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Sample records for acicular ferrite af

  1. The Origin of Acicular Ferrite in Gas Metal Arc and Submerged ARC Welds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    Ti/Al ........ .. 120 Figure 4.4 SAW % Acicular Ferrite vs Inclusion VF . . 121 Figure 4.5 Micrograph of TiN Inclusion in HY-80 Steel 122 Figure 4.6...Figure 4.19 SAW Strength vs %CG/%XF/CFE ... ........ .. 136 Figure 4.20 SAW DBTT vs CG/AF/Weld Mn ... ......... .. 137 viii LIST OF TABLES TABLE 2.1...COMPOSITION OF HIGH STRENGTH STEELS . . .. 48 TABLE 2.2 MECH. PROP. LIMITS OF HIGH STRENGTH STEELS 49 TABLE 2.3 HY-100 SAW ELECTRODE CHEMISTRY ...... 49

  2. Factors Affecting the Inclusion Potency for Acicular Ferrite Nucleation in High-Strength Steel Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yongjoon; Jeong, Seonghoon; Kang, Joo-Hee; Lee, Changhee

    2016-06-01

    Factors affecting the inclusion potency for acicular ferrite nucleation in high-strength weld metals were investigated and the contribution of each factor was qualitatively evaluated. Two kinds of weld metals with different hardenabilities were prepared, in both, MnTi2O4-rich spinel formed as the predominant inclusion phase. To evaluate the factors determining the inclusion potency, the inclusion characteristics of size, phase distribution in the multiphase inclusion, orientation relationship with ferrite, and Mn distribution near the inclusion were analyzed. Three factors affecting the ferrite nucleation potency of inclusions were evaluated: the Baker-Nutting (B-N) orientation relationship between ferrite and the inclusion; the formation of an Mn-depleted zone (MDZ) near the inclusion; and the strain energy around the inclusion. Among these, the first two factors were found to be the most important. In addition, it was concluded that the increased chemical driving force brought about by the formation of an MDZ contributed more to the formation of acicular ferrite in higher-strength weld metals, because the B-N orientation relationship between ferrite and the inclusion was less likely to form as the transformation temperature decreased.

  3. Fracture mechanisms in dual phase steels based on the acicular ferrite + martensite/austenite microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poruks, Peter

    The fracture mechanisms of low carbon microalloyed plate steels based on the acicular ferrite + marten site/austenite microstructure (AF + M/A) are investigated. The final microstructure consists of a dispersed phase of submicron equi-axed martensite particles with a bainitic ferrite matrix. A series of plates with M/A volume fractions of 0.076--0.179 are studied. Brittle fracture is investigated by Instrumented Charpy impact testing of samples at -196°C and subsequent metallography. The M/A particles are identified as the crack nucleation sites and the cleavage fracture stress calculated to be 2400 MPa in a complete AF microstrucuture. This value is significantly larger than in steels that contain significant proportions of conventional bainite. Standard Charpy and Instrumented Charpy impact testing is conducted through a temperature range from -80 to + 22°C to study ductile fracture behaviour. The total absorbed energy is separated into energies of crack nucleation and of crack propagation. It is found that the energy of crack nucleation is weakly dependent on the volume fraction of M/A and completely independent of temperature over the range studied. The crack propagation energy varies significantly with both variables, decreasing with increased volume fraction of M/A and with decreasing temperature. The peak load in the instrumented Charpy data is used to calculate the dynamic fracture toughness, KId, which is found to be 105--120 MPa-m1/2. The void nucleation and void growth stages of ductile fracture are studied by metallographic examination of tensile bars. The sites of void nucleation are identified as inclusions and M/A particles. Voids nucleate at the M/A particles by decohesion of the particle-matrix interface. A constant void nucleation strain of epsilon = 0.90 +/- 0.05 is measured for all of the samples independent of the volume fraction of M/A. A stress-based criterion is used to predict void nucleation and the interface strength is determined to be

  4. Effect of Ti-containing inclusions on the nucleation of acicular ferrite and mechanical properties of multipass weld metals.

    PubMed

    Fattahi, M; Nabhani, N; Hosseini, M; Arabian, N; Rahimi, E

    2013-02-01

    In the present study, the influence of Ti-containing inclusions on the development of acicular ferrite microstructure and mechanical properties in the multipass weld metals has been studied. Shielded metal arc weld deposits were prepared by varying titanium content in the range of 0.003-0.021%. The variation in the titanium content was obtained by the addition of different amounts of titanium oxide nanoparticles to the electrode coating. The dispersion of titanium oxide nanoparticles, composition of inclusions, microstructural analysis, tensile properties and Charpy impact toughness were evaluated. As the amount of Ti-containing inclusions in the weld metal was increased, the microstructure of the weld metal was changed from the grain boundary allotriomorphic ferrite structure to acicular ferrite with the intragranular nucleation of ferrite on the Ti-containing inclusions, and the mechanical properties were improved. This improvement is attributable to the increased percentage of acicular ferrite due to the uniform dispersion of Ti-containing inclusions and the pinning force of oxide nanoparticles against the growth of allotriomorphic ferrite and Widmanstätten ferrite from the austenite grain boundaries.

  5. Morphology of Proeutectoid Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jiaqing; Hillert, Mats; Borgenstam, Annika

    2017-01-01

    The morphology of grain boundary nucleated ferrite particles in iron alloys with 0.3 mass pct carbon has been classified according to the presence of facets. Several kinds of particles extend into both grains of austenite and have facets to both. It is proposed that they all belong to a continuous series of shapes. Ferrite plates can nucleate directly on the grain boundary but can also develop from edges on many kinds of particles. Feathery structures of parallel plates on both sides of a grain boundary can thus form. In sections, parallel to their main growth direction, plates have been seen to extend the whole way from the nucleation site at the grain boundary and to the growth front. This happens in the whole temperature range studied from 973 K to 673 K (700 °C to 400 °C). The plates thus grow continuously and not by subunits stopping at limited length and continuing the growth by new ones nucleating. Sometimes, the plates have ridges and in oblique sections they could be mistaken for the start of new plates. No morphological signs were observed indicating a transition between Widmanstätten ferrite and bainitic ferrite. It is proposed that there is only one kind of acicular ferrite.

  6. Morphology of Proeutectoid Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jiaqing; Hillert, Mats; Borgenstam, Annika

    2017-03-01

    The morphology of grain boundary nucleated ferrite particles in iron alloys with 0.3 mass pct carbon has been classified according to the presence of facets. Several kinds of particles extend into both grains of austenite and have facets to both. It is proposed that they all belong to a continuous series of shapes. Ferrite plates can nucleate directly on the grain boundary but can also develop from edges on many kinds of particles. Feathery structures of parallel plates on both sides of a grain boundary can thus form. In sections, parallel to their main growth direction, plates have been seen to extend the whole way from the nucleation site at the grain boundary and to the growth front. This happens in the whole temperature range studied from 973 K to 673 K (700 °C to 400 °C). The plates thus grow continuously and not by subunits stopping at limited length and continuing the growth by new ones nucleating. Sometimes, the plates have ridges and in oblique sections they could be mistaken for the start of new plates. No morphological signs were observed indicating a transition between Widmanstätten ferrite and bainitic ferrite. It is proposed that there is only one kind of acicular ferrite.

  7. Self-Assemblies of Acicular Hollow Fe/C Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Li, Wangchang; Qiao, Xiaojing; Li, Mingyu; Zheng, Qiuyu; Ren, Qingguo; Zhu, Y Q; Peng, H X

    2015-08-01

    Self-assemblies of acicular hollow Fe/C structures were synthesized using D-glucose monohydrate and ferric chloride as precursors by a simple hydrothermal process followed by carbonization at 800 °C. The self-assembled structures with an overall diameter of 15~20 µm composed of radially formed hollow needles from a central core with an average diameter of ca. 1 µm and a length up to 10 µm. The end of the needles was revealed to be a awl shape with a hollow structure formed during the self-assembly process and the subsequent heat treatment. The hollow structure was probably caused by the Kirkendall effect at 800 °C. The materials exhibit ferromagnetic characteristic with saturation magnetization (Ms), remanent magnetization (Mr), and coercivity (Hc) of 22.2 emu/g, 3 emu/g, and 151.22 Oe, respectively, with Ms much lower than that of Fe3O4.

  8. Porous acicular mullite obtained by controlled oxidation of waste molybdenum disilicide

    SciTech Connect

    Bučevac, Dušan; Dapčević, Aleksandra; Maksimović, Vesna

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • Waste MoSi{sub 2} heating elements were used as starting material for fabrication of porous acicular mullite. • Calcined MoSi{sub 2} powder was source of SiO{sub 2} and pore former at the same time. • Porous acicular mullite is promising material for filtration of diesel engine exhaust. • Samples with decent mechanical integrity and porosity of more than 60% were fabricated. - Abstract: Porous acicular mullite was fabricated by using waste MoSi{sub 2} heating element and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Careful calcination of the pulverized heating element led to the formation of a mixture of MoO{sub 3} and amorphous SiO{sub 2}. This mixture was employed as both SiO{sub 2} precursor and pore former. The oxidation of MoSi{sub 2} and mullite formation were studied. The effect of fabrication temperature on phase composition, porosity, grain morphology, and compressive strength of sintered mullite was examined. Pure mullite with porosity of more than 60% and compressive strength of ∼20 MPa was obtained at temperature as low as 1300 °C. The microstructure consisted of elongated, rectangular, prism-like grains which are known to be effective in filtration of diesel engine exhaust. The increase in sintering temperature caused the change of grain morphology and reduction in compressive strength.

  9. Fabrication and flexural strength of multi-layer alumina with aligned acicular pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Dong-Soo; Lee, Myoung-Won; Kim, Hai-Doo; Jung, Yeon-Gil

    2004-07-01

    Multi-layer alumina with alternating dense and porous layers with aligned acicular pores was successfully prepared by tape casting the slurry with chopped carbon fibers followed by pressureless sintering. As the content of the chopped carbon fiber increased, the open porosity was increased, in part due to impingement among the carbon fibers inside the sample. The three-point flexural strength of the sample with total porosity of 11% was approximately 80% that of a dense sample. However, a sample with a porous layer with 5% chopped carbon fiber exhibited only 60% flexural strength of the dense sample, in part due to a low degree of alignment among the chopped fibers.

  10. Precipitation of sigma and chi phases in δ-ferrite of Type 316FR weld metals

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Eun Joon; Baba, Hayato; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi; Saida, Kazuyoshi

    2013-12-15

    The decomposition behavior and kinetics of δ-ferrite are examined using aging treatments between 873 and 1073 K for Type 316FR stainless steel weld metals with different solidification modes (316FR AF, 316FR FA). The dominant precipitates are sigma, chi, and secondary austenite nucleated at δ-ferrite/austenite interfaces or in the interior of the ferrite grains. These precipitates consume all the ferrite during isothermal aging in both 316FR AF and FA weld metals. Differences in the precipitation behavior (precipitation initiation time and precipitation speed) between weld metals can be explained by i) the degree of Cr and Mo microsegregation within δ-ferrite or austenite near ferrite and ii) the nucleation sites induced due to the solidification mode (AF or FA), such as the ferrite amount. For both weld materials, a Johnson–Mehl-type equation can express the precipitation behavior of the sigma + chi phases and quantitatively predict the behavior at the service-exposure temperatures of a fast breed reactor. - Highlights: • Precipitation of σ and χ phase in Type 316FR welds (two solidification modes) • Different precipitation behaviors: precipitation initiation time and growth speed • Johnson-Mehl–type equation is the most applicable to the precipitation behaviors • Precipitation behaviors are predicted under service conditions of FBRs.

  11. Comminuting irradiated ferritic steel

    DOEpatents

    Bauer, Roger E.; Straalsund, Jerry L.; Chin, Bryan A.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of comminuting irradiated ferritic steel by placing the steel in a solution of a compound selected from the group consisting of sulfamic acid, bisulfate, and mixtures thereof. The ferritic steel is used as cladding on nuclear fuel rods or other irradiated components.

  12. XXIst Century Ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaleyrat, F.; Zehani, K.; Pasko, A.; Loyau, V.; LoBue, M.

    2012-05-01

    Ferrites have always been a subject of great interest from point of view of magnetic application, since the fist compass to present date. In contrast, the scientific interest for iron based magnetic oxides decreased after Ørsted discovery as they where replaced by coil as magnetizing sources. Neel discovery of ferrimagnetism boosted again interest and leads to strong developments during two decades before being of less interest. Recently, the evolution of power electronics toward higher frequency, the downsizing of ceramics microstucture to nanometer scale, the increasing price of rare-earth elements and the development of magnetocaloric materials put light again on ferrites. A review on three ferrite families is given herein: harder nanostructured Ba2+Fe12O19 magnet processed by spark plasma sintering, magnetocaloric effect associated to the spin transition reorientation of W-ferrite and low temperature spark plasma sintered Ni-Zn-Cu ferrites for high frequency power applications.

  13. Cr-W-V bainitic/ferritic steel with improved strength and toughness and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1994-03-08

    This work describes a high strength, high toughness bainitic/ferritic steel alloy comprising about 2.75% to 4.0% chromium, about 2.0% to 3.5% tungsten, about 0.10% to 0.30% vanadium, and about 0.1% to 0.15% carbon with the balance iron, wherein the percentages are by total weight of the composition, wherein the alloy having been heated to an austenitizing temperature and then cooled at a rate sufficient to produce carbide-free acicular bainite. 15 figures.

  14. Epitaxial Garnets and Hexagonal Ferrites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    Ferrites Lithium Ferrite Magnetostatic Wave Garnets Epitaxy Yttrium Iron Garnet Liquid Phase Epitaxy Hexagonal Ferrite Microwave Signal Processing...epitaxial ferrit ( materials for use in microwave and millirreter-wave signal processing devices. The major emphasis has been on multiple layer...overall objective of this research is to develop epitaxial single crystal ferrite films suitable for microwave and millimeter-wave signal processing at

  15. Al substituted Ba ferrite films with high coercivity and excellent squareness for low noise perpendicular recording layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, J.; Matsushita, N.; Watanabe, K.; Nakagawa, S.; Naoe, M.

    1999-04-01

    Al substituted BaM (Al-BaM) ferrite films with composition of BaAlxFe12-xO19 (x=0,1,2) were deposited using facing targets sputtering apparatus on SiOx/Si wafers with a Pt seed layer. A postannealing process is necessary to crystallize the films. It was confirmed that the substrate temperature Ts is also one of the important parameters for the magnetic properties of the postannealed films. Al-BaM ferrite films exhibit the Ts dependence of magnetic properties different from that of simple BaM ones. With increase of the Al content x in Al-BaM ferrite films, 4πMs decreased, while Hc and the anisotropy field HA increased. It was found that acicular shape grains formed more easily in Al-BaM ferrite films than in simple BaM ones. The squareness S⊥ increased largely by substitution of Al for Fe. The Al-BaM ferrite films with high Hc⊥ (˜3 kOe) and large S⊥(˜0.9) may be applicable as perpendicular magnetic recording layers with low noise level.

  16. Impedance calculation for ferrite inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Breitzmann, S.C.; Lee, S.Y.; Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    Passive ferrite inserts were used to compensate the space charge impedance in high intensity space charge dominated accelerators. They study the narrowband longitudinal impedance of these ferrite inserts. they find that the shunt impedance and the quality factor for ferrite inserts are inversely proportional to the imaginary part of the permeability of ferrite materials. They also provide a recipe for attaining a truly passive space charge impedance compensation and avoiding narrowband microwave instabilities.

  17. Ferrite logic reliability study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baer, J. A.; Clark, C. B.

    1973-01-01

    Development and use of digital circuits called all-magnetic logic are reported. In these circuits the magnetic elements and their windings comprise the active circuit devices in the logic portion of a system. The ferrite logic device belongs to the all-magnetic class of logic circuits. The FLO device is novel in that it makes use of a dual or bimaterial ferrite composition in one physical ceramic body. This bimaterial feature, coupled with its potential for relatively high speed operation, makes it attractive for high reliability applications. (Maximum speed of operation approximately 50 kHz.)

  18. CoS acicular nanorod arrays for the counter electrode of an efficient dye-sensitized solar cell.

    PubMed

    Kung, Chung-Wei; Chen, Hsin-Wei; Lin, Chia-Yu; Huang, Kuan-Chieh; Vittal, R; Ho, Kuo-Chuan

    2012-08-28

    One-dimensional cobalt sulfide (CoS) acicular nanorod arrays (ANRAs) were obtained on a fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrate by a two-step approach. First, Co(3)O(4) ANRAs were synthesized, and then they were converted to CoS ANRAs for various periods. The compositions of the films obtained after various conversion periods were verified by X-ray diffraction, UV-visible spectrophotometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy; their morphologies were examined at different periods by scanning electron microscopic and transmission electron microscopic images. Electrocatalytic abilities of the films toward I(-)/I(3)(-) were verified through cyclic voltammetry (CV) and Tafel polarization curves. Long-term stability of the films in I(-)/I(3)(-) electrolyte was studied by CV. The FTO substrates with CoS ANRAs were used as the counter electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells; a maximum power conversion efficiency of 7.67% was achieved for a cell with CoS ANRAs, under 100 mW/cm(2), which is nearly the same as that of a cell with a sputtered Pt counter electrode (7.70%). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to substantiate the photovoltaic parameters.

  19. Epitaxial Garnets and Hexagonal Ferrites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-20

    Iron Garnet Liquid Phase Epitaxy Hexagonal Ferrite microwave Signal Processing Millimeter-Wave 20. ABSTRACT (Continue ani revee arde if necoeermy and...le.’uIfy by block rns.) e objective of this research is to develop new and improved epitauial ferrite materials for use in microwave and millimeter... ferrite films suitable for microwave and millimeter-wave signal processing at frequencies above 1 GHz. The specific tasks are: a. Analyze and develop

  20. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, David S.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Powell, Roger W.

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  1. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, D.S.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Powell, R.W.

    1985-02-07

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  2. Acicular photomultiplier photocathode structure

    DOEpatents

    Craig, Richard A.; Bliss, Mary

    2003-09-30

    A method and apparatus for increasing the quantum efficiency of a photomultiplier tube by providing a photocathode with an increased surface-to-volume ratio. The photocathode includes a transparent substrate, upon one major side of which is formed one or more large aspect-ratio structures, such as needles, cones, fibers, prisms, or pyramids. The large aspect-ratio structures are at least partially composed of a photoelectron emitting material, i.e., a material that emits a photoelectron upon absorption of an optical photon. The large aspect-ratio structures may be substantially composed of the photoelectron emitting material (i.e., formed as such upon the surface of a relatively flat substrate) or be only partially composed of a photoelectron emitting material (i.e., the photoelectron emitting material is coated over large aspect-ratio structures formed from the substrate material itself.) The large aspect-ratio nature of the photocathode surface allows for an effective increase in the thickness of the photocathode relative the absorption of optical photons, thereby increasing the absorption rate of incident photons, without substantially increasing the effective thickness of the photocathode relative the escape incidence of the photoelectrons.

  3. ARTICLES: Intermode scattering effects in laser emission spectra of platelet and acicular CdS-type single crystals subjected to one-photon excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodin, M. S.; Vitrikhovskiĭ, N. I.; Kipen', A. A.; Shevel', S. G.; Yanushevskiĭ, N. I.

    1982-12-01

    An investigation was made of the laser emission spectra of platelet CdS, Znx, Cd1-xS, and CdS1-xSex, single crystals and acicular CdS single crystals at T=4.2, 77, and 300 °K. Lasing developed in partial resonators (rectangular insulating microboxes or microprisms) and the emission consisted of total-internal-reflection modes characterized by the highest Q factor. Radiation emerged in vacuum as a result of intermode scattering of photons (without a change in the frequency) out of the total-internal-reflection modes into modes with lower Q factors, which could be emitted.

  4. TiO2 decorated Co3O4 acicular nanotube arrays and its application as a non-enzymatic glucose sensor.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhenfei; Zhang, Liqiang; Ma, Chi; Zhou, Qidong; Tang, Yushu; Tu, Zhiqiang; Yang, Wang; Cui, Lishan; Li, Yongfeng

    2016-06-15

    TiO2 modified Co3O4 acicular nanotube arrays (ANTAs) have been fabricated in this study, showing a good performance in glucose detection. In the experiment, the precursor Co(CO3)0.5(OH)·0.11H2O acicular nanowire arrays (ANWAs) was first grown on the fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) substrate by a hydrothermal method. Thereafter, the uniform pink precursor Co(CO3)0.5(OH)·0.11H2O ANWAs was completely converted to the black Co3O4 ANTAs thin film by alkaline treatment. After the decoration of TiO2, the TiO2/Co3O4 ANTAs electrode exhibits a much higher current response to glucose compared with the Co3O4 ANTAs. Importantly, this neotype composite structure of Co3O4 enhances the glucose sensing performance by increasing specific surface area, additional reactive sites and synergistic effect, which make the TiO2/Co3O4 glucose sensor show a high sensitivity of 2008.82 μA mM(-1) cm(-2), a fast response time (less than 5s) and a detection limit as low as 0.3396 μM (S/N=3). The TiO2/Co3O4 ANTAs modified electrode exhibits a high selectivity for glucose in human serum, against ascorbic acid and uric acid.

  5. High strength ferritic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Hagel, William C.; Smidt, Frederick A.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1977-01-01

    A high-strength ferritic alloy useful for fast reactor duct and cladding applications where an iron base contains from about 9% to about 13% by weight chromium, from about 4% to about 8% by weight molybdenum, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight niobium, from about 0.1% to about 0.3% by weight vanadium, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight silicon, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight manganese, a maximum of about 0.05% by weight nitrogen, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight sulfur, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight phosphorous, and from about 0.04% to about 0.12% by weight carbon.

  6. Ferrite attenuator modulation improves antenna performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooks, J. C.; Larson, S. G.; Shorkley, F. H.; Williams, B. T.

    1970-01-01

    Ferrite attenuator inserted into appropriate waveguide reduces the gain of the antenna element which is causing interference. Modulating the ferrite attenuator to change the antenna gain at the receive frequency permits ground tracking until the antenna is no longer needed.

  7. Effect of ferrite on cast stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Nadezhdin, A.; Cooper, K. ); Timbers, G. . Kraft Pulp Division)

    1994-09-01

    Premature failure of stainless steel castings in bleach washing service is attributed to poor casting quality high porosity and to a high ferrite content, which makes the castings susceptible to corrosion by hot acid chloride solutions. A survey of the chemical compositions and ferrite contents of corrosion-resistant castings in bleach plants at three pulp mills found high [delta]-ferrite levels in the austenitic matrix due to the improper balance between austenite and ferrite stabilizers.

  8. Small high directivity ferrite antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, T. M. B.

    A centimeter-wavelength antenna of millimetric dimensions, which uses the intrinsic angular sensitivity of ferrites, is described, with an emphasis on the modification of the material's permeability. The construction of both the ferrite film lens antenna and the ferrite film cassegrain antenna are detailed; both can be devised in a number of configurations for appropriate beam positioning and rf filtering. The antenna design, discussed primarily in the context of smart missiles, electronic warfare, and satellite systems, presents the possibility of magnetically switching between the transmit and receive modes within the antenna structure itself. Finally, it is noted that for a simple 2-dipole array the angular resolution can be two orders of magnitude higher than with the conventional techniques.

  9. Articles comprising ferritic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, James M.

    2016-06-28

    An article of manufacture comprises a ferritic stainless steel that includes a near-surface region depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the ferritic stainless steel. The article has a reduced tendency to form an electrically resistive silica layer including silicon derived from the steel when the article is subjected to high temperature oxidizing conditions. The ferritic stainless steel is selected from the group comprising AISI Type 430 stainless steel, AISI Type 439 stainless steel, AISI Type 441 stainless steel, AISI Type 444 stainless steel, and E-BRITE.RTM. alloy, also known as UNS 44627 stainless steel. In certain embodiments, the article of manufacture is a fuel cell interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell.

  10. High power ferrite microwave switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardash, I.; Roschak, N. K.

    1975-01-01

    A high power ferrite microwave switch was developed along with associated electronic driver circuits for operation in a spaceborne high power microwave transmitter in geostationary orbit. Three units were built and tested in a space environment to demonstrate conformance to the required performance characteristics. Each unit consisted of an input magic-tee hybrid, two non-reciprocal latching ferrite phase shifters, an out short-slot 3 db quadrature coupler, a dual driver electronic circuit, and input logic interface circuitry. The basic mode of operation of the high power ferrite microwave switch is identical to that of a four-port, differential phase shift, switchable circulator. By appropriately designing the phase shifters and electronic driver circuits to operate in the flux-transfer magnetization mode, power and temperature insensitive operation was achieved. A list of the realized characteristics of the developed units is given.

  11. RF cavities with transversely biased ferrite tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Smythe, W.R.; Brophy, T.G.; Carlini, R.D.; Friedrichs, C.C.; Grisham, D.L.; Spalek, G.; Wilkerson, L.C.

    1985-10-01

    Earley et al. suggested that ferrite tuned rf cavities have lower ferrite power dissipation if the ferrite bias field is perpendicular rather than parallel to the rf magnetic field. A 50-84 MHz cavity has been constructed in which ferrite can be biased either way. Low power measurements of six microwave ferrites show that the magnetic Q's of these ferrites under perpendicular bias are much higher than under parallel bias, and that the high Q region extends over a much wider range of rf permeability. TDK Y-5 ferrite was found to have a magnetic Q of 10,800, 4,800, 1,200 and 129 at rf permeabilities of 1.2, 2.4, 3.7 and 4.5, respectively. Measurements of perpendicularly biased ferrite at various power levels were made in a coaxial line cavity. The Q of Y-5 ferrite was found to decrease by less than a factor of 2 as the power density in the ferrite was increased to 1.3 W/cmT. A cavity design for a 6 GeV, high current, rapid cycling synchrotron using transversely biased ferrite tuning is described.

  12. A STUDY OF FERRITE CAVITY.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHAO, Y.

    2002-04-19

    This note addresses the general concerns for the design of a ferrite cavity. The parameters are specified for the RCMS, for which the frequency ramp is in the range of 1.27 MHz to 6.44 MHz, or a ratio of 1:5.

  13. A new AF gravitational instanton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Teo, Edward

    2011-09-01

    It has long been conjectured that the Euclidean Schwarzschild and Euclidean Kerr instantons are the only non-trivial asymptotically flat (AF) gravitational instantons. In this Letter, we show that this conjecture is false by explicitly constructing a new two-parameter AF gravitational instanton with a U (1) × U (1) isometry group, using the inverse-scattering method. It has Euler number χ = 3 and Hirzebruch signature τ = 1, and its global topology is CP2 with a circle S1 removed appropriately. Various other properties of this gravitational instanton are also discussed.

  14. Development of a monolithic ferrite memory array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, C. H., Jr.; Bhiwandker, N. C.

    1972-01-01

    The results of the development and testing of ferrite monolithic memory arrays are presented. This development required the synthesis of ferrite materials having special magnetic and physical characteristics and the development of special processes; (1) for making flexible sheets (laminae) of the ferrite composition, (2) for embedding conductors in ferrite, and (3) bonding ferrite laminae together to form a monolithic structure. Major problems encountered in each of these areas and their solutions are discussed. Twenty-two full-size arrays were fabricated and fired during the development of these processes. The majority of these arrays were tested for their memory characteristics as well as for their physical characteristics and the results are presented. The arrays produced during this program meet the essential goals and demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating monolithic ferrite memory arrays by the processes developed.

  15. Ferrite Phase Shifters Using Stress Insensitive Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    loop property as far as microvave applications of ferrite toroids is concerned. Ideally, the remanent magnetization should equal the saturation ...a second phase that is presumably Mn ferrite or mannetite which both have large values of saturation magnetization (- 5000 gauss) and low field...temperature. In a ferrite device this may result in a loss of saturation and remanent magnetizations vhich may degrade phaser performance. In a unit excited

  16. Progress in ferrite phase shifters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, C. R., Jr.

    1983-10-01

    Advances in the technology of reciprocal ferrite phase shifters are outlined. Nonlatching rotary-field phase shifters have been produced with enhanced phase accuracy and modest control power. A significant quantity of dual-mode latching units has been built at 35 GHz, with good results. Both types of phase shifter can be adapted to perform other functions in addition to phase shifting. Examples of phase shifters that perform duplexing and polarization switching functions are given.

  17. Spin canting in ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, J.; Huang, H.; Salih, K. S. M.; Thiel, W. R.; Schünemann, V.

    2016-12-01

    Recently, an easily scalable process for the production of small (3 -7 nm) monodisperse superparamagnetic ferrite nanoparticles MeFe2O4 (Me = Zn, Mn, Co) from iron metal and octanoic acid has been reported (Salih et al., Chem. Mater. 25 1430-1435 2013). Here we present a Mössbauer spectroscopic study of these ferrite nanoparticles in external magnetic fields of up to B = 5 T at liquid helium temperatures. Our analysis shows that all three systems show a comparable inversion degree and the cationic distribution for the tetrahedral A and the octahedral B sites has been determined to (Zn0.19Fe0.81) A [Zn0.81Fe1.19] B O4, (Mn0.15Fe0.85) A [Mn0.85Fe1.15] B O4 and (Co0.27Fe0.73) A [Co0.73Fe1.27] B O4. Spin canting occurs presumably in the B-sites and spin canting angles of 33°, 51° and 59° have been determined for the zinc, the manganese, and the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

  18. Multifunctionality of nanocrystalline lanthanum ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Atma; Thakur, Awalendra K.

    2016-05-01

    Nanocrystalline lanthanum ferrite has been synthesized by adopting modified Pechini route. No evidence of impurity or secondary phase has been detected up to the detection of error limit of X-ray diffractometer (XRD). Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction pattern reveals orthorhombic crystal system with space group Pnma (62).Crystallite size and lattice strain was found to be ˜42.8nm and 0.306% respectively. Optical band gap was found to be 2.109 eV, by UV-Visible diffused reflectance spectrum (DRS). Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) surface area was found to be ˜3.45 m2/g. Magnetization-hysteresis (M-H) loop was recorded at room temperature (300K) reveals weak ferromagnetism in Nanocrystalline lanthanum ferrite. The weak ferromagnetism in lanthanum ferrite is due to the uncompensated antiferromagnetic spin ordering. Ferroelectric loop hysteresis observed at room temperature at 100Hz depicts the presence of ferroelectric ordering in LaFeO3.Simultanious presence of magnetic and ferroelectric ordering at room temperature makes it suitable candidate of Multiferroic family.

  19. Installation Restoration Program. Phase 1 - Records Search AAC-Northern Region, Galena AFS, Campion AFS, Cape Lisburne AFS, Fort Yukon AFS, Indian Mountain AFS, Kotzebue AFS, Murphy Dome AFS, and Tin City AFS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    registered with Defense Technical Information Center should direct requests for copies of this report to: Defense Technical Information Center Cameron Station ...Information Center should direct requests for copies of this report to: Defense Technical Information Center Cameron Station Alexandria, Virginia 22314 U’ B...Contract No. F08637 84 C0070. The locations of these installations are shown in Figure 1. INSTALLATION DESCRIPTION Galena AFS * Galena Air Force Station

  20. Ferrite Solutions for Electromagnetic Shock Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Phillip D.; Dudley, Mark; Primm, Paul

    2014-09-01

    The goal of this work is to develop tools and test procedures for identifying ferrites suitable for use in shock line applications. Electromagnetic shocklines have been used to provide fast rising voltage pulses for many applications. In these applications a slow rising pulse is injected into the line where currents drive the ferrites into saturation leading to a fast rising output pulse. A shockline’s unique capabilities could be applied to new detonator configurations. A properly conditioned voltage pulse is critical for fire set applications. A carefully designed shockline could provide a passive solution to generating a fast rising voltage pulse for the fire set. Traditional circuits use ferrites operating in a linear regime. Shock lines push the ferrites well into the nonlinear regime where very few tools and data currently exist. Ferrite material is key to the operation of these shock lines, and tools for identifying suitable ferrites are critical. This report describes an experimental setup to that allows testing of ferrite samples and comparison to models with the goal of identifying optimal ferrites for shockline use.

  1. Subdomain zinc ferrite particles: Synthesis and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannaparayil, T.; Komarneni, S.; Marande, R.; Zadarko, M.

    1990-05-01

    Ultrafine and nearly spherical particles of zinc ferrite were synthesized under mild hydrothermal conditions by precipitating from metal nitrates. These particles exhibited antiferromagnetic ordering below 13 K. Mössbauer spectroscopic measurements revealed the subdomain superparamagnetic nature of the particles having a narrow particle size distribution. The hydrothermal ferrite powders were found to sinter to almost theoretical density with little or no intragranular porosity.

  2. Ferrite thin films for microwave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zaquine, I.; Benazizi, H.; Mage, J.C.

    1988-11-15

    Production of ferrite thin films is the key to integration of microwave ferrite devices (circulators for phased array antennas, for instance). The interesting materials are the usual microwave ferrites: garnets, lithium ferrites, barium hexaferrites. The required thicknesses are a few tens of micrometers, and it will be important to achieve high deposition rates. Different substrates can be used: silicon and alumina both with and without metallization. The films were deposited by rf sputtering from a single target. The as-deposited films are amorphous and therefore require careful annealing in oxygen atmosphere. The sputtered films are a few micrometers thick on 4 in. substrates. The optimum annealing temperature was found by trying to obtain the highest possible magnetization for each ferrite. The precision on the value of magnetization is limited by the precision on the thickness of the film. We obtain magnetization values slightly lower than the target's. The ferromagnetic resonance linewidth was measured on toroids from 5 to 18 GHz.

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of Nickel Zinc Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurian, Manju; Nair, Divya S.

    2011-10-01

    Nano crystalline mixed ferrites can be prepared through different methods. In the present work a comparison was made on sol-gel auto combustion method and co-precipitation method by preparing Nickel Zinc Ferrite. The prepared samples were calcined at different temperatures and were characterized by powder XRD, FTIR. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated the formation of ferrite in nanophase. The lattice parameter was found to be in the range 8.31-8.41Ao. This confirms that nano crystalline ferrite samples are in the cubic spinel structure. An average nano crystalline size was estimated from XRD by the Scherrer's equation. FTIR study also confirms the formation of ferrites. Sol-gel auto combustion technique was superior to co-precipitation method for producing single phase nano particles with smaller crystallite size.

  4. Ferrite Phase Shifters Using Stress Insensitive Materials. Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-11

    PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 1.3 PROGRAM TECHNICAL TASKS (PHASE I) 2.0 BACKGROUND DISCUSSION 2.1 REMANENT STATE FERRITE PHASERS 2.2 REMANENT MAGNETIZATION 2.3... MAGNETIZATION AND MAGNETOSTRICTION 2.1 REMANENT STATE FERRITE PHASERS Microwave ferrite digital phase shifters utilize ferrite toroidal structures and the...The insertion phase length of the structure is dependent on the remanent magnetization of the ferrite (see the hysteresis loop shown in Figure 2-4

  5. Comparison of nanostructured nickel zinc ferrite and magnesium copper zinc ferrite prepared by water-in-oil microemulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hee, Ay Ching; Mehrali, Mehdi; Metselaar, Hendrik Simon Cornelis; Mehrali, Mohammad; Osman, Noor Azuan Abu

    2012-12-01

    Ferrite is an important ceramic material with magnetic properties that are useful in many types of electronic devices. In this study, structure and magnetic properties of nanostructured nickel zinc ferrite and magnesium copper zinc ferrite prepared by water-in-oil microemulsion were compared. Both ferrites samples demonstrated similar weight loss characteristics in TGA. The magnesium copper zinc ferrite showed a crystalline structure with an average crystallite size of 13.5 nm. However, nickel zinc ferrite showed an amorphous phase. Transmission electron micrographs showed agglomerated nanoparticles with an average crystallite size of 26.6 nm for magnesium copper zinc ferrite and 22.7 nm for nickel zinc ferrite. Magnesium copper zinc ferrite exhibited soft ferromagnetic bahaviour whereas nickel zinc ferrite showed superparamagnetic nature.

  6. Ferrite thin films for microwave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaquine, I.; Benazizi, H.; Mage, J. C.

    1988-11-01

    This paper describes the preparation and the properties of thin (a few micron-thick) ferrite films for microwave applications. The films were deposited by RF sputtering from a single ferrite target on two different 4-in-thick substrates, silicon and alumina, both bare and metallized. The as-deposited films were amorphous, requiring careful annealing in oxygen atmosphere. The optimum annealing temperature was determined by obtaining the highest possible magnetization for each ferrite. The conditions of microwave measurements are described together with the results.

  7. Structural analysis of emerging ferrite: Doped nickel zinc ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rajinder; Kumar, Hitanshu; Singh, Ragini Raj; Barman, P. B.

    2015-08-28

    Ni{sub 0.6-x}Zn{sub 0.4}Co{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 0, 0.033, 0.264) nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel method and annealed at 900°C. Structural properties of all prepared samples were examined with X-ray diffraction (XRD). The partial formation of hematite (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) secondary phase with spinel phase cubic structure of undoped and cobalt doped nickel zinc ferrite was found by XRD peaks. The variation in crystallite size and other structural parameters with cobalt doping has been calculated for most prominent peak (113) of XRD and has been explained on the basis of cations ionic radii difference.

  8. HIGH POWER MICROWAVE FERRITES AND DEVICES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FERROMAGNETIC MATERIALS, * MICROWAVE EQUIPMENT, ALUMINUM, DELAY LINES, ELECTRODES, FERRITES , GADOLINIUM , GARNET, IONS, IRON, MAGNESIUM ALLOYS...MAGNETIC FIELDS, MAGNETIC MATERIALS, MAGNETIC MOMENTS, MANGANESE ALLOYS, MICROWAVE SPECTROSCOPY, NICKEL ALLOYS, RADIOFREQUENCY POWER, RARE EARTH COMPOUNDS, SINGLE CRYSTALS, WAVEFORM GENERATORS, YTTRIUM.

  9. HIGH POWER MICROWAVE FERRITES AND DEVICES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FERRITES , *FERROMAGNETIC MATERIALS, *GARNET, *MICROWAVE EQUIPMENT, ABSORPTION, ALUMINUM, ALUMINUM ALLOYS, ANISOTROPY, CRYSTALS, DIELECTRICS, DIRECT...CURRENT, ELECTRODES, GADOLINIUM , IRON, IRON ALLOYS, MAGNETIC FIELDS, MAGNETIC PROPERTIES, NICKEL ALLOYS, PHASE SHIFT CIRCUITS, RADIOFREQUENCY, RESONANCE, WAVEGUIDES, X RAY DIFFRACTION, YTTRIUM.

  10. Ferrite HOM Absorber for the RHIC ERL

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn,H.; Choi, E.M.; Hammons, L.

    2008-10-01

    A superconducting Energy Recovery Linac is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory to serve as test bed for RHIC upgrades. The damping of higher-order modes in the superconducting five-cell cavity for the Energy-Recovery linac at RHIC is performed exclusively by two ferrite absorbers. The ferrite properties have been measured in ferrite-loaded pill box cavities resulting in the permeability values given by a first-order Debye model for the tiled absorber structure and an equivalent permeability value for computer simulations with solid ring dampers. Measured and simulated results for the higher-order modes in the prototype copper cavity are discussed. First room-temperature measurements of the finished niobium cavity are presented which confirm the effective damping of higher-order modes in the ERL. by the ferrite absorbers.

  11. Ferrite Nanoparticles in Pharmacological Modulation of Angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Aparna; Radha, S.; Khan, Y.; Tilak, Priya

    2011-07-01

    Nanoparticles are being explored in the targeted drug delivery of pharmacological agents : angiogenesis being one such novel application which involves formation of new blood vessels or branching of existing ones. The present study involves the use of ferrite nanoparticles for precise therapeutic modulation of angiogenesis. The ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by co-precipitation of ferrous and ferric salts by a suitable base, were found to be 10-20 nm from X-ray diffraction and TEM measurements. The magnetization measurements showed superparamagnetic behavior of the uncoated nanoparticles. These ferrite nanoparticles were found to be bio-compatible with lymphocytes and neural cell lines from the biochemical assays. The chick chorioallantoic membrane(CAM) from the shell of fertile white Leghorn eggs was chosen as a model to study angiogenic activity. An enhancement in the angiogenic activity in the CAM due to addition of uncoated ferrite nanoparticles was observed.

  12. Ferrite insertion at Recycler Flying Wire System

    SciTech Connect

    K.Y. Ng

    2004-02-27

    Ferrite rods are installed inside the flying-wire cavity of the Recycler Ring and at entrance and exit beam pipes in order to absorb high-frequency electromagnetic waves excited by the beam. However, these rods may also deteriorate the vacuum pressure of the ring. An investigation is made to analyze the necessity of the ferrite rods at the entrance and exit beam pipes.

  13. Health Information in Somali (af Soomaali): MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... af Soomaali (Somali) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Wildfires Wildfires - English Dabka duurka - af Soomaali (Somali) Multimedia Healthy Roads Media Wildfires - English Dabka duurka - af Soomaali (Somali) PDF Healthy ...

  14. Residual ferrite formation in 12CrODS steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukai, S.; Kudo, Y.; Wu, X.; Oono, N.; Hayashi, S.; Ohtsuka, S.; Kaito, T.

    2014-12-01

    Increasing Cr content from 9 to 12 mass% leads to superior corrosion and high-temperature oxidation resistances, and usually changes microstructure from martensite to a ferrite. To make transformable martensitic type of 12CrODS steels that have superior processing capability by using α/γ phase transformation, alloy design was conducted through varying nickel content. The structure of 12CrODS steels was successfully modified from full ferrite to a transformable martensite-base matrix containing ferrite. This ferrite consists of both equilibrium ferrite and a metastable residual ferrite. It was shown that the fraction of the equilibrium ferrite is predictable by computed phase diagram and formation of the residual ferrite was successfully evaluated through pinning of α/γ interfacial boundaries by oxide particles.

  15. Ferrite Materials for Advanced Multifunction Microwave Systems Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-05

    TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Ferrite Materials for Advanced Multifunction Microwave Systems Applications Award No. (Grant) N00014-03-1-0070 PR...were also used in this work. (200 words) 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Microwave ferrites , yttrium iron garnet, lithium ferrites , hexagonal...Unlimited COVER PAGE FINAL REPORT to the UNITED STATES OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH Ferrite Materials for Advanced Multifunction Microwave Systems

  16. Magnetic Characterization of Ferrite Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Matthew; Sokol, Paul; Gumina, Greg; Bronstein, Lyudmila; Dragnea, Bogdan

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) of different compositions (FeO/ Fe 3 O4 , g- Fe 2 O3 , FePt, and CoFe 2 O4) have been synthesized using high temperature organometallic routes described elsewhere. NPs (16.6 nm in diameter) of a mixed FeO/ Fe 3 O4 (wuestite/magnetite) composition were prepared by thermal decomposition or iron oleate in the presence of oleic acid as a surfactant in dodocane at 370C in argon atmosphere. After the thermal treatment of the reaction solution at 200 C under air for 2 hours these NPs are transformed into maghemite (g- Fe 2 O3) , the magnetization of which is significantly enhanced. NPs of CoFe 2 O4 (8 nm) have been prepared by simultaneous decomposition of Co(II) and Fe(III) acetylacetonates in the presence of oleic acid and oleylamine. The X-ray diffraction profile of these NPs is characteristic of cobalt ferrite. Alternatively, alloyed 1.8 nm FePt NPs prepared by simultaneous decomposition of Fe and Pt acetylacetonates in the reductive environment demonstrate a completely disordered structure, which is reflected in their magnetic properties. SQUID magnetometry was used to measure the magnetization of NPs at high and low temperatures. Zero-field cooling and field-cooling measurements were taken to demonstrate superparamagnetic behavior and an associated blocking temperature.

  17. Synthesis of ferrite and nickel ferrite nanoparticles using radio-frequency thermal plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, S.; Taheri, M.; Carpenter, E.; Harris, V. G.; McHenry, M. E.

    2002-05-01

    Nanocrystalline (NC) ferrite powders have been synthesized using a 50 kW-3 MHz rf thermal plasma torch for high-frequency soft magnet applications. A mixed powder of Ni and Fe (Ni:Fe=1:2), a NiFe permalloy powder with additional Fe powder (Ni:Fe=1:2), and a NiFe permalloy powder (Ni:Fe=1:1) were used as precursors for synthesis. Airflow into the reactor chamber was the source of oxygen for oxide formation. XRD patterns clearly show that the precursor powders were transformed into NC ferrite particles with an average particle size of 20-30 nm. SEM and TEM studies indicated that NC ferrite particles had well-defined polygonal growth forms with some exhibiting (111) faceting and many with truncated octahedral and truncated cubic shapes. The Ni content in the ferrite particles was observed to increase in going from mixed Ni and Fe to mixed permalloy and iron and finally to only permalloy starting precursor. The plasma-torch synthesized ferrite materials using exclusively the NiFe permalloy precursor had 40%-48% Ni content in the Ni-ferrite particle, differing from the NiFe2O4 ideal stoichiometry. EXAFS was used to probe the cation coordination in low Ni magnetite species. The coercivity and Neel temperature of the high Ni content ferrite sample were 58 Oe and ˜590 °C, respectively.

  18. Rapid phase synthesis of nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugavel, T.; Raj, S. Gokul; Rajarajan, G.; Kumar, G. Ramesh

    2014-04-24

    Synthesis of single phase nanocrystalline Cobalt Ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) was achieved by single step autocombustion technique with the use of citric acid as a chelating agent in mono proportion with metal. Specimens prepared with this method showed significantly higher initial permeability's than with the conventional process. Single phase nanocrystalline cobalt ferrites were formed at very low temperature. Surface morphology identification were carried out by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. The average grain size and density at low temperature increased gradually with increasing the temperature. The single phase formation is confirmed through powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Magnetization measurements were obtained at room temperature by using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), which showed that the calcined samples exhibited typical magnetic behaviors. Temperature dependent magnetization results showed improved behavior for the nanocrystalline form of cobalt ferrite when compared to the bulk nature of materials synthesized by other methods.

  19. Dual-mode latching ferrite devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Jiang, Z.

    1986-05-01

    A primary consideration with microwave ferrite control devices is related to the switching speed. In order to achieve fast switching with the considered devices, an operation in the latching mode is required. A description is given of a new class of ferrite latching devices, taking into account latching quadrupole devices and their modifications. It is pointed out that the advantages of the new devices include fast switching, high electrical performance, and simple construction. According to the utilization of external or internal magnetic return paths, there are two modes of operation in latching ferrite devices. Attention is given to constructions and calculations, the design of a model for each of the two modes of operation, polarization insensitive phase shifters (PIPS) with external magnetic return paths, and PIPS with internal magnetic return paths.

  20. Status of ferrite technology for high volume microwave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, D.C.

    1995-08-01

    With the emergence of high volume commercial and military applications, there is a growing need to reduce the size and cost of microwave ferrite components, especially ferrite circulators, to be more compatible with monolithic integrated circuits. The Ferrite Development Consortium, consisting of leading US ferrite government, university and industrial institutions, was formed under Advanced Research Project Agency (ARPA) sponsorship to address these needs. Areas of Consortium technical activity include bulk and thick-film techniques for batch processing of ferrite devices, improved computer-aided-design tools and protype demonstrations. This paper will review the Consortium`s materials development needs and progress.

  1. Characterization of (Mg, La) Substituted Ni-Zn Spinel Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Wei, S. C.; Wang, Y. J.; Tian, H. L.; Tong, H.; Xu, B. S.

    Spinel structure of (Mg, La) substituted spinel Ni-Zn ferrite has been synthesized by sol-gel auto combustion method. The ferrite exhibits a single-spinel structure. The ferrite is studied as a microwave absorbing material. The microwave measurements are carried out by a vector network analyzer. The reflection loss of the ferrite is calculated as a single-layer absorber. The results indicate that the ferrite annealed at 850°C has great potential for application in electromagnetic wave attenuation.

  2. Cation distributions on rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The cation distributions in two rapidly solidified cobalt ferrites have been determined using Moessbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K in an 8-T magnetic field. The samples were obtained by gas atomization of a Co0-Fe2O3-P2O5 melt. The degree of cation disorder in both cases was greater than is obtainable by cooling unmelted cobalt ferrite. The more rapidly cooled sample exhibited a smaller departure from the equilibrium cation distribution than did the more slowly cooled sample. This result is explained on the basis of two competing effects of rapid solidification: high cooling rate of the solid, and large undercooling.

  3. Development of Lanthanum Ferrite SOFC Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Simner, Steve P.; Bonnett, Jeff F.; Canfield, Nathan L.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Shelton, Jayne P.; Sprenkle, Vince L.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2003-01-01

    A number of studies have been conducted concerning compositional/microstructural modifications of a Sr-doped lanthanum ferrite (LSF) cathode and protective Sm-doped ceria (SDC) layer in an anode supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Emphasis was placed on achieving enhanced low temperature (700-800 degrees C) performance, and long-term cell stability. Investigations involved manipulation of the lanthanum ferrite chemistry, addition of noble metal oxygen reduction catalysts, incorporation of active cathode layer compositions containing Co, Fe and higher Sr contents, and attempts to optimize the ceria barrier layer between the LSF cathode and YSZ electrolyte.

  4. Implantable ferrite antenna for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazeli, Maxwell L.

    We have developed an implantable microstrip patch antenna with dimensions of 10x10x1.28 mm, operating around the Industrial, Scientific and Medical (ISM) band (2.4-2.5 GHz). The antenna is characterized in skin-mimicking gels and compared with simulation results. The experimental measurements are in good agreement with simulations, having a -16 dB reflection coefficient and -18 dBi realized gain at resonance, with a 185 MHz -10 dB bandwidth. The simulated effects of ferrite film loading on antenna performance are investigated, with comparisons made for 5 and 10 microm thick films, as well as for 10 microm thick films with varying magnetic loss (tan delta micro = 0.05, 0.1 and 0.3). Our simulations reveal that the addition of 10 microm thick magnetic layers has effectively lowered the resonant frequency by 70 MHz, while improving return loss and -10 dB bandwidth by 3 dB and 40 MHz, respectively, over the uncoated antenna. Ferrite film coating also improved realized gain within the ISM band, with largest gain increases at resonance found for films having lower magnetic loss. Additionally, the gain (G) variance at ISM band limits, Delta Gf(2.5GHz)-f (2.4GHz), decreased from 1.97 to 0.44 dBi for the antenna with 10 microm films over the non-ferrite antenna. The measured dip-coated NiCo ferrite films effectively reduces the antenna resonance by 110 MHz, with a 4.2 dB reflection coefficient improvement as compared to an antenna without ferrite. The measured ferrite antenna also reveals a 6 dBi and 35 MHz improvement in realized gain and -10 dB bandwidth, respectively, at resonance. Additionally, the ferrite-coated antenna shows improved directivity, with wave propagation attenuated at the direction facing the body internal. These results indicate that implantable antenna miniaturization and reliable wireless communication in the operating frequency band can be realized with ferrite loading.

  5. Transmission through Ferrite Samples at Submillimeter Frequencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    K w+ i YAH YH P+ i , with "a - - B _ iB y = + iH) and / Bx = Hx + iKHy By = y iKHx where 4nM = the saturation magnetization , Y = the gyromagnetic...nac..ry ma Idertify by block number) A theoretical analysis is presented of 1he transmission spectra of thin magnetized ferrite slabs The energy range...chosen was 1 < V < 120 cm 1 (30 GHz < f < 3600 GHz) The magnetic field was assumed to lie in the plane of the ferrite slab, and the incident

  6. STBC AF relay for unmanned aircraft system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Fumiyuki; Miyazaki, Hiroyuki; Endo, Chikara

    2015-01-01

    If a large scale disaster similar to the Great East Japan Earthquake 2011 happens, some areas may be isolated from the communications network. Recently, unmanned aircraft system (UAS) based wireless relay communication has been attracting much attention since it is able to quickly re-establish the connection between isolated areas and the network. However, the channel between ground station (GS) and unmanned aircraft (UA) is unreliable due to UA's swing motion and as consequence, the relay communication quality degrades. In this paper, we introduce space-time block coded (STBC) amplify-and-forward (AF) relay for UAS based wireless relay communication to improve relay communication quality. A group of UAs forms single frequency network (SFN) to perform STBC-AF cooperative relay. In STBC-AF relay, only conjugate operation, block exchange and amplifying are required at UAs. Therefore, STBC-AF relay improves the relay communication quality while alleviating the complexity problem at UAs. It is shown by computer simulation that STBC-AF relay can achieve better throughput performance than conventional AF relay.

  7. A study of the magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite-coated zinc ferrite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Huan; Du, You-wei; Qiu, Zi-qiang; Walker, J. C.

    1987-04-01

    Nearly spherical Zn0.2Fe2.8O4 particles coated with an epitaxial layer of CoFe2O4 ferrites of various thicknesses were studied with Mössbauer spectroscopy. Measurements reveal that the magnetic structures of these particles are different at room temperature and liquid nitrogen or liquid helium temperatures, indicating the existence of a Verwey transition, which occurs between 77 and 119 K. Coating of Co-ferrite has no sizable effect on the transition.

  8. Designing shielded metal arc consumables for underwater wet welding in offshore applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Osio, A.; Liu, S.; Olson, D.L.; Ibarra, S.

    1995-08-01

    The use of underwater wet welding for offshore repairs has been limited mainly because of porosity and low toughness in the resulting welds. With appropriate consumable design, however, it is possible to reduce porosity and to enhance weld metal toughness through microstructural refinement. New titanium and boron-based consumables have been developed with which high toughness acicular ferrite (AF) can be produced in underwater wet welds. Titanium, by means of oxide formation, promoted an increase in the amount of acicular ferrite in the weld metal, while boron additions decreased the amount of grain boundary ferrite (GBF), further improving the microstructure. Porosity reduction was possible through the addition of calcium carbonate at approximately 13 wt percent in the electrode coating. However, weld metal decarbonization also resulted with the addition of carbonate.

  9. Effect of ferrite addition above the base ferrite on the coupling factor of wireless power transfer for vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, T.; Schaltz, E.; Ahn, S.

    2015-05-01

    Power transfer capability of wireless power transfer systems is highly dependent on the magnetic design of the primary and secondary inductors and is measured quantitatively by the coupling factor. The inductors are designed by placing the coil over a ferrite base to increase the coupling factor and reduce magnetic emissions to the surroundings. Effect of adding extra ferrite above the base ferrite at different physical locations on the self-inductance, mutual inductance, and coupling factor is under investigation in this paper. The addition can increase or decrease the mutual inductance depending on the placement of ferrite. Also, the addition of ferrite increases the self-inductance of the coils, and there is a probability for an overall decrease in the coupling factor. Correct placement of ferrite, on the other hand, can increase the coupling factor relatively higher than the base ferrite as it is closer to the other inductor. Ferrite being a heavy compound of iron increases the inductor weight significantly and needs to be added judiciously. Four zones have been identified in the paper, which shows different sensitivity to addition of ferrite in terms of the two inductances and coupling factor. Simulation and measurement results are presented for different air gaps between the coils and at different gap distances between the ferrite base and added ferrite. This paper is beneficial in improving the coupling factor while adding minimum weight to wireless power transfer system.

  10. Tantalum modified ferritic iron base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldrieve, R. E.; Blankenship, C. P. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Strong ferritic alloys of the Fe-CR-Al type containing 0.4% to 2% tantalum were developed. These alloys have improved fabricability without sacrificing high temperature strength and oxidation resistance in the 800 C (1475 F) to 1040 C (1900 F) range.

  11. Temperature stabilization of microwave ferrite devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaminsky, R.; Wendt, E. J.

    1978-01-01

    Thin-film heating element for strip-line circulator is sandwiched between insulation and copper laminations. Disks conform to shape of circulator ferrite disks and are installed between copper-clad epoxy ground planes. Heater design eliminates external cartridges and reduces weight by approximately one-third.

  12. Adding calcium improves lithium ferrite core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lessoff, H.

    1969-01-01

    Adding calcium increases uniformity of grain growth over a wide range of sintering temperatures and reduces porosity within the grain. Ferrite cores containing calcium have square hysteresis loops and high curie temperatures, making them useful in coincident current memories of digital electronic computers.

  13. Rectangular microstrip antenna on a ferrite substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S.; Chowdhury, S. K.

    1982-05-01

    The bandwidth and radiation characteristics of a simple quarter wave microstrip antenna on a typical ferrite substrate are measured and compared with the theoretical results in the lower range of ultrahigh frequency (UHF). A method has also been discussed for impedance matching of the antenna to the feed line.

  14. Properties of ferrites at low temperatures (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Dionne, G.F.

    1997-04-01

    At cryogenic temperatures magnetic properties of ferrites change significantly from their values at room temperature, which has been the main regime for most device applications. Recently, microwave ferrite devices with superconducting microstrip circuits have been demonstrated at a temperature of 77 K with virtually no electrical conduction losses. Conventional ferrimagnetic garnet and spinel compositions, however, are not generally optimized for low temperatures and may require chemical redesign if the full potential of these devices is to be realized. Saturation magnetizations increase according to the Brillouin{endash}Weiss function dependence that is characteristic of all ferromagnetic materials. Increased magnetocrystalline anisotropy and magnetostriction can have large effects on hysteresis loop squareness and coercive fields that are essential for stable phase shift and efficient switching. Rare-earth impurities and other ions with short spin-lattice relaxation times can cause increased microwave losses. In this article, the basic magnetochemistry pertaining to ferrites will be examined for adaptation of ferrite technology to cryogenic environments. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Hexagonal ferrites for millimeter wave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polk, Donald E.; Hathaway, Kristl B.

