain report (RS: ######). Conclusions As rat researchers are often unaware of the number of substrains or altered strains within a breeding line, this vocabulary now provides an easy way to retrieve all substrains and accompanying information. Its usefulness is particularly evident in tools such as the PhenoMiner at RGD, where users can now easily retrieve phenotype measurement data for related strains, strains with similar backgrounds or those with similar

  15. 40 CFR 180.1209 - Bacillus subtilis strain QST 713 and strain QST 713 variant soil; exemption from the requirement...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... strain QST 713 variant soil; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1209 Section 180.1209... strain QST 713 and strain QST 713 variant soil; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An... Bacillus subtilis strain QST 713 and strain QST 713 variant soil when used in or on all food commodities....

  16. 40 CFR 180.1209 - Bacillus subtilis strain QST 713 and strain QST 713 variant soil; exemption from the requirement...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... strain QST 713 variant soil; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1209 Section 180.1209... strain QST 713 and strain QST 713 variant soil; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An... Bacillus subtilis strain QST 713 and strain QST 713 variant soil when used in or on all food commodities....

  17. A new radial strain and strain rate estimation method using autocorrelation for carotid artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jihui; Kim, Hoonmin; Park, Jongho; Yeo, Sunmi; Shim, Hwan; Lim, Hyungjoon; Yoo, Yangmo

    2014-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is a leading cause of cardiovascular disease. The early diagnosis of atherosclerosis is of clinical interest since it can prevent any adverse effects of atherosclerotic vascular diseases. In this paper, a new carotid artery radial strain estimation method based on autocorrelation is presented. In the proposed method, the strain is first estimated by the autocorrelation of two complex signals from the consecutive frames. Then, the angular phase from autocorrelation is converted to strain and strain rate and they are analyzed over time. In addition, a 2D strain image over region of interest in a carotid artery can be displayed. To evaluate the feasibility of the proposed radial strain estimation method, radiofrequency (RF) data of 408 frames in the carotid artery of a volunteer were acquired by a commercial ultrasound system equipped with a research package (V10, Samsung Medison, Korea) by using a L5-13IS linear array transducer. From in vivo carotid artery data, the mean strain estimate was -0.1372 while its minimum and maximum values were -2.961 and 0.909, respectively. Moreover, the overall strain estimates are highly correlated with the reconstructed M-mode trace. Similar results were obtained from the estimation of the strain rate change over time. These results indicate that the proposed carotid artery radial strain estimation method is useful for assessing the arterial wall's stiffness noninvasively without increasing the computational complexity.

  18. Strain redistribution in free-standing bridge structure released from strained silicon-on-insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Gaodi; Zhang, Miao; Xue, Zhongying; Guo, Qinglei; Chen, Da; Mu, Zhiqiang; Dong, Linxi; Wang, Xi; Di, Zengfeng

    2014-11-01

    The strain evolution including relaxation and conversion during the fabrication of free-standing bridge structure, which is the building block for the gate-all-around transistor, has been investigated in strained silicon-on-insulator. Compared to the starting strained silicon-on-insulator substrate, the strain of the free-standing bridge structure transforms from the biaxial strain to the uniaxial strain after patterning and release due to its unique configuration, as suggested by UV-Raman spectroscopy. Furthermore, such uniaxial strain has strong correlation with the dimension of the suspended structure, and it is enhanced as the width of the free-standing bridge decreases and the size of the connected pad increases. For 0.5μm-wide free-standing bridge connected to the pad of 16 × 16 μm2, the maximum uniaxial tensile strain of 4.65% is obtained, which remarkably exceeds the levels that can be achieved by other techniques ever reported. The observed strain redistribution phenomenon is also analyzed by two-dimensional finite element modeling. The finite element modeling confirms the strain evolution in the suspended bridge structure after patterning and release, in agreement with the experimental observations.

  19. Tropical strains of Ralstonia solanacearum Outcompete race 3 biovar 2 strains at lowland tropical temperatures.

    PubMed

    Huerta, Alejandra I; Milling, Annett; Allen, Caitilyn

    2015-05-15

    Bacterial wilt, caused by members of the heterogenous Ralstonia solanacearum species complex, is an economically important vascular disease affecting many crops. Human activity has widely disseminated R. solanacearum strains, increasing their global agricultural impact. However, tropical highland race 3 biovar 2 (R3bv2) strains do not cause disease in tropical lowlands, even though they are virulent at warm temperatures. We tested the hypothesis that differences in temperature adaptation and competitive fitness explain the uneven geographic distribution of R. solanacearum strains. Using three phylogenetically and ecologically distinct strains, we measured competitive fitness at two temperatures following paired-strain inoculations of their shared host, tomato. Lowland tropical strain GMI1000 was only weakly virulent on tomato under temperate conditions (24°C for day and 19°C for night [24/19°C]), but highland tropical R3bv2 strain UW551 and U.S. warm temperate strain K60 were highly virulent at both 24/19°C and 28°C. Strain K60 was significantly more competitive than both GMI1000 and UW551 in tomato rhizospheres and stems at 28°C, and GMI1000 also outcompeted UW551 at 28°C. The results were reversed at cooler temperatures, at which highland strain UW551 generally outcompeted GMI1000 and K60 in planta. The superior competitive index of UW551 at 24/19°C suggests that adaptation to cool temperatures could explain why only R3bv2 strains threaten highland agriculture. Strains K60 and GMI1000 each produced different bacteriocins that inhibited growth of UW551 in culture. Such interstrain inhibition could explain why R3bv2 strains do not cause disease in tropical lowlands.

  20. Tropical Strains of Ralstonia solanacearum Outcompete Race 3 Biovar 2 Strains at Lowland Tropical Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Huerta, Alejandra I.; Milling, Annett

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial wilt, caused by members of the heterogenous Ralstonia solanacearum species complex, is an economically important vascular disease affecting many crops. Human activity has widely disseminated R. solanacearum strains, increasing their global agricultural impact. However, tropical highland race 3 biovar 2 (R3bv2) strains do not cause disease in tropical lowlands, even though they are virulent at warm temperatures. We tested the hypothesis that differences in temperature adaptation and competitive fitness explain the uneven geographic distribution of R. solanacearum strains. Using three phylogenetically and ecologically distinct strains, we measured competitive fitness at two temperatures following paired-strain inoculations of their shared host, tomato. Lowland tropical strain GMI1000 was only weakly virulent on tomato under temperate conditions (24°C for day and 19°C for night [24/19°C]), but highland tropical R3bv2 strain UW551 and U.S. warm temperate strain K60 were highly virulent at both 24/19°C and 28°C. Strain K60 was significantly more competitive than both GMI1000 and UW551 in tomato rhizospheres and stems at 28°C, and GMI1000 also outcompeted UW551 at 28°C. The results were reversed at cooler temperatures, at which highland strain UW551 generally outcompeted GMI1000 and K60 in planta. The superior competitive index of UW551 at 24/19°C suggests that adaptation to cool temperatures could explain why only R3bv2 strains threaten highland agriculture. Strains K60 and GMI1000 each produced different bacteriocins that inhibited growth of UW551 in culture. Such interstrain inhibition could explain why R3bv2 strains do not cause disease in tropical lowlands. PMID:25769835

  1. Analysis of silicon stress/strain relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, O.

    1986-01-01

    Results are presented for work on stress-strain relationships in silicon ribbon. Calculations of stress fields, dislocation desities, and buckling were made; uniaxial tensile tests were made on silicon at 1150 C; and dislocation motion studies were performed.

  2. Strain sensing technology for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, W. Dan

    1993-01-01

    This review discusses the status of strain sensing technology for high temperature applications. Technologies covered are those supported by NASA such as required for applications in hypersonic vehicles and engines, advanced subsonic engines, as well as material and structure development. The applications may be at temperatures of 540 C (1000 F) to temperatures in excess of 1400 C (2500 F). The most promising technologies at present are the resistance strain gage and remote sensing schemes. Resistance strain gages discussed include the BCL gage, the LaRC compensated gage, and the PdCr gage. Remote sensing schemes such as laser based speckle strain measurement, phase-shifling interferometry, and x-ray extensometry are discussed. Present status and limitations of these technologies are presented.

  3. Five challenges in modelling interacting strain dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wikramaratna, Paul S; Kucharski, Adam; Gupta, Sunetra; Andreasen, Viggo; McLean, Angela R; Gog, Julia R

    2015-03-01

    Population epidemiological models where hosts can be infected sequentially by different strains have the potential to help us understand many important diseases. Researchers have in recent years started to develop and use such models, but the extra layer of complexity from multiple strains brings with it many technical challenges. It is therefore hard to build models which have realistic assumptions yet are tractable. Here we outline some of the main challenges in this area. First we begin with the fundamental question of how to translate from complex small-scale dynamics within a host to useful population models. Next we consider the nature of so-called "strain space". We describe two key types of host heterogeneities, and explain how models could help generate a better understanding of their effects. Finally, for diseases with many strains, we consider the challenge of modelling how immunity accumulates over multiple exposures.

  4. Can a strain yield a qubit?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Colin

    2015-03-01

    A Josepshon qubit is designed via the application of a tensile strain to a topological insulator surface, sandwiched between two s-wave superconductors. The strain applied leads to a shift in Dirac point without changing the conducting states existing on the surface of a topological insulator. This strain applied can be tuned to form a π-junction in such a structure. Combining two such junctions in a ring architecture leads to the ground state of the ring being in a doubly degenerate state- ``0'' and ``1'' states of the qubit. A qubit designed this way is easily controlled via the tunable strain. We report on the conditions necessary to design such a qubit. Finally the operating time of a single qubit phase gate is derived. This work was supported by funds from Dept. of Science and Technology (Nanomission), Govt. of India, Grant No. SR/NM/NS-1101/2011.

  5. Strain accumulation along the Cascadia subduction zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murray, M.H.; Lisowski, M.

    2000-01-01

    We combine triangulation, trilateration, and GPS observations to determine horizontal strain rates along the Cascadia subduction zone from Cape Mendocino to the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Shear-strain rates are significantly greater than zero (95% confidence) in all forearc regions (26-167 nanoradians/yr), and are not significant in the arc and backarc regions. The deformation is primarily uniaxial contraction nearly parallel to Juan de Fuca-North America plate convergence (N55??-80??E). The strain rates are consistent with an elastic dislocation model for interseismic slip with a shallow 100-km wide locked zone and a deeper 75-km transition zone along the entire megathrust, except along the central Oregon coast where relatively lower strain rates are consistent with 30-40 km wide locked and transition zones.

  6. A Portable Calibrator for Dynamic Strain Gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpherson, Albert E

    1943-01-01

    A portable device for calibrating dynamic strain gages is described. The device contains a motor-driven cam, which applies alternating tensile loads to a metal strip 5/8 inch wide and 6 1/4 inches long. The cam is designed to produce a nearly sinusoidal variation of strain with time. Dynamic strain gages with gage lengths up to 5 inches may be calibrated by mounting them on the strip and by changing the frequency and the amplitude of the tensile load. The frequency may be varied from 15 to 30 cycles per second and the strain amplitude from 0 to 10x10-4 in steps of 2x10-4.

  7. Simultaneous narrowband ultrasonic strain-flow imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, Jean K.; Mai, Jerome J.; Lupotti, Fermin A.; Insana, Michael F.

    2004-04-01

    We are summarizing new research aimed at forming spatially and temporally registered combinations of strain and color-flow images using echo data recorded from a commercial ultrasound system. Applications include diagnosis of vascular diseases and tumor malignancies. The challenge is to meet the diverse needs of each measurement. The approach is to first apply eigenfilters that separate echo components from moving tissues and blood flow, and then estimate blood velocity and tissue displacement from the filtered-IQ-signal phase modulations. At the cost of a lower acquisition frame rate, we find the autocorrelation strain estimator yields higher resolution strain estimate than the cross-correlator since estimates are made from ensembles at a single point in space. The technique is applied to in vivo carotid imaging, to demonstrate the sensitivity for strain-flow vascular imaging.

  8. Method of transferring strained semiconductor structure

    DOEpatents

    Nastasi, Michael A.; Shao, Lin

    2009-12-29

    The transfer of strained semiconductor layers from one substrate to another substrate involves depositing a multilayer structure on a substrate having surface contaminants. An interface that includes the contaminants is formed in between the deposited layer and the substrate. Hydrogen atoms are introduced into the structure and allowed to diffuse to the interface. Afterward, the deposited multilayer structure is bonded to a second substrate and is separated away at the interface, which results in transferring a multilayer structure from one substrate to the other substrate. The multilayer structure includes at least one strained semiconductor layer and at least one strain-induced seed layer. The strain-induced seed layer can be optionally etched away after the layer transfer.

  9. Thin film strain gage development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, H. P.; Przybyszewski, J. S.; Anderson, W. L.; Claing, R. G.

    1983-01-01

    Sputtered thin-film dynamic strain gages of 2 millimeter (0.08 in) gage length and 10 micrometer (0.0004 in) thickness were fabricated on turbojet engine blades and tested in a simulated compressor environment. Four designs were developed, two for service to 600 K (600 F) and two for service to 900 K (1200 F). The program included a detailed study of guidelines for formulating strain-gage alloys to achieve superior dynamic and static gage performance. The tests included gage factor, fatigue, temperature cycling, spin to 100,000 G, and erosion. Since the installations are 30 times thinner than conventional wire strain gage installations, and any alteration of the aerodynamic, thermal, or structural performance of the blade is correspondingly reduced, dynamic strain measurement accuracy higher than that attained with conventional gages is expected. The low profile and good adherence of the thin film elements is expected to result in improved durability over conventional gage elements in engine tests.

  10. Dynamic Force Measurement with Strain Gauges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Bruce E.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the use of four strain gauges, a Wheatstone bridge, and an oscilloscope to measure forces dynamically. Included is an example of determining the centripetal force of a pendulum in a general physics laboratory. (CC)

  11. Strained Hydrocarbons as Potential Hypergolic Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    A storable combination of high-energy hypergolic fuel and oxidizer is advantageous to the future of reusable launch vehicles (RLVs). The combination will allow an increase in energy per unit volume of fuel and eliminate the need for an external ignition system. Strained systems have been studied as potential high-density fuels. Adding hypergolic functional groups, such as amino groups, to these hydrocarbons will potentially allow auto ignition of strained systems with hydrogen peroxide. Several straight chain amines and their strained counterparts containing an equivalent number of carbon atoms have been purchased and synthesized. These amines provide initial studies to determine the effects of fuel vapor pressure, strain energy, fuel miscibility, and amine substitution upon fuel ignition time and hypergolicity with hydrogen peroxide as an oxidizer.

  12. Plane Strain Testing with Passive Restraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhnenko, Roman; Labuz, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    A plane strain condition for testing rock is developed through passive restraint in the form of a thick-walled cylinder. The so-called biaxial frame generates the intermediate principal stress that imposes a triaxial state of stress on a prismatic specimen. Major and minor principal stresses and corresponding strains are accurately measured, providing data to calculate the elastic (Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio), inelastic (dilatancy angle), and strength (friction angle and cohesion) parameters of the rock. Results of experiments conducted on Indiana limestone in plane strain compression are compared with the results of axisymmetric compression and extension. With proper system calibration, Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio are consistent among the tests. The plane strain apparatus enforces in-plane deformation with the three principal stresses at failure being different, and it allows one to determine the Paul-Mohr-Coulomb failure surface, which includes an intermediate stress effect.

  13. Heat strain during explosive ordnance disposal.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Ian B; Rojek, Amanda M; Hunt, Andrew P

    2011-08-01

    Bomb technicians perform their work while encapsulated in explosive ordnance disposal suits. Designed primarily for safety, these suits have an unintended consequence of impairing the body's natural mechanisms for heat dissipation. Consequently, bomb technicians are known to experience symptoms of heat illness while performing their work. This research provides the first field based analysis of heat strain in bomb technicians. Six participants undertook simulated operational tasks across 2 days of variable climate. All subjects demonstrated high levels of heat strain as evidenced by elevated heart rate, core body temperature, and physiological strain index. Participants also reported signs and symptoms associated with heat illness. These results were exacerbated by more intense physical activity despite being undertaken in a cooler environment. The universal experience of heat strain in this sample has significant implications for the health of bomb technicians and additional research examining methods to improve temperature regulation and performance is warranted. PMID:21882791

  14. Superinfection Behaviors on Scale-Free Networks with Competing Strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qingchu; Small, Michael; Liu, Huaxiang

    2013-02-01

    This paper considers the epidemiology of two strains ( I, J) of a disease spreading through a population represented by a scale-free network. The epidemiological model is SIS and the two strains have different reproductive numbers. Superinfection means that strain I can infect individuals already infected with strain J, replacing the strain J infection. Individuals infected with strain I cannot be infected with strain J. The model is set up as a system of ordering differential equations and stability of the disease free, marginal strain I and strain J, and coexistence equilibria are assessed using linear stability analysis, supported by simulations. The main conclusion is that superinfection, as modeled in this paper, can allow strain I to coexist with strain J even when it has a lower basic reproductive number. Most strikingly, it can allow strain I to persist even when its reproductive number is less than 1.

  15. Geometric reconstruction using tracked ultrasound strain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pheiffer, Thomas S.; Simpson, Amber L.; Ondrake, Janet E.; Miga, Michael I.

    2013-03-01

    The accurate identification of tumor margins during neurosurgery is a primary concern for the surgeon in order to maximize resection of malignant tissue while preserving normal function. The use of preoperative imaging for guidance is standard of care, but tumor margins are not always clear even when contrast agents are used, and so margins are often determined intraoperatively by visual and tactile feedback. Ultrasound strain imaging creates a quantitative representation of tissue stiffness which can be used in real-time. The information offered by strain imaging can be placed within a conventional image-guidance workflow by tracking the ultrasound probe and calibrating the image plane, which facilitates interpretation of the data by placing it within a common coordinate space with preoperative imaging. Tumor geometry in strain imaging is then directly comparable to the geometry in preoperative imaging. This paper presents a tracked ultrasound strain imaging system capable of co-registering with preoperative tomograms and also of reconstructing a 3D surface using the border of the strain lesion. In a preliminary study using four phantoms with subsurface tumors, tracked strain imaging was registered to preoperative image volumes and then tumor surfaces were reconstructed using contours extracted from strain image slices. The volumes of the phantom tumors reconstructed from tracked strain imaging were approximately between 1.5 to 2.4 cm3, which was similar to the CT volumes of 1.0 to 2.3 cm3. Future work will be done to robustly characterize the reconstruction accuracy of the system.

  16. Hydraulic Calibrator for Strain-Gauge Balances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelly, Kenneth; Ballard, John

    1987-01-01

    Instrument for calibrating strain-gauge balances uses hydraulic actuators and load cells. Eliminates effects of nonparallelism, nonperpendicularity, and changes of cable directions upon vector sums of applied forces. Errors due to cable stretching, pulley friction, and weight inaccuracy also eliminated. New instrument rugged and transportable. Set up quickly. Developed to apply known loads to wind-tunnel models with encapsulated strain-gauge balances, also adapted for use in calibrating dynamometers, load sensors on machinery and laboratory instruments.

  17. Genomic diversity of Clostridium difficile strains.

    PubMed

    Janezic, Sandra; Rupnik, Maja

    2015-05-01

    Approaches to exploring Clostridium difficile genomic diversity have ranged from molecular typing methods to use of comparative genome microarrays and whole genome sequence comparisons. The C. difficile population structure is clonal and distributed into six clades, which correlate well with MLST STs (multilocus sequence types) and PCR ribotypes. However, toxigenic strains and strains with increased virulence are distributed throughout several clades. Here we summarize studies on C. difficile genomic diversity, with emphasis on phylogenetic aspects, epidemiological aspect and variability of some virulence factors.

  18. Computed tomography of hamstring muscle strains.

    PubMed

    Garrett, W E; Rich, F R; Nikolaou, P K; Vogler, J B

    1989-10-01

    Acute hamstring muscle strains occurring in ten college athletes were evaluated using computed tomography to identify the location and characteristics of these common injuries. Acute muscle strains appeared as areas of hypodensity within the muscle 1-2 d following injury. This suggests that inflammation and edema are the major component of injury, not bleeding as commonly assumed. Injuries were seen most commonly in the proximal and lateral portions of the hamstring muscle group, particularly in the biceps femoris.

  19. High-Temperature Adhesive Strain Gage Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Roberts, Gary D.

    1997-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center have developed a unique strain gage and adhesive system for measuring the mechanical properties of polymers and polymer composites at elevated temperatures. This system overcomes some of the problems encountered in using commercial strain gages and adhesives. For example, typical commercial strain gage adhesives require a postcure at temperatures substantially higher than the maximum test temperature. The exposure of the specimen to this temperature may affect subsequent results, and in some cases may be higher than the glass-transition temperature of the polymer. In addition, although typical commercial strain gages can be used for short times at temperatures up to 370 C, their long-term use is limited to 230 C. This precludes their use for testing some high-temperature polyimides near their maximum temperature capability. Lewis' strain gage and adhesive system consists of a nonencapsulated, unbacked gage grid that is bonded directly to the polymer after the specimen has been cured but prior to the normal postcure cycle. The gage is applied with an adhesive specially formulated to cure under the specimen postcure conditions. Special handling, mounting, and electrical connection procedures were developed, and a fixture was designed to calibrate each strain gage after it was applied to a specimen. A variety of tests was conducted to determine the performance characteristics of the gages at elevated temperatures on PMR-15 neat resin and titanium specimens. For these tests, which included static tension, thermal exposure, and creep tests, the gage and adhesive system performed within normal strain gage specifications at 315 C. An example of the performance characteristics of the gage can be seen in the figure, which compares the strain gage measurement on a polyimide specimen at 315 C with an extensometer measurement.

  20. Strain limit criteria to predict failure

    SciTech Connect

    Flanders, H.E.

    1995-12-31

    In recent years extensive effort has been expended to qualify existing structures for conditions that are beyond the original design basis. Determination of the component failure load is useful for this type of evaluation. This paper presents criteria based upon strain limits to predict the load at failure. The failure modes addressed are excessive plastic deformations, localized plastic strains, and structural instability. The effects of analytical method sophistication, as built configurations, material properties degradation, and stress state are addressed by the criteria.

  1. High Temperature Strain Gage Calibration Fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranas, T. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus and method are described for calibrating high temperature strain gases which serve for both dead weight and constant deflection measurements. A cantilever support arm allows the test unit to slide into a furnace while one end is subjected to bending strain either by hanging weights upon it or by deflecting it with a push rod. The dual nature of the fixture permits both tests to be run without change of the test specimen or removal from the furnace.

  2. Emerging clinical role of strain imaging in echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Leung, Dominic Y; Ng, Arnold C T

    2010-03-01

    Myocardial strain is a measure of tissue deformation and strain rate is the rate at which deformation occurs. When applied to the heart, strain and strain rate give fundamental information on myocardial properties and mechanics that would otherwise be unavailable. Site specificity and angle independency are two unique characteristics of strain and strain rate data. Strain and strain rate can be obtained with tissue Doppler imaging or with 2D speck tracking. These two techniques derive information on strain and strain rate in two fundamentally different ways and each has its own advantages and limitations. Tissue Doppler imaging yields velocity information from which strain and strain rate are mathematically derived whereas 2D speckle tracking yields strain information from which strain rate and velocity data are derived. Data obtained from these two different techniques may not be equivalent due to limitations inherent with each technique. Strain and strain rate imaging have been used to assess myocardial function in a wide range of cardiac conditions. They are useful in detecting early left ventricular (LV) dysfunction in the setting of systemic diseases with cardiac involvement, in differentiating transmural from non-transmural infarction, and in identifying LV contractile reserve in regurgitant valve lesions. When used with dobutamine echocardiography, strain and strain rate imaging can identify viable myocardium and aid the detection of myocardial ischaemia. Strain and strain rate imaging can also be used to assess right ventricular and left atrial function. Despite significant promises, strain and strain rate imaging is technically challenging and signal to noise ratio may be potentially affected by a wide range of factors. As a result, strain and strain rate imaging have been slow to get incorporated into everyday clinical practice. Ongoing research and further technical development are likely to improve the quality of the data and the more general acceptance

  3. Load cell having strain gauges of arbitrary location

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry

    2007-03-13

    A load cell utilizes a plurality of strain gauges mounted upon the load cell body such that there are six independent load-strain relations. Load is determined by applying the inverse of a load-strain sensitivity matrix to a measured strain vector. The sensitivity matrix is determined by performing a multivariate regression technique on a set of known loads correlated to the resulting strains. Temperature compensation is achieved by configuring the strain gauges as co-located orthogonal pairs.

  4. A closer look at prion strains

    PubMed Central

    Solforosi, Laura; Milani, Michela; Mancini, Nicasio; Clementi, Massimo; Burioni, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Prions are infectious proteins that are responsible for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) and consist primarily of scrapie prion protein (PrPSc), a pathogenic isoform of the host-encoded cellular prion protein (PrPC). The absence of nucleic acids as essential components of the infectious prions is the most striking feature associated to these diseases. Additionally, different prion strains have been isolated from animal diseases despite the lack of DNA or RNA molecules. Mounting evidence suggests that prion-strain-specific features segregate with different PrPSc conformational and aggregation states. Strains are of practical relevance in prion diseases as they can drastically differ in many aspects, such as incubation period, PrPSc biochemical profile (e.g., electrophoretic mobility and glycoform ratio) and distribution of brain lesions. Importantly, such different features are maintained after inoculation of a prion strain into genetically identical hosts and are relatively stable across serial passages. This review focuses on the characterization of prion strains and on the wide range of important implications that the study of prion strains involves. PMID:23357828

  5. Strained-germanium nanostructures for infrared photonics.

    PubMed

    Boztug, Cicek; Sánchez-Pérez, José R; Cavallo, Francesca; Lagally, Max G; Paiella, Roberto

    2014-04-22

    The controlled application of strain in crystalline semiconductors can be used to modify their basic physical properties to enhance performance in electronic and photonic device applications. In germanium, tensile strain can even be used to change the nature of the fundamental energy band gap from indirect to direct, thereby dramatically increasing the interband radiative efficiency and allowing population inversion and optical gain. For biaxial tension, the required strain levels (around 2%) are physically accessible but necessitate the use of very thin crystals. A particularly promising materials platform in this respect is provided by Ge nanomembranes, that is, single-crystal sheets with nanoscale thicknesses that are either completely released from or partially suspended over their native substrates. Using this approach, Ge tensilely strained beyond the expected threshold for direct-band gap behavior has recently been demonstrated, together with strong strain-enhanced photoluminescence and evidence of population inversion. We review the basic properties, state of the art, and prospects of tensilely strained Ge for infrared photonic applications.

  6. [Screening of strain producing extracellular penicillin acylase].

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Han, W; Men, D; Wang, Q

    1992-04-01

    Ninety-eight strains having extracellular penicillin acylase activity were derived from soil samples by colour-developing method. 10 strains of them possess higher activity of penicillin acylase. All of those are found to be Bacillus megaterium. The optimum condition of enzyme production was investigated with the strain No. 46 which is from No. 247 by single colony isolation. The productivity of penicillin acylase in the optimum condition have been enhanced 2.5 times more than that in the screening condition. The mutant strain, Bacillus megaterium UL-81, which penicillin acylase activity reached the level of 723u/100ml of broth was obtained from No. 46 by treatment with physical and chemical factors. The penicillin acylase activity of UL-81 can reach 820u/100 ml in 500L fermentor. The mutant strain differed from parent strain in the morphology of colony, the size of cells, the effect of concentration and the addition time of phenylacetic acid on the production of penicillin acylase. PMID:1598760

  7. Biaxial strain and variable stiffness in aponeuroses

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Emanuel; Roberts, Thomas J

    2009-01-01

    The elastic structures of many muscles include both an extramuscular free tendon as well as a sheet-like aponeurosis. An important distinguishing feature of aponeuroses is that these tendinous structures function as the attachment and insertion surfaces of muscle fascicles and therefore surround a substantial portion of the muscle belly. As a result, aponeuroses must expand both parallel (longitudinal) and perpendicular (transverse) to a muscle's line of action when contracting muscles bulge to maintain a constant volume. In this study, we use biplanar high-speed fluoroscopy to track the strain patterns of the turkey lateral gastrocnemius aponeurosis during active and passive force production in situ. We find that the behaviour of the aponeurosis during passive force production is consistent with uniaxial loading, as aponeuroses stretch only in the longitudinal direction. By contrast, our results show that aponeuroses are stretched in both longitudinal and transverse directions during active force production and that transverse strains are on average 4 times greater than longitudinal strains. Biaxial loading of aponeuroses appears to effectively modulate longitudinal stiffness, as we find the measured stiffness in the longitudinal direction varies in proportion to transverse strain. We conclude that biaxial strain during active force production distinguishes aponeuroses from free tendons and may function to dynamically modulate stiffness along the axis of muscle force production. It is likely that consideration of strains measured only in the longitudinal direction result in an underestimation of aponeurosis stiffness as well as its capacity for elastic energy storage. PMID:19596897

  8. Fermentation studies using Saccharomyces diastaticus yeast strains

    SciTech Connect

    Erratt, J.A.; Stewart, G.G.

    1981-01-01

    The yeast species, Saccharomyces diastaticus, has the ability to ferment starch and dextrin, because of the extracellular enzyme, glucoamylase, which hydrolyzes the starch/dextrin to glucose. A number of nonallelic genes--DEX 1, DEX 2, and dextrinase B which is allelic to STA 3--have been isolated, which impart to the yeast the ability to ferment dextrin. Various diploid yeast strains were constructed, each being either heterozygous or homozygous for the individual dextrinase genes. Using 12 (sup 0) plato hopped wort (30% corn adjunct) under agitated conditions, the fermentation rates of the various diploid yeast strains were monitored. A gene-dosage effect was exhibited by yeast strains containing DEX 1 or DEX 2, however, not with yeast strains containing dextrinase B (STA 3). The fermentation and growth rates and extents were determined under static conditions at 14.4 C and 21 C. With all yeast strains containing the dextrinase genes, both fermentation and growth were increased at the higher incubation temperature. Using 30-liter fermentors, beer was produced with the various yeast strains containing the dextrinase genes and the physical and organoleptic characteristics of the products were determined. The concentration of glucose in the beer was found to increase during a 3-mo storage period at 21 C, indicating that the glucoamylase from Saccharomyces diastaticus is not inactivated by pasteurization. (Refs. 36).

