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Sample records for acid aa induced

  1. AA-PMe, a novel asiatic acid derivative, induces apoptosis and suppresses proliferation, migration, and invasion of gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yue; Wang, Gang; Ge, Ying; Xu, Minjie; Tang, Shuainan; Gong, Zhunan

    2016-01-01

    Asiatic acid (AA; 2α,3β,23-trihydroxyurs-12-ene-28-oic acid) is widely used for medicinal purposes in many Asian countries due to its various bioactivities. A series of AA derivatives has been synthesized in attempts to improve its therapeutic potencies. Herein we investigated the anti-tumor activities of N-(2α,3β,23-acetoxyurs-12-en-28-oyl)-l-proline methyl ester (AA-PMe), a novel AA derivative. AA-PMe exhibited a stronger anti-cancer activity than its parent compound AA. AA-PMe inhibited the proliferation of SGC7901 and HGC27 human gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner but had no significant toxicity in human gastric mucosa epithelial cells (GES-1). AA-PMe induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and blocked G1-S transition, which correlated well with marked decreases in levels of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase CKD4, and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein, and increase in cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor P15. Further, AA-PMe induced apoptosis of human gastric cancer cells by affecting Bcl-2, Bax, c-Myc, and caspase-3. Moreover, AA-PMe suppressed the migration and invasion of human gastric cancer cells (SGC7901 and HGC27) cells by downregulating the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Overall, this study investigated the potential anti-cancer activities of AA-PMe including inducing apoptosis and suppressing proliferation, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells, as well as the underlying mechanisms, suggesting that AA-PMe is a promising anti-cancer drug candidate in gastric cancer therapy.

  2. AA-PMe, a novel asiatic acid derivative, induces apoptosis and suppresses proliferation, migration, and invasion of gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Yue; Wang, Gang; Ge, Ying; Xu, Minjie; Tang, Shuainan; Gong, Zhunan

    2016-01-01

    Asiatic acid (AA; 2α,3β,23-trihydroxyurs-12-ene-28-oic acid) is widely used for medicinal purposes in many Asian countries due to its various bioactivities. A series of AA derivatives has been synthesized in attempts to improve its therapeutic potencies. Herein we investigated the anti-tumor activities of N-(2α,3β,23-acetoxyurs-12-en-28-oyl)-l-proline methyl ester (AA-PMe), a novel AA derivative. AA-PMe exhibited a stronger anti-cancer activity than its parent compound AA. AA-PMe inhibited the proliferation of SGC7901 and HGC27 human gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner but had no significant toxicity in human gastric mucosa epithelial cells (GES-1). AA-PMe induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and blocked G1-S transition, which correlated well with marked decreases in levels of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase CKD4, and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein, and increase in cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor P15. Further, AA-PMe induced apoptosis of human gastric cancer cells by affecting Bcl-2, Bax, c-Myc, and caspase-3. Moreover, AA-PMe suppressed the migration and invasion of human gastric cancer cells (SGC7901 and HGC27) cells by downregulating the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Overall, this study investigated the potential anti-cancer activities of AA-PMe including inducing apoptosis and suppressing proliferation, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells, as well as the underlying mechanisms, suggesting that AA-PMe is a promising anti-cancer drug candidate in gastric cancer therapy. PMID:27073325

  3. EB1 levels are elevated in ascorbic Acid (AA)-stimulated osteoblasts and mediate cell-cell adhesion-induced osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Pustylnik, Sofia; Fiorino, Cara; Nabavi, Noushin; Zappitelli, Tanya; da Silva, Rosa; Aubin, Jane E; Harrison, Rene E

    2013-07-26

    Osteoblasts are differentiated mesenchymal cells that function as the major bone-producing cells of the body. Differentiation cues including ascorbic acid (AA) stimulation provoke intracellular changes in osteoblasts leading to the synthesis of the organic portion of the bone, which includes collagen type I α1, proteoglycans, and matrix proteins, such as osteocalcin. During our microarray analysis of AA-stimulated osteoblasts, we observed a significant up-regulation of the microtubule (MT) plus-end binding protein, EB1, compared with undifferentiated osteoblasts. EB1 knockdown significantly impaired AA-induced osteoblast differentiation, as detected by reduced expression of osteoblast differentiation marker genes. Intracellular examination of AA-stimulated osteoblasts treated with EB1 siRNA revealed a reduction in MT stability with a concomitant loss of β-catenin distribution at the cell cortex and within the nucleus. Diminished β-catenin levels in EB1 siRNA-treated osteoblasts paralleled an increase in phospho-β-catenin and active glycogen synthase kinase 3β, a kinase known to target β-catenin to the proteasome. EB1 siRNA treatment also reduced the expression of the β-catenin gene targets, cyclin D1 and Runx2. Live immunofluorescent imaging of differentiated osteoblasts revealed a cortical association of EB1-mcherry with β-catenin-GFP. Immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed an interaction between EB1 and β-catenin. We also determined that cell-cell contacts and cortically associated EB1/β-catenin interactions are necessary for osteoblast differentiation. Finally, using functional blocking antibodies, we identified E-cadherin as a major contributor to the cell-cell contact-induced osteoblast differentiation.

  4. The cytochrome P450 2AA gene cluster in zebrafish (Danio rerio): Expression of CYP2AA1 and CYP2AA2 and response to phenobarbital-type inducers

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, Akira; Bainy, Afonso C.D.; Woodin, Bruce R.; Goldstone, Jared V.; Stegeman, John J.

    2013-10-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2 gene family is the largest and most diverse CYP gene family in vertebrates. In zebrafish, we have identified 10 genes in a new subfamily, CYP2AA, which does not show orthology to any human or other mammalian CYP genes. Here we report evolutionary and structural relationships of the 10 CYP2AA genes and expression of the first two genes, CYP2AA1 and CYP2AA2. Parsimony reconstruction of the tandem duplication pattern for the CYP2AA cluster suggests that CYP2AA1, CYP2AA2 and CYP2AA3 likely arose in the earlier duplication events and thus are most diverged in function from the other CYP2AAs. On the other hand, CYP2AA8 and CYP2AA9 are genes that arose in the latest duplication event, implying functional similarity between these two CYPs. A molecular model of CYP2AA1 showing the sequence conservation across the CYP2AA cluster reveals that the regions with the highest variability within the cluster map onto CYP2AA1 near the substrate access channels, suggesting differing substrate specificities. Zebrafish CYP2AA1 transcript was expressed predominantly in the intestine, while CYP2AA2 was most highly expressed in the kidney, suggesting differing roles in physiology. In the liver CYP2AA2 expression but not that of CYP2AA1, was increased by 1,4-bis [2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)] benzene (TCPOBOP) and, to a lesser extent, by phenobarbital (PB). In contrast, pregnenolone 16α-carbonitrile (PCN) increased CYP2AA1 expression, but not CYP2AA2 in the liver. The results identify a CYP2 subfamily in zebrafish that includes genes apparently induced by PB-type chemicals and PXR agonists, the first concrete in vivo evidence for a PB-type response in fish. - Highlights: • A tandemly duplicated cluster of ten CYP2AA genes was described in zebrafish. • Parsimony and duplication analyses suggest pathways to CYP2AA diversity. • Homology models reveal amino acid positions possibly related to functional diversity. • The CYP2AA locus does not share synteny with

  5. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induced P-450 mediated arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism in chick embryo liver (CEL) occurs in parenchymal cells (PC) rather than in non-parenchymal cells (NPC)

    SciTech Connect

    Paroli, L.; Rifkind, A.B. )

    1992-02-26

    TCDD induces cytochrome P-450 mediated AA metabolism in CEL and changes the dominant metabolite(s) from {omega}-OH AA to AA epoxygenase products (EETs and EET-diols). PC and NPC from CEL were separated by differential centrifugation and characterized by morphology, immunohistochemistry and P-450 mediated xenobiotic metabolism; purities were >95%. PC and NPC, from 16 day old chick embryos treated for 5 days with TCDD or vehicle alone, were cultured for 48 hr, homogenized and incubated with ({sup 14}C)-AA {plus minus} NADPH. AA products were resolved by reverse phase HPLC. The major product in control PC, {omega}-OH AA was not significantly affected by TCDD. All of the AA metabolism was NADPH dependent. Control and TCDD treated PC had the same metabolite patterns as whole liver microsomes. Neither control nor TCDD treated NPC generated P-450 AA metabolites. Also co-culturing NPC with PC did not affect AA metabolism of either cell type. The findings indicate that TCDD-induced changes in AA metabolism are retained in culture and that hepatocytes rather than NPC effect P-450 mediated AA metabolism in both control and TCDD-induced CEL.

  6. Characterization of the radical-scavenging reaction of 2-O-substituted ascorbic acid derivatives, AA-2G, AA-2P, and AA-2S: a kinetic and stoichiometric study.

    PubMed

    Takebayashi, Jun; Tai, Akihiro; Gohda, Eiichi; Yamamoto, Itaru

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the antioxidant activity of three ascorbic acid (AA) derivatives O-substituted at the C-2 position of AA: ascorbic acid 2-glucoside (AA-2G), ascorbic acid 2-phosphate (AA-2P), and ascorbic acid 2-sulfate (AA-2S). The radical-scavenging activities of these AA derivatives and some common low molecular-weight antioxidants such as uric acid or glutathione against 1,1-diphenyl-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical cation (ABTS+), or galvinoxyl radical were kinetically and stoichiometrically evaluated under pH-controlled conditions. Those AA derivatives slowly and continuously reacted with DPPH radical and ABTS+, but not with galvinoxyl radical. They effectively reacted with DPPH radical under acidic conditions and with ABTS+ under neutral conditions. In contrast, AA immediately quenched all species of radicals tested at all pH values investigated. The reactivity of Trolox, a water-soluble vitamin E analogue, was comparable to that of AA in terms of kinetics and stoichiometrics. Uric acid and glutathione exhibited long-lasting radical-scavenging activity against these radicals under certain pH conditions. The radical-scavenging profiles of AA derivatives were closer to those of uric acid and glutathione rather than to that of AA. The number of radicals scavenged by one molecule of AA derivatives, uric acid, or glutathione was equal to or greater than that by AA or Trolox under the appropriate conditions. These data suggest the potential usage of AA derivatives as radical scavengers.

  7. The amino acid sequence of protein AA from a burro (Equus asinus).

    PubMed

    Sletten, Knut; Johnson, Kenneth H; Westermark, Per

    2003-09-01

    The primary structure of amyloid fibril protein AA of a burro has been determined by Edman degradation. The 80 amino acid residue long protein shows strong resemblance to that of other mammalian AA-proteins and differs from equine protein AA at 5 positions: Burro/horse positions 20 (Q/N), 44 (R,Q, K/K,Q), 59 (G,L/G,A), 61 (Q/E) and 65 (N/R).

  8. ASCORBIC ACID IS DECREASED IN INDUCED SPUTUM OF MILD ASTHMATICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Asthma is primarily an airways inflammatory disease, and the bronchial airways have been shown to be particularly susceptible to oxidant-induced tissue damage. The antioxidant ascorbic acid (AA) plays an essential role in defending against oxidant attack in the airways. Decreased...

  9. Protection of free radical-induced cytotoxicity by 2-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Yukako; Iomori, Atsuko; Ishii, Rie; Gohda, Eiichi; Tai, Akihiro

    2014-01-01

    The stable ascorbic acid (AA) derivative, 2-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid (AA-2G), exhibits vitamin C activity after enzymatic hydrolysis to AA. The biological activity of AA-2G per se has not been studied in detail, although AA-2G has been noted as a stable source for AA supply. The protective effect of AA-2G against the oxidative cell death of human dermal fibroblasts induced by incubating with 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) for 24 h was investigated in this study. AA-2G showed a significant protective effect against the oxidative stress in a concentration-dependent manner. AA-2G did not exert a protective effect during the initial 12 h of incubation, but had a significant protective effect in the later part of the incubation period. Experiments using a α-glucosidase inhibitor and comparative experiments using a stereoisomer of AA-2G confirmed that AA-2G had a protective effect against AAPH-induced cytotoxicity without being converted to AA. Our results provide an insight into the efficacy of AA-2G as a biologically interesting antioxidant and suggest the practical use of AA-2G even before being converted into AA as a beneficial antioxidant.

  10. Effects of arachidonic acid intake on inflammatory reactions in dextran sodium sulphate-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Naito, Yukiko; Ji, Xu; Tachibana, Shigehiro; Aoki, Satoko; Furuya, Mami; Tazura, Yoshiyuki; Miyazawa, Daisuke; Harauma, Akiko; Moriguchi, Toru; Nagata, Tomoko; Iwai, Naoharu; Ohara, Naoki

    2015-09-14

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the administration of oral arachidonic acid (AA) in rats with or without dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced inflammatory bowel disease. Male Wistar rats were administered AA at 0, 5, 35 or 240 mg/kg daily by gavage for 8 weeks. Inflammatory bowel disease was induced by replacing drinking water with 3 % DSS solution during the last 7 d of the AA dosing period. These animals passed loose stools, diarrhoea and red-stained faeces. Cyclo-oxygenase-2 concentration and myeloperoxidase activity in the colonic tissue were significantly increased in the animals given AA at 240 mg/kg compared with the animals given AA at 0 mg/kg. Thromboxane B2 concentration in the medium of cultured colonic mucosae isolated from these groups was found to be dose-dependently increased by AA, and the increase was significant at 35 and 240 mg/kg. Leukotriene B4 concentration was also significantly increased and saturated at 5 mg/kg. In addition, AA at 240 mg/kg promoted DSS-induced colonic mucosal oedema with macrophage infiltration. In contrast, administration of AA for 8 weeks, even at 240 mg/kg, showed no effects on the normal rats. These results suggest that in rats with bowel disease AA metabolism is affected by oral AA, even at 5 mg/kg per d, and that excessive AA may aggravate inflammation, whereas AA shows no effects in rats without inflammatory bowel disease.

  11. cAMP/PKA Pathways and S56 Phosphorylation Are Involved in AA/PGE2-Induced Increases in rNaV1.4 Current

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Hua; Fang, Yan-Jia; Liu, Dong-Dong; Chen, Ping; Mei, Yan-Ai

    2015-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) and its metabolites are important second messengers for ion channel modulation. The effects of extracellular application of AA and its non-metabolized analogue on muscle rNaV1.4 Na+ current has been studied, but little is known about the effects of intracellular application of AA on this channel isoform. Here, we report that intracellular application of AA significantly augmented the rNaV1.4 current peak without modulating the steady-state activation and inactivation properties of the rNaV1.4 channel. These results differed from the effects of extracellular application of AA on rNaV1.4 current. The effects of intracellular AA were mimicked by prostaglandin E2 but not eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA), the non-metabolized analogue of AA, and were eliminated by treatment with cyclooxygenase inhibitors, flufenamic acid, or indomethacin. AA/PGE2-induced activation of rNaV1.4 channels was mimicked by a cAMP analogue (db-cAMP) and eliminated by a PKA inhibitor, PKAi. Furthermore, inhibition of EP2 and EP4 (PGE2 receptors) with AH6809 and AH23848 reduced the intracellular AA/PGE2-induced increase of rNaV1.4 current. Two mutated channels, rNaV1.4S56A and rNaV1.4T21A, were designed to investigate the role of predicted phosphorylation sites in the AA/PGE2–mediated regulation of rNaV1.4 currents. In rNaV1.4S56A, the effects of intracellular db-cAMP, AA, and PGE2 were significantly reduced. The results of the present study suggest that intracellular AA augments rNaV1.4 current by PGE2/EP receptor-mediated activation of the cAMP/PKA pathway, and that the S56 residue on the channel protein is important for this process. PMID:26485043

  12. Performance of AA5052 alloy anode in alkaline ethylene glycol electrolyte with dicarboxylic acids additives for aluminium-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, DaPeng; Zhang, DaQuan; Lee, KangYong; Gao, LiXin

    2015-11-01

    Dicarboxylic acid compounds, i.e. succinic acid (SUA), adipic acid (ADA) and sebacic acid (SEA), are used as electrolyte additives in the alkaline ethylene glycol solution for AA5052 aluminium-air batteries. It shows that the addition of dicarboxylic acids lowers the hydrogen gas evolution rate of commercial AA5052 aluminium alloy anode. AA5052 aluminium alloy has wide potential window for electrochemical activity and better discharge performance in alkaline ethylene glycol solution containing dicarboxylic acid additives. ADA has the best inhibition effect for the self-corrosion of AA5052 anode among the three dicarboxylic acid additives. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) reveals that dicarboxylic acids and aluminium ions can form coordination complexes. Quantum chemical calculations shows that ADA has a smaller energy gap (ΔE, the energy difference between the lowest unoccupied orbital and the highest occupied orbital), indicating that ADA has the strongest interaction with aluminium ions.

  13. Ultraviolet-induced oxidation of ascorbic acid in a model juice system: identification of degradation products.

    PubMed

    Tikekar, Rohan V; Anantheswaran, Ramaswamy C; Elias, Ryan J; LaBorde, Luke F

    2011-08-10

    Degradation products of ultraviolet (UV-C, 254 nm) treated ascorbic acid (AA) are reported. Analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (HPLC-MS) conducted in a 0.5% malic acid model juice system (pH 3.3) demonstrated increased degradation of AA above untreated controls with concomitant increases in dehydroascorbic acid (DHA) and 2,3-diketogulonic acid (DKGA) levels. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy studies, conducted in phosphate buffer (pH 7.0) to increase detection sensitivity, demonstrated that ascorbyl radical (AA•) formation occurs simultaneously with AA degradation. Consistent with a previous study in which UV treatments were shown to accelerate dark storage degradation, AA• radicals continued to form for up to 200 min after an initial UV treatment. Results from this study suggest that the mechanism for UV-induced degradation is the same as the general mechanism for metal-catalyzed oxidation of AA in juice.

  14. AaCAT1 of the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti: a novel histidine-specific amino acid transporter from the SLC7 family.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Immo A; Boudko, Dmitri Y; Shiao, Shin-Hong; Voronov, Dmitri A; Meleshkevitch, Ella A; Drake, Lisa L; Aguirre, Sarah E; Fox, Jeffrey M; Attardo, Geoffrey M; Raikhel, Alexander S

    2011-03-25

    Insect yolk protein precursor gene expression is regulated by nutritional and endocrine signals. A surge of amino acids in the hemolymph of blood-fed female mosquitoes activates a nutrient signaling system in the fat bodies, which subsequently derepresses yolk protein precursor genes and makes them responsive to activation by steroid hormones. Orphan transporters of the SLC7 family were identified as essential upstream components of the nutrient signaling system in the fat body of fruit flies and the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti. However, the transport function of these proteins was unknown. We report expression and functional characterization of AaCAT1, cloned from the fat body of A. aegypti. Expression of AaCAT1 transcript and protein undergoes dynamic changes during postembryonic development of the mosquito. Transcript expression was especially high in the third and fourth larval stages; however, the AaCAT1 protein was detected only in pupa and adult stages. Functional expression and analysis of AaCAT1 in Xenopus oocytes revealed that it acts as a sodium-independent cationic amino acid transporter, with unique selectivity to L-histidine at neutral pH (K(0.5)(L-His) = 0.34 ± 0.07 mM, pH 7.2). Acidification to pH 6.2 dramatically increases AaCAT1-specific His(+)-induced current. RNAi-mediated silencing of AaCAT1 reduces egg yield of subsequent ovipositions. Our data show that AaCAT1 has notable differences in its transport mechanism when compared with related mammalian cationic amino acid transporters. It may execute histidine-specific transport and signaling in mosquito tissues.

  15. Vip3Aa induces apoptosis in cultured Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Kun; Mei, Si-Qi; Wang, Ting-Ting; Pan, Jin-Hua; Chen, Yue-Hua; Cai, Jun

    2016-09-15

    The vegetative insecticidal proteins (Vip) secreted by many Bacillus thuringiensis strains during their vegetative growth stage are regarded as second generation insecticidal proteins, as they share no sequence or structural homology with known crystal insecticidal proteins (Cry) and have a broad insecticidal spectrum. Compared with insecticidal crystal proteins (ICPs), the insecticidal mechanisms of Vips have been little studied. Here we investigated the mechanism responsible for Vip3Aa toxicity in cultured insect cells. Using, flow cytometry analyzes, TUNEL staining and DNA fragmentation assays, we show that Vip3Aa can induce apoptosis in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells and cause cells to arrest at the G2/M phase. We also show that Vip3Aa can disrupt mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), leading to the activation of Sf-caspase-1, suggesting that a mitochondrial mediated and caspase dependent pathway may be involved in Vip3Aa-induced apoptosis in Sf9 cells.

  16. Enhanced morphine- and cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization in alcohol-preferring AA rats.

    PubMed

    Honkanen, A; Mikkola, J; Korpi, E R; Hyytiä, P; Seppälä, T; Ahtee, L

    1999-03-01

    Locomotor stimulation and behavioral sensitization induced by acute and repeated treatment with alcohol, cocaine or morphine were studied in the alcohol-preferring AA (Alko, Alcohol), alcohol-avoiding ANA (Alko, Non-Alcohol) rats and non-selected Wistar rats. Daily treatment with alcohol (ethanol, 0.4 or 1.0 g/kg, IP) for 6 days had no effect on locomotor activity either in the AA or ANA rats. Acute cocaine (5, 10 or 20 mg/kg, IP) produced a locomotor stimulation in the animals of all lines studied, and there was no difference in this effect between the AA and ANA rats. During a 4-day repeated cocaine treatment, the AA rats became sensitized with the 10 mg/kg dose, while the ANA rats did not show any sensitization with this dose. With the 20 mg/kg cocaine dose, in addition to locomotor stimulation, the rats of all lines studied showed stereotyped behavior, which response was enhanced during repeated treatment. Morphine-induced locomotor stimulation was larger in the AA rats than in the ANA or Wistar rats both with 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg doses and only the AA rats were sensitized during 4-day treatment with the 1 mg/kg dose. With the 3.0 mg/kg morphine dose, only the AA rats showed a weak sensitization evident only during the initial 30 min after morphine injection. As the drug-induced behavioral sensitization is an important factor in the development of drug addiction, it is possible that mechanisms underlying the enhanced susceptibility of the AA rats to morphine- and cocaine-induced sensitization contribute to the high intake of alcohol and other abused drugs by these animals.

  17. Arachidonic acid enhances TPA-induced differentiation in human leukemia HL-60 cells via reactive oxygen species-dependent ERK activation.

    PubMed

    Chien, Chih-Chiang; Wu, Ming-Shun; Shen, Shing-Chuan; Yang, Liang-Yo; Wu, Wen-Shin; Chen, Yen-Chou

    2013-04-01

    The phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), is a potent stimulator of differentiation in human leukemia cells; however, the effects of arachidonic acid (AA) on TPA-induced differentiation are still unclear. In the present study, we investigated the contribution of AA to TPA-induced differentiation of human leukemia HL-60 cells. We found that treatment of HL-60 cells with TPA resulted in increases in cell attachment and nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT)-positive cells, which were significantly enhanced by the addition of AA. Stimulation of TPA-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by AA was detected in HL-60 cells via a DCHF-DA analysis, and the addition of the antioxidant, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), was able to reduce TPA+AA-induced differentiation in accordance with suppression of intracellular peroxide elevation by TPA+AA. Furthermore, activation of extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) by TPA+AA was identified in HL-60 cells, and the ERK inhibitor, PD98059, but not the JNK inhibitor, SP600125, inhibited TPA+AA-induced NBT-positive cells. Suppression of TPA+AA-induced ERK protein phosphorylation by PD98059 and NAC was detected, and AA enhanced ERK protein phosphorylation by TPA was in HL-60 cells. AA clearly increased TPA-induced HL-60 cell differentiation, as evidenced by a marked increase in CD11b expression, which was inhibited by NAC and PD98059 addition. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) as well as AA showed increased intracellular peroxide production and differentiation of HL-60 cells elicited by TPA. Evidence of AA potentiation of differentiation by TPA in human leukemia cells HL-60 via activation of ROS-dependent ERK protein phosphorylation was first demonstrated herein.

  18. Dabigatran and rivaroxaban do not affect AA- and ADP-induced platelet aggregation in patients receiving concomitant platelet inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Christoph B; Weik, Patrick; Meyer, Melanie; Weber, Susanne; Diehl, Philipp; Bode, Christoph; Moser, Martin; Zhou, Qian

    2016-08-01

    Dabigatran and rivaroxaban are novel, vitamin K-independent oral anticoagulants (NOACs) and act via antagonism of the coagulation factor (F) IIa (dabigatran) or FXa (rivaroxaban), respectively. Compared to vitamin-K-antagonists, NOACs have shown non-inferiority of risk and benefit in patients with non valvular atrial fibrillation (AF). In clinical practice there is increasing use of NOACs combined with platelet inhibitors in patients with AF and coronary artery disease. However, whether NOACs affect the function of platelet inhibitors remains incompletely known. This observational study aimed to assess the platelet function in patients receiving dabigatran or rivaroxaban and concomitant platelet inhibitors. A single centre observational study was performed analysing the platelet aggregation of patients treated with dabigatran or rivaroxaban with or without concomitant platelet inhibitors. Measurements before the initiation of NOAC therapy served as the respective control group. Platelet aggregation was measured by multiple electrode aggregometry and was induced with adenosine diphosphate (ADP, 6.5 µM) and arachidonic acid (AA, 0.5 mM), respectively. In order to evaluate whether NOACs interact with platelet inhibition by ASA or the P2Y12-antagonist clopidogrel, 87 patients were grouped according to their concomitant antiplatelet medication. Comparing the ADP- and AA-induced platelet aggregation in patients without concomitant platelet inhibitors (n = 45) no significant differences under therapy with dabigatran (d) or rivaroxaban (r) compared to the control group (c) were observed. In patients taking clopidogrel as a concomitant platelet inhibitor (n = 21), neither dabigatran nor rivaroxaban affected the ADP-induced platelet aggregation (c 20 ± 11, d 21 ± 14, r 18 ± 8 AU*min, p = 0.200). Patients receiving dabigatran or rivaroxaban in combination with ASA (n = 42; 21 ASA only, 21 ASA + clopidogrel) showed no significant differences of the AA-induced

  19. Glutamate dehydrogenase requirement for apoptosis induced by aristolochic acid in renal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Victor; Whyard, Terry; Bonala, Radha; Johnson, Francis; Grollman, Arthur

    2011-12-01

    Ingestion of aristolochic acids (AA) contained in herbal remedies results in a renal disease and, frequently, urothelial malignancy. The genotoxicity of AA in renal cells, including mutagenic DNA adduct formation, is well-documented. However, the mechanisms of AA-induced tubular atrophy and renal fibrosis are largely unknown. Epithelial cell death is a critical characteristic of these pathological conditions. To elucidate the mechanisms of AA-induced cytotoxicity, we explored AA-interacting proteins in tubular epithelial cells (TEC). We found that AA interacts with a mitochondrial enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and moderately inhibits its activity. We report that AA induces cell death in GDH-knockdown TEC preferentially via non-apoptotic means, whereas in GDH-positive cells, death was executed by both the non-apoptotic and apoptotic mechanisms. Apoptosis is an energy-reliant process and demands higher adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) consumption than does the non-apoptotic cell death. We found that, after AAI treatment, the ATP depletion is more pronounced in GDH-knockdown cells. When we reduced ATP in TEC cells by inhibition of glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration, cell death mode switched from apoptosis and necrosis to necrosis only. In addition, in cells incubated at low glucose and no glutamine conditions, oxaloacetate and pyruvate reduced AAI-induced apoptosis our data suggest that AAI-GDH interactions in TEC are critical for the induction of apoptosis by direct inhibition of GDH activity. AA binding may also induce changes in GDH conformation and promote interactions with other molecules or impair signaling by GDH metabolic products, leading to apoptosis.

  20. Nitro-Arachidonic Acid Prevents Angiotensin II-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction in a Cell Line of Kidney Proximal Tubular Cells.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Cassina, Adriana; Rios, Natalia; Peluffo, Gonzalo; Boggia, José; Radi, Rafael; Rubbo, Homero; Trostchansky, Andres

    2016-01-01

    Nitro-arachidonic acid (NO2-AA) is a cell signaling nitroalkene that exerts anti-inflammatory activities during macrophage activation. While angiotensin II (ANG II) produces an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial dysfunction in renal tubular cells, little is known regarding the potential protective effects of NO2-AA in ANG II-mediated kidney injury. As such, this study examines the impact of NO2-AA on ANG II-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in an immortalized renal proximal tubule cell line (HK-2 cells). Treatment of HK-2 cells with ANG II increases the production of superoxide (O2●-), nitric oxide (●NO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) expression, peroxynitrite (ONOO-) and mitochondrial dysfunction. Using high-resolution respirometry, it was observed that the presence of NO2-AA prevented ANG II-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. Attempting to address mechanism, we treated isolated rat kidney mitochondria with ONOO-, a key mediator of ANG II-induced mitochondrial damage, in the presence or absence of NO2-AA. Whereas the activity of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and ATP synthase (ATPase) were diminished upon exposure to ONOO-, they were restored by pre-incubating the mitochondria with NO2-AA. Moreover, NO2-AA prevents oxidation and nitration of mitochondrial proteins. Combined, these data demonstrate that ANG II-mediated oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction is abrogated by NO2-AA, identifying this compound as a promising pharmacological tool to prevent ANG II-induced renal disease.

  1. Heart disease induced by AAS abuse, using experimental mice/rats models and the role of exercise-induced cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Riezzo, I; De Carlo, D; Neri, M; Nieddu, A; Turillazzi, E; Fineschi, V

    2011-05-01

    The anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are all synthetic derivates of testosterone and are commonly used as sport performance enhancers in athletes. The heart is one of the organs most frequently affected by administration of anabolic steroids. A direct myocardial injury caused by AAS is supposed to determine marked hypertrophy in myocardial cells, extensive regional fibrosis and necrosis. A number of excellent studies, using animal models, were performed to evaluate the cardiac effects of AAS. It is known that exogenous administration induced cardiac hypertrophy in vitro and in vivo, and when combined with exercise, anabolic steroid use has been shown to change exercise-induced physiological cardiac hypertrophy to pathophysiological cardiac hypertrophy. However the molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. It's described that sudden cardiac death, myocardial infarct; ventricular remodelling and cardiomyopathy do to AAS is related to apoptosis and oxidative stress when associated with exercise. Mechanical stimuli and circulating humoral factors (TNF-α, HSP-70, IL-1β) released by the heart and peripheral organs are responsible. Testosterone and derivates can work through genomic (activation of specific androgen receptor, interaction with coactivators and co-repressors transcription factors, gene regulation) and non-genomic mechanism (membrane-receptor-second messenger cascades). Chronic AAS abuse results in different patterns of pathologic alterations, which depend on type, dose, frequency, and mode of use. The difficulty in interpreting experimental data on animals (mice and rats) lies in the diversity of experiments (the diversity of substances, which show different properties, different mice / rats by sex and age, duration of treatment with AAS, dosages used, type, scope and exercise duration).

  2. Arachidonic acid supplementation does not affect N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced renal preneoplastic lesions in young Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Emoto, Yuko; Kinoshita, Yuichi; Kimura, Ayako; Uehara, Norihisa; Yuri, Takashi; Shikata, Nobuaki; Hamazaki, Tomohito; Tsubura, Airo

    2013-04-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is naturally found in human breast milk. AA, together with docosahexaenoic acid, is commonly added as a functional food ingredient to commercial infant formula worldwide, in accordance with the international standards of Codex Alimentarius. However, few studies of the possible renal carcinogenic effects of AA supplementation during neonatal life have been performed. The effect of dietary AA supplementation in dams during gestation and lactation was investigated on N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced preneoplastic lesions in the kidneys of young Lewis rats. Dams were fed a 2.0% AA diet or a basal diet (<0.01% AA). At birth (postnatal day 0), male and female pups received a single intraperitoneal injection of 35 mg/kg MNU or vehicle. Renal morphology was examined after 7, 14, 21, 28 and 60 days. Histopathologically, renal preneoplastic lesions, such as nephroblastomatosis and mesenchymal cell proliferation, were found on day 60 in both the MNU-treated groups. There was no significant difference in lesion incidence of 38% in the basal diet group and 31% in the AA diet group. In conclusion, an AA-rich diet for dams during gestation and lactation does not modify MNU-induced renal preneoplastic lesions in their offspring.

  3. Enterococcus faecalis lipoteichoic acid suppresses Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-8 expression in human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Im, Jintaek; Baik, Jung Eun; Kim, Kyoung Whun; Kang, Seok-Seong; Jeon, Jun Ho; Park, Ok-Jin; Kim, Hyun Young; Kum, Kee-Yeon; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-08-01

    Periodontitis is caused by multi-bacterial infection and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Enterococcus faecalis are closely associated with inflammatory periodontal diseases. Although lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of A. actinomycetemcomitans (Aa.LPS) and lipoteichoic acid of E. faecalis (Ef.LTA) are considered to be major virulence factors evoking inflammatory responses, their combinatorial effect on the induction of chemokines has not been investigated. In this study, we investigated the interaction between Aa.LPS and Ef.LTA on IL-8 expression in human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells. Aa.LPS, but not Ef.LTA, substantially induced IL-8 expression at the protein and mRNA levels. Interestingly, Ef.LTA suppressed Aa.LPS-induced IL-8 expression without affecting the binding of Aa.LPS to Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. Ef.LTA reduced Aa.LPS-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, including ERK, JNK and p38 kinase. Furthermore, Ef.LTA inhibited the Aa.LPS-induced transcriptional activities of the activating protein 1, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein and nuclear factor-kappa B transcription factors, all of which are known to regulate IL-8 gene expression. Ef.LTA augmented the expression of IL-1 receptor-associated kinase-M (IRAK-M), a negative regulator of TLR intracellular signaling pathways, in the presence of Aa.LPS at both the mRNA and protein levels. Small interfering RNA silencing IRAK-M reversed the attenuation of Aa.LPS-induced IL-8 expression by Ef.LTA. Collectively, these results suggest that Ef.LTA down-regulates Aa.LPS-induced IL-8 expression in human PDL cells through up-regulation of the negative regulator IRAK-M.

  4. Experimental study of albumin and lysozyme adsorption onto acrylic acid (AA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Omid; Modarress, Hamid; Noroozi, Mehdi

    2004-03-01

    Many commercial soft contact lenses are based on poly-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and acrylic acid (AA) hydrogels. The adsorption of proteins, albumin and lysozyme, on such contact lens surfaces may cause problems in their applications. In this work the adsorption of proteins, albumin and lysozyme, on hydrogel surfaces, AA and HEMA, was investigated as a function of concentration of protein. Also the effects of pH and ionic strength of protein solution on the adsorption of protein were examined. The obtained results indicated that the degree of adsorption of protein increased with the concentration of protein, and the adsorption of albumin on HEMA surface at the studied pHs (6.2-8.6) was higher than AA surface, whereas the adsorption of lysozyme on AA surface at the same pHs was higher than HEMA. The change in ionic strength of protein solution affected the proteins adsorption on both AA and HEMA surfaces. Also, the amount of sodium ions deposited on the AA surface was much higher than HEMA surface. This effect can be related to the negative surface charge of AA and its higher tendency for adsorption of sodium ions compared to the HEMA surface.

  5. Effects of dexpanthenol on acetic acid-induced colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cagin, Yasir Furkan; Parlakpinar, Hakan; Vardi, Nigar; Polat, Alaadin; Atayan, Yahya; Erdogan, Mehmet Ali; Tanbek, Kevser

    2016-01-01

    While the pathogenesis of acetic acid (AA)-induced colitis is unclear, reactive oxygen species are considered to have a significant effect. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the therapeutic potential of dexpanthenol (Dxp) on the amelioration of colitis in rats. Group I (n=8; control group) was intrarectally administered 1 ml saline solution (0.9%); group II [n=8; AA] was administered 4% AA into the colon via the rectum as a single dose for three consecutive days; group III (n=8; AA + Dxp) was administered AA at the same dosage as group II from day 4, and a single dose of Dxp was administered intraperitoneally; and group IV (n=8; Dxp) was administered Dxp similarly to Group III. Oxidative stress and colonic damage were assessed via biochemical and histologic examination methods. AA treatment led to an increase in oxidative parameters and a decrease in antioxidant systems. Histopathological examination showed that AA treatment caused tissue injury and increased caspase-3 activity in the distal colon and triggered apoptosis. Dxp treatment caused biochemical and histopathological improvements, indicating that Dxp may have an anti-oxidant effect in colitis; therefore, Dxp may be a potential therapeutic agent for the amelioration of IBD. PMID:27882101

  6. Effects of dexpanthenol on acetic acid-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Cagin, Yasir Furkan; Parlakpinar, Hakan; Vardi, Nigar; Polat, Alaadin; Atayan, Yahya; Erdogan, Mehmet Ali; Tanbek, Kevser

    2016-11-01

    While the pathogenesis of acetic acid (AA)-induced colitis is unclear, reactive oxygen species are considered to have a significant effect. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the therapeutic potential of dexpanthenol (Dxp) on the amelioration of colitis in rats. Group I (n=8; control group) was intrarectally administered 1 ml saline solution (0.9%); group II [n=8; AA] was administered 4% AA into the colon via the rectum as a single dose for three consecutive days; group III (n=8; AA + Dxp) was administered AA at the same dosage as group II from day 4, and a single dose of Dxp was administered intraperitoneally; and group IV (n=8; Dxp) was administered Dxp similarly to Group III. Oxidative stress and colonic damage were assessed via biochemical and histologic examination methods. AA treatment led to an increase in oxidative parameters and a decrease in antioxidant systems. Histopathological examination showed that AA treatment caused tissue injury and increased caspase-3 activity in the distal colon and triggered apoptosis. Dxp treatment caused biochemical and histopathological improvements, indicating that Dxp may have an anti-oxidant effect in colitis; therefore, Dxp may be a potential therapeutic agent for the amelioration of IBD.

  7. Nadroparin sodium activates Nrf2/HO-1 pathway in acetic acid-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Yalniz, Mehmet; Demirel, Ulvi; Orhan, Cemal; Bahcecioglu, Ibrahim Halil; Ozercan, Ibrahim Hanefi; Aygun, Cem; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Sahin, Kazim

    2012-06-01

    Effects of nadroparin sodium, a low molecular weight heparin, in colitis was investigated by analyzing proteins implicated in nuclear factor E2-related factor-2/heme oxygenase-1 (Nrf2/HO-1) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathways. Twenty-eight rats were used. Colitis was induced by acetic acid (AA). Nadroparin sodium was given to prevention and treatment groups in addition to AA. Colitis was assessed histologically and levels of proteins were analyzed with Western blot. Nadroparin not only prevented and ameliorated the AA-induced colitis histopathologically but also decreased expression of colon NF-κB, activator protein-1, cyclooxygenase-2, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and IL-6, which were significantly increased in group AA compared to control. The accumulation of Nrf2 in nuclear fraction and HO-1 found low in group AA was increased with nadroparin (p < 0.05). The mean malondialdehyde level increased with AA and was decreased significantly with nadroparin prevention and treatment (p < 0.001). Nadroparin sodium has both protective and therapeutic effects against colonic inflammation via exerting anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects by modulating Nrf2/HO-1 and NF-κB pathways.

  8. Dietary linoleic acid elevates endogenous 2-AG and anandamide and induces obesity.

    PubMed

    Alvheim, Anita R; Malde, Marian K; Osei-Hyiaman, Douglas; Lin, Yu Hong; Pawlosky, Robert J; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten; Frøyland, Livar; Hibbeln, Joseph R

    2012-10-01

    Suppressing hyperactive endocannabinoid tone is a critical target for reducing obesity. The backbone of both endocannabinoids 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and anandamide (AEA) is the ω-6 fatty acid arachidonic acid (AA). Here we posited that excessive dietary intake of linoleic acid (LA), the precursor of AA, would induce endocannabinoid hyperactivity and promote obesity. LA was isolated as an independent variable to reflect the dietary increase in LA from 1 percent of energy (en%) to 8 en% occurring in the United States during the 20th century. Mice were fed diets containing 1 en% LA, 8 en% LA, and 8 en% LA + 1 en% eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) + docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in medium-fat diets (35 en% fat) and high-fat diets (60 en%) for 14 weeks from weaning. Increasing LA from 1 en% to 8 en% elevated AA-phospholipids (PL) in liver and erythrocytes, tripled 2-AG + 1-AG and AEA associated with increased food intake, feed efficiency, and adiposity in mice. Reducing AA-PL by adding 1 en% long-chain ω-3 fats to 8 en% LA diets resulted in metabolic patterns resembling 1 en% LA diets. Selectively reducing LA to 1 en% reversed the obesogenic properties of a 60 en% fat diet. These animal diets modeled 20th century increases of human LA consumption, changes that closely correlate with increasing prevalence rates of obesity. In summary, dietary LA increased tissue AA, and subsequently elevated 2-AG + 1-AG and AEA resulting in the development of diet-induced obesity. The adipogenic effect of LA can be prevented by consuming sufficient EPA and DHA to reduce the AA-PL pool and normalize endocannabinoid tone.

  9. Aristolochic acid-induced apoptosis and G2 cell cycle arrest depends on ROS generation and MAP kinases activation.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Victor; Whyard, Terry C; Waltzer, Wayne C; Grollman, Arthur P; Rosenquist, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Ingestion of aristolochic acids (AAs) contained in herbal remedies results in a renal disease and, frequently, urothelial malignancy. The genotoxicity of AA in renal cells, including mutagenic DNA adducts formation, is well documented. However, the mechanisms of AA-induced tubular atrophy and renal fibrosis are largely unknown. To better elucidate some aspects of this process, we studied cell cycle distribution and cell survival of renal epithelial cells treated with AAI at low and high doses. A low dose of AA induces cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase via activation of DNA damage checkpoint pathway ATM-Chk2-p53-p21. DNA damage signaling pathway is activated more likely via increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) caused by AA treatment then via DNA damage induced directly by AA. Higher AA concentration induced cell death partly via apoptosis. Since mitogen-activated protein kinases play an important role in cell survival, death and cell cycle progression, we assayed their function in AA-treated renal tubular epithelial cells. ERK1/2 and p38 but not JNK were activated in cells treated with AA. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of ERK1/2 and p38 as well as suppression of ROS generation with N-acetyl-L-cysteine resulted in the partial relief of cells from G2/M checkpoint and a decline of apoptosis level. Cell cycle arrest may be a mechanism for DNA repair, cell survival and reprogramming of epithelial cells to the fibroblast type. An apoptosis of renal epithelial cells at higher AA dose might be necessary to provide space for newly reprogrammed fibrotic cells.

  10. The Effect of Ascorbic Acid and Garlic Administration on Lead-Induced Apoptosis in Rat Offspring's Eye Retina

    PubMed Central

    Khordad, Elnaz; Fazel, Alireza; Ebrahimzadeh Bideskan, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Lead toxicity induces retinal cell apoptosis. Vitamin C and garlic may decrease lead-induced apoptosis. This study was undertaken to investigate vitamin C and garlic protective effects on lead-induced apoptosis in eye retina. Methods: Pregnant Wistar rats (n = 72) were divided randomly into 9 groups: (L) treated rats with lead acetate in drinking water and (L+AA) with leaded water and vitamin C intraperitoneally;(L+G), the rats received leaded-water and garlic juice via gavage; (L+AA+G) treated rats with leaded water, ascorbic acid, and garlic juice, (AA) with ascorbic acid, and (G) with garlic juice; (AA+G) treated rats with vitamin C and garlic juice and (Sh) with tap water plus normal hydrogen chloride (HCl) and glucose; normal (N). After 21-day lactation, blood lead level (BLL) in rats was measured, and then their offspring and the rat offspring's eyes were removed and processed for using TUNEL method. TUNEL positive cells in the eye retina were counted and all groups were compared. Results: BLL increased in L group compared to the control groups and decreased significantly in L + G, L + AA, and L+ AA + G groups compared to L group (P<0.05). TUNELL positive cell number in eye retina significantly increased in L group compared to control groups (P<0.05) and decreased in L+ G, L+ AA, and L+AA + G groups compared to L group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Garlic juice and ascorbic acid administration during pregnancy and lactation may protect lead-induced apoptosis in rat offspring's eye retina. PMID:23999717

  11. Inhibition of serine/threonine phosphatase enhances arachidonic acid-induced [Ca2+]i via protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Saino, Tomoyuki; Watson, Eileen L

    2009-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) regulates intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in a variety of cell types including salivary cells. In the present study, the effects of serine/threonine phosphatases on AA-induced Ca(2+) signaling in mouse parotid acini were determined. Mice were euthanized with CO2. Treatment of acini with the serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor calyculin A blocked both thapsigargin- and carbachol-induced Ca2+ entry but resulted in an enhancement of AA-induced Ca2+ release and entry. Effects were mimicked by the protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) inhibitor tautomycin but were inhibited by the PP2A inhibitor okadaic acid. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor PKI(14-22) significantly attenuated AA-induced enhancement of Ca2+ release and entry in the presence of calyculin A, whereas it had no effect on calyculin A-induced inhibition of thapsigargin-induced Ca2+ responses. The ryanodine receptor (RyR) inhibitor, tetracaine, and StHt-31, a peptide known to competitively inhibit type II PKA regulatory subunit binding to PKA-anchoring protein (AKAP), abolished calyculin A enhancement of AA-induced Ca2+ release and entry. StHt-31 also abolished forskolin potentiation of 4-chloro-3-ethylphenol (4-CEP) and AA on Ca2+ release but had no effect on 8-(4-methoxyphenylthio)-2'-O-methyladenosine-3',5'-cAMP potentiation of 4-CEP responses. Results suggest that inhibition of PP1 results in an enhancement of AA-induced [Ca2+]i via PKA, AKAP, and RyRs.

  12. Stability of 100 homo and heterotypic coiled-coil a-a' pairs for ten amino acids (A, L, I, V, N, K, S, T, E, and R).

    PubMed

    Acharya, Asha; Rishi, Vikas; Vinson, Charles

    2006-09-26

    We present the thermal stability monitored by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy at 222 nm of 100 heterodimers that contain all possible coiled-coil a-a' pairs for 10 amino acids (I, V, L, N, A, K S, T, E, and R). This includes the stability of 36 heterodimers for 6 amino acids (I, V, L, N, A, and K) previously described and 64 new heterodimers including the 4 amino acids (S, T, E, and R). We have calculated a double mutant alanine thermodynamic cycle to determine a-a' pair coupling energies to evaluate which a-a' pairs encourage specific dimerization partners. The four new homotypic a-a' pairs (T-T, S-S, R-R, E-E) are repulsive relative to A-A and have destabilizing coupling energies. Among the 90 heterotypic a-a' pairs, the stabilizing coupling energies contain lysine or arginine paired with either an aliphatic or a polar amino acid. The range in coupling energies for each amino acid reveals its potential to regulate dimerization specificity. The a-a' pairs containing isoleucine and asparagine have the greatest range in coupling energies and thus contribute dramatically to dimerization specificity, which is to encourage homodimerization. In contrast, the a-a' pairs containing charged amino acids (K, R, and E) show the least range in coupling energies and promiscuously encourage heterodimerization.

  13. Kolaviron and L-Ascorbic Acid Attenuate Chlorambucil-Induced Testicular Oxidative Stress in Rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Chlorambucil (4-[4-[bis(2-chloroethyl)amino]phenyl]butanoic acid) is an alkylating agent, indicated in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Kolaviron (KV), a biflavonoid complex from Garcinia kola, and L-ascorbic acid (AA) are known to protect against oxidative damage in vivo. This study evaluates the protective capacity of KV and AA on chlorambucil-induced oxidative stress in the testes of rat. Twenty male Wistar rats (180–200 g) were randomized into four groups: I: control, II: chlorambucil (0.2 mg/kg b.w.), III: 0.2 mg/kg chlorambucil and 100 mg/kg KV, and IV: 0.2 mg/kg chlorambucil and 100 mg/kg AA. After 14 days of treatments, results indicated that chlorambucil caused significant reduction (P < 0.05) in testicular vitamin C and glutathione by 32% and 39%, respectively, relative to control. Similarly, activities of testicular GST, SOD, and CAT reduced significantly by 48%, 47%, and 49%, respectively, in chlorambucil-treated rats relative to control. Testicular MDA and activities of ALP, LDH, and ACP were increased significantly by 53%, 51%, 64%, and 70%, respectively, in the chlorambucil-treated rat. However, cotreatment with KV and AA offered protection and restored the levels of vitamin C, GSH, and MDA as well as SOD, CAT, GST, ACP, ALP, and LDH activities. Overall, kolaviron and L-ascorbic acid protected against chlorambucil-induced damage in the testes of the rat. PMID:25309592

  14. Synergism and Rules of the new Combination drug Yiqijiedu Formulae (YQJD) on Ischemic Stroke based on amino acids (AAs) metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jian; Chen, Chang; Chen, Jian-Xin; Wen, Li-Mei; Yang, Geng-Liang; Duan, Fei-Peng; Huang, Zhi-Ying; Li, De-Feng; Yu, Ding-Rong; Yang, Hong-Jun; Li, Shao-Jing

    2014-01-01

    The use of combination drugs is considered to be a promising strategy to control complex diseases such as ischemic stroke. The detection of metabolites has been used as a versatile tool to reveal the potential mechanism of diverse diseases. In this study, the levels of 12 endogenous AAs were simultaneously determined quantitatively in the MCAO rat brain using RRLC-QQQ method. Seven AAs were chosen as the potential biomarkers, and using PLS-DA analysis, the effects of the new combination drug YQJD, which is composed of ginsenosides, berberine, and jasminoidin, on those 7 AAs were evaluated. Four AAs, glutamic acid, homocysteine, methionine, and tryptophan, which changed significantly in the YQJD-treated groups compared to the vehicle groups (P < 0.05), were identified and designated as the AAs to use to further explore the synergism of YQJD. The result of a PCA showed that the combination of these three drugs exhibits the strongest synergistic effect compared to other combination groups and that ginsenosides might play a pivotal role, especially when combined with jasminoidin. We successfully explored the synergetic mechanism of multi-component and provided a new method for evaluating the integrated effects of combination drugs in the treatment of complex diseases. PMID:24889025

  15. Tranexamic Acid-Induced Fixed Drug Eruption

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Natsuko; Hanami, Yuka; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    A 33-year-old male showed multiple pigmented patches on his trunk and extremities after he took tranexamic acid for common cold. He stated that similar eruptions appeared when he was treated with tranexamic acid for influenza 10 months before. Patch test showed positive results at 48 h and 72 h by 1% and 10% tranexamic acid at the lesional skin only. To our knowledge, nine cases of fixed drug eruption induced by tranexamic acid have been reported in Japan. Tranexamic acid is a safe drug and frequently used because of its anti-fibrinolytic and anti-inflammatory effects, but caution of inducing fixed drug eruption should be necessary. PMID:26288438

  16. Tranexamic Acid-Induced Fixed Drug Eruption.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Natsuko; Hanami, Yuka; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    A 33-year-old male showed multiple pigmented patches on his trunk and extremities after he took tranexamic acid for common cold. He stated that similar eruptions appeared when he was treated with tranexamic acid for influenza 10 months before. Patch test showed positive results at 48 h and 72 h by 1% and 10% tranexamic acid at the lesional skin only. To our knowledge, nine cases of fixed drug eruption induced by tranexamic acid have been reported in Japan. Tranexamic acid is a safe drug and frequently used because of its anti-fibrinolytic and anti-inflammatory effects, but caution of inducing fixed drug eruption should be necessary.

  17. The Effect of Ascorbic Acid and Garlic Administration on Lead-Induced Neural Damage in Rat Offspring’s Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Akram; Ebrahimzadeh Bideskan, Alireza; Alipour, Fatemeh; Fazel, Alireza; Haghir, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this study was to investigate ascorbic acid and garlic protective effects on lead-induced neurotoxicity during rat hippocampus development. Materials and Methods: 90 pregnant wistar rats were divided randomly into nine groups: 1- Animals received leaded water (L). 2- Rats received leaded water and ascorbic acid (L+AA). 3- Animals received leaded water and garlic juice (L+G). 4-Animals received leaded water, ascorbic acid and garlic juice (L+G+AA). 5- Rats treated with ascorbic acid (AA). 6- Rats treated with garlic juice (G). 7- Rats treated with ascorbic acid and garlic juice (AA+G). 8- Rats treated with tap water plus 0.4 ml/l normal hydrogen chloride (HCl) and 0.5 mg/l Glucose (Sham). 9- Normal group (N). Leaded water (1500 ppm), garlic juice (1 ml/100g/day, gavage) and ascorbic acid (500 mg/kg/day, IP) were used. Finally, blood lead levels (BLL) were measured in both rats and their offspring. The rat offspring brain sections were stained using Toluidine Blue and photographed. Dark neurons (DNs) were counted to compare all groups. Results: BLL significantly increased in L group compared to control and sham groups and decreased in L+G and L+AA groups in comparison to the L group (P<0.05). the number of DNs in the CA1, CA3, and DG of rat offspring hippocampus significantly increased in L group in comparison to control and sham groups (P<0.05) and decreased in L+G and L+AA groups compared to L group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Garlic juice and ascorbic acid administration during pregnancy and lactation may protect lead-induced neural damage in rat offspring hippocampus. PMID:24298384

  18. An amino acid-based oral rehydration solution (AA-ORS) enhanced intestinal epithelial proliferation in mice exposed to radiation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Liangjie; Gupta, Reshu; Vaught, Lauren; Grosche, Astrid; Okunieff, Paul; Vidyasagar, Sadasivan

    2016-01-01

    Destruction of clonogenic cells in the crypt following irradiation are thought to cause altered gastrointestinal function. Previously, we found that an amino acid-based oral rehydration solution (AA-ORS) improved gastrointestinal function in irradiated mice. However, the exact mechanisms were unknown. Electrophysiology, immunohistochemistry, qPCR, and Western blot analysis were used to determine that AA-ORS increased proliferation, maturation, and differentiation and improved electrolyte and nutrient absorption in irradiated mice. A single-hit, multi-target crypt survival curve showed a significant increase in crypt progenitors in irradiated mice treated with AA-ORS for six days (8.8 ± 0.4) compared to the saline-treated group (6.1 ± 0.3; P < 0.001) without a change in D0 (4.8 ± 0.1 Gy). The Dq values increased from 8.8 ± 0.4 Gy to 10.5 ± 0.5 Gy with AA-ORS treatment (P < 0.01), indicating an increased radiation tolerance of 1.7 Gy. We also found that AA-ORS treatment (1) increased Lgr5+, without altering Bmi1 positive cells; (2) increased levels of proliferation markers (Ki-67, p-Erk, p-Akt and PCNA); (3) decreased apoptosis markers, such as cleaved caspase-3 and Bcl-2; and (4) increased expression and protein levels of NHE3 and SGLT1 in the brush border membrane. This study shows that AA-ORS increased villus height and improved electrolyte and nutrient absorption. PMID:27876791

  19. Flow cytometric assessment of cell structural and functional changes induced by acetic acid in the yeasts Zygosaccharomyces bailii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Prudêncio, C; Sansonetty, F; Côrte-Real, M

    1998-04-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) was used with different viability dyes to assess changes in cell structure and function induced by acetic acid (AA) in populations of Zygosaccharomyces bailii (AA resistant) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (AA sensitive). Kinetic changes in esterase activity, intracellular dye processing, and membrane integrity were monitored, and to detect those changes we used three assays involving fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis, FUN-1 processing, and propidium iodide exclusion, respectively. In S. cerevisiae, the decrease in the ability to process FUN-1 preceded the decrease in esterase activity, and there was loss of cell membrane integrity after incubation with AA. In Z. bailii, with higher AA concentrations, there was a similar decrease in the ability to process FUN-1, which also preceded the loss of cell membrane integrity. Changes in esterase activity in this yeast induced by AA treatment could not be monitored because the changes occurred independently of the presence of the acid. For control samples (untreated cells killed with 10% v/v of AA), the percentages of nonaltered cells as estimated by FCM and percentages of viable cells as estimated by colony forming unit (CFU) counts were identical. However, for cell samples treated for short periods with 3% (v/v) or less of AA, none of the dyes produced FCM results comparable to those produced by CFU counts.

  20. SIRT1 prevents pulmonary thrombus formation induced by arachidonic acid via downregulation of PAF receptor expression in platelets.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun Hak; Bae, Jin Ung; Kim, In Suk; Chang, Chulhun L; Oh, Sae Ock; Kim, Chi Dae

    2016-12-01

    SIRT1, a class III histone deacetylase, is critically involved in cellular response to stress and modulates cardiovascular risk factors. However, its role in thrombus formation is largely unknown. Thus, this study investigated the effect of SIRT1 on pulmonary thrombus formation, and then identified its role in the modulation of platelet aggregation. In isolated human platelets, cell aggregation was increased by various platelet activators, such as platelet activating factor (PAF), arachidonic acid (AA), ADP, and thrombin. AA- and PAF-mediated platelet aggregations were suppressed by WEB2086, a PAF receptor (PAFR) antagonist. Pulmonary thrombus formation induced by PAF or AA was also attenuated by WEB2086, suggesting that PAFR plays a key role in AA-induced platelet aggregation. In platelets isolated from SIRT1-TG mice as well as in platelets treated with resveratrol or reSIRT1, PAFR expression was decreased, whereas this expressional downregulation by SIRT1 activators was inhibited in platelets treated with MG132 (a proteasome inhibitor) or NH4Cl (a lysosome inhibitor). Furthermore, platelet aggregation induced by AA was markedly attenuated by resveratrol and reSIRT1. Likewise, the increased pulmonary thrombus formation in mice treated with AA was also attenuated by SIRT1 activators. In line with these results, pulmonary thrombus formation was markedly attenuated in SIRT1-TG mice. Taken together, this study showed that SIRT1 downregulates PAFR expression on platelets via proteasomal and lysosomal pathways, and that this downregulation inhibits platelet aggregation in vitro and pulmonary thrombus formation in vivo.

  1. Cyanide-induced cytochrome a,a3 oxidation-reduction responses in rat brain in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Piantadosi, C A; Sylvia, A L; Jöbsis, F F

    1983-01-01

    The sensitivity of the brain to cyanide-induced histotoxic hypoxia and the protective effects of known cyanide antagonists, have been assessed in vivo by reflectance spectrophotometry. Cyanide-related changes in cytochrome a,a3 (cytochrome c oxidase) oxidation-reduction (redox) state, tissue hemoglobin saturation, and local blood volume were continuously monitored in cerebral cortex of rats. Noncumulative, dose-dependent inhibition of the in situ mitochondrial respiratory chain was evaluated directly by measuring increases in reduction levels of the terminal oxidase. These transient cytochrome a,a3 reductions were accompanied by increases in regional cerebral hemoglobin saturation and blood volume. Cytochrome redox responses were not altered either in magnitude or kinetics by hyperoxia; however, the cyanide-cytochrome dose-response curve was greatly shifted to the right by pretreatment with sodium nitrite, and the recovery rate of cytochrome a,a3 from cyanide-induced reduction was enhanced fourfold by pretreatment with sodium thiosulfate. PMID:6313756

  2. Yeast acetic acid-induced programmed cell death can occur without cytochrome c release which requires metacaspase YCA1.

    PubMed

    Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Bobba, Antonella; Passarella, Salvatore; Marra, Ersilia; Giannattasio, Sergio

    2010-01-04

    To investigate the role of cytochrome c (cyt c) release in yeast acetic acid-induced programmed cell death (AA-PCD), wild type (wt) and cells lacking metacaspase (Deltayca1), cytochrome c (Deltacyc1,7) and both (Deltacyc1,7Deltayca1) were compared for AA-PCD occurrence, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) production and caspase activity. AA-PCD occurs in Deltacyc1,7 and Deltacyc1,7Deltayca1 cells slower than in wt, but similar to that in Deltayca1 cells, in which no cytochrome c release occurs. Both H(2)O(2) production and caspase activation occur in these cells with early and extra-activation in Deltacyc1,7 cells. We conclude that alternative death pathways can be activated in yeast AA-PCD, one dependent on cyt c release, which requires YCA1, and the other(s) independent on it.

  3. Determination of free amino acids in African gourd seed milks by capillary electrophoresis with light-emitting diode induced fluorescence and laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Enzonga, Josiane; Ong-Meang, Varravaddheay; Couderc, François; Boutonnet, Audrey; Poinsot, Véréna; Tsieri, Michel Mvoula; Silou, Thomas; Bouajila, Jalloul

    2013-09-01

    A CE technique coupled to LIF detection (488 nm) or LED-induced fluorescence detection (470 nm) has been evaluated to acquire a cheap way to analyze amino acids (AAs) whilst maintaining the best sensitivity. To quantitate AAs in milk of Cucurbitaceae of Sub-Saharan Africa, they were labeled with FITC. We used an optimized separation buffer composed of 30 mM boric acid buffer adjusted to pH 9.3 with NaOH (1 M) containing 12 mM SDS and 5% ethylene glycol v/v; prior to the injections, the derivatized samples are diluted 100 times. The LOQs in the sample are Arg: 1.1 μM, Ala: 3.5 μM, and Glu 8.9 μM. Cucumeropsis mannii (CM) Naudin and Citrullus lanatus (CL) are vegetable sources rich in proteins and AAs of high quality. Our analyses have led to the identification of 11 AAs in CL and CM milks. Phe, Trp, and Ala are predominant in the two types of lyophilized milks, while Asp and Val demonstrate very low contents. Six essential AAs (Phe, Thr, Val, Trp, Ile, and Leu) are present in both types of extracts, but lysine was not detected, indicating that this AA is missing in gourd milk. These results should be useful in efforts to complement or replace very expensive cow milk or the less-appreciated soya milk with milk from available local agroressources.

  4. Ascorbic Acid and a Cytostatic Inhibitor of Glycolysis Synergistically Induce Apoptosis in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vuyyuri, Saleha B.; Rinkinen, Jacob; Worden, Erin; Shim, Hyekyung; Lee, Sukchan; Davis, Keith R.

    2013-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AA) exhibits significant anticancer activity at pharmacologic doses achievable by parenteral administration that have minimal effects on normal cells. Thus, AA has potential uses as a chemotherapeutic agent alone or in combination with other therapeutics that specifically target cancer-cell metabolism. We compared the effects of AA and combinations of AA with the glycolysis inhibitor 3-(3-pyridinyl)-1-(4-pyridinyl)-2-propen-1-one (3-PO) on the viability of three non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines to the effects on an immortalized lung epithelial cell line. AA concentrations of 0.5 to 5 mM caused a complete loss of viability in all NSCLC lines compared to a <10% loss of viability in the lung epithelial cell line. Combinations of AA and 3-PO synergistically enhanced cell death in all NSCLC cell lines at concentrations well below the IC50 concentrations for each compound alone. A synergistic interaction was not observed in combination treatments of lung epithelial cells and combination treatments that caused a complete loss of viability in NSCLC cells had modest effects on normal lung cell viability and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Combination treatments induced dramatically higher ROS levels compared to treatment with AA and 3-PO alone in NSCLC cells and combination-induced cell death was inhibited by addition of catalase to the medium. Analyses of DNA fragmentation, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage, annexin V-binding, and caspase activity demonstrated that AA-induced cell death is caused via the activation of apoptosis and that the combination treatments caused a synergistic induction of apoptosis. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of AA against NSCLC cells and that combinations of AA with 3-PO synergistically induce apoptosis via a ROS-dependent mechanism. These results support further evaluation of pharmacologic concentrations of AA as an adjuvant treatment for NSCLC and that combination of AA with glycolysis

  5. Promoting effect of arachidonic acid supplementation on N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced pancreatic acinar cell hyperplasia in young Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Uehara, Norihisa; Kimura, Ayako; Emoto, Yuko; Kinoshita, Yuichi; Yuri, Takashi; Takada, Hideho; Moriguchi, Toru; Hamazaki, Tomohito; Tsubura, Airo

    2013-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is naturally found in human breast milk. AA, together with docosahexaenoic acid, is commonly added as a functional food ingredient to commercial infant formula worldwide, in accordance with the international standard of Codex Alimentarius. However, few studies have been performed that are concerned with the possible carcinogenic effects of AA supplementation during neonatal life. The effect of dietary AA supplementation in dams, during gestation and lactation, was investigated in N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced preneoplastic lesions in the exocrine pancreas of young Lewis rats. Dams were fed either an AA (2.0% AA) or a basal (<0.01% AA) diet. On postnatal day 0 (at birth), male and female pups received a single intraperitoneal injection of either 35 mg/kg MNU or vehicle. The morphology and proliferating activity of the exocrine pancreas were examined by proliferative cell nuclear antigen immunohistochemistry 7, 14, 21, 28 and/or 60 days post-MNU. Histopathologically, acinar cell hyperplasia (ACH) occurred in the MNU-treated groups 60 days after MNU injection, irrespecitive of whether the rats had been fed an AA diet. Morphometrically, the number and area of ACH per 1 mm(2) in MNU-treated rats increased significantly in the AA diet-fed rats, compared with basal diet-fed rats. The number of proliferative cell nuclear antigen-positive acinar cells in both the normal and hyperplastic areas of MNU-treated rats increased significantly in the AA diet-fed rats. In conclusion, providing dams with an AA-rich diet during gestation and lactation promotes MNU-induced pancreatic ACH in young Lewis rats.

  6. A synergistic combination of tetraethylorthosilicate and multiphosphonic acid offers excellent corrosion protection to AA1100 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalmoro, Viviane; dos Santos, João H. Z.; Armelin, Elaine; Alemán, Carlos; Azambuja, Denise S.

    2013-05-01

    This work describes a new mechanism for the incorporation of organophosphonic acid into silane self-assembly monolayers, which has been used to protect AA1100 aluminum alloy. The protection improvement has been attributed to the fact that phosphonic structures promote the formation of strongly bonded and densely packed monolayer films, which show higher surface coverage and better adhesion than conventional silane systems. In order to evaluate the linking chemistry offered by phosphonic groups, two functionalized organophosphonic groups have been employed, 1,2-diaminoethanetetrakis methylenephosphonic acid (EDTPO) and aminotrimethylenephosphonic acid (ATMP), and combined with tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) films prepared by sol-gel synthesis. Results suggest that phosphonic acids may interact with the surface through a monodentate and bidentate coordination mode and, in addition, form one or more strong and stable linkages with silicon through non-hydrolysable bonds. Therefore, the incorporation of a very low concentration of phosphonic acids on TEOS solutions favors the complete coverage of the aluminum substrate during the silanization process, which is not possible using TEOS alone. The linking capacity of phosphonic acid has been investigated by FTIR-RA spectroscopy, SEM and EDX analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and quantum mechanical calculations. Finally, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has been used to study the corrosion protection revealing that EDTPO-containing films afforded more protection to the AA1100 substrate than ATMP-containing films.

  7. Oxidative potential of ambient water-soluble PM2.5 measured by Dithiothreitol (DTT) and Ascorbic Acid (AA) assays in the southeastern United States: contrasts in sources and health associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, T.; Verma, V.; Bates, J. T.; Abrams, J.; Klein, M.; Strickland, M. J.; Sarnat, S. E.; Chang, H. H.; Mulholland, J. A.; Tolbert, P. E.; Russell, A. G.; Weber, R. J.

    2015-11-01

    The ability of certain components of particulate matter to induce oxidative stress through catalytic generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vivo may be one mechanism accounting for observed linkages between ambient aerosols and adverse health outcomes. A variety of assays have been used to measure this so-called aerosol oxidative potential. We developed a semi-automated system to quantify oxidative potential of filter aqueous extracts utilizing the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay and have recently developed a similar semi-automated system using the ascorbic acid (AA) assay. Approximately 500 PM2.5 filter samples collected in contrasting locations in the southeastern US were analyzed using both assays. We found that water-soluble DTT activity on a per air volume basis was more spatially uniform than water-soluble AA activity. DTT activity was higher in winter than in summer/fall, whereas AA activity was higher in summer/fall compared to winter, with highest levels near highly trafficked highways. DTT activity was correlated with organic and metal species, whereas AA activity was correlated with water-soluble metals (especially water-soluble Cu, r=0.70-0.91 at most sites). Source apportionment models, Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) and a Chemical Mass Balance Method with ensemble-averaged source impact profiles (CMB-E), suggest a strong contribution from secondary processes (e.g., organic aerosol oxidation or metal mobilization by formation of an aqueous particle with secondary acids) and traffic emissions to both DTT and AA activities in urban Atlanta. Biomass burning was a large source for DTT activity, but insignificant for AA. DTT activity was well correlated with PM2.5 mass (r=0.49-0.86 across sites/seasons), while AA activity did not co-vary strongly with mass. A linear model was developed to estimate DTT and AA activities for the central Atlanta Jefferson Street site, based on the CMB-E sources that are statistically significant with positive

  8. Oxidative potential of ambient water-soluble PM2.5 in the southeastern United States: contrasts in sources and health associations between ascorbic acid (AA) and dithiothreitol (DTT) assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ting; Verma, Vishal; Bates, Josephine T.; Abrams, Joseph; Klein, Mitchel; Strickland, Matthew J.; Sarnat, Stefanie E.; Chang, Howard H.; Mulholland, James A.; Tolbert, Paige E.; Russell, Armistead G.; Weber, Rodney J.

    2016-03-01

    The ability of certain components of particulate matter to induce oxidative stress through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vivo may be one mechanism accounting for observed linkages between ambient aerosols and adverse health outcomes. A variety of assays have been used to measure this so-called aerosol oxidative potential. We developed a semi-automated system to quantify oxidative potential of filter aqueous extracts utilizing the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay and report here the development of a similar semi-automated system for the ascorbic acid (AA) assay. Approximately 500 PM2.5 filter samples collected in contrasting locations in the southeastern US were analyzed for a host of aerosol species, along with AA and DTT activities. We present a detailed contrast in findings from these two assays. Water-soluble AA activity was higher in summer and fall than in winter, with highest levels near heavily trafficked highways, whereas DTT activity was higher in winter compared to summer and fall and more spatially homogeneous. AA activity was nearly exclusively correlated with water-soluble Cu (r = 0.70-0.94 at most sites), whereas DTT activity was correlated with organic and metal species. Source apportionment models, positive matrix factorization (PMF) and a chemical mass balance method with ensemble-averaged source impact profiles (CMB-E), suggest a strong contribution from traffic emissions and secondary processes (e.g., organic aerosol oxidation or metals mobilization by secondary acids) to both AA and DTT activities in urban Atlanta. In contrast, biomass burning was a large source for DTT activity, but insignificant for AA. AA activity was not correlated with PM2.5 mass, while DTT activity co-varied strongly with mass (r = 0.49-0.86 across sites and seasons). Various linear models were developed to estimate AA and DTT activities for the central Atlanta Jefferson Street site, based on the CMB-E sources. The models were then used to estimate daily

  9. Chirality-induced magnon transport in AA-stacked bilayer honeycomb chiral magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owerre, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    In this Letter, we study the magnetic transport in AA-stacked bilayer honeycomb chiral magnets coupled either ferromagnetically or antiferromagnetically. For both couplings, we observe chirality-induced gaps, chiral protected edge states, magnon Hall and magnon spin Nernst effects of magnetic spin excitations. For ferromagnetically coupled layers, thermal Hall and spin Nernst conductivities do not change sign as function of magnetic field or temperature similar to single-layer honeycomb ferromagnetic insulator. In contrast, for antiferromagnetically coupled layers, we observe a sign change in the thermal Hall and spin Nernst conductivities as the magnetic field is reversed. We discuss possible experimental accessible honeycomb bilayer quantum materials in which these effects can be observed.

  10. Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa protoxin intoxication of Tenebrio molitor induces widespread changes in the expression of serine peptidase transcripts.

    PubMed

    Oppert, Brenda; Martynov, Alexander G; Elpidina, Elena N

    2012-09-01

    The yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor, is a pest of stored grain products and is sensitive to the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry3Aa toxin. As digestive peptidases are a determining factor in Cry toxicity and resistance, we evaluated the expression of peptidase transcripts in the midgut of T. molitor larvae fed either a control or Cry3Aa protoxin diet for 24 h (RNA-Seq), or in larvae exposed to the protoxin for 6, 12, or 24 h (microarrays). Cysteine peptidase transcripts (9) were similar to cathepsins B, L, and K, and their expression did not vary more than 2.5-fold in control and Cry3Aa-treated larvae. Serine peptidase transcripts (48) included trypsin, chymotrypsin and chymotrypsin-like, elastase 1-like, and unclassified serine peptidases, as well as homologs lacking functional amino acids. Highly expressed trypsin and chymotrypsin transcripts were severely repressed, and most serine peptidase transcripts were expressed 2- to 15-fold lower in Cry3Aa-treated larvae. Many serine peptidase and homolog transcripts were found only in control larvae. However, expression of a few serine peptidase transcripts was increased or found only in Cry3Aa-treated larvae. Therefore, Bt intoxication significantly impacted the expression of serine peptidases, potentially important in protoxin processing, while the insect maintained the production of critical digestive cysteine peptidases.

  11. Synergistic protective role of mirazid (Commiphora molmol) and ascorbic acid against tilmicosin-induced cardiotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Daim, Mohamed M; Ghazy, Emad W; Fayez, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Tilmicosin (TIL) is a long-acting macrolide antibiotic approved for the treatment of cattle with Bovine Respiratory Disease. However, overdose of TIL has been reported to induce cardiotoxicity. The purpose of our experiment was to evaluate the protective effects of Commiphora molmol (mirazid (MRZ); myrrh) and (or) ascorbic acid (AA) against TIL-induced cardiotoxicity in mice. MRZ and AA were orally administered using stomach gavage, either alone or in combination for 5 consecutive days, followed with a single TIL overdose. TIL overdose induced a significant increase in serum levels of cardiac damage biomarkers (AST, LDH, CK, CK-MB, and cTnT), as well as cardiac lipid peroxidation, but cardiac levels of antioxidant biomarkers (GSH, SOD, CAT, and TAC) were decreased. Both MRZ and AA tended to normalize the elevated serum levels of cardiac injury biomarkers. Furthermore, MRZ and AA reduced TIL-induced lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress parameters. MRZ and AA combined produced a synergistic cardioprotective effect. We conclude that myrrh and (or) vitamin C administration minimizes the toxic effects of TIL through their free-radical-scavenging and potent antioxidant activities.