    1993-01-01

    A review of the work accomplished on this contract is presented. A review of the physics of hexagonal ferrite materials and the effective linewidth concept and the detailed overall research plan are contained in the original proposal document. The focus of the program was on the effective linewidth in millimeter wave materials, including planar hexagonal ferrite Y-type materials, uniaxial M-type materials, and thin ferromagnetic transition metal and alloy films. The key idea in the original proposal was that the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) linewidth in hexagonal ferrites is dominated by inhomogeneous and two-magnon scattering losses and that off-resonance measurements of the effective linewidth would (1) show that the FMR losses do not represent the intrinsic losses, and (2) that the intrinsic losses are significantly lower. This basic idea was verified. Results were obtained on the off-resonance far-field effective linewidth in planar Zn-Y hexagonal ferrite single crystal platelets, single crystal spheres of Ba- and Sr-hexaferrite materials, and permalloy thin films. Three papers on these results were published.

  16. Contact material for pressure-sintering ferrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentworth, C.

    1970-01-01

    Pressure-sintering, in which the unfired laminated ferrite plane is placed between two flat punches and pressed during firing, reduces lateral firing shrinkage to less than one percent. A decrease in thickness of the laminate produces the required volume shrinkage. Phlogopite is the most suitable contact material investigated.

  17. Differential cytotoxicity of copper ferrite nanoparticles in different human cells.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Javed; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Alshamsan, Aws; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Saquib, Quaiser; Khan, Shams T; Wahab, Rizwan; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Musarrat, Javed; Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Ahamed, Maqusood

    2016-10-01

    Copper ferrite nanoparticles (NPs) have the potential to be applied in biomedical fields such as cell labeling and hyperthermia. However, there is a lack of information concerning the toxicity of copper ferrite NPs. We explored the cytotoxic potential of copper ferrite NPs in human lung (A549) and liver (HepG2) cells. Copper ferrite NPs were crystalline and almost spherically shaped with an average diameter of 35 nm. Copper ferrite NPs induced dose-dependent cytotoxicity in both types of cells, evident by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide and neutral red uptake assays. However, we observed a quite different susceptibility in the two kinds of cells regarding toxicity of copper ferrite NPs. Particularly, A549 cells showed higher susceptibility against copper ferrite NP exposure than those of HepG2 cells. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential due to copper ferrite NP exposure was observed. The mRNA level as well as activity of caspase-3 enzyme was higher in cells exposed to copper ferrite NPs. Cellular redox status was disturbed as indicated by induction of reactive oxygen species (oxidant) generation and depletion of the glutathione (antioxidant) level. Moreover, cytotoxicity induced by copper ferrite NPs was efficiently prevented by N-acetylcysteine treatment, which suggests that reactive oxygen species generation might be one of the possible mechanisms of cytotoxicity caused by copper ferrite NPs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing the cytotoxic potential of copper ferrite NPs in human cells. This study warrants further investigation to explore the mechanisms of differential toxicity of copper ferrite NPs in different types of cells. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Non-Linear Dielectrics and Ferrites in ICEPIC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-10

    Technical Paper 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 2010-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Non-linear Dielectrics and Ferrites in ICEPIC 5a. CONTRACT...Electromagnetics Government Purpose Rights 14. ABSTRACT Models for non-linear dielectrics and magnetic ferrites are developed and coded into the particle...be longer than an FDTD time step. The ferrite model accounts for the non-linearity of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gibert equation, and the magnetization

  19. Advanced Microwave Ferrite Research (AMFeR): Phase Four

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-15

    COVERED (From - To) 28 Dec 2006 - 30 Sep 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Advanced Microwave Ferrite Research (AMFeR): Phase Four 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...research endeavor is to devise ferrite materials for microwave , self-biased circulator applications. To this end, the research team focused on two key...Std Z39-18 Final Report Advanced Microwave Ferrite Research (AMFeR): Phase Four Dr. Jeffrey L. Young MRC Institute/Electrical and Computer

  20. Electric Field Tunable Microwave and MM-wave Ferrite Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-30

    Electric Field Tunable Microwave and MM-wave Ferrite Devices (N00014-06-01-0167) Period of Performance: May 1, 2006-April 30, 2010 Principal...modes as a function of E. The coupling was strong and ranged from 1 to 30 MHz/(kV/cm). Ferrite - ferroelectric composites were used in microwave and...2005, focused on ME effects at microwave and millimeter wave frequencies in ferrite -ferroelectric composites. Studies were performed on basic

  1. Epitaxial Hexagonal Ferrites for Millimeter Wave Tunable Filters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-13

    anisotropy fields which, in effect, provide built-in biasing. The result is that ferrite components, similar to those used in microwave systems, can operate... method for growing hexagonal ferrites in the form of single crystal layers on non-magnetic, trAnsparmat subsrates - . The LPE method circumvents... method , single crystal hexagonal ferrites which are superior in quality to those grown by conventional methods . In order to have a more specific goal

  2. Distributed Ferrite Isolation in Traveling-Wave Tubes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    coupling to broadband edge modes of ferrite slabs. Evidence of coupling to the lower branch of edge mode, i.e., magnetostatic, has been obtained with...L-band helix . Cold tests and analysis suggest coupling to ferrite edge modes from helix is easier at higher microwave frequencies. Plans for a hot...test at the 1-2 kW power level is an L-band TWT incorporating such distributed ferrites are described.

  3. Studies on the activation energy from the ac conductivity measurements of rubber ferrite composites containing manganese zinc ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, Mohd.; Alimuddin; Kumar, Shalendra; Shirsath, Sagar E.; Mohammed, E. M.; Chung, Hanshik; Kumar, Ravi

    2012-11-01

    Manganese zinc ferrites (MZF) have resistivities between 0.01 and 10 Ω m. Making composite materials of ferrites with either natural rubber or plastics will modify the electrical properties of ferrites. The moldability and flexibility of these composites find wide use in industrial and other scientific applications. Mixed ferrites belonging to the series Mn(1-x)ZnxFe2O4 were synthesized for different ‘x’ values in steps of 0.2, and incorporated in natural rubber matrix (RFC). From the dielectric measurements of the ceramic manganese zinc ferrite and rubber ferrite composites, ac conductivity and activation energy were evaluated. A program was developed with the aid of the LabVIEW package to automate the measurements. The ac conductivity of RFC was then correlated with that of the magnetic filler and matrix by a mixture equation which helps to tailor properties of these composites.

  4. Tunable dielectric properties of ferrite-dielectric based metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Bi, K; Huang, K; Zeng, L Y; Zhou, M H; Wang, Q M; Wang, Y G; Lei, M

    2015-01-01

    A ferrite-dielectric metamaterial composed of dielectric and ferrite cuboids has been investigated by experiments and simulations. By interacting with the electromagnetic wave, the Mie resonance can take place in the dielectric cuboids and the ferromagnetic precession will appear in the ferrite cuboids. The magnetic field distributions show the electric Mie resonance of the dielectric cuboids can be influenced by the ferromagnetic precession of ferrite cuboids when a certain magnetic field is applied. The effective permittivity of the metamaterial can be tuned by modifying the applied magnetic field. A good agreement between experimental and simulated results is demonstrated, which confirms that these metamaterials can be used for tunable microwave devices.

  5. Properties of ferrites important to their friction and wear behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Environmental, chemical and crystallographical effects on the fundamental nature on friction and wear of the ferrites in contact with metals, magnetic tapes and themselves are reviewed. The removal of adsorbed films from the surfaces of ferrites results in very strong interfacial adhesion and high friction in ferrite to metal and ferrite to magnetic tape contacts. The metal ferrite bond at the interface is primarily a chemical bond between the metal atoms and the large oxygen anions in the ferrite surface, and the strength of these bonds is related to the oxygen to metal bond strength in the metal oxide. The more active the metal, the higher is the coefficient of friction. Not only under adhesive conditions, but also under abrasive conditions the friction and wear properties of ferrites are related to the crystallographic orientation. With ferrite to ferrite contact the mating of highest atomic density (most closely packed) direction on matched crystallographic planes, that is, 110 directions on /110/planes, results in the lowest coefficient of friction.

  6. Dielectric investigations of polycrystalline samarium bismuth ferrite ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaimiene, E.; Macutkevic, J.; Karpinsky, D. V.; Kholkin, A. L.; Banys, J.

    2015-01-01

    Results of broadband dielectric investigations of samarium doped bismuth ferrite ceramics are presented in wide temperature range (20-800 K). At temperatures higher than 400 K, the dielectric properties of samarium bismuth ferrite ceramics are governed by Maxwell-Wagner relaxation and electrical conductivity. The DC conductivity increases and activation energy decreases with samarium concentration. In samarium doped bismuth ferrite, the ferroelectric phase transition temperature decreases with samarium concentration and finally no ferroelectric order is observed at x = 0.2. At lower temperatures, the dielectric properties of ferroelectric samarium doped bismuth ferrite are governed by ferroelectric domains dynamics. Ceramics with x = 0.2 exhibit the relaxor-like behaviour.

  7. Tunable Dielectric Properties of Ferrite-Dielectric Based Metamaterial

    PubMed Central

    Bi, K.; Huang, K.; Zeng, L. Y.; Zhou, M. H.; Wang, Q. M.; Wang, Y. G.; Lei, M.

    2015-01-01

    A ferrite-dielectric metamaterial composed of dielectric and ferrite cuboids has been investigated by experiments and simulations. By interacting with the electromagnetic wave, the Mie resonance can take place in the dielectric cuboids and the ferromagnetic precession will appear in the ferrite cuboids. The magnetic field distributions show the electric Mie resonance of the dielectric cuboids can be influenced by the ferromagnetic precession of ferrite cuboids when a certain magnetic field is applied. The effective permittivity of the metamaterial can be tuned by modifying the applied magnetic field. A good agreement between experimental and simulated results is demonstrated, which confirms that these metamaterials can be used for tunable microwave devices. PMID:25993433

  8. Ferrite microwave electronics Citations from the NTIS data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, W. E.

    1980-07-01

    Research reports on single crystals, thin films, dielectrics, semiconductor devices, integrated circuits, phase shifters, and waveguide components are cited. Studies on the microwave properties of ferrites are included.

  9. Soft ferrite cores characterization for integrated micro-inductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Yen Mai; Lopez, Thomas; Laur, Jean-Pierre; Bourrier, David; Charlot, Samuel; Valdez-Nava, Zarel; Bley, Vincent; Combettes, Céline; Brunet, Magali

    2013-12-01

    Ferrite-based micro-inductors are proposed for hybrid integration on silicon for low-power medium frequency DC-DC converters. Due to their small coercive field and their high resistivity, soft ferrites are good candidates for a magnetic core working at moderate frequencies in the range of 5-10 MHz. We have studied several soft ferrites including commercial ferrite film and U70 and U200 homemade ferrites. The inductors are fabricated at wafer level using micromachining and assembling techniques. The proposed process is based on a sintered ferrite core placed in between thick electroplated copper windings. The low profile ferrite cores of 1.2 × 2.6 × 0.2 mm3 are produced by two methods from green tape-casted films and ferrite powder. This paper presents the magnetic characterization of the sintered ferrite films cut and printed in rectangular shape and sintered at different temperatures. The comparison is made in order to find out the best material for the core that can reach the required inductance (470 nH at 6 MHz) under 0.6A current DC bias and that generate the smallest losses. An inductance density of 285 nH/ mm2 up to 6 MHz was obtained for ESL 40011 cores that is much higher than the previously reported devices. The small size of our devices is also a prominent point.

  10. Tunable polarity of the Casimir force based on saturated ferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Ran; Yang Yaping

    2011-01-15

    We study the polarity of the Casimir force between two different parallel slabs separated by vacuum when the saturated ferrite materials under the influence of an external magnetic field are taken into consideration. Between the ordinary dielectric slab and the ferrite slab, repulsive Casimir force may be observed by adjusting the applied magnetic field. For the ferrite material, we consider the frequency dependence of the permeability modified by the external magnetic field to analyze the formation of the repulsive Casimir force. The restoring force, which means the transition of the force polarity from repulsion to attraction with the increasing slab separation, can also be obtained between two different ferrite slabs.

  11. Magnetoacoustic resonance in ferrite-ferroelectric nanopillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, V. M.; Zibtsev, V. V.; Srinivasan, G.

    2009-10-01

    This work is concerned with the nature of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) under the influence of acoustic oscillations with the same frequency as FMR. Here we provide the theoretical model for ME coupling at FMR in the nanopillars of ferrite in a piezoelectric matrix. Our calculations show that magnification of ME coefficient is obtained at the magnetoacoustic resonance (MAR) region where FMR and acoustic oscillations at electromechanical resonance (EMR) overlap. The clamping effect of the substrate for nanopillars is considered in determining the ME voltage coefficient. In addition, nanostructures based on single crystal ferrites take on special significance as magnetic resonance line width of such materials may be narrow enough to enable the observation of effects connected with magnetoelastic interaction. As an example, ME coefficient is estimated for the nanopillars of yttrium iron garnet in lead zirconate titanate matrix. The phenomenon is of importance for the realization of multifunctional ME nanosensors/transducers operating at microwave frequencies.

  12. Degradation of AF1Q by chaperone-mediated autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Peng; Ji, Min; Lu, Fei; Zhang, Jingru; Li, Huanjie; Cui, Taixing; Li Wang, Xing; Tang, Dongqi; Ji, Chunyan

    2014-09-10

    AF1Q, a mixed lineage leukemia gene fusion partner, is identified as a poor prognostic biomarker for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML), adult AML with normal cytogenetic and adult myelodysplastic syndrome. AF1Q is highly regulated during hematopoietic progenitor differentiation and development but its regulatory mechanism has not been defined clearly. In the present study, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches to influence chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) and explored the degradation mechanism of AF1Q. Pharmacological inhibitors of lysosomal degradation, such as chloroquine, increased AF1Q levels, whereas activators of CMA, including 6-aminonicotinamide and nutrient starvation, decreased AF1Q levels. AF1Q interacts with HSPA8 and LAMP-2A, which are core components of the CMA machinery. Knockdown of HSPA8 or LAMP-2A increased AF1Q protein levels, whereas overexpression showed the opposite effect. Using an amino acid deletion AF1Q mutation plasmid, we identified that AF1Q had a KFERQ-like motif which was recognized by HSPA8 for CMA-dependent proteolysis. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that AF1Q can be degraded in lysosomes by CMA. - Highlights: • Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is involved in the degradation of AF1Q. • Macroautophagy does not contribute to the AF1Q degradation. • AF1Q has a KFERQ-like motif that is recognized by CMA core components.

  13. Cold worked ferritic alloys and components

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1984-01-01

    This invention relates to liquid metal fast breeder reactor and steam generator precipitation hardening fully ferritic alloy components which have a microstructure substantially free of the primary precipitation hardening phase while having cells or arrays of dislocations of varying population densities. It also relates to the process by which these components are produced, which entails solution treating the alloy followed by a final cold working step. In this condition, the first significant precipitation hardening of the component occurs during high temperature use.

  14. Hexagonal Ferrites for Millimeter Wave Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-07

    single crystal platelets, single crystal spheres of Ba- and Sr- hexaferrite materials, and permalloy thin films. Three papers on these results have been...effective linewidth in planar Zn-Y hexagonal ferrite single crystal platelets, single crystal spheres of Ba- and Sr- hexaferrite materials, and...basic thesis of the original proposal - that the measured linewidth in single crystal hexaferrites (1) may contain significant contributions related to

  15. Ferritic steel melt and FLiBe/steel experiment : melting ferritic steel.

    SciTech Connect

    Troncosa, Kenneth P.; Smith, Brandon M.; Tanaka, Tina Joan

    2004-11-01

    In preparation for developing a Z-pinch IFE power plant, the interaction of ferritic steel with the coolant, FLiBe, must be explored. Sandia National Laboratories Fusion Technology Department was asked to drop molten ferritic steel and FLiBe in a vacuum system and determine the gas byproducts and ability to recycle the steel. We tried various methods of resistive heating of ferritic steel using available power supplies and easily obtained heaters. Although we could melt the steel, we could not cause a drop to fall. This report describes the various experiments that were performed and includes some suggestions and materials needed to be successful. Although the steel was easily melted, it was not possible to drip the molten steel into a FLiBe pool Levitation melting of the drop is likely to be more successful.

  16. AFS Estuaries Section - A Successful Partnership

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Estuaries Section of the American Fisheries Society offers travel awards to students in support of their attendance and presentations at the AFS meeting. Since 2007, the Southern Association of Marine Laboratories has partnered with the Estuaries Section to sponsor two stude...

  17. Topological ferrimagnetic behaviours of coordination polymers containing manganese(II) chains with mixed azide and carboxylate bridges and alternating F/AF/AF'/AF'/AF interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Qin; Liu, Hou-Ting; Qi, Yan; Gao, En-Qing

    2014-08-21

    Two Mn(ii) complexes with azide and a new zwitterionic tetracarboxylate ligand 1,2,4,5-tetrakis(4-carboxylatopyridinium-1-methylene)benzene (L(1)), {[Mn5(L(1))2(N3)8(OH)2]·12H2O}n () and {[Mn5(L(1))2(N3)8(H2O)2](ClO4)2·6H2O}n (), have been synthesized and characterized crystallographically and magnetically. and contain similar alternating chains constructed by azide and carboxylate bridges. The independent sets of bridges alternate in an ABCCB sequence between adjacent Mn(ii) ions: (EO-N3)2 double bridges (EO = end-on) (denoted as A), [(EO-N3)(OCO)2] triple bridges (denoted as B) and [(EO-N3)(OCO)] double bridges (denoted as C). The alternating chains are interlinked into 2D coordination networks by the tetrapyridinium spacers. Magnetic studies demonstrate that the magnetic coupling through the double EO azide bridges is ferromagnetic and that through mixed azide/carboxylate bridges is antiferromagnetic. The unprecedented F/AF/AF'/AF'/AF coupling sequence along the chain dictates an uncompensated ground spin state (S = 5/2 per Mn5 unit) and leads to one-dimensional topological ferrimagnetism, which features a minimum in the χT versus T plot.

  18. The Formation Process of Silico-Ferrite of Calcium (SFC) from Binary Calcium Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xiang; Guo, Xing-Min

    2014-08-01

    Silico-ferrite of calcium (SFC) is a significant equilibrium crystalline phase in the Fe2O3-CaO-SiO2 (FCS) ternary system and a key bonding phase in the sintering process of fine iron ore. In this work, the formation process of SFC from binary calcium ferrite has been determined by X-ray diffraction and field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Experiments were carried out under air at 1473 K (1200 °C) by adding SiO2 and Fe2O3 into CaO·Fe2O3 (CF). It was found that the formation of SFC is dominated by solid-state reactions in the FCS ternary system, in which Fe2O3 reacts with CaO·Fe2O3 to form the binary calcium ferrite phase. The chemical composition of binary calcium ferrite is Ca2.5Fe15.5O25 and approximately Ca2Fe12O20 (CaO·3Fe2O3). Then Si4+ and Ca2+ ions take the place of Fe3+ ion in preference located on the octahedral layers which belongs to (0 0 18) plane of binary calcium ferrite. The crystal structure of binary calcium ferrite gradually transforms from orthorhombic to triclinic, and the grain is refined with the addition of silica due to the smaller radius of Si4+ ion. A solid solution SFC forms completely when the content of SiO2 reaches approximately 3.37 wt pct at 1473 K (1200 °C).

  19. Effect of Submerged Arc Welding Parameters on the Microstructure of SA516 and A709 Steel Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amanie, James

    The effects of submerged arc welding (SAW) current and speed on the microstructures of SA516 grade 70 and A709 grade 50 steel welds were studied in this research. Steel plates 17 mm-thick were submerged arc welded using different welding currents (from 700 to 850 A) and welding speeds (from 5.3 to 15.3 mm/s). The effect of heat input on the weld metal chemistry, morphologies and chemistry of inclusions and nucleation of acicular ferrite (AF), grain boundary ferrite (GBF) and Widmanstatten ferrite (WF) were evaluated. Optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) microanalysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to examine the microstructures of the developed weld joints. PAX-it image analysis software program was utilized for quantitative analysis of the microstructures. The results showed that it is difficult to ascribe changes in the microstructure that occurred in the heat affected zone (HAZ) and the weld metal regions to a single welding process parameter. Inclusion analysis revealed two types of inclusions formed in the weld metals for both steels. They are spherical and faceted inclusions. It was also observed that acicular ferrite nucleated only on the spherical inclusions. EDS analysis showed that the two inclusions have different chemical compositions. The results further showed that the total oxygen content of the weld metals of both steels generally increased with welding current, but decreased with increasing welding speed. The prior austenite grain width decreased with increasing welding speed, but increased with increasing welding current (increased heat input). For both SA516 and A709 steel welds, the proportion of acicular ferrite (AF) in the weld metals increased initially, while those of grain boundary ferrite (GBF) and Widmanstatten ferrite (WF) decreased with increasing welding current when welding current was increased from 700 A to 800 A. With further increase in the

  20. AF fixer: new incremental OPC method for optimizing assist feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sung-Gon; Kim, Sang-Wook; Suh, Sung-Soo; Kim, Young-Chang; Lee, Suk-Joo; Choi, Sung-Woon; Han, Woo-Sung; Moon, Joo-Tae; Barnes, Levi D.; Li, Xiaohai; Lugg, Robert M.; Lee, Sooryong; Koo, Kyoil; Do, Munhoe; Amoroso, Frank P.; Painter, Benjamin

    2008-05-01

    Due to shrinking design nodes and to some limitations of scanners, extreme off-axis illumination (OAI) required and its use and implementation of assist features (AF) to solve depth of focus (DOF) problems for isolated features and specific pitch regions is essential. But unfortunately, the strong periodic character of OAI illumination makes AF's print more easily. Present OPC flows generate AFs before OPC, which is also causes some AF printing problems. At present, mask manufacturers must downsize AF's below 30nm to solve this problem. This is challenging and increases mask cost. We report on an AF-fixer tool which is able to check AF printability and correct weak points with minimal cost in terms of DOF after OPC. We have devised an effective algorithm that removes printing AF's. It can not only search for the best non-printing AF condition to meet the DOF spec, but also reports uncorrectable spots, which could be marked as design errors. To limit correction times and to maximize DOF in full-chip correction, a process window (PW) model and incremental OPC method are applied. This AF fixer, which suggests optimum AF in only weak point region, solves AF printing problems economically and accurately.

  1. Intrinsic modes of radiation in ferrite patch antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    How, Hoton; Fang, Ta-Ming; Vittoria, Carmine

    1994-06-01

    We have found two types of radiation modes for patch antennas loaded with ferrite materials. Each mode of radiation is a linear combination of normal modes of propagation in parallel plate waveguide separated by a slab of ferrite material. We have introduced new boundary conditions in which only TE modes of oscillation in the patch antenna cavity result.

  2. Synthesis And Characterization Of Reduced Size Ferrite Reinforced Polymer Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Borah, Subasit; Bhattacharyya, Nidhi S.

    2008-04-24

    Small sized Co{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite particles are synthesized by chemical route. The precursor materials are annealed at 400, 600 and 800 C. The crystallographic structure and phases of the samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The annealed ferrite samples crystallized into cubic spinel structure. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) micrographs show that the average particle size of the samples are <20 nm. Particulate magneto-polymer composite materials are fabricated by reinforcing low density polyethylene (LDPE) matrix with the ferrite samples. The B-H loop study conducted at 10 kHz on the toroid shaped composite samples shows reduction in magnetic losses with decrease in size of the filler sample. Magnetic losses are detrimental for applications of ferrite at high powers. The reduction in magnetic loss shows a possible application of Co-Ni ferrites at high microwave power levels.

  3. Recent advances in processing and applications of microwave ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Vincent G.; Geiler, Anton; Chen, Yajie; Yoon, Soack Dae; Wu, Mingzhong; Yang, Aria; Chen, Zhaohui; He, Peng; Parimi, Patanjali V.; Zuo, Xu; Patton, Carl E.; Abe, Manasori; Acher, Olivier; Vittoria, Carmine

    2009-07-01

    Next generation magnetic microwave devices will be planar, smaller, weigh less, and perform well beyond the present state-of-the-art. For this to become a reality advances in ferrite materials must first be realized. These advances include self-bias magnetization, tunability of the magnetic anisotropy, low microwave loss, and volumetric and weight reduction. To achieve these goals one must turn to novel materials processing methods. Here, we review recent advances in the processing of microwave ferrites. Attention is paid to the processing of ferrite films by pulsed laser deposition, liquid phase epitaxy, spin spray ferrite plating, screen printing, and compaction of quasi-single crystals. Conventional and novel applications of ferrite materials, including microwave non-reciprocal passive devices, microwave signal processing, negative index metamaterial-based electronics, and electromagnetic interference suppression are discussed.

  4. Electrical transport behavior of nonstoichiometric magnesium-zinc ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Ghatak, S.; Sinha, M.; Meikap, A.K.; Pradhan, S.K.

    2010-08-15

    This paper presents the direct current conductivity, alternate current conductivity and dielectric properties of nonstoichiometric magnesium-zinc ferrite below room temperature. The frequency exponent (s) of conductivity shows an anomalous temperature dependency. The magnitude of the temperature exponent (n) of dielectric permittivity strongly depends on frequency and its value decreases with increasing frequency. The grain boundary contribution is dominating over the grain contribution in conduction process and the temperature dependence of resistance due to grain and grain boundary contribution exhibits two activation regions. The ferrite shows positive alternating current magnetoconductivity. The solid state processing technique was used for the preparation of nanocrystalline ferrite powder from oxides of magnesium, zinc and iron. The X-ray diffraction methods were used in determining the structure and composition of obtained ferrite, while multimeter, impedance analyzer, liquid nitrogen cryostat and electromagnet were used in the study of conducting and dielectric properties of ferrite.

  5. Microfluidic Pumps Containing Teflon [Trademark] AF Diaphragms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Peter; White, Victor; Grunthaner, Frank; Ikeda, Mike; Mathies, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Microfluidic pumps and valves based on pneumatically actuated diaphragms made of Teflon AF polymers are being developed for incorporation into laboratory-on-a-chip devices that must perform well over temperature ranges wider than those of prior diaphragm-based microfluidic pumps and valves. Other potential applications include implanted biomedical microfluidic devices, wherein the biocompatability of Teflon AF polymers would be highly advantageous. These pumps and valves have been demonstrated to function stably after cycling through temperatures from -125 to 120 C. These pumps and valves are intended to be successors to similar prior pumps and valves containing diaphragms made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) [commonly known as silicone rubber]. The PDMS-containing valves ae designed to function stably only within the temperature range from 5 to 80 C. Undesirably, PDMS membranes are somwehat porous and retain water. PDMS is especially unsuitable for use at temperatures below 0 C because the formation of ice crystals increases porosity and introduces microshear.

  6. Corrosion behavior of magnetic ferrite coating prepared by plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi; Wei, Shicheng Tong, Hui; Tian, Haoliang; Liu, Ming; Xu, Binshi

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of the ferrite coating is 34.417 emu/g while the M{sub s} value of the ferrite powder is 71.916 emu/g. It can be seen that plasma spray process causes deterioration of the room temperature soft magnetic properties. - Highlights: • Spinel ferrite coatings have been prepared by plasma spraying. • The coating consists of nanocrystalline grains. • The saturation magnetization of the ferrite coating is 34.417 emu/g. • Corrosion behavior of the ferrite coating was examined in NaCl solution. - Abstract: In this study, spray dried spinel ferrite powders were deposited on the surface of mild steel substrate through plasma spraying. The structure and morphological studies on the ferrite coatings were carried out using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and Raman spectroscopy. It was showed that spray dried process was an effective method to prepare thermal spraying powders. The coating showed spinel structure with a second phase of LaFeO{sub 3}. The magnetic property of the ferrite samples were measured by vibrating sample magnetometer. The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of the ferrite coating was 34.417 emu/g. The corrosion behavior of coating samples was examined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. EIS diagrams showed three corrosion processes as the coating immersed in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The results suggested that plasma spraying was a promising technology for the production of magnetic ferrite coatings.

  7. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Saccone, F. D.; Ferrari, S.; Grinblat, F.; Bilovol, V.; Errandonea, D.

    2015-08-21

    We report by the first time a high pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy study of cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles carried out at room temperature up to 17 GPa. In contrast with previous studies of nanoparticles, which proposed the transition pressure to be reduced from 20–27 GPa to 7.5–12.5 GPa (depending on particle size), we found that cobalt ferrite nanoparticles remain in the spinel structure up to the highest pressure covered by our experiments. In addition, we report the pressure dependence of the unit-cell parameter and Raman modes of the studied sample. We found that under quasi-hydrostatic conditions, the bulk modulus of the nanoparticles (B{sub 0} = 204 GPa) is considerably larger than the value previously reported for bulk CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (B{sub 0} = 172 GPa). In addition, when the pressure medium becomes non-hydrostatic and deviatoric stresses affect the experiments, there is a noticeable decrease of the compressibility of the studied sample (B{sub 0} = 284 GPa). After decompression, the cobalt ferrite lattice parameter does not revert to its initial value, evidencing a unit cell contraction after pressure was removed. Finally, Raman spectroscopy provides information on the pressure dependence of all Raman-active modes and evidences that cation inversion is enhanced by pressure under non-hydrostatic conditions, being this effect not fully reversible.

  8. Microstructural origin of the skeletal ferrite morphology of austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, J A; Williams, J C; Thompson, A W

    1982-04-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy was conducted on welds exhibiting a variety of skeletal, or vermicular ferrite morphologies in addition to one lathy ferrite morphology. These ferrite morphologies result from primary ferrite solidification followed by a solid state transformation upon cooling. During cooling, a large fraction of the ferrite transforms to austenite leaving a variety of ferrite morphologies. Comparison of composition profiles and alloy partitioning showed both the skeletal and lathy ferrite structures result from a diffusion controlled solid state transformation. However, the overall measured composition profiles of the weld structure are a result of partitioning during both solidification and the subsequent solid state transformation.

  9. Helium entrapment in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, Philip D; Parish, Chad M; Zhang, Yanwen; Hallen, Dr Anders; Miller, Michael K

    2011-01-01

    The nanostructured ferritic alloy 14YWT has been irradiated with He ions to simulate accumulation of He during the service life of a nuclear reactor to test the hypothesis that the large surface area for nanoclusters is a preferential nucleation site for bubbles. Transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography showed that high number densities of He bubbles were formed on the surface of nanoclusters and Ti(C,N) precipitates, and along grain boundaries and dislocations. At higher fluences, facetted bubbles are formed and it is postulated that the lowest energy state configuration is the truncated rhombic dodecahedron.

  10. CASS Ferrite and Grain Structure Relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Ruud, Clayton O.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2016-07-13

    This document summarizes the results of research conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine whether, based on experimental measurements, a correlation existed between grain structure in cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) piping and ferrite content of the casting alloy. The motivation for this research lies in the fact that ultrasonic testing (UT) is strongly influenced by CASS grain structure; knowledge of this grain structure may help improve the ability to interpret UT responses, thereby improving the overall reliability of UT inspections of CASS components.

  11. Finemet versus ferrite -- Pros and cons

    SciTech Connect

    K.Y. Ng and Z.B. Qian

    1999-05-19

    There is a new magnetic alloy called Finemet which has very constant {mu}'{sub p}Qf up to {approximately} 2 kG and is very stable at high magnet flux density and temperature. It may be a good can-didate for high-gradient rf cavities. However, it has a rather low quality factor and is therefore very lossy. We compare the pros and cons of Finemet versus the common ferrite, when used in low-energy accelerating cavities, insertion for space-charge compensation, and barrier cavities.

  12. Microstrip transmission line tapers on ferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Albuquerque, M.R.; dAssuncao, A.G.; Lima, F.

    1997-04-01

    The spectral domain approach is employed to perform a theoretical investigation of tapered microstrip lines on magnetized ferrite substrates. A linear variation of the conducting strip width along the direction of propagation is considered. The analysis takes into account the effects of the applied dc magnetic bias field in the transmission characteristics of these structures. The properties of the taper are determined by a model based on a segmentation of the considered line into uniform microstrip line subsections. Normalized phase constants and characteristic impedances are obtained by using the Hertz vector potentials method and Galerkin numerical technique. Numerical results are presented to show the taper input parameters as a function of the load impedance, geometrical dimensions, operating frequency, and ferrite parameters, considering the orientation and magnitude changes of the biasing magnetic-field {bold H}{sub 0}. The results agree fairly well with those available in the literature for tapered microstrip lines on isotropic dielectric substrates. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. High magnetization limits of spinel ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dionne, Gerald F.

    1987-04-01

    Modifications to a previously reported theoretical model of the thermomagnetization properties of LiZnTi spinel ferrite have made possible the prediction of upper limits to the magnetization of the spinel system. Extrapolation of the molecular-field coefficient relations to the limits of the undiluted spinel, i.e., the fictitious case of unrestricted Fe3+ occupancy, provides a basis for computing all combinations of dilutant site distributions. For this situation, the maximum room-temperature magnetization and Curie temperature approach 8000 G and 1050 K, respectively. Computations for the more realistic monovalent cation system Fe3+1-xA1+x [B1+0.5-xFe3+1.5+x]O4, where A and B could represent any combination of Li, Na, or possibly Cu, yield an optimum magnetization that could reach 6500 G with a Curie temperature of about 700 K. In the context of this theoretical model, the cation site distributions for high magnetization in the Mn and Ni spinel ferrite families are also discussed.

  14. Cast Stainless Steel Ferrite and Grain Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ruud, Clayton O.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Mathews, Royce; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-09-01

    In-service inspection requirements dictate that piping welds in the primary pressure boundary of light-water reactors be subject to a volumetric examination based on the rules contained within the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI. The purpose of the inspection is the reliable detection and accurate sizing of service-induced degradation and/or material flaws introduced during fabrication. The volumetric inspection is usually carried out using ultrasonic testing (UT) methods. However, the varied metallurgical macrostructures and microstructures of cast austenitic stainless steel piping and fittings, including statically cast stainless steel and centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS), introduce significant variations in the propagation and attenuation of ultrasonic energy. These variations complicate interpretation of the UT responses and may compromise the reliability of UT inspection. A review of the literature indicated that a correlation may exist between the microstructure and the delta ferrite content of the casting alloy. This paper discusses the results of a recent study where the goal was to determine if a correlation existed between measured and/or calculated ferrite content and grain structure in CCSS pipe.

  15. Ferrite Nanoparticles, Films, Single Crystals, and Metamaterials: High Frequency Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Harris,V.

    2006-01-01

    Ferrite materials have long played an important role in power conditioning, conversion, and generation across a wide spectrum of frequencies (up to ten decades). They remain the preferred magnetic materials, having suitably low losses, for most applications above 1 MHz, and are the only viable materials for nonreciprocal magnetic microwave and millimeter-wave devices (including tunable filters, isolators, phase shifters, and circulators). Recently, novel processing techniques have led to a resurgence of research interest in the design and processing of ferrite materials as nanoparticles, films, single crystals, and metamaterials. These latest developments have set the stage for their use in emerging technologies that include cancer remediation therapies such as magnetohyperthermia, magnetic targeted drug delivery, and magneto-rheological fluids, as well as enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. With reduced dimensionality of nanoparticles and films, and the inherent nonequilibrium nature of many processing schemes, changes in local chemistry and structure have profound effects on the functional properties and performance of ferrites. In this lecture, we will explore these effects upon the fundamental magnetic and electronic properties of ferrites. Density functional theory will be applied to predict the properties of these ferrites, with synchrotron radiation techniques used to elucidate the chemical and structural short-range order. This approach will be extended to study the atomic design of ferrites by alternating target laser-ablation deposition. Recently, this approach has been shown to produce ferrites that offer attractive properties not found in conventionally grown ferrites. We will explore the latest research developments involving ferrites as related to microwave and millimeter-wave applications and the attempt to integrate these materials with semiconductor materials platforms.

  16. [Experimental studies of ferrite as a MRI contrast agent].

    PubMed

    Aoki, F

    1992-02-01

    Using a 0.2 T permanent MR imaging system, the gradual changes of signal intensity after intravenous injection of Ferrite suspension were studied in liver of normal rabbits and those with intrahepatic VX2 tumor. After injection of Ferrite suspension, decreased signal intensities of liver were observed on both T1 and T2 weighted images. The decrease on T2 weighted images was more remarkable than that on the T1 weighted image. The image with 8 mg/kg (50 mumol/kg) dose of Ferrite suspension showed significant changes of signal intensity, while, the image with 24 mg/kg (150 mumol/kg) dose was hardly evaluated because of inducing intense artifacts. The decrease of signal intensity in liver was observed immediately after the injection and was lowest after 1 hour. After 48 hours, the signal intensity began to increase. However, a slight loss of signal intensity was visualized even after 4 weeks. A clear MRI of the intrahepatic tumor following injection of Ferrite suspension was acquired especially on T2 weighted image in comparison with MRI after Gd-DTPA administration. In addition, MRI using Ferrite suspension could detect the small intrahepatic tumors which had been unable to be visualized by plain CT or enhanced CT. It is of benefit, furthermore, that Ferrite suspension could be an useful tracer for observing the intrahepatic tumor growth by a first single injection. Histologically, Ferrite particles were accumulated in reticuloendothelial system of liver whereas no accumulated in intrahepatic tumor was verified. The particles produced changes in local magnetic field resulting that signal intensity of liver showed decrease on the image. Subsequently, relatively negative contrast enhancement of liver was displayed. As a result of the present investigation, the MR imaging following injection of Ferrite suspension was found to be useful for detection of intrahepatic tumors, particularly of metastatic tumors which were isointense or hypovascular to the surrounding tissue

  17. Simulations of Ferrite-Dielectric-Wire Composite Negative Index Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachford, Frederic J.; Armstead, Douglas N.; Harris, Vincent G.; Vittoria, Carmine

    2007-08-01

    We perform extensive finite difference time domain simulations of ferrite based negative index of refraction composites. A wire grid is employed to provide negative permittivity. The ferrite and wire grid interact to provide both negative and positive index of refraction transmission peaks in the vicinity of the ferrite resonance. Notwithstanding the extreme anisotropy in the index of refraction of the composite, negative refraction is seen at the composite air interface allowing the construction of a focusing concave lens with a magnetically tunable focal length.

  18. Ferrite-superconductor devices for advanced microwave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dionne, G.F.; Oates, D.E.; Temme, D.H.; Weiss, J.A.

    1996-07-01

    Microwave devices comprising magnetized ferrite in contact with superconductor circuits designed to eliminate magnetic field penetration of the superconductor have demonstrated phase shift without significant conduction losses. The device structures are adaptable to low- or high-{Tc} superconductors. A nonoptimized design of a ferrite phase shifter that employs niobium or YBCO meanderlines has produced over 1,000 degrees of differential phase shift with a figure of merit exceeding 1,000 degrees/dB at X band. By combining superconductor meanderline sections with alternating T junctions on a ferrite substrate in a configuration with three-fold symmetry, a low-loss three-port switching circulator has been demonstrated.

  19. Magnetically tunable wideband microwave filter using ferrite-based metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Ke; Zhu, Wenting; Lei, Ming; Zhou, Ji

    2015-04-01

    Magnetically tunable wideband microwave filters have been designed and prepared by using ferrite-based metamaterial structures. The microwave properties of the filters have been investigated by experiments and simulations. The negative permeability appears around the ferromagnetic resonance frequency, which leads to a remarkable stopband for the bandstop filter. The bandpass filter is composed of two kinds of ferrite rods with different saturation magnetization. The bandwidth of the passband can be tuned by adjusting the saturation magnetization of the ferrite rods. Both the experimental and the simulated results show that those filters possess magnetically tunable property. This approach opens a way for designing tunable wideband microwave filters.

  20. Fast ferrite tuner for the BNL synchrotron light source

    SciTech Connect

    Pivit, E. ); Hanna, S.M.; Keane, J. )

    1991-01-01

    A new type of ferrite tuner has been tested at the BNL. The ferrite tuner uses garnet slabs partially filling a stripline. One of the important features of the tuner is that the ferrite is perpendicularly biased for operation above FMR, thus reducing the magnetic losses. A unique design was adopted to achieve the efficient cooling. The principle of operation of the tuner as well as our preliminary results on tuning a 52 MHz cavity are reported. Optimized conditions under which we demonstrated linear tunability of 80 KHz are described. The tuner's losses and its effect on higher-order modes in the cavity are discussed. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  1. Nickel hydroxide/cobalt-ferrite magnetic nanocatalyst for alcohol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Pooja B; Inam, Fawad; Bhat, Badekai Ramachandra

    2014-08-11

    A magnetically separable, active nickel hydroxide (Brønsted base) coated nanocobalt ferrite catalyst has been developed for oxidation of alcohols. High surface area was achieved by tuning the particle size with surfactant. The surface area of 120.94 m2 g(-1) has been achieved for the coated nanocobalt ferrite. Improved catalytic activity and selectivity were obtained by synergistic effect of transition metal hydroxide (basic hydroxide) on nanocobalt ferrite. The nanocatalyst oxidizes primary and secondary alcohols efficiently (87%) to corresponding carbonyls in good yields.

  2. Coaxially electrospun PVDF-Teflon AF and Teflon AF-PVDF core-sheath nanofiber mats with superhydrophobic properties.

    PubMed

    Muthiah, Palanikkumaran; Hsu, Shu-Hau; Sigmund, Wolfgang

    2010-08-03

    This work reports the coaxial electrospinning of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF)-Teflon amorphous fluoropolymer (AF) and Teflon AF-PVDF core-sheath nanofiber mats yielding superhydrophobic properties. The coaxial electrospinning configuration allows for the electrospinning of Teflon AF, a nonelectrospinnable polymer, with the help of an electrospinnable PVDF polymer. PVDF-Teflon AF and Teflon AF-PVDF core-sheath fibers have been found to a have mean fiber diameter ranging from 400 nm to less than 100 nm. TEM micrographs exhibit a typical core-sheath fiber structure for these fibers, where the sheath fiber coats the core fiber almost thoroughly. Water contact angle measurements by sessile drop method on these core-sheath nanofiber mats exhibited superhydrophobic characteristics with contact angles close to or higher than 150 degrees. Surprisingly, PVDF-Teflon AF and Teflon AF-PVDF nanofiber mat surface properties were dominated by the fiber dimensions and less influenced by the type of sheath polymer. This suggests that highly fluorinated polymer Teflon AF does not advance the hydrophobicity beyond what surface physics and slightly fluorinated polymer PVDF can achieve. It is concluded that PVDF-Teflon AF and Teflon AF-PVDF core-sheath electrospun nanofiber mats may be used in lithium (Li)-air batteries.

  3. Dielectric investigations of polycrystalline samarium bismuth ferrite ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Palaimiene, E.; Macutkevic, J.; Banys, J.; Karpinsky, D. V.; Kholkin, A. L.

    2015-01-05

    Results of broadband dielectric investigations of samarium doped bismuth ferrite ceramics are presented in wide temperature range (20–800 K). At temperatures higher than 400 K, the dielectric properties of samarium bismuth ferrite ceramics are governed by Maxwell-Wagner relaxation and electrical conductivity. The DC conductivity increases and activation energy decreases with samarium concentration. In samarium doped bismuth ferrite, the ferroelectric phase transition temperature decreases with samarium concentration and finally no ferroelectric order is observed at x = 0.2. At lower temperatures, the dielectric properties of ferroelectric samarium doped bismuth ferrite are governed by ferroelectric domains dynamics. Ceramics with x = 0.2 exhibit the relaxor-like behaviour.

  4. Ferrite core coupled slapper detonator apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Boberg, R.E.; Lee, R.S.; Weingart, R.C.

    1989-08-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for coupling a temporally short electric power pulse from a thick flat-conductor power cable into a thin flat-conductor slapper detonator circuit. A first planar and generally circular loop is formed from an end portion of the power cable. A second planar and generally circular loop, of similar diameter, is formed from all or part of the slapper detonator circuit. The two loops are placed together, within a ferrite housing that provides a ferrite path that magnetically couples the two loops. Slapper detonator parts may be incorporated within the ferrite housing. The ferrite housing may be made vacuum and water-tight, with the addition of a hermetic ceramic seal, and provided with an enclosure for protecting the power cable and parts related thereto. 10 figs.

  5. New sintering process adjusts magnetic value of ferrite cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinal, A. W.

    1964-01-01

    A two-phase sintering technique based on time and temperature permits reversible control of the coercive threshold of sintered ferrite cores. Threshold coercivity may be controlled over a substantial range of values by selective control of the cooling rate.

  6. Sustainable synthesis of monodispersed spinel nano-ferrites

    EPA Science Inventory

    A sustainable approach for the synthesis of various monodispersed spinel ferrite nanoparticles has been developed that occurs at water-toluene interface under both conventional and microwave hydrothermal conditions. This general synthesis procedure utilizes readily available and ...

  7. Ferrite-filled cavities for compact planar resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keatley, P. S.; Durrant, C. J.; Berry, S. J.; Sirotkin, E.; Hibbins, A. P.; Hicken, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    Sub-wavelength metallic planar cavities, closed at one end, have been constructed by wrapping aluminium foil around teflon or ferrite slabs. Finite cavity width perturbs the fundamental cavity mode frequency of ferrite-filled cavities due to different permeability inside and outside of the cavity, in contrast to teflon-filled cavities, while the cavity length required to achieve a specific resonance frequency is significantly reduced for a ferrite-filled cavity. Ferrite-filled cavities may be excited by an in-plane alternating magnetic field and may be advantageous for high-frequency (HF) and ultra HF tagging and radio frequency identification of metallic objects within security, manufacturing, and shipping environments.

  8. Controlled ferrite content improves weldability of corrosion-resistant steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, C. O.

    1967-01-01

    Corrosion-resistant steel that adds restrictions on chemical composition to ensure sufficient ferrite content decreases the tendency of CRES to develop cracks during welding. The equations restricting composition are based on the Schaeffler constitution diagram.

  9. Ferrite core coupled slapper detonator apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Boberg, Ralph E.; Lee, Ronald S.; Weingart, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for coupling a temporally short electric power pulse from a thick flat-conductor power cable into a thin flat-conductor slapper detonator circuit. A first planar and generally circular loop is formed from an end portion of the power cable. A second planar and generally circular loop, of similar diameter, is formed from all or part of the slapper detonator circuit. The two loops are placed together, within a ferrite housing that provides a ferrite path that magnetically couples the two loops. Slapper detonator parts may be incorporated within the ferrite housing. The ferrite housing may be made vacuum and water-tight, with the addition of a hermetic ceramic seal, and provided with an enclosure for protecting the power cable and parts related thereto.

  10. Magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite synthesized by hydrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaedini, Ghazaleh; Tasirin, Siti Masrinda; Aminayi, Payam

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the magnetic properties of nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite synthesized via the hydrothermal method have been investigated. The structural properties of the produced powders were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The observed XRD pattern confirmed the spinel/cubic structure of the prepared cobalt ferrite. The SEM pictures show that the simple hydrothermal method produces uniform sphere-shaped nanopowders. Moreover, infrared spectroscopy was used to confirm the formation of cobalt ferrite particles. Magnetic hysteresis was measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer in a maximum field of 10 kOe. The magnetization of the prepared nanoparticles was investigated, and the saturation magnetization ( M s), remanence ( M r), and coercivity ( H c) were derived from the hysteresis loops. The results revealed that the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles synthesized via the simple hydrothermal method exhibit superior magnetic properties.

  11. Surface impedance of transversely moving microwave ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, R. S.

    1990-01-01

    A theoretical study was made of the surface impedance Z for an electromagnetic transverse magnetic wave from free space on a magnetized ferrite surface moving normal to the plane of incidence. It was found convenient to decompose the surface impedance into two transfer impedances, Z1 and Z2, which relate the hybrid reflected amplitudes to the amplitude of the incident wave. The surface impedance does not vary much with respect to the angle of incidence, so only the case of normal incidence (θi = 0°) was evaluated. Resonant poles at ƒc, [ƒc(ƒc + ƒm)]1/2, and ƒc + ƒm dominate the frequency characteristics of Z1 and Z2. The frequencies ƒc andƒm are the precessional frequency and magnetization frequency, respectively.

  12. Characterization of Irradiated Nanostructured Ferritic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, James; Hoelzer, David T; Tanigawa, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Odette, George R.

    2007-01-01

    The past decade has seen the development of a new class of mechanically alloyed (MA) ferritic steels with outstanding mechanical properties that come, at least in part, from the presence of high concentrations (>10{sup 23} m{sup -3}) of Ti-, Y-, and O-enriched nanoclusters (NC). From the outset, there has been much interest in their potential use for applications to fission and proposed fusion reactors, not only because of their attractive high-temperature strength, but also because the presence of NC may result in a highly radiation-resistant material by efficiently trapping point defects to enhance recombination. Of special interest for fusion applications is the potential of NC to trap transmutation-produced He in high concentrations of small cavities, rather than in fewer but larger cavities that lead to greater radiation-induced swelling and other degraded properties.

  13. Transport in Manganese-Zinc Ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, David J.; Gupta, M.; Gupta, R.

    2002-03-01

    Density functional studies of the electronic and magnetic structure of the spinel ferrites ZnFe_2O4 and MnFe_2O4 are reported. Correct magnetic orderings are obtained. ZnFe_2O4 is predicted to be a small gap insulator in agreement with experiment. MnFe_2O4 is found to be a low carrier density half-metal in the fully ordered state. However, strong effects on the band structure near the band edges are found upon partial interchange of Fe and Mn atoms. These are above the criterion for disorder induced localization. This indicates that the insulating character may well be due to Anderson localization associated with the intersite Mn-Fe disorder in contrast to the usual picture of a Mott insulating ground state. This possibility is discussed in relation to experimental data.

  14. Ethanol sensor based on nanocrystallite cadmium ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Gadkari, Ashok B.; Shinde, Tukaram J.; Vasambekar, Pramod N.

    2015-06-24

    The cadmium ferrite was synthesized by oxalate co-precipitation method. The crystal structure and surface morphology were examined by X-ray diffraction and SEM techniques, respectively. The nanocrystallite CdFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} sensor was tested for LPG, Cl{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH. The sensitivity was measured at various operating temperatures in the range of 100-400°C. The sensor shows highest sensitivity and selectivity to C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH at 350°C. The response and recovery time was measured at operating temperature of 350°C. The sensor exhibits a lower response and recovery time for LPG and Cl{sub 2} as compared to ethanol.

  15. High strength ferritic alloy-D53

    DOEpatents

    Hagel, William C.; Smidt, Frederick A.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1977-01-01

    A high strength ferritic alloy is described having from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight nickel, from about 2.5% to about 3.6% by weight chromium, from about 2.5% to about 3.5% by weight molybdenum, from about 0.1% to about 0.5% by weight vanadium, from about 0.1% to about 0.5% by weight silicon, from about 0.1% to about 0.6% by weight manganese, from about 0.12% to about 0.20% by weight carbon, from about 0.02% to about 0.1% by weight boron, a maximum of about 0.05% by weight nitrogen, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight phosphorous, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight sulfur, and the balance iron.

  16. Ethanol sensor based on nanocrystallite cadmium ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadkari, Ashok B.; Shinde, Tukaram J.; Vasambekar, Pramod N.

    2015-06-01

    The cadmium ferrite was synthesized by oxalate co-precipitation method. The crystal structure and surface morphology were examined by X-ray diffraction and SEM techniques, respectively. The nanocrystallite CdFe2O4 sensor was tested for LPG, Cl2 and C2H5OH. The sensitivity was measured at various operating temperatures in the range of 100-400°C. The sensor shows highest sensitivity and selectivity to C2H5OH at 350°C. The response and recovery time was measured at operating temperature of 350°C. The sensor exhibits a lower response and recovery time for LPG and Cl2 as compared to ethanol.

  17. Joining Techniques for Ferritic ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    V.G. Krishnardula; V.G. Krishnardula; D.E. Clark; T.C. Totemeier

    2005-06-01

    This report presents results of research on advanced joining techniques for ferritic oxide-dispersion strengthened alloys MA956 and PM2000. The joining techniques studied were resistance pressure welding (also known as pressure forge welding), transient liquid phase bonding, and diffusion bonding. All techniques were shown to produce sound joints in fine-grained, unrecrystallized alloys. Post-bond heat treatment to produce a coarse-grained, recrystallized microstructure resulted in grain growth across the bondline for transient liquid phase and diffusion bonds, giving microstructures essentially identical to that of the parent alloy in the recrystallized condition. The effects of bond orientation, boron interlayer thickness, and bonding parameters are discussed for transient liquid phase and diffusion bonding. The report concludes with a brief discussion of ODS joining techniques and their applicability to GEN IV reactor systems.

  18. Advanced Microwave Ferrite Research (AMFeR): Phase Three

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-31

    10 GHz. Certain deviations from simulation The ferrite hysteresis and ferromagnetic resonance proper- are apparent particularly in the insertion loss...Field (Oe) 12 Frequency (GHz) Fig. 7. Measured hysteresis curve of TT1-1000. Fig. 10. Simulation and measurement Wwrtion loss and isolation of the 0...quality simulation of a ferrite phase shifter. The key team members of this project are divided into two functional groups: Material Science and Microwave

  19. DARHT-II Injector Transients and the Ferrite Damper

    SciTech Connect

    Waldron, Will; Reginato, Lou; Chow, Ken; Houck, Tim; Henestroza, Enrique; Yu, Simon; Kang, Michael; Briggs, Richard

    2006-08-04

    This report summarizes the transient response of the DARHT-II Injector and the design of the ferrite damper. Initial commissioning of the injector revealed a rise time excited 7.8 MHz oscillation on the diode voltage and stalk current leading to a 7.8 MHz modulation of the beam current, position, and energy. Commissioning also revealed that the use of the crowbar to decrease the voltage fall time excited a spectrum of radio frequency modes which caused concern that there might be significant transient RF electric field stresses imposed on the high voltage column insulators. Based on the experience of damping the induction cell RF modes with ferrite, the concept of a ferrite damper was developed to address the crowbar-excited oscillations as well as the rise-time-excited 7.8 MHz oscillations. After the Project decided to discontinue the use of the crowbar, further development of the concept focused exclusively on damping the oscillations excited by the rise time. The design was completed and the ferrite damper was installed in the DARHT-II Injector in February 2006. The organization of this report is as follows. The suite of injector diagnostics are described in Section 2. The data and modeling of the injector transients excited on the rise-time and also by the crowbar are discussed in Section 3; the objective is a concise summary of the present state of understanding. The design of the ferrite damper, and the small scale circuit simulations used to evaluate the ferrite material options and select the key design parameters like the cross sectional area and the optimum gap width, are presented in Section 4. The details of the mechanical design and the installation of the ferrite damper are covered in Section 5. A brief summary of the performance of the ferrite damper following its installation in the injector is presented in Section 6.

  20. Propagation along azimuthally magnetized ferrite-loaded circular waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, R. S.; Rosenbaum, F. J.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes the modal dispersion characteristics of electromagnetic waves traveling along the azimuthally magnetized ferrite-loaded coaxial transmission line and the ferrite-loaded wire. The modal dispersion curves are used to determine the pass and stop bands of normal propagation. Boundary-value problems were solved with Bolle-Heller functions. The dispersion characteristics of transverse electric modes are presented as plots of the normalized propagation constant vs the normalized frequency.

  1. Charpy impact test results for low-activation ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, N.S.; Hu, W.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1987-05-01

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the shift of the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and the reduction of the upper shelf energy (USE) due to neutron irradiation of low activation ferritic alloys. Six low activation ferritic alloys have been tested following irradiation at 365/sup 0/C to 10 dpa and compared with control specimens in order to assess the effect of irradiation on Charpy impact properties.

  2. MHD Effects of a Ferritic Wall on Tokamak Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Paul E.

    It has been recognized for some time that the very high fluence of fast (14.1MeV) neutrons produced by deuterium-tritium fusion will represent a major materials challenge for the development of next-generation fusion energy projects such as a fusion component test facility and demonstration fusion power reactor. The best-understood and most promising solutions presently available are a family of low-activation steels originally developed for use in fission reactors, but the ferromagnetic properties of these steels represent a danger to plasma confinement through enhancement of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and increased susceptibility to error fields. At present, experimental research into the effects of ferromagnetic materials on MHD stability in toroidal geometry has been confined to demonstrating that it is still possible to operate an advanced tokamak in the presence of ferromagnetic components. In order to better quantify the effects of ferromagnetic materials on tokamak plasma stability, a new ferritic wall has been installated in the High Beta Tokamak---Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) device. The development, assembly, installation, and testing of this wall as a modular upgrade is described, and the effect of the wall on machine performance is characterized. Comparative studies of plasma dynamics with the ferritic wall close-fitting against similar plasmas with the ferritic wall retracted demonstrate substantial effects on plasma stability. Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) are applied, demonstrating a 50% increase in n = 1 plasma response amplitude when the ferritic wall is near the plasma. Susceptibility of plasmas to disruption events increases by a factor of 2 or more with the ferritic wall inserted, as disruptions are observed earlier with greater frequency. Growth rates of external kink instabilities are observed to be twice as large in the presence of a close-fitting ferritic wall. Initial studies are made of the influence of mode rotation frequency

  3. Temperature dependent phase transformation in nano sized magnesium ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumangala T., P.; Mahender, C.; Venkataramani, N.; Prasad, Shiva

    2015-06-01

    The phase transformation in nanosized stoichiometric magnesium ferrite is being discussed. It was shown by TGA/DSC that there exist two reactions (shown by exothermic peaks) in nano sized magnesium ferrite when synthesized by sol gel combustion synthesis. First one of these reactions resulted in the precipitation of α-Fe2O3 and a resultant spinel. The second reaction resulted in stoichiometric spinel from this two phase system.