  9. Fiber optic strain monitoring for pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Berthold, J.W.

    1998-04-08

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate the feasibility of using fiber optic Bragg grating sensors (BGS) to measure axial and bending strain in pipes. Work was performed by McDermott Technology Inc. (MTI) and included BGS design and procurement. In addition to the pipe strain testing, a number of BGS evaluations were performed. Several methods were evaluated to protect and encapsulate the BGS, which are embedded inside an optical fiber, and strain transfer tests were performed on two of the encapsulation approaches. A high strain bending test to failure was performed on one BGS. A special test section was used to characterize the performance of the BGS and compare to standard electrical resistance foil strain gages. Two sets of pipe strain tests were performed. In the first test series, optical fiber was positioned along the pipe test section and embedded BGS were attached directly to the outside of the pipe wall. In the second tests series, the BGS were encapsulated inside a stainless steel tube which was attached to the outside of the pipe wall. All the tests were successfully completed, the data analyzed, and the results summarized in this report.

  10. Interplay between nanometer-scale strain variations and externally applied strain in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbiest, G. J.; Stampfer, C.; Huber, S. E.; Andersen, M.; Reuter, K.

    2016-05-01

    We present a molecular modeling study analyzing nanometer-scale strain variations in graphene as a function of externally applied tensile strain. We consider two different mechanisms that could underlie nanometer-scale strain variations: static perturbations from lattice imperfections of an underlying substrate and thermal fluctuations. For both cases we observe a decrease in the out-of-plane atomic displacements with increasing strain, which is accompanied by an increase in the in-plane displacements. Reflecting the nonlinear elastic properties of graphene, both trends together yield a nonmonotonic variation of the total displacements with increasing tensile strain. This variation allows us to test the role of nanometer-scale strain variations in limiting the carrier mobility of high-quality graphene samples.

  11. Strain-displacement relations for strain engineering in single-layer 2d materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midtvedt, Daniel; Lewenkopf, Caio H.; Croy, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the electromechanical coupling in single-layer 2d materials. For non-Bravais lattices, we find important corrections to the standard macroscopic strain-microscopic atomic-displacement theory. We put forward a general and systematic approach to calculate strain-displacement relations for several classes of 2d materials. We apply our findings to graphene as a study case, by combining a tight binding and a valence force-field model to calculate electronic and mechanical properties of graphene nanoribbons under strain. The results show good agreement with the predictions of the Dirac equation coupled to continuum mechanics. For this long wave-limit effective theory, we find that the strain-displacement relations lead to a renormalization correction to the strain-induced pseudo-magnetic fields. A similar renormalization is found for the strain-induced band-gap of black phosphorous. Implications for nanomechanical properties and electromechanical coupling in 2d materials are discussed.

  12. A resistance strain gage with repeatable and cancellable apparent strain for use to 800 C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jih-Fen

    1990-07-01

    A temperature compensated static strain gage, which is fabricated from palladium-13w/o chromium (Pd13Cr) alloy and a platinum (Pt) compensator, is being developed and was tested over a temperature range to 800 C at NASA-Lewis. The PdCr compensated strain gage has significantly lower apparent strain to 800 C than other high temperature strain gages. The PdCr compensated gage is protected from oxidation by a flame-sprayed alumina-4w/o zirconia overcoating. Test results to 800 C indicate apparent strain variations of less than 300 micro-epsilon and reproducibility between thermal cycles within 50 micro-epsilon. Apparent strain of the coated PdCr compensated gage can be predicted and cancelled due to its reproducibility and low value.

  13. A resistance strain gage with repeatable and cancellable apparent strain for use to 800 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Jih-Fen

    1990-01-01

    A temperature compensated static strain gage, which is fabricated from palladium-13w/o chromium (Pd13Cr) alloy and a platinum (Pt) compensator, is being developed and was tested over a temperature range to 800 C at NASA-Lewis. The PdCr compensated strain gage has significantly lower apparent strain to 800 C than other high temperature strain gages. The PdCr compensated gage is protected from oxidation by a flame-sprayed alumina-4w/o zirconia overcoating. Test results to 800 C indicate apparent strain variations of less than 300 micro-epsilon and reproducibility between thermal cycles within 50 micro-epsilon. Apparent strain of the coated PdCr compensated gage can be predicted and cancelled due to its reproducibility and low value.

  14. A resistance strain gage with repeatable and cancellable apparent strain for use to 1500 F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jih-Fen

    A temperature compensated static strain gauge, which is fabricated from Pd13Cr alloy and a Pt compensator, is being developed and has been tested over a temperature range to 1500 F at NASA-Lewis. The PdCr compensated strain gage has significantly lower apparent strain to 500 F than other high temperature strain gages. The PdCr compensated gage is protected from oxidation by a flame-sprayed alumina-4 wt pct zirconia overcoating. Test Results to 1500 F indicate apparent strain variations of less than 250 micro-epsilon and reproducibility between thermal cycles within 50 micro-epsilon. The apparent strain of the coated PdCr compensated gage can be predicted and cancelled due to its reproducibility and low value.

  15. Culturable bacteria present in the fluid of the hooded-pitcher plant Sarracenia minor based on 16S rDNA gene sequence data.

    PubMed

    Siragusa, Alex J; Swenson, Janice E; Casamatta, Dale A

    2007-08-01

    The culturable microbial community within the pitcher fluid of 93 Sarracenia minor carnivorous plants was examined over a 2-year study. Many aspects of the plant/bacterial/insect interaction within the pitcher fluid are minimally understood because the bacterial taxa present in these pitchers have not been identified. Thirteen isolates were characterized by 16S rDNA sequencing and subsequent phylogenetic analysis. The Proteobacteria were the most abundant taxa and included representatives from Serratia, Achromobacter, and Pantoea. The Actinobacteria Micrococcus was also abundant while Bacillus, Lactococcus, Chryseobacterium, and Rhodococcus were infrequently encountered. Several isolates conformed to species identifiers (>98% rDNA gene sequence similarity) including Serratia marcescens (isolates found in 27.5% of pitchers), Achromobacter xylosoxidans (37.6%), Micrococcus luteus (40.9%), Bacillus cereus (isolates found in 10.2%), Bacillus thuringiensis (5.4%), Lactococcus lactis (17.2%), and Rhodococcus equi (2.2%). Species-area curves suggest that sampling efforts were sufficient to recover a representative culturable bacterial community. The bacteria present represent a diverse community probably as a result of introduction by insect vectors, but the ecological significance remains under explored. PMID:17380356

  16. Poorly processed reusable surface disinfection tissue dispensers may be a source of infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Reusable surface disinfectant tissue dispensers are used in hospitals in many countries because they allow immediate access to pre-soaked tissues for targeted surface decontamination. On the other hand disinfectant solutions with some active ingredients may get contaminated and cause outbreaks. We determined the frequency of contaminated surface disinfectant solutions in reusable dispensers and the ability of isolates to multiply in different formulations. Methods Reusable tissue dispensers with different surface disinfectants were randomly collected from healthcare facilities. Solutions were investigated for bacterial contamination. The efficacy of two surface disinfectants was determined in suspension tests against two isolated species directly from a contaminated solution or after 5 passages without selection pressure in triplicate. Freshly prepared use solutions were contaminated to determine survival of isolates. Results 66 dispensers containing disinfectant solutions with surface-active ingredients were collected in 15 healthcare facilities. 28 dispensers from nine healthcare facilities were contaminated with approximately 107 cells per mL of Achromobacter species 3 (9 hospitals), Achromobacter xylosoxidans or Serratia marcescens (1 hospital each). In none of the hospitals dispenser processing had been adequately performed. Isolates regained susceptibility to the disinfectants after five passages without selection pressure but were still able to multiply in different formulations from different manufacturers at room temperature within 7 days. Conclusions Neglecting adequate processing of surface disinfectant dispensers has contributed to frequent and heavy contamination of use-solutions based on surface active ingredients. Tissue dispenser processing should be taken seriously in clinical practice. PMID:24447780

  17. Culturable bacteria present in the fluid of the hooded-pitcher plant Sarracenia minor based on 16S rDNA gene sequence data.

    PubMed

    Siragusa, Alex J; Swenson, Janice E; Casamatta, Dale A

    2007-08-01

    The culturable microbial community within the pitcher fluid of 93 Sarracenia minor carnivorous plants was examined over a 2-year study. Many aspects of the plant/bacterial/insect interaction within the pitcher fluid are minimally understood because the bacterial taxa present in these pitchers have not been identified. Thirteen isolates were characterized by 16S rDNA sequencing and subsequent phylogenetic analysis. The Proteobacteria were the most abundant taxa and included representatives from Serratia, Achromobacter, and Pantoea. The Actinobacteria Micrococcus was also abundant while Bacillus, Lactococcus, Chryseobacterium, and Rhodococcus were infrequently encountered. Several isolates conformed to species identifiers (>98% rDNA gene sequence similarity) including Serratia marcescens (isolates found in 27.5% of pitchers), Achromobacter xylosoxidans (37.6%), Micrococcus luteus (40.9%), Bacillus cereus (isolates found in 10.2%), Bacillus thuringiensis (5.4%), Lactococcus lactis (17.2%), and Rhodococcus equi (2.2%). Species-area curves suggest that sampling efforts were sufficient to recover a representative culturable bacterial community. The bacteria present represent a diverse community probably as a result of introduction by insect vectors, but the ecological significance remains under explored.

  18. Inexpensive Implementation of Many Strain Gauges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkun, Andrew C.

    2010-01-01

    It has been proposed to develop arrays of strain gauges as arrays of ordinary metal film resistors and associated electronic readout circuitry on printed circuit boards or other suitable substrates. This proposal is a by-product of a development of instrumentation utilizing metal film resistors on printed-circuit boards to measure temperatures at multiple locations. In the course of that development, it was observed that in addition to being sensitive to temperature, the metal film resistors were also sensitive to strains in the printed-circuit boards to which they were attached. Because of the low cost of ordinary metal film resistors (typically <$0.01 apiece at 2007 prices), the proposal could enable inexpensive implementation of arrays of many (e.g., 100 or more) strain gauges, possibly concentrated in small areas. For example, such an array could be designed for use as a computer keyboard with no moving parts, as a device for sensing the shape of an object resting on a surface, or as a device for measuring strains at many points on a mirror, a fuel tank, an airplane wing, or other large object. Ordinarily, the effect of strain on resistance would be regarded as a nuisance in a temperature-measuring application, and the effect of temperature on resistance would be regarded as a nuisance in a strain-measuring application. The strain-induced changes in resistance of the metal film resistors in question are less than those of films in traditional strain gauges. The main novel aspect of present proposal lies in the use of circuitry affording sufficient sensitivity to measure strain plus means for compensating for the effect of temperature. For an array of metal film resistors used as proposed, the readout circuits would include a high-accuracy analog-to-digital converter fed by a low noise current source, amplifier chain, and an analog multiplexer chain. Corrections would be provided by use of high-accuracy calibration resistors and a temperature sensor. By use of

  19. A numerical method for determining the strain rate intensity factor under plane strain conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, S.; Kuo, C.-Y.; Jeng, Y.-R.

    2016-07-01

    Using the classical model of rigid perfectly plastic solids, the strain rate intensity factor has been previously introduced as the coefficient of the leading singular term in a series expansion of the equivalent strain rate in the vicinity of maximum friction surfaces. Since then, many strain rate intensity factors have been determined by means of analytical and semi-analytical solutions. However, no attempt has been made to develop a numerical method for calculating the strain rate intensity factor. This paper presents such a method for planar flow. The method is based on the theory of characteristics. First, the strain rate intensity factor is derived in characteristic coordinates. Then, a standard numerical slip-line technique is supplemented with a procedure to calculate the strain rate intensity factor. The distribution of the strain rate intensity factor along the friction surface in compression of a layer between two parallel plates is determined. A high accuracy of this numerical solution for the strain rate intensity factor is confirmed by comparison with an analytic solution. It is shown that the distribution of the strain rate intensity factor is in general discontinuous.

  20. Stress-Strain Relation and strain-Induced Crystallization in Rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Toki,S.

    2006-01-01

    Rubber is composed of flexible chains and network points. Theory of rubber elasticity succeeds to elucidate stress-strain relation of rubber using the inverse Langevin equation of entropy modulus. However, actual rubber is much different from ideal networks composed of ideal rubber chains. Network points may not distribute homogeneously and the molecular weight between two network points may show wide distribution. Flexible chains show strain-induced crystallization. Recent synchrotron X-ray and simultaneous stress-strain measurements reveal that strain-induced crystallization reduces the stress by increasing the length of molecules along the stretching direction. Also, strain-induced crystals are created not at the middle of the network points, but at the close location to the network points. The hybrid structure of strain-induced crystallites and network points may be stronger than network points alone. Therefore, strain induced crystallization may increase the tensile strength of rubber by two mechanisms, they are, increase of elongation at break and reinforcement of network points. Natural rubber has biotic network points in nature. After vulcanization, the biotic network may contribute the superior toughness of NR, comparing to IR. Carbon filled NR also shows strain induced crystallization. In order to acquire high tensile strength, molecules should have higher flexibility to perform strain induced crystallization by selecting a kind of carbon blacks, an accelerator and a curing condition.

  1. Strain analysis and strain path modelling in the Loch Tollie gneisses, Gairloch, NW Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odling, N. E.

    A quantitative structural analysis is presented for the Loch Tullie gneisses of the Lewisian complex outcropping at Gairloch. The gneisses and the dykes they contain are folded into a large antiformal structure known as the Tollic Antiform. Quartz aggregates in quartzo-feldspathic gneisses have been used as finite strain markers in eleven specimens across the antiform. Two models, using rotational strain (simple shear) and irrotational strain (pure shear), are used to reconstruct the strain path. Results show that only the rotational strain model satisfies the strain data and the field evidence, and indicates a steeply northeast (75°) dipping shear plane and moderately northwest (55°) plunging shear direction, with a southwest-side-down sense of shear. A strain profile is constructed for the Tollie gneisses using the model and the attitude of gneissose layering. This shows increasing shear strain to the southwest to a maximum gamma value of approximately 8. The strain profile indicates a horizontal dextral displacement of 4.7 km and a vertical displacement of 6.8 km for the Tollie gneisses. The Tollie Antiform thus lies on the northeast margin of a large-scale shear zone, the main zone of deformation of which can be traced southwestwards some 4 km. Such a shear zone presents a major tectonic boundary within the Lewisian of northwest Scotland.

  2. Elastocaloric cooling processes: The influence of material strain and strain rate on efficiency and temperature span

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Marvin; Schütze, Andreas; Seelecke, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    This paper discusses the influence of material strain and strain rate on efficiency and temperature span of elastocaloric cooling processes. The elastocaloric material, a newly developed quaternary Ni-Ti-Cu-V alloy, is characterized at different maximum strains and strain rates. The experiments are performed with a specially designed test setup, which enables the measurement of mechanical and thermal process parameters. The material efficiency is compared to the efficiency of the Carnot process at equivalent thermal operation conditions. This method allows for a direct comparison of the investigated material with other caloric materials.

  3. Bone strain magnitude is correlated with bone strain rate in tetrapods: implications for models of mechanotransduction

    PubMed Central

    Aiello, B. R.; Iriarte-Diaz, J.; Blob, R. W.; Butcher, M. T.; Carrano, M. T.; Espinoza, N. R.; Main, R. P.; Ross, C. F.

    2015-01-01

    Hypotheses suggest that structural integrity of vertebrate bones is maintained by controlling bone strain magnitude via adaptive modelling in response to mechanical stimuli. Increased tissue-level strain magnitude and rate have both been identified as potent stimuli leading to increased bone formation. Mechanotransduction models hypothesize that osteocytes sense bone deformation by detecting fluid flow-induced drag in the bone's lacunar–canalicular porosity. This model suggests that the osteocyte's intracellular response depends on fluid-flow rate, a product of bone strain rate and gradient, but does not provide a mechanism for detection of strain magnitude. Such a mechanism is necessary for bone modelling to adapt to loads, because strain magnitude is an important determinant of skeletal fracture. Using strain gauge data from the limb bones of amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, we identified strong correlations between strain rate and magnitude across clades employing diverse locomotor styles and degrees of rhythmicity. The breadth of our sample suggests that this pattern is likely to be a common feature of tetrapod bone loading. Moreover, finding that bone strain magnitude is encoded in strain rate at the tissue level is consistent with the hypothesis that it might be encoded in fluid-flow rate at the cellular level, facilitating bone adaptation via mechanotransduction. PMID:26063842

  4. Within-strain variation in behavior differs consistently between common inbred strains of mice.

    PubMed

    Loos, Maarten; Koopmans, Bastijn; Aarts, Emmeke; Maroteaux, Gregoire; van der Sluis, Sophie; Verhage, Matthijs; Smit, August B

    2015-08-01

    Genetic and environmental factors interact throughout life and give rise to individual differences, i.e., individuality. The diversifying effect of environmental factors is counteracted by genetic mechanisms to yield persistence of specific features (robustness). Here, we compared robustness between cohorts of isogenic mice of eight different commonly used strains by analyzing to what extent environmental variation contributed to individuality in each of the eight genotypes, using a previously published dataset. Behavior was assessed in the home-cage, providing control over environmental factors, to reveal within-strain variability in numerous spontaneous behaviors. Indeed, despite standardization and in line with previous studies, substantial variability among mice of the same inbred strain was observed. Strikingly, across a multidimensional set of 115 behavioral parameters, several strains consistently ranked high in within-strain variability (DBA/2J, 129S1/Sv A/J and NOD/LtJ), whereas other strains ranked low (C57BL/6J and BALB/c). Strain rankings of within-strain variability in behavior were confirmed in an independent, previously published behavioral dataset using conventional behavioral tests administered to different mice from the same breeding colonies. Together, these show that genetically inbred mouse strains consistently differ in phenotypic robustness against environmental variation, suggesting that genetic factors contribute to variation in robustness. PMID:26123533

  5. The influence of strain rate and hydrogen on the plane-strain ductility of Zircaloy cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Link, T.M.; Motta, A.T.; Koss, D.A.

    1998-03-01

    The authors studied the ductility of unirradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding under loading conditions prototypical of those found in reactivity-initiated accidents (RIA), i.e.: near plane-strain deformation in the hoop direction (transverse to the cladding axis) at room temperature and 300 C and high strain rates. To conduct these studies, they developed a specimen configuration in which near plane-strain deformation is achieved in the gage section, and a testing methodology that allows one to determine both the limit strain at the onset of localized necking and the fracture strain. The experiments indicate that there is little effect of strain rate (10{sup {minus}3} to 10{sup 2} s{sup {minus}1}) on the ductility of unhydrided Zircaloy tubing deformed under near plane-strain conditions at either room temperature or 300 C. Preliminary experiments on cladding containing 190 ppm hydrogen show only a small loss of fracture strain but no clear effect on limit strain. The experiments also indicate that there is a significant loss of Zircaloy ductility when surface flaws are present in the form of thickness imperfections.

  6. Myocardial strain estimated from standard cine MRI closely represents strain estimated from dedicated strain-encoded MRI.

    PubMed

    Allan, Andrew; Gao, Hao; McComb, Christie; Berry, Colin

    2011-01-01

    A method of non-rigid image registration was developed and evaluated for the purpose of quantifying myocardial displacement and strain from cine MRI using DENSE MRI as the reference standard. The objective of this paper was to study the potential use of cine MRI with image registration, as a means of measuring strain. The local displacement of the left ventricle was modelled by free-form deformations using b-splines. Cardiac MRI images were obtained from four healthy volunteers at 1.5T and analysed by the implementation of image registration algorithms in cine data and with DENSE view in DENSE data. The results indicated there was less than 3% difference between the strain values obtained from cine and DENSE scans averaging across the regions of the left ventricle in healthy subjects (n=4). There lies great potential in the implementation of cine MRI as a means of strain estimation. As such the measurement of strain from standard cine MRI poses an appealing and potentially clinically useful new option for assessing patients with myocardial dysfunction.

  7. Volume strain within the Geysers geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Mossop, Antony; Segall, Paul

    1999-12-10

    During the 1970s and 1980s. The Geysers geothermal region was rapidly developed as a site of geothermal power production. The likelihood that this could cause significant strain within the reservoir, with corresponding surface displacements, led to a series of deformation monitoring surveys. In 1973, 1975, 1977, and 1980, The Geysers region was surveyed using first-order, class I, spirit leveling. In 1994, 1995, and 1996, many of the leveling control monuments were resurveyed using high-precision Global Positioning System receivers. The two survey methods are reconciled using the GEOID96 geoid model. The displacements are inverted to determine volume strain within the reservoir. For the period 1980-1994, peak volume strains in excess of 5x10{sup -4} are imaged. There is an excellent correlation between the observed changes in reservoir steam pressures and the imaged volume strain. If reservoir pressure changes are inducing volume strain, then the reservoir quasi-static bulk modulus K must be <4.6x10{sup 9} Pa. However, seismic velocities indicate a much stiffer reservoir with K=3.4x10{sup 10} Pa. This apparent discrepancy is shown to be consistent with predicted frequency dependence in K for fractured and water-saturated rock. Inversion of surface deformation data therefore appears to be a powerful method for imaging pressure change within the body of the reservoir. Correlation between induced seismicity at The Geysers and volume strain is observed. However, earthquake distribution does not appear to have a simple relationship with volume strain rate. (c) 1999 American Geophysical Union.

  8. Strain preservation of experimental animals: vitrification of two-cell stage embryos for multiple mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Eto, Tomoo; Takahashi, Riichi; Kamisako, Tsutomu

    2015-04-01

    Strain preservation of experimental animals is crucial for experimental reproducibility. Maintaining complete animal strains, however, is costly and there is a risk for genetic mutations as well as complete loss due to disasters or illness. Therefore, the development of effective vitrification techniques for cryopreservation of multiple experimental animal strains is important. We examined whether a vitrification method using cryoprotectant solutions, P10 and PEPeS, is suitable for preservation of multiple inbred and outbred mouse strains. First, we investigated whether our vitrification method using cryoprotectant solutions was suitable for two-cell stage mouse embryos. In vitro development of embryos exposed to the cryoprotectant solutions was similar to that of fresh controls. Further, the survival rate of the vitrified embryos was extremely high (98.1%). Next, we collected and vitrified two-cell stage embryos of 14 mouse strains. The average number of embryos obtained from one female was 7.3-33.3. The survival rate of vitrified embryos ranged from 92.8% to 99.1%, with no significant differences among mouse strains. In vivo development did not differ significantly between fresh controls and vitrified embryos of each strain. For strain preservation using cryopreserved embryos, two offspring for inbred lines and one offspring for outbred lines must be produced from two-cell stage embryos collected from one female. The expected number of surviving fetuses obtained from embryos collected from one female of either the inbred or outbred strains ranged from 2.9 to 19.5. The findings of the present study indicated that this vitrification method is suitable for strain preservation of multiple mouse strains.

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains exhibit differential and strain-specific molecular signatures in pulmonary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mvubu, Nontobeko Eunice; Pillay, Balakrishna; Gamieldien, Junaid; Bishai, William; Pillay, Manormoney

    2016-12-01

    Although pulmonary epithelial cells are integral to innate and adaptive immune responses during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, global transcriptomic changes in these cells remain largely unknown. Changes in gene expression induced in pulmonary epithelial cells infected with M. tuberculosis F15/LAM4/KZN, F11, F28, Beijing and Unique genotypes were investigated by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). The Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform generated 50 bp reads that were mapped to the human genome (Hg19) using Tophat (2.0.10). Differential gene expression induced by the different strains in infected relative to the uninfected cells was quantified and compared using Cufflinks (2.1.0) and MeV (4.0.9), respectively. Gene expression varied among the strains with the total number of genes as follows: F15/LAM4/KZN (1187), Beijing (1252), F11 (1639), F28 (870), Unique (886) and H37Rv (1179). A subset of 292 genes was commonly induced by all strains, where 52 genes were down-regulated while 240 genes were up-regulated. Differentially expressed genes were compared among the strains and the number of induced strain-specific gene signatures were as follows: F15/LAM4/KZN (138), Beijing (52), F11 (255), F28 (55), Unique (186) and H37Rv (125). Strain-specific molecular gene signatures associated with functional pathways were observed only for the Unique and H37Rv strains while certain biological functions may be associated with other strain signatures. This study demonstrated that strains of M. tuberculosis induce differential gene expression and strain-specific molecular signatures in pulmonary epithelial cells. Specific signatures induced by clinical strains of M. tuberculosis can be further explored for novel host-associated biomarkers and adjunctive immunotherapies. PMID:27497873

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains exhibit differential and strain-specific molecular signatures in pulmonary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mvubu, Nontobeko Eunice; Pillay, Balakrishna; Gamieldien, Junaid; Bishai, William; Pillay, Manormoney

    2016-12-01

    Although pulmonary epithelial cells are integral to innate and adaptive immune responses during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, global transcriptomic changes in these cells remain largely unknown. Changes in gene expression induced in pulmonary epithelial cells infected with M. tuberculosis F15/LAM4/KZN, F11, F28, Beijing and Unique genotypes were investigated by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). The Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform generated 50 bp reads that were mapped to the human genome (Hg19) using Tophat (2.0.10). Differential gene expression induced by the different strains in infected relative to the uninfected cells was quantified and compared using Cufflinks (2.1.0) and MeV (4.0.9), respectively. Gene expression varied among the strains with the total number of genes as follows: F15/LAM4/KZN (1187), Beijing (1252), F11 (1639), F28 (870), Unique (886) and H37Rv (1179). A subset of 292 genes was commonly induced by all strains, where 52 genes were down-regulated while 240 genes were up-regulated. Differentially expressed genes were compared among the strains and the number of induced strain-specific gene signatures were as follows: F15/LAM4/KZN (138), Beijing (52), F11 (255), F28 (55), Unique (186) and H37Rv (125). Strain-specific molecular gene signatures associated with functional pathways were observed only for the Unique and H37Rv strains while certain biological functions may be associated with other strain signatures. This study demonstrated that strains of M. tuberculosis induce differential gene expression and strain-specific molecular signatures in pulmonary epithelial cells. Specific signatures induced by clinical strains of M. tuberculosis can be further explored for novel host-associated biomarkers and adjunctive immunotherapies.

  11. Anisotropic nature of radially strained metal tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Julie N.

    Metal pipes are sometimes swaged by a metal cone to enlarge them, which increases the strain in the material. The amount of strain is important because it affects the burst and collapse strength. Burst strength is the amount of internal pressure that a pipe can withstand before failure, while collapse strength is the amount of external pressure that a pipe can withstand before failure. If the burst or collapse strengths are exceeded, the pipe may fracture, causing critical failure. Such an event could cost the owners and their customers millions of dollars in clean up, repair, and lost time, in addition to the potential environmental damage. Therefore, a reliable way of estimating the burst and collapse strength of strained pipe is desired and valuable. The sponsor currently rates strained pipes using the properties of raw steel, because those properties are easily measured (for example, yield strength). In the past, the engineers assumed that the metal would be work-hardened when swaged, so that yield strength would increase. However, swaging introduces anisotropic strain, which may decrease the yield strength. This study measured the yield strength of strained material in the transverse and axial direction and compared them to raw material, to determine the amount of anisotropy. This information will be used to more accurately determine burst and collapse ratings for strained pipes. More accurate ratings mean safer products, which will minimize risk for the sponsor's customers. Since the strained metal has a higher yield strength than the raw material, using the raw yield strength to calculate burst and collapse ratings is a conservative method. The metal has even higher yield strength after strain aging, which indicates that the stresses are relieved. Even with the 12% anisotropy in the strained and 9% anisotropy in the strain aged specimens, the raw yield strengths are lower and therefore more conservative. I recommend that the sponsor continue using the raw

  12. [Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus spp. strains].

    PubMed

    Kozuszko, Sylwia; Bogiel, Tomasz; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2009-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate a frequency of isolation and susceptibility to antibiotics of vancomycin-resistant enterococci isolated between 2005 and the first half of the 2009 from patients of University Hospital of Dr. A. Jurasz Collegium Medicum of L. Rydygier in Bydgoszcz Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruli. Study shows increasing frequency of VRE isolation from two in 2005, 8 in 2006, 30 in 2007 to 79 in 2008 and 40 in the first half of 2009 year. Among all isolated VRE strains E. faecium definitely predominated (75.0-90.0% in 2006-2009). The majority of strains were obtained from patients of the Pediatrics, Hematology and Oncology Clinic (43,4%) and Pediatric Surgery Clinic (41.5%). VRE strains were mainly isolated from digestive tract (79,9%). The isolates demonstrated frequently resistance to penicillin, ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, rifampicin and chloramphenicol. Percentage of VRE strain resistant to aminoglycosides decreased during the last four years of study. Over 56% of VRE isolates showed resistance to teicoplanin. Linezolid and quinupristin-dalfopristin were the only drugs presenting activity against isolated VRE strains.

  13. [Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strains].

    PubMed

    Bogiel, Tomasz; Kwiecińska-Piróg, Joanna; Jachna-Sawicka, Katarzyna; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2010-01-01

    A. baumannii rods are opportunistic pathogens responsible generally for nosocomial infections. Resistance to carbapenems, observed among them, is a serious threat due to ability to be transmitted between bacterial species. The aim of our study was to evaluate the frequency of isolation and susceptibility to antibiotics of resistant to imipenem and/or meropenem A. baumannii strains isolated between 2007 and 2009 from patients of University Hospital of dr A. Jurasz Collegium Medicum of L. Rydygier in Bydgoszcz Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń. Study shows increasing frequency of isolation that type of strains from 4 in 2007 to 95 in 2008 and 67 in 2009. Percentage of imipenem-resistant isolates raised to 27.6% in 2008 and 31.0% in 2009. Meropenem-resistant A. baumannii isolates frequency changed from 2.1% in 2007 to 31.2% and 34.6%, in 2008 and 2009, respectively. The majority of strains were obtained from patients of the Intensive Care Units and surgery clinics. Examined A. baumannii strains were generally isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage (25.3%) and wound (18.1%) or throat (12.0%) swabs samples. The isolates demonstrated full resistance to norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and chloramphenicol. Ampicillin/sulbactam (24.8%), tobramycin (8.1%) and colistin (1.5%) presented the highest in vitro activity against isolated strains.

  14. Extraordinary strain hardening by gradient structure

    PubMed Central

    Wu, XiaoLei; Jiang, Ping; Chen, Liu; Yuan, Fuping; Zhu, Yuntian T.