  12. Cyclic AMP regulation of arachidonic acid (AA) release and phospholipid metabolism in human monocytes: modulation by intracellular calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffstein, S.T.; Manzi, R.M.; Godfrey, R.W.

    1986-05-01

    Stimulation of inflammatory cells by specific ligands results in activation of phospholipase(s) and production of oxygenation products of AA. The authors have employed (/sup 3/H)AA labeled monocytes to examine the involvement of cAMP in regulating phospholipase activity as measured by percent of incorporated (/sup 3/H)AA released and TLC analysis of (/sup 3/H)AA cellular lipids. Maximum release of radiolabel (31 +/- 5%) occurred upon challenge with the calcium ionophore A23187/sup -/ (10..mu..M), while FMLP (1..mu..M) yielded 15 +/- 1% and untreated cells 8 +/- 1%. Pretreatment of monocytes with isobutyl methyl xanthine/sup -/(IBMX) or dibutyrl cyclic AMP (d-cAMP) inhibited FMLP stimulated release with IC/sub 50/'s of 2.5 x 10/sup -5/M and 8 x 10/sup -5/M respectively. Exposure of monocytes to maximal levels of IBMX (5 x 10/sup -4/M) or d-cAMP (10/sup -3/M) also reduced release from controls by 40%, while A23187 induced release was uneffected by either. Examination of (/sup 3/H) AA labeled phospholipids showed that phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylinositol were the major pools labeled and that stimulation by FMLP or A23187 appeared to deplete the PC pool exclusively. Prior exposure to IBMX or d-cAMP inhibited the loss from the PC pool only in untreated or FMLP stimulated cells. The data suggests that a phospholipase A/sub 2/ activity, directly primarily towards PC, is regulated by cAMP possibly by inhibiting receptor mediated increases in intracellular calcium levels.

  13. Antioxidant defense and apoptotic effectors in ascorbic acid and β-glycerophosphate-induced osteoblastic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chaves Neto, Antonio Hernandes; Machado, Daisy; Yano, Cláudia Lumy; Ferreira, Carmen Veríssima

    2011-01-01

    MC3T3-E1 cells grown in the presence of ascorbic acid and β-glycerophosphate (AA/β-GP) express alkaline phosphatase and produce an extensive collagenous extracellular matrix. Differentiated MC3T3-E1 cells are more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress than undifferentiated cells. In this study, we compared the profile of antioxidant enzymes and molecular markers of apoptosis in undifferentiated and differentiated MC3T3-E1 cells (cell differentiation was induced by treatment with AA/β-GP). Differentiated osteoblasts showed lower expression and activity of catalase, glutathione S-transferase and glutathione peroxidase. The total superoxide dismutase activity and the expression of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase were also lower, while the expression of Mn superoxide dismutase was higher in differentiated osteoblasts. The level of malondialdehyde, a widely used marker for oxidative stress, was lower in the AA/β-GP group compared with control cells, but this difference was not significant. Western blotting showed that treatment with AA/β-GP increased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio used as an index of cellular vulnerability to apoptosis. In addition, the activities of caspases 3, 8 and 9 and cleaved poly (ADP) ribose polymerase were significantly higher in differentiated cells. These findings provide new insights into how changes in the activities of major antioxidant enzymes and in the signaling pathways associated with apoptosis may influence the susceptibility of bone cells to oxidative stress.

  14. Electron transfer induced fragmentation of acetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Meneses, G.; Almeida, D.; Limão-Vieira, P.

    2014-04-01

    We present negative ion formation driven by electron transfer in atom (K) molecule (acetic acid) collisions. Acetic acid has been found in the interstellar medium, is also considered a biological related compound and as such studying low energy electron interactions will bring new insights as far as induced chemistry is concerned.

  15. Role of mitochondrial permeability transition in human renal tubular epithelial cell death induced by aristolochic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Qi Xinming; Cai Yan; Gong Likun; Liu Linlin; Chen Fangping; Xiao Ying; Wu Xiongfei; Li Yan; Xue Xiang |; Ren Jin . E-mail: cdser_simm@mail.shcnc.ac.cn

    2007-07-01

    Aristolochic acid (AA), a natural nephrotoxin and carcinogen, can induce a progressive tubulointerstitial nephropathy. However, the mechanism by which AA causes renal injury remains largely unknown. Here we reported that the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) plays an important role in the renal injury induced by aristolochic acid I (AAI). We found that in the presence of Ca{sup 2+}, AAI caused mitochondrial swelling, leakage of Ca{sup 2+}, membrane depolarization, and release of cytochrome c in isolated kidney mitochondria. These alterations were suppressed by cyclosporin A (CsA), an agent known to inhibit MPT. Culture of HK-2 cell, a human renal tubular epithelial cell line for 24 h with AAI caused a decrease in cellular ATP, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cytochrome c release, and increase of caspase 3 activity. These toxic effects of AAI were attenuated by CsA and bongkrekic acid (BA), another specific MPT inhibitor. Furthermore, AAI greatly inhibited the activity of mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) in isolated mitochondria. We suggested that ANT may mediate, at least in part, the AAI-induced MPT. Taken together, these results suggested that MPT plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of HK-2 cell injury induced by AAI and implied that MPT might contribute to human nephrotoxicity of aristolochic acid.

  16. Synthesis of ST7612AA1, a Novel Oral HDAC Inhibitor, via Radical 
Thioacetic Acid Addition

    PubMed Central

    Battistuzzi, Gianfranco; Giannini, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Background In the expanding field of anticancer drugs, HDAC inhibitors are playing an increasingly important role. To date, four/five HDAC inhibitors have been approved by FDA. All these compounds fit the widely accepted HDAC inhibitors pharmacophore model characterized by a cap group, a linker chain and a zinc binding group (ZBG), able to bind the Zn2+ ion in a pocket of the HDAC active site. Romidepsin, a natural compound, is the only thiol derivative. We have selected a new class of synthetic HDAC inhibitors, the thio-ω(lactam-carboxamide) derivatives, with ST7612AA1 as drug candidate, pan-inhibitor active in the range of single- to two-digit nanomolar concentrations. Preliminary results of a synthetic optimization attempt towards a fast scale-up process are here proposed. Methods In the four steps of synthesis, from unsaturated amino acid intermediate to the final product, we explored different synthetic conditions in order to have a transferable process for a scale-up synthetic laboratory. Results In the first step, isobutyl chloroformate was used and, after a simple work up with 1M HCl, 2 (96% yield) was obtained as a white solid, which was used directly in the next step. For thioacetic acid addition to the double bond of intermediate 2, two different routes were possible, with addition reaction in the first (D’) or last step (D). Reactions of 2 to give 5 or of 4 to give ST7612AA1 were both performed in dioxane. Reactions were fast and did not need the usually advised radical quenching with cyclohexene. The corresponding products were obtained in good yields (step D’, 89%; step D, 81%) after a flash chromatography. Conclusion: ST7612AA1 , a thiol derivative prodrug of ST7464AA1, is the first of a new generation of HDAC inhibitors, very potent, orally administered, and well tolerated. Here, we have identified a synthetic route, competitive, versatile and easily transferable to industrial processes. PMID:27917100

  17. Molecular cloning and promoter analysis of the specific salicylic acid biosynthetic pathway gene phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (AaPAL1) from Artemisia annua.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Fu, Xueqing; Hao, Xiaolong; Zhang, Lida; Wang, Luyao; Qian, Hongmei; Zhao, Jingya

    2016-07-01

    Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) is the key enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of salicylic acid (SA). In this study, a full-length cDNA of PAL gene (named as AaPAL1) was cloned from Artemisia annua. The gene contains an open reading frame of 2,151 bps encoding 716 amino acids. Comparative and bioinformatics analysis revealed that the polypeptide protein of AaPAL1 was highly homologous to PALs from other plant species. Southern blot analysis revealed that it belonged to a gene family with three members. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of various tissues of A. annua showed that AaPAL1 transcript levels were highest in the young leaves. A 1160-bp promoter region was also isolated resulting in identification of distinct cis-regulatory elements including W-box, TGACG-motif, and TC-rich repeats. Quantitative RT-PCR indicated that AaPAL1 was upregulated by salinity, drought, wounding, and SA stresses, which were corroborated positively with the identified cis-elements within the promoter region. AaPAL1 was successfully expressed in Escherichia. coli and the enzyme activity of the purified AaPAL1 was approximately 287.2 U/mg. These results substantiated the involvement of AaPAL1 in the phenylalanine pathway.

  18. Changes in saccharin preference behavior as a primary outcome to evaluate pain and analgesia in acetic acid-induced visceral pain in mice

    PubMed Central

    de la Puente, Beatriz; Romero-Alejo, Elizabeth; Vela, José Miguel; Merlos, Manuel; Zamanillo, Daniel; Portillo-Salido, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Reflex-based procedures are important measures in preclinical pain studies that evaluate stimulated behaviors. These procedures, however, are insufficient to capture the complexity of the pain experience, which is often associated with the depression of several innate behaviors. While recent studies have made efforts to evidence the suppression of some positively motivated behaviors in certain pain models, they are still far from being routinely used as readouts for analgesic screening. Here, we characterized and compared the effect of the analgesic ibuprofen (Ibu) and the stimulant, caffeine, in assays of acute pain-stimulated and pain-depressed behavior. Intraperitoneal injection of acetic acid (AA) served as a noxious stimulus to stimulate a writhing response or depress saccharin preference and locomotor activity (LMA) in mice. AA injection caused the maximum number of writhes between 5 and 20 minutes after administration, and writhing almost disappeared 1 hour later. AA-treated mice showed signs of depression-like behaviors after writhing resolution, as evidenced by reduced locomotion and saccharin preference for at least 4 and 6 hours, respectively. Depression-like behaviors resolved within 24 hours after AA administration. A dose of Ibu (40 mg/kg) – inactive to reduce AA-induced abdominal writhing – administered before or after AA injection significantly reverted pain-induced saccharin preference deficit. The same dose of Ibu also significantly reverted the AA-depressed LMA, but only when it was administered after AA injection. Caffeine restored locomotion – but not saccharin preference – in AA-treated mice, thus suggesting that the reduction in saccharin preference – but not in locomotion – was specifically sensitive to analgesics. In conclusion, AA-induced acute pain attenuated saccharin preference and LMA beyond the resolution of writhing behavior, and the changes in the expression of hedonic behavior, such as sweet taste preference, can be

  19. Changes in saccharin preference behavior as a primary outcome to evaluate pain and analgesia in acetic acid-induced visceral pain in mice.

    PubMed

    de la Puente, Beatriz; Romero-Alejo, Elizabeth; Vela, José Miguel; Merlos, Manuel; Zamanillo, Daniel; Portillo-Salido, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Reflex-based procedures are important measures in preclinical pain studies that evaluate stimulated behaviors. These procedures, however, are insufficient to capture the complexity of the pain experience, which is often associated with the depression of several innate behaviors. While recent studies have made efforts to evidence the suppression of some positively motivated behaviors in certain pain models, they are still far from being routinely used as readouts for analgesic screening. Here, we characterized and compared the effect of the analgesic ibuprofen (Ibu) and the stimulant, caffeine, in assays of acute pain-stimulated and pain-depressed behavior. Intraperitoneal injection of acetic acid (AA) served as a noxious stimulus to stimulate a writhing response or depress saccharin preference and locomotor activity (LMA) in mice. AA injection caused the maximum number of writhes between 5 and 20 minutes after administration, and writhing almost disappeared 1 hour later. AA-treated mice showed signs of depression-like behaviors after writhing resolution, as evidenced by reduced locomotion and saccharin preference for at least 4 and 6 hours, respectively. Depression-like behaviors resolved within 24 hours after AA administration. A dose of Ibu (40 mg/kg) - inactive to reduce AA-induced abdominal writhing - administered before or after AA injection significantly reverted pain-induced saccharin preference deficit. The same dose of Ibu also significantly reverted the AA-depressed LMA, but only when it was administered after AA injection. Caffeine restored locomotion - but not saccharin preference - in AA-treated mice, thus suggesting that the reduction in saccharin preference - but not in locomotion - was specifically sensitive to analgesics. In conclusion, AA-induced acute pain attenuated saccharin preference and LMA beyond the resolution of writhing behavior, and the changes in the expression of hedonic behavior, such as sweet taste preference, can be used as a more

  20. Salivary thiocyanate/nitrite inhibits hydroxylation of 2-hydroxybenzoic acid induced by hydrogen peroxide/Fe(II) systems under acidic conditions: possibility of thiocyanate/nitrite-dependent scavenging of hydroxyl radical in the stomach.

    PubMed

    Takahama, Umeo; Oniki, Takayuki

    2004-11-18

    Formation of OH radicals in the stomach is possible by Fenton-type reactions, as gastric juice contains ascorbic acid (AA), iron ions and H2O2. An objective of the present study is to elucidate the effects of salivary SCN- and NO2- on the hydroxylation of salicylic acid which was induced by H2O2/Fe(II) and AA/H2O2/Fe(II) systems. Thiocyanate ion inhibited the hydroxylation of salicylic acid by the above systems in acidic buffer solutions and in acidified saliva. The inhibition by SCN- was deduced to be due to SCN- -dependent scavenging of OH radicals. Nitrite ion could enhance the SCN- -dependent inhibition of the hydroxylation induced by AA/H2O2/Fe(II) systems. The enhancement was suggested to be due to scavenging of OH radicals by NO which was formed by the reactions among AA, HNO2 and SCN- contained in the reaction mixture. The concentrations of SCN- and NO2-, which were effective for the inhibition, were in ranges of their normal salivary concentrations. These results suggest that salivary SCN- can cooperate with NO2- to protect stomach from OH radicals formed by AA/H2O2/Fe(II) systems under acidic conditions.

  1. Antioxidant properties of 2-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Takebayashi, Jun; Yagi, Yasuyuki; Ishii, Rie; Abe, Shigeki; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Tai, Akihiro

    2008-06-01

    The antioxidant activity of a provitamin C agent, 2-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid (AA-2betaG), was compared to that of 2-O-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid (AA-2G) and ascorbic acid (AA) using four in vitro methods, 1,1-diphenyl-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging assay, 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical cation (ABTS(*+))-scavenging assay, oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay, and 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH)-induced erythrocyte hemolysis inhibition assay. AA-2betaG slowly and continuously scavenged DPPH radicals and ABTS(*+) in roughly the same reaction profiles as AA-2G, whereas AA quenched these radicals immediately. In the ORAC assay and the hemolysis inhibition assay, AA-2betaG showed similar overall activities to AA-2G and to AA, although the reactivity of AA-2betaG against the peroxyl radical generated in both assays was lower than that of AA-2G and AA. These data indicate that AA-2betaG had roughly the same radical-scavenging properties as AA-2G, and a comprehensive in vitro antioxidant activity of AA-2betaG appeared to be comparable not only to that of AA-2G but also to that of AA.

  2. [Aristolochic acid nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Witkowicz, Joanna

    2009-01-01

    Aristolochic acid nephropathy is a chronic, fibrosing, interstitial nephritis caused by aristolochic acid (AA), which is a component of the plants of Aristolochiacae family. It was first reported in 1993, in Belgium as a Chinese herb nephropathy, in patients who received a slimming regimen containing AA. The term aristolochic acid nephropathy also includes Balcan endemic nephropathy and other endemic tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Moreover, AA is a human carcinogen which induces urothelial cancer. The AA-containing herbs are banned in many countries and FDA published the warnings concerning the safety of AA-containing botanical remedies in 2000. Regarding the increasing interest in herbal medicines, uncontrolled access to botanical remedies and replacement of one herb by another AA-containing compounds makes thousands of people all around the world at risk of this grave disease.

  3. Effect of adding amino acids residues in N- and C-terminus of Vip3Aa16 (L121I) toxin.

    PubMed

    Sellami, Sameh; Cherif, Marwa; Jamoussi, Kaïs

    2016-06-01

    To study the importance of N- and C-terminus of Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3Aa16 (L121I) toxin (88 kDa), a number of mutants were generated. The addition of two (2R: RS) or eleven (11R: RSRPGHHHHHH) amino acid residues at the Vip3Aa16 (L121I) C-terminus allowed to an unappropriated folding illustrated by the abundant presence of the 62 kDa proteolytic form. The produced Vip3Aa16 (L121I) full length form was less detected when increasing the number of amino acids residues in the C-terminus. Bioassays demonstrated that the growth of the lepidopteran Ephestia kuehniella was slightly affected by Vip3Aa16 (L121I)-2R and not affected by Vip3Aa16 (L121I)-11R. Additionally, the fusion at the Vip3Aa16 (L121I) N-terminus of 39 amino acids harboring the E. coli OmpA leader peptide and the His-tag sequence allowed to the increase of protease sensitivity of Vip3Aa16 (L121I) full length form, as only the 62 kDa proteolysis form was detected. Remarkably, this fused protein produced in Escherichia coli (E. coli) was biologically inactive toward Ephestia kuehniella larvae. Thus, the N-terminus of the protein is required to the accomplishment of the insecticidal activity of Vip3 proteins. This report serves as guideline for the study of Vip3Aa16 (L121I) protein stability and activity.

  4. Tetracycline-inducible shRNA targeting antisense long non-coding RNA HIF1A-AS2 represses the malignant phenotypes of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingwei; Zhuang, Chengle; Liu, Yuchen; Li, Jianfa; Dai, Fen; Xia, Ming; Zhan, Yonghao; Lin, Junhao; Chen, Zhicong; He, Anbang; Xu, Wen; Zhao, Guoping; Guo, Yinglu; Cai, Zhiming; Huang, Weiren

    2016-06-28

    Various studies have indicated that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play vital roles in the cancer development and progression. LncRNA hypoxia inducible factor 1alpha antisense RNA-2 (HIF1A-AS2) is upregulated in gastric carcinomas and knockdown of HIF1A-AS2 expression by siRNA could inhibit cell proliferation in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo. Inspired by these observations, we hypothesized that HIF1A-AS2 possibly plays the analogous roles in bladder cancer. In our study, we first reported that HIF1A-AS2 was up-regulated in bladder cancer tissues and cells, and HIF1A-AS2 expression level in bladder cancer tissues is positively associated with advanced clinical pathologic grade and TNM phase. Cell proliferation inhibition, cell migration suppression and apoptosis induction were observed by silencing HIF1A-AS2 in bladder cancer T24 and 5637 cells. Overexpression of HIF1A-AS2 in SV-HUC-1 cells could promote cell proliferation, cell migration and anti-apoptosis. Besides, we utilized the emerging technology of medical synthetic biology to design tetracycline-inducible small hairpin RNA (shRNA) vector which specifically silenced HIF1A-AS2 in a dosage-dependent manner to inhibit the progression of human bladder cancer. In conclusion, our data suggested that HIF1A-AS2 plays oncogenic roles and can be used as a therapeutic target for treating human bladder cancer. Synthetic "tetracycline-on" switch system that quantitatively controlled the expression of HIF1A-AS2 in bladder cancer can inhibit the progression of bladder cancer cells in a dosage-dependent manner. Our findings provide new insights into the role of the lncRNA HIF1A-AS2 in the bladder cancer.

  5. Acanthoic Acid Can Partially Prevent Alcohol Exposure-Induced Liver Lipid Deposition and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yao, You-Li; Han, Xin; Li, Zhi-Man; Lian, Li-Hua; Nan, Ji-Xing; Wu, Yan-Ling

    2017-01-01

    Aims: The present study aims to detect the effect of acanthoic acid (AA) on alcohol exposure-induced liver lipid deposition and inflammation, and to explore the mechanisms. Methods: C57BL/6 mice were pretreated with single dose of AA (20 and 40 mg/kg) by oral gavage or equal volume of saline, and then exposed to three doses of ethanol (5 g/kg body weight, 25%, w/v) by gavage within 24 h. The mice were sacrificed at 6 h after the last ethanol dosing. Serum and hepatic indexes were detected by western blot, RT-PCR, and histopathological assay. AML-12 cells were pretreated with AA (5, 10, 20 μM), or AICAR (500 μM), GW3965 (1 μM), SRT1720 (6 μM), Nicotinamide (20 mM) for 2 h, respectively, and then following treated with EtOH (200 mM) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (10 ng/ml) for additional 48 h. Cell protein and mRNA were collected for western blot and RT-PCR. Cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) release were detected by ELISA assay. Results: It was found that AA significantly decreased acute ethanol-induced increasing of the serum ALT/AST, LDH, ALP levels, and hepatic and serum triglyceride levels, and reduced fat droplets accumulation in mice liver. AA significantly suppressed the levels of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP-1), cytochrome P4502E1 (CYP2E1), IL-1β, and caspase-1 induced by ethanol. Furthermore, a significant decline of sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) and liver X receptors (LXRs) levels was observed in EtOH group, compared with normal group mice. And AA pretreatment increased the Sirt1 and LXRs levels, and also ameliorated phosphorylation of liver kinase B-1 (LKB-1), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC) proteins, compared with EtOH group. However, the levels of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor -α or -γ (PPAR-α or PPAR-γ) induced by acute ethanol were reversed by AA. In EtOH/LPS cultivated AML-12 cells, AA decreased IL-1β and TNF-α levels, lipid

  6. Acanthoic Acid Can Partially Prevent Alcohol Exposure-Induced Liver Lipid Deposition and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yao, You-Li; Han, Xin; Li, Zhi-Man; Lian, Li-Hua; Nan, Ji-Xing; Wu, Yan-Ling

    2017-01-01

    Aims: The present study aims to detect the effect of acanthoic acid (AA) on alcohol exposure-induced liver lipid deposition and inflammation, and to explore the mechanisms. Methods: C57BL/6 mice were pretreated with single dose of AA (20 and 40 mg/kg) by oral gavage or equal volume of saline, and then exposed to three doses of ethanol (5 g/kg body weight, 25%, w/v) by gavage within 24 h. The mice were sacrificed at 6 h after the last ethanol dosing. Serum and hepatic indexes were detected by western blot, RT-PCR, and histopathological assay. AML-12 cells were pretreated with AA (5, 10, 20 μM), or AICAR (500 μM), GW3965 (1 μM), SRT1720 (6 μM), Nicotinamide (20 mM) for 2 h, respectively, and then following treated with EtOH (200 mM) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (10 ng/ml) for additional 48 h. Cell protein and mRNA were collected for western blot and RT-PCR. Cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) release were detected by ELISA assay. Results: It was found that AA significantly decreased acute ethanol-induced increasing of the serum ALT/AST, LDH, ALP levels, and hepatic and serum triglyceride levels, and reduced fat droplets accumulation in mice liver. AA significantly suppressed the levels of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP-1), cytochrome P4502E1 (CYP2E1), IL-1β, and caspase-1 induced by ethanol. Furthermore, a significant decline of sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) and liver X receptors (LXRs) levels was observed in EtOH group, compared with normal group mice. And AA pretreatment increased the Sirt1 and LXRs levels, and also ameliorated phosphorylation of liver kinase B-1 (LKB-1), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC) proteins, compared with EtOH group. However, the levels of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor -α or -γ (PPAR-α or PPAR-γ) induced by acute ethanol were reversed by AA. In EtOH/LPS cultivated AML-12 cells, AA decreased IL-1β and TNF-α levels, lipid

  7. Pretreatment of Gymnema sylvestre revealed the protection against acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Overproduction of free radicals and decreased antioxidant capacity are well-known risk factors for inflammatory bowel diseases. Gymnema sylvestre (GS) leaves extract is distinguished for its anti-diabetic, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Present study is designed to evaluate the preventative activities of GS against acetic acid (AA)-induced ulcerative colitis in Wistar rats. Methods Experimentally ulcerative colitis (UC) was induced by AA in animals pretreated with three different doses of GS leaves extract (50, 100, 200 mg/kg/day) and a single dose of mesalazine (MES, 300 mg/kg/day) for seven days. Twenty four hours later, animals were sacrificed and the colonic tissues were collected. Colonic mucus content was determined using Alcian blue dye binding technique. Levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), total glutathione sulfhydryl group (T-GSH) and non-protein sulfhydryl group (NPSH) as well as the activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were estimated in colon tissues. Colonic nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) and total protein (TP) concentrations were also determined. Levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) as well as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and nitric oxide (NO) were estimated in colonic tissues. The histopathological changes of the colonic tissues were also observed. Results In AA administered group TBARS levels were increased, while colonic mucus content, T-GSH and NP-SH, SOD and CAT were reduced in colon. Pretreatment with GS inhibited TBARS elevation as well as mucus content, T-GSH and NP-SH reduction. Enzymatic activities of SOD and CAT were brought back to their normal levels in GS pretreated group. A significant reduction in DNA, RNA and TP levels was seen following AA administration and this inhibition was significantly eliminated by GS treatment. GS pretreatment also inhibited

  8. Homocysteine induced cardiovascular events: a consequence of long term anabolic‐androgenic steroid (AAS) abuse

    PubMed Central

    Graham, M R; Grace, F M; Boobier, W; Hullin, D; Kicman, A; Cowan, D; Davies, B; Baker, J S

    2006-01-01

    Objectives The long term effects (>20 years) of anabolic‐androgenic steroid (AAS) use on plasma concentrations of homocysteine (HCY), folate, testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), free androgen index, urea, creatinine, haematocrit (HCT), vitamin B12, and urinary testosterone/epitestosterone (T/E) ratio, were examined in a cohort of self‐prescribing bodybuilders. Methods Subjects (n = 40) were divided into four distinct groups: (1) AAS users still using AAS (SU; n = 10); (2) AAS users abstinent from AAS administration for 3 months (SA; n = 10); (3) non‐drug using bodybuilding controls (BC; n = 10); and (4) sedentary male controls (SC; n = 10). Results HCY levels were significantly higher in SU compared with BC and SC (p<0.01), and with SA (p<0.05). Fat free mass was significantly higher in both groups of AAS users (p<0.01). Daily energy intake (kJ) and daily protein intake (g/day) were significantly higher in SU and SA (p<0.05) compared with BC and SC, but were unlikely to be responsible for the observed HCY increases. HCT concentrations were significantly higher in the SU group (p<0.01). A significant linear inverse relationship was observed in the SU group between SHBG and HCY (r = −0.828, p<0.01), indicating a possible influence of the sex hormones in determining HCY levels. Conclusions With mounting evidence linking AAS to adverse effects on some clotting factors, the significantly higher levels of HCY and HCT observed in the SU group suggest long term AAS users have increased risk of future thromboembolic events. PMID:16488899

  9. Adenoviral expression of 15-lipoxygenase-1 in rabbit aortic endothelium: role in arachidonic acid-induced relaxation.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Nitin T; Holmes, Blythe B; Cui, Lijie; Viita, Helena; Yla-Herttuala, Seppo; Campbell, William B

    2007-02-01

    Endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation of the rabbit aorta is mediated by either nitric oxide (NO) or arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites from cyclooxygenase (COX) and 15-lipoxygenase (15-LO) pathways. 15-LO-1 metabolites of AA, 11,12,15-trihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid (THETA), and 15-hydroxy-11,12-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (HEETA) cause concentration-dependent relaxation. We tested the hypothesis that in the 15-LO pathway of AA metabolism, 15-LO-1 is sufficient and is the rate-limiting step in inducing relaxations in rabbit aorta. Aorta and rabbit aortic endothelial cells were treated with adenoviruses containing human 15-LO-1 cDNA (Ad-15-LO-1) or beta-galactosidase (Ad-beta-Gal). Ad-15-LO-1-transduction increased the expression of a 75-kDa protein corresponding to 15-LO-1, detected by immunoblotting with an anti-human15-LO-1 antibody, and increased the production of HEETA and THETA from [(14)C]AA. Immunohistochemical studies on Ad-15-LO-1-transduced rabbit aorta showed the presence of 15-LO-1 in endothelial cells. Ad-15-LO-1-treated aortic rings showed enhanced relaxation to AA (max 31.7 +/- 3.2%) compared with Ad-beta-Gal-treated (max 12.7 +/- 3.2%) or control nontreated rings (max 13.1 +/- 1.6%) (P < 0.01). The relaxations in Ad-15-LO-1-treated aorta were blocked by the 15-LO inhibitor cinnamyl-3,4-dihydroxy-a-cyanocinnamate. Overexpression of 15-LO-1 in the rabbit aortic endothelium is sufficient to increase the production of the vasodilatory HEETA and THETA and enhance the relaxations to AA. This confirms the role of HEETA and THETA as endothelium-derived relaxing factors.

  10. Profiling the changes in signaling pathways in ascorbic acid/β-glycerophosphate-induced osteoblastic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chaves Neto, Antonio Hernandes; Queiroz, Karla Cristiana; Milani, Renato; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar Julian; Justo, Giselle Zenker; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Ferreira, Carmen Veríssima

    2011-01-01

    Despite numerous reports on the ability of ascorbic acid and β-glycerophosphate (AA/β-GP) to induce osteoblast differentiation, little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in this phenomenon. In this work, we used a peptide array containing specific consensus sequences (potential substrates) for protein kinases and traditional biochemical techniques to examine the signaling pathways modulated during AA/β-GP-induced osteoblast differentiation. The kinomic profile obtained after 7 days of treatment with AA/β-GP identified 18 kinase substrates with significantly enhanced or reduced phosphorylation. Peptide substrates for Akt, PI3K, PKC, BCR, ABL, PRKG1, PAK1, PAK2, ERK1, ERBB2, and SYK showed a considerable reduction in phosphorylation, whereas enhanced phosphorylation was observed in substrates for CHKB, CHKA, PKA, FAK, ATM, PKA, and VEGFR-1. These findings confirm the potential usefulness of peptide microarrays for identifying kinases known to be involved in bone development in vivo and in vitro and show that this technique can be used to investigate kinases whose function in osteoblastic differentiation is poorly understood.

  11. Cross-talk between TLR4 and PPARγ pathways in the arachidonic acid-induced inflammatory response in pancreatic acini.

    PubMed

    Mateu, A; Ramudo, L; Manso, M A; De Dios, I

    2015-12-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is generally associated with inflammation in different settings. We assess the molecular mechanisms involved in the inflammatory response exerted by AA on pancreatic acini as an approach to acute pancreatitis (AP). Celecoxib (COX-2 inhibitor), TAK-242 (TLR4 inhibitor) and 15d-PGJ2 (PPARγ agonist) were used to ascertain the signaling pathways. In addition, we examine the effects of TAK-242 and 15d-PGJ2 on AP induced in rats by bile-pancreatic duct obstruction (BPDO). To carry out in vitro studies, acini were isolated from pancreas of control rats. Generation of PGE2 and TXB2, activation of pro-inflammatory pathways (MAPKs, NF-κB, and JAK/STAT3) and overexpression of CCL2 and P-selectin was found in AA-treated acini. In addition, AA up-regulated TLR4 and down-regulated PPARγ expression. Celecoxib prevented the up-regulation of CCL2 and P-selectin but did not show any effect on the AA-mediated changes in TLR4 and PPARγ expression. TAK-242, reduced the generation of AA metabolites and repressed both the cascade of pro-inflammatory events which led to CCL2 and P-selectin overexpression as well as the AA-induced PPARγ down-regulation. Thus, TLR4 acts as upstream activating pro-inflammatory and inhibiting anti-inflammatory pathways. 15d-PGJ2 down-regulated TLR4 expression and hence prevented the synthesis of AA metabolites and the inflammatory response mediated by them. Reciprocal negative cross-talk between TLR4 and PPARγ pathways is evidenced. In vivo experiments showed that TAK-242 and 15d-PGJ2 treatments reduced the inflammatory response in BPDO-induced AP. We conclude that through TLR4-dependent mechanisms, AA up-regulated CCL2 and P-selectin in pancreatic acini, partly mediated by the generation of PGE2 and TXB2, which activated pro-inflammatory pathways, but also directly by down-regulating PPARγ expression with anti-inflammatory activity. In vitro and in vivo studies support the role of TLR4 in AP and the use of TLR4 inhibitors and

  12. Nrf2 is crucial for the down-regulation of Cyp7a1 induced by arachidonic acid in Hepg2 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Ming; Wang, Xing-He; Hao, Li-Hong; Wang, He; Zhang, Xiu-Ying; Muhammad, Ishfaq; Qi, Yue; Li, Guang-Liang; Sun, Xiao-Qi

    2017-03-07

    In former research, cyp7a1 expression was decreased but Nrf2 transcription and hepatic arachidonic acid (AA) concentration were increased in high-fat diet fed mice. This study aims to investigate the influence of AA in CYP7A1 expression and the role of Nrf2 in regulating CYP7A1 in the process. HepG2 cells were administered with different concentrations of AA. Nrf2 and CYP7A1 expressions were analyzed by real-time PCR and western blot. Nrf2 silenced and over-expressed cell models were constructed by Nrf2 siRNA and eukaryotic expression vector transient transfections and were used to investigate the role of Nrf2 in regulating CYP7A1 following AA administration. The results showed that Nrf2 was increased dose-dependently but CYP7A1 was decreased dose-dependently in cells treated with increasing concentrations of AA. The expression of CYP7A1 was increased by Nrf2 silence and was decreased by Nrf2 over-expression in HepG2 cells treated with different concentrations of AA. In conclusion, Nrf2 plays a significant role in the down-regulation of CYP7A1 induced by AA in HepG2 cells.

  13. Protective effect of anacardic acids from cashew (Anacardium occidentale) on ethanol-induced gastric damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Morais, Talita C; Pinto, Natália B; Carvalho, Karine Maria M B; Rios, Jeison B; Ricardo, Nagila Maria P S; Trevisan, Maria Teresa S; Rao, Vietla S; Santos, Flávia A

    2010-01-05

    Cashew nut-shell liquid and the contained anacardic acids (AAs) have been shown to possess antioxidant, lipoxygenase inhibitory, anti-Helicobacter pylori and antitumor properties. Despite these known effects, hitherto there were no published reports on their likely gastroprotective effects. The present study was designed to verify whether AAs afford gastroprotection against the ethanol-induced gastric damage and to examine the underlying mechanism(s). Gastric damage was induced by intragastric administration of 0.2mL of ethanol (96%). Mice in groups were pretreated orally with AAs (10, 30 and 100mg/kg), misoprostol (50 microg/kg), or vehicle (2% Tween 80 in saline, 10mL/kg), 45min before ethanol administration. They were sacrificed 30min later, the stomachs excised, and the mucosal lesion area (mm(2)) measured by planimetry. Gastroprotection was assessed in relation to inhibition of gastric lesion area. To study the gastroprotective mechanism(s), its relations to capsaicin-sensitive fibers, endogenous prostaglandins, nitric oxide and ATP-sensitive potassium channels were analysed. Treatments effects on ethanol-associated oxidative stress markers GSH, MDA, catalase, SOD, and total nitrate/nitrite levels as an index of NO were measured in gastric tissue. Besides, the effects of AAs on gastric secretory volume and total acidity were analysed in 4-h pylorus-ligated rat. AAs afforded a dose-related gastroprotection against the ethanol damage and further prevented the ethanol-induced changes in the levels of GSH, MDA, catalase, SOD and nitrate/nitrite. However, they failed to modify the gastric secretion or the total acidity. It was observed that the gastroprotection by AAs was greatly reduced in animals pretreated with capsazepine, indomethacin, l-NAME or glibenclamide. These results suggest that AAs afford gastroprotection principally through an antioxidant mechanism. Other complementary mechanisms include the activation of capsaicin-sensitive gastric afferents

  14. L-Ascorbic Acid Protected Against Extrinsic and Intrinsic Apoptosis Induced by Cobalt Nanoparticles Through ROS Attenuation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yake; Hong, Hongxiang; Lu, Xu; Wang, Wei; Liu, Fan; Yang, Huilin

    2017-02-01

    Currently, tissue damage induced by cobalt nanoparticles (CoNPs) and cobalt ions (Co(2+)) are the most serious syndrome in the patients with metal-on-metal hip prostheses. Therefore, an urgent need exists for the identification of the mechanisms and the development of therapeutic strategies to limit it. The purpose of this study was to explore the mechanism of this damage and to demonstrate if L-ascorbic acid (L-AA) could protect against the cell toxicities induced by CoNPs and Co(2+) in vitro. With CoNPs and Co(2+) treatment, cell viability was significantly decreased; the ROS (reactive oxygen species) level in mitochondria was dramatically increased in CoNPs treated cells, but cobalt ions could barely induce the ROS. Consistently, the level of cell apoptosis was increased with the upregulation of pro-apoptotic factors (caspases 8, 9, and 3, and Bax) and the downregulation of anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-2. Besides that, the levels of cytochrome c and AIF were increased and released from mitochondria into the cytoplasm. After the cells were pretreated with L-AA, the cell viability decreased by CoNPs was reversed and the ROS induced by CoNPs was suppressed. The level of cell apoptosis induced by CoNPs was decreased as well. But it could not reverse the effects induced by Co(2+). These studies demonstrated that CoNPs induce extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways via generation of ROS, and L-AA could prevent the cytotoxicity by reducing the level of ROS. While Co(2+) may induce cytotoxicity through other signals, it could not be protected by L-AA treatment.

  15. Effects of Nigella sativa oil and ascorbic acid against oxytetracycline-induced hepato-renal toxicity in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Daim, Mohamed M.; Ghazy, Emad W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Oxytetracycline (OTC) is a broad spectrum antibiotic widely used for treatment of a wide range of infections. However, its improper human and animal use leads to toxic effects, including hepatonephrotoxicity. Our objective was to evaluate protective effects of Nigella sativa oil (NSO) and/or ascorbic acid (AA), against OTC-induced hepatonephrotoxicity in rabbits. Materials and Methods: Forty male white New Zealand rabbits were divided into 5 groups of eight each. The 1st group (control) was given saline. The 2nd group was given OTC (200 mg/kg, orally). The 3rd and 4th groups were orally administered NSO and AA (2 ml/kg and 200 mg/kg respectively) 1 hr before OTC administration at the same dose regimen used for the 2nd group. Both NSO and AA were given in combination for the 5th group along with OTC administration. Serum biochemical parameters related to liver and kidney injury were evaluated, and lipid peroxidation as well as antioxidant markers in hepatic and renal tissues were examined. Results: OTC-treated animals revealed significant alterations in serum biochemical hepato-renal injury markers, and showed a markedly increase in hepato-renal lipid peroxidation and inhibition in tissue antioxidant biomarkers. NSO and AA protect against OTC-induced serum and tissue biochemical alterations when each of them is used alone or in combination along with OTC treatment. Furthermore, both NSO and AA produced synergetic hepatoprotective and antioxidant properties. Conclusion: The present study revealed the preventive role of NSO and/or AA against the toxic effects of OTC through their free radical-scavenging and potent antioxidant activities. PMID:25945233

  16. Relaxin attenuates aristolochic acid induced human tubular epithelial cell apoptosis in vitro by activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiang-Cheng; Zhao, Ning; Xu, Qun-Hong; Yang, Xiu; Xia, Wen-Kai; Chen, Qi; Wang, Ming; Fei, Xiao

    2017-04-06

    Aristolochic acid nephropathy remains a leading cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD), however few treatment strategies exist. Emerging evidence has shown that H2 relaxin (RLX) possesses powerful antifibrosis and anti-apoptotic properties, therefore we aimed to investigate whether H2 relaxin can be employed to reduce AA-induced cell apoptosis. Human proximal tubular epithelial (HK-2) cells exposed to AA-I were treated with or without administration of H2 RLX. Cell viability was examined using the WST-8 assay. Apoptotic morphologic alterations were observed using the Hoechst 33342 staining method. Apoptosis was detected using flow cytometry. The expression of caspase 3, caspase 8, caspase 9, ERK1/2, Bax, Bcl-2, and Akt proteins was determined by Western blot. Co-treatment with RLX reversed the increased apoptosis observed in the AA-I only treated group. RLX restored expression of phosphorylated Akt which found to be decreased in the AA-I only treated cells. RLX co-treatment led to a decrease in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio as well as the cleaved form of caspase-3 compared to the AA-I only treated cells. This anti-apoptotic effect of RLX was attenuated by co-administration of the Akt inhibitor LY294002. The present study demonstrated H2 RLX can decrease AA-I induced apoptosis through activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  17. Altered macrophage arachidonic acid metabolism induced by endotoxin tolerance: characterization and mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, T.S.

    1986-01-01

    Altered macrophage arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism may play a role in endotoxic shock and the phenomenon of endotoxin tolerance induced by repeated injections of endotoxin. Studies were initiated to characterize both lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase metabolite formation by endotoxin tolerant and non-tolerant macrophages in response to 4 different stimuli, i.e., endotoxin, glucan, zymosan, and the calcium ionophore A23187. In contrast to previous reports of decreased prostaglandin synthesis by tolerant macrophages, A23187-stimulated immunoreactive (i) leukotriene (LT) C/sub 4/D/sub 4/ and prostaglandin (PG) E/sub 2/ production by tolerant cells was greater than that by non-tolerant controls (p <0.001). However, A23187-stimulated i6-keto PGF/sub 1a/ levels were lower in tolerant macrophages compared to controls (P < 0.05). iL TC/sub 4/D/sub 4/ production was not significantly stimulated by endotoxin or glucan, but was stimulated by zymosan in non-tolerant cells. Synthesis of iLTB/sub 4/ by control macrophages was stimulated by endotoxin (p <0.01). The effect of tolerance on factors that affect AA release was investigated by measuring /sup 14/C-AA incorporation and release and phospholipase A/sub 2/ activity

  18. Interactions of collagen molecules in the presence of N-hydroxysuccinimide activated adipic acid (NHS-AA) as a crosslinking agent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Wu, Kun; Li, Guoying

    2011-11-01

    The effect of crosslinking agent on pepsin-soluble bovine collagen solution was examined using N-hydroxysuccinimide activated adipic acid (NHS-AA) as a crosslinker. Electrophoretic patterns indicated that crosslinks formed when NHS-AA was added. A higher polarity level deduced from the changes in the fluorescence emission spectrum of pyrene in the crosslinked collagen solution indicated that the formation of well-ordered aggregates was suppressed. The random aggregation of collagens was also observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Furthermore, the association of collagens into fibrils was influenced by crosslinking. Self-assembly was suppressed at 37°C; however, as temperature was increased to 39°C, a small amount of NHS-AA leaded to an improvement in the ability of self-aggregation. Although more random structure was brought about by crosslinking, self-aggregation might still be promoted as temperature was increased, accompanying by the thermal stability improvement of fibrils.

  19. Knock-out of metacaspase and/or cytochrome c results in the activation of a ROS-independent acetic acid-induced programmed cell death pathway in yeast.

    PubMed

    Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Passarella, Salvatore; Marra, Ersilia; Giannattasio, Sergio

    2010-08-20

    To gain further insight into yeast acetic acid-induced programmed cell death (AA-PCD) we analyzed the effects of the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) on cell viability, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) production, DNA fragmentation, cytochrome c (cyt c) release and caspase-like activation in wild type (wt) and metacaspase and/or cyt c-lacking cells. We found that NAC prevents AA-PCD in wt cells, by scavenging H(2)O(2) and by inhibiting both cyt c release and caspase-like activation. This shows the occurrence of a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent AA-PCD. Contrarily no NAC dependent change in AA-PCD of mutant cells was detectable, showing that a ROS-independent AA-PCD can also occur.

  20. Asiatic acid attenuates pre-neoplastic lesions, oxidative stress, biotransforming enzymes and histopathological alterations in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced experimental rat colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Aktarul Islam; Mani, Vijay; Arivalagan, Sivaranjani; Thomas, Nisha Susan; Namasivayam, Nalini

    2017-02-01

    Asiatic acid (AA), a pentacyclic triterpenoid, derived from the tropical medicinal plant Centella asiatica is known to exhibit numerous pharmacological properties. We hypothesized that AA will have chemopreventive potential against 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced experimental colon carcinogenesis in male Wistar rats. Rats were arbitrarily divided into six groups. Group I rats were processed as control. Group II rats received AA (8 mg/kg b.w., p.o.) and groups III-VI rats received subcutaneous injections of DMH (20 mg/kg b.w.) once a week, for the first four weeks. In addition, groups IV-VI rats received AA at the doses of 2, 4 and 8 mg/kg b.w., respectively, for 16 weeks. Our results discovered that supplementation with AA to the DMH-exposed rats significantly decreased the incidence of polyps and Aberrant crypt foci (ACF) as compared to the DMH-alone-exposed rats. Moreover, in the AA-supplemented DMH-exposed rats, we ascertained increased activities of the antioxidants and decreased levels of lipid peroxidation (LPO) in the liver and circulation and enhanced levels of both LPO and antioxidants in the colon, which were altered in the DMH-alone-exposed rats. Furthermore, we also observed altered activities of vitamins C and E and biotransforming enzymes in DMH-alone-exposed rats, which were reversed on AA supplementation. All the observations were supported by our histological findings. Thus, we can conclude that, AA could be used as an effective chemopreventive agent against DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis.

  1. Conjugated Linoleic Acid Induces Human Adipocyte Delipidation

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. Mark; Boysen, Maria Sandberg; Chung, Soonkyu; Fabiyi, Olowatoyin; Morrison, Ron F.; Mandrup, Susanne; McIntosh, Michael K.

    2005-01-01

    Dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) reduces body fat in animals and some humans. Here we show that trans-10, cis-12 CLA, but not cis-9, trans-11 CLA, when added to cultures of stromal vascular cells containing newly differentiated human adipocytes, caused a time-dependent decrease in triglyceride content, insulin-stimulated glucose and fatty acid uptake, incorporation into lipid, and oxidation compared with controls. In parallel, gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ and many of its downstream targets were diminished by trans-10, cis-12 CLA, whereas leptin gene expression was increased. Prior to changes in gene expression and metabolism, trans-10, cis-12 CLA caused a robust and sustained activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular signal-related kinase (MEK/ERK) signaling. Furthermore, the trans-10, cis-12 CLA-mediated activation of MEK/ERK could be attenuated by pretreatment with U0126 and pertussis toxin. In parallel, pretreatment with U0126 blocked the ability of trans-10, cis-12 CLA to alter gene expression and attenuate glucose and fatty acid uptake of the cultures. Intriguingly, the induction by CLA of MEK/ERK signaling was linked to hypersecretion of adipocytokines interleukin-6 and interleukin-8. Collectively, these data demonstrate for the first time that trans-10, cis-12 CLA decreases the triglyceride content of newly differentiated human adipocytes by inducing MEK/ERK signaling through the autocrine/paracrine actions of interleukins-6 and 8. PMID:15067015

  2. Binding of the pathogen receptor HSP90AA1 to avibirnavirus VP2 induces autophagy by inactivating the AKT-MTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Hu, Boli; Zhang, Yina; Jia, Lu; Wu, Huansheng; Fan, Chengfei; Sun, Yanting; Ye, Chengjin; Liao, Min; Zhou, Jiyong

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an essential component of host innate and adaptive immunity. Viruses have developed diverse strategies for evading or utilizing autophagy for survival. The response of the autophagy pathways to virus invasion is poorly documented. Here, we report on the induction of autophagy initiated by the pathogen receptor HSP90AA1 (heat shock protein 90 kDa α [cytosolic], class A member 1) via the AKT-MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin)-dependent pathway. Transmission electron microscopy and confocal microscopy revealed that intracellular autolysosomes packaged avibirnavirus particles. Autophagy detection showed that early avibirnavirus infection not only increased the amount of light chain 3 (LC3)-II, but also upregulated AKT-MTOR dephosphorylation. HSP90AA1-AKT-MTOR knockdown by RNA interference resulted in inhibition of autophagy during avibirnavirus infection. Virus titer assays further verified that autophagy inhibition, but not induction, enhanced avibirnavirus replication. Subsequently, we found that HSP90AA1 binding to the viral protein VP2 resulted in induction of autophagy and AKT-MTOR pathway inactivation. Collectively, our findings suggest that the cell surface protein HSP90AA1, an avibirnavirus-binding receptor, induces autophagy through the HSP90AA1-AKT-MTOR pathway in early infection. We reveal that upon viral recognition, a direct connection between HSP90AA1 and the AKT-MTOR pathway trigger autophagy, a critical step for controlling infection.

  3. L-arginine and aminoguanidine reduce colonic damage of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats: potential modulation of nuclear factor-κB/p65.

    PubMed

    Farghaly, Hanan S M; Thabit, Romany H

    2014-10-01

    The transcription factor, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is a key inducer of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) gene expression. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential protective effect of l-arginine (Arg; nitric oxide precursor) and aminoguanidine (inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor) against acetic acid (AA)-induced colitis in rats, and the potential role of NF-κB. Colitis was induced by intrarectal inoculation of rats with 4% acetic acid for three consecutive days. The effect of Arg and aminoguanidine on nitric oxide levels was assessed by Greiss assay and protein expression of NF-κB/p65, and inducible nitric oxide synthase was also investigated by immunohistochemistry. Slides were examined using ImageJ, and results reported as the percent area positive for each marker. Intrarectal AA caused a significant increase in bodyweight loss and colon weights. Arg at 100 mg/day for 7 days before induction of colitis diminished the changes in both bodyweight loss and colon weights. Furthermore, Arg attenuated the colonic tissues macroscopic and microscopic damage induced by acetic acid. In addition, i.p. AG 100 mg/kg given during and after induction of colitis recovered the colonic ulcerative lesion induced by AA. Arg can protect against colonic inflammation; an effect that probably be attributed to its nitric oxide-donating property, resulting in modulatory effects on the expression of NF-κB/p65 in the colon tissues. The results suggested that Arg might reduce the inflammation associated with colitis as confirmed by histopathological investigations. Arg might inhibit AA-induced colitis through the NF-κB/nitric oxide pathway.

  4. Perflurooctanoic Acid Induces Developmental Cardiotoxicity in ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a widespread environmental contaminant that is detectable in serum of the general U.S. population. PFOA is a known developmental toxicant that induces mortality in mammalian embryos and is thought to induce toxicity via interaction with the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPAR_). As the cardiovascular system is crucial for embryonic survival, PFOA-induced effects on the heart may partially explain embryonic mortality. To assess impacts of PFOA exposure on the developing heart in an avian model, we used histopathology and immunohistochemical staining for myosin to assess morphological alterations in 19-day-old chicken embryo hearts after PFOA exposure. Additionally, echocardiography and cardiac myofibril ATPase activity assays were used to assess functional alterations in 1-day-old hatchling chickens following developmental PFOA exposure. Overall thinning and thinning of a dense layer of myosin in the right ventricular wall were observed in PFOA-exposed chicken embryo hearts. Alteration of multiple cardiac structural and functional parameters, including left ventricular wall thickness, left ventricular volume, heart rate, stroke volume, and ejection fraction were detected with echocardiography in the exposed hatchling chickens. Assessment of ATPase activity indicated that the ratio of cardiac myofibril calcium-independent ATPase activity to calcium-dependent ATPase activity was not affected, which suggests that d

  5. Gremlin-mediated decrease in bone morphogenetic protein signaling promotes aristolochic acid-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in HK-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Wang, Zihua; Wang, Shuai; Zhao, Jinghong; Zhang, Jingbo; Huang, Yunjian

    2012-07-16

    Ingestion of aristolochic acid (AA) is associated with the development of aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN), which is characterized by progressive tubulointerstitial fibrosis, chronic renal failure and urothelial cancer. Our previous study showed that bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) could attenuate AA-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in human proximal tubule epithelial cells (PTEC). However, how gremlin (a BMP-7 antagonist) antagonizes the BMP-7 action in PTEC remained unsolved. The aim of the current study was to investigate the role of gremlin in AA-induced EMT in PTEC (HK-2 cells). HK-2 cells were treated with AA (10 μmol/L) for periods up to 72 h. Cell viability was determined by tetrazolium dye (MTT) assay. Morphological changes were assessed by phase-contrast microscopy. Markers of EMT, including E-cadherin and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) were detected by indirect immunofluorescence stains. The BMP-7 and gremlin mRNA and protein expression in HK-2 cells were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR (real-time RT-PCR) and western blotting after exposure to AA. The level of phosphorylated Smad1/5/8, a marker of BMP-7 activity, was also determined by western blot analysis. Cells were transfected with gremlin siRNA to determine the effects of gremlin knockdown on markers of EMT following treatment with AA. Our results indicated that AA-induced EMT was associated with acquisition of fibroblast-like cell shape, loss of E-cadherin, and increases of alpha-SMA and collagen type I. Interestingly, exposure of HK-2 cells to 10 μmol/L AA increased the mRNA and protein expression of gremlin in HK-2 cells. This increase was in parallel with a decrease in BMP-7 expression and a down-regulation of phosphorylated Smad1/5/8 protein levels. Moreover, transfection with siRNA to gremlin was able to recover BMP-7 signaling activity, and attenuate EMT-associated phenotypic changes induced by AA. Together, these observations strongly suggest that gremlin

  6. The Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Arachidonic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid Induce Mouse Dendritic Cells Maturation but Reduce T-Cell Responses In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Johan A; Wold, Agnes E; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie; Östman, Sofia M

    2015-01-01

    Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) might regulate T-cell activation and lineage commitment. Here, we measured the effects of omega-3 (n-3), n-6 and n-9 fatty acids on the interaction between dendritic cells (DCs) and naïve T cells. Spleen DCs from BALB/c mice were cultured in vitro with ovalbumin (OVA) with 50 μM fatty acids; α-linolenic acid, arachidonic acid (AA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), linoleic acid or oleic acid and thereafter OVA-specific DO11.10 T cells were added to the cultures. Fatty acids were taken up by the DCs, as shown by gas chromatography analysis. After culture with arachidonic acid or DHA CD11c+ CD11b+ and CD11c+ CD11bneg DCs expressed more CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86 and PDL-1, while IAd remained unchanged. However, fewer T cells co-cultured with these DCs proliferated (CellTrace Violet low) and expressed CD69 or CD25, while more were necrotic (7AAD+). We noted an increased proportion of T cells with a regulatory T cell (Treg) phenotype, i.e., when gating on CD4+ FoxP3+ CTLA-4+, CD4+ FoxP3+ Helios+ or CD4+ FoxP3+ PD-1+, in co-cultures with arachidonic acid- or DHA-primed DCs relative to control cultures. The proportion of putative Tregs was inversely correlated to T-cell proliferation, indicating a suppressive function of these cells. With arachidonic acid DCs produced higher levels of prostaglandin E2 while T cells produced lower amounts of IL-10 and IFNγ. In conclusion arachidonic acid and DHA induced up-regulation of activation markers on DCs. However arachidonic acid- and DHA-primed DCs reduced T-cell proliferation and increased the proportion of T cells expressing FoxP3, indicating that these fatty acids can promote induction of regulatory T cells.

  7. Modulating Effect of Ascorbic Acid on Transport-Induced Immunosuppression in Goats

    PubMed Central

    Minka, Ndazo Salka; Ayo, Joseph Olusegun

    2011-01-01

    The effect of 12 h road transportation on some basic blood cells and the modulating role of ascorbic acid were investigated in 40 adult Red Sokoto goats during the hot dry season. The animals were divided into two groups, GI (experimental; n = 20) and GII (control; n = 20). Group 1 was administered with ascorbic acid (AA) per os at a dosage rate of 100 mg/kg body weight, while GII was given 10 mL of sterile water per goat. Forty minutes after the administration and loading, the goats were transported for 12 h. The result obtained in GII goats showed that loading, transportation, high ambient temperature (AT), and relative humidity (RH) encountered during transportation induced lymphopenia, neutrophilia, and eosinopenia, which can cause immunosuppression. In GI goats, the administration of AA prior to loading and transportation ameliorated the adverse effects of loading and transportation stress on neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio and eosinopenia of the goats. PMID:23738106

  8. Ammodytoxins efficiently release arachidonic acid and induce apoptosis in a motoneuronal cell line in an enzymatic activity-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Jenko-Pražnikar, Zala; Petan, Toni; Pungerčar, Jože

    2013-03-01

    Secreted phospholipases A2 (sPLA2s) are phospholipolytic enzymes and receptor ligands whose action affects cell death and survival. We have previously shown that ammodytoxin A (AtxA), a snake venom sPLA2, is rapidly internalized into motoneuronal NSC34 cells, inducing characteristic neurotoxic sPLA2 cell damage and apoptosis. In this study, we have analyzed the role of sPLA2 enzymatic activity, including arachidonic acid (AA) release, in the induction of motoneuronal apoptosis by AtxA and homologous recombinant sPLA2s with different enzymatic properties: an AtxA mutant (V31W) with very high enzymatic activity, enzymatically inactive S49-sPLA2 (ammodytin L, AtnL), its mutant (LW) with restored enzymatic activity, and non-toxic, enzymatically active sPLA2 (AtnI2). Addition of AA, AtxA, AtxA-V31W and AtnL-LW, but not AtnL and AtnI2, to NSC34 cells resulted in caspase-3 activation, DNA fragmentation and disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, leading to a significant and rapid decrease in motoneuronal cell viability that was not observed in C2C12 myoblasts and HEK293 cells. AtxA, AtxA-V31W and AtnL-LW, but not AtnL and AtnI2, also liberated large amounts of AA specifically from motoneuronal cells, and this ability correlated well with the ability to induce apoptotic changes and decrease cell viability. The enzymatic activity of AtxA and similar sPLA2s is thus necessary, but not sufficient, for inducing motoneuronal apoptosis. This suggests that specific binding to the motoneuronal cell surface, followed by internalization and enzymatic activity-dependent induction of apoptosis, possibly as a consequence of extensive extra- and intracellular AA release, is necessary for Atx-induced motoneuronal cell death.

  9. Keto analogues and amino acids supplementation induces a decrease of white blood cell counts and a reduction of muscle damage during intense exercise under thermoneutral conditions.

    PubMed

    Lima, R C P; Camerino, S R A S; França, T C L; Rodrigues, D S A; Gouveia, M G S; Ximenes-da-Silva, A; Bassini, A; Prado, E S; Cameron, L C

    2017-04-05

    This study evaluated the acute effect of keto analogue and amino acid (AA-KAAA) supplementation on both white blood cell counts and the established biomarkers of muscle damage during exercise under thermoneutral conditions. Sixteen male cyclists received a ketogenic diet for two days and were divided into two equal groups: a group taking AA-KAAA (KA) or a control group (PL). The athletes performed a two hour cycling session followed by a maximum incremental test until voluntary exhaustion (VExh). Blood samples were obtained at rest and during exercise for further hematological and biochemical analyses. Exercise-induced ammonemia increased in the PL group at VExh (75%) but remained unchanged in the KA group. Both groups exhibited a significant increase in leukocyte and neutrophil counts of ∼85% (∼13 × 10(9) L(-1)), but the shape of the lymphocytes and the eosinophil counts suggest that AA-KAAA supplementation helps prevent lymphocytosis. AA-KAAA supplementation induced a decrease in creatine kinase and aspartate aminotransferase levels at VExh while showing a significant decrease in lactate dehydrogenase at 120 min. We found that AA-KAAA supplementation decreases both the lymphocyte count response in blood and the established biomarkers of muscle damage after intense exercise under a low heat stress environment.

  10. Mechanosensitive neurons on the internal reproductive tract contribute to egg-laying-induced acetic acid attraction in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Gou, Bin; Liu, Ying; Guntur, Ananya R; Stern, Ulrich; Yang, Chung-Hui

    2014-10-23

    Selecting a suitable site to deposit their eggs is an important reproductive need of Drosophila females. Although their choosiness toward egg-laying sites is well documented, the specific neural mechanism that activates females' search for attractive egg-laying sites is not known. Here, we show that distention and contraction of females' internal reproductive tract triggered by egg delivery through the tract plays a critical role in activating such search. We found that females start to exhibit acetic acid (AA) attraction prior to depositing each egg but no attraction when they are not laying eggs. Artificially distending the reproductive tract triggers AA attraction in non-egg-laying females, whereas silencing the mechanosensitive neurons we identified that can sense the contractile status of the tract eliminates such attraction. Our work uncovers the circuit basis of an important reproductive need of Drosophila females and provides a simple model for dissecting the neural mechanism that underlies a reproductive need-induced behavioral modification.

  11. Role of arachidonic acid and protein kinase C during maturation-inducing hormone-dependent meiotic resumption and ovulation in ovarian follicles of Atlantic croaker

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patino, R.; Yoshizaki, G.; Bolamba, D.; Thomas, P.

    2003-01-01

    The roles of arachidonic acid (AA) and protein kinase C (PKC) during in vitro maturation-inducing hormone (MIH)-dependent meiotic resumption (maturation) and ovulation were studied in ovarian follicles of Atlantic croaker (Micropogonias undulatus). The requirement for cyclooxygenase (COX) metabolites of AA was examined using a nonspecific COX inhibitor, indomethacin (IM), as well as two COX products, prostaglandin (PG) F2?? and PGE2, whereas the role of lipoxygenase (LOX) was investigated using a specific LOX inhibitor, nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA). The involvement of PKC was examined using phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a PKC activator, as well as GF109203X (GF), a specific inhibitor of PKC and 1-(5-isoquin- olinesulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H7), nonspecific inhibitor of protein kinases. Genomic mechanisms were examined with the transcription-inhibitor actinomycin D (ActD) and the functionality of heterologous (oocyte-granulosa) gap junctions (GJ) with a dye transfer assay. The AA (100 ??M) and PGF2?? (5 ??M) did not induce maturation, and NDGA (10 ??M) did not affect MIH-dependent maturation. However, IM (100 ??M) partially inhibited MIH-dependent maturation. Conversely, AA and both PGs induced, and IM and NDGA inhibited, MIH-dependent ovulation in matured follicles. The PMA (1 ??g/ml) did not induce maturation but caused ovulation in matured follicles, whereas PKC inhibitors (GF, 5 ??M; H7, 50??M) did not affect MIH-dependent maturation but inhibited MIH- and PMA-dependent ovulation. The PMA-dependent ovulation was inhibited by IM but not by NDGA. In addition, ActD (5 ??M) blocked MIH-dependent, but not PMA-dependent, ovulation, and PGF2?? restored MIH-dependent ovulation in ActD-blocked follicles. The AA and PGs did not induce, and GF did not inhibit, MIH-dependent heterologous GJ uncoupling. In conclusion, AA and PKC mediate MIH-dependent ovulation but not meiotic resumption or heterologous GJ uncoupling in croaker follicles, but a permissive role

  12. Asiatic Acid Isolated From Centella Asiatica Inhibits TGF-β1-induced Collagen Expression in Human Keloid Fibroblasts via PPAR-γ Activation

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Difei; Zhang, Jizhou; Wu, Xin; Dou, Yannong; Yang, Yan; Tan, Qian; Xia, Yufeng; Gong, Zhunan; Dai, Yue

    2013-01-01

    Keloids are fibroproliferative disorders characterized by exuberant extracellular matrix deposition and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β/Smad pathway plays a pivotal role in keloid pathogenesis. Centella asiatica extract has been applied in scar management for ages. As one of its major components, asiatic acid (AA) has been recently reported to inhibit liver fibrosis by blocking TGF-β/Smad pathway. However, its effect on keloid remains unknown. In order to investigate the effects of AA on cell proliferation, invasion and collagen synthesis, normal and keloid fibroblasts were exposed to TGF-β1 with or without AA. Relevant experiments including 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation assay, Transwell invasion assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and RNA interference assay were conducted. As a result, keloid fibroblasts showed higher responsiveness to TGF-β1 stimulation than normal fibroblasts in terms of invasion and collagen synthesis. AA could suppress TGF-β1-induced expression of collagen type I, inhibit Smad 2/3 phosphorylation and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) expression, while elevate Smad 7 protein level. Noteworthy, the effects of AA on keloid fibroblasts could be abrogated by PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 and by silencing of PPAR-γ. The present study demonstrated that AA inhibited TGF-β1-induced collagen and PAI-1 expression in keloid fibroblasts through PPAR-γ activation, which suggested that AA was one of the active constituents of C. asiatica responsible for keloid management, and could be included in the arsenal for combating against keloid. PMID:24250248

  13. Effet de l'acide ascorbique sur la détermination du plomb dans des matrices végétales par ETA-AAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoenig, Michel; Van Hoeyweghen, Paul

    Sulphuric acid used in wet oxidation of plant material and the matrix elements are responsible for a strong suppression of lead absorption signals and for the poor reproducibility of the measurements with ETA-AAS. Addition of ascorbic acid to samples (2% m/V) provides an enhancement in sensitivity by more than 200% and leads to acceptable values of the relative error. The results obtained with the 283.3 nm line are better than those obtained with the 217.0 nm line.

  14. Dipyrone metabolite 4-MAA induces hypothermia and inhibits PGE2-dependent and -independent fever while 4-AA only blocks PGE2-dependent fever

    PubMed Central

    Malvar, David do C; Aguiar, Fernando A; Vaz, Artur de L L; Assis, Débora C R; de Melo, Miriam C C; Jabor, Valquíria A P; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes; Ferreira, Sérgio H; Clososki, Giuliano C; de Souza, Glória E P

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The antipyretic and hypothermic prodrug dipyrone prevents PGE2-dependent and -independent fever induced by LPS from Escherichia coli and Tityus serrulatus venom (Tsv) respectively. We aimed to identify the dipyrone metabolites responsible for the antipyretic and hypothermic effects. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Male Wistar rats were treated i.p. with indomethacin (2 mg·kg−1), dipyrone, 4-methylaminoantipyrine (4-MAA), 4-aminoantipyrine (4-AA) (60–360 mg·kg−1), 4-formylaminoantipyrine, 4-acethylaminoantipyrine (120–360 mg·kg−1) or vehicle 30 min before i.p. injection of LPS (50 μg·kg−1), Tsv (150 μg·kg−1) or saline. Rectal temperatures were measured by tele-thermometry and dipyrone metabolite concentrations determined in the plasma, CSF and hypothalamus by LC-MS/MS. PGE2 concentrations were determined in the CSF and hypothalamus by elisa. KEY RESULTS In contrast to LPS, Tsv-induced fever was not followed by increased PGE2 in the CSF or hypothalamus. The antipyretic time-course of 4-MAA and 4-AA on LPS-induced fever overlapped with the period of the highest concentrations of 4-MAA and 4-AA in the hypothalamus, CSF and plasma. These metabolites reduced LPS-induced fever and the PGE2 increase in the plasma, CSF and hypothalamus. Only 4-MAA inhibited Tsv-induced fever. The higher doses of dipyrone and 4-MAA also induced hypothermia. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The presence of 4-MAA and 4-AA in the CSF and hypothalamus was associated with PGE2 synthesis inhibition and a decrease in LPS-induced fever. 4-MAA was also shown to be an antipyretic metabolite for PGE2-independent fever induced by Tsv suggesting that it is responsible for the additional antipyretic mechanism of dipyrone. Moreover, 4-MAA is the hypothermic metabolite of dipyrone. PMID:24712707

  15. Effect of insulin-transferrin-selenium (ITS) and l-ascorbic acid (AA) during in vitro maturation on in vitro bovine embryo development.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, A L S; Pereira, S A; Diógenes, M N; Dode, M A N

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of adding a combination of insulin, transferrin and selenium (ITS) and l-ascorbic acid (AA) during in vitro maturation (IVM) and in vitro culture (IVC) on in vitro embryo production. To verify the effect of the supplements, cleavage and blastocyst rates, embryo size and total cell number were performed. Embryonic development data, embryo size categorization and kinetics of maturation were analyzed by chi-squared test, while the total cell number was analyzed by a Kruskal-Wallis test (P < 0.05). When ITS was present during IVM, IVC or the entire culture, all treatments had a cleavage and blastocyst rates and embryo quality, similar to those of the control group (P < 0.05). Supplementation of IVM medium with ITS and AA for 12 h or 24 h showed that the last 12 h increased embryo production (51.6%; n = 220) on D7 compared with the control (39.5%; n = 213). However, no improvement was observed in blastocyst rate when less competent oocytes, obtained from 1-3 mm follicles, were exposed to ITS + AA for the last 12 h of IVM, with a blastocyst rate of 14.9% (n = 47) compared with 61.0% (n = 141) in the control group. The results suggest that the addition of ITS alone did not affect embryo production; however, when combined with AA in the last 12 h of maturation, there was improvement in the quantity and quality of embryos produced. Furthermore, the use of ITS and AA during IVM did not improve the competence of oocytes obtained from small follicles.

  16. The Cytotoxic Enterotoxin of Aeromonas hydrophila Induces Proinflammatory Cytokine Production and Activates Arachidonic Acid Metabolism in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, A. K.; Xu, X.-J.; Ribardo, D.; Gonzalez, M.; Kuhl, K.; Peterson, J. W.; Houston, C. W.

    2000-01-01

    An aerolysin-related cytotoxic enterotoxin (Act) of Aeromonas hydrophila possesses multiple biological activities, which include its ability to lyse red blood cells, destroy tissue culture cell lines, evoke a fluid secretory response in ligated intestinal loop models, and induce lethality in mice. The role of Act in the virulence of the organism has been demonstrated. In this study, we evaluated the potential of Act to induce production of proinflammatory cytokines associated with Act-induced tissue injury and Act's capacity to activate in macrophages arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism that leads to production of eicosanoids (e.g., prostaglandin E2 [PGE2]). Our data indicated that Act stimulated the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha and upregulated the expression of genes encoding interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6 in the murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7. Act also activated transcription of the gene encoding inducible nitric oxide synthase. Act evoked the production of PGE2 coupled to the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) pathway. AA is a substrate for PGE2, and Act produced AA from phospholipids by inducing group V secretory phospholipase A2. We also demonstrated that Act increased cyclic AMP (cAMP) production in macrophages. cAMP, along with PGE2, could potentiate fluid secretion in animal models because of infiltration and activation of macrophages resulting from Act-induced tissue injury. After Act treatment of RAW cells, we detected an increased translocation of NF-κB and cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) to the nucleus using gel shift assays. Act also upregulated production of antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 in macrophages, suggesting a protective role for Bcl-2 against cell death induced by proinflammatory cytokines. The increased expression of genes encoding the proinflammatory cytokines, COX-2, and Bcl-2 appeared correlated with the activation of NF-κB and CREB. This is the first report of the detailed mechanisms of action of Act from A

  17. Swelling and aspirin release study: cross-linked pH-sensitive vinyl acetate-co-acrylic acid (VAC-co-AA) hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Ranjha, Nazar Mohammad; Mudassir, Jahanzeb

    2008-05-01

    The objective of this work was to develop new pH-sensitive hydrogels to deliver gastric mucosal irritating drugs to the lower part of the gastrointestinal tract. For this purpose, cross-linked vinyl acetate-co-acrylic acid (VAC-co-AA) hydrogels were synthesized by using N, N, methylene bisacrylamide (MBAAm) as a cross-linking agent. Different ratios of 90:10, 70:30, 50:50, 30:70, and 10:90 of VAC-co-AA were synthesized. All of the compositions were cross-linked using 0.15, 0.30, 0.45, and 0.60 mol percent MBAAm. Swelling and aspirin release were studied for 8 hour period. The drug release data were fitted into various kinetic models like the zero-order, first-order, Higuchi, and Peppas. Hydrogels were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. In addition to the above, these hydrogels were loaded with 2%, 8% and 14% w/v aspirin solutions, keeping the monomeric composition and degree of cross-linking constant. In conclusion, it can be said that aspirin can be successfully incorporated into cross-linked VAC/AA hydrogels and its swelling and drug release can be modulated by changing the mole fraction of the acid component in the gels.

  18. Developmental nephrotoxicity of aristolochic acid in a zebrafish model

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yu-Ju; Chen, Yau-Hung

    2012-05-15

    Aristolochic acid (AA) is a component of Aristolochia plant extracts which is used as a treatment for different pathologies and their toxicological effects have not been sufficiently studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate AA-induced nephrotoxicity in zebrafish embryos. After soaking zebrafish embryos in AA, the embryos displayed malformed kidney phenotypes, such as curved, cystic pronephric tubes, pronephric ducts, and cases of atrophic glomeruli. The percentages of embryos with malformed kidney phenotypes increased as the exposure dosages of AA increased. Furthermore, AA-treated embryos exhibited significantly reduced glomerular filtration rates (GFRs) in comparison with mock-control littermates (mock-control: 100 ± 2.24% vs. 10 ppm AA treatment for 3–5 h: 71.48 ± 18.84% ∼ 39.41 ± 15.88%), indicating that AA treatment not only caused morphological kidney changes but also induced renal failure. In addition to kidney malformations, AA-treated zebrafish embryos also exhibited deformed hearts, swollen pericardiums, impaired blood circulation and the accumulation(s) of red blood cells. Whole-mount in situ hybridization studies using cmlc2 and wt1b as riboprobes indicated that the kidney is more sensitive than the heart to AA damage. Real-time PCR showed that AA can up-regulate the expression of proinflammatory genes like TNFα, cox2 and mpo. These results support the following conclusions: (1) AA-induced renal failure is mediated by inflammation, which causes circulation dysfunction followed by serious heart malformation; and (2) the kidney is more sensitive than the heart to AA injury. -- Highlights: ► Zebrafish were used to evaluate aristolochic acid (AA)-induced nephrotoxicity. ► AA-treated zebrafish embryos exhibited deformed heart as well as malformed kidney. ► Kidney is more sensitive to AA injury than the heart.

  19. Dynamic release of amino acid transmitters induced by valproate in PTZ-kindled epileptic rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Ping; Zhang, Xu-Ying; Lu, Xiang; Zhong, Ming-Kang; Ji, Yong-Hua

    2004-03-01

    In the present communication, the dynamic release of amino acid (AA) transmitters induced by valproate (VPA) in pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-kindled freely moving rats hippocampus has been determined. The results showed that glutamate and aspartate release were significantly increased during the seizure/interical periods, and markedly decreased after the application of 200mg/kg valproate. In contrast, gamma-aminobutyric acid and taurine release were markedly decreased during interical period, and significantly increased during the seizure period. Glycine release was similar to the case of glutamate and aspartate release. The increase of either gamma-aminobutyric acid/taurine or glycine releases during the seizure period could be inhibited by the application of valproate likewise. The results indicate that: (a) the imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters is really involved in epilepsy; (b) the modulation of valproate on the major amino acid neurotransmitters certainly plays one of important roles on antiepilepsy efficacy; (c) the pentylenetetrazol-kindled epileptogenesis model is a fit one for approaching the mechanisms of valproate modulating amino acid neurotransmitters.