  4. Exchange-spring mechanism of soft and hard ferrite nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Manjura Hoque, S.; Srivastava, C.; Kumar, V.; Venkatesh, N.; Das, H.N.; Saha, D.K.; Chattopadhyay, K.

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Exchange-spring behaviour of soft and hard ferrites was studied. • XRD patterns indicated soft and hard ferrites as fcc and hcp structure. • Hysteresis loops indicate wide difference in coercivity of soft and hard phases. • Nanocomposites produced convex hysteresis loop characteristic of single-phase. - Abstract: The paper reports exchange-spring soft and hard ferrite nanocomposites synthesized by chemical co-precipitation with or without the application of ultrasonic vibration. The composites contained BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} as the hard phase and CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} as the soft phase. X-ray diffraction patterns of the samples in the optimum calcined condition indicated the presence of soft ferrites as face-centred cubic (fcc) and hard ferrites as hexagonal close packed (hcp) structure respectively. Temperature dependence of magnetization in the range of 20–700 °C demonstrated distinct presence of soft and hard ferrites as magnetic phases which are characterized by wide difference in magnetic anisotropy and coercivity. Exchange-spring mechanism led these nanocomposite systems to exchange-coupled, which ultimately produced convex hysteresis loops characteristic of a single-phase permanent magnet. Fairly high value of coercivity and maximum energy product were observed for the samples in the optimum calcined conditions with a maximum applied field of 1600 kA/m (2 T)

  5. Coating of zinc ferrite particles with a conducting polymer, polyaniline.

    PubMed

    Stejskal, Jaroslav; Trchová, Miroslava; Brodinová, Jitka; Kalenda, Petr; Fedorova, Svetlana V; Prokes, Jan; Zemek, Josef

    2006-06-01

    Particles of zinc ferrite, ZnOFe2O3, were coated with polyaniline (PANI) phosphate during the in situ polymerization of aniline in an aqueous solution of phosphoric acid. The PANI-ferrite composites were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine the degree of coating with a conducting polymer. Even a low content of PANI, 1.4 wt%, resulted in the 45% coating of the particles' surface. On the other hand, even at high PANI content, the coating of ferrite surface did not exceeded 90%. This is explained by the clustering of hydrophobic aniline oligomers at the hydrophilic ferrite surface and the consequent irregular PANI coating. The conductivity increased from 2 x 10(-9) to 6.5 S cm(-1) with increasing fraction of PANI phosphate in the composite. The percolation threshold was located at 3-4 vol% of the conducting component. In the absence of any acid, a conducting product, 1.4 x 10(-2) Scm(-1), was also obtained. As the concentration of phosphoric acid increased to 3 M, the conductivity of the composites reached 1.8 S cm(-1) at 10-14 wt% of PANI. The ferrite alone can act as an oxidant for aniline; a product having a conductivity 0.11 S cm(-1) was obtained after a one-month immersion of ferrite in an acidic solution of aniline.

  6. Epitaxial single crystalline ferrite films for high frequency applications

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Y.; Dover, R.B. van; Korenivski, V.; Werder, D.; Chen, C.H.; Felder, R.J.; Phillips, J.M.

    1996-11-01

    The successful growth of single crystal ferrites in thin film form is an important step towards their future incorporation into integrated circuits operating at microwave frequencies. The authors have successfully grown high quality single crystalline spinel ferrite thin films of (Mn,Zn)Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} on (100) and (110) SrTiO{sub 3} and MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} at low temperature. These ferrite films are buffered with spinel structure layers that are paramagnetic at room temperature. In contrast to ferrite films grown directly on the substrates, ferrite films grown on buffered substrates exhibit excellent crystallinity and bulk saturation magnetization values, thus indicating the importance of lattice match and structural similarity between the film and the immediately underlying layer. X-ray, RBS, AFM and TEM analysis provide a consistent picture of the structural properties of these ferrite films. The authors then use this technique to grow exchange-coupled bilayers of single crystalline CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and (Mn,Zn)Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. In these bilayers, they observe strong exchange coupling across the interface that is similar in strength to the exchange coupling in the individual layers.

  7. Performance of ferritic stainless steels for automobile muffler corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Tarutani, Y.; Hashizume, T.

    1995-11-01

    Corrosion behavior of ferritic stainless steels was studied in artificial exhaust gas condensates containing corrosive ions such as Cl{sup {minus}} and SO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}. Continuous immersion tests in flasks and Dip and Dry tests by using the alternate corrosion tester with a heating system clarified the effects of chromium and molybdenum additions on the corrosion resistance of a ferritic stainless steel in the artificial exhaust gas condensates. Effects of surface oxidation on the corrosion behavior were investigated in a temperature range of 573K to 673K. Oxidation of 673K reduced the corrosion resistance of the ferritic stainless steels in the artificial environment of the automobile muffler. Particulate matter deposited on the muffler inner shell from the automobile exhaust gas was also examined. Deposited particulate matter increased the corrosion rate of the ferritic stainless steel. Finally, the authors also investigated the corrosion of the automobile mufflers made of Type 436L ferritic stainless steel with 18% chromium-1.2% molybdenum after 24 months, in Japan. The sets of results clarified that Type 436L ferritic stainless steel as the material for the automobile muffler exhibited acceptable corrosion resistance.

  8. Analytical modeling of demagnetizing effect in magnetoelectric ferrite/PZT/ferrite trilayers taking into account a mechanical coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyau, V.; Aubert, A.; LoBue, M.; Mazaleyrat, F.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the demagnetizing effect in ferrite/PZT/ferrite magnetoelectric (ME) trilayer composites consisting of commercial PZT discs bonded by epoxy layers to Ni-Co-Zn ferrite discs made by a reactive Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) technique. ME voltage coefficients (transversal mode) were measured on ferrite/PZT/ferrite trilayer ME samples with different thicknesses or phase volume ratio in order to highlight the influence of the magnetic field penetration governed by these geometrical parameters. Experimental ME coefficients and voltages were compared to analytical calculations using a quasi-static model. Theoretical demagnetizing factors of two magnetic discs that interact together in parallel magnetic structures were derived from an analytical calculation based on a superposition method. These factors were introduced in ME voltage calculations which take account of the demagnetizing effect. To fit the experimental results, a mechanical coupling factor was also introduced in the theoretical formula. This reflects the differential strain that exists in the ferrite and PZT layers due to shear effects near the edge of the ME samples and within the bonding epoxy layers. From this study, an optimization in magnitude of the ME voltage is obtained. Lastly, an analytical calculation of demagnetizing effect was conducted for layered ME composites containing higher numbers of alternated layers (n ≥ 5). The advantage of such a structure is then discussed.

  9. Synthesis, characterization and potential application of MnZn ferrite and MnZn ferrite @ Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Lingyan; Lim, I-Im S; Bao, Kun; Mott, Derrick; Park, Hye-Young; Luo, Jin; Hao, Shunli; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2009-05-01

    The ability to tune the magnetic properties of magnetic nanoparticles by manipulating the composition or surface properties of the nanoparticles is important for exploiting the application of the nanomaterials. This report describes preliminary findings of an investigation of the viability of synthesizing MnZn ferrite and core @ shell MnZn ferrite @ Au nanoparticles as potentially magnetization-tunable nanomaterials. The synthesis of the core-shell magnetic nanoparticles involved a simple combination of seed formation of the MnZn ferrite magnetic nanoparticles and surface coating of the seeds with gold shells. Water-soluble MnZn ferrite nanoparticles of 20-40 nm diameters and MnZn ferrite @ Au nanoparticles of 30-60 nm have been obtained. The MnZn ferrite @ Au nanoparticles have been demonstrated to be viable in magnetic separation of nanoparticles via interparticle antibody-specific binding reactivity between antibodies on the gold shells of the core-shell magnetic particles and proteins on gold nanoparticles. These findings have significant implications to the design of the core @ shell magnetic nanomaterials with core composition tuned magnetization for bioassay application.

  10. FCRD Milestone Report: M21AF050901

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelzer, David T; Sokolov, Mikhail A; Byun, Thak Sang; Odette, George R.; Klingensmith, Doug; Gragg, David; Stergar, Eric; Fields, Kirk

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to perform mechanical testing on large scale heats of the advanced ODS 14YWT alloy to investigate the effects of processing parameters on mechanical properties. Mechanical properties tests were conducted on two heats of the advanced ODS 14YWT ferritic alloy: the 14YWT-SM11 was produced by extrusion at ORNL and OW4 was produced by HIP at UCSB. The 14YWT-SM11 showed very high tensile strength compared to OW4, but showed less ductility as a result. The fracture toughness transition temperature of 14YWT-SM11 was determined in two orientations and showed T{sub 0} = 48 C in the favorably strong L-T direction while shifting by 63 C to T{sub 0} = 111 C in the weaker T-L direction. The fracture toughness transition temperature for OW4 was not determined but appeared to be within the range observed for 14YWT-SM11. The fracture toughness of 14YWT-SM11 at room temperature was 86.8 MPa{radical}m and 93.1 MPa{radical}m, which was much higher than that of OW4 (27.4 MPa{radical}m). The strain rate jump tests conducted on OW4 indicated that the creep properties were similar to MA957 at 750 C.

  11. 7 CFR Exhibits A-F to Subpart A... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false A Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... Real and Chattel Property Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955...

  12. 7 CFR Exhibits A-F to Subpart A... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false A Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... Real and Chattel Property Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955...

  13. 7 CFR Exhibits A-F to Subpart A... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false A Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... Real and Chattel Property Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955...

  14. 7 CFR Exhibits A-F to Subpart A... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true A Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... Real and Chattel Property Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955...

  15. 7 CFR Exhibits A-F to Subpart A... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false A Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... Real and Chattel Property Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955...

  16. Part III: AFS - A Secure Distributed File System

    SciTech Connect

    Wachsmann, A.; /SLAC

    2005-06-29

    AFS is a secure distributed global file system providing location independence, scalability and transparent migration capabilities for data. AFS works across a multitude of Unix and non-Unix operating systems and is used at many large sites in production for many years. AFS still provides unique features that are not available with other distributed file systems even though AFS is almost 20 years old. This age might make it less appealing to some but with IBM making AFS available as open-source in 2000, new interest in use and development was sparked. When talking about AFS, people often mention other file systems as potential alternatives. Coda (http://www.coda.cs.cmu.edu/) with its disconnected mode will always be a research project and never have production quality. Intermezzo (http://www.inter-mezzo.org/) is now in the Linux kernel but not available for any other operating systems. NFSv4 (http://www.nfsv4.org/) which picked up many ideas from AFS and Coda is not mature enough yet to be used in serious production mode. This article presents the rich features of AFS and invites readers to play with it.

  17. DDX6 transfers P-TEFb kinase to the AF4/AF4N (AFF1) super elongation complex

    PubMed Central

    Mück, Fabian; Bracharz, Silvia; Marschalek, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    AF4/AFF1 and AF5/AFF4 are both backbones for the assembly of “super elongation complexes” (SECs) that exert 2 distinct functions after the recruitment of P-TEFb from the 7SK snRNP: (1) initiation and elongation of RNA polymerase II gene transcription, and (2) modification of transcribed gene regions by distinct histone methylation patterns. In this study we aimed to investigate one of the initial steps, namely how P-TEFb is transferred from 7SK snRNPs to the SECs. In particular, we were interested in the role of DDX6 that we have recently identified as part of the AF4 complex. DDX6 is an evolutionarily conserved member of the DEAD-box RNA helicase family that is known to control miRNA and mRNA biology (translation, storage and degradation). Overexpressed DDX6 is associated with different cancer types and with c-Myc protein overexpression. We could demonstrate that DDX6 binds to 7SK snRNA and causes the release and transfer of P-TEFb to the AF4/AF4N SEC. DDX6 also binds stably to AF4 and AF4N as demonstrated by GST pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation experiments. As a consequence, overexpression of either AF4/AF4N or DDX6 resulted in a strong increase of mRNA production (5-6 fold), while their simultaneous expression increased the cellular mRNA production by 11-fold. Conversely, the corresponding knockdown of DDX6 decreased mRNA production by 70%. In conclusion, AF4/AF4N and DDX6 represent key molecules for the elongation process of gene transcription and a model will be proposed for the hand-over process of P-TEFb to SECs. PMID:27679741

  18. Compliance Testing of the Clear AFS Power Plant, Coal-Fired Boiler 1 Clear AFS, Alaska

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    Background On 3 February 1987 Clear AFS requested a permit modification to allow limited burning of waste oil for their power plant shown in Figure 1...The Alaska DEC rescindel Permit to Operate No. 8331-AA003 and issued Permit No. 8731-AA004 (Appendix B) allowing the burning of waste oil. As a...below. 1. Visible Emissions (18 AAC 50.050(a)) Visible emissions, excluding condensed water vapor from an industrial process or fuel burning

  19. Physical facets of ultrasonic cavitational synthesis of zinc ferrite particles.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Bhaskar Rao; Sivasankar, Thirugnanasambandam; Sivakumar, Manickam; Moholkar, Vijayanand S

    2010-02-01

    This paper addresses the physical features of the ultrasonic cavitational synthesis of zinc ferrite particles and tries to establish the relationship between cavitation physics and sonochemistry of the zinc ferrite synthesis. A dual approach of coupling experimental results with simulations of radial motion of cavitation bubbles has been adopted. The precursors for the zinc ferrite, viz. ZnO and Fe(3)O(4) are produced in situ by the hydrolysis of Zn and Fe(II) acetates stimulated by (*)OH radicals produced from the transient collapse of the cavitation bubbles. Experiments performed under different conditions create significant variation in the production of (*)OH radicals, and hence, the rate of acetate hydrolysis. Correlation of the results of experiments and simulations sheds light on the important facets of the physical mechanism of ultrasonic cavitational zinc ferrite synthesis. It is revealed that too much or too little rate of acetate hydrolysis results in smaller particle size of zinc ferrite. The first effect of a higher rate of hydrolysis leads to excessively large growth of particles, due to which they become susceptible to the disruptive action of cavitation bubbles. Whereas, the second effect of too small rate of hydrolysis of Zn and Fe(II) acetates restricts the growth of particles. It has been observed that the initial reactant concentration does not influence the mean particle size or the size distribution of zinc ferrite particles. The present investigation clearly confirms that the rate-controlling step of zinc ferrite synthesis through ultrasonic cavitational route is the rate of formation of (*)OH radicals from cavitation bubbles.

  20. Scattering from the Quasi-Optical Ferrite Circulator Using a Coupled Integral Equation/FEM Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epp, L. W.; Hoppe, D. J.; Chinn, G. C.; Lee, J.

    1994-01-01

    Ferrite materials are used in microwave devices that exploit the property of Faraday rotation to give non-reciprocal behavior. Examples of common waveguide components that use ferrite materials include circulators, isolators and gyrators.

  1. Synthesis of Novel Ferrite Based Recyclable Catalyst Used to Clean Dye and Emerging Contaminates from Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Herein, we describe synthesis of novel palladium, copper, cobalt and vanadium ferrites. The ferrites were synthesized by combustion method using polyvinyl alcohol. The particles phases were confirmed using X-ray diffraction and sizes were determined using particle size analyzer. ...

  2. Applications of ferrites and ferromagnets in tuning rf cavities for accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, S.M. )

    1994-05-15

    Traditionally ferrites have been used in accelerators for tuning rf cavities and in nonreciprocal devices controlling the power flow in rf accelerating systems. Recently, the development of cavity tuners based on perpendicularly biased ferrites has shown good progress. Yttrium iron garnet (YIG) is gradually replacing the traditional Ni Zn ferrites. The use of conventional parallel-biased Ni Zn ferrites for varying the frequency of accelerating cavities has the disadvantage of high saturation magnetization (4[pi][ital M][sub [ital s

  3. 40 CFR 721.10223 - Styrenyl surface treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). 721.10223 Section 721.10223 Protection of Environment... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (PMN P-09-582) is subject to reporting under this section...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10223 - Styrenyl surface treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). 721.10223 Section 721.10223 Protection of Environment... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (PMN P-09-582) is subject to reporting under this section...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10223 - Styrenyl surface treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). 721.10223 Section 721.10223 Protection of Environment... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (PMN P-09-582) is subject to reporting under this section...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10223 - Styrenyl surface treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). 721.10223 Section 721.10223 Protection of Environment... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (PMN P-09-582) is subject to reporting under this section...

  7. 77 FR 60478 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... COMMISSION Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This guide describes a method that the NRC staff considers acceptable for controlling ferrite content in stainless steel weld metal. Revision 4 updates...

  8. Strong and moldable cellulose magnets with high ferrite nanoparticle content.

    PubMed

    Galland, Sylvain; Andersson, Richard L; Ström, Valter; Olsson, Richard T; Berglund, Lars A

    2014-11-26

    A major limitation in the development of highly functional hybrid nanocomposites is brittleness and low tensile strength at high inorganic nanoparticle content. Herein, cellulose nanofibers were extracted from wood and individually decorated with cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles and then for the first time molded at low temperature (<120 °C) into magnetic nanocomposites with up to 93 wt % inorganic content. The material structure was characterized by TEM and FE-SEM and mechanically tested as compression molded samples. The obtained porous magnetic sheets were further impregnated with a thermosetting epoxy resin, which improved the load-bearing functions of ferrite and cellulose material. A nanocomposite with 70 wt % ferrite, 20 wt % cellulose nanofibers, and 10 wt % epoxy showed a modulus of 12.6 GPa, a tensile strength of 97 MPa, and a strain at failure of ca. 4%. Magnetic characterization was performed in a vibrating sample magnetometer, which showed that the coercivity was unaffected and that the saturation magnetization was in proportion with the ferrite content. The used ferrite, CoFe2O4, is a magnetically hard material, demonstrated by that the composite material behaved as a traditional permanent magnet. The presented processing route is easily adaptable to prepare millimeter-thick and moldable magnetic objects. This suggests that the processing method has the potential to be scaled-up for industrial use for the preparation of a new subcategory of magnetic, low-cost, and moldable objects based on cellulose nanofibers.

  9. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T.; Asta, Mark D.; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C.; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-11-01

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. The present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.

  10. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T.; Asta, Mark D.; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C.; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. The present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures. PMID:26548303

  11. Magnesium ferrite nanoparticles: a rapid gas sensor for alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godbole, Rhushikesh; Rao, Pratibha; Bhagwat, Sunita

    2017-02-01

    Highly porous spinel MgFe2O4 nanoparticles with a high specific surface area have been successfully synthesized by a sintering free auto-combustion technique and characterized for their structural and surface morphological properties using XRD, BET, TEM and SEM techniques. Their sensing properties to alcohol vapors viz. ethanol and methanol were investigated. The site occupation of metal ions was investigated by VSM. The as-synthesized sample shows the formation of sponge-like porous material which is necessary for gas adsorption. The gas sensing characteristics were obtained by measuring the gas response as a function of operating temperature, concentration of the gas, and the response-recovery time. The response of magnesium ferrite to ethanol and methanol vapors was compared and it was revealed that magnesium ferrite is more sensitive and selective to ethanol vapor. The sensor operates at a substantially low vapor concentration of about 1 ppm of alcohol vapors, exhibits fantastic response reproducibility, long term reliability and a very fast response and recovery property. Thus the present study explored the possibility of making rapidly responding alcohol vapor sensor based on magnesium ferrite. The sensing mechanism has been discussed in co-relation with magnetic and morphological properties. The role of occupancy of Mg2+ ions in magnesium ferrite on its gas sensing properties has also been studied and is found to influence the response of magnesium ferrite ethanol sensor.

  12. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; ...

    2015-11-09

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones.more » These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. Finally, the present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.« less

  13. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T.; Asta, Mark D.; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C.; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-11-09

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. Finally, the present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.

  14. Towards Radiation Tolerant Nanostructured Ferritic Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael K; Hoelzer, David T; Russell, Kaye F

    2010-01-01

    The high temperature and irradiation response of a new class of nanostructured ferritic alloys have been investigated by atom probe tomography. These materials are candidate materials for use in the extreme environments that will be present in the next generation of power generating systems. Atom probe tomography has revealed that the yttria powder is forced into solid solution during the mechanical alloying process andsubsequently 2-nm-diameter Ti-, Y- and O-enriched nanoclusters are formedduring the extrusion process. These nanoclusters have been shown to be remarkably stable during isothermal annealing treatments up to 0.92 of the melting temperature and during proton irradiation up to 3 displacements per atom. No significant difference in sizes, compositions and number densities of the nanoclusters was also observed between the unirradiated and proton irradiated conditions. The grain boundaries were found to have high number densities of nanoclusters as well as chromium and tungsten segregation which pin the grain boundary to minimize creep and grain growth.

  15. Tuning the magnetism of ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viñas, S. Liébana; Simeonidis, K.; Li, Z.-A.; Ma, Z.; Myrovali, E.; Makridis, A.; Sakellari, D.; Angelakeris, M.; Wiedwald, U.; Spasova, M.; Farle, M.

    2016-10-01

    The importance of magnetic interactions within an individual nanoparticle or between adjacent ones is crucial not only for the macroscopic collective magnetic behavior but for the AC magnetic heating efficiency as well. On this concept, single-(MFe2O4 where M=Fe, Co, Mn) and core-shell ferrite nanoparticles consisting of a magnetically softer (MnFe2O4) or magnetically harder (CoFe2O4) core and a magnetite (Fe3O4) shell with an overall size in the 10 nm range were synthesized and studied for their magnetic particle hyperthermia efficiency. Magnetic measurements indicate that the coating of the hard magnetic phase (CoFe2O4) by Fe3O4 provides a significant enhancement of hysteresis losses over the corresponding single-phase counterpart response, and thus results in a multiplication of the magnetic hyperthermia efficiency opening a novel pathway for high-performance, magnetic hyperthermia agents. At the same time, the existence of a biocompatible Fe3O4 outer shell, toxicologically renders these systems similar to iron-oxide ones with significantly milder side-effects.

  16. Feedback controlled hybrid fast ferrite tuners

    SciTech Connect

    Remsen, D.B.; Phelps, D.A.; deGrassie, J.S.; Cary, W.P.; Pinsker, R.I.; Moeller, C.P.; Arnold, W.; Martin, S.; Pivit, E.

    1993-09-01

    A low power ANT-Bosch fast ferrite tuner (FFT) was successfully tested into (1) the lumped circuit equivalent of an antenna strap with dynamic plasma loading, and (2) a plasma loaded antenna strap in DIII-D. When the FFT accessible mismatch range was phase-shifted to encompass the plasma-induced variation in reflection coefficient, the 50 {Omega} source was matched (to within the desired 1.4 : 1 voltage standing wave ratio). The time required to achieve this match (i.e., the response time) was typically a few hundred milliseconds, mostly due to a relatively slow network analyzer-computer system. The response time for the active components of the FFT was 10 to 20 msec, or much faster than the present state-of-the-art for dynamic stub tuners. Future FFT tests are planned, that will utilize the DIII-D computer (capable of submillisecond feedback control), as well as several upgrades to the active control circuit, to produce a FFT feedback control system with a response time approaching 1 msec.

  17. Must we use ferritic steel in TBM?

    SciTech Connect

    Salavy, Jean-Francois; Boccaccini, Lorenzo V.; Chaudhuri, Paritosh; Cho, Seungyon; Enoeda, Mikio; Giancarli, Luciano; Kurtz, Richard J.; Luo, Tian Y.; Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Wong, Clement

    2010-12-13

    Mock-ups of DEMO breeding blankets, called Test Blanket Modules (TBMs), inserted and tested in ITER in dedicated equatorial ports directly facing the plasma, are expected to provide the first experimental answers on the necessary performance of the corresponding DEMO breeding blankets. Several DEMO breeding blanket designs have been studied and assessed in the last 20 years. At present, after considering various coolant and breeder combinations, all the TBM concepts proposed by the seven ITER Parties use Reduced-Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel as the structural material. In order to perform valuable tests in ITER, the TBMs are expected to use the same structural material as corresponding DEMO blankets. However, due to the fact that this family of steels is ferromagnetic, their presence in the ITER vacuum vessel will create perturbations of the ITER magnetic fields that could reduce the quality of the plasma confinement during H-mode. As a consequence, a legitimate question has been raised on the necessity of using RAFM steel for TBMs structural material in ITER. By giving a short description of the main TBM testing objectives in ITER and assessing the consequences of not using such a material, this paper gives a comprehensive answer to this question. According to the working group author of the study, the use of RAFM steel as structural material for TBM is judged mandatory.

  18. Chemical looping coal gasification with calcium ferrite and barium ferrite via solid--solid reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Siriwardane, Ranjani; Tian, Hanjing; Richards, George

    2016-01-01

    Coal gasification to produce synthesis gas by chemical looping was investigated with two oxygen carriers, barium ferrite (BaFe2O4) and calcium ferrite (CaFe2O4). Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and fixed-bed flow reactor data indicated that a solid–solid interaction occurred between oxygen carriers and coal to produce synthesis gas. Both thermodynamic analysis and experimental data indicated that BaFe2O4 and CaFe2O4 have high reactivity with coal but have a low reactivity with synthesis gas, which makes them very attractive for the coal gasification process. Adding steam increased the production of hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO), but carbon dioxide (CO2) remained low because these oxygen carriers have minimal reactivity with H2 and CO. Therefore, the combined steam–oxygen carrier produced the highest quantity of synthesis gas. It appeared that neither the water–gas shift reaction nor the water splitting reaction promoted additional H2 formation with the oxygen carriers when steam was present. Wyodak coal, which is a sub-bituminous coal, had the best gasification yield with oxygen carrier–steam while Illinois #6 coal had the lowest. The rate of gasification and selectivity for synthesis gas production was significantly higher when these oxygen carriers were present during steam gasification of coal. The rates and synthesis gas yields during the temperature ramps of coal–steam with oxygen carriers were better than with gaseous oxygen.

  19. An Implicit LU/AF FDTD Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beggs, John H.; Briley, W. Roger

    2001-01-01

    There has been some recent work to develop two and three-dimensional alternating direction implicit (ADI) FDTD schemes. These ADI schemes are based upon the original ADI concept developed by Peaceman and Rachford and Douglas and Gunn, which is a popular solution method in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). These ADI schemes work well and they require solution of a tridiagonal system of equations. A new approach proposed in this paper applies a LU/AF approximate factorization technique from CFD to Maxwell s equations in flux conservative form for one space dimension. The result is a scheme that will retain its unconditional stability in three space dimensions, but does not require the solution of tridiagonal systems. The theory for this new algorithm is outlined in a one-dimensional context for clarity. An extension to two and threedimensional cases is discussed. Results of Fourier analysis are discussed for both stability and dispersion/damping properties of the algorithm. Results are presented for a one-dimensional model problem, and the explicit FDTD algorithm is chosen as a convenient reference for comparison.

  20. Origin of magnetocapacitance in chemically homogeneous and inhomogeneous ferrites.

    PubMed

    Mondal, R A; Murty, B S; Murthy, V R K

    2015-01-28

    The present work mainly focuses on the magnetodielectric (MD) effect in polycrystalline Ni0.9-yCuyZn0.1Fe1.98O3.97 (y = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5) ferrite synthesized by a solid-state reaction method. Sintered samples showed the formation of CuO-rich grain boundary segregation for y≥ 0.2. The appearance of segregation made the present material chemically inhomogeneous and electrically heterogeneous. A negative MD response was observed in homogeneous ferrite for y = 0 and 0.1 due to lattice distortion (an intrinsic effect), whereas a positive MD response occurs in chemically inhomogeneous segregated ferrite (y≥ 0.2) due the collective effects of Maxwell-Wagner (MW) polarization with intrinsic magnetoresistance (an extrinsic effect).

  1. Biocompatibility of transition metal-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanpo, Noppakun; Tharajak, Jirasak; Li, Yuncang; Berndt, Christopher C.; Wen, Cuie; Wang, James

    2014-07-01

    Transition metals of copper, zinc, manganese, and nickel were substituted into cobalt ferrite nanoparticles via a sol-gel route using citric acid as a chelating agent. The microstructure and elemental compositions of the nanoparticles were characterized using scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The particle size of the nanoparticles was investigated using particle size analyzer, and the zeta potentials were measured using zeta potential analyzer. The phase components of the synthesized transition metal-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were studied using Raman spectroscopy. The biocompatibility of the nanoparticles was assessed using osteoblast-like cells. Results indicated that the substitution of transition metals strongly influences the physical, chemical properties, and biocompatibility of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

  2. Synthesis and magnetic properties of a novel ferrite organogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sichu; John, Vijay T.; Irvin, Glen C.; Rachakonda, Suguna H.; McPherson, Gary L.; O'Connor, Charles J.

    1999-04-01

    A novel magnetic organogel that can be considered a precursor example of a magnetoresponsive gel is reported. The gel is formed by the bridging of ferrite containing anionic bis(2-ethlhexyl) sodium sulfosuccinate reverse micelles with 2,6-dihydroxynaphthalene (2,6-DHN). The addition of 2,6-DHN leads to a room temperature quotes "freezing in" of the liquid solution to a clear organogel. Ferrite particles in the size range 10-15 nm are doped into the gel network and are thus suspended in the optically clear gel media. The magnetic properties of the gel were measured using a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer. The results reveal that the gel exhibits superparamagnetic behavior with a blocking temperature of 6 K (at an applied field of 1000 G), and a coercivity of 850 G at 2 K. The ferrites introduced into the gel serve the function of magnetic "seeds" via which magnetic properties are acquired by the gel.

  3. The nature of temper brittleness of high-chromium ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrak, V.I.; Suvorova, S.O.; Golovin, I.S.; Mishin, V.M.; Kislyuk, I.V.

    1995-03-01

    The reasons for development of {open_quotes}475{degrees}C brittleness{close_quotes} of high-chromium ferritic steels are considered from the standpoint of fracture mechanics. It is shown that the general rise in the curve of temperature-dependent local flow stress has the decisive influence on the position of the ductile-to-brittle transformation temperature and the increase in it as the result of a hold at temperatures of development of brittleness. The established effect is related to the change in the parameters determining dislocation mobility, that is, the activation energy of dislocation movement in high-chromium ferrite and the resistance to microplastic deformation, both caused by processes of separation into layers of high-chromium ferrite and decomposition of the interstitial solid solution.

  4. Ferrite synthesis in microstructured media: Template effects and magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, C. J.; Buisson, Y. S. L.; Li, S.; Banerjee, S.; Premchandran, R.; Baumgartner, T.; John, V. T.; McPherson, G. L.; Akkara, J. A.; Kaplan, D. L.

    1997-04-01

    Inverse micelles and organogels provide novel environments to synthesize ferrite particles. The fluid microstructure provides a template for the synthesis. Our experiments with ferrite synthesis in inverse micelles indicate the formation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles. Of interest is the encapsulation of these particles in polymer microspheres. The encapsulation is done using simple polymer precipitation in the micellar nonsolvent. The process results in a polymer-ferrite composite exhibiting supermagnetism. Low temperature spin glass properties of the composite are characterized through SQUID measurements. These composites have a superparamagnetic blocking temperature of 16 K and follow Curie-Weiss law at temperatures above 60 K with the fitted parameters: C=0.941 emu/g K, θ=-287 K, and TIP=0.0001 emu/g. Since the polymer used is polyphenol, a highly functionalizable material, the composite is well suited for applications in magnetic bioseparations and magnetic coatings.

  5. Antimicrobial Lemongrass Essential Oil-Copper Ferrite Cellulose Acetate Nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Liakos, Ioannis L; Abdellatif, Mohamed H; Innocenti, Claudia; Scarpellini, Alice; Carzino, Riccardo; Brunetti, Virgilio; Marras, Sergio; Brescia, Rosaria; Drago, Filippo; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2016-04-20

    Cellulose acetate (CA) nanoparticles were combined with two antimicrobial agents, namely lemongrass (LG) essential oil and Cu-ferrite nanoparticles. The preparation method of CA nanocapsules (NCs), with the two antimicrobial agents, was based on the nanoprecipitation method using the solvent/anti-solvent technique. Several physical and chemical analyses were performed to characterize the resulting NCs and to study their formation mechanism. The size of the combined antimicrobial NCs was found to be ca. 220 nm. The presence of Cu-ferrites enhanced the attachment of LG essential oil into the CA matrix. The magnetic properties of the combined construct were weak, due to the shielding of Cu-ferrites from the polymeric matrix, making them available for drug delivery applications where spontaneous magnetization effects should be avoided. The antimicrobial properties of the NCs were significantly enhanced with respect to CA/LG only. This work opens novel routes for the development of organic/inorganic nanoparticles with exceptional antimicrobial activities.

  6. Transition metal-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Sanpo, Noppakun; Berndt, Christopher C; Wen, Cuie; Wang, James

    2013-03-01

    Transition metals of copper, zinc, chromium and nickel were substituted into cobalt ferrite nanoparticles via a sol-gel route using citric acid as a chelating agent. The microstructure and elemental composition were characterized using scanning electron microscopy combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Phase analysis of transition metal-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was performed via X-ray diffraction. Surface wettability was measured using the water contact angle technique. The surface roughness of all nanoparticles was measured using profilometry. Moreover, thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry were performed to determine the temperature at which the decomposition and oxidation of the chelating agents took place. Results indicated that the substitution of transition metals influences strongly the microstructure, crystal structure and antibacterial property of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

  7. Impedimetric detection of alcohol vapours using nanostructured zinc ferrite.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Padmanathan Karthick; Saraswathi, Ramiah

    2014-11-01

    A comparative study on the sensing characteristics of nanostructured zinc ferrite to three primary alcohols viz. methanol, ethanol and propanol has been carried out. The zinc ferrite has been prepared by a combustion method and characterized by XRD, FTIR, AFM and SEM. Impedance studies in the alcohol concentration range varying from 100 to 1000 ppm show definite variations in response to both the nature of the alcohol and its concentration. The nanostructured zinc ferrite shows the highest sensor response to methanol and least to propanol. Equivalent circuit modelling and calibration have been made for all the three alcohol sensors. The material shows a better selectivity to the alcohols compared to formaldehyde, ammonia and acetone vapours.

  8. Ferrite core non-linearity in coils for magnetic neurostimulation.

    PubMed

    RamRakhyani, Anil Kumar; Lazzi, Gianluca

    2014-10-01

    The need to correctly predict the voltage across terminals of mm-sized coils, with ferrite core, to be employed for magnetic stimulation of the peripheral neural system is the motivation for this work. In such applications, which rely on a capacitive discharge on the coil to realise a transient voltage curve of duration and strength suitable for neural stimulation, the correct modelling of the non-linearity of the ferrite core is critical. A demonstration of how a finite-difference model of the considered coils, which include a model of the current-controlled inductance in the coil, can be used to correctly predict the time-domain voltage waveforms across the terminals of a test coil is presented. Five coils of different dimensions, loaded with ferrite cores, have been fabricated and tested: the measured magnitude and width of the induced pulse are within 10% of simulated values.

  9. Some properties of the circular waveguide with azimuthally magnetized ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Kamen P.; Georgiev, Georgi N.

    1990-05-01

    A comprehensive analysis of normal rotationally symmetric TE modes in a circular waveguide, filled with ferrite, magnetized azimuthally to remanence by a coaxial switching conductor of finite radius, is presented. The characteristic equation of the structure, derived in terms of Kummer and Tricomi confluent hypergeometric functions of complex parameter and variable, is solved numerically, using specially compiled tables of wave functions. Families of theoretically calculated nonreciprocal phase characteristics of the gyrotropic waveguide are shown in normalized form for the two latched states of remanent magnetization, a variety of ferrite parameters, and different values of switching conductor to waveguide radius ratio. The influence of structure geometry and parameters of anisotropic ferrite on normalized differential phase shift and cutoff frequency spectrum of the TE01 mode is discussed.

  10. XANES evidence of arsenate removal from water with magnetic ferrite.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yao-Jen; You, Chen-Feng; Chang, Chien-Kuei; Wang, Shan-Li

    2013-05-15

    Arsenic (As) in groundwater and surface water is a worldwide problem possessing a serious threat to public health. In this study, a magnetic ferrite, was synthesized and investigated for its As(V) removal efficiency. The adsorption of As(V) by magnetic ferrite exhibited an L-shaped nonlinear isotherm, suggesting limiting binding sites on the adsorbent surface. The As K-edge X-Ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) revealed that the adsorbed As(V) on ferrite was not reduced to more toxic As(III) by Fe(2+) in the ferrite structure. The maximum As adsorption capacity of ferrite was 14 mg/g at pH 3 and decreased with increasing pH due to enhanced electrostatic repulsion between As(V) and the adsorbent surface. Desorption of As(V) using six different acid and salt solutions showed that the desorption rate decreased in an order of H3PO4 > Na3PO4 > H2SO4 > Na2SO4 > HCl > HNO3. These results suggest that magnetic ferrite without surface modification is an effective adsorbent for removing As(V) from water, which was confirmed by the effective removal of As(V) from contaminated groundwater using this material. The used material can then be recovered using a magnet because of its paramagnetism; the adsorbed As(V) on the material can be recovered using H3PO4 or Na3PO4 solutions.

  11. Tin City AFS, Alaska. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    GL&bAL CLIMATOLOGY 9 RA14CH T AC NG VERSUS Vi’SIBILITY A .FAT"E S[ PfIC /mAC I .17 TI CITY AFS AK 73-74,77-81 T 1b. 3 19.5 17.S 19.5 19.5...2. GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3 RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER USAFETAC/DS 83017 4. TITLE (d SubtII-)Reised Uniform Summary of Surface 5 TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD...WINDS PART 0 CEILING VERSUS VISIBILITY PART F STATION PRESSURE SKYCOVER SEA LEVEL PRESSURE STANDARD 3 -HOUR GROUPS All su-nseri- requiring diurnal

  12. Indian Mountain AFS, Alaska. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    31 8... . 1B b w., B. 0- r] N I o N.. Ob.. M.., N.. .1 N.-. it% To’p.Wo.- R. .1.__-___ 0 F 322 F *67 F *73 F 60S F *93 F To. 4 .. P , PSYCHROMETRIC...Psychrometrl- summary Surfoc, Worlds Extreme temperature Ceiling versus vis:boloi-; Helative Humidity -Climatological data (over) 20 ABSTRACT ’C- P ,, -1...uSAFETAC A2 4EATR SERVICE/MAC WEATHER CONDITIONS 70173C INDIAN MOUNTAIN AFS AK 73-8? P PEOCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF OCCURRENCE OF WEATHER CONDITIONS FROP HOURLY

  13. Cobalt ferrite based magnetostrictive materials for magnetic stress sensor and actuator applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiles, David C. (Inventor); Paulsen, Jason A. (Inventor); Snyder, John E. (Inventor); Lo, Chester C. H. (Inventor); Ring, Andrew P. (Inventor); Bormann, Keith A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Magnetostrictive material based on cobalt ferrite is described. The cobalt ferrite is substituted with transition metals (such manganese (Mn), chromium (Cr), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) or mixtures thereof) by substituting the transition metals for iron or cobalt to form substituted cobalt ferrite that provides mechanical properties that make the substituted cobalt ferrite material effective for use as sensors and actuators. The substitution of transition metals lowers the Curie temperature of the material (as compared to cobalt ferrite) while maintaining a suitable magnetostriction for stress sensing applications.

  14. Fabrication of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic clad fuel pins

    SciTech Connect

    Zirker, L.R. ); Bottcher, J.H. ); Shikakura, S. ); Tsai, C.L. . Dept. of Welding Engineering); Hamilton, M.L. )

    1991-01-01

    A resistance butt welding procedure was developed and qualified for joining ferritic fuel pin cladding to end caps. The cladding are INCO MA957 and PNC ODS lots 63DSA and 1DK1, ferritic stainless steels strengthened by oxide dispersion, while the end caps are HT9 a martensitic stainless steel. With adequate parameter control the weld is formed without a residual melt phase and its strength approaches that of the cladding. This welding process required a new design for fuel pin end cap and weld joint. Summaries of the development, characterization, and fabrication processes are given for these fuel pins. 13 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, M.C.; Baltich, L.K.

    1987-02-23

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  16. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Silaban, A.; Harrison, D.P. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1989-05-02

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such as size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  17. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, M.C.; Berggren, M.H.

    1989-05-02

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  18. Gas atomization of cobalt ferrite-phosphate melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Guire, Mark R.; O'Handley, R. C.; Kalonji, G.

    1989-01-01

    XRD, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and EDXS have been used to characterize a rapidly-solidified (Co,Fe)3O4 spinel generated in a cobalt-iron-phosphate glass matrix by gas atomization of melts. Of the two compositions tested, that containing 20 mol pct P2O5 exhibited randomly-oriented ferrite crystallization whose growth appears to have been diffusion-controlled. Unlike the ferrite, in which the iron has both tetrahedral and octahedral coordination, the iron in the glassy matrix was primarily of distorted-octahedral coordination. Calculations indicate that the cooling rates obtained with oxide melts vary strongly with droplet size, but less strongly with melt temperature.

  19. The ferrite/superconductor layered structure for tunable microwave devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobyl, A.; Suris, R.; Karmanenko, S.; Semenov, A.; Melkov, A.; Konuhov, S.; Olshevski, A.

    2002-08-01

    The ferrite/superconductor (FS) structure composed from the separate ferrite garnet Y 3Fe 5O 12 epitaxial layers and superconducting films was used for development of such microwave devices as tunable pass-band filter, phase-shifter and delay line. Application of superconducting layer decreases the microwave losses and it provides new functions of magnetostatic waveguide FS structures. The central frequency of band-pass filter is tuned from 1.5 up to 3 GHz; bandwidth can be regulated by the geometry of antenna transducers (from 30 up to 300 MHz); band insertion loss is about 1.5-3 dB.

  20. Magnetodielectric effect of Mn-Zn ferrite at resonant frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pengfei, Pan; Ning, Zhang

    2016-10-01

    The dielectric properties and the magnetodielectric effect in Mn-Zn ferrite at resonant frequency have been studied in this paper. Dimensional-resonance-induced abnormal dielectric spectrum was observed at f≈1 MHz. The relatively large magnetodielectric ratio of 4500% in a magnetic field of 3.5 kOe was achieved from the Mn-Zn ferrite sample with the initial permeability of 15 K at resonant frequency at room temperature. Theoretical analysis suggests that the large MD effect at resonant frequency is attributed to the enhanced magnetostriction effect.

  1. Nanoindentation studies of nickel zinc ferrite embedded mesoporous silica template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, S.; Hajra, P.; Mada, M. R.; Bandopadhyay, S.; Chakravorty, D.

    2013-02-01

    Nickel zinc ferrite (NZF) embedded mesoporous silica KIT-6 nanocomposite (NZFMS) was synthesized via impregnation method. The microstructure of the samples was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Nanoindentation (NI) studies were carried out on both mesoporous silica (MS) and the nanocomposite NZFMS. It was found that the young's modulus (E) and hardness (H) of the NZFMS were higher than that of the MS. From creep measurement it was observed that the creep-strain rate was greater for NZFMS compared to MS. This arose due to diffusion of Fe3+ ions from nickel zinc ferrite to the silica glass. The results indicate that the NZFMS material shows superplastic behaviour at room temperature.

  2. Electrical and optical properties of gadolinium doped bismuth ferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, A. Banerjee, M. Basu, S.; Pal, M.

    2014-04-24

    Multiferroic bismuth ferrite (BFO) and gadolinium (Gd) doped bismuth ferrite had been synthesized by a sol-gel method. Particle size had been estimated by Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and found to decrease with Gd doping. We studied the temperature and frequency dependence of impedance and electric modulus and calculated the grain and grain boundary resistance and capacitance of the investigated samples. We observed that electrical activation energy increases for all the doped samples. Optical band gap also increases for the doped samples which can be used in photocatalytic application of BFO.

  3. Modeling ferrite electromagnetic response in the time domain

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.; DeFord, J.F.; Craig, G.D.

    1989-04-06

    The behavior of ferrite loads commonly found in induction accelertors has important consequences for the performance of these accelerators. Previous work by the authors on modeling the electromagnetic fields in induction cavities has focussed upon use of a simple, phenomenological model for the process of magnetization reversal in these ferrite loads. In this paper we consider a model for magnetization reversal which is more deeply rooted in theory, and present a simulation of the reversal process based upon this model for an idealized set of boundary conditions. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  4. The role of cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles in medical science.

    PubMed

    Amiri, S; Shokrollahi, H

    2013-01-01

    The nanotechnology industry is rapidly growing and promises that the substantial changes that will have significant economic and scientific impacts be applicable to a wide range of areas, such as aerospace engineering, nano-electronics, environmental remediation and medical healthcare. In this area, cobalt ferrite nanoparticles have been regarded as one of the competitive candidates because of their suitable physical, chemical and magnetic properties like the high anisotropy constant, high coercivity and high Curie temperature, moderate saturation magnetization and ease of synthesis. This paper introduces the magnetic properties, synthesis methods and some medical applications, including the hyperthermia, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic separation and drug delivery of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

  5. Control of magnetization reversal in oriented strontium ferrite thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Debangsu Anil Kumar, P. S.

    2014-02-21

    Oriented Strontium Ferrite films with the c axis orientation were deposited with varying oxygen partial pressure on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) substrate using Pulsed Laser Deposition technique. The angle dependent magnetic hysteresis, remanent coercivity, and temperature dependent coercivity had been employed to understand the magnetization reversal of these films. It was found that the Strontium Ferrite thin film grown at lower (higher) oxygen partial pressure shows Stoner-Wohlfarth type (Kondorsky like) reversal. The relative importance of pinning and nucleation processes during magnetization reversal is used to explain the type of the magnetization reversal with different oxygen partial pressure during growth.

  6. Microstructure characterization and cation distribution of nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Y. M.; Mansour, S. A.; Ibrahim, M. H.; Ali, Shehab E.

    2011-11-01

    Nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite has been synthesized using two different methods: ceramic and co-precipitation techniques. The nanocrystalline ferrite phase has been formed after 3 h of sintering at 1000 °C. The structural and microstructural evolutions of the nanophase have been studied using X-ray powder diffraction and the Rietveld method. The refinement result showed that the type of the cationic distribution over the tetrahedral and octahedral sites in the nanocrystalline lattice is partially an inverse spinel. The transmission electronic microscope analysis confirmed the X-ray results. The magnetic properties of the samples were characterized using a vibrating sample magnetometer.

  7. Electrical and optical properties of gadolinium doped bismuth ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, A.; Banerjee, M.; Basu, S.; Pal, M.

    2014-04-01

    Multiferroic bismuth ferrite (BFO) and gadolinium (Gd) doped bismuth ferrite had been synthesized by a sol-gel method. Particle size had been estimated by Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and found to decrease with Gd doping. We studied the temperature and frequency dependence of impedance and electric modulus and calculated the grain and grain boundary resistance and capacitance of the investigated samples. We observed that electrical activation energy increases for all the doped samples. Optical band gap also increases for the doped samples which can be used in photocatalytic application of BFO.

  8. Dependence of microwave absorption properties on ferrite volume fraction in MnZn ferrite/rubber radar absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gama, Adriana M.; Rezende, Mirabel C.; Dantas, Christine C.

    2011-11-01

    We report the analysis of measurements of the complex magnetic permeability ( μr) and dielectric permittivity ( ɛr) spectra of a rubber radar absorbing material (RAM) with various MnZn ferrite volume fractions. The transmission/reflection measurements were carried out in a vector network analyzer. Optimum conditions for the maximum microwave absorption were determined by substituting the complex permeability and permittivity in the impedance matching equation. Both the MnZn ferrite content and the RAM thickness effects on the microwave absorption properties, in the frequency range of 2-18 GHz, were evaluated. The results show that the complex permeability and permittivity spectra of the RAM increase directly with the ferrite volume fraction. Reflection loss calculations by the impedance matching degree (reflection coefficient) show the dependence of this parameter on both thickness and composition of RAM.

  9. Recent advances in nanosized Mn-Zn ferrite magnetic fluid hyperthermia for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mei; Huang, Junxing; Sha, Min

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent research and development of nanosized manganese zinc (Mn-Zn) ferrite magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) for cancer treatment. Mn-Zn ferrite MFH, which has a targeted positioning function that only the temperature of tumor tissue with magnetic nanoparticles can rise, while normal tissue without magnetic nanoparticles is not subject to thermal damage, is a promising therapy for cancer. We introduce briefly the composition and properties of magnetic fluid, the concept of MFH, and features of Mn-Zn ferrite magnetic nanoparticles for MFH such as thermal bystander effect, universality, high specific absorption rate, the targeting effect of small size, uniformity of hyperthermia temperature, and automatic temperature control and constant temperature effect. Next, preparation methods of Mn-Zn ferrite magnetic fluid are discussed, and biocompatibility and biosecurity of Mn-Zn ferrite magnetic fluid are analyzed. Then the applications of nanosized Mn-Zn ferrite MFH in cancer are highlighted, including nanosized Mn-Zn ferrite MFH alone, nanosized Mn-Zn ferrite MFH combined with As2O3 chemotherapy, and nanosized Mn-Zn ferrite MFH combined with radiotherapy. Finally, the combination application of nanosized Mn-Zn ferrite MFH and gene-therapy is conceived, and the challenges and perspectives for the future of nanosized Mn-Zn ferrite MFH for oncotherapy are discussed.

  10. Microwave absorption property of plasma spray W-type hexagonal ferrite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shicheng; Liu, Yi; Tian, Haoliang; Tong, Hui; Liu, Yuxin; Xu, Binshi

    2015-03-01

    In order to enhance the adhesion strength of microwave absorbing materials, W-type hexagonal ferrite coating is fabricated by plasma spray. The feedstock of ferrite powders is synthesized by solid-state reaction and spray dried process. Microstructures of the coating are analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectra (EDS). Hexagonal ferrite coating is successfully deposited on the substrate with adhesion strength of 28 MPa. The magnetic property of ferrite samples is measured using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Saturation magnetization of the ferrite coating is lower than ferrite powder. Reflection loss of the hexagonal ferrite coating is measured in frequency of 2-18 GHz. The result shows that the coating is suitable for electromagnetic wave absorbers in Ku-band.

  11. Microwave characterization of (Co,Zn) 2W barium hexagonal ferrite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Y.; He, H. H.; Feng, Z. K.; Zhang, X. C.; Cheng, X. M.

    2006-08-01

    This paper presents the static magnetic and microwave characterization of hexagonal ferrite BaZn 1.1Co 0.9Fe 16O 27 particles for application in a microwave absorber. The hexagonal ferrite particles have been developed through conventional ceramic processes. Ferrite particles were examined via scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and vibrating sample magnetometry. The complex permeability and permittivity of ferrite-wax composites were measured over the frequency range of 2-8 GHz. The microwave intrinsic permeability and permittivity spectra have been presented, which were calculated on the basis of the measurement data of the ferrite-wax mixtures using the Bruggeman equation. The microwave absorption properties of these ferrite particles have also been discussed. The results indicate that these ferrites have good potential to be used as a broad band microwave absorber.

  12. A study of NiZnCu-ferrite/SiO 2 nanocomposites with different ferrite contents synthesized by sol-gel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shifeng; Geng, Jianxin; Chen, Jianfeng; Yin, Li; Zhou, Yunchun; Liu, Leijing; Zhou, Enle

    2005-04-01

    Ni 0.65Zn 0.35Cu 0.1Fe 1.9O 4/SiO 2 nanocomposites with different weight percentages of NiZnCu-ferrite dispersed in silica matrix were successfully fabricated by the sol-gel method using tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) as a precursor of silica, and metal nitrates as precursors of NiZnCu ferrite. The thermal decomposition process of the dried gel was studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The obtained Ni 0.65Zn 0.35Cu 0.1Fe 1.9O 4/SiO 2 nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), Mössbauer spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). The formation of stoichiometric NiZnCu-ferrite dispersed in silica matrix is confirmed when the weight percentage of ferrite is not more than 30%. Samples with higher ferrite content have small amount of α-Fe 2O 3. The transition from the paramagnetic to the ferromagnetic state is observed as the ferrite content increases from 20 to 90 wt%. The magnetic properties of the nanocomposites are closely related to the ferrite content. The saturation magnetization increases with the ferrite content, while the coercivity reaches a maximum when the ferrite is 80 wt% in the silica matrix.

  13. Effect of δ-ferrite evolution and high-temperature annealing on mechanical properties of 11Cr3W3Co ferritic/martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Zhongxia; Shen, Yinzhong; Ji, Bo; Zhang, Lanting

    2016-03-01

    An 11Cr3W3Co ferritic/martensitic steel was annealed at 1100 °C for different time to gradually dissolve δ-ferrite, and then conducted tensile, hardness, and short-term creep tests in combination with microstructural characterization to study the effect of δ-ferrite on the mechanical properties of high-Cr ferritic/martensitic steels. The amount of δ-ferrite gradually decreased to a minimum value with increasing annealing time up to 10 h, and then tended to an ascending tendency when annealed for 15 and 20 h. Accordingly the tensile strength at 300 and 650 °C, and Vickers hardness of the steel had an increase and a decrease tendency when δ-ferrite amount decreased down to its minimum value and increased again, respectively. The short-term creep property at 210 MPa at 650 °C of the steel exhibited a serious degradation as annealing time gradually increased to 15 h. The morphology and orientation of δ-ferrite grains seriously affected the short-term creep property of the steel. δ-ferrite with a continuously bamboo-like shape parallel to loading direction effectively improved the short-term creep property of the steel at high temperature, while δ-ferrite with a granular or block shape seriously damaged the short-term creep property of the steel. These findings have also been discussed.

  14. A novel high power X-band ferrite phase shifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, G. J.; Huang, W. H.; Li, J. W.; Ba, T.; Guo, L. T.; Jiang, Y.

    2017-01-01

    A novel high power X-band ferrite phase shifter (PS) employing the structure of several waveguides connected in parallel is proposed. Each of the waveguides is a phase shift unit utilizing a dual-toroid structure. First, the phase shift unit is designed, manufactured, and tested. The results indicate that the power capacity reaches 115 kW. At this power, the maximum magnetic field strength of ferrite is 7.9 kA/m, beyond which the nonlinear effect of ferrite will occur. On this basis, the PS that consists of four units connected in parallel is designed. According to the threshold of ferrite, the power capacity of the PS can theoretically reach 430 kW. Limited by the maximum output power of the microwave source, the preliminary high-power test results demonstrate that the PS can operate properly at 270 kW. The PS exhibits an insertion loss of 0.82 dB and a maximum differential phase shift of approximately 300° at 9.3 GHz. The return loss of the PS is more than 16 dB from 9.0 to 9.5 GHz.

  15. A novel high power X-band ferrite phase shifter.

    PubMed

    Deng, G J; Huang, W H; Li, J W; Ba, T; Guo, L T; Jiang, Y

    2017-01-01

    A novel high power X-band ferrite phase shifter (PS) employing the structure of several waveguides connected in parallel is proposed. Each of the waveguides is a phase shift unit utilizing a dual-toroid structure. First, the phase shift unit is designed, manufactured, and tested. The results indicate that the power capacity reaches 115 kW. At this power, the maximum magnetic field strength of ferrite is 7.9 kA/m, beyond which the nonlinear effect of ferrite will occur. On this basis, the PS that consists of four units connected in parallel is designed. According to the threshold of ferrite, the power capacity of the PS can theoretically reach 430 kW. Limited by the maximum output power of the microwave source, the preliminary high-power test results demonstrate that the PS can operate properly at 270 kW. The PS exhibits an insertion loss of 0.82 dB and a maximum differential phase shift of approximately 300° at 9.3 GHz. The return loss of the PS is more than 16 dB from 9.0 to 9.5 GHz.

  16. Ferritic Fe-Mn alloy for cryogenic applications

    DOEpatents

    Hwang, Sun-Keun; Morris, Jr., John W.

    1979-01-01

    A ferritic, nickel-free alloy steel composition, suitable for cryogenic applications, which consists essentially of about 10-13% manganese, 0.002-0.01% boron, 0.1-0.5% titanium, 0-0.05% aluminum, and the remainder iron and incidental impurities normally associated therewith.

  17. Characteristics of a broad band and thin ferrite absorbing wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsuka, Youji

    The author proposes a method of reducing the thickness of a ferrite absorbing wall and controlling the matching frequency characteristics by applying a DC magnetic field, HDC, perpendicularly to the microwave magnetic field. The matching characteristics of this method are investigated in detail on the basis of experimental data. The thickness reduction of the absorbing is first discussed from the standpoint of scalar permeability. Based upon these investigations, a thinned ferrite absorbing wall has been designed on a trial basis. The synthetic wave-absorbing material consists of a ferrite disk backed with a samarium-cobalt magnetic material generating a static magnetic field. Fairly good VSWR (voltage standing wave ratio) characteristics below 1.2 have been obtained with a total thickness of 3.8 mm in the frequency range from VHF to UHF. As an application of these characteristics, by controlling both the ferrite thickness and DC magnetic field simultaneously, it has been clarified that the matching frequency characteristics are easily exchanged in the broad frequency region.