    2014-01-01

    Gradient structures have evolved over millions of years through natural selection and optimization in many biological systems such as bones and plant stems, where the structures change gradually from the surface to interior. The advantage of gradient structures is their maximization of physical and mechanical performance while minimizing material cost. Here we report that the gradient structure in engineering materials such as metals renders a unique extra strain hardening, which leads to high ductility. The grain-size gradient under uniaxial tension induces a macroscopic strain gradient and converts the applied uniaxial stress to multiaxial stresses due to the evolution of incompatible deformation along the gradient depth. Thereby the accumulation and interaction of dislocations are promoted, resulting in an extra strain hardening and an obvious strain hardening rate up-turn. Such extraordinary strain hardening, which is inherent to gradient structures and does not exist in homogeneous materials, provides a hitherto unknown strategy to develop strong and ductile materials by architecting heterogeneous nanostructures. PMID:24799688

  15. Fast flexible electronics with strained silicon nanomembranes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Han; Seo, Jung-Hun; Paskiewicz, Deborah M; Zhu, Ye; Celler, George K; Voyles, Paul M; Zhou, Weidong; Lagally, Max G; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2013-01-01

    Fast flexible electronics operating at radio frequencies (>1 GHz) are more attractive than traditional flexible electronics because of their versatile capabilities, dramatic power savings when operating at reduced speed and broader spectrum of applications. Transferrable single-crystalline Si nanomembranes (SiNMs) are preferred to other materials for flexible electronics owing to their unique advantages. Further improvement of Si-based device speed implies significant technical and economic advantages. While the mobility of bulk Si can be enhanced using strain techniques, implementing these techniques into transferrable single-crystalline SiNMs has been challenging and not demonstrated. The past approach presents severe challenges to achieve effective doping and desired material topology. Here we demonstrate the combination of strained- NM-compatible doping techniques with self-sustained-strain sharing by applying a strain-sharing scheme between Si and SiGe multiple epitaxial layers, to create strained print-transferrable SiNMs. We demonstrate a new speed record of Si-based flexible electronics without using aggressively scaled critical device dimensions.

  16. Glucosyltransferase gene polymorphism among Streptococcus mutans strains.

    PubMed Central

    Chia, J S; Hsu, T Y; Teng, L J; Chen, J Y; Hahn, L J; Yang, C S

    1991-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in genes coding for the glucosyltransferases were detected among Streptococcus mutans serotype c strains by Southern blot analysis with DNA probes located within the gtfB gene (H. Aoki, T. Shiroza, M. Hayakawa, S. Sato, and H. K. Kuramitsu, Infect. Immun. 53:587-594, 1986). Restriction endonucleases were used to examine genomic DNAs isolated from serotype a to h strains. The variations were readily detected among 33 strains of serotype c by EcoRI and PstI restriction enzyme digestions. Serotypes e and f, which are genetically similar to serotype c, also had comparable polymorphism; however, serotypes a, b, d, g, and h did not hybridize to the same DNA probes in parallel experiments. Further analysis of enzymatic activities for glucan synthesis and sucrose-dependent adherence revealed no significant differences among the serotype c strains. Our results suggested that genetic polymorphisms existing in S. mutans serotype c strains may reflect a complexity in genes coding for the glucosyltransferases, which are produced ubiquitously in members of the S. mutans group. Images PMID:1826894

  17. Strain Hardening of Hadfield Manganese Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, P. H.; Olson, G. B.; Owen, W. S.

    1986-10-01

    The plastic flow behavior of Hadfield manganese steel in uniaxial tension and compression is shown to be greatly influenced by transformation plasticity phenomena. Changes in the stress-strain (σ-ɛ) curves with temperature correlate with the observed extent of deformation twinning, consistent with a softening effect of twinning as a deformation mechanism and a hardening effect of the twinned microstructure. The combined effects give upward curvature to the σ-ɛ curve over extensive ranges of plastic strain. A higher strain hardening in compression compared with tension appears to be consistent with the observed texture development. The composition dependence of stacking fault energy computed using a thermodynamic model suggests that the Hadfield composition is optimum for a maximum rate of deformation twinning. Comparisons of the Hadfield steel with a Co-33Ni alloy exhibiting similar twinning kinetics, and an Fe-21Ni-lC alloy deforming by slip indicate no unusual strain hardening at low strains where deformation is controlled by slip, but an unusual amount of structural hardening associated with the twin formation in the Hadfield steel. A possible mechanism of anomalous twin hardening is discussed in terms of modified twinning behavior (pseudotwinning) in nonrandom solid solutions.

  18. Secretome analysis of Clostridium difficile strains.

    PubMed

    Boetzkes, Alexander; Felkel, Katharina Wiebke; Zeiser, Johannes; Jochim, Nelli; Just, Ingo; Pich, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    Clostridium difficile causes infections ranging from mild C. difficile-associated diarrhea to severe pseudomembranous colitis. Since 2003 new hypervirulent C. difficile strains (PCR ribotype 027) emerged characterized by a dramatically increased mortality. The secretomes of the three C. difficile strains CDR20291, CD196, and CD630 were analyzed and compared. Proteins were separated and analyzed by means of SDS--PAGE and LC-MS. MS data were analyzed using Mascot and proteins were checked for export signals with SecretomeP and SignalP. LC-MS analysis revealed 158 different proteins in the supernatant of C. difficile. Most of the identified proteins originate from the cytoplasm. Thirty-two proteins in CDR20291, 36 in CD196 and 26 in CD630 were identified to be secreted by C. difficile strains. Those were mainly S-layer proteins, substrate-binding proteins of ABC-transporters, cell wall hydrolases, pilin and unknown hypothetical proteins. Toxin A and toxin B were identified after growth in brain heart infusion medium using immunological techniques. The ADP-ribosyltransferase-binding component protein, which is a part of the binary toxin CDT, was only identified in the hypervirulent ribotype 027 strains. Further proteins that are secreted specifically by hypervirulent strains were identified. PMID:22398929

  19. Closure of fatigue cracks at high strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyyer, N. S.; Dowling, N. E.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on smooth specimens to study the closure behavior of short cracks at high cyclic strains under completely reversed cycling. Testing procedures and methodology, and closure measurement techniques, are described in detail. The strain levels chosen for the study cover from predominantly elastic to grossly plastic strains. Crack closure measurements are made at different crack lengths. The study reveals that, at high strains, cracks close only as the lowest stress level in the cycle is approached. The crack opening is observed to occur in the compressive part of the loading cycle. The applied stress needed to open a short crack under high strain is found to be less than for cracks under small scale yielding. For increased plastic deformations, the value of sigma sub op/sigma sub max is observed to decrease and approaches the value of R. Comparison of the experimental results with existing analysis is made and indicates the limitations of the small scale yielding approach where gross plastic deformation behavior occurs.

  20. Outbreak-related porcine epidemic diarrhea virus strains similar to US strains, South Korea, 2013.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunhee; Lee, Changhee

    2014-07-01

    In late 2013, outbreaks of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) infection recurred in South Korea. Genetic and phylogenetic analyses showed that isolates from the outbreaks were most closely related to emergent US strains of PEDV. These US strain-like PEDV variants are prevalent in South Korea and responsible for recent outbreaks in the country.

  1. Measurement of high temperature strain by the laser-speckle strain gauge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, I.

    1984-01-01

    By using the laser-speckle strain gauge, the strain of metal at the temperature lower than 250 C is measured. The principle of the gauge is to measure the expansion or contraction of the fine structures of surface by detecting the resultant speckle displacement in an optoelectronic way, whereby the effect of rigid-body motion is automatically cancelled out with the aid of a differential detection system. A transportable apparatus was built and a comparison experiment performed with a resistance strain gauge at room temperature. It has a strain sensitivity of .00002, a gauge length smaller than 1 mm, and no upper limit in a range of strain measurement. In the measurement of high-temperature strain it is free from the need for a dummy gauge and insensitive to an electric drift effect. As examples of strain measurement at high-temperature, thermal expansion and contraction of a top of a soldering iron are measured. The interval of the measurement can be made at shortest 1.6 sec. and the change in the strain is clearly followed until the ultimate stationary temperature is reached.

  2. Manipulation of electronic structure in WSe2 monolayer by strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cong-xia; Zhao, Xu; Wei, Shu-yi

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we study the electronic properties of WSe2 monolayer with biaxial tensile strain and compressive strain by using first principles based on the density function theory. Under the biaxial tensile strain, WSe2 monolayer retains direct band gap with increasing strain and the band gap of WSe2 continuously decreases with increasing strain, eventually turn to metal when strain is equal to or more than 13%. Under the biaxial compressive strain, WSe2 monolayer turns to indirect gap and the band gap continuously decreases with increasing strain, finally turn to metal when strain is up to -7%. The strain can reduce the band gap of the WSe2 monolayer regardless of the strain direction. By comparison, we can see that the tensile strain appears to be more effective in reducing the band gap of pristine WSe2 monolayer than the compressive strain from -5% to 5%. But the band gap turns to zero quickly from -6% to -7% under compressive strain, however for tensile strain from 5% to 13%, the band gap decreases slowly. Based on the further analysis of the projected charge density for WSe2 monolayer, the fundamental reason of the change of band structure under biaxial tensile strain is revealed.

  3. Complete Genome Sequences of 17 Rapidly Growing Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Strains.

    PubMed

    Caverly, Lindsay J; Spilker, Theodore; LiPuma, John J

    2016-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequences of 17 rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) strains, including 16 Mycobacterium abscessus complex strains and one M. immunogenum strain. These sequences add value to studies of the genetic diversity of rapidly growing NTM strains recovered from human specimens. PMID:27660787

  4. Complete Genome Sequences of 17 Rapidly Growing Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Strains

    PubMed Central

    Spilker, Theodore; LiPuma, John J.

    2016-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequences of 17 rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) strains, including 16 Mycobacterium abscessus complex strains and one M. immunogenum strain. These sequences add value to studies of the genetic diversity of rapidly growing NTM strains recovered from human specimens. PMID:27660787

  5. Strain analysis of free-standing strained silicon-on-insulator nanomembrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Gao-Di; Dong, Lin-Xi; Xue, Zhong-Ying; Chen, Da; Guo, Qing-Lei; Mu, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-03-01

    Based on the ultra-thin strained silicon-on-insulator (sSOI) technology, by creatively using a hydrofluoric acid (HF) vapor corrosion system to dry etch the SiO2 layer, a large area of suspended strained silicon (sSi) nanomembrane with uniform strain distribution is fabricated. The strain state in the implemented nanomembrane is comprehensively analyzed by using an UV-Raman spectrometer with different laser powers. The results show that the inherent strain is preserved while there are artificial Raman shifts induced by the heat effect, which is proportional to the laser power. The suspended sSOI nanomembrane will be an important material for future novel high-performance devices. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61376117 and 61107025) and the Zhejiang Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. LY13F040004).

  6. Spontaneous strain glass to martensite transition in ferromagnetic Ni-Co-Mn-Ga strain glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Huang, Chonghui; Wu, Haijun; Gao, Jinghui; Yang, Sen; Wang, Dong; Ding, Xiangdong; Song, Xiaoping; Ren, Xiaobing

    2013-04-01

    We report that a spontaneous strain glass to martensite (STG-M) transition occurs in a Ni45Co10Mn20Ga25 ferromagnetic strain glass. The signatures of the spontaneous STG-M transition of Ni45Co10Mn20Ga25 ferromagnetic strain glass are stronger than those of Ti50Ni44.5Fe5.5 strain glass reported previously. Such a difference is attributed to that the martensitic terminal of the former has larger elastic anisotropy than that of the later. The spontaneous STG-M transition in this ferromagnetic strain glass is due to that the delicate competition between the kinetic limitation and the martensitic thermodynamic driving force changes with temperature.

  7. Wing Shape Sensing from Measured Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi

    2015-01-01

    A new two step theory is investigated for predicting the deflection and slope of an entire structure using strain measurements at discrete locations. In the first step, a measured strain is fitted using a piecewise least squares curve fitting method together with the cubic spline technique. These fitted strains are integrated twice to obtain deflection data along the fibers. In the second step, computed deflection along the fibers are combined with a finite element model of the structure in order to extrapolate the deflection and slope of the entire structure through the use of System Equivalent Reduction and Expansion Process. The theory is first validated on a computational model, a cantilevered rectangular wing. It is then applied to test data from a cantilevered swept wing model.

  8. Test load verification through strain data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.; Harrington, F.

    1995-01-01

    A traditional binding acceptance criterion on polycrystalline structures is the experimental verification of the ultimate factor of safety. At fracture, the induced strain is inelastic and about an order-of-magnitude greater than designed for maximum expected operational limit. At this extreme strained condition, the structure may rotate and displace at the applied verification load such as to unknowingly distort the load transfer into the static test article. Test may result in erroneously accepting a submarginal design or rejecting a reliable one. A technique was developed to identify, monitor, and assess the load transmission error through two back-to-back surface-measured strain data. The technique is programmed for expediency and convenience. Though the method was developed to support affordable aerostructures, the method is also applicable for most high-performance air and surface transportation structural systems.

  9. Dialysis Culture of T-Strain Mycoplasmas

    PubMed Central

    Masover, Gerald K.; Hayflick, Leonard

    1974-01-01

    Using dialyzing cultures of T-strain mycoplasmas, it was possible to make some observations relevant to the growth and metabolism of these organisms which would not be possible in nondialyzing cultures due to growth inhibition of the organisms by elevated pH and increased ammonium ion concentration in media containing urea. The rate of ammonia accumulation was found to be related to the initial urea concentration in the medium and could not be accounted for by any change in the multiplication rate of the organisms. More ammonia was generated than could be accounted for by the added urea alone, suggesting that an ammonia-producing activity other than urease may be present in T-strain mycoplasmas. Titers above 107 color change units per ml were achieved in dialysis cultures of a T-strain mycoplasma in the presence of urea, and such titers were maintained for approximately 60 h during dialysis culture in the absence of added urea. PMID:4595203

  10. Self-diffusion in compressively strained Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, Yoko; Uematsu, Masashi; Itoh, Kohei M.; Hoshi, Yusuke; Sawano, Kentarou; Shiraki, Yasuhiro; Myronov, Maksym; Haller, Eugene E.

    2011-08-01

    Under a compressive biaxial strain of {approx} 0.71%, Ge self-diffusion has been measured using an isotopically controlled Ge single-crystal layer grown on a relaxed Si{sub 0.2}Ge{sub 0.8} virtual substrate. The self-diffusivity is enhanced by the compressive strain and its behavior is fully consistent with a theoretical prediction of a generalized activation volume model of a simple vacancy mediated diffusion, reported by Aziz et al.[Phys. Rev. B 73, 054101 (2006)]. The activation volume of (-0.65{+-}0.21) times the Ge atomic volume quantitatively describes the observed enhancement due to the compressive biaxial strain very well.

  11. A photoelastic fiber optic strain gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Wei; Gilbert, John A.; Katsunis, Constantine

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a photoelastic fiber optic strain gage sensitive to transverse strain. The sensing element is made from an epoxy resin which is stress frozen to passively achieve the quadrature condition. Light, emitted from an LED operating at 820 nm, is transmitted to and from the sensing element via multimode fibers and the signal is detected using a dual channel operational photodiode/amplifier. This unique combination of optics and electronics produces a fiber optic sensor having a high signal to noise ratio which is lead-in/out insensitive. Results show that strains on the order of 1 microstrain can be measured over an 800 microstrain range and that dummy gages can be used for temperature compensation.

  12. The breaking strain of neutron star crust

    SciTech Connect

    Kadau, Kai; Horowitz, C J

    2009-01-01

    Mountains on rapidly rotating neutron stars efficiently radiate gravitational waves. The maximum possible size of these mountains depends on the breaking strain of neutron star crust. With multimillion ion molecular dynamics simulations of Coulomb solids representing the crust, we show that the breaking strain of pure single crystals is very large and that impurities, defects, and grain boundaries only modestly reduce the breaking strain to around 0.1. Due to the collective behavior of the ions during failure found in our simulations, the neutron star crust is likely very strong and can support mountains large enough so that their gTavitational wave radiation could limit the spin periods of some stars and might be detectable in large scale interferometers. Furthermore, our microscopic modeling of neutron star crust material can help analyze mechanisms relevant in Magnetar Giant and Micro Flares.

  13. High sensitivity knitted fabric strain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Juan; Long, Hairu; Miao, Menghe

    2016-10-01

    Wearable sensors are increasingly used in smart garments for detecting and transferring vital signals and body posture, movement and respiration. Existing fabric strain sensors made from metallized yarns have low sensitivity, poor comfort and low durability to washing. Here we report a knitted fabric strain sensor made from a cotton/stainless steel (SS) fibre blended yarn which shows much higher sensitivity than sensors knitted from metallized yarns. The fabric feels softer than pure cotton textiles owing to the ultrafine stainless steel fibres and does not lose its electrical property after washing. The reason for the high sensitivity of the cotton/SS knitted fabric sensor was explored by comparing its sensing mechanism with the knitted fabric sensor made from metallized yarns. The results show that the cotton/SS yarn-to-yarn contact resistance is highly sensitive to strain applied to hooked yarn loops.

  14. Developments of borehole strain observation outside China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Ze-Hua; Shi, Yao-Lin

    2004-11-01

    Borehole strain observation is playing an increasingly important role in the study on the crustal movements. It has been used by many countries such as China, USA, Japan, Peru, Australia, South Africa, Iceland and Italy, in research fields of plate tectonics, earthquake, volcanic eruption, dam safety, oil field subsidence, mining collapse and so on. Borehole strainmeter has been improved rapidly and tends to get more and more components included in one probe. Based on observations by this kind of instruments, studies on seismic strain step, slow earthquake, earthquake precursor and volcanic eruption forecasting have made remarkable achievements. In the coming years, borehole strain observation is going to become one major goedetic means, together with GPS and InSAR.

  15. Genome sequence of Coxiella burnetii strain Namibia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We present the whole genome sequence and annotation of the Coxiella burnetii strain Namibia. This strain was isolated from an aborting goat in 1991 in Windhoek, Namibia. The plasmid type QpRS was confirmed in our work. Further genomic typing placed the strain into a unique genomic group. The genome sequence is 2,101,438 bp long and contains 1,979 protein-coding and 51 RNA genes, including one rRNA operon. To overcome the poor yield from cell culture systems, an additional DNA enrichment with whole genome amplification (WGA) methods was applied. We describe a bioinformatics pipeline for improved genome assembly including several filters with a special focus on WGA characteristics. PMID:25593636

  16. Conservative treatment for repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed

    Konijnenberg, H S; de Wilde, N S; Gerritsen, A A; van Tulder, M W; de Vet, H C

    2001-10-01

    Various conservative treatment options for repetitive strain injury are widely used, despite questionable evidence of their effectiveness. This systematic review evaluates the effectiveness of these treatment options for relieving symptoms of repetitive strain injury and improving activities of daily living. Searches in Medline and Embase, with additional reference checking resulted in 15 eligible trials for this review. Methodological quality was assessed, and data-extraction was performed. With the use of a "best-evidence synthesis", no strong evidence was found for the effectiveness of any of the treatment options. There is limited evidence that multidisciplinary rehabilitation, ergonomic intervention measures, exercises, and spinal manipulation combined with soft tissue therapy are effective in providing symptom relief or improving activities of daily living. There is conflicting evidence for the effectiveness of behavioral therapy. In conclusion, little is known about the effectiveness of conservative treatment options for repetitive strain injury. To establish strong evidence, more high-quality trials are needed.

  17. Realization of a Strained Atomic Wire Superlattice.

    PubMed

    Song, Inkyung; Goh, Jung Suk; Lee, Sung-Hoon; Jung, Sung Won; Shin, Jin Sung; Yamane, Hiroyuki; Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Yeom, Han Woong

    2015-11-24

    A superlattice of strained Au-Si atomic wires is successfully fabricated on a Si surface. Au atoms are known to incorporate into the stepped Si(111) surface to form a Au-Si atomic wire array with both one-dimensional (1D) metallic and antiferromagnetic atomic chains. At a reduced density of Au, we find a regular array of Au-Si wires in alternation with pristine Si nanoterraces. Pristine Si nanoterraces impose a strain on the neighboring Au-Si wires, which modifies both the band structure of metallic chains and the magnetic property of spin chains. This is an ultimate 1D version of a strained-layer superlattice of semiconductors, defining a direction toward the fine engineering of self-assembled atomic-scale wires. PMID:26446292

  18. Strain relief in Cu-Pd heteroepitaxy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yafeng; Przybylski, M; Trushin, O; Wang, W H; Barthel, J; Granato, E; Ying, S C; Ala-Nissila, T

    2005-04-15

    We present experimental and theoretical studies of Pd/Cu(100) and Cu/Pd(100) heterostructures in order to explore their structure and misfit strain relaxation. Ultrathin Pd and Cu films are grown by pulsed laser deposition at room temperature. For Pd/Cu, compressive strain is released by networks of misfit dislocations running in the [100] and [010] directions, which appear after a few monolayers (ML) already. In striking contrast, for Cu/Pd the tensile overlayer remains coherent up to about 9 ML, after which multilayer growth occurs. The strong asymmetry between tensile and compressive cases is in contradiction with continuum elasticity theory and is also evident in the structural parameters of the strained films. Molecular dynamics calculations based on classical many-body potentials confirm the pronounced tensile-compressive asymmetry and are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  19. Genomic diversity of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus strains.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi-Peng; Cheng, Ruo-Lin; Xi, Yu; Zhang, Chuan-Xi

    2013-07-01

    Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) is a baculovirus that selectively infects the domestic silkworm. In this study, six BmNPV strains were compared at the whole genome level. We found that the number of bro genes and the composition of the homologous regions (hrs) are the two primary areas of divergence within these genomes. When we compared the ORFs of these BmNPV variants, we noticed a high degree of sequence divergence in the ORFs that are not baculovirus core genes. This result is consistent with the results derived from phylogenetic trees and evolutionary pressure analyses of these ORFs, indicating that ORFs that are not core genes likely play important roles in the evolution of BmNPV strains. The evolutionary relationships of these BmNPV strains might be explained by their geographic origins or those of their hosts. In addition, the total number of hr palindromes seems to affect viral DNA replication in Bm5 cells. PMID:23639478

  20. Comparison of barley stripe mosaic virus strains.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Elsayed E; Abdel Aleem, Engy E; Fattouh, Faiza A

    2008-01-01

    BSMV (barley stripe mosaic virus) particles were obtained in a pure state from infected host plant tissues of Hordeum vulgare. The three genomic parities (alpha, beta and gamma) were amplified by PCR using specific primers for each particle; each was cloned. Partial sequence of the alpha, beta and gamma segments was determined for the Egyptian isolate of barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV AE1). Alignment of nucleotide sequences with that of other known strains of the virus, BSMV type strains (CV17, ND18 and China), and the generation of phylogenetic trees was performed. A low level of homology was detected comparing 467 bp of the a and 643 bp of the segments to that of the other strains, and thus BSMV alpha and beta segments were in separate clusters. However, 1154 bp of the gamma segments of BSMV AE1 showed a high level of homology especially to strain BSMV ND18, as they both formed a distinct cluster. Northern blotting of pure BSMV AE1 virus and H. vulgare-infected tissue were compared using an alpha ND18 specific probe. Western blotting using antibodies specific for the coat protein (CP) and the triple gene block 1 (TGB1) protein, which are both encoded by the beta ND18 segment, still indicated a high level of similarity between proteins produced by BSMV ND18 and AE1. We suggest that the BSMV AE1 isolate is a distinct strain of BSMV which reflects the genetic evolutionary divergence among BSMV strains and members of the Hordeivirus group. PMID:18533473

  1. Gate leakage mechanisms in strained Si devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, L.; Olsen, S. H.; Kanoun, M.; Agaiby, R.; O'Neill, A. G.

    2006-11-01

    This work investigates gate leakage mechanisms in advanced strained Si /SiGe metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) devices. The impact of virtual substrate Ge content, epitaxial material quality, epitaxial layer structure, and device processing on gate oxide leakage characteristics are analyzed in detail. In state of the art MOSFETs, gate oxides are only a few nanometers thick. In order to minimize power consumption, leakage currents through the gate must be controlled. However, modifications to the energy band structure, Ge diffusion due to high temperature processing, and Si /SiGe material quality may all affect gate oxide leakage in strained Si devices. We show that at high oxide electric fields where gate leakage is dominated by Fowler-Nordheim tunneling, tensile strained Si MOSFETs exhibit lower leakage levels compared with bulk Si devices. This is a direct result of strain-induced splitting of the conduction band states. However, for device operating regimes at lower oxide electric fields Poole-Frenkel emissions contribute to strained Si gate leakage and increase with increasing virtual substrate Ge content. The emissions are shown to predominantly originate from surface roughness generating bulk oxide traps, opposed to Ge diffusion, and can be improved by introducing a high temperature anneal. Gate oxide interface trap density exhibits a dissimilar behavior and is highly sensitive to Ge atoms at the oxidizing surface, degrading with increasing thermal budget. Consequently advanced strained Si /SiGe devices are inadvertently subject to a potential tradeoff between power consumption (gate leakage current) and device reliability (gate oxide interface quality).

  2. Cyclomodulins in Urosepsis Strains of Escherichia coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Damien; Delmas, Julien; Cady, Anne; Robin, Frédéric; Sivignon, Adeline; Oswald, Eric; Bonnet, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Determinants of urosepsis in Escherichia coli remain incompletely defined. Cyclomodulins (CMs) are a growing functional family of toxins that hijack the eukaryotic cell cycle. Four cyclomodulin types are actually known in E. coli: cytotoxic necrotizing factors (CNFs), cycle-inhibiting factor (Cif), cytolethal distending toxins (CDTs), and the pks-encoded toxin. In the present study, the distribution of CM-encoding genes and the functionality of these toxins were investigated in 197 E. coli strains isolated from patients with community-acquired urosepsis (n = 146) and from uninfected subjects (n = 51). This distribution was analyzed in relation to the phylogenetic background, clinical origin, and antibiotic resistance of the strains. It emerged from this study that strains harboring the pks island and the cnf1 gene (i) were strongly associated with the B2 phylogroup (P, <0.001), (ii) frequently harbored both toxin-encoded genes in phylogroup B2 (33%), and (iii) were predictive of a urosepsis origin (P, <0.001 to 0.005). However, the prevalences of the pks island among phylogroup B2 strains, in contrast to those of the cnf1 gene, were not significantly different between fecal and urosepsis groups, suggesting that the pks island is more important for the colonization process and the cnf1 gene for virulence. pks- or cnf1-harboring strains were significantly associated with susceptibility to antibiotics (amoxicillin, cotrimoxazole, and quinolones [P, <0.001 to 0.043]). Otherwise, only 6% and 1% of all strains harbored the cdtB and cif genes, respectively, with no particular distribution by phylogenetic background, antimicrobial susceptibility, or clinical origin. PMID:20375237

  3. Path dependent high strain, strain-rate deformation of polymer toroidal elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chien-Wei; Nesterenko, Vitali F.

    2014-08-01

    The dynamic behavior of toroidal elements (o-rings) is investigated at the range of global engineering strains up to 0.7 and strain rates about 100 s-1. It was observed that the corresponding average dynamic stiffness of rubber toroidal elements increases up to 3 times in comparison with their quasistatic compression. The viscoelastic dynamic model using linear strain-rate dependence and Hertz damped model did not satisfactory agree with experimental data in investigated range of strains and strain-rates. In order to reflect experimental results, a modified viscoelastic model with power-law strain-rate dependence was proposed. Path dependent deformation of o-rings with different levels of pre-compression was investigated under dynamic loading conditions. It was found that dynamic response of pre-compressed o-rings at the initial strain range of 0.04-0.25 is similar to the behavior of uncompressed o-rings, but further increasing pre-compression to 0.4 and 0.5 results in different force-strain curves demonstrating memory effect. This phenomenon is explained using a model incorporating dependence of dynamic force on initial pre-compression introducing critical level of dynamic strain, after which memory of initial pre-compression fades. This model predicts that force history of weakly compressed o-rings (initial strain 4%) on the stage of loading represents an envelope for all other data in agreement with experiments. In all cases, the dynamic behavior was characterized by stiffer force-displacement curves in comparison with quasistatic compression of o-rings.

  4. Comparison of ethanol production by different Zymomonas strains

    SciTech Connect

    Skotnicki, M.L.; Lee, K.J.; Tribe, D.E.; Rogers, P.L.

    1981-04-01

    A comparison of the rates of growth and ethanol production by 11 different strains of Zymomonas revealed a wide range of characteristics, with some strains being more tolerant of high sugar or ethanol concentrations and high incubation temperatures than others. Some strains were unable to utilize sucrose; others produced large amounts of levan, and one strain grew well but produced no levan. One strain, CP4, was considerably better in all respects than most of the other strains and was chosen as a starting strain for genetic improvement of ethanol production.

  5. Variability among Rhizobium Strains Originating from Nodules of Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    van Berkum, P; Beyene, D; Vera, F T; Keyser, H H

    1995-07-01

    Rhizobium strains from nodules of Vicia faba were diverse in plasmid content and serology. Results of multilocus gel electrophoresis and restriction fragment length polymorphism indicated several deep chromosomal lineages among the strains. Linkage disequilibrium among the chromosomal types was detected and may have reflected variation of Rhizobium strains in the different geographical locations from which the strains originated. An investigation of pea strains with antibodies prepared against fava bean strains and restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses, targeting DNA regions coding for rRNA and nodulation, indicated that Rhizobium strains from V. faba nodules were distinguishable from those from Pisum sativum, V. villosa, and Trifolium spp. PMID:16535075

  6. Comparison of Ethanol Production by Different Zymomonas Strains

    PubMed Central

    Skotnicki, M. L.; Lee, K. J.; Tribe, D. E.; Rogers, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    A comparison of the rates of growth and ethanol production by 11 different strains of Zymomonas revealed a wide range of characteristics, with some strains being more tolerant of high sugar or ethanol concentrations and high incubation temperatures than others. Some strains were unable to utilize sucrose; others produced large amounts of levan, and one strain grew well but produced no levan. One strain, CP4, was considerably better in all respects than most of the other strains and was chosen as a starting strain for genetic improvement of ethanol production. PMID:16345753

  7. Development of high temperature strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemcoe, M. M.

    1973-01-01

    High temperature electric resistance wire strain gages were developed and evaluated for use at temperatures exceeding 922 K (1200 F). A special high temperature strain gage alloy (Fe-25Cr-7.5A1), designated BCL-3, was used to fabricate the gages. Pertinent gage characteristics were determined at temperatures up to 1255 K (1800 F). The results of the evaluation were reported in graphical and tabular form. It was concluded that the gages will perform satisfactorily at temperatures to at least 1089 K (1500 F) for at least one hour.