  20. Arachidonic acid-containing phosphatidylcholine characterized by consolidated plasma and liver lipidomics as an early onset marker for tamoxifen-induced hepatic phospholipidosis.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kosuke; Goda, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Akio; Yamada, Naohito; Maekawa, Kyoko; Saito, Yoshiro; Sugai, Shoichiro

    2017-01-31

    Lipid profiling has emerged as an effective approach to not only screen disease and drug toxicity biomarkers but also understand their underlying mechanisms of action. Tamoxifen, a widely used antiestrogenic agent for adjuvant therapy against estrogen-positive breast cancer, possesses side effects such as hepatic steatosis and phospholipidosis (PLD). In the present study, we administered tamoxifen to Sprague-Dawley rats and used lipidomics to reveal tamoxifen-induced alteration of the hepatic lipid profile and its association with the plasma lipid profile. Treatment with tamoxifen for 28 days caused hepatic PLD in rats. We compared the plasma and liver lipid profiles in treated vs. untreated rats using a multivariate analysis to determine differences between the two groups. In total, 25 plasma and 45 liver lipids were identified and altered in the tamoxifen-treated group. Of these lipids, arachidonic acid (AA)-containing phosphatidylcholines (PCs), such as PC (17:0/20:4) and PC (18:1/20:4), were commonly reduced in both plasma and liver. Conversely, tamoxifen increased other phosphoglycerolipids in the liver, such as phosphatidylethanolamine (18:1/18:1) and phosphatidylinositol (18:0/18:2). We also examined alteration of AA-containing PCs and some phosphoglycerolipids in the pre-PLD stage and found that these lipid alterations were initiated before pathological alteration in the liver. In addition, changes in plasma and liver levels of AA-containing PCs were linearly associated. Moreover, levels of free AA and mRNA levels of AA-synthesizing enzymes, such as fatty acid desaturase 1 and 2, were decreased by tamoxifen treatment. Therefore, our study demonstrated that AA-containing PCs might have potential utility as novel and predictive biomarkers for tamoxifen-induced PLD. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Comparative evaluation of the antioxidant effects of the natural vitamin C analog 2-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid isolated from Goji berry fruit.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ziping; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Junhong; Hao, Yanfang; Yang, Xueyun; Wang, Yujiong

    2011-05-01

    2-O-β-D-Glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid (AA-2βG) is a natural derivative of vitamin C (Lascorbic acid, AA) isolated from Goji berry (Lycium barbarum L.) fruit. We evaluated the antioxidant activities of AA-2βG and AA using in vitro and in vivo model systems. In vitro radical scavenging assays demonstrated that AA-βG was capable of scavenging 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl and hydroxyl peroxide and inhibiting H(2)O(2)-induced hemolysis better than AA. AA-2βG and AA had similar hydroxyl radical scavenging capabilities, but AA-2βG was incapable of scavenging superoxide anion radicals, and its capacity to scavenge nitrite (NO(2) (-)) was lower than that of AA. The overall in vitro reduction capability of AA-2βG was also significantly lower than that of AA. Moreover, in vivo studies demonstrated that AA-2βG was capable of protecting the liver against carbon tetrachloride-induced acute liver injury in mice. These results suggest that AA-2βG is an important antioxidant component of Goji berry fruit, which may share similar but distinct antioxidant mechanistic properties with AA. This study furthers our understanding of the mechanisms of Goji berry fruit pharmacological activities on antiaging and antitumor properties as a traditional medicine and dietary supplement.

  2. Polyunsaturated Branched-Chain Fatty Acid Geranylgeranoic Acid Induces Unfolded Protein Response in Human Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iwao, Chieko; Shidoji, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    The acyclic diterpenoid acid geranylgeranoic acid (GGA) has been reported to induce autophagic cell death in several human hepatoma-derived cell lines; however, the molecular mechanism for this remains unknown. In the present study, several diterpenoids were examined for ability to induce XBP1 splicing and/or lipotoxicity for human hepatoma cell lines. Here we show that three groups of diterpenoids emerged: 1) GGA, 2,3-dihydro GGA and 9-cis retinoic acid induce cell death and XBP1 splicing; 2) all-trans retinoic acid induces XBP1 splicing but little cell death; and 3) phytanic acid, phytenic acid and geranylgeraniol induce neither cell death nor XBP1 splicing. GGA-induced ER stress/ unfolded protein response (UPR) and its lipotoxicity were both blocked by co-treatment with oleic acid. The blocking activity of oleic acid for GGA-induced XBP1 splicing was not attenuated by methylation of oleic acid. These findings strongly suggest that GGA at micromolar concentrations induces the so-called lipid-induced ER stress response/UPR, which is oleate-suppressive, and shows its lipotoxicity in human hepatoma cells. PMID:26186544

  3. UV-induced graft polymerization of acrylic acid in the sub-micronchannels of oxidized PET track-etched membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolkov, Ilya V.; Mashentseva, Anastassiya A.; Güven, Olgun; Taltenov, Abzal A.

    2015-12-01

    In this article, we report on functionalization of track-etched membrane based on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET TeMs) oxidized by advanced oxidation systems and by grafting of acrylic acid using photochemical initiation technique for the purpose of increasing functionality thus expanding its practical application. Among advanced oxidation processes (H2O2/UV) system had been chosen to introduce maximum concentration of carboxylic acid groups. Benzophenone (BP) photo-initiator was first immobilized on the surfaces of cylindrical pores which were later filled with aq. acrylic acid solution. UV-irradiation from both sides of PET TeMs has led to the formation of grafted poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) chains inside the membrane sub-micronchannels. Effect of oxygen-rich surface of PET TeMs on BP adsorption and subsequent process of photo-induced graft polymerization of acrylic acid (AA) were studied by ESR. The surface of oxidized and AA grafted PET TeMs was characterized by UV-vis, ATR-FTIR, XPS spectroscopies and by SEM.

  4. Lysophosphatidic acid induces osteocyte dendrite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Karagiosis, Sue A; Karin, Norman J

    2007-05-25

    Osteocytes elaborate an extensive mechanosensory network in bone matrix and communicate intercellularly via gap junctions established at dendrite termini. We developed a method to measure osteocyte dendritogenesis in vitro using a modified transwell assay and determined that the lipid growth factor lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a potent stimulator of dendrite outgrowth in MLO-Y4 osteocytes. The stimulatory effects were dose-dependent with maximal outgrowth observed within a physiological range of LPA. LPA-treated osteocytes exhibited distinct rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton and a more stellate morphology than control cells. LPA also promoted osteocyte chemotaxis, suggesting a shared molecular mechanism between dendrite outgrowth and cell motility. The LPA-induced increase in dendrite formation was blocked by the specific LPA-receptor antagonist Ki16425 and by pertussis toxin. Bone cells in vivo encounter platelet-derived LPA in regions of bone damage, and we postulate that this lipid factor is important for re-establishing osteocyte connectivity during fracture repair.

  5. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids induce growth inhibition and calpain/caspase-12 dependent apoptosis in PDGF cultured 3T6 fibroblast.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Diana; Moreno, Juan J

    2007-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites released by the cyclooxygenase pathway is involved in serum-induced 3T6 fibroblast cycle progression and proliferation. However, these results also suggest that other AA cascade pathways might be involved. Recently, we also described the role of hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids, which are produced by cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYP), in 3T6 fibroblast growth. AA can be also metabolized by the epoxygenase activity of CYP-producing epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). Finally, the cytosolic epoxide hydrolases catalyze the hydration of the EETs, transforming them into dihydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (DHETEs). In this work, we have studied the role of the EETs/DHETEs on 3T6 fibroblasts growth. Our results show that PDGF stimulates 3T6 fibroblast proliferation and [3H]thymidine incorporation, while the addition of 5,6-EET, 8,9-EET, 11,12-EET or 14,15-EET (0.1-1 microM) inhibit these processes. Furthermore, 5,6-DHETE and 11,12-DHETE (0.1-1 microM) also inhibit cell proliferation and DNA synthesis. Interestingly, this growth inhibition was correlated with an induction of apoptosis. Thus, we observed that in the presence of PDGF, EETs or DHETEs (0.1-1 microM) induce phosphatidylserine externalization (as measured by annexin V-binding) and DNA fragmentation (as quantified using a TUNEL assay). Our results show that calpain, as well as caspase-12 and caspase-3, are involved in these events. Therefore, EETs and DHETEs have anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on PDGF-stimulated 3T6 fibroblasts.

  6. ROLE OF INTRACELLULAR CALCIUM AND PHOSPHOLIPASE A2 IN ARACHIDONIC ACID-INDUCED TOXICITY IN LIVER CELLS OVEREXPRESSING CYP2E1*

    PubMed Central

    Caro, Andres A.; Cederbaum, Arthur I.

    2007-01-01

    Liver cells (HepG2 and primary hepatocytes) overexpressing CYP2E1 and exposed to arachidonic acid (AA) were previously shown to lose viability together with enhanced lipid peroxidation. These events were blocked in cells pre-incubated with antioxidants (α -tocopherol, glutathione ethyl ester), or in HepG2 cells not expressing CYP2E1. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the role of calcium and calcium-activated hydrolases in these CYP2E1-AA interactions. CYP2E1-expressing HepG2 cells treated with AA showed an early increase in cytosolic calcium and partial depletion of ionomycin-sensitive calcium stores. These changes in calcium were blocked by α -tocopherol. AA activated phospholipase A2 (PLA2) in CYP2E1-expressing liver cells, and this was inhibited by PLA2 inhibitors or α -tocopherol. PLA2 inhibitors prevented the cell death caused by AA, without affecting CYP2E1 activity or lipid peroxidation. AA toxicity and PLA2 activation were inhibited in calcium-depleted cells, but not by removal of extracellular calcium alone. Removal of extracellular calcium inhibited the early increase in cytosolic calcium caused by AA. CYP2E1 overexpressing HepG2 cells exposed to AA showed a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, which was prevented by the PLA2 inhibitors. These results suggest that AA-induced toxicity to CYPE1-expressing cells: (i) is associated with release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores that depends mainly on oxidative membrane damage; (ii) is associated with activation of PLA2 that depends on intracellular calcium and lipid peroxidation; iii) does not depend on increased influx of extracellular calcium, and iv) depends on the effect of converging events (lipid peroxidation, intracellular calcium, activation of PLA2) on mitochondria to induce bioenergetic failure and necrosis. These interactions may play a role in alcohol liver toxicity, which requires polyunsaturated fatty acids, and involves induction of CYP2E1. PMID:17118330

  7. Low Na intake suppresses expression of CYP2C23 and arachidonic acid-induced inhibition of ENaC.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peng; Lin, Dao-Hong; Wang, Tong; Babilonia, Elisa; Wang, Zhijian; Jin, Yan; Kemp, Rowena; Nasjletti, Alberto; Wang, Wen-Hui

    2006-12-01

    We previously demonstrated that arachidonic acid (AA) inhibits epithelial Na channels (ENaC) through the cytochrome P-450 (CYP) epoxygenase-dependent pathway (34). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that low Na intake suppresses the expression of CYP2C23, which is mainly responsible for converting AA to epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) in the kidney (11) and attenuates the AA-induced inhibition of ENaC. Immunostaining showed that CYP2C23 is expressed in the Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP)-positive and aquaporin 2 (AQP2)-positive tubules. This suggests that CYP2C23 is expressed in the thick ascending limb (TAL) and collecting duct (CD). Na restriction significantly suppressed the expression of CYP2C23 in the TAL and CD. Western blot also demonstrated that the expression of CYP2C23 in renal cortex and outer medulla diminished in rats on Na-deficient diet (Na-D) but increased in those on high-Na diet (4%). Moreover, the content of 11,12-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) decreased in the isolated cortical CD from rats on Na-D compared with those on a normal-Na diet (0.5%). Patch-clamp study showed that application of 15 microM AA inhibited the activity of ENaC by 77% in the CCD of rats on a Na-D for 3 days. However, the inhibitory effect of AA on ENaC was significantly attenuated in rats on Na-D for 14 days. Furthermore, inhibition of CYP epoxygenase with MS-PPOH increased the ENaC activity in the CCD of rats on a control Na diet. We also used microperfusion technique to examine the effect of MS-PPOH on Na transport in the distal nephron. Application of MS-PPOH significantly increased Na absorption in the distal nephron of control rats but had no significant effect on Na absorption in rats on Na-D for 14 days. We conclude that low Na intake downregulates the activity and expression of CYP2C23 and attenuates the inhibitory effect of AA on Na transport.

  8. Lacosamide-induced valproic acid toxicity.

    PubMed

    Jones, Gina L; Popli, Gautam S; Silvia, Mary T

    2013-04-01

    Valproic acid is commonly used in the treatment of both focal and generalized epilepsies and is often well tolerated. There are many reported cases of hyperammonemic encephalopathy and other well-known side effects reported during use of valproic acid either alone or in combination with other antiepileptics. This case report demonstrates valproic acid toxicity in the presence of lacosamide, which has not previously been reported. Full recovery occurred after withdrawal of both valproic acid and lacosamide.

  9. Effects of chebulic acid on advanced glycation endproducts-induced collagen cross-links.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Young; Oh, Jun-Gu; Kim, Jin Sook; Lee, Kwang-Won

    2014-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) have been implicated in the development of diabetic complications. We report the antiglycating activity of chebulic acid (CA), isolated from Terminalia chebula on breaking the cross-links of proteins induced by AGEs and inhibiting the formation of AGEs. Aminoguanidine (AG) reduced 50% of glycated bovine serum albumin (BSA) with glycolaldehyde (glycol-BSA)-induced cross-links of collagen at a concentration of 67.8 ± 2.5 mM, the level of CA required for exerting a similar antiglycating activity was 38.8 ± 0.5 µM. Also, the breaking activity on collagen cross-links induced by glycol-BSA was potent with CA (IC50=1.46 ± 0.05 mM), exhibiting 50-fold stronger breaking activity than with ALT-711, a well-known cross-link breaker (IC50=72.2 ± 2.4 mM). IC50 values of DPPH· scavenging activity for CA and ascorbic acid (AA) were 39.2 ± 4.9 and 19.0 ± 1.2 µg dry matter (DM) mL(-1), respectively, and ferric reducing and antioxidant power (FRAP) activities for CA and AA were 4.70 ± 0.06 and 11.4 ± 0.1 mmol/FeSO4·7H2O/g DM, respectively. The chelating activities of CA, AG and ALT711 on copper-catalyzed oxidation of AA were compared, and in increasing order, ALT-711 (IC50 of 1.92 ± 0.20 mM)

  10. Long-term acid-induced wall extension in an in-vitro system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleland, R. E.; Cosgrove, D.; Tepfer, M.

    1987-01-01

    When frozen-thawed Avena sativa L. coleoptile and Cucumis sativa L. hypocotyl sections, under tension, are acid-treated, they undergo rapid elongation (acid-extension). The acid-extension response consists of two concurrent phases: a burst of extension which decays exponentially over 1-2 h (ExE), and a constant rate of extension (CE) which can persist for at least 6h. The extension (delta L) is closely represented by the equation: delta L = a-a e(-kt) + C t where a is the total extension of the exponential phase, k is the rate constant for ExE, and c is the rate of linear extension (CE). Low pH and high tension increased a and c, whereas temperature influenced k. The magnitude of the CE (over 50% extension/10 h), the similarity in its time course to auxin-induced growth, and the apparent yield threshold for CE indicate that CE is more likely than ExE to be the type of extension which cell walls undergo during normal auxin-induced growth.

  11. Protective effects of arachidonic acid against palmitic acid-mediated lipotoxicity in HIT-T15 cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young Sik; Kim, Chi Hyun; Kim, Ki Young; Cheon, Hyae Gyeong

    2012-05-01

    Saturated fatty acids have been considered major contributing factors in type 2 diabetes, whereas unsaturated fatty acids have beneficial effects for preventing the development of diabetes. However, the effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids in pancreatic β cells have not been reported. Here, we examined the effects of arachidonic acid (AA) on palmitic acid (PA)-mediated lipotoxicity in clonal HIT-T15 pancreatic β cells. AA prevented the PA-induced lipotoxicity as indicated by cell viability, DNA fragmentation and mitochondrial membrane potential, whereas eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA), a non-metabolizable AA, had little effect on PA-induced lipotoxicity. In parallel with its protective effects against PA-induced lipotoxicity, AA restored impaired insulin expression and secretion induced by PA. AA but not ETYA increased intracellular triglyceride (TG) in the presence of PA compared with PA alone, and xanthohumol, a diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) inhibitor, reversed AA-induced protection from PA. Taken together, our results suggest that AA protects against PA-induced lipotoxicity in clonal HIT-T15 pancreatic β cells, and the protective effects may be associated with TG accumulation, possibly through sequestration of lipotoxic PA into TG.

  12. Myrrh attenuates oxidative and inflammatory processes in acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Fatani, Amal Jamil; Alrojayee, Fatima Salih; Parmar, Mihir Yogeshkumar; Abuohashish, Hatem Mustafa; Ahmed, Mohammed Mahboobuddin; Al-Rejaie, Salim Salih

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis (UC) has been associated with a weakened antioxidant capacity and increased inflammatory processes. Myrrh is traditionally used for the treatment of inflammatory diseases due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of myrrh on an experimental rat model of UC. UC was induced in rats using acetic acid (AA) after pre-treatment with myrrh (125, 250 or 500 mg/kg/day) or mesalazine (MES; 300 mg/kg/day) for 7 days. The levels of various inflammatory cytokines, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and nitric oxide (NO) in the rat colon tissues were assessed. In addition, the colonic levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and non-protein sulfhydryl groups (NP-SH), as well as the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), were estimated. Furthermore, total protein (TP) contents and the levels of DNA and RNA were measured, and histopathological changes in colonic tissues were analyzed. The results indicated that the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, PGE2, NO and TBARS were markedly increased. By contrast, the levels of interleukin-10, NP-SH, TP and nucleic acids, and the enzymatic activities of SOD and CAT were significantly decreased in the AA model group. In addition, pretreatment with myrrh and MES was able to attenuate the impaired oxidative stress response and upregulation of inflammatory biomarkers. Furthermore, the enzymatic activities of SOD and CAT were near to normal in the myrrh and MES pretreated groups. The ability of myrrh to protect against UC was further confirmed by histopathological analysis, and the high dose of myrrh exerted an effect comparable to MES. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that myrrh has potent therapeutic value in the amelioration of experimental colitis in laboratory animals by downregulating the expression of proinflammatory mediators and improving endogenous antioxidative activities. PMID

  13. Ascorbic acid oxidation of thiol groups from dithiotreitol is mediated by its conversion to dehydroascorbic acid

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Nilda B.V.; Lissner, Leandro A.; Klimaczewski, Cláudia V.; Colpo, Elisangela; Rocha, Joao B.T.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the in vitro pro-oxidant effect of ascorbic acid towards thiol groups could be mediated by free radicals formed during its auto-oxidation and/or by a direct oxidation of -SH groups by its oxidized form (dehydroascorbic acid). This hypothesis was examined by measuring the rate of AA (ascorbic acid) oxidation in MOPS (3-morpholinepropanesulfonic acid buffer) and phosphate buffer (PB). Here we have used dithiothreitol (DTT) as model of vicinal thiol-containing enzymes, namely δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase. The rate of AA and DTT oxidation was more pronounced in the presence of PB than in the MOPS. AA oxidation induced by iron/EDTA complex was significantly reduced by addition of superoxide dismutase, catalase and DTT to the reaction medium. H2O2 alone did not stimulate the oxidation of AA; however, AA oxidation was enhanced significantly with the addition of crescent concentrations of iron. Conversely, in DTT oxidation assay (without AA) the addition of iron, EDTA and H2O2, did not promote the oxidation of -SH groups. Our findings suggest that in the presence of physiological concentrations of AA and thiols, the oxidation of -SH groups is mediated by AA conversion to dehydroascorbic acid with the participation of iron. Furthermore, free radical species formed during the auto-oxidation of AA apparently did not oxidize thiol groups to a significant extent. PMID:27847448

  14. Hypochlorous and peracetic acid induced oxidation of dairy proteins.

    PubMed

    Kerkaert, Barbara; Mestdagh, Frédéric; Cucu, Tatiana; Aedo, Philip Roger; Ling, Shen Yan; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2011-02-09

    Hypochlorous and peracetic acids, both known disinfectants in the food industry, were compared for their oxidative capacity toward dairy proteins. Whey proteins and caseins were oxidized under well controlled conditions at pH 8 as a function of the sanitizing concentration. Different markers for protein oxidation were monitored. The results established that the protein carbonyl content was a rather unspecific marker for protein oxidation, which did not allow one to differentiate the oxidant used especially at the lower concentrations. Cysteine, tryptophan, and methionine were proven to be the most vulnerable amino acids for degradation upon hypochlorous and peracetic acid treatment, while tyrosine was only prone to degradation in the presence of hypochlorous acid. Hypochlorous acid induced oxidation gave rise to protein aggregation, while during peracetic acid induced oxidation, no high molecular weight aggregates were observed. Protein aggregation upon hypochlorous acid oxidation could primarily be linked to tryptophan and tyrosine degradation.

  15. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Aa of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants From Phosphoric Acid Manufacturing Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. AA, App. A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA 40...

  16. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Aa of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants From Phosphoric Acid Manufacturing Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. AA, App. A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA 40...

  17. Radiation-induced grafting of diallyldimethylammonium chloride onto acrylic acid grafted polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Sanju; Dhanawade, B. R.; Mitra, D.; Varshney, Lalit; Sabharwal, Sunil

    2009-01-01

    Diallyldimethylammonium chloride (DADMAC) was grafted onto polyethylene (PE) films by a double grafting procedure. The PE film was initially modified by grafting acrylic acid (AA), through a mutual irradiation method. AA-g-PE film, thus obtained was subjected to subsequent radiation grafting reaction of DADMAC, to give a DADMAC-g-AA-g-PE film having a comb-type structure. The influence of different conditions, such as the extent of AA grafting, DADMAC concentration, absorbed dose and dose rate, on the grafting yield of DADMAC was investigated. A maximum DADMAC grafting of 30% was achieved. The equilibrium degree of swelling (EDS) of the grafted films were gravimetrically determined. TGA and FT-IR techniques were employed to characterize the grafted PE films.

  18. Differences in basal and morphine-induced FosB/DeltaFosB and pCREB immunoreactivities in dopaminergic brain regions of alcohol-preferring AA and alcohol-avoiding ANA rats.

    PubMed

    Kaste, Kristiina; Kivinummi, Tanja; Piepponen, T Petteri; Kiianmaa, Kalervo; Ahtee, Liisa

    2009-06-01

    Besides alcohol, alcohol-preferring AA and alcohol-avoiding ANA rats differ also with respect to other abused drugs. To study the molecular basis of these differences, we examined the expression of two transcription factors implicated in addiction, DeltaFosB and pCREB, in brain dopaminergic regions of AA and ANA rats. The effects of morphine and nicotine were studied to relate the behavioral and molecular changes induced by these drugs. Baseline FosB/DeltaFosB immunoreactivity (IR) in the nucleus accumbens core and pCREB IR in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) were elevated in AA rats. Morphine increased DeltaFosB-like IR more readily in the caudate-putamen of AA rats than in ANA rats. In the PFC morphine decreased pCREB IR in AA rats, but increased it in ANA rats. In addition to enhanced locomotor response, the development of place preference to morphine was enhanced in AA rats. The enhanced nicotine-induced locomotor sensitization found in AA compared with ANA rats seems to depend in addition to dopamine and DeltaFosB on other mechanisms. These findings suggest that enhanced sensitivity of AA rats to morphine is related to augmented morphine-induced expression of FosB/DeltaFosB and morphine-induced reduction of pCREB levels. Moreover, altered innate expression of FosB/DeltaFosB and pCREB in AA rats is likely to affect the sensitivity of these rats to abused drugs.

  19. Perflurooctanoic Acid Induces Developmental Cardiotoxicity in Chicken Embryos and Hatchlings

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a widespread environmental contaminant that is detectable in serum of the general U.S. population. PFOA is a known developmental toxicant that induces mortality in mammalian embryos and is thought to induce toxicity via interaction with the peroxi...

  20. Apoptosis of HL-60 human leukemia cells induced by Asiatic acid through modulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 family proteins and the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiuling; Lv, Tingting; Chen, Yan; Wen, Lu; Zhang, Junli; Jiang, Xudong; Liu, Fang

    2015-07-01

    The toxicities of conventional chemotherapeutic agents to normal cells restrict their dosage and clinical efficacy in acute leukemia; therefore, it is important to develop novel chemotherapeutics, including natural products, which selectively target cancer-specific pathways. The present study aimed to explore the effect of the chemopreventive agent asiatic acid (AA) on the proliferation and apoptotic rate of the leukemia cell line HL-60 and investigated the mechanisms underlying its anti-tumor activity. The effect of AA on the proliferation of HL-60 cells was evaluated using the MTT assay. Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide double staining followed by flow cytometric analysis as well as Hoechst 33258 staining were used to analyze the apoptotic rate of the cells. Furthermore, changes of survivin, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 expressions were detected by western blot analysis. AA blocked the growth of HL-60 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The IC50-value of AA on HL-60 cells was 46.67 ± 5.08 µmol/l for 24 h. AA induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, which was inhibited in the presence of Z-DEVD-FMK, a specific inhibitor of caspase. The anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Mcl-1 and survivin were downregulated by AA in a dose-dependent manner. Concurrently, AA inhibited ERK and p38 phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner, while JNK phosphorylation was not affected. In conclusion, the present study indicated that the p38 and ERK pathways, as well as modulation of Bcl-2 family and survivin proteins were key regulators of apoptosis induced in HL-60 cells in response to AA.

  1. Amino Acids, Independent of Insulin, Attenuate Skeletal Muscle Autophagy in Neonatal Pigs during Endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-García, Adriana; Manjarín, Rodrigo; Suryawan, Agus; Nguyen, Hanh V.; Davis, Teresa A.; Orellana, Renán A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Sepsis induces loss of skeletal muscle mass by activating the ubiquitin proteasome (UPS) and autophagy systems. Although muscle protein synthesis in healthy neonatal piglets is responsive to amino acid (AA) stimulation, it is not known if amino acids (AA) can prevent the activation of muscle protein degradation induced by sepsis. We hypothesize that AA attenuate the sepsis-induced activation of UPS and autophagy in neonates. METHODS Newborn pigs were infused for 8 h with liposaccharide (LPS) (0 and 10 µg·kg−1·h−1), while circulating glucose and insulin were maintained at fasting levels; circulating AA were clamped at fasting or fed levels. Markers of protein degradation and AA transporters in longissimus dorsi (LD) were examined. RESULTS Fasting AA increased muscle microtubule-associated protein light 1 chain 3 II (LC3-II) abundance in LPS compared to control, while fed AA levels decreased LC3-II abundance in both LPS and controls. There was no effect of AA supplementation on AMP-activated protein kinase, forkhead box O1 and O4 phosphorylation, nor on sodium-coupled neutral AA transporter 2 and light chain AA transporter 1, muscle RING-finger protein-1 and muscle Atrophy F-Box/Atrogin-1 abundance. CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that supplementation of AA antagonize autophagy signal activation in skeletal muscle of neonates during endotoxemia. PMID:27064245

  2. Folic acid and pantothenic acid protection against valproic acid-induced neural tube defects in CD-1 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Jennifer E.; Raymond, Angela M.; Winn, Louise M. . E-mail: winnl@biology.queensu.ca

    2006-03-01

    In utero exposure to valproic acid (VPA) during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of neural tube defects (NTDs). Although the mechanism by which VPA mediates these effects is unknown, VPA-initiated changes in embryonic protein levels have been implicated. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of in utero VPA exposure on embryonic protein levels of p53, NF-{kappa}B, Pim-1, c-Myb, Bax, and Bcl-2 in the CD-1 mouse. We also evaluated the protective effects of folic acid and pantothenic acid on VPA-induced NTDs and VPA-induced embryonic protein changes in this model. Pregnant CD-1 mice were administered a teratogenic dose of VPA prior to neural tube closure and embryonic protein levels were analyzed. In our study, VPA (400 mg/kg)-induced NTDs (24%) and VPA-exposed embryos with an NTD showed a 2-fold increase in p53, and 4-fold decreases in NF-{kappa}B, Pim-1, and c-Myb protein levels compared to their phenotypically normal littermates (P < 0.05). Additionally, VPA increased the ratio of embryonic Bax/Bcl-2 protein levels (P < 0.05). Pretreatment of pregnant dams with either folic acid or pantothenic acid prior to VPA significantly protected against VPA-induced NTDs (P < 0.05). Folic acid also reduced VPA-induced alterations in p53, NF-{kappa}B, Pim-1, c-Myb, and Bax/Bcl-2 protein levels, while pantothenic acid prevented VPA-induced alterations in NF-{kappa}B, Pim-1, and c-Myb. We hypothesize that folic acid and pantothenic acid protect CD-1 embryos from VPA-induced NTDs by independent, but not mutually exclusive mechanisms, both of which may be mediated by the prevention of VPA-induced alterations in proteins involved in neurulation.

  3. Folic acid and pantothenic acid protection against valproic acid-induced neural tube defects in CD-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Jennifer E; Raymond, Angela M; Winn, Louise M

    2006-03-01

    In utero exposure to valproic acid (VPA) during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of neural tube defects (NTDs). Although the mechanism by which VPA mediates these effects is unknown, VPA-initiated changes in embryonic protein levels have been implicated. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of in utero VPA exposure on embryonic protein levels of p53, NF-kappaB, Pim-1, c-Myb, Bax, and Bcl-2 in the CD-1 mouse. We also evaluated the protective effects of folic acid and pantothenic acid on VPA-induced NTDs and VPA-induced embryonic protein changes in this model. Pregnant CD-1 mice were administered a teratogenic dose of VPA prior to neural tube closure and embryonic protein levels were analyzed. In our study, VPA (400 mg/kg)-induced NTDs (24%) and VPA-exposed embryos with an NTD showed a 2-fold increase in p53, and 4-fold decreases in NF-kappaB, Pim-1, and c-Myb protein levels compared to their phenotypically normal littermates (P<0.05). Additionally, VPA increased the ratio of embryonic Bax/Bcl-2 protein levels (P<0.05). Pretreatment of pregnant dams with either folic acid or pantothenic acid prior to VPA significantly protected against VPA-induced NTDs (P<0.05). Folic acid also reduced VPA-induced alterations in p53, NF-kappaB, Pim-1, c-Myb, and Bax/Bcl-2 protein levels, while pantothenic acid prevented VPA-induced alterations in NF-kappaB, Pim-1, and c-Myb. We hypothesize that folic acid and pantothenic acid protect CD-1 embryos from VPA-induced NTDs by independent, but not mutually exclusive mechanisms, both of which may be mediated by the prevention of VPA-induced alterations in proteins involved in neurulation.

  4. Protective effect of L-ascorbic acid against oxidative damage in the liver of rats with water-immersion restraint stress.

    PubMed

    Kaida, Shingo; Ohta, Yoshiji; Imai, Yoichiro; Kawanishi, Minoru

    2010-01-01

    We examined whether L-ascorbic acid (AA) (or reduced ascorbic acid) protects against oxidative damage in the liver of rats subjected to water-immersion stress (WIRS). AA (100, 250 or 500 mg/kg) was orally administered at 0.5 h before the onset of WIRS. Rats with 6 h of WIRS had increased serum corticosterone, glucose, total ascorbic acid (T-AA), AA, lipid peroxide (LPO), and NOx concentrations and alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotrasferase activities. The stressed rats had increased hepatic LPO, NOx, and dehydroascorbic acid concentrations and myeloperoxidase activity, decreased hepatic T-AA, AA, reduced glutathione concentrations and superoxide dismutase activity, and unchanged hepatic vitamin E concentration. Pre-administered AA attenuated the stress-induced changes in serum LPO and NOx concentrations and alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotrasferase activities and hepatic LPO, NOx, and T-AA, AA, dehydroascorbic acid, and reduced glutathione concentrations and myeloperoxidase and superoxide dismutase activities dose-dependently. Pre-administered AA did not affect the stress-induced changes in serum corticosterone and glucose concentrations. These results indicate that pre-administered AA protects against oxidative damage in the liver of rats with WIRS possibly by attenuating disruption of the antioxidant defense system and increases in NO generation and neutrophil infiltration in the tissue.

  5. Yeast growth in raffinose results in resistance to acetic-acid induced programmed cell death mostly due to the activation of the mitochondrial retrograde pathway.

    PubMed

    Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Zdralević, Maša; Lattanzio, Paolo; Marzulli, Domenico; Pracheil, Tammy; Liu, Zhengchang; Passarella, Salvatore; Marra, Ersilia; Giannattasio, Sergio

    2013-12-01

    In order to investigate whether and how a modification of mitochondrial metabolism can affect yeast sensitivity to programmed cell death (PCD) induced by acetic acid (AA-PCD), yeast cells were grown on raffinose, as a sole carbon source, which, differently from glucose, favours mitochondrial respiration. We found that, differently from glucose-grown cells, raffinose-grown cells were mostly resistant to AA-PCD and that this was due to the activation of mitochondrial retrograde (RTG) response, which increased with time, as revealed by the up-regulation of the peroxisomal isoform of citrate synthase and isocitrate dehydrogenase isoform 1, RTG pathway target genes. Accordingly, the deletion of RTG2 and RTG3, a positive regulator and a transcription factor of the RTG pathway, resulted in AA-PCD, as shown by TUNEL assay. Neither deletion in raffinose-grown cells of HAP4, encoding the positive regulatory subunit of the Hap2,3,4,5 complex nor constitutive activation of the RTG pathway in glucose-grown cells due to deletion of MKS1, a negative regulator of RTG pathway, had effect on yeast AA-PCD. The RTG pathway was found to be activated in yeast cells containing mitochondria, in which membrane potential was measured, capable to consume oxygen in a manner stimulated by the uncoupler CCCP and inhibited by the respiratory chain inhibitor antimycin A. AA-PCD resistance in raffinose-grown cells occurs with a decrease in both ROS production and cytochrome c release as compared to glucose-grown cells en route to AA-PCD.

  6. Ursodeoxycholic acid induced generalized fixed drug eruption.

    PubMed

    Ozkol, Hatice Uce; Calka, Omer; Dulger, Ahmet Cumhur; Bulut, Gulay

    2014-09-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is a rare form of drug allergies that recur at the same cutaneous or mucosal site in every usage of drug. Single or multiple round, sharply demarcated and dusky red plaques appear soon after drug exposure. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA: 3α,7β-dihydroxy-5β-cholanic acid) is used for the treatment of cholestatic liver diseases. Some side effects may be observed, such as diarrhea, dyspepsia, pruritus and headaches. We encountered only three cases of lichenoid reaction regarding the use of UDCA among previous studies. In this article, we reported a generalized FDE case related to UDCA intake in a 59-year-old male patient with cholestasis for the first time in the literature.

  7. Red fluorescent protein DsRed: parametrization of its chromophore as an amino acid residue for computer modeling in the OPLS-AA force field.

    PubMed

    Dmitrienko, D V; Vrzheshch, E P; Drutsa, V L; Vrzheshch, P V

    2006-10-01

    Topology of the neutral form of the DsRed fluorescent protein chromophore as a residue of [(4-cis)-2-[(1-cis)-4-amino-4-oxobutanimidoyl]-4-(4-hydroxybenzylidene)-5-oxo-4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-1-yl]acetic acid was calculated with OPLS-AA force field. Use of this topology and molecular dynamics simulation allows calculating the parameters of proteins that contain such residue in their polypeptide chains. The chromophore parameters were obtained by ab initio (RHF/6-31G**) quantum chemical calculations applying density functional theory (B3LYP). Using this chromophore, we have calculated the molecular dynamics trajectory of tetrameric fluorescent protein DsRed in solution at 300 K (4 nsec). Correctness of the chromophore parametrization was revealed by comparison of quantitative characteristics of the chromophore structure obtained from the molecular dynamic simulations of DsRed protein with the quantitative characteristics of the chromophore based on the crystallographic X-ray data of fluorescent protein DsRed (PDB ID: 1ZGO, 1G7K, and 1GGX), and also with the quantitative characteristics of the chromophore obtained by quantum chemical calculations. Inclusion of the neutral form of DsRed protein chromophore topology into the OPLS-AA force field yielded the extended force field OPLS-AA/DsRed. This force field can be used for molecular dynamics calculations of proteins containing the DsRed chromophore. The parameter set presented in this study can be applied for similar extension in any other force fields.

  8. Cadmium Induces Retinoic Acid Signaling by Regulating Retinoic Acid Metabolic Gene Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yuxia; Freedman, Jonathan H.

    2009-01-01

    The transition metal cadmium is an environmental teratogen. In addition, cadmium and retinoic acid can act synergistically to induce forelimb malformations. The molecular mechanism underlying the teratogenicity of cadmium and the synergistic effect with retinoic acid has not been addressed. An evolutionarily conserved gene, β,β-carotene 15,15′-monooxygenase (BCMO), which is involved in retinoic acid biosynthesis, was studied in both Caenorhabditis elegans and murine Hepa 1–6 cells. In C. elegans, bcmo-1 was expressed in the intestine and was cadmium inducible. Similarly, in Hepa 1–6 cells, Bcmo1 was induced by cadmium. Retinoic acid-mediated signaling increased after 24-h exposures to 5 and 10 μm cadmium in Hepa 1–6 cells. Examination of gene expression demonstrated that the induction of retinoic acid signaling by cadmium may be mediated by overexpression of Bcmo1. Furthermore, cadmium inhibited the expression of Cyp26a1 and Cyp26b1, which are involved in retinoic acid degradation. These results indicate that cadmium-induced teratogenicity may be due to the ability of the metal to increase the levels of retinoic acid by disrupting the expression of retinoic acid-metabolizing genes. PMID:19556237

  9. Structural rearrangements and interaction within H(II) mesophase induced by cosolubilization of vitamin E and ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Bitan-Cherbakovsky, Liron; Yuli-Amar, Idit; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2009-11-17

    We investigated the effect of ascorbic acid (AA) cosolubilized with vitamin E (VE) on reverse hexagonal (H(II)) mesophase. The H(II) phase comprises monoolein (GMO)/d-alpha-tocopherol (VE) in a ratio of 90/10 by weight and 12.5 wt % water. The macrostructural characteristics of this system were determined by polarized light microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering measurements. We used differential scanning calorimetry and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared to characterize the microstructure, the vibration of the functional groups, and the location of the AA guest molecule. AA was incorporated to the system in two steps: 1-4 wt % AA and 5-6 wt % AA. We compared this system to one containing tricaprylin as the oil phase, as previously reported. These measurements revealed that AA is localized first in the water rich-core and in the interface, and acts as a chaotropic molecule that decreases the water melting point. When a larger quantity of AA (5-6 wt %) is added, the system is saturated, and the AA is located in the inner cylinder and manifested by more moderate distortion. The addition of AA also causes alteration in the behavior of the GMO hydrocarbon chains and makes them more flexible. Further addition of AA caused the GMO hydrocarbon chain to be more solvated by the VE hydrocarbon chain and enabled additional migration of VE; hence a decrease in the hydrophobic melting temperature occurred (similar to tricaprylin). Increasing the amount of AA weakened the bonding between the GMO and water and created new bonds between AA and GMO and AA with water.

  10. The transcription factors ADR1 or CAT8 are required for RTG pathway activation and evasion from yeast acetic acid-induced programmed cell death in raffinose

    PubMed Central

    Laera, Luna; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Ždralević, Maša; Marzulli, Domenico; Liu, Zhengchang; Giannattasio, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown on glucose undergoes programmed cell death (PCD) induced by acetic acid (AA-PCD), but evades PCD when grown in raffinose. This is due to concomitant relief of carbon catabolite repression (CCR) and activation of mitochondrial retrograde signaling, a mitochondria-to-nucleus communication pathway causing up-regulation of various nuclear target genes, such as CIT2, encoding peroxisomal citrate synthase, dependent on the positive regulator RTG2 in response to mitochondrial dysfunction. CCR down-regulates genes mainly involved in mitochondrial respiratory metabolism. In this work, we investigated the relationships between the RTG and CCR pathways in the modulation of AA-PCD sensitivity under glucose repression or de-repression conditions. Yeast single and double mutants lacking RTG2 and/or certain factors regulating carbon source utilization, including MIG1, HXK2, ADR1, CAT8, and HAP4, have been analyzed for their survival and CIT2 expression after acetic acid treatment. ADR1 and CAT8 were identified as positive regulators of RTG-dependent gene transcription. ADR1 and CAT8 interact with RTG2 and with each other in inducing cell resistance to AA-PCD in raffinose and controlling the nature of cell death. In the absence of ADR1 and CAT8, AA-PCD evasion is acquired through activation of an alternative factor/pathway repressed by RTG2, suggesting that RTG2 may play a function in promoting necrotic cell death in repressing conditions when RTG pathway is inactive. Moreover, our data show that simultaneous mitochondrial retrograde pathway activation and SNF1-dependent relief of CCR have a key role in central carbon metabolism reprogramming which modulates the yeast acetic acid-stress response. PMID:28357334

  11. Doped copolymer of polyanthranilic acid and o-aminophenol (AA-co-OAP): Synthesis, spectral characterization and the use of the doped copolymer as precursor of α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosny, Nasser Mohammed; Nowesser, Nourhan; Al-Hussaini, A. S.; Zoromba, Mohamed Shafick

    2016-02-01

    The copolymer of anthranilic acid and o-aminophenol (AA-co-OAP) was synthesized and characterized by IR, UV-Vis. and thermal analyses (TGA). Linear chain mode was suggested for the pure (AA-co-OAP). The effect of inclusion of MnCl2, CoCl2, NiCl2, CuCl2 and FeCl3 on the spectral, thermal and optical properties of AA-co-OAP has been studied. Octahedral stereochemistry was suggested for Fe, Mn and Ni doped AA-co-OAP, while tetrahedral and square-planar geometries were suggested for Co and Cu doped AA-co-OAP, respectively. Fe doped AA-co-OAP has been used as a precursor for α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles by thermal decomposition route at 800 °C. The obtained hematite has been characterized by XRD and TEM. The average size of the prepared nanoparticles was estimated as 34 nm. The optical band gap of the synthesized hematite nanoparticles was measured and compared with the bulk.

  12. Nitrous acid induced damage in T7 DNA and phage

    SciTech Connect

    Scearce, L.M.; Masker, W.E.

    1986-05-01

    The response of bacteriophage T7 to nitrous acid damage was investigated. The T7 system allows in vitro mimicry of most aspects of in vivo DNA metabolism. Nitrous acid is of special interest since it has been previously shown to induce deletions and point mutations as well as novel adducts in DNA. T7 phage was exposed to 56 mM nitrous acid at pH 4.6 in vivo, causing a time dependent 98% decrease in survival for each 10 min duration of exposure to nitrous acid. These studies were extended to include examination of pure T7 DNA exposed in vitro to nitrous acid conditions identical to those used in the in vivo survival studies. The treated DNA was dialyzed to remove the nitrous acid and the DNA was encapsulated into empty phage heads. These in vitro packaged phage showed a survival curve analogous to the in vivo system. There was no change in survival when either in vitro or in vivo exposed phage were grown on wild type E. coli or on E. coli strains deficient in DNA repair due to mutations in DNA polymerase I, exonuclease III or a uvrA mutation. Survival was not increased when nitrous acid treated T7 were grown on E. coli induced for SOS repair. In vitro replication of nitrous acid treated DNA showed a time dependent decrease in the total amount of DNA synthesized.

  13. Human monocyte differentiation stage affects response to arachidonic acid.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Alvarez, Elizabeth; Pelaez, Carlos A; García, Luis F; Rojas, Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    AA-induced cell death mechanisms acting on human monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM), U937 promonocytes and PMA-differentiated U937 cells were studied. Arachidonic acid induced apoptosis and necrosis in monocytes and U937 cells but only apoptosis in MDM and U937D cells. AA increased both types of death in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected cells and increased the percentage of TNFalpha+ cells and reduced IL-10+ cells. Experiments blocking these cytokines indicated that AA-mediated death was TNFalpha- and IL-10-independent. The differences in AA-mediated cell death could be explained by high ROS, calpain and sPLA-2 production and activity in monocytes. Blocking sPLA-2 in monocytes and treatment with antioxidants favored M. tuberculosis control whereas AA enhanced M. tuberculosis growth in MDM. Such evidence suggested that AA-modulated effector mechanisms depend on mononuclear phagocytes' differentiation stage.

  14. In situ synthesis of silver nanoparticles on the cotton fabrics modified by plasma induced vapor phase graft polymerization of acrylic acid for durable multifunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. X.; Ren, Y.; Lv, J. C.; Zhou, Q. Q.; Ma, Z. P.; Qi, Z. M.; Chen, J. Y.; Liu, G. L.; Gao, D. W.; Lu, Z. Q.; Zhang, W.; Jin, L. M.

    2017-02-01

    A practical and ecological method for preparing the multifunctional cotton fabrics with excellent laundering durability was explored. Cotton fabrics were modified by plasma induced vapor phase graft polymerization (PIVPGP) of acrylic acid (AA) and subsequently silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were in situ synthesized on the treated cotton fabrics. The AgNP loaded cotton fabrics were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), antibacterial activity, self-cleaning activity, thermal stability and laundering durability, respectively. SEM observation and EDX, XPS and XRD analysis demonstrated the much more AgNPs deposition on the cotton fabrics modified by PIVPGP of AA. The AgNP loaded cotton fabrics also exhibited better antibacterial activity, self-cleaning activity, thermal stability and laundering durability. It was concluded that the surface modification of the cotton fabrics by PIVPGP of AA could increase the loading efficiency and binding fastness of AgNPs on the treated cotton fabrics, which could fabricate the cotton fabrics with durable multifunction. In addition, the mechanism of in situ synthesis of AgNPs on the cotton fabrics modified by PIVPGP of AA was proposed.

  15. Neuroprotective effect of asiatic acid on rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis in differentiated SH-SYS5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Nataraj, Jagatheesan; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Justin Thenmozhi, Arokiasamy; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed

    2016-02-08

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease, manifested due to the loss of dopaminergic neurons, which ultimately leads to impaired movement in elderly populations. The pathogenesis of PD is associated with numerous factors including oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. There is no effective therapy available to cure or halt the progression of this disease still now. Asiatic acid (AA) is a triterpene extracted from Centella asiatica has been reported as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent, that offers neuroprotection against glutamate toxicity. Therefore, in this study, we have investigated the effect of AA in a rotenone (an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I) induced in vitro model of PD. Following the exposure of SH-SY5Y cells to rotenone, there was a marked overproduction of ROS, mitochondrial dysfunction (as indexed by the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential) and apoptosis (Hoechst and dual staining, comet assay; expressions of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic indices). Pre-treatment with AA reversed these changes might be due to its antioxidant, mitoprotective and anti-apoptotic properties. However further extensive studies on in vivo models of PD are warranted to prove AA neuroprotective effect before entering into the clinical trial.

  16. Uric acid protects membranes and linolenic acid from ozone-induced oxidation.

    PubMed

    Meadows, J; Smith, R C; Reeves, J

    1986-05-29

    Aqueous preparations of linolenic acid, bovine serum albumin, and bovine erythrocyte membrane fragments were bubbled with ozone in the presence or absence of uric acid. Ozonation of the membrane fragments or the bovine serum albumin did not result in protein degradation. After 15 min of ozonation, the absorbance of the thiobarbituric acid-reactive material increased by 0.34 in the linolenic acid preparation and by 0.08 in the suspension of membrane fragments. In the presence of uric acid, these changes in absorbance were reduced to 0.14 for the fatty acid and to 0.01 for the membrane fragments. This result indicates that uric acid protects lipids from ozone-induced oxidation.

  17. Role of arachidonic acid lipoxygenase metabolites in acetylcholine-induced relaxations of mouse arteries

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Daniel H.; Aggarwal, Nitin T.; Chawengsub, Yuttana; Falck, J. R.; Campbell, William B.

    2011-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites function as EDHFs in arteries of many species. They mediate cyclooxygenase (COX)- and nitric oxide (NO)-independent relaxations to acetylcholine (ACh). However, the role of AA metabolites as relaxing factors in mouse arteries remains incompletely defined. ACh caused concentration-dependent relaxations of the mouse thoracic and abdominal aorta and carotid, femoral, and mesentery arteries (maximal relaxation: 57 ± 4%, 72 ± 4%, 82 ± 3%, 80 ± 3%, and 85 ± 3%, respectively). The NO synthase inhibitor nitro-l-arginine (l-NA; 30 μM) blocked relaxations in the thoracic aorta, and l-NA plus the COX inhibitor indomethacin (10 μM) inhibited relaxations in the abdominal aorta and carotid, femoral, and mesenteric arteries (maximal relaxation: 31 ± 10%, 33 ± 5%, 41 ± 8%, and 73 ± 3%, respectively). In mesenteric arteries, NO- and COX-independent relaxations to ACh were inhibited by the lipoxygenase (LO) inhibitors nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA; 10 μM) and BW-755C (200 μM), the K+ channel inhibitor apamin (1 μM), and 60 mM KCl and eliminated by endothelium removal. They were not altered by the cytochrome P-450 inhibitor N-methylsulfonyl-6-(2-propargyloxyphenyl)hexanamide (20 μM) or the epoxyeicosatrienoic acid antagonist 14,15-epoxyeicosa-5(Z)-enoic acid (10 μM). AA relaxations were attenuated by NDGA or apamin and eliminated by 60 mM KCl. Reverse-phase HPLC analysis revealed arterial [14C]AA metabolites that comigrated with prostaglandins, trihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (THETAs), hydroxyepoxyeicosatrienoic acids (HEETAs), and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs). Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids were not observed. Mass spectrometry confirmed the identity of 6-keto-PGF1α, PGE2, 12-HETE, 15-HETE, HEETAs, 11,12,15-THETA, and 11,14,15-THETA. AA metabolism was blocked by NDGA and endothelium removal. 11(R),12(S),15(S)-THETA relaxations (maximal relaxation: 73 ± 3%) were endothelium independent and blocked by 60 mM KCl. Western

  18. Protective Mechanisms of Nitrone Antioxidants in Kanic Acid Induced Neurodegeneration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    L., Hong, J.S. (1996) Expression of) FosB in the rat hippocampus and striatum after systemic administration of kainic acid. Neurosci. Abstr. 22...gene expression in the hippocampus . Immunohistochemical methods and electromobility gel shift assays (EMSAs) demonstrate the concerted activation of...acid-induced neurodegenerative diseases. The major focus will be on the pathophysiological changes in the hippocampus . Special attention will be given

  19. Isoliquiritigenin induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through downregulating arachidonic acid metabolic network and the deactivation of PI3K/Akt in human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ying; Zhao, Haixia; Wang, Yuzhong; Zheng, Hao; Yu, Wei; Chai, Hongyan; Zhang, Jing; Falck, John R.; Guo, Austin M.; Yue, Jiang; Peng, Renxiu; Yang, Jing

    2013-10-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA)-derived eicosanoids and its downstream pathways have been demonstrated to play crucial roles in growth control of breast cancer. Here, we demonstrate that isoliquiritigenin, a flavonoid phytoestrogen from licorice, induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through downregulating multiple key enzymes in AA metabolic network and the deactivation of PI3K/Akt in human breast cancer. Isoliquiritigenin diminished cell viability, 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation, and clonogenic ability in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231cells, and induced apoptosis as evidenced by an analysis of cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragmentation, flow cytometry and hoechst staining. Furthermore, isoliquiritigenin inhibited mRNA expression of multiple forms of AA-metabolizing enzymes, including phospholipase A2 (PLA2), cyclooxygenases (COX)-2 and cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4A, and decreased secretion of their products, including prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), without affecting COX-1, 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP), and leukotriene B{sub 4} (LTB{sub 4}). In addition, it downregulated the levels of phospho-PI3K, phospho-PDK (Ser{sup 241}), phospho-Akt (Thr{sup 308}), phospho-Bad (Ser{sup 136}), and Bcl-x{sub L} expression, thereby activating caspase cascades and eventually cleaving poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Conversely, the addition of exogenous eicosanoids, including PGE{sub 2}, LTB{sub 4} and a 20-HETE analog (WIT003), and caspase inhibitors, or overexpression of constitutively active Akt reversed isoliquiritigenin-induced apoptosis. Notably, isoliquiritigenin induced growth inhibition and apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts in nude mice, together with decreased intratumoral levels of eicosanoids and phospho-Akt (Thr{sup 308}). Collectively, these data suggest that isoliquiritigenin induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through downregulating AA metabolic

  20. Anacardic Acids from Cashew Nuts Ameliorate Lung Damage Induced by Exposure to Diesel Exhaust Particles in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Ana Laura Nicoletti; Annoni, Raquel; Torres, Larissa Helena Lobo; Durão, Ana Carolina Cardoso Santos; Shimada, Ana Lucia Borges; Almeida, Francine Maria; Hebeda, Cristina Bichels; Lopes, Fernanda Degobbi Tenorio Quirino Santos; Dolhnikoff, Marisa; Martins, Milton Arruda; Silva, Luiz Fernando Ferraz; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Owen, Robert W.; Marcourakis, Tania; Trevisan, Maria Teresa Salles; Mauad, Thais

    2013-01-01

    Anacardic acids from cashew nut shell liquid, a Brazilian natural substance, have antimicrobial and antioxidant activities and modulate immune responses and angiogenesis. As inflammatory lung diseases have been correlated to environmental pollutants exposure and no reports addressing the effects of dietary supplementation with anacardic acids on lung inflammation in vivo have been evidenced, we investigated the effects of supplementation with anacardic acids in a model of diesel exhaust particle- (DEP-) induced lung inflammation. BALB/c mice received an intranasal instillation of 50 μg of DEP for 20 days. Ten days prior to DEP instillation, animals were pretreated orally with 50, 150, or 250 mg/kg of anacardic acids or vehicle (100 μL of cashew nut oil) for 30 days. The biomarkers of inflammatory and antioxidant responses in the alveolar parenchyma, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and pulmonary vessels were investigated. All doses of anacardic acids ameliorated antioxidant enzyme activities and decreased vascular adhesion molecule in vessels. Animals that received 50 mg/kg of anacardic acids showed decreased levels of neutrophils and tumor necrosis factor in the lungs and BALF, respectively. In summary, we demonstrated that AAs supplementation has a potential protective role on oxidative and inflammatory mechanisms in the lungs. PMID:23533495

  1. Nephroprotective Role of Resveratrol and Ursolic Acid in Aristolochic Acid Intoxicated Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yu-Ju; Sun, Chiao-Yin; Wen, Chi-Chung; Chen, Yau-Hung

    2015-01-01

    The nephrotoxicity of aristolochic acid (AA) is well known, but information regarding the attenuation of AA-induced toxicity is limited. The aim of the present study was to study the nephroprotective effects of resveratrol (Resv) and ursolic acid (UA) in a zebrafish model. We used two transgenic lines, Tg(wt1b:EGFP) and Tg(gata1:DsRed), to evaluate the nephroprotective effects of Resv and UA by recording subtle changes in the kidney and red blood cell circulation. Our results demonstrated that both Resv and UA treatment can attenuate AA-induced kidney malformations and improve blood circulation. Glomerular filtration rate assays revealed that both Resv and UA treatment can restore renal function (100% for Mock; 56.1% ± 17.3% for AA-treated; 80.2% ± 11.3% for Resv+AA; and 83.1% ± 8.1% for UA+AA, n = 15). Furthermore, real-time RT-PCR experiments showed that pre-treatment with either Resv or UA suppresses expression of pro-inflammatory genes. In conclusion, our findings reveal that AA-induced nephrotoxicities can be attenuated by pre-treatment with either Resv or UA. Therefore, we believe that zebrafish represent an efficient model for screening AA-protective natural compounds. PMID:25590276

  2. Oleic acid-induced mucosal injury in developing piglet intestine.

    PubMed

    Velasquez, O R; Henninger, K; Fowler, M; Tso, P; Crissinger, K D

    1993-03-01

    A role for luminal nutrients, in particular products of lipid digestion, in the pathogenesis of mucosal injury to developing intestine has been postulated. We evaluated changes in mucosal permeability and light and electron microscopic histology induced by luminal perfusion with the long-chain fatty acid oleate in developing piglet intestine as a function of age and concentration of the fatty acid. 51Cr-labeled EDTA plasma-to-lumen clearance was measured in jejunum and ileum of 1-day-, 3-day-, 2-wk-, and 1-mo-old piglets during sequential perfusion with saline control (20 min); 0, 1, 5, and 10 mM oleic acid/10 mM taurocholate in saline (20 min); and normal saline (60 min). The jejunum of piglets < or = 2 wk showed significantly greater increases in mucosal permeability compared with 1-mo-old animals after perfusion with oleic acid. This effect was dependent on the luminal concentration of the fatty acid and was associated with mucosal injury evident under light and electron microscopy. In contrast, the overall response in ileum was more attenuated compared with jejunum. Thus oleic acid, a common dietary fatty acid, induces dose- and age-dependent injury in developing piglet intestine. Investigation of the mechanisms of this injury may provide the basis for dietary modifications directed at decreasing the risk of mucosal injury during enteral feeding in neonatal intestine.

  3. Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa protoxin intoxication of Tenebrio molitor induces widespread changes in the expression of serine peptidase transcripts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor, is a pest of stored grain products and is sensitive to the coleopteran-specific Cry3Aa toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). Larvae digest protein initially with cysteine peptidases in the anterior midgut and further with serine peptidases in middle and poste...

  4. Glycation inhibits trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-induced whey protein precipitation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four different WPI saccharide conjugates were successfully prepared to test whether glycation could inhibit WPI precipitation induced by trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Conjugates molecular weights after glycation were analyzed with SDS-PAGE. No significant secondary structure change due to glycation wa...

  5. Cyclic phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid induce hyaluronic acid synthesis via CREB transcription factor regulation in human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Maeda-Sano, Katsura; Gotoh, Mari; Morohoshi, Toshiro; Someya, Takao; Murofushi, Hiromu; Murakami-Murofushi, Kimiko

    2014-09-01

    Cyclic phosphatidic acid (cPA) is a naturally occurring phospholipid mediator and an analog of the growth factor-like phospholipid lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). cPA has a unique cyclic phosphate ring at the sn-2 and sn-3 positions of its glycerol backbone. We showed before that a metabolically stabilized cPA derivative, 2-carba-cPA, relieved osteoarthritis pathogenesis in vivo and induced hyaluronic acid synthesis in human osteoarthritis synoviocytes in vitro. This study focused on hyaluronic acid synthesis in human fibroblasts, which retain moisture and maintain health in the dermis. We investigated the effects of cPA and LPA on hyaluronic acid synthesis in human fibroblasts (NB1RGB cells). Using particle exclusion and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, we found that both cPA and LPA dose-dependently induced hyaluronic acid synthesis. We revealed that the expression of hyaluronan synthase 2 messenger RNA and protein is up-regulated by cPA and LPA treatment time dependently. We then characterized the signaling pathways up-regulating hyaluronic acid synthesis mediated by cPA and LPA in NB1RGB cells. Pharmacological inhibition and reporter gene assays revealed that the activation of the LPA receptor LPAR1, Gi/o protein, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) but not nuclear factor κB induced hyaluronic acid synthesis by the treatment with cPA and LPA in NB1RGB cells. These results demonstrate for the first time that cPA and LPA induce hyaluronic acid synthesis in human skin fibroblasts mainly through the activation of LPAR1-Gi/o followed by the PI3K, ERK, and CREB signaling pathway.

  6. A molecular basis for retinoic acid-induced axial truncation.

    PubMed

    Iulianella, A; Beckett, B; Petkovich, M; Lohnes, D

    1999-01-01

    Dietary deprivation and gene disruption studies clearly demonstrate that biologically active retinoids, such as retinoic acid (RA), are essential for numerous developmental programs. Similar ontogenic processes are also affected by retinoic acid excess, suggesting that the effects of retinoid administration reflect normal retinoid-dependent events. In the mouse, exogenous retinoic acid can induce both anterior (anencephaly, exencephaly) and posterior (spina bifida) neural tube defects depending on the developmental stage of treatment. Retinoic acid receptor gamma (RARgamma) mediates these effects on the caudal neural tube at 8.5 days postcoitum, as RARgamma-/- mice are completely resistant to spina bifida induced by retinoic acid at this stage. We therefore used this null mouse as a model to examine the molecular nature of retinoid-induced caudal neural tube defects by using a panel of informative markers and comparing their expression between retinoic acid-treated wild-type and RARgamma-/- embryos. Our findings indicate that treatment of wild-type embryos led to a rapid and significant decrease in the caudal expression of all mesodermal markers examined (e.g., brachyury, wnt-3a, cdx-4), whereas somite, neuroepithelial, notochord, floorplate, and hindgut markers were unaffected. RARgamma-/- mutants exhibited normal expression patterns for all markers examined, consistent with the notion that mesodermal defects underlie the etiology of retinoid-induced spina bifida. We also found that posterior somitic, but not caudal presomitic, embryonic tissues contained detectable bioactive retinoids, an observation which correlated with the ability of caudal explants to rapidly clear exogenous RA. Interestingly, transcripts encoding mP450RAI, a cytochrome P450, the product of which is believed to catabolize retinoic acid, were abundant in the retinoid-poor region of the caudal embryo. mP450RAI was rapidly induced by retinoic acid treatment in vivo, consistent with previous

  7. Increased isoprostane levels in oleic acid-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Koichi; Koizumi, Tomonobu; Tsushima, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Sumiko; Yokoyama, Toshiki; Nakagawa, Rikimaru; Obata, Toru

    2009-10-16

    The present study was performed to examine a role of oxidative stress in oleic acid-induced lung injury model. Fifteen anesthetized sheep were ventilated and instrumented with a lung lymph fistula and vascular catheters for blood gas analysis and measurement of isoprostanes (8-epi prostaglandin F2{alpha}). Following stable baseline measurements, oleic acid (0.08 ml/kg) was administered and observed 4 h. Isoprostane was measured by gas chromatography mass spectrometry with the isotope dilution method. Isoprostane levels in plasma and lung lymph were significantly increased 2 h after oleic acid administration and then decreased at 4 h. The percent increases in isoprostane levels in plasma and lung lymph at 2 h were significantly correlated with deteriorated oxygenation at the same time point, respectively. These findings suggest that oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of the pulmonary fat embolism-induced acute lung injury model in sheep and that the increase relates with the deteriorated oxygenation.

  8. Rating AAs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Susan J.

    2001-01-01

    Why alternative investments? In a word: performance. Many higher education endowment and foundation managers are making increasing commitments to alternative investments, or AAs, in order to obtain higher returns and broader diversification for their investment portfolios than public securities instruments can usually provide. Learn how to handle…

  9. Can valproic acid be an inducer of clozapine metabolism?

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Francisco J.; Eap, Chin B.; Ansermot, Nicolas; Crettol, Severine; Spina, Edoardo; de Leon, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Prior clozapine studies indicated no effects, mild inhibition or induction of valproic acid (VPA) on clozapine metabolism. The hypotheses that 1) VPA is a net inducer of clozapine metabolism, and 2) smoking modifies this inductive effect were tested in a therapeutic drug monitoring study. Methods After excluding strong inhibitors and inducers, 353 steady-state total clozapine (clozapine plus norclozapine) concentrations provided by 151 patients were analyzed using a random intercept linear model. Results VPA appeared to be an inducer of clozapine metabolism since total plasma clozapine concentrations in subjects taking VPA were significantly lower (27% lower; 95% confidence interval, 14% to 39%) after controlling for confounding variables including smoking (35% lower, 28% to 56%). Discussion Prospective studies are needed to definitively establish that VPA may 1) be an inducer of clozapine metabolism when induction prevails over competitive inhibition, and 2) be an inducer even in smokers who are under the influence of smoking inductive effects on clozapine metabolism. PMID:24764199

  10. Chiral acidic amino acids induce chiral hierarchical structure in calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenge; Pacella, Michael S; Athanasiadou, Dimitra; Nelea, Valentin; Vali, Hojatollah; Hazen, Robert M; Gray, Jeffrey J; McKee, Marc D

    2017-04-13

    Chirality is ubiquitous in biology, including in biomineralization, where it is found in many hardened structures of invertebrate marine and terrestrial organisms (for example, spiralling gastropod shells). Here we show that chiral, hierarchically organized architectures for calcium carbonate (vaterite) can be controlled simply by adding chiral acidic amino acids (Asp and Glu). Chiral, vaterite toroidal suprastructure having a 'right-handed' (counterclockwise) spiralling morphology is induced by L-enantiomers of Asp and Glu, whereas 'left-handed' (clockwise) morphology is induced by D-enantiomers, and sequentially switching between amino-acid enantiomers causes a switch in chirality. Nanoparticle tilting after binding of chiral amino acids is proposed as a chiral growth mechanism, where a 'mother' subunit nanoparticle spawns a slightly tilted, consequential 'daughter' nanoparticle, which by amplification over various length scales creates oriented mineral platelets and chiral vaterite suprastructures. These findings suggest a molecular mechanism for how biomineralization-related enantiomers might exert hierarchical control to form extended chiral suprastructures.

  11. Amino acids, independent of insulin, attenuate skeletal muscle autophagy in neonatal pigs during endotoxemia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sepsis induces loss of skeletal muscle mass by activating the ubiquitin proteasome (UPS) and autophagy systems. Although muscle protein synthesis in healthy neonatal piglets is responsive to amino acids (AA) stimulation, it is not known if AA can prevent the activation of muscle protein degradation ...

  12. Computerized image analysis for acetic acid induced intraepithelial lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; Ferris, Daron G.; Lieberman, Rich W.

    2008-03-01

    Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) exhibits certain morphologic features that can be identified during a visual inspection exam. Immature and dysphasic cervical squamous epithelium turns white after application of acetic acid during the exam. The whitening process occurs visually over several minutes and subjectively discriminates between dysphasic and normal tissue. Digital imaging technologies allow us to assist the physician analyzing the acetic acid induced lesions (acetowhite region) in a fully automatic way. This paper reports a study designed to measure multiple parameters of the acetowhitening process from two images captured with a digital colposcope. One image is captured before the acetic acid application, and the other is captured after the acetic acid application. The spatial change of the acetowhitening is extracted using color and texture information in the post acetic acid image; the temporal change is extracted from the intensity and color changes between the post acetic acid and pre acetic acid images with an automatic alignment. The imaging and data analysis system has been evaluated with a total of 99 human subjects and demonstrate its potential to screening underserved women where access to skilled colposcopists is limited.

  13. The saturated fatty acid, palmitic acid, induces anxiety-like behavior in mice

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Morgan L.; Joesting, Jennifer J.; Lawson, Marcus A.; Chiu, Gabriel S.; Blevins, Neil A.; Kwakwa, Kristin A.; Freund, Gregory G.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Excess fat in the diet can impact neuropsychiatric functions by negatively affecting cognition, mood and anxiety. We sought to show that the free fatty acid (FFA), palmitic acid, can cause adverse biobehaviors in mice that lasts beyond an acute elevation in plasma FFAs. Methods Mice were administered palmitic acid or vehicle as a single intraperitoneal (IP) injection. Biobehaviors were profiled 2 and 24 hrs after palmitic acid treatment. Quantification of dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), serotonin (5-HT) and their major metabolites was performed in cortex, hippocampus and amygdala. FFA concentration was determined in plasma. Relative fold change in mRNA expression of unfolded protein response (UPR)-associated genes was determined in brain regions. Results In a dose-dependent fashion, palmitic acid rapidly reduced mouse locomotor activity by a mechanism that did not rely on TLR4, MyD88, IL-1, IL-6 or TNFα but was dependent on fatty acid chain length. Twenty-four hrs after palmitic acid administration mice exhibited anxiety-like behavior without impairment in locomotion, food intake, depressive-like behavior or spatial memory. Additionally, the serotonin metabolite 5-HIAA was increased by 33% in the amygdala 24 hrs after palmitic acid treatment. Conclusions Palmitic acid induces anxiety-like behavior in mice while increasing amygdala-based serotonin metabolism. These effects occur at a time point when plasma FFA levels are no longer elevated. PMID:25016520

  14. Unsaturated fatty acids induce non-canonical autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Niso-Santano, Mireia; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Pietrocola, Federico; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Mariño, Guillermo; Cianfanelli, Valentina; Ben-Younès, Amena; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Markaki, Maria; Sica, Valentina; Izzo, Valentina; Chaba, Kariman; Bauvy, Chantal; Dupont, Nicolas; Kepp, Oliver; Rockenfeller, Patrick; Wolinski, Heimo; Madeo, Frank; Lavandero, Sergio; Codogno, Patrice; Harper, Francis; Pierron, Gérard; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Cecconi, Francesco; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-01-01

    To obtain mechanistic insights into the cross talk between lipolysis and autophagy, two key metabolic responses to starvation, we screened the autophagy-inducing potential of a panel of fatty acids in human cancer cells. Both saturated and unsaturated fatty acids such as palmitate and oleate, respectively, triggered autophagy, but the underlying molecular mechanisms differed. Oleate, but not palmitate, stimulated an autophagic response that required an intact Golgi apparatus. Conversely, autophagy triggered by palmitate, but not oleate, required AMPK, PKR and JNK1 and involved the activation of the BECN1/PIK3C3 lipid kinase complex. Accordingly, the downregulation of BECN1 and PIK3C3 abolished palmitate-induced, but not oleate-induced, autophagy in human cancer cells. Moreover, Becn1+/− mice as well as yeast cells and nematodes lacking the ortholog of human BECN1 mounted an autophagic response to oleate, but not palmitate. Thus, unsaturated fatty acids induce a non-canonical, phylogenetically conserved, autophagic response that in mammalian cells relies on the Golgi apparatus. PMID:25586377

  15. Functional and cellular characterization of human Retinoic Acid Induced 1 (RAI1) mutations associated with Smith-Magenis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Smith-Magenis Syndrome is a contiguous gene syndrome in which the dosage sensitive gene has been identified: the Retinoic Acid Induced 1 (RAI1). Little is known about the function of human RAI1. Results We generated the full-length cDNA of the wild type protein and five mutated forms: RAI1-HA 2687delC, RAI1-HA 3103delC, RAI1 R960X, RAI1-HA Q1562R, and RAI1-HA S1808N. Four of them have been previously associated with SMS clinical phenotype. Molecular weight, subcellular localization and transcription factor activity of the wild type and mutant forms were studied by western blot, immunofluorescence and luciferase assays respectively. The wild type protein and the two missense mutations presented a higher molecular weight than expected, localized to the nucleus and activated transcription of a reporter gene. The frameshift mutations generated a truncated polypeptide with transcription factor activity but abnormal subcellular localization, and the same was true for the 1-960aa N-terminal half of RAI1. Two different C-terminal halves of the RAI1 protein (1038aa-end and 1229aa-end) were able to localize into the nucleus but had no transactivation activity. Conclusion Our results indicate that transcription factor activity and subcellular localization signals reside in two separate domains of the protein and both are essential for the correct functionality of RAI1. The pathogenic outcome of some of the mutated forms can be explained by the dissociation of these two domains. PMID:20738874

  16. Valproic acid-induced hyperammonaemic coma and unrecognised portosystemic shunt.

    PubMed

    Nzwalo, Hipólito; Carrapatoso, Leonor; Ferreira, Fátima; Basilio, Carlos

    2013-06-01

    Hyperammonaemic encephalopathy is a rare and potentially fatal complication of valproic acid treatment. The clinical presentation of hyperammonaemic encephalopathy is wide and includes seizures and coma. We present a case of hyperammonaemic coma precipitated by sodium valproate use for symptomatic epilepsy in a patient with unrecognised portosystemic shunt, secondary to earlier alcoholism. The absence of any stigmata of chronic liver disease and laboratory markers of liver dysfunction delayed the recognition of this alcohol-related complication. The portal vein bypass led to a refractory, valproic acid-induced hyperammonaemic coma. The patient fully recovered after dialysis treatment.

  17. Visible Light-Induced Lipid Peroxidation of Unsaturated Fatty Acids in the Retina and the Inhibitory Effects of Blueberry Polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yixiang; Zhang, Di; Hu, Jimei; Liu, Guangming; Chen, Jun; Sun, Lechang; Jiang, Zedong; Zhang, Xichun; Chen, Qingchou; Ji, Baoping

    2015-10-28

    The lipid peroxidation of unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) in the retina not only threatens visual cells but also affects the physiological health of the retina. In this work, the potential damages caused by daily visible light exposure on retinal UFAs were evaluated via a simulated in vitro model. At the same time, the benefits of dietary supplementation of blueberries to the eyes were also assessed. After prolonged light exposure, lipid peroxidation occurred for both docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acids (DHA and AA, respectively). The oxidized UFAs presented obvious cytotoxicity and significantly inhibited cell growth in retinal pigment epithelium cells. Among the different blueberry polyphenol fractions, the flavonoid-rich fraction, in which quercetin was discovered as the main component, was considerably better in preventing visible light-induced DHA lipid peroxidation than the anthocyanin- and phenolic acid-rich fractions. Then the retinal protective activity of blueberry polyphenols against light-induced retinal injury was confirmed in vivo. On the basis of the above results, inhibiting lipid peroxidation of UFAs in the retina is proposed to be another important function mechanism for antioxidants to nourish eyes.

  18. Jasmonic acid signaling modulates ozone-induced hypersensitive cell death.

    PubMed

    Rao, M V; Lee, H; Creelman, R A; Mullet, J E; Davis, K R

    2000-09-01

    Recent studies suggest that cross-talk between salicylic acid (SA)-, jasmonic acid (JA)-, and ethylene-dependent signaling pathways regulates plant responses to both abiotic and biotic stress factors. Earlier studies demonstrated that ozone (O(3)) exposure activates a hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death pathway in the Arabidopsis ecotype Cvi-0. We now have confirmed the role of SA and JA signaling in influencing O(3)-induced cell death. Expression of salicylate hydroxylase (NahG) in Cvi-0 reduced O(3)-induced cell death. Methyl jasmonate (Me-JA) pretreatment of Cvi-0 decreased O(3)-induced H(2)O(2) content and SA concentrations and completely abolished O(3)-induced cell death. Cvi-0 synthesized as much JA as did Col-0 in response to O(3) exposure but exhibited much less sensitivity to exogenous Me-JA. Analyses of the responses to O(3) of the JA-signaling mutants jar1 and fad3/7/8 also demonstrated an antagonistic relationship between JA- and SA-signaling pathways in controlling the magnitude of O(3)-induced HR-like cell death.