  18. Magnetoabsorption and magnetic hysteresis in Ni ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Gómez, P.; Muñoz, J. M.; Valente, M. A.; Torres, C.; de Francisco, C.

    2013-01-01

    Nickel ferrite nanoparticles were prepared by a modified sol-gel technique employing coconut oil, and then annealed at different temperatures in 400-1200 °C range. This route of preparation has revealed to be one efficient and cheap technique to obtain high quality nickel ferrite nanosized powder. Sample particles sizes obtained with XRD data and Scherrer's formula lie in 13 nm to 138 nm, with increased size with annealing temperature. Hysteresis loops have been obtained at room temperature with an inductive method. Magnetic field induced microwave absorption in nanoscale ferrites is a recent an active area of research, in order to characterize and explore potential novel applications. In the present work microwave magnetoabsorption data of the annealed nickel ferrite nanoparticles are presented. These data have been obtained with a system based on a network analyzer that operates in the frequency range 0 - 8.5 GHz. At fields up to 400 mT we can observe a peak according to ferromagnetic resonance theory. Sample annealed at higher temperature exhibits different absorption, coercivity and saturation magnetization figures, revealing its multidomain character.

  19. Millimetre-wave isolator based on Al substituted Ba ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustinov, A. B.; Vinnik, D. A.; Belyavskii, P. Yu; Gudkova, S. A.; Zakharchuk, I.; Lähderanta, E.

    2016-11-01

    A mm-wave isolator is fabricated and studied. The operating frequency of the devices is 78.5 GHz. A bandwidth at the level of -3 dB equals 1.6 GHz. The device used a flux grown single-crystal aluminum substituted barium ferrite.

  20. Tuning of magnetic properties in cobalt ferrite nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Cedeno-Mattei, Y.; Roman, F.; Perales-Perez, O.; Tomar, M. S.; Voyles, P. M.; Stratton, W. G.

    2008-04-01

    Cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) possesses excellent chemical stability, good mechanical hardness, and a large positive first order crystalline anisotropy constant, making it a promising candidate for magneto-optical recording media. In addition to precise control of the composition and structure of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, its practical application will require the capability to control particle size at the nanoscale. The results of a synthesis approach in which size control is achieved by modifying the oversaturation conditions during ferrite formation in water through a modified coprecipitation approach are reported. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) diffraction, and TEM energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analyses confirmed the formation of the nanoscale cobalt ferrite. M-H measurements verified the strong influence of synthesis conditions on crystal size and hence, on the magnetic properties of ferrite nanocrystals. The room-temperature coercivity values increased from 460 up to 4626 Oe under optimum synthesis conditions determined from a 2{sup 3} factorial design.

  1. Surface hardening of parts from ferrite-pearlite gray iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, Yu. G.; Ovsyannikov, V. E.; Marfitsyn, V. V.; Frolov, V. A.

    2011-10-01

    The possibility of a simple method of chromizing of parts from ferrite-pearlite gray iron is studied theoretically and proved experimentally. A process for diffusion chromizing of parts from this iron is suggested. When followed by surface hardening the process yields a high-hardness surface layer with abrasive strength comparable to that of white chromium cast iron.

  2. Molded elastomer provides compact ferrite-core holder, simplifies assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayden, R. R.

    1964-01-01

    A ferrite-core holder, fabricated by casting an elastomer in a simple mold, simplifies the assembly of modular matrix units for computers. Use of the device permits the core leads to be multiply threaded and soldered to terminals, without requiring intermediate terminals.

  3. Microwave Loss Properties of Hexagonal Ferrites for Millimeter Wave Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-15

    concerns the magnetic loss. Previous ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) linewidth data indicated that these losses were too large for efficient device... magnetic and dielectric materials measurement facility at Colorado State University and one to extend the measurements reported herein to the actual...reprint of the article, "Off Resonance Relaxation in Hexagonal Ferrites", which was presented at the International Conference on Magnetics , San

  4. Tailoring the magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Vega, A. Estrada; Garza-Navarro, M. A.; Durán-Guerrero, J. G.; Moreno Cortez, I. E.; Lucio-Porto, R.; González-González, V.

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution, we report on the tuning of magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters. The cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters were synthesized from a two-step approach that consists of the synthesis of cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles in organic media, followed by their dispersion into aqueous dissolution to form an oil-in-water emulsion. These emulsions were prepared at three different concentrations of the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), in order to control the size and clustering density of the nanoparticles in the nanoclusters. The synthesized samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and their related techniques, such as bright-field and Z-contrast imaging, electron diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry; as well as static magnetic measures. The experimental evidence indicates that the size, morphology, and nanoparticles clustering density in the nanoclusters is highly dependent of the cobalt-ferrite:CTAB molar ratio that is used in their synthesis. In addition, due to the clustering of the nanoparticles into the nanoclusters, their magnetic moments are blocked to relax cooperatively. Hence, the magnetic response of the nanoclusters can be tailored by controlling the size and nanoparticles clustering density.

  5. Synthesis and Magnetic Properties of Cobalt Ferrite with Different Morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Bibhuti B.; Nayak, Nadiya Bihary; Mallik, Rahul Kumar; Mondal, Aparna

    Different morphologies (spherical, flake and rod) of cobalt ferrite were synthesized using cobalt salt, iron salts, hydrazine hydrate (as a precipitating agent) and CTAB (surfactant) in water as well as ethylene glycol solvents. Four different synthesis ways (HIS, SIH, HISCO and HISG) were adopted to synthesize cobalt ferrite nanopowders using precipitation method. The as-prepared powders obtained after different synthesis ways were calcined at 800°C and structure, microstructure as well as magnetic properties are studied. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and magnetization studies using pulsed field loop tracer were employed to characterize these cobalt ferrite powders, prepared using different precipitation ways. All the samples are identified with single phase cobalt ferrite and the crystallite size was found to be around 40 nm. Nearly spherical (multifaceted), rod with flake-like, nearly spherical and rod-like morphologies are obtained while synthesizing using HIS, SIH, HISCO and HISG ways, respectively. Rod with flake-like (SIH sample) and rod-like morphologies (HISG sample) show higher coercivity, than the spherical-like (SIH and HISCO smaples) morphology. The highest coericivty was found to be around 925 Oe for HISG sample and highest magnetization is 67 emu/g for HISCO sample.

  6. Study of DNA interaction with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pershina, A G; Sazonov, A E; Novikov, D V; Knyazev, A S; Izaak, T I; Itin, V I; Naiden, E P; Magaeva, A A; Terechova, O G

    2011-03-01

    Interaction of cobalt ferrite nanopowder and nucleic acid was investigated. Superparamagnetic cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (6-12 nm) were prepared by mechanochemical synthesis. Structure of the nanopowder was characterized using X-ray diffraction. It was shown that cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were associated with ssDNA and dsDNA in Tris-buffer resulting in bionanocomposite formation with mass weight relation nanoparticles: DNA 1:(0.083 +/- 0.003) and 1:(0.075 +/- 0.003) respectively. The mechanism of interaction between a DNA and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was considered basing on the whole set of obtained data: FTIR-spectroscopy, analyzing desorption of DNA from the surface of the particles while changing the chemical content of the medium, and on the modeling interaction of specific biomolecule fragments with surface of a inorganic material. It was supposed that the linkage was based on coordination interaction of the phosphate groups and oxygen atoms heterocyclic bases of DNA with metal ions on the particle surface. These data can be used to design specific magnetic DNA-nanoparticles hybrid structures.

  7. Spindly cobalt ferrite nanocrystals: preparation, characterization and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xuebo; Gu, Li

    2005-02-01

    In this paper we describe the preparation of homogeneously needle-shaped cobalt ferrite (CoFe(2)O(4)) nanocrystals on a large scale through the smooth decomposition of urea and the resulting co-precipitation of Co(2+) and Fe(3+) in oleic acid micelles. Furthermore, we found that other ferrite nanocrystals with a needle-like shape, such as zinc ferrite (ZnFe(2)O(4)) and nickel ferrite (NiFe(2)O(4)), can be prepared by the same process. Needle-shaped CoFe(2)O(4) nanocrystals dispersed in an aqueous solution containing oleic acid exhibit excellent stability and the formed colloid does not produce any precipitations after two months, which is of prime importance if these materials are applied in magnetic fluids. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements were used to characterize the phase and component of the co-precipitation products, and demonstrate that they are spinel ferrite with a cubic symmetry. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation showed that all the nanocrystals present a needle-like shape with a 22 nm short axis and an aspect ratio of around 6. Varying the concentration of oleic acid did not bring about any obvious influence on the size distribution and shapes of CoFe(2)O(4). The magnetic properties of the needle-shaped CoFe(2)O(4) nanocrystals were evaluated by using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and a Mössbauer spectrometer, and the results all demonstrated that CoFe(2)O(4) nanocrystals were superparamagnetic at room temperature.

  8. Dielectric Properties of Hydrothermal Nickel-Zinc Ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Anderson; della Santina Mohallem, Nelcy; Luiz Moreira, Roberto

    1996-07-01

    NiZn ferrites were hydrothermally prepared and sintered at different experimental conditions, leading to materials of composition Ni{0.34}Zn{0.60}Fe{2.06}O{4}. An investigation of the dielectric properties over a wide frequency range showed the semiconductor character of the ferrites and the presence of a masked relaxation, revealed after a mathematical treatment. The relaxation was modeled using a Cole-Cole model and the parameters correlated with the microstructural evolution of the ferrites during the sintering. The contributions of hopping electrons and space charges to the total conductivity have been discussed. La méthode hydrothermale a été utilisée pour préparer des poudres de NiZn. Ces matériaux ont été synthétisés sous différentes conditions expérimentales. Après frittage, la composition est Ni{0,34}Zn{0,60}Fe{2,06}O{4}. L'investigation des propriétés diélectriques, sur une large intervalle de fréquence, a démontré le caractère semiconducteur des ferrites et l'existence d'une relaxation masquée, mise en évidence après un traitement mathématique. Cette relaxation a été traitée par un modèle de type Cole-Cole et les paramètres corrélés à l'évolution microstructurale des ferrites, pendant le processus de frittage. Les contributions à la conductivités complexe dues aux électrons (“hopping”) et aux charges d'espace ont été discutées.

  9. Cape Newenham AFS, Alaska. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    OBSERVATIONS) L P- 14 H~N A A-F S .~ 73-F2 ____ JA&,. ALL WI- LAt E -- .. - - 6 7 0 11 16 17 21 22 27 28- 33 34 *0 41 A7 48 5 .7 * . .3 .4 .4 . 1 . i E...PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF WIND DIRECTION AND SPEED (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) 4LL . LAT -E- - 10 1 1 i 7 23 22 ’ 2 3 3 A 40 A 3 5 A7 A • ’ .. 5 .t",5...SCOTT A. APR 03 UNCLASSIFIED USAFETAC/DS-83/019 SBI-AD-EB50 397 F/6 4/2 NL SU 2. lii .0 EM *,*,- Ica L- 11111 1.25 s~w ,r- 1 . 11.6 I MiCRQ OPY

  10. Influence of ferrite phase in alite-calcium sulfoaluminate cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvallet, Tristana Yvonne Francoise

    Since the energy crisis in 1970's, research on low energy cements with low CO2- emissions has been increasing. Numerous solutions have been investigated, and the goal of this original research is to create a viable hybrid cement with the components of both Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSAC), by forming a material that contains both alite and calcium sulfoaluminate clinker phases. Furthermore, this research focuses on keeping the cost of this material reasonable by reducing aluminum requirements through its substitution with iron. The aim of this work would produce a cement that can use large amounts of red mud, which is a plentiful waste material, in place of bauxite known as an expensive raw material. Modified Bogue equations were established and tested to formulate this novel cement with different amounts of ferrite, from 5% to 45% by weight. This was followed by the production of cement from reagent chemicals, and from industrial by-products as feedstocks (fly ash, red mud and slag). Hydration processes, as well as the mechanical properties, of these clinker compositions were studied, along with the addition of gypsum and the impact of a ferric iron complexing additive triisopropanolamine (TIPA). To summarize this research, the influence of the addition of 5-45% by weight of ferrite phase, was examined with the goal of introducing as much red mud as possible in the process without negatively attenuate the cement properties. Based on this PhD dissertation, the production of high-iron alite-calcium sulfoaluminateferrite cements was proven possible from the two sources of raw materials. The hydration processes and the mechanical properties seemed negatively affected by the addition of ferrite, as this phase was not hydrated entirely, even after 6 months of curing. The usage of TIPA counteracted this decline in strength by improving the ferrite hydration and increasing the optimum amount of gypsum required in each composition

  11. Tunable dual-band negative refractive index in ferrite-based metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Bi, Ke; Zhou, Ji; Zhao, Hongjie; Liu, Xiaoming; Lan, Chuwen

    2013-05-06

    A tunable dual-band ferrite-based metamaterial has been investigated by experiments and simulations. The negative permeability is realized around the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) frequency which can be influenced by the dimension of the ferrites. Due to having two negative permeability frequency regions around the two FMR frequencies, the metamaterials consisting of metallic wires and ferrite rods with different sizes possess two passbands in the transmission spectra. The microwave transmission properties of the ferrite-based metamaterials can be not only tuned by the applied magnetic field, but also adjusted by the dimension of the ferrite rods. A good agreement between experimental and simulated results is demonstrated, which confirms that the tunable dual-band ferrite-based metamaterials can be used for cloaks, antennas and absorbers.

  12. Comments on ferrite phase shifter configurations for the millimeter wave region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuss, M. L., Jr.

    1982-09-01

    In the microwave region of the electromagnetic spectrum, electronically controllable ferrite phase shifters have demonstrated their value as components and as control elements for switches and attenuators. As the need for control components operating in the lower millimeter wave region increases, it is a reasonable approach to scale successful microwave ferrite configurations into the lower millimeter wave region (30 GHz to 140 GHz). However, many problems are encountered when attempting to scale efficient microwave ferrite configurations, particularly latching ferrite configurations, into the millimeter wave region. It is the objective of this report to review several ferrite configurations with the intent that consideration of these configurations may stimulate development of practical millimeter wave configurations. Ferrite phase shifter configurations that will be the subject of comment include the toroidal (dual slab), dual mode, Bush-Reggia-Spencer, and single slab configurations. Comments are also presented on a circulator used as a phase shifter.

  13. AF-GEOSpace Version 2.5: Space Environment Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilmer, R. V.; Hall, T.; Roth, C.; Ling, A.; Ginet, G. P.; Madden, D.

    2010-12-01

    AF-GEOSpace is a graphics-intensive software program with space environment models and applications developed by the Space Weather Center of Excellence at AFRL. The software addresses a wide range of physical domains, e.g., solar disturbance propagation, geomagnetic field and radiation belt configurations, auroral particle precipitation, and ionospheric scintillation. AF-GEOSpace has become a platform for developing and prototyping space weather visualization products. The new AF-GEOSpace Version 2.5 (release scheduled for 2010) expands on the content of Version 2.1 by including modules addressing the following new topics: (1) energetic proton maps for the South Atlantic Anomaly (from Ginet et al. [2007]), (2) GPS scintillation outage simulation tools, (3) magnetopause location determination (Shue et al. [1998]), (4) a plasmasphere model (Global Core Plasma Model, 2009 version based on Gallagher et al. [2000]), (5) a standard ionospheric model (International Reference Ionosphere 2007), (6) the CAMMICE/MICS model of inner magnetosphere plasma population (based on Roeder et al. [2005]), (7) magnetic field models (e.g., Tsyganenko and Sitnov [2005]), and (8) loading and displaying externally-produced 3D gridded data sets within AF-GEOSpace. Improvements to existing Version 2.1 capabilities include: (1) a 2005 update to the geomagnetic cutoff rigidity model of Smart and Shea [2003], (2) a 2005 update to the ionospheric scintillation Wide-Band Model (WBMOD) of Secan and Bussey [1994], and (3) improved magnetic field flux mapping options for the existing set of AF-GEOSpace radiation belt models. A basic review of these new AF-GEOSpace capabilities will be provided. To obtain a copy of the software, please contact the first author.

  14. GPIM AF-M315E Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spores, Ronald A.; Masse, Robert; Kimbrel, Scott; McLean, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Space Technology mission Directorate's (STMD) Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) will demonstrate an operational AF-M315E green propellant propulsion system. Aerojet-Rocketdyne is responsible for the development of the propulsion system payload. This paper statuses the propulsion system module development, including thruster design and system design; Initial test results for the 1N engineering model thruster are presented. The culmination of this program will be high-performance, green AF-M315E propulsion system technology at TRL 7+, with components demonstrated to TRL 9, ready for direct infusion to a wide range of applications for the space user community.

  15. New design concepts for ferrite-tuned low-energy-booster cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffer, G.

    1991-05-01

    The design concepts for ferrite-tuned accelerating cavities discussed in this paper differ from conventional solutions using thick ferrite toroids for frequency tuning. Instead, tuners consisting of an array of ferrite-loaded striplines are investigated. These promise more efficient cooling and higher operational reliability. Layout examples for the SSC-LEB rf system are presented (tuning range 47.5 to 59.8 MHz, repetition frequency 10 Hz). 15 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Investigation of Hexagonal Ferrite Film Growth Techniques for Millimeter-Wave Systems Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-15

    hexagonal ferrite compounds. The approach was twofold: to synthesize lattice-matched substrate materials and to explore epitaxial growth methods which...poly-crystal garnet or spinel ferrites find widespread use as tunable microwave filters and resonators in applica- tions ranging from test equipment...REFERENCES 1. W. H. von Aulock, ed., Handbook of Microwave Ferrite Materials, Academic Press, NY. 2. R. 0. Savage et al., J. App1. Phys., 36: 873 (1965

  17. Delta ferrite-containing austenitic stainless steel resistant to the formation of undesirable phases upon aging

    DOEpatents

    Leitnaker, J.M.

    Austenitic stainless steel alloys containing delta ferrite, such as are used as weld deposits, are protected against the transformation of delta ferrite to sigma phase during aging by the presence of carbon plus nitrogen in a weight percent 0.015 to 0.030 times the volume percent ferrite present in the alloy. The formation of chi phase upon aging is controlled by controlling the Mo content.

  18. Delta ferrite-containing austenitic stainless steel resistant to the formation of undesirable phases upon aging

    DOEpatents

    Leitnaker, James M.

    1981-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steel alloys containing delta ferrite, such as are used as weld deposits, are protected against the transformation of delta ferrite to sigma phase during aging by the presence of carbon plus nitrogen in a weight percent 0.015-0.030 times the volume percent ferrite present in the alloy. The formation of chi phase upon aging is controlled by controlling the Mo content.

  19. Suitability of cation substituted cobalt ferrite materials for magnetoelastic sensor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nlebedim, Ikenna Catjetan; Jiles, David C

    2015-02-01

    The results of a study on the suitability of materials derived from cobalt ferrite for sensor and actuator applications are presented. The mechanism responsible for the superior sensor properties of Ge-substituted cobalt ferrite compared with Ti and other cation substituted cobalt ferrite materials is believed to be due to the tetrahedral site preference of Ge4+ and its co-substitution with Co2+. Results also showed that the higher strain derivative of Ge-substituted cobalt ferrite compared with Ti-substitution is due to a higher magnetostrictive coupling in response to applied field in the material.

  20. The study of the ferroelectric properties of lithium-titanium ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshev, A. V.; Nikolaev, E. V.; Surzhikov, A. P.; Zarubin, A. N.

    2015-04-01

    Loop-shaped dependences of the electric polarization on the electric field strength (the dielectric hysteresis) are registered for the first time for polycrystalline Li-Ti ferrite. Temperature evolution of the hysteresis loop parameters is investigated for ferrite samples. A thermal Barkhausen effect is detected during heating and cooling of ferrite specimens prepolarized in an electric field. The results obtained can be interpreted from the viewpoint of the Maxwell-Wagner relaxation polarization or induced ferroelectric-like state in the electric ferrite subsystem.

  1. Material for magnetostrictive sensors and other applications based on ferrite materials

    DOEpatents

    McCallum, R. William; Snyder, John E.; Dennis, Kevin W.; Schwichtenberg, Carl R.; Jiles, David C.

    2000-07-25

    The present invention provides magnetostrictive compositions that include an oxide ferrite which provides mechanical properties that make the magnetostrictive compositions effective for use as sensors and actuators.

  2. Method for making conductors for ferrite memory arrays. [from pre-formed metal conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, C. H.; Baba, P. D.; Bhiwandker, N. C. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The ferrite memory arrays are made from pre-formed metal conductors for the ferrite arrays. The conductors are made by forming a thin sheet of a metallizing paste of metal alloy powder, drying the paste layer, bisque firing the dried sheet at a first temperature, and then punching the conductors from the fired sheet. During the bisque firing, the conductor sheet shrinks to 58 percent of its pre-fired volume and the alloy particles sinter together. The conductors are embedded in ferrite sheet material and finally fired at a second higher temperature during which firing the conductors shrink approximately the same degree as the ferrite material.

  3. Dye removal using modified copper ferrite nanoparticle and RSM analysis.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodi, Niyaz Mohammad; Soltani-Gordefaramarzi, Sajjad; Sadeghi-Kiakhani, Moosa

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, copper ferrite nanoparticle (CFN) was synthesized, modified by cetyl trimethylammonium bromide, and characterized. Dye removal ability of the surface modified copper ferrite nanoparticle (SMCFN) from single system was investigated. The physical characteristics of SMCFN were studied using Fourier transform infrared, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Acid Blue 92, Direct Green 6, Direct Red 23, and Direct Red 80 were used as model compounds. The effect of operational parameters (surfactant concentration, adsorbent dosage, dye concentration, and pH) on dye removal was evaluated. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used for the analysis of the dye removal data. The experimental checking in these optimal conditions confirms good agreements with RSM results. The results showed that the SMCFN being a magnetic adsorbent might be a suitable alternative to remove dyes from colored aqueous solutions.

  4. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, D.K.; Froes, F.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1998-03-01

    An oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with high temperature strength has been developed in line with low activation criteria for application in fusion power systems. The composition Fe-13.5Cr-2W-0.5Ti-0.25Y{sub 2}O{sup 3} was chosen to provide a minimum chromium content to insure fully delta-ferrite stability. High temperature strength has been demonstrated by measuring creep response of the ODS alloy in uniaxial tension at 650 and 900 C in an inert atmosphere chamber. Results of tests at 900 C demonstrate that this alloy has creep properties similar to other alloys of similar design and can be considered for use in high temperature fusion power system designs. The alloy selection process, materials production, microstructural evaluation and creep testing are described.

  5. Experimental demonstration of a magnetically tunable ferrite based metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongjun; Wen, Guangjun; Zhu, Weiren; Li, Jian; Si, Li-Ming; Premaratne, Malin

    2014-06-30

    We synthesize and systematically characterize a novel type of magnetically tunable metamaterial absorber (MA) by integrating ferrite as a substrate or superstrate into a conventional passive MA. The nearly perfect absorption and tunability of this device is studied both numerically and experimentally within X-band (8-12 GHz) in a rectangular waveguide setup. Our measurements clearly show that the resonant frequency of the MA can be shifted across a wide frequency band by continuous adjustment of a magnetic field acting on the ferrite. Moreover, the effects of substrate/superstrate's thickness on the MA's tunability are discussed. The insight gained from the generic analysis enabled us to design an optimized tunable MA with relative frequency tuning range as larger as 11.5% while keeping the absorptivity higher than 98.5%. Our results pave a path towards applications with tunable devices, such as selective thermal emitters, sensors, and bolometers.

  6. Studies on structural properties of clay magnesium ferrite nano composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Manpreet; Singh, Mandeep; Jeet, Kiran; Kaur, Rajdeep

    2015-08-01

    Magnesium ferrite-bentonite clay composite was prepared by sol-gel combustion method employing citric acid as complexing agent and fuel. The effect of clay on the structural properties was studied with X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), SEM- Energy dispersive Spectroscope (EDS) and BET surface area analyzer. Decrease in particle size and density was observed on addition of bentonite clay. The BET surface area of nano composite containing just 5 percent clay was 74.86 m2/g. Whereas porosity increased from 40.5 per cent for the pure magnesium ferrite to 81.0 percent in the composite showing that nano-composite has potential application as an adsorbent.

  7. Stress insensitive multilayer chip inductor with ferrite core

    SciTech Connect

    Vishwas, B.; Madhuri, W. Rao, N. Madhusudan; Kaleemulla, S.

    2015-06-24

    Mg{sub 0.25}Cu{sub 0.25}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} is synthesized by sol gel auto combustion technique. The obtained ferrite powder is finally sintered in a microwave furnace at 850°C. Multilayer chip inductor (MLCI) of two layers is prepared by screen printing technique. The sintered ferrite is characterized by X-ray diffraction. The frequency response of dielectric constant is studied in the frequency range of 100Hz to 5MHz. Dielectric polarization is discussed in the light of Maxwell-Wagner interfacial polarization. The prepared MLCI is studied for stress sensitivity in the range of 0 to 8 MPa.

  8. Design and screening of nanoprecipitates-strengthened advanced ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Yang, Ying; Chen, Tianyi; Sridharan, K.; He, Li

    2016-12-30

    Advanced nuclear reactors as well as the life extension of light water reactors require advanced alloys capable of satisfactory operation up to neutron damage levels approaching 200 displacements per atom (dpa). Extensive studies, including fundamental theories, have demonstrated the superior resistance to radiation-induced swelling in ferritic steels, primarily inherited from their body-centered cubic (bcc) structure. This study aims at developing nanoprecipitates strengthened advanced ferritic alloys for advanced nuclear reactor applications. To be more specific, this study aims at enhancing the amorphization ability of some precipitates, such as Laves phase and other types of intermetallic phases, through smart alloying strategy, and thereby promote the crystalline®amorphous transformation of these precipitates under irradiation.

  9. Studies on structural properties of clay magnesium ferrite nano composite

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Manpreet Singh, Mandeep; Jeet, Kiran Kaur, Rajdeep

    2015-08-28

    Magnesium ferrite-bentonite clay composite was prepared by sol-gel combustion method employing citric acid as complexing agent and fuel. The effect of clay on the structural properties was studied with X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), SEM- Energy dispersive Spectroscope (EDS) and BET surface area analyzer. Decrease in particle size and density was observed on addition of bentonite clay. The BET surface area of nano composite containing just 5 percent clay was 74.86 m{sup 2}/g. Whereas porosity increased from 40.5 per cent for the pure magnesium ferrite to 81.0 percent in the composite showing that nano-composite has potential application as an adsorbent.

  10. Development of ferrite logic devices for an arithmetic processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, C. H., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A number of fundamentally ultra-reliable, all-magnetic logic circuits are developed using as a basis a single element ferrite structure wired as a logic delay element. By making minor additions or changes to the basic wiring pattern of the delay element other logic functions such as OR, AND, NEGATION, MAJORITY, EXCLUSIVE-OR, and FAN-OUT are developed. These logic functions are then used in the design of a full-adder, a set/reset flip-flop, and an edge detector. As a demonstration of the utility of all the developed devices, an 8-bit, all-magnetic, logic arithmetic unit capable of controlled addition, subtraction, and multiplication is designed. A new basic ferrite logic element and associated complementary logic scheme with the potential of improved performance is also described. Finally, an improved batch process for fabricating joint-free power drive and logic interconnect conductors for this basic class of all-magnetic logic is presented.

  11. Advanced Microwave Ferrite Research (AMFeR): Phase Two

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-31

    well with the measured longitudinal-plane and normal-plane hysteresis and torque curve data. Since the micromagnetic modeling effort has reach maturation...temperature/slow furnace cooling process The hysteresis loops in Fig. 7 show the magnetization curves of different samples measured in perpendicular... Hysteresis loops of sintered Co0 .8Zn 1 2Z ferrite phases were identified by x-ray disks with 5 wt% Bi 20 3 sintering agent at diffraction pattern for low

  12. FTIR and VSM properties of samarium-doped nickel ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şabikoğlu, Israfil; Paralı, Levent

    2014-05-01

    Nickel Ferrite (NiFe2O4) doped with Samarium (Sm) (0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5 mol.%) was prepared by the conventional solid-state reaction. The crystal structure, surface morphology, infrared spectrum of absorption, and magnetic properties of samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). XRD patterns were indexed with inverse spinel cubic phase with the space group of Fd-3m of nickel ferrite. The average grain size was about 5-10 μm. FTIR spectral study on the NiFe2O4 ferrite phase was recorded between 350 cm-1 and 4000 cm-1. Two fundamental absorption bands of the ferrites were appeared at 450 cm-1 and 1000 cm-1 characteristic of metal vibrations. VSM measurements show that the NiFe2O4 doped with Sm 0.3% has the highest value of saturation magnetization. It is also easily demagnetized due to the low value of coercivity field it has. Both NiFe2O4 doped with Sm 0.2 mol.% and 0.4 mol.% materials have same values of coercivity field. However, NiFe2O4 doped with Sm 0.4 mol.% material has the comparatively high value of saturation magnetization than NiFe2O4 doped with Sm 0.2%, also this material was hardly demagnetized, and has highest coercivity field.

  13. Growth of Ferrite Needles in Compacted Graphite Cast Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Duran, G.A.; Mercader, R.C.; Desimoni, J.; Perez, T.; Gregorutti, R.W.

    2005-04-26

    The austempering kinetics transformation of compacted graphite cast irons austempered at 623K is studied. The length (l) and the number per unit volume (N) of ferrite needles were followed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), while Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS) was used to determine the austenite relative areas. The SEM results are compared with theoretical calculations available in the literature and indicate that the diffusion of C atoms in austenite controls the transformation, confirming the indirect MS determinations.

  14. Magnetic and magnetostrictive properties of Cu substituted Co-ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra Sekhar, B.; Rao, G. S. N.; Caltun, O. F.; Dhana Lakshmi, B.; Parvatheeswara Rao, B.; Subba Rao, P. S. V.

    2016-01-01

    Copper substituted cobalt ferrite, Co1-xCuxFe2O4 (x=0.00-0.25), nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel autocombustion method. X-ray diffraction analysis on the samples was done to confirm the cubic spinel structures and Scherrer equation was used to estimate the mean crystallite size as 40 nm. Using the obtained nanoparticles, fabrication of the sintered pellets was done by standard ceramic technique. Magnetic and magnetostrictive measurements on the samples were made by strain gauge and vibrating sample magnetometer techniques, respectively. Maximum magnetostriction and strain derivative values were deduced from the field dependent magnetostriction curves while the magnetic parameters such as saturation magnetization (51.7-61.9 emu/g) and coercivity (1045-1629 Oe) on the samples were estimated from the obtained magnetic hysteresis loops. Curie temperature values (457-315 °C) were measured by a built in laboratory set-up. Copper substituted cobalt ferrites have shown improved strain derivative values as compared to the pure cobalt ferrite and thus making them suitable for stress sensing applications. The results have been explained on the basis of cationic distributions, strength of exchange interactions and net decreased anisotropic contributions due to the increased presence of Co2+ ions in B-sites as a result of Cu substitutions.

  15. Physiological Remediation of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles by Ferritin

    PubMed Central

    Volatron, Jeanne; Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena; Javed, Yasir; Vuong, Quoc Lam; Gossuin, Yves; Neveu, Sophie; Luciani, Nathalie; Hémadi, Miryana; Carn, Florent; Alloyeau, Damien; Gazeau, Florence

    2017-01-01

    Metallic nanoparticles have been increasingly suggested as prospective therapeutic nanoplatforms, yet their long-term fate and cellular processing in the body is poorly understood. Here we examined the role of an endogenous iron storage protein – namely the ferritin – in the remediation of biodegradable cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles. Structural and elemental analysis of ferritins close to exogenous nanoparticles within spleens and livers of mice injected in vivo with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles, suggests the intracellular transfer of degradation-derived cobalt and iron, entrapped within endogenous protein cages. In addition, the capacity of ferritin cages to accommodate and store the degradation products of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was investigated in vitro in the acidic environment mimicking the physiological conditions that are present within the lysosomes. The magnetic, colloidal and structural follow-up of nanoparticles and proteins in the lysosome-like medium confirmed the efficient remediation of nanoparticle-released cobalt and iron ions by ferritins in solution. Metal transfer into ferritins could represent a quintessential process in which biomolecules and homeostasis regulate the local degradation of nanoparticles and recycle their by-products. PMID:28067263

  16. Perpendicular Biased Ferrite Tuned Cavities for the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, Gennady; Awida, Mohamed; Khabiboulline, Timergali; Pellico, William; Tan, Cheng-Yang; Terechkine, Iouri; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav; Zwaska, Robert

    2014-07-01

    The aging Fermilab Booster RF system needs an upgrade to support future experimental program. The important feature of the upgrade is substantial enhancement of the requirements for the accelerating cavities. The new requirements include enlargement of the cavity beam pipe aperture, increase of the cavity voltage and increase in the repetition rate. The modification of the present traditional parallel biased ferrite cavities is rather challenging. An alternative to rebuilding the present Fermilab Booster RF cavities is to design and construct new perpendicular biased RF cavities, which potentially offer a number of advantages. An evaluation and a preliminary design of the perpendicular biased ferrite tuned cavities for the Fermilab Booster upgrade is described in the paper. Also it is desirable for better Booster performance to improve the capture of beam in the Booster during injection and at the start of the ramp. One possible way to do that is to flatten the bucket by introducing second harmonic cavities into the Booster. This paper also looks into the option of using perpendicularly biased ferrite tuners for the second harmonic cavities.

  17. Physiological Remediation of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles by Ferritin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volatron, Jeanne; Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena; Javed, Yasir; Vuong, Quoc Lam; Gossuin, Yves; Neveu, Sophie; Luciani, Nathalie; Hémadi, Miryana; Carn, Florent; Alloyeau, Damien; Gazeau, Florence

    2017-01-01

    Metallic nanoparticles have been increasingly suggested as prospective therapeutic nanoplatforms, yet their long-term fate and cellular processing in the body is poorly understood. Here we examined the role of an endogenous iron storage protein – namely the ferritin – in the remediation of biodegradable cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles. Structural and elemental analysis of ferritins close to exogenous nanoparticles within spleens and livers of mice injected in vivo with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles, suggests the intracellular transfer of degradation-derived cobalt and iron, entrapped within endogenous protein cages. In addition, the capacity of ferritin cages to accommodate and store the degradation products of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was investigated in vitro in the acidic environment mimicking the physiological conditions that are present within the lysosomes. The magnetic, colloidal and structural follow-up of nanoparticles and proteins in the lysosome-like medium confirmed the efficient remediation of nanoparticle-released cobalt and iron ions by ferritins in solution. Metal transfer into ferritins could represent a quintessential process in which biomolecules and homeostasis regulate the local degradation of nanoparticles and recycle their by-products.

  18. Mechanical alloying of lanthana-bearing nanostructured ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Somayeh Paseban; Indrajit Charit; Yaqiao Q. Wu; Jatuporn Burns; Kerry N. Allahar; Darryl P. Butt; James I. Cole

    2013-09-01

    A novel nanostructured ferritic steel powder with the nominal composition Fe–14Cr–1Ti–0.3Mo–0.5La2O3 (wt.%) was developed via high energy ball milling. La2O3 was added to this alloy instead of the traditionally used Y2O3. The effects of varying the ball milling parameters, such as milling time, steel ball size and ball to powder ratio, on the mechanical properties and micro structural characteristics of the as-milled powder were investigated. Nanocrystallites of a body-centered cubic ferritic solid solution matrix with a mean size of approximately 20 nm were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Nanoscale characterization of the as-milled powder by local electrode atom probe tomography revealed the formation of Cr–Ti–La–O-enriched nanoclusters during mechanical alloying. The Cr:Ti:La:O ratio is considered “non-stoichiometric”. The average size (radius) of the nanoclusters was about 1 nm, with number density of 3.7 1024 m3. The mechanism for formation of nanoclusters in the as-milled powder is discussed. La2O3 appears to be a promising alternative rare earth oxide for future nanostructured ferritic steels.

  19. Impedance spectroscopic characterization of gadolinium substituted cobalt ferrite ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Md. T. Ramana, C. V.

    2014-10-28

    Gadolinium (Gd) substituted cobalt ferrites (CoFe{sub 2−x}Gd{sub x}O{sub 4}, referred to CFGO) with variable Gd content (x = 0.0–0.4) have been synthesized by solid state ceramic method. The crystal structure and impedance properties of CFGO compounds have been evaluated. X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that CFGO crystallize in the inverse spinel phase. The CFGO compounds exhibit lattice expansion due to substitution of larger Gd ions into the crystal lattice. Impedance spectroscopy analysis was performed under a wide range of frequency (f = 20 Hz–1 MHz) and temperature (T = 303–573 K). Electrical properties of Gd incorporated Co ferrite ceramics are enhanced compared to pure CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} due to the lattice distortion. Impedance spectroscopic analysis illustrates the variation of bulk grain and grain-boundary contributions towards the electrical resistance and capacitance of CFGO materials with temperature. A two-layer heterogeneous model consisting of moderately conducting grain interior (ferrite-phase) regions separated by insulating grain boundaries (resistive-phase) accurately account for the observed temperature and frequency dependent electrical characteristic of CFGO ceramics.

  20. Lattice strain induced magnetism in substituted nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajnish; Kar, Manoranjan

    2016-10-01

    Strontium (Sr) substituted cobalt ferrite i.e. Co1-xSrxFe2O4 (x=0.00, 0.01, 0.015, 0.02, 0.05, 0.1) have been synthesized by the citric acid modified sol-gel method. Crystal structure and phase purity have been studied by the X-ray powder diffraction technique. The Rietveld refinement of XRD pattern using the space group Fd 3 bar m shows monotonically increasing of lattice parameter with the increase in Sr concentration. Magnetic hysteresis loops measurement has been carried out at room temperature using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) over a field range of ±1.5 T. Magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant were calculated by employing the Law of Approach (LA) to the saturation. It is observed that magnetocrystalline anisotropy has anomaly for x=0.01 (Co0.99Sr0.01Fe2O4) sample. Strain mediated modification of magnetic properties in Sr substituted cobalt ferrite has been observed. The saturation magnetization for doping concentration i.e. x=0.01 abruptly increase while for x>0.01 decreases with the increase in Sr concentration. A correlation between lattice strain and magnetic behavior in non-magnetic Sr- substituted nano-crystalline cobalt ferrite has been reported.

  1. Study of Zn-Cu Ferrite Nanoparticles for LPG Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anuj; Baranwal, Ravi Kant; Bharti, Ajaya; Vakil, Z.; Prajapati, C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured zinc-copper mixed ferrite was synthesized using sol-gel method. XRD patterns of different compositions of zinc-copper ferrite, Zn(1−x)CuxFe2O4 (x = 0.0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75), revealed single phase inverse spinel ferrite in all the samples synthesized. With increasing copper concentration, the crystallite size was found to be increased from 28 nm to 47 nm. The surface morphology of all the samples studied by the Scanning Electron Microscopy there exhibits porous structure of particles throughout the samples. The pellets of the samples are prepared for LPG sensing characteristics. The sensing is carried out at different operating temperatures (200, 225, and 250°C) with the variation of LPG concentrations (0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 vol%). The maximum sensitivity of 55.33% is observed at 250°C operating for the 0.6 vol% LPG. PMID:23864833

  2. Defect detection for end surface of ferrite magnetic tile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jiayuan; Wang, Yuwei; Wang, Keyi

    2016-09-01

    A visual automatic detection method is proposed for defect detection on end surface of ferrite magnetic tile to tackle the disadvantages generated by human work which has low efficiency and unstable accuracy. Because the defects on end surface of ferrite magnetic tile with dark colors and low contrasts are negative for defect detection, uniform illumination is provided by LED light source and a dedicated optical system is designed to extract defects conveniently. The approach uses comparison of the fitting and actual edge curves to detect defects mainly with most defects located on the edge. Firstly improved adaptive median filter is used as the image preprocessing. Subsequently the appropriate threshold is calculated by Otsu algorithm based on the extreme points in the gray-level histogram to segment the preprocessing image. Then the Sobel operator can be used to extract the edge of end surface precisely. Finally through comparing the ideal fitting and actual edge curves of end surface, to detect the defects with some relevant features. Experimental results show that the proposed scheme could detect defects on the end surface of ferrite magnetic tile efficiency and accurately with 93.33% accuracy rate, 2.30% false acceptance rate and 8.45% correct rejection rate.

  3. Evidence of domain wall pinning in aluminum substituted cobalt ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, J. C.; Janrao, P. S.; Datar, A. A.; Kanhe, N. S.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Mathe, V. L.

    2016-08-01

    In the present work spinel structured cobalt ferrites with aluminum substitution having composition CoAlxFe2-xO4 (x=0.0, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3) have been synthesized using chemical co-precipitation method. Their microstructural, magnetic, magnetostriction and magnetoimpedance properties have been investigated. The piezomagnetic coefficient (dλ/dH) obtained from magnetostriction data is found to enhance with 0.1 Al substitutions in place of iron which decreases with further increase of Al content. It is noticed that 0.3 Al substitutions in place of Fe introduces domain wall pinning as evidenced from magnetostriction, magnetoimpedance and dc magnetization data. It is noted that ferrites so prepared using a simple procedure are magnetostrictive in good measure and with the addition of very small amount of non-magnetic aluminum their magnetostriction has shown saturation at relatively low magnetic fields. Such magnetostrictive ferrites find their applications in magnetic sensors and actuators.

  4. Structural, dielectric and magnetic properties of Ni substituted zinc ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumbhar, S. S.; Mahadik, M. A.; Mohite, V. S.; Rajpure, K. Y.; Kim, J. H.; Moholkar, A. V.; Bhosale, C. H.

    2014-08-01

    NixZn1-xFe2O4 ferrite has been synthesized by the ceramic method using Ni CO3, ZnO, Fe2O3 precursors. The influence of Ni content on the structural, morphological, electrical and magnetic properties of NixZn1-xFe2O4 ferrites is studied. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis reveals that the samples are polycrystalline with spinel cubic structure. The SEM images of NixZn1-xFe2O4 ferrite show that the grain size decreases with an increase in the Ni content. The tetrahedral and octahedral vibrations in the samples are studied by IR spectra. Frequency dependence of dielectric constant shows dielectric dispersion due to the Maxwell-Wagner type of interfacial polarization. Conduction mechanism due to polarons has been analyzed by measuring the AC conductivity. Impedance spectroscopy is used to study the electrical behavior. Magnetic properties of NixZn1-xFe2O4 are studied by using hysteresis loop measurement. The maximum value of saturation magnetization of 132.8 emu/g obtained for the composition, x=0.8, is attributed to magnetic moment of Fe3+ ions.

  5. Study of Zn-Cu ferrite nanoparticles for LPG sensing.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anuj; Baranwal, Ravi Kant; Bharti, Ajaya; Vakil, Z; Prajapati, C S

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured zinc-copper mixed ferrite was synthesized using sol-gel method. XRD patterns of different compositions of zinc-copper ferrite, Zn(1-x)Cu(x)Fe2O4 (x = 0.0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75), revealed single phase inverse spinel ferrite in all the samples synthesized. With increasing copper concentration, the crystallite size was found to be increased from 28 nm to 47 nm. The surface morphology of all the samples studied by the Scanning Electron Microscopy there exhibits porous structure of particles throughout the samples. The pellets of the samples are prepared for LPG sensing characteristics. The sensing is carried out at different operating temperatures (200, 225, and 250°C) with the variation of LPG concentrations (0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 vol%). The maximum sensitivity of 55.33% is observed at 250°C operating for the 0.6 vol% LPG.

  6. Physiological Remediation of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles by Ferritin.

    PubMed

    Volatron, Jeanne; Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena; Javed, Yasir; Vuong, Quoc Lam; Gossuin, Yves; Neveu, Sophie; Luciani, Nathalie; Hémadi, Miryana; Carn, Florent; Alloyeau, Damien; Gazeau, Florence

    2017-01-09

    Metallic nanoparticles have been increasingly suggested as prospective therapeutic nanoplatforms, yet their long-term fate and cellular processing in the body is poorly understood. Here we examined the role of an endogenous iron storage protein - namely the ferritin - in the remediation of biodegradable cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles. Structural and elemental analysis of ferritins close to exogenous nanoparticles within spleens and livers of mice injected in vivo with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles, suggests the intracellular transfer of degradation-derived cobalt and iron, entrapped within endogenous protein cages. In addition, the capacity of ferritin cages to accommodate and store the degradation products of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was investigated in vitro in the acidic environment mimicking the physiological conditions that are present within the lysosomes. The magnetic, colloidal and structural follow-up of nanoparticles and proteins in the lysosome-like medium confirmed the efficient remediation of nanoparticle-released cobalt and iron ions by ferritins in solution. Metal transfer into ferritins could represent a quintessential process in which biomolecules and homeostasis regulate the local degradation of nanoparticles and recycle their by-products.

  7. Sabiperones A-F, new diterpenoids from Juniperus sabina.

    PubMed

    Janar, Jenis; Nugroho, Alfarius Eko; Wong, Chin Piow; Hirasawa, Yusuke; Kaneda, Toshio; Shirota, Osamu; Morita, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Six new diterpenoids, sabiperones A-F (1-6) have been isolated from the aerial part of Juniperus sabina. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods including 2D NMR techniques. Sabiperone F showed moderate cell growth inhibitory activities against five human cancer cell lines.

  8. Action of AF64A on rat brain muscarinic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Eva, C.; Costa, E.

    1986-03-01

    ICV administration of compound AF64A (ethylcholine mustard aziridium ion) induces a long-term selective cholinergic hypofunction; however, it does not modify the characteristics of muscarinic receptors. In brain muscarinic receptor activation can either stimulate phosphoinositide turnover or inhibit adenylate cyclase. ICV infusion of AF64A (5 nmol/side/2.5 ..mu..l) reduced the hippocampal ACh content 10 or 30 days after the treatment to 75% of the control values. Under these conditions neither in the striatum nor in the frontal cortex ACh levels were decreased. The carbachol dose-dependent stimulation in hippocampal slices differed from that observed in control rats. The carbachol efficacy was increased but its potency was unchanged by AF64A. In contrast, ICV administration of AF64A failed to alter the oxotremorine efficacy or potency in inhibiting the forskolin stimulated adenylate cyclase in rat hippocampal membranes. These results suggest the two transducer systems coupled to muscarinic receptors may be differentially regulatable by cholinergic input.

  9. An Empirical Test of Oklahoma's A-F School Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Curt M.; Forsyth, Patrick B.; Ware, Jordan; Mwavita, Mwarumba; Barnes, Laura L.; Khojasteb, Jam

    2016-01-01

    Oklahoma is one of 16 states electing to use an A-F letter grade as an indicator of school quality. On the surface, letter grades are an attractive policy instrument for school improvement; they are seemingly clear, simple, and easy to interpret. Evidence, however, on the use of letter grades as an instrument to rank and improve schools is scant…

  10. Increased Heart Rate Is Associated With Higher Mortality in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation (AF): Results From the Outcomes Registry for Better Informed Treatment of AF (ORBIT-AF)

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Benjamin A; Kim, Sunghee; Thomas, Laine; Fonarow, Gregg C; Gersh, Bernard J; Holmqvist, Fredrik; Hylek, Elaine; Kowey, Peter R; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Naccarelli, Gerald; Reiffel, James A; Chang, Paul; Peterson, Eric D; Piccini, Jonathan P

    2015-01-01

    Background Most patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) require rate control; however, the optimal target heart rate remains under debate. We aimed to assess rate control and subsequent outcomes among patients with permanent AF. Methods and Results We studied 2812 US outpatients with permanent AF in the Outcomes Registry for Better Informed Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation. Resting heart rate was measured longitudinally and used as a time-dependent covariate in multivariable Cox models of all-cause and cause-specific mortality during a median follow-up of 24 months. At baseline, 7.4% (n=207) had resting heart rate <60 beats per minute (bpm), 62% (n=1755) 60 to 79 bpm, 29% (n=817) 80 to 109 bpm, and 1.2% (n=33) ≥110 bpm. Groups did not differ by age, previous cerebrovascular disease, heart failure status, CHA2DS2-VASc scores, renal function, or left ventricular function. There were significant differences in race (P=0.001), sinus node dysfunction (P=0.004), and treatment with calcium-channel blockers (P=0.006) and anticoagulation (P=0.009). In analyses of continuous heart rates, lower heart rate ≤65 bpm was associated with higher all-cause mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.15 per 5-bpm decrease; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.32; P=0.04). Similarly, increasing heart rate >65 bpm was associated with higher all-cause mortality (adjusted HR, 1.10 per 5-bpm increase; 95% CI, 1.05 to 1.15; P<0.0001). This relationship was consistent across endpoints and in a broader sensitivity analysis of permanent and nonpermanent AF patients. Conclusions Among patients with permanent AF, there is a J-shaped relationship between heart rate and mortality. These data support current guideline recommendations, and clinical trials are warranted to determine optimal rate control. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov/. Unique identifier: NCT01165710. PMID:26370445

  11. Effect of constituent phase on mechanical properties of 9Cr-1WVTa reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Hoon; Moon, Joonoh; Park, Min-Gu; Lee, Tae-Ho; Jang, Min-Ho; Kim, Hyoung Chan; Suh, Dong-Woo

    2014-12-01

    Influence of the formation of ferrite and accompanying carbides in martensite matrix on the tensile and Charpy impact properties was investigated for reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) 9Cr-1WVTa steel. As the fractions of ferrite and carbide adjacent to the ferrite grain boundary increase, both tensile and Charpy impact properties deteriorated in as-normalized condition. In particular, the tensile strength and elongation decreased simultaneously, which is believed to be led by the localized deformation in ferrite which is softer than martensite, promoting the formation and growth of voids. In addition, the formation of ferrite was also detrimental to the Charpy impact properties regarding to the absorbed energy because the precipitation of carbides around ferrite were vulnerable to the nucleation and propagation of cleavage cracks. The degradation of tensile properties can be recovered by tempering, but the DBTT temperature still increases with presence of ferrite.

  12. Synthesis and Staging of the Phase Formation for Strontium Ferrites in Thermal and Radiation-Thermal Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancharova, U. V.; Mikhailenko, M. A.; Tolochko, B. P.; Lyakhov, N. Z.; Korobeinikov, M. V.; Bryazgin, A. A.; Bezuglov, V. V.; Shtarklev, E. A.; Vlasov, A. Yu; Vinokurov, Z. S.

    2015-04-01

    The strontium ferrite radiation-thermal synthesis process due to heating by intensive electron beam is described. The radiation-thermal and thermal strontium ferrite synthesis processes kinetics were studied and compared.

  13. Extracting Uranium from Seawater: Promising AF Series Adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.; Oyola, Y.; Mayes, Richard T.; Janke, Chris J.; Kuo, L. -J.; Gill, G.; Wood, J. R.; Dai, S.

    2016-04-20

    A new family of high-surface-area polyethylene fiber adsorbents named the AF series was recently developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The AF series adsorbents were synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of acrylonitrile and itaconic acid (at different monomer/comonomer mol ratios) onto high surface area polyethylene fibers. The degree of grafting (%DOG) of AF series adsorbents was found to be 154-354%. The grafted nitrile groups were converted to amidoxime groups by treating with hydroxylamine. The amidoximated adsorbents were then conditioned with 0.44 M KOH at 80 °C followed by screening at ORNL with sodium-based synthetic aqueous solution, spiked with 8 ppm uranium. The uranium adsorption capacity in simulated seawater screening ranged from 170 to 200 g-U/kg-ads irrespective of %DOG. A monomer/comonomer molar ratio in the range of 7.57-10.14 seemed to be optimum for highest uranium loading capacity. Subsequently, the adsorbents were also tested with natural seawater at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) using flow-through column experiments to determine uranium loading capacity with varying KOH conditioning times at 80 °C. The highest adsorption capacity of AF1 measured after 56 days of marine testing was demonstrated as 3.9 g-U/kg-adsorbent and 3.2 g-U/kg-adsorbent for 1 and 3 h of KOH conditioning at 80 °C, respectively. Based on capacity values of several AF1 samples, it was observed that changing KOH conditioning from 1 to 3 h at 80 °C resulted in a 22-27% decrease in uranium adsorption capacity in seawater.

  14. Extracting uranium from seawater: Promising AF series adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sadananda; Oyola, Y.; Mayes, Richard T.; Janke, Christopher James; Kuo, Li-Jung; Gill, Gary; Wood, Jordana; Dai, Sheng

    2015-11-02

    Here, a new family of high surface area polyethylene fiber adsorbents (AF series) was recently developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The AF series of were synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of acrylonitrile and itaconic acid (at different monomer/co-monomer mol ratios) onto high surface area polyethylene fibers. The degree of grafting (%DOG) of AF series adsorbents was found to be 154 354%. The grafted nitrile groups were converted to amidoxime groups by treating with hydroxylamine. The amidoximated adsorbents were then conditioned with 0.44M KOH at 80 C followed by screening at ORNL with simulated seawater spiked with 8 ppm uranium. Uranium adsorption capacity in simulated seawater screening ranged from 170-200 g-U/kg-ads irrespective of %DOG. A monomer/co-monomer mol ratio in the range of 7.57-10.14 seemed to be optimum for highest uranium loading capacity. Subsequently, the adsorbents were also tested with natural seawater at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) using flow-through exposure uptake experiments to determine uranium loading capacity with varying KOH conditioning time at 80 C. The highest adsorption capacity of AF1 measured after 56 days of marine testing was demonstrated as 3.9 g-U/kg-adsorbent and 3.2 g-U/kg-adsorbent for 1hr and 3hrs of KOH conditioning at 80 C, respectively. Based on capacity values of several AF1 samples, it was observed that changing KOH conditioning from 3hrs to 1hr at 80 C resulted in 22-27% increase in uranium loading capacity in seawater.

  15. Extracting uranium from seawater: Promising AF series adsorbents

    DOE PAGES

    Das, Sadananda; Oyola, Y.; Mayes, Richard T.; ...

    2015-11-02

    Here, a new family of high surface area polyethylene fiber adsorbents (AF series) was recently developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The AF series of were synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of acrylonitrile and itaconic acid (at different monomer/co-monomer mol ratios) onto high surface area polyethylene fibers. The degree of grafting (%DOG) of AF series adsorbents was found to be 154 354%. The grafted nitrile groups were converted to amidoxime groups by treating with hydroxylamine. The amidoximated adsorbents were then conditioned with 0.44M KOH at 80 C followed by screening at ORNL with simulated seawater spiked with 8more » ppm uranium. Uranium adsorption capacity in simulated seawater screening ranged from 170-200 g-U/kg-ads irrespective of %DOG. A monomer/co-monomer mol ratio in the range of 7.57-10.14 seemed to be optimum for highest uranium loading capacity. Subsequently, the adsorbents were also tested with natural seawater at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) using flow-through exposure uptake experiments to determine uranium loading capacity with varying KOH conditioning time at 80 C. The highest adsorption capacity of AF1 measured after 56 days of marine testing was demonstrated as 3.9 g-U/kg-adsorbent and 3.2 g-U/kg-adsorbent for 1hr and 3hrs of KOH conditioning at 80 C, respectively. Based on capacity values of several AF1 samples, it was observed that changing KOH conditioning from 3hrs to 1hr at 80 C resulted in 22-27% increase in uranium loading capacity in seawater.« less

  16. Copper ferrite nanoparticle-induced cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Alshamsan, Aws

    2016-06-01

    Copper ferrite (CuFe2O4) nanoparticles (NPs) are important magnetic materials currently under research due to their applicability in nanomedicine. However, information concerning the biological interaction of copper ferrite NPs is largely lacking. In this study, we investigated the cellular response of copper ferrite NPs in human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells. Copper ferrite NPs were prepared by co-precipitation technique with the thermal effect. Prepared NPs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission transmission electron microscopy (FETEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Characterization data showed that copper ferrite NPs were crystalline, spherical with smooth surfaces and average diameter of 15nm. Biochemical studies showed that copper ferrite NPs induce cell viability reduction and membrane damage in MCF-7 cells and degree of induction was dose- and time-dependent. High SubG1 cell population during cell cycle progression and MMP loss with a concomitant up-regulation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 genes suggested that copper ferrite NP-induced cell death through mitochondrial pathway. Copper ferrite NP was also found to induce oxidative stress in MCF-7 cells as indicated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and glutathione depletion. Cytotoxicity due to copper ferrite NPs exposure was effectively abrogated by N-acetyl-cysteine (ROS scavenger) suggesting that oxidative stress could be the plausible mechanism of copper ferrite NPs toxicity. Further studies are underway to explore the toxicity mechanisms of copper ferrite NPs in different types of human cells. This study warrants further generation of extensive biointeraction data before their application in nanomedicine.

  17. Calculation of the standard heat capacity at constant pressure for cobalt ferrite-zinc ferrite solid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Chachanidze, G.D.; Pavlenishvili, T.A.; Machaladze, T.E.; Khutsishvili, D.I.