  8. Cells as strain-cued automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Brian N.; Snead, Malcolm L.

    2016-02-01

    We argue in favor of representing living cells as automata and review demonstrations that autonomous cells can form patterns by responding to local variations in the strain fields that arise from their individual or collective motions. An autonomous cell's response to strain stimuli is assumed to be effected by internally-generated, internally-powered forces, which generally move the cell in directions other than those implied by external energy gradients. Evidence of cells acting as strain-cued automata have been inferred from patterns observed in nature and from experiments conducted in vitro. Simulations that mimic particular cases of pattern forming share the idealization that cells are assumed to pass information among themselves solely via mechanical boundary conditions, i.e., the tractions and displacements present at their membranes. This assumption opens three mechanisms for pattern formation in large cell populations: wavelike behavior, kinematic feedback in cell motility that can lead to sliding and rotational patterns, and directed migration during invasions. Wavelike behavior among ameloblast cells during amelogenesis (the formation of dental enamel) has been inferred from enamel microstructure, while strain waves in populations of epithelial cells have been observed in vitro. One hypothesized kinematic feedback mechanism, "enhanced shear motility", accounts successfully for the spontaneous formation of layered patterns during amelogenesis in the mouse incisor. Directed migration is exemplified by a theory of invader cells that sense and respond to the strains they themselves create in the host population as they invade it: analysis shows that the strain fields contain positional information that could aid the formation of cell network structures, stabilizing the slender geometry of branches and helping govern the frequency of branch bifurcation and branch coalescence (the formation of closed networks). In simulations of pattern formation in

  9. Chitosan-Polypyrrole Fiber for Strain Sensor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Songjun; Yi, Byung-Ju; Chun, Kyoung-Yong; Lee, Jaeah; Kim, Youn Tae; Cha, Eun-Jong; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2015-03-01

    A chitosan/polypyrrole composited fiber as bio-compatible materials for artificial muscles is investigated. The chitosan/polypyrrole fiber (CPF) is fabricated by in-situ chemical polymerization of pyrrole monomer solution using FeCl3 as an oxidant. The electrical resistivity of the fiber is changed according to the strain variation applied to the both ends of the specimen. The sensor built by using the CPF has a higher gauge factor (4) compared to conventional metal strain gauges (~2) indicating a suitable material for delicate force control in sensing work. PMID:26413701

  10. Development of inkjet printed strain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, V.; Caparros, C.; Casellas, C.; Francesch, L.; Rocha, J. G.; Lanceros-Mendez, S.

    2013-10-01

    Strain sensors with different architectures, such as single sensors, sensor arrays and a sensor matrix have been developed by inkjet printing technology. Sensors with gauge factors up to 2.48, dimensions of 1.5 mm × 1.8 mm and interdigitated structures with a distance of 30 μm between the finger lines have been achieved based on PeDOT (poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) and conductive ink. Strain gauges based on silver ink have also been achieved with a gauge factor of 0.35. Performance tests including 1000 mechanical cycles have been successfully carried out for the development of smart prosthesis applications.

  11. Genomic diversity of Clostridium difficile strains.

    PubMed

    Janezic, Sandra; Rupnik, Maja

    2015-05-01

    Approaches to exploring Clostridium difficile genomic diversity have ranged from molecular typing methods to use of comparative genome microarrays and whole genome sequence comparisons. The C. difficile population structure is clonal and distributed into six clades, which correlate well with MLST STs (multilocus sequence types) and PCR ribotypes. However, toxigenic strains and strains with increased virulence are distributed throughout several clades. Here we summarize studies on C. difficile genomic diversity, with emphasis on phylogenetic aspects, epidemiological aspect and variability of some virulence factors. PMID:25700631

  12. Enabling Strain Hardening Simulations with Dislocation Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenlis, A; Cai, W

    2006-12-20

    Numerical algorithms for discrete dislocation dynamics simulations are investigated for the purpose of enabling strain hardening simulations of single crystals on massively parallel computers. The algorithms investigated include the /(N) calculation of forces, the equations of motion, time integration, adaptive mesh refinement, the treatment of dislocation core reactions, and the dynamic distribution of work on parallel computers. A simulation integrating all of these algorithmic elements using the Parallel Dislocation Simulator (ParaDiS) code is performed to understand their behavior in concert, and evaluate the overall numerical performance of dislocation dynamics simulations and their ability to accumulate percents of plastic strain.

  13. Tensile strain mapping in flat germanium membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Rhead, S. D. Halpin, J. E.; Myronov, M.; Patchett, D. H.; Allred, P. S.; Wilson, N. R.; Leadley, D. R.; Shah, V. A.; Kachkanov, V.; Dolbnya, I. P.; Reparaz, J. S.; Sotomayor Torres, C. M.

    2014-04-28

    Scanning X-ray micro-diffraction has been used as a non-destructive probe of the local crystalline quality of a thin suspended germanium (Ge) membrane. A series of reciprocal space maps were obtained with ∼4 μm spatial resolution, from which detailed information on the strain distribution, thickness, and crystalline tilt of the membrane was obtained. We are able to detect a systematic strain variation across the membranes, but show that this is negligible in the context of using the membranes as platforms for further growth. In addition, we show evidence that the interface and surface quality is improved by suspending the Ge.

  14. Ecoepidemics with Two Strains: Diseased Prey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elena, Elisa; Grammauro, Maria; Venturino, Ezio

    2011-09-01

    In this work we present a minimal model for an ecoepidemic situation with two diseases affecting the prey population. The main assumptions are the following ones. The predators recognize and hunt only the healthy prey. An infected prey of one strain becomes immune to the other one. The major finding shows that the two strains cannot simultaneously thrive in the system, contrary to the standard assumptions in epidemiology. But this rather unexpected and remarkable result, paralleling another one when the epidemics affects the predators, is most likely due to the assumptions made.

  15. Strain responsive concave and convex microlens arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Dinesh; Yang, Shu; Lin, Pei-Chun

    2007-12-01

    We report the fabrication of single-component, strain responsive microlens arrays with real-time tunability. The concave lens array is fabricated by patterning hard oxide layer on a bidirectionally prestretched soft elastomer, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) followed by confined buckling upon release of the prestrain. The convex microlens array is replica molded from the concave lenses in PDMS. Due to difference in lens formation mechanisms, the two types of lenses show different tunable range of focal length in response to the applied strain: large focal length change is observed from the concave microlens array, whereas that from the convex microlens array is much smaller.

  16. Phosphorus donors in highly strained silicon.

    PubMed

    Huebl, Hans; Stegner, Andre R; Stutzmann, Martin; Brandt, Martin S; Vogg, Guenther; Bensch, Frank; Rauls, Eva; Gerstmann, Uwe

    2006-10-20

    The hyperfine interaction of phosphorus donors in fully strained Si thin films grown on virtual Si(1-x)Ge(x) substrates with x< or =0.3 is determined via electrically detected magnetic resonance. For highly strained epilayers, hyperfine interactions as low as 0.8 mT are observed, significantly below the limit predicted by valley repopulation. Within a Green's function approach, density functional theory shows that the additional reduction is caused by the volume increase of the unit cell and a relaxation of the Si ligands of the donor.

  17. Serological Strains of Tobacco Ringspot Virus Transmitted by Xiphinema americanum.

    PubMed

    Rush, M C

    1970-07-01

    Five serological strains of tobacco ringspot virus isolated from naturally infected tobacco in North Carolina, and a strain isolated from watermelon in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas were transmitted from cucumber to cucumber by mass-screened and handpicked Xiphinerna americanum from North Carolina. The Eucharis mottle strain from Peru was not transmitted, indicating that a specific strain-vector relationship may exist between the geographically isolated strains from North and South America.

  18. Revisiting borehole strain, typhoons, and slow earthquakes using quantitative estimates of precipitation-induced strain changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Ya-Ju; Chang, Yuan-Shu; Liu, Chi-Ching; Lee, Hsin-Ming; Linde, Alan T.; Sacks, Selwyn I.; Kitagawa, Genshio; Chen, Yue-Gau

    2015-06-01

    Taiwan experiences high deformation rates, particularly along its eastern margin where a shortening rate of about 30 mm/yr is experienced in the Longitudinal Valley and the Coastal Range. Four Sacks-Evertson borehole strainmeters have been installed in this area since 2003. Liu et al. (2009) proposed that a number of strain transient events, primarily coincident with low-barometric pressure during passages of typhoons, were due to deep-triggered slow slip. Here we extend that investigation with a quantitative analysis of the strain responses to precipitation as well as barometric pressure and the Earth tides in order to isolate tectonic source effects. Estimates of the strain responses to barometric pressure and groundwater level changes for the different stations vary over the ranges -1 to -3 nanostrain/millibar(hPa) and -0.3 to -1.0 nanostrain/hPa, respectively, consistent with theoretical values derived using Hooke's law. Liu et al. (2009) noted that during some typhoons, including at least one with very heavy rainfall, the observed strain changes were consistent with only barometric forcing. By considering a more extensive data set, we now find that the strain response to rainfall is about -5.1 nanostrain/hPa. A larger strain response to rainfall compared to that to air pressure and water level may be associated with an additional strain from fluid pressure changes that take place due to infiltration of precipitation. Using a state-space model, we remove the strain response to rainfall, in addition to those due to air pressure changes and the Earth tides, and investigate whether corrected strain changes are related to environmental disturbances or tectonic-original motions. The majority of strain changes attributed to slow earthquakes seem rather to be associated with environmental factors. However, some events show remaining strain changes after all corrections. These events include strain polarity changes during passages of typhoons (a characteristic that is

  19. Multiple Comparison Analysis of Two New Genomic Sequences of ILTV Strains from China with Other Strains from Different Geographic Regions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Kong, Congcong; Wang, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    To date, twenty complete genome sequences of ILTV strains have been published in GenBank, including one strain from China, and nineteen strains from Australian and the United States. To investigate the genomic information on ILTVs from different geographic regions, two additional individual complete genome sequences of WG and K317 strains from China were determined. The genomes of WG and K317 strains were 153,505 and 153,639 bp in length, respectively. Alignments performed on the amino acid sequences of the twelve glycoproteins showed that 13 out of 116 mutational sites were present only among the Chinese strain WG and the Australian strains SA2 and A20. The phylogenetic tree analysis suggested that the WG strain established close relationships with the Australian strain SA2. The recombination events were detected and confirmed in different subregions of the WG strain with the sequences of SA2 and K317 strains as parental. In this study, two new complete genome sequences of Chinese ILTV strains were used in comparative analysis with other complete genome sequences of ILTV strains from China, the United States, and Australia. The analysis of genome comparison, phylogenetic trees, and recombination events showed close relationships among the Chinese strain WG and the Australian strains SA2. The information of the two new complete genome sequences from China will help to facilitate the analysis of phylogenetic relationships and the molecular differences among ILTV strains from different geographic regions.

  20. Multiple Comparison Analysis of Two New Genomic Sequences of ILTV Strains from China with Other Strains from Different Geographic Regions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yan; Kong, Congcong; Wang, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    To date, twenty complete genome sequences of ILTV strains have been published in GenBank, including one strain from China, and nineteen strains from Australian and the United States. To investigate the genomic information on ILTVs from different geographic regions, two additional individual complete genome sequences of WG and K317 strains from China were determined. The genomes of WG and K317 strains were 153,505 and 153,639 bp in length, respectively. Alignments performed on the amino acid sequences of the twelve glycoproteins showed that 13 out of 116 mutational sites were present only among the Chinese strain WG and the Australian strains SA2 and A20. The phylogenetic tree analysis suggested that the WG strain established close relationships with the Australian strain SA2. The recombination events were detected and confirmed in different subregions of the WG strain with the sequences of SA2 and K317 strains as parental. In this study, two new complete genome sequences of Chinese ILTV strains were used in comparative analysis with other complete genome sequences of ILTV strains from China, the United States, and Australia. The analysis of genome comparison, phylogenetic trees, and recombination events showed close relationships among the Chinese strain WG and the Australian strains SA2. The information of the two new complete genome sequences from China will help to facilitate the analysis of phylogenetic relationships and the molecular differences among ILTV strains from different geographic regions. PMID:26186451

  1. Dynamics of Dual Infection with Campylobacter jejuni Strains in Chickens Reveals Distinct Strain-to-Strain Variation in Infection Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Wigley, Paul; Humphrey, Suzanne; Kemmett, Kirsty; Lacharme-Lora, Lizeth; Humphrey, Tom; Williams, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Although multiple genotypes of Campylobacter jejuni may be isolated from the same commercial broiler flock, little is known about the infection dynamics of different genotypes within individuals or their colonization sites within the gut. Single experimental infections with C. jejuni M1 (sequence type 137, clonal complex 45) and C. jejuni 13126 (sequence type 21, clonal complex 21) revealed that 13126 colonized the ceca at significantly higher levels. The dissemination and colonization sites of the two C. jejuni strains then were examined in an experimental broiler flock. Two 33-day-old broiler chickens were infected with M1 and two with 13126, and 15 birds were left unchallenged. Cloacal swabs were taken postinfection to determine the colonization and shedding of each strain. By 2 days postinfection (dpi), 8/19 birds were shedding M1 whereas none were shedding 13126. At 8 dpi, all birds were shedding both strains. At 18 dpi, liver and cecal levels of each isolate were quantified, while in 10 birds they also were quantified at nine sites throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. 13126 was found throughout the GI tract, while M1 was largely restricted to the ceca and colon. The livers of 7/19 birds were culture positive for 13126 only. These data show that 13126 has a distinctly different infection biology than strain M1. It showed slower colonization of the lower GI tract but was more invasive and able to colonize at a high level throughout the GI tract. The finding that C. jejuni strains have markedly different infection ecologies within the chicken has implications for control in the poultry industry and suggests that the contamination risk of edible tissues is dependent on the isolate involved. PMID:25107966

  2. Probiotic potential of Lactobacillus strains with antimicrobial activity against some human pathogenic strains.

    PubMed

    Shokryazdan, Parisa; Sieo, Chin Chin; Kalavathy, Ramasamy; Liang, Juan Boo; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu; Faseleh Jahromi, Mohammad; Ho, Yin Wan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to isolate, identify, and characterize some lactic acid bacterial strains from human milk, infant feces, and fermented grapes and dates, as potential probiotics with antimicrobial activity against some human pathogenic strains. One hundred and forty bacterial strains were isolated and, after initial identification and a preliminary screening for acid and bile tolerance, nine of the best isolates were selected and further identified using 16 S rRNA gene sequences. The nine selected isolates were then characterized in vitro for their probiotic characteristics and their antimicrobial activities against some human pathogens. Results showed that all nine isolates belonged to the genus Lactobacillus. They were able to tolerate pH 3 for 3 h, 0.3% bile salts for 4 h, and 1.9 mg/mL pancreatic enzymes for 3 h. They exhibited good ability to attach to intestinal epithelial cells and were not resistant to the tested antibiotics. They also showed good antimicrobial activities against the tested pathogenic strains of humans, and most of them exhibited stronger antimicrobial activity than the reference strain L. casei Shirota. Thus, the nine Lactobacillus strains could be considered as potential antimicrobial probiotic strains against human pathogens and should be further studied for their human health benefits.

  3. The apparent strain stability and repeatability of a BCL3 resistance strain gage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jih-Fen

    1991-02-01

    Experiments were conducted at NASA-Lewis to study the effect of microstructural instability on the apparent strain stability and reproducibility of a BCL3 resistance strain gage. The resistance drift of the gage at various temperatures in the phase transition temperature range (PTTR) was measured. The effects of the heating and cooling rates with which the gage passed through the PTTR on the apparent strain characteristics of the gage were also studied. BCL3 gage, like other Fe-Cr-Al based gages, exhibited apparent strain instability in the temperature range of 700 to 1100 F due to the reversible microstructural transition the gage materials experienced in this temperature range. The BCL3 gage had a maximum apparent strain drift in the neighborhood of 770 F with an average drift rate of approx. -440 microstrain/hr in 2 hrs. The use of the BCL3 gage as well as other Fe-Cl-Al based gages for static strain measurements within the PTTR should be avoided unless the time durations in the PTTR are small enough to introduce a neglible drift. The microstructure transition that the BCL3 gage underwent occurred in the temperature range of 750 to 1050 F during heating and around 1000 to 800 F during cooling. The heating rate, and, in particular, the cooling rate with which the gage passed through the PTTR affected the shape and the repeatability of the apparent strain curve of the gage.

  4. Perceptual strain index for heat strain assessment in an experimental study: an application to construction workers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Chan, Albert P C

    2015-02-01

    Although the physiological strain index (PhSI) is universal and comprehensive, its restrictions are recognized in terms of invasive on-site measurements and the requirement of accurate instruments. The perceptual strain index (PeSI) has been proposed as a user-friendly and practical indicator for heat strain. However, the application of this index in assessing the heat strain of construction workers has yet to be examined and documented. This study aims to ascertain the reliability and applicability of PeSI in an experimental setting that simulates a stressful working environment (i.e., environment, work uniform, and work pace) experienced by construction workers. Ten males and two females performed intermittent exercise on a treadmill while wearing a summer work uniform at 34.5 °C and 75% relative humidity in a climatic chamber. Physiological parameters (core temperature, heart rate) and perceptual variables (thermal sensation, perceived exertion) were collated synchronously at 3 min intervals. The results of two-way repeated measures analysis of variance (clothing×time) revealed that the PeSI was useful in differentiating the heat strain levels between different work uniforms. Not only did the PeSI change in the same general manner with the PhSI, but it was also powerful in reflecting different levels of physiological strain. Thus, the PeSI offers considerable promise for heat strain assessment under simulated working conditions. PMID:25660626

  5. Perceptual strain index for heat strain assessment in an experimental study: an application to construction workers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Chan, Albert P C

    2015-02-01

    Although the physiological strain index (PhSI) is universal and comprehensive, its restrictions are recognized in terms of invasive on-site measurements and the requirement of accurate instruments. The perceptual strain index (PeSI) has been proposed as a user-friendly and practical indicator for heat strain. However, the application of this index in assessing the heat strain of construction workers has yet to be examined and documented. This study aims to ascertain the reliability and applicability of PeSI in an experimental setting that simulates a stressful working environment (i.e., environment, work uniform, and work pace) experienced by construction workers. Ten males and two females performed intermittent exercise on a treadmill while wearing a summer work uniform at 34.5 °C and 75% relative humidity in a climatic chamber. Physiological parameters (core temperature, heart rate) and perceptual variables (thermal sensation, perceived exertion) were collated synchronously at 3 min intervals. The results of two-way repeated measures analysis of variance (clothing×time) revealed that the PeSI was useful in differentiating the heat strain levels between different work uniforms. Not only did the PeSI change in the same general manner with the PhSI, but it was also powerful in reflecting different levels of physiological strain. Thus, the PeSI offers considerable promise for heat strain assessment under simulated working conditions.

  6. Probiotic Potential of Lactobacillus Strains with Antimicrobial Activity against Some Human Pathogenic Strains

    PubMed Central

    Shokryazdan, Parisa; Sieo, Chin Chin; Kalavathy, Ramasamy; Liang, Juan Boo; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu; Faseleh Jahromi, Mohammad; Ho, Yin Wan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to isolate, identify, and characterize some lactic acid bacterial strains from human milk, infant feces, and fermented grapes and dates, as potential probiotics with antimicrobial activity against some human pathogenic strains. One hundred and forty bacterial strains were isolated and, after initial identification and a preliminary screening for acid and bile tolerance, nine of the best isolates were selected and further identified using 16 S rRNA gene sequences. The nine selected isolates were then characterized in vitro for their probiotic characteristics and their antimicrobial activities against some human pathogens. Results showed that all nine isolates belonged to the genus Lactobacillus. They were able to tolerate pH 3 for 3 h, 0.3% bile salts for 4 h, and 1.9 mg/mL pancreatic enzymes for 3 h. They exhibited good ability to attach to intestinal epithelial cells and were not resistant to the tested antibiotics. They also showed good antimicrobial activities against the tested pathogenic strains of humans, and most of them exhibited stronger antimicrobial activity than the reference strain L. casei Shirota. Thus, the nine Lactobacillus strains could be considered as potential antimicrobial probiotic strains against human pathogens and should be further studied for their human health benefits. PMID:25105147

  7. Simple Numerical Simulation of Strain Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, H.

    2002-01-01

    By adopting the basic principle of the reflection (and transmission) of a plane polarized electromagnetic wave incident normal to a stack of films of alternating refractive index, a simple numerical code was written to simulate the maximum reflectivity (transmittivity) of a fiber optic Bragg grating corresponding to various non-uniform strain conditions including photo-elastic effect in certain cases.

  8. Charge and Strain Control of Interface Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Dumesnil, K.; Jaouen, N.; Maroutian, T.; Agnus, G.; Tonnerre, J.-M.; Kirby, B.; Fohtung, E.; Holladay, B.; Fullerton, E. E.; Shpyrko, O.; Sinha, S. K.; Wang, Q.; Chen, A.; Jia, Q. X.

    2015-03-01

    We studied the influence of an electric field applied to an La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 (LSMO) layer in a LSMO/Pb(Zr0.2Ti0.8) O3 (PZT)/Nb-doped SrTiO3 (STO) heterostructure by measuring its magnetization depth profile using resonant x-ray magnetic reflectivity. The saturation magnetization of the ferromagnetically-ordered LSMO was not affected by the direction of the polarization of the PZT. However, the ferromagnetic thickness and magnetization of the LSMO film at remanence were reduced for hole-charge accumulation at the LSMO/PZT interface. To understand the independent roles of strain and hole-doping, we performed neutron scattering experiments of La0.8Sr0.2MnO3 films grown on Nb-doped STO in which bending strain (via 4-point bending jig) or electric field (via parallel plate capacitor) was applied to the films. We observed that bending strain affects the saturation magnetization of the LSMO film, whereas electric field affects the remanent magnetization of the film. These observations suggest strain may be a more effective means to control magnetism than charge. This work has benefited from use of CINT(LANL), NIST Center for Neutron Research and the Synchrotron SOLEIL and funding from LANL/LDRD program, DOE-BES (UCSD) and DOD (NMSU).

  9. High strain rate behaviour of polypropylene microfoams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-del Río, T.; Garrido, M. A.; Rodríguez, J.; Arencón, D.; Martínez, A. B.

    2012-08-01

    Microcellular materials such as polypropylene foams are often used in protective applications and passive safety for packaging (electronic components, aeronautical structures, food, etc.) or personal safety (helmets, knee-pads, etc.). In such applications the foams which are used are often designed to absorb the maximum energy and are generally subjected to severe loadings involving high strain rates. The manufacture process to obtain polymeric microcellular foams is based on the polymer saturation with a supercritical gas, at high temperature and pressure. This method presents several advantages over the conventional injection moulding techniques which make it industrially feasible. However, the effect of processing conditions such as blowing agent, concentration and microfoaming time and/or temperature on the microstructure of the resulting microcellular polymer (density, cell size and geometry) is not yet set up. The compressive mechanical behaviour of several microcellular polypropylene foams has been investigated over a wide range of strain rates (0.001 to 3000 s-1) in order to show the effects of the processing parameters and strain rate on the mechanical properties. High strain rate tests were performed using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus (SHPB). Polypropylene and polyethylene-ethylene block copolymer foams of various densities were considered.

  10. Asymmetric quadrilateral shell elements for finite strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Areias, P.; Dias-da-Costa, D.; Pires, E. B.; Van Goethem, N.

    2013-07-01

    Very good results in infinitesimal and finite strain analysis of shells are achieved by combining either the enhanced-metric technique or the selective-reduced integration for the in-plane shear energy and an assumed natural strain technique (ANS) in a non-symmetric Petrov-Galerkin arrangement which complies with the patch-test. A recovery of the original Wilson incompatible mode element is shown for the trial functions in the in-plane components. As a beneficial side-effect, Newton-Raphson convergence behavior for non-linear problems is improved with respect to symmetric formulations. Transverse-shear and in-plane patch tests are satisfied while distorted-mesh accuracy is higher than with symmetric formulations. Classical test functions with assumed-metric components are required for compatibility reasons. Verification tests are performed with advantageous comparisons being observed in all of them. Applications to large displacement elasticity and finite strain plasticity are shown with both low sensitivity to mesh distortion and (relatively) high accuracy. A equilibrium-consistent (and consistently linearized) updated-Lagrangian algorithm is proposed and tested. Concerning the time-step dependency, it was found that the consistent updated-Lagrangian algorithm is nearly time-step independent and can replace the multiplicative plasticity approach if only moderate elastic strains are present, as is the case of most metals.

  11. Comparison of Fiber Optic Strain Demodulation Implementations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quach, Cuong C.; Vazquez, Sixto L.

    2005-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is developing instrumentation based upon principles of Optical Frequency-Domain Reflectometry (OFDR) for the provision of large-scale, dense distribution of strain sensors using fiber optics embedded with Bragg gratings. Fiber Optic Bragg Grating technology enables the distribution of thousands of sensors immune to moisture and electromagnetic interference with negligible weight penalty. At Langley, this technology provides a key component for research and development relevant to comprehensive aerospace vehicle structural health monitoring. A prototype system is under development that includes hardware and software necessary for the acquisition of data from an optical network and conversion of the data into strain measurements. This report documents the steps taken to verify the software that implements the algorithm for calculating the fiber strain. Brief descriptions of the strain measurement system and the test article are given. The scope of this report is the verification of software implementations as compared to a reference model. The algorithm will be detailed along with comparison results.

  12. Division Heads and Role Strain Perception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, William M.

    1984-01-01

    Reports on a study of the extent to which ambiguous and conflicting circumstances contribute to role strain perceptions among community college division heads. Clarifies how working conditions and personal attributes affect job expectations. Finds experience, age, outlook, and job satisfaction to be strong influential factors. (DMM)

  13. High temperature static strain sensor development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulse, C.; Lemkey, F.; Bailey, R.; Grant, H.

    1982-01-01

    The development of resistance strain gages which are useful for static strain measurements on nickel or cobalt superalloy parts inside a gas turbine engine on a test stand were examined. These measurements of a strain gage alloy development program which to be followed by an optional investigation of complete strain gage systems which will use the best of the alloys developed together with other system improvements is reviewed. The specific goal for the complete system is to make measurements to 2,000 micro epsilon with error of only + or - 10% over a 50 hour period. In addition to simple survival and stability, attaining a low thermal coefficient to resistivity, of order 100 ppm/K or less, is also a major goal. The first task was to select candidate alloys or alloy systems using a search of the literature and the available metallurgical theory. Alloy candidates were evaluated and compared by a grading system. Equipment and techniques were developed which are suitable for iterative studies of a variety of compositions. Many compositions were examined and significantly improved alloys were identified.

  14. Prediction of swelling rocks strain in tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsapour, D.; Fahimifar, A.

    2016-05-01

    Swelling deformations leading to convergence of tunnels may result in significant difficulties during the construction, in particular for long term use of tunnels. By extracting an experimental based explicit analytical solution for formulating swelling strains as a function of time and stress, swelling strains are predicted from the beginning of excavation and during the service life of tunnel. Results obtained from the analytical model show a proper agreement with experimental results. This closed-form solution has been implemented within a numerical program using the finite element method for predicting time-dependent swelling strain around tunnels. Evaluating effects of swelling parameters on time-dependent strains and tunnel shape on swelling behavior around the tunnel according to this analytical solution is considered. The ground-support interaction and consequent swelling effect on the induced forces in tunnel lining is considered too. Effect of delay in lining installation on swelling pressure which acting on the lining and its structural integrity, is also evaluated. A MATLAB code of " SRAP" is prepared and applied to calculate all swelling analysis around tunnels based on analytical solution.

  15. Superconducting wire with improved strain characteristics

    DOEpatents

    Luhman, Thomas; Klamut, Carl J.; Suenaga, Masaki; Welch, David

    1982-01-01

    A superconducting wire comprising a superconducting filament and a beryllium strengthened bronze matrix in which the addition of beryllium to the matrix permits a low volume matrix to exhibit reduced elastic deformation after heat treating which increases the compression of the superconducting filament on cooling and thereby improves the strain characteristics of the wire.

  16. Superconducting wire with improved strain characteristics

    DOEpatents

    Luhman, Thomas; Klamut, Carl J.; Suenaga, Masaki; Welch, David

    1982-01-01

    A superconducting wire comprising a superconducting filament and a beryllium strengthened bronze matrix in which the addition of beryllium to the matrix permits a low volume matrix to exhibit reduced elastic deformation after heat treating which increases the compression of the superconducting filament on cooling and thereby improve the strain characteristics of the wire.

  17. Superconducting wire with improved strain characteristics

    DOEpatents

    Luhman, T.; Klamut, C.J.; Suenaga, M.; Welch, D.

    1979-12-19

    A superconducting wire comprising a superconducting filament and a beryllium strengthened bronze matrix in which the addition of beryllium to the matrix permits a low volume matrix to exhibit reduced elastic deformation after heat treating which increases the compression of the superconducting filament on cooling and thereby improve the strain characteristics of the wire.

  18. Strain rate behavior of magnetorheological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seminuk, Kenneth; Joshi, Vasant; Gump, Jared; Stoltz, Chad; Forbes, Jerry

    2014-05-01

    Strain rate response of two Hydroxyl-terminated Polybutadiene/ Iron (HTPB/Fe) compositions under electromagnetic fields has been investigated using a Split Hopkinson Pressure bar arrangement equipped with aluminum bars. Two HTPB/Fe compositions were developed, the first without plasticizer and the second containing plasticizer. Samples were tested with and without the application of a 0.01 Tesla magnetic field. Strain gauge data taken from the Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar has been used to determine the extent of change in mechanical properties by inducing a mild electromagnetic field onto each sample. Raw data from strain gages was processed using commercial software (Signo) and Excel spreadsheet. It is of particular interest to determine whether the mechanical properties of binder systems can be manipulated by adding ferrous or Magnetostrictive particulates. Data collected from the Split Hopkinson Pressure bar indicate changes in the Mechanical Stress-Strain curves and suggest that the impedance of a binder system can be altered by means of a magnetic field.