  19. Gababuline induces delta-aminolevulinic acid excretion by cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, L.; Guikema, J.A.

    1986-04-01

    Gabaculine (5-amino-1,3-cyclohexadienylcarboxylic acid) was examined as an inhibitor of Chl biosynthesis in the cyanobacterium, Anacystis nidulans. At 20 ..mu..M, it blocked the synthesis of both Chl and phycocyanin. Similar results were obtained using aminooxyacetic acid. Because gabaculine is well established as an inhibitor of aminotransferase activity, the authors expected it to cause an inhibition of ..delta..-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) synthesis. However, an excretion of ALA was observed instead. Concentrated cell cultures were incubated in the presence of gabaculine, and the spent media was examined for ALA excretion using modified Ehrlick's reagent. Gabaculine induced ALA excretion in normal cultures, and in those stressed by iron or phosphate deficiency. Nitrate deficiency depressed the extent of ALA excretion. These results suggest that, in cyanobacteria, gabaculine inhibits CHl biosynthesis at a site after ALA formation.

  20. Docosahexaenoic Acid Induces Apoptosis in Primary Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gyan, Emmanuel; Tournilhac, Olivier; Halty, Christelle; Veyrat-Masson, Richard; Akil, Saïda; Berger, Marc; Hérault, Olivier; Callanan, Mary; Bay, Jacques-Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is an indolent disorder with an increased infectious risk remaining one of the main causes of death. Development of therapies with higher safety profile is thus a challenging issue. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6) is an omega-3 fatty acid, a natural compound of normal cells, and has been shown to display antitumor potency in cancer. We evaluated the potential in vitro effect of DHA in primary CLL cells. DHA induces high level of in vitro apoptosis compared to oleic acid in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Estimation of IC50 was only of 4.813 µM, which appears lower than those reported in solid cancers. DHA is highly active on CLL cells in vitro. This observation provides a rationale for further studies aiming to understand its mechanisms of action and its potent in vivo activity. PMID:26734128

  1. Acid-induced unfolding mechanism of recombinant human endostatin.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Wu, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Hao; Chen, Qianjie; Luo, Yongzhang

    2004-03-09

    Endostatin is a potent angiogenesis inhibitor. The structure of endostatin is unique in that its secondary structure is mainly irregular loops and beta-sheets and contains only a small fraction of alpha-helices with two pairs of disulfide bonds in a nested pattern. We choose human endostatin as a model system to study the folding mechanism of this kind. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), tryptophan emission fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) were used to monitor the unfolding process of endostatin upon acid titration. Urea-induced unfolding was used to measure the stability of endostatin under different conditions. Our results show that endostatin is very acid-resistant; some native structure still remains even at pH 2 as evidenced by (1)H NMR. Trifluoroethanol (TFE) destabilizes native endostatin, while it makes endostatin even more acid-resistant in the low pH region. Stability measurement of endostatin suggests that endostatin is still in native structure at pH 3.5 despite the decreased stability. Acid-induced unfolding of endostatin is reversible, although it requires a long time to reach equilibrium below pH 3. Surprisingly, the alpha-helical content of endostatin is increased when it is unfolded at pH 1.6, and the alpha-helical content of the polypeptide chain of unfolded endostatin increases linearly with TFE concentration in the range of 0-30%. This observation indicates that the polypeptide chain of unfolded endostatin has an intrinsic alpha-helical propensity. Our discoveries may provide clues for refolding endostatin more efficiently. The acid-resistance property of endostatin may have biological significance in that it cannot be easily digested by proteases in an acidic environment such as in a lysosome in the cell.

  2. Infection with Marek’s disease virus induces high levels of CD8a/a cells in chickens resistant to Marek’s disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The CD8a/a cells have non-traditional roles. CD8a/a cells (T'' cells) usually recognize monomorphic antigen like bacterial lipids presented by non-traditional class I glycoproteins such as BF1 (minor) or Rfp-Y. CD8a/a cells have also been implicated in natural killing with approximately 80% of NK ...

  3. [Kv3.4 channel is involved in rat pulmonary vasoconstriction induced by 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid].

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Bi, Hai-Rong; Zhang, Rong; Zhu, Da-Ling

    2006-02-25

    We have reported that hypoxia increases the activation of 15-lipoxygenase (15-LO), which converts arachidonic acid (AA) into 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE) in small pulmonary arteries (PAs). Through inhibition of Kv channels, 15-HETE causes more robust concentration-dependent contraction of PA rings from the hypoxic compared to the normoxic controls. However, the subtypes of Kv channels inhibited by 15-HETE are incompletely understood. The aim of the present study was to identify the contribution of Kv3.4 channel in the process of pulmonary vasoconstriction induced by 15-HETE using the tension studies of PA rings from rat with Kv3.4 channel blocker in tissue bath; to explore the role of vascular endothelium in15-HETE-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction through denuded endothelia of PA rings; and to define the downregulation of 15-HETE on the expression of Kv3.4 channel in cultured pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) with RT-PCR and Western blot. In the present study, healthy Wistar rats were divided randomly into two groups: Group A with normal oxygen supply and group B with hypoxia. Six days later, the rats were killed. Pulmonary artery rings were prepared for organ bath experiments. Firstly, different concentrations of 15-HETE (10~1 000 nmol/L) were added to the Krebs solution. The isometric tension was recorded using a four-channel force-displacement transducer. Then Kv3.4 channel blocker, 100 nmol/L BDS-I, was added, followed by adding 1 mumol/L 15-HETE, and the isometric tension was recorded. Furthermore, RT-PCR and Western blot were employed to identify the influence of 15-HETE on the expression of Kv3.4 channel in cultured rat PASMCs.The results showed the PA tension was significantly increased both in groups A and B by 15-HETE in a concentration-dependent manner (P<0.05), especially in group B (P<0.05 compared to control); denuded endothelia enhanced 15-HETE concentration-related constrictions in rat PA rings; Kv3.4 channel blocker, BDS

  4. Dissolution of kaolinite induced by citric, oxalic, and malic acids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingxiang; Li, Qingman; Hu, Huafeng; Zhang, Taolin; Zhou, Yiyong

    2005-10-15

    Kaolinite is a dominant clay mineral in the soils in tropical and subtropical regions, and its dissolution has an influence on a variety of soil properties. In this work, kaolinite dissolution induced by three kinds of low-molecular-weight organic acid, i.e., citric, oxalic, and malic acids, was evaluated under far-from-equilibrium conditions. The rates of kaolinite dissolution depended on the kind and concentration of organic acids, with the sequence R(oxalate)>R(citrate)>R(malate). Chemical calculation showed the change in concentration of organic ligand relative to change in concentration of organic acid in suspensions of kaolinite and organic acid. The effect of organic acid on kaolinite dissolution was modeled by species of organic anionic ligand. For oxalic acid, L(2-)(oxalic) and HL(-)(oxalic) jointly enhanced the dissolution of kaolinite, but for malic and citric acids, HL(-)(malic) and H2L-(citric) made a higher contribution to the total dissolution rate of kaolinite than L(2-)(malic) and L(3-)(citric), respectively. For oxalic acid, the proposed model was R(Si)=1.89x10(-12)x[(25x)/(1+25x)]+1.93x10(-12)x[(1990x1)/(1+1990x1)] (R2=0.9763), where x and x1 denote the concentrations of HL(oxalic) and L(oxalic), respectively, and x1=10(-3.81)xx/[H+]. For malic acid, the model was R(Si)=4.79x10(-12)x[(328x)/(1+328x)]+1.67x10(-13)x[(1149x1)/(1+1149x1)] (R2=0.9452), where x and x1 denote the concentrations of HL(malic) and L(malic), respectively, and x1=10(-5.11)xx/[H+], and for citric acid, the model was R(Si)=4.73x10(-12)x[(845x)/(1+845x)]+4.68x10(-12)x[(2855x1)/(1+2855x1)] (R2=0.9682), where x and x1 denote the concentrations of H2L(citric) and L(citric), respectively, and [Formula: see text] .

  5. Eicosapentaenoic acid prevents TCDD-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory response by modulating MAP kinases and redox-sensitive transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Palanisamy, Kalaiselvi; Krishnaswamy, Rajashree; Paramasivan, Poornima; Chih-Yang, Huang; Vishwanadha, Vijaya Padma

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Oxidative stress and subsequent activation of inflammatory responses is a widely accepted consequence of exposure to environmental toxins. TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin), a well-known environmental toxin, exerts its toxicity through many signalling mechanisms, with liver being the principal organ affected. However, an effective antidote to TCDD-induced toxicity is unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), an n3 fatty acid, on TCDD-induced toxicity. Experimental Approach In cultures of HepG2 cells, the EPA/AA ratio was determined using gas chromatography, oxidative stress and inflammatory responses through reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, antioxidant status, [Ca2+]i, nuclear migration of two redox-sensitive transcription factors, NF-κB p65 and Nrf-2, expression of MAP kinase (p-Erk, p-p38), NF-κB p65, COX-2 and Nrf-2. Cellular changes in ΔΨm, acidic vesicular organelle formation, cell cycle analysis and scanning electron microscopy analysis were performed. Key Results EPA offered significant cytoprotection by increasing EPA/AA ratios in cell membranes, inhibiting ROS generation, enhancing antioxidant status and modulating nuclear translocation of redox-sensitive transcription factors (NF-κB p65 and Nrf-2) and expression of NF-κB p65, COX-2 and Nrf-2. Furthermore, TCDD-induced upstream events of MAPK phosphorylation, the increase in [Ca2+]i levels and cell surface changes in microvilli were significantly inhibited by EPA. EPA treatment maintained ΔΨm and prevented formation of acidic vesicular organelles. Conclusion and Implications The present study demonstrates for the first time some underlying molecular mechanisms of cytoprotection exerted by EPA against TCDD-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. PMID:26177858

  6. Folic acid induces salicylic acid-dependent immunity in Arabidopsis and enhances susceptibility to Alternaria brassicicola.

    PubMed

    Wittek, Finni; Kanawati, Basem; Wenig, Marion; Hoffmann, Thomas; Franz-Oberdorf, Katrin; Schwab, Wilfried; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Vlot, A Corina

    2015-08-01

    Folates are essential for one-carbon transfer reactions in all organisms and contribute, for example, to de novo DNA synthesis. Here, we detected the folate precursors 7,8-dihydropteroate (DHP) and 4-amino-4-deoxychorismate (ADC) in extracts from Arabidopsis thaliana plants by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometry. The accumulation of DHP, but not ADC, was induced after infection of plants with Pseudomonas syringae delivering the effector protein AvrRpm1. Application of folic acid or the DHP precursor 7,8-dihydroneopterin (DHN) enhanced resistance in Arabidopsis to P. syringae and elevated the transcript accumulation of the salicylic acid (SA) marker gene pathogenesis-related1 in both the treated and systemic untreated leaves. DHN- and folic acid-induced systemic resistance was dependent on SA biosynthesis and signalling. Similar to SA, folic acid application locally enhanced Arabidopsis susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria brassicicola. Together, the data associate the folic acid pathway with innate immunity in Arabidopsis, simultaneously activating local and systemic SA-dependent resistance to P. syringae and suppressing local resistance to A. brassicicola.

  7. Phenolic Acids (Gallic and Tannic Acids) Modulate Antioxidant Status and Cisplatin Induced Nephrotoxicity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Akomolafe, Seun F; Akinyemi, Ayodele J; Anadozie, Scholarstical O

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) or CDDP), used in the treatment of many solid-tissue cancers, has its chief side-effect in nephrotoxicity. Hence, this study sought to investigate and compare the protective effect of gallic acid (GA) and tannic acid (TA) against cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity in rats. The rats were given a prophylactic treatment of GA and TA orally at a dose of 20 and 40 mg/kg body weight for 7 consecutive days before the administration of a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of cisplatin (CP) at 7.5 mg/kg bwt. The protective effects of both GA and TA on CP induced nephrotoxicity were investigated by assaying renal function, oxidative stress biomarkers, and histopathological examination of kidney architecture. A single dose of cisplatin (7.5 mg/kg bwt) injected i.p. caused a significant increase in some biomarkers of renal function (creatinine, uric acid, and urea levels), with a marked elevation in malondialdehyde (MDA) content accompanied by a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH) content (103.27%) of kidney tissue as compared to control group. Furthermore, a significant (P < 0.05) reduction in kidney antioxidant enzymes (SOD, catalase, GPx, and GST) activity was observed. However, pretreatment with oral administration of tannic acid and gallic acid at a dose of 20 and 40 mg/kg body weight, respectively, for 7 days prior to cisplatin administration reduced histological renal damage and suppressed the generation of ROS, lipid peroxidation, and oxidative stress in kidney tissues. These results indicate that both gallic and tannic acids could serve as a preventive strategy against cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity.

  8. Neuroprotective effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester in 3-nitropropionic acid-induced striatal neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Bak, Jia; Kim, Hee Jung; Kim, Seong Yun

    2016-01-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), derived from honeybee hives, is a bioactive compound with strong antioxidant activity. This study was designed to test the neuroprotective effect of CAPE in 3-nitropropionic acid (3NP)-induced striatal neurotoxicity, a chemical model of Huntington's disease (HD). Initially, to test CAPE's antioxidant activity, a 2,2'-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) antioxidant assay was employed, and CAPE showed a strong direct radical-scavenging eff ect. In addition, CAPE provided protection from 3NP-induced neuronal cell death in cultured striatal neurons. Based on these observations, the in vivo therapeutic potential of CAPE in 3NP-induced HD was tested. For this purpose, male C57BL/6 mice were repeatedly given 3NP to induce HD-like pathogenesis, and 30 mg/kg of CAPE or vehicle (5% dimethyl sulfoxide and 95% peanut oil) was administered daily. CAPE did not cause changes in body weight, but it reduced mortality by 29%. In addition, compared to the vehicle-treated group, robustly reduced striatal damage was observed in the CAPE-treated animals, and the 3NP-induced behavioral defi cits on the rotarod test were signifi cantly rescued after the CAPE treatment. Furthermore, immunohistochemical data showed that immunoreactivity to glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and CD45, markers for astrocyte and microglia activation, respectively, were strikingly reduced. Combined, these data unequivocally indicate that CAPE has a strong antioxidant eff ect and can be used as a potential therapeutic agent against HD. PMID:27162482

  9. Acid exposure induces multiplication of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    PubMed

    Ahirwar, Suneel Kumar; Pratap, Chandra Bhan; Patel, Saurabh Kumar; Shukla, Vijay K; Singh, Indarjeet Gambhir; Mishra, Om Prakash; Kumar, Kailash; Singh, Tej Bali; Nath, Gopal

    2014-12-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi faces several environmental stresses while going through the stomach (acidic pH) to the small intestine (basic pH) and intracellularly in macrophages (acidic pH) in humans. The acidic pH followed by alkaline pH in the small intestine might be responsible for expression of certain stress-induced genes, resulting in not only better survival but also induction of multiplication and invasion of the bacterium in the small intestine. Based on this hypothesis, we developed a process wherein we exposed the blood, urine, and stool specimens from 90 acute typhoid fever patients and 36 chronic typhoid carriers to acidic pH to see the effect on isolation rate of S. Typhi. About 5 g of freshly passed unpreserved stool, a centrifuged deposit of 15 ml of urine, and 5 ml of blood clot were subjected to 5 ml of Luria-Bertani (LB) broth (pH 3.5) for 20 min, followed by enrichment in bile broth-selenite F broth. When the combined isolation from all 3 specimens, i.e., blood, urine, and stool, after acid exposure was considered, a total of 77.7% of the acute typhoid patients were observed to be positive for the isolation of the S. Typhi serotype, compared to 8.8% by the conventional method. Similarly, 42% (15/36) of chronic carriers yielded positive for S. Typhi growth after acid exposure, compared to 5.5% (2/36) by the conventional method. It therefore can be concluded that acid shock triggers the multiplication of the bacteria, resulting in better isolation rates from blood clot, stool, and urine specimens.

  10. Site-saturation engineering of lysine 47 in cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase from Paenibacillus macerans to enhance substrate specificity towards maltodextrin for enzymatic synthesis of 2-O-D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid (AA-2G).

    PubMed

    Han, Ruizhi; Liu, Long; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-07-01

    In this work, the site-saturation engineering of lysine 47 in cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase) from Paenibacillus macerans was conducted to improve the specificity of CGTase towards maltodextrin, which can be used as a cheap and easily soluble glycosyl donor for the enzymatic synthesis of 2-O-D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid (AA-2G) by CGTase. When using maltodextrin as glycosyl donor, four mutants K47F (lysine→ phenylalanine), K47L (lysine→ leucine), K47V (lysine→ valine) and K47W (lysine→ tryptophan) showed higher AA-2G yield as compared with that produced by the wild-type CGTase. The transformation conditions (temperature, pH and the mass ratio of L-ascorbic acid to maltodextrin) were optimized and the highest titer of AA-2G produced by the mutant K47L could reach 1.97 g/l, which was 64.2% higher than that (1.20 g/l) produced by the wild-type CGTase. The reaction kinetics analysis confirmed the enhanced maltodextrin specificity, and it was also found that compared with the wild-type CGTase, the four mutants had relatively lower cyclization activities and higher disproportionation activities, which was favorable for AA-2G synthesis. The mechanism responsible for the enhanced substrate specificity was further explored by structure modeling and it was indicated that the enhancement of maltodextrin specificity may be due to the short residue chain and the removal of hydrogen bonding interactions between the side chain of residue 47 and the sugar at -3 subsite. Here the obtained mutant CGTases, especially the K47L, has a great potential in the production of AA-2G with maltodextrin as a cheap and easily soluble substrate.

  11. Valproic Acid Induces Antimicrobial Compound Production in Doratomyces microspores

    PubMed Central

    Zutz, Christoph; Bacher, Markus; Parich, Alexandra; Kluger, Bernhard; Gacek-Matthews, Agnieszka; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Wagner, Martin; Rychli, Kathrin; Strauss, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges in public health is the rising number of antibiotic resistant pathogens and the lack of novel antibiotics. In recent years there is a rising focus on fungi as sources of antimicrobial compounds due to their ability to produce a large variety of bioactive compounds and the observation that virtually every fungus may still contain yet unknown so called “cryptic,” often silenced, compounds. These putative metabolites could include novel bioactive compounds. Considerable effort is spent on methods to induce production of these “cryptic” metabolites. One approach is the use of small molecule effectors, potentially influencing chromatin landscape in fungi. We observed that the supernatant of the fungus Doratomyces (D.) microsporus treated with valproic acid (VPA) displayed antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and two methicillin resistant clinical S. aureus isolates. VPA treatment resulted in enhanced production of seven antimicrobial compounds: cyclo-(L-proline-L-methionine) (cPM), p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, cyclo-(phenylalanine-proline) (cFP), indole-3-carboxylic acid, phenylacetic acid (PAA) and indole-3-acetic acid. The production of the antimicrobial compound phenyllactic acid was exclusively detectable after VPA treatment. Furthermore three compounds, cPM, cFP, and PAA, were able to boost the antimicrobial activity of other antimicrobial compounds. cPM, for the first time isolated from fungi, and to a lesser extent PAA, are even able to decrease the minimal inhibitory concentration of ampicillin in MRSA strains. In conclusion we could show in this study that VPA treatment is a potent tool for induction of “cryptic” antimicrobial compound production in fungi, and that the induced compounds are not exclusively linked to the secondary metabolism. Furthermore this is the first discovery of the rare diketopiperazine cPM in fungi. Additionally we could demonstrate that cPM and PAA boost antibiotic activity

  12. Supramolecular Adducts of Cucurbit[7]uril and Amino Acids in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, Ekaterina; Vilaseca, Marta; Díaz-Lobo, Mireia; Masliy, A. N.; Vicent, Cristian; Fedin, Vladimir P.

    2016-02-01

    The complexation of the macrocyclic cavitand cucurbit[7]uril (Q7) with a series of amino acids (AA) with different side chains (Asp, Asn, Gln, Ser, Ala, Val, and Ile) is investigated by ESI-MS techniques. The 1:1 [Q7 + AA + 2H]2+ adducts are observed as the base peak when equimolar Q7:AA solutions are electrosprayed, whereas the 1:2 [Q7 + 2AA + 2H]2+ dications are dominant when an excess of the amino acid is used. A combination of ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and DFT calculations of the 1:1 [Q7 + AA + 2H]2+ (AA = Tyr, Val, and Ser) adducts is also reported and proven to be unsuccessful at discriminating between exclusion or inclusion-type conformations in the gas phase. Collision induced dissociation (CID) revealed that the preferred dissociation pathways of the 1:1 [Q7 + AA + 2H]2+ dications are strongly influenced by the identity of the amino acid side chain, whereas ion molecule reactions towards N-butylmethylamine displayed a common reactivity pattern comprising AA displacement. Special emphasis is given on the differences between the gas-phase behavior of the supramolecular adducts with amino acids (AA = Asp, Asn, Gln, Ser, Ala, Val, and Ile) and those featuring basic (Lys and Arg) and aromatic (Tyr and Phe) side chains.

  13. Menopause-induced uterine epithelium atrophy results from arachidonic acid/prostaglandin E2 axis inhibition-mediated autophagic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shengtao; Zhao, Linjie; Yi, Tao; Wei, Yuquan; Zhao, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Women experience menopause later in life. Menopause is characterized by dramatically decreased circulating estrogen level secondary to loss of ovarian function and atrophic state of genital organs. However, the molecular mechanisms for this process are not fully understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential molecular mechanisms that underlie menopause-induced uterine endometrial atrophy. Our data showed that autophagy was activated in the uterine epithelial cells of both ovariectomized rats and peri-menopausal females. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress occurred even prior to autophagy induction. Integrated bioinformatics analysis revealed that ER stress induced downstream decreased release of arachidonic acid (AA) and downregulation of AA/prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) axis, which led to Akt/mTOR signaling pathway inactivation. Consequently, autophagosomes were recruited and LC3-dependent autophagy was induced in uterine epithelial cells. Treatment with exogenous E2, PGE2, salubrinal or RNAi-mediated silencing of key autophagy genes could effectively counteract estrogen depletion-induced autophagy. Collectively, autophagy is a critical regulator of the uterine epithelium that accounts for endometrial atrophy after menopause. PMID:27506466

  14. Inhibition of fatty-acid amide hydrolase enhances cannabinoid stress-induced analgesia: sites of action in the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray and rostral ventromedial medulla.

    PubMed

    Suplita, Richard L; Farthing, Jesse N; Gutierrez, Tannia; Hohmann, Andrea G

    2005-12-01

    Recent research in our laboratory has demonstrated that stress activates an endogenous cannabinoid mechanism that suppresses sensitivity to pain [Nature 435 (2005) 1108]. In this work, CB(1) antagonists administered systemically blocked stress-induced analgesia induced by brief, continuous foot-shock. The present studies were conducted to examine the role of cannabinoid CB(1) receptors in the brainstem rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) and midbrain dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (PAG) in cannabinoid stress-induced analgesia (SIA). Pharmacological blockade of vanilloid TRPV1 receptors with capsazepine, administered systemically, did not alter cannabinoid SIA, suggesting that cannabinoid SIA was not dependent upon TRPV1. Microinjection of the competitive CB(1) antagonist rimonabant (SR141716A) into either the RVM or dorsolateral PAG suppressed stress antinociception in this model. Rimonabant was maximally effective following microinjection into the dorsolateral PAG. The fatty-acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor arachidonoyl serotonin (AA-5-HT) was subsequently used to block hydrolysis of endocannabinoids and enhance SIA. Systemic and site-specific injections of AA-5-HT into either the dorsolateral PAG or RVM induced CB(1)-mediated enhancements of SIA. Palmitoyltrifluoromethylketone, a potent inhibitor of FAAH and phospholipase A2 activity, administered systemically, exerted similar effects. In all conditions, the antinociceptive effects of each FAAH inhibitor were completely blocked by coadministration of the CB(1) antagonist rimonabant. The present results provide evidence that a descending cannabinergic neural system is activated by environmental stressors to modulate pain sensitivity in a CB(1)-dependent manner.

  15. Arachidonic acid alters tomato HMG expression and fruit growth and induces 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase-independent lycopene accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Concepcion, M.; Gruissem, W.

    1999-01-01

    Regulation of isoprenoid end-product synthesis required for normal growth and development in plants is not well understood. To investigate the extent to which specific genes for the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) are involved in end-product regulation, the authors manipulated expression of the HMG1 and HMG2 genes in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) fruit using arachidonic acid (AA). In developing young fruit AA blocked fruit growth, inhibited HMG1, and activated HMG2 expression. These results are consistent with other reports indicating that HMG1 expression is closely correlated with growth processes requiring phytosterol production. In mature-green fruit AA strongly induced the expression of HMG2, PSY1 (the gene for phytoene synthase), and lycopene accumulation before the normal onset of carotenoid synthesis and ripening. The induction of lycopene synthesis was not blocked by inhibition of HMGR activity using mevinolin, suggesting that cytoplasmic HMGR is not required for carotenoid synthesis. Their results are consistent with the function of an alternative plastid isoprenoid pathway (the Rohmer pathway) that appears to direct the production of carotenoids during tomato fruit ripening.

  16. Dimethylarsenic acid induces tetraploids in Chinese hamster cells

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, Ginji; Horiguchi, Shun'ichi ); Kuroda, Koichi; Okamoto, Akiyoshi )

    1992-01-01

    Arsenic has been documented as a human carcinogen of the skin and lungs. However, attempts to induce tumors in experimental animals with inorganoarsenic compounds have mostly failed except in a few studies in which animals were given arsenic trioxide by intratracheal instillation. Moreover, inorganoarsenics are either inactive or too weak to induce gene mutations in vitro. The mechanism of arsenic carcinogenicity has not yet been discovered. Most mammals including human are able to methylate inorganoarsenic compounds to methylarsonic acid and dimethylarsenic acid. However, the genotoxicity of organoarsenic compounds has hardly been examined. The authors therefore decided to study this genotoxicity, including the frequency of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) of nine organic and three inorganic arsenic compounds. Observation of the metaphases in the SCE test revealed that only DMA of the organo- and inorgano-arsenic compounds induces tetraploids and mitotic arrest. This indicates that the role of DMA may be important in arsenic genotoxicity and may give a clue to the carcinogenic mechanism of arsenic.

  17. [Signaling pathway of meiosis induced by retinoic acid during spermatogenesis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Wu, Ying-Ji

    2013-02-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is an oxidative metabolite of vitamin A (retinol, ROH) and plays an important role in the spermatogenesis (as in meiosis) of mammals. In mammalian testes, RA, in combination with its retinoic acid receptor (RAR), regulates the expressions of related target genes in various types of cells at different times. It activates meiosis by up-regulating the expressions of the genes that promote meiosis and down-regulate those that inhibit it during spermatogenesis in a specific stage. The results of researches on mammalian spermatogenesis have a great application value in reproductive biology, developmental biology, and reproductive engineering. Therefore, it is of considerable significance to study the signaling pathway of RA-induced meiosis during mammalian spermatogenesis. This article presents an introduction of the RA signal transduction system and its action mechanisms, as well as an overview on the signaling pathway of RA-activated meiosis during spermatogenesis.

  18. Ursolic acid improves domoic acid-induced cognitive deficits in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Dong-mei; Lu, Jun; Zhang, Yan-qiu; Zheng, Yuan-lin; Hu, Bin; Cheng, Wei; Zhang, Zi-feng; Li, Meng-qiu

    2013-09-01

    Our previous findings suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction is the mechanism underlying cognitive deficits induced by domoic acid (DA). Ursolic acid (UA), a natural triterpenoid compound, possesses many important biological functions. Evidence shows that UA can activate PI3K/Akt signaling and suppress Forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1) activity. FoxO1 is an important regulator of mitochondrial function. Here we investigate whether FoxO1 is involved in the oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in DA-treated mice and whether UA inhibits DA-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cognitive deficits through regulating the PI3K/Akt and FoxO1 signaling pathways. Our results showed that FoxO1 knockdown reversed the mitochondrial abnormalities and cognitive deficits induced by DA in mice through decreasing HO-1 expression. Mechanistically, FoxO1 activation was associated with oxidative stress-induced JNK activation and decrease of Akt phosphorylation. Moreover, UA attenuated the mitochondrial dysfunction and cognitive deficits through promoting Akt phosphorylation and FoxO1 nuclear exclusion in the hippocampus of DA-treated mice. LY294002, an inhibitor of PI3K/Akt signaling, significantly decreased Akt phosphorylation in the hippocampus of DA/UA mice, which weakened UA actions. These results suggest that UA could be recommended as a possible candidate for the prevention and therapy of cognitive deficits in excitotoxic brain disorders. - Highlights: • Ursolic acid (UA) is a naturally triterpenoid compound. • UA attenuated the mitochondrial dysfunction and cognitive deficits. • Mechanistically, UA activates PI3K/Akt signaling and suppresses FoxO1 activity. • UA could be recommended as a possible candidate for anti-excitotoxic brain disorders.

  19. [Sunitinib and zoledronic acid induced osteonecrosis of the jaw].

    PubMed

    Soós, Balázs; Vajta, László; Szalma, József

    2015-11-15

    The tendency for bisphosphonate and non-bisphosphonate (eg.: antiresorptive or anti-angiogenesis drugs) induced osteonecrosis is increasing. Treatment of these patients is a challenge both for dentists and for oral and maxillofacial surgeons. Cooperation with the drug prescribing general medicine colleagues to prevent osteonecrosis is extremely important. Furthermore, prevention should include dental focus elimination, oral hygienic instructions and education, dental follow-up and, in case of manifest necrosis, referral to maxillofacial departments. Authors outline the difficulties of conservative and surgical treatment of a patient with sunitinib and zoledronic acid induced osteonecrosis. The patient became symptomless and the operated area healed entirely six and twelve months postoperatively. A long term success further follow-up is necessary to verify long-term success.

  20. Saturated phosphatidic acids mediate saturated fatty acid-induced vascular calcification and lipotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Masashi; Miyazaki-Anzai, Shinobu; Keenan, Audrey L; Okamura, Kayo; Kendrick, Jessica; Chonchol, Michel; Offermanns, Stefan; Ntambi, James M; Kuro-O, Makoto; Miyazaki, Makoto

    2015-10-26

    Recent evidence indicates that saturated fatty acid-induced (SFA-induced) lipotoxicity contributes to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases; however, the molecular mechanisms that underlie SFA-induced lipotoxicity remain unclear. Here, we have shown that repression of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) enzymes, which regulate the intracellular balance of SFAs and unsaturated FAs, and the subsequent accumulation of SFAs in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), are characteristic events in the development of vascular calcification. We evaluated whether SMC-specific inhibition of SCD and the resulting SFA accumulation plays a causative role in the pathogenesis of vascular calcification and generated mice with SMC-specific deletion of both Scd1 and Scd2. Mice lacking both SCD1 and SCD2 in SMCs displayed severe vascular calcification with increased ER stress. Moreover, we employed shRNA library screening and radiolabeling approaches, as well as in vitro and in vivo lipidomic analysis, and determined that fully saturated phosphatidic acids such as 1,2-distearoyl-PA (18:0/18:0-PA) mediate SFA-induced lipotoxicity and vascular calcification. Together, these results identify a key lipogenic pathway in SMCs that mediates vascular calcification.

  1. The abundance and activation of mTORC1 regulators in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs are modulated by insulin, amino acids, and age

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously we demonstrated that the insulin (INS) and amino acid (AA) -induced activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is developmentally regulated in neonatal pigs. This study aimed to determine the effects of the post-prandial rise in INS and AA on the activation and abu...

  2. Depressed phosphatidic acid-induced contractile activity of failing cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Tappia, Paramjit S; Maddaford, Thane G; Hurtado, Cecilia; Panagia, Vincenzo; Pierce, Grant N

    2003-01-10

    The effects of phosphatidic acid (PA), a known inotropic agent, on Ca(2+) transients and contractile activity of cardiomyocytes in congestive heart failure (CHF) due to myocardial infarction were examined. In control cells, PA induced a significant increase (25%) in active cell shortening and Ca(2+) transients. The phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor, 2-nitro-4-carboxyphenyl N,N-diphenylcarbonate, blocked the positive inotropic action induced by PA, indicating that PA induces an increase in contractile activity and Ca(2+) transients through stimulation of PLC. Conversely, in failing cardiomyocytes there was a loss of PA-induced increase in active cell shortening and Ca(2+) transients. PA did not alter resting cell length. Both diastolic and systolic [Ca(2+)] were significantly elevated in the failing cardiomyocytes. In vitro assessment of the cardiac sarcolemmal (SL) PLC activity revealed that the impaired failing cardiomyocyte response to PA was associated with a diminished stimulation of SL PLC activity by PA. Our results identify an important defect in the PA-PLC signaling pathway in failing cardiomyocytes, which may have significant implications for the depressed contractile function during CHF.

  3. Docosahexaenoic acid, an omega-3 polyunsaturated acid protects against indomethacin-induced gastric injury.

    PubMed

    Pineda-Peña, Elizabeth Arlen; Jiménez-Andrade, Juan Miguel; Castañeda-Hernández, Gilberto; Chávez-Piña, Aracely Evangelina

    2012-12-15

    Previous studies have shown gastroprotective effect of fish oil in several experimental models. However, the mechanisms and active compounds underlying this effect are not fully understood. Fish oil has several components; among them, one of the most studied is docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which is an omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid. The aim of this study was to examine the gastroprotective effect of DHA as a pure compound in a rat model of indomethacin-induced gastric injury as well as elucidate some of the mechanism(s) behind DHA's gastroprotective effect. Indomethacin was orally administered to induce an acute gastric injury (3, 10 and 30mg/kg). Omeprazol (a proton pump inhibitor, 30mg/kg, p.o.) and DHA (3, 10, 30mg/kg, p.o.) were gavaged 30 and 120min, respectively, before indomethacin insult (30mg/kg p.o.). Three hours after indomethacin administration, rats were sacrificed, gastric injury was evaluated by determining the total damaged area. A sample of gastric tissue was harvested and processed to quantify prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)) levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Indomethacin produced gastric injury in dose-dependent manner. DHA protected against indomethacin-induced gastric damage, and this effect was comparable with omeprazol's gastroprotective effect. DHA did not reverse the indomethacin-induced reduction of PGE(2) gastric levels. In contrast, DHA partially prevented the indomethacin-induced increase in LTB(4) gastric levels. This is the first report demonstrating DHA's gastroprotective effect as a pure compound. Furthermore, the results reveal that the gastroprotective effect is mediated by a decrease in gastric LTB(4) levels in indomethacin-induced gastric damage.

  4. Acid aspiration-induced airways hyperresponsiveness in mice

    PubMed Central

    Leclair, Timothy R.; von Reyn, Jessica; Larrabee, Yuna C.; Cloutier, Mary E.; Irvin, Charles G.; Bates, Jason H. T.

    2009-01-01

    The role of gastroesophageal reflux and micro-aspiration as a trigger of airways hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in patients with asthma is controversial. The role of acid reflux and aspiration as a direct cause of AHR in normal subjects is also unclear. We speculated that aspiration of a weak acid with a pH (1.8) equivalent to the upper range of typical gastric contents would lead to AHR in naive mice. We further speculated that modest reductions in aspirate acidity to a level expected during gastric acid suppression therapy (pH 4.0) would impede aspiration-induced AHR. BALB/c female mice were briefly anesthetized with isoflurane and allowed to aspirate 75 μl of saline with HCl (pH 1.8, 4.0, or 7.4) or underwent sham aspiration. Mice were re-anesthetized 2 or 24 h later, underwent tracheostomy, and were coupled to a mechanical ventilator. Forced oscillations were used to periodically measure respiratory impedance (Zrs) following aerosol delivery of saline and increasing doses of methacholine to measure for AHR. Values for elastance (H), airways resistance (RN), and tissue damping (G) were derived from Zrs. Aspirate pH of 1.8 led to a significant overall increase in peak RN, G, and H compared with pH 4.0 and 7.4 at 2 and 24 h. Differences between pH 7.4 and 4.0 were not significant. In mice aspirating pH 1.8 compared with controls, airway lavage fluid contained more neutrophils, higher protein, and demonstrated higher permeability. We conclude that acid aspiration triggers an acute AHR, driven principally by breakdown of epithelial barrier integrity within the airways. PMID:19797689

  5. Dietary supplementation with phytosterol and ascorbic acid reduces body mass accumulation and alters food transit time in a diet-induced obesity mouse model

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Previous research indicates that animals fed a high fat (HF) diet supplemented with disodium ascorbyl phytostanyl phosphate (DAPP) exhibit reduced mass accumulation when compared to HF control. This compound is a water-soluble phytostanol ester and consists of a hydrophobic plant stanol covalently bonded to ascorbic acid (Vitamin C). To provide insight into the mechanism of this response, we examined the in vivo effects of a high fat diet supplemented with ascorbic acid (AA) in the presence and absence of unesterified phytosterols (PS), and set out to establish whether the supplements have a synergistic effect in a diet-induced obesity mouse model. Our data indicate that HF diet supplementation with a combination of 1% w/w phytosterol and 1% w/w ascorbic acid results in reduced mass accumulation, with mean differences in absolute mass between PSAA and HF control of 10.05%; and differences in mass accumulation of 21.6% (i.e. the PSAA group gained on average 21% less mass each week from weeks 7-12 than the HF control group). In our previous study, the absolute mass difference between the 2% DAPP and HF control was 41%, while the mean difference in mass accumulation between the two groups for weeks 7-12 was 67.9%. Mass loss was not observed in animals supplemented with PS or AA alone. These data suggest that the supplements are synergistic with respect to mass accumulation, and the esterification of the compounds further potentiates the response. Our data also indicate that chronic administration of PS, both in the presence and absence of AA, results in changes to fecal output and food transit time, providing insight into the possibility of long-term changes in intestinal function related to PS supplementation. PMID:21711516

  6. Role of hepatocyte S6K1 in palmitic acid-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, lipotoxicity, insulin resistance and in oleic acid-induced protection.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Virginia; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; Muntané, Jordi; Kozma, Sara C; Valverde, Ángela M

    2015-06-01

    The excess of saturated free fatty acids, such as palmitic acid, that induces lipotoxicity in hepatocytes, has been implicated in the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease also associated with insulin resistance. By contrast, oleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid, attenuates the effects of palmitic acid. We evaluated whether palmitic acid is directly associated with both insulin resistance and lipoapoptosis in mouse and human hepatocytes and the impact of oleic acid in the molecular mechanisms that mediate both processes. In human and mouse hepatocytes palmitic acid at a lipotoxic concentration triggered early activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related kinases, induced the apoptotic transcription factor CHOP, activated caspase 3 and increased the percentage of apoptotic cells. These effects concurred with decreased IR/IRS1/Akt insulin pathway. Oleic acid suppressed the toxic effects of palmitic acid on ER stress activation, lipoapoptosis and insulin resistance. Besides, oleic acid suppressed palmitic acid-induced activation of S6K1. This protection was mimicked by pharmacological or genetic inhibition of S6K1 in hepatocytes. In conclusion, this is the first study highlighting the activation of S6K1 by palmitic acid as a common and novel mechanism by which its inhibition by oleic acid prevents ER stress, lipoapoptosis and insulin resistance in hepatocytes.

  7. The Lipophilic Vitamin C Derivative, 6-O-Palmitoylascorbate Protects Human Keratinocytes and 3D-Human Skin Equivalents Against X-Ray-Induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis More Markedly Than L-Ascorbic Acid.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Li; Miwa, Nobuhiko

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate preventive effects of the lipophilic vitamin C derivative, 6-O-palmitoylascorbate (PlmtVC) against X-ray radiation-induced harmful events. Free radical scavenging activity tests showed that both fresh and old (being kept at 37°C for 72 h) solutions of PlmtVC showed significantly higher abilities for scavenging both DPPH and peroxyl radical (ROO·) radicals than L-ascorbic acid (L-AA) under the same conditions, suggesting that PlmtVC is an antioxidant more efficient and stable than L-AA. Irradiation with X-ray (15 Gy) increased intracellular ROS production, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation, in human keratinocytes HaCaT, all of which were repressed, especially for intracellular ROS more markedly, by PlmtVC than by L-AA. After X-ray (15 Gy)-irradiation, caspase 3/7 activation and TUNEL-detected DNA-strand-breakages characteristic of apoptosis obviously increased in HaCaT cells or 3D-skin tissue equivalents, respectively, both of which were prevented more appreciably by PlmtVC than by L-AA. PlmtVC also noticeably prevented cumene hydroperoxide-induced generation of cellular ROS in epidermis parts of 3D-skin equivalents. Thus, PlmtVC prevents X-ray-induced diverse harmful effects, through its antioxidant activity and the palmitoyl moiety-based lipophilicity, more efficiently than L-AA. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 318-329, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Curcumin and folic acid abrogated methotrexate induced vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sankrityayan, Himanshu; Majumdar, Anuradha S

    2016-01-01

    Methotrexate, an antifolate drug widely used in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and cancer, is known to cause vascular endothelial dysfunction by causing hyperhomocysteinemia, direct injury to endothelium or by increasing the oxidative stress (raising levels of 7,8-dihydrobiopterin). Curcumin is a naturally occurring polyphenol with strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action and therapeutic spectra similar to that of methotrexate. This study was performed to evaluate the effects of curcumin on methotrexate induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and also compare its effect with that produced by folic acid (0.072 μg·g(-1)·day(-1), p.o., 2 weeks) per se and in combination. Male Wistar rats were exposed to methotrexate (0.35 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), i.p.) for 2 weeks to induce endothelial dysfunction. Methotrexate exposure led to shedding of endothelium, decreased vascular reactivity, increased oxidative stress, decreased serum nitrite levels, and increase in aortic collagen deposition. Curcumin (200 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) and 400 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), p.o.) for 4 weeks prevented the increase in oxidative stress, decrease in serum nitrite, aortic collagen deposition, and also vascular reactivity. The effects were comparable with those produced by folic acid therapy. The study shows that curcumin, when concomitantly administered with methotrexate, abrogated its vascular side effects by preventing an increase in oxidative stress and abating any reduction in physiological nitric oxide levels.

  9. Lysophosphatidic acid-induced chemotaxis of bone cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiosis, Sue A.; Masiello, Lisa M.; Bollinger, Nikki; Karin, Norm J.

    2006-07-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a platelet-derived bioactive lipid that is postulated to regulate wound healing. LPA activates G protein-coupled receptors to induce Ca2+ signaling in MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts, and is a potent chemotactic stimulus for these cells. Since bone fracture healing requires the migration of osteoblast progenitors, we postulate that LPA is among the factors that stimulate bone repair. UMR 106-01 cells, which express a more mature osteoblastic phenotype than MC3T3-E1 cells, did not migrate in response to LPA, although they express LPA receptors and exhibit LPA-induced Ca2+ signals. This suggests that LPA differentially induces pre-osteoblast chemotaxis, consistent with our hypothesis that LPA stimulates the motility of osteoblast progenitors during bone healing. LPA-stimulated MC3T3-E1 cells exhibit striking changes in morphology and F-actin architecture, and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) is required for motility-associated cytoskeletal rearrangements in many cell types. We found a dose-dependent reduction in LPA-induced osteoblast migration when cells also were treated with the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. Treatment of many cell types with LPA is associated with an autocrine/paracrine transactivation of the EGF receptor (EGFR) via shedding of surface-tethered EGFR ligands, a phenomenon often required for LPA-induced chemotaxis. MC3T3-E1 cells express multiple EGFR ligands (epigen, epiregulin, HB-EGF and amphiregulin) and migrated in response to EGF. However, while EGF-stimulated motility in MC3T3-E1 cells was blocked by an EGFR inhibitor, there was no significant effect on LPA-induced chemotaxis. Activation of MAP kinases is a hallmark of EGFR-mediated signaling, and EGF treatment of MC3T3-E1 cells led to a strong stimulation of ERK1/2 kinase. In contrast, LPA induced only a minor elevation in ERK activity. Thus, it is likely that the increase in ERK activity by LPA is related to cell proliferation associated with lipid treatment. We

  10. Effect of arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acid metabolism on RAW 264.7 macrophage proliferation.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Diana; Moreno, Juan José

    2006-08-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) and leukotrienes (LTs) derived from arachidonic acid (AA) are potent mediators of inflammation and cell proliferation. Dietary intake of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) appears beneficial to both inflammatory processes and cell proliferation. However, there is no clear mechanism explaining these effects. In this study, we investigated the effect of EPA on the AA incorporation in phospholipid membranes, on AA release and metabolism, and consequently, on PG synthesis. Our results showed not only that [(3)H]AA and [(14)C]EPA were similar incorporated into RAW 264.7 macrophage membranes, but also that the redistribution pattern between phospholipids was alike. [(3)H]AA or [(14)C]EPA release was induced by fetal bovine serum (FBS) in a similar fashion with AA metabolizing 3-fold more than EPA. In this way, we observed that AA could be metabolized by cyclooxygenase (COX)-1, COX-2 and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) whereas EPA was metabolized by COX-2 and 5-LOX pathways. Moreover, both fatty acids were able to induce COX-2 expression. When we incubated [(3)H]AA labeled cells with exogenous EPA, we observed that EPA did not modify FBS-induced [(3)H]AA release but that the presence of EPA decreased [(3)H]AA metabolism and therefore PGE(2) synthesis. Moreover, we studied the effect of AA and EPA metabolites on macrophage proliferation. Our results showed that PGE(3) stimulated cell growth with a potency similar to that of PGE(2), whereas LTB(5) was less effective than LTB(4). These data suggest that the effects of EPA on cell growth might be attributable, at least in part, to the marked decrease of eicosanoid release.

  11. Salicylic acid attenuates gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Randjelovic, Pavle; Veljkovic, Slavimir; Stojiljkovic, Nenad; Jankovic-Velickovic, Ljubinka; Sokolovic, Dusan; Stoiljkovic, Milan; Ilic, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Gentamicin (GM) is a widely used antibiotic against serious and life-threatening infections, but its usefulness is limited by the development of nephrotoxicity. The present study was designed to determine the protective effect of salicylic acid (SA) in gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. Quantitative evaluation of gentamicin-induced structural alterations and degree of functional alterations in the kidneys were performed by histopathological and biochemical analyses in order to determine potential beneficial effects of SA coadministration with gentamicin. Gentamicin was observed to cause a severe nephrotoxicity which was evidenced by an elevation of serum urea and creatinine levels. The significant increases in malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and protein carbonyl groups indicated that GM-induced tissue injury was mediated through oxidative reactions. On the other hand, simultaneous SA administration protected kidney tissue against the oxidative damage and the nephrotoxic effect caused by GM treatment. Exposure to GM caused necrosis of tubular epithelial cells. Necrosis of tubules was found to be prevented by SA pretreatment. The results from our study indicate that SA supplement attenuates oxidative-stress associated renal injury by reducing oxygen free radicals and lipid peroxidation in gentamicin-treated rats.

  12. Endothelial dysfunction is induced by proinflammatory oxidant hypochlorous acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C; Patel, R; Eiserich, J P; Zhou, F; Kelpke, S; Ma, W; Parks, D A; Darley-Usmar, V; White, C R

    2001-10-01

    The myeloperoxidase (MPO)-derived oxidant hypochlorous acid (HOCl) plays a role in tissue injury under inflammatory conditions. The present study tests the hypothesis that HOCl decreases nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability in the vasculature of Sprague-Dawley rats. Aortic ring segments were pretreated with HOCl (1-50 microM) followed by extensive washing. Endothelium-dependent relaxation was then assessed by cumulative addition of acetylcholine (ACh) or the calcium ionophore A23187. HOCl treatment significantly impaired both ACh- and A23187-mediated relaxation. In contrast, endothelium-independent relaxation induced by sodium nitroprusside was unaffected. The inhibitory effect of HOCl on ACh-induced relaxation was reversed by exposure of ring segments to L-arginine but not D-arginine. In cellular studies, HOCl did not alter endothelial NO synthase (NOS III) protein or activity, but inhibited formation of the NO metabolites nitrate (NO3(-) and nitrite (NO2(-). The reduction in total NO metabolite production in bovine aortic endothelial cells was also reversed by addition of L-arginine. These data suggest that HOCl induces endothelial dysfunction via modification of L-arginine.

  13. Palmitic acid but not palmitoleic acid induces insulin resistance in a human endothelial cell line by decreasing SERCA pump expression.

    PubMed

    Gustavo Vazquez-Jimenez, J; Chavez-Reyes, Jesus; Romero-Garcia, Tatiana; Zarain-Herzberg, Angel; Valdes-Flores, Jesus; Manuel Galindo-Rosales, J; Rueda, Angelica; Guerrero-Hernandez, Agustin; Olivares-Reyes, J Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Palmitic acid is a negative regulator of insulin activity. At the molecular level, palmitic acid reduces insulin stimulated Akt Ser473 phosphorylation. Interestingly, we have found that incubation with palmitic acid of human umbilical vein endothelial cells induced a biphasic effect, an initial transient elevation followed by a sustained reduction of SERCA pump protein levels. However, palmitic acid produced a sustained inhibition of SERCA pump ATPase activity. Insulin resistance state appeared before there was a significant reduction of SERCA2 expression. The mechanism by which palmitic acid impairs insulin signaling may involve endoplasmic reticulum stress, because this fatty acid induced activation of both PERK, an ER stress marker, and JNK, a kinase associated with insulin resistance. None of these effects were observed by incubating HUVEC-CS cells with palmitoleic acid. Importantly, SERCA2 overexpression decreased the palmitic acid-induced insulin resistance state. All these results suggest that SERCA pump might be the target of palmitic acid to induce the insulin resistance state in a human vascular endothelial cell line. Importantly, these data suggest that HUVEC-CS cells respond to palmitic acid-exposure with a compensatory overexpression of SERCA pump within the first hour, which eventually fades out and insulin resistance prevails.

  14. Tumor-dependent increase of serum amino acid levels in breast cancer patients has diagnostic potential and correlates with molecular tumor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Malignancies induce changes in the levels of serum amino acids (AA), which may offer diagnostic potential. Furthermore, changes in AA levels are associated with immune cell function. In this study, serum AA levels were studied in breast cancer patients versus patients with benign breast lesions. Methods In a prospective study, serum levels of 15 AA were measured by high performance liquid chromatography before and after surgery in 41 breast cancer patients (BrCA) and nine patients with benign breast lesions (healthy donors, HD). Results were analyzed in relation to clinical tumor data and tested against immunological flow cytometry data. Principal component analysis was performed and the accuracy of AA levels as a potential diagnostic tool was tested. Results Pre- but not postoperative serum AA levels were increased in BrCA in eight out of 15 AA compared with HD. Serum AA levels were highest in the most aggressive (basal-like) as compared with the least aggressive tumor subtype (luminal A). A principal component (PC1) of all measured AA correlated with a mainly pro-inflammatory immune profile, while a second one (PC2, selectively considering AA preoperatively differing between HD and BrCA) could predict health state with an area under the curve of 0.870. Conclusions Breast cancer shows a tumor-dependent impact on serum AA levels, which varies with intrinsic tumor subtypes and is associated with a pro-inflammatory state. Serum AA levels need further evaluation as a potential diagnostic tool. PMID:24237611

  15. The effect of docosahexaenoic acid on t10, c12-conjugated linoleic acid-induced changes in fatty acid composition of mouse liver, adipose and muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Concomitant supplementation of 1.5% docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 n-3; DHA) with 0.5% t10, c12- conjugated linoleic acid (18:2 n-6; CLA) prevented the CLA-induced increase in expression of hepatic genes involved in fatty acid synthesis and the decrease in expression of genes involved in fat...

  16. Folic acid supplementation during pregnancy protects against lipopolysaccharide-induced neural tube defects in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mei; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Chen, Xue; Dong, Xu-Ting; Zhou, Jun; Wang, Hua; Wu, Shu-Xian; Zhang, Cheng; Xu, De-Xiang

    2014-01-13

    Folic acid is a water-soluble B-complex vitamin. Increasing evidence demonstrates that physiological supply of folic acid during pregnancy prevents folic acid deficiency-related neural tube defects (NTDs). Previous studies showed that maternal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure caused NTDs in rodents. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of high-dose folic acid supplementation during pregnancy on LPS-induced NTDs. Pregnant mice were intraperitoneally injected with LPS (20 μg/kg/d) from gestational day (GD) 8 to GD12. As expected, a five-day LPS injection resulted in 19.96% of fetuses with NTDs. Interestingly, supplementation with folic acid (3mg/kg/d) during pregnancy significantly alleviated LPS-induced NTDs. Additionally, folic acid significantly attenuated LPS-induced fetal growth restriction and skeletal malformations. Additional experiment showed that folic acid attenuated LPS-induced glutathione (GSH) depletion in maternal liver and placentas. Moreover, folic acid significantly attenuated LPS-induced expression of placental MyD88. Additionally, folic acid inhibited LPS-induced c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation in placentas. Correspondingly, folic acid significantly attenuated LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in placentas, maternal serum and amniotic fluid. In conclusion, supplementation with high-dose folic acid during pregnancy protects against LPS-induced NTDs through its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects.

  17. Salicylic acid induces mitochondrial injury by inhibiting ferrochelatase heme biosynthesis activity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vipul; Liu, Shujie; Ando, Hideki; Ishii, Ryohei; Tateno, Shumpei; Kaneko, Yuki; Yugami, Masato; Sakamoto, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Nureki, Osamu; Handa, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    Salicylic acid is a classic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Although salicylic acid also induces mitochondrial injury, the mechanism of its antimitochondrial activity is not well understood. In this study, by using a one-step affinity purification scheme with salicylic acid-immobilized beads, ferrochelatase (FECH), a homodimeric enzyme involved in heme biosynthesis in mitochondria, was identified as a new molecular target of salicylic acid. Moreover, the cocrystal structure of the FECH-salicylic acid complex was determined. Structural and biochemical studies showed that salicylic acid binds to the dimer interface of FECH in two possible orientations and inhibits its enzymatic activity. Mutational analysis confirmed that Trp301 and Leu311, hydrophobic amino acid residues located at the dimer interface, are directly involved in salicylic acid binding. On a gel filtration column, salicylic acid caused a shift in the elution profile of FECH, indicating that its conformational change is induced by salicylic acid binding. In cultured human cells, salicylic acid treatment or FECH knockdown inhibited heme synthesis, whereas salicylic acid did not exert its inhibitory effect in FECH knockdown cells. Concordantly, salicylic acid treatment or FECH knockdown inhibited heme synthesis in zebrafish embryos. Strikingly, the salicylic acid-induced effect in zebrafish was partially rescued by FECH overexpression. Taken together, these findings illustrate that FECH is responsible for salicylic acid-induced inhibition of heme synthesis, which may contribute to its antimitochondrial and anti-inflammatory function. This study establishes a novel aspect of the complex pharmacological effects of salicylic acid.

  18. The Acetic Acid Tolerance Response induces cross-protection to salt stress in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Greenacre, E J; Brocklehurst, T F

    2006-10-15

    Salmonella typhimurium induces an Acid Tolerance Response (ATR) upon exposure to mildly acidic conditions in order to protect itself against severe acid shock. This response can also induce cross-protection to other stresses such as heat and salt. We investigated whether both the acetic acid induced and lactic acid induced ATR in S. typhimurium provided cross-protection to a salt stress at 20 degrees C. Acid-adapted cells were challenged with both a sodium chloride (NaCl) and potassium chloride (KCl) shock and their ability to survive ascertained. Acetic acid adaptation provided cells with protection against both NaCl and KCl stress. However, lactic acid adaptation did not protect against either osmotic stressor and rendered cells hypersensitive to NaCl. These results have implications for the food industry where hurdle technology means multiple sub-lethal stresses such as mild pH and low salt are commonly used in the preservation of products.

  19. Chlorogenic acid and coffee prevent hypoxia-induced retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Jang, Holim; Ahn, Hong Ryul; Jo, Hyoung; Kim, Kyung-A; Lee, Eun Ha; Lee, Ki Won; Jung, Sang Hoon; Lee, Chang Y

    2014-01-08

    This study explored whether chlorogenic acid (CGA) and coffee have protective effects against retinal degeneration. Under hypoxic conditions, the viability of transformed retinal ganglion (RGC-5) cells was significantly reduced by treatment with the nitric oxide (NO) donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP). However, pretreatment with CGA attenuated cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, CGA prevented the up-regulation of apoptotic proteins such as Bad and cleaved caspase-3. Similar beneficial effects of both CGA and coffee extracts were observed in mice that had undergone an optic nerve crush (ONC) procedure. CGA and coffee extract reduced cell death by preventing the down-regulation of Thy-1. Our in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that coffee and its major component, CGA, significantly reduce apoptosis of retinal cells induced by hypoxia and NO, and that coffee consumption may help in preventing retinal degeneration.

  20. Habituation of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus to Origanum vulgare L. essential oil does not induce direct-tolerance and cross-tolerance to salts and organic acids

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Adassa Gama; do Monte, Daniel Farias Marinho; Albuquerque, Allan dos Reis; Sampaio, Fábio Correia; Magnani, Marciane; de Siqueira, José Pinto; de Souza, Evandro Leite

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus strains that were isolated from foods were investigated for their ability to develop direct-tolerance and cross-tolerance to sodium chloride (NaCl), potassium chloride (KCl), lactic acid (LA) and acetic acid (AA) after habituation in sublethal amounts (1/2 of the minimum inhibitory concentration - 1/2 MIC and 1/4 of the minimum inhibitory concentration - 1/4 MIC) of Origanum vulgare L. essential oil (OVEO). The habituation of S. aureus to 1/2 MIC and 1/4 MIC of OVEO did not induce direct-tolerance or cross-tolerance in the tested strains, as assessed by modulation of MIC values. Otherwise, exposing the strains to OVEO at sublethal concentrations maintained or increased the sensitivity of the cells to the tested stressing agents because the MIC values of OVEO, NaCl, KCl, LA and AA against the cells that were previously habituated to OVEO remained the same or decreased when compared with non-habituated cells. These data indicate that OVEO does not have an inductive effect on the acquisition of direct-tolerance or cross-tolerance in the tested enterotoxigenic strains of S. aureus to antimicrobial agents that are typically used in food preservation. PMID:26413067

  1. Habituation of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus to Origanum vulgare L. essential oil does not induce direct-tolerance and cross-tolerance to salts and organic acids.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Adassa Gama; Monte, Daniel Farias Marinho do; Albuquerque, Allan Dos Reis; Sampaio, Fábio Correia; Magnani, Marciane; Siqueira Júnior, José Pinto de; Souza, Evandro Leite de

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus strains that were isolated from foods were investigated for their ability to develop direct-tolerance and cross-tolerance to sodium chloride (NaCl), potassium chloride (KCl), lactic acid (LA) and acetic acid (AA) after habituation in sublethal amounts (1/2 of the minimum inhibitory concentration - 1/2 MIC and 1/4 of the minimum inhibitory concentration - 1/4 MIC) of Origanum vulgare L. essential oil (OVEO). The habituation of S. aureus to 1/2 MIC and 1/4 MIC of OVEO did not induce direct-tolerance or cross-tolerance in the tested strains, as assessed by modulation of MIC values. Otherwise, exposing the strains to OVEO at sublethal concentrations maintained or increased the sensitivity of the cells to the tested stressing agents because the MIC values of OVEO, NaCl, KCl, LA and AA against the cells that were previously habituated to OVEO remained the same or decreased when compared with non-habituated cells. These data indicate that OVEO does not have an inductive effect on the acquisition of direct-tolerance or cross-tolerance in the tested enterotoxigenic strains of S. aureus to antimicrobial agents that are typically used in food preservation.

  2. The effects of centrally injected arachidonic acid on respiratory system: Involvement of cyclooxygenase to thromboxane signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Erkan, Leman Gizem; Guvenc, Gokcen; Altinbas, Burcin; Niaz, Nasir; Yalcin, Murat

    2016-05-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is a polyunsaturated fatty acid that is present in the phospholipids of the cell membranes of the body and is abundant in the brain. Exogenously administered AA has been shown to affect brain metabolism and to exhibit cardiovascular and neuroendocrine actions. However, little is known regarding its respiratory actions and/or central mechanism of its respiratory effects. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the possible effects of centrally injected AA on respiratory system and the mediation of the central cyclooxygenase (COX) to thromboxane A2 (TXA2) signaling pathway on AA-induced respiratory effects in anaesthetized rats. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of AA induced dose- and time-dependent increase in tidal volume, respiratory rates and respiratory minute ventilation and also caused an increase in partial oxygen pressure (pO2) and decrease in partial carbon dioxide pressure (pCO2) in male anaesthetized Spraque Dawley rats. I.c.v. pretreatment with ibuprofen, a non-selective COX inhibitor, completely blocked the hyperventilation and blood gases changes induced by AA. In addition, central pretreatment with different doses of furegrelate, a TXA2 synthesis inhibitor, also partially prevented AA-evoked hyperventilation and blood gases effects. These data explicitly show that centrally administered AA induces hyperventilation with increasing pO2 and decreasing pCO2 levels which are mediated by the activation of central COX to TXA2 signaling pathway.

  3. Light-Induced Alterations in Basil Ganglia Kynurenic Acid Levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sroufe, Angela E.; Whittaker, J. A.; Patrickson, J. W.; Orr, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    The metabolic synthesis, release and breakdown of several known CNS neurotransmitters have been shown to follow a circadian pattern entrained to the environmental light/dark cycle. The levels of excitatory amino acid (EAA) transmitters such as glutamate, have been shown to vary with environmental lighting conditions. Kynurenic Acid (KA), an endogenous tryptophan metabolite and glutamate receptor antagonist, has been reported to have neuroprotective effects against EAA-induced excitotoxic cell damage. Changes in KA's activity within the mammalian basal ganglia has been proposed as being contributory to neurotoxicity in Huntington's Disease. It is not known whether CNS KA levels follow a circadian pattern or exhibit light-induced fluctuations. However, because the symptoms of certain degenerative motor disorders seem to fluctuate with daily 24 hour rhythm, we initiated studies to determine if basal ganglia KA were influenced by the daily light/dark cycle and could influence motor function. Therefore in this study, HPLC-EC was utilized to determine if basal ganglia KA levels in tissue extracts from adult male Long-Evans rats (200-250g) entrained to 24 and 48 hours constant light and dark conditions, respectively. Samples were taken one hour before the onset of the subjective day and one hour prior to the onset of the subjective night in order to detect possible phase differences in KA levels and to allow for accumulation of factors expressed in association with the light or dark phase. Data analysis revealed that KA levels in the basal ganglia vary with environmental lighting conditions; being elevated generally during the dark. Circadian phase differences in KA levels were also evident during the subjective night and subjective day, respectively. Results from these studies are discussed with respect to potential cyclic changes in neuronal susceptibility to excitotoxic damage during the daily 24 hour cycle and its possible relevance to future therapeutic approaches in

  4. Iron transformations induced by an acid-tolerant Desulfosporosinus species.

    PubMed

    Bertel, Doug; Peck, John; Quick, Thomas J; Senko, John M

    2012-01-01

    The mineralogical transformations of Fe phases induced by an acid-tolerant, Fe(III)- and sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfosporosinus sp. strain GBSRB4.2 were evaluated under geochemical conditions associated with acid mine drainage-impacted systems (i.e., low pH and high Fe concentrations). X-ray powder diffractometry coupled with magnetic analysis by first-order reversal curve diagrams were used to evaluate mineral phases produced by GBSRB4.2 in media containing different ratios of Fe(II) and Fe(III). In medium containing Fe predominately in the +II oxidation state, ferrimagnetic, single-domain greigite (Fe₃S₄) was formed, but the addition of Fe(III) inhibited greigite formation. In media that contained abundant Fe(III) [as schwertmannite; Fe₈O₈(OH)₆SO₄ · nH₂O], the activities of strain GBSRB4.2 enhanced the transformation of schwertmannite to goethite (α-FeOOH), due to the increased pH and Fe(II) concentrations that resulted from the activities of GBSRB4.2.

  5. Proteolytic Pathways Induced by Herbicides That Inhibit Amino Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zulet, Amaia; Gil-Monreal, Miriam; Villamor, Joji Grace; Zabalza, Ana; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.; Royuela, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    Background The herbicides glyphosate (Gly) and imazamox (Imx) inhibit the biosynthesis of aromatic and branched-chain amino acids, respectively. Although these herbicides inhibit different pathways, they have been reported to show several common physiological effects in their modes of action, such as increasing free amino acid contents and decreasing soluble protein contents. To investigate proteolytic activities upon treatment with Gly and Imx, pea plants grown in hydroponic culture were treated with Imx or Gly, and the proteolytic profile of the roots was evaluated through fluorogenic kinetic assays and activity-based protein profiling. Results Several common changes in proteolytic activity were detected following Gly and Imx treatment. Both herbicides induced the ubiquitin-26 S proteasome system and papain-like cysteine proteases. In contrast, the activities of vacuolar processing enzymes, cysteine proteases and metacaspase 9 were reduced following treatment with both herbicides. Moreover, the activities of several putative serine protease were similarly increased or decreased following treatment with both herbicides. In contrast, an increase in YVADase activity was observed under Imx treatment versus a decrease under Gly treatment. Conclusion These results suggest that several proteolytic pathways are responsible for protein degradation upon herbicide treatment, although the specific role of each proteolytic activity remains to be determined. PMID:24040092

  6. Iron Transformations Induced by an Acid-Tolerant Desulfosporosinus Species

    PubMed Central

    Bertel, Doug; Peck, John; Quick, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    The mineralogical transformations of Fe phases induced by an acid-tolerant, Fe(III)- and sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfosporosinus sp. strain GBSRB4.2 were evaluated under geochemical conditions associated with acid mine drainage-impacted systems (i.e., low pH and high Fe concentrations). X-ray powder diffractometry coupled with magnetic analysis by first-order reversal curve diagrams were used to evaluate mineral phases produced by GBSRB4.2 in media containing different ratios of Fe(II) and Fe(III). In medium containing Fe predominately in the +II oxidation state, ferrimagnetic, single-domain greigite (Fe3S4) was formed, but the addition of Fe(III) inhibited greigite formation. In media that contained abundant Fe(III) [as schwertmannite; Fe8O8(OH)6SO4 · nH2O], the activities of strain GBSRB4.2 enhanced the transformation of schwertmannite to goethite (α-FeOOH), due to the increased pH and Fe(II) concentrations that resulted from the activities of GBSRB4.2. PMID:22038606

  7. Sphingoid bases inhibit acid-induced demineralization of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Valentijn-Benz, Marianne; van 't Hof, Wim; Bikker, Floris J; Nazmi, Kamran; Brand, Henk S; Sotres, Javier; Lindh, Liselott; Arnebrant, Thomas; Veerman, Enno C I

    2015-01-01

    Calcium hydroxyapatite (HAp), the main constituent of dental enamel, is inherently susceptible to the etching and dissolving action of acids, resulting in tooth decay such as dental caries and dental erosion. Since the prevalence of erosive wear is gradually increasing, there is urgent need for agents that protect the enamel against erosive attacks. In the present study we studied in vitro the anti-erosive effects of a number of sphingolipids and sphingoid bases, which form the backbone of sphingolipids. Pretreatment of HAp discs with sphingosine, phytosphingosine (PHS), PHS phosphate and sphinganine significantly protected these against acid-induced demineralization by 80 ± 17%, 78 ± 17%, 78 ± 7% and 81 ± 8%, respectively (p < 0.001). On the other hand, sphingomyelin, acetyl PHS, octanoyl PHS and stearoyl PHS had no anti-erosive effects. Atomic force measurement revealed that HAp discs treated with PHS were almost completely and homogeneously covered by patches of PHS. This suggests that PHS and other sphingoid bases form layers on the surface of HAp, which act as diffusion barriers against H(+) ions. In principle, these anti-erosive properties make PHS and related sphingosines promising and attractive candidates as ingredients in oral care products.

  8. Glycyrrhetinic acid alleviates radiation-induced lung injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinmei; Zhang, Weijian; Zhang, Lurong; Zhang, Jiemin; Chen, Xiuying; Yang, Meichun; Chen, Ting; Hong, Jinsheng

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common complication of thoracic radiotherapy, but efficacious therapy for RILI is lacking. This study ascertained whether glycyrrhetinic acid (GA; a functional hydrolyzed product of glycyrrhizic acid, which is extracted from herb licorice) can protect against RILI and investigated its relationship to the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1/Smads signaling pathway. C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: a control group, a GA group and two irradiation (IR) groups. IR groups were exposed to a single fraction of X-rays (12 Gy) to the thorax and administered normal saline (IR + NS group) or GA (IR + GA group). Two days and 17 days after irradiation, histologic analyses were performed to assess the degree of lung injury, and the expression of TGF-β1, Smad2, Smad3 and Smad7 was recorded. GA administration mitigated the histologic changes of lung injury 2 days and 17 days after irradiation. Protein and mRNA expression of TGF-β1, Smad2 and Smad3, and the mRNA level of Smad7, in lung tissue were significantly elevated after irradiation. GA decreased expression of TGF-β1, Smad2 and Smad3 in lung tissue, but did not increase Smad7 expression. GA can protect against early-stage RILI. This protective effect may be associated with inhibition of the TGF-β1/Smads signaling pathway. PMID:27672101

  9. High dose of ascorbic acid induces cell death in mesothelioma cells.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Yukitoshi; Satoh, Motohiko; Satoh, Kiyotoshi; Hamada, Hironobu; Sekido, Yoshitaka; Kubota, Shunichiro

    2010-04-02

    Malignant mesothelioma is an asbestos-related fatal disease with no effective cure. Recently, high dose of ascorbate in cancer treatment has been reexamined. We studied whether high dose of ascorbic acid induced cell death of four human mesothelioma cell lines. High dose of ascorbic acid induced cell death of all mesothelioma cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. We further clarified the cell killing mechanism that ascorbic acid induced reactive oxygen species and impaired mitochondrial membrane potential. In vivo experiment, intravenous administration of ascorbic acid significantly decreased the growth rate of mesothelioma tumor inoculated in mice. These data suggest that ascorbic acid may have benefits for patients with mesothelioma.

  10. Carbon nanotubes induced gelation of unmodified hyaluronic acid.

    PubMed

    Zamora-Ledezma, Camilo; Buisson, Lionel; Moulton, Simon E; Wallace, Gordon; Zakri, Cécile; Blanc, Christophe; Anglaret, Eric; Poulin, Philippe

    2013-08-13

    This work reports an experimental study of the kinetics and mechanisms of gelation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-hyaluronic acid (HA) mixtures. These materials are of great interest as functional biogels for future medical applications and tissue engineering. We show that CNTs can induce the gelation of noncovalently modified HA in water. This gelation is associated with a dynamical arrest of a liquid crystal phase separation, as shown by small-angle light scattering and polarized optical microscopy. This phenomenon is reminiscent of arrested phase separations in other colloidal systems in the presence of attractive interactions. The gelation time is found to strongly vary with the concentrations of both HA and CNTs. Near-infrared photoluminescence reveals that the CNTs remain individualized both in fluid and in gel states. It is concluded that the attractive forces interplay are likely weak depletion interactions and not strong van der Waals interactions which could promote CNT rebundling, as observed in other biopolymer-CNT mixtures. The present results clarify the remarkable efficiency of CNT at inducing the gelation of HA, by considering that CNTs easily phase separate as liquid crystals because of their giant aspect ratio.

  11. Monomeric Tartrate Resistant Acid Phosphatase Induces Insulin Sensitive Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Lång, Pernilla; van Harmelen, Vanessa; Rydén, Mikael; Kaaman, Maria; Parini, Paolo; Carneheim, Claes; Cassady, A. Ian; Hume, David A.; Andersson, Göran; Arner, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with macrophage infiltration of adipose tissue, which may link adipose inflammation to insulin resistance. However, the impact of inflammatory cells in the pathophysiology of obesity remains unclear. Tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) is an enzyme expressed by subsets of macrophages and osteoclasts that exists either as an enzymatically inactive monomer or as an active, proteolytically processed dimer. Principal Findings Using mice over expressing TRAP, we show that over-expression of monomeric, but not the dimeric form in adipose tissue leads to early onset spontaneous hyperplastic obesity i.e. many small fat cells. In vitro, recombinant monomeric, but not proteolytically processed TRAP induced proliferation and differentiation of mouse and human adipocyte precursor cells. In humans, monomeric TRAP was highly expressed in the adipose tissue of obese individuals. In both the mouse model and in the obese humans the source of TRAP in adipose tissue was macrophages. In addition, the obese TRAP over expressing mice exhibited signs of a low-grade inflammatory reaction in adipose tissue without evidence of abnormal adipocyte lipolysis, lipogenesis or insulin sensitivity. Conclusion Monomeric TRAP, most likely secreted from adipose tissue macrophages, induces hyperplastic obesity with normal adipocyte lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity. PMID:18320034

  12. Activity of vegetative insecticidal proteins Vip3Aa58 and Vip3Aa59 of Bacillus thuringiensis against lepidopteran pests.

    PubMed

    Baranek, Jakub; Kaznowski, Adam; Konecka, Edyta; Naimov, Samir

    2015-09-01

    Vegetative insecticidal proteins (Vips) secreted by some isolates of Bacillus thuringiensis show activity against insects and are regarded as insecticides against pests. A number of B. thuringiensis strains harbouring vip3A genes were isolated from different sources and identified by using a PCR based approach. The isolates with the highest insecticidal activity were indicated in screening tests, and their vip genes were cloned and sequenced. The analysis revealed two polymorphic Vip protein forms, which were classified as Vip3Aa58 and Vip3Aa59. After expression of the vip genes, the proteins were isolated and characterized. The activity of both toxins was estimated against economically important lepidopteran pests of woodlands (Dendrolimus pini), orchards (Cydia pomonella) and field crops (Spodoptera exigua). Vip3Aa58 and Vip3Aa59 were highly toxic and their potency surpassed those of many Cry proteins used in commercial bioinsecticides. Vip3Aa59 revealed similar larvicidal activity as Vip3Aa58 against S. exigua and C. pomonella. Despite 98% similarity of amino acid sequences of both proteins, Vip3Aa59 was significantly more active against D. pini. Additionally the effect of proteolytic activation of Vip58Aa and Vip3Aa59 on toxicity of D. pini and S. exigua was studied. Both Vip3Aa proteins did not show any activity against Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera) larvae. The results suggest that the Vip3Aa58 and Vip3Aa59 toxins might be useful for controlling populations of insect pests of crops and forests.