    1994-08-01

    Magnetic, electrical, and other properties of Co{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} solid solutions are widely studied because of their high coercive force and Curie temperature ({Tc}), which makes these compounds applicable in modern electronic devices. However, the information published on their thermodynamic properties is limited. This paper focuses on calculation of the standard heat capacity C{sub p}{sup 0} (298 K) for cobalt zinc ferrites using correlation analysis of the relationship between C{sub p}{sup 0} (298 K) and the saturation magnetic moment {mu}{sub o}. The authors studied the solid solutions Co{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 0.2, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, and 0.8), whose magnetic and thermal parameters, crucial in our calculations, are known to be strongly dependent on the preparation conditions. An equation was derived for calculation of the standard heat capacity at constant pressure from the saturation magnetic moment of Co{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} solid solutions. The equation allows a satisfactory estimation of the standard heat capacity at 298 Kelvin for any cobalt ferrite-zinc ferrite solid, providing the saturation magnetic moment is available.

  18. New Magnetic Materials and Phenomena for Radar and Microwave Signal Processing Devices - Bulk and Thin Film Ferrites and Metallic Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-15

    methods have been used to produce in-plane c-axis (IPCA) oriented barium ferrite (BaM) films on o-plane (1120) sapphire substrates with low microwave ...New magnetic materials and phenomena for radar and microwave signal processing devices - bulk and thin film ferrites and metallic films 6. AUTHOR(S...excitation properties in delay line structures. (173 words) 14. SUBJECT TERMS Microwave ferrites , yttrium iron garnet, hexagonal ferrites

  19. 40 CFR 180.1206 - Aspergillus flavus AF36; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aspergillus flavus AF36; exemption... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1206 Aspergillus flavus AF36; exemption from the requirement of a... pesticide Aspergillus flavus AF36 in or on cotton, gin byproducts; cotton, hulls; cotton, meal;...

  20. 32 CFR 989.12 - AF Form 813, Request for Environmental Impact Analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false AF Form 813, Request for Environmental Impact... FORCE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.12 AF Form 813, Request for Environmental Impact Analysis. The Air Force uses AF Form 813 to document the need...

  1. 32 CFR 989.12 - AF Form 813, Request for Environmental Impact Analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false AF Form 813, Request for Environmental Impact... FORCE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.12 AF Form 813, Request for Environmental Impact Analysis. The Air Force uses AF Form 813 to document the need...

  2. 32 CFR 989.12 - AF Form 813, Request for Environmental Impact Analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false AF Form 813, Request for Environmental Impact... FORCE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.12 AF Form 813, Request for Environmental Impact Analysis. The Air Force uses AF Form 813 to document the need...

  3. 32 CFR 989.12 - AF Form 813, Request for Environmental Impact Analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false AF Form 813, Request for Environmental Impact... FORCE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.12 AF Form 813, Request for Environmental Impact Analysis. The Air Force uses AF Form 813 to document the need...

  4. 32 CFR 989.12 - AF Form 813, Request for Environmental Impact Analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false AF Form 813, Request for Environmental Impact... FORCE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.12 AF Form 813, Request for Environmental Impact Analysis. The Air Force uses AF Form 813 to document the need...

  5. Synthesis of Highly Uniform and Compact Lithium Zinc Ferrite Ceramics via an Efficient Low Temperature Approach.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fang; Liao, Yulong; Zhang, Dainan; Zhou, Tingchuan; Li, Jie; Gan, Gongwen; Zhang, Huaiwu

    2017-03-27

    LiZn ferrite ceramics with high saturation magnetization (4πMs) and low ferromagnetic resonance line widths (ΔH) represent a very critical class of material for microwave ferrite devices. Many existing approaches emphasize promotion of the grain growth (average size is 10-50 μm) of ferrite ceramics to improve the gyromagnetic properties at relatively low sintering temperatures. This paper describes a new strategy for obtaining uniform and compact LiZn ferrite ceramics (average grains size is ∼2 μm) with enhanced magnetic performance by suppressing grain growth in great detail. The LiZn ferrites with a formula of Li0.415Zn0.27Mn0.06Ti0.1Fe2.155O4 were prepared by solid reaction routes with two new sintering strategies. Interestingly, results show that uniform, compact, and pure spinel ferrite ceramics were synthesized at a low temperature (∼850 °C) without obvious grain growth. We also find that a fast second sintering treatment (FSST) can further improve their gyromagnetic properties, such as higher 4πMs and lower ΔH. The two new strategies are facile and efficient for densification of LiZn ferrite ceramics via suppressing grain growth at low temperatures. The sintering strategy reported in this study also provides a referential experience for other ceramics, such as soft magnetism ferrite ceramics or dielectric ceramics.

  6. Effect of internal nitriding on the fatigue strength of ferritic corrosion-resistant steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogachev, S. O.; Nikulin, S. A.; Terent'ev, V. F.; Khatkevich, V. M.; Prosvirnin, D. V.; Savicheva, R. O.

    2015-04-01

    The effect of internal nitriding and subsequent annealing on the mechanical properties of ferritic corrosion-resistance 08Kh17T steel has been studied during static and cyclic loading. Nitriding was shown to increase the static and cyclic strength of ferritic steel substantially and to decrease its plasticity slightly. These changes are confirmed by results of fractographic studies.

  7. Influence of matching thickness on the absorption properties of doped barium ferrites at microwave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, A.; Saatchi, A.; Salehi, M.; Hossienpour, A.; Morisako, A.; Liu, X.

    2006-02-01

    The development and characterization of hexagonal ferrite powders of BaFe9Mn1.5Ti1.5O19, BaFe9Mn1.5Co1.5O19, and BaFe9Ti1.5Co1.5O19 as the microwave absorbers have been investigated. The ferrites were fabricated by conventional ceramic technology. The developed ferrite powders 80% by weight were mixed with polyvinylchloride plasticizer and fired to form rubber-ferrite with the thickness of 1.5 mm, 2 mm and 2.5 mm. XRD was used to identify structures of the samples. The magnetoplumbite structures for all the samples have been formed. Vibrating sample magnetometer was used to determine the hysteresis loops of barium ferrite and BaFe9Mn1.5Ti1.5O19 at room temperature. The vector network analyzers in the frequency range of 12 to 20 GHz have measured the reflection loss properties of rubber-ferrite. It was concluded that BaFe9Mn1.5Ti1.5O19 with thickness of 2 mm could be designed as a wide-band microwave absorber. By SEM, the size and morphology of grains in BaFe9Mn1.5Ti1.5O19 ferrite were examined. The results showed that ferrite with grain size of 5 μm do not have any impurities.

  8. Carbon concentration measurements by atom probe tomography in the ferritic phase of high-silicon steels

    DOE PAGES

    Rementeria, Rosalia; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Aranda, Maria M.; ...

    2016-12-19

    Current studies using atom probe tomography (APT) show that bainitic ferrite formed at low temperature contains more carbon than what is consistent with the paraequilibrium phase diagram. However, nanocrystalline bainitic ferrite exhibits a non-homogeneous distribution of carbon atoms in arrangements with specific compositions, i.e. Cottrell atmospheres, carbon clusters, and carbides, in most cases with a size of a few nanometers. The ferrite volume within a single platelet that is free of these carbon-enriched regions is extremely small. Proximity histograms can be compromised on the ferrite side, and a great deal of care should be taken to estimate the carbon contentmore » in regions of bainitic ferrite free from carbon agglomeration. For this purpose, APT measurements were first validated for the ferritic phase in a pearlitic sample and further performed for the bainitic ferrite matrix in high-silicon steels isothermally transformed between 200 °C and 350 °C. Additionally, results were compared with the carbon concentration values derived from X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses considering a tetragonal lattice and previous APT studies. In conclusion, the present results reveal a strong disagreement between the carbon content values in the bainitic ferrite matrix as obtained by APT and those derived from XRD measurements. Those differences have been attributed to the development of carbon-clustered regions with an increased tetragonality in a carbon-depleted matrix.« less

  9. Carbon concentration measurements by atom probe tomography in the ferritic phase of high-silicon steels

    SciTech Connect

    Rementeria, Rosalia; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Aranda, Maria M.; Guo, Wei; Jimenez, Jose A.; Garcia-Mateo, Carlos; Caballero, Francisca G.

    2016-12-19

    Current studies using atom probe tomography (APT) show that bainitic ferrite formed at low temperature contains more carbon than what is consistent with the paraequilibrium phase diagram. However, nanocrystalline bainitic ferrite exhibits a non-homogeneous distribution of carbon atoms in arrangements with specific compositions, i.e. Cottrell atmospheres, carbon clusters, and carbides, in most cases with a size of a few nanometers. The ferrite volume within a single platelet that is free of these carbon-enriched regions is extremely small. Proximity histograms can be compromised on the ferrite side, and a great deal of care should be taken to estimate the carbon content in regions of bainitic ferrite free from carbon agglomeration. For this purpose, APT measurements were first validated for the ferritic phase in a pearlitic sample and further performed for the bainitic ferrite matrix in high-silicon steels isothermally transformed between 200 °C and 350 °C. Additionally, results were compared with the carbon concentration values derived from X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses considering a tetragonal lattice and previous APT studies. In conclusion, the present results reveal a strong disagreement between the carbon content values in the bainitic ferrite matrix as obtained by APT and those derived from XRD measurements. Those differences have been attributed to the development of carbon-clustered regions with an increased tetragonality in a carbon-depleted matrix.

  10. Nano-ferrites for Water Splitting: Unprecedented High Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production under Visible Light

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the present investigation, hydrogen production via water splitting by nano ferrites has been studied using ethanol as the sacrificial donor. The nano ferrite has shown great potential in hydrogen generation with hydrogen yield of 8275 9moles/h/ g of photocatalyst under visible...

  11. 78 FR 63517 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... Information The NRC published DG-1279 in the Federal Register on October 3, 2012 (77 FR 60479), for a 60-day... COMMISSION Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... revision to Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.31, ``Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.''...

  12. Thin-film ferrites vapor deposited by one-step process in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacskaylo, M.

    1966-01-01

    Thin-film ferrites are formed by vapor deposition of a mixture of powdered ferrites and powdered boron oxide at controlled temperatures in a vacuum chamber. These films are used in memory devices for computers and as thin-film inductors in communications and telemetry systems.

  13. Antibacterial activity and characteristics of modified ferrite powder coated with a gemini pyridinium salt molecule.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Akihiro; Maeda, Takuya; Ohkita, Motoaki; Nagamune, Hideaki; Kourai, Hiroki

    2007-09-01

    This report describes the synthesis of an antibacterial material consisting of a gemini quaternary ammonium salt (gemini-QUAT) immobilized on ferrite powder, and its antibacterial activity. A gemini-QUAT containing two pyridinium residues per molecule, 4,4'-[1,3-(2,2-dihydroxylmethyl-1,3-dithiapropane)]bis (1-octylpyridinium bromide), was immobilized on ferrite powder by a reaction between the hydroxyl group of the QUAT and trimethoxysilane. Immobilization of the gemini-QUAT on ferrite (F-gemini-QUAT) was confirmed when the dye, bromophenol blue, was released from F-gemini-QUAT-dye after contact between ferrite and the dye. Elemental analysis of the QUAT-ferrite determined the molar amount of QUAT on the ferrite. The antibacterial effect of the ferrite was investigated using a batch treatment system, and this effect was compared with that of another QUAT-ferrite (F-mono-QUAT) binding a mono-QUAT, which possesses one pyridinium residue, prepared by the same immobilization method as F-gemini-QUAT. Results indicated the F-gemini QUAT possessed a higher bactericidal potency and broader antibacterial spectrum compared to F-mono-QUAT. In addition, this study suggested that gemini-QUATs possessed high bactericidal potency without being influenced by immobilization to materials, and the antibacterial activity and characteristics of F-gemini-QUAT could be attributed to the unique structure of the immobilized gemini-QUAT.

  14. Effect of powder compaction on radiation-thermal synthesis of lithium-titanium ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surzhikov, A. P.; Lysenko, E. N.; Vlasov, V. A.; Malyshev, A. V.; Korobeynikov, M. V.; Mikhailenko, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    Effect of powder compaction on the efficiency of thermal and radiation-thermal synthesis of lithium-substituted ferrites was investigated by X-Ray diffraction and specific magnetization analysis. It was shown that the radiation-thermal heating of compacted powder reagents mixture leads to an increase in efficiency of lithium-titanium ferrites synthesis.

  15. Embossed Teflon AF Laminate Membrane Microfluidic Diaphragm Valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Peter; Hunt, Brian; White,Victor; Grunthaner, Frank

    2008-01-01

    A microfluidic system has been designed to survive spaceflight and to function autonomously on the Martian surface. It manipulates microscopic quantities of liquid water and performs chemical analyses on these samples to assay for the presence of molecules associated with past or present living processes. This technology lies at the core of the Urey Instrument, which is scheduled for inclusion on the Pasteur Payload of the ESA ExoMars rover mission in 2013. Fabrication processes have been developed to make the microfabricated Teflon-AF microfluidic diaphragm pumps capable of surviving extreme temperature excursions before and after exposure to liquid water. Two glass wafers are etched with features and a continuous Teflon membrane is sandwiched between them (see figure). Single valves are constructed using this geometry. The microfabricated devices are then post processed by heating the assembled device while applying pneumatic pressure to force the Teflon diaphragm against the valve seat while it is softened. After cooling the device, the embossed membrane retains this new shape. This solves previous problems with bubble introduction into the fluid flow where deformations of the membrane at the valve seat occurred during device bonding at elevated temperatures (100-150 C). The use of laminated membranes containing commercial Teflon AF 2400 sheet sandwiched between spun Teflon AF 1600 layers performed best, and were less gas permeable than Teflon AF 1600 membranes on their own. Spinning Teflon AF 1600 solution (6 percent in FLOURINERT(Registered TradeMark) FC40 solvent, 3M Company) at 500 rpm for 1.5 seconds, followed by 1,000 rpm for 3 seconds onto Borofloat glass wafers, results in a 10-micron-thick film of extremely smooth Teflon AF. This spinning process is repeated several times on flat, blank, glass wafers in order to gradually build a thick, smooth membrane. After running this process at least five times, the wafer and Teflon coating are heated under vacuum

  16. Fabrication of ultrathin Ni-Zn ferrite films using electron cyclotron resonance sputtering method

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Terumitsu; Kurisu, Hiroki; Matsuura, Mitsuru; Shimosato, Yoshihiro; Okada, Shigenobu; Oshiro, Kazunori; Fujimori, Hirotaka; Yamamoto, Setsuo

    2006-04-15

    Well-crystallized Ni-Zn ferrite (Ni{sub 0.4}Zn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) highly oriented ultrathin films were obtained at a substrate temperature of 200 deg. C by a reactive sputtering method utilizing electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma, which is very effective to crystallize oxide or nitride materials without heat treatment. Thin films of Ni-Zn ferrite deposited on a MgO (100) underlayer showed an intense X-ray-diffraction peak of (400) from the Ni-Zn ferrite as compared to similar films deposited directly onto thermally oxidized Si substrates. A 1.5-nm-thick Ni-Zn ferrite film, which corresponds to twice the lattice constant for bulk Ni-Zn ferrite, crystallized on a MgO (100) underlayer.

  17. FERRITE-LINED HOM ABSORBER FOR THE E-COOL ERL

    SciTech Connect

    HAHN,H.

    2007-06-25

    An R&D Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) intended as step towards electron-cooling of RHIC-II is being constructed at this laboratory. The center piece of the project is the experimental 5-cell 703.75 MHz superconducting ECX cavity. Successful operation will depend on effective NOM suppression, and it is planned to achieve NOM damping exclusively with room temperature ferrite absorbers. A ferrite-lined pillbox test model with dimensions reflecting the operational unit was assembled and attached to the 5-cell copper cavity. The cavity resonances of the lowest dipole and monopole modes and their damping due to the ferrite were determined. The effective ferrite properties in a form portable to other structures were obtained from network analyzer measurements of the ferrite absorber models and their interpretation with the simulation code Microwave Studio.

  18. Toughness of 12%Cr ferritic/martensitic steel welds produced by non-arc welding processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ginn, B.J.; Gooch, T.G.

    1998-08-01

    Low carbon 12%Cr steels can offer reduced life cycle costs in many applications. The present work examined the behavior of commercial steels of varying composition when subject to low heat input welding by the electron beam (EB) process and to a forge cycle by linear friction welding (LFW). Charpy impact testing was carried out on the high temperature heat-affected zone (HAZ)/fusion boundary or weld interface, with metallographic examination. With EB welding, the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) was below 0 C (32 F) only for steel of low ferrite factor giving a fully martensitic weld area. Higher ferrite factor alloys showed predominantly ferritic transformed microstructures and a transition well above room temperature. Grain coarsening was found even with low EB process power, the peak grain size increasing with both heat input and steel ferrite factor. Use of LFW gave a fine weld area structure and DBTTs around 0 C even in high ferrite factor (FF) material.

  19. Negative and near zero refraction metamaterials based on permanent magnetic ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Ke; Guo, Yunsheng; Zhou, Ji; Dong, Guoyan; Zhao, Hongjie; Zhao, Qian; Xiao, Zongqi; Liu, Xiaoming; Lan, Chuwen

    2014-02-01

    Ferrite metamaterials based on the negative permeability of ferromagnetic resonance in ferrites are of great interest. However, such metamaterials face a limitation that the ferromagnetic resonance can only take place while an external magnetic field applied. Here, we demonstrate a metamaterial based on permanent magnetic ferrite which exhibits not only negative refraction but also near zero refraction without applied magnetic field. The wedge-shaped and slab-shaped structures of permanent magnetic ferrite-based metamaterials were prepared and the refraction properties were measured in a near-field scanning system. The negative and near zero refractive behaviors are confirmed by the measured spatial electric field maps. This work offers new opportunities for the development of ferrite-based metamaterials.

  20. Negative and near zero refraction metamaterials based on permanent magnetic ferrites

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Ke; Guo, Yunsheng; Zhou, Ji; Dong, Guoyan; Zhao, Hongjie; Zhao, Qian; Xiao, Zongqi; Liu, Xiaoming; Lan, Chuwen

    2014-01-01

    Ferrite metamaterials based on the negative permeability of ferromagnetic resonance in ferrites are of great interest. However, such metamaterials face a limitation that the ferromagnetic resonance can only take place while an external magnetic field applied. Here, we demonstrate a metamaterial based on permanent magnetic ferrite which exhibits not only negative refraction but also near zero refraction without applied magnetic field. The wedge-shaped and slab-shaped structures of permanent magnetic ferrite-based metamaterials were prepared and the refraction properties were measured in a near-field scanning system. The negative and near zero refractive behaviors are confirmed by the measured spatial electric field maps. This work offers new opportunities for the development of ferrite-based metamaterials. PMID:24553188

  1. Negative and near zero refraction metamaterials based on permanent magnetic ferrites.

    PubMed

    Bi, Ke; Guo, Yunsheng; Zhou, Ji; Dong, Guoyan; Zhao, Hongjie; Zhao, Qian; Xiao, Zongqi; Liu, Xiaoming; Lan, Chuwen

    2014-02-20

    Ferrite metamaterials based on the negative permeability of ferromagnetic resonance in ferrites are of great interest. However, such metamaterials face a limitation that the ferromagnetic resonance can only take place while an external magnetic field applied. Here, we demonstrate a metamaterial based on permanent magnetic ferrite which exhibits not only negative refraction but also near zero refraction without applied magnetic field. The wedge-shaped and slab-shaped structures of permanent magnetic ferrite-based metamaterials were prepared and the refraction properties were measured in a near-field scanning system. The negative and near zero refractive behaviors are confirmed by the measured spatial electric field maps. This work offers new opportunities for the development of ferrite-based metamaterials.

  2. R&D of low activation ferritic steels for fusion in japanese universities*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohyama, Akira; Kohno, Yutaka; Asakura, Kentaro; Kayano, Hideo

    1994-09-01

    Following the brief review of the R&D of low activation ferritic steels in Japanese universities, the status of 9Cr-2W type ferritic steels development is presented. The main emphasis is on mechanical property changes by fast neutron irradiation in FFTF. Bend test, tensile test, CVN test and in-reactor creep results are provided including some data about low activation ferritic steels with Cr variation from 2.25 to 12%. The 9Cr-2W ferritic steel, denoted as JLF-1, showed excellent mechanical properties under fast neutron irradiation as high as 60 dpa. As potential materials for DEMO and beyond, innovative oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) quasi-amorphous low activation ferritic steels are introduced. The baseline properties, microstructural evolution under ion irradiation and the recent progress of new processes are provided.

  3. Interaction between Subunits of Heterodimeric Splicing Factor U2AF Is Essential In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rudner, David Z.; Kanaar, Roland; Breger, Kevin S.; Rio, Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    The heterodimeric pre-mRNA splicing factor, U2AF (U2 snRNP auxiliary factor), plays a critical role in 3′ splice site selection. Although the U2AF subunits associate in a tight complex, biochemical experiments designed to address the requirement for both subunits in splicing have yielded conflicting results. We have taken a genetic approach to assess the requirement for the Drosophila U2AF heterodimer in vivo. We developed a novel Escherichia coli copurification assay to map the domain on the Drosophila U2AF large subunit (dU2AF50) that interacts with the Drosophila small subunit (dU2AF38). A 28-amino-acid fragment on dU2AF50 that is both necessary and sufficient for interaction with dU2AF38 was identified. Using the copurification assay, we scanned this 28-amino-acid interaction domain for mutations that abrogate heterodimer formation. A collection of these dU2AF50 point mutants was then tested in vivo for genetic complementation of a recessive lethal dU2AF50 allele. A mutation that completely abolished interaction with dU2AF38 was incapable of complementation, whereas dU2AF50 mutations that did not effect heterodimer formation rescued the recessive lethal dU2AF50 allele. Analysis of heterodimer formation in embryo extracts derived from these interaction mutant lines revealed a perfect correlation between the efficiency of subunit association and the ability to complement the dU2AF50 recessive lethal allele. These data indicate that Drosophila U2AF heterodimer formation is essential for viability in vivo, consistent with a requirement for both subunits in splicing in vitro. PMID:9528748

  4. Effects of MgO Nanoparticle Additions on the Structure and Mechanical Properties of Continuously Cast Steel Billets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiangzhou; Yang, Shufeng; Li, Jingshe; Yang, Yindong; Chattopadhyay, Kinnor; McLean, Alex

    2016-01-01

    A new approach for pre-dispersing MgO nanoparticles and adding them to molten steel during continuous casting operations was established. The influence of different mass fractions of MgO nanoparticles on inclusion characteristics, steel microstructure, and the ability of inclusions to induce acicular ferrite (AF) formation, was investigated. The results revealed that after adding different mass fractions of nanoparticles, the majority of inclusions contained MgO-Al2O3, and the inclusion size was considerably refined. These inclusions promoted AF formation, and with increasing inclusion size from 1.0 to 1.8 μm, the proportion of AF progressively increased. The ability of inclusions to induce AF was greatly reduced when the inclusion size reached 7.0 μm. This was primarily due to the relationship between the ferrite nucleation rate and inclusion size. It was also found that the size of inclusions that functioned as pinning particles was larger than that of inclusions that served as AF nucleation cores. When the mass fraction of MgO nanoparticles reached 0.05 pct, the degree of interlocking of AF within the microstructure of billet specimens was maximized and this was associated with optimal values for strength and impact properties.

  5. In situ fabrication and characterization of cobalt ferrite nanorods/graphene composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Min; Jiao, Qingze; Zhao, Yun

    2013-12-15

    Cobalt ferrite nanorods/graphene composites were prepared by a one-step hydrothermal process using NaHSO{sub 3} as the reducing agent and 1-propyl-3-hexadecylimidazolium bromide as the structure growth-directing template. The reduction of graphene oxide and the in situ formation of cobalt ferrite nanorods were accomplished in a one-step reaction. The structure and morphology of as-obtained composites were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscope, X-ray diffractometer, Fourier transform infrared spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Uniform rod-like cobalt ferrites with diameters of about 100 nm and length of about 800 nm were homogeneously distributed on the graphene sheets. The hybrid materials showed a saturation magnetization of 42.5 emu/g and coercivity of 495.1 Oe at room temperature. The electromagnetic parameters were measured using a vector network analyzer. A minimum reflection loss (RL) of − 25.8 dB was observed at 16.1 GHz for the cobalt ferrite nanorods/graphene composites with a thickness of 2 mm, and the effective absorption frequency (RL < − 10 dB) ranged from 13.5 to 18.0 GHz. The composites exhibited better absorbing properties than the cobalt ferrite nanorods and the mixture of cobalt ferrite nanorods and graphene. - Highlights: • Reduction of GO and formation of ferrites were accomplished in a one-step reaction. • Ionic liquid was used to control 1D growth of ferrite nanorods for the first time. • Cobalt ferrite nanorods/graphene composites showed dielectric and magnetic loss. • Cobalt ferrite nanorods/graphene composites exhibited better absorbing properties.

  6. Morphological Stability of δ-Ferrite/γ Interphase Boundary in Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Guowei; Chen, Shuying; Yue, Xudong; Li, Qingchun

    2017-01-01

    The morphological changes of the δ-ferrite/γ interphase boundary have been observed in situ with a high-temperature confocal scanning laser microscope (HTCSLM) during δ/γ transformations (δ → γ and γ → δ) of Fe-0.06 wt pct C-0.6 wt pct Mn alloy, and a kinetic equation of morphological stability of δ-ferrite/γ interphase boundary has been established. Thereafter, the criterion expression for morphological stability of δ-ferrite/γ interphase boundary was established and discussed, and the critical migration speeds of δ-ferrite/γ interphase boundaries are calculated in Fe-C, Fe-Ni, and Fe-Cr alloys. The results indicate that the δ-ferrite/γ interphase boundary is very stable and nearly remains absolute planar all the time during γ → δ transformation in Fe-C alloy. The δ-ferrite/γ interphase boundary remains basically planar during δ → γ transformation when the migration speed is lower than 0.88 μm/s, and the interphase boundary will be unstable and exhibit a finger-like morphology when the migration speed is higher than 0.88 μm/s. The morphological stability of δ-ferrite/γ interphase boundary is primarily controlled by the interface energy and the solute concentration gradient at the front of the boundary. During the constant temperature phase transformation, an opposite temperature gradient on both sides of δ-ferrite/γ interphase boundary weakens the steady effect of the temperature gradient on the boundary. The theoretical analysis of the morphological stability of the δ-ferrite/γ interphase boundary is coincident with the observed experimental results utilizing the HTCSLM. There is a good agreement between the theoretical calculation of the critical moving velocities of δ-ferrite/γ interphase boundaries and the experimental results.

  7. Morphological Stability of δ-Ferrite/ γ Interphase Boundary in Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Guowei; Chen, Shuying; Yue, Xudong; Li, Qingchun

    2017-04-01

    The morphological changes of the δ-ferrite/ γ interphase boundary have been observed in situ with a high-temperature confocal scanning laser microscope (HTCSLM) during δ/ γ transformations ( δ → γ and γ → δ) of Fe-0.06 wt pct C-0.6 wt pct Mn alloy, and a kinetic equation of morphological stability of δ-ferrite/ γ interphase boundary has been established. Thereafter, the criterion expression for morphological stability of δ-ferrite/ γ interphase boundary was established and discussed, and the critical migration speeds of δ-ferrite/ γ interphase boundaries are calculated in Fe-C, Fe-Ni, and Fe-Cr alloys. The results indicate that the δ-ferrite/ γ interphase boundary is very stable and nearly remains absolute planar all the time during γ → δ transformation in Fe-C alloy. The δ-ferrite/ γ interphase boundary remains basically planar during δ → γ transformation when the migration speed is lower than 0.88 μm/s, and the interphase boundary will be unstable and exhibit a finger-like morphology when the migration speed is higher than 0.88 μm/s. The morphological stability of δ-ferrite/ γ interphase boundary is primarily controlled by the interface energy and the solute concentration gradient at the front of the boundary. During the constant temperature phase transformation, an opposite temperature gradient on both sides of δ-ferrite/ γ interphase boundary weakens the steady effect of the temperature gradient on the boundary. The theoretical analysis of the morphological stability of the δ-ferrite/ γ interphase boundary is coincident with the observed experimental results utilizing the HTCSLM. There is a good agreement between the theoretical calculation of the critical moving velocities of δ-ferrite/ γ interphase boundaries and the experimental results.

  8. Structure and magnetic properties of rf thermally plasma synthesized Mn and Mn-Zn ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, S.; Swaminathan, R.; McHenry, M. E.

    2003-05-01

    Plasma synthesis has previously been shown to be a viable route to producing nanocrystalline magnetite and Ni ferrite nanoparticles. In this work nanocrystalline powders of Mn and Mn-Zn ferrites have been synthesized using a 50 kW-3 MHz rf (radio frequency) induction plasma torch. We investigate these materials for soft magnetic applications. High-energy ball milled Mn + Fe powders and (Mn+Zn) +Fe powders (<10 μm) in the stoichiometric ratio of 1:2 were used as precursors for the ferrite synthesis. Compressed air was used in the oxygen source for oxidation of metal species in the plasma. X-ray diffraction patterns for the plasma-torched Mn ferrite and MnZn ferrite powders were indexed to the spinel ferrite crystal structure. An average grain size of ˜20 nm was determined from Scherrer analysis confirmed by transmission electron microscopy studies. The particles also exhibited faceted polygonal growth forms with the associated truncated cuboctahedral shapes. Room-temperature vibrating sample magnetometer measurements of the hysteretic response revealed saturation magnetization Ms and coercivity Hc of Mn ferrite are 23.65 emu/g and 20 Oe, respectively. The Néel temperatures of Mn ferrite powders before and after annealing (500 °C, 30 min) were determined to be 200 and 360 °C, respectively. Inductively coupled plasma chemical analysis and energy dispersive x-ray analysis data on the plasma-torched powders indicated deviations in the Mn or Zn contents than the ideal stoichiometry. MnZn ferrite was observed to have a Néel temperature increased by almost 400 °C as compared with as-synthesized Mn ferrite but with a larger coercivity of ˜35 Oe.

  9. Oxidative stress mediated apoptosis induced by nickel ferrite nanoparticles in cultured A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Ahmad, Javed; Musarrat, Javed; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; AlSalhi, Mohamad S; Alrokayan, Salman A

    2011-05-10

    Due to the interesting magnetic and electrical properties with good chemical and thermal stabilities, nickel ferrite nanoparticles are being utilized in many applications including magnetic resonance imaging, drug delivery and hyperthermia. Recent studies have shown that nickel ferrite nanoparticles produce cytotoxicity in mammalian cells. However, there is very limited information concerning the toxicity of nickel ferrite nanoparticles at the cellular and molecular level. The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and apoptosis induction by well-characterized nickel ferrite nanoparticles (size 26 nm) in human lung epithelial (A549) cells. Nickel ferrite nanoparticles induced dose-dependent cytotoxicity in A549 cells demonstrated by MTT, NRU and LDH assays. Nickel ferrite nanoparticles were also found to induce oxidative stress evidenced by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depletion of antioxidant glutathione (GSH). Further, co-treatment with the antioxidant L-ascorbic acid mitigated the ROS generation and GSH depletion due to nickel ferrite nanoparticles suggesting the potential mechanism of oxidative stress. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis demonstrated that following the exposure of A549 cells to nickel ferrite nanoparticles, the level of mRNA expressions of cell cycle checkpoint protein p53 and apoptotic proteins (bax, caspase-3 and caspase-9) were significantly up-regulated, whereas the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins (survivin and bcl-2) were down-regulated. Moreover, activities of caspase-3 and caspase-9 enzymes were also significantly higher in nickel ferrite nanoparticles exposed cells. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report showing that nickel ferrite nanoparticles induced apoptosis in A549 cells through ROS generation and oxidative stress via p53, survivin, bax/bcl-2 and caspase pathways.

  10. The Role of U2AF1 Mutations in the Pathogenesis of Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    to U2AF1(WT). We validated several homologous dysregulated junctions (i.e., across species) in MDS patient bone marrow samples that have mutant ...U2AF1(S34F) versus U2AF1(WT). Together, these results suggest that mutant U2AF1 expression contributes to the altered hematopoiesis and pre-mRNA...whether the U2AF1(S34F) mutation alters hematopoiesis in vivo. We will inducibly express wild-type and S34F mutant (resulting from the most common

  11. Characterization of physically vapor deposited AF2400 thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, R.; Spragge, M.K.; Loomis, G.E.; Rainer, F.; Ward, R.; Thomas, I.M.; Kozlowski, M.R.

    1993-11-01

    Anti-reflective coatings made with Teflon AF2400 had the highest damage thresholds recorded for physical vapor deposited coatings at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory damage facility. Physical vapor deposited layers of Teflon AF2400, a perfluorinated amorphous polymer, maintained the bulk optical properties of a high transmittance from 200 nm to 1600 nm, and a low refractive index. In addition, the refractive index can be intentionally reduced by control of two common deposition parameters, deposition rate and substrate temperature. Scanning electron microscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance observations indicated that morphological changes caused the variations in the refractive index rather than compositional changes. The coatings adhered to fused silica and silicon wafers under normal laboratory handling conditions.

  12. Gymnasterkoreaynes A-F, cytotoxic polyacetylenes from Gymnaster koraiensis.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyun-Ju; Min, Byung-Sun; Park, Jin-Young; Kim, Young-Ho; Lee, Hyeong-Kyu; Bae, Ki-Hwan

    2002-06-01

    Six new polyacetylenes, gymnasterkoreaynes A-F (1-6), were isolated from the roots of Gymnaster koraiensis, together with 2,9,16-heptadecatrien-4,6-diyn-8-ol (7) and 1,9,16-heptadecatriene-4,6-diyn-3,8-diol (8), by bioassay-guided fractionation using the L1210 tumor cell line as a model for cytotoxicity. The structures of compounds 1-6 were established spectroscopically, which included 2D NMR experiments. Gymnasterkoreaynes A-F (1-6) are linear diacetylenes and are structurally related to falcarinol, panaxynol, panaxydiol, and panaxytriol. Of the compounds isolated, gymnasterkoreaynes B (2), C (3), F (6), and 1,9,16-heptadecatrien-4,6-diyn-3,8-diol (8) exhibited significant cytotoxicity against L1210 tumor cells with ED(50) values of 0.12-3.3 microg/mL.

  13. Exchange coupling between soft magnetic ferrite and hard ferromagnetic Sm2Fe17N3 in ferrite/Sm2Fe17N3 composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imaoka, N.; Kakimoto, E.; Takagi, K.; Ozaki, K.; Tada, M.; Nakagawa, T.; Abe, M.

    2016-05-01

    In our previous work, we succeeded in fabricating ferrite/Sm2Fe17N3 composite magnets from explosive-consolidating Sm2Fe17N3 powders (2μm size) which were coated with a continuous iron ferrite layer (50nm thick) in an aqueous solution. The magnetization curves had no inflection, which suggests that the soft magnetic ferrite layer is exchange-coupled with the hard ferromagnetic Sm2Fe17N3 particles. In this paper, we provide evidence of exchange coupling in ferrite/Sm2Fe17N3 composites by the following means: 1) measurements of recoil permeability, 2) detailed microstructural observation and 3) calculations of the reduction in remanence due to the introduction of a ferrite layer in the Sm2Fe17N3 magnets. Our ferrite/Sm2Fe17N3 composite magnets are a novel type of spring magnet in which an insulating soft magnetic phase is exchange-coupled with hard magnetic phase.

  14. Optimization and testing results of Zr-bearing ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Yang, Ying; Tyburska-Puschel, Beata; Sridharan, K.

    2014-09-01

    The mission of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program is to develop crosscutting technologies for nuclear energy applications. Advanced structural materials with superior performance at elevated temperatures are always desired for nuclear reactors, which can improve reactor economics, safety margins, and design flexibility. They benefit not only new reactors, including advanced light water reactors (LWRs) and fast reactors such as sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) that is primarily designed for management of high-level wastes, but also life extension of the existing fleet when component exchange is needed. Developing and utilizing the modern materials science tools (experimental, theoretical, and computational tools) is an important path to more efficient alloy development and process optimization. Ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels are important structural materials for nuclear reactors due to their advantages over other applicable materials like austenitic stainless steels, notably their resistance to void swelling, low thermal expansion coefficients, and higher thermal conductivity. However, traditional FM steels exhibit a noticeable yield strength reduction at elevated temperatures above ~500°C, which limits their applications in advanced nuclear reactors which target operating temperatures at 650°C or higher. Although oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels have shown excellent high-temperature performance, their extremely high cost, limited size and fabricability of products, as well as the great difficulty with welding and joining, have limited or precluded their commercial applications. Zirconium has shown many benefits to Fe-base alloys such as grain refinement, improved phase stability, and reduced radiation-induced segregation. The ultimate goal of this project is, with the aid of computational modeling tools, to accelerate the development of a new generation of Zr-bearing ferritic alloys to be fabricated using conventional

  15. The magnetic properties of aligned M hexa-ferrite fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullar, R. C.; Bhattacharya, A. K.

    2006-05-01

    Aligned and random fibres of strontium hexaferrite (SrM, SrFe 12O 19) and barium hexaferrite (BaM, BaFe 12O 19) were manufactured by blow spinning from an aqueous inorganic sol-gel precursor, which was then fired to give the hexagonal ferrite fibre. Their magnetic properties were studied by VSM, investigating the evolution of these properties with firing and measurement temperature, and in particular the effects of fibre alignment. It has been predicted that aligned ferrite fibres will demonstrate an enhanced magnetisation along the axis of alignment with respect to perpendicular to the axis, and this has been demonstrated here for the first time. The optimum firing temperature was 1000 °C, at which point they still had submicron grains. In BaM random fibres Ms=63.8 emu g -1 and Hc=428.1 kA m -1, and in SrM random fibres Ms=63.3 emu g -1 and Hc=452.8 kA m -1, high values for polycrystalline materials. Fibres aligned parallel to the applied field had saturation magnetisation ( Ms) values equal to those of the random fibres, whilst fibres aligned perpendicular to the field had Ms values 62% and 75% lower, for BaM and SrM, respectively. There was no change in coercivity ( Hc) between random or aligned fibres of any orientation, and fibres aligned 45° and parallel to H appeared identical. Therefore, properties along the axis of alignment were superior when compared to measurements perpendicular to the axis of alignment, giving a directionality to the magnetisation in an otherwise randomly oriented ferrite material.

  16. Improved AF Squadron Command Structure for Leadership, Accountability, and Efficiency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-20

    of Defense respectively focus on span of control. The concept of span of control was developed in 1922 by Sir Ian Hamilton based on the assumption...For the AF, this means squadrons must be organized across a wing to minimize inconsistency within units as well as across them. A study by Dewar ... Dewar , Robert D., and Simet, Donald P. “A Level Specific Prediction of Spans of Control Examining the Effects of Size, Technology, and

  17. Adiabatic Compression Sensitivity of AF-M315E

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    the development of green rocket propellants . The Air Force Research Laboratory’s (AFRL) monopropellant, AF-M315E, has been selected for...art rocket fuels and propellants . A known quantity of liquid propellant is placed in a metal U-tube and held isothermally in a preheated mixture of... Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) program. As the propulsion system developed by Aerojet- Rocketdyne for this propellant advances in maturity, studies

  18. Installation Restoration Program. Records Search, Newark AFS, Ohio

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    plants. In this assignment and all that follow, a part of each was spent in conducting health and environment compliance inspections and audits at mili...OH 434&33 EiLO)( 2 bJATEP SYSTE-M, KTTC𔃻EN TAP, ’DATE: 76-P6-16*’.TI- E: 1304.1, APPEA0AfJCE OF SbmPLE CLEAR, TEA;:, 72 I PFE -ULTS OF ANALYS15 C T

  19. Genomic functions of U2AF in constitutive and regulated splicing.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tongbin; Fu, Xiang-Dong

    2015-01-01

    The U2AF heterodimer is generally accepted to play a vital role in defining functional 3' splice sites in pre-mRNA splicing. Given prevalent mutations in U2AF, particularly in the U2AF1 gene (which encodes for the U2AF35 subunit) in blood disorders and other human cancers, there are renewed interests in these classic splicing factors to further understand their regulatory functions in RNA metabolism in both physiological and disease settings. We recently reported that U2AF has a maximal capacity to directly bind ˜88% of functional 3' splice sites in the human genome and that numerous U2AF binding events also occur in various exonic and intronic locations, thus providing additional mechanisms for the regulation of alternative splicing besides their traditional role in titrating weak splice sites in the cell. These findings, coupled with the existence of multiple related proteins to both U2AF65 and U2AF35, beg a series of questions on the universal role of U2AF in functional 3' splice site definition, their binding specificities in vivo, potential mechanisms to bypass their requirement for certain intron removal events, contribution of splicing-independent functions of U2AF to important cellular functions, and the mechanism for U2AF mutations to invoke specific diseases in humans.

  20. Durable Superhydrophobic Surfaces via Spontaneous Wrinkling of Teflon AF.

    PubMed

    Scarratt, Liam R J; Hoatson, Ben S; Wood, Elliot S; Hawkett, Brian S; Neto, Chiara

    2016-03-01

    We report the fabrication of both single-scale and hierarchical superhydrophobic surfaces, created by exploiting the spontaneous wrinkling of a rigid Teflon AF film on two types of shrinkable plastic substrates. Sub-100 nm to micrometric wrinkles were reproducibly generated by this simple process, with remarkable control over the size and hierarchy. Hierarchical Teflon AF wrinkled surfaces showed extremely high water repellence (contact angle 172°) and very low contact angle hysteresis (2°), resulting in droplets rolling off the surface at tilt angles lower than 5°. The wrinkling process intimately binds the Teflon AF layer with its substrate, making these surfaces mechanically robust, as revealed by macroscale and nanoscale wear tests: hardness values were close to that of commercial optical lenses and aluminum films, resistance to scratch was comparable to commercial hydrophobic coatings, and damage by extensive sonication did not significantly affect water repellence. By this fabrication method the size of the wrinkles can be reproducibly tuned from the nanoscale to the microscale, across the whole surface in one step; the fabrication procedure is extremely rapid, requiring only 2 min of thermal annealing to produce the desired topography, and uses inexpensive materials. The very low roll-off angles achieved in the hierarchical surfaces offer a potentially up-scalable alternative as self-cleaning and drag-reducing coatings.

  1. Size dependence of magnetorheological properties of cobalt ferrite ferrofluid

    SciTech Connect

    Radhika, B.; Sahoo, Rasmita; Srinath, S.

    2015-06-24

    Cobalt Ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized using co-precipitation method at reaction temperatures of 40°C and 80°C. X-Ray diffraction studies confirm cubic phase formation. The average crystallite sizes were found to be ∼30nm and ∼48nm for 40°C sample and 80°C sample respectively. Magnetic properties measured using vibrating sample magnetometer show higher coercivety and magnetization for sample prepared at 80°C. Magnetorheological properties of CoFe2O4 ferrofluids were measured and studied.

  2. R-SQUARE IMPEDANCES OF ERL FERRITE HOM ABSORBER.

    SciTech Connect

    HAHN, H.; BURRILL, A.; CALAGA,R.; KAYRAN, D.; ZHAO, Y.

    2005-07-10

    An R&D facility for an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) intended as part of an electron-cooling project for RHIC is, being constructed at this laboratory. The center piece of the facility is a 5-cell 703.75 MHz super-conducting RF linac. Successful operation will depend on effective HOM damping. It is planned to achieve HOM damping exclusively with ferrite absorbers. The performance of a prototype absorber was measured by transforming it into a resonant cavity and alternatively by a conventional wire method. The results expressed as a surface or R-square impedance are presented in this paper.

  3. SELECTIVE SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM FERRITIC STAINLESS STEELS

    DOEpatents

    Beaver, R.J.; Cherubini, J.H.

    1963-05-14

    A process is described for separating uranium from a nuclear fuel element comprising a uranium-containing core and a ferritic stainless steel clad by heating said element in a non-carburizing atmosphere at a temperature in the range 850-1050 un. Concent 85% C, rapidly cooling the heated element through the temperature range 815 un. Concent 85% to 650 EC to avoid annealing said steel, and then contacting the cooled element with an aqueous solution of nitric acid to selectively dissolve the uranium. (AEC)

  4. Electrical and magnetic properties of nano-sized magnesium ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    T, Smitha; X, Sheena; J, Binu P.; Mohammed, E. M.

    2015-02-01

    Nano-sized magnesium ferrite was synthesized using sol-gel techniques. Structural characterization was done using X-ray diffractometer and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer. Vibration Sample Magnetometer was used to record the magnetic measurements. XRD analysis reveals the prepared sample is single phasic without any impurity. Particle size calculation shows the average crystallite size of the sample is 19nm. FTIR analysis confirmed spinel structure of the prepared samples. Magnetic measurement study shows that the sample is ferromagnetic with high degree of isotropy. Hysterisis loop was traced at temperatures 100K and 300K. DC electrical resistivity measurements show semiconducting nature of the sample.

  5. Stability of Waves in Semiconductor-Ferrite-Metamaterials Waveguide Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabat, M. M.; Hamada, M. S.; El-Astal, A. H.; Mohammad, H. A. H.

    In recent years, the properties of electromagnetic waves propagating in various waveguide structures containing metamaterials have attracted increasing and growing attention. In this paper, the propagation of electromagnetic waves in a layered structure consisting of ferrite film bounded by a semiconductor cover and a metamaterial substrate was analyzed and discussed. The stability of magnetostatic surface waves through mentioned three waveguide structures has been obtained by implementing the perturbation method and the lighthill criteria has also been checked to find out the possibility of existence of magnetostatic envelope Solitons.

  6. Magnetic tuning of electrically resonant metamaterial with inclusion of ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Lei; Zhao, Qian; Zhao, Hongjie; Zhou, Ji

    2008-10-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a magnetic tuning of electrically resonant metamaterial (EMM) at microwave frequencies by introducing microwave ferrite rods into the periodic array of electrically resonant element. Different from those based on controlling the capacitance of equivalent LC circuit, this tunability arises from a mechanism of magnetically tuning the inductance of resonant element via the active ambient effective permeability. For magnetic fields from 0 to 5000 Oe, resonance frequency of the EMM can be continuously and reversibly tuned in a range of about 800 MHz. The active effective permittivity has also been investigated through the simulated scattering parameters.

  7. Processing and Characterization of Cobalt-Zinc Nano Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Ritu; Thakur, Sangeeta; Singh, M.

    2011-07-01

    Co(1-x)ZnxFe2O4 (x = 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4) nano magnetic systems were prepared by solution combustion method. The powder samples are characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The average crystallite sizes of the prepared sample obtained from XRD are well consistent with particle size obtained from TEM images. Fourier transform confirm the spinel phase structure of cobalt zinc ferrite. Mössbauer spectra indicate that sample with 40% zinc concentration exhibits the collective magnetic excitations.

  8. Modeling the austenite decomposition into ferrite and bainite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazeli, Fateh

    2005-12-01

    Novel advanced high-strength steels such as dual-phase (DP) and transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steels, are considered as promising materials for new generation of lightweight vehicles. The superior mechanical properties of these steels, compared to classical high strength steels, are associated with their complex microstructures. The desired phase configuration and morphology can only be achieved through well-controlled processing paths with rather tight processing windows. To implement such challenging processing stages into the current industrial facilities a significant amount of development efforts, in terms of mill trials, have to be performed. Alternatively, process models as predictive tools can be employed to aid the process development' and also to design new steel grades. Knowledge-based process models are developed by virtue of the underlying physical phenomena occurring during the industrial processing and are validated with experimental data. The goal of the present work is to develop an integrated microstructure model to adequately describe the kinetics of austenite decomposition into polygonal ferrite and bainite, such that for complex thermal paths simulating those of industrial practice, the final microstructure in advanced high strength steels can reasonably be predicted. This is in particular relevant to hot-rolled DP and TRIP steels, where the intercritical ferrite evolution due to its crucial influence on the onset and kinetics of the subsequent bainite formation, has to be quantified precisely. The calculated fraction, size and spatial carbon distribution of the intercritical austenite are employed as input to characterize adequately the kinetic of the bainite reaction. Pertinent to ferrite formation, a phenomenological, physically-based model was developed on the ground of the mixed-mode approach. The model deals with the growth stage since nucleation site saturation at prior austenite grain boundaries is likely to be attained

  9. Corrosion Performance of Ferritic Steel for SOFC Interconnect Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Jablonski, P.D.; Alman, D.E.

    2006-11-01

    Ferritic stainless steels have been identified as potential candidates for interconnects in planar-type solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) operating below 800ºC. Crofer 22 APU was selected for this study. It was studied under simulated SOFC-interconnect dual environment conditions with humidified air on one side of the sample and humidified hydrogen on the other side at 750ºC. The surfaces of the oxidized samples were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with microanalytical capabilities. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was also used in this study.

  10. Size dependence of magnetorheological properties of cobalt ferrite ferrofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhika, B.; Sahoo, Rasmita; Srinath, S.

    2015-06-01

    Cobalt Ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized using co-precipitation method at reaction temperatures of 40°C and 80°C. X-Ray diffraction studies confirm cubic phase formation. The average crystallite sizes were found to be ˜30nm and ˜48nm for 40°C sample and 80°C sample respectively. Magnetic properties measured using vibrating sample magnetometer show higher coercivety and magnetization for sample prepared at 80°C. Magnetorheological properties of CoFe2O4 ferrofluids were measured and studied.

  11. Room temperature texturing of austenite/ferrite steel by electropulsing

    PubMed Central

    Rahnama, Alireza; Qin, Rongshan

    2017-01-01

    The work reports an experimental observation on crystal rotation in a duplex (austenite + ferrite) steel induced by the electropulsing treatment at ambient temperature, while the temperature rising due to ohmic heating in the treatment was negligible. The results demonstrate that electric current pulses are able to dissolve the initial material’s texture that has been formed in prior thermomechanical processing and to produce an alternative texture. The results were explained in terms of the instability of an interface under perturbation during pulsed electromigation. PMID:28195181

  12. Room temperature texturing of austenite/ferrite steel by electropulsing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahnama, Alireza; Qin, Rongshan

    2017-02-01

    The work reports an experimental observation on crystal rotation in a duplex (austenite + ferrite) steel induced by the electropulsing treatment at ambient temperature, while the temperature rising due to ohmic heating in the treatment was negligible. The results demonstrate that electric current pulses are able to dissolve the initial material’s texture that has been formed in prior thermomechanical processing and to produce an alternative texture. The results were explained in terms of the instability of an interface under perturbation during pulsed electromigation.

  13. Wild-Type U2AF1 Antagonizes the Splicing Program Characteristic of U2AF1-Mutant Tumors and Is Required for Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Dennis Liang; Motowski, Hayley; Chatrikhi, Rakesh; Gao, Shaojian; Kielkopf, Clara L.; Varmus, Harold

    2016-01-01

    We have asked how the common S34F mutation in the splicing factor U2AF1 regulates alternative splicing in lung cancer, and why wild-type U2AF1 is retained in cancers with this mutation. A human lung epithelial cell line was genetically modified so that U2AF1S34F is expressed from one of the two endogenous U2AF1 loci. By altering levels of mutant or wild-type U2AF1 in this cell line and by analyzing published data on human lung adenocarcinomas, we show that S34F-associated changes in alternative splicing are proportional to the ratio of S34F:wild-type gene products and not to absolute levels of either the mutant or wild-type factor. Preferential recognition of specific 3′ splice sites in S34F-expressing cells is largely explained by differential in vitro RNA-binding affinities of mutant versus wild-type U2AF1 for those same 3′ splice sites. Finally, we show that lung adenocarcinoma cell lines bearing U2AF1 mutations do not require the mutant protein for growth in vitro or in vivo. In contrast, wild-type U2AF1 is required for survival, regardless of whether cells carry the U2AF1S34F allele. Our results provide mechanistic explanations of the magnitude of splicing changes observed in U2AF1-mutant cells and why tumors harboring U2AF1 mutations always retain an expressed copy of the wild-type allele. PMID:27776121

  14. Surface chemistry, friction and wear of Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites in contact with metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy analysis were used in sliding friction experiments. These experiments were conducted with hot-pressed polycrystalline Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites, and single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrite in contact with various transition metals at room temperature in both vacuum and argon. The results indicate that Ni2O3 and Fe3O4 were present on the Ni-Zn ferrite surface in addition to the nominal bulk constituents, while MnO2 and Fe3O4 were present on the Mn-Zn ferrite surface in addition to the nominal bulk constituents. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites in contact with metals were related to the relative chemical activity of these metals. The more active the metal, the higher is the coefficient of friction. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites were correlated with the free energy of formation of the lowest metal oxide. The interfacial bond can be regarded as a chemical bond between the metal atoms and the oxygen anions in the ferrite surfaces. The adsorption of oxygen on clean metal and ferrite does strengthen the metal-ferrite contact and increase the friction. The ferrites exhibit local cracking and fracture with sliding under adhesive conditions. All the metals transferred to he surfaces of the ferrites in sliding.

  15. Influence of high temperature pre-deformation on the dissolution rate of delta ferrites in martensitic heat-resistant steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junru; Liu, Jianjun; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Chaolei; Liu, Yazheng

    2017-03-01

    The dissolution process of delta ferrites and the influence of high temperature pre-deformation on the dissolution rate of delta ferrites in martensitic heat-resistant steel 10Cr12Ni3Mo2VN were studied by isothermal heating and thermal simulation experiments. The precipitation temperature of delta ferrites in experimental steel is about 1195 °C. M23C6-type carbides incline to precipitate and coarsen at the boundaries of delta ferrites below 930 °C, and can be rapidly dissolved by heating at 1180 °C. The percentage of delta ferrites gradually decreases with heating time. And a Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation was established to describe the dissolution process of delta ferrites at 1180 °C. High temperature pre-deformation can markedly increase the dissolution rate of delta ferrites. Pre-deformation can largely increase the interface area between delta ferrite and matrix and thus increase the unit-time diffusing quantities of alloying elements between delta ferrites and matrix. In addition, high temperature pre-deformation leads to dynamic recrystallization and increases the number of internal grain boundaries in the delta ferrites. This can also greatly increase the diffusing rate of alloying elements. In these cases, the dissolution of delta ferrites can be promoted.

  16. Surface chemistry, friction, and wear of Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites in contact with metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy analysis were used in sliding friction experiments. These experiments were conducted with hot-pressed polycrystalline Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites, and single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrite in contact with various transition metals at room temperature in both vacuum and argon. The results indicate that Ni2O3 and Fe3O4 were present on the Ni-Zn ferrite surface in addition to the nominal bulk constituents, while MnO2 and Fe3O4 were present on the Mn-Zn ferrite surface in addition to the nominal bulk constituents. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites in contact with metals were related to the relative chemical activity of these metals. The more active the metal, the higher is the coefficient of friction. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites were correlated with the free energy of formation of the lowest metal oxide. The interfacial bond can be regarded as a chemical bond between the metal atoms and the oxygen anions in the ferrite surfaces. The adsorption of oxygen on clean metal and ferrite does strengthen the metal-ferrite contact and increase the friction. The ferrites exhibit local cracking and fracture with sliding under adhesive conditions. All the metals transferred to the surfaces of the ferrites in sliding. Previously announced in STAR as N83-19901

  17. Influence of high temperature pre-deformation on the dissolution rate of delta ferrites in martensitic heat-resistant steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junru; Liu, Jianjun; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Chaolei; Liu, Yazheng

    2017-02-01

    The dissolution process of delta ferrites and the influence of high temperature pre-deformation on the dissolution rate of delta ferrites in martensitic heat-resistant steel 10Cr12Ni3Mo2VN were studied by isothermal heating and thermal simulation experiments. The precipitation temperature of delta ferrites in experimental steel is about 1195 °C. M23C6-type carbides incline to precipitate and coarsen at the boundaries of delta ferrites below 930 °C, and can be rapidly dissolved by heating at 1180 °C. The percentage of delta ferrites gradually decreases with heating time. And a Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation was established to describe the dissolution process of delta ferrites at 1180 °C. High temperature pre-deformation can markedly increase the dissolution rate of delta ferrites. Pre-deformation can largely increase the interface area between delta ferrite and matrix and thus increase the unit-time diffusing quantities of alloying elements between delta ferrites and matrix. In addition, high temperature pre-deformation leads to dynamic recrystallization and increases the number of internal grain boundaries in the delta ferrites. This can also greatly increase the diffusing rate of alloying elements. In these cases, the dissolution of delta ferrites can be promoted.

  18. Alternative splicing of U2AF1 reveals a shared repression mechanism for duplicated exons

    PubMed Central

    Kralovicova, Jana; Vorechovsky, Igor

    2017-01-01

    The auxiliary factor of U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (U2AF) facilitates branch point (BP) recognition and formation of lariat introns. The gene for the 35-kD subunit of U2AF gives rise to two protein isoforms (termed U2AF35a and U2AF35b) that are encoded by alternatively spliced exons 3 and Ab, respectively. The splicing recognition sequences of exon 3 are less favorable than exon Ab, yet U2AF35a expression is higher than U2AF35b across tissues. We show that U2AF35b repression is facilitated by weak, closely spaced BPs next to a long polypyrimidine tract of exon Ab. Each BP lacked canonical uridines at position -2 relative to the BP adenines, with efficient U2 base-pairing interactions predicted only for shifted registers reminiscent of programmed ribosomal frameshifting. The BP cluster was compensated by interactions involving unpaired cytosines in an upstream, EvoFold-predicted stem loop (termed ESL) that binds FUBP1/2. Exon Ab inclusion correlated with predicted free energies of mutant ESLs, suggesting that the ESL operates as a conserved rheostat between long inverted repeats upstream of each exon. The isoform-specific U2AF35 expression was U2AF65-dependent, required interactions between the U2AF-homology motif (UHM) and the α6 helix of U2AF35, and was fine-tuned by exon Ab/3 variants. Finally, we identify tandem homologous exons regulated by U2AF and show that their preferential responses to U2AF65-related proteins and SRSF3 are associated with unpaired pre-mRNA segments upstream of U2AF-repressed 3′ss. These results provide new insights into tissue-specific subfunctionalization of duplicated exons in vertebrate evolution and expand the repertoire of exon repression mechanisms that control alternative splicing. PMID:27566151

  19. Influence of particle size on the magnetic spectrum of NiCuZn ferrites for electromagnetic shielding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaohan; Yan, Shuoqing; Liu, Weihu; Feng, Zekun; Chen, Yajie; Harris, Vincent G.