  19. Role Strain in University Research Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boardman, Craig; Bozeman, Barry

    2007-01-01

    One way in which university faculty members' professional lives have become more complex with the advent of contemporary university research centers is that many faculty have taken on additional roles. The authors' concern in this article is to determine the extent to which role strain is experienced by university faculty members who are…

  20. Lysogenic Strains of Group N Lactic Streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Lowrie, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    A temperate bacteriophage, designated r1t, was inducible from the group N lactic streptococcus, Streptococcus cremoris R1, by ultraviolet irradiation or mitomycin C treatment. Induced lysates produced plaques on lawns of three closely related S. cremoris strains, AM1, SK11, and US3. Strain SK11 was readily lysogenized. S. cremoris AM1 was the most reliable indicator strain, although the age of the culture used for seeding plates was critical. Zones of lysis but no plaque formation were observed on lawns of nine additional S. cremoris strains. Phage r1t could not be detected in filtrates of stationary-phase R1 cultures and was near the limits of detection in logarithmically growing cultures. Phage levels were still very low (1 plaque-forming unit on AM1 per 10 induced cells) in induced lysates of R1 cultures. These low levels of detectable phage may be attributable to an inadequate indicator, lysogenization of the indicator, adsorption of induced phage to cellular debris, concurrent induction of other undetectable phages, or the production of high proportions of defective phages. Electron micrographs of induced R1 lysates revealed a high incidence of incomplete phage particles, fragments, and ghosts. Images PMID:4203783

  1. Superficial stress and strain at coherent interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.C.

    2000-01-24

    The thermodynamics of a coherent interface separating two non-hydrostatically stressed crystals is examined using the Gibbsian paradigm of a dividing surface and associated superficial quantities. Cahn-Hilliard diffuse interface theory is used to derive equations governing the equilibrium composition, stress, and strain profiles through a planar surface of discontinuity. Expressions are then obtained for the superficial stress and strain (excess volume) assuming the isotropic elastic constants are independent of composition and the lattice parameter is a quadratic function of the composition. Materials parameters are identified for which the superficial stress becomes independent of the position of the dividing surface, and the dependence of the superficial stress on the application of a stress normal to the interface, as well as the strain components in the plane of the interface, is calculated for various compositional strains. The superficial stress is estimated to be of the order 1--10{sup 3} dynes/cm and can be either positive or negative in sign.

  2. "The Andromeda Strain" as Science and Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaczmarek, Nancy

    Well-written, with a flair for character development, and focusing on controversial issues, Michael Crichton's novel "The Andromeda Strain" can precipitate lively discussions in science, English, and social studies classes and can help students to integrate all three areas. English and science teachers can collaborate in a variety of ways in…

  3. Strain-Energy-Release Rates In Delamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.

    1988-01-01

    Q3DG computer program developed to perform quasi-three-dimensional stress analysis of composite laminates containing delaminations. Calculates strain-energy-release rates for long, rectangular composite laminates containing delaminations and subjected to any combination of mechanical, thermal, and hygroscopic loading. Written in FORTRAN V.

  4. [Progress on engineered strains for ethanol production].

    PubMed

    Wang, Fan-qiang; Xu, Ping

    2006-08-01

    With the 21 century's coming, the era of cheap oil is coming to the end. There has been an increasing worldwide interest in fuel ethanol. In the last two decades, lots of work has been done to develop strains for ethanol producing. Research progress on metabolic engineering of strains for fuel ethanol production is summarized, including genetically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae to utilize starch, pentose and cellulose, Zymomonas mobilis to ferment arabinose and xylose, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella oxytoca to introduce heterogenous ethanol production pathway. The aim of engineering these strains is to obtain an ideal microorganism which can converse the available carbon sources to ethanol rapidly and efficiently with high tolerance to ethanol and to inhibitory components in the cheap materials such as lignocellulose hydrolysate. The importance of fuel ethanol will be a stimulus to develop engineered hardy strains to utilize cheap materials for high ethanol concentration production. Since both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zymomonas mobilis are generally regarded as safe (GRAS), genetically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae which can utilize raw starch directly and recombinant Zymomonas mobilis which can ferment glucose, arabinose and xylose in the lignocellulose hydrolysate have potential application to industry in the near future.

  5. Neutron apparatus for measuring strain in composites

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.; Majumdar, Saurindranath; Faber, Jr., John F.; Singh, J. P.

    1990-01-01

    A method and apparatus for orienting a pulsed neutron source and a multi-angle diffractometer toward a sample of a ceramic-matrix or metal-matrix composite so that the measurement of internal strain (from which stress is calculated) is reduced to uncomplicated time-of-flight measurements.

  6. Thermal strain analysis of optic fiber sensors.

    PubMed

    Her, Shiuh-Chuan; Huang, Chih-Ying

    2013-01-31

    An optical fiber sensor surface bonded onto a host structure and subjected to a temperature change is analytically studied in this work. The analysis is developed in order to assess the thermal behavior of an optical fiber sensor designed for measuring the strain in the host structure. For a surface bonded optical fiber sensor, the measuring sensitivity is strongly dependent on the bonding characteristics which include the protective coating, adhesive layer and the bonding length. Thermal stresses can be generated due to a mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients between the optical fiber and host structure. The optical fiber thermal strain induced by the host structure is transferred via the adhesive layer and protective coating. In this investigation, an analytical expression of the thermal strain and stress in the optical fiber is presented. The theoretical predictions are validated using the finite element method. Numerical results show that the thermal strain and stress are linearly dependent on the difference in thermal expansion coefficients between the optical fiber and host structure and independent of the thermal expansion coefficients of the adhesive and coating.

  7. High strain-rate magnetoelasticity in Galfenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domann, J. P.; Loeffler, C. M.; Martin, B. E.; Carman, G. P.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the experimental measurements of a highly magnetoelastic material (Galfenol) under impact loading. A Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar was used to generate compressive stress up to 275 MPa at strain rates of either 20/s or 33/s while measuring the stress-strain response and change in magnetic flux density due to magnetoelastic coupling. The average Young's modulus (44.85 GPa) was invariant to strain rate, with instantaneous stiffness ranging from 25 to 55 GPa. A lumped parameters model simulated the measured pickup coil voltages in response to an applied stress pulse. Fitting the model to the experimental data provided the average piezomagnetic coefficient and relative permeability as functions of field strength. The model suggests magnetoelastic coupling is primarily insensitive to strain rates as high as 33/s. Additionally, the lumped parameters model was used to investigate magnetoelastic transducers as potential pulsed power sources. Results show that Galfenol can generate large quantities of instantaneous power (80 MW/m3 ), comparable to explosively driven ferromagnetic pulse generators (500 MW/m3 ). However, this process is much more efficient and can be cyclically carried out in the linear elastic range of the material, in stark contrast with explosively driven pulsed power generators.

  8. Aligned carbon nanotube sheet piezoresistive strain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ang; Bogdanovich, Alexander E.; Bradford, Philip D.

    2015-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have a unique set of properties that may be useful in the production of next generation structural health monitoring composites. This research introduces a novel CNT based material system for strain and damage sensing applications. An aligned sheet of interconnected CNTs was drawn from a chemical vapor deposition grown CNT array and then bonded to the surface of glass fiber/epoxy composite coupons. Various types of mechanical tests were conducted, accompanied by real-time electrical data acquisition, in order to evaluate the electro-mechanical behavior of the developed sensing material. Specimens were loaded in the longitudinal and transverse CNT sheet orientations to investigate the anisotropy of the piezoresistive effect. The CNT sheets exhibited good sensing stability, linearity, sensitivity and repeatability within a practical strain range; which are crucial sensor features for health monitoring. It was also demonstrated that the CNT orientation in the sheet had a dramatic effect on the sensitivity, thus validating the usefulness of this sensing material for directional strain/damage monitoring. Finally, pre-straining of the CNT sheet sensors was conducted to further enhance the linearity of electro-mechanical response and long-term stability of the sensors during cyclic loading.

  9. Photonic skin for pressure and strain sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xianfeng; Zhang, C.; van Hoe, B.; Webb, D. J.; Kalli, K.; van Steenberge, G.; Peng, G.-D.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we report on the strain and pressure testing of highly flexible skins embedded with Bragg grating sensors recorded in either silica or polymer optical fibre. The photonic skins, with a size of 10cm x 10cm and thickness of 1mm, were fabricated by embedding the polymer fibre or silica fibre containing Bragg gratings in Sylgard 184 from Dow Corning. Pressure sensing was studied using a cylindrical metal post placed on an array of points across the skin. The polymer fibre grating exhibits approximately 10 times the pressure sensitivity of the silica fibre and responds to the post even when it is placed a few centimetres away from the sensing fibre. Although the intrinsic strain sensitivities of gratings in the two fibre types are very similar, when embedded in the skin the polymer grating displayed a strain sensitivity approximately 45 times greater than the silica device, which also suffered from considerable hysteresis. The polymer grating displayed a near linear response over wavelength shifts of 9nm for 1% strain. The difference in behaviour we attribute to the much greater Young's modulus of the silica fibre (70 GPa) compared to the polymer fibre (3 GPa).

  10. Network of flexible capacitive strain gauges for the reconstruction of surface strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jingzhe; Song, Chunhui; Saleem, Hussam S.; Downey, Austin; Laflamme, Simon

    2015-05-01

    Monitoring of surface strain on mesosurfaces is a difficult task, often impeded by the lack of scalability of conventional sensing systems. A solution is to deploy large networks of flexible strain gauges, a type of large area electronics. The authors have recently proposed a soft elastomeric capacitor (SEC) as an economical skin-type solution for large-scale deployment onto mesosurfaces. The sensing principle is based on a measurable change in the sensor’s capacitance upon strain. In this paper, we study the performance of the sensor at reconstructing surface strain map and deflection shapes. A particular feature of the sensor is that it measures surface strain additively, because it is not utilized within a Wheatstone bridge configuration. An algorithm is proposed to decompose the additive in-plane strain measurements from the SEC into principal components. The algorithm consists of assuming a polynomial shape function, and deriving the strain based on Kirchhoff plate theory. A least-squares estimator (LSE) is used to minimize the error between the assumed model and the SEC signals after the enforcement of boundary conditions. Numerical simulations are conducted on a symmetric rectangular cantilever thin plate under symmetric and asymmetric static loads to demonstrate the accuracy and real-time applicability of the algorithm. The performance of the algorithm is further examined on an asymmetric cantilever laminated thin plate constituted with orthotropic materials mimicking a wind turbine blade, and subjected to a non-stationary wind load. Results from simulations show good performance of the algorithm at reconstructing the surface strain maps for both in-plane principal strain components, and that it can be applied in real time. However, its performance can be improved by strengthening assumptions on boundary conditions. The algorithm exhibits robustness in performance with respect to load and noise in signals, except when most of the sensors’ signals are

  11. Strain Hardening and Strain Softening of Reversibly Cross-linked Supramolecular Polymer Networks.

    PubMed

    Xu, Donghua; Craig, Stephen L

    2011-09-27

    The large amplitude oscillatory shear behavior of metallo-supramolecular polymer networks formed by adding bis-Pd(II) cross-linkers to poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PVP) in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solution is reported. The influence of scanning frequency, dissociation rate of cross-linkers, concentration of cross-linkers, and concentration of PVP solution on the large amplitude oscillatory shear behavior is explored. In semidilute unentangled PVP solutions, above a critical scanning frequency, strain hardening of both storage moduli and loss moduli is observed. In the semidilute entangled regime of PVP solution, however, strain softening is observed for samples with faster cross-linkers (k(d) ∼ 1450 s(-1)), whereas strain hardening is observed for samples with slower cross-linkers (k(d) ∼ 17 s(-1)). The mechanism of strain hardening is attributed primarily to a strain-induced increase in the number of elastically active chains, with possible contributions from non-Gaussian stretching of polymer chains at strains approaching network fracture. The divergent strain softening of samples with faster cross-linkers in semidilute entangled PVP solutions, relative to the strain hardening of samples with slower cross-linkers, is consistent with observed shear thinning/shear thickening behavior reported previously and is attributed to the fact that the average time that a cross-linker remains detached is too short to permit the local relaxation of polymer chain segments that is necessary for a net conversion of elastically inactive to elastically active cross-linkers. These and other observations paint a picture in which strain softening and shear thinning arise from the same set of molecular mechanisms, conceptually uniting the two nonlinear responses for this system.

  12. Strain Hardening and Strain Softening of Reversibly Cross-linked Supramolecular Polymer Networks

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Donghua; Craig, Stephen L.

    2011-01-01

    The large amplitude oscillatory shear behavior of metallo-supramolecular polymer networks formed by adding bis-Pd(II) cross-linkers to poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PVP) in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solution is reported. The influence of scanning frequency, dissociation rate of cross-linkers, concentration of cross-linkers, and concentration of PVP solution on the large amplitude oscillatory shear behavior is explored. In semidilute unentangled PVP solutions, above a critical scanning frequency, strain hardening of both storage moduli and loss moduli is observed. In the semidilute entangled regime of PVP solution, however, strain softening is observed for samples with faster cross-linkers (kd ∼ 1450 s−1), whereas strain hardening is observed for samples with slower cross-linkers (kd ∼ 17 s−1). The mechanism of strain hardening is attributed primarily to a strain-induced increase in the number of elastically active chains, with possible contributions from non-Gaussian stretching of polymer chains at strains approaching network fracture. The divergent strain softening of samples with faster cross-linkers in semidilute entangled PVP solutions, relative to the strain hardening of samples with slower cross-linkers, is consistent with observed shear thinning/shear thickening behavior reported previously and is attributed to the fact that the average time that a cross-linker remains detached is too short to permit the local relaxation of polymer chain segments that is necessary for a net conversion of elastically inactive to elastically active cross-linkers. These and other observations paint a picture in which strain softening and shear thinning arise from the same set of molecular mechanisms, conceptually uniting the two nonlinear responses for this system. PMID:22043083

  13. Unsteady Aerodynamic Force Sensing from Measured Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi

    2016-01-01

    A simple approach for computing unsteady aerodynamic forces from simulated measured strain data is proposed in this study. First, the deflection and slope of the structure are computed from the unsteady strain using the two-step approach. Velocities and accelerations of the structure are computed using the autoregressive moving average model, on-line parameter estimator, low-pass filter, and a least-squares curve fitting method together with analytical derivatives with respect to time. Finally, aerodynamic forces over the wing are computed using modal aerodynamic influence coefficient matrices, a rational function approximation, and a time-marching algorithm. A cantilevered rectangular wing built and tested at the NASA Langley Research Center (Hampton, Virginia, USA) in 1959 is used to validate the simple approach. Unsteady aerodynamic forces as well as wing deflections, velocities, accelerations, and strains are computed using the CFL3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code and an MSC/NASTRAN code (MSC Software Corporation, Newport Beach, California, USA), and these CFL3D-based results are assumed as measured quantities. Based on the measured strains, wing deflections, velocities, accelerations, and aerodynamic forces are computed using the proposed approach. These computed deflections, velocities, accelerations, and unsteady aerodynamic forces are compared with the CFL3D/NASTRAN-based results. In general, computed aerodynamic forces based on the lifting surface theory in subsonic speeds are in good agreement with the target aerodynamic forces generated using CFL3D code with the Euler equation. Excellent aeroelastic responses are obtained even with unsteady strain data under the signal to noise ratio of -9.8dB. The deflections, velocities, and accelerations at each sensor location are independent of structural and aerodynamic models. Therefore, the distributed strain data together with the current proposed approaches can be used as distributed deflection

  14. Strain differences in guinea pigs' bronchial sensitivity to acetylcholine.

    PubMed

    Mikami, H; Nishibata, R; Kawamoto, Y; Ino, T

    1990-01-01

    The bronchial sensitivity to acetylcholine (ACh) of guinea pigs of various strains was investigated to clarify strain differences. Inbred Strain 2, Strain 13 and JY-1 and non-inbred Hartley strain (two colonies) were used in this experiment. (1) Guinea pigs were exposed to 0.08% ACh aerosol and the time needed to produce falling down (TNPFD) was determined. Mean +/- standard error of TNPFD (n = 14 per group) of animals was 182 +/- 28 sec, 148 +/- 22 sec, 210 +/- 30 sec, 342 +/- 24 sec and 406 +/- 36 sec in Strain 2, Strain 13, JY-1, Hartley (Japan SLC) and Hartley (Hitachi), respectively. There was a significant difference in TNPFD between inbred strains and non-inbred strains (P less than 0.05 or P less than 0.01), indicating that inbred strains had higher sensitivity. (2) Guinea pigs were exposed to 20-5000 micrograms/ml ACh for 2 min. The mean dose threshold as determined by transcutaneous oxygen pressure was 524 micrograms/ml, 424 micrograms/ml, 614 micrograms/ml, 1317 micrograms/ml and 1651 micrograms/ml (n = 14 per group) in Strain 2, Strain 13, JY-1, Hartley (Japan SLC) and Hartley (Hitachi), respectively. Inbred strains showed lower dose thresholds than non-inbred strains. (3) Isolated trachea-lungs of 5 guinea pigs were perfused with 10(-9)-10(-5) g/ml ACh to determine strain differences. Dose response curves of animals of inbred strains shifted to the left (lower concentrations), unlike those of non-inbred strains, suggesting that inbred strains had higher sensitivity to ACh than non-inbred strains.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. On strain and stress in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Brian N.; Smith, David W.

    2014-11-01

    Recent theoretical simulations of amelogenesis and network formation and new, simple analyses of the basic multicellular unit (BMU) allow estimation of the order of magnitude of the strain energy density in populations of living cells in their natural environment. A similar simple calculation translates recent measurements of the force-displacement relation for contacting cells (cell-cell adhesion energy) into equivalent volume energy densities, which are formed by averaging the changes in contact energy caused by a cell's migration over the cell's volume. The rates of change of these mechanical energy densities (energy density rates) are then compared to the order of magnitude of the metabolic activity of a cell, expressed as a rate of production of metabolic energy per unit volume. The mechanical energy density rates are 4-5 orders of magnitude smaller than the metabolic energy density rate in amelogenesis or bone remodeling in the BMU, which involve modest cell migration velocities, and 2-3 orders of magnitude smaller for innervation of the gut or angiogenesis, where migration rates are among the highest for all cell types. For representative cell-cell adhesion gradients, the mechanical energy density rate is 6 orders of magnitude smaller than the metabolic energy density rate. The results call into question the validity of using simple constitutive laws to represent living cells. They also imply that cells need not migrate as inanimate objects of gradients in an energy field, but are better regarded as self-powered automata that may elect to be guided by such gradients or move otherwise. Thus Ġel=d/dt 1/2 >[(C11+C12)ɛ02+2μγ02]=(C11+C12)ɛ0ɛ˙0+2μγ0γ˙0 or Ġel=ηEɛ0ɛ˙0+η‧Eγ0γ˙0 with 1.4≤η≤3.4 and 0.7≤η‧≤0.8 for Poisson's ratio in the range 0.2≤ν≤0.4 and η=1.95 and η‧=0.75 for ν=0.3. The spatial distribution of shear strains arising within an individual cell as cells slide past one another during amelogenesis is not known

  16. Searching for Strain Transients in PBO data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, M.; McGuire, J. J.; Richardson, E.; Kraft, R. L.; Hardwig, M. D.

    2011-12-01

    We applied a recently developed strain anomaly detector, the Network Stain Filter [Ohtani et al., 2010], to the continuous GPS datasets from the PBO in Alaska and Salton Trough. The strategy of the filter is to find spatially and temporally coherent signals by processing data from the entire network simultaneously. Compared to previous Network Inversion Filter [Segall and Matthews, 1997], the new detector does not require the knowledge of potential sources, which can be either unknown and/or very numerous in a large tectonically active area. At Alaska, we find a strain anomaly between Kodiak Island and Kenai Peninsula that began in early 2010. There are earthquakes that are likely related to the strain anomaly. The physical interpretation of the strain anomaly is still in progress. The secular motion since 2006 that PBO recorded is consistent with a model that consist of two locked patches on Kodiak Island and Kenai Peninsula and a creeping patch near Cook Inlet as determined earlier by Zweck et al. [2002]. Seasonal signals dominate in the data and are highly correlated between stations in the horizontal components. The reason for this correlation in seasonal term azimuths between stations is not clear. At Salton Trough, the post-seismic deformation of the 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor Earthquake dominates the transient signals. The maximum post-seismic slip recorded by the GPS is 23 mm during 1.5 years after the earthquake (Site ID P494). Additionally, we are exploring using InSAR data as a complimentary method for detecting strain anomaly in areas with shallow sources, such as in the Salton Trough. A creep event on the Superstition Hills Fault in October 2006 has been observed by InSAR but missed by nearby GPS stations due to low amplitude at the location [Wei et al., 2009].

  17. Stress and strain in staphylococcal nuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Hodel, A.; Kautz, R. A.; Jacobs, M. D.; Fox, R. O.

    1993-01-01

    Protein molecules generally adopt a tertiary structure in which all backbone and side chain conformations are arranged in local energy minima; however, in several well-refined protein structures examples of locally strained geometries, such as cis peptide bonds, have been observed. Staphylococcal nuclease A contains a single cis peptide bond between residues Lys 116 and Pro 117 within a type VIa beta-turn. Alternative native folded forms of nuclease A have been detected by NMR spectroscopy and attributed to a mixture of cis and trans isomers at the Lys 116-Pro 117 peptide bond. Analyses of nuclease variants K116G and K116A by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography are reported herein. The structure of K116A is indistinguishable from that of nuclease A, including a cis 116-117 peptide bond (92% populated in solution). The overall fold of K116G is also indistinguishable from nuclease A except in the region of the substitution (residues 112-117), which contains a predominantly trans Gly 116-Pro 117 peptide bond (80% populated in solution). Both Lys and Ala would be prohibited from adopting the backbone conformation of Gly 116 due to steric clashes between the beta-carbon and the surrounding residues. One explanation for these results is that the position of the ends of the residue 112-117 loop only allow trans conformations where the local backbone interactions associated with the phi and psi torsion angles are strained. When the 116-117 peptide bond is cis, less strained backbone conformations are available. Thus the relaxation of the backbone strain intrinsic to the trans conformation compensates for the energetically unfavorable cis X-Pro peptide bond. With the removal of the side chain from residue 116 (K116G), the backbone strain of the trans conformation is reduced to the point that the conformation associated with the cis peptide bond is no longer favorable. PMID:8495201

  18. Biomechanical response to hamstring muscle strain injury.

    PubMed

    Schache, Anthony G; Wrigley, Tim V; Baker, Richard; Pandy, Marcus G

    2009-02-01

    Hamstring strains are common injuries, the majority of which occur whilst sprinting. An understanding of the biomechanical circumstances that cause the hamstrings to fail during sprinting is required to improve rehabilitation specificity. The aim of this study was to therefore investigate the biomechanics of an acute hamstring strain. Bilateral kinematic and ground reaction force data were captured from a sprinting athlete prior to and immediately following a right hamstring strain. Ten sprinting trials were collected: nine normal (pre-injury) trials and one injury trial. Joint angles, torques and powers as well as hamstring muscle-tendon unit lengths were computed using a three-dimensional biomechanical model. For the pre-injury trials, the right leg compared to the left displayed greater knee extension and hamstring muscle-tendon unit length during terminal swing, an increased vertical ground reaction force peak and loading rate, and an increased peak hip extensor torque and peak hip power generation during initial stance. For the injury trial, significant biomechanical reactions were evident in response to the right hamstring strain, most notably for the right leg during the proceeding swing phase after the onset of the injury. The earliest kinematic deviations in response to the injury were displayed by the trunk and pelvis during right mid-stance. Taking into account neuromuscular latencies and electromechanical delays, the stimulus for the injury must have occurred prior to right foot-strike during the swing phase of the sprinting cycle. It is concluded that hamstring strains during sprinting most likely occur during terminal swing as a consequence of an eccentric contraction.

  19. [Behavior of Argentine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus strains in rodents].

    PubMed

    Saavedra, María del Cármen; Ambrosio, Ana M; Riera, Laura; Sabattini, Marta S

    2007-01-01

    The activity of LCM virus was first reported in Argentina at the beginning of the seventies and only five strains have been isolated from rodents Mus domesticus and two from humans. The objective of this paper was to find differential biological characteristics of Argentine strains of LCM virus comparing them in relation to the historical strains WE and Armstrong. Regarding the results obtained in tissue culture, when L 929 cells were used, plaque forming units (PFU) were obtained with human and mouse strains, whilst on Vero cells only human strains developed PFU. Differentials characteristics of historical and Argentine strain's plates were not found, neither differences related to the strain's origin. Neither historical nor Argentine strains were lethal to new-born mice giving a persistent infection, that was demonstrated when we inoculated new-born mouse by intracranial route with different strains of LCM virus and virus was isolated from brains harvested at different days post inoculation. The only exception was Cba An 13065 strain that exhibited virulence in new-born mice, only with 0.026 PFU was obtained 1 DL50. All the strains resulted lethal to adult mice. The mouse strains were more virulent than human strains, being Cba An 13065 the most virulent. These results demonstrate a different behavior in tissue culture between human and mouse strains and allow the identification of virulence markers by intracranial inoculation into new-born or adult mice.

  20. Development of quantitative PCR and metagenomics-based approaches for strain quantification of a defined mixed-strain starter culture.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Pernille; Vindeløv, Jannik; Arneborg, Nils; Brockmann, Elke

    2014-05-01

    Although the strain composition of mixed cultures may hugely affect production of various fermented foods, such as e.g. cheese, tools for investigating it have so far been limited. In this study, two new approaches for quantification of seven Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strains (S1-S7) in a defined mixed-strain starter culture were developed and verified. By mapping NGS reads from 47 sequenced L. lactis strains to de novo assembly contigs of the seven strains, two strain-specific sequence regions (SEQ1 and SEQ2) were identified for each strain for qPCR primer design (A1 and A2). The qPCR assays amplified their strain-specific sequence region target efficiently. Additionally, high reproducibility was obtained in a validation sample containing equal amounts of the seven strains, and assay-to-assay coefficients of variance (CVs) for six (i.e. S1, S2, S4-S7) of the seven strains correlated to the inter-plate CVs. Hence, at least for six strains, the qPCR assay design approach was successful. The metagenomics-based approach quantified the seven strains based on average coverage of SEQ1 and SEQ2 by mapping sequencing reads from the validation sample to the strain-specific sequence regions. Average coverages of the SEQ1 and SEQ2 in the metagenomics data showed CVs of ≤17.3% for six strains (i.e. S1-S4, S6, S7). Thus, the metagenomics-based quantification approach was considered successful for six strains, regardless of the strain-specific sequence region used. When comparing qPCR- and metagenomics-based quantifications of the validation sample, the identified strain-specific sequence regions were considered suitable and applicable for quantification at a strain level of defined mixed-strain starter cultures.

  1. Gendered Responses to Serious Strain: The Argument for a General Strain Theory of Deviance

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Joanne M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper expands and builds on newer avenues in research on gender and general strain theory (GST). I accomplish this by focusing on serious strains that are relevant for males and females, including externalizing and internalizing forms of negative emotions, and including multiple gendered deviant outcomes. Using the Add Health dataset, I find strong support for the impact of serious strains on both types of negative emotions and different forms of deviance for males and females. However, the experience of serious strain, emotionally and behaviorally, is gendered. Depressive symptoms are particularly important for all types of deviance by females. Including multiple types of deviant outcomes offers a fuller understanding of both similarities and differences by gender. These results support the utility of GST as a theory of deviance in general and support greater connections between GST, feminist theorizing, and the sociology of mental health. PMID:20625472

  2. Brucella abortus Strain 2308 Wisconsin Genome: Importance of the Definition of Reference Strains

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Esquivel, Marcela; Ruiz-Villalobos, Nazareth; Castillo-Zeledón, Amanda; Jiménez-Rojas, César; Roop II, R. Martin; Comerci, Diego J.; Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Chacón-Díaz, Carlos; Caswell, Clayton C.; Baker, Kate S.; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Moreno, Edgardo; Letesson, Jean J.; De Bolle, Xavier; Guzmán-Verri, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a bacterial infectious disease affecting a wide range of mammals and a neglected zoonosis caused by species of the genetically homogenous genus Brucella. As in most studies on bacterial diseases, research in brucellosis is carried out by using reference strains as canonical models to understand the mechanisms underlying host pathogen interactions. We performed whole genome sequencing analysis of the reference strain B. abortus 2308 routinely used in our laboratory, including manual curated annotation accessible as an editable version through a link at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brucella#Genomics. Comparison of this genome with two publically available 2308 genomes showed significant differences, particularly indels related to insertional elements, suggesting variability related to the transposition of these elements within the same strain. Considering the outcome of high resolution genomic techniques in the bacteriology field, the conventional concept of strain definition needs to be revised. PMID:27746773

  3. The genome of Shigella dysenteriae strain Sd1617 comparison to representative strains in evaluating pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vongsawan, Ajchara A.; Kapatral, Vinayak; Vaisvil, Benjamin; Burd, Henry; Serichantalergs, Oralak; Venkatesan, Malabi M.; Mason, Carl J.

    2015-01-01

    We sequenced and analyzed Shigella dysenteriae strain Sd1617 serotype 1 that is widely used as model strain for vaccine design, trials and research. A combination of next-generation sequencing platforms and assembly yielded two contigs representing a chromosome size of 4.34 Mb and the large virulence plasmid of 177 kb. This genome sequence is compared with other Shigella genomes in order to understand gene complexity and pathogenic factors. PMID:25743074

  4. Susceptibility to antibiotics and biochemical properties of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strains.