  13. Monomethylarsonous acid induces transformation of human bladder cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bredfeldt, Tiffany G.; Jagadish, Bhumasamudram; Eblin, Kylee E.; Mash, Eugene A.; Gandolfi, A. Jay . E-mail: gandolfi@pharmacy.arizona.edu

    2006-10-01

    Arsenic is a human bladder carcinogen. Arsenic is methylated to both monomethyl and dimethyl metabolites which have been detected in human urine. The trivalent methylated arsenicals are more toxic than inorganic arsenic. It is unknown if these trivalent methylated metabolites can directly cause malignant transformation in human cells. The goal of this study is determine if monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}) can induce malignant transformation in a human bladder urothelial cell line. To address this goal, a non-tumorigenic human urothelial cell line (UROtsa) was continuously exposed to 0.05 {mu}M MMA{sup III} for 52 weeks. Hyperproliferation was the first phenotypic change observed in exposed UROtsa (URO-MSC). After 12 weeks of exposure, doubling time had decreased from 42 h in unexposed control cells to 27 h in URO-MSC. Hyperproliferation continued to be a quality possessed by the URO-MSC cells after both 24 and 52 weeks of exposure to MMA{sup III}, which had a 40-50% reduction in doubling time. Throughout the 52-week exposure, URO-MSC cells retained an epithelial morphology with subtle morphological differences from control cells. 24 weeks of MMA{sup III} exposure was required to induce anchorage-independent growth as detected by colony formation in soft agar, a characteristic not found in UROtsa cells. To further substantiate that malignant transformation had occurred, URO-MSC cells were tested after 24 and 52 weeks of exposure to MMA{sup III} for the ability to form tumors in SCID mice. Enhanced tumorigenicity in SCID mouse xenografts was observed after 52 weeks of treatment with MMA{sup III}. These observations are the first demonstration of MMA{sup III}-induced malignant transformation in a human bladder urothelial cell line and provide important evidence that MMA{sup III} may be carcinogenic in human tissues.

  14. Zebrafish retinal defects induced by ethanol exposure are rescued by retinoic acid and folic acid supplement

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan, Pooja; Sarmah, Swapnalee; Marrs, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is caused by prenatal alcohol exposure, producing craniofacial, sensory, motor, and cognitive defects. FASD is highly prevalent in low socioeconomic populations, which are frequently accompanied by malnutrition. FASD-associated ocular pathologies include microphthalmia, optic nerve hypoplasia, and cataracts. The present study characterizes specific retinal tissue defects, identifies ethanol-sensitive stages during retinal development, and dissects the effect of nutrient supplements, such as retinoic acid (RA) and folic acid (FA) on ethanol-induced retinal defects. Exposure to pathophysiological concentrations of ethanol (during midblastula transition through somitogenesis; 2–24 hours post fertilization [hpf]) altered critical transcription factor expression involved in retinal cell differentiation, and produced severe retinal ganglion cell, photoreceptor, and Müller glial differentiation defects. Ethanol exposure did not alter retinal cell differentiation induction, but increased retinal cell death and proliferation. RA and FA nutrient co-supplementation rescued retinal photoreceptor and ganglion cell differentiation defects. Ethanol exposure during retinal morphogenesis stages (16–24 hpf) produced retinal defects like those seen with ethanol exposure between 2–24 hpf. Significantly, during an ethanol-sensitive time window (16–24 hpf), RA co-supplementation moderately rescued these defects, whereas FA co-supplementation showed significant rescue of optic nerve and photoreceptor differentiation defects. Interestingly, RA, but not FA, supplementation after ethanol exposure could reverse ethanol-induced optic nerve and photoreceptor differentiation defects. Our results indicate that various ethanol-sensitive events underlie FASD-associated retinal defects. Nutrient supplements like retinoids and folate were effective in alleviating ethanol-induced retinal defects. PMID:25541501

  15. Zebrafish retinal defects induced by ethanol exposure are rescued by retinoic acid and folic acid supplement.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, Pooja; Sarmah, Swapnalee; Marrs, James A

    2015-03-01

    Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is caused by prenatal alcohol exposure, producing craniofacial, sensory, motor, and cognitive defects. FASD is highly prevalent in low socioeconomic populations, which are frequently accompanied by malnutrition. FASD-associated ocular pathologies include microphthalmia, optic nerve hypoplasia, and cataracts. The present study characterizes specific retinal tissue defects, identifies ethanol-sensitive stages during retinal development, and dissects the effect of nutrient supplements, such as retinoic acid (RA) and folic acid (FA) on ethanol-induced retinal defects. Exposure to pathophysiological concentrations of ethanol (during midblastula transition through somitogenesis; 2-24 h post fertilization [hpf]) altered critical transcription factor expression involved in retinal cell differentiation, and produced severe retinal ganglion cell, photoreceptor, and Müller glial differentiation defects. Ethanol exposure did not alter retinal cell differentiation induction, but increased retinal cell death and proliferation. RA and FA nutrient co-supplementation rescued retinal photoreceptor and ganglion cell differentiation defects. Ethanol exposure during retinal morphogenesis stages (16-24 hpf) produced retinal defects like those seen with ethanol exposure between 2 and 24 hpf. Significantly, during an ethanol-sensitive time window (16-24 hpf), RA co-supplementation moderately rescued these defects, whereas FA co-supplementation showed significant rescue of optic nerve and photoreceptor differentiation defects. Interestingly, RA, but not FA, supplementation after ethanol exposure could reverse ethanol-induced optic nerve and photoreceptor differentiation defects. Our results indicate that various ethanol-sensitive events underlie FASD-associated retinal defects. Nutrient supplements like retinoids and folate were effective in alleviating ethanol-induced retinal defects.

  16. Arachidonic acid increases choline acetyltransferase activity in spinal cord neurons through a protein kinase C-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chalimoniuk, Malgorzata; King-Pospisil, Kelley; Pedersen, Ward A; Malecki, Andrzej; Wylegala, Edward; Mattson, Mark P; Hennig, Bernhard; Toborek, Michal

    2004-08-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) plays an important role as a signaling factor in the CNS. Therefore, exposure to AA may affect cholinergic neurons in the spinal cord. To test this hypothesis, mRNA expression and activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) was measured in cultured spinal cord neurons treated with increasing concentrations (0.1-10 microm) of AA. Exposure to AA increased mRNA levels and activity of ChAT in dose- and time-dependent manners. The most marked effect of AA on ChAT expression was observed in spinal cord neurons treated with 10 microm AA for 1 h. To study the mechanisms associated with these effects, ChAT mRNA levels and activity were measured in cultured spinal cord neurons exposed to AA and inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC), such as 1-(5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine dichloride (H-7) and chelerythrine. Inhibition of PKC completely prevented an AA-induced increase in ChAT expression. In addition, exposure of spinal cord neurons to phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), an activator of PKC, mimicked AA-induced stimulation of ChAT activity. The AA-mediated increase in ChAT mRNA levels and activity was also prevented by treatments with EGTA, indicating the role of calcium metabolism in induction of this enzyme. In contrast, treatments with 7-nitroindazole (7-NI, a specific inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase), sodium vanadate (NaV, a non-specific inhibitor of phosphatases), and N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC, an antioxidant) had no effect on AA-induced changes in ChAT activity. The protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide completely blocked AA-mediated increase in ChAT activity. These results indicate that the AA-evoked increase in ChAT activity in spinal cord neurons is mediated by PKC, presumably at the transcriptional level.

  17. Synergistic chondroprotective effect of alpha-tocopherol, ascorbic acid, and selenium as well as glucosamine and chondroitin on oxidant induced cell death and inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-3--studies in cultured chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Graeser, Anne-Christi; Giller, Katri; Wiegand, Heike; Barella, Luca; Boesch Saadatmandi, Christine; Rimbach, Gerald

    2009-12-24

    Overproduction of reactive oxygen species and impaired antioxidant defence accompanied by chronic inflammatory processes may impair joint health. Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) stimulate the expression of metalloproteinases which degrade the extracellular matrix. Little is known regarding the potential synergistic effects of natural compounds such as alpha-tocopherol (alpha-toc), ascorbic acid (AA) and selenium (Se) on oxidant induced cell death. Furthermore studies regarding the metalloproteinase-3 inhibitory activity of glucosamine sulfate (GS) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) are scarce. Therefore we have studied the effect of alpha-toc (0.1-2.5 micromol/L), AA (10-50 micromol/L) and Se (1-50 nmol/L) on t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP, 100-500 micromol/L)-induced cell death in SW1353 chondrocytes. Furthermore we have determined the effect of GS and CS alone (100-500 micromol/L each) and in combination on MMP3 mRNA levels and MMP3 secretion in IL-1beta stimulated chondrocytes. A combination of alpha-toc, AA, and Se was more potent in counteracting t-BHP-induced cytotoxicity as compared to the single compounds. Similarly a combination of CS and GS was more effective in inhibiting MMP3 gene expression and secretion than the single components. The inhibition of MMP3 secretion due to GS plus CS was accompanied by a decrease in TNF-alpha production. Combining natural compounds such as alpha-toc, AA, and Se as well as GS and CS seems to be a promising strategy to combat oxidative stress and cytokine induced matrix degradation in chondrocytes.

  18. Transcript and metabolite alterations increase ganoderic acid content in Ganoderma lucidum using acetic acid as an inducer.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ang; Li, Xiong-Biao; Miao, Zhi-Gang; Shi, Liang; Jaing, Ai-Liang; Zhao, Ming-Wen

    2014-12-01

    Acetic acid at 5-8 mM increased ganoderic acid (GA) accumulation in Ganoderma lucidum. After optimization by the response surface methodology, the GA content reached 5.5/100 mg dry weight, an increase of 105% compared with the control. The intermediate metabolites of GA biosynthesis, lanosterol and squalene also increased to 47 and 15.8 μg/g dry weight, respectively, in response to acetic acid. Acetic acid significantly induced transcription levels of sqs, lano, hmgs and cyp51 in the GA biosynthesis pathway. An acetic acid-unregulated acetyl coenzyme A synthase (acs) gene was selected from ten candidate homologous acs genes. The results indicate that acetic acid alters the expression of genes related to acetic acid assimilation and increases GA biosynthesis and the metabolic levels of lanosterol, squalene and GA-a, thereby resulting in GA accumulation.

  19. Uric acid protects erythrocytes from ozone-induced changes.

    PubMed

    Meadows, J; Smith, R C

    1987-08-01

    Uric acid effectively reduced hemolysis and methemoglobin formation in bovine and swine erythrocytes bubbled with ozone in vitro. In bovine erythrocytes, formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive material was inhibited by uric acid, but there was little immediate protection for the swine cells. Antioxidant protection was due to preferential degradation of the uric acid by ozone. These results provide evidence to support the hypothesis that in plasma, uric acid can provide antioxidant protection for erythrocytes.

  20. Epigenetic modifications in valproic acid-induced teratogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, Emily W.Y.; Winn, Louise M.

    2010-11-01

    Exposure to the anticonvulsant drug valproic acid (VPA) in utero is associated with a 1-2% increase in neural tube defects (NTDs), however the molecular mechanisms by which VPA induces teratogenesis are unknown. Previous studies demonstrated that VPA, a direct inhibitor of histone deacetylase, can induce histone hyperacetylation and other epigenetic changes such as histone methylation and DNA demethylation. The objective of this study was to determine if maternal exposure to VPA in mice has the ability to cause these epigenetic alterations in the embryo and thus contribute to its mechanism of teratogenesis. Pregnant CD-1 mice (GD 9.0) were administered a teratogenic dose of VPA (400 mg/kg, s.c.) and embryos extracted 1, 3, 6, and 24 h after injection. To assess embryonic histone acetylation and histone methylation, Western blotting was performed on whole embryo homogenates, as well as immunohistochemical staining on embryonic sections. To measure DNA methylation changes, the cytosine extension assay was performed. Results demonstrated that a significant increase in histone acetylation that peaked 3 h after VPA exposure was accompanied by an increase in histone methylation at histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) and a decrease in histone methylation at histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9). Immunohistochemical staining revealed increased histone acetylation in the neuroepithelium, heart, and somites. A decrease in methylated histone H3K9 staining was observed in the neuroepithelium and somites, METHYLATED histone H3K4 staining was observed in the neuroepithelium. No significant differences in global or CpG island DNA methylation were observed in embryo homogenates. These results support the possibility that epigenetic modifications caused by VPA during early mouse organogenesis results in congenital malformations.

  1. Epigenetic modifications in valproic acid-induced teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tung, Emily W Y; Winn, Louise M

    2010-11-01

    Exposure to the anticonvulsant drug valproic acid (VPA) in utero is associated with a 1-2% increase in neural tube defects (NTDs), however the molecular mechanisms by which VPA induces teratogenesis are unknown. Previous studies demonstrated that VPA, a direct inhibitor of histone deacetylase, can induce histone hyperacetylation and other epigenetic changes such as histone methylation and DNA demethylation. The objective of this study was to determine if maternal exposure to VPA in mice has the ability to cause these epigenetic alterations in the embryo and thus contribute to its mechanism of teratogenesis. Pregnant CD-1 mice (GD 9.0) were administered a teratogenic dose of VPA (400mg/kg, s.c.) and embryos extracted 1, 3, 6, and 24h after injection. To assess embryonic histone acetylation and histone methylation, Western blotting was performed on whole embryo homogenates, as well as immunohistochemical staining on embryonic sections. To measure DNA methylation changes, the cytosine extension assay was performed. Results demonstrated that a significant increase in histone acetylation that peaked 3h after VPA exposure was accompanied by an increase in histone methylation at histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) and a decrease in histone methylation at histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9). Immunohistochemical staining revealed increased histone acetylation in the neuroepithelium, heart, and somites. A decrease in methylated histone H3K9 staining was observed in the neuroepithelium and somites, METHYLATED histone H3K4 staining was observed in the neuroepithelium. No significant differences in global or CpG island DNA methylation were observed in embryo homogenates. These results support the possibility that epigenetic modifications caused by VPA during early mouse organogenesis results in congenital malformations.

  2. Viewpoints on Acid-Induced Inflammatory Mediators in Esophageal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Harnett, Karen M; Rieder, Florian; Behar, Jose

    2010-01-01

    We have focused on understanding the onset of gastroesophageal reflux disease by examining the mucosal response to the presence of acid in the esophageal lumen. Upon exposure to HCl, inflammation of the esophagus begins with activation of the transient receptor potential channel vanilloid subfamily member-1 (TRPV1) in the mucosa, and production of IL-8, substance P (SP), calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) and platelet activating factor (PAF). Production of SP and CGRP, but not PAF, is abolished by the neural blocker tetrodotoxin suggesting that SP and CGRP are neurally released and that PAF arises from non neural pathways. Epithelial cells contain TRPV1 receptor mRNA and protein and respond to HCl and to the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin with production of PAF. PAF, SP and IL-8 act as chemokines, inducing migration of peripheral blood leukocytes. PAF and SP activate peripheral blood leukocytes inducing the production of H2O2. In circular muscle, PAF causes production of IL-6, and IL-6 causes production of additional H2O2, through activation of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases. Among these, NADPH oxidase 5 cDNA is significantly up-regulated by exposure to PAF; H2O2 content of esophageal and lower esophageal sphincter circular muscle is elevated in human esophagitis, causing dysfunction of esophageal circular muscle contraction and reduction in esophageal sphincter tone. Thus esophageal keratinocytes, that constitute the first barrier to the refluxate, may also serve as the initiating cell type in esophageal inflammation, secreting inflammatory mediators and pro-inflammatory cytokines and affecting leukocyte recruitment and activity. PMID:21103419

  3. In vitro gastrointestinal digestion promotes the protective effect of blackberry extract against acrylamide-induced oxidative stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Su, Hongming; Xu, Yang; Jin, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Acrylamide (AA)-induced toxicity has been associated with accumulation of excessive reactive oxygen species. The present study was therefore undertaken to investigate the protective effect of blackberry digests produced after (BBD) in vitro gastrointestinal (GI) digestion against AA-induced oxidative damage. The results indicated that the BBD (0.5 mg/mL) pretreatment significantly suppressed AA-induced intracellular ROS generation (56.6 ± 2.9% of AA treatment), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) decrease (297 ± 18% of AA treatment) and glutathione (GSH) depletion (307 ± 23% of AA treatment), thereby ameliorating cytotoxicity. Furthermore, LC/MS/MS analysis identified eight phenolic compounds with high contents in BBD, including ellagic acid, ellagic acid pentoside, ellagic acid glucuronoside, methyl-ellagic acid pentoside, methyl-ellagic acid glucuronoside, cyanidin glucoside, gallic acid and galloyl esters, as primary active compounds responsible for antioxidant action. Collectively, our study uncovered that the protective effect of blackberry was reserved after gastrointestinal digestion in combating exogenous pollutant-induced oxidative stress.

  4. In vitro gastrointestinal digestion promotes the protective effect of blackberry extract against acrylamide-induced oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Su, Hongming; Xu, Yang; Jin, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Acrylamide (AA)-induced toxicity has been associated with accumulation of excessive reactive oxygen species. The present study was therefore undertaken to investigate the protective effect of blackberry digests produced after (BBD) in vitro gastrointestinal (GI) digestion against AA-induced oxidative damage. The results indicated that the BBD (0.5 mg/mL) pretreatment significantly suppressed AA-induced intracellular ROS generation (56.6 ± 2.9% of AA treatment), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) decrease (297 ± 18% of AA treatment) and glutathione (GSH) depletion (307 ± 23% of AA treatment), thereby ameliorating cytotoxicity. Furthermore, LC/MS/MS analysis identified eight phenolic compounds with high contents in BBD, including ellagic acid, ellagic acid pentoside, ellagic acid glucuronoside, methyl-ellagic acid pentoside, methyl-ellagic acid glucuronoside, cyanidin glucoside, gallic acid and galloyl esters, as primary active compounds responsible for antioxidant action. Collectively, our study uncovered that the protective effect of blackberry was reserved after gastrointestinal digestion in combating exogenous pollutant-induced oxidative stress. PMID:28084406

  5. Protective Effects of Norursodeoxycholic Acid Versus Ursodeoxycholic Acid on Thioacetamide-induced Rat Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Buko, Vyacheslav U.; Lukivskaya, Oxana Y.; Naruta, Elena E.; Belonovskaya, Elena B.; Tauschel, Horst-Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Background/objectives Effects of norursodeoxycholic acid (norUDCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) on liver fibrosis progression and liver fibrosis reversal in thioacetamide (TAA)-treated rats were studied. Methods Advanced liver fibrosis was induced by TAA treatment (200 mg/kg, i.p.) for 12 weeks. In the second experiment resolution of liver fibrosis was assessed after 8 weeks of TAA withdrawal. During 8 last weeks of each trial, fibrotic rats were daily administered with UDCA (80 mg/kg) and norUDCA (equimolar to 80 mg/kg of UDCA) by oral gavage. Liver fibrosis was assessed by Sirius red staining, liver hydroxyproline and serum fibrosis markers determination. Results The TAA treatment resulted in advanced fibrosis and increase in liver hydroxyproline content and serum fibrosis markers. These signs of fibrosis were less pronounced in rats after TAA withdrawal. Treatment with of norUDCA significantly decreased the total and relative liver hydroxyproline contents in rats with fibrosis reversal, whereas UDCA did not change these parameters. Both compounds decreased serum TGFβ and type IV collagen contents, whereas other serum markers did not differ from the placebo group. In the fibrosis progression model the square of connective tissue was decreased by norUDCA. Serum type IV collagen and procollagen III-NT contents in these experiments were lowered by both UDCA and norUDCA, whereas rest of serum fibrosis markers were diminished only by norUDCA. Conclusions Both norUDCA and UDCA showed therapeutic and prophylactic antifibrotic effect in rats with TAA-induced liver fibrosis. For most of tested parameters norUDCA was more effective than UDCA, especially in the experiment with liver fibrosis regression. PMID:25755576

  6. Stability of sublethal acid stress adaptaion and induced cross protection against lauric arginate in Listeria monocytogenes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The stability of acid stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes and its induced cross protection effect against GRAS (generally recognized as safe) antimicrobial compounds has never been investigated before. In the present study, the acid stress adaptation in L. monocytogenes was initially induced...

  7. Design and construction of a synthetic Bacillus thuringiensis Cry4Aa gene: hyperexpression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Tohru; Howlader, Mohammad Tofazzal Hossain; Yamagiwa, Masashi; Sakai, Hiroshi

    2008-10-01

    Cry4Aa produced by Bacillus thuringiensis is a dipteran-specific toxin and is, therefore, of great interest for developing a bioinsecticide to control mosquitoes. However, the expression of Cry4Aa in Escherichia coli is relatively low, which is a major disadvantage in its development as a bioinsecticide. In this study, to establish an effective production system, a 1,914-bp modified gene (cry4Aa-S1) encoding Cry4Aa was designed and synthesized in accordance with the G + C content and codon preference of E. coli genes without altering the encoded amino acid sequence. The cry4Aa-S1 gene allowed a significant improvement in expression level, over five-fold, compared to that of the original cry4Aa gene. The product of the cry4Aa-S1 gene showed the same level of insecticidal activity against Culex pipiens larvae as that from cry4Aa. This suggested that unfavorable codon usage was one of the reasons for poor expression of cry4Aa in E. coli, and, therefore, changing the cry4Aa codons to accord with the codon usage in E. coli led to efficient production of Cry4Aa. Efficient production of Cry4Aa in E. coli can be a powerful measure to prepare a sufficient amount of Cry4Aa protein for both basic analytical and applied researches.

  8. Therapeutic potential of quercetin against acrylamide induced toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Uthra, Chhavi; Shrivastava, Sadhana; Jaswal, Amita; Sinha, Neelu; Reshi, Mohd Salim; Shukla, Sangeeta

    2017-02-01

    Acrylamide (AA) is found in foods containing carbohydrates and proteins, where it is formed during the heating process. It is classified as neurotoxic and probably carcinogenic to humans. The present investigation was aimed to determine the lethal Dose (LD50) of AA and to evaluate the protective effects of quercetin (QE) against AA induced adverse effects in rats. For the determination of LD50, AA was administered orally at four different doses (46.4mg/kg, 100mg/kg, 215mg/kg and 464mg/kg) to experimental animals for seven days. After 7days LD50 of AA was determined using graphical method of Miller and Tainter. Then AA was administered at 1/3rd dose of LD50 (38.27mgkg(-1) body weight; p.o. for 10 days) followed by the therapy of QE (5, 10, 20 and 40mg kg(-1) orally), for 3 consecutive days for the determination of protective effect of QE against AA. The estimated LD50 of AA was 114.81mg/kg with 95% confidence interval. Exposure to AA 1/3rd dose of LD50 for 10days induced neurotoxicity which was confirmed by decreased acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. AA substantially increased lipid peroxidation (LPO), decreased the level of reduced glutathione (GSH) and antioxidant enzymes (SOD and CAT) in liver, kidney and brain. It also increased the activities of serum transaminases, urea, uric acid, creatinine, lipid profile, bilirubin in serum. Treatment with QE restored tissue and serological indices concomitantly towards normal levels. These results revealed that QE is able to significantly alleviate the toxicity induced by AA in rats.

  9. Yeast genes involved in response to lactic acid and acetic acid: acidic conditions caused by the organic acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultures induce expression of intracellular metal metabolism genes regulated by Aft1p.

    PubMed

    Kawahata, Miho; Masaki, Kazuo; Fujii, Tsutomu; Iefuji, Haruyuki

    2006-09-01

    Using two types of genome-wide analysis to investigate yeast genes involved in response to lactic acid and acetic acid, we found that the acidic condition affects metal metabolism. The first type is an expression analysis using DNA microarrays to investigate 'acid shock response' as the first step to adapt to an acidic condition, and 'acid adaptation' by maintaining integrity in the acidic condition. The other is a functional screening using the nonessential genes deletion collection of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The expression analysis showed that genes involved in stress response, such as YGP1, TPS1 and HSP150, were induced under the acid shock response. Genes such as FIT2, ARN1 and ARN2, involved in metal metabolism regulated by Aft1p, were induced under the acid adaptation. AFT1 was induced under acid shock response and under acid adaptation with lactic acid. Moreover, green fluorescent protein-fused Aft1p was localized to the nucleus in cells grown in media containing lactic acid, acetic acid, or hydrochloric acid. Both analyses suggested that the acidic condition affects cell wall architecture. The depletion of cell-wall components encoded by SED1, DSE2, CTS1, EGT2, SCW11, SUN4 and YNL300W and histone acetyltransferase complex proteins encoded by YID21, EAF3, EAF5, EAF6 and YAF9 increased resistance to lactic acid. Depletion of the cell-wall mannoprotein Sed1p provided resistance to lactic acid, although the expression of SED1 was induced by exposure to lactic acid. Depletion of vacuolar membrane H+-ATPase and high-osmolarity glycerol mitogen-activated protein kinase proteins caused acid sensitivity. Moreover, our quantitative PCR showed that expression of PDR12 increased under acid shock response with lactic acid and decreased under acid adaptation with hydrochloric acid.

  10. Single amino acid insertions in extracellular loop 2 of Bombyx mori ABCC2 disrupt its receptor function for Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac but not Cry1Aa toxins.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shiho; Miyamoto, Kazuhisa; Noda, Hiroaki; Endo, Haruka; Kikuta, Shingo; Sato, Ryoichi

    2016-04-01

    In a previous report, seven Cry1Ab-resistant strains were identified in the silkworm, Bombyx mori; these strains were shown to have a tyrosine insertion at position 234 in extracellular loop 2 of the ABC transporter C2 (BmABCC2). This insertion was confirmed to destroy the receptor function of BmABCC2 and confer the strains resistance against Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac. However, these strains were susceptible to Cry1Aa. In this report, we examined the mechanisms of the loss of receptor function of the transporter by expressing mutations in Sf9 cells. After replacement of one or two of the five amino acid residues in loop 2 of the susceptible BmABCC2 gene [BmABCC2_S] with alanine, cells still showed susceptibility, retaining the receptor function. Five mutants with single amino acid insertions at position 234 in BmABCC2 were also generated, resulting in loop 2 having six amino acids, which corresponds to replacing the tyrosine insertion in the resistant BmABCC2 gene [BmABCC2_R(+(234)Y)] with another amino acid. All five mutants exhibited loss of function against Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac. These results suggest that the amino acid sequence in loop 2 is less important than the loop size (five vs. six amino acids) or loop structure for Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac activity. Several domain-swapped mutant toxins were then generated among Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Ac, which are composed of three domains. Swapped mutants containing domain II of Cry1Ab or Cry1Ac did not kill Sf9 cells expressing BmABCC2_R(+(234)Y), suggesting that domain II of the Cry toxin is related to the interaction with the receptor function of BmABCC2. This also suggests that different reactions against Bt-toxins in some B. mori strains, that is, Cry1Ab resistance or Cry1Aa susceptibility, are attributable to structural differences in domain II of Cry1A toxins.

  11. Soybean Aphid Infestation Induces Changes in Fatty Acid Metabolism in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Kanobe, Charles; McCarville, Michael T.; O’Neal, Matthew E.; Tylka, Gregory L.; MacIntosh, Gustavo C.

    2015-01-01

    The soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) is one of the most important insect pests of soybeans in the North-central region of the US. It has been hypothesized that aphids avoid effective defenses by inhibition of jasmonate-regulated plant responses. Given the role fatty acids play in jasmonate-induced plant defenses, we analyzed the fatty acid profile of soybean leaves and seeds from aphid-infested plants. Aphid infestation reduced levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids in leaves with a concomitant increase in palmitic acid. In seeds, a reduction in polyunsaturated fatty acids was associated with an increase in stearic acid and oleic acid. Soybean plants challenged with the brown stem rot fungus or with soybean cyst nematodes did not present changes in fatty acid levels in leaves or seeds, indicating that the changes induced by aphids are not a general response to pests. One of the polyunsaturated fatty acids, linolenic acid, is the precursor of jasmonate; thus, these changes in fatty acid metabolism may be examples of “metabolic hijacking” by the aphid to avoid the induction of effective defenses. Based on the changes in fatty acid levels observed in seeds and leaves, we hypothesize that aphids potentially induce interference in the fatty acid desaturation pathway, likely reducing FAD2 and FAD6 activity that leads to a reduction in polyunsaturated fatty acids. Our data support the idea that aphids block jasmonate-dependent defenses by reduction of the hormone precursor. PMID:26684003

  12. DL-beta-aminobutyric acid-induced resistance of potato against Phytophthora infestans requires salicylic acid but not oxylipins.

    PubMed

    Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Altmann, Simone; Rosahl, Sabine

    2010-05-01

    Inducing systemic resistance responses in crop plants is a promising alternative way of disease management. To understand the underlying signaling events leading to induced resistance, functional analyses of plants defective in defined signaling pathway steps are required. We used potato, one of the economically most-important crop plants worldwide, to examine systemic resistance against the devastating late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans, induced by treatment with dl-beta-aminobutyric acid (BABA). Transgenic plants impaired in either the 9-lipoxygenase pathway, which produces defense-related compounds, or the 13-lipoxygenase pathway, which generates jasmonic acid-derived signals, expressed wild-type levels of BABA-induced resistance. Plants incapable of accumulating salicylic acid (SA), on the other hand, failed to mount this type of induced resistance. Consistently, treatment of these plants with the SA analog 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid restored BABA-induced resistance. Together, these results demonstrate the indispensability of a functional SA pathway for systemic resistance in potato induced by BABA.

  13. Ameliorative effects of phycocyanin against gibberellic acid induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Mohamed M A; Ali, Haytham A; Ahmed, Mona M

    2015-03-01

    Gibberellic acid (GA3) was used extensively unaware in agriculture in spite of its dangerous effects on human health. The current study was designed to investigate the ameliorative effects of the co-administration of phycocyanin with GA3 induced oxidative stress and histopathological changes in the liver. Forty male albino rats were randomly divided into four groups. Group I (control group) received normal saline for 6 weeks, Group II (GA3 treated group) received 3.85 mg/kg body weight GA3 once daily for 6 weeks, Group III (phycocyanin treated group) received Phycocyanin 200 mg/kg body weight/day for 6 weeks orally dissolved in distilled water and Group IV was treated with GA3 and phycocyanin at the same doses as groups 2 and 3. All treatments were given daily using intra-gastric intubation and continued for 6 weeks. Our results revealed significant downregulation of antioxidant enzyme activities and their mRNA levels (CAT, GPx and Cu-Zn, SOD) with marked elevation of liver enzymes and extensive fibrous connective tissue deposition with large biliary cells in hepatic tissue of GA3 treated rats, while treatment with phycocyanin improved the antioxidant defense system, liver enzymes and structural hepatocytes recovery in phycocyanin treated group with GA3. These data confirm the antioxidant potential of Phycocyanin and provide strong evidence to support the co-administration of Phycocyanin during using GA3.

  14. Retinoic acid from retinal pigment epithelium induces T regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Kawazoe, Yuko; Sugita, Sunao; Keino, Hiroshi; Yamada, Yukiko; Imai, Ayano; Horie, Shintaro; Mochizuki, Manabu

    2012-01-01

    Primary cultured retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells can convert T cells into T regulatory cells (Tregs) through inhibitory factor(s) including transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) in vitro. Retinoic acid (RA) enhances induction of CD4(+) Tregs in the presence of TGFβ. We investigated whether RA produced by RPE cells can promote generation of Tregs. We found that in vitro, RA-treated T cells expressed high levels of Foxp3 in the presence of recombinant TGFβ. In GeneChip analysis, cultured RPE cells constitutively expressed RA-associated molecules such as RA-binding proteins, enzymes, and receptors. RPE from normal mice, but not vitamin A-deficient mice, contained significant levels of TGFβ. RPE-induced Tregs from vitamin A-deficient mice failed to suppress activation of target T cells. Only a few Foxp3(+) T cells were found in intraocular cells from vitamin A-deficient experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) mice, whereas expression was higher in cells from normal EAU mice. RA receptor antagonist-pretreated or RA-binding protein-siRNA-transfected RPE cells failed to convert CD4(+) T cells into Tregs. Our data support the hypothesis that RPE cells produce RA, thereby enabling bystander T cells to be converted into Tregs through TGFβ promotion, which can then participate in the establishment of immune tolerance in the eye.

  15. Lysophosphatidic acid induced red blood cell aggregation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kaestner, Lars; Steffen, Patrick; Nguyen, Duc Bach; Wang, Jue; Wagner-Britz, Lisa; Jung, Achim; Wagner, Christian; Bernhardt, Ingolf

    2012-10-01

    Under physiological conditions healthy RBCs do not adhere to each other. There are indications that RBCs display an intercellular adhesion under certain (pathophysiological) conditions. Therefore we investigated signaling steps starting with transmembrane calcium transport by means of calcium imaging. We found a lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) concentration dependent calcium influx with an EC(50) of 5 μM LPA. Downstream signaling was investigated by flow cytometry as well as by video-imaging comparing LPA induced with "pure" calcium mediated phosphatidylserine exposure and concluded the coexistence of two branches of the signaling pathway. Finally we performed force measurements with holographic optical tweezers (HOT): The intercellular adhesion of RBCs (aggregation) exceeds a force of 25 pN. These results support (i) earlier data of a RBC associated component in thrombotic events under certain pathophysiological conditions and (ii) the concept to use RBCs in studies of cellular adhesion behavior, especially in combination with HOT. The latter paves the way to use RBCs as model cells to investigate molecular regulation of cellular adhesion processes.

  16. Retinoic acid induces TGFbeta-dependent autocrine fibroblast growth.

    PubMed

    Fadloun, A; Kobi, D; Delacroix, L; Dembélé, D; Michel, I; Lardenois, A; Tisserand, J; Losson, R; Mengus, G; Davidson, I

    2008-01-17

    To evaluate the role of murine TFIID subunit TAF4 in activation of cellular genes by all-trans retinoic acid (T-RA), we have characterized the T-RA response of taf4(lox/-) and taf4(-/-) embryonic fibroblasts. T-RA regulates almost 1000 genes in taf4(lox/-) cells, but less than 300 in taf4(-/-) cells showing that TAF4 is required for T-RA regulation of most, but not all cellular genes. We further show that T-RA-treated taf4(lox/-) cells exhibit transforming growth factor (TGF)beta-dependent autocrine growth and identify a set of genes regulated by loss of TAF4 and by T-RA corresponding to key mediators of the TGFbeta signalling pathway. T-RA rapidly and potently induces expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) via a conserved DR2 type response element in its proximal promoter leading to serum-free autocrine growth. These results highlight the role of TAF4 as a cofactor in the cellular response to T-RA and identify the genetic programme of a novel cross talk between the T-RA and TGFbeta pathways that leads to deregulated cell growth.

  17. Acerola (Malpighia emarginata DC.) Juice Intake Suppresses UVB-Induced Skin Pigmentation in SMP30/GNL Knockout Hairless Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yasunori; Uchida, Eriko; Aoki, Hitoshi; Hanamura, Takayuki; Nagamine, Kenichi; Kato, Hisanori; Koizumi, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Acerola (Malpighia emarginata DC.) is a fruit that is known to contain high amounts of ascorbic acid (AA) and various phytochemicals. We have previously reported that AA deficiency leads to ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced skin pigmentation in senescence marker protein 30 (SMP30)/gluconolactonase (GNL) knockout (KO) hairless mice. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of acerola juice (AJ) intake on the skin of UVB-irradiated SMP30/GNL KO mice. Research design/Principal findings Five-week old hairless mice were given drinking water containing physiologically sufficient AA (1.5 g/L) [AA (+)], no AA [AA (-)] or 1.67% acerola juice [AJ]. All mice were exposed to UVB irradiation for 6 weeks. UVB irradiation was performed three times per week. The dorsal skin color and stratum corneum water content were measured every weekly, and finally, the AA contents of the skin was determined. The skin AA and stratum corneum water content was similar between the AA (+) and AJ groups. The L* value of the AA (+) group was significantly decreased by UVB irradiation, whereas AJ intake suppressed the decrease in the L* value throughout the experiment. Moreover, in the AJ group, there was a significant decrease in the expression level of dopachrome tautomerase, an enzyme that is involved in melanin biosynthesis. Conclusion These results indicate that AJ intake is effective in suppressing UVB-induced skin pigmentation by inhibiting melanogenesis-related genes. PMID:28114343

  18. SVCT-2 determines the sensitivity to ascorbate-induced cell death in cholangiocarcinoma cell lines and patient derived xenografts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changzheng; Lv, Hongwei; Yang, Wen; Li, Ting; Fang, Tian; Lv, Guishuai; Han, Qin; Dong, Liwei; Jiang, Tianyi; Jiang, Beige; Yang, Guangshun; Wang, Hongyang

    2017-04-04

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CC) is a devastating malignancy with late diagnosis and poor response to conventional chemotherapy. Recent studies have revealed anti-cancer effect of vitamin C (l-ascorbic acid, ascorbate) in several types of cancer. However, the effect of l-ascorbic acid (AA) in CC remains elusive. Herein, we demonstrated that AA induced cytotoxicity in CC cells by generating intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and subsequently DNA damage, ATP depletion, mTOR pathway inhibition. Moreover, AA worked synergistically with chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin to impair CC cells growth both in vitro and in vivo. Intriguingly, sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT-2) expression was inversely correlated with IC50 values of AA. Knockdown of SVCT-2 dramatically alleviated DNA damage, ATP depletion, and inhibition of mTOR pathway induced by AA. Furthermore, SVCT-2 knockdown endowed CC cells with the resistance to AA treatment. Finally, the inhibitory effects of AA were further confirmed in patient-derived CC xenograft models. Thus, our results unravel therapeutic potential of AA alone or in combination with cisplatin for CC. SVCT2 expression level may serve as a positive outcome predictor for AA treatment in CC.

  19. Inducible 70 kDa Heat Shock Proteins Protect Embryos from Teratogen-Induced Exencephaly: Analysis using Hspa1a/a1b Knockout Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: It is well known that a variety of teratogens induce neural tube defects in animals; however, less is known about proteins that play a role in protecting embryos from teratogen-induced neural tube defects. Previously, our lab has shown that embryos over-expressing th...

  20. Acetic acid in aged vinegar affects molecular targets for thrombus disease management.

    PubMed

    Jing, Li; Yanyan, Zhang; Junfeng, Fan

    2015-08-01

    To elucidate the mechanism underlying the action of dietary vinegar on antithrombotic activity, acetic acid, the main acidic component of dietary vinegar, was used to determine antiplatelet and fibrinolytic activity. The results revealed that acetic acid significantly inhibits adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-, collagen-, thrombin-, and arachidonic acid (AA)-induced platelet aggregation. Acetic acid (2.00 mM) reduced AA-induced platelet aggregation to approximately 36.82 ± 1.31%, and vinegar (0.12 mL L(-1)) reduced the platelet aggregation induced by AA to 30.25 ± 1.34%. Further studies revealed that acetic acid exerts its effects by inhibiting cyclooxygenase-1 and the formation of thromboxane-A2. Organic acids including acetic acid, formic acid, lactic acid, citric acid, and malic acid also showed fibrinolytic activity; specifically, the fibrinolytic activity of acetic acid amounted to 1.866 IU urokinase per mL. Acetic acid exerted its fibrinolytic activity by activating plasminogen during fibrin crossing, thus leading to crosslinked fibrin degradation by the activated plasmin. These results suggest that organic acids in dietary vinegar play important roles in the prevention and cure of cardiovascular diseases.

  1. Anti-inflammatory effect of Helichrysum oligocephalum DC extract on acetic acidInduced acute colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Minaiyan, Mohsen; Ghassemi-Dehkordi, Nasrollah; Mahzouni, Parvin; Ahmadi, Najme-Sadat

    2014-01-01

    Background: Helichrysum oligocephalum DC. from Asteraceae family is an endemic plant growing wild in Iran. This study was carried out to investigate the effect of H. oligocephalum hydroalcoholic extract (HOHE) on ulcerative colitis (UC) induced by acetic acid (AA) in rats. Materials and Methods: Rats were grouped (n = 6) and fasted for 24 h before colitis induction. Treatments were started 2 h before the induction of colitis and continued for two consecutive days with different doses of HOHE (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg) orally (p.o.) and intraperitoneally (i.p.). The colon tissue was removed and tissue damages were scored after macroscopic and histopathologic assessments. Results: Among the examined doses of HOHE, 100 mg/kg was the most effective dose that reduced the extent of UC lesions and resulted in significant alleviation. Weight/length ratio as an index of tissue inflammation and extravasation was also diminished in the treatment group administered HOHE at a dose of 100 mg/kg, and the results showed correlation with macroscopic and histopathologic evaluations. These data suggest that HOHE (100 mg/kg) administered either p.o. or i.p. was effective in diminishing inflammation and ulcer indices in this murine model of acute colitis in a non–dose-related manner. Conclusions: H. oligocephalum could be considered as a suitable anticolitis alternative; however, further studies are needed to support this hypothesis for clinical setting. PMID:24761395

  2. Microbially induced organic acid underdeposit attack in a gas pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Dias, O.C.; Bromel, M.C. )

    1990-04-01

    A leaking undersea carbon-steel gas pipeline was investigated, and attack was confined to low areas where water had accumulated.Analyses showed that pitting, which occurred under deposits, was caused by organic acids generated by bacteria. The metabolic activities of anaerobic sporeformers produce these acids. Alkyl amine carboxylic acid and metronidizole were effective deterrents at low concentrations.

  3. Fatty acid regulates gene expression and growth of human prostate cancer PC-3 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Chen, Y.; Tjandrawinata, R. R.

    2001-01-01

    It has been proposed that the omega-6 fatty acids increase the rate of tumor growth. Here we test that hypothesis in the PC-3 human prostate tumor. We found that the essential fatty acids, linoleic acid (LA) and arachidonic acid (AA), and the AA metabolite PGE(2) stimulate tumor growth while oleic acid (OA) and the omega-3 fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) inhibited growth. In examining the role of AA in growth response, we extended our studies to analyze changes in early gene expression induced by AA. We demonstrate that c-fos expression is increased within minutes of addition in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the immediate early gene cox-2 is also increased in the presence of AA in a dose-dependent manner, while the constitutive cox-1 message was not increased. Three hours after exposure to AA, the synthesis of PGE(2) via COX-2 was also increased. Previous studies have demonstrated that AA was primarily delivered by low density lipoprotein (LDL) via its receptor (LDLr). Since it is known that hepatomas, acute myelogenous leukemia and colorectal tumors lack normal cholesterol feedback, we examined the role of the LDLr in growth regulation of the PC-3 prostate cancer cells. Analysis of ldlr mRNA expression and LDLr function demonstrated that human PC-3 prostate cancer cells lack normal feedback regulation. While exogenous LDL caused a significant stimulation of cell growth and PGE(2) synthesis, no change was seen in regulation of the LDLr by LDL. Taken together, these data show that normal cholesterol feedback of ldlr message and protein is lost in prostate cancer. These data suggest that unregulated over-expression of LDLr in tumor cells would permit increased availability of AA, which induces immediate early genes c-fos and cox-2 within minutes of uptake.

  4. Molecular characterization of the acid-inducible asr gene of Escherichia coli and its role in acid stress response.

    PubMed

    Seputiene, Vaida; Motiejūnas, Domantas; Suziedelis, Kestutis; Tomenius, Henrik; Normark, Staffan; Melefors, Ojar; Suziedeliene, Edita

    2003-04-01

    Enterobacteria have developed numerous constitutive and inducible strategies to sense and adapt to an external acidity. These molecular responses require dozens of specific acid shock proteins (ASPs), as shown by genomic and proteomic analysis. Most of the ASPs remain poorly characterized, and their role in the acid response and survival is unknown. We recently identified an Escherichia coli gene, asr (acid shock RNA), encoding a protein of unknown function, which is strongly induced by high environmental acidity (pH < 5.0). We show here that Asr is required for growth at moderate acidity (pH 4.5) as well as for the induction of acid tolerance at moderate acidity, as shown by its ability to survive subsequent transfer to extreme acidity (pH 2.0). Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western analysis of acid-shocked E. coli cells harboring a plasmid-borne asr gene demonstrated that the Asr protein is synthesized as a precursor with an apparent molecular mass of 18 kDa. Mutational studies of the asr gene also demonstrated the Asr preprotein contains 102 amino acids. This protein is subjected to an N-terminal cleavage of the signal peptide and a second processing event, yielding 15- and 8-kDa products, respectively. Only the 8-kDa polypeptide was detected in acid-shocked cells containing only the chromosomal copy of the asr gene. N-terminal sequencing and site-directed mutagenesis revealed the two processing sites in the Asr protein precursor. Deletion of amino acids encompassing the processing site required for release of the 8-kDa protein resulted in an acid-sensitive phenotype similar to that observed for the asr null mutant, suggesting that the 8-kDa product plays an important role in the adaptation to acid shock. Analysis of Asr:PhoA fusions demonstrated a periplasmic location for the Asr protein after removal of the signal peptide. Homologues of the asr gene from other Enterobacteriaceae were cloned and shown to be induced in E. coli

  5. LIMB DEFECTS INDUCED BY RETINOIC ACID SIGNALING ANTAGONISM AND SYNTHESIS INHIBITION ARE CONSISTENT WITH ETHANOL-INDUCED LIMB DEFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Limb defects induced by retinoic acid signaling antagonism and synthesis inhibition are consistent with ethanol-induced limb defects

    Johnson CS1, Sulik KK1,2, Hunter, ES III3
    1Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC....

  6. Increased production of γ-lactones from hydroxy fatty acids by whole Waltomyces lipofer cells induced with oleic acid.

    PubMed

    An, Jung-Ung; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2013-09-01

    Among several fatty acids tested, oleic acid was selected as the most efficient inducer for the production of 4-hydroxydodecanoic acid, a metabolite of β-oxidation, by Waltomyces lipofer. Cells were induced by incubation for 12 h in a medium containing 10 g l(-1) yeast extract, 10 g l(-1) peptone, 5 g l(-1) oleic acid, 1 g l(-1) glucose, and 0.05 % (w/v) Tween 80. The optimal reaction conditions for the production of γ-lactones by induced cells were pH 6.5, 35 °C, 200 rpm, 0.71 M Tris, 60 g l(-1) hydroxy fatty acid, and 20 g l(-1) cells. Non-induced cells produced 38 g l(-1) γ-dodecalactone from 60 g l(-1) 10-hydroxystearic acid after 30 h, with a conversion yield of 63 % (w/w) and a productivity of 1.3 g l(-1) h(-1) under the optimized conditions, whereas induced cells produced 51 g l(-1) γ-dodecalactone from 60 g l(-1) 10-hydroxystearic acid after 30 h, with a conversion yield of 85 % (w/w) and a productivity of 1.7 g l(-1) h(-1). The conversion yield and productivity of induced cells were 22 % and 1.3-fold higher, respectively, than those of non-induced cells. Induced cells also produced 28 g l(-1) γ-decalactone and 12 g l(-1) γ-butyrolactone from 60 g l(-1) 12-hydroxystearic acid and 60 g l(-1) 10-hydroxydecanoic acid, respectively, after 30 h. The concentration, conversion yield, and productivity of γ-dodecalactone and γ-decalactone are the highest reported thus far. This is the first study on the biotechnological production of γ-butyrolactone.

  7. Role of Ingested Amino Acids and Protein in the Promotion of Resistance Exercise–Induced Muscle Protein Anabolism123

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Blake B

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this critical review is to comprehensively assess the evidence for the molecular, physiologic, and phenotypic skeletal muscle responses to resistance exercise (RE) combined with the nutritional intervention of protein and/or amino acid (AA) ingestion in young adults. We gathered the literature regarding the translational response in human skeletal muscle to acute exposure to RE and protein/AA supplements and the literature describing the phenotypic skeletal muscle adaptation to RE and nutritional interventions. Supplementation of protein/AAs with RE exhibited clear protein dose–dependent effects on translational regulation (protein synthesis) through mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling, which was most apparent through increases in p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) phosphorylation, compared with postexercise recovery in the fasted or carbohydrate-fed state. These acute findings were critically tested via long-term exposure to RE training (RET) and protein/AA supplementation, and it was determined that a diminishing protein/AA supplement effect occurs over a prolonged exposure stimulus after exercise training. Furthermore, we found that protein/AA supplements, combined with RET, produced a positive, albeit minor, effect on the promotion of lean mass growth (when assessed in >20 participants/treatment); a negligible effect on muscle mass; and a negligible to no additional effect on strength. A potential concern we discovered was that the majority of the exercise training studies were underpowered in their ability to discern effects of protein/AA supplementation. Regardless, even when using optimal methodology and large sample sizes, it is clear that the effect size for protein/AA supplementation is low and likely limited to a subset of individuals because the individual variability is high. With regard to nutritional intakes, total protein intake per day, rather than protein timing or quality, appears to be more of a factor

  8. Role of docosahexaenoic acid in modulating methylmercury-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Parvinder; Schulz, Kristina; Aschner, Michael; Syversen, Tore

    2007-12-01

    The effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in modulating methylmercury (MeHg)-induced neurotoxicity was investigated in C6-glial and B35-neuronal cell lines. Gas chromatography measurements indicated increased DHA content in both the cell lines after 24 h supplementation. Mitochondrial activity evaluated by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction indicated that 10 microM MeHg treatment for 50 min led to a significant (p < 0.001) and similar decrease in MTT activity in both the cell lines. However, DHA pretreatment led to more pronounced depletion (p < 0.05) in the MTT activity in C6 cells as compared to B35 cells. The depletion of glutathione (GSH) content measured with the fluorescent indicator monochlorobimane was more apparent (p < 0.001) in C6 cells treated with DHA and MeHg. The amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) detected with the fluorescent indicator -- chloromethyl derivative of dichloro dihydro fluorescein diacetate (CMH(2)DCFDA) -- indicated a fourfold increase in C6 cells (p < 0.001) as compared to twofold increase in B35 cells (p < 0.001) upon DHA and MeHg exposure. However, the cell-associated MeHg measurement using (14)C-labeled MeHg indicated a decrease (p < 0.05) in MeHg accumulation upon DHA exposure in both the cell lines. These findings provide experimental evidence that although pretreatment with DHA reduces cell-associated MeHg, it causes an increased ROS (p < 0.001) and GSH depletion (p < 0.05) in C6 cells.

  9. Neurotoxic effects induced by gammahydroxybutyric acid (GHB) in male rats.

    PubMed

    Pedraza, Carmen; García, Francisca Belén; Navarro, José Francisco

    2009-10-01

    Gammahydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous constituent of the central nervous system that has acquired great social relevance for its use as a recreational 'club drug'. GHB, popularly known as 'liquid ecstasy', is addictive when used continuously. Although the symptoms associated with acute intoxication are well known, the effects of prolonged use remain uncertain. We examined in male rats the effect of repeated administration of GHB (10 and 100 mg/kg) on various parameters: neurological damage, working memory and spatial memory, using neurological tests, the Morris water maze and the hole-board test. The results showed that repeated administration of GHB, especially at doses of 10 mg/kg, causes neurological damage, affecting the 'grasping' reflex, as well as alteration in spatial and working memories. Stereological quantification showed that this drug produces a drastic neuronal loss in the CA1 hippocampal region and in the prefrontal cortex, two areas clearly involved in cognitive and neurological functions. No effects were noted after quantification in the periaqueductal grey matter (PAG), a region lacking GHB receptors. Moreover, NCS-382, a putative antagonist of GHB receptor, prevented both neurological damage and working- memory impairment induced by GHB. This suggests that the effects of administration of this compound may be mediated, at least partly, by specific receptors in the nervous system. The results show for the first time that the repeated administration of GHB, especially at very low doses, produces neurotoxic effects. This is very relevant because its abuse, especially by young persons, could produce considerable neurological alterations after prolonged abuse.

  10. OH-radical induced degradation of hydroxybenzoic- and hydroxycinnamic acids and formation of aromatic products—A gamma radiolysis study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimmel, Birgit; Swoboda, Friederike; Solar, Sonja; Reznicek, Gottfried

    2010-12-01

    The OH-radical induced degradation of hydroxybenzoic acids (HBA), hydroxycinnamic acids (HCiA) and methoxylated derivatives, as well as of chlorogenic acid and rosmarinic acid was studied by gamma radiolysis in aerated aqueous solutions. Primary aromatic products resulting from an OH-radical attachment to the ring (hydroxylation), to the position occupied by the methoxyl group (replacement -OCH 3 by -OH) as well as to the propenoic acid side chain of the cinnamic acids (benzaldehyde formations) were analysed by HPLC-UV and LC-ESI-MS. A comparison of the extent of these processes is given for 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, isovanillic acid, syringic acid, cinnamic acid, 4-hydroxycinnamic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, isoferulic acid, chlorogenic acid, and rosmarinic acid. For all cinnamic acids and derivatives benzaldehydes were significant oxidation products. With the release of caffeic acid from chlorogenic acid the cleavage of a phenolic glycoside could be demonstrated. Reaction mechanisms are discussed.

  11. Valproic acid induces the glutamate transporter excitatory amino acid transporter-3 in human oligodendroglioma cells.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, M G; Franchi-Gazzola, R; Reia, L; Allegri, M; Uggeri, J; Chiu, M; Sala, R; Bussolati, O

    2012-12-27

    Glutamate transport in early, undifferentiated oligodendrocytic precursors has not been characterized thus far. Here we show that human oligodendroglioma Hs683 cells are not endowed with EAAT-dependent anionic amino acid transport. However, in these cells, but not in U373 human glioblastoma cells, valproic acid (VPA), an inhibitor of histone deacetylases, markedly induces SLC1A1 mRNA, which encodes for the glutamate transporter EAAT3. The effect is detectable after 8h and persists up to 120h of treatment. EAAT3 protein increase becomes detectable after 24h of treatment and reaches its maximum after 72-96h, when it is eightfold more abundant than control. The initial influx of d-aspartate increases in parallel, exhibiting the typical features of an EAAT3-mediated process. SLC1A1 mRNA induction is associated with the increased expression of PDGFRA mRNA (+150%), a marker of early oligodendrocyte precursor cells, while the expression of GFAP, CNP and TUBB3 remains unchanged. Short term experiments have indicated that the VPA effect is shared by trichostatin A, another inhibitor of histone deacetylases. On the contrary, EAAT3 induction is neither prevented by inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinases nor triggered by a prolonged incubation with lithium, thus excluding a role for the GSK3β/β-catenin pathway. Thus, the VPA-dependent induction of the glutamate transporter EAAT3 in human oligodendroglioma cells likely occurs through an epigenetic mechanism and may represent an early indicator of commitment to oligodendrocytic differentiation.

  12. Acid tolerance in Salmonella typhimurium induced by culturing in the presence of organic acids at different growth temperatures.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Fernández, Ana; Bernardo, Ana; López, Mercedes

    2010-02-01

    The influence of growth temperature and acidification of the culture medium up to pH 4.25 with acetic, citric, lactic and hydrochloric acids on the growth and subsequent acid resistance at pH 3.0 of Salmonella typhimurium CECT 443 was studied. The minimum pH value which allowed for S. typhimurium growth within the temperature range of 25-37 degrees C was 4.5 when the pH was reduced using citric and hydrochloric acids, and 5.4 and 6.4 when lactic acid and acetic acid were used, respectively. At high (45 degrees C) or low (10 degrees C) temperatures, the growth pH boundary was increased about 1 pH unit. The growth temperature markedly modified the acid resistance of the resulting cells. In all cases, D-values were lower for cells grown at 10 degrees C and significantly increased with increasing growth temperature up to 37 degrees C, at which D-values obtained were up to 10 times higher. Cells grown at 45 degrees C showed D-values similar to those found for cells grown at 25 degrees C. The growth of cells in acidified media, regardless of the pH value, caused an increase in their acid resistance at the four incubation temperatures, although the magnitude of the Acid Tolerance Response (ATR) observed depended on the growth temperature. Acid adapted cultures at 10 degrees C showed D-values ranging from 5.75 to 6.91 min, which turned out to be about 2 times higher than those corresponding to non-acid adapted cultures, while higher temperatures induced an increase in D-values of at least 3.5 times. Another finding was that, while at 10 and 45 degrees C no significant differences among the effect of the different acids tested in inducing an ATR were observed, when cells were grown at 25 and 37 degrees C citric acid generally turned out to be the acid which induced the strongest ATR. Results obtained in this study show that growth temperature is an important factor affecting S. typhimurium acid resistance and could contribute to find new strategies based on intelligent

  13. Cyclosporine A and palmitic acid treatment synergistically induce cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yi; Rana, Payal; Will, Yvonne

    2012-06-01

    Immunosuppressant cyclosporine A (CsA) treatment can cause severe side effects. Patients taking immunosuppressant after organ transplantation often display hyperlipidemia and obesity. Elevated levels of free fatty acids have been linked to the etiology of metabolic syndromes, nonalcoholic fatty liver and steatohepatitis. The contribution of free fatty acids to CsA-induced toxicity is not known. In this study we explored the effect of palmitic acid on CsA-induced toxicity in HepG2 cells. CsA by itself at therapeutic exposure levels did not induce detectible cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. Co-treatment of palmitic acid and CsA resulted in a dose dependent increase in cytotoxicity, suggesting that fatty acid could sensitize cells to CsA-induced cytotoxicity at the therapeutic doses of CsA. A synergized induction of caspase-3/7 activity was also observed, indicating that apoptosis may contribute to the cytotoxicity. We demonstrated that CsA reduced cellular oxygen consumption which was further exacerbated by palmitic acid, implicating that impaired mitochondrial respiration might be an underlying mechanism for the enhanced toxicity. Inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) attenuated palmitic acid and CsA induced toxicity, suggesting that JNK activation plays an important role in mediating the enhanced palmitic acid/CsA-induced toxicity. Our data suggest that elevated FFA levels, especially saturated FFA such as palmitic acid, may be predisposing factors for CsA toxicity, and patients with underlying diseases that would elevate free fatty acids may be susceptible to CsA-induced toxicity. Furthermore, hyperlipidemia/obesity resulting from immunosuppressive therapy may aggravate CsA-induced toxicity and worsen the outcome in transplant patients.

  14. Gambogic acid induces apoptosis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells via inducing proteasome inhibition.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianping; Lan, Xiaoying; Chen, Xin; Zhao, Chong; Li, Xiaofen; Liu, Shouting; Huang, Hongbiao; Liu, Ningning; Zang, Dan; Liao, Yuning; Zhang, Peiquan; Wang, Xuejun; Liu, Jinbao

    2015-04-08

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a great challenge to improving the survival of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), especially those with activated B-cell-like DLBCL (ABC-DLBCL). Therefore it is urgent to search for novel agents for the treatment of DLBCL. Gambogic acid (GA), a small molecule derived from Chinese herb gamboges, has been approved for Phase II clinical trial for cancer therapy by Chinese FDA. In the present study, we investigated the effect of GA on cell survival and apoptosis in DLBCL cells including both GCB- and ABC-DLBCL cells. We found that GA induced growth inhibition and apoptosis of both GCB- and ABC-DLBCL cells in vitro and in vivo, which is associated with proteasome malfunction. These findings provide significant pre-clinical evidence for potential usage of GA in DLBCL therapy particularly in ABC-DLBCL treatment.

  15. Tranexamic acid induces kaolin intake stimulating a pathway involving tachykinin neurokinin 1 receptors in rats.

    PubMed

    Kakiuchi, Hitoshi; Kawarai-Shimamura, Asako; Kuwagata, Makiko; Orito, Kensuke

    2014-01-15

    Tranexamic acid suppresses post-partum haemorrhage and idiopathic menorrhagia through its anti-fibrinolytic action. Although it is clinically useful, it is associated with high risks of side effects such as emesis. Understanding the mechanisms underlying tranexamic acid-induced emesis is very important to explore appropriate anti-emetic drugs for the prevention and/or suppression of emesis. In this study, we examined the receptors involved in tranexamic acid-induced kaolin intake in rats, which reflects the drug's clinical emetogenic potential in humans. Further, we examined the brain regions activated by administration of tranexamic acid and elucidated pivotal pathways of tranexamic acid-induced kaolin intake. We examined the effects of ondansetron, a 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor antagonist, domperidone, a dopamine 2 receptor antagonist, and aprepitant, a tachykinin neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor antagonist, on tranexamic acid-induced kaolin intake in rats. Then, we determined the brain regions that showed increased numbers of c-Fos immunoreactive cells. Finally, we examined the effects of an antagonist(s) that reduced tranexamic acid-induced kaolin intake on the increase in c-Fos immunoreactive cells. Aprepitant significantly decreased tranexamic acid-induced kaolin intake. However, neither ondansetron nor domperidone decreased kaolin intake. Tranexamic acid significantly increased c-Fos immunoreactive cells by approximately 5.5-fold and 22-fold in the area postrema and nucleus of solitary tract, respectively. Aprepitant decreased the number of c-Fos immunoreactive cells in both areas. Tranexamic acid induced kaolin intake possibly via stimulation of tachykinin NK1 receptors in rats. The tachykinin NK1 receptor could be targeted to prevent and/or suppress emesis in patients receiving tranexamic acid.

  16. Fecal transmission of AA amyloidosis in the cheetah contributes to high incidence of disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Beiru; Une, Yumi; Fu, Xiaoying; Yan, Jingmin; Ge, FengXia; Yao, Junjie; Sawashita, Jinko; Mori, Masayuki; Tomozawa, Hiroshi; Kametani, Fuyuki; Higuchi, Keiichi

    2008-05-20

    AA amyloidosis is one of the principal causes of morbidity and mortality in captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus), which are in danger of extinction, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms. Given the transmissible characteristics of AA amyloidosis, transmission between captive cheetahs may be a possible mechanism involved in the high incidence of AA amyloidosis. In this study of animals with AA amyloidosis, we found that cheetah feces contained AA amyloid fibrils that were different from those of the liver with regard to molecular weight and shape and had greater transmissibility. The infectious activity of fecal AA amyloid fibrils was reduced or abolished by the protein denaturants 6 M guanidine.HCl and formic acid or by AA immunodepletion. Thus, we propose that feces are a vehicle of transmission that may accelerate AA amyloidosis in captive cheetah populations. These results provide a pathogenesis for AA amyloidosis and suggest possible measures for rescuing cheetahs from extinction.

  17. Hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction induced by fatty acids and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Gyamfi, Daniel; Everitt, Hannah E; Tewfik, Ihab; Clemens, Dahn L; Patel, Vinood B

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the key aspects of the pathogenesis of alcoholic fatty liver disease particularly alterations to mitochondrial function remains to be resolved. The role of fatty acids in this regard requires further investigation due to their involvement in fatty liver disease and obesity. This study aimed to characterize the early effects of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids alone on liver mitochondrial function and during concomitant ethanol exposure using isolated liver mitochondria and VA-13 cells (Hep G2 cells that efficiently express alcohol dehydrogenase). Liver mitochondria or VA-13 cells were treated with increasing concentrations of palmitic or arachidonic acid (1 to 160 μM) for 24 h with or without 100 mM ethanol. The results showed that in isolated liver mitochondria both palmitic and arachidonic acids significantly reduced state 3 respiration in a concentration-dependent manner (P<0.001), implicating their ionophoric activities. Increased ROS production occurred in a dose-dependent manner especially in the presence of rotenone (complex I inhibitor), which was significantly more prominent in arachidonic acid at 80 μM (+970%, P<0.001) than palmitic acid (+40%, P<0.01). In VA-13 cells, ethanol alone and both fatty acids (40 μM) were able to decrease the mitochondrial membrane potential and cellular ATP levels and increase lipid formation. ROS production was significantly increased with arachidonic acid (+110%, P<0.001) exhibiting a greater effect than palmitic acid (+39%, P<0.05). While in the presence of ethanol, the drop in the mitochondrial membrane potential, cellular ATP levels, and increased lipid formation were further enhanced by both fatty acids, but with greater effect in the case of arachidonic acid, which also correlated with significant cytotoxicity (P<0.001). This study confirms the ability of fatty acids to promote mitochondrial injury in the development of alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  18. Amino acid supplementation alters bone metabolism during simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwart, S. R.; Davis-Street, J. E.; Paddon-Jones, D.; Ferrando, A. A.; Wolfe, R. R.; Smith, S. M.

    2005-01-01

    High-protein and acidogenic diets induce hypercalciuria. Foods or supplements with excess sulfur-containing amino acids increase endogenous sulfuric acid production and therefore have the potential to increase calcium excretion and alter bone metabolism. In this study, effects of an amino acid/carbohydrate supplement on bone resorption were examined during bed rest. Thirteen subjects were divided at random into two groups: a control group (Con, n = 6) and an amino acid-supplemented group (AA, n = 7) who consumed an extra 49.5 g essential amino acids and 90 g carbohydrate per day for 28 days. Urine was collected for n-telopeptide (NTX), deoxypyridinoline (DPD), calcium, and pH determinations. Bone mineral content was determined and potential renal acid load was calculated. Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase was measured in serum samples collected on day 1 (immediately before bed rest) and on day 28. Potential renal acid load was higher in the AA group than in the Con group during bed rest (P < 0.05). For all subjects, during bed rest urinary NTX and DPD concentrations were greater than pre-bed rest levels (P < 0.05). Urinary NTX and DPD tended to be higher in the AA group (P = 0.073 and P = 0.056, respectively). During bed rest, urinary calcium was greater than baseline levels (P < 0.05) in the AA group but not the Con group. Total bone mineral content was lower after bed rest than before bed rest in the AA group but not the Con group (P < 0.05). During bed rest, urinary pH decreased (P < 0.05), and it was lower in the AA group than the Con group. These data suggest that bone resorption increased, without changes in bone formation, in the AA group.

  19. Ursolic acid induces neural regeneration after sciatic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Biao; Liu, Yan; Yang, Guang; Xu, Zemin; Chen, Jiajun

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to explore the role of ursolic acid in the neural regeneration of the injured sciatic nerve. BALB/c mice were used to establish models of sciatic nerve injury through unilateral sciatic nerve complete transection and microscopic anastomosis at 0.5 cm below the ischial tube-rosity. The successfully generated model mice were treated with 10, 5, or 2.5 mg/kg ursolic acid via intraperitoneal injection. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results showed that serum S100 protein expression level gradually increased at 1–4 weeks after sciatic nerve injury, and significantly decreased at 8 weeks. As such, ursolic acid has the capacity to significantly increase S100 protein expression levels. Real-time quantitative PCR showed that S100 mRNA expression in the L4–6 segments on the injury side was increased after ursolic acid treatment. In addition, the muscular mass index in the soleus muscle was also increased in mice treated with ursolic acid. Toluidine blue staining revealed that the quantity and average diameter of myelinated nerve fibers in the injured sciatic nerve were significantly increased after treatment with ursolic acid. 10 and 5 mg/kg of ursolic acid produced stronger effects than 2.5 mg/kg of ursolic acid. Our findings indicate that ursolic acid can dose-dependently increase S100 expression and promote neural regeneration in BALB/c mice following sciatic nerve injury. PMID:25206561

  20. Stimulus-specific induction of phospholipid and arachidonic acid metabolism in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, R.W.; Manzi, R.M.; Clark, M.A.; Hoffstein, S.T.

    1987-04-01

    Phospholipid remodeling resulting in arachidonic acid (AA) release and metabolism in human neutrophils stimulated by calcium ionophore A23187 has been extensively studied, while data obtained using physiologically relevant stimuli is limited. Opsonized zymosan and immune complexes induced stimulus-specific alterations in lipid metabolism that were different from those induced by A23187. (/sup 3/H)AA release correlated with activation of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) but not with cellular activation as indicated by superoxide generation. The latter correlated more with calcium-dependent phospholipase C (PLC) activation and elevation of cellular diacylglycerol (DAG) levels. When cells that had been allowed to incorporate (/sup 3/H)AA were stimulated with A23187, large amounts of labeled AA was released, most of which was metabolized to 5-HETE and leukotriene B4. Stimulation with immune complexes also resulted in the release of (/sup 3/H)AA but this released radiolabeled AA was not metabolized. In contrast, stimulation with opsonized zymosan induced no detectable release of (/sup 3/H)AA. Analysis of (/sup 3/H)AA-labeled lipids in resting cells indicated that the greatest amount of label was incorporated into the phosphatidylinositol (PI) pool, followed closely by phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine, while little (/sup 3/H)AA was detected in the phosphatidylethanolamine pool. During stimulation with A23187, a significant decrease in labeled PI occurred and labeled free fatty acid in the pellet increased. With immune complexes, only a small decrease was seen in labeled PI while the free fatty acid in the pellets was unchanged. In contrast, opsonized zymosan decreased labeled PI, and increased labeled DAG. Phospholipase activity in homogenates from human neutrophils was also assayed. A23187 and immune complexes, but not zymosan, significantly enhanced PLA2 activity in the cell homogenates. On the other hand, PLC activity was enhanced by zymosan and immune complexes

  1. Low oleic acid-derived repression of jasmonic acid-inducible defense responses requires the WRKY50 and WRKY51 proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Signaling induced upon a reduction in oleic acid (18:1) levels simultaneously up-regulates salicylic acid (SA)-mediated responses and inhibits jasmonic acid (JA)-inducible defenses, resulting in enhanced resistance to biotrophs but increased susceptibility to necrotrophs. SA and the signaling compon...

  2. Migration of human inflammatory cells into the lung results in the remodeling of arachidonic acid into a triglyceride pool

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA) may be different in inflammatory cells isolated from blood or migrating into tissues. To explore the possibility that changes in AA metabolism between blood and tissue inflammatory cells could be due in part to a different content or distribution of AA in glycerolipid classes, we studied these parameters in six human inflammatory cells isolated from blood (eosinophils, monocytes, neutrophils, and platelets) or from the lung tissue (mast cells and macrophages). Lung cells generally had a higher total cellular content of AA than that found in the blood cells. In addition, both mast cells and macrophages had a large endogenous pool of AA associated with triglycerides (TG), containing 45 and 22% of their total cellular AA, respectively. To address the hypothesis that cells migrating into the lung had a higher cellular level of AA and a larger AA pool in TG, we studied neutrophils isolated from the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome. BAL neutrophils had a fourfold increase in cellular AA as compared with blood neutrophils and contained 25% of their AA in TG versus 3% in blood neutrophils. BAL neutrophils also had a higher number of cytoplasmic lipid bodies (8 +/- 3/cell) relative to blood neutrophils (2 +/- 1/cell). High concentrations of free AA were also found in the cell-free BAL fluid of adult respiratory distress syndrome patients. To explore whether changes in BAL neutrophils may be due to the exposure of the cells to high concentrations of exogenous AA found in BAL, we incubated blood neutrophils in culture with AA (10-100 microM) for 24 h. Neutrophils supplemented with AA had a 10-fold increase in the amount of AA associated with TG and a sixfold increase in the number of lipid bodies. In addition, supplementation with AA induced a dose-dependent formation of hypodense cells. Taken together, these data indicate that human inflammatory cells

  3. Interplay between microbial d-amino acids and host d-amino acid oxidase modifies murine mucosal defence and gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Sasabe, Jumpei; Miyoshi, Yurika; Rakoff-Nahoum, Seth; Zhang, Ting; Mita, Masashi; Davis, Brigid M; Hamase, Kenji; Waldor, Matthew K

    2016-07-25

    L-Amino acids are the building blocks for proteins synthesized in ribosomes in all kingdoms of life, but d-amino acids (d-aa) have important non-ribosome-based functions(1). Mammals synthesize d-Ser and d-Asp, primarily in the central nervous system, where d-Ser is critical for neurotransmission(2). Bacteria synthesize a largely distinct set of d-aa, which become integral components of the cell wall and are also released as free d-aa(3,4). However, the impact of free microbial d-aa on host physiology at the host-microbial interface has not been explored. Here, we show that the mouse intestine is rich in free d-aa that are derived from the microbiota. Furthermore, the microbiota induces production of d-amino acid oxidase (DAO) by intestinal epithelial cells, including goblet cells, which secrete the enzyme into the lumen. Oxidative deamination of intestinal d-aa by DAO, which yields the antimicrobial product H2O2, protects the mucosal surface in the small intestine from the cholera pathogen. DAO also modifies the composition of the microbiota and is associated with microbial induction of intestinal sIgA. Collectively, these results identify d-aa and DAO as previously unrecognized mediators of microbe-host interplay and homeostasis on the epithelial surface of the small intestine.