    2016-03-01

    The effect of ferrite particle size on the magnetic spectra (1 MHz to 1 GHz) of NiCuZn polycrystalline ferrites doped with Co2O3 and Bi2O3 were systematically investigated. The experiments indicate that the ferrite particle size tailored by grinding time and corresponding sintering temperatures is crucial to achieving high permeability, high Q-factor and low magnetic loss, at 13.56 MHz for electromagnetic shielding applications especially in the near field communication (NFC) field. It is evident that high-performance NiZnCu ferrite materials are strongly tailored by morphology and microstructure. It is conclusive that fine ferrite particles and relatively low sintering temperatures are favorable to lowering magnetic loss and enhancing permeability. This work has built a foundation for improvement of the ferrite slurry used for fabrication of large area tape-casting ferrite sheets.

  20. Microstructural evolution of delta ferrite in SAVE12 steel under heat treatment and short-term creep

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shengzhi; Eliniyaz, Zumrat; Zhang, Lanting; Sun, Feng; Shen, Yinzhong; Shan, Aidang

    2012-11-15

    This research focused on the formation and microstructural evolution of delta ferrite phase in SAVE12 steel. The formation of delta ferrite was due to the high content of ferrite forming alloy elements such as Cr, W, and Ta. This was interpreted through either JMatPro-4.1 computer program or Cr{sub eq} calculations. Delta ferrite was found in bamboo-like shape and contained large amount of MX phase. It was surrounded by Laves phases before creep or aging treatment. Annealing treatments were performed under temperatures from 1050 Degree-Sign C to 1100 Degree-Sign C and various time periods to study its dissolution kinetics. The result showed that most of the delta ferrite can be dissolved by annealing in single phase austenitic region. Dissolution process of delta ferrite may largely depend on dissolution kinetic factors, rather than on thermodynamic factors. Precipitation behavior during short-term (1100 h) creep was investigated at temperature of 600 Degree-Sign C under a stress of 180 MPa. The results demonstrated that delta ferrite became preferential nucleation sites for Laves phase at the early stage of creep. Laves phase on the boundary around delta ferrite showed relatively slower growth and coarsening rate than that inside delta ferrite. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Delta ferrite is systematically studied under heat treatment and short-term creep. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Delta ferrite contains large number of MX phase and is surrounded by Laves phases before creep or aging treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation of delta ferrite is interpreted by theoretical and empirical methods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most of the delta ferrite is dissolved by annealing in single phase austenitic region. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Delta ferrite becomes preferential nucleation sites for Laves phase at the early stage of creep.

  1. Synthesis and thermal stability of polycrystalline new divalent [beta][double prime]- and [beta]-ferrites prepared by ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Kalogirou, O. Aristotle Univ., Thessaloniki )

    1993-02-01

    Using ion-exchange chemistry the divalent cations Ba[sup 2+], Sr[sup 2+], Ca[sup 2+], Mg[sup 2+], Cd[sup 2+], Pb[sup 2+], Co[sup 2+], Zn[sup 2+], Mn[sup 2+], Fe[sup 2+], and Sn[sup 2+] have been substituted for K[sup +] in polycrystalline CdO-stabilized K-[beta][double prime]-ferrite samples. Ba, Sr, Ca, Mg, Pb, and Cd ion exchange led to the synthesis of new materials, the divalent M[sup 2+]-[beta][double prime]-ferrites (M = Ba, Sr, Ca, Mg) and M[sup 2+]-[beta]-ferrites (M = Cd, Pb), respectively. Co[sup 2+]-diffusion resulted in the formation of a spinel-type Co-ferrite. In the case of Zn, Mn, Fe, and Sn the samples decomposed to [alpha]-Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3]. The thermal stability of the new divalent [beta][double prime]- and [beta]-ferrites was studied either by high-temperature exchange reactions or by air annealing of the exchanged products. Ba- and Sr-[beta][double prime]-ferrites and Pb-[beta]-ferrite converted to M-type hexagonal ferrites with the magnetoplumbite structure, Mg-[beta][double prime]-ferrite decomposed to a spinel-type Mg-ferrite, and Ca-[beta][double prime]-ferrite and Cd-[beta]-ferrite decomposed to [alpha]-Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3]. Composition, lattice parameters, SEM photographs, and magnetic properties of the ferrites formed are given. The magnetic susceptibilities of the divalent [beta][double prime]- or [beta]-ferrites have values between 0.63 and 1.14 [times] 10[sup [minus]4] emu/g[center dot]Oe at room temperature. 41 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  2. Monosemousness of Thermal Plastic Strain on Thermal Fatigue Life in Ferrite Ductile Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Morihito; Mouri, Hayato

    In this study, the monosemous effect of thermal plastic strain on the thermal fatigue life is newly found on ferrite ductile cast iron around the alpha phase field. At first, the monosemousness is defined and its meaning described. Next, the monosemousness of thermal fatigue is demonstrated by its conditional equation and its existence is verified by the thermal fatigue test on ferrite ductile cast iron. By doing so, the feature on the thermal fatigue of ferrite ductile cast iron is clarified. Generally, it is considered that fatigue life in ferrite-matrix temperature range can be expressed at least by two or more different Arrhenius equations, namely there are two or more different activation mechanisms to govern the thermal fatigue life corresponding to various ferrite temperature ranges. In this case, for determining the life in any various ferrite temperature ranges, it must have at least four or more unknown quantities. If there is the presence of a general equation which is able to replace above described plural equations, then the life can be determined by simple one variable. Here, by introducing conditional equations, it is verified that the general equation is a Coffin and Manson's equation of low cycle fatigue and whole thermal fatigue life can be determined by a variable of thermal plastic strain occurred in thermal cycle. As a result, the law can apply to describe thermal fatigue phenomenon and predict thermal fatigue life monosemously from cyclic thermal plastic strain on ductile cast iron with ferrite matrix.

  3. MnZn-ferrites: Targeted Material Design for New Emerging Application Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaspalis, V. T.; Tsakaloudi, V.; Kogias, G.

    2014-07-01

    In this article the main characteristics for emerging MnZn-ferrite applications are described on the basis of the new demands they possess on the ferrite material development. A number of recently developed MnZn-ferrite materials is presented together with the main scientific principles lying behind their development. These include: (i) high saturation flux density MnZn-ferrites (i.e. Bsat=550 mT at 10 kHz, 1200 A/m, 100°C), (ii) low power losses MnZn-ferrites (i.e. Pv~210 mW cm-3 at 100 kHz, 200mT, 100°C), (iii) MnZn-ferrites with broad temperature stability (i.e. PV<375 mW cm-3 for 25°Cferrites with high and frequency stable permeability (i.e. μi~12600 at 10 kHz, 0.1 mT, 25°C and tan(δ)/μi=20.5×10-6 at 100 kHz). In a final discussion the importance of defect chemistry for the time stability and stress sensitivity of the magnetic properties is discussed and some important issues are addressed, encountered during the transfer of a laboratory developed material to a large scale industrial production process.

  4. Field representations in uniaxial bianisotropic-ferrite medium by cylindrical vector wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Dajun; Lin, Weigan; Zhao, Yushen

    1995-04-01

    The uniaxial bianisotropic-ferrite medium is a generalization of the well-studied magnetically biased ferrite and uniaxial material. It can be manufactured either by immersing randomly oriented short helices and Ω-shaped particles in a magnetically biased ferrite, or by arranging short conductive helices in a magnetized ferrite in a certain manner. It has potential applications in microwave technology, antenna design, and antireflection shielding. In the present consideration, based on the concept of characteristic waves and the method of angular spectral expansion, field representations in uniaxial bianisotropic-ferrite medium are developed. The analysis reveals the solutions of source-free Maxwell's equations for uniaxial bianisotropic-ferrite medium can be represented in sum-integral forms of the circular cylindrical vector wave functions. The addition theorem of vector wave functions for uniaxial bianisotropic-ferrite medium can be straightforwardly derived from that of vector wave functions for isotropic medium. An application of the proposed theory in scattering is presented to show how to use these formulations in a practical way.

  5. An influence of a Glass Braze Composition on the Properties of Li-Ti Ferrite Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Panpan; Lin, Tiesong; He, Peng; Sekulic, Dusan P.; Zhao, Mengyuan; Wang, Shulei

    2017-04-01

    The influence of the chemical composition of Bi2O3-B2O3-SiO2-ZnO glass brazes on (i) the microstructure, (ii) the mechanical and (iii) the dielectric properties of Li-Ti ferrite joints was systematically investigated. The Bi5(Ti3Fe)O15 whisker and a white block phase consisting of Bi12SiO2 and Bi24B2O39 were observed in the joints of Li-Ti ferrite/Bi25-Ba and Li-Ti ferrite/glass brazes, respectively, containing a higher content of Bi2O3. No crystalline phase was detected in the Li-Ti ferrite/Bi25 and Li-Ti ferrite/Bi20 joints. The joint strength reached the maximum of 48 MPa in the Li-Ti ferrite/Bi25-Ba couples. It is assumed that this is mainly due to the strengthening effect of Bi5(Ti3Fe)O15 whiskers. The bonding temperature (700°C) had little effect on the dielectric properties of Li-Ti ferrite. Moreover, compared to the Bi25-Ba glass brazes, the Bi25 and Bi20 glass brazes had a less pronounced influence on the dielectric properties of joints. Different glass brazes can be tailored to different requirements depending on specific application and joint property requirements.

  6. Effect of filler loading of nickel zinc ferrite on the tensile properties of PLA nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahdan, Dalila; Ahmad, Sahrim Hj

    2013-05-01

    The mechanical strength of magnetic polymer nanocomposite (MPNC) of nickel zinc (NiZn) ferrite nanoparticles incorporated with polylactic acid (PLA) and liquid natural rubber (LNR) as compatibilizer is reported. The matrix was prepared from PLA and LNR in the ratio of 90:10. The MPNC were prepared at constant mixing temperature at 180°C, mixing time of 15 min. and mixing speed of 100 rpm. In order to achieve a good dispersion of NiZn ferrite in the matrix, firstly an ultrasonic treatment had been employed to mix the LNR and NiZn ferrite for 1 hour. The MPNC of PLA/LNR/NiZn ferrite then were prepared via Thermo Haake internal mixer using melt-blending method from different filler loading from 1-5 wt% NiZn ferrite. The result of tensile tests showed that as the filler loading increases the tensile strength also increases until an optimum value of filler loading was reached. The Young's modulus, tensile strength and elongation at break have also increased. The study proves that NiZn ferrite is excellent reinforcement filler in PLA matrix. Scanning electron micrograph (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were meant to show the homogeneity dispersion of nanoparticles within the matrix and to confirm the elemental composition of NiZn ferrites-PLA/LNR nanocomposites respectively.

  7. Studies on magnetic properties of chemically synthesized crystalline calcium ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, A.; Bera, A.; Chattopadhyay, K. K.; Saha, B.

    2016-05-01

    Spinel-type ferrites have taken a very important role for modern electronic industry. Most of these ferrites exhibit low-loss dielectric properties, high resistivity, low eddy current and also high temperature ferromagnetism. Calcium ferrite is one such important metal oxide which is environmentally safe, chemically stable, low cost and greatly abundant. This outstanding material of calcium ferrite is synthesized by a simple chemical precipitation method using NaOH as the precipitating agent. Ferric chloride anhydrous (FeCl3) and Calcium chloride dihydrate (CaCl2.2H2O) were used as iron and calcium sources respectively. The samples were heated at 200°C for 8h to obtain homogeneous powder of Calcium ferrite. The powders were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), Transmission electrical microscopy (TEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) measurements. The polycrystalline nature of the sample was confirmed by X-ray diffraction study. The magnetic properties of the sample were investigated by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) measurements. Magnetization curve of the prepared sample depicts that as synthesized calcium ferrite nanoparticles have saturation magnetic moment of 1.74 emu/g and the coercivity of 35.08 Oe with superparamagnetic behavior. The synthesized calcium ferrite nanoparticles with such magnetic properties will be a candidate material for different applications in electronics and exploring its functionality in the field of recently developing semiconductor device physics and spintronics.

  8. Chemical and physical characterizations of spinel ferrite nanoparticles containing Nd and B elements.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Takashi; Komorida, Yuki; Mito, Masaki; Takahara, Atsushi

    2010-05-15

    We first succeeded in synthesizing ferrite nanoparticles containing Nd and B elements by a chemical route using a polyol process. The lattice constants of the ferrite nanoparticles were equivalent to 8.39Å of the lattice constant for Fe(3)O(4) with the spinel structure in a bulk state independently of the size in diameter and composition (Fe:Nd:B). The size in diameter was actually dominated by the amount of ligands (oleic acid and oleylamine) coating the nanoparticles and easily tuned by changing refluxing-time under reaction. The spinel-structured ferrite nanoparticles containing Nd and B elements showed large coercivity as compared to Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles with the spinel structure, which were prepared by the same chemical method. By doping Nd and B elements into the spinel structure of ferrite, magnetic anisotropy increased in comparison with Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles. According to the analysis of magnetization curve using the modified Langevin function, the ferrite nanoparticles displayed the coexistence of superparamagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases. The ferrite nanoparticles containing Nd and B elements exhibited magnetic core/shell structure on the basis of various magnetic properties. The interface effect between the superparamagnetic core and antiferromagnetic shell might enhance the effective magnetic anisotropy of the ferrite nanoparticles containing Nd and B elements.

  9. Postirradiation thermocyclic loading of ferritic-martensitic structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaeva, L.; Orychtchenko, A.; Petersen, C.; Rybin, V.

    Thermonuclear fusion reactors of the Tokamak-type will be unique power engineering plants to operate in thermocyclic mode only. Ferritic-martensitic stainless steels are prime candidate structural materials for test blankets of the ITER fusion reactor. Beyond the radiation damage, thermomechanical cyclic loading is considered as the most detrimental lifetime limiting phenomenon for the above structure. With a Russian and a German facility for thermal fatigue testing of neutron irradiated materials a cooperation has been undertaken. Ampule devices to irradiate specimens for postirradiation thermal fatigue tests have been developed by the Russian partner. The irradiation of these ampule devices loaded with specimens of ferritic-martensitic steels, like the European MANET-II, the Russian 05K12N2M and the Japanese Low Activation Material F82H-mod, in a WWR-M-type reactor just started. A description of the irradiation facility, the qualification of the ampule device and the modification of the German thermal fatigue facility will be presented.

  10. Stability tests of permanent magnets built with strontium ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, H.D.; Brown, B.C.; Foster, G.W.; Fowler, W.B.; Gustafson, R.; Jackson, G.P.; Ostiguy, J.F.; Volk, J.T.

    1997-06-01

    Permanent magnets built using strontium ferrite bricks have been tested for stability against demagnetization. Ten test dipoles were built to monitor ferrite behavior under a variety of stressing conditions, including irradiation, mechanical shock, extreme thermal excursions, and long term magnetization stability. The test magnets were geometrically similar to, but much shorter than, the magnets built for the 8 GeV transfer line at FNAL. No loss of magnetization was observed for bricks exposed to a proton beam, and a magnet exposed to several Gigarads of Co{sup 60} gamma radiation suffered no measurable demagnetization. The magnet strength was observed to decrease logarithmically with time, consistent with the expected effect of thermal fluctuations. Irreversible demagnetization of {approx}0.1% was seen in cooling magnets to 0{degree}C, and the loss was {approx}0.2% for magnets cooled to -20{degree}C. No additional demagnetization was seen on subsequent cycling to 0{degree}C. Finally, one of the long dipoles built for the 8 GeV line was periodically tested over the course of 3 months, and showed no measurable demagnetization.

  11. Synthesis of Strontium Ferrite Ultrafine Particles Using Microemulsion Processing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong-Hwang; Chen, Yuh-Yuh

    2001-04-01

    The strontium ferrite ultrafine particles have been prepared using the microemulsion processing. The mixed hydroxide precursor was obtained via the coprecipitation of Sr(2+) and Fe(3+) in a water-in-oil microemulsion of water/CTAB/n-butanol/isooctane. According to the investigation on the thermochemical properties by TGA/DTA and the phase analysis by XRD, it was shown that the precursor could yield pure strontium ferrite after calcination at 700 degrees C for 5 h while using an appropriate molar ratio of Sr/Fe in microemulsions. From TEM measurement, the diameters of the precursor and calcined particles were 3.8+/-0.7 and 50-100 nm, respectively. The magnetic properties characterized by a SQUID magnetometer showed that the saturation magnetization, remanent magnetization, coercivity, and squareness ratio were 55 emu/g, 28 emu/g, 492 Oe, and 0.51, respectively. The magnetization was also observed to increase with the decrease of temperature at 5-400 K. Compared with those reported earlier, the quite low coercivity implies the potential application of final product in the high-density perpendicular recording media. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  12. Monodisperse cobalt ferrite nanomagnets with uniform silica coatings.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qiu; Lam, Michelle; Swanson, Sally; Yu, Rui-Hui Rachel; Milliron, Delia J; Topuria, Teya; Jubert, Pierre-Olivier; Nelson, Alshakim

    2010-11-16

    Ferro- and ferrimagnetic nanoparticles are difficult to manipulate in solution as a consequence of the formation of magnetically induced nanoparticle aggregates, which hamper the utility of these particles for applications ranging from data storage to bionanotechnology. Nonmagnetic shells that encapsulate these magnetic particles can reduce the interparticle magnetic interactions and improve the dispersibility of the nanoparticles in solution. A route to create uniform silica shells around individual cobalt ferrite nanoparticles--which uses poly(acrylic acid) to bind to the nanoparticle surface and inhibit nanoparticle aggregation prior to the addition of a silica precursor--was developed. In the absence of the poly(acrylic acid) the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles irreversibly aggregated during the silica shell formation. The thickness of the silica shell around the core-shell nanoparticles could be controlled in order to tune the interparticle magnetic coupling as well as inhibit magnetically induced nanoparticle aggregation. These ferrimagnetic core-silica shell structures form stable dispersion in polar solvents such as EtOH and water, which is critical for enabling technologies that require the assembly or derivatization of ferrimagnetic particles in solution.

  13. Synthesis and Characterization of Zirconium Substituted Cobalt Ferrite Nanopowders

    SciTech Connect

    Rus, S. F.; Vlazan, P.; Herklotz, A.

    2016-01-01

    Nanocrystalline ferrites; CoFe2O4 (CFO) and CoFe1.9Zr0.1O4 (CFZO) have been synthesized through chemical coprecipitation method. Moreover, the role played by the zirconium ions in improving the magnetic and structural properties is analyzed. X-ray diffraction revealed a single-phase cubic spinel structure for both materials, where the crystallite size increases and the lattice parameter decreases with substitution of Zr. The average sizes of the nanoparticles are estimated to be 16-19 nm. These sizes are small enough to achieve the suitable signal to noise ratio in the high density recording media. An increase in the saturation magnetization with the substitution of Zr suggests the preferential occupation of Zr4+ ions in the tetrahedral sites. A decrease in the coercivity values indicates the reduction of magneto-crystalline anisotropy. We investigated spinel ferrites can be used also in recoding media due to the large value of coercivity 1000 Oe which is comparable to those of hard magnetic materials.

  14. Monte Carlo calculations of the microstructure of barium ferrite dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walmsley, N. S.; Coverdale, G. N.; Chantrell, R. W.; Parker, D. A.; Bissell, P. R.

    1998-07-01

    A Monte Carlo (MC) model has been developed to investigate the influences of the volume packing fraction and applied field on the equilibrium microstructure of a dispersion of barium ferrite particles. We accounted for magnetostatic interaction effects by using a surface charge model which allows the calculation of the energy term required for the Metropolis-type MC algorithm. In addition to single particle moves, the model employs a clustering algorithm, based on particle proximity, in order to take into account the cooperative behaviour of the particles bound by magnetostatic energy. The stacks which are thought to be characteristic of barium ferrite systems are an example of this type of binding. Our study provides strong evidence, in agreement with experiment, for the formation of stacks both in the zero field and in the applied field equilibrium configurations. The simulation also predicts, by considering the effects of the packing density, that the dispersion properties are strongly affected by the mobility of these stacks. The equilibrium particle configurations have been investigated using a correlation function and visualized by computer graphics. The magnetic behaviour has been investigated by calculation of the magnetization curve.

  15. Preparation and Characterization of Zinc-Containing Nickel Gallate Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashhash, A.; Imam, N. G.; Ismail, S. M.; Yehia, M.

    2015-10-01

    Polycrystalline Ni1- x Zn x FeGaO4 samples containing different amounts of zinc ( x = 0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5) were synthesized by solid-state reaction. Study of the crystal structure by x-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed peaks typical of a single-phase polycrystalline face-centered cubic structure (FCC). Elemental composition was determined by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectra contained two absorption bands related to the tetrahedral A and octahedral B sites of the spinel ferrite. Magnetization loops obtained by vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) indicated that the saturation magnetization, M s, decreased gradually with increasing in Zn content ( x), and that coercivity H c was related to the microstructure of the Zn-doped samples. Mössbauer effect (ME) spectra of the samples were broad and magnetically split for x = 0.0 and 0.1 and quadruple doublets for the other Zn2+ concentrations. The dielectric constant ( ɛ') and dielectric loss tangent (tan δ) were also measured over wide ranges of frequency and temperature by use of the two probe method. The results were explained on the basis of cation-anion-cation and cation-cation interactions through the metal sites in the Ni-Zn-Ga ferrites.

  16. Structural and magnetic properties of chromium doped zinc ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian, Rintu Mary; Thankachan, Smitha; Xavier, Sheena; Mohammed, E. M.; Joseph, Shaji

    2014-01-28

    Zinc chromium ferrites with chemical formula ZnCr{sub x}Fe{sub 2−x}O{sub 4} (x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0) were prepared by Sol - Gel technique. The structural as well as magnetic properties of the synthesized samples have been studied and reported here. The structural characterizations of the samples were analyzed by using X – Ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). The single phase spinel cubic structure of all the prepared samples was tested by XRD and FTIR. The particle size was observed to decrease from 18.636 nm to 6.125 nm by chromium doping and induced a tensile strain in all the zinc chromium mixed ferrites. The magnetic properties of few samples (x = 0.0, 0.4, 1.0) were investigated using Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM)

  17. Low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Kenik, E.A.

    1996-04-01

    Development of reduced-activation ferritic steels has concentrated on high-chromium (8-10 wt% Cr) steels. However, there are advantages for a low-chromium steel, and initial ORNL studies on reduced-activation steels were on compositions with 2.25 to 12% Cr. Those studies showed an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.25V-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2WV) steel to have the highest strenglth of the steels studied. Although this steel had the best strength, Charpy impact properties were inferior to those of an Fe-9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (9Cr-2WVTa) and an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2W) steel. Therefore, further development of the low-chromium Cr-W steels was required. These results indicate that it is possible to develop low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels that have tensile and impact properties as good or better than those of high-chromium (7-9% Cr) steels. Further improvement of properties should be possible by optimizing the composition.

  18. Anticorrosion Properties of Pigments based on Ferrite Coated Zinc Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benda, P.; Kalendová, A.

    The paper deals with a new anticorrosion pigment, synthesized on a core-shell basis. For its syntheses a starting substance is used that forms the lamellar shaped core; namely lamellar zinc. The cover of the core is represented by zinc oxide, which is in fact partly oxidized lamellar zinc core, and is created during the calcination of the pigment. The compound that forms the top layer of the core, a ferrite, is also formed during calcination. The formula for the prepared pigment is then defined as MexZn1-xFe2O4/Zn and the formula of thin ferrite layer is MexZn1-xFe2O4 (where Me = Ca, Mg). Due to its shape, this anticorrosion pigment includes another anticorrosion effect, the so called "barrier effect". The mechanisms of anticorrosion effect, corrosion efficiency and mechanical properties were investigated for epoxy-ester paint systems with 10%pigment volume concentration (PVC). Mechanical tests were performed to determine the adhesiveness and mechanical resistance of paints and accelerated corrosion tests were carried out to evaluate efficiency against chemical degradation factors.

  19. Magnetic Contribution to heat capacity and entropy of nickel ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemniak, S. E.; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Castelli, R. A.; Porter, Wallace D

    2006-01-01

    The heat capacity of nickel ferrite was measured as a function of temperature from 50 to 1200 C using a differential scanning calorimeter. A thermal anomaly was observed at 584.9 C, the expected Curie temperature, TC. The observed behavior was interpreted by recognizing the sum of three contributions: (1) lattice (vibrational), (2) a spin wave (magnetic) component and (3) a ?-transition (antiferromagnetic-paramagnetic transition) at the Curie temperature. The first was modeled using vibrational frequencies derived from an experimentally-based IR absorption spectrum, while the second was modeled using a spin wave analysis that provided a T3/2 dependency in the low-temperature limit, but incorporated an exchange interaction between cation spins in the octahedral and tetrahedral sites at elevated temperatures, as first suggested by Grimes [15]. The ?-transition was fitted to an Inden-type model which consisted of two truncated power law series in dimensionless temperature (T/TC). Exponential equality (m=n=7) was observed below and above TC, indicating symmetry about the Curie temperature. Application of the methodology to existing heat capacity data for other transition metal ferrites (AFe2O4, A=Fe, Co) revealed nearly the same exponential equality, i.e., m=n=5.

  20. Hydrothermal growth of fine magnetite and ferrite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrappa, Shayan; Vicas, C. S.; Dhanaraj, Neel; Namratha, K.; Keerthana, S. D.; Dey, Ravi; Byrappa, K.

    2016-10-01

    In the present work, magnetite (Fe3O4, avg. 70 nm) synthesis employing Azadirachta indica (neem) leaf extract is reported originally using hydrothermal conditions and the results obtained were compared with that of D-glucose. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirms the presence of polysaccharides and proteins in the extract which act as both surfactants and reducing agents, aided the formation of magnetite nanostructures. Authors also reported the selective doping of Zn, Cu and Co on nickel ferrite for the enhancement of adsorptive dye removal property, adopting and investigating the use of eloquent one-step green hydrothermal approach (T=180 °C, t=4 h, pH=12) with sodium dodecyl sulfate as surfactant. X-ray diffraction studies reveal that all the materials synthesized are isometric spinel structures and furthermore, morphological evidences using scanning electron microscopy are accounted. Adsorptive dye removal ability of synthesized materials was investigated using trypan blue as a probe. It was evident from the results that magnetite using neem extract showed enhanced adsorption ability (75%) than that of D-glucose (62%). Also, exponential increase in dye removal efficiency from 55% to 81% due to the presence of copper in nickel ferrite was duly noted.

  1. Synthesis, microstructure and magnetic properties of Ni-Zn ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, A. C. F. M.; Tortella, E.; Morelli, M. R.; Kiminami, R. H. G. A.

    2003-01-01

    Ni-Zn ferrite powders with a nominal composition of Ni 0.5Zn 0.5Fe 2O 4 were prepared by combustion synthesis, using urea as fuel. The large quantity of gas that developed inhibited particle aggregation and yielded soft powders suitable for dispersion and use. The as-prepared combustion products, helium pycnometer and BET, which were characterized by XRD, showed a high specific surface area (44.26 m 2/g) and a very small particle and crystalline phase with atomic level homogeneity. The samples were uniaxially compacted by dry pressing and sintered at 1100°C, 1200°C, 1300°C and 1400°C for 2 h. The samples were characterized by bulk density, SEM, and B- H loop measurements. Optimum properties were obtained for samples sintered at 1200°C. The Ni-Zn ferrite presented a uniform microstructure with small grain size (2.0 μm), high density (95% TD) and significant hysteresis parameter values.

  2. Thermoelectric power and DC conductivity of Li-Cu ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazen, S. A.; Dawoud, H. A.; Abu-Elsaad, N. I.

    2017-04-01

    Thermoelectric power (Seebeck coefficient S) and dc conductivity of Li-Cu ferrite in chemical formula Li0.5-0.5xCuxFe2.5-.5xO4 (where x=0.0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 0.9 and1.0) were studied in a wide range of temperature from 300 up to 930 K. On the basis of the sign of Seebeck coefficient all the compositions of 0≤ x≤0.9 are n-type semiconductors except the sample of x=1.0 (CuFe2O4) is p-type at room temperature. It was noticed that the sample of x=1.0 converted to n-type at 350 K, but for the sample of x=0.9, it was expected to convert from n-type to p-type at 240 K. The Fermi energy at absolute zero EF (0) and the density of charge carriers (n) or (p) were determined. From the obtained results, the conduction mechanism of Li-Cu ferrite was discussed. Also, an energy band scheme was suggested.

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of Zirconium Substituted Cobalt Ferrite Nanopowders

    DOE PAGES

    Rus, S. F.; Vlazan, P.; Herklotz, A.

    2016-01-01

    Nanocrystalline ferrites; CoFe2O4 (CFO) and CoFe1.9Zr0.1O4 (CFZO) have been synthesized through chemical coprecipitation method. Moreover, the role played by the zirconium ions in improving the magnetic and structural properties is analyzed. X-ray diffraction revealed a single-phase cubic spinel structure for both materials, where the crystallite size increases and the lattice parameter decreases with substitution of Zr. The average sizes of the nanoparticles are estimated to be 16-19 nm. These sizes are small enough to achieve the suitable signal to noise ratio in the high density recording media. An increase in the saturation magnetization with the substitution of Zr suggests themore » preferential occupation of Zr4+ ions in the tetrahedral sites. A decrease in the coercivity values indicates the reduction of magneto-crystalline anisotropy. We investigated spinel ferrites can be used also in recoding media due to the large value of coercivity 1000 Oe which is comparable to those of hard magnetic materials.« less

  4. Temperature Dependent Dielectric Behavior of Nanocrystalline Ca Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samariya, Arvind; Pareek, S. P.; Sharma, P. K.; Prasad, Arun S.; Dhawan, M. S.; Dolia, S. N.; Sharma, K. B.

    Dielectric behaviour of Nanocrystalline CaFe2O4 ferrite synthesized by advanced sol- gel method has been investigated as a function of frequency at different temperatures. Rietveld profile refinement of the XRD pattern confirms formation of cubic spinel structure of the specimen.The dispersion in dielectric behavior of CaFe2O4ferrite sample has been observed in the temperature range of 100-250˚C as a function of frequency in the range 75 kHz to 10 MHz Both the real value of dielectric constant (ɛ‧) and the dielectric loss factor (tanδ) decrease with frequency. This decrease in the values of ɛ‧ and tanδ could be explained on the basis of available ferrous, i.e. Fe2+, ions on octahedral sites such that beyond a certain frequency of applied electric field the electronic exchange between the ferrous and ferric ions i.e. Fe2+↔Fe3+ cannot follow the applied alternating electric field.

  5. Current topics in the field of materials technology of soft ferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Takeshi; Ochiai, Tatusshiro

    1995-09-01

    The present paper focuses on the recent progress of materials technology for high performance soft ferrites. The electromagnetic properties of ferrites depend on the producing process and micro- and nano-structures. MnZn ferrite is a principal ferrite for high permeability and power uses. Recently, spray roasting method of Mn-Zn-Fe ternary system has been developed. High initial permeability over 20000 at 10kHz was achieved by using highly pure spray roasted powder of Mn-Fe binary system. Low power loss is of prime importance for power application. Control of grain boundary chemistry and grain size by the adequate selection of additives and firing conditions is required for achieving low power loss at high frequencies. NiCuZn ferrites for multilayer-ferrite chip-components fired under controlled oxygen partial pressure showed high Q-value. This could be explained by nanostructure of grain boundary. MnMgZn ferrites for deflection yoke cores satisfy high cost-performance. Problems of MnMgZn ferrites are loss characteristics and instability of initial permeability. Relaxation of permeability could be depressed by the control of chemical composition and microstructure. Fine magnetite powders by thermal decomposition of iron chloride are under development. This method may be a promising way to low cost and high performance toner for copy machines. High performance such as low loss or high permeability can be achieved by controlling ferrite microstructure and grain boundary chemistry. These can be attained by a highly pure raw powder, a small amount of additives, and an adequate firing program.

  6. The electromagnetic radiation and scanning characteristics of circular ferrite disc loaded with metallic discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishvakarma, B. R.; Ali, A. A. M.

    A ferrite-disk antenna has been developed in which the scanning of the beam is achieved electromagnetically. The antenna consists of a ferrite disk loaded by metallic disks at the top and the bottom; scanning is achieved by changing the biasing magnetic field. The scanning mechanism is explained using the concept of surface waves. The equivalence principle is used to characterize the radiation, in which surface electric density distribution in the metallic disks and polarization current inside the ferrite volume are considered. The current densities in the proposed antenna are quantified using exact field solutions obtained from the Helmhotz and Maxwell equations.

  7. The zinc ferrite obtained by oxidative precipitation method as a catalyst in n-butanol conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Klimkiewicz, Roman Wolska, Jolanta; Przepiera, Aleksander; Przepiera, Krystyna; Jablonski, Maciej; Lenart, Stanislaw

    2009-01-08

    This paper presents the results of catalytic properties of n-butanol conversion of the zinc ferrite obtained by oxidative precipitation method. The zinc ferrite showed good dehydrogenating activity but also catalyzed consecutive bimolecular condensation of emerged aldehyde particles into symmetrical ketone. The zinc-iron oxide of spinel structure was prepared from ferrous sulfate, which forms as a waste during the titanium dioxide production. The X-ray diffraction methods (XRD, XRF) were used in determining the structure and composition of obtained zinc ferrite, while thermogravimetry (TG-DTG), and differential thermal analysis (DTA) were used in the study of thermal transformations of zinc spinel in air.

  8. Effects of inverse degree on electronic structure and electron energy-loss spectrum in zinc ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, D.; Wang, M. X.; Zhang, Z. H.; Tao, H. L.; He, M.; Song, B.; Li, Q.

    2015-12-01

    First-principles calculations were performed to study the effects of inverse degree in zinc ferrite on electronic structure and properties. The electron energy-loss near-edge fine structure (ELNES) were simulated, and the splitting of peak and intensities of the oxygen K-edges can be used to identify the inversion of zinc ferrite. More Fe3+ transferring from the octahedral sites to the tetrahedral sites lead to the changing of the ligand shells surrounding the absorbing atom, accounting for the observed changing in ELNES. The standard criterion for determining the reversal extent of the cations in zinc ferrite by ELNES was given.

  9. Computing ferrite core losses at high frequency by finite elements method including temperature influence

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, B.; Ahmad, J.; Guy, G.

    1994-09-01

    A finite elements method coupled with the Preisach model of hysteresis is used to compute-the ferrite losses in medium power transformers (10--60 kVA) working at relatively high frequencies (20--60 kHz) and with an excitation level of about 0.3 Tesla. The dynamic evolution of the permeability is taken into account. The simple and doubly cubic spline functions are used to account for temperature effects respectively on electric and on magnetic parameters of the ferrite cores. The results are compared with test data obtained with 3C8 and B50 ferrites at different frequencies.

  10. Characterization and Applications of Micro- and Nano- Ferrites at Microwave and Millimeter Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Liu

    Ferrite materials are one of the most widely used magnetic materials in microwave and millimeter wave applications such as radar, wireless communication. They provide unique properties for microwave and millimeter wave devices especially non-reciprocal devices. Some ferrite materials with strong magnetocrystalline anisotropy fields can extend these applications to tens of GHz range while reducing the size, weight and cost. This thesis focuses on characterization of such ferrite materials as micro- and nano-powder and the fabrication of the devices. The ferrite materials with strong magnetocrystalline anisotropy field are metal/non-metal substituted iron oxides oriented in low crystal symmetry. The ferrite materials characterized in this thesis include M-type hexagonal ferrites such as barium ferrite (BaFe12O19), strontium ferrite (SrFe12O19), epsilon phase iron oxide (epsilon-Fe 2O3), substituted epsilon phase iron oxide (epsilon-Ga xFe2-xO3, epsilon-AlxFe2-xO 3). These ferrites exhibit great anisotropic magnetic fields. A transmission-reflection based in-waveguide technique that employs a vector network analyzer was used to determine the scattering parameters for each sample in the microwave bands (8.2--40 GHz). From the S-parameters, complex dielectric permittivity and complex magnetic permeability are evaluated by an improved algorithm. The millimeter wave measurement is based on a free space quasi-optical spectrometer. Initially precise transmittance spectra over a broad millimeter wave frequency range from 40 GHz to 120 GHz are acquired. Later the transmittance spectra are converted into complex permittivity and permeability spectra. These ferrite powder materials are further characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD) to understand the crystalline structure relating to the strength and the shift of the ferromagnetic resonance affected by the particle size. A Y-junction circulator working in the 60 GHz frequency band is designed based on characterized M

  11. Surface waves in a magnetized ferrite slab filled with a wire medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefedov, I. S.; Soloviev, A. S.; Tarot, A. C.; Abdouni, W.

    2009-06-01

    Novel metamaterial, based on wire medium embedded into magnetized ferrite, is studied. Waves in unbounded ferrites filled with wire media, surface wave at the interface of this metamaterial and the air as well as waves in a ferrite slab adjacent to a wire medium are considered. Different geometries of wires arrangement and different magnetization directions are discussed. Effective permeability was introduced for the case where both plasma and magnetic properties take place. Dispersion diagrams and applicability of the Drude model for the description of the wire medium in a host matrix, possessing high permittivity and permeability, are discussed.

  12. Low temperature bainitic ferrite: Evidence of carbon super-saturation and tetragonality

    DOE PAGES

    Garcia-Mateo, C.; Jimenez, J. A.; Yen, Hung-Wei; ...

    2015-03-31

    Experimental evidence indicates that bainitic ferrite formed by transformation at low temperatures (200-350 °C) includes quantities of carbon in solid solution far beyond those expected from para-equilibrium. A change in the conventional symmetry of the bainitic ferrite lattice from cubic to tetragonal explains the abnormal solid solubility detected. This carbon supersaturation was measured by atom probe tomography, and the tetragonality of the bainitic ferrite, was characterized by means of X-ray diffraction analysis and high resolution transmission electron microscopy.

  13. Fabrication of silver-coated cobalt ferrite nanocomposite and the study of its antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooti, M.; Saiahi, S.; Motamedi, H.

    2013-05-01

    A new silver coated cobalt ferrite nanocomposite, Ag@CoFe2O4, was prepared by a two-step procedure. In the first step, cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by a combustion method using glycine as a fuel. This ferrite was then coated with nanosilver via chemical reduction of Ag+ solution. The as-synthesized Ag@CoFe2O4 was characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer. The antibacterial activity of this composite was investigated against some Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and compared with those of silver nanoparticles and some standard antibacterial drugs.

  14. Influence of reagents mixture density on the radiation-thermal synthesis of lithium-zinc ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surzhikov, A. P.; Lysenko, E. N.; Vlasov, V. A.; Malyshev, A. V.; Korobeynikov, M. V.; Mikhailenko, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    Influence of Li2CO3-ZnO-Fe2O3 powder reagents mixture density on the synthesis efficiency of lithium-zinc ferrites in the conditions of thermal heating or pulsed electron beam heating was studied by X-Ray diffraction and magnetization analysis. The results showed that the including a compaction of powder reagents mixture in ferrite synthesis leads to an increase in concentration of the spinel phase and decrease in initial components content in lithium-substituted ferrites synthesized by thermal or radiation-thermal heating.

  15. Stability of Y–Ti–O precipitates in friction stir welded nanostructured ferritic alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Xinghua; Mazumder, B.; Miller, M. K.; ...

    2015-01-19

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys, which have complex microstructures which consist of ultrafine ferritic grains with a dispersion of stable oxide particles and nanoclusters, are promising materials for fuel cladding and structural applications in the next generation nuclear reactor. This paper evaluates microstructure of friction stir welded nanostructured ferritic alloys using electron microscopy and atom probe tomography techniques. Atom probe tomography results revealed that nanoclusters are coarsened and inhomogeneously distributed in the stir zone and thermomechanically affected zone. Three hypotheses on coarsening of nanoclusters are presented. Finally, the hardness difference in different regions of friction stir weld has been explained.

  16. Correlation Between Microstructures and Tensile Properties of Strain-Based API X60 Pipeline Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Hyo Kyung; Lee, Dong Ho; Lee, Sunghak; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Ro, Yunjo; Lee, Chang Sun; Hwang, Byoungchul; Shin, Sang Yong

    2016-06-01

    The correlation between the microstructures and tensile properties of strain-based American Petroleum Institute (API) X60 pipeline steels was investigated. Eight types of strain-based API X60 pipeline steels were fabricated by varying the chemical compositions, such as C, Ni, Cr, and Mo, and the finish cooling temperatures, such as single-phase and dual-phase regions. In the 4N and 5C steels, the volume fractions of bainitic ferrite (BF) and the secondary phases increased with the increasing C and adding Cr instead of Ni. In the 5C and 6NC steels, the volume fractions of acicular ferrite (AF) and BF decreased with increasing C and adding Ni, whereas the volume fractions of polygonal ferrite (PF) and the secondary phases increased. In the 6NC and 6NM steels, the volume fraction of BF was increased by adding Mo instead of Cr, whereas the volume fractions of PF and the secondary phases decreased. In the steels rolled in the single-phase region, the volume fraction of polygonal ferrite ranged from 40 to 60 pct and the volume fraction of AF ranged from 20 to 40 pct. In the steels rolled in the dual-phase region, however, the volume fraction of PF was more than 70 pct and the volume fraction of AF was below 20 pct. The strength of the steels with a high volume fraction of AF was higher than those of the steels with a high volume fraction of PF, whereas the yield point elongation and the strain hardening exponent were opposite. The uniform elongation after the thermal aging process decreased with increasing volume fraction of PF, whereas the uniform elongation increased with increasing volume fraction of AF. The strain hardening exponent increased with increasing volume fraction of PF, but decreased with increasing volume fraction of AF and effective grain size.

  17. Influence of n-type nickel ferrite in enhancing the AC conductivity of optimized polyaniline-nickel ferrite nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megha, R.; Ravikiran, Y. T.; Vijaya Kumari, S. C.; Thomas, S.

    2017-04-01

    In the present work, n-type nickel ferrite (NF) particles prepared by sol gel autocombustion method were used to synthesize optimized polyaniline-nickel ferrite (PANI-NF) nanocomposite by in situ polymerization method. Then, NF, PANI and the composite were structurally characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. Improved π-electron delocalization in PANI-NF composite as compared to that in PANI was confirmed from FTIR analysis. Interfacial interaction between PANI and NF was confirmed from XRD studies. Highly agglomerated, more densely packed particles of the composite facilitating easier charge transport were confirmed from SEM image. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image was analysed to calculate accurate average particle size of the composite by fitting the data to log-normal distribution function. Crystalline nature of the composite was confirmed from selected area electron diffraction (SAED) analysis. Remarkable increase in AC conductivity of the PANI-NF composite as compared to that of PANI due mainly to the formation of interfacial heterojunction barrier between p-type PANI and n-type NF was confirmed experimentally and well supported theoretically by calculating binding energy, hopping distance and density of states at Fermi level as per correlated barrier hopping (CBH) model.

  18. AFS dynamics in a short-lived active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuccarello, F.; Battiato, V.; Contarino, L.; Romano, P.; Spadaro, D.; Vlahos, L.

    2005-11-01

    In the framework of the study on active region emergence, we report the results obtained from the analysis of the short-lived (7 days) active region NOAA 10407. The data used were acquired during an observational campaign carried out with the THEMIS telescope in IPM mode in July 2003, coordinated with other ground- and space-based instruments (INAF-OACT, DOT, BBSO, MDI/SOHO, EIT/SOHO, TRACE). We determined the morphological and magnetic evolution of NOAA 10407, as well as the velocity fields associated with its magnetic structures. Within the limits imposed by the spatial and temporal resolution of the images analyzed, the first evidence of the active region formation is initially observed in the transition region and lower corona, and later on (i.e. after about 7 h) in the inner layers, as found in a previous analysis concerning a long-lived, recurrent active region. The results also indicate that the AFS formed in the active region shows typical upward motion at the AFS's tops and downward motion at the footpoints. The velocity values relevant to the upward motions decrease over the evolution of the region, similarly to the case of the recurrent active region, while we notice an increasing trend in the downflow velocity during the early phases of the time interval analyzed by THEMIS. On the other hand, the AFS preceding legs show a higher downflow than the following ones, a result in contrast with that found in the long-lived active region. The chromospheric area overhanging the sunspot umbra shows an upward motion of ˜ 2 km s-1, while that above the pores shows a downward motion of ~4 km s-1.

  19. The Advancing State of AF-M315E Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masse, Robert; Spores, Ronald A.; McLean, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The culmination of twenty years of applied research in hydroxyl ammonium nitrate (HAN)-based monopropellants, the NASA Space Technology mission Directorate's (STMD) Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will achieve the first on-orbit demonstration of an operational AF-M315E green propellant propulsion system by the end of 2015. Following an contextual overview of the completed flight design of the GPIM propellant storage and feed system, results of first operation of a flight-representative heavyweight 20-N engineering model thruster (to be conducted in mid-2014) are presented with performance comparisons to prior lab model (heavyweight) test articles.

  20. RX-26-AY/AF rifle bullet tests

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, D.D.

    1980-11-01

    A series of rifle bullet tests was performed on two explosives, RX-26-AY and RX-26-AF, using the Pantex version of the Picatinny Arsenal Test (PA-2). With the exception of one test, both explosives displayed a relatively low sensitivity to bullet impact. However, a marked difference was noted in the average burn time duration between the two types of explosives being tested. A minor modification was made on the rifle barrel used at the test site in order to improve the sighting procedure.

  1. Addition of MgO Nanoparticles to Carbon Structural Steel and the Effect on Inclusion Characteristics and Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiangzhou; Yang, Shufeng; Li, Jingshe; Liao, Hang; Gao, Wei; Wu, Tuo

    2016-04-01

    An innovative approach for pre-dispersing MgO nanoparticles with AlSi alloy nanoparticles was established, and the nanoparticles were dispersed well in carbon structural steel. After adding different mass fractions of MgO nanoparticles in steel, the majority of inclusions contained MgO·Al2O3 spinel and MgO-Al2O3-bearing hybrid inclusion, and these inclusions promoted acicular ferrite (AF) formation. With increasing amount of added nanoparticles, the average inclusion size increased from 0.90 to 1.50 μm and the inclusion size was considerably refined, but the ability of inclusions to induce AF was greatly declined. It was revealed that the inclusion size was the decisive factor influencing the inducing ability of inclusions for AF, which also got a solid support from the nucleation thermomechanical and dynamic analyses. When the mass fraction of MgO nanoparticles reached 0.05 pct, the proportion of AF in microstructure is relatively larger and the degree of interlocking of the AF within the microstructure was optimized. The ferrite grains also got refined and the average grain size decreased by more than 94 pct compared with that of the original steel.

  2. Effects of Ultra Fast Cooling on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Pipeline Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yong; Li, Qun; Wang, Zhao-dong; Wang, Guo-dong

    2015-09-01

    X70 (steel A) and X80 (steel B) pipeline steels were fabricated by ultra fast cooling (UFC). UFC processing improves not only ultimate tensile strength (UTS), yield strength (YS), yield ratio (YS/UTS), and total elongation of both steels, but also their Charpy absorbed energy ( A K) as well. The microstructures of both steels were all composed of quasi polygonal, acicular ferrite (AF), and granular bainite. MA islands (the mixtures of brittle martensite and residual austenite) are more finely dispersed in steel B, and the amount of AF in steel B is much more than that in steel A. The strength of steel B is higher than that of steel A. This is mainly attributed to the effect of the ferrite grain refinement which is resulted from UFC processing. The finely dispersed MA islands not only provide dispersion strengthening, but also reduce loss of impact properties to pipeline steels. UFC produces low-temperature transformation microstructures containing larger amounts of AFs. The presence of AF is a crucial factor in achieving desired mechanical properties for both steels. It is suggested that the toughness of the experimental steel increases with increasing the amount of AF.

  3. NMR study of the AF-SC-SC-AF phased transition in a pnictide superconductor LaFeAsO1-xHx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Naoki; Sakurai, Ryosuke; Iimura, Soushi; Matsuishi, Satoru; Hosono, Hideo; Yamakawa, Youichi; Kontani, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    We have performed 75As and 1H NMR measurements in LaFeAsO1xHx, an isomorphic compound of LaFeAsO1xFx. LaFeAsO1xHx is an electron doped system, and O2- can be replaced with H- up to x = 0.5. LaFeAsO1xHx is known for having double superconducting (SC) domes on H doping. Recently, we discovered that a new antiferromagnetic (AF) phase follows the double SC domes on further H doping, forming a symmetric AF-SC-SC-AF phase alignment in the electronic phase diagram Unlike the AF ordering in the lightly H-doped regime, the AF ordering in the highly H-doped regime is attributed to the nesting between electron pockets. In the conference, we will show the data of both NMR spectra and the relaxation rate 1/T1 in the whole doping region. We will discuss the difference of electronic states between the lightly H-doped AF-SC phases and highly H-doped SC-AF phases. This work is supported by a Grant-in-Aid (Grant No. KAKENHI 23340101) from the Ministry of Education, Science, and Culture, Japan.

  4. Chiral states of electromagnetic fields originated from ferrite-based microwave vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Sigalov, M.; Kamenetskii, E. O.; Shavit, R.

    2008-12-01

    Electromagnetic vortices in a microwave cavity with an inserted piece of a magnetized ferrite appear due to the time-reversal symmetry breaking effect. We reveal numerically that the Poynting-vector vortices are possible in open resonant microwave structures with ferrite inclusions. We demonstrate a pair of resonances which have opposite vortex rotations at the same direction of time given by the direction of the magnetization precession. There are two coalescent resonances with different chirality. We show that the structures of the radiating near and far fields are intimately related to the ferrite-induced topological singularities. The observed far-field polarization structures represent a doublet of chiral vortices in space originated from a doublet of resonant chiral states in a patch resonator with an enclosed ferrite disk.

  5. Realization of hexagonal barium ferrite thick films on Si substrates using a screen printing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yajie; Smith, Ian; Geiler, Anton L.; Vittoria, Carmine; Zagorodnii, Volodymyr; Celinski, Zbigniew; Harris, Vincent G.

    2008-05-01

    Hexagonal barium ferrite thick films (50-200 µm) have been deposited on Si and Al2O3/Si substrates using a screen printing technique. X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy and magnetometry were used to characterize and correlate the ferrite films' microstructure and magnetic properties. The experiments indicated that an Al2O3 underlayer was effective in preventing silicon diffusion into the barium ferrite films during a final sintering treatment at temperatures above 1100 °C. A two-stage sintering process allowed a reasonable tradeoff between mechanical and magnetic properties. This work reveals the feasibility of fabrication of thick ferrite films on large substrates (up to 25 mm in diameter) for future planar microwave devices compatible with semiconductor integrated circuits processing.

  6. Abrasion and deformed layer formation of manganese-zinc ferrite in sliding contact with lapping tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.; Tanaka, K.

    1986-01-01

    Wear experiments were conducted using replication electron microscopy and reflection electron diffraction to study abrasion and the deformed layers produced in single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrite simulated heads during contact with lapping tapes. The crystaline state of the head is changed drastically during the abrasion process. Crystalline states ranging from nearly amorphous to highly textured polycrystalline can be produced on the wear surface of a single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrite head. The total thickness of the deformed layer was approximately 0.8 microns. This thickness increased as the load and abrasive grit size increased. The anisotropic wear of the ferrite was found to be inversely proportional to the hardness of the wear surface. The wear was lower in the order 211 111 10 0110. The wear of the ferrite increased markedly with an increase in sliding velocity and abrasive grit size.

  7. Friction and wear of single-crystal manganese-zinc ferrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with single-crystal manganese-zinc ferrite in contact with itself and with transition metals. Results indicate mating highest atomic density directions (110 line type) on matched crystallographic planes exhibit the lowest coefficient of friction indicating that direction is important in the friction behavior of ferrite. Matched parallel high atomic density planes and crystallographic directions at the interface exhibit low coefficients of friction. The coefficients of friction for ferrite in contact with various metals are related to the relative chemical activity of these metals. The more active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction. Cracking and the formation of hexagon- and rectangular-shaped platelet wear debris due to cleavages are observed on the ferrite surfaces as a result of sliding.

  8. Friction and wear of single-crystal manganese-zinc ferrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with single crystal manganese-zinc ferrite in contact with itself and with transition metals. Results indicate mating highest atomic density directions (110) on matched crystallographic planes exhibit the lowest coefficient of friction, indicating that direction is important in the friction behavior of ferrite. Matched parallel high atomic density planes and crystallographic directions at the interface exhibit low coefficients of friction. The coefficients of friction for ferrite in contact with various metals are related to the relative chemical activity of these metals. The more active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction. Cracking and the formation of hexagon- and rectangular-shaped platelet wear debris due to cleavages of (110) planes are observed on the ferrite surfaces as a result of sliding.

  9. Gadolinium substitution effect on the thermomagnetic properties of Ni ferrite ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobo, Silvia E.; Arana, Mercedes; Bercoff, Paula G.

    2016-10-01

    This work is focused on the structural and magnetic characterization of Gd-doped Ni ferrite nanoparticles and the preparation of a ferrofluid for applications in heat-transfer devices. For this purpose, spinel ferrites NiFe2O4, and NiFe1.88Gd0.12O4 were prepared by the self-combustion method. The substituted sample was obtained with a small amount of Gd inclusion and the excess appeared as GdFeO3. The smallest nanoparticles of both samples were properly coated and dispersed in kerosene. Thermal conductivities of the produced ferrofluids were measured at 25 °C under an applied magnetic field. There is a significant enhancement in the thermal conductivity of the ferrofluid prepared with NiGd ferrite with respect to the one with Ni ferrite, in presence of a magnetic field. This effect is directly related to the well-known magnetocaloric effect of Gd.

  10. Material for magnetostrictive sensors and other applications based on ferrite materials

    DOEpatents

    McCallum, R. William; Snyder, John E.; Dennis, Kevin W.; Schwichtenberg, Carl R.; Jiles, David C.

    2002-03-05

    The present invention provides magnetostrictive composites that include an oxide ferrite and metallic binders which provides mechanical properties that make the magnetostrictive compositions effective for use as sensors and actuators.

  11. One-pot production of copper ferrite nanoparticles using a chemical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Naoki; Amagasa, Shota; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Yamada, Yasuhiro

    2016-12-01

    Copper ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized via the oxidation of precipitates obtained from the reaction of FeCl2, CuSO4 and N2H4 in the presence of gelatin. These copper ferrite particles were subsequently examined using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The average size of the copper ferrite nanoparticles was less than 5 nm, and they exhibited superparamagnetic behavior as a result of their small size. The low temperature Mössbauer spectrum exhibited three sets of sextets, two corresponding to the tetrahedral and octahedral sites of the copper spinel structure and one with small hyperfine magnetic field corresponding to the surface or defects of the nanoparticles. When the ratio of copper salt was increased, the tetrahedral site became preferable for copper, and metallic copper and copper ferrite were both present in a single nanoparticle.

  12. Design, fabrication, testing and delivery of a feasibility model laminated ferrite memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, H. C.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of using multiword addressing with laminated ferrite arrays was made. Both a reduction in the number of components, and a reduction in power consumption was obtained for memory capacities between one million bits and one million words. An investigation into the effect of variations in the processing steps resulted in a number of process modifications that improved the quality of the arrays. A feasibility model laminated ferrite memory system was constructed by modifying a commercial plated wire memory system to operate with laminated ferrite arrays. To provide flexibility for the testing of the laminated ferrite memory, an exerciser has been constructed to automatically control the loading and recirculation of arbitrary size checkerboard patterns of one's and zero's and to display the patterns of stored information on a CRT screen.

  13. Ferrite-Cored Solenoidal Induction Coil Sensor for BUD (MM-1667)

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, F.; Becker, A.; Conti, U.; Gasperikova, E.

    2011-06-15

    We have designed and lab tested a new ferrite cored induction coil sensor for measuring the secondary fields from metallic UXO with the BUD system. The objective was to replace the 5-inch diameter air-cored coils in the BUD system with smaller sensors that would allow the placement of multiple sensors in the smaller package of the new BUD hand-held system. A ferrite-cored solenoidal coil of length L can easily be made to have sensitivity and noise level roughly the same as an air-cored coil of a diameter on the same order as L. A ferrite-cored solenoidal coil can easily have a feedback configuration to achieve critical damping. The feedback configuration leads to a very stable response. Feedback ferrite-cored solenoidal coils show very little interaction as long as they are separated by one half their length.

  14. Normal and Inverse Ferrite Spinels: A Set of Solid State Chemistry Related Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaumont, C.; Burgard, M.

    1979-01-01

    Presents one of the themes of a French chemistry college laboratory course, which concerns the field of solid state chemistry and is focused on the study of the cation distribution in the case of certain spinel ferrites. (HM)

  15. Preparation of transparent conductors ferroelectric memory materials and ferrites

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghu Nath; Ginley, David S.