    PubMed

    Dzierzewicz, Z; Cwalina, B; Jaworska-Kik, M; Weglarz, L; Wilczok, T

    2001-01-01

    Susceptibility to several antibiotics and biochemical properties of intestinal and soil strains of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans bacteria were investigated using the tests: ATB ANA, Sceptor Anaerobic MIC/ID and API ZYM. It was demonstrated that the D. desulfuricans strains were resistant to penicillin, cefoxitin, clindamycin, metronidazole, erythromycin, rifampicin and teicoplanin. The strains initially susceptible to imipenem became resistant to this drug following 72 h incubation with it. Of 25 analyzed antibiotics there was none that after 72 h action on the bacteria was effective in relation to all of the investigated strains. The differences in susceptibility of D. desulfuricans strains to antibiotics were not associated with the strains' biochemical properties. PMID:12197616

  5. Bioconjugation with strained alkenes and alkynes.

    PubMed

    Debets, Marjoke F; van Berkel, Sander S; Dommerholt, Jan; Dirks, A Ton J; Rutjes, Floris P J T; van Delft, Floris L

    2011-09-20

    The structural complexity of molecules isolated from biological sources has always served as an inspiration for organic chemists. Since the first synthesis of a natural product, urea, chemists have been challenged to prepare exact copies of natural structures in the laboratory. As a result, a broad repertoire of synthetic transformations has been developed over the years. It is now feasible to synthesize organic molecules of enormous complexity, and also molecules with less structural complexity but prodigious societal impact, such as nylon, TNT, polystyrene, statins, estradiol, XTC, and many more. Unfortunately, only a few chemical transformations are so mild and precise that they can be used to selectively modify biochemical structures, such as proteins or nucleic acids; these are the so-called bioconjugation strategies. Even more challenging is to apply a chemical reaction on or in living cells or whole organisms; these are the so-called bioorthogonal reactions. These fields of research are of particular importance because they not only pose a worthy challenge for chemists but also offer unprecedented possibilities for studying biological systems, especially in areas in which traditional biochemistry and molecular biology tools fall short. Recent years have seen tremendous growth in the chemical biology toolbox. In particular, a rapidly increasing number of bioorthogonal reactions has been developed based on chemistry involving strained alkenes or strained alkynes. Such strained unsaturated systems have the unique ability to undergo (3 + 2) and (4 + 2) cycloadditions with a diverse set of complementary reaction partners. Accordingly, chemistry centered around strain-promoted cycloadditions has been exploited to precisely modify biopolymers, ranging from nucleic acids to proteins to glycans. In this Account, we describe progress in bioconjugation centered around cycloadditions of these strained unsaturated systems. Being among the first to recognize the utility

  6. Strain rate dependency of oceanic intraplate earthquake b-values at extremely low strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasajima, Ryohei; Ito, Takeo

    2016-06-01

    We discovered a clear positive dependence of oceanic intraplate earthquake (OCEQ) b-values on the age of the oceanic lithosphere. OCEQ b-values in the youngest (<10 Ma) oceanic lithosphere are around 1.0, while those in middle to old (>20 Ma) oceanic lithosphere exceed 1.5, which is significantly higher than the average worldwide earthquake b-value (around 1.0). On the other hand, the b-value of intraplate earthquakes in the Ninety East-Sumatra orogen, where oceanic lithosphere has an anomalously higher strain rate compared with normal oceanic lithosphere, is 0.93, which is significantly lower than the OCEQ b-value (about 1.9) with the same age (50-110 Ma). Thus, the variation in b-values relates to the strain rate of the oceanic lithosphere and is not caused by a difference in thermal structure. We revealed a negative strain rate dependency of the b-value at extremely low strain rates (<2 × 10-10/year), which can clearly explain the above b-values. We propose that the OCEQ b-value depends strongly on strain rate (either directly or indirectly) at extremely low strain rates. The high OCEQ b-values (>1.5) in oceanic lithosphere >20 Ma old imply that future improvement in seismic observation will capture many smaller magnitude OCEQs, which will provide valuable information on the evolution of the oceanic lithosphere and the driving mechanism of plate tectonics.

  7. Real-time soil compaction monitoring through pad strain measurements: modeling to inform strain gage placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Shawn C.; Mooney, Michael A.

    2011-04-01

    Soil compaction monitoring is critical to earthwork projects, including roadways, earth dams, and levees. Current methods require a halt of production, and provide at best sparse coverage. A system is proposed for static pad foot soil compaction to provide real-time feedback at higher spatial resolutions through machine integrated sensors. The system is composed of pad sensors that measure total normal force and contact stress distribution (CSD), laser sensors that measure soil deflection, and GPS to spatially reference measurements. By combining these measurements, soil stiffness and potentially modulus can be determined. This paper discusses the development of the force and CSD sensing pad. The concept is to instrument individual pads with strain gages to determine loading conditions. Modeling is used to inform strain gage positioning through pad strain behavior analysis of different simulated soil conditions. The finite element analysis (FEA) of a Caterpillar pad is discussed, including formulation and rationale for the various model parameters. The loading parameters are explained, including the range of force magnitudes experienced throughout compaction and the CSD elicited by various soils. The results of this analysis are presented, and show that pad strain is sensitive to both force magnitude and CSD. Specific strain trends are identified in the sidewall and bottom face of the pad which are particularly sensitive to the loading variables. Strain gage placements are proposed that capture the identified trends, thereby providing definitive information on total normal force and CSD.

  8. Creep Strain and Strain Rate Response of 2219 Al Alloy at High Stress Levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taminger, Karen M. B.; Wagner, John A.; Lisagor, W. Barry

    1998-01-01

    As a result of high localized plastic deformation experienced during proof testing in an International Space Station connecting module, a study was undertaken to determine the deformation response of a 2219-T851 roll forging. After prestraining 2219-T851 Al specimens to simulate strains observed during the proof testing, creep tests were conducted in the temperature range from ambient temperature to 107 C (225 F) at stress levels approaching the ultimate tensile strength of 2219-T851 Al. Strain-time histories and strain rate responses were examined. The strain rate response was extremely high initially, but decayed rapidly, spanning as much as five orders of magnitude during primary creep. Select specimens were subjected to incremental step loading and exhibited initial creep rates of similar magnitude for each load step. Although the creep rates decreased quickly at all loads, the creep rates dropped faster and reached lower strain rate levels for lower applied loads. The initial creep rate and creep rate decay associated with primary creep were similar for specimens with and without prestrain; however, prestraining (strain hardening) the specimens, as in the aforementioned proof test, resulted in significantly longer creep life.

  9. EDITORIAL: Excelling under strain: band engineering in nanomaterials Excelling under strain: band engineering in nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2013-08-01

    A little stress or strain has been known to improve the performance of athletes, actors and of course nanomaterials alike. In fact strain in silicon is now a major engineering tool for improving the performance of devices, and is ubiquitously used in device design and fabrication. Strain engineering alters a material's band structure, a model of electron behaviour that describes how as atoms come together in a solid, their discrete electron orbitals overlap to ultimately give rise to bands of allowed energy levels. In a strained crystal lattice of silicon or silicon germanium the distance between atoms in the lattice is greater than usual and the bands of allowed energy levels change. This July marks 100 years since Bohr submitted his paper 'On the constitution of atoms and molecules' [1] where he describes the structure of the atom in terms of discrete allowed energy levels. The paper was a seminal contribution to the development of quantum mechanics and laid the initial theoretical precepts for band gap engineering in devices. In this issue Nrauda and a collaboration of researchers in Europe and Australia study the growth of defect-free SiGe islands on pre-patterned silicon [2]. They analyse the strain in the islands and determine at what point lattice dislocations set in with a view to informing implementation of strain engineering in devices. The effects of strain on band structure in silicon and germanium were already studied and reported in the 1950s [3, 4]. Since then the increasing focus on nanoscale materials and the hunger for control of electronic properties has prompted further study of strain effects. The increased surface area to volume ratio in nanostructures changes the strain behaviour with respect to bulk materials, and this can also be exploited for handling and fine tuning strain to manipulate material properties. It is perhaps no surprise that graphene, one of the most high-profile materials in current nanotechnology research, has attracted

  10. Genomic Diversity of Enterotoxigenic Strains of Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Jessica V.; Bernstein, Harris D.

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic (ETBF) strains of Bacteroides fragilis are the subset of strains that secrete a toxin called fragilysin (Bft). Although ETBF strains are known to cause diarrheal disease and have recently been associated with colorectal cancer, they have not been well characterized. By sequencing the complete genome of four ETBF strains, we found that these strains exhibit considerable variation at the genomic level. Only a small number of genes that are located primarily in the Bft pathogenicity island (BFT PAI) and the flanking CTn86 conjugative transposon are conserved in all four strains and a fifth strain whose genome was previously sequenced. Interestingly, phylogenetic analysis strongly suggests that the BFT PAI was acquired by non-toxigenic (NTBF) strains multiple times during the course of evolution. At the phenotypic level, we found that the ETBF strains were less fit than the NTBF strain NCTC 9343 and were susceptible to a growth-inhibitory protein that it produces. The ETBF strains also showed a greater tendency to form biofilms, which may promote tumor formation, than NTBF strains. Although the genomic diversity of ETBF strains raises the possibility that they vary in their pathogenicity, our experimental results also suggest that they share common properties that are conferred by different combinations of non-universal genetic elements. PMID:27348220

  11. Typing of Histoplasma capsulatum strains by fatty acid profile analysis.

    PubMed

    Zarnowski, Robert; Miyazaki, Makoto; Dobrzyn, Agnieszka; Ntambi, James M; Woods, Jon P

    2007-06-01

    The performance of fatty acid profiling for strain differentiation of Histoplasma capsulatum was assessed. Total fatty acids were isolated from the yeast-phase cells of seven stock and two previously unreported clinical strains of H. capsulatum var. capsulatum, as well as from one unreported clinical strain and one stock strain of H. capsulatum var. duboisii, and one strain of each of three other dimorphic zoopathogenic fungal species, Blastomyces dermatitidis, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Sporothrix schenckii. Different colony morphology and pigmentation types of the H. capsulatum strains were also included. The most frequently occurring fatty acids were oleic, palmitic, stearic and linoleic acids. There were variations in the relative percentage fatty acid contents of H. capsulatum strains that could be used for strain identification and discrimination. Differentiation between H. capsulatum strains was achieved by the comparison of detected fatty acids accompanied by principal component analysis using calculated Varimax-rotated principal component loadings. Statistical analysis yielded three major principal components that explained over 94 % of total variance in the data. All the strains of H. capsulatum var. capsulatum RFLP classes II and III were grouped into two distinct clusters: the heterogenic RFLP class I formed a large, but also well-defined group, whereas the outgroup strains of H. capsulatum var. duboisii, B. dermatitidis, P. brasiliensis and S. schenckii were shifted away. These data suggest that fatty acid profiling can be used in H. capsulatum strain classification and epidemiological studies that require strain differentiation at the intraspecies level. PMID:17510264

  12. Motion Driven by Strain Gradient Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Chen, Shaohua

    2015-09-01

    A new driving mechanism for direction-controlled motion of nano-scale objects is proposed, based on a model of stretching a graphene strip linked to a rigid base with linear springs of identical stiffness. We find that the potential energy difference induced by the strain gradient field in the graphene strip substrate can generate sufficient force to overcome the static and kinetic friction forces between the nano-flake and the strip substrate, resulting in the nanoscale flake motion in the direction of gradient reduction. The dynamics of the nano-flake can be manipulated by tuning the stiffness of linear springs, stretching velocity and the flake size. This fundamental law of directional motion induced by strain gradient could be very useful for promising designs of nanoscale manipulation, transportation and smart surfaces.

  13. Strain-dependent permeability of volcanic rocks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Jamie; Heap, Michael; Baud, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    We explore permeability evolution during deformation of volcanic materials using a suite of rocks with varying compositions and physical properties (such as porosity ϕ). 40 mm × 20 mm cylindrical samples were made from a range of extrusive rocks, including andesites from Colima, Mexico (ϕ˜0.08; 0.18; 0.21), Kumamoto, Japan (ϕ˜0.13), and Ruapehu, New Zealand (ϕ˜0.15), and basalt from Mt Etna, Italy (ϕ˜0.04). Gas permeability of each sample was measured before and after triaxial deformation using a steady-state benchtop permeameter. To study the strain-dependence of permeability in volcanic rocks, we deformed samples to 2, 3, 4, 6, and 12 % axial strain at a constant strain rate of 10‑5 s‑1. Further, the influence of failure mode - dilatant or compactant - on permeability was assessed by repeating experiments at different confining pressures. During triaxial deformation, porosity change of the samples was monitored by a servo-controlled pore fluid pump. Below an initial porosity of ˜0.18, and at low confining pressures (≤ 20 MPa), we observe a dilatant failure mode (shear fracture formation). With increasing axial strain, stress is accommodated by fault sliding and the generation of ash-sized gouge between the fracture planes. In higher-porosity samples, or at relatively higher confining pressures (≥ 60 MPa), we observe compactant deformation characterised by a monotonous decrease in porosity with increasing axial strain. The relative permeability k' is given by the change in permeability divided by the initial reference state. When behaviour is dilatant, k' tends to be positive: permeability increases with progressive deformation. However, results suggest that after a threshold amount of strain, k' can decrease. k' always is negative (permeability decreases during deformation) when compaction is the dominant behaviour. Our results show that - in the absence of a sealing or healing process - the efficiency of a fault to transmit fluids is

  14. Magnetic properties on strained manganite thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapat, C. L.; Singh, M. R.; Gupta, S. K.; Bhattacharya, D.; Basu, S.; Ravikumar, G.

    2014-04-01

    Structural and magnetic studies on La2/3Sr1/3MnO3 (LSMO) epitaxial films grown on STO (100) and MgO (100) substrates by Pulsed Laser Deposition are presented. Due to larger interface strain, the grain size of LSMO on MgO is much smaller than that on STO substrate. However, anisotropy energy produced as a result of in plane tensile strain is much larger in case of the films deposited on MgO in such a way that the blocking (irreversibility) temperature and the coercive fields inferred from temperature and magnetic field dependent magnetization measurements are significantly higher. The importance of this result for the memory applications is highlighted.

  15. Organic chemistry. Strain-release amination.

    PubMed

    Gianatassio, Ryan; Lopchuk, Justin M; Wang, Jie; Pan, Chung-Mao; Malins, Lara R; Prieto, Liher; Brandt, Thomas A; Collins, Michael R; Gallego, Gary M; Sach, Neal W; Spangler, Jillian E; Zhu, Huichin; Zhu, Jinjiang; Baran, Phil S

    2016-01-15

    To optimize drug candidates, modern medicinal chemists are increasingly turning to an unconventional structural motif: small, strained ring systems. However, the difficulty of introducing substituents such as bicyclo[1.1.1]pentanes, azetidines, or cyclobutanes often outweighs the challenge of synthesizing the parent scaffold itself. Thus, there is an urgent need for general methods to rapidly and directly append such groups onto core scaffolds. Here we report a general strategy to harness the embedded potential energy of effectively spring-loaded C-C and C-N bonds with the most oft-encountered nucleophiles in pharmaceutical chemistry, amines. Strain-release amination can diversify a range of substrates with a multitude of desirable bioisosteres at both the early and late stages of a synthesis. The technique has also been applied to peptide labeling and bioconjugation.

  16. Techniques for increasing boron fiber fracture strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Improvement in the strain-to-failure of CVD boron fibers is shown possible by contracting the tungsten boride core region and its inherent flaws. The results of three methods are presented in which etching and thermal processing techniques were employed to achieve core flaw contraction by internal stresses available in the boron sheath. After commercially and treatment induced surface flaws were removed from 203 micrometers (8 mil) fibers, the core flaw was observed to be essentially the only source of fiber fracture. Thus, fiber strain-to-failure was found to improve by an amount equal to the treatment induced contraction on the core flaw. Commercial feasibility considerations suggest as the most cost effective technique that method in which as-produced fibers are given a rapid heat treatment above 700 C. Preliminary results concerning the contraction kinetics and fracture behavior observed are presented and discussed both for high vacuum and argon gas heat treatment environments.

  17. Strain gradient plasticity theory applied to machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, Raphaël; Laheurte, Raynald; Darnis, Philippe; Gérard, Alain; Cahuc, Olivier

    2011-05-01

    Machining is the most common manufacturing process. A good behaviour law is necessary in the simulation of machining processes (analytical and finite element modeling). Usually, commonly used behaviour laws such as Jonhson-Cook can bring unsatisfactory results especially for high strain and large deformation processes. Significant differences can appear between experimental and simulation results. The aim of this paper is to present the choices made regarding the behaviour law in this context. This study develops a large deformation strain-gradient theoretical framework with hypothesis linked to metal cutting processes. The theoretical framework has the potential of expressing moments at the tool tip as they were observed in experiments. It will be shown that the theory has the capability of interpreting the complex phenomena found in machining and more particularly in high speed machining.

  18. Stepparent role strain and psychological distress.

    PubMed

    Espinar Fellmann, Isabel; Carrasco Galán, Ma José; Hernández Lloreda, Ma José

    2008-11-01

    In the last few decades, Spain has witnessed a slow but progressive change in predominant family models. The purpose of this work is to advance in our knowledge of stepfamilies through the perspectives and experiences of two of their members, the stepfather and the stepmother. The theoretical model examined in this investigation proposes that stepparents' role strain could have negative effects on their psychological wellbeing. It also proposes that a satisfactory couple relation could mediate in the relation between role strain and psychological wellbeing. In this study, participants were 116 stepparents who had been living for at least one year with their partner. The most relevant results showed the adequacy of the proposed model and the higher vulnerability of stepmothers in these family structures.

  19. Modulating thermal conduction by the axial strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jianjun; Zhao, Hong

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have revealed that the symmetry of interparticle potential plays an important role in the one-dimensional thermal conduction problem. Here we demonstrate that, by introducing strain into the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam-β lattice, the interparticle potential can be converted from symmetric to asymmetric, which leads to a change of the asymptotic decaying behavior of the heat current autocorrelation function. More specifically, such a change in the symmetry of the potential induces a fast decaying stage, in which the heat current autocorrelation function decays faster than power-law manners or in a power-law manner but faster than ~t -1, in the transient stage. The duration of the fast decaying stage increases with increasing strain ratio and decreasing of the temperature. As a result, the thermal conductivity calculated following the Green-Kubo formula may show a truncation-time independent behavior, suggesting a system-size independent thermal conductivity.

  20. OTDR strain gauge for smart skins

    SciTech Connect

    Kercel, S.W.

    1993-09-01

    Optical time-domain reflectometry (OTDR) is a simple and rugged technique for measuring quantities such as strain that affect the propagation of light in an optical fiber. For engineering applications of OTDR, it is important to know the repeatable limits of its performance. The author constructed an OTDR-based, submillimeter resolution strain measurement system from off-the-shelf components. The systems repeatably resolves changes in time of flight to within {plus_minus}2 ps. Using a 1-m, single-mode fiber as a gauge and observing the time of flight between Fresnel reflections, a repeatable sensitivity of 400 microstrains was observed. Using the same fiber to connect the legs of a 3-dB directional coupler to form a loop, a repeatable sensitivity of 200 microstrains was observed. Realizable changes to the system that should improve the repeatable sensitivity to 20 microstrains or less are discussed.

  1. Attaching of strain gages to substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemcoe, M. M.; Pattee, H. E. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus for attaching strain gages to substrates is described. A strain gage having a backing plate is attached to a substrate by using a foil of brazing material between the backing plate and substrate. A pair of electrodes that are connected to a current source, are applied to opposite sides of the backing plate, so that heating of the structure occurs primarily along the relatively highly conductive foil of brazing material. Field installations are facilitated by utilizing a backing plate with wings extending at an upward incline from either side of the backing plate, by attaching the electrodes to the wings to perform the brazing operation, and by breaking off the wings after the brazing is completed.

  2. Motion Driven by Strain Gradient Fields

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Chen, Shaohua

    2015-01-01

    A new driving mechanism for direction-controlled motion of nano-scale objects is proposed, based on a model of stretching a graphene strip linked to a rigid base with linear springs of identical stiffness. We find that the potential energy difference induced by the strain gradient field in the graphene strip substrate can generate sufficient force to overcome the static and kinetic friction forces between the nano-flake and the strip substrate, resulting in the nanoscale flake motion in the direction of gradient reduction. The dynamics of the nano-flake can be manipulated by tuning the stiffness of linear springs, stretching velocity and the flake size. This fundamental law of directional motion induced by strain gradient could be very useful for promising designs of nanoscale manipulation, transportation and smart surfaces. PMID:26323603

  3. Analysis of finger extensor mechanism strains.

    PubMed

    Hurlbut, P T; Adams, B D

    1995-09-01

    Strains in the extensor mechanism of the finger were measured in a cadaver model using Hall-effect transducers. Several components of the mechanism were evaluated at different joint positions, with different intrinsic and extrinsic tendon loading conditions, and after creating a boutonnière deformity. Landsmeer's theory that predictable and obligatory interactions occur within the extensor mechanism during finger movement is strongly supported by our results. The concept of the Bunnell intrinsic-tightness test was confirmed. Results were consistent with clinical observations and current theories on the pathomechanics of claw and boutonnière deformities. Based on our experimental findings, we conclude that strain analysis is an effective method of evaluation of the extensor mechanism with potential for in vivo surgical applications.

  4. Strain gradient plasticity theory applied to machining

    SciTech Connect

    Royer, Raphael; Laheurte, Raynald; Darnis, Philippe; Gerard, Alain; Cahuc, Olivier

    2011-05-04

    Machining is the most common manufacturing process. A good behaviour law is necessary in the simulation of machining processes (analytical and finite element modeling). Usually, commonly used behaviour laws such as Jonhson-Cook can bring unsatisfactory results especially for high strain and large deformation processes. Significant differences can appear between experimental and simulation results. The aim of this paper is to present the choices made regarding the behaviour law in this context. This study develops a large deformation strain-gradient theoretical framework with hypothesis linked to metal cutting processes. The theoretical framework has the potential of expressing moments at the tool tip as they were observed in experiments. It will be shown that the theory has the capability of interpreting the complex phenomena found in machining and more particularly in high speed machining.

  5. Thymineless Death in Escherichia coli: Strain Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Donald J.; Mondale, Lee

    1967-01-01

    Thymineless death of various ultraviolet (UV)-sensitive strains of Escherichia coli B and K-12 was investigated. It was found that E. coli B, Bs−12, K-12 rec-21, and possibly K-12 Lon−, all sensitive to UV, were also sensitive to thymine starvation. However, other UV-sensitive strains of E. coli were found to display the typical resistant-type kinetics of thymineless death. The correlation of these results with various other cellular processes suggested that the filament-forming ability of the bacteria might be involved in the mechanism of thymineless death. It was apparent from the present results that capacity for host-cell reactivation, recombination ability, thymine dimer excision, and probably induction of a defective prophage had little to do with determining sensitivity to thymine deprivation. Images PMID:5337772

  6. Strain monitoring of a composite wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strathman, Joseph; Watkins, Steve E.; Kaur, Amardeep; Macke, David C.

    2016-04-01

    An instrumented composite wing is described. The wing is designed to meet the load and ruggedness requirements for a fixed-wing unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) in search-and-rescue applications. The UAV supports educational systems development and has a 2.1-m wingspan. The wing structure consists of a foam core covered by a carbon-fiber, laminate composite shell. To quantify the wing characteristics, a fiber-optic strain sensor was surface mounted to measure distributed strain. This sensor is based on Rayleigh scattering from local index variations and it is capable of high spatial resolution. The use of the Rayleigh-scattering fiber-optic sensors for distributed measurements is discussed.

  7. Wing Shape Sensing from Measured Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi

    2015-01-01

    A new two-step theory is investigated for predicting the deflection and slope of an entire structure using strain measurements at discrete locations. In the first step, a measured strain is fitted using a piecewise least-squares curve fitting method together with the cubic spline technique. These fitted strains are integrated twice to obtain deflection data along the fibers. In the second step, computed deflection along the fibers are combined with a finite element model of the structure in order to interpolate and extrapolate the deflection and slope of the entire structure through the use of the System Equivalent Reduction and Expansion Process. The theory is first validated on a computational model, a cantilevered rectangular plate wing. The theory is then applied to test data from a cantilevered swept-plate wing model. Computed results are compared with finite element results, results using another strain-based method, and photogrammetry data. For the computational model under an aeroelastic load, maximum deflection errors in the fore and aft, lateral, and vertical directions are -3.2 percent, 0.28 percent, and 0.09 percent, respectively; and maximum slope errors in roll and pitch directions are 0.28 percent and -3.2 percent, respectively. For the experimental model, deflection results at the tip are shown to be accurate to within 3.8 percent of the photogrammetry data and are accurate to within 2.2 percent in most cases. In general, excellent matching between target and computed values are accomplished in this study. Future refinement of this theory will allow it to monitor the deflection and health of an entire aircraft in real time, allowing for aerodynamic load computation, active flexible motion control, and active induced drag reduction..

  8. Development of amnesia in different mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Sinovyev, D R; Dubrovina, N I; Kulikov, A V

    2009-05-01

    We studied passive avoidance retrieval after amnestic stimulation (arrest in unsafe section of the experimental setup) in C57Bl/6J, BALB/c, CBA/Lac, AKR/J, DBA/2J, C3H/HeJ, and ASC/Icg mice. We demonstrated resistance to amnestic stimulation in mice with high predisposition to freezing reaction (ASC/Icg) and memory deficit in other mouse strains.

  9. Strain monitoring averts line failure in Rockies

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.; Bukovansky, M.

    1987-08-10

    The case history of a landslide in the U.S. Rocky Mountains shows that the potential for pipeline monitoring in geologically sensitive areas, those subject to landslides and subsidence, for example. A properly installed monitoring system monitored by the pipeline operator, Western Gas Supply Co. (West Gas), Denver, provided an early warning of increasing line strains. The problem was complicated by rugged topography which is described here. Stability analysis was the key technique utilized in the process.

  10. Rectus abdominis muscle strains in tennis players

    PubMed Central

    Maquirriain, Javier; Ghisi, Juan P; Kokalj, Antonio M

    2007-01-01

    Rectus abdominis muscle strains are common and debilitating injuries among competitive tennis players. Eccentric overload, followed by forced contraction of the non‐dominant rectus abdominis during the cocking phase of the service motion is the accepted injury mechanism. A tennis‐specific rehabilitation program emphasising eccentrics and plyometric strengthening of the abdominal wall muscles, contributes to the complete functional recovery in tennis players, and could help reduce recurrences. PMID:17957025

  11. Bioprocessing of Stichococcus bacillaris strain siva2011

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Globally, the development of a cost-effective long-term renewable energy infrastructure is one of the most challenging problems faced by society today. Microalgae are rich in potential biofuel substrates such as lipids, including triacylglycerols (TAGs). Some of these algae also biosynthesize small molecule hydrocarbons. These hydrocarbons can often be used as liquid fuels, often with more versatility and by a more direct approach than some TAGs. However, the appropriate TAGs, accumulated from microalgae biomass, can be used as substrates for different kinds of renewable liquid fuels such as biodiesel and jet fuel. Results This article describes the isolation and identification of a lipid-rich, hydrocarbon-producing alga, Stichococcus bacillaris strain siva2011, together with its bioprocessing, hydrocarbon and fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiles. The S. bacillaris strain siva2011 was scaled-up in an 8 L bioreactor with 0.2% CO2. The C16:0, C16:3, C18:1, C18:2 and C18:3 were 112.2, 9.4, 51.3, 74.1 and 69.2 mg/g dry weight (DW), respectively. This new strain produced a significant amount of biomass of 3.79 g/L DW on day 6 in the 8 L bioreactor and also produced three hydrocarbons. Conclusions A new oil-rich microalga S. bacillaris strain siva2011 was discovered and its biomass has been scaled-up in a newly designed balloon-type bioreactor. The TAGs and hydrocarbons produced by this organism could be used as substrates for jet fuel or biodiesel. PMID:24731690

  12. Quasi-bound states in strained graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahamon, Dario; Qi, Zenan; Park, Harold; Pareira, Vitor; Campbell, David

    In this work, we explore the possibility of manipulating electronic states in graphene nanostructures by mechanical means. Specifically, we use molecular dynamics and tight-binding models to access the electronic and transport properties of strained graphene nanobubbles and graphene kirigami. We establish that low energy electrons can be confined in the arms of the kirigami and within the nanobubbles; under different load conditions the coupling between confined states and continuous states is modified creating different conductance line-shapes.

  13. PNNL Stress/Strain Correlation for Zircaloy

    SciTech Connect

    Geelhood, Kenneth J.; Beyer, Carl E.; Luscher, Walter G.

    2008-07-18

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked with incorporating cladding mechanical property data into the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) fuel codes, FRAPCON-31 and FRAPTRAN2, by the NRC Office of Nuclear Reactor Research. The objective of that task was to create a mechanical model that can calculate true stress, true strain, and the possible failure of the fuel rod cladding based on uniaxial test data.

  14. Designing recombinant Pseudomonas strains to enhance biodesulfurization.

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, M E; Ferrández, A; De Lorenzo, V; García, J L; Díaz, E

    1997-01-01

    The dsz biodesulfurization cluster from Rhodococcus erythropolis IGTS8 has been engineered under the control of heterologous broad-host-range regulatory signals to alleviate the mechanism of sulfur repression, and it was stably inserted into the chromosomes of different Pseudomonas strains. The recombinant bacteria were able to desulfurize dibenzothiophene more efficiently than the native host. Furthermore, these new biocatalysts combine relevant industrial and environmental traits, such as production of biosurfactants, with the enhanced biodesulfurization phenotype. PMID:9371464

  15. Electrochemical strain microscopy of silica glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proksch, R.

    2014-08-01

    Piezoresponse Force Microscopy and Electrochemical Strain Microscopy (ESM) are two related techniques that have had considerable success in nano-scale probing of functional material properties. Both measure the strain of the sample in response to a localized electric field beneath a sharp conductive tip. In this work, a collection of commercially available glass samples were measured with a variety of Si cantilevers coated with different conductive metals. In some cases, these glasses showed significant hysteresis loops, similar in appearance to those measured on ferroelectric materials with spontaneous permanent electric dipoles. The magnitude of the electrochemical strain and hysteresis correlated well with the molar percentage of sodium in the glass material, with high sodium (soda-lime) glass showing large hysteresis and fused silica (pure SiO2) showing essentially no hysteresis. The "elephant-ear" shape of the hysteresis loops correlated well with it originating from relaxation behavior—an interpretation verified by observing the temperature dependent relaxation of the ESM response. Cation mobility in a disordered glass should have a low diffusion constant. To evaluate this diffusion constant, the temperature of the glass was varied between room temperature to ˜200 °C. Vanishing hysteresis as the temperature increased was associated with a decrease in the relaxation time of the electrochemical response. The hysteretic behavior changed drastically in this temperature range, consistent with bound surface water playing a large role in the relaxation. This demonstrates the ability of ESM to differentiate cationic concentrations in a range of silica glasses. In addition, since glass is a common sample substrate for, this provides some clear guidance for avoiding unwanted substrate crosstalk effects in piezoresponse and electrochemical strain response measurements.

  16. Strain-tolerant ceramic coated seal

    DOEpatents

    Schienle, James L.; Strangman, Thomas E.

    1994-01-01

    A metallic regenerator seal is provided having multi-layer coating comprising a NiCrAlY bond layer, a yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) intermediate layer, and a ceramic high temperature solid lubricant surface layer comprising zinc oxide, calcium fluoride, and tin oxide. An array of discontinuous grooves is laser machined into the outer surface of the solid lubricant surface layer making the coating strain tolerant.