  4. Lipopolysaccharide Stimulates Butyric Acid-Induced Apoptosis in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Fukushima, Kazuo; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    1999-01-01

    We previously reported that butyric acid, an extracellular metabolite from periodontopathic bacteria, induced apoptosis in murine thymocytes, splenic T cells, and human Jurkat T cells. In this study, we examined the ability of butyric acid to induce apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on this apoptosis. Butyric acid significantly inhibited the anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody- and concanavalin A-induced proliferative responses in a dose-dependent fashion. This inhibition of PBMC growth by butyric acid depended on apoptosis in vitro. It was characterized by internucleosomal DNA digestion and revealed by gel electrophoresis followed by a colorimetric DNA fragmentation assay to occur in a concentration-dependent fashion. Butyric acid-induced PBMC apoptosis was accompanied by caspase-3 protease activity but not by caspase-1 protease activity. LPS potentiated butyric acid-induced PBMC apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Flow-cytometric analysis revealed that LPS increased the proportion of sub-G1 cells and the number of late-stage apoptotic cells induced by butyric acid. Annexin V binding experiments with fractionated subpopulations of PBMC in flow cytometory revealed that LPS accelerated the butyric acid-induced CD3+-T-cell apoptosis followed by similar levels of both CD4+- and CD8+-T-cell apoptosis. The addition of LPS to PBMC cultures did not cause DNA fragmentation, suggesting that LPS was unable to induce PBMC apoptosis directly. These data suggest that LPS, in combination with butyric acid, potentiates CD3+ PBMC T-cell apoptosis and plays a role in the apoptotic depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ cells. PMID:9864191

  5. Galantamine potentiates the protective effect of rofecoxib and caffeic acid against intrahippocampal Kainic acid-induced cognitive dysfunction in rat.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Prakash, Atish; Pahwa, Deeksha

    2011-05-30

    Role of neuroinflammatory mediators particularly cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX), have been well suggested in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative disorders. Rofecoxib is a selective cyclooxygenase 2 enzymes belongs to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, commonly called as coxibs. Whereas, caffeic acid (3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid) is one of the natural phenolic compounds and reported to inhibit 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) activity as one of mechanisms. Present study has been designed to investigate the effects of rofecoxib, caffeic acid and its potentiation by galantamine against intrahippocampal kainic acid-induced cognitive impairment, oxidative damage and mitochondrial respiratory enzyme alterations in rats. Kainic acid (KA) was administrated in the hippocampus region of rat brain. Various behavioral (locomotor activity and memory performances were assessed by using actophotometer and Morris water maze respectively) followed by oxidative stress, mitochondrial enzyme complex were assessed. Intrahippocampal administration of KA significantly impaired locomotor activity, memory performance, mitochondrial enzyme complexes and caused oxidative stress as compared to sham treatment. Rofecoxib (5 and 10mg/kg), caffeic acid (5 and 10mg/kg), Gal (2.5 and 5mg/kg) treatment for 14 days significantly improved locomotor activity, memory retention and oxidative defense (as evidenced by decrease lipid peroxidation, nitrite, increased superoxide dismutase activity and redox ratio) in hippocampus. Besides, alterations in the levels of mitochondrial enzymes and acetylcholine esterase enzyme were significantly restored by rofecoxib and caffeic acid as compared to control. Further, combination of rofecoxib (5mg/kg) with caffeic acid (5mg/kg) and lower dose of gal (2.5mg/kg) with rofecoxib (5mg/kg) treatments significantly potentiated their protective effect which was significant as compared to their effect per se. The results of the present study suggest that galantamine

  6. Orally Administrated Ascorbic Acid Suppresses Neuronal Damage and Modifies Expression of SVCT2 and GLUT1 in the Brain of Diabetic Rats with Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Naohiro; Okazaki, Mari; Xuan, Meiyan; Kamiuchi, Shinya; Matsuzaki, Hirokazu; Hibino, Yasuhide

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is known to exacerbate cerebral ischemic injury. In the present study, we investigated antiapoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects of oral supplementation of ascorbic acid (AA) on cerebral injury caused by middle cerebral artery occlusion and reperfusion (MCAO/Re) in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. We also evaluated the effects of AA on expression of sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT2) and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) after MCAO/Re in the brain. The diabetic state markedly aggravated MCAO/Re-induced cerebral damage, as assessed by infarct volume and edema. Pretreatment with AA (100 mg/kg, p.o.) for two weeks significantly suppressed the exacerbation of damage in the brain of diabetic rats. AA also suppressed the production of superoxide radical, activation of caspase-3, and expression of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β) in the ischemic penumbra. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that expression of SVCT2 was upregulated primarily in neurons and capillary endothelial cells after MCAO/Re in the nondiabetic cortex, accompanied by an increase in total AA (AA + dehydroascorbic acid) in the tissue, and that these responses were suppressed in the diabetic rats. AA supplementation to the diabetic rats restored these responses to the levels of the nondiabetic rats. Furthermore, AA markedly upregulated the basal expression of GLUT1 in endothelial cells of nondiabetic and diabetic cortex, which did not affect total AA levels in the cortex. These results suggest that daily intake of AA attenuates the exacerbation of cerebral ischemic injury in a diabetic state, which may be attributed to anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects via the improvement of augmented oxidative stress in the brain. AA supplementation may protect endothelial function against the exacerbated ischemic oxidative injury in the diabetic state and improve AA transport through SVCT2 in the cortex. PMID:24739976

  7. Cytochrome aa3 in Haloferax volcanii

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Mikiei; Ogawa, Naohide; Ihara, Kunio; Sugiyama, Yasuo; Mukohata, Yasuo

    2002-01-01

    A cytochrome in an extremely halophilic archaeon, Haloferax volcanii, was purified to homogeneity. This protein displayed a redox difference spectrum that is characteristic of a-type cytochromes and a CN− complex spectrum that indicates the presence of heme a and heme a3. This cytochrome aa3 consisted of 44- and 35-kDa subunits. The amino acid sequence of the 44-kDa subunit was similar to that of the heme-copper oxidase subunit I, and critical amino acid residues for metal binding, such as histidines, were highly conserved. The reduced cytochrome c partially purified from the bacterial membrane fraction was oxidized by the cytochrome aa3, providing physiological evidence for electron transfer from cytochrome c to cytochrome aa3 in archaea. PMID:11790755

  8. Cyclosporine A and palmitic acid treatment synergistically induce cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Yi Rana, Payal; Will, Yvonne

    2012-06-01

    Immunosuppressant cyclosporine A (CsA) treatment can cause severe side effects. Patients taking immunosuppressant after organ transplantation often display hyperlipidemia and obesity. Elevated levels of free fatty acids have been linked to the etiology of metabolic syndromes, nonalcoholic fatty liver and steatohepatitis. The contribution of free fatty acids to CsA-induced toxicity is not known. In this study we explored the effect of palmitic acid on CsA-induced toxicity in HepG2 cells. CsA by itself at therapeutic exposure levels did not induce detectible cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. Co-treatment of palmitic acid and CsA resulted in a dose dependent increase in cytotoxicity, suggesting that fatty acid could sensitize cells to CsA-induced cytotoxicity at the therapeutic doses of CsA. A synergized induction of caspase-3/7 activity was also observed, indicating that apoptosis may contribute to the cytotoxicity. We demonstrated that CsA reduced cellular oxygen consumption which was further exacerbated by palmitic acid, implicating that impaired mitochondrial respiration might be an underlying mechanism for the enhanced toxicity. Inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) attenuated palmitic acid and CsA induced toxicity, suggesting that JNK activation plays an important role in mediating the enhanced palmitic acid/CsA-induced toxicity. Our data suggest that elevated FFA levels, especially saturated FFA such as palmitic acid, may be predisposing factors for CsA toxicity, and patients with underlying diseases that would elevate free fatty acids may be susceptible to CsA-induced toxicity. Furthermore, hyperlipidemia/obesity resulting from immunosuppressive therapy may aggravate CsA-induced toxicity and worsen the outcome in transplant patients. -- Highlights: ► Palmitic acid and cyclosporine (CsA) synergistically increased cytotoxicity. ► The impairment of mitochondrial functions may contribute to the enhanced toxicity. ► Inhibition of JNK activity attenuated

  9. Evidence for a significant role of gastrin in cysteamine-induced hypersecretion of gastric acid.

    PubMed

    Shiratori, K; Shimizu, K; Ikeda, M; Watanabe, S; Hayashi, N

    1997-01-01

    Cysteamine has been known to stimulate gastric acid secretion and to induce duodenal ulcers in rats. We investigated the role of gastrin in cysteamine-induced acid hypersecretion in the perfused rat stomach. Intravenous infusion of cysteamine (75 mg/kg/h) resulted in a significant increase in acid secretion, which was accompanied by a marked increase in the plasma gastrin concentration. The cysteamine-induced increase in gastric acid secretion was completely blocked by i.v. injection of anti-gastrin rabbit serum (500 microliters). In addition, i.v. infusion of a CCK-B/gastrin receptor antagonist (L-365,260) (1 mg/kg/h) also suppressed the cysteamine-induced increase in acid secretion. Atropine significantly, but only partially, inhibited the increase. The elevated plasma gastrin levels induced by cysteamine were unaffected by atropine and L-365,260. In conclusion, cysteamine-induced acid hypersecretion is mediated mainly by cysteamine-induced gastrin release and partially by cholinergic factors. Furthermore, gastrin release caused by cysteamine appears to be independent of cholinergic tone.

  10. Synaptic plasticity preserved with arachidonic acid diet in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Susumu; Nakazawa, Hiroe; Tokimasa, Takayuki; Akimoto, Kengo; Kawashima, Hiroshi; Toyoda-Ono, Yoshiko; Kiso, Yoshinobu; Okaichi, Hiroshige; Sakakibara, Manabu

    2003-08-01

    We examined whether synaptic plasticity was preserved in aged rats administered an arachidonic acid (AA) containing diet. Young male Fischer-344 rats (2 mo of age), and two groups of aged rats of the same strain (2 y of age) who consumed either a control diet or an AA ethyl ester-containing diet for at least 3 mo were used. In the Morris water maze task, aged rats on the AA diet had tendency to show better performance than aged rats on the control diet. Long-term potentiation induced by tetanic stimulation was recorded from a 300 microm thick hippocampal slice with a 36 multi-electrode-array positioned at the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons. The degree of potentiation after 1 h in aged rats on the AA diet was comparable as that of young controls. Phospholipid analysis revealed that AA and docosahexaenoic acid were the major fatty acids in the hippocampus in aged rats. There was a correlation between the behavioral measure and the changes in excitatory postsynaptic potential slope and between the physiologic measure and the total amount of AA in hippocampus.

  11. Mechanism of arachidonic acid liberation in platelet-activating factor-stimulated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, S.; Suganuma, A.; Sato, M.; Tohmatsu, T.; Nozawa, Y. )

    1989-08-15

    Upon stimulation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils with platelet-activating factor (PAF), arachidonic acid (AA) is released from membrane phospholipids. The mechanism for AA liberation, a key step in the synthesis of biologically active eicosanoids, was investigated. PAF was found to elicit an increase in the cytoplasmic level of free Ca2+ as monitored by fluorescent indicator fura 2. When (3H) AA-labeled neutrophils were exposed to PAF, the enhanced release of AA was observed with a concomitant decrease of radioactivity in phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine fractions. The inhibitors of phospholipase A2, mepacrine and 2-(p-amylcinnamoyl)-amino-4-chlorobenzoic acid, effectively suppressed the liberation of (3H)AA from phospholipids, indicating that liberation of AA is mainly catalyzed by the action of phospholipase A2. The extracellular Ca2+ is not required for AA release. However, intracellular Ca2+ antagonists, TMB-8 and high dose of quin 2/AM drastically reduced the liberation of AA induced by PAF, indicating that Ca2+ is an essential factor for phospholipase A2 activation. PAF raised the fluorescence of fura 2 at concentrations as low as 8 pM which reached a maximal level about 8 nM, whereas more than nM order concentrations of PAF was required for the detectable release of (3H)AA. Pretreatment of neutrophils with pertussis toxin resulted in complete abolition of AA liberation in response to PAF. However, the fura 2 response to PAF was not effectively inhibited by toxin treatment. In human neutrophil homogenate and membrane preparations, guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) stimulated AA release and potentiated the action of PAF. Guanosine 5'-O-(thiodiphosphate) inhibited the effects of guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate).

  12. Caffeic acid, tyrosol and p-coumaric acid are potent inhibitors of 5-S-cysteinyl-dopamine induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Vauzour, David; Corona, Giulia; Spencer, Jeremy P E

    2010-09-01

    Parkinson's disease is characterized by a progressive and selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Recent investigations have shown that conjugates such as the 5-S-cysteinyl-dopamine, possess strong neurotoxicity and may contribute to the underlying progression of the disease pathology. Although the neuroprotective actions of flavonoids are well reported, that of hydroxycinnamates and other phenolic acids is less established. We show that the hydroxycinnamates caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid, the hydroxyphenethyl alcohol, tyrosol, and a Champagne wine extract rich in these components protect neurons against injury induced by 5-S-cysteinyl-dopamine in vitro. The protection induced by these polyphenols was equal to or greater than that observed for the flavonoids, (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin and quercetin. For example, p-coumaric acid evoked significantly more protection at 1muM (64.0+/-3.1%) than both (-)-epicatechin (46.0+/-4.1%, p<0.05) and (+)-catechin (13.1+/-3.0%, p<0.001) at the same concentration. These data indicate that hydroxycinnamates, phenolic acids and phenolic alcohol are also capable of inducing neuroprotective effects to a similar extent to that seen with flavonoids.

  13. Section AA Pre2004 Fire, Section AA 2009, Section AA, South ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Section A-A Pre-2004 Fire, Section A-A 2009, Section A-A, South Elevation - Boston & Maine Railroad, Berlin Branch Bridge #148.81, Formerly spanning Moose Brook at former Boston & Maine Railroad, Gorham, Coos County, NH

  14. Sasa quelpaertensis and p-coumaric acid attenuate oleic acid-induced lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Kang, Seong-Il; Shin, Hye-Sun; Yoon, Seon-A; Kang, Seung-Woo; Ko, Hee-Chul; Kim, Se-Jae

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effects of Jeju dwarf bamboo (Sasa quelpaertensis Nakai) extract (JBE) and p-coumaric acid (CA) on oleic acid (OA)-induced lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells. JBE and CA increased the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and the expression of carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1a (CPT1a) in OA-treated HepG2 cells. Additionally, these compounds decreased sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and OA-induced lipid accumulation, suggesting that JBE and CA modulate lipid metabolism in HepG2 cells via the AMPK activation pathway.

  15. Chemical processes induced by OH attack on nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwabara, Mikinori

    Recent studies concerning the chemical processes in nucleic acids starting with OH attack to produce free radicals and ending with the formation of stable products were reviewed. Using nucleosides, nucleotides and homopolynucleotides as model compounds, and DNA itself, free radicals produced by OH attack on nucleic acids have been mainly studied by a method combining ESR, spin trapping and high-performance liquid chromatography. For identification of final products in both base and sugar moieties of nucleic acids, mass and NMR spectroscopies combined with gas chromatography or high-performance liquid chromatography are usually employed. Kinetic measurements of structural alterations in the polynucleotides and DNA after OH attack have been made by a method combining electron-pulse irradiation and laser-light scattering. From these studies, the chemical reaction processes from the generation of free radicals in nucleic acids by OH attack, through the formation of unstable intermediates, to the formation of final products can be described.

  16. Ellagic acid ameliorates isoproterenol induced oxidative stress: Evidence from electrocardiological, biochemical and histological study.

    PubMed

    Kannan, M Mari; Quine, S Darlin

    2011-05-20

    The present study was designed to evaluate the cardioprotective effects of ellagic acid against isoproterenol induced myocardial infarction in rats by studying electrocardiography, blood pressure, cardiac markers, lipid peroxidation, antioxidant defense system and histological changes. Male Wistar rats were treated orally with ellagic acid (7.5 and 15mg/kg) daily for a period of 10 days. After 10 days of pretreatment, isoproterenol (100mg/kg) was injected subcutaneously to rats at an interval of 24h for 2 days to induce myocardial infarction. Isoproterenol administered rats showed significant changes in the electrocardiogram pattern, arterial pressure, and heart rate. Isoproterenol-induced rats also showed significant (P<0.05) increase in the levels of serum troponin-I, creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, C-reactive protein, plasma homocysteine, heart tissue thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and lipid hydro peroxides. The activities/levels of antioxidant system were decreased in isoproterenol-induced rats. The histopathological findings of the myocardial tissue evidenced myocardial damage in isoproterenol induced rats. The oral pretreatment of ellagic acid restored the pathological electrocardiographic patterns, regulated the arterial blood pressures and heart rate in the isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats. The ellagic acid pretreatment significantly reduced the levels of biochemical markers, lipid peroxidation and significantly increased the activities/levels of the antioxidant system in the isoproterenol induced rats. An inhibited myocardial necrosis was evidenced by the histopathological findings in ellagic acid pretreated isoproterenol induced rats. Our study shows that oral pretreatment of ellagic acid prevents isoproterenol induced oxidative stress in myocardial infarction.

  17. Protective effect of phytic acid hydrolysis products on iron-induced lipid peroxidation of liposomal membranes.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, S; Kuwata, G; Imai, M; Nagao, A; Terao, J

    2000-12-01

    Beneficial effects of dietary phytic acid (myo-inositol hexaphosphate; IP6) have often been explained by its strong iron ion-chelating ability, which possibly suppresses iron ion-induced oxidative damage in the gastrointestinal tract. Because phytic acid is hydrolyzed during digestion, this work aimed to know whether its hydrolysis products (IP2, IP3, IP4, and IP5) could still prevent iron ion-induced lipid peroxidation. Studies using liposomal membranes demonstrated that hydrolysis products containing three or more phosphate groups are able to inhibit iron ion-induced lipid peroxidation although their effectiveness decreased with dephosphorylation. Similarly, they also prevented iron ion-induced decomposition of phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxide. These results demonstrate that intermediate products of phytic acid hydrolysis still possess iron ion-chelating ability, and thus they can probably prevent iron ion-induced lipid peroxidation in biological systems.

  18. Effects of sodium bicarbonate on butyric acid-induced epithelial cell damage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Takigawa, Satoko; Sugano, Naoyuki; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Arai, Noriyuki; Ota, Noriko; Ito, Koichi

    2008-12-01

    Butyric acid is detected in periodontal pockets and is thought to be involved in the initiation and progression of periodontal disease. We examined the effects of sodium bicarbonate on the butyric acid-induced epithelial cell damage. The human gingival carcinoma cell line Ca9-22 was cultured in medium that contained butyric acid with or without sodium bicarbonate. The viability of cells treated with sodium bicarbonate was significantly higher than that of cells treated with butyric acid alone. The effects of butyric acid on ICAM-1 expression were significantly improved by sodium bicarbonate. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, sodium bicarbonate was indicated to be a useful therapeutic agent to reduce the butyric acid-induced periodontal tissue damage.

  19. Protective effect of boric acid against carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Ince, Sinan; Keles, Hikmet; Erdogan, Metin; Hazman, Omer; Kucukkurt, Ismail

    2012-07-01

    The protective effect of boric acid against liver damage was evaluated by its attenuation of carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4))-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. Male albino mice were treated intraperitoneally (i.p.) with boric acid (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) or silymarin daily for 7 days and received 0.2% CCl(4) in olive oil (10 mL/kg, i.p.) on day 7. Results showed that administration of boric acid significantly reduced the elevation in serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, and the level of malondialdehyde in the liver that were induced by CCl(4) in mice. Boric acid treatment significantly increased glutathione content, as well as the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase in the liver. Boric acid treatment improved the catalytic activity of cytochrome P450 2E1 and maintained activation of nuclear factor kappa light-chain enhancer of activated B cell gene expression, with no effect on inducible nitric oxide synthase gene expression in the livers of mice. Histopathologically, clear decreases in the severity of CCl(4)-induced lesions were observed, particularly at high boric acid concentrations. Results suggest that boric acid exhibits potent hepatoprotective effects on CCl(4)-induced liver damage in mice, likely the result of both the increase in antioxidant-defense system activity and the inhibition of lipid peroxidation.

  20. MICROARRAY ANALYSIS OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory


    MICROARRAY ANALYSIS OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a major by-product of water disinfection by chlorination. Several studies have demonstrated the hepatocarcinogenicity of DCA in rodents when administered in dri...

  1. Sweating treatment enhances citrus fruit disease resistance by inducing the accumulation of amino acids and salicylic acid-induced resistance pathway.

    PubMed

    Yun, Ze; Zhu, Feng; Liu, Ping; Zeng, Yunliu; Xu, Juan; Cheng, Yunjiang; Deng, Xiuxin

    2015-04-20

    To clarify the mechanism of fruit disease resistance activated by sweating treatment, 'Guoqing NO.1' Satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc.) fruits were treated by sweating, which is a traditional prestorage treatment in China. Subsequently, we performed inoculation and physiological characterization, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) proteomics analysis and metabonomics analysis based on gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry (HPLC-qTOF-MS). The results showed that sweating treatment significantly inhibited pathogen infection without negatively affecting the fruit commercial quality. In addition, sweating treatment rapidly promoted the accumulation of amino acids (such as proline and serine). Meanwhile, hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) and salicylic acid (SA) were significantly accumulated in the sweating-treated fruit. Thereafter, some stress-response proteins and metabolites [such as ascorbate peroxidase (APX), β-1,3-glucanase, vanillic acid and rutin] which can be induced by SA were also significantly increased in the sweating-treated fruit. Taken together, the disease resistance induced by sweating treatment might be attributed to: (1) the induction of the accumulation of amino acids; and (2) the accumulation of SA and subsequent activation of SA-induced resistance pathway, which can induce the stress-response proteins and metabolites that can directly inhibit pathogen development.

  2. Grafting of acrylic acid on etched latent tracks induced by swift heavy ions on polypropylene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzei, R.; Fernández, A.; García Bermúdez, G.; Torres, A.; Gutierrez, M. C.; Magni, M.; Celma, G.; Tadey, D.

    2008-06-01

    In order to continue with a systematic study that include different polymers and monomers, the residual active sites produced by heavy ion beams, that remain after the etching process, were used to start the grafting process. To produce tracks, foils of polypropylene (PP) were irradiated with 208Pb of 25.62 MeV/n. Then, these were etched and grafted with acrylic acid (AA) monomers. Experimental curves of grafting yield as a function of grafting time with the etching time as a parameter were measured. Also, the grating yield as a function of the fluence and etching time was obtained. In addition, the permeation of solutions, with different pH, through PP grafted foils was measured.

  3. Protective effects of Artocarpus altilis (Moraceae) on cadmium-induced changes in sperm characteristics and testicular oxidative damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Adaramoye, O A; Akanni, O O

    2016-03-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a major environmental toxicant and an endocrine disruptor. We investigated the protective effects of methanol extract of Artocarpus altilis (AA) against Cd-induced testicular damage in rats while quercetin (Que) served as standard. The total flavonoids and phenolic contents (TFC and TPC), 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and hydroxyl (OH) radicals scavenging activities of AA were determined. In vivo, thirty male Wistar rats were assigned to six groups and orally treated with corn oil (control), Cd alone, Cd+Que, Cd+AA, Que and AA alone. Que and AA were given at doses of 25 and 200 mg kg(-1), respectively, for 3 weeks and challenged with two doses of Cd (1.5 mg kg(-1)). Results showed that TFC and TPC of AA increased with increase in concentration. AA scavenged DPPH and OH radicals in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of Cd significantly increased the relative weight of testis of rats. Lipid peroxidation was significantly increased while antioxidant parameters decreased in testis of Cd-treated rats. Also, Cd-treated rats had significantly reduced sperm count, motility, sialic acid, luteinising hormone and testosterone relative to controls. Pre-treatment with AA or Que significantly attenuated the biochemical alterations observed in Cd-treated rats. Overall, AA protects against Cd-induced testicular damage via antioxidative mechanism.

  4. DEVELOPMENTAL AND WITHDRAWAL EFFECTS OF ADOLESCENT AAS EXPOSURE ON THE GLUTAMATERGIC SYSTEM IN HAMSTERS

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, Maria; Ricci, Lesley A.; Melloni, Richard H.

    2011-01-01

    In the Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) glutamate activity has been implicated in the modulation of adolescent anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS)-induced aggression. The current study investigated the time course of adolescent AAS-induced neurodevelopmental and withdrawal effects on the glutamatergic system and examined whether these changes paralleled those of adolescent AAS-induced aggression. Glutamate activity in brain areas comprising the aggression circuit in hamsters and aggression were examined following 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks of AAS treatment or 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks following the cessation of AAS exposure. In these studies glutamate activity was examined using vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2). The onset of aggression was observed following 2 weeks exposure to AAS and continued to increase showing maximal aggression levels after 4 weeks of AAS treatment. This aggressive phenotype was detected after 2 weeks of withdrawal from AAS. The time-course of AAS-induced changes in latero anterior hypothalamus (LAH)-VGLUT2 closely paralleled increases in aggression. Increases in LAH-VGLUT2 were first detected in animals exposed to AAS for 2 weeks and were maintained up to 3 weeks following the cessation of AAS treatment. AAS treatment also produced developmental and long-term alterations in VGLUT2 expression within other aggression areas. However, AAS-induced changes in glutamate activity within these regions did not coincide with changes in aggression. Together, these data indicate that adolescent AAS treatment leads to alterations in the glutamatergic system in brain areas implicated in aggression control, yet only alterations in LAH-glutamate parallel the time course of AAS-induced changes in the aggressive phenotype. PMID:21500881

  5. Developmental and withdrawal effects of adolescent AAS exposure on the glutamatergic system in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Maria; Ricci, Lesley A; Melloni, Richard H

    2011-06-01

    In the Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) glutamate activity has been implicated in the modulation of adolescent anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS)-induced aggression. The current study investigated the time course of adolescent AAS-induced neurodevelopmental and withdrawal effects on the glutamatergic system and examined whether these changes paralleled those of adolescent AAS-induced aggression. Glutamate activity in brain areas comprising the aggression circuit in hamsters and aggression levels were examined following 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks of AAS treatment or 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks following the cessation of AAS exposure. In these studies glutamate activity was examined using vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2). The onset of aggression was observed following 2 weeks exposure to AAS and continued to increase showing maximal aggression levels after 4 weeks of AAS treatment. This aggressive phenotype was detected after 2 weeks of withdrawal from AAS. The time-course of AAS-induced changes in latero-anterior hypothalamus (LAH)-VGLUT2 closely paralleled increases in aggression. Increases in LAH-VGLUT2 were first detected in animals exposed to AAS for 2 weeks and were maintained up to 3 weeks following the cessation of AAS treatment. AAS treatment also produced developmental and long-term alterations in VGLUT2 expression within other aggression areas. However, AAS-induced changes in glutamate activity within these regions did not coincide with changes in aggression. Together, these data indicate that adolescent AAS treatment leads to alterations in the glutamatergic system in brain areas implicated in aggression control, yet only alterations in LAH-glutamate parallel the time course of AAS-induced changes in the aggressive phenotype.

  6. Arachidonic acid triggers [Ca2+]i increases in rat round spermatids by a likely GPR activation, ERK signalling and ER/acidic compartments Ca2+ release.

    PubMed

    Paillamanque, Joaquin; Sanchez-Tusie, Ana; Carmona, Emerson M; Treviño, Claudia L; Sandoval, Carolina; Nualart, Francisco; Osses, Nelson; Reyes, Juan G

    2017-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA), a compound secreted by Sertoli cells (SC) in a FSH-dependent manner, is able to induce the release of Ca2+ from internal stores in round spermatids and pachytene spermatocytes. In this study, the possible site(s) of action of AA in round spermatids, the signalling pathways associated and the intracellular Ca2+ stores targeted by AA-induced signalling were pharmacologically characterized by measuring intracellular Ca2+ using fluorescent Ca2+ probes. Our results suggest that AA acts by interacting with a fatty acid G protein coupled receptor, initiating a G protein signalling cascade that may involve PLA2 and ERK activation, which in turn opens intracellular ryanodine-sensitive channels as well as NAADP-sensitive channels in acidic intracellular Ca2+ stores. The results presented here also suggest that AMPK and PKA modulate this AA-induced Ca2+ release from intracellular Ca2+ stores in round spermatids. We propose that unsaturated free fatty acid lipid signalling in the seminiferous tubule is a novel regulatory component of rat spermatogenesis.

  7. Arachidonic acid triggers [Ca2+]i increases in rat round spermatids by a likely GPR activation, ERK signalling and ER/acidic compartments Ca2+ release

    PubMed Central

    Paillamanque, Joaquin; Sanchez-Tusie, Ana; Carmona, Emerson M.; Treviño, Claudia L.; Sandoval, Carolina; Nualart, Francisco; Osses, Nelson

    2017-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA), a compound secreted by Sertoli cells (SC) in a FSH-dependent manner, is able to induce the release of Ca2+ from internal stores in round spermatids and pachytene spermatocytes. In this study, the possible site(s) of action of AA in round spermatids, the signalling pathways associated and the intracellular Ca2+ stores targeted by AA-induced signalling were pharmacologically characterized by measuring intracellular Ca2+ using fluorescent Ca2+ probes. Our results suggest that AA acts by interacting with a fatty acid G protein coupled receptor, initiating a G protein signalling cascade that may involve PLA2 and ERK activation, which in turn opens intracellular ryanodine-sensitive channels as well as NAADP-sensitive channels in acidic intracellular Ca2+ stores. The results presented here also suggest that AMPK and PKA modulate this AA-induced Ca2+ release from intracellular Ca2+ stores in round spermatids. We propose that unsaturated free fatty acid lipid signalling in the seminiferous tubule is a novel regulatory component of rat spermatogenesis. PMID:28192519

  8. Biosynthesis of terephthalic acid, isophthalic acid and their derivatives from the corresponding dinitriles by tetrachloroterephthalonitrile-induced Rhodococcus sp.

    PubMed

    He, Yu-Cai; Wu, Ya-Dong; Pan, Xue-He; Ma, Cui-Luan

    2014-02-01

    The nitrilase from Rhodococcus sp. CCZU10-1 catalyses the hydrolysis of dinitriles to acids without the formation of amides and cyanocarboxylic acids. It was induced by benzonitrile and its analogues (tetrachloroterephthalonitrile > ε-caprolactam > benzonitrile > phenylacetonitrile), and had activity towards aromatic nitriles (terephthalonitrile > tetrachloroterephthalonitrile > isophthalonitrile > tetrachloroisophthalonitrile > tetrafluoroterephthalonitrile > benzonitrile). After the optimization, the highest nitrilase induction [311 U/(g DCW)] was achieved with tetrachloroterephthalonitrile (1 mM) in the medium after 24 h at 30 °C after optimum enzyme activity was at pH 6.8 and at 30 °C. Efficient biocatalyst recycling was achieved by cell immobilization in calcium alginate, with a product-to-biocatalyst ratios of 776 g terephthalic acid/g DCW and 630 g isophthalic acid/g DCW.

  9. Poly(acrylic acid) to induce competitive crystallization of a theophylline/oxalic acid cocrystal and a theophylline polymorph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jisun; Kim, Il Won

    2016-01-01

    Polymeric additives to induce competitive crystallization of pharmaceutical compounds were explored. A cocrystal of theophylline and oxalic acid was used as a model system, and poly(acrylic acid), poly(caprolactone), and poly(ethylene glycol) were the additives. The cocrystal formation was selectively hindered with addition of poly(acrylic acid). First the size of the cocrystals were reduced, and eventually the cocrystallization was inhibited to generate neat theophylline crystals. The theophylline crystals were of a distinctively different crystal structure from known polymorphs, based on powder X-ray diffraction. They were also obtained in nanoscale size, when millimeter-scale crystals formed without poly(acrylic acid). Polymeric additives that could form specific interactions with crystallizing compounds seem to be useful tools for the phase and size control of pharmaceutical crystals.

  10. New insights into structural alteration of enamel apatite induced by citric acid and sodium fluoride solutions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojie; Klocke, Arndt; Mihailova, Boriana; Tosheva, Lubomira; Bismayer, Ulrich

    2008-07-24

    Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy and complementary scanning electron microscopy were applied to analyze the surface structure of enamel apatite exposed to citric acid and to investigate the protective potential of fluorine-containing reagents against citric acid-induced erosion. Enamel and, for comparison, geological hydroxylapatite samples were treated with aqueous solutions of citric acid and sodium fluoride of different concentrations, ranging from 0.01 to 0.5 mol/L for citric acid solutions and from 0.5 to 2.0% for fluoride solutions. The two solutions were applied either simultaneously or consecutively. The citric acid-induced structural modification of apatite increases with the increase in the citric acid concentration and the number of treatments. The application of sodium fluoride alone does not suppress the atomic level changes in apatite exposed to acidic agents. The addition of sodium fluoride to citric acid solutions leads to formation of surface CaF2 and considerably reduces the changes in the apatite P-O-Ca framework. However, the CaF2 globules deposited on the enamel surface seem to be insufficient to prevent the alteration of the apatite structure upon further exposure to acidic agents. No evidence for fluorine-induced recovery of the apatite structure was found.

  11. Ascorbic acid and protein glycation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sadowska-Bartosz, Izabela; Bartosz, Grzegorz

    2015-10-05

    The aim of the study was to compare the effects of ascorbic acid (AA) in vitro in the absence and in the presence of cell-dependent recycling. In a cell-free system, AA enhanced glycoxidation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) by glucose and induced BSA glycation in the absence of sugars. On the other hand, AA did not affect erythrocyte hemolysis, glycation of hemoglobin and erythrocyte membranes, and inactivation of catalase, protected against inactivation of acetylcholinesterase of erythrocytes incubated with high glucose concentrations and enhanced the loss of glutathione. These results can be explained by assumption that AA acts as a proglycating agent in the absence of recycling while is an antiglycating agent when metabolic recycling occurs.

  12. Is the serum amyloid A protein in acute phase plasma high density lipoprotein the precursor of AA amyloid fibrils?

    PubMed Central

    Baltz, M L; Rowe, I F; Caspi, D; Turnell, W G; Pepys, M B

    1986-01-01

    Serum amyloid A protein (SAA), an apolipoprotein of high density lipoprotein (HDL), is generally considered to be the precursor of AA protein, which forms the fibrils in reactive systemic amyloidosis in man and animals. This view is based on amino acid sequence identity between AA and the amino-terminal portion of SAA. However, in extensive and well-controlled studies of experimentally induced murine AA amyloidosis, we were unable to demonstrate a direct precursor-product relationship between SAA, in SAA-rich HDL preparations from acute phase or amyloidotic mouse or human serum, and AA protein in the amyloid deposits. This raises the possibility that SAA in its usual form, as an apolipoprotein of HDL synthesized during the acute phase response, may not be the major precursor of AA fibrils. The amyloidogenic forms of circulating SAA molecules may not be isolated during the preparation of HDL. Alternatively, particularly in the light of recent evidence that SAA mRNA is expressed in many different tissues throughout the body of appropriately stimulated animals, amyloidogenic SAA may be derived from sources other than the liver cells in which SAA-rich HDL is synthesized. PMID:3105937

  13. The acid-induced folded state of Sac7d is the native state.

    PubMed Central

    Bedell, J. L.; McCrary, B. S.; Edmondson, S. P.; Shriver, J. W.

    2000-01-01

    Sac7d unfolds at low pH in the absence of salt, with the greatest extent of unfolding obtained at pH 2. We have previously shown that the acid unfolded protein is induced to refold by decreasing the pH to 0 or by addition of salt (McCrary BS, Bedell J. Edmondson SP, Shriver JW, 1998, J Mol Biol 276:203-224). Both near-ultraviolet circular dichroism spectra and ANS fluorescence enhancements indicate that the acid- and salt-induced folded states have a native fold and are not molten globular. 1H,15N heteronuclear single quantum coherence NMR spectra confirm that the native, acid-, and salt-induced folded states are essentially identical. The most significant differences in amide 1H and 15N chemical shifts are attributed to hydrogen bonding to titrating carboxyl side chains and through-bond inductive effects. The 1H NMR chemical shifts of protons affected by ring currents in the hydrophobic core of the acid- and salt-induced folded states are identical to those observed in the native. The radius of gyration of the acid-induced folded state at pH 0 is shown to be identical to that of the native state at pH 7 by small angle X-ray scattering. We conclude that acid-induced collapse of Sac7d does not lead to a molten globule but proceeds directly to the native state. The folding of Sac7d as a function of pH and anion concentration is summarized with a phase diagram that is similar to those observed for other proteins that undergo acid-induced folding except that the A-state is encompassed by the native state. These results demonstrate that formation of a molten globule is not a general property of proteins that are refolded by acid. PMID:11106160

  14. Graft polymerization using radiation-induced peroxides and application to textile dyeing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, Ichiro; Katsumura, Yosuke; Kudo, Hisaaki; Soeda, Shin

    2011-02-01

    To improve the dyeing affinity of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fiber, surface treatment by radiation-induced graft polymerization was performed. Methyl methacrylate (MMA), acrylic acid (AA) and styrene (St) were used as the monomers. The grafting yields as a function of storage time after irradiation were examined. Although the grafting yield of St after the sulfonation processing was quite low compared with those of MMA and AA, it was successfully dyed to a dark color with a cationic dye. Some acid dyes can dye the grafted fiber with AA. The acid dye is distributed to the amorphous domains of the AA grafted fiber. The dyeing concentration depended on the grafting yield, and the higher the grafting yield the darker the dye color.

  15. Effects of unsaturated fatty acids on the kinetics of voltage‐gated proton channels heterologously expressed in cultured cells

    PubMed Central

    Kawanabe, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Key points Arachidonic acid (AA) greatly enhances the activity of the voltage‐gated proton (Hv) channel, although its mechanism of action and physiological function remain unclear.In the present study, we analysed the effects of AA on proton currents through Hv channels heterologously expressed in HEK293T cells.The dramatic increase in proton current amplitude elicited by AA was accompanied by accelerated activation kinetics and a leftward shift in the voltage‐dependence of activation.Mutagenesis studies suggest the two aforementioned effects of AA reflect two distinct structural mechanisms.Application of phospholipase A2, which liberates AA from phospholipids in the membrane, also enhances Hv channel activity, supporting the idea that AA modulates Hv channel activity within physiological contexts. Abstract Unsaturated fatty acids are key components of the biological membranes of all cells, and precursors of mediators for cell signalling. Arachidonic acid (AA) is an unsaturated fatty acid known to modulate the activities of various ion channels, including the voltage‐gated proton (Hv) channel, which supports the rapid production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in phagocytes through regulation of pH and membrane potential. However, the molecular mechanisms and physiological functions of the effects of AA on Hv channels remain unclear. In the present study, we report an electrophysiological analysis of the effects of AA on the mouse Hv channel (mHv1) heterologously expressed in HEK293T cells. Application of AA to excised inside‐out patch membranes rapidly induced a robust increase in the amplitude of the proton current through mHv1. The current increase was accompanied by accelerated activation kinetics and a small leftward shift of the current–voltage relationship. In monomeric channels lacking the coiled‐coil region of the channel protein, the shift in the current–voltage relationship was diminished but activation and deactivation remained

  16. Dietary linoleic acid-induced alterations in pro- and anti-nociceptive lipid autacoids

    PubMed Central

    Ringel, Amit; Majchrzak-Hong, Sharon F; Yang, Jun; Blanchard, Helene; Zamora, Daisy; Loewke, James D; Rapoport, Stanley I; Hibbeln, Joseph R; Davis, John M; Hammock, Bruce D; Taha, Ameer Y

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic idiopathic pain syndromes are major causes of personal suffering, disability, and societal expense. Dietary n-6 linoleic acid has increased markedly in modern industrialized populations over the past century. These high amounts of linoleic acid could hypothetically predispose to physical pain by increasing the production of pro-nociceptive linoleic acid-derived lipid autacoids and by interfering with the production of anti-nociceptive lipid autacoids derived from n-3 fatty acids. Here, we used a rat model to determine the effect of increasing dietary linoleic acid as a controlled variable for 15 weeks on nociceptive lipid autacoids and their precursor n-6 and n-3 fatty acids in tissues associated with idiopathic pain syndromes. Results Increasing dietary linoleic acid markedly increased the abundance of linoleic acid and its pro-nociceptive derivatives and reduced the abundance of n-3 eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid and their anti-nociceptive monoepoxide derivatives. Diet-induced changes occurred in a tissue-specific manner, with marked alterations of nociceptive lipid autacoids in both peripheral and central tissues, and the most pronounced changes in their fatty acid precursors in peripheral tissues. Conclusions The present findings provide biochemical support for the hypothesis that the high linoleic acid content of modern industrialized diets may create a biochemical susceptibility to develop chronic pain. Dietary linoleic acid lowering should be further investigated as part of an integrative strategy for the prevention and management of idiopathic pain syndromes. PMID:27030719

  17. Relationships between fatty acids and psychophysiological parameters in depressive inpatients under experimentally induced stress.

    PubMed

    Irmisch, G; Schläfke, D; Richter, J

    2006-02-01

    Fatty acids can influence important cellular and hormonal processes in the human body. Non-adequate contents of fatty acids, e.g., in blood, can cause and/or result in various diseases. In depressive patients, changes in fatty acid concentrations were found (deficits in omega3-fatty acids, in particular). This paper poses the question whether there are any relations between psychophysiological parameters and changes in fatty acid compositions. The concentration of fatty acids in serum of 118 psychiatric inpatients measured directly before and after experimentally induced stress of about 1h were analysed in relation to psychophysiological parameters continuously registered during the experimental sessions at admission, discharge and at 3 months follow-up. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure, finger pulse amplitude, forehead temperature (FD) and the EMG activity of the musculus zygomaticus consistently correlated with concentrations of single unsaturated oleic (18:1n-9) and erucic acid (22:1) and saturated myristic (14:0) and lauric acid (12:0). Negative relations were found between FD and the concentration of arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) as well as of palmitoleic acid (16:1). Furthermore, the higher the concentration of the erucic acid at discharge the higher the depression score as assessed by the Beck depression inventory (BDI). High concentrations of palmitoleic acid and lauric acid were related to a low level of depression (BDI and Hamilton scores). The implications of these findings for add-on treatment regimens in depression are discussed.

  18. The amelioration effect of tranexamic acid in wrinkles induced by skin dryness.

    PubMed

    Hiramoto, Keiichi; Sugiyama, Daijiro; Takahashi, Yumi; Mafune, Eiichi

    2016-05-01

    Tranexamic acid (trans-4-aminomethylcyclohexanecarboxylic acid) is a medical amino acid widely used as an anti-inflammatory and a whitening agent. This study examined the effect of tranexamic acid administration in wrinkle formation following skin dryness. We administered tranexamic acid (750mg/kg/day) orally for 20 consecutive days to Naruto Research Institute Otsuka Atrichia (NOA) mice, which naturally develop skin dryness. In these NOA mice, deterioration of transepidermal water loss (TEWL), generation of wrinkles, decrease of collagen type I, and increases in mast cell proliferation and tryptase and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-1) release were observed. However, these symptoms were improved by tranexamic acid treatment. Moreover, the increase in the β-endorphin level in the blood and the expression of μ-opioid receptor on the surface of fibroblasts increased by tranexamic acid treatment. In addition, when the fibroblasts induced by tranexamic acid treatment were removed, the amelioration effect by tranexamic acid treatment was halved. On the other hand, tranexamic acid treated NOA mice and mast cell removal in tranexamic acid treated NOA mice did not result in changes in the wrinkle amelioration effect. Additionally, the amelioration effect of mast cell deficient NOA mice was half that of tranexamic acid treated NOA mice. These results indicate that tranexamic acid decreased the proliferation of mast cells and increases the proliferation of fibroblasts, subsequently improving wrinkles caused by skin dryness.

  19. Properties of an Inducible C4-Dicarboxylic Acid Transport System in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Ghei, Om. K.; Kay, William W.

    1973-01-01

    The transport of the tricarboxylic acid cycle C4-dicarboxylic acids was studied in both the wild-type strain and tricarboxylic acid cycle mutants of Bacillus subtilis. Active transport of malate, fumarate, and succinate was found to be inducible by these dicarboxylic acids or by precursors to them, whereas glucose or closely related metabolites catabolite-repressed their uptake. l-Malate was found to be the best dicarboxylic acid transport inducer in succinic dehydrogenase, fumarase, and malic dehydrogenase mutants. Succinate and fumarate are accumulated over 100-fold in succinic dehydrogenase and fumarase mutants, respectively, whereas mutants lacking malate dehydrogenase were unable to accumulate significant quantities of the C4-dicarboxylic acids. The stereospecificity of this transport system was studied from a comparison of the rates of competitive inhibition of both succinate uptake and efflux in a succinate dehydrogenase mutant by utilizing thirty dicarboxylic acid analogues. The system was specific for the C4-dicarboxylic acids of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, neither citrate nor α-ketoglutarate were effective competitive inhibitors. Of a wide variety of metabolic inhibitors tested, inhibiors of oxidative phosphorylation and of the formation of proton gradients were the most potent inhibitors of transport. From the kinetics of dicarboxylic acid transport (Km approximately 10−4 M for succinate or fumarate in succinic acid dehydrogenase and fumarase mutants) and from the competitive inhibition studies, it was concluded that an inducible dicarboxylic acid transport system mediates the entry of malate, fumarate, or succinate into B. subtilis. Mutants devoid of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase were shown to accumulate both α-ketoglutarate and glutamate, and these metabolites subsequently inhibited the transport of all the C4-dicarboxylic acids, suggesting a regulatory role. Images PMID:4633350

  20. Eicosopentaneoic Acid and Other Free Fatty Acid Receptor Agonists Inhibit Lysophosphatidic Acid- and Epidermal Growth Factor-Induced Proliferation of Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Mandi M.; Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Ze; Meier, Kathryn E.

    2016-01-01

    Many key actions of ω-3 (n-3) fatty acids have recently been shown to be mediated by two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the free fatty acid receptor (FFAR) family, FFA1 (GPR40) and FFA4 (GPR120). n-3 Fatty acids inhibit proliferation of human breast cancer cells in culture and in animals. In the current study, the roles of FFA1 and FFA4 were investigated. In addition, the role of cross-talk between GPCRs activated by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and the tyrosine kinase receptor activated by epidermal growth factor (EGF), was examined. In MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines, both LPA and EGF stimulated proliferation, Erk activation, Akt activation, and CCN1 induction. LPA antagonists blocked effects of LPA and EGF on proliferation in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and on cell migration in MCF-7. The n-3 fatty acid eicosopentaneoic acid inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation in both cell lines. Two synthetic FFAR agonists, GW9508 and TUG-891, likewise inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation. The data suggest a major role for FFA1, which was expressed by both cell lines. The results indicate that n-3 fatty acids inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation via FFARs, and suggest a mechanism involving negative cross-talk between FFARS, LPA receptors, and EGF receptor. PMID:26821052

  1. Eicosopentaneoic Acid and Other Free Fatty Acid Receptor Agonists Inhibit Lysophosphatidic Acid- and Epidermal Growth Factor-Induced Proliferation of Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Mandi M; Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Ze; Meier, Kathryn E

    2016-01-26

    Many key actions of ω-3 (n-3) fatty acids have recently been shown to be mediated by two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the free fatty acid receptor (FFAR) family, FFA1 (GPR40) and FFA4 (GPR120). n-3 Fatty acids inhibit proliferation of human breast cancer cells in culture and in animals. In the current study, the roles of FFA1 and FFA4 were investigated. In addition, the role of cross-talk between GPCRs activated by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and the tyrosine kinase receptor activated by epidermal growth factor (EGF), was examined. In MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines, both LPA and EGF stimulated proliferation, Erk activation, Akt activation, and CCN1 induction. LPA antagonists blocked effects of LPA and EGF on proliferation in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and on cell migration in MCF-7. The n-3 fatty acid eicosopentaneoic acid inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation in both cell lines. Two synthetic FFAR agonists, GW9508 and TUG-891, likewise inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation. The data suggest a major role for FFA1, which was expressed by both cell lines. The results indicate that n-3 fatty acids inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation via FFARs, and suggest a mechanism involving negative cross-talk between FFARS, LPA receptors, and EGF receptor.

  2. Bile acid-induced necrosis in primary human hepatocytes and in patients with obstructive cholestasis

    SciTech Connect

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Dorko, Kenneth; Antoine, Daniel J.; Clarke, Joanna I.; Gholami, Parviz; Li, Feng; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson; Fan, Fang; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Park, B. Kevin; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Olyaee, Mojtaba; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of bile acids is a major mediator of cholestatic liver injury. Recent studies indicate bile acid composition between humans and rodents is dramatically different, as humans have a higher percent of glycine conjugated bile acids and increased chenodeoxycholate content, which increases the hydrophobicity index of bile acids. This increase may lead to direct toxicity that kills hepatocytes, and promotes inflammation. To address this issue, this study assessed how pathophysiological concentrations of bile acids measured in cholestatic patients affected primary human hepatocytes. Individual bile acid levels were determined in serum and bile by UPLC/QTOFMS in patients with extrahepatic cholestasis with, or without, concurrent increases in serum transaminases. Bile acid levels increased in serum of patients with liver injury, while biliary levels decreased, implicating infarction of the biliary tracts. To assess bile acid-induced toxicity in man, primary human hepatocytes were treated with relevant concentrations, derived from patient data, of the model bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). Treatment with GCDC resulted in necrosis with no increase in apoptotic parameters. This was recapitulated by treatment with biliary bile acid concentrations, but not serum concentrations. Marked elevations in serum full-length cytokeratin-18, high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), and acetylated HMGB1 confirmed inflammatory necrosis in injured patients; only modest elevations in caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 were observed. These data suggest human hepatocytes are more resistant to human-relevant bile acids than rodent hepatocytes, and die through necrosis when exposed to bile acids. These mechanisms of cholestasis in humans are fundamentally different to mechanisms observed in rodent models. - Highlights: • Cholestatic liver injury is due to cytoplasmic bile acid accumulation in hepatocytes. • Primary human hepatocytes are resistant to BA-induced injury

  3. Energetic particle-induced enhancements of stratospheric nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1994-01-01

    Inclusion of complete ion chemistry in the calculation of minor species production during energetic particle deposition events leads to significant enhancement in the calculated nitric acid concentration during precipitation. An ionization rate of 1.2 x 10(exp 3)/cu cm/s imposed for 1 day increases HNO3 from 3 x 10(exp 5) to 6 x 10(exp 7)/cu cm at 50 km. With an ionization rate of 600 cu cm/s, the maximum HNO3 is 3 x 10(exp 7)/cu cm. Calculations which neglect negative ions predict the nitric acid will fall during precipitation events. The decay time for converting HNO3 into odd nitrogen and hydrogen is more than 1 day for equinoctial periods at 70 deg latitude. Examination of nitric acid data should yield important information on the magnitude and frequency of charged particle events.

  4. [Pseudothrombocytopenia induced by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid in burned patients].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; Contreras-Domínguez, Vladimir

    2004-01-01

    The EDTA-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia is a false decrease in the number of platelets below the normal value when analyzed with automated devices. There is an incidence of 0.09 to 0.21% in hospitalized patients. Pseudothrombocytopenia is secondary to platelet clumping induced by antibodies in the presence of EDTA and has been associated with sepsis, cancer, cardiac surgery and drugs. We report the first case of pseudothrombocytopenia induced by EDTA in a burn patient.

  5. Mechanism underlying mitochondrial protection of asiatic acid against hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; Chen, Jin; Tang, Xinhui; Pan, Liya; Fang, Feng; Xu, Lizhi; Zhao, Xiaoning; Xu, Qiang

    2006-02-01

    Asiatic acid (AA) is one of the triterpenoid components of Terminalia catappa L., which has antioxidative, anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective activity. This research focused on the mitochondrial protection of AA against acute liver injury induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and D-galactosamine (D-GalN) in mice. It was found that pretreatment with 25, 50 or 100 mg kg(-1) AA significantly blocked the LPS + D-GalN-induced increase in both serum aspartate aminotransferase (sAST) and serum alanine aminotransferase (sALT) levels, which was confirmed by ultrastructural observation under an electron microscope, showing improved nuclear condensation, ameliorated mitochondrion proliferation and less lipid deposition. Meanwhile, different doses of AA could decrease both the transcription and the translation level of voltage-dependent anion channels (VDACs), the most important mitochondrial PTP component protein, and block the translocation of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol. On the other hand, pre-incubation with 25, 50 and 100 microg mL(-1) AA inhibited the Ca(2+)-induced mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT), including mitochondrial swelling, membrane potential dissipation and releasing of matrix Ca(2+) in liver mitochondria separated from normal mice, indicating the direct role of AA on mitochondria. Collectively, the above data suggest that AA could protect liver from damage and the mechanism might be related to up-regulating mitochondrial VDACs and inhibiting the process of MPT.

  6. Acanthoic acid, a diterpene in Acanthopanax koreanum, ameliorates the development of liver fibrosis via LXRs signals.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ting; Yao, You-li; Jin, Xue-jun; Lian, Li-hua; Li, Qian; Yang, Ning; Jin, Quan; Wu, Yan-ling; Nan, Ji-xing

    2014-07-25

    Liver X receptors (LXRs)-mediated signals in acanthoic acid (AA) ameliorating liver fibrosis were examined in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced mice and TGF-β stimulated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). AA was isolated from the root of Acanthopanax koreanum Nakai (Araliaceae). CCl4-treated mice were intraperitoneally injected with 10% CCl4 in olive oil (2 mL/kg for 8 weeks). In AA treated groups, mice were intragastrically administrated with AA (20 mg/kg or 50 mg/kg) 3 times per week for 8 weeks. Administration of AA reduced serum aminotransferase and tissue necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels evoked by CCl4, and the reverse of liver damage was further confirmed by histopathological staining. Administration of AA reduced the expression of fibrosis markers and regulated the ratio of MMP-13/TIMP-1, further reversed the development of liver fibrosis. TGF-β (5 ng/ml) was added to activate HSC-T6 cells for 2 h, and then treated with AA (1, 3, or 10 μmol/l) for 24 h before analysis. Cells were collected and proteins were extracted to detect the expressions of LXRs. AA could inhibit the expression of α-SMA stimulated by TGF-β and increase the expression of LXRβ. In vivo and in vitro experiments, AA could modulate liver fibrosis induced by CCl4-treatment via activation of LXRα and LXRβ, while inhibit HSCs activation only via activation of LXRβ. Acanthoic acid might ameliorate liver fibrosis induced by CCl4 via LXRs signals.

  7. [Effect of calcium on medium alkalinization induced by salicylic acid in Salvia miltiorrhiza suspension cultures].

    PubMed

    Liu, Liancheng; Wang, Cong; Dong, Juan'e; Su, Hui; Zhuo, Zequn; Xue, Yaxin

    2013-07-01

    We studied medium alkalinization in Salvia miltiorrhiza suspension cultures treated with salicylic acid and the effect of Ca2+ in this process through application of calcium channel antagonists (Verapamil, LaCl3, LiCl, 2-APB) and ionophore A23187. The results show that salicylic acid could induce significant medium alkalinization in S. miltiorrhiza culture. Verapamil and LaCl3 or LiCl and 2-APB, two different groups of calcium channel antagonist, significantly inhibited the medium alkalinization induced by salicylic acid. However, the suppression effect of verapamil or LaCl3 on medium alkalinization induced by salicylic acid was higher than that of LiCl or 2-APB. When two types of calcium channel inhibitor (LaCl3 and 2-APB) were used together, the medium alkalinization induced by salicylic acid was completely suppressed and even reduced the pH in medium. On the other hand, A23187 could promote the medium alkalinization. Based on the results above, we speculated that salicylic acid could induce significant medium alkalinization in S. miltiorrhiza culture, depending on the calcium from both extracell and intracell. Moreover, calcium from extracell plays a more dominant role in this process. Reveal of relationship in this research between Ca2+ and medium alkalinization can provide theory evidence for mechanism of the plant secondary metabolism.

  8. Nucleic acid-induced antiviral immunity in invertebrates: an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-Hui; Weng, Shao-Ping; He, Jian-Guo

    2015-02-01

    Nucleic acids derived from viral pathogens are typical pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). In mammals, the recognition of viral nucleic acids by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which include Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and retinoic acid-inducible gene (RIG)-I-like receptors (RLRs), induces the release of inflammatory cytokines and type I interferons (IFNs) through the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3/7 pathways, triggering the host antiviral state. However, whether nucleic acids can induce similar antiviral immunity in invertebrates remains ambiguous. Several studies have reported that nucleic acid mimics, especially dsRNA mimic poly(I:C), can strongly induce non-specific antiviral immune responses in insects, shrimp, and oyster. This behavior shows multiple similarities to the hallmarks of mammalian IFN responses. In this review, we highlight the current understanding of nucleic acid-induced antiviral immunity in invertebrates. We also discuss the potential recognition and regulatory mechanisms that confer non-specific antiviral immunity on invertebrate hosts.

  9. Dynamic aspects of ascorbic acid metabolism in the circulation: analysis by ascorbate oxidase with a prolonged in vivo half-life.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Emiko; Kashiba, Misato; Jikumaru, Mika; Kuratsune, Daisuke; Orita, Kumi; Yamate, Yurika; Hara, Kenjiro; Sekiyama, Atsuo; Sato, Eisuke F; Inoue, Masayasu

    2009-06-26

    Because AA (L-ascorbic acid) scavenges various types of free radicals to form MDAA (monodehydroascorbic acid) and DAA (dehydroascorbic acid), its regeneration from the oxidized metabolites is critically important for humans and other animals that lack the ability to synthesize this antioxidant. To study the dynamic aspects of AA metabolism in the circulation, a long acting AOase (ascorbate oxidase) derivative was synthesized by covalently linking PEG [poly(ethylene glycol)] to the enzyme. Fairly low concentrations of the modified enzyme (PEG-AOase) rapidly decreased AA levels in isolated fresh plasma and blood samples with a concomitant increase in their levels of MDAA and DAA. In contrast, relatively high doses of PEG-AOase were required to decrease the circulating plasma AA levels of both normal rats and ODS (osteogenic disorder Shionogi) rats that lack the ability to synthesize AA. Administration of 50 units of PEG-AOase/kg of body weight rapidly decreased AA levels in plasma and the kidney without affecting the levels in other tissues, such as the liver, brain, lung, adrenal grand and skeletal muscles. PEG-AOase slightly, but significantly, decreased glutathione (GSH) levels in the liver without affecting those in other tissues. Suppression of hepatic synthesis of GSH by administration of BSO [L-buthionin-(S,R)-sulfoximine] enhanced the PEG-AOase-induced decrease in plasma AA levels. These and other results suggest that the circulating AA is reductively regenerated from MDAA extremely rapidly and that hepatic GSH plays important roles in the regeneration of this antioxidant.

  10. Glucose supplementation-induced changes in the Auxenochlorella protothecoides fatty acid composition suitable for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Krzemińska, Izabela; Oleszek, Marta

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluates the effect of different concentrations of glucose supplementation on growth, lipid accumulation, and the fatty acid profile in the Auxenochlorella protothecoides. Addition of glucose promoted the growth rate and decreased the chlorophyll content. Compared with photoautotrophic cells, an increase in the lipid content was observed in mixotrophic cells. The glucose addition induced changes in the fatty acid profile. Higher content of saturated fatty acids was found in the case of cells growing in the glucose-free medium. Oleic acid was the predominant component in mixotrophic cells supplemented with 5gL(-1) glucose, while linoleic acids dominated in cultures supplemented with both 1 and 3gL(-1) glucose. The use of glucose was associated with decreased levels of linolenic acid and PUFA. The changes in the fatty acid profile in mixotrophic cells are favourable for biodiesel production.

  11. Cytoprotective effects of phenolic acids on methylglyoxal-induced apoptosis in Neuro-2A cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shang-Ming; Chuang, Hong-Chih; Wu, Chi-Hao; Yen, Gow-Chin

    2008-08-01

    In the process of glycation, methylglyoxal is a reactive dicarbonyl compound physiologically generated as an intermediate of glycolysis, and is found in high levels in blood or tissue of diabetic models. Biological glycation has been commonly implicated in the development of diabetic microvascular complications of neuropathy. Increasing evidence suggests that neuronal cell cycle regulatory failure followed by apoptosis is an important mechanism in the development of diabetic neuropathy complication. Naturally occurring antioxidants, especially phenolic acids have been recommended as the major bioactive compounds to prevent chronic diseases and promote health benefits. The objective of this study was to investigate the inhibitory abilities of phenolic acids (chlorogenic acid, syringic acid and vanillic acid) on methylglyoxal-induced mouse Neuro-2A neuroblastoma (Neuro-2A) cell apoptosis in the progression of diabetic neuropathy. The data indicated that methylglyoxal induced mouse Neuro-2A neuroblastoma (Neuro-2A) cell apoptosis via alternation of mitochondria membrane potential and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, activation of caspase-3, and cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. Furthermore, the results demonstrated that activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase signal pathways (JNK and p38) participated in the methylglyoxal-induced Neuro-2A cell apoptosis process. Treatment of Neuro-2A cells with phenolic acids markedly suppresses cell apoptosis induced by methylglyoxal, suggesting that phenolic acids possess cytoprotective ability in the prevention of diabetic neuropathy complication.

  12. Minocycline ameliorates prenatal valproic acid induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairments in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hariom; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopment disorder. One percent worldwide population suffers with autism and males suffer more than females. Microglia plays an important role in neurodevelopment, neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. The present study has been designed to investigate the role of minocycline in prenatal valproic acid induced autism in rats. Animals with prenatal valproic acid have reduced social interaction (three chamber social behaviour apparatus), spontaneous alteration (Y-Maze), exploratory activity (Hole board test), intestinal motility, serotonin levels (both in prefrontal cortex and ileum) and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity (complexes I, II, IV). Furthermore, prenatal valproic acid treated animals have shown an increase in locomotion (actophotometer), anxiety (elevated plus maze), brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive species, glutathione, catalase), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), inflammation (both in brain and ileum myeloperoxidase activity), calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Treatment with minocycline significantly attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced reduction in social interaction, spontaneous alteration, exploratory activity intestinal motility, serotonin levels and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity. Furthermore, minocycline has also attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced increase in locomotion, anxiety, brain oxidative and nitrosative stress, inflammation, calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Thus, it may be concluded that prenatal valproic acid has induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairment in animals, which were significantly attenuated by minocycline. Minocycline should be explored further for its therapeutic benefits in autism.

  13. Chronic exercise dampens hippocampal glutamate overflow induced by kainic acid in rats.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Philip V; Reiss, Jenny I; Murray, Patrick S; Dishman, Rod K; Spradley, Jessica M

    2015-05-01

    Our laboratory has previously reported that chronic, voluntary exercise diminishes seizure-related behaviors induced by convulsant doses of kainic acid. The present experiments tested the hypothesis that exercise exerts this protective effect through a mechanism involving suppression of glutamate release in the hippocampal formation. Following three weeks of voluntary wheel running or sedentary conditions, rats were injected with 10 mg/kg of kainic acid, and hippocampal glutamate was measured in real time using a telemetric, in vivo voltammetry system. A separate experiment measured electroencephalographic (EEG) activity following kainic acid treatment. Results of the voltammetry experiment revealed that the rise in hippocampal glutamate induced by kainic acid is attenuated in exercising rats compared to sedentary controls, indicating that the exercise-induced protection against seizures involves regulation of hippocampal glutamate release. The findings reveal the potential benefit of regular exercise in the treatment and prevention of seizure disorders and suggest a possible neurobiological mechanism underlying this effect.

  14. Induced lung inflammation and dietary protein supply affect nitrogen retention and amino acid metabolism in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Kampman-van de Hoek, Esther; Sakkas, Panagiotis; Gerrits, Walter J J; van den Borne, Joost J G C; van der Peet-Schwering, Carola M C; Jansman, Alfons J M

    2015-02-14

    It is hypothesised that during immune system activation, there is a competition for amino acids (AA) between body protein deposition and immune system functioning. The aim of the present study was to quantify the effect of immune system activation on N retention and AA metabolism in growing pigs, depending on dietary protein supply. A total of sixteen barrows received an adequate (Ad) or restricted (Res) amount of dietary protein, and were challenged at day 0 with intravenous complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). At days - 5, 3 and 8, an irreversible loss rate (ILR) of eight AA was determined. CFA successfully activated the immune system, as indicated by a 2- to 4-fold increase in serum concentrations of acute-phase proteins (APP). Pre-challenge C-reactive protein concentrations were lower (P< 0·05) and pre- and post-challenge albumin tended to be lower in Res-pigs. These findings indicate that a restricted protein supply can limit the acute-phase response. CFA increased urinary N losses (P= 0·04) and tended to reduce N retention in Ad-pigs, but not in Res-pigs (P= 0·07). The ILR for Val was lower (P= 0·05) at day 8 than at day 3 in the post-challenge period. The ILR of most AA, except for Trp, were strongly affected by dietary protein supply and positively correlated with N retention. The correlations between the ILR and APP indices were absent or negative, indicating that changes in AA utilisation for APP synthesis were either not substantial or more likely outweighed by a decrease in muscle protein synthesis during immune system activation in growing pigs.

  15. Autophagy Protects against Palmitic Acid-Induced Apoptosis in Podocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xu-Shun; Chen, Xue-Mei; Wan, Jiang-Min; Gui, Hai-Bo; Ruan, Xiong-Zhong; Du, Xiao-Gang

    2017-02-22

    Autophagy is a highly conserved degradation process that is involved in the clearance of proteins and damaged organelles to maintain intracellular homeostasis and cell integrity. Type 2 diabetes is often accompanied by dyslipidemia with elevated levels of free fatty acids (FFAs). Podocytes, as an important component of the filtration barrier, are susceptible to lipid disorders. The loss of podocytes causes proteinuria, which is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. In the present study, we demonstrated that palmitic acid (PA) promoted autophagy in podocytes. We further found that PA increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in podocytes and that NAC (N-acetyl-cysteine), a potent antioxidant, significantly eliminated the excessive ROS and suppressed autophagy, indicating that the increased generation of ROS was associated with the palmitic acid-induced autophagy in podocytes. Moreover, we also found that PA stimulation decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential in podocytes and induced podocyte apoptosis, while the inhibition of autophagy by chloroquine (CQ) enhanced palmitic acid-induced apoptosis accompanied by increased ROS generation, and the stimulation of autophagy by rapamycin (Rap) remarkably suppressed palmitic acid-induced ROS generation and apoptosis. Taken together, these in vitro findings suggest that PA-induced autophagy in podocytes is mediated by ROS production and that autophagy plays a protective role against PA-induced podocyte apoptosis.

  16. Autophagy Protects against Palmitic Acid-Induced Apoptosis in Podocytes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xu-shun; Chen, Xue-mei; Wan, Jiang-min; Gui, Hai-bo; Ruan, Xiong-zhong; Du, Xiao-gang

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved degradation process that is involved in the clearance of proteins and damaged organelles to maintain intracellular homeostasis and cell integrity. Type 2 diabetes is often accompanied by dyslipidemia with elevated levels of free fatty acids (FFAs). Podocytes, as an important component of the filtration barrier, are susceptible to lipid disorders. The loss of podocytes causes proteinuria, which is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. In the present study, we demonstrated that palmitic acid (PA) promoted autophagy in podocytes. We further found that PA increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in podocytes and that NAC (N-acetyl-cysteine), a potent antioxidant, significantly eliminated the excessive ROS and suppressed autophagy, indicating that the increased generation of ROS was associated with the palmitic acid-induced autophagy in podocytes. Moreover, we also found that PA stimulation decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential in podocytes and induced podocyte apoptosis, while the inhibition of autophagy by chloroquine (CQ) enhanced palmitic acid-induced apoptosis accompanied by increased ROS generation, and the stimulation of autophagy by rapamycin (Rap) remarkably suppressed palmitic acid-induced ROS generation and apoptosis. Taken together, these in vitro findings suggest that PA-induced autophagy in podocytes is mediated by ROS production and that autophagy plays a protective role against PA-induced podocyte apoptosis. PMID:28225005

  17. Arachidonic acid has protective effects on oxygen-glucose deprived astrocytes mediated through enhancement of potassium channel TREK-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Li; Zhang, Guangru; Song, Chunli; Wang, Xuexi; Qian, Weina; Wang, Zhuanling; Liu, Yanan; Gong, Sheng; Zhou, Shuning

    2017-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have neuroprotective effects against ischemic brain diseases. The newly discovered potassium channel "TREK-1" is a promising target for therapies against neurodegeneration. Arachidonic acid (AA) is an n-6 PUFA, as well as a potent TREK-1 activator. We previously showed that TREK-1 is expressed at high levels in astrocytes. However, the effect of AA on astrocytes in ischemia remains unknown. Here, we assessed the effects of 3-30μM AA on astrocyte apoptosis, glutamate uptake, and expression of the astrocytic glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and TREK-1 under different conditions. Under normal conditions, 3-30μM AA showed no effect on astrocytic apoptosis or TREK-1 expression, whereas glutamate uptake decreased significantly and its change paralleled the decreased expression of GLT-1. When astrocytes were subjected to 4h of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), 10μM AA markedly alleviated OGD-induced cell death, recovering from 63.50±1.90% to 82.96±4.63% of the control value. AA also rescued the decreased glutamate uptake and increased mRNA, as well as protein levels of GLT-1 and TREK-1. Our results provide new evidence of a protective effect of AA on astrocytes under OGD conditions, suggesting that a low concentration of AA may protect against brain ischemic diseases.

  18. Amino acid limitation induces down-regulation of WNT5a at transcriptional level

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zuguang; Chen Hong

    2009-01-23

    An aberrant WNT signaling contributes to the development and progression of multiple cancers. WNT5a is one of the WNT signaling molecules. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that amino acid deprivation induces changes in the WNT signaling pathway in colon cancer cells. Results showed that targets of the amino acid response pathway, ATF3 and p21, were induced in the human colon cancer cell line SW480 during amino acid limitation. There was a significant decrease in the WNT5a mRNA level following amino acid deprivation. The down-regulation of WNT5a mRNA by amino acid deprivation is not due to mRNA destabilization. There is a reduction of nuclear {beta}-catenin protein level by amino acid limitation. Under amino acid limitation, phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was increased and the blockage of ERK1/2 by the inhibitor U0126 partially restored WNT5a mRNA level. In conclusion, amino acid limitation in colon cancer cells induces phosphorylation of ERK1/2, which then down-regulates WNT5a expression.

  19. Effect of sinapic acid against dimethylnitrosamine-induced hepatic fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong-Su; Kim, Kung Wook; Chung, Hae Young; Yoon, Sik; Moon, Jeon-Ok

    2013-05-01

    Sinapic acid is a member of the phenylpropanoid family and is abundant in cereals, nuts, oil seeds, and berries. It exhibits a wide range of pharmacological properties. In this study, we investigated the hepatoprotective and antifibrotic effects of sinapic acid on dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)-induced chronic liver injury in rats. Sinapic acid remarkably prevented DMN-induced loss of body weight. This was accompanied by a significant increase in levels of serum alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, and liver malondialdehyde content. Furthermore, sinapic acid reduced hepatic hydroxyproline content, which correlated with a reduction in the expression of type I collagen mRNA and histological analysis of collagen in liver tissue. Additionally, the expression of hepatic fibrosis-related factors such as α-smooth muscle actin and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), were reduced in rats treated with sinapic acid. Sinapic acid exhibited strong scavenging activity. In conclusion, we find that sinapic acid exhibits hepatoprotective and antifibrotic effects against DMN-induced liver injury, most likely due to its antioxidant activities of scavenging radicals, its capacity to suppress TGF-β1 and its ability to attenuate activation of hepatic stellate cells. This suggests that sinapic acid is a potentially useful agent for the protection against liver fibrosis and cirrhosis.

  20. Endothelium-dependent contraction of rat thoracic aorta induced by gallic acid.

    PubMed

    Sanae, Fujiko; Miyaichi, Yukinori; Hayashi, Hisao

    2003-02-01

    The vascular effect of a component of hydrolysable tannins, gallic acid, was examined in isolated rat thoracic aorta. Gallic acid exerted a contractile effect on the phenylephrine- or prostaglandin F(2/alpha)-precontracted endothelium-intact arteries. In endothelium-denuded arteries, the contractile response to-gallic acid was absent. Pretreatment with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (30 microM) abolished the gallic acid-induced contraction. Pretreatment with indomethacin (10 microM) or BQ610 (100 nM) had no observed effect. Pretreatment with gallic acid (1-10 microM) significantly attenuated the relaxation induced by acetylcholine, and that with 10 microM gallic acid also reduced the potency of sodium nitroprusside in the relaxation, without a reduction in efficacy, in endothelium-denuded arteries. These findings indicate that gallic acid induced endothelium-dependent contraction and strongly inhibited the endothelium-dependent relaxation rather than the endothelium-independent relaxation, probably through inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) production. Since NO plays an important role in vasodilative regulation and inflammatory disorders, these findings may also indicate that gallic acid interferes with the inflammatory responses.

  1. Alteration of bile acid metabolism in the rat induced by chronic ethanol consumption

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guoxiang; Zhong, Wei; Li, Houkai; Li, Qiong; Qiu, Yunping; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Chen, Huiyuan; Zhao, Xueqing; Zhang, Shucha; Zhou, Zhanxiang; Zeisel, Steven H.; Jia, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of the bile acid metabolism is limited by the fact that previous analyses have primarily focused on a selected few circulating bile acids; the bile acid profiles of the liver and gastrointestinal tract pools are rarely investigated. Here, we determined how chronic ethanol consumption altered the bile acids in multiple body compartments (liver, gastrointestinal tract, and serum) of rats. Rats were fed a modified Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet with 38% of calories as ethanol (the amount equivalent of 4–5 drinks in humans). While conjugated bile acids predominated in the liver (98.3%), duodenum (97.8%), and ileum (89.7%), unconjugated bile acids comprised the largest proportion of measured bile acids in serum (81.2%), the cecum (97.7%), and the rectum (97.5%). In particular, taurine-conjugated bile acids were significantly decreased in the liver and gastrointestinal tract of ethanol-treated rats, while unconjugated and glycine-conjugated species increased. Ethanol consumption caused increased expression of genes involved in bile acid biosynthesis, efflux transport, and reduced expression of genes regulating bile acid influx transport in the liver. These results provide an improved understanding of the systemic modulations of bile acid metabolism in mammals through the gut-liver axis.—Xie, G., Zhong, W., Li, H., Li, Q., Qiu, Y., Zheng, X., Chen, H., Zhao, X., Zhang, S., Zhou, Z., Zeisel, S. H., Jia, W. Alteration of bile acid metabolism in the rat induced by chronic ethanol consumption. PMID:23709616

  2. Netupitant, a Potent and Highly Selective NK1 Receptor Antagonist, Alleviates Acetic Acid-Induced Bladder Overactivity in Anesthetized Guinea-Pigs.