    1998-01-01

    A process for the preparation by electrodeposition of metal oxide film and powder compounds for ferroelectric memory materials and ferrites wherein the metal oxide includes a plurality of metals. The process comprises providing an electrodeposition bath, providing soluble salts of the metals to this bath, electrically energizing the bath to thereby cause formation of a recoverable film of metal on the electrode, recovering the resultant film as a film or a powder, and recovering powder formed on the floor of the bath. The films and powders so produced are subsequently annealed to thereby produce metal oxide for use in electronic applications. The process can be employed to produce metal-doped metal oxide film and powder compounds for transparent conductors. The process for preparation of these metal-doped metal oxides follows that described above.

  16. Size-dependent antimicrobial properties of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žalnėravičius, Rokas; Paškevičius, Algimantas; Kurtinaitiene, Marija; Jagminas, Arūnas

    2016-10-01

    The growing resistance of bacteria to conventional antibiotics elicited considerable interest to non-typical drugs. In this study, antimicrobial investigations were performed on low-size dispersion cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (Nps) fabricated by co-precipitation approach in several average sizes, in particular, 15.0, 5.0, and 1.65 nm. A variety of experimental tests demonstrated that the size of these Nps is determinant for antimicrobial efficiency against S. cerevisiae and several Candida species, in particular, C. parapsilosis, C. krusei, and C. albicans. The small and ultra-small fractions of CoFe2O4 Nps possess especially strong antimicrobial activity against all tested microorganisms. The possible reasons are discussed. Nps were characterized by means of transmission and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy, chemical analysis and magnetic measurements.

  17. Microwave magnetoelectric effects in bilayer of ferrite and piezoelectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bichurin, M. I.; Petrov, V. M.; Galkina, T. A.

    2009-03-01

    The present paper focuses on magnetoelectric (ME) interactions under ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) in a bilayer of a ferrite and a piezoelectric. Applying a dc electric field perpendicular to the sample plane induces a uniaxial magnetic anisotropy. The effects of flexural deformation and substrate clamping have been considered in determining the electric field induced FMR line shift. The obtained model is applied to a specific case of yttrium iron garnet/lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate. Our studies indicate that flexural deformation gives rise to a decrease in the strength of ME interaction for a free standing bilayer. The substrate thickness dependence of FMR line shift reveals a maximum for the substrate thickness that is approximately equal to that of the bilayer.

  18. Microwave-assisted synthesis and characterization of nickel ferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, Gopal; Sen, Ravindra; Gupta, Nitish; Malviya, Nitin

    2015-08-28

    Nickel ferrite nanoparticles (NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) were successfully prepared by microwave-assisted combustion method (MWAC) using citric Electron acid as a chelating agent. NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern, Scanning Microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and UV-Visible techniques. XRD analysis revealed that NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles have spinel cubic structure with the average crystalline size of 26.38 nm. SEM analysis revealed random and porous structural morphology of particles and FTIR showed absorption bands related to octahedral and tetrahedral sites, in the range 400–600cm{sup −1} which strongly favor the formation of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. The optical band gap is determined by UV Visible method and found to be 5.4 eV.

  19. Microwave synthesis and characterization of Co-ferrite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bensebaa, F; Zavaliche, F; L'Ecuyer, P; Cochrane, R W; Veres, T

    2004-09-01

    Stable CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticles have been obtained by co-precipitation using a microwave heating system. Transmission electron microscopy images analysis shows an agglomeration of particles with an average size of about 5 nm, and X-ray diffraction reveals the presence of a pure ferrite nanocrystalline phase. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis show the presence of organic matter in the range of about 16 wt%. The magnetic response in DC fields is typical for an assembly of single-domain particles. The measured saturation magnetization is slightly larger than the bulk value, probably due to the presence of small amounts of Co and Fe. AC magnetization data indicate the presence of magnetic interactions between the nanoparticles.

  20. Electrical properties and initial permeability of Cu-Mg ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ateia, E.; Ahmed, M. A.; Ghouniem, R. M.

    2014-05-01

    A series of polycrystalline spinel ferrites with composition Cu1-xMgxFe2O4 where 0.0 ≤ x ≤ 1 are prepared by the standard ceramic method. The single-phase cubic spinel structure of all the samples has been confirmed from X-ray diffraction analysis. The lattice constant increases linearly with increasing magnesium content obeying Vegard's law. The electrical properties (ɛ‧, and σ) of the prepared samples are measured at different temperatures as a function of applied frequency ranging from 100 kHz up to 5 MHz. The general trend of ɛ‧, and σ is decreased with increasing Mg2+ and increases with increasing temperature. The observed variation of dielectric properties is explained on the basis of Cu2+/Cu1+ ionic concentration as well as the electronic hopping frequency between Fe2+ and Fe3+ ions in the present samples. The data of initial permeability is also discussed.

  1. Origin of the constricted hysteresis loop in cobalt ferrites revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong-guo; Zhang, Yu-Jie; Wang, Weng-Hong; Wu, Guang-Heng

    2011-08-01

    A series of Co ferrites (Co xFe 3- xO 4 ( x=0-1)) were prepared using solid-state method in this work. The aging effect of their structures and constrictions of hysteresis loops under low magnetic field were investigated. It was found that during the aging process, the migration of trivalent (bivalent) ions between tetrahedral (A-site) and octahedral (B-site) coordination induced a shrinking of the lattice, which would expand again due to the precipitation of Fe 3+ after a much longer aging time. The first process caused a pronounced constriction of the loops, due to the uniaxial anisotropy led by this migration. The depression of constriction could attribute to both the expansion of lattice and the change of ionic ratios as a result of the second-phase-precipitation. The impacts of Co content, aging time and temperature upon the constriction were also discussed.

  2. Preparation of transparent conductors ferroelectric memory materials and ferrites

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, R.N.; Ginley, D.S.

    1998-07-28

    A process is described for the preparation by electrodeposition of metal oxide film and powder compounds for ferroelectric memory materials and ferrites wherein the metal oxide includes a plurality of metals. The process comprises providing an electrodeposition bath, providing soluble salts of the metals to this bath, electrically energizing the bath to thereby cause formation of a recoverable film of metal on the electrode, recovering the resultant film as a film or a powder, and recovering powder formed on the floor of the bath. The films and powders so produced are subsequently annealed to thereby produce metal oxide for use in electronic applications. The process can be employed to produce metal-doped metal oxide film and powder compounds for transparent conductors. The process for preparation of these metal-doped metal oxides follows that described above.

  3. Sensitization and stabilization of type 409 ferritic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, J.D.; Franson, I.A.

    1997-08-01

    Type 409 (UNS S40900) ferritic stainless steel, used widely in automotive exhaust systems, can be subject to intergranular corrosion (IGC) of weld heat-affected zones (HAZ), even though ASTM stabilization requirements (Ti = 6 {times} C) are met. A boiling Cu/6% CuSO{sub 4}/0.5% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} test is shown to be appropriate for detecting IGC of welds and HAZ. This test was used to establish stabilization requirements for type 409, whether dual-stabilized with Ti + Nb or singly stabilized with Ti alone. It was found that the stabilization requirement should be Ti + Nb {ge} 0.08 + 8 (C + N). Benefits of dual stabilization include improved surface quality and formability without sacrifice of mechanical properties or weldability.

  4. Precipitation sequence in niobium-alloyed ferritic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Nobuhiro; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H.; Kikuchi, Masao

    2004-03-01

    Niobium is an important alloying element in the design of heat-resistant ferritic stainless steels for automotive exhaust systems. When in solid solution, it improves both the high temperature strength and the resistance to thermal fatigue. However, it also forms several kinds of precipitates during service. These reactions have been modelled, taking into account the multicomponent nature of the diffusion process and allowing for capillarity effects. It has been possible to estimate not only the volume fractions but also the particle sizes for Fe2Nb (Laves phase) and Fe3Nb3C (M6C) carbide in a 19Cr-0.8Nb steel, with good agreement against experimental data.

  5. Fe57 NMR and spin structure of manganese ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štěpánková, H.; Sedlák, B.; Chlan, V.; Novák, P.; Šimša, Z.

    2008-03-01

    NMR of Fe57 in five MnFe2O4 single crystals with different degrees of inversion was measured in liquid He temperature. At the zero external field, two lines originating from Fe3+ ions on the octahedral sites are observed at 68.7 and 71.1MHz , while the line at 72.0MHz , the amplitude of which increases with increasing inversion, is ascribed to Fe3+ ions on the tetrahedral sites. Measurement in the external field shows that the spin structure is in accord with the Goodenough-Kanamori rules. This contradicts to an abnormal spin structure which Shim [Phys. Rev. B 75, 134406 (2007)] proposed recently on the basis of Fe57 NMR measured in polycrystalline manganese ferrite. Reinterpretation of the NMR in polycrystalline compounds is given.

  6. Microwave-assisted synthesis and characterization of nickel ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Gopal; Sen, Ravindra; Malviya, Nitin; Gupta, Nitish

    2015-08-01

    Nickel ferrite nanoparticles (NiFe2O4) were successfully prepared by microwave-assisted combustion method (MWAC) using citric Electron acid as a chelating agent. NiFe2O4 nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern, Scanning Microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and UV-Visible techniques. XRD analysis revealed that NiFe2O4 nanoparticles have spinel cubic structure with the average crystalline size of 26.38 nm. SEM analysis revealed random and porous structural morphology of particles and FTIR showed absorption bands related to octahedral and tetrahedral sites, in the range 400-600cm-1 which strongly favor the formation of NiFe2O4 nanoparticles. The optical band gap is determined by UV Visible method and found to be 5.4 eV.

  7. Evidence of reentrant behavior in nanoparticles of ferrite in ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zins, D.; Nakatsuka, K.; Gendron, F.; Rivoire, M.

    1999-07-01

    Ferrofluids made up of mixed ferrite particles Mn 1- xZn xFe 2O 4 mono-dispersed in glycerol have been studied by ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) in X band and by magnetization measurements in the temperature range of 3.5-300 K. FMR spectra have been recorded on field-cooled samples. Some features of these spectra are typical of a transition from ferro to spin-glass state, i.e. a reentrant behavior. By taking relaxation into account in the frame of Landau Lifchitz formalism, the freezing temperature Tf=40 K was accurately determined, in good agreement with temperature measurements of the static magnetic susceptibility of field-cooled ferrofluid samples.

  8. Magnetic Properties of Nanocrystalline Nickel-Cobalt Ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, D. K.; Villaseñor-Cendejas, L. M.; Thakur, A. K.

    2013-09-01

    In this study, the nanocrystalline nickel-cobalt ferrites were prepared via the citrate route method at . The samples were calcined at for 3 h. The crystalline structure and the single-phase formations were confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. Prepared materials showed the cubic spinel structure with m3m symmetry and Fd3m space group. The analyses of XRD patterns were carried out using POWD software. It gave an estimation of lattice constant “” of 8.3584 Å, which was in good agreement with the results reported in JCPDS file no. 742081. The crystal size of the prepared materials calculated by Scherer’s formula was 27.6 nm and the electrical conductivity was around . The permeability component variations with frequency were realized. The magnetic properties of the prepared materials were analyzed by a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). It showed a saturation magnetization of and the behavior of a hard magnet.

  9. Magnetization anomalies of nanosize zinc ferrite particles prepared using electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, M. K.; Verma, H. C.

    2006-11-01

    Nanosize zinc ferrite particles have been prepared for the first time using electrodeposition. Zinc and iron are deposited on the cathode from a common bath containing the salts of zinc and iron. The deposited materials were forced to undergo electrochemical oxidation in a strong alkaline solution (1 M KOH) to convert them into oxides. Crystallization in ZnFe 2O 4 structure was obtained by heating the deposited material at appropriate temperature. X-ray diffraction pattern confirmed that the procedure leads to the formation of pure phase of ZnFe 2O 4. The magnetization value for the smallest size ZnFe 2O 4 is much smaller than that for the ZnFe 2O 4 made by most of the other methods although it shows a nice hysteresis shape. The magnetization shows very little variation with size in the range studied.

  10. Electrospun magnetically separable calcium ferrite nanofibers for photocatalytic water purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EL-Rafei, A. M.; El-Kalliny, Amer S.; Gad-Allah, Tarek A.

    2017-04-01

    Three-dimensional random calcium ferrite, CaFe2O4, nanofibers (NFs) were successfully prepared via the electrospinning method. The effect of calcination temperature on the characteristics of the as-spun NFs was investigated. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that CaFe2O4 phase crystallized as a main phase at 700 °C and as a sole phase at 1000 °C. Field emission scanning electron microscopy emphasized that CaFe2O4 NFs were fabricated with diameters in the range of 50-150 nm and each fiber was composed of 20-50 nm grains. Magnetic hysteresis loops revealed superparamagnetic behavior for the prepared NFs. These NFs produced active hydroxyl radicals under simulated solar light irradiation making them recommendable for photocatalysis applications in water purification. In the meantime, these NFs can be easily separated from the treated water by applying an external magnetic field.

  11. Cr3+ substituted spinel ferrite nanoparticles with high coercivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Zuo, Xudong; Zhang, Dongmei; Wu, Chengwei; Silva, S. Ravi P.

    2016-06-01

    The low coercivity of spinel ferrites is a major barrier that significantly limits their use in high density magnetic recording applications. By controlling the substituting content of Cr3+, in this article we describe how magnetic CoCr x Fe2-x O4 (0 < x < 1.2) nanoparticles with coercivity of up to 6.4 kOe were successfully obtained by the hydrothermal process. The high coercivity is attributed to the synergetic effects of magnetocrystalline anisotropy and the nanoscale size effect. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the spinel structure of the nanoparticles with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) suggesting regular tetragonal morphology. The TEM indicated an edge length ranging from 15 nm to 150 nm, which increases monotonically with increasing Cr content. Raman analyses supported the proposed model on the formation mechanism of the nanoparticles, i.e. heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation.

  12. New grain formation during warm deformation of ferritic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Belyakov, A.; Sakai, Taku; Kaibyshev, R.

    1998-01-01

    Microstructural evolution accompanied by localization of plastic flow was studied in compression of a ferritic stainless steel with high stacking fault energy (SFE) at 873 K ({approx} 0.5 Tm). The structure evolution is characterized by the formation of dense dislocation walls at low strains and subsequently of microbands and their clusters at moderate strains, followed by the evolution of fragmented structure inside the clusters of microbands at high strains. The misorientations of the fragmented boundaries and the fraction of high-angle grain boundaries increase substantially with increasing strain. Finally, further straining leads to the formation of new fine grains with high-angle boundaries, which become more equiaxed than the previous fragmented structure. The mechanisms operating during such structure changes are discussed in detail.

  13. Evaluation Of Shielding Efficacy Of A Ferrite Containing Ceramic Material

    SciTech Connect

    Verst, C.

    2015-10-12

    The shielding evaluation of the ferrite based Mitsuishi ceramic material has produced for several radiation sources and possible shielding sizes comparative dose attenuation measurements and simulated projections. High resolution gamma spectroscopy provided uncollided and scattered photon spectra at three energies, confirming theoretical estimates of the ceramic’s mass attenuation coefficient, μ/ρ. High level irradiation experiments were performed using Co-60, Cs-137, and Cf-252 sources to measure penetrating dose rates through steel, lead, concrete, and the provided ceramic slabs. The results were used to validate the radiation transport code MCNP6 which was then used to generate dose rate attenuation curves as a function of shielding material, thickness, and mass for photons and neutrons ranging in energy from 200 keV to 2 MeV.

  14. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles in a mesoporous silicon dioxide matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komogortsev, S. V.; Patrusheva, T. N.; Balaev, D. A.; Denisova, E. A.; Ponomarenko, I. V.

    2009-10-01

    We have studied magnetic nanoparticles of cobalt ferrite obtained by the extraction-pyrolysis method in a mesoporous silicon dioxide (MSM-41) molecular sieve matrix. The X-ray diffraction data show evidence for the formation of CoFe2O4 particles with a coherent scattering domain size of ˜40 nm. Measurements of the magnetization curves showed that powders consisting of these nanoparticles are magnetically hard materials with a coercive field of H c(4.2 K) = 9.0 kOe and H c(300 K) = 1.8 kOe and a reduced remanent magnetization of M r/ M s(4.2 K) = 0.83 and M r/ M s(300 K) = 0.49. The shape of the low-temperature (4.2 K) magnetization curves is adequately described in terms of the Stoner-Wohlfarth model for randomly oriented single-domain particles with a cubic magnetic anisotropy.

  15. Structure and magnetic properties of nanostructured Ni-ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuquerque, A. S.; Ardisson, J. D.; Macedo, W. A. A.; López, J. L.; Paniago, R.; Persiano, A. I. C.

    2001-05-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of NiFe 2O 4 ultrafine powders synthesized by coprecipitation, a nonconventional method of preparation, were investigated. The samples were obtained by annealing at relatively low temperatures (300-600°C) and characterized by X-ray diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometry. The average particle diameter ranges from 4 to 15 nm, as determined by X-ray diffraction. All nanometric powder samples presented strong superparamagnetic relaxation at room temperature and reduced magnetic hyperfine fields at -193°C. Magnetometry measurements indicated different magnetic behavior related with crystallinity of samples, coercivity as high as 168 Oe at 27°C, value that is nearly two times higher than coercivity of bulk Ni-ferrite.

  16. Growth, structure, morphology, and magnetic properties of Ni ferrite films

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The morphology, structure, and magnetic properties of nickel ferrite (NiFe2O4) films fabricated by radio frequency magnetron sputtering on Si(111) substrate have been investigated as functions of film thickness. Prepared films that have not undergone post-annealing show the better spinel crystal structure with increasing growth time. Meanwhile, the size of grain also increases, which induces the change of magnetic properties: saturation magnetization increased and coercivity increased at first and then decreased. Note that the sample of 10-nm thickness is the superparamagnetic property. Transmission electron microscopy displays that the film grew with a disorder structure at initial growth, then forms spinel crystal structure as its thickness increases, which is relative to lattice matching between substrate Si and NiFe2O4. PMID:23622034

  17. AFS men and women differ most in their lifestyle choices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Connelly, N.A.; Brown, T.L.; Hardiman, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    The American Fisheries Society sponsored a survey to examine the career development choices of men and women and how they might differ by gender. A random sample of 700 men and 700 women was selected from the AFS membership database. The survey was mailed out in October 2004 and 991 questionnaires were returned for an adjusted response rate of 71%. Some differences exist between men and women in the areas of interest development, education, and employment, but the substantive differences occur in lifestyle choices. Women with a fisheries career are less likely to be married than men, even when age is controlled for, and women who are married are more likely to have dual-career considerations than their male counterparts. Among respondents without dependents in their home during their professional career, twice as many women as men think having children will adversely affect their career. For those with dependents, more than twice as many women as men said they had to put their career "on hold" because of their dependents. While AFS members do not represent all members of the fisheries profession, their experiences shed substantial light on the lifestyle choices likely faced by most members of the profession.

  18. Investigation of frequency response of microwave active ring resonator based on ferrite film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynov, M. I.; Nikitin, A. A.; Ustinov, A. B.; Kalinikos, B. A.

    2016-11-01

    The complex transmission coefficient of active ring resonators based on ferrite-film delay lines was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Influence of the parameters of the delay line on the transmission coefficients was investigated. It was shown that the resonant frequencies of the ring depend on the ferrite film thickness and the distance between spin-wave antennae. These dependences give possibility to control the shape of the transmission coefficient that in combination with magnetic tuning provide flexibility for microwave applications.

  19. The antitumor effect of locoregional magnetic cobalt ferrite in dog mammary adenocarcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şincai, Mariana; Gângǎ, Diana; Bica, Doina; Vékás, Ladislau

    2001-01-01

    The endocytosis of nanosized magnetic particles by tumor cells led to numerous tests to establish the use of this phenomenon in antitumor therapy. The direct antitumor effect of a biocompatible cobalt-ferrite-based magnetic fluid directly inoculated in bitch mammary tumors was studied. A direct correlation between tumor cell lysis and cobalt ferrite was established in tumors. Massive endocytosis of magnetic particles was observed 1 h after the contact of magnetic fluid with tumor cells.

  20. Magnetostatic surface waves propagation at dissipative ferrite-MTMs-metal structure.

    PubMed

    Al-Sahhar, Zeyad I; Shabat, Mohammed M; El-Khozondar, Hala J

    2013-01-01

    The magnetostatic surface waves (MSSW) propagation in a layered structure composed of ferrite film covered by air and on top of metamaterial (MTM) placed on metal is discussed. Dispersion equations which relate the parameters of different layers are derived and used to analyse propagation of MSSW. It is found that the MSSW excitation band depends on the thickness of the MTM layer and ferrite layer.

  1. Surface modification to improve fireside corrosion resistance of Fe-Cr ferritic steels

    DOEpatents

    Park, Jong-Hee; Natesan, Krishnamurti; Rink, David L.

    2010-03-16

    An article of manufacture and a method for providing an Fe--Cr ferritic steel article of manufacture having a surface layer modification for corrosion resistance. Fe--Cr ferritic steels can be modified to enhance their corrosion resistance to liquid coal ash and other chemical environments, which have chlorides or sulfates containing active species. The steel is modified to form an aluminide/silicide passivating layer to reduce such corrosion.

  2. Chromium and copper substituted lanthanum nano-ferrites: Their synthesis, characterization and application studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauhar, Sheenu; Singhal, Sonal

    2014-10-01

    Nano-crystalline lanthanum ferrites substituted by chromium and copper having formula LaMxFe1-xO3 (M = Cr, Cu; 0.0 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.5) were synthesized using sol-gel auto-combustion method. The formation of ferrite particles was confirmed using Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FT-IR) spectra and powder X-ray Diffraction (XRD) techniques. The entire ferrite compositions were found to be pure phased with same symmetry as LaFeO3. The average crystallite size was calculated to be ∼60 nm. The ferrite compositions were observed to behave as semi-conductors, as their resistivity decreased with increasing temperature. These ferrite compositions were employed as catalysts in the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide solution (0.17 M). Pure LaFeO3 was found to have a very low catalytic activity towards the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide solution, while presence of copper in the lanthanum ferrite lattice was found to significantly enhance its catalytic activity. The rate constant in case of reactions catalysed by LaCu0.5Fe0.5O3 was nearly 25 times larger than that obtained from reactions catalysed by pure LaFeO3. However, chromium substitution was not found to influence the catalytic activity of lanthanum ferrites as chromium substituted lanthanum ferrites exhibited very low catalytic activity. This was explained on the basis of relative stability of oxidation states of the substituent ions and the presence of defects in the crystal lattice.

  3. Electrical and optical properties of nickel ferrite/polyaniline nanocomposite

    PubMed Central

    Khairy, M.; Gouda, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    Polyaniline–NiFe2O4 nanocomposites (PANI–NiFe2O4) with different contents of NiFe2O4 (2.5, 5 and 50 wt%) were prepared via in situ chemical oxidation polymerization, while the nanoparticles nickel ferrite were synthesized by sol–gel method. The prepared samples were characterized using some techniques such as Fourier transforms infrared (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Moreover, the electrical conductivity and optical properties of the nanocomposites were investigated. Pure (PANI) and the composites containing 2.5 and 5 wt% NiFe2O4 showed amorphous structures, while the one with 50 wt% NiFe2O4 showed a spinel crystalline structure. The SEM images of the composites showed different aggregations for the different nickel ferrite contents. FTIR spectra revealed to the formation of some interactions between the PANI macromolecule and the NiFe2O4 nanoparticles, while the thermal analyses indicated an increase in the composites stability for samples with higher NiFe2O4 nanoparticles contents. The electrical conductivity of PANI–NiFe2O4 nanocomposite was found to increase with the rise in NiFe2O4 nanoparticle content, probably due to the polaron/bipolaron formation. The optical absorption experiments illustrate direct transition with an energy band gap of Eg = 1.0 for PANI–NiFe2O4 nanocomposite. PMID:26199745

  4. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Berggren, M.H.; Jha, M.C.

    1989-10-01

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) investigated methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbents. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For this program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such as size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation. Two base case sorbents, a spherical pellet and a cylindrical extrude used in related METC-sponsored projects, were used to provide a basis for the aimed enhancement in durability and reactivity. Sorbent performance was judged on the basis of physical properties, single particle kinetic studies based on thermogravimetric (TGA) techniques, and multicycle bench-scale testing of sorbents. A sorbent grading system was utilized to quantify the characteristics of the new sorbents prepared during the program. Significant enhancements in both reactivity and durability were achieved for the spherical pellet shape over the base case formulation. Overall improvements to reactivity and durability were also made to the cylindrical extrude shape. The primary variables which were investigated during the program included iron oxide type, zinc oxide:iron oxide ratio, inorganic binder concentration, organic binder concentration, and induration conditions. The effects of some variables were small or inconclusive. Based on TGA studies and bench-scale tests, induration conditions were found to be very significant.

  5. Ferrous sulfate based low temperature synthesis and magnetic properties of nickel ferrite nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Tejabhiram, Y.; Pradeep, R.; Helen, A.T.; Gopalakrishnan, C.; Ramasamy, C.

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Novel low temperature synthesis of nickel ferrite nanoparticles. • Comparison with two conventional synthesis techniques including hydrothermal method. • XRD results confirm the formation of crystalline nickel ferrites at 110 °C. • Superparamagnetic particles with applications in drug delivery and hyperthermia. • Magnetic properties superior to conventional methods found in new process. - Abstract: We report a simple, low temperature and surfactant free co-precipitation method for the preparation of nickel ferrite nanostructures using ferrous sulfate as the iron precursor. The products obtained from this method were compared for their physical properties with nickel ferrites produced through conventional co-precipitation and hydrothermal methods which used ferric nitrate as the iron precursor. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the synthesis of single phase inverse spinel nanocrystalline nickel ferrites at temperature as low as 110 °C in the low temperature method. Electron microscopy analysis on the samples revealed the formation of nearly spherical nanostructures in the size range of 20–30 nm which are comparable to other conventional methods. Vibrating sample magnetometer measurements showed the formation of superparamagnetic particles with high magnetic saturation 41.3 emu/g which corresponds well with conventional synthesis methods. The spontaneous synthesis of the nickel ferrite nanoparticles by the low temperature synthesis method was attributed to the presence of 0.808 kJ mol{sup −1} of excess Gibbs free energy due to ferrous sulfate precursor.

  6. Pulsed-laser deposition of crystalline cobalt ferrite thin films at lower temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiles, David; Raghunathan, Arun; Nlebedim, Ikenna; Snyder, John

    2010-03-01

    Cobalt ferrite thin films have been proposed for various engineering applications due to their exceptional magnetic, magnetoelastic, magnetotransport, magnetooptical properties. In this research, cobalt ferrite thin films were grown on SiO2/Si(100) substrates using pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) technique at substrate temperatures ranging from 250 C to 600 C. It has been shown in this study, that polycrystalline films with (111)-preferred orientation can be prepared at substrate temperatures as low as 250 C, as opposed to a report of optimum 600 C substrate temperature [1]. Thermal expansion mismatch between the film and substrate was found to have a substantial effect on the magnetic properties of the cobalt ferrite films, due to the large magnetoelastic coupling of cobalt ferrite. The growth of crystalline cobalt ferrite films at such low temperatures indicates the potential to use cobalt ferrite for MEMS devices and sensor applications [2] including integration with a wider range of multilayered device structures. This research was supported by the UK EPSRC (EP/D057094) and the US NSF (DMR-0402716). [1] J. Zhou et. al, Applied Surface Sciences, 253 (2007), p. 7456. [2] J. A. Paulsen et. al., Journal of Applied Physics, 97 (2005), p. 044502.

  7. Effect of Er doping on the structural and magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prathapani, Sateesh; Vinitha, M.; Jayaraman, T. V.; Das, D.

    2014-05-01

    Nanocrystalline particulates of Er doped cobalt-ferrites CoFe(2-x)ErxO4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.04), were synthesized, using sol-gel assisted autocombustion method. Co-, Fe-, and Er- nitrates were the oxidizers, and malic acid served as a fuel and chelating agent. Calcination (400-600 °C for 4 h) of the precursor powders was followed by sintering (1000 °C for 4 h) and structural and magnetic characterization. X-ray diffraction confirmed the formation of single phase of spinel for the compositions x = 0, 0.01, and 0.02; and for higher compositions an additional orthoferrite phase formed along with the spinel phase. Lattice parameter of the doped cobalt-ferrites was higher than that of pure cobalt-ferrite. The observed red shift in the doped cobalt-ferrites indicates the presence of induced strain in the cobalt-ferrite matrix due to large size of the Er+3 compared to Fe+3. Greater than two-fold increase in coercivity (˜66 kA/m for x = 0.02) was observed in doped cobalt-ferrites compared to CoFe2O4 (˜29 kA/m).

  8. Thermodynamic and Kinetic Studies for Intensifying Selective Decomposition of Zinc Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Junwei; Liu, Wei; Qin, Wenqing; Jiao, Fen; Wang, Dawei; Liang, Chao

    2016-09-01

    A novel method to intensify the selective decomposition of zinc ferrite by a roasting process including reduction and magnetization stages was proposed. The relevant thermodynamic analysis with HSC [enthalpy (H), entropy (S) and heat capacity (C)] Chemistry 5.0 and experimental research on a laboratory scale were investigated. The thermodynamic calculations show that increasing the temperature and the CO amount promote not only the decomposition of zinc ferrite but also the formation of wustite, which can be converted to magnetite using sufficient CO2 at 823 K. The experimental results indicate that the zinc ferrite was decomposed into zinc oxide and wustite by reduction roasting under a gas mixture of 20% CO, 20% CO2 and 60% N2 at 1023 K for 90 min, and the decomposition degree of zinc ferrite reached 94%. Then, the generated wustite was transformed into magnetite by magnetization roasting under CO2 atmosphere at 823 K for 75 min, after which the selective extraction of zinc from zinc ferrite could be well achieved by low acid leaching. Increasing temperature and time were conducive to the magnetization within low temperature range, but when the temperature was above 823 K the zinc ferrite could be regenerated.

  9. Nano-ferrites for water splitting: unprecedented high photocatalytic hydrogen production under visible light.

    PubMed

    Mangrulkar, Priti A; Polshettiwar, Vivek; Labhsetwar, Nitin K; Varma, Rajender S; Rayalu, Sadhana S

    2012-08-21

    In the present investigation, hydrogen production via water splitting by nano-ferrites was studied using ethanol as the sacrificial donor and Pt as co-catalyst. Nano-ferrite is emerging as a promising photocatalyst with a hydrogen evolution rate of 8.275 μmol h(-1) and a hydrogen yield of 8275 μmol h(-1) g(-1) under visible light compared to 0.0046 μmol h(-1) for commercial iron oxide (tested under similar experimental conditions). Nano-ferrites were tested in three different photoreactor configurations. The rate of hydrogen evolution by nano-ferrite was significantly influenced by the photoreactor configuration. Altering the reactor configuration led to sevenfold (59.55 μmol h(-1)) increase in the hydrogen evolution rate. Nano-ferrites have shown remarkable stability in hydrogen production up to 30 h and the cumulative hydrogen evolution rate was observed to be 98.79 μmol h(-1). The hydrogen yield was seen to be influenced by several factors like photocatalyst dose, illumination intensity, irradiation time, sacrificial donor and presence of co-catalyst. These were then investigated in detail. It was evident from the experimental data that nano-ferrites under optimized reaction conditions and photoreactor configuration could lead to remarkable hydrogen evolution activity under visible light. Temperature had a significant role in enhancing the hydrogen yield.

  10. Effect of Er doping on the structural and magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Prathapani, Sateesh; Vinitha, M.; Das, D.; Jayaraman, T. V.

    2014-05-07

    Nanocrystalline particulates of Er doped cobalt-ferrites CoFe{sub (2−x)}Er{sub x}O{sub 4} (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.04), were synthesized, using sol-gel assisted autocombustion method. Co-, Fe-, and Er- nitrates were the oxidizers, and malic acid served as a fuel and chelating agent. Calcination (400–600 °C for 4 h) of the precursor powders was followed by sintering (1000 °C for 4 h) and structural and magnetic characterization. X-ray diffraction confirmed the formation of single phase of spinel for the compositions x = 0, 0.01, and 0.02; and for higher compositions an additional orthoferrite phase formed along with the spinel phase. Lattice parameter of the doped cobalt-ferrites was higher than that of pure cobalt-ferrite. The observed red shift in the doped cobalt-ferrites indicates the presence of induced strain in the cobalt-ferrite matrix due to large size of the Er{sup +3} compared to Fe{sup +3}. Greater than two-fold increase in coercivity (∼66 kA/m for x = 0.02) was observed in doped cobalt-ferrites compared to CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (∼29 kA/m)

  11. Magnetic properties and loss separation in iron-silicone-MnZn ferrite soft magnetic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Shen; Sun, Aizhi; Xu, Wenhuan; Zou, Chao; Yang, Jun; Dong, Juan

    2013-12-16

    This paper investigates the magnetic and structural properties of iron-based soft magnetic composites coated with silicone-MnZn ferrite hybrid. The organic silicone resin was added to improve the flexibility of the insulated iron powder and causes better adhesion between particles to increase the mechanical properties. Scanning electron microscopy and distribution maps show that the iron particle surface is covered with a thin layer of silicone-MnZn ferrite. Silicone-MnZn ferrite coated samples have higher permeability when compared with the non-magnetic silicone resin coated compacts. The real part of permeability increases by 34.18% when compared with the silicone resin coated samples at 20 kHz. In this work, a formula for calculating the total loss component by loss separation method is presented and finally the different parts of total losses are calculated. The results show that the eddy current loss coefficient is close to each other for the silicone-MnZn ferrite, silicone resin and MnZn ferrite coated samples (0.0078ferrite coated sample (k{sub 2} =1.4058) in comparison with other samples.

  12. Synthesis of magnetic nickel spinel ferrite nanospheres by a reverse emulsion-assisted hydrothermal process

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jilin; Shi Jianxin; Gong Menglian

    2009-08-15

    Nickel ferrite nanospheres were successfully synthesized by a reverse emulsion-assisted hydrothermal method. The reverse emulsion was composed of water, cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide, polyoxyethylene(10)nonyl phenyl ether, iso-amyl alcohol and hexane. During the hydrothermal process, beta-FeO(OH) and Ni{sub 0.75}Fe{sub 0.25}(CO{sub 3}){sub 0.125}(OH){sub 2}.0.38H{sub 2}O (INCHH) nanorods formed first and then transformed into nickel spinel ferrite nanospheres. The phase transformation mechanism is proposed based on the results of X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, etc. Nickel ferrite may form at the end of the INCHH nanorods or from the solution accompanied by the dissolution of beta-FeO(OH) and INCHH nanorods. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis shows that a few Fe{sup 3+} ions have been reduced to Fe{sup 2+} ions during the formation of nickel ferrite. The maximum magnetization of the nickel ferrite nanospheres obtained after hydrothermal reaction for 30 h is 55.01 emu/g, which is close to that of bulk NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. - Graphical abstract: Nickel ferrite nanospheres were obtained through a reverse emulsion-assisted hydrothermal process. The phase transformation as a function of reaction time was studied based on the XRD, TEM and EDS analyses.

  13. Cytotoxicity of nickel zinc ferrite nanoparticles on cancer cells of epithelial origin.

    PubMed

    Al-Qubaisi, Mothanna Sadiq; Rasedee, Abdullah; Flaifel, Moayad Husein; Ahmad, Sahrim H J; Hussein-Al-Ali, Samer; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Eid, Eltayeb E M; Zainal, Zulkarnain; Saeed, Mohd; Ilowefah, Muna; Fakurazi, Sharida; Mohd Isa, Norhaszalina; El Zowalaty, Mohamed Ezzat

    2013-01-01

    In this study, in vitro cytotoxicity of nickel zinc (NiZn) ferrite nanoparticles against human colon cancer HT29, breast cancer MCF7, and liver cancer HepG2 cells was examined. The morphology, homogeneity, and elemental composition of NiZn ferrite nanoparticles were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, respectively. The exposure of cancer cells to NiZn ferrite nanoparticles (15.6-1,000 μg/mL; 72 hours) has resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth determined by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. The quantification of caspase-3 and -9 activities and DNA fragmentation to assess the cell death pathway of the treated cells showed that both were stimulated when exposed to NiZn ferrite nanoparticles. Light microscopy examination of the cells exposed to NiZn ferrite nanoparticles demonstrated significant changes in cellular morphology. The HepG2 cells were most prone to apoptosis among the three cells lines examined, as the result of treatment with NiZn nanoparticles. In conclusion, NiZn ferrite nanoparticles are suggested to have potential cytotoxicity against cancer cells.

  14. Synthesis, microstructure, and magnetic properties of monosized MnxZnyFe3 - x - yO4 ferrite nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hayoung; Lee, Ji Sung; Min, Ji Hyun; Wu, Junhua; Kim, Young Keun

    2013-12-17

    We report the synthesis and characterization of ferrite nanocrystals which exhibit high crystallinity and narrow size distributions. The three types of samples including Zn ferrite, Mn ferrite, and Mn-Zn ferrite were prepared via a non-aqueous nanoemulsion method. The structural, chemical, and magnetic properties of the nanocrystals are analyzed by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, and physical property measurement system. The characterization indicates that the three types of ferrite nanocrystals were successfully produced, which show well-behaved magnetic properties, ferrimagnetism at 5 K and superparamagnetism at 300 K, respectively. In addition, the magnetization value of the ferrites increases with the increasing concentration of Mn.

  15. A correlative approach to segmenting phases and ferrite morphologies in transformation-induced plasticity steel using electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gazder, Azdiar A; Al-Harbi, Fayez; Spanke, Hendrik Th; Mitchell, David R G; Pereloma, Elena V

    2014-12-01

    Using a combination of electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy data, a segmentation procedure was developed to comprehensively distinguish austenite, martensite, polygonal ferrite, ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths in a thermo-mechanically processed low-Si, high-Al transformation-induced plasticity steel. The efficacy of the ferrite morphologies segmentation procedure was verified by transmission electron microscopy. The variation in carbon content between the ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths was explained on the basis of carbon partitioning during their growth.

  16. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Volume 2, Single particle kinetic studies of sulfidation and regeneration reactions of candidate zinc ferrite sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Silaban, A.; Harrison, D.P.

    1989-05-02

    AMAX Research & Development Center (AMAX R&D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such as size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  17. Comparative cytotoxic response of nickel ferrite nanoparticles in human liver HepG2 and breast MFC-7 cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Khan, M A Majeed; Alrokayan, Salman A

    2015-09-01

    Nickel ferrite nanoparticles (NPs) have received much attention for their potential applications in biomedical fields such as magnetic resonance imaging, drug delivery and cancer hyperthermia. However, little is known about the toxicity of nickel ferrite NPs at the cellular and molecular levels. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic responses of nickel ferrite NPs in two different types of human cells (i.e., liver HepG2 and breast MCF-7). Nickel ferrite NPs induced dose-dependent cytotoxicity in both types of cells, which was demonstrated by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT), neutral red uptake (NRU) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. Nickel ferrite NPs were also found to induce oxidative stress, which was evident by the depletion of glutathione and the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation. The mitochondrial membrane potential due to nickel ferrite NP exposure was also observed. The mRNA levels for the tumor suppressor gene p53 and the apoptotic genes bax, CASP3 and CASP9 were up-regulated, while the anti-apoptotic gene bcl-2 was down-regulated following nickel ferrite NP exposure. Furthermore, the activities of apoptotic enzymes (caspase-3 and caspase-9) were also higher in both types of cells treated with nickel ferrite NPs. Cytotoxicity induced by nickel ferrite was efficiently prevented by N-acetyl cysteine (ROS scavenger) treatment, which suggested that oxidative stress might be one of the possible mechanisms of nickel ferrite NP toxicity. We also observed that MCF-7 cells were slightly more susceptible to nickel ferrite NP exposure than HepG2 cells. This study warrants further investigation to explore the potential mechanisms of different cytotoxic responses of nickel ferrite NPs in different cell lines.

  18. Microstructural and antibacterial properties of zinc-substituted cobalt ferrite nanopowders synthesized by sol-gel methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanpo, Noppakun; Berndt, Christopher C.; Wang, James

    2012-10-01

    Zinc-substituted cobalt ferrite nanopowders were prepared via a sol-gel route using citric acid as a chelating agent. The influence of zinc concentration on the microstructure, crystal structure, surface wettability, surface roughness, and antibacterial property of zinc-substituted cobalt ferrite nanopowders was investigated systematically. The substitution of zinc influences slightly the microstructure, surface wettability, surface roughness, and crystal structure but strongly affects the antibacterial property of the cobalt ferrite nanopowders.

  19. Effect of Dy-doping on the structural and magnetic properties of Co-Zn ferrite nanocrystals for magnetocaloric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urcia-Romero, S.; Perales-Pérez, O.; Gutiérrez, G.

    2010-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles for magnetocaloric applications should combine small coercivity, low demagnetization temperature, and high pyromagnetic coefficients while keeping the magnetization as high as possible. The strong dependence of the magnetic properties of cobalt-zinc mixed ferrite with specific dopant species enables this material to be considered a promising candidate for magnetocaloric applications. On this basis, pure and Dy-doped Co0.7Zn0.3Fe2O4 cobalt-zinc ferrite nanocrystals have been synthesized by conventional and modified (i.e., flow rate controlled addition of reactants) coprecipitation routes. The modified approach allows the control of ferrite crystal growth at the nanoscale and hence tuning of the corresponding magnetic properties. The magnetic properties of the produced nanocrystals were determined as a function of their structure, nominal dopant concentration, and crystal size. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy analyses suggested both the actual incorporation of the dopants into the host ferrite lattice and the promoting effect on crystal size of the flow rate at which the reactants are contacted. The average crystallite size varied from 13 nm (no control of flow rate) to 28 nm when the ferrite was synthesized at 1 ml/min. Doping caused the maximum magnetization of the ferrite to decrease; this parameter dropped from 60 emu/g (nondoped ferrite) to 55 emu/g when the ferrite was doped with 0.01 at. % of Dy. The maximum magnetization of the Dy (y =0.01) Co-Zn ferrite went up to 62 emu/g when the synthesis was carried out under flow-controlled conditions. The presence of 0.01 at. % Dy in the ferrite caused the demagnetization temperature to decrease from 350 °C (nondoped ferrite) to 320 °C. The demagnetization temperature was further decreased down to 308 °C when the ferrite powders were synthesized under flow rate controlled conditions.

  20. A comparative assessment of the fracture toughness behavior of ferritic-martensitic steels and nanostructured ferritic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Hoelzer, David T.; Kim, Jeoung Han; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2017-02-01

    The Fe-Cr alloys with ultrafine microstructures are primary candidate materials for advanced nuclear reactor components because of their excellent high temperature strength and high resistance to radiation-induced damage such as embrittlement and swelling. Mainly two types of Fe-Cr alloys have been developed for the high temperature reactor applications: the quenched and tempered ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels hardened primarily by ultrafine laths and carbonitrides and the powder metallurgy-based nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) by nanograin structure and nanoclusters. This study aims at elucidating the differences and similarities in the temperature and strength dependences of fracture toughness in the Fe-Cr alloys to provide a comparative assessment of their high-temperature structural performance. The KJQ versus yield stress plots confirmed that the fracture toughness was inversely proportional to yield strength. It was found, however, that the toughness data for some NFAs were outside the band of the integrated dataset at given strength level, which indicates either a significant improvement or deterioration in mechanical properties due to fundamental changes in deformation and fracture mechanisms. When compared to the behavior of NFAs, the FM steels have shown much less strength dependence and formed narrow fracture toughness data bands at a significantly lower strength region. It appeared that at high temperatures ≥600 °C the NFAs cannot retain the nanostructure advantage of high strength and high toughness either by high-temperature embrittlement or by excessive loss of strength. Irradiation studies have revealed, however, that the NFAs have much stronger radiation resistance than tempered martensitic steels, such as lower radiation-induced swelling, finer helium bubble formation, lower irradiation creep rate and reduced low temperature embrittlement.

  1. A comparative assessment of the fracture toughness behavior of ferritic-martensitic steels and nanostructured ferritic alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Byun, Thak Sang; Hoelzer, David T.; Kim, Jeoung Han; ...

    2016-12-07

    The Fe-Cr alloys with ultrafine microstructures are primary candidate materials for advanced nuclear reactor components because of their excellent high temperature strength and high resistance to radiation-induced damage such as embrittlement and swelling. Mainly two types of Fe-Cr alloys have been developed for the high temperature reactor applications: the quenched and tempered ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels hardened primarily by ultrafine laths and carbonitrides and the powder metallurgy-based nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) by nanograin structure and nanoclusters. This paper aims at elucidating the differences and similarities in the temperature and strength dependences of fracture toughness in the Fe-Cr alloys to provide amore » comparative assessment of their high-temperature structural performance. The KJQ versus yield stress plots confirmed that the fracture toughness was inversely proportional to yield strength. It was found, however, that the toughness data for some NFAs were outside the band of the integrated dataset at given strength level, which indicates either a significant improvement or deterioration in mechanical properties due to fundamental changes in deformation and fracture mechanisms. When compared to the behavior of NFAs, the FM steels have shown much less strength dependence and formed narrow fracture toughness data bands at a significantly lower strength region. It appeared that at high temperatures ≥600 °C the NFAs cannot retain the nanostructure advantage of high strength and high toughness either by high-temperature embrittlement or by excessive loss of strength. Finally, irradiation studies have revealed, however, that the NFAs have much stronger radiation resistance than tempered martensitic steels, such as lower radiation-induced swelling, finer helium bubble formation, lower irradiation creep rate and reduced low temperature embrittlement.« less

  2. A comparative assessment of the fracture toughness behavior of ferritic-martensitic steels and nanostructured ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Hoelzer, David T.; Kim, Jeoung Han; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2016-12-07

    The Fe-Cr alloys with ultrafine microstructures are primary candidate materials for advanced nuclear reactor components because of their excellent high temperature strength and high resistance to radiation-induced damage such as embrittlement and swelling. Mainly two types of Fe-Cr alloys have been developed for the high temperature reactor applications: the quenched and tempered ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels hardened primarily by ultrafine laths and carbonitrides and the powder metallurgy-based nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) by nanograin structure and nanoclusters. This paper aims at elucidating the differences and similarities in the temperature and strength dependences of fracture toughness in the Fe-Cr alloys to provide a comparative assessment of their high-temperature structural performance. The KJQ versus yield stress plots confirmed that the fracture toughness was inversely proportional to yield strength. It was found, however, that the toughness data for some NFAs were outside the band of the integrated dataset at given strength level, which indicates either a significant improvement or deterioration in mechanical properties due to fundamental changes in deformation and fracture mechanisms. When compared to the behavior of NFAs, the FM steels have shown much less strength dependence and formed narrow fracture toughness data bands at a significantly lower strength region. It appeared that at high temperatures ≥600 °C the NFAs cannot retain the nanostructure advantage of high strength and high toughness either by high-temperature embrittlement or by excessive loss of strength. Finally, irradiation studies have revealed, however, that the NFAs have much stronger radiation resistance than tempered martensitic steels, such as lower radiation-induced swelling, finer helium bubble formation, lower irradiation creep rate and reduced low temperature embrittlement.

  3. Structural, magnetic, DC-AC electrical conductivities and thermo electric studies of MgCuZn Ferrites for microinductor applications.

    PubMed

    Varalaxmi, N; Sivakumar, K V

    2013-01-01

    Multilayer chip inductors (MLCIs) have been rapidly developed for electromagnetic applications. NiCuZn ferrites are the most preferred ferrite materials to produce MLCIs. MgCuZn ferrites have similar properties to those of NiCuZn ferrites. MgCuZn ferrites owing to their superior properties like low magnetostriction, environmental stability, low stress sensitivity, high resistivity and low cost can replace NiCuZn ferrites, which have a wide range of electronic applications. In view of this, a series of polycrystalline MgCuZn ferrites with generic formula MgxCu0.5Zn0.5-xFe2O4 (X=0.0 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5) are successfully synthesized by conventional double sintering technique. The samples were then characterized by the X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD) microstructural studies and the grain size was estimated using SEM micrographs. The sintered ferrites have been investigated in their magnetic, electrical and thermoelectric effect studies, which were carried out in the temperature range from 30 °C to 490 °C. The investigated ferrites are found to exhibit excellent properties that are suitable for the core materials in multilayer chip inductors, and the results are discussed.

  4. A Conditional Role of U2AF in Splicing of Introns with Unconventional Polypyrimidine Tracts▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Vinod; Singh, Ravinder

    2007-01-01

    Recognition of polypyrimidine (Py) tracts typically present between the branch point and the 3′ splice site by the large subunit of the essential splicing factor U2AF is a key early step in pre-mRNA splicing. Diverse intronic sequence arrangements exist, however, including 3′ splice sites lacking recognizable Py tracts, which raises the question of how general the requirement for U2AF is for various intron architectures. Our analysis of fission yeast introns in vivo has unexpectedly revealed that whereas introns lacking Py tracts altogether remain dependent on both subunits of U2AF, introns with long Py tracts, unconventionally positioned upstream of branch points, are unaffected by U2AF inactivation. Nevertheless, mutation of these Py tracts causes strong dependence on the large subunit U2AF59. We also find that Py tract diversity influences the requirement for the conserved C-terminal domain of U2AF59 (RNA recognition motif 3), which has been implicated in protein-protein interactions with other splicing factors. Together, these results suggest that in addition to Py tract binding by U2AF, supplementary mechanisms of U2AF recruitment and 3′ splice site identification exist to accommodate diverse intron architectures, which have gone unappreciated in biochemical studies of model pre-mRNAs. PMID:17709389

  5. Evaluation of the atoxigenic Aspergillus flavus strain AF36 in pistachio orchards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The atoxigenic strain Aspergillus flavus AF36, which has been extensively used as a biocontrol agent in commercial corn and cotton fields to reduce aflatoxin contamination, was applied in research pistachio orchards from 2002 to 2005 and in commercial pistachio orchards from 2008 to 2011. AF36 was a...

  6. Seladoeflavones A-F, six novel flavonoids from Selaginella doederleinii.

    PubMed

    Zou, ZhenXing; Xu, KangPing; Xu, PingSheng; Li, XiaoMin; Cheng, Fei; Li, Jing; Yu, Xia; Cao, DongSheng; Li, Dan; Zeng, Wei; Zhang, GuoGang; Tan, GuiShan

    2017-01-01

    Six new flavonoids, seladoeflavones A-F (1-6), were isolated from the whole herbs of Selaginella doederleinii, together with one known flavonoid (7). Their structures including absolute configuration were characterized on the basis of extensive spectroscopic methods including NMR, HRMS, and electronic circular dichroism (ECD). All compounds consist of an aryl substituent at the C-3' position of naringenin or apigenin skeletons, and compounds 1 and 6 were identified as R configurations, which are uncommonly encountered in nature. A possible biosynthetic pathway was postulated. In addition, bioassay of the isolates revealed that 5-7 exhibited moderate cytotoxicity against three human cancer cell lines NCI-H460, A549, and K562 in vitro with IC50 values ranging from 8.17 to 18.66μM.

  7. Optimised secure transmission through untrusted AF relays using link adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taki, Mehrdad; Sadeghi, Mohammad

    2016-05-01

    A new transmission scheme is presented for a two-hop relay network including two AF relays, considering physical layer security where relays are not able to detect signal with an acceptable bit error rate (BER) but the combined received signal is detected with an acceptable BER at the final receiver. It is assumed that there is no direct path between the transmitter and the receiver (relay network without diversity). Adaptive modulation and coding is utilised at the transmitter and transmission powers of the transmitter and of the relays are continuously adapted provisioning individual average power constraint for each node. Numerical evaluations show that an acceptable performance degradation is seen by the proposed secure relaying scheme compared to the optimum relay selection scheme without security constraint.

  8. Automation under suspicion--case flight AF-447 Air France.

    PubMed

    Martins, Edgard; Soares, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    The probes allow the pilot to control the aircraft speed was essential to the balance of the flight. Opinions of experts who claim that "the design of the plane would have exercised a not inconsiderable role in the occurrence of a disaster." These messages revealed a series of important operating errors in a zone of turbulence, "making the plane uncontrollable, leading to a rapid depressurization device, according to these reports. A lawsuit in Toulouse and in Brazil aims to recognition of the liability of Air France and Airbus not insignificant role in the design and operation of the aircraft in the event of catastrophe. Opinions are taken from senior pilots that no commercial aviation training for certain situations abnormal flight that, if realized, could have influenced the pilots of the AF-447 to remove the plane's fatal dive show what experiments performed in simulators for military pilots, who are permanently subject to critical flight situations.

  9. The leukemogenic CALM/AF10 fusion protein alters the subcellular localization of the lymphoid regulator Ikaros.

    PubMed

    Greif, P A; Tizazu, B; Krause, A; Kremmer, E; Bohlander, S K

    2008-05-01

    The t(10;11)(p13;q14) translocation leads to the fusion of the CALM and AF10 genes. This translocation can be found as the sole cytogenetic abnormality in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia and in malignant lymphomas. The expression of CALM/AF10 in primary murine bone marrow cells results in the development of an aggressive leukemia in a murine bone marrow transplantation model. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we identified the lymphoid regulator Ikaros as an AF10 interacting protein. Interestingly, Ikaros is required for normal development of lymphocytes, and aberrant expression of Ikaros has been found in leukemia. In a murine model, the expression of a dominant negative isoform of Ikaros causes leukemias and lymphomas. The Ikaros interaction domain of AF10 was mapped to the leucine zipper domain of AF10, which is required for malignant transformation both by the CALM/AF10 and the MLL/AF10 fusion proteins. The interaction between AF10 and Ikaros was confirmed by GST pull down and co-immunoprecipitation. Coexpression of CALM/AF10 but not of AF10 alters the subcellular localization of Ikaros in murine fibroblasts. The transcriptional repressor activity of Ikaros is reduced by AF10. These results suggest that CALM/AF10 might interfere with normal Ikaros function, and thereby block lymphoid differentiation in CALM/AF10 positive leukemias.

  10. Expression of MLL-AF4 or AF4-MLL fusions does not impact the efficiency of DNA damage repair.

    PubMed

    Castaño, Julio; Herrero, Ana B; Bursen, Aldeheid; González, Federico; Marschalek, Rolf; Gutiérrez, Norma C; Menendez, Pablo

    2016-05-24

    The most frequent rearrangement of the human MLL gene fuses MLL to AF4 resulting in high-risk infant B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). MLL fusions are also hallmark oncogenic events in secondary acute myeloid leukemia. They are a direct consequence of mis-repaired DNA double strand breaks (DNA-DSBs) due to defects in the DNA damage response associated with exposure to topoisomerase-II poisons such as etoposide. It has been suggested that MLL fusions render cells susceptible to additional chromosomal damage upon exposure to etoposide. Conversely, the genome-wide mutational landscape in MLL-rearranged infant B-ALL has been reported silent. Thus, whether MLL fusions compromise the recognition and/or repair of DNA damage remains unanswered. Here, the fusion proteins MLL-AF4 (MA4) and AF4-MLL (A4M) were CRISPR/Cas9-genome edited in the AAVS1 locus of HEK293 cells as a model to study MLL fusion-mediated DNA-DSB formation/repair. Repair kinetics of etoposide- and ionizing radiation-induced DSBs was identical in WT, MA4- and A4M-expressing cells, as revealed by flow cytometry, by immunoblot for γH2AX and by comet assay. Accordingly, no differences were observed between WT, MA4- and A4M-expressing cells in the presence of master proteins involved in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ; i.e.KU86, KU70), alternative-NHEJ (Alt-NHEJ; i.e.LigIIIa, WRN and PARP1), and homologous recombination (HR, i.e.RAD51). Moreover, functional assays revealed identical NHEJ and HR efficiency irrespective of the genotype. Treatment with etoposide consistently induced cell cycle arrest in S/G2/M independent of MA4/A4M expression, revealing a proper activation of the DNA damage checkpoints. Collectively, expression of MA4 or A4M does neither influence DNA signaling nor DNA-DSB repair.