  17. On Dynamic Nonlinear Elasticity and Small Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, P. A.; Sutin, A.; Guyer, R. A.; Tencate, J. A.

    2002-12-01

    We are addressing the question of whether or not there is a threshold strain behavior where anomalous nonlinear fast dynamics (ANFD) commences in rock and other similar solids, or if the elastic nonlinearity persists to the smallest measurable values. In qualitative measures of many rock types and other materials that behave in the same manner, we have not observed a threshold; however the only careful, small strain level study conducted under controlled conditions that we are aware of is that of TenCate et al. in Berea sandstone (Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 1020-1024 (2000)). This work indicates that in Berea sandstone, the elastic nonlinearity persists to the minimum measured strains of at least 10-8. Recently, we have begun controlled experiments in other materials that exhibit ANFD in order to see whether or not they behave as Berea sandstone does. We are employing Young's mode resonance to study resonance peak shift and amplitude variations as a function of drive level and detected strain level. In this type of experiment, the time average amplitude is recorded as the sample is driven by a continuous wave source from below to above the fundamental mode resonance. The drive level is increased, and the measurement is repeated progressively over larger and larger drive levels. Experiments are conducted at ambient pressure. Pure alumina ceramic is a material that is highly, elastically-nonlinear and nonporous, and therefore the significant influence of relative humidity on elastic nonlinear response that rock suffers is avoided. Temperature is carefully monitored. Measurements on pure alumina ceramic show that, like Berea sandstone, there is no threshold of elastic nonlinearity within our measurement capability. We are now studying other solids that exhibit ANFD including rock and mixed phase metal. These results indicate that elastic nonlinearity influences all elastic measurments on these solids including modulus and Q at ambient conditions. There appears to be no

  18. Canthaxanthin production with modified Mucor circinelloides strains.

    PubMed

    Papp, Tamás; Csernetics, Arpád; Nagy, Gábor; Bencsik, Ottó; Iturriaga, Enrique A; Eslava, Arturo P; Vágvölgyi, Csaba

    2013-06-01

    Canthaxanthin is a natural diketo derivative of β-carotene primarily used by the food and feed industries. Mucor circinelloides is a β-carotene-accumulating zygomycete fungus and one of the model organisms to study the carotenoid biosynthesis in fungi. In this study, the β-carotene ketolase gene (crtW) of the marine bacterium Paracoccus sp. N81106 fused with fungal promoter and terminator regions was integrated into the M. circinelloides genome to construct stable canthaxanthin-producing strains. Different transformation methods including polyethylene glycol-mediated transformation with linear DNA fragments, restriction enzyme-mediated integration and Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation were tested to integrate the crtW gene into the Mucor genome. Mitotic stability, site of integration and copy number of the transferred genes were analysed in the transformants, and several stable strains containing the crtW gene in high copy number were isolated. Carotenoid composition of selected transformants and effect of culturing conditions, such as temperature, carbon sources and application of certain additives in the culturing media, on their carotenoid content were analysed. Canthaxanthin-producing transformants were able to survive at higher growth temperature than the untransformed strain, maybe due to the effect of canthaxanthin on the membrane fluidity and integrity. With the application of glucose, trehalose, dihydroxyacetone and L-aspartic acid as sole carbon sources in minimal medium, the crtW-expressing M. circinelloides strain, MS12+pCA8lf/1, produced more than 200 μg/g (dry mass) of canthaxanthin. PMID:23224586

  19. Repetitive strain injury: causes, treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Shuttleworth, Ann

    Repetitive strain injury (RSI) has become increasingly prevalent with the growth of computer-based and automated occupations. While environmental factors such as work stations and repetitive tasks are primary causes, a number of secondary causes can increase a person's risk of RSI. Various treatments provide relief but the rate of recovery varies widely. Prevention involves adopting a range of measures that will also promote recovery in those with RSI.

  20. Gurson's Model: ALE Formulation and Strain Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Cunda, Luiz A. B.; Creus, Guillermo J.

    2007-05-01

    This paper presents a brief review of Gurson's damage model, employed to describes the strength degradation in ductile metals submitted to large plastic deformations. The damage model is applied using finite elements and an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation (ALE), to ensure a better quality to the finite elements mesh. The study of the combined application of ALE and Gurson approach to damage modeling and strain localization is the object of this paper.

  1. Small Fixture Strains Composites for Environmental Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tervet, F. W.

    1982-01-01

    Fixture for long-term strain tests of composites is based on inexpensive tool for repairing motorcycle chains. (In normal use tool forces rivet out of chain element.) As modified for composite testing, tool has precision screw and shim. Qualification tests for graphite/epoxy composites are made less expensive by simple test fixture. Used in quantity, fixtures apply precisely similar loads to many samples.

  2. Himalayan Strain Accumulation 100 ka Timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, J. M.; Murphy, M. A.; Liu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Crustal scale fault systems and tectonostratigraphic units in the Himalaya can be traced for 2500 km along strike. However regional studies have shown that there is variability in the location and rate of strain accumulation which appears to be driven by Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT) geometry and convergence obliquity. GPS illuminates the modern interseismic strain rate and the historical record of great earthquakes elucidates variations in strain accumulation over 103 years. To connect these patterns with the 106 year structural and thermochronometric geologic record we examine normalized river channel steepness (ksn), a proxy for rock uplift rate, which develops over 104 - 105 years. Here we present a ksn map of the Himalaya and compare it with bedrock geology, precipitation, the historic earthquake record, GPS, seismicity, and seismotectonic models. Our map shows significant along strike changes in the magnitude of channel steepness, the areal extent of swaths of high ksn channels, and their location with respect to the range front. Differences include the juxtaposition of two narrow (30 - 40 km) range parallel belts of high ksn in west Nepal and Bhutan coincident with MHT duplexes and belts of microseismcity, with a single broad (70 km) swath of high ksn and microseismicity in central and eastern Nepal. Separating west and central Nepal a band of low ksn crosses the range coincident with the West Nepal Fault (WNF) and the lowest rate of microseismicity in Nepal. To the west the orogen is obliquely convergent and has less high ksn channels, while the orthogonally convergent region to the east contains the highest concentration of oversteepened channels in the Himalaya supporting the idea that the WNF is a strain partitioning boundary. The syntaxes are characterized by locally high channel steepness surrounded by low to moderate ksn channels consistent with the hypothesis that rapid exhumation within the syntaxes is sustained by an influx of lower crust.

  3. Gurson's Model: ALE Formulation and Strain Localization

    SciTech Connect

    Cunda, Luiz A. B. da; Creus, Guillermo J.

    2007-05-17

    This paper presents a brief review of Gurson's damage model, employed to describes the strength degradation in ductile metals submitted to large plastic deformations. The damage model is applied using finite elements and an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation (ALE), to ensure a better quality to the finite elements mesh. The study of the combined application of ALE and Gurson approach to damage modeling and strain localization is the object of this paper.

  4. Laboratory evolution of copper tolerant yeast strains

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Yeast strains endowed with robustness towards copper and/or enriched in intracellular Cu might find application in biotechnology processes, among others in the production of functional foods. Moreover, they can contribute to the study of human diseases related to impairments of copper metabolism. In this study, we investigated the molecular and physiological factors that confer copper tolerance to strains of baker's yeasts. Results We characterized the effects elicited in natural strains of Candida humilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae by the exposure to copper in the culture broth. We observed that, whereas the growth of Saccharomyces cells was inhibited already at low Cu concentration, C. humilis was naturally robust and tolerated up to 1 g · L-1 CuSO4 in the medium. This resistant strain accumulated over 7 mg of Cu per gram of biomass and escaped severe oxidative stress thanks to high constitutive levels of superoxide dismutase and catalase. Both yeasts were then "evolved" to obtain hyper-resistant cells able to proliferate in high copper medium. While in S. cerevisiae the evolution of robustness towards Cu was paralleled by the increase of antioxidative enzymes, these same activities decreased in evolved hyper-resistant Candida cells. We also characterized in some detail changes in the profile of copper binding proteins, that appeared to be modified by evolution but, again, in a different way in the two yeasts. Conclusions Following evolution, both Candida and Saccharomyces cells were able to proliferate up to 2.5 g · L-1 CuSO4 and to accumulate high amounts of intracellular copper. The comparison of yeasts differing in their robustness, allowed highlighting physiological and molecular determinants of natural and acquired copper tolerance. We observed that different mechanisms contribute to confer metal tolerance: the control of copper uptake, changes in the levels of enzymes involved in oxidative stress response and changes in the copper

  5. Problems and advances in monitoring horizontal strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caputo, M.

    1978-01-01

    The modern instrumentation is described for use in geodesy for the detection of the deformations of the crust of the earth. Problems are listed. Needs are discussed for the survey of the physical quantities of interest in geodesy, geology, geophysics, and engineering such as the strain invariants, the optimal network of baselines and the accuracy. An analytic method is also given for the computation of the effect of a source of dilatation in a spherical earth.

  6. A tale of two mechanisms. Strain-softening versus strain-hardening in single crystals under small stressed volumes

    DOE PAGES

    Bei, Hongbin; Xia, Yuzhi; Barabash, Rozaliya; Gao, Y. F.

    2015-08-10

    Pre-straining defect-free single crystals will introduce heterogeneous dislocation nucleation sources that reduce the measured strength from the theoretical value, while pre-straining bulk samples will lead to strain hardening. Their competition is investigated by nanoindentation pop-in tests on variously pre-strained Mo single crystals with several indenter radii (~micrometer). Pre-straining primarily shifts deformation mechanism from homogeneous dislocation nucleation to a stochastic behavior, while strain hardening plays a secondary role, as summarized in a master plot of pop-in strength versus normalized indenter radius.

  7. Strain Variation in Mycobacterium marinum Fish Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ucko, M.; Colorni, A.; Kvitt, H.; Diamant, A.; Zlotkin, A.; Knibb, W. R.

    2002-01-01

    A molecular characterization of two Mycobacterium marinum genes, 16S rRNA and hsp65, was carried out with a total of 21 isolates from various species of fish from both marine and freshwater environments of Israel, Europe, and the Far East. The nucleotide sequences of both genes revealed that all M. marinum isolates from fish in Israel belonged to two different strains, one infecting marine (cultured and wild) fish and the other infecting freshwater (cultured) fish. A restriction enzyme map based on the nucleotide sequences of both genes confirmed the divergence of the Israeli marine isolates from the freshwater isolates and differentiated the Israeli isolates from the foreign isolates, with the exception of one of three Greek isolates from marine fish which was identical to the Israeli marine isolates. The second isolate from Greece exhibited a single base alteration in the 16S rRNA sequence, whereas the third isolate was most likely a new Mycobacterium species. Isolates from Denmark and Thailand shared high sequence homology to complete identity with reference strain ATCC 927. Combined analysis of the two gene sequences increased the detection of intraspecific variations and was thus of importance in studying the taxonomy and epidemiology of this aquatic pathogen. Whether the Israeli M. marinum strain infecting marine fish is endemic to the Red Sea and found extremely susceptible hosts in the exotic species imported for aquaculture or rather was accidentally introduced with occasional imports of fingerlings from the Mediterranean Sea could not be determined. PMID:12406715

  8. Revealing Invisible Photonic Inscriptions: Images from Strain.

    PubMed

    Ding, Tao; Cao, Guoshuai; Schäfer, Christian G; Zhao, Qibin; Gallei, Markus; Smoukov, Stoyan K; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2015-06-24

    Photonic structural materials have received intensive interest and have been strongly developed over the past few years for image displays, sensing, and anticounterfeit materials. Their "smartness" arises from their color responsivity to changes of environment, strain, or external fields. Here, we introduce a novel invisible photonic system that reveals encrypted images or characters by simply stretching, or immersing in solvents. This type of intriguing photonic material is composed of regularly arranged core-shell particles that are selectively cross-linked by UV irradiation, giving different strain response compared to un-cross-linked regions. The images reversibly appear and disappear when cycling the strain and releasing it. The unique advantages of this soft polymer opal system compared with other types of photonic gels are that it can be produced in roll to roll quantities, can be vigorously deformed to achieve strong color changes, and has no solvent evaporation issues because it is a photonic rubber system. We demonstrate potential applications together with a fabrication procedure which is straightforward and scalable, vital for user take-up. Our work deepens understanding of this rubbery photonic system based on core-shell nanospheres. PMID:26039279

  9. Revealing Invisible Photonic Inscriptions: Images from Strain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Photonic structural materials have received intensive interest and have been strongly developed over the past few years for image displays, sensing, and anticounterfeit materials. Their “smartness” arises from their color responsivity to changes of environment, strain, or external fields. Here, we introduce a novel invisible photonic system that reveals encrypted images or characters by simply stretching, or immersing in solvents. This type of intriguing photonic material is composed of regularly arranged core–shell particles that are selectively cross-linked by UV irradiation, giving different strain response compared to un-cross-linked regions. The images reversibly appear and disappear when cycling the strain and releasing it. The unique advantages of this soft polymer opal system compared with other types of photonic gels are that it can be produced in roll to roll quantities, can be vigorously deformed to achieve strong color changes, and has no solvent evaporation issues because it is a photonic rubber system. We demonstrate potential applications together with a fabrication procedure which is straightforward and scalable, vital for user take-up. Our work deepens understanding of this rubbery photonic system based on core–shell nanospheres. PMID:26039279

  10. Sorbitol production using recombinant Zymomonas mobilis strain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changjun; Dong, Hongwei; Zhong, Jianjiang; Ryu, Dewey D Y; Bao, Jie

    2010-07-20

    A recombinant Zymomonas mobilis strain harboring the plasmid pHW20a-gfo for over-expression of glucose-fructose oxidoreductase (GFOR) was constructed. The specific activity of GFOR enzyme in the new recombinant strain was at least two folds greater than that in the wild strain. The maximum GFOR activity achieved in terms of the volumetric, and the cellular were 2.59 U ml(-1), and 0.70 U mg(-1), respectively, in the batch cultures. A significant improvement of the bioconversion process for the production of sorbitol and gluconic acid from glucose and fructose was made using divalent metal ions which drastically reduced the ethanol yield and significantly increased the yield of target product. Among several divalent metal ions evaluated, Zn(2+) was found to be most effective by inhibiting the Entner-Doudoroff pathway enzymes. The yield of the byproduct ethanol was reduced from 16.7 to 1.8 gl(-1) and the sorbitol yield was increased to almost 100% from 89%. The Ca(2+) enhanced the sorbitol yield and the formation of calcium gluconate salt made the separation of gluconate from the reaction system easier.

  11. Integrated strain array for cellular mechanobiology studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, C. S.; Sim, J. Y.; Baechtold, P.; Gonzalez, A.; Chung, C.; Borghi, N.; Pruitt, B. L.

    2011-05-01

    We have developed an integrated strain array for cell culture enabling high-throughput mechano-transduction studies. Biocompatible cell culture chambers were integrated with an acrylic pneumatic compartment and microprocessor-based control system. Each element of the array consists of a deformable membrane supported by a cylindrical pillar within a well. For user-prescribed waveforms, the annular region of the deformable membrane is pulled into the well around the pillar under vacuum, causing the pillar-supported region with cultured cells to be stretched biaxially. The optically clear device and pillar-based mechanism of operation enables imaging on standard laboratory microscopes. Straightforward fabrication utilizes off-the-shelf components, soft lithography techniques in polydimethylsiloxane and laser ablation of acrylic sheets. Proof of compatibility with basic biological assays and standard imaging equipment were accomplished by straining C2C12 skeletal myoblasts on the device for 6 h. At higher strains, cells and actin stress fibers realign with a circumferential preference.

  12. Deformation twinning: Influence of strain rate

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, G.T. III

    1993-11-01

    Twins in most crystal structures, including advanced materials such as intermetallics, form more readily as the temperature of deformation is decreased or the rate of deformation is increased. Both parameters lead to the suppression of thermally-activated dislocation processes which can result in stresses high enough to nucleate and grow deformation twins. Under high-strain rate or shock-loading/impact conditions deformation twinning is observed to be promoted even in high stacking fault energy FCC metals and alloys, composites, and ordered intermetallics which normally do not readily deform via twinning. Under such conditions and in particular under the extreme loading rates typical of shock wave deformation the competition between slip and deformation twinning can be examined in detail. In this paper, examples of deformation twinning in the intermetallics TiAl, Ti-48Al-lV and Ni{sub 3}A as well in the cermet Al-B{sub 4}C as a function of strain rate will be presented. Discussion includes: (1) the microstructural and experimental variables influencing twin formation in these systems and twinning topics related to high-strain-rate loading, (2) the high velocity of twin formation, and (3) the influence of deformation twinning on the constitutive response of advanced materials.

  13. Advanced high temperature static strain sensor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulse, C. O.; Stetson, K. A.; Grant, H. P.; Jameikis, S. M.; Morey, W. W.; Raymondo, P.; Grudkowski, T. W.; Bailey, R. S.

    1986-01-01

    An examination was made into various techniques to be used to measure static strain in gas turbine liners at temperatures up to 1150 K (1600 F). The methods evaluated included thin film and wire resistive devices, optical fibers, surface acoustic waves, the laser speckle technique with a heterodyne readout, optical surface image and reflective approaches and capacitive devices. A preliminary experimental program to develop a thin film capacitive device was dropped because calculations showed that it would be too sensitive to thermal gradients. In a final evaluation program, the laser speckle technique appeared to work well up to 1150 K when it was used through a relatively stagnant air path. The surface guided acoustic wave approach appeared to be interesting but to require too much development effort for the funds available. Efforts to develop a FeCrAl resistive strain gage system were only partially successful and this part of the effort was finally reduced to a characterization study of the properties of the 25 micron diameter FeCrAl (Kanthal A-1) wire. It was concluded that this particular alloy was not suitable for use as the resistive element in a strain gage above about 1000 K.

  14. Spherical nanoindentation stress–strain curves

    DOE PAGES

    Pathak, Siddhartha; Kalidindi, Surya R.

    2015-03-24

    Although indentation experiments have long been used to measure the hardness and Young's modulus, the utility of this technique in analyzing the complete elastic–plastic response of materials under contact loading has only been realized in the past few years – mostly due to recent advances in testing equipment and analysis protocols. This paper provides a timely review of the recent progress made in this respect in extracting meaningful indentation stress–strain curves from the raw datasets measured in instrumented spherical nanoindentation experiments. These indentation stress–strain curves have produced highly reliable estimates of the indentation modulus and the indentation yield strength inmore » the sample, as well as certain aspects of their post-yield behavior, and have been critically validated through numerical simulations using finite element models as well as direct in situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements on micro-pillars. Much of this recent progress was made possible through the introduction of a new measure of indentation strain and the development of new protocols to locate the effective zero-point of initial contact between the indenter and the sample in the measured datasets. As a result, this has led to an important key advance in this field where it is now possible to reliably identify and analyze the initial loading segment in the indentation experiments.« less

  15. Acceleration and Velocity Sensing from Measured Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi; Truax, Roger

    2015-01-01

    A simple approach for computing acceleration and velocity of a structure from the strain is proposed in this study. First, deflection and slope of the structure are computed from the strain using a two-step theory. Frequencies of the structure are computed from the time histories of strain using a parameter estimation technique together with an autoregressive moving average model. From deflection, slope, and frequencies of the structure, acceleration and velocity of the structure can be obtained using the proposed approach. Simple harmonic motion is assumed for the acceleration computations, and the central difference equation with a linear autoregressive model is used for the computations of velocity. A cantilevered rectangular wing model is used to validate the simple approach. Quality of the computed deflection, acceleration, and velocity values are independent of the number of fibers. The central difference equation with a linear autoregressive model proposed in this study follows the target response with reasonable accuracy. Therefore, the handicap of the backward difference equation, phase shift, is successfully overcome.

  16. Minimal nitrogen requirements of Corynebacterium renal strains.

    PubMed

    VanEseltine, W P; Cox, W M; Kadis, S

    1978-01-01

    Corynebacterium renale strain 10849 was grown in a chemically defined medium containing glucosamine, ammonium sulfate, and 5 amino acids as possible nitrogen sources. Although glucosamine was slightly stimulatory, its omission from the medium had a minimal effect on growth, and washed cells introduced into glucosamine-free medium grew readily through 10 serial transfers, demonstrating that this compound was not required for growth. Individual omissions of isoleucine, valine, methionine, and glutamine resulted in lengthened lag periods and reduced growth rates in initial transfers, but recovery occurred in subsequent serial transfers so that by the 3rd or 4th transfer, growth rates and cell crops were only slightly less than in control cultures in complete medium. Omission of cystine resulted in a permanently low growth rate and reduced cell crop, but this was remedied by substituting various nonnitrogenous compounds containing reduced sulfur. Strain 10849 and 6 additional strains were then serially cultured in a minimal defined medium in which sodium thioglycolate provided reduced sulfur and ammonium sulfate served as sole nitrogen source. Since only ammonium ion was required as the nitrogen source, it could be concluded that C renale, which rapidly hydrolyzes urea, should find an adequate source of nitrogen for growth in the urinary tract of animals. PMID:629434

  17. Models for elastic shells with incompatible strains

    PubMed Central

    Lewicka, Marta; Mahadevan, L.; Pakzad, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    The three-dimensional shapes of thin lamina, such as leaves, flowers, feathers, wings, etc., are driven by the differential strain induced by the relative growth. The growth takes place through variations in the Riemannian metric given on the thin sheet as a function of location in the central plane and also across its thickness. The shape is then a consequence of elastic energy minimization on the frustrated geometrical object. Here, we provide a rigorous derivation of the asymptotic theories for shapes of residually strained thin lamina with non-trivial curvatures, i.e. growing elastic shells in both the weakly and strongly curved regimes, generalizing earlier results for the growth of nominally flat plates. The different theories are distinguished by the scaling of the mid-surface curvature relative to the inverse thickness and growth strain, and also allow us to generalize the classical Föppl–von Kármán energy to theories of prestrained shallow shells. PMID:24808750

  18. Spherical nanoindentation stress–strain curves

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, Siddhartha; Kalidindi, Surya R.

    2015-03-24

    Although indentation experiments have long been used to measure the hardness and Young's modulus, the utility of this technique in analyzing the complete elastic–plastic response of materials under contact loading has only been realized in the past few years – mostly due to recent advances in testing equipment and analysis protocols. This paper provides a timely review of the recent progress made in this respect in extracting meaningful indentation stress–strain curves from the raw datasets measured in instrumented spherical nanoindentation experiments. These indentation stress–strain curves have produced highly reliable estimates of the indentation modulus and the indentation yield strength in the sample, as well as certain aspects of their post-yield behavior, and have been critically validated through numerical simulations using finite element models as well as direct in situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements on micro-pillars. Much of this recent progress was made possible through the introduction of a new measure of indentation strain and the development of new protocols to locate the effective zero-point of initial contact between the indenter and the sample in the measured datasets. As a result, this has led to an important key advance in this field where it is now possible to reliably identify and analyze the initial loading segment in the indentation experiments.

  19. Strain rate and stress field in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlié, Nicolas; Woessner, Jochen; Giardini, Domenico; Rothacher, Markus

    2016-04-01

    In this study we test whether the surface deformation and the seismic activity are in agreement in terms of seismic moment release and stress/strain orientations within the territory of Switzerland. We find that for most of the country, the stress released (~2.0 10E11 N·m/yr) is consistent with the lithosphere deformation (<5 10E-8 /yr) constrained using the Global Positioning System (GPS). South of the Alpine front, we note that surface strain rates displays few agreement with long-term (and deep) deformation of the upper mantle. In this area, we propose that shear strain is being distributed in the upper crust as a result of the clockwise rotation of the Adria plate. For three regions (Basel, Swiss Jura and Ticino), we find that seismic current activity and surface deformation not to be in agreement. In the Basel area, deep seismicity exists while surface deformation is absent. This situation contrasts to what is found in the Ticino and the Swiss Jura, where seismic activity is close to absent but surface deformation is detected (~2 10E-8 /yr). While the surface deformation and seismic activity is inconsistent for the Ticino, we find them to comply in the Valais region where MW≥6 events are historically documented. Our comparison implies that the Ticino faces the potential of damaging earthquakes every hundred to few hundred years.

  20. Strain sensors for high field pulse magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Christian; Zheng, Yan; Easton, Daniel; Farinholt, Kevin M; Park, Gyuhae

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present an investigation into several strain sensing technologies that are being considered to monitor mechanical deformation within the steel reinforcement shells used in high field pulsed magnets. Such systems generally operate at cryogenic temperatures to mitigate heating issues that are inherent in the coils of nondestructive, high field pulsed magnets. The objective of this preliminary study is to characterize the performance of various strain sensing technologies at liquid nitrogen temperatures (-196 C). Four sensor types are considered in this investigation: fiber Bragg gratings (FBG), resistive foil strain gauges (RFSG), piezoelectric polymers (PVDF), and piezoceramics (PZT). Three operational conditions are considered for each sensor: bond integrity, sensitivity as a function of temperature, and thermal cycling effects. Several experiments were conducted as part of this study, investigating adhesion with various substrate materials (stainless steel, aluminum, and carbon fiber), sensitivity to static (FBG and RFSG) and dynamic (RFSG, PVDF and PZT) load conditions, and sensor diagnostics using PZT sensors. This work has been conducted in collaboration with the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), and the results of this study will be used to identify the set of sensing technologies that would be best suited for integration within high field pulsed magnets at the NHMFL facility.

  1. Macroscopic strain potentials in nonlinear porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Liu; Zhuping, Huang

    2003-02-01

    By taking a hollow sphere as a representative volume element (RVE), the macroscopic strain potentials of porous materials with power-law incompressible matrix are studied in this paper. According to the principles of the minimum potential energy in nonlinear elasticity and the variational procedure, static admissible stress fields and kinematic admissible displacement fields are constructed, and hence the upper and the lower bounds of the macroscopic strain potential are obtained. The bounds given in the present paper differ so slightly that they both provide perfect approximations of the exact strain potential of the studied porous materials. It is also found that the upper bound proposed by previous authors is much higher than the present one, and the lower bounds given by Cocks is much lower. Moreover, the present calculation is also compared with the variational lower bound of Ponte Castañeda for statistically isotropic porous materials. Finally, the validity of the hollow spherical RVE for the studied nonlinear porous material is discussed by the difference between the present numerical results and the Cocks bound.

  2. Strain Functionals for Characterizing Atomistic Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kober, Edward; Rudin, Sven

    The development of a set of strain tensor functionals that are capable of characterizing arbitrarily ordered atomistic structures is described. This approach defines a Gaussian-weighted neighborhood around each atom and characterizes that local geometry in terms of n-th order strain tensors, which are equivalent to the moments of the neighborhood. Fourth order expansions can distinguish the cubic structures (and deformations thereof), but sixth order expansions are required to fully characterize hexagonal structures. Other methods used to characterize atomic structures, such as the Steinhardt parameters or the centrosymmetry metric, can be derived from this more general approach. These functions are continuous and smooth and much less sensitive to thermal fluctuations than other descriptors based on discrete neighborhoods. They allow material phases, deformations, and a large number of defect structures to be readily identified and classified. Applications to the analysis of shock-loaded samples of Cu, Ta and Ti will be presented. This strain functional basis can also then be used for developing interatomic potential functions, and an initial application to Cu will be presented.

  3. Circulatory strain in everyday life of paraplegics.

    PubMed

    Hjeltnes, N; Vokac, Z

    1979-01-01

    Circulatory strain encountered in everyday life was low, taxing 15-24% of HRR. Similar results (Th8-Th12) was estimated from their heart rates (fH) recorded continuously by portable tape recorders for up to 48 h. The degree of strain was expressed in per cent of the individual's heart rate reserve (HRR), i.e. of the span between resting and maximal fH. The average strain of everyday life was low, taxing 15-24% of HRR. Similar results were obtained in a rehabilitated patient (subj. 5, Th12) at the hospital. fH higher than 50% of HRR which could be expected to have a training effect on the circulatory system was recoreded only when ambulating with crutches, driving wheelchair uphill, playing basketball, or during specific training (arm cranking in subj. 6 (Th2) who attended a post-rehabilitation course). The results confirm that daily life activities with no additional training are not intense enough to maintain the circulatory and physical fitness of rehabilitated paraplegics.

  4. Strain limit dependence on stress triaxiality for pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Y.-C.; Chen, G.; Yang, X.-F.; Xu, T.

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, the failure characteristics of pressure vessel materials were investigated, and measurement and analysis approaches for ductile fracture strains were studied. Based on uniaxial tensile tests of notched round bar specimens, combined with finite element analyses and microscopic observations of fracture surface, the relationships between the stress triaxiality factor and the ductile fracture strain are proposed for three typical Chinese pressure vessel steels, 16MnR, Q235 and 0Cr18Ni9. The comparison of experimental fracture strains with the multiaxial strain limit specified in ASME VIII-2 2007 shows that the strain limit criterion of ASME is suitable for carbon steels but not suitable for austenitic stainless steels for Chinese pressure vessel steels. To improve the calculation accuracy for fracture strain of materials and to develop the strain limit criterion for Chinese pressure vessel materials, more experimental studies and numerical analyses on fracture strain are necessary.

  5. Strain gage network distinguishes between thermal and mechanical deformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cepollina, F. J.

    1966-01-01

    Strain gage network measures the thermal coefficient of linear expansion of composite metal structures. The network consists of a test gage and two dummy gages arranged to distinguish thermally induced deformation from mechanical strain.

  6. Whole Genome Analysis of a Wine Yeast Strain

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Nicole C.; Fellenberg, Kurt; Gil, Rosario; Bastuck, Sonja; Hoheisel, Jörg D.

    2001-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains frequently exhibit rather specific phenotypic features needed for adaptation to a special environment. Wine yeast strains are able to ferment musts, for example, while other industrial or laboratory strains fail to do so. The genetic differences that characterize wine yeast strains are poorly understood, however. As a first search of genetic differences between wine and laboratory strains, we performed DNA-array analyses on the typical wine yeast strain T73 and the standard laboratory background in S288c. Our analysis shows that even under normal conditions, logarithmic growth in YPD medium, the two strains have expression patterns that differ significantly in more than 40 genes. Subsequent studies indicated that these differences correlate with small changes in promoter regions or variations in gene copy number. Blotting copy numbers vs. transcript levels produced patterns, which were specific for the individual strains and could be used for a characterization of unknown samples. PMID:18628902

  7. Bonding of strain gages to fiber reinforced composite plastic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Hanson, M. P.; Serafini, T. T.