    PubMed

    Palea, Stefano; Guilloteau, Véronique; Rekik, Moéz; Lovati, Emanuela; Guerard, Marc; Guardia, Maria-Alba; Lluel, Philippe; Pietra, Claudio; Yoshiyama, Mitsuharu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Tachykinins potently contract the isolated urinary bladder from a number of animal species and play an important role in the regulation of the micturition reflex. On the guinea-pig isolated urinary bladder we examined the effects of a new potent and selective NK1 receptor antagonist (netupitant) on the contractions induced by a selective NK1 receptor agonist, SP-methylester (SP-OMe). Moreover, the effects of netupitant and another selective NK1 antagonist (L-733,060) were studied in anesthetized guinea-pigs using two experimental models, the isovolumetric bladder contractions and a model of bladder overactivity induced by intravesical administration of acetic acid (AA). Methods and Results. Detrusor muscle strips were mounted in 5 mL organ baths and isometric contractions to cumulative concentrations of SP-OME were recorded before and after incubation with increasing concentrations of netupitant. In anesthetized female guinea-pigs, reflex bladder activity was examined under isovolumetric conditions with the bladder distended with saline or during cystometry using intravesical infusion of AA. After a 30 min stabilization period, netupitant (0.1-3 mg/kg, i.v.) or L-733,060 (3-10 mg/kg, i.v.) were administered. In the detrusor muscle, netupitant produced a concentration-dependent inhibition (mean pKB = 9.24) of the responses to SP-OMe. Under isovolumetric conditions, netupitant or L-733,060 reduced bladder contraction frequency in a dose-dependent manner, but neither drug changed bladder contraction amplitude. In the AA model, netupitant dose-dependently increased intercontraction interval (ICI) but had no effect on the amplitude of micturition (AM). L-733,060 dose-dependently increased ICI also but this effect was paralleled by a significant reduction of AM. Conclusion. Netupitant decreases the frequency of reflex bladder contractions without altering their amplitude, suggesting that this drug targets the afferent limb of the micturition reflex circuit

  3. Netupitant, a Potent and Highly Selective NK1 Receptor Antagonist, Alleviates Acetic Acid-Induced Bladder Overactivity in Anesthetized Guinea-Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Palea, Stefano; Guilloteau, Véronique; Rekik, Moéz; Lovati, Emanuela; Guerard, Marc; Guardia, Maria-Alba; Lluel, Philippe; Pietra, Claudio; Yoshiyama, Mitsuharu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Tachykinins potently contract the isolated urinary bladder from a number of animal species and play an important role in the regulation of the micturition reflex. On the guinea-pig isolated urinary bladder we examined the effects of a new potent and selective NK1 receptor antagonist (netupitant) on the contractions induced by a selective NK1 receptor agonist, SP-methylester (SP-OMe). Moreover, the effects of netupitant and another selective NK1 antagonist (L-733,060) were studied in anesthetized guinea-pigs using two experimental models, the isovolumetric bladder contractions and a model of bladder overactivity induced by intravesical administration of acetic acid (AA). Methods and Results. Detrusor muscle strips were mounted in 5 mL organ baths and isometric contractions to cumulative concentrations of SP-OME were recorded before and after incubation with increasing concentrations of netupitant. In anesthetized female guinea-pigs, reflex bladder activity was examined under isovolumetric conditions with the bladder distended with saline or during cystometry using intravesical infusion of AA. After a 30 min stabilization period, netupitant (0.1–3 mg/kg, i.v.) or L-733,060 (3–10 mg/kg, i.v.) were administered. In the detrusor muscle, netupitant produced a concentration-dependent inhibition (mean pKB = 9.24) of the responses to SP-OMe. Under isovolumetric conditions, netupitant or L-733,060 reduced bladder contraction frequency in a dose-dependent manner, but neither drug changed bladder contraction amplitude. In the AA model, netupitant dose-dependently increased intercontraction interval (ICI) but had no effect on the amplitude of micturition (AM). L-733,060 dose-dependently increased ICI also but this effect was paralleled by a significant reduction of AM. Conclusion. Netupitant decreases the frequency of reflex bladder contractions without altering their amplitude, suggesting that this drug targets the afferent limb of the micturition reflex

  4. The 9aaTAD Transactivation Domains: From Gal4 to p53

    PubMed Central

    Havelka, Marek; Rezacova, Martina

    2016-01-01

    The family of the Nine amino acid Transactivation Domain, 9aaTAD family, comprises currently over 40 members. The 9aaTAD domains are universally recognized by the transcriptional machinery from yeast to man. We had identified the 9aaTAD domains in the p53, Msn2, Pdr1 and B42 activators by our prediction algorithm. In this study, their competence to activate transcription as small peptides was proven. Not surprisingly, we elicited immense 9aaTAD divergence in hundreds of identified orthologs and numerous examples of the 9aaTAD species' convergence. We found unforeseen similarity of the mammalian p53 with yeast Gal4 9aaTAD domains. Furthermore, we identified artificial 9aaTAD domains generated accidentally by others. From an evolutionary perspective, the observed easiness to generate 9aaTAD transactivation domains indicates the natural advantage for spontaneous generation of transcription factors from DNA binding precursors. PMID:27618436

  5. Sinapic Acid and Its Derivatives as Medicine in Oxidative Stress-Induced Diseases and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chunye

    2016-01-01

    Sinapic acid (3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxycinnamic acid) is an orally bioavailable phytochemical, extensively found in spices, citrus and berry fruits, vegetables, cereals, and oilseed crops and is known to exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antimutagenic, antiglycemic, neuroprotective, and antibacterial activities. The literature reveals that sinapic acid is a bioactive phenolic acid and has the potential to attenuate various chemically induced toxicities. This minireview is an effort to summarize the available literature about pharmacokinetic, therapeutic, and protective potential of this versatile molecule in health related areas. PMID:27069529

  6. Ameliorative Effect of Chronic Supplementation of Protocatechuic Acid Alone and in Combination with Ascorbic Acid in Aniline Hydrochloride Induced Spleen Toxicity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Upasana; Upaganlawar, Aman; Upasani, Chandrashekhar

    2016-01-01

    Background. Present study was designed to evaluate the protective effects of protocatechuic acid alone and in combination with ascorbic acid in aniline hydrochloride induced spleen toxicity in rats. Materials and Methods. Male Wistar rats of either sex (200-250 g) were used and divided into different groups. Spleen toxicity was induced by aniline hydrochloride (100 ppm) in drinking water for a period of 28 days. Treatment group received protocatechuic acid (40 mg/kg/day, p.o.), ascorbic acid (40 mg/kg/day, p.o.), and combination of protocatechuic acid (20 mg/kg/day, p.o.) and ascorbic acid (20 mg/kg/day, p.o.) followed by aniline hydrochloride. At the end of treatment period serum and tissue parameters were evaluated. Result. Rats supplemented with aniline hydrochloride showed a significant alteration in body weight, spleen weight, feed consumption, water intake, hematological parameters (haemoglobin content, red blood cells, white blood cells, and total iron content), tissue parameters (lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione, and nitric oxide content), and membrane bound phosphatase (ATPase) compared to control group. Histopathology of aniline hydrochloride induced spleen showed significant damage compared to control rats. Treatment with protocatechuic acid along with ascorbic acid showed better protection as compared to protocatechuic acid or ascorbic acid alone in aniline hydrochloride induced spleen toxicity. Conclusion. Treatment with protocatechuic acid and ascorbic acid in combination showed significant protection in aniline hydrochloride induced splenic toxicity in rats.

  7. The potential usage of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) against chemotherapy-induced and radiotherapy-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Akyol, Sumeyya; Ginis, Zeynep; Armutcu, Ferah; Ozturk, Gulfer; Yigitoglu, M Ramazan; Akyol, Omer

    2012-07-01

    Protection of the patients against the side effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimens has attracted increasing interest of clinicians and practitioners. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), which is extracted from the propolis of honeybee hives as an active component, specifically inhibits nuclear factor κB at micromolar concentrations and show ability to stop 5-lipoxygenase-catalysed oxygenation of linoleic acid and arachidonic acid. CAPE has antiinflammatory, antiproliferative, antioxidant, cytostatic, antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal and antineoplastic properties. The purpose of this review is to summarize in vivo and in vitro usage of CAPE to prevent the chemotherapy-induced and radiotherapy-induced damages and side effects in experimental animals and to develop a new approach for the potential usage of CAPE in clinical trial as a protective agent during chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimens.

  8. The AAS Workforce Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postman, Marc; Norman, D. J.; Evans, N. R.; Ivie, R.

    2014-01-01

    The AAS Demographics Committee, on behalf of the AAS, was tasked with initiating a biennial survey to improve the Society's ability to serve its members and to inform the community about changes in the community's demographics. A survey, based in part on similar surveys for other scientific societies, was developed in the summer of 2012 and was publicly launched in January 2013. The survey randomly targeted 2500 astronomers who are members of the AAS. The survey was closed 4 months later (April 2013). The response rate was excellent - 63% (1583 people) completed the survey. I will summarize the results from this survey, highlighting key results and plans for their broad dissemination.

  9. Alterations of amino acid metabolism in osteoarthritis: its implications for nutrition and health.

    PubMed

    Li, Yusheng; Xiao, Wenfeng; Luo, Wei; Zeng, Chao; Deng, Zhenhan; Ren, Wenkai; Wu, Guoyao; Lei, Guanghua

    2016-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common form of arthritis in humans. It has long been regarded as a non-inflammatory disease, but a degree of inflammation is now recognized as being a vital inducer of subpopulation of OA. Besides inflammation, the establishment and development of OA are associated with alterations in metabolism and profiles of amino acids (AA), including glutamate- and arginine-family AA as well as their related metabolites (e.g., creatinine, hydroxyproline, γ-aminobutyrate, dimethylarginines and homoarginine). Functional AA (e.g., glutamine, arginine, glutamate, glycine, proline, and tryptophan) have various benefits (i.e., anti-inflammation and anti-oxidation) in treatment of inflammation-associated diseases, including OA. Thus, these AA have potential as immunomodulatory nutrients for patients with inflammation-induced OA.

  10. ETHANOL AND ARACHIDONIC ACID SYNERGIZE TO ACTIVATE KUPFFER CELLS AND MODULATE THE FIBROGENIC RESPONSE VIA TNFα, GSH, AND TGFβ-DEPENDENT MECHANISMS

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aim because of the contribution of ethanol and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) to alcoholic liver disease, we investigated whether chronic ethanol administration and arachidonic acid (AA) could synergistically mediate Kupffer cell (KC) activation and modulate the stellate cell (HSC) fibrogenic response. Results 1) Ethanol and AA effects on KC and HSC mono-cultures: cell proliferation, lipid peroxidation, H2O2, O2.−, NADPH oxidase activity, and TNFα were higher in KCethanol than in KCcontrol, and were enhanced by AA; HSCethanol proliferated faster, increased collagen, and showed higher GSH than HSCcontrol, with modest effects by AA. 2) AA effects on the control co-culture: we previously reported (1) the ability of KC to induce a pro-fibrogenic response in HSC via ROS-dependent mechanisms; we now show that AA further increases cell proliferation and collagen in the control co-culture. The latter was prevented by vitamin E (an antioxidant) and by diphenyleneiodonium (a NADPH oxidase inhibitor). 3) Ethanol effects on the co-cultures: co-culture with KCcontrol or KCethanol induced HSCcontrol and HSCethanol proliferation; however, the pro-fibrogenic response in HSCethanol was suppressed due to up-regulation of TNFα and GSH, which was prevented by a TNFα neutralizing Ab and by l-buthionine-sulfoximine, a GSH-depleting agent. 4) Ethanol plus AA effects on the co-cultures: AA lowered TNFα in the HSCcontrol co-cultures allowing for enhanced collagen deposition; furthermore, AA restored the pro-fibrogenic response in the HSCethanol co-cultures by counteracting the up-regulation of TNFα and GSH with a significant increase in GSSG and in pro-fibrogenic TGFβ. Conclusion these results unveil synergism between ethanol and AA to the mechanism whereby KC mediate ECM remodeling, and suggest that even if chronic ethanol consumption sensitizes HSC to up-regulate anti-fibrogenic signals, their effects are blunted by a second ‘hit’ such as AA. PMID:19003881

  11. Asiatic acid inhibits cardiac hypertrophy by blocking interleukin-1β-activated nuclear factor-κB signaling in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaohan; Si, Linjie; Xu, Jing; Yi, Chenlong; Wang, Fang; Gu, Weijuan

    2015-01-01

    Background Activated interleukin (IL)-1β signaling pathway is closely associated with pathological cardiac hypertrophy. This study investigated whether asiatic acid (AA) could inhibit IL-1β-related hypertrophic signaling, and thus suppressing the development of cardiac hypertrophy. Methods Transverse aortic constriction (TAC) induced cardiac hypertrophy in C57BL/6 mice and cultured neonatal cardiac myocytes stimulated with IL-1β were used to evaluate the role of AA in cardiac hypertrophy. The expression of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was evaluated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and the nuclear factor (NF)-κB binding activity was measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Results AA pretreatment significantly attenuated the IL-1β-induced hypertrophic response of cardiomyocytes as reflected by reduction in the cardiomyocyte surface area and the inhibition of ANP mRNA expression. The protective effect of AA on IL-1β-stimulated cardiomyocytes was associated with the reduction of NF-κB binding activity. In addition, AA prevented TAC-induced cardiac hypertrophy in vivo. It was found that AA markedly reduced the excessive expression of IL-1β and ANP, and inhibited the activation of NF-κB in the hypertrophic myocardium. Conclusions Our data suggest that AA may be a novel therapeutic agent for cardiac hypertrophy. The inhibition of IL-1β-activated NF-κB signaling may be the mechanism through which AA prevents cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:26623102

  12. Palmitoleic acid prevents palmitic acid-induced macrophage activation and consequent p38 MAPK-mediated skeletal muscle insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Nicola A; Wheeler-Jones, Caroline P; Cleasby, Mark E

    2014-08-05

    Obesity and saturated fatty acid (SFA) treatment are both associated with skeletal muscle insulin resistance (IR) and increased macrophage infiltration. However, the relative effects of SFA and unsaturated fatty acid (UFA)-activated macrophages on muscle are unknown. Here, macrophages were treated with palmitic acid, palmitoleic acid or both and the effects of the conditioned medium (CM) on C2C12 myotubes investigated. CM from palmitic acid-treated J774s (palm-mac-CM) impaired insulin signalling and insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis, reduced Inhibitor κBα and increased phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase in myotubes. p38 MAPK inhibition or siRNA partially ameliorated these defects, as did addition of tumour necrosis factor-α blocking antibody to the CM. Macrophages incubated with both FAs generated CM that did not induce IR, while palmitoleic acid-mac-CM alone was insulin sensitising. Thus UFAs may improve muscle insulin sensitivity and counteract SFA-mediated IR through an effect on macrophage activation.

  13. Folic acid improve developmental toxicity induced by aluminum sulphates.

    PubMed

    Yassa, Heba A; George, Safaa M; Mohamed, Heba K

    2017-03-01

    Aluminum sulphate has a significant toxic effects for humans. Aluminum is one of the most abundant metal on the Earth crust. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of short term exposure to aluminum sulphate on the bone development of the fetuses in rats, and if folic acid has a protective role upon that effects or not. Forty female rats were used, ten per group, GI served as negative control (receive nothing except normal feeding and water), GII served as positive control (receive water by gastric gavage), GIII treated with aluminum sulphate orally by gastric gavage and GIV treated with aluminum sulphate with folic acid. Mating occurred and known by presence of vaginal plug in the female rats. Rats were killed on day 18 of gestation.

  14. Ginkgolic acids induce neuronal death and activate protein phosphatase type-2C.

    PubMed

    Ahlemeyer, B; Selke, D; Schaper, C; Klumpp, S; Krieglstein, J

    2001-10-26

    The standardized extract from Ginkgo biloba (EGb 761) is used for the treatment of dementia. Because of allergenic and genotoxic effects, ginkgolic acids are restricted in EGb 761 to 5 ppm. The question arises whether ginkgolic acids also have neurotoxic effects. In the present study, ginkgolic acids caused death of cultured chick embryonic neurons in a concentration-dependent manner, in the presence and in the absence of serum. Ginkgolic acids-induced death showed features of apoptosis as we observed chromatin condensation, shrinkage of the nucleus and reduction of the damage by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, demonstrating an active type of cell death. However, DNA fragmentation detected by the terminal-transferase-mediated ddUTP-digoxigenin nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay and caspase-3 activation, which are also considered as hallmarks of apoptosis, were not seen after treatment with 150 microM ginkgolic acids in serum-free medium, a dose which increased the percentage of neurons with chromatin condensation and shrunken nuclei to 88% compared with 25% in serum-deprived, vehicle-treated controls. This suggests that ginkgolic acid-induced death showed signs of apoptosis as well as of necrosis. Ginkgolic acids specifically increased the activity of protein phosphatase type-2C, whereas other protein phosphatases such as protein phosphatases 1A, 2A and 2B, tyrosine phosphatase, and unspecific acid- and alkaline phosphatases were inhibited or remained unchanged, suggesting protein phosphatase 2C to play a role in the neurotoxic effect mediated by ginkgolic acids.

  15. Acidic pH environment induces autophagy in osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhichao; Lai, Qingguo; Li, Yanan; Xu, Chao; Tang, Xiaopeng; Ci, Jiangbo; Sun, Shaolong; Xu, Bingbing; Li, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Osteoblasts (OBs) play an important role in bone fracture healing, yet the extreme adverse microenvironment in fracture sites has a negative impact on the survival of OBs. Therefore, it is important to study how OBs behave in the complex fracture microenvironment. Studies have shown that autophagy plays a pivotal role in maintaining cellular homeostasis and defending the cell against adverse microenvironments. In this study we found the induction of autophagy in OBs at femoral bone fracture sites, which may be a result of ischemia, oxidative stress and hypoxia within the local area. At fracture sites a low pH environment also developed. Until now it has been unclear whether the induction of autophagy in osteoblasts is triggered by the acidic pH environment. Therefore, we cultured OBs in vitro in media of different pH values, and found both autophagy and apoptosis increased in OBs in acidic conditions. However, when autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) was used, apoptosis increased significantly compared with that without CQ. Thus indicating that inhibition of autophagy may promote apoptosis in OBs in an acidic environment, which may provide a new therapeutic strategy to decrease cell apoptosis in OBs through the use of drugs that modulate the autophagic state. PMID:28382973

  16. Reversible phenotypic modulation induced by deprivation of exogenous essential fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Laposata, M; Minda, M; Capriotti, A M; Hartman, E J; Furth, E E; Iozzo, R V

    1988-12-01

    Essential fatty acid deficiency, produced by deprivation of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids, is a condition characterized by renal disease, dermatitis, and infertility. Although many of the biochemical aspects of this disorder have been investigated, little is known about the ultrastructural changes induced by essential fatty acid deficiency. Using a unique fatty acid-deficient cell line (EFD-1), which demonstrates the in vivo fatty acid changes of essential fatty acid deficiency, and the prostaglandin E2-producing mouse fibrosarcoma line from which it was derived (HSDM1C1), we correlated ultrastructural and biochemical changes induced by prolonged deprivation of all exogenous lipids and subsequent repletion of selected essential fatty acids. We found that in cells deprived of all exogenous lipids, there was dilation of rough endoplasmic reticulum and an associated defect in protein secretion; these changes were specifically reversed by arachidonate. There was also an accumulation of secondary lysosomes containing degraded membranes in these cells with an associated increase in phospholipids relative to parent HSDM1C1 cells. Cytoplasmic lipid bodies present in parent cells disappeared, with an associated decrease in triacylglycerol. After just 2 days in lipid-free medium, all these changes were apparent, and prostaglandin E2 production was markedly impaired despite normal amounts of cellular arachidonate. Incubation of EFD-1 cells with arachidonate, the major prostaglandin precursor fatty acid, induced a reversion to the HSDM1C1 phenotype, whereas other fatty acids were totally ineffective. These results indicate changes in fatty acid metabolism in essential fatty acid deficiency are associated with marked alterations in ultrastructure and secretion of protein from cells.

  17. Simultaneous activation of p38 and JNK by arachidonic acid stimulates the cytosolic phospholipase A2-dependent synthesis of lipid droplets in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Guijas, Carlos; Pérez-Chacón, Gema; Astudillo, Alma M.; Rubio, Julio M.; Gil-de-Gómez, Luis; Balboa, María A.; Balsinde, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of human peripheral blood monocytes to free arachidonic acid (AA) results in the rapid induction of lipid droplet (LD) formation by these cells. This effect appears specific for AA in that it is not mimicked by other fatty acids, whether saturated or unsaturated. LDs are formed by two different routes: (i) the direct entry of AA into triacylglycerol and (ii) activation of intracellular signaling, leading to increased triacylglycerol and cholesteryl ester formation utilizing fatty acids coming from the de novo biosynthetic route. Both routes can be dissociated by the arachidonyl-CoA synthetase inhibitor triacsin C, which prevents the former but not the latter. LD formation by AA-induced signaling predominates, accounting for 60–70% of total LD formation, and can be completely inhibited by selective inhibition of the group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2α (cPLA2α), pointing out this enzyme as a key regulator of AA-induced signaling. LD formation in AA-treated monocytes can also be blocked by the combined inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family members p38 and JNK, which correlates with inhibition of cPLA2α activation by phosphorylation. Collectively, these results suggest that concomitant activation of p38 and JNK by AA cooperate to activate cPLA2α, which is in turn required for LD formation possibly by facilitating biogenesis of this organelle, not by regulating neutral lipid synthesis. PMID:22949356

  18. Myristic acid potentiates palmitic acid-induced lipotoxicity and steatohepatitis associated with lipodystrophy by sustaning de novo ceramide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Laura; Torres, Sandra; Baulies, Anna; Alarcón-Vila, Cristina; Elena, Montserrat; Fabriàs, Gemma; Casas, Josefina; Caballeria, Joan; Fernandez-Checa, Jose C; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2015-12-08

    Palmitic acid (PA) induces hepatocyte apoptosis and fuels de novo ceramide synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Myristic acid (MA), a free fatty acid highly abundant in copra/palmist oils, is a predictor of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and stimulates ceramide synthesis. Here we investigated the synergism between MA and PA in ceramide synthesis, ER stress, lipotoxicity and NASH. Unlike PA, MA is not lipotoxic but potentiated PA-mediated lipoapoptosis, ER stress, caspase-3 activation and cytochrome c release in primary mouse hepatocytes (PMH). Moreover, MA kinetically sustained PA-induced total ceramide content by stimulating dehydroceramide desaturase and switched the ceramide profile from decreased to increased ceramide 14:0/ceramide16:0, without changing medium and long-chain ceramide species. PMH were more sensitive to equimolar ceramide14:0/ceramide16:0 exposure, which mimics the outcome of PA plus MA treatment on ceramide homeostasis, than to either ceramide alone. Treatment with myriocin to inhibit ceramide synthesis and tauroursodeoxycholic acid to prevent ER stress ameliorated PA plus MA induced apoptosis, similar to the protection afforded by the antioxidant BHA, the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-Fmk and JNK inhibition. Moreover, ruthenium red protected PMH against PA and MA-induced cell death. Recapitulating in vitro findings, mice fed a diet enriched in PA plus MA exhibited lipodystrophy, hepatosplenomegaly, increased liver ceramide content and cholesterol levels, ER stress, liver damage, inflammation and fibrosis compared to mice fed diets enriched in PA or MA alone. The deleterious effects of PA plus MA-enriched diet were largely prevented by in vivo myriocin treatment. These findings indicate a causal link between ceramide synthesis and ER stress in lipotoxicity, and imply that the consumption of diets enriched in MA and PA can cause NASH associated with lipodystrophy.

  19. Myristic acid potentiates palmitic acid-induced lipotoxicity and steatohepatitis associated with lipodystrophy by sustaning de novo ceramide synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Laura; Torres, Sandra; Baulies, Anna; Alarcón-Vila, Cristina; Elena, Montserrat; Fabriàs, Gemma; Casas, Josefina; Caballeria, Joan; Fernandez-Checa, Jose C.; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Palmitic acid (PA) induces hepatocyte apoptosis and fuels de novo ceramide synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Myristic acid (MA), a free fatty acid highly abundant in copra/palmist oils, is a predictor of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and stimulates ceramide synthesis. Here we investigated the synergism between MA and PA in ceramide synthesis, ER stress, lipotoxicity and NASH. Unlike PA, MA is not lipotoxic but potentiated PA-mediated lipoapoptosis, ER stress, caspase-3 activation and cytochrome c release in primary mouse hepatocytes (PMH). Moreover, MA kinetically sustained PA-induced total ceramide content by stimulating dehydroceramide desaturase and switched the ceramide profile from decreased to increased ceramide 14:0/ceramide16:0, without changing medium and long-chain ceramide species. PMH were more sensitive to equimolar ceramide14:0/ceramide16:0 exposure, which mimics the outcome of PA plus MA treatment on ceramide homeostasis, than to either ceramide alone. Treatment with myriocin to inhibit ceramide synthesis and tauroursodeoxycholic acid to prevent ER stress ameliorated PA plus MA induced apoptosis, similar to the protection afforded by the antioxidant BHA, the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-Fmk and JNK inhibition. Moreover, ruthenium red protected PMH against PA and MA-induced cell death. Recapitulating in vitro findings, mice fed a diet enriched in PA plus MA exhibited lipodystrophy, hepatosplenomegaly, increased liver ceramide content and cholesterol levels, ER stress, liver damage, inflammation and fibrosis compared to mice fed diets enriched in PA or MA alone. The deleterious effects of PA plus MA-enriched diet were largely prevented by in vivo myriocin treatment. These findings indicate a causal link between ceramide synthesis and ER stress in lipotoxicity, and imply that the consumption of diets enriched in MA and PA can cause NASH associated with lipodystrophy. PMID:26539645

  20. Contribution of gastrin to cysteamine-induced gastric acid secretion in rats.

    PubMed

    van de Brug, F J; Jansen, J B; Kuijpers, I J; Lamers, C B

    1993-01-01

    The role of circulating gastrin in cysteamine induced gastric acid secretion was examined in conscious male Wistar rats, provided with a portal vein catheter, a jugular vein catheter and a pyloric drainage tube. Intravenous infusion of 0.3 nmol/kg.30 min of gastrin 17-l resulted in serum gastrin concentrations of 1138 +/- 151 pg/ml and gastric acid secretion of 104 +/- 36 mumol H+/kg.30 min. This acid response was abolished by intravenous injection of 60 microliters of a gastrin-antiserum, indicating the efficacy of immunoneutralization with this antiserum in vivo. Intravenous bolus administration of 125 mg/kg of cysteamine induced increases in serum gastrin concentration (864 +/- 96 pg/ml) and gastric acid outputs (107 +/- 27 mumol H+/kg.30 min) not significantly different from the gastrin 17-l infusion experiments. Gastrin antiserum abolished cysteamine-induced gastric acid secretion, indicating that gastric acid secretion induced by 125 mg/kg of cysteamine is largely mediated by circulating gastrin in rats.

  1. Castor oil induces laxation and uterus contraction via ricinoleic acid activating prostaglandin EP3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Tunaru, Sorin; Althoff, Till F; Nüsing, Rolf M; Diener, Martin; Offermanns, Stefan

    2012-06-05

    Castor oil is one of the oldest drugs. When given orally, it has a laxative effect and induces labor in pregnant females. The effects of castor oil are mediated by ricinoleic acid, a hydroxylated fatty acid released from castor oil by intestinal lipases. Despite the wide-spread use of castor oil in conventional and folk medicine, the molecular mechanism by which ricinoleic acid acts remains unknown. Here we show that the EP(3) prostanoid receptor is specifically activated by ricinoleic acid and that it mediates the pharmacological effects of castor oil. In mice lacking EP(3) receptors, the laxative effect and the uterus contraction induced via ricinoleic acid are absent. Although a conditional deletion of the EP(3) receptor gene in intestinal epithelial cells did not affect castor oil-induced diarrhea, mice lacking EP(3) receptors only in smooth-muscle cells were unresponsive to this drug. Thus, the castor oil metabolite ricinoleic acid activates intestinal and uterine smooth-muscle cells via EP(3) prostanoid receptors. These findings identify the cellular and molecular mechanism underlying the pharmacological effects of castor oil and indicate a role of the EP(3) receptor as a target to induce laxative effects.

  2. Salicylic acid and gentisic acid induce RNA silencing-related genes and plant resistance to RNA pathogens.

    PubMed

    Campos, Laura; Granell, Pablo; Tárraga, Susana; López-Gresa, Pilar; Conejero, Vicente; Bellés, José María; Rodrigo, Ismael; Lisón, Purificación

    2014-04-01

    We have observed that treatments with salicylic acid (SA) or gentisic acid (GA) induced resistance to RNA pathogens such as ToMV and CEVd in tomato and Gynura auriantiaca, respectively. Accumulation of SA and GA has been found to occur in plants infected by these pathogens, thus pointing out a possible defence role of both molecules. To study the molecular basis of the observed induced resistance to RNA pathogens the induction of silencing-related genes by SA and GA was considered. For that purpose, we searched for tomato genes which were orthologous to those described in Arabidopsis thaliana, such as AtDCL1, AtDCL2, AtDCL4, AtRDR1, AtRDR2 and AtRDR6, and we tracked their induction in tomato along virus and viroid infections. We observed that CEVd significantly induced all these genes in tomato, with the exception of ToRDR6, being the induction of ToDCL4 the most outstanding. Regarding the ToMV asymptomatic infection, with the exception of ToRDR2, we observed a significant induction of all the indicated silencing-related genes, being ToDCL2 the most induced gene. Subsequently, we analyzed their transcriptional activation by SA and at the time when ToMV was inoculated on plants. ToDCL2, ToRDR1 and ToRDR2 were significantly induced by both SA and GA, whereas ToDCL1 was only induced by SA. Such an induction resulted more effective by SA treatment, which is in agreement with the stronger SA-induced resistance observed. Our results suggest that the observed delay in the RNA pathogen accumulation could be due to the pre-induction of RNA silencing-related genes by SA or GA.

  3. Preventive Effect of Phytic Acid on Isoproterenol-Induced Cardiotoxicity in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Brindha, E.; Rajasekapandiyan, M.

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the preventive role of phytic acid on membrane bound enzymes such as sodium potassium- dependent adenosine triphosphatase (Na+ /K+ ATPase), calcium-dependent adenosine triphosphatase (Ca2+ ATPase) and magnesium- dependent adenosine triphosphatase (Mg2+ ATPase) and glycoproteins such as hexose, hexosamine, fucose and sialic acid in isoproterenol (ISO)-induced myocardial infarction (MI) in rats. Male albino Wistar rats were pretreated with phytic acid (25 and 50 mg/kg, respectively) for a period of 56 days. After the treatment period, ISO (85 mg/kg) was subcutaneously injected to rats at an interval of 24 h for 2 days. ISO-induced rats showed a significant decrease in the activity of Na+ /K+ ATPase and increase in the activities of Ca2+ and Mg2+ ATPase in the heart and a significant (P<0.05) increase in the levels of glycoproteins in serum and the heart were also observed in ISO-induced rats. Pretreatment with phytic acid for a period of 56 days exhibited a significant (P<0.05) effect and altered these biochemical parameters positively in ISO-induced rats. Thus, our study shows that phytic acid has cardioprotective role in ISO-induced MI in rats.

  4. Acid-inducible proton influx currents in the plasma membrane of murine osteoclast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Kuno, Miyuki; Li, Guangshuai; Moriura, Yoshie; Hino, Yoshiko; Kawawaki, Junko; Sakai, Hiromu

    2016-05-01

    Acidification of the resorption pits, which is essential for dissolving bone, is produced by secretion of protons through vacuolar H(+)-ATPases in the plasma membrane of bone-resorbing cells, osteoclasts. Consequently, osteoclasts face highly acidic extracellular environments, where the pH gradient across the plasma membrane could generate a force driving protons into the cells. Proton influx mechanisms during the acid exposure are largely unknown, however. In this study, we investigated extracellular-acid-inducible proton influx currents in osteoclast-like cells derived from a macrophage cell line (RAW264). Decreasing extracellular pH to <5.5 induced non-ohmic inward currents. The reversal potentials depended on the pH gradients across the membrane and were independent of concentrations of Na(+), Cl(-), and HCO3 (-), suggesting that they were carried largely by protons. The acid-inducible proton influx currents were not inhibited by amiloride, a widely used blocker for cation channels/transporters, or by 4,4'-diisothiocyanato-2,2'-stilbenesulfonate(DIDS) which blocks anion channels/transporters. Additionally, the currents were not significantly affected by V-ATPase inhibitors, bafilomycin A1 and N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. Extracellular Ca(2+) (10 mM) did not affect the currents, but 1 mM ZnCl2 decreased the currents partially. The intracellular pH in the vicinity of the plasma membrane was dropped by the acid-inducible H(+) influx currents, which caused overshoot of the voltage-gated H(+) channels after removal of acids. The H(+) influx currents were smaller in undifferentiated, mononuclear RAW cells and were negligible in COS7 cells. These data suggest that the acid-inducible H(+) influx (H(+) leak) pathway may be an additional mechanism modifying the pH environments of osteoclasts upon exposure to strong acids.

  5. Protective effect of bile acid derivatives in phalloidin-induced rat liver toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Herraez, Elisa; Macias, Rocio I.R.; Vazquez-Tato, Jose; Hierro, Carlos; Monte, Maria J.; Marin, Jose J.G.

    2009-08-15

    Phalloidin causes severe liver damage characterized by marked cholestasis, which is due in part to irreversible polymerization of actin filaments. Liver uptake of this toxin through the transporter OATP1B1 is inhibited by the bile acid derivative BALU-1, which does not inhibit the sodium-dependent bile acid transporter NTCP. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether BALU-1 prevents liver uptake of phalloidin without impairing endogenous bile acid handling and hence may have protective effects against the hepatotoxicity induced by this toxin. In anaesthetized rats, i.v. administration of BALU-1 increased bile flow more than taurocholic acid (TCA). Phalloidin administration decreased basal (- 60%) and TCA-stimulated bile flow (- 55%) without impairing bile acid output. Phalloidin-induced cholestasis was accompanied by liver necrosis, nephrotoxicity and haematuria. In BALU-1-treated animals, phalloidin-induced cholestasis was partially prevented. Moreover haematuria was not observed, which was consistent with histological evidences of BALU-1-prevented injury of liver and kidney tissue. HPLC-MS/MS analysis revealed that BALU-1 was secreted in bile mainly in non-conjugated form, although a small proportion (< 5%) of tauro-BALU-1 was detected. BALU-1 did not inhibit the biliary secretion of endogenous bile acids. When highly choleretic bile acids, - ursodeoxycholic (UDCA) and dehydrocholic acid (DHCA) - were administered, they were found less efficient than BALU-1 in preventing phalloidin-induced cholestasis. Biliary phalloidin elimination was low but it was increased by BALU-1 > TCA > DHCA > UDCA. In conclusion, BALU-1 is able to protect against phalloidin-induced hepatotoxicity, probably due to an inhibition of the liver uptake and an enhanced biliary secretion of this toxin.

  6. Ursodeoxycholic acid protects colon cancer HCT116 cells from deoxycholic acid-induced apoptosis by inhibiting apoptosome formation.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Tohru; Yui, Satoko; Hirai, Tadashi; Fujii, Takami; Okada, Sawami; Kanamoto, Ryuhei

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that ursodeoxycholic acid (UDC) requires prolonged (≥5 h) preincubation to exhibit effective protection of colon cancer HCT116 cells from deoxycholic acid (DC)-induced apoptosis. Although UDC diminished DC-mediated caspase-9 activation, cytochrome c release from the mitochondria was not inhibited, indicating that UDC acts on the steps of caspase-9 activation. In the present study, therefore, we investigated the effects of UDC on the factors involved in caspase-9 activation. We found that UDC had no significant effect on the expression of antiapoptotic XIAP. Furthermore, UDC did not affect the expression or release of proapoptotic Smac/DIABLO, or the association of XIAP and Smac/DIABLO. In contrast, association of Apaf-1 and caspase-9 stimulated by 500 μM DC was inhibited by UDC pretreatment. Although UDC caused remarkable activation of Akt/PKB, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor did not significantly reduce UDC-mediated cytoprotection. Furthermore, phosphorylation of threonine residues on caspase-9 after UDC pretreatment could not be detected. UDC-mediated cytoprotection was independent of the MAPK pathway, and cyclic AMP (cAMP) analogue did not inhibit DC-induced apoptosis. Our results indicate that UDC protects colon cancer cells from apoptosis induced by hydrophobic bile acids, by inhibiting apoptosome formation independently of the survival signals mediated by the PI3K, MAPK, or cAMP pathways.

  7. CO2-limitation-inducible Green Recovery of fatty acids from cyanobacterial biomass.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyao; Fallon, Sarah; Sheng, Jie; Curtiss, Roy

    2011-04-26

    Using genetically modified cyanobacterial strains, we engineered a Green Recovery strategy to convert membrane lipids into fatty acids for economical and environmentally sustainable biofuel production. The Green Recovery strategy utilizes lipolytic enzymes under the control of promoters induced by CO(2) limitation. Data indicate that strains of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 engineered for Green Recovery underwent degradation of membrane diacylglycerols upon CO(2) limitation, leading to release of fatty acids into the culture medium. Recovered fatty acid yields of 36.1 × 10(-12) mg/cell were measured in one of the engineered strains (SD239). Green Recovery can be incorporated into previously constructed fatty-acid-secretion strains, enabling fatty acid recovery from the remaining cyanobacterial biomass that will be generated during fatty acid biofuel production in photobioreactors.

  8. AAS 228: Welcome!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Greetings from the 228th American Astronomical Society meeting in San Diego, California! This week, along with a team of fellow authorsfrom astrobites, Iwill bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. You can follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.If youre at the meeting, come stop by the AAS booth (Booth #211-213) to learn about the newly-announced partnership between AAS and astrobites and pick up some swag.And dont forget to visit the IOP booth in the Exhibit Hall (Booth #223) to learn more about the new corridors for AAS Journals and to pick up a badge pin to representyour corridor!

  9. AAS 227: Welcome!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Greetings from the 227th American Astronomical Society meeting in Kissimmee, Florida! This week, along with several fellow authors from astrobites, Iwill bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. You can follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.If youre an author or referee (or plan to be!) and youre here at the meeting, consider joining us at our Author and Referee Workshop on Wednesday in the Tallahassee room, where well be sharingsome of the exciting new features of the AAS journals. You can drop intoeither of the two-hour sessions(10 AM 12 PM or 1 PM 3 PM), and there will be afree buffet lunch at noon.Heres the agenda:Morning SessionTopic Speaker10:00 am 10:05 amIntroductionsJulie Steffen10:05 am 10:35 amChanges at AAS Journals; How to Be a Successful AAS AuthorEthan Vishniac10:35 am 11:00 amThe Peer Review ProcessButler Burton11:00 am 11:15 amAAS Nova: Sharing AAS Authors Research with the Broader CommunitySusanna Kohler11:15 am 11:30 amFixing Software and Instrumentation Publishing: New Paper Styles in AAS JournalsChris Lintott11:30 am 11:45 amMaking Article Writing Easier with the New AASTeX v6.0Greg Schwarz11:45 am 12:00 pmBringing JavaScript and Interactivity to Your AAS Journal FiguresGus MuenchLunch SessionTopic Speaker12:00 pm 12:15 pmUnified Astronomy ThesaurusKatie Frey12:15 pm 12:30 pmAAS/ADS ORCID Integration ToolAlberto Accomazzi12:30 pm 12:45 pmWorldWide Telescope and Video AbstractsJosh Peek12:45 pm 01:00 pmArizona Astronomical Data Hub (AADH)Bryan HeidornAfternoon SessionTopic Speaker01:00 pm 01:05 pmIntroductionsJulie Steffen01:05 pm 01:35 pmChanges at AAS Journals; How to Be a Successful AAS AuthorEthan Vishniac01:35 pm 02:00 pmThe Peer Review ProcessButler Burton02:00 pm 02:15 pmAAS Nova: Sharing AAS Authors Research with the Broader CommunitySusanna Kohler02:15 pm 02:30 pm

  10. The effects of the oral administration of fish oil concentrate on the release and the metabolism of (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid and (/sup 14/C)eicosapentaenoic acid by human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, A.; Terano, T.; Hamazaki, T.; Sajiki, J.; Kondo, S.; Ozawa, A.; Fujita, T.; Miyamoto, T.; Tamura, Y.; Kumagai, A.

    1982-11-01

    It has been suggested by several investigators that eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5 omega 3, EPA) might have anti-thrombotic effects. In this experiment, the effect of the oral administration of EPA rich fish oil concentrate on platelet aggregation and the release and the metabolism of (/sup 1 -14/C)arachidonic acid and ((U)-/sup 14/C)eicosapentaenoic acid by human platelets was studied. Eight healthy male subjects ingested 18 capsules of fish oil concentrate (EPA 1.4 g) per day for 4 weeks. Plasma and platelet concentrations of EPA markedly increased, while those of arachidonic acid (C20:4 omega 6, AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6 omega 3, DHA) did not change. Platelet aggregation induced by collagen and ADP was reduced. Collagen induced (/sup 14/C)thromboxane B2 (TXB2) formation from (/sup 14/C)AA prelabeled platelets decreased. There was no detectable formation of (/sup 14/C)TXB3 from (/sup 14/C)EPA prelabeled platelets, and the conversion of exogenous (/sup 14/C)EPA to (/sup 14/C)TXB3 was lower than that of (/sup 14/C)AA to (/sup 14/C)TXB2. The release of (/sup 14/C)AA from (/sup 14/C)AA prelabeled platelets by collagen was significantly decreased. These observations raise the possibility that the release of arachidonic acid from platelet lipids might be affected by the alteration of EPA content in platelets.

  11. The AaDREB1 Transcription Factor from the Cold-Tolerant Plant Adonis amurensis Enhances Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Transgenic Plant.

    PubMed

    Zong, Jun-Mei; Li, Xiao-Wei; Zhou, Yuan-Hang; Wang, Fa-Wei; Wang, Nan; Dong, Yuan-Yuan; Yuan, Yan-Xi; Chen, Huan; Liu, Xiu-Ming; Yao, Na; Li, Hai-Yan

    2016-04-22

    Dehydration-responsive element binding (DREB) transcription factors (TFs) play important roles in the regulation of plant resistance to environmental stresses and can specifically bind to dehydration-responsive element/C-repeat element (DRE/CRT) proteins (G/ACCGAC) and activate expression of many stress-inducible genes. Here, we cloned and characterized a novel gene (AaDREB1) encoding the DREB1 transcription factor from the cold-tolerant plant Adonis amurensis. Quantitative real-time (qRT)-PCR results indicated that AaDREB1 expression was induced by salt, drought, cold stress, and abscisic acid application. A yeast one-hybrid assay demonstrated that AaDREB1 encodes a transcription activator and specifically binds to DRE/CRT. Furthermore, transgenic Arabidopsis and rice harboring AaDREB1 showed enhanced tolerance to salt, drought, and low temperature. These results indicated that AaDREB1 might be useful in genetic engineering to improve plant stress tolerance.

  12. The AaDREB1 Transcription Factor from the Cold-Tolerant Plant Adonis amurensis Enhances Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Transgenic Plant

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Jun-Mei; Li, Xiao-Wei; Zhou, Yuan-Hang; Wang, Fa-Wei; Wang, Nan; Dong, Yuan-Yuan; Yuan, Yan-Xi; Chen, Huan; Liu, Xiu-Ming; Yao, Na; Li, Hai-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Dehydration-responsive element binding (DREB) transcription factors (TFs) play important roles in the regulation of plant resistance to environmental stresses and can specifically bind to dehydration-responsive element/C-repeat element (DRE/CRT) proteins (G/ACCGAC) and activate expression of many stress-inducible genes. Here, we cloned and characterized a novel gene (AaDREB1) encoding the DREB1 transcription factor from the cold-tolerant plant Adonis amurensis. Quantitative real-time (qRT)-PCR results indicated that AaDREB1 expression was induced by salt, drought, cold stress, and abscisic acid application. A yeast one-hybrid assay demonstrated that AaDREB1 encodes a transcription activator and specifically binds to DRE/CRT. Furthermore, transgenic Arabidopsis and rice harboring AaDREB1 showed enhanced tolerance to salt, drought, and low temperature. These results indicated that AaDREB1 might be useful in genetic engineering to improve plant stress tolerance. PMID:27110776

  13. Proline induces calcium-mediated oxidative burst and salicylic acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiugeng; Zhang, Yueqin; Wang, Cuiping; Lü, Weitao; Jin, Jing Bo; Hua, Xuejun

    2011-05-01

    Although free proline accumulation is a well-documented phenomenon in many plants in response to a variety of environmental stresses, and is proposed to play protective roles, high intracellular proline content, by either exogenous application or endogenous over-production, in the absence of stresses, is found to be inhibitory to plant growth. We have shown here that exogenous application of proline significantly induced intracellular Ca(2+) accumulation in tobacco and calcium-dependent ROS production in Arabidopsis seedlings, which subsequently enhanced salicylic acid (SA) synthesis and PR genes expression. This suggested that proline can promote a reaction similar to hypersensitive response during pathogen infection. Other amino acids, such as glutamate, but not arginine and phenylalanine, were also found to be capable of inducing PR gene expression. In addition, proline at concentration as low as 0.5 mM could induce PR gene expression. However, proline could not induce the expression of PDF1.2 gene, the marker gene for jasmonic acid signaling pathway. Furthermore, proline-induced SA production is mediated by NDR1-dependent signaling pathway, but not that mediated by PAD4. Our data provide evidences that exogenous proline, and probably some other amino acids can specifically induce SA signaling and defense response.

  14. Free fatty acids normalize a rosiglitazone-induced visfatin release.

    PubMed

    Haider, Dominik G; Mittermayer, Friedrich; Schaller, Georg; Artwohl, Michaela; Baumgartner-Parzer, Sabina M; Prager, Gerhard; Roden, Michael; Wolzt, Michael

    2006-11-01

    The detrimental effect of elevated free fatty acids (FFAs) on insulin sensitivity can be improved by thiazolidinediones (TZDs) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is unknown whether this salutary action of TZD is associated with altered release of the insulin-mimetic adipocytokine visfatin. In this study, we investigated whether visfatin concentrations are altered by FFA and TZD treatment. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study 16 healthy volunteers received an infusion of triglycerides/heparin to increase plasma FFA after 3 wk of treatment with rosiglitazone (8 mg/day, n = 8) or placebo (n = 8), and circulating plasma visfatin was measured. As a corollary, human adipocytes were incubated with synthetic fatty acids and rosiglitazone to assess visfatin release in vitro. The results were that rosiglitazone treatment increased systemic plasma visfatin concentrations from 0.6 +/- 0.1 to 1.7 +/- 0.2 ng/ml (P < 0.01). Lipid infusion caused a marked elevation of plasma FFA but had no effect on circulating visfatin in controls. In contrast, elevated visfatin concentrations in subjects receiving rosiglitazone were normalized by lipid infusion. In isolated adipocytes, visfatin was released into supernatant medium by acute addition and long-term treatment of rosiglitazone. This secretion was blocked by synthetic fatty acids and by inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase or Akt. In conclusion, release of the insulin-mimetic visfatin may represent a major mechanism of metabolic TZD action. The presence of FFA antagonizes this action, which may have implications for visfatin bioactivity.

  15. Salicylic acid-induced resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici in tomato.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Sudhamoy; Mallick, Nirupama; Mitra, Adinpunya

    2009-07-01

    We demonstrated that exogenous application of 200 microM salicylic acid through root feeding and foliar spray could induce resistance against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. Lycopersici (Fol) in tomato. Endogenous accumulation of free salicylic acid in tomato roots was detected by HPLC and identification was confirmed by LC-MS/MS analysis. At 168h of salicylic acid treatment through roots, the endogenous salicylic acid level in the roots increased to 1477ngg(-1) FW which was 10 times higher than control plants. Similarly, the salicylic acid content was 1001ngg(-1) FW at 168h of treatment by foliar spray, which was 8.7 times higher than control plants. The activities of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL, EC 4.3.1.5) and peroxidase (POD, EC 1.11.1.7) were 5.9 and 4.7 times higher, respectively than the control plants at 168h of salicylic acid feeding through the roots. The increase in PAL and POD activities was 3.7 and 3.3 times higher, respectively at 168h of salicylic acid treatments through foliar spray than control plants. The salicylic acid-treated tomato plants challenged with Fol exhibited significantly reduced vascular browning and leaf yellowing wilting. The mycelial growth of Fol was not significantly affected by salicylic acid. Significant increase in basal level of salicylic acid in noninoculated plants indicated that tomato root system might have the capacity to assimilate and distribute salicylic acid throughout the plant. The results indicated that the induced resistance observed in tomato against Fol might be a case of salicylic acid-dependent systemic acquired resistance.

  16. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibition potentiates amino acid- and bile acid-induced bicarbonate secretion in rat duodenum

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Takuya; Wang, Joon-Ho; Higashiyama, Masaaki; Rudenkyy, Sergiy; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Guth, Paul H.; Engel, Eli; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal endocrine cells release gut hormones, including glucagon-like peptides (GLPs), in response to luminal nutrients. Luminal l-glutamate (l-Glu) and 5′-inosine monophosphate (IMP) synergistically increases duodenal HCO3− secretion via GLP-2 release. Since L cells express the bile acid receptor TGR5 and dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) IV rapidly degrades GLPs, we hypothesized that luminal amino acids or bile acids stimulate duodenal HCO3− secretion via GLP-2 release, which is enhanced by DPPIV inhibition. We measured HCO3− secretion with pH and CO2 electrodes using a perfused rat duodenal loop under isoflurane anesthesia. l-Glu (10 mM) and IMP (0.1 mM) were luminally coperfused with or without luminal perfusion (0.1 mM) or intravenous (iv) injection (3 μmol/kg) of the DPPIV inhibitor NVP728. The loop was also perfused with a selective TGR5 agonist betulinic acid (BTA, 10 μM) or the non-bile acid type TGR5 agonist 3-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N,5-dimethylisoxazole-4-carboxamide (CCDC; 10 μM). DPPIV activity visualized by use of the fluorogenic substrate was present on the duodenal brush border and submucosal layer, both abolished by the incubation with NVP728 (0.1 mM). An iv injection of NVP728 enhanced l-Glu/IMP-induced HCO3− secretion, whereas luminal perfusion of NVP728 had no effect. BTA or CCDC had little effect on HCO3− secretion, whereas NVP728 iv markedly enhanced BTA- or CCDC-induced HCO3− secretion, the effects inhibited by a GLP-2 receptor antagonist. Coperfusion of the TGR5 agonist enhanced l-Glu/IMP-induced HCO3− secretion with the enhanced GLP-2 release, suggesting that TGR5 activation amplifies nutrient sensing signals. DPPIV inhibition potentiated luminal l-Glu/IMP-induced and TGR5 agonist-induced HCO3− secretion via a GLP-2 pathway, suggesting that the modulation of the local concentration of the endogenous secretagogue GLP-2 by luminal compounds and DPPIV inhibition helps regulate protective duodenal HCO3− secretion

  17. CO 2 and CO utilization: radiation-induced carboxylation of aqueous chloroacetic acid to malonic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getoff, Nikola

    2003-07-01

    CO 2 and CO in addition to HCOOH/HCOO - can be used to produce the carboxylating radical rad COOH/ rad COO - under the influence of ionizing radiation. The carboxylation of ClCH 2COOH/ClCH 2COO - to malonic acid/malonate was studied at the pH range 2-7. A maximum yield G(malonic acid)=85 at pH=3 was observed by using 5×10 -2 mol dm -3 ClCH 2COOH, 1×10 -2 mol dm -3 HCOOH and 1×10 -3 mol dm -3 CO at a dose of 4.8 kGy. Oxalic and succinic acids were found as byproducts. The yield of the formed Cl - ions passes two maxima, at pH=3 ( G=7.5) and 7 ( G=15). Reaction mechanisms for the carboxylation process are presented.

  18. Post-exercise whey protein hydrolysate supplementation induces a greater increase in muscle protein synthesis than its constituent amino acid content.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Atsushi; Nakayama, Kyosuke; Fukasawa, Tomoyuki; Koga, Jinichiro; Kanegae, Minoru; Kawanaka, Kentaro; Higuchi, Mitsuru

    2013-09-28

    It is well known that ingestion of a protein source is effective in stimulating muscle protein synthesis after exercise. In addition, there are numerous reports on the impact of leucine and leucine-rich whey protein on muscle protein synthesis and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling. However, there is only limited information on the effects of whey protein hydrolysates (WPH) on muscle protein synthesis and mTOR signalling. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of WPH and amino acids on muscle protein synthesis and the initiation of translation in skeletal muscle during the post-exercise phase. Male Sprague–Dawley rats swam for 2 h to depress muscle protein synthesis. Immediately after exercise, the animals were administered either carbohydrate (CHO), CHO plus an amino acid mixture (AA) or CHO plus WPH. At 1 h after exercise, the supplements containing whey-based protein (AA and WPH) caused a significant increase in the fractional rate of protein synthesis (FSR) compared with CHO. WPH also caused a significant increase in FSR compared with AA. Post-exercise ingestion of WPH caused a significant increase in the phosphorylation of mTOR levels compared with AA or CHO. In addition, WPH caused greater phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 kinase and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 than AA and CHO. In contrast, there was no difference in plasma amino acid levels following supplementation with either AA or WPH. These results indicate that WPH may include active components that are superior to amino acids for stimulating muscle protein synthesis and initiating translation.

  19. The potential benefits and adverse effects of phytic Acid supplement in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Omoruyi, F O; Budiaman, A; Eng, Y; Olumese, F E; Hoesel, J L; Ejilemele, A; Okorodudu, A O

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the effect of phytic acid supplement on streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats was investigated. Diabetic rats were fed rodent chow with or without phytic acid supplementation for thirty days. Blood and organ samples were collected for assays. The average food intake was the highest and the body weight gain was the lowest in the group fed phytic acid supplement compared to the diabetic and normal control groups. There was a downward trend in intestinal amylase activity in the group fed phytic acid supplement compared to the other groups. The spike in random blood glucose was the lowest in the same group. We noted reduced serum triglycerides and increased total cholesterol and HDL cholesterol levels in the group fed phytic acid supplement. Serum alkaline phosphatase and alanine amino transferase activities were significantly (P < 0.05) increased by phytic acid supplementation. Systemic IL-1 β level was significantly (P < 0.05) elevated in the diabetic control and supplement treated groups. The liver lipogenic enzyme activities were not significantly altered among the groups. These results suggest that phytic acid supplementation may be beneficial in the management of diabetes mellitus. The observed adverse effect on the liver may be due to the combined effect of streptozotocin-induced diabetes and phytic acid supplementation.

  20. Mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle insulin resistance induced by fatty acids: importance of the mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance condition is associated to the development of several syndromes, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome. Although the factors linking insulin resistance to these syndromes are not precisely defined yet, evidence suggests that the elevated plasma free fatty acid (FFA) level plays an important role in the development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance. Accordantly, in vivo and in vitro exposure of skeletal muscle and myocytes to physiological concentrations of saturated fatty acids is associated with insulin resistance condition. Several mechanisms have been postulated to account for fatty acids-induced muscle insulin resistance, including Randle cycle, oxidative stress, inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction. Here we reviewed experimental evidence supporting the involvement of each of these propositions in the development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance induced by saturated fatty acids and propose an integrative model placing mitochondrial dysfunction as an important and common factor to the other mechanisms. PMID:22360800

  1. Cell wall dynamics modulate acetic acid-induced apoptotic cell death of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Rego, António; Duarte, Ana M.; Azevedo, Flávio; Sousa, Maria J.; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Chaves, Susana R.

    2014-01-01

    Acetic acid triggers apoptotic cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, similar to mammalian apoptosis. To uncover novel regulators of this process, we analyzed whether impairing MAPK signaling affected acetic acid-induced apoptosis and found the mating-pheromone response and, especially, the cell wall integrity pathways were the major mediators, especially the latter, which we characterized further. Screening downstream effectors of this pathway, namely targets of the transcription factor Rlm1p, highlighted decreased cell wall remodeling as particularly important for acetic acid resistance. Modulation of cell surface dynamics therefore emerges as a powerful strategy to increase acetic acid resistance, with potential application in industrial fermentations using yeast, and in biomedicine to exploit the higher sensitivity of colorectal carcinoma cells to apoptosis induced by acetate produced by intestinal propionibacteria. PMID:28357256

  2. Investigating acid-induced structural transitions of lysozyme in an electrospray ionization source.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Wha; Kim, Hugh I

    2015-01-21

    The effect of acids on the structure of lysozyme (Lyz) during electrospray ionization (ESI) was studied by comparing the solution and gas-phase structures of Lyz. Investigation using circular dichroism spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering demonstrated that the folded conformation of Lyz was maintained in pH 2.2 solutions containing different acids. On the other hand, analysis of the charge state distributions and ion mobility (IM) distributions, combined with molecular dynamics simulations, demonstrated that the gas phase structures of Lyz depend on the pKa of the acid used to acidify the protein solution. Formic acid and acetic acid, which are weak acids (pKa > 3.5), induce unfolding of Lyz during ESI, presumably because the undissociated weak acids provide protons to maintain the acidic groups within Lyz protonated and prevent the formation of salt bridges. However, HCl suppressed the formation of the unfolded conformers because the acid is already dissociated in solution, and chloride anions within the ESI droplet can interact with Lyz to reduce the intramolecular electrostatic repulsion. These trends in the IM distributions are observed for all charge states, demonstrating the significance of the acid effect on the structure of Lyz during ESI.

  3. Elevated ratio of arachidonic acid to long-chain omega-3 fatty acids predicts depression development following interferon-alpha treatment: relationship with interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Lotrich, Francis E; Sears, Barry; McNamara, Robert K

    2013-07-01

    Cross-sectional studies have found that an elevated ratio of arachidonic acid to omega-3 fatty acid is associated with depression, and controlled intervention studies have found that decreasing this ratio through administration of omega-3 fatty acids can alleviate depressive symptoms. Additionally, arachidonic acid and omega-3 fatty acids have opposing effects on inflammatory signaling. Exogenous administration of the inflammatory cytokine interferon-alpha (IFN-α) can trigger a depressive episode in a subset of vulnerable people, though associated risk factors remain poorly understood. Using a within-subject prospective design of 138 subjects, we examined whether baseline long-chain omega-3 (docosahexaenoic acid - DHA; eicosapentaenoic acid - EPA) and omega-6 (arachidonic acid - AA; di-homo-gamma-linolenic acid - DGLA) fatty acid status was associated with depression vulnerability in hepatitis C patients treated with IFN-α. Based on the literature, we had specific a priori interest in the AA/EPA+DHA ratio. Lower baseline DHA predicted depression incidence (p=0.04), as did elevated DGLA (p=0.02) and an elevated AA/EPA+DHA ratio (p=0.007). The AA/EPA+DHA ratio predicted depression even when controlling for other critical variables such as sleep quality and race. A higher AA/EPA+DHA ratio was positively associated with both increasing Montgomery-Asperg Depression Rating Scores over time (F=4.0; p<0.05) as well as interleukin-6 levels (F=107.4; p<0.05) but not C-reactive protein. Importantly, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid status was not associated with sustained viral response to IFN-α treatment. These prospective data support the role of fatty acid status in depression vulnerability and indicate a potential role for omega-3 fatty acids in the prevention of inflammation-induced depression.

  4. Interaction between propranolol and amino acids in the single-pass isolated, perfused rat liver.

    PubMed

    Semple, H A; Xia, F

    1995-08-01

    Propranolol (PL) bioavailability has been shown to increase substantially when it is administered with a protein-rich meal. A change in metabolic capacity or tissue uptake, induced by amino acids (AAs) released as a result of digestion of dietary protein, is a possible contributing mechanism to the food effect. This hypothesis was tested in isolated, perfused rat livers in the single-pass mode. Rac-PL (20 micrograms/ml) was infused to steady-state at 3 ml/min/g liver for 150 min. A balanced mixture of I-AA was coinfused from 70 to 110 min. The AA reversibly increased the steady-state concentration of PL by 18% and reduced steady-state concentrations of 4-hydroxypropranolol, N-deisopropylpranolol, PL glycol, naphthoxylactic acid, and naphthoxyacetic acid by an average of 41% and propanolol conjugates by almost 100%, indicating metabolic inhibition. In a second experiment, PL was coinfused with AAs from the beginning of the experiment, and tissue binding was compared with control livers. There was no significant effect of AAs on PL tissue binding. In a third study, the effect of four different concentrations of AAs coinfused from 70 to 110 min was assessed. The percentage change in PL and phase I metabolite levels was linearly correlated to the influent AA concentration. The large magnitude, reversibility, lack of pathway specificity, and concentration dependence of the AA interaction in the perfused liver are also features of food interaction in humans. These similarities constitute evidence that metabolic inhibition by AAs originating from dietary protein could contribute to the PL-food interaction.

  5. Modification of polyethylene by radiation-induced graft polymerization of acrylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorova, L. P.; Aliev, A. D.; Zlobin, V. B.; Aliev, R. E.; Chalykh, A. E.; Kabanov, V. Ya.

    The kinetics investigation of the radiation-induced graft polymerization of acrylic acid onto low density polyethylene by direct method in aqueous solution in the presence of Mohr's salt, was performed. The technique of the contrasting of polyacrylic acid (PAA) graft layer was worked out by Ag +-ions. The structural and morphological peculiarities of grafted copolymers of PE with PAA were determined by the method of electron probe, and X-ray microanalysis by means of the electron microscopy.

  6. Ursolic Acid Inhibits Na+/K+-ATPase Activity and Prevents TNF-α-Induced Gene Expression by Blocking Amino Acid Transport and Cellular Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yokomichi, Tomonobu; Morimoto, Kyoko; Oshima, Nana; Yamada, Yuriko; Fu, Liwei; Taketani, Shigeru; Ando, Masayoshi; Kataoka, Takao

    2011-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, induce the expression of a wide variety of genes, including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). Ursolic acid (3β-hydroxy-urs-12-en-28-oic acid) was identified to inhibit the cell-surface ICAM-1 expression induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines in human lung carcinoma A549 cells. Ursolic acid was found to inhibit the TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 protein expression almost completely, whereas the TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 mRNA expression and NF-κB signaling pathway were decreased only partially by ursolic acid. In line with these findings, ursolic acid prevented cellular protein synthesis as well as amino acid uptake, but did not obviously affect nucleoside uptake and the subsequent DNA/RNA syntheses. This inhibitory profile of ursolic acid was similar to that of the Na+/K+-ATPase inhibitor, ouabain, but not the translation inhibitor, cycloheximide. Consistent with this notion, ursolic acid was found to inhibit the catalytic activity of Na+/K+-ATPase. Thus, our present study reveals a novel molecular mechanism in which ursolic acid inhibits Na+/K+-ATPase activity and prevents the TNF-α-induced gene expression by blocking amino acid transport and cellular protein synthesis. PMID:24970122

  7. The role of hyaluronic acid in SEB-induced acute lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Uchakina, Olga N; Castillejo, Clara M; Bridges, Christy C; McKallip, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the role of the extracellular matrix component, hyaluronic acid (HA) in SEB-induced ALI/ARDS. Intranasal exposure of mice to SEB led to a significant increase in the level of soluble hyaluronic acid in the lungs. Similarly, in an endothelial cell/spleen cell co-culture, SEB exposure led to significant increases in soluble levels of hyaluronic acid, cellular proliferation, and cytokine production compared with SEB-exposed spleen cells or endothelial cells alone. Exposure of SEB-activated spleen cells to hyaluronic acid led to increased cellular proliferation and increased cytokine production. SEB-induced cytokine production and proliferation in vitro were significantly reduced by the hyaluronic acid blocking peptide, Pep-1. Finally, treatment of SEB-exposed mice with Pep-1 significantly reduced SEB-induced ALI/ARDS, through reduction of cytokine production and numbers of lung inflammatory cells, compared to mice treated with a control peptide. Together, these results suggest the possibility of targeting HA for the treatment of SEB-induced ALI/ARDS.

  8. Exogenous Ghrelin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Ceranowicz, Dagmara; Gałązka, Krystyna; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Bartuś, Krzysztof; Gil, Krzysztof; Olszanecki, Rafał; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that ghrelin reduces colonic inflammation induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid and dextran sodium sulfate. In the present study we determined the effect of treatment with ghrelin on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Rectal administration of 3% acetic acid solution led to induction of colitis in all animals. Damage of the colonic wall was accompanied by an increase in mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Moreover, induction of colitis led to a reduction in colonic blood flow and DNA synthesis. Administration of ghrelin after induction of colitis led to faster regeneration of the colonic wall and reduction in colonic levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, and myeloperoxidase. In addition, treatment with ghrelin improved mucosal DNA synthesis and blood flow. Our study disclosed that ghrelin exhibits a strong anti-inflammatory and healing effect in acetic acid-induced colitis. Our current observation in association with previous findings that ghrelin exhibits curative effect in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- and dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis suggest that therapeutic effect of ghrelin in the colon is universal and independent of the primary cause of colitis.

  9. Increased hepatic Fatty Acid uptake and esterification contribute to tetracycline-induced steatosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, You-Jin; Lee, Chae-Hyeon; Lee, Kang-Yo; Jung, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2015-06-01

    Tetracycline induces microvesicular steatosis, which has a poor long-term prognosis and a higher risk of steatohepatitis development compared with macrovesicular steatosis. Recent gene expression studies indicated that tetracycline treatment affects the expression of many genes associated with fatty acid transport and esterification. In this study, we investigated the role of fatty acid transport and esterification in tetracycline-induced steatosis. Intracellular lipid accumulation and the protein expression of fatty acid translocase (FAT or CD36) and diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) 2 were increased in both mouse liver and HepG2 cells treated with tetracycline at 50 mg/kg (intraperitoneal injection, i.p.) and 100 μM, respectively. Tetracycline increased the cellular uptake of boron-dipyrromethene-labeled C16 fatty acid, which was abolished by CD36 RNA interference. Oleate-induced cellular lipid accumulation was further enhanced by co-incubation with tetracycline. Tetracycline downregulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, which negatively regulated DGAT2 expression. U0126, a specific ERK inhibitor, also increased DGAT2 expression and cellular lipid accumulation. DGAT1 and 2 knock-down with specific small interfering (si)-RNA completely abrogated the steatogenic effect of tetracycline in HepG2 cells. Taken together, our data showed that tetracycline induces lipid accumulation by facilitating fatty acid transport and triglyceride esterification by upregulating CD36 and DGAT2, respectively.

  10. Protective effect of hispidulin on kainic acid-induced seizures and neurotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu Yu; Lu, Cheng Wei; Wang, Su Jane; Huang, Shu Kuei

    2015-05-15

    Hispidulin is a flavonoid compound which is an active ingredient in a number of traditional Chinese medicinal herbs, and it has been reported to inhibit glutamate release. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether hispidulin protects against seizures induced by kainic acid, a glutamate analog with excitotoxic properties. The results indicated that intraperitoneally administering hispidulin (10 or 50mg/kg) to rats 30 min before intraperitoneally injecting kainic acid (15 mg/kg) increased seizure latency and decreased seizure score. In addition, hispidulin substantially attenuated kainic acid-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death, and this protective effect was accompanied by the suppression of microglial activation and the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α in the hippocampus. Moreover, hispidulin reduced kainic acid-induced c-Fos expression and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in the hippocampus. These data suggest that hispidulin has considerable antiepileptic, neuroprotective, and antiinflammatory effects on kainic acid-induced seizures in rats.

  11. Mycolic acid-containing bacteria induce natural-product biosynthesis in Streptomyces species.

    PubMed

    Onaka, Hiroyasu; Mori, Yukiko; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Furumai, Tamotsu

    2011-01-01

    Natural products produced by microorganisms are important starting compounds for drug discovery. Secondary metabolites, including antibiotics, have been isolated from different Streptomyces species. The production of these metabolites depends on the culture conditions. Therefore, the development of a new culture method can facilitate the discovery of new natural products. Here, we show that mycolic acid-containing bacteria can influence the biosynthesis of cryptic natural products in Streptomyces species. The production of red pigment by Streptomyces lividans TK23 was induced by coculture with Tsukamurella pulmonis TP-B0596, which is a mycolic acid-containing bacterium. Only living cells induced this pigment production, which was not mediated by any substances. T. pulmonis could induce natural-product synthesis in other Streptomyces strains too: it altered natural-product biosynthesis in 88.4% of the Streptomyces strains isolated from soil. The other mycolic acid-containing bacteria, Rhodococcus erythropolis and Corynebacterium glutamicum, altered biosynthesis in 87.5 and 90.2% of the Streptomyces strains, respectively. The coculture broth of T. pulmonis and Streptomyces endus S-522 contained a novel antibiotic, which we named alchivemycin A. We concluded that the mycolic acid localized in the outer cell layer of the inducer bacterium influences secondary metabolism in Streptomyces, and this activity is a result of the direct interaction between the mycolic acid-containing bacteria and Streptomyces. We used these results to develop a new coculture method, called the combined-culture method, which facilitates the screening of natural products.

  12. Exogenous Ghrelin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Ceranowicz, Dagmara; Gałązka, Krystyna; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Bartuś, Krzysztof; Gil, Krzysztof; Olszanecki, Rafał; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that ghrelin reduces colonic inflammation induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid and dextran sodium sulfate. In the present study we determined the effect of treatment with ghrelin on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Rectal administration of 3% acetic acid solution led to induction of colitis in all animals. Damage of the colonic wall was accompanied by an increase in mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Moreover, induction of colitis led to a reduction in colonic blood flow and DNA synthesis. Administration of ghrelin after induction of colitis led to faster regeneration of the colonic wall and reduction in colonic levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, and myeloperoxidase. In addition, treatment with ghrelin improved mucosal DNA synthesis and blood flow. Our study disclosed that ghrelin exhibits a strong anti-inflammatory and healing effect in acetic acid-induced colitis. Our current observation in association with previous findings that ghrelin exhibits curative effect in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- and dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis suggest that therapeutic effect of ghrelin in the colon is universal and independent of the primary cause of colitis. PMID:27598133

  13. Incorporated Fish Oil Fatty Acids Prevent Action Potential Shortening Induced by Circulating Fish Oil Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ruijter, Hester M. Den; Verkerk, Arie O.; Coronel, Ruben

    2010-01-01

    Increased consumption of fatty fish, rich in omega-3-polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω3-PUFAs) reduces the severity and number of arrhythmias. Long-term ω3-PUFA-intake modulates the activity of several cardiac ion channels leading to cardiac action potential shortening. Circulating ω3-PUFAs in the bloodstream and incorporated ω3-PUFAs in the cardiac membrane have a different mechanism to shorten the action potential. It is, however, unknown whether circulating ω3-PUFAs in the bloodstream enhance or diminish the effects of incorporated ω3-PUFAs. In the present study, we address this issue. Rabbits were fed a diet rich in fish oil (ω3) or sunflower oil (ω9, as control) for 3 weeks. Ventricular myocytes were isolated by enzymatic dissociation and action potentials were measured using the perforated patch-clamp technique in the absence and presence of acutely administered ω3-PUFAs. Plasma of ω3 fed rabbits contained more free eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and isolated myocytes of ω3 fed rabbits contained higher amounts of both EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in their sarcolemma compared to control. In the absence of acutely administered fatty acids, ω3 myocytes had a shorter action potential with a more negative plateau than ω9 myocytes. In the ω9 myocytes, but not in the ω3 myocytes, acute administration of a mixture of EPA + DHA shortened the action potential significantly. From these data we conclude that incorporated ω3-PUFAs into the sarcolemma and acutely administered ω3 fatty acids do not have a cumulative effect on action potential duration and morphology. As a consequence, patients with a high cardiac ω3-PUFA status will probably not benefit from short term ω3 supplementation as an antiarrhythmic therapy. PMID:21423389

  14. Enhancement of taxol-induced apoptosis by inhibition of NF-κB with ursorlic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunlong; Xing, Da

    2007-05-01

    Taxol is known to inhibit cell growth and triggers significant apoptosis in various cancer cells, and activation of proliferation factor NF-κB during Taxol-induced apoptosis is regarded as a main reason resulting in tumor cells resistance to Taxol. It has been found that ursorlic acid can inhibit the activation of NF-κB. In order to study whether ursorlic acid can enhance the Taxol-induced apoptosis, we use fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique and probe SCAT3 to compare the difference of caspase-3 activation between Taxol alone and Taxol combined ursorlic acid. With laser scanning confocal microscopy, we find that ursorlic acid, a nontoxic food component, sensitizes ASTC-a-1 cells more efficiently to Taxol-induced apoptosis by advanced activation of caspase 3. The result also suggests that there would be a synergistic effect between Taxol and ursorlic acid, and the more detailed mechanism of synergistic effect needs to be clarified further, such as the correlations among NF-κB, Akt, caspase 8, which leads to the advanced activation of caspase 3 during combined treatment of Taxol and ursorlic acid. Moreover, this may be a new way to improve Taxol-dependent tumor therapy.

  15. Protective effects of sinapic acid on lysosomal dysfunction in isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats.

    PubMed

    Roy, Subhro Jyoti; Stanely Mainzen Prince, Ponnian

    2012-11-01

    In the pathology of myocardial infarction, lysosomal lipid peroxidation and resulting enzyme release play an important role. We evaluated the protective effects of sinapic acid on lysosomal dysfunction in isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats. Male Wistar rats were treated with sinapic acid (12 mg/kg body weight) orally daily for 10 days and isoproterenol (100 mg/kg body weight) was injected twice at an interval of 24 h (9th and 10th day). Then, lysosomal lipid peroxidation, lysosomal enzymes in serum, heart homogenate, lysosomal fraction and myocardial infarct size were measured. Isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats showed a significant increase in serum creatine kinase-MB and lysosomal lipid peroxidation. The activities of β-glucuronidase, β-galactosidase, cathepsin-B and D were significantly increased in serum, heart and the activities of β-glucuronidase and cathepsin-D were significantly decreased in lysosomal fraction of myocardial infarcted rats. Pre-and-co-treatment with sinapic acid normalized all the biochemical parameters and reduced myocardial infarct size in myocardial infarcted rats. In vitro studies confirmed the free radical scavenging effects of sinapic acid. The possible mechanisms for the observed effects are attributed to sinapic acid's free radical scavenging and membrane stabilizing properties. Thus, sinapic acid has protective effects on lysosomal dysfunction in isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats.

  16. Phenylephrine-induced cardiac hypertrophy is attenuated by a histone acetylase inhibitor anacardic acid in mice.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chang; Luo, Xiaomei; Li, Shuo; Sun, Huichao

    2017-03-28

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a complex process involving highly coordinated but tight regulation of multiple elements, such as in epigenetics, which make an important contribution to myocardium remodeling and cardiac hypertrophy. Epigenetic regulations, particularly histone acetylation, have been implicated in cardiac hypertrophy, however, the exact mechanism is still largely unknown. In the present study, we explored the potential attenuating effects of Chinese herbal extract anacardic acid on phenylephrine-induced cardiac hypertrophy and the underlying mechanism. The mouse cardiac hypertrophy model was established and the hearts were collected from C57BL/6 mice for further analyses. The data showed that anacardic acid modulated the cardiac genes expression and attenuated the phenylephrine-induced cardiac hypertrophy via the suppression of histone acetylases activity and downstream cardiac genes. In addition, anacardic acid abrogated histone and MEF2A acetylation and DNA-binding activity by blocking p300-HAT and PCAF-HAT activities. In addition, anacardic acid normalized the cardiac hypertrophy-related genes expressions (ANP, BNP, cTnT, cTnI, β-MHC, and Cx43) induced by phenylephrine at the level of transcription and translation. In addition, anacardic acid did not affect the blood routine index, hepatic function, renal function, and myocardial enzymes. Therefore, anacardic acid may prove to be a candidate drug to cure hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

  17. Chemical and biological characterization of cinnamic acid derivatives from cell cultures of lavender (Lavandula officinalis) induced by stress and jasmonic acid.

    PubMed

    Nitzsche, Astrid; Tokalov, Sergey V; Gutzeit, Herwig O; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta

    2004-05-19

    Cell cultures of lavender (Lavandula officinalis) were analyzed for the metabolite profile under normal growth conditions and under stress as well as after jasmonic acid treatment. The main compound synthesized was rosmarinic acid, which was also secreted into the culture medium. Different solvent extraction methods at different pH values altered the profile slightly. Anoxic stress induced the synthesis of a cinnamic acid derivative, which was identified as caffeic acid by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Caffeic acid was also induced after treatment of the cell cultures with jasmonic acid. Although the antioxidative activity of both compounds, rosmarinic acid and caffeic acid, was confirmed in an assay using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), it was demonstrated that both substances have a low cytotoxic potential in vitro using acute myeloid leukemia (HL-60) cells. The potential of the system for finding new bioactive compounds is discussed.

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pyocyanin Induces Neutrophil Death via Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species and Mitochondrial Acid Sphingomyelinase

    PubMed Central

    Managò, Antonella; Becker, Katrin Anne; Carpinteiro, Alexander; Wilker, Barbara; Soddemann, Matthias; Seitz, Aaron P.; Edwards, Michael J.; Grassmé, Heike

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Pulmonary infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa are a serious clinical problem and are often lethal. Because many strains of P. aeruginosa are resistant to antibiotics, therapeutic options are limited. Neutrophils play an important role in the host's early acute defense against pulmonary P. aeruginosa. Therefore, it is important to define the mechanisms by which P. aeruginosa interacts with host cells, particularly neutrophils. Results: Here, we report that pyocyanin, a membrane-permeable pigment and toxin released by P. aeruginosa, induces the death of wild-type neutrophils; its interaction with the mitochondrial respiratory chain results in the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the activation of mitochondrial acid sphingomyelinase, the formation of mitochondrial ceramide, and the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. A genetic deficiency in acid sphingomyelinase prevents both the activation of this pathway and pyocyanin-induced neutrophil death. This reduced death, on the other hand, is associated with an increase in the release of interleukin-8 from pyocyanin-activated acid sphingomyelinase-deficient neutrophils but not from wild-type cells. Innovation: These studies identified the mechanisms by which pyocyanin induces the release of mitochondrial ROS and by which ROS induce neutrophil death via mitochondrial acid sphingomyelinase. Conclusion: These findings demonstrate a novel mechanism of pyocyanin-induced death of neutrophils and show how this apoptosis balances innate immune reactions. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1097–1110. PMID:25686490

  19. Palmitoleic acid induces the cardiac mitochondrial membrane permeability transition despite the presence of L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Oyanagi, Eri; Uchida, Masataka; Miyakawa, Takeshi; Miyachi, Motohiko; Yamaguchi, Hidetaka; Nagami, Kuniatsu; Utsumi, Kozo; Yano, Hiromi

    Although palmitoleic acid (C16:1) is associated with arrhythmias, and increases in an age-dependent matter, the effects of L-carnitine, which is essential for the transport of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondria, are unclear. It has been postulated that L-carnitine may attenuate palmitate (C16:0)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and the apoptosis of cardiomyocytes. The aim of this study was to elucidate the activity of L-carnitine in the prevention of the palmitoleic acid-induced mitochondrial membrane permeability transition and cytochrome c release using isolated cardiac mitochondria from rats. Palmitoleoyl-CoA-induced mitochondrial respiration was not accelerated by L-carnitine treatment, and this respiration was slightly inhibited by oligomycin, which is an inhibitor of ATP synthase. Despite pretreatment with L-carnitine, the mitochondrial membrane potential decreased and mitochondrial swelling was induced by palmitoleoyl-CoA. In the presence of a combination of L-carnitine and tiron, a free radical scavenger, there was attenuated mitochondrial swelling and cytochrome c release following palmitoleoyl-CoA treatment. We concluded that palmitoleic acid, but not palmitate, induces the cardiac mitochondrial membrane permeability transition despite the presence of L-carnitine.

  20. Protection of arsenic-induced testicular oxidative stress by arjunolic acid.

    PubMed

    Manna, Prasenjit; Sinha, Mahua; Sil, Parames C

    2008-01-01

    Arsenic-induced tissue damage is a major concern to the human population. An impaired antioxidant defense mechanism followed by oxidative stress is the major cause of arsenic-induced toxicity, which can lead to reproductive failure. The present study was carried out to investigate the preventive role of arjunolic acid, a triterpenoid saponin isolated from the bark of Terminalia arjuna, against arsenic-induced testicular damage in mice. Administration of arsenic (in the form of sodium arsenite, NaAsO(2), at a dose of 10 mg/kg body weight) for 2 days significantly decreased the intracellular antioxidant power, the activities of the antioxidant enzymes, as well as the levels of cellular metabolites. In addition, arsenic intoxication enhanced testicular arsenic content, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation and the level of glutathione disulfide (GSSG). Exposure to arsenic also caused significant degeneration of the seminiferous tubules with necrosis and defoliation of spermatocytes. Pretreatment with arjunolic acid at a dose of 20 mg/kg body weight for 4 days could prevent the arsenic-induced testicular oxidative stress and injury to the histological structures of the testes. Arjunolic acid had free radical scavenging activity in a cell-free system and antioxidant power in vivo. In summary, the results suggest that the chemopreventive role of arjunolic acid against arsenic-induced testicular toxicity may be due to its intrinsic antioxidant property.

  1. Contributions of spinal D-amino acid oxidase to chronic morphine-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuai; Li, Xin-Yan; Gong, Nian; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2015-12-10

    Spinal D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) is an FAD-dependent peroxisomal flavoenzyme which mediates the conversion of neutral and polar D-amino acids (including D-serine) to the corresponding α-keto acids, and simultaneously produces hydrogen peroxide and ammonia. This study has aimed to explore the potential contributions of spinal DAAO and its mediated hydrogen peroxide/D-serine metabolism to the development of morphine-induced hyperalgesia. Bi-daily subcutaneous injections of morphine to mice over 7 days induced thermal hyperalgesia as measured by both the hot-plate and tail-immersion tests, and spinal astroglial activation with increased spinal gene expression of DAAO, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)). Subcutaneous injections of the potent DAAO inhibitor CBIO (5-chloro-benzo[D]isoxazol-3-ol) prevented and reversed the chronic morphine-induced hyperalgesia. CBIO also inhibited both astrocyte activation and the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Intrathecal injection of the hydrogen peroxide scavenger PBN (phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone) and of catalase completely reversed established morphine hyperalgesia, whereas subcutaneous injections of exogenous D-serine failed to alter chronic morphine-induced hyperalgesia. These results provided evidence that spinal DAAO and its subsequent production of hydrogen peroxide rather than the D-serine metabolism contributed to the development of morphine-induced hyperalgesia.

  2. Studies on the vascular and hematological changes induced by ellagic acid in rats.

    PubMed

    Damas, J; Adam, A; Remacle-Volon, G; Grek, V

    1987-12-01

    We compared the major changes induced by ellagic acid (EA), a Hageman factor activator, in normal rats and in kininogen-deficient Brown Norway rats. In normal rats, large doses of EA induced a congestion of lymph nodes, spleen and liver, a prolongation of activated partial thromboplastin time, the consumption of prekallikrein, high molecular weight kininogen and fibrinogen, as well as the stimulation of platelets with their accumulation in lungs, liver and spleen. A systemic hypotension of long duration was also observed. The fibrinogen consumption, the thrombocytopenia and the lengthening of activated partial thromboplastin time were dose-dependent. In kininogen-deficient rats, EA induced only a minimal congestion of lymphoid tissues, the accumulation of platelets in lungs, a decrease of plasma fibrinogen and a short-lasting hypotension. It is concluded that the vascular changes induced by blood coagulation with ellagic acid resulted mainly from kinin formation.

  3. Hepatoprotective effect of Matrine salvianolic acid B salt on Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Hepatic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the hepatoprotective effect of Matrine salvianolic acid B salt on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatic fibrosis in rats. Salvianolic acid B and Matrine has long been used to treat liver fibrosis. Matrine salvianolic acid B salt is a new compound containing Salvianolic acid B and Matrine. Hepatic fibrosis induced by CCl4 was studied in animal models using Wistar rats. Organ coefficient, serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), hexadecenoic acid (HA), laminin (LN), hydroxyproline (Hyp), and glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) in liver tissues were measured, respectively. Histopathological changes in the livers were studied by hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining and Masson Trichrome (MT) examination. The expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) was observed by immunohistochemical analysis. A significant reduction in serum levels of AST, ALT, HA, LN and Hyp was observed in the Matrine salvianolic acid B salt treated groups, suggesting that the salt had hepatoprotective effects. The depletion of GSH and SOD, as well as MDA accumulation in liver tissues was suppressed by Matrine salvianolic acid B salt too. The expression of TGF-β1 and α-SMA measured by immunohistology was significantly reduced by Matrine salvianolic acid B salt in a dose-dependent manner. Matrine salvianolic acid B salt treatment attenuated the necro-inflammation and fibrogenesis induced by CCl4 injection, and thus it is promising as a therapeutic anti-fibrotic agent against hepatic fibrosis. PMID:22559721

  4. Proteomic investigation into betulinic acid-induced apoptosis of human cervical cancer HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Pang, Qiuying; Zhou, Dong; Zhang, Aiqin; Luo, Shaman; Wang, Yang; Yan, Xiufeng

    2014-01-01

    Betulinic acid is a pentacyclic triterpenoid that exhibits anticancer functions in human cancer cells. This study provides evidence that betulinic acid is highly effective against the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa by inducing dose- and time-dependent apoptosis. The apoptotic process was further investigated using a proteomics approach to reveal protein expression changes in HeLa cells following betulinic acid treatment. Proteomic analysis revealed that there were six up- and thirty down-regulated proteins in betulinic acid-induced HeLa cells, and these proteins were then subjected to functional pathway analysis using multiple analysis software. UDP-glucose 6-dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase decarboxylating, chain A Horf6-a novel human peroxidase enzyme that involved in redox process, was found to be down-regulated during the apoptosis process of the oxidative stress response pathway. Consistent with our results at the protein level, an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species was observed in betulinic acid-treated cells. The proteins glucose-regulated protein and cargo-selection protein TIP47, which are involved in the endoplasmic reticulum pathway, were up-regulated by betulinic acid treatment. Meanwhile, 14-3-3 family proteins, including 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ε, were down-regulated in response to betulinic acid treatment, which is consistent with the decrease in expression of the target genes 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ε. Furthermore, it was found that the antiapoptotic bcl-2 gene was down-regulated while the proapoptotic bax gene was up-regulated after betulinic acid treatment in HeLa cells. These results suggest that betulinic acid induces apoptosis of HeLa cells by triggering both the endoplasmic reticulum pathway and the ROS-mediated mitochondrial pathway.

  5. Importance of interferon inducible trans-membrane proteins and retinoic acid inducible gene I for influenza virus replication: A review.

    PubMed

    Suo, Siqingaowa; Ren, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the interplay between Influenza viruses and host cells is key to elucidating the pathogenesis of these viruses. Several host factors have been identified that exert antiviral functions; however, influenza viruses continue to replicate utilizing host cell machinery. Herein, we review the mechanisms of action of two host-derived proteins on conferring cellular resistance to the influenza virus; (1) the interferon inducible trans-membrane proteins, 1, 2 and 3, a recently identified family of early restriction factors; and (2) retinoic acid inducible gene I, a key mediator of antiviral immunity. These data may contribute to the design of novel and efficient anti-influenza treatments.

  6. Arachidonic acid enhances reproduction in Daphnia magna and mitigates changes in sex ratios induced by pyriproxyfen.

    PubMed

    Ginjupalli, Gautam K; Gerard, Patrick D; Baldwin, William S

    2015-03-01

    Arachidonic acid is 1 of only 2 unsaturated fatty acids retained in the ovaries of crustaceans and an inhibitor of HR97g, a nuclear receptor expressed in adult ovaries. The authors hypothesized that, as a key fatty acid, arachidonic acid may be associated with reproduction and potentially environmental sex determination in Daphnia. Reproduction assays with arachidonic acid indicate that it alters female:male sex ratios by increasing female production. This reproductive effect only occurred during a restricted Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata diet. Next, the authors tested whether enriching a poorer algal diet (Chlorella vulgaris) with arachidonic acid enhances overall reproduction and sex ratios. Arachidonic acid enrichment of a C. vulgaris diet also enhances fecundity at 1.0 µM and 4.0 µM by 30% to 40% in the presence and absence of pyriproxyfen. This indicates that arachidonic acid is crucial in reproduction regardless of environmental sex determination. Furthermore, the data indicate that P. subcapitata may provide a threshold concentration of arachidonic acid needed for reproduction. Diet-switch experiments from P. subcapitata to C. vulgaris mitigate some, but not all, of arachidonic acid's effects when compared with a C. vulgaris-only diet, suggesting that some arachidonic acid provided by P. subcapitata is retained. In summary, arachidonic acid supplementation increases reproduction and represses pyriproxyfen-induced environmental sex determination in D. magna in restricted diets. A diet rich in arachidonic acid may provide protection from some reproductive toxicants such as the juvenile hormone agonist pyriproxyfen. Environ Toxicol Chem 2015;34:527-535. © 2014 SETAC.

  7. Combination of chlorogenic acid and salvianolic acid B protects against polychlorinated biphenyls-induced oxidative stress through Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lijun; Li, Yuan; Yin, Wenqin; Shan, Wenqi; Dai, Jinfeng; Yang, Ye; Li, Lei

    2016-09-01

    Caffeic acid derivatives (CADs) are well-known phytochemicals with multiple physiological and pharmacological activities. This study aimed to investigate the combined protective effects of CADs on PCB126-induced liver damages and oxidative stress in mice. Here, we used chemiluminescence and chose chlorogenic acid (CGA), salvianolic acid B (Sal B) as the best antioxidants. Then, mice were intragastrically administered with 60mg/kg/d CGA, Sal B, and CGA plus Sal B (1:1) for 3 weeks before exposing to 0.05mg/kg/d PCB126 for 2 weeks. We found that pretreatment with CGA, Sal B, and CGA plus Sal B effectively attenuated liver injury and cytotoxicity caused by PCB126, but improved the expressions of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reduced (GSH), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), CGA plus Sal B especially, was found to have the best effects that indicated a synergetic protective effect. Taken together, as the Nrf2 regulates the cyto-protective response by up-regulating the expression of antioxidant genes, we suggested that CGA plus Sal B had a combined protection on PCB126-induced tissue damages and that the Nrf2 signaling might be involved.

  8. Role of Arachidonic Acid in Promoting Hair Growth

    PubMed Central

    Munkhbayar, Semchin; Jang, Sunhyae; Cho, A-Ri; Choi, Soon-Jin; Shin, Chang Yup; Eun, Hee Chul; Kim, Kyu Han

    2016-01-01

    Background Arachidonic acid (AA) is an omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid present in all mammalian cell membranes, and involved in the regulation of many cellular processes, including cell survival, angiogenesis, and mitogenesis. The dermal papilla, composed of specialized fibroblasts located in the bulb of the hair follicle, contributes to the control of hair growth and the hair cycle. Objective This study investigated the effect of AA on hair growth by using in vivo and in vitro models. Methods The effect of AA on human dermal papilla cells (hDPCs) and hair shaft elongation was evaluated by MTT assay and hair follicle organ culture, respectively. The expression of various growth and survival factors in hDPCs were investigated by western blot or immunohistochemistry. The ability of AA to induce and prolong anagen phase in C57BL/6 mice was analyzed. Results AA was found to enhance the viability of hDPCs and promote the expression of several factors responsible for hair growth, including fibroblast growth factor-7 (FGF-7) and FGF-10. Western blotting identified the role of AA in the phosphorylation of various transcription factors (ERK, CREB, and AKT) and increased expression of Bcl-2 in hDPCs. In addition, AA significantly promoted hair shaft elongation, with increased proliferation of matrix keratinocytes, during ex vivo hair follicle culture. It was also found to promote hair growth by induction and prolongation of anagen phase in telogen-stage C57BL/6 mice. Conclusion This study concludes that AA plays a role in promoting hair growth by increasing the expression of growth factors in hDPCs and enhancing follicle proliferation and survival. PMID:26848219

  9. Fruit acids do not enhance sodium lauryl sulphate-induced cumulative irritant contact dermatitis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Schliemann-Willers, Sibylle; Fuchs, Silke; Kleesz, Peter; Grieshaber, Romano; Elsner, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Combined exposure to different irritants in the workplace may lead to irritant contact dermatitis, which is the main type of occupational dermatitis among bakers and confectioners. Following previous work on "tandem irritation", a panel of healthy volunteers was exposed twice daily for 4 days to the organic fruit acids: citric, malic, and lactic acid, either alone or in tandem application with 0.5% sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) in a repetitive irritation test. Irritant cutaneous reactions were quantified by visual scoring and non-invasive measurement of transepidermal water loss and skin colour reflectance. Twice daily application of either citric or malic acid alone did not induce a significant irritant reaction. Combined exposure to one of the fruit acids and SLS caused marked barrier disturbance, but the latter irritant effect was smaller than that obtained by combined exposure to SLS and water. Thus, combined exposure to the above-mentioned fruit acids and SLS did not enhance cumulative skin irritation.

  10. Exacerbation of Alcohol-Induced Oxidative Stress in Rats by Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Iron Load

    PubMed Central

    Patere, S. N.; Majumdar, A. S.; Saraf, M. N.

    2011-01-01

    The hypothesis that excessive intake of vegetable oil containing polyunsaturated fatty acids and iron load precipitate alcohol-induced liver damage was investigated in a rat model. In order to elucidate the mechanism underlying this synergism, the serum levels of iron, total protein, serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase, liver thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and activities of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase in liver of rats treated with alcohol, polyunsaturated fatty acids and iron per se and in combination were examined. Alcohol was fed to the rats at a level of 10-30% (blood alcohol was maintained between 150-350 mg/dl by using head space gas chromatography), polyunsaturated fatty acids at a level of 15% of diet and carbonyl iron 1.5-2% of diet per se and in combination to different groups for 30 days. Hepatotoxicity was assessed by measuring serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase, which was elevated and serum total protein, which was decreased significantly in rats fed with a combination of alcohol, polyunsaturated fatty acids and iron. It was also associated with increased lipid peroxidation and disruption of antioxidant defense in combination fed rats as compared to rats fed with alcohol or polyunsaturated fatty acids or iron. The present study revealed significant exacerbation of the alcohol-induced oxidative stress in presence of polyunsaturated fatty acids and iron. PMID:22303057

  11. Chlorogenic and caftaric acids in liver toxicity and oxidative stress induced by methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Koriem, Khaled M M; Soliman, Rowan E

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine intoxication can cause acute hepatic failure. Chlorogenic and caftaric acids are the major dietary polyphenols present in various foods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective role of chlorogenic and caftaric acids in liver toxicity and oxidative stress induced by methamphetamine in rats. Thirty-two male albino rats were divided into 4 equal groups. Group 1, which was control group, was injected (i.p) with saline (1 mL/kg) twice a day over seven-day period. Groups 2, 3, and 4 were injected (i.p) with methamphetamine (10 mg/kg) twice a day over seven-day period, where groups 3 and 4 were injected (i.p) with 60 mg/kg chlorogenic acid and 40 mg/kg caftaric acid, respectively, one day before methamphetamine injections. Methamphetamine increased serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, bilirubin, cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides. Also, malondialdehyde in serum, liver, and brain and plasma and liver nitric oxide levels were increased while methamphetamine induced a significant decrease in serum total protein, albumin, globulin, albumin/globulin ratio, brain serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine, blood and liver superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase levels. Chlorogenic and caftaric acids prior to methamphetamine injections restored all the above parameters to normal values. In conclusion, chlorogenic and caftaric acids before methamphetamine injections prevented liver toxicity and oxidative stress where chlorogenic acid was more effective.

  12. Beta-glycerophosphate accelerates RANKL-induced osteoclast formation in the presence of ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Noh, A Long Sae Mi; Yim, Mijung

    2011-03-01

    Despite numerous reports of the synergistic effects of beta-glycerophosphate and ascorbic acid in inducing the differentiation of osteoblasts, little is known about their roles in osteoclastic differentiation. Therefore, we investigated the effect of beta-glycerophosphate on osteoclastogenesis in the presence of ascorbic acid using primary mouse bone marrow cultures treated with macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB ligand (RANKL). Beta-Glycerophosphate dose-dependently increased RANKL-induced osteoclast formation in the presence of ascorbic acid. This stimulatory effect was apparent when beta-glycerophosphate and ascorbic acid were only added during the late stages of the culture period, indicating that they influence later events in osteoclastic differentiation. While the combination of beta-glycerophosphate and ascorbic acid inhibited RANKL-stimulated activation of ERK and p38, and degradation of IkappaB, it increased the induction of c-Fos and NFATc1. In addition, beta-glycerophosphate and ascorbic acid together enhanced the induction of COX-2 following RANKL stimulation. Taken together, our data suggest that beta-glycerophosphate and ascorbic acid have synergistic effects on osteoclast formation, increasing RANKL-mediated induction of c-Fos, NFATc1 and COX-2 in osteoclast precursors.

  13. Sialic acid attenuates puromycin aminonucleoside-induced desialylation and oxidative stress in human podocytes.

    PubMed

    Pawluczyk, Izabella Z A; Ghaderi Najafabadi, Maryam; Patel, Samita; Desai, Priyanka; Vashi, Dipti; Saleem, Moin A; Topham, Peter S

    2014-01-15

    Sialoglycoproteins make a significant contribution to the negative charge of the glomerular anionic glycocalyx-crucial for efficient functioning of the glomerular permselective barrier. Defects in sialylation have serious consequences on podocyte function leading to the development of proteinuria. The aim of the current study was to investigate potential mechanisms underlying puromycin aminonucleosisde (PAN)-induced desialylation and to ascertain whether they could be corrected by administration of free sialic acid. PAN treatment of podocytes resulted in a loss of sialic acid from podocyte proteins. This was accompanied by a reduction, in the expression of sialyltransferases and a decrease in the key enzyme of sialic acid biosynthesis N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase/N-acetylmannosamine kinase (GNE). PAN treatment also attenuated expression of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (mSOD) and concomitantly increased the generation of superoxide anions. Sialic acid supplementation rescued podocyte protein sialylation and partially restored expression of sialyltransferases. Sialic acid also restored mSOD mRNA expression and quenched the oxidative burst. These data suggest that PAN-induced aberrant sialylation occurs as a result of modulation of enzymes involved sialic acid metabolism some of which are affected by oxidative stress. These data suggest that sialic acid therapy not only reinstates functionally important negative charge but also acts a source of antioxidant activity.

  14. Hepatic Fasting-Induced PPARα Activity Does Not Depend on Essential Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Polizzi, Arnaud; Fouché, Edwin; Ducheix, Simon; Lasserre, Frédéric; Marmugi, Alice P; Mselli-Lakhal, Laila; Loiseau, Nicolas; Wahli, Walter; Guillou, Hervé; Montagner, Alexandra

    2016-09-24

    The liver plays a central role in the regulation of fatty acid metabolism, which is highly sensitive to transcriptional responses to nutrients and hormones. Transcription factors involved in this process include nuclear hormone receptors. One such receptor, PPARα, which is highly expressed in the liver and activated by a variety of fatty acids, is a critical regulator of hepatic fatty acid catabolism during fasting. The present study compared the influence of dietary fatty acids and fasting on hepatic PPARα-dependent responses. Pparα(-/-) male mice and their wild-type controls were fed diets containing different fatty acids for 10 weeks prior to being subjected to fasting or normal feeding. In line with the role of PPARα in sensing dietary fatty acids, changes in chronic dietary fat consumption influenced liver damage during fasting. The changes were particularly marked in mice fed diets lacking essential fatty acids. However, fasting, rather than specific dietary fatty acids, induced acute PPARα activity in the liver. Taken together, the data imply that the potent signalling involved in triggering PPARα activity during fasting does not rely on essential fatty acid-derived ligand.

  15. Role of intramitochondrial arachidonic acid and acyl-CoA synthetase 4 in angiotensin II-regulated aldosterone synthesis in NCI-H295R adrenocortical cell line.

    PubMed

    Mele, Pablo G; Duarte, Alejandra; Paz, Cristina; Capponi, Alessandro; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2012-07-01

    Although the role of arachidonic acid (AA) in angiotensin II (ANG II)- and potassium-stimulated steroid production in zona glomerulosa cells is well documented, the mechanism responsible for AA release is not fully described. In this study we evaluated the mechanism involved in the release of intramitochondrial AA and its role in the regulation of aldosterone synthesis by ANG II in glomerulosa cells. We show that ANG II and potassium induce the expression of acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) thioesterase 2 and acyl-CoA synthetase 4, two enzymes involved in intramitochondrial AA generation/export system well characterized in other steroidogenic systems. We demonstrate that mitochondrial ATP is required for AA generation/export system, steroid production, and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein induction. We also demonstrate the role of protein tyrosine phosphatases regulating acyl-CoA synthetase 4 and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein induction, and hence ANG II-stimulated aldosterone synthesis.

  16. Antagonistic effects of abscisic acid and jasmonates on salt stress-inducible transcripts in rice roots.

    PubMed Central

    Moons, A; Prinsen, E; Bauw, G; Van Montagu, M

    1997-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonates have been implicated in responses to water deficit and wounding. We compared the molecular and physiological effects of jasmonic acid (JA) (< or = 10 microM), ABA, and salt stress in roots of rice. JA markedly induced a cationic peroxidase, two novel 32- and 28-kD proteins, acidic PR-1 and PR-10 pathogenesis-related proteins, and the salt stress-responsive SalT protein in roots. Most JA-responsive proteins (JIPs) from roots also accumulated when plants were subjected to salt stress. None of the JIPs accumulated when plants were treated with ABA. JA did not induce an ABA-responsive group 3 late-embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein. Salt stress and ABA but not JA induced oslea3 transcript accumulation. By contrast, JA, ABA, and salt stress induced transcript accumulation of salT and osdrr, which encodes a rice PR-10 protein. However, ABA also negatively affected salT transcript accumulation, whereas JA negatively affected ABA-induced oslea3 transcript levels. Endogenous root ABA and methyl jasmonate levels showed a differential increase with the dose and the duration of salt stress. The results indicate that ABA and jasmonates antagonistically regulated the expression of salt stress-inducible proteins associated with water deficit or defense responses. PMID:9437865

  17. Ethanol promotes saturated fatty acid-induced hepatoxicity through endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hong-Wei; Ma, Yu-Xiang; Wang, Xiao-Ning; Wang, Cui-Fen; Lu, Jian; Cao, Wei; Wu, Xu-Dong

    2015-04-01

    Serum palmitic acid (PA), a type of saturated fatty acid, causes lipid accumulation and induces toxicity in hepatocytes. Ethanol (EtOH) is metabolized by the liver and induces hepatic injury and inflammation. Herein, we analyzed the effects of EtOH on PA-induced lipotoxicity in the liver. Our results indicated that EtOH aggravated PA-induced apoptosis and lipid accumulation in primary rat hepatocytes in dose-dependent manner. EtOH intensified PA-caused endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response in vitro and in vivo, and the expressions of CHOP, ATF4, and XBP-1 in nucleus were significantly increased. EtOH also increased PA-caused cleaved caspase-3 in cytoplasm. In wild type and CHOP(-/-) mice treated with EtOH and high fat diet (HFD), EtOH worsened the HFD-induced liver injury and dyslipidemia, while CHOP knockout blocked toxic effects of EtOH and PA. Our study suggested that targeting UPR-signaling pathways is a promising, novel approach to reducing EtOH and saturated fatty acid-induced metabolic complications.

  18. Effect of Surface Pretreatment on the Underpaint Corrosion of AA2024-T3 at Various Temperatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    CORROSION SCIENCE SECTION 300 CORROSION—APRIL 2006 Submitted for publication December 2004; in revised form , June 2005. ‡ Corresponding author. E...induce acid pitting and alkaline attack, are often formed by Cu- and Fe-containing intermetallics or replated Cu.1-12 In AA2024-T3 (UNS A92024),(1) pit...these particles and elsewhere.3 The 0010-9312/06/000059/$5.00+$0.50/0 © 2006, NACE International Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704

  19. Temperature induced denaturation of collagen in acidic solution.

    PubMed

    Mu, Changdao; Li, Defu; Lin, Wei; Ding, Yanwei; Zhang, Guangzhao

    2007-07-01

    The denaturation of collagen solution in acetic acid has been investigated by using ultra-sensitive differential scanning calorimetry (US-DSC), circular dichroism (CD), and laser light scattering (LLS). US-DSC measurements reveal that the collagen exhibits a bimodal transition, i.e., there exists a shoulder transition before the major transition. Such a shoulder transition can recover from a cooling when the collagen is heated to a temperature below 35 degrees C. However, when the heating temperature is above 37 degrees C, both the shoulder and major transitions are irreversible. CD measurements demonstrate the content of triple helix slowly decreases with temperature at a temperature below 35 degrees C, but it drastically decreases at a higher temperature. Our experiments suggest that the shoulder transition and major transition arise from the defibrillation and denaturation of collagen, respectively. LLS measurements show the average hydrodynamic radius R(h), radius of gyration R(g)of the collagen gradually decrease before a sharp decrease at a higher temperature. Meanwhile, the ratio R(g)/R(h) gradually increases at a temperature below approximately 34 degrees C and drastically increases in the range 34-40 degrees C, further indicating the defibrillation of collagen before the denaturation.

  20. Theoretical study of ultraviolet induced photodissociation dynamics of sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Tatsuhiro; Ohta, Ayumi; Suzuki, Tomoya; Ikeda, Kumiko; Danielache, Sebastian O.; Nanbu, Shinkoh

    2015-05-01

    Photodissociation dynamics of sulfuric acid after excitation to the first and second excited states (S1 and S2) were studied by an on-the-fly ab initio molecular dynamics simulations based on the Zhu-Nakamura version of the trajectory surface hopping (ZN-TSH). Forces acting on the nuclear motion were computed on-the-fly by CASSCF method with Dunning's augmented cc-pVDZ basis set. It was newly found that the parent molecule dissociated into two reaction-channels (i) HSO4(12A″) + H(2S) by S1-excitation, and (ii) HSO4(22A″) + H(2S) by S2-excitation. The direct dissociation dynamics yield products different from the SO2 + 2OH fragments often presented in the literature. Both channels result in the same product and differs only in the electronic state of the HSO4 fragment. The trajectories running on S2 do not hop with S0 and a nonadiabatic transition happens at the S2-S1 conical intersection located at a longer OH bond-length than the S1-S0 intersection producing an electronic excited state (22A″) of HSO4 product.

  1. Alteration of cyclosporine (CsA)-induced nephrotoxicity by gamma linolenic acid (GLA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Morphake, P; Bariety, J; Darlametsos, I; Tsipas, G; Gkikas, G; Hornysh, A; Papanikolaou, N

    1994-01-01

    Administration of cyclosporine (CsA), 37.4 microM (45 mg)/Kg, per day for 7 days, to Wistar rats, induced decreased creatinine clearance (Ccr) and body weight loss (BWL), but it did not induce proteinuria. These changes were associated with enhanced urinary thromboxane B2 (TXB2) and diminished 6-keto-PGF1 alpha (6kPGF1 alpha) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) excretions. The augmentation in TXB2 and the decrease in PGs highly diminished the ratios of 6kPGF1 alpha/TXB2 and PGE2/TXB2. In microscopic sections all of the kidneys were affected to variable degrees. When CsA was administered to animals fed for 70 days, prior to the experiment, on standard chow (SC) containing evening primrose oil (EPO) or fish oil (FO), 1% and 10% respectively (EPO contained 9% gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) and FO 5.6% eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)), the nephrotoxic effect of CsA was partially prevented. These changes were accompanied by increased ratios of urinary 6kPGF1 alpha/TXB2 and PGE2/TXB2 excretions. Light microscopic (LM) studies showed that rats' kidneys fed on SC containing EPO or FO were not always affected and the lesions were of minor importance. In conclusion, these results suggest that EPO (GLA) and FO (EPA) could play a beneficial role in the development or the modulation of the renal syndrome induced by CsA.

  2. Betulin, betulinic acid and butein are inhibitors of acetaldehyde-induced activation of liver stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Szuster-Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Plewka, Krzysztof; Kandefer-Szerszeń, Martyna

    2011-01-01

    Liver fibrosis has been reported to be inhibited in vivo by oleanolic and ursolic acids; however, the activity of other triterpenes like betulin and betulinic acid has not been examined. Butein has also been reported to prevent and partly reverse liver fibrosis in vivo, although its mechanism of action is poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the antifibrotic potential of butein, betulin, and betulinic acid and examine their mechanisms of action in vitro. This study was conducted in rat stellate cells (HSCs) that were treated with acetaldehyde, which is the most reactive product of ethanol metabolism. Butein, betulin, and betulinic acid were preincubated with rat HSCs at non-toxic concentrations. Treatment effects were measured in regard to acetaldehyde-induced toxicity and cell migration, and several markers of HSC activation were evaluated, including smooth muscle α-actin (α-SMA) and procollagen I expression. In addition, changes in the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and tumor growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and changes in the production of metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2) were determined. In vitro, HSCs were protected against acetaldehyde-induced toxicity by betulin but not by betulinic acid and butein. However, butein, betulin, and betulinic acid inhibited the production of ROS by HSCs treated with acetaldehyde and inhibited their migration. Butein also inhibited acetaldehyde-induced TGF-β1 production. Butein, betulin, and betulinic acid down-regulated acetaldehyde-induced production of TIMP-1 and TIMP-2. Betulin decreased the acetaldehyde-induced activity of MMP-2, but butein and betulinic acid did not. The results indicated that butein, betulin, and betulinic acid inhibited the acetaldehyde-induced activation of HSCs. Each drug functioned in a different manner, whereby some were acting as either

  3. Asiatic acid enhances Nrf2 signaling to protect HepG2 cells from oxidative damage through Akt and ERK activation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhimin; Ci, Xinxin; Huang, Jingbo; Liu, Qinmei; Yu, Qinlei; Zhou, Junfeng; Deng, Xuming

    2017-04-01

    Asiatic acid (AA), a natural triterpene isolated from the plant Centella asiatica, have antioxidative potential, but the molecular mechanism of AA against oxidative stress remains unclear. Our study was performed to investigate the antioxidative effect of AA against oxidative stress and the antioxidative mechanism in tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP) -stimulated the HepG2 cells. The results showed that AA suppressed t-BHP-induced cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Additionally, AA activated the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signal, which was closely related to induction Nrf2 nuclear translocation, reduction the expression of Keap1 and up-regulation the activity of the antioxidant response element (ARE). Meanwhile, activation of Nrf2 signal upregulated the protein expressions of antioxidant genes, including heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H: quinone oxidase (NQO-1), and glutamyl cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC). Excitingly, Knockout of Nrf2 almost abolished AA-mediated antioxidant activity and cytoprotection against t-BHP. Further studies showed the mechanism underlying that AA induced Nrf2 activation in HepG2 cells via Akt and ERK signal activation. We found Akt and ERK inhibitors treatment attenuated AA-mediated Nrf2 nuclear translocation. Furthermore, treatment with either Akt or ERK inhibitor also decreased AA-mediated cytoprotection against t-BHP-induced cellular damage. Collectively, these results presented in this study indicate that AA has the protective effect against t-BHP-induced cellular damage and oxidative stress by modulating Nrf2 signaling through activating the signals of Akt and ERK.

  4. Effect of niflumic acid on noradrenaline-induced contractions of the rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Criddle, D N; de Moura, R S; Greenwood, I A; Large, W A

    1996-06-01

    1. The effects of niflumic acid, an inhibitor of calcium-activated chloride channels, were compared with the actions of the calcium channel antagonist nifedipine on noradrenaline-evoked contractions in isolated preparations of the rat aorta. 2. The cumulative concentration-effect curve to noradrenaline (NA) was depressed by both nifedipine and niflumic acid in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner. The degree of inhibition of the maximal contractile response to NA (1 microM) produced by 10 microM niflumic acid (38%) was similar to the effect of 1 microM nifedipine (39%). 3. Contractions to brief applications (30 s) of 1 microM NA were inhibited by 55% and 62% respectively by 10 microM niflumic acid and 1 microM nifedipine. 4. In the presence of 0.1 microM nifedipine, niflumic acid (10 microM) produced no further inhibition of the NA-evoked contractions. Thus, the actions of niflumic acid and nifedipine were not additive. 5. In Ca-free conditions the transient contraction induced by 1 microM NA was not inhibited by niflumic acid (10 microM) and therefore this agent does not reduce the amount of calcium released from the intracellular store or reduce the sensitivity of the contractile apparatus to calcium. 6. Niflumic acid 10 microM did not inhibit the contractions produced by KCl (up to 120 mM) which were totally blocked by nifedipine. Contractions induced by 25 mM KCl were completely inhibited by 1 microM levcromakalim but were unaffected by niflumic acid. 7. It was concluded that niflumic acid produces selective inhibition of a component of NA-evoked contraction which is probably mediated by voltage-gated calcium channels. These data are consistent with a model in which NA stimulates a calcium-activated chloride conductance which leads to the opening of voltage-gated calcium channels to produce contraction.

  5. Calcium Uptake via Mitochondrial Uniporter Contributes to Palmitic Acid-induced Apoptosis in Mouse Podocytes.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zeting; Cao, Aili; Liu, Hua; Guo, Henjiang; Zang, Yingjun; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yunman; Wang, Hao; Yin, Peihao; Peng, Wen

    2017-02-09

    Podocytes are component cells of the glomerular filtration barrier, and their loss by apoptosis is the main cause of proteinuria that leads to diabetic nephropathy (DN). Therefore, insights into podocyte apoptosis mechanism would allow a better understanding of DN pathogenesis and thus help develop adequate therapeutic strategies. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism of palmitic acid-inhibited cell death in mouse podocytes, and found that palmitic acid increased cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Palmitic acid induces apoptosis in podocytes through up-regulation of cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) , mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), cytochrome c release and depletion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) , The intracellular calcium chelator, 1,2-bis (2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N, N'-tetraacetic acid tetrakis acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM), partially prevented this up-regulation whereas 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), an inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (IP3R) inhibitor; dantrolene, a ryanodine receptor (RyR) inhibitor; and 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostibene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS), an anion exchange inhibitor, had no effect. Interestingly, ruthenium red and Ru360, both inhibitors of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU), blocked palmitic acid-induced mitochondrial Ca(2+) elevation, cytochrome c release from mitochondria to cytosol, and apoptosis. siRNA to MCU markedly reduced curcumin-induced apoptosis. These data indicate that Ca(2+) uptake via mitochondrial uniporter contributes to palmitic acid-induced apoptosis in mouse podocytes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Clavulanic acid induces penile erection and yawning in male rats: comparison with apomorphine.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Fabrizio; Melis, Maria Rosaria; Angioni, Laura; Argiolas, Antonio

    2013-02-01

    The beta-lactamase inhibitor clavulanic acid induced penile erection and yawning in a dose dependent manner when given intraperitoneally (IP, 0.05-5mg/kg), perorally (OS, 0.1-5mg/kg) and intracereboventricularly (ICV, 0.01-5 μg/rat) to male rats. The effect resembles that of the dopamine receptor agonist apomorphine given subcutaneously (SC) (0.02-0.25mg/kg), although the responses of the latter followed a U inverted dose-response curve, disappearing at doses higher than 0.1mg/kg. Clavulanic acid responses were reduced by about 55% by haloperidol, a dopamine D2 receptor antagonist (0.1mg/kg IP), and by d(CH(2))(5)Tyr(Me)(2)-Orn(8)-vasotocin, an oxytocin receptor antagonist (2 μg/rat ICV), both given 15 min before clavulanic acid. A higher reduction of clavulanic acid responses (more than 80%) was also found with morphine, an opioid receptor agonist (5mg/kg IP), and with mianserin, a serotonin 5HT(2c) receptor antagonist (0.2mg/kg SC). In contrast, no reduction was found with naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist (1mg/kg IP). The ability of haloperidol, d(CH(2))(5)Tyr(Me)(2)-Orn(8)-vasotocin and morphine to reduce clavulanic acid induced penile erection and yawning suggests that clavulanic acid induces these responses, at least in part, by increasing central dopaminergic neurotransmission. Dopamine in turn activates oxytocinergic neurotransmission and centrally released oxytocin induces penile erection and yawning. However, since both penile erection and yawning episodes were reduced not only by the blockade of central dopamine and oxytocin receptors and by the stimulation of opioid receptors, which inhibits oxytocinergic neurotransmission, but also by mianserin, an increase of central serotonin neurotransmission is also likely to participate in these clavulanic acid responses.

  7. The cumulus cell layer protects the bovine maturing oocyte against fatty acid-induced lipotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lolicato, Francesca; Brouwers, Jos F; de Lest, Chris H A van; Wubbolts, Richard; Aardema, Hilde; Priore, Paola; Roelen, Bernard A J; Helms, J Bernd; Gadella, Bart M

    2015-01-01

    Mobilization of fatty acids from adipose tissue during metabolic stress increases the amount of free fatty acids in blood and follicular fluid and is associated with impaired female fertility. In a previous report, we described the effects of the three predominant fatty acids in follicular fluid (saturated palmitate and stearate and unsaturated oleate) on oocyte maturation and quality. In the current study, the effects of elevated fatty acid levels on cumulus cells were investigated. In a dose-dependent manner, the three fatty acids induced lipid storage in cumulus cells accompanied by an enhanced immune labeling of perilipin-2, a marker for lipid droplets. Lipidomic analysis confirmed incorporation of the administered fatty acids into triglyceride, resulting in a 3- to 6-fold increase of triglyceride content. In addition, palmitate selectively induced ceramide formation, which has been implicated in apoptosis. Indeed, of the three fatty acids tested, palmitate induced reactive oxygen species formation, caspase 3 activation, and mitochondria deterioration, leading to degeneration of the cumulus cell layers. This effect could be mimicked by addition of the ceramide-C2 analog and could be inhibited by the ceramide synthase inhibitor fumonisin-B1. Interfering with the intactness of the cumulus cell layers, either by mechanical force or by palmitate treatment, resulted in enhanced uptake of lipids in the oocyte and increased radical formation. Our results show that cumulus cells act as a barrier, protecting oocytes from in vitro induced lipotoxic effects. We suggest that this protective function of the cumulus cell layers is important for the developmental competence of the oocyte. The relevance of our findings for assisted reproduction technologies is discussed.

  8. C-Myc induced compensated cardiac hypertrophy increases free fatty acid utilization for the citric acid cycle.

    PubMed

    Olson, Aaron K; Ledee, Dolena; Iwamoto, Kate; Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly Priddy, Colleen; Isern, Nancy; Portman, Michael A

    2013-02-01

    The protooncogene C-Myc (Myc) regulates cardiac hypertrophy. Myc promotes compensated cardiac function, suggesting that the operative mechanisms differ from those leading to heart failure. Myc regulation of substrate metabolism is a reasonable target, as Myc alters metabolism in other tissues. We hypothesize that Myc induced shifts in substrate utilization signal and promote compensated hypertrophy. We used cardiac specific Myc-inducible C57/BL6 male mice between 4-6 months old that develop hypertrophy with tamoxifen (tam) injections. Isolated working hearts and (13)Carbon ((13)C)-NMR were used to measure function and fractional contributions (Fc) to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate containing (13)C-labeled free fatty acids, acetoacetate, lactate, unlabeled glucose and insulin. Studies were performed at pre-hypertrophy (3-days tam, 3dMyc), established hypertrophy (7-days tam, 7dMyc) or vehicle control (Cont). Non-transgenic siblings (NTG) received 7-days tam or vehicle to assess drug effect. Hypertrophy was assessed by echocardiograms and heart weights. Western blots were performed on key metabolic enzymes. Hypertrophy occurred in 7dMyc only. Cardiac function did not differ between groups. Tam alone did not affect substrate contributions in NTG. Substrate utilization was not significantly altered in 3dMyc versus Cont. The free fatty acid FC was significantly greater in 7dMyc versus Cont with decreased unlabeled Fc, which is predominately exogenous glucose. Free fatty acid flux to the citric acid cycle increased while lactate flux was diminished in 7dMyc compared to Cont. Total protein levels of a panel of key metabolic enzymes were unchanged; however total protein O-GlcNAcylation was increased in 7dMyc. Substrate utilization changes for the citric acid cycle did not precede hypertrophy; therefore they are not the primary signal for cardiac growth in this model. Free fatty acid utilization and oxidation increase at established hypertrophy. Understanding the

  9. Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells-dependent Down-regulation of the Transcription Factor Glioma-associated Protein 1 (GLI1) Underlies the Growth Inhibitory Properties of Arachidonic Acid*

    PubMed Central

    Comba, Andrea; Almada, Luciana L.; Tolosa, Ezequiel J.; Iguchi, Eriko; Marks, David L.; Vara Messler, Marianela; Silva, Renata; Fernandez-Barrena, Maite G.; Enriquez-Hesles, Elisa; Vrabel, Anne L.; Botta, Bruno; Di Marcotulio, Lucia; Ellenrieder, Volker; Eynard, Aldo R.; Pasqualini, Maria E.; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous reports have demonstrated a tumor inhibitory effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). However, the molecular mechanisms modulating this phenomenon are in part poorly understood. Here, we provide evidence of a novel antitumoral mechanism of the PUFA arachidonic acid (AA). In vivo and in vitro experiments showed that AA treatment decreased tumor growth and metastasis and increased apoptosis. Molecular analysis of this effect showed significantly reduced expression of a subset of antiapoptotic proteins, including BCL2, BFL1/A1, and 4-1BB, in AA-treated cells. We demonstrated that down-regulation of the transcription factor glioma-associated protein 1 (GLI1) in AA-treated cells is the underlying mechanism controlling BCL2, BFL1/A1, and 4-1BB expression. Using luciferase reporters, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and expression studies, we found that GLI1 binds to the promoter of these antiapoptotic molecules and regulates their expression and promoter activity. We provide evidence that AA-induced apoptosis and down-regulation of antiapoptotic genes can be inhibited by overexpressing GLI1 in AA-sensitive cells. Conversely, inhibition of GLI1 mimics AA treatments, leading to decreased tumor growth, cell viability, and expression of antiapoptotic molecules. Further characterization showed that AA represses GLI1 expression by stimulating nuclear translocation of NFATc1, which then binds the GLI1 promoter and represses its transcription. AA was shown to increase reactive oxygen species. Treatment with antioxidants impaired the AA-induced apoptosis and down-regulation of GLI1 and NFATc1 activation, indicating that NFATc1 activation and GLI1 repression require the generation of reactive oxygen species. Collectively, these results define a novel mechanism underlying AA antitumoral functions that may serve as a foundation for future PUFA-based therapeutic approaches. PMID:26601952

  10. Dissecting the beta-aminobutyric acid-induced priming phenomenon in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ton, Jurriaan; Jakab, Gabor; Toquin, Valérie; Flors, Victor; Iavicoli, Annalisa; Maeder, Muriel N; Métraux, Jean-Pierre; Mauch-Mani, Brigitte

    2005-03-01

    Plants treated with the nonprotein amino acid beta-aminobutyric acid (BABA) develop an enhanced capacity to resist biotic and abiotic stresses. This BABA-induced resistance (BABA-IR) is associated with an augmented capacity to express basal defense responses, a phenomenon known as priming. Based on the observation that high amounts of BABA induce sterility in Arabidopsis thaliana, a mutagenesis screen was performed to select mutants impaired in BABA-induced sterility (ibs). Here, we report the isolation and subsequent characterization of three T-DNA-tagged ibs mutants. Mutant ibs1 is affected in a cyclin-dependent kinase-like protein, and ibs2 is defective in AtSAC1b encoding a polyphosphoinositide phosphatase. Mutant ibs3 is affected in the regulation of the ABA1 gene encoding the abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthetic enzyme zeaxanthin epoxidase. To elucidate the function of the three IBS genes in plant resistance, the mutants were tested for BABA-IR against the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato, the oomycete Hyaloperonospora parasitica, and BABA-induced tolerance to salt. All three ibs mutants were compromised in BABA-IR against H. parasitica, although to a different extent. Whereas ibs1 was reduced in priming for salicylate (SA)-dependent trailing necrosis, mutants ibs2 and ibs3 were affected in the priming for callose deposition. Only ibs1 failed to express BABA-IR against P. syringae, which coincided with a defect in priming for SA-inducible PR-1 gene expression. By contrast, ibs2 and ibs3 showed reduced BABA-induced tolerance to salt, which correlated with an affected priming for ABA-inducible gene expression. For all three ibs alleles, the defects in BABA-induced sterility and BABA-induced protection against P. syringae, H. parasitica, and salt could be confirmed in independent mutants. The data presented here introduce three novel regulatory genes involved in priming for different defense responses.

  11. Formic-acid-induced depolymerization of oxidized lignin to aromatics.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Alireza; Ulbrich, Arne; Coon, Joshua J; Stahl, Shannon S

    2014-11-13

    Lignin is a heterogeneous aromatic biopolymer that accounts for nearly 30% of the organic carbon on Earth and is one of the few renewable sources of aromatic chemicals. As the most recalcitrant of the three components of lignocellulosic biomass (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin), lignin has been treated as a waste product in the pulp and paper industry, where it is burned to supply energy and recover pulping chemicals in the operation of paper mills. Extraction of higher value from lignin is increasingly recognized as being crucial to the economic viability of integrated biorefineries. Depolymerization is an important starting point for many lignin valorization strategies, because it could generate valuable aromatic chemicals and/or provide a source of low-molecular-mass feedstocks suitable for downstream processing. Commercial precedents show that certain types of lignin (lignosulphonates) may be converted into vanillin and other marketable products, but new technologies are needed to enhance the lignin value chain. The complex, irregular structure of lignin complicates chemical conversion efforts, and known depolymerization methods typically afford ill-defined products in low yields (that is, less than 10-20wt%). Here we describe a method for the depolymerization of oxidized lignin under mild conditions in aqueous formic acid that results in more than 60wt% yield of low-molecular-mass aromatics. We present the discovery of this facile C-O cleavage method, its application to aspen lignin depolymerization, and mechanistic insights into the reaction. The broader implications of these results for lignin conversion and biomass refining are also considered.

  12. Formic-acid-induced depolymerization of oxidized lignin to aromatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Alireza; Ulbrich, Arne; Coon, Joshua J.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2014-11-01

    Lignin is a heterogeneous aromatic biopolymer that accounts for nearly 30% of the organic carbon on Earth and is one of the few renewable sources of aromatic chemicals. As the most recalcitrant of the three components of lignocellulosic biomass (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin), lignin has been treated as a waste product in the pulp and paper industry, where it is burned to supply energy and recover pulping chemicals in the operation of paper mills. Extraction of higher value from lignin is increasingly recognized as being crucial to the economic viability of integrated biorefineries. Depolymerization is an important starting point for many lignin valorization strategies, because it could generate valuable aromatic chemicals and/or provide a source of low-molecular-mass feedstocks suitable for downstream processing. Commercial precedents show that certain types of lignin (lignosulphonates) may be converted into vanillin and other marketable products, but new technologies are needed to enhance the lignin value chain. The complex, irregular structure of lignin complicates chemical conversion efforts, and known depolymerization methods typically afford ill-defined products in low yields (that is, less than 10-20wt%). Here we describe a method for the depolymerization of oxidized lignin under mild conditions in aqueous formic acid that results in more than 60wt% yield of low-molecular-mass aromatics. We present the discovery of this facile C-O cleavage method, its application to aspen lignin depolymerization, and mechanistic insights into the reaction. The broader implications of these results for lignin conversion and biomass refining are also considered.

  13. Retinoic Acid Excess Impairs Amelogenesis Inducing Enamel Defects

    PubMed Central

    Morkmued, Supawich; Laugel-Haushalter, Virginie; Mathieu, Eric; Schuhbaur, Brigitte; Hemmerlé, Joseph; Dollé, Pascal; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès; Niederreither, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Abnormalities of enamel matrix proteins deposition, mineralization, or degradation during tooth development are responsible for a spectrum of either genetic diseases termed Amelogenesis imperfecta or acquired enamel defects. To assess if environmental/nutritional factors can exacerbate enamel defects, we investigated the role of the active form of vitamin A, retinoic acid (RA). Robust expression of RA-degrading enzymes Cyp26b1 and Cyp26c1 in developing murine teeth suggested RA excess would reduce tooth hard tissue mineralization, adversely affecting enamel. We employed a protocol where RA was supplied to pregnant mice as a food supplement, at a concentration estimated to result in moderate elevations in serum RA levels. This supplementation led to severe enamel defects in adult mice born from pregnant dams, with most severe alterations observed for treatments from embryonic day (E)12.5 to E16.5. We identified the enamel matrix proteins enamelin (Enam), ameloblastin (Ambn), and odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (Odam) as target genes affected by excess RA, exhibiting mRNA reductions of over 20-fold in lower incisors at E16.5. RA treatments also affected bone formation, reducing mineralization. Accordingly, craniofacial ossification was drastically reduced after 2 days of treatment (E14.5). Massive RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) was performed on E14.5 and E16.5 lower incisors. Reductions in Runx2 (a key transcriptional regulator of bone and enamel differentiation) and its targets were observed at E14.5 in RA-exposed embryos. RNA-seq analysis further indicated that bone growth factors, extracellular matrix, and calcium homeostasis were perturbed. Genes mutated in human AI (ENAM, AMBN, AMELX, AMTN, KLK4) were reduced in expression at E16.5. Our observations support a model in which elevated RA signaling at fetal stages affects dental cell lineages. Thereafter enamel protein production is impaired, leading to permanent enamel alterations. PMID:28111553

  14. Ultrastructural Changes in Chick Cerebellum Induced by Polyinosinic Polycytidylic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mang C.; Young, Paul A.; Yu, Wan-Hua Amy

    1971-01-01

    The ultrastructural changes in cerebellar encephalopathy induced by intravenous injection of poly I:C in young chickens were studied. The neuroglia and the small blood vessels showed the most severe injury. In the astroglia, initial alterations consisted of a mild cytoplasmic swelling whereas terminally, evagination of the outer nuclear membrane, formation of large vacuoles, and mitochondrial swelling occurred. In the cortex, oligodendroglial alterations consisted of dilatation of the nuclear membranes and of the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas in the white matter, the interfascicular oligodendroglia exhibited clumping and coagulation of the chromatin material. Some small blood vessels appeared normal, while others showed massive erosion of the endothelium resulting in aneurysm-like ballooning of the vascular wall. The granule cells displayed marked edema. The myelin of nerve fibers showed an accumulation of fluid initially, with splitting occurring in the terminal stages. These studies indicated a severe cytotoxic effect of poly I:C on the cerebella of young chickens. ImagesFig 16Fig 17Fig 13Fig 14Fig 15Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11Fig 12Fig 1Fig 2Fig 3Fig 4 PMID:5142269

  15. Folic acid and safflower oil supplementation interacts and protects embryos from maternal diabetes-induced damage.

    PubMed

    Higa, R; Kurtz, M; Mazzucco, M B; Musikant, D; White, V; Jawerbaum, A

    2012-05-01

    Maternal diabetes increases the risk of embryo malformations. Folic acid and safflower oil supplementations have been shown to reduce embryo malformations in experimental models of diabetes. In this study we here tested whether folic acid and safflower oil supplementations interact to prevent embryo malformations in diabetic rats, and analyzed whether they act through the regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), their endogenous inhibitors (TIMPs), and nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species production. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin administration prior to mating. From Day 0.5 of pregnancy, rats did or did not receive folic acid (15 mg/kg) and/or a 6% safflower oil-supplemented diet. Embryos and decidua were explanted on Day 10.5 of gestation for further analysis of embryo resorptions and malformations, MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 levels, NO production and lipid peroxidation. Maternal diabetes induced resorptions and malformations that were prevented by folic acid and safflower oil supplementation. MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities were increased in embryos and decidua from diabetic rats and decreased with safflower oil and folic acid supplementations. In diabetic animals, the embryonic and decidual TIMPs were increased mainly with safflower oil supplementation in decidua and with folic acid in embryos. NO overproduction was decreased in decidua from diabetic rats treated with folic acid alone and in combination with safflower oil. These treatments also prevented increases in embryonic and decidual lipid peroxidation. In conclusion, folic acid and safflower oil supplementations interact and protect the embryos from diabetes-induced damage through several pathways related to a decrease in pro-inflammatory mediators.

  16. Protective role of ascorbic acid against asbestos induced toxicity in rat lung: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Khan, S G; Ali, S; Rahman, Q

    1990-01-01

    Asbestos fibers adsorb cytochrome P-450 and P-448 proteins from rat lung micosomal fractions and liberate heme from cytochrome P-448 on prolonged incubation in vitro. further, fibers, decrease the activities of benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase and glutathione-S-transferase in microsomal and cytosolic fractions respectively. Mineral fibers also stimulate both the enzymatic (NADPH-induced) and non-enzymatic (Fe2(+)-induced) lipid peroxidation in microsomal fractions. Preincubation of microsomal and cytosolic fractions with a physiological concentration of ascorbic acid ameliorates, to a large extent, the changes induced by asbestos fibers.

  17. Omeprazole Alleviates Aristolochia manshuriensis Kom-Induced Acute Nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lianmei; Zhang, Hongbing; Li, Chunying; Yi, Yan; Liu, Jing; Zhao, Yong; Tian, Jingzhuo; Zhang, Yushi; Wei, Xiaolu; Gao, Yue; Liang, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    Aristolochia manshuriensis Kom (AMK) is a member of the Aristolochiaceae family and is a well-known cause of aristolochic acid (AA) nephropathy. In this study, we investigated the potential of omeprazole (OM) to alleviate AMK-induced nephrotoxicity. We found that OM reduced mouse mortality caused by AMK and attenuated AMK-induced acute nephrotoxicity in rats. OM enhanced hepatic Cyp 1a1/2 and renal Cyp 1a1 expression in rats, as well as CYP 1A1 expression in human renal tubular epithelial cells (HKCs). HKCs with ectopic CYP 1A1 expression were more tolerant to AA than the control cells. Therefore, OM may alleviate AMK-mediated acute nephrotoxicity through induction of CYP 1A1. We suggest that the coadministration of OM might be beneficial for reducing of AA-induced nephrotoxicity. PMID:27716846

  18. Lysophosphatidic acid induces cell migration through the selective activation of Akt1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Kyoung; Yun, Sung Ji; Do, Kee Hun; Kim, Min Sung; Cho, Mong; Suh, Dong-Soo; Kim, Chi Dae; Kim, Jae Ho; Birnbaum, Morris J.

    2008-01-01

    Akt plays pivotal roles in many physiological responses including growth, proliferation, survival, metabolism, and migration. In the current studies, we have evaluated the isoform-specific role of akt in lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced cell migration. Ascites from ovarian cancer patients (AOCP) induced mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) cell migration in a dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, ascites from liver cirrhosis patients (ALCP) did not induce MEF cell migration. AOCP-induced MEF cell migration was completely blocked by pre-treatment of cells with LPA receptor antagonist, Ki16425. Both LPA- and AOCP-induced MEF cell migration was completely attenuated by PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. Furthermore, cells lacking Akt1 displayed defect in LPA-induced cell migration. Re-expression of Akt1 in DKO (Akt1-/-Akt2-/-) cells restored LPA-induced cell migration, whereas re-expression of Akt2 in DKO cells could not restore the LPA-induced cell migration. Finally, Akt1 was selectively phosphorylated by LPA and AOCP stimulation. These results suggest that LPA is a major factor responsible for AOCP-induced cell migration and signaling specificity of Akt1 may dictate LPA-induced cell migration. PMID:18779657

  19. Experimental fertilization increases amino acid content in floral nectar, fruit set and degree of selfing in the orchid Gymnadenia conopsea.

    PubMed

    Gijbels, Pieter; Ceulemans, Tobias; Van den Ende, Wim; Honnay, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    Floral traits have evolved to maximize reproductive success by attracting pollinators and facilitating pollination. Highly attractive floral traits may, however, also increase the degree of self-pollination, which could become detrimental for plant fitness through inbreeding depression. Floral nectar is a trait that is known to strongly mediate pollinator attraction and plant reproductive success, but the particular role of the nectar amino acid (AA) composition is poorly understood. Therefore, we experimentally manipulated the nectar AA composition and abundance of the Lepidoptera-pollinated orchid Gymnadenia conopsea through soil fertilization, and we quantified AA content and AA composition through high performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection. Mixed models were then used to evaluate differences in pollinia removal, fruit set, seed set and degree of selfing between fertilized and control individuals. Selfing rates were estimated using microsatellite markers. We found that fertilized individuals had a significantly higher nectar AA content and an altered AA composition, whereas plant height, number of flowers, nectar volume and sugar concentration remained unchanged. Fertilized individuals also had significantly more pollinia removed and a higher fruit set, whereas control plants that did not receive the fertilization treatment had significantly fewer selfed seeds, and more viable seeds. Although we cannot exclude a role of changes in floral scent following the fertilization treatment, our results strongly suggest a relation among nectar AA composition, fruiting success and selfing rates. Our results also indicate potential consequences of nutrient pollution for plant reproductive success, through the induced changes in nectar AA composition.

  20. Chronic Valproate Treatment Blocks D2-like Receptor-Mediated Brain Signaling via Arachidonic Acid in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ramadan, Epolia; Basselin, Mireille; Taha, Ameer Y.; Cheon, Yewon; Chang, Lisa; Chen, Mei; Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objective Hyperdopaminergic signaling and an upregulated brain arachidonic acid (AA) cascade may contribute to bipolar disorder (BD). Lithium and carbamazepine, FDA-approved for the treatment of BD, attenuate brain dopaminergic D2-like (D2, D3, and D4) receptor signaling involving AA when given chronically to awake rats. We hypothesized that valproate (VPA), with mood-stabilizing properties, would also reduce the D2-like-mediated signaling via AA. Methods An acute dose of quinpirole (1 mg/kg) or saline was administered to unanesthetized rats that had been treated for 30 days with a therapeutically relevant dose of VPA (200 mg/kg/day) or vehicle. Regional brain AA incorporation coefficients, k*, and incorporation rates, Jin, markers of AA signaling and metabolism, were measured by quantitative autoradiography after intravenous [1-14C]AA infusion. Whole brain concentrations of prostaglandin (PG)E2 and thromboxane (TX)B2 also were measured. Results Quinpirole compared to saline significantly increased k* in 40 of 83 brain regions, and increased brain concentrations of PGE2 in chronic vehicle-treated rats. VPA treatment by itself reduced concentrations of plasma unesterified AA and whole brain PGE2 and TXB2, and blocked the quinpirole-induced increments in k* and PGE2. Conclusion These results further support our hypothesis that similar to lithium and carbamazepine, VPA downregulates brain dopaminergic D2-like receptor-signaling involving AA. PMID:21839100

  1. Synergistic protective effects of ceftriaxone and ascorbic acid against subacute deltamethrin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Daim, Mohamed M; El-Ghoneimy, Ashraf

    2015-03-01

    Deltamethrin (DLM) is a synthetic class II pyrethroid acaricide and insecticide widely used for veterinary and agricultural purposes. However, its animal and human exposure leads to nephrotoxicity. Our experimental objective was to evaluate protective effects of ceftriaxone and/or ascorbic acid against DLM-induced renal injury in male Wistar albino rats. DLM-treated animals revealed significant alterations in serum biochemical parameters related to renal injury; urea, uric acid and creatinine. There was a significant increase in renal lipid peroxidation and a significant inhibition in antioxidant biomarkers. Moreover, DLM significantly reduced serum acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. In addition, It induced serum and kidney tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Both ceftriaxone and ascorbic acid protect against DLM-induced biochemical alterations in serum and renal tissue when used alone or in combination along with DLM-intoxication. Furthermore, both ceftriaxone and ascorbic acid produced synergetic nephroprotective and antioxidant effects. Therefore, it could be concluded that ceftriaxone and/or ascorbic acid administration able to minimize the toxic effects of DLM through their free radical-scavenging and potent antioxidant activity.

  2. Uric Acid Is a Mediator of the Plasmodium falciparum-Induced Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Orengo, Jamie Marie; Leliwa-Sytek, Aleksandra; Evans, James E.; Evans, Barbara; van de Hoef, Diana; Nyako, Marian; Day, Karen; Rodriguez, Ana

    2009-01-01

    Background Malaria triggers a high inflammatory response in the host that mediates most of the associated pathologies and contributes to death. The identification of pro-inflammatory molecules derived from Plasmodium is essential to understand the mechanisms of pathogenesis and to develop targeted interventions. Uric acid derived from hypoxanthine accumulated in infected erythrocytes has been recently proposed as a mediator of inflammation in rodent malaria. Methods and Findings We found that human erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum gradually accumulate hypoxanthine in their late stages of development. To analyze the role of hypoxanthine-derived uric acid induced by P. falciparum on the inflammatory cytokine response from human blood mononuclear cells, cultures were treated with allopurinol, to inhibit uric acid formation from hypoxanthine, or with uricase, to degrade uric acid. Both treatments significantly reduce the secretion of TNF, IL-6, IL-1β and IL-10 from human cells. Conclusions and Significance Uric acid is a major contributor of the inflammatory response triggered by P. falciparum in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Since the inflammatory reaction induced by P. falciparum is considered a major cause of malaria pathogenesis, identifying the mechanisms used by the parasite to induce the host inflammatory response is essential to develop urgently needed therapies against this disease. PMID:19381275

  3. Inducible Arginase 1 Deficiency in Mice Leads to Hyperargininemia and Altered Amino Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    St. Amand, Tim; Kyriakopoulou, Lianna; Schulze, Andreas; Funk, Colin D.

    2013-01-01

    Arginase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from a loss of the liver arginase isoform, arginase 1 (ARG1), which is the final step in the urea cycle for detoxifying ammonia. ARG1 deficiency leads to hyperargininemia, characterized by progressive neurological impairment, persistent growth retardation and infrequent episodes of hyperammonemia. Using the Cre/loxP-directed conditional gene knockout system, we generated an inducible Arg1-deficient mouse model by crossing “floxed” Arg1 mice with CreERT2 mice. The resulting mice (Arg-Cre) die about two weeks after tamoxifen administration regardless of the starting age of inducing the knockout. These treated mice were nearly devoid of Arg1 mRNA, protein and liver arginase activity, and exhibited symptoms of hyperammonemia. Plasma amino acid analysis revealed pronounced hyperargininemia and significant alterations in amino acid and guanidino compound metabolism, including increased citrulline and guanidinoacetic acid. Despite no alteration in ornithine levels, concentrations of other amino acids such as proline and the branched-chain amino acids were reduced. In summary, we have generated and characterized an inducible Arg1-deficient mouse model exhibiting several pathologic manifestations of hyperargininemia. This model should prove useful for exploring potential treatment options of ARG1 deficiency. PMID:24224027

  4. Arsenic-induced toxicity and the protective role of ascorbic acid in mouse testis

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Soo Im; Jin, Bohwan; Youn, Pilju; Park, Changbo; Park, Jung-Duck; Ryu, Doug-Young . E-mail: dyryu@snu.ac.kr

    2007-01-15

    Oxidative stress has been suggested to be a major cause of male reproductive failure. Here, we investigated whether arsenic, which impairs male reproductive functions in rodent models, acts by inducing oxidative stress. Male 8-week-old ICR mice were given drinking water containing 20 or 40 mg/l sodium arsenite with or without 0.75 or 1.5 g/l of the antioxidant ascorbic acid for 5 weeks. The arsenic-treated mice showed decreased epididymidal sperm counts and testicular weights compared to untreated mice. These effects were reversed in mice that were co-treated with ascorbic acid. Similarly, arsenic treatment lowered the activities of testicular 3{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) and 17{beta}-HSD, which play important roles in steroidogenesis, and this was reversed by co-treatment with ascorbic acid. The testicles of arsenic-treated mice had decreased glutathione (GSH) levels (which correlate inversely with the degree of cellular oxidative stress) and elevated levels of protein carbonyl (a marker of oxidative damage to tissue proteins). Ascorbic acid co-treatment reversed both of these effects. Thus, ascorbic acid blocks both the adverse effects of arsenic on male reproductive functions and the arsenic-induced testicular oxidative changes. These observations support the notion that arsenic impairs male reproductive function by inducing oxidative stress.

  5. Prevention of photocarcinogenesis and UV-induced immunosuppression in mice by topical tannic acid.

    PubMed

    Gensler, H L; Gerrish, K E; Williams, T; Rao, G; Kittelson, J

    1994-01-01

    Topical application of tannic acid, a phenolic antioxidant derived from plants, was found to inhibit the cutaneous carcinogenesis and the immunosuppression induced by ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation with no visible toxicity. BALB/cAnNTacfBR mice were treated with 200 micrograms of tannic acid three times weekly for two weeks before UV treatments began and throughout the experiment. UVB irradiation consisted of five 30-minute exposures per week to banks of six FS40 Westinghouse sunlamps. In the photocarcinogenesis study, mice received a total dose of approximately 1.09 x 10(6) J/m2. Skin cancer incidence in UV-irradiated mice was 75% at 26 weeks after the first UV exposure; tannic acid reduced this to 42%. Immunosuppression induced by UVB irradiation normally prevents the host from rejecting antigenic syngeneic UV-induced tumors. Immunosuppression in these experiments was measured by a passive transfer assay. Tumor challenges grew to an average of 88 +/- 20, 36 +/- 11, and 20 +/- 8 mm2 in naive recipients of splenocytes from UVB-irradiated mice, nonirradiated control mice, and UVB-irradiated mice treated with tannic acid, respectively. Thus topical tannic acid treatment prevented the transfer of enhanced tumor susceptibility with splenocytes from UVB-irradiated mice.

  6. Phytic acid suppresses 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion-induced hydroxyl radical generation in rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Obata, Toshio

    2003-07-18

    The present study examined the antioxidant effect of phytic acid on iron (II)-enhanced hydroxyl radical (*OH) generation induced by 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP(+)) in the extracellular fluid of rat striatum. Rats were anesthetized, and sodium salicylate in Ringer's solution (0.5 nmol/microl/min) was infused through a microdialysis probe to detect the generation of *OH as reflected by the non-enzymatic formation of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA) in the striatum. Phytic acid (100 microM) did not significantly decrease the levels of MPP(+)-induced *OH formation trapped as 2,3-DHBA. To confirm the generation of *OH by the Fenton-type reaction, iron (II) was infused through a microdialysis probe. Introduction of iron (II) (10 microM) enhanced MPP(+) induced *OH generation. However, phytic acid significantly suppressed iron (II)-enhanced *OH formation after MPP(+) treatment (n=6, P<0.05). These results suggest that the antiradical effect of phytic acid occurs by chelating iron required for the MPP(+)-enhanced *OH generation via the Fenton-type reaction.

  7. APOPTOSIS AND PROLIFERATION DURING DICHLOROACETIC ACID (DCA) INDUCED HEPTACELLULAR CARCINOGENESIS IN THE F344 MALE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Apoptosis and Proliferation During DicWoroacetic Acid (DCA) Induced Hepatocellular
    Carcinogenesis in the F344 Male Rat

    Chlorine, introduced into public drinking \\\\'ater supplies for disinfection, can react with organic compounds in surface waters to form toxic by-prod...

  8. Dithiolopyrrolone antibiotic formation induced by adding valeric acid to the culture broth of Saccharothrix algeriensis.

    PubMed

    Merrouche, Rabiâa; Bouras, Noureddine; Coppel, Yannick; Mathieu, Florence; Monje, Marie-Carmen; Sabaou, Nasserdine; Lebrihi, Ahmed

    2010-06-25

    Three new antibiotics were isolated from the fermentation broth of Saccharothrix algeriensis NRRL B-24137 and characterized as the dithiolopyrrolone derivatives valerylpyrrothine (1), isovalerylpyrrothine (2), and formylpyrrothine (3) as well as the known antibiotic aureothricin. The production of the dithiolopyrrolone derivatives was induced by adding valeric acid to the culture medium. The compounds exhibited moderate antimicrobial activity in vitro.

  9. Breast Cancer Prevention by Fatty Acid Binding Protein MRG-Induced Pregnancy Like Mammary Gland Differentiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    Annual Summary 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 AUG 2004 - 31 JUL 2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Breast Cancer Prevention by Fatty Acid Binding Protein...differentiation. Overexpression of MRG in human breast cancer cells induced differentiation with changes in cellular morphology and a significant increase

  10. Inhibition of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mutagenicity and DNA methylation by ellagic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, R; Gold, B

    1986-01-01

    Ellagic acid, a naturally occurring plant phenol, inhibits the activity of the direct-acting mutagen N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MeNU) in Salmonella typhimurium TA100. Ellagic acid at 0.10, 0.25, 0.50, and 1.00 mM inhibited the mutagenicity of MeNU (0.40 mM) by 3%, 13%, 45%, and 60%, respectively. Ellagic acid (3 mM) also inhibited the mutagenic activity of N,N-dimethylnitrosamine (25-200 mM) in the presence of pyrazole-induced rat liver fraction S-9. The effect of ellagic acid on DNA methylation was studied by incubating 0, 0.72, 1.32, 2.64, and 6.60 mM ellagic acid with DNA (0.9 mM nucleotide) and [3H]MeNU (0.66 mM). HPLC analysis of DNA hydrolysates showed that ellagic acid caused a dose-dependent 36-84% decrease in O6-methylguanine but only a 20% decrease in the 7-methylguanine adduct. Under conditions where methylation at the O6 position of guanine in double-stranded DNA was inhibited 65% by ellagic acid, no significant inhibition of either O6- or 7-methylguanine formation was detected in single-stranded DNA. Affinity-binding studies revealed that [3H]ellagic acid binds equally to double-stranded or single-stranded