  11. Mutant U2AF1 Expression Alters Hematopoiesis and Pre-mRNA Splicing In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, Cara Lunn; Ley, James N.; White, Brian S.; Kim, Sanghyun; Tibbitts, Justin; Shao, Jin; Ndonwi, Matthew; Wadugu, Brian; Duncavage, Eric J.; Okeyo-Owuor, Theresa; Liu, Tuoen; Griffith, Malachi; McGrath, Sean; Magrini, Vincent; Fulton, Robert S.; Fronick, Catrina; O’Laughlin, Michelle; Graubert, Timothy A.; Walter, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Heterozygous somatic mutations in the spliceosome gene U2AF1 occur in ~11% of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), the most common adult myeloid malignancy. It is unclear how these mutations contribute to disease. We examined in vivo hematopoietic consequences of the most common U2AF1 mutation using a doxycycline-inducible transgenic mouse model. Mice expressing mutant U2AF1(S34F) display altered hematopoiesis and changes in pre-mRNA splicing in hematopoietic progenitor cells by whole transcriptome analysis (RNA-seq). Integration with human RNA-seq datasets determined that common mutant U2AF1-induced splicing alterations are enriched in RNA processing genes, ribosomal genes, and recurrently-mutated MDS and acute myeloid leukemia-associated genes. These findings support the hypothesis that mutant U2AF1 alters downstream gene isoform expression, thereby contributing to abnormal hematopoiesis in MDS patients. PMID:25965570

  12. Catalysts prepared from copper-nickel ferrites for the steam reforming of methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yung-Han; Wang, Sea-Fue; Tsai, An-Pang; Kameoka, Satoshi

    2015-05-01

    In this study, Fe3O4-supported Cu and Ni catalysts are prepared through reduction of Cu-Ni (Ni1-xCuxFe2O4) ferrites. The Cu-Ni ferrites, synthesized using a solid-state reaction method, are reduced at temperatures from 240 °C to 500 °C in a H2 atmosphere. All ferrites are characterized with granular morphology and a smooth particle surface before reduction. For the CuFe2O4, Ni0.5Cu0.5Fe2O4 and NiFe2O4 ferrites reduced at 240, 300, and 400 °C, respectively, nanosized Cu and/or Ni particles (5-32 nm) and mesopores (5-30 nm) are distributed and adhered on the surfaces of Fe3O4 supports. After increasing the reduction temperature of NiFe2O4 ferrite to 500 °C, the Ni particles and mesopores disappear from the Fe3O4 surfaces, which is due to the formation of a Fe-Ni alloy covering on the Fe3O4 surfaces. The CuFe2O4 ferrite after H2 reduction at 240 °C exhibits the highest H2 production rate of 149 ml STP/min g-cat at 360 °C. The existence of Ni content in the Cu-Ni ferrites enhances the reverse water gas shift reaction, and raises the CO selectivity while reducing the CO2 selectivity. Formation of a Fe-Ni alloy exaggerates the trend and poisons the H2 production rate.

  13. Oleate Coated Magnetic Cores Based on Magnetite, Zn Ferrite and Co Ferrite Nanoparticles - Preparation, Physical Characterization and Biological Impact on Helianthus Annuus Photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ursache-Oprisan, Manuela; Foca-nici, Ecaterina; Cirlescu, Aurelian; Caltun, Ovidiu; Creanga, Dorina

    2010-12-02

    Sodium oleate was used as coating shell for magnetite, Zn ferrite and Co ferrite powders to stabilize them in the form of aqueous magnetic suspensions. The physical characterization was carried out by applying X-ray diffraction and magnetization measurements. Both crystallite size and magnetic core diameter ranged between 7 and 11 nm. The influence of magnetic nanoparticle suspensions (corresponding to magnetic nanoparticle levels of 10{sup -14}-10{sup -15}/cm{sup 3}) on sunflower seedlings was studied considering the changes in the photosynthesis pigment levels. Similar responses were obtained for magnetite and cobalt ferrite nanoparticle treatment consisting in the apparent inhibition of chlorophyll biosynthesis while for zinc ferrite nanoparticles some concentrations seemed to have stimulatory effects on the chlorophylls as well as on the carotene levels. But the chlorophyll ratio was diminished in the case of all three types of magnetic nanoparticles meaning their slight negative effect on the light harvesting complex II (LHC II) from the chloroplast membranes and consequently on the photosynthesis efficiency.

  14. Magneto acoustical emission in nanocrystalline Mn–Zn ferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Praveena, K.; Murthty, S.R.

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Mn{sub 0.4}Zn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} powders were prepared by microwave hydrothermal method. The powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope. The powders were sintered at different temperatures 400, 500, 600, 700, 800 and 900 °C/30 min using microwave sintering method. The grain size was estimated by scanning electron microscope. The room temperature dielectric and magnetic properties were studied in the frequency range (100 kHz–1.8 GHz). The magnetization properties were measured upto 1.5 T. The acoustic emission has been measured along the hysteresis loops from 80 K to Curie temperature. It is found that the magneto-acoustic emission (MAE) activity along hysteresis loop is proportional to the hysteresis losses during the same loop. This law has been verified on series of polycrystalline ferrites and found that the law is valid whatever the composition, the grain size and temperature. It is also found that the domain wall creation/or annihilation processes are the origin of the MAE. - Highlights: • The AE been measured along the hysteresis loops from 80 K to Curie temperature. • The MAE activity along hysteresis loop is proportional to P{sub h} during the same loop. • It is found that the domain wall creation/or annihilation processes are the origin of the MAE. - Abstract: Mn{sub 0.4}Zn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} powders were prepared by microwave hydrothermal method. The powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope. The powders were sintered at different temperatures 400, 500, 600, 700, 800 and 900 °C/30 min using microwave sintering method. The grain size was estimated by scanning electron microscope. The room temperature dielectric and magnetic properties were studied in the frequency range (100 kHz–1.8 GHz). The magnetization properties were measured upto 1.5 T. The acoustic emission has been measured along the hysteresis loops from 80 K to Curie

  15. The identification of GPR3 inverse agonist AF64394; the first small molecule inhibitor of GPR3 receptor function.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Thomas; Elster, Lisbeth; Nielsen, Søren Møller; Poda, Suresh Babu; Loechel, Frosty; Volbracht, Christiane; Klewe, Ib Vestergaard; David, Laurent; Watson, Stephen P

    2014-11-15

    The identification of the novel and selective GPR3 inverse agonist AF64394, the first small molecule inhibitor of GPR3 receptor function, is described. Structure activity relationships and syntheses based around AF64394 are reported.

  16. ROK AFS, Kwandae-ri, Korea. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1968-04-15

    KlmANCAF RI KCREA/kC, AFS K-6 1-54 AL L STATION STATION NAME YEARS MONTH PERCEfNT G ’F C., YS , 1Th VPR IC Lc AT CSP-F PIC P H-C F FRCf. CAILY C4SV...DS 301 iq WTIONS Op THIS pOrn AM OIomr ATA PRrCESSIN;G C[ S!CN ETAC, LSAF SURFACE WINDS AS#-EVILLE9 N. C. 28E01 PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF WIND...NNW VAREIL F -3.4 7.4 5.4 .7 _ 1.0 TOTAL NUMBER OF OISERVATIONS 146 1210 WS j 0--S (0. SO) SSIeo.. KDSTIO,. oP TIN PORN AN O.S.OC. I [~. [ATA

  17. Nonlinear spin wave instability processes in manganese substituted zinc Y-type hexagonal ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Richard G.

    The large magnetocrystalline anisotropy observed in hexagonal ferrites makes these materials ideally suited for high frequency millimeter-wave applications. However, the large microwave losses observed at low-power levels and the high-power handling capabilities of hexagonal ferrites need to be addressed prior to their wide acceptance in real devices. In order to address the above issues, measurements and analyses of the microwave field amplitude (h crit) required to parametrically excite nonlinear spin wave amplitude growth were performed on single crystal easy plane disks of Mn substituted Zn Y-type hexagonal ferrites at 9 GHz and room temperatures. Plots of the crit h dependence on the static magnetic field, termed "butterfly curves," were obtained and analyzed for the resonance saturation (RA), subsidiary absorption (SA), and parallel pumping (PP) configurations. In order to obtain the butterfly curve data and perform the analyses: (1) a state-of-the-art computer-controlled high-power microwave spectrometer was constructed, (2) the classical spin wave instability theory, originally developed by Suhl and Schloemann, was extended, and (3) instability measurements were performed on multiple Zn Y-type hexagonal ferrites samples for several pumping configurations and static field settings. The measurements and analyses performed here constitute the first time RS, SA, and PP spin wave instability butterfly curve analysis have all been performed in planar hexagonal ferrite samples. This work also corresponds to the first time that resonance saturation measurements and analyses were performed for static magnetic fields both at and in the vicinity of the ferromagnetic resonant field in a hexagonal ferrite. The data obtained as part of this work show that the microwave field amplitude required to parametrically excite nonlinear spin wave amplitude growth in hexagonal ferrites is similar to polycrystalline cubic ferrites, which are currently in use in microwave devices

  18. Microwave processed NiMg ferrite: Studies on structural and magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra Babu Naidu, K.; Madhuri, W.

    2016-12-01

    Ferrites are magnetic semiconductors realizing an important role in electrical and electronic circuits where electrical and magnetic property coupling is required. Though ferrite materials are known for a long time, there is a large scope in the improvement of their properties (vice sintering and frequency dependence of electrical and magnetic properties) with the current technological trends. Forth coming technology is aimed at miniaturization and smart gadgets, electrical components like inductors and transformers cannot be included in integrated circuits. These components are incorporated into the circuit as surface mount devices whose fabrication involves low temperature co-firing of ceramics and microwave monolithic integrated circuits technologies. These technologies demand low temperature sinter-ability of ferrites. This article presents low temperature microwave sintered Ni-Mg ferrites of general chemical formula Ni1-xMgxFe2O4 (x=0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.8, 1) for potential applications as transformer core materials. The series of ferrites are characterized using X-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared and vibrating sample magnetometer for investigating structural, morphological and magnetic properties respectively. The initial permeability is studied with magnesium content, temperature and frequency in the temperature range of 308 K-873 K and 42 Hz-5 MHz.

  19. A facile microwave synthetic route for ferrite nanoparticles with direct impact in magnetic particle hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Makridis, A; Chatzitheodorou, I; Topouridou, K; Yavropoulou, M P; Angelakeris, M; Dendrinou-Samara, C

    2016-06-01

    The application of ferrite magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in medicine finds its rapidly developing emphasis on heating mediators for magnetic hyperthermia, the ever-promising "fourth leg" of cancer treatment. Usage of MNPs depends largely on the preparation processes to select optimal conditions and effective routes to finely tailor MNPs. Microwave heating, instead of conventional heating offers nanocrystals at significantly enhanced rate and yield. In this work, a facile mass-production microwave hydrothermal synthetic approach was used to synthesize stable ferromagnetic manganese and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with sizes smaller than 14 nm from metal acetylacetonates in the presence of octadecylamine. Prolonging the reaction time from 15 to 60 min, led to ferrites with improved crystallinity while the sizes are slight increased. The high crystallinity magnetic nanoparticles showed exceptional magnetic heating parameters. In vitro application was performed using the human osteosarcoma cell line Saos-2 incubated with manganese ferrite nanoparticles. Hyperthermia applied in a two cycle process, while AC magnetic field remained on until the upper limit of 45 °C was achieved. The comparative results of the AC hyperthermia efficiency of ferrite nanoparticles in combination with the in vitro study coincide with the magnetic features and their tunability may be further exploited for AC magnetic hyperthermia driven applications.

  20. Chemical methodologies for preparation of micron and nanometer scale ferrites--a mini review of patents.

    PubMed

    Pant, Prita; Bhuvaneswari, Sundararaman; Ghosh, Narendra Nath

    2008-01-01

    Ferrites, with wide range of chemical compositions, have been studied extensively over the years as they have a plethora of applications such as magnetic read/write heads, transformer cores, antennas, microwave absorbers, deflecting yoke, high frequency transformers, catalysis, pigments etc. Particles of submicron size have attracted the attention of scientists and technologists in different fields because they exhibit many unique physical properties as compared to those of bulk materials and are in great demand. Traditional high temperature solid-state method for preparation of ferrites is associated with several limitations. The quest for synthesis of ultrafine ferrite materials has led to the development of various preparative methods. Several patents disclose different wet chemical techniques namely sol-gel, coprecipitation, hydrothermal, combustion, spray pyrolysis etc for preparation of variety of ferrites for wide range of applications. In this mini-review, several patented chemical methods have been discussed critically with specific examples along with the effect of synthetic routes on particle size formation. Applications of ferrite powders with different compositions prepared by the above mentioned patented methods have also been discussed in this review.

  1. Synthesis and properties of hybrid hydroxyapatite-ferrite (Fe3O4) particles for hyperthermia applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachenko, M. V.; Kamzin, A. S.

    2016-04-01

    Hybrid ceramics consisting of hydroxyapatite Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 and ferrite Fe3O4 were synthesized using a two-stage procedure. The first stage included the synthesis of Fe3O4 ferrite particles by co-precipitation and the synthesis of hydroxyapatite. In the second stage, the magnetic hybrid hydroxyapatite-ferrite bioceramics were synthesized by a thorough mixing of the obtained powders of carbonated hydroxyapatite and Fe3O4 ferrite taken in a certain proportion, pressing into tablets, and annealing in a carbon dioxide atmosphere for 30 min at a temperature of 1200°C. The properties of the components and hybrid particles were investigated using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The saturation magnetization of the hybrid ceramic composite containing 20 wt % Fe3O4 was found to be 12 emu/g. The hybrid hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2)-ferrite Fe3O4 ceramics, which are promising for the use in magnetotransport and hyperthermia treatment, were synthesized and investigated for the first time.

  2. Thermodynamic modelling of the formation of zinc-manganese ferrite spinel in electric arc furnace dust.

    PubMed

    Pickles, C A

    2010-07-15

    Electric arc furnace dust is generated when automobile scrap, containing galvanized steel, is remelted in an electric arc furnace. This dust is considered as a hazardous waste in most countries. Zinc is a major component of the dust and can be of significant commercial value. Typically, the majority of the zinc exists as zinc oxide (ZnO) and as a zinc-manganese ferrite spinel ((Zn(x)Mn(y)Fe(1-x-y))Fe(2)O(4)). The recovery of the zinc from the dust in metal recycling and recovery processes, particularly in the hydrometallurgical extraction processes, is often hindered by the presence of the mixed ferrite spinel. However, there is a paucity of information available in the literature on the formation of this spinel. Therefore, in the present research, the equilibrium module of HSC Chemistry 6.1 was utilized to investigate the thermodynamics of the formation of the spinel and the effect of variables on the amount and the composition of the mixed ferrite spinel. It is proposed that the mixed ferrite spinel forms due to the reaction of iron-manganese particulates with both gaseous oxygen and zinc, at the high temperatures in the freeboard of the furnace above the steel melt. Based on the thermodynamic predictions, methods are proposed for minimizing the formation of the mixed ferrite spinel.

  3. Morphological, Raman, electrical and dielectric properties of rare earth doped X-type hexagonal ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majeed, Abdul; Khan, Muhammad Azhar; ur Raheem, Faseeh; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Akhtar, Majid Niaz; Warsi, Muhammad Farooq

    2016-12-01

    The influence of rare-earth metals (La, Nd, Gd, Tb, Dy) on morphology, Raman, electrical and dielectric properties of Ba2NiCoRExFe28-xO46 ferrites were studied. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) exhibited the platelet like structure of these hexagonal ferrites. The surface morphology indicated the formation of ferrite grains in the nano-regime scale. The bands obtained at lower wave number may be attributed to the metal-oxygen vibration at octahedral site which confirm the development of hexagonal phase of these ferrites. The resonance peaks were observed in dielectric constant, dielectric loss factor and quality factor versus frequency graphs. These dielectric parameters indicate that these ferrites nano-materials are potential candidates in the high frequency applications. The enhancement in DC electric resistivity from 2.48×108 to 1.20×109 Ω cm indicates that the prepared materials are beneficial for decreasing the eddy current losses at high frequencies and for the fabrication of multilayer chip inductor (MLCI) devices.

  4. Synthesis, electrical and dielectric characterization of cerium doped nano copper ferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Malana, Muhammad Aslam Qureshi, Raheela Beenish; Ashiq, Muhammad Naeem; Zafar, Zafar Iqbal

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Lattice constant (a) and activation energy (Ea) as a function of Ce (cerium) content. - Highlights: • The simple and economic method has been adopted for the synthesis of nanoferrites. • The electrical resistivity increases with cerium concentration. • DC electrical resistivity of these materials favours their use in microwave devices. • Dielectric measurements show semiconductor nature of the synthesized ferrites. - Abstract: The nanosized CuFe{sub 2−x}Ce{sub x}O{sub 4} (x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8) ferrites doped with cerium are synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method. The synthesized materials are characterized by XRD, FTIR, TGA and SEM. XRD analysis of cerium substituted copper ferrites confirms the cubic spinel structure. The average crystallite size calculated by using Scherrer's formula ranges from 37 to 53 nm. The values of cell constant and cell volume vary with the dopant concentration. These variations can be explained in terms of their ionic radii. The DC electrical resistivity, measured by two point probe method, increases with increase in dopant concentration while it decreases with rise in temperature exhibiting semiconductor behaviour. Energy of activation of these ferrites is calculated by using Arrhenius type resistivity plots. Dielectric measurements of the synthesized compounds show exponential decrease in dielectric constant and dielectric loss factor with increase in frequency. This indicates the normal dielectric behaviour of ferrites.

  5. Ferrite Measurement in Austenitic and Duplex Stainless Steel Castings - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, C.D.; Zhou, G.; Ruprecht, W.

    1999-08-01

    The ability to determine ferrite rapidly, accurately and directly on a finished casting, in the solution annealed condition, can enhance the acceptance, save on manufacturing costs and ultimately improve service performance of duplex stainless steel cast products. If the suitability of a non-destructive ferrite determination methodology can be demonstrated for standard industrial measurement instruments, the production of cast secondary standards for calibration of these instruments is a necessity. With these concepts in mind, a series of experiments were carried out to demonstrate, in a non-destructive manner, the proper methodology for determining ferrite content. The literature was reviewed, with regard to measurement techniques and vagaries, an industrial ferrite measurement round-robin was conducted, the effects of casting surface finish, preparation of the casting surface for accurate measurement and the evaluation of suitable means for the production of cast secondary standards for calibration were systematically investigated. The data obtained from this research program provide recommendations to ensure accurate, repeatable, and reproducible ferrite measurement and qualifies the Feritscope for field use on production castings.

  6. Ferrite Measurement in Austenitic and Duplex Stainless Steel Castings - Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, C.D.; Zhou, G.; Ruprecht, W.

    1999-08-01

    The ability to determine ferrite rapidly, accurately and directly on a finished casting, in the solution annealed condition, can enhance the acceptance, save on manufacturing costs and ultimately improve service performance of duplex stainless steel cast products. If the suitability of a non-destructive ferrite determination methodology can be demonstrated for standard industrial measurement instruments, the production of cast secondary standards for calibration of these instruments is a necessity. With these concepts in mind, a series of experiments were carried out to demonstrate, in a non-destructive manner, the proper methodology for determining ferrite content. The literature was reviewed, with regard to measurement techniques and vagaries, an industrial ferrite measurement round-robin was conducted, the effects of casting surface finish, preparation of the casting surface for accurate measurement and the evaluation of suitable means for the production of cast secondary standards for calibration were systematically investigated. The data obtained from this research program provides recommendations to insure accurate, repeatable and reproducible ferrite measurement and qualifies the Feritscope for field use on production castings.

  7. Mixed Mg-Mn ferrites for high frequency applications processed by citrate precursor technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Gagan; Chand, Jagdish; Verma, Satish; Singh, M.

    2009-08-01

    Mg0.9Mn0.1InxFe2-x O4 (x = 0.1 and 0.2) and Mg0.9Mn0.1AlyFe2-y O4 (y = 0.1, 0.5 and 0.7) ferrites, with improved initial permeability and extremely low relative loss factor (RLF), were synthesized by the citrate precursor technique. Structural studies were made by using the x-ray diffraction technique and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which confirm the formation of single-phase spinel structure. The size of the particle was of the order of ~0.5 µm for the samples sintered at 1200 °C, which is smaller than that obtained for ferrite powders by the conventional ceramic method. The magnetic properties such as initial permeability and RLF with frequency, in the range 0.1-20 MHz, at different temperatures have been investigated. Initial permeability (μi) attains a very high value, 17342, for the In3+ doped ferrite series and for the Al3+ doped ferrite series the maximum value is 3785. The RLF was found to have low values and is of the order of 10-5-10-4 in the frequency range 0.1-20 MHz. In addition to this, an increase in the value of μi was observed with the rise in the temperature for all the series of ferrites.

  8. Co-Ti co-substitution of M-type hexagonal barium ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Huaiwu; Liu, Yinong; Liao, Yulong; Ma, Guokun; Yang, Hong

    2015-04-01

    This paper reports a study of Co-Ti equiatomic co-substitution of M-type hexagonal barium ferrites Ba(CoTi)xFe12-2xO19, with the objective to adjust coercivity to meet different application requirements. The ferrites, with x = 0.00-1.30, all exhibited the single-phase M-type barium ferrite structure. At x = 1.30, the saturation magnetization (MS) decreased by 27.7% to 47.5 Am2 kg-1 and the coercivity (HC) decreased from 4047 to 171 Oe, providing a wide control range of coercivity. Complex magnetic permeability (μ‧ and μ″) was measured to be μ‧max = 25 and μ″max = 1.5 (at 10 MHz). The value of μ‧ is much higher than that of un-doped barium ferrite (x = 0.00). Co-Ti substitution reduced the coercivity whilst increased magnetic permeability. These improvements in magnetic properties are attributed to Co and Ti occupancies at different sites in the barium ferrite crystalline structure. Substitution is preferred at 4f2, 2b and 2a sites at x < 0.50, but 2a and 4f1 sites at x < 1.15. In addition, the bulk density (ρ) of the sintered compound was found to increase with increasing Co-Ti substitution.

  9. Metal ferrite oxygen carriers for chemical looping combustion of solid fuels

    DOEpatents

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.; Fan, Yueying

    2017-01-31

    The disclosure provides a metal ferrite oxygen carrier for the chemical looping combustion of solid carbonaceous fuels, such as coal, coke, coal and biomass char, and the like. The metal ferrite oxygen carrier comprises MFe.sub.xO.sub.y on an inert support, where MFe.sub.xO.sub.y is a chemical composition and M is one of Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Co, Mn, and combinations thereof. For example, MFe.sub.xO.sub.y may be one of MgFe.sub.2O.sub.4, CaFe.sub.2O.sub.4, SrFe.sub.2O.sub.4, BaFe.sub.2O.sub.4, CoFe.sub.2O.sub.4, MnFeO.sub.3, and combinations thereof. The MFe.sub.xO.sub.y is supported on an inert support. The inert support disperses the MFe.sub.xO.sub.y oxides to avoid agglomeration and improve performance stability. In an embodiment, the inert support comprises from about 5 wt. % to about 60 wt. % of the metal ferrite oxygen carrier and the MFe.sub.xO.sub.y comprises at least 30 wt. % of the metal ferrite oxygen carrier. The metal ferrite oxygen carriers disclosed display improved reduction rates over Fe.sub.2O.sub.3, and improved oxidation rates over CuO.

  10. Adsorption of Pb(2+) from aqueous solution using spinel ferrite prepared from steel pickling sludge.

    PubMed

    Fang, Binbin; Yan, Yubo; Yang, Yang; Wang, Fenglian; Chu, Zhen; Sun, Xiuyun; Li, Jiansheng; Wang, Lianjun

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, spinel ferrite with high crystallinity and high saturation magnetization was successfully prepared from steel pickling sludge by adding iron source and precipitator in the hydrothermal condition. The obtained spinel ferrite was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), and Zeta potential methods and investigated as an adsorbent for removal of Pb(2+) from aqueous solution. Batch experiments were performed by varying the pH values, contact time, temperature and initial metal concentration. The result of pH impact showed that the adsorption of Pb(2+) was a pH dependent process, and the pH 5.8 ± 0.2 was found to be the optimum condition. The achieved experimental data were analyzed with various kinetic and isotherm models. The kinetic studies revealed that Pb(2+) adsorption onto spinel ferrite followed a pseudo-second order model, and the Langmuir isotherm model provided the perfect fit to the equilibrium experimental data. At different temperatures, the maximum Pb(2+) adsorption capacities calculated from the Langmuir equation were in the range of 126.5-175.4 mg/g, which can be in competition with other adsorbents. The thermodynamic results showed that the spinel ferrite could spontaneously and endothermically adsorb Pb(2+) from aqueous solution. The regeneration studies showed that spinel ferrite could be used five times (removal efficiency (%) >90%) by desorption with HNO3 reagent.

  11. Effects of Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Low-Carbon Steel with Magnesium-Based Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Feng, Pei-Hsien; Pan, Yan-Chi; Hwang, Weng-Sing; Su, Yen-Hao; Lu, Muh-Jung

    2016-10-01

    The effects of heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Mg-containing (7 ppm), low-carbon commercial steel (SS400) were investigated. Twenty different heat treatment paths were performed using a Gleeble 1500 thermomechanical simulator. It was observed by using an optical microscope that as the cooling rate increased and holding temperature decreased, the volume fractions of pearlite, Widmanstätten ferrite, and grain boundary allotriomorphs ferrite fell, whereas that of acicular ferrite (AF) increased. Quantifying the fractions of AF and other phases by using electron backscatter diffraction shows that the heat treatment path with a cooling rate of 20 K/s and holding temperature of 723 K (450 °C) induced the highest volume fraction (44 pct) of AF. As such, the toughness of the sample was increased 12.4 times compared with that observed in the sample containing 4 pct AF. Typical inclusions were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results showed that the magnesium-based complex inclusions could act as nucleation sites of AF. Inclusions with a size of about 5 μm can serve as heterogeneous nucleation sites for AF. Mg-containing SS400 steel also has excellent hot-ductility in the temperature range of 973 K to 1273 K (700 °C to 1000 °C), and the minimum percentage reduction in area (R.A pct) value of around 63 pct at 1073 K (800 °C).

  12. Vacancy-controlled ultrastable nanoclusters in nanostructured ferritic alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Z. W.; Yao, L.; Wang, X. -L.; ...

    2015-05-29

    A new class of advanced structural materials, based on the Fe-O-vacancy system, has exceptional resistance to high-temperature creep and excellent tolerance to extremely high-dose radiation. Although these remarkable improvements in properties compared to steels are known to be associated with the Y-Ti-O-enriched nanoclusters, the roles of vacancies in facilitating the nucleation of nanoclusters are a long-standing puzzle, due to the experimental difficulties in characterizing vacancies, particularly in-situ while the nanoclusters are forming. We report an experiment study that provides the compelling evidence for the presence of significant concentrations of vacancies in Y-Ti-O-enriched nanoclusters in a nanostructured ferritic alloy using amore » combination of state-of-the-art atom-probe tomography and in situ small angle neutron scattering. The nucleation of nanoclusters starts from the O-enriched solute clustering with vacancy mediation. The nanoclusters grow with an extremely low growth rate through attraction of vacancies and O:vacancy pairs, leading to the unusual stability of the nanoclusters.« less

  13. Vacancy-controlled ultrastable nanoclusters in nanostructured ferritic alloys

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Z. W.; Yao, L.; Wang, X.-L.; Miller, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    A new class of advanced structural materials, based on the Fe-O-vacancy system, has exceptional resistance to high-temperature creep and excellent tolerance to extremely high-dose radiation. Although these remarkable improvements in properties compared to steels are known to be associated with the Y-Ti-O-enriched nanoclusters, the roles of vacancies in facilitating the nucleation of nanoclusters are a long-standing puzzle, due to the experimental difficulties in characterizing vacancies, particularly in-situ while the nanoclusters are forming. Here we report an experiment study that provides the compelling evidence for the presence of significant concentrations of vacancies in Y-Ti-O-enriched nanoclusters in a nanostructured ferritic alloy using a combination of state-of-the-art atom-probe tomography and in situ small angle neutron scattering. The nucleation of nanoclusters starts from the O-enriched solute clustering with vacancy mediation. The nanoclusters grow with an extremely low growth rate through attraction of vacancies and O:vacancy pairs, leading to the unusual stability of the nanoclusters. PMID:26023747

  14. Thermal helium desorption behavior in advanced ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Akihiko; Sugano, R.; Matsushita, Y.; Ukai, S.

    2005-02-01

    Thermal helium desorption measurements were performed to investigate the difference in the helium trapping and accumulation behavior among a reduced activation ferritic (RAF) steel and oxide dispersion strengthening (ODS) steels after implantation of He+ ions at room temperature. Thermal helium desorption spectra (THDS) were obtained during annealing to 1200 °C at a heating rate of 1 °C/s. The THDS of the ODS steels are very similar to that of the RAF steel, except for the presence of the peak in the temperature range from 800 to 1000 °C, where the α γ transformation related helium desorption from the γ-phase is considered to occur in the 9Cr-ODS martensitic steels. The fraction of helium desorption becomes larger at higher temperatures, and this trend is increased with the amount of implanted helium. In the 9Cr-ODS steels, the fraction of helium desorption by bubble migration mechanism was smaller than that in the RAF steel. This suggests that the bubble formation was suppressed in the ODS steels. In the 12Cr-ODS steel, the fraction of helium desorption by bubble migration reached more than 90%, suggesting that the trapping capacity of martensite phase in the 9Cr-ODS steel is rather large.

  15. Direct dyes removal using modified magnetic ferrite nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic adsorbent nanoparticle was modified using cationic surface active agent. Zinc ferrite nanoparticle and cetyl trimethylammonium bromide were used as an adsorbent and a surface active agent, respectively. Dye removal ability of the surface modified nanoparticle as an adsorbent was investigated. Direct Green 6 (DG6), Direct Red 31 (DR31) and Direct Red 23 (DR23) were used. The characteristics of the adsorbent were studied using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effect of adsorbent dosage, initial dye concentration and salt was evaluated. In ternary system, dye removal of the adsorbent at 90, 120, 150 and 200 mg/L dye concentration was 63, 45, 30 and 23% for DR23, 97, 90, 78 and 45% for DR31 and 51, 48, 42 and 37% for DG6, respectively. It was found that dye adsorption onto the adsorbent followed Langmuir isotherm. The adsorption kinetic of dyes was found to conform to pseudo-second order kinetics. PMID:24991427

  16. Size and compositionally controlled manganese ferrite nanoparticles with enhanced magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vamvakidis, K.; Sakellari, D.; Angelakeris, M.; Dendrinou-Samara, C.

    2013-06-01

    A facile solvothermal approach was used to synthesize stable, superparamagnetic manganese ferrite nanoparticles with relatively small sizes (<10 nm) and enhanced magnetic features. Tetraethylene glycol has been used in all the syntheses as a biocompatible and stabilizing agent. By varying the oxidation state of manganese precursor, Mn(acac)2 to Mn(acac)3, different sizes, 8 and 5 nm, of MnFe2O4 nanoparticles were obtained respectively, while by tailoring the synthetic conditions iron-rich Mn0.77Fe2.23O4 nanoparticles have been isolated with identical sizes and enhanced saturation magnetization. The magnetization values increased from 58.2 to 68.3 Am2/kg and from 53.3 to 60.2 Am2/kg for the nanoparticles of 8 and 5 nm, respectively. Blocking temperature ( T B), ranging from 80 to 180 K, and anisotropy constant ( K eff), ranging from 1.5 × 105 to 4.9 × 105 J/m3, were found higher for the iron-rich samples and associated with size and composition effects.

  17. Method for preparing spherical ferrite beads and use thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Lauf, Robert J.; Anderson, Kimberly K.; Montgomery, Frederick C.; Collins, Jack L.

    2002-01-01

    The invention allows the fabrication of small, dense, highly polished spherical beads of hexagonal ferrites with selected compositions for use in nonreciprocal microwave and mm-wave devices as well as in microwave absorbent or reflective coatings, composites, and the like. A porous, generally spherical bead of hydrous iron oxide is made by a sol-gel process to form a substantially rigid bead having a generally fine crystallite size and correspondingly finely distributed internal porosity. The resulting gel bead is washed and hydrothermally reacted with a soluble alkaline earth salt (typically Ba or Sr) under conditions of elevated temperature and pressure to convert the bead into a mixed hydrous iron-alkaline earth oxide while retaining the generally spherical shape. This mixed oxide bead is then washed, dried, and calcined to produce the desired (BaFe.sub.12 O.sub.19 or SrFe.sub.12 O.sub.19) crystal structure. The calcined bead is then sintered to form a dense bead of the BaFe.sub.12 O.sub.19 and SrFe.sub.12 O.sub.19 phase suitable for polishing and incorporation into various microwave devices and components.

  18. Abnormal refraction of microwave in ferrite/wire metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongjie; Li, Bo; Zhou, Ji; Kang, Lei; Zhao, Qian; Li, Weibin

    2011-08-15

    We report the experimentally observed abnormal refraction in metamaterials (MMs) consisting of ferrite rods and metallic wires with two kinds of configurations. Negative refraction (NR) and positive refraction (PR) are demonstrated in an MM constructed with parallel-arranged rods and wires. The frequencies of both NR and PR can be adjusted dynamically and together by an applied magnetic field and the PR occurs at frequencies slightly lower than that of the NR. The NR is attributed to simultaneously negative effective permittivity and permeability, and the PR is resulted from positive effective permittivity and permeability with the positive effective permittivity originating from electromagnetic coupling between the closest rod and wire. By making the rod cross the wire to reduce the coupling, we observed sole NR in an MM consisting of the cross-arranged rods and wires. Theoretical analysis explained qualitatively the abnormal refraction behaviors of microwave for the two kinds of MMs and it is supported by the retrieved effective parameters and field distributions.

  19. Liquid-phase syntheses of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinkó, Katalin; Manek, Enikő; Meiszterics, Anikó; Havancsák, Károly; Vainio, Ulla; Peterlik, Herwig

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to synthesize cobalt-ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles using various liquid phase methods; sol-gel route, co-precipitation process, and microemulsion technique. The effects of experimental parameters on the particle size, size distribution, morphology, and chemical composition have been studied. The anions of precursors (chloride and nitrate), the solvents (water, n-propanol, ethanol, and benzyl alcohol), the precipitating agent (ammonia, sodium carbonate, and oxalic acid), the surfactants (polydimethylsiloxane, ethyl acetate, citric acid, cethyltrimethylammonium bromide, and sodium dodecil sulfate), their concentrations, and heat treatments were varied in the experiments. The smallest particles (around 40 nm) with narrow polydispersity and spherical shape could be achieved by a simple, fast sol-gel technique in the medium of propanol and ethyl acetate. The size characterization methods have also been investigated. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) provide the comparison of methods. The SAXS data correspond with the sizes detected by SEM and differ from DLS data. The crystalline phases, morphology, and chemical composition of the particles with different shapes have been analyzed by X-ray diffraction, SEM, and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer.

  20. Mn-ferrite nanoparticles via reverse microemulsions: synthesis and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scano, Alessandra; Ennas, Guido; Frongia, Francesca; La Barbera, Aurelio; López-Quintela, M. Arturo; Marongiu, Giaime; Paschina, Giorgio; Peddis, Davide; Pilloni, Martina; Vázquez-Vázquez, Carlos

    2011-07-01

    Mn-ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by thermal treatment at 800 °C of manganese and iron oxo-hydroxides obtained via water-in-oil microemulsions consisting of n-hexanol as continuous phase, cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) as the cationic surfactant and aqueous solutions of metal salts and precipitant agent (tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide) as reagents. Nanoparticles were synthesized using a multi-microemulsion approach. Two different co-precipitation routes are described depending on the Fe(II) or Fe(III) precursor salts. The influence of salt concentration and digestion process on the final products was examined. The nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction accompanied by Rietveld analysis, transmission electron microscopy, thermal analysis, infrared spectroscopy, and SQUID magnetometry. In all the synthesis reported in this study MnFe2O4 was observed only after thermal treatment at 800 °C of the as-prepared precursors. Almost spherical nanocrystalline MnFe2O4 ranging from 12 to 39 nm was obtained starting from chlorides or mixed chloride-sulfate salts as precursors. Low values of reduced remanent magnetization ( M r/ M s) and coercive field ( H c) induce to believe that a fraction of superparamagnetic particle is present at room temperature.

  1. The role of nickel in radiation damage of ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Osetskiy, Yury N.; Anento, Napoleon; Serra, Anna; Terentyev, Dmitry

    2014-11-26

    According to the modern theory damage evolution under neutron irradiation depends on the fraction of self interstitial atoms (SIAs) produced in the form of one-dimensionally (1-D) glissile clusters. These clusters, having a low interaction cross-section with other defects, sink mainly on grain boundaries and dislocations creating the so-called production bias. It is known empirically that addition of certain alloying elements affect many radiation effects, including swelling, however the mechanisms are unknown in many cases. In this paper we report the results of an extensive multi-technique atomistic level modeling of SIA clusters mobility in bcc Fe-Ni alloys with Ni content from 0.8 to 10 at.%. We have found that Ni interacts strongly with periphery of clusters affecting their mobility. The total effect is defined by all Ni atoms interacting with the cluster at the same time and can be significant even in low-Ni alloys. Thus 1nm (37SIAs) cluster is practically immobile at T < 500K in the Fe-0.8at.% Ni alloy. Increasing cluster size and Ni content enhance cluster immobilization. Furthermore, this effect should have quite broad consequences in swelling rate, matrix damage accumulation, radiation induced hardening, etc. and the results obtained help in better understanding and prediction of radiation effects in Fe-Ni ferritic alloys.

  2. Prediction of yield stress in highly irradiated ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windsor, Colin G.; Cottrell, Geoff; Kemp, Richard

    2008-03-01

    The design of any fusion power plant requires information on the irradiation hardening of low-activation ferritic/martensitic steels beyond the range of most present measurements. Neural networks have been used by Kemp et al (J. Nucl. Mater. 348 311-28) to model the yield stress of some 1811 irradiated alloys. The same dataset has been used in this study, but has been divided into a training set containing the majority of the dataset with low irradiation levels, and a test set which contains just those alloys which have been irradiated above a given level. For example some 4.5% of the alloys were irradiated above 30 displacements per atom. For this 'prediction' problem it is found that simpler networks with fewer inputs are advantageous. By using target-driven dimensionality reduction, linear combinations of the atomic inputs reduce the test residual below that achievable by adding inputs from single atoms. It is postulated that these combinations represent 'mechanisms' for the prediction of irradiated yield stress.

  3. Investigations of low-temperature neutron embrittlement of ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, K.; Mahmood, S.T.; Stoller, R.E.; Mansur, L.K.

    1992-12-31

    Investigations were made into reasons for accelerated embrittlement of surveillance specimens of ferritic steels irradiated at 50C at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel. Major suspects for the precocious embrittlement were a highly thermalized neutron spectrum,a low displacement rate, and the impurities boron and copper. None of these were found guilty. A dosimetry measurement shows that the spectrum at a major surveillance site is not thermalized. A new model of matrix hardening due to point defect clusters indicates little effect of displacement rate at low irradiation temperature. Boron levels are measured at 1 wt ppM or less, inadequate for embrittlement. Copper at 0.3 wt % and nickel at 0.7 wt % are shown to promote radiation strengthening in iron binary alloys irradiated at 50 to 60C, but no dependence on copper and nickel was found in steels with 0.05 to 0.22% Cu and 0.07 to 3.3% Ni. It is argued that copper impurity is not responsible for the accelerated embrittlement of the HFIR surveillance specimens. The dosimetry experiment has revealed the possibility that the fast fluence for the surveillance specimens may be underestimated because the stainless steel monitors in the surveillance packages do not record an unexpected component of neutrons in the spectrum at energies just below their measurement thresholds of 2 to 3 MeV.

  4. Vacancy-controlled ultrastable nanoclusters in nanostructured ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. W.; Yao, L.; Wang, X. -L.; Miller, M. K.

    2015-05-29

    A new class of advanced structural materials, based on the Fe-O-vacancy system, has exceptional resistance to high-temperature creep and excellent tolerance to extremely high-dose radiation. Although these remarkable improvements in properties compared to steels are known to be associated with the Y-Ti-O-enriched nanoclusters, the roles of vacancies in facilitating the nucleation of nanoclusters are a long-standing puzzle, due to the experimental difficulties in characterizing vacancies, particularly in-situ while the nanoclusters are forming. We report an experiment study that provides the compelling evidence for the presence of significant concentrations of vacancies in Y-Ti-O-enriched nanoclusters in a nanostructured ferritic alloy using a combination of state-of-the-art atom-probe tomography and in situ small angle neutron scattering. The nucleation of nanoclusters starts from the O-enriched solute clustering with vacancy mediation. The nanoclusters grow with an extremely low growth rate through attraction of vacancies and O:vacancy pairs, leading to the unusual stability of the nanoclusters.

  5. Effect Of Neodymium Substitution In Structural Characteristics Of Magnesium Ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Thankachan, Smitha; Binu, P. J.; Xavier, Sheena; Mohammed, E. M.

    2011-10-20

    The effect of Nd{sup 3+} substitution on the structural properties of Magnesium ferrite was studied in the series MgNd{sub x}Fe{sub 2-x}O{sub 4}, where x = 0 to 0.3 in steps of 0.05. The series was prepared by sol-gel technique which is one of the novel technique to prepare nanosized samples. Structural characterization was done using X-ray diffractometer and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer. XRD analysis reveals the prepared samples are single phasic till x = 0.2. From x0 = .25, a secondary phase of iron neodymium oxide appears along with the spinel phase. Particle size calculation shows the prepared samples are in the 9nm to 11 nm regime. Lattice parameter was found to increase with concentration of Nd. XRD and FTIR analysis confirmed spinel structure of the prepared samples. XRF result shows the expected composition of prepared samples. The frequency dependence of the dielectric constant in the range 100 Hz--120MHz was also studied

  6. Spin-phonon coupling in scandium doped gallium ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Keka R. E-mail: smyusuf@barc.gov.in; Mukadam, M. D.; Basu, S.; Yusuf, S. M. E-mail: smyusuf@barc.gov.in; Paul, Barnita; Roy, Anushree; Grover, Vinita; Tyagi, A. K.

    2015-03-28

    We embarked on a study of Scandium (Sc) doped (onto Ga site) gallium ferrite (GaFeO{sub 3}) and found remarkable magnetic properties. In both doped as well as parent compounds, there were three types of Fe{sup 3+} ions (depending on the symmetry) with the structure conforming to space group Pna2{sub 1} (Sp. Grp. No. 33) below room temperature down to 5 K. We also found that all Fe{sup 3+} ions occupy octahedral sites, and carry high spin moment. For the higher Sc substituted sample (Ga{sub 1−x}Sc{sub x}FeO{sub 3}: x = 0.3), a canted magnetic ordered state is found. Spin-phonon coupling below Néel temperature was observed in doped compounds. Our results indicated that Sc doping in octahedral site modifies spin-phonon interactions of the parent compound. The spin-phonon coupling strength was estimated for the first time in these Sc substituted compounds.

  7. The role of nickel in radiation damage of ferritic alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Osetskiy, Yury N.; Anento, Napoleon; Serra, Anna; ...

    2014-11-26

    According to the modern theory damage evolution under neutron irradiation depends on the fraction of self interstitial atoms (SIAs) produced in the form of one-dimensionally (1-D) glissile clusters. These clusters, having a low interaction cross-section with other defects, sink mainly on grain boundaries and dislocations creating the so-called production bias. It is known empirically that addition of certain alloying elements affect many radiation effects, including swelling, however the mechanisms are unknown in many cases. In this paper we report the results of an extensive multi-technique atomistic level modeling of SIA clusters mobility in bcc Fe-Ni alloys with Ni content frommore » 0.8 to 10 at.%. We have found that Ni interacts strongly with periphery of clusters affecting their mobility. The total effect is defined by all Ni atoms interacting with the cluster at the same time and can be significant even in low-Ni alloys. Thus 1nm (37SIAs) cluster is practically immobile at T < 500K in the Fe-0.8at.% Ni alloy. Increasing cluster size and Ni content enhance cluster immobilization. Furthermore, this effect should have quite broad consequences in swelling rate, matrix damage accumulation, radiation induced hardening, etc. and the results obtained help in better understanding and prediction of radiation effects in Fe-Ni ferritic alloys.« less

  8. Lanthana-bearing nanostructured ferritic steels via spark plasma sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasebani, Somayeh; Charit, Indrajit; Wu, Yaqiao; Burns, Jatuporn; Allahar, Kerry N.; Butt, Darryl P.; Cole, James I.; Alsagabi, Sultan F.

    2016-03-01

    A lanthana-containing nanostructured ferritic steel (NFS) was processed via mechanical alloying (MA) of Fe-14Cr-1Ti-0.3Mo-0.5La2O3 (wt.%) and consolidated via spark plasma sintering (SPS). In order to study the consolidation behavior via SPS, sintering temperature and dwell time were correlated with microstructure, density, microhardness and shear yield strength of the sintered specimens. A bimodal grain size distribution including both micron-sized and nano-sized grains was observed in the microstructure of specimens sintered at 850, 950 and1050 °C for 45 min. Significant densification occurred at temperatures greater than 950 °C with a relative density higher than 98%. A variety of nanoparticles, some enriched in Fe and Cr oxides and copious nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm with faceted morphology and enriched in La and Ti oxides were observed. After SPS at 950 °C, the number density of Cr-Ti-La-O-enriched nanoclusters with an average radius of 1.5 nm was estimated to be 1.2 × 1024 m-3. The La + Ti:O ratio was close to 1 after SPS at 950 and 1050 °C; however, the number density of nanoclusters decreased at 1050 °C. With SPS above 950 °C, the density improved but the microhardness and shear yield strength decreased due to partial coarsening of the grains and nanoparticles.

  9. Magnetic and electrical properties of In doped cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nongjai, Razia; Khan, Shakeel; Asokan, K.; Ahmed, Hilal; Khan, Imran

    2012-10-01

    Nanoparticles of CoFe2O4 and CoIn0.15Fe1.85O4 ferrites were prepared by citrate gel route and characterized to understand their structural, electrical, and magnetic properties. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were used to confirm the formation of single phase cubic spinel structure. The average grain sizes from the Scherrer formula were below 50 nm. Microstructural features were obtained by scanning electron microscope and compositional analysis by energy dispersive spectroscopy. The hysteresis curve shows enhancement in coercivity while reduction in saturation magnetization with the substitution of In3+ ions. Enhancement of coercivity is attributed to the transition from multidomain to single domain nature. Electrical properties, such as dc resistivity as a function of temperature and ac conductivity as a function of frequency and temperature were studied for both the samples. The activation energy derived from the Arrhenius equation was found to increase in the doped sample. The dielectric constant (ɛ') and dielectric loss (tan δ) are also studied as a function of frequency and temperature. The variation of dielectric properties ɛ', tan δ, and ac conductivity (σac) with frequency reveals that the dispersion is due to Maxwell-Wagner type of interfacial polarization in general and the hopping of charge between Fe2+ and Fe3+ as well as between Co2+ and Co3+ ions at B-sites. Magnetization and electrical property study showed its dominant dependence on the grain size.

  10. Ferroelectric and dielectric properties of ferrite-ferroelectric ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Elena Ciomaga, Cristina; Maria Neagu, Alexandra; Valentin Pop, Mihai; Mitoseriu, Liliana; Airimioaei, Mirela; Tascu, Sorin; Schileo, Giorgio; Galassi, Carmen

    2013-02-21

    Particulate composites of ferrite and ferroelectric phases with xNiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (NF) and (1 - x)Pb{sub 0.988}(Zr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48}){sub 0.976}Nb{sub 0.024}O{sub 3} (where x = 2, 10, 20, 30, 50, 70, and 100 wt. %) were prepared in situ by sol-gel method. The presence of a diphase composition was confirmed by X-ray diffraction while the microstructure of the composites was studied by scanning electron microscopy revealing a good mixing of the two phases and a good densification of the bulk ceramics. The dielectric permittivity shows usual dielectric dispersion behavior with increasing frequency due to Maxwell-Wagner interfacial polarization. AC conductivity measurements made in frequency range 1 Hz-1 MHz suggest that the conduction process is due to mixed polaron hopping. The effect of NF phase concentration on the P-E and M-H hysteresis behavior and dielectric properties of the composites was investigated. At low NF concentration a sharp ferro-paraelectric transition peak can be observed at around 360 Degree-Sign C while for higher NF concentrations a trend to a diffuse phase transition occurs. All the composite samples exhibit typical ferromagnetic hysteresis loops, indicating the presence of ordered magnetic structure.

  11. Moessbauer spectra of ferrite catalysts used in oxidative dehydrogenation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cares, W. R.; Hightower, J. W.

    1971-01-01

    Room temperature Mossbauer spectroscopy was used to examine bulk changes which occur in low surface area CoFe2O4 and CuFe2O4 catalysts as a result of contact with various mixtures of trans-2-butene and O2 during oxidative dehydrogenation reactions at about 420 C. So long as there was at least some O2 in the gas phase, the CoFe2O4 spectrum was essentially unchanged. However, the spectrum changed from a random spinel in the oxidized state to an inverse spinel as it was reduced by oxide ion removal. The steady state catalyst lies very near the fully oxidized state. More dramatic solid state changes occurred as the CuFe2O4 underwent reduction. Under severe reduction, the ferrite was transformed into Cu and Fe3O4, but it could be reversibly recovered by oxidation. An intense doublet located near zero velocity persisted in all spectra of CuFe2O4 regardless of the state of reduction.

  12. Tritium retention in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hatano, Y.; Abe, S.; Matsuyama, M.; Alimov, V.K.; Spitsyn, A.V.; Bobyr, N.P.; Cherkez, D.I.; Khripunov, B.I.; Golubeva, A.V.; Ogorodnikova, O.V.; Klimov, N.S.; Chernov, V.M.; Oyaidzu, M.; Yamanishi, T.

    2015-03-15

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are structural material candidates for breeding blankets of future fusion reactors. Therefore, tritium (T) retention in RAFM steels is an important problem in assessing the T inventory of blankets. In this study, specimens of RAFM steels were subjected to irradiation of 20 MeV W ions to 0.54 displacements per atom (dpa), exposure to high flux D plasmas at 400 and 600 K and that to pulsed heat loads. The specimens thus prepared were exposed to DT gas at 473 K. Despite severe modification in the surface morphology, heat loads had negligible effects on T retention. Significant increase in T retention at the surface and/or subsurface was observed after D plasma exposure. However, T trapped at the surface/subsurface layer was easily removed by maintaining the specimens in the air at about 300 K. Displacement damage led to increase in T retention in the bulk due to the trapping effects of defects, and T trapped was stable at 300 K. It was therefore concluded that displacement damages had the largest influence on T retention under the present conditions.

  13. New ferritic steels increase the thermal efficiency of steam turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, K.H.; Bakker, W.T.

    1996-12-31

    The further development of ferritic high-temperature-resistant 9--11%Cr steels has paved the way for fossil-fired power stations to be operated at turbine steam inlet temperatures of up to around 600 C and high supercritical steam pressures with a distinct improvement in thermal efficiency, a significant contribution towards reducing the environmental impact of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and CO{sub 2} emissions and to a more economical utilization of fossil fuels. Advances in the development of these steels are primarily attributable to joint research projects undertaken by the manufacturers and operators of power stations in Japan (EPDC), in the USA (EPRI) and in Europe (COST 501). The report gives details on the results achieved under EPRI Research Project RP 140 3-15/23 on the creep behavior of modified 9%CrMo cast steel used in the manufacture of steam turbines for coal-fired power plants. The modified 9%CrMo cast steel also offers great benefits as regards improving the useful life and thermal efficiency of existing power plants.

  14. Electrical and magnetic properties of chemically derived nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, N.; Narayanasamy, A.; Shinoda, K.; Chinnasamy, C. N.; Jeyadevan, B.; Greneche, J.-M.

    2007-07-01

    Nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite particles of 8nm grain size were synthesized by coprecipitation technique and subsequently suitably heat treated to obtain higher grain sizes. The experimentally observed changes in the dc electrical conductivity and Curie temperature with heat treatment have been attributed to the changes in the cation distributions as obtained from the Mössbauer and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements and to the grain size. The activation energies for conduction as determined from the Arrhenius plots suggest that the conductivity is due to hopping of both electrons and holes. The observed decrease in conductivity when the grain size is increased from 8to92nm is clearly due to the predominant effect of migration of some of the Fe3+ ions from octahedral to tetrahedral sites, as is evident from in-field Mössbauer and EXAFS measurements. But the higher conductivity of the 102 and 123nm particles compared to that of the 92nm particles is attributed to the higher grain size, since the cation distribution is found to be the same for all these three samples. The Néel temperature increases from 709K for the as-prepared particles (8nm)to809K for the 92nm particles because of the change in the cation distribution and it remains almost the same for the higher grain sizes as there is no further change in the cation distribution.

  15. Magnetoelectric Effect in Ceramics Based on Bismuth Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jartych, Elżbieta; Pikula, Tomasz; Kowal, Karol; Dzik, Jolanta; Guzdek, Piotr; Czekaj, Dionizy

    2016-04-01

    Solid-state sintering method was used to prepare ceramic materials based on bismuth ferrite, i.e., (BiFeO3)1 - x -(BaTiO3) x and Bi1 - x Nd x FeO3 solid solutions and the Aurivillius Bi5Ti3FeO15 compound. The structure of the materials was examined using X-ray diffraction, and the Rietveld method was applied to phase analysis and structure refinement. Magnetoelectric coupling was registered in all the materials using dynamic lock-in technique. The highest value of magnetoelectric coupling coefficient α ME was obtained for the Bi5Ti3FeO15 compound ( α ME ~ 10 mVcm-1 Oe-1). In the case of (BiFeO3)1 - x -(BaTiO3) x and Bi1 - x Nd x FeO3 solid solutions, the maximum α ME is of the order of 1 and 2.7 mVcm-1 Oe-1, respectively. The magnitude of magnetoelectric coupling is accompanied with structural transformation in the studied solid solutions. The relatively high magnetoelectric effect in the Aurivillius Bi5Ti3FeO15 compound is surprising, especially since the material is paramagnetic at room temperature. When the materials were subjected to a preliminary electrical poling, the magnitude of the magnetoelectric coupling increased 2-3 times.

  16. Precipitates and boundaries interaction in ferritic ODS steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallez, Nicolas; Hatzoglou, Constantinos; Delabrouille, Fredéric; Sornin, Denis; Chaffron, Laurent; Blat-Yrieix, Martine; Radiguet, Bertrand; Pareige, Philippe; Donnadieu, Patricia; Bréchet, Yves

    2016-04-01

    In the course of a recrystallization study of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels during extrusion, particular interest was paid to the (GB) Grain Boundaries interaction with precipitates. Complementary and corresponding characterization experiments using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Atom Probe Tomography (APT) have been carried out on a voluntarily interrupted extrusion or extruded samples. Microscopic observations of Precipitate Free Zones (PFZ) and precipitates alignments suggest precipitate interaction with migrating GB involving dissolution and Oswald ripening of the precipitates. This is consistent with the local chemical information gathered by EDX and APT. This original mechanism for ODS steels is similar to what had been proposed in the late 80s for similar observation made on Ti alloys reinforced by nanosized yttrium oxides: An interaction mechanism between grain boundaries and precipitates involving a diffusion controlled process of precipitates dissolution at grain boundaries. It is believed that this mechanism can be of primary importance to explain the mechanical behaviour of such steels.

  17. Humidity effects on adhesion of nickel-zinc ferrite in elastic contact with magnetic tape and itself

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.; Kusaka, T.; Maeda, C.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of humidity on the adhesion of Ni-Zn ferrite and magnetic tape in elastic contact with a Ni-Zn ferrite hemispherical pin in moist nitrogen were studied. Adhesion was independent of normal load in dry, humid, and saturated nitrogen. Ferrites adhere to ferrites in a saturated atmosphere primarily from the surface tension effects of a thin film of water adsorbed on the ferrite surfaces. The surface tension of the water film calculated from the adhesion results was 48 times 0.00001 to 56 times 0.00001 N/cm; the accepted value for water is 72.7 x 0.00001 N/cm. The adhesion of ferrite-ferrite contacts increased gradually with increases in relative humidity to 80 percent, but rose rapidly above 80 percent. The adhesion at saturation was 30 times or more greater than that below 80 percent relative humidity. Although the adhesion of magnetic tape - ferrite contacts remained low below 40 percent relative humidity and the effect of humidity was small, the adhesion increased considerably with increasing relative humidity above 40 percent. The changes in adhesion of elastic contacts were reversible on humidifying and dehumidifying.

  18. Synthesis and charcterization of Nanocrystalline NiCuZn Ferrite prepared by Sol-gel auto combution method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathod, Sopan M.; Shinde, Ashok B.

    2012-11-01

    Promising future applications of ferrite nanoparticles in medicine, making many devices like permanent magnets, memory storage devices etc. Ferrite nanoparticles have been the emerging focus of the recent scientific research. Therefore nanostructured powders of ferrites having chemical compositions [Ni0.8-xCu0.2Znxfe2O4], where x=0.3, 0.5, synthesised through nitrate citrate by sol-gel autocombustion method from stoichiometric mixture of their respective metal nitrate. The prepared powders were sintered at 400 0C and 600 0C for 4 hours. The structural, morphology, ferrite formation of powder were determined by X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) photograph of the samples and Infrared (IR) spectroscopy technique. The X-ray revealed the formation of nano-sized ferrite particles with cubic spinel structure and the cubic phase in the ferrite matrix. The IR shows the characteristic ferrite bonds were confirmed. The average crystalline particles sized were calculated by Scherrer formula. The average crystalline size obtained from XRD was found between 40 and 44nm. The lattice parameters, X-ray density and bond length are different parameters are calculated from XRD patterns. The UV-Visible Spectroscopy of prepared sample shows that the band gap energy in the range of semiconductor materials. The Coercivity was found to change in proportionally and sintering temperature with the particle sizes of the investigated ferrites.

  19. 46 CFR 54.25-20 - Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with properties enhanced by heat treatment (modifies...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with... VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-20 Low temperature operation—ferritic steels with properties enhanced by heat treatment (modifies UHT-5(c), UHT-6, UHT-23, and...

  20. 46 CFR 54.25-20 - Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with properties enhanced by heat treatment (modifies...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with... VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-20 Low temperature operation—ferritic steels with properties enhanced by heat treatment (modifies UHT-5(c), UHT-6, UHT-23, and...