    1970-01-01

    Strain gage is installed during molding of composite and utilizes the adhesive properties of the matrix resin in the composite to bond the strain gage in place. Gages thus embedded provide data at all temperatures that the matrix can withstand.

  8. Electronic structure and optic absorption of phosphorene under strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Houjian; Yang, Mou; Wang, Ruiqiang

    2016-07-01

    We studied the electronic structure and optic absorption of phosphorene (monolayer of black phosphorus) under strain. Strain was found to be a powerful tool for the band structure engineering. The in-plane strain in armchair or zigzag direction changes the effective mass components along both directions, while the vertical strain only has significant effect on the effective mass in the armchair direction. The band gap is narrowed by compressive in-plane strain and tensile vertical strain. Under certain strain configurations, the gap is closed and the energy band evolves to the semi-Dirac type: the dispersion is linear in the armchair direction and is gapless quadratic in the zigzag direction. The band-edge optic absorption is completely polarized along the armchair direction, and the polarization rate is reduced when the photon energy increases. Strain not only changes the absorption edge (the smallest photon energy for electron transition), but also the absorption polarization.

  9. Genome Sequence of the Immunomodulatory Strain Bifidobacterium bifidum LMG 13195

    PubMed Central

    Gueimonde, Miguel; Ventura, Marco; Margolles, Abelardo

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we report the genome sequences of Bifidobacterium bifidum strain LMG13195. Results from our research group show that this strain is able to interact with human immune cells, generating functional regulatory T cells. PMID:23209243

  10. [Electricity generation and quinoline degradation of pure strains and mixed strains in the microbial fuel cell].

    PubMed

    Chen, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Cui-Ping; Liu, Guang-Li; Zhang, Ren-Duo; Li, Ming-Chen; Quan, Xiang-Chun

    2010-09-01

    Microbial flora composition of microbial fuel cells (MFC) is important to the electricity generation. Four bacterium strains Q1, b, c and d which represent all different morphology of culturable bacterium were isolated from a MFC using 200 mg x L(-1) quinoline as the fuel and operating for at least 210 days. Strains Q1, c and d were Pseudomonas sp. based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis, while strain b was Burkholderia sp. Double-chamber MFCs using 200 mg x L(-1) quinoline and 300 mg x L(-1) glucose as the fuel and potassium ferricyanide as the electron acceptor were constructed. Results showed that strain b, c and d were non-electrogenesis. The electrical charges of MFC inoculated electrogenesis strain Q1 with non-electrogenesis strain b, c and d respectively were 3.00, 3.57 and 5.13C, and the columbic efficiency were 3.85%, 4.59% and 6.58%, which were all lower than that inoculated with pure Q1, because of the interspecific competition of electrogenesis and non-electrogenesis bacteria. Combinations of Q1 with the other three strains respectively resulted in 100% of quinoline degradation rates within 24h, which is better than pure cultures, that is, mixed microbial populations perform better in MFC when complex organics are used as the fuel. GC/MS analyses showed that only 2(1H)-quinolinone and phenol existed in the effluent of the MFC, which was inoculated with only Q1 or mixed bacteria.

  11. New Amylolytic Yeast Strains for Starch and Dextrin Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Laluce, Cecília; Bertolini, Maria Célia; Ernandes, José Roberto; Martini, Ann Vaughan; Martini, Alessandro

    1988-01-01

    Yeast strains capable of fermenting starch and dextrin to ethanol were isolated from samples collected from Brazilian factories in which cassava flour is produced. Considerable alcohol production was observed for all the strains selected. One strain (DI-10) fermented starch rapidly and secreted 5 times as much amylolytic enzyme than that observed for Schwanniomyces alluvius UCD 54-83. This strain and three other similar isolates were classified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. diastaticus by morphological and physiological characteristics and molecular taxonomy. PMID:16347755

  12. EVALUATION OF LOCAL STRAIN EVOLUTION FROM METALLIC WHISKER FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.; Lam, P.

    2011-05-11

    Evolution of local strain on electrodeposited tin films upon aging has been monitored by digital image correlation (DIC) for the first time. Maps of principal strains adjacent to whisker locations were constructed via comparing pre- and post-growth scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. Results showed that the magnitude of the strain gradient plays an important role in whisker growth. DIC visualized the dynamic growth process in which the alteration of strain field has been identified to cause growth of subsequent whiskers.

  13. Fitness Studies of Azole-Resistant Strains of Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Valsecchi, Isabel; Mellado, Emilia; Beau, Rémi; Raj, Shriya

    2015-01-01

    Isogenic bar-coded strains of Aspergillus fumigatus carrying the G54W or M220K mutation in Cyp51A were constructed. In vitro, the growth and conidiation capacities of the mutants were similar to those of the parental strain. Competition studies in the absence of azoles showed that there was no adverse fitness cost for the azole-resistant A. fumigatus strains in vitro or in vivo compared to the parental strain. PMID:26416854

  14. Flexible Bond Wire Capacitive Strain Sensor for Vehicle Tyres.

    PubMed

    Cao, Siyang; Pyatt, Simon; Anthony, Carl J; Kubba, Ammar I; Kubba, Ali E; Olatunbosun, Oluremi

    2016-01-01

    The safety of the driving experience and manoeuvrability of a vehicle can be improved by detecting the strain in tyres. To measure strain accurately in rubber, the strain sensor needs to be flexible so that it does not deform the medium that it is measuring. In this work, a novel flexible bond wire capacitive strain sensor for measuring the strain in tyres is developed, fabricated and calibrated. An array of 25 micron diameter wire bonds in an approximately 8 mm × 8 mm area is built to create an interdigitated structure, which consists of 50 wire loops resulting in 49 capacitor pairs in parallel. Laser machining was used to pattern copper on a flexible printed circuit board PCB to make the bond pads for the wire attachment. The wire array was finally packaged and embedded in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), which acts as the structural material that is strained. The capacitance of the device is in a linear like relationship with respect to the strain, which can measure the strain up to at least ±60,000 micro-strain (±6%) with a resolution of ~132 micro-strain (0.013%). In-tyre testing under static loading has shown the ability of the sensor to measure large tyre strains. The technology used for sensor fabrication lends itself to mass production and so the design is considered to be consistent with low cost commercialisable strain sensing technology. PMID:27338402

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Neurospora crassa Strain FGSC 73

    DOE PAGES

    Baker, Scott E.; Schackwitz, Wendy; Lipzen, Anna; Martin, Joel; Haridas, Sajeet; LaButti, Kurt; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Simmons, Blake A.; McCluskey, Kevin

    2015-04-02

    We report the elucidation of the complete genome of the Neurospora crassa (Shear and Dodge) strain FGSC 73, a mat-a, trp-3 mutant strain. The genome sequence around the idiotypic mating type locus represents the only publicly available sequence for a mat-a strain. 40.42 Megabases are assembled into 358 scaffolds carrying 11,978 gene models.

  16. Bordetella pertussis Strain Lacking Pertactin and Pertussis Toxin.

    PubMed

    Williams, Margaret M; Sen, Kathryn; Weigand, Michael R; Skoff, Tami H; Cunningham, Victoria A; Halse, Tanya A; Tondella, M Lucia

    2016-02-01

    A Bordetella pertussis strain lacking 2 acellular vaccine immunogens, pertussis toxin and pertactin, was isolated from an unvaccinated infant in New York State in 2013. Comparison with a French strain that was pertussis toxin-deficient, pertactin wild-type showed that the strains carry the same 28-kb deletion in similar genomes.

  17. Virulence of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain A281 on legumes

    SciTech Connect

    Hood, E.E.; Fraley, R.T.; Chilton, M.D.

    1987-03-01

    This study addresses the basis of host range on legumes of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain A281, an L,L-succinamopine strain. The authors tested virulence of T-DNA and vir region constructs from this tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid with complementary Ti plasmid regions from heterologous nopaline and octopine strains.

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Lysinibacillus sphaericus WHO Reference Strain 2362

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Santana, Alejandra; Gómez-Garzón, Camilo

    2016-01-01

    Lysinibacillus sphaericus is a species that contains strains widely used in the biological control of mosquitoes. Here, we present the complete 4.67-Mb genome of the WHO entomopathogenic reference strain L. sphaericus 2362, which is probably one of the most commercialized and studied strains. Genes coding for mosquitocidal toxin proteins were detected. PMID:27284157

  19. Flexible Bond Wire Capacitive Strain Sensor for Vehicle Tyres.

    PubMed

    Cao, Siyang; Pyatt, Simon; Anthony, Carl J; Kubba, Ammar I; Kubba, Ali E; Olatunbosun, Oluremi

    2016-06-21

    The safety of the driving experience and manoeuvrability of a vehicle can be improved by detecting the strain in tyres. To measure strain accurately in rubber, the strain sensor needs to be flexible so that it does not deform the medium that it is measuring. In this work, a novel flexible bond wire capacitive strain sensor for measuring the strain in tyres is developed, fabricated and calibrated. An array of 25 micron diameter wire bonds in an approximately 8 mm × 8 mm area is built to create an interdigitated structure, which consists of 50 wire loops resulting in 49 capacitor pairs in parallel. Laser machining was used to pattern copper on a flexible printed circuit board PCB to make the bond pads for the wire attachment. The wire array was finally packaged and embedded in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), which acts as the structural material that is strained. The capacitance of the device is in a linear like relationship with respect to the strain, which can measure the strain up to at least ±60,000 micro-strain (±6%) with a resolution of ~132 micro-strain (0.013%). In-tyre testing under static loading has shown the ability of the sensor to measure large tyre strains. The technology used for sensor fabrication lends itself to mass production and so the design is considered to be consistent with low cost commercialisable strain sensing technology.

  20. Proteomic analysis of Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine strain F

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The persistence and displacement abilities of the Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine strain F (F-strain) are well documented. Understanding the mechanism(s) of colonization and persistence of F-strain will aid in the current intervention strategies to diagnose and control MG infections in poultry. In ...

  1. Draft Genome Sequences of Four Plant Probiotic Bacillus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the whole-genome sequences of four Bacillus strains that exhibit plant probiotic activities. Three of them are the type strains of Bacillus endophyticus, “Bacillus gaemokensis,” and Bacillus trypoxylicola, and the other, Bacillus sp. strain KCTC 13219, should be reclassified into a species belonging to the genus Lysinibacillus. PMID:27174273

  2. Strain effects on oxygen transport in tetragonal zirconium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Xian-Ming Bai; Yongfeng Zhang; Michael R. Tonks

    2013-11-01

    Temperature accelerated dynamics and molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the strain effects on oxygen interstitial and vacancy migration in tetragonal zirconium dioxide. At zero external strain, the anisotropic migration mechanisms of oxygen defects are characterized. At non-zero strains, both the crystal structure and defect migration barriers are modified by strain. Under compressive strains, the defect migration barrier increases with the increasing strain for both interstitials and vacancies. The crystal structure transforms from a tetragonal to a nearly cubic fluorite structure. Accordingly, the defect migration becomes nearly isotropic. Under dilative strains, the migration barrier first decreases then increases with increasing strain for both types of defects. The tetragonal phase transforms to a lower symmetry structure that is close to the orthorhombic phase. In turn, the defect migration becomes highly anisotropic. Under both compressive and dilative strains, interstitials respond to strain more strongly than vacancies. At small dilative strains, an oxygen interstitial has comparable diffusivity to a vacancy, suggesting that both types of defects can contribute to oxygen transport, if they are present. Although currently no previous result is available to validate oxygen interstitial diffusion behavior, the trend of strain effects on oxygen vacancy diffusion is in good agreement with available experimental and theoretical studies in the literature.

  3. Flexible Bond Wire Capacitive Strain Sensor for Vehicle Tyres

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Siyang; Pyatt, Simon; Anthony, Carl J.; Kubba, Ammar I.; Kubba, Ali E.; Olatunbosun, Oluremi

    2016-01-01

    The safety of the driving experience and manoeuvrability of a vehicle can be improved by detecting the strain in tyres. To measure strain accurately in rubber, the strain sensor needs to be flexible so that it does not deform the medium that it is measuring. In this work, a novel flexible bond wire capacitive strain sensor for measuring the strain in tyres is developed, fabricated and calibrated. An array of 25 micron diameter wire bonds in an approximately 8 mm × 8 mm area is built to create an interdigitated structure, which consists of 50 wire loops resulting in 49 capacitor pairs in parallel. Laser machining was used to pattern copper on a flexible printed circuit board PCB to make the bond pads for the wire attachment. The wire array was finally packaged and embedded in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), which acts as the structural material that is strained. The capacitance of the device is in a linear like relationship with respect to the strain, which can measure the strain up to at least ±60,000 micro-strain (±6%) with a resolution of ~132 micro-strain (0.013%). In-tyre testing under static loading has shown the ability of the sensor to measure large tyre strains. The technology used for sensor fabrication lends itself to mass production and so the design is considered to be consistent with low cost commercialisable strain sensing technology. PMID:27338402

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium bovis Strain BCG-1 (Russia)

    PubMed Central

    Shitikov, Egor A.; Malakhova, Maja V.; Kostryukova, Elena S.; Ilina, Elena N.; Atrasheuskaya, Alena V.; Ignatyev, Georgy M.; Vinokurova, Nataliya V.; Gorbachyov, Vyacheslav Y.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG (Bacille Calmette-Guérin) is a vaccine strain used for protection against tuberculosis. Here, we announce the complete genome sequence of M. bovis strain BCG-1 (Russia). Extensive use of this strain necessitates the study of its genome stability by comparative analysis. PMID:27034492

  5. Characterization of refractory materials using sapphire strain gages

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, T.A.; Greene, J.A.; Alcock, M.A.

    1995-12-31

    A high-temperature sapphire strain gage based on the optical fiber extrinsic Fizeau interferometric sensor (EFI) was used to measure strain on a compressive loaded silicon carbide rod at a temperature of 1100{degrees}C. Experimental strain sensitivities on the order of 1 {mu}{epsilon} were obtained.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Agrobacterium rhizogenes Strain NCPPB2659

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This work reports the draft genome of Agrobacterium rhizogenes strain NCPPB2659 (also known as strain K599). The assembled genome contains 5,277,347 bp, and is composed of 1 circular chromosome, the Ri virulence plasmid, and 17 scaffolds pertaining to the linear chromosome. The wild type strain cau...

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Vaccinia Virus Strain L-IVP

    PubMed Central

    Shvalov, Alexander N.; Sivolobova, Galina F.; Kuligina, Elena V.

    2016-01-01

    Most of the live vaccine doses of vaccinia virus donated to the Intensified Smallpox Eradication Programme after 1971 were prepared using the L-IVP strain. A mixture of three clones of the L-IVP strain was sequenced using MySEQ. Consensus sequence similarity with the vaccinia virus Lister strain is 99.5%. PMID:27174282

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Vaccinia Virus Strain L-IVP.

    PubMed

    Shvalov, Alexander N; Sivolobova, Galina F; Kuligina, Elena V; Kochneva, Galina V

    2016-01-01

    Most of the live vaccine doses of vaccinia virus donated to the Intensified Smallpox Eradication Programme after 1971 were prepared using the L-IVP strain. A mixture of three clones of the L-IVP strain was sequenced using MySEQ. Consensus sequence similarity with the vaccinia virus Lister strain is 99.5%. PMID:27174282

  9. Bordetella pertussis Strain Lacking Pertactin and Pertussis Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Kathryn; Weigand, Michael R.; Skoff, Tami H.; Cunningham, Victoria A.; Halse, Tanya A.; Tondella, M. Lucia

    2016-01-01

    A Bordetella pertussis strain lacking 2 acellular vaccine immunogens, pertussis toxin and pertactin, was isolated from an unvaccinated infant in New York State in 2013. Comparison with a French strain that was pertussis toxin–deficient, pertactin wild-type showed that the strains carry the same 28-kb deletion in similar genomes. PMID:26812174

  10. Towards quantification of the interplay between strain weakening and strain localisation in granular material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Malte C.; Rosenau, Matthias; Leever, Karen; Oncken, Onno

    2014-05-01

    Strain weakening is the major agent of localisation of deformation into shear zones and faults at various scales in brittle media. Physical analogue models using granular material are especially apt to investigate both phenomena, because they are able to reproduce them without the need of any assumptions concerning the physics behind. Several attempts have been made to quantify either strain weakening (e. g. Lohrmann et al., 2003, using Ring-Shear tests) or strain localisation (e. g. Schrank et al., 2008, using a variation of the classical Riedel-experiment). While Ring-Shear tests yield excellent data on strain weakening through measuring shear stress during localisation, they do not allow monitoring the process of strain localisation in-situ because of experimental inaccessibility of the small scale kinematics. In Riedel-type strike-slip experiments, on the other hand, no direct measurements of shear stresses have been available so far. Furthermore, they contain a strong boundary condition in form of a pre-defined linear discontinuity at the base. This forces the formation of Riedel-Shears, i. e. a complex fault system, that makes it difficult to define strain localisation on single faults. We developed a new experimental set-up, in which the formation of a strike-slip shear zone in granular material is induced using an ndenter with stress and strain monitored at high accuracy and resolution. In a first set of experiments we used a horizontal sand layer indented by a vertical wall. The sand layer is laterally unconfined and rests on low-viscosity silicone oil in order to minimize basal shear strength. Compared to the Riedel experiments, this avoids the boundary condition of a pre-existing basal discontinuity allowing one single, hrough-going shear crack to form and propagate. The indenter moves at a constant rate and is equipped with a force sensor that measures the applied push, which integrates over shear stresses along the fault and the base of the sand pack

  11. HIGH-RATE FORMABILITY OF HIGH-STRENGTH ALUMINUM ALLOYS: A STUDY ON OBJECTIVITY OF MEASURED STRAIN AND STRAIN RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Piyush; Rohatgi, Aashish; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Davies, Richard W.; Catalini, David

    2015-02-18

    Al alloy AA7075 sheets were deformed at room temperature at strain-rates exceeding 1000 /s using the electrohydraulic forming (EHF) technique. A method that combines high speed imaging and digital image correlation technique, developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, is used to investigate high strain rate deformation behavior of AA7075. For strain-rate sensitive materials, the ability to accurately model their high-rate deformation behavior is dependent upon the ability to accurately quantify the strain-rate that the material is subjected to. This work investigates the objectivity of software-calculated strain and strain rate by varying different parameters within commonly used commercially available digital image correlation software. Except for very close to the time of crack opening the calculated strain and strain rates are very consistent and independent of the adjustable parameters of the software.

  12. Strain and strain rate: An emerging technology in the perioperative period

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Vishwas; Subramaniam, Arun; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra

    2016-01-01

    Newer noninvasive parameters are being used for perioperative detection of myocardial ischaemia. TDI and global strain rate are some of these parameters. TDI signal is a modification of the routine Doppler flow signal. It is obtained by using thresholding and filtering algorithms that reject echoes originating from the blood pool (by-passing the high pass filter). Set-Up of the machine by activating the TDI function allows decreasing the system gain using a low pass filter and eliminates the signal produced by blood flow. Doppler shift obtained from myocardial tissue motion are of higher amplitudes (reflectivity 40 dB higher) and move about 10 times slower than blood (velocity range: 0.06 to 0.24 m/s). Speckle tracking echocardiography (tissue tracking, 2D strain) utilizes routine gray-scale 2D echo images to calculate myocardial strain. Interactions of ultrasound with myocardium result in reflection and scattering. These interactions generate a finely gray-shaded, speckled pattern (acoustic marker). This speckled pattern is unique for each myocardial region and relatively stable throughout the cardiac cycle. Spatial and temporal image processing of acoustic speckles in both 2D and 3D allows for the calculation of myocardial velocity, strain, and Strain rate. PMID:26750682

  13. Transcriptomics-based strain optimization tool for designing secondary metabolite overproducing strains of Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minsuk; Yi, Jeong Sang; Lakshmanan, Meiyappan; Lee, Dong-Yup; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2016-03-01

    In silico model-driven analysis using genome-scale model of metabolism (GEM) has been recognized as a promising method for microbial strain improvement. However, most of the current GEM-based strain design algorithms based on flux balance analysis (FBA) heavily rely on the steady-state and optimality assumptions without considering any regulatory information. Thus, their practical usage is quite limited, especially in its application to secondary metabolites overproduction. In this study, we developed a transcriptomics-based strain optimization tool (tSOT) in order to overcome such limitations by integrating transcriptomic data into GEM. Initially, we evaluated existing algorithms for integrating transcriptomic data into GEM using Streptomyces coelicolor dataset, and identified iMAT algorithm as the only and the best algorithm for characterizing the secondary metabolism of S. coelicolor. Subsequently, we developed tSOT platform where iMAT is adopted to predict the reaction states, and successfully demonstrated its applicability to secondary metabolites overproduction by designing actinorhodin (ACT), a polyketide antibiotic, overproducing strain of S. coelicolor. Mutants overexpressing tSOT targets such as ribulose 5-phosphate 3-epimerase and NADP-dependent malic enzyme showed 2 and 1.8-fold increase in ACT production, thereby validating the tSOT prediction. It is expected that tSOT can be used for solving other metabolic engineering problems which could not be addressed by current strain design algorithms, especially for the secondary metabolite overproductions.

  14. Comparative proteome analysis of Brucella melitensis vaccine strain Rev 1 and a virulent strain, 16M.

    PubMed

    Eschenbrenner, Michel; Wagner, Mary Ann; Horn, Troy A; Kraycer, Jo Ann; Mujer, Cesar V; Hagius, Sue; Elzer, Philip; DelVecchio, Vito G

    2002-09-01

    The genus Brucella consists of bacterial pathogens that cause brucellosis, a major zoonotic disease characterized by undulant fever and neurological disorders in humans. Among the different Brucella species, Brucella melitensis is considered the most virulent. Despite successful use in animals, the vaccine strains remain infectious for humans. To understand the mechanism of virulence in B. melitensis, the proteome of vaccine strain Rev 1 was analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and compared to that of virulent strain 16M. The two strains were grown under identical laboratory conditions. Computer-assisted analysis of the two B. melitensis proteomes revealed proteins expressed in either 16M or Rev 1, as well as up- or down-regulation of proteins specific for each of these strains. These proteins were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting. It was found that certain metabolic pathways may be deregulated in Rev 1. Expression of an immunogenic 31-kDa outer membrane protein, proteins utilized for iron acquisition, and those that play a role in sugar binding, lipid degradation, and amino acid binding was altered in Rev 1.

  15. Mismatching between circulating strains and vaccine strains of influenza: Effect on Hajj pilgrims from both hemispheres

    PubMed Central

    Alfelali, Mohammad; Khandaker, Gulam; Booy, Robert; Rashid, Harunor

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine is expected to provide optimum protection if the vaccine strains match the circulating strains. The effect of worldwide mismatch between the vaccine strains and extant strains on travelers attending Hajj pilgrimage is not known. Annually 2-3 million Muslims coming from north and south hemispheres congregate at Hajj in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, where intense congestion amplifies the risk of respiratory infection up to eight fold. In order to estimate, to what extent mismatching increases the risk of vaccine failure in Hajj pilgrims, we have examined the global data on influenza epidemiology since 2003, in light of the available data from Hajj. These data demonstrate that globally mismatching between circulating and vaccine strains has occurred frequently over the last 12 years, and the mismatch seems to have affected the Hajj pilgrims, however, influenza virus characteristics were studied only in a limited number of Hajj seasons. When the vaccines are different, dual vaccination of travelers by vaccines for southern and northern hemispheres should be considered for Hajj pilgrims whenever logistically feasible. Consideration should also be given to the use of vaccines with broader coverage, i.e., quadrivalent, or higher immunogenicity. Continuous surveillance of influenza at Hajj is important. PMID:26317639

  16. Strain and strain rate: An emerging technology in the perioperative period.

    PubMed

    Malik, Vishwas; Subramaniam, Arun; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra

    2016-01-01

    Newer noninvasive parameters are being used for perioperative detection of myocardial ischaemia. TDI and global strain rate are some of these parameters. TDI signal is a modification of the routine Doppler flow signal. It is obtained by using thresholding and filtering algorithms that reject echoes originating from the blood pool (by-passing the high pass filter). Set-Up of the machine by activating the TDI function allows decreasing the system gain using a low pass filter and eliminates the signal produced by blood flow. Doppler shift obtained from myocardial tissue motion are of higher amplitudes (reflectivity 40 dB higher) and move about 10 times slower than blood (velocity range: 0.06 to 0.24 m/s). Speckle tracking echocardiography (tissue tracking, 2D strain) utilizes routine gray-scale 2D echo images to calculate myocardial strain. Interactions of ultrasound with myocardium result in reflection and scattering. These interactions generate a finely gray-shaded, speckled pattern (acoustic marker). This speckled pattern is unique for each myocardial region and relatively stable throughout the cardiac cycle. Spatial and temporal image processing of acoustic speckles in both 2D and 3D allows for the calculation of myocardial velocity, strain, and Strain rate.

  17. Selective enrichment media bias the types of Salmonella enterica strains isolated from mixed strain cultures and complex enrichment broths.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    For foodborne outbreak investigations it can be difficult to isolate the relevant strain from food and/or environmental sources. If the sample is contaminated by more than one strain of the pathogen the relevant strain might be missed. In this study mixed cultures of Salmonella enterica were grown in one set of standard enrichment media to see if culture bias patterns emerged. Nineteen strains representing four serogroups and ten serotypes were compared in four-strain mixtures in Salmonella-only and in cattle fecal culture enrichment backgrounds using Salmonella enrichment media. One or more strain(s) emerged as dominant in each mixture. No serotype was most fit, but strains of serogroups C2 and E were more likely to dominate enrichment culture mixtures than strains of serogroups B or C1. Different versions of Rappaport-Vassiliadis (RV) medium gave different patterns of strain dominance in both Salmonella-only and fecal enrichment culture backgrounds. The fittest strains belonged to serogroups C1, C2, and E, and included strains of S. Infantis, S. Thompson S. Newport, S. 6,8:d:-, and S. Give. Strains of serogroup B, which included serotypes often seen in outbreaks such as S. Typhimurium, S. Saintpaul, and S. Schwarzengrund were less likely to emerge as dominant strains in the mixtures when using standard RV as part of the enrichment. Using a more nutrient-rich version of RV as part of the protocol led to a different pattern of strains emerging, however some were still present in very low numbers in the resulting population. These results indicate that outbreak investigations of food and/or other environmental samples should include multiple enrichment protocols to ensure isolation of target strains of Salmonella.

  18. Revealing Differences in Metabolic Flux Distributions between a Mutant Strain and Its Parent Strain Gluconacetobacter xylinus CGMCC 2955

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Miao; Yang, Xiao-Ning; Zhu, Hui-Xia; Jia, Yuan-Yuan; Jia, Shi-Ru; Piergiovanni, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    A better understanding of metabolic fluxes is important for manipulating microbial metabolism toward desired end products, or away from undesirable by-products. A mutant strain, Gluconacetobacter xylinus AX2-16, was obtained by combined chemical mutation of the parent strain (G. xylinus CGMCC 2955) using DEC (diethyl sulfate) and LiCl. The highest bacterial cellulose production for this mutant was obtained at about 11.75 g/L, which was an increase of 62% compared with that by the parent strain. In contrast, gluconic acid (the main byproduct) concentration was only 5.71 g/L for mutant strain, which was 55.7% lower than that of parent strain. Metabolic flux analysis indicated that 40.1% of the carbon source was transformed to bacterial cellulose in mutant strain, compared with 24.2% for parent strain. Only 32.7% and 4.0% of the carbon source were converted into gluconic acid and acetic acid in mutant strain, compared with 58.5% and 9.5% of that in parent strain. In addition, a higher flux of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was obtained in mutant strain (57.0%) compared with parent strain (17.0%). It was also indicated from the flux analysis that more ATP was produced in mutant strain from pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and TCA cycle. The enzymatic activity of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), which is one of the key enzymes in TCA cycle, was 1.65-fold higher in mutant strain than that in parent strain at the end of culture. It was further validated by the measurement of ATPase that 3.53–6.41 fold higher enzymatic activity was obtained from mutant strain compared with parent strain. PMID:24901455

  19. Morphological and molecular differences in two strains of Ustilago esculenta.

    PubMed

    You, Wenyu; Liu, Qian; Zou, Keqin; Yu, Xiaoping; Cui, Haifeng; Ye, Zihong

    2011-01-01

    Ustilago esculenta is a fungal endophyte of Zizania latifolia that plays an important agricultural role in this vegetable crop. The purpose of this study was to characterize sporidial (T) and mycelial (M-T) strains of U. esculenta isolated from sporulating and non-sporulating galls on plants growing in Zhejiang province, China. Morphological comparisons of the T strain and M-T strain were made by optical and scanning electron microscope observation. Genetic differences were examined by sequencing the ITS region of the fungus and examining differential protein expression by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS. The sporidial (T) and mycelial (M-T) strains differed in morphological characteristics of their in vitro single colony formations and in cell shape. Alignment of ITS sequences of the T strain and M-T strain revealed a single mutation between the T strain and M-T strain, but the sequences were the same within strains. A total of 146 proteins were only expressed in the M-T strain, and 242 proteins were only expressed in the T strain isolated from infected plants. A total of 222 proteins were up-regulated or down-regulated in the T strain when compared with the M-T strain. Of these, 18 proteins were identified and eight were associated with processes involving energy metabolism and the cytoskeleton. Two morphology-related proteins, MAP kinase kinase and actin, were differentially expressed. The differences noted in the T strain and M-T strain may lead to a better understanding of the life cycle and morphogenesis in U. esculenta. PMID:20495805

  20. Draft Genome Sequences of Agrobacterium nepotum Strain 39/7T and Agrobacterium sp. Strain KFB 330.

    PubMed

    Kuzmanović, Nemanja; Puławska, Joanna; Prokić, Anđelka; Ivanović, Milan; Zlatković, Nevena; Gašić, Katarina; Obradović, Aleksa

    2015-01-01

    Tumorigenic strains of Agrobacterium spp. are responsible for crown gall disease of numerous plant species. We present here draft genome sequences of nonpathogenic Agrobacterium nepotum strain 39/7(T) (CFBP 7436(T), LMG 26435(T)), isolated from crown gall tumor on Prunus cerasifera, and tumorigenic Agrobacterium sp. strain KFB 330 (CFBP 8308, LMG 28674), isolated from galls on raspberry. PMID:25